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Sample records for acid bacteria elicit

  1. Distinct gut-derived lactic acid bacteria elicit divergent dendritic cell-mediated NK cell responses

    Fink, Lisbeth Nielsen; Zeuthen, Louise Hjerrild; Christensen, Hanne;

    2007-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are abundant in the gastrointestinal tract where they continuously regulate the immune system. NK cells are potently activated by dendritic cells (DCs) matured by inflammatory stimuli, and NK cells are present in the gut epithelium and in mesenteric lymph nodes, but it is...

  2. Chitin elicitation of natural product production in marine bacteria

    Månsson, Maria; Wietz, Matthias; Larsen, Thomas Ostenfeld;

    glucose-based medium. The different phenotypic responses to a natural growth substrate may reflect different niche-adaptations or ecological functions of the compounds produced and it represents a fruitful approach for elicitation of natural product production in marine bacteria....... uncharacterized chemical potential of these organisms. As part of a new project on ecology-driven drug discovery at the Technical University of Denmark, we investigate the use of chitin to elicit or alter production of antibacterial compounds in marine bacteria. Within our large collection of Gram...... indicating that andrimid serves a function while growing on chitin-containing surfaces. In contrast, a Photobacterium halotolerans sustained production of all metabolites including the antibiotic holomycin. Furthermore, chitin stimulated the production of two potentially novel metabolites not observed on...

  3. Lactic Acid Bacteria

    ToddKlaenhammer

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Lactic acid bacteria (LAB are a diverse group of Gram-positive bacteria found in a vast array of environments including dairy products and the human gastrointestinal tract. In both niches, surface proteins play a crucial role in mediating interactions with the surrounding environment. The sortase enzyme is responsible for covalently coupling a subset of surface dependent proteins (SDPs to the cell wall of Gram-positive organisms through recognition of a conserved C-terminal LPXTG motif. Genomic sequencing of LAB and annotation has allowed for the identification of sortase and SDPs. Historically, sortase and SDPs were predominately investigated for their role in mediating pathogenesis. Identification of these proteins in LAB has shed light on their important roles in mediating nutrient acquisition through proteinase P as well as positive probiotic attributes including adhesion, mucus barrier function, and immune signaling. Furthermore, sortase expression signals in LAB have been exploited as a means to develop oral vaccines targeted to the gastrointestinal tract. In this review, we examine the collection of studies which evaluate sortase and SDPs in select species of dairy associated and health promoting LAB.

  4. LACTIC ACID BACTERIA: PROBIOTIC APPLICATIONS

    NEENA GARG

    2015-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) is a heterotrophic Gram-positive bacteria which under goes lactic acid fermentations and leads to production of lactic acid as an end product. LAB includes Lactobacillus, Leuconostoc, Pediococcus, Lactococcus and Streptococcus which are grouped together in the family lactobacillaceae. LAB shows numerous antimicrobial activities due to production of antibacterial and antifungal compounds such as organic acids, bacteriocins, diacetyl, hydrogen peroxide and reutrin. LA...

  5. Mucosal Vaccination and Therapy with Genetically Modified Lactic Acid Bacteria

    Wells, J.

    2011-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) have proved to be effective mucosal delivery vehicles that overcome the problem of delivering functional proteins to the mucosal tissues. By the intranasal route, both live and killed LAB vaccine strains have been shown to elicit mucosal and systemic immune responses that

  6. LACTIC ACID BACTERIA: PROBIOTIC APPLICATIONS

    NEENA GARG

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Lactic acid bacteria (LAB is a heterotrophic Gram-positive bacteria which under goes lactic acid fermentations and leads to production of lactic acid as an end product. LAB includes Lactobacillus, Leuconostoc, Pediococcus, Lactococcus and Streptococcus which are grouped together in the family lactobacillaceae. LAB shows numerous antimicrobial activities due to production of antibacterial and antifungal compounds such as organic acids, bacteriocins, diacetyl, hydrogen peroxide and reutrin. LAB are used as starter culture, consortium members and bioprotective agents in food industry that improve food quality, safety and shelf life. A variety of probiotic LAB species are available including Lactobacillus acidophilus, L. bulgaricus, L. lactis, L. plantarum, L. rhamnosus, L. reuteri, L. fermentum, Bifidobacterium longum, B. breve, B. bifidum, B. esselnsis, B. lactis, B. infantis that are currently recommended for development of functional food products with health-promoting capacities.

  7. Engineering robust lactic acid bacteria

    Bron, P.A.; Bokhorst-van de Veen, van H.; Wels, M.; Kleerebezem, M.

    2011-01-01

    For centuries, lactic acid bacteria (LAB) have been industrially exploited as starter cultures in the fermentation of foods and feeds for their spoilage-preventing and flavor-enhancing characteristics. More recently, the health-promoting effects of LAB on the consumer have been widely acknowledged,

  8. Electron transport chains of lactic acid bacteria

    Brooijmans, R.J.W.

    2008-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria are generally considered facultative anaerobic obligate fermentative bacteria. They are unable to synthesize heme. Some lactic acid bacteria are unable to form menaquinone as well. Both these components are cofactors of respiratory (electron transport) chains of prokaryotic bacteria. Lactococcus lactis, and several other lactic acid bacteria, however respond to the addition of heme in aerobic growth conditions. This response includes increased biomass and robustness. In t...

  9. Genetics of Lactic Acid Bacteria

    Zagorec, Monique; Anba-Mondoloni, Jamila; Coq, Anne-Marie Crutz-Le; Champomier-Vergès, Marie-Christine

    Many meat (or fish) products, obtained by the fermentation of meat originating from various animals by the flora that naturally contaminates it, are part of the human diet since millenaries. Historically, the use of bacteria as starters for the fermentation of meat, to produce dry sausages, was thus performed empirically through the endogenous micro-biota, then, by a volunteer addition of starters, often performed by back-slopping, without knowing precisely the microbial species involved. It is only since about 50 years that well defined bacterial cultures have been used as starters for the fermentation of dry sausages. Nowadays, the indigenous micro-biota of fermented meat products is well identified, and the literature is rich of reports on the identification of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) present in many traditional fermented products from various geographical origin, obtained without the addition of commercial starters (See Talon, Leroy, & Lebert, 2007, and references therein).

  10. Lactic Acid Bacteria in the Gut

    Stolaki, M.; Vos, de W.M.; Kleerebezem, M.; Zoetendal, E.G.

    2012-01-01

    From all bacterial groups, the lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are probably the group of bacteria that is most associated with human lifestyle. The term LAB mainly refers to the ability of these organisms to convert sugars to lactic acid. The LAB comprise non-sporing, aerotolerant, coccus or rod-shaped,

  11. Comparative genomics of the lactic acid bacteria

    Lactic acid-producing bacteria are associated with various plant and animal niches and play a key role in the production of fermented foods and beverages. We report nine genome sequences representing the phylogenetic and functional diversity of these bacteria. The small genomes of lactic acid bacter...

  12. Quorum sensing mechanism in lactic acid bacteria

    Hatice Yılmaz - Yıldıran

    2015-04-01

    and detection occurs as a consecution it is hard to understand their QS mechanism. In this review, connection between QS mechanism and some characteristics of lactic acid bacteria are evaluated such as concordance with its host, inhibition of pathogen development and colonization in gastrointestinal system, bacteriocin production, acid and bile resistance, adhesion to epithelium cells. Understanding QS mechanism of lactic acid bacteria will be useful to design metabiotics which is defined as novel probiotics.

  13. A Novel Lactic Acid Bacteria Growth-stimulating Peptide from Broad Bean (Vicia faba .) Protein Hydrolysates

    Ping Xiao; Yuan Liu; Rizwan-ur-Rehman; Ran Kang; Yanping Wang

    2015-01-01

    In this study, broad bean protein hydrolysates (BPH) produced by alcalase with strong-stimulating activity for lactic acid bacteria (LAB) was first time reported. In order to obtain the key peptide that have growth-stimulating activity for lactic acid bacteria (LAB), gel filtration chromatography and Reverse Phase High Performance Liquid Chromatography (RP-HPLC) were applied to isolate and purify the peptides from BPH. Finally, F4-2 elicited the highest activity for LAB, corresponding to amin...

  14. Genetics of proteinases of lactic acid bacteria

    Kok, Jan; Venema, Gerhardus

    1988-01-01

    Because it is essential for good growth with concomitant rapid acid production, and for the production of flavorous peptides and amino acids, the proteolytic ability of lactic acid bacteria is of crucial importance for reliable dairy product quality. In view of this importance, considerable research

  15. Acidophilic, Heterotrophic Bacteria of Acidic Mine Waters

    Wichlacz, Paul L.; Unz, Richard F.

    1981-01-01

    Obligately acidophilic, heterotrophic bacteria were isolated both from enrichment cultures developed with acidic mine water and from natural mine drainage. The bacteria were grouped by the ability to utilize a number of organic acids as sole carbon sources. None of the strains were capable of chemolithotrophic growth on inorganic reduced iron and sulfur compounds. All bacteria were rod shaped, gram negative, nonencapsulated, motile, capable of growth at pH 2.6 but not at pH 6.0, catalase and ...

  16. Comparative genomics of the lactic acid bacteria

    Makarova, K.; Slesarev, A.; Wolf, Y.; Sorokin, A.; Mirkin, B.; Koonin, E.; Pavlov, A.; Pavlova, N.; Karamychev, V.; Polouchine, N.; Shakhova, V.; Grigoriev, I.; Lou, Y.; Rokhsar, D.; Lucas, S.; Huang, K.; Goodstein, D. M.; Hawkins, T.; Plengvidhya, V.; Welker, D.; Hughes, J.; Goh, Y.; Benson, A.; Baldwin, K.; Lee, J. -H.; Diaz-Muniz, I.; Dosti, B.; Smeianov, V; Wechter, W.; Barabote, R.; Lorca, G.; Altermann, E.; Barrangou, R.; Ganesan, B.; Xie, Y.; Rawsthorne, H.; Tamir, D.; Parker, C.; Breidt, F.; Broadbent, J.; Hutkins, R.; O' Sullivan, D.; Steele, J.; Unlu, G.; Saier, M.; Klaenhammer, T.; Richardson, P.; Kozyavkin, S.; Weimer, B.; Mills, D.

    2006-06-01

    Lactic acid-producing bacteria are associated with various plant and animal niches and play a key role in the production of fermented foods and beverages. We report nine genome sequences representing the phylogenetic and functional diversity of these bacteria. The small genomes of lactic acid bacteria encode a broad repertoire of transporters for efficient carbon and nitrogen acquisition from the nutritionally rich environments they inhabit and reflect a limited range of biosynthetic capabilities that indicate both prototrophic and auxotrophic strains. Phylogenetic analyses, comparison of gene content across the group, and reconstruction of ancestral gene sets indicate a combination of extensive gene loss and key gene acquisitions via horizontal gene transfer during the coevolution of lactic acid bacteria with their habitats.

  17. Amino Acid Decarboxylase Activity of Some Lactic Acid Bacteria

    Pelin ERTÜRKMEN; Turhan, İlkay; Öner, Zübeyde

    2015-01-01

    Microorganisms which have decarboxylase activity can form biogenic amine by enzymatic decarboxylation of amino acids in foods. Histamine poisoning results from consumption of foods typically certain types of fish and cheeses that contain unusually high levels of histamine. Therefore, decarboxylase activity is an important problem at the selection of lactic acid bacteria as a starter culture in fermented products. In this study, decarboxylase activities of 161 lactic acid bacteria (LAB) strain...

  18. Study of fatty acid-bacteria interactions

    Complete text of publication follows. During our work we investigated fatty acid-bacteria interactions. The antibacterial property of fatty acids was reported by several authors. Despite of them there is not reassuring explanation about the mechanism of the antibacterial activity of these compounds. An effect can considerably change in case of different structured fatty acids. Our earlier studies conduct that small changes in the structures can modify changes in their behavior towards bacteria. The stearic acid does not cause any antibacterial effects during the first few hours of the investigation, may even help the bacterial growth. However, linolic acid (C18:2) shows a strong antibacterial effect during the first hours. After 24 hours this effect wears out and the bacteria have adapted to the stress. We studied the antibacterial activity using direct bioautography. This method has the advantage to allow examining lipophilic compounds. The linoleic acid decomposes in time under different physiological conditions creating numerous oxidized molecules. This may be the reason of its antimicrobial effect. For studying this phenomenon we used infrared and mass spectroscopic methods. We applied infrared spectroscopy for indicating any changes in the spectra of the fatty acids after the interaction of fatty acids with bacteria. So we are able to deduct on what could happen during these process. We paid great attention towards the changes of double bonds, on methylation and demethylation processes. Using mass spectroscopy we searched for oxidized products that may play important role in this process. These studies are only part of our more widespreading investigations, dealing with the antimicrobial properties of fatty acids.

  19. Acid resistance in enteric bacteria.

    Gorden, J; Small, P L

    1993-01-01

    Shigella species require a uniquely small inoculum for causing dysentery. One explanation for the low infective dose is that Shigella species are better able to survive the acidic conditions encountered in the stomach than are other enteric pathogens. We have tested Shigella species, Escherichia coli, and Salmonella species for the ability to survive at pH 2.5 for at least 2 h. Most isolates of Shigella and E. coli survived this treatment, whereas none of the Salmonella isolates were able to ...

  20. Discovering lactic acid bacteria by genomics

    Klaenhammer, T; Altermann, E; Arigoni, F; Bolotin, A; Breidt, F; Broadbent, J; Cano, R; Chaillou, S; Deutscher, J; Gasson, M; van de Guchte, M; Guzzo, J; Hartke, A; Hawkins, T; Hols, P; Hutkins, R; Kleerebezem, M; Kok, J; Kuipers, O; Maguin, E; McKay, L; Mills, D; Nauta, A; Overbeek, R; Pel, H; Pridmore, D; Saier, M; van Sinderen, D; Sorokin, A; Steele, J; O'Sullivan, D; de Vos, W; Weimer, B; Zagorec, M; Siezen, R

    2002-01-01

    This review summarizes a collection of lactic acid bacteria that are now undergoing genomic sequencing and analysis. Summaries are presented on twenty different species, with each overview discussing the organisms fundamental and practical significance, environmental habitat, and its role in ferment

  1. Bacteriocins From Lactic Acid Bacteria: Interest For Food Products Biopreservation

    Dortu, C.; Thonart, Philippe

    2009-01-01

    Bacteriocins from lactic acid bacteria: interest for food products biopreservation. Bacteriocins from lactic acid bacteria are low molecular weight antimicrobial peptides. They have inhibitory activity against the bacteria that are closed related to the producer strains and a narrow inhibitory spectrum. Nevertheless, most of them have activity against some food-born pathogenic bacteria as Listeria monocytogenes. The application of bacteriocins or bacteriocin producing lactic acid bacteria in ...

  2. Freeze-drying of lactic acid bacteria.

    Fonseca, Fernanda; Cenard, Stéphanie; Passot, Stéphanie

    2015-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria are of great importance for the food and biotechnology industry. They are widely used as starters for manufacturing food (e.g., yogurt, cheese, fermented meats, and vegetables) and probiotic products, as well as for green chemistry applications. Freeze-drying or lyophilization is a convenient method for preservation of bacteria. By reducing water activity to values below 0.2, it allows long-term storage and low-cost distribution at suprazero temperatures, while minimizing losses in viability and functionality. Stabilization of bacteria via freeze-drying starts with the addition of a protectant solution to the bacterial suspension. Freeze-drying includes three steps, namely, (1) freezing of the concentrated and protected cell suspension, (2) primary drying to remove ice by sublimation, and (3) secondary drying to remove unfrozen water by desorption. In this chapter we describe a method for freeze-drying of lactic acid bacteria at a pilot scale, thus allowing control of the process parameters for maximal survival and functionality recovery. PMID:25428024

  3. Food preservation using antifungal lactic acid bacteria

    Crowley, Sarah Catherine Mary

    2013-01-01

    Fungal spoilage of food and feed prevails as a major problem for the food industry. The use antifungal-producing lactic acid bacteria (LAB) may represent a safer, natural alternative to the use of chemical preservatives in foods. A large scale screen was undertaken to identify a variety of LAB with antifungal properties from plant, animal and human sources. A total of 6,720 LAB colonies were isolated and screened for antifungal activity against the indicator Penicillium expansum. 94 broad-spe...

  4. Biosynthesis of myristic acid in luminescent bacteria

    In vivo pulse-label studies have demonstrated that luminescent bacteria can provide myritic acid (14:0) required for the synthesis of the luciferase substrate myristyl aldehyde. Luminescent wild type Vibrio harveyi incubated with [14C] acetate in a nutrient-depleted medium accumulated substantial tree [14C]fatty acid (up to 20% of the total lipid label). Radio-gas chromatography revealed that > 75% of the labeled fatty acid is 14:0. No free fatty acid was detected in wild type cells labeled prior to the development of bioluminescence in the exponential growth phase, or in a dark mutant of V. harveyi (mutant M17) that requires exogenous 14:0 for light emission. The preferential accumulation of 14:0 was not observed when wild type cells were labeled with [14C]acetate in regular growth medium. Moreover, all V. harveyi strains exhibited similar fatty acid mass compositions regardless of the state of bioluminescence. Since earlier work has shown that a luminescence-related acyltransferase (defective in the M17 mutant) can catalyze the deacylation of fatty acyl-acyl carrier protein in vitro, the present results are consistent with a model in which this enzyme diverts 14:0 to the luminescence system during fatty acid biosynthesis. Under normal conditions, the supply of 14:0 by this pathway is tightly regulated such that bioluminescence development does not significantly alter the total fatty acid composition

  5. Exogenous Abscisic Acid and Gibberellic Acid Elicit Opposing Effects on Fusarium graminearum Infection in Wheat.

    Buhrow, Leann M; Cram, Dustin; Tulpan, Dan; Foroud, Nora A; Loewen, Michele C

    2016-09-01

    Although the roles of salicylate (SA) and jasmonic acid (JA) have been well-characterized in Fusarium head blight (FHB)-infected cereals, the roles of other phytohormones remain more ambiguous. Here, the association between an array of phytohormones and FHB pathogenesis in wheat is investigated. Comprehensive profiling of endogenous hormones demonstrated altered cytokinin, gibberellic acid (GA), and JA metabolism in a FHB-resistant cultivar, whereas challenge by Fusarium graminearum increased abscisic acid (ABA), JA, and SA in both FHB-susceptible and -resistant cultivars. Subsequent investigation of ABA or GA coapplication with fungal challenge increased and decreased FHB spread, respectively. These phytohormones-induced effects may be attributed to alteration of the F. graminearum transcriptome because ABA promoted expression of early-infection genes, including hydrolases and cytoskeletal reorganization genes, while GA suppressed nitrogen metabolic gene expression. Neither ABA nor GA elicited significant effects on F. graminearum fungal growth or sporulation in axenic conditions, nor do these phytohormones affect trichothecene gene expression, deoxynivalenol mycotoxin accumulation, or SA/JA biosynthesis in F. graminearum-challenged wheat spikes. Finally, the combined application of GA and paclobutrazol, a Fusarium fungicide, provided additive effects on reducing FHB severity, highlighting the potential for combining fungicidal agents with select phytohormone-related treatments for management of FHB infection in wheat. PMID:27135677

  6. IDENTIFICATION OF INDUSTRIALLY IMPORTANT LACTIC ACID BACTERIA IN FOODSTUFFS

    Prosekov, A.; Babich, O.; Bespomestnykh, K.

    2013-01-01

    Universal genus-specific primers for comparative analysis of two aligned 16S rRNA gene nucleotide sequences of lactic acid bacteria were constructed. The method to identify lactic acid bacteria and a comprehensive plan for their genus and species identification may be used to characterize isolated strains of the Lactobacillus genus bacteria and in quality control of foodstuffs enriched with Lactobacillus.

  7. The effect of lactic acid bacteria on cocoa bean fermentation.

    Ho, Van Thi Thuy; Zhao, Jian; Fleet, Graham

    2015-07-16

    Cocoa beans (Theobroma cacao L.) are the raw material for chocolate production. Fermentation of cocoa pulp by microorganisms is crucial for developing chocolate flavor precursors. Yeasts conduct an alcoholic fermentation within the bean pulp that is essential for the production of good quality beans, giving typical chocolate characters. However, the roles of bacteria such as lactic acid bacteria and acetic acid bacteria in contributing to the quality of cocoa bean and chocolate are not fully understood. Using controlled laboratory fermentations, this study investigated the contribution of lactic acid bacteria to cocoa bean fermentation. Cocoa beans were fermented under conditions where the growth of lactic acid bacteria was restricted by the use of nisin and lysozyme. The resultant microbial ecology, chemistry and chocolate quality of beans from these fermentations were compared with those of indigenous (control) fermentations. The yeasts Hanseniaspora guilliermondii, Pichia kudriavzevii, Kluyveromyces marxianus and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the lactic acid bacteria Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus pentosus and Lactobacillus fermentum and the acetic acid bacteria Acetobacter pasteurianus and Gluconobacter frateurii were the major species found in control fermentations. In fermentations with the presence of nisin and lysozyme, the same species of yeasts and acetic acid bacteria grew but the growth of lactic acid bacteria was prevented or restricted. These beans underwent characteristic alcoholic fermentation where the utilization of sugars and the production of ethanol, organic acids and volatile compounds in the bean pulp and nibs were similar for beans fermented in the presence of lactic acid bacteria. Lactic acid was produced during both fermentations but more so when lactic acid bacteria grew. Beans fermented in the presence or absence of lactic acid bacteria were fully fermented, had similar shell weights and gave acceptable chocolates with no differences

  8. Probiotic Lactic Acid Bacteria and Skin Health.

    Jeong, Ji Hye; Lee, Chang Y; Chung, Dae Kyun

    2016-10-25

    Human skin is the first defense barrier against the external environment, especially microbial pathogens and physical stimulation. Many studies on skin health with Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) have been published for many years, including prevention of skin disease and improvement of skin conditions. LAB, a major group of gram-positive bacteria, are known to be beneficial to human health by acting as probiotics. Recent studies have shown that LAB and their extracts have beneficial effects on maintenance and improvement of skin health. Oral administration of Lactobacillus delbrueckii inhibits the development of atopic disease. In addition, LAB and LAB extracts are known to have beneficial effects on intestinal diseases, with Lactobacillus plantarum having been shown to attenuate IL-10 deficient colitis. In addition to intestinal health, L. plantarum also has beneficial effects on skin. pLTA, which is lipoteichoic acid isolated from L. plantarum, has anti-photoaging effects on human skin cells by regulating the expression matrix meralloprotionase-1 (MMP-1) expression. While several studies have proposed a relationship between diseases of the skin and small intestines, there are currently no published reviews of the effects of LAB for skin health through regulation of intestinal conditions and the immune system. In this review, we discuss recent findings on the effects of LAB on skin health and its potential applications in beauty foods. PMID:26287529

  9. Functional genomics of lactic acid bacteria: from food to health

    Douillard, F.P.; Vos, de, W.M.

    2014-01-01

    Genome analysis using next generation sequencing technologies has revolutionized the characterization of lactic acid bacteria and complete genomes of all major groups are now available. Comparative genomics has provided new insights into the natural and laboratory evolution of lactic acid bacteria and their environmental interactions. Moreover, functional genomics approaches have been used to understand the response of lactic acid bacteria to their environment. The results have been instrumen...

  10. Selection of lactic acid bacteria able to ferment inulin hydrolysates

    Octavian BASTON; Oana Emilia CONSTANTIN

    2012-01-01

    Eight homofermentative lactic acid bacteria isolates were tested for lactic acid production using chicory and Jerusalem artichoke hydrolysate as substrate. The pH, lactic acid yield and productivity were used to select the best homolactic bacteria for lactic acid production. The selected strains produced lactic acid at maximum yield after 24 hours of fermentation and the productivity was greater at 24 hours of fermentation. From all studied strains, Lb1 and Lb2 showed the best results regardi...

  11. Towards lactic acid bacteria-based biorefineries.

    Mazzoli, Roberto; Bosco, Francesca; Mizrahi, Itzhak; Bayer, Edward A; Pessione, Enrica

    2014-11-15

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) have long been used in industrial applications mainly as starters for food fermentation or as biocontrol agents or as probiotics. However, LAB possess several characteristics that render them among the most promising candidates for use in future biorefineries in converting plant-derived biomass-either from dedicated crops or from municipal/industrial solid wastes-into biofuels and high value-added products. Lactic acid, their main fermentation product, is an attractive building block extensively used by the chemical industry, owing to the potential for production of polylactides as biodegradable and biocompatible plastic alternative to polymers derived from petrochemicals. LA is but one of many high-value compounds which can be produced by LAB fermentation, which also include biofuels such as ethanol and butanol, biodegradable plastic polymers, exopolysaccharides, antimicrobial agents, health-promoting substances and nutraceuticals. Furthermore, several LAB strains have ascertained probiotic properties, and their biomass can be considered a high-value product. The present contribution aims to provide an extensive overview of the main industrial applications of LAB and future perspectives concerning their utilization in biorefineries. Strategies will be described in detail for developing LAB strains with broader substrate metabolic capacity for fermentation of cheaper biomass. PMID:25087936

  12. Antifungal Activity of Selected Lactic Acid Bacteria and Propionic Acid Bacteria against Dairy-Associated Spoilage Fungi

    Aunsbjerg, Stina Dissing

    Bacterial cultures of lactic and propionic acid bacteria are widely used in fermented products including dairy products. Spoilage fungi may constitute a quality and safety issue in these products. The antifungal properties of some lactic and propionic acid bacteria make them potential candidates...... metabolites produced. Besides diacetyl and lactic acid, 6 antifungal hydroxy acids were identified. Of these, 3 have previously been reported from antifungal lactic acid bacteria, whereas the other 3 hydroxy acids have not previously been reported produced by antifungal lactic acid bacteria....... for prolonging shelf-life of food without the addition of specific preservatives. Increased interest in the use of these bacteria for biopreservation has led to identification of a range of potent strains, and in addition, isolation and identification of various antifungal metabolites produced by...

  13. Stress Physiology of Lactic Acid Bacteria.

    Papadimitriou, Konstantinos; Alegría, Ángel; Bron, Peter A; de Angelis, Maria; Gobbetti, Marco; Kleerebezem, Michiel; Lemos, José A; Linares, Daniel M; Ross, Paul; Stanton, Catherine; Turroni, Francesca; van Sinderen, Douwe; Varmanen, Pekka; Ventura, Marco; Zúñiga, Manuel; Tsakalidou, Effie; Kok, Jan

    2016-09-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are important starter, commensal, or pathogenic microorganisms. The stress physiology of LAB has been studied in depth for over 2 decades, fueled mostly by the technological implications of LAB robustness in the food industry. Survival of probiotic LAB in the host and the potential relatedness of LAB virulence to their stress resilience have intensified interest in the field. Thus, a wealth of information concerning stress responses exists today for strains as diverse as starter (e.g., Lactococcus lactis), probiotic (e.g., several Lactobacillus spp.), and pathogenic (e.g., Enterococcus and Streptococcus spp.) LAB. Here we present the state of the art for LAB stress behavior. We describe the multitude of stresses that LAB are confronted with, and we present the experimental context used to study the stress responses of LAB, focusing on adaptation, habituation, and cross-protection as well as on self-induced multistress resistance in stationary phase, biofilms, and dormancy. We also consider stress responses at the population and single-cell levels. Subsequently, we concentrate on the stress defense mechanisms that have been reported to date, grouping them according to their direct participation in preserving cell energy, defending macromolecules, and protecting the cell envelope. Stress-induced responses of probiotic LAB and commensal/pathogenic LAB are highlighted separately due to the complexity of the peculiar multistress conditions to which these bacteria are subjected in their hosts. Induction of prophages under environmental stresses is then discussed. Finally, we present systems-based strategies to characterize the "stressome" of LAB and to engineer new food-related and probiotic LAB with improved stress tolerance. PMID:27466284

  14. Fermentation of Fructooligosaccharides by Lactic Acid Bacteria and Bifidobacteria†

    Kaplan, Handan; Hutkins, Robert W.

    2000-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria and bifidobacteria were screened of their ability to ferment fructooligosaccharides (FOS) on MRS agar. Of 28 strains of lactic acid bacteria and bifidobacteria examined, 12 of 16 Lactobacillus strains and 7 of 8 Bifidobacterium strains fermented FOS. Only strains that gave a positive reaction by the agar method reached high cell densities in broth containing FOS.

  15. Functional genomics of lactic acid bacteria: from food to health

    Douillard, F.P.; Vos, de W.M.

    2014-01-01

    Genome analysis using next generation sequencing technologies has revolutionized the characterization of lactic acid bacteria and complete genomes of all major groups are now available. Comparative genomics has provided new insights into the natural and laboratory evolution of lactic acid bacteria a

  16. A Novel Lactic Acid Bacteria Growth-stimulating Peptide from Broad Bean (Vicia faba . Protein Hydrolysates

    Ping Xiao

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, broad bean protein hydrolysates (BPH produced by alcalase with strong-stimulating activity for lactic acid bacteria (LAB was first time reported. In order to obtain the key peptide that have growth-stimulating activity for lactic acid bacteria (LAB, gel filtration chromatography and Reverse Phase High Performance Liquid Chromatography (RP-HPLC were applied to isolate and purify the peptides from BPH. Finally, F4-2 elicited the highest activity for LAB, corresponding to amino acid sequence Ser-Ala-Gln (304.10Da was identified by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF MS/MS. Thus, this study shows that broad bean peptide is a good source to promote the LAB growth and this function is reported for the first time.

  17. Antibiotic resistance of lactic acid bacteria

    Bulajić Snežana

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge on the antibiotic resistance of lactic acid bacteria is still limited, possibly because of the large numbers of genera and species encountered in this group, as well as variances in their resistance spectra. The EFSA considers antibiotic resistances, especially transferable resistances, an important decision criterion for determining a strain's QPS status. There are no approved standards for the phenotypic or genotypic evaluation of antibiotic resistances in food isolates. Also, the choice of media is problematic, as well as the specification of MIC breakpoint values as a result of the large species variation and the possible resulting variation in MIC values between species and genera. The current investigations in this field showed that we might end up with a range of different species- or genus-specific breakpoint values that may further increase the current complexity. Another problem associated with safety determinations of starter strains is that once a resistance phenotype and an associated resistance determinant have been identified, it becomes difficult to show that this determinant is not transferable, especially if the resistance gene is not located on a plasmid and no standard protocols for showing genetic transfer are available. Encountering those problems, the QPS system should allow leeway for the interpretations of results, especially when these relate to the methodology for resistance phenotype determinations, determinations of MIC breakpoints for certain genera, species, or strains, the nondeterminability of a genetic basis of a resistance phenotype and the transferability of resistance genes.

  18. Lactic Acid Bacteria Differentially Activate Natural Killer Cells

    Fink, Lisbeth Nielsen; Christensen, Hanne Risager; Frøkiær, Hanne

    antigen presenting cells and T-cells. Bacteria translocating across the gastrointestinal mucosa are presumed to gain access to NK cell compartments, as consumption of certain strains of lactic acid bacteria has been shown to increase in vivo NK cytotoxic activity. On-going research in our lab aims at...... describing strain-dependent effects of lactic acid bacteria on regulatory functions of NK-cells. Here, we have investigated how human gut flora-derived non-pathogenic lactic acid bacteria affect NK cells in vitro, by measuring proliferation and IFN-gamma production of human peripheral blood NK cells upon...... bacterial stimulation. Methods: CD3-CD56+ NK cells were isolated from buffy coats by negative isolation using a lineage specific antibody cocktail and magnetic beads binding the labelling antibodies on non-NK cells. NK cells were incubated either with 10 microg/ml UV-inactivated lactic acid bacteria or 10...

  19. COMPARISON OF OCCURENCE LACTIC ACID BACTERIA IN CHOSEN YOGURTS

    Silvia Pinterová

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The yogurt is healthy food, which contains at least 100 million cultures per gram. Probiotic bacteria have been proven to reduce the effects of some gastrointestinal problems, probiotics can greatly reduce lactose intolerance, have also been proven to prevent colon cancers, there are also a natural immune system booster. In our research we detected numbers of lactid acid bacteria in yogurts in slovak market. There were classical yogurts, yogurts with probiotics, yogurts with fat and non fat. We numbered lactid acid bacteria from and after expiration, in agars MRS and Lee´s. In examined yogurts we detected from expiration from 78.107  to 169.107  and after expiration from 59.107 to 133.107 lactic acid bacteria in 1 ml of yogurt. In agreement with Food Codex of SR (2010 of rules all these yogurts satisfy number of lactid acid bacteria. doi:10.5219/31

  20. The impact of lactic acid bacteria on sourdough fermentation

    Savić Dragiša S.; Joković Nataša

    2005-01-01

    The baking of sourdough breads represents one of the oldest biotechnological processes. Despite traditionality, sourdough bread has great potential because of its benefits. Sourdough is a mixture of flour and water that is dominated by a complex microflora composed of yeasts and lactic acid bacteria that are crucial in the preparation of bread dough. Lactic acid bacteria cause acidification by producing lactic acid that increases the shelf life of bread by preventing the growth of undesirable...

  1. Quorum sensing mechanism in lactic acid bacteria

    Hatice Yılmaz - Yıldıran; Aynur Gül Karahan; Gülden Başyiğit - Kılıç

    2015-01-01

    For a long time, microorganisms were considered as just multiplying, finding nutrients and living by themselves organisms. But that belief changed 50 years ago along with the discovery of bacteria communication with each other and environment by microbiologists. The language used in the communication consists of signal molecules and these molecules are generally called 'auto inducer'. Bacteria are capable of measuring density of these molecules and by this way they are able to detect amoun...

  2. Interaction of neptunium with humic acid and anaerobic bacteria

    Humic acid and bacteria play an important role in the migration of radionuclides in groundwaters. The interaction of neptunium with humic acid and anaerobic bacteria has been investigated by liquid/liquid and solid/liquid extraction systems. For liquid/liquid extraction, the apparent complex formation constant, βα was obtained from the distribution between two phases of neptunium. For solid/liquid extraction, the ratio of sorption to bacteria, Kd, was measured. Kd of humic acid can be evaluated from βα. The large value of βα and Kd means strong interaction of neptunium with organisms. In order to examine the effect of the nature of organism on interaction, the interaction with humic acid was compared to that with non-sterilized or sterilized mixed anaerobic bacteria. The value of βα of humate depended on neptunium ion concentration as well as pH, which showed the effect of polyelectrolyte properties and heterogeneous composition of humic acid. The comparison of interaction with humic acid and bacteria indicated that the Kd value of humic acid was larger than that of bacteria and more strongly depend on pH. (author)

  3. Production of Value-added Products by Lactic Acid Bacteria

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are a group of facultative anaerobic, catalase negative, nonmotile and nonsporeforming–Gram positive bacteria. Most LAB utilize high energy C sources including monomer sugars to produce energy to maintain cellular structure and function. This anaerobic fermentation proce...

  4. Inhibition of seafood-borne bacteria in cooked mackerel (Rastrelliger kanagurta) fish meat by lactic acid bacteria

    Kanappan, S.; G. Gopikrishna

    2008-01-01

    Antagonistic activity of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) namely Streptococcus faecalis, Pediococcus cerevisiae and Lactobacillus casei was tested against seafood-borne bacteria such as Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus cereus, Escherichia coli, Clostridium perfringens and Listeria monocytogenes. Three lactic acid bacteria such as Streptococcus faecalis, Lactobacillus casei and Pediococcus cerevisiae were coated on cooked mackerel meat, individually and in combination against fish-borne bacteria. S. ...

  5. DNA fingerprinting of lactic acid bacteria in sauerkraut fermentations

    Previous studies using traditional biochemical methods to study the ecology of commercial sauerkraut fermentations revealed that four lactic acid bacteria species, Leuconostoc mesenteroides, Lactobacillus plantarum, Pediococcus pentosaceus, and Lactobacillus brevis were the primary microorganisms in...

  6. Cell wall structure and function in lactic acid bacteria

    Kulakauskas, Saulius

    2014-01-01

    The cell wall of Gram-positive bacteria is a complex assemblage of glycopolymers and proteins. It consists of a thick peptidoglycan sacculus that surrounds the cytoplasmic membrane and that is decorated with teichoic acids, polysaccharides, and proteins. It plays a major role in bacterial physiology since it maintains cell shape and integrity during growth and division; in addition, it acts as the interface between the bacterium and its environment. Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are traditionall...

  7. Flow cytometric assessment of viability of lactic acid bacteria

    Bunthof, C.J.; Bloemen, K.; Breeuwer, P.; Rombouts, F. M.; Abee, T

    2001-01-01

    The viability of lactic acid bacteria is crucial for their applications as dairy starters and as probiotics. We investigated the usefulness of flow cytometry (FCM) for viability assessment of lactic acid bacteria. The esterase substrate carboxyfluorescein diacetate (cFDA) and the dye exclusion DNA binding probes propidium iodide (PI) and TOTO-1 were tested for live/dead discrimination using a Lactococcus, a Streptococcus, three Lactobacillus, two Leuconostoc, an Enterococcus, and a Pediococcu...

  8. Controlled overproduction of proteins by lactic acid bacteria

    Kuipers, Oscar P; Ruyter, Pascalle G.G.A. de; Kleerebezem, Michiel; de Vos, Willem M

    1997-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria are widely used in industrial food fermentations, contributing to flavour, texture and preservation of the fermented products. Here we describe recent advances in the development of controlled gene expression systems, which allow the regulated overproduction of any desirable protein by lactic acid bacteria. Some systems benefit from the fact that the expression vectors, marker genes and inducing factors can be used directly in food applications since they are all derived ...

  9. The impact of lactic acid bacteria on sourdough fermentation

    Savić Dragiša S.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The baking of sourdough breads represents one of the oldest biotechnological processes. Despite traditionality, sourdough bread has great potential because of its benefits. Sourdough is a mixture of flour and water that is dominated by a complex microflora composed of yeasts and lactic acid bacteria that are crucial in the preparation of bread dough. Lactic acid bacteria cause acidification by producing lactic acid that increases the shelf life of bread by preventing the growth of undesirable microorganisms and affects the nutritional value of bread by increasing the availability of minerals. In addition to these advantages, the use of sourdough fermentation also improves dough machinability, breadcrumb structure and the characteristic flavour of bread. Lactic acid bacteria in sourdough fermentation are well known representing both homofermentative and heterofermentative bacteria. They may originate from selected natural contaminants in the flour or from a starter culture containing one or more known species of lactic acid bacteria. Sourdough can be cultivated in bakeries or obtained from commercial suppliers. However, many bakeries in Europe still use spontaneously fermented sourdoughs, which have been kept metabolically active for decades by the addition of flour and water at regular intervals. The impact of lactic acid bacteria on sourdough fermentation and their influence on dough and bread quality was discussed on the basis of research and literature data.

  10. Effects of Lactic Acid Bacteria Inoculated Fermentation on Pickled Cucumbers

    Xiaoyi Ji; Yuan Wu; Xingzhu Wu; Yonghua Lin; Weiwei Xu; Hui Ruan; Guoqing He

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effects of Lactic Acid Bacteria (LAB) fermentation on the texture and organic acid of pickled cucumbers. Texture and sensory evaluation as well as a microscopic observation were performed to study the textural differences among fresh cucumber, Spontaneous fermentation (SF) cucumber and LAB Inoculating Fermentation (LABIF) cucumber. Accumulation of seven organic acids i.e., oxalic, tartaric, malic, lactic, acetic, citric and succinic acid during cucum...

  11. Making More of Milk Sugar by Engineering Lactic Acid Bacteria

    Vos, Willem M. de; Hols, Pascal; Kranenburg, Richard van; Luesink, Evert; Kuipers, Oscar P.; Oost, John van der; Kleerebezem, Michiel; Hugenholtz, Jeroen

    1998-01-01

    By exploiting their genetic and metabolic capacity, lactic acid bacteria can be used to generate a variety of products from milk sugar lactose other than the archetypical lactic acid. This review will outline the different genetic and metabolic engineering strategies that can be applied to lactic ac

  12. Remediation of Acid Mine Drainage with Sulfate Reducing Bacteria

    Hauri, James F.; Schaider, Laurel A.

    2009-01-01

    Sulfate reducing bacteria have been shown to be effective at treating acid mine drainage through sulfide production and subsequent precipitation of metal sulfides. In this laboratory experiment for undergraduate environmental chemistry courses, students design and implement a set of bioreactors to remediate acid mine drainage and explain observed…

  13. Lactic acid bacteria from fresh fruit and vegetables as biocontrol agents of phytopathogenic bacteria and fungi

    Trias Mansilla, Rosalia; Bañeras Vives, Lluís; Montesinos Seguí, Emilio; Badosa Romañó, Esther

    2008-01-01

    This study evaluated the efficacy of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) isolated from fresh fruits and vegetables as biocontrol agents against the phytopathogenic and spoilage bacteria and fungi, Xanthomonas campestris, Erwinia carotovora, Penicillium expansum, Monilinia laxa, and Botrytis cinerea. The antagonistic activity of 496 LAB strains was tested in vitro and all tested microorganisms except P. expansum were inhibited by at least one isolate. The 496 isolates were also analyzed for the inhibit...

  14. Comparative functional genomics of amino acid metabolism of lactic acid bacteria

    Pastink, M.I.

    2009-01-01

    The amino acid metabolism of lactic acid bacteria used as starters in industrial fermentations has profound effects on the quality of the fermented foods. The work described in this PhD thesis was initiated to use genomics technologies and a comparative approach to link the gene content of some well-known lactic acid bacteria to flavor formation and to increase our general knowledge in the area of amino acid metabolism. The three well-known lactic acid bacteria that were used in these studies...

  15. Fatty acid composition of cream fermented by probiotic bacteria

    Lutfiye Yilmaz-Ersan

    2013-01-01

    The production of fatty acids in cream containing one of the three probiotic microorganisms (Bifidobacterium lactis, Lactobacillus acidophilus and Lactobacillus rhamnosus) was evaluated at 4±1 °C for up to 15 days. Gas chromatographic analysis of the fatty acid content showed that during storage the amount of linoleic and α-linolenic acids increased in the probiotic cream fermented with B. lactis compared to the control cream. Probiotic bacteria were all associated with increases in medium ch...

  16. Food-grade Selection Markers in Lactic Acid Bacteria

    Song He; Fanghong Gong; Ya'nan Guo; Dechun Zhang.

    2012-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are generally regarded as safe (GRAS) microorganisms and widely used in industry and medicine. We are trying to add additional properties to them by gene engineering. However, the genetically modified bacteria are not acceptable to use in food and medicine due to the presence of antibiotic resistance genes in plasmids. Thus, it is necessary to develop food-grade selection markers. Food-grade markers can be divided into three classes based on their selected character...

  17. Selection of lactic acid bacteria able to ferment inulin hydrolysates

    Octavian BASTON

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Eight homofermentative lactic acid bacteria isolates were tested for lactic acid production using chicory and Jerusalem artichoke hydrolysate as substrate. The pH, lactic acid yield and productivity were used to select the best homolactic bacteria for lactic acid production. The selected strains produced lactic acid at maximum yield after 24 hours of fermentation and the productivity was greater at 24 hours of fermentation. From all studied strains, Lb1 and Lb2 showed the best results regarding lactic acid yields andproductivity. After 48 hours of chicory and Jerusalem artichhoke hydrolysates fermentation, from all the studied strains, Lb2 produced the highest lactic acid yield (0.97%. Lb2 produced after 48 hours of fermentation the lowest pH value of 3.45±0.01. Lb2 showed greater lactic acid productivity compared to the other studied lactic acid bacteria, the highest values, 0.13 g·L-1·h-1fromJerusalem artichoke hydrolysate and 0.11g·L-1·h-1 from chicory hydrolysate, being produced after 24 hours of fermentation.

  18. Nucleotide Metabolism and its Control in Lactic Acid Bacteria

    Kilstrup, Mogens; Hammer, Karin; Jensen, Peter Ruhdal;

    2005-01-01

    Most metabolic reactions are connected through either their utilization of nucleotides or their utilization of nucleotides or their regulation by these metabolites. In this review the biosynthetic pathways for pyrimidine and purine metabolism in lactic acid bacteria are described including the...... interconversion pathways, the formation of deoxyribonucleotides and the salvage pathways for use of exogenous precursors. The data for the enzymatic and the genetic regulation of these pathways are reviewed, as well as the gene organizations in different lactic acid bacteria. Mutant phenotypes and methods for...... manipulation of nucleotide pools are also discussed. Our aim is to provide an overview of the physiology and genetics of nucleotide metabolism and its regulation that will facilitate the interpretation of data arising from genetics, metabolomics, proteomics, and transcriptomics in lactic acid bacteria....

  19. L-Amino Acids Elicit Diverse Response Patterns in Taste Sensory Cells: A Role for Multiple Receptors.

    Shreoshi Pal Choudhuri

    Full Text Available Umami, the fifth basic taste, is elicited by the L-amino acid, glutamate. A unique characteristic of umami taste is the response potentiation by 5' ribonucleotide monophosphates, which are also capable of eliciting an umami taste. Initial reports using human embryonic kidney (HEK cells suggested that there is one broadly tuned receptor heterodimer, T1r1+T1r3, which detects L-glutamate and all other L-amino acids. However, there is growing evidence that multiple receptors detect glutamate in the oral cavity. While much is understood about glutamate transduction, the mechanisms for detecting the tastes of other L-amino acids are less well understood. We used calcium imaging of isolated taste sensory cells and taste cell clusters from the circumvallate and foliate papillae of C57BL/6J and T1r3 knockout mice to determine if other receptors might also be involved in detection of L-amino acids. Ratiometric imaging with Fura-2 was used to study calcium responses to monopotassium L-glutamate, L-serine, L-arginine, and L-glutamine, with and without inosine 5' monophosphate (IMP. The results of these experiments showed that the response patterns elicited by L-amino acids varied significantly across taste sensory cells. L-amino acids other than glutamate also elicited synergistic responses in a subset of taste sensory cells. Along with its role in synergism, IMP alone elicited a response in a large number of taste sensory cells. Our data indicate that synergistic and non-synergistic responses to L-amino acids and IMP are mediated by multiple receptors or possibly a receptor complex.

  20. ldentification and Mutagenesis of Lactic Acid Bacteria from Chinese Sauerkraut

    Yajing CHAl; Hao SHl; Ri NA

    2015-01-01

    ln order to analyze the fermentation properties of lactic acid bacteria in Chinese sauerkraut and to improve acid production, 21 samples of Chinese sauerkraut from lnner Mongolia and Northeast China were col ected and isolated with a Man-Rogosa-Sharpe (MRS) culture. Sixteen strains of lactic acid bacteria were identified by combining both phenotype and genotype methods. After activation, the 16 strains were inoculated into the MRS medium with a concentration of 4%and then incubated at 37 ℃. The pH and the absorbance of the culture were mea-sured. The activated strains were then mutagenized in a field of 4 KV/cm mutation, with dosages administered within 20 minutes and 30 minutes, respectively. The variation curves of the pH and the absorbance of the culture were determined. The experimental results showed that the lactic acid bacteria isolated from the soup were identified as Lactobacil us and the acid production of the bacteria was signifi-cantly improved by the mutagenesis of the corona electric field.

  1. Acetic acid bacteria: A group of bacteria with versatile biotechnological applications.

    Saichana, Natsaran; Matsushita, Kazunobu; Adachi, Osao; Frébort, Ivo; Frebortova, Jitka

    2015-11-01

    Acetic acid bacteria are gram-negative obligate aerobic bacteria assigned to the family Acetobacteraceae of Alphaproteobacteria. They are members of the genera Acetobacter, Gluconobacter, Gluconacetobacter, Acidomonas, Asaia, Kozakia, Swaminathania, Saccharibacter, Neoasaia, Granulibacter, Tanticharoenia, Ameyamaea, Neokomagataea, and Komagataeibacter. Many strains of Acetobacter and Komagataeibacter have been known to possess high acetic acid fermentation ability as well as the acetic acid and ethanol resistance, which are considered to be useful features for industrial production of acetic acid and vinegar, the commercial product. On the other hand, Gluconobacter strains have the ability to perform oxidative fermentation of various sugars, sugar alcohols, and sugar acids leading to the formation of several valuable products. Thermotolerant strains of acetic acid bacteria were isolated in order to serve as the new strains of choice for industrial fermentations, in which the cooling costs for maintaining optimum growth and production temperature in the fermentation vessels could be significantly reduced. Genetic modifications by adaptation and genetic engineering were also applied to improve their properties, such as productivity and heat resistance. PMID:25485864

  2. Surface Binding of Aflatoxin B1 by Lactic Acid Bacteria

    Haskard, Carolyn A.; El-Nezami, Hani S.; Kankaanpää, Pasi E.; Salminen, Seppo; Ahokas, Jorma T.

    2001-01-01

    Specific lactic acid bacterial strains remove toxins from liquid media by physical binding. The stability of the aflatoxin B1 complexes formed with 12 bacterial strains in both viable and nonviable (heat- or acid-treated) forms was assessed by repetitive aqueous extraction. By the fifth extraction, up to 71% of the total aflatoxin B1 remained bound. Nonviable bacteria retained the highest amount of aflatoxin B1. Lactobacillus rhamnosus strain GG (ATCC 53103) and L. rhamnosus strain LC-705 (DS...

  3. PRODUCTION OF MANNITOL BY LACTIC ACID BACTERIA: A REVIEW

    Mannitol, a naturally occurring polyol, can be produced by lactic acid bacteria (LAB) by fermentation. Some homofermentative LAB produce small amounts of mannitol from glucose. Several heterofermentative LAB can produce mannitol effectively from fructose. In this article, a review on mannitol pro...

  4. Effects of lactic acid bacteria contamination on lignocellulosic ethanol fermentation

    Slower fermentation rates, mixed sugar compositions, and lower sugar concentrations may make lignocellulosic fermentations more susceptible to contamination by lactic acid bacteria (LAB), which is a common and costly problem to the corn-based fuel ethanol industry. To examine the effects of LAB con...

  5. Lactic acid bacteria in a changing legislative environment

    Feord, J.

    2002-01-01

    The benefits of using lactic acid bacteria in the food chain, both through direct consumption and production of ingredients, are increasingly recognised by the food industry and consumers alike. The regulatory environment surrounding these products is diverse, covering foods and food ingredients, pr

  6. Make use of lactic acid bacteria in biomass to biofuel

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) have been widely used in dairy fermentations, nutraceuticals, and probiotic/prebiotic applications. Selected strains from the LAB could potentially be used as microbial catalysts for production of fuels and chemicals from lignocellulosic biomass. The unique traits of lac...

  7. Identification and characterisation of probiotic lactic acid bacteria

    Španová, A.; Rittich, B.; Horák, Daniel; Dráb, V.; Drbohlav, J.

    Hydebarad : Osmania University, 2008. s. 17. [International Congress on Bioprocesses in Food Industries /3./ & Convention of the Biotech Research Society India /5./. 06.11.2008-08.11.2008, Hyderabad] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : probiotic lactic acid bacteria Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry

  8. Acetic acid bacteria spoilage of bottled red wine -- a review.

    Bartowsky, Eveline J; Henschke, Paul A

    2008-06-30

    Acetic acid bacteria (AAB) are ubiquitous organisms that are well adapted to sugar and ethanol rich environments. This family of Gram-positive bacteria are well known for their ability to produce acetic acid, the main constituent in vinegar. The oxidation of ethanol through acetaldehyde to acetic acid is well understood and characterised. AAB form part of the complex natural microbial flora of grapes and wine, however their presence is less desirable than the lactic acid bacteria and yeast. Even though AAB were described by Pasteur in the 1850s, wine associated AAB are still difficult to cultivate on artificial laboratory media and until more recently, their taxonomy has not been well characterised. Wine is at most risk of spoilage during production and the presence of these strictly aerobic bacteria in grape must and during wine maturation can be controlled by eliminating, or at least limiting oxygen, an essential growth factor. However, a new risk, spoilage of wine by AAB after packaging, has only recently been reported. As wine is not always sterile filtered prior to bottling, especially red wine, it often has a small resident bacterial population (Bottled red wines, sealed with natural cork closures, and stored in a vertical upright position may develop spoilage by acetic acid bacteria. This spoilage is evident as a distinct deposit of bacterial biofilm in the neck of the bottle at the interface of the wine and the headspace of air, and is accompanied with vinegar, sherry, bruised apple, nutty, and solvent like off-aromas, depending on the degree of spoilage. This review focuses on the wine associated AAB species, the aroma and flavour changes in wine due to AAB metabolism, discusses the importance of oxygen ingress into the bottle and presents a hypothesis for the mechanism of spoilage of bottled red wine. PMID:18237809

  9. Lactic acid bacteria isolated from soy sauce mash in Thailand.

    Tanasupawat, Somboon; Thongsanit, Jaruwan; Okada, Sanae; Komagata, Kazuo

    2002-08-01

    Fourteen sphere-shaped and 30 rod-shaped lactic acid bacteria were isolated from soy sauce mash of two factories in Thailand. These strains were separated into two groups, Group A and Group B, by cell shape and DNA-DNA similarity. Group A contained 14 tetrad-forming strains, and these strains were identified as Tetragenococcus halophilus by DNA similarity. Group B contained 30 rod-shaped bacteria, and they were further divided into four Subgroups, B1, B2, B3, and B4, and three ungrouped strains by phenotypic characteristics and DNA similarity. Subgroup B1 contained 16 strains, and these strains were identified as Lactobacillus acidipiscis by DNA similarity. Subgroup B2 included two strains, and the strains were identified as Lactobacillus farciminis by DNA similarity. Subgroup B3 contained five strains. The strains had meso-diaminopimelic acid in the cell wall, and were identified as Lactobacillus pentosus by DNA similarity. The strains tested produced DL-lactic acid from D-glucose. Subgroup B4 contained four strains. The strains had meso-diaminopimelic acid in the cell wall, and they were identified as Lactobacillus plantarum by DNA similarity. Two ungrouped strains were homofermentative, and one was heterofermentative. They showed a low degree of DNA similarity with the type strains tested, and were left unnamed. The distribution of lactic acid bacteria in soy sauce mash in Thailand is discussed. PMID:12469319

  10. Lactic Acid Bacteria – Friend or Foe? Lactic Acid Bacteria in the Production of Polysaccharides and Fuel Ethanol

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) have been widely used in the production of fermented foods and as probiotics. Alternan is a glucan with a distinctive backbone structure of alternating a-(1,6) and a-(1,3) linkages produced by the LAB Leuconostoc mesenteroides. In recent years, we have developed improved...

  11. Antibiotic resistance in food lactic acid bacteria--a review.

    Mathur, Shalini; Singh, Rameshwar

    2005-12-15

    Antibiotics are a major tool utilized by the health care industry to fight bacterial infections; however, bacteria are highly adaptable creatures and are capable of developing resistance to antibiotics. Consequently, decades of antibiotic use, or rather misuse, have resulted in bacterial resistance to many modern antibiotics. This antibiotic resistance can cause significant danger and suffering for many people with common bacterial infections, those once easily treated with antibiotics. For several decades studies on selection and dissemination of antibiotic resistance have focused mainly on clinically relevant species. However, recently many investigators have speculated that commensal bacteria including lactic acid bacteria (LAB) may act as reservoirs of antibiotic resistance genes similar to those found in human pathogens. The main threat associated with these bacteria is that they can transfer resistance genes to pathogenic bacteria. Genes conferring resistance to tetracycline, erythromycin and vancomycin have been detected and characterized in Lactococcus lactis, Enterococci and, recently, in Lactobacillus species isolated from fermented meat and milk products. A number of initiatives have been recently launched by various organizations across the globe to address the biosafety concerns of starter cultures and probiotic microorganisms. The studies can lead to better understanding of the role played by the dairy starter microorganisms in horizontal transfer of antibiotic resistance genes to intestinal microorganisms and food-associated pathogenic bacteria. PMID:16289406

  12. Lactic acid bacteria as a cell factory for riboflavin production.

    Thakur, Kiran; Tomar, Sudhir Kumar; De, Sachinandan

    2016-07-01

    Consumers are increasingly becoming aware of their health and nutritional requirements, and in this context, vitamins produced in situ by microbes may suit their needs and expectations. B groups vitamins are essential components of cellular metabolism and among them riboflavin is one of the vital vitamins required by bacteria, plants, animals and humans. Here, we focus on the importance of microbial production of riboflavin over chemical synthesis. In addition, genetic abilities for riboflavin biosynthesis by lactic acid bacteria are discussed. Genetically modified strains by employing genetic engineering and chemical analogues have been developed to enhance riboflavin production. The present review attempts to collect the currently available information on riboflavin production by microbes in general, while placing greater emphasis on food grade lactic acid bacteria and human gut commensals. For designing riboflavin-enriched functional foods, proper selection and exploitation of riboflavin-producing lactic acid bacteria is essential. Moreover, eliminating the in situ vitamin fortification step will decrease the cost of food production. PMID:26686515

  13. Occurrence and role of lactic acid bacteria in seafood products

    Leroi, Francoise

    2010-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) in fish flesh has long been disregarded because the high post-mortem pH, the low percentage of sugars, the high content of low molecular weight nitrogenous molecules and the low temperature of temperate waters favor the rapid growth of pH-sensitive psychrotolerant marine Gram-negative bacteria like Pseudomonas, Shewanella and Photobacterium. In seafood packed in both vacuum (VP) and modified atmosphere (MAP) packaging commonly CO2 enriched, the growth of the Gram-ne...

  14. Adaptation and tolerance of bacteria against acetic acid.

    Trček, Janja; Mira, Nuno Pereira; Jarboe, Laura R

    2015-08-01

    Acetic acid is a weak organic acid exerting a toxic effect to most microorganisms at concentrations as low as 0.5 wt%. This toxic effect results mostly from acetic acid dissociation inside microbial cells, causing a decrease of intracellular pH and metabolic disturbance by the anion, among other deleterious effects. These microbial inhibition mechanisms enable acetic acid to be used as a preservative, although its usefulness is limited by the emergence of highly tolerant spoilage strains. Several biotechnological processes are also inhibited by the accumulation of acetic acid in the growth medium including production of bioethanol from lignocellulosics, wine making, and microbe-based production of acetic acid itself. To design better preservation strategies based on acetic acid and to improve the robustness of industrial biotechnological processes limited by this acid's toxicity, it is essential to deepen the understanding of the underlying toxicity mechanisms. In this sense, adaptive responses that improve tolerance to acetic acid have been well studied in Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Strains highly tolerant to acetic acid, either isolated from natural environments or specifically engineered for this effect, represent a unique reservoir of information that could increase our understanding of acetic acid tolerance and contribute to the design of additional tolerance mechanisms. In this article, the mechanisms underlying the acetic acid tolerance exhibited by several bacterial strains are reviewed, with emphasis on the knowledge gathered in acetic acid bacteria and E. coli. A comparison of how these bacterial adaptive responses to acetic acid stress fit to those described in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is also performed. A systematic comparison of the similarities and dissimilarities of the ways by which different microbial systems surpass the deleterious effects of acetic acid toxicity has not been performed so far, although such exchange

  15. Cell wall structure and function in lactic acid bacteria.

    Chapot-Chartier, Marie-Pierre; Kulakauskas, Saulius

    2014-08-29

    The cell wall of Gram-positive bacteria is a complex assemblage of glycopolymers and proteins. It consists of a thick peptidoglycan sacculus that surrounds the cytoplasmic membrane and that is decorated with teichoic acids, polysaccharides, and proteins. It plays a major role in bacterial physiology since it maintains cell shape and integrity during growth and division; in addition, it acts as the interface between the bacterium and its environment. Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are traditionally and widely used to ferment food, and they are also the subject of more and more research because of their potential health-related benefits. It is now recognized that understanding the composition, structure, and properties of LAB cell walls is a crucial part of developing technological and health applications using these bacteria. In this review, we examine the different components of the Gram-positive cell wall: peptidoglycan, teichoic acids, polysaccharides, and proteins. We present recent findings regarding the structure and function of these complex compounds, results that have emerged thanks to the tandem development of structural analysis and whole genome sequencing. Although general structures and biosynthesis pathways are conserved among Gram-positive bacteria, studies have revealed that LAB cell walls demonstrate unique properties; these studies have yielded some notable, fundamental, and novel findings. Given the potential of this research to contribute to future applied strategies, in our discussion of the role played by cell wall components in LAB physiology, we pay special attention to the mechanisms controlling bacterial autolysis, bacterial sensitivity to bacteriophages and the mechanisms underlying interactions between probiotic bacteria and their hosts. PMID:25186919

  16. Phenolic Biotransformations during Conversion of Ferulic Acid to Vanillin by Lactic Acid Bacteria

    Baljinder Kaur

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Vanillin is widely used as food additive and as a masking agent in various pharmaceutical formulations. Ferulic acid is an important precursor of vanillin that is available in abundance in cell walls of cereals like wheat, corn, and rice. Phenolic biotransformations can occur during growth of lactic acid bacteria (LAB, and their production can be made feasible using specialized LAB strains that have been reported to produce ferulic acid esterases. The present study aimed at screening a panel of LAB isolates for their ability to release phenolics from agrowaste materials like rice bran and their biotransformation to industrially important compounds such as ferulic acid, 4-ethyl phenol, vanillic acid, vanillin, and vanillyl alcohol. Bacterial isolates were evaluated using ferulic acid esterase, ferulic acid decarboxylase, and vanillin dehydrogenase assays. This work highlights the importance of lactic acid bacteria in phenolic biotransformations for the development of food grade flavours and additives.

  17. Lactobionic and cellobionic acid production profiles of the resting cells of acetic acid bacteria.

    Kiryu, Takaaki; Kiso, Taro; Nakano, Hirofumi; Murakami, Hiromi

    2015-01-01

    Lactobionic acid was produced by acetic acid bacteria to oxidize lactose. Gluconobacter spp. and Gluconacetobacter spp. showed higher lactose-oxidizing activities than Acetobacter spp. Gluconobacter frateurii NBRC3285 produced the highest amount of lactobionic acid per cell, among the strains tested. This bacterium assimilated neither lactose nor lactobionic acid. At high lactose concentration (30%), resting cells of the bacterium showed sufficient oxidizing activity for efficient production of lactobionic acid. These properties may contribute to industrial production of lactobionic acid by the bacterium. The bacterium showed higher oxidizing activity on cellobiose than that on lactose and produced cellobionic acid. PMID:25965080

  18. Interactions between Cooccurring Lactic Acid Bacteria in Honey Bee Hives

    Rokop, Z. P.; Horton, M. A.; Newton, I. L. G.

    2015-01-01

    In contrast to the honey bee gut, which is colonized by a few characteristic bacterial clades, the hive of the honey bee is home to a diverse array of microbes, including many lactic acid bacteria (LAB). In this study, we used culture, combined with sequencing, to sample the LAB communities found across hive environments. Specifically, we sought to use network analysis to identify microbial hubs sharing nearly identical operational taxonomic units, evidence which may indicate cooccurrence of ...

  19. Naturally Occurring Lactic Acid Bacteria Isolated from Tomato Pomace Silage

    Wu, Jing-Jing; Du, Rui-ping; Gao, Min; Sui, Yao-qiang; Xiu, Lei; Wang, Xiao

    2014-01-01

    Silage making has become a significant method of forage conservation worldwide. To determine how tomato pomace (TP) may be used effectively as animal feed, it was ensilaged for 90 days and microbiology counts, fermentation characteristics and chemical composition of tomato pomace silage (TPS) were evaluated at the 30th, 60th, and 90th days, respectively. In addition, 103 lactic acid bacteria were isolated from TPS. Based on the phenotypic and chemotaxonomic characteristics, 16S rDNA sequence ...

  20. Lactic acid bacteria fermentations in oat-based suspensions

    Mårtensson, Olof

    2002-01-01

    This thesis deals with the fermentation characteristics of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) in oat-based suspensions, with formulation work of fermented products based on oat and with nutritional studies of these products. Changes in structure in terms of viscosity and ropiness were studied when exopolysaccharide (EPS)-producing LAB strains, namely, Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus NCFB 2772, Lactobacillus brevis G-77 and Pediococcus damnosus 2.6 were grown in these oat-based suspensions...

  1. Lactic acid bacteria: the bugs of the new millennium

    Konings, W N; Kok, J; Kuipers, O P; Poolman, B.

    2000-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LABs) are widely used in the manufacturing of fermented food and are among the best-studied microorganisms. Detailed knowledge of a number of physiological traits has opened new potential applications for these organisms in the food industry, while other traits might be beneficial for human health. Important new developments have been made in the research of LABs in the areas of multidrug resistance, bacteriocins and quorum sensing, osmoregulation, proteolysis, autolysin...

  2. Research of Sichuan Paocai and Lactic Acid Bacteria

    Chen Gong; Yu Wen-Hua; Zhang Qi-sheng; Song Ping; Zhang Bei-Bei; Liu Zhu; You Jing-gang; Li Heng

    2014-01-01

    Sichuan Paocai with long history is a typical representative of Chinese pickles, which has been inherited for thousands years. Its strong vitality was largely due to its unique microbial fermentation style. In this study, molecular microbial technology and traditional microbial technology were employed to study the distributions and changes of the microorganisms during the fermentation. The results showed that the lactic acid bacteria such as Leuconostoc mesenteroides, Lactobacillus plantarum...

  3. SCREENING OF BACTERIA FOR LACTIC ACID PRODUCTION FROM WHEY WATER

    Vethakanraj Helen Shiphrah

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Lactobacilli have the property of converting lactose and other sugars to lactic acid through fermentation. So whey water, the greenish translucent liquid rich in lactose, vitamins, proteins and mineral salts, obtained as a by-product after the precipitation of cheese can be used as a substrate for Lactobacilli for lactic acid production which otherwise is a serious environmental pollutant when disposed without pre-treatment. 16 isolates of Lactic acid producing bacteria isolated from various biological sources were inoculated in whey water (1% inoculum and kept at 37°C in the shaker at a speed of 150 revolutions per minute for 36 h. Lactic acid production was estimated after 36 h and the strains 4a, 12a and 15b showed lactic acid production of which 12a produced the highest concentration. The amount of Lactic acid produced by 12a was 0.62 g L-1 under unadjusted condition which is comparable to previously reported strains in enriched medium. So the lactic acid production by strain 12a was further investigated to find the effect of pH and temperature on the production efficiency. Lactic acid production was also checked in Luria-Bertani broth and whey water was found to be the medium of choice for prolonged lactic acid production.

  4. Intracellular pH of acid-tolerant ruminal bacteria.

    Russell, J B

    1991-01-01

    Acid-tolerant ruminal bacteria (Bacteroides ruminicola B1(4), Selenomonas ruminantium HD4, Streptococcus bovis JB1, Megasphaera elsdenii B159, and strain F) allowed their intracellular pH to decline as a function of extracellular pH and did not generate a large pH gradient across the cell membrane until the extracellular pH was low (less than 5.2). This decline in intracellular pH prevented an accumulation of volatile fatty acid anions inside the cells.

  5. Probiotication of tomato juice by lactic acid bacteria.

    Yoon, Kyung Young; Woodams, Edward E; Hang, Yong D

    2004-12-01

    This study was undertaken to determine the suitability of tomato juice as a raw material for production of probiotic juice by four lactic acid bacteria (Latobacillus acidophilus LA39, Lactobacillus plantarum C3, Lactobacillus casei A4, and Lactobacillus delbrueckii D7). Tomato juice was inoculated with a 24-h-old culture and incubated at 30 degrees C. Changes in pH, acidity, sugar content, and viable cell counts during fermentation under controlled conditions were measured. The lactic acid cultures reduced the pH to 4.1 or below and increased the acidity to 0.65% or higher, and the viable cell counts (CFU) reached nearly 1.0 to 9.0 x 10(9)/ml after 72 h fermentation. The viable cell counts of the four lactic acid bacteria in the fermented tomato juice ranged from 10(6) to 10(8) CFU/ml after 4 weeks of cold storage at 4 degrees C. Probiotic tomato juice could serve as a health beverage for vegetarians or consumers who are allergic to dairy products. PMID:15650688

  6. Chemotactic behavior of deep subsurface bacteria toward carbohydrates, amino acids and a chlorinated alkene

    Lopez de Victoria, G. (Puerto Rico Univ., Rio Piedras (Puerto Rico). Dept. of Biology)

    1989-02-01

    The chemotactic behavior of deep terrestrial subsurface bacteria toward amino acids, carbohydrates and trichloroethylene was assayed using a modification of the capillary method and bacterial enumeration by acridine orange direct counts. Eleven isolates of bacteria isolated from six different geological formations were investigated. A bimodal response rather than an absolute positive or negative response was observed in most assays. Most of the isolates were positively chemotactic to low concentrations of substrates and were repelled by high concentrations of the same substrate. However, this was not the case for trichloroethylene (TCE) which was mostly an attractant and elicited the highest responses in all the isolates when compared with amino acids and carbohydrates. The movement rates of these isolates in aseptic subsurface sediments in the absence and presence of TCE were also determined using a laboratory model. All of the isolates showed distinct response range, peak, and threshold concentrations when exposed to the same substrates suggesting that they are possibly different species as has been inferred from DNA homology studies. 101 refs., 4 figs., 57 tabs.

  7. Lactic acid bacteria from fresh fruit and vegetables as biocontrol agents of phytopathogenic bacteria and fungi.

    Trias, Rosalia; Bañeras, Lluís; Montesinos, Emilio; Badosa, Esther

    2008-12-01

    This study evaluated the efficacy of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) isolated from fresh fruits and vegetables as biocontrol agents against the phytopathogenic and spoilage bacteria and fungi, Xanthomonas campestris, Erwinia carotovora, Penicillium expansum, Monilinia laxa, and Botrytis cinerea. The antagonistic activity of 496 LAB strains was tested in vitro and all tested microorganisms except P. expansum were inhibited by at least one isolate. The 496 isolates were also analyzed for the inhibition of P. expansum infection in wounds of Golden Delicious apples. Four strains (TC97, AC318, TM319, and FF441) reduced the fungal rot diameter of the apples by 20%; only Weissella cibaria strain TM128 decreased infection levels by 50%. Cell-free supernatants of selected antagonistic bacteria were studied to determine the nature of the antimicrobial compounds produced. Organic acids were the preferred mediators of inhibition but hydrogen peroxide was also detected when strains BC48, TM128, PM141 and FF441 were tested against E. carotovora. While previous reports of antifungal activity by LAB are scarce, our results support the potential of LAB as biocontrol agents against postharvest rot. PMID:19204894

  8. Mechanistic modeling of biocorrosion caused by biofilms of sulfate reducing bacteria and acid producing bacteria.

    Xu, Dake; Li, Yingchao; Gu, Tingyue

    2016-08-01

    Biocorrosion is also known as microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC). Most anaerobic MIC cases can be classified into two major types. Type I MIC involves non-oxygen oxidants such as sulfate and nitrate that require biocatalysis for their reduction in the cytoplasm of microbes such as sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) and nitrate reducing bacteria (NRB). This means that the extracellular electrons from the oxidation of metal such as iron must be transported across cell walls into the cytoplasm. Type II MIC involves oxidants such as protons that are secreted by microbes such as acid producing bacteria (APB). The biofilms in this case supply the locally high concentrations of oxidants that are corrosive without biocatalysis. This work describes a mechanistic model that is based on the biocatalytic cathodic sulfate reduction (BCSR) theory. The model utilizes charge transfer and mass transfer concepts to describe the SRB biocorrosion process. The model also includes a mechanism to describe APB attack based on the local acidic pH at a pit bottom. A pitting prediction software package has been created based on the mechanisms. It predicts long-term pitting rates and worst-case scenarios after calibration using SRB short-term pit depth data. Various parameters can be investigated through computer simulation. PMID:27071053

  9. CHARACTERIZATION OF LACTIC ACID BACTERIA ISOLATED FROM SUMBAWA MARE MILK

    Nengah Sujaya

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available A study was carried out to isolate and characterize lactic acid bacteria (LAB from the Sumbawa mares milk The Isolation of LAB was conducted in Man Rogosa Sharpe (MRS agar. The isolates were characterized by standard methods, such as Gram staining, cell morphology study and fermentation activities. The ability of the isolates to inhibit some pathogenic bacteria was studied by dual culture assay. Isolates showing the widest spectrum of inhibiting pathogenic bacteria were further identified using API 50 CHL. The results showed that Sumbawa mare milk was dominated by lactobacilli and weisella/leuconostoc. As many as 26 out 36 isolates belong to homofermentative lactobacilli and another 10 isolates belong to both heterofermentative lactobacilli and weissella or leuconostoc. Twenty four isolates inhibited the growth of Escherichia coli 25922, Shigela flexneri, Salmonella typhimurium, and Staphylococcus aureus 29213. Two promising isolates with the widest spectrum of inhibiting pathogenic bacteria, Lactobacillus sp. SKG34 and Lactobacillus sp. SKG49, were identified respectively as Lactobacillus rhamnosus SKG34 and Lactobacillus ramnosus SKG49. These two isolates were specific strains of the sumbawa mare milk and are very potential to be developed as probiotic for human.

  10. Inhibition of citrus fungal pathogens by using lactic acid bacteria.

    Gerez, C L; Carbajo, M S; Rollán, G; Torres Leal, G; Font de Valdez, G

    2010-08-01

    The effect of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) on pathogenic fungi was evaluated and the metabolites involved in the antifungal effect were characterized. Penicillium digitatum (INTA 1 to INTA 7) and Geotrichum citri-aurantii (INTA 8) isolated from decayed lemon from commercial packinghouses were treated with imazalil and guazatine to obtain strains resistant to these fungicides. The most resistant strains (4 fungal strains) were selected for evaluating the antifungal activity of 33 LAB strains, among which only 8 strains gave positive results. The antifungal activity of these LAB strains was related to the production of lactic acid, acetic acid, and phenyllactic acid (PLA). A central composite design and the response surface methodology were used to evaluate the inhibitory effect of the organic acids produced by the LAB cultures. The antifungal activity of lactic acid was directly related to its concentration; however, acetic acid and PLA showed a peak of activity at 52.5 and 0.8 mM, respectively, with inhibition rates similar to those obtained with Serenade((R)) (3.0 ppm) imazalil (50 ppm) and guazatine (50 ppm). Beyond the peak of activity, a reduction in effectiveness of both acetic acid and PLA was observed. Comparing the inhibition rate of the organic acids, PLA was about 66- and 600-fold more effective than acetic acid and lactic acid, respectively. This study presents evidences on the antifungal effect of selected LAB strains and their end products. Studies are currently being undertaken to evaluate the effectiveness in preventing postharvest diseases on citrus fruits. PMID:20722936

  11. Affinity sensor using 3-aminophenylboronic acid for bacteria detection.

    Wannapob, Rodtichoti; Kanatharana, Proespichaya; Limbut, Warakorn; Numnuam, Apon; Asawatreratanakul, Punnee; Thammakhet, Chongdee; Thavarungkul, Panote

    2010-10-15

    Boronic acid that can reversibly bind to diols was used to detect bacteria through its affinity binding reaction with diol-groups on bacterial cell walls. 3-aminophenylboronic acid (3-APBA) was immobilized on a gold electrode via a self-assembled monolayer. The change in capacitance of the sensing surface caused by the binding between 3-APBA and bacteria in a flow system was detected by a potentiostatic step method. Under optimal conditions the linear range of 1.5×10(2)-1.5×10(6) CFU ml(-1) and the detection limit of 1.0×10(2) CFU ml(-1) was obtained. The sensing surface can be regenerated and reused up to 58 times. The method was used for the analysis of bacteria in several types of water, i.e., bottled, well, tap, reservoir and wastewater. Compared with the standard plate count method, the results were within one standard deviation of each other. The proposed method can save both time and cost of analysis. The electrode modified with 3-APBA would also be applicable to the detection of other cis-diol-containing analytes. The concept could be extended to other chemoselective ligands, offering less expensive and more robust affinity sensors for a wide range of compounds. PMID:20801635

  12. Biosynthesis of myristic acid in luminescent bacteria. [Vibrio harveyi

    Byers, D.M.

    1987-05-01

    In vivo pulse-label studies have demonstrated that luminescent bacteria can provide myritic acid (14:0) required for the synthesis of the luciferase substrate myristyl aldehyde. Luminescent wild type Vibrio harveyi incubated with (/sup 14/C) acetate in a nutrient-depleted medium accumulated substantial tree (/sup 14/C)fatty acid (up to 20% of the total lipid label). Radio-gas chromatography revealed that > 75% of the labeled fatty acid is 14:0. No free fatty acid was detected in wild type cells labeled prior to the development of bioluminescence in the exponential growth phase, or in a dark mutant of V. harveyi (mutant M17) that requires exogenous 14:0 for light emission. The preferential accumulation of 14:0 was not observed when wild type cells were labeled with (/sup 14/C)acetate in regular growth medium. Moreover, all V. harveyi strains exhibited similar fatty acid mass compositions regardless of the state of bioluminescence. Since earlier work has shown that a luminescence-related acyltransferase (defective in the M17 mutant) can catalyze the deacylation of fatty acyl-acyl carrier protein in vitro, the present results are consistent with a model in which this enzyme diverts 14:0 to the luminescence system during fatty acid biosynthesis. Under normal conditions, the supply of 14:0 by this pathway is tightly regulated such that bioluminescence development does not significantly alter the total fatty acid composition.

  13. Ability of Thermophilic Lactic Acid Bacteria To Produce Aroma Compounds from Amino Acids

    Helinck, Sandra; Le Bars, Dominique; Moreau, Daniel; Yvon, Mireille

    2004-01-01

    Although a large number of key odorants of Swiss-type cheese result from amino acid catabolism, the amino acid catabolic pathways in the bacteria present in these cheeses are not well known. In this study, we compared the in vitro abilities of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. lactis, Lactobacillus helveticus, and Streptococcus thermophilus to produce aroma compounds from three amino acids, leucine, phenylalanine, and methionine, under mid-pH conditions of cheese ripening (pH 5.5), and we investigated the catabolic pathways used by these bacteria. In the three lactic acid bacterial species, amino acid catabolism was initiated by a transamination step, which requires the presence of an α-keto acid such as α-ketoglutarate (α-KG) as the amino group acceptor, and produced α-keto acids. Only S. thermophilus exhibited glutamate dehydrogenase activity, which produces α-KG from glutamate, and consequently only S. thermophilus was capable of catabolizing amino acids in the reaction medium without α-KG addition. In the presence of α-KG, lactobacilli produced much more varied aroma compounds such as acids, aldehydes, and alcohols than S. thermophilus, which mainly produced α-keto acids and a small amount of hydroxy acids and acids. L. helveticus mainly produced acids from phenylalanine and leucine, while L. delbrueckii subsp. lactis produced larger amounts of alcohols and/or aldehydes. Formation of aldehydes, alcohols, and acids from α-keto acids by L. delbrueckii subsp. lactis mainly results from the action of an α-keto acid decarboxylase, which produces aldehydes that are then oxidized or reduced to acids or alcohols. In contrast, the enzyme involved in the α-keto acid conversion to acids in L. helveticus and S. thermophilus is an α-keto acid dehydrogenase that produces acyl coenzymes A. PMID:15240255

  14. Amino acid catabolism and generation of volatiles by lactic acid bacteria

    Tavaria, F. K.; Dahl, S.; Carballo, F. J.; Malcata, F. X.

    2002-01-01

    Twelve isolates of lactic acid bacteria, belonging to the Lactobacillus, Lactococcus, Leuconostoc, and Enterococcus genera, were previously isolated from 180- d-old Serra da Estrela cheese, a traditional Portuguese cheese manufactured from raw milk and coagulated with a plant rennet. These isolates were subsequently tested for their ability to catabolize free amino acids, when incubated independently with each amino acid in free form or with a mixture thereof. Attempts...

  15. Phenolic Biotransformations during Conversion of Ferulic Acid to Vanillin by Lactic Acid Bacteria

    Baljinder Kaur; Debkumar Chakraborty; Balvir Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Vanillin is widely used as food additive and as a masking agent in various pharmaceutical formulations. Ferulic acid is an important precursor of vanillin that is available in abundance in cell walls of cereals like wheat, corn, and rice. Phenolic biotransformations can occur during growth of lactic acid bacteria (LAB), and their production can be made feasible using specialized LAB strains that have been reported to produce ferulic acid esterases. The present study aimed at screening a panel...

  16. Development of Mucosal Vaccines Based on Lactic Acid Bacteria

    Bermúdez-Humarán, Luis G.; Innocentin, Silvia; Lefèvre, Francois; Chatel, Jean-Marc; Langella, Philippe

    Today, sufficient data are available to support the use of lactic acid bacteria (LAB), notably lactococci and lactobacilli, as delivery vehicles for the development of new mucosal vaccines. These non-pathogenic Gram-positive bacteria have been safely consumed by humans for centuries in fermented foods. They thus constitute an attractive alternative to the attenuated pathogens (most popular live vectors actually studied) which could recover their pathogenic potential and are thus not totally safe for use in humans. This chapter reviews the current research and advances in the use of LAB as live delivery vectors of proteins of interest for the development of new safe mucosal vaccines. The use of LAB as DNA vaccine vehicles to deliver DNA directly to antigen-presenting cells of the immune system is also discussed.

  17. Current taxonomy of phages infecting lactic acid bacteria

    Jennifer eMahony

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Phages infecting lactic acid bacteria have been the focus of significant research attention over the past three decades. Through the isolation and characterization of hundreds of phage isolates, it has been possible to classify phages of the dairy starter and adjunct bacteria Lactococus lactis, Streptococcus thermophilus, Leuconostoc spp. and Lactobacillus spp. Among these, phages of L. lactis have been most thoroughly scrutinized and serve as an excellent model system to address issues that arise when attempting taxonomic classification of phages infecting other LAB species. Here, we present an overview of the current taxonomy of phages infecting LAB genera of industrial significance, the methods employed in these taxonomic efforts and how these may be employed for the taxonomy of phages of currently underrepresented and emerging phage species.

  18. Screening and characterization of novel bacteriocins from lactic acid bacteria.

    Zendo, Takeshi

    2013-01-01

    Bacteriocins produced by lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are expected to be safe antimicrobial agents. While the best studied LAB bacteriocin, nisin A, is widely utilized as a food preservative, various novel ones are required to control undesirable bacteria more effectively. To discover novel bacteriocins at the early step of the screening process, we developed a rapid screening system that evaluates bacteriocins produced by newly isolated LAB based on their antibacterial spectra and molecular masses. By means of this system, various novel bacteriocins were identified, including a nisin variant, nisin Q, a two-peptide bacteriocin, lactococcin Q, a leaderless bacteriocin, lacticin Q, and a circular bacteriocin, lactocyclicin Q. Moreover, some LAB isolates were found to produce multiple bacteriocins. They were characterized as to their structures, mechanisms of action, and biosynthetic mechanisms. Novel LAB bacteriocins and their biosynthetic mechanisms are expected for applications such as food preservation and peptide engineering. PMID:23649268

  19. Fermentation of aqueous plant seed extracts by lactic acid bacteria

    Schafner, D.W.; Beuchat, R.L.

    1986-05-01

    The effects of lactic acid bacterial fermentation on chemical and physical changes in aqueous extracts of cowpea (Vigna unguiculata), peanut (Arachis hypogea), soybean (Glycine max), and sorghum (Sorghum vulgare) were studied. The bacteria investigated were Lactobacillus helveticus, L. delbrueckii, L. casei, L. bulgaricus, L. acidophilus, and Streptococcus thermophilus. Organisms were inoculated individually into all of the seed extracts; L. bulgaricus and S. thermophilus were also evaluated together as inocula for fermenting the legume extracts. During fermentation, bacterial population and changes in titratable acidity, pH, viscosity, and color were measured over a 72 h period at 37 degrees C. Maximum bacterial populations, titratable acidity, pH, and viscosity varied depending upon the type of extract and bacterial strain. The maximum population of each organism was influenced by fermentable carbohydrates, which, in turn, influenced acid production and change in pH. Change in viscosity was correlated with the amount of protein and titratable acidity of products. Color was affected by pasteurization treatment and fermentation as well as the source of extract. In the extracts inoculated simultaneously with L. bulgaricus and S. thermophilus, a synergistic effect resulted in increased bacterial populations, titratable acidity, and viscosity, and decreased pH in all the legume extracts when compared to the extracts fermented with either of these organisms individually. Fermented extracts offer potential as substitutes for cultured dairy products. 24 references.

  20. Metabolic strategies of beer spoilage lactic acid bacteria in beer.

    Geissler, Andreas J; Behr, Jürgen; von Kamp, Kristina; Vogel, Rudi F

    2016-01-01

    Beer contains only limited amounts of readily fermentable carbohydrates and amino acids. Beer spoilage lactic acid bacteria (LAB) have to come up with metabolic strategies in order to deal with selective nutrient content, high energy demand of hop tolerance mechanisms and a low pH. The metabolism of 26 LAB strains of 6 species and varying spoilage potentialwas investigated in order to define and compare their metabolic capabilities using multivariate statistics and outline possible metabolic strategies. Metabolic capabilities of beer spoilage LAB regarding carbohydrate and amino acids did not correlate with spoilage potential, but with fermentation type (heterofermentative/homofermentative) and species. A shift to mixed acid fermentation by homofermentative (hof) Pediococcus claussenii and Lactobacillus backii was observed as a specific feature of their growth in beer. For heterofermentative (hef) LAB a mostly versatile carbohydrate metabolism could be demonstrated, supplementing the known relevance of organic acids for their growth in beer. For hef LAB a distinct amino acid metabolism, resulting in biogenic amine production, was observed, presumably contributing to energy supply and pH homeostasis. PMID:26398285

  1. Occurrence and role of lactic acid bacteria in seafood products.

    Françoise, Leroi

    2010-09-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) in fish flesh has long been disregarded because the high post-mortem pH, the low percentage of sugars, the high content of low molecular weight nitrogenous molecules and the low temperature of temperate waters favor the rapid growth of pH-sensitive psychrotolerant marine Gram-negative bacteria like Pseudomonas, Shewanella and Photobacterium. In seafood packed in both vacuum (VP) and modified atmosphere (MAP) packaging commonly CO(2) enriched, the growth of the Gram-negative aerobic bacteria group (predominantly pseudomonads) is effectively inhibited and the number reached by LAB during storage is higher than that achieved in air but always several log units lower than the trimethylamine oxide (TMA-O) reducing and CO(2)-resistant organisms (Shewanella putrefaciens and Photobacterium phosphoreum). Accordingly, LAB are not of much concern in seafood neither aerobically stored nor VP and MAP. However, they may acquire great relevance in lightly preserved fish products (LPFP), including those VP or MAP. Fresh fish presents a very high water activity (aw) value (0.99). However, aw is reduced to about 0.96 when salt (typically 6% WP) is added to the product. As a result, aerobic Gram-negative bacteria are inhibited, which allows the growth of other organisms more resistant to reduced aw, i.e. LAB, and then they may acquire a central role in the microbial events occurring in the product. Changes in consumers' habits have led to an increase of convenient LPFP with a relative long shelf-life (at least 3 weeks) which, on the other hand, may constitute a serious problem from a safety perspective since Listeria monocytogenes and sometimes Clostridium botulinum (mainly type E) may able to grow. In any case the LAB function in marine products is complex, depending on species, strains, interaction with other bacteria and the food matrix. They may have no particular effect or they may be responsible for spoilage and, in certain cases, they may even exert

  2. Preparation of lactic acid bacteria fermented wheat-yoghurt mixtures

    Michal Magala

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background. Tarhana, a wheat-yoghurt fermented mixture, is considered as a good source of saccharides, proteins, some vitamins and minerals. Moreover, their preparation is inexpensive and lactic acid fermentation offers benefi ts like product preservation, enhancement of nutritive value and sensory properties improvement. The aim of this work was to evaluate changes of some chemical parameters during fermentation of tarhana, when the level of salt and amount of yoghurt used were varied. Some functional and sensory characteristics of the fi nal product were also determined. Material and methods. Chemical analysis included determination of pH, titrable acidity, content of reducing saccharides, lactic, acetic and citric acid. Measured functional properties of tarhana powder were foaming capacity, foam stability, water absorption capacity, oil absorption capacity and emulsifying activity. Tarhana soups samples were evaluated for their sensory characteristics (colour, odor, taste, consistency and overall acceptability. Results. Fermentation of tarhana by lactic acid bacteria and yeasts led to decrease in pH, content of reducing saccharides and citric acid, while titrable acidity and concentration of lactic and acetic acid increased. Determination of functional properties of tarhana powder showed, that salt absence and increased amount of yoghurt in tarhana recipe reduced foaming capacity and oil absorption capacity, whereas foam stability and water absorption capacity were improved. Sensory evaluation of tarhana soups showed that variations in tarhana recipe adversly affected sensory parameters of fi nal products. Conclusion. Variations in tarhana recipe (salt absence, increased proportion of yoghurt led to changes in some chemical parameters (pH, titrable acidity, reducing saccharides, content of lactic, acetic and citric acid. Functional properties were also affected with changed tarhana recipe. Sensory characteristics determination showed, that

  3. Phytase-active lactic acid bacteria from sourdoughs

    Nuobariene, Lina; Cizeikiene, Dalia; Gradzeviciute, Egle;

    2015-01-01

    Whole-grain foods play an important role in human diet as they are relatively rich in minerals, however, the absorption of those minerals in human gut can be very low due to high content of the mineral binding phytate. Therefore, the object of this study was to identify phytase-active lactic acid...... bacteria (LAB) which could be used as a starter to increase mineral bioavailability in whole-meal bread. Hence, LAB isolates were isolated from Lithuanian sourdoughs, tested for phytase activity, and phytase active isolates were identified. Studies of phytase activity of the isolates were carried out at...

  4. Overview on mechanisms of acetic acid resistance in acetic acid bacteria.

    Wang, Bin; Shao, Yanchun; Chen, Fusheng

    2015-02-01

    Acetic acid bacteria (AAB) are a group of gram-negative or gram-variable bacteria which possess an obligate aerobic property with oxygen as the terminal electron acceptor, meanwhile transform ethanol and sugar to corresponding aldehydes, ketones and organic acids. Since the first genus Acetobacter of AAB was established in 1898, 16 AAB genera have been recorded so far. As the main producer of a world-wide condiment, vinegar, AAB have evolved an elegant adaptive system that enables them to survive and produce a high concentration of acetic acid. Some researches and reviews focused on mechanisms of acid resistance in enteric bacteria and made the mechanisms thoroughly understood, while a few investigations did in AAB. As the related technologies with proteome, transcriptome and genome were rapidly developed and applied to AAB research, some plausible mechanisms conferring acetic acid resistance in some AAB strains have been published. In this review, the related mechanisms of AAB against acetic acid with acetic acid assimilation, transportation systems, cell morphology and membrane compositions, adaptation response, and fermentation conditions will be described. Finally, a framework for future research for anti-acid AAB will be provided. PMID:25575804

  5. SuperSAGE analysis of the Nicotiana attenuata transcriptome after fatty acid-amino acid elicitation (FAC: identification of early mediators of insect responses

    Baldwin Ian T

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plants trigger and tailor defense responses after perception of the oral secretions (OS of attacking specialist lepidopteran larvae. Fatty acid-amino acid conjugates (FACs in the OS of the Manduca sexta larvae are necessary and sufficient to elicit the herbivory-specific responses in Nicotiana attenuata, an annual wild tobacco species. How FACs are perceived and activate signal transduction mechanisms is unknown. Results We used SuperSAGE combined with 454 sequencing to quantify the early transcriptional changes elicited by the FAC N-linolenoyl-glutamic acid (18:3-Glu and virus induced gene silencing (VIGS to examine the function of candidate genes in the M. sexta-N. attenuata interaction. The analysis targeted mRNAs encoding regulatory components: rare transcripts with very rapid FAC-elicited kinetics (increases within 60 and declines within 120 min. From 12,744 unique Tag sequences identified (UniTags, 430 and 117 were significantly up- and down-regulated ≥ 2.5-fold, respectively, after 18:3-Glu elicitation compared to wounding. Based on gene ontology classification, more than 25% of the annotated UniTags corresponded to putative regulatory components, including 30 transcriptional regulators and 22 protein kinases. Quantitative PCR analysis was used to analyze the FAC-dependent regulation of a subset of 27 of these UniTags and for most of them a rapid and transient induction was confirmed. Six FAC-regulated genes were functionally characterized by VIGS and two, a putative lipid phosphate phosphatase (LPP and a protein of unknown function, were identified as important mediators of the M. sexta-N. attenuata interaction. Conclusions The analysis of the early changes in the transcriptome of N. attenuata after FAC elicitation using SuperSAGE/454 has identified regulatory genes involved in insect-specific mediated responses in plants. Moreover, it has provided a foundation for the identification of additional novel regulators

  6. Diversity of lactic acid bacteria of the bioethanol process

    Azevedo Vasco

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bacteria may compete with yeast for nutrients during bioethanol production process, potentially causing economic losses. This is the first study aiming at the quantification and identification of Lactic Acid Bacteria (LAB present in the bioethanol industrial processes in different distilleries of Brazil. Results A total of 489 LAB isolates were obtained from four distilleries in 2007 and 2008. The abundance of LAB in the fermentation tanks varied between 6.0 × 105 and 8.9 × 108 CFUs/mL. Crude sugar cane juice contained 7.4 × 107 to 6.0 × 108 LAB CFUs. Most of the LAB isolates belonged to the genus Lactobacillus according to rRNA operon enzyme restriction profiles. A variety of Lactobacillus species occurred throughout the bioethanol process, but the most frequently found species towards the end of the harvest season were L. fermentum and L. vini. The different rep-PCR patterns indicate the co-occurrence of distinct populations of the species L. fermentum and L. vini, suggesting a great intraspecific diversity. Representative isolates of both species had the ability to grow in medium containing up to 10% ethanol, suggesting selection of ethanol tolerant bacteria throughout the process. Conclusions This study served as a first survey of the LAB diversity in the bioethanol process in Brazil. The abundance and diversity of LAB suggest that they have a significant impact in the bioethanol process.

  7. Production of probiotic cabbage juice by lactic acid bacteria.

    Yoon, Kyung Young; Woodams, Edward E; Hang, Yong D

    2006-08-01

    Research was undertaken to determine the suitability of cabbage as a raw material for production of probiotic cabbage juice by lactic acid bacteria (Lactobacillus plantarum C3, Lactobacillus casei A4, and Lactobacillus delbrueckii D7). Cabbage juice was inoculated with a 24-h-old lactic culture and incubated at 30 degrees C. Changes in pH, acidity, sugar content, and viable cell counts during fermentation under controlled conditions were monitored. L. casei, L. delbrueckii, and L. plantarum grew well on cabbage juice and reached nearly 10x10(8) CFU/mL after 48 h of fermentation at 30 degrees C. L. casei, however, produced a smaller amount of titratable acidity expressed as lactic acid than L. delbrueckii or L. plantarum. After 4 weeks of cold storage at 4 degrees C, the viable cell counts of L. plantarum and L. delbrueckii were still 4.1x10(7) and 4.5x10(5) mL(-1), respectively. L. casei did not survive the low pH and high acidity conditions in fermented cabbage juice and lost cell viability completely after 2 weeks of cold storage at 4 degrees C. Fermented cabbage juice could serve as a healthy beverage for vegetarians and lactose-allergic consumers. PMID:16125381

  8. Antagonism Between Osmophilic Lactic Acid Bacteria and Yeasts in Brine Fermentation of Soy Sauce

    Noda, Fumio; HAYASHI, Kazuya; Mizunuma, Takeji

    1980-01-01

    Brine fermentation by osmophilic lactic acid bacteria and yeasts for long periods of time is essential to produce a good quality of shoyu (Japanese fermented soy sauce). It is well known that lactic acid fermentation by osmophilic lactic acid bacteria results in the depression of alcoholic fermentation by osmophilic yeasts, but the nature of the interaction between osmophilic lactic acid bacteria and yeasts in brine fermentation of shoyu has not been revealed. The inhibitory effect of osmophi...

  9. Enhancement of vindoline and vinblastine production in suspension-cultured cells of Catharanthus roseus by artemisinic acid elicitation.

    Liu, Jinwei; Zhu, Jianhua; Tang, Le; Wen, Wei; Lv, Shuangshuang; Yu, Rongmin

    2014-01-01

    Elicitation is an important strategy to improve production of secondary metabolites in vitro. Artemisinic acid was studied as a novel elicitor to enhance the yield of terpenoid indole alkaloids in the present paper. Our results demonstrated that the concentrations of vindoline and vinblastine were increased by sixfold and twofold, respectively, compared to those of the control group after treatment with artemisinic acid. To elucidate the underlying mechanism, we investigated the gene expression of four enzymes involved in the biosynthetic pathway of vinblastine in the suspension-cultured cells of Catharanthu sroseus. RT-PCR experiment showed that artemisinic acid was able to up-regulate the transcriptions of tryptophan decarboxylase, geraniol 10-hydroxylase, tabersonine 16-hydroxylase and deacetoxyvindoline 4-hydroxylase. PMID:23864440

  10. Bacteriocins produced by lactic acid bacteria: A review

    Vesković-Moračanin Slavica M.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Lactic acid bacteria (LAB have an essential role in the production of fermented products. With their metabolic activity, they influence the ripening processes - leading to desired sensory qualities while at the same time inhibiting the growth of undesired microorganisms. Because of their dominant role during fermentation and because of a long tradition of utilization, Lhave been designated as “safe microbiota”. Biological protection of LAB, as a naturally present and/or selected and intentionally added microflora, is realized through the production of non-specific (lactic acid, acetic acid and other volatile organic acids, hydrogen peroxide, diacetyl, etc and specific metabolites, bacteriocins. Bacteriocins are extracellularly released proteins or peptides which possess certain antibacterial activity towards certain types of microorganisms, usually related to the producing bacteria. Today, bacteriocins represent a very interesting potential for their application in the food industry. Their application can reduce the use of synthetic preservatives and/or the intensity of thermal treatment during food production consumer’s need for safe, fresh and minimally-processed food. With the intention of realizing this potential to the fullest, it is necessary to understand the nature of bacteriocins, their production mechanisms, regulations and actions, as well as the influence of external factors on the their antimicrobial activity. The composition of food, i.e. its characteristics (pH, temperature, ingredients and additives, types and quantities of epiphytic microbiota and the actual technological process used in production, can all influence the stability and activity of the added bacteriocins. The future research in this field should also aim to clarify this unknown aspect of the application of bacteriocins, to provide the necessary knowledge about the optimization of the external conditions and open up the possibility of discovering their new

  11. Probiotic properties of endemic strains of lactic acid bacteria

    Flora N. Tkhruni

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Strains of lactic acid bacteria (LAB isolated from various samples of matsun, yogurt and salted cheese from natural farms of Armenia were studied. They have high antimicrobial and probiotic activities, growth rate and differ by their resistance to enzymes. Supernatants of LAB retain bactericidal activity at рН 3.0-8.0 and inhibit growth of various microflora. The application of different methods of identification and LAB genotyping (API 50 CH, 16S rRNA sequencing, GS-PCR, RAPD PCR showed that isolated LAB evidenced a 99.9% similarity with L. rhamnosus, L. plantarum and L. pentosus species and coccoid forms of Streptococcus and Enterococcus species. It can be concluded, that some strains of lactic acid bacteria, isolated from dairy products from natural farms of Armenia, can be properly used for biopreservation of some foodstuffs. On the basis of experimental data, the LAB can be used as basis for obtaining the new products of functional nutrition.

  12. Naturally occurring lactic Acid bacteria isolated from tomato pomace silage.

    Wu, Jing-Jing; Du, Rui-Ping; Gao, Min; Sui, Yao-Qiang; Xiu, Lei; Wang, Xiao

    2014-05-01

    Silage making has become a significant method of forage conservation worldwide. To determine how tomato pomace (TP) may be used effectively as animal feed, it was ensilaged for 90 days and microbiology counts, fermentation characteristics and chemical composition of tomato pomace silage (TPS) were evaluated at the 30th, 60th, and 90th days, respectively. In addition, 103 lactic acid bacteria were isolated from TPS. Based on the phenotypic and chemotaxonomic characteristics, 16S rDNA sequence and carbohydrate fermentation tests, the isolates were identified as 17 species namely: Lactobacillus coryniformis subsp. torquens (0.97%), Lactobacillus pontis (0.97%), Lactobacillus hilgardii (0.97%), Lactobacillus pantheris (0.97%), Lactobacillus amylovorus (1.9%), Lactobacillus panis (1.9%), Lactobacillus vaginalis (1.9%), Lactobacillus rapi (1.9%), Lactobacillus buchneri (2.9%), Lactobacillus parafarraginis (2.9%), Lactobacillus helveticus (3.9%), Lactobacillus camelliae (3.9%), Lactobacillus fermentum (5.8%), Lactobacillus manihotivorans (6.8%), Lactobacillus plantarum (10.7%), Lactobacillus harbinensis (16.5%) and Lactobacillus paracasei subsp. paracasei (35.0%). This study has shown that TP can be well preserved for 90 days by ensilaging and that TPS is not only rich in essential nutrients, but that physiological and biochemical properties of the isolates could provide a platform for future design of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) inoculants aimed at improving the fermentation quality of silage. PMID:25049999

  13. Naturally Occurring Lactic Acid Bacteria Isolated from Tomato Pomace Silage

    Wu, Jing-jing; Du, Rui-ping; Gao, Min; Sui, Yao-qiang; Xiu, Lei; Wang, Xiao

    2014-01-01

    Silage making has become a significant method of forage conservation worldwide. To determine how tomato pomace (TP) may be used effectively as animal feed, it was ensilaged for 90 days and microbiology counts, fermentation characteristics and chemical composition of tomato pomace silage (TPS) were evaluated at the 30th, 60th, and 90th days, respectively. In addition, 103 lactic acid bacteria were isolated from TPS. Based on the phenotypic and chemotaxonomic characteristics, 16S rDNA sequence and carbohydrate fermentation tests, the isolates were identified as 17 species namely: Lactobacillus coryniformis subsp. torquens (0.97%), Lactobacillus pontis (0.97%), Lactobacillus hilgardii (0.97%), Lactobacillus pantheris (0.97%), Lactobacillus amylovorus (1.9%), Lactobacillus panis (1.9%), Lactobacillus vaginalis (1.9%), Lactobacillus rapi (1.9%), Lactobacillus buchneri (2.9%), Lactobacillus parafarraginis (2.9%), Lactobacillus helveticus (3.9%), Lactobacillus camelliae (3.9%), Lactobacillus fermentum (5.8%), Lactobacillus manihotivorans (6.8%), Lactobacillus plantarum (10.7%), Lactobacillus harbinensis (16.5%) and Lactobacillus paracasei subsp. paracasei (35.0%). This study has shown that TP can be well preserved for 90 days by ensilaging and that TPS is not only rich in essential nutrients, but that physiological and biochemical properties of the isolates could provide a platform for future design of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) inoculants aimed at improving the fermentation quality of silage. PMID:25049999

  14. IN VITRO CHARACTERIZATION OF PROBIOTIC PROPERTIES OF LACTIC ACID BACTERIA FROM BULGARIAN RYE SOURDOUGHS

    Dobreva-Yosifova, G.; Yocheva, L.; Mehmed, A.; Danova, S.; Antonova-Nikolova, S.

    2009-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria play a key role in human health. These friendly bacteria as a part of the microflora of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) have a beneficial influence on microbial balance. The probiotic cultures stimulate the growth of beneficial microorganisms, crowd out potentially harmful bacteria and reinforce the body's natural defense mechanisms. Recent data improve the positive effects of probiotics and stimulate research for discovering of new lactic acid bacteria strains with prob...

  15. Protection of live bacteria from bile acid toxicity using bile acid adsorbing resins.

    Edwards, Alexander D; Slater, Nigel K H

    2009-06-12

    We previously demonstrated that a dry, room temperature stable formulation of a live bacterial vaccine was highly susceptible to bile, and suggested that this will lead to significant loss of viability of any live bacterial formulation released into the intestine using an enteric coating or capsule. We found that bile and acid tolerance is very rapidly recovered after rehydration with buffer or water, raising the possibility that rehydration in the absence of bile prior to release into the intestine might solve the problem of bile toxicity to dried cells. We describe here a novel formulation that combines extensively studied bile acid adsorbent resins with the dried bacteria, to temporarily adsorb bile acids and allow rehydration and recovery of bile resistance of bacteria in the intestine before release. Tablets containing the bile acid adsorbent cholestyramine release 250-fold more live bacteria when dissolved in a bile solution, compared to control tablets without cholestyramine or with a control resin that does not bind bile acids. We propose that a simple enteric coated oral dosage form containing bile acid adsorbent resins will allow improved live bacterial delivery to the intestine via the oral route, a major step towards room temperature stable, easily administered and distributed vaccine pills and other bacterial therapeutics. PMID:19490986

  16. Purification Techniques of Bacteriocins from Lactic Acid Bacteria and Other Gram-Positive Bacteria

    Saavedra, Lucila; Sesma, Fernando

    The search for new antimicrobial peptides produced by lactic acid ­bacteria and other Gram-positive microorganisms has become an interesting field of research in the past decades. The fact that bacteriocins are active against numerous foodborne and human pathogens, are produced by generally regarded as safe (GRAS) microorganisms, and are readily degraded by proteolytic host systems makes them attractive candidates for biotechnological applications. However, before suggesting or choosing a new bacteriocin for future technology developments, it is necessary to elucidate its biochemical structure and its mode of action, which may be carried out once the bacteriocin is purified to homogeneity. This chapter focuses on describing the main strategies used for the purification of numerous bacteriocins.

  17. Growth inhibition of Streptococcus mutans by cellular extracts of human intestinal lactic acid bacteria.

    Ishihara, K; Miyakawa, H; Hasegawa, A.; Takazoe, I; Kawai, Y.

    1985-01-01

    The in vitro growth of Streptococcus mutans was completely inhibited by water-soluble extracts from cells of various intestinal lactic acid bacteria identified as Streptococcus faecium, Streptococcus equinus, Lactobacillus fermentum, and Lactobacillus salivarius. The growth inhibition was dependent on the concentrations of the extracts. In contrast, the extracts did not inhibit the growth of the major indigenous intestinal lactic acid bacteria isolated from humans. These lactic acid bacteria ...

  18. STUDY ON PROBIOTIC POTENTIAL AND LABORATORY SCALE PRODUCTION OF LACTIC ACID BACTERIA

    Ambule A.H.; Timande S.P; Soni S.B

    2012-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria were isolated from dairy food. They were identified on the basis of theirmorphological, cultural and biochemical characterastics.The cell free supernatant of lactic acid bacteria were ableto inhibit the growth ofE.coli,Klebsiella aerogens,Salmonella spp. , S.aureus, P.mirabilies and Ps .aeruginosa.The probiotic properties of isolate of lactic acid bacteria (LAB-VI) were investigated. The LAB-VI wassusceptible to antibiotics like ampicillin, gentamycin, ciprofloxacin, oflo...

  19. Interactions between Cooccurring Lactic Acid Bacteria in Honey Bee Hives.

    Rokop, Z P; Horton, M A; Newton, I L G

    2015-10-01

    In contrast to the honey bee gut, which is colonized by a few characteristic bacterial clades, the hive of the honey bee is home to a diverse array of microbes, including many lactic acid bacteria (LAB). In this study, we used culture, combined with sequencing, to sample the LAB communities found across hive environments. Specifically, we sought to use network analysis to identify microbial hubs sharing nearly identical operational taxonomic units, evidence which may indicate cooccurrence of bacteria between environments. In the process, we identified interactions between noncore bacterial members (Fructobacillus and Lactobacillaceae) and honey bee-specific "core" members. Both Fructobacillus and Lactobacillaceae colonize brood cells, bee bread, and nectar and may serve the role of pioneering species, establishing an environment conducive to the inoculation by honey bee core bacteria. Coculture assays showed that these noncore bacterial members promote the growth of honey bee-specific bacterial species. Specifically, Fructobacillus by-products in spent medium supported the growth of the Firm-5 honey bee-specific clade in vitro. Metabolic characterization of Fructobacillus using carbohydrate utilization assays revealed that this strain is capable of utilizing the simple sugars fructose and glucose, as well as the complex plant carbohydrate lignin. We tested Fructobacillus for antibiotic sensitivity and found that this bacterium, which may be important for establishment of the microbiome, is sensitive to the commonly used antibiotic tetracycline. Our results point to the possible significance of "noncore" and environmental microbial community members in the modulation of honey bee microbiome dynamics and suggest that tetracycline use by beekeepers should be limited. PMID:26253685

  20. Immunomodulation of monocytes by probiotic and selected lactic Acid bacteria.

    Jensen, Hanne; Drømtorp, Signe Marie; Axelsson, Lars; Grimmer, Stine

    2015-03-01

    Some lactic acid bacteria (LAB), especially bacteria belonging to the genus Lactobacillus, are recognized as common inhabitants of the human gastrointestinal tract and have received considerable attention in the last decades due to their postulated health-promoting effects. LAB and probiotic bacteria can modulate the host immune response. However, much is unknown about the mediators and mechanisms responsible for their immunological effect. Here, we present a study using cytokine secretion from the monocytic cell line THP-1 and NF-κB activation in the monocytic cell line U937-3xkB-LUC to elucidate immune stimulating abilities of LAB in vitro. In this study, we investigate both commercially available and potential probiotic LAB strains, and the role of putative surface proteins of L. reuteri using mutants. L. reuteri strains induced the highest cytokine secretion and the highest NF-κB activation, whereas L. plantarum strains and L. rhamnosus GG were low inducers/activators. One of the putative L. reuteri surface proteins, Hmpref0536_10802, appeared to be of importance for the stimulation of THP-1 cells and the activation of NF-κB in U937-3xkB-LUC cells. Live and UV-inactivated preparations resulted in different responses for two of the strains investigated. Our results add to the complexity in the interaction between LAB and human cells and suggest the possible involvement of secreted pro- and anti-inflammatory mediators of LAB. It is likely that it is the sum of bacterial surface proteins and bacterial metabolites and/or secreted proteins that induce cytokine secretion in THP-1 cells and activate NF-κB in U937-3xkB-LUC cells in this study. PMID:25331988

  1. PROBIOTIC POTENTIALS AMONG LACTIC ACID BACTERIA ISOLATED FROM CURD

    Shruthy VV

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Curd is a commonly used fermented milk product in India since time immemorial. The scientific use of curd as a source of probiotic (good bacteria for health has not been much examined. The yougurt (curd containing probiotics is in Indian market and highly acclaimed. Therefore the status of curd as a source of probiotics is in question and requires scientific examination of its content, so the study was carried out. Probiotic potentials of two bacterial isolates from 20 different curd samples were identified as Lactobacillus spp. by the determination of morphological, cultural, physiological and biochemical characteristics, were investigated. The antibacterial potential against diarrhoegenic bacterial pathogens was also examined. The reference strain used was Lactobacillus acidophilus, MTCC 447. The percentage survivability of the strains at pH 3.5, was found to be satisfactory (>90%. Bile salt resistance (0.3% sodium thioglycollate was found to be between 80.41% and 83.2%. The pH decrease of the strains with time showed slow acidification activity. The lactic acid production of the strains ranges from 1.83 ± 0.12 to 3.93 ± 0.07 g. The strains were β-galactosidase producer and were resistant to principal antibiotics tested. But the absence of plasmids showed that they are intrinsically resistant or chromosome encoded. Strains showed maximum inhibition zone against V. cholerae O139 (13.67 ± 0.57 to 15.33 ± 0.57 mm in comparison to other diarrhoeagenic bacteria. Only 10% of the examined curd samples had probiotic bacteria. Isolated strains of Lactobacillus spp. showed satisfactory probiotic potentials in comparison with reference strains and with antibacterial activity against diarrhoeagenic pathogens and thus maybe useful in the management of diarrhoea and also in functional food industry.

  2. Perspectives of engineering lactic acid bacteria for biotechnological polyol production.

    Monedero, Vicente; Pérez-Martínez, Gaspar; Yebra, María J

    2010-04-01

    Polyols are sugar alcohols largely used as sweeteners and they are claimed to have several health-promoting effects (low-caloric, low-glycemic, low-insulinemic, anticariogenic, and prebiotic). While at present chemical synthesis is the only strategy able to assure the polyol market demand, the biotechnological production of polyols has been implemented in yeasts, fungi, and bacteria. Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are a group of microorganisms particularly suited for polyol production as they display a fermentative metabolism associated with an important redox modulation and a limited biosynthetic capacity. In addition, LAB participate in food fermentation processes, where in situ production of polyols during fermentation may be useful in the development of novel functional foods. Here, we review the polyol production by LAB, focusing on metabolic engineering strategies aimed to redirect sugar fermentation pathways towards the synthesis of biotechnologically important sugar alcohols such as sorbitol, mannitol, and xylitol. Furthermore, possible approaches are presented for engineering new fermentation routes in LAB for production of arabitol, ribitol, and erythritol. PMID:20180114

  3. Lactic acid bacteria as adjuvants for sublingual allergy vaccines.

    Van Overtvelt, Laurence; Moussu, Helene; Horiot, Stéphane; Samson, Sandrine; Lombardi, Vincent; Mascarell, Laurent; van de Moer, Ariane; Bourdet-Sicard, Raphaëlle; Moingeon, Philippe

    2010-04-01

    We compared immunomodulatory properties of 11 strains of lactic acid bacteria as well as their capacity to enhance sublingual immunotherapy efficacy in a murine asthma model. Two types of bacterial strains were identified, including: (i) potent inducers of IL-12p70 and IL-10 in dendritic cells, supporting IFN-gamma and IL-10 production in CD4+ T cells such as Lactobacillus helveticus; (ii) pure Th1 inducers such as L. casei. Sublingual administration in ovalbumin-sensitized mice of L. helveticus, but not L. casei, reduced airways hyperresponsiveness, bronchial inflammation and proliferation of specific T cells in cervical lymph nodes. Thus, probiotics acting as a Th1/possibly Treg, but not Th1 adjuvant, potentiate tolerance induction via the sublingual route. PMID:20175969

  4. Variations in prebiotic oligosaccharide fermentation by intestinal lactic acid bacteria.

    Endo, Akihito; Nakamura, Saki; Konishi, Kenta; Nakagawa, Junichi; Tochio, Takumi

    2016-03-01

    Prebiotic oligosaccharides confer health benefits on the host by modulating the gut microbiota. Intestinal lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are potential targets of prebiotics; however, the metabolism of oligosaccharides by LAB has not been fully characterized. Here, we studied the metabolism of eight oligosaccharides by 19 strains of intestinal LAB. Among the eight oligosaccharides used, 1-kestose, lactosucrose and galactooligosaccharides (GOSs) led to the greatest increases in the numbers of the strains tested. However, mono- and disaccharides accounted for more than half of the GOSs used, and several strains only metabolized the mono- and di-saccharides in GOSs. End product profiles indicated that the amounts of lactate produced were generally consistent with the bacterial growth recorded. Oligosaccharide profiling revealed the interesting metabolic manner in Lactobacillus paracasei strains, which metabolized all oligosaccharides, but left sucrose when cultured with fructooligosaccharides. The present study clearly indicated that the prebiotic potential of each oligosaccharide differs. PMID:26888650

  5. Phenolic acid degradation potential and growth behavior of lactic acid bacteria in sunflower substrates.

    Fritsch, Caroline; Heinrich, Veronika; Vogel, Rudi F; Toelstede, Simone

    2016-08-01

    Sunflower flour provides a high content of protein with a well-balanced amino acid composition and is therefore regarded as an attractive source for protein. The use for human nutrition is hindered by phenolic compounds, mainly chlorogenic acid, which can lead under specific circumstances to undesirable discolorations. In this study, growth behavior and degradation ability of chlorogenic acid of four lactic acid bacteria were explored. Data suggested that significant higher fermentation performances on sunflower flour as compared to sunflower protein concentrate were reached by Lactobacillus plantarum, Pediococcus pentosaceus, Lactobacillus gasseri and Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis. In fermentation with the latter two strains reduced amounts of chlorogenic acid were observed in sunflower flour (-11.4% and -19.8%, respectively), which were more pronounced in the protein concentrate (-50.7% and -95.6%, respectively). High tolerances against chlorogenic acid and the cleavage product quinic acid with a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of ≥20.48 mg/ml after 48 h were recorded for all strains except Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis, which was more sensitive. The second cleavage compound, caffeic acid revealed a higher antimicrobial potential with MIC values of 0.64-5.12 mg/ml. In this proof of concept study, degradation versus inhibitory effect suggest the existence of basic mechanisms of interaction between phenolic acids in sunflower and lactic acid bacteria and a feasible way to reduce the chlorogenic acid content, which may help to avoid undesired color changes. PMID:27052717

  6. Plasmodium falciparum malaria elicits inflammatory responses that dysregulate placental amino acid transport.

    Philippe Boeuf

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Placental malaria (PM can lead to poor neonatal outcomes, including low birthweight due to fetal growth restriction (FGR, especially when associated with local inflammation (intervillositis or IV. The pathogenesis of PM-associated FGR is largely unknown, but in idiopathic FGR, impaired transplacental amino acid transport, especially through the system A group of amino acid transporters, has been implicated. We hypothesized that PM-associated FGR could result from impairment of transplacental amino acid transport triggered by IV. In a cohort of Malawian women and their infants, the expression and activity of system A (measured by Na⁺-dependent ¹⁴C-MeAIB uptake were reduced in PM, especially when associated with IV, compared to uninfected placentas. In an in vitro model of PM with IV, placental cells exposed to monocyte/infected erythrocytes conditioned medium showed decreased system A activity. Amino acid concentrations analyzed by reversed phase ultra performance liquid chromatography in paired maternal and cord plasmas revealed specific alterations of amino acid transport by PM, especially with IV. Overall, our data suggest that the fetoplacental unit responds to PM by altering its placental amino acid transport to maintain adequate fetal growth. However, IV more profoundly compromises placental amino acid transport function, leading to FGR. Our study offers the first pathogenetic explanation for FGR in PM.

  7. Formic and Acetic Acids in Degradation Products of Plant Volatiles Elicit Olfactory and Behavioral Responses from an Insect Vector.

    George, Justin; Robbins, Paul S; Alessandro, Rocco T; Stelinski, Lukasz L; Lapointe, Stephen L

    2016-05-01

    Volatile phytochemicals play a role in orientation by phytophagous insects. We studied antennal and behavioral responses of the Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri, vector of the citrus greening disease pathogen. Little or no response to citrus leaf volatiles was detected by electroantennography. Glass cartridges prepared with β-ocimene or citral produced no response initially but became stimulatory after several days. Both compounds degraded completely in air to a number of smaller molecules. Two peaks elicited large antennal responses and were identified as acetic and formic acids. Probing by D. citri of a wax substrate containing odorants was significantly increased by a blend of formic and acetic acids compared with either compound separately or blends containing β-ocimene and/or citral. Response surface modeling based on a 4-component mixture design and a 2-component mixture-amount design predicted an optimal probing response on wax substrate containing a blend of formic and acetic acids. Our study suggests that formic and acetic acids play a role in host selection by D. citri and perhaps by phytophagous insects in general even when parent compounds from which they are derived are not active. These results have implications for the investigation of arthropod olfaction and may lead to elaboration of attract-and-kill formulations to reduce nontarget effects of chemical control in agriculture. PMID:26857741

  8. Probiotic lactic acid bacteria for applications in vegetarian food products

    Charernjiratrakul, W.

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Total of 225 isolates of lactic acid bacteria were isolated from 152 samples of various fermented foods. The strains were investigated for their probiotic properties based on stability in bile salt (0.30% and high acidity (pH 3, growth under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions, ability to grow without vitamin B12. According to the above criteria, 40 isolates were selected. Using an agar spot method, 16 isolates were able to inhibit Salmonella typhimurium, S. typhi, S. enteritidis, S. paratyphi and 4 strains of E. coli O157 : H7 as clear zone greater than 10 mm. Moreover, utilization of protein or fat or starch was also considered. Only 5 isolates were able to utilize protein and further selected for antibiotics sensitivity test. The selected isolates were susceptible to following antibiotics: ampicillin, chloramphenicol, erythromycin , kanamycin, tetracycline and vancomycin; however they were resistant to ceptazidime and norfloxacin. They all showed better growth in vegetarian medium (coconut juice medium than MRS medium both under static and shaking conditions. Five active isolates were identified as Lactobacillus plantarum LL13, LN18, LP11, LS35 and Pediococcus pentosaceus LT02 by API 50 CH system. All cultures grew well in carrot juice by reducing pH from 6.4 to below 4.0 after 24 h of fermentation at 35oC. The lactic cultures in fermented carrot juice lost their viability about 2 log cycles after 15 days of cold storage at 4oC.

  9. Kinetic Analysis of Strains of Lactic Acid Bacteria and Acetic Acid Bacteria in Cocoa Pulp Simulation Media toward Development of a Starter Culture for Cocoa Bean Fermentation ▿

    Lefeber, Timothy; Janssens, Maarten; Camu, Nicholas; De Vuyst, Luc

    2010-01-01

    The composition of cocoa pulp simulation media (PSM) was optimized with species-specific strains of lactic acid bacteria (PSM-LAB) and acetic acid bacteria (PSM-AAB). Also, laboratory fermentations were carried out in PSM to investigate growth and metabolite production of strains of Lactobacillus plantarum and Lactobacillus fermentum and of Acetobacter pasteurianus isolated from Ghanaian cocoa bean heap fermentations, in view of the development of a defined starter culture. In a first step, a...

  10. Lactic Acid Bacteria Strains Exert Immunostimulatory Effect on H. pylori-Induced Dendritic Cells

    Małgorzata Wiese

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to find out if selected lactic acid bacteria (LAB strains (antagonistic or nonantagonistic against H. pylori in vitro would differ in their abilities to modulate the DCs maturation profiles reflected by their phenotype and cytokine expression patterns. Methods. Monocyte-derived DCs maturation was elicited by their direct exposure to the LAB strains of L. rhamnosus 900 or L. paracasei 915 (antagonistic and nonantagonistic to H. pylori, resp., in the presence or absence of H. pylori strain cagA+. The DCs maturation profile was assessed on the basis of surface markers expression and cytokines production. Results. We observed that the LAB strains and the mixtures of LAB with H. pylori are able to induce mature DCs. At the same time, the L. paracasei 915 leads to high IL-10/IL-12p70 cytokine ratio, in contrast to L. rhamnosus 900. Conclusions. This study showed that the analyzed lactobacilli strains are more potent stimulators of DC maturation than H. pylori. Interestingly from the two chosen LAB strains the antagonistic to H. pylori-L. rhamnosus strain 900 has more proinflammatory and probably antibactericidal properties.

  11. Isolation and characterization of lactic acid bacteria and yeasts from the Brazilian grape sourdough

    Krischina Singer Aplevicz; Jaciara Zarpellon Mazo; Eunice Cassanego Ilha; Andréia Zilio Dinon; Ernani Sebastião Sant´Anna

    2014-01-01

    Sourdough is a mixture of flour and water fermented by lactic acid bacteria and yeast, with a large use in bakery products. This study was developed with Brazilian grape (Niagara rosada) sourdough obtained from spontaneous fermentation. The aim of this work was to characterize genotypic and phenotypically lactic acid bacteria and yeasts isolated from sourdough. The phenotypic identification for bacteria and yeasts was performed by using the kit API50CHL and 20CAUX and the genotypic characteri...

  12. Antimicrobial properties of lactic acid bacteria isolated from uruguayan artisan cheese

    Martín Fraga Cotelo; Karen Perelmuter Schein; Sheila Solange Giacaman Salvo; Pablo Miguel Zunino Abirad; Silvana Beatriz Carro Techera

    2013-01-01

    Uruguayan artisan cheese is elaborated with raw milk and non-commercial starters. The associated native microbiota may include lactic acid bacteria and also potentially pathogenic bacteria. Lactic acid bacteria were isolated from artisan cheese, raw milk, and non-commercial starter cultures, and their potential bacteriocin production was assessed. A culture collection of 509 isolates was obtained, and five isolates were bacteriocin-producers and were identified as Enterococcus durans,Lactobac...

  13. Naturally fermented Jijelian black olives: microbiological characteristics and isolation of lactic acid bacteria

    Karam, Nour-Eddine; Leghouchi, Essaid; Boudjerda, Jamel; Idoui, Tayeb

    2009-01-01

    A study of the microflora of traditionally fermented black olives in Eastern Algeria is presented. A count of the following microbial groups was carried out: mesophilic bacteria, enterobacteria, lactic acid bacteria (LAB), staphylococci and yeast. In a second phase, the identification and assessment of the technological traits of LAB was performed. Seventeen lactic acid bacteria were isolated and identified. These isolates were represented by two genera: Lactobacillus and Leuconostoc. The res...

  14. Myosin-cross-reactive antigens from four different lactic acid bacteria are fatty acid hydratases.

    Yang, Bo; Chen, Haiqin; Song, Yuanda; Chen, Yong Q; Zhang, Hao; Chen, Wei

    2013-01-01

    The 67 kDa myosin-cross-reactive antigen (MCRA) is a member of the MCRA family of proteins present in a wide range of bacteria and was predicted to have fatty acid isomerase function. We have now characterised the catalytic activity of MCRAs from four LAB stains, including Lactobacillus rhamnosus LGG, L. plantarum ST-III, L. acidophilus NCFM and Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis BB-12. MCRA genes from these strains were cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli, and the recombinant protein function was analysed with lipid profiles by GC-MS. The four MCRAs catalysed the conversion of linoleic acid and oleic acid to their respective 10-hydroxy derivatives, which suggests that MCRA proteins catalyse the first step in conjugated linoleic acid production. This is the first report of MCRA from L. rhamnosus with such catalytic function. PMID:22955678

  15. Effect of jasmonic acid elicitation on the yield, chemical composition, and antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties of essential oil of lettuce leaf basil (Ocimum basilicum L.).

    Złotek, Urszula; Michalak-Majewska, Monika; Szymanowska, Urszula

    2016-12-15

    The effect of elicitation with jasmonic acid (JA) on the plant yield, the production and composition of essential oils of lettuce leaf basil was evaluated. JA-elicitation slightly affected the yield of plants and significantly increased the amount of essential oils produced by basil - the highest oil yield (0.78±0.005mL/100gdw) was achieved in plants elicited with 100μM JA. The application of the tested elicitor also influenced the chemical composition of basil essential oils - 100μM JA increased the linalool, eugenol, and limonene levels, while 1μM JA caused the highest increase in the methyl eugenol content. Essential oils from JA-elicited basil (especially 1μM and 100μM) exhibited more effective antioxidant and anti-inflammatory potential; therefore, this inducer may be a very useful biochemical tool for improving production and composition of herbal essential oils. PMID:27451148

  16. Activity of capryloyl collagenic acid against bacteria involved in acne.

    Fourniat, J; Bourlioux, P

    1989-12-01

    Synopsis Capryloyl collagenic acid (Lipacide C8Co) has similar bacteriostatic activity in vitro to that of benzoyl peroxide towards the bacteria found in acne lesions (Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis and Propionibacterium acnes) (MIC between 1 and 4 mg ml(-1) for C8Co, and between 0.5 and 5 mg ml(-1) for benzoyl peroxide). The presence of Emulgine M8 did not affect the bacteriostatic activity of C8Co. A 4% w/v solution of C8Co (incorporating Emulgine M8) fulfilled the criteria for an antiseptic preparation as laid down by the French Pharmacopoeia (10th Edition), and had a spectrum 5 bactericidal activity according to the French Standard AFNOR NF T 72-151. The excellent cutaneous tolerance of capryloyl collagenic acid would indicate that an aqueous solution might be of value for topical treatment of the bacterial component of acne. Résumé Activité antibactérienne de l'acide capryloyl-collagénique vis à vis des bactéries impliquées dans l'etiologie de l'acné L'acide capryloyl-collagénique (Lipacide C8Co) et le peroxyde de benzoyle présentent une activité bactériostatique in-vitroéquivalente vis à vis des espèces bactériennes retrouvées au niveau des lésions acnéiques (Staphylococcus aureus, S. epidermidis et Propionibacterium acnes) (CMI comprise entre 1 et 4 mg ml(-1) pour le lipoaminoacide, et 0,5 et 5 mg ml(-1) pour le peroxyde de benzoyle). La mise en solution aqueuse de l'acide capryloyl-collagénique en présence d'Emulgine M8 ne modifie pas son activité bactériostatique. Une telle solution, à 4% m/V d'acide capryloyl-collagénique et 5% m/V d'Emulgine M8, satisfait à l'essai d'activité des préparations antiseptiques décrit à la Pharmacopée Française (Xème Ed.) (concentration minimale antiseptique: 10% v/V, pour un temps de contact de 5 min à 32 degrees C entre les germes tests et la solution diluée en eau distillée), et posséde une activité bactéricide antiseptique spectre 5 conforme à la norme AFNOR NF T

  17. Engineering strategies aimed at control of acidification rate of lactic acid bacteria

    Martinussen, Jan; Solem, Christian; Holm, Anders Koefoed;

    2013-01-01

    The ability of lactic acid bacteria to produce lactic acid from various sugars plays an important role in food fermentations. Lactic acid is derived from pyruvate, the end product of glycolysis and thus a fast lactic acid production rate requires a high glycolytic flux. In addition to lactic acid......, alternative end products - ethanol, acetic acid and formic acid - are formed by many species. The central role of glycolysis in lactic acid bacteria has provoked numerous studies aiming at identifying potential bottleneck(s) since knowledge about flux control could be important not only for optimizing food...... fermentation processes, but also for novel applications of lactic acid bacteria, such as cell factories for the production of green fuels and chemicals. With respect to the control and regulation of the fermentation mode, some progress has been made, but the question of which component(s) control the main...

  18. Co-culture-inducible bacteriocin production in lactic acid bacteria.

    Chanos, Panagiotis; Mygind, Tina

    2016-05-01

    It is common knowledge that microorganisms have capabilities, like the production of antimicrobial compounds, which do not normally appear in ideal laboratory conditions. Common antimicrobial discovery techniques require the isolation of monocultures and their individual screening against target microorganisms. One strategy to achieve expression of otherwise hidden antimicrobials is induction by co-cultures. In the area of bacteriocin-producing lactic acid bacteria, there has been some research focusing into the characteristics of co-culture-inducible bacteriocin production and particularly the molecular mechanism(s) of such interactions. No clear relationship has been seen between bacteriocin-inducing and bacteriocin-producing microorganisms. The three-component regulatory system seems to be playing a central role in the induction, but inducing compounds have not been identified or characterized. However, the presence of the universal messenger molecule autoinducer-2 has been associated in some cases with the co-culture-inducible bacteriocin phenotype and it may play the role in the additional regulation of the three-component regulatory system. Understanding the mechanisms of induction would facilitate the development of strategies for screening and development of co-culture bacteriocin-producing systems and novel products as well as the perseverance of such systems in food and down to the intestinal tract, possibly conferring a probiotic effect on the host. PMID:27037694

  19. Removal of Paralytic Shellfish Toxins by Probiotic Lactic Acid Bacteria

    Mari Vasama

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Paralytic shellfish toxins (PSTs are non-protein neurotoxins produced by saltwater dinoflagellates and freshwater cyanobacteria. The ability of Lactobacillus rhamnosus strains GG and LC-705 (in viable and non-viable forms to remove PSTs (saxitoxin (STX, neosaxitoxin (neoSTX, gonyautoxins 2 and 3 (GTX2/3, C-toxins 1 and 2 (C1/2 from neutral and acidic solution (pH 7.3 and 2 was examined using HPLC. Binding decreased in the order of STX ~ neoSTX > C2 > GTX3 > GTX2 > C1. Removal of STX and neoSTX (77%–97.2% was significantly greater than removal of GTX3 and C2 (33.3%–49.7%. There were no significant differences in toxin removal capacity between viable and non-viable forms of lactobacilli, which suggested that binding rather than metabolism is the mechanism of the removal of toxins. In general, binding was not affected by the presence of other organic molecules in solution. Importantly, this is the first study to demonstrate the ability of specific probiotic lactic bacteria to remove PSTs, particularly the most toxic PST-STX, from solution. Further, these results warrant thorough screening and assessment of safe and beneficial microbes for their usefulness in the seafood and water industries and their effectiveness in vivo.

  20. Antibiotics influence on lactic acid bacteria inhibiting gastrointestinal tract

    Andreja Čanžek Majhenič

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available Lactic acid bacteria (LAB are common inhabitants of the gastrointestinal (GI tract and have important role in maintaining the equilibrium of GI flora, which can be influenced by various factors like diets, antimicrobials and stress. Minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC and minimal bactericidal concentrations (MBC of 6 antibiotics, commonly used in human medicine for 8 selected lactobacilli strains were determined by macrodilution and microdilution methods in liquid media and by diffusion method on agar plates. The effects of Penicillin G and Ampicillin on intestinal LAB were tested in vivoon mice as well. Lactobacilli were sensitive to Penicillin G, (penicillines and their derivatives and Erythromycin (macrolides by in vitro testing. Clyndamycin (pyranosid showed moderate inhibitory effect. All lactobacilli strains were resistant to Kanamycin and Neomycin (aminoglycosides, while L. salivarius IM 124 has shown extra resistance to Erythromycin and Clyndamycin. The influence of orally administered Ampicillin showed no significant influence on LAB count in mice faeces. The effect of Penicillin G on mice LAB total count was significant, while no effect of orally administered lactobacilli was determined.

  1. Isolation and characterisation of lactic acid bacteria from donkey milk.

    Soto Del Rio, Maria de Los Dolores; Andrighetto, Christian; Dalmasso, Alessandra; Lombardi, Angiolella; Civera, Tiziana; Bottero, Maria Teresa

    2016-08-01

    During the last years the interest in donkey milk has increased significantly mainly because of its compelling functional elements. Even if the composition and nutritional properties of donkey milk are known, its microbiota is less studied. This Research Communication aimed to provide a comprehensive characterisation of the lactic acid bacteria in raw donkey milk. RAPD-PCR assay combined with 16S rDNA sequencing analysis were used to describe the microbial diversity of several donkey farms in the North West part of Italy. The more frequently detected species were: Lactobacillus paracasei, Lactococcus lactis and Carnobacterium maltaromaticum. Less abundant genera were Leuconostoc, Enterococcus and Streptococcus. The yeast Kluyveromyces marxianus was also isolated. The bacterial and biotype distribution notably diverged among the farms. Several of the found species, not previously detected in donkey milk, could have an important probiotic activity and biotechnological potential. This study represents an important insight to the ample diversity of the microorganisms present in the highly selective ecosystem of raw donkey milk. PMID:27600975

  2. Antimicrobial susceptibility of lactic acid bacteria isolated from Sombor cheese

    Bulajić Snežana

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Extensive literature data pointed out that some lactic acid bacteria (LABs, the predominant microbiota in fermented dairy products, may serve as reservoirs of antibiotic resistance genes potentially transferable to human pathogens. Hence, there is a growing interest in the possible role of Las vectors of antibiotic resistance determinants. This paper reports the susceptibility patterns of a number of Lspecies (belonging to the genera Lactococcus, Lactobacillus, and Enterococcus isolated from different batches of autochthonous Sombor cheese, traditionally made without the addition of starter cultures, and currently proposed as a candidate for PDO/PGI designation. The experimental work was performed to select strains that do not contain antibiotic resistance genes among those with desirable technological characteristics such as rapid acidification, proteolysis, ability to metabolise citrate and form aromogenic compounds. In addition, the results of these screening procedures could also indicate the types and degrees of antimicrobial resistance already present among the Lcommunity of Sombor cheese, which according to their geographically restricted areas of production, specific manufacturing process and characteristic aroma and appearance, represent a distinct ecological niche.

  3. Optimization of β-galactosidase production from lactic acid bacteria

    Carević Milica

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available β-galactosidase, commonly known as lactase, represents commercially important enzyme that is prevalently used for lactose hydrolysis in milk and whey. To the date, it has been isolated from various sources. In this study different strains of lactic acid bacteria were assessed for their β-galactosidase productivity, and Lactobacillus acidophilus ATCC 4356 resulted with the highest production potential. Thereafter, optimal conditions for accomplishing high yields of β-galactosidase activity were determined. Maximal specific activity (1.01 IU mL-1 was accomplished after 2 days shake flask culture fermentation (150 rpm at 37ºC, with modified Man Rogosa Sharpe culture broth using lactose (2.5% as sole carbon source. Finally, in order to intensify release of intracellular β-galactosidase different mechanical and chemical methods were conducted. Nevertheless, vortexing with quartz sand (150 μm as abrasive was proven to be the most efficient method of cell disruption. The optimum temperature of obtained β-galactosidase was 45°C and the optimum range pH 6.5-7.5.

  4. Activity of H(+)-ATPase in ruminal bacteria with special reference to acid tolerance.

    Miwa, T.; Esaki, H; Umemori, J; Hino, T.

    1997-01-01

    Batch culture experiments showed that permeabilized cells and membranes of Ruminococcus albus and Fibrobacter succinogenes, acid-intolerant celluloytic bacteria, have only one-fourth to one-fifth as much H(+)-ATPase as Megasphaera elsdenii and Streptococcus bovis, which are relatively acid tolerant. Even in the cells grown in continuous culture at pH 7.0, the acid-intolerant bacteria contained less than half as much H(+)-ATPase as the acid-tolerant bacteria. The amounts of H(+)-ATPase in the ...

  5. Arachidonic acid drives postnatal neurogenesis and elicits a beneficial effect on prepulse inhibition, a biological trait of psychiatric illnesses.

    Motoko Maekawa

    Full Text Available Prepulse inhibition (PPI is a compelling endophenotype (biological markers for mental disorders including schizophrenia. In a previous study, we identified Fabp7, a fatty acid binding protein 7 as one of the genes controlling PPI in mice and showed that this gene was associated with schizophrenia. We also demonstrated that disrupting Fabp7 dampened hippocampal neurogenesis. In this study, we examined a link between neurogenesis and PPI using different animal models and exploring the possibility of postnatal manipulation of neurogenesis affecting PPI, since gene-deficient mice show biological disturbances from prenatal stages. In parallel, we tested the potential for dietary polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs, arachidonic acid (ARA and/or docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, to promote neurogenesis and improve PPI. PUFAs are ligands for Fabp members and are abundantly expressed in neural stem/progenitor cells in the hippocampus. Our results are: (1 an independent model animal, Pax6 (+/- rats, exhibited PPI deficits along with impaired postnatal neurogenesis; (2 methylazoxymethanol acetate (an anti-proliferative drug elicited decreased neurogenesis even in postnatal period, and PPI defects in young adult rats (10 weeks when the drug was given at the juvenile stage (4-5 weeks; (3 administering ARA for 4 weeks after birth promoted neurogenesis in wild type rats; (4 raising Pax6 (+/- pups on an ARA-containing diet enhanced neurogenesis and partially improved PPI in adult animals. These results suggest the potential benefit of ARA in ameliorating PPI deficits relevant to psychiatric disorders and suggest that the effect may be correlated with augmented postnatal neurogenesis.

  6. Examination of Lactic Acid Bacteria to Secretion of Bacteriocins

    Maira Urazova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Bacteriocins produced by lactic acid bacteria (LAB have the potential to cover a very broad field of applications, including the food industry and the medical sector. In the food industry, bacteriocinogenic LAB strains can be used as starter cultures, co-cultures, and bioprotective cultures, which would be used to improve food quality and safety. In the medical sector, bacteriocins of probiotic LAB might play a role in interactions, which take place in human gastrointestinal tract, and contribute to gut health. The aim of this study was the examine the effect of LAB antimicrobial activity. Methods: LAB were isolated from different commercial and home made products, such as kazy and sour cream. To screen for bacteriocin producing LAB, we used an agar diffusion bioassay, described in a previous study by Dr. Yang, with three modifications in cell-free supernatant (CFS. First we had a clear supernatant, second we adjusted the CFS to pH 6.0 to eliminate acids antimicrobial effects, and third the CFS pH 6.0 was treated with catalase to exclude the action of H2O2 and confirm action of bacteriocin-like substances. Pathogenic S.marcescens, E. coli, S.aureus cultures were used as indicators. Results: Screening of 95 strains of LAB through deferred antagonism to six indicator cultures showed that all of the selected strains had a high value of antibacterial activity. However, CFS of only 50 strains retained their antimicrobial activity, and 10 of them lost this activity in the second modification of CFS with pH 6.0 to test culture S.marcescens, which confirmed the acidic nature of antimicrobial activity of CFS. Lb.rhamnosus (P-1, Lb.fermentum (N-6, and Lc.lactis (7M lost antibacterial activity in the presence of the catalase. All modifications of CFS of three strains: Lb.pentosus (16al, Lb.pentosus (P-2, and Pediococcusacidilactici (8 retained inhibitory activity to E.coli and S. aureus. Supernatants of only Lactococcusgarvieae (10a and

  7. Production of γ-Amino Butyric Acid in Tea Leaves wit Treatment of Lactic Acid Bacteria

    Watanabe, Yuko; Hayakawa, Kiyoshi; Ueno, Hiroshi

    Lactic acid bacteria was searched for producing termented tea that contained a lot of γ-amino butyric acid(GABA). Also examined were the growth condition, GABA production and changes in catechin contents in the tea leaves. Lactobacillus brevis L12 was found to be suitable for the production of fermented tea since it gave as much GABA as gabaron tea when tea leaves being suspended with water at 10% and incubated for 4 days at 25°C. The amount of GABA produced was more than calculated based upon the content of glutamic acid in tea leaves. It is probable to assume that glutamate derived from glutamine and theanine is converted into GABA.

  8. TECHNOLOGICAL AND FUNCTIONAL PROPERTIES OF LACTIC ACID BACTERIA: THE IMPORTANCE OF THESE MICROORGANISMS FOR FOOD

    Amanda de Souza Motta; Melina Da Silva Mesquita Gomes

    2015-01-01

    Eacters of coccus or rods Gram-positive, catalase negative, non-sporulating, which produce lactic acid as the major end product during the fermentation of carbohydrates. When applied on food, provides beneficial effects to consumers through its functional and technological properties. With this the present review article, explore the potential application of lactic acid bacteria in food. The following genera are considered the principal lactic acid bacteria: Aerococcus, Carnobacterium, Entero...

  9. Effect of fermented broth from lactic acid bacteria on pathogenic bacteria proliferation.

    Gutiérrez, S; Martínez-Blanco, H; Rodríguez-Aparicio, L B; Ferrero, M A

    2016-04-01

    In this study, the effect that 5 fermented broths of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) strains have on the viability or proliferation and adhesion of 7 potentially pathogenic microorganisms was tested. The fermented broth from Lactococcus lactis C660 had a growth inhibitory effect on Escherichia coli K92 that reached of 31%, 19% to Pseudomonas fluorescens, and 76% to Staphylococcus epidermidis. The growth of Staph. epidermidis was negatively affected to 90% by Lc. lactis 11454 broth, whereas the growth of P. fluorescens (25%) and both species of Staphylococcus (35% to Staphylococcus aureus and 76% to Staph. epidermidis) were inhibited when they were incubated in the presence of Lactobacillus casei 393 broth. Finally, the fermented broth of Lactobacillus rhamnosus showed an inhibitory effect on growth of E. coli K92, Listeria innocua, and Staph. epidermidis reached values of 12, 28, and 76%, respectively. Staphylococcus epidermidis was the most affected strain because the effect was detected from the early stages of growth and it was completely abolished. The results of bacterial adhesion revealed that broths from Lc. lactis strains, Lactobacillus paracasei, and Lb. rhamnosus caused a loss of E. coli K92 adhesion. Bacillus cereus showed a decreased of adhesion in the presence of the broths of Lc. lactis strains and Lb. paracasei. Listeria innocua adhesion inhibition was observed in the presence of Lb. paracasei broth, and the greatest inhibitory effect was registered when this pathogenic bacterium was incubated in presence of Lc. lactis 11454 broth. With respect to the 2 Pseudomonas, we observed a slight adhesion inhibition showed by Lactobacillus rhamnosus broth against Pseudomonas putida. These results confirm that the effect caused by the different LAB assayed is also broth- and species-specific and reveal that the broth from LAB tested can be used as functional bioactive compounds to regulate the adhesion and biofilm synthesis and ultimately lead to preventing food and

  10. Selection of Lactic Acid Bacteria as Probiotic Candidate for Chicken

    F. Hamida

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Lactic acid bacteria (LAB regarded as safe microorganisms; they can naturally live in gastrointestinal tract, so appropriately used as a probiotic for chicken. This study aimed to select six isolates of LAB (E1223, E3, E4, E5, E7, and E8 to obtain the isolates potentially as probiotic candidate for chicken. The six isolates were derived from spontaneous fermented corn obtained from Laboratory of Animal Biotechnology and Biomedical, PPSHB, Bogor Agricultural University, Indonesia. LAB isolates were tested their susceptibility to antibiotics (bambermycin, erythromycin, chloramphenicol, and tetracycline then were examined in vitro for their tolerance to gastrointestinal pH (2, 3, 4, and 7.2 and 0.5% bile salt condition, antimicrobial activity against Salmonella enteritidis and Enterococcus casseliflavus, and ability to adhere to chicken ileal cells. The results showed the isolates E5, E7, and E8 were sensitive to tetracycline and chloramphenicol, they could survive at pH 2, 3, 4, and 7.2, could survive at 0.5% bile salts, produced antimicrobial activity, and able to adhere to ileal cells (9.40±0.00 Log CFU/cm2 of E8 and were significantly (P<0.05 higher than those of control (5.30±0.14 Log CFU/cm2. In conclusion, this study showed that isolate E8 had better potential compared to isolates E5 and E7 in most in vitro assays as a probiotic candidate for chicken. E5, E7, and E8 were closely related with Pediococcus pentosaceus based on 16S rRNA gene.

  11. Resistance to antibiotics in Lacid acid bacteria - strain Lactococcus

    Filipić Brankica

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Lactic acid bacteria (LAB are widely used in the food industry, especially in the production of fermented dairy products and meat. The most studied species among Lis Lactococcus lactis. L. lactis strains are of great importance in the production of fermented dairy products such as yogurt, butter, fresh cheese and some kind of semi-hard cheese. Although L. lactis acquired the „Generally Regarded As Safe“ (GRAS status, many investigations indicated that lactococci may act as reservoirs of antibiotic resistance genes, which could be transferred to other bacterial species in human gastrointestinal tract includ­ing pathogens. The genome analysis of L. lactis indicated the presence of at least 40 putative drug transporter genes, and only four multidrug resistance (MDR transporters are functionally characterized: LmrA, LmrP, LmrCD i CmbT. LmrA is the first described MDR transporter in prokaryotes. LmrCD is responsible for resistance to cholate, which is an integral part of human bile and LmrCD is important for intestinal survival of lactococci that are used as probiotics. Secondary multidrug transporter LmrP confers resistance to lincosamides, macrolides, streptogramins and tetracyclines. CmbT protein has an effect on the host cell resistance to lincomycin, sulfadiazine, streptomycin, rifampicin, puromycin and sulfametox­azole. Since the food chain is an important way of transmitting resistance genes in human and animal population, it is of great importance to study the mechanisms of resistance in lactococci and other LAB, intended for the food industry. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 173019: Izučavanje gena i molekularnih mehanizama u osnovi probiotičke aktivnosti bakterija mlečne kiseline izolovanih sa područja Zapadnog Balkana

  12. Hypolipidemic effects of lactic acid bacteria fermented cereal in rats

    Banjoko Immaculata

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The objectives of the present study were to investigate the efficacy of the mixed culture of Lactobacillus acidophilus (DSM 20242, Bifidobacterium bifidum (DSM 20082 and Lactobacillus helveticus (CK60 in the fermentation of maize and the evaluation of the effect of the fermented meal on the lipid profile of rats. Methods Rats were randomly assigned to 3 groups and each group placed on a Diet A (high fat diet into which a maize meal fermented with a mixed culture of Lb acidophilus (DSM 20242, B bifidum (DSM 20082 and Lb helveticus (CK 60 was incorporated, B (unfermented high fat diet or C (commercial rat chow respectively after the first group of 7 rats randomly selected were sacrificed to obtain the baseline data. Thereafter 7 rats each from the experimental and control groups were sacrificed weekly for 4 weeks and the plasma, erythrocytes, lipoproteins and organs of the rats were assessed for cholesterol, triglyceride and phospholipids. Results Our results revealed that the mixed culture of Lb acidophilus (DSM 20242, B bifidum (DSM 20082 and Lb helveticus (CK 60 were able to grow and ferment maize meal into ‘ogi’ of acceptable flavour. In addition to plasma and hepatic hypercholesterolemia and hypertriglyceridemia, phospholipidosis in plasma, as well as cholesterogenesis, triglyceride constipation and phospholipidosis in extra-hepatic tissues characterized the consumption of unfermented hyperlipidemic diets. However, feeding the animals with the fermented maize diet reversed the dyslipidemia. Conclusion The findings of this study indicate that consumption of mixed culture lactic acid bacteria (Lb acidophilus (DSM 20242, Bifidobacterium bifidum (DSM 20082 and Lb helveticus (CK 60 fermented food results in the inhibition of fat absorption. It also inhibits the activity of HMG CoA reductase. This inhibition may be by feedback inhibition or repression of the transcription of the gene encoding the enzyme via activation of the

  13. The Effects of Lactic Acid Bacteria and Lactic Acid Bacteria+Enzyme Mixture Silage Inoculants on Maize Silage Fermentation and Nutrient Digestibility in Lambs

    M. L. Ozduven

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out to determine the effects of lactic acid bacteria and lact ic acidbacteria+enzyme mixture inoculants as silage additives, on the fermentation, aerobic stability, cell wallcontent, and nutrient digestibility in lambs of maize silages. Pioneer 1174 (Iowa, USA, and Maize -All(Alltech, UK were used as lactic acid bacteria and lactic acid bacteria+enzyme mixture inoculants. Plantmaterials were fermented for 60 days in bunker type silos. Aerobic stability test was applied to all silosopened in the end of fermentation period. Relating to silage fermentation analysis of pH, ammonia nitrogen,water soluble carbohydrate, organic acids (lactic, acetic and butyric acid were carried out andmicrobiological analyses had been done. Digestional value of crude nutritive matters of silages determinedwith classical digestive experiments. Both inoculants increased characteristics of fermentation but impairedaerobic stability of maize silages. Inoculants were not effect on the nutritient digestibility of silages. Lacticacid bacteria+enzyme mixture inoculant decreased neutral and acid detergent fiber content.

  14. Plants know where it hurts: root and shoot jasmonic acid induction elicit differential responses in Brassica oleracea.

    Tom O G Tytgat

    Full Text Available Plants respond to herbivore attack by rapidly inducing defenses that are mainly regulated by jasmonic acid (JA. Due to the systemic nature of induced defenses, attack by root herbivores can also result in a shoot response and vice versa, causing interactions between above- and belowground herbivores. However, little is known about the molecular mechanisms underlying these interactions. We investigated whether plants respond differently when roots or shoots are induced. We mimicked herbivore attack by applying JA to the roots or shoots of Brassica oleracea and analyzed molecular and chemical responses in both organs. In shoots, an immediate and massive change in primary and secondary metabolism was observed. In roots, the JA-induced response was less extensive and qualitatively different from that in the shoots. Strikingly, in both roots and shoots we also observed differential responses in primary metabolism, development as well as defense specific traits depending on whether the JA induction had been below- or aboveground. We conclude that the JA response is not only tissue-specific but also dependent on the organ that was induced. Already very early in the JA signaling pathway the differential response was observed. This indicates that both organs have a different JA signaling cascade, and that the signal eliciting systemic responses contains information about the site of induction, thus providing plants with a mechanism to tailor their responses specifically to the organ that is damaged.

  15. Strong, but Age-Dependent, Protection Elicited by a Deoxyribonucleic Acid/Modified Vaccinia Ankara Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Vaccine.

    Chamcha, Venkateswarlu; Kannanganat, Sunil; Gangadhara, Sailaja; Nabi, Rafiq; Kozlowski, Pamela A; Montefiori, David C; LaBranche, Celia C; Wrammert, Jens; Keele, Brandon F; Balachandran, Harikrishnan; Sahu, Sujata; Lifton, Michelle; Santra, Sampa; Basu, Rahul; Moss, Bernard; Robinson, Harriet L; Amara, Rama Rao

    2016-01-01

    Background.  In this study, we analyzed the protective efficacy of a simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) macaque 239 (SIVmac239) analogue of the clinically tested GOVX-B11 deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA)/modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA) human immunodeficiency virus vaccine. Methods.  The tested vaccine used a DNA immunogen mutated to mimic the human vaccine and a regimen with DNA deliveries at weeks 0 and 8 and MVA deliveries at weeks 16 and 32. Twelve weekly rectal challenges with 0.3 animal infectious doses of SIV sootey mangabey E660 (SIVsmE660) were administered starting at 6 months after the last immunization. Results.  Over the first 6 rectal exposures to SIVsmE660, <10-year-old tripartite motif-containing protein 5 (TRIM5)α-permissive rhesus macaques showed an 80% reduction in per-exposure risk of infection as opposed to a 46% reduction in animals over 10 years old; and, over the 12 challenges, they showed a 72% as opposed to a 10% reduction. Analyses of elicited immune responses suggested that higher antibody responses in the younger animals had played a role in protection. Conclusions.  The simian analogue of the GOVX-B11 HIV provided strong protection against repeated rectal challenges in young adult macaques. PMID:27006959

  16. Cd(II) Sorption on Montmorillonite-Humic acid-Bacteria Composites

    Du, Huihui; Chen, Wenli; Cai, Peng; Rong, Xingmin; Dai, Ke; Peacock, Caroline L.; Huang, Qiaoyun

    2016-01-01

    Soil components (e.g., clays, bacteria and humic substances) are known to produce mineral-organic composites in natural systems. Herein, batch sorption isotherms, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), and Cd K-edge EXAFS spectroscopy were applied to investigate the binding characteristics of Cd on montmorillonite(Mont)-humic acid(HA)-bacteria composites. Additive sorption and non-additive Cd(II) sorption behaviour is observed for the binary Mont-bacteria and ternary Mont-HA-bacteria composite, respectively. Specifically, in the ternary composite, the coexistence of HA and bacteria inhibits Cd adsorption, suggesting a “blocking effect” between humic acid and bacterial cells. Large positive entropies (68.1 ~ 114.4 J/mol/K), and linear combination fitting of the EXAFS spectra for Cd adsorbed onto Mont-bacteria and Mont-HA-bacteria composites, demonstrate that Cd is mostly bound to bacterial surface functional groups by forming inner-sphere complexes. All our results together support the assertion that there is a degree of site masking in the ternary clay mineral-humic acid-bacteria composite. Because of this, in the ternary composite, Cd preferentially binds to the higher affinity components-i.e., the bacteria. PMID:26792640

  17. Inactivation of bacteria on surfaces by sprayed slightly acidic hypochlorous acid water: in vitro experiments.

    Hakim, Hakimullah; Alam, Md Shahin; Sangsriratanakul, Natthanan; Nakajima, Katsuhiro; Kitazawa, Minori; Ota, Mari; Toyofuku, Chiharu; Yamada, Masashi; Thammakarn, Chanathip; Shoham, Dany; Takehara, Kazuaki

    2016-08-01

    The capacity of slightly acidic hypochlorous acid water (SAHW), in both liquid and spray form, to inactivate bacteria was evaluated as a potential candidate for biosecurity enhancement in poultry production. SAHW (containing 50 or 100 ppm chlorine, pH 6) was able to inactivate Escherichia coli and Salmonella Infantis in liquid to below detectable levels (≤2.6 log10 CFU/ml) within 5 sec of exposure. In addition, SAHW antibacterial capacity was evaluated by spraying it using a nebulizer into a box containing these bacteria, which were present on the surfaces of glass plates and rayon sheets. SAHW was able to inactivate both bacterial species on the glass plates (dry condition) and rayon sheets within 5 min spraying and 5 min contact times, with the exception of 50 ppm SAHW on the rayon sheets. Furthermore, a corrosivity test determined that SAHW does not corrode metallic objects, even at the longest exposure times (83 days). Our findings demonstrate that SAHW is a good candidate for biosecurity enhancement in the poultry industry. Spraying it on the surfaces of objects, eggshells, egg incubators and transport cages could reduce the chances of contamination and disease transmission. These results augment previous findings demonstrating the competence of SAHW as an anti-viral disinfectant. PMID:27052464

  18. Dietary interesterified fat enriched with palmitic acid induces atherosclerosis by impairing macrophage cholesterol efflux and eliciting inflammation.

    Afonso, Milessa Silva; Lavrador, Maria Silvia Ferrari; Koike, Marcia Kiyomi; Cintra, Dennys Esper; Ferreira, Fabiana Dias; Nunes, Valeria Sutti; Castilho, Gabriela; Gioielli, Luiz Antonio; Paula Bombo, Renata; Catanozi, Sergio; Caldini, Elia Garcia; Damaceno-Rodrigues, Nilsa Regina; Passarelli, Marisa; Nakandakare, Edna Regina; Lottenberg, Ana Maria

    2016-06-01

    Interesterified fats are currently being used to replace trans fatty acids. However, their impact on biological pathways involved in the atherosclerosis development was not investigated. Weaning male LDLr-KO mice were fed for 16weeks on a high-fat diet (40% energy as fat) containing polyunsaturated (PUFA), TRANS, palmitic (PALM), palmitic interesterified (PALM INTER), stearic (STEAR) or stearic interesterified (STEAR INTER). Plasma lipids, lipoprotein profile, arterial lesion area, macrophage infiltration, collagen content and inflammatory response modulation were determined. Macrophage cholesterol efflux and the arterial expression of cholesterol uptake and efflux receptors were also performed. The interesterification process did not alter plasma lipid concentrations. Although PALM INTER did not increase plasma cholesterol concentration as much as TRANS, the cholesterol enrichment in the LDL particle was similar in both groups. Moreover, PALM INTER induced the highest IL-1β, MCP-1 and IL-6 secretion from peritoneal macrophages as compared to others. This inflammatory response elicited by PALM INTER was confirmed in arterial wall, as compared to PALM. These deleterious effects of PALM INTER culminate in higher atherosclerotic lesion, macrophage infiltration and collagen content than PALM, STEAR, STEAR INTER and PUFA. These events can partially be attributed to a macrophage cholesterol accumulation, promoted by apoAI and HDL2-mediated cholesterol efflux impairment and increased Olr-1 and decreased Abca1 and Nr1h3 expressions in the arterial wall. Interesterified fats containing palmitic acid induce atherosclerosis development by promoting cholesterol accumulation in LDL particles and macrophagic cells, activating the inflammatory process in LDLr-KO mice. PMID:27142741

  19. Molecular Characterization of Intrinsic and Acquired antibiotic resistance in lactic Acid bacteria and Bifidobacteria

    Ammor, M.S.; Flórez, A.B.; Hoek, van A.H.A.M.; Reyes-Gavilan, de los C.G.; Aarts, H.J.M.; Margolles, A.; Mayo, B.

    2008-01-01

    The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of 6 different antibiotics (chloramphenicol, clindamycin, erythromycin, streptomycin, tetracycline and vancomycin) were determined for 143 strains of lactic acid bacteria and bifidobacteria using the Etest. Different MICs were found for different species

  20. Characterization of anti-listerial lactic acid bacteria isolated from Thai fermented fish products

    Østergaard, Anya; Embarek, Peter Karim Ben; Wedell-Neergaard, C.;

    1998-01-01

    Thai fermented fish products were screened for lactic acid bacteria capable of inhibiting Listeria sp. (Listeria innocua). Of 4150 assumed lactic acid bacteria colonies from MRS agar plates that were screened by an agar-overlay method 58 (1.4%) were positive. Forty four of these strains were...... further characterized and 43 strains were inhibitory against Listeria monocytogenes. The strains were inhibitory to other Gram- positive (lactic acid) bacteria probably because of production of bacteriocins. All 44 strains inhibited both Vibrio cholerae and Vibrio parahaemolyticus and 37 were inhibitory...... to a mesophilic fish spoilage bacterium tan Aeromonas sp.). Inhibition of Gram-negative bacteria was attributed to production of lactic acid. Most strains were identified as Lactobacillus spp., and all grew well at ambient temperatures (25-37 degrees C) and tolerated up to 6.5% NaCl. Glucose was...

  1. Bacillus spp. produce antibacterial activities against lactic acid bacteria that contaminate fuel ethanol plants

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) frequently contaminate commercial fuel ethanol fermentations, reducing yields and decreasing profitability of biofuel production. Microorganisms from environmental sources in different geographic regions of Thailand were tested for antibacterial activity against LAB. Fou...

  2. Display of recombinant proteins at the surface of lactic acid bacteria: strategies and applications.

    Michon, C; Langella, P; Eijsink, V G H; Mathiesen, G; Chatel, J M

    2016-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are promising vectors of choice to deliver active molecules to mucosal tissues. They are recognized as safe by the World Health Organization and some strains have probiotic properties. The wide range of potential applications of LAB-driven mucosal delivery includes control of inflammatory bowel disease, vaccine delivery, and management of auto-immune diseases. Because of this potential, strategies for the display of proteins at the surface of LAB are gaining interest. To display a protein at the surface of LAB, a signal peptide and an anchor domain are necessary. The recombinant protein can be attached to the membrane layer, using a transmembrane anchor or a lipoprotein-anchor, or to the cell wall, by a covalent link using sortase mediated anchoring via the LPXTG motif, or by non-covalent liaisons employing binding domains such as LysM or WxL. Both the stability and functionality of the displayed proteins will be affected by the kind of anchor used. The most commonly surfaced exposed recombinant proteins produced in LAB are antigens and antibodies and the most commonly used LAB are lactococci and lactobacilli. Although it is not necessarily so that surface-display is the preferred localization in all cases, it has been shown that for certain applications, such as delivery of the human papillomavirus E7 antigen, surface-display elicits better biological responses, compared to cytosolic expression or secretion. Recent developments include the display of peptides and proteins targeting host cell receptors, for the purpose of enhancing the interactions between LAB and host. Surface-display technologies have other potential applications, such as degradation of biomass, which is of importance for some potential industrial applications of LAB. PMID:27142045

  3. Acetic Acid Bacteria and the Production and Quality of Wine Vinegar

    Albert Mas; María Jesús Torija; María del Carmen García-Parrilla; Ana María Troncoso

    2014-01-01

    The production of vinegar depends on an oxidation process that is mainly performed by acetic acid bacteria. Despite the different methods of vinegar production (more or less designated as either “fast” or “traditional”), the use of pure starter cultures remains far from being a reality. Uncontrolled mixed cultures are normally used, but this review proposes the use of controlled mixed cultures. The acetic acid bacteria species determine the quality of vinegar, although the final quality is a ...

  4. Adhesion of Zearalenone to the Surface of Lactic Acid Bacteria Cells

    Čvek, Domagoj; Markov, Ksenija; Frece, Jadranka; Friganović, Maja; Duraković, Lejla; Delaš, Frane

    2012-01-01

    Zearalenone is mycotoxin harmful to the health of humans and animals and is present in food and feed. Therefore, last few decades, great attention is paid to the development of biological detoxification methods with reference to the application of lactic acid bacteria in binding and removal of mycotoxins from food and feed. The aim of this work was to investigate the ability of lactic acid bacteria Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (ATCC 53103) and Lactobacillus plantarum A1 to bind zearalenone unto...

  5. Isolation of lactic acid bacteria for its possible use in the fermentation of green algerian olives

    Nour-Eddine, Karam; Halima, Zadi-Karam; Mourad, Kacem

    2004-01-01

    This study was undertaken with the aim of obtaining lactic acid bacteria with the ability to ferment olives for possible use as starter cultures. For this reason, 32 isolates of lactic acid bacteria isolated from the spontaneous fermentation of green olives were characterized and identified on the basis of morphological and biochemical criteria. 14 of them were identified as Lactococcus lactis, 11 isolates as Lactobacillus plantarum and 7 isolates as Enterococcus sp. Of the 18 isolates examin...

  6. LACTIC ACID BACTERIA FLORA OF KONYA KUFLU CHEESE: A TRADITIONAL CHEESE FROM KONYA PROVINCE IN TURKEY

    Ziba Guley; Harun R. Uysal; Sevda Kilic

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the lactic acid bacteria flora of mature Konya Kuflu cheese. Konya Kuflu cheese is a traditional blue cheese which is produced from raw milk without starter culture addition and mould growth occurs in uncontrolled conditions during its ripening. Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) isolated from 9 mature Konya Kuflu cheese samples were investigated using a combination of conventional biochemical tests, API test kits, and molecular approaches. For some isolates,...

  7. Isolation and identification of indigenous lactic acid bacteria from North Sumatra river buffalo milk

    2015-01-01

    Buffalo milk is a source of various lactic acid bacteria (LAB) which is potential as culture starter as well as the probiotic. This study was conducted to isolate and identify LAB from indigenous North Sumatra river buffalo milk. Lactic acid bacteria was isolated and grown in medium De Man Rogosa Sharpe Agar (MRSA). The isolation was conducted to obtain pure isolate. The identification of LAB was studied in terms of morphology, physiology, biochemistry and survival on low pH. Morphology test...

  8. ISOLATION AND IDENTIFICATION OF LACTIC ACID PRODUCING BACTERIA FROM CAMEL MILK

    Toqeer Ahmad, Rashida Kanwal, Izhar Hussain Athar1, Najam Ayub

    2002-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) were isolated from camel milk by culturing the camel milk on specific media and pure culture was obtained by sub culturing. Purification of culture was confirmed by Gram's staining and identified by different bio-chemical tests. Camel milk contains lactic acid producing bacteria including Strpptococci such as S. cremoris and S. lactis and Lactobacilli such as L. acidophilus L. acidophilus grows more rapidly in camel milk than others as its growth is supported by cam...

  9. Immune Modulation Capability of Exopolysaccharides Synthesised by Lactic Acid Bacteria and Bifidobacteria

    Hidalgo-Cantabrana, Claudio; López, Patricia; Gueimonde Fernández, Miguel; González de los Reyes-Gavilán, Clara; Suárez, Ana; Margolles Barros, Abelardo; Ruas-Madiedo, Patricia

    2012-01-01

    During recent years, the exopolysaccharides (EPS) produced by some strains of lactic acid bacteria and bifidobacteria have attracted the attention of researchers, mainly due to their potential technological applications. However, more recently, it has been observed that some of these EPS present immunomodulatory properties, which suggest a potential effect on human health. Whereas EPS from lactic acid bacteria have been studied in some detail, those of bifidobacteria largely remain uncharacte...

  10. Survival of Listeria monocytogenes, Listeria innocua, and Lactic acid bacteria species in chill brine

    Meadows, Bridget Archibald

    2004-01-01

    SURVIVAL OF LISTERIA MONOCYTOGENES, LISTERIA INNOCUA, AND LACTIC ACID BACTERIA SPECIES IN CHILL BRINES Bridget Archibald Meadows (ABSTRACT) Listeria monocytogenes is the major pathogen in ready-to-eat meat products such as deli meats and frankfurters. Contamination can occur via the salt brines that are used to cool thermally processed meats. Both L. monocytogenes and lactic acid bacteria can grow and thrive under these brine conditions, and may become competitive with each ot...

  11. ISOLATION OF LACTIC ACID BACTERIA UNDER LOW TEMPERATURE FOR THE PREPARATION OF YOGURT

    Javid Ahmad Bhat; Mohd Irfan Naik; R.K Tenguria

    2014-01-01

    An investigation of isolation of Lactic acid bacteria was carried out under low temperature for the preparation of Yogurt by using various food supplements like carrot, ground-nut and tomato juices. Methods: Various samples of Cow milk, Skimmed milk were processed along with nutrients like Carrot, ground nut and tomato juices with Tryptone glucose yeast extract agar (TGYA) at different temperatures like 50C, 150C and 220C for the isolation of Lactic acid bacteria for the preparation of yogurt...

  12. Isolation, characterization and optimization of indigenous acetic acid bacteria and evaluation of their preservation methods

    K Beheshti-Maal

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Acetic acid bacteria (AAB are useful in industrial production of vinegar. The present study aims at isolation and identification of acetic acid bacteria with characterization, optimization, and evaluation of their acetic acid productivity."nMaterials and Methods: Samples from various fruits were screened for presence of acetic acid bacteria on glucose, yeast extract, calcium carbonate (GYC medium. Carr medium supplemented with bromocresol green was used for distinguishing Acetobacter from Gluconobacter. The isolates were cultured in basal medium to find the highest acetic acid producer. Biochemical tests followed by 16S rRNA and restriction analyses were employed for identification of the isolate and phylogenic tree was constructed. Bacterial growth and acid production conditions were optimized based on optimal inoculum size, pH, temperature, agitation, aeration and medium composition."nResults: Thirty-seven acetic acid bacteria from acetobacter and gluconobacter members were isolated. Acetic acid productivity yielded 4 isolates that produced higher amounts of acid. The highest producer of acid (10.03% was selected for identification. The sequencing and restriction analyses of 16S rRNA revealed a divergent strain of Acetobacter pasteurianus (Gene bank accession number # GU059865. The optimum condition for acid production was a medium composed of 2% glucose, 2% yeast extract, 3% ethanol and 3% acid acetic at inoculum size of 4% at 3L/Min aeration level in the production medium. The isolate was best preserved in GYC medium at 12oC for more than a month. Longer preservation was possible at -70oC."nConclusion: The results are suggestive of isolation of an indigenous acetic acid bacteria. Pilot plan is suggested to study applicability of the isolated strain in acetic acid production.

  13. Antimicrobial properties of lactic acid bacteria isolated from uruguayan artisan cheese

    Martín Fraga Cotelo

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Uruguayan artisan cheese is elaborated with raw milk and non-commercial starters. The associated native microbiota may include lactic acid bacteria and also potentially pathogenic bacteria. Lactic acid bacteria were isolated from artisan cheese, raw milk, and non-commercial starter cultures, and their potential bacteriocin production was assessed. A culture collection of 509 isolates was obtained, and five isolates were bacteriocin-producers and were identified as Enterococcus durans,Lactobacillus casei, and Lactococcus lactis. No evidence of potential virulence factors were found in E. durans strains. These are promising results in terms of using these native strains for cheese manufacture and to obtain safe products.

  14. Acetic acid bacteria in traditional balsamic vinegar: phenotypic traits relevant for starter cultures selection.

    Gullo, Maria; Giudici, Paolo

    2008-06-30

    This review focuses on acetic acid bacteria in traditional balsamic vinegar process. Although several studies are available on acetic acid bacteria ecology, metabolism and nutritional requirements, their activity as well as their technological traits in homemade vinegars as traditional balsamic vinegar is not well known. The basic technology to oxidise cooked grape must to produce traditional balsamic vinegar is performed by the so called "seed-vinegar" that is a microbiologically undefined starter culture obtained from spontaneous acetification of previous raw material. Selected starter cultures are the main technological improvement in order to innovate traditional balsamic vinegar production but until now they are rarely applied. To develop acetic acid bacteria starter cultures, selection criteria have to take in account composition of raw material, acetic acid bacteria metabolic activities, applied technology and desired characteristics of the final product. For traditional balsamic vinegar, significative phenotypical traits of acetic acid bacteria have been highlighted. Basic traits are: ethanol preferred and efficient oxidation, fast rate of acetic acid production, tolerance to high concentration of acetic acid, no overoxidation and low pH resistance. Specific traits are tolerance to high sugar concentration and to a wide temperature range. Gluconacetobacter europaeus and Acetobacter malorum strains can be evaluated to develop selected starter cultures since they show one or more suitable characters. PMID:18177968

  15. Antibacterial Activity of Some Lactic Acid Bacteria Isolated from an Algerian Dairy Product

    Abdelkader Mezaini

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, the antibacterial effect of 20 lactic acid bacteria isolates from a traditional cheese was investigated. 6 isolates showed antibacterial effect against Gram positive bacteria. Streptococcus thermophilus T2 strain showed the wide inhibitory spectrum against the Gram positive bacteria. Growth and bacteriocin production profiles showed that the maximal bacteriocin production, by S. thermophilus T2 cells, was measured by the end of the late-log phase (90 AU ml−1 with a bacteriocine production rate of 9.3 (AU ml−1 h−1. In addition, our findings showed that the bacteriocin, produced by S. thermophilus T2, was stable over a wide pH range (4–8; this indicates that such bacteriocin may be useful in acidic as well as nonacidic food. This preliminarily work shows the potential application of autochthonous lactic acid bacteria to improve safety of traditional fermented food.

  16. Isolation of lactic acid bacteria with potential protective culture characteristics from fruits

    Hashim, Nurul Huda; Sani, Norrakiah Abdullah

    2015-09-01

    Lactic acid bacteria are also known as beneficial microorganisms abundantly found in fermented food products. In this study, lactic acid bacteria were isolated from fresh cut fruits obtained from local markets. Throughout the isolation process from 11 samples of fruits, 225 presumptive lactic acid bacteria were isolated on MRS agar medium. After catalase and oxidase tests, 149 resulted to fit the characteristics of lactic acid bacteria. Further identification using Gram staining was conducted to identify the Gram positive bacteria. After this confirmation, the fermentation characteristics of these isolates were identified. It was found that 87 (58.4%) isolates were heterofermentative, while the rest of 62 (41.6%) are homofermentative lactic acid bacteria. Later, all these isolates were investigated for the ability to inhibit growth of Staphylococcus aureus using agar spot assay method. Seven (4.7%) isolates showed strong antagonistic capacity, while 127 (85.2%) and 8 (5.4%) isolates have medium and weak antagonistic capacity, respectively. The other 7 (4.7%) isolates indicated to have no antagonistic effect on S. aureus. Results support the potential of LAB isolated in this study which showed strong antagonistic activity against S. aureus may be manipulated to become protective cultures in food products. While the homofermentative or heterofermentative LAB can be utilized in fermentation of food and non-food products depending on the by-products required during the fermentation.

  17. Metabolic Induction of Lactic Acid Bacteria for Urea Removal

    ZHANG Su-ai; BAI Yu; LI Dong-xia; CHEN Bo-li; SONG Cun-jiang; QIAO Ming-qiang; KONG De-ling; YU Yao-ting

    2009-01-01

    Objective:This study aims to induce nonpathogenic bacteria for urea removal as a potential treatment in renal failure. Methods:Lactococus lactis MG1363 was induced by repeated exposure to urea-rich culture media, the ability to remove urea from the media was evaluated. The effect of gastroenteric environment, such as low pH, bile salt and antiagonistic properties were investigated.The antimicrobial activities on pathogenic E.coli and S.aureus in the intestinal tract and the antibiotic tolerance of the induced bacteria were also studied.Results: Induced bacteria of 50 generations could decrease the urea level from 40.01 mg/dL to 32.99 mg/dL after 24 h. The bacteria could grow after treatment at pH3.0 for 2 h and in 0.1% bile salt for 6 h, and the urea removal activity was retained in such simulated gastroenteric environment. The removal of urea was significantly enhanced to 35.8% by addition of Ni2+ to the culture medium at neutral pH. It was also found that the induced bacteria could inhibit the growth of E.coli and S.aureus, and tolerate ampicillin,gentamicin,roxithromycin,tetracycline and cefradine. The safety tests were performed by feeding normal rats with either Lactococus lactis MG1363 or induced Lactococus lactis MG1363. The two materials did not cause any changes in blood cells, blood biochemical indexes and body weight. Conclusion: These results suggest that the induced Lactococus lactis MG1363 has the potential as an oral therapy for the removal of urea in patients with renal failure.

  18. Preservation of acidified cucumbers with a natural preservative combination of fumaric acid and allyl isothiocyanate that target lactic acid bacteria and yeasts

    Without the addition of preservative compounds cucumbers acidified with 150 mM acetic acid with pH adjusted to 3.5 typically undergo fermentation by lactic acid bacteria. Fumaric acid (20 mM) inhibited growth of Lactobacillus plantarum and the lactic acid bacteria present on fresh cucumbers, but sp...

  19. Metabolic engineering of lactic acid bacteria for the production of nutraceuticals

    Hugenholtz, J.; Sybesma, W.; Groot, M.N.; Wisselink, W.; Ladero, V.; Burgess, K.; Sinderen, van D.; Piard, J.C.; Eggink, G.; Smid, E.J.; Savoy, G.; Sesma, F.; Jansen, T.; Hols, P.; Kleerebezem, M.

    2002-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria display a relatively simple and well-described metabolism where the sugar source is converted mainly to lactic acid. Here we will shortly describe metabolic engineering strategies on the level of sugar metabolism, that lead to either the efficient re-routing of the lactococcal s

  20. Lactic acid bacteria as a cell factory for riboflavin production

    Thakur, Kiran; Tomar, Sudhir Kumar; De, Sachinandan

    2015-01-01

    Summary Consumers are increasingly becoming aware of their health and nutritional requirements, and in this context, vitamins produced in situ by microbes may suit their needs and expectations. B groups vitamins are essential components of cellular metabolism and among them riboflavin is one of the vital vitamins required by bacteria, plants, animals and humans. Here, we focus on the importance of microbial production of riboflavin over chemical synthesis. In addition, genetic abilities for r...

  1. Local domestication of lactic acid bacteria via cassava beer fermentation

    Colehour, Alese M.; Meadow, James F.; Liebert, Melissa A.; Tara J. Cepon-Robins; Theresa E. Gildner; Urlacher, Samuel S.; Bohannan, Brendan J.M.; Snodgrass, J. Josh; Lawrence S. Sugiyama

    2014-01-01

    Cassava beer, or chicha, is typically consumed daily by the indigenous Shuar people of the Ecuadorian Amazon. This traditional beverage made from cassava tuber (Manihot esculenta) is thought to improve nutritional quality and flavor while extending shelf life in a tropical climate. Bacteria responsible for chicha fermentation could be a source of microbes for the human microbiome, but little is known regarding the microbiology of chicha. We investigated bacterial community composition of chic...

  2. Production and transformation of dissolved neutral sugars and amino acids by bacteria in seawater

    Jørgensen, Linda; Lechtenfeld, O.J.; Benner, R.; Middelboe, M.; Stedmon, Colin

    2014-01-01

    production and degradation processes. This study provides insight into the bioavailability of biomolecules as well as the chemical composition of DOM produced by bacteria. The molecular compositions of combined neutral sugars and amino acids were investigated in DOM produced by bacteria and in DOM remaining...... degradation are not strongly influenced by the initial substrate or bacterial community. The molecular composition of neutral sugars released by bacteria was characterized by a high glucose content (47 mol %) and heterogeneous contributions from other neutral sugars (3–14 mol %). DOM remaining after bacterial...... acid, glutamic acid, serine and alanine reached around 0.79, 0.32, 0.30 and 0.51 in all treatments, respectively. The striking similarity in neutral sugar and amino acid compositions between natural (representing marine semi-labile and refractory DOM) and artificial (representing bacterially produced...

  3. Molecular Identification of Lactic Acid Bacteria Producing Antimicrobial Agents from Bakasang, An Indonesian Traditional Fermented Fish Product

    Helen Joan Lawalata; Langkah Sembiring; Endang Sutriswati Rahayu

    2015-01-01

    AbstractTwenty seven strains of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) were isolated from bakasang, Indonesian traditional fermented fish product. In general, LAB have inhibitory activity againts pathogenic bacteria and spoilage bacteria. Screening for antimicrobia activity of isolates were performed with well-diffusion method. One isolate that was designed as Pediococcus BksC24 was the strongest against bacteria pathogenic and spoilage bacteria. This strain was further identified by 16S rRNA gen sequenc...

  4. Bioprocessing with enzymes and lactic acid bacteria for production of new functional faba bean ingredients

    Karsma, Anni

    2015-01-01

    Faba bean (Vicia Faba L.) is a nutritious high protein crop widely cultivated for uses of both food and feed. Its use has limited due to presence of anti-nutritional factors, including phytic acid, bitter taste and poor technological functionality. Phytic acid is the major storage of phosphorus in cereals and legumes lowering the bioavailability of proteins and micronutrients. The aim of this master’s thesis was to study the impacts of bioprocessing with enzymes and lactic acid bacteria on bo...

  5. Repetitive sequence based polymerase chain reaction to differentiate close bacteria strains in acidic sites

    XIE Ming; YIN Hua-qun; LIU Yi; LIU Jie; LIU Xue-duan

    2008-01-01

    To study the diversity of bacteria strains newly isolated from several acid mine drainage(AMD) sites in China,repetitive sequence based polymerase chain reaction (rep-PCR),a well established technology for diversity analysis of closely related bacteria strains,was conducted on 30 strains of bacteria Leptospirillum ferriphilium,8 strains of bacteria Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans,as well as the Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans type strain ATCC (American Type Culture Collection) 23270.The results showed that,using ERIC and BOX primer sets,rep-PCR produced highly discriminatory banding patterns.Phylogenetic analysis based on ERIC-PCR banding types was made and the results indicated that rep-PCR could be used as a rapid and highly discriminatory screening technique in studying bacterial diversity,especially in differentiating bacteria within one species in AMD.

  6. HYDROLYTIC BREAKDOWN OF LACTOFERRICIN BY LACTIC ACID BACTERIA

    Lactoferricin is a 25 amino acid antimicrobial peptide domain that is liberated by pepsin digestion of lactoferrin in bovine milk. Along with its antibacterial properties, lactoferricin has also been reported to have immunostimulatory, antiviral, and anticarcinogenic effects. There is substantial ...

  7. Mechanical and acid neutralizing properties and bacteria inhibition of amorphous calcium phosphate dental nanocomposite

    Moreau, Jennifer L.; Sun, Limin; Chow, Laurence C.; Xu, Hockin H. K.

    2011-01-01

    Dental composites do not hinder bacteria colonization and plaque formation. Caries at the restoration margins is a frequent reason for replacement of existing restorations, which accounts for 50 to 70% of all restorations. The objectives of this study were to examine the filler level effect on nanocomposite containing nanoparticles of amorphous calcium phosphate (NACP) and investigate the load-bearing and acid-neutralizing properties and bacteria inhibition. NACP with 116-nm particle size wer...

  8. The evolution of lactic acid bacteria community during the development of mature sourdough

    Savić Dragiša S.; Joković Nataša M.; Žugić-Petrović Tanja D.

    2009-01-01

    In order to follow the composition and changes in lactic acid bacteria (LAB) population of rye flour sourdough that was continuously propagated by a repeated inoculation, sixty-two strains of LAB were isolated and characterized. The LAB were the only bacteria detected, both at the end of the second propagation step and in the stage of mature sourdough (after two weeks of continuous daily refreshment). The stable ecological system in rye sourdough could be established from the second propagati...

  9. Bio-detoxification of mycotoxins by lactic acid bacteria from different food matrices

    Inês, António; Guimarães, Ana; Maria, J. C.; Laranjo,V.; Venâncio, Armando; Abrunhosa, Luís

    2015-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) play a key role in the biopreservation of a wide range of fermented food products, such as yogurt, cheese, fermented milks, meat, fish, vegetables (sauerkraut, olives and pickles), certain beer brands, wines and silage, allowing their safe consumption, which gave to these bacteria a GRAS (Generally Recognised as Safe) status. Besides that, the use of LAB in food and feed is a promising strategy to reduce the exposure to dietary mycotoxins, improving their ...

  10. Influence of aeration intensity and medium acidity on phosphate mobilization affected by soil bacteria

    K. V. Lavrentyeva; P. I. Kharchenko; N. V. Cherevach; A. I. Vinnikov

    2009-01-01

    The paper deals with the investigation of phosphate solubilisation conducted by two bacteria Pseudomonas putida and Enterobacter dissolvens under conditions of different rates of aeration and рН. Bacterial development was characterized by different media acidity and aeration levels. It was established optimal aeration rates and potential of hydrogen for soil bacteria growth and phosphate solubilisation – 0.5721 mole О2/l per hour and pH ≈ 6.0.

  11. Occurrence of Lactic Acid Bacteria During the Different Stages of Vinification and Conservation of Wines

    Lafon-Lafourcade, S.; Carre, E.; Ribéreau-Gayon, P.

    1983-01-01

    We showed that the growth of lactic acid bacteria during alcoholic fermentation depends on the composition of the must. We illustrated how the addition of sulfur dioxide to the must before fermentation and the temperature of storage both affect the growth of these bacteria in the wine. Whereas species of Lactobacillus and Leuconostoc mesenteroides were isolated from grapes and must, Leuconostoc oenos was the only species isolated after alcoholic fermentation. This organism was responsible for...

  12. Biotechnology and pasta-making: Lactic Acid Bacteria as a new driver of innovation

    GiuseppeSpano; VittorioCapozzi; DanielaFiocco; MariagiovannaFragasso

    2012-01-01

    Cereals-derived foods represent a key constituent in the diet of many populations. In particular, pasta is consumed in large quantities throughout the world in reason of its nutritive importance, containing significant amounts of complex carbohydrates, proteins, B-vitamins, and iron. Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are a heterogeneous group of bacteria that play a key role in the production of fermented foods and beverages with high relevance for human and animal health. A wide literature testifie...

  13. Biotechnology and Pasta-Making: Lactic Acid Bacteria as a New Driver of Innovation

    Capozzi, Vittorio; Russo, Pasquale; Fragasso, Mariagiovanna; de Vita, Pasquale; Fiocco, Daniela; Spano, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    Cereals-derived foods represent a key constituent in the diet of many populations. In particular, pasta is consumed in large quantities throughout the world in reason of its nutritive importance, containing significant amounts of complex carbohydrates, proteins, B-vitamins, and iron. Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are a heterogeneous group of bacteria that play a key role in the production of fermented foods and beverages with high relevance for human and animal health. A wide literature testifie...

  14. Lactic acid bacteria from Jijel's traditional butter: Isolation, identification and major technological traits

    Idoui, Tayeb; Karam, Nour-Eddine

    2008-01-01

    Twenty seven (27) lactic acid bacteria were isolated from Jijel’s traditional butter. These strains belong to three genera: Lactococcus, Lactobacillus and Leuconostoc. The results showed that Lactobacillus plantarum was the predominant species in this traditional butter. It appears that these strains have some interesting technological properties.Se aíslan veintisiete (27) bacterias acidolácticas de la mantequilla tradicional de Jijel. Éstas pertenecen a los géneros Lactococcus, Lactobacill...

  15. Bacteriophages of lactic acid bacteria and their impact on milk fermentations

    Garneau, Josiane E.; Moineau, Sylvain

    2011-01-01

    Every biotechnology process that relies on the use of bacteria to make a product or to overproduce a molecule may, at some time, struggle with the presence of virulent phages. For example, phages are the primary cause of fermentation failure in the milk transformation industry. This review focuses on the recent scientific advances in the field of lactic acid bacteria phage research. Three specific topics, namely, the sources of contamination, the detection methods and the control procedures w...

  16. Lactic acid bacteria and their antimicrobial peptides : Induction,detection,partial characterization, and potential applications

    Abbas Hilmi, Hanan

    2010-01-01

    Bacteriocin-producing lactic acid bacteria and their isolated peptide bacteriocins are of value to control pathogens and spoiling microorganisms in foods and feed. Nisin is the only bacteriocin that is commonly accepted as a food preservative and has a broad spectrum of activity against Gram-positive organisms including spore forming bacteria. In this study nisin induction was studied from two perspectives, induction from inside of the cell and selection of nisin inducible strains with increa...

  17. Relevance and application of sortase and sortase-dependent proteins in lactic acid bacteria

    ToddKlaenhammer

    2013-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are a diverse group of Gram-positive bacteria found in a vast array of environments including dairy products and the human gastrointestinal tract. In both niches, surface proteins play a crucial role in mediating interactions with the surrounding environment. The sortase enzyme is responsible for covalently coupling a subset of surface dependent proteins (SDPs) to the cell wall of Gram-positive organisms through recognition of a conserved C-terminal LPXTG motif. Ge...

  18. Lactic acid bacteria: reviewing the potential of a promising delivery live vector for biomedical purposes

    Cano-Garrido, Olivia; Seras-Franzoso, Joaquin; Garcia-Fruitós, Elena

    2015-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) have a long history of safe exploitation by humans, being used for centuries in food production and preservation and as probiotic agents to promote human health. Interestingly, some species of these Gram-positive bacteria, which are generally recognized as safe organisms by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), are able to survive through the gastrointestinal tract (GIT), being capable to reach and colonize the intestine, where they play an important role. Besi...

  19. Application of molecular techniques for identification and ennumeration of acetic acid bacteria

    González Benito, Angel

    2005-01-01

    Application of molecular techniques for identification and enumeration of acetic acid bacteria:Los principales objetivos de la tesis son el desarrollo de técnicas de biología molecular rápidas y fiables para caracterizar bacterias acéticas.Las bacterias acéticas son las principales responsables del picado de los vinos y de la producción de vinagre. Sin embargo, existe un desconocimiento importante sobre su comportamiento y evolución. Las técnicas de enumeración y de identificación basadas en ...

  20. Role in Cheese Flavour Formation of Heterofermentative Lactic Acid Bacteria from Mesophilic Starter Cultures

    Pedersen, Thomas Bæk

    Undefined mesophilic cheese starters are complex ecosystems that contain both homofermentative and heterofermentative lactic acid bacteria, with the Lactococcus genera representing the former and Lceuonostoc and sometimes Lactobacillus the latter. These starters originate from old butter starters...... dairy strains had, in comparison with plant isolates, the ability to ferment citrate and lacked several genes involved in the fermentation of complex carbohydrates. The presented research in this thesis has gained insight in to the role of heterofermentative lactic acid bacteria in cheese flavour...... formation. The traditional DL-starters contained numerous of strains of heterofermentative Le. mesenteroides, whereas Le. pseudomesenteroides and  only were found in some starters. The potential of heterofermentative lactic acid bacteria to effect the flavour formation in cheese seems to be dependent on how...

  1. Phenotypic and genotypic characterization of lactic acid bacteria isolated from raw goat milk and effect of farming practices on the dominant species of lactic acid bacteria.

    Tormo, Hélène; Ali Haimoud Lekhal, Djamila; Roques, C

    2015-10-01

    Lactic acid bacteria, in particular Lactococcus lactis, play a decisive role in the cheese making process and more particularly in lactic cheeses which are primarily produced on goat dairy farms. The objective of this study was therefore to identify the main lactic acid bacteria found in raw goats' milk from three different regions in France and evaluate if certain farming practices have an effect on the distribution of species of lactic acid bacteria in the various milk samples. Identification at genus or species level was carried out using phenotypic tests and genotypic methods including repetitive element REP-PCR, species-specific PCR and 16S rRNA gene sequencing. The distribution of the main bacterial species in the milk samples varied depending on farms and their characteristics. Out of the 146 strains identified, L. lactis was the dominant species (60% of strains), followed by Enterococcus (38%) of which Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium. Within the species L. lactis, L. lactis subsp lactis was detected more frequently than L. lactis subsp cremoris (74% vs. 26%). The predominance of L. lactis subsp cremoris was linked to geographical area studied. It appears that the animals' environment plays a role in the balance between the dominance of L. lactis and enterococci in raw goats' milk. The separation between the milking parlor and the goat shed (vs no separation) and only straw in the bedding (vs straw and hay) seems to promote L. lactis in the milk (vs enterococci). PMID:26082325

  2. [Comparative genomics and evolutionary analysis of CRISPR loci in acetic acid bacteria].

    Kai, Xia; Xinle, Liang; Yudong, Li

    2015-12-01

    The clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR) is a widespread adaptive immunity system that exists in most archaea and many bacteria against foreign DNA, such as phages, viruses and plasmids. In general, CRISPR system consists of direct repeat, leader, spacer and CRISPR-associated sequences. Acetic acid bacteria (AAB) play an important role in industrial fermentation of vinegar and bioelectrochemistry. To investigate the polymorphism and evolution pattern of CRISPR loci in acetic acid bacteria, bioinformatic analyses were performed on 48 species from three main genera (Acetobacter, Gluconacetobacter and Gluconobacter) with whole genome sequences available from the NCBI database. The results showed that the CRISPR system existed in 32 species of the 48 strains studied. Most of the CRISPR-Cas system in AAB belonged to type I CRISPR-Cas system (subtype E and C), but type II CRISPR-Cas system which contain cas9 gene was only found in the genus Acetobacter and Gluconacetobacter. The repeat sequences of some CRISPR were highly conserved among species from different genera, and the leader sequences of some CRISPR possessed conservative motif, which was associated with regulated promoters. Moreover, phylogenetic analysis of cas1 demonstrated that they were suitable for classification of species. The conservation of cas1 genes was associated with that of repeat sequences among different strains, suggesting they were subjected to similar functional constraints. Moreover, the number of spacer was positively correlated with the number of prophages and insertion sequences, indicating the acetic acid bacteria were continually invaded by new foreign DNA. The comparative analysis of CRISR loci in acetic acid bacteria provided the basis for investigating the molecular mechanism of different acetic acid tolerance and genome stability in acetic acid bacteria. PMID:26704949

  3. 10-oxo-12(Z)-octadecenoic acid, a linoleic acid metabolite produced by gut lactic acid bacteria, potently activates PPARγ and stimulates adipogenesis

    Goto, Tsuyoshi, E-mail: tgoto@kais.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Laboratory of Molecular Function of Food, Division of Food Science and Biotechnology, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Uji 611-0011 (Japan); Research Unit for Physiological Chemistry, The Center for the Promotion of Interdisciplinary Education and Research, Kyoto University (Japan); Kim, Young-Il; Furuzono, Tomoya [Laboratory of Molecular Function of Food, Division of Food Science and Biotechnology, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Uji 611-0011 (Japan); Takahashi, Nobuyuki [Laboratory of Molecular Function of Food, Division of Food Science and Biotechnology, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Uji 611-0011 (Japan); Research Unit for Physiological Chemistry, The Center for the Promotion of Interdisciplinary Education and Research, Kyoto University (Japan); Yamakuni, Kanae; Yang, Ha-Eun; Li, Yongjia [Laboratory of Molecular Function of Food, Division of Food Science and Biotechnology, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Uji 611-0011 (Japan); Ohue, Ryuji [Laboratory of Molecular Function of Food, Division of Food Science and Biotechnology, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Uji 611-0011 (Japan); Research Unit for Physiological Chemistry, The Center for the Promotion of Interdisciplinary Education and Research, Kyoto University (Japan); Nomura, Wataru [Laboratory of Molecular Function of Food, Division of Food Science and Biotechnology, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Uji 611-0011 (Japan); Sugawara, Tatsuya [Laboratory of Marine Bioproducts Technology, Division of Applied Biosciences, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Yu, Rina [Department of Food Science and Nutrition, University of Ulsan, Ulsan 680-749 (Korea, Republic of); Kitamura, Nahoko [Laboratory of Fermentation Physiology and Applied Microbiology, Division of Applied Life Sciences, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); and others

    2015-04-17

    Our previous study has shown that gut lactic acid bacteria generate various kinds of fatty acids from polyunsaturated fatty acids such as linoleic acid (LA). In this study, we investigated the effects of LA and LA-derived fatty acids on the activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) which regulate whole-body energy metabolism. None of the fatty acids activated PPARδ, whereas almost all activated PPARα in luciferase assays. Two fatty acids potently activated PPARγ, a master regulator of adipocyte differentiation, with 10-oxo-12(Z)-octadecenoic acid (KetoA) having the most potency. In 3T3-L1 cells, KetoA induced adipocyte differentiation via the activation of PPARγ, and increased adiponectin production and insulin-stimulated glucose uptake. These findings suggest that fatty acids, including KetoA, generated in gut by lactic acid bacteria may be involved in the regulation of host energy metabolism. - Highlights: • Most LA-derived fatty acids from gut lactic acid bacteria potently activated PPARα. • Among tested fatty acids, KetoA and KetoC significantly activated PPARγ. • KetoA induced adipocyte differentiation via the activation of PPARγ. • KetoA enhanced adiponectin production and glucose uptake during adipogenesis.

  4. 10-oxo-12(Z)-octadecenoic acid, a linoleic acid metabolite produced by gut lactic acid bacteria, potently activates PPARγ and stimulates adipogenesis

    Our previous study has shown that gut lactic acid bacteria generate various kinds of fatty acids from polyunsaturated fatty acids such as linoleic acid (LA). In this study, we investigated the effects of LA and LA-derived fatty acids on the activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) which regulate whole-body energy metabolism. None of the fatty acids activated PPARδ, whereas almost all activated PPARα in luciferase assays. Two fatty acids potently activated PPARγ, a master regulator of adipocyte differentiation, with 10-oxo-12(Z)-octadecenoic acid (KetoA) having the most potency. In 3T3-L1 cells, KetoA induced adipocyte differentiation via the activation of PPARγ, and increased adiponectin production and insulin-stimulated glucose uptake. These findings suggest that fatty acids, including KetoA, generated in gut by lactic acid bacteria may be involved in the regulation of host energy metabolism. - Highlights: • Most LA-derived fatty acids from gut lactic acid bacteria potently activated PPARα. • Among tested fatty acids, KetoA and KetoC significantly activated PPARγ. • KetoA induced adipocyte differentiation via the activation of PPARγ. • KetoA enhanced adiponectin production and glucose uptake during adipogenesis

  5. Bile Salt and Acid Tolerant of Lactic Acid Bacteria Isolated from Proventriculus of Broiler Chicken

    E. Damayanti

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research was to obtain the lactic acid bacteria (LAB as probiotic candidates which have resistance to bile salt and acid condition. LAB was obtained using isolation method from proventriculus of broiler chicken. Selective MRS media with 0.2% CaCO3 addition were used for LAB isolation using pour plate sampling method under anaerobic condition. The result showed that four selected isolates had morphological and biochemical characteristics as LAB. The selected LAB was characterized as follow: antibacterial activities, antibiotic sensitivity, resistance on bile salt, gastric juice and acid condition, and biochemical identification. Antibacterial activities assay of cell free supernatant was confirmed using disc paper diffusion method which was arranged on factorial design and each treatment consisted of three replications. The cell free supernatant of LAB isolates had antibacterial activities against Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aerugenosa, and Salmonella pullorum. Molecular identification procedure using 16S rRNA sequence analysis showed that R01 and R02 as Pediococcus acidilactici. The viability of the two isolates were tested by acid pH (pH 1, 2, and 3, gastric juice pH 2, and bile salt condition for digestives tract simulation. The result showed that R01 and R02 had a high viability percentages at pH 1, 2, and 3 (95.45%, 99.49%, 104.01%, and 67.17%, 120.74%, 103.4%, respectively and at bile salt simulation for 1-2 hours (100.35%-102.71% and 100.02%-102.65%, respectively, but at gastric juice simulation for 1-2 hours, the P. acidilactici R01 had higher viability than P. acidilactici R02 (59.69%-76.53% versus 43.57%-40.69%, respectively. In the antibiotic sensitivity test for three antibiotics (i.e. erythromicin 15 µg, penicillin G 10 µg, and streptomycin 10 µg, the P. acidilactici R02 showed resistance to Streptomycin and Penicillin. It is concluded that P. acidilactici R01 and P. acidilactici R02 isolated from proventriculus

  6. TO THE QUESTION OF BIOSYNTHESIS OF CROTONALDEHYDE OF WINE YEAST AND LACTIC ACID BACTERIA DURING VINIFICATION

    Kushnereva E. V.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article investigates the possible pathways for the formation of crotonaldehyde in wine production in the result of the activity of wine yeast and lactic acid bacteria. It established that exposure to exhaust gases, noble rot, pathogens and pests on grape plant does not lead to the biosynthesis of crotonaldehyde in grape berry. The experimental data to identify probable pathways for the formation of crotonaldehyde during vinification has been presented. The effect of the test substance on the life of yeasts and lactic acid bacteria has been estimated

  7. Plasmids from Food Lactic Acid Bacteria: Diversity, Similarity, and New Developments

    Yanhua Cui

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Plasmids are widely distributed in different sources of lactic acid bacteria (LAB as self-replicating extrachromosomal genetic materials, and have received considerable attention due to their close relationship with many important functions as well as some industrially relevant characteristics of the LAB species. They are interesting with regard to the development of food-grade cloning vectors. This review summarizes new developments in the area of lactic acid bacteria plasmids and aims to provide up to date information that can be used in related future research.

  8. Effect of proteolitic enzymes with probiotic of lactic acid bacteria on characteristics of cow milk dadih

    Miskiyah; S. Usmiati; Mulyorini

    2011-01-01

    Texture of dadih from cow milk tends to be soft, while dadih from buffalo milk have more compact and solid texture. Enzyme is one of food additives that may produce fermented products made from cow milk that has same charcteristic as dadih’s from buffalo milk. Lactic acid bacteria in fermented milk affect product characteristics. This study aimed to determine the effect of combination of enzyme and probiotic lactic acid bacteria on the characteristics of cow's milk dadih. The study was aime d...

  9. Development of a Method for Detection of Lactic Acid Bacteria Producing Exclusively the l-(+)- Isomer of Lactic Acid

    Jehanno, D.; Thuault, D; Bourgeois, C. M.

    1992-01-01

    A method was developed for the detection and isolation, within a population of lactic acid bacteria, of strains producing exclusively the l-(+)- isomer of lactic acid; the visual detection of colonies of these particular strains can be carried out directly on agar plates (50 to 70 colonies per plate). The method is based on an enzymatic stereospecific reaction involving d-(−)-lactate dehydrogenase and linked to a staining reaction; the diffusion area of the d-(−)- isomer stains red around the...

  10. Lactic Acid Bateria - Friend or Foe? Lactic Acid Bacteria in the Production of Polysaccharides and Fuel Ethanol

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) have been widely used in the production of fermented foods and as probiotics. Alternan is a glucan with a distinctive backbone structure of alternating alpha-(1,6) and alpha-(1,3) linkages produced by the LAB Leuconostoc mesenteroides. In recent years, improved strains f...

  11. Phenolic content, antioxidant activities and stimulatory roles of citrus fruits on some lactic acid bacteria

    Irkin Reyhan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, phenolic compounds and antioxidant activities in citrus fruits and their peels were determined, and their stimulatory roles on some lactic acid bacteria were investigated. Phenolic compounds in citrus fruits such as mandarin, lemon, orange and grapefruit were determined either in the juices or in the peel extracts. Total phenolic content was determined in a spectrophotometer at 685 nm using the adapted Folin-Ciocalteu method. Total flavonoid content was measured using LC/MS (liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. The effects of the fruit juices and peel extracts on the selected lactic acid bacteria (Lactobacillus delbrueckii NRRL B5448, Lb. casei NRRL B1922, Lb. acidophilus NRRL B4495 were investigated. The tested lactic acid bacteria were significantly affected by chlorogenic acid, hesperidin, naringin and caffeic acid compared to the control samples (P≤0.05. Antioxidant properties of fruit samples were also measured using the DPPH (2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl method. The phenolics positively affected the metabolism of bacteria, with the stimulatory effects of the assayed samples being influenced by the phenolic profile.

  12. PENAMBAHAN BAKTERI ASAM LAKTAT TERENKAPSULASI UNTUK MENEKAN PERTUMBUHAN BAKTERI PATOGEN PADA PROSES PRODUKSI TAPIOKA [Addition of Encapsulated Lactic Acid Bacteria to Suppress the Growth of Pathogenic Bacteria during Tapioca Production

    Glisina Dwinoor Rembulan; Titi Candra Sunarti; Anja Meryandini

    2015-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) produce organic acids and active compounds which can inhibit the growth of pathogenic bacteria. Lactic acid bacteria potentially can be introduced to inhibit pathogenic bacteria in the tapioca production at the extraction stage, especially during the settling process since there is possibility of starch slurry to be contaminated by pathogenic bacteria from water. The objectives of this research were to design a solid starter of LAB through encapsulation by using mod...

  13. Acid production in dental plaque after exposure to probiotic bacteria

    Keller Mette K; Twetman Svante

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background The increasing interest in probiotic lactobacilli in health maintenance has raised the question of potential risks. One possible side effect could be an increased acidogenicity in dental plaque. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of probiotic lactobacilli on plaque lactic acid (LA) production in vitro and in vivo. Methods In the first part (A), suspensions of two lactobacilli strains (L. reuteri DSM 17938, L. plantarum 299v) were added to suspensions of su...

  14. Addicting diverse bacteria to a noncanonical amino acid.

    Tack, Drew S; Ellefson, Jared W; Thyer, Ross; Wang, Bo; Gollihar, Jimmy; Forster, Matthew T; Ellington, Andrew D

    2016-03-01

    Engineered orthogonal translation systems have greatly enabled the expansion of the genetic code using noncanonical amino acids (NCAAs). However, the impact of NCAAs on organismal evolution remains unclear, in part because it is difficult to force the adoption of new genetic codes in organisms. By reengineering TEM-1 β-lactamase to be dependent on a NCAA, we maintained bacterial NCAA dependence for hundreds of generations without escape. PMID:26780407

  15. Local domestication of lactic acid bacteria via cassava beer fermentation.

    Colehour, Alese M; Meadow, James F; Liebert, Melissa A; Cepon-Robins, Tara J; Gildner, Theresa E; Urlacher, Samuel S; Bohannan, Brendan J M; Snodgrass, J Josh; Sugiyama, Lawrence S

    2014-01-01

    Cassava beer, or chicha, is typically consumed daily by the indigenous Shuar people of the Ecuadorian Amazon. This traditional beverage made from cassava tuber (Manihot esculenta) is thought to improve nutritional quality and flavor while extending shelf life in a tropical climate. Bacteria responsible for chicha fermentation could be a source of microbes for the human microbiome, but little is known regarding the microbiology of chicha. We investigated bacterial community composition of chicha batches using Illumina high-throughput sequencing. Fermented chicha samples were collected from seven Shuar households in two neighboring villages in the Morona-Santiago region of Ecuador, and the composition of the bacterial communities within each chicha sample was determined by sequencing a region of the 16S ribosomal gene. Members of the genus Lactobacillus dominated all samples. Significantly greater phylogenetic similarity was observed among chicha samples taken within a village than those from different villages. Community composition varied among chicha samples, even those separated by short geographic distances, suggesting that ecological and/or evolutionary processes, including human-mediated factors, may be responsible for creating locally distinct ferments. Our results add to evidence from other fermentation systems suggesting that traditional fermentation may be a form of domestication, providing endemic beneficial inocula for consumers, but additional research is needed to identify the mechanisms and extent of microbial dispersal. PMID:25071997

  16. Local domestication of lactic acid bacteria via cassava beer fermentation

    Alese M. Colehour

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Cassava beer, or chicha, is typically consumed daily by the indigenous Shuar people of the Ecuadorian Amazon. This traditional beverage made from cassava tuber (Manihot esculenta is thought to improve nutritional quality and flavor while extending shelf life in a tropical climate. Bacteria responsible for chicha fermentation could be a source of microbes for the human microbiome, but little is known regarding the microbiology of chicha. We investigated bacterial community composition of chicha batches using Illumina high-throughput sequencing. Fermented chicha samples were collected from seven Shuar households in two neighboring villages in the Morona-Santiago region of Ecuador, and the composition of the bacterial communities within each chicha sample was determined by sequencing a region of the 16S ribosomal gene. Members of the genus Lactobacillus dominated all samples. Significantly greater phylogenetic similarity was observed among chicha samples taken within a village than those from different villages. Community composition varied among chicha samples, even those separated by short geographic distances, suggesting that ecological and/or evolutionary processes, including human-mediated factors, may be responsible for creating locally distinct ferments. Our results add to evidence from other fermentation systems suggesting that traditional fermentation may be a form of domestication, providing endemic beneficial inocula for consumers, but additional research is needed to identify the mechanisms and extent of microbial dispersal.

  17. Naturally fermented Jijelian black olives: microbiological characteristics and isolation of lactic acid bacteria

    Karam, Nour-Eddine

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available A study of the microflora of traditionally fermented black olives in Eastern Algeria is presented. A count of the following microbial groups was carried out: mesophilic bacteria, enterobacteria, lactic acid bacteria (LAB, staphylococci and yeast. In a second phase, the identification and assessment of the technological traits of LAB was performed. Seventeen lactic acid bacteria were isolated and identified. These isolates were represented by two genera: Lactobacillus and Leuconostoc. The results showed that Lactobacillus plantarum was the predominant species in this traditional product.Un estudio sobre la microflora de aceitunas negras fermentada por métodos tradicionales en el Este de Argelia es presentado. Se realizo el siguiente recuento de grupos de microorganismos: bacterias mesófilas, enterobacterias, bacterias ácido lácticas (LAB, staphylococcus y levaduras. En una segunda fase, la identificación y evaluación de aspectos tecnológicos de LAB fue realizada. Setenta bacterias ácido lácticas fueron aisladas e identificadas. Estos aislados contenían principalmente dos géneros: Lactobacillus y Leuconostoc. Los resultados mostraron que Lactobacillus plantarum fue la especie predominante en este producto tradicional.

  18. Lactic acid bacteria in dairy food: surface characterization and interactions with food matrix components.

    Burgain, J; Scher, J; Francius, G; Borges, F; Corgneau, M; Revol-Junelles, A M; Cailliez-Grimal, C; Gaiani, C

    2014-11-01

    This review gives an overview of the importance of interactions occurring in dairy matrices between Lactic Acid Bacteria and milk components. Dairy products are important sources of biological active compounds of particular relevance to human health. These compounds include immunoglobulins, whey proteins and peptides, polar lipids, and lactic acid bacteria including probiotics. A better understanding of interactions between bioactive components and their delivery matrix may successfully improve their transport to their target site of action. Pioneering research on probiotic lactic acid bacteria has mainly focused on their host effects. However, very little is known about their interaction with dairy ingredients. Such knowledge could contribute to designing new and more efficient dairy food, and to better understand relationships between milk constituents. The purpose of this review is first to provide an overview of the current knowledge about the biomolecules produced on bacterial surface and the composition of the dairy matter. In order to understand how bacteria interact with dairy molecules, adhesion mechanisms are subsequently reviewed with a special focus on the environmental conditions affecting bacterial adhesion. Methods dedicated to investigate the bacterial surface and to decipher interactions between bacteria and abiotic dairy components are also detailed. Finally, relevant industrial implications of these interactions are presented and discussed. PMID:25277266

  19. Heterologous surface display on lactic acid bacteria: non-GMO alternative?

    Zadravec, Petra; Štrukelj, Borut; Berlec, Aleš

    2015-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are food-grade hosts for surface display with potential applications in food and therapy. Alternative approaches to surface display on LAB would avoid the use of recombinant DNA technology and genetically-modified organism (GMO)-related regulatory requirements. Non-covalent surface display of proteins can be achieved by fusing them to various cell-wall binding domains, of which the Lysine motif domain (LysM) is particularly well studied. Fusion proteins have been isolated from recombinant bacteria or from their growth medium and displayed on unmodified bacteria, enabling heterologous surface display. This was demonstrated on non-viable cells devoid of protein content, termed bacteria-like particles, and on various species of genus Lactobacillus. Of the latter, Lactobacillus salivarius ATCC 11741 was recently shown to be particularly amenable for LysM-mediated display. Possible regulatory implications of heterologous surface display are discussed, particularly those relevant for the European Union. PMID:25880164

  20. Acid production in dental plaque after exposure to probiotic bacteria

    Keller Mette K

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The increasing interest in probiotic lactobacilli in health maintenance has raised the question of potential risks. One possible side effect could be an increased acidogenicity in dental plaque. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of probiotic lactobacilli on plaque lactic acid (LA production in vitro and in vivo. Methods In the first part (A, suspensions of two lactobacilli strains (L. reuteri DSM 17938, L. plantarum 299v were added to suspensions of supragingival dental plaque collected from healthy young adults (n=25. LA production after fermentation with either xylitol or fructose was analyzed. In the second part (B, subjects (n=18 were given lozenges with probiotic lactobacilli (L. reuteri DSM 17938 and ATCC PTA 5289 or placebo for two weeks in a double-blinded, randomized cross-over trial. The concentration of LA in supragingival plaque samples was determined at baseline and after 2 weeks. Salivary counts of mutans streptococci (MS and lactobacilli were estimated with chair-side methods. Results Plaque suspensions with L. reuteri DSM 17938 produced significantly less LA compared with L. plantarum 299v or controls (p Conclusion Lactic acid production in suspensions of plaque and probiotic lactobacilli was strain-dependant and the present study provides no evidence of an increase in plaque acidity by the supply of selected probiotic lactobacilli when challenged by fructose or xylitol. The study protocol was approved by The Danish National Committee on Biomedical Research Ethics (protocol no H-2-2010-112. Trial registration NCT01700712

  1. Selected Lactic Acid Bacteria Synthesize Antioxidant Peptides during Sourdough Fermentation of Cereal Flours

    Coda, Rossana; Rizzello, Carlo Giuseppe; Pinto, Daniela; Gobbetti, Marco

    2012-01-01

    A pool of selected lactic acid bacteria was used for the sourdough fermentation of various cereal flours with the aim of synthesizing antioxidant peptides. The radical-scavenging activity of water/salt-soluble extracts (WSE) from sourdoughs was significantly (P < 0.05) higher than that of chemically acidified doughs. The highest activity was found for whole wheat, spelt, rye, and kamut sourdoughs. Almost the same results were found for the inhibition of linoleic acid autoxidation. WSE were su...

  2. Selection of potential probiotic lactic acid bacteria from fermented olives by in vitro tests

    Argyri, Anthoula; Zoumpopoulou, Georgia; Karatzas, Kimon Andreas; Tsakalidou, Effie; Nychas, George John; Panagou, Efstathios; Tassou, Chrysoula

    2012-01-01

    The present study aims to evaluate the probiotic potential of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) isolated from naturally fermented olives and select candidates to be used as probiotic starters for the improvement of the traditional fermentation process and the production of newly added value functional foods. Seventy one (71) lactic acid bacterial strains (17 Leuconostoc mesenteroides, 1 Ln. pseudomesenteroides, 13 Lactobacillus plantarum, 37 Lb. pentosus, 1 Lb. paraplantarum, and 2 Lb. paracasei sub...

  3. Selection of exopolysaccharide-producing lactic acid bacteria isolates from Inner Mongolian traditional yoghurt

    Zhang Chun-lei; Li Jia-qi; Guo Hai-tao; Wang Jie; Xu Ri-hua

    2014-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) isolated from Inner Mongolian traditional yoghurt were evaluated for the production of exopolysaccharides (EPS) by phenol-sulphuric acid method after ethanol precipitation and dialysis. Total polysaccharide was extracted from sucrose-containing MRS broth cultures of the selected LAB strains. Comparison of the EPS yields revealed that among tested LAB, strain 37 exhibited the highest production of 536.904 mg/L. The strain was identified as Leuconostoc citreum with ca...

  4. Competition mechanisms of lactic acid bacteria and bifidobacteria: Fermentative metabolism and colonization

    Tabasco, Raquel; Fernández de Palencia, P.; Fontecha, F. Javier; Peláez, Carmen; Requena, Teresa

    2014-01-01

    Enzyme activities (α- and β-glucosidases, α- and β-galactosidases and β-fructofuranosidase) and organic acid production of four strains of lactic acid bacteria (LAB; Streptococcus thermophilus STY-31, Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus LBY-27, Lactobacillus casei LC-01 and Lactobacillus acidophilus LA-5) and Bifidobacterium lactis BB-12 were tested on milk and MRS fermentation broth with glucose, lactose or fructooligosaccharides (FOS) as carbon source. The highest β-galactosidase ac...

  5. Cholesterol Assimilation by Lactic Acid Bacteria and Bifidobacteria Isolated from the Human Gut

    Dora I A Pereira; Gibson, Glenn R.

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of human gut-derived lactic acid bacteria and bifidobacteria on cholesterol levels in vitro. Continuous cultures inoculated with fecal material from healthy human volunteers with media supplemented with cholesterol and bile acids were used to enrich for potential cholesterol assimilators among the indigenous bacterial populations. Seven potential probiotics were found: Lactobacillus fermentum strains F53 and KC5b, Bifidobacterium infantis...

  6. Evaluation of Immunomodulatory Effects of Lactic Acid Bacteria in Turbot (Scophthalmus maximus)

    Villamil, L.; Tafalla, C.; Figueras, A.; Novoa, B.

    2002-01-01

    In the present work, the effects of several lactic acid bacteria on the immune response of turbot (Scophthalmus maximus) macrophages have been studied both in vitro and in vivo. Out of six lactic acid bacterial strains tested, only heat-killed Lactococcus lactis significantly increased the turbot head kidney macrophage chemiluminescent (CL) response after 24 h of incubation. Nitric oxide (NO) was also significantly enhanced by this bacterium after 72 h of incubation with either viable (103 an...

  7. Lactic acid bacteria in Hamei and Marcha of North East India

    Tamang, J. P.; Dewan, S.; Tamang, B.; Rai, A; Schillinger, U.; Holzapfel, W. H.

    2007-01-01

    Hamei and Marcha are mixed dough inocula used as starters for preparation of various indigenous alcoholic beverages in Manipur and Sikkim in India, respectively. These starters are traditionally prepared from rice with wild herbs and spices. Samples of Hamei and Marcha, collected from Manipur and Sikkim, respectively, were analysed for lactic acid bacterial composition. The population of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) was 6.9 and 7.1 Log cfu/g in Hamei and Marcha, respectively. On the basis of ph...

  8. Evolution of Acetic Acid Bacteria During Fermentation and Storage of Wine

    Joyeux, A.; Lafon-Lafourcade, S.; Ribéreau-Gayon, P.

    1984-01-01

    Acetic acid bacteria were present at all stages of wine making, from the mature grape through vinification to conservation. A succession of Gluconobacter oxydans, Acetobacter pasteurianus, and Acetobacter aceti during the course of these stages was noted. Low levels of A. aceti remained in the wine; they exhibited rapid proliferation on short exposure of the wine to air and caused significant increases in the concentration of acetic acid. Higher temperature of wine storage and higher wine pH ...

  9. Surviving the Acid Test: Responses of Gram-Positive Bacteria to Low pH

    Cotter, Paul D.; Hill, Colin

    2003-01-01

    Gram-positive bacteria possess a myriad of acid resistance systems that can help them to overcome the challenge posed by different acidic environments. In this review the most common mechanisms are described: i.e., the use of proton pumps, the protection or repair of macromolecules, cell membrane changes, production of alkali, induction of pathways by transcriptional regulators, alteration of metabolism, and the role of cell density and cell signaling. We also discuss the reponses of Listeria...

  10. Isolation and characterization of lactic acid bacteria and yeasts from the Brazilian grape sourdough

    Krischina Singer Aplevicz

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Sourdough is a mixture of flour and water fermented by lactic acid bacteria and yeast, with a large use in bakery products. This study was developed with Brazilian grape (Niagara rosada sourdough obtained from spontaneous fermentation. The aim of this work was to characterize genotypic and phenotypically lactic acid bacteria and yeasts isolated from sourdough. The phenotypic identification for bacteria and yeasts was performed by using the kit API50CHL and 20CAUX and the genotypic characterization was performed by sequencing method. A total of four isolated strains were analyzed in this study. Two of these strains were phenotypically and genotypic identified as Lactobacillus paracasei and one as Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Another sample phenotypically identified as Candida pelliculosa did not show the same identity by sequencing. It shows the need to use phenotypic and genotypic characterization associated for the correct microorganism identification.

  11. Natural Killer Cells Are Activated by Lactic Acid Bacteria-Matured Dendritic Cells

    Fink, Lisbeth Nielsen; Christensen, Hanne Risager; Frøkiær, Hanne

    of certain lactic acid bacteria has been shown to increase in vivo NK cytotoxicity. Here, we investigated how human gut flora-derived lactobacilli affect NK cells in vitro, by measuring proliferation and IFN-gamma production of human NK cells upon bacterial stimulation. Human peripheral blood NK...... encounter of NK cells with lactic acid bacteria will affect NK cell activation. Such activation of NK cells may potentially skew an on-going or subsequent immune response towards a Th1 response.......Natural killer (NK) cells are cells of the non-specific immune system lysing altered self-cells. A non-cytolytic subset of NK cells may serve a regulatory role by secreting cytokines. Bacteria translocating across the gastrointestinal mucosa are presumed to gain access to NK cells, as consumption...

  12. Short-chain fatty acids produced by intestinal bacteria.

    Topping, D L

    1996-03-01

    The colon is the major site of bacterial colonisation in the human gut and the resident species are predominantly anaerobes. They include potential pathogens but the greater proportion appear to be organisms which salvage energy through the metabolism of undigested carbohydrates and gut secretions. The major products of carbohydrate metabolism are the short chain fatty acids (SCFA), acetate, propionate and butyrate. In addition to general effects (such as lowering of pH) individual acids exert specific effects. All of the major SCFA appear to promote the flow of blood through the colonic vasculature while propionate enhances muscular activity and epithelial cell proliferation. Butyrate appears to promote a normal cell phenotype as well as being a major fuel for colonocytes. Important substrates for bacterial fermentation include non-starch polysaccharides (major components of dietary fibre) but it seems that starch which has escaped digestion in the small intestine (resistant starch) is the major contributor. Oligosaccharides are utilised by probiotic organisms and in the diet, act as prebiotics in promoting their numbers in faeces. High amylose starch is a form of RS and it appears to act as a prebiotic also. Although there is evidence that probiotics such as Bifidobacteria metabolise oligosaccharides and other carbohydrates, there appears to be little evidence to support a change in faecal SCFA excretion. It seems that any health benefits of probiotics are exerted through means other than SCFA. PMID:24394459

  13. Batch fermentations on synthetic mixed sugar and starch medium with amylolytic lactic acid bacteria

    Thomsen, Mette Hedegaard; Guyot, J.P.; Kiel, P.

    2007-01-01

    process. A number of amylolytic lactic acid bacteria have been identified, and in this work, six different strains were tested for their ability to produce alpha-amylase and to utilise all sugars with high lactic acid yield in a medium with a complex composition of free sugars (brown juice) and starch...... brown juice. Brown juice was shown to be an excellent medium for lactic acid fermentation. The aim of this study was to investigate the utilisation of brown juice in the production of polylactic acid, where wheat starch would be added to increase the lactic acid yield and, thus, the feasibility of the....... Lactobacillus plantarum A6 was the only strain that showed both a good lactic acid production and utilisation of starch in this medium. The growth rate of this strain was approximately 0.4 h(-1) and the lactic acid yield was 0.7....

  14. Ammonia production by human faecal bacteria, and the enumeration, isolation and characterization of bacteria capable of growth on peptides and amino acids

    Richardson Anthony J

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The products of protein breakdown in the human colon are considered to be detrimental to gut health. Amino acid catabolism leads to the formation of sulfides, phenolic compounds and amines, which are inflammatory and/or precursors to the formation of carcinogens, including N-nitroso compounds. The aim of this study was to investigate the kinetics of protein breakdown and the bacterial species involved. Results Casein, pancreatic casein hydrolysate (mainly short-chain peptides or amino acids were incubated in vitro with suspensions of faecal bacteria from 3 omnivorous and 3 vegetarian human donors. Results from the two donor groups were similar. Ammonia production was highest from peptides, followed by casein and amino acids, which were similar. The amino acids metabolized most extensively were Asp, Ser, Lys and Glu. Monensin inhibited the rate of ammonia production from amino acids by 60% (P = 0.001, indicating the involvement of Gram-positive bacteria. Enrichment cultures were carried out to investigate if, by analogy with the rumen, there was a significant population of asaccharolytic, obligately amino acid-fermenting bacteria (‘hyper-ammonia-producing’ bacteria; HAP in the colon. Numbers of bacteria capable of growth on peptides or amino acids alone averaged 3.5% of the total viable count, somewhat higher than the rumen. None of these were HAP, however. The species enriched included Clostridium spp., one of which was C. perfringens, Enterococcus, Shigella and Escherichia coli. Conclusions Protein fermentation by human faecal bacteria in the absence of sugars not only leads to the formation of hazardous metabolic products, but also to the possible proliferation of harmful bacteria. The kinetics of protein metabolism were similar to the rumen, but HAP bacteria were not found.

  15. Pediocin PA-1, a wide-spectrum bacteriocin from lactic acid bacteria

    Rodriguez, JM; Martinez, MI; Kok, J

    2002-01-01

    Pediocin PA-1 is a broad-spectrum lactic acid bacteria bacteriocin that shows a particularly strong activity against Listeria monocytogenes, a foodborne pathogen of special concern among the food industries. This antimicrobial peptide is the most extensively studied class IIa (or pediocin family) ba

  16. Towards metagenome-scale models for industrial applications-the case of Lactic Acid Bacteria

    Branco Dos Santos, F.; Vos, de W.M.; Teusink, B.

    2013-01-01

    We review the uses and limitations of modelling approaches that are in use in the field of Lactic Acid Bacteria (LAB). We describe recent developments in model construction and computational methods, starting from application of such models to monocultures. However, since most applications in food b

  17. Diversity, vitality and activities of intestinal lactic acid bacteria and bifidobacteria assessed by molecular approaches

    Vaughan, E.E.; Heilig, G.H.J.; Ben-Amor, K.; Vos, de W.M.

    2005-01-01

    While lactic acid bacteria and bifidobacteria have been scientifically important for over a century, many of these are marketed today as probiotics and have become a valuable and rapidly expanding sector of the food market that is leading functional foods in many countries. The human gastro-intestin

  18. Competitive selection of lactic acid bacteria that persist in the human oral cavity

    Snel, J.; Marco, M.L.; Kingma, F.; Noordman, W.M.; Rademaker, J.; Kleerebezem, M.

    2011-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) might offer opportunities as oral probiotics provided candidate strains persist in the mouth. After intake of a mixture of 69 LAB, strains of Lactobacillus fermentum and Lactobacillus salivarius were especially recovered. Coaggregation with other microbes is likely not a prerequisite for persistence since L. salivarius strongly coaggregated with typical oral cavity isolates, whereas L. fermentum failed to display this phenotype.

  19. Potential and opportunities for use of recombinant lactic acid bacteria in human health

    Hanniffy, S.; Wiedermann, U.; Repa, A.; Mercenier, A.; Daniel, C.; Fioramonti, J.; Tlaskalová, Helena; Kozáková, Hana; Israelsen, H.; Madsen, S.; Vrang, A.; Hols, P.; Delcour, J.; Bron, P.; Kleerebezem, M.; Wells, J.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 56, - (2004), s. 1-64. ISSN 0065-2164 Grant ostatní: EC contract(XE) QLK3-CT-QLK3-CT-2000-00340 Keywords : lactic acid bacteria * human health Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 1.156, year: 2004

  20. TECHNOLOGICAL AND FUNCTIONAL PROPERTIES OF LACTIC ACID BACTERIA: THE IMPORTANCE OF THESE MICROORGANISMS FOR FOOD

    Amanda de Souza Motta

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Eacters of coccus or rods Gram-positive, catalase negative, non-sporulating, which produce lactic acid as the major end product during the fermentation of carbohydrates. When applied on food, provides beneficial effects to consumers through its functional and technological properties. With this the present review article, explore the potential application of lactic acid bacteria in food. The following genera are considered the principal lactic acid bacteria: Aerococcus, Carnobacterium, Enterococcus, Lactobacillus, Lactococcus, Leuconostoc, Oenococcus, Pediococcus, Streptococcus, Tetragenococcus, Vagococcus and Weissella. These cultures have been used as starter or adjunct cultures for the fermentation of foods and beverages due to their contributions to the sensorial characteristics of these products and by microbiological stability. Their probiotic properties have also been investigated. More recent studies by indigenous cultures have received increased attention in light of the search for isolated cultures of a given raw material and a certain region. These microorganisms are being investigated for its functional and technological potential that may be applied in product development with its own characteristics and designation of origin. Those properties will be discussed in the present review in order to highlight the performance of these bacteria and the high degree of control over the fermentation process and standardization of the final product. The use of autochthonous cultures will be considered due the increase of studies of new cultures of lactic acid bacteria isolated of milk and meat of distinct products.

  1. Improving farm management by modeling the contamination of farm tank milk with butyric acid bacteria

    Vissers, M.M.M.; Driehuis, F.; Giffel, te M.C.; Jong, de P.; Lankveld, J.M.G.

    2006-01-01

    Control of contamination of farm tank milk (FTM) with the spore-forming butyric acid bacteria (BAB) is important to prevent the late-blowing defect in semi-hard cheeses. The risk of late blowing can be decreased via control of the contamination level of FTM with BAB. A modeling approach was applied

  2. Intrinsic nitric oxide-stimulatory activity of lipoteichoic acids from different Gram-positive bacteria

    Zídek, Zdeněk; Farghali, H.; Kmoníčková, Eva

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 23, č. 4 (2010), s. 300-310. ISSN 1089-8603 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA305/08/0535 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390512 Keywords : Lipoteichoic acid * Gram-positive bacteria * Nitric oxide Subject RIV: FR - Pharmacology ; Medidal Chemistry Impact factor: 3.384, year: 2010

  3. Inducible gene expression and environmentally regulated genes in lactic acid bacteria

    Kok, Jan

    1996-01-01

    Relatively recently, a number of genes and operons have been identified in lactic acid bacteria that are inducible and respond to environmental factors. Some of these genes/operons had been isolated and analysed because of their importance in the fermentation industry and, consequently, their transc

  4. Surface of Lactic Acid Bacteria: Relationships between Chemical Composition and Physicochemical Properties

    Boonaert, C J; Rouxhet, Paul

    2000-01-01

    The surface chemical composition and physicochemical properties (hydrophobicity and zeta potential) of two lactic acid bacteria, Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis bv. diacetilactis and Lactobacillus helveticus, have been investigated using cells harvested in exponential or stationary growth phase. The surface composition determined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was converted into a molecular composition in terms of proteins, polysaccharides, and hydrocarbonlike compounds. The conce...

  5. Systems biology and metabolic engineering of lactic acid bacteria for improved fermented foods

    Flahaut, N.A.L.; Vos, de W.M.

    2014-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria have long been used in industrial dairy and other food fermentations that make use of their metabolic activities leading to products with specific organoleptic properties. Metabolic engineering is a rational approach to steer fermentations toward the production of desired compou

  6. Protective Effect of Adonitol on Lactic Acid Bacteria Subjected to Freeze-Drying

    de Valdéz, Graciela F.; de Giori, Graciela S.; de Ruiz Holgado, Aída A. P.; Oliver, Guillermo

    1983-01-01

    The protective effects of glycerol, adonitol, and four other related polyhydric alcohols on lactic acid bacteria subjected to freeze-drying were examined. The presence of adonitol in the suspending medium markedly protected the viabilities of the 12 stains tested. Dulcitol, mannitol, m-inositol, and sorbitol were found to provide little or no protection.

  7. Bacteria and Archaea in acidic environments and a key to morphological identification

    Robbins, E.I.

    2000-01-01

    Natural and anthropogenic acidic environments are dominated by bacteria and Archaea. As many as 86 genera or species have been identified or isolated from pH <4.5 environments. This paper reviews the worldwide literature and provide tables of morphological characteristics, habitat information and a key for light microscope identification for the non-microbiologist.

  8. Characterization of airag collected in Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia with emphasis on isolated lactic acid bacteria

    Choi, Suk-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Background Airag, alcoholic sour-tasting beverage, has been traditionally prepared by Mongolian nomads who naturally ferment fresh mares’ milk. Biochemical and microbiological compositions of airag samples collected in Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia and physiological characteristics of isolated lactic acid bacteria were investigated. Methods Protein composition and biochemical composition were determined using sodium dodecyl sulfate-gel electrophoresis and high performance liquid chromatography, respe...

  9. Comparison of phenotypic and molecular tests to identify lactic acid bacteria

    Paula Mendonça Moraes; Luana Martins Perin; Abelardo Silva Júnior; Luís Augusto Nero

    2013-01-01

    Twenty-nine lactic acid bacteria (LAB) isolates were submitted for identification using Biolog, API50CHL, 16S rDNA sequencing, and species-specific PCR reactions. The identification results were compared, and it was concluded that a polyphasic approach is necessary for proper LAB identification, being the molecular analyzes the most reliable.

  10. Minimizing the level of butyric acid bacteria spores in farm tank milk

    Vissers, M.M.M.; Driehuis, F.; Giffel, M.C.T.; Jong, de P.; Lankveld, J.M.G.

    2007-01-01

    A year-long survey of 24 dairy farms was conducted to determine the effects of farm management on the concentrations of butyric acid bacteria (BAB) spores in farm tank milk (FTM). The results were used to validate a control strategy derived from model simulations. The BAB spore concentrations were m