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Sample records for acid brittleness

  1. Brittle Faults

    Caine, J.; Choudhuri, M.; Bose, N.; Mukherjee, S.; Misra, A.A.; Mathew, G.; Salvi, D.; Toro, B.; Pratt, B.R.; Dasgupta, S.; Nováková, Lucie

    Amsterdam: Elsevier, 2015 - (Mukherjee, S.), s. 79-106 ISBN 978-0-12-420152-1 Institutional support: RVO:67985891 Keywords : brittle shear zone * brittle tectonics * conjugate faults * faults * kinematic indicators Subject RIV: DC - Siesmology, Volcanology, Earth Structure

  2. Friction and wear of tough and brittle zirconia in nitrogen, air, water, hexadecane and hexadecane containing stearic acid

    The friction and wear of zirconia sliding on zirconia at low speed (1 mm/s) and moderate load (9.8N) were studied with a pin-on-disc machine. Two materials were investigated, a brittle (2.5 MPam/sup 1/2/), cubic phase doped with 5.5 m/o yttria and a tough (11.6 MPam/sup 1/2/), tetragonal phase stabilized with 3 m/o yttria. Sliding occurred in dry nitrogen, where mechanical effects alone are expected, in laboratory air (50 +- 10% RH), in water, in pure hexadecane and in hexadecane containing 0.5 w/o stearic acid. Friction coefficients of depend on the environment and somewhat on toughness. (f = 0.1 in hexadecane containing stearic acid, 0.15 in pure hexadecane, 0.3 to 0.6 in air, 0.7 in water and 1.0 in dry N/sub 2/). All wear rates decrease with increasing sliding distance. They are in the range of 10/sup -5/ to 3.10/sup -4/ mm/sup 3//Nm for the brittle zirconia and in the range of 10/sup -9/ to 10/sup -6/ mm/sup 3//Nm for the tough material. Environment effects are strong; they are compatible with stress corrosion cracking and not with the tribochemistry that governs environmental effects in non oxide ceramics such as Si/sub 3/N/sub 4/. For the tough zirconia, the wear rate is lowest in dry nitrogen. For the other environments, it increases in the order; hexadecane, hexadecane containing stearic acid, air, water. With the brittle material, wear is lowest in hexadecane and highest in air. The results are analyzed with the help of a model that relates the wear rate to the local contact stresses

  3. Fracture of brittle solids

    Lawn, Brian

    1993-01-01

    This is an advanced text for higher degree materials science students and researchers concerned with the strength of highly brittle covalent-ionic solids, principally ceramics. It is a reconstructed and greatly expanded edition of a book first published in 1975. The book presents a unified continuum, microstructural and atomistic treatment of modern day fracture mechanics from a materials perspective. Particular attention is directed to the basic elements of bonding and microstructure that govern the intrinsic toughness of ceramics. These elements hold the key to the future of ceramics as high-technology materials--to make brittle solids strong, we must first understand what makes them weak. The underlying theme of the book is the fundamental Griffith energy-balance concept of crack propagation. The early chapters develop fracture mechanics from the traditional continuum perspective, with attention to linear and nonlinear crack-tip fields, equilibrium and non-equilibrium crack states. It then describes the at...

  4. Effect of rare earths on cold brittleness and temper brittleness and temper brittleness of structural steels

    The following problems are discussed: the possibility to bind phosphorus in steel with rare-earth metals and concentrations of these metals; the effect produced on mechanical properties of steels at static and dynamic tests. The study has been made on the 35KhGS and 38KhS steels prone to reversible temper brittleness. It is shown that small practically adopted (up to 0.15%) additions of rare-earth metals to structural steels do not produce any significant effect on the position of cold brittleness threshold after improvement and additional embrittling tempering. Alloying Cr-Mn-Si steels with large additions of rare-earth metals (0.40 to O.65%) shifts the cold brittleness threshold of the improved steel by more than 100 deg C towards the region of low temperatures and practically eliminates its tendency to reversible temper brittleness. It has been established as a result of micro-X-ray spectrum studies that rare-earth metals do not produce alloying effect on the solid solution and do not enrich grain boundaries but can be found as a whole in nonmetallic inclusions. It is demonstrated that the main reason for the considerably lower cold brittleness threshold in the alloying with large additions of rare-earth metals lies in the fact that they bind phosphorus and its analogues into nonmetallic inclusions

  5. Soft matter: Brittle for breakfast

    Vandewalle, Nicolas

    2015-10-01

    Crushing a brittle porous medium such as a box of cereal causes the grains to break up and rearrange themselves. A lattice spring model based on simple physical assumptions gives rise to behaviours that are complex enough to reproduce diverse compaction patterns.

  6. Protection of brittle film against cracking

    Musil, J.; Sklenka, J.; Čerstvý, R.

    2016-05-01

    This article reports on the protection of the brittle Zrsbnd Sisbnd O film against cracking in bending by the highly elastic top film (over-layer). In experiments the Zrsbnd Sisbnd O films with different elemental composition and structure were used. Both the brittle and highly elastic films were prepared by magnetron sputtering using a dual magnetron. The brittle film easily cracks in bending. On the other hand, the highly elastic film exhibits enhanced resistance to cracking in bending. Main characteristic parameters of both the brittle and highly elastic films are given. Special attention is devoted to the effect of the structure (crystalline, amorphous) of both the brittle and highly elastic top film on the resistance of cracking of the brittle film. It was found that (1) both the X-ray amorphous and crystalline brittle films easily crack in bending, (2) the highly elastic film can have either X-ray amorphous or crystalline structure and (3) both the X-ray amorphous and crystalline, highly elastic top films perfectly protect the brittle films against cracking in bending. The structure, mechanical properties and optical transparency of the brittle and highly elastic sputtered Zrsbnd Sisbnd O films are described in detail. At the end of this article, the principle of the low-temperature formation of the highly elastic films is also explained.

  7. Fractal statistics of brittle fragmentation

    M. Davydova

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The study of fragmentation statistics of brittle materials that includes four types of experiments is presented. Data processing of the fragmentation of glass plates under quasi-static loading and the fragmentation of quartz cylindrical rods under dynamic loading shows that the size distribution of fragments (spatial quantity is fractal and can be described by a power law. The original experimental technique allows us to measure, apart from the spatial quantity, the temporal quantity - the size of time interval between the impulses of the light reflected from the newly created surfaces. The analysis of distributions of spatial (fragment size and temporal (time interval quantities provides evidence of obeying scaling laws, which suggests the possibility of self-organized criticality in fragmentation.

  8. Fracturing and brittleness index analyses of shales

    Barnhoorn, Auke; Primarini, Mutia; Houben, Maartje

    2016-04-01

    The formation of a fracture network in rocks has a crucial control on the flow behaviour of fluids. In addition, an existing network of fractures , influences the propagation of new fractures during e.g. hydraulic fracturing or during a seismic event. Understanding of the type and characteristics of the fracture network that will be formed during e.g. hydraulic fracturing is thus crucial to better predict the outcome of a hydraulic fracturing job. For this, knowledge of the rock properties is crucial. The brittleness index is often used as a rock property that can be used to predict the fracturing behaviour of a rock for e.g. hydraulic fracturing of shales. Various terminologies of the brittleness index (BI1, BI2 and BI3) exist based on mineralogy, elastic constants and stress-strain behaviour (Jin et al., 2014, Jarvie et al., 2007 and Holt et al., 2011). A maximum brittleness index of 1 predicts very good and efficient fracturing behaviour while a minimum brittleness index of 0 predicts a much more ductile shale behaviour. Here, we have performed systematic petrophysical, acoustic and geomechanical analyses on a set of shale samples from Whitby (UK) and we have determined the three different brittleness indices on each sample by performing all the analyses on each of the samples. We show that each of the three brittleness indices are very different for the same sample and as such it can be concluded that the brittleness index is not a good predictor of the fracturing behaviour of shales. The brittleness index based on the acoustic data (BI1) all lie around values of 0.5, while the brittleness index based on the stress strain data (BI2) give an average brittleness index around 0.75, whereas the mineralogy brittleness index (BI3) predict values below 0.2. This shows that by using different estimates of the brittleness index different decisions can be made for hydraulic fracturing. If we would rely on the mineralogy (BI3), the Whitby mudstone is not a suitable

  9. Dating brittle tectonic movements with cleft monazite

    Berger, Alfons; Gnos, E.; Janots, E.; Whitehouse, M.; Soom, M.; Frei, Robert; Waight, Tod Earle

    2013-01-01

    phases. This allows the high precision isotope dating of cleft monazite. 232Th/208Pb ages are not affected by excess Pb and yield growth domain ages between 8.03 ± 0.22 Ma and 6.25 ± 0.60 Ma. Monazite crystallization in brittle structures is coeval or younger than 8 Ma zircon fission track data, and...

  10. Precision grinding process development for brittle materials

    High performance, brittle materials are the materials of choice for many of today's engineering applications. This paper describes three separate precision grinding processes developed at Lawrence Liver-more National Laboratory to machine precision ceramic components. Included in the discussion of the precision processes is a variety of grinding wheel dressing, truing and profiling techniques

  11. Banishing brittle bones with boron

    A 6-month study indicates that boron, not even considered an essential nutrient for people and animals, may be a key to preventing osteoporosis, say nutritionist Forrest H. Nielsen and anatomist Curtiss D. Hunt at ARS' Grand Forks, North Dakota, Human Nutrition Research Center. They believe the results of the study - the first to look at the nutritional effects of boron in humans - will generate a lot of interest in the element. In the study, 12 postmenopausal women consumed a very low boron diet (0.25 milligrams per day) for 17 weeks then were given a daily 3-mg supplement - representing the boron intake from a well-balanced diet - for 7 more weeks. Within 8 days after the supplement was introduced, the lost 40 percent less calcium, one-third less magnesium, and slightly less phosphorus through the urine. In fact, their calcium and magnesium losses were lower than prestudy levels, when they were on their normal diets. Since boron isn't considered essential for people, there is not recommended intake and no boron supplement on the market. Nielsen says the supplement of sodium borate used in the study was specially prepared based on the amount of boron a person would get from a well-balanced diet containing fruits and vegetables. He says the average boron intake is about 1.5 mg - or half the experimental dose - but average means a lot of people get less and a lot get more. Hunt cautioned that large doses of boron can be toxic, even lethal. The lowest reported lethal dose of boric acid is about 45 grams (1.6 ounces) for an adult and only 2 grams (0.07 ounce) for an infant.

  12. Aspects of brittle failure assessment for RPV

    Zecha, H.; Hermann, T.; Hienstorfer, W. [TUeV SUeD Energietechnik GmbH Baden-Wuerttemberg, Filderstadt (Germany); Schuler, X. [Materialpruefungsanstalt, Univ. Stuttgart (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    This paper describes the process of pressurized thermal shock analysis (PTS) and brittle failure assessment for the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) of the nuclear power plants NECKAR I/II. The thermo-hydraulic part of the assessment provides the boundary conditions for the fracture mechanics analysis. In addition to the one dimensional thermo-hydraulic simulations CFD, analyses were carried out for selected transients. An extensive evaluation of material properties is necessary to provide the input data for a reliable fracture mechanics assessment. For the core weld and the flange weld it has shown that brittle crack initiation can be precluded for all considered load cases. For the cold and hot leg nozzle detailed linear-elastic and elasticplastic Finite Element Analyses (FEA) are performed to verify the integrity of the RPV. (orig.)

  13. Overcoming brittleness through bioinspiration and -microarchitecture

    Barthelat, Francois; Mirkhalaf, Mohammad; Dastjerdi, Ahmad

    2014-01-01

    The fracture of highly mineralized natural materials such as bone, teeth, or seashells is largely controlled by the interfaces they contain. These interfaces, relatively weak, deflect and guide cracks into configurations which eventually impede their propagation. As a result, weaker interfaces turn brittle minerals into tough materials which can deform and absorb energy from impacts. To explore these concepts in synthetic materials, we used a 3D laser-engraver to carve arrays of microcracks w...

  14. Psychiatric and social aspects of brittle asthma.

    Garden, G M; Ayres, J.G.

    1993-01-01

    BACKGROUND--Many studies have shown that emotional factors play a part in asthma, but few have compared patients with differing severities of asthma. It was our impression that patients with "brittle" asthma (BA; more than 40% diurnal variation in peak flow on 15 or more days a month over a period of at least six months, and persistent symptoms despite multiple drug treatment) had greater psychosocial morbidity than asthmatic patients with less variable asthma. METHODS--Twenty patients with B...

  15. Fabrication of brittle materials -- current status

    Scattergood, R.O.

    1988-12-01

    The research initiatives in the area of precision fabrication will be continued in the upcoming year. Three students, T. Bifano (PhD), P. Blake (PhD) and E. Smith (MS), finished their research programs in the last year. Sections 13 and 14 will summarize the essential results from the work of the Materials Engineering students Blake and Smith. Further details will be presented in forthcoming publications that are now in preparation. The results from Bifano`s thesis have been published in adequate detail and need not be summarized further. Three new students, S. Blackley (MS), H. Paul (PhD), and S. Smith (PhD) have joined the program and will continue the research efforts in precision fabrication. The programs for these students will be outlined in Sections 15 and 16. Because of the success of the earlier work in establishing new process models and experimental techniques for the study of diamond turning and diamond grinding, the new programs will, in part, build upon the earlier work. This is especially true for investigations concerned with brittle materials. The basic understanding of material response of nominally brittle materials during machining or grinding operations remains as a challenge. The precision fabrication of brittle materials will continue as an area of emphasis for the Precision Engineering Center.

  16. Fracture of brittle materials under compression

    Kinetics of crack development in plates of brittle materials under uniaxial compression is studied by the calculated-experimental method. Failure diagrams for single sloping cracks as well as for the periodical system of parallel cracks with due regrd for curvikinearity of their trajectory are plotted using the method of singular integral equations. Effect of the crack interaction on the plate failure kinetics is estimated. The calculated data are compared with experimental results obtained on graphite ARW, zirconium carbide, soda-lime and acrylic glass sepcimens with atificial nothes

  17. Brittle and semi-brittle behaviours of a carbonate rock: influence of water and temperature

    Nicolas, A.; Fortin, J.; Regnet, J. B.; Dimanov, A.; Guéguen, Y.

    2016-07-01

    Inelastic deformation can either occur with dilatancy or compaction, implying differences in porosity changes, failure and petrophysical properties. In this study, the roles of water as a pore fluid, and of temperature, on the deformation and failure of a micritic limestone (white Tavel limestone, porosity 14.7 per cent) were investigated under triaxial stresses. For each sample, a hydrostatic load was applied up to the desired confining pressure (from 0 up to 85 MPa) at either room temperature or at 70 °C. Two pore fluid conditions were investigated at room temperature: dry and water saturated. The samples were deformed up to failure at a constant strain rate of ˜10-5 s-1. The experiments were coupled with ultrasonic wave velocity surveys to monitor crack densities. The linear trend between the axial crack density and the relative volumetric strain beyond the onset of dilatancy suggests that cracks propagate at constant aspect ratio. The decrease of ultrasonic wave velocities beyond the onset of inelastic compaction in the semi-brittle regime indicates the ongoing interplay of shear-enhanced compaction and crack development. Water has a weakening effect on the onset of dilatancy in the brittle regime, but no measurable influence on the peak strength. Temperature lowers the confining pressure at which the brittle-semi-brittle transition is observed but does not change the stress states at the onset of inelastic compaction and at the post-yield onset of dilatancy.

  18. Phase field approximation of dynamic brittle fracture

    Schlüter, Alexander; Willenbücher, Adrian; Kuhn, Charlotte; Müller, Ralf

    2014-11-01

    Numerical methods that are able to predict the failure of technical structures due to fracture are important in many engineering applications. One of these approaches, the so-called phase field method, represents cracks by means of an additional continuous field variable. This strategy avoids some of the main drawbacks of a sharp interface description of cracks. For example, it is not necessary to track or model crack faces explicitly, which allows a simple algorithmic treatment. The phase field model for brittle fracture presented in Kuhn and Müller (Eng Fract Mech 77(18):3625-3634, 2010) assumes quasi-static loading conditions. However dynamic effects have a great impact on the crack growth in many practical applications. Therefore this investigation presents an extension of the quasi-static phase field model for fracture from Kuhn and Müller (Eng Fract Mech 77(18):3625-3634, 2010) to the dynamic case. First of all Hamilton's principle is applied to derive a coupled set of Euler-Lagrange equations that govern the mechanical behaviour of the body as well as the crack growth. Subsequently the model is implemented in a finite element scheme which allows to solve several test problems numerically. The numerical examples illustrate the capabilities of the developed approach to dynamic fracture in brittle materials.

  19. Permeability Evolution and Rock Brittle Failure

    Sun Qiang

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports an experimental study of the evolution of permeability during rock brittle failure and a theoretical analysis of rock critical stress level. It is assumed that the rock is a strain-softening medium whose strength can be described by Weibull’s distribution. Based on the two-dimensional renormalization group theory, it is found that the stress level λ c (the ratio of the stress at the critical point to the peak stress depends mainly on the homogeneity index or shape parameter m in the Weibull’s distribution for the rock. Experimental results show that the evolution of permeability is closely related to rock deformation stages: the permeability has a rapid increase with the growth of cracks and their surface areas (i.e., onset of fracture coalescence point, and reaches the maximum at rock failure. Both the experimental and analytical results show that this point of rapid increase in permeability on the permeabilitypressure curve corresponds to the critical point on the stress-strain curve; for rock compression, the stress at this point is approximately 80% of the peak strength. Thus, monitoring the evolution of permeability may provide a new means of identifying the critical point of rock brittle fracture

  20. Research on basic characteristics of complex system brittleness

    JIN Hong-zhang; GUO Jian; WEI Qi; LIN De-ming; LI Qi

    2004-01-01

    Tbe goal of this paper is to research one new characteristic of complex system. Brittleness, which is one new characteritic of complex system, is presented in this paper. The linguistic and qualitative descriptions of complex system are also given in this paper.Otherwise, the qualitative description of complex system is presented at first. On the basis of analyzing the existing brittleness problems, linguistic description and mathematic description of brittleness are given as well. Three kinds of phenomena to judge brittleness of complex system are also given, based on catastrophe theory. Basic characteristics of brittleness are given on the basis of its mathematic description. Two critical point sets are defined by using catastrophe theory. The definition of brittleness and its related theory can serve the control of complex system, and provide theoretical basis for the design and control of complex system.

  1. The role of brittleness in fracture of concrete

    Based on the analysis of load-deflection curves of concrete, mortar and hcp during fracture tests, we introduce a brittleness parameter to describe the failure pattern, and try to explore how the fracture energy, strength and the brittleness are mutually interdependent. It is proposed in this contribution that for practical use or design of materials, all three properties strength, fracture energy and brittleness have to be taken into consideration. (orig.)

  2. National conference on brittle fracture of materials and structures

    The proceedings contain full texts of 28 contributions, out of which 10 fall within the INIS subject scope. These deal particularly with the effect of neutron radiation on the brittle fracture properties of structural steels used in nuclear facilities and with theoretical problems of brittle fracture of such steels in cyclic stress conditions. (Z.M.)

  3. Effect of substrate roughness on the contact damage of thin brittle films on brittle substrates

    Weidner, Mirko [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of New South Wales NSW 2052, Sydney (Australia); Institute for Materials Science, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Petersenstrasse 23, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany); Borrero-Lopez, Oscar [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of New South Wales NSW 2052, Sydney (Australia); Departamento de Ingenieria Mecanica, Energetica y de los Materiales, Universidad de Extremadura, 06071, Badajoz (Spain); Hoffman, Mark, E-mail: mark.hoffman@unsw.edu.a [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of New South Wales NSW 2052, Sydney (Australia); Bendavid, Avi; Martin, Phil J. [CSIRO Materials Science and Engineering, P.O. Box 218, Lindfield NSW 2070 (Australia)

    2010-07-01

    The effect of substrate and surface roughness on the contact fracture of diamond-like carbon coatings on brittle soda-lime glass substrates has been investigated. The average surface roughness (R{sub a}) of the examined samples ranged from 15 nm to 571 nm. Contact damage was simulated by means of spherical nanoindentation, and fracture was subsequently assessed by focused ion beam microscopy. It was found that, in the absence of sub-surface damage in the substrate, fracture occurs in the coating in the form of radial, and ring/cone cracks during loading, and lateral cracks during unloading. Increasing the surface roughness results in a decrease in the critical load for crack initiation during loading, and in the suppression of fracture modes during unloading from high loads. When sub-surface damage (lateral cracks) is present in the substrate, severe spalling takes place during loading, causing a large discontinuity in the load-displacement curve. The results have implications concerning the design of damage-tolerant coated systems consisting of a brittle film on a brittle substrate.

  4. The brittleness model of complex system based on cellular automata

    LIN De-ming; JIN Hong-zhang; LI Qi; WU Hong-mei

    2004-01-01

    Now the research on the complex system is a hot spot. Brittleness is one of the basic characteristics of a complex system. In a complex system, after one of subsystems is struck to be collapsed, the whole system will collapse. Meanwhile, cellular automata is a discrete dynamic system. When the rule is given, the cellular automata could be defined. Then it can imitate the complex action. Cellular automata is used to simulate the brittleness action in this study. Entropy was used to analyze the action and get the rule. Then,three normal brittleness models were given. The result shows that the brittleness of complex system is existent and in addition some important behavior mode of complex system brittleness has been achieved.

  5. Brittle and compaction creep in porous sandstone

    Heap, Michael; Brantut, Nicolas; Baud, Patrick; Meredith, Philip

    2015-04-01

    Strain localisation in the Earth's crust occurs at all scales, from the fracture of grains at the microscale to crustal-scale faulting. Over the last fifty years, laboratory rock deformation studies have exposed the variety of deformation mechanisms and failure modes of rock. Broadly speaking, rock failure can be described as either dilatant (brittle) or compactive. While dilatant failure in porous sandstones is manifest as shear fracturing, their failure in the compactant regime can be characterised by either distributed cataclastic flow or the formation of localised compaction bands. To better understand the time-dependency of strain localisation (shear fracturing and compaction band growth), we performed triaxial deformation experiments on water-saturated Bleurswiller sandstone (porosity = 24%) under a constant stress (creep) in the dilatant and compactive regimes, with particular focus on time-dependent compaction band formation in the compactive regime. Our experiments show that inelastic strain accumulates at a constant stress in the brittle and compactive regimes leading to the development of shear fractures and compaction bands, respectively. While creep in the dilatant regime is characterised by an increase in porosity and, ultimately, an acceleration in axial strain to shear failure (as observed in previous studies), compaction creep is characterised by a reduction in porosity and a gradual deceleration in axial strain. The overall deceleration in axial strain, AE activity, and porosity change during creep compaction is punctuated by excursions interpreted as the formation of compaction bands. The growth rate of compaction bands formed during creep is lower as the applied differential stress, and hence background creep strain rate, is decreased, although the inelastic strain required for a compaction band remains constant over strain rates spanning several orders of magnitude. We find that, despite the large differences in strain rate and growth rate

  6. CONSERVATION LAWS IN FINITE MICROCRACKING BRITTLE SOLIDS

    Wang Defa; Chen Yiheng; Fukui Takuo

    2005-01-01

    This paper addresses the conservation laws in finite brittle solids with microcracks.The discussion is limited to the 2-D cases. First, after considering the combination of the PseudoTraction Method and the indirect Boundary Element Method, a versatile method for solving multicrack interacting problems in finite plane solids is proposed, by which the fracture parameters (SIF and path-independent integrals) can be calculated with a desirable accuracy. Second, with the aid of the method proposed, the roles the conservation laws play in the fracture analysis for finite microcracking solids are studied. It is concluded that the conservation laws do play important roles in not only the fracture analysis but also the analysis of damage and stability for the finite microcracking system. Finally, the physical interpretation of the M-integral is discussed further.An explicit relation between the M-integral and the crack face area, I.e., M = GS, has been discovered using the analytical method, which can shed some light on the Damage Mechanics issues from a different perspective.

  7. Diffuse interface approach to brittle fracture

    We present a continuum model for the propagation of cracks and fractures in brittle materials. The components of the strain tensor ε are the fundamental variables. The evolution equations are based on a free energy that reduces to that of linear elasticity for small ε, and accounts for cracks through energy saturation at large values of ε. We regularize the model by including terms dependent on gradients of ε in the free energy. No additional fields are introduced, and then the whole dynamics is perfectly defined. We show that the model is able to reproduce basic facts in fracture physics, like the Griffith's dependence of the critical stress as a minus one half power of the crack length. In addition, regularization makes the results insensitive to the numerical mesh used, something not at all trivial in crack modeling. We present and example of the application of the model to predict the growth and curving of cracks in a non-trivial geometrical configuration. (author)

  8. Ductile-brittle transition behaviour of PLA/o-MMT films during the physical aging process

    M. Ll. Maspoch

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The ductile-brittle transition behaviour of organo modified montmorillonite-based Poly(lactic acid films (PLA/o-MMT was analysed using the Essential Work of Fracture (EWF methodology, Small Punch Tests (SPT and Enthalpy relaxation analysis. While the EWF methodology could only be applied successfully to de-aged samples, small punch test (SPT was revealed as more effective for a mechanical characterization during the transient behaviour from ductile to brittle. According to differential scanning calorimetry (DSC results, physical aging at 30°C of PLA/o-MMT samples exhibited slower enthalpy relaxation kinetics as compared to the pristine polymer. Although all samples exhibited an equivalent thermodynamic state after being stored one week at 30°C, significant differences were observed in the mechanical performances. These changes could be attributed to the toughening mechanisms promoted by o-MMT.

  9. Candidate materials to prevent brittle fracture - (186)

    For heavy transport or dual purpose casks, selecting the appropriate materials for the body is a key decision. To get a Type B(U) approval, it is necessary to demonstrate that the mechanical strength of the material is good enough at temperature as low as -40 C so as to prevent the cask from any risk of brittle fracture in regulatory accident conditions. Different methods are available to provide such a demonstration and can lead to different choices. It should be noted also that the material compositions given by national or international standards display relatively wide tolerances and therefore are not necessarily sufficient to guarantee a required toughness. It is therefore necessary to specify to the fabricator the minimum value for toughness, and to verify it. This paper gives an overview of the different methods and materials that are used in several countries. Although the safety is strongly linked to the choice of the material, it is shown that many other parameters are important, such as the design, the fabrication process (multi layer, cast or forged body), the welding material and process, the ability to detect flaws, and the measured and/or calculated stress level, including stress concentration, in particular when bolts are used. The paper will show that relying exclusively on high toughness at low temperature does not necessarily deliver the maximum safety as compared with other choices. It follows that differences in approaches to licensing by different competent authorities may bias the choice of material depending on the country of application, even though B(U) licenses are meant to guarantee unilaterally a uniform minimum level of safety

  10. Reversible temper brittleness on tensile tests at room temperature

    Tensile tests were carried out on unnotched test pieces at room temperature and three strain rates: 2,5x10-4, 2,5x10-3 and 1,0x10-2 s-1 in a low alloy No-Cr-Mo steel to observe the variation in its mechanical properties with the occurrence of reversible temper brittleness. The brittle samples showed a sensitivity of 500C in a 48 hour heat treatment at 5000C. The tests showed that at the strain rate of 2,5x10-4 s-1 there are statistically significant differences between the elongations of the material in the brittle and the nonbrittle and regenerated states. A short review of reversible temper brittleness is given and a theory suggested for the mechanism

  11. Scattering mechanical performances for brittle bulk metallic glasses

    J. W. Qiao

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Scattering mechanical performances of brittle La- and Mg-based BMGs are found in the present study. Upon dynamic loading, there exist largely scattered fracture strengths even if the strain rates are under the same order, and the BMG systems are the same. The negative strain rate dependence for La- and Mg-based BMGs is obtained, i.e., a decreased fracture strength is dominating from quasi-static to dynamic compression. At cryogenic temperatures, distinguishingly low fracture strengths are available for these two brittle BMGs, and decreased tolerance to accommodate strains makes BMGs more and more brittle. It is concluded that the scattering mechanical performances of brittle BMGs should be carefully evaluated before actual applications.

  12. Increase in cellular concrete resistance to brittle fracture

    Considered are theoretical premises of decrease in cellular concrete resistance to brittle fracture at the expense of dispersed reinforcement. It is stated experimentally that the introduction of 3% asbestos fibers permits to increase the ultimate extensibility and strength during cellular concrete tension by 15-30% and to increase in unit rupture work 1.4-1.6 time more and therefore to decrease its brittleness

  13. Universal behaviour in compressive failure of brittle materials.

    Renshaw, C E; Schulson, E M

    2001-08-30

    Brittle failure limits the compressive strength of rock and ice when rapidly loaded under low to moderate confinement. Higher confinement or slower loading results in ductile failure once the brittle-ductile transition is crossed. Brittle failure begins when primary cracks initiate and slide, creating wing cracks at their tips. Under little to no confinement, wing cracks extend and link together, splitting the material into slender columns which then fail. Under low to moderate confinement, wing crack growth is restricted and terminal failure is controlled by the localization of damage along a narrow band. Early investigations proposed that localization results from either the linkage of wing cracks or the buckling of microcolumns created between adjacent wing cracks. Observations of compressive failure in ice suggest a mechanism whereby localization initiates owing to the bending-induced failure of slender microcolumns created between sets of secondary cracks emanating from one side of a primary crack. Here we analyse this mechanism, and show that it leads to a closed-form, quantitative model that depends only on independently measurable mechanical parameters. Our model predictions for both the brittle compressive strength and the brittle-ductile transition are consistent with data from a variety of crystalline materials, offering quantitative evidence for universal processes in brittle failure and for the broad applicability of the model. PMID:11528475

  14. Intermittent single point machining of brittle materials

    Marsh, E

    1999-12-07

    A series of tests were undertaken to explore diamond tool wear in the intermittent cutting of brittle materials, specifically silicon. The tests were carried out on a plain way No. 3 Moore machine base equipped as a flycutter with a motorized Professional Instruments 4R air bearing spindle. The diamond tools were made by Edge Technologies with known crystal orientation and composition and sharpened with either an abrasive or chemical process, depending on the individual test. The flycutting machine configuration allowed precise control over the angle at which the tool engages the anisotropic silicon workpiece. In contrast, the crystallographic orientation of the silicon workpiece changes continuously during on-axis turning. As a result, it is possible to flycut a workpiece in cutting directions that are known to be easy or hard. All cuts were run in the 100 plane of the silicon, with a slight angle deliberately introduced to ensure that the 100 plane is engaged in ''up-cutting'' which lengthens the tool life. A Kistler 9256 dynamometer was used to measure the cutting forces in order to gain insight into the material removal process and tool wear during testing. The dynamometer provides high bandwidth force measurement with milli-Newton resolution and good thermal stability. After many successive passes over the workpiece, it was observed that the cutting forces grow at a rate that is roughly proportional to the degradation of the workpiece surface finish. The exact relationship between cutting force growth and surface finish degradation was not quantified because of the problems associated with measuring surface finish in situ. However, a series of witness marks were made during testing in an aluminum sample that clearly show the development of wear flats on the tool nose profile as the forces grow and the surface finish worsens. The test results show that workpieces requiring on the order of two miles of track length can be made with low tool

  15. Brittle and semibrittle creep in a low porosity carbonate rock

    Nicolas, Aurélien; Fortin, Jérôme; Regnet, Jean-Baptiste; Dimanov, Alexandre; Guéguen, Yves

    2016-04-01

    The mechanical behavior of limestones at room temperature is brittle at low confining pressure and becomes semi-brittle with the increase of the confining pressure. The brittle behavior is characterized by a macroscopic dilatancy due to crack propagation, leading to a stress drop when cracks coalesce at failure. The semi-brittle behavior is characterized by diffuse deformation due to intra-crystalline plasticity (dislocation movements and twinning) and microcracking. The aim of this work is to examine the influence of pore fluid and time on the mechanical behavior. Constant strain rate triaxial deformation experiments and stress-stepping creep experiments were performed on white Tavel limestone (porosity 14.7%). Elastic wave velocity evolutions were recorded during each experiment and inverted to crack densities. Constant strain rate triaxial experiments were performed for confining pressure in the range of 5-90 MPa. For Pc≤55 MPa our results show that the behavior is brittle. In this regime, water-saturation decreases the differential stress at the onset of crack propagation and enhances macroscopic dilatancy. For Pc≥70 MPa, the behavior is semi-brittle. Inelastic compaction is due to intra-crystalline plasticity and micro-cracking. However, in this regime, our results show that water-saturation has no clear effect at the onset of inelastic compaction. Stress stepping creep experiments were performed in a range of confining pressures crossing the brittle-ductile transition. In the brittle regime, the time-dependent axial deformation is coupled with dilatancy and a decrease of elastic wave velocities, which is characteristic of crack propagation and/or nucleation. In the semi-brittle regime, the first steps are inelastic compactant because of plastic pore collapse. But, following stress steps are dilatant because of crack nucleation and/or propagation. However, our results show that the axial strain rate is always controlled by plastic phenomena, until the last

  16. Brittleness Generation Mechanism and Failure Model of High Strength Lightweight Aggregate Concrete

    2006-01-01

    The brittleness generation mechanism of high strength lightweight aggregate concrete(HSLWAC) was presented, and it was indicated that lightweight aggregate was the vulnerable spot,initiating brittleness. Based on the analysis of the brittleness failure by the load-deflection curve, the brittleness presented by HSLWAC was more prominent compared with ordinary lightweight aggregate concrete of the same strength grade. The model of brittleness failure was also established.

  17. Brittle and ductile friction and the physics of tectonic tremor

    Daub, E.G.; Shelly, D.R.; Guyer, R.A.; Johnson, P.A.

    2011-01-01

    Observations of nonvolcanic tremor provide a unique window into the mechanisms of deformation and failure in the lower crust. At increasing depths, rock deformation gradually transitions from brittle, where earthquakes occur, to ductile, with tremor occurring in the transitional region. The physics of deformation in the transition region remain poorly constrained, limiting our basic understanding of tremor and its relation to earthquakes. We combine field and laboratory observations with a physical friction model comprised of brittle and ductile components, and use the model to provide constraints on the friction and stress state in the lower crust. A phase diagram is constructed that characterizes under what conditions all faulting behaviors occur, including earthquakes, tremor, silent transient slip, and steady sliding. Our results show that tremor occurs over a range of ductile and brittle frictional strengths, and advances our understanding of the physical conditions at which tremor and earthquakes take place. Copyright ?? 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  18. Cuttability Assessment of Selected Rocks Through Different Brittleness Values

    Dursun, Arif Emre; Gokay, M. Kemal

    2016-04-01

    Prediction of cuttability is a critical issue for successful execution of tunnel or mining excavation projects. Rock cuttability is also used to determine specific energy, which is defined as the work done by the cutting force to excavate a unit volume of yield. Specific energy is a meaningful inverse measure of cutting efficiency, since it simply states how much energy must be expended to excavate a unit volume of rock. Brittleness is a fundamental rock property and applied in drilling and rock excavation. Brittleness is one of the most crucial rock features for rock excavation. For this reason, determination of relations between cuttability and brittleness will help rock engineers. This study aims to estimate the specific energy from different brittleness values of rocks by means of simple and multiple regression analyses. In this study, rock cutting, rock property, and brittleness index tests were carried out on 24 different rock samples with different strength values, including marble, travertine, and tuff, collected from sites around Konya Province, Turkey. Four previously used brittleness concepts were evaluated in this study, denoted as B 1 (ratio of compressive to tensile strength), B 2 (ratio of the difference between compressive and tensile strength to the sum of compressive and tensile strength), B 3 (area under the stress-strain line in relation to compressive and tensile strength), and B 9 = S 20, the percentage of fines (University of Science and Technology (NTNU) model as well as B 9p (B 9 as predicted from uniaxial compressive, Brazilian tensile, and point load strengths of rocks using multiple regression analysis). The results suggest that the proposed simple regression-based prediction models including B 3, B 9, and B 9p outperform the other models including B 1 and B 2 and can be used for more accurate and reliable estimation of specific energy.

  19. In the Initiation of Brittle Compressive Failure: Lessons From Ice

    Renshaw, C. E.; Schulson, E. M.

    2001-12-01

    Brittle failure limits the compressive strength of rock and ice when rapidly loaded under low to moderate confinement. Higher confinement or slower loading results in ductile failure once the brittle-ductile transition is crossed. It is well established that the macroscopic brittle failure of rock, concrete and other brittle materials under compression is preceded by the initiation and sliding of microscopic primary cracks, creating wing cracks at their tips. In laboratory samples, microcracks begin to nucleate more or less uniformly throughout the sample at compressions equal to about 1/5 to 1/3 the terminal failure stress. Under little to no confinement, wing cracks extend and link together, splitting the material into slender columns which then fail. Under low to moderate confinement, wing crack growth is restricted and terminal failure is controlled by the localization of damage along discrete bands of intense damage inclined by approximately 30 degrees to the direction of the most compressive stress. Earlier investigators proposed that localization results from either the linkage of wing cracks or the buckling of microcolumns created between adjacent wing cracks. Observations of compressive failure in ice suggest a new mechanism whereby localization initiates due to the bending-induced failure of slender microcolumns created between sets of secondary cracks emanating from one side of a primary crack. Analysis of this mechanism leads to a closed-form, quantitative model that only depends on independently measureable mechanical parameters. We show that model predictions for both the brittle compressive strength and the brittle-ductile transition are consistent with data from a variety of crystalline materials.

  20. Microscopic characteristics of different fracture modes of brittle rock

    2001-01-01

    Three types of rock specimens, three-point bending specimen, anti-symmetric four-point bending specimen and direct shearing specimen, were used to achieve Mode Ⅰ , Mode Ⅱ and mixed mode Ⅰ - Ⅱ fracture, respectively . Microscopic characteristics of the three fracture modes of brittle rock were studied by SEM technique in order to analyze fracture behaviors and better understand fracture mechanisms of different fracture modes of brittle rock. Test results show that the microscopic characteristics of different fracture modes correspond to different fracture mechanisms. The surface of Mode Ⅰ fracture has a great number of sparse and steep slip-steps with few tearing ridges and shows strong brittleness. In the surface of Mode Ⅱ fracture there exist many tearing ridges and densely distributed parallel slip-steps and it is attributed to the action of shear stress.The co-action of tensile and shear stresses results in brittle cleavage planes mixed with streamline patterns and tearing ridges in the surface of mixed mode Ⅰ - Ⅱ fracture. The measured Mode Ⅱ fracture toughness K Ⅱ c and mixed mode Ⅰ -Ⅱ fracture toughness Kmc are larger than Mode Ⅰ fracture toughness KⅠc. KⅡc is about 3.5times KI c, and KmC is about 1.2 times K Ⅰ c.

  1. Finite element modelling of fibre-reinforced brittle materials

    Kullaa, J.

    1997-01-01

    The tensile constitutive behaviour of fibre-reinforced brittle materials can be extended to two or three dimensions by using the finite element method with crack models. The three approaches in this study include the smeared and discrete crack concepts and a multi-surface plasticity model. The tensi

  2. Micro-structural reliability design of brittle materials

    Strnadel, B.; Byczanski, Petr

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 74, č. 11 (2007), s. 1825-1836. ISSN 0013-7944 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA106/06/0646 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30860518 Keywords : Cleavage strength * Brittle fracture * Fracture toughness Subject RIV: JJ - Other Materials Impact factor: 1.227, year: 2007 www.elsevier.com/locate/engfracmech

  3. Hugoniot elastic limits and compression parameters for brittle materials

    The physical properties of brittle materials are of interest because of the rapidly expanding use of these material in high-pressure and shock wave techology, e.g., geophysics and explosive compaction as well as military applications. These materials are characterized by unusually high sonic velocities, have large dynamic impedances and exhibit large dynamic yield strengths

  4. Scaling properties of crack branching and brittle fragmentation

    Uvarov S.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study is focused on the correlation of scaling properties of crack branching and brittle fragmentation with damage accumulation and a change in the fracture mechanism. The experimental results obtained from the glass fragmentation tests indicate that the size distribution of fragments has a fractal character and is described by a power law.

  5. Dislocation dynamics modelling of the ductile-brittle-transition

    Hennecke, Thomas; Haehner, Peter, E-mail: thomas.hennecke@tu-bs.de, E-mail: peter.haehner@jrc.nl [European Commission, DG Joint Research Centre, Institute for Energy, Westerduinweg 3, 1755 LE Petten (Netherlands)

    2009-07-15

    Many materials like silicon, tungsten or ferritic steels show a transition between high temperature ductile fracture with stable crack grow and high deformation energy absorption and low temperature brittle fracture in an unstable and low deformation mode, the ductile-brittle-transition. Especially in steels, the temperature transition is accompanied by a strong increase of the measured fracture toughness over a certain temperature range and strong scatter in the toughness data in this transition regime. The change in fracture modes is affected by dynamic interactions between dislocations and the inhomogeneous stress fields of notches and small cracks. In the present work a dislocation dynamics model for the ductile-brittle-transition is proposed, which takes those interactions into account. The model can explain an increase with temperature of apparent toughness in the quasi-brittle regime and different levels of scatter in the different temperature regimes. Furthermore it can predict changing failure sites in materials with heterogeneous microstructure. Based on the model, the effects of crack tip blunting, stress state, external strain rate and irradiation-induced changes in the plastic flow properties can be discussed.

  6. Brittle-to-ductile transition temperature in InP

    Bayu-Aji, Leonardus B. [School of Education, Universitas Pelita Harapan, M. H. Thamrin Boulevard, 15811 Tangerang (Indonesia); Pirouz, P. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Case Western Reserve University, 44106 Cleveland, Ohio (United States)

    2010-05-15

    Deformation experiments were conducted on monocrystalline InP by 4-point bend tests as well as by conventional and depth-sensing indentation (DSI) tests. Temperature ranges where the material exhibited a brittle or a ductile behavior were investigated with particular focus on the transition from one deformation mode to the other. The 4-point bend tests show that InP exhibits a sharp brittle-to-ductile transition (BDT) temperature within 5 between 350 and 355 C at a strain rate of 2.9 x 10{sup -5} s{sup -1}. The indentation BDT (IBDT) temperature is found to be significantly lower at {proportional_to}250 C. The difference of nearly 100 C between the two techniques is attributed to the hydrostatic component of the indentation stress field that suppresses fracture and shifts the transition to a lower temperature. (Abstract Copyright [2010], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  7. Potential of carnuba wax in ameliorating brittle fracture during tableting.

    Uhumwangho, M U; Okor, R S; Adogah, J T

    2009-01-01

    Carnuba wax (as binder) forms hard tablets even at low compression load attributable to its high plasticity. The aim of the present study is to investigate its potential in ameliorating brittle fracture (i.e., lamination and capping) a problem often encountered during tableting. Granules of paracetamol (test drug) were made by triturating the drug powder with the melted wax or starch mucilage (20%w/v). Resulting granules were separated into different size fractions which were separately compressed into tablets with and without a centre hole (as in- built defect) using different compression loads. The tablets were evaluated for tensile strength and the data used to calculate the brittle fracture index (BFI), using the expression: BFI = 0.5(T/T(0)-1) where T0 and T are the tensile strength of tablets with and without a centre hole respectively. The BFI values were significantly lower (pload further ameliorated the brittle fracture tendency of the tablets. Using granules with the larger particle size (850microm) and applying the lowest unit of load (6 arbitrary unit on the load scale of the tableting machine) the BFI values were 0.03 (carnuba wax tablets) and 0.11 (maize starch tablets). When the conditions were reversed (i.e., a highest load, 8 units and the smallest particle size, 212microm) the BFI values now became 0.17 (carnuba wax tablets) and 0.26 (maize starch tablets). The indication is that the use of large granules and low compression loads to form tablets can further enhance the potential of carnuba wax in ameliorating brittle fracture tendency of tablets during their manufacture. PMID:19168422

  8. Constraint Effects at Brittle Fracture Initiation in Cast Ferritic Steel

    Dlouhý, Ivo; Chlup, Zdeněk; Kozák, Vladislav

    Ženeva : Hoggar, 2001, s. 245-250. ISBN 2-940130-14-0. [International Conference on Fracture and Damage Mechanics 2001. Miláno (IT), 18.09.2001-20.09.2001] R&D Projects: GA ČR GV101/96/K264; GA MŠk ME 303 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2041904 Keywords : crack tip constraint * Q-parameter * brittle fracture Subject RIV: JG - Metallurgy

  9. Guidelines for safe design of shipping packages against brittle fracture

    In 1992, the ninth meeting of the Standing Advisory Group on the Safe Transport of Radioactive Materials recommended the publication of this TECDOC in an effort to promote the widest debate on the criteria for the brittle fracture safe design of transport packages. The published IAEA advice on the influence of brittle fracture on material integrity is contained in Appendix IX of the Advisory Material for the IAEA Regulations for the Safety Transport of Radioactive Material (1985 Edition, as amended 1990), Safety Series No. 37. This guidance is limited in scope, dealing only with ferritic steels in general terms. It is becoming more common for designers to specify materials other than austenitic stainless steel for packaging components. The data on ferritic steels cannot be assumed to apply to other metals, hence the need for further guidance on the development of relationships describing material properties at low temperatures. The methods described in this TECDOC will be considered by the Revision Panel for inclusion in the 1996 Edition of the IAEA Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material and the supporting documents. If accepted by the Revision Panel, this advice will be a candidate for upgrading to a Safety Practice. In the interim period, this TECDOC offers provisional advice on brittle fracture evaluation. It is acknowledged that, at this stage, the views expressed do not necessarily reflect those of the governments of Member States or organizations under whose auspices this manuscript was produced. Refs and figs

  10. Ductile-to-brittle transition in a low alloy steel

    The mechanical properties of pressure vessel steel (and above all its resistance to brittle fracture) are a decisive factor in the complex safety assessment of nuclear power plants. The monitoring of neutron induced embrittlement is provided using Charpy impact tests on standard V-notch specimens due to their small size. Material's ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) can be easily characterised using this test. However, Charpy impact energy cannot be immediately used for safety assessment, since fracture toughness is required. Some empirical formulas have been developed, but no direct relationship was still found. When the specimens are tested in the ductile-to-brittle transition region, cleavage crack initiation is preceded by ductile crack growth giving a large scatter to the values of fracture toughness and/or Charpy impact energy. Even if the cleavage initiation and propagation in steels containing isolated spheroidic carbides are qualitatively well understood, no one from existing models can explain the sharp upturn in ductile-to-brittle transition region. In the present work, French tempered bainitic steel 16MND5 (considered as equivalent to the American standard A508 Cl.3) is studied: The large fractographic analysis of CT and Charpy specimens broken in the DBTT range is undertaken to account for the evolution of cleavage fracture mechanisms. In addition to classical scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and EBSD technique are used in order to study the propagation of cleavage crack. The classical fracture mechanics using KIc or Jc concepts can hardly describe the unstable brittle fracture in the DBTT range. Hence, the local approach, which aims to predict the fracture of any structural component using local criteria, providing that the mechanical fields in the structure are known, is used. The probability of cleavage fracture in the DBTT range is predicted using the Beremin model based on weakest link theory, e.g. 2

  11. Cold brittleness of commercial iron-manganese alloys

    Using dilatometric, roentgenographic and metallographic methods the structure of Fe-(2-54%) Mn commercial alloys is studied. A phase diagram and a diagram of direct and reverse martensite transformations are plotted. It is found that the maximum quantity of E-martensite is formed in an alloy with 16% Mn. The alloy purity decrease leads to increasing the cold brittleness threshold and decreasing impact strength of all Fe-Mn alloys. Commercial alloys with the optimum manganese content (22-25%) are recommended for operation at cryogenic temperatures down to -160 deg C

  12. Dynamic Initiation and Propagation of Multiple Cracks in Brittle Materials

    Xiaodan Ren

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Brittle materials such as rock and ceramic usually exhibit apparent increases of strength and toughness when subjected to dynamic loading. The reasons for this phenomenon are not yet well understood, although a number of hypotheses have been proposed. Based on dynamic fracture mechanics, the present work offers an alternate insight into the dynamic behaviors of brittle materials. Firstly, a single crack subjected to stress wave excitations is investigated to obtain the dynamic crack-tip stress field and the dynamic stress intensity factor. Second, based on the analysis of dynamic stress intensity factor, the fracture initiation sizes and crack size distribution under different loading rates are obtained, and the power law with the exponent of −2/3 is derived to describe the fracture initiation size. Third, with the help of the energy balance concept, the dynamic increase of material strength is directly derived based on the proposed multiple crack evolving criterion. Finally, the model prediction is compared with the dynamic impact experiments, and the model results agree well with the experimentally measured dynamic increasing factor (DIF.

  13. Interfacial sliding in fibrous brittle-matrix composites

    Miles, Herbert Frederick, II

    Ceramic materials have desirable characteristics for use in high temperature applications, but due to their brittle nature they were avoided until the recent advent of ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) in which ceramic fibers are inserted into a ceramic matrix to toughen the material by retarding crack growth. This work investigates the role of sliding at interfaces in making brittle matrix composites (BMCs) more crack resistant. A two-dimensional study investigates the effects of roughness, toughness, and friction on the fracture behavior of BMCs. This study was then expanded to an axisymmetric study of a fiber engulfed by a crack. The results indicate that there are significant interaction effects between friction and the other parameters. To achieve 'long' sliding lengths, the magnitude of the interfacial critical energy release rate must be significantly less than the magnitude required to ensure crack deflection. The study then investigates the three-dimensional nature of a crack as it flows past a fiber. A computational analysis is performed to determine the crack propagation angle at a frictional interface. The computational results show good agreement with a novel experimental analysis using modified DCDC specimens. The experiments show, in real time, the propagation of a crack which is perpendicular to and intersects a frictional interface.

  14. Coexistence of ductile and brittle fracture in metals

    It is well known that semibrittle body-centered cubic (bcc) metals fail at low temperatures by cleavage that is preceded by crack tip deformation. Sinclair and Finnis proposed a mechanism by which crack tip deformation may be combined with brittle crack extension. In this model, edge dislocations are emitted from a crack tip on an inclined plane under pure mode I loading conditions. The authors propose a new mechanism of brittle fracture of semibrittle metals preceded by crack tip deformation by extending the model of Sinclair and Finnis and by incorporating experimental evidence on mixed mode crack propagation observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). They have shown experimentally that, even when the orientation of the dislocations in the plastic zone indicated pure mode III crack tip deformation, the crack opening displacement determined from the relative displacement of the crack flanks showed the presence of an additional mode I component. They have also shown that zigzag crack propagation observed in many metals can occur only if mode I cleavage is superimposed to mode II crack tip deformation

  15. Acoustic emission during the compaction of brittle UO2 particles

    One of the options considered for recycling minor actinides is to incorporate about 10% to UO2 matrix. The presence of open pores interconnected within this fuel should allow the evacuation of helium and fission gases to prevent swelling of the pellet and ultimately its interaction with the fuel clad surrounding it. Implementation of minor actinides requires working in shielded cell, reducing their retention and outlawing additions of organic products. The use of fragmentable particles of several hundred micrometers seems a good solution to control the microstructure of the green compacts and thus control the open porosity after sintering. The goal of this study is to monitor the compaction of brittle UO2 particles by acoustic emission and to link the particle characteristics to the open porosity obtained after the compact sintering. The signals acquired during tensile strength tests on individual granules and compacts show that the acoustic emission allows the detection of the mechanism of fragmentation and enables identification of a characteristic waveform of this fragmentation. The influences of compaction stress, of the initial particle size distribution and of the internal cohesion of the granules, on the mechanical strength of the compact and on the microstructure and open porosity of the sintered pellets, are analyzed. By its ability to identify the range of fragmentation of the granules during compaction, acoustic emission appears as a promising technique for monitoring the compaction of brittle particles in the manufacture of a controlled porosity fuel. (author)

  16. How plasticizer makes a ductile polymer glass brittle?

    Zhao, Yue; Li, Xiaoxiao; Wang, Shi-Qing

    During uniaxial extension, a polymer glass of high molecular weight is ductile at high temperatures (still below Tg) and turns brittle when the temperature is sufficiently lowered. Incorporation of small-molecular additives to polymer glasses can speed up segmental relaxation considerably. The effect of such plasticization should be to make the polymers more ductile. We examined the effect of blending a few weight percent of either triphenyl phosphate (TPP) or a mineral oil to a commercial-grade PS and PMMA. Our Instron tests show that the plasticized PS is less ductile. Specifically, at 70 oC, the original PS is ductile at an extensional rate of 0.02 s-1 whereas the PS with 4 wt. % TPP turns brittle. Mechanical spectroscopic measurements show that the alpha relaxation time is shortened by more than two orders of magnitude with 4 wt. % TPP. On the other hand, such anomalous behavior did not occur in PMMA. We need to go beyond the conventional description to rationalize these results This work is supported, in part, by a NSF Grant (DMR-EAGER-1444859).

  17. The initiation of brittle faults in crystalline rock

    Crider, Juliet G.

    2015-08-01

    Faults in the upper crust initiate from pre-existing (inherited) or precursory (early-formed) structures and typically grow by the mechanical interaction and linkage of these structures. In crystalline rock, rock architecture, composition, cooling, and exhumation influence the initiation of faults, with contrasting styles observed in plutonic rocks, extrusive igneous rocks, and foliated metamorphic rocks. Brittle fault growth in granitic rock is commonly controlled by the architecture of inherited joints or preexisting dikes. In basalt, abundant joints control the surface expression of faulting, and enhanced compliance due to abundant joints leads to folding and deformation asymmetry in the fault zone. Highly reactive mafic minerals likely become rapidly evolving fault rocks. In foliated metamorphic rocks, fault initiation style is strongly influenced by strength anisotropy relative to the principal stress directions, with fracturing favored when the foliation is aligned with the directions of principal stress. The continuity of micas within the foliation also influences the micromechanics of fault initiation. Brittle kink bands are an example of a strain-hardening precursory structure unique to foliated rock. Each of these fault initiation processes produces different initial fault geometry and spatial heterogeneity that influence such properties as fault permeability and seismogenesis.

  18. Large strain bulk deformation and brittle tough transitions in polyethylenes

    Hillmansen, S

    2001-01-01

    Some tough, crystalline polymers can fail by fast brittle fracture. This thesis explores the role of ductile 'shear lips', which form at the fracture surface verges, in brittle-tough transitions. A new laboratory method was used to isolate this region, and to test its ability to draw rapidly, in polyethylenes. The test uses a conventional Charpy type specimen that is deeply notched and impact loaded in three-point bending by a single striker. The ligament, rapidly loaded in almost pure tension, first yields, and then necks down until failure. Initial results are encouraging and correlate well with the in-service performance. A fundamental study of large strain deformation, that avoids the complexity associated with impact tests, was then conducted with the aim of isolating the dominating influences that furnish a polymer with the ability to sustain rapid large strain deformation. True stress vs. true strain curves have been interpreted using the one dimensional spring dashpot model of Haward and Thackray (H-T...

  19. The Potential of Brittle Star Extracted Polysaccharide in Promoting Apoptosis via Intrinsic Signaling Pathway

    Baharara, Javad; Amini, Elaheh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Anti-cancer potential of marine natural products such as polysaccharides represented therapeutic potential in oncological researches. In this study, total polysaccharide from brittle star [Ophiocoma erinaceus (O. erinaceus)] was extracted and chemopreventive efficacy of Persian Gulf brittle star polysaccharide was investigated in HeLa human cervical cancer cells. Methods: To extract polysaccharide, dried brittle stars were ground and extracted mechanically. Then, detection of poly...

  20. Determination of the Influence of c-BN+h-BN Coating Structure on Brittleness

    Maciej Kupczyk; Adam Lejwoda; Przemyslaw Cieszkowski; Przemyslaw Libuda

    2004-01-01

    In the article is presented the brittleness study of boron nitride coatings deposited on cutting edges made of cemented carbides by the pulse-plasma method (PPD). Influences of the structure (density, pores, microcracks) of coating material on the brittleness and on selected technological parameters of boron nitride formation by PPD method particularly taking into account discharge voltage on brittleness are shown. Differences between values of both a1(300) and a1(500)coefficients characterized susceptibility to coatings cracking of investigated coating manufactured using different values of discharge voltage were defined. Results of an investigations have been confirmed usefulness of Palmqvist's method for measurement of coating susceptibility to brittle cracking.

  1. Determination of the Influence of c-BN+h-BN Coating Structure on Brittleness

    MaciejKupczyk; AdamLejwoda; PrzemyslawCieszkowski; PrzemyslawLibuda

    2004-01-01

    In the article is presented the brittleness study of boron nitride coatings deposited on cutting edges made of cemented carbides by the pulse-plasma method (PPD). Influences of the structure (density, pores, microcracks) of coating material on the brittleness and on selected technological parameters of boron nitride formation by PPD method particularly taking into account discharge voltage on brittleness are shown. Differences between values of both a1(300) and a1(500)coefficients characterized susceptibility to coatings cracking of investigated coating manufactured using different values of discharge voltage were defined. Results of an investigations have been confirmed usefulness of Palmqyist's method for measurement of coating susceptibility to brittle cracking.

  2. Fracture statistics of brittle materials with intergranular cracks

    When brittle materials are used for structural purposes, the initial design must take their relatively large dispersion in fracture stress properly into account. This is difficult when failure probabilities must be extremely low, because empirically based statistical theories of fracture, such as that of Weibull, cannot reliably predict the stresses corresponding to failure probabilities much lower than n-1, where n is the number of specimens tested. Recently McClintock proposed a rational method of predicting the size distribution of intergranular cracks. The method assumed that large cracks are random aggregations of cracked grain boundaries. The present paper employs this method to find the size distribution of penny-shaped cracks, and also P(f), the probability of failure of a specimen of volume V subjected to a tensile stress sigma. The present paper is a pioneering effort, which should be applicable to ceramics and related materials

  3. Meso-scopic deformation in brittle granular materials

    Compaction is the process of removing void-space from a porous material. In brittle particulate systems, the majority of densification is caused by particle fracture. This preliminary study aimed to investigate the differences in fracture behaviour between quasi-statically and shock loaded glass-microsphere beds. Macro-scale quasi-static (20 μm s−1) and dynamic compaction curves were measured that show subtle qualitative differences in stress-density space. Samples were recovered from a quasi-static and dynamic experiment at a similar order of stress. Differences in fracture behaviour were observed that may explain the differences in crush curves. Results suggest that the primary total-fracture process occurs relatively instantaneously at low stresses in the quasi-static regime. The sphere fracture process is slow relative to the stress-wave therefore causing a different fracture pattern in the shock regime.

  4. Modeling Strain Rate Effect for Heterogeneous Brittle Materials

    MA Guowei; DONG Aiai; LI Jianchun

    2006-01-01

    Rocks are heterogeneous from the point of microstructure which is of significance to their dynamic failure behavior.Both the compressive and tensile strength of rock-like materials is regarded different from the static strength.The present study adopts smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) which is a virtual particle based meshfree method to investigate strain rate effect for heterogeneous brittle materials.The SPH method is capable of simulating rock fracture,free of the mesh constraint of the traditional FEM and FDM models.A pressure dependent J-H constitutive model involving heterogeneity is employed in the numerical modeling.The results show the compressive strength increases with the increase of strain rate as well as the tensile strength,which is important to the engineering design.

  5. Quantitative comparisons of numerical models of brittle wedge dynamics

    Buiter, Susanne

    2010-05-01

    Numerical and laboratory models are often used to investigate the evolution of deformation processes at various scales in crust and lithosphere. In both approaches, the freedom in choice of simulation method, materials and their properties, and deformation laws could affect model outcomes. To assess the role of modelling method and to quantify the variability among models, we have performed a comparison of laboratory and numerical experiments. Here, we present results of 11 numerical codes, which use finite element, finite difference and distinct element techniques. We present three experiments that describe shortening of a sand-like, brittle wedge. The material properties of the numerical ‘sand', the model set-up and the boundary conditions are strictly prescribed and follow the analogue setup as closely as possible. Our first experiment translates a non-accreting wedge with a stable surface slope of 20 degrees. In agreement with critical wedge theory, all models maintain the same surface slope and do not deform. This experiment serves as a reference that allows for testing against analytical solutions for taper angle, root-mean-square velocity and gravitational rate of work. The next two experiments investigate an unstable wedge in a sandbox-like setup, which deforms by inward translation of a mobile wall. The models accommodate shortening by formation of forward and backward shear zones. We compare surface slope, rate of dissipation of energy, root-mean-square velocity, and the location, dip angle and spacing of shear zones. We show that we successfully simulate sandbox-style brittle behaviour using different numerical modelling techniques and that we obtain the same styles of deformation behaviour in numerical and laboratory experiments at similar levels of variability. The GeoMod2008 Numerical Team: Markus Albertz, Michelle Cooke, Tony Crook, David Egholm, Susan Ellis, Taras Gerya, Luke Hodkinson, Boris Kaus, Walter Landry, Bertrand Maillot, Yury Mishin

  6. Tecnique for probabilistic calculation of brittle fracture of power plant pressure vessels

    Technique for probabilistic calculation of brittle fracture of power plant pressure vessels is presented. Effect of static spread in data on mechanical material properties, defect sizes and errors of nondestructive test means on the accuracy of brittle fracture time prediction is taken account of. Example of probabilistic calculation of nuclear reactor vessel fracture during its operation is given

  7. Microstructural features of intergranular brittle fracture and cold cracking in high strength aluminum alloys

    Lalpoor, M.; Eskin, D. G.; ten Brink, Gert; Katgerman, L.

    2010-01-01

    Intergranular brittle fracture has been mainly observed and reported in steel alloys and precipitation hardened At-alloys where intergranular precipitates cover a major fraction of the grain boundary area. 7xxx series aluminum alloys suffer from this problem in the as-cast condition when brittle int

  8. A combined analytical-experimental tensile test technique for brittle materials

    Chu, M. L.; Scavuzzo, R. J.; Srivatsan, T. S.

    1992-01-01

    A semiconventional tensile test technique is developed for impact ices and other brittle materials. Accurate results have been obtained on ultimate strength and modulus of elasticity in a refrigerated ice test. It is noted that the technique can be used to determine the physical properties of impact ices accreted inside icing wind tunnels or other brittle materials.

  9. Onset of ductility and brittleness in silicon nanowires mediated by dislocation nucleation

    Most studies show that materials at the nano-scale have different mechanical properties than in the bulk state. Semiconductors like silicon and germanium are brittle in the bulk state, but when their size is reduced to the nano-scale they appear to be ductile. Under tensile loading, we performed molecular dynamics simulations on silicon crystalline nanowires of different lengths. We present the details of the obtained mechanisms that led to ductility and brittleness. In the case of ductility, dislocation nucleation was observed with a signature of surface step formation on the surface and in the case of brittleness a cavity was formed after the distinct formation of a wedge-like shape on the surface. Interestingly, a common mechanism taking place behind ductility and brittleness is dislocation nucleation. We believe that the observed mechanisms reveal interesting information for understanding and explaining the size dependent brittle to ductile transition. (paper)

  10. SAFOD Brittle Microstructure and Mechanics Knowledge Base (BM2KB)

    Babaie, Hassan A.; Broda Cindi, M.; Hadizadeh, Jafar; Kumar, Anuj

    2013-07-01

    Scientific drilling near Parkfield, California has established the San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD), which provides the solid earth community with short range geophysical and fault zone material data. The BM2KB ontology was developed in order to formalize the knowledge about brittle microstructures in the fault rocks sampled from the SAFOD cores. A knowledge base, instantiated from this domain ontology, stores and presents the observed microstructural and analytical data with respect to implications for brittle deformation and mechanics of faulting. These data can be searched on the knowledge base‧s Web interface by selecting a set of terms (classes, properties) from different drop-down lists that are dynamically populated from the ontology. In addition to this general search, a query can also be conducted to view data contributed by a specific investigator. A search by sample is done using the EarthScope SAFOD Core Viewer that allows a user to locate samples on high resolution images of core sections belonging to different runs and holes. The class hierarchy of the BM2KB ontology was initially designed using the Unified Modeling Language (UML), which was used as a visual guide to develop the ontology in OWL applying the Protégé ontology editor. Various Semantic Web technologies such as the RDF, RDFS, and OWL ontology languages, SPARQL query language, and Pellet reasoning engine, were used to develop the ontology. An interactive Web application interface was developed through Jena, a java based framework, with AJAX technology, jsp pages, and java servlets, and deployed via an Apache tomcat server. The interface allows the registered user to submit data related to their research on a sample of the SAFOD core. The submitted data, after initial review by the knowledge base administrator, are added to the extensible knowledge base and become available in subsequent queries to all types of users. The interface facilitates inference capabilities in the

  11. Semi-brittle flow of granitoid fault rocks in experiments

    Pec, Matej; Stünitz, Holger; Heilbronner, Renée.; Drury, Martyn

    2016-03-01

    Field studies and seismic data show that semi-brittle flow of fault rocks probably is the dominant deformation mechanism at the base of the seismogenic zone at the so-called frictional-viscous transition. To understand the physical and chemical processes accommodating semi-brittle flow, we have performed an experimental study on synthetic granitoid fault rocks exploring a broad parameter space (temperature, T = 300, 400, 500, and 600°C, confining pressure, Pc ≈ 300, 500, 1000, and 1500 MPa, shear strain rate, γṡ ≈ 10-3, 10-4, 10-5, and 10-6 s-1, to finite shear strains, γ = 0-5). The experiments have been carried out using a granular material with grain size smaller than 200 µm with a little H2O added (0.2 wt %). Only two experiments (performed at the fastest strain rates and lowest temperatures) have failed abruptly right after reaching peak strength (τ ~ 1400 MPa). All other samples reach high shear stresses (τ ~ 570-1600 MPa) then weaken slightly (by Δτ ~ 10-190 MPa) and continue to deform at a more or less steady state stress level. Clear temperature dependence and a weak strain rate dependence of the peak as well as steady state stress levels are observed. In order to express this relationship, the strain rate-stress sensitivity has been fit with a stress exponent, assuming γ˙ ∝ τn and yields high stress exponents (n ≈ 10-140), which decrease with increasing temperature. The microstructures show widespread comminution, strain partitioning, and localization into slip zones. The slip zones contain at first nanocrystalline and partly amorphous material. Later, during continued deformation, fully amorphous material develops in some of the slip zones. Despite the mechanical steady state conditions, the fabrics in the slip zones and outside continue to evolve and do not reach a steady state microstructure below γ = 5. Within the slip zones, the fault rock material progressively transforms from a crystalline solid to an amorphous material. We

  12. Brittle-tough transitions during crack growth in toughened adhesives

    Thoules, Michael

    2008-03-01

    The use of structural adhesives in automotive applications relies on an effective understanding of their performance under crash conditions. In particular, there is considerable potential for mechanics-based modeling of the interaction between an adhesive layer and the adherends, to replace current empirical approaches to design. Since energy dissipation during a crash, mediated by plastic deformation of the structure, is a primary consideration for automotive applications, traditional approaches of fracture mechanics are not appropriate. Cohesive-zone models that use two fracture parameters - cohesive strength and toughness - have been shown to provide a method for quantitative mechanics analysis. Combined numerical and experimental techniques have been developed to deduce the toughness and strength parameters of adhesive layers, allowing qualitative modeling of the performance of adhesive joints. These techniques have been used to study the failure of joints, formed from a toughened adhesive and sheet metal, over a wide range of loading rates. Two fracture modes are observed: quasi-static crack growth and dynamic crack growth. The quasi-static crack growth is associated with a toughened mode of failure; the dynamic crack growth is associated with a more brittle mode of failure. The results of the experiments and analyses indicate that the fracture parameters for quasi-static crack growth in this toughened system are essentially rate independent, and that quasi-static crack growth can occur even at the highest crack velocities. Effects of rate appear to be limited to the ease with which a transition to dynamic fracture could be triggered. This transition appears to be stochastic in nature, and it does not appear to be associated with the attainment of any critical value for crack velocity or loading rate. Fracture-mechanics models exist in the literature for brittle-ductile transitions in rate-dependent polymers, which rely on rate dependent values of toughness

  13. Ductile streaks in precision grinding of hard and brittle materials

    V C Venkatesh; S Izman; S Sharif; T T Mon; M Konneh

    2003-10-01

    Ductile streaks produced during diamond grinding of hard and brittle materials have aided the subsequent process of polishing. Two novel techniques were used to study the formation of ductile mode streaks during diamond grinding (primary process) of germanium, silicon, and glass. In the first technique, aspheric surfaces were generated on Ge and Si at conventional speeds (5000 rpm). In the second technique, diamond grinding of plano surfaces on glass and Si surfaces using high speed (100,000 rpm) was carried out. Form accuracy, surface finish and ductile mode grinding streaks are discussed in this paper. It was found that resinoid diamond wheels gave more ductile streaks than metal-bonded wheels but better form accuracy was obtained with the latter. Ductile streaks were obtained more easily with pyrex rather than with BK 7 glass thus necessitating very little time for polishing. Ductile streaks appeared in abundance on germanium rather than silicon. Both the novel grinding techniques were used on CNC machining centres.

  14. Scratch resistance of brittle thin films on compliant substrates

    There has been intensive interest in studying the behavior of hard and brittle thin films on compliant substrates under scratch action. The examples include sol-gel protective coatings on plastic optical lenses, safe windows, and flexible electronic devices and displays. Hard ceramic coatings have been widely used to prolong the life of cutting tools and biomedical implants. In this work, the scratch resistance of sol-gel coatings with different amount of colloidal silica on polycarbonate substrates was tested by the pencil scratch test following the ISO 15184 standard. The scratch failure was found to be tensile trailing cracking in the coating and substrate gouging. The indentation hardness, elasticity modulus and fracture toughness of the coatings were determined and correlated to the observed pencil scratch hardness. Based on the analysis, the main factors to improve the scratch resistance are the elasticity modulus, thickness and fracture toughness of the coatings. General consideration for the improvement of scratch resistance of hard coatings on compliant substrates was also discussed

  15. Brittle thermoelectric semiconductors extrusion under high hydrostatic pressure

    Origins of strength increase of brittle materials like thermoelectric (TE) semiconductors during plastic deformation under high external pressure are analyzed. TE material stressed state in the process of extrusion is reviewed. Plastic deformation of monocrystalline TE material billet produced by extrusion under sufficiently high external hydrostatic pressure is more uniform than under ordinary ambient pressure and can lead to crack free extruded TE material structure, crystallographic symmetry of which coincides with original billet one. Experimental device realized the scheme of extrusion under high hydrostatic pressure is described. Here extrusion are carrying out in compressed liquid medium. The developed device ensures the value of hydrostatic pressure up to 2 GPa and extrusion temperature interval 300--600 K. Properties of extruded Bi-Sb and Bi-Sb-Te single crystals are also reviewed. Possible application of presented method of extrusion under high hydrostatic pressure to form TE branches with highly accurate cross section for miniature TE coolers or generators is discussed. copyright 1995 American Institute of Physics

  16. BRITTLE BONES, UNBREAKABLE SPIRIT: OSTEOGENESIS IMPERFECTA: A CASE REPORT

    Subhra Mandal

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI, Fragilitis Ossium or Brittle bone disease is a group of rare inherited disorders with a broad spectrum of clinical and genetic variability. It is characterized by fragile bones that are prone to fracture often from mild trauma or with no apparent cause. People with OI are born with defective connective tissue or without the ability to make it, usually because of a deficiency of Type1 collagen. Incidence of OI is estimated to be one per twenty thousand live births. Eight types of OI can be distinguished. Most cases are caused by mutations in the COL1A1 and COL1A2 genes. We have reported a special case of OI, probably belonging to Type III group. The subject visited the PMR (Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation OPD of Bankura Sammilani medical college (BSMC, Bankura ,West Bengal, India.. The details of etiology, diagnosis, genetic causes and treatment will be discussed in the study. Diagnosis of OI is based on clinical features and may be confirmed by collagen or DNA testing. There is no cure for OI. Our management is aimed at increasing over all bone strength to prevent fracture and maintain mobility. Nevertheless, life style modifications by adaptive equipments, oral drugs (Bisphosphonates and Intramedullary rod insertions, provide a significant degree of autonomy to OI patients.

  17. Micromechanics of brittle faulting and cataclastic flow in Berea sandstone

    Menéndez, Beatriz; Zhu, Wenlu; Wong, Teng-Fong

    1996-01-01

    The micromechanics of failure in Berea sandstone were investigated by characterizing quantitatively the evolution of damage under the optical and scanning electron microscopes. Three series of triaxial compression experiments were conducted at the fixed pore pressure of 10 MPa and confining pressures of 20, 50 and 260 MPa, respectively, corresponding to three different failure modes: shear localization with positive dilatancy, shear localization with relatively little dilatancy and distributed cataclastic flow. To distinguish the effect of non-hydrostatic stress from that of hydrostatic pressure, a fourth suite of hydrostatically loaded samples was also studied. Using stereological procedures, we characterized quantitatively the following damage parameters: microcrack density and its anisotropy, pore-size distribution, comminuted volume fraction and mineral damage index. In the brittle regime, shear localization did not develop until the post-failure stage, after the peak stress had been attained. The microcrack density data show that very little intragranular cracking occurred before the peak stress was attained. We infer that dilatancy and acoustic emission activity in the prefailure stage are primarily due to intergranular cracking, probably related to the shear rupture of lithified and cemented grain contacts. Near the peak stress, intragranular cracking initiates from grain contacts and this type of Hertzian fracture first develops in isolated clusters, and their subsequent coalescence results in shear localization in the post-failure stage. The very high density of intragranular microcracking and pronounced stress-induced anisotropy in the post-failure samples are the consequence of shear localization and compactive processes operative inside the shear band. In contrast, Hertzian fracture was a primary cause for shear-enhanced compaction and strain hardening throughout the cataclastic flow regime. Grain crushing and pore collapse seem to be most intense in

  18. Brittle versus ductile behaviour of nanotwinned copper: A molecular dynamics study

    Nanotwinned copper (Cu) exhibits an unusual combination of ultra-high yield strength and high ductility. A brittle-to-ductile transition was previously experimentally observed in nanotwinned Cu despite Cu being an intrinsically ductile metal. However, the atomic mechanisms responsible for brittle fracture and ductile fracture in nanotwinned Cu are still not clear. In this study, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations at different temperatures have been performed to investigate the fracture behaviour of a nanotwinned Cu specimen with a single-edge-notched crack whose surface coincides with a twin boundary. Three temperature ranges are identified, indicative of distinct fracture regimes, under tensile straining perpendicular to the twin boundary. Below 1.1 K, the crack propagates in a brittle fashion. Between 2 K and 30 K a dynamic brittle-to-ductile transition is observed. Above 40 K the crack propagates in a ductile mode. A detailed analysis has been carried out to understand the atomic fracture mechanism in each fracture regime

  19. Hydraulic fracture and toughening of a brittle layer bonded to a hydrogel

    Lucantonio, Alessandro; Noselli, Giovanni; Trepat, Xavier; Desimone, Antonio; Arroyo, Marino

    Brittle materials fracture under tensile or shear stress. When stress attains a critical threshold, crack propagation becomes unstable and proceeds dynamically. In the presence of several precracks, a brittle material always propagates only the weakest crack, leading to catastrophic failure. Here, we show that all these features of brittle fracture are radically modified when the material susceptible to cracking is bonded to a poroelastic medium, such as a hydrogel, a common situation in biological tissues. In particular, we show that the brittle material can fracture in compression and can resist cracking in tension, thanks to the hydraulic coupling with the hydrogel. In the case of multiple cracks, we find that localized fracture occurs when the permeability of the hydrogel is high, whereas decreased permeability leads to toughening by promoting multiple cracking. Our results may contribute to the understanding of fracture in biological tissues and provide inspiration for the design of tough, biomimetic materials.

  20. Methodology of thermal hydraulic analysis for substantiation of reactor vessel brittle fracture resistance

    Methodology of thermal hydraulic analysis for substantiation of reactor vessel brittle fracture resistance is presented in this article. This procedure was used during PTS study for SUNPP Unit 1 and represents generally accepted international approach.

  1. Preventing and Treating Brittle Bones and Osteoporosis | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    ... Javascript on. Feature: Osteoporosis Preventing and Treating Brittle Bones and Osteoporosis Past Issues / Winter 2011 Table of ... at high risk due to low bone mass. Bone and Bone Loss Bone is living, growing tissue. ...

  2. Polymer Reinforced, Non-Brittle, Light-Weight Cryogenic Insulation for Reduced Life Cycle Costs Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — InnoSense LLC (ISL) proposes to fabricate a composite aerogel foam. This material is designed to be impact resistant, non-brittle, non-water-retaining and...

  3. Experimental study on the physical and chemical properties of the deep hard brittle shale

    Jian Xiong; Xiangjun Liu; Lixi Liang; Yi Ding; Meng Lei

    2016-01-01

    In the hard brittle shale formation, rock composition, physical and chemical properties, mechanics property before and after interacting with fluid have direct relation with borehole problems, such as borehole wall collapse, mud loss, hole shrinkage. To achieve hard brittle shale micro-structure, physical–chemical properties and mechanics property, energy-dispersive X-ray diffraction (XRD), cation exchange capacity experiment and hardness test are conducted. The result of laboratory experimen...

  4. Evaluation of the Interfacial Adhesion between Brittle Coating and Ductile Substrate by Cross-Sectional Indention

    SUJian-yu; ZHANGKun; CHENGuang-nan

    2004-01-01

    The cross-sectional indentation method is extended to evaluate the interracial adhesion between brittle coating and ductile substrate. The experimental results on electroplated chromium coating/steel substrate show that the interracial separation occurs due to the edge chipping of brittle coating. The comesponding models are established to elucidate interracial separation processes. This work further highlights the advantages and potential of this novel indentation method.

  5. Evaluation of the Interfacial Adhesion between Brittle Coating and Ductile Substrate by Cross-Secitional Indention

    SU Jian-yu; ZHANG Kun; CHEN Guang-nan

    2004-01-01

    The cross-sectional indentation method is extended to evaluate the interfacial adhesion between brittle coating and ductile substrate. The experimental results on electroplated chromium coating/steel substrate show that the interfacial separation occurs due to the edge chipping of brittle coating. The corresponding models are established to elucidate interfacial separation processes. This work further highlights the advantages and potential of this novel indentation method.

  6. Nonadiabatic Study of Dynamic Electronic Effects during Brittle Fracture of Silicon

    Theofanis, Patrick L.; Jaramillo-Botero, Andres; Goddard, William A.; Xiao, Hai

    2012-01-01

    It has long been observed that brittle fracture of materials can lead to emission of high energy electrons and UV photons, but an atomistic description of the origin of such processes has lacked. We report here on simulations using a first-principles-based electron force field methodology with effective core potentials to describe the nonadiabatic quantum dynamics during brittle fracture in silicon crystal. Our simulations replicate the correct response of the crack tip velocity to the thresh...

  7. Development of a brittle fracture acceptance criterion for the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)

    An effort has been undertaken to develop a brittle fracture acceptance criterion for structural components of nuclear material transportation casks. The need for such a criterion was twofold. First, new generation cask designs have proposed the use of ferritic steels and other materials to replace the austenitic stainless steel commonly used for structural components in transport casks. Unlike austenitic stainless steel which fails in a high-energy absorbing, ductile tearing mode, it is possible for these candidate materials to fail via brittle fracture when subjected to certain combinations of elevated loading rates and low temperatures. Second, there is no established brittle fracture criterion accepted by the regulatory community that covers a broad range of structural materials. Although the existing IAEA Safety Series number-sign 37 addressed brittle fracture, its the guidance was dated and pertained only to ferritic steels. Consultant's Services Meetings held under the auspices of the IAEA have resulted in a recommended brittle fracture criterion. The brittle fracture criterion is based on linear elastic fracture mechanics, and is the result of a consensus of experts from six participating IAEA-member countries. The brittle fracture criterion allows three approaches to determine the fracture toughness of the structural material. The three approaches present the opportunity to balance material testing requirements and the conservatism of the material's fracture toughness which must be used to demonstrate resistance to brittle fracture. This work has resulted in a revised Appendix IX to Safety Series number-sign 37 which will be released as an IAEA Technical Document within the coming year

  8. Hemolytic and cytotoxic effects of saponin like compounds isolated from Persian Gulf brittle star (Ophiocoma erinaceus)

    Elaheh Amini; Mohammad Nabiuni; Javad Baharara; Kazem Parivar; Javad Asili

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To isolate and characterize the saponin from Persian Gulf brittle star (Ophiocoma erinaceus) and to evaluate its hemolytic and cytotoxic potential. Methods: In an attempt to prepare saponin from brittle star, collected samples were minced and extracted with ethanol, dichloromethane, n-buthanol. Then, concentrated n-butanol extract were loaded on HP-20 resin and washed with dionized water, 80% ethanol and 100% ethanol respectively. Subsequently, detection of saponin w...

  9. Brittle fracture resistance of anti-corrosive cladding on pressure vessel

    This paper reports the estimation of brittle fracture resistance of austenitic-ferritic anticorrosive cladding metal, produced by submerged arc welding with the use of strip electrodes. The dependence of impact toughness and temperature both in as produced condition and after the exposure to a neutron fluence together with the temperature dependence of cladding metal static crack resistance were determined. The transition from ductile to brittle condition for cladding metal was found to be typical for a ferritic-perlitic steel

  10. Brittle cornea syndrome: a case report and comparison with Ehlers Danlos syndrome.

    Ramappa, Muralidhar; Wilson, M Edward; Rogers, R Curtis; Trivedi, Rupal H

    2014-10-01

    We report a 6-week-old white boy of nonconsanguineous parents who presented with bluish scleral discoloration, thin corneas, and progressive high myopia. A diagnosis of brittle cornea syndrome was confirmed by molecular analysis and prompt measures were taken to manage the condition. Long-term follow-up of children diagnosed with brittle cornea syndrome is important to minimize the risks of corneal rupture and for detecting late-onset systemic conditions. PMID:25266838

  11. A new approach to rock brittleness and its usability at prediction of drillability

    Özfırat, M. Kemal; Yenice, Hayati; Şimşir, Ferhan; Yaralı, Olgay

    2016-07-01

    Rock brittleness is one of the most important issues in rock drilling and cutting. The relations between drillability and brittleness will assist engineers in excavation works. The demand for representative rock parameters related to planning of underground excavations is increasing, as these parameters constitute fundamental input for obtaining the most reliable cost and time estimates. In rock cutting mechanics, the effects of the rock and brittleness on the efficiency of drilling and excavation are examined by many researchers. In this study, 41 different rock types were tested in laboratory to investigate the relations between the drilling rate index and different brittleness values. Firstly, the relations defined in literature are tested. Strength tests are made according to International Society for Rock Mechanics standards. In addition Norwegian University of Science and Technology standards are used to determine drilling rate index. Then, a new brittleness index is proposed which is the arithmetic average of uniaxial compressive strength and tensile strength. Considering the regression analysis carried out, it was seen that the proposed formula showed good correlation for these samples handled in this study. As a result of this study, a high correlation is obtained between the proposed index and drilling rate index values (R:0.84). The results are found to be at least reliable as well as other brittleness equations given in literature.

  12. Quantitative comparisons of analogue models of brittle wedge dynamics

    Schreurs, Guido

    2010-05-01

    Analogue model experiments are widely used to gain insights into the evolution of geological structures. In this study, we present a direct comparison of experimental results of 14 analogue modelling laboratories using prescribed set-ups. A quantitative analysis of the results will document the variability among models and will allow an appraisal of reproducibility and limits of interpretation. This has direct implications for comparisons between structures in analogue models and natural field examples. All laboratories used the same frictional analogue materials (quartz and corundum sand) and prescribed model-building techniques (sieving and levelling). Although each laboratory used its own experimental apparatus, the same type of self-adhesive foil was used to cover the base and all the walls of the experimental apparatus in order to guarantee identical boundary conditions (i.e. identical shear stresses at the base and walls). Three experimental set-ups using only brittle frictional materials were examined. In each of the three set-ups the model was shortened by a vertical wall, which moved with respect to the fixed base and the three remaining sidewalls. The minimum width of the model (dimension parallel to mobile wall) was also prescribed. In the first experimental set-up, a quartz sand wedge with a surface slope of ˜20° was pushed by a mobile wall. All models conformed to the critical taper theory, maintained a stable surface slope and did not show internal deformation. In the next two experimental set-ups, a horizontal sand pack consisting of alternating quartz sand and corundum sand layers was shortened from one side by the mobile wall. In one of the set-ups a thin rigid sheet covered part of the model base and was attached to the mobile wall (i.e. a basal velocity discontinuity distant from the mobile wall). In the other set-up a basal rigid sheet was absent and the basal velocity discontinuity was located at the mobile wall. In both types of experiments

  13. New approaches for evaluation of brittle strength of reactor pressure vessels

    Based on the Master curve conception, condition of brittle strength is formulated for heterogeneous distribution of stress intensity factor along crack front and non-monotonic, non-isothermic loading. This formulation includes the elaborated procedure for taking into account the effects of shallow cracks and biaxial loading on fracture toughness. It is concluded as follows: (1) A condition of brittle strength is formulated for reactor pressure vessel with crack-like flaw in probabilistic statement. As the condition of brittle strength it is taken condition Pf f(bar) where Pf is fracture probability, and Pf(bar) is a given level of fracture probability. Formulation of this condition is based on the weakest link model and takes into account a variation of the stress intensity factor KI and KIC along the crack front. (2) Dependencies are proposed which allow to take into account the shallow crack effect and the biaxial loading effect on fracture toughness of reactor pressure vessel steels. (3) Using approaches presented in the present paper allows one to decrease conservatism and to increase adequacy of evaluations of brittle strength of reactor pressure vessels. Now these approaches have been included in Russian Standard on evaluation of brittle fracture of RPV of WWER type

  14. Ultraprecision machining of micro-structured functional surfaces on brittle materials

    Ultraprecision micro-structured functional surfaces on hard and brittle materials, e.g. ceramic and glass, are gaining increasing application in a range of areas such as engineering optics and semiconductor and biomedical products. However, due to their tendency of being damaged in brittle fracture in machining, it is challenging to achieve both a high surface finish and complex surface shapes. In this paper, ultraprecision machining of micro-structured functional surfaces on brittle materials by fast tool servo diamond turning is studied. A machining model has been developed to ensure ductile regime machining of the brittle material, in which the material is removed by both plastic deformation and brittle fracture, but the cracks produced are prevented from being extended into the finished surface. Based on the model, an iterative numerical method has been proposed to predict the maximum feed rate for producing crack-free micro-structured surfaces. Machining experiments on typical micro-structured functional surfaces have been carried out to validate the effectiveness of the proposed method for producing ultraprecision micro-structured functional surfaces

  15. Brittle fracture of T91 steel in liquid lead–bismuth eutectic alloy

    Ye, Changqing, E-mail: Changqing.ye@ed.univ-lille1.fr; Vogt, Jean-Bernard, E-mail: jean-bernard.vogt@univ-lille1.fr; Proriol-Serre, Ingrid, E-mail: ingrid.proriol-serre@univ-lille1.fr

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • Tempering temperature is important for LBE embrittlement occurrence. • Brittle behaviour in LBE evidenced by small punch test and fatigue test. • Brittle behaviour in low oxygen LBE observed for low loading rate. - Abstract: The mechanical behaviour of the T91 martensitic steel has been studied in liquid lead–bismuth eutectic (LBE) and in inert atmosphere. Several conditions were considered to point out the most sensitive embrittling factors. Smooth and notched specimens were employed for respectively monotonic and cyclic loadings. The present investigation showed that T91 appeared in general as a ductile material, and became brittle in the considered conditions only if at least tests were performed in LBE. It turns out that the loading rate appeared as a critical parameter for the occurrence of liquid metal embrittlement of T91 in LBE. For the standard heat treatment condition, loading monotonically the T91 very slowly instead of rapidly in LBE resulted in brittle fracture. Also, under cyclic loading, the crack propagated in a brittle manner in LBE.

  16. Brittle Rock Modeling Approach and its Validation Using Excavation-Induced Micro-Seismicity

    Ma, Chun-Chi; Li, Tian-Bin; Xing, Hui-Lin; Zhang, Hang; Wang, Min-Jie; Liu, Tian-Yi; Chen, Guo-Qing; Chen, Zi-Quan

    2016-08-01

    With improvements to the bonded-particle model, a custom indicator of crack intensity is introduced to grade rock fractures accurately. Brittle fracturing of rock mass is studied using the bonded-particle model; here, "brittle" refers to the process where more energy is released towards making particles collide and disperse, and hence results in the quick emergence of "chain cracks". Certain principles concerning how to construct brittle rock are then proposed. Furthermore, a modeling approach for brittle rocks based on the adaptive continuum/discontinuum (AC/DC) method is proposed to aid the construction of large-scale models of tunnel excavations. To connect with actual tunneling conditions, fundamental mechanical properties, the mechanism for brittle fracturing, the joint distribution, and the initial stress field are considered in the modeling approach. Results from micro-seismic monitoring of a tunnel excavation confirmed the suitability of this modeling approach to simulate crack behavior, and results show that simulated cracking exhibit similar trends (evolution, location, and intensity) with micro-seismic cracking.

  17. Some elementary mechanics of explosive and brittle failure modes in prestressed containments

    Fundamental concepts related to pneumatic pressurization and explosive behaviour of containment structures are reviewed. It is shown that explosive behaviour occurs whenever a pressure equal to the ultimate capacity of the structure is attained. The energy associated with hydraulic pressurization is bounded and shown to be orders of magnitude less than that associated with pneumatic pressurization. It is also shown that structural behaviour prior to attaining the ultimate load capacity is independent of the pressurized medium. The phenomenon of brittle fracture, as it relates to prestressed concrete containments, is explored. A theoretical technique of proportioning cross sections is developed to eliminate the possibility of catastrophic brittle tensile fractures. The possibility of brittle fractures being triggered by failure of some type of 'detail' is also examined. An attempt is made to identify the types of failures for which the state of the art may be inadequate to assess behaviour under overpressure conditions. (author)

  18. BRITTLE-DUCTILE TRANSITION OF PP/EPDM/ELASTOMERIC NANO-PARTICLE TERNARY BLENDS

    Yan Xiao; Wen Cao; Ke Wang; Hong Tan; Qin Zhang; Rong-ni Du; Qiang Fu

    2006-01-01

    The brittle-ductile transition is a very important phenomenon for polymer toughening. Polypropylene (PP) is often toughened by using rubbers, e.g., ethylene-propylene diene monomer (EPDM) has often been used as a modifier. In this article, the toughening of PP by using a new kind of rubber, known as elastomeric nano-particle (ENP), and the brittleductile transition of PP/EPDM/ENP was studied. Compared to PP/EPDM binary blends, the brittle-ductile transition of PP/EPDM/ENP ternary blends occurred at lower EPDM contents. SEM experiment was carried out to investigate the etched and impact-fractured surfaces. ENP alone had no effect on the impact strength of PP, however, with the same EPDM content,PP/EPDM/ENP ternary blends had smaller particle size, better dispersion and smaller interparticle distance in contrary to PP/EPDM binary blends, which promoted the brittle-ductile transition to occur earlier.

  19. Prediction of Brittle Failure for TBM Tunnels in Anisotropic Rock: A Case Study from Northern Norway

    Dammyr, Øyvind

    2016-06-01

    Prediction of spalling and rock burst is especially important for hard rock TBM tunneling, because failure can have larger impact than in a drill and blast tunnel and ultimately threaten excavation feasibility. The majority of research on brittle failure has focused on rock types with isotropic behavior. This paper gives a review of existing theory and its application before a 3.5-m-diameter TBM tunnel in foliated granitic gneiss is used as a case to study brittle failure characteristics of anisotropic rock. Important aspects that should be considered in order to predict brittle failure in anisotropic rock are highlighted. Foliation is responsible for considerable strength anisotropy and is believed to influence the preferred side of v-shaped notch development in the investigated tunnel. Prediction methods such as the semi- empirical criterion, the Hoek- Brown brittle parameters, and the non-linear damage initiation and spalling limit method give reliable results; but only as long as the angle between compression axis and foliation in uniaxial compressive tests is relevant, dependent on the relation between tunnel trend/plunge, strike/dip of foliation, and tunnel boundary stresses. It is further demonstrated that local in situ stress variations, for example, due to the presence of discontinuities, can have profound impact on failure predictions. Other carefully documented case studies into the brittle failure nature of rock, in particular anisotropic rock, are encouraged in order to expand the existing and relatively small database. This will be valuable for future TBM planning and construction stages in highly stressed brittle anisotropic rock.

  20. Estimating the mechanical properties of the brittle deformation zones at Olkiluoto

    In rock mechanics modelling to support repository design and safety assessment for the Olkiluoto site, it is necessary to obtain the relevant rock mechanics parameters, these being an essential pre-requisite for the modelling. The parameters include the rock stress state, the properties of the intact rock and the rock mass, and the properties of the brittle deformation zones which represent major discontinuities in the rock mass continuum. However, because of the size and irregularity of the brittle deformation zones, it is not easy to estimate their mechanical properties, i.e. their deformation and strength properties. Following Section 1 explaining the motivation for the work and the objective of the Report, in Sections 2 and 3, the types of fractures and brittle deformation zones that can be encountered are described with an indication of the mechanisms that lead to complex structures. The geology at Olkiluoto is then summarized in Section 4 within the context of this Report. The practical aspects of encountering the brittle deformation zones in outcrops, drillholes and excavations are described in Sections 5 and 6 with illustrative examples of drillhole core intersections in Section 7. The various theoretical, numerical and practical methods for estimating the mechanical properties of the brittle deformation zones are described in Section 8, together with a Table summarizing each method's advantages, disadvantages and utility in estimating the mechanical properties of the zones. We emphasise that the optimal approach to estimating the mechanical properties of the brittle deformation zones cannot be determined without a good knowledge, not only of each estimation method's capabilities and idiosyncrasies, but also of the structural geology background and the specific nature of the brittle deformation zones being characterized. Finally, in Section 9, a Table is presented outlining each method's applicability to the Olkiluoto site. A flowchart is included to

  1. Micromechanics-Based Permeability Evolution in Brittle Materials at High Strain Rates

    Perol, Thibaut; Bhat, Harsha S.

    2016-08-01

    We develop a micromechanics-based permeability evolution model for brittle materials at high strain rates (≥ 100 s^{-1}). Extending for undrained deformation the mechanical constitutive description of brittle solids, whose constitutive response is governed by micro-cracks, we now relate the damage-induced strains to micro-crack aperture. We then use an existing permeability model to evaluate the permeability evolution. This model predicts both the percolative and connected regime of permeability evolution of Westerly Granite during triaxial loading at high strain rate. This model can simulate pore pressure history during earthquake coseismic dynamic ruptures under undrained conditions.

  2. Friction effect in supports on resistance to brittle fracture under three-point bending

    Quasistatic bending of the beam of elastic material with fixed supports with an account of possible slip in the points of support and then with an account of friciton in the supports is investigated analytically. The method presented permits to improve precision of the determination of mechanical properties of the materials in brittle state (ceramics, cast iron, cast aluminium alloys) at the bending test

  3. Morphological, Biochemical and Genetic Analysis of a Brittle Stalk Mutant of Maize Inserted by Mutator

    FU Xue-qian; FENG Jing; YU Bin; GAO You-jun; ZHENG Yong-lian; YUE Bing

    2013-01-01

    Mutants on stalk strength are essential materials for the studies on the formation of plant cell wall. In this study, a brittle stalk mutant of maize, designated as Bk-x, was screened from a Mutator inserted mutant library. At the germination and early seedling stage, the mutant plants were indistinguishable from the normal ones. However, all of the plant organs were brittle after the 5th-leaf stage and remained brittle throughout the rest of the growing period. Microstructure observation showed that the cell wall in vascular bundle sheath of Bk-x was thinner than that in normal plants. The leaf mechanical strength in Bk-x was 77.9%of that in normal plants growing at Xishuangbanna (BN), Yunnan province and that was 61.7%in Wuhan (WH), Hubei Province, China. The proportion of cellulose was 12.3%in Bk-x, which was significantly lower than that in normal plants (26.7%), while the soluble sugar content was 36.1%in Bk-x, which is significantly higher than that in normal plants (12.4%). Genetic analysis using two F2 populations and one F2:3 families demonstrated that the trait of brittle stalk is controlled by a single recessive gene.

  4. Brittle fracture phase-field modeling of a short-rod specimen

    Escobar, Ivana [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Tupek, Michael R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bishop, Joseph E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Predictive simulation capabilities for modeling fracture evolution provide further insight into quantities of interest in comparison to experimental testing. Based on the variational approach to fracture, the advent of phase-field modeling achieves the goal to robustly model fracture for brittle materials and captures complex crack topologies in three dimensions.

  5. Rock Physics Model and Brittleness Index Calculation for Shale Gas Study in Jambi Basin, Indonesia

    Fatkhan, Fatkhan; Fauzi, Inusa P.; Sule, Rachmat; Usman, Alfian

    2014-05-01

    Research about shale gas is often conducted in oil and gas industries since the demand of energy supply has increased recently. Indonesia is newly interested on researching, exploring and even producing shale gas. To seek prospects of shale gas play in an area, one needs to look into some of characteristics. This paper describes about rock physics model that is used to investigate a prospect zone of shale gas play by looking into percentage of TOC and brittleness index. Method used to modeling rock physics are as follows, first Hashin-Shtrikman bound is employed to estimate percentage of minerals, then inclusions are modeled by Kuster-Toksoz method and finally kerogens are calculated by Ciz and Shapiro's model. In addition, we compared between inclusion saturated by kerogen and water and inclusion filled up by only kerogen. Modulus Young is used to estimate brittleness index. Then in order to map and delineate brittle area, simultaneous seismic inversion method using pre stack data is employed to generate volume of P-wave, S-wave and density. Finally, these volumes are used to calculate Modulus Young value. Since the area of study has a very thick shale then the area is divided into four zones based on modulus shear and bulk values. The rock physics model shows that there are two zones having quartz-rich mineral and the inclusion saturated by water and kerogen. More over Modulus Young calculations show there are two zones having high values or more than 50%. The rock physics model can be used for predicting mineralogy leading into zones of prospect brittle shale. These zones are then correlated with brittleness index calculations. In addition, results show that the study area has a shale gas prospect for further exploration.

  6. Predicting brittle zones in the Bakken Formation using well logs and seismic data

    Beecher, Michael E.

    The oil-in-place estimate for the Bakken Formation has varied from 10 billion barrels in 1974 to 503 billion barrels in 1999. However, only a small fraction of this estimate is recoverable due to the formation having very low porosity and permeability. Implementation of hydraulic fracture stages along horizontal wells in the Bakken has been productive. Recently, identification of zones where the formation is brittle has been used to improve hydraulic fracture stimulation efficiency in an effort to improve production. The first goal for this thesis is to identify a correlation between brittleness and production data by using elastic moduli and normalized production values. The hypothesis for this study is that rock with a low Poisson's ratio and high Young's modulus will be more brittle and will ultimately produce a higher amount of oil than more ductile rock. The next goal was to create and test a method to identify brittle zones with high normalized production in a 3D seismic data set without well control using producing wells from outside the survey with dipole sonic logs from the Bakken Formation. Correlations between normalized production values and elastic moduli were subsequently identified. Cumulative first-four-months' production was found to have the best correlation to the elastic moduli. Correlations of normalized production values and Poisson's ratio showed that sections of the middle Bakken with low Poisson's ratio yield higher normalized production values. Correlations of Young's modulus and normalized production showed that middle Bakken zones with low Young's modulus have higher normalized production values. However, when using additional wells that were not used for well-to-3D seismic correlations, the correlation shows that higher Young's modulus yield higher normalized production. The correlation with additional wells best represented the data and agrees with the initial hypothesis. Brittle zones were mapped in a 3D seismic data set by

  7. Discrete element modeling on the crack evolution behavior of brittle sandstone containing three fissures under uniaxial compression

    Yang, Sheng-Qi; Huang, Yan-Hua; Ranjith, P. G.; Jiao, Yu-Yong; Ji, Jian

    2015-12-01

    Based on experimental results of brittle, intact sandstone under uniaxial compression, the micro-parameters were firstly confirmed by adopting particle flow code (PFC^{2D}). Then, the validation of the simulated models were cross checked with the experimental results of brittle sandstone containing three parallel fissures under uniaxial compression. The simulated results agreed very well with the experimental results, including the peak strength, peak axial strain, and ultimate failure mode. Using the same micro-parameters, the numerical models containing a new geometry of three fissures are constructed to investigate the fissure angle on the fracture mechanical behavior of brittle sandstone under uniaxial compression. The strength and deformation parameters of brittle sandstone containing new three fissures are dependent to the fissure angle. With the increase of the fissure angle, the elastic modulus, the crack damage threshold, and the peak strength of brittle sandstone containing three fissures firstly increase and secondly decrease. But the peak axial strain is nonlinearly related to the fissure angle. In the entire process of deformation, the crack initiation and propagation behavior of brittle sandstone containing three fissures under uniaxial compression are investigated with respect to the fissure angle. Six different crack coalescence modes are identified for brittle sandstone containing three fissures under uniaxial compression. The influence of the fissure angle on the length of crack propagation and crack coalescence stress is evaluated. These investigated conclusions are very important for ensuring the stability and safety of rock engineering with intermittent structures.

  8. Brittleness and elastic limit of iron-aluminium 40 at high strain rates

    Iron-aluminium 40 - a B2 ordered solid solution - was tensile tested to provide information on the brittleness of this alloy and its dependence on strain rate and temperature. For slow strain rates (0.34 per cent s-1) cleaved fracture prevails when temperature is kept below 400 deg. C, while a ductile rupture is observed, with an almost 100 per cent necking at higher temperatures. In this case, recrystallization occurs during the deformation. For higher strain rates - 335 per cent s-1), a ductility reduction - owed to intergranular fracture - precedes the brittle-ductile transition. This property may be bound to the peak on the yield stress temperature curve, which is itself connected to the ordered structure of this alloy. (author)

  9. Interim report of brittle-fracture impact studies: development of methodology

    A comprehensive methodology for characterizing the results of impact fracture of brittle waste forms is presented, and its use illustrated by application to available particle-size data obtained in impact tests of various materials. The respirable-size fraction and the total surface area of the fracture particulates are the major criteria for characterization. Particle-size distributions were all found to be characterized approximately by the two parameters of the lognormal probability function (the geometric mean diameter D/sub g/ and the geometric standard deviation sigma/sub g/). These results are explained in terms of the brittle-fracture process as it is described in the technical literature. The methodology appears promising both for standardized evaluation of the impact strength of various solid-waste compositions, either vitreous or crystalline, and for studying the deformation of canistered waste forms in scale-model tests

  10. Alternating brittle and ductile response of coherent twin boundaries in nanotwinned metals

    Nanotwinned metals have opened exciting avenues for the design of high strength and high ductility materials. In this work, we investigate crack propagation along coherent twin boundaries in nanotwinned metals using molecular dynamics. Our simulations reveal that alternating twin boundaries exhibit intrinsic brittleness and ductility owing to the opposite crystallographic orientations of the adjoining twins. This is a startling consequence of the directional anisotropy of an atomically sharp crack along a twin boundary that favors cleavage in one direction and dislocation emission from the crack tip in the opposite direction. We further find that a blunt crack exhibits ductility in all cases albeit with very distinct deformation mechanisms and yield strength associated with intrinsically brittle and ductile coherent twin boundaries

  11. Study on subsurface-inclined crack propagation during machining of brittle crystal materials

    Guo, Jiawen; Chen, Jianbin; Li, Jia; Fang, Qihong; Liu, Youwen

    2016-05-01

    There is an immense need to obtain high-quality surface and subsurface on brittle material owing to the advantage of its improved performance. Thus, in this paper, we proposed a mechanical and numerical study of fracture mechanics from the perspective of external loading and indentation geometry in brittle machining. Stress intensity factors are computed to analyze various impacts of external loading and indentation configuration on subsurface crack propagation. Results indicate that the main fracture mode for inclined crack is shear rather than opening and the apex angle of the indentation plays an important role in fracture behavior. As a certain external loading is exerted to the surface of the silicon, a large apex angle of indentation may lead to strong shielding effect on mode II crack propagation. A relationship between critical value of external loading to the crack propagation and the apex angle of the indentation is given in this paper that shows quantitative indication for suppression of crack growth.

  12. Application of percolation model on the brittle to ductile transition for polystyrene and polyolefin elastomer blends

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The percolation model was applied in the study of brittle to ductile transition (BDT of polystyrene (PS and polyolefin elastomer (POE blends. Based on the interparticle distance and percolation model, stress volume (Vs can be expressed by volume fraction (Vr and ratio of the diameter of stress volume and the diameter of the domain (S/d. The percolation threshold (Vsc varied from π/6 to 0.65. From the results of the Charpy impact strength of the blends, the percolation threshold for the brittle to ductile transition of PS/POE blend is 14 wt% POE, corresponding to Vsc~0.5, which is consistent with the calculated value of π/6. Morphology observations show that the percolation point is correlated with the phase inversion of the blend.

  13. Neutron irradiation effects on the ductile-brittle transition of ferritic/martensitic steels

    Klueh, R.L.; Alexander, D.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1997-08-01

    Ferritic/martensitic steels such as the conventional 9Cr-1MoVNb (Fe-9Cr-1Mo-0.25V-0.06Nb-0.1C) and 12Cr-1MoVW (Fe-12Cr-1Mo-0.25V-0.5W-0.5Ni-0.2C) steels have been considered potential structural materials for future fusion power plants. The major obstacle to their use is embrittlement caused by neutron irradiation. Observations on this irradiation embrittlement is reviewed. Below 425-450{degrees}C, neutron irradiation hardens the steels. Hardening reduces ductility, but the major effect is an increase in the ductile-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) and a decrease in the upper-shelf energy, as measured by a Charpy impact test. After irradiation, DBTT values can increase to well above room temperature, thus increasing the chances of brittle rather than ductile fracture.

  14. Nonadiabatic study of dynamic electronic effects during brittle fracture of silicon.

    Theofanis, Patrick L; Jaramillo-Botero, Andres; Goddard, William A; Xiao, Hai

    2012-01-27

    It has long been observed that brittle fracture of materials can lead to emission of high energy electrons and UV photons, but an atomistic description of the origin of such processes has lacked. We report here on simulations using a first-principles-based electron force field methodology with effective core potentials to describe the nonadiabatic quantum dynamics during brittle fracture in silicon crystal. Our simulations replicate the correct response of the crack tip velocity to the threshold critical energy release rate, a feat that is inaccessible to quantum mechanics methods or conventional force-field-based molecular dynamics. We also describe the crack induced voltages, current bursts, and charge carrier production observed experimentally during fracture but not previously captured in simulations. We find that strain-induced surface rearrangements and local heating cause ionization of electrons at the fracture surfaces. PMID:22400860

  15. Steadiness and stop of brittle fracture driven by the forces in different distances

    和雪松; 李世愚; 滕春凯

    2005-01-01

    Based on the principle of fracture mechanics, the stop criterion of brittle fracture is proposed and the equation of minimal crack stop is given. By using the zero frequency Green function, the steadiness and stop of brittle fracture driven by the concentrated force and simple distributed forces in different locales are analyzed. The critical loading, unsteady boundary line and location of stop points under some typical conditions are calculated. The steady growth caused by the near forces is significant in interpreting the creep and the forming of some tectonics. Whereas the unsteady propagation caused by the forces in different distances from the crack is significant in interpreting the occurring and stop of earthquakes. It is suggested that the strong earthquakes may be the result of compound of the near-field and far-field forces. The results of this paper are also valuable for investigation of the mechanism of induced earthquake.

  16. Overcoming the brittleness of glass through bio-inspiration and micro-architecture

    Mirkhalaf, M.; Dastjerdi, A. Khayer; Barthelat, F.

    2014-01-01

    Highly mineralized natural materials such as teeth or mollusk shells boast unusual combinations of stiffness, strength and toughness currently unmatched by engineering materials. While high mineral contents provide stiffness and hardness, these materials also contain weaker interfaces with intricate architectures, which can channel propagating cracks into toughening configurations. Here we report the implementation of these features into glass, using a laser engraving technique. Three-dimensional arrays of laser-generated microcracks can deflect and guide larger incoming cracks, following the concept of ‘stamp holes’. Jigsaw-like interfaces, infiltrated with polyurethane, furthermore channel cracks into interlocking configurations and pullout mechanisms, significantly enhancing energy dissipation and toughness. Compared with standard glass, which has no microstructure and is brittle, our bio-inspired glass displays built-in mechanisms that make it more deformable and 200 times tougher. This bio-inspired approach, based on carefully architectured interfaces, provides a new pathway to toughening glasses, ceramics or other hard and brittle materials.

  17. Intergranular brittle fracture of a low alloy steel. Global and local approaches

    The intergranular brittle fracture of a low alloy steel (A533B.Cl1) is studied: an embrittlement heat treatment is used to develop two brittle 'states' that fail through an intergranular way at low temperatures. This mode of fracture leads to an important shift of the transition temperature (∼ 165 deg C) and a decrease in the fracture toughness. The local approach to fracture, developed for cleavage, is applied to the case of intergranular fracture. Modifications are proposed. The physical supports of these models are verified by biaxial (tension-torsion) tests. From the local approaches developed for intergranular fracture, the static and dynamic fracture toughness of the embrittled steel is predicted. The local approach applied to a structural steel, which presents mixed modes of fracture (cleavage and intergranular), showed that this mode of fracture seems to be controlled by intergranular loss of cohesion

  18. Mechanical Properties Degradation at Room Temperature in ZRY-4 by Hydrogen Brittleness

    Bertolino G.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available A hot rolled Zircaloy-4 alloy, annealed with a final cold rolling, presenting rounded grains, was studied. Hydrogen cathodic charge with a homogenization heat treatment was used to pre-charge the specimens with different hydrogen contents. Hydrogen embrittlement susceptibility analysis was held using J integral and J-R curve results from CT specimens (compact tension specimens tested at room temperature. As J IC values showed scatter, toughness was evaluated for deltaa = 1mm. Toughness clearly tended to decrease as hydrogen content increased abruptly for low H contents and gradually for high contents. A few specimens with high hydrogen content failed in brittle mode, or presented instability and posterior crack arrest. Fractographic observations showed that, despite the records had presented no signs of brittle fracture, certain specimens showed cleavage-like zones. More cleavage-like area percentage was present the higher the hydrogen content was.

  19. Brittleness estimation from seismic measurements in unconventional reservoirs: Application to the Barnett shale

    Perez Altimar, Roderick

    Brittleness is a key characteristic for effective reservoir stimulation and is mainly controlled by mineralogy in unconventional reservoirs. Unfortunately, there is no universally accepted means of predicting brittleness from measures made in wells or from surface seismic data. Brittleness indices (BI) are based on mineralogy, while brittleness average estimations are based on Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio. I evaluate two of the more popular brittleness estimation techniques and apply them to a Barnett Shale seismic survey in order to estimate its geomechanical properties. Using specialized logging tools such as elemental capture tool, density, and P- and S wave sonic logs calibrated to previous core descriptions and laboratory measurements, I create a survey-specific BI template in Young's modulus versus Poisson's ratio or alternatively lambdarho versus murho space. I use this template to predict BI from elastic parameters computed from surface seismic data, providing a continuous estimate of BI estimate in the Barnett Shale survey. Extracting lambdarho-murho values from microseismic event locations, I compute brittleness index from the template and find that most microsemic events occur in the more brittle part of the reservoir. My template is validated through a suite of microseismic experiments that shows most events occurring in brittle zones, fewer events in the ductile shale, and fewer events still in the limestone fracture barriers. Estimated ultimate recovery (EUR) is an estimate of the expected total production of oil and/or gas for the economic life of a well and is widely used in the evaluation of resource play reserves. In the literature it is possible to find several approaches for forecasting purposes and economic analyses. However, the extension to newer infill wells is somewhat challenging because production forecasts in unconventional reservoirs are a function of both completion effectiveness and reservoir quality. For shale gas reservoirs

  20. Study on the fragility of structure with several elements in its story. Part 1: structure with brittle elements

    The relationship among the fragility of element, that of story and that of system, is examined using the Monte Carlo simulation. In this study, 2-story models whose stories consist of 2 brittle elements are employed. Through the simulation, the feature of the failure of brittle elements is derived. From this results, 2 methods to evaluate the fragility of brittle element are presented. Also, a method to estimate the fragilities of the story and the system are presented. (author). 2 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs

  1. Mechanical Properties of Brittle Materials and Their Single Fracture under Dynamic Loading

    YASHIMA, Saburo; Kanda, Yoshiteru; Saito, Fumio; Sasaki, Toru; Iijima, Masayoshi; HASHIMOTO, Hitoshi

    1983-01-01

    The meaning of study on single particle crushing is recognized at which it is regarded the accumulation of single particle crushing as the comminution performed in practical operations stochastic phenomena. Especially, experimental data concerning the mechanical properties of brittle solids measured under dynamic loading are so far very few. Further, the experimental data concerning compressive strength, sphere compressive strength, fracture energy, new surface produced and fracture surface e...

  2. Investigation of the brittle fracture behavior of intermetallic Ti-Al-Si-Nd-alloys

    The object of this paper is the fracture behaviour of three Ti-Al-Si-Nb alloys. Fracture mechanical data are experimentally determined and their statistical properties are investigated. To describe the fracture process of disordered heterogeneous brittle materials a statistical model was developed, based on damage mechanics. With the aid of this model it was possible to attribute the fracture behaviour, the fracture mechanical data and their statistical properties to the microstructure of the materials studied. (orig.)

  3. Observations on the sub-critical growth and healing of microcracks in brittle ceramics

    Micro-cracking in brittle composites was monitored by measuring the temperature dependence of thermal diffusivity by the laser flash method. Depending upon the material system, micro-cracks can exhibit a time dependent growth or healing or a combination of both. A theoretical basis for these observations was established by analyzing the stability and nature of crack propagation of precursor micro-cracks in a spherical inclusion contained in an infinite matrix with different elastic properties

  4. Mechanical behavior of quasi-brittle materials under cyclic loadings : from virtual testing to structural simulations

    Vassaux, Maxime

    2015-01-01

    Macroscopic mechanical behavior models are developed for their light computational costs, allowing the simulation of large structural elements, and the precise description of mechanical phenomena observed by the material at lower scales. Such constitutive models are here developed in the seismic solicitation framework, therefore implying cyclic alternate loadings at the material scale, and applied to civil engineering buildings, often made of concrete, or more generally of quasi-brittle mater...

  5. Model inspired by population genetics to study fragmentation of brittle plates

    Gomes, M. A. F.; VIVIANE M. DE OLIVEIRA

    2006-01-01

    We use a model whose rules were inspired by population genetics, the random capability growth model, to describe the statistical details observed in experiments of fragmentation of brittle platelike objects, and in particular the existence of (i) composite scaling laws, (ii) small critical exponents \\tau associated with the power-law fragment-size distribution, and (iii) the typical pattern of cracks. The proposed computer simulations do not require numerical solutions of the Newton's equatio...

  6. Failure Probabilities and Tough-Brittle Crossover of Heterogeneous Materials with Continuous Disorder

    Wu, B. Q.; Leath, P. L.

    1998-01-01

    The failure probabilities or the strength distributions of heterogeneous 1D systems with continuous local strength distribution and local load sharing have been studied using a simple, exact, recursive method. The fracture behavior depends on the local bond-strength distribution, the system size, and the applied stress, and crossovers occur as system size or stress changes. In the brittle region, systems with continuous disorders have a failure probability of the modified-Gumbel form, similar...

  7. A continuous-discontinuous approach to simulate fracture processes in quasi-brittle materials

    Moonen, Peter; Carmeliet, Jan; Sluys, Bert

    2009-01-01

    Abstract A macroscopic framework for the simulation of failure processes in quasi-brittle materials is proposed. The framework employs the partition of unity (PU) concept and introduces a new cohesive zone model, capturing the transition between the initial continuum state and the final localized damage state. The model is generic in a sense that it allows extending most continuum models to a discontinuous framework in an efficient and robust way, hereby adding the effect of macro-...

  8. Ultrasonic detection of ductile-to-brittle transitions in free-cutting aluminum alloys

    Nejezchlebová, J.; Seiner, Hanuš; Ševčík, Martin; Landa, Michal; Karlík, M.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 69, January 2015 (2015), s. 40-47. ISSN 0963-8695 R&D Projects: GA ČR GB14-36566G Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : aluminum alloys * laser ultrasound * ductile-to-brittle * elastic constants * resonant ultrasound spectroscopy Subject RIV: BI - Acoustics Impact factor: 2.225, year: 2014 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0963869514001200

  9. Micromechanics of brittle faulting and cataclastic flow in Alban Hills tuff

    Zhu, W.; Baud, P.; Vinciguerra, S.; Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Sezione Roma1, Roma, Italia; Wong, T

    2011-01-01

    An understanding of how tuff deforms and fails is of importance in the mechanics of volcanic eruption as well as geotechnical and seismic applications related to the integrity of tuff structures and repositories. Previous rock mechanics studies have focused on the brittle strength. We conducted mechanical tests on nominally dry and water-saturated tuff samples retrieved from the Colli Albani drilling project, in conjunction with systematic microstructural observations on the deformed samples ...

  10. Numerical Study on Crack Propagation in Brittle Jointed Rock Mass Influenced by Fracture Water Pressure

    Yong Li; Hao Zhou; Weishen Zhu; Shucai Li; Jian Liu

    2015-01-01

    The initiation, propagation, coalescence and failure mode of brittle jointed rock mass influenced by fissure water pressure have always been studied as a hot issue in the society of rock mechanics and engineering. In order to analyze the damage evolution process of jointed rock mass under fracture water pressure, a novel numerical model on the basis of secondary development in fast Lagrangian analysis of continua (FLAC3D) is proposed to simulate the fracture development of jointed rock mass u...

  11. Pinch and swell structures: evidence for brittle-viscous behaviour in the middle crust

    Gardner, R.; Piazolo, S.; Daczko, N.

    2015-04-01

    The flow properties of middle to lower crustal rocks are commonly represented by viscous flow. However, examples of pinch and swell structures found in a mid-crustal high strain zone at St. Anne Point (Fiordland, New Zealand) suggest pinch and swell structures are initiated by brittle failure of the more competent layer in conjunction with material softening. On this basis we develop a flexible numerical model using brittle-viscous flow where Mohr-Coulomb failure is utilised to initiate pinch and swell structure development. Results show that pinch and swell structures develop in a competent layer in both Newtonian and non-Newtonian flow provided the competent layer has enough viscosity contrast and initially fails brittlely. The degree of material softening after initial failure is shown to impact pinch and swell characteristics with high rates of material softening causing the formation of thick necks between swells by limiting the successful localisation of strain. The flow regime and yielding characteristics of the matrix do not impact pinch and swell structure formation itself, so long as the matrix is less competent. To aid analysis of the structures and help derive the flow properties of rocks in the field, we define three stages of pinch and swell development and offer suggestions for measurements to be made in the field. Our study suggests that Mohr-Coulomb behaviour combined with viscous flow is an appropriate way to represent the heterogeneous rocks of the middle to lower crust. This type of mid-crustal rheological behaviour has significant influence on the localization of strain at all scales. For example, inclusion of Mohr-Coulomb brittle failure with viscous flow in just some mid-crustal layers within a crustal scale model will result in strain localisation throughout the whole crustal section allowing the development of through-going high strain structures from the upper crust into the middle and lower crust. This localization then has a significant

  12. Effect of rock microfabric on the brittle failure process of rocks

    Přikryl, R.; Lokajíček, Tomáš; Klíma, Karel

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 8, - (2006), ---. ISSN 1029-7006. [European Geosciences Union General Assembly. 02.04.2006-07.04.2006, Vienna] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA205/04/0088; GA ČR GA205/06/0906 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30130516 Keywords : rock microfabric * brittle fracturing Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy http://www.cosis.net/abstracts/EGU06/06876/EGU06-J-06876.pdf

  13. Oblique Powder Blasting for Three-dimensional Micromachining of Brittle Materials

    Belloy, E.; Sayah, A.; Gijs, M. A. M.

    2001-01-01

    We present oblique powder blasting as a three-dimensional micromachining technology for brittle materials. Powder blasting is a microfabrication process, based on the use of a pressurised air beam containing eroding Al2O3 particles. By varying the angle of incidence of the incoming particles to a substrate, covered by a mask, one can exploit the oblique slopes of micropatterned holes and mask underetching phenomena to generate new options for three-dimensional microstructuring. We have identi...

  14. Pinch and swell structures: evidence for brittle-viscous behaviour in the middle crust

    R. Gardner

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The flow properties of middle to lower crustal rocks are commonly represented by viscous flow. However, examples of pinch and swell structures found in a mid-crustal high strain zone at St. Anne Point (Fiordland, New Zealand suggest pinch and swell structures are initiated by brittle failure of the more competent layer in conjunction with material softening. On this basis we develop a flexible numerical model using brittle-viscous flow where Mohr–Coulomb failure is utilised to initiate pinch and swell structure development. Results show that pinch and swell structures develop in a competent layer in both Newtonian and non-Newtonian flow provided the competent layer has enough viscosity contrast and initially fails brittlely. The degree of material softening after initial failure is shown to impact pinch and swell characteristics with high rates of material softening causing the formation of thick necks between swells by limiting the successful localisation of strain. The flow regime and yielding characteristics of the matrix do not impact pinch and swell structure formation itself, so long as the matrix is less competent. To aid analysis of the structures and help derive the flow properties of rocks in the field, we define three stages of pinch and swell development and offer suggestions for measurements to be made in the field. Our study suggests that Mohr–Coulomb behaviour combined with viscous flow is an appropriate way to represent the heterogeneous rocks of the middle to lower crust. This type of mid-crustal rheological behaviour has significant influence on the localization of strain at all scales. For example, inclusion of Mohr–Coulomb brittle failure with viscous flow in just some mid-crustal layers within a crustal scale model will result in strain localisation throughout the whole crustal section allowing the development of through-going high strain structures from the upper crust into the middle and lower crust. This

  15. Slip energy barriers in aluminum and implications for ductile versus brittle behavior

    Sun, Y; Sun, Yuemin; Kaxiras, Efthimios

    1996-01-01

    We conisder the brittle versus ductile behavior of aluminum in the framework of the Peierls-model analysis of dislocation emission from a crack tip. To this end, we perform first-principles quantum mechanical calculations for the unstable stacking energy $\\gamma_{us}$ of aluminum along the Shockley partial slip route. Our calculations are based on density functional theory and the local density approximation and include full atomic and volume relaxation. We find that in aluminum $\\gamma_{us} = 0.224$ J/m$^2$. Within the Peierls-model analysis, this value would predict a brittle solid which poses an interesting problem since aluminum is typically considered ductile. The resolution may be given by one of three possibilites: (a) Aluminum is indeed brittle at zero temperature, and becomes ductile at a finite temperature due to motion of pre-existing dislocations which relax the stress concentration at the crack tip. (b) Dislocation emission at the crack tip is itself a thermally activated process. (c) Aluminum is...

  16. Rock Drilling Performance Evaluation by an Energy Dissipation Based Rock Brittleness Index

    Munoz, H.; Taheri, A.; Chanda, E. K.

    2016-08-01

    To reliably estimate drilling performance both tool-rock interaction laws along with a proper rock brittleness index are required to be implemented. In this study, the performance of a single polycrystalline diamond compact (PDC) cutter cutting and different drilling methods including PDC rotary drilling, roller-cone rotary drilling and percussive drilling were investigated. To investigate drilling performance by rock strength properties, laboratory PDC cutting tests were performed on different rocks to obtain cutting parameters. In addition, results of laboratory and field drilling on different rocks found elsewhere in literature were used. Laboratory and field cutting and drilling test results were coupled with values of a new rock brittleness index proposed herein and developed based on energy dissipation withdrawn from the complete stress-strain curve in uniaxial compression. To quantify cutting and drilling performance, the intrinsic specific energy in rotary-cutting action, i.e. the energy consumed in pure cutting action, and drilling penetration rate values in percussive action were used. The results show that the new energy-based brittleness index successfully describes the performance of different cutting and drilling methods and therefore is relevant to assess drilling performance for engineering applications.

  17. Experimental study on the physical and chemical properties of the deep hard brittle shale

    Jian Xiong

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In the hard brittle shale formation, rock composition, physical and chemical properties, mechanics property before and after interacting with fluid have direct relation with borehole problems, such as borehole wall collapse, mud loss, hole shrinkage. To achieve hard brittle shale micro-structure, physical–chemical properties and mechanics property, energy-dispersive X-ray diffraction (XRD, cation exchange capacity experiment and hardness test are conducted. The result of laboratory experiments indicates that, clay mineral and quartz is dominated in mineral composition. In clay mineral, illite and illite/semectite mixed layers are abundant and there is no sign of montmorillonite. Value of cation exchange capacity (CEC ranges from 102.5–330 mmol/kg and average value is 199.56 mmol/kg. High value of CEC and content of clay mineral means hard brittle shale has strong ability of hydration. The image of XRD shows well developed micro-cracks and pores, which make rock failure easily, especially when fluid invades rock inside. Shale sample soaked with anti-high temperature KCL drilling fluid on shorter immersing time has stronger strength, whereas shale sample soaked with plugging and film forming KCL drilling fluid on longer immersing time has stronger strength.

  18. Formulation and computational aspects of plasticity and damage models with application to quasi-brittle materials

    Chen, Z.; Schreyer, H.L. [New Mexico Engineering Research Institute, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1995-09-01

    The response of underground structures and transportation facilities under various external loadings and environments is critical for human safety as well as environmental protection. Since quasi-brittle materials such as concrete and rock are commonly used for underground construction, the constitutive modeling of these engineering materials, including post-limit behaviors, is one of the most important aspects in safety assessment. From experimental, theoretical, and computational points of view, this report considers the constitutive modeling of quasi-brittle materials in general and concentrates on concrete in particular. Based on the internal variable theory of thermodynamics, the general formulations of plasticity and damage models are given to simulate two distinct modes of microstructural changes, inelastic flow and degradation of material strength and stiffness, that identify the phenomenological nonlinear behaviors of quasi-brittle materials. The computational aspects of plasticity and damage models are explored with respect to their effects on structural analyses. Specific constitutive models are then developed in a systematic manner according to the degree of completeness. A comprehensive literature survey is made to provide the up-to-date information on prediction of structural failures, which can serve as a reference for future research.

  19. Fracture-mode map of brittle coatings: Theoretical development and experimental verification

    He, Chong; Xie, Zhaoqian; Guo, Zhenbin; Yao, Haimin

    2015-10-01

    Brittle coatings, upon sufficiently high indentation load, tend to fracture through either ring cracking or radial cracking. In this paper, we systematically study the factors determining the fracture modes of bilayer material under indentation. By analyzing the stress field developed in a coating/substrate bilayer under indentation in combination with the application of the maximum-tensile-stress fracture criterion, we show that the fracture mode of brittle coatings due to indentation is determined synergistically by two dimensionless parameters being functions of the mechanical properties of coating and substrate, coating thickness and indenter tip radius. Such dependence can be graphically depicted by a diagram called 'fracture-mode map', whereby the fracture modes can be directly predicated based on these two dimensionless parameters. Experimental verification of the fracture-mode map is carried out by examining the fracture modes of fused quartz/cement bilayer materials under indentation. The experimental observation exhibits good agreement with the prediction by the fracture-mode map. Our finding in this paper may not only shed light on the mechanics accounting for the fracture modes of brittle coatings in bilayer structures but also pave a new avenue to combating catastrophic damage through fracture mode control.

  20. Strain Rate Dependent Ductile-to-Brittle Transition of Graphite Platelet Reinforced Vinyl Ester Nanocomposites

    Brahmananda Pramanik

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In previous research, the fractal dimensions of fractured surfaces of vinyl ester based nanocomposites were estimated applying classical method on 3D digital microscopic images. The fracture energy and fracture toughness were obtained from fractal dimensions. A noteworthy observation, the strain rate dependent ductile-to-brittle transition of vinyl ester based nanocomposites, is reinvestigated in the current study. The candidate materials of xGnP (exfoliated graphite nanoplatelets reinforced and with additional CTBN (Carboxyl Terminated Butadiene Nitrile toughened vinyl ester based nanocomposites that are subjected to both quasi-static and high strain rate indirect tensile load using the traditional Brazilian test method. High-strain rate indirect tensile testing is performed with a modified Split-Hopkinson Pressure Bar (SHPB. Pristine vinyl ester shows ductile deformation under quasi-static loading and brittle failure when subjected to high-strain rate loading. This observation reconfirms the previous research findings on strain rate dependent ductile-to-brittle transition of this material system. Investigation of both quasi-static and dynamic indirect tensile test responses show the strain rate effect on the tensile strength and energy absorbing capacity of the candidate materials. Contribution of nanoreinforcement to the tensile properties is reported in this paper.

  1. Final report of experimental laboratory-scale brittle fracture studies of glasses and ceramics

    An experimental program was conducted to characterize the fragments generated when brittle glasses and ceramics are impacted. The direct application of the results is to radioactive waste forms for which the effects of accidental impacts must be known or predictable. Two major measurable experimental responses used for characterization of these effects are (1) the size distribution of the fragments, including the sizes that are respirable, and (2) the increase in surface area of the brittle test specimen. This report describes the glass and ceramic materials characterized, the procedures and techniques used for the characterization of size distributions and surface areas, and the results of the two key responses of the impact tests. Five alternative methods of determining size distributions were compared. Also examined were the effects of diametral and axial specimen impact configurations and the use of mechanical stops to eliminate secondary crushing during testing. Microscopic characterizations of Pyrex and SRL 131 simulated waste glass and SYNROC fragments were also performed. Preliminary correlations of impact energy with key size-distribution parameters, fragment surface areas, and respirable fines were proposed as useful for future verification and for use with modeling and scale-up studies of brittle fracture of larger realistic waste forms. The impact fragments of all specimens could be described by lognormal size distributions

  2. Stress localization in BCC polycrystals and its implications on the probability of brittle fracture

    Highlights: → Intergranular stress distributions in a bainitic steel. → Comparison of local mean stress field with neutron diffraction results. → Application of the local stress distribution in a brittle fracture model. - Abstract: The evaluation of the reliability of pressure vessels in nuclear plants relies on the evaluation of failure probability models. Micromechanical approaches are of great interest to refine their description, to better understand the underlying mechanisms leading to failure, and finally to improve the prediction of these models. The main purpose of this paper is to introduce the stress heterogeneities arising within the polycrystal in a probabilistic modeling of brittle fracture. Stress heterogeneities are evaluated from Finite-Element simulations performed on a large number of Statistical Volume Elements. Results are validated both on the measured averaged behavior and on the averaged stresses measured by neutron diffraction in five specific orientations. A probabilistic model for brittle fracture is then presented accounting for the carbide distribution and the stress distribution evaluated previously inside an elementary volume V0. Results are compared to a 'Beremin type' approach, assuming a homogeneous stress state inside V0.

  3. Final report of experimental laboratory-scale brittle fracture studies of glasses and ceramics

    Jardine, L.J.; Mecham, W.J.; Reedy, G.T.; Steindler, M.J.

    1982-10-01

    An experimental program was conducted to characterize the fragments generated when brittle glasses and ceramics are impacted. The direct application of the results is to radioactive waste forms for which the effects of accidental impacts must be known or predictable. Two major measurable experimental responses used for characterization of these effects are (1) the size distribution of the fragments, including the sizes that are respirable, and (2) the increase in surface area of the brittle test specimen. This report describes the glass and ceramic materials characterized, the procedures and techniques used for the characterization of size distributions and surface areas, and the results of the two key responses of the impact tests. Five alternative methods of determining size distributions were compared. Also examined were the effects of diametral and axial specimen impact configurations and the use of mechanical stops to eliminate secondary crushing during testing. Microscopic characterizations of Pyrex and SRL 131 simulated waste glass and SYNROC fragments were also performed. Preliminary correlations of impact energy with key size-distribution parameters, fragment surface areas, and respirable fines were proposed as useful for future verification and for use with modeling and scale-up studies of brittle fracture of larger realistic waste forms. The impact fragments of all specimens could be described by lognormal size distributions.

  4. The role of fluids on the brittle-ductile transition in the crust

    Hirth, Greg; Beeler, Nick

    2015-04-01

    To characterize stress and deformation style at the base of the seismogenic zone we investigate how the mechanical properties of fluid-rock systems respond to variations in temperature and strain rate. The role of fluids on the processes responsible for the brittle-ductile transition in quartz-rich rocks has not been explored at experimental conditions where the kinetic competition between microcracking and viscous flow is similar to that expected in the Earth. Our initial analysis of this competition suggests that the effective pressure law for sliding friction should not work as effectively near the brittle-ductile transition (BDT) as it does at shallow conditions. Our motivation comes from three observations. First, extrapolation of quartzite flow laws indicates the brittle-ductile transition (BDT) occurs at ~300 °C at geologic strain rates for conditions where fault strength is controlled by a coefficient of friction of ~0.6 with a hydrostatic pore-fluid pressure gradient. Second, we suggest that the preservation of relatively high stress microstructures indicates that the effective stress law must sometimes evolve rapidly near the BDT. There is abundant evidence for the presence of fluids during viscous deformation of mylonites (e.g., recrystallization and redistribution of micas, dissolution and reprecipitation of quartz). The relatively high viscous stresses inferred from these microstructures are incompatible with the standard effective stress relationship. A similar "paradox" is evident at experimental conditions where viscous creep is studied in the laboratory. In this case, the presence of fluid (which should produce low effective stress) does not promote localized brittle failure, even though these experiments are conducted under undrained conditions. Third, experiments on partially molten rocks illustrate viscous creep behavior during both drained compaction and undrained triaxial deformation tests, even though the melt pressure approaches or equals

  5. Rheology of Pure Glasses and Crystal Bearing Melts: from the Newtonian Field to the Brittle Onset

    Cordonnier, B.; Caricchi, L.; Pistone, M.; Castro, J. M.; Hess, K.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2010-12-01

    The brittle-ductile transition remains a central question of modern geology. If rocks can be perceived as a granular flow on geological time-scale, their behavior is brittle in dynamic areas. Understanding rock failure conditions is the main parameter in mitigating geological risks, more specifically the eruptive style transitions from effusive to explosive. If numerical simulations are the only way to fully understanding the physical processes involved, we are in a strong need of an experimental validation of the proposed models. here we present results obtained under torsion and uni-axial compression on both pure glasses and crystal bearing melts. We characterized the brittle onset of two phases magmas from 0 to 65% crystals. The strain-rates span a 5 orders magnitude range, from the Newtonian flow to the Brittle field (10-5 - 100 s-1). We particularly emphasize the time dependency of the measured rheology. The materials tested are a borosilicate glass from the National Bureau of Standards, a natural sample from Mt Unzen volcano and a synthetic sample. The lattest is an HPG8 melt with 7% sodium mole excess. The particles are quasi-isometric corundum crystalschosen for their shape and integrity under the stress range investigated. The crystal fraction ranges from 0 to 0.65. Concerning pure magmas, we recently demonstrated that the material passes from a Newtonian to a non-Nemtonian behavior with increasing strain-rate. This onset can mostly be explained by viscous-heating effects. However, for even greater strain-rates, the material cracks and finally fail. The brittle onset is here explained with the visco-elastic theory and corresponds to a Deborah number greater than 10-2. Concerning crystal bearing melts the departure from the Newtonian state is characterized by two effects: a shear-thinning and a time weakening effect. The first one is instantaneous and loading-unloading cyclic tests suggest an elastic contribution of the crystal network. The second one

  6. Deciphering the brittle evolution of SW Norway through a combined structural, mineralogical and geochronological approach

    Scheiber, Thomas; Viola, Giulio; Fredin, Ola; Zwingmann, Horst; Wilkinson, Camilla Maya; Ganerød, Morgan

    2016-04-01

    SW Norway has experienced a complex brittle history after cessation of the Caledonian orogeny, and the recent discoveries of major hydrocarbon reserves in heavily fractured and weathered basement offshore SW Norway has triggered a renewed interest in understanding this complex tectonic evolution. In this contribution we present results from a multidisciplinary study combining lineament analysis, field work, paleo-stress inversion, mineralogical characterization and radiometric dating in the Bømlo area of SW Norway in order to develop a tectonic model for the brittle evolution of this important region. The study area mainly consists of the Rolvsnes granodiorite (U-Pb zircon age of ca. 466 Ma), which is devoid of penetrative ductile deformation features. The first identified brittle faults are muscovite-bearing top-to-the-NNW thrusts and E-W striking dextral strike-slip faults decorated with stretched biotite. These are mechanically compatible and are assigned to the same NNW-SSE transpressional regime. Ar-Ar muscovite and biotite dates of ca. 450 Ma (Late Ordovician) indicate fault activity in the course of a Taconian-equivalent orogenic event. During the subsequent Silurian Laurentia-Baltica collision variably oriented, lower-grade chlorite and epidote-coated faults formed in response to a ENE-WSW compressional stress regime. A large number of mainly N-S striking normal faults consist of variably thick fault gouge cores with illite, quartz, kaolinite, calcite and epidote mineralizations, accommodating mainly E-W extension. K-Ar dating of illites separated from representative fault gouges and zones of altered granodiorite constrain deformation ranging from the Permian to the Late Jurassic, indicating a long history of crustal extension where faults were repeatedly activated. In addition, a set of ca. SW-NE striking faults associated with alteration zones give Cretaceous dates, either representing a young phase of NW-SE extension or reactivation of previously formed

  7. Transition from cataclastic flow to aseismic brittle failure in Carrarra marble

    Walker, E.; Schubnel, A.; Thompson, B.; Fortin, J.; Nasseri, M.; Young, R.

    2004-12-01

    Interest in the brittle-ductile transition has increased considerably in recent years, in large part due to the fact that the maximum depth of seismicity corresponds to a transition in the crust and in the upper mantle from seismogenic brittle failure to aseismic cataclastic flow, i.e. from localized to homogeneous deformation. The mechanics of the transition depends both on some extrinsic variable (state of solid stress, pore pressure, temperature, fluid chemistry and strain rate) and intrinsic parameters (crack and dislocation density, modal composition of the rock or porosity for example). In the present study, two triaxial experiments were performed on Carrara marble at room temperature. The rock samples were first deformed in the cataclastic domain (up to ˜5% axial strain) until they exhibited severe damage accumulation, i.e. wavespeed attenuation. Damaged samples were then brought back at constant differential stress into the the brittle field by solely reducing the effective mean stress. Throughout both experiments, compressional wave velocities were measured along several raypaths. Acoustic Emissions, when any, were monitored and localized after testing. A complete 2 minutes failure recordings of failure (12 channels at 10MHz sampling frequency) was also obtained using ESG's Hyperion gigarecorder during one of the experiment. Our new set of data shows that during cataclastic deformation, elastic wave velocities show large variations, but only a small degree of elastic anisotropy when compared to what is generally observed in typical brittle materials such as granite or sandstones. After sufficient damage accumulation and when reducing the mean stress, both samples exhibited a fast acceleration in axial strain. Tertiary creep was followed by the nucleation of a brittle failure. Observed differential stress drops during rupture propagation were of the order of 150 MPa. Although failure occurred with large slip and stress drop, only very few AEs could be

  8. Brittle fracture at beam-to-column connection during earthquake; Kosei kyokyaku ramen gukakubu no jishinji zeiseika hakai

    Miki, C.; Aizawa, T.; Anami, K. [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo (Japan)

    1998-04-21

    During the Great Hanshin-Awaji Earthquake, brittle fracture was caused at beam-to-column connection of P75 steel pier. In this study, concerning the brittle fracture at P75 pier, simulations of brittle fracture at beam-to-column connection are carried out by using large scale specimens simulating the P75 beam-to-column joint. Some improved specimens which include ribs at corners of connection are also used. As a result, there is a high possibility that brittle fracture is caused at corner of connection where there is a high strain concentration. Shapes of the damages characteristic in the experiment using the reinforcing model studied in this study were buckling on the web near the rib end and cracks generated from near the rib. 11 refs., 23 figs., 4 tabs.

  9. Static and fatigue failure of quasi brittle materials at a V-notch using a Dugdale model

    Murer, S.; Leguillon, D.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract The prediction of crack nucleation at stress concentration points in brittle and quasi-brittle materials may generally rely on either an Irwin-like criterion, involving a critical value of the generalized stress intensity factor of the singularity associated to the stress concentration, or on cohesive zone models. Leguillon's criterion enters the first category and combines an energy condition and a stress one. Thanks to matched asymptotics procedures, the associated numer...

  10. Influence of the static strain ageing on the ductile-to-brittle transition in C-Mn steel

    Ferritic steels for industrial structures have a brittle-ductile transition toughness and impact energy with temperature. Their resistance to the brittle fracture plays an essential role in the safety certification of industrial structures. Nowadays, the performance and the durability are key issues for major players such as EDF. In these approaches ductile-to-brittle transition toughness and impact energy, toughness is predicted from resilience. Several previous studies have shown that the probability of cleavage fracture can be adequately described in brittle plateau by a local approach to fracture. However, these studies assume that the material does not undergo strain aging, which is rarely relevant for low carbon steels and low calmed down. The work consisted firstly to characterize the behavior and secondly to propose a robust and explicit modeling of the observed phenomena. Characterization consisted of performing tensile tests between -150 C and 20 C for several strain rates. A model able to simulate the static aging is identified by implementing an appropriate and systematic strategy. Impact resistance test allows us to build the curve of ductile-to-brittle transition of the material for different conditions to understand and observe the influence of static strain aging on the failure. Finally, the modeling of the brittle fracture has been described for all experimental conditions tested using the model developed and identified in the previous section to predict the transition for different material conditions. (author)

  11. Experiments on buoyancy-driven crack around the brittle-ductile transition

    Sumita, Ikuro; Ota, Yukari

    2011-04-01

    We report the results of laboratory experiments exploring how a buoyancy-driven liquid-filled crack migrates within a viscoelastic medium whose rheology is around the brittle-ductile transition. To model such medium, we use a low concentration agar, which has a small yield stress and a large yield strain (deformation) when it fractures. We find that around the transition, the fluid migrates as a hybrid of a diapir (head) and a dyke (tail). Here the diapir is a bulged crack in which fracturing occurs at its tip and closes at its tail to form a dyke. A small amount of fluid is left along its trail and the fluid decelerates with time. We study how the shape and velocity of a constant volume fluid change as two control parameters are varied; the agar concentration ( C) and the density difference Δρ between the fluid and the agar. Under a fixed Δρ, as C decreases the medium becomes ductile, and the trajectory and shape of the fluid changes from a linearly migrating dyke to a meandering or a bifurcating dyke, and finally to a diapir-dyke hybrid. In this transition, the shape of the crack tip viewed from above, changes from blade-like to a cusped-ellipse. A similar transition is also observed when Δρ increases under a fixed C, which can be interpreted using a force balance between the buoyancy and the yield stress. Our experiments indicate that cracks around the brittle-ductile transition deviates from those in an elastic medium by several ways, such as the relaxation of the crack bulge, slower deceleration rate, and velocity becoming insensitive to medium rheology. Our experiments suggest that the fluid migrates as a diapir-dyke hybrid around the brittle-ductile transition and that fluid migration of various styles can coexist at the same depth, if they have different buoyancy.

  12. Improved small punch testing and parameter identification of ductile to brittle materials

    Minimal invasive material testing is of special interest, when only small amounts of material are available or the material degradation of structural components in service has to be evaluated. The disc-shaped specimens used in the small punch test are small enough for local material sampling but representative for characterizing the macroscopic material behaviour. A small punch test device was developed which enables the testing of materials in the whole range from ductile to brittle failure and from ambient temperature down to −190 °C in a unique experimental set-up. The specimens are not clamped as usually in the small punch test. This is crucial for brittle fracture behaviour with little or without plastic deformation. The measured load displacement curve of the punch represents the non-linear response of the material due to elastic–plastic deformation. It contains relevant information about true material parameters, which can be made accessible by solving the inverse problem. Thus, plastic yield curves and Weibull parameters were identified by combining finite element simulations with non-linear optimization techniques. Examples for measured load displacement curves and related results of parameter identification are shown for a pressure vessel steel and a laser welded joint. The results obtained from the small punch test are verified by data from standard specimen tests. - Highlights: • Improved small punch test suited for the whole range of ductile to brittle materials. • Minimal invasive determination of true material parameters by means of numerical simulations. • Temperature dependent yield curve parameters were identified using a response surface approach. • Estimation of Weibull parameters of cleavage fracture for steels at low temperatures

  13. An experimental study on semi-brittle and plastic rheology of Panzhihua gabbro

    何昌荣; 周永胜; 桑祖南

    2003-01-01

    We have carried out a systematic experimental study on semi-brittle and plastic deformation of fine-grained Panzhihua gabbro under dry condition with temperature range of 700-1100℃, confining pressure of 450-500 MPa, and strain rate of 1×10-4-3.1×10-6 s-1, using a triaxial testing system with a Griggs type solid medium pressure vessel. In terms of the parameters in the flow law and microstructure after deformation, the rate-dependent deformation can be categorized into three modes: (i) In temperature range of 700-800℃, the deformation is accommodated by semi-brittle flow, with activation energy Q = 612 ± 12 kJ/mol, and stress exponent n = 14.6. The deformation in microscopic scale corresponds to the dislocation glide accompanied with microfracturing. (ii) In temperature range of 900-950℃, the predominant deformation mechanisms in this phase are mechanical twinning and dislocation glide, with activation energy Q =720 ± 61 kJ/mol, and stress exponent n = 6.4. (iii) In temperature range of 1000-1150℃, the major deformation mechanisms are dislocation glide and dislocation climb with minor processes of partial melting, with activation energy Q = 699 ± 55 kJ/mol and stress exponent n = 4.1. The microstructure and deformation mechanism of our experiments are comparable to the results of clinopyroxene and diabase as observed in previous studies. The flow stress of a mafic lower crust is calculated based on the rheological parameters of dry fine-grained gabbro, which implies that a lower curst with mafic granulite may be brittle, and it is possible to fracture and produce frictional slips. This may be an important implication for earthquake nucleation in the lower crust.

  14. THE VISCOUS TO BRITTLE TRANSITION IN CRYSTAL- AND BUBBLE-BEARING MAGMAS

    Mattia ePistone

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The transition from viscous to brittle behaviour in magmas plays a decisive role in determining the style of volcanic eruptions. While this transition has been determined for one- or two-phase systems, it remains poorly constrained for natural magmas containing silicic melt, crystals, and gas bubbles. Here we present new experimental results on shear-induced fracturing of three-phase magmas obtained at high-temperature (673-1023 K and high-pressure (200 MPa conditions over a wide range of strain-rates (5·10-6 s-1 to 4·10-3 s-1. During the experiments bubbles are deformed (i.e. capillary number are in excess of 1 enough to coalesce and generate a porous network that potentially leads to outgassing. A physical relationship is proposed that quantifies the critical stress required for magmas to fail as a function of both crystal (0.24 to 0.65 and bubble volume fractions (0.09 to 0.12. The presented results demonstrate efficient outgassing for low crystal fraction ( 0.44 promote gas bubble entrapment and inhibit outgassing. The failure of bubble-free, crystal-bearing systems is enhanced by the presence of bubbles that lower the critical failure stress in a regime of efficient outgassing, while the failure stress is increased if bubbles remain trapped within the crystal framework. These contrasting behaviours have direct impact on the style of volcanic eruptions. During magma ascent, efficient outgassing reduces the potential for an explosive eruption and favours brittle behaviour, contributing to maintain low overpressures in an active volcanic system resulting in effusion or rheological flow blockage of magma at depth. Conversely, magmas with high crystallinity experience limited loss of exsolved gas, permitting the achievement of larger overpressures prior to a potential sudden transition to brittle behaviour, which could result in an explosive volcanic eruption.

  15. Hemolytic and cytotoxic effects of saponin like compounds isolated from Persian Gulf brittle star (Ophiocoma erinaceus

    Elaheh Amini

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To isolate and characterize the saponin from Persian Gulf brittle star (Ophiocoma erinaceus and to evaluate its hemolytic and cytotoxic potential. Methods: In an attempt to prepare saponin from brittle star, collected samples were minced and extracted with ethanol, dichloromethane, n-buthanol. Then, concentrated n-butanol extract were loaded on HP-20 resin and washed with dionized water, 80% ethanol and 100% ethanol respectively. Subsequently, detection of saponin was performed by foaming property, fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and hemolytic analysis on thin layer chromatography. The cytotoxic activity on HeLa cells was evaluated through 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5- diphenyltetrazoliumbromide (MTT assay and under invert microscopy. Results: The existence of saponin in Ophiocoma erinaceus were approved by phytochemical method. The presence of C-H bond, C-O-C and OH in fourier transform infrared spectrum of fraction 80% ethanol is characteristic feature in the many of saponin compounds. Hemolytic assay revealed HD 50 value was 500 µg/mL. MTT assay exhibited that saponin extracted in IC50 value of 25 µg/mL inducsd potent cytotoxic activity against HeLa cells in 24 h and 12.5 µg/mL in 48 h, meanwhile in lower concentration did not have considerable effect against HeLa cells. Conclusions: These findings showed that only 80% ethanol fraction Persian Gulf brittle star contained saponin like compounds with hemolytic activity which can be detected simply by phytochemical that can be appreciable for future anticancer research.

  16. Effect of impurities on the high-temperature brittleness of commercial grade beryllium

    The variation in the hot-ductility of as-extruded beryllium has been studied, first of all, as a function of the temperature and of the rate of application of the tractive force. At 600 deg. C intergranular brittle fractures were observed. The presence of a Portevin-Le Chatelier phenomenon in the region where the ductility decreases has made it possible for us to connect this brittleness with an impurity-dislocation interaction. Secondly, the influence has been studied of various thermal treatments on the ductility at 600 deg. C, on the presence of the Portevin-Le Chatelier phenomenon, on the aspect of the fracture and on the formation of a face-centred cubic product (a = 6.07 A) whose presence is accompanied by an improvement in the ductility. We show the existence of a correlation between these different parameters. The use of an electronic probe micro-analyser and of X-rays has made it possible to show that the role of the three main impurities is of prime importance in the mechanism of the hot-brittleness of commercial grade beryllium, the iron in solution being responsible for the impurity-dislocation interaction, the aluminium and the silicon being present in the form of a ternary Be-Al-Si eutectic with a melting point of 430 deg. C. As a result of suitable thermal treatments the iron migrates towards the liquid phase of the eutectic, situated at the grain boundaries, and forms a face-centred cubic Be-Al-Fe compound with a = 6.07 A. This has two consequences: the matrix becomes more liable to deformation and the liquid phase disappears to give way to a high melting point compound. These two effects result, in a notable improvement in the hot-ductility of commercial grade beryllium. (author)

  17. New perspectives on the transition between discrete fracture, fragmentation, and pulverization during brittle failure of rocks

    Griffith, W. A.; Ghaffari, H.; Barber, T. J.; Borjas, C.

    2015-12-01

    The motions of Earth's tectonic plates are typically measured in millimeters to tens of centimeters per year, seemingly confirming the generally-held view that tectonic processes are slow, and have been throughout Earth's history. In line with this perspective, the vast majority of laboratory rock mechanics research focused on failure in the brittle regime has been limited to experiments utilizing slow loading rates. On the other hand, many natural processes that pose significant risk for humans (e.g., earthquakes and extraterrestrial impacts), as well as risks associated with human activities (blow-outs, explosions, mining and mine failures, projectile penetration), occur at rates that are hundreds to thousands of times faster than those typically simulated in the laboratory. Little experimental data exists to confirm or calibrate theoretical models explaining the connection between these dramatic events and the pulverized rocks found in fault zones, impacts, or explosions; however the experimental data that does exist is thought-provoking: At the earth's surface, the process of brittle fracture passes through a critical transition in rocks at high strain rates (101-103s-1) between regimes of discrete fracture and distributed fragmentation, accompanied by a dramatic increase in strength. Previous experimental works on this topic have focused on key thresholds (e.g., peak stress, peak strain, average strain rate) that define this transition, but more recent work suggests that this transition is more fundamentally dependent on characteristics (e.g., shape) of the loading pulse and related microcrack dynamics, perhaps explaining why for different lithologies different thresholds more effectively define the pulverization transition. In this presentation we summarize some of our work focused on this transition, including the evolution of individual defects at the microscopic, microsecond scale and the energy budget associated with the brittle fragmentation process as a

  18. Brittle versus ductile deformation as the main control of the deep fluid circulation in continental crust

    Violay, Marie; Madonna, Claudio; Burg, Jean-Pierre

    2016-04-01

    The Japan Beyond-Brittle Project (JBBP) and the Taupo Volcanic Zone-Deep geothermal drilling project in New Zealand (TVZ-DGDP) proposed a new concept of engineered geothermal development where reservoirs are created in ductile rocks. This system has several advantages including (1) a simpler design and control of the reservoir due to homogeneous rock properties and stress states in the ductile domain ,(2) possible extraction of supercritical fluids (3) less probability for induced earthquakes. However, it is at present unknwon what and how porosity and permeability can be engineered in such environments. It has been proposed that the magmatic chamber is surrounded by a hot and ductile carapace through which heat transfer is conductive because the plastic behaviour of the rock will close possible fluid pathways. Further outward, as temperature declines, the rock will encounter the brittle-ductile transition with a concomitant increase in porosity and permeability. The thickness of the conduction-dominated, ductile boundary zone between the magmatic chamber and the convecting geothermal fluid directly determines the rate of heat transfer. To examine the brittle to ductile transition in the context of the Japanese crust, we conducted deformation experiments on very-fine-grain granite in conventional servocontrolled, gas-medium triaxial apparatus (from Paterson instrument). Temperature ranged from 600° C to 1100° C and effective confining pressure from 100 to 150 MPa. Dilatancy was measured during deformation. The method consisted in monitoring the volume of pore fluid that flows into or out of the sample at constant pore pressure. Permeability was measured under static conditions by transient pressure pulse method. Mechanical and micro-structural observations at experimental constant strain rate of 10‑5 s‑1 indicated that the granite was brittle and dilatant up to 900 ° C. At higher temperatures the deformation mode becomes macroscopically ductile, i

  19. A damage model with non-convex free energy for quasi-brittle materials

    François, Marc Louis Maurice

    2010-01-01

    A state coupling between the hydrostatic (volumetric) and deviatoric parts of the free energy is introduced in a damage mechanics model relevant for the quasi-brittle materials. It is shown that it describes the large dilatancy of concrete under compression and the different localization angles and damage levels in tension and compression. A simple isotropic description is used, although similar ideas can be extended to anisotropic damage. The model is identified with respect to tensile and compression tests and validated on bi-compression and bi-tension. Fully written in three dimensions under the framework of thermodynamics of irreversible processes, it allows further developments within a finite element code.

  20. Understanding brittle deformation at the Olkiluoto site. Literature compilation for site characterization and geological modelling

    The present report arose from the belief that geological modelling at Olkiluoto, Finland, where an underground repository for spent nuclear fuel is at present under construction, could be significantly improved by an increased understanding of the phenomena being modelled, in conjunction with the more sophisticated data acquisition and processing methods which are now being introduced. Since the geological model is the necessary basis for the rock engineering and hydrological models, which in turn provide the foundation for identifying suitable rock volumes underground and for demonstrating longterm safety, its scientific basis is of critical importance. As a contribution to improving this scientific basis, the literature on brittle deformation in the Earth's crust has been reviewed, and key references chosen and arranged, with the particular geology of the Olkiluoto site in mind. The result is a compilation of scientific articles, reports and books on some of the key topics, which are of significance for an improved understanding of brittle deformation of hard, crystalline rocks, such as those typical for Olkiluoto. The report is subdivided into six Chapters, covering (1) background information, (2) important aspects of the fabric of intact rock, (3) fracture mechanics and brittle microtectonics, (4) fracture data acquisition and processing, for the statistical characterisation and modelling of fracture systems, (5) the characterisation of brittle deformation zones for deterministic modelling, and (6) the regional geological framework of the Olkiluoto site. The Chapters are subdivided into a number of Sections, and each Section into a number of Topics. The citations are mainly collected under each Topic, embedded in a short explanatory text or listed chronologically without comment. The systematic arrangement of Chapters, Sections and Topics is such that the Table of Contents can be used to focus quickly on the theme of interest without the necessity of looking

  1. Hydrogen effect on tendency to brittle fracture of welded joints in WWER-1000 reactor vessels

    Hydrogen effect on tendency to brittle fracture of varions welded joint zones under a 12 MPa pressure, at operatting temperatures, various deformation rates and hydrogen concentrations has been studied. Welded joints of shrouds 4535X295 mm in diameter of 15Kh2NMFA steel have been investigated. It has been found that for raising resistance to hydrogen embrittlement of WWER type reactor vessels it is reasonable to decrease a detrimental impurities content (antimony, tin, arsenic, zinc lead) in the base metal and welding wire. To prevent reactor vessel damages due to hydrogen embrittlement steelaustenite internal surface cladding is reqUired

  2. Effect of alloying elements on tendency to reversible temper brittleness of low alloy welds

    Results of assessing the role of impurity and alloying elements contained in multicomponent (Cr-Ni-Mo system) weld in development of embrittlement during decelerated cooling after tempering to treat for stress-relieve are given as well as of establishing basic concentration and time-temperature regularities of this process. Cr-Mn-Ni-Mo system wires were used in experiments. Quantitative relation between temperature level of transition to brittle state of welds and elements contents affecting embrittlement has been determined. Parametric dependence revealed permits to assess with high confidence cold resistance of Cr-Ni-Mo welds at this stage of choosing the weld material composition, welding and thermal treatment conditions

  3. Process diagnostics for precision grinding brittle materials in a production environment

    Precision grinding processes are steadily migrating from research laboratory environments into manufacturing production lines as precision machines and processes become increasingly more commonplace throughout industry. Low-roughness, low-damage precision grinding is gaining widespread commercial acceptance for a host of brittle materials including advanced structural ceramics. The development of these processes is often problematic and requires diagnostic information and analysis to harden the processes for manufacturing. This paper presents a series of practical precision grinding tests developed and practiced at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory that yield important information to help move a new process idea into production

  4. Cleavage Fracture of Brittle Semiconductors from the Nanometer to the Centimeter Scale

    Wasmer, Kilian; Ballif, Christophe; Gassilloud, Rémy; Pouvreau, Cédric; Rabe, Rodolfo; Michler, Johann; Breguet, Jean-Marc; Solletti, Jean-Marie; Karimi, Ayat; Schulz, Daniel; Schulz, D; Wasmer, K; Ballif, C.; Pouvreau, C.; Rabe, R.

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to present the fundamental phenomena occurring during the scribing and subsequent fracturing process usually performed when preparing surfaces of brittle semiconductors. In the first part, an overview of nano-scratching experiments of different semiconductor surfaces (InP, Si and GaAs) is given. It is shown how phase transformation can occur in Si under a diamond tip, how single dislocations can be induced in InP wafers and how higher scratching load of GaAs waf...

  5. Micro mechanical analysis of the coupling between damage and permeability of brittle rocks

    This paper presents a coupled model for anisotropic damage and permeability variation in brittle rocks by micro-macro approach. The material damage is represented by space distribution of microcracks (crack orientation, crack length and crack aperture). The evolution of damage is determined from a crack propagation criterion. Effective properties of damaged material are studied using micro mechanical considerations. By using Darcy law for macroscopic fluid flow and assuming laminar flow inside microcracks, the total permeability of the cracked material is obtained by a volume averaging procedure taking into account crack aperture distribution in each orientation in the space. (authors)

  6. Continuous amperometric monitoring of glucose in a brittle diabetic chimpanzee with a miniature subcutaneous electrode

    Wagner, J. G.; Schmidtke, D. W.; Quinn, C P; Fleming, T F; Bernacky, B.; Heller, A.

    1998-01-01

    The performance of an amperometric biosensor, consisting of a subcutaneously implanted miniature (0.29 mm diameter, 5 × 10−4 cm2 mass transporting area), 90 s 10–90% rise/decay time glucose electrode, and an on-the-skin electrocardiogram Ag/AgCl electrode was tested in an unconstrained, naturally diabetic, brittle, type I, insulin-dependent chimpanzee. The chimpanzee was trained to wear on her wrist a small electronic package and to present her heel for capillary blood samples. In five sets o...

  7. Modeling and mesoscopic damage constitutive relation of brittle short-fiber-reinforced composites

    刘洪秋; 梁乃刚; 夏蒙棼

    1999-01-01

    Aimed at brittle composites reinforced by randomly distributed short-fibers with a relatively large aspect ratio, stiffness modulus and strength, a mesoscopic material model was proposed. Based on the statistical description,damage mechanisms, damage-induced anisotropy, damage rate effect and stress redistribution, the constitutive relation were derived. By taking glass fiber reinforced polypropylene polymers as an example, the effect of initial orientation distribution of fibers, damage-induced anisotropy, and damage-rate effect on macro-behaviors of composites were quantitatively analyzed. The theoretical predictions compared favorably with the experimental results.

  8. Brittle and semibrittle behaviours of a carbonate rock: Influence of water and temperature

    Nicolas, A.; Fortin, J.; Regnet, J. B.; Dimanov, A.; Guéguen, Y.

    2016-04-01

    Inelastic deformation can either occur with dilatancy or compaction, implying differences in porosity changes, failure and petrophysical properties. In this study, the roles of water as a pore fluid, and of temperature, on the deformation and failure of a micritic limestone (white Tavel limestone, porosity 14.7%) were investigated under triaxial stresses. For each sample, a hydrostatic load was applied up to the desired confining pressure (from 0 MPa up to 85 MPa) at either room temperature or at 70°C. Two pore fluid conditions were investigated at room temperature: dry and water saturated. The samples were deformed up to failure at a constant strain rate of ˜10-5s-1. The experiments were coupled with ultrasonic wave velocity surveys to monitor crack densities. The linear trend between the axial crack density and the relative volumetric strain beyond the onset of dilatancy suggests that cracks propagate at constant aspect ratio. The decrease of ultrasonic wave velocities beyond the onset of inelastic compaction in the semibrittle regime indicate the ongoing interplay of shear-enhanced compaction and crack development. Water has a weakening effect on the onset of dilatancy in the brittle regime, but no measurable influence on the peak strength. Temperature lowers the confining pressure at which the brittle-semibrittle transition is observed but does not change the stress states at the onset of inelastic compaction and at the post-yield onset of dilatancy.

  9. Brittle Creep Failure, Critical Behavior, and Time-to-Failure Prediction of Concrete under Uniaxial Compression

    Yingchong Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the time-dependent brittle deformation behavior of concrete as a main building material is fundamental for the lifetime prediction and engineering design. Herein, we present the experimental measures of brittle creep failure, critical behavior, and the dependence of time-to-failure, on the secondary creep rate of concrete under sustained uniaxial compression. A complete evolution process of creep failure is achieved. Three typical creep stages are observed, including the primary (decelerating, secondary (steady state creep regime, and tertiary creep (accelerating creep stages. The time-to-failure shows sample-specificity although all samples exhibit a similar creep process. All specimens exhibit a critical power-law behavior with an exponent of −0.51 ± 0.06, approximately equal to the theoretical value of −1/2. All samples have a long-term secondary stage characterized by a constant strain rate that dominates the lifetime of a sample. The average creep rate expressed by the total creep strain over the lifetime (tf-t0 for each specimen shows a power-law dependence on the secondary creep rate with an exponent of −1. This could provide a clue to the prediction of the time-to-failure of concrete, based on the monitoring of the creep behavior at the steady stage.

  10. Brittle and Ductile Behavior in Deep-Seated Landslides: Learning from the Vajont Experience

    Paronuzzi, Paolo; Bolla, Alberto; Rigo, Elia

    2016-06-01

    This paper analyzes the mechanical behavior of the unstable Mt. Toc slope before the 1963 catastrophic collapse, considering both the measured data (surface displacements and microseismicity) and the updated geological model of the prehistoric rockslide. From February 1960 up to 9 October 1963, the unstable mass behaved as a brittle-ductile `mechanical system,' characterized by remarkable microseismicity as well as by considerable surface displacements (up to 4-5 m). Recorded microshocks were the result of progressive rock fracturing of distinct resisting stiff parts made up of intact rock (indentations, undulations, and rock bridges). The main resisting stiff part was a large rock indentation located at the NE extremity of the unstable mass that acted as a mechanical constraint during the whole 1960-1963 period, inducing a progressive rototranslation toward the NE. This large constraint failed in autumn 1960, when an overall slope failure took place, as emphasized by the occurrence of the large perimetrical crack in the upper slope. In this circumstance, the collapse was inhibited by a reblocking phenomenon of the unstable mass that had been previously destabilized by the first reservoir filling. Progressive failure of localized intact rock parts progressively propagated westwards as a consequence of the two further filling-drawdown cycles of the reservoir (1962 and 1963). The characteristic brittle-ductile behavior of the Vajont landslide was made possible by the presence of a very thick (40-50 m) and highly deformable shear zone underlying the upper rigid rock mass (100-120 m thick).

  11. Brittle-ductile transition for nuclear applications in contact with mercury

    In this work is studied the mercury embrittlement of austenitic stainless steel 316L and ferritic-martensitic steel T91 at ambient temperature in carrying out tensile tests on CCT (Center Cracked Tension) specimens at solicitation velocities between 1.67*10-8 and 6.67*10-3 m.s-1. The results reveal that these two steels are sensitive to mercury embrittlement. A ductile-brittle transition of the steel 316L in contact to mercury in terms of the deformation velocity is observed. The early beginnings of such a transition are visible too on the steel T91 in the experiment conditions. On a some range of the solicitation velocity, the presence of mercury modifies the plastic behaviour of the material in inhibiting the nucleation-growth of the cavities. For these two steels in contact with mercury, in the area of velocities for which a brittle rupture is observed, it appears that the fracture is produced by de-cohesion of shear bands. (O.M.)

  12. Visco-poroelastic damage model for brittle-ductile failure of porous rocks

    Lyakhovsky, Vladimir; Zhu, Wenlu; Shalev, Eyal

    2015-04-01

    The coupling between damage accumulation, dilation, and compaction during loading of sandstones is responsible for different structural features such as localized deformation bands and homogeneous inelastic deformation. We distinguish and quantify the role of each deformation mechanism using new mathematical model and its numerical implementation. Formulation includes three different deformation regimes: (I) quasi-elastic deformation characterized by material strengthening and compaction; (II) cataclastic flow characterized by damage increase and compaction; and (III) brittle failure characterized by damage increase, dilation, and shear localization. Using a three-dimensional numerical model, we simulate the deformation behavior of cylindrical porous Berea sandstone samples under different confining pressures. The obtained stress, strain, porosity changes and macroscopic deformation features well reproduce the laboratory results. The model predicts different rock behavior as a function of confining pressures. The quasi-elastic and brittle regimes associated with formation of shear and/or dilatant bands occur at low effective pressures. The model also successfully reproduces cataclastic flow and homogeneous compaction under high pressures. Complex behavior with overlap of common features of all regimes is simulated under intermediate pressures, resulting with localized compaction or shear enhanced compaction bands. Numerical results elucidate three steps in the formation of compaction bands: (1) dilation and subsequent shear localization, (2) formation of shear enhanced compaction band, and (3) formation of pure compaction band.

  13. Research on Ultrasonic Vibration Grinding of the Hard and Brittle Materials

    YANG Xin-hong; HAN Jie-cai; ZHANG Yu-min; ZUO Hong-bo; ZHANG Xue-jun

    2006-01-01

    It is well known that grinding techniques are main methods to machine hard and brittle materials such as engineering ceramics. But the conventional grinding has many shortcomings such as poorer surface finish, quicker wear and tear of grinding tools, lower efficiency and so on. Ultrasonic vibration grinding (UVG) which combines ultrasonic machining and grinding emerged as a developing and promising technique in recent years. In this paper, experimental studies on UVG were conducted on several kinds of hard and brittle material by altering processing parameters such as vibration frequency and its amplitude, diamond abrasive grit size, cutting depth, feeding speed and rotary speed of tools. The experimental results show that alteration in any of above mentioned parameters will bring effects on the processed surface finish of these materials. Of them, the diamond abrasive grit size has the greatest. Moreover, conventional grinding experiments were also carried out on these materials. By comparison, it was found that the UVG is superior to the conventional method in terms of the ground surface quality, the working efficiency and the wear rate of tools.

  14. Nano finish grinding of brittle materials using electrolytic in-process dressing (ELID) technique

    M Rahman; A Senthil Kumar; H S Lim; K Fatima

    2003-10-01

    Recent developments in grinding have opened up new avenues for finishing of hard and brittle materials with nano-surface finish, high tolerance and accuracy. Grinding with superabrasive wheels is an excellent way to produce ultraprecision surface finish. However, superabrasive diamond grits need higher bonding strength while grinding, which metal-bonded grinding wheels can offer. Truing and dressing of the wheels are major problems and they tend to glaze because of wheel loading. When grinding with superabrasive wheels, wheel loading can be avoided by dressing periodically to obtain continuous grinding. Electrolytic inprocess dressing (ELID) is the most suitable process for dressing metal-bonded grinding wheels during the grinding process. Nano-surface finish can be achieved only when chip removal is done at the atomic level. Recent developments of ductile mode machining of hard and brittle materials show that plastically deformed chip removal minimizes the subsurface damage of the workpiece. When chip deformation takes place in the ductile regime, a defect-free nano-surface is possible and it completely eliminates the polishing process. ELID is one of the processes used for atomic level metal removal and nano-surface finish. However, no proper and detailed studies have been carried out to clarify the fundamental characteristics for making this process a robust one. Consequently, an attempt has been made in this study to understand the fundamental characteristics of ELID grinding and their influence on surface finish.

  15. KrF excimer laser precision machining of hard and brittle ceramic biomaterials.

    Huang, Yao-Xiong; Lu, Jian-Yi; Huang, Jin-Xia

    2014-06-01

    KrF excimer laser precision machining of porous hard-brittle ceramic biomaterials was studied to find a suitable way of machining the materials into various desired shapes and sizes without distorting their intrinsic structure and porosity. Calcium phosphate glass ceramics (CPGs) and hydroxyapatite (HA) were chosen for the study. It was found that KrF excimer laser can cut both CPGs and HA with high efficiency and precision. The ablation rates of CPGs and HA are respectively 0.081 µm/(pulse J cm(-2)) and 0.048 µm/(pulse  J cm(-2)), while their threshold fluences are individually 0.72 and 1.5 J cm(-2). The cutting quality (smoothness of the cut surface) is a function of laser repetition rate and cutting speed. The higher the repetition rate and lower the cutting speed, the better the cutting quality. A comparison between the cross sections of CPGs and HA cut using the excimer laser and using a conventional diamond cutting blade indicates that those cut by the excimer laser could retain their intrinsic porosity and geometry without distortion. In contrast, those cut by conventional machining had distorted geometry and most of their surface porosities were lost. Therefore, when cutting hard-brittle ceramic biomaterials to prepare scaffold and implant or when sectioning them for porosity evaluation, it is better to choose KrF excimer laser machining. PMID:24784833

  16. KrF excimer laser precision machining of hard and brittle ceramic biomaterials

    KrF excimer laser precision machining of porous hard–brittle ceramic biomaterials was studied to find a suitable way of machining the materials into various desired shapes and sizes without distorting their intrinsic structure and porosity. Calcium phosphate glass ceramics (CPGs) and hydroxyapatite (HA) were chosen for the study. It was found that KrF excimer laser can cut both CPGs and HA with high efficiency and precision. The ablation rates of CPGs and HA are respectively 0.081 µm/(pulse ⋅ J cm−2) and 0.048 µm/(pulse ⋅ J cm−2), while their threshold fluences are individually 0.72 and 1.5 J cm−2. The cutting quality (smoothness of the cut surface) is a function of laser repetition rate and cutting speed. The higher the repetition rate and lower the cutting speed, the better the cutting quality. A comparison between the cross sections of CPGs and HA cut using the excimer laser and using a conventional diamond cutting blade indicates that those cut by the excimer laser could retain their intrinsic porosity and geometry without distortion. In contrast, those cut by conventional machining had distorted geometry and most of their surface porosities were lost. Therefore, when cutting hard–brittle ceramic biomaterials to prepare scaffold and implant or when sectioning them for porosity evaluation, it is better to choose KrF excimer laser machining. (paper)

  17. An approach to scaling size effect on strength of quasi-brittle biomedical materials.

    Lei, Wei-Sheng; Su, Peng

    2016-09-01

    Two-parameter Weibull statistics is commonly used for characterizing and modeling strength distribution of biomedical materials and its size dependence. The calibrated scale parameter and shape factor are usually sensitive to specimen size. Since Weibull statistics is subject to the weakest link postulate, this work proposed to directly resort to the weakest-link formulation for the cumulative failure probability to characterize size effect on strength distribution of quasi-brittle biomedical materials. As a preliminary examination, the approach was assessed by two sets of published strength data. It shows that the resultant expression for the cumulative probability follows either Weibull distribution or other type of distributions. The calibrated model parameters are independent of specimen size, so they can be used to transfer strength distribution from one set of specimens to another set of specimens with geometrical similarity under same loading mode. These initial results motivate a more comprehensive validation of the proposed approach to proceed via a larger set of case studies covering different quasi-brittle biomedical materials over a wider range of size variation. PMID:27266476

  18. Dislocation dynamics modelling of brittle-ductile transitions in BCC metals

    Tarleton, E.; Roberts, S.; Novokshanov, R. [Oxford Univ., Dept. of Materials (United Kingdom)

    2007-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: Bend tests on single crystals of BCC metals (Tungsten, Iron and Iron Chromium alloys) show the brittle ductile transition temperature of a pre-cracked specimen under 4 point bending decreases by around 10 K for each order of magnitude decrease in strain rate. At higher temperatures or lower strain rates large numbers of dislocations are produced which are able to shield the crack from the external loading. This increased plasticity in the region of the crack tip can delay or even prevent brittle fracture meaning the specimen is ductile. These experiments have been modelled using a 2D dislocation dynamics code which simulates the nucleation and motion of dislocations around a loaded crack, and their effect of the crack-tip stress intensity factor. At high simulated temperatures or low simulated loading rates, dislocations can shield the crack tip sufficiently to prevent fracture. The model gives excellent agreement between predicted and experimental value of BDT temperatures and the variation with loading rate. However this good agreement occurs only the slip direction is at 70 degrees to the crack plane, rather than the 45 degree angle imposed by the crystallography of the real test specimens. 3D modelling of a crack is currently being performed to see if cross slip can account for an effective slip plane angle close to 70 degrees. (authors)

  19. Electromagnetic and neutron emissions from brittle rocks failure: Experimental evidence and geological implications

    A Carpinteri; G Lacidogna; O Borla; A Manuello; G Niccolini

    2012-02-01

    It has been observed energy emission in the form of electromagnetic radiation, clearly indicating charge redistribution, and neutron bursts, necessarily involving nuclear reactions, during the failure process of quasi-brittle materials such as rocks, when subjected to compression tests. The material used is Luserna stone, which presents a very brittle behaviour during compression failure. The observed phenomenon of high-energy particle emission, i.e., electrons and neutrons, can be explained in the framework of the superradiance applied to the solid state, where individual atoms lose their identity and become part of different plasmas, electronic and nuclear. Since the analysed material contains iron, it can be conjectured that piezonuclear reactions involving fission of iron into aluminum, or into magnesium and silicon, should have occurred during compression damage and failure. These complex phenomenologies are confirmed by Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS) tests conducted on Luserna stone specimens, and found additional evidences at the Earth’s Crust scale, where electromagnetic and neutron emissions are observed just in correspondence with major earthquakes. In this context, the effects of piezonuclear reactions can be also considered from a geophysical and geological point of view.

  20. Superior room-temperature ductility of typically brittle quasicrystals at small sizes.

    Zou, Yu; Kuczera, Pawel; Sologubenko, Alla; Sumigawa, Takashi; Kitamura, Takayuki; Steurer, Walter; Spolenak, Ralph

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of quasicrystals three decades ago unveiled a class of matter that exhibits long-range order but lacks translational periodicity. Owing to their unique structures, quasicrystals possess many unusual properties. However, a well-known bottleneck that impedes their widespread application is their intrinsic brittleness: plastic deformation has been found to only be possible at high temperatures or under hydrostatic pressures, and their deformation mechanism at low temperatures is still unclear. Here, we report that typically brittle quasicrystals can exhibit remarkable ductility of over 50% strains and high strengths of ∼4.5 GPa at room temperature and sub-micrometer scales. In contrast to the generally accepted dominant deformation mechanism in quasicrystals-dislocation climb, our observation suggests that dislocation glide may govern plasticity under high-stress and low-temperature conditions. The ability to plastically deform quasicrystals at room temperature should lead to an improved understanding of their deformation mechanism and application in small-scale devices. PMID:27515779

  1. Experimental Study of the Brittle Behavior of Clay shale in Rapid Unconfined Compression

    Amann, Florian; Button, Edward Alan; Evans, Keith Frederick; Gischig, Valentin Samuel; Blümel, Manfred

    2011-07-01

    The mechanical behavior of clay shales is of great interest in many branches of geo-engineering, including nuclear waste disposal, underground excavations, and deep well drilling. Observations from test galleries (Mont Terri, Switzerland and Bure, France) in these materials have shown that the rock mass response near the excavation is associated with brittle failure processes combined with bedding parallel shearing. To investigate the brittle failure characteristics of the Opalinus Clay recovered from the Mont Terri Underground Research Laboratory, a series of 19 unconfined uniaxial compression tests were performed utilizing servo-controlled testing procedures. All specimens were tested at their natural water content with loading approximately normal to the bedding. Acoustic emission (AE) measurements were utilized to help quantify stress levels associated with crack initiation and propagation. The unconfined compression strength of the tested specimens averaged 6.9 MPa. The crack initiation threshold occurred at approximately 30% of the rupture stress based on analyzing both the acoustic emission measurements and the stress-strain behavior. The crack damage threshold showed large variability and occurred at approximately 70% of the rupture stress.

  2. Breaking new ground in the mind: an initial study of mental brittle transformation and mental rigid rotation in science experts.

    Resnick, Ilyse; Shipley, Thomas F

    2013-05-01

    The current study examines the spatial skills employed in different spatial reasoning tasks, by asking how science experts who are practiced in different types of visualizations perform on different spatial tasks. Specifically, the current study examines the varieties of mental transformations. We hypothesize that there may be two broad classes of mental transformations: rigid body mental transformations and non-rigid mental transformations. We focus on the disciplines of geology and organic chemistry because different types of transformations are central to the two disciplines: While geologists and organic chemists may both confront rotation in the practice of their profession, only geologists confront brittle transformations. A new instrument was developed to measure mental brittle transformation (visualizing breaking). Geologists and organic chemists performed similarly on a measure of mental rotation, while geologists outperformed organic chemists on the mental brittle transformation test. The differential pattern of skill on the two tests for the two groups of experts suggests that mental brittle transformation and mental rotation are different spatial skills. The roles of domain general cognitive resources (attentional control, spatial working memory, and perceptual filling in) and strategy in completing mental brittle transformation are discussed. The current study illustrates how ecological and interdisciplinary approaches complement traditional cognitive science to offer a comprehensive approach to understanding the nature of spatial thinking. PMID:23440527

  3. Transient creep, aseismic damage and slow failure in Carrara marble deformed across the brittle-ductile transition

    Schubnel, A.; Walker, E.; Thompson, B. D.; Fortin, J.; Guéguen, Y.; Young, R. P.

    2006-09-01

    Two triaxial compression experiments were performed on Carrara marble at high confining pressure, in creep conditions across the brittle-ductile transition. During cataclastic deformation, elastic wave velocity decrease demonstrated damage accumulation (microcracks). Keeping differential stress constant and reducing normal stress induced transient creep events (i.e., fast accelerations in strain) due to the sudden increase of microcrack growth. Tertiary creep and brittle failure followed as damage came close to criticality. Coalescence and rupture propagation were slow (60-200 seconds with ~150 MPa stress drops and millimetric slips) and radiated little energy in the experimental frequency range (0.1-1 MHz). Microstructural analysis pointed out strong interactions between intra-crystalline plastic deformation (twinning and dislocation glide) and brittle deformation (microcracking) at the macroscopic level. Our observations highlight the dependence of acoustic efficiency on the material's rheology, at least in the ultrasonic frequency range, and the role played by pore fluid diffusion as an incubation process for delayed failure triggering.

  4. Peculiarities of influence of molybdenum silicon and manganese on tempering stability and resistance to brittle fractures of pearlitic steels

    The effect of alloying degree of α-solid solution of thermally strengthened low- and medium-carbon pearlitic steels by molybdenum, silicon and manganese on their resistance to softening under conditions of high tempering and on resistance to brittle fracture is studied. It is shown that the critical content of molybdenum in solid solution of low-carbon pearlitic steels constitutes 0.2 ... 0.3%. The presence in solid solution of more than 0.4% molybdenum results in a considerable decrease in brittle fracture resistance. The critical content of manganese and silicon in solid solution of low- and medium-carbon steel the exceeding of which leads to a noticeable decrease in the steel brittle fracture resistance, depends considerably on the steel structural state

  5. Are magma chamber boundaries brittle or ductile? Rheological insights from thermal stressing experiments

    Browning, John; Meredith, Philip G.; Gudmundsson, Agust; Lavallée, Yan; Drymoni, Kyriaki

    2015-04-01

    Rheological conditions at magma chamber boundaries remain poorly understood. Many field observations of deeply-eroded and well-exposed plutons, for example Slaufrudalur and Geitafell in SE Iceland, exhibit a sharp transition between what may have been a partially or fully molten magma chamber and its surrounding brittle host rock. Some studies have suggested a more gradual change in the rheological properties of chamber boundaries, marked by a ductile halo, which is likely to exert a significant impact on their rheological response. Understanding the state and rheological conditions of magma-rock interface and interaction is essential for constraining chamber-boundary failure conditions leading to dyke propagation, onset of volcanic eruption as well as caldera fault formation. We present results from a series of thermal stressing experiments in which we attempt to recreate the likely conditions at magma-chamber boundaries. Cores of volcanic material (25 mm diameter x 65 mm long) were heated to magmatic temperatures under controlled conditions in a horizontal tube furnace (at atmospheric pressure) and then held at those temperatures over variable dwell times. At the maximum temperatures reached, the inner part of the samples undergoes partial melting whilst the outer part remains solid. After cooling the brittle shells commonly exhibit axial, fissure-like fractures with protruded blobs of solidified melt. This phenomenon is interpreted as being the result of volume expansion during partial melting. The internal melt overpressure generates fluid-driven fractures analogous to filter-pressing textures or on a large scale, dykes. We complement our observations with acoustic emission and seismic velocity data obtained from measurements throughout the experiments. These complementary data are used to infer the style and timescale of fracture formation. Our results pinpoint the temperature ranges over which brittle fractures form as a result of internal melt overpressure

  6. Slip transfer across fault discontinuities within granitic rock at the brittle-ductile transition

    Nevitt, J. M.; Pollard, D. D.; Warren, J. M.

    2011-12-01

    Fault mechanics are strongly influenced by discontinuities in fault geometry and constitutive differences between the brittle and ductile regions of the lithosphere. This project uses field observations, laboratory analysis and numerical modeling to investigate deformational processes within a contractional step at the brittle-ductile transition, and in particular, how slip is transferred between faults via ductile deformation across the step. The Bear Creek field area (central Sierra Nevada, CA) is comprised of late Cretaceous biotite-hornblende granodiorite and experienced a period of faulting at the brittle-ductile transition. Abundant echelon faults in Bear Creek, some of which were seismically active, provide many textbook examples of contractional steps, which are characterized by well-developed ductile fabrics. The occurrence of hydrothermal alteration halos and hydrothermal minerals in fracture fill documents the presence of water, which we suggest played a weakening role in the constitutive behavior of the granodiorite. Furthermore, the mechanism that accomplishes slip transfer in contractional steps appears to be related to water-enhanced ductile deformation. We focus our investigation on Outcrop SG10, which features a 10cm thick aplite dike that is offset 0.45m through a contractional step between two sub-parallel left-lateral faults. Within the step, the aplite undergoes dramatic thinning (stretch ~1/10) and the granodiorite is characterized by a well-developed mylonitic foliation, in which quartz and biotite plastically flow around larger grains of feldspars, hornblende and opaque minerals. Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) analysis gives a more quantitative depiction of the active micromechanics and reveals how slip is accommodated at the crystal scale throughout the step. We use Abaqus, a commercial finite element software, to test several constitutive laws that may account for the deformation observed both macro- and microscopically throughout

  7. Evaluation of the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature in steel low carbon

    The aim of this study was evaluated the The aim of this study was evaluated the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) by five different methods: lateral expansion, shear fracture appearance, the average between lower and upper-shelf, load diagram and master curve using instrumented Charpy tests with total impact energy was 300 J and the impact velocity was 5.12 m/s. The Charpy specimens were 10 x 10 x 55 mm according to ASTM E-23. The load diagram showed one approach to measure when shear fractures become 50 %. Quantitative fractographic analyses of Charpy specimens reveal a certain proportion of ductile fracture even if the Charpy test is conducted at low temperatures, below the transition temperature. The ductile fracture area situated next to the notch was correlated to fracture energy for all temperatures. In the transition temperature range, fracture energy and the ductile area had a large scatter. A model for ductile -to-brittle fracture mode transition has been developed. Master curve was applied and one direction results were good.transition temperature (DBTT) by five different methods: lateral expansion, shear fracture appearance, the average between lower and upper-shelf, load diagram and master curve using instrumented Charpy tests with total impact energy was 300 J and the impact velocity was 5.12 m/s. The Charpy specimens were 10 x 10 x 55 mm according to ASTM E-23. The load diagram showed one approach to measure when shear fractures become 50 %. Quantitative fractographic analyses of Charpy specimens reveal a certain proportion of ductile fracture even if the Charpy test is conducted at low temperatures, below the transition temperature. The ductile fracture area situated next to the notch was correlated to fracture energy for all temperatures. In the transition temperature range, fracture energy and the ductile area had a large scatter. A model for ductile -to-brittle fracture mode transition has been developed. Master curve was applied

  8. Ultraprecision, high stiffness CNC grinding machines for ductile mode grinding of brittle materials

    McKeown, Patrick A.; Carlisle, Keith; Shore, Paul; Read, R. F.

    1990-10-01

    Under certain controlled conditions it is now possible to machine brittle materials such as glasses and ceramics using single or multi-point diamond tools (grinding), so that material is removed by plastic flow, leaving crack-free surfaces. This process is called 'shear' or 'ductile' mode grinding. It represents a major breakthrough in modern manufacturing engineering since it promises to enable: - complex optical components, both transmission and reflecting to be generated by advanced CNC machines with very little (or even zero) subsequent polishing. - complex shaped components such as turbine blades, nozzle guide vanes, etc. to be finish machined after near net shape forming, to high precision in advanced ceramics such as silicon nitride, without inducing micro-cracking and thus lowering ultimate rupture strength and fatigue life. Ductile mode "damage free" grinding occurs when the volume of materials stressed by each grit of the grinding wheel is small enough to yield rather than exhibit brittle fracture, i.e. cracking. In practice, this means maintaining the undeformed chip thickness to below the ductile-brittle transition value; this varies from material to material but is generally in the order of 0.1 pm or 100 nm, (hence the term "nanogrinding" is sometimes used) . Thus the critical factors for operating successfully in the ductile regime are machine system accuracy and dynamic stiffness between each grit and the workpiece. In detail this means: (i) High precision 'truing' of the diamond grits, together with dressing of the wheel bond to ensure adequate ' openness'; (ii) Design and build of the grinding wheel spindle with very high dynamic stiffness; error motions, radial and axial, must be considerably less than 100 nfl. (iii) Design and build of the workpiece carriage motion system with very high dynamic stiffness; error motions, linear or rotary, must be well within 100 nm. (iv) Smooth, rumble-free, high-stiffness servo-drives controlling the motions

  9. Capsules with evolving brittleness to resist the preparation of self-healing concrete

    Gruyaert, E.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Capsules for self-healing concrete have to possess multifunctional properties and it would be an enormous advantage in the valorization process when they could also be mixed in. Therefore, we aimed to develop capsules with evolving brittleness. Capsules with high initial flexibility were prepared by adding a plasticizer to an ethyl cellulose matrix. During hardening of the concrete, the plasticizing agent should leach out to the moist environment yielding more brittle capsules which break upon crack appearance. The tested capsules could easily be mixed in during concrete production. However, incompatibility issues between the capsule wall and the inner polymeric healing agent appeared. Moreover, the capsules became insufficiently brittle and the bond strength to the cementitious matrix was too weak. Consequently, multilayer capsules were tested. These capsules had a high impact resistance to endure concrete mixing and were able to break upon crack formation.Las cápsulas para la auto-reparación del hormigón tienen que poseer propiedades multifuncionales. Una enorme ventaja en el proceso para su valorización se obtendría si aquellas pudieran resistir con éxito el mezclado. Por lo tanto, nos propusimos desarrollar cápsulas cuya fragilidad evoluciona. Cápsulas con una alta flexibilidad inicial se prepararon mediante la adición de un plastificante a una matriz de etil celulosa. Durante el endurecimiento del hormigón, el agente plastificante debe filtrarse hacia el medio ambiente húmedo produciendo cápsulas más frágiles que se rompen con el surgimiento de fisuras. Las cápsulas pudieron ser fácilmente mezcladas durante la producción de hormigón. Sin embargo, aparecieron problemas de incompatibilidad entre la pared de la cápsula y el agente de curación polimérico interior. Por otra parte, las cápsulas se comportaron insuficientemente frágiles y con una baja adherencia hacia la matriz cementicia. En consecuencia, se probaron las c

  10. De Novo Adult Transcriptomes of Two European Brittle Stars: Spotlight on Opsin-Based Photoreception

    Mallefet, Jérôme; Flammang, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Next generation sequencing (NGS) technology allows to obtain a deeper and more complete view of transcriptomes. For non-model or emerging model marine organisms, NGS technologies offer a great opportunity for rapid access to genetic information. In this study, paired-end Illumina HiSeqTM technology has been employed to analyse transcriptomes from the arm tissues of two European brittle star species, Amphiura filiformis and Ophiopsila aranea. About 48 million Illumina reads were generated and 136,387 total unigenes were predicted from A. filiformis arm tissues. For O. aranea arm tissues, about 47 million reads were generated and 123,324 total unigenes were obtained. Twenty-four percent of the total unigenes from A. filiformis show significant matches with sequences present in reference online databases, whereas, for O. aranea, this percentage amounts to 23%. In both species, around 50% of the predicted annotated unigenes were significantly similar to transcripts from the purple sea urchin, the closest species to date that has undergone complete genome sequencing and annotation. GO, COG and KEGG analyses were performed on predicted brittle star unigenes. We focused our analyses on the phototransduction actors involved in light perception. Firstly, two new echinoderm opsins were identified in O. aranea: one rhabdomeric opsin (homologous to vertebrate melanopsin) and one RGR opsin. The RGR-opsin is supposed to be involved in retinal regeneration while the r-opsin is suspected to play a role in visual-like behaviour. Secondly, potential phototransduction actors were identified in both transcriptomes using the fly (rhabdomeric) and mammal (ciliary) classical phototransduction pathways as references. Finally, the sensitivity of O.aranea to monochromatic light was investigated to complement data available for A. filiformis. The presence of microlens-like structures at the surface of dorsal arm plate of O. aranea could potentially explain phototactic behaviour differences

  11. De Novo Adult Transcriptomes of Two European Brittle Stars: Spotlight on Opsin-Based Photoreception.

    Jérôme Delroisse

    Full Text Available Next generation sequencing (NGS technology allows to obtain a deeper and more complete view of transcriptomes. For non-model or emerging model marine organisms, NGS technologies offer a great opportunity for rapid access to genetic information. In this study, paired-end Illumina HiSeqTM technology has been employed to analyse transcriptomes from the arm tissues of two European brittle star species, Amphiura filiformis and Ophiopsila aranea. About 48 million Illumina reads were generated and 136,387 total unigenes were predicted from A. filiformis arm tissues. For O. aranea arm tissues, about 47 million reads were generated and 123,324 total unigenes were obtained. Twenty-four percent of the total unigenes from A. filiformis show significant matches with sequences present in reference online databases, whereas, for O. aranea, this percentage amounts to 23%. In both species, around 50% of the predicted annotated unigenes were significantly similar to transcripts from the purple sea urchin, the closest species to date that has undergone complete genome sequencing and annotation. GO, COG and KEGG analyses were performed on predicted brittle star unigenes. We focused our analyses on the phototransduction actors involved in light perception. Firstly, two new echinoderm opsins were identified in O. aranea: one rhabdomeric opsin (homologous to vertebrate melanopsin and one RGR opsin. The RGR-opsin is supposed to be involved in retinal regeneration while the r-opsin is suspected to play a role in visual-like behaviour. Secondly, potential phototransduction actors were identified in both transcriptomes using the fly (rhabdomeric and mammal (ciliary classical phototransduction pathways as references. Finally, the sensitivity of O.aranea to monochromatic light was investigated to complement data available for A. filiformis. The presence of microlens-like structures at the surface of dorsal arm plate of O. aranea could potentially explain phototactic

  12. Numerical simulation of dynamic brittle fracture of pipeline steel subjected to DWTT using XFEM-based cohesive segment technique

    Reza H. Talemi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In the past several numerical studies have addressed the ductile mode of fracture propagation. However, the brittle mode of pipeline failure has not received as much attention yet. The main objective of this study is to predict brittle fracture behaviour of API X70 pipeline steel by means of a numerical approach. To this end, the eXtended Finite Element Method (XFEM-based cohesive segment technique is used to model Drop Weight Tear Test (DWTT of X70 pipeline steel at -100°C. In this model the dynamic stress intensity factor and crack velocity are calculated at the crack tip at each step of crack propagation.

  13. An investigation of safety aspects of operating the end-shields in a brittle condition

    Published data on radiation embrittlement of 3.5% Ni steels (material for RAPP-1, RAPP-2 and MAPP-1 end shields - with charpy V notch value of 2.074 gm at -1010C) indicates that the nil ductility transition temperature rise would be of the order of 2050C to 2600C at the end of 30 year reactor life, against earlier figure of around 1200C. Surveillance programme on radiation embrittlement of the end-shields is being conducted to get an idea of the actual condition of the material at any required time. A study has been made to investigate safety aspects of operating the end shields in 'Brittle condition' of the material under the presently designed operating conditions. This study is based on the concept of crack arrest approach (employing fracture analysis diagram; FAD and linear elastic fracture mechanics (using possible correlation between Ksub(Ic) and CVN values). (author)

  14. Morphological study of elastic-plastic-brittle transitions in disordered media.

    Kale, Sohan; Ostoja-Starzewski, Martin

    2014-10-01

    We use a spring lattice model with springs following a bilinear elastoplastic-brittle constitutive behavior with spatial disorder in the yield and failure thresholds to study patterns of plasticity and damage evolution. The elastic-perfectly plastic transition is observed to follow percolation scaling with the correlation length critical exponent ν≈1.59, implying the universality class corresponding to the long-range correlated percolation. A quantitative analysis of the plastic strain accumulation reveals a dipolar anisotropy (for antiplane loading) which vanishes with increasing hardening modulus. A parametric study with hardening modulus and ductility controlled through the spring level constitutive response demonstrates a wide spectrum of behaviors with varying degree of coupling between plasticity and damage evolution. PMID:25375508

  15. Brittle Cornea Syndrome Associated with a Missense Mutation in the Zinc-Finger 469 Gene

    Christensen, Anne Elisabeth; Knappskog, Per Morten; Midtbø, Marit;

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the diverse clinical manifestations, identify the causative mutation and explain the association with red hair in a family with brittle cornea syndrome (BCS). Methods: Eight family members in three generations underwent ophthalmic, dental, and general medical examination...... mapping with SNP markers, DNA sequencing, and MC1R genotyping. Results: At 42 and 48 years of age, respectively, both affected individuals were blind due to retinal detachment and secondary glaucoma. They had extremely thin and bulging corneas, velvety skin, chestnut colored hair, scoliosis, reduced BMD......, dental anomalies, hearing loss and minor cardiac defects. The morphologies of the skin biopsies were normal except that in some areas slightly thinner collagen fibrils were seen in one of the affected individuals. Molecular genetic analysis revealed a novel missense mutation of ZNF469, c.10016G>A that...

  16. Stress-driven local-solution approach to quasistatic brittle delamination

    Roubíček, Tomáš; Thomas, M.; Panagiotopoulos, Ch.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 22, April (2015), s. 645-663. ISSN 1468-1218 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP201/10/0357 Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : unilateral adhesive contact * brittle limit * rate-independent processes Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 2.519, year: 2014 http://ac.els-cdn.com/S1468121814001242/1-s2.0-S1468121814001242-main.pdf?_tid=858ed642-d4c1-11e5-95d4-00000aacb35d&acdnat=1455636514_256ad6f368e89062d783bce2ac1f9a02

  17. Resilience and Brittleness in a Nuclear Emergency Response Simulation: Focusing on Team Coordination Activity

    The current work presents results from a cognitive task analysis (CTA) of a nuclear disaster simulation. Audio-visual records were collected from an emergency room team composed of individuals from 26 different agencies as they responded to multiple scenarios in a simulated nuclear disaster. This simulation was part of a national emergency response training activity for a nuclear power plant located in a developing country. The objectives of this paper are to describe sources of resilience and brittleness in these activities, identify cues of potential improvements for future emergency simulations, and leveraging the resilience of the emergency response System in case of a real disaster. Multiple CTA techniques were used to gain a better understanding of the cognitive dimensions of the activity and to identify team coordination and crisis management patterns that emerged from the simulation training. (authors)

  18. The role of microcracking on the crack growth resistance of brittle solids and composites

    A set of numerical analyses of crack growth was preformed to elucidate the influence of microcracking on the fracture behavior of microcracking brittle solids and composites. The random nucleation, orientation and size effects of discrete nucleating microcracks and resulting interactions are fully accounted for in a hybrid finite element model. The results obtained from the finite element analysis are compared with the continuum description of the microcracking. Although continuum description can provide a reasonable estimation of shielding, it fails to resolve the details of micromechanism of toughening resulting from microcracking, since not every shielding event during the course of crack extension corresponds to an increase in the R-curve. Moreover, as seen in the composite cases, the local events leading to toughening behavior may not be associated with the microcracking even in the presence of a large population of microcracks

  19. Nominally brittle cracks in inhomogeneous solids: From microstructural disorder to continuum-level scale

    Barés, Jonathan; Barlet, Marina; Rountree, Cindy; Barbier, Luc; Bonamy, Daniel

    2014-11-01

    We analyze the intermittent dynamics of cracks in heterogeneous brittle materials and the roughness of the resulting fracture surfaces by investigating theoretically and numerically crack propagation in an elastic solid of spatially-distributed toughness. The crack motion split up into discrete jumps, avalanches, displaying scale-free statistical features characterized by universal exponents. Conversely, the ranges of scales are non-universal and the mean avalanche size and duration depend on the loading microstructure and specimen parameters according to scaling laws which are uncovered. The crack surfaces are found to be logarithmically rough. Their selection by the fracture parameters is formulated in term of scaling laws on the structure functions measured on one-dimensional roughness profiles taken parallel and perpendicular to the direction of crack growth.

  20. A dimensional analysis approach to fatigue in quasi-brittle materials

    Marco Paggi

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a generalized Barenblatt and Botvina dimensional analysis approach to fatigue crack growth is proposed in order to highlight and explain the deviations from the classical power-law equations used to characterize the fatigue behaviour of quasi-brittle materials. According to this theoretical approach, the microstructural-size (related to the volumetric content of fibres in fibre-reinforced concrete, the crack-size, and the size-scale effects on the Paris’ law and the Wöhler equation are presented within a unified mathematical framework. Relevant experimental results taken from the literature are used to confirm the theoretical trends and to determine the values of the incomplete self-similarity exponents. All these information are expected to be useful for the design of experiments, since the role of the different dimensionless numbers governing the phenomenon of fatigue is herein elucidated.

  1. Generalized Continuum: from Voigt to the Modeling of Quasi-Brittle Materials

    Jamile Salim Fuina

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses the use of the generalized continuum theories to incorporate the effects of the microstructure in the nonlinear finite element analysis of quasi-brittle materials and, thus, to solve mesh dependency problems. A description of the problem called numerically induced strain localization, often found in Finite Element Method material non-linear analysis, is presented. A brief historic about the Generalized Continuum Mechanics based models is presented, since the initial work of Voigt (1887 until the more recent studies. By analyzing these models, it is observed that the Cosserat and microstretch approaches are particular cases of a general formulation that describes the micromorphic continuum. After reporting attempts to incorporate the material microstructure in Classical Continuum Mechanics based models, the article shows the recent tendency of doing it according to assumptions of the Generalized Continuum Mechanics. Finally, it presents numerical results which enable to characterize this tendency as a promising way to solve the problem.

  2. The Pore Collapse “Hot-Spots” Model Coupled with Brittle Damage for Solid Explosives

    L. R. Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is devoted to the building of a numerical pore collapse model with “hot-spots” formation for the impacted damage explosives. According to damage mechanical evolution of brittle material, the one-dimensional elastic-viscoplastic collapse model was improved to incorporate the impact damage during the dynamic collapse of pores. The damage of explosives was studied using the statistical crack mechanics (SCRAM. The effects of the heat conduction and the chemical reaction were taken into account in the formation of “hot-spots.” To verify the improved model, numerical simulations were carried out for different pressure states and used to model a multiple-impact experiment. The results show that repeated weak impacts can lead to the collapse of pores and the “hot-spots” may occur due to the accumulation of internal defects accompanied by the softening of explosives.

  3. A MIXED MODE FRACTURE CRITERION BASED ON THE MAXIMUM TANGENTIAL STRESS IN BRITTLE INCLUSION

    Ji Changjiang; Li Zhonghua; Sun Jun

    2005-01-01

    A closed-form solution for predicting the tangential stress of an inclusion located in mixed mode Ⅰ and Ⅱ crack tip field was developed based on the Eshelby equivalent inclusion theory. Then a mixed mode fracture criterion, including the fracture direction and the critical load, was established based on the maximum tangential stress in the inclusion for brittle inclusioninduced fracture materials. The proposed fracture criterion is a function of the inclusion fracture stress, its size and volume fraction, as well as the elastic constants of the inclusion and the matrix material. The present criterion will reduce to the conventional one as the inclusion having the same elastic behavior as the matrix material. The proposed solutions are in good agreement with detailed finite element analysis and measurement.

  4. Molecular-dynamics study of ductile and brittle fracture in model noncrystalline solids

    Molecular-dynamics simulations of fracture in systems akin to metallic glasses are observed to undergo embrittlement due to a small change in interatomic potential. This change in fracture toughness, however, is not accompanied by a corresponding change in flow stress. Theories of brittle fracture proposed by Freund and Hutchinson indicate that strain rate sensitivity is the controlling physical parameter in these cases. A recent theory of viscoplasticity in this class of solids by Falk and Langer further suggests that the change in strain rate sensitivity corresponds to a change in the susceptibility of local shear transformation zones to applied shear stresses. A simple model of these zones is developed in order to quantify the dependence of this sensitivity on the interparticle potential. copyright 1999 The American Physical Society

  5. Molecular-dynamics study of ductile and brittle fracture in model noncrystalline solids

    Falk, M.L. [Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States)

    1999-09-01

    Molecular-dynamics simulations of fracture in systems akin to metallic glasses are observed to undergo embrittlement due to a small change in interatomic potential. This change in fracture toughness, however, is not accompanied by a corresponding change in flow stress. Theories of brittle fracture proposed by Freund and Hutchinson indicate that strain rate sensitivity is the controlling physical parameter in these cases. A recent theory of viscoplasticity in this class of solids by Falk and Langer further suggests that the change in strain rate sensitivity corresponds to a change in the susceptibility of local shear transformation zones to applied shear stresses. A simple model of these zones is developed in order to quantify the dependence of this sensitivity on the interparticle potential. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  6. Brittle intermetallic compound makes ultrastrong low-density steel with large ductility

    Kim, Sang-Heon; Kim, Hansoo; Kim, Nack J.

    2015-02-01

    Although steel has been the workhorse of the automotive industry since the 1920s, the share by weight of steel and iron in an average light vehicle is now gradually decreasing, from 68.1 per cent in 1995 to 60.1 per cent in 2011 (refs 1, 2). This has been driven by the low strength-to-weight ratio (specific strength) of iron and steel, and the desire to improve such mechanical properties with other materials. Recently, high-aluminium low-density steels have been actively studied as a means of increasing the specific strength of an alloy by reducing its density. But with increasing aluminium content a problem is encountered: brittle intermetallic compounds can form in the resulting alloys, leading to poor ductility. Here we show that an FeAl-type brittle but hard intermetallic compound (B2) can be effectively used as a strengthening second phase in high-aluminium low-density steel, while alleviating its harmful effect on ductility by controlling its morphology and dispersion. The specific tensile strength and ductility of the developed steel improve on those of the lightest and strongest metallic materials known, titanium alloys. We found that alloying of nickel catalyses the precipitation of nanometre-sized B2 particles in the face-centred cubic matrix of high-aluminium low-density steel during heat treatment of cold-rolled sheet steel. Our results demonstrate how intermetallic compounds can be harnessed in the alloy design of lightweight steels for structural applications and others.

  7. Time-resolved study of femtosecond laser induced micro-modifications inside transparent brittle materials

    Hendricks, F.; Matylitsky, V. V.; Domke, M.; Huber, Heinz P.

    2016-03-01

    Laser processing of optically transparent or semi-transparent, brittle materials is finding wide use in various manufacturing sectors. For example, in consumer electronic devices such as smartphones or tablets, cover glass needs to be cut precisely in various shapes. The unique advantage of material processing with femtosecond lasers is efficient, fast and localized energy deposition in nearly all types of solid materials. When an ultra-short laser pulse is focused inside glass, only the localized region in the neighborhood of the focal volume absorbs laser energy by nonlinear optical absorption. Therefore, the processing volume is strongly defined, while the rest of the target stays unaffected. Thus ultra-short pulse lasers allow cutting of the chemically strengthened glasses such as Corning Gorilla glass without cracking. Non-ablative cutting of transparent, brittle materials, using the newly developed femtosecond process ClearShapeTM from Spectra-Physics, is based on producing a micron-sized material modification track with well-defined geometry inside. The key point for development of the process is to understand the induced modification by a single femtosecond laser shot. In this paper, pump-probe microscopy techniques have been applied to study the defect formation inside of transparent materials, namely soda-lime glass samples, on a time scale between one nanosecond to several tens of microseconds. The observed effects include acoustic wave propagation as well as mechanical stress formation in the bulk of the glass. Besides better understanding of underlying physical mechanisms, our experimental observations have enabled us to find optimal process parameters for the glass cutting application and lead to better quality and speed for the ClearShapeTM process.

  8. Modelling of the plasticity and brittle failure of the irradiated bainitic steels

    Low alloy steels are used in various equipments of nuclear reactors. Subjected to neutron irradiation produced during the operation of reactors, these materials exhibit significant changes in their microstructure, especially with the formation of radiation defects as interstitial loops, void clusters and precipitates. These defects in interactions with dislocations lead to a hardening and embrittlement which are directly related to the received dose and neutron flux. The plastic behaviour of non-irradiated low alloy bainitic steels has been the object of several modelling based on observations from experiments and atomistic simulations. Some of them result from thesis supported by EDF and CEA, which describe different strategies for the micro-mechanical modelling of brittle failure. Improvements in this work come from the integration of new physical characteristics and the attention paid to the representativeness of the microstructure: whereas realistic microstructures in terms of morphology and crystal orientations have been adopted, a dislocation density based constitutive model in the large deformation framework is used to describe crystal plasticity. This choice is justified by the need to take into account, in the constitutive modelling, the interactions between dislocations and irradiation defects under severe loading conditions. The plasticity laws have been implemented in the finite elements code ZeBuLoN in order to perform computations of polycrystalline aggregates. Such aggregates are representative volume elements. They thus provide the database required for the application of brittle failure models to structures. This multi-scale character confers to the modelling the status of 'micro-mechanical local approach of failure'. (author)

  9. A graphene meta-interface for enhancing the stretchability of brittle oxide layers

    Won, Sejeong; Jang, Jae-Won; Choi, Hyung-Jin; Kim, Chang-Hyun; Lee, Sang Bong; Hwangbo, Yun; Kim, Kwang-Seop; Yoon, Soon-Gil; Lee, Hak-Joo; Kim, Jae-Hyun; Lee, Soon-Bok

    2016-02-01

    Oxide materials have recently attracted much research attention for applications in flexible and stretchable electronics due to their excellent electrical properties and their compatibility with established silicon semiconductor processes. Their widespread uptake has been hindered, however, by the intrinsic brittleness and low stretchability. Here we investigate the use of a graphene meta-interface to enhance the electromechanical stretchability of fragile oxide layers. Electromechanical tensile tests of indium tin oxide (ITO) layers on polymer substrates were carried out with in situ observations using an optical microscope. It was found that the graphene meta-interface reduced the strain transfer between the ITO layer and the substrate, and this behavior was well described using a shear lag model. The graphene meta-interface provides a novel pathway for realizing flexible and stretchable electronic applications based on oxide layers.Oxide materials have recently attracted much research attention for applications in flexible and stretchable electronics due to their excellent electrical properties and their compatibility with established silicon semiconductor processes. Their widespread uptake has been hindered, however, by the intrinsic brittleness and low stretchability. Here we investigate the use of a graphene meta-interface to enhance the electromechanical stretchability of fragile oxide layers. Electromechanical tensile tests of indium tin oxide (ITO) layers on polymer substrates were carried out with in situ observations using an optical microscope. It was found that the graphene meta-interface reduced the strain transfer between the ITO layer and the substrate, and this behavior was well described using a shear lag model. The graphene meta-interface provides a novel pathway for realizing flexible and stretchable electronic applications based on oxide layers. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr05412e

  10. Ductile-brittle transition behavior of V-4Cr-4Ti irradiated in the dynamic helium charging experiment

    Chung, H.M.; Nowicki, L.J.; Busch, D.E. [Argonne National Lab., Chicago, IL (United States)] [and others

    1995-04-01

    The objective of this work is to determine the effect of simultaneous displacement damage and dynamically charged helium on the ductile-brittle transition behavior of V-4Cr-4Ti specimens irradiated to 18-31 dpa at 425-600{degrees}C in the Dynamic Helium Charging Experiment (DHCE).

  11. Micromechanics of failure in brittle geomaterials. Final technical report (for 7/1/1994 - 8/31/2000)

    The overall objective was to provide a fundamental understanding of brittle failure processes in porous and compact geomaterials. This information is central to energy-related programs such as oil and gas exploration/production, reservoir engineering, drilling technology, geothermal energy recovery, nuclear waste isolation, and environmental remediation. The effects of key parameters such as grain boundary structure and cementation, damage state, and load path on the deformation and failure model of brittle geomaterials are still largely unknown. The research methodology emphasized the integration of experimental rock mechanical testing, quantitative microscopy, and detailed analysis using fracture mechanics, continuum plasticity theory, and numerical methods. Significant progress was made in elucidating the micromechanics of brittle failure in compact crystalline rocks, as well as high-porosity siliciclastic and carbonate rocks. Substantial effort was expended toward applying a new quantitative three-dimensional imaging technique to geomaterials and for developing enhanced image analysis capabilities. The research is presented under the following topics: technique for imaging the 3-D pore structure of geomaterials; mechanics of compressive failure in sandstone; effect of water on compressive failure of sandstone; micromechanics of compressive failure: observation and model; and the brittle-ductile transition in porous carbonate rocks

  12. A role for repressive complexes and H3K9 di-methylation in PRDM5-associated brittle cornea syndrome

    Porter, Louise F; Galli, Giorgio G; Williamson, Sally;

    2015-01-01

    Type 2 brittle cornea syndrome (BCS2) is an inherited connective tissue disease with a devastating ocular phenotype caused by mutations in the transcription factor PRDM5 hypothesised to exert epigenetic effects through histone and DNA methylation. Here we investigate clinical samples, including s...

  13. Analysis of intergranular crack propagation in brittle polycrystals with a generalized finite element method and network algorithm

    Shabir, Z.; Van der Giessen, E.; Duarte, C.A.; Simone, A.

    2009-01-01

    Two different approaches to intergranular crack propagation in brittle polycrystals are contrasted. Crack paths resulting from a method that allows a detailed description of the stress field within a polycrystal are compared to cracks dictated by topological considerations. In the first approach, a

  14. A composite material model for investigation of micro-fracture mechanism of brittle rock subjected to uniaxial compression

    2001-01-01

    A two-phase model of rock was proposed in order to investigate the mechanism of brittle fracture due to uniaxial compression, in which rock was considered to be a composite material consisting of hard grains and colloids. The stress state in colloid region near grains was calculated using Finite Element Metnod ( FEM). The influence of the tensile stresses on the crack initiation and failure process of brittle rock subjected to uniaxial compression was investigated by numerical experiments. The FE results show that tensile stresses are induced easily in the neighboring area of hard grains with the maximum value near grain boundaries. The distribution of tensile stresses depends on the relative position of hard grains. The cracks initiated just near the boundary area of hare grains, which was governed by tensile stress. These results dearly reveal the micro-fracture mechanism of brittle rock loaded by uniaxial compression. It can be concluded that the failure mode of brittle rock under uniaxial compression is still tensile fracture from the point view of microstructure. However,since the wide colloid region is still under compressive stress state, further propagation of boundary, cracks through this region obviously needs more external load, thus causing the uniaxial compressive strength of rock much higher than its tensile strength obtained via Brazilian (splitting) experiment.

  15. Understanding brittle deformation at the Olkiluoto site. Literature Supplement 2010: an Update of Posiva Working Report 2006-25

    Posiva Working Report 2006-25 arose from the belief that geological modelling at Olkiluoto, Finland, where an underground repository for spent nuclear fuel is at present under construction, could be significantly improved by an increased understanding of the phenomena being modelled, in conjunction with the more sophisticated data acquisition and processing methods which are now being introduced. Since the geological model is the necessary basis for the rock engineering and hydrological models, which in turn provide the foundation for identifying suitable rock volumes underground and for demonstrating long-term safety, its scientific basis is of critical importance. As a contribution to improving this scientific basis, the literature on brittle deformation in the Earth's crust was reviewed up to and including year 2005. The result was a compilation of scientific articles, reports and books on some of the key topics of significance for an improved understanding of brittle deformation of hard, crystalline rocks, particularly heterogeneous migmatitic and metamorphic rocks like those that make up the Olkiluoto bedrock. The present report is a supplement to WR 2006-25, covering the 5-year period 2006-2010, with some key earlier references and an Annotated Bibliography. The present report is subdivided into five chapters, listing recent literature on (1) background subjects and basic principles, (2) the fabric of Olkiluoto-type intact rock (gneisses, migmatites, fault rocks), (3) formation and characteristics of brittle deformation features (fracture mechanics, brittle microtectonics), (4) fracture data acquisition and processing (statistical characterisation and modelling of fracture systems), and (5) the characterisation of brittle deformation zones (for deterministic and dynamic modelling), corresponding to the first five chapters of the earlier report

  16. Brittle-to-viscous behaviour of quartz gouge in shear experiments

    Richter, Bettina; Stunitz, Holger; Heilbronner, Renée

    2016-04-01

    In order to study the microstructure development across the brittle-viscous transition and to derive the corresponding flow laws, we performed shear experiments on quartz gouge in a Griggs-type deformation apparatus. The starting material is a crushed quartz single crystal (sieved grain size temperatures between 500 ° C and 1000 ° C at confining pressures of 0.5 GPa, 1.0 GPa or 1.5 GPa. Four strain-rate-stepping experiments were conducted at strain rates between ˜2.5 x 10‑6 s‑1 and ˜2.5 x 10‑4 s‑1. Other experiments were conducted at constant strain rates of ˜2.5 x 10‑6 s‑1, ˜2.5 x 10‑5 s‑1, ˜2.5 x 10‑4 s‑1 and ˜2.5 x 10‑3 s‑1. At high confining pressure, the strength of the samples decreases with increasing temperature for all strain rates. The largest decrease occurred between 650 ° C and 700 ° C at shear strain rates of ˜2.5 x 10‑5 s‑1. At the same time, the pressure dependence of strength is positive for T ≤ 650 ° C while an inverse pressure dependence is observed at T > 650 ° C. For T temperature, from 700-1000 ° C it shows a strong temperature dependence. Between 650 ° C and 700 ° C at shear strain rates of ˜2.5 x 10‑5 s‑1 a change in the deformation process occurs from one dominated by cataclastic flow to one dominated by crystal plasticity. The microstructure reveals a less abrupt transition in terms of operating processes, because brittle and viscous processes are equally active around 650 ° C. With increasing temperature the volume fraction of recrystallised grains increases, and at 900 ° C - 1000 ° C recrystallisation is nearly complete at strains of γ ˜ 3. The crystallographic preferred orientation of the c-axis evolves from a random distribution at low temperatures towards two peripheral maxima at intermediate temperatures. At high temperatures the c-axis show a single Y-maximum. At high temperature, the stress exponent is n = 2.1 ± 0.2. The activation energy Q is 193 ± 12 kJ/mol at strain rates

  17. Failure processes in soft and quasi-brittle materials with nonhomogeneous microstructures

    Spring, Daniel W.

    Material failure pervades the fields of materials science and engineering; it occurs at various scales and in various contexts. Understanding the mechanisms by which a material fails can lead to advancements in the way we design and build the world around us. For example, in structural engineering, understanding the fracture of concrete and steel can lead to improved structural systems and safer designs; in geological engineering, understanding the fracture of rock can lead to increased efficiency in oil and gas extraction; and in biological engineering, understanding the fracture of bone can lead to improvements in the design of bio-composites and medical implants. In this thesis, we numerically investigate a wide spectrum of failure behavior; in soft and quasi-brittle materials with nonhomogeneous microstructures considering a statistical distribution of material properties. The first topic we investigate considers the influence of interfacial interactions on the macroscopic constitutive response of particle reinforced elastomers. When a particle is embedded into an elastomer, the polymer chains in the elastomer tend to adsorb (or anchor) onto the surface of the particle; creating a region in the vicinity of each particle (often referred to as an interphase) with distinct properties from those in the bulk elastomer. This interphasial region has been known to exist for many decades, but is primarily omitted in computational investigations of such composites. In this thesis, we present an investigation into the influence of interphases on the macroscopic constitutive response of particle filled elastomers undergoing large deformations. In addition, at large deformations, a localized region of failure tends to accumulate around inclusions. To capture this localized region of failure (often referred to as interfacial debonding), we use cohesive zone elements which follow the Park-Paulino-Roesler traction-separation relation. To account for friction, we present a new

  18. Brittle-ductile shear zone formation in the McKim Limestone: eastern Monument Upwarp, Utah

    Seyum, S.; Pollard, D. D.

    2011-12-01

    The McKim Limestone is part of a regressive, marine sedimentary sequence of strata that was deposited in the Pennsylvanian to Permian periods. It is well-exposed across large portions of Raplee anticline and Comb monocline; a pair of kilometer-scale folds that mark the Monument Upwarp of the Colorado Plateau in southeastern Utah. Two conjugate sets of echelon vein arrays, with complementary echelon pressure solution seam arrays, occur as bed-perpendicular, systematic deformation features in the 1-3 m thick McKim Limestone unit. Based on large vein to vein array angles, large vein aperture to length ratios, and the presence of vein-perpendicular pressure solution seams, these structures are interpreted to have developed within localized, brittle-ductile shear zones. Topics of debate among structural geologists regarding the formation mechanism of echelon veins include the initiation mode of vein segments (tensile or shear), the relative age between shear zone initiation and vein formation, the interpretation of strain within a shear zone, and the development of sigmoidal veins as being indicative of rotation. These concepts often are founded on geometric observations and kinematic models of deformation (e.g. simple shear) that are independent of the constitutive properties of the rock, are not constrained by the equations of motion, and do not honor the boundary conditions on the vein surfaces. Here we show a more realistic representation of brittle-ductile shear zone formation by introducing numerical models that consider the mechanical properties of limestone, are constrained by the equations of motion, and explicitly define the vein surfaces and their boundary conditions. The commercial finite element software, Abaqus FEA, is used to investigate the deformed geometry of model echelon vein arrays as a function of the remotely applied stress, the initial geometry of the vein arrays, and the constitutive properties of the solid. These geometric patterns are compared

  19. Brittle Solvers: Lessons and insights into effective solvers for visco-plasticity in geodynamics

    Spiegelman, M. W.; May, D.; Wilson, C. R.

    2014-12-01

    Plasticity/Fracture and rock failure are essential ingredients in geodynamic models as terrestrial rocks do not possess an infinite yield strength. Numerous physical mechanisms have been proposed to limit the strength of rocks, including low temperature plasticity and brittle fracture. While ductile and creep behavior of rocks at depth is largely accepted, the constitutive relations associated with brittle failure, or shear localisation, are more controversial. Nevertheless, there are really only a few macroscopic constitutive laws for visco-plasticity that are regularly used in geodynamics models. Independent of derivation, all of these can be cast as simple effective viscosities which act as stress limiters with different choices for yield surfaces; the most common being a von Mises (constant yield stress) or Drucker-Prager (pressure dependent yield-stress) criterion. The choice of plasticity model, however, can have significant consequences for the degree of non-linearity in a problem and the choice and efficiency of non-linear solvers. Here we describe a series of simplified 2 and 3-D model problems to elucidate several issues associated with obtaining accurate description and solution of visco-plastic problems. We demonstrate that1) Picard/Successive substitution schemes for solution of the non-linear problems can often stall at large values of the non-linear residual, thus producing spurious solutions2) Combined Picard/Newton schemes can be effective for a range of plasticity models, however, they can produce serious convergence problems for strongly pressure dependent plasticity models such as Drucker-Prager.3) Nevertheless, full Drucker-Prager may not be the plasticity model of choice for strong materials as the dynamic pressures produced in these layers can develop pathological behavior with Drucker-Prager, leading to stress strengthening rather than stress weakening behavior.4) In general, for any incompressible Stoke's problem, it is highly advisable to

  20. Developing an Experimental Simulation Method for Rock Avalanches: Fragmentation Behavior of Brittle Analogue Material

    Thordén Haug, Øystein; Rosenau, Matthias; Leever, Karen; Oncken, Onno

    2013-04-01

    Gravitational mass movement on earth and other planets show a scale dependent behavior, of which the physics is not fully understood. In particular, the runout distance for small to medium sized landslides (volume transport of loose granular material down a chute. Though such granular avalanche models provide important insights into avalanche dynamics, they imply that the material fully disintegrate instantaneously. Observations from nature, however, suggests that a transition from solid to "liquid" occurs over some finite distance downhill, critically controlling the mobility and energy budget of the avalanche. Few experimental studies simulated more realistically the material failing during sliding and those were realized in a labscale centrifuge, where the range of volumes/scales is limited. To develop a new modeling technique to study the scale dependent runout behavior of rock avalanches, we designed, tested and verified several brittle materials allowing fragmentation to occur under normal gravity conditions. According to the model similarity theory, the analogue material must behave dynamically similar to the rocks in natural rock avalanches. Ideally, the material should therefore deform in a brittle manner with limited elastic and ductile strains up to a certain critical stress, beyond which the material breaks and deforms irreversibly. According to scaling relations derived from dimensional analysis and for a model-to-prototype length ratio of 1/1000, the appropriate yield strength for an analogue material is in the order of 10 kPa, friction coefficient around 0.8 and stiffness in the order of MPa. We used different sand (garnet, quartz) in combination with different matrix materials (sugar, salt, starch, plaster) to cement it. The deformation behavior and strength of the samples was tested using triaxial compression tests at atmospheric confining pressures. Proper material properties were obtained using well-sorted, well-rounded, medium grained quartz

  1. Insensitivity to Flaws Leads to Damage Tolerance in Brittle Architected Meta-Materials

    Montemayor, L. C.; Wong, W. H.; Zhang, Y.-W.; Greer, J. R.

    2016-02-01

    Cellular solids are instrumental in creating lightweight, strong, and damage-tolerant engineering materials. By extending feature size down to the nanoscale, we simultaneously exploit the architecture and material size effects to substantially enhance structural integrity of architected meta-materials. We discovered that hollow-tube alumina nanolattices with 3D kagome geometry that contained pre-fabricated flaws always failed at the same load as the pristine specimens when the ratio of notch length (a) to sample width (w) is no greater than 1/3, with no correlation between failure occurring at or away from the notch. Samples with (a/w) > 0.3, and notch length-to-unit cell size ratios of (a/l) > 5.2, failed at a lower peak loads because of the higher sample compliance when fewer unit cells span the intact region. Finite element simulations show that the failure is governed by purely tensile loading for (a/w) materials may give rise to their damage tolerance and insensitivity of failure to the presence of flaws even when made entirely of intrinsically brittle materials.

  2. Design against brittle or elastic-plastic fracture of nuclear waste container

    Design against brittle or elastic plastic fracture of nuclear waste container is discussed based on three different concepts: (i) reserve of ductility defined by means of reference temperature, (ii) deterministic design using linear or elasto-plastic fracture mechanics associated with reserve factors, and (iii) probabilistic design associated with RCCMR failure assessment diagram. Cast ferritic steel predetermined for containers of spent nuclear fuel has been used in experimental part of the study. Fracture toughness characteristics necessary for considerations have been obtained by standard 1T three point bend specimens tested statically at different temperatures. Pre-cracked Charpy type specimen has been also employed for the investigations tested statically and dynamically. Material properties necessary for the concept presented are corresponding Master Curve and Weibull distribution of fracture toughness. Special attention has been paid to dynamic loading. Large scatter in reserve factor was found depending on the selected failure assessment method for fracture toughness characteristics changing the value from 1.44 to 4.55. (author)

  3. Evaluation of Crashworthiness for SAE Materials under Ductile to Brittle Transition Temperature (DBTT

    Amol Bhanage

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The concept of crashworthy coaches came into existence after a crash. This demands, avoid vehicle deformation of other/central parts. For this, the behaviour of plastic deformation of the material is necessary to be known. So, these results are required to study the crashworthy behaviour of the structure. In this research, Comparative study has been taken on the automotive materials of SAE 1026, SAE 4140, SAE 5120 and SAE8620. This paper presents the results of fracture toughness, impact energy and stress required for crack propagation from Charpy v-notch impact test and tensile test. The mechanical behaviour of SAE 1026, SAE 4140, SAE 5120 and SAE 8620 are important to describe response during actual loading condition properties used in the crash analysis of the component. The Charpy impact test was conducted at temperature ranging from room temperature 24°C, 0°C, -20°C, - 40°C, -60°C. Specimens oriented in T-L direction are tested. The materials SAE 1026, SAE 4140, SAE 5120 and SAE8620 shown that the ductile to brittle transition temperature, based on 19.5 J, 10.5 J, 113 J, 59.5 J, absorbed energy is about 1.2°C, -3°C, -38°C, -10°C respectively.

  4. Optimization Of Laboratory Hot Rolling Of Brittle Fe-40at.%Al-Zr-B Aluminide

    Schindler I.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Use of the protective steel capsules enabled to manage the laboratory hot flat rolling of the extremely brittle as-cast aluminide Fe-40at.%Al-Zr-B with the total height reduction of almost 70 %. The hot rolling parameters were optimized to obtain the best combination of deformation temperature (from 1160°C up to 1240°C and rolling speed (from 0.14 m·s−1 to 0.53 m·s−1. The resistance against cracking and refinement of the highly heterogeneous cast microstructure were the main criteria. Both experiments and mathematical simulations based on FEM demonstrated that it is not possible to exploit enhanced plasticity of the investigated alloy at low strain rates in the hot rolling process. The heat flux from the sample to the working rolls is so intensive at low rolling speed that even the protective capsule does not prevent massive appearance of the surface transverse cracking. The homogeneity and size of product’s grain was influenced significantly by temperature of deformation, whereas the effect of rolling speed was relatively negligible. The optimal forming parameters were found as rolling temperature 1200°C and the rolling speed 0.35 m·s−1. The effective technology of the iron aluminide Fe-40at.% Al-Zr-B preparation by simple processes of melting, casting and hot rolling was thus established and optimized.

  5. A Criterion for Brittle Failure of Rocks Using the Theory of Critical Distances

    Castro, Jorge; Cicero, Sergio; Sagaseta, César

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a new analytical criterion for brittle failure of rocks and heavily over-consolidated soils. Griffith's model of a randomly oriented defect under a biaxial stress state is used to keep the criterion simple. The Griffith's criterion is improved because the maximum tensile strength is not evaluated at the boundary of the defect but at a certain distance from the boundary, known as half of the critical distance. This fracture criterion is known as the point method, and is part of the theory of critical distances, which is utilised in fracture mechanics. The proposed failure criterion has two parameters: the inherent tensile strength, σ 0, and the ratio of the half-length of the initial crack/flaw to the critical distance, a/ L. These parameters are difficult to measure but they may be correlated with the uniaxial compressive and tensile strengths, σ c and σ t. The proposed criterion is able to reproduce the common range of strength ratios for rocks and heavily overconsolidated soils ( σ c/ σ t = 3-50) and the influence of several microstructural rock properties, such as texture and porosity. Good agreement with laboratory tests reported in the literature is found for tensile and low-confining stresses.

  6. Observations on the nature of micro-cracking in brittle composites

    The degree of micro-cracking in BeO-SiC composites due to internal stresses which arise from the mismatch in the coefficients of thermal expansion was monitored by measurements of the thermal diffusivity by the laser-flash technique. The experimental results indicated that micro-cracking was most extensive at approximately 30 and 80 wt % SiC and a minimum at nearly 50 wt % SiC. A theoretical analysis indicated that the magnitude of internal stress increases linearly with SiC content, so that the above observations cannot be attributed to a low internal stress state at approximately 50 wt % SiC. Instead, this effect can be attributed to changes in the statistical variables affecting the brittle fracture as well as the degree of internal stress relaxation. Both these factors are thought to be controlled by the nature of multiaxial stress distribution. At approximately 50 wt % SiC-content, due to anticipated non-hydrostatic triaxial stress distribution, residual stress relaxation is possible in both the components of the composite. However, at low and high fractions of SiC content, such stress relaxation is less likely to occur due to the expected hydrostatic stress distribution in one of the components. (author)

  7. Micropolar effect on the cataclastic flow and brittle-ductile transition in high-porosity rocks

    Zheng, Zheyuan; Sun, WaiChing; Fish, Jacob

    2016-03-01

    A micromechanical distinct element method (DEM) model is adopted to analyze the grain-scale mechanism that leads to the brittle-ductile transition in cohesive-frictional materials. The cohesive-frictional materials are idealized as particulate assemblies of circular disks. While the frictional sliding of disks is sensitive to the normal compressive stress exerted on contacts, normal force can be both caused by interpenetration and long-range cohesive bonding between two particles. Our numerical simulations indicate that the proposed DEM model is able to replicate the gradual shift of porosity change from dilation to compaction and failure pattern from localized failures to cataclastic flow upon rising confining pressure in 2-D biaxial tests. More importantly, the micropolar effect is examined by tracking couple stress and microcrack initiation to interpret the transition mechanism. Numerical results indicate that the first invariant of the couple stress remains small for specimen sheared under low confining pressure but increases rapidly when subjected to higher confining pressure. The micropolar responses inferred from DEM simulations reveal that microcracking may occur in a more diffuse and stable manner when the first invariant of the macroscopic couple stress are of higher magnitudes.

  8. Insensitivity to Flaws Leads to Damage Tolerance in Brittle Architected Meta-Materials.

    Montemayor, L C; Wong, W H; Zhang, Y-W; Greer, J R

    2016-01-01

    Cellular solids are instrumental in creating lightweight, strong, and damage-tolerant engineering materials. By extending feature size down to the nanoscale, we simultaneously exploit the architecture and material size effects to substantially enhance structural integrity of architected meta-materials. We discovered that hollow-tube alumina nanolattices with 3D kagome geometry that contained pre-fabricated flaws always failed at the same load as the pristine specimens when the ratio of notch length (a) to sample width (w) is no greater than 1/3, with no correlation between failure occurring at or away from the notch. Samples with (a/w) > 0.3, and notch length-to-unit cell size ratios of (a/l) > 5.2, failed at a lower peak loads because of the higher sample compliance when fewer unit cells span the intact region. Finite element simulations show that the failure is governed by purely tensile loading for (a/w) discrete-continuum duality of architected structural meta-materials may give rise to their damage tolerance and insensitivity of failure to the presence of flaws even when made entirely of intrinsically brittle materials. PMID:26837581

  9. Application of fracture toughness scaling models to the ductile-to- brittle transition

    An experimental investigation of fracture toughness in the ductile-brittle transition range was conducted. A large number of ASTM A533, Grade B steel, bend and tension specimens with varying crack lengths were tested throughout the transition region. Cleavage fracture toughness scaling models were utilized to correct the data for the loss of constraint in short crack specimens and tension geometries. The toughness scaling models were effective in reducing the scatter in the data, but tended to over-correct the results for the short crack bend specimens. A proposed ASTM Test Practice for Fracture Toughness in the Transition Range, which employs a master curve concept, was applied to the results. The proposed master curve over predicted the fracture toughness in the mid-transition and a modified master curve was developed that more accurately modeled the transition behavior of the material. Finally, the modified master curve and the fracture toughness scaling models were combined to predict the as-measured fracture toughness of the short crack bend and the tension specimens. It was shown that when the scaling models over correct the data for loss of constraint, they can also lead to non-conservative estimates of the increase in toughness for low constraint geometries

  10. Controlling the ductile to brittle transition in Fe–9%Cr ODS steels

    Probably the most important range of materials for consideration as the blanket material for the tokamak design for fusion reactors ITER and DEMO is the high alloy Fe–9Cr oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic steels. Ferritic steels possess exceptional thermal conductivity and low thermal expansion and are resistant to void swelling. Their main drawback is high ductile to brittle transition temperatures, particularly in the oxide dispersion strengthened versions. This paper describes attempts to reduce the DBTT in an un-irradiated ferritic steel by a novel heat treatment procedure. New batches of high alloy Fe–9Cr oxide dispersion strengthened (Eurofer) ferritic steel have been produced by a powder metallurgy route, and relatively homogeneous material has been produced by hot isostatic pressing (HIP). Mini-Charpy test specimens were made from materials which had been subjected to a matrix of heat treatments with varying solution treatment temperature (ST), cooling rate from the ST temperature, and tempering treatment. The initial DBTT was in the range of 150–200 °C (423–473 K). Downward shifts of up to approximately 200 °C (473 K) have been observed after solution treatment at 1300 °C (1573 K) followed by slow cooling. This paper describes the microstructure of this material, and discussion is made of the likely microstructural factors needed to produce these DBTT downward shifts

  11. Investigations on hydrogen brittleness of quenched and draun steels during electrochemical coating

    The results of hydrogen permeation investigations on coated steel foils on the one hand, and during metal depositing on the other, clearly show that the decisive quantity of hydrogen for possible material brittleness occurs during the nucleation process and the building-up of the first atomic positions. One can thus no longer measure any hydrogen permeation for the deposit of bright cadmium or zinc longers after a layer of about 0,5 μm has been built up. It would seem therefore useful after building up this layer to allow the hydrogen to diffuse out by temperature procedure and then to deposit the layer with no danger to the desired thickeness. It is also advantageous to coat a diffusion inhiliting, very this layer of e.g. copper, upon which further layers can be deposited. Furthermore, the diffusion behaviour of hydrogen can be reduced by appropriate alloy components or layered electrochemically inactive particles such as found for Cu-Ni alloy coatings or phosphorous-contained nickel dispersion layers. (orig.)

  12. On the initiation of shear faults during brittle compressive failure: A new mechanism

    Schulson, Erland M.; Iliescu, Daniel; Renshaw, Carl E.

    1999-01-01

    Brittle materials loaded under compression generally fail by shear faulting. This paper addresses the initiation of the fault. It presents direct observational evidence from ice, which is used as a model material for rock, and shows that wing cracking and "splay cracking" are important processes in the localization of deformation, both prior to and during fault initiation. Wing cracks develop at the tips of sliding intergranular cracks and tend to align with the maximum principal stress. Splay cracks emanate from one side of the sliding parent crack. The theme of the paper is that the splay cracks play the dominant role in triggering the fault. The central idea is that the slender columns between the splay cracks are more likely to buckle and fail than are the columns between adjacent wing cracks because they do not have two fixed ends; instead, the end stemming from the inclined parent crack is free. A moment is then applied by frictional sliding of the parent inclined crack, and this causes the fixed-free columns to break at a much lower stress than the fixed-fixed columns. Columns created near a free surface are more likely to fail than those created elsewhere, and this explains the observation that shear localization tends to initiate near free surfaces. A first-order calculation shows that the failure stress of the splay-created columns is of the same order of magnitude as the terminal failure stress.

  13. Standard test method for splitting tensile strength for brittle nuclear waste forms

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1989-01-01

    1.1 This test method is used to measure the static splitting tensile strength of cylindrical specimens of brittle nuclear waste forms. It provides splitting tensile-strength data that can be used to compare the strength of waste forms when tests are done on one size of specimen. 1.2 The test method is applicable to glass, ceramic, and concrete waste forms that are sufficiently homogeneous (Note 1) but not to coated-particle, metal-matrix, bituminous, or plastic waste forms, or concretes with large-scale heterogeneities. Cementitious waste forms with heterogeneities >1 to 2 mm and 5 mm can be tested using this procedure provided the specimen size is increased from the reference size of 12.7 mm diameter by 6 mm length, to 51 mm diameter by 100 mm length, as recommended in Test Method C 496 and Practice C 192. Note 1—Generally, the specimen structural or microstructural heterogeneities must be less than about one-tenth the diameter of the specimen. 1.3 This test method can be used as a quality control chec...

  14. Characterizing and Modeling Brittle Bi-material Interfaces Subjected to Shear

    Anyfantis, Konstantinos N.; Berggreen, Christian

    2014-12-01

    This work is based on the investigation, both experimentally and numerically, of the Mode II fracture process and bond strength of bondlines formed in co-cured composite/metal joints. To this end, GFRP-to-steel double strap joints were tested in tension, so that the bi-material interface was subjected to shear with debonding occurring under Mode II conditions. The study of the debonding process and thus failure of the joints was based both on stress and energy considerations. Analytical formulas were utilized for the derivation of the respective shear strength and fracture toughness measures which characterize the bi-material interface, by considering the joint's failure load, geometry and involved materials. The derived stress and toughness magnitudes were further utilized as the parameters of an extrinsic cohesive law, applied in connection with the modeling the bi-material interface in a finite element simulation environment. It was concluded that interfacial fracture in the considered joints was driven by the fracture toughness and not by strength considerations, and that LEFM is well suited to analyze the failure of the joint. Additionally, the double strap joint geometry was identified and utilized as a characterization test for measuring the Mode II fracture toughness of brittle bi-material interfaces.

  15. Influence of the residual stresses on crack initiation in brittle materials and structures

    Many material assemblies subjected to thermo-mechanical loadings develop thermal residual stresses which modify crack onset conditions. Besides if one of the components has a plastic behaviour, plastic residual deformations may also have a contribution. One of the issues in brittle fracture mechanics is to predict crack onset without any pre-existing defect. Leguillon proposed an onset criterion based on both a Griffth-like energetic condition and a maximum stress criterion. The analysis uses matched asymptotics and the theory of singularity. The good fit between the model and experimental measurements led on homogeneous isotropic materials under pure mechanical loading incited us to take into account residual stresses in the criterion. The comparison between the modified criterion and the experimental measurements carried out on an aluminum/epoxy assembly proves to be satisfying concerning the prediction of failure of the interface between the two components. Besides, it allows, through inversion, identifying the fracture properties of this interface. The modified criterion is also applied to the delamination of the tile/structure interface in the plasma facing components of the Tore Supra tokamak. Indeed thermal and plastic residual stresses appear in the metallic part of these coating tiles. (author)

  16. Large-scale 3D modeling of projectile impact damage in brittle plates

    Seagraves, A.; Radovitzky, R.

    2015-10-01

    The damage and failure of brittle plates subjected to projectile impact is investigated through large-scale three-dimensional simulation using the DG/CZM approach introduced by Radovitzky et al. [Comput. Methods Appl. Mech. Eng. 2011; 200(1-4), 326-344]. Two standard experimental setups are considered: first, we simulate edge-on impact experiments on Al2O3 tiles by Strassburger and Senf [Technical Report ARL-CR-214, Army Research Laboratory, 1995]. Qualitative and quantitative validation of the simulation results is pursued by direct comparison of simulations with experiments at different loading rates and good agreement is obtained. In the second example considered, we investigate the fracture patterns in normal impact of spheres on thin, unconfined ceramic plates over a wide range of loading rates. For both the edge-on and normal impact configurations, the full field description provided by the simulations is used to interpret the mechanisms underlying the crack propagation patterns and their strong dependence on loading rate.

  17. Rice Brittleness Mutants: A Way to Open the 'Black Box' of Monocot Cell Wall Biosynthesis

    Baocai Zhang; Yihua Zhou

    2011-01-01

    Rice is a model organism for studying the mechanism of cell wall biosynthesis and remolding in Gramineae.Mechanical strength is an important agronomy trait of rice(Oryza sativa L.)plants that affects crop lodging and grain yield.As a prominent physical property of cell walls,mechanical strength reflects upon the structure of different wall polymers and how they interact.Studies on the mechanisms that regulate the mechanical strength therefore consequently results in uncovering the genes functioning in cell wall biosynthesis and remodeling.Our group focuses on the study of isolation of brittle culm(bc)mutants and characterization of their corresponding genes.To date,several bc mutants have been reported.The identified genes have covered several pathways of cell wall biosynthesis,revealing many secrets of monocot cell wall biosynthesis.Here,we review the progress achieved in this research field and also highlight the perspectives in expectancy.All of those lend new insights into mechanisms of cell wall formation and are helpful for harnessing the waste rice straws for biofuel production.

  18. Residual stress evaluation in brittle coatings using indentation technique combined with in-situ bending

    The indentation crack length approach was adopted and further elaborated to evaluate residual stress and toughness of the brittle coatings: two kinds of glass coatings on steel. The influence of the residual stress on indentation cracking was examined in as-received coating condition and by in-situ superimposing a counteracting tensile stress. For purpose of providing reference toughness values stress-free pieces of separated coating material have also been examined. Thus results of the two complementary sets of experiments were assumed to prove self-consistently toughness and residual stress data of the coating. In particular, the in-situ bending of specimen in combination with the indentation test allowed us to vary deliberately the residual stress situation in glass coating. Thus experiments which utilized the combination of bending test and micro-indentation were introduced as a method to provide unambiguous information about residual compressive stress. Toughness and residual compressive stress of glass coatings used in this study were 0.46-0.50 MPa·m1/2 and 94-111 MPa, respectively. Furthermore, a thermoelastic calculation of the residual compressive stress was performed and it is found that the value of residual compressive stress at coating surface of specimen was 90-102 MPa. (author)

  19. An analytical study on the effects of strain gradient on the fracture statistics of quasi-brittle materials

    A deterministic model with material strain-softening has been employed to predict the failure process of quasi-brittle materials subjected to different strain gradients. The failures of beams in pure bending and L-shape specimens in tension are simulated using this model, and the influence of material damage rate on the failure process is studied. The effect of statistical variations in the material properties on the fracture statistics of the components is then considered. The model correctly predicts the changes in the magnitude and distribution of the failure loads of specimens with different strain gradients. The results can help explain the influence of strain gradient on the fracture statistics of quasi-brittle materials.

  20. Impact of sediment organic matter quality on the fate and effects of fluoranthene in the infaunal brittle star Amphiura filiformis

    Selck, Henriette; Granberg, Maria E; Forbes, Valery E.

    2005-01-01

    Hydrophobic contaminants, such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) readily adsorb to organic matter. The aim of this study was to determine the importance of the quality of sedimentary organic matter for the uptake, biotransformation and toxicity of the PAH, fluoranthene (Flu), in the...... infaunal brittle star Amphiura filiformis. Brittle stars were exposed to a base sediment covered by a 2 cm Flu-spiked top layer (30 mug Flu/g dry wt. sed.), enriched to the same total organic carbon content with either refractory or labile organic matter. The labile carbon source was concentrated green...... results showed that sediment particle ingestion is a pathway by which Flu can enter benthic food webs. Flu toxicity (measured as arm-regeneration), but not net accumulation, was dependent on the nutritional quality of the ingested sediment particles. Flu bioaccumulation could not be attributed solely to...

  1. Brittle fracture safety analysis of RPV based on progressive thermo hydraulic analysis; Sproedbruchsicherheitsnachweise von Reaktordruckbehaeltern auf Basis fortschrittlicher thermohydraulischer Analysen

    Keim, E.; Hertlein, R. [AREVA NP GmbH (Germany); Ilg, U.; Koenig, G. [AREVA NP GmbH (Germany)]|[EnBW Kernkraft GmbH (Germany); Schlueter, N.; Widera, M. [RWE Power AG (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    The fundamentals of brittle fracture safety analysis of RPV in case of LCA are presented in the following steps: 1. Proof of flawlessness of the RPV and plating after production; 2. Crack postulate: Internal defect with defect depth x safety factor 2 according to non-destructive test and defect type a/2c = 1/6; 3. Exclusion of crack initiation with RT{sub NDT} concept and consideration of maximum load; 4.If necessary, crack arrest as a further barrier. This concept is applied to three types of nuclear power plant: a) KKE, KKPL2, GKN II; b) GKN I; c) Biblis A/B. The thermohydraulic and fracture-mechanical calculaitons and the subsequent safety assessment showed that brittle fracture of RPV in case of LCA can be excluded for all parts of the RPV and for all accident scenarios. (orig.)

  2. Auto-refrigeration/brittle fracture analysis of existing olefins plants--translation of lessons learned to other processes.

    King, Ralph E

    2007-04-11

    This paper describes the use of process hazards analysis (PHA) techniques and "API 579 Recommended Practice for Fitness-for-Service, Assessment of Existing Equipment for Brittle Fracture" to evaluate existing olefins plants. It also examines some of the identified transient process excursions that can result in operations below vessel minimum allowable temperature (MAT), creating the potential for brittle fracture, and the methods of the evaluation are described. The importance of identifying transient process conditions and making materials-of-construction selections based on these conditions is emphasized. Translation of the typical findings and lessons learned to other processes handling light-liquid hydrocarbon materials in carbon steel equipment is discussed, as well as the importance of operator training and response. PMID:16982139

  3. The influence of coarse aggregate size and volume on the fracture behavior and brittleness of self-compacting concrete

    This paper presents the results of an experimental investigation on fracture characteristics and brittleness of self-compacting concrete (SCC), involving the tests of 185 three point bending beams with different coarse aggregate size and content. Generally, the parameters were analyzed by the work of fracture method (WFM) and the size effect method (SEM). The results showed that with increase of size and content of coarse aggregate, (a) the fracture energy increases which is due to the change in fractal dimensions, (b) behavior of SCC beams approaches strength criterion, (c) characteristic length, which is deemed as an index of brittleness, increases linearly. It was found with decrease of w/c ratio that fracture energy increases which may be explained by the improvement in structure of aggregate-paste transition zone. Also, the results showed that there is a correlation between the fracture energy measured by WFM (GF) and the value measured through SEM (Gf) (GF = 3.11Gf)

  4. Existence of a threshold for brittle grains crushing strength: two-versus three- parameter Weibull distribution fitting

    Stefanou, Ioannis; Sulem, Jean

    2015-01-01

    International audience Grain crushing plays an important role in the mechanical behavior of granular media, in chemo-hydro-thermo-mechanical couplings, in instabilities related to strain localization such as shear bands and compaction bands, in geophysical and geotechnical processes, in reservoir and petroleum engineering and in many other domains. The strength of brittle particles seems to be quite well described by a two-parameter Weibull distribution. Nevertheless, such a distribution p...

  5. Intergranular brittle fracture of a low alloy steel induced by grain boundary segregation of impurities: influence of the microstructure

    The study contributes to improve the comprehension of intergranular embrittlement induced by the phosphorus segregation along prior austenitic grain boundaries of low alloy steels used in pressurized power reactor vessel. A part of this study was performed using a A533 steel which contains chemical fluctuations (ghost lines) with two intensities. Axi-symmetrically notched specimens were tested and intergranular brittle de-cohesions were observed in the ghost lines. The fracture initiation sites observed on fracture surfaces were identified as MnS inclusions. A bimodal statistic obtained in a probabilistic model of the fracture is explained by the double population of ghost lines' intensities. A metallurgical study was performed on the same class of steel by studying the influence of the microstructure on the susceptibility to temper embrittlement. Brittle fracture properties of such microstructures obtained by dilatometric experiments were tested on sub-sized specimens to measure the V-notched fracture toughness. Fraction areas of brittle fracture modes were determined on surface fractures. A transition of the fracture mode with the microstructure is observed. It is shown that tempered microstructures of martensite and lower bainite are more susceptible to intergranular embrittlement than tempered upper bainitic microstructure. The intergranular fracture is the most brittle mode. The analysis of crystalline mis-orientations shows a grain boundary structure appreciably more coherent for tempered microstructures of martensite and lower bainite. The higher density of random grain boundaries is susceptible to drag the phosphorus in the upper bainitic matrix and to make the quantity of free phosphorus decreasing. Microstructure observations show a difference in the size and the spatial distribution of carbides, essentially cementite, between tempered martensite and upper bainite. It can explain the bigger susceptibility of this last microstructure to cleavage mode

  6. The Ductile to Brittle Transition Behavior of the Modified 9Cr-1Mo Steel and Its Laser Welds

    H.C.Wu; R.K.Shiue; C.Chen

    2004-01-01

    The ductile to brittle transition temperature (DBTT) of the modified 9Cr-1Mo steel and its laser welds was studied. The increase in grain size of the weld structure ascended the DBTT of the steel significantly. The transformation of retained austenite at martensite interlath boundaries into untempered and/or twinned martensite could also contribute to increased DBTTs of the steel and its welds tempered at 540℃.

  7. Understanding and modelling of the brittle failure of oxide dispersion strengthened steels - texture, thermal ageing and chemical composition effects

    The Oxide Dispersion Strengthened (ODS) steels have been identified as potential materials for fuel cladding in Generation IV nuclear reactors. They are characterized by a very good resistance to swelling under irradiation and to high temperature creep, but questions still remain about the impact toughness of these materials. The first aim of this work is to understand the effects of different parameters (chemical composition, texture, thermal ageing...) on the impact behaviour of ODS steels. The final objective is to predict the occurrence of the brittle failure on the ODS steel components in normal or incidental conditions. Firstly, this study assesses the stability of two ODS steel grades containing either 14%Cr or 18%Cr during thermal ageing. The 18%Cr steel grade has been discarded due to the growing of the brittle intermetallic α' phase at 600 C. However, the 14%Cr steel grade showed a promising behaviour given the stability of its mechanical properties after thermal ageing between 400 C and 600 C, for a maximum duration of 10000 hours, and regardless of the presence of chromium carbides, α' and Laves phases. Then, the morphological texture characterized by elongated grains along the extrusion direction enhances the propagation of intergranular cracks along this direction. Meanwhile, the crystallographic texture controls the cleavage micro-mechanisms. Indeed, the microstructural entities that control the propagation of the cleavage crack are groups of grains which are characterized by low crystallographic misorientation and referred to as effective grains. At last, the tensile and bending behaviour of a 14%Cr ODS steel grade has been modelled. A brittle failure criterion based on a critical stress value had also been suggested. This model allowed us to simulate mechanical tests on different geometries and to predict the occurrence of the brittle failure. (author)

  8. Growth of a brittle crack (001) in 3D bcc iron crystal with a Cu nano-particle

    Uhnáková, Alena; Machová, Anna; Hora, Petr; Červená, Olga

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 83, February (2014), s. 229-234. ISSN 0927-0256 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA101/09/1630 Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : brittle crack extension * 3D * mode I * bcc iron * Cu nano-particle * molecular dynamics * acoustic emission Subject RIV: JG - Metallurgy Impact factor: 2.131, year: 2014 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0927025613006575

  9. Numerical simulation of triaxial compression test for brittle rock sample using a modified constitutive law considering degradation and dilation behavior

    谭鑫

    2015-01-01

    The understanding of the rock deformation and failure process and the development of appropriate constitutive models are the basis for solving problems in rock engineering. In order to investigate progressive failure behavior in brittle rocks, a modified constitutive model was developed which follows the principles of the continuum damage mechanics method. It incorporates non-linear Hoek-Brown failure criterion, confining pressure-dependent strength degradation and volume dilation laws, and is able to represent the nonlinear degradation and dilation behaviors of brittle rocks in the post-failure region. A series of triaxial compression tests were carried out on Eibenstock (Germany) granite samples. Based on a lab data fitting procedure, a consistent parameter set for the modified constitutive model was deduced and implemented into the numerical code FLAC3D. The good agreement between numerical and laboratory results indicates that the modified constitutive law is well suited to represent the nonlinear mechanical behavior of brittle rock especially in the post-failure region.

  10. A Study on the Low Temperature Brittleness by Cyclic Cooling-Heating of Low Carbon Hot Rolled Steel Plate

    The ductile-brittle transition phenomenon of low carbon steel has been investigated using the standard Charpy V-notch specimen. Dry ice and acetone were used as refrigerants. Notched specimens were cut from the hot rolled plate produced at POSCO for the Olsen impact test. The effect of cyclic cooling and heating of 0.14% carbon steel on the embrittlement was extensively examined. The ductile-brittle transition temperature was found to be approximately-30 .deg. C. The transition temperature was gradually increased as the number of cooling-heating cycles increased. On a typical V-notch fracture surface it was found that the ductile fracture surface showed a thick and fibrous structure, while the brittle fracture surface a small and light grain with irregular disposition. As expected, the transition temperature was also increased as the carbon content of steel increased. Compared with the case of 0.14% carbon steel, the transition temperature of 0.17% carbon steel was found to be increased about 12 .deg. C