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Sample records for acid affect bleaching

  1. Influence of Bleaching on Flavor of 34% Whey Protein Concentrate and Residual Benzoic Acid Concentration in Dried Whey Proteins

    Previous studies have shown that bleaching negatively affects the flavor of 70% whey protein concentrate (WPC70), but bleaching effects on lower-protein products have not been established. Benzoyl peroxide (BP), a whey bleaching agent, degrades to benzoic acid (BA) and may elevate BA concentrations...

  2. MOLYBDENUM CATALYZED ACID PEROXIDE BLEACHING OF EUCALYPTUS KRAFT PULP

    Marcos S. Rabelo; Jorge L. Colodette; Vera M. Sacon; Marcelo R. Silva; Marco A. B. Azevedo

    2008-01-01

    Molybdenum catalyzed peroxide bleaching (PMo Stage) consists of pulp treatment with hydrogen peroxide under acidic conditions in the presence of a molybdenum catalyst. Molybdenum is applied in catalytic doses (50-200 mg/kg pulp) and may originate from various sources, including (NH4)6Mo7O24.4H2O, Na2MoO4.2H2O, siliconmolybdate, etc. This work is aimed at optimizing the PMo stage and evaluating its industrial application in the OAZDP sequence. Optimum PMo stage conditions for bleaching eucalyp...

  3. Acid hydrolysis of cellulosic fibres: Comparison of bleached kraft pulp, dissolving pulps and cotton textile cellulose.

    Palme, Anna; Theliander, Hans; Brelid, Harald

    2016-01-20

    The behaviour of different cellulosic fibres during acid hydrolysis has been investigated and the levelling-off degree of polymerisation (LODP) has been determined. The study included a bleached kraft pulp (both never-dried and once-dried) and two dissolving pulps (once-dried). Additionally, cotton cellulose from new cotton sheets and sheets discarded after long-time use was studied. Experimental results from the investigation, together with results found in literature, imply that ultrastructural differences between different fibres affect their susceptibility towards acid hydrolysis. Drying of a bleached kraft pulp was found to enhance the rate of acid hydrolysis and also result in a decrease in LODP. This implies that the susceptibility of cellulosic fibres towards acid hydrolysis is affected by drying-induced stresses in the cellulose chains. In cotton cellulose, it was found that use and laundering gave a substantial loss in the degree of polymerisation (DP), but that the LODP was only marginally affected. PMID:26572472

  4. Effect of acid activation on structural and bleaching properties of a bentonite

    A natural bentonite obtained from Khorasan, Iran, was submitted to acid activation with sulphuric acid. Sample aliquots (5 gr) were leached with 100 ml H2SO4 solutions of various concentrations (2-7 N) at 80±2 degreeC for 2 hours. X-ray diffraction, chemical analysis, infrared spectroscopy and specific surface area measurements were performed in order to evaluate important structural modifications occurring as a result of acid attack. Octahedral sheet was affected by acid activation resulting into the dissolution of cations (Mg2+, Fe2+, Al3+) and consequent decomposition of montmorillonite structure. Bentonite samples were then tested in order to verify their capacity to bleach colza-soybean oil, and their performances were compared to that of a commercial bleaching clay. The bleaching ability of the natural clay was poor when compared with that of the industrial adsorbent. Acid activation of the bentonite sample with 7N sulphuric acid yielded an adsorbent material which was highly efficient in the bleaching of the oil functioned better than the commercial clay product under the same conditions.

  5. Corrosion Study of Stainless Steels in Peracetic Acid Bleach Media With and Without Chloride and Chelant

    Rohtash

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper industries are adopting non-chlorine containing chemicals e.g. peroxide, ozone, peracids etc. as alternate of chlorine based bleach chemicals e.g. chlorine and chlorine dioxide etc. with the aim of eco-friend atmospheres. Changeover to the new chemicals in the bleaching process is likely to affect the metallurgy of the existing bleach plants due to change in the corrosivity of the media. Accordingly, corrosion investigations were performed in a peracid namely peracetic acid to test the suitability of austenitic stainless steels 654SMO, 265SMO, 2205, 317L and 316L. The performance of above stainless steels was evaluated through long term immersion tests and Electrochemical polarization measurements in peracetic acid (PAA bleach media at pH value 4 maintaining concentration 0.2 % as active oxygen along with three chloride levels 0, 500 and 1000 ppm in pulp-free laboratory. To study the effect of corrosion inhibitors with extending limit of chloride in liquors, measurements were also made with two types of chelants- EDTA & MgSO4. The results showed that corrosivity of PAA reduced by addition of chelant while increased with concentration of Cl¯. The results also exhibited that EDTA is better inhibitor than MgSO4.

  6. ISOLATION OF PECTIC ACIDS FROM BLEACHED TMP WATER AND AGGREGATION OF MODEL AND TMP PECTIC ACIDS BY CALCIUM

    Anna C. Sundberg; Andrey V. Pranovich; Ville J. Saarimaa; Bjarne R. Holmbom

    2007-01-01

    Pectins are important structural elements in spruce fibres. Alkaline peroxide bleaching of spruce thermomechanical pulp (TMP) causes degradation and demethylation of pectins, yielding high-charge-density pectic acids. The pectic acids in fibres contribute strongly to the negative fibre charge, and the dissolved pectic acids increase the cationic demand of bleached TMP water. In this study, a method to isolate pectic acids from peroxide-bleached TMP pulp water is presented. The pectic acids we...

  7. MOLYBDENUM CATALYZED ACID PEROXIDE BLEACHING OF EUCALYPTUS KRAFT PULP

    Marcos S. Rabelo

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Molybdenum catalyzed peroxide bleaching (PMo Stage consists of pulp treatment with hydrogen peroxide under acidic conditions in the presence of a molybdenum catalyst. Molybdenum is applied in catalytic doses (50-200 mg/kg pulp and may originate from various sources, including (NH46Mo7O24.4H2O, Na2MoO4.2H2O, siliconmolybdate, etc. This work is aimed at optimizing the PMo stage and evaluating its industrial application in the OAZDP sequence. Optimum PMo stage conditions for bleaching eucalyptus pulp were 90 ºC, pH 3.5, 2 h, 0.1 kg/adt Mo and 5 kg/adt H2O2. The PMo stage was more efficient to remove pulp hexenuronic acids than lignin. Its efficiency decreased with increasing pH in the range of 1.5-5.5, while it increased with increasing temperature and peroxide and molybdenum doses. The application of the PMo stage as replacement for the A-stage of the AZDP sequence significantly decreased chlorine dioxide demand. The PMo stage caused a decrease of 20-30% in the generation of organically bound chlorine. The quality parameters of the pulp produced during the PMo stage mill trial were comparable to those obtained with the reference A-stage.

  8. Boring sponges, an increasing threat for coral reefs affected by bleaching events

    Carballo, José L; Bautista, Eric; Nava, Héctor; Cruz-Barraza, José A; Chávez, Jesus A

    2013-01-01

    Coral bleaching is a stress response of corals induced by a variety of factors, but these events have become more frequent and intense in response to recent climate-change-related temperature anomalies. We tested the hypothesis that coral reefs affected by bleaching events are currently heavily infested by boring sponges, which are playing a significant role in the destruction of their physical structure. Seventeen reefs that cover the entire distributional range of corals along the Mexican P...

  9. Corrosion Study of Stainless Steels in Peracetic Acid Bleach Media With and Without Chloride and Chelant

    Rohtash; Ajay K Singh; Rajendra Kumar

    2014-01-01

    The paper industries are adopting non-chlorine containing chemicals e.g. peroxide, ozone, peracids etc. as alternate of chlorine based bleach chemicals e.g. chlorine and chlorine dioxide etc. with the aim of eco-friend atmospheres. Changeover to the new chemicals in the bleaching process is likely to affect the metallurgy of the existing bleach plants due to change in the corrosivity of the media. Accordingly, corrosion investigations were performed in a peracid namely peracetic a...

  10. SIMULTANEOUS DETERMINATION OF CHLORINE DIOXIDE AND HYPOCHLOROUS ACID IN BLEACHING SYSTEM

    Qiang Wang

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available This study has demonstrated a rapid spectroscopic method for the determination of chlorine dioxide and hypochlorous acid concentrations in the pulp bleaching processes. It was found that chlorine dioxide and hypochlorous acid have an isosbestic wavelength of 295 nm. The soluble lignin in such a system is the main interference, but can be corrected by determining the absorbances at 295 nm, 380 nm, and 480 nm. Thus, based on the spectroscopic measurements at 295 nm (the isosbestic point wavelength for chlorine dioxide and hypochlorous acid, 380 nm (absorbance wavelength of chlorine dioxide and 480 nm (the acid soluble lignin absorbance wavelength, the chlorine dioxide and hypochlorous acid concentrations in the bleaching process can be quantified. However, hypochlorous acid was not detected in the real bleaching effluent for its low content. The present method is simple, rapid, accurate, and has the potential for on-line monitoring of the chlorine dioxide bleaching process.

  11. Histological observations in the Hawaiian reef coral, Porites compressa, affected by Porites bleaching with tissue loss

    Sudek, M.; Work, T.M.; Aeby, G.S.; Davy, S.K.

    2012-01-01

    The scleractinian finger coral Porites compressa is affected by the coral disease Porites bleaching with tissue loss (PBTL). This disease initially manifests as bleaching of the coenenchyme (tissue between polyps) while the polyps remain brown with eventual tissue loss and subsequent algal overgrowth of the bare skeleton. Histopathological investigation showed a loss of symbiont and melanin-containing granular cells which was more pronounced in the coenenchyme than the polyps. Cell counts confirmed a 65% reduction in symbiont density. Tissue loss was due to tissue fragmentation and necrosis in affected areas. In addition, a reduction in putative bacterial aggregate densities was found in diseased samples but no potential pathogens were observed.

  12. Performance of an Argentinian acid-activated bentonite in the bleaching of soybean oil

    Foletto E.L.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, a bentonite clay from Mendoza, Argentina was activated with H2SO4 (4 and 8 N at 90ºC for 2 and 3.5 hours. Under these conditions several cations were removed from the octahedral sheet (Mg, Al, and Fe and the DTA-TGA curves of the solids obtained after treatment were modified. Treatment time and acid concentration increased the degree of destruction of the bentonite structure. Activated samples were tested in order to verify their capacity to bleach soybean oil and were compared to a standard commercial bleaching clay. Treated samples are more efficient in bleaching than the standard.

  13. Influence of pH, bleaching agents, and acid etching on surface wear of bovine enamel

    Ana Flávia Soares

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Development of new materials for tooth bleaching justifies the need for studies to evaluate the changes in the enamel surface caused by different bleaching protocols. Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the bovine dental enamel wear in function of different bleaching gel protocols, acid etching and pH variation. Material and Methods Sixty fragments of bovine teeth were cut, obtaining a control and test areas. In the test area, one half received etching followed by a bleaching gel application, and the other half, only the bleaching gel. The fragments were randomly divided into six groups (n=10, each one received one bleaching session with five hydrogen peroxide gel applications of 8 min, activated with hybrid light, diode laser/blue LED (HL or diode laser/violet LED (VHL (experimental: Control (C; 35% Total Blanc Office (TBO35HL; 35% Lase Peroxide Sensy (LPS35HL; 25% Lase Peroxide Sensy II (LPS25HL; 15% Lase Peroxide Lite (LPL15HL; and 10% hydrogen peroxide (experimental (EXP10VHL. pH values were determined by a pHmeter at the initial and final time periods. Specimens were stored, subjected to simulated brushing cycles, and the superficial wear was determined (μm. ANOVA and Tukey´s tests were applied (α=0.05. Results The pH showed a slight decrease, except for Group LPL15HL. Group LPS25HL showed the highest degree of wear, with and without etching. Conclusion There was a decrease from the initial to the final pH. Different bleaching gels were able to increase the surface wear values after simulated brushing. Acid etching before bleaching increased surface wear values in all groups.

  14. Influence of pH, bleaching agents, and acid etching on surface wear of bovine enamel

    Soares, Ana Flávia; Bombonatti, Juliana Fraga Soares; Alencar, Marina Studart; Consolmagno, Elaine Cristina; Honório, Heitor Marques; Mondelli, Rafael Francisco Lia

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Development of new materials for tooth bleaching justifies the need for studies to evaluate the changes in the enamel surface caused by different bleaching protocols. Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the bovine dental enamel wear in function of different bleaching gel protocols, acid etching and pH variation. Material and Methods Sixty fragments of bovine teeth were cut, obtaining a control and test areas. In the test area, one half received etching followed by a bleaching gel application, and the other half, only the bleaching gel. The fragments were randomly divided into six groups (n=10), each one received one bleaching session with five hydrogen peroxide gel applications of 8 min, activated with hybrid light, diode laser/blue LED (HL) or diode laser/violet LED (VHL) (experimental): Control (C); 35% Total Blanc Office (TBO35HL); 35% Lase Peroxide Sensy (LPS35HL); 25% Lase Peroxide Sensy II (LPS25HL); 15% Lase Peroxide Lite (LPL15HL); and 10% hydrogen peroxide (experimental) (EXP10VHL). pH values were determined by a pHmeter at the initial and final time periods. Specimens were stored, subjected to simulated brushing cycles, and the superficial wear was determined (μm). ANOVA and Tukey´s tests were applied (α=0.05). Results The pH showed a slight decrease, except for Group LPL15HL. Group LPS25HL showed the highest degree of wear, with and without etching. Conclusion There was a decrease from the initial to the final pH. Different bleaching gels were able to increase the surface wear values after simulated brushing. Acid etching before bleaching increased surface wear values in all groups. PMID:27008254

  15. Influence of pH, bleaching agents, and acid etching on surface wear of bovine enamel.

    Soares, Ana Flávia; Bombonatti, Juliana Fraga Soares; Alencar, Marina Studart; Consolmagno, Elaine Cristina; Honório, Heitor Marques; Mondelli, Rafael Francisco Lia

    2016-02-01

    Development of new materials for tooth bleaching justifies the need for studies to evaluate the changes in the enamel surface caused by different bleaching protocols. Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the bovine dental enamel wear in function of different bleaching gel protocols, acid etching and pH variation. Material and Methods Sixty fragments of bovine teeth were cut, obtaining a control and test areas. In the test area, one half received etching followed by a bleaching gel application, and the other half, only the bleaching gel. The fragments were randomly divided into six groups (n=10), each one received one bleaching session with five hydrogen peroxide gel applications of 8 min, activated with hybrid light, diode laser/blue LED (HL) or diode laser/violet LED (VHL) (experimental): Control (C); 35% Total Blanc Office (TBO35HL); 35% Lase Peroxide Sensy (LPS35HL); 25% Lase Peroxide Sensy II (LPS25HL); 15% Lase Peroxide Lite (LPL15HL); and 10% hydrogen peroxide (experimental) (EXP10VHL). pH values were determined by a pHmeter at the initial and final time periods. Specimens were stored, subjected to simulated brushing cycles, and the superficial wear was determined (μm). ANOVA and Tukey´s tests were applied (α=0.05). Results The pH showed a slight decrease, except for Group LPL15HL. Group LPS25HL showed the highest degree of wear, with and without etching. Conclusion There was a decrease from the initial to the final pH. Different bleaching gels were able to increase the surface wear values after simulated brushing. Acid etching before bleaching increased surface wear values in all groups. PMID:27008254

  16. Improved microscopical detection of acid-fast bacilli by the modified bleach method in lymphnode aspirates

    Annam Vamseedhar

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To improve the smear microscopy for detection of acid-fast bacilli (AFB in fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC of lymph node using the bleach method and also to compare this with cytological diagnosis and the conventional Ziehl-Neelsen (ZN method. Study Design: In 99 consecutive patients with clinical suspicion of tuberculosis (TB presenting with lymphadenopathy, FNACs were performed. Smears from the aspirates were processed for routine cytology and the conventional ZN method. The remaining material in the needle hub and/or the syringe was used for the bleach method. The significance of the bleach method over the conventional ZN method and cytology was analyzed using the χ2 test. Results: Of 99 aspirates, 93 were studied and the remaining six were excluded from the study due to diagnosis of malignancy in 4.04% (4/6 and inadequate aspiration in 2.02% (2/6. Among the 93 aspirates, 33.33% (31/93 were positive for AFB on conventional ZN method, 41.94% (39/93 were indicative of TB on cytology and the smear positivity increased to 63.44% (59/93 on bleach method. Conclusion: The bleach method is simple, inexpensive and potent disinfectant, also limiting the risk of laboratory-acquired infections. The implementation of the bleach method clearly improves microscopic detection and can be a useful contribution to routine cytology.

  17. Effect of temperature and concentration on benzoyl peroxide bleaching efficacy and benzoic acid levels in whey protein concentrate.

    Smith, T J; Gerard, P D; Drake, M A

    2015-11-01

    Much of the fluid whey produced in the United States is a by-product of Cheddar cheese manufacture and must be bleached. Benzoyl peroxide (BP) is currently 1 of only 2 legal chemical bleaching agents for fluid whey in the United States, but benzoic acid is an unavoidable by-product of BP bleaching. Benzoyl peroxide is typically a powder, but new liquid BP dispersions are available. A greater understanding of the bleaching characteristics of BP is necessary. The objective of the study was to compare norbixin destruction, residual benzoic acid, and flavor differences between liquid whey and 80% whey protein concentrates (WPC80) bleached at different temperatures with 2 different benzoyl peroxides (soluble and insoluble). Two experiments were conducted in this study. For experiment 1, 3 factors (temperature, bleach type, bleach concentration) were evaluated for norbixin destruction using a response surface model-central composite design in liquid whey. For experiment 2, norbixin concentration, residual benzoic acid, and flavor differences were explored in WPC80 from whey bleached by the 2 commercially available BP (soluble and insoluble) at 5 mg/kg. In liquid whey, soluble BP bleached more norbixin than insoluble BP, especially at lower concentrations (5 and 10 mg/kg) at both cold (4°C) and hot (50°C) temperatures. The WPC80 from liquid whey bleached with BP at 50°C had lower norbixin concentration, benzoic acid levels, cardboard flavor, and aldehyde levels than WPC80 from liquid whey bleached with BP at 4°C. Regardless of temperature, soluble BP destroyed more norbixin at lower concentrations than insoluble BP. The WPC80 from soluble-BP-bleached wheys had lower cardboard flavor and lower aldehyde levels than WPC80 from insoluble-BP-bleached whey. This study suggests that new, soluble (liquid) BP can be used at lower concentrations than insoluble BP to achieve equivalent bleaching and that less residual benzoic acid remains in WPC80 powder from liquid whey

  18. SIMULTANEOUS DETERMINATION OF CHLORINE DIOXIDE AND HYPOCHLOROUS ACID IN BLEACHING SYSTEM

    Qiang Wang; Kefu Chen; Jun Li Mail; Jun Xu; Shanshan Liu Mail

    2011-01-01

    This study has demonstrated a rapid spectroscopic method for the determination of chlorine dioxide and hypochlorous acid concentrations in the pulp bleaching processes. It was found that chlorine dioxide and hypochlorous acid have an isosbestic wavelength of 295 nm. The soluble lignin in such a system is the main interference, but can be corrected by determining the absorbances at 295 nm, 380 nm, and 480 nm. Thus, based on the spectroscopic measurements at 295 nm (the isosbestic point wavelen...

  19. ISOLATION OF PECTIC ACIDS FROM BLEACHED TMP WATER AND AGGREGATION OF MODEL AND TMP PECTIC ACIDS BY CALCIUM

    Anna C. Sundberg

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Pectins are important structural elements in spruce fibres. Alkaline peroxide bleaching of spruce thermomechanical pulp (TMP causes degradation and demethylation of pectins, yielding high-charge-density pectic acids. The pectic acids in fibres contribute strongly to the negative fibre charge, and the dissolved pectic acids increase the cationic demand of bleached TMP water. In this study, a method to isolate pectic acids from peroxide-bleached TMP pulp water is presented. The pectic acids were isolated and purified in good yield using a polyacrylate resin to remove lignin, a cellulose filter to remove galactoglucomannans (GGM, and an anion exchange resin to separate pectic acids from neutral carbohydrates. Salts and residual low-molar-mass carbohydrates were further removed from the isolated pectic acids by dialysis. The isolated pectic acids (>80% purity had a low molar mass and a wide polydispersity (5.9 kDa, MW/MN 3.3. The aggregation and precipitation of the isolated pectic acids, as well as citrus fruit pectic acids with well-defined molar masses, by Ca2+-ions were studied. The molar mass of pectic acids was a key factor determining the precipitation of Ca2+-pectates. Pectic acids below 6 kDa were not precipitated by Ca2+, while higher molar masses led first to partial and then to complete precipitation. The precipitated Ca2+-pectates may impair paper machine runnability and paper quality.

  20. Gas Chromatography Analysis of Resin and Fatty Acids from Laboratory Generated Bleach Plant Effluents

    Chhaya Sharma; S. Mohanty; S. Kumar; N.J. Rao

    2007-01-01

    Laboratory generated spent bleached liquor from the chlorination, caustic extraction stage of mixed wood kraft pulp processing has been analyzed both qualitatively and quantitatively for various resin & fatty acids by using GC. A number of resin acids,saturated and unsaturated fatty acids, chloro fatty and resin acid have been detected and their concentrations are estimated. The results are compared with results on different agriculture residue/hardwood pulps, which were reported earlier. The concentrations of various compounds detected have also been compared with their reported LC50 values.

  1. Whiteness improvement of citric acid crosslinked cotton fabrics: H2O2 bleaching under alkaline condition.

    Tang, Peixin; Ji, Bolin; Sun, Gang

    2016-08-20

    Polycarboxylic acids have been employed as formaldehyde-free crosslinking agents in anti-wrinkle treatment for cotton fabrics. Cotton fabrics treated by citric acid (CA) catalyzed with effective catalysts have shown satisfactory anti-wrinkle properties. Meanwhile, CA is a natural-based and environmental friendly compound. However, the yellowing of CA treated fabrics is a stumbling block for its practical application. Due to the fact that CA firstly forms aconitic acid (AA) before forming anhydrides, the cause of the yellowing, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) bleaching was adopted to treat the CA treated fabrics in order to break the CC bond structure and reduce the yellow color but retaining the desired anti-wrinkle properties. Thermogravimetric analysis and Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy were employed to investigate the reactions. The results revealed that the H2O2 bleaching can effectively improve the whiteness and also maintain a good anti-wrinkle performance of the CA treated fabrics under an appropriate bleaching temperature and time. PMID:27178918

  2. IMPACT OF ACID WASHING AND CHELATION ON Mg(OH2-BASED HYDROGEN PEROXIDE BLEACHING OF MIXED HARDWOODS CMP AT A HIGH CONSISTENCY

    Somayeh Ghasemi

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The removal of transition metal ions is crucial for improving the efficiency of subsequent peroxide bleaching. Acid-washing and chelation have been proposed for such a purpose. However, their influences on the Mg(OH2-based peroxide bleaching of hardwood pulps at a high consistency have not been well documented in the literature. In this work, we studied the influence of acid-washing using sulfuric acid or chelation using diethylenetriaminepentaacetic (DTPA on the Mg(OH2- or NaOH-based hydrogen peroxide bleaching efficiency, effluent properties of bleaching filtrates, and paper properties. The results showed that for Mg(OH2-based peroxide bleaching, the pulp yield and water retention value of acid-washed pulp were higher than those of the chelated pulp; the chemical oxygen demand (COD and turbidity of the bleaching filtrates for the acid-washed pulp were lower than those of the chelated pulp. The bleached acid-washed pulp had lower strength properties than bleached chelated pulp did. Additionally, at a high pulp consistency (25%, the Mg(OH2-based process had a higher bleaching efficiency and superior bleaching effluent properties, but a lower strength properties, in comparison with the NaOH-based process.

  3. The Effect of Fiber Bleaching Treatment on the Properties of Poly(lactic acid)/Oil Palm Empty Fruit Bunch Fiber Composites

    Marwah Rayung; Nor Azowa Ibrahim; Norhazlin Zainuddin; Wan Zuhainis Saad; Nur Inani Abdul Razak; Buong Woei Chieng

    2014-01-01

    In this work, biodegradable composites from poly(lactic acid) (PLA) and oil palm empty fruit bunch (OPEFB) fiber were prepared by melt blending method. Prior to mixing, the fiber was modified through bleaching treatment using hydrogen peroxide. Bleached fiber composite showed an improvement in mechanical properties as compared to untreated fiber composite due to the enhanced fiber/matrix interfacial adhesion. Interestingly, fiber bleaching treatment also improved the physical appearance of th...

  4. Removal of hexenuronic acid by xylanase to reduce adsorbable organic halides formation in chlorine dioxide bleaching of bagasse pulp.

    Nie, Shuangxi; Wang, Shuangfei; Qin, Chengrong; Yao, Shuangquan; Ebonka, Johnbull Friday; Song, Xueping; Li, Kecheng

    2015-11-01

    Xylanase-aided chlorine dioxide bleaching of bagasse pulp was investigated. The pulp was pretreated with xylanase and followed a chlorine dioxide bleaching stage. The ATR-FTIR and XPS were employed to determine the surface chemistry of the control pulp, xylanase treated and chlorine dioxide treated pulps. The hexenuronic acid (HexA) could obviously be reduced after xylanase pretreatment, and the adsorbable organic halides (AOX) were reduced after chlorine dioxide bleaching. Compared to the control pulp, AOX could be reduced by 21.4-26.6% with xylanase treatment. Chlorine dioxide demand could be reduced by 12.5-22% to achieve the same brightness. The ATR-FTIR and XPS results showed that lignin and hemicellulose (mainly HexA) were the main source for AOX formation. Xylanase pretreatment could remove HexA and expose more lignin, which decreased the chlorine dioxide demand and thus reduced formation of AOX. PMID:26263004

  5. Bleach vs. Bacteria

    ... Articles | Inside Life Science Home Page Bleach vs. Bacteria By Sharon Reynolds Posted April 2, 2014 Your ... hypochlorous acid to help kill invading microbes, including bacteria. Researchers funded by the National Institutes of Health ...

  6. The Effect of Fiber Bleaching Treatment on the Properties of Poly(lactic acid/Oil Palm Empty Fruit Bunch Fiber Composites

    Marwah Rayung

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available In this work, biodegradable composites from poly(lactic acid (PLA and oil palm empty fruit bunch (OPEFB fiber were prepared by melt blending method. Prior to mixing, the fiber was modified through bleaching treatment using hydrogen peroxide. Bleached fiber composite showed an improvement in mechanical properties as compared to untreated fiber composite due to the enhanced fiber/matrix interfacial adhesion. Interestingly, fiber bleaching treatment also improved the physical appearance of the composite. The study was extended by blending the composites with commercially available masterbatch colorant.

  7. The effect of fiber bleaching treatment on the properties of poly(lactic acid)/oil palm empty fruit bunch fiber composites.

    Rayung, Marwah; Ibrahim, Nor Azowa; Zainuddin, Norhazlin; Saad, Wan Zuhainis; Razak, Nur Inani Abdul; Chieng, Buong Woei

    2014-01-01

    In this work, biodegradable composites from poly(lactic acid) (PLA) and oil palm empty fruit bunch (OPEFB) fiber were prepared by melt blending method. Prior to mixing, the fiber was modified through bleaching treatment using hydrogen peroxide. Bleached fiber composite showed an improvement in mechanical properties as compared to untreated fiber composite due to the enhanced fiber/matrix interfacial adhesion. Interestingly, fiber bleaching treatment also improved the physical appearance of the composite. The study was extended by blending the composites with commercially available masterbatch colorant. PMID:25153628

  8. The Effect of Fiber Bleaching Treatment on the Properties of Poly(lactic acid)/Oil Palm Empty Fruit Bunch Fiber Composites

    Rayung, Marwah; Ibrahim, Nor Azowa; Zainuddin, Norhazlin; Saad, Wan Zuhainis; Razak, Nur Inani Abdul; Chieng, Buong Woei

    2014-01-01

    In this work, biodegradable composites from poly(lactic acid) (PLA) and oil palm empty fruit bunch (OPEFB) fiber were prepared by melt blending method. Prior to mixing, the fiber was modified through bleaching treatment using hydrogen peroxide. Bleached fiber composite showed an improvement in mechanical properties as compared to untreated fiber composite due to the enhanced fiber/matrix interfacial adhesion. Interestingly, fiber bleaching treatment also improved the physical appearance of the composite. The study was extended by blending the composites with commercially available masterbatch colorant. PMID:25153628

  9. BLEACHING EUCALYPTUS PULPS WITH SHORT SEQUENCES

    Flaviana Reis Milagres

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Eucalyptus spp kraft pulp, due to its high content of hexenuronic acids, is quite easy to bleach. Therefore, investigations have been made attempting to decrease the number of stages in the bleaching process in order to minimize capital costs. This study focused on the evaluation of short ECF (Elemental Chlorine Free and TCF (Totally Chlorine Free sequences for bleaching oxygen delignified Eucalyptus spp kraft pulp to 90% ISO brightness: PMoDP (Molybdenum catalyzed acid peroxide, chlorine dioxide and hydrogen peroxide, PMoD/P (Molybdenum catalyzed acid peroxide, chlorine dioxide and hydrogen peroxide, without washing PMoD(PO (Molybdenum catalyzed acid peroxide, chlorine dioxide and pressurized peroxide, D(EPODP (chlorine dioxide, extraction oxidative with oxygen and peroxide, chlorine dioxide and hydrogen peroxide, PMoQ(PO (Molybdenum catalyzed acid peroxide, DTPA and pressurized peroxide, and XPMoQ(PO (Enzyme, molybdenum catalyzed acid peroxide, DTPA and pressurized peroxide. Uncommon pulp treatments, such as molybdenum catalyzed acid peroxide (PMo and xylanase (X bleaching stages, were used. Among the ECF alternatives, the two-stage PMoD/P sequence proved highly cost-effective without affecting pulp quality in relation to the traditional D(EPODP sequence and produced better quality effluent in relation to the reference. However, a four stage sequence, XPMoQ(PO, was required to achieve full brightness using the TCF technology. This sequence was highly cost-effective although it only produced pulp of acceptable quality.

  10. Coral Bleaching

    Brinch, Anna; Hemmingsen, Sofie K. Møhlenfeldt; Rosenquist, Camilla; Tangaa, Stine Rosendal

    2010-01-01

    This review scrutinises the different cellular mechanisms and environmental stressors that lead to bleaching and discuss the numerous effects of these. Coral bleaching is characterized by corals losing their symbiotic zooxanthellae. Different environmental stressors, e.g. elevated sea temperatures, irradiance, changing salinity and increasing atmospheric CO2 induce damage in multiple sites of the photosynthetic apparatus of the zooxanthellae, leading to bleaching. Reactive oxygen species ...

  11. Peroxy bleaches

    Carson, P.A. [Unilever Research, Port Sunlight Laboratory (United States) and Chemistry Department, University of Manchester, Institute of Science and Technology (United States)]. E-mail: pcarson2005@aol.com; Fairclough, C.S. [Unilever Research, Port Sunlight Laboratory (United States); Mauduit, C. [Chemistry Department, University of Manchester, Institute of Science and Technology (United States); Colsell, M. [Chemistry Department, University of Manchester, Institute of Science and Technology (United States)

    2006-08-25

    Fabric laundering is now a sophisticated chemical process involving a variety of operations including bleaching. The chemistry of peroxy bleaches is described including the use of novel organic compounds to provide effective bleaching at the lower temperatures of modern wash cycles. The instability of peroxy compounds is illustrated using cameo case histories to relate theory and practice. Techniques available for determining their thermochemistry are summarised. A model is provided for hazard and risk assessment of development projects in general (particularly those involving new molecules, processes or formulations) from ideas phase through exploratory laboratory investigations to pilot plant scale-up and eventual manufacture and commercial exploitation. This paper is a prelude to Part 2, which describes the determination of thermodynamic and kinetic properties of peroxy bleaches and discusses the implication of the results in terms of precautions for their safe storage and incorporation into detergent formulations during processing.

  12. Peroxy bleaches

    Fabric laundering is now a sophisticated chemical process involving a variety of operations including bleaching. The chemistry of peroxy bleaches is described including the use of novel organic compounds to provide effective bleaching at the lower temperatures of modern wash cycles. The instability of peroxy compounds is illustrated using cameo case histories to relate theory and practice. Techniques available for determining their thermochemistry are summarised. A model is provided for hazard and risk assessment of development projects in general (particularly those involving new molecules, processes or formulations) from ideas phase through exploratory laboratory investigations to pilot plant scale-up and eventual manufacture and commercial exploitation. This paper is a prelude to Part 2, which describes the determination of thermodynamic and kinetic properties of peroxy bleaches and discusses the implication of the results in terms of precautions for their safe storage and incorporation into detergent formulations during processing

  13. BLEACHING EUCALYPTUS PULPS WITH SHORT SEQUENCES

    Flaviana Reis Milagres; Jorge Luiz Colodette; Marcos Sousa Rabelo; Danila Morais de Carvalho

    2011-01-01

    Eucalyptus spp kraft pulp, due to its high content of hexenuronic acids, is quite easy to bleach. Therefore, investigations have been made attempting to decrease the number of stages in the bleaching process in order to minimize capital costs. This study focused on the evaluation of short ECF (Elemental Chlorine Free) and TCF (Totally Chlorine Free) sequences for bleaching oxygen delignified Eucalyptus spp kraft pulp to 90% ISO brightness: PMoDP (Molybdenum catalyzed acid peroxide, chlorine d...

  14. Influence of H2SO4 as Activator to ClO2 on the Bleaching Effects

    Xingxiang Ji; Jiachuan Chen; Guihua Yang,; Zhong Jian Tian

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we show that chlorine dioxide activated by 4% Hydrochloric Acid Solution (HCl) has the same bleaching effects as that by sulfuric acid (H2SO4). Chlorine dioxide is an important bleaching agent in ECF bleaching. Stable chlorine dioxide in conjunction with Hydrochloric Acid Solution (HCl) activation in a certain proportion can be applied in the process of pulp bleach with a bleaching result of environment friendly, positive brightness stability, low pollutant bleach and pulp brig...

  15. Docosahexaenoic acid affects arachidonic acid uptake in megakaryocytes

    Schick, P.K.; Webster, P.

    1987-05-01

    Dietary omega 3 fatty acids are thought to prevent atherosclerosis, possibly by modifying platelet (PT) function and arachidonic acid (20:4) metabolism. The study was designed to determine whether omega 3 fatty acids primarily affect 20:4 metabolism in megakaryocytes (MK), bone marrow precursors of PT, rather than in circulating PT. MK and PT were isolated from guinea pigs and incubated with (/sup 14/C)-20:4 (0.13uM). Docosahexaenoic acid (22:6) is a major omega 3 fatty acid in marine oils. The incubation of MK with 22:6 (0.1, 1.0 uM) resulted in the decrease of incorporation of (/sup 14/C)-20:4 into total MK phospholipids, 16% and 41% respectively. Alpha-linolenic acid (18:3), a major omega 3 fatty acid present in American diets, had no effect on 20:4 uptake in MK. 22:6 primarily affected the uptake of (/sup 14/C)-20:4 into phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) and phosphatidylserine (PS) in MK. In MK, 22:6 (0.1, 1.0 uM) caused a decrease of incorporation of (/sup 14/C)-20:4 into PE, 21% and 55% respectively; a decrease into PS, 16% and 48% respectively; but only a decrease of 4% and 18%, respectively, into phosphatidylcholine; and a decrease of 3% and 21% into phosphatidylinositol 22:6 (3.0 uM) had no effect on the uptake of AA into PT phospholipids. The study shows that 22:6 has a selective effect on AA uptake in MK and that the acylation or transacylation of PE and PS are primarily affected. 22:6 and other marine omega 3 fatty acids appear to primarily affect megakaryocytes which may result in the production of platelets with abnormal content and compartmentalization of AA.

  16. OZONE BLEACHING AT NEUTRAL PH – A NEW CONCEPT

    Fernando de Carvalho

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The effect of medium consistency ozone stage pH was evaluated for brown and oxygen delignified eucalyptus kraft pulp samples obtained from VCP - Luiz Antônio pulp mill. These samples were used as such or previously treated with the hot acid stage (A. The main objective of this study was to determine the viability of increasing the ozone stage pH aiming at decreasing bleaching variable costs. The ozone stage was studied in the pH range of 2.5-9.0, taking into account some important variables which affect ozone bleaching: (1 pulp kappa number entering the ozone stage, (2 reactivity of ozone towards lignin versus hexenuronic acids (HexA´s, (3 pulp treatments prior to ozone stage (acid hydrolysis, and (4 pulp treatments after the ozone stage (extraction or a chlorine dioxide stage.  Therefore, the impact of ozone stage pH was investigated in bleaching process such as Z/DEop vs AZ/DEop, Z/DEopD vs AZ/DEopD, Z/E vs AZ/E. The results were interpreted based on ozone stage efficiency and selectivity, and overall bleaching performance measured by the total bleaching chemical consumption required to achieve full brightness, pulp quality and environmental impact. It was concluded that the increase of ozone stage pH from 2.5 to 7.0 has a slightly negative impact on the efficiency and selectivity, measured after Z/DEop sequence, but this effect is not expressive in the end of Z/DEopD bleaching sequence. The increase of ozone stage pH from 2.5 to 7.0 in the sequence Z/DEopD is cost-effective at industrial level because it represents expressive reduction of sulphuric acid and caustic soda demand for pH control in the bleaching plant. These gain areas achieved without any significant changes in pulp quality and effluent load discharge. Nevertheless, the increase of ozone stage pH from 2.5 to 7.0 has a very high negative impact on the efficiency and selectivity for the Z/E and AZ/E processes and it is not recommended in such cases.

  17. Esthetic rehabilitation with tooth bleaching, enamel microabrasion, and direct adhesive restorations.

    Bezerra-Júnior, Douglas Machado; Silva, Luciana Mendonça; Martins, Leandro de Moura; Cohen-Carneiro, Flávia; Pontes, Danielson Guedes

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this case report is to report esthetic rehabilitation with combined tooth bleaching, enamel microabrasion, and anterior restoration replacement in a 26-year-old man. Clinical examination showed deficient restorations in the maxillary anterior teeth, significant discoloration of the maxillary left central incisor, and hypoplastic stains affecting the maxillary right lateral incisor. A radiograph of the left central incisor showed satisfactory endodontic treatment, allowing preparation for the walking bleach technique. For 3 weeks, 37% carbamide peroxide in the pulp chamber was renewed every week. In-office bleaching with 35% hydrogen peroxide was also performed on the maxillary teeth. After 21 days, all teeth had been bleached to shade A1. After bleaching was completed, enamel microabrasion of the maxillary right lateral incisor was conducted with 6% hydrochloric acid. In later sessions, microhybrid composite resin restorations were placed in all 4 maxillary incisors. A combination of dental bleaching techniques, enamel microabrasion, and resin restorations was a successful and conservative choice for reestablishing the natural appearance of discolored teeth, improving the self-esteem of the patient. PMID:26943091

  18. A utilização de perácidos na deslignificação e no branqueamento de polpas celulósicas The use of peracids in delignification and cellulose pulp bleaching

    Lilian Borges Brasileiro

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Peracids are strong oxidant species and their use is being largely studied in the delignification and cellulose pulp bleaching. Some of them has already an industrial application, specially in non-conventional bleaching sequences like ECF (Elemental chlorine free and TCF (Totally chlorine free. This review presents the main aspects of the structure, properties, preparation and reaction of peracids (peracetic acid, peroxymonosulfuric acid and their mixture with lignin, specially for peracetic acid. Information about bleaching and delignification of wood pulps with peracids and the factors affecting its efficiency are also presented.

  19. Study of Melanin Bleaching After Immunohistochemistry of Melanin-containing Tissues

    Shen, Hongwu; Wu, Wenqiao

    2015-01-01

    Melanin may interfere with immunohistochemical staining. The goal of this study was to investigate the effects of trichloroisocyanuric acid (TCCA) bleaching, potassium permanganate bleaching, and potassium dichromate bleaching on melanin, tissue antigen, and 3,3′-diaminobenzidine (DAB) using melanin-containing and melanin-free tissue samples. Our results demonstrated that all 3 bleaching methods efficiently bleached melanin and partially destroyed tissue antigen. In addition, potassium perman...

  20. Evaluation of peanut hulls as an alternative to bleaching clays

    Hassanein, M. M.M.; El- Shami, S. M.; Taha, F. S.

    2011-01-01

    Peanut hulls (PNH) were carbonized at different temperatures, times, and evaluated at different concentrations as an alternative to bleaching clays. Evaluation of bleached crude soybean oil with PNH was based on their delta free fatty acids, reduction in peroxide value (PV), reduction in phospholipids (PL) and bleachability. The performance of several commercially used bleaching clays was evaluated, for comparison. Mixtures were formulated including: PNH and Tonsil -N (TN), PNH and Fuller’s e...

  1. EFFECT OF BIRCH KRAFT PULP PRIMARY FINES ON BLEACHING AND SHEET PROPERTIES

    Sari Anneli Asikainen

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available By removing the primary fines from an oxygen-delignified mill birch pulp, a fiber fraction was obtained having low metals content and no extractives. After DEDeD bleaching the fiber fraction had somewhat higher brightness and better brightness stability than the birch pulp containing the primary fines. The fines fraction was enriched with lignin, extractives, xylan, and metals. Bleaching the fines fraction in a QQP sequence did not affect the extractives, whereas a ZeQP sequence clearly reduced the extractives content. In a biorefinery concept, the fines fraction could be utilized as a source of xylan, fatty acids, sterols, and betulinol. Another possibility is to use the fines fraction unbleached or separately bleached as a bonding material in various fiber furnishes.

  2. Use of Carbonized Seed Hulls as Alternative to Bleaching Clay During Miscella Bleaching of Oils

    Mona El- Hamidi; Taha, F. S.; Safinaz M. El- Shami; Hassanein, Minar M. M.

    2016-01-01

    Soybean oil (SBO) was miscella bleached in hexane using carbonized hulls of Jojoba (Jo), Jatrova (Ja), Peanuts (PN) and Pistachios (P) as alternatives to bleaching clays. Evaluation of bleached crude SBO with carbonized hulls was based on their delta-Free Fatty Acids (ΔFFA), reduction in Peroxide Value (PV), carotenoid content, color index and bleachability. Fuller’s Earth (FE) and Tonsil N (TN) were used for comparison with the carbonized hulls. Three oil: hexane ratios, 1: 0.5, 1:1 and 1:1....

  3. Layer-by-layer hyaluronic acid/chitosan polyelectrolyte coated mesoporous silica nanoparticles as pH-responsive nanocontainers for optical bleaching of cellulose fabrics.

    Yilmaz, M Deniz

    2016-08-01

    Polyelectrolyte multilayer (PEM) films composed of two natural polysaccharides (hyaluronic acid and chitosan) were deposited through layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly on top of biocompatible mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNPs). Polyelectrolyte multilayer coated mesoporous silica nanoparticles (PEM-MSNPs) were characterized by using attenuated total reflection-fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), nitrogen adsorption-desorption isotherms, UV-vis and fluorescence spectrophotometer. A commercially available and industrially used optical brightener, 4,4'-distyrylbiphenyl sulfonate sodium salt (CBSX) was loaded into nanocontainers (CBSX@PEM-MSNPs) to evaluate their use for the pH-sensitive release. The controlled release of CBSX from nanocontainers in response to pH is monitored by using UV-vis and fluorescence spectrophotometer in water and the almost 100% of encapsulated CBSX is released within 2h at pH 7. The increase in both whiteness and total color change at pH 7 on a cellulose fabric demonstrates the great potential of nanocontainers as pH-sensitive whitening agents for optical bleaching of cellulose fabrics. PMID:27112863

  4. Adsorption and photocatalytic and photosensitised bleaching of acid orange 7 on multilayer mesoporous films of TiO2

    Mills, A.; O´Rourke, Ch.; Kalousek, Vít; Rathouský, Jiří

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 211, SI (2012), s. 182-187. ISSN 0304-3894 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : acid orange 7 * photocatalysis * titania Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.925, year: 2012

  5. Thermoluminescence emission spectra and optical bleaching of oligoclase

    Thermoluminescence (TL) spectra of oligoclase samples have been recorded in the temperature range from 300 to 700 K and the wavelength range from 300 to 850 nm. Like other feldspars, oligoclase produces blue (peaking at 460 nm) and red (peaking at 765 nm) emission bands. The maximum of the red emission occurs 20 K lower than that of the blue band. Optical bleaching was performed at wavelengths varying from 360 to 800 nm. Bleaching of artificially irradiated oligoclase causes a decrease of the TL signal. The bleaching efficiency increases with decreasing wavelength. Bleaching does not only influence the height of the glow curve but also the shape. An interesting observation is that the ratio of the blue and red band intensities is not affected by a bleaching procedure. No evidence has been found that bleaching influences the shape of the emission spectra. The correlation between the blue and red bands is discussed. (Author)

  6. Kraft pulp bleaching with molybdenum activated acid peroxide (P{sub Mo} stage); Branqueamento de polpa celulosica kraft de eucalipto com peroxido acido ativado por molibdenio

    Rabelo, Marcos Sousa [Servico Nacional de Aprendizagem Industrial (SENAI), Lauro de Freitas, BA (Brazil). Dept. Regional da Bahia; Silva, Vanessa Lopes; Barros, Denise Pires de; Colodette, Jorge Luiz [Universidade Federal de Vicosa (UFV), MG (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Florestal; Sacon, Vera Maria; Silva, Marcelo Rodrigues da [Votorantim Celulose e Papel, Jacarei, SP (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    Optimum conditions to run the P{sub Mo} stage for bleaching eucalyptus kraft pulp were 90 deg C, pH 3.5, 2 h, 0.1 kg/t Mo and 5 kg/t H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. The P{sub Mo} stage efficiency increased with decreasing pH (1.5-5.5) and increasing temperature (75-90 deg C), time (2-4 h), and hydrogen peroxide (3-10 kg/t) and molybdenum concentration (0.1-0.4 kg/t). The implementation of the P{sub Mo} stage, as replacement for the A stage, decreased total active chlorine demand of the OAZDP sequence by 6 kg/t to reach 90% ISO, both in laboratory and mill scale. Such practice resulted in decreased bleaching chemical costs to produce fully bleached pulp of 90% ISO. (author)

  7. Factors Affecting the Relative Efficiency of General Acid Catalysis

    Kwan, Eugene E.

    2005-01-01

    A simple framework for evaluating experimental kinetic data to provide support for Specific Acid Catalysis (SAC) and General Acid Catalysis (GAC) is described based on the factors affecting their relative efficiency. Observations reveal that increasing the SAC-to-GAC rate constant ratio reduces the effective pH range for GAC.

  8. Patterns of coral bleaching: Modeling the adaptive bleaching hypothesis

    Ware, J.R.; Fautin, D.G.; Buddemeier, R.W.

    1996-01-01

    Bleaching - the loss of symbiotic dinoflagellates (zooxanthellae) from animals normally possessing them - can be induced by a variety of stresses, of which temperature has received the most attention. Bleaching is generally considered detrimental, but Buddemeier and Fautin have proposed that bleaching is also adaptive, providing an opportunity for recombining hosts with alternative algal types to form symbioses that might be better adapted to altered circumstances. Our mathematical model of this "adaptive bleaching hypothesis" provides insight into how animal-algae symbioses might react under various circumstances. It emulates many aspects of the coral bleaching phenomenon including: corals bleaching in response to a temperature only slightly greater than their average local maximum temperature; background bleaching; bleaching events being followed by bleaching of lesser magnitude in the subsequent one to several years; higher thermal tolerance of corals subject to environmental variability compared with those living under more constant conditions; patchiness in bleaching; and bleaching at temperatures that had not previously resulted in bleaching. ?? 1996 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Ocean Acidification: A Major Driver of Coral Bleaching in the 21st Century?

    Anthony, K.; Eakin, M. C.; Cao, L.; Caldeira, K.; Hoegh-Guldberg, O.

    2009-05-01

    Heat stress long been known to drive patterns of coral bleaching. Recently, however, it was discovered that ocean acidification can drive coral bleaching independently of temperature. This raises the question: how important will acidification be in driving coral bleaching under climate change? Here, we develop and apply a model that accounts for both thermal stress and ocean acidification in the coral bleaching response. Our analyses, which combine experimental bleaching data under manipulated ocean chemistry and warming with projections of CO2 and SST based on global circulation models, show that ocean acidification will become a key driver of future mass bleaching events within a few decades. Our findings, based on highly conservative assumptions, reveal that coral bleaching alert systems based on warming alone could underestimate coral bleaching by up to 50% during the 21st century. This is a striking result that will affect coral reef management strategies worldwide and has policy implications relating to global efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

  10. Bleached dissolving pulps applying laccase treatments

    Quintana, Elisabet; Valls Vidal, Cristina; Roncero Vivero, María Blanca

    2012-01-01

    A biobleaching sequence, using a laccase enzyme (Trametes Villosa) in combination with different mediators, was applied to softwood dissolving cellulose in order to study its bleaching efficiency and its potential in terms of kappa number, ISO brightness and viscosity. The tested mediators were classified as synthetic compounds such as HBT (1-hydroxybenzotriazole) and VA (violuric acid), and as natural compounds such as SA (syringaldehyde) and pCA (p-coumaric acid). The influence of the enzym...

  11. Bleach Neutralizes Mold Allergens

    Science Teacher, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Researchers at National Jewish Medical and Research Center have demonstrated that dilute bleach not only kills common household mold, but may also neutralize the mold allergens that cause most mold-related health complaints. The study, published in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, is the first to test the effect on allergic…

  12. Enzymes improve ECF bleaching of pulp

    Lachenal, D.

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available The delignification efficiency of different laccase enzymes was examined on the eucalyptus Kraft pulp. The laccase enzyme from Trametes versicolor showing the highest delignification efficiency was selected and used in the elemental chlorine-free bleaching sequence for improving the pulp bleachability. An appreciable reduction in chlorine dioxide consumption was also obtained. Further reduction in chlorine dioxide consumption was obtained when the same laccase treated pulp was subjected to an acid treatment after the extraction stage followed by the DEPD sequence. Elemental-chlorine free bleaching was also performed using the xylanase-laccase treated pulp. Xylanase treatment was incorporated to the laccase mediator system in the elemental-chlorine free bleaching both sequentially and simultaneously. The bleaching sequence DEPD followed and in both the cases, the reduction in chlorine dioxide consumption was greater in comparison to the control. The chlorine dioxide consumption was reduced further when xylanase-laccase treated pulp was given an additional acid treatment. The final pulp properties of the treated pulps were comparable to the control pulp.

  13. BLEACHING NEPTUNE BALLS

    BONET Maria Angeles

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Posidonia Oceanic is a seaweed from Mediterranean Sea and it is more concentrated at the Balerian SEA. This implies the Valencian Community also. It forms vaste underwater meadows in the sea and are part of the Mediterranean ecosystem. It is a sea-grass specie with fruits and flowers. Leaves are ribbon-like and they grow in winter and at the end of summer some of them are separated and arrive to some sea line. Fuit is separated and can floate, it is known as “the olive of the sea” mainly in Italy, or as the Neptune Balls. As it can be used in different fields, it is is being studied in order ro have the precitice tests. Some authors have reported the manufacturing of fully bio-based comites with a gluten matrix by hot-press molding. And it has been considered as an effective insulator for building industry or even though to determine the presence of mercure in the Mediterranean sea some years ago. As many applications can be designed from that fibers, it has been considered to be bleached in order to used them in fashionable products. Consequently, its original brown color is not the most suitable one and it should be bleached as many other cellulosic fibers. The aim of this paper is to bleache neptune balls however, the inner fibers were not accessible at all and it implied not to bleach the inner fibers in the neptune ball. Further studiesd will consider bleaching the individualized fibers.

  14. Influence of H2SO4 as Activator to ClO2 on the Bleaching Effects

    Xingxiang Ji

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we show that chlorine dioxide activated by 4% Hydrochloric Acid Solution (HCl has the same bleaching effects as that by sulfuric acid (H2SO4. Chlorine dioxide is an important bleaching agent in ECF bleaching. Stable chlorine dioxide in conjunction with Hydrochloric Acid Solution (HCl activation in a certain proportion can be applied in the process of pulp bleach with a bleaching result of environment friendly, positive brightness stability, low pollutant bleach and pulp brightness stability, not easy to reverse. By experiment of OD, ODED, ODQP bleach Triploid of Populus Tomentos with stable chlorine dioxide activated by sulfuric acid (H2SO4. Moreover, the result of the experiment can prove that principle of activation of HCl to ClO2 is similar to H2SO4 to ClO2, that is, to provide an acid environment for ClO2.

  15. Effect of bleaching on the microhardness of tooth-colored restorative materials

    Abdolrahim Davari

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available   Background and Aims: Bleaching agents not only affect the tooth structure, but also may alter the properties of restorative materials. The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of different bleaching regimens on the microhardness of four tooth-colored restorative materials.   Materials and Methods: Eighty specimens of four restorative materials (Microhybrid resin composite (Z250 (3M, ESPE, nanohybrid composite Z350 (3M, ESPE, packable composite P60 (3M, ESPE, and resin modified glass ionomer Vitremer (3M, ESPE were fabricated and were polished after 24 h with Soflex discs (3M,ESPE. Then the specimens were divided into two groups: In office bleach group, 40 specimens (10 of each restorative material were bleached with hydrogen peroxide 37.5% for 30 min in two sessions with 7 days interval. In home bleaching group, 40 specimens were bleached with carbamid peroxide 22%, 6 h a day for 14 days. Vickers microhardness test were done before and after bleaching (baseline. Finally data were evaluated using analysis of Variance.   Results: Two bleaching regimens were significantly decreased the microhardness values. In Z250 resin composite, the microhardness values before and after bleaching were 95.30 and 92.67 kg/mm2, respectively. for office bleaching (P=0.011 and 95.38 and 92.39 kg/mm2 for home bleaching (P<0.001. In Z350 resin composite, the microhardness values before and after bleaching were 98.29 and 92.41 kg/mm2, for office bleaching (P<0.001 and 97.35 and 93.44 kg/mm2 for home bleaching (P<0.001 respectively. In P60 resin composite, the microhardness values before and after bleaching were 103.10 and 96.16 kg/mm2, respectively. for office bleaching (P=0.045 and 102.61 and 98.16 kg/mm2 for home bleaching (P=0.001. In resin modified glass ionomer (Vitremer, the microhardness values before and after bleaching were 56.79 and 49.41 kg/mm2, respectively. for office bleaching (P=0.004 and 54.17 and 46.50 kg/mm2 for home bleaching (P

  16. Coral bleaching response index: a new tool to standardize and compare susceptibility to thermal bleaching.

    Swain, Timothy D; Vega-Perkins, Jesse B; Oestreich, William K; Triebold, Conrad; DuBois, Emily; Henss, Jillian; Baird, Andrew; Siple, Margaret; Backman, Vadim; Marcelino, Luisa

    2016-07-01

    As coral bleaching events become more frequent and intense, our ability to predict and mitigate future events depends upon our capacity to interpret patterns within previous episodes. Responses to thermal stress vary among coral species; however the diversity of coral assemblages, environmental conditions, assessment protocols, and severity criteria applied in the global effort to document bleaching patterns creates challenges for the development of a systemic metric of taxon-specific response. Here, we describe and validate a novel framework to standardize bleaching response records and estimate their measurement uncertainties. Taxon-specific bleaching and mortality records (2036) of 374 coral taxa (during 1982-2006) at 316 sites were standardized to average percent tissue area affected and a taxon-specific bleaching response index (taxon-BRI) was calculated by averaging taxon-specific response over all sites where a taxon was present. Differential bleaching among corals was widely variable (mean taxon-BRI = 25.06 ± 18.44%, ±SE). Coral response may differ because holobionts are biologically different (intrinsic factors), they were exposed to different environmental conditions (extrinsic factors), or inconsistencies in reporting (measurement uncertainty). We found that both extrinsic and intrinsic factors have comparable influence within a given site and event (60% and 40% of bleaching response variance of all records explained, respectively). However, when responses of individual taxa are averaged across sites to obtain taxon-BRI, differential response was primarily driven by intrinsic differences among taxa (65% of taxon-BRI variance explained), not conditions across sites (6% explained), nor measurement uncertainty (29% explained). Thus, taxon-BRI is a robust metric of intrinsic susceptibility of coral taxa. Taxon-BRI provides a broadly applicable framework for standardization and error estimation for disparate historical records and collection of novel

  17. Reef fishes can recognize bleached habitat during settlement: sea anemone bleaching alters anemonefish host selection.

    Scott, Anna; Dixson, Danielle L

    2016-05-25

    Understanding how bleaching impacts the settlement of symbiotic habitat specialists and whether there is flexibility in settlement choices with regard to habitat quality is essential given our changing climate. We used five anemonefishes (Amphiprion clarkii, Amphiprion latezonatus, Amphiprion ocellaris, Amphiprion percula and Premnas biaculeatus) and three host sea anemones (Entacmaea quadricolor, Heteractis crispa and Heteractis magnifica) in paired-choice flume experiments to determine whether habitat naive juveniles have the olfactory capabilities to distinguish between unbleached and bleached hosts, and how this may affect settlement decisions. All anemonefishes were able to distinguish between bleached and unbleached hosts, and responded only to chemical cues from species-specific host anemones irrespective of health status, indicating a lack of flexibility in host use. While bleached hosts were selected as habitat, this occurred only when unbleached options were unavailable, with the exception of A. latezonatus, which showed strong preferences for H. crispa regardless of health. This study highlights the potential deleterious indirect impacts of declining habitat quality during larval settlement in habitat specialists, which could be important in the field, given that bleaching events are becoming increasingly common. PMID:27226472

  18. Mill Designed Bio bleaching Technologies

    Institute of Paper Science Technology

    2004-01-30

    A key finding of this research program was that Laccase Mediator Systems (LMS) treatments on high-kappa kraft could be successfully accomplished providing substantial delignification (i.e., > 50%) without detrimental impact on viscosity and significantly improved yield properties. The efficiency of the LMS was evident since most of the lignin from the pulp was removed in less than one hour at 45 degrees C. Of the mediators investigated, violuric acid was the most effective vis-a-vis delignification. A comparative study between oxygen delignification and violuric acid revealed that under relatively mild conditions, a single or a double LMS{sub VA} treatment is comparable to a single or a double O stage. Of great notability was the retention of end viscosity of LMS{sub VA} treated pulps with respect to the end viscosity of oxygen treated pulps. These pulps could then be bleached to full brightness values employing conventional ECF bleaching technologies and the final pulp physical properties were equal and/or better than those bleached in a conventional ECF manner employing an aggressively O or OO stage initially. Spectral analyses of residual lignins isolated after LMS treated high-kappa kraft pulps revealed that similar to HBT, VA and NHA preferentially attack phenolic lignin moieties. In addition, a substantial decrease in aliphatic hydroxyl groups was also noted, suggesting side chain oxidation. In all cases, an increase in carboxylic acid was observed. Of notable importance was the different selectivity of NHA, VA and HBT towards lignin functional groups, despite the common N-OH moiety. C-5 condensed phenolic lignin groups were overall resistant to an LMS{sub NHA, HBT} treatments but to a lesser extent to an LMS{sub VA}. The inactiveness of these condensed lignin moieties was not observed when low-kappa kraft pulps were biobleached, suggesting that the LMS chemistry is influenced by the extent of delignification. We have also demonstrated that the current

  19. Evaluation of peanut hulls as an alternative to bleaching clays

    Hassanein, M. M.; El-Shami, S. M.; Taha, F. S.

    2011-07-01

    Peanut hulls (PNH) were carbonized at different temperatures, times, and evaluated at different concentrations as an alternative to bleaching clays. Evaluation of bleached crude soybean oil with PNH was based on their delta free fatty acids, reduction in peroxide value (PV), reduction in phospholipids (PL) and bleachability. The performance of several commercially used bleaching clays was evaluated, for comparison. Mixtures were formulated including: PNH and Tonsil -N (TN), PNH and Fuller's earth (FE) and PNH and O-passive (OP) and examined. The oxidative stability of oils was determined. Results for the investigated commercial bleaching clays revealed: TN > FE > F > TF > OP. Highest reduction in PV and PL, and highest bleachability were achieved for soybean oil bleached with 2% PNH carbonized at 500 degree centigrade for 30 min (PNH). Mixtures of PNH with the three chosen bleaching clays indicated that 1PNH : 2TN gave the highest bleachability. CSO was miscella bleached in hexane using PNH and resulted in an appreciable improvement in all oil characteristics, especially in bleachability. Oxidative stability of oils was in the following order: TN > control > FE > PNH with Induction period values of 23.1 > 6.43 > 5.73 > 2.85 h, respectively. (Author) 20 refs.

  20. STUDY ON THE EFFECTS OF ACID ETCHING ON AFFECTED ENAMEL

    Simona Stoleriu

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study was to establish and compare the effects of ortophosphoric and hydrochloric acids on the enamel affected by incipient carious lesions with different evolution. Materials and method. 20 teeth with acute and chronic non-cavitary carious lesions were considered for the study. The teeth were sectioned in two halves through the middle of the non-cavitary lesions. The halves of 5 white spot-type lesions and of 5 brown spot-type ones were analyzed as to their surface roughness, on an atomic force microscope (AFM. 5 halves with white spot-type lesions and 5 halves with brown spot-type ones were subjected to acid etching with 37% ortophosphoric acid (Scotchbond etchant gel, 3M ESPE, and an equal number of samples was subjected to the action of 15% hydrochloric acid (ICON-etch, DMG Dental Products Ltd for 2 min, then washed with water and analyzed by AFM. Results. The initial surface roughness of the enamel was higher in the white spot–type carious lesions, comparatively with the brown spot-type ones. For both types of carious non-cavitary lesions, acid etching with phosphoric and hydrochloric acid significantly increased the surface roughness of the enamel, comparatively with the status of the enamel surface prior to etching. The hydrochloric acid led to a surface roughness significantly higher than in the case of ortophosphoric acid, in both acute and chronic non-cavitary carious lesions. The roughness values obtained through etching with ortophosphoric and hydrochloric acid were higher in the white spot-type carious lesions, comparatively with the brown spot-type ones. Conclusions. Both the 37% ortophosphoric acid and the 15% hydrochloric acid determined a significantly higher surface roughness of the enamel affected by acute and chronic non-cavitary carious lesions. The surface condition of the brown spot-type carious lesions was less significantly modified, comparatively with that of the white spot-type lesions, by the

  1. Augmenting acid with affective details to assess credibility

    Roland Fleck

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available There is a need within the criminal justice systems of many countries to create a valid and applicable system of investigative interviewing and credibility assessment. The present study assesses the general validity one such system, called Assessment Criteria Indicative of Deception (ACID. ACID comprises interviewing strategies that facilitate the detection of deception and content criteria that highlight differences in verbal behavior. Sixty university undergraduates performed a staged theft under time pressure and with incentives designed to increase external validity. The participants were interviewed and assessed using the ACID procedure. Half of them were instructed to answer honestly and the other half to deny his/her participation in the theft. Results showed that honest statements were longer, more vividly detailed, and more spontaneously structured than deceptive statements. Also, the addition of affective details as a dependent measure significantly improved the ACID system. Overall, 48 of 60 statements were accurately classified (26 of 30 honest statements and 22 of 30 deceptive statements. The ACID procedure was effective and benefited from the addition of affective details. The strengths and weaknesses of this study are discussed in light of basic research into deception and potential forensic application.

  2. Mineral loss and color change of enamel after bleaching and staining solutions combination.

    de Araújo, Larissa Sgarbosa Napoleão; dos Santos, Paulo Henrique; Anchieta, Rodolfo Bruniera; Catelan, Anderson; Fraga Briso, André Luiz; Fraga Zaze, Ana Carolina Soares; Sundfeld, Renato Herman

    2013-10-01

    Pigments of food and beverages could affect dental bleaching efficacy. The aim of this investigation was to evaluate color change and mineral loss of tooth enamel as well as the influence of staining solutions normally used by adolescent patients undergoing home bleaching. Initial hardness and baseline color were measured on enamel blocks. Specimens were divided into five groups (n=5): G1 (control) specimens were kept in artificial saliva throughout the experiment (3 weeks); G2 enamel was exposed to 10% carbamide peroxide for 6 h daily, and after this period, the teeth were cleaned and stored in artificial saliva until the next bleaching session; and G3, G4, and G5 received the same treatments as G2, but after bleaching, they were stored for 1 h in cola soft drink, melted chocolate, or red wine, respectively. Mineral loss was obtained by the percentage of hardness reduction, and color change was determined by the difference between the data obtained before and after treatments. Data were subjected to analysis of variance and Fisher's test (α=0.05). G3 and G5 showed higher mineral loss (92.96 ± 5.50 and 94.46 ± 1.00, respectively) compared to the other groups (p ≤ 0.05). G5 showed high-color change (9.34 ± 2.90), whereas G1 presented lower color change (2.22 ± 0.44) (p ≤ 0.05). Acidic drinks cause mineral loss of the enamel, which could modify the surface and reduce staining resistance after bleaching. PMID:24165745

  3. Biomass pretreatment affects Ustilago maydis in producing itaconic acid

    Klement Tobias

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the last years, the biotechnological production of platform chemicals for fuel components has become a major focus of interest. Although ligno-cellulosic material is considered as suitable feedstock, the almost inevitable pretreatment of this recalcitrant material may interfere with the subsequent fermentation steps. In this study, the fungus Ustilago maydis was used to produce itaconic acid as platform chemical for the synthesis of potential biofuels such as 3-methyltetrahydrofuran. No studies, however, have investigated how pretreatment of ligno-cellulosic biomass precisely influences the subsequent fermentation by U. maydis. Thus, this current study aims to first characterize U. maydis in shake flasks and then to evaluate the influence of three exemplary pretreatment methods on the cultivation and itaconic acid production of this fungus. Cellulose enzymatically hydrolysed in seawater and salt-assisted organic-acid catalysed cellulose were investigated as substrates. Lastly, hydrolysed hemicellulose from fractionated beech wood was applied as substrate. Results U. maydis was characterized on shake flask level regarding its itaconic acid production on glucose. Nitrogen limitation was shown to be a crucial condition for the production of itaconic acid. For itaconic acid concentrations above 25 g/L, a significant product inhibition was observed. Performing experiments that simulated influences of possible pretreatment methods, U. maydis was only slightly affected by high osmolarities up to 3.5 osmol/L as well as of 0.1 M oxalic acid. The production of itaconic acid was achieved on pretreated cellulose in seawater and on the hydrolysed hemicellulosic fraction of pretreated beech wood. Conclusion The fungus U. maydis is a promising producer of itaconic acid, since it grows as single cells (yeast-like in submerged cultivations and it is extremely robust in high osmotic media and real seawater. Moreover, U. maydis can grow on

  4. ECF AND TCF BLEACHING OF SECONDARY FIBER PULP

    Gustavo Ventorim

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study, ECF and TCF bleaching processes were evaluated for the bleaching of a deinked mixed office waste (MOW pulp sample produced in a pilot plant. The sample was bleached by all processes to a target brightness of 78 % ISO minimum. The results were interpreted on the basis of chemical cost to reach the target brightness, bleaching yield and bleached pulp quality as measured by viscosity, fluorescence and b* color coordinate. Among the ECF sequences, the mosattractive was the DEDD which showed the lowest chemical cost and produced bleached pulp of high quality as measured by viscosity, fluorescence and b* coordinate. The best TCF sequence with ozone was the Q(PO(ZQ(PO which resulted in very high brightness ceiling. This sequence decreased moderately the pulp b* coordinate and viscosity and slightly its fluorescence. Among the TCF sequences without ozone the Q(POQ(PO was the most effective but showed poor flexibility with regard to brightness ceiling. This sequence had little effect on pulp viscosity, fluorescence and b* coordinate. For all three  bleaching processes, it was determined that process yield is negatively affected by hot alkaline stages such as O, P and (PO.

  5. Factors Affecting Sensitivity of Variable Charge Soils to Acid Rain

    WANGJING-HUA

    1995-01-01

    The sensitivity of a large number of variable charge soils to acid rain was evaluated through examining pH-H2SO4 input curves.Two derivative parameters,the consumption of hydrogen ions by the soil and the acidtolerant limit as defined as the quantity of sulfuric acid required to bring the soil to pH 3.5 in a 0.001mol L-1 Ca(NO3)2 solution,were used.The sensitivity of variable charge soils was higher than that of constant charge soils,due to the predominance of kaolinite in clay mineralogical composition.Among these soils the sensitivity was generally of the order lateritic red soil>red soil> latosol.For a given type of soil within the same region the sensitivity was affected by parent material,due to differences in clay minerals and texture.The sensitivity of surface soil may be lower or higher than that of subsiol,depending on whether organic matter or texture plays the dominant role in determining the buffering capacity.Paddy soils consumed more acid within lower range of acid input when compared with upland soils,due to the presence of more exchangeable bases,but consumed less acid within higher acid input range,caused by the decrease in clay content.

  6. RESPONSE SURFACE METHODOLOGY APPROACH FOR OPTIMIZATION OF FLAX SEED OIL BLEACHING PROCESS

    Miroslav Ondrejovič

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Flax seed is an important source of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids essential for human physiology. For low oxidation stability, specific taste and concomitant color compounds this oil is poorly applicable as nutraceutical additive. The aim of this study was optimization of flax seed oil bleaching. The optimal conditions for the bleaching process were determined using response surface methodology. A central composite design was used to investigate the effects of three independent variables, namely solid to liquid ratio, temperature and time, to output parameters of the bleaching process such as crude oil color expressed as optical density at 490 nm, acid and peroxide value. Calculated optimal conditions for the bleaching, expressed by the optical density of the oil were as follows: temperature 50°C, bleaching time 77 minutes and solid-liquid ratio 56 g of bleaching agent to 1 liter of oil.

  7. Evaluation of bleach-sedimentation for sterilising and concentrating Mycobacterium tuberculosis in sputum specimens

    Valencia Teresa

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bleach-sedimentation may improve microscopy for diagnosing tuberculosis by sterilising sputum and concentrating Mycobacterium tuberculosis. We studied gravity bleach-sedimentation effects on safety, sensitivity, speed and reliability of smear-microscopy. Methods This blinded, controlled study used sputum specimens (n = 72 from tuberculosis patients. Bleach concentrations and exposure times required to sterilise sputum (n = 31 were determined. In the light of these results, the performance of 5 gravity bleach-sedimentation techniques that sterilise sputum specimens (n = 16 were compared. The best-performing of these bleach-sedimentation techniques involved adding 1 volume of 5% bleach to 1 volume of sputum, shaking for 10-minutes, diluting in 8 volumes distilled water and sedimenting overnight before microscopy. This technique was further evaluated by comparing numbers of visible acid-fast bacilli, slide-reading speed and reliability for triplicate smears before versus after bleach-sedimentation of sputum specimens (n = 25. Triplicate smears were made to increase precision and were stained using the Ziehl-Neelsen method. Results M. tuberculosis in sputum was successfully sterilised by adding equal volumes of 15% bleach for 1-minute, 6% for 5-minutes or 3% for 20-minutes. Bleach-sedimentation significantly decreased the number of acid-fast bacilli visualised compared with conventional smears (geometric mean of acid-fast bacilli per 100 microscopy fields 166, 95%CI 68-406, versus 346, 95%CI 139-862, respectively; p = 0.02. Bleach-sedimentation diluted paucibacillary specimens less than specimens with higher concentrations of visible acid-fast bacilli (p = 0.02. Smears made from bleach-sedimented sputum were read more rapidly than conventional smears (9.6 versus 11.2 minutes, respectively, p = 0.03. Counting conventional acid-fast bacilli had high reliability (inter-observer agreement, r = 0.991 that was significantly reduced (p

  8. HE EFFECT OF TRANSITION METAL IONS-IRON ON HYDROGEN PEROXIDE BLEACHING

    Yumeng Zhao; Shuhui Yang; Liang Sheng; Yonghao Ni

    2004-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide bleaching has been extensively used in high-yield pulp bleaching. Unfortunately,hydrogen peroxide can be decomposed under alkaline condition, especially when transition metal ions exit. Experiments show that the valence of transition metal ion is also responsible for the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide.Iron ions are present in two oxidation states, Fe2+ and Fe3+. They are both catalytically active to hydrogen peroxide decomposition. Because Fe3+ is brown, it can affect the brightness of pulp directly, it can also combine with phenol, forming complexes which not only are stable structures and are difficult to be removed from pulp, but also significantly affect the brightness of pulp because of their color.Sodium silicate and magnesium sulfate, when used together, can greatly decrease hydrogen peroxide decomposition. The optimum dosage of sodium silicate is about 0.1% (on solution) for Fe2+ and 0.25% (on solution) for Fe3+. Adding chelants such as DTPA or EDTA with stabilizers simultaneously can obviously improve pulp brightness. For iron ions, the chelate effect of DTPA is better than that of EDTA.Under acidic conditions, sodium hyposulfite and cellulose can reduce Fe3+ to Fe2+ effectively, and pulp brightness is improved greatly. Adding sodium thiosulfate simultaneously with magnesium sulfate,sodium silicate, and DTPA to alkaline peroxide solution can result in higher brightness of pulp.pH is a key parameter during hydrogen peroxide bleaching, the optimum pH value should be 10.5-12.

  9. The role of bound chlorine in the brightness reversion of bleached hardwood kraft pulp

    Kátia Maria Morais Eiras; Jorge Luiz Colodette; Vanessa Lopes Silva

    2009-01-01

    Our previous paper showed fragmentary evidence that pulp brightness reversion may be negatively affected by its organically bound chlorine (OX) content. A thorough investigation on eucalyptus kraft pulp led to the conclusion that OX increases reversion of certain pulps but this trend is not universal. Alkaline bleaching stages decrease reversion regardless of pulp OX content. Pulps bleached with high temperature chlorine dioxide revert less than those bleached with conventional chlorine dioxi...

  10. Major hydrogeochemical processes in an Acid Mine Drainage affected estuary

    Highlights: • Mixing of acid riverine water with alkaline seawater was studied in an estuary. • Combination of data and geochemical tools allowed modeling the water mixing. • The main geochemical processes were identified and for the first time quantified. • Water chemistry is the result of mixing, dissolution-precipitation and sorption. • Main reactions: gypsum and calcite dissolution and Al and Fe solids precipitation. - Abstract: This study provides geochemical data with the aim of identifying and quantifying the main processes occurring in an Acid Mine Drainage (AMD) affected estuary. With that purpose, water samples of the Huelva estuary were collected during a tidal half-cycle and ion–ion plots and geochemical modeling were performed to obtain a general conceptual model. Modeling results indicated that the main processes responsible for the hydrochemical evolution of the waters are: (i) the mixing of acid fluvial water with alkaline ocean water; (ii) precipitation of Fe oxyhydroxysulfates (schwertmannite) and hydroxides (ferrihydrite); (iii) precipitation of Al hydroxysulfates (jurbanite) and hydroxides (amorphous Al(OH)3); (iv) dissolution of calcite; and (v) dissolution of gypsum. All these processes, thermodynamically feasible in the light of their calculated saturation states, were quantified by mass-balance calculations and validated by reaction-path calculations. In addition, sorption processes were deduced by the non-conservative behavior of some elements (e.g., Cu and Zn)

  11. Trace elementary concentration in enamel after dental bleaching using HI-ERDA

    Added, N. [GFAA, Depto de Fisica Nuclear, IFUSP, University of Sao Paulo, Travessa R da rua do Matao 187, Cidade Universitaria, Caixa Postal 66318, CEP 05508-970 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)]. E-mail: nemitala@dfn.if.usp.br; Rizzutto, M.A. [GFAA, Depto de Fisica Nuclear, IFUSP, University of Sao Paulo, Travessa R da rua do Matao 187, Cidade Universitaria, Caixa Postal 66318, CEP 05508-970 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Curado, J.F. [GFAA, Depto de Fisica Nuclear, IFUSP, University of Sao Paulo, Travessa R da rua do Matao 187, Cidade Universitaria, Caixa Postal 66318, CEP 05508-970 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Francci, C. [School of Dentistry, University of Sao Paulo (Brazil); Markarian, R. [School of Dentistry, University of Sao Paulo (Brazil); Mori, M. [School of Dentistry, University of Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2006-08-15

    Changes of elementary concentrations in dental enamel after a bleaching treatment with different products, is presented, with special focus on the oxygen contribution. Concentrations for Ca, P, O and C and some other trace elements were obtained for enamel of bovine incisor teeth by HI-ERDA measurements using a {sup 35}Cl incident beam and an ionization chamber. Five groups of teeth with five samples each were treated with a different bleaching agents. Each tooth had its crown sectioned in two halves, one for bleaching test and one the other used as a control. Average values of C/Ca, O/Ca, F/Ca enrichment factors were found. The comparison between bleached and non-bleached halves indicates that bleaching treatment did not affect the mineral structure when low-concentration whitening systems were used. The almost constant oxygen concentration in enamel, suggests little changes due to whitening therapy.

  12. Trace elementary concentration in enamel after dental bleaching using HI-ERDA

    Changes of elementary concentrations in dental enamel after a bleaching treatment with different products, is presented, with special focus on the oxygen contribution. Concentrations for Ca, P, O and C and some other trace elements were obtained for enamel of bovine incisor teeth by HI-ERDA measurements using a 35Cl incident beam and an ionization chamber. Five groups of teeth with five samples each were treated with a different bleaching agents. Each tooth had its crown sectioned in two halves, one for bleaching test and one the other used as a control. Average values of C/Ca, O/Ca, F/Ca enrichment factors were found. The comparison between bleached and non-bleached halves indicates that bleaching treatment did not affect the mineral structure when low-concentration whitening systems were used. The almost constant oxygen concentration in enamel, suggests little changes due to whitening therapy

  13. Humidity testing of bleached holograms.

    Chenoweth, A J

    1971-04-01

    One of the proposed storage media for semipermanent optical stores is an array of bleached holograms fabricated on photographic plates. If a store utilizing this medium is to be operated in a field environment, the effect of humidity variation requires consideration. In this study holograms were made using either Burckhardt's potassium ferricyanide or Russo and Sottini's modified R-10 type bleach on Kodak 649F and Agfa 10E70 plates. Diffraction efficiency was measured as a function of relative humidity over the range 30-98%. For holograms fabricated and tested as described above it was found that relative humidity values above 75% caused a permanent loss in diffraction efficiency for potassium ferricyanide bleached plates; humidity above 90% produced a temporary loss in R-10 bleached plates. PMID:20094561

  14. Optical dating: insufficiently bleached sediments

    Although infrared-stimulated luminescence (IRSL) signals in feldspars can be bleached rapidly by sunlight, there could still be a small amount of IRSL signal remaining in sediment grains if they have experienced only relatively short sunlight exposure before deposition. This remaining signal results in a ''remnant dose'' stored in the grain and is important for young samples but negligible for old samples. Several methods have been introduced to detect insufficient bleaching, and some of them can provide information on the extent of the bleaching. Others can only distinguish between samples bleached for a very long time and for a short time. Empirical methods are introduced to evaluate the possible values of equivalent dose accumulated since the grains were deposited. These methods involve the analysis of the equivalent doses and the natural IRSL signals obtained using single-disc dose determination methods. (author)

  15. Corals differential susceptibilities to bleaching along the Red Sea Coast, Egypt

    MONTASER ALY MAHMOUD AL-HAMMADY

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Ammar MSA, Obuid-Allah AH, Al-Hammady MAM. 2011. Corals differential susceptibilities to bleaching along the Red Sea Coast, Egypt. Nusantara Bioscience 3: 73-81. Coral bleaching was studied at four sites in four widely geographically separated areas. Three of these sites are subjected to different human activities and the fourth one is considered as a control site. Data were collected by using SCUBA diving equipments and the line transects method. A total of 3940 coral colonies, representing 62 species in 21genera and 10 families, were recorded on transects on the reefs of four studied sites.20.11% of all corals were affected by bleaching: 5.4% were moderately affected; 2.7% severely affected and 12.007% were dead. Overall, there were differences in the proportion of colonies affected by bleaching between the studied sites. Ras El-Behar, the site impacted by petroleum oil, has the maximum average proportion of moderately, severely bleached and dead colonies. While, the lowest average proportions of severely bleached colonies and dead colonies were found at Kalawy bay. Surprisingly, coral reef taxa at El-Hamraween harbor showed high resistance to bleaching probably because of having a new different clade of Symbiodinium which can withstand sea water temperature. Species with highest susceptibilities to bleaching in areas of oil pollution, increased sedimentation and heavy load of phosphate are Stylophora pistillata, Acropora granulosa and Montipora meandrina, respectively while species with lowest susceptibilities are Fungia fungites, Alveopora daedalea and Millepora dichotoma, respectively.

  16. Post-bleaching application of an antioxidant on dentin bond strength of three dental adhesives

    Maryam Khoroushi

    2012-01-01

    Conclusions: The findings suggest that bond strength of resin to bleached dentin may be affected with the adhesive system. Reduced SBS to bleached dentin can be amended by the use of SA as an antioxidizing agent. However, the amount of reversed bond strength subsequent to applying antioxidant might be related to the kind of dental adhesive.

  17. Local bleaching thresholds established by remote sensing techniques vary among reefs with deviating bleaching patterns during the 2012 event in the Arabian/Persian Gulf

    Shuail, Dawood; Wiedenmann, Jörg; D'Angelo, Cecilia; Baird, Andrew H.; Pratchett, Morgan S.; Riegl, Bernhard; Burt, John A.; Petrov, Peter; Amos, Carl

    2016-01-01

    A severe bleaching event affected coral communities off the coast of Abu Dhabi, UAE in August/September, 2012. In Saadiyat and Ras Ghanada reefs ~ 40% of the corals showed signs of bleaching. In contrast, only 15% of the corals were affected on Delma reef. Bleaching threshold temperatures for these sites were established using remotely sensed sea surface temperature (SST) data recorded by MODIS-Aqua. The calculated threshold temperatures varied between locations (34.48 °C, 34.55 °C, 35.05 °C)...

  18. The corrosion of titanium and some other construction materials during hydrogen peroxide bleaching according to the field measurements

    In a Finnish pulp mill, the field measurements of different materials were performed in different stages of peroxide bleaching: P1 and P2. The field measurements were performed with three different sensors. The sensors were designed in co-operation with Valmet Automation Kajaani Oy. Each sensor measured the corrosion potential, the redox potential and the weight losses of three different materials. Simultaneously, the data of the most important parameters of bleaching, i.e. temperature, pH, peroxide flow rate and concentration, mass flow, consistency, residuals, flow rate and concentration of alkaline, were collected in the data logger by a dedicated program. The results proved that the corrosion of different materials (stainless steel S31654, nickel-based alloy N10276 and titanium Gr. 5) could be estimated with field experiments. The uniform corrosion of titanium occurred in a certain bleaching situation. The field measurements gave a good estimation of whether the material dissolved during process operation or process disorders. Our results clearly show that the mixing of the chemicals can be reliably estimated, and thus advantageous for a pulp mill. The materials studied withstood the bleaching significantly better if the chemicals were mixed directly with a pulp. Usually the chemicals are mixed with alkaline and then added to the pulp. The field measurements could also be applied in ozone and in the peracetic acid bleaching stage. The sensors can be utilized as tools during process monitoring or diagnostics. With the aid of monitoring it is possible to clarify how the different process operation models affect the corrosion of materials. (author)

  19. Effect of thickener agents on dental enamel microhardness submitted to at-home bleaching Efeito de agentes espessantes na microdureza do esmalte submetido ao clareamento dental caseiro

    José Augusto Rodrigues; Glauco Paulo Felício Oliveira; Cristiane Mariote Amaral

    2007-01-01

    Dental bleaching occurs due to an oxidation reaction between the bleaching agents and the macromolecules of pigments in the teeth. This reaction is unspecific and the peroxides can also affect the dental matrix causing mineral loss. On the other hand, recent studies have suggested that the thickener agent carbopol can also cause mineral loss. Thus, the objective of this study was to evaluate in vitro the effect of at-home dental bleaching on dental enamel microhardness after the use of bleach...

  20. Antioxidant therapy enhances pulpal healing in bleached teeth

    Lima, Adriano Fonseca; Marques, Marcelo Rocha; Soares, Diana Gabriela; Hebling, Josimeri; Marchi, Giselle Maria

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to evaluate the histopathological effects of an antioxidant therapy on the pulp tissue of rat teeth exposed to a bleaching gel with 35% hydrogen peroxide. Materials and Methods Forty rats were subjected to oral ingestion by gavage of distilled water (DW) or ascorbic acid (AA) 90 min before the bleaching therapy. For the bleaching treatment, the agent was applied twice for 5 min each to buccal surfaces of the first right mandibular molars. Then, the animals were sacrificed at 6 hr, 24 hr, 3 day, or 7 day post-bleaching, and the teeth were processed for microscopic evaluation of the pulp tissue. Results At 6 hr, the pulp tissue showed moderate inflammatory reactions in all teeth of both groups. In the DW and AA groups, 100% and 80% of teeth exhibited pulp tissue with significant necrosis and intense tissue disorganization, respectively. At 24 hr, the AA-treated group demonstrated a greater regenerative capability than the DW group, with less intense inflammatory reaction and new odontoblast layer formation in 60% of the teeth. For up to the 7 day period, the areas of pulpal necrosis were replaced by viable connective tissue, and the dentin was underlined by differentiated odontoblast-like cells in most teeth of both groups. Conclusions A slight reduction in initial pulpal damage during post-bleaching was promoted by AA therapy. However, the pulp tissue of AA-treated animals featured faster regenerative potential over time. PMID:26877990

  1. SUGARCANE BAGASSE PULPING AND BLEACHING: THERMAL AND CHEMICAL CHARACTERIZATION

    Paulo Henrique Fernandes Pereira

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Cellulose fibers were isolated from sugarcane bagasse in three stages. Initially sugarcane bagasse was subjected to a pre-treatment process with hydrolyzed acid to eliminate hemicellulose. Whole cellulosic fibers thus obtained were then subjected to a two-stage delignification process and finally to a bleaching process. The chemical structure of the resulting cellulose fibers was studied by Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR spectroscopy. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM and X-ray diffraction (XRD were used to analyze the effects of hydrolysis, delignification, and bleaching on the structure of the fibers. Two different thermal analysis techniques were used to study the bleaching cellulose fibers. These techniques confirmed that cellulose fibers were isolated from sugarcane bagasse. A future goal is to use these fibers as reinforcement elements in composites, organic-inorganic hybrid, and membranes for nanofiltration.

  2. Nanotribological and Nanomechanical Properties Changes of Tooth After Bleaching and Remineralization in Wet Environment

    Yu, Dandan; Gao, Shanshan; Min, Jie; Zhang, Qianqian; Gao, Shuai; Yu, Haiyang

    2015-12-01

    Teeth bleaching cases had increased with people's desire for oral aesthetic; however, bleached teeth would still undertake chewing actions and remineralizing process in saliva. Nanotribological and nanomechanical properties are proper displays for dental performance of bleached teeth. The purpose of the research was to reveal the effect of bleaching and remineralization on the nanotribological and nanomechanical properties of teeth in wet environment. The specimens were divided into four groups according to the bleaching products used: 12 % hydrogen peroxide (HP) (12HP group); 15 % carbamide peroxide (CP) (15CP group); 35 % CP (35CP group); and artificial saliva (control group). The nanotribological and nanomechanical property changes of tooth enamel after bleaching and remineralization were evaluated respectively by nanoscratch and nanoindentation tests in wet environment, imitating the wet oral environment. The morphology changes were evaluated by statistical parametric mapping (SPM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). After bleaching, 12HP group and 15CP group showed increased scratch depth with more pile ups on the scratch edges, decreased nanohardness, and corroded surface appearance. While the 35CP group showed an increase in nanoscratch depth, no change in nanohardness and surface appearance was observed. The control group showed no change in these measurements. After remineralization, the three bleaching groups showed decreased nanoscratch depth and no change of nanohardness compared with the bleached teeth. And the control group showed no changes in nanotribological and nanomechanical properties. The nanotribological and nanomechanical properties of the 12HP group and 15CP group were affected by bleaching, but the nanotribological properties recovered partly and the nanomechanical properties got no change after 1 week of remineralization. As for the 35CP group, the nanotribological properties were influenced and the nanomechanical properties were not

  3. Effects of coral bleaching on the obligate coral-dwelling crab Trapezia cymodoce

    Stella, J. S.; Munday, P. L.; Jones, G. P.

    2011-09-01

    Corals are an essential and threatened habitat for a diverse range of reef-associated animals. Episodes of coral bleaching are predicted to increase in frequency and intensity over coming decades, yet the effects of coral-host bleaching on the associated animal communities remain poorly understood. The present study investigated the effects of host-colony bleaching on the obligate coral-dwelling crab, Trapezia cymodoce, during a natural bleaching event in the lagoon of Lizard Island, Australia. Branching corals, which harbour the highest diversity of coral associates, comprised 13% of live coral cover at the study site, with 83% affected by bleaching. Crabs on healthy and bleached colonies of Pocillopora damicornis were monitored over a 5-week period to determine whether coral bleaching affected crab density and movement patterns. All coral colonies initially contained one breeding pair of crabs. There was a significant decline in crab density on bleached corals after 5 weeks, with many corals losing one or both crabs, yet all healthy colonies retained a mating pair. Fecundity of crabs collected from bleached and healthy colonies of P. damicornis was also compared. The size of egg clutches of crabs collected from bleached hosts was 40% smaller than those from healthy hosts, indicating a significant reduction in fecundity. A laboratory experiment on movement patterns found that host-colony bleaching also prompted crabs to emigrate in search of more suitable colonies. Emigrant crabs engaged in aggressive interactions with occupants of healthy hosts, with larger crabs always usurping occupants of a smaller size. Decreased densities and clutch sizes, along with increased competitive interactions, could potentially result in a population decline of these important coral associates with cascading effects on coral health.

  4. Reuse of discarded deactivated bleaching earth in the bleaching of oils

    Girgis, Adel Y.

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Discarded bleaching earth was used after its reactivation for the bleaching of sunflower, soybean and corn oils. The efficiency of reactivated bleaching earth was compared to the efficiency of virgin activated bleaching earth. Acid reactivated earth (pH 2.5-3 had a slightly higher content in silicone than virgin activated or neutralized reactivated earths. The best results in the color of sunflower and corn oils were obtained when neutralized earth (pH 6–7 was used at 1 and 2 % levels. Acid reactivated earth used at 2 % achieved a higher reduction in soybean oil color than virgin earth (pH 3 at the same dosage. Both reactivated earths reduced peroxide value, iron, conjugated dienes and soap, while they increased acidity and conjugated trienes. Furthermore, these reactivated earths determined higher decrements in the oil induction period than virgin earth. Reactivated earth could be used for 5 cycles for the bleaching of soybean or corn oils and for more than 6 cycles for sunflower oil.Tierra decolorante desechada, fue empleada, tras su reactivación para decolorar aceites de girasol, soja y maíz. La eficiencia de la tierra decolorante reactivada fue comparada con la de la virgen activada. La tierra reactivada ácida (pH 2,5–3 tuvo ligeramente mayor contenido en silicona que la tierra virgen o la reactivada neutra. Los mejores resultados en el color de los aceites de girasol y maíz fueron obtenidos cuando se emplearon niveles del 1 y 2 % de tierra reactivada neutra (pH 6-7. La tierra ácida reactivada, usada al 2 % consiguió una mayor reducción del color del aceite de soja, que una misma dosis de tierra virgen (pH 3. Ambas tierras reactivadas redujeron el índice de peróxidos, hierro, dienos conjugados y jabón de los aceites, mientras que hicieron aumentar la acidez y los trienos conjugados. Además, estas tierras reactivadas determinaron mayores descensos en los periodos de inducción del aceite que la tierra virgen. Las tierras

  5. Quantification of cross-bleaching during infrared (IR) light stimulation

    Kreutzer, Sebastian; Hülle, Daniela; Thomsen, Kristina Jørkov; Hilgers, Alexandra; Kadereit, Annette; Fuchs, Markus

    2013-01-01

    1 at the time” option can result in significant dose underestimation (1) if the sequence is not split into different sets, or (2) if samples are not placed on every 2nd position. In addition, a newly designed flange for the optical unit of the TL/OSL reader is presented which appears to reduce cross-bleaching......The cross-bleaching behaviour of automated Risø TL/OSL (DA-12, DA-15, DA-20) luminescence readers is investigated. By design, up to 24 or 48 aliquots can be stored on a carousel in a single measurement chamber. Due to this construction, irradiation or illumination on one sample may affect the...... adjacent position resulting in systematic errors. Previously reported for blue LEDs, such cross-talk (cross-bleaching/illumination) has never been quantified explicitly for the infrared (IR) LEDs, although they are intensively used in IRSL measurements of e.g. feldspar and polymineral samples. In IRSL...

  6. Ten years after bleaching - facing the consequences of climate change in the Indian Ocean.CORDIO Status Report 2008.

    Grimsditch, G.; Mwaura, J.; Kilonzo, J.; Amiyo, N.; Obura, D.

    2008-01-01

    When a coral bleaches, the obligate symbiosis between the coral polyp and the micro-algal zooxanthellae is disrupted and the zooxanthellae are expelled from the polyp. Although a bleached coral does not necessarily die, it is more vulnerable to disease, algal overgrowth, bioerosion and eventually mortality. Mass bleaching and mortality events in the last decade have prompted increased research into zooxanthellae, and it is possible that zooxanthellae population strategies affect a coral’s tol...

  7. Spring ``bleaching'' among Pocillopora in the Sea of Cortez, Eastern Pacific

    Lajeunesse, T. C.; Reyes-Bonilla, H.; Warner, M. E.

    2007-06-01

    A mild bleaching event was observed among Pocillopora spp. in the southern Gulf of California in the spring of 2006. Uniform bleaching occurred in numerous colonies on the upper portions of their branches. Most (˜90%) colonies that exhibited bleaching contained a species of endosymbiotic dinoflagellate, Symbiodinium C1b-c, which differed from the Symbiodinium D1 found inhabiting most unbleached colonies. Analysis of chlorophyll fluorescence, indicated a decline in photosystem II photochemical activity, especially among colonies populated with C1b-c. By early August, most affected colonies had recovered their normal pigmentation and fluorescence values were once again high for all colonies. No mortality was observed among tagged bleached colonies nor did symbiont species composition change during recovery. This unusual episode of bleaching did not appear to be a response to thermal stress, but may have been triggered by high levels of solar radiation during a period of unseasonally high water clarity in the early spring.

  8. Coral Mortality and Bleaching Output

    COMBO is a spreadsheet-based model for the use of managers, conservationists, and biologists for projecting the effects of climate change on coral reefs at local-to-regional scales. The COMBO (Coral Mortality and Bleaching Output) model calculates the impacts to coral reefs from...

  9. Coral reef bleaching and sea surface temperature anomalies: 1991-1996 global patterns

    Goreau, T.J.; Hayes, R.L.; Strong, A.

    1997-12-31

    Global spatio-temporal patterns of mass coral reef bleaching during the first half of the 1990s continued to show the strong temperature correlations which first became established in the 1980s. Satellite sea surface temperature data and field observations were used to track thermal bleaching events in real time. Most bleaching events followed warm season sea surface temperature anomalies of around +1 degree celsius above historical means. Global bleaching patterns appear to have been strongly affected by worldwide cooling which followed eruption of Mount Pinatubo in June 1991. High water temperatures and mass coral reef bleaching took place in the Caribbean, Indian Ocean, and South Pacific in 1991, but there were few thermal anomalies or bleaching events in 1992 and 1993, years which were markedly cooler worldwide. Following the settling of Mount Pinatubo aerosols and resumption of global warming trends, extensive ocean thermal hot spots and bleaching events resumed in the South Pacific, South Atlantic, and Indian Oceans in 1994. Bleaching again took place in hot spots in the Indian Ocean and Caribbean in 1995, and in the South Atlantic, Caribbean, South Pacific, North Pacific, and Persian Gulf in 1996. Coral reefs worldwide are now very close to their upper temperature tolerance limits. This sensitivity, and the fact that the warmest ecosystems have no source of immigrant species pre-adapted to warmer conditions, may make coral reef ecosystems the first to be severely impacted if global temperatures and sea levels remain at current values or increase further.

  10. The effect of elapsed time following bleaching on enamel bond strength of resin composite.

    Cavalli, V; Reis, A F; Giannini, M; Ambrosano, G M

    2001-01-01

    Recent studies have concluded that carbamide peroxide bleaching agents significantly affect the bond strength of composite to bleached enamel. This study evaluated the effects of bleaching regimen with different carbamide peroxide concentrations and post-treatment times on composite bond strength to enamel. Two hundred and four flat buccal and lingual enamel surfaces obtained from erupted sound third molars were randomly divided into 17 groups (n = 12). Sixteen experimental groups comprised the evaluation of four carbamide peroxide home bleaching agents (Opalescence 10%-20% and Whiteness 10%-16%) and four time intervals after bleaching (one day, one, two and three weeks). Specimens of control group were not submitted to bleaching and were stored in artificial saliva at 37 degrees C for 10 days. The specimens of experimental groups were exposed to one daily application of carbamide peroxide for six hours for 10 consecutive days. After each daily treatment and post-bleaching, the specimens were stored in artificial saliva solution. Bonds were formed with Scotchbond MP and Z-100 composite resin, and shear bond test was carried out 24 hours after adhesive-composite application. Two-way ANOVA showed that the bond strengths were significantly different (p < 0.05). For the first two weeks post-bleaching, the bond strengths of resin to enamel were low. After a lapse of three weeks, the bond strength returned to that of the untreated control group. Increased concentration did not prolong the time needed prior to bonding. PMID:11699184

  11. ECF bleaching with a final hydrogen peroxide stage: Impact of the chemical composition of Eucalyptus globulus kraft pulps

    Loureiro, Pedro E. G.; Eva F. Domingues; Evtuguin, Dmitry V.; M. Graça Videira Sousa Carvalho

    2010-01-01

    Two industrial elemental chlorine free (ECF) bleaching sequences, D0(EOP)D1(EP)D2 and OQ(PO)DP, are compared with respect to the bulk content of lignin, carboxyl, hexeneuronic acids (HexA), and reducing groups after each bleaching stage. HexA groups contribute significantly to the total content of carboxyl groups, and their degradation during chlorine dioxide bleaching is reflected by a decrease of the carboxyl content. The higher degradation using an enhanced use of oxygen-based bleaching ch...

  12. Cloning and transcriptional analysis of Crepis alpina fatty acid desaturases affecting the biosynthesis of crepenynic acid.

    Nam, Jeong-Won; Kappock, T Joseph

    2007-01-01

    Crepis alpina acetylenase is a variant FAD2 desaturase that catalyses the insertion of a triple bond at the Delta12 position of linoleic acid, forming crepenynic acid in developing seeds. Seeds contain a high level of crepenynic acid but other tissues contain none. Using reverse transcriptase-coupled PCR (RT-PCR), acetylenase transcripts were identified in non-seed C. alpina tissues, which were highest in flower heads. To understand why functional expression of the acetylenase is limited to seeds, genes that affect acetylenase activity by providing substrate (FAD2) or electrons (cytochrome b5), or that compete for substrate (FAD3), were cloned. RT-PCR analysis indicated that the availability of a preferred cytochrome b5 isoform is not a limiting factor. Developing seeds co-express acetylenase and FAD2 isoform 2 (FAD2-2) at high levels. Flower heads co-express FAD2-3 and FAD3 at high levels, and FAD2-2 and acetylenase at moderate levels. FAD2-3 was not expressed in developing seed. Real-time RT-PCR absolute transcript quantitation showed 10(4)-fold higher acetylenase expression in developing seeds than in flower heads. Collectively, the results show that both the acetylenase expression level and the co-expression of other desaturases may contribute to the tissue specificity of crepenynate production. Helianthus annuus contains a Delta12 acetylenase in a polyacetylene biosynthetic pathway, so does not accumulate crepenynate. Real-time RT-PCR analysis showed relatively strong acetylenase expression in young sunflowers. Acetylenase transcription is observed in both species without accumulation of the enzymatic product, crepenynate. Functional expression of acetylenase appears to be affected by competition and collaboration with other enzymes. PMID:17329262

  13. Effect of casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate on the flexural strength of enamel-dentin complex following extracoronal bleaching

    Diatri Nari Ratih

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Bleaching can affect the mechanical properties of enamel-dentin complex, such as flexural strength. Casein phosphopeptide-amorphus calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP is often used following bleaching treatment to reduce hypersensitivity and to increase demineralization of tooth. Purpose: The purpose of the study was to investigate the effect of CPP-ACP on the flexural strength of enamel-dentin complex following extracoronal bleaching. Methods: Forty-eight enamel-dentin plates (size 8 x 2 x 3 mm were randomly assigned into 6 groups, each consisted of 8 samples. Group 1, no bleaching and immersed in artificial saliva. Group 2, no bleaching, CPP-ACP application only. Group 3, bleaching using 15% carbamide peroxide. Group 4, similar to group 3, except application of CPP-ACP for the times between bleaching. Group 5, bleaching with 40% hydrogen peroxide. Group 6, similar to group 5, except application of CPP-ACP for the times between bleaching. Flexural strength of each enamel-dentin plate was tested by threepoint bending test using universal testing machine. Results: The results showed that 15% carbamide peroxide and 40% hydrogen peroxide significantly reduced flexural strength of enamel-dentin (216.25±26.44 MPa and 206.67±32.07 MPa respectively. Conversely, application of CPP-ACP following both bleachings increased flexural strength (266.75± 28.27MPa and 254.58±36.59 MPa respectively. A two-way Anova revealed that extracoronal bleaching agents significantly reduced flexural strength (p<0.05. Conclusion: Extracoronal bleaching agents reduce flexural strength, whereas application of CPP-ACP following bleaching either with 15% carbamide peroxide or 40% hydrogen peroxide can increase the flexural strength of enamel-dentin complex.

  14. Augmenting acid with affective details to assess credibility

    Roland Fleck; Amber Hines; Cheryl Hiscock-Anisman; Kevin Colwell; Ryan Ansarra; Lindsey Cole; Delyana Belarde

    2011-01-01

    There is a need within the criminal justice systems of many countries to create a valid and applicable system of investigative interviewing and credibility assessment. The present study assesses the general validity one such system, called Assessment Criteria Indicative of Deception (ACID). ACID comprises interviewing strategies that facilitate the detection of deception and content criteria that highlight differences in verbal behavior. Sixty university undergraduates performed a staged thef...

  15. THE EFFECT OF TRANSITION METAL IONS-IRON ON HYDROGEN PEROXIDE BLEACHING

    YumengZhao; ShuhuiYang; LiangSheng; YonghaoNi

    2004-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide bleaching has been extensivelyused in high-yield pulp bleaching. Unfortunately,hydrogen peroxide can be decomposed underalkaline condition, especially when transition metalions exit. Experiments show that the valence oftransition metal ion is also responsible for thedecomposition of hydrogen peroxide.Iron ions are present in two oxidation states, Fe2+ andFe3+. They are both catalytically active to hydrogenperoxide decomposition. Because Fe3+ is brown, itcan affect the brightness of pulp directly, it can alsocombine with phenol, forming complexes which notonly are stable structures and are difficult to beremoved from pulp, but also significantly affect thebrightness of pulp because of their color.Sodium silicate and magnesium sulfate, when usedtogether, can greatly decrease hydrogen peroxidedecomposition. The optimum dosage of sodiumsilicate is about 0.1% (on solution) for Fe2~ and0.25% (on solution) for Fe3~. Adding chelants such asDTPA or EDTA with stabilizers simultaneously canobviously improve pulp brightness. For iron ions, thechelate effect of DTPA is better than that of EDTA.Under acidic conditions, sodium hyposulfite andcellulose can reduce Fe3+ to Fez+ effectively, and pulpbrightness is improved greatly. Adding sodiumthiosulfate simultaneously with magnesium sulfate,sodium silicate, and DTPA to alkaline peroxidesolution can result in higher brightness of pulp.pH is a key parameter during hydrogen peroxidebleaching, the optimum pH value should be 10.5-12.

  16. Response of millepora alcicornis (Milleporina: Milleporidae) to two bleaching enventgs at Puerto Morelos reef, Mexican Caribbean

    Two naturally occurring colonies of Millepora alcicornis were monitored during 1997 and 1998, both years in which this species bleached in the Mexican Caribbean. One colony (HL) was naturally exposed to a high light environment and another nearby colony (LL) was exposed to 5.9 times lower light levels due to shadowing by a pier. For 10 days in August 1997, seawater temperatures in the surrounding reef lagoon rose up to 1.5 degrees C above the 6-year August average. The HL colony bleached to white during this period, whereas, the LL colony remained dark-brown colored. The HL colony recovered its normal dark-brown coloration (reversible bleaching) within several weeks, during which time the seawater temperatures returned to average. The following year, for 10 days, seawater temperatures rose up to 3 degrees C above the 7-year August average and both colonies bleached to white and neither colony recovered (irreversible bleaching). Both colonies were rapidly overgrown by algae and hydroids and, as of June 2003, no recovery has taken place. Prior to the 1997 bleaching, experiments using solar radiation showed that the quantum yield of photosystem II charge separation of branches from HL and LL colonies were affected for several hours by exposure to ultraviolet radiation (UVR, 280 to 400 nm), but recovered by the same evening, suggesting that UVR does not have long-term effects on photochemistry in M. alcicornis. In situ effective quantum yield of photosystem II charge separation (ΔF/Fm') measurements before the 1998 bleaching event indicate that both colonies were healthy in terms of the physiological status of their endosymbionts. During and after the 1998 bleaching event, both colonies showed a reduction in ΔF/Fm' and consequently an increase in excitation pressure on photosystem II. The data suggest that temperature is not the only factor that causes bleaching and that solar radiation may play an important role in coral bleaching. (Author)

  17. Retinoic Acid Signaling Affects Cortical Synchrony During Sleep

    Maret, Stéphanie; Franken, Paul; Dauvilliers, Yves; Ghyselinck, Norbert B.; Chambon, Pierre; Tafti, Mehdi

    2005-10-01

    Delta oscillations, characteristic of the electroencephalogram (EEG) of slow wave sleep, estimate sleep depth and need and are thought to be closely linked to the recovery function of sleep. The cellular mechanisms underlying the generation of delta waves at the cortical and thalamic levels are well documented, but the molecular regulatory mechanisms remain elusive. Here we demonstrate in the mouse that the gene encoding the retinoic acid receptor beta determines the contribution of delta oscillations to the sleep EEG. Thus, retinoic acid signaling, which is involved in the patterning of the brain and dopaminergic pathways, regulates cortical synchrony in the adult.

  18. Optical bleaching studies of quartz

    The bleaching properties of a hydrothermal, Arkansas quartz are studied in detail. The thermoluminescence (TL) and phototransferred TL (PTTL) signals are examined as a function of wavelength, illumination time and temperature at which the sample is illuminated. We have also briefly studied the effects of pre-irradiation annealing on the sample. The results of these experiments are described and their relevance to the models for TL is discussed. (Author)

  19. Study on Bleaching Technology of Cotton Fabric with Sodium Percarbonate

    Li Zhi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Bleach cotton fabric with sodium percarbonate solution. Analyse of the effect of the concentration of sodium percarbonate solution, bleaching time, bleaching temperature and the light radiation on the bleaching effect of fabric.The result shows that increasing concentrations of percarbonate,increasing the bleaching time , raising the bleaching temperature and the UV irradiation may whiten the cotton fabric.The most suitable conditions for the bleaching process is concentration of sodium percarbonate solution 6 g/ L, bleaching temperature 80°C and bleaching time 60 min.

  20. The role of bound chlorine in the brightness reversion of bleached hardwood kraft pulp

    Kátia Maria Morais Eiras

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Our previous paper showed fragmentary evidence that pulp brightness reversion may be negatively affected by its organically bound chlorine (OX content. A thorough investigation on eucalyptus kraft pulp led to the conclusion that OX increases reversion of certain pulps but this trend is not universal. Alkaline bleaching stages decrease reversion regardless of pulp OX content. Pulps bleached with high temperature chlorine dioxide revert less than those bleached with conventional chlorine dioxide in sequences ending with a chlorine dioxide stage but similarly in sequences ending with a final peroxide stage. The use of secondary condensate for pulp washing decreases reversion.

  1. RESPONSE SURFACE METHODOLOGY APPROACH FOR OPTIMIZATION OF FLAX SEED OIL BLEACHING PROCESS

    Miroslav Ondrejovič; Daniela Chmelová; Tibor Maliar

    2013-01-01

    Flax seed is an important source of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids essential for human physiology. For low oxidation stability, specific taste and concomitant color compounds this oil is poorly applicable as nutraceutical additive. The aim of this study was optimization of flax seed oil bleaching. The optimal conditions for the bleaching process were determined using response surface methodology. A central composite design was used to investigate the effects of three independent variable...

  2. STUDIES ON XYLANASE AND LACCASE ENZYMATIC PREBLEACHING TO REDUCE CHLORINE-BASED CHEMICALS DURING CEH AND ECF BLEACHING

    Vasanta V. Thakur,

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The biobleaching efficiency of xylanase and laccase enzymes was studied on kraft pulps from wood and nonwood based raw materials employed in the Indian paper industry. Treatment of these pulps with xylanase enzyme could result in improved properties, showing 2.0% ISO gain in pulp brightness and/or reducing the demand of chlorine-based bleach chemicals by up to 15% with simultaneous reduction of 20 to 25% in AOX generation in bleach effluents. Further, mill-scale trial results revealed that enzymatic prebleaching can be successfully employed with xylanases to reach the same bleach boosting efficacy. Laccase bleaching was also studied on hardwood pulp at a pH around 8.0, where most of the pulp mills in India are operating, in contrast to earlier studies on laccase enzyme bleaching, which were conducted at acidic pHs, i.e. 4.0 to 5.0. In case of laccase bleaching, interesting results were found wherein a bleach-boosting effect was observed even at pH 8.0. Further studies carried out with HOBT as mediator in comparison to the commonly used and expensive ABTS laccase mediator system (LMS resulted in improvement of the bleaching efficiency with reduction in demand of chlorine dioxide by more than 35%. Potential for further reduction was indicated by the brightness gain, when compared with a control using the DE(pD bleach sequence.

  3. Evaluation of cotton-fabric bleaching using hydrogen peroxide and Blue LED

    de Oliveira, Bruno P.; Moriyama, Lilian T.; Bagnato, Vanderlei S.

    2015-06-01

    The raw cotton production requires multiple steps being one of them the removal of impurities acquired during previous processes. This procedure is widely used by textile industries around the world and is called bleaching. The raw cotton is composed by cellulosic and non-cellulosic materials like waxes, pectins and oils, which are responsible for its characteristic yellowish color. The bleaching process aims to remove the non-cellulosic materials concentration in the fabric, increasing its whiteness degree. The most used bleaching method utilizes a bath in an alkali solution of hydrogen peroxide, stabilizers and buffer solutions under high temperature. In the present study we evaluated the possibility of using a blue illumination for the bleaching process. We used blue LEDs (450 nm) to illuminate an acid hydrogen peroxide solution at room temperature. The samples treated by this method were compared with the conventional bleaching process through a colorimetric analysis and by a multiple comparison visual inspection by volunteers. The samples were also studied by a tensile test in order to verify the integrity of the cloth after bleaching. The results of fabric visual inspection and colorimetric analysis showed a small advantage for the sample treated by the standard method. The tensile test showed an increasing on the yield strength of the cloth after blue light bleaching. The presented method has great applicability potential due to the similar results compared to the standard method, with relative low cost and reduced production of chemical waste.

  4. Effectiveness of bleaching agent on composite resin discoloration

    Galih Sampoerno

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The discoloration of teeth, especially anterior teeth, is one of aesthetic problems. The use of tooth bleaching agents for discolored natural teeth is becoming increasingly popular. Many dentists, however, get many problems when they conduct bleaching process since there is much composite filling on patient’s anterior teeth. Although many research have focused on the discoloration of composite resin after bleaching process, the problem still becomes debatable. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the difference of the discoloration between hybrid composite and nano composite before and after the application of tooth bleaching agent, 38% hydrogen peroxide. Methods: Eighteen disk-shaped specimens (5 mm of each of two composite resins, hybrid and nano filler, were prepared. The each group was treated 3 times and the specimens were divided into two groups consisted of 9 specimens for each, and then immersed in black tea solutions for 72 hours. Next, after having staining and bleaching processes, the color of the specimens was measured with a optic spectrophotometer by using photo with type BPY-47 and digital microvolt. The differences of the light intensity among three measurements were then calculated. Afterwards, GLM MANOVA Repeated Measure and parametric analysis (Independent t-test and Paired t-test were then used to analyze the data. Results: After staining process, it is then known that the nano composite had more discoloration and more affected by the black tea solution than the hybrid one. Conclusion: After bleaching, the discoloration was finally removed completely from both hybride and nano filler composite resins and became brighter from the baseline color.Latar belakang: Salah satu problem estetik adalah adanya perubahan warna pada gigi anterior. Peningkatan pemakaian bahan bleaching semakin popular. Banyak dokter gigi mempunyai problem ketika mereka akan melakukan proses bleaching dan ditemukan banyak

  5. Microhardness of demineralized enamel following home bleaching and laser-assisted in office bleaching

    Ghanbarzadeh, Majid; Akbari, Majid; Hamzei, Haniye

    2015-01-01

    Background There is little data regarding the effect of tooth whitening on microhardness of white spot lesions. This study was conducted to investigate the effect of home-bleaching and laser-assisted in-office bleaching on microhardness of demineralized enamel. Material and Methods Forty bovine incisors were selected and immersed in a demineralizing solution for 12 weeks to induce white spot lesions. Enamel blocks were prepared and randomly assigned to two groups of 20 each. The first group underwent home bleaching with 15% carbamide peroxide which was applied for 8 hours a day over a period of 15 days. In the second group, in-office bleaching was performed by 40% hydrogen peroxide and powered by irradiation from an 810 nm gallium-aluminum-arsenide (GaAlAs) diode laser (CW, 2W). This process was performed for 3 sessions every seven days, in 15 days. The specimens were stored in Fusayama Meyer artificial saliva during the experiment. Surface microhardness was assessed before and after the bleaching therapies in both groups. Results Microhardness decreased significantly following both home bleaching and laser-assisted in-office bleaching (plaser-assisted in-office bleaching can result in a significant reduction in microhardness of white spot lesions. Therefore, it is suggested to take protective measures on bleached demineralized enamel. Key words:White spot lesion, bleaching, laser, microhardness, demineralized enamel, home bleaching, in-office bleaching. PMID:26330939

  6. Arachidonic Acid and Eicosapentaenoic Acid Metabolism in Juvenile Atlantic Salmon as Affected by Water Temperature

    Norambuena, Fernando; Morais, Sofia; Emery, James A.; Turchini, Giovanni M.

    2015-01-01

    Salmons raised in aquaculture farms around the world are increasingly subjected to sub-optimal environmental conditions, such as high water temperatures during summer seasons. Aerobic scope increases and lipid metabolism changes are known plasticity responses of fish for a better acclimation to high water temperature. The present study aimed at investigating the effect of high water temperature on the regulation of fatty acid metabolism in juvenile Atlantic salmon fed different dietary ARA/EPA ratios (arachidonic acid, 20:4n-6/ eicosapentaenoic acid, 20:5n-3), with particular focus on apparent in vivo enzyme activities and gene expression of lipid metabolism pathways. Three experimental diets were formulated to be identical, except for the ratio EPA/ARA, and fed to triplicate groups of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) kept either at 10°C or 20°C. Results showed that fatty acid metabolic utilisation, and likely also their dietary requirements for optimal performance, can be affected by changes in their relative levels and by environmental temperature in Atlantic salmon. Thus, the increase in temperature, independently from dietary treatment, had a significant effect on the β-oxidation of a fatty acid including EPA, as observed by the apparent in vivo enzyme activity and mRNA expression of pparα -transcription factor in lipid metabolism, including β-oxidation genes- and cpt1 -key enzyme responsible for the movement of LC-PUFA from the cytosol into the mitochondria for β-oxidation-, were both increased at the higher water temperature. An interesting interaction was observed in the transcription and in vivo enzyme activity of Δ5fad–time-limiting enzyme in the biosynthesis pathway of EPA and ARA. Such, at lower temperature, the highest mRNA expression and enzyme activity was recorded in fish with limited supply of dietary EPA, whereas at higher temperature these were recorded in fish with limited ARA supply. In consideration that fish at higher water temperature

  7. Wood Properties of Poplar from Stand Affected by Acid Rain

    2002-01-01

    Wood properties from 28 trees (Populus euramericana) selected from healthy and acid rain damaged forest were measured to evaluate the possible impacts on wood quality and utilization. On the heavily damaged location, the pH value of precipitation ranged from 3.7-5.0, and sulfate loading ranged from 20-40 kg·ha-2.y-1. Quantitative and qualitative studies on ring width, physical properties and mechanical properties indicated that changes of wood properties between diseased and healthy poplar occurred. Aci...

  8. Influence of bleach activators on the fabric made from cotton (gossypium hamster l.)

    Raw cotton contains various type of trash and most of the impurities are removed during the spinning process but still the cotton fabric coming from the weaving or knitting process always contains some impurities. Some time cotton fabric gets the oil, stains and coloured materials which affect the quality of dyed fabric. Bleaching is a process that eliminates unwanted coloured matters from the fibres, yarn and fabrics. A bleaching agent is a material that lightens or whitens a substrate through chemical action. Hydrogen peroxide is by far the most commonly used oxidative bleaching agent for cotton and its blends, accounting for more than 90 percent of all the bleaching agents. The use of activators to enhance the bleaching performance of hydrogen peroxide for cellulosic materials has gained popularity now a day. In this context the main objectives of this paper are to study the influence of different bleaching activators on cotton fabric and to give implications for textile extension.The results indicate that the activators with different concentrations, along with different concentrations of hydrogen peroxide (H/sub 2/O/sub 2) have significant influence on the bleaching performance of cotton fabric. (author)

  9. Effect of three nanobiomaterials on the surface roughness of bleached enamel

    Maryam Khoroushi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The ever-increasing demand for enhanced esthetic appearance has resulted in significant developments in bleaching products. However, the enamel surface roughness (SR might be negatively affected by bleaching agents. This in vitro study was undertaken to compare the effects of three nanobiomaterials on the enamel SR subsequent to bleaching. Materials and Methods: The crowns of six extracted intact nonerupted human third molars were sectioned. Five dental blocks measuring 2 mm × 3 mm × 4 mm were prepared from each tooth and placed in colorless translucent acrylic resin. The enamel areas from all the specimens were divided into five groups (n = 6: Group 1 did not undergo any bleaching procedures; Group 2 was bleached with a 40% hydrogen peroxide (HP gel; Groups 3, 4, and 5 were bleached with a 40% HP gel modified by bioactive glass (BAG, amorphous calcium phosphate, and hydroxyapatite, respectively. The enamel SR was evaluated before and after treatment by atomic force microscopy. The data were analyzed by Kruskal–Wallis and Mann–Whitney tests. Results: SR increased significantly in the HP group. SR decreased significantly in the HP gel modified by BAG group as compared to other groups. Conclusions: Within the limitations of this study, incorporation of each one of the three test biomaterials proved effective in decreasing enamel SR subsequent to in-office bleaching technique.

  10. Short-Term Coral Bleaching Is Not Recorded by Skeletal Boron Isotopes

    Schoepf, Verena; Malcolm T McCulloch; Mark E Warner; Stephen J Levas; Matsui, Yohei; Aschaffenburg, Matthew D.; Andréa G Grottoli

    2014-01-01

    Coral skeletal boron isotopes have been established as a proxy for seawater pH, yet it remains unclear if and how this proxy is affected by seawater temperature. Specifically, it has never been directly tested whether coral bleaching caused by high water temperatures influences coral boron isotopes. Here we report the results from a controlled bleaching experiment conducted on the Caribbean corals Porites divaricata, Porites astreoides, and Orbicella faveolata. Stable boron (δ11B), carbon (δ1...

  11. Influence of Coral Bleaching on the Fauna of Tutia Reef, Tanzania

    Öhman, M.C.; Lindahl, U.; Schelten, C.K.

    1999-01-01

    In 1998, coral reefs of Tanzania were severely affected by bleaching. The coral mortality that followed caused a concern for coral reef degradation and overall resource depletion. In this study, we investigated coral bleaching effects on the coral reef fauna at Tutia Reef in Mafia Island Marine Park, Tanzania. Corals from adjacent reef patches of the species Acropora formosa were transplanted into plots, and reef structure and associated fish assemblages were examined before and after the ble...

  12. Low irradiances affect abscisic acid, indole-3-acidic acid, and cytokinin levels of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) tissues

    Nan, R.; Carman, J. G.; Salisbury, F. B.

    1999-01-01

    Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) plants were grown under four irradiance levels: 1,400, 400, 200, and 100 micromol m-2 s-1. Leaves and roots were sampled before, during, and after the boot stage, and levels of abscisic acid (ABA), indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), zeatin, zeatin riboside, dihydrozeatin, dihydrozeatin riboside, isopentenyl adenine, and isopentenyl adenosine were quantified using noncompetitive indirect ELISA systems. Levels of IAA in leaves and roots of plants exposed to 100 micromol m-2 s-1 of irradiance were 0.7 and 2.9 micromol kg-1 dry mass (DM), respectively. These levels were 0.2 and 1.0 micromol kg-1 DM, respectively, when plants were exposed to 1,400 micromol m-2 s-1. Levels of ABA in leaves and roots of plants exposed to 100 micromol m-2 s-1 were 0.65 and 0.55 micromol kg-1 DM, respectively. They were 0.24 micromol kg-1 DM (both leaves and roots) when plants were exposed to 1,400 micromol m-2 s-1. Levels of isopentenyl adenosine in leaves (24.3 nmol kg-1 DM) and roots (29.9 nmol kg-1 DM) were not affected by differences in the irradiance regime. Similar values were obtained in a second experiment. Other cytokinins could not be detected (<10 nmol kg 1 DM) in either experiment with the sample sizes used (150-600 mg DM for roots and shoots, respectively).

  13. Habitat and Bleaching in the Foraminiferan Peneroplis Pertusus

    Ellison, Aimee

    2006-01-01

    The effects of human activities on the earth’s environment have gained increasing attention in recent years. With coral reefs declining worldwide, efficient tools for assessing reef health are more important than ever. The species of larger foraminifera known as Peneroplis pertusus share key characteristics with reef building corals. By examining the populations’ natural distribution along with the abiotic factors affecting bleaching, a better understanding of reef systems as a whole is a...

  14. Physicochemical properties and oxidative stability of bleached pomace-olive oil on Tunisian activated clays

    This work is a contribution to studying bleaching process, which is an important stage in refining of vegetable oils. This process permitted to reduce or convert undesired constituents to harmless ones from oils and fats. Virgin olive oil, considered as reference, and pomace-olive oil were bleached in optimal conditions using Tunisian activated clays ( collected from the South of Tunisia) which were prepared in our laboratory and compared with commercial bleaching earths. It was shown that activated Tunisian clays are characterized by a very important adsorptive capacity, which is similar to that of commercial ones. In addition, the study of physicochemical properties of bleached oils was considered. The fatty acid composition (GC), the triacylglycerol composition (HPLC), and oxidative stability (UV spectrometry) allowed to conclude that treated oils do not undergo considerable physicochemical alterations and their caracteristics remain in concordance with international standards relative to edible refined oils. (Author)

  15. Post-bleaching application of an antioxidant on dentin bond strength of three dental adhesives

    Khoroushi, Maryam; Saneie, Tahereh

    2012-01-01

    Background: Antioxidizing agents have recently been suggested to compensate decreased bond strength of resin materials to bleached tooth tissues. This study compared the shear bond strength (SBS) of three different adhesives on bleached dentin immediately after bleaching, bleached/delayed for 1 week, and bleached/applied antioxidizing agent. Materials and Methods: The dentinal surfaces of 132 intact extracted molars were prepared and divided into 12 groups. The following adhesives were investigated: Optibond FL (OFL) (three-step etch-and-rinse), Optibond Solo Plus (two-step etch-and-rinse), and Optibond all-in-one (OA) (one-step self-etch) (Kerr, Orange, USA). Unbleached dentin groups (groups 1-3) were prepared as negative controls (NC). The remainder surfaces (groups 4-12) were bleached with 20% Opalescent PF (Ultradent, USA). Specimens were bonded immediately after bleaching (groups 4-6), after 1 week (groups 7-9), or after using 10% sodium ascorbate (SA) gel (groups 10-12). Subsequent to bonding of composite resin, the samples were tested for SBS and analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests (α=0.05). Results: Regarding control groups, OA showed the highest SBS among the studied adhesives (P0.05) except the of delay bonding with OA. Conclusions: The findings suggest that bond strength of resin to bleached dentin may be affected with the adhesive system. Reduced SBS to bleached dentin can be amended by the use of SA as an antioxidizing agent. However, the amount of reversed bond strength subsequent to applying antioxidant might be related to the kind of dental adhesive. PMID:22363363

  16. An Effective Ostrich Oil Bleaching Technique Using Peroxide Value as an Indicator

    Gan Seng Chiew

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Ostrich oil has been used extensively in the cosmetic and pharmaceutical industries. However, rancidity causes undesirable chemical changes in flavour, colour, odour and nutritional value. Bleaching is an important process in refining ostrich oil. Bleaching refers to the removal of certain minor constituents (colour pigments, free fatty acid, peroxides, odour and non-fatty materials from crude fats and oils to yield purified glycerides. There is a need to optimize the bleaching process of crude ostrich oil prior to its use for therapeutic purposes. The objective of our study was to establish an effective method to bleach ostrich oil using peroxide value as an indicator of refinement. In our study, we showed that natural earth clay was better than bentonite and acid-activated clay to bleach ostrich oil. It was also found that 1 hour incubation at a 150 °C was suitable to lower peroxide value by 90%. In addition, the nitrogen trap technique in the bleaching process was as effective as the continuous nitrogen flow technique and as such would be the recommended technique due to its cost effectiveness.

  17. In vitro penetration of bleaching agents into the pulp chamber

    Benetti, Ana Raquel; Valera, M C; Mancini, M N G;

    2004-01-01

    To investigate pulp chamber penetration of bleaching agents in teeth following restorative procedures.......To investigate pulp chamber penetration of bleaching agents in teeth following restorative procedures....

  18. REEF MANAGER'S GUIDE TO CORAL BLEACHING

    A Reef Manager's Guide to Coral Bleaching is the result of a collaborative effort by over 50 scientists and managers to: (1) engage in information-sharing in the areas of coral reef science and management for climate change and coral bleaching; and (2) compile a management tool ...

  19. On luminescence bleaching of tidal channel sediments

    Fruergaard, Mikkel; Pejrup, Morten; Murray, Andrew S.;

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the processes responsible for bleaching of the quartz OSL signal from tidal channel sediment. Tidal dynamics are expected to play an important role for complete bleaching of tidal sediments. However, no studies have examined the amount of reworking occurring in tidal channels and o...

  20. A bleaching earth from egyptian local deposits

    El Kinawy, Omayma S.

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available The present investigation deals with the bleaching of vegetable oils using activated clays collected from some deposits in Egypt as compared to Tonsil FF currently used by local oil industry. The comparison was made; not only on the basis of the decolourising power of the earth, but also on the basis of its effects on the oil acidity, formation of the oil peroxides and the decomposition rate of the formed peroxides to aldehydes and ketones during the bleaching process. The activation of the collected earth samples was made using 4N HCl, 6N HCl and 30 % H2SO4. The bleaching tests of the activated samples were performed using the major four oil types processed in Egypt being cottonseed, sunflower, soybean and palm oils. In addition to the laboratory-evaluation tests, the performance of the activated samples, which showed promise on the lab-scale have been also tested on an industrial scale. The industrial application has proved that the activated local earth's can be successfully used as bleaching earth of local oils. Thus it can be used as a substitute of the varieties currently imported and used by the local oil sector.La presente investigación trata de la decoloración de aceites vegetales usando tierras activadas obtenidas de yacimientos egipcios, comparándola con el Tonsil FF usado normalmente en la industria oleícola local. La comparación se realizó, no sólo sobre la base del poder decolorante de la tierra, sino también sobre la base de sus efectos en la acidez del aceite, la formación de peróxidos y la velocidad de descomposición de los peróxidos formados en aldehidos y cetonas durante el proceso de decoloración. La activación de las muestras de tierras recogidas se hizo utilizando ClH 4N, ClH 6N y H2SO4 30 %. Los tests de decoloración de las muestras activadas se llevaron a cabo usando los cuatro tipos mayoritarios de aceites procesados en Egipto: aceite de semilla de algodón, de girasol, de soja y de palma. Además de los

  1. Utilization of concentrate of membrane filtration of bleach plant effluent in brick production

    Utilization potential of membrane filtration retentate (concentrate) of bleach plant effluent from paper industry, in bricks production, was investigated in the present study. Bricks were prepared by using retentate of membrane filtration in place of water. The physical properties measured for bricks were dimensions, density, moisture content, compressive strength, water absorption and porosity. Chemical analysis of the bricks was performed for water leachability and acid leachability, using ASTM Standard methods D 3987-06 and D 5233-92 respectively. The leachate samples were analyzed for Al, Cu, Fe, Co, Cr, Pb, Ni and Zn using AAS (atomic absorption spectrophotometer). Adsorbable organic halides (AOX) of leachate were analyzed by using AOX analyzer model ECS 1200 using column method. It was observed that the physical and chemical properties of bricks especially fire clay bricks were not adversely affected by the use of wastewater. Therefore, the organic matter of the retentate of membrane filtration creates no problems for this application.

  2. Removal of lead from aqueous solutions with a treated spent bleaching earth

    A spent bleaching earth from an edible oil refinery has been treated by impregnation with a normal sodium hydroxide solution followed by mild thermal treatment (100 deg. C). The obtained material (TSBE) was washed, dried and characterized by X-ray diffraction, FTIR, SEM, BET and thermal analysis. The clay structure was not apparently affected by the treatment and the impregnated organic matter was quantitatively removed. We have investigated the sorption of lead on this material, the spent bleaching earth (SBE) and the virgin bleaching earth (VBE). The kinetic results fit the pseudo second-order kinetic model and the Weber and Morris, intraparticle diffusion model. The pH had effect on the sorption efficiency. The sorption isotherms followed the Langmuir model for various sorbent concentrations with good values of determination coefficient. A comparison between the results obtained with this material and those of the literature highlighted a good removal capacity of the treated spent bleaching earth at low cost

  3. Short-term coral bleaching is not recorded by skeletal boron isotopes.

    Verena Schoepf

    Full Text Available Coral skeletal boron isotopes have been established as a proxy for seawater pH, yet it remains unclear if and how this proxy is affected by seawater temperature. Specifically, it has never been directly tested whether coral bleaching caused by high water temperatures influences coral boron isotopes. Here we report the results from a controlled bleaching experiment conducted on the Caribbean corals Porites divaricata, Porites astreoides, and Orbicella faveolata. Stable boron (δ11B, carbon (δ13C, oxygen (δ18O isotopes, Sr/Ca, Mg/Ca, U/Ca, and Ba/Ca ratios, as well as chlorophyll a concentrations and calcification rates were measured on coral skeletal material corresponding to the period during and immediately after the elevated temperature treatment and again after 6 weeks of recovery on the reef. We show that under these conditions, coral bleaching did not affect the boron isotopic signature in any coral species tested, despite significant changes in coral physiology. This contradicts published findings from coral cores, where significant decreases in boron isotopes were interpreted as corresponding to times of known mass bleaching events. In contrast, δ13C and δ18O exhibited major enrichment corresponding to decreases in calcification rates associated with bleaching. Sr/Ca of bleached corals did not consistently record the 1.2°C difference in seawater temperature during the bleaching treatment, or alternatively show a consistent increase due to impaired photosynthesis and calcification. Mg/Ca, U/Ca, and Ba/Ca were affected by coral bleaching in some of the coral species, but the observed patterns could not be satisfactorily explained by temperature dependence or changes in coral physiology. This demonstrates that coral boron isotopes do not record short-term bleaching events, and therefore cannot be used as a proxy for past bleaching events. The robustness of coral boron isotopes to changes in coral physiology, however, suggests that

  4. Bleaching in vital teeth: a literary review

    Felipe Fagundes Soares

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Tooth bleaching technique has presented a significant evolution, promoting higher satisfaction and comfort to the patients. Therefore, the aim of this study was to present the bleaching agents and the techniques, discussing advantages and disadvantages of each one, and the effect of these agents in the oral environment. The main agents used in the bleaching technique are the hydrogen peroxide and the carbamide peroxide, promoting the bleaching effect through oxidation of organic compounds. The application of these agents can be made at home or at a doctor office. During treatment, it may occur some adverse effects, such as tooth sensibility, increasing of dental porosity, and some interactions with the restorative material. However, these adverse effects can be eliminated or controlled when the treatment is executed under professional orientation. When the bleaching technique is well indicated and correctly conducted, it is associated with significantly positive results.

  5. [Gingival bleaching: teaching and ethnocentrism].

    Bolla, Edson Daruich; Goldenberg, Paulete

    2010-06-01

    The aim of this study was to identify buccal/gingival cosmetic dentistry patterns subjacent to formation and professional practice of the dental surgeon from the ethnocentrism point of view. This is an exploratory study with a qualitative approach based on the thematic analysis. Initially a documental analysis was carried out. Thereafter, dental surgeons were interviewed and semi-structured questions were applied. In the Periodontal teaching field, this study showed that the presence of racial melanosis is omitted or treated as an alteration in the normality patterns and it is considered anti-aesthetic. All the interviewers learnt how to practice gingival bleaching in the post-graduation courses, they were all encouraged to offer this cosmetic dentistry procedure with the opportunity of obtaining a beautiful and healthy smile, thus assuring the belief of the Caucasian racial aesthetic superiority. This study make us think that the offer of gingival bleaching is oriented by the Caucasian pattern of beauty evidencing the ethnocentric character of this procedure. PMID:20640340

  6. Optical bleaching, TSL and OSL features of CVD diamond

    Luminescence and optical features of chemical vapour deposition (CVD) diamond have been studied in view of the potential application of this material in ionising radiation dosimetry field. For this purpose, thermally stimulated luminescence (TSL) and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) techniques have been used. A large amount of work has emphasised the excellent dosimetric properties of CVD diamond. Nevertheless, TSL measurements showed that after irradiation, this material is extremely sensitive to ambient light and the stored dose information is drastically affected by optical bleaching. From OSL analysis, it follows that both types of processes (TSL and OSL) were characterised by the same excitation and emission spectra and that optical bleaching originated from a broad stimulation band lying from visible to near infrared with a continuous character. (authors)

  7. Whole transcriptome analysis reveals changes in expression of immune-related genes during and after bleaching in a reef-building coral

    Pinzón, Jorge H.; Kamel, Bishoy; Burge, Colleen A.; Harvell, C. Drew; Medina, Mónica; Weil, Ernesto; Mydlarz, Laura D.

    2015-01-01

    Climate change is negatively affecting the stability of natural ecosystems, especially coral reefs. The dissociation of the symbiosis between reef-building corals and their algal symbiont, or coral bleaching, has been linked to increased sea surface temperatures. Coral bleaching has significant impacts on corals, including an increase in disease outbreaks that can permanently change the entire reef ecosystem. Yet, little is known about the impacts of coral bleaching on the coral immune system...

  8. Local bleaching thresholds established by remote sensing techniques vary among reefs with deviating bleaching patterns during the 2012 event in the Arabian/Persian Gulf.

    Shuail, Dawood; Wiedenmann, Jörg; D'Angelo, Cecilia; Baird, Andrew H; Pratchett, Morgan S; Riegl, Bernhard; Burt, John A; Petrov, Peter; Amos, Carl

    2016-04-30

    A severe bleaching event affected coral communities off the coast of Abu Dhabi, UAE in August/September, 2012. In Saadiyat and Ras Ghanada reefs ~40% of the corals showed signs of bleaching. In contrast, only 15% of the corals were affected on Delma reef. Bleaching threshold temperatures for these sites were established using remotely sensed sea surface temperature (SST) data recorded by MODIS-Aqua. The calculated threshold temperatures varied between locations (34.48 °C, 34.55 °C, 35.05 °C), resulting in site-specific deviations in the numbers of days during which these thresholds were exceeded. Hence, the less severe bleaching of Delma reef might be explained by the lower relative heat stress experienced by this coral community. However, the dominance of Porites spp. that is associated with the long-term exposure of Delma reef to elevated temperatures, as well as the more pristine setting may have additionally contributed to the higher coral bleaching threshold for this site. PMID:26971815

  9. Effects of light activated in-office bleaching on permeability, microhardness, and mineral content of enamel.

    Parreiras, S O; Vianna, P; Kossatz, S; Loguercio, A D; Reis, A

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the permeability (PE), microhardness (KHN), and mineral change in enamel after LED/laser activated in-office bleaching. For PE, the coronal portion of premolars (n=51) was subjected to bleaching with 35% hydrogen peroxide (Whiteness HP Maxx, FGM Dental Products, Joinville, SC, Brazil). The samples were stained via the histochemical method, which involves a copper sulphate solution and rubeanic acid. The penetration of dye into the enamel was measured. The KHN of enamel was assessed before treatment, immediately after the bleaching treatment, and again after one week. The calcium and phosphorus content were analyzed with a scanning electron microscope with energy-dispersive X-ray (JSM 6360LV, Jeol Ltd, Tokyo, Japan). The data set from each test was subjected to appropriate parametric statistical analysis (α=0.05). No significant differences were observed for PE in NLA and LA compared to the control group (p=0.98), as well as for calcium (p=0.16) and phosphorus (p=0.80) content. Significant reduction of KHN after bleaching occurred for both groups (p<0.001). After immersion in artificial saliva, the KHN of the enamel for all groups was similar to that seen before bleaching. Light activation during in-office bleaching does not produce significant changes in the enamel compared to a non-light-activated technique. PMID:24815914

  10. Trans fatty acid intake is related to emotional affect in the Adventist Health Study-2.

    Ford, Patricia A; Jaceldo-Siegl, Karen; Lee, Jerry W; Tonstad, Serena

    2016-06-01

    Trans fatty acids in Western diets increase health risks, and have been associated with the risk of depression. We hypothesized that intakes of trans fatty acids (primarily from margarines and baked goods) were inversely associated with positive affect and positively associated with negative affect in a longitudinal study. Church attendees residing in North America completed a food frequency questionnaire in 2002-6 as part of the Adventist Health Study-2. A subset in which we excluded participants with established cardiovascular disease (n=8,771) completed the Positive and Negative Affect Schedule (PANAS) in 2006-7. The associations between dietary intakes of fatty acids to positive and negative affect were tested with linear regression analysis controlling for age, gender, ethnicity, education, body mass index, exercise, sleep, sleep squared, Mediterranean diet, total energy intake and alcohol. Intakes of trans fatty acids were inversely associated with positive affect (β=-0.06, B=-0.27 [95% CI -0.37, -0.17], pemotional affect while the n-6: n-3 ratio is detrimental to positive affect. PMID:27188896

  11. Coral bleaching on high-latitude marginal reefs at Sodwana Bay, South Africa

    Coral bleaching, involving the expulsion of symbiotic zooxanthellae from the host cells, poses a major threat to coral reefs throughout their distributional range. The role of temperature in coral bleaching has been extensively investigated and is widely accepted. A bleaching event was observed on the marginal high-latitude reefs of South Africa located at Sodwana Bay during the summer months of 2000. This was associated with increased sea temperatures with high seasonal peaks in summer and increased radiation in exceptionally clear water. The bleaching was limited to Two-mile Reef and Nine-mile Reef at Sodwana Bay and affected -1 from May 1994 to April 2000. High maximum temperatures were measured (>29 deg. C). The lowest mean monthly and the mean maximum monthly temperatures at which coral bleaching occurred were 27.5 and 28.8 deg. C, respectively, while the duration for which high temperatures occurred in 2000 was 67 days at ≥27.5 deg. C (4 days at ≥28.8 deg. C). Increased water clarity and radiation appeared to be a synergistic cause in the coral bleaching encountered at Sodwana Bay

  12. Effect of two bleaching agents on enamel morphology: a SEM study

    Ghavam M.

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: Bleaching materials are able to change the surface morphology as well as mineral and organic content of tooth structure. Considering that bleaching is done for aesthetic purpose, awareness of the possible effect of these materials on hard tissue is important, because it may affect the restorative treatments. Purpose: The aim of this study was comparing the effect of two bleaching materials, Kimia and Ultradent both containing 35% H2O2, on tooth enamel by SEM. Materials and Methods: Five intact central incisors were cut into three sections vertically and each part was randomly divided into three groups. Group 1 (control, without any bleaching. Group 2, bleached with Kimia 35% H2O2. Group 3, bleached with Ultradent 35% H2O2. Each tooth served as its own control. Then the samples were observed by SEM with 250 and 500 magnifications. Results: In the control group some scratches and small white grains were observed which seems to be the result of mastication trauma and pumice powder. In the other groups, morphologic changes like increased surface roughness, deepening of cracks, rod exposure and presence of new cracks were observed. The two experimental materials did not differ in these regards. Conclusion: It seems that both studied materials have limited destructive effects on tooth enamel which seems to be of no clinical importance.

  13. The effect of remin pro and MI paste plus on bleached enamel surface roughness.

    Haleh Heshmat

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The growing demand for enhanced esthetic appearance has led to great developments in bleaching products. The exposure of hard tissues of the tooth to bleaching agents can affect the roughness of the enamel surface. The freshly bleached enamel surface exposed to various surface treatments such as fluoride and other remineralizing agents have been assessed in this study. The aim of this experimental study was to compare the effect of Casein Phosphopeptide-Amorphous Calcium Phosphate with Fluoride (MI Paste Plus and Remin Pro on the enamel surface roughness after bleaching.Thirty enamel samples of sound human permanent molars were prepared for this study. After initial roughness measurement with profilometer, the samples were exposed to 37% carbamide peroxide bleaching agent 20 minutes twice, and randomly divided into three groups of ten. In group 1, a CPP-ACPF containing paste (MI Paste Plus and in group 2, Remin Pro were applied to the teeth during a 15 day period for 5 minutes, twice a day. Samples of group 3 (control were immersed in artificial saliva for 15 days. The roughness of all samples were measured at the beginning, after bleaching and after the study intervention and statistically analyzed.The surface roughness significantly increased in all groups following bleaching, and then it showed a decrease after application of both Remin Pro and CPP-ACPF in comparison to using bleaching agent (P0.05.There was no difference between surface roughness of MI Paste Plus and Remin Pro groups. Also the surface roughness was decreased compared to the initial enamel surface roughness.

  14. Coral bleaching under unconventional scenarios of climate warming and ocean acidification

    Kwiatkowski, Lester; Cox, Peter; Halloran, Paul R.; Mumby, Peter J.; Wiltshire, Andy J.

    2015-08-01

    Elevated sea surface temperatures have been shown to cause mass coral bleaching. Widespread bleaching, affecting >90% of global coral reefs and causing coral degradation, has been projected to occur by 2050 under all climate forcing pathways adopted by the IPCC for use within the Fifth Assessment Report. These pathways include an extremely ambitious pathway aimed to limit global mean temperature rise to 2 °C (ref. ; Representative Concentration Pathway 2.6--RCP2.6), which assumes full participation in emissions reductions by all countries, and even the possibility of negative emissions. The conclusions drawn from this body of work, which applied widely used algorithms to estimate coral bleaching, are that we must either accept that the loss of a large percentage of the world’s coral reefs is inevitable, or consider technological solutions to buy those reefs time until atmospheric CO2 concentrations can be reduced. Here we analyse the potential for geoengineering, through stratospheric aerosol-based solar radiation management (SRM), to reduce the extent of global coral bleaching relative to ambitious climate mitigation. Exploring the common criticism of geoengineering--that ocean acidification and its impacts will continue unabated--we focus on the sensitivity of results to the aragonite saturation state dependence of bleaching. We do not, however, address the additional detrimental impacts of ocean acidification on processes such as coral calcification that will further determine the benefit to corals of any SRM-based scenario. Despite the sensitivity of thermal bleaching thresholds to ocean acidification being uncertain, stabilizing radiative forcing at 2020 levels through SRM reduces the risk of global bleaching relative to RCP2.6 under all acidification-bleaching relationships analysed.

  15. Effect of postoperative bleaching on microleakage of etch-and-rinse and self-etch adhesives

    Vajihesadat Mortazavi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Bleaching the discoloured teeth may affect the tooth/composite interface. The aim of this in vitro experimental study was to evaluate the effect of vital tooth bleaching on microleakage of existent class V composite resin restorations bonded with three dental bonding agents. Methods : Class V cavities were prepared on buccal surfaces of 72 intact, extracted human anterior teeth with gingival margins in dentin and occlusal margins in enamel, and randomly divided into 3 groups. Cavities in the three groups were treated with Scotch bond Multi-Purpose, a total etch system and Prompt L-Pop and iBond, two self-etch adhesives. All teeth were restored with Z250 resin composite material and thermo-cycled. Each group was equally divided into the control and the bleached subgroups (n = 12. The bleached subgroups were bleached with 15% carbamide peroxide gel for 8 hours a day for 15 days. Microleakage scores were evaluated on the incisal and cervical walls. Data were analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis, Mann-Whitney and Bonferroni post-hoc tests (α = 0.05. Results: Bleaching with carbamide peroxide gel significantly increased the microleakage of composite restorations in Prompt L-Pop group at dentinal walls (P = 0.001. Bleaching had no effect on microleakage of restorations in the Scotch bond Multi-Purpose and iBond groups. Conclusion: Vital tooth bleaching with carbamide peroxide gel has an adverse effect on marginal seal of dentinal walls of existent composite resin restorations bonded with prompt L-Pop self-etch adhesive.

  16. Surviving coral bleaching events: porites growth anomalies on the Great Barrier Reef.

    Neal E Cantin

    Full Text Available Mass coral bleaching affected large parts of the Great Barrier Reef (GBR in 1998 and 2002. In this study, we assessed if signatures of these major thermal stress events were recorded in the growth characteristics of massive Porites colonies. In 2005 a suite of short (<50 cm cores were collected from apparently healthy, surviving Porites colonies, from reefs in the central GBR (18-19°S that have documented observations of widespread bleaching. Sites included inshore (Nelly Bay, Pandora Reef, annually affected by freshwater flood events, midshelf (Rib Reef, only occasionally affected by freshwater floods and offshore (Myrmidon Reef locations primarily exposed to open ocean conditions. Annual growth characteristics (extension, density and calcification were measured in 144 cores from 79 coral colonies and analysed over the common 24-year period, 1980-2003. Visual examination of the annual density bands revealed growth hiatuses associated with the bleaching years in the form of abrupt decreases in annual linear extension rates, high density stress bands and partial mortality. The 1998 mass-bleaching event reduced Porites calcification by 13 and 18% on the two inshore locations for 4 years, followed by recovery to baseline calcification rates in 2002. Evidence of partial mortality was apparent in 10% of the offshore colonies in 2002; however no significant effects of the bleaching events were evident in the calcification rates at the mid shelf and offshore sites. These results highlight the spatial variation of mass bleaching events and that all reef locations within the GBR were not equally stressed by the 1998 and 2002 mass bleaching events, as some models tend to suggest, which enabled recovery of calcification on the GBR within 4 years. The dynamics in annual calcification rates and recovery displayed here should be used to improve model outputs that project how coral calcification will respond to ongoing warming of the tropical oceans.

  17. ALKALINE PEROXIDE BLEACHING OF HOT WATER TREATED WHEAT STRAW

    Suvi Mustajoki

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the possibilities for chemical consumption reduction in P-P-Paa-P bleaching (P alkaline peroxide stage, Paa peracetic stage of hot water treated straw and the effect of the wheat straw variability on the process. Papermaking fibre production from wheat straw using such a process could be implemented on a small scale if chemical consumption was low enough to eliminate the need for chemical recovery. The pulp properties obtained with this process are equal to or even superior to the properties of wheat straw soda pulp. The possibility of enhancing the first peroxide stage with oxygen and pressure was studied. The possibility for substitution of sodium hydroxide partially with sodium carbonate was also investigated. The objective was to achieve International Standardization Organization (ISO brightness of 75%, with minimal sodium hydroxide consumption, whilst maintaining the pulp properties. The optimization of the peroxide bleaching is challenging if the final brightness target cannot be reduced. Results indicate that up to 25% of the sodium hydroxide could be substituted with sodium carbonate without losing brightness or affecting pulp properties. Another possibility is a mild alkali treatment between the hot water treatment and the bleaching sequence.

  18. Modeling Reef Hydrodynamics to Predict Coral Bleaching

    Bird, James; Steinberg, Craig; Hardy, Tom

    2005-11-01

    The aim of this study is to use environmental physics to predict water temperatures around and within coral reefs. Anomalously warm water is the leading cause for mass coral bleaching; thus a clearer understanding of the oceanographic mechanisms that control reef water temperatures will enable better reef management. In March 1998 a major coral bleaching event occurred at Scott Reef, a 40 km-wide lagoon 300 km off the northwest coast of Australia. Meteorological and coral cover observations were collected before, during, and after the event. In this study, two hydrodynamic models are applied to Scott Reef and validated against oceanographic data collected between March and June 2003. The models are then used to hindcast the reef hydrodynamics that led up to the 1998 bleaching event. Results show a positive correlation between poorly mixed regions and bleaching severity.

  19. Thermoluminescence dating of partially bleached sediments

    A major problem in TL dating of sediments is the lack of knowledge concerning the degree of bleaching that took place during transport of the material prior to deposition. A method is proposed that may enable partially bleached sediments to be dated by determining the correct residual value to be used with the build-up curve. The method uses a combination of results for quartz and feldspar, presuming that these two minerals have the same age. Samples are bleached by sunlight for different periods, and the correct bleaching time is taken as that producing residual values which yield identical ages for the minerals. Preliminary results for a number of aeolian sediments from Jutland are presented. In most cases the TL ages were in acceptable agreement with expected ages. (author)

  20. Ocean acidification has no effect on thermal bleaching in the coral Seriatopora caliendrum

    Wall, C. B.; Fan, T.-Y.; Edmunds, P. J.

    2014-03-01

    The objective of this study was to test whether elevated pCO2 predicted for the year 2100 (85.1 Pa) affects bleaching in the coral Seriatopora caliendrum (Ehrenberg 1834) either independently or interactively with high temperature (30.5 °C). Response variables detected the sequence of events associated with the onset of bleaching: reduction in the photosynthetic performance of symbionts as measured by maximum photochemical efficiency ( F v/ F m) and effective photochemical efficiency (Δ F/ F m') of PSII, declines in net photosynthesis ( P net) and photosynthetic efficiency (alpha, α), and finally, reduced chlorophyll a and symbiont concentrations. S. caliendrum was collected from Nanwan Bay, Taiwan, and subjected to combinations of temperature (27.7 vs. 30.5 °C) and pCO2 (45.1 vs. 85.1 Pa) for 14 days. High temperature reduced values of all dependent variables (i.e., bleaching occurred), but high pCO2 did not affect Symbiodinium photophysiology or productivity, and did not cause bleaching. These results suggest that short-term exposure to 81.5 Pa pCO2, alone and in combination with elevated temperature, does not cause or affect coral bleaching.

  1. HOME BLEACHING TECHNIQUE USING CARBAMIDE PEROXIDE

    Rahmi Alma Farah Adang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available There are two basic kinds of tooth whitening agents. The first is over the counter materials and the other is material used by the dentist or under dentist control. Home bleaching is a technique using 10% carbamide peroxide on a tray applied by patient under dentist supervision. This paper is a review of the effect of 10% carbamide peroxide home bleaching technique. It is revealed that this method is simple, safe, economic, and has short chairside time.

  2. Local Stressors Reduce Coral Resilience to Bleaching

    Carilli, Jessica E; Norris, Richard D.; Black, Bryan A.; Walsh, Sheila M.; McField, Melanie

    2009-01-01

    Coral bleaching, during which corals lose their symbiotic dinoflagellates, typically corresponds with periods of intense heat stress, and appears to be increasing in frequency and geographic extent as the climate warms. A fundamental question in coral reef ecology is whether chronic local stress reduces coral resistance and resilience from episodic stress such as bleaching, or alternatively promotes acclimatization, potentially increasing resistance and resilience. Here we show that following...

  3. Fatty acid composition of camelina sativa as affected by combined nitrogen and sulphur fertilisation

    Šípalová, Markéta; Lošák, Tomáš; Hlušek, Jaroslav; Vollmann, Johann; Hudec, Jozef; Filipčík, Radek; Macek, Michal; Kráčmar, Stanislav

    2011-01-01

    Camelina (false flax) oil is an important source of linolenic acid (C18:3). As agronomic treatments such as fertilization may affect seed quality parameters in oilseeds, fatty acid composition and oil content of Camelina sativa were investigated as affected by the combined application of nitrogen and sulphur in pot experiments. Nitrogen was applied as NH4NO3 at rates of 0.6 (N1), 0.9 (N2) or 1.2 (N3) g per pot. To increase the natural soil S-SO42- level of 25 mg/kg (S0) to 35 mg/kg (S1), 45 m...

  4. Fermentation Conditions that Affect Clavulanic Acid Production in Streptomyces clavuligerus: A Systematic Review.

    Ser, Hooi-Leng; Law, Jodi Woan-Fei; Chaiyakunapruk, Nathorn; Jacob, Sabrina Anne; Palanisamy, Uma Devi; Chan, Kok-Gan; Goh, Bey-Hing; Lee, Learn-Han

    2016-01-01

    The β-lactamase inhibitor, clavulanic acid is frequently used in combination with β-lactam antibiotics to treat a wide spectrum of infectious diseases. Clavulanic acid prevents drug resistance by pathogens against these β-lactam antibiotics by preventing the degradation of the β-lactam ring, thus ensuring eradication of these harmful microorganisms from the host. This systematic review provides an overview on the fermentation conditions that affect the production of clavulanic acid in the firstly described producer, Streptomyces clavuligerus. A thorough search was conducted using predefined terms in several electronic databases (PubMed, Medline, ScienceDirect, EBSCO), from database inception to June 30th 2015. Studies must involve wild-type Streptomyces clavuligerus, and full texts needed to be available. A total of 29 eligible articles were identified. Based on the literature, several factors were identified that could affect the production of clavulanic acid in S. clavuligerus. The addition of glycerol or other vegetable oils (e.g., olive oil, corn oil) could potentially affect clavulanic acid production. Furthermore, some amino acids such as arginine and ornithine, could serve as potential precursors to increase clavulanic acid yield. The comparison of different fermentation systems revealed that fed-batch fermentation yields higher amounts of clavulanic acid as compared to batch fermentation, probably due to the maintenance of substrates and constant monitoring of certain entities (such as pH, oxygen availability, etc.). Overall, these findings provide vital knowledge and insight that could assist media optimization and fermentation design for clavulanic acid production in S. clavuligerus. PMID:27148211

  5. Fermentation Conditions that Affect Clavulanic Acid Production in Streptomyces clavuligerus: A Systematic Review

    Ser, Hooi-Leng; Law, Jodi Woan-Fei; Chaiyakunapruk, Nathorn; Jacob, Sabrina Anne; Palanisamy, Uma Devi; Chan, Kok-Gan; Goh, Bey-Hing; Lee, Learn-Han

    2016-01-01

    The β-lactamase inhibitor, clavulanic acid is frequently used in combination with β-lactam antibiotics to treat a wide spectrum of infectious diseases. Clavulanic acid prevents drug resistance by pathogens against these β-lactam antibiotics by preventing the degradation of the β-lactam ring, thus ensuring eradication of these harmful microorganisms from the host. This systematic review provides an overview on the fermentation conditions that affect the production of clavulanic acid in the firstly described producer, Streptomyces clavuligerus. A thorough search was conducted using predefined terms in several electronic databases (PubMed, Medline, ScienceDirect, EBSCO), from database inception to June 30th 2015. Studies must involve wild-type Streptomyces clavuligerus, and full texts needed to be available. A total of 29 eligible articles were identified. Based on the literature, several factors were identified that could affect the production of clavulanic acid in S. clavuligerus. The addition of glycerol or other vegetable oils (e.g., olive oil, corn oil) could potentially affect clavulanic acid production. Furthermore, some amino acids such as arginine and ornithine, could serve as potential precursors to increase clavulanic acid yield. The comparison of different fermentation systems revealed that fed-batch fermentation yields higher amounts of clavulanic acid as compared to batch fermentation, probably due to the maintenance of substrates and constant monitoring of certain entities (such as pH, oxygen availability, etc.). Overall, these findings provide vital knowledge and insight that could assist media optimization and fermentation design for clavulanic acid production in S. clavuligerus. PMID:27148211

  6. Melanin bleaching with dilute hydrogen peroxide: a simple and rapid method.

    Liu, Chia-Hsing; Lin, Chih-Hung; Tsai, Min-Jan; Chen, Wan-Tzu; Chai, Chee-Yin; Huang, Ya-Chun; Tsai, Kun-Bow

    2013-05-01

    Melanins are naturally occurring pigments in both normal and pathologic tissues. Two common bleaching processes are potassium permanganate followed by oxalic acid treatment and dilute hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) process. The potassium permanganate/oxalic acid method is faster and more easily incorporated in conventional daily immunostaining protocols, whereas the dilute H2O2 method requires 24 hours. This study aimed to reduce melanin bleaching time by using a 10% H2O2 dilution. First, reaction time was reduced to 30 minutes by raising the temperature to 65°C. Second, containers with high thermal conductivity were used to improve bleaching effectiveness. Experimental comparisons of melanin treatments with H2O2 contained in an iron jar, a glass coplin jar, and a plastic steel jar obtained bleaching time of 20, 30, and 40 minutes, respectively. These modifications of the conventional bleaching method significantly improve the speed and efficiency of the procedure and are recommended when performing immunohistochemical studies. PMID:23060296

  7. OZONE BLEACHING AT NEUTRAL PH – A NEW CONCEPT

    Fernando Carvalho; Denis Asbahr; Antonio A. R. Godoy; Jorge Luiz Colodette

    2010-01-01

    The effect of medium consistency ozone stage pH was evaluated for brown and oxygen delignified eucalyptus kraft pulp samples obtained from VCP - Luiz Antônio pulp mill. These samples were used as such or previously treated with the hot acid stage (A). The main objective of this study was to determine the viability of increasing the ozone stage pH aiming at decreasing bleaching variable costs. The ozone stage was studied in the pH range of 2.5-9.0, taking into account some important variables ...

  8. ECF BLEACHING WITH A FINAL HYDROGEN PEROXIDE STAGE: IMPACT ON THE CHEMICAL COMPOSITION OF Eucalyptus globulus KRAFT PULPS

    Pedro E. G. Loureiro

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Two industrial elemental chlorine free (ECF bleaching sequences, D0(EOPD1(EPD2 and OQ(PODP, are compared with respect to the bulk content of lignin, carboxyl, hexeneuronic acids (HexA, and reducing groups after each bleaching stage. HexA groups contribute significantly to the total content of carboxyl groups, and their degradation during chlorine dioxide bleaching is reflected by a decrease of the carboxyl content. The higher degradation using an enhanced use of oxygen-based bleaching chemicals is associated with a higher fiber charge reduction, mainly due to xylan depletion. Additionally, the effect of process variables of a laboratory final hydrogen peroxide stage on the chemical composition of the fully bleached pulp (D0(EOPD1P and OQ(PODP is studied. The ability of final peroxide bleaching to raise the content of carboxyl groups is dependent on the operating conditions and pulp bleaching history. A balance between carbohydrate oxidation and dissolution of oxidized groups determines the effect on fiber charge. The effect of hydrogen peroxide stabilizers added into the final stage on the content of carboxyl groups is also reported.

  9. Metal cycling during sediment early diagenesis in a water reservoir affected by acid mine drainage

    Torres, Ester; Ayora, Carlos; Canovas, C. R.;

    2013-01-01

    The discharge of acid mine drainage (AMD) into a reservoir may seriously affect the water quality. To investigate the metal transfer between the water and the sediment, three cores were collected from the Sancho Reservoir (Iberian Pyrite Belt, SW Spain) during different seasons: turnover event...

  10. Assessment of the process of cottonseed oil bleaching in hexane

    Megahed, Ola A.

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available This work has been initiated to assess the feasibility of bleaching cottonseed oil in miscella as a processing step next to alkali refining in miscella. Alkali refining of cottonseed oil in miscella has several advantages over conventional refining technologies with respect to oil quality, oil losses and process cost. Therefore, the process efficiency of the bleaching of cottonseed oil in presence of hexane (at a volumetric ratio of 1:1, has been studied and compared to that without solvent. The process efficiency has been evaluated according to the decolourization capacity, the oil losses on spent earth, the filtration rate of the oil from the clay and the acidity of the bleached oil as well as its peroxide content. The bleaching in presence of hexane was carried out at 25ºC whereas that by conventional bleaching at 110ºC. Different clay loads were used in each of the two bleaching techniques and the colour indices of the oils before and after bleaching determined in each case. The results were used to predict Freundlich adsorption equations for the oil pigments in both cases. These equations were then used to predict the colour of the oils obtained by bleaching of refined oils of different grades. The results have shown that oil decolourization is more efficient in presence of solvent when the starting oil is of an acceptable grade and the reverse is true for low grade oils. Also, the possibility of oil oxidation during bleaching is less in presence of solvent. Moreover, the bleaching in miscella has proved two other additional advantages over conventional bleaching. The filtration of oil from clay is much faster in miscella bleaching and the oil losses on spent earth is lower. This will be reflected on the overall process economy.Este trabajo ha sido iniciado para evaluar la viabilidad de la decoloración del aceite de semilla de algodón en miscela como un paso de procesado próximo a la refinación alcalina en miscela. La refinaci

  11. Diatoms as biomonitors in two temporary streams affected by acid drainage from disused mines

    Diatoms are increasingly used as biomonitors of water quality in Australia, partly as an extension of the AUSRIVAS concept and partly through the increasing emphasis on biological/ecological monitoring of stream health that is acknowledged in the Australian and New Zealand water quality guidelines (ANZECC and ARMCANZ, 2000). This work brings together the findings of three studies relating diatom populations to the water chemistry of two temporary streams affected by acid drainage. In the three studies reported, changes in the benthic diatom flora have been successfully used to: show the toxic effects of acid drainage from two mine sites; differentiate between nutrient and acid drainage pollution in a stream system affected by more than one pollutant and provide independent corroboration of the AQUARISK ecological risk assessment code

  12. Characterization of napthenic acids in oil sands process-affected waters using fluorescence technology

    Process-affected water from oil sands production plants presents a major environmental challenge to oil sands operators due to its toxicity to different organisms as well as its corrosiveness in refinery units. This abstract investigated the use of fluorescence excitation-emission matrices to detect and characterize changes in naphthenic acid in oil sands process-affected waters. Samples from oil sands production plants and storage ponds were tested. The study showed that oil sands naphthenic acids show characteristic fluorescence signatures when excited by ultraviolet light in the range of 260 to 350 mm. The signal was a unique attribute of the naphthenic acid molecule. Changes in the fluorescence signature can be used to determine chemical changes such as degradation or aging. It was concluded that the technology can be used as a non-invasive continuous water quality monitoring tool to increase process control in oil sands processing plants

  13. Characterization of napthenic acids in oil sands process-affected waters using fluorescence technology

    Brown, L.; Alostaz, M.; Ulrich, A. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    2009-07-01

    Process-affected water from oil sands production plants presents a major environmental challenge to oil sands operators due to its toxicity to different organisms as well as its corrosiveness in refinery units. This abstract investigated the use of fluorescence excitation-emission matrices to detect and characterize changes in naphthenic acid in oil sands process-affected waters. Samples from oil sands production plants and storage ponds were tested. The study showed that oil sands naphthenic acids show characteristic fluorescence signatures when excited by ultraviolet light in the range of 260 to 350 mm. The signal was a unique attribute of the naphthenic acid molecule. Changes in the fluorescence signature can be used to determine chemical changes such as degradation or aging. It was concluded that the technology can be used as a non-invasive continuous water quality monitoring tool to increase process control in oil sands processing plants.

  14. Broiler skin color as affected by organic acids: influence of concentration and method of application.

    Bilgili, S F; Conner, D E; Pinion, J L; Tamblyn, K C

    1998-05-01

    Color of broiler skin was evaluated after exposure to organic acids under various concentrations and simulated potential plant application conditions. Breast skin from chilled broiler carcasses was treated with acetic (AA), citric (CA), lactic (LA), malic (ML), mandelic (MN), propionic (PA), or tartaric (TA) acids at 0.5, 1, 2, 4, and 6% concentrations. Each acid and concentration was applied in simulated dip (23 C for 15 s), scalder (50 C for 2 min), and immersion chiller (1 C for 60 min) conditions. A tap water control was included with each application method. Objective color values of L* (lightness), a* (redness), and b* (yellowness) were measured before and after the treatments to calculate color differentials under a factorial arrangement of organic acids and concentrations. Skin lightness increased (P dip and scalder applications. Skin redness was reduced significantly in scalder, and yellowness in dip and scalder applications, respectively. In simulated dip application, with the exception of PA, all acids decreased lightness and increased redness and yellowness values. Propionic acid had little affect on lightness and redness values, but decreased yellowness values. In simulated scalder application, with the exception of PA, all acids decreased lightness with increasing concentration. The redness values changed little in scalder application. However, yellowness values were increased with all acids, except for PA, which decreased yellowness values. In simulated chiller conditions, all acids, except for PA, decreased lightness and redness and increased yellowness values. Propionic acid increased lightness and decreased yellowness values significantly in chiller conditions. Alterations in skin color should be taken into account in the selection and application of organic acids as carcass disinfectants. PMID:9603365

  15. Recycling of bleach plant filtrates by electrodialysis removal of inorganic non-process elements.; TOPICAL

    Water use in the pulp and paper industry is very significant, and the U.S. pulp and paper industries as well as other processing industries are actively pursuing water conservation and pollution prevention by in-process recycling of water. Bleach plant effluent is a large portion of the water discharged from a typical bleached kraft pulp mill. The recycling of bleach plant effluents to the kraft recovery cycle is widely regarded as an approach to low effluent bleached kraft pulp production. The focus of this work has been on developing an electrodialysis process for recycling the acidic bleach plant effluent of bleached Kraft pulp mills. Electrodialysis is uniquely suited as a selective kidney to remove non-process elements (NPEs) from bleach plant effluent before they reach the chemical recovery cycle. Using electrodialysis for selective NPE removal can prevent the problems caused by accumulation of inorganic NPEs in the pulping cycle and recovery boiler. In this work, acidic bleach plant filtrates from three mills using different bleaching sequences based on chlorine dioxide were characterized. The analyses showed no fundamental differences in the inorganic NPE composition or other characteristics among these filtrates. The majority of total dissolved solids in the effluents were found to be inorganic NPEs. Chloride and nitrate were present at significant levels in all effluent samples. Sodium was the predominant metal ion, while calcium and magnesium were also present at considerable levels. The feasibility of using electrodialysis to selectively remove inorganic NPEs from the acidic bleach effluent was successfully demonstrated in laboratory experiments with effluents from all these three mills. Although there were some variations in these effluents, chloride and potentially harmful cations, such as potassium, calcium, and magnesium, were removed efficiently from the bleach effluents into a small-volume, concentrated purge stream. This effective removal of

  16. OVERVIEW OF IN-OFFICE BLEACHING OF VITAL TEETH

    Hegde Mithra N.

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The importance of tooth whitening for patients has shown a dramatic increase in the number of products and procedures over recent years. Vital tooth bleaching refers to chair-side clinical application of a chemical solution to a tooth surface in order to achieve whitening effect of the teeth. Vital bleaching have found to be very effective but they also have their the drawbacks. The current article gives knowledge of vital tooth whitening with respect to external bleaching methods. the external bleaching of vital teeth focuses on patient selection, mechanisms, bleaching procedure and various in-office bleaching systems and techniques and their disadvantages.

  17. Impact of mass coral bleaching on reef fish community and fishermen catches at Sabang, Aceh Province, Indonesia

    Edi Rudi; Taufiq Iskandar; Nur Fadli; Hidayati Hidayati

    2012-01-01

    Mass coral bleaching was observed at Sabang, Aceh in early 2010, and approximately 60% ofhard coral in waters surrounding Sabang died post-event. Coral mortality was expected to affect thecomposition of reef fish due to decrease its function such as providing a shelter, feeding and spawninggrounds for fish and other marine organisms. The objectives of this research were to evaluate the impactof coral bleaching on coral reef fish community and to compare the composition of fishermen catchesbef...

  18. Omega-3 fatty acids in the gravid pig uterus as affected by maternal supplementation with omega-3 fatty acids.

    Brazle, A E; Johnson, B J; Webel, S K; Rathbun, T J; Davis, D L

    2009-03-01

    Two experiments evaluated the ability of maternal fatty acid supplementation to alter conceptus and endometrial fatty acid composition. In Exp. 1, treatments were 1) the control, a corn-soybean meal diet; 2) flax, the control diet plus ground flax (3.75% of diet); and 3) protected fatty acids (PFA), the control plus a protected fish oil source rich in n-3 PUFA (Gromega, JBS United Inc., Sheridan, IN; 1.5% of diet). Supplements replaced equal parts of corn and soybean meal. When gilts reached 170 d of age, PG600 (PMSG and hCG, Intervet USA, Millsboro, DE) was injected to induce puberty, and dietary treatments (n = 8/treatment) were initiated. When detected in estrus, gilts were artificially inseminated. On d 40 to 43 of gestation, 7 gilts in the control treatment, 8 gilts in the PFA treatment, and 5 gilts in the flax treatment were pregnant and were slaughtered. Compared with the control treatment, the flax treatment tended to increase eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA: C20:5n-3) in fetuses (0.14 vs. 0.25 +/- 0.03 mg/g of dry tissue; P = 0.055), whereas gilts receiving PFA had more (P flax and PFA diets increased (P flax, and PFA diet, respectively) in the chorioallantois. In the endometrium, EPA and docosapentaenoic acid (C22:5n-3) were increased by the flax diet (P flax diet selectively increased EPA, and the PFA diet selectively increased DHA in the fetus and endometrium. In Exp. 2, gilts were fed diets containing PFA (1.5%) or a control diet beginning at approximately 170 of age (n = 13/treatment). A blood sample was collected after 30 d of treatment, and gilts were artificially inseminated when they were approximately 205 d old. Conceptus and endometrial samples were collected on d 11 to 19 of pregnancy. Plasma samples indicated that PFA increased (P breeding, affected endometrial, conceptus, and fetal fatty acid composition in early pregnancy. Dynamic day effects in fatty acid composition indicate this may be a critical period for maternal fatty acid resources to

  19. Effectiveness of home bleaching agents in discolored teeth and influence on enamel microhardness

    Carina Sinclér Delfino

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: This study evaluated the effectiveness of different home bleaching agents on color alteration and their influence on surface and subsurface microhardness of discolored bovine enamel. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Forty-five fragments of bovine incisors were randomly allocated into 3 groups (n=15 according to the bleaching agent: 10% carbamide peroxide gel (CP10, 16% carbamide peroxide gel (CP16 and 6.5%-hydrogen-peroxide-based strip (HP6.5. Before bleaching treatment, initial values of Knoop surface microhardness and color (CIEL*a*b* were obtained and the fragments were artificially stained in hemolyzed rat blood. Then, bleaching treatments were performed over a 21-day period. Color changes (ΔE were assessed at 7, 14 and 21 days, and final surface microhardness reading was done after 21 days. Thereafter, the fragments were bisected to obtain subsurface microhardness. Data were subjected to ANOVA and Tukey's tests (α=5%. RESULTS: Color changes produced by CP16 were similar to those of CP10, and the color changes produced by these materials were significantly superior to those produced by HP6.5. Color changes at 21 days were superior to 7 days and similar to 14 days. The time did not influence color changes for CP16, which showed similarity between the 14- and 21-day results. No statistically significant differences were found among the home bleaching agents for surface and subsurface microhardness. CONCLUSIONS: Microhardness of bovine enamel was not affected by the bleaching agents. The 16% carbamide peroxide gel was the most effective for bleaching the stained substrate.

  20. Coral bleaching on high-latitude marginal reefs at Sodwana Bay, South Africa

    Celliers, Louis; Schleyer, Michael H

    2002-12-01

    Coral bleaching, involving the expulsion of symbiotic zooxanthellae from the host cells, poses a major threat to coral reefs throughout their distributional range. The role of temperature in coral bleaching has been extensively investigated and is widely accepted. A bleaching event was observed on the marginal high-latitude reefs of South Africa located at Sodwana Bay during the summer months of 2000. This was associated with increased sea temperatures with high seasonal peaks in summer and increased radiation in exceptionally clear water. The bleaching was limited to Two-mile Reef and Nine-mile Reef at Sodwana Bay and affected <12% of the total living cover on Two-mile Reef. Montipora spp., Alveopora spongiosa and Acropora spp. were bleached, as well as some Alcyoniidae (Sinularia dura, Lobophytum depressum, L. patulum). A cyclical increase in sea temperature (with a period of 5-6 years) was recorded during 1998-2000 in addition to the regional temperature increase caused by the El Nino Southern Oscillation phenomenon. The mean sea temperature increased at a rate of 0.27 deg. C year{sup -1} from May 1994 to April 2000. High maximum temperatures were measured (>29 deg. C). The lowest mean monthly and the mean maximum monthly temperatures at which coral bleaching occurred were 27.5 and 28.8 deg. C, respectively, while the duration for which high temperatures occurred in 2000 was 67 days at {>=}27.5 deg. C (4 days at {>=}28.8 deg. C). Increased water clarity and radiation appeared to be a synergistic cause in the coral bleaching encountered at Sodwana Bay.

  1. Evaluation of peanut hulls as an alternative to bleaching clays

    Hassanein, M. M. M.

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Peanut hulls (PNH were carbonized at different temperatures, times, and evaluated at different concentrations as an alternative to bleaching clays. Evaluation of bleached crude soybean oil with PNH was based on their delta free fatty acids, reduction in peroxide value (PV, reduction in phospholipids (PL and bleachability. The performance of several commercially used bleaching clays was evaluated, for comparison. Mixtures were formulated including: PNH and Tonsil -N (TN, PNH and Fuller’s earth (FE and PNH and O-passive (OP and examined. The oxidative stability of oils was determined. Results for the investigated commercial bleaching clays revealed: TN > FE > F > TF > OP. Highest reduction in PV and PL, and highest bleachability were achieved for soybean oil bleached with 2% PNH carbonized at 500°C for 30 min (PNH”. Mixtures of PNH” with the three chosen bleaching clays indicated that 1PNH”: 2TN gave the highest bleachability. CSO was miscella bleached in hexane using PNH” and resulted in an appreciable improvement in all oil characteristics, especially in bleachability. Oxidative stability of oils was in the following order: TN > control > FE > PNH” with Induction period values of 23,1 > 6,43 > 5,73 > 2,85 h, respectively.

    Las cáscaras de maní (PNH fueron carbonizadas a diferentes temperaturas y tiempos, y utilizadas a diferentes concentraciones como una alternativa a las tierras decolorantes. La evaluación de un aceite de soja decolorado con PNH se ha basado en sus ácidos grasos libres, reducción del índice de peróxidos (PV, reducción de los fosfolípidos (PL, y en la blanqueabilidad. El rendimiento de varias tierras decolorantes de uso comercial fue evaluado y comparado con el de PNH carbonizada. Las mezclas formuladas incluían: PNH y Tonsil-N (TN, PNH y tierras de Fuller (FE y PNH y O-pasivo (OP. La estabilidad oxidativa de los aceites resultantes fue determinada. Los resultados revelaron que la efectividad de la

  2. Influence of microhybrid resin and etching times on bleached enamel for the bonding of ceramic brackets

    Leily Macedo Firoozmand

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength (SBS of polycrystalline ceramic brackets (PCB bonded after bleaching treatment using different composite resins and enamel etching times. A total of 144 bovine incisors were randomly divided into two study groups (n = 72, each as follows: G1, enamel bleached with 35% hydrogen peroxide, and G2 (control group, enamel unbleached. After the bleaching treatment, the samples were stored in artificial saliva for 14 days. These groups were further divided into two subgroups (n = 36, each as follows: GA, brackets bonded with Transbond XT (3M and GB, brackets bonded with Filtek Z250 (3M. For each resin used, three different etching times with 37% phosphoric acid (15, 30 and 60 seconds were tested. SBS tests were performed using a universal testing machine (EMIC, and the adhesive remnant index (ARI score was verified. Significant differences among the three experimental conditions and interactions between the groups were observed. The type of composite resin accounted for 24% of the influence on the bond strength, whereas the etching time and bleaching treatment accounted for 14.5% and 10% of the influence on bond strength, respectively. The ARI revealed that the most common area of adhesion failure was at the composite resin-bracket interface. The type of composite resin, etching time and external bleaching significantly influenced the SBS of PCB on enamel, even after 14 days of saliva storage.

  3. Erosion and abrasion on dental structures undergoing at-home bleaching

    Tarquinio SBC

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Flávio Fernando Demarco1, Sônia Saeger Meireles2, Hugo Ramalho Sarmento1, Raquel Venâncio Fernandes Dantas1, Tatiana Botero3, Sandra Beatriz Chaves Tarquinio11Graduate Program in Dentistry, School of Dentistry, Federal University of Pelotas, Brazil; 2Department of Operative Dentistry, Federal University of Paraíba, Brazil; 3Cariology, Restorative Science, and Endodontics Department, School of Dentistry, University of Michigan, MI, USAAbstract: This review investigates erosion and abrasion in dental structures undergoing at-home bleaching. Dental erosion is a multifactorial condition that may be idiopathic or caused by a known acid source. Some bleaching agents have a pH lower than the critical level, which can cause changes in the enamel mineral content. Investigations have shown that at-home tooth bleaching with low concentrations of hydrogen or carbamide peroxide have no significant damaging effects on enamel and dentin surface properties. Most studies where erosion was observed were in vitro. Even though the treatment may cause side effects like sensitivity and gingival irritation, these usually disappear at the end of treatment. Considering the literature reviewed, we conclude that tooth bleaching agents based on hydrogen or carbamide peroxide have no clinically significant influence on enamel/dentin mineral loss caused by erosion or abrasion. Furthermore, the treatment is tolerable and safe, and any adverse effects can be easily reversed and controlled.Keywords: peroxide, tooth bleaching, enamel, dentin, erosion, abrasion

  4. Coupling of hydrologic transport and chemical reactions in a stream affected by acid mine drainage

    Kimball, B.A.; Broshears, R.E.; Bencala, K.E.; McKnight, Diane M.

    1994-01-01

    Experiments in St. Kevin Gulch, an acid mine drainage stream, examined the coupling of hydrologic transport to chemical reactions affecting metal concentrations. Injection of LiCl as a conservative tracer was used to determine discharge and residence time along a 1497-m reach. Transport of metals downstream from inflows of acidic, metal-rich water was evaluated based on synoptic samples of metal concentrations and the hydrologic characteristics of the stream. Transport of SO4 and Mn was generally conservative, but in the subreaches most affected by acidic inflows, transport was reactive. Both 0.1-??m filtered and particulate Fe were reactive over most of the stream reach. Filtered Al partitioned to the particulate phase in response to high instream concentrations. Simulations that accounted for the removal of SO4, Mn, Fe, and Al with first-order reactions reproduced the steady-state profiles. The calculated rate constants for net removal used in the simulations embody several processes that occur on a stream-reach scale. The comparison between rates of hydrologie transport and chemical reactions indicates that reactions are only important over short distances in the stream near the acidic inflows, where reactions occur on a comparable time scale with hydrologic transport and thus affect metal concentrations.

  5. The effects of bleach plant effluent recycle in kraft mill green liquors

    Richardson, B.M.; Uloth, V.C. [Pulp and Paper Research Inst. of Canada, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Dorris, G.M. [Pulp and Paper Research Inst. of Canada, Pointe Claire, PQ (Canada); Stafford, E. C.

    1995-12-31

    A new approach to reducing or eliminating effluent flows from a kraft mill through process changes and by recycling, was presented. A closed system experiment was conducted in which bleach plant effluents and green liquors were used to simulate effluent recycling to the recausticizing area in place of fresh water. Results showed that with current levels of water use, acid effluents from bleaching of softwood pulp could be recycled to the recausticizing area if a 5-18 per cent loss in causticizing efficiency and a 10 per cent decrease in the lime mud settling rate was tolerable. High levels of sodium chloride did not always reduce causticizing efficiency. It was found that bleach plant water usage was very high in the plants studied. New ways to minimize water use in the plant must be found if a significant degree of closure is to be achieved. 15 refs., 6 tabs., 8 figs.

  6. Ultrasound aided in situ transesterification of crude palm oil adsorbed on spent bleaching clay

    Research highlights: → Crude palm oil adsorbed on spent bleaching clay converted to biodiesel. → Ultrasound dislodges adsorbed oil from spent bleaching clay into reaction mixture. → Co-solvents promotes miscibility of the reactants. -- Abstract: Adsorbed crude palm oil on spent bleaching clay (SBC) was in situ transesterified to methyl esters (biodiesel) by the aid of ultrasound and organic co-solvents (petroleum ether (PE) or ethyl methyl ketone (EMK)). The SBC under study was found to contain 24.2-27.0% of crude oil with free fatty acids (FFA) of 3.01% and moisture content of 0.29%. The optimized reaction conditions were as follows: methanol to oil molar ratio of 150:1; catalyst (KOH), 20%; reaction temperature, 60 ± 2 oC; reaction time, 2 h. Using PE as a co-solvent, highest conversion of 75.2% was achieved while 60% was recorded with EMK.

  7. APPLIED STUDY OF BIRCH PULP BLEACHING USING DIMETHYLDIOXIRANE TO OBTAIN ACETATE-GRADE PULP

    Shu-Ke Zhou

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available As a pulp bleaching agent, dimethyldioxirane (DMD is effective and selective. In this study, it was employed as a delignifying agent or as an activating agent for hydrogen peroxide treatment in bleaching acetate-grade pulp. Brightness, kappa number, degree of polymerization (DP, and alpha-cellulose content were evaluated to determine the optimal charges of DMD: 2.5% AO, and 4% HSO5-, respectively. Results from the totally chlorine-free (TCF sequences MEQMPA, MEpQMPA, and OQMPA suggested that DMD is both effective and selective as a delignifying agent but not as a brightening agent as compared to oxygen. And in a long sequence for the bleaching of dissolving pulp, acid treatment can be used in two approaches: to remove the metal ions without washing before the chelation stage, and to reduce hemicellulose and ash in the final stage.

  8. Ultrasound aided in situ transesterification of crude palm oil adsorbed on spent bleaching clay

    Boey, Peng-Lim [School of Chemical Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800 Minden, Penang (Malaysia); Ganesan, Shangeetha, E-mail: shangeetha.ganesan@gmail.co [School of Chemical Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800 Minden, Penang (Malaysia); Maniam, Gaanty Pragas [School of Chemical Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800 Minden, Penang (Malaysia); Ali, Dafaalla Mohamed Hag [School of Chemical Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800 Minden, Penang (Malaysia); Chemistry Department, Sudan University of Science and Technology, P.O. Box 407, Khartoum (Sudan)

    2011-05-15

    Research highlights: {yields} Crude palm oil adsorbed on spent bleaching clay converted to biodiesel. {yields} Ultrasound dislodges adsorbed oil from spent bleaching clay into reaction mixture. {yields} Co-solvents promotes miscibility of the reactants. -- Abstract: Adsorbed crude palm oil on spent bleaching clay (SBC) was in situ transesterified to methyl esters (biodiesel) by the aid of ultrasound and organic co-solvents (petroleum ether (PE) or ethyl methyl ketone (EMK)). The SBC under study was found to contain 24.2-27.0% of crude oil with free fatty acids (FFA) of 3.01% and moisture content of 0.29%. The optimized reaction conditions were as follows: methanol to oil molar ratio of 150:1; catalyst (KOH), 20%; reaction temperature, 60 {+-} 2 {sup o}C; reaction time, 2 h. Using PE as a co-solvent, highest conversion of 75.2% was achieved while 60% was recorded with EMK.

  9. Lamb meat quality and intramuscular fatty acid composition as affected by concentrates including different legume seeds

    Pietro Pennisi

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the experiment was to study the effect of concentrates including legume seeds (Vicia faba var. minor or Pisum sativum on lamb performances and on meat quality, with an emphasis on intramuscular fatty acid composition. Thirty lambs (14.5 ± 3.45 kg live weight were randomly assigned to three dietary treatments: PEA group (concentrate including 400 g/kg of peas; FB group (concentrate including 380 g/kg of faba bean; SBM group (concentrate including 180 g/kg of soybean meal. Growth and slaughter performances were not affected by treatments as well as physical and proximate chemical meat characteristics. FB and SBM meat showed higher (P<0.001 vaccenic acid levels compared to PEA meat. Oleic acid was higher (P<0.05 in PEA meat compared to SBM meat while its level in FB meat was similar to counterparts. Linoleic acid levels tended to increase (P<0.10 in SBM lambs compared to PEA animals. PEA group showed higher (P<0.001 α-linolenic acid proportions compared to FB and SBM groups and a tendentially higher (P<0.10 eicosapentaenoic acid content compared to SBM meat. As a result, total n-3 fatty acids were higher (P<0.05 in PEA meat compared to SBM one while the proportions in FB meat were at intermediate level. These findings accounted for a lower and more favourable (P<0.001 n-6/n-3 ratio in PEA group compared to counterparts. Peas based-concentrate seemed to be more effective than faba bean- or soybean meal-included concentrates to improve the acidic profile of meat leading to higher α-linolenic acid levels and a lower n-6/n-3 ratio.

  10. Maternal dietary Alpine butter intake affects human milk: fatty acids and conjugated linoleic acid isomers.

    Bertschi, Isabelle; Collomb, Marius; Rist, Lukas; Eberhard, Pius; Sieber, Robert; Bütikofer, Ulrich; Wechsler, Daniel; Folkers, Gerd; von Mandach, Ursula

    2005-06-01

    Consumption of CLA by lactating women affects the composition of their milk, but the pattern of the different CLA isomers is still unknown. We determined the effects of short maternal supplementation with CLA-rich Alpine butter on the occurrence of FA and CLA isomers in human milk. In an open randomized controlled study with a two-period cross-over design, milk FA and CLA isomer concentrations were measured on postpartum days > or = 20 in two parallel groups of lactating women before, during, and after consumption of defined quantities of Alpine butter or margarine with comparable fat content (10 d of butter followed by 10 d of margarine for one group, and vice versa in the other). In the 16 women who completed the study (8/group), Alpine butter supplementation increased the C16 and C18 FA, the sum of saturated FA, the 18:1 trans FA, and the trans FA with CLA. The CLA isomer 18:2 c9,t11 increased by 49.7%. Significant increases were also found for the isomers t9,t11, t7,c9, t11,c13, and t8,c10 18:2. The remaining nine of the total 14 detectable isomers showed no changes, and concentrations were <5 mg/100 g fat. A breastfeeding mother can therefore modulate the FA/CLA supply of her child by consuming Alpine butter. Further studies will show whether human milk containing this FA and CLA isomer pattern acts as a functional food for newborns. PMID:16149737

  11. Local stressors reduce coral resilience to bleaching.

    Jessica E Carilli

    Full Text Available Coral bleaching, during which corals lose their symbiotic dinoflagellates, typically corresponds with periods of intense heat stress, and appears to be increasing in frequency and geographic extent as the climate warms. A fundamental question in coral reef ecology is whether chronic local stress reduces coral resistance and resilience from episodic stress such as bleaching, or alternatively promotes acclimatization, potentially increasing resistance and resilience. Here we show that following a major bleaching event, Montastraea faveolata coral growth rates at sites with higher local anthropogenic stressors remained suppressed for at least 8 years, while coral growth rates at sites with lower stress recovered in 2-3 years. Instead of promoting acclimatization, our data indicate that background stress reduces coral fitness and resilience to episodic events. We also suggest that reducing chronic stress through local coral reef management efforts may increase coral resilience to global climate change.

  12. Cone photopigment bleaching abnormalities in diabetes.

    Elsner, A E; Burns, S A; Lobes, L A; Doft, B H

    1987-04-01

    We have used a color-matching technique to obtain estimates of the optical density of cone photopigments as a function of retinal illuminance in patients with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM). We found that the half-bleach illuminance of some patients is abnormally high. That is, it takes more light to bleach an equivalent amount of photopigment in these patients. Since low illuminance color matches for these patients are normal, this implies that these patients have normal amounts of photopigment, but the photopigment is not bleaching normally. This result clearly points to abnormalities in the outer retina of these diabetic patients. The most likely causes of this abnormality are either decreases in the ability of the cones to absorb light, or an increased rate of regeneration of the cone photopigments. PMID:3557875

  13. Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM affects vitamin E acetate metabolism and intestinal bile acid signature in monocolonized mice

    Roager, Henrik Munch; Sulek, Karolina; Skov, Kasper;

    2014-01-01

    deconjugation and dehydroxylation of bile acids. Furthermore, we confirmed that carbohydrate metabolism is affected by NCFM in the mouse intestine. Especially, the digestion of larger carbohydrates (penta- and tetrasaccharides) was increased in MC mice. Interestingly, we also found vitamin E (α......-tocopherol acetate) in higher levels in the intestine of GF mice compared to MC mice, suggesting that NCFM either metabolizes the compound orindirectly affects the absorption by changing the metabolome in the intestine. The use of NCFM to increase the uptake of vitamin E supplements in humans and animals is a highly...

  14. Comparative study of lipophilic extractives of hardwoods and corresponding ECF bleached kraft pulps

    Pascoal Neto, C.

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available The lipophilic extractives of Eucalyptus globulus , Eucalyptus grandis , Eucalyptus urograndis , Betula verrucosa and Acacia mangium woods and of the corresponding ECF bleached kraft pulps, were characterised by GC-MS. The five hardwoods showed significant differences in the content and composition of the main families of extractives, namely fatty acids, long chain aliphatic alcohols and sterols. Significant differences in the composition persist after wood pulping and ECF bleaching of pulps. The fate of the various types of extractives during the wood and pulp processing is discussed. Long chain aliphatic acids and alcohols are quite stable during the pulp production and are retained to a great extent in the final bleached pulp; delta 5 sterols are mostly oxidised and partially retained in the pulps, while delta 7 sterols are completely degraded and/or dissolved. B. verrucosa and A. mangium bleached pulps show contents of fatty acids about 4 and 20 times higher than that of Eucalyptus pulps, respectively, while the content of long chain aliphatic alcohols in A. mangium pulp is of the order of 100 times higher than Eucalyptus and B. verrucosa pulps.

  15. Surviving Coral Bleaching Events: Porites Growth Anomalies on the Great Barrier Reef

    Cantin, Neal E.; Lough, Janice M.

    2014-01-01

    Mass coral bleaching affected large parts of the Great Barrier Reef (GBR) in 1998 and 2002. In this study, we assessed if signatures of these major thermal stress events were recorded in the growth characteristics of massive Porites colonies. In 2005 a suite of short (

  16. Study of thermal annealing induced plasmonic bleaching in Ag:TiO2 nanocomposite thin films

    Graphical abstract: The plasmonic bleaching observed in Ag:TiO2 nanocomposite thin films, when annealed at 450 °C in Ar environment, is due to the dissociation of Ag nanoparticles followed by diffusion of Ag atoms outside the nanocomposite film and into substrate. - Plasmonic properties of metal nanomaterials critically affect on thermal treatments. One of such effects is ‘plasmonic-bleaching’ observed in ‘atom beam co-sputtering’ derived Ag:TiO2 nanocomposite thin films, when annealed at 450 °C. The origin of bleaching is investigated using glancing angle X-ray diffraction and Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy. The kinetics of Ag nanoparticles during the deposition and after thermal treatment is presented to understand involved host-matrix interactions. Based on Rutherford Materials Program simulation, possible mechanism of bleaching is presented

  17. The Effects of Habitat on Coral Bleaching Responses in Kenya

    Grimsditch, Gabriel; Mwaura, Jelvas M.; Kilonzo, Joseph; Amiyo, Nassir

    2010-01-01

    This study examines the bleaching responses of scleractinian corals at four sites in Kenya (Kanamai, Vipingo, Mombasa and Nyali) representing two distinct lagoon habitats (relatively shallow and relatively deep). Bleaching incidence was monitored for the whole coral community, while zooxanthellae densities and chlorophyll levels were monitored for target species (Pocillopora damicornis, Porites lutea, and Porites cylindrica) during a non-bleaching year (2006) and a year of mild-bleaching (200...

  18. Photo-bleaching response in chlorophyll solutions

    Photo-excitation processes were investigated in chlorophyll solutions by irradiation with UV light sources. Photo-excited bulk effects during the bleaching experiments were diagnosed. The optical diagnostic was expressed by a Beer-Lambert matrix formulation and applied to the experimental results. The chromophores evaluated optical cross-section was 10-15 cm2 and the optical absorption coefficient dynamic variation was fitted to a simple reaction rate model. The bleaching rates were expressed by this model and fitted to the experimental data

  19. Exogenous abscisic acid significantly affects proteome in tea plant (Camellia sinensis) exposed to drought stress

    Lin Zhou; Hui Xu; Sue Mischke; Meinhardt, Lyndel W.; Dapeng Zhang; Xujun Zhu; Xinghui Li; Wanping Fang

    2014-01-01

    Tea [Camellia sinensis (L.) O. Kuntze] is an important economic crop, and drought is the most important abiotic stress affecting yield and quality. Abscisic acid (ABA) is an important phytohormone responsible for activating drought resistance. Increased understanding of ABA effects on tea plant under drought stress is essential to develop drought-tolerant tea genotypes, along with crop management practices that can mitigate drought stress. The objective of the present investigation is evaluat...

  20. Copper complexation by fulvic acid affects copper toxicity to the larvae of the polychaete

    Qiu, Jian-Wen; Tang, Xiao; Zheng, Chuanbo; Li, Yan; Huang, Yanliang

    2007-01-01

    Copper complexation by fulvic acid affects copper toxicity to the larvae of the polychaete Hydroides elegans correspondence: Corresponding author. Tel.: +852 34117055; fax: +852 34115995. (Qiu, Jian-Wen) (Qiu, Jian-Wen) Department of Biology, Hong Kong Baptist University - HONG KONG, CHINA (Qiu, Jian-Wen) CHINA (Qiu, Jian-Wen) Department of Biology, Hong Kong Baptist University - HONG KONG, CHINA (Tang, Xiao) Insti...

  1. Sediment-water interaction in a water reservoir affected by acid mine drainage : experimental and modeling

    Torres Sánchez, Ester

    2013-01-01

    The discharge of acid mine drainage into a water reservoir may seriously affect the water quality. In this setting, sediment is commonly thought to act as a sink for pollutants. However, redox oscillations in the bottom water promoted by stratification-turnover events may significantly alter the metal cycling. A new sequential extraction procedure has been developed to study the metal partitioning in the sediment. The new scheme for iron, sulfur and organic carbon rich sediments was evaluated...

  2. Meat fatty acid composition as affected by fatness and genetic factors: a review

    De Smet, Stefaan; Raes, Katleen; Demeyer, Daniel

    2004-01-01

    Influence des facteurs génétiques et de l'état d'engraissement sur la composition en acides gras de la viande. Revue. La composition en acides gras de la viande est affectée par divers facteurs : des facteurs nutritionnels, mais aussi des facteurs génétiques, quoiqu'à un degré moindre. L'espèce animale est également une source de variation importante, c'est même la plus importante. La viande des ruminants est plus riche en acides gras saturés que celle des monogastriques, en raison de la bioh...

  3. Soil acidity as affecting micronutrients concentration, nitrato reductase enzyme activity and yield in upland rice plants

    Edemar Moro

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The lowest grain yield of rice under no-tillage system (NTS in relation to the conventional system may be due to the predominance nitrate in the soil and the low nitrate reductase activity. Another reason may be caused by micronutrient deficiency because of superficially soil acidity corrections. Therefore, the objective of this study was to evaluate the changes caused by soil pH in the N forms in the soil, micronutrients concentration in rice plants, nitrate reductase activity, yield of rice and its components. The experiment was performed in a greenhouse conditions. The experimental design was a completely randomized in a factorial three (levels of soil acidity x five (micronutrients sources with four replications. The addition of micronutrients does not affect levels of nitrate and ammonium in the soil; soil acidity significantly affects levels of nitrate and ammonium in the soil, concentration of micronutrients in rice plants and crop yield and its components; medium soil acidity (pH 5.5 result in medium to high levels of Cu and Fe, medium level of Zn and Mn, high nitrate reductase activity, resulting in higher dry matter, tillers, panicles, spikelets, weight of 100 grains and hence grain yield.

  4. 21 CFR 872.6475 - Heat source for bleaching teeth.

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Heat source for bleaching teeth. 872.6475 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6475 Heat source for bleaching teeth. (a) Identification. A heat source for bleaching teeth is an AC-powered device that consists of...

  5. Bleaching and diffusion dynamics in optofluidic dye lasers

    Gersborg-Hansen, Morten; Balslev, Søren; Mortensen, Asger;

    2007-01-01

    The authors have investigated the bleaching dynamics that occur in optofluidic dye lasers where the liquid laser dye in a microfluidic channel is locally bleached due to optical pumping. They find that for microfluidic devices, the dye bleaching may be compensated through diffusion of dye molecules...... pumping devices. ©2007 American Institute of Physics....

  6. Fenomena Bleaching Karang Tahun 2009 di Pulau Badi Selat Makassar (Coral Bleaching Event on 2009 in Badi Island Makassar Strait)

    Yusuf, Syafyudin; Rani, Chair; Jompa, Jamaluddin

    2010-01-01

    Bleaching event is loss of zooxanthella from the marine organisms tissue, as a caused by enviromental stress. Coral bleaching fenomenom was observed on May and June 2009 in Badi Island on Makassar Strait, Indonesia . The method used in this study is identified the photos coral colonies which bleaching infected were photographed with a Ixus Digital Canon 75 camera in an underwater housing. The results showed that the bleaching corals are caused by temperature anomaly above 1,24oC higher...

  7. Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM affects vitamin E acetate metabolism and intestinal bile acid signature in monocolonized mice.

    Roager, Henrik M; Sulek, Karolina; Skov, Kasper; Frandsen, Henrik L; Smedsgaard, Jørn; Wilcks, Andrea; Skov, Thomas H; Villas-Boas, Silas G; Licht, Tine R

    2014-01-01

    Monocolonization of germ-free (GF) mice enables the study of specific bacterial species in vivo. Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM(TM) (NCFM) is a probiotic strain; however, many of the mechanisms behind its health-promoting effect remain unknown. Here, we studied the effects of NCFM on the metabolome of jejunum, cecum, and colon of NCFM monocolonized (MC) and GF mice using liquid chromatography coupled to mass-spectrometry (LC-MS). The study adds to existing evidence that NCFM in vivo affects the bile acid signature of mice, in particular by deconjugation. Furthermore, we confirmed that carbohydrate metabolism is affected by NCFM in the mouse intestine as especially the digestion of oligosaccharides (penta- and tetrasaccharides) was increased in MC mice. Additionally, levels of α-tocopherol acetate (vitamin E acetate) were higher in the intestine of GF mice than in MC mice, suggesting that NCFM affects the vitamin E acetate metabolism. NCFM did not digest vitamin E acetate in vitro, suggesting that direct bacterial metabolism was not the cause of the altered metabolome in vivo. Taken together, our results suggest that NCFM affects intestinal carbohydrate metabolism, bile acid metabolism and vitamin E metabolism, although it remains to be investigated whether this effect is unique to NCFM. PMID:24717228

  8. Factors affecting the fatty acid composition and fat oxidative stability in pigs

    Karel Vehovsky

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of selected factors affecting fatty acids (FA composition in pig fat. In the experiment, the influence of nutrition, gender, carcass weight, lean meat proportion (LMP and intramuscular fat (IMF were monitored. The effect of diet, specifically the influence of added linseed or corn on the fatty acids composition in the backfat was studied in pigs. From the perspective of the required increase of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA only the addition of the linseed proved to have a significant effect. Another evaluated aspect concerning the FA spectrum was the gender. While the backfat in barrows showed higher (P≤0.05 amount of monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA, the backfat in gilts displayed a significantly higher proportion (P≤0.01 of the PUFA and total unsaturated fatty acids (UFA. A significant effect on the PUFA proportion has also been demonstrated for the lean meat proportion (LMP parameter, which therefore represents not only a qualitative carcass meat parameter but also plays an important role in relation to the FA composition in the fat in pigs. In connection to the FA proportion changes the study also monitored the fat oxidative stability with the use of the TBARS method. Concerning the oxidative stability the effects of nutrition, FA groups, gender, carcass weight and LMP were studied. The relationship between the above mentioned factors and oxidative stability was found to be insignificant.

  9. Identifying well-bleached quartz using the different bleaching rates of quartz and feldspar luminescence signals

    Murray, A.S.; Thomsen, Kristina Jørkov; Masuda, N.; Buylaert, Jan-Pieter; Jain, Mayank

    2012-01-01

    relative bleaching rates of quartz optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) and feldspar luminescence stimulated at 50 °C by infrared light (IR50) and feldspar luminescence stimulated at 290 °C by infrared light after a stimulation at 50 °C (pIRIR290), and use recently deposited samples to determine the......When dating older sedimentary deposits using quartz, there are no unambiguous methods for identifying the presence of incomplete bleaching. Current statistical analysis of dose distributions depends entirely on the assumption that incomplete bleaching and mixing are the main causes of any excess...... dispersion in the distribution; the only existing way to test this assumption is using independent age control. Here we suggest a new approach to this question, based on the differential bleaching rates of quartz and feldspar luminescence signals. We first present data that confirm the differences in...

  10. Low environmental impact bleaching sequences for attaining high brightness level with eucalyptus SPP pulp

    M. M. Costa

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The alternatives used for minimizing the usage of chlorine dioxide in bleaching sequences included a hot acid hydrolysis (Ahot stage, the use of hot chlorine dioxide (Dhot and ozone stages at medium consistency and high consistency (Zmc and Zhc, in addition to stages with atmospheric hydrogen peroxide (P and pressurized hydrogen peroxide (PO. The results were interpreted based on the cost of the chemical products, bleaching process yields and on minimizing the environmental impact of the bleaching process. In spite of some process restrictions, high ISO brightness levels were kept around 90 % brightness. Additionally, the inclusion of stages like acid hydrolysis, pressurized peroxide and ozone in the bleaching sequences provided an increase in operating flexibility, aimed at reducing environmental impact (ECF Light. The Dhot(EOPD(PO sequence presented lower operating cost for ISO brightness above 92 %. However, this kind of sequence was not allowed for closing the wastewater circuit, even partially. For ISO brightness level around 91%, the AhotZhcDP sequence presented a lower operating cost than the others.

  11. Improved sensitivity, safety and laboratory turnaround time in the diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis by use of bleach sedimentation

    Ameh James

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Inadequate diagnostic processes and human resources in laboratories contribute to a high burden of tuberculosis (TB in low- and middle-income countries. Direct smear microscopy is relied on for TB diagnosis; however, sensitivity rates vary. To improve sensitivity of direct microscopy, the researchers employed several approaches, including sputum digestion and concentration of acid-fast bacilli (AFB, a technique which uses commercial bleach.Objectives: This study compared methods used to diagnose active Mycobacterium tuberculosis infections.Methods: Three sputum specimens were collected from each of 340 participants in Abuja, Nigeria, over two consecutive days. Direct microscopy was performed on all specimens; following microscopy, one specimen from each patient was selected randomly for bleach sedimentation and one for Lowenstein-Jensen culture.Results: Direct microscopy produced 28.8% AFB-positive results, whilst bleach sedimentation resulted in 30.3%. When compared with the cultures, 26.5% were AFB true positive using direct microscopy and 27.1% using bleach sedimentation. Whilst the specificity rate between these two methods was not statistically significant (P = 0.548, the sensitivity rate was significant (P = 0.004.Conclusion: Based on these results, bleach increases the sensitivity of microscopy compared with direct smear and has similar specificity. When diagnosing new cases of pulmonary TB, one bleach-digested smear is as sensitive as three direct smears, reducing waiting times for patients and ensuring the safety of laboratory technicians.

  12. Oxidation of rapeseed oil in waste activated bleaching earth and its effect on riboflavin production in culture of Ashbya gossypii.

    Park, Enoch Y; Ming, Hwa

    2004-01-01

    Long-term behavior of rapeseed oil in waste activated bleaching earth (ABE) and the effect of this oil on riboflavin production in the culture of Ashbya gossypii were investigated. Waste ABE with 40% (w/w) rapeseed oil was stored for 80 d, and the extent of oxidation of rapeseed oil was measured by several analytical methods to determine the chemical properties of the oil at different stages of the oil deterioration process:peroxide value, acid value, concentrations of organic acids, acetaldehyde and unsaturated fatty acid, and content of polymerized triglycerides. Peroxide value, acid value, and concentrations of organic acids and acetaldehyde did not affect riboflavin production. However, the content of polymerized triglycerides markedly increased the viscosity of rapeseed oil and was the main reason for the exponential decrease in riboflavin production. A good correlation between the polymerized triglyceride content or viscosity and riboflavin production in the culture of A. gossypii using rapeseed oil as the sole carbon source was found. PMID:16233590

  13. Modelling the optical bleaching of a complex TL signal

    Thermoluminescence (TL) intensity decrease is observed in many materials after optical stimulation and is called optical bleaching of TL. The optical bleaching of a TL peak does not always mean that the traps responsible for this peak are emptied by stimulating light. The McKeever model explains TL bleaching by the emptying of deep thermally disconnected traps. The modification of this model is used for simulating the optical bleaching of complex TL curves in the case of complex TL spectrum. Some characteristic outcomes important for interpreting the results of TL optical bleaching measurements are reported

  14. Enamel alteration following tooth bleaching and remineralization.

    Coceska, Emilija; Gjorgievska, Elizabeta; Coleman, Nichola J; Gabric, Dragana; Slipper, Ian J; Stevanovic, Marija; Nicholson, John W

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of professional tooth whitening agents containing highly concentrated hydrogen peroxide (with and without laser activation), on the enamel surface; and the potential of four different toothpastes to remineralize any alterations. The study was performed on 50 human molars, divided in two groups: treated with Opalescence(®) Boost and Mirawhite(®) Laser Bleaching. Furthermore, each group was divided into five subgroups, a control one and 4 subgroups remineralized with: Mirasensitive(®) hap+, Mirawhite(®) Gelleѐ, GC Tooth Mousse™ and Mirafluor(®) C. The samples were analysed by SEM/3D-SEM-micrographs, SEM/EDX-qualitative analysis and SEM/EDX-semiquantitative analysis. The microphotographs show that both types of bleaching cause alterations: emphasized perikymata, erosions, loss of interprizmatic substance; the laser treatment is more aggressive and loss of integrity of the enamel is determined by shearing off the enamel rods. In all samples undergoing remineralization deposits were observed, those of toothpastes based on calcium phosphate technologies seem to merge with each other and cover almost the entire surface of the enamel. Loss of integrity and minerals were detected only in the line-scans of the sample remineralized with GC Tooth Mousse™. The semiquantitative EDX analysis of individual elements in the surface layer of the enamel indicates that during tooth-bleaching with HP statistically significant loss of Na and Mg occurs, whereas the bleaching in combination with a laser leads to statistically significant loss of Ca and P. The results undoubtedly confirm that teeth whitening procedures lead to enamel alterations. In this context, it must be noted that laser bleaching is more aggressive for dental substances. However, these changes are reversible and can be repaired by application of remineralization toothpastes. PMID:27197087

  15. Identification of Chlorinated Fatty Acids in Standard Samples and Fish Lipids : Verification and Validation of Extraction, Transesterification and GC-MS/XSD

    Brown, Philip; Järlskog, Ida

    2015-01-01

    Chlorine gas bleaching was a common method used in pulp industries. As a consequence, significant amounts of chlorine were discharged into surrounding aquatic ecosystems, affecting the biota. Chlorinated organic pollutants are formed when chlorine react with organic material. Octadecanoic acid (stearic acid) is one of the most common saturated fatty acids in aquatic biota. In a naturally occurring process two and four chlorine atoms, respectively, are added over the unsaturated bonds, forming...

  16. Bonding Effectiveness of Universal Adhesive to Intracoronal Bleached Dentin Treated with Sodium Ascorbate.

    Trindade, Thaís Fantinato; Moura, Luana Kelle Batista; Raucci, Walter; Messias, Danielle Cristine Furtado; Colucci, Vivian

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of restorative protocol with sodium ascorbate on the shear bond strength (SBS) of a universal adhesive to intracoronal bleached dentin. One hundred-and-twenty bovine dentin fragments were randomly divided into 12 groups (n=10), according to the bleaching procedure (unbleached and bleached) and restorative protocol (no treatment, 10% sodium ascorbate -10SA, 35% sodium ascorbate -35SA and two-step etch-and-rinse -ER or one-step self-etch -SE Scotchbond universal adhesive approaches). Four whitening sessions were performed using 35% hydrogen peroxide. The samples from control groups were kept in relative humidity at 37 °C. Immediately after bleaching procedures, the assigned antioxidant solution was applied on dentin and restorative procedures were performed following either the ER or the SE approach. After 24 h, the specimens were subjected to SBS test. Data (MPa) were analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey's test (?=0.05). Lower SBS values were found for bleached specimens (8.54 MPa) compared with those unbleached (12.13 MPa) (pbond strength of the sodium ascorbate-treated groups was higher than those untreated, regardless of the strategy employed (pbond strength values for both ER (8.32 MPa) and SE (8.28 MPa) adhesive strategies. The group treated with 10SA submitted to ER approach (10.14 MPa) was similar to untreated groups (p>0.05). It may be concluded that bond strength of composite resin to intracoronal dentin was affected by restorative protocol and reduced by bleaching. PMID:27224564

  17. N-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid DHA during IVM affected oocyte developmental competence in cattle.

    Oseikria, Mouhamad; Elis, Sébastien; Maillard, Virginie; Corbin, Emilie; Uzbekova, Svetlana

    2016-06-01

    The positive effect of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (FAs) on fertility in ruminants seems to be partly mediated through direct effects on the oocyte developmental potential. We aimed to investigate whether supplementation with physiological levels of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, C22:6 n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids) during IVM has an effect on oocyte maturation and in vitro embryo development in cattle. We reported that DHA (0, 1, 10, or 100 μM) had no effect on oocyte viability or maturation rate after 22-hour IVM. Incubation of oocyte-cumulus complexes with 1-μM DHA during IVM significantly increased (P reaction, negative effects of 100-μM DHA were associated with significant increase of progesterone synthesis by oocyte-cumulus complexes, a three-fold increase in expression level of FA transporter CD36 and a two-fold decrease of FA synthase FASN genes in cumulus cells (CCs) of corresponding oocytes. Docosahexaenoic acid at 1 and 10 μM had no effect on expression of those and other key lipid metabolism-related genes in CC. In conclusion, administration of a low physiological dose of DHA (1 μM) during IVM may have beneficial effects on oocyte developmental competence in vitro without affecting lipid metabolism gene expression in surrounding CCs, contrarily to 100 μM DHA which diminished oocyte quality associated with perturbation of lipid and steroid metabolism in CC. PMID:26898414

  18. Factors that affect the degradation of naphthenic acids in oil sands wastewater by indigenous microbial communities

    The acute toxicity of wastewater generated during the extraction of bitumen from oil sands is believed to be due to naphthenic acids (NAs). To determine the factors that affect the rate of degradation of representative NAs in microcosms containing wastewater and the acute toxicity of treated and untreated wastewater, the effects of temperature, dissolved oxygen concentration, and phosphate addition on the rate of 14CO2 release form two representative naphthenic acid substrates, (linear) U-14C-palmitic acid (PA) and (bicyclic) decahydro-2-naphthoic acid-8-14C (DHNA), were monitored. Tailings pond water (TPW) contained microorganisms well adapted to mineralizing both PA and DHNA:PA was degraded more quickly (10--15% in 4 weeks) compared to DHNA (2--4% in 8 weeks). On addition of phosphate, the rate of NA degradation increased up to twofold in the first 4 weeks, with a concurrent increase in the rate of oxygen consumption by oil sands TPW. The degradation rate then declined to levels equivalent to those measured in flasks without phosphate. The observed plateau was not due to phosphate limitation. Decreases in either the dissolved oxygen concentration or the temperature reduced the rate. Phosphate addition also significantly decreased the acute toxicity of TPW to fathead minnows. In contrast, Microtox reg-sign analyses showed no reduction in the toxicity of treated or untreated TPW after incubation for up to 8 weeks at 15 C

  19. Accumulation of aluminium and iron by bryophytes in streams affected by acid-mine drainage

    Engleman, C.J.; McDiffett, W.F. [Bucknell University, Lewisburg, PA (United States). Dept. of Biology

    1996-12-31

    This paper examines the accumulation of two heavy metals (Al and Fe) by bryophytes in a northern Pennsylvania stream system affected by acid-mine drainage. Four sites within one watershed were selected on the basis of their pH and dissolved metal concentrations. Significant differences among sites were found with regard to bioaccumulation of Al an Fe. A negative relationship between pH and Fe concentrations in bryophyte tissues was found, with the highest accumulation of Fe observed at the most acidic site (pH 3.5), whereas accumulation of Al was highest at a site with an intermediate pH of 5.2. Bryophytes transplanted from a circum-neutral site to acidic sites showed highly significant increases in Fe and Al concentrations in tissues after 6 weeks, and transplants from more acidic sites to a circum-neutral site generally showed highly significant declines in Fe and Al concentration in tissues after the incubation period.

  20. Impact of mass coral bleaching on reef fish community and fishermen catches at Sabang, Aceh Province, Indonesia

    Edi Rudi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Mass coral bleaching was observed at Sabang, Aceh in early 2010, and approximately 60% ofhard coral in waters surrounding Sabang died post-event. Coral mortality was expected to affect thecomposition of reef fish due to decrease its function such as providing a shelter, feeding and spawninggrounds for fish and other marine organisms. The objectives of this research were to evaluate the impactof coral bleaching on coral reef fish community and to compare the composition of fishermen catchesbefore and after the coral bleaching. The data were collected before (in 2008 and after (in 2010 themass coral bleaching event in Sabang waters by using a photographic method and the data on theaverage catch of fishermen (catch per fishing effort was calculated in kg/hour. The data of theknowledge of fishermen on climate change was collected by questionnaire method. The results showedthat 259 species of coral reef fishes were caught by fishermen in 2008 and 2010. There was nosignificantly difference between the fish catches before and after the mass coral bleaching. However,species richness decreased up to 50% after the mass coral bleaching. The knowledge of fishermen onclimate change issue was very low.

  1. Seychelles Lagoon Provides Corals with a Refuge from Bleaching

    Zvy Dubinsky

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available An extensive bleaching event in the summer of the year 1997-1998 affected most reefs along East Africa's shores. In the aftermath of that episode, the reefs of Île Alphonse in the Seychelles were examined and it was found that reefs along the seaward slopes of the island lost >95% of their branching coral colonies, with considerably higher survival of massive species. Île Alphonse features a nearly circular shallow lagoon, with steep seaward slopes. Contrary to our expectations, mortality in the warmer lagoon was far lower than of coral colonies on the surrounding slopes, bathed in deeper and cooler waters. We suggest that corals in the lagoon were protected from UV radiation by leachate stemming from seagrass leaves steeped in the lagoon. Our measurements in the lagoon showed a strong attenuation of ultraviolet radiation, not observed in the waters outside the lagoon, and laboratory examination confirmed that the strong UV absorption of substances leached into seawater from decomposing leaves of the seagrass Thalassodendron (=Cymodocea testudinaceum. Our findings demonstrate the synergism between elevated seawater temperature and UV radiation in triggering bleaching on shallow reefs.

  2. Seychelles Lagoon Provides Corals with a Refuge from Bleaching

    An extensive bleaching event in the summer of the year 1997-1998 affected most reefs along East Africa's shores. In the aftermath of that episode, the reefs of Ile Alphonse in the Seychelles were examined and it was found that reefs along the seaward slopes of the island lost >95% of their branching coral colonies, with considerably higher survival of massive species. Ile Alphonse features a nearly circular shallow lagoon, with steep seaward slopes. Contrary to our expectations, mortality in the warmer lagoon was far lower than of coral colonies on the surrounding slopes, bathed in deeper and cooler waters. We suggest that corals in the lagoon were protected from UV radiation by leachate stemming from sea grass leaves steeped in the lagoon. Our measurements in the lagoon showed a strong attenuation of ultraviolet radiation, no observed in the waters outside the lagoon, and laboratory examination confirmed that the strong UV absorption of substances leached into seawater from decomposing leaves of the sea grass Thalassodendron (=Cymodocea) testudinaceum. Our findings demonstrate the synergism between elevated seawater temperature and UV radiation in triggering bleaching on shallow reefs.

  3. Behaviour of U-Isotopes in an Estuary Affected by Acid Mine Drainage and Industrial Releases

    Tinto and Odiel rivers (SW of Spain) is an ecosystem of great interest that is seriously affected by acid mine drainage (AMD) from long-term mining activities (pH < 3). Additionally, a large industrial complex is located in the surroundings of this estuary and Huelva town, which includes two phosphate rock processing plants that produce about 3 millions of tons per year of a byproduct called phosphogypsum (PG) containing high U-series radionuclides concentrations. For these reasons, the estuary of Huelva is one of the most heavy metals and radionuclides polluted estuarine systems in Europe with extremely low pH.

  4. A novel paleo-bleaching proxy using boron isotopes and high-resolution laser ablation to reconstruct coral bleaching events

    G. Dishon

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Coral reefs occupy only ~0.1% of the oceans habitat, but are the most biologically diverse marine ecosystem. In recent decades, coral reefs have experienced significant global declines due to a variety of causes, one of the major being widespread coral bleaching events. During bleaching the coral expels its symbiotic algae losing its main source of nutrition generally obtained through photosynthesis. While recent coral bleaching events have been extensively investigated, there is no scientific data on historical coral bleaching prior to 1979. In this study, we employ high-resolution femtosecond Laser Ablation Multiple Collector Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (LA-MC-ICP-MS to demonstrate a distinct biologically-induced decline of boron (B isotopic composition (δ11B as a result of coral bleaching. These findings and methodology offer a new use for a previously developed isotopic proxy to reconstruct paleo-coral bleaching events. Based on a literature review of published δ11B data and our recorded "vital effect" of coral bleaching on the δ11B signal, we also describe at least two possible coral bleaching events since the Last Glacial Maximum. The implementation of this bleaching proxy holds the potential of identifying occurrences of coral bleaching throughout the geological record. A deeper temporal view of coral bleaching will enable scientists to determine if it occurred in the past during times of environmental change and what outcome it may have had on coral population structure.

  5. Immune defenses of healthy, bleached and diseased Montastraea faveolata during a natural bleaching event.

    Mydlarz, Laura D; Couch, Courtney S; Weil, Ernesto; Smith, Garriet; Harvell, C Drew

    2009-11-16

    One prominent hypothesis regarding climate change and scleractinian corals is that thermal stress compromises immune competence. To test this hypothesis we tracked how the immune defenses of bleached, apparently healthy and yellow band disease (YBD) diseased Montastraea faveolata colonies varied with natural thermal stress in southwestern Puerto Rico. Colonies were monitored for 21 mo from the peak of the bleaching event in October 2005 to August 2007. Since sea surface temperature was significantly higher in summer and fall 2005 than 2006, year of collection was used as a proxy for temperature stress, and colony fragments collected in 2005 were compared with those collected in 2006. Mortality rate was high (43% overall) and all colonies (except one) either died or became infected with YBD by August 2007. YBD-infected tissue did not bleach (i.e. expel zooxanthellae) during the 2005 bleaching event, even when healthy tissue of these colonies bleached. Immune activity was assayed by measuring prophenoloxidase (PPO), peroxidase (POX), lysozyme-like (LYS) and antibacterial (AB) activity. Immune activity was variable between all coral samples, but there was a significant elevation of PPO activity in bleached colonies collected in 2005 relative to apparently healthy and YBD-diseased corals in 2006. In YBD-diseased colonies, LYS and AB activity were elevated in both healthy and infected tissue, indicating a systemic response; activity levels in these colonies were higher compared to those that appeared healthy. In both these immune parameters, there was a trend for suppression of activity in corals that were bleached in 2005. These data, while complicated by between-genet variability, illustrate the complex interaction between disease and temperature stress on immune function. PMID:20095242

  6. Changes in bleaching susceptibility among corals subject to ocean warming and recurrent bleaching in Moorea, French Polynesia.

    Morgan S Pratchett

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Climate-induced coral bleaching poses a major threat to coral reef ecosystems, mostly because of the sensitivities of key habitat-forming corals to increasing temperature. However, susceptibility to bleaching varies greatly among coral genera and there are likely to be major changes in the relative abundance of different corals, even if the wholesale loss of corals does not occur for several decades. Here we document variation in bleaching susceptibility among key genera of reef-building corals in Moorea, French Polynesia, and compare bleaching incidence during mass-bleaching events documented in 1991, 1994, 2002 and 2007. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: This study compared the proportion of colonies that bleached for four major genera of reef-building corals (Acropora, Montipora, Pocillopora and Porites, during each of four well-documented bleaching events from 1991 to 2007. Acropora and Montipora consistently bleached in far greater proportions (up to 98% than Pocillopora and Porites. However, there was an apparent and sustained decline in the proportion of colonies that bleached during successive bleaching events, especially for Acropora and Montipora. In 2007, only 77% of Acropora colonies bleached compared with 98% in 1991. Temporal variation in the proportion of coral colonies bleached may be attributable to differences in environmental conditions among years. Alternately, the sustained declines in bleaching incidence among highly susceptible corals may be indicative of acclimation or adaptation. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Coral genera that are highly susceptible to coral bleaching, and especially Acropora and Montipora, exhibit temporal declines in their susceptibility to thermal anomalies at Moorea, French Polynesia. One possible explanation for these findings is that gradual removal of highly susceptible genotypes (through selective mortality of individuals, populations, and/or species is producing a coral assemblage that is

  7. Perfluorooctanoic acid exposure for 28 days affects glucose homeostasis and induces insulin hypersensitivity in mice

    Yan, Shengmin; Zhang, Hongxia; Zheng, Fei; Sheng, Nan; Guo, Xuejiang; Dai, Jiayin

    2015-06-01

    Perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) are widely used in many applications due to their unique physical and chemical characteristics. Because of the increasing prevalence of metabolic syndromes, including obesity, dyslipidemia and insulin resistance, concern has arisen about the roles of environmental pollutants in such diseases. Earlier epidemiologic studies showed a potential association between perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and glucose metabolism, but how PFOA influences glucose homeostasis is still unknown. Here, we report on the modulation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-serine/threonine protein kinase (PI3K-AKT) signaling pathway in the livers of mice after 28 d of exposure to PFOA. Compared with normal mice, PFOA exposure significantly decreased the expression of the phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN) protein and affected the PI3K-AKT signaling pathway in the liver. Tolerance tests further indicated that PFOA exposure induced higher insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance in mice. Biochemical analysis revealed that PFOA exposure reduced hepatic glycogen synthesis, which might be attributed to gluconeogenesis inhibition. The levels of several circulating proteins were altered after PFOA exposure, including proteins potentially related to diabetes and liver disease. Our results suggest that PFOA affected glucose metabolism and induced insulin hypersensitivity in mice.

  8. Whole transcriptome analysis reveals changes in expression of immune-related genes during and after bleaching in a reef-building coral.

    Pinzón, Jorge H; Kamel, Bishoy; Burge, Colleen A; Harvell, C Drew; Medina, Mónica; Weil, Ernesto; Mydlarz, Laura D

    2015-04-01

    Climate change is negatively affecting the stability of natural ecosystems, especially coral reefs. The dissociation of the symbiosis between reef-building corals and their algal symbiont, or coral bleaching, has been linked to increased sea surface temperatures. Coral bleaching has significant impacts on corals, including an increase in disease outbreaks that can permanently change the entire reef ecosystem. Yet, little is known about the impacts of coral bleaching on the coral immune system. In this study, whole transcriptome analysis of the coral holobiont and each of the associate components (i.e. coral host, algal symbiont and other associated microorganisms) was used to determine changes in gene expression in corals affected by a natural bleaching event as well as during the recovery phase. The main findings include evidence that the coral holobiont and the coral host have different responses to bleaching, and the host immune system appears suppressed even a year after a bleaching event. These results support the hypothesis that coral bleaching changes the expression of innate immune genes of corals, and these effects can last even after recovery of symbiont populations. Research on the role of immunity on coral's resistance to stressors can help make informed predictions on the future of corals and coral reefs. PMID:26064625

  9. Expression, protein stability and transcriptional activity of retinoic acid receptors are affected by microtubules interfering agents and all-trans retinoic acid in primary rat hepatocytes

    2007-01-01

    Expression, protein stability and transcriptional activity of retinoic acid receptors are affected by microtubules interfering agents and all-trans retinoic acid in primary rat hepatocytes CZECH REPUBLIC (Dvorak, Zdenek) CZECH REPUBLIC Received: 2006-08-22 Revised: 2006-11-16 Accepted: 2007-01-02

  10. Basal omega-3 fatty acid status affects fatty acid and oxylipin responses to high-dose n3-HUFA in healthy volunteers

    Objective: Baseline concentrations of highly unsaturated omega-3 fatty acid (n3-HUFA) may influence the ability of dietary n3-HUFA to affect changes in concentrations of esterified fatty acids and their metabolites. This study evaluates the influence of basal n3-HUFA and n3-HUFA metabolite status ...

  11. Exudation of organic acids by Lupinus albus and Lupinus angustifolius as affected by phosphorus supply

    Hentschel, Werner; Wiche, Oliver

    2016-04-01

    In phytomining and phytoremediation research mixed cultures of bioenergy crops with legumes hold promise to enhance availability of trace metals and metalloids in the soil plant system. This is due to the ability of certain legumes to mobilize trace elements during acquisition of nutrients making these elements available for co-cultured species. The legumes achieve this element mobilization by exudating carboxylates and enzymes as well as by lowering the pH value in the rhizosphere. The aim of our research was to determine characteristics and differences in the exudation of Lupinus albus and Lupinus angustifolius regarding to quantitative as to qualitative aspects. Especially the affection by phosphorus (P) supply was a point of interest. Thus we conducted laboratory batch experiments, wherein the plants were grown over four weeks under controlled light, moisture and nutritional conditions on sand as substrate. Half of the plants were supplied with 12 mg P per kg substrate, the other half were cultivated under a total lack of P. After cultivation the plants were transferred from the cultivation substrate into a 0,05 mmolṡL‑1 CaCl2 solution. After two hours the plants were removed, moist and dry mass off shoots and roots were measured together with the root length (Tennants' method). Concentrations of exudated carboxylates in the CaCl2 solution were determined via IC (column: Metrosept OrganicAcids, eluent 0.5 molṡL‑1 H2SO4 + 15% acetone, pH=3; 0.5 mLṡmin‑1). As a result four different organic acids were identified (citric acid, fumaric acid, tartaric acid, malic acid) in concentration ranges of 0.15 mgṡL‑1 (fumaric acid) to 9.21 mgṡL‑1 (citric acid). Lupinus angustifolius showed a higher exudation rate (in nmol per cm root length per hour) than Lupinus albus in the presence of phosphorus (e.g. regarding citric acid: 1.99 vs 0.64 nmolṡ(gṡh)‑1). However, as the root complexity and length of L. albus were far higher than of L. angustifolius

  12. The ratio of unsaturated fatty acids in biosurfactants affects the efficiency of gene transfection.

    Inoh, Yoshikazu; Furuno, Tadahide; Hirashima, Naohide; Kitamoto, Dai; Nakanishi, Mamoru

    2010-10-15

    An unsaturated hydrocarbon chain in phospholipid was reported to affect a phase transition and a fusogenic activity after mixing membranes, and consequently to achieve a high DNA transfection efficiency. We previously showed that a biosurfactant mannosylerythritol lipid-A (MEL-A) enhances the gene transfection efficiency of cationic liposomes. Here, we have studied the effects of unsaturated fatty acid ratio of MEL-A on the physicochemical properties and gene delivery into cells of cationic liposomes using MEL-A with three different unsaturated fatty acid ratios (9.1%, 21.5%, and 46.3%). The gene transfer efficiency of cationic liposomes containing MEL-A (21.5%) was much higher than that of those containing MEL-A (9.1%) and MEL-A (46.3%). MEL-A (21.5%)-containing cationic liposomes induced highly efficient membrane fusion after addition of anionic liposomes and led to subsequent DNA release. Imaging analysis revealed that MEL-A (21.5%)-containing liposomes fused with the plasma membrane and delivered DNA into the nucleus of NIH-3T3 cells, MEL-A (46.3%)-containing liposomes fused with the plasma membrane did not deliver DNA into the nucleus, and MEL-A (9.1%)-containing liposomes neither fused with the plasma membrane nor delivered DNA into the nucleus. Thus, it is understandable that the unsaturated fatty acid ratio of MEL-A strongly influences the gene transfection efficiency of cationic liposomes. PMID:20674726

  13. Side effects of external tooth bleaching

    E.M., Bruzell; Pallesen, Ulla; Thoresen, N.R.;

    2013-01-01

    -office = 39.3% [n = 28]; p >0.05; 95% CI [OR]: 0.198‑1.102) whereas prevalence of gingival irritation was higher after in-office treatment (at-home = 14.0%; in-office = 35.7%; p <0.05) (mean age: 37.3 years; 73.7% women; n = 171). At the second follow-up, two and three patients reported side effects...... attributed to the bleaching treatment in the at-home and in-office groups, respectively. Predictors for side effects were tooth sensitivity, surface loss and gingivitis when observed at inclusion. Treatment-related predictors were bleaching concentration and contact between tray and gingiva. Conclusions...

  14. Effect of ultrasonic pre-treatment of thermomechanical pulp on hydrogen peroxide bleaching

    Ultrasound pre-treatments of softwood TMP had been carried to evaluate its impact on the efficiency of hydrogen peroxide bleaching. The trials were performed after a factorial design of experiment using frequency, power and time as variables. The experiments were conducted in an ultrasonic bath and then bleached with hydrogen peroxide. Measurements such as brightness, L*A*B* color system coordinate, residual hydrogen peroxide and metal content were evaluated on bleached pulp. The results indicate that the effect of ultrasonic treatment on brightness was dependent on the ultrasound frequency used; the brightness increased slightly at 68 kHz and decreased at 40 and 170 kHz. These results were correlated to the ultrasound effect on the generation of transition metals (copper, iron and manganese) which are responsible for catalytic decomposition of hydrogen peroxide. The influence of metal interference was minimized by using a chelating agent such as diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA). With the results obtained in this study we have identified a set of option conditions, e.g. 1000 W, 40 kHz, 1.5 % consistency and 0.2% addition of DTPA prior to the bleaching stage (after ultrasonic pre-treatment) who improve brightness by 2.5 %ISO.

  15. Metagenomic analysis of the coral holobiont during a natural bleaching event on the Great Barrier Reef.

    Littman, Raechel; Willis, Bette L; Bourne, David G

    2011-12-01

    Understanding the effects of elevated seawater temperatures on each member of the coral holobiont (the complex comprised of coral polyps and associated symbiotic microorganisms, including Bacteria, viruses, Fungi, Archaea and endolithic algae) is becoming increasingly important as evidence accumulates that microbial members contribute to overall coral health, particularly during thermal stress. Here we use a metagenomic approach to identify metabolic and taxonomic shifts in microbial communities associated with the hard coral Acropora millepora throughout a natural thermal bleaching event at Magnetic Island (Great Barrier Reef). A direct comparison of metagenomic data sets from healthy versus bleached corals indicated major shifts in microbial associates during heat stress, including Bacteria, Archaea, viruses, Fungi and micro-algae. Overall, metabolism of the microbial community shifted from autotrophy to heterotrophy, including increases in genes associated with the metabolism of fatty acids, proteins, simple carbohydrates, phosphorus and sulfur. In addition, the proportion of virulence genes was higher in the bleached library, indicating an increase in microorganisms capable of pathogenesis following bleaching. These results demonstrate that thermal stress results in shifts in coral-associated microbial communities that may lead to deteriorating coral health. PMID:23761353

  16. Enzymes improve ECF bleaching of pulp

    Lachenal, D.; Bajpai, P. K.; S P Mishra; Sharma, N.; Anand, A; Bajpai, P.

    2006-01-01

    The delignification efficiency of different laccase enzymes was examined on the eucalyptus Kraft pulp. The laccase enzyme from Trametes versicolor showing the highest delignification efficiency was selected and used in the elemental chlorine-free bleaching sequence for improving the pulp bleachability. An appreciable reduction in chlorine dioxide consumption was also obtained. Further reduction in chlorine dioxide consumption was obtained when the same laccase treated pulp was subjected to an...

  17. How dietary arachidonic- and docosahexaenoic- acid rich oils differentially affect the murine hepatic transcriptome

    Roberts Matthew A

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Herein, we expand our previous work on the effects of long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFA on the murine hepatic transcriptome using novel statistical and bioinformatic approaches for evaluating microarray data. The analyses focuses on key differences in the transcriptomic response that will influence metabolism following consumption of FUNG (rich in 20:4n6, FISH (rich in 20:5n3, 22:5n3, and 22:6n3 and COMB, the combination of the two. Results Using a variance-stabilized F-statistic, 371 probe sets (out of 13 K probe sets in the Affymetrix Mu11K chip set were changed by dietary treatment (P Conclusion Distinct transcriptomic, signaling cascades, and predicted affects on murine liver metabolism have been elucidated for 20:4n6-rich dietary oils, 22:6n3-rich oils, and a surprisingly distinct set of genes were affected by the combination of the two. Our results emphasize that the balance of dietary n6 and n3 LC-PUFA provided for infants and in nutritional and neutraceutical applications could have profoundly different affects on metabolism and cell signaling, beyond that previously recognized.

  18. Coral reef recovery status in south Andaman Islands after the bleaching event 2010

    Marimuthu, N.; Jerald Wilson, J.; Vinithkumar, N. V.; Kirubagaran, R.

    2013-03-01

    The Andaman and Nicobar Islands are one of the Union Territories of India, located in the eastern part of the Bay of Bengal. In 2010 summer, the increment in sea surface water temperature (up to 34°C) resulted in the bleaching of about 74% to 77% of corals in the South Andaman. During this event, coral species such as Acropora cerealis, A. humilis, Montipora sp., Favia pallida, Diploastrea sp., Goniopora sp. Fungia concinna, Gardineroseries sp., Porites sp., Favites abdita and Lobophyllia robusta were severely affected. This study is to assess the recovery status of the reef ecosystem by estimating the percentage of Live Coral cover, Bleached coral cover, Dead coral with algae, Rubble, Sandy flat, Algal assemblage and other associated organisms. The sedimentation rate (mg cm-2 d-1) and coral coverage (%) were assessed during this study period. The average sedimentation rate was ranged between 0.27 and 0.89 mg cm-2 d-1. The observed post bleaching recovery of coral cover was 21.1% at Port Blair Bay and 13.29% at Havelock Island. The mortality rate of coral cover due to this bleaching was estimated as 2.05% at Port Blair Bay and 9.82% at Havelock Island. Once the sea water temperature resumed back to the normal condition, most of the corals were found recovered.

  19. Coral Reef Recovery Status in South Andaman Islands after the Bleaching Event 2010

    N. Marimuthu; J. Jerald Wilson; N.V. Vinithkumar; R. Kirubagaran

    2013-01-01

    The Andaman and Nicobar Islands are one of the Union Territories of India,located in the eastern part of the Bay of Bengal.In 2010 summer,the increment in sea surface water temperature (up to 34℃) resulted in the bleaching of about 74% to 77% of corals in the South Andaman.During this event,coral species such as Acropora cerealis,A.humilis,Montipora sp.,Favia pallida,Diploastrea sp.,Goniopora sp.Fungia concinna,Gardineroseries sp.,Porites sp.,Favites abdita and Lobophyllia robusta were severely affected.This study is to assess the recovery status of the reef ecosystem by estimating the percentage of Live Coral cover,Bleached coral cover,Dead coral with algae,Rubble,Sandy fiat,Algal assemblage and other associated organisms.The sedimentation rate (mg cm-2 d-1) and coral coverage (%) were assessed during this study period.The average sedimentation rate was ranged between 0.27 and 0.89mg cm-2 d-1.The observed post bleaching recovery of coral cover was 21.1% at Port Blair Bay and 13.29% at Havelock Island.The mortality rate of coral cover due to this bleaching was estimated as 2.05% at Port Blair Bay and 9.82% at Havelock Island.Once the sea water temperature resumed back to the normal condition,most of the corals were found recovered.

  20. A study on the recovery of Tobago's coral reefs following the 2010 mass bleaching event.

    Buglass, Salome; Donner, Simon D; Alemu I, Jahson B

    2016-03-15

    In 2010, severe coral bleaching was observed across the southeastern Caribbean, including the island of Tobago, where coral reefs are subject to sedimentation and high nutrient levels from terrestrial runoff. Here we examine changes in corals' colony size distributions over time (2010-2013), juvenile abundances and sedimentation rates for sites across Tobago following the 2010 bleaching event. The results indicated that since pre-bleaching coral cover was already low due to local factors and past disturbance, the 2010 event affected only particular susceptible species' population size structure and increased the proportion of small sized colonies. The low density of juveniles (mean of 5.4±6.3 juveniles/m(-2)) suggests that Tobago's reefs already experienced limited recruitment, especially of large broadcasting species. The juvenile distribution and the response of individual species to the bleaching event support the notion that Caribbean reefs are becoming dominated by weedy non-framework building taxa which are more resilient to disturbances. PMID:26856646

  1. Pigmentation changes in Siderastrea spp. during bleaching events in the costal reefs of northeastern Brazil

    Roberto Sassi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available We report here the occurrence of seasonal changes in the pigmentation of colonies of Siderastrea spp. during bleaching events on coastal reefs in northeastern Brazil. Bleached affected almost 50% of coral colonies analyzed in Cabo Branco reefs (Paraiba state in the summer of 2005. The same phenomenon was detected along various coastal reefs in northeastern Brazil during the summer of 2007 and 2008. These events were seasonal, and began with the emergence of pale colonies that became pale-pink and then purple during the rainy months. The patterns and intensity of colonies pigmentation changes varied with the studied sites. The decrease in zooxanthellae density and chlorophyll-a content was quantified in the colonies with their pigmentation pattern altered (bleaching. Microbiological analyses revealed higher densities of bacteria in pink colonies (bleached as compared to brown colonies (normal. Environmental disturbances may lead to the pigmentation changes in Siderastrea spp., but the immediate causes of this phenomenon are not clear and require further investigations.

  2. Biodiesel production from residual oils recovered from spent bleaching earth

    This work was to study technical and economic feasibilities of converting residual oils recovered from spent bleaching earth generated at soybean oil refineries into useable biodiesel. Experimental results showed that fatty acids in the SBE residual oil were hexadecenoic acid (58.19%), stearic acid (21.49%) and oleic acid (20.32%), which were similar to those of vegetable oils. The methyl ester conversion via a transesterification process gave a yield between 85 and 90%. The biodiesel qualities were in reasonable agreement with both EN 14214 and ASTM D6751 standards. A preliminary financial analysis showed that the production cost of biodiesel from SBE oils was significantly lower than the pre-tax price of fossil diesel or those made of vegetable oils or waste cooking oils. The effects of the crude oil price and the investment on the production cost and the investment return period were also conducted. The result showed that the investment would return faster at higher crude oil price. (author)

  3. Integrating a xylanase treatment into an industrial-type sequence for eucalyptus kraft pulp bleaching

    Fillat Latorre, Úrsula; Roncero Vivero, María Blanca; Sacón, Vera Maria; Bassa, Alexandre

    2012-01-01

    The influence of a treatment with two commercial xylanases on pulp and effluents obtained after the bleaching stages in the OXAZDP (O, oxygen stage; X, xylanase treatment; A, acid stage; Z, ozone stage; D, chlorine dioxide stage; P, hydrogen peroxide stage) sequence was studied. Also, the potential saving in chlorine dioxide was assessed. The enzyme treatment was performed on pulp containing some black liquor since the operating conditions were close to the conditions used in the storage towe...

  4. Anaerobic treatment of cellulose bleach plant wastewater: chlorinated organics and genotoxicity removal

    T. R. Chaparro; E. C. Pires

    2011-01-01

    This study assessed the removal efficiency of organic matter and how it relates to the decrease of toxic and mutagenic effects when an anaerobic reactor is used to treat the bleaching effluent from two kraft pulp mills. Parameters such as COD (chemical oxygen demand), DOC (dissolved organic carbon), AOX (adsorbable organic halogen), ASL (acid soluble lignin), color, chlorides, total phenols and absorbance values in the UV-VIS spectral region were measured. The acute and chronic toxicity and g...

  5. Effectiveness of bleaching agent on composite resin discoloration

    Galih Sampoerno

    2012-01-01

    Background: The discoloration of teeth, especially anterior teeth, is one of aesthetic problems. The use of tooth bleaching agents for discolored natural teeth is becoming increasingly popular. Many dentists, however, get many problems when they conduct bleaching process since there is much composite filling on patient’s anterior teeth. Although many research have focused on the discoloration of composite resin after bleaching process, the problem still becomes debatable. Purpose: The purpose...

  6. Mass Coral Bleaching in 2010 in the Southern Caribbean

    Alemu I, Jahson Berhane; Clement, Ysharda

    2014-01-01

    Ocean temperatures are increasing globally and the Caribbean is no exception. An extreme ocean warming event in 2010 placed Tobago's coral reefs under severe stress resulting in widespread coral bleaching and threatening the livelihoods that rely on them. The bleaching response of four reef building taxa was monitored over a six month period across three major reefs systems in Tobago. By identifying taxa resilient to bleaching we propose to assist local coral reef managers in the decision mak...

  7. Dental pulp vascular permeability changes induced by dental bleaching

    Cristiane da Costa; Sueli Patricia Harumi Miyagi; Marcelo dos Santos; Manoel Eduardo de Lima Machado; Márcia Martins Marques

    2012-01-01

    Aiming to compare the effect of different light sources for dental bleaching on vascular permeability of dental pulps, forty-eight incisors were used. The bleaching agent (35 % hydrogen peroxide) was activated by halogen light; LED (Light Emitting Diode) or LED, followed by laser phototherapy (LPT) (λ = 780 nm; 3 J/cm²). After the bleaching procedures, the animals received an intra-arterial dye injection and one hour later were sacrificed. The teeth were diaphanized and photographed. The...

  8. Coral community response to bleaching on a highly disturbed reef

    Guest, J R; Low, J.; Tun, K.; Wilson, B.; Ng, C.; D. Raingeard; Ulstrup, K. E.; Tanzil, J. T. I.; Todd, P.A.; Toh, T. C.; McDougald, D; Chou, L. M.; Steinberg, P D

    2016-01-01

    While many studies of coral bleaching report on broad, regional scale responses, fewer examine variation in susceptibility among coral taxa and changes in community structure, before, during and after bleaching on individual reefs. Here we report in detail on the response to bleaching by a coral community on a highly disturbed reef site south of mainland Singapore before, during and after a major thermal anomaly in 2010. To estimate the capacity for resistance to thermal stress, we report on:...

  9. A global protocol for monitoring of coral bleaching

    Oliver, J.; Setiasih, N.; Marshall, P.; Hansen, L.

    2004-01-01

    Coral bleaching and subsequent mortality represent a major threat to the future health and productivity of coral reefs. However a lack of reliable data on occurrence, severity and other characteristics of bleaching events hampers research on the causes and consequences of this important phenomenon. This article describes a global protocol for monitoring coral bleaching events, which addresses this problem and can be used by people with different levels of expertise and resources.

  10. Identification of significant medium components that affect docosahexaenoic acid production by Schizochytrium sp. SW1

    Manikan, Vidyah; Hamid, Aidil A.

    2013-11-01

    Central composite design (CCD) was employed to investigate the significance of glucose, yeast extract, MSG and sea salt in affecting the amount of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) accumulated by a locally isolated strain of Schizochytrium. Design Expert software was used to construct a set of experiments where each medium component mentioned above was varied over three levels. Cultivation was carried out in 250mL flasks containing 50mL of medium, incubated at 30°C with 200 rpm agitation for 96 hours. ANOVA was conducted to identify the influential factors and the level of their significance where factors that scored a probability value of less than 0.05 were considered significant. The level of influence for each independent variable was also interpreted using perturbation whereas pattern of interaction between the factors were interpreted using interaction plots. This experiment revealed that yeast extract and monosodium glutamate have significant influence on DHA accumulation process by Schizochytrium sp. SW1.

  11. Interactions between major chlorogenic acid isomers and chemical changes in coffee brew that affect antioxidant activities.

    Liang, Ningjian; Xue, Wei; Kennepohl, Pierre; Kitts, David D

    2016-12-15

    Coffee bean source and roasting conditions significantly (p<0.05) affected the content of chlorogenic acid (CGA) isomers, several indices of browning and subsequent antioxidant values. Principal component analysis was used to interpret the correlations between physiochemical and antioxidant parameters of coffee. CGA isomer content was positively correlated (p<0.001) to capacity of coffee to reduce nitric oxide and scavenge Frémy's salt. Indices of browning in roasted coffee were positively correlated (p<0.001) to ABTS and TEMPO radical scavenging capacity, respectively. Only the CGA content of coffee corresponded to intracellular antioxidant capacity measured in Caco-2 intestinal cells. This study concluded that the intracellular antioxidant capacity that best describes potential health benefits of coffee positively corresponds best with CGA content. PMID:27451179

  12. Regeneration of irradiated optical fibres by photo-bleaching?

    It is known that a light power between 0,1 and 20 μW caused bleaching of colour centres, which implies a reduction of induced loss. Older fibres especially those with a core made of undoped, low OH silica, experience tremendous photo-bleaching. Light of shorter wavelengths has a higher bleaching efficiency than that of longer wavelengths and same light intensity. The investigations have demonstrated that the injection of photo-bleaching light of shorter wavelength and higher intensity can distinctly decrease the radiation-induced loss of Ge-doped fibres, especially at low temperatures. Another possibility to apply photo-bleaching by short wavelength is to regenerate fibres that are permanently installed in radiation environments. Modern undoped multi-mode (MM) step index (Si), Ge-doped MM graded index (Gi) and Ge-doped single-mode (SM) fibres that had been irradiated were submitted to bleaching light. In this article it is shown how loss reduction and necessary bleaching time depend on wavelength and intensity of the bleaching light, on fibre length (bleaching time) and on radiation dose. These results are promising for the regeneration of optical fibres in facilities where the fibres cannot be replaced easily by new ones. (A.C.)

  13. Coral community response to bleaching on a highly disturbed reef.

    Guest, J R; Low, J; Tun, K; Wilson, B; Ng, C; Raingeard, D; Ulstrup, K E; Tanzil, J T I; Todd, P A; Toh, T C; McDougald, D; Chou, L M; Steinberg, P D

    2016-01-01

    While many studies of coral bleaching report on broad, regional scale responses, fewer examine variation in susceptibility among coral taxa and changes in community structure, before, during and after bleaching on individual reefs. Here we report in detail on the response to bleaching by a coral community on a highly disturbed reef site south of mainland Singapore before, during and after a major thermal anomaly in 2010. To estimate the capacity for resistance to thermal stress, we report on: a) overall bleaching severity during and after the event, b) differences in bleaching susceptibility among taxa during the event, and c) changes in coral community structure one year before and after bleaching. Approximately two thirds of colonies bleached, however, post-bleaching recovery was quite rapid and, importantly, coral taxa that are usually highly susceptible were relatively unaffected. Although total coral cover declined, there was no significant change in coral taxonomic community structure before and after bleaching. Several factors may have contributed to the overall high resistance of corals at this site including Symbiodinium affiliation, turbidity and heterotrophy. Our results suggest that, despite experiencing chronic anthropogenic disturbances, turbid shallow reef communities may be remarkably resilient to acute thermal stress. PMID:26876092

  14. Mass coral bleaching in 2010 in the southern Caribbean.

    Jahson Berhane Alemu I

    Full Text Available Ocean temperatures are increasing globally and the Caribbean is no exception. An extreme ocean warming event in 2010 placed Tobago's coral reefs under severe stress resulting in widespread coral bleaching and threatening the livelihoods that rely on them. The bleaching response of four reef building taxa was monitored over a six month period across three major reefs systems in Tobago. By identifying taxa resilient to bleaching we propose to assist local coral reef managers in the decision making process to cope with mass bleaching events. The bleaching signal (length of exposure to high ocean temperatures varied widely between the Atlantic and Caribbean reefs, but regardless of this variation most taxa bleached. Colpophyllia natans, Montastraea faveolata and Siderastrea siderea were considered the most bleaching vulnerable taxa. Interestingly, reefs with the highest coral cover showed the greatest decline reef building taxa, and conversely, reefs with the lowest coral cover showed the most bleaching but lowest change in coral cover with little algal overgrowth post-bleaching.

  15. Movement of Phosphorus in a Calcareous Soil as Affected by Humic Acid

    DU Zhen-Yu; WANG Qing-Hua; LIU Fang-Chun; MA Hai-Lin; MA Bing-Yao; S.S.MALHI

    2013-01-01

    When humic acid (HA) and phosphorus (P) fertilizer are simultaneously applied to soil,HA may affect the movement of P.A laboratory incubation experiment was conducted to quantify the effects of a commercial HA product co-applied with monocalcium phosphate (MCP) on the distance of P movement and the concentration of P in various forms at different distances from the P fertilizer application site in a calcareous soil from northern China.Fertilizer MCP (at a rate equivalent to 26.6 kg P ha-1) was applied alone or in combination with HA (at 254.8 kg HA ha-1) to the surface of soil packed in cylinders (150 mm high and 50 mm internal diameter),and then incubated at 320 g kg-1 moisture content for 7 and 28 d periods.Extraction and analysis of each 2 mm soil layer in columns showed that the addition of HA to MCP increased the distance of P movement and the concentrations of water-extractable P,acid-extractable P and Olsen P in soil.The addition of HA to MCP could enhance P availability by increasing the distance of P movement and the concentration of extractable P in soil surrounding the P fertilizer.

  16. Solar photocatalytic degradation of naphthenic acids in oil sands process-affected water.

    Leshuk, Tim; Wong, Timothy; Linley, Stuart; Peru, Kerry M; Headley, John V; Gu, Frank

    2016-02-01

    Bitumen mining in the Canadian oil sands creates large volumes of oil sands process-affected water (OSPW), the toxicity of which is due in part to naphthenic acids (NAs) and other acid extractable organics (AEO). The objective of this work was to evaluate the potential of solar photocatalysis over TiO2 to remove AEO from OSPW. One day of photocatalytic treatment under natural sunlight (25 MJ/m(2) over ∼14 h daylight) eradicated AEO from raw OSPW, and acute toxicity of the OSPW toward Vibrio fischeri was eliminated. Nearly complete mineralization of organic carbon was achieved within 1-7 day equivalents of sunlight exposure, and degradation was shown to proceed through a superoxide-mediated oxidation pathway. High resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) analysis of oxidized intermediate compounds indicated preferential degradation of the heavier and more cyclic NAs (higher number of double bond equivalents), which are the most environmentally persistent fractions. The photocatalyst was shown to be recyclable for multiple uses, and thus solar photocatalysis may be a promising "green" advanced oxidation process (AOP) for OSPW treatment. PMID:26539710

  17. Changes in Bleaching Susceptibility among Corals Subject to Ocean Warming and Recurrent Bleaching in Moorea, French Polynesia

    Pratchett, Morgan S.; McCowan, Dominique; Maynard, Jeffrey A; Heron, Scott F.

    2013-01-01

    Background Climate-induced coral bleaching poses a major threat to coral reef ecosystems, mostly because of the sensitivities of key habitat-forming corals to increasing temperature. However, susceptibility to bleaching varies greatly among coral genera and there are likely to be major changes in the relative abundance of different corals, even if the wholesale loss of corals does not occur for several decades. Here we document variation in bleaching susceptibility among key genera of reef-bu...

  18. A novel paleo-bleaching proxy using boron isotopes and high-resolution laser ablation to reconstruct coral bleaching events

    Dishon, G.; Fisch, J.; Horn, I.; Kaczmarek, K.; Bijma, J.; Gruber, D. F.; Nir, O.; Popovich, Y.; Tchernov, D.

    2015-10-01

    Coral reefs occupy only ~ 0.1 percent of the ocean's habitat, but are the most biologically diverse marine ecosystem. In recent decades, coral reefs have experienced a significant global decline due to a variety of causes, one of the major causes being widespread coral bleaching events. During bleaching, the coral expels its symbiotic algae, thereby losing its main source of nutrition generally obtained through photosynthesis. While recent coral bleaching events have been extensively investigated, there is no scientific data on historical coral bleaching prior to 1979. In this study, we employ high-resolution femtosecond Laser Ablation Multiple Collector Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (LA-MC-ICP-MS) to demonstrate a distinct biologically induced decline of boron (B) isotopic composition (δ11B) as a result of coral bleaching. These findings and methodology offer a new use for a previously developed isotopic proxy to reconstruct paleo-coral bleaching events. Based on a literature review of published δ11B data and our recorded vital effect of coral bleaching on the δ11B signal, we also describe at least two possible coral bleaching events since the Last Glacial Maximum. The implementation of this bleaching proxy holds the potential of identifying occurrences of coral bleaching throughout the geological record. A deeper temporal view of coral bleaching will enable scientists to determine if it occurred in the past during times of environmental change and what outcome it may have had on coral population structure. Understanding the frequency of bleaching events is also critical for determining the relationship between natural and anthropogenic causes of these events.

  19. A novel paleo-bleaching proxy using boron isotopes and high-resolution laser ablation to reconstruct coral bleaching events

    Dishon, G.; Fisch, J.; Horn, I.; K. Kaczmarek; Bijma, J.; D. F. Gruber; O. Nir; Y. Popovich; D. Tchernov

    2015-01-01

    Coral reefs occupy only ~0.1% of the oceans habitat, but are the most biologically diverse marine ecosystem. In recent decades, coral reefs have experienced significant global declines due to a variety of causes, one of the major being widespread coral bleaching events. During bleaching the coral expels its symbiotic algae losing its main source of nutrition generally obtained through photosynthesis. While recent coral bleaching events hav...

  20. A novel paleo-bleaching proxy using boron isotopes and high-resolution laser ablation to reconstruct coral bleaching events

    Dishon, G.; Fisch, J.; Horn, I.; K. Kaczmarek; Bijma, J.; D. F. Gruber; O. Nir; Y. Popovich; D. Tchernov

    2015-01-01

    Coral reefs occupy only ~ 0.1 percent of the ocean's habitat, but are the most biologically diverse marine ecosystem. In recent decades, coral reefs have experienced a significant global decline due to a variety of causes, one of the major causes being widespread coral bleaching events. During bleaching, the coral expels its symbiotic algae, thereby losing its main source of nutrition generally obtained through photosynthesis. While recent coral bleaching events have been ex...

  1. Survey of SSC12 regions affecting fatty acid composition of intramuscular fat using high density SNP data

    María eMuñoz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Fatty acid composition is a critical aspect of pork because it affects sensorial and technological aspects of meat quality and it is relevant for human health. Previous studies identified significant QTLs in porcine chromosome 12 for fatty acid profile of backfat and intramuscular fat. In the present study, 374 SNPs mapped in SSC12 from the 60K Porcine SNP Beadchip were used. We have combined linkage and association analyses with expression data analysis in order to identify regions of SSC12 that could affect fatty acid composition of intramuscular fat in longissimus muscle. The QTL scan showed a region around the 60 cM position that significantly affects palmitic fatty acid and two related fatty acid indexes. The Iberian QTL allele increased the palmitic content (+2.6% of mean trait. This QTL does not match any of those reported in the previous study on fatty acid composition of backfat, suggesting different genetic control acting at both tissues. The SNP association analyses showed significant associations with linolenic and palmitic acids besides several indexes. Among the polymorphisms that affect palmitic fatty acid and match the QTL region at 60 cM, there were three that mapped in the Phosphatidylcholine Transfer Protein (PCTP gene and one in the Acetyl-CoA Carboxylase  gene (ACACA. Interestingly one of the PCTP SNPs also affected significantly unsaturated and double bound indexes and the ratio between polyunsaturated/monounsaturated fatty acids. Differential expression was assessed on longissimus muscle conditional on the genotype of the QTL and on the most significant SNPs, according to the results obtained in the former analyses. Results from the microarray expression analyses, validated by RT-qPCR, showed that PCTP expression levels significantly vary depending on the QTL as well as on the own PCTP genotype. The results obtained with the different approaches point out the PCTP gene as a powerful candidate underlying the QTL for

  2. The Salicylic Acid-Mediated Release of Plant Volatiles Affects the Host Choice of Bemisia tabaci.

    Shi, Xiaobin; Chen, Gong; Tian, Lixia; Peng, Zhengke; Xie, Wen; Wu, Qingjun; Wang, Shaoli; Zhou, Xuguo; Zhang, Youjun

    2016-01-01

    The whitefly Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) causes serious crop losses worldwide by transmitting viruses. We have previously shown that salicylic acid (SA)-related plant defenses directly affect whiteflies. In this study, we applied exogenous SA to tomato plants in order to investigate the interaction between SA-induced plant volatiles and nonviruliferous B. tabaci B and Q or B- and Q-carrying tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV). The results showed that exogenous SA caused plants to repel nonviruliferous whiteflies, but the effect was reduced when the SA concentration was low and when the whiteflies were viruliferous. Exogenous SA increased the number and quantity of plant volatiles-especially the quantity of methyl salicylate and δ-limonene. In Y-tube olfactometer assays, methyl salicylate and δ-limonene repelled the whiteflies, but the repellency was reduced for viruliferous Q. We suggest that the release of plant volatiles as mediated by SA affects the interaction between whiteflies, plants, and viruses. Further studies are needed to determine why viruliferous Q is less sensitive than nonviruliferous Q to repellent plant volatiles. PMID:27376280

  3. Selection for low erucic acid and genetic mapping of loci affecting the accumulation of very long-chain fatty acids in meadowfoam seed storage lipids.

    Gandhi, S D; Kishore, V K; Crane, J M; Slabaugh, M B; Knapp, S J

    2009-06-01

    Erucic acid (22:1(13)) has been identified as an anti-nutritional compound in meadowfoam (Limnanthes alba) and other oilseeds in the Brassicales, a classification which has necessitated the development of low erucic acid cultivars for human consumption. The erucic acid concentrations of meadowfoam wild types (8%-24%) surpass industry standards for human consumption (acid lines and identify loci affecting the accumulation of 22:1(13) and other very long-chain fatty acids (VLCFAs) in meadowfoam seed storage lipids. LE76, a low erucic acid line, was developed by 3 cycles of selection in an ethyl methanesulfonate-treated wildtype population. LE76 produced 3% 22:1(13), threefold less than the M0 population. Wildtype x LE76 F2 populations produced continuous, approximately normal erucic and dienoic acid distributions. Loss-of-function mutations apparently did not segregate and individuals with low 22:1(13) concentrations (affecting VLCFA profiles in seed storage lipids by genotyping and phenotyping wildtype x low erucic acid F2 progeny. Composite interval mapping identified 3 moderately large-effect erucic acid QTL. The low erucic acid parent transmitted favorable alleles for 2 of 3 QTL, suggesting low erucic acid cultivars can be developed by combining favorable alleles transmitted by wildtype and low erucic acid parents. PMID:19483773

  4. Environmental factors affecting the low temperature isomerization of homohopanes in acidic peat deposits, central China

    Huang, Xianyu; Meyers, Philip A.; Xue, Jiantao; Gong, Linfeng; Wang, Xinxin; Xie, Shucheng

    2015-04-01

    Progressively more evidence reveals the abundant occurrence of the C31 homohopane with a 17α, 21β-configuration (C31 αβ) in immature peats. This compound is commonly considered to be an indicator of thermal maturity in petroleum source rocks, but in peats it has also been interpreted to reflect the oxidation and subsequent decarboxylation reactions of bacteriohopanepolyols with microbially mediated epimerization at C-17 that is catalyzed by the acidic peat conditions. To learn more about the environmental factors that affect the low-temperature isomerization of homohopanes, we investigated the distribution patterns of homohopanes in a well-studied peat core from the Dajiuhu peatland, central China, together with data from modern surface peat samples from Dajiuhu and three other locations. From comparison with paleotemperature and paleohydrologic records in the peat core, we hypothesize that the ratio of C31 αβ hopane relative to the ββ isomer (C31 αβ/ββ) is mainly influenced on a centennial to millennial timescale by ambient temperature with a secondary effect from redox conditions that are defined by peatland water levels. The surface peat samples revealed that relatively high C31 αβ/ββ values occurred under pH < 6. These results suggest that pH is indeed an important factor in the low-temperature isomerization of C31 homohopanes, although the magnitude of the pH effect may be less than those of ambient temperature and redox conditions. In both surface peat and peat horizons from the Dajiuhu peatland, the amount of the C31 αβ compound with R configuration relative to that with S configuration (C31 R/S) varied closely with C31 αβ/ββ, suggesting that the epimerization at both C-17 and C-22 may happen synchronously and at similar rates. This study reveals that the isomerization of homohopanes has the potential to reflect paleoenvironmental changes in acidic peat deposits. In addition, acidic peat samples investigated in this and previous studies

  5. PROCESS OPTIMIZATION OF TETRA ACETYL ETHYLENE DIAMINE ACTIVATED HYDROGEN PEROXIDE BLEACHING OF POPULUS NIGRA CTMP

    Qiang Zhao; Junwen Pu; Shulei Mao; Guibo Qi

    2010-01-01

    To enhance the bleaching efficiency, the activator of tetra acetyl ethylene diamine (TAED) was used in conventional H2O2 bleaching. The H2O2/TAED bleaching system can accelerate the reaction rate and shorten bleaching time at relative low temperature, which can reduce the production cost. In this research, the process with hydrogen peroxide activated by TAED bleaching of Populus nigra chemi-thermo mechanical pulp was optimized. Suitable bleaching conditions were confirmed as follows: pulp con...

  6. Coral disease following massive bleaching in 2005 causes 60% decline in coral cover on reefs in the US Virgin Islands

    Miller, J.; Muller, E.; Rogers, C.; Waara, R.; Atkinson, A.; Whelan, K.R.T.; Patterson, M.; Witcher, B.

    2009-01-01

    In the northeast Caribbean, doldrum-like conditions combined with elevated water temperatures in the summer/fall 2005 created the most severe coral bleaching event ever documented within this region. Video monitoring of 100 randomly chosen, permanent transects at five study sites in the US Virgin Islands revealed over 90% of the scleractinian coral cover showed signs of thermal stress by paling or becoming completely white. Lower water temperatures in October allowed some re-coloring of corals; however, a subsequent unprecedented regional outbreak of coral disease affected all sites. Five known diseases or syndromes were recorded; however, most lesions showed signs similar to white plague. Nineteen scleractinian species were affected by disease, with >90% of the disease-induced lesions occurring on the genus Montastraea. The disease outbreak peaked several months after the onset of bleaching at all sites but did not occur at the same time. The mean number of disease-induced lesions increased 51-fold and the mean area of disease-associated mortality increased 13-fold when compared with pre-bleaching disease levels. In the 12 months following the onset of bleaching, coral cover declined at all sites (average loss: 51.5%, range: 42.4-61.8%) reducing the five-site average from 21.4% before bleaching to 10.3% with most mortality caused by white plague disease, not bleaching. Continued losses through October 2007 reduced the average coral cover of the five sites to 8.3% (average 2-year loss: 61.1%, range: 53.0-79.3%). Mean cover by M. annularis (complex) decreased 51%, Colpophyllia natans 78% and Agaricia agaricites 87%. Isolated disease outbreaks have been documented before in the Virgin Islands, but never as widespread or devastating as the one that occurred after the 2005 Caribbean coral-bleaching event. This study provides insight into the effects of continued seawater warming and subsequent coral bleaching events in the Caribbean and highlights the need to

  7. Ocean acidification causes bleaching and productivity loss in coral reef builders

    Anthony, K. R. N.; Kline, D. I.; Diaz-Pulido, G.; Dove, S.; Hoegh-Guldberg, O

    2008-01-01

    Ocean acidification represents a key threat to coral reefs by reducing the calcification rate of framework builders. In addition, acidification is likely to affect the relationship between corals and their symbiotic dinoflagellates and the productivity of this association. However, little is known about how acidification impacts on the physiology of reef builders and how acidification interacts with warming. Here, we report on an 8-week study that compared bleaching, productivity, and calcifi...

  8. Physiological and biogeochemical traits of bleaching and recovery in the mounding species of coral Porites lobata: implications for resilience in mounding corals.

    Stephen J Levas

    Full Text Available Mounding corals survive bleaching events in greater numbers than branching corals. However, no study to date has determined the underlying physiological and biogeochemical trait(s that are responsible for mounding coral holobiont resilience to bleaching. Furthermore, the potential of dissolved organic carbon (DOC as a source of fixed carbon to bleached corals has never been determined. Here, Porites lobata corals were experimentally bleached for 23 days and then allowed to recover for 0, 1, 5, and 11 months. At each recovery interval a suite of analyses were performed to assess their recovery (photosynthesis, respiration, chlorophyll a, energy reserves, tissue biomass, calcification, δ(13C of the skeletal, δ(13C, and δ(15N of the animal host and endosymbiont fractions. Furthermore, at 0 months of recovery, the assimilation of photosynthetically acquired and zooplankton-feeding acquired carbon into the animal host, endosymbiont, skeleton, and coral-mediated DOC were measured via (13C-pulse-chase labeling. During the first month of recovery, energy reserves and tissue biomass in bleached corals were maintained despite reductions in chlorophyll a, photosynthesis, and the assimilation of photosynthetically fixed carbon. At the same time, P. lobata corals catabolized carbon acquired from zooplankton and seemed to take up DOC as a source of fixed carbon. All variables that were negatively affected by bleaching recovered within 5 to 11 months. Thus, bleaching resilience in the mounding coral P. lobata is driven by its ability to actively catabolize zooplankton-acquired carbon and seemingly utilize DOC as a significant fixed carbon source, facilitating the maintenance of energy reserves and tissue biomass. With the frequency and intensity of bleaching events expected to increase over the next century, coral diversity on future reefs may favor not only mounding morphologies but species like P. lobata, which have the ability to utilize heterotrophic

  9. Conjugated linoleic acid of dairy foods is affected by cows’ feeding system and processing of milk

    Juan Pablo Avilez Ruiz

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The distribution of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA in dairy products commercially available in Chile is poorly understood. This study aimed to assess the content of CLA in dairy cow products from Chile and the effect of processing fresh milk into dairy products. Samples of raw milk were categorized into two groups based on the animal feeding system utilized by the dairy farm: 1 grazing based systems (Los Lagos region; and 2 housing systems using total mixed ration (TMR diets (Los Angeles region. Simultaneously, commercial samples of condensed milk, powdered milk, butter and Gouda cheese were analyzed. Furthermore, samples of raw milk and processed products (powdered and sweetened condensed milk were also analyzed. Dairy farms based on grazing systems had higher levels of CLA in raw milk than TMR farms. In addition, average values of CLA were 1.72 g 100 g−1 of total fatty acids, in spring milk in the Los Lagos region, and 0.42 g 100 g−1 in summer milk, in the Los Angeles region. Similarly, the CLA content of dairy products was higher than that of raw milk. Milk processing affected the transferring of CLA from fresh milk into the final products. Sweetened condensed milk presented lower CLA values than raw and powdered milk. In conclusion, this study indicates the importance of the production systems to the CLA content as well as the effects of milk processing into dairy products. To sum up, more research is needed to elucidate the exact effect of the processing conditions of dairy products on the CLA content.

  10. Soil Components Affecting Phosphate Sorption Parameters of Acid Paddy Soils in Guangdong Province

    2000-01-01

    Soil components affecting phosphate sorption parameters were studied using acid paddy soils derived from basalt, granite, sand-shale and the Pearl River Delta sediments, respectively, in Guangdong Province.For each soil, seven 2.50 g subsamples were equilibrated with 50 mL 0.02 mol L-1 (pH=7.0) of KCl containing 0, 5, 10, 15, 25, 50 and 100 ng P kg-1, respectively, in order to derive P sorption parameters (P sorption maximum, P sorption intensity factor and maximum buffer capacity) by Langmuir isotherm equation. It was shown that the main soil components influencing phosphate sorption maximum (Xm) included soil clay, pH,amorphous iron oxide (Feo) and amorphous aluminum oxide (Alo), with their effects in the order of Alo >Feo > pH > clay. Among these components, pH had a negative effect, and the others had a positive effect.Organic matter (OM) was the only soil component influencing P sorption intensity factor (K). The main components influencing maximum phosphate buffer capacity (MBC) consisted of soil clay, OM, pH, Feo and Alo, with their effects in the order of Alo > OM > pH > Feo > clay. Path analysis indicated that among the components with positive effects on maximum phosphate buffer capacity (MBC), the effect was in the order of Alo > Feo > Clay, while among the components with negative effects, OM > pH. OM played an important role in mobilizing phosphate in acid paddy soils mainly through decreasing the sorption intensity of phosphate by soil particles.

  11. Translocator Protein (TSPO) Affects Mitochondrial Fatty Acid Oxidation in Steroidogenic Cells.

    Tu, Lan N; Zhao, Amy H; Hussein, Mahmoud; Stocco, Douglas M; Selvaraj, Vimal

    2016-03-01

    Translocator protein (TSPO), also known as the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor, is a highly conserved outer mitochondrial membrane protein present in specific subpopulations of cells within different tissues. In recent studies, the presumptive model depicting mammalian TSPO as a critical cholesterol transporter for steroidogenesis has been refuted by studies examining effects of Tspo gene deletion in vivo and in vitro, biochemical testing of TSPO cholesterol transport function, and specificity of TSPO-mediated pharmacological responses. Nevertheless, high TSPO expression in steroid-producing cells seemed to indicate an alternate function for this protein in steroidogenic mitochondria. To seek an explanation, we used CRISPR/Cas9-mediated TSPO knockout steroidogenic MA-10 Leydig cell (MA-10:TspoΔ/Δ) clones to examine changes to core mitochondrial functions resulting from TSPO deficiency. We observed that 1) MA-10:TspoΔ/Δ cells had a shift in substrate utilization for energy production from glucose to fatty acids with significantly higher mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation (FAO), and increased reactive oxygen species production; and 2) oxygen consumption rate, mitochondrial membrane potential, and proton leak were not different between MA-10:TspoΔ/Δ and MA-10:Tspo+/+ control cells. Consistent with this finding, TSPO-deficient adrenal glands from global TSPO knockout (Tspo(-/-)) mice also showed up-regulation of genes involved in FAO compared with the TSPO floxed (Tspo(fl/fl)) controls. These results demonstrate the first experimental evidence that TSPO can affect mitochondrial energy homeostasis through modulation of FAO, a function that appears to be consistent with high levels of TSPO expression observed in cell types active in lipid storage/metabolism. PMID:26741196

  12. The effect of light-activation sources on tooth bleaching

    Kusai Baroudi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Vital bleaching is one of the most requested cosmetic dental procedures asked by patients who seek a more pleasing smile. This procedure consists of carbamide or hydrogen peroxide gel applications that can be applied in-office or by the patient (at-home/overnight bleaching system. Some in-office treatments utilise whitening light with the objective of speeding up the whitening process. The objective of this article is to review and summarise the current literature with regard to the effect of light-activation sources on in-office tooth bleaching. A literature search was conducted using Medline, accessed via the National Library of Medicine Pub Med from 2003 to 2013 searching for articles relating to effectiveness of light activation sources on in-office tooth bleaching. This study found conflicting evidence on whether light truly improve tooth whitening. Other factors such as, type of stain, initial tooth colour and subject age which can influence tooth bleaching outcome were discussed. Conclusions: The use of light activator sources with in-office bleaching treatment of vital teeth did not increase the efficacy of bleaching or accelerate the bleaching.

  13. Investigating Motivations for Women's Skin Bleaching in Tanzania

    Lewis, Kelly M.; Robkin, Navit; Gaska, Karie; Njoki, Lillian Carol

    2011-01-01

    Why do many African women continue to use damaging skin-bleaching cosmetics that contain dangerous chemicals (e.g., mercury) that may increase their rates of infertility, skin cancer, and serious skin/brain/kidney disease? To address this question, our study investigated motivations driving the preservation of skin-bleaching practices in Tanzania.…

  14. Does deposition depth control the OSL bleaching of fluvial sediment?

    Cunningham, A. C.; Wallinga, J.; Hobo, N.; Versendaal, A. J.; Makaske, B.; Middelkoop, H.

    2014-07-01

    The Optically Stimulated Luminescence (OSL) signal from fluvial sediment often contains a remnant from the previous deposition cycle, leading to a partially bleached equivalent-dose distribution. Although identification of the burial dose is of primary concern, the degree of bleaching could potentially provide insights into geomorphic processes. However, comparison of bleaching between samples is complicated by sample-to-sample variation in aliquot size and luminescence sensitivity. Here we develop an age model to account for these effects. With measurement data from multi-grain aliquots, we use Bayesian computational statistics to estimate the burial dose and bleaching parameters of the single-grain dose distribution. We apply the model to 46 samples taken from fluvial sediment of Rhine branches in the Netherlands, and compare the results with environmental predictor variables (depositional energy and environment, sample depth, depth relative to mean water level, dose rate). We find no significant correlations between any predictor variable and the bleaching parameters, although large uncertainties may be obscuring relationships. However, the best bleached samples are found close to the mean water level. Based on these results, we hypothesize that bleaching occurs mainly during fluvial transport rather than upon deposition, with extra bleaching possible for sediments near the transition of channel to overbank deposits due to local reworking after deposition either by wind or water.

  15. Decolorization of kraft bleaching effluent by advanced oxidation processes using copper (II) as electron acceptor.

    Yeber, María C; Oñate, Katherine P; Vidal, Gladys

    2007-04-01

    Two advanced oxidation processes (AOPs), TiO2/UV/O2 and TiO2/UV/Cu (II), were used to remove color from a Kraft bleaching effluent. The optimal decoloration rate was determined by multivariate analysis, obtaining a mathematical model to evaluate the effect among variables. TiO2 and Cu (II) concentrations and the reaction times were optimized. The experimental design resulted in a quadratic matrix of 30 experiments. Additionally, the pH influence on the color removal was determined by multivariate analysis. Results indicate that color removal was 94% at acidic pH (3.0) in the presence of Cu (11) as an electron acceptor. Under this condition, the biodegradation of the effluent increased from 0.3 to 0.6. Moreover, 70% of COD (chemical oxygen demand) was removed, and the ecotoxicity, measured by Daphnia magna, was reduced. Photocatalytic oxidation to remove the color contained in the Kraft mill bleaching effluent was effective under the following conditions: short reaction time, acidic pH values, and without the addition of oxygen due to the presence of Cu (II) in the effluent. Moreover, residual Cu (II) was a minimum (0.05.mg L(-1)) and was not toxic to the next biological stage. The experimental design methodology indicated that a quadratic polynomial model may be used to representthe efficiencyfor degradation of the Kraft bleach pulp effluent by a photocatalytic process. PMID:17438808

  16. Application of TCF bleaching in mixtures of chemical and mechanics fibers recycled: alternative for the paper industry

    In this paper we study the technical feasibility of using mixtures composed by mechanical and chemical fibers recycled in the production of tissue paper, using TCF bleaching sequences that improve the optical properties of this raw material. At present, chemical fibers recycled are used, but their limited availability and high cost,stimulate the search for raw materials which replace them partially. Bleaching stages were carried out at atmospheric pressure, with the oxidative process made with hydrogen peroxide at 80 celsius degrade in 1.5 hours and the reductive stage with FAS, VBrite, Thiourea Dioxide in situ or Chromaclear at 60 celsius degrade for 1 hour. The obtained results allow to deduce that the addition of mechanical recycled fiber significantly affects the optical properties of mixtures. However, some of the bleaching sequences applied manage to compensate, at least partly, the effect of adding this raw material of lower quality and cost.

  17. Simultaneous production of bio-ethanol and bleached pulp from red algae.

    Yoon, Min Ho; Lee, Yoon Woo; Lee, Chun Han; Seo, Yung Bum

    2012-12-01

    The red algae, Gelidium corneum, was used to produce bleached pulp for papermaking and ethanol. Aqueous extracts obtained at 100-140 °C were subjected to saccharification, purification, fermentation, and distillation to produce ethanol. The solid remnants were bleached with chlorine dioxide and peroxide to make pulp. In the extraction process, sulfuric acid and sodium thiosulfate were added to increase the extract yield and to improve de-polymerization of the extracts, as well as to generate high-quality pulp. An extraction process incorporating 5% sodium thiosulfate by dry weight of the algae provided optimal production conditions for the production of both strong pulp and a high ethanol yield. These results suggest that it might be possible to utilize algae instead of trees and starch for pulp and ethanol production, respectively. PMID:23073109

  18. Retinoic Acid Signaling Is Essential for Valvulogenesis by Affecting Endocardial Cushions Formation in Zebrafish Embryos.

    Li, Junbo; Yue, Yunyun; Zhao, Qingshun

    2016-02-01

    Retinoic acid (RA) plays important roles in many stages of heart morphogenesis. Zebrafish embryos treated with exogenous RA display defective atrio-ventricular canal (AVC) specification. However, whether endogenous RA signaling takes part in cardiac valve formation remains unknown. Herein, we investigated the role of RA signaling in cardiac valve development by knocking down aldh1a2, the gene encoding an enzyme that is mainly responsible for RA synthesis during early development, in zebrafish embryos. The results showed that partially knocking down aldh1a2 caused defective formation of primitive cardiac valve leaflets at 108 hpf (hour post-fertilization). Inhibiting endogenous RA signaling by 4-diethylaminobenzal-dehyde revealed that 16-26 hpf was a key time window when RA signaling affects the valvulogenesis. The aldh1a2 morphants had defective formation of endocardial cushion (EC) at 76 hpf though they had almost normal hemodynamics and cardiac chamber specification at early development. Examining the expression patterns of AVC marker genes including bmp4, bmp2b, nppa, notch1b, and has2, we found the morphants displayed abnormal development of endocardial AVC but almost normal development of myocardial AVC at 50 hpf. Being consistent with the reduced expression of notch1b in endocardial AVC, the VE-cadherin gene cdh5, the downstream gene of Notch signaling, was ectopically expressed in AVC of aldh1a2 morphants at 50 hpf, and overexpression of cdh5 greatly affected the formation of EC in the embryos at 76 hpf. Taken together, our results suggest that RA signaling plays essential roles in zebrafish cardiac valvulogenesis. PMID:26671342

  19. Osteoclasts but not osteoblasts are affected by a calcified surface treated with zoledronic acid in vitro

    Bisphosphonates are potent inhibitors of osteoclast-mediated bone resorption. Recent interest has centered on the effects of bisphosphonates on osteoblasts. Chronic dosing of osteoblasts with solubilized bisphosphonates has been reported to enhance osteogenesis and mineralization in vitro. However, this methodology poorly reflects the in vivo situation, where free bisphosphonate becomes rapidly bound to mineralized bone surfaces. To establish a more clinically relevant cell culture model, we cultured bone cells on calcium phosphate coated quartz discs pre-treated with the potent nitrogen-containing bisphosphonate, zoledronic acid (ZA). Binding studies utilizing [14C]-labeled ZA confirmed that the bisphosphonate bound in a concentration-dependent manner over the 1-50 μM dose range. When grown on ZA-treated discs, the viability of bone-marrow derived osteoclasts was greatly reduced, while the viability and mineralization of the osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cell line were largely unaffected. This suggests that only bone resorbing cells are affected by bound bisphosphonate. However, this system does not account for transient exposure to unbound bisphosphonate in the hours following a clinical dosing. To model this event, we transiently treated osteoblasts with ZA in the absence of a calcified surface. Osteoblasts proved highly resistant to all transitory treatment regimes, even when utilizing ZA concentrations that prevented mineralization and/or induced cell death when dosed chronically. This study represents a pharmacologically more relevant approach to modeling bisphosphonate treatment on cultured bone cells and implies that bisphosphonate therapies may not directly affect osteoblasts at bone surfaces

  20. Vital tooth bleaching: biologic adverse effects-a review.

    Minoux, Maryline; Serfaty, Rene

    2008-09-01

    Depending on etiology, the esthetic treatment of dyschromia may involve vital tooth- bleaching techniques. Hydrogen peroxide is the active molecule used for such procedures; however, its action mechanism is not clearly understood. Moreover, a variety of contradictory studies make difficult the evaluation of the safety of bleaching techniques. The purpose of this article is therefore to review the available literature (1) to describe the physicochemical properties of hydrogen peroxide and (2) to assess the safety of its use as a vital tooth-bleaching agent. Indeed, based on hydrogen peroxide's capacity to generate free radicals that diffuse throughout the dental hard tissues, concerns have been addressed regarding the adverse effects that bleaching products can induce on the enamel and dentin structures, pulp, and bonding to a composite resin system. Moreover, during self-application of home bleaching products, hydrogen peroxide is released into the oral cavity and ingested. Some questions have therefore arisen concerning its toxicity and its possible carcinogenicity. PMID:19107251

  1. Dental pulp vascular permeability changes induced by dental bleaching

    Cristiane da Costa

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Aiming to compare the effect of different light sources for dental bleaching on vascular permeability of dental pulps, forty-eight incisors were used. The bleaching agent (35 % hydrogen peroxide was activated by halogen light; LED (Light Emitting Diode or LED, followed by laser phototherapy (LPT (λ = 780 nm; 3 J/cm². After the bleaching procedures, the animals received an intra-arterial dye injection and one hour later were sacrificed. The teeth were diaphanized and photographed. The amount of blue stain content of each dental pulp was quantified using a computer imaging program. The data was statistically compared (p < 0.05. The results showed a significant higher (p < 0.01 dye content in the groups bleached with halogen light, compared with the control, LED and LED plus LPT groups. Thus, tooth bleaching activated by LED or LED plus LPT induces lesser resulted in increased vascular permeability than halogen light.

  2. ESR studies on bleached sedimentary quartz

    Walther, R.; Zilles, D.

    Some ESR signals in quartz are reported to be bleachable by sunlight and so they promise to be useful for dating sediments (Grün, 1989). The Ge signal in quartz is the only one that shows bleaching effects with UV light in short time scales (hours). Therefore we used quartz samples from the sites of Mauer ( 'Homo erectus heidelbergensis'), samples from a borehole in the Neckar valley ('Entensee', Ladenburg near Heidelberg) and samples from a pegmatite for basic studies on the Ge signal. The results show that with our standard sample preparation procedure for quartz separation (using red light as for TL samples), the natural Ge signal is not detectable, but rises clearly with gamma irradiation. Several experiments for examination of the stability and sensitivity of the Ge centre in quartz were carried out. For comparison with the behaviour of the Ge signal we measured the Al signal as well. Our experiments show that the Al signal is bleachable in long time scales (weeks). The behaviour on bleaching, irradiation and thermal annealing is very complicated, as the Al centre is a hole centre (it possibly interacts with several electron centres in the quartz and so the processes are of higher order).

  3. Effect of the Purple Corn Beverage “Chicha Morada” in Composite Resin during Dental Bleaching

    Acuña, Eric Dario; Delgado-Cotrina, Leyla; Rumiche, Francisco Aurelio

    2016-01-01

    During dental bleaching the staining potential of the surface would increase. This study aims to evaluate the staining susceptibility of one bleached composite resin after the exposure to three different beverages: Peruvian purple corn based beverage (chicha morada), green tea, and distilled water. Thirty disk-shaped specimens of one nanofill composite resin were prepared. The specimens were then divided into six groups (n = 5): purple corn (P), purple corn + bleaching (PB), green tea (T), green tea + bleaching (TB), distilled water (W), and distilled water + bleaching (WB). In groups that received bleaching, two sessions of bleaching with 35% hydrogen peroxide were done. Following bleaching, specimens were exposed to each liquid thirty minutes daily. Color was measured with a digital spectrophotometer. For statistical analysis, color measurement differences between the obtained results were used: during bleaching, after bleaching, and during + after bleaching. Two-way ANOVA was used to compare the color changes in the resins of all groups (p 3.3). PMID:27034897

  4. UPR in palmitate-treated pancreatic beta-cells is not affected by altering oxidation of the fatty acid

    Sol E-ri; Sargsyan Ernest; Bergsten Peter

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Elevated levels of lipids are detrimental for beta-cell function and mass. One of the mechanisms of how fatty acids induce apoptosis is development of the unfolded protein response (UPR). It is still far from understood how fatty acids activate the UPR, however. Methods We examined how palmitate-induced activation of the UPR was affected by altering the metabolism of the fatty acid in insulin-secreting INS-1E and MIN6 cell lines and intact human islets. To increase oxidati...

  5. The adsorption of oil sands naphthenic acids from process-affected tailings water using activated petroleum coke

    Small, C.C.; Hashisho, Z.; Ulrich, A.C. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    2010-07-01

    Eighty percent of the organic acids in the Athabasca oil sands region are comprised of naphthenic acids that are toxic to a variety of aquatic life-forms as well as being highly corrosive. This PowerPoint presentation discussed a method of adsorbing naphthenic acids from process-affected water. Activated petroleum coke was studied in order to investigate optimal physical activation conditions for adsorbing oil sands naphthenic acids. Experimental tests were conducted in a centrifuge and analyzed with Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometry, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and fluorescence spectrometry. The study demonstrated that delayed and fluid petroleum cokes can be turned into high surface area carbons with increased activation time, temperature, and steam rate. The coke can be used as an adsorbent to remove oil sands naphthenic acids. tabs., figs.

  6. High Physiological Omega-3 Fatty Acid Supplementation Affects Muscle Fatty Acid Composition and Glucose and Insulin Homeostasis in Obese Adolescents

    Frida Dangardt; Yun Chen; Eva Gronowitz; Jovanna Dahlgren; Peter Friberg; Birgitta Strandvik

    2012-01-01

    Obese adolescents have high concentrations of saturated fatty acids and low omega-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCUFAs) in plasma phospholipids. We aimed to investigate effects of omega-3 LCPUFA supplementation to obese adolescents on skeletal muscle lipids and glucose and insulin homeostasis. Twenty-five obese adolescents (14–17 years old, 14 females) completed a randomized double-blind crossover study supplying capsules containing either 1.2 g omega-3 LCPUFAs or placebo, for 3 m...

  7. Long term bleaching of optical glasses darkened by Co60 ionizing radiation

    Typical camera designs include optical glass elements that may be affected by the ionizing radiation present in the natural space environment. Ordinary optical glasses darken at low (10(to the 3rd power) rad) dose levels when exposed to ionizing radiation. This darkening decreases the sensitivity of optical sensors. Optical glass flats of FK 51, LaK 0, PK 51A, and ZK Ny were exposed to a 10.6 krad dose of ionizing radiation. Spectrophotometer traces determined the transmittance of the samples as a function of wavelength in the range 350 to 850 nm before and at various time intervals after the irradiation. These measured values were then use to evaluate the rate of recovery or ''bleaching'' of the exposed samples. To prevent accelerated bleaching, the samples were kept at room temperature and away from light, except during measurement. Tables of the measured data and plots of the transmissivity vs. wavelength at various times after irradiation are presented

  8. Dissolution of Aluminum in Variably Charged Soils as Affected by Low-Molecular-Weight Organic Acids

    LI Jiu-Yu; XU Ren-Kou; JI Guo-Liang

    2005-01-01

    Low-molecular-weight (LMW) organic acids exist widely in soils and play an important role in soil processes such as mineral weathering, nutrient mobilization and Al detoxification. In this research, a batch experiment was conducted to examine the effects of LMW organic acids on dissolution of aluminum in two variably charged soils, an Ultisol and an Oxisol. The results showed that the LMW organic acids enhanced the dissolution of Al in the two investigated soils in the following order: citric > oxalic > malonic > malic > tartaric > salicylic > lactic > maleic. This was generally in agreement with the magnitude of the stability constants for the Al-organic complexes. The effects of LMW organic acids on Al dissolution were greater in the Ultisol than in the Oxisol as compared to their controls. Also, the accelerating effects of citric and oxalic acids on dissolution of Al increased with an increase in pH, while the effects of lactic and salicylic acids decreased. Additionally, when the organic acid concentration was less than 0.2 mmol L-1, the dissolution of Al changed little with increase in acid concentration. However, when the organic acid concentration was greater than 0.2 mmol L-1,the dissolution of Al increased with increase in acid concentration. In addition to the acid first dissociation constant and stability constant of Al-organic complexes, the promoting effects of LMW organic acids on dissolution of Al were also related to their sorption-desorption equilibrium in the soils.

  9. Alternative technique for evaluating yield loss in modern bleach plants

    Dalton Longue Júnior

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study an alternative technique is presented and discussed for measuring yield loss based on the analysis of total organic carbon (TOC in bleaching filtrates. Oxygen predelignified eucalyptus kraft pulp was subjected to the DHT(EPD, D(EPDD and D(EPDP bleaching sequences and the gravimetric yield of each stage was determined, with 10 replicates. Then the filtrates were analyzed for TOC and COD. Correlations were established among the three measurement methods (gravimetric, COD and TOC. Yield losses in the DHT stage were more accentuated than in the D0 stage, these losses being recovered in subsequent stages of the bleaching sequence. Yield loss decreased with each advancing stage of the bleaching sequences (D0,DHT>(EP>D1>P>D2. Yield loss increased with higher kappa factors in the first bleaching stage and with higher temperature in the (EP stage. The final P stage resulted in greater yield losses than the final D stage. Yield loss intensifies with gain in brightness from bleaching. Yield losses as measured by the TOC method revealed a narrower range of variation in relation to the gravimetric and COD methods, and the linear equation derived for the TOC vs. gravimetric yield relationship provided the best fit (R2=97.27%. Overall yield losses throughout were in the range of 4-5%, depending on the bleaching sequence and operating conditions.

  10. Pyrene fate affected by humic acid amendment in soil slurry systems

    McLean Joan E

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Humic acid (HA has been found to affect the solubility, mineralization, and bound residue formation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs. However, most of the studies on the interaction between HA and PAH concentrated on one or two of the three phases. Few studies have provided a simple protocol to demonstrate the overall effects of HA on PAH distribution in soil systems for all three phases. Methods In this study, three doses of standard Elliott soil HA (ESHA, 15, 187.5, and 1,875 μg ESHA/g soil slurry, were amended to soil slurry systems. 14C-pyrene was added to the systems along with non-radiolabeled pyrene; 14C and 14CO2 were monitored for each system for a period of 120 days. Results The highest amendment dose significantly increased the 14C fraction in the aqueous phase within 24 h, but not after that time. Pyrene mineralization was significantly inhibited by the highest dose over the 120-day study. While organic solvent extractable 14C decreased with time in all systems, non-extractable or bound 14C was significantly enhanced with the highest dose of ESHA addition. Conclusion Amendment of the highest dose of ESHA to pyrene contaminated soil was observed to have two major functions. The first was to mitigate CO2 production significantly by reducing 14CO2 from 14C pyrene mineralization. The second was to significantly increase stable bound 14C formation, which may serve as a remediation end point. Overall, this study demonstrated a practical approach for decontamination of PAH contaminated soil. This approach may be applicable to other organic contaminated environments where active bioremediation is taking place.

  11. Isotope geochemistry of waters affected by acid mine drainage in old labour sites (SE, Spain).

    Pérez-Sirvent, Carmen; Martinez-Sanchez, Maria Jose; Garcia-Lorenzo, Maria Luz; Agudo, Ines; Hernandez-Cordoba, Manuel; Recio, Clemente

    2015-04-01

    The ore deposits of this zone have iron, lead and zinc as the main metal components. Iron is present in oxides, hydroxides, sulfides, sulfates, carbonates, and silicates; lead and zinc occur in sulfides (galena and sphalerite, respectively), carbonates, sulfates, and lead or zinc-bearing (manganese, iron) oxides. Mining started with the Romans and activity peaked in the second half of the 19th century and throughout the 20th century until the 1980's. From 1940 to 1957, mineral concentration was made by froth flotation and, prior to this, by gravimetric techniques. The mining wastes, or tailings, with a very fine particle size were deposited inland (tailings dams) and, since 1957, huge releases were made in directly the sea coast. The objective of this work was to evaluate processes affecting waters from abandoned mine sites by way of stable isotopic analysis, particularly H and O stable isotopes from water and S and O from dissolved sulfates. Several common chemical and physical processes, such as evaporation, water-rock interaction and mixing could alter water isotopic composition. Evaporation, which causes an enrichment in δD and δ18O in the residual water, is an important process in semiarid areas. The results obtained indicate that, for sites near the coast, waters are meteoric, and marine infiltration only takes place in the deepest layers near the shore or if water remains stagnated in sediments with low permeability. The main source of sulfate was the oxidation of sulfides, resulting in the liberation of acid, sulfate and metals. In order to assess the mechanism responsible for sulfide oxidation, the stoichiometric isotope balance model and the general isotope balance model were tested, suggesting that the oxidation via Fe3+ was predominant in the surface, and controlled by A. ferrooxidans, while at depth, sulfate reduction occurred.

  12. Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) affects distinct molecular signalling pathways in human primary hepatocytes

    Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) was shown to damage the liver of rodents and to impair embryonic development. At the molecular level, the hepatotoxic effects were attributed to the PFOA-mediated activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα). In general, PPARα-dependent effects are less pronounced in humans than in rodents, and the hazard potential of PFOA for humans is controversially discussed. To analyse the effects of PFOA in human hepatocytes, a microarray analysis was conducted to screen for PFOA-mediated alterations in the transcriptome of human primary hepatocytes. A subsequent network analysis revealed that PFOA had an impact on several signalling pathways in addition to the well-known activation of PPARα. The microarray data confirmed earlier findings that PFOA: (i) affects the estrogen receptor ERα, (ii) activates the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ), and (iii) inhibits the function of the hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α (HNF4α) which is an essential factor for liver development and embryogenesis. Finally, as a novel finding, PFOA was shown to stimulate gene expression of the proto-oncogenes c-Jun and c-Fos. This was confirmed by using the HepG2 cell line as a model for human hepatocytes. PFOA stimulated cellular proliferation and the metabolic activity of the cells, and upregulated the expression of various cyclins which have a central function in the regulation of cell cycle control. Functional studies, however, indicated that PFOA had no impact on c-Jun and c-Fos phosphorylation and on AP-1-dependent gene transcription, thus demonstrating that PFOA-induced proliferation occurs largely independent of c-Jun and c-Fos

  13. Mobility and speciation of Cd,Cu,and Zn in two acidic soils affected by simulated acid rain

    GUO Zhao-hui; LIAO Bo-han; HUANG Chang-yong

    2005-01-01

    Through a batch experiment, the mobility and speciation of heavy metals(Cd, Cu, Zn) in two acidic forest soils from Hunan Province were studied. The results showed that the release and potential active speciation of Cd, Cu, and Zn in the tested contaminated red soil(CRS) and yellow red soil(CYRS) increased significantly with pH decreasing and ion concentrations increasing of simulated acid rain, and these effects were mainly decided by the pH value of simulated acid rain. Cd had the highest potential risk on the environment compared with Cu and Zn. Cd existed mainly in exchangeable form in residual CRS and CYRS, Cu in organically bound and Mn-oxide occluded forms, and Zn in mineral forms due to the high background values.

  14. Intrapulpal temperature variation during bleaching with various activation mechanisms

    Sílvia Masae de Araujo Michida

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to evaluate the intrapulpal temperature variation after bleaching treatment with 35% hydrogen peroxide using different sources of activation. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Twenty-four human teeth were sectioned in the mesiodistal direction providing 48 specimens, and were divided into 4 groups (n=12: (G1 Control - Bleaching gel without light activation, (G2 Bleaching gel + halogen light, (G3 Bleaching gel + LED, (G4 Bleaching gel + Nd:YAG Laser. The temperatures were recorded using a digital thermometer at 4 time points: before bleaching gel application, 1 min after bleaching gel application, during activation of the bleaching gel, and after the bleaching agent turned from a dark-red into a clear gel. Data were analyzed statistically by the Dunnet's test, ANOVA and Tukey's test (a=0.05. RESULTS: The mean intrapulpal temperature values (ºC in the groups were: G1: 0.617 ± 0.41; G2: 1.800 ± 0.68; G3: 0.975 ± 0.51; and G4: 4.325 ± 1.09. The mean maximum temperature variation (MTV values were: 1.5ºC (G1, 2.9ºC (G2, 1.7ºC (G3 and 6.9ºC (G4. When comparing the experimental groups to the control group, G3 was not statistically different from G1 (p>0.05, but G2 and G4 presented significantly higher (p<0.05 intrapulpal temperatures and MTV. The three experimental groups differed significantly (p<0.05 from each other. CONCLUSIONS: The Nd:YAG laser was the activation method that presented the highest values of intrapulpal temperature variation when compared with LED and halogen light. The group activated by LED light presented the lowest values of temperature variation, which were similar to that of the control group.

  15. Bile acid salt binding with colesevelam HCl is not affected by suspension in common beverages.

    Hanus, Martin; Zhorov, Eugene

    2006-12-01

    It has been previously reported that anions in common beverages may bind to bile acid sequestrants (BAS), reducing their capacity for binding bile acid salts. This study examined the ability of the novel BAS colesevelam hydrochloride (HCl), in vitro, to bind bile acid sodium salts following suspension in common beverages. Equilibrium binding was evaluated under conditions of constant time and varying concentrations of bile acid salts in simulated intestinal fluid (SIF). A stock solution of sodium salts of glycochenodeoxycholic acid (GCDC), taurodeoxycholic acid (TDC), and glycocholic acid (GC), was added to each prepared sample of colesevelam HCl. Bile acid salt binding was calculated by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis. Kinetics experiments were conducted using constant initial bile acid salt concentrations and varying binding times. The affinity, capacity, and kinetics of colesevelam HCl binding for GCDC, TDC, and GC were not significantly altered after suspension in water, carbonated water, Coca-Cola, Sprite, grape juice, orange juice, tomato juice, or Gatorade. The amount of bile acid sodium salt bound as a function of time was unchanged by pretreatment with any beverage tested. The in vitro binding characteristics of colesevelam HCl are unchanged by suspension in common beverages. PMID:16937334

  16. Effect of a Home Bleaching Agent on the Fracture Toughness of Resin Composites: using short rod design

    Bagheri R.

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: Resin composites are brittle materials and their major shortcomings are manifested in their sensitivity to flaws and defects. Although various mechanical properties of resin composites have been described, few studies are available on assessing the effect of bleaching agents on resin composites using the short rod design. Materials and Method: Specimens were prepared from three resin composites; Rok (SDI, Esthet (Dentsply, and Estelite (Tokuyama. For each material, a total of 24 disc-shaped specimens were prepared using a custom-made mould. Specimens were randomly divided into 3 groups of 8 and conditioned in 37°C distilled water for either 24 hours, or 21 days. 21 day specimens were tested both with and without applying bleaching agent; Polanight (SDI. Study group specimens were bleached for 21 days, 2 hours a day. The specimens were loaded using a universal testing machine with a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm per minute. The maximum load at specimen failure was recorded and the KIc (MPa. M 0.5 was calculated. Results: Statistical analysis using two-way ANOVA showed a significant relationship between material and time (p< 0.05. Tukey’s test showed that after 24 h of immersion in distilled water, Rok revealed the highest KIc followed by Esthet and Estelite. The bleaching agent significantly improved the fracture toughness values of Esthet while it decreased that of Estelite. Conclusion: The fracture toughness of the resin composites was affected by the bleaching agent and distilled water. In comparison with Rok and Estelite, fracture toughness of Esthet was increased due to aging and application of bleaching agent.

  17. Transcriptomic responses to heat stress and bleaching in the elkhorn coral Acropora palmata

    DeSalvo, MK

    2010-03-08

    The emergence of genomic tools for reef-building corals and symbiotic anemones comes at a time when alarming losses in coral cover are being observed worldwide. These tools hold great promise in elucidating novel and unforeseen cellular processes underlying the successful mutualism between corals and their dinoflagellate endosymbionts Symbiodinium spp. Since thermal stress triggers a breakdown in the symbiosis (coral bleaching), measuring the transcriptomic response to thermal stress-induced bleaching offers an extraordinary view of cellular processes that are specific to coral–algal symbioses. In the present study, we utilized a cDNA microarray containing 2059 genes of the threatened Caribbean elkhorn coral Acropora palmata to identify genes that are differentially expressed upon thermal stress. Fragments from replicate colonies were exposed to elevated temperature for 2 d, and samples were frozen for microarray analysis after 24 and 48 h. Totals of 204 and 104 genes were differentially expressed in samples that were collected 1 and 2 d after thermal stress, respectively. Analysis of the differentially expressed genes indicates a cellular stress response in A. palmata involving (1) growth arrest, (2) chaperone activity, (3) nucleic acid stabilization and repair, and (4) removal of damaged macromolecules. Other differentially expressed processes include sensory perception, metabolite transfer between host and endosymbiont, nitric oxide signaling, and modifications to the actin cytoskeleton and extracellular matrix. The results are compared with those from a previous coral microarray study of thermal stress in Montastraea faveolata, and point to an overall evolutionary conserved bleaching response in scleractinian corals.

  18. TCF bleaching of soda-anthraquinone and diethanolamine pulp from oil palm empty fruit bunches.

    Jiménez, L; Serrano, L; Rodríguez, A; Ferrer, A

    2009-02-01

    The AOpAZRP bleaching sequence (A is an acid treatment, Op an oxygen and peroxide stage, Z an ozone stage, R a reductive treatment and P a peroxide stage) have been applied to oil palm empty fruit bunches (EFB) soda-anthraquinone and diethanolamine pulp. On similar Kappa numbers for the two types of pulp (14.2 and 17.3), paper from unbleached soda-anthraquinone pulp exhibited increased tensile index (25.8 Nm/g), stretch (2.35%), burst index (1.69 kN/g), tear index (0.50 mN m(2)/g) and brightness (60.6%) relative to paper for unbleached diethanolamine pulp; but the latter type of pulp exhibited higher viscosity (659 mL/g) than the former. Upon bleaching with the AOpAZRP sequence, diethanolamine pulp exhibited higher viscosity (783 mL/g), and the properties of the paper sheets were close to or even better to those from soda-anthraquinone pulp, namely: 22.2 vs 20.4 Nm/g tensile index, 1.30 vs 1.42 kN/g burst index, 0.71 vs 0.70 mN m(2)/g tear index and 71.3% vs 77.5% brightness. Therefore, the properties of paper from diethanolamine pulp evolved more favourably during bleaching than did those of paper from soda-anthraquinone pulp. PMID:18809321

  19. FRAP analysis: accounting for bleaching during image capture.

    Jun Wu

    Full Text Available The analysis of Fluorescence Recovery After Photobleaching (FRAP experiments involves mathematical modeling of the fluorescence recovery process. An important feature of FRAP experiments that tends to be ignored in the modeling is that there can be a significant loss of fluorescence due to bleaching during image capture. In this paper, we explicitly include the effects of bleaching during image capture in the model for the recovery process, instead of correcting for the effects of bleaching using reference measurements. Using experimental examples, we demonstrate the usefulness of such an approach in FRAP analysis.

  20. Bleaching and diffusion dynamics in optofluidic dye lasers

    Gersborg-Hansen, M; Kristensen, A; Mortensen, N A

    2007-01-01

    We have investigated the bleaching dynamics that occur in optofluidic dye lasers where the liquid laser dye in a microfluidic channel is locally bleached due to optical pumping. We find that for microfluidic devices, the dye bleaching may be compensated through diffusion of dye molecules alone. By relying on diffusion rather than convection to generate the necessary dye replenishment, our observation potentially allows for a significant simplification of optofluidic dye laser device layouts, omitting the need for cumbersome and costly external fluidic handling or on-chip microfluidic pumping devices.

  1. The optical bleaching of thermoluminescence in K-feldspar

    The thermoluminescence (TL) of K-feldspar extracted from sediment was bleached by means of a sunlight simulator. The differences in the TL bleaching efficiency of different trap groups are correlated with significant differences between trap parameters. The fractional glow technique applied for the investigation of optically bleached samples reveals the coexistence of various trap groups which are active in the same temperature region over 300 deg. C. This gives rise to a growth curve (i.e. the TL intensity dependence on dose) with linear and nonlinear regions. (author)

  2. Determination of burial dose in incompletely bleached fluvial samples using single grains of quartz

    Thomsen, Kristina Jørkov; Murray, A.S.; Bøtter-Jensen, Lars; Kinahan, J.

    2007-01-01

    We determine the burial dose in three known-age incompletely bleached fluvial samples using single grains of quartz. Estimation of burial dose in incompletely bleached samples requires that the characteristics of the well-bleached part of the distribution are known in order to distinguish between...... well-bleached and poorly bleached grains. It is especially important to investigate if the uncertainties assigned to individual estimates of dose adequately describe the observed variability in well-bleached dose distributions. We investigate this by quantifying the overdispersion in laboratory-bleached...

  3. The drying method affects the organic acid content of alfalfa forages

    P. Pezzi

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Malic acid (the main organic acid contained in alfalfa; Callaway et al., 1997 is an important metabolite for ruminal microbial population since it improves the uptake of lactic acid by Selenomonas ruminantium (Evans and Martin, 1997 and Megasphaera elsdenii (Rossi and Piva, 1999. Several studies have shown the effect of adding malic acid to the diet of steers and dairy cows on ruminal fermentation (Martin et al., 1999; Martin et al., 2000 and animal performances (Krummrey et al., 1979; Stallcup, 1979; Kung et al., 1982. Aim of this study was the evaluation of the influence of drying method.......

  4. Colostrum and milk production of sows is affected by dietary conjugated linoleic acid

    Krogh, Uffe; Flummer, Christine; Jensen, Søren Krogh;

    2012-01-01

    The present experiment was conducted to investigate dietary effects of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) on sow traits related to piglet survival and growth performance. A total of 23 gestating sows were fed either a standard lactation diet (control diet [CON]) or the CON supplemented with 1.3% CLA...... productivity may be improved by using different fatty acids for transition and lactating sows....

  5. Growth and recovery of three Caribbean scleractinian coral species following the severe thermally-mediated bleaching event of 2005

    Neal, Benjamin Paul

    2013-01-01

    Coral reefs have been affected in the past few decades by a number of anthropogenic environmental stresses, and have suffered unprecedented declines in areal extent, live coral cover, and individual colony health. One primary factor affecting reefs has been increased thermal stress from higher water temperatures. Thermal stress is a principal environmental trigger, and increases the severity and extent of coral bleaching, a physiological response where the symbiotic zoozanthellae in the coral...

  6. Post-bleaching application of an antioxidant on dentin bond strength of three dental adhesives

    Maryam Khoroushi; Tahereh Saneie

    2012-01-01

    Background: Antioxidizing agents have recently been suggested to compensate decreased bond strength of resin materials to bleached tooth tissues. This study compared the shear bond strength (SBS) of three different adhesives on bleached dentin immediately after bleaching, bleached/delayed for 1 week, and bleached/applied antioxidizing agent. Materials and Methods: The dentinal surfaces of 132 intact extracted molars were prepared and divided into 12 groups. The following adhesives were in...

  7. Contrasting Patterns of Coral Bleaching Susceptibility in 2010 Suggest an Adaptive Response to Thermal Stress

    James R Guest; Baird, Andrew H.; Maynard, Jeffrey A; Efin Muttaqin; Alasdair J Edwards; Stuart J Campbell; Katie Yewdall; Yang Amri Affendi; Loke Ming Chou

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Coral bleaching events vary in severity, however, to date, the hierarchy of susceptibility to bleaching among coral taxa has been consistent over a broad geographic range and among bleaching episodes. Here we examine the extent of spatial and temporal variation in thermal tolerance among scleractinian coral taxa and between locations during the 2010 thermally induced, large-scale bleaching event in South East Asia. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Surveys to estimate the bleaching ...

  8. Protein synthesis during the initial phase of the temperature-induced bleaching response in Euglena gracilis

    Growing cultures of photoheterotrophic Euglena gracilis experience an increase in chlorophyll accumulation during the initial phase of the temperature-induced bleaching response suggesting an increase in the synthesis of plastid components at the bleaching temperature of 33 degree C. A primary goal of this work was to establish whether an increase in the synthesis of plastid proteins accompanies the observed increase in chlorophyll accumulation. In vivo pulse-labeling experiments with [35S]sodium sulfate were carried out with cells grown at room temperature or at 33 degree C. The synthesis of a number of plastid polypeptides of nucleocytoplasmic origin, including some presumably novel polypeptides, increased in cultures treated for 15 hours at 33 degree C. In contrast, while synthesis of thylakoid proteins by the plastid protein synthesis machinery decreased modestly, synthesis of the large subunit of the enzyme ribulosebisphosphate carboxylase was strongly affected at the elevated temperature. Synthesis of novel plastid-encoded polypeptides was not induced at the bleaching temperature. It is concluded that protein synthesis in plastids declines during the initial phase of the temperature response in Euglena despite an overall increase in cellular protein synthesis and an increase in chlorophyll accumulation per cell

  9. Forecasting decadal changes in sea surface temperatures and coral bleaching within a Caribbean coral reef

    Li, Angang; Reidenbach, Matthew A.

    2014-09-01

    Elevated sea surface temperature (SST) caused by global warming is one of the major threats to coral reefs. While increased SST has been shown to negatively affect the health of coral reefs by increasing rates of coral bleaching, how changes to atmospheric heating impact SST distributions, modified by local flow environments, has been less understood. This study aimed to simulate future water flow patterns and water surface heating in response to increased air temperature within a coral reef system in Bocas del Toro, Panama, located within the Caribbean Sea. Water flow and SST were modeled using the Delft3D-FLOWcomputer simulation package. Locally measured physical parameters, including bathymetry, astronomic tidal forcing, and coral habitat distribution were input into the model and water flow, and SST was simulated over a four-month period under present day, as well as projected warming scenarios in 2020s, 2050s, and 2080s. Changes in SST, and hence the thermal stress to corals, were quantified by degree heating weeks. Results showed that present-day reported bleaching sites were consistent with localized regions of continuous high SST. Regions with highest SST were located within shallow coastal sites adjacent to the mainland or within the interior of the bay, and characterized by low currents with high water retention times. Under projected increases in SSTs, shallow reef areas in low flow regions were found to be hot spots for future bleaching.

  10. Microbial dinitrogen fixation in coral holobionts exposed to thermal stress and bleaching.

    Cardini, Ulisse; van Hoytema, Nanne; Bednarz, Vanessa N; Rix, Laura; Foster, Rachel A; Al-Rshaidat, Mamoon M D; Wild, Christian

    2016-09-01

    Coral holobionts (i.e., coral-algal-prokaryote symbioses) exhibit dissimilar thermal sensitivities that may determine which coral species will adapt to global warming. Nonetheless, studies simultaneously investigating the effects of warming on all holobiont members are lacking. Here we show that exposure to increased temperature affects key physiological traits of all members (herein: animal host, zooxanthellae and diazotrophs) of both Stylophora pistillata and Acropora hemprichii during and after thermal stress. S. pistillata experienced severe loss of zooxanthellae (i.e., bleaching) with no net photosynthesis at the end of the experiment. Conversely, A. hemprichii was more resilient to thermal stress. Exposure to increased temperature (+ 6°C) resulted in a drastic increase in daylight dinitrogen (N2 ) fixation, particularly in A. hemprichii (threefold compared with controls). After the temperature was reduced again to in situ levels, diazotrophs exhibited a reversed diel pattern of activity, with increased N2 fixation rates recorded only in the dark, particularly in bleached S. pistillata (twofold compared to controls). Concurrently, both animal hosts, but particularly bleached S. pistillata, reduced both organic matter release and heterotrophic feeding on picoplankton. Our findings indicate that physiological plasticity by coral-associated diazotrophs may play an important role in determining the response of coral holobionts to ocean warming. PMID:27234003

  11. Choice of solvent extraction technique affects fatty acid composition of pistachio (Pistacia vera L.) oil.

    Abdolshahi, Anna; Majd, Mojtaba Heydari; Rad, Javad Sharifi; Taheri, Mehrdad; Shabani, Aliakbar; Teixeira da Silva, Jaime A

    2015-04-01

    Pistachio (Pistacia vera L.) oil has important nutritional and therapeutic properties because of its high concentration of essential fatty acids. The extraction method used to obtain natural compounds from raw material is critical for product quality, in particular to protect nutritional value. This study compared the fatty acid composition of pistachio oil extracted by two conventional procedures, Soxhlet extraction and maceration, analyzed by a gas chromatography-flame ionization detector (GC-FID). Four solvents with different polarities were tested: n-hexane (Hx), dichloromethane (DCM), ethyl acetate (EtAc) and ethanol (EtOH). The highest unsaturated fatty acid content (88.493 %) was obtained by Soxhlet extraction with EtAc. The Soxhlet method extracted the most oleic and linolenic acids (51.99 % and 0.385 %, respectively) although a higher concentration (36.32 %) of linoleic acid was extracted by maceration. PMID:25829628

  12. Root-zone acidity affects relative uptake of nitrate and ammonium from mixed nitrogen sources

    Vessey, J. K.; Henry, L. T.; Chaillou, S.; Raper, C. D. Jr; Raper CD, J. r. (Principal Investigator)

    1990-01-01

    Soybean plants (Glycine max [L.] Merr. cv Ransom) were grown for 21 days on 4 sources of N (1.0 mM NO3-, 0.67 mM NO3- plus 0.33 mM NH4+, 0.33 mM NO3- plus 0.67 mM NH4+, and 1.0 mM NH4+) in hydroponic culture with the acidity of the nutrient solution controlled at pH 6.0, 5.5, 5.0, and 4.5. Dry matter and total N accumulation of the plants was not significantly affected by N-source at any of the pH levels except for decreases in these parameters in plants supplied solely with NH4+ at pH 4.5. Shoot-to-root ratios increased in plants which had an increased proportion [correction of proporiton] of NH4(+)-N in their nutrient solutions at all levels of root-zone pH. Uptake of NO3- and NH4+ was monitored daily by ion chromatography as depletion of these ions from the replenished hydroponic solutions. At all pH levels the proportion of either ion that was absorbed increased as the ratio of that ion increased in the nutrient solution. In plants which were supplied with sources of NO3- plus NH4+, NH4+ was absorbed at a ratio of 2:1 over NO3- at pH 6.0. As the pH of the root-zone declined, however, NH4+ uptake decreased and NO3- uptake increased. Thus, the NH4+ to NO3- uptake ratio declined with decreases in root-zone pH. The data indicate a negative effect of declining root-zone pH on NH4+ uptake and supports a hypothesis that the inhibition of growth of plants dependent on NH4(+)-N at low pH is due to a decline in NH4+ uptake and a consequential limitation of growth by N stress.

  13. Phase holograms in silver halide emulsions without a bleaching step

    Belendez, Augusto; Madrigal, Roque F.; Pascual, Inmaculada V.; Fimia, Antonio

    2000-03-01

    Phase holograms in holographic emulsions are usually obtained by two bath processes (developing and bleaching). In this work we present a one step method to reach phase holograms with silver-halide emulsions. Which is based on the variation of the conditions of the typical developing processes of amplitude holograms. For this, we have used the well-known chemical developer, AAC, which is composed by ascorbic acid as a developing agent and sodium carbonate anhydrous as accelerator. Agfa 8E75 HD and BB-640 plates were used to obtain these phase gratings, whose colors are between yellow and brown. In function of the parameters of this developing method the resulting diffraction efficiency and optical density of the diffraction gratings were studied. One of these parameters studied is the influence of the grain size. In the case of Agfa plates diffraction efficiency around 18% with density emulsion, whose grain is smaller than that of the Agfa, diffraction efficiency near 30% has been obtained. The resulting gratings were analyzed through X-ray spectroscopy showing the differences of the structure of the developed silver when amplitude and transmission gratings are obtained. The angular response of both (transmission and amplitude) gratings were studied, where minimal transmission is showed at the Braggs angle in phase holograms, whilst a maximal value is obtained in amplitude gratings.

  14. Regulation of apoptotic pathways by Stylophora pistillata (Anthozoa, Pocilloporidae to survive thermal stress and bleaching.

    Hagit Kvitt

    Full Text Available Elevated seawater temperatures are associated with coral bleaching events and related mortality. Nevertheless, some coral species are able to survive bleaching and recover. The apoptotic responses associated to this ability were studied over 3 years in the coral Stylophora pistillata from the Gulf of Eilat subjected to long term thermal stress. These include caspase activity and the expression profiles of the S. pistillata caspase and Bcl-2 genes (StyCasp and StyBcl-2-like cloned in this study. In corals exposed to thermal stress (32 or 34°C, caspase activity and the expression levels of the StyBcl-2-like gene increased over time (6-48 h and declined to basal levels within 72 h of thermal stress. Distinct transcript levels were obtained for the StyCasp gene, with stimulated expression from 6 to 48 h of 34°C thermal stress, coinciding with the onset of bleaching. Increased cell death was detected in situ only between 6 to 48 h of stress and was limited to the gastroderm. The bleached corals survived up to one month at 32°C, and recovered back symbionts when placed at 24°C. These results point to a two-stage response in corals that withstand thermal stress: (i the onset of apoptosis, accompanied by rapid activation of anti-oxidant/anti-apoptotic mediators that block the progression of apoptosis to other cells and (ii acclimatization of the coral to the chronic thermal stress alongside the completion of symbiosis breakdown. Accordingly, the coral's ability to rapidly curb apoptosis appears to be the most important trait affecting the coral's thermotolerance and survival.

  15. Evaluation of the bleached human enamel by Scanning Electron Microscopy

    Miranda, Carolina Baptista; Pagani, Clovis; Benetti, Ana Raquel;

    2005-01-01

    : 2h); G3- four 2-hour exposures to 35% carbamide peroxide (total exposure: 8h); G4- two applications of 35% hydrogen peroxide, which was light-activated with halogen lamp at 700mW/cm² during 7min and remained in contact with enamel for 20min (total exposure: 40min). All bleaching treatments adopted...... for SEM analysis performing gold sputter coating under vacuum and were examined using 15kV at 500x and 2000x magnification. Results: Morphological alterations on the enamel surface were similarly detected after bleaching with either 35% carbamide peroxide or 35% hydrogen peroxide. Surface porosities......Since bleaching has become a popular procedure, the effect of peroxides on dental hard tissues is of great interest in research. Purpose: The aim of this in vitro study was to perform a qualitative analysis of the human enamel after the application of in-office bleaching agents, using Scanning...

  16. Ecology: Deep and complex ways to survive bleaching

    Pandolfi, John M.

    2015-02-01

    Mass coral bleaching events can drive reefs from being the domains of corals to becoming dominated by seaweed. But longitudinal data show that more than half of the reefs studied rebound to their former glory. See Letter p.94

  17. New Parameter for In-Office Dental Bleaching

    Bortolatto, Janaina Freitas; de Carvalho, Priscila Petrucelli Freire; Trevisan, Tamara Carolina; Floros, Michael Christopher; Junior, Osmir Batista de Oliveira

    2016-01-01

    Dental bleaching is considered a conservative and biologically safe treatment for discolored teeth. Despite this, one of the major undesirable effects of bleaching is dentin sensitivity which may occur during and after treatment. To address these sensitivity issues, new dental bleaching preparations with lower concentrations of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) have recently been introduced to the market. This paper presents a clinical case report of a 20-year-old female patient admitted to the Araraquara Dental School, UNESP, Brazil. The patient underwent dental bleaching using one of the new products with reduced hydrogen peroxide concentration, Lase Peroxide Lite 6%, a 6% H2O2 gel containing titanium oxide nanoparticles doped with nitrogen (6% H2O2/N-doped TiO2).

  18. Sludge disinfection by combined treatment of bleaching powder and irradiation

    Sludge disinfection by combined treatment of bleaching powder and irradiation. Disinfection of sludge by combined treatment of bleaching powder and irradiation has been investigated. Sludge were obtained from water and waste sanitation department (Dinas Kebersihan) DKI located at Kebon Nanas, Jakarta. Sludge were mixed with bleaching powder at the concentration of 0, 10 and 20 mg/l and then irradiated in multipurpose panoramic batch irradiator (PANBIT) with doses of 2, 4, 6, 8, and 10 kGy and a dose rate 9 kGy/h. The reducing colony form unit caused by the combined treatment depend on type bacteria observed in sludge. Pathogenic bacteria as Clostridium still survive at a dose of 10 kGy on sludge containing 20 mg/l bleaching powder, but Salmonella, Shigella, and Vibrio were not detected in this experiment, neither in the control nor in the irradiated samples. (author). 14 refs.; 4 figs

  19. Through bleaching and tsunami: Coral reef recovery in the Maldives.

    Morri, Carla; Montefalcone, Monica; Lasagna, Roberta; Gatti, Giulia; Rovere, Alessio; Parravicini, Valeriano; Baldelli, Giuseppe; Colantoni, Paolo; Bianchi, Carlo Nike

    2015-09-15

    Coral reefs are degrading worldwide, but little information exists on their previous conditions for most regions of the world. Since 1989, we have been studying the Maldives, collecting data before, during and after the bleaching and mass mortality event of 1998. As early as 1999, many newly settled colonies were recorded. Recruits shifted from a dominance of massive and encrusting corals in the early stages of recolonisation towards a dominance of Acropora and Pocillopora by 2009. Coral cover, which dropped to less than 10% after the bleaching, returned to pre-bleaching values of around 50% by 2013. The 2004 tsunami had comparatively little effect. In 2014, the coral community was similar to that existing before the bleaching. According to descriptors and metrics adopted, recovery of Maldivian coral reefs took between 6 and 15years, or may even be considered unachieved, as there are species that had not come back yet. PMID:26228070

  20. Evaluation of temperature increase during in-office bleaching

    Rafael Francisco Lia MONDELLI

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The use of light sources in the bleaching process reduces the time required and promotes satisfactory results. However, these light sources can cause an increase in the pulp temperature. Objective The purpose of the present study was to measure the increase in intrapulpal temperature induced by different light-activated bleaching procedures with and without the use of a bleaching gel. Material and Methods A human maxillary central incisor was sectioned 2 mm below the cementoenamel junction. A K-type thermocouple probe was introduced into the pulp chamber. A 35% hydrogen peroxide bleaching gel was applied to the vestibular tooth surface. The light units used were a conventional halogen, a hybrid light (only LED and LED/Laser, a high intensity LED, and a green LED light. Temperature increase values were compared by two-way ANOVA and Tukey´s tests (p<0.05. Results There were statistically significant differences in temperature increases between the different light sources used and between the same light sources with and without the use of a bleaching gel. The presence of a bleaching gel generated an increase in intra-pulpal temperature in groups activated with halogen light, hybrid light, and high intensity LED. Compared to the other light sources, the conventional halogen lamp applied over the bleaching gel induced a significant increase in temperature (3.83±0.41°C. The green LED unit with and without gel application did not produce any significant intrapulpal temperature variations. Conclusion In the present study, the conventional halogen lamp caused the highest increase in intrapulpal temperature, and the green LED caused the least. There was an increase in temperature with all lights tested and the maximum temperature remained below the critical level (5.5°C. The addition of a bleaching gel led to a higher increase in intrapulpal temperatures.

  1. Evaluation of temperature increase during in-office bleaching

    MONDELLI, Rafael Francisco Lia; SOARES, Ana Flávia; PANGRAZIO, Eugenio Gabriel Kegler; WANG, Linda; ISHIKIRIAMA, Sergio Kiyoshi; BOMBONATTI, Juliana Fraga Soares

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The use of light sources in the bleaching process reduces the time required and promotes satisfactory results. However, these light sources can cause an increase in the pulp temperature. Objective The purpose of the present study was to measure the increase in intrapulpal temperature induced by different light-activated bleaching procedures with and without the use of a bleaching gel. Material and Methods A human maxillary central incisor was sectioned 2 mm below the cementoenamel junction. A K-type thermocouple probe was introduced into the pulp chamber. A 35% hydrogen peroxide bleaching gel was applied to the vestibular tooth surface. The light units used were a conventional halogen, a hybrid light (only LED and LED/Laser), a high intensity LED, and a green LED light. Temperature increase values were compared by two-way ANOVA and Tukey´s tests (p<0.05). Results There were statistically significant differences in temperature increases between the different light sources used and between the same light sources with and without the use of a bleaching gel. The presence of a bleaching gel generated an increase in intra-pulpal temperature in groups activated with halogen light, hybrid light, and high intensity LED. Compared to the other light sources, the conventional halogen lamp applied over the bleaching gel induced a significant increase in temperature (3.83±0.41°C). The green LED unit with and without gel application did not produce any significant intrapulpal temperature variations. Conclusion In the present study, the conventional halogen lamp caused the highest increase in intrapulpal temperature, and the green LED caused the least. There was an increase in temperature with all lights tested and the maximum temperature remained below the critical level (5.5°C). The addition of a bleaching gel led to a higher increase in intrapulpal temperatures. PMID:27119761

  2. Conservation of Coral Reefs after the 1998 Global Bleaching Event

    Hayes, R.L.; Goreau, T.J.; Mcclanahan, T.R.

    2000-01-01

    Large-scale coral bleaching has happened repeatedly in the Pacific and Indian oceans and the Caribbean since 1982. Previously it was observed only on a small scale (Williams and Bunkley- Williams 1990;Jokiel & Coles 1990; Glynn 1988, 1991; Goreau et al. 1993; Goreau & Hayes 1994, 1995). The 1998 bleaching event was globally the most extensive such event recorded except in the Caribbean and Central Pacific where a comparison of year-byyear temperature and bl...

  3. Endolithic algae: an alternative source of photoassimilates during coral bleaching.

    Fine, Maoz; Loya, Yossi

    2002-01-01

    Recent reports of worldwide coral bleaching events leading to devastating coral mortality have caused alarm among scientists and resource managers. Differential survival of coral species through bleaching events has been widely documented. We suggest that among the possible factors contributing to survival of coral species during such events are endolithic algae harboured in their skeleton, providing an alternative source of energy. We studied the dynamics of photosynthetic pigment concentrat...

  4. BLEACHING OF SULFONATED CMP FROM BIO-TREATED WHEAT STRAW

    HongYu; MenghuaQin; XuemeiLu; YinboQu; PeijiGao

    2004-01-01

    Wheat straw chemi-mechanical pulp was pretreated with a crude xylanase which was secreted by white rot fungus Phanerochaete Chrysosporium prior to hydrogen peroxide bleaching. The process of xylanase pretreatment and hydrogen peroxide bleaching was optimized. The xylanase treated pulp achieved a brightness gain of 5.8% ISO over the untreated pulp. The xylanase treatment was found to liberate reducing sugars and facilitating lignin removal. Fiber morphology of pulp treated with xylanase was also studied by SEM.

  5. Poultry fat decreased fatty acid transporter protein mRNA expression and affected fatty acid composition in chickens

    Yuan Jianmin

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A study was undertaken to examine the effects of poultry fat (PF compared with those of soybean oil (SBO on intestinal development, fatty acid transporter protein (FATP mRNA expression, and fatty acid composition in broiler chickens. A total of 144 day-old male commercial broilers were randomly allocated to 2 treatment groups (6 replicates of 12 chicks for each treatment and fed isocaloric diets containing 3.0% PF or 2.7% SBO at 0 to 3 wk and 3.8% PF or 3.5% SBO at 4 to 6 wk, respectively. Results PF had no influence on intestinal morphology, weight, or DNA, RNA, or protein concentrations at 2, 4, and 6 wk of age. However, compared with SBO, PF significantly decreased FATP mRNA abundance at 4 wk (P = 0.009 and 6 wk of age (P P = 0.039; and decreased C18:2 (P = 0.015, C18:3 (P P = 0.018, Σ-polyunsaturated fatty acids (Σ-PUFA (P = 0.020, and the proportion of PUFA (P P = 0.010, C18:3 (P P P = 0.005, and the proportion of PUFA (P  Conclusions PF decreases FATP and L-FABP mRNA expression and decreased the proportion of PUFA in the intestinal mucosa and breast muscle.

  6. D-amino acid oxidase activator gene (DAOA) variation affects cerebrospinal fluid homovanillic acid concentrations in healthy Caucasians

    Andreou, Dimitrios; Saetre, Peter; Werge, Thomas;

    2012-01-01

    The D-amino acid oxidase activator (DAOA) protein regulates the function of D-amino oxidase (DAO), an enzyme that catalyzes the oxidative deamination of D-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (D-DOPA) and D-serine. D-DOPA is converted to L-3,4-DOPA, a precursor of dopamine, whereas D-serine participates in...... dopamine turnover in healthy individuals, suggesting that disturbed dopamine turnover is a possible mechanism behind the observed associations between genetic variation in DAOA and behavioral phenotypes in humans....

  7. Analysis of internal structure changes in black human hair keratin fibers resulting from bleaching treatments using Raman spectroscopy

    Kuzuhara, Akio

    2013-09-01

    In order to investigate in detail the internal structure changes in virgin black human hair keratin fibers resulting from bleaching treatments, the structure of cross-sections at various depths of black human hair, which had been impossible due to high melanin grande content, was directly analyzed using Raman spectroscopy. The gauche-gauche-gauche (GGG) content of the sbnd SSsbnd groups existing from the cuticle region to the center of cortex region of the virgin black human hair remarkably decreased, while the gauche-gauche-trans and trans-gauche-trans contents were not changed by performing the excessive bleaching treatment. In particular, it was found that not only the β-sheet and/or random coil content, but also the α-helix content existing throughout the cortex region of virgin black human hair decreased. In addition, the transmission electron microscope observation shows that the proteins in the cell membrane complex, the cuticle and cortex of the virgin black human hair were remarkably eluted by performing the excessive bleaching treatment. From these experiments, the author concluded that the sbnd SSsbnd groups, which have a GGG conformation were decomposed and finally converted to cysteic acid, and the α-helix structure of some of the proteins existing in the keratin was changed to the random coil structure, or eluted from the cortex region, thereby leading to the reduction in the protein density of the virgin human hair after the excessive bleaching treatment.

  8. Upgrading of citric acid production from cheap carbohydrate sources as affected by aspergillus

    Five strains of aspergillus niger (EMCC 102, EMCC 104, EMCC 111, EMCC 132 and EMCC 147) were for citric acid production at different incubation period using different cheap carbohydrate substrates, such as beet, cane and citrus molasses and milk whey. A. niger EMCC 111 was found to be the most potent strain for citric acid production from beet molasses after 11 days of incubation at 30 degree. The studies concerning molasses concentration and nitrogen sources (inorganic and organic sources with different concentration, revealed that 30 g% beet molasses and ammonium sulfate with 0.05 g% as N2 content, gave the highest production of citric acid. Gamma irradiated inocula of A. niger EMCC 111 at doses (0.05-0.8 KGy), showed that the dose 0.4 KGy was the optimum for maximum citric acid production. 8 tabs

  9. Dietary conjugated linoleic acids affect tissue lipid composition but not de novo lipogenesis in finishing pigs

    Bee, Giuseppe

    2001-01-01

    Influence de l'apport des acides linoléiques conjugués dans l'alimentation sur la composition des tissus adipeux et la lipogenèse de novo chez les porcs en finition. Plusieurs travaux ont révélé que les acides linoléiques conjugués (conjugated linoleic acids : CLA) ont une influence importante sur le métabolisme des lipides et des protéines. En revanche, les effets des CLA sur le profil des acides gras dans les tissus adipeux chez le porc sont peu connus. Dans cette étude, nous avons détermin...

  10. The hydroperoxide moiety of aliphatic lipid hydroperoxides is not affected by hypochlorous acid

    Zschaler, Josefin; Arnhold, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    The oxidation of polyunsaturated fatty acids to the corresponding hydroperoxide by plant and animal lipoxygenases is an important step for the generation of bioactive lipid mediators. Thereby fatty acid hydroperoxide represent a common intermediate, also in human innate immune cells, like neutrophil granulocytes. In these cells a further key component is the heme protein myeloperoxidase producing HOCl as a reactive oxidant. On the basis of different investigation a reaction of the fatty ac...

  11. Choice of solvent extraction technique affects fatty acid composition of pistachio (Pistacia vera L.) oil

    Abdolshahi, Anna; Majd, Mojtaba Heydari; Rad, Javad Sharifi; Taheri, Mehrdad; Shabani, Aliakbar; JAIME A. TEIXEIRA DA SILVA

    2013-01-01

    Pistachio (Pistacia vera L.) oil has important nutritional and therapeutic properties because of its high concentration of essential fatty acids. The extraction method used to obtain natural compounds from raw material is critical for product quality, in particular to protect nutritional value. This study compared the fatty acid composition of pistachio oil extracted by two conventional procedures, Soxhlet extraction and maceration, analyzed by a gas chromatography-flame ionization detector (...

  12. Perfluorooctanoic acid exposure for 28 days affects glucose homeostasis and induces insulin hypersensitivity in mice

    Yan, Shengmin; Zhang, Hongxia; ZHENG, FEI; Sheng, Nan; Guo, Xuejiang; Dai, Jiayin

    2015-01-01

    Perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) are widely used in many applications due to their unique physical and chemical characteristics. Because of the increasing prevalence of metabolic syndromes, including obesity, dyslipidemia and insulin resistance, concern has arisen about the roles of environmental pollutants in such diseases. Earlier epidemiologic studies showed a potential association between perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and glucose metabolism, but how PFOA influences glucose homeostasis is stil...

  13. Bile acids affect liver mitochondrial bioenergetics: possible relevance for cholestasis therapy

    Rolo, Anabela P.; Oliveira, Paulo J.; Moreno, António J. M.; Palmeira, Carlos M.

    2000-01-01

    It has been pointed out that intracellular accumulation of bile acids cause hepatocyte injury in cholestatic disease process. This study was aimed to test if cytotoxicity of these compounds is mediated through mitochondria dysfunction. Bile acids effects on isolated rat liver mitochondrial were analyzed by monitoring changes in membrane potential and mitochondrial respiration, as well as alterations in H+ membrane permeability and mitochondrial permeability transition pore induction. Increasi...

  14. Combination of inositol and alpha lipoic acid in metabolic syndrome-affected women: a randomized placebo-controlled trial

    Capasso, Immacolata; Esposito, Emanuela; Maurea, Nicola; Montella, Maurizio; Crispo, Anna; De Laurentiis, Michelino; D’Aiuto, Massimiliano; Frasci, Giuseppe; Botti, Gerardo; Grimaldi, Maria; Cavalcanti, Ernesta; Esposito, Giuseppe; Fucito, Alfredo; Brillante, Giuseppe; D’Aiuto, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    Background Inositol has been reported to improve insulin sensitivity since it works as a second messenger achieving insulin-like effects on metabolic enzymes. The aim of this study was to evaluate the inositol and alpha lipoic acid combination effectiveness on metabolic syndrome features in postmenopausal women at risk of breast cancer. Methods A six-month prospective, randomized placebo-controlled trial was carried out on a total of 155 postmenopausal women affected by metabolic syndrome at ...

  15. Crocin Bleaching Assay Using Purified Di-gentiobiosyl Crocin (-crocin) from Iranian Saffron

    Bathaie, Seyedeh Zahra; Shams, Azam; Moghadas Zadeh Kermani, Fatemeh

    2011-01-01

    Objective(s) Crocin bleaching assay (CBA) is a new method for determination of antioxidant capacity. In CBA, addition of hydrogen to the conjugated double bonds of crocin results in reduction of crocin and increase in the absorbance at 440 nm, which is considered as a measure of antioxidant potential. Here CBA method was set up using di-gentiobiosyl crocin or α-crocin from Iranian saffron. Then, the antioxidant activity of some known antioxidants i.e. L-ascorbic acid, bilirubin, Trolox, uric ...

  16. A Study of Residual Oils Recovered from Spent Bleaching Earth: Their Characteristics and Applications

    Loh S. Kheang; Cheng S. Foon; Choo Y. May; Ma A. Ngan

    2006-01-01

    This study described the extraction of residual oils of spent bleaching earth (SBE) from palm oil refining industry, the properties and applications of residual oils obtained there from. Residual oils of SBE (acid-activated, WAC and neutral, NC) were recovered via solvent and supercritical-fluid (SC-CO2) extraction. The yields of residual oils recovered from WAC were higher than those from NC using solvent and SC-CO2 extraction respectively. Both the residual oils recovered from WAC and NC ha...

  17. Water Adsorption and Surface Acidity of Nano-Ball Allophane as Affected by Heat Treatment

    Hamayoon Khan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Effect of heat treatment on the water adsorption and surface acidity of two nano-ball allophane samples with varying Si/Al ratio under different relative humidities (RHs was studied. The water vapor adsorption of two allophane samples under various relative humidities, decreased with preheating treatment up to 400 °C for 2 h. The decrease in water adsorption at monolayer level (RH≤0.45 was greater for KnP sample than for KyP sample, whereas the decrease in water adsorption due to capillary condensation between allophane unit particles (RH≥0.6 was greater for KyP sample. These indicate that allophane hollow spherical particles in KyP sample were directly connected each other with the preheating, but those in KnP sample were not. Heat treatment caused the enhancement in the surface acidity of nano-ball allophane samples. The enhancement in the surface acidity after heat treatment is attributed to the inductive effect on the Si-OH groups present at the pore region of the hollow sphere. The results showed that surface acidity of the allophane with higher Si/Al ratio (KnP was stronger than the (KyP sample having lower Si/Al ratio. This trend was observed under RH between 0 and 75%; then the acid strength for the two samples was the same at RH of 98%. After the heat treatment at lower level of RH, the surface acidity of KnP was higher than KyP. The presence of polymerized silicate tails exposed outside of hollow spherical allophane particles (KnP, causes the enhancement of the BrØnsted acidity and also prevent direct connection between the particles after heating.

  18. Biological short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) production from waste-activated sludge affected by surfactant.

    Jiang, Su; Chen, Yinguang; Zhou, Qi; Gu, Guowei

    2007-07-01

    Short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), the preferred carbon sources for biological nutrient removal, are the important intermediate products in sludge anaerobic fermentation. Sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate (SDBS) is a widespread used surfactant, which can be easily found in waste-activated sludge (WAS). In this investigation, the effect of SDBS on SCFAs production from WAS was investigated, and the potential of using fermentative SCFAs to promote enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) was tested. Results showed that the total SCFAs production increased significantly in the presence of SDBS at room temperature. At fermentation time of 6 days, the maximum SCFAs was 2599.1mg chemical oxygen demand (COD)/L in the presence of SDBS 0.02g/g, whereas it was only 339.1mg (COD)/L in the absence of SDBS. The SCFAs produced in the case of SDBS 0.02g/g and fermentation time 6 days consisted of acetic acid (27.1%), propionic acid (22.8%), iso-valeric acid (20.1%), iso-butyric acid (11.9%), n-butyric acid (10.4%) and n-valeric acid (7.7%). It was found that during sludge anaerobic fermentation, the solubilization of sludge particulate organic-carbon and hydrolysis of solubilized substrate as well as acidification of hydrolyzed products were all increased in the presence of SDBS, while the methane formation was decreased, the SCFAs production was therefore remarkably improved. Further investigation showed that the production of SCFAs enhanced by SDBS was caused mainly by biological effects, rather than by chemical effects and SDBS decomposition. With the fermentative SCFAs as the main carbon source, the EBPR maintained high phosphorus removal efficiency ( approximately 97%). PMID:17499838

  19. Polonium behaviour in reservoirs potentially affected by acid mine drainage (AMD) in the Iberian Pyrite Belt (SW of Spain).

    Blasco, M; Gázquez, M J; Pérez-Moreno, S M; Grande, J A; Valente, T; Santisteban, M; de la Torre, M L; Bolívar, J P

    2016-02-01

    The province of Huelva is one of the areas most affected by acid mine drainage (AMD) in the world, which can produce big enhancements and fractionations in the waters affected by AMD. There are very few studies on this issue, and none on polonium-210. Twenty-two water reservoirs were sampled, and the (210)Po was measured in both dissolution and particulate phases. The (210)Po concentrations in the waters were in the same order of magnitude to those ones for unperturbed systems, although the data published to particulate matter are very scarce. A mean value and standard uncertainty for (210)Po of 0.25 ± 0.03 mBq L(-1) in the dissolved matter, and 62 ± 9 mBq g(-1) in the particulate matter can be established as base line for the reservoirs of the Huelva area. The distribution coefficients (kd) range from 10(4) to 10(6) L kg(-1), in agreement to the found ones by other authors for the case of neutral waters, but being the lowest values for the more acidic reservoirs. It has been also found that (210)Po has a high tendency to be associated to the particulate matter for neutral-alkaline waters, however, under extreme acid conditions (pH waters of reservoirs, but the acidity has a clear influence on its distribution between both dissolved and the particulate phases. PMID:26650826

  20. 'Ethnic cleansing' bleaches the atrocities of genocide.

    Blum, Rony; Stanton, Gregory H; Sagi, Shira; Richter, Elihu D

    2008-04-01

    Genocide has been the leading cause of preventable violent death in the 20th-21st century, taking even more lives than war. The term 'ethnic cleansing' is used as a euphemism for genocide despite it having no legal status. Like 'Judenrein' and 'racial hygiene' in Nazi medicine, it expropriates pseudo-medical terminology to justify massacre. Use of the term reifies a dehumanized view of the victims as sources of filth and disease, and propagates the reversed social ethics of the perpetrators. Timelines for recent genocides (Bosnia, 1991-1996, 200,000; Kosovo 1998-2000, 10,000-20,000; Rwanda, 1994, 800,000; Darfur 2002-2006, >400,000) show that its use bears no relationship to death tolls or the scale of atrocity. Bystanders' use of the term 'ethnic cleansing' signals the lack of will to stop genocide, resulting in huge increases in deaths, and undermines international legal obligations to acknowledge genocide. The term 'ethnic cleansing' corrupts observation, interpretation, ethical judgment and decision-making, thereby undermining the aim of public health. Public health should lead the way in expunging the term 'ethnic cleansing' from official use. 'Ethnic cleansing' bleaches the atrocities of genocide, leading to inaction in preventing current and future genocides. PMID:17513346

  1. Quantitation of alpha-linolenic acid elongation to eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acid as affected by the ratio of n6/n3 fatty acids

    Somoza Veronika

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Conversion of linoleic acid (LA and alpha-linolenic acid (ALA to their higher chain homologues in humans depends on the ratio of ingested n6 and n3 fatty acids. Design and methods In order to determine the most effective ratio with regard to the conversion of ALA to eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, human hepatoma cells were incubated with varying ratios of [13C] labeled linoleic acid ([13C]LA- and alpha-linolenic acid ([13C]ALA-methylesters. Regulative cellular signal transduction pathways involved were studied by determinations of transcript levels of the genes encoding delta-5 desaturase (D5D and delta-6 desaturase (D6D, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα and sterol regulatory element binding protein 1c (SREBP-1c. Mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1 (MEK1 and mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase 1 (MEKK1 were also examined. Results Maximum conversion was observed in cells incubated with the mixture of [13C]LA/[13C]ALA at a ratio of 1:1, where 0.7% and 17% of the recovered [13C]ALA was converted to DHA and EPA, respectively. Furthermore, differential regulation of enzymes involved in the conversion at the transcript level, dependent on the ratio of administered n6 to n3 fatty acids in human hepatocytes was demonstrated. Conclusion Formation of EPA and DHA was highest at an administered LA/ALA ratio of 1:1, although gene expression of PPARα, SREBP-1c and D5D involved in ALA elongation were higher in the presence of ALA solely. Also, our findings suggest that a diet-induced enhancement of the cell membrane content of highly unsaturated fatty acids is only possible up to a certain level.

  2. In Situ Biodiesel Production from Residual Oil Recovered from Spent Bleaching Earth

    Ramli Mat

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Currently, semi-refined and refined vegetable oils are used as a feedstock in biodiesel production. However, due to competition with conventional fossil fuel, economic reasons, shortage supply of food and its social impact on the global scale has somewhat slowed the development of biodiesel industry. Studies have been conducted to recover oil from mill palm oil operation especially from the spent bleaching earth. Hence, the study was to investigate the potential recovery of oil from spent bleaching earth to be used as a feedstock for biodiesel production. The effect of different types of catalysts (sodium hydroxide alkali and sulfuric acid catalysts on biodiesel yield was studied. In addition, the effect of volume addition of methanol to the weight of spent bleaching earth on the product yield was also studied. Furthermore, the effect of ratio of hexane to methanol was also carried out to determine its product yield. The studies were carried out in an in-situ biodiesel reactor system and the biodiesel product was analyzed using gas chromatography mass spectrometry. Result shows that the use of alkali catalyst produced the highest yield of biodiesel and the most optimum biodiesel yield was obtained when the methanol to spent bleaching earth ratio was 3.2:1 (gram of methanol: gram of SBE and hexane to methanol ratio of 0.6:1 (volume of hexane: volume of methanol. © 2011 BCREC UNDIP. All rights reserved(Received: 19th December 2010, Revised: 10th May 2011; Accepted: 18th May 2011[How to Cite: R. Mat, O.S. Ling, A. Johari, M. Mohamed. (2011. In Situ Biodiesel Production from Residual Oil Recovered from Spent Bleaching Earth. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 6(1: 53-57. doi:10.9767/bcrec.6.1.678.53-57][How to Link / DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.6.1.678.53-57 || or local:  http://ejournal.undip.ac.id/index.php/bcrec/article/view/678 ] | View in 

  3. PROCESS OPTIMIZATION OF TETRA ACETYL ETHYLENE DIAMINE ACTIVATED HYDROGEN PEROXIDE BLEACHING OF POPULUS NIGRA CTMP

    Qiang Zhao

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available To enhance the bleaching efficiency, the activator of tetra acetyl ethylene diamine (TAED was used in conventional H2O2 bleaching. The H2O2/TAED bleaching system can accelerate the reaction rate and shorten bleaching time at relative low temperature, which can reduce the production cost. In this research, the process with hydrogen peroxide activated by TAED bleaching of Populus nigra chemi-thermo mechanical pulp was optimized. Suitable bleaching conditions were confirmed as follows: pulp consistency 10%, bleaching temperature 70oC, bleaching time 60 min when the charge of H2O2 was 4%, NaOH charge 2%, and molar ratio of TAED to H2O2 0.3. The pulp brightness gain reached 23.6% ISO with the optimized bleaching conditions. FTIR analysis indicated that the H2O2/TAED bleaching system can decrease carbonyl group further than that of conventional H2O2 bleaching, which contributed to the higher bleaching efficiency and final brightness. The H2O2/TAED bleaching had stronger oxidation ability on lignin than that of H2O2 bleaching.

  4. Eccentric contractions affect muscle membrane phospholipid fatty acid composition in rats

    Helge, Jørn Wulff; Therkildsen, K J; Jørgensen, T B;

    2001-01-01

    three groups who received chow with added fish oil (n = 8), vitamin C (n = 8) or no supplement (n = 7). After 3 weeks of feeding, calf muscles on one side were stimulated electrically during anaesthesia causing eccentric contractions. Two days later the white gastrocnemius, a part of the stimulated calf...... muscle, was excised from both legs. In the muscles stimulated to contract eccentrically, compared to the control muscles, the proportion of arachidonic acid, C20:4,n-6 (17.7 +/- 0.6; 16.4 +/- 0.4% of total fatty acids, respectively) and docosapentanoeic acid, C22:5,n-3 (2.9 +/- 0.1 and 2.7 +/- 0.1% of...... leg, and supplemental intake of fish oil or vitamin C did not attenuate this effect....

  5. Factors affecting the rate of hydrolysis of phenylboronic acid in lab-scale precipitate reactor studies

    Removing aromatic carbon from an aqueous slurry of cesium-137 and other alkali tetraphenylborates by acid hydrolysis will be an important step in preparing high-level radioactive waste for vitrification at the Savannah River Site's Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). Kinetic data obtained in bench-scale precipitate hydrolysis reactors suggest changes in operating parameters to improve product quality in the future plant-scale radioactive operation. The rate-determining step is the removal of the fourth phenyl group, i.e. hydrolysis of phenylboronic acid. Efforts to maximize this rate have established the importance of several factors in the system, including the ratio of copper(II) catalyst to formic acid, the presence of nitrite ion, reactions of diphenylmercury, and the purge gas employed in the system

  6. Factors affecting the rate of hydrolysis of phenylboronic acid in lab-scale precipitate reactor studies

    Bannochie, C.J.; Marek, J.C.; Eibling, R.E.; Baich, M.A.

    1992-10-01

    Removing aromatic carbon from an aqueous slurry of cesium-137 and other alkali tetraphenylborates by acid hydrolysis will be an important step in preparing high-level radioactive waste for vitrification at the Savannah River Site`s Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). Kinetic data obtained in bench-scale precipitate hydrolysis reactors suggest changes in operating parameters to improve product quality in the future plant-scale radioactive operation. The rate-determining step is the removal of the fourth phenyl group, i.e. hydrolysis of phenylboronic acid. Efforts to maximize this rate have established the importance of several factors in the system, including the ratio of copper(II) catalyst to formic acid, the presence of nitrite ion, reactions of diphenylmercury, and the purge gas employed in the system.

  7. Factors affecting the rate of hydrolysis of phenylboronic acid in lab-scale precipitate reactor studies

    Bannochie, C.J.; Marek, J.C.; Eibling, R.E.; Baich, M.A.

    1992-01-01

    Removing aromatic carbon from an aqueous slurry of cesium-137 and other alkali tetraphenylborates by acid hydrolysis will be an important step in preparing high-level radioactive waste for vitrification at the Savannah River Site's Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). Kinetic data obtained in bench-scale precipitate hydrolysis reactors suggest changes in operating parameters to improve product quality in the future plant-scale radioactive operation. The rate-determining step is the removal of the fourth phenyl group, i.e. hydrolysis of phenylboronic acid. Efforts to maximize this rate have established the importance of several factors in the system, including the ratio of copper(II) catalyst to formic acid, the presence of nitrite ion, reactions of diphenylmercury, and the purge gas employed in the system.

  8. Long-term high fructose and saturated fat diet affects plasma fatty acid profile in rats

    Fabrice TRANCHIDA; Léopold TCHIAKPE; Zo RAKOTONIAINA; Valérie DEYRIS; Olivier RAVION; Abel HIOL

    2012-01-01

    As the consumption of fructose and saturated fatty acids (FAs) has greatly increased in western diets and is linked with an increased risk of metabolic syndrome,the aim of this study was to investigate the effects of a moderate (10 weeks) and a prolonged (30 weeks) high fructose and saturated fatty acid (HFS) diet on plasma FA composition in rats.The effects of a few weeks of HFS diet had already been described,but in this paper we tried to establish whether these effects persist or if they are modified after 10 or 30 weeks.We hypothesized that the plasma FA profile would be altered between 10 and 30 weeks of the HFS diet.Rats fed with either the HFS or a standard diet were tested after 10 weeks and again after 30 weeks.After 10 weeks of feeding,HFS-fed rats developed the metabolic syndrome,as manifested by an increase in fasting insulinemia,total cholesterol and triglyceride levels,as well as by impaired glucose tolerance.Furthermore,the plasma FA profile of the HFS group showed higher proportions of monounsaturated FAs like palmitoleic acid [16:1(n-7)] and oleic acid [18:1(n-9)],whereas the proportions of some polyunsaturated n-6 FAs,such as linoleic acid [18:2(n-6)] and arachidonic acid [20:4(n-6)],were lower than those in the control group.After 30 weeks of the HFS diet,we observed changes mainly in the levels of 16:1(n-7) (decreased)and 20:4(n-6) (increased).Together,our results suggest that an HFS diet could lead to an adaptive response of the plasma FA profile over time,in association with the development of the metabolic syndrome.

  9. Candidate gene expression affects intramuscular fat content and fatty acid composition in pigs.

    Wang, Wei; Xue, Wenda; Jin, Bangquan; Zhang, Xixia; Ma, Fei; Xu, Xiaofeng

    2013-02-01

    The objective of this study was to correlate the expression pattern of candidate genes with the intramuscular fat (IMF) content and fatty acid composition of the Longissimus dorsi muscle of Duroc × Shanzhu commercial crossbred pigs. Animals of both sexes were slaughtered at a body weight of about 90 kg. The IMF content and fatty acid composition of the Longissimus dorsi muscle were measured and correlated with candidate genes mRNA expression (AdPLA, ADRB3, LEPR, MC4R, PPARγ, PPARα, LPL, PEPCK, and SCD). Females presented higher IMF content (p < 0.05) than males. The total saturated fatty acid (SFA) in males was greater (p < 0.01), whereas the total monounsaturated fatty acid (MUFA) (p < 0.01) and polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) (p < 0.05) were lower than in females. The expressions of AdPLA, MC4R, PEPCK, and SCD correlated with the IMF content (p < 0.05). AdPLA showed a positive association with MUFA and a negative association with SFA (p < 0.05). LEPR and MC4R were both positively and significantly associated with C18:3 and C20:0 (p < 0.05). PPARα and PPARγ were negatively correlated with SFA, and PPARγ was positively associated with MUFA (p < 0.05). LPL was positively associated with MUFA and negatively associated with SFA (p < 0.05). PEPCK was negatively correlated with PUFA (p < 0.05). SCD was positively associated with MUFA (p < 0.05). The revealed correlations may confirm that these candidate genes are important for fat deposition and fatty acid composition in pigs, and the evaluation and use of these genes may be useful for improving porcine meat quality. PMID:23275256

  10. Lipophilization of dihydrocaffeic acid affects its antioxidative properties in fish‐oil‐enriched emulsions

    Sørensen, Ann-Dorit Moltke; Nielsen, Nina Skall; Yang, Zhiyong;

    2012-01-01

    , the decreased antioxidative efficacy with increasing alkyl chain length esterified to dihydrocaffeic acid supported a newly suggested cut‐off effect hypothesis. This hypothesis suggests that when a certain level of hydrophobicity is obtained for lipophilized phenolic acids, the ester forms micelles in...... the aqueous phase rather than being located at the interface or oil phase. This phenomenon is suggested to explain the reduced antioxidant activity of oleyl dihydrocaffeate compared with octyl dihydrocaffeate. Practical application: The finding that lipophilization of phenolic compounds increase their...

  11. Effect of colony size and surrounding substrate on corals experiencing a mild bleaching event on Heron Island reef flat (southern Great Barrier Reef, Australia)

    Ortiz, J. C.; Gomez-Cabrera, M. Del C.; Hoegh-Guldberg, O.

    2009-12-01

    In January-May 2006, Heron Island in the Great Barrier Reef experienced a mild bleaching event. The effect of colony size, morphology and surrounding substrate on the extent of bleaching was explored. In contrast with previous studies, colony size did not influence bleaching sensitivity, suggesting that there may be a threshold of light and temperature stress beyond which size plays a role. Also contrasting with previous studies, massive corals were more affected by bleaching than branching corals. Massive corals surrounded by sand were more affected than the ones surrounded by rubble or dead coral. It is hypothesized that light reflectance from sand increases stress levels experienced by the colonies. This effect is maximized in massive corals as opposed to branching corals that form dense thickets on Heron Island. These results emphasize the importance of the ecological dynamics of coral communities experiencing low, moderate and high levels of bleaching for the understanding of how coral communities may change under the stress of climate change.

  12. Dietary linseed oil and selenate affect the concentration of fatty acids in selected tissues of sheep

    Czauderna, M.; Kowalczyk, J.; Marounek, Milan

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 57, č. 9 (2012), s. 389-401. ISSN 1212-1819 Grant ostatní: State Committee for Scientific Research(PL) 3PO6Z 034 22 Institutional support: RVO:67985904 Keywords : selenium * linseed oil * fatty acid Subject RIV: GH - Livestock Nutrition Impact factor: 0.922, year: 2012

  13. PUFAs acutely affect triacylglycerol-derived skeletal muscle fatty acid uptake and increase postprandial insulin sensitivity

    Jans, A.; Konings, E.; Goossens, G.H.; Bouwman, F.G.; Moors, C.C.; Boekschoten, M.V.; Afman, L.A.; Muller, M.R.; Mariman, E.C.; Blaak, E.E.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Dietary fat quality may influence skeletal muscle lipid processing and fat accumulation, thereby modulating insulin sensitivity. Objective: The objective was to examine the acute effects of meals with various fatty acid (FA) compositions on skeletal muscle FA processing and postprandial

  14. Plant Responses to Water Stress as Affected by Abscisic Acid and Benzyladenine

    Pospíšilová, Jana; Haisel, Daniel; Schnablová, Renáta; Synková, Helena; Baťková, Petra

    Montreal : International Society of Photosynthesis , 2005 - (Van der Est, A.; Bruce, D.), s. 593-595 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA522/02/1099 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : abscisic acid * benzyladenine * chlorophyl content Subject RIV: ED - Physiology

  15. A mutation affecting the synthesis of 4-chloroindole-3-acetic acid.

    Ross, John J; Tivendale, Nathan D; Davidson, Sandra E; Reid, James B; Davies, Noel W; Quittenden, Laura J; Smith, Jason A

    2012-12-01

    Traditionally, schemes depicting auxin biosynthesis in plants have been notoriously complex. They have involved up to four possible pathways by which the amino acid tryptophan might be converted to the main active auxin, indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), while another pathway was suggested to bypass tryptophan altogether. It was also postulated that different plants use different pathways, further adding to the complexity. In 2011, however, it was suggested that one of the four tryptophan-dependent pathways, via indole-3-pyruvic acid (IPyA), is the main pathway in Arabidopsis thaliana, although concurrent operation of one or more other pathways has not been excluded. We recently showed that, for seeds of Pisum sativum (pea), it is possible to go one step further. Our new evidence indicates that the IPyA pathway is the only tryptophan-dependent IAA synthesis pathway operating in pea seeds. We also demonstrated that the main auxin in developing pea seeds, 4-chloroindole-3-acetic acid (4-Cl-IAA), which accumulates to levels far exceeding those of IAA, is synthesized via a chlorinated version of the IPyA pathway. PMID:23073010

  16. DIBROMOACETIC ACID AFFECTS REPRODUCTIVE COMPETENCE AND SPERM QUALITY IN THE MALE RAT

    We have recently shown that Dibromoacetic acid (DBAA) alters sperm quality in short duration tests. n this study, male rats were gavaged with 0, 2, 10, 50, 250 mg DBAA/kg/d for up to 49 d. Interim. and terminal measurements of sperm quality & reproductive outcome were made. BAA c...

  17. Artificial Lignification of Maize Cell Walls Does Not Affect Bile Acid Adsorption

    Bile acid adsorption by lignified dietary fiber in the human intestine is proposed as a mechanism for lowering blood cholesterol level and reducing colon cancer risk. In this study, we investigated how the concentration and composition of lignin in fiber influences the in vitro adsorption of primary...

  18. Tooth Whitening And Temperature Rise With Two Bleaching Activation Methods

    To measure the tooth whitening and the surface and Intrapulpal temperature increase in vitro on freshly extracted upper human central incisors after chemical, Zoom AP light and diode laser activated bleaching. Thirty caries-free upper human incisors were selected. Teeth were divided into three equal groups according to the methods of activation of the bleaching agent (n = 10). A whitening gel containing hydrogen peroxide was applied to the buccal surface of all teeth. Group I was bleached using chemically activated hydrogen peroxide gel, for three applications of 15 min each. Group II was bleached with high intensity advanced power Zoom activation light (Zoom AP), for three applications of 15 min each. Group III was bleached with diode laser activation technique, where the teeth were irradiated with 2 Watt diode laser for three applications of 30 sec each. The whitening degree was assessed using an image analysis system, while temperature rise was recorded using a thermocouple on the external tooth surface and Intrapulpal. The degree of whitening increased significantly in all groups. However, the percentage of whitening was not statistically significantly different between the three groups. In addition, group II showed statistically significant higher mean rise in both surface and pulp temperatures than group I and group III. Chemical bleaching produces the same whitening effect as Zoom AP light and laser, with no surface or pulpal temperature rise. Laser application is faster and produces less surface and pulp temperature increase than Zoom AP light. Diode laser used to activate bleaching gels is not considered dangerous to the vitality of dental pulp using power settings of 2 W.

  19. The chain length of biologically produced (R)-3-hydroxyalkanoic acid affects biological activity and structure of anti-cancer peptides.

    Szwej, Emilia; Devocelle, Marc; Kenny, Shane; Guzik, Maciej; O'Connor, Stephen; Nikodinovic-Runic, Jasmina; Radivojevic, Jelena; Maslak, Veselin; Byrne, Annete T; Gallagher, William M; Zulian, Qun Ren; Zinn, Manfred; O'Connor, Kevin E

    2015-06-20

    Conjugation of DP18L peptide with (R)-3-hydroxydecanoic acid, derived from the biopolymer polyhydroxyalkanoate, enhances its anti-cancer activity (O'Connor et al., 2013. Biomaterials 34, 2710-2718). However, it is unknown if other (R)-3-hydroxyalkanoic acids (R3HAs) can enhance peptide activity, if chain length affects enhancement, and what effect R3HAs have on peptide structure. Here we show that the degree of enhancement of peptide (DP18L) anti-cancer activity by R3HAs is carbon chain length dependent. In all but one example the R3HA conjugated peptides were more active against cancer cells than the unconjugated peptides. However, R3HAs with 9 and 10 carbons were most effective at improving DP18L activity. DP18L peptide variant DP17L, missing a hydrophobic amino acid (leucine residue 4) exhibited lower efficacy against MiaPaCa cells. Circular dichroism analysis showed DP17L had a lower alpha helix content and the conjugation of any R3HA ((R)-3-hydroxyhexanoic acid to (R)-3-hydroxydodecanoic acid) to DP17L returned the helix content back to levels of DP18L. However (R)-3-hydroxyhexanoic did not enhance the anti-cancer activity of DP17L and at least 7 carbons were needed in the R3HA to enhance activity of D17L. DP17L needs a longer chain R3HA to achieve the same activity as DP18L conjugated to an R3HA. As a first step to assess the synthetic potential of polyhydroxyalkanoate derived R3HAs, (R)-3-hydroxydecanoic acid was synthetically converted to (±)3-chlorodecanoic acid, which when conjugated to DP18L improved its antiproliferative activity against MiaPaCa cells. PMID:25820126

  20. Interaction of phytic acid and zinc affecting copper bioavailability in rats

    The objectives of this investigation were to develop a protocol to measure Cu bioavailability using four different indices of Cu status, and to evaluate the effect of phytic acid on Cu bioavailability using these indices in the rat. Ninety-six Sprague-Dawley male weanling rats were fed a Cu-deficient diet for four weeks. The Cu-depleted rats were divided into twelve groups and fed test diets containing 1, 2, 3, and 10 ug Cu and 0, 0.4 and 0.8% phytic acid at each Cu level. After 3 days of Cu repletion, liver copper (LCu), liver superoxide dismutase (LSOD) activity, serum copper (SCu), and serum ceruloplasmin (CP) were measured. There was a significant decrease in SCu and LCu in rats fed 30 ug Zn/g or 230 ug Zn/g compared to animals fed 12 ug Zn/g. Phytic acid increased the level of Cu in the sera and livers of rats fed the diet with 30 ug Zn/g, but those of rats fed 12 or 230 ug Zn/g did not. Dietary phytic acid appeared to reduce the synthesis of two intestinal proteins: a high molecular weight protein and metallothionein. The incorporation of 35S-cysteine into both proteins increased with increasing levels of dietary Zn. The results of these studied indicated: (1) LCu and SCu are reliable indices of Cu for absorption and utilization in the rat, and (2) phytic acid increases Cu bioavailability by binding dietary Zn and reduces the level of Zn-induced mucosal proteins which allows Cu to be more efficiently absorbed

  1. Final chlorine dioxide stage at near-neutral pH for bleaching eucalypt pulp

    Robisnéa A. Ribeiro; Fernando J. B. Gomes; José N. Floriani; Renato A. P. Damásio; Iara F. Demuner; Jorge L. Colodette

    2014-01-01

    It is well known that pH is an important parameter for controlling the eucalyptus pulp bleaching when using the final chlorine dioxide stage, since it affects the effectiveness of the process. Recommendations found in the literature for operating are in the 3.5 to 4.0 range. However, in this paper it was shown that final chlorine dioxide has better performance, with significant brightness gain while also preserving pulp quality, when it is operated at near neutral pH. This result can be expla...

  2. Final chlorine dioxide stage at near-neutral pH for bleaching eucalypt pulp

    Robisnéa A. Ribeiro

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that pH is an important parameter for controlling the eucalyptus pulp bleaching when using the final chlorine dioxide stage, since it affects the effectiveness of the process. Recommendations found in the literature for operating are in the 3.5 to 4.0 range. However, in this paper it was shown that final chlorine dioxide has better performance, with significant brightness gain while also preserving pulp quality, when it is operated at near neutral pH. This result can be explained by the generation of sodium bicarbonate in situ upon adding carbon dioxide at this stage.

  3. Chitosan nanoparticles affect acid tolerance response in adhered cells of strpetococcus mutans

    Neilands, Julia; Sutherland, Duncan S; Resin, Anton;

    2011-01-01

    In this study we evaluated the effect of chitosan nanoparticles on the acid tolerance response (ATR) of adhered Streptococcus mutans. An ATR was induced by exposing S. mutans to pH 5.5 for 2 h and confirmed by exposing the acid-adapted cells to pH 3.5 for 30 min, with the majority of cells...... appearing viable according to the LIVE/DEAD (R) technique. However, when chitosan nanoparticles were present during the exposure to pH 5.5, no ATR occurred as most cells appeared dead after the pH 3.5 shock. We conclude that the chitosan nanoparticles tested had the ability to hinder ATR induction in...

  4. Leaf Associated Microbial Activities in a Stream Affected by Acid Mine Drainage

    Schlief, Jeanette

    2004-11-01

    Microbial activity was assessed on birch leaves and plastic strips during 140 days of exposure at three sites in an acidic stream of the Lusatian post-mining landscape, Germany. The sites differed in their degrees of ochre deposition and acidification. The aim of the study was (1) to follow the microbial activities during leaf colonization, (2) to compare the effect of different environmental conditions on leaf associated microbial activities, and (3) to test the microbial availability of leaf litter in acidic mining waters. The activity peaked after 49 days and subsequently decreased gradually at all sites. A formation of iron plaques on leaf surfaces influenced associated microbial activity. It seemed that these plaques inhibit the microbial availability of leaf litter and serve as a microbial habitat by itself. (

  5. Starch and sucrose synthesis in Phaseolus vulgaris as affected by light, CO2, and abscisic acid

    Phaseolus vulgaris L. leaves were subjected to various light, CO2, and O2 levels and abscisic acid, then given a 10 minute pulse of 14CO2 followed by a 5 minute chase with unlabeled CO2. After the chase period, very little label remained in the ionic fractions except at low CO2 partial pressure. Most label was found in the neutral, alcohol soluble fraction or in the insoluble fraction digestable by amyloglucosidase. Sucrose formation was linearly related to assimilation rate. Starch formation increased linearly with assimilation rate, but did not occur if the assimilation rate was below 4 micromoles per square meter per second. Neither abscisic acid, nor high CO2 in combination with low O2 caused significant perturbations of the sucrose/starch formation ratio. These studies indicate that the pathways for starch and sucrose synthesis both are controlled by the rate of net CO2 assimilation, with sucrose the preferred product at very low assimilation rates

  6. Some factors affecting on the behavior of steel electrode in citric acid solutions.

    A.Diab

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Potential-time curves are constructed for the steel electrode in naturally aerated citric acid solutions devoid of and containing some aggressive and inhibitive compounds. Cl- and SO4 2- ions cause the destruction of passivity and initiation of pitting corrosion. The rate of oxide film growth by citric acid and oxide film destruction by Cl- and SO4 2- ions follows a direct logarithmic law as evident from the linear relationships between the open-circuit potential and the logarithm of immersion time. Urea, phenylhydrazine and 1,2-phenylenediamine compounds inhibit the pitting corrosion of steel. The rate of oxide film healing and thickening increases with their concentrations. In presence of constant inhibitor concentration, the efficiency of pitting inhibition increases in the order: (weak urea

  7. Citrus Flavanones Affect Hepatic Fatty Acid Oxidation in Rats by Acting as Prooxidant Agents

    Rodrigo Polimeni Constantin; Gilson Soares do Nascimento; Renato Polimeni Constantin; Clairce Luzia Salgueiro; Adelar Bracht; Emy Luiza Ishii-Iwamoto; Nair Seiko Yamamoto; Jorgete Constantin

    2013-01-01

    Citrus flavonoids have a wide range of biological activities and positive health effects on mammalian cells because of their antioxidant properties. However, they also act as prooxidants and thus may interfere with metabolic pathways. The purpose of this work was to evaluate the effects of three citrus flavanones, hesperidin, hesperetin, and naringenin, on several parameters linked to fatty acid oxidation in mitochondria, peroxisomes, and perfused livers of rats. When exogenous octanoate was ...

  8. Conjugated linoleic acid of dairy foods is affected by cows’ feeding system and processing of milk

    Juan Pablo Avilez Ruiz; Marcelo Wladimir Alonzo; Manuel Delgado Pertíñez

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The distribution of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) in dairy products commercially available in Chile is poorly understood. This study aimed to assess the content of CLA in dairy cow products from Chile and the effect of processing fresh milk into dairy products. Samples of raw milk were categorized into two groups based on the animal feeding system utilized by the dairy farm: 1) grazing based systems (Los Lagos region); and 2) housing systems using total mixed ration (TMR) diets (Los...

  9. Microorganisms and dietary factors affecting biohydrogenation and conjugated linoleic acid production in the rumen ecosystem

    Maia, Margarida Rosa Garcez

    2010-01-01

    Tese de Doutoramento em Ciências Veterinárias, especialidade de Produção Animal Consumption of animal fat has been associated with an increased incidence of chronic diseases, as cardiovascular disease, obesity and diabetes. Ruminant products, milk and meat, have high saturated fatty acids (FA) content as a result of biohydrogenation by microbial metabolic activity in the rumen. Biohydrogenation also originates FA with health promoting or disease preventing properties, including...

  10. Nitrate reductase and acid phosphatase activities as affected by inorganic phosphate in corn roots

    Marie Kummerova; Józef Buczek

    2014-01-01

    The deficieny of inorganic phosphate in nutrient solution reduces by about 50 per cent NO3- absorption in corn seedlings, it decreases both in vitro and in vivo nitrate reductase (NR) activity, as well the potential and actual NR level and has a very weak effect on NR induction. Acid phosphatases activities increase in corn roots when the plants are grown in nutrient solution without phosphorus. We suggest that inorganic phosphate is required mainly for maintenance of NR activity rather, than...

  11. Lactic acid bacteria affect serum cholesterol levels, harmful fecal enzyme activity, and fecal water content

    Chung Myung; Shin Hea; Lee Kyung; Kim Mi; Baek Eun; Jang Seok; Lee Do; Kim Jin; Lee Kang; Ha Nam

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are beneficial probiotic organisms that contribute to improved nutrition, microbial balance, and immuno-enhancement of the intestinal tract, as well as lower cholesterol. Although present in many foods, most trials have been in spreads or dairy products. Here we tested whether Bifidobacteria isolates could lower cholesterol, inhibit harmful enzyme activities, and control fecal water content. Methods In vitro culture experiments were performed to ...

  12. Influence of aeration intensity and medium acidity on phosphate mobilization affected by soil bacteria

    K. V. Lavrentyeva; P. I. Kharchenko; N. V. Cherevach; A. I. Vinnikov

    2009-01-01

    The paper deals with the investigation of phosphate solubilisation conducted by two bacteria Pseudomonas putida and Enterobacter dissolvens under conditions of different rates of aeration and рН. Bacterial development was characterized by different media acidity and aeration levels. It was established optimal aeration rates and potential of hydrogen for soil bacteria growth and phosphate solubilisation – 0.5721 mole О2/l per hour and pH ≈ 6.0.

  13. Soil acidity as affecting micronutrients concentration, nitrato reductase enzyme activity and yield in upland rice plants

    Edemar Moro; Carlos Alexandre Costa Crusciol; Heitor Cantarella; Adriano Stephan Nascente; Adriana Lima Moro; Fernando Broetto

    2013-01-01

    The lowest grain yield of rice under no-tillage system (NTS) in relation to the conventional system may be due to the predominance nitrate in the soil and the low nitrate reductase activity. Another reason may be caused by micronutrient deficiency because of superficially soil acidity corrections. Therefore, the objective of this study was to evaluate the changes caused by soil pH in the N forms in the soil, micronutrients concentration in rice plants, nitrate reductase activity, yield of ric...

  14. Content and distribution of phytanic acid diastereomers in organic milk as affected by feed composition

    Che, Brita Ngum; Kristensen, Troels; Nebel, Caroline; Dalsgaard, Trine; Hellgren, Lars; Young, Jette Feveile; Larsen, Mette K.

    2013-01-01

    Phytanic acid (PA) is a bioactive compound found in milk that is derived from the phytol chain of chlorophyll, and the content of PA in milk fat depends on the availability of phytol from feed. In this study, the content of PA diastereomers was analyzed in milk sampled from five organic herds twi...... related to the amount of grazed clovers, where a higher intake resulted in a higher share of the RRR isomer. © 2012 American Chemical Society....

  15. Salinity, dissolved organic carbon and water hardness affect peracetic acid (PAA) degradation in aqueous solutions

    Liu, Dibo; Steinberg, Christian E.W.; Straus, David L.; Pedersen, Lars-Flemming; Meinelt, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Peracetic acid (PAA) is used in aquaculture under different conditions for disinfection and therapeutic purposes. There is limited information about its environmental fate, particularly its persistence in aquatic systems with different physical–chemical conditions. This study investigated PAA...... hardness had only minor impact. For commercial aquaculture, actual PAA concentration in the raw product needs to be measured; the fate of PAA in individual facilities must be carefully monitored and feasible application strategies need to be investigated to achieve maximal disinfection and therapeutic...

  16. Dietary n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids affect the development of renovascular hypertension in rats

    Rousseau, D.; Helies-Toussaint, C.; Raederstorff, D.; Moreau, D.; Grynberg, A.

    2001-01-01

    The consequences of a dietary n-3 PUFA supply was investigated on the blood pressure (BP) increase elicited by left renal artery stenosis in rats distributed in 3 groups (n = 8) fed for 8 weeks a semi-purified diet either as control diet or enriched diets (docosahexaenoic acid, DHA, or eicosapentaenoic acid, EPA). The PUFA intake induced large alterations in heart and kidney phospholipid fatty acid profile, but did not influence body weight, cardiac hypertrophy, renal left atrophy and right hypertrophy. Within 4 weeks, BP raised from 120-180 +/- 2 mm Hg in the control group, but only to 165 +/- 3 mm Hg in the n-3 PUFA groups. After stabilization of BP in the 3 groups, the rats received a short administration of increasing dose of perindopril. The lower dose (0.5 mg/kg) moderately decreased BP only in the control group. With higher doses (1, 5 and 10 mg/kg) BP was normalized in the 3 groups, with a higher amplitude of the BP lowering effect in the control group. A moderate n-3 PUFA intake can contribute to prevent the development of peripheral hypertension in rats by a mechanism that may involve angiotensin converting enzyme.

  17. γ-Aminobutyric acid transporter (GAT1) overexpression in mouse affects the testicular morphology

    2000-01-01

    γ-Aminobutyric acid and GABAergic receptors were previously reported to be distributed in reproductive sys tems besides CNS and predicted to participate in the mod ulation of testicular function. γ-Aminobutyric acid trans porter was implicated to be involved in this process. How ever, the potential role of γ-aminobutyric transporter in testis has not been explored. In this study, we investi gated the existence of mouse γ-aminobutyric acid trans porter subtype I (mGAT1) in testis. Wild-type and trans genic mice, which overexpressing mGAT1 in a variety of tissues, especially in testis, were primarily studied to ap proach the profile of mGAT1 in testis. Mice with overex pressed mGAT1 develop normally but with reduced mass and size of testis as compared with wild-type. Testicu lar morphology of transgenic mice exhibited overt abnor malities including focal damage of the spermatogenic ep ithelium accompanied by capillaries proliferation and in creased diameter of seminiferous tubules lumen. Reduced number of spermatids was also found in some seminiferous tubules. Our results clearly demonstrate the presence of GAT1 in mouse testis and imply that GAT1 is possibly involved in testicular function.

  18. Enhanced PCBs sorption on biochars as affected by environmental factors: Humic acid and metal cations

    Biochar plays an important role in the behaviors of organic pollutants in the soil environment. The role of humic acid (HA) and metal cations on the adsorption affinity of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) to the biochars in an aqueous medium and an extracted solution from a PCBs-contaminated soil was studied using batch experiments. Biochars were produced with pine needles and wheat straw at 350 °C and 550 °C under anaerobic condition. The results showed that the biochars had high adsorption affinity for PCBs. Pine needle chars adsorbed less nonplanar PCBs than planar ones due to dispersive interactions and separation. Coexistence of HA and metal cations increased PCBs sorption on the biochars accounted for HA adsorption and cation complexation. The results will aid in a better understanding of biochar sorption mechanism of contaminants in the environment. - Highlights: ► Application of the biochars for PCBs sorption was a new and effective way. ► The biochars had higher adsorption affinity for PCBs in the soil extracted solution. ► Pine needle chars adsorbed less nonplanar PCBs than planar ones. ► Coexisting humic acid or metal cations increased PCBs sorption on the biochars. - The biochars had higher adsorption affinity for PCBs in the extracted soil solution because coexisting humic acid and metal cations increased their sorption.

  19. Uranium pollution in an estuary affected by pyrite acid mine drainage and releases of naturally occurring radioactive materials

    Highlights: → Huelva estuary is affected by former phosphogypsum releases and pyrite acid mine drainage. → Time evolution of uranium concentration is analyzed after halting of NORM releases. → Two new contamination sources are preventing the complete uranium cleaning: (1) The leaching of phosphogypsum stacks located close to Tinto River. (2) Pyrite acid mine drainage. → High uranium concentrations are dissolved in water and precipitate subsequently. - Abstract: After the termination of phosphogypsum discharges to the Huelva estuary (SW Spain), a unique opportunity was presented to study the response of a contaminated environmental compartment after the cessation of its main source of pollution. The evolution over time of uranium concentrations in the estuary is presented to supply new insights into the decontamination of a scenario affected by Naturally Occurring Radioactive Material (NORM) discharges. The cleaning of uranium isotopes from the area has not taken place as rapidly as expected due to leaching from phosphogypsum stacks. An in-depth study using various techniques of analysis, including 234U/238U and 230Th/232Th ratios and the decreasing rates of the uranium concentration, enabled a second source of uranium contamination to be discovered. Increased uranium levels due to acid mine drainage from pyrite mines located in the Iberian Pyrite Belt (SW Spain) prevent complete uranium decontamination and, therefore, result in levels nearly twice those of natural background levels.

  20. AFM analysis of bleaching effects on dental enamel microtopography

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to test a new methodology to evaluate the effects of 35% hydrogen peroxide agent on the microtopography of sound enamel using an atomic force microscope (AFM). The buccal sound surfaces of three extracted human lower incisors were used, without polishing the surfaces to maintain them with natural morphology. These unpolished surfaces were subjected to bleaching procedure with 35% hydrogen peroxide that consisted of 4 applications of the bleaching agent on enamel surfaces for 10 min each application. Surface images were obtained in a 15 μm x 15 μm area using an AFM. The roughness (Ra and RMS) and the power spectral density (PSD) were obtained before and after the bleaching treatment. As results we could inquire that the PSD analyses were very suitable to identifying the morphological changes on the surfaces, while the Ra and RMS parameters were insufficient to represent the morphological alterations promoted by bleaching procedure on enamel. The morphological wavelength in the range of visible light spectrum (380-750 nm) was analyzed, showing a considerable increase of the PSD with the bleaching treatment.

  1. AFM analysis of bleaching effects on dental enamel microtopography

    Pedreira de Freitas, Ana Carolina, E-mail: anacarolfreitas@usp.br [Departamento de Dentistica, Faculdade de Odontologia da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes, 2227 - Cidade Universitaria, CEP 05508-000, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Cardoso Espejo, Luciana, E-mail: luespejo@hotmail.com [Departamento de Dentistica, Faculdade de Odontologia da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes, 2227 - Cidade Universitaria, CEP 05508-000, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Brossi Botta, Sergio, E-mail: sbbotta@usp.br [Departamento de Dentistica, Faculdade de Odontologia da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes, 2227 - Cidade Universitaria, CEP 05508-000, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Sa Teixeira, Fernanda de, E-mail: nandast@if.usp.br [Laboratorio de Filmes Finos, Instituto de Fisica da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Rua do Matao, Travessa R, 187 - Cidade Universitaria, CEP 05314-970, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Cerqueira, Luz Maria Aparecida A., E-mail: maacluz@usp.br [Departamento de Dentistica, Faculdade de Odontologia da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes, 2227 - Cidade Universitaria, CEP 05508-000, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Garone-Netto, Narciso, E-mail: ngarone@usp.br [Departamento de Dentistica, Faculdade de Odontologia da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes, 2227 - Cidade Universitaria, CEP 05508-000, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Bona Matos, Adriana, E-mail: bona@usp.br [Departamento de Dentistica, Faculdade de Odontologia da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes, 2227 - Cidade Universitaria, CEP 05508-000, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Barbosa da Silveira Salvadori, Maria Cecilia, E-mail: mcsalva@if.usp.br [Laboratorio de Filmes Finos, Instituto de Fisica da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Rua do Matao, Travessa R, 187 - Cidade Universitaria, CEP 05314-970, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2010-02-15

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to test a new methodology to evaluate the effects of 35% hydrogen peroxide agent on the microtopography of sound enamel using an atomic force microscope (AFM). The buccal sound surfaces of three extracted human lower incisors were used, without polishing the surfaces to maintain them with natural morphology. These unpolished surfaces were subjected to bleaching procedure with 35% hydrogen peroxide that consisted of 4 applications of the bleaching agent on enamel surfaces for 10 min each application. Surface images were obtained in a 15 {mu}m x 15 {mu}m area using an AFM. The roughness (Ra and RMS) and the power spectral density (PSD) were obtained before and after the bleaching treatment. As results we could inquire that the PSD analyses were very suitable to identifying the morphological changes on the surfaces, while the Ra and RMS parameters were insufficient to represent the morphological alterations promoted by bleaching procedure on enamel. The morphological wavelength in the range of visible light spectrum (380-750 nm) was analyzed, showing a considerable increase of the PSD with the bleaching treatment.

  2. Analysis of optical bleaching of OSL signal in sediment quartz

    The aim of this work was to study the effect of the quality of optical bleaching on the results of OSL (Optically Stimulated Luminescence) dating method. The large aliquots of coarse quartz grains extracted from fluvial deposit were used in the study. The poor, medium and good bleaching were simulated in laboratory with help of Blue LED light source in series of experiments. Then the samples were irradiated with a common laboratory dose. The equivalent doses (DE) were measured by the help of standard Single Aliquot Regeneration (SAR) technique, but obtained DE distributions are analyzed in a new way. The method for recognizing and compensating for partial bleaching is proposed. The conclusions for dating sediment quartz samples are presented and discussed. -- Highlights: ► Bleaching experiments on sediment quartz are performed. ► Blue LED light source incorporated in luminescence reader is used. ► New analysis of data measured by standard SAR OSL technique is proposed. ► The results are promising for recognizing and compensating for partial bleaching

  3. Optical bleaching of radiation-induced colour centres in fluorapatite

    One of the important steps in thermoluminescence (TL) dating studies is the assessment of the total natural radiation dose that a sample has received and retained. This, in turn, depends on the thermal and temporal stabilities as well as the optical bleaching of the radiation-induced colour centres. In this paper, we report the effect of selective optical bleaching, after X-irradiation, on the TL glow curves of synthetic fluorapatite. X-irradiated fluorapatite exhibits three unresolved TL peaks around 150, 250 and 345 C. Diffuse reflectance studies of the polycrystalline fluorapatite show that X-irradiation induces absorption bands at 370 and 450 nm. Furthermore, exposure to light through 320 to 400 nm and 400 to 480 nm band filters effectively bleaches the TL glow from the first two peaks at around 150 and 250 C. By correlating the wavelength of light used for bleaching the TL with the radiation-induced absorption bands, the type of centres involved in the approx. 150 C TL glow peak in fluorapatite has been identified as E(II) or A centres, i.e. halogen ion vacancies with trapped electrons. Although the approx. 250 C TL glow peak is also bleached along with the 150 C TL peak, its temperature stability does not agree with that of the A centres. (author)

  4. Coral Reef Bleaching at Agatti Island of Lakshadweep Atolls, India

    Ramar Vinoth; Mohan Gopi; Thipramalai Thankappanpillai Ajith Kumar; Thirunavukarassu Thangaradjou; Thangavel Balasubramanian

    2012-01-01

    A survey on coral bleaching was carried out at Agatti Island of Lakshadweep from May to June 2010.Elevated sea surface temperatures (SSTs) of the region exceeded the seasonal average and delayed the onset of monsoon,which triggered widespread bleaching of corals.The Agatti reefs showed an average of 73% bleached corals with apparent bleaching-related mortality of sea anemones (87%) and giant clams (83%).The SST increased up to 34 ℃ with an average maximum SST of 32.5℃ during the study period between May and June 2010.Coral reefs on the southern side of the island are fully or partially exposed to sun light during low tide in contrast to the other side.This suggests that the mortality is more likely due to the low tide exposure than exclusively due to the elevated SST.Observations indicated a clear increase in coral bleaching during April 2010,at levels higher than that in normal summer.

  5. Dissolved organic carbon and nitrogen mineralization strongly affect co2 emissions following lime application to acidic soil

    Emission of greenhouse gases from agricultural soils has main contribution to the climatic change and global warming. Dynamics of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and nitrogen mineralization can affect CO/sub 2/ emission from soils. Influence of DOC and nitrogen mineralization on CO/sub 2/ emissions following lime application to acidic soil was investigated in current study. Laboratory experiment was conducted under aerobic conditions with 25% moisture contents (66% water-filled pore space) at 25 degree C in the dark conditions. Different treatments of lime were applied to acidic soil as follows: CK (control), L (low rate of lime: 0.2g lime / 100 g soil) and H (high rate of lime: 0.5g lime /100g soil). CO/sub 2/ emissions were measured by gas chromatography and dissolved organic carbon, NH4 +-N, NO/sub 3/ --N and soil pH were measured during incubation study. Addition of lime to acidic soil significantly increased the concentration of DOC and N mineralization rate. Higher concentrations of DOC and N mineralization, consequently, increased the CO/sub 2/ emissions from lime treated soils. Cumulative CO/sub 2/ emission was 75% and 71% higher from L and H treatments as compared to CK. The results of current study suggest that DOC and N mineralization are critical in controlling gaseous emissions of CO/sub 2/ from acidic soils following lime application. (author)

  6. Natural oils affect the human skin integrity and the percutaneous penetration of benzoic acid dose-dependently

    Nielsen, Jesper Bo

    2006-01-01

    three natural oils (eucalyptus oil, tea tree oil, peppermint oil) would affect the skin integrity and the percutaneous penetration of benzoic acid when applied topically in relevant concentrations. An experimental in vitro model using static diffusion cells mounted with human breast or abdominal skin......Abstract: Natural oils are extensively used in cosmetics and as treatment for a growing number of more or less specific ailments. Skin irritation and cases of allergy have repeatedly been described in the literature following exposure to these oils. The present study evaluated the extent to which...... was applied. The three natural oils decreased the skin integrity dose-dependently. Concomitant dermal exposure to low concentrations of peppermint oil reduced the percutaneous penetration of benzoic acid. The present study lends support to the notion that low concentrations of peppermint oil may act...

  7. Balance of alkaline and acidic pollution loads in the area affected by oil shale combustion

    Field measurements of concentrations of SO2 and NO2 in the air and deposition of Ca2+, Mg2+, K+, Na+, SO42-, NO3- and Cl- in northeastern Estonia were carried out in the end of winter 1998/99. Concentrations in the air were measured by passive sampling method (Palmes tubes); snow samples were used to quantify the deposition loads. The measurement domain covered entire Ida-Viru County, eastern part of Laeaene-Viru County and a few sites in Jogeva County. These measurements and comparison with earlier investigations show that in wintertime most of sulfate over the area affected by oil shale industrial complex appears to be deposited with fly ash particles. The regression formulae for wintertime sulfate and calcium deposition loads for oil-shale region are derived. The inhomogeneous chemical composition of fly ash and influence of other (domestic, traffic) emissions are suggested as possible factors affecting the ratio of sulfate and calcium deposition loads. (author)

  8. Iduronic Acid in chondroitin/dermatan sulfate affects directional migration of aortic smooth muscle cells

    B. Bartolini; Thelin, M.A.; Svensson, L; Ghiselli, G.; Kuppevelt, T.H. van; Malmstrom, A.; Maccarana, M.

    2013-01-01

    Aortic smooth muscle cells produce chondroitin/dermatan sulfate (CS/DS) proteoglycans that regulate extracellular matrix organization and cell behavior in normal and pathological conditions. A unique feature of CS/DS proteoglycans is the presence of iduronic acid (IdoA), catalyzed by two DS epimerases. Functional ablation of DS-epi1, the main epimerase in these cells, resulted in a major reduction of IdoA both on cell surface and in secreted CS/DS proteoglycans. Downregulation of IdoA led to ...

  9. Action of polyvinylsulphate on metabolism of nucleic acids affected by radiation

    Polyvinyl sulphate (PVS) as a nuclease inhibitor was used to protect endogenic nucleic acids from irradiation-activated nucleases. The survival of 700 rad irradiated rats was 33% and 60% in the control and PVS-treated (25 mg/kg) groups, respectively. PVS intravenously injected to 1000 R irradiated animals at 50 mg/kg inhibited DNase I in the liver and spleen and stimulated DNase 2 in the liver. A partial restoration of DNA level in the liver was observed simultaneously with the inhibitory effect on alkaline nucleases (no restoration effect had been found in the spleen)

  10. Water Adsorption and Surface Acidity of Nano-Ball Allophane as Affected by Heat Treatment

    Hamayoon Khan; Rozina Khan; Naoto Matsue; Teruo Henmi

    2009-01-01

    Effect of heat treatment on the water adsorption and surface acidity of two nano-ball allophane samples with varying Si/Al ratio under different relative humidities (RHs) was studied. The water vapor adsorption of two allophane samples under various relative humidities, decreased with preheating treatment up to 400 °C for 2 h. The decrease in water adsorption at monolayer level (RH≤0.45) was greater for KnP sample than for KyP sample, whereas the decrease in water adsorption due to ...

  11. Proteomics identifies molecular networks affected by tetradecylthioacetic acid and fish oil supplemented diets

    Wrzesinski, Krzysztof; León, Ileana R.; Kulej, Katarzyna;

    2013-01-01

    antioxidant properties of TTA. BIOLOGICAL SIGNIFICANCE: This study for the first time explores the effect of fish oil and TTA - tetradecyl-thioacetic acid and the combination of those two as diet supplements on mitochondria metabolism in a comprehensive and systematic manner. We show that fish oil and TTA...... carried out. The results of this work provide an excellent starting point for further studies that will help to understand the metabolic effects of fish oil and TTA and will hopefully help to design dietary programs directed towards reduction of the prevalence of metabolic syndrome and associated diseases....

  12. Kinetic modeling of the oxidative degradation of additive free PE in bleach disinfected water

    Mikdam, Aïcha; Colin, Xavier; Billon, Noëlle; Minard, Gaëlle

    2016-05-01

    The chemical interactions between PE and bleach were studied at 60°C in immersion in bleach solutions kept at a free chlorine concentration of 100 ppm and a pH of 5 or 7.2. It was found that the polymer undergoes a severe oxidation from the earliest weeks of exposure, in a superficial layer whose thickness (of about 50-70 µm) is almost independent of the pH value, although the superficial oxidation rate is faster in acidic than in neutral medium. Oxidation leads to the formation and accumulation of a large variety of carbonyl products (mostly ketones and carboxylic acids) and, after a few weeks, to a decrease in the average molar mass due to the large predominance of chain scissions over crosslinking. A scenario was elaborated for explaining such unexpected results. According to this scenario, the non-ionic molecules (Cl2 and ClOH) formed from the disinfectant in the water phase, would migrate deeply into PE and dissociate into highly reactive radicals (Cl• and HO•) in order to initiate a radical chain oxidation. A kinetic model was derived from this scenario for predicting the general trends of the oxidation kinetics and its dependence on environmental factors such as temperature, free chlorine concentration and pH. The validity of this model was successfully checked by comparing the numerical simulations with experimental data.

  13. Deoiling and Regeneration Efficiencies of Spent Bleaching Clay

    A. W. Nursulihatimarsyila

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Disposal and reuse of Spent Bleaching Clay (SBC from palm oil processing industry is a problem of growing importance. The residual oil in the SBC can be recovered using hexane as solvent.Approach: In this study, the effect of different solid to solvent ratio on the deoiling efficiency of SBC samples from palm oil refinery and palm kernel refinery were studied. The amount of extracted oil and deoiling efficiency for both types of SBC increases as the solid to solvent ratio is decreased. Results: All the extracted oils, irrespective of the amount of solvent used, have poorer quality than crude oil and may be difficult to be refined to good quality and stability.Conclusion: The deoiled SBC treated using different solid to solvent ratio gave almost similar regeneration efficiency i.e., about 80% for bleaching of CPO and not more than 30% for bleaching of CPKO.

  14. Low and moderate concentrations of lysobisphosphatidic acid in brain and liver of patients affected by some storage diseases.

    Kahma, K; Brotherus, J; Haltia, M; Renkonen, O

    1976-07-01

    The relative amount of lysobisphosphatidic acid (LBPA), known also as bis(monoacylglycerly)phosphate, among the total phospholipids was analyzed in post mortem samples of brain and liver of patients affected by four storage diseases. In spite of the extensive accumulation of storage lysosomes, none of the samples revealed a highly evelated LBPA content comparable to that found in the liver in Niemann-Pick disease and in the liver in lipidosis induced by 4,4'-diethylaminoethoxyhexestrol. We conclude that, although LBPA is often present in high concentration in lysosomes of many types of cells, it is not always a major component of these organelles. PMID:948249

  15. Evaluation of temperature increase during in-office bleaching.

    Mondelli, Rafael Francisco Lia; Soares, Ana Flávia; Pangrazio, Eugenio Gabriel Kegler; Wang, Linda; Ishikiriama, Sergio Kiyoshi; Bombonatti, Juliana Fraga Soares

    2016-04-01

    The use of light sources in the bleaching process reduces the time required and promotes satisfactory results. However, these light sources can cause an increase in the pulp temperature. Objective The purpose of the present study was to measure the increase in intrapulpal temperature induced by different light-activated bleaching procedures with and without the use of a bleaching gel. Material and Methods A human maxillary central incisor was sectioned 2 mm below the cementoenamel junction. A K-type thermocouple probe was introduced into the pulp chamber. A 35% hydrogen peroxide bleaching gel was applied to the vestibular tooth surface. The light units used were a conventional halogen, a hybrid light (only LED and LED/Laser), a high intensity LED, and a green LED light. Temperature increase values were compared by two-way ANOVA and Tukey´s tests (phybrid light, and high intensity LED. Compared to the other light sources, the conventional halogen lamp applied over the bleaching gel induced a significant increase in temperature (3.83±0.41°C). The green LED unit with and without gel application did not produce any significant intrapulpal temperature variations. Conclusion In the present study, the conventional halogen lamp caused the highest increase in intrapulpal temperature, and the green LED caused the least. There was an increase in temperature with all lights tested and the maximum temperature remained below the critical level (5.5°C). The addition of a bleaching gel led to a higher increase in intrapulpal temperatures. PMID:27119761

  16. Control of bleaching in mushroom coral populations (Scleractinia: Fungiidae) in the Java Sea: stress tolerance and interference by life history strategy

    Hoeksema, B.W.

    1991-01-01

    Bleaching was studied in populations of phylogenetically closely related species (n = 21) of mushroom corals (Scleractinia: Fungiidae) around Pari Island (Java Sea) during a period of excessive seawater warming in 1983. The interspecific variation in the proportions of affected individuals was signi

  17. Trace metal partitioning over a tidal cycle in an estuary affected by acid mine drainage (Tinto estuary, SW Spain)

    Hierro, A. [Department of Physics, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Department of Applied Physics, Facultad de Ciencias Experimentales, University of Huelva, Campus de El Carmen, Campus de Excelencia Internacional del Mar CEIMAR, 21071 Huelva (Spain); Olías, M., E-mail: manuel.olias@dgyp.uhu.es [Department of Geodynamics and Paleontology, Facultad de Ciencias Experimentales, University of Huelva, Campus de El Carmen, Campus de Excelencia Internacional del Mar CEIMAR, 21071 Huelva (Spain); Cánovas, C.R. [Department of Geodynamics and Paleontology, Facultad de Ciencias Experimentales, University of Huelva, Campus de El Carmen, Campus de Excelencia Internacional del Mar CEIMAR, 21071 Huelva (Spain); Martín, J.E.; Bolivar, J.P. [Department of Applied Physics, Facultad de Ciencias Experimentales, University of Huelva, Campus de El Carmen, Campus de Excelencia Internacional del Mar CEIMAR, 21071 Huelva (Spain)

    2014-11-01

    The Tinto River estuary is highly polluted with the acid lixiviates from old sulphide mines. In this work the behaviour of dissolved and particulate trace metals under strong chemical gradients during a tidal cycle is studied. The pH values range from 4.4 with low tide to 6.9 with high tide. Precipitation of Fe and Al is intense during rising tides and As and Pb are almost exclusively found in the particulate matter (PM). Sorption processes are very important in controlling the mobility (and hence bioavailability) of some metals and particularly affect Cu below pH 6. Above pH ∼ 6 Cu is desorbed, probably by the formation of Cu(I)–chloride complexes. Although less pronounced than Cu, also Zn desorption above pH 6.5 seems to occur. Mn and Co are affected by sorption processes at pH higher than ca. 6. Cd behaves conservatively and Ni is slightly affected by sorption processes. - Highlights: • The Tinto estuary shows strong pH gradients and high trace elements concentrations. • PM has a hysteretic relationship with tides and high contents of Fe, Al, As and Pb. • Co and Mn are controlled by river and sea water mixing and sorption processes. • Sorption processes strongly affect Cu below pH 6, above this value Cu is desorpted. • Cadmium behaves conservatively along the pH range studied (4.4–6.9)

  18. Trace metal partitioning over a tidal cycle in an estuary affected by acid mine drainage (Tinto estuary, SW Spain)

    The Tinto River estuary is highly polluted with the acid lixiviates from old sulphide mines. In this work the behaviour of dissolved and particulate trace metals under strong chemical gradients during a tidal cycle is studied. The pH values range from 4.4 with low tide to 6.9 with high tide. Precipitation of Fe and Al is intense during rising tides and As and Pb are almost exclusively found in the particulate matter (PM). Sorption processes are very important in controlling the mobility (and hence bioavailability) of some metals and particularly affect Cu below pH 6. Above pH ∼ 6 Cu is desorbed, probably by the formation of Cu(I)–chloride complexes. Although less pronounced than Cu, also Zn desorption above pH 6.5 seems to occur. Mn and Co are affected by sorption processes at pH higher than ca. 6. Cd behaves conservatively and Ni is slightly affected by sorption processes. - Highlights: • The Tinto estuary shows strong pH gradients and high trace elements concentrations. • PM has a hysteretic relationship with tides and high contents of Fe, Al, As and Pb. • Co and Mn are controlled by river and sea water mixing and sorption processes. • Sorption processes strongly affect Cu below pH 6, above this value Cu is desorpted. • Cadmium behaves conservatively along the pH range studied (4.4–6.9)

  19. Taxonomic, Spatial and Temporal Patterns of Bleaching in Anemones Inhabited by Anemonefishes

    Hobbs, Jean-Paul A.; Frisch, Ashley J.; Ford, Benjamin M.; Thums, Michele; Saenz-Agudelo, Pablo; Furby, Kathryn A.; Berumen, Michael L.

    2013-01-01

    Background Rising sea temperatures are causing significant destruction to coral reef ecosystems due to coral mortality from thermally-induced bleaching (loss of symbiotic algae and/or their photosynthetic pigments). Although bleaching has been intensively studied in corals, little is known about the causes and consequences of bleaching in other tropical symbiotic organisms. Methodology/Principal Findings This study used underwater visual surveys to investigate bleaching in the 10 species of a...

  20. Taxonomic, Spatial and Temporal Patterns of Bleaching in Anemones Inhabited by Anemonefishes

    Hobbs, Jean-Paul A; Ashley J Frisch; Ford, Benjamin M.; Michele Thums; Pablo Saenz-Agudelo; Kathryn A Furby; Berumen, Michael L.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Rising sea temperatures are causing significant destruction to coral reef ecosystems due to coral mortality from thermally-induced bleaching (loss of symbiotic algae and/or their photosynthetic pigments). Although bleaching has been intensively studied in corals, little is known about the causes and consequences of bleaching in other tropical symbiotic organisms. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: This study used underwater visual surveys to investigate bleaching in the 10 species of...

  1. Coral bleaching, rise in sea temperature, and the population of Acanthaster planci in Okinawa

    Arakaki, Yuji; Yamazato, Kiyoshi; 新垣, 裕治; 山里, 清; 名桜大学・国際・観光

    2001-01-01

    Large scale coral bleaching in Japanese waters, extending from the Ryukyus to southern Kyushyu, occurred in 1998 owing to high seawater temperature. In this study, the authors show population fluctuations of Acanthaster planci before and after this bleaching event, and try to explain the reason for these fluctuations in relation to this event. A. planci, a strong coral predator, prefers to prey on acroporid corals. These corals are easily bleached, and most of them died from the bleaching dur...

  2. Influence of bleaching and desensitizing gel on bond strength of orthodontic brackets

    Fernanda Alves Rodrigues Britto; Adriana Simoni Lucato; Heloisa Cristina Valdrighi; Sílvia Amélia Scudeler Vedovello

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to assess, in vitro, the influence of bleaching gel and the use of desensitizing agent over bond strength of ceramic brackets bonded to bovine enamel. METHODS: One hundred bovine incisors were selected and randomly divided into five groups (n = 20): Group 1, control group (without bleaching); Group 2, bleached with 35% hydrogen peroxide; Group 3, bleached with 35% hydrogen peroxide (three applications, 15 minutes each) and desensitizing agent applied...

  3. Bleaching absorption fronts and beam propagation in laser-heated solenoids

    It is shown that the propagation velocity of bleaching laser-driven heating waves in the supersonic mode is governed by the requirement that the bleached plasma maintains an optical thickness of unity. It is proposed that in the case where the bleached plasma is confined by very large magnetic fields, the diameter of the plasma column may self-regulate so that the bleaching wave propagates at the Alfven velocity

  4. Modified Technique for Nonvital Tooth Bleaching: A Case Report

    Abdelkader, Naglaa Nabil

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to report a case of a nonvital, discolored, maxillary central incisor bleached by 35% hydrogen peroxide gel with the use of glass ionomer cement as a mechanical barrier in an attempt to minimize the undesirable side effects of intracoronal bleaching. The patient was a 13-year-old boy complaining of a discolored nonvital upper-right central incisor and was selected for this study from the pedodontic clinic in the Shibin Elkom teaching hospital in June 2013. After succe...

  5. Optical dating: bleaching experiment on IRSL signals from loess samples

    A kind of red LEDs (Light emitting Diode) with a wavelength of 655 nm provides light illumination of loess samples while pretreatment the samples with minimal effect on the latent IRSL. The IRSL signal is decreased to two percent after 20 minutes bleaching by sun light. It implies that the residual signals may be neglected even when dating very young loess samples, and that IRSL dating has significant potential in dating very poorly-bleached sediments. The recuperation of IRSL in loess is negligible, so the measurable age limit for IRSL is much lower than that for GLSL (Gree Light Stimulate Luminescence)

  6. Climatological context for large-scale coral bleaching

    Barton, A. D.; Casey, K. S.

    2005-12-01

    Large-scale coral bleaching was first observed in 1979 and has occurred throughout virtually all of the tropics since that time. Severe bleaching may result in the loss of live coral and in a decline of the integrity of the impacted coral reef ecosystem. Despite the extensive scientific research and increased public awareness of coral bleaching, uncertainties remain about the past and future of large-scale coral bleaching. In order to reduce these uncertainties and place large-scale coral bleaching in the longer-term climatological context, specific criteria and methods for using historical sea surface temperature (SST) data to examine coral bleaching-related thermal conditions are proposed by analyzing three, 132 year SST reconstructions: ERSST, HadISST1, and GISST2.3b. These methodologies are applied to case studies at Discovery Bay, Jamaica (77.27°W, 18.45°N), Sombrero Reef, Florida, USA (81.11°W, 24.63°N), Academy Bay, Galápagos, Ecuador (90.31°W, 0.74°S), Pearl and Hermes Reef, Northwest Hawaiian Islands, USA (175.83°W, 27.83°N), Midway Island, Northwest Hawaiian Islands, USA (177.37°W, 28.25°N), Davies Reef, Australia (147.68°E, 18.83°S), and North Male Atoll, Maldives (73.35°E, 4.70°N). The results of this study show that (1) The historical SST data provide a useful long-term record of thermal conditions in reef ecosystems, giving important insight into the thermal history of coral reefs and (2) While coral bleaching and anomalously warm SSTs have occurred over much of the world in recent decades, case studies in the Caribbean, Northwest Hawaiian Islands, and parts of other regions such as the Great Barrier Reef exhibited SST conditions and cumulative thermal stress prior to 1979 that were comparable to those conditions observed during the strong, frequent coral bleaching events since 1979. This climatological context and knowledge of past environmental conditions in reef ecosystems may foster a better understanding of how coral reefs will

  7. Disease outbreaks, bleaching and a cyclone drive changes in coral assemblages on an inshore reef of the Great Barrier Reef

    Haapkylä, J.; Melbourne-Thomas, J.; Flavell, M.; Willis, B. L.

    2013-09-01

    Coral disease is a major threat to the resilience of coral reefs; thus, understanding linkages between disease outbreaks and disturbances predicted to increase with climate change is becoming increasingly important. Coral disease surveys conducted twice yearly between 2008 and 2011 at a turbid inshore reef in the central Great Barrier Reef spanned two disturbance events, a coral bleaching event in 2009 and a severe cyclone (cyclone `Yasi') in 2011. Surveys of coral cover, community structure and disease prevalence throughout this 4-yr study provide a unique opportunity to explore cumulative impacts of disturbance events and disease for inshore coral assemblages. The principal coral disease at the study site was atramentous necrosis (AtN), and it primarily affected the key inshore, reef-building coral Montipora aequituberculata. Other diseases detected were growth anomalies, white syndrome and brown band syndrome. Diseases affected eight coral genera, although Montipora was, by far, the genus mostly affected. The prevalence of AtN followed a clear seasonal pattern, with disease outbreaks occurring only in wet seasons. Mean prevalence of AtN on Montipora spp. (63.8 % ± 3.03) was three- to tenfold greater in the wet season of 2009, which coincided with the 2009 bleaching event, than in other years. Persistent wet season outbreaks of AtN combined with the impacts of bleaching and cyclone events resulted in a 50-80 % proportional decline in total coral cover. The greatest losses of branching and tabular acroporids occurred following the low-salinity-induced bleaching event of 2009, and the greatest losses of laminar montiporids occurred following AtN outbreaks in 2009 and in 2011 following cyclone Yasi. The shift to a less diverse coral assemblage and the concomitant loss of structural complexity are likely to have long-term consequences for associated vertebrate and invertebrate communities on Magnetic Island reefs.

  8. Calcium affecting protein expression in longan under simulated acid rain stress.

    Pan, Tengfei; Li, Yongyu; Ma, Cuilan; Qiu, Dongliang

    2015-08-01

    Longan (Dimocarpus longana Lour. cv. Wulongling) of uniform one-aged seedlings grown in pots were selected to study specific proteins expressed in leaves under simulated acid rain (SiAR) stress and exogenous Ca(2+) regulation. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) results showed that there was a protein band specifically expressed under SiAR of pH 2.5 stress for 15 days with its molecular weight of about 23 kD. A 17 kD protein band specifically expressed after SiAR stress 5 days. Compared with pH 2.5, the pH 3.5 of SiAR made a less influence to protein expression. Two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) results showed that six new specific proteins including C4 (20.2 kD pI 6.0), F (24 kD pI 6.35), B3 (22.3 kD pI 6.35), B4 (23.5 kD pI 6.5), C5 (21.8 kD pI 5.6), and C6 (20.2 kD pI 5.6) specifically expressed. C4 always expressed during SiAR stress. F expressed under the stress of pH 2.5 for 15 days and expressed in all pH SiAR stress for 20 days. The expression of proteins including B3, C5, and C6 was related to pH value and stress intensity of SiAR. The expression of B4 resulted from synergistic effects of SiAR and Ca. The expression of G1 (Mr 19.3 kD, pI 4.5), G2 (Mr 17.8 kD, pI 4.65), G3 (Mr 16.6 kD, pI 4.6), and G4 (Mr 14.7 kD, pI 4.4) enhanced under the treatment of 5 mM ethylene glycol tetraacetic acid (EGTA) and 2 mM chlorpromazine (CPZ). These proteins showed antagonistic effects and might be relative to the Ca-calmodulin (Ca-CaM) system of longan in response to SiAR stress. PMID:25893616

  9. Hexachlorobenzene dechlorination as affected by nitrogen application in acidic paddy soil

    Batch incubation experiments were conducted to study the effects of different nitrogen (N) fertilizers (NH4HCO3, CO(NH2)2, and NaNO3) on hexachlorobenzene (HCB) dechlorination in an acidic paddy soil. Results showed that NH4HCO3 and CO(NH2)2 had similar effects on HCB dechlorination, and their application amount was a crucial factor on reductive dechlorination. The addition of a proper amount of 0.14 g NH4HCO3- or CO(NH2)2-N to 500 g soil promoted HCB dechlorination, however, the application of a high amount (0.84 g) of NH4HCO3- or CO(NH2)2-N inhibited HCB dechlorination. Additional NaNO3 served as an electron acceptor and led to lower soil pH, thus inhibited HCB dechlorination. Detected dechlorinated products showed that the dominant pathway of HCB dechlorination was HCB → pentachlorobenzene (PeCB) → 1,2,3,5-tetrachlorobenzene (TeCB) → 1,3,5-trichlorobenzene (TCB), and PeCB was the main metabolite. The role of methanogenic bacteria in HCB dechlorination was uncertain and conditions-dependent.

  10. Dietary polyunsaturated fatty acids from flaxseed affect immune responses of dairy sheep around parturition.

    Caroprese, Mariangela; Ciliberti, Maria Giovanna; Albenzio, Marzia; Annicchiarico, Giovanni; Sevi, Agostino

    2015-11-15

    The objective of the study was to characterize the immune profile of dairy ewes fed flaxseed, rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), around parturition. The hypothesis to be verified was that a physiological stressor, such as parturition, could be overcome with a nutritional manipulation in the diet of the animal in order to guarantee welfare of animals and to sustain their immune responses. Twenty Comisana ewes were divided in two groups (10 ewes/group), and fed a supplementation of whole flaxseed in the diet (FS group) or no supplementation (CON group). Blood samples were collected at parturition and then 7, 14, 21, 28, and 42 day post partum. Plasma samples were used to assess the humoral immune response after ovalbumin (OVA) immunization. At parturition, at 14 day, and 42 day post partum the level of plasma cytokines was assessed. The sheep showed a reduced responsiveness to OVA immunization. In FS ewes the IL-6 level remained unchanged until 14 day post partum and then significantly decreased from 14 day to 42 day post partum. IL-10 level was significantly higher in FS ewes than in CON ewes at 14 day. At parturition IL-1β level was significantly lower in FS ewes than in CON ewes and significantly decreased in both groups from parturition to 42 day. In conclusion, PUFA from flaxseed, as supplement in the diet of ewes around parturition can modulate sheep immune reactivity by influencing cytokine production. PMID:26347035

  11. Aminocarnitine and acylaminocarnitines: Carnitine acyltransferase inhibitors affecting long-chain fatty acid and glucose metabolism

    Clark, D.J.

    1989-01-01

    DL-Aminocarnitine (DL-3-amino-4-trimethylaminobutyrate) and the acylaminocarnitines acetyl-, decanoyl- and palmitoyl-DL-aminocarnitine have been synthesized and tested as inhibitors of carnitine palmitoyl-transferase and carnitine acetyltransferase in vitro and in vivo. Acetyl-DL-aaminocarnitine is the most potent reversible inhibitor of carnitine acetyltransferase reported to date, and is competitive with respect to acetyl-L-carnitine. Mice given acetyl-DL-aminocarnitine metabolize (U-{sup 14}C)acetyl-L-carnitine at about 60% of the rate of control mice. Palmitoyl-DL-aminocarnitine is the most potent reversible inhibitor of carnitine palmitoyltransferase reported to date. Decanoyl-DL-aminocarnitine and DL-aminocarnitine are also very potent inhibitors; all compounds inhibit the catabolism of ({sup 14}C)palmitate to {sup 14}CO{sub 2} in intact mice by at least 50%. Carnitine palmitoyltransferase controls the entry of long-chain fatty acids into the mitochondrial matrix for {beta}-oxidation. The inhibition of carnitine palmitoyltransferase by aminocarnitine or acylaminocarnitines in vivo prevents or reverses ketogenesis in fasted mice, and causes the reversible accumulation of triglycerides in liver, kidney and plasma. Administration of DL-aminocarnitine to streptozotocindiabetic mice lowers plasma glucose levels and improves the glucose tolerance test.

  12. Aminocarnitine and acylaminocarnitines: Carnitine acyltransferase inhibitors affecting long-chain fatty acid and glucose metabolism

    DL-Aminocarnitine (DL-3-amino-4-trimethylaminobutyrate) and the acylaminocarnitines acetyl-, decanoyl- and palmitoyl-DL-aminocarnitine have been synthesized and tested as inhibitors of carnitine palmitoyl-transferase and carnitine acetyltransferase in vitro and in vivo. Acetyl-DL-aaminocarnitine is the most potent reversible inhibitor of carnitine acetyltransferase reported to date, and is competitive with respect to acetyl-L-carnitine. Mice given acetyl-DL-aminocarnitine metabolize [U-14C]acetyl-L-carnitine at about 60% of the rate of control mice. Palmitoyl-DL-aminocarnitine is the most potent reversible inhibitor of carnitine palmitoyltransferase reported to date. Decanoyl-DL-aminocarnitine and DL-aminocarnitine are also very potent inhibitors; all compounds inhibit the catabolism of [14C]palmitate to 14CO2 in intact mice by at least 50%. Carnitine palmitoyltransferase controls the entry of long-chain fatty acids into the mitochondrial matrix for β-oxidation. The inhibition of carnitine palmitoyltransferase by aminocarnitine or acylaminocarnitines in vivo prevents or reverses ketogenesis in fasted mice, and causes the reversible accumulation of triglycerides in liver, kidney and plasma. Administration of DL-aminocarnitine to streptozotocindiabetic mice lowers plasma glucose levels and improves the glucose tolerance test

  13. Potentiation of gamma aminobutyric acid receptors (GABAAR by Ethanol: How are inhibitory receptors affected?

    Benjamin eFörstera

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In recent years there has been an increase in the understanding of ethanol actions on the type A -aminobutyric acid chloride channel (GABAAR, a member of the pentameric ligand gated ion channels (pLGICs. However, the mechanism by which ethanol potentiates the complex is still not fully understood and a number of publications have shown contradictory results. Thus many questions still remain unresolved requiring further studies for a better comprehension of this effect. The present review concentrates on the involvement of GABAAR in the acute actions of ethanol and specifically focuses on the immediate, direct or indirect, synaptic and extra-synaptic modulatory effects. To elaborate on the immediate, direct modulation of GABAAR by acute ethanol exposure, electrophysiological studies investigating the importance of different subunits, and data from receptor mutants will be examined. We will also discuss the nature of the putative binding sites for ethanol based on structural data obtained from other members of the pLGICs family. Finally, we will briefly highlight the glycine gated chloride channel (GlyR, another member of the pLGIC family, as a suitable target for the development of new pharmacological tools.

  14. Marine Toxin Okadaic Acid Affects the Immune Function of Bay Scallop (Argopecten irradians).

    Chi, Cheng; Giri, Sib Sankar; Jun, Jin Woo; Kim, Hyoun Joong; Yun, Saekil; Kim, Sang Guen; Park, Se Chang

    2016-01-01

    Okadaic acid (OA) is produced by dinoflagellates during harmful algal blooms and is a diarrhetic shellfish poisoning toxin. This toxin is particularly problematic for bivalves that are cultured for human consumption. This study aimed to reveal the effects of exposure to OA on the immune responses of bay scallop, Argopecten irradians. Various immunological parameters were assessed (total hemocyte counts (THC), reactive oxygen species (ROS), malondialdehyde (MDA), glutathione (GSH), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), and nitric oxide (NO) in the hemolymph of scallops at 3, 6, 12, 24, and 48 h post-exposure (hpe) to different concentrations of OA (50, 100, and 500 nM). Moreover, the expression of immune-system-related genes (CLT-6, FREP, HSP90, MT, and Cu/ZnSOD) was also measured. Results showed that ROS, MDA, and NO levels and LDH activity were enhanced after exposure to different concentrations of OA; however, both THC and GSH decreased between 24-48 hpe. The expression of immune-system-related genes was also assessed at different time points during the exposure period. Overall, our results suggest that exposure to OA had negative effects on immune system function, increased oxygenic stress, and disrupted metabolism of bay scallops. PMID:27563864

  15. Lactic acid bacteria affect serum cholesterol levels, harmful fecal enzyme activity, and fecal water content

    Chung Myung

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lactic acid bacteria (LAB are beneficial probiotic organisms that contribute to improved nutrition, microbial balance, and immuno-enhancement of the intestinal tract, as well as lower cholesterol. Although present in many foods, most trials have been in spreads or dairy products. Here we tested whether Bifidobacteria isolates could lower cholesterol, inhibit harmful enzyme activities, and control fecal water content. Methods In vitro culture experiments were performed to evaluate the ability of Bifidobacterium spp. isolated from healthy Koreans (20~30 years old to reduce cholesterol-levels in MRS broth containing polyoxyethanylcholesterol sebacate. Animal experiments were performed to investigate the effects on lowering cholesterol, inhibiting harmful enzyme activities, and controlling fecal water content. For animal studies, 0.2 ml of the selected strain cultures (108~109 CFU/ml were orally administered to SD rats (fed a high-cholesterol diet every day for 2 weeks. Results B. longum SPM1207 reduced serum total cholesterol and LDL levels significantly (p B. longum SPM1207 also increased fecal LAB levels and fecal water content, and reduced body weight and harmful intestinal enzyme activities. Conclusion Daily consumption of B. longum SPM1207 can help in managing mild to moderate hypercholesterolemia, with potential to improve human health by helping to prevent colon cancer and constipation.

  16. Parameters affecting the analytical profile of fatty acids in the macroalgal genus Ulva.

    McCauley, Janice I; Meyer, Barbara J; Winberg, Pia C; Skropeta, Danielle

    2016-10-15

    The fatty acids (FA) of Ulva have potential to contribute to nutrition. However the large variability of FA profiles of Ulva species; thus the quality and quantity of FA in relation to nutrition is poorly defined. Herein we investigate the FA profile of 74 cultured Ulva samples crossing five culture regimes, six extraction regimes and four post-harvesting processes. This is compared alongside a comprehensive review of FA profiles of Ulva spp. With regard to the literature, Ulva is characterised by C16:0 (30.5±11.5%), C18:3 n-3 (14.5±6.3%), C18:4 n-3 (12.5±5.4%), C16:4 n-3 (8.9±4.8%) and C18:1 n-7 (10.1±4.0%). The investigated Ulva fell within the reported range of specific FA. High nutrient conditions showed the most desirable FA profile for health, along with the highest total FA content (56mgg(-1) dry weight equivalent) when extracted with an optimised protocol. PMID:27173571

  17. Chlorogenic acid differentially affects postprandial glucose and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide response in rats.

    Tunnicliffe, Jasmine M; Eller, Lindsay K; Reimer, Raylene A; Hittel, Dustin S; Shearer, Jane

    2011-10-01

    Regular coffee consumption significantly lowers the risk of type 2 diabetes (T2D). Coffee contains thousands of compounds; however, the specific component(s) responsible for this reduced risk is unknown. Chlorogenic acids (CGA) found in brewed coffee inhibit intestinal glucose uptake in vitro. The objective of this study was to elucidate the mechanisms by which CGA acts to mediate blood glucose response in vivo. Conscious, unrestrained, male Sprague-Dawley rats were chronically catheterized and gavage-fed a standardized meal (59% carbohydrate, 25% fat, 12% protein), administered with or without CGA (120 mg·kg(-1)), in a randomized crossover design separated by a 3-day washout period. Acetaminophen was co-administered to assess the effects of CGA on gastric emptying. The incretins glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide (GIP) were measured. GLP-1 response in the presence of glucose and CGA was further examined, using the human colon cell line NCI-H716. Total area under the curve (AUC) for blood glucose was significantly attenuated in rats fed CGA (p gastric emptying was not altered. Plasma GIP response was blunted in rats fed CGA, with a lower peak concentration and AUC up to 180 min postprandially (p alterations seen in GIP concentrations. Given the widespread consumption and availability of coffee, CGA may be a viable prevention tool for T2D. PMID:21977912

  18. Nitrogen Nutrition of Sugar Beet as Affected by Water Salinity, Proline Acid and Nitrogen Forms Using 15N Tracer Technique

    A pot experiment was conducted under green house condition using sugar beet as a test crop. Saline water (sea water) was applied at different levels. i.e. fresh water, 4 and 8 dSm-1. Labelled urea and ammonium sulphate (5% a.e.) were applied at rate of 120 kg N fed-1. Also; proline amino acid was sprayed at rate of 25, and 50 ppm. Basal recommended doses of P and K were applied. Crop leaves and tuber yield were severely affected by sea water salinity. These parameters were improved by adding proline acid. Effect of proline acid was significantly varied according to rate of addition, water salinity levels and N forms. In this respect, the improvement of leaves and tuber was more pronounced at rate of 50 ppm proline under 8 dSm-1 salinity when plants fertilized with ammonium sulfate. Another picture was drawn with urea, where the improvement was detected at rate of 25 ppm proline, under 4dSm-1 water salinity level. Nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium and sodium uptake by leaves and tuber of sugar beet plants were significantly improved by addition of 50 ppm proline under 4 and /or 8 dSm-1 salinity levels. Nitrogen uptake was higher in tuber and fertilization with urea than those of leaves and ammonium sulfate, respectively. Other nutrients were varied according to N forms and proline levels. Nitrogen use efficiency was enhanced by spraying proline, despite of addition rates, and negatively affected by increasing salinity levels. In this regard, no big significant difference was detected between urea and ammonium sulfat

  19. Failure analysis of a heat exchanger used of a wood pulp bleaching process

    This study involved an investigation of the failure of a heat exchanger used in the ozone destruction stage of a wood pulp bleaching process at a pulp plant. The following procedures were carried out to determine the causes of the failure: a chemical analysis of the component, atomic absorption spectroscopy, measurements of hardness and of corrosion-related mass loss, characterization by scanning electron microscopy, and chemical microanalysis by X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy. The corrosion damage of the heat exchanger was caused by chloric and sulfuric acid, which led to pitting, grooving and cracking, as well as generalized corrosion of the component (AISI 316L steel). Nitric acid caused minimal damage to the heat exchanger, with minor generalized corrosion and occasional pitting. White crystals rich in sulfur and chlorine were identified as the corrosive agents acting inside the heat exchanger. (author)

  20. Coral bleaching: one disturbance too many for near-shore reefs of the Great Barrier Reef

    Thompson, A. A.; Dolman, A. M.

    2010-09-01

    The dynamic nature of coral communities can make it difficult to judge whether a reef system is resilient to the current disturbance regime. To address this question of resilience for near-shore coral communities of the Great Barrier Reef (Australia) a data set consisting of 350 annual observations of benthic community change was compiled from existing monitoring data. These data spanned the period 1985-2007 and were derived from coral reefs within 20 km of the coast. During years without major disturbance events, cover increase of the Acroporidae was much faster than it was for other coral families; a median of 11% per annum compared to medians of less than 4% for other coral families. Conversely, Acroporidae were more severely affected by cyclones and bleaching events than most other families. A simulation model parameterised with these observations indicated that while recovery rates of hard corals were sufficient to compensate for impacts associated with cyclones and crown-of-thorns starfish, the advent of mass bleaching has lead to a significant change in the composition of the community and a rapid decline in hard coral cover. Furthermore, if bleaching events continue to occur with the same frequency and severity as in the recent past, the model predicts that the cover of Acroporidae will continue to decline. Although significant cover of live coral remains on near-shore reefs, and recovery is observed during inter-disturbance periods, it appears that this system will not be resilient to the recent disturbance regime over the long term. Conservation strategies for coral reefs should focus on both mitigating local factors that act synergistically to increase the susceptibility of Acroporidae to climate change while promoting initiatives that maximise the recovery potential from inevitable disturbances.

  1. A Single Amino Acid Substitution in the NS2A Protein of Japanese Encephalitis Virus Affects Virus Propagation In Vitro but Not In Vivo

    Takamatsu, Yuki; Morita, Kouichi; Hayasaka, Daisuke

    2015-01-01

    We identified a unique amino acid of NS2A113, phenylalanine, that affects the efficient propagation of two Japanese encephalitis virus strains, JaTH160 and JaOArS982, in neuroblastoma Neuro-2a cells but not in cell lines of extraneural origin. This amino acid did not affect viral loads in the brain or survival curves in mice. These findings suggest that virus propagation in vitro may not reflect the level of virus neuroinvasiveness in vivo.

  2. A high linoleic acid diet increases oxidative stress in vivo and affects nitric oxide metabolism in humans.

    Turpeinen, A M; Basu, S; Mutanen, M

    1998-09-01

    Evidence from in vitro studies shows that increased intake of polyunsaturated fatty acids leads to increased oxidative stress, which may be associated with endothelial damage. We measured the urinary levels of 8-iso-PGF2alpha and nitric oxide metabolites as well as plasma sICAM-1 levels from healthy subjects after strictly controlled diets rich in either linoleic acid (LA, C18:2 n-6) or oleic acid (OA, C18:1 n-9). Thirty-eight volunteers (20 women and 18 men, mean age 27 years) consumed a baseline diet rich in saturated fatty acids (SFA) for 4 weeks and were then switched to either a high LA diet (11.5 en%) or a high OA diet (18.0 en%) also for 4 weeks. During the LA and OA diets, nearly all food was provided for the whole day. A control group of 13 subjects consumed their habitual diet throughout the study. Urinary excretion of 8-iso-PGF2alpha was significantly increased after the LA diet (170 vs 241 ng/mmol creatinine, P=0.04), whereas the urinary concentration of nitric oxide metabolites decreased (4.2 vs 2.6 mg/mmol creatinine, P=0.03). No significant changes were seen in the OA group. Significant differences between the LA and control group were found for both 8-oxo-PGF2alpha (P=0.03) and NO (P=0.02), whereas the OA and LA groups did not differ with respect to any parameter. Also plasma sICAM-1 remained unchanged in both groups throughout the study. In conclusion, the high-LA diet increased oxidative stress and affected endothelial function in a way which may in the long-term predispose to endothelial dysfunction. PMID:9844997

  3. Plant phenolic acids affect the virulence of Pectobacterium aroidearum and P. carotovorum ssp. brasiliense via quorum sensing regulation.

    Joshi, Janak Raj; Burdman, Saul; Lipsky, Alexander; Yariv, Shaked; Yedidia, Iris

    2016-05-01

    Several studies have reported effects of the plant phenolic acids cinnamic acid (CA) and salicylic acid (SA) on the virulence of soft rot enterobacteria. However, the mechanisms involved in these processes are not yet fully understood. Here, we investigated whether CA and SA interfere with the quorum sensing (QS) system of two Pectobacterium species, P. aroidearum and P. carotovorum ssp. brasiliense, which are known to produce N-acyl-homoserine lactone (AHL) QS signals. Our results clearly indicate that both phenolic compounds affect the QS machinery of the two species, consequently altering the expression of bacterial virulence factors. Although, in control treatments, the expression of QS-related genes increased over time, the exposure of bacteria to non-lethal concentrations of CA or SA inhibited the expression of QS genes, including expI, expR, PC1_1442 (luxR transcriptional regulator) and luxS (a component of the AI-2 system). Other virulence genes known to be regulated by the QS system, such as pecS, pel, peh and yheO, were also down-regulated relative to the control. In agreement with the low levels of expression of expI and expR, CA and SA also reduced the level of the AHL signal. The effects of CA and SA on AHL signalling were confirmed in compensation assays, in which exogenous application of N-(β-ketocaproyl)-l-homoserine lactone (eAHL) led to the recovery of the reduction in virulence caused by the two phenolic acids. Collectively, the results of gene expression studies, bioluminescence assays, virulence assays and compensation assays with eAHL clearly support a mechanism by which CA and SA interfere with Pectobacterium virulence via the QS machinery. PMID:26177258

  4. Taxonomic, Spatial and Temporal Patterns of Bleaching in Anemones Inhabited by Anemonefishes

    Hobbs, Jean-Paul A.

    2013-08-08

    Background:Rising sea temperatures are causing significant destruction to coral reef ecosystems due to coral mortality from thermally-induced bleaching (loss of symbiotic algae and/or their photosynthetic pigments). Although bleaching has been intensively studied in corals, little is known about the causes and consequences of bleaching in other tropical symbiotic organisms.Methodology/Principal Findings:This study used underwater visual surveys to investigate bleaching in the 10 species of anemones that host anemonefishes. Bleaching was confirmed in seven anemone species (with anecdotal reports of bleaching in the other three species) at 10 of 19 survey locations spanning the Indo-Pacific and Red Sea, indicating that anemone bleaching is taxonomically and geographically widespread. In total, bleaching was observed in 490 of the 13,896 surveyed anemones (3.5%); however, this percentage was much higher (19-100%) during five major bleaching events that were associated with periods of elevated water temperatures and coral bleaching. There was considerable spatial variation in anemone bleaching during most of these events, suggesting that certain sites and deeper waters might act as refuges. Susceptibility to bleaching varied between species, and in some species, bleaching caused reductions in size and abundance.Conclusions/Significance:Anemones are long-lived with low natural mortality, which makes them particularly vulnerable to predicted increases in severity and frequency of bleaching events. Population viability will be severely compromised if anemones and their symbionts cannot acclimate or adapt to rising sea temperatures. Anemone bleaching also has negative effects to other species, particularly those that have an obligate relationship with anemones. These effects include reductions in abundance and reproductive output of anemonefishes. Therefore, the future of these iconic and commercially valuable coral reef fishes is inextricably linked to the ability of host

  5. Taxonomic, spatial and temporal patterns of bleaching in anemones inhabited by anemonefishes.

    Jean-Paul A Hobbs

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Rising sea temperatures are causing significant destruction to coral reef ecosystems due to coral mortality from thermally-induced bleaching (loss of symbiotic algae and/or their photosynthetic pigments. Although bleaching has been intensively studied in corals, little is known about the causes and consequences of bleaching in other tropical symbiotic organisms. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: This study used underwater visual surveys to investigate bleaching in the 10 species of anemones that host anemonefishes. Bleaching was confirmed in seven anemone species (with anecdotal reports of bleaching in the other three species at 10 of 19 survey locations spanning the Indo-Pacific and Red Sea, indicating that anemone bleaching is taxonomically and geographically widespread. In total, bleaching was observed in 490 of the 13,896 surveyed anemones (3.5%; however, this percentage was much higher (19-100% during five major bleaching events that were associated with periods of elevated water temperatures and coral bleaching. There was considerable spatial variation in anemone bleaching during most of these events, suggesting that certain sites and deeper waters might act as refuges. Susceptibility to bleaching varied between species, and in some species, bleaching caused reductions in size and abundance. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Anemones are long-lived with low natural mortality, which makes them particularly vulnerable to predicted increases in severity and frequency of bleaching events. Population viability will be severely compromised if anemones and their symbionts cannot acclimate or adapt to rising sea temperatures. Anemone bleaching also has negative effects to other species, particularly those that have an obligate relationship with anemones. These effects include reductions in abundance and reproductive output of anemonefishes. Therefore, the future of these iconic and commercially valuable coral reef fishes is inextricably linked

  6. Chlorine bleaches - A significant long term source of mercury pollution

    Siegel, S. M.; Eshleman, A.

    1975-01-01

    Products of industrial electrolysis of brine - NaOCl-based bleaches and NaOH - yielded 17 to 1290 ppb of Hg upon flameless atomic absorption analysis. Compared with current U.S. rejection value of 5 ppb for potable waters, the above levels seem sufficiently high to be a matter of environmental concern.

  7. Bleached and unbleached MFC nanobarriers: properties and hydrophobisation with hexamethyldisilazane

    Chinga-Carrasco, Gary, E-mail: gary.chinga.carrasco@pfi.no [Paper and Fibre Research Institute (PFI) (Norway); Kuznetsova, Nina; Garaeva, Milyausha [Kazan National Research Technological University (KNRTU) (Russian Federation); Leirset, Ingebjorg [Paper and Fibre Research Institute (PFI) (Norway); Galiullina, Guzaliya; Kostochko, Anatoly [Kazan National Research Technological University (KNRTU) (Russian Federation); Syverud, Kristin [Paper and Fibre Research Institute (PFI) (Norway)

    2012-12-15

    This study explores the production and surface modification of microfibrillated cellulose (MFC), based on unbleached and bleached Pinus radiata pulp fibres. Unbleached Pinus radiata pulp fibres tend to fibrillate easier by homogenisation without pre-treatment, compared to the corresponding bleached MFC. The resulting unbleached MFC films have higher barrier against oxygen, lower water wettability and higher tensile strength than the corresponding bleached MFC qualities. In addition, it is demonstrated that carboxymethylation can also be applied for production of highly fibrillated unbleached MFC. The nanofibril size distribution of the carboxymethylated MFC is narrow with diameters less than 20 nm, as quantified on high-resolution field-emission scanning electron microscopy images. The carboxymetylation had a larger fibrillation effect on the bleached pulp fibres than on the unbleached one. Importantly, the suitability of hexamethyldisilazane (HMDS) as a new alternative for rendering MFC films hydrophobic was demonstrated. The HMDS-modified films made of carboxymethylated MFC had oxygen permeability levels better than 0.06 mL mm m{sup -2} day{sup -1} atm{sup -1}, which is a good property for some packaging applications.

  8. Bleached and unbleached MFC nanobarriers: properties and hydrophobisation with hexamethyldisilazane

    This study explores the production and surface modification of microfibrillated cellulose (MFC), based on unbleached and bleached Pinus radiata pulp fibres. Unbleached Pinus radiata pulp fibres tend to fibrillate easier by homogenisation without pre-treatment, compared to the corresponding bleached MFC. The resulting unbleached MFC films have higher barrier against oxygen, lower water wettability and higher tensile strength than the corresponding bleached MFC qualities. In addition, it is demonstrated that carboxymethylation can also be applied for production of highly fibrillated unbleached MFC. The nanofibril size distribution of the carboxymethylated MFC is narrow with diameters less than 20 nm, as quantified on high-resolution field-emission scanning electron microscopy images. The carboxymetylation had a larger fibrillation effect on the bleached pulp fibres than on the unbleached one. Importantly, the suitability of hexamethyldisilazane (HMDS) as a new alternative for rendering MFC films hydrophobic was demonstrated. The HMDS-modified films made of carboxymethylated MFC had oxygen permeability levels better than 0.06 mL mm m−2 day−1 atm−1, which is a good property for some packaging applications.

  9. Bleaching in vital deciduous teeth – a clinical case

    José Carlos Pettorossi Imparato

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available There has been growing concern and search for esthetic beauty and harmony over the last few years. This concern does not form part ofadults’ lives only, but also of children’s. Among the substances used for bleaching dental structures, the most outstanding are those whoseactive principle is hydrogen peroxide-based . The present study reports a clinical case of a 4-year-old girl that suffered trauma of tooth 61 with consequent color alteration, but with no alteration in pulp vitality. The main complaint by the patient and her guardians concerned esthetics, therefore external dental bleaching was performed, using Opalescence Xtra® (Ultradent, in two sessions with an interval of one month between them. External in office bleaching was the treatment of choice, due to the tooth vitality, patient’s age and presence of only one darkened tooth. After the bleaching treatments an improvement in the darkening was observed, and both the child and her guardians were satisfied with the esthetic result.

  10. Gastric acid secretion in relation to personality, affect and coping ability in duodenal ulcer patients. A multivariate analysis. Hvidovre Ulcer Project Group

    Jess, P

    1994-01-01

    The role of personality, mood state (affect) and coping ability (ego strength) on basal and stimulated gastric acid secretion were assessed in 56 duodenal ulcer patients using the Minnesota, Multiphasic Personality Inventory. The patients had high scores on most MMPI scales, but basal acid output...

  11. Chlorophyll bleaching by UV-irradiation in vitro and in situ: Absorption and fluorescence studies

    Chlorophyll bleaching by UV-irradiation has been studied by absorbance and fluorescence spectroscopy in extracts containing mixtures of photosynthetic pigments, in acetone and n-hexane solutions, and in aqueous thylakoid suspensions. Chlorophyll undergoes destruction (bleaching) accompanied by fluorescent transient formation obeying first-order kinetics. The bleaching is governed by UV-photon energy input, as well as by different chlorophyll molecular organizations in solvents of different polarities (in vitro), and in thylakoids (in situ). UV-C-induced bleaching of chlorophylls in thylakoids is probably caused by different mechanisms compared to UV-A- and UV-B-induced bleaching

  12. Studies on optical bleaching of x-ray irradiated KCL by thermoluminescence

    The optical bleaching characteristics of F-centres in X-ray irradiated KCl crystals have been studied by using thermoluminescence (TL) as the tool. It is found that the bleaching of F-centres takes place in two stages, a rapid stage initially, followed by a slow second age agreeing with reports of earlier workers based on photoconductivity and optical absorption measurements. SUDY OF THE BLEACHING CHARACTERISTICS OF THE INDIVIDUAL TL peaks shows that the individual TL peaks also follow a two-stage bleaching process. There is no correlation between the two stages of F-bleaching with those of formation of F-centres. (author)

  13. Bahan pemutih gigi dengan sertifikat ADA/ISO (Tooth bleaching material with ADA/ISO certificate

    Asti Meizarini

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Bleaching of teeth for cosmetic reasons is a popular aspect of cosmetic dentistry because patients realize the aesthetical benefits of these products. The dentist as a clinician's practitioner must be knowledgeable of the products and their application techniques. Bleaching materials which are safe and effective are the ADA accepted or manufactured by those which have already haved ISO certificate. Dentist must have enough knowledge about in-office bleaching prescribed for home-use bleaching including their contra indication and side effects, to advise the patients and provide effective bleaching services.

  14. Tracking the Effect of Algal Mats on Coral Bleaching Using Remote Sensing

    El-Askary, H. M.; Johnson, S. H.; Idris, N.; Qurban, M. A. B.

    2014-12-01

    Benthic habitats rely on relatively stable environmental conditions for survival. The introduction of algal mats into an ecosystem can have a notable effect on the livelihood of organisms such as coral reefs by causing changes in the biogeochemistry of the surrounding water. Increasing levels of acidity and new competition for sunlight caused by congregations of cyanobacteria essentially starve coral reefs of natural resources. These changes are particularly prevalent in waters near quickly developing population centers, such as the ecologically diverse Arabian Gulf. While ground-truthing studies to determine the extensiveness of coral death proves useful on a microcosmic level, new ventures in remote sensing research allow scientists to utilize satellite data to track these changes on a broader scale. Satellite images acquired from Landsat 5, 1987, Landsat 7, 2000, and Landsat 8, 2013 along with higher resolution IKONOS data are digitally analyzed in order to create spectral libraries for relevant benthic types, which in turn can be used to perform supervised classifications and change detection analyses over a larger area. The supervised classifications performed over the three scenes show five significant marine-related classes, namely coral, mangroves, macro-algae, and seagrass, in different degrees of abundance, yet here we focus only on the algal mats impact on corals bleaching. The change detection analysis is introduced to study see the degree of algal mats impact on coral bleaching over the course of time with possible connection to the local meteorology and current climate scenarios.

  15. The decontamination of bleaching effluent by pilot-scale solar Fenton process.

    Wang, Zhaojiang; Chen, Kefu; Li, Jun; Mo, Lihuan

    2011-01-01

    A solar Fenton process was applied as post-treatment to selectively eliminate organic pollutants and toxicants in bleaching effluents of kraft pulp mills. Experiments were conducted to study the effect of system parameters (pH, initial concentration of H2O2, molar ratio of Fe2+/H2O2 and solar-UV irradiance) on the removals of chemical oxygen demand and colour. The results showed 92.8% of COD and 99.6% of colour were removed at pH 3.5, H2O2 30 mM/ L, Fe2+/H2O2 1:100, solar-UV irradiance 11070 mW/m2, reaction time 120 min. The first-order kinetic model was used to study the dependence of the reaction rate on solar-UV irradiance: a linear relationship was shown to exist between reaction rate constants and solar-UV irradiance. The results of gas chromatography mass spectrometry analysis showed that the toxicity of the bleaching effluents was mainly derived from the presence of mononuclear aromatics, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and organochlorides, which were all degraded into harmless organic acids under the attack of hydroxyl radicals generated from the solar Fenton reaction. PMID:21879547

  16. Surface discoloration of composite resins: Effects of staining and bleaching

    Claudio Poggio

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate surface discoloration of three microhybrid composite resins (Esthet·X HD, Clearfil AP-X, Gradia Direct and five nanohybrid composite resins (Ceram·X, GC Kalore, G-aenial, Grandio, GrandioSO, after staining and bleaching procedures. Materials and Methods: The composite resins were polymerized with a curing light (Celalux II, Voco, Cuxhaven, Germany into 160 silicon molds (6,4 mm in diameter and 2 mm in thickness to obtain identical specimens. Twenty samples for each composite resin were prepared. The specimens were polished using an automated polishing machine with the sequence of 600-, 800-, 1000-grit abrasive paper under water irrigation. The specimens were immersed in tea and distilled water: the specimens were dipped for 20 min, once a day (every 24 h, for 14 days into the drinks. The specimens were then bleached with carbamide peroxide at 17% (Perfect Bleach-Voco. The color of specimens was measured with a spectrophotometer according to the CIE LFNx01aFNx01bFNx01 system after light-polymerization of composite resin specimens, after 7 days, after 14 days, and after bleaching. The color difference h index (DE abFNx01 between each measurement was calculated. Statistical analysis was made using analysis of variance (ANOVA. Results: All specimens showed a significant increase in staining with a similar trend and no significant differences between microhybrid and nanohybrid composite resins. After whitening procedures, materials tested showed both significant and unsignificant differences of the h index. Conclusions: Microhybrid and nanohybrid composite resins had similar in vitro surface discoloration in tea. After bleaching, discoloration was removed from some composite resins tested.

  17. Monomer release from nanofilled and microhybrid dental composites after bleaching.

    Masumeh Hasani Tabatabaee

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to assess the effect of bleaching on elution of monomers from nanofilled and microhybrid composites.80 samples (5mm diameter and 3mm thickness of each composite were prepared. After curing, half of them were randomly polished. Each group was divided into 8 subgroups and immersed in water or 10%, 20% and 30% H2O2 for 3 or 8 hours. Eluted Bis-GMA (Bis-phenol A Glycidyl Dimethacrylate, TEGDMA (Triethyleneglycol Dimethacrylate, UDMA (Urethane Dimethacrylate and BisEMA (Bis-phenol A ethoxylate Dimethacrylate were quantified by high performance liquid chromatography and the results were analyzed by univariate ANOVA and t-test (P<0.05.Bleach significantly increased the overall release of monomers (P<0.001; TEGDMA was released more than Bis-GMA (P<0.001. Supreme released more TEGDMA compared to Z250 (P<0.001. Bleaching increased the release of this monomer (P<0.001. Increasing both the concentration of H2O2, and the immersion time, increased the release of TEGDMA (P<0.001. Polishing had no effect on release of this monomer (P=0.952. Supreme released more Bis-GMA than Z250 (P=0.000. The more concentrated H2O2 caused more elution of Bis-GMA (P= 0.003; while the effect of immersion time was not significant (P=0.824. Polishing increased the release of Bis-GMA (P=0.001. Neither the type of composite nor Bleaching had any effect on release of UDMA (P=0.972 and (P=0.811 respectively. Immersion duration increased the release of UDMA (P=0.002, as well as polishing (P=0.024.Bleaching increased the release of monomers. Nanofilled composites released more monomer than the microfilled.

  18. Tropical cyclone cooling combats region-wide coral bleaching.

    Carrigan, Adam D; Puotinen, Marji

    2014-05-01

    Coral bleaching has become more frequent and widespread as a result of rising sea surface temperature (SST). During a regional scale SST anomaly, reef exposure to thermal stress is patchy in part due to physical factors that reduce SST to provide thermal refuge. Tropical cyclones (TCs - hurricanes, typhoons) can induce temperature drops at spatial scales comparable to that of the SST anomaly itself. Such cyclone cooling can mitigate bleaching across broad areas when well-timed and appropriately located, yet the spatial and temporal prevalence of this phenomenon has not been quantified. Here, satellite SST and historical TC data are used to reconstruct cool wakes (n=46) across the Caribbean during two active TC seasons (2005 and 2010) where high thermal stress was widespread. Upon comparison of these datasets with thermal stress data from Coral Reef Watch and published accounts of bleaching, it is evident that TC cooling reduced thermal stress at a region-wide scale. The results show that during a mass bleaching event, TC cooling reduced thermal stress below critical levels to potentially mitigate bleaching at some reefs, and interrupted natural warming cycles to slow the build-up of thermal stress at others. Furthermore, reconstructed TC wave damage zones suggest that it was rare for more reef area to be damaged by waves than was cooled (only 12% of TCs). Extending the time series back to 1985 (n = 314), we estimate that for the recent period of enhanced TC activity (1995-2010), the annual probability that cooling and thermal stress co-occur is as high as 31% at some reefs. Quantifying such probabilities across the other tropical regions where both coral reefs and TCs exist is vital for improving our understanding of how reef exposure to rising SSTs may vary, and contributes to a basis for targeting reef conservation. PMID:24474700

  19. Can a bleaching toothpaste containing Blue Covarine demonstrate the same bleaching as conventional techniques? An in vitro, randomized and blinded study

    Andréa Abi Rached DANTAS

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare the efficacy of a bleaching toothpaste containing Blue Covarine vs. conventional tooth bleaching techniques using peroxides (both in-office and at-home. Material and Methods Samples were randomly distributed into five experimental groups (n=15: C - Control; BC – Bleaching toothpaste containing Blue Covarine; WBC – Bleaching toothpaste without Blue Covarine; HP35 - In-office bleaching using 35% hydrogen peroxide; and CP10 – At-home bleaching with 10% carbamide peroxide. The dental bleaching efficacy was determined by the color difference (ΔE, luminosity (ΔL, green-red axis (Δa, and blue-yellow axis (Δb. The CIELab coordinates were recorded with reflectance spectroscopy at different times: T0 - baseline, T1 – immediately after bleaching, T2 - 7 days, T3 - 14 days, and T4 - 21 days after the end of treatments. Data were analyzed by a repeated measures mixed ANOVA and post hoc Bonferroni test, with a significance level of 5%. Results No significant differences were found between the treatment groups C, BC, and WBC. The groups HP35 and CP10 showed significantly higher whitening efficacy than groups C, BC, and WBC. Conclusions There were no significant differences in the whitening efficacy between a Blue Covarine containing toothpaste, a standard whitening toothpaste, and a control. Neither of the whitening toothpastes tested were as effective as in-office or at-home bleaching treatments.

  20. Can a bleaching toothpaste containing Blue Covarine demonstrate the same bleaching as conventional techniques? An in vitro, randomized and blinded study

    DANTAS, Andréa Abi Rached; BORTOLATTO, Janaina Freitas; RONCOLATO, Ávery; MERCHAN, Hugo; FLOROS, Michael Christopher; KUGA, Milton Carlos; de OLIVEIRA, Osmir Batista

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare the efficacy of a bleaching toothpaste containing Blue Covarine vs. conventional tooth bleaching techniques using peroxides (both in-office and at-home). Material and Methods Samples were randomly distributed into five experimental groups (n=15): C - Control; BC – Bleaching toothpaste containing Blue Covarine; WBC – Bleaching toothpaste without Blue Covarine; HP35 - In-office bleaching using 35% hydrogen peroxide; and CP10 – At-home bleaching with 10% carbamide peroxide. The dental bleaching efficacy was determined by the color difference (ΔE), luminosity (ΔL), green-red axis (Δa), and blue-yellow axis (Δb). The CIELab coordinates were recorded with reflectance spectroscopy at different times: T0 - baseline, T1 – immediately after bleaching, T2 - 7 days, T3 - 14 days, and T4 - 21 days after the end of treatments. Data were analyzed by a repeated measures mixed ANOVA and post hoc Bonferroni test, with a significance level of 5%. Results No significant differences were found between the treatment groups C, BC, and WBC. The groups HP35 and CP10 showed significantly higher whitening efficacy than groups C, BC, and WBC. Conclusions There were no significant differences in the whitening efficacy between a Blue Covarine containing toothpaste, a standard whitening toothpaste, and a control. Neither of the whitening toothpastes tested were as effective as in-office or at-home bleaching treatments. PMID:26814462

  1. In-office bleaching effects on the pulp flow and tooth sensitivity – case series

    Andrés Felipe CARTAGENA

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF is a noninvasive method capable of evaluating variations in pulp blood flow (PBF and pulp vitality. This method has thus far not been used to assess changes in blood flow after in-office bleaching. The aim of this case series report was to measure changes in PBF by LDF in the upper central incisor of three patients submitted to in-office bleaching. The buccal surfaces of the upper arch were bleached with a single session of 35% hydrogen peroxide gel with three 15-min applications. The color was recorded using a value-oriented Vita shade guide before in-office bleaching and one week after the procedure. The tooth sensitivity (TS in a verbal scale was reported, and PBF was assessed by LDF before, immediately, and one week after the bleaching session. The lower arch was submitted to dental bleaching but not used for data assessment. A whitening degree of 3 to 4 shade guide units was detected. All participants experienced moderate to considerable TS after the procedure. The PBF readings reduced 20% to 40% immediately after bleaching. One week post-bleaching, TS and PBF were shown to be equal to baseline values. A reversible decrease of PBF was detected immediately after bleaching, which recovered to the baseline values or showed a slight increase sooner than one week post-bleaching. The LDF method allows detection of pulp blood changes in teeth submitted to in-office bleaching, but further studies are still required.

  2. Influence of thermoluminescence signal for debris flow surface materials by sunlight bleaching

    Thermoluminescence was utilized for measuring the thermoluminescence signals of the standard debris flow samples which were bleached by simulated sunlight and debris flow samples after real sunlight bleaching. The experiment results demonstrate that light bleaching phenomenon of the debris flow occurs when it experiences a period of exposure. The thermoluminescence signal of the samples weakens gradually with the increase of depth. The optical bleaching phenomenon is obvious. Within a certain depth, light bleaching phenomenon is enhanced with the increase of light intensity. The annealing depth of simulated sunlight bleaching experiment is about 1 mm, and the actual annealing depth of sunlight bleaching is about 6 mm. According to the equivalent dose variation with depth, the mud of natural debris flow can be divided into two stages. It has fundamental significance in the application of thermoluminescence dating techniques to divide the stages of debris flow sediments. (authors)

  3. Determination of burial dose in incompletely bleached fluvial samples using single grains of quartz

    We determine the burial dose in three known-age incompletely bleached fluvial samples using single grains of quartz. Estimation of burial dose in incompletely bleached samples requires that the characteristics of the well-bleached part of the distribution are known in order to distinguish between well-bleached and poorly bleached grains. It is especially important to investigate if the uncertainties assigned to individual estimates of dose adequately describe the observed variability in well-bleached dose distributions. We investigate this by quantifying the over-dispersion in laboratory-bleached and gamma-irradiated samples. We show that there is a linear relationship between the over-dispersion and the mean dose. Knowing this uncertainty relationship enables us to estimate the burial dose by comparing the predicted uncertainty on the running mean with that calculated from actual dispersion

  4. Susceptibility to Coffee Staining during Enamel Remineralization Following the In-Office Bleaching Technique

    Mori, Aline Akemi; Lima, Fernanda Ferruzzi; Benetti, Ana Raquel;

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: To assess in situ the enamel mineralization level and susceptibility to coffee staining after in-office bleaching. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Thirty-six human dental fragments assembled into intraoral devices were bleached with 35% hydrogen peroxide and treated as follows: (group 1) no contact...... with coffee; (group 2) immersion in a coffee solution for 30 minutes daily for 7 days, starting 1 week after bleaching; and (group 3) immersion in a coffee solution for 30 minutes daily for 14 days, starting immediately after bleaching. Enamel mineralization and color were assessed before bleaching (T1......), immediately after bleaching (T2), and after 7 (T3) and 14 days (T4). The CIE whiteness index (W*) and closeness to white (ΔW*) following bleaching and/or immersion in coffee were calculated. Data were analyzed with Friedman and Wilcoxon tests or Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U-tests (α = 0.05). RESULTS...

  5. Ingestion of branched-chain amino acids and tryptophan during sustained exercise in man: failure to affect performance

    Van Hall, Gerrit; Raaymakers, J S; Saris, W H;

    1995-01-01

    1. An increased uptake of tryptophan in the brain may increase serotoninergic activity and recently has been suggested to be a cause of fatigue during prolonged exercise. The present study, therefore, investigates whether ingestion of tryptophan or the competing branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs...... tryptophan ingestion caused a 7- to 20-fold increase. Exercise time to exhaustion was not different between treatments (122 +/- 3 min). 3. The data suggest that manipulation of tryptophan supply to the brain either has no additional effect upon serotoninergic activity during prolonged exhaustive exercise......) affect performance. Ten endurance-trained male athletes were studied during cycle exercise at 70-75% maximal power output, while ingesting, ad random and double-blind, drinks that contained 6% sucrose (control) or 6% sucrose supplemented with (1) tryptophan (3 g l-1), (2) a low dose of BCAA (6 g l-1...

  6. Interspecies and spatial diversity in the symbiotic zooxanthellae density in corals from northern South China Sea and its relationship to coral reef bleaching

    2008-01-01

    Coral reef bleaching is usually characterized by expulsion of symbiotic zooxanthellae, loss of zooxanthellae pigmentation, or both. We collected 128 samples comprising 39 species of 21 genera of reef-building corals from Luhuitou and Xiaodonghai in Sanya of Hainan Island and Daya Bay of Guangdong Province, respectively, and analyzed the symbiotic zooxanthellae population density. The results show that: (1) the symbiotic zooxanthella density varies from 0.67×106 to 8.48×106 cell/cr2, displaying significant interspecies variability, with branch corals usually having relatively less zooxanthellae (ranging from 0.67×106 to 2.47×106 cell/cm2) than massive species (from 1.0×106 to 8.48×106 cell/cm2); (2) corals inhabiting within 4 m water depth have higher levels of symbiotic zooxanthellae than those living at the bottom (~7 m depth) of the reef area; (3) there is no discernable difference in the zooxanthellae density between corals from relatively high latitude Daya Bay (~22°N)and those from relatively Iow latitude Sanya (~18°N) at comparable sea surface temperatures (SST); (4)in partially-bleached corals, the density of zooxanthellae shows the following order: healthy-looking part> semi-bleached part > bleached part. Based on the above results, we suggest that (1) the zooxanthellae density difference between branching and massive coral species is the main cause that branching corals are more vulnerable to bleaching than massive corals. For example, symbiotic zooxanthellae levels are low in branching Acropora and Pocillopora corals and thus these corals are more susceptible to bleaching and mortality; (2) symbiotic zooxanthellae density can also be affected by environmental conditions, such as sediment loads, diving-related turbidity, and aquaculture-related nitrate and phosphate input, and their increase may reduce symbiotic zooxanthellae density in corals.

  7. Behaviour of U-Series Radionuclides in an Estuary Affected by Acid Mine Drainage and Industrial Releases

    The estuary formed by the Tinto and Odiel rivers is an ecosystem of great interest because it is seriously affected by the acid mine drainage (AMD) produced by the high mining activity in the watersheds of these rivers, generating in their waters an extremely low pH (2.5- 3.5), and consequently high concentrations of heavy metals and natural radionuclides in dissolution. Secondly, in their estuary there is a large chemical industrial complex, and in particular two phosphoric acid production plants, which use a sedimentary phosphate rock from Morocco as raw material containing at approximately 1.5 Bq/g of U-series radionuclides, which produce annually about 2.5-3 millions of tonnes of a byproduct, called phosphogypsum (PG). PG contains high concentrations of some U-series radionuclides as 226Ra (650 Bq/kg), 210Pb-210Po (600 Bq/kg) or 230Th (450 Bq/kg). Seventeen sampling stations along the end of these rivers and this estuary were selected to study the behaviour of U-series radionuclides in the recent surface sediments and its waters. The most relevant results show a non-conservative behaviour of Uisotopes, precipitating in the zone where large pH changes (3-5) are produced. This behaviour is different from the majority of typical estuaries where only salinity changes are produced, and therefore, a conservative behaviour of uranium is observed. (author)

  8. Exploring the biodegradation and toxicity of naphthenic acids present in Athabasca oil sands process affected waters using simulated wetlands

    Naphthenic acids (NAs) are a persistent group of dissolved organic acids found in oil sands process affected water (OSPW) from the Athabasca Oil Sands (AOS) in northern Alberta. This study investigated the feasibility of reducing the toxicity of OSPW in wetland environments, and proposed a strategy for reclamation at the AOS. Laboratory microcosms were used to mimic natural wetlands. The purpose was to determine if the toxicities of OSPWs generated by Syncrude Canada Ltd. (Syncrude) and Suncor Energy Inc. (Suncor) change with time as a result of aging and biodegradation. Experiments involved 2 types of OSPW obtained from Syncrude and Suncor. Nutrient availability (nitrogen and phosphorus enrichment) was increased for both short and long hydraulic retention times (40 and 400 days). The NAs found in the OSPW were tracked over the course of one year using Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy, Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry and Microtox bioassays. The objective was to determine the relationships between total NA concentrations, the degree to which different sub-groups of NAs are biodegraded and any potential reduction in OSPW toxicity

  9. Catalase and sodium fluoride mediated rehabilitation of enamel bleached with 37% hydrogen peroxide

    Ruchi Thakur

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Bleaching agents bring about a range of unwanted changes in the physical structure of enamel which needs to be restored qualitatively and timely. Catalase being an antioxidant ensures the effective removal of free radicals and improvement in fluoride mediated remineralization from the enamel microstructure which if retained may harm the integrity and affect the hardness of enamel. Materials and Methods: Thirty freshly extracted incisors were sectioned to 6 slabs which were divided into 5 groups: Group A, control; Group B, treatment with 37% hydrogen peroxide (HP; Group C, treatment with 37% HP and catalase, Group D, treatment with 37% HP and 5% sodium fluoride application, Group E, treatment with 37% HP followed by catalase and 5% sodium fluoride. Scanning electron microscope and microhardness analysis were done for all slabs. One-way ANOVA test was applied among different groups. Results: Vicker′s microhardness number (VHN of Group B and C was significantly lower. No significant difference between VHN of Group B and C. VHN of Group D was significantly higher than Group A, B, and C; but significantly lower than Group E. VHN of Group E was significantly higher than any other experimental group. One-way ANOVA revealed a highly significant P value (P = 0.0001 and so Tukey′s post-hoc Test for the group comparisons was employed. Conclusion: Subsequent treatment of bleached enamel with catalase and fluoride varnish separately results in repairing and significantly increasing the microhardness.

  10. Degradation and aquatic toxicity of naphthenic acids in oil sands process-affected waters using simulated wetlands.

    Toor, Navdeep S; Franz, Eric D; Fedorak, Phillip M; MacKinnon, Michael D; Liber, Karsten

    2013-01-01

    Oil sands process-affected waters (OSPWs) produced during the extraction of bitumen at the Athabasca Oil Sands (AOS) located in northeastern Alberta, Canada, are toxic to many aquatic organisms. Much of this toxicity is related to a group of dissolved organic acids known as naphthenic acids (NAs). Naphthenic acids are a natural component of bitumen and are released into process water during the separation of bitumen from the oil sand ore by a caustic hot water extraction process. Using laboratory microcosms as an analogue of a proposed constructed wetland reclamation strategy for OSPW, we evaluated the effectiveness of these microcosms in degrading NAs and reducing the aquatic toxicity of OSPW over a 52-week test period. Experimental manipulations included two sources of OSPW (one from Syncrude Canada Ltd. and one from Suncor Energy Inc.), two different hydraulic retention times (HRTs; 40 and 400 d), and increased nutrient availability (added nitrate and phosphate). Microcosms with a longer HRT (for both OSPWs) showed higher reductions in total NAs concentrations (64-74% NAs reduction, pacute rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) bioassay showed that the initial acute toxicity of Syncrude OSPW (LC50=67% v/v) was reduced (LC50>100% v/v) independent of HRT. However, EC20s from separate Microtox® bioassays were relatively unchanged when comparing the input and microcosm waters at both HRTs over the 52-week study period (p>0.05), indicating that some sub-lethal toxicity persisted under these experimental conditions. The present study demonstrated that given sufficiently long HRTs, simulated wetland microcosms containing OSPW significantly reduced total NAs concentrations and acute toxicity, but left behind a persistent component of the NAs mixture that appeared to be associated with residual chronic toxicity. PMID:23000048

  11. Exercise training of late-pregnant and nonpregnant dairy cows affects physical fitness and acid-base homeostasis.

    Davidson, J A; Beede, D K

    2009-02-01

    The objective was to determine if exercise training improves physical fitness of nonlactating, late-pregnant and nonpregnant multiparous Holstein cows and alters acid-base homeostasis during an exercise test on a treadmill. Twenty-six pairs (each pair having 1 late-pregnant and 1 nonpregnant) of cows were assigned to treatments of exercise training or no exercise. Exercise training was walking (1.25 to 1.5 h at 3.25 km/h) every other day in an outdoor mechanical walker for 70 d. Cows completed treadmill exercise tests on d 0, 30, and 60 of the experiment or about d 70, 40, and 10 before expected parturition of the pregnant cow of each pair. On d 0, physical fitness was similar among all cows based on durations of treadmill tests, heart rates, and acid-base measurements at given workloads (21.1 +/- 0.6 min; 144 +/- 2.2 beats per min; plasma lactate 3.1 +/- 1.9 mmol/L; and venous blood pH 7.44 +/- 0.0035, respectively). After 60 d of training, exercised cows walked longer during treadmill exercise tests compared with nonexercised cows (23.7 vs. 18.3 +/- 0.85 min, respectively), indicating greater physical fitness (pooled across pregnancy status). Heart rates and plasma lactate concentrations at given workloads were less (144 vs. 156 +/- 2.7 beats per min; and 1.4 vs. 3.2 +/- 0.24 mmol/L for exercised compared with nonexercised cows, respectively). Additionally, exercised cows more effectively maintained acid-base homeostasis during treadmill tests compared with nonexercised cows. Metabolic, endocrine, and nutritional demands associated with late pregnancy did not affect responses differently to exercise training for late-pregnant compared with nonpregnant cows. Overall, exercise training of late-pregnant and nonpregnant cows for 60 d improved physical fitness. PMID:19164665

  12. Naphthenic acids speciation and removal during petroleum-coke adsorption and ozonation of oil sands process-affected water.

    Gamal El-Din, Mohamed; Fu, Hongjing; Wang, Nan; Chelme-Ayala, Pamela; Pérez-Estrada, Leonidas; Drzewicz, Przemysław; Martin, Jonathan W; Zubot, Warren; Smith, Daniel W

    2011-11-01

    The Athabasca Oil Sands industry produces large volumes of oil sands process-affected water (OSPW) as a result of bitumen extraction and upgrading processes. Constituents of OSPW include chloride, naphthenic acids (NAs), aromatic hydrocarbons, and trace heavy metals, among other inorganic and organic compounds. To address the environmental issues associated with the recycling and/or safe return of OSPW into the environment, water treatment technologies are required. This study examined, for the first time, the impacts of pretreatment steps, including filtration and petroleum-coke adsorption, on ozonation requirements and performance. The effect of the initial OSPW pH on treatment performance, and the evolution of ozonation and its impact on OSPW toxicity and biodegradability were also examined. The degradation of more than 76% of total acid-extractable organics was achieved using a semi-batch ozonation system at a utilized ozone dose of 150 mg/L. With a utilized ozone dose of 100 mg/L, the treated OSPW became more biodegradable and showed no toxicity towards Vibrio fischeri. Changes in the NA profiles in terms of carbon number and number of rings were observed after ozonation. The filtration of the OSPW did not improve the ozonation performance. Petroleum-coke adsorption was found to be effective in reducing total acid-extractable organics by a 91%, NA content by an 84%, and OSPW toxicity from 4.3 to 1.1 toxicity units. The results of this study indicate that the combination of petroleum-coke adsorption and ozonation is a promising treatment approach to treat OSPW. PMID:21907388

  13. Lesions of nucleus accumbens affect morphine-induced release of ascorbic acid and GABA but not of glutamate in rats.

    Sun, Ji Y; Yang, Jing Y; Wang, Fang; Wang, Jian Y; Song, Wu; Su, Guang Y; Dong, Ying X; Wu, Chun F

    2011-10-01

    Our previous studies have shown that local perfusion of morphine causes an increase of extracellular ascorbic acid (AA) levels in nucleus accumbens (NAc) of freely moving rats. Lines of evidence showed that glutamatergic and GABAergic were associated with morphine-induced effects on the neurotransmission of the brain, especially on the release of AA. In the present study, the effects of morphine on the release of extracellular AA, γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and glutamate (Glu) in the NAc following bilateral NAc lesions induced by kainic acid (KA) were studied by using the microdialysis technique, coupled to high performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection (HPLC-ECD) and fluorescent detection (HPLC-FD). The results showed that local perfusion of morphine (100 µM, 1 mM) in NAc dose-dependently increased AA and GABA release, while attenuated Glu release in the NAc. Naloxone (0.4 mM) pretreated by local perfusion to the NAc, significantly blocked the effects of morphine. After NAc lesion by KA (1 µg), morphine-induced increase in AA and GABA were markedly eliminated, while decrease in Glu was not affected. The loss effect of morphine on AA and GABA release after KA lesion could be recovered by GABA agonist, musimol. These results indicate that morphine-induced AA release may be mediated at least by µ-opioid receptor. Moreover, this effect of morphine possibly depend less on the glutamatergic afferents, but more on the GABAergic circuits within this nucleus. Finally, AA release induced by local perfusion of morphine may be GABA-receptor mediated and synaptically localized in the NAc. PMID:20731632

  14. PRESENCE OF HARDWOOD CHIPS AND ITS IMPACT ON PULP STRENGTH PROPERTIES IN THE PRODUCTION OF BLEACHED SOFTWOOD KRAFT PULP

    Zhibin He

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The effect of hardwood admixture (15-25% birch or aspen in kraft cooking on the strength properties of the fully bleached pulp was investigated. Results obtained from both lab- and mill-processed ECF bleached pulps showed that adding 15-25% birch or aspen to the production of fully bleached softwood kraft pulp had a minor effect on the strength properties. No significant effect was observed for the hardwood admixture on the apparent density over a wide range of breaking length. Under the conditions studied, the results showed that pulping of mixed softwood/hardwood chips (chip blending resulted in overall better strength properties than the pulp blending at a given freeness. It was hypothesized that the softwood fibers would be cooked to a higher kappa number in the cooking of mixed softwood/hardwood chips for the same target kappa number, thus having higher fiber strength due to higher pulp viscosity and preservation of the hemicellulose. This was supported by the results from zero-span tensile strength of the long fiber fraction of the samples from chip blending and pulp blending. The implication is that some softwood kraft pulp mills can add up to 25% of hardwood chips to the kraft cooking of softwood chips without significantly affecting the overall pulp strength properties.

  15. Supplemental leucine and isoleucine affect expression of cationic amino acid transporters and myosin, serum concentration of amino acids, and growth performance of pigs.

    Cervantes-Ramírez, M; Mendez-Trujillo, V; Araiza-Piña, B A; Barrera-Silva, M A; González-Mendoza, D; Morales-Trejo, A

    2013-01-01

    Leucine (Leu) participates in the activity of cationic amino acid (aa) transporters. Also, branched-chain aa [Leu, isoleucine (Ile), and valine (Val)] share intestinal transporters for absorption. We conducted an experiment with 16 young pigs (body weight of about 16 kg) to determine whether Leu and Ile affect expression of aa transporters b(0,+) and CAT-1 in the jejunum and expression of myosin in muscle, as well as serum concentration of essential aa, and growth performance in pigs. Dietary treatments were: wheat-based diets fortified with Lys, Thr, and Met; basal diet plus 0.50% Leu; basal diet plus 0.50% Ile, and basal diet plus 0.50% Leu and 0.50% Ile. After 28 days, the pigs were sacrificed to collect blood, jejunum, and semitendinosus and longissimus muscle samples. The effects of single and combined addition of Leu and Ile were analyzed. Leu alone or combined with Ile significantly decreased daily weight gain and reduced feed conversion. Leu and Ile, alone or in combination, significantly decreased expression of b(0,+) and significantly increased CAT-1. Ile alone or combined with Leu significantly decreased myosin expression in semitendinosus and significantly decreased it in longissimus muscle. Leu alone significantly decreased Lys, Ile and Thr serum concentrations; Ile significantly decreased Thr serum concentration; combined Leu and Ile significantly decreased Thr and significantly increased Val serum concentration. We conclude that dietary levels of Leu and Ile affect growth performance, expression of aa transporters and myosin, and aa serum concentrations in pigs. PMID:23408397

  16. Comparing the Effect of Different Bleaching Regims of Carbamide Peroxide on Microhardness of Z250 Composite

    B Esmaeili

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Bleaching products with oxidizing mechanism can exert side effects on the restorative materials existing in the oral cavity. Since bleaching agents are applied in different concentrations, the present study aimed to compare the effect of different bleaching regims of carbamide peroxide on microhardness of Z250 microhybride composite. Methods: In this in vitro study , 32 specimens of micro hybride composite (Z250 were made which were randomly divided into 4 subgroups (n=8: G1: bleached with10% carbamide peroxide 4 hours a day for 2 weeks G2: bleached with 16%carbamide peroxide 3 hours a day for 2 weeks G3: bleached with 22%carbamide peroxide 1hour a day for 2 weeks G4: the control subgroup stored in distilled water at 37◦c for 2 weeks. Microhardness of specimens was measured before and after bleaching using Vickers hardness testing machine. Moreover, the study data were analyzed statistically applying Anova and t-test (&alpha= 0.05. Results: This study findings revealed that using bleaching agent significantly decreased the  microhardness of composite resin in the bleaching groups compared to the control group, though the concentration of carbamide peroxide produced no significant effect on the microhardness value. (p>0.13 Conclusion: Bleaching therapy can cause a reduction in microhardness of Z250 composite and different concentrations of carbamide peroxide can reduce microhardness of Z250 to the same value.

  17. Differential Response of Coral Assemblages to Thermal Stress Underscores the Complexity in Predicting Bleaching Susceptibility.

    Loke Ming Chou

    Full Text Available Coral bleaching events have been predicted to occur more frequently in the coming decades with global warming. The susceptibility of corals to bleaching during thermal stress episodes is dependent on many factors and an understanding of these underlying drivers is crucial for conservation management. In 2013, a mild bleaching episode ensued in response to elevated sea temperature on the sediment-burdened reefs in Singapore. Surveys of seven sites highlighted variable bleaching susceptibility among coral genera-Pachyseris and Podabacia were the most impacted (31% of colonies of both genera bleached. The most susceptible genera such as Acropora and Pocillopora, which were expected to bleach, did not. Susceptibility varied between less than 6% and more than 11% of the corals bleached, at four and three sites respectively. Analysis of four of the most bleached genera revealed that a statistical model that included a combination of the factors (genus, colony size and site provided a better explanation of the observed bleaching patterns than any single factor alone. This underscored the complexity in predicting the coral susceptibility to future thermal stress events and the importance of monitoring coral bleaching episodes to facilitate more effective management of coral reefs under climate change.

  18. Differential Response of Coral Assemblages to Thermal Stress Underscores the Complexity in Predicting Bleaching Susceptibility

    Toh, Kok Ben; Ng, Chin Soon Lionel; Cabaitan, Patrick; Tun, Karenne; Goh, Eugene; Afiq-Rosli, Lutfi; Taira, Daisuke; Du, Rosa Celia Poquita; Loke, Hai Xin; Khalis, Aizat; Li, Jinghan; Song, Tiancheng

    2016-01-01

    Coral bleaching events have been predicted to occur more frequently in the coming decades with global warming. The susceptibility of corals to bleaching during thermal stress episodes is dependent on many factors and an understanding of these underlying drivers is crucial for conservation management. In 2013, a mild bleaching episode ensued in response to elevated sea temperature on the sediment-burdened reefs in Singapore. Surveys of seven sites highlighted variable bleaching susceptibility among coral genera–Pachyseris and Podabacia were the most impacted (31% of colonies of both genera bleached). The most susceptible genera such as Acropora and Pocillopora, which were expected to bleach, did not. Susceptibility varied between less than 6% and more than 11% of the corals bleached, at four and three sites respectively. Analysis of four of the most bleached genera revealed that a statistical model that included a combination of the factors (genus, colony size and site) provided a better explanation of the observed bleaching patterns than any single factor alone. This underscored the complexity in predicting the coral susceptibility to future thermal stress events and the importance of monitoring coral bleaching episodes to facilitate more effective management of coral reefs under climate change. PMID:27438593

  19. Susceptibility of central Red Sea corals during a major bleaching event

    Furby, Kathryn A.

    2013-01-04

    A major coral bleaching event occurred in the central Red Sea near Thuwal, Saudi Arabia, in the summer of 2010, when the region experienced up to 10-11 degree heating weeks. We documented the susceptibility of various coral taxa to bleaching at eight reefs during the peak of this thermal stress. Oculinids and agaricids were most susceptible to bleaching, with up to 100 and 80 % of colonies of these families, respectively, bleaching at some reefs. In contrast, some families, such as mussids, pocilloporids, and pectinids showed low levels of bleaching (<20 % on average). We resurveyed the reefs 7 months later to estimate subsequent mortality. Mortality was highly variable among taxa, with some taxa showing evidence of full recovery and some (e. g., acroporids) apparently suffering nearly complete mortality. The unequal mortality among families resulted in significant change in community composition following the bleaching. Significant factors in the likelihood of coral bleaching during this event were depth of the reef and distance of the reef from shore. Shallow reefs and inshore reefs had a higher prevalence of bleaching. This bleaching event shows that Red Sea reefs are subject to the same increasing pressures that reefs face worldwide. This study provides a quantitative, genus-level assessment of the vulnerability of various coral groups from within the Red Sea to bleaching and estimates subsequent mortality. As such, it can provide valuable insights into the future for reef communities in the Red Sea. © 2013 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

  20. Differential Response of Coral Assemblages to Thermal Stress Underscores the Complexity in Predicting Bleaching Susceptibility.

    Chou, Loke Ming; Toh, Tai Chong; Toh, Kok Ben; Ng, Chin Soon Lionel; Cabaitan, Patrick; Tun, Karenne; Goh, Eugene; Afiq-Rosli, Lutfi; Taira, Daisuke; Du, Rosa Celia Poquita; Loke, Hai Xin; Khalis, Aizat; Li, Jinghan; Song, Tiancheng

    2016-01-01

    Coral bleaching events have been predicted to occur more frequently in the coming decades with global warming. The susceptibility of corals to bleaching during thermal stress episodes is dependent on many factors and an understanding of these underlying drivers is crucial for conservation management. In 2013, a mild bleaching episode ensued in response to elevated sea temperature on the sediment-burdened reefs in Singapore. Surveys of seven sites highlighted variable bleaching susceptibility among coral genera-Pachyseris and Podabacia were the most impacted (31% of colonies of both genera bleached). The most susceptible genera such as Acropora and Pocillopora, which were expected to bleach, did not. Susceptibility varied between less than 6% and more than 11% of the corals bleached, at four and three sites respectively. Analysis of four of the most bleached genera revealed that a statistical model that included a combination of the factors (genus, colony size and site) provided a better explanation of the observed bleaching patterns than any single factor alone. This underscored the complexity in predicting the coral susceptibility to future thermal stress events and the importance of monitoring coral bleaching episodes to facilitate more effective management of coral reefs under climate change. PMID:27438593

  1. Susceptibility of central Red Sea corals during a major bleaching event

    Furby, K. A.; Bouwmeester, J.; Berumen, M. L.

    2013-06-01

    A major coral bleaching event occurred in the central Red Sea near Thuwal, Saudi Arabia, in the summer of 2010, when the region experienced up to 10-11 degree heating weeks. We documented the susceptibility of various coral taxa to bleaching at eight reefs during the peak of this thermal stress. Oculinids and agaricids were most susceptible to bleaching, with up to 100 and 80 % of colonies of these families, respectively, bleaching at some reefs. In contrast, some families, such as mussids, pocilloporids, and pectinids showed low levels of bleaching (bleaching. Significant factors in the likelihood of coral bleaching during this event were depth of the reef and distance of the reef from shore. Shallow reefs and inshore reefs had a higher prevalence of bleaching. This bleaching event shows that Red Sea reefs are subject to the same increasing pressures that reefs face worldwide. This study provides a quantitative, genus-level assessment of the vulnerability of various coral groups from within the Red Sea to bleaching and estimates subsequent mortality. As such, it can provide valuable insights into the future for reef communities in the Red Sea.

  2. Bacteria are not the primary cause of bleaching in the Mediterranean coral Oculina patagonica.

    Ainsworth, T D; Fine, M; Roff, G; Hoegh-Guldberg, O

    2008-01-01

    Coral bleaching occurs when the endosymbiosis between corals and their symbionts disintegrates during stress. Mass coral bleaching events have increased over the past 20 years and are directly correlated with periods of warm sea temperatures. However, some hypotheses have suggested that reef-building corals bleach due to infection by bacterial pathogens. The 'Bacterial Bleaching' hypothesis is based on laboratory studies of the Mediterranean invading coral, Oculina patagonica, and has further generated conclusions such as the coral probiotic hypothesis and coral hologenome theory of evolution. We aimed to investigate the natural microbial ecology of O. patagonica during the annual bleaching using fluorescence in situ hybridization to map bacterial populations within the coral tissue layers, and found that the coral bleaches on the temperate rocky reefs of the Israeli coastline without the presence of Vibrio shiloi or bacterial penetration of its tissue layers. Bacterial communities were found associated with the endolithic layer of bleached coral regions, and a community dominance shift from an apparent cyanobacterial-dominated endolithic layer to an algal-dominated layer was found in bleached coral samples. While bacterial communities certainly play important roles in coral stasis and health, we suggest environmental stressors, such as those documented with reef-building corals, are the primary triggers leading to bleaching of O. patagonica and suggest that bacterial involvement in patterns of bleaching is that of opportunistic colonization. PMID:18059488

  3. Controlling bleached kraft pulp costs: a predictive modelling approach

    Schroderus, S.K.

    1988-07-01

    A mathematical model is described which simulates the operation of a bleached kraft paper mill. The model can be used to analyze a wide range of operating conditions and mill configurations. It is structured into the following functional blocks: assignment of process parameters; cooking and brown stock washing; bleaching, evaporation and calculation of black liquor heating value; recovery boiler and recausticizing; secondary heat balance; and generation of heat and electrical power. Computer programs have been developed using the model, usable on inexpensive personal computers, which enable calculation of stream variables, consumption of wood, chemicals, and energy, and operating costs. Examples of model use are presented, calculated for a hypothetical mill featuring a continuous digester and a low-odor type recovery boiler. These examples illustrate the effect of operating conditions on operating costs. 24 refs., 7 figs.

  4. Models for optical bleaching of thermoluminescence in sediments

    In this paper, we examine several models for the description of TL, focusing most attention on the properties of optical bleaching, in an effort to determine if realistic models can be devised which accurately describe the observed behavior. The models considered include multiple trapping and recombination levels, radiative and non-radiative processes, trap interaction effects, retrapping of released charge, and include transitions into and out of the recombination centers as well as the traps. All such phenomena are likely to occur in real materials and should be included in any model which purports to describe such materials. This paper concludes that models which account for the recombination of freed electrons with trapped holes during the bleaching period appear to be the most successful at describing the observed phenomena. (author)

  5. Dietary structured triacylglycerols containing docosahexaenoic acid given from birth affect visual and auditory performance and tissue fatty acid profiles of rats

    Christensen, M. M.; Lund, S. P.; Simonsen, L.;

    1998-01-01

    structured oil, 22:6(n-3) was located in the sn-2 position, whereas it was equally distributed among the three positions in the triacylglycerol molecule in the randomized oil. A reference group was fed rat milk before weaning and nonpurified diet after weaning. After 12 wk, the fevers of 22:6(n-3) in brain...... and liver phospholipids were higher in the groups fed the experimental diets than in the reference group. The specific structured oil resulted in the highest level of 22:6(n-3) in the brain, whereas the level of 22:6(n-3) was highest in the liver of the group fed randomized oil, indicating differences...... the level of 22:6(n-3), in the retina phospholipids were not affected by the three different diets apart from a lower level of 20:4(n-6) in rats fed the experimental diets, indicating a strong tendency to maintain a high level of 22:6(n-3) in the retina. The changes in the fatty acid profiles did not...

  6. The Role of Home Bleaching Agent on the Fracture Toughness of Resin Composites Using Four-Point Bending Test

    Ghazvini Ferooz M

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: Resin composites are a common type of tooth coloured restorative materials. These materials are brittle and their major shortcomings are sensitivity to flaws and defects, low tensile strength, and susceptibility to catastrophic failure.The role of home bleaching agents on the fracture toughness of resin composites using four-point bending test is scanty. Objectives: To compare the fracture toughness (KIc of resin composites on a fourpoint bending test and to assess the effect of distilled water and a home bleaching agent on the resistance of the materials to fracture. Materials and Methods: seventy-two bar-shaped specimens were prepared from three materials: Rok (SDI, Estelite (Tokuyama, and Vit-l-escence (Ultradent and divided into three groups. Two groups were assigned as “control” and conditioned in distilled water at 37oC for 24 hours or 21 days, respectively. The specimens in the third group (treatment were stored in distilled water for 21 days and bleached using Polanight (SDI for 2 hours daily. For each material, a total of 24 disc-shaped specimens were prepared and after each time interval loaded in a four-point bending test using a universal testing machine with a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/m. The maximum load to specimen failure was recorded and the KIc was calculated. Results: Statistical analysis using two-way ANOVA showed a significant relationship between materials and treatment (P<0.05. Tukey’s test showed that after 24 hours of immersion in distilled water, KIc was not significantly different between materials; Rok revealed the highest value followed by Estelite and Vit-l-escence. The bleaching agent significantly decreased the KIc values of Estelite and Rok while it did not affect that of Vita-l-escence. Immersion in distilled water for all resin composites caused a significant decrease in KIc. Conclusion: The fracture toughness of the resin composites was affected by the bleaching agent and 21day

  7. Is climate change triggering coral bleaching in tropical reef?

    Kalyan, De; Sautya, S.; Mote, S.; Tsering, L.; Patil, V.; Nagesh, R.; Ingole, B.S.

    & Marine Chemicals Research Institute, Mandpam Camp 623 519, India e-mail: vaibhav@csmcri.org Is climate change triggering coral bleaching in tropical reef? Elevated sea-surface temperatures (SST) caused by global warming is having seri- ous... and to also undertake complete digitiza- tion of its collection for database and Figure 1. View of compactors housing herbarium sheets. linking it to leading global biodiversity databases. We are in process of obtaining recognition from National...

  8. Bleached smear microscopy provides higher yield in diagnosing pulmonary tuberculosis

    Jithendra Kandati; Suresh Kumar Boorsu; Ramamohan Pathalapati; Madhavulu Buchineni

    2016-01-01

    Background: Tuberculosis (TB) remains one of the major deadliest communicable diseases throughout the world. Worldwide, 9.6 million people are estimated to have fallen ill with TB in 2014, India accounts for 23% of total global cases. The study evaluated the performance of direct sputum smear versus bleach concentration smear in diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis. Methods: Patients more than 10 years of age who presented with history of cough for >2 weeks duration were included. One spot ...

  9. Comparison of pulping and bleaching behaviors of some agricultural residues

    ATEŞ, Saim; DENİZ, İlhan; KIRCI, Hüseyin; ATİK, Celil; OKAN, Onur Tolga

    2015-01-01

    The present study determines the characteristics of bleaching and beating of annual plants and agricultural waste, which constitute important raw material potential for the pulp and paper industry in Turkey. It also examines the effects of this process on several paper properties. Firstly, chemical contents are determined for each raw material and then evaluated for use in the pulp and paper industry. All raw materials studied are found to be suitable for use in the pulp and paper industry, a...

  10. A Preliminary Assessment of Coral Bleaching in Mozambique

    SCHLEYER, M.; Obura, D.; Rodrigues, M.J.

    1999-01-01

    The 1997-1998 El Nino southern oscillation (ENSO) caused elevated sea temperatures that resulted in global coral bleaching. Coral reefs constitute an important biological resource in terms of their complex biodiversity and are the basis for tropical reef fisheries and marine ecotourism. They represent one of Mozambique's main coastal assets and its coastal communities and growing tourism industry rely mainly on reef-based resources. Mozambican artisanal fisheries are largely centred on reefs ...

  11. Sunscreens Cause Coral Bleaching by Promoting Viral Infections

    Danovaro, Roberto; Bongiorni, Lucia; Corinaldesi, Cinzia; Giovannelli, Donato; Damiani, Elisabetta; Astolfi, Paola; Greci, Lucedio; Pusceddu, Antonio

    2008-01-01

    Background Coral bleaching (i.e., the release of coral symbiotic zooxanthellae) has negative impacts on biodiversity and functioning of reef ecosystems and their production of goods and services. This increasing world-wide phenomenon is associated with temperature anomalies, high irradiance, pollution, and bacterial diseases. Recently, it has been demonstrated that personal care products, including sunscreens, have an impact on aquatic organisms similar to that of other contaminants. Objectiv...

  12. Through bleaching and tsunami : coral reef recovery in the Maldives

    Morri, C.; M. MONTEFALCONE; Lasagna, R.; Gatti, G.; A. Rovere; Parravicini, Valeriano; Baldelli, G.; Colantoni, P.; C.N. BIANCHI

    2015-01-01

    Coral reefs are degrading worldwide, but little information exists on their previous conditions for most regions of the world. Since 1989, we have been studying the Maldives, collecting data before, during and after the bleaching and mass mortality event of 1998. As early as 1999, many newly settled colonies were recorded. Recruits shifted from a dominance of massive and encrusting corals in the early stages of recolonisation towards a dominance of Acropora and Pocillopora by 2009. Coral cove...

  13. Poling-assisted bleaching of metal-doped nanocomposite glass

    Deparis, O.; Kazansky, P. G.; Abdolvand, A.; Podlipensky, A.; Seifert, G.; Graener, H

    2004-01-01

    Thermal poling of soda-lime glass which was doped with spherical or ellipsoidal silver nanoparticles has revealed what we believe to be a phenomenon of general interest in the physics of nanocomposite materials: The field-assisted dissolution of metal nanoparticles embedded in glass. Macroscopically, this phenomenon manifested itself as poling-assisted bleaching of the glass in the sense that the glass became more (or even completely) transparent under the anode. The phenomenon is physically ...

  14. Does lactobionic acid affect the colloidal structure and skin moisturizing potential of the alkyl polyglucoside-based emulsion systems?

    Tasic-Kostov, M Z; Reichl, S; Lukic, M Z; Jaksic, I N; Savic, S D

    2011-11-01

    Moisturizing creams are the most prescribed products in dermatology, essential in maintaining healthy skin as well as in the topical treatment of some diseases. The irritation potential of commonly used emulsifiers and moisturizing ingredients, but also their mutual interactions, could affect the functionality and safety of those dermopharmaceutics. The aim of this study was to promote moisturizing alkyl polyglucoside (APG)-based emulsion as vehicle for lactobionic acid (LA), advantageous representative of the alphahydroxyacids (AHAs)-multifunctional moisturizers, assessing the safety for use (in vitro acute skin irritation test using cytotoxicity assay compared with in vivo data obtained using skin bioengineering methods) and in vivo moisturizing capacity (bioengineering of the skin). In order to investigate possible interactions between APG mild natural emulsifier-based emulsion and LA, a deeper insight into the colloidal structure of the placebo and the emulsion with LA was given using polarization and transmission electron microscopy, rheology, thermal and texture analysis. This study showed that APG-based emulsions could be promoted as safe cosmetic/dermopharmaceutical vehicles and carriers for extremely acidic and hygroscopic AHA class of actives (specifically LA); prospective safety for human use of both APG and LA with the correlation between in vivo and in vitro findings was shown. However, it was revealed that LA strongly influenced the colloidal structure of the emulsion based on APGs and promoted the formation of lamellar structures which reflects onto the mode of water distribution within the cream. The advantageous skin hydrating potential of LA-containing emulsion vs. placebo was unlikely to be achieved, pointing that emulsions stabilized by lamellar liquid crystalline structures probably are not satisfying carriers for highly hygroscopic actives in order to reach the full moisturizing potential. Safe and effective use on dry skin is presumed. PMID

  15. Fatty Acid Methyl Ester (FAME Succession in Different Substrates as Affected by the Co-Application of Three Pesticides.

    Alessandra Cardinali

    Full Text Available In intensive agriculture areas the use of pesticides can alter soil properties and microbial community structure with the risk of reducing soil quality.In this study the fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs evolution has been studied in a factorial lab experiment combining five substrates (a soil, two aged composts and their mixtures treated with a co-application of three pesticides (azoxystrobin, chlorotoluron and epoxiconazole, with two extraction methods, and two incubation times (0 and 58 days. FAMEs extraction followed the microbial identification system (MIDI and ester-linked method (EL.The pesticides showed high persistence, as revealed by half-life (t1/2 values ranging from 168 to 298 days, which confirms their recalcitrance to degradation. However, t1/2 values were affected by substrate and compost age down to 8 days for chlorotoluron in S and up to 453 days for epoxiconazole in 12M. Fifty-six FAMEs were detected. Analysis of variance (ANOVA showed that the EL method detected a higher number of FAMEs and unique FAMEs than the MIDI one, whereas principal component analysis (PCA highlighted that the monosaturated 18:1ω9c and cyclopropane 19:0ω10c/19ω6 were the most significant FAMEs grouping by extraction method. The cyclopropyl to monoenoic acids ratio evidenced higher stress conditions when pesticides were applied to compost and compost+soil than solely soil, as well as with final time.Overall, FAMEs profiles showed the importance of the extraction method for both substrate and incubation time, the t1/2 values highlighted the effectiveness of solely soil and the less mature compost in reducing the persistence of pesticides.

  16. Optical bleaching of bismuth implanted silica glass: A threshold effect

    The near surface regions of high purity silica glass discs, Spectrosil A, were modified by implantation with bismuth ions at 160 keV and room temperature. The glasses implanted with a nominal dose of 6 x 1016 Bi/cm2 at ∼5 μA/cm2 were subsequently bleached with a 5.0 eV KrF pulsed excimer laser. The laser had an average pulse duration of ∼20 ns and repetition rate of 10 Hz, It was found that the bleaching was dependent upon the power density of the laser for a constant total integrated energy. Ion backscattering and optical absorption measurements were made before and after laser irradiation. Large changes in optical density and depth distribution of the implanted ions were observed at power densities of ≥45 mJ/cm2-pulse. On the basis of the experimental results, the onset of the threshold for bleaching of silica glass implanted with 6 x 1016 Bi/cm2 at 160 keV and at room temperature is between 30 and 45 mJ/cm2-pulse

  17. Fracture resistance of bleached teeth restored with different procedures

    Matheus Coelho Bandéca

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the fracture resistance of teeth submitted to internal bleaching and restored with different non-metallic post. Eighty mandibular incisors were endodontically treated and randomly divided in 10 groups (n = 8: G1- restored with composite resin (CR, G2- CR + fiber-reinforced composite post (FRC, Everstick post, Sticktech cemented with resin cement self-etch adhesive (RCS, Panavia F 2.0, Kuraray, G3- CR + FRC + self-adhesive resin cement (SRC, Breeze, Pentral Clinical, G4- CR+ glass fiber post (GF, Exacto Post, Angelus + RCS, G5- CR + GF + SRC. The G6 to G10 were bleached with hydrogen peroxide (HP and restored with the same restorative procedures used for G1 to G5, respectively. After 7 days storage in artificial saliva, the specimens were submitted to the compressive strength test (N at 0.5 mm/min cross-head speed and the failure pattern was identified as either reparable (failure showed until 2 mm below the cement-enamel junction or irreparable (the failure showed <2 mm or more below the cement-enamel. Data were analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey test (α = 0.05. No significant difference (p < 0.05 was found among G1 to G10. The results suggest that intracoronal bleaching did not significantly weaken the teeth and the failure patterns were predominately reparable for all groups. The non-metallic posts in these teeth did not improve fracture resistance.

  18. Optical bleaching of bismuth implanted silica glass: A threshold effect

    The near surface regions of high purity silica glass discs, Spectrosil A, were modified by implantation with bismuth ions at 160 key and room temperature. The glasses implanted with a nominal dose of 6x1016 Bi/cm2 at ∼5 μA/cm2 were subsequently bleached with a 5.0 eV KrF pulsed excimer laser. The laser had an average pulse duration of ∼20 ns and repetition rate of 10 Hz. It was found that the bleaching was dependent upon the power density of the laser for a constant total integrated energy. Ion backscattering and optical absorption measurements were made before and after laser irradiation. Large changes in optical density and depth distribution of the implanted ions were observed at power densities of ≥45 mJ/cm2-pulse. Onset of threshold for bleaching of silica glass implanted with 6x1016 Bi/cm2 at 160 key and at room temperature is between 30 and 45 mJ/cm2-pulse

  19. Biodegradability and toxicity assessment of bleach plant effluents treated anaerobically.

    Chaparro, T R; Botta, C M; Pires, E C

    2010-01-01

    As part of an experimental project on the treatment of bleach plant effluents the results of biodegradability and toxicity assessment of effluents from a bench-scale horizontal anaerobic immobilized bioreactor (HAIB) are discussed in this paper. The biodegradability of the bleach plant effluents from a Kraft pulp mill treated in the HAIB was evaluated using the modified Zahn-Wellens test. The inoculum came from a pulp mill wastewater treatment plant and the dissolved organic carbon (DOC) was used as the indicator of organic matter removal. The acute and chronic toxicity removal during the anaerobic treatment was estimated using Daphnia similis and Ceriodaphnia silvestrii respectively. Moreover, the evaluation of chromosome aberrations (CA), micronucleus frequencies (MN) and mitotic index (IM) in Allium cepa cells were used as genotoxicity indicators. The results indicate that the effluents from the anaerobic reactor are amenable to aerobic polishing. Acute and chronic toxicity were reduced by 90 and 81%, respectively. The largest CA and MN incidence in the meristematic cells of A. cepa were observed after exposure to the raw bleach plant effluent. The HAIB was able to reduce the acute and chronic toxicity as well as chromosome aberrations and the occurrence of micronucleus. PMID:20861545

  20. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester preferentially sensitizes CT26 colorectal adenocarcinoma to ionizing radiation without affecting bone marrow radioresponse

    Purpose: Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE), a component of propolis, was reported capable of depleting glutathione (GSH). We subsequently examined the radiosensitizing effect of CAPE and its toxicity. Methods and Materials: The effects of CAPE on GSH level, GSH metabolism enzyme activities, NF-κB activity, and radiosensitivity in mouse CT26 colorectal adenocarcinoma cells were determined. BALB/c mouse with CT26 cells implantation was used as a syngeneic in vivo model for evaluation of treatment and toxicity end points. Results: CAPE entered CT26 cells rapidly and depleted intracellular GSH in CT26 cells, but not in bone marrow cells. Pretreatment with nontoxic doses of CAPE significantly enhanced cell killing by ionizing radiation (IR) with sensitizer enhancement ratios up to 2.2. Pretreatment of CT26 cells with N-acetyl-L-cysteine reversed the GSH depletion activity and partially blocked the radiosensitizing effect of CAPE. CAPE treatment in CT26 cells increased glutathione peroxidase, decreased glutathione reductase, and did not affect glutathione S-transferase or γ-glutamyl transpeptidase activity. Radiation activated NF-κB was reversed by CAPE pretreatment. In vivo study revealed that pretreatment with CAPE before IR resulted in greater inhibition of tumor growth and prolongation of survival in comparison with IR alone. Pretreatment with CAPE neither affected body weights nor produced hepatic, renal, or hematopoietic toxicity. Conclusions: CAPE sensitizes CT26 colorectal adenocarcinoma to IR, which may be via depleting GSH and inhibiting NF-κB activity, without toxicity to bone marrow, liver, and kidney

  1. Degradation of Chlorophenols by Alcaligenes eutrophus JMP134(pJP4) in Bleached Kraft Mill Effluent

    Valenzuela, J.; Bumann, U.; Cespedes, R.; Padilla, L.; Gonzalez, B

    1997-01-01

    The ability of Alcaligenes eutrophus JMP134(pJP4) to degrade 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid, 2,4,6-trichlorophenol, and other chlorophenols in a bleached kraft mill effluent was studied. The efficiency of degradation and the survival of strain JMP134 and indigenous microorganisms in short-term batch or long-term semicontinuous incubations performed in microcosms were assessed. After 6 days of incubation, 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetate (400 ppm) or 2,4,6-trichlorophenol (40 to 100 ppm) were extens...

  2. Comparative study of the effects of two bleaching agents on oral microbiota.

    Alkmin, Yara Tardelli; Sartorelli, Renata; Flório, Flávia Martão; Basting, Roberta Tarkany

    2005-01-01

    This study evaluated the in vivo effects of bleaching agents containing 10% carbamide peroxide (Platinum/Colgate) or 7.5% hydrogen peroxide (Day White 2Z/Discus Dental) on mutans Streptococcus during dental bleaching. The products were applied on 30 volunteers who needed dental bleaching. In each volunteer, one of the two bleaching agents was used on both dental arches one hour a day for three weeks. Analysis of the bacterial counts was made by collecting saliva before (baseline values), during (7 and 21 days) bleaching treatments and 14 days posttreatment. The Friedman non-parametric analysis (alpha=0.05) found no differences in microorganism counts at different times for each group for both agents (p>0.05). The Mann Whitney nonparametric test (alpha=0.05) showed no differences in micro-organism counts for both agents (p>0.05). Different bleaching agents did not change the oral cavity mutans Streptococcus counts. PMID:16130860

  3. Etiology and prevention of external cervical root resorption associated to teeth bleaching

    Eliane Mendes da SILVA

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and objective: Esthetic dentistry has been prioritizedand the desire for whiter teeth has been increasingly present in dental offices, since whiter teeth tend to indicate health, beauty, youth and a more attractive smile. Teeth bleaching is a conservative method widely used to restore the original color of darkened teeth. However, possible relations with the external cervical root resorption have concerned many researchers and clinicians. Literature review: There are many mechanisms that can activate the external cervical root resorption, such as: chemical and physical action of the bleaching materials used, morphology of the cementoenamel junction associated to the immune system, material concentration, traumas and bleaching technique used. Conclusion: Therefore, considering many factors that are still not conclusive, preventing deleterious effects on teeth and support structures, care must be taken when choosing bleaching agent and bleaching technique, as well as when selecting each case, beyond a proper restoration after teeth bleaching.

  4. Study of the hydrogen peroxide bleaching agent effects on bovine enamel using X-ray fluorescence

    Hydrogen Peroxide's a bleaching agent capable of oxidizing a wide range of colored organic, causing discoloration and hence bleaching of the substrate, but some authors related the occurrence of side effects related to bleaching of the tooth structure, such as changes in morphology superficial. It was used 6 bovine incisors, each tooth was initially evaluated six times in different areas to obtain the count of elements phosphorus and calcium using X-Ray Fluorescence. The teeth were randomly divided in two groups: both groups were submitted to bleaching in office with hydrogen peroxide 38%, once a week during three weeks. Group 1 was stored in distilled water and group 2 in artificial saliva, between the sessions. The measurements were repeated every seven days before the bleaching treatment. Besides that, changes in mineral levels were always assessed in the same area and using the same procedure. It was observed that the bleaching was not able to demineralize the tooth enamel studied. (author)

  5. Holographic gratings with different spatial frequencies recorded on BB-640 bleached silver halide emulsions using reversal bleaches

    Álvarez López, Mariela Lázara; Camacho, Norma; Neipp López, Cristian; Márquez Ruiz, Andrés; Beléndez Vázquez, Augusto; Pascual Villalobos, Inmaculada

    2003-01-01

    The research made in the field of recording materials for holographic applications has yielded to materials of improving quality. Photographic emulsions have played an important role in this investigation, since although this is the first material used for recording purposes, there are a series of characteristics that convert the photographic emulsion in a very interesting material for holographic recording. In this work we will present the optimisation of a reversal bleaching process. This p...

  6. Exposure to perfluorooctane sulfonic acid (PFOS) adversely affects the life-cycle of the damselfly Enallagma cyathigerum

    We evaluated whether life-time exposure to PFOS affects egg development, hatching, larval development, survival, metamorphosis and body mass of Enallagma cyathigerum (Insecta: Odonata). Eggs and larvae were exposed to five concentrations ranging from 0 to 10 000 μg/L. Our results show reduced egg hatching success, slower larval development, greater larval mortality, and decreased metamorphosis success with increasing PFOS concentration. PFOS had no effect on egg developmental time and hatching or on mass of adults. Eggs were the least sensitive stage (NOEC = 10 000 μg/L). Larval NOEC values were 1000 times smaller (10 μg/L). Successful metamorphosis was the most sensitive response trait studied (NOEC < 10 μg/L). The NOEC value suggests that E. cyathigerum is amongst the most sensitive freshwater organisms tested. NOEC for metamorphosis is less than 10-times greater than the ordinary reported environmental concentrations in freshwater, but is more than 200-times smaller than the greatest concentrations measured after accidental releases. - Long-term laboratory exposure to perfluorooctane sulfonic acid reduces survival and interferes with metamorphosis of Enallagma cyathigerum (Insecta: Odonata).

  7. Benthic Communities of Low-Order Streams Affected by Acid Mine Drainages: A Case Study from Central Europe

    Marek Svitok

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Only little attention has been paid to the impact of acid mine drainages (AMD on aquatic ecosystems in Central Europe. In this study, we investigate the physico-chemical properties of low-order streams and the response of benthic invertebrates to AMD pollution in the Banská Štiavnica mining region (Slovakia. The studied streams showed typical signs of mine drainage pollution: higher conductivity, elevated iron, aluminum, zinc and copper loads and accumulations of ferric precipitates. Electric conductivity correlated strongly with most of the investigated elements (weighted mean absolute correlation = 0.95 and, therefore, can be recommended as a good proxy indicator for rapid AMD pollution assessments. The diversity and composition of invertebrate assemblages was related to water chemistry. Taxa richness decreased significantly along an AMD-intensity gradient. While moderately affected sites supported relatively rich assemblages, the harshest environmental conditions (pH < 2.5 were typical for the presence of a limited number of very tolerant taxa, such as Oligochaeta and some Diptera (Limnophyes, Forcipomyiinae. The trophic guild structure correlated significantly with AMD chemistry, whereby predators completely disappeared under the most severe AMD conditions. We also provide a brief review of the AMD literature and outline the needs for future detailed studies involving functional descriptors of the impact of AMD on aquatic ecosystems.

  8. How the multiple antioxidant properties of ascorbic acid affect lipid oxidation in oil-in-water emulsions.

    Uluata, Sibel; McClements, D Julian; Decker, Eric A

    2015-02-18

    Lipid oxidation is a serious problem for oil-containing food products because it negatively affects shelf life and nutritional composition. An antioxidant strategy commonly employed to prevent or delay oxidation in foods is to remove oxygen from the closed food-packaging system. An alternative technique is use of an edible oxygen scavenger to remove oxygen within the food. Ascorbic acid (AA) is a particularly promising antioxidant because of its natural label and multiple antioxidative functions. In this study, AA was tested as an oxygen scavenger in buffer and an oil-in-water (O/W) emulsion. The effects of transition metals on the ability of AA to scavenge oxygen were determined. Headspace oxygen decrease less than 1% in the medium-chain triacylglycerol (MCT) O/W emulsion system (pH 3 and 7). AA was able to almost completely remove dissolved oxygen (DO) in a buffered solution. Transition metals (Fe(2+) and Cu(+)) significantly accelerated the degradation of AA; however, iron and copper only increased DO depletion rates, by 10.6-16.4% from day 1 to 7, compared to the control. AA (2.5-20 mM) decreased DO in a 1% O/W emulsion system 32.0-64.0% and delayed the formation of headspace hexanal in the emulsion from 7 to over 20 days. This research shows that, when AA is used in an O/W emulsion system, oxidation of the emulsion system can be delay by multiple mechanisms. PMID:25650525

  9. A novel solid-state fractionation of naphthenic acid fraction components from oil sands process-affected water.

    Mohamed, Mohamed H; Wilson, Lee D; Shah, Jaimin R; Bailey, Jon; Peru, Kerry M; Headley, John V

    2015-10-01

    Various sorbent materials were evaluated for the fractionation of naphthenic acid fraction components (NAFCs) from oil sand process-affected water (OSPW). The solid phase materials include activated carbon (AC), cellulose, iron oxides (magnetite and goethite), polyaniline (PANI) and three types of biochar derived from biomass (BC-1; rice husks, BC-2; acacia low temperature and BC-3; acacia high temperature). NAFCs were semi-quantified using electrospray ionization high resolution Orbitrap mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and the metals were assessed by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). The average removal efficacy of NAFCs by AC was 95%. The removal efficacy decreased in the following order: AC, BC-1>BC-2, BC-3, goethite>PANI>cellulose, magnetite. The removal of metals did not follow a clear trend; however, there was notable leaching of potassium by AC and biochar samples. The bound NAFCs by AC were desorbed efficiently with methanol. Methanol regeneration and recycling of AC revealed 88% removal on the fourth cycle; a 4.4% decrease from the first cycle. This fractionation method represents a rapid, cost-effective, efficient, and green strategy for NAFCs from OSPW, as compared with conventional solvent extraction. PMID:26042363

  10. Aminolevulinic acid-photodynamic therapy of basal cell carcinoma and factors affecting the response to treatment: A clinical trial

    Zohreh Tehranchinia

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Basal cell carcinoma (BCC is the most common type of skin cancer in humans. Photodynamic therapy (PDT is a non-invasive therapeutic modality that may be considered as a valuable treatment option for BCC. This study was designed with the aim of evaluating the efficacy of PDT in treatment of BCC and factors that may affect the response rate. Materials and Methods: This clinical trial was conducted on 12 patients (28 BCC lesions who were treated with aminulevulinic acid (ALA-PDT, monthly, up to 6 sessions and the clinical response, cosmetic results, and possible side effects were evaluated. Results: The study was performed on 28 BCC lesions from 12 patients. Complete response was achieved in 9 (32.1% lesions. Complete response rate was higher in younger patients ( P < 0.01 and those with smaller lesions ( P < 0.001. Superficial type also had significant higher response rate ( P < 0.05. Patients with history of radiotherapy for the treatment of tinea capitis in childhood showed less response ( P < 0.05. Cosmetic results were excellent or good in 77.5% cases. After 6 months of follow-up, none of the resolved lesions recurred. Conclusion: PDT would be a good therapeutic option in treatment of BCC with acceptable efficacy and low side effects. Younger patients, superficial BCCs, and smaller lesions show better response to ALA-PDT. History of radiotherapy may be associated with a lower response rate.

  11. Exposure to perfluorooctane sulfonic acid (PFOS) adversely affects the life-cycle of the damselfly Enallagma cyathigerum

    Bots, Jessica, E-mail: Jessica.bots@ua.ac.b [Evolutionary Ecology Group, University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, B-2020 Antwerpen (Belgium); De Bruyn, Luc, E-mail: luc.debruyn@ua.ac.b [Evolutionary Ecology Group, University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, B-2020 Antwerpen (Belgium); Research Institute for Nature and Forest (INBO), Kliniekstraat 25, 1070 Brussels (Belgium); Snijkers, Tom, E-mail: tomsnijkers@gmail.co [Evolutionary Ecology Group, University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, B-2020 Antwerpen (Belgium); Van den Branden, Bert, E-mail: bvandenbranden@gmail.co [Department PIH Environment, University College West Flanders (HOWEST), Graaf K. 11 de Goedelaan 5, B-8500 Kortrijk (Belgium); Van Gossum, Hans, E-mail: hans.vangossum@ua.ac.b [Evolutionary Ecology Group, University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, B-2020 Antwerpen (Belgium)

    2010-03-15

    We evaluated whether life-time exposure to PFOS affects egg development, hatching, larval development, survival, metamorphosis and body mass of Enallagma cyathigerum (Insecta: Odonata). Eggs and larvae were exposed to five concentrations ranging from 0 to 10 000 mug/L. Our results show reduced egg hatching success, slower larval development, greater larval mortality, and decreased metamorphosis success with increasing PFOS concentration. PFOS had no effect on egg developmental time and hatching or on mass of adults. Eggs were the least sensitive stage (NOEC = 10 000 mug/L). Larval NOEC values were 1000 times smaller (10 mug/L). Successful metamorphosis was the most sensitive response trait studied (NOEC < 10 mug/L). The NOEC value suggests that E. cyathigerum is amongst the most sensitive freshwater organisms tested. NOEC for metamorphosis is less than 10-times greater than the ordinary reported environmental concentrations in freshwater, but is more than 200-times smaller than the greatest concentrations measured after accidental releases. - Long-term laboratory exposure to perfluorooctane sulfonic acid reduces survival and interferes with metamorphosis of Enallagma cyathigerum (Insecta: Odonata).

  12. Vital Bleaching of Tetracycline-Stained Teeth by Using KTP Laser: A Case Report

    Kinoshita, Jun-Ichiro; Jafarzadeh, Hamid; Forghani, Maryam

    2009-01-01

    Bleaching of discolored teeth is one of the most important topics in aesthetic dentistry. A great challenge in this area is obtaining good results in tetracycline-stained teeth. The wavelength and features of KTP laser, which is a type of Nd:YAG laser, seem to be appropriate for bleaching of these teeth. This case report underlines the importance of knowledge about the photochemical bleaching by using the KTP laser and its side effects on soft tissues.

  13. THE EFFECTS OF HOME BLEACHING ON THE HARDNESS OF AMALGAM FILLING

    Andi Soufyan; Niti Matram

    2015-01-01

    Dental bleaching has been considered as a feasible approach for dental esthetic, and many dental bleaching products can be seen in the market. Therefore, the side effect of such dental product should be studied. This study was aimed to determine the effect of carbamide peroxide-containing home bleaching agent on the hardness of dental amalgam surface structure. Forty amalgam filling specimens were divided into 4 groups, which consist of 3 treatment groups and 1 controu group. Each group was e...

  14. The effect of different drinks on tooth color after home bleaching

    Karadas, Muhammet; Seven, Nilgun

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This study evaluated the influence of coffee, tea, cola, and red wine staining on the color of teeth after home bleaching. Materials and Methods: A total of 45 samples were obtained from 45 sound maxillary central incisors. The home bleaching procedure was performed using 10% carbamide peroxide gel applied to the sample surface for a period of 6 h each day, for 14 days. After bleaching, baseline color measurements were taken, and the samples were immersed in four staining solutions...

  15. Optical bleaching of BaFCl crystals X-irradiated at room temperature

    The optical bleaching behaviour of the optical absorption bands produced by X-irradiation is investigated by paying particular attention to the difference between the two types of F centers in the BaFCl crystals. The optical bleachings are performed using a Xe-lamp. The optical absorption spectra and changes in the absorption bands during bleaching with F(Cl-) and F(F-) light are given and discussed

  16. Status of the Coral Reefs of Maldives after the Bleaching Event in 1998

    Zahir, H.

    2000-01-01

    A pilot reef monitoring study was conducted in 1998 to assess the extent of coral bleaching in the Maldives. The aims of this monitoring exercise were: 1. To quantitatively document the post-bleaching status of the shallow-water coral communities on the reefs of the north, central and southern regions of Maldives. 2. To estimate bleaching-induced coral mortality by comparing data yielded by the pilot survey with data from previous surveys, especially those sites for which historical dat...

  17. A diet rich in conjugated linoleic acid and butter increases lipid peroxidation but does not affect atherosclerotic, inflammatory, or diabetic risk markers in healthy young men

    Raff, Marianne; Tholstrup, Tine; Basu, Samar;

    2008-01-01

    Intake of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) has been demonstrated to beneficially affect risk markers of atherosclerosis and diabetes in rats. CLA is naturally found in milk fat, especially from cows fed a diet high in oleic acid, and increased CLA intake can occur concomitantly with increased milk...... oil, a mixture of 39.4% cis9, trans11 and 38.5% trans10, cis12) or of control fat with a low content of CLA in a 5-wk double-blind, randomized, parallel intervention study. We collected blood and urine before and after the intervention. The fatty acid composition of plasma triacylglycerol, cholesterol...

  18. Structure of FabH and factors affecting the distribution of branched fatty acids in Micrococcus luteus

    Pereira, Jose H.; Goh, Ee-Been; Keasling, Jay D.; Beller, Harry R.; Adams, Paul D

    2012-01-01

    In an effort to better understand the control of the formation of branched fatty acids in Micrococcus luteus, the structure of β-ketoacyl-ACP synthase III, which catalyzes the initial step of fatty-acid biosynthesis, has been determined.

  19. OSL response bleaching of BeO samples, using fluorescent light and blue LEDs

    Groppo, D. P.; Caldas, L. V. E.

    2016-07-01

    The optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) is widely used as a dosimetric technique for many applications. In this work, the OSL response bleaching of BeO samples was studied. The samples were irradiated using a beta radiation source (90Sr+90Y); the bleaching treatments (fluorescent light and blue LEDs) were performed, and the results were compared. Various optical treatment time intervals were tested until reaching the complete bleaching of the OSL response. The best combination of the time interval and bleaching type was analyzed.

  20. Influence of fluoride-containing adhesives and bleaching agents on enamel bond strength

    Vanessa Cavalli

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the influence of fluoride-containing carbamide peroxide (CP bleaching agents and adhesive systems on bonded enamel interfaces that are part of the dynamic pH cycling and thermal cycling models. The buccal surfaces of 60 bovine incisors were restored with a composite resin and bonded with three- and two-step, etch-and-rinse, fluoride-containing adhesives, Optibond FL (FL and Optibond Solo Plus (SP, respectively. Restored teeth were subjected to thermal cycling to age the interface. Both SP and FL adhesive-restored teeth were bleached (n = 10 with 10% CP (CP and 10% CP + fluoride (CPF or were left unbleached (control. Bleaching was performed for 14 days simultaneously with pH cycling, which comprised of 14 h of remineralization, 2 h of demineralization and 8 h of bleaching. The control groups (FL and SP were stored in remineralizing solution during their bleaching periods and were also subjected to carious lesion formation. Parallelepiped-shaped samples were obtained from the bonded interface for microtensile bond strength (∝TBS testing. The enamel ∝TBS of the FL and SP groups (control, not bleached were higher (p FL + CPF = FL + CP and SP > SP + CPF = SP + CP. The groups subjected to treatment with the fluoride-containing bleaching agents exhibited similar ∝TBS compared to regular bleaching agents. Bleaching agents, regardless of whether they contained fluoride, decreased enamel bond strength.

  1. Influence of fluoride-containing adhesives and bleaching agents on enamel bond strength.

    Cavalli, Vanessa; Liporoni, Priscila Cristiane Suzy; Rego, Marcos Augusto do; Berger, Sandrine Bittencourt; Giannini, Marcelo

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated the influence of fluoride-containing carbamide peroxide (CP) bleaching agents and adhesive systems on bonded enamel interfaces that are part of the dynamic pH cycling and thermal cycling models. The buccal surfaces of 60 bovine incisors were restored with a composite resin and bonded with three- and two-step, etch-and-rinse, fluoride-containing adhesives, Optibond FL (FL) and Optibond Solo Plus (SP), respectively. Restored teeth were subjected to thermal cycling to age the interface. Both SP and FL adhesive-restored teeth were bleached (n = 10) with 10% CP (CP) and 10% CP + fluoride (CPF) or were left unbleached (control). Bleaching was performed for 14 days simultaneously with pH cycling, which comprised of 14 h of remineralization, 2 h of demineralization and 8 h of bleaching. The control groups (FL and SP) were stored in remineralizing solution during their bleaching periods and were also subjected to carious lesion formation. Parallelepiped-shaped samples were obtained from the bonded interface for microtensile bond strength (μTBS) testing. The enamel μTBS of the FL and SP groups (control, not bleached) were higher (p FL > FL + CPF = FL + CP and SP > SP + CPF = SP + CP). The groups subjected to treatment with the fluoride-containing bleaching agents exhibited similar μTBS compared to regular bleaching agents. Bleaching agents, regardless of whether they contained fluoride, decreased enamel bond strength. PMID:23184165

  2. Impacts of the 1998 and 2010 mass coral bleaching events on the Western Gulf of Thailand

    Sutthacheep, Makamas; Yucharoen, Mathinee; Klinthong, Wanlaya; Pengsakun, Sittiporn; Sangmanee, Kanwara; Yeemin, Thamasak

    2013-11-01

    A long-term study of coral reef ecology in the Gulf of Thailand provides a good opportunity to examine the temporal variation on the impact of mass coral bleaching at those reef sites. We compared the bleaching and mortality of corals between the mass bleaching events in 1998 and 2010 at a coral community in the Western Gulf of Thailand. The aim was to identify the coral species which were most likely to suffer from (and to be able to tolerate) changes in seawater temperature. Significant differences in the susceptibility of the coral taxa to bleaching events between the years 1998 and 2010 and among coral species were documented. Bleaching was significantly different between the most dominant corals. Diploastrea heliopora was the most resistant coral to bleaching in both years. Some coral species showed more resistance to bleaching in 2010. The coral mortality following the mass bleaching events in 1998 and 2010 varied significantly between the years and the coral taxa. Mortality of some dominant coral taxa was also lower in 2010. Seven coral species, i.e. Astreopora myriophthalma, Pachyseris rugosa, Turbinaria mesenterina, Goniastrea pectinata, Favia pallida, F. maritima, Favites halicora, Platygyra daedalea and Galaxea fascicularis, were tolerant to the coral bleaching events. An ecosystem-based approach to managing coral reefs in the Gulf of Thailand is needed to identify appropriate marine protected area networks and to strengthen marine and coastal resource policies in order to build coral reef resilience.

  3. Annual coral bleaching and the long-term recovery capacity of coral.

    Schoepf, Verena; Grottoli, Andréa G; Levas, Stephen J; Aschaffenburg, Matthew D; Baumann, Justin H; Matsui, Yohei; Warner, Mark E

    2015-11-22

    Mass bleaching events are predicted to occur annually later this century. Nevertheless, it remains unknown whether corals will be able to recover between annual bleaching events. Using a combined tank and field experiment, we simulated annual bleaching by exposing three Caribbean coral species (Porites divaricata, Porites astreoides and Orbicella faveolata) to elevated temperatures for 2.5 weeks in 2 consecutive years. The impact of annual bleaching stress on chlorophyll a, energy reserves, calcification, and tissue C and N isotopes was assessed immediately after the second bleaching and after both short- and long-term recovery on the reef (1.5 and 11 months, respectively). While P. divaricata and O. faveolata were able to recover from repeat bleaching within 1 year, P. astreoides experienced cumulative damage that prevented full recovery within this time frame, suggesting that repeat bleaching had diminished its recovery capacity. Specifically, P. astreoides was not able to recover protein and carbohydrate concentrations. As energy reserves promote bleaching resistance, failure to recover from annual bleaching within 1 year will likely result in the future demise of heat-sensitive coral species. PMID:26582020

  4. Effect of coffe and a cola-based soft drink on the color stability of bleached bovine incisors considering the time elapsed after bleaching

    Rodrigo PIROLO

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available There is no consensus about the waiting time necessary for the patient to start consuming beverages containing colorants again after bleaching. Objective: To evaluate the influence of beverages with coloring agents on bleached bovine incisors considering the time elapsed after bleaching. Materials and methods: Sixty bovine incisors were bleached with 35% hydrogen peroxide for in-office use (Whiteness HP Max and divided into 10 groups. The color was evaluated with a spectrophotometer (Spectro Shade MICRO before and after bleaching, employing the CIE-Lab system. After bleaching, the teeth were exposed for 5 min to coffee or cola-based soft drink (CBSD at different periods after bleaching: 10 min, 1 h, 24 h, 48 h, and 72 h. Color (∆E and lightness (∆L variations were obtained from the CIE-Lab coordinates. Data were subjected to two-way ANOVA and Tukey HSD tests (p<0.05. Results: Significant differences were observed between groups for both the ∆L and ∆E values (p<0.001. All specimens presented a decrease in brightness (negative ∆L. The highest ∆E values were observed for teeth stained with a CBSD at 10 min and 1 h (4.12 and 4.16, respectively. Teeth pigmented with coffee presented ∆E values below 3.3 units for all evaluation times. Conclusion: The exposure to coffee after bleaching causes less color changes than the exposure to a CBSD regardless of the time after bleaching.

  5. Performance of an open limestone channel for treating a stream affected by acid rock drainage (León, Spain).

    Santofimia, Esther; López-Pamo, Enrique

    2016-07-01

    The generation of acid rock drainage (ARD) was observed after the oxidation dissolution of pyrite-rich black shales, which were excavated during the construction of a highway in León (Spain). ARDs are characterized by the presence of high concentrations of sulfate and metals (Al, Fe, Mn, Zn, Cu, Co, Ni, Th, and U) that affect the La Silva stream. Dissolved element concentrations showed values between one and four orders of magnitude higher than those of natural waters of this area. A passive treatment system was constructed; the aim of which was to improve the quality of the water of the stream. This work provides a hydrochemical characterization of the La Silva stream after its transit through the different elements that constitute the passive treatment system (open limestone channel (OLC), small ponds, and a wetland), during its first year of operation. The passive treatment system has two sections separated by a tunnel 230 m long. The first section, which stretches between the highway and the tunnel entrance, is an OLC 350 m long with a slope of 16 %. The second section, which stretches from the tunnel exit to the end wetland, has a length of 700 m and a slope of 6 %; it is in this section where six small ponds are located. In the first section of this passive treatment system, the OLC was effectively increasing the pH from 3 to 4-4.5 and eliminating all of the dissolved Fe and the partially dissolved Al. These elements, after hydrolysis at a pH 3-3.5 and 4-4.5, respectively, had precipitated as schwertmannite and hydrobasaluminite, while other dissolved metals were removed totally or partially for adsorption by the precipitates and/or by coprecipitation. The second section receives different inputs of water such as ARDs and natural waters. After exiting the treatment system, the stream is buffered by Al at a pH of 4-4.3, showing high Al concentrations (19-101 mg/L) but with a complete removal of dissolved Fe. Unfortunately, the outflow shows similar or

  6. Temperature Affects the Use of Storage Fatty Acids as Energy Source in a Benthic Copepod (Platychelipus littoralis, Harpacticoida)

    Werbrouck, Eva; Van Gansbeke, Dirk; Vanreusel, Ann; De Troch, Marleen

    2016-01-01

    The utilization of storage lipids and their associated fatty acids (FA) is an important means for organisms to cope with periods of food shortage, however, little is known about the dynamics and FA mobilization in benthic copepods (order Harpacticoida). Furthermore, lipid depletion and FA mobilization may depend on the ambient temperature. Therefore, we subjected the temperate copepod Platychelipus littoralis to several intervals (3, 6 and 14 days) of food deprivation, under two temperatures in the range of the normal habitat temperature (4, 15°C) and under an elevated temperature (24°C), and studied the changes in FA composition of storage and membrane lipids. Although bulk depletion of storage FA occurred after a few days of food deprivation under 4°C and 15°C, copepod survival remained high during the experiment, suggesting the catabolization of other energy sources. Ambient temperature affected both the degree of FA depletion and the FA mobilization. In particular, storage FA were more exhausted and FA mobilization was more selective under 15°C compared with 4°C. In contrast, depletion of storage FA was limited under an elevated temperature, potentially due to a switch to partial anaerobiosis. Food deprivation induced selective DHA retention in the copepod’s membrane, under all temperatures. However, prolonged exposure to heat and nutritional stress eventually depleted DHA in the membranes, and potentially induced high copepod mortality. Storage lipids clearly played an important role in the short-term response of the copepod P. littoralis to food deprivation. However, under elevated temperature, the use of storage FA as an energy source is compromised. PMID:26986852

  7. Genetic modification of alternative respiration in Nicotiana benthamiana affects basal and salicylic acid-induced resistance to potato virus X

    Verchot-Lubicz Jeanmarie

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Salicylic acid (SA regulates multiple anti-viral mechanisms, including mechanism(s that may be negatively regulated by the mitochondrial enzyme, alternative oxidase (AOX, the sole component of the alternative respiratory pathway. However, studies of this mechanism can be confounded by SA-mediated induction of RNA-dependent RNA polymerase 1, a component of the antiviral RNA silencing pathway. We made transgenic Nicotiana benthamiana plants in which alternative respiratory pathway capacity was either increased by constitutive expression of AOX, or decreased by expression of a dominant-negative mutant protein (AOX-E. N. benthamiana was used because it is a natural mutant that does not express a functional RNA-dependent RNA polymerase 1. Results Antimycin A (an alternative respiratory pathway inducer and also an inducer of resistance to viruses and SA triggered resistance to tobacco mosaic virus (TMV. Resistance to TMV induced by antimycin A, but not by SA, was inhibited in Aox transgenic plants while SA-induced resistance to this virus appeared to be stronger in Aox-E transgenic plants. These effects, which were limited to directly inoculated leaves, were not affected by the presence or absence of a transgene constitutively expressing a functional RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (MtRDR1. Unexpectedly, Aox-transgenic plants infected with potato virus X (PVX showed markedly increased susceptibility to systemic disease induction and virus accumulation in inoculated and systemically infected leaves. SA-induced resistance to PVX was compromised in Aox-transgenic plants but plants expressing AOX-E exhibited enhanced SA-induced resistance to this virus. Conclusions We conclude that AOX-regulated mechanisms not only play a role in SA-induced resistance but also make an important contribution to basal resistance against certain viruses such as PVX.

  8. Diet supplementation with the cis-9,trans-11 conjugated linoleic acid isomer affects the size of adipocytes in Wistar rats.

    Lopes, Paula A; Martins, Susana V; Pinho, Mário S; Alfaia, Cristina M; Fontes, Carlos M G A; Rodrigues, Pedro O; Morais, Graça S L; Castro, Matilde F; Pinto, Rui; Prates, José A M

    2008-07-01

    Previous reports have demonstrated that conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) acts on body fat accumulation in a variety of animal models. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of cis (c)-9,trans (t)-11 and t10,c12 CLA isomers on the number and size of adipocytes from the inguinal and retroperitoneal fats in Wistar male rats. A 5.1% palm oil-based diet was supplemented with CLA isomers as follows: 0.6% of c9,t11, 0.6% of t10,c12, 1.3% of c9,t11 and t10,c12 isomers in mixture, and a control nonsupplemented group for comparative purposes. Fat tissues were prepared on microscope slides for histologic examination using an image-analysis software to count the number of adipocytes and measure cell sizes. The results showed that CLA isomers did not affect (P > .05) either final body and fat depot weights or serum lipids (with the exception of triacylglycerols) and adipocytokines (leptin and adiponectin). Animals fed the c9,t11 CLA isomer diet showed larger adipocytes when compared to other groups. Independently of the CLA dietary treatment, retroperitoneal fat showed larger adipocytes (3319 microm(2)) and therefore a smaller number of adipocytes per unit of area, compared to inguinal fat (3055 microm(2)). Taken together, the data suggest that a palm oil-based diet supplemented with the c9,t11 CLA isomer in Wistar rats, in contrast to the t10,c12 isomer and the mixture of both isomers, increases adipocyte dimensions in inguinal and retroperitoneal fat depots, while having a minor effect in serum lipids and adipocytokines. PMID:19083449

  9. HYDROGEN PEROXIDE BLEACHING OF HARDWOOD KRAFT PULP WITH ADSORBED BIRCH XYLAN AND ITS EFFECT ON PAPER PROPERTIES

    Hyejung Youn

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The adsorption of xylan on pulp fibers improves the strength properties of paper. However, the optical properties are decreased significantly. The objective of our research was to bleach hardwood kraft pulp with adsorbed birch xylan by hydrogen peroxide and study the effect of bleaching parameters on paper properties. The bleaching parameters studied included bleaching temperature, time, initial pH as well as MgSO4 dosage. The optical properties (whiteness, brightness, opacity and physical properties (tensile index, tearing index, bulk of handsheets made from the pulp bleached with different process variables were measured. The results showed that better optical properties were obtained with higher bleaching temperature, longer bleaching time, and more MgSO4 dosage. Bleaching from an initial pH of 11 provided the highest brightness value. On the other hand, strength properties were improved with decreasing of the bleaching temperature, and increasing the initial pH and MgSO4 dosage. The relationship between strength properties and bleaching time varied depending on bleaching temperature. According to the results, both good mechanical properties and optical properties could be achieved when the operating parameters were controlled properly. Therefore hydrogen peroxide bleaching was proved to be a suitable method for bleaching hardwood kraft pulp with adsorption of birch xylan.

  10. Low Dose Gamma Irradiation Does Not Affect the Quality or Total Ascorbic Acid Concentration of “Sweetheart” Passionfruit (Passiflora edulis

    John B. Golding

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Passionfruit (Passiflora edulis, Sims, cultivar “Sweetheart” were subject to gamma irradiation at levels suitable for phytosanitary purposes (0, 150, 400 and 1000 Gy then stored at 8 °C and assessed for fruit quality and total ascorbic acid concentration after one and fourteen days. Irradiation at any dose (≤1000 Gy did not affect passionfruit quality (overall fruit quality, colour, firmness, fruit shrivel, stem condition, weight loss, total soluble solids level (TSS, titratable acidity (TA level, TSS/TA ratio, juice pH and rot development, nor the total ascorbic acid concentration. The length of time in storage affected some fruit quality parameters and total ascorbic acid concentration, with longer storage periods resulting in lower quality fruit and lower total ascorbic acid concentration, irrespective of irradiation. There was no interaction between irradiation treatment and storage time, indicating that irradiation did not influence the effect of storage on passionfruit quality. The results showed that the application of 150, 400 and 1000 Gy gamma irradiation to “Sweetheart” purple passionfruit did not produce any deleterious effects on fruit quality or total ascorbic acid concentration during cold storage, thus supporting the use of low dose irradiation as a phytosanitary treatment against quarantine pests in purple passionfruit.

  11. A Study of Residual Oils Recovered from Spent Bleaching Earth: Their Characteristics and Applications

    Loh S. Kheang

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This study described the extraction of residual oils of spent bleaching earth (SBE from palm oil refining industry, the properties and applications of residual oils obtained there from. Residual oils of SBE (acid-activated, WAC and neutral, NC were recovered via solvent and supercritical-fluid (SC-CO2 extraction. The yields of residual oils recovered from WAC were higher than those from NC using solvent and SC-CO2 extraction respectively. Both the residual oils recovered from WAC and NC had fatty acids composition (FAC similar to that of crude palm oil. These oils exhibited poor qualities in terms of free fatty acids (FFA content and peroxide value (PV. As the residual oils had very high FFA value (more than 10%, they were no longer suitable for food applications. Alternatively, these oils can be converted to their respective methyl esters for biofuel and other non-food applications as they were thermally and chemically stable with induction period of up to 29 h in Rancimat test. The methyl esters conversion via esterification and transesterification gave optimum yields of more than 80%. The methyl esters obtained have comparable fuel properties as petroleum diesel; hence, they can be used as diesel substitute.

  12. Contrasting patterns of coral bleaching susceptibility in 2010 suggest an adaptive response to thermal stress.

    James R Guest

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Coral bleaching events vary in severity, however, to date, the hierarchy of susceptibility to bleaching among coral taxa has been consistent over a broad geographic range and among bleaching episodes. Here we examine the extent of spatial and temporal variation in thermal tolerance among scleractinian coral taxa and between locations during the 2010 thermally induced, large-scale bleaching event in South East Asia. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Surveys to estimate the bleaching and mortality indices of coral genera were carried out at three locations with contrasting thermal and bleaching histories. Despite the magnitude of thermal stress being similar among locations in 2010, there was a remarkable contrast in the patterns of bleaching susceptibility. Comparisons of bleaching susceptibility within coral taxa and among locations revealed no significant differences between locations with similar thermal histories, but significant differences between locations with contrasting thermal histories (Friedman = 34.97; p<0.001. Bleaching was much less severe at locations that bleached during 1998, that had greater historical temperature variability and lower rates of warming. Remarkably, Acropora and Pocillopora, taxa that are typically highly susceptible, although among the most susceptible in Pulau Weh (Sumatra, Indonesia where respectively, 94% and 87% of colonies died, were among the least susceptible in Singapore, where only 5% and 12% of colonies died. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The pattern of susceptibility among coral genera documented here is unprecedented. A parsimonious explanation for these results is that coral populations that bleached during the last major warming event in 1998 have adapted and/or acclimatised to thermal stress. These data also lend support to the hypothesis that corals in regions subject to more variable temperature regimes are more resistant to thermal stress than those in less variable environments.

  13. Tooth bleaching--a critical review of the biological aspects

    Dahl, J E; Pallesen, Ulla

    2003-01-01

    addressing the risk of other adverse effects are lacking. Direct contact with hydrogen peroxide induced genotoxic effects in bacteria and cultured cells, whereas the effect was reduced or abolished in the presence of metabolizing enzymes. Several tumor-promoting studies, including the hamster cheek pouch......, and in the period of 1-8 years' observation time, from 10 to 40% of the initially successfully treated teeth needed re-treatment. Cervical root resorption is a possible consequence of internal bleaching and is more frequently observed in teeth treated with the thermo-catalytic procedure. When the external tooth...

  14. EFFECT BLEACHING REAGENT ON THE QUALITY OF FLAX CELLULOSE

    Дейкун, Ірина Михайлівна

    2015-01-01

    The paper studies the impact of bleaching chemicals such as chlorine dioxide, hydrogen peroxide and chlorine on the product yield, residual lignin content, a-cellulose, viscosity, ash content and whiteness of flax natron cellulose for chemical processing.It was found that one-step processing of flax pulp with chlorine dioxide consumption rate 0,3…0,5 % and with hydrogen peroxide consumption rate 2…3 % by weight of abs. dry cellulose is more effective than treatment with chlorine water at chlo...

  15. Reducing bleaching effects in organic nanofibers by coating

    Tavares, Luciana; Kjelstrup-Hansen, Jakob; Rubahn, Horst-Günter;

    Para-hexaphenylene (p-6P) organic nanofibers emit polarized, blue light upon UV excitation with a peak wavelength of the emitted light of 425 nm [1] and a spatially anisotropic distribution of the emitted light [2]. These features could enable future (opto-)electronic applications [3], since, for...... example, these molecules in the form of a thin film can function as an OLED [4]. However, the nanofibers exhibit a characteristic photoinduced reaction during illumination with UV light that causes a decrease in luminescence intensity (bleaching) and that is partly attributed to photooxidation [1]. Here...

  16. Detection of Chlorophenolic Compounds in Bleaching Effluents of Chemical Pulps

    Chhaya Sharma; S.Mohanty; S.Kumar; N.J.Rao; li qian

    2008-01-01

    Laboratory bleaching effluents from the chlorination and caustic extraction stages of mixed wood kraft pulp processing have been analysed both qualitatively and quantitatively for various chlorophenolics by using GC.A number of chlorinated derivaties of phenols,catechols,guaiacols and syringaldehydes have been detected and their concentrations are estimated.The results are compared with that of different agriculture residue / hardwood pulps,which were reported in literature.The concentrations of various compounds detected have also been compared with their reported 96LC50 values.

  17. Fabrication of Polymer Nonlinear Directional Coupler by Photo-bleaching

    2001-01-01

    The preparation of a nonlinear directional coupler in polymer PMMA/DR1 film by photobleaching is studied. We find it easier to obtain a required coupling length by controlling photo-bleaching time than by controlling the dimension of the coupler. The transmittance of each arm is measured when the pulse input light energy changes in our experiment. The experimental results show that the coupling length will change with the intensity of input light due to optical nonlinearities of the polymer PMMA/DR1 at 1064nm.

  18. Acidic deposition: State of science and technology. Report 10. Watershed and lake processes affecting surface-water acid-base chemistry. Final report

    The acid-base chemistry of surface waters is governed by the amount and chemistry of deposition and by the biogeochemical reactions that generate acidity or acid neutralizing capacity (ANC) along the hydrologic pathways that water follows through watersheds to streams and lakes. The amount of precipitation and it chemical loading depend on the area's climate and physiography, on it proximity to natural or industrial gaseous or particulate sources, and on local or regional air movements. Vegetation interacts with the atmosphere to enhance both wet and dry deposition of chemicals to a greater or lesser extent, depending on vegetation type. Vegetation naturally acidifies the environment in humid regions through processes of excess base cation uptake and generation of organic acids associated with many biological processes. Natural acid production and atmospheric deposition of acidic materials drive the acidification process. The lake or stream NAC represents a balance between the acidity-and ANC-generating processes that occur along different flow paths in the watershed and the relative importance of each flow path

  19. Compared with Daily, Weekly n–3 PUFA Intake Affects the Incorporation of Eicosapentaenoic Acid and Docosahexaenoic Acid into Platelets and Mononuclear Cells in Humans 1 2 3

    Browning, Lucy M; Walker, Celia G.; Mander, Adrian P; West, Annette L.; Gambell, Joanna; Madden, Jackie; Calder, Philip C.; Jebb, Susan A.

    2014-01-01

    Consumption of oily fish is sporadic, whereas controlled intervention studies of n–3 (ω-3) fatty acids usually provide capsules containing eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) as a daily dose. This methodologic study explored whether there are differences in the short-, medium-, and long-term incorporation of EPA and DHA into blood plasma and cells with the provision of identical amounts of EPA and DHA, equivalent to 2 oily fish servings per week (or 6.54 g/wk EPA and DH...

  20. PB2 amino acid at position 627 affects replicative efficiency, but not cell tropism, of Hong Kong H5N1 influenza A viruses in mice

    A single amino acid substitution, from glutamic acid to lysine at position 627 of the PB2 protein, converts a nonlethal H5N1 influenza A virus isolated from a human to a lethal virus in mice. In contrast to the nonlethal virus, which replicates only in respiratory organs, the lethal isolate replicates in a variety of organs, producing systemic infection. Despite a clear difference in virulence and organ tropism between the two viruses, it remains unknown whether the dissimilarity is a result of differences in cell tropism or the reduced replicative ability of the nonlethal virus in mouse cells in general. To determine how this single amino acid change affects virulence and organ tropism in mice, we investigated the growth kinetics of the two H5N1 viruses both in vitro and in vivo. The identity of the PB2 amino acid at position 627 did not appreciably affect viral replicative efficiency in chicken embryo fibroblasts and a quail cell line; however, viruses with lysine at this position instead of glutamic acid grew better in the different mouse cells tested. When the effect of this substitution was investigated in mice, all of the test viruses showed the same cell tropism, but infection by viruses containing lysine at position 627 spread more rapidly than those viruses containing glutamic acid at this position. Further analysis showed a difference in local immune responses: neutrophil infiltration in lungs infected with viruses containing lysine at position 627 persisted longer than that associated with viruses lacking a glutamic acid substitution. Our data indicate that the amino acid at position 627 of the PB2 protein determines the efficiency of viral replication in mouse (not avian) cells, but not tropism among cells in different mouse organs. The presence of lysine leads to more aggressive viral replication, overwhelming the host's defense mechanisms and resulting in high mortality rates in mice