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Sample records for achieving polio eradication

  1. Achieving polio eradication: a review of health communication evidence and lessons learned in India and Pakistan

    2009-01-01

    Since 1988, the world has come very close to eradicating polio through the Global Polio Eradication Initiative, in which communication interventions have played a consistently central role. Mass media and information dissemination approaches used in immunization efforts worldwide have contributed to this success. However, reaching the hardest-to-reach, the poorest, the most marginalized and those without access to health services has been challenging. In the last push to eradicate polio, Poli...

  2. Polio eradication in India: some observations.

    Paul, Yash; Priya

    2004-10-22

    In 1988, the World Health Assembly passed resolution WHA 41.28, which committed the World Health Organization (WHO) to the global eradication of poliomyelitis by the year 2000. In spite of the combined efforts by UNICEF, National Polio Surveillance Project (NPSP), Indian Academy of Pediatrics (IAP) and Rotary International, Polio Free India is still a distant dream. Though oral polio vaccine has succeeded in polio eradication from many countries but there is high incidence of vaccine failure in India. Oral polio vaccine (OPV) has failed to provide full protection to many children who have developed paralytic polio even after taking 10 or more doses of OPV. In some children, OPV has caused paralysis-vaccine associated paralytic polio (VAPP). Number of children developing polio due to vaccine is high and on increase. Reasons for this could be that even immunocompromised children are being administered OPVbecause IPV is not available. Vaccine failure has exaggerated the problem of VAPP. No efforts have been made to find the causes for high incidence of vaccine failure and VAPP. PMID:15532129

  3. Global Polio Eradication: So Close, yet so Far

    Samad EJ Golzari

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Launched in 1988, the Global Polio Eradication Initiative (GPEI never seemed as close to its sole target as by 2012; polio cases decreased by over 99% thanks to the global efforts restricting endemic areas into three countries, i.e. Afghanistan, Pakistan and Nigeria. However, the enchantment did not last long as WPV1 and confirmed new polio cases were reported in Syria (1. Re-emergence of the virus, related to the WPV1 still endemic in Pakistan, had already been identified in some of the Middle Eastern countries and caused an outbreak in China (2. In previous experiences, for instance in Egypt, international outbreak response guidelines issued by the World Health Assembly (WHA in Resolution WHA59 were implemented comprehensively and supplementary immunization activities (SIAs were conducted carefully. Such global measures should immediately be taken in order to halt the risk of transmission and spread of WPV as a public health threat (2.Thanks to the continuing support of WHO and Iranian health ministry, Iran is the only country which has achieved the goal of polio eradication yet neighbouring two of the three polio endemic countries. However, the on-going challenge has become even more daunting as the threat has the potential of exacerbation due to the imported cases or carriers. Although Iran has been successful in eradication of some infectious diseases, imported cases contribute immensely to the failure in realizing the eradication aim for some other infectious diseases (3,4. Bordering Pakistan (909 km (565 mi and Afghanistan (936 km (582 mi to the east is one of the few major obstacles to be perceived as important. In some parts of Pakistan, immunization activities were suspended since June 2012 (2. It is pivotal to the polio eradication goals that immunization is restarted in the halted areas and reinforced in neighboring high-risk areas in order to prevent further spread of this outbreak.Surveillance for cases of acute flaccid

  4. POLIO ERADICATION IN INDIA: NEW INITIATIVES IN SANITATION

    Pradeep Sukla; Karun Dev Sharma; Manish Rana; Syed Hasan Nawaz Zaidi

    2013-01-01

    Abstract: Polio eradication continues to be a priority in the South-East Asia Region. For developing countries, considering that the practice of open defecation and fecal contamination of drinking water easily precipitates virus transmissions, the eradication of polio called for rounds after rounds of campaign. In the districts of western Uttar Pradesh (UP), in India, which continues to be polio endemic, key challenge is the low levels of sanitation and personal hygiene. The residents of poli...

  5. Polio eradication: mobilizing and managing the human resources.

    2005-01-01

    Between 1988 and 2004, the Global Polio Eradication Initiative grew to become the largest international health effort in history, operating in every country of the world. An estimated 10 million health workers and volunteers have been engaged in implementing the necessary polio supplementary immunization activities (SIAs) on a recurring basis, and at least 35,000 well-trained workers have been conducting polio surveillance. A combination of task simplification, technological innovations and a...

  6. Regression in polio eradication in Pakistan: A national tragedy.

    Kanwal, Sumaira; Hussain, Abrar; Mannan, Shazia; Perveen, Shazia

    2016-03-01

    Polio is one out of 200 infections results to lasting paralysis, usually in the legs. The year 2014 has been the saddest year for the Pakistan when the World was about to eliminate Polio from all over the World. In year 1994 Pakistan took the initiative to eliminate Polio from the country. The efforts were going well until 2005, when Pakistan was on the wedge to overcome the Disease. The hopes were high that soon Pakistan will become a polio-virus-free country, but the drone strikes in FATA and the rise of different militant groups as a reaction of the drone attacks in FATA made it difficult for the health workers to continue their vaccination campaigns in these areas. However various factors ruined the efforts made to eradicate Polio. In Pakistan, polio is widespread to three sections. These are Karachi, Quetta block (Quetta, Pishin and Killah Abdullah district) and FATA and Peshawar district. Numerous things are accountable for polio flourishing in these regions. These comprise near to the ground socioeconomic rank of the families, not having the knowledge concerning hazard caused by polio and disinformation by limited significant people concerning how polio vaccines fabricate damage. In 2014, only 3 countries in the world remain polio-endemic: Nigeria, Pakistan and Afghanistan. From year 2012-2014 the number of registered Polio cases is on rise contrary to rest of the other two Polio-endemic countries. In spite of the extensive work done by Polio workers the number of Polio cases has broken the 16 year record. The situation is getting worse because it can also be threatening to the rest of the World. PMID:26968287

  7. POLIO ERADICATION IN INDIA: NEW INITIATIVES IN SANITATION

    Pradeep Sukla

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Polio eradication continues to be a priority in the South-East Asia Region. For developing countries, considering that the practice of open defecation and fecal contamination of drinking water easily precipitates virus transmissions, the eradication of polio called for rounds after rounds of campaign. In the districts of western Uttar Pradesh (UP, in India, which continues to be polio endemic, key challenge is the low levels of sanitation and personal hygiene. The residents of polio endemic areas are now reluctant to frequent pulse polio immunization rounds and are using these rounds to raise their voice against chronic apathy to providing the basic amenities such as adequate sanitation facilities. Newer initiatives such as Urban Sanitation and Hygiene Action (USHA Project, in western UP and “107 block” campaign launched in UP and Bihar aiming to improve sanitation, water quality and routine immunizations in the high risk polio endemic administrative blocks have the potential to significantly strengthen eradication efforts, especially in high risk areas for wild poliovirus transmission in North India.

  8. Post-polio eradication: vaccination strategies and options for India

    Jayakrishnan Thayyil

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In 1988, the World Health Organization (WHO resolved to eradicate poliomyelitis globally. Since then, the initiative has reported dramatic progress in decreasing the incidence of poliomyelitis and limiting the geographical extent of transmission. 2013 is recorded as the second consecutive year not reporting wild poliovirus (WPV from India. If the country can retain this position for one more year India will be declared as polio eradicated. What should be the future vaccination strategies? We searched and reviewed the full text of the available published literature on polio eradication via PubMed and examined Internet sources and websites of major international health agencies. The oral polio vaccine (OPV has been the main tool in the polio eradication program. Once WPV transmission is interrupted, the poliomyelitis will be caused only by OPV. India could expect 1 vaccine-associated paralytic polio per 4.2-4.6 million doses of OPV. Considering the threat of vaccine-derived viruses to polio eradication, WHO urged to develop a strategy to safely discontinue OPV after certification. The ultimate aim is to stop OPV safely and effectively, and eventually substitute with inactivated polio vaccine (IPV. The argument against the use of IPV is its cost. From India, field based data were available on the efficacy of IPV, which was better than OPV. IPV given intradermally resulted in seroconversion rates similar to full-dose intramuscular vaccine. The incremental cost of adopting IPV to replace OPV is relatively low, about US $1 per child per year, and most countries should be able to afford this additional cost.

  9. Are we doing enough? Evaluation of the Polio Eradication Initiative in a district of Pakistan's Punjab province: a LQAS study

    Waqas Muhammad; Shad Mushtaq Ahmad; Siddiqui Arif Mahmood; Akram Javed; Ullah Mohsin Zia Sana; Majrooh Muhammad Ashraf; Mushtaq Muhammad Umair; Abdullah Hussain Muhammad; Ahmad Waqar; Shahid Ubeera; Khurshid Usman

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background The success of the Global Polio Eradication Initiative was remarkable, but four countries - Afghanistan, Pakistan, India and Nigeria - never interrupted polio transmission. Pakistan reportedly achieved all milestones except interrupting virus transmission. The aim of the study was to establish valid and reliable estimate for: routine oral polio vaccine (OPV) coverage, logistics management and the quality of monitoring systems in health facilities, NIDs OPV coverage, the qu...

  10. Polio eradication: mobilizing and managing the human resources

    Aylward R. Bruce

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Between 1988 and 2004, the Global Polio Eradication Initiative grew to become the largest international health effort in history, operating in every country of the world. An estimated 10 million health workers and volunteers have been engaged in implementing the necessary polio supplementary immunization activities (SIAs on a recurring basis, and at least 35 000 well-trained workers have been conducting polio surveillance. A combination of task simplification, technological innovations and adaptation of strategies to fit local circumstances has allowed the Initiative to use a wide range of workers and volunteers, from both inside and outside the health sector, to deliver the polio vaccine during SIAs and to monitor progress in virtually every area of every country, regardless of the health infrastructure, conflict, geography and/or culture. This approach has required sustained political advocacy and mass community mobilization, together with strong management and supervisory processes. Non-monetary incentives, reimbursement of costs and substantial technical assistance have been essential. Given the unique features of eradication programmes in general, and polio eradication in particular, the implications of this approach for the broader health system must continue to be studied if it is to be replicated for the delivery and monitoring of other interventions.

  11. Eradicating polio: how the world's pediatricians can help stop this crippling illness forever.

    Orenstein, Walter A

    2015-01-01

    The American Academy of Pediatrics strongly supports the Polio Eradication and Endgame Strategic Plan of the Global Polio Eradication Initiative. This plan was endorsed in November 2012 by the Strategic Advisory Group of Experts on Immunization of the World Health Organization and published by the World Health Organization in April 2013. As a key component of the plan, it will be necessary to stop oral polio vaccine (OPV) use globally to achieve eradication, because the attenuated viruses in the vaccine rarely can cause polio. The plan includes procedures for elimination of vaccine-associated paralytic polio and circulating vaccine-derived polioviruses (cVDPVs). cVDPVs can proliferate when vaccine viruses are transmitted among susceptible people, resulting in mutations conferring both the neurovirulence and transmissibility characteristics of wild polioviruses. Although there are 3 different types of wild poliovirus strains, the polio eradication effort has already resulted in the global elimination of type 2 poliovirus for more than a decade. Type 3 poliovirus may be eliminated because the wild type 3 poliovirus was last detected in 2012. Thus, of the 3 wild types, only wild type 1 poliovirus is still known to be circulating and causing disease. OPV remains the key vaccine for eradicating wild polioviruses in polio-infected countries because it induces high levels of systemic immunity to prevent paralysis and intestinal immunity to reduce transmission. However, OPV is a rare cause of paralysis and the substantial decrease in wild-type disease has resulted in estimates that the vaccine is causing more polio-related paralysis annually in recent years than the wild virus. The new endgame strategic plan calls for stepwise removal of the type 2 poliovirus component from trivalent oral vaccines, because type 2 wild poliovirus appears to have been eradicated (since 1999) and yet is the main cause of cVDPV outbreaks and approximately 40% of vaccine-associated paralytic

  12. Next generation inactivated polio vaccine manufacturing to support post polio-eradication biosafety goals.

    Yvonne E Thomassen

    Full Text Available Worldwide efforts to eradicate polio caused a tipping point in polio vaccination strategies. A switch from the oral polio vaccine, which can cause circulating and virulent vaccine derived polioviruses, to inactivated polio vaccines (IPV is scheduled. Moreover, a manufacturing process, using attenuated virus strains instead of wild-type polioviruses, is demanded to enhance worldwide production of IPV, especially in low- and middle income countries. Therefore, development of an IPV from attenuated (Sabin poliovirus strains (sIPV was pursued. Starting from the current IPV production process based on wild type Salk strains, adaptations, such as lower virus cultivation temperature, were implemented. sIPV was produced at industrial scale followed by formulation of both plain and aluminium adjuvanted sIPV. The final products met the quality criteria, were immunogenic in rats, showed no toxicity in rabbits and could be released for testing in the clinic. Concluding, sIPV was developed to manufacturing scale. The technology can be transferred worldwide to support post polio-eradication biosafety goals.

  13. Next generation inactivated polio vaccine manufacturing to support post polio-eradication biosafety goals.

    Thomassen, Yvonne E; van 't Oever, Aart G; van Oijen, Monique G C T; Wijffels, René H; van der Pol, Leo A; Bakker, Wilfried A M

    2013-01-01

    Worldwide efforts to eradicate polio caused a tipping point in polio vaccination strategies. A switch from the oral polio vaccine, which can cause circulating and virulent vaccine derived polioviruses, to inactivated polio vaccines (IPV) is scheduled. Moreover, a manufacturing process, using attenuated virus strains instead of wild-type polioviruses, is demanded to enhance worldwide production of IPV, especially in low- and middle income countries. Therefore, development of an IPV from attenuated (Sabin) poliovirus strains (sIPV) was pursued. Starting from the current IPV production process based on wild type Salk strains, adaptations, such as lower virus cultivation temperature, were implemented. sIPV was produced at industrial scale followed by formulation of both plain and aluminium adjuvanted sIPV. The final products met the quality criteria, were immunogenic in rats, showed no toxicity in rabbits and could be released for testing in the clinic. Concluding, sIPV was developed to manufacturing scale. The technology can be transferred worldwide to support post polio-eradication biosafety goals. PMID:24349497

  14. Progress Toward Polio Eradication - Worldwide, 2015-2016.

    Morales, Michelle; Tangermann, Rudolf H; Wassilak, Steven G F

    2016-01-01

    In 1988, the World Health Assembly resolved to eradicate poliomyelitis. Wild poliovirus (WPV) transmission persists in only two countries (Afghanistan and Pakistan) after the removal of Nigeria from the list of countries with endemic polio in September 2015.* Indigenous WPV type 2 has not been detected since 1999 and was declared eradicated by the Global Commission for the Certification of Poliomyelitis Eradication in September 2015.(†) Since November 2012, when the last case of WPV type 3 was detected in Nigeria, WPV type 1 has been the sole circulating type of WPV (1). This report summarizes global progress toward polio eradication during 2015-2016 and updates previous reports (2). In 2015, 74 WPV cases were reported in two countries (Afghanistan and Pakistan), a decrease of 79% from the 359 WPV cases reported in 2014 in nine countries; 12 WPV cases have been reported in 2016 (to date), compared with 23 during the same period in 2015 (3). Paralytic polio caused by circulating vaccine-derived poliovirus (cVDPV) remains a risk in areas with low oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV) coverage. Seven countries, including Pakistan, reported 32 cVDPV cases in 2015 (4). In four of these countries, ≥6 months have passed since the most recent case or isolate. One country (Laos) with VDPV transmission in 2015 has reported three additional cVDPV cases in 2016 to date. Encouraging progress toward polio eradication has been made over the last year; however, interruption of WPV transmission will require focus on reaching and vaccinating every missed child through high quality supplementary immunization activities (SIAs) and cross-border coordination between Afghanistan and Pakistan (5,6). PMID:27171208

  15. Tracking progress toward polio eradication - worldwide, 2013-2014.

    Porter, Kimberly A; Diop, Ousmane M; Burns, Cara C; Tangermann, Rudolph H; Wassilak, Steven G F

    2015-04-24

    Global efforts to eradicate polio began in 1988 and have been successful in all but two of the six World Health Organization (WHO) regions. Within these two regions (African and Eastern Mediterranean), three countries (Afghanistan, Nigeria, and Pakistan) have never interrupted transmission of wild poliovirus (WPV). Outbreaks following importation of WPV from these countries occurred in the Horn of Africa, Central Africa, and in the Middle East during 2013-2014. The primary means of tracking polio is surveillance for cases of acute flaccid paralysis (AFP), the main symptom of polio, followed by testing of AFP patients' stool specimens for both WPV and vaccine-derived poliovirus (VDPV) in WHO-accredited laboratories within the Global Polio Laboratory Network (GPLN). This is supplemented with environmental surveillance (testing sewage for WPV and VDPV) (4). Both types of surveillance use genomic sequencing for characterization of poliovirus isolates to map poliovirus transmission and for identifying gaps in AFP surveillance by measuring genetic divergence between isolates. This report presents 2013 and 2014 poliovirus surveillance data, focusing primarily on the two WHO regions with endemic WPV transmission, and the 29 countries (African Region = 23; Eastern Mediterranean Region = six) with at least one case of WPV or circulating VDPV (cVDPV) reported during 2010-2014. In 2013, 20 of these 23 African region countries met both primary surveillance quality indicators; in 2014, the number decreased to 15. In 2013, five of the six Eastern Mediterranean Region countries met the primary indicators, and in 2014, all six did. To complete and certify polio eradication, surveillance gaps must be identified and surveillance activities, including supervision, monitoring, and specimen collection, further strengthened. PMID:25905895

  16. Resistance of polio to its eradication in Pakistan

    Sher Zunaira

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study is based on EPI (Expanded Program on Immunization immunization surveys and surveillance of polio, its challenges in immunization and the way forward to overcome these challenges. Methods Several Government documents, survey reports and unpublished program documents were studied and online search was made to find information on EPI Pakistan. SPSS 16 and Microsoft Excel 2007 were used for the statistical analysis. Results Immunization against polio is higher in urban areas as compared to rural areas. Marked variation in vaccination has been observed in different provinces of Pakistan in the last decade. Secondly 10-20% of the children who have received their first dose of trivalent polio vaccine were deprived of their 2nd and 3rd dose because of poor performance of EPI and Lack of information about immunization. Conclusion In spite of numerous successes, such as the addition of new vaccines and raising immunization to over 100% in some areas, EPI is still struggling to reach its polio eradication goals. Inadequate service delivery, lack of information about immunization and limited number of vaccinators were found to be the key reason for poor performance of immunization and for large number of cases reported each year due to the deficiency of second and third booster dose.

  17. Faster Detection of Poliomyelitis Outbreaks to Support Polio Eradication.

    Blake, Isobel M; Chenoweth, Paul; Okayasu, Hiro; Donnelly, Christl A; Aylward, R Bruce; Grassly, Nicholas C

    2016-03-01

    As the global eradication of poliomyelitis approaches the final stages, prompt detection of new outbreaks is critical to enable a fast and effective outbreak response. Surveillance relies on reporting of acute flaccid paralysis (AFP) cases and laboratory confirmation through isolation of poliovirus from stool. However, delayed sample collection and testing can delay outbreak detection. We investigated whether weekly testing for clusters of AFP by location and time, using the Kulldorff scan statistic, could provide an early warning for outbreaks in 20 countries. A mixed-effects regression model was used to predict background rates of nonpolio AFP at the district level. In Tajikistan and Congo, testing for AFP clusters would have resulted in an outbreak warning 39 and 11 days, respectively, before official confirmation of large outbreaks. This method has relatively high specificity and could be integrated into the current polio information system to support rapid outbreak response activities. PMID:26890053

  18. Quantifying the impact of expanded age group campaigns for polio eradication.

    Bradley G Wagner

    Full Text Available A priority of the Global Polio Eradication Initiative (GPEI 2013-2018 strategic plan is to evaluate the potential impact on polio eradication resulting from expanding one or more Supplementary Immunization Activities (SIAs to children beyond age five-years in polio endemic countries. It has been hypothesized that such expanded age group (EAG campaigns could accelerate polio eradication by eliminating immunity gaps in older children that may have resulted from past periods of low vaccination coverage. Using an individual-based mathematical model, we quantified the impact of EAG campaigns in terms of probability of elimination, reduction in polio transmission and age stratified immunity levels. The model was specifically calibrated to seroprevalence data from a polio-endemic region: Zaria, Nigeria. We compared the impact of EAG campaigns, which depend only on age, to more targeted interventions which focus on reaching missed populations. We found that EAG campaigns would not significantly improve prospects for polio eradication; the probability of elimination increased by 8% (from 24% at baseline to 32% when expanding three annual SIAs to 5-14 year old children and by 18% when expanding all six annual SIAs. In contrast, expanding only two of the annual SIAs to target hard-to-reach populations at modest vaccination coverage-representing less than one tenth of additional vaccinations required for the six SIA EAG scenario-increased the probability of elimination by 55%. Implementation of EAG campaigns in polio endemic regions would not improve prospects for eradication. In endemic areas, vaccination campaigns which do not target missed populations will not benefit polio eradication efforts.

  19. Oversight role of the Independent Monitoring Board of the Global Polio Eradication Initiative.

    Rutter, Paul D; Donaldson, Liam J

    2014-11-01

    The Global Polio Eradication Initiative (GPEI) established its Independent Monitoring Board (IMB) in 2010 to monitor and guide its progress toward stopping polio transmission globally. The concept of an IMB is innovative, with no clear analogue in the history of the GPEI or in any other global health program. The IMB meets with senior program officials every 3-6 months. Its reports provide analysis and recommendations about individual polio-affected countries. The IMB also examines issues affecting the global program as a whole. Its areas of focus have included escalating the level of priority afforded to polio eradication (particularly by recommending a World Health Assembly resolution to declare polio eradication a programmatic emergency, which was enacted in May 2012), placing greater emphasis on people factors in the delivery of the program, encouraging innovation, strengthening focus on the small number of so-called sanctuaries where polio persists, and continuous quality improvement to reach every missed child with vaccination. The IMB's true independence from the agencies and countries delivering the program has enabled it to raise difficult issues that others cannot. Other global health programs might benefit from establishing similar independent monitoring mechanisms. PMID:25316831

  20. Role of Serial Polio Seroprevalence Studies in Guiding Implementation of the Polio Eradication Initiative in Kano, Nigeria: 2011–2014

    Craig, Kehinde TemilolaOluwa; Verma, Harish; Iliyasu, Zubairu; Mkanda, Pascal; Touray, Kebba; Johnson, Ticha; Walla, Abdullahi; Banda, Richard; Tegegne, Sisay G.; Yehualashet, Yared G.; Abba, Bashir; Ahmad-Shehu, Amina; Takane, Marina; Sutter, Roland W.; Nsubuga, Peter; Muhammad, Ado J. G.; Vaz, Rui G.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Nigeria was one of 3 polio-endemic countries before it was de-listed in September 2015 by the World Health Organization, following interruption of transmission of the poliovirus. During 2011–2014, Nigeria conducted serial polio seroprevalence surveys (SPS) in Kano Metropolitan Area, comprising 8 local government areas (LGAs) in Kano that is considered very high risk (VHR) for polio, to monitor performance of the polio eradication program and guide the program in the adoption of innovative strategies. Methods. Study subjects who resided in any of the 8 local government areas of Kano Metropolitan Area and satisfied age criteria were recruited from patients at Murtala Mohammed Specialist Hospital (Kano) for 3 seroprevalence surveys. The same methods were used to conduct each survey. Results. The 2011 study showed seroprevalence values of 81%, 75%, and 73% for poliovirus types 1, 2, and 3, respectively, among infants aged 6–9 months age. Among children aged 36–47 months, seroprevalence values were greater (91%, 87%, and 85% for poliovirus types 1, 2, and 3, respectively). In 2013, the results showed that the seroprevalence was unexpectedly low among infants aged 6–9 months, remained high among children aged 36–47 months, and increased minimally among children aged 5–9 years and those aged 10–14 years. The baseline seroprevalence among infants aged 6–9 months in 2014 was better than that in 2013. Conclusions. The results from the polio seroprevalence surveys conducted in Kano Metropolitan Area in 2011, 2013, and 2014 served to assess the trends in immunity and program performance, as well as to guide the program, leading to various interventions being implemented with good effect, as evidenced by the reduction of poliovirus circulation in Kano. PMID:26908720

  1. Analysing the impact of the polio eradication initiative on routine immunisation in Uttar Pradesh, India

    Haenssgen, MJ

    2012-01-01

    Embedded in the study of interactions between global health initiatives and country health systems, this paper analyses the impact of the Polio Eradication Initiative’s (PEI) on the routine immunisation programme in Uttar Pradesh, India. Applying the policy implementation framework and a mixed-method research design to analyse the PEI’s policy to “strengthen routine immunisation,” qualitative analysis demonstrates ambiguous translations of programme policies into operational guidelines. Tr...

  2. World Health Organization Guidelines for Containment of Poliovirus Following Type-Specific Polio Eradication - Worldwide, 2015.

    Previsani, Nicoletta; Tangermann, Rudolph H; Tallis, Graham; Jafari, Hamid S

    2015-08-28

    In 1988, the World Health Assembly of the World Health Organization (WHO) resolved to eradicate polio worldwide. Among the three wild poliovirus (WPV) types (type 1, type 2, and type 3), WPV type 2 (WPV2) has been eliminated in the wild since 1999, and WPV type 3 (WPV3) has not been reported since 2012. In 2015, only Afghanistan and Pakistan have reported WPV transmission. On May 25, 2015, all WHO Member States endorsed World Health Assembly resolution 68.3 on full implementation of the Polio Eradication and Endgame Strategic Plan 2013-2018 (the Endgame Plan), and with it, the third Global Action Plan to minimize poliovirus facility-associated risk (GAPIII). All WHO Member States have committed to implementing appropriate containment of WPV2 in essential laboratory and vaccine production facilities* by the end of 2015 and of type 2 oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV2) within 3 months of global withdrawal of OPV2, which is planned for April 2016. This report summarizes critical steps for essential laboratory and vaccine production facilities that intend to retain materials confirmed to contain or potentially containing type-specific WPV, vaccine-derived poliovirus (VDPV), or OPV/Sabin viruses, and steps for nonessential facilities† that process specimens that contain or might contain polioviruses. National authorities will need to certify that the essential facilities they host meet the containment requirements described in GAPIII. After certification of WPV eradication, the use of all OPV will cease; final containment of all polioviruses after polio eradication and OPV cessation will minimize the risk for reintroduction of poliovirus into a polio-free world. PMID:26313474

  3. Partition and poliomyelitis: an investigation of the polio disparity affecting Muslims during India's eradication program.

    Rashid S Hussain

    Full Text Available Significant disparities in the incidence of polio existed during its eradication campaign in India. In 2006, Muslims, who comprise 16% of the population in affected states, comprised 70% of paralytic polio cases. This disparity was initially blamed on the Muslims and a rumor that the vaccination program was a plot to sterilize their children. Using the framework of structural violence, this paper describes how the socio-political and historical context of Muslim populations in India shaped the polio disparity.A qualitative study utilizing methods of rapid ethnography was conducted from May-August 2009 in Aligarh, Uttar Pradesh, India. Field methods included participant observation of vaccination teams, historical document research, and 107 interviews with both Global Polio Eradication Initiative (GPEI stakeholders and families with vaccine-eligible children. Almost all respondents agreed that Aligarh was a highly segregated city, mostly due to riots after Partition and during the 1990s. Since the formation of segregated neighborhoods, most respondents described that "Muslim areas" had been underdeveloped compared to "Hindu areas," facilitating the physical transmission of poliovirus. Distrust of the government and resistance to vaccination were linked to this disparate development and fears of sterilization influenced by the "Family Planning Program" from 1976-1977.Ethnic violence and social marginalization since the Partition and during the rise of Hindu nationalism led to distrust of the government, the formation of segregated slums, and has made Muslims victims of structural violence. This led to the creation of disease-spreading physical environments, lowered vaccine efficacy, and disproportionately higher levels of resistance to vaccination. The causes of the polio disparity found in this study elucidate the nature of possible other health disparities affecting minorities in India.This study is limited by the manual coding of the

  4. Are we doing enough? Evaluation of the Polio Eradication Initiative in a district of Pakistan's Punjab province: a LQAS study

    Waqas Muhammad

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The success of the Global Polio Eradication Initiative was remarkable, but four countries - Afghanistan, Pakistan, India and Nigeria - never interrupted polio transmission. Pakistan reportedly achieved all milestones except interrupting virus transmission. The aim of the study was to establish valid and reliable estimate for: routine oral polio vaccine (OPV coverage, logistics management and the quality of monitoring systems in health facilities, NIDs OPV coverage, the quality of NIDs service delivery in static centers and mobile teams, and to ultimately provide scientific evidence for tailoring future interventions. Methods A cross-sectional study using lot quality assessment sampling was conducted in the District Nankana Sahib of Pakistan's Punjab province. Twenty primary health centers and their catchment areas were selected randomly as 'lots'. The study involved the evaluation of 1080 children aged 12-23 months for routine OPV coverage, 20 health centers for logistics management and quality of monitoring systems, 420 households for NIDs OPV coverage, 20 static centers and 20 mobile teams for quality of NIDs service delivery. Study instruments were designed according to WHO guidelines. Results Five out of twenty lots were rejected for unacceptably low routine immunization coverage. The validity of coverage was questionable to extent that all lots were rejected. Among the 54.1% who were able to present immunization cards, only 74.0% had valid immunization. Routine coverage was significantly associated with card availability and socioeconomic factors. The main reasons for routine immunization failure were absence of a vaccinator and unawareness of need for immunization. Health workers (96.9% were a major source of information. All of the 20 lots were rejected for poor compliance in logistics management and quality of monitoring systems. Mean compliance score and compliance percentage for logistics management were 5.4 ± 2

  5. Intensified Local Resource Mobilization for the Polio Eradication Initiative: The Experience of World Health Organization in Nigeria During 2008–2015

    Yehualashet, Yared G.; Horton, Janet; Mkanda, Pascal; Vaz, Rui G.; Afolabi, Oluwole; Gashu, Sisay G.; Banda, Richard; O'Malley, Helena; Nsubuga, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Country Office team produced and submitted 102 grant reports and facilitated >20 joint project assessment exercises. Discussion. The polio program in Nigeria has achieved unprecedented gains, despite prevailing security and operational challenges, with no case of wild poliovirus infection since July 2014. Through rigorous, transparent, and accountable funds management practice, the WHO country office in Nigeria gained donors' confidence. The locally mobilized funds have made a remarkable contribution to the successful implementation of the strategies set out in the polio emergency plan. We face the challenges of a narrow donor-base, donor fatigue, and competition among other emerging agencies joining the polio eradication initiative efforts over the last few years. We actively engage the national authorities and partners for effective coordination of the polio eradication initiative program and harmonization of resources, using the existing platforms at national, state, and local levels. We recommend strengthening the local resource mobilization machinery and broadening the donor base, to support the polio endgame strategy. Such efforts should also be adopted to support routine immunization, introduction of new vaccines, and strengthening of health systems in the country as part of polio legacy planning. PMID:26912380

  6. National choices related to inactivated poliovirus vaccine, innovation and the endgame of global polio eradication.

    Thompson, Kimberly M; Duintjer Tebbens, Radboud J

    2014-02-01

    Achieving the goal of a world free of poliomyelitis still requires significant effort. Although polio immunization represents a mature area, the polio endgame will require new tools and strategies, particularly as national and global health leaders coordinate the cessation of all three serotypes of oral poliovirus vaccine and increasingly adopt inactivated poliovirus vaccine (IPV). Poliovirus epidemiology and the global options for managing polioviruses continue to evolve, along with our understanding and appreciation of the resources needed and the risks that require management. Based on insights from modeling, we offer some perspective on the current status of plans and opportunities to achieve and maintain a world free of wild polioviruses and to successfully implement oral poliovirus vaccine cessation. IPV costs and potential wastage will represent an important consideration for national policy makers. Innovations may reduce future IPV costs, but the world urgently needs lower-cost IPV options. PMID:24308581

  7. New Strains Intended for the Production of Inactivated Polio Vaccine at Low-Containment After Eradication.

    Knowlson, Sarah; Burlison, John; Giles, Elaine; Fox, Helen; Macadam, Andrew J; Minor, Philip D

    2015-12-01

    Poliomyelitis has nearly been eradicated through the efforts of the World Health Organization's Global Eradication Initiative raising questions on containment of the virus after it has been eliminated in the wild. Most manufacture of inactivated polio vaccines currently requires the growth of large amounts of highly virulent poliovirus, and release from a production facility after eradication could be disastrous; WHO have therefore recommended the use of the attenuated Sabin strains for production as a safer option although it is recognised that they can revert to a transmissible paralytic form. We have exploited the understanding of the molecular virology of the Sabin vaccine strains to design viruses that are extremely genetically stable and hyperattenuated. The viruses are based on the type 3 Sabin vaccine strain and have been genetically modified in domain V of the 5' non-coding region by changing base pairs to produce a cassette into which capsid regions of other serotypes have been introduced. The viruses give satisfactory yields of antigenically and immunogenically correct viruses in culture, are without measurable neurovirulence and fail to infect non-human primates under conditions where the Sabin strains will do so. PMID:26720150

  8. Strategic Engagement of Technical Surge Capacity for Intensified Polio Eradication Initiative in Nigeria, 2012–2015

    Yehualashet, Yared G.; Mkanda, Pascal; Gasasira, Alex; Erbeto, Tesfaye; Onimisi, Anthony; Horton, Janet; Banda, Richard; Tegegn, Sisay G.; Ahmed, Haruna; Afolabi, Oluwole; Wadda, Alieu; Vaz, Rui G.; Nsubuga, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Background. Following the 65th World Health Assembly (WHA) resolution on intensification of the Global Poliomyelitis Eradication Initiative (GPEI), the Nigerian government, with support from the World Health Organization (WHO) and other partners, implemented a number of innovative strategies to curb the transmission of wild poliovirus (WPV) in the country. One of the innovations successfully implemented since mid 2012 is the WHO's engagement of surge capacity personnel. Methods. The WHO reorganized its functional structure, adopted a transparent recruitment and deployment process, provided focused technical and management training, and applied systematic accountability framework to successfully manage the surge capacity project in close collaboration with the national counterparts and partners. The deployment of the surge capacity personnel was guided by operational and technical requirement analysis. Results. Over 2200 personnel were engaged, of whom 92% were strategically deployed in 11 states classified as high risk on the basis of epidemiological risk analysis and compromised security. These additional personnel were directly engaged in efforts aimed at improving the performance of polio surveillance, vaccination campaigns, increased routine immunization outreach sessions, and strengthening partnership with key stakeholders at the operational level, including community-based organizations. Discussion. Programmatic interventions were sustained in states in which security was compromised and the risk of polio was high, partly owing to the presence of the surge capacity personnel, who are engaged from the local community. Since mid-2012, significant programmatic progress was registered in the areas of polio supplementary immunization activities, acute flaccid paralysis surveillance, and routine immunization with the support of the surge capacity personnel. As of 19 June 2015, the last case of WPV was reported on 24 July 2014. The surge infrastructure has

  9. ERADIKASI POLIO DAN IPV (INACTIVATED POLIO VACCINE

    Gendrowahyuhono Gendrowahyuhono

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available In the year 1988, World Health Organization (WHO claims that polio viruses should be eradicated after year 2000. However, until year 2010 the world have not been free from polio viruses circulation. So many effort had been achieved and it is estimated that the world will be free from polio virus after the year 2013. Control of poliomyelitis in Indonesia has been commenced since 1982 with routine immunization of polio program and the National Immunization Days (NID has been commenced since 1995,1996,2005 and 2006. When the world is free from polio virus, WHO suggests several alternative effort to maintain the world free from polio viruses : I stop the OPV (Oral Polio Vaccine and no polio immunization, 2 stop OPV and stock pile mOPV (monovalent OPV, 3 use OPV and IPV (Inactivated Polio Vaccine in a certain times, 4 use IPV only in a certain times. IPV has been used routinely in develop countries but has not been used in the developing countries. Several studies in development countries has been conducted, but had not been done in the developing countries. Indonesia collaboration with WHO has conducted the study of IPV in Yogyakarta Province since year 2002 until year 2010. The overall aim of the study is to compile the necessary data that will inform global and national decision-making regarding future polio immunization policies for the OPV cessation era. The data generated from the study will be particularly important to make decisions regarding optimal IPV use in developing tropical countries. It is unlikely that this data can be assembled through other means than through this study. The tentative result of the study shows that OPV immunization coverage in the year 2004 is 99% in four district and 93 % in the Yogyakarta city. Environment surveillance shows that there are 65.7% polio virus detected from 137 sewage samples pre IPV swich, and 4.8% polio virus detected from 83 sewage samples post IPV swich. Survey polio antibody serologis shows

  10. World Witnesses a Tumultuous Year while India Reports an Eventful Decade in the Long Story of Polio Eradication.

    Chaturvedi, Sanjay

    2014-04-01

    With recent outbreaks in Syria and Horn of Africa, silent circulation of wild poliovirus type 1 (WPV1) in Israel, West Bank, and Gaza, and fresh spate of violence against vaccinators and their security personnel in Pakistan, the world is facing a turbulent final ascent to the summit of polio eradication. On the positive side, we may also be witnessing the end of wild poliovirus type 3 (WPV3) and defused programmatic crisis caused by funding gaps, while India registers third consecutive polio-free year. Having a cogent endgame plan 2013-2018, informed by some cardinal lessons learned from an eventful decade in India, is also a very significant development. Now, there is a parallel pursuit against WPV and vaccine-derived poliovirus (VDPV). Endgame would also involve integration of at least one dose of affordable inactivated polio vaccine (IPV) to up-scaled routine immunization (RI), switch from trivalent oral polio vaccine (tOPV) to bivalent oral polio vaccine (bOPV) in 144 countries before 2018, stockpiling of mOPV, and simultaneous global cessation of bOPV before 2020. Role of antivirals in post-eradication era is still unclear. Some specific threats emerging at this stage are as follows: Global buildup of new birth cohorts in non-endemic countries with weak RI and downscaled supplementary immunization activities (SIAs), tremendous pressure on peripheral health workers, and fatigued systems. Cultural resistance to transnational programs is taking a violent shape in some areas. Differential interpretations of 'right to say no', on both sides of the divide, are damaging a global cause. Amidst all these concerns, let us not forget to underline the sacrifice made by frontline vaccinators working in some of the most challenging circumstances. PMID:24963219

  11. World witnesses a tumultuous year while India reports an eventful decade in the long story of polio eradication

    Sanjay Chaturvedi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available With recent outbreaks in Syria and Horn of Africa, silent circulation of wild poliovirus type 1 (WPV1 in Israel, West Bank, and Gaza, and fresh spate of violence against vaccinators and their security personnel in Pakistan, the world is facing a turbulent final ascent to the summit of polio eradication. On the positive side, we may also be witnessing the end of wild poliovirus type 3 (WPV3 and defused programmatic crisis caused by funding gaps, while India registers third consecutive polio-free year. Having a cogent endgame plan 2013-2018, informed by some cardinal lessons learned from an eventful decade in India, is also a very significant development. Now, there is a parallel pursuit against WPV and vaccine-derived poliovirus (VDPV. Endgame would also involve integration of at least one dose of affordable inactivated polio vaccine (IPV to up-scaled routine immunization (RI, switch from trivalent oral polio vaccine (tOPV to bivalent oral polio vaccine (bOPV in 144 countries before 2018, stockpiling of mOPV, and simultaneous global cessation of bOPV before 2020. Role of antivirals in post-eradication era is still unclear. Some specific threats emerging at this stage are as follows: Global buildup of new birth cohorts in non-endemic countries with weak RI and downscaled supplementary immunization activities (SIAs, tremendous pressure on peripheral health workers, and fatigued systems. Cultural resistance to transnational programs is taking a violent shape in some areas. Differential interpretations of ′right to say no′, on both sides of the divide, are damaging a global cause. Amidst all these concerns, let us not forget to underline the sacrifice made by frontline vaccinators working in some of the most challenging circumstances.

  12. From their own perspective - constraints in the Polio Eradication Initiative: perceptions of health workers and managers in a district of Pakistan's Punjab province

    Mushtaq Muhammad Umair

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The success of the Global Polio Eradication Initiative was remarkable, but four countries - Afghanistan, Pakistan, India and Nigeria - never interrupted polio transmission. Pakistan reportedly achieved all milestones except interrupting virus transmission. This paper describes the perceptions of health workers and managers regarding constraints in the Polio Eradication Initiative (PEI to ultimately provide evidence for designing future interventions. Methods A qualitative cross-sectional study using focus group discussions and in-depth interviews was conducted in the Nankana Sahib District of Pakistan's Punjab province. Study subjects included staff at all levels in the PEI at district headquarters, in all 4 tehsils (sub-districts and at 20 randomly selected primary health centers. In total, 4 FGD and 7 interview sessions were conducted and individual session summary notes were prepared and later synthesized, consolidated and subjected to conceptual analysis. Results The main constraints identified in the study were the poor condition of the cold chain in all aspects, poor skills and a lack of authority in resource allocation and human resource management, limited advocacy and communication resources, a lack of skills and training among staff at all levels in the PEI/EPI in almost all aspects of the program, a deficiency of public health professionals, poor health services structure, administrative issues (including ineffective means of performance evaluation, bureaucratic and political influences, problems in vaccination areas and field programs, no birth records at health facilities, and poor linkage between different preventive programs, unreliable reporting and poor monitoring and supervision systems, limited use of local data for interventions, and unclear roles and responsibilities after decentralization. Conclusion The study highlights various shortcomings and bottlenecks in the PEI, and the barriers identified should

  13. The Challenge of Global Poliomyelitis Eradication.

    Garon, Julie R; Cochi, Stephen L; Orenstein, Walter A

    2015-12-01

    In the United States during the 1950's, polio was on the forefront of every provider and caregiver's mind. Today, most providers in the United States have never seen a case. The Global Polio Eradication Initiative (GPEI), which began in 1988 has reduced the number of cases by over 99%. The world is closer to achieving global eradication of polio than ever before but as long as poliovirus circulates anywhere in the world, every country is vulnerable. The global community can support the polio eradication effort through continued vaccination, surveillance, enforcing travel regulations and contributing financial support, partnerships and advocacy. PMID:26610419

  14. Support for children identified with acute flaccid paralysis under the global polio eradication programme in Uttar Pradesh, India: a qualitative study

    Yotsu Rie R

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cases of polio in India declined after the implementation of the polio eradication programme especially in these recent years. The programme includes surveillance of acute flaccid paralysis (AFP to detect and diagnose cases of polio at early stage. Under this surveillance, over 40,000 cases of AFP are reported annually since 2007 regardless of the number of actual polio cases. Yet, not much is known about these children. We conducted a qualitative research to explore care and support for children with AFP after their diagnosis. Methods The research was conducted in a district of western Uttar Pradesh classified as high-risk area for polio. In-depth interviews with parents of children with polio (17, with non-polio AFP (9, healthcare providers (40, and key informants from community including international and government officers, religious leaders, community leaders, journalists, and academics (21 were performed. Results Minimal medicine and attention were provided at government hospitals. Therefore, most parents preferred private-practice doctors for their children with AFP. Many were visited at homes to have stool samples collected by authorities. Some were visited repetitively following the sample collection, but had difficulty in understanding the reasons for these visits that pertained no treatment. Financial burden was a common concern among all families. Many parents expressed resentment for their children's disease, notably have been affected despite receiving multiple doses of polio vaccine. Both parents and healthcare providers lacked information and knowledge, furthermore poverty minimised the access to available healthcare services. Medicines, education, and transportation means were identified as foremost needs for children with AFP and residual paralysis. Conclusions Despite the high number of children diagnosed with AFP as part of the global polio eradication programme, we found they were not provided with

  15. Outcomes of polio eradication activities in Uttar Pradesh, India: the Social Mobilization Network (SM Net and Core Group Polio Project (CGPP

    Singh Vibha

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The primary strategy to interrupt transmission of wild poliovirus in India is to improve supplemental immunization activities and routine immunization coverage in priority districts with a focus on 107 high-risk blocks of western Uttar Pradesh and central Bihar. Villages or urban areas with a history of wild poliovirus transmission, or hard-to-reach or resistant populations are categorized as high-risk areas within blocks. The Social Mobilization Network (SM Net was formed in Uttar Pradesh in 2003 to support polio eradication efforts through improved planning, implementation and monitoring of social mobilization activities in those high-risk areas. In this paper, we examine the vaccination outcomes in districts of SM Net where the CORE Group works. Methods We carried out a secondary data analysis of routine monitoring information collected by the SM Net and the Government of India. These data include information about vaccination outcomes in SM Net areas and non-SM Net areas within the districts where the CORE Group operates. Statistical analysis was used to compare, between SM Net and non-SM Net areas, vaccination outcomes considered sensitive to social mobilization efforts of the SM Net. We employed Generalized Estimating Equations (GEE statistical method to account for Intra-cluster Correlation (ICC, and used 'Quasi-likelihood under the independence model criterion (QIC' as the model selection method. Results Vaccination outcomes in SM Net areas were as high as or higher than in non-SM Net areas. There was considerable variation in vaccination outcomes between districts. Conclusions While not conclusive, the results suggest that the social mobilization efforts of the SM Net and the CORE Group are helping to increase vaccination levels in high-risk areas of Uttar Pradesh. Vaccination outcomes in CORE Group areas were equal or higher than in non-CORE, non-SM Net areas. This occurred even though SM Net areas are those with

  16. The role of nurses and midwives in polio eradication and measles control activities: a survey in Sudan and Zambia

    Haithami Salah

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nurses and midwives are the key providers of nursing and midwifery services; in many countries, they form the major category of frontline workers who provide both preventive and curative services in the community. When the skills and experience of nursing and midwifery personnel are maximized, they can contribute significantly to positive health outcomes. We conducted a survey among nurses and midwives working at district level in Sudan and Zambia to determine their roles and functions in polio eradication and measles elimination programmes. Methods Nurses and midwives practising in four selected districts in Sudan and in Zambia completed a self-administered questionnaire on their roles and responsibilities, their routine activities and their functions during supplementary immunization campaigns for polio and measles. Results Nurses and midwives were found to play significant roles in implementing immunization programme activities. The level of responsibilities of nurses and midwives in their routine work related more to existing opportunities than to their job descriptions. In Zambia, where nurses reported constraints in performing their tasks, the reasons cited were an increase in the burden of disease and the shortage of health personnel. Factors identified as key to improving work performance included written job descriptions, opportunities for staff and career development and opportunities to earn extra income through activities associated with their jobs. Other non-monetary incentives mentioned included reliable transport, resources and logistics to support routine work in the district. However, in both countries, during supplementary immunization activities or mass campaigns for polio eradication and measles control, nurses and midwives took on more management responsibilities. Conclusion This study shows that nurses and midwives play an important role in implementing immunization activities at the district level and

  17. Factors affecting routine immunization coverage among children aged 12-59 months in Lao PDR after regional polio eradication in western Pacific region.

    Maekawa, Masaharu; Douangmala, Somthana; Sakisaka, Kayako; Takahashi, Kenzoh; Phathammavong, Outavong; Xeuatvongsa, Anonh; Kuroiwa, Chushi

    2007-08-01

    The global poliomyelitis eradication programme had a great impact on routine immunization coverage in Lao PDR: DPT3 increased 23% in 1992 to 56% in 1999; OPV3 27% to 64%. However, after the achievement of regional eradication, coverage became stagnant in accordance with the withdrawal of various sources of financial supports. In place of the former funds, a public-private global partnership began to support EPI. We aim to explore factors affecting routine immunization coverage. From February to March of 2005, a cross-sectional questionnaire survey was conducted, targeting 341 mothers living in two districts where immunization coverage was the lowest and the middle in Oudomxay province. DPT3 coverage was 72%, higher than the national target of 65%; however, the drop-out rate was 21%. Influential factors on fully immunized child was distance, literacy, possession of livestock; mothers knowledge of immunization target diseases, measles immunization schedule; and mother's willingness to pay for immunization. In total, 98% of all mothers lived within a 30-minute walk of the immunization site. Household visits increased the immunization status among mothers who were illiterate, utilizing an outreach site for immunization, not willing to pay for immunization, receiving home delivery, and without health education attendance. The much higher routine immunization coverage especially in a district of poor EPI activities suggests a well-designed primary health care approach under the district strategy, the zone-zero social mobilization strategy and good lines of communications; it also points to the benefits of the polio eradication initiative. Household visits were found to be effective for people living with difficulties in such as education, living location, and finance. An equally shared funding system for the basic health as well as international policy for respecting the existing system in poor country is important. PMID:20103866

  18. Alternative administration routes and delivery technologies for polio vaccines.

    Kraan, Heleen; van der Stel, Wanda; Kersten, Gideon; Amorij, Jean-Pierre

    2016-08-01

    Global polio eradication is closer than ever. Replacement of the live attenuated oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV) by inactivated poliovirus vaccine (IPV) is recommended to achieve complete eradication. Limited global production capacity and relatively high IPV costs compared to OPV spur the need for improved polio vaccines. The target product profile of these vaccines includes not only dose sparing but also high stability, which is important for stockpiling, and easy application important for (emergency) vaccination campaigns. In this review, the current status of alternative polio vaccine delivery strategies is given. Furthermore, we discuss the feasibility of these strategies by highlighting challenges, hurdles to overcome, and formulation issues relevant for optimal vaccine delivery. PMID:26912100

  19. Eradication of yaws: historical efforts and achieving WHO's 2020 target.

    Kingsley Asiedu

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Yaws, one of the 17 neglected tropical diseases (NTDs, is targeted for eradication by 2020 in resolution WHA66.12 of the World Health Assembly (2013 and the WHO roadmap on NTDs (2012. The disease frequently affects children who live in poor socioeconomic conditions. Between 1952 and 1964, WHO and the United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF led a global eradication campaign using injectable benzathine penicillin. Recent developments using a single dose of oral azithromycin have renewed optimism that eradication can be achieved through a comprehensive large-scale treatment strategy. We review historical efforts to eradicate yaws and argue that this goal is now technically feasible using new tools and with the favorable environment for control of NTDs. We also summarize the work of WHO's Department of Control of Neglected Tropical Diseases in leading the renewed eradication initiative and call on the international community to support efforts to achieve the 2020 eradication goal. The critical factor remains access to azithromycin. Excluding medicines, the financial cost of yaws eradication could be as little as US$ 100 million.The development of new tools has renewed interest in eradication of yaws; with modest support, the WHO eradication target of 2020 can be achieved.

  20. Introduction of sequential inactivated polio vaccine-oral polio vaccine schedule for routine infant immunization in Brazil's National Immunization Program.

    Domingues, Carla Magda Allan S; de Fátima Pereira, Sirlene; Cunha Marreiros, Ana Carolina; Menezes, Nair; Flannery, Brendan

    2014-11-01

    In August 2012, the Brazilian Ministry of Health introduced inactivated polio vaccine (IPV) as part of sequential polio vaccination schedule for all infants beginning their primary vaccination series. The revised childhood immunization schedule included 2 doses of IPV at 2 and 4 months of age followed by 2 doses of oral polio vaccine (OPV) at 6 and 15 months of age. One annual national polio immunization day was maintained to provide OPV to all children aged 6 to 59 months. The decision to introduce IPV was based on preventing rare cases of vaccine-associated paralytic polio, financially sustaining IPV introduction, ensuring equitable access to IPV, and preparing for future OPV cessation following global eradication. Introducing IPV during a national multivaccination campaign led to rapid uptake, despite challenges with local vaccine supply due to high wastage rates. Continuous monitoring is required to achieve high coverage with the sequential polio vaccine schedule. PMID:25316829

  1. Eradication of Yaws: Historical Efforts and Achieving WHO's 2020 Target

    Fitzpatrick, Christopher; Asiedu, Kingsley; Jannin, Jean

    2014-01-01

    Introduction A disabling and disfiguring disease that “begins where the road ends”, yaws is targeted by WHO for eradication by the year 2020. The global campaign is not yet financed. To evaluate yaws eradication within the context of the post-2015 development agenda, we perform a somewhat allegorical cost-effectiveness analysis of eradication, comparing it to a counterfactual in which we simply wait for more roads (the end of poverty). Methods We use evidence from four yaws eradication pilot ...

  2. Progress Toward Poliomyelitis Eradication--Pakistan, January 2014-September 2015.

    Farag, Noha H; Wadood, Mufti Zubair; Safdar, Rana Muhammad; Ahmed, Nabil; Hamdi, Sabrine; Tangermann, Rudolph H; Ehrhardt, Derek

    2015-11-20

    Since Nigeria reported its last case of wild poliovirus type 1 (WPV1) in July 2014, Pakistan and Afghanistan remain the only two countries where WPV transmission has never been interrupted. This report describes actions taken and progress achieved toward polio eradication in Pakistan during January 2014-September 2015 and updates previous reports. A total of 38 WPV1 cases were reported in Pakistan during January-September 2015, compared with 243 during the same period in 2014 (an 84% decline). Among WPV1 cases reported in 2015, 32 (84%) occurred in children aged FATA) and Khyber Pakhtunkhwa (KPK) Province. During January-September 2015, WPV1 was detected in 20% (64 of 325) of environmental samples collected, compared with 34% (98 of 294) of samples collected during the same period in 2014. The quality and scope of polio eradication activities improved considerably following the establishment of a national Emergency Operations Center, which coordinated polio eradication partners' activities. All activities are following a National Polio Eradication Emergency Action Plan that includes a rigorous action plan for the polio low transmission season (January-April). The presence of WPV1 in environmental samples in areas where no polio cases are detected highlights the need to improve surveillance for acute flaccid paralysis (AFP). Focused efforts to close remaining immunity gaps by locating, tracking, and vaccinating continually missed children and improving coverage with OPV through the routine vaccination program are needed to stop WPV transmission in Pakistan. PMID:26584026

  3. Polio Vaccination

    ... to its advantages over IPV in providing intestinal immunity and providing secondary spread of the vaccine to unprotected contacts. Who needs this vaccine and when? Side Effects Excerpt from Vaccine Information Statement A Polio-Free ...

  4. How vaccine safety can become political--the example of polio in Nigeria.

    Clements, Christopher J; Greenough, Paul; Shull, Diana

    2006-01-01

    Vaccine safety is increasingly a major aspect of immunization programmes. Parents are becoming more aware of safety issues relating to vaccines their babies might receive. As a consequence, public health initiatives have had to take note of pressures brought to bear by individual parents and groups. Now we document a new phase in vaccine safety where it has been used to achieve political objectives. In 1988, the World Health Assembly declared its intention to eradicate poliomyelitis from the globe by the year 2000. This goal had to be postponed to 2005 for a number of reasons. Although the progress has been spectacular in achieving eradication in almost all nations and areas, the goal has been tantalizingly elusive. But arguably the most difficult country from which to eradicate the virus has been Nigeria. Over the past two years, tension has arisen in the north against immunizing against polio using the oral polio vaccine (OPV). Although this vaccine has been used in every other country in the world including other Muslim states, some religious leaders in the north found reason in August 2003 to advise their followers not to have their children vaccinated with OPV. Subsequent to this boycott, which the Kano governor had endorsed for a year and then ended in July 2004, cases of polio occurred in African nations previously free of the virus, and the DNA finger-print of the virus indicated it had come from Nigeria. In other words, Nigeria became a net exporter of polio virus to its African neighbours and beyond. Now the disease has spread to a dozen formerly polio-free countries, including Sudan and Indonesia. We show that, while the outward manifestations of the northern Nigerian intransigence were that of distrust of vaccine, the underlying problem was actually part of a longstanding dispute about political and religious power vis a vis Abuja. It is unlikely that polio transmission will be interrupted by 2005 if this dispute is allowed to run its course. PMID

  5. Non-Polio Enterovirus

    ... CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Non-Polio Enterovirus Note: Javascript is disabled or is not supported ... visit this page: About CDC.gov . Non-Polio Enterovirus Home About Non-Polio Enterovirus Overview Enterovirus D68 ...

  6. Polio--new challenges in 2006.

    Katz, Samuel L

    2006-07-01

    The continued progress of the Polio Eradication Program has encountered a number of hurdles in the past 2 years as virus has spread from northern Nigeria across much of central Africa and into the Middle East and as far as Indonesia. India continues to be a source of virus exportation but to a much less degree. WHO is optimistic regarding elimination of circulating virus from all of these countries in 2006 with the exception of Nigeria. Newly recognized obstacles to the eradication are the circulating vaccine-derived polioviruses (cVDPV) and those originating from immune deficient patients (iVDPV). Data are presented on the numbers and locations of cases of paralytic polio in 2004 and 2005 as reported to the WHO in early 2006. Scenarios for the maintenance of freedom from polio when/if the final cases occur are considered. PMID:16679055

  7. Post-Polio Syndrome

    ... had subtle paralytic polio where there was no obvious deficit. In such cases, prior polio should be ... because other medical conditions can complicate the evaluation. Depression, for example, is associated with fatigue and can ...

  8. Eradicating and eliminating infectious diseases: Past, Present and Future

    Jai P Narain

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available During the past 60 years, a number of infectious diseases have been targeted for eradication or elimination, with mixed results. While smallpox is the only one successfully eradicated so far, campaigns on yaws and malaria brought about a dramatic reduction in the incidence in the beginning of the campaign but ultimately could not achieve the desired goal. There is again a renewed interest in disease eradication. The World Health assembly in May 2010 passed a resolution calling for eradication of measles by 2015; the target of polio eradication still remains elusive. In view of these developments, it is appropriate time to revisit the concept of disease eradication and elimination, the achievements and failures of past eradication programmes and reasons thereof, and possibly apply these lessons while planning for the future activities. This paper based on the Dr. A.L.Saha Memorial Oration describes various infectious diseases that have been targeted for eradication or elimination since 1950s, the potential direct and indirect benefits from disease eradication, and the issues and opportunities for the future.

  9. The Journalists Initiatives on Immunisation Against Polio and Improved Acceptance of the Polio Vaccine in Northern Nigeria 2007–2015

    Warigon, Charity; Mkanda, Pascal; Banda, Richard; Zakari, Furera; Damisa, Eunice; Idowu, Audu; Bawa, Samuel; Gali, Emmanuel; Tegegne, Sisay G.; Hammanyero, Kulchumi; Nsubuga, Peter; Korir, Charles; Vaz, Rui G.

    2016-01-01

    Background. The polio eradication initiative had major setbacks in 2003 and 2007 due to media campaigns in which renowned scholars and Islamic clerics criticized polio vaccines. The World Health Organization (WHO) partnered with journalists in 2007 to form the Journalists Initiatives on Immunisation Against Polio (JAP), to develop communication initiatives aimed at highlighting polio eradication activities and the importance of immunization in northern Nigeria. Methods. We evaluated the impact of JAP activities in Kaduna State by determining the total number of media materials produced and the number of newspaper clips and bulletins published in support of polio eradication. We also determined the number of households in noncompliant communities that became compliant with vaccination during 2015 supplementary immunization activities (SIAs) after JAP interventions and compared caregivers’ sources of information about SIAs in 2007 before and after the JAP was formed. Results. Since creation of the JAP, >500 reports have been published and aired, with most portraying polio vaccine positively. During June 2015 SIAs in high-risk wards of Kaduna STATE, JAP interventions resulted in vaccination of 5122 of 5991 children (85.5%) from noncompliant households. During early 2007, the number of caregivers who had heard about SIA rounds from the media increased from 26% in January, before the JAP was formed, to 33% in March, after the initiation of JAP activities. Conclusions. The formation of the JAP resulted in measurable improvement in the acceptance of polio vaccine in northern Nigeria. PMID:26721745

  10. Polio programme: let us declare victory and move on.

    Vashisht, Neetu; Puliyel, Jacob

    2012-01-01

    It was hoped that following polio eradication, immunisation could be stopped. However the synthesis of polio virus in 2002, made eradication impossible. It is argued that getting poor countries to expend their scarce resources on an impossible dream over the last 10 years was unethical. Furthermore, while India has been polio-free for a year, there has been a huge increase in non-polio acute flaccid paralysis (NPAFP). In 2011, there were an extra 47,500 new cases of NPAFP. Clinically indistinguishable from polio paralysis but twice as deadly, the incidence of NPAFP was directly proportional to doses of oral polio received. Though this data was collected within the polio surveillance system, it was not investigated. The principle of primum-non-nocere was violated. The authors suggest that the huge bill of US$ 8 billion spent on the programme, is a small sum to pay if the world learns to be wary of such vertical programmes in the future. PMID:22591873

  11. Estimating the risk of re-emergence after stopping polio vaccination

    Akira eSasaki

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Live vaccination against polio has effectively prevented outbreaks in most developed countries for more than 40 years, and there remain only a few countries where outbreaks of poliomyelitis by the wild strain still threaten the community. It is expected that worldwide eradication will be eventually achieved through careful surveillance and a well-managed immunization program. The present paper argues, however, that based on a simple stochastic model the risk of outbreak by a vaccine-derived strain after the cessation of vaccination is quite high, even if many years have passed since the last confirmed case. As vaccinated hosts are natural reservoirs for virulent poliovirus, the source of the risk is the vaccination itself, employed to prevent the outbreaks. The crisis after stopping vaccination will emerge when the following two conditions are met: the susceptible host density exceeds the threshold for epidemics and the vaccinated host density remains large enough to ensure the occurrence of virulent mutants in the population. Our estimates for transmission, recovery, and mutation rates, show that the probability of an outbreak of vaccine-derived virulent viruses easily exceeds 90%. Moreover, if a small fraction of hosts have a longer infectious period, as observed in individuals with innate immunodeficiency, the risk of an outbreak rises significantly. Under such conditions, successful global eradication of polio is restricted to a certain range of parameters even if inactive polio vaccine (IPV is extensively used after the termination of live vaccination.

  12. A case for developing antiviral drugs against polio.

    Collett, Marc S; Neyts, Johan; Modlin, John F

    2008-09-01

    Polio eradication is within sight. In bringing the world close to this ultimate goal, the Global Polio Eradication Initiative (GPEI) has relied exclusively on the live, attenuated oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV). However, as eradication nears, continued OPV use becomes less tenable due to the incidence of vaccine associated paralytic poliomyelitis (VAPP) in vaccine recipients and disease caused by circulating vaccine-derived polioviruses (cVDPVs) in contacts. Once wild poliovirus transmission has been interrupted globally, OPV use will stop. This will leave the inactivated poliovirus vaccine (IPV) as the only weapon to defend a polio-free world. Outbreaks caused by cVDPVs are expected post-OPV cessation, and accidental or deliberate releases of virus could also occur. There are serious doubts regarding the ability of IPV alone to control outbreaks. Here, we argue that antiviral drugs against poliovirus be added to the arsenal. Anti-poliovirus drugs could be used to treat the infected and protect the exposed, acting rapidly on their own to contain an outbreak and used as a complement to IPV. While there are no polio antiviral drugs today, the technological feasibility of developing such drugs and their probability of clinical success have been established by over three decades of drug development targeting the related rhinoviruses and non-polio enteroviruses (NPEVs). Because of this history, there are known compounds with anti-poliovirus activity in vitro that represent excellent starting points for polio drug development. Stakeholders must come to understand the potential public health benefits of polio drugs, the feasibility of their development, and the relatively modest costs involved. Given the timelines for eradication and those for drug development, the time for action is now. PMID:18513807

  13. Smallpox and polio eradication in India: comparative histories and lessons for contemporary policy Erradicação da varíola e da pólio na Índia: histórias comparativas e lições para políticas contemporâneas

    Sanjoy Bhattacharya

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available This article argues that a detailed examination of factors contributing to the development of complex structures and strategies for smallpox eradication in South Asia in the 1970s can provide fruitful indications for the reformulation of the national chapters of the global polio eradication programme in this region. There is a magnificent archive in the WHO's Geneva offices, which details how smallpox eradication outbreaks were located and then contained in cities, small towns and remote rural areas in this region, by teams of international workers working closely with local officials. A systematic assessment of the global smallpox eradication efforts indicates parallels between the early stages of the global smallpox eradication programme and the present situation of the polio campaign; as we will see here, it can also provide useful indicators for future action in South Asia and beyond.O artigo argumenta que um exame detalhado dos fatores que contribuíram para o desenvolvimento de estruturas e estratégias complexas para a erradicação da varíola no Sul da Ásia nos anos 70 pode fornecer indicações proveitosas para a reformulação dos capítulos nacionais do programa global de erradicação da pólio nesta região. Existe um impressionante arquivo nos escritórios da OMS em Genebra que detalha como os ataques para a erradicação da varíola foram localizados e então contidos em cidades, pequenas vilas e áreas rurais remotas desta região, por equipes de profissionais internacionais trabalhando em conjunto com as autoridades locais. Uma avaliação sistemática dos esforços globais de erradicação da varíola indicam paralelos entre os estágios iniciais do programa global de erradicação da varíola e a atual situação da campanha contra a pólio. Como veremos aqui, o artigo também pode fornecer indicadores úteis para ações futuras no Sul da Ásia e em outros locais.

  14. Polio elimination in Nigeria: A review.

    Nasir, Usman Nakakana; Bandyopadhyay, Ananda Sankar; Montagnani, Francesca; Akite, Jacqueline Elaine; Mungu, Etaluka Blanche; Uche, Ifeanyi Valentine; Ismaila, Ahmed Mohammed

    2016-03-01

    Nigeria has made tremendous strides towards eliminating polio and has been free of wild polio virus (WPV) for more than a year as of August 2015. However, sustained focus towards getting rid of all types of poliovirus by improving population immunity and enhancing disease surveillance will be needed to ensure it sustains the polio-free status. We reviewed the pertinent literature including published and unpublished, official reports and working documents of the Global Polio Eradication Initiative (GPEI) partners as well as other concerned organizations. The literature were selected based on the following criteria: published in English Language, published after year 2000, relevant content and conformance to the theme of the review and these were sorted accordingly. The challenges facing the Polio Eradication Initiative (PEI) in Nigeria were found to fall into 3 broad categories viz failure to vaccinate, failure of the Oral Polio Vaccine (OPV) and epidemiology of the virus. Failure to vaccinate resulted from insecurity, heterogeneous political support, programmatic limitation in implementation of vaccination campaigns, poor performance of vaccination teams in persistently poor performing Local Government areas and sporadic vaccine refusals in Northern Nigeria. Sub optimal effectiveness of OPV in some settings as well as the rare occurrence of VDPVs associated with OPV type 2 in areas of low immunization coverage were also found to be key issues. Some of the innovations which helped to manage the threats to the PEI include a strong government accountability frame work, change from type 2 containing OPV to bi valent OPVs for supplementary immunization activities (SIA), enhancing environmental surveillance in key states (Sokoto, Kano and Borno) along with an overall improvement in SIA quality. There has been an improvement in coverage of routine immunization and vaccination campaigns, which has resulted in Nigeria being removed from the list of endemic countries

  15. Smallpox and its eradication in the Democratic Republic of Congo: lessons learned.

    Muyembe-Tamfum, Jean-Jacques; Mulembakani, Prime; Lekie, René Botee; Szczeniowski, Mark; Ježek, Zdeněk; Doshi, Reena; Hoff, Nicole; Rimoin, Anne W

    2011-12-30

    Smallpox eradication is considered to be one of the most remarkable accomplishments of the 20th century. Lessons learned from the campaign during the 1960s and 1970s in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) can provide important information for the development of other eradication programs including polio. The DRC is the third largest country in Africa; the population suffers from extreme poverty, deteriorating infrastructure and health systems, and long periods of civil strife. Despite these challenges, DRC's smallpox eradication campaign was successful, eradicating smallpox only 41 months after initiation. DRC had been polio free since 2001; however, in 2006, imported cases were identified in the country. Polio transmission has since been re-established and DRC now has the second greatest number of reported polio cases in the world. Challenges which existed during the smallpox campaign in DRC are still present today; additionally, the polio vaccine itself poses unique challenges which include requiring multiple doses to confer immunity. In the fight against polio in DRC, it will be important to draw from the smallpox eradication experience. A number of important themes emerged during the campaign that could be beneficial to eradicating polio and future eradication programs that may follow. During the smallpox campaign, a standard vaccination program was implemented, surveillance was intensified, and there were strong collaborative programs with community involvement. These successful elements of the smallpox campaign should be adapted and applied in DRC in polio eradication programs. PMID:22188930

  16. Polio (For Parents)

    ... States), the approximately 10 cases per year of polio seen in this country were traced to OPV. IPV is a vaccine that stimulates the immune system of the body (through production of antibodies) to fight the virus if it ...

  17. Evaluation of National Immunization Day (NID Activities Under Intensified Pulse Polio Immunization Program (IPPI Feb 2012 in Central Gujarat, India

    Manish Rana, Sanju Gajjar, Rashmi Sharma, Anish Sinha, Brinda Chudasama, Pradeep Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: It has been more than 1 year since the last case of wild polio virus occurred in the country and we are at the final phase of polio eradication. It needs to enhance/ sustain all activities of polio eradication. This study was carried out to critically evaluate the various activities undertaken and make the suggestions for improvement during the National Immunization Day (NID of February 2012 under Intensified Pulse Polio Immunization Program (IPPI in urban/ rural areas of Ahmedabad, Kheda and Gandhinagar districts of Central Gujarat. Methodology: External evaluators after a training cum orientation program undertook the evaluation of NID (Feb 2012 in 3 districts of Central Gujarat in identified 20 booths through assessing booth based vaccination and undertaking surveys of house to house activities and at migratory/ transit/ street sites. Results: (a Booth based activities: Most booths were accessible and had supply of logistics (IEC materials, stationeries, vaccines, cold chain equipments, marker pens. Understaffing and last minute replacement with untrained staff and non participation of community or nongovernmental organizations (NGOs were some of the issues. (b House to house visits: External monitors could detect 7 missed sites with 63 unvaccinated children while the in house health supervisors could not detect any site. False P detection rates were also high for external monitors (5.3% than in house supervisors (1.3%. (c Migratory sites: Visit to 118 migratory sites yielded even more children as not vaccinated (16.8%. 21 transit sites showed the inadequacies of program where almost one third of children could not be checked for the vaccination. (d Street surveys: Street surveys done after completion of NID (Based on finger markings alone found 12.7% children as not vaccinated. Conclusions: Present communication aims to explore the problematic issues in achieving vaccination coverage, capacity building of team members and

  18. Polio vaccine and retroviruses.

    Beale, J; Horaud, F.

    2001-01-01

    In this paper we consider the main steps in the process of manufacture of oral polio vaccine and assess the probable clearance factor for HIV retrovirus at each step. We conclude that the processes employed would have eliminated retrovirus contamination for all practical purposes.

  19. Applying the Concept of Peptide Uniqueness to Anti-Polio Vaccination

    Darja Kanduc

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Although rare, adverse events may associate with anti-poliovirus vaccination thus possibly hampering global polio eradication worldwide. Objective. To design peptide-based anti-polio vaccines exempt from potential cross-reactivity risks and possibly able to reduce rare potential adverse events such as the postvaccine paralytic poliomyelitis due to the tendency of the poliovirus genome to mutate. Methods. Proteins from poliovirus type 1, strain Mahoney, were analyzed for amino acid sequence identity to the human proteome at the pentapeptide level, searching for sequences that (1 have zero percent of identity to human proteins, (2 are potentially endowed with an immunologic potential, and (3 are highly conserved among poliovirus strains. Results. Sequence analyses produced a set of consensus epitopic peptides potentially able to generate specific anti-polio immune responses exempt from cross-reactivity with the human host. Conclusion. Peptide sequences unique to poliovirus proteins and conserved among polio strains might help formulate a specific and universal anti-polio vaccine able to react with multiple viral strains and exempt from the burden of possible cross-reactions with human proteins. As an additional advantage, using a peptide-based vaccine instead of current anti-polio DNA vaccines would eliminate the rare post-polio poliomyelitis cases and other disabling symptoms that may appear following vaccination.

  20. Knowledge, attitude and practice of polio prevention among people in Khyber pakhtunkhwa

    To assess the knowledge, attitude and practice of Polio among people in Khyber PakhtunKhwa and to recommend measures in order to improve the awareness of disease. Study Design: Descriptive cross sectional study. Place and Duration of Study: This study was conducted at CMH Nowshera, CMH Mardan and Kohat General Hospital from March to June 2013. Subjects and Methods: Persons presenting for consultation to tertiary care hospitals at medical reception rooms were approached by convenience sampling. Structured questionnaire was developed and data was collected by interviews. Results: The findings of the study revealed that out of 296 persons participated in study 57.4% were males while 42.2% were females. They were residents of Mardan, Nowshera, Kohat and Swabi districts of Khyber Pakhtukhwa. Persons who believed that vaccine is prohibited in religion were 13.9%, 81.1% persons knew about Polio disease and 84.5% persons believed that disease could be prevented by giving vaccines to children. Persons who gave vaccine to their children were 88.9% and 66.9% also knew the schedule of the vaccine. Pressure groups which included tribal elders stopped 19.3% people from giving vaccine to their children and for 11.1% persons the facility of giving vaccine was not available. Persons who believed that Polio can cause infertility were 11.5% and 20.9% believed that Polio vaccine cannot prevent Polio disease. Persons who have seen patient of Polio were 38.9% and 88.5 % persons wanted to eradicate disease from Pakistan. Conclusion: The results of the study revealed that people have adequate knowledge about Polio and wanted to eradicate it from Pakistan by participating in vaccination activities but still there are few people who believe that Polio vaccine cannot prevent disease resulting in failure to adminster vaccine for their children. (author)

  1. Final stages of poliomyelitis eradication--Western Pacific Region, 1997-1998.

    1999-01-22

    In 1988, the World Health Assembly resolved to eradicate poliomyelitis globally by 2000. A plan of action for polio eradication in the Western Pacific Region (WPR) by 1995 was adopted in 1990. The plan was based on routine and supplemental vaccination activities with oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV) and acute flaccid paralysis (AFP) surveillance in the eight countries where polio was endemic (Cambodia, China, Laos, Malaysia, Mongolia, Papua New Guinea, Philippines, and Vietnam). Regionwide, the number of reported polio cases decreased from approximately 6000 in 1990 to zero in 1998. This report describes the extensive efforts to eliminate the last chains of poliovirus transmission in the Mekong River area. PMID:9933126

  2. Eradication and Current Status of Poliomyelitis in Pakistan: Ground Realities

    Shazia Ghafoor

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Pakistan is among the last three countries along with Afghanistan and Nigeria, where polio virus is still endemic. More or less, with some fluctuations, numbers of reported cases in the past few years have shown a rising trend. Year 2014 pushed the country into the deep sea of difficulties, as number of cases rose to red alert level of 328. Security situation has adversely affected the whole immunization coverage campaign. In a country where 40 polio vaccinators have been killed since 2012, such a big number of cases is not a surprising outcome. Worse perception of parents about polio vaccine as in Karachi and FATA, the high risk zones, makes 100% coverage a dream. Minor and perhaps delayed payments to polio workers make them frustrated, resulting in decline of trained manpower for vaccination. Strong implementation of policies is required and those found guilty of attack on polio workers need to be punished. Targeted community awareness programme, strong surveillance network, and involvement of influential religious entities can help to root out polio disease from country. Present review is aimed at analyzing all barriers on the road to success in eradication of polio from Pakistan.

  3. Eradication and Current Status of Poliomyelitis in Pakistan: Ground Realities.

    Ghafoor, Shazia; Sheikh, Nadeem

    2016-01-01

    Pakistan is among the last three countries along with Afghanistan and Nigeria, where polio virus is still endemic. More or less, with some fluctuations, numbers of reported cases in the past few years have shown a rising trend. Year 2014 pushed the country into the deep sea of difficulties, as number of cases rose to red alert level of 328. Security situation has adversely affected the whole immunization coverage campaign. In a country where 40 polio vaccinators have been killed since 2012, such a big number of cases is not a surprising outcome. Worse perception of parents about polio vaccine as in Karachi and FATA, the high risk zones, makes 100% coverage a dream. Minor and perhaps delayed payments to polio workers make them frustrated, resulting in decline of trained manpower for vaccination. Strong implementation of policies is required and those found guilty of attack on polio workers need to be punished. Targeted community awareness programme, strong surveillance network, and involvement of influential religious entities can help to root out polio disease from country. Present review is aimed at analyzing all barriers on the road to success in eradication of polio from Pakistan. PMID:27517055

  4. Progress toward poliomyelitis eradication--Nigeria, January 2003-March 2004.

    2004-04-30

    Since the 1988 World Health Assembly resolution to eradicate poliomyelitis, three World Health Organization (WHO) regions (Americas, Western Pacific, and European) have been certified polio-free, and the number of countries where polio is endemic has decreased from 125 in 1988 to six in 2003 (Afghanistan, Egypt, India, Niger, Nigeria, and Pakistan). In 2003, Nigeria, the most populous country of the African continent (2003 population projected from 1991 census report: 125 million), reported 355 wild poliovirus (WPV) cases, accounting for 45% of cases reported globally and >80% of cases reported from the African Region (AFR). This report summarizes progress toward polio eradication in Nigeria during January 2003-March 2004. The findings indicate the urgent need to implement high-quality supplementary immunization activities (SIAs) in Nigeria to interrupt ongoing WPV transmission. PMID:15123987

  5. Scale-down of the inactivated polio vaccine production process.

    Thomassen, Yvonne E; van 't Oever, Aart G; Vinke, Marian; Spiekstra, Arjen; Wijffels, René H; van der Pol, Leo A; Bakker, Wilfried A M

    2013-05-01

    The anticipated increase in the demand for inactivated polio vaccines resulting from the success in the polio eradication program requires an increase in production capacity and cost price reduction of the current inactivated polio vaccine production processes. Improvement of existing production processes is necessary as the initial process development has been done decades ago. An up-to-date lab-scale version encompassing the legacy inactivated polio vaccine production process was set-up. This lab-scale version should be representative of the large scale, meaning a scale-down model, to allow experiments for process optimization that can be readily applied. Initially the separate unit operations were scaled-down at setpoint. Subsequently, the unit operations were applied successively in a comparative manner to large-scale manufacturing. This allows the assessment of the effects of changes in one unit operation to the consecutive units at small-scale. Challenges in translating large-scale operations to lab-scale are discussed, and the concessions that needed to be made are described. The current scale-down model for cell and virus culture (2.3-L) presents a feasible model with its production scale counterpart (750-L) when operated at setpoint. Also, the current scale-down models for the DSP unit operations clarification, concentration, size exclusion chromatography, ion exchange chromatography, and inactivation are in agreement with the manufacturing scale. The small-scale units can be used separately, as well as sequentially, to study variations and critical product quality attributes in the production process. Finally, it is shown that the scale-down unit operations can be used consecutively to prepare trivalent vaccine at lab-scale with comparable characteristics to the product produced at manufacturing scale. PMID:23192424

  6. Inactivated polio vaccination using a microneedle patch is immunogenic in the rhesus macaque.

    Edens, Chris; Dybdahl-Sissoko, Naomi C; Weldon, William C; Oberste, M Steven; Prausnitz, Mark R

    2015-09-01

    The phased replacement of oral polio vaccine (OPV) with inactivated polio vaccine (IPV) is expected to significantly complicate mass vaccination campaigns, which are an important component of the global polio eradication endgame strategy. To simplify mass vaccination with IPV, we developed microneedle patches that are easy to administer, have a small package size, generate no sharps waste and are inexpensive to manufacture. When administered to rhesus macaques, neutralizing antibody titers were equivalent among monkeys vaccinated using microneedle patches and conventional intramuscular injection for IPV types 1 and 2. Serologic response to IPV type 3 vaccination was weaker after microneedle patch vaccination compared to intramuscular injection; however, we suspect the administered type 3 dose was lower due to a flawed pre-production IPV type 3 analytical method. IPV vaccination using microneedle patches was well tolerated by the monkeys. We conclude that IPV vaccination using a microneedle patch is immunogenic in rhesus macaques and may offer a simpler method of IPV vaccination of people to facilitate polio eradication. PMID:25749246

  7. Post-Polio Health International including International Ventilator Users Network

    ... at PHI Want to be a sponsor? Contact director@post-polio.org. Check out International Ventilator Users Network Post-Polio Health International's mission is to enhance the lives and independence of polio survivors and home ventilator users through ...

  8. A study of the knowledge and attitude towards pulse polio immunization in semi urban areas of South India

    Joseph N

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundThe government of India launched the pulse polioimmunization (PPI programme in 1995 with the aim oferadicating poliomyelitis by the end of 2000. Despite this,733 children with polio were reported in 2009 alone.Therefore, there is a need to understand the reasonunderlying such high numbers of cases after so many yearsof programme implementation. This study was performedto assess the knowledge of the general population aboutpoliomyelitis and PPI and their attitude and practicetowards PPI.MethodThis cross-sectional study was undertaken in two semiurbanareas of Mangalore city. Only houses in whichchildren under five lived were included in the study. Datawas collected by interviewing any adult member of thehousehold using a pretested questionnaire.ResultsThe literacy rate of study participants was 99%. Only35(10.9% participants knew the correct mode oftransmission of polio. More than one quarter of the studypopulation were under the misconception that polio is acurable disease. The primary source of information aboutPPI in majority of participants was the television (n = 192;60%. Two-hundred and eighty eight (90% participantsknew that the purpose of PPI was to eradicate polio. Only128 (40% participants knew that polio drops can be givento children with mild illnesses and an identical number ofparticipants knew that hot food stuff should not be givenfor at least half an hour following vaccinationadministration. Misconceptions such as PPI causing vaccineoverdose was identified among 7 (2.2% participants, it is asubstitute for routine immunization was believed among 30(9.4% participants and that oral polio vaccine preventsother diseases was seen among 76 (23.7% participants. Theeducational status of the participants was significantlyassociated with their awareness level (χ2 =13.668, DF=6,P=0.033.ConclusionThis study identified a few important misconceptionsassociated with polio and PPI which need to be addressedby large scale awareness

  9. Update: progress toward poliomyelitis eradication--Socialist Republic of Vietnam, 1993-1994.

    1995-06-01

    In 1988, the Western Pacific Region (WPR) of the World Health Organization (WHO) adopted a resolution to eradicate poliomyelitis from the region by the end of 1995. In 1993, the Socialist Republic of Vietnam (1993 population: 70.9 million) accounted for 452 (40%) of the 1147 cases of confirmed polio reported to WPR-WHO. Efforts to eradicate polio in Vietnam were initiated in 1991 using supplementary vaccination activities with oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV). National Immunization Days (NIDs) were first conducted during November-December 1993. This report updates these efforts and describes the impact of the first NIDs in 1993 (1). PMID:7753014

  10. Awareness of pulse polio immunisation.

    Gomber, S; Taneja, D K; Mohan, K

    1996-01-01

    Mass polio immunisation campaign was launched in the national capital territory of Delhi with 2 doses of polio vaccine to be administered to children upto 3 years of age on October and December 4, 1994 respectively. Massive information, education & communication (IEC) efforts through mass media and interpersonal communication preceded the dates of the campaign. A study to assess the awareness of general population was carried out by interviewing 225 adult residents of Delhi using a structured questionnaire. These were drawn by two stage stratified random sampling. Zonewise assembly segments in the first stage and census enumeration blocks in the second stage formed the sampling frame. The study, carried out 3 days prior to date of administration of first dose of oral polio, revealed that 60.4% of population was aware of the programme being launched and 31.6% about aim of the programme. None of the respondents were aware of all the specific parameters put together correctly viz., objective, immunisation days, age group & immunisation status of children. The higher level of awareness was directly proportional to the level of education. The overwhelming success of the programme was indicated by immunisation of > 90% children upto 3 years of age all over Delhi in the first phase of the programme. The key to success of the programme despite low awareness is explained on the basis of unflinching efforts put in by vaccine centre level committees, integrated child development scheme (ICDS) and urban basic service (UBS) functionaries in mobilising people to reach various vaccination centres. Other states planning to launch such mass campaigns should pay attention to social mobilisation in addition to IEC efforts for successful completion of the programme. PMID:10829972

  11. Seven-Day Nonbismuth Containing Quadruple Therapy Could Achieve a Grade “A” Success Rate for First-Line Helicobacter pylori Eradication

    Wei-Chen Tai

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This prospective study was to assess the efficacy of nonbismuth containing quadruple therapy as first-line H. pylori treatment and to determine the clinical factors influencing patient outcome. We enrolled 200 H. pylori-infected naïve patients. They were prescribed either a 7-day nonbismuth containing quadruple therapy group (EACM, esomeprazole 40 mg twice daily, amoxicillin 1 g twice daily, metronidazole 500 mg twice daily, and clarithromycin 500 mg twice daily or a 7-day standard triple therapy group (EAC, esomeprazole 40 mg twice daily, amoxicillin 1 g twice daily, and clarithromycin 500 mg twice daily. Follow-up studies to assess treatment responses were carried out 8 weeks later. The eradication rates attained by EACM and EAC groups were 95.6% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 89.4%–98.3% and 79.3% (95% CI = 70%–86.4% in the per-protocol analysis (P < 0.001 and 88% (95% CI = 80.2%–93.0% and 73% (95% I = 63.6%–80.3% in the intention-to-treat analysis (P = 0.007. Clarithromycin resistance, metronidazole resistance, and dual clarithromycin and metronidazole resistances were the clinical factors influencing H. pylori eradication in EACM group. Clarithromycin resistance and dual clarithromycin and metronidazole resistances were the influential factor for EAC treatment. In conclusion, the results suggest that 7-day nonbismuth containing quadruple therapy could achieve a grade “A” report card for first-line H. pylori treatment.

  12. Upaya Eradikasi Polio Di Indonesia

    Rina R., Oke; Ritarwan, Kiking

    2010-01-01

    Poliomyelitis is an acute infectious disease involve motor neuron of the spinal cord and brain and results in an asymmetric flaccid paralysis of the voluntary muscles. Although poliomyelitis caused by wild virus has been eradicated from the western since 1994, its remains a problem in developing countries.With widespread immunization, poliomyelitis has become preventable, and recurrent major epidemics are no longer encountered. Wisdom background and eradicate poliomyelitis strategy ...

  13. Frequency of isolation of polioviruses and non polio enteroviruses from patients with acute flaccid paralysis, enterovirus infection and children from groups at risk

    N. I. Romanenkova

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The article describes the frequency of isolation of polioviruses and non polio enteroviruses from different categories of the investigated children. The percentage of detection of polioviruses from the patients with acute flaccid paralysis was lower than that from the children from groups at risk. Among the patients with the enterovirus infection the polioviruses were rarely revealed. The frequency of isolation of non polio enteroviruses from these patients was significantly higher than that from the other categories of investigated persons. The improvement of poliomyelitis surveillance and the reinforcement of virological surveillance of children from groups at risk and those with enterovirus infection will provide the important data for Global Polio Eradication Initiative and the maintenance of polio free status of the Russian Federation.

  14. Polio

    ... is a medical emergency that may result in paralysis or death (usually from respiratory problems). Disability is more common than death. Infection that is located high in the spinal cord or in the brain increases the risk of breathing problems.

  15. Progress toward poliomyelitis eradication -- Western Pacific Region, January 1, 1996-September 27, 1997.

    1997-11-28

    In 1988, the World Health Assembly adopted the goal of global poliomyelitis eradication by 2000, which was endorsed in each of the six regions of the World Health Organization (WHO). In the Western Pacific Region (WPR), where the last known case of polio associated with isolation of wild poliovirus occurred in March 1997, the reported number of cases decreased from 5963 in 1990 to 197 in 1996. This report documents progress toward polio eradication in WPR from January 1, 1996, through September 27, 1997, in countries where polio is endemic (Cambodia, China, Laos, Papua New Guinea, Philippines, and Vietnam) or recently was endemic (Malaysia and Mongolia) and describes the routine and supplemental vaccination activities necessary to interrupt wild poliovirus transmission in the region. PMID:9393657

  16. Listening to the rumours: what the northern Nigeria polio vaccine boycott can tell us ten years on.

    Ghinai, Isaac; Willott, Chris; Dadari, Ibrahim; Larson, Heidi J

    2013-01-01

    In 2003 five northern Nigerian states boycotted the oral polio vaccine due to fears that it was unsafe. Though the international responses have been scrutinised in the literature, this paper argues that lessons still need to be learnt from the boycott: that the origins and continuation of the boycott were due to specific local factors. We focus mainly on Kano state, which initiated the boycotts and continued to reject immunisations for the longest period, to provide a focused analysis of the internal dynamics and complex multifaceted causes of the boycott. We argue that the delay in resolving the year-long boycott was largely due to the spread of rumours at local levels, which were intensified by the outspoken involvement of high-profile individuals whose views were misunderstood or underestimated. We use sociological concepts to analyse why these men gained influence amongst northern Nigerian communities. This study has implications on contemporary policy: refusals still challenge the Global Polio Eradication Initiative; and polio remains endemic to Nigeria (Nigeria accounted for over half of global cases in 2012). This paper sheds light on how this problem may be tackled with the ultimate aim of vaccinating more children and eradicating polio. PMID:24294986

  17. Reasons for non-vaccination in pediatric patients visiting tertiary care centers in a polio-prone country

    Sheikh, Asfandyar; Iqbal, Bushra; Ehtamam, Anabia; Rahim, Maria; Shaikh, Hiba Arshad; Usmani, Hina Azhar; Nasir, Javeria; Ali, Sheharbano; Zaki, Muniba; Wahab, Tooba Abdul; Wasim, Warda; Aftab, Ali Akber

    2013-01-01

    Background The Expanded Program on Immunization (EPI) was initiated by World Health Organization (WHO) in 1974 in order to save children from life threatening, disabling vaccine-preventable diseases (VPDs). In Pakistan, this program was launched in 1978 with the main objectives of eradicating polio by 2012, eliminating measles and neonatal tetanus by 2015, and minimizing the incidence of other VPDs. However, despite the efforts of government and WHO, this program has not received the amount o...

  18. The Role of the Polio Program Infrastructure in Response to Ebola Virus Disease Outbreak in Nigeria 2014

    Vaz, Rui G.; Mkanda, Pascal; Banda, Richard; Komkech, William; Ekundare-Famiyesin, Olubowale O.; Onyibe, Rosemary; Abidoye, Sunday; Nsubuga, Peter; Maleghemi, Sylvester; Hannah-Murele, Bolatito; Tegegne, Sisay G.

    2016-01-01

    Background. The current West African outbreak of the Ebola virus disease (EVD) began in Guinea in December 2013 and rapidly spread to Liberia and Sierra Leone. On 20 July 2014, a sick individual flew into Lagos, Nigeria, from Monrovia, Liberia, setting off an outbreak in Lagos and later in Port Harcourt city. The government of Nigeria, supported by the World Health Organization and other partners, mounted a response to the outbreak relying on the polio program experiences and infrastructure. On 20 October 2014, the country was declared free of EVD. Methods. We examined the organization and operations of the response to the 2014 EVD outbreak in Nigeria and how experiences and support from the country's polio program infrastructure accelerated the outbreak response. Results. The deputy incident manager of the National Polio Emergency Operations Centre was appointed the incident manager of the Ebola Emergency Operations Centre (EEOC), the body that coordinated and directed the response to the EVD outbreak in the country. A total of 892 contacts were followed up, and blood specimens were collected from 61 persons with suspected EVD and tested in designated laboratories. Of these, 19 (31%) were positive for Ebola, and 11 (58%) of the case patients were healthcare workers. The overall case-fatality rate was 40%. EVD sensitization and training were conducted during the outbreak and for 2 months after the outbreak ended. The World Health Organization deployed its surveillance and logistics personnel from non–Ebola-infected states to support response activities in Lagos and Rivers states. Conclusions. The support from the polio program infrastructure, particularly the coordination mechanism adopted (the EEOC), the availability of skilled personnel in the polio program, and lessons learned from managing the polio eradication program greatly contributed to the speedy containment of the 2014 EVD outbreak in Nigeria. PMID:26908718

  19. Post-Polio Directory 2014: Post-Polio Clinics, Health Professionals, Support Groups

    ... 6756 fax *Polio Services Victoria, Melbourne Russel Anbiah, Physiotherapist St. Vincent’s Hospital Melbourne PO Box 2900, Bolte ... Oliveira, Chief, Neurology Dept Tatiana Mesquita e Silva, Physiotherapist Abrahão Quadros, Physiotherapist Rua Estado de Israel 899 - ...

  20. Polio and Post-Polio Syndrome - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    ... Haitian Creole (Kreyol) Hmong (Hmoob) Ilocano (ilokano) Italian (italiano) Khmer (Khmer) Korean (한국어) Laotian (Lao) Polish (polski) ... Coalition; Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Italian (italiano) Polio Vaccine English Vaccino Antipoliomelite - italiano (Italian) PDF ...

  1. Revised Household-Based Microplanning in Polio Supplemental Immunization Activities in Kano State, Nigeria. 2013–2014

    Gali, Emmanuel; Mkanda, Pascal; Banda, Richard; Korir, Charles; Bawa, Samuel; Warigon, Charity; Abdullahi, Suleiman; Abba, Bashir; Isiaka, Ayodeji; Yahualashet, Yared G.; Touray, Kebba; Chevez, Ana; Tegegne, Sisay G.; Nsubuga, Peter; Etsano, Andrew; Shuaib, Faisal; Vaz, Rui G.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Remarkable progress had been made since the launch of the Global Polio Eradication Initiative in 1988. However endemic wild poliovirus transmission in Nigeria, Pakistan, and Afghanistan remains an issue of international concern. Poor microplanning has been identified as a major contributor to the high numbers of chronically missed children. Methods. We assessed the contribution of the revised household-based microplanning process implemented in Kano State from September 2013 to April 2014 to the outcomes of subsequent polio supplemental immunization activities using used preselected planning and outcome indicators. Results. There was a 38% increase in the number of settlements enumerated, a 30% reduction in the number of target households, and a 54% reduction in target children. The reported number of children vaccinated and the doses of oral polio vaccine used during subsequent polio supplemental immunization activities showed a decline. Postvaccination lot quality assurance sampling and chronically missed settlement reports also showed a progressive reduction in the number of children and settlements missed. Conclusions. We observed improvement in Kano State's performance based on the selected postcampaign performance evaluation indicators and reliability of baseline demographic estimates after the revised household-based microplanning exercise. PMID:26908755

  2. Obesity and Pulmonary Function in Polio Survivors

    Han, Soo Jeong; Lim, Jae-Young

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine the correlation between obesity and pulmonary function in polio survivors. Methods This study was conducted based on a questionnaire survey and physical examination. The questionnaire included gender, age, paralyzed regions, physical activity levels, and accompanying diseases. The physical examination included measuring body mass index, waist circumference, muscle power, total fat amount, body fat percentage, and lean body mass. In addition, pulmonary function was tested based on forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1), ratio of FEV1 to FVC, and chest circumference. Five university hospitals and a local health clinic participated in this study. Results Pearson and partial correlation coefficients that used data collected from 73 polio survivors showed that obesity had a negative correlation with pulmonary function. Conclusion This study found that pulmonary function has a negative correlation with obesity for polio survivors. Therefore, it is necessary to develop specialized exercise programs to help polio survivors reduce their weight and strengthen their respiratory muscles. PMID:26798602

  3. From smallpox eradication to the future of global health: innovations, application and lessons for future eradication and control initiatives.

    Tomori, Oyewale

    2011-12-30

    Technological advancements, including landmark innovations in vaccinology through molecular virology, and significant transformation and changes in the society have taken place since the eradication of smallpox thirty years ago. The success with eradicating smallpox gave confidence for initiating the eradication of other diseases, such as malaria and polio. However, these efforts have not been as effective, as recorded for small pox, for a variety of reasons. There is now a debate within the global health community as to whether eradication campaigns should be abandoned in favor of less costly and perhaps more effective primary health and containment or control programmes. Significant changes that have taken place in the last thirty years, since the eradication of smallpox include, among others, (i) post-colonial political changes, with varying commitment to disease eradication initiatives, especially in the parts of the world most burdened by infectious and vaccine preventable diseases, (ii) innovations leading to the development of new and highly effective vaccines, targeted to specific diseases, (iii) the transformation brought about by improvement in education and the new global access to information (cell phones, internet, etc.), leading to an unlimited access to different types of information, subject to either positive or negative use. At the onset of eradication of smallpox, global health was confined in its operation. Today, global health is at the intersection of medical and social science disciplines-including demography, economics, epidemiology, political economy and sociology. Therefore, in considering the issue of disease eradication, medical and social perspectives must be brought into play, if future eradication programmes must succeed. The paper discusses the roles of these disciplines in disease control and eradication, especially as it affects sub Saharan Africa, the melting pot and verdant pasture of infectious diseases. PMID:22185830

  4. Progress toward poliomyelitis eradication - Pakistan, January 2012-September 2013.

    2013-11-22

    Pakistan is one of three countries where transmission of indigenous wild poliovirus (WPV) has never been interrupted. This report describes polio eradication activities and progress in Pakistan during January 2012-September 2013 and updates previous reports. During 2012, 58 WPV cases were reported in selected areas, compared with 198 cases throughout the country in 2011; 52 WPV cases were reported during January-September 2013, compared with 54 cases during the same period in 2012. Of the 110 WPV cases reported since January 2012, 92 cases (84%) occurred in the conflict-affected Federally Administered Tribal Areas (FATA) and in security-compromised Khyber Pakhtunkhwa (KP) Province. WPV type 3 (WPV3) was isolated from only three persons with polio in a single district in 2012; the most recent case occurred in April 2012. During August 2012-September 2013, 52 circulating vaccine-derived poliovirus type 2 (cVDPV2) cases were detected, including 30 cases (58%) identified in FATA during January-September 2013. Approximately 350,000 children in certain districts of FATA have not received polio vaccine during supplementary immunization activities (SIAs) conducted since mid-2012 because local authorities have banned polio vaccination. In some other areas of Pakistan, SIAs have been compromised by attacks targeting polio workers that started in mid-2012. Further efforts to reach children in conflict-affected and security-compromised areas, including vaccinating at transit points and conducting additional short-interval-additional-dose (SIAD) SIAs as areas become accessible, will be necessary to prevent reintroduction of WPV into other areas of Pakistan and other parts of the world. PMID:24257203

  5. Crippling Violence: Conflict and Incident Polio in Afghanistan.

    Alison Norris

    Full Text Available Designing effective public health campaigns in areas of armed conflict requires a nuanced understanding of how violence impacts the epidemiology of the disease in question.We examine the geographical relationship between violence (represented by the location of detonated Improvised Explosive Devices and polio incidence by generating maps of IEDs and polio incidence during 2010, and by comparing the mean number of IED detonations in polio high-risk districts with non polio high-risk districts during 2004-2009.We demonstrate a geographic relationship between IED violence and incident polio. Districts that have high-risk for polio have highly statistically significantly greater mean numbers of IEDs than non polio high-risk districts (p-values 0.0010-0.0404.The geographic relationship between armed conflict and polio incidence provides valuable insights as to how to plan a vaccination campaign in violent contexts, and allows us to anticipate incident polio in the regions of armed conflict. Such information permits vaccination planners to engage interested armed combatants to co-develop strategies to mitigate the effects of violence on polio.

  6. Hormesis and the Salk Polio Vaccine

    Calabrese, Edward J.

    2011-01-01

    The production of the Salk vaccine polio virus by monkey kidney cells was generated using the synthetic tissue culture medium, Mixture 199. In this paper’s retrospective assessment of this process, it was discovered that Mixture 199 was modified by the addition of ethanol to optimize animal cell survival based on experimentation that revealed a hormetic-like biphasic response relationship. This hormesis-based optimization procedure was then applied to all uses of Mixture 199 and modifications...

  7. Survey of post polio syndrome in Tehran

    Talebian S

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground: The long-term effects of poliomyelitis are known in many of countries. In despite of one accrue title for these signs and symptoms; there are similarity aspects in patients' problems. In the signs of explained, absence of strength and endurance, musculoskeletal difficulties, respiratory dysfunction, sleep disorders are more generalized. Prevalence of post polio syndrome (PPS is aim of this study. "nMethods: 150 subjects with history of poliomyelitis (80 male and 70 female in Tehran city contributes in this study and complete question forms. "nResults: Muscle pain was reported in 88% of subjects. Thigh muscle weakness was at 42/28%, also muscle spasm indicated at 66%. Recurrent falling of subjects appeared in 74/7%. Early fatigue reported 86%. Above five signs selected for PPS. In this study 85 subjects had four signs of above criteria or 56.66% of subjects had PPS. "nConclusion:  Depended of evaluation and observation there is post polio syndrome in Tehran. Recommended for physical therapy of post polio syndrome attend to stages of progression of this syndrome. In aim to this procedure, physical treatment of these patients must limit to muscle fatigue and also severe physical and exercise activities must be reduce, also some mild aerobic activities without fatigue can be useful.

  8. Eradicating and eliminating infectious diseases: Past, Present and Future

    Narain, Jai P

    2011-01-01

    During the past 60 years, a number of infectious diseases have been targeted for eradication or elimination, with mixed results. While smallpox is the only one successfully eradicated so far, campaigns on yaws and malaria brought about a dramatic reduction in the incidence in the beginning of the campaign but ultimately could not achieve the desired goal. There is again a renewed interest in disease eradication. The World Health assembly in May 2010 passed a resolution calling for eradication...

  9. Progress toward poliomyelitis eradication--Democratic Republic of Congo, 1996-1999.

    2000-03-31

    In 1988, the World Health Assembly resolved to eradicate poliomyelitis by December 31, 2000 (1). Although progress has been extraordinary (2), full implementation of polio eradication strategies has been delayed in several countries affected by war. The Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) has experienced continual armed conflict since October 1996. As a result, DRC is the last country in the African Region of the World Health Organization (WHO) to implement National Immunization Days (NIDs*). DRC is an important global reservoir for wild poliovirus and shares more than 5580 miles (9000 km) of border with nine countries; in at least seven of these countries polio is endemic. The large area of DRC, substantial amount of poverty, weak health-care infrastructure, poor transportation and communication, and competing demands for resources present considerable challenges to polio eradication. This report summarizes information on the existing health-care infrastructure and routine coverage, information from NIDs carried out in 1999, and results from the recently established surveillance system for acute flaccid paralysis (AFP). PMID:10774546

  10. An Introduction to Poliovirus: Pathogenesis, Vaccination, and the Endgame for Global Eradication.

    Minor, Philip D

    2016-01-01

    Poliomyelitis is caused by poliovirus, which is a positive strand non-enveloped virus that occurs in three distinct serotypes (1, 2, and 3). Infection is mainly by the fecal-oral route and can be confined to the gut by antibodies induced either by vaccine, previous infection or maternally acquired. Vaccines include the live attenuated strains developed by Sabin and the inactivated vaccines developed by Salk; the live attenuated vaccine (Oral Polio Vaccine or OPV) has been the main tool in the Global Program of Polio eradication of the World Health Organisation. Wild type 2 virus has not caused a case since 1999 and type 3 since 2012 and eradication seems near. However most infections are entirely silent so that sophisticated environmental surveillance may be needed to ensure that the virus has been eradicated, and the live vaccine can sometimes revert to virulent circulating forms under conditions that are not wholly understood. Cessation of vaccination is therefore an increasingly important issue and inactivated polio vaccine (IPV) is playing a larger part in the end game. PMID:26983727

  11. Oral Polio Vaccination and Hospital Admissions With Non-Polio Infections in Denmark

    Sørup, Signe; Stensballe, Lone G; Krause, Tyra G;

    2016-01-01

    inactivated diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis-polio-Haemophilus influenzae type b vaccine (DTaP-IPV-Hib) or live measles-mumps-rubella vaccine (MMR) as their most recent vaccine. Methods.  A nationwide, register-based, retrospective cohort study of 137 403 Danish children born 1997-1999, who had received 3 doses...

  12. Progress toward poliomyelitis eradication--Socialist Republic of Vietnam, 1991-1993.

    1994-06-01

    In 1988, the World Health Organization (WHO) established the goal of global eradication of poliomyelitis by the year 2000 (1), and the Western Pacific Region (WPR) of WHO established the goal of regional eradication by 1995 (2). In 1990, the Socialist Republic of Vietnam (1993 population: 70.9 million; approximately 2 million births annually) endorsed this regional goal and enacted a National Plan of Action for eradication. This plan comprises three main strategies: 1) maintenance of high coverage with three doses of oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV) through routine vaccination; 2) supplemental vaccination with OPV, including National Immunization Days (NIDs) and outbreak-response vaccination; and 3) surveillance of acute flaccid paralysis (AFP) cases. This report summarizes the polio eradication effort in Vietnam during 1991-1993. PMID:8183231

  13. Evaluation and comparison of Hela, Hep2C and Vero cell lines sensitivity to polio vaccinal virus using micro and macro vaccine potency tests

    Soleimani, S.,

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Poliomyelitis, an acute viral infectious disease caused by poliovirus, still remains a public health problem in developing countries. Despite the global effort to eradicate polio, continuing the polio immunization with a potent and safe vaccine is essential. For accurate vaccine evaluation, three types of cell lines including Hela, Hep2C and Vero were evaluated and compared using two methods of polio vaccine potency tests (micro & macro. For cells comparison, five different batches from polio vaccines were tested and to develop the test, five variables including viruses, cells, serum, media and Co2 were studied. For validation, the titer of which has been well established as a working reference preparation (WRP was applied to control the accuracy and reproducibility of the testing system. Multiple comparisons were performed by analysis of variance (ANOVA followed by Tokey HDS and LSD. No significant differences were found between the potency of vaccine batches and between macro and micro methods. Reduction in cells sensitivity and potency of vaccines was found with increasing passage number. Significant differences were found between the sensitivity of the cell lines. The highest potency of polio vaccines was obtained using Hela cells (GMT in macro and micro test = 10 6.35; Hep2C cells were afterwards (GMT in macro= 10 6.01 and in micro test= 10 5.94; Vero cells were lowest (GMT in macro= 10 5.78 and in micro test= 10 5.72. So, the sensitivity and accuracy of the potency test for evaluation of the polio vaccine in immunization program in Iran will be assured using the Hela cell line with low passage number in macro and micro methods.

  14. 江苏省消灭脊髓灰质炎工作的回顾及策略%Review of the Works for Poliomyelitis Eradication and Its Strategies in Jiangsu Province

    刁连东

    2001-01-01

    routine polio vaccination, still we carried out supplementary vaccination to establish an effective immune barrier among the population; (2) To strengthen the AFP surveillance. The AFP surveillance system had been established in 1991 in Jiangsu Province, the various surveillance indexes now has reached every requirements for proving no polio virus exists. In the course of surveillance, we pursued a case-reporting encouragement system and an active AFP searching at regular intervals to strengthen AFP case reporting and surveillance. Since 1993, there was no wild-type polio virus found. To summarize and evaluate the strategies for poliomyelitis eradication not only can consolidate the achievements of the work but also can provide reference in controlling other viral diseases.

  15. Unusual MRI Findings in a Polio Survivor.

    Sakamoto, Masaaki; Watanabe, Hitoshi; Kubosawa, Hitoshi; Ishii, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    A 63-year-old male consulted our institution due to worsening of right hip pain for approximately one month. The patient had no apparent functional disorders besides rigidity of the right ankle secondary to childhood poliomyelitis. Plain radiographs demonstrated narrowing of the right hip joint space. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed unusual findings in the right gluteus medius muscle, suspecting a malignant musculoskeletal tumor. Further examinations clarified acute inflammation caused by Staphylococcus aureus with no atypia. After treatment, serum inflammatory markers normalized and MRI showed homogeneous fat signal intensity in the muscle, which was consistent with poliomyelitis. Total hip arthroplasty was performed due to progression of osteoarthritis. Intraoperative findings showed flaccidity of the gluteus medius muscle, and histological examination of the specimen also was compatible with poliomyelitis. Postoperatively there was no hip instability and the patient has been able to resume his previous physical activity. To our knowledge, this is the first report regarding polio survivors combined with septic arthritis, and sole MRI examination was unable to lead to the diagnosis. The current patient demonstrates the possibility that the involved muscles in poliomyelitis exist even in asymptomatic regions, which will be helpful for accurate diagnosis and life guidance in polio survivors. PMID:27069705

  16. Environmental surveillance of poliovirus and non-polio enterovirus in urban sewage in Dakar, Senegal (2007-2013)

    Ndiaye, Abdou Kader; Diop, Pape Amadou Mbathio; Diop, Ousmane Madiagne

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Global poliomyelitis eradication initiative relies on (i) laboratory based surveillance of acute flaccid surveillance (AFP) to monitor the circulation of wild poliovirus in a population, and (ii) vaccination to prevent its diffusion. However, as poliovirus can survive in the environment namely in sewage, environmental surveillance (ES) is of growing importance as the eradication target is close. This study aimed to assess polioviruses and non polio enteroviruses circulation in sewage drains covering a significant population of Dakar. Methods From April 2007 to May 2013, 271 specimens of raw sewage were collected using the grab method in 6 neighborhoods of Dakar. Samples were processed to extract and concentrate viruses using polyethylene glycol and Dextran (two-phase separation method). Isolation of enteroviruses was attempted in RD, L20B and Hep2 cell lines. Polioviruses were identified by RT-PCR and Elisa. Non Polio Enteroviruses (NPEVs) were identified by RT-PCR and microneutralisation tests. Results Polioviruses and NPEVs were respectively detected in 34,3% and 42,8% sewage samples. No wild poliovirus neither circulating vaccine-derived Poliovirus (cVDPV) was detected. Neutralization assays have identified 49 non polio enteroviruses that were subsequently classified in 13 serotypes belonging to HEV-A (22, 4%), HEV-B (12, 24%), HEV-C (26, 53%) and HEV-D (6, 12%) species. Conclusion This study is the first documentation of enteroviruses environmental detection in Senegal. It shows the usefulness of environmental surveillance for indirect monitoring of the circulation and distribution of enteroviruses in the community. PMID:25848458

  17. Willapa - Spartina Eradication 2013

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Willapa NWR and its partners continue the ongoing and successful program aimed at eradication of the nonnative cordgrass, Spartina alterniflora (Spartina) in...

  18. Strategies for dracunculiasis eradication.

    Hopkins, D R; Ruiz-Tiben, E.

    1991-01-01

    In 1991 the Forty-fourth World Health Assembly declared the goal of eradicating dracunculiasis (guinea worm disease) by the end of 1995. This article summarizes the recommended strategies for surveillance and interventions in national dracunculiasis eradication programmes. It is based on personal experience with dracunculiasis programmes in Ghana, Nigeria and Pakistan. Three phases are described: establishment of a national programme office and conduct of a baseline survey; implementation of ...

  19. Tsetse eradication: Zanzibar

    Tsetse flies (Glossina sp.) continue to make livestock production difficult or impossible throughout a very large part of Africa. One of the most promising techniques for eradicating tsetse from certain locations is the environmentally safe Sterile Insect Technique (SIT). In collaboration with the Tanzanian authorities, the Department of Technical Co-operation is sponsoring a programme, with technical support from the Joint FAO/IAEA Division, to eradicate tsetse from Zanzibar using the SIT. (IAEA)

  20. Improving Compliance with Helicobacter Pylori Eradication Therapy: When and How?

    O'Connor, John P. Anthony; Taneike, Ikue; O'Morain, Colm

    2009-01-01

    Compliance with therapy is the single most important factor in Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) eradication. Poorer levels of compliance with therapy are associated with significantly lower levels of eradication. Numerous factors can contribute to achieving good levels of compliance. These include the complexity and duration of treatment. It is also important that the physicia...

  1. The novel adjuvant dmLT promotes dose sparing, mucosal immunity and longevity of antibody responses to the inactivated polio vaccine in a murine model.

    Norton, Elizabeth B; Bauer, David L; Weldon, William C; Oberste, M Steven; Lawson, Louise B; Clements, John D

    2015-04-15

    One option for achieving global polio eradication is to replace the oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV), which has the risk of reversion to wild-type virulence, with the inactivated poliovirus vaccine (IPV) vaccine. Adjuvants and alternate routes of immunization are promising options that may reduce antigen dose in IPV vaccinations, potentially allowing dose sparing and cost savings. Use of adjuvants and alternate routes of immunization could also help promote mucosal immunity, potentially mimicking the protection against intestinal virus shedding seen with OPV. In the current study, we examined the impact of combining the novel adjuvant dmLT with trivalent IPV for dose sparing, induction of mucosal immunity and increasing longevity of anti-poliovirus (PV) responses in a mouse model following either intradermal (ID) or intramuscular (IM) delivery. We found that non-adjuvanted ID delivery was not superior to IM delivery for fractional dose sparing, but was associated with development of mucosal immunity. Vaccination with IPV+dmLT promoted serum anti-PV neutralizing antibodies with fractional IPV doses by either IM or ID delivery, achieving at least five-fold dose sparing above non-adjuvanted fractional doses. These responses were most noticeable with the PV1 component of the trivalent vaccine. dmLT also promoted germinal center formation and longevity of serum anti-PV neutralizing titers. Lastly, dmLT enhanced mucosal immunity, as defined by fecal and intestinal anti-PV IgA secretion, when included in IPV immunization by ID or IM delivery. These studies demonstrate that dmLT is an effective adjuvant for either IM or ID delivery of IPV. Inclusion of dmLT in IPV immunizations allows antigen dose sparing and enhances mucosal immunity and longevity of anti-PV responses. PMID:25765967

  2. Molecular epidemiology of enterovirus B77 isolated from non polio acute flaccid paralytic patients in Pakistan during 2013.

    Angez, Mehar; Shaukat, Shahzad; Zahra, Rabaab; Khurshid, Adnan; Sharif, Salmaan; Alam, Muhammad Masroor; Zaidi, Syed Sohail Zahoor

    2015-01-01

    Human enteroviruses are associated with various clinical syndromes and severe neurological disorders. The aim of this study was to determine the molecular epidemiology of non polio enteroviruses and their correlation with acute flaccid paralysis (AFP) patients living in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa (KP) and Federally Administered Tribal Areas (FATA) of Pakistan. The stool samples collected from these patients were used for isolation of non polio enteroviruses (NPEVs). Out of 38 samples, 29 (76.3%) were successfully typed by microneutralization assay into eleven serotypes including echovirus (E)-3 (5.3%), E-7 (2.6%), E-11 (13.2%), E-12 (7.9%), E-13 (10.5%), E-20 (7.9%), E-27 (5.3%), E-29 (10.5%), E-30 (7.9%), E-33 (2.6%), coxsackievirus (CV) B5 (2.6%) and nine isolates (23.7%) remained untyped which were confirmed as NPEVs by real time RT-PCR. Complete VP1 genetic sequencing data characterized untypeable isolates into enterovirus B77 (EV-B77). Moreover, molecular phylogenetic analysis classified these viruses into two new genotypes having high genetic diversity (at least 17.7%) with prototype. This study provides valuable information on extensive genetic diversity of EV-B77 genotypes. Although, its association with neurological disorder has not yet been known but isolation of nine EV-B77 viruses from AFP cases highlights the fact that they may have a contributing role in the etiology of AFP. In addition, it is needed to establish enterovirus surveillance system and laboratory diagnostic facilities for early detection of NPEVs that may cause poliomyelitis like paralysis especially in the situation when we are at the verge of polio eradication. PMID:25433133

  3. The Meaning of Gender while Aging with Paralytic Polio

    Harrison, Tracie; Stuifbergen, Alexa; Walker, Janiece; Scott, Tiffany; Choban, Robin

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to report the influence of gender on aging with childhood onset paralytic polio. The hermeneutic phenomenological exploration of gender was done using multiple qualitative interviews with 25 women, age 55 to 75 years of age, who had polio since before 14 years of age. We noted three themes: 1) The movement of her body, 2) Integrating body and gender, and 3) Gender discrepancies. Findings are discussed in the context of gendered expectations and the women’s bodies.

  4. Fruit fly eradication: Argentina

    Fruit exports account for 9% of Argentina's total agricultural exports and generate annually close to $450 million. This could be increased but for fruit flies that cause damage equivalent to 15% to 20% of present production value of fruit and also deny export access to countries imposing quarantine barriers. The Department of Technical Co-operation is sponsoring a programme, with technical support from the Joint FAO/IAEA Division, to eradicate the Mediterranean fruit fly using the Sterile Insect Technique (SIT). (IAEA)

  5. Pylera for the eradication of Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Saleem, Aamir

    2012-02-01

    An ideal antibiotic regimen for Helicobacter pylori should achieve eradication rates of approximately 90%. Current 7-day triple therapy is successful in about two-thirds of patients. A novel treatment is required to achieve higher eradication with minimal induction of bacterial resistance. The aim of this article is to evaluate the safety and efficacy of a single triple capsule (Pylera) containing bismuth, metronidazole and tetracycline, given with omeprazole for the eradication of H. pylori infection. Extensive literature searches were conducted using PubMed data from 1982 to 2007. This search included headings of H. pylori, bismuth and eradication therapy. The triple capsule Pylera, when given with omeprazole, achieved eradication rates ranging between 84 and 97%. Eradication rates were similar for clarithromycin- and metronidazole-resistant strains. Eradication rates with an omeprazole, bismuth, metronidazole and tetracycline regimen appeared comparable for metronidazole-resistant and -sensitive strains. This effect is not seen with the use of triple therapy in cases of clarithromycin resistance. Clinical trials did not report any serious side effects from bismuth-based regimens and compliance was similar to standard triple therapy. Bismuth-based triple therapy using Pylera is a simplified, effective and well-tolerated regimen achieving cure rates of above 90%.

  6. Measuring Gender Satisfaction among Women Aging with Paralytic Polio

    Walker, Janiece L.; Harrison, Tracie C.

    2013-01-01

    In this study we tested the Gendered Outcome Scale as a measure of gender satisfaction among 295 women aging with the disabling affects of paralytic polio. Principal components analysis, reliability analyses, and content validity were analyzed on the scale. The scale had a Cronbach’s alpha of .90. Younger women had more gender satisfaction (r=−.173, p

  7. Patients with post-polio syndrome are more likely to have subclinical involvement as compared to polio survivors without new symptoms

    On, Arzu Yağız; Sungur, Ulaş

    2016-01-01

    Background: Post-polio syndrome (PPS) is a condition that affects polio survivors decades after recovery from an initial acute attack. It is a well-known entity that limbs thought to be nonaffected by polio survivors commonly demonstrate electromyography (EMG) evidence of prior polio. Although the diagnosis of PPS requires a remote history of acute paralytic polio, clinically unapparent damage caused by poliovirus can be associated with PPS later in life. Objective: To evaluate EMG abnormalities and late progressive symptoms in limbs thought to be nonaffected by polio survivors, in order to determine the prevalence of subclinical motor neuron involvement in those fulfilling criteria for PPS comparing to those without such symptoms. Materials and Methods: Clinical and EMG findings of 464 limbs in 116 polio survivors who had been admitted to our clinic were analyzed. Affection of the limbs by polio was classified based on the patient's self-report on remote weakness during the acute phase of poliomyelitis, muscle strength measured by manual muscle testing, and four-limb needle EMG. Results: Seventy-six of the patients (65.5%) met the criteria of PPS. Needle EMG studies revealed subclinical involvement in 122 out of 293 (42%) limbs with no history of remote weakness during the acute phase of poliomyelitis. Prevalence of subclinical involvement was found 47% in polio survivors who met the criteria of PPS compared to 33% in those without PPS (P = 0.013). Among the limbs that had developed new weakness in PPS patients, 33.5% had subclinical involvement. Discussion and Conclusion: Subclinical involvement is common in limbs thought to be nonaffected by polio survivors, and this is especially present in those fulfilling criteria for PPS. New muscle weakness may develop in apparently nonaffected, subclinically involved muscles. Thus we believe that four-limb EMG studies should be performed in all polio survivors, especially in those with the symptoms of PPS. PMID:27011627

  8. Patients with post-polio syndrome are more likely to have subclinical involvement as compared to polio survivors without new symptoms

    Arzu Yagiz On

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Post-polio syndrome (PPS is a condition that affects polio survivors decades after recovery from an initial acute attack. It is a well-known entity that limbs thought to be nonaffected by polio survivors commonly demonstrate electromyography (EMG evidence of prior polio. Although the diagnosis of PPS requires a remote history of acute paralytic polio, clinically unapparent damage caused by poliovirus can be associated with PPS later in life. Objective: To evaluate EMG abnormalities and late progressive symptoms in limbs thought to be nonaffected by polio survivors, in order to determine the prevalence of subclinical motor neuron involvement in those fulfilling criteria for PPS comparing to those without such symptoms. Materials and Methods: Clinical and EMG findings of 464 limbs in 116 polio survivors who had been admitted to our clinic were analyzed. Affection of the limbs by polio was classified based on the patient′s self-report on remote weakness during the acute phase of poliomyelitis, muscle strength measured by manual muscle testing, and four-limb needle EMG. Results: Seventy-six of the patients (65.5% met the criteria of PPS. Needle EMG studies revealed subclinical involvement in 122 out of 293 (42% limbs with no history of remote weakness during the acute phase of poliomyelitis. Prevalence of subclinical involvement was found 47% in polio survivors who met the criteria of PPS compared to 33% in those without PPS (P = 0.013. Among the limbs that had developed new weakness in PPS patients, 33.5% had subclinical involvement. Discussion and Conclusion: Subclinical involvement is common in limbs thought to be nonaffected by polio survivors, and this is especially present in those fulfilling criteria for PPS. New muscle weakness may develop in apparently nonaffected, subclinically involved muscles. Thus we believe that four-limb EMG studies should be performed in all polio survivors, especially in those with the symptoms of PPS.

  9. Oral Polio Vaccination and Hospital Admissions With Non-Polio Infections in Denmark: Nationwide Retrospective Cohort Study.

    Sørup, Signe; Stensballe, Lone G; Krause, Tyra G; Aaby, Peter; Benn, Christine S; Ravn, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    Background.  Live vaccines may have nonspecific beneficial effects on morbidity and mortality. This study examines whether children who had the live-attenuated oral polio vaccine (OPV) as the most recent vaccine had a different rate of admissions for infectious diseases than children with inactivated diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis-polio-Haemophilus influenzae type b vaccine (DTaP-IPV-Hib) or live measles-mumps-rubella vaccine (MMR) as their most recent vaccine. Methods.  A nationwide, register-based, retrospective cohort study of 137 403 Danish children born 1997-1999, who had received 3 doses of DTaP-IPV-Hib, were observed from 24 months (first OPV dose) to 36 months of age. Results.  Oral polio vaccine was associated with a lower rate of admissions with any type of non-polio infection compared with DTaP-IPV-Hib as most recent vaccine (adjusted incidence rate ratio [IRR], 0.85; 95% confidence interval [CI], .77-.95). The association was separately significant for admissions with lower respiratory infections (adjusted IRR, 0.73; 95% CI, .61-.87). The admission rates did not differ for OPV versus MMR. Conclusions.  Like MMR, OPV was associated with fewer admissions for lower respiratory infections than having DTaP-IPV-Hib as the most recent vaccination. Because OPV is now being phased-out globally, further studies of the potential beneficial nonspecific effects of OPV are warranted. PMID:26885538

  10. Rinderpest Eradication in Africa

    After its introduction into Africa in the 1880s, rinderpest became the most feared and most devastating disease to afflict the continent's cattle and wildlife herds. Outbreaks of the classical disease in cattle caused mortality rates of 10 to 90 percent. So devastating was this 'cattle plague' that many countries worldwide made concerted efforts to stamp it out and, having once eliminated it, prevent its re-emergence. The disease was a serious threat to the livelihoods of millions of people in Africa. The presence or suspected presence in a country served as a major barrier to livestock trade, and many countries of the world, particularly in Africa, were denied access to valuable external livestock markets. This devastating blow to trade impoverished the pastoral peoples of Africa and dealt considerable blows to the economies of their countries. The present-day African Union3 Inter-African Bureau for Animal Resources (AUIBAR) 4 was established in 1951 with responsibility for eliminating rinderpest from Egypt and sub-Saharan Africa, where continual east-west cattle movements prevented effective control by individual countries. Since then, with the European Union (EU) as the main donor, AU-IBAR has coordinated the eradication of rinderpest from Africa through five main projects: Joint Project 15 (JP15), 1962 to 1976; the Pan African Rinderpest Campaign (PARC), 1986 to 1998; the Pan African Programme for the Control of Epizootics (PACE), 1999 to 2007; the African Wildlife Veterinary Project (AWVP), 2002 to 2003; and the Somali Ecosystem Rinderpest Eradication Coordination Unit (SERECU) project, 2006 to 2010. In tandem with rinderpest eradication, the need to strengthen veterinary services was addressed. From JP15 to SERECU, the main objective was the eradication of rinderpest from Africa. Alongside this main objective were other complementary and synergistic objectives. Under PARC, these were controlling contagious bovine pleuropneumonia (CBPP) through mass

  11. Randomized trial: The effect of oral polio vaccine at birth on polio antibody titers at 6 weeks and 6 months of age

    Anna Sofie Hansen

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions: OPV0 may contribute to early polio protection, particularly in children of mothers with low antibody levels. However, OPV0 did not contribute to overall polio immunity after subsequent doses of OPV were given, and was associated with significantly lower antibody titers in children of mothers with high antibody levels. However, it did not negatively affect the proportion of seropositive children.

  12. [Polio, the long walk to the endgame].

    García-Sánchez, José Elías; García-Sánchez, Enrique; García-Merino, Enrique; Fresnadillo-Martínez, María José

    2015-12-01

    Although the WHO original target date for the global eradication of poliomyelitis was the year 2000 -thanks to vaccination and institutional, public and private, resources for that purpose-, in 2013 the disease remained endemic in three countries, Afghanistan, Pakistan and Nigeria, and some cases were described in five others. The circulation of wild type 1 poliovirus in Israel, Gaza and the West Bank and the cases in Syria were a wakeup call, as at that time there were polioviruses derived from the oral vaccine that are still circulating among the human population and can cause the development of the disease. Travelling "from" and "to" endemic areas are factors to consider in poliovirus exportation and in its spread when it reaches areas with poor immunogenicity. Wars, terrorism, intolerance, lack of culture and proliferation of anti-vaccine groups and the rise of the anti-vaccination movement are important factors in the maintenance and expansion of the virus and in the "non-vaccination" against it. Based on the international situation to date, the Emergency Committee of WHO met in May 2014 to address the problem. It is still necessary to enhance the knowledge of the disease and its agent. In the first case to perform a differential diagnosis of flaccid paralysis and to continue vaccination programs, and in the second case to keep studying and looking for the poliovirus in environmental samples, which is a model for the study of many other viruses. PMID:25595690

  13. Ileo-colic intussusception following oral polio vaccination: A mere coincidence or morbid consequence

    Shaw, Chandan Kumar; Shaw, Prachi; Malla, Tejesh; Malla, Kalpana K.; Baxi, Jalaj

    2013-01-01

    Abstract. The National polio surveillance programme is one ofthe prime health projects in Nepaland its neighboring countries. A huge amount of effort and money is beingpumped into polio surveillance in these areas. Vaccine associated Paralyticpolio is one of the prime concerns as far as the side effects are considered.In the past there has been concern over the relationship of Oral Polio Vaccine(OPV) with intussusception as with rotavirus vaccine. We report a case ofileo-colic intussusception...

  14. Challenges and key research questions for yaws eradication

    Marks, Michael; Mitjà, Oriol; Vestergaard, Lasse S; Pillay, Allan; Knauf, Sascha; Chen, Cheng-Yen; Bassat, Quique; Martin, Diana L.; Fegan, David; Taleo, Fasihah; Kool, Jacob; Lukehart, Sheila; Emerson, Paul M.; Solomon, Anthony W; Ye, Tun

    2015-01-01

    Yaws is endemic in West Africa, Southeast Asia and the Pacific. The WHO has launched a campaign based on mass treatment with azithromycin, to eradicate yaws by 2020. Progress has been made towards achieving this ambitious goal, including the validation of point-of-care and molecular diagnostic tests and piloting of the strategy in a number of countries including Ghana, Vanuatu and Papua New Guinea. There is a need to address gaps in knowledge to allow refinement of the eradication strategy. S...

  15. Thermostabilization of inactivated polio vaccine in PLGA-based microspheres for pulsatile release.

    Tzeng, Stephany Y; Guarecuco, Rohiverth; McHugh, Kevin J; Rose, Sviatlana; Rosenberg, Evan M; Zeng, Yingying; Langer, Robert; Jaklenec, Ana

    2016-07-10

    Vaccines are a critical clinical tool in preventing illness and death due to infectious diseases and are regularly administered to children and adults across the globe. In order to obtain full protection from many vaccines, an individual needs to receive multiple doses over the course of months. However, vaccine administration in developing countries is limited by the difficulty in consistently delivering a second or third dose, and some vaccines, including the inactivated polio vaccine (IPV), must be injected more than once for efficacy. In addition, IPV does not remain stable over time at elevated temperatures, such as those it would encounter over time in the body if it were to be injected as a single-administration vaccine. In this manuscript, we describe microspheres composed of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) that can encapsulate IPV along with stabilizing excipients and release immunogenic IPV over the course of several weeks. Additionally, pH-sensitive, cationic dopants such as Eudragit E polymer caused clinically relevant amounts of stable IPV release upon degradation of the PLGA matrix. Specifically, IPV was released in two separate bursts, mimicking the delivery of two boluses approximately one month apart. In one of our top formulations, 1.4, 1.1, and 1.2 doses of the IPV serotype 1, 2, and 3, respectively, were released within the first few days from 50mg of particles. During the delayed, second burst, 0.5, 0.8, and 0.6 doses of each serotype, respectively, were released; thus, 50mg of these particles released approximately two clinical doses spaced a month apart. Immunization of rats with the leading microsphere formulation showed more robust and long-lasting humoral immune response compared to a single bolus injection and was statistically non-inferior from two bolus injections spaced 1 month apart. By minimizing the number of administrations of a vaccine, such as IPV, this technology can serve as a tool to aid in the eradication of polio and

  16. A research agenda for malaria eradication: modeling.

    2011-01-01

    Malaria modeling can inform policy and guide research for malaria elimination and eradication from local implementation to global policy. A research and development agenda for malaria modeling is proposed, to support operations and to enhance the broader eradication research agenda. Models are envisioned as an integral part of research, planning, and evaluation, and modelers should ideally be integrated into multidisciplinary teams to update the models iteratively, communicate their appropriate use, and serve the needs of other research scientists, public health specialists, and government officials. A competitive and collaborative framework will result in policy recommendations from multiple, independently derived models and model systems that share harmonized databases. As planned, modeling results will be produced in five priority areas: (1) strategic planning to determine where and when resources should be optimally allocated to achieve eradication; (2) management plans to minimize the evolution of drug and pesticide resistance; (3) impact assessments of new and needed tools to interrupt transmission; (4) technical feasibility assessments to determine appropriate combinations of tools, an associated set of target intervention coverage levels, and the expected timelines for achieving a set of goals in different socio-ecological settings and different health systems; and (5) operational feasibility assessments to weigh the economic costs, capital investments, and human resource capacities required. PMID:21283605

  17. Undiagnosed Hoffa fracture of medial femoral condyle presenting as chronic pain in a post-polio limb

    Aditya Krishna Mootha; Priyanka Majety; Vishal Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Isolated coronal fracture of medial femoral condyle with intact lateral femoral condyle is extremely rare.A high index of suspicion is necessary for early diagnosis especially in cases of undisplaced fractures.Here we report a case of medial Hoffa fracture in a post-polio limb presenting as chronic pain.Management of such fractures in limbs affected by late sequelae of poliomyelitis is particularly problematic in view ofosteoporosis and osseous hypoplasia.The fracture was approached through medial parapatellar arthrotomy and fixation was done with cannulated cancellous screws in anteroposterior direction.Union was achieved at 16 weeks.

  18. Mankind's Magnificent Milestone: Smallpox Eradication.

    Small, Parker A., Jr.; Small, Natalie S.

    1996-01-01

    Illustrates the complex interactions between disease, societal attitudes, and technology by looking at the history of smallpox. Describes one of mankind's most magnificent accomplishments--the eradication of smallpox from the earth. (JRH)

  19. Willapa - Spartina Mapping and Eradication

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Willapa National Wildlife Refuge (Willapa NWR) continued a successful program aimed at eradicating the non-native cordgrass, Spartina alterniflora (Spartina)...

  20. Willapa - Spartina Mapping and Eradication

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Willapa National Wildlife Refuge (Willapa NWR) continues to work toward the eradication of the non-native cordgrass, Spartina alterniflora (Spartina) from...

  1. Invasive rodent eradication on islands.

    Howald, Gregg; Donlan, C Josh; Galván, Juan Pablo; Russell, James C; Parkes, John; Samaniego, Araceli; Wang, Yiwei; Veitch, Dick; Genovesi, Piero; Pascal, Michel; Saunders, Alan; Tershy, Bernie

    2007-10-01

    Invasive mammals are the greatest threat to island biodiversity and invasive rodents are likely responsible for the greatest number of extinctions and ecosystem changes. Techniques for eradicating rodents from islands were developed over 2 decades ago. Since that time there has been a significant development and application of this conservation tool. We reviewed the literature on invasive rodent eradications to assess its current state and identify actions to make it more effective. Worldwide, 332 successful rodent eradications have been undertaken; we identified 35 failed eradications and 20 campaigns of unknown result. Invasive rodents have been eradicated from 284 islands (47,628 ha). With the exception of two small islands, rodenticides were used in all eradication campaigns. Brodifacoum was used in 71% of campaigns and 91% of the total area treated. The most frequent rodenticide distribution methods (from most to least) are bait stations, hand broadcasting, and aerial broadcasting. Nevertheless, campaigns using aerial broadcast made up 76% of the total area treated. Mortality of native vertebrates due to nontarget poisoning has been documented, but affected species quickly recover to pre-eradication population levels or higher. A variety of methods have been developed to mitigate nontarget impacts, and applied research can further aid in minimizing impacts. Land managers should routinely remove invasive rodents from islands <100 ha that lack vertebrates susceptible to nontarget poisoning. For larger islands and those that require nontarget mitigation, expert consultation and greater planning effort are needed. With the exception of house mice (Mus musculus), island size may no longer be the limiting factor for rodent eradications; rather, social acceptance and funding may be the main challenges. To be successful, large-scale rodent campaigns should be integrated with programs to improve the livelihoods of residents, island biosecurity, and reinvasion response

  2. Childhood mortality after oral polio immunisation campaign in Guinea-Bissau

    Aaby, Peter; Hedegaard, Kathryn; Sodemann, Morten;

    2005-01-01

    Though previous studies have suggested a non-specific beneficial effect of oral polio vaccine (OPV), there has been no evaluation of the mortality impact of national polio immunization days. On the other hand, studies examining the effect of OPV and diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis (DTP) vaccines, wh...

  3. Psoriasis sparing the polio-affected limb: Is it merely the koebner phenomenon?

    B C Ravikumar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Psoriasis being a common skin condition, atypical forms and unusual localizations of this disease are quite frequently seen. However, psoriasis sparing a polio-affected limb is extremely rare. We report a case of an adult male, who presented with psoriasis distributed all over the body but with almost complete sparing of the polio-affected left lower limb.

  4. Molecular Characterization of Polio from Environmental Samples: ISSP, The Israeli Sewage Surveillance Protocol.

    Shulman, Lester M; Manor, Yossi; Hindiyeh, Musa; Sofer, Danit; Mendelson, Ella

    2016-01-01

    Polioviruses are enteric viruses that cause paralytic poliomyelitis in less than 0.5 % of infections and are asymptomatic in >90 % infections of naïve hosts. Environmental surveillance monitors polio in populations rather than in individuals. When this very low morbidity to infection ratio, drops drastically in highly vaccinated populations, environmental surveillance employing manual or automatic sampling coupled with molecular analysis carried out in well-equipped central laboratories becomes the surveillance method of choice since polioviruses are excreted by infected individuals regardless of whether or not the infection is symptomatic. This chapter describes a high throughput rapid turn-around time method for molecular characterization of polioviruses from sewage. It is presented in five modules: (1) Sewage collection and concentration of the viruses in the sewage; (2) Cell cultures for identification of virus in the concentrated sewage; (3) Nucleic acid extractions directly from sewage and from tissue cultures infected with aliquots of concentrated sewage; (4) Nucleic Acid Amplification for poliovirus serotype identification and intratypic differentiation (discriminating wild and vaccine derived polioviruses form vaccine strains); and (5) Molecular characterization of viral RNA by qRT-PCR, TR-PCR, and Sequence analysis. Monitoring silent or symptomatic transmission of vaccine-derived polioviruses or wild polioviruses is critical for the endgame of poliovirus eradication. We present methods for adapting standard kits and validating the changes for this purpose based on experience gained during the recent introduction and sustained transmission of a wild type 1 poliovirus in Israel in 2013 in a population with an initial IPV vaccine coverage >90 %. PMID:26983731

  5. Lessons learnt to keep Europe polio-free: a review of outbreaks in the European Union, European Economic Area, and candidate countries, 1973 to 2013.

    Derrough, Tarik; Salekeen, Alexandra

    2016-04-21

    Between 1973 and 2013, 12 outbreaks of paralytic poliomyelitis with a cumulative total of 660 cases were reported in the European Union, European Economic Area and candidate countries. Outbreaks lasted seven to 90 weeks (median: 24 weeks) and were identified through the diagnosis of cases of acute flaccid paralysis, for which infection with wild poliovirus was subsequently identified. In two countries, environmental surveillance was in place before the outbreaks, but did not detect any wild strain before the occurrence of clinical cases. This surveillance nonetheless provided useful information to monitor the outbreaks and their geographical spread. Outbreaks were predominantly caused by poliovirus type 1 and typically involved unvaccinated or inadequately vaccinated groups within highly immunised communities. Oral polio vaccine was primarily used to respond to the outbreaks with catch-up campaigns implemented either nationwide or in restricted geographical areas or age groups. The introduction of supplementary immunisation contained the outbreaks. In 2002, the European region of the World Health Organization was declared polio-free and it has maintained this status since. However, as long as there are non-vaccinated or under-vaccinated groups in European countries and poliomyelitis is not eradicated, countries remain continuously at risk of reintroduction and establishment of the virus. Continued efforts to reach these groups are needed in order to ensure a uniform and high vaccination coverage. PMID:27123992

  6. Experimental oral polio vaccines and acquired immune deficiency syndrome.

    Hooper, E

    2001-06-29

    The simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) of the common chimpanzee is widely acknowledged as the direct ancestor of HIV-1. There is increasing historical evidence that during the late 1950s, kidneys were routinely excised from central African chimpanzees by scientists who were collaborating with the polio vaccine research of Dr Hilary Koprowski, and sent - inter alia - to vaccine-making laboratories in the USA and Africa, and to unspecified destinations in Belgium. While there is no direct evidence that cells from these kidneys were used as a substrate for growing Dr Koprowski's oral polio vaccines, there is a startling coincidence between places in Africa where his CHAT vaccine was fed, and the first appearances in the world of HIV-1 group M and group-M-related AIDS. Because of the enormous implications of the hypothesis that AIDS may be an unintended iatrogenic (physician-caused) disease, it is almost inevitable that this theory will engender heated opposition from many of those in the scientific establishment, and those with vested interests. PMID:11405924

  7. Medfly eradication programme in Guatemala

    The programme on eradication of the Mediterranean fruit fly (Ceratitis capitata) in Guatemala has successfully demonstrated that this pest can be eradicated from large areas with the use of the sterile insect technique (SIT), supplemented by a series of control measures. More than 60% of the country is now free of the medfly as a result of the measures taken in the last few years. In the coffee growing areas, the large wild fly populations have been reduced by a factor of more than 1000, in terms of fertile flies per trap per day, and many areas have been totally freed of the pest. (author). 4 refs, 4 figs, 2 tabs

  8. Eradication of the melon fly, Bactrocera cucurbitae Coquillett, by mass release of sterile flies in Okinawa prefecture, Japan

    In 1972, MAFF, Japan and the Okinawa Prefectural Government initiated an experimental eradication project of the melon fly from Kume Island, Okinawa Prefecture, Japan using the sterile insect technique (SIT). Following the successful eradication on Kume Island in 1978, large scale SIT was started to eradicate the melon fly on the 3 groups of islands, Miyako, Okinawa and Yaeyama of Okinawa Prefecture, Japan in 1984, 1986 and 1989, and eradication was achieved in 1987, 1990 and 1993, respectively. For the successful eradication on Miyako, Okinawa and Yaeyama groups of islands, about 6,340, 30,940 and 15,440 million sterile melon flies were released, respectively

  9. High incidence of osteoporosis and fractures in an aging post-polio population.

    Mohammad, Ausaf F

    2009-01-01

    Since the polio epidemic in Ireland in the 1950s, most polio survivors are approaching into the 6th and 7th decade of their lives. There is little data about bone density and risk of fractures in these patients. In 2006, we undertook an audit of post-polio patients attending rheumatology and neurology outpatient clinics in a university teaching hospital. Our aim was to determine the prevalence of osteoporosis (OP), falls and fractures and to evaluate the association of bone density with other potential contributing factors to OP.

  10. Viral Aetiology of Acute Flaccid Paralysis Surveillance Cases, before and after Vaccine Policy Change from Oral Polio Vaccine to Inactivated Polio Vaccine

    T. S. Saraswathy Subramaniam

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Since 1992, surveillance for acute flaccid paralysis (AFP cases was introduced in Malaysia along with the establishment of the National Poliovirus Laboratory at the Institute for Medical Research. In 2008, the Ministry of Health, Malaysia, approved a vaccine policy change from oral polio vaccine to inactivated polio vaccine (IPV. Eight states started using IPV in the Expanded Immunization Programme, followed by the remaining states in January 2010. The objective of this study was to determine the viral aetiology of AFP cases below 15 years of age, before and after vaccine policy change from oral polio vaccine to inactivated polio vaccine. One hundred and seventy-nine enteroviruses were isolated from the 3394 stool specimens investigated between 1992 and December 2012. Fifty-six out of 107 virus isolates were polioviruses and the remaining were non-polio enteroviruses. Since 2009 after the sequential introduction of IPV in the childhood immunization programme, no Sabin polioviruses were isolated from AFP cases. In 2012, the laboratory AFP surveillance was supplemented with environmental surveillance with sewage sampling. Thirteen Sabin polioviruses were also isolated from sewage in the same year, but no vaccine-derived poliovirus was detected during this period.

  11. Eradication of measles: remaining challenges.

    Holzmann, Heidemarie; Hengel, Hartmut; Tenbusch, Matthias; Doerr, H W

    2016-06-01

    Measles virus (MeV) is an aerosol-borne and one of the most contagious pathogenic viruses known. Almost every MeV infection becomes clinically manifest and can lead to serious and even fatal complications, especially under conditions of malnutrition in developing countries, where still 115,000 to 160,000 patients die from measles every year. There is no specific antiviral treatment. In addition, MeV infections cause long-lasting memory B and T cell impairment, predisposing people susceptible to opportunistic infections for years. A rare, but fatal long-term consequence of measles is subacute sclerosing panencephalitis. Fifteen years ago (2001), WHO has launched a programme to eliminate measles by a worldwide vaccination strategy. This is promising, because MeV is a human-specific morbillivirus (i.e. without relevant animal reservoir), safe and potent vaccine viruses are sufficiently produced since decades for common application, and millions of vaccine doses have been used globally without any indications of safety and efficacy issues. Though the prevalence of wild-type MeV infection has decreased by >90 % in Europe, measles is still not eliminated and has even re-emerged with recurrent outbreaks in developed countries, in which effective vaccination programmes had been installed for decades. Here, we discuss the crucial factors for a worldwide elimination of MeV: (1) efficacy of current vaccines, (2) the extremely high contagiosity of MeV demanding a >95 % vaccination rate based on two doses to avoid primary vaccine failure as well as the installation of catch-up vaccination programmes to fill immunity gaps and to achieve herd immunity, (3) the implications of sporadic cases of secondary vaccine failure, (4) organisation, acceptance and drawbacks of modern vaccination campaigns, (5) waning public attention to measles, but increasing concerns from vaccine-associated adverse reactions in societies with high socio-economic standards and (6) clinical

  12. Challenges and key research questions for yaws eradication.

    Marks, Michael; Mitjà, Oriol; Vestergaard, Lasse S; Pillay, Allan; Knauf, Sascha; Chen, Cheng-Yen; Bassat, Quique; Martin, Diana L; Fegan, David; Taleo, Fasihah; Kool, Jacob; Lukehart, Sheila; Emerson, Paul M; Solomon, Anthony W; Ye, Tun; Ballard, Ronald C; Mabey, David C W; Asiedu, Kingsley B

    2015-10-01

    Yaws is endemic in west Africa, southeast Asia, and the Pacific region. To eradicate yaws by 2020, WHO has launched a campaign of mass treatment with azithromycin. Progress has been made towards achievement of this ambitious goal, including the validation of point-of-care and molecular diagnostic tests and piloting of the strategy in several countries, including Ghana, Vanuatu, and Papua New Guinea. Gaps in knowledge need to be addressed to allow refinement of the eradication strategy. Studies exploring determinants of the spatial distribution of yaws are needed to help with the completion of baseline mapping. The finding that Haemophilus ducreyi causes lesions similar to yaws is particularly important and further work is needed to assess the effect of azithromycin on these lesions. The integration of diagnostic tests into different stages of the eradication campaign needs investigation. Finally, studies must be done to inform the optimum mass-treatment strategy for sustainable interruption of transmission. PMID:26362174

  13. Incompatibility of lyophilized inactivated polio vaccine with liquid pentavalent whole-cell-pertussis-containing vaccine.

    Kraan, Heleen; Ten Have, Rimko; van der Maas, Larissa; Kersten, Gideon; Amorij, Jean-Pierre

    2016-08-31

    A hexavalent vaccine containing diphtheria toxoid, tetanus toxoid, whole cell pertussis, Haemophilius influenza type B, hepatitis B and inactivated polio vaccine (IPV) may: (i) increase the efficiency of vaccination campaigns, (ii) reduce the number of injections thereby reducing needlestick injuries, and (iii) ensure better protection against pertussis as compared to vaccines containing acellular pertussis antigens. An approach to obtain a hexavalent vaccine might be reconstituting lyophilized polio vaccine (IPV-LYO) with liquid pentavalent vaccine just before intramuscular delivery. The potential limitations of this approach were investigated including thermostability of IPV as measured by D-antigen ELISA and rat potency, the compatibility of fluid and lyophilized IPV in combination with thimerosal and thimerosal containing hexavalent vaccine. The rat potency of polio type 3 in IPV-LYO was 2 to 3-fold lower than standardized on the D-antigen content, suggesting an alteration of the polio type 3 D-antigen particle by lyophilization. Type 1 and 2 had unaffected antigenicity/immunogenicity ratios. Alteration of type 3 D-antigen could be detected by showing reduced thermostability at 45°C compared to type 3 in non-lyophilized liquid controls. Reconstituting IPV-LYO in the presence of thimerosal (TM) resulted in a fast temperature dependent loss of polio type 1-3 D-antigen. The presence of 0.005% TM reduced the D-antigen content by ∼20% (polio type 2/3) and ∼60% (polio type 1) in 6h at 25°C, which are WHO open vial policy conditions. At 37°C, D-antigen was diminished even faster, suggesting that very fast, i.e., immediately after preparation, intramuscular delivery of the conceived hexavalent vaccine would not be a feasible option. Use of the TM-scavenger, l-cysteine, to bind TM (or mercury containing TM degradation products), resulted in a hexavalent vaccine mixture in which polio D-antigen was more stable. PMID:27470209

  14. Coincident polio and Ebola crises expose similar fault lines in the current global health regime

    Calain, Philippe; Abu Sa’Da, Caroline

    2015-01-01

    Background In 2014, the World Health Organization (WHO) declared two "public health emergencies of international concern", in response to the worldwide polio situation and the Ebola epidemic in West Africa respectively. Both emergencies can be seen as testing moments, challenging the current model of epidemic governance, where two worldviews co-exist: global health security and humanitarian biomedicine. Discussion The resurgence of polio and the spread of Ebola in 2014 have not only exposed t...

  15. Uso universal da vacina inativada contra poliomielite Universal use of inactivated polio vaccine

    Luiza Helena Falleiros Carvalho

    2006-07-01

    terms of worldwide eradication and the World Health Organization.s (WHO proposals in this transition period between global eradication and the post-eradication period. SOURCES OF DATA: Data for the period from 1955 to 2005 were searched in MEDLINE, LILACS, The Web, Doctor's Guide, WHO website and Pan American Health Organization (PAHO website and text book. SUMMARY OF THE FINDINGS: In 1988, the WHO established the goal of eradicating the disease and interrupting transmission of the wild virus globally. Since then, there has been a dramatic decline of the disease, although in 2005 there were still some countries considered endemic and others where polio returned on account of imported viruses. The vaccines used worldwide are the classical tOPV and IPV, and in this eradication process, the use of mOPV vaccines has been encouraged in places where only one type of poliovirus circulates. In addition to spreading the virus in the community, the OPV vaccines may, however, cause paralyses by reversal of the neurovirulence process. CONCLUSIONS: For a world free of poliomyelitis disease, it would be necessary to interrupt circulation of the virus, which will only be possible if the OPV virus were to be discontinued, in accordance with the WHO proposals for this transition period and the post-eradication period.

  16. Eradication of Helicobacter pylori Infection.

    Marcus, Elizabeth A; Sachs, George; Scott, David R

    2016-07-01

    Helicobacter pylori infects about 50 % of the world's population, causing at a minimum chronic gastritis. A subset of infected patients will ultimately develop gastric or duodenal ulcer disease, gastric adenocarcinoma, or MALT (mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue) lymphoma. Eradication of H. pylori requires complex regimens that include acid suppression and multiple antibiotics. The efficacy of treatment using what were once considered standard regimens have declined in recent years, mainly due to widespread development of antibiotic resistance. Addition of bismuth to standard triple therapy regimens, use of alternate antibiotics, or development of alternative regimens using known therapies in novel combinations have improved treatment efficacy in specific populations, but overall success of eradication remains less than ideal. Novel regimens under investigation either in vivo or in vitro, involving increased acid suppression ideally with fewer antibiotics or development of non-antibiotic treatment targets, show promise for future therapy. PMID:27177639

  17. Experiences with rabies eradication programs

    Hostnik Peter; Barlič-Maganja Darja; Grom Jože; Malovrh Tadej; Bidovec Andrej

    2005-01-01

    Oral vaccination as a method of rabies eradication in the field was first started in Switzerland in 1978 and after 1984 several other EU countries followed this practice. Due to oral vaccination some European countries are now rabies-free in terrestrial animals. In Slovenia, after the first experimental oral vaccination and study of vaccination models from 1988 -1992, the spring-autumn campaigns have been carried out since 1995. The model of oral vaccination of wildlife requires 16-20 baits p...

  18. The New World Screwworm eradication programme in North Africa

    The screwworm is thought to have reached North Africa with a shipment of contaminated livestock imported from Central or South America. The parasite's presence in Libya poses a great threat to livestock, wildlife, and the environment in Africa, the Middle East, and the Mediterranean Basin. The parasite's present restricted distribution in Africa - confined to an area of approximately 20,000 square kilometers, 30 kilometers south of Tripoli and 60 kilometers east of the border with Tunisia - offers the possibility for eradication, if an international emergency action programme can be fully instituted. The programme is a collaborative effort of the Government of Libya and international agencies including FAO, IAEA, International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD), and United Nations Development Programme (UNDP). If eradication is achieved before much additional spread occurs, savings will be very great indeed. The sterile insect technique, in conjunction with surveillance, preventive, and curative treatment of animal wounds, is the only available technique for eradicating the New World Screwworm. The sterile insect technique requires the releases of huge numbers of factory-reared, sexually sterile insects. Sexual sterility is induced by exposing the late pupal stage to gamma rays. When these sterile insects mate with native females, the eggs laid on open wounds fail to hatch and no progeny are produced. By sustained releases and maintaining a ratio of 10 or more sterile insects to each native insect over several generations, eradication is achieved in a relatively short period of time

  19. Eradication of the new world screwworm from the Libyan Arab Jamahiriya

    The New World screwworm, Cochliomyia hominivorax (Coquerel), invaded North Africa in the late 1980s. It became established in the Libyan Arab Jamahiriya, where it was first detected in 1988 and confirmed in 1989. This devastating pest of livestock became the target of a major eradication programme costing approximately US $80 million. The basis of the eradication programme was the sterile insect technique. A total of 1400 million sterile screwworm flies from Mexico were released over a 40,000 km2 area between December 1990 and October 1991. Total eradication was achieved. The eradication programme included a very strong quarantine effort to prevent expansion of the infested area in the Libyan Arab Jamahiriya. Animals in the infested area were inspected and wounds treated about every three or four weeks. Trapping of adults determined the presence or absence of adult screwworm flies. A major information programme supported the eradication effort. (author). 11 refs, 12 figs

  20. Eradicating cancer cells: struggle with a chameleon

    Di, Jiabo; Boer, Tjitske Duiveman-de; Figdor, Carl G.; Torensma, Ruurd

    2011-01-01

    Eradication of cancer stem cells to abrogate tumor growth is a new treatment modality. However, like normal cells cancer cells show plasticity. Differentiated tumor stem cells can acquire stem cell properties when they gain access to the stem cell niche. This indicates that eradicating of stem cells (emptying of the niche) alone will not lead to eradication of the tumor. Treatment should be directed to cancer stem cells ànd more mature cancer cells.

  1. OIE's Contributions to the Eradication of Rinderpest

    Following the unexpected reoccurrence of rinderpest in Belgium in 1920, due to infected zebu cattle in transit at Antwerp on the way from India to Brazil, chief veterinary officers from various regions of the world gathered in Paris in March 1921 and agreed to support a concerted international effort in the fight against rinderpest. This conference led to the creation of OIE in 1924. The main objectives of OIE have remained unchanged since: to ensure transparency in the global animal disease situation; to collect, analyse and disseminate veterinary scientific information; to elaborate scientifically sound international standards and recommendations on disease control and on the quality of animal vaccines; and to encourage international solidarity in the control of animal diseases. Immediately following the Second World War, in 1947 OIE was actively promoting international solidarity for rinderpest control by mediating among donors, vaccine producers and countries in need, thereby facilitating large-scale campaigns based on the most recent scientific information available. OIE started to commission national research institutes around the world to conduct work tailored to the needs of the international community of veterinary services, e.g., research on appropriate methods, including suitable virus inactivation procedures, to prevent the spread of rinderpest from occurring through international trade in bovine meat as well as on the standardization of safety of rinderpest vaccines. Commencing in the 1960s, OIE, FAO and regional organizations launched and coordinated large-scale campaigns to strengthen capacities of member countries' in endemic areas to eradicate rinderpest and control other major transboundary diseases. Through these intensive control programmes, the eradication of rinderpest was achieved in almost all areas of the world between the 1960s and mid-1970s. However, the disappearance of clinical disease led to a discontinuation of vaccination campaigns

  2. Strangles: taking steps towards eradication.

    Waller, Andrew S

    2013-11-29

    Strangles, caused by the host adapted Lancefield group C bacterium Streptococcus equi sub-species equi (S. equi), is one of the oldest recognised infectious diseases of horses and continues to cause significant welfare and economic cost throughout the world. The ability of S. equi to establish sub-clinical persistent infections primarily in the guttural pouches of convalescent horses has been instrumental to its success. However, the implementation of simple control measures that permit the identification and treatment of persistently infected carriers can prevent further outbreaks of disease at a local level. This review summarises some of the molecular mechanisms exploited by S. equi to cause disease. New qPCR and iELISA diagnostic tests replace culture methodologies as the gold standard for the detection of infected animals. A strategy to maximise the effective application of these tests to direct management methods for the eradication of S. equi infection is presented and the role of preventative vaccines is discussed. In contrast to current understanding, emerging data illustrates the dynamism of the global S. equi population and potential consequences for the effectiveness of currently available vaccines. The ability to use modern vaccines alongside conventional biosecurity and screening procedures will be critical to the large-scale prevention and even eradication of strangles, providing an opportunity to finally break the stranglehold that this disease has on the world's equine industry. PMID:23642414

  3. Sequential (as Opposed to Simultaneous) Antibiotic Therapy Improves Helicobacter pylori Eradication in the Pediatric Population: A Meta-Analysis.

    Lau, Christine S M; Ward, Amanda; Chamberlain, Ronald S

    2016-06-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a common infection associated with many gastrointestinal diseases. Triple or quadruple therapy is the current recommendation for H pylori eradication in children but is associated with success rates as low as 50%. Recent studies have demonstrated that a 10-day sequential therapy regimen, rather than simultaneous antibiotic administration, achieved eradication rates of nearly 95%. This meta-analysis found that sequential therapy increased eradication rates by 14.2% (relative risk [RR] = 1.142; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.082-1.207; P pylori eradication rates compared to the 7-day standard therapy (RR = 1.182; 95% CI = 1.102-1.269; p eradication rates compared to 14-day standard therapy (RR = 0.926; 95% CI = 0.811-1.059; P = .261). The use of sequential therapy is associated with increased H pylori eradication rates in children compared to standard therapy of equal or shorter duration. PMID:26297295

  4. Population models for optimising SIT eradication strategies

    suggests that the fitness of irradiated males used in the New Zealand painted apple moth eradication programme was close to optimal. A raster-based spatial analogue was constructed for this model, including additional parameters describing the dispersal kernels for female, male, and irradiated insects. Initial wild populations were assigned according to different spatial patterns (random or aggregated), and different release strategies (many small releases versus few large ones, and random, aggregated or regular spatial releases) were explored, depending on how well the wild distribution was presumed to be known. Scenarios were run for representative parameter sets corresponding to the biology of different insect pests for which Sterile Insect Technique has been employed, such as moths and fruit flies. Here, the basic problem was to ensure that the critical overflooding ratio was achieved over the entire (possibly poorly known) pest distribution. Representative results are presented to help guide future SIT eradication efforts

  5. Eradication of Helicobacter pylori: are rifaximin-based regimens effective?

    Gasbarrini, Antonio; Gasbarrini, Giovanni; Pelosini, Iva; Scarpignato, Carmelo

    2006-01-01

    Rifaximin is a non-absorbed semisynthetic rifamycin derivative with a broad spectrum of antibacterial activity including Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, both aerobes and anaerobes. Although originally developed for the treatment of infectious diarrhea, the appreciation of the pathogenic role of gut bacteria in several organic and functional gastrointestinal diseases has increasingly broadened its clinical use. Being the antibiotic active against Helicobacter pylori, even towards clarithromycin-resistant strain, and being the primary resistance very rare, several investigations explored its potential use for eradication of the microorganism. Rifaximin alone proved to be effective, but even the highest dose (1,200 mg daily) gave a cure rate of only 30%. Dual and triple therapies were also studied, with the better results obtained with rifaximin-clarithromycin and rifaximin-clarithromycin-esomeprazole combinations. However, the eradication rates (60-70%) obtained with these regimens were still below the standard set by the Maastricht Consensus guidelines. Although rifaximin-based eradication therapies are promising, new antimicrobial combinations (with and without proton pump inhibitors) need to be explored in well-designed clinical trials including a large cohort of H. pylori-infected patients. The remarkable safety of rifaximin will allow high-dose regimens of longer duration (e.g. 10 or 14 days) to be tested with confidence in the hope of achieving better eradication rates. A drawback of rifaximin could be its inability to reach sufficiently high concentrations in the gastric mucus layer under and within which H. pylori is commonly located and this would likely affect eradication rate. Taking these considerations into account, bioadhesive rifaximin formulations able to better and persistently cover gastric mucosa, or combination with mucolytic agents, such as pronase or acetylcysteine, need to be evaluated in order to better define the place of this

  6. Eradicating a Disease: Lessons from Mathematical Epidemiology

    Glomski, Matthew; Ohanian, Edward

    2012-01-01

    Smallpox remains the only human disease ever eradicated. In this paper, we consider the mathematics behind control strategies used in the effort to eradicate smallpox, from the life tables of Daniel Bernoulli, to the more modern susceptible-infected-removed (SIR)-type compartmental models. In addition, we examine the mathematical feasibility of…

  7. H pylori recurrence after successful eradication

    Yaron Niv

    2008-01-01

    Recurrence of H pylori after eradication is rare in developed countries and more frequent in developing countries.Recrudescence(recolonization of the same strain within 12 mo after eradication)rather than reinfection(colonization with a new strain,more than 12 mo after eradication)is considered to be responsiblefor most of the cases.This observation was confirmed only in developed countries,while in developing countries a recent meta-analysis demonstrated a high rate of reinfection.The proportion of H pylori annual recurrence was 2.67% and 13.00% in developed and developing countries,respectively.Nested meta-analysis(only cases with a longer follow-up and a negative 13CUBT a year after eradication)revealed annual recurrence rate of 1.45%[relative risk(RR),0.54]and 12.00%(RR,0.92)in developed and developing countries,respectively.These findings support the notion that in developed countries many cases of recurrence are due to recrudescence within the first year after eradication,with a 46% drop in the recurrence rate after the first year post eradication,while in developing countries reinfection is more pronounced,and continue at the same rate since eradication.A different approach for follow-up after H pylori eradication is probably needed in patients of developing countries,since reinfection is highly prevalent.

  8. Preventing Vaccine-Derived Poliovirus Emergence during the Polio Endgame.

    Pons-Salort, Margarita; Burns, Cara C; Lyons, Hil; Blake, Isobel M; Jafari, Hamid; Oberste, M Steven; Kew, Olen M; Grassly, Nicholas C

    2016-07-01

    Reversion and spread of vaccine-derived poliovirus (VDPV) to cause outbreaks of poliomyelitis is a rare outcome resulting from immunisation with the live-attenuated oral poliovirus vaccines (OPVs). Global withdrawal of all three OPV serotypes is therefore a key objective of the polio endgame strategic plan, starting with serotype 2 (OPV2) in April 2016. Supplementary immunisation activities (SIAs) with trivalent OPV (tOPV) in advance of this date could mitigate the risks of OPV2 withdrawal by increasing serotype-2 immunity, but may also create new serotype-2 VDPV (VDPV2). Here, we examine the risk factors for VDPV2 emergence and implications for the strategy of tOPV SIAs prior to OPV2 withdrawal. We first developed mathematical models of VDPV2 emergence and spread. We found that in settings with low routine immunisation coverage, the implementation of a single SIA increases the risk of VDPV2 emergence. If routine coverage is 20%, at least 3 SIAs are needed to bring that risk close to zero, and if SIA coverage is low or there are persistently "missed" groups, the risk remains high despite the implementation of multiple SIAs. We then analysed data from Nigeria on the 29 VDPV2 emergences that occurred during 2004-2014. Districts reporting the first case of poliomyelitis associated with a VDPV2 emergence were compared to districts with no VDPV2 emergence in the same 6-month period using conditional logistic regression. In agreement with the model results, the odds of VDPV2 emergence decreased with higher routine immunisation coverage (odds ratio 0.67 for a 10% absolute increase in coverage [95% confidence interval 0.55-0.82]). We also found that the probability of a VDPV2 emergence resulting in poliomyelitis in >1 child was significantly higher in districts with low serotype-2 population immunity. Our results support a strategy of focused tOPV SIAs before OPV2 withdrawal in areas at risk of VDPV2 emergence and in sufficient number to raise population immunity above the

  9. Preventing Vaccine-Derived Poliovirus Emergence during the Polio Endgame.

    Margarita Pons-Salort

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Reversion and spread of vaccine-derived poliovirus (VDPV to cause outbreaks of poliomyelitis is a rare outcome resulting from immunisation with the live-attenuated oral poliovirus vaccines (OPVs. Global withdrawal of all three OPV serotypes is therefore a key objective of the polio endgame strategic plan, starting with serotype 2 (OPV2 in April 2016. Supplementary immunisation activities (SIAs with trivalent OPV (tOPV in advance of this date could mitigate the risks of OPV2 withdrawal by increasing serotype-2 immunity, but may also create new serotype-2 VDPV (VDPV2. Here, we examine the risk factors for VDPV2 emergence and implications for the strategy of tOPV SIAs prior to OPV2 withdrawal. We first developed mathematical models of VDPV2 emergence and spread. We found that in settings with low routine immunisation coverage, the implementation of a single SIA increases the risk of VDPV2 emergence. If routine coverage is 20%, at least 3 SIAs are needed to bring that risk close to zero, and if SIA coverage is low or there are persistently "missed" groups, the risk remains high despite the implementation of multiple SIAs. We then analysed data from Nigeria on the 29 VDPV2 emergences that occurred during 2004-2014. Districts reporting the first case of poliomyelitis associated with a VDPV2 emergence were compared to districts with no VDPV2 emergence in the same 6-month period using conditional logistic regression. In agreement with the model results, the odds of VDPV2 emergence decreased with higher routine immunisation coverage (odds ratio 0.67 for a 10% absolute increase in coverage [95% confidence interval 0.55-0.82]. We also found that the probability of a VDPV2 emergence resulting in poliomyelitis in >1 child was significantly higher in districts with low serotype-2 population immunity. Our results support a strategy of focused tOPV SIAs before OPV2 withdrawal in areas at risk of VDPV2 emergence and in sufficient number to raise population

  10. Vacina contra poliomielite: um novo paradigma Polio vaccines: a new paradigma

    Lucia Ferro Bricks

    2007-06-01

    , from January 2000 to December 2006. DATA SYNTHESIS: Acknowledgement of vaccine-associated paralysis and oral vaccine-derived circulating viruses’ paralysis shall certainly require discontinuation of oral vaccination for poliomyelitis use in a short time. After eradication of the wild viruses, oral vaccination for poliomyelitis should be discontinued, preferably in a synchronized manner in all the countries. After termination of vaccination programs, people will become susceptible again to poliomyelitis virus and disease outbreaks caused by wild viruses may occur (accidental escape from laboratories or bioterrorism. In countries already using inactivated poliovirus vaccine, it is unlikely that vaccination will be interrupted. Countries that currently use exclusively oral poliovirus vaccine will have to rely on epidemiological surveillance and on oral vaccine inventories to control potential polio outbreaks. If the oral poliovirus vaccine is reintroduced in those populations, there will be again a risk for vaccine-associated paralysis and oral vaccine-derived circulating viruses’ that may spread rapidly to other regions and to nearby countries. CONCLUSIONS: Inactivated poliovirus vaccine introduction in the routine Brazilian vaccination calendar should be programmed as well as acquisition of technology for inactivated poliovirus vaccine production since the latter is currently insufficient to cover global demand.

  11. Poverty eradication: a new paradigm.

    Pethe, V P

    1998-08-01

    This article offers a new paradigm for eradicating poverty in India. It was assumed incorrectly by Mahatma Gandhi that a good society without mass poverty would follow after independence. India copied Western models of development and developed giant factories, big dams, and megacities. Agriculture did not expand the number of jobs for people. The Western paradigm failed in India because of the false assumption of "trickle down" of income to the masses. The targeted programs to the poor did not directly benefit enough of the poor. Mega-industrialization led to reduced employment and higher skill needs. The model failed mainly because it was a proxy and relied on indirect ways of reaching the poor. The models failed to be adapted to conditions in India. The Swadeshi paradigm is a direct model for addressing mass poverty. Poverty is affected by immediate, intermediate, and ultimate determinants. Poverty begets social and economic problems, such as ignorance, ill health, high fertility, unemployment, and crime. In India and developing countries, mass poverty results from under use of human resources; lack of equal opportunities; and an outdated non-egalitarian social structure, an unjust global economic order, human cruelty, and erosion of ethical values. Indians are squandering their precious resources mimicking Western consumerism. Poverty leads to rapid population growth. People become productive assets with universal literacy, compulsory and free education, health services and sanitation, vocational training, and work ethics. India needs people-oriented policies with less emphasis on capital accumulation. PMID:12294462

  12. Non-Polio Enteroviruses Aseptic Meningitis:Embaba Fever Hospital Admissions 2010-2011

    Raafat A. Abdel-Twab¹, Kouka S. Abdel-Wahab2. Ahmed O. El-Kafrawi3, Moustafa A. Aly3, Laila A. EL-Bassiony4, May EL-Maamoun4, Caroline Fayez5

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Human enteroviruses (EV cause a wide spectrum of both common and uncommon illnesses among all age groups. Enterically transmitted. The objective of this study was to identify non-poliovirus EV as a cause of viral aseptic meningitis (VAM by two methods (cell culture and Real time PCR. From October 2010 to August 2011 cerebrospinal fluid (CSF samples were collected from 85 patients Embaba fever hospital admitted with symptoms of aseptic meningitis of any age and both sexes. The 85 CSF samples were inoculated into RD (human rhabdomyosarcoma cell line in three blind passages to amplify isolates producing EV-like CPE. A total of 14 (16.5% out of 85 CSF samples showed EV-like CPE. By Real time PCR 11 out of the 14 culture positive samples and 5 out of the 14 source of virus isolation original CSF were non polio EV positive. The frequency of non-polio EV meningitis hospital admissions was in the summer season (50%, spring (25%, late autumn (16.6% and least frequency in winter (8.4%. non-polio EV meningitis was detected in 6 out of 41 male patients (14.5% and in 6 out of 44 female patients (13.5%. Also non-polio EV meningitis was detected in all ages with marked increase of incidence in young children (41.6% and old age (50% and less in adult (8.4%. . In conclusionOur data showed that the non-polioviruses EV was associated with the majority of VAM during 2010 – 2011 at the Embaba fever hospital which serves Embaba, Shoubra Elkheema, Qualyba and neighbors localities in Egypt. Rapid detection of non-polio EV meningitis is essential for making decisions about patient management and treatment

  13. Willapa - Spartina Mapping and Eradication 2014

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Willapa National Wildlife Refuge (Willapa NWR) continued a successful program aimed at eradicating the non-native cordgrass, Spartina alterniflora (Spartina)...

  14. Willapa - Spartina Mapping and Eradication 2015

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Willapa National Wildlife Refuge (Willapa NWR) continues to work toward the eradication of the non-native cordgrass, Spartina alterniflora (Spartina) from...

  15. Reflux esophagitis triggered after Helicobacter pylori eradication: a noteworthy demerit of eradication therapy among the Japanese?

    Iijima, Katsunori; Koike, Tomoyuki; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2015-01-01

    In the February 2013 Revision of Insured Medical Treatment, bacterial eradication for all Helicobacter pylori-positive individuals in Japan was covered under the insurance scheme. However, reflux esophagitis is believed to occur in approximately 10% of Japanese patients who undergo eradication therapy. Hence, the risk of reflux esophagitis among such cases should be carefully considered, particularly in the treatment for H. pylori-positive patients who are otherwise healthy. The eradication o...

  16. A Research Agenda for Malaria Eradication: Modeling

    ,

    2011-01-01

    Malaria modeling can inform policy and guide research for malaria elimination and eradication from local implementation to global policy. A research and development agenda for malaria modeling is proposed, to support operations and to enhance the broader eradication research agenda. Models are envisioned as an integral part of research, planning, and evaluation, and modelers should ideally be integrated into multidisciplinary teams to update the models iteratively, communicate their appropria...

  17. A Research Agenda for Malaria Eradication: Vaccines

    ,

    2011-01-01

    Vaccines could be a crucial component of efforts to eradicate malaria. Current attempts to develop malaria vaccines are primarily focused on Plasmodium falciparum and are directed towards reducing morbidity and mortality. Continued support for these efforts is essential, but if malaria vaccines are to be used as part of a repertoire of tools for elimination or eradication of malaria, they will need to have an impact on malaria transmission. We introduce the concept of “vaccines that interrupt...

  18. A research agenda for malaria eradication: vaccines.

    Abdulla, S.; Agre, P; P.L. Alonso; Arevalo-Herrera, M.; Bassat, Q.; Binka, F.; Chitnis, C.; Corradin, G; Cowman, A. F.; Culpepper, J.; Portillo, H. del; Dinglasan, R. R.; Duffy, P.; Gargallo, D; Greenwood, B.

    2011-01-01

    Vaccines could be a crucial component of efforts to eradicate malaria. Current attempts to develop malaria vaccines are primarily focused on Plasmodium falciparum and are directed towards reducing morbidity and mortality. Continued support for these efforts is essential, but if malaria vaccines are to be used as part of a repertoire of tools for elimination or eradication of malaria, they will need to have an impact on malaria transmission. We introduce the concept of "vaccines that interrupt...

  19. Eradication of Ebola Based on Dynamic Programming

    Zhu, Jia-Ming; Wang, Lu; Liu, Jia-Bao

    2016-01-01

    This paper mainly studies the eradication of the Ebola virus, proposing a scientific system, including three modules for the eradication of Ebola virus. Firstly, we build a basic model combined with nonlinear incidence rate and maximum treatment capacity. Secondly, we use the dynamic programming method and the Dijkstra Algorithm to set up M-S (storage) and several delivery locations in West Africa. Finally, we apply the previous results to calculate the total cost, production cost, storage cost, and shortage cost. PMID:27313655

  20. Developing strategies for HIV-1 eradication

    Durand, Christine M.; Blankson, Joel N.; Siliciano, Robert F.

    2012-01-01

    Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) suppresses HIV-1 replication, transforming the outlook for infected patients. However, reservoirs of replication-competent forms of the virus persist during HAART, and when treatment is stopped, high rates of HIV-1 replication return. Recent insights into HIV-1 latency, as well as a report that HIV-1 infection was eradicated in one individual, have renewed interest in finding a cure for HIV-1 infection. Strategies for HIV-1 eradication include gene...

  1. BVD eradication in Switzerland ? A new approach

    Presi, P.; Heim, D.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Diverse concepts for BVD eradication or control have been applied in several countries with varying success. Results of previous studies conducted in Switzerland have shown that the prevalence of antibody-positive animals is high and that BVDV is wide spread in the country causing serious economic losses. A new approach to eradicate BVD in the cattle population in Switzerland was chosen. It consists in testing the whole Swiss cattle population for virus detection in a shor...

  2. Eradication of Ebola Based on Dynamic Programming.

    Zhu, Jia-Ming; Wang, Lu; Liu, Jia-Bao

    2016-01-01

    This paper mainly studies the eradication of the Ebola virus, proposing a scientific system, including three modules for the eradication of Ebola virus. Firstly, we build a basic model combined with nonlinear incidence rate and maximum treatment capacity. Secondly, we use the dynamic programming method and the Dijkstra Algorithm to set up M-S (storage) and several delivery locations in West Africa. Finally, we apply the previous results to calculate the total cost, production cost, storage cost, and shortage cost. PMID:27313655

  3. Impact of screwworm eradication programmes using the sterile insect technique

    The use of the sterile insect technique (SIT) in New World screwworm Cochliomyia hominivorax (Coquerel) eradication programmes has been successfully demonstrated. As a result of a 45-year area-wide campaign, suppression and eradication have been achieved in the USA, Mexico, Belize, Guatemala, Honduras, El Salvador, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, Panama north of the Canal, some Caribbean Islands, and the outbreak in Libya, North Africa. The humans, livestock, and wildlife in these countries are now free of this dangerous pest. It has been estimated that the annual producer benefits are: USA - USD 796 million, Mexico - USD 292 million, and Central America - USD 77.9 million. In Libya, the estimated benefit/cost ratio was 5:1 in the infested zone, and 10:1 in the whole country. If the New World screwworm were eradicated in South America, it has been estimated that each year USD 3592 million could be saved. Small field trials have confirmed that the SIT would be effective for the area-wide control of the Old World screwworm Chrysomya bezziana (Villeneuve). (author)

  4. Experiences with rabies eradication programs

    Hostnik Peter

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Oral vaccination as a method of rabies eradication in the field was first started in Switzerland in 1978 and after 1984 several other EU countries followed this practice. Due to oral vaccination some European countries are now rabies-free in terrestrial animals. In Slovenia, after the first experimental oral vaccination and study of vaccination models from 1988 -1992, the spring-autumn campaigns have been carried out since 1995. The model of oral vaccination of wildlife requires 16-20 baits per km2 in the vaccination area. The baits were distributed by plane. They were dispersed from a height of 300-500 m. The aeroplanes' paths were 1000 metres apart. In the vaccination campaigns two vaccines were used. Lysvulpen®, produced by the Bioveta company at the Czech Republic, was laid down in the southwestern part of the country, and Fuchsoral®, produced by the German company Impfstoffwerk Dessau-Tornau, was placed in the eastern part of Slovenia. A rapid decline of rabies was evidenced from 1995 to 1999, when the oral vaccination program in the whole territory using the aircraft baits distributing system was practiced. In 1999, only 6 rabies cases were laboratory-confirmed, whereas in 1995, 1089 rabies cases were documented. Of the 14 rabies cases detected in 1998, 12 were found as an island in a circle with a radius of 30 km in the centre of the vaccinated area. In 2000 and 2001, rabies incidence increased again, so it was decided to change the baits distribution system in the year 2001. The vaccination by crossing flights in certain areas was introduced. In the next year (2002, after changing the vaccination strategy, positive cases rapidly dropped and only 15 cases in 2002, and 8 cases were found in 2003, near the non-vaccinated border with Croatia.

  5. Conditions for eradicating hepatitis C in people who inject drugs: A fibrosis aware model of hepatitis C virus transmission.

    Rozada, Ignacio; Coombs, Daniel; Lima, Viviane D

    2016-04-21

    It is estimated that 80% of new hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections occur among people who inject drugs (PWID). Eradicating HCV from this population is key for the complete eradication of the disease, and the advent of simple to use, high efficacy treatments could conceivably make this scenario possible. This paper presents a mathematical model where transmission of HCV is studied in a simulated population of PWID where fibrosis progression is explicitly tracked. The stability thresholds that determine whether HCV will remain endemic or become eradicated were established numerically, and analytically on a reduced version of the model. Conditions on testing and treatment rates for eradication to occur were determined, within the context of the new high efficacy therapies. The results show that HCV eradication in the PWID population of the Vancouver, BC test scenario is achievable, but testing and especially treatment rates will need to increase significantly from current rates. Parameter estimates were drawn from published data. PMID:26845310

  6. Use of Mobile Information Technology during Planning, Implementation and Evaluation of a Polio Campaign in South Sudan.

    John Haskew

    Full Text Available Use of mobile information technology may aid collection of real-time, standardised data to inform and improve decision-making for polio programming and response. We utilised Android-based smartphones to collect data electronically from more than 8,000 households during a national round of polio immunisation in South Sudan. The results of the household surveys are presented here, together with discussion of the application of mobile information technology for polio campaign planning, implementation and evaluation in a real-time setting.Electronic questionnaires were programmed onto Android-based smartphones for mapping, supervision and survey activities during a national round of polio immunisation. National census data were used to determine the sampling frame for each activity and select the payam (district. Individual supervisors, in consultation with the local district health team, selected villages and households within each payam. Data visualisation tools were utilised for analysis and reporting.Implementation of mobile information technology and local management was feasible during a national round of polio immunisation in South Sudan. Red Cross visits during the polio campaign were equitable according to household wealth index and households who received a Red Cross visit had significantly higher odds of being aware of the polio campaign than those who did not. Nearly 95% of children under five were reported to have received polio immunisation (according to maternal recall during the immunisation round, which varied by state, county and payam. A total of 11 payams surveyed were identified with less than 90% reported immunisation coverage and the least poor households had significantly higher odds of being vaccinated than the most poor. More than 95% of households were aware of the immunisation round and households had significantly higher odds of being vaccinated if they had prior awareness of the campaign taking place

  7. Can Economic Analysis Contribute to Disease Elimination and Eradication? A Systematic Review.

    Elisa Sicuri

    . To a lesser extent, challenges associated with achieving elimination/eradication and ensuring equity have also been explored. Although elimination and eradication are, for some diseases, good investments compared with control, countries' incentives to eliminate do not always align with the global good and the most efficient elimination strategies may not prioritize the poorest populations. For any infectious disease, policy-makers will need to consider realigning contrasting incentives between the individual countries and the global community and to assure that the process towards elimination/eradication considers equity.

  8. Ridgefield - Invasive Plant Focused Eradication

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The proposed project is a part of the Refuge invasive species management program and willhelp achieve goals and protect priority habitats identified in the Refuge...

  9. An evaluation of impairment, mobility and quality of life in Polio survivors, change in muscle strength over time and the effects of an arm ergometry aerobic exercise programme.

    Murray, Deirdre E

    2014-01-01

    Many Polio survivors report new problems, including new muscle weakness, fatigue, decreased mobility and pain (Halstead, 2004). There is a lack of consensus regarding the rate of decline in muscle strength and function of Polio survivors (Stolwijk-Swuste et al., 2005), the reasons for the new symptoms such as fatigue and the cause of declining mobility. As a result of their disability many Polio survivors report significant barriers to physical activity (Becker and Stuifbergen, 2004) and the ...

  10. Interim CDC guidance for polio vaccination for travel to and from countries affected by wild poliovirus.

    Wallace, Gregory S; Seward, Jane F; Pallansch, Mark A

    2014-07-11

    In the prevaccine era, infection with wild poliovirus (WPV) was common worldwide, with seasonal peaks and epidemics in the summer and fall in temperate areas. The incidence of poliomyelitis in the United States declined rapidly after the licensure of inactivated polio vaccine (IPV) in 1955 and live oral polio vaccine (OPV) in the 1960s. The last cases of indigenously acquired WPV in the United States occurred in 1979, the last WPV case in a U.S. resident traveling abroad occurred in 1986, and the last WPV imported case was in 1993. Since 2000, the United States has exclusively used IPV, resulting in prevention of 8-10 vaccine-associated paralytic poliomyelitis cases annually. In 2005, an unvaccinated U.S. adult traveling abroad acquired vaccine-associated paralytic poliomyelitis after contact with an infant recently vaccinated with OPV. PMID:25006826

  11. Helicobacter pylori eradication: Sequential therapy and Lactobacillus reuteri supplementation

    Cesare Efrati; Giorgia Nicolini; Claudio Cannaviello; Nicole Piazza O'Sed; Stefano Valabrega

    2012-01-01

    incidence of adverse effects in all groups of patients with sequential therapy,probably due to the presence of the L.reuteri supplementation.CONCLUSION:The sequential treatment regimen achieved a significantly higher eradication rate of H.pylori compared with standard 7-d regimen.L.reuteri supplementation could reduce the frequency and the intensity of antibiotic-associated side-effects.

  12. Change in physical mobility over 10 years in post-polio syndrome.

    Bickerstaffe, A; Beelen, A; Nollet, F

    2015-03-01

    Post-polio syndrome is characterised by progressive muscle weakness and other symptoms which can limit physical mobility. We assessed the rate of decline in mobility over 10 years in relation to strength decline; and investigated potential predictors for the rate of decline of walking capacity, a measure of mobility, in 48 patients with post-polio syndrome and proven quadriceps dysfunction at baseline. Average walking capacity and self-reported physical mobility declined over 10 years, by 6 and 14%, respectively. Concomitantly people lost an average of 15% of isometric quadriceps strength. Significantly more people used walking aids offering greater support at follow-up. Notably, there was much individual variation, with 18% of participants losing a substantial amount of walking capacity (27% decline) and concomitant self-reported physical mobility (38% decline). Loss of quadriceps strength only explained a small proportion of the variance of the decline in walking capacity (R = 11%) and the rate of decline could not be predicted from baseline values for strength, walking capacity, self-reported physical mobility or basic demographics. The individual variability, yet lack of predictive factors, underscores the need for personally tailored care based on actual functional decline in patients with post-polio syndrome. PMID:25613808

  13. ROLE OF MEDICAL REHABILITATION TREATMENT IN POST-POLIO SYNDROME – A CASE REPORT

    DOGARU Gabriela

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The term post-polio syndrome (PPS was introduced in 1985 by Halstead. It is characterized by sudden or progressive muscle weakness, new muscular atrophy, muscle pain, fatigue, functional impotence, cold intolerance, after a period of at least 15 years from acute polio virus infection, a period of neurological and functional stability, in the absence of other medical explanation [1]. The reported prevalence of PPS is between 15% and 80% of all patients with previous polio virus infections [2, 3]. Poliomyelitis continues to be a public health problem, because the consequences of the disease last throughout life. In Europe, there are about 700,000 persons who survived the infection and are still alive. Non-randomized studies with kinesitherapy programs with a duration between 6 weeks and 7 months, involving isokinetic and isometric endurance muscle training, have demonstrated an increase of muscle strength in the case of patients with mild or moderate muscle weakness, and a reduction of muscle fatigue [7, 8, 9]. The differential diagnosis of PPS can be difficult because of the need to exclude both neurological and non-neurological conditions that aggravate the pre-existing motor deficit. Rehabilitation programs using therapeutic means: kinesitherapy, thermotherapy, hydrothermotherapy, occupational therapy represent the only way to limit functional deficit and to improve pain, playing an important role in the long-term management and care of patients.

  14. Education for the Eradication of Poverty

    C.I. Oriahi

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the possible education for the eradication of poverty in Nigeria. It defines poverty as a state pf shortage or deficiency of meeting basic needs. Majors causes of poverty are overpopulation, illiteracy, unemployment, environmental degradation and government insensitive to the welfare of the people. Effects of poverty include homelessness, malnutrition and starvation, illness, crime, violence and antisocial behaviour like Internet Fraud (Yahoo business and Advance Fee Fraud Populace (419. Some poverty eradication strategies highlighted include: (i Organisation of international workshops on eradication of poverty, (ii Respect for human rights, (iii Quality basic education for girls (iv Meaningful contributions by NGOs, (v Provision of jobs for the people. Some recommendations are made for the way forward.

  15. Eradication of New World Screwworm from Jamaica

    The New World Screwworm (NWS) is an insect pest affecting warm-blooded animals and also humans. It causes widespread economic losses in livestock production as well as pain and suffering to animals and to those people unfortunate enough to become infected. Although it is endemic in Jamaica, the screwworm can be eradicated from the island using the well proven and successful Sterile Insect Technique. In collaboration with the Jamaican authorities, the Department of Technical Co-operation of the IAEA is planning to sponsor a Model Project to eradicate screwworm from Jamaica. (IAEA)

  16. Eradication of Ebola Based on Dynamic Programming

    Jia-Ming Zhu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper mainly studies the eradication of the Ebola virus, proposing a scientific system, including three modules for the eradication of Ebola virus. Firstly, we build a basic model combined with nonlinear incidence rate and maximum treatment capacity. Secondly, we use the dynamic programming method and the Dijkstra Algorithm to set up M-S (storage and several delivery locations in West Africa. Finally, we apply the previous results to calculate the total cost, production cost, storage cost, and shortage cost.

  17. Eradicating successfully yaws from India: The strategy & global lessons.

    Narain, Jai P; Jain, S K; Bora, D; Venkatesh, S

    2015-05-01

    Yaws, a non-venereal treponematosis, affecting primarily the tribal populations, has been considered historically as one of the most neglected tropical diseases in the world. In 1996, India piloted an initiative to eradicate yaws based on a strategy consisting of active case finding through house-to-house search and treatment of cases and their contacts with long acting penicillin. Thereafter, the campaign implemented in all 51 endemic districts in 10 states of the country led to the achievement of a yaws-free status in 2004. In the post-elimination phase, surveillance activities accompanied by serological surveys were continued in the erstwhile endemic districts. These surveys carried out among children between the age of 1-5 yr, further confirmed the absence of community transmission in the country. The experience of India demonstrates that yaws can be eradicated in all endemic countries of Africa and Asia, provided that political commitment can be mobilized and community level activities sustained until the goal is achieved. PMID:26139778

  18. Effect of sequential versus standard Helicobacter pylori eradication therapy on the associated iron deficiency anemia in children

    Hamed Said Ali Habib; Hussam Aly Sayed Murad; Elamir Mahmoud Amir; Taher Fawzy Halawa

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Helicobacter pylori infection may be associated with low iron stores and iron deficiency anemia. Eradication of infection by the standard 10-day therapy (a proton pump inhibitor [PPI], clarithromycin and amoxicillin; each given orally, twice daily) is decreasing. The sequential 10-day therapy (a PPI and amoxicillin; each given orally twice daily for 5 days; followed by a PPI, clarithromycin and tinidazole; each given orally twice daily for another 5 days) may achieve higher eradic...

  19. The screwworm eradication program: From an unlikely dream to an outstanding reality

    The screwworm, Cochliomyia hominivorax (Coquerel) (Diptera: Calliphoridae), was a devastating pest to all warm blooded animals in the United States and the rest of North America. Successful eradication of the screwworm was achieved by using the unique approach called the sterile insect technique. He...

  20. Brazil : Eradicating Child Labor in Brazil

    World Bank

    2001-01-01

    The report reviews evidence of child labor in Brazil, and the Government's efforts to eradicate its worst forms, by examining background assessments of ongoing programs for its prevention. It seeks to identify promising strategies, addressing the needs of highly vulnerable children in urban areas, engaged in activities such as drug commerce, prostitution, or other dangerous activities. One...

  1. The Costs and Benefits of Rinderpest Eradication

    In addition to health risk, animal diseases inflict a broad spectrum of direct and indirect economic costs on society, many of which are neither well-understood nor rigorously analysed. Various methods exist to evaluate economic impacts, but many of these focus only on specific aspects or stakeholder interests and how they are affected by a disease, and do not capture the totality of impacts across the economy. However, these economy-wide considerations are essential to comprehensive expost evaluation of disease control or eradication programmes. Direct disease incidence and control costs may be focused on particular stakeholder groupings, but spill-over costs and benefits are dispersed more widely, traversing agricultural supply chains and associated households and enterprises. These extensive indirect effects often outweigh the direct ones. For this reason, cost-benefit analysis of animal disease and policy response must include a broad spectrum of both direct and indirect impacts in the assessment. Rinderpest was once one of the world's most feared livestock diseases, but concerted international control campaigns have now eradicated the disease globally. Despite this success, a major gap remains in the history of rinderpest eradication, namely a comprehensive assessment of the socio-economic costs and benefits of its control and eventual eradication. Such an assessment would make an important additional contribution, offering policy-makers an instrument for assessing the risk, cost and reward of enhanced investment in the control of other (present and future) animal diseases. Although it may be desirable to eradicate any health threat, cost-effectiveness is an important consideration, especially in developing countries, where public resources have many high priorities, and sustained expenditures re-quire clearly discernable benefits for large segments of society. While much has been documented on the epidemiological, technical and institutional lessons resulting

  2. Brazil: from reduction of poverty to a commitment to eradicate extreme poverty

    Lena Lavinas

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this article is to summarise certain positive results achieved by the Lula government in the sphere of social policy and to highlight the new challenges taken on by President Dilma Rousseff in terms of eradicating extreme poverty, after her first year in government. After Lula’s success with social policy, Rousseff has committed herself to eradicating extreme poverty over the short term (the four years of her mandate) in a federation that is marked by weak links in cooperation, a d...

  3. Managing breaches of containment and eradication of invasive plant populations

    Cameron S. Fletcher; Westcott, David A.; Murphy, Helen T; Grice, Anthony C; Clarkson, John R

    2014-01-01

    Containment can be a viable strategy for managing invasive plants, but it is not always cheaper than eradication. In many cases, converting a failed eradication programme to a containment programme is not economically justified. Despite this, many contemporary invasive plant management strategies invoke containment as a fallback for failed eradication, often without detailing how containment would be implemented. We demonstrate a generalized analysis of the costs of eradication and containmen...

  4. Challenges to health workers and their opinions about parents' refusal of oral polio vaccination in the Khyber Pakhtoon Khawa (KPK) province, Pakistan.

    Khan, Tahir Mehmood; Sahibzada, Muhammad Umar Khayam

    2016-04-19

    A qualitative study design was adapted to explore the challenges faced by health workers (HWs) during the polio health campaign. In addition, HWs' opinions about the factors causing parents to refuse oral polio vaccination (OPV) were also explored. Four focus group discussions (FGDs) were held (from 1st January 2015-31st March 2015) with the HWs who participated in the OPV campaigns in the polio red zones of Khyber Pakhtoon Khawa (KPK) province of Pakistan, namely Kohat (FG 1), Domel and Bannu (FG 2), Hangoo (FG 3), and Peshawar (FG 4). A total of N=42 HWs (10-11 in each FG) agreed to participate in this study. Overall, HWs disclosed that public attitude and harsh behaviour towards the HWs and security threats are the two main challenges they face. Common issues hindering parents' willingness to vaccinate their children against OPV are: OPV is seen as haram and not permitted in Islam, it is said to contain the blood of pigs (Khinzir) and monkeys, and parents are afraid that it is done to induce sterility among their children. HWs also shared that parents have a strong belief in the conspiracies that are associated with OPV, i.e. the USA and CIA, are spying on us and our government is helping them to achieve their agenda. Furthermore, HWs revealed that frequent visits may further strengthen parents' perceptions and make them more resistant to OPV. The common side effects of OPV reported by parents were mainly gastro-intestinal problems and in some cases mild to moderate fever with some respiratory symptoms. There is a great need to improve the logistics and facilities for HWs assisting in vaccination programmes. Furthermore, it is necessary to improve education, so people understand the basic concept of revaccination and booster doses, thereby assisting in creating a basic understanding of vaccinations, which may trigger changes in attitudes and make people believe in the benefits of OPV rather than following the conspiracies that lead them to refuse it. PMID

  5. Commonly used disinfectants fail to eradicate Salmonella enterica biofilms from food contact surface materials.

    Corcoran, M; Morris, D; De Lappe, N; O'Connor, J; Lalor, P; Dockery, P; Cormican, M

    2014-02-01

    Salmonellosis is the second most common cause of food-borne illness worldwide. Contamination of surfaces in food processing environments may result in biofilm formation with a risk of food contamination. Effective decontamination of biofilm-contaminated surfaces is challenging. Using the CDC biofilm reactor, the activities of sodium hypochlorite, sodium hydroxide, and benzalkonium chloride were examined against an early (48-h) and relatively mature (168-h) Salmonella biofilm. All 3 agents result in reduction in viable counts of Salmonella; however, only sodium hydroxide resulted in eradication of the early biofilm. None of the agents achieved eradication of mature biofilm, even at the 90-min contact time. Studies of activity of chemical disinfection against biofilm should include assessment of activity against mature biofilm. The difficulty of eradication of established Salmonella biofilm serves to emphasize the priority of preventing access of Salmonella to postcook areas of food production facilities. PMID:24362427

  6. Reflux esophagitis triggered after Helicobacter pylori eradication: a noteworthy demerit of eradication therapy among the Japanese?

    Katsunori eIijima

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In the February 2013 Revision of Insured Medical Treatment, bacterial eradication for all Helicobacter pylori-positive individuals in Japan was covered under the insurance scheme. However, reflux esophagitis is believed to occur in approximately 10% of Japanese patients who undergo eradication therapy. Hence, the risk of reflux esophagitis among such cases should be carefully considered, particularly in the treatment for H. pylori-positive patients who are otherwise healthy. The eradication of Helicobacter pylori in cases of H. pylori-positive gastritis markedly suppresses gastric inflammation, and inhibits gastric mucosal atrophy and its progression to intestinal metaplasia. In a long-term follow-up study (10-20 years, eradication treatment was found to reduce the risk of subsequent gastric cancer. However, the fact that eradication-induced reflux esophagitis could increase the long-term risk of Barrett’s esophagus and esophageal adenocarcinoma should also be considered in the Japanese population. Appropriate treatment with proton pump inhibitors should be taken into consideration for patients undergoing eradication therapy in clinical practice.

  7. Reflux esophagitis triggered after Helicobacter pylori eradication: a noteworthy demerit of eradication therapy among the Japanese?

    Iijima, Katsunori; Koike, Tomoyuki; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2015-01-01

    In the February 2013 Revision of Insured Medical Treatment, bacterial eradication for all Helicobacter pylori-positive individuals in Japan was covered under the insurance scheme. However, reflux esophagitis is believed to occur in approximately 10% of Japanese patients who undergo eradication therapy. Hence, the risk of reflux esophagitis among such cases should be carefully considered, particularly in the treatment for H. pylori-positive patients who are otherwise healthy. The eradication of H. pylori in cases of H. pylori-positive gastritis markedly suppresses gastric inflammation, and inhibits gastric mucosal atrophy and its progression to intestinal metaplasia. In a long-term follow-up study (10-20 years), eradication treatment was found to reduce the risk of subsequent gastric cancer. However, the fact that eradication-induced reflux esophagitis could increase the long-term risk of Barrett's esophagus and esophageal adenocarcinoma should also be considered in the Japanese population. Appropriate treatment with proton pump inhibitors should be taken into consideration for patients undergoing eradication therapy in clinical practice. PMID:26106373

  8. Symptom-based tendencies of Helicobacter pylori eradication in patients with functional dyspepsia

    Ling Lan; Jing Yu; Yu-Long Chen; Ya-Li Zhong; Hao Zhang; Chang-He Jia; Yuan Yuan; Bo-Wei Liu

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether there were symptombased tendencies in the Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori ) eradication in functional dyspepsia (FD) patients. METHODS: A randomized, single-blind, placebo-controlled study of H. pylori eradication for FD was conducted. A total of 195 FD patients with H. pylori infection were divided into two groups: 98 patients in the treatment group were treated with rabeprazole 10 mg twice daily for 2 wk, amoxicillin 1.0 g and clarithromycin 0.5 g twice daily for 1 wk; 97 patients in the placebo group were given placebos as control. Symptoms of FD, such as postprandial fullness, early satiety, nausea, belching, epigastric pain and epigastric burning, were assessed 3 mo after H. pylori eradication. RESULTS: By per-protocol analysis in patients with successful H. pylori eradication, higher effective rates of 77.2% and 82% were achieved in the patients with epigastric pain and epigastric burning than those in the placebo group (P 0.05). In 84 patients who received H. pylori eradication therapy, the effective rates for epigastric pain (73.8%) and epigastric burning (80.7%) were higher than those in the placebo group (P 0.05). By intention-to-treat analysis, patients with epigastric pain and epigastric burning in the treatment group achieved higher effective rates of 60.8% and 65.7% than the placebo group (33.3% and 31.8%) (P 0.05). CONCLUSION: The efficacy of H. pylori eradication has symptom-based tendencies in FD patients. It may be effective in the subgroup of FD patients with epigastric pain syndrome.

  9. Global eradication of lymphatic filariasis: the value of chronic disease control in parasite elimination programmes.

    Edwin Michael

    Full Text Available The ultimate goal of the global programme against lymphatic filariasis is eradication through irrevocable cessation of transmission using 4 to 6 years of annual single dose mass drug administration. The costs of eradication, managerial impediments to executing national control programmes, and scientific uncertainty about transmission endpoints, are challenges to the success of this effort, especially in areas of high endemicity where financial resources are limited. We used a combined analysis of empirical community data describing the association between infection and chronic disease prevalence, mathematical modelling, and economic analyses to identify and evaluate the feasibility of setting an infection target level at which the chronic pathology attributable to lymphatic filariasis--lymphoedema of the extremities and hydroceles--becomes negligible in the face of continuing transmission as a first stage option in achieving the elimination of this parasitic disease. The results show that microfilaria prevalences below a threshold of 3.55% at a blood sampling volume of 1 ml could constitute readily achievable and sustainable targets to control lymphatic filarial disease. They also show that as a result of the high marginal cost of curing the last few individuals to achieve elimination, maximal benefits can occur at this threshold. Indeed, a key finding from our coupled economic and epidemiological analysis is that when initial uncertainty regarding eradication occurs and prospects for resolving this uncertainty over time exist, it is economically beneficial to adopt a flexible, sequential, eradication strategy based on controlling chronic disease initially.

  10. Update on current and emerging treatment options for post-polio syndrome

    Elisabeth Farbu

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Elisabeth Farbu Neurocenter and National Competence Center for Movement Disorders, Stavanger University Hospital, Stavanger, NorwayAbstract: Post-polio syndrome (PPS refers to the clinical deterioration experienced by many polio survivors several decades after their acute illness. The symptoms are new muscle weakness, decreased muscle endurance, fatigue, muscle pain, joint pain, cold intolerance, and this typical clinical entity is reported from different parts of the world. The pathophysiology behind PPS is not fully understood, but a combination of distal degeneration of enlarged motor units caused by increased metabolic demands and the normal aging process, in addition to inflammatory mechanisms, are thought to be involved. There is no diagnostic test for PPS, and the diagnosis is based on a proper clinical workup where all other possible explanations for the new symptoms are ruled out. The basic principle of management of PPS lies in physical activity, individually tailored training programs, and lifestyle modification. Muscle weakness and muscle pain may be helped with specific training programs, in which training in warm water seems to be particularly helpful. Properly fitted orthoses can improve the biomechanical movement pattern and be energy-saving. Fatigue can be relieved with lifestyle changes, assistive devices, and training programs. Respiratory insufficiency can be controlled with noninvasive respiratory aids including biphasic positive pressure ventilators. Pharmacologic agents like prednisone, amantadine, pyridostigmine, and coenzyme Q10 are of no benefit in PPS. Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG has been tried in three studies, all having positive results. IVIG could probably be a therapeutic alternative, but the potential benefit is modest, and some important questions are still unanswered, in particular to which patients this treatment is useful, the dose, and the therapeutic interval.Keywords: polio, survivors, fatigue, aging

  11. Legal Policy Of Corruption Eradication At State-Owned Enterprises Sector In Indonesia

    Zulkipli; Aminuddin Ilmar; H.M. Djafar Saidi; Slamet Sampurno

    2015-01-01

    A mandate of the constitution of the Republic of Indonesia as the highest law is the creation of Indonesia people that is just and prosperous and then the development in all sectors becomes a necessity for achieving that goal. To achieve continuity and development success the enforcement of law supremacy in the form of prevention and eradication of corruption is a necessary condition condition sine qua non. Type of legal research conducted is normative. This research was carried out by discu...

  12. Evaluation of Intensive Pulse Polio Immunization in District Dang During 2008

    Bipin Vasava, Goti Pravin, Rupani Mihir, Mandaviya Vipul, Chudasma Rajesh

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Two rounds of pulse polio immunization in January and February 2008 were evaluated in rural areas of Dang district. Randomly selected team members of 24% booths and teams working during house to house activity were interviewed. Approximately 78% of eligible children were immunized on booths whereas remaining eligible were covered during house to house activity. In January & February 2008 round, tOPV was used for immunization purpose. Utilizers of booth services received information about these rounds mainly from health worker/anganwadi worker and television. During house to house activity, few unimmunized children were found. Adequate manpower with proper training and community mobilization can improve the coverage.

  13. Oral Polio Vaccine Influences the Immune Response to BCG Vaccination. A Natural Experiment

    Sartono, Erliyani; Lisse, Ida M.; Terveer, Elisabeth M.; van de Sande, Paula J. M.; Whittle, Hilton; Fisker, Ane B; ROTH, ADAM; Aaby, Peter; Yazdanbakhsh, Maria; Benn, Christine S

    2010-01-01

    Background: Oral polio vaccine (OPV) is recommended to be given at birth together with BCG vaccine. While we were conducting two trials including low-birth-weight (LBW) and normal-birth-weight (NBW) infants in Guinea-Bissau, OPV was not available during some periods and therefore some infants did not receive OPV at birth, but only BCG. We investigated the effect of OPV given simultaneously with BCG at birth on the immune response to BCG vaccine. Methods and Findings: We compared the in vitro ...

  14. Vaccine-associated Paralytic Poliomyelitis : A Case Report of Flaccid Monoparesis after Oral Polio Vaccine

    Kim, Sun Jun; Kim, Sung Han; Jee, Young Mee; Kim, Jung Soo

    2007-01-01

    This report describes a case of acute flaccid paralysis after administration of oral polio vaccine (OPV). A 4 month-old male patient with the decreased movement of left lower extremity for 1 month was transferred to the Department of Pediatrics. He received OPV with DTaP at 2 months of age. Flaccid paralysis was detected 4 weeks after OPV immunization. Attempts to isolate Sabin-like viruses in the two stool and CSF samples failed because those specimens were collected more than 2 month after ...

  15. HIV-1 Eradication: Early Trials (and Tribulations).

    Spivak, Adam M; Planelles, Vicente

    2016-01-01

    Antiretroviral therapy (ART) has rendered HIV-1 infection a manageable illness for those with access to treatment. However, ART does not lead to viral eradication owing to the persistence of replication-competent, unexpressed proviruses in long-lived cellular reservoirs. The potential for long-term drug toxicities and the lack of access to ART for most people living with HIV-1 infection have fueled scientific interest in understanding the nature of this latent reservoir. Exploration of HIV-1 persistence at the cellular and molecular level in resting memory CD4(+) T cells, the predominant viral reservoir in patients on ART, has uncovered potential strategies to reverse latency. We review recent advances in pharmacologically based 'shock and kill' HIV-1 eradication strategies, including comparative analysis of early clinical trials. PMID:26691297

  16. Eradicating smallpox in Indonesia: the archipelagic challenge.

    Neelakantan, Vivek

    2010-01-01

    From 1804 to 1974, the colonial Dutch East Indies government and the postcolonial Indonesian state attempted to tackle the problem of smallpox. The vaccination efforts in the colonial era virtually eliminated smallpox by 1940. Unfortunately, as a consequence of the war smallpox was reintroduced into the archipelago in 1947. Indonesia finally succeeded in eradicating smallpox in 1974 through campaigns of mass vaccination and surveillance. In the last few years of the fight against smallpox, a detection system was set up in order to have every suspected case of smallpox isolated and investigated by the health authorities until verified in the government laboratory at Bandung. This paper looks at the impact of the archipelagic nature of Indonesia on the smallpox eradication campaigns. PMID:20973337

  17. And they shall walk: ideal versus reality in polio rehabilitation in the United States

    Wilson, Daniel J.

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available This essay explores the significance that rehabilitation physicians and polio patients in the United States put on recovering the ability to walk. Polio often paralyzed or severely weakened the legs of those who contracted the disease. Regaining the ability to walk was thus a significant measure of recovery from the disease. However, walking meant more than the physical act itself. Regaining the ability to walk meant, in a symbolic sense, that one was no longer disabled, that one had again become normal. This attitude was shared by rehabilitation specialists and patients alike. This essay examines this attitude and the cultural values it embodied through a study of the efforts of selected polio survivors to learn to walk again and of the rehabilitation literature that held walking as an ideal. It also explores what happened when polio patients were unable to walk again because of the severity of their paralysis.

    En este artículo se analiza la importancia que tiene la recuperación de la capacidad de andar para los especialistas en rehabilitación y los pacientes de polio en los Estados Unidos. La polio iba a menudo acompañada de parálisis o de una grave debilitación de las piernas en aquellas personas que contraían la enfermedad. El recuperar la capacidad de andar era por lo tanto un importante factor indicativo de la recuperación de la enfermedad. Sin embargo, el andar significaba algo más que la simple acción física. El recuperar la movilidad significaba simbólicamente que uno dejaba de ser un minusválido y que volvía a ser una persona normal. Esta postura la compartían tanto los especialistas en rehabilitación como los pacientes. Este artículo analiza esta actitud y los valores culturales derivados de la misma, a través de un estudio sobre los esfuerzos llevados a cabo por un grupo seleccionado de supervivientes de polio para aprender a andar de nuevo así como de un análisis de la literatura sobre la rehabilitaci

  18. Education for the Eradication of Poverty

    C.I. Oriahi; A.O. Aitufe

    2010-01-01

    This study examines the possible education for the eradication of poverty in Nigeria. It defines poverty as a state pf shortage or deficiency of meeting basic needs. Majors causes of poverty are overpopulation, illiteracy, unemployment, environmental degradation and government insensitive to the welfare of the people. Effects of poverty include homelessness, malnutrition and starvation, illness, crime, violence and antisocial behaviour like Internet Fraud (Yahoo business) and Advance Fee Frau...

  19. Hybrid Therapy Regimen for Helicobacter Pylori Eradication

    Song, Zhi-Qiang; Liu, Jian; Zhou, Li-Ya

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) eradication remains a challenge with increasing antibiotic resistance. Hybrid therapy has attracted widespread attention because of initial report with good efficacy and safety. However, many issues on hybrid therapy are still unclear such as the eradication efficacy, safety, compliance, influencing factors, correlation with antibiotic resistance, and comparison with other regimens. Therefore, a comprehensive review on the evidence of hybrid therapy for H. pylori infection was conducted. Data Sources: The data used in this review were mainly from PubMed articles published in English up to September 30, 2015, searching by the terms of “Helicobacter pylori” or “H. pylori”, and “hybrid”. Study Selection: Clinical research articles were selected mainly according to their level of relevance to this topic. Results: Totally, 1871 patients of 12 studies received hybrid therapy. The eradication rates were 77.6–97.4% in intention-to-treat and 82.6–99.1% in per-protocol analyses. Compliance was 93.3–100.0%, overall adverse effects rate was 14.5–67.5%, and discontinued medication rate due to adverse effects was 0–6.7%. H. pylori culture and sensitivity test were performed only in 13.3% patients. Pooled analysis showed that the eradication rates with dual clarithromycin and metronidazole susceptible, isolated metronidazole or clarithromycin resistance, and dual clarithromycin and metronidazole resistance were 98.5%, 97.6%, 92.9%, and 80.0%, respectively. Overall, the efficacy, compliance, and safety of hybrid therapy were similar with sequential or concomitant therapy. However, hybrid therapy might be superior to sequential therapy in Asians. Conclusions: Hybrid therapy showed wide differences in the efficacy but consistently good compliance and safety across different regions. Dual clarithromycin and metronidazole resistance were the key factor to efficacy. Hybrid therapy was similar to sequential or concomitant

  20. The Mexican Fruit Fly Eradication Programme

    The goal of the Mexican Fruit Fly Eradication Programme is to control, suppress or eradicate from Mexico four species of fruit flies of economic and quarantine importance (Anastrepha ludens Loew, A. obliqua Macquart, A. serpentina Wied. and A. striata Schiner). These pests cause damage amounting to US$710 million per year. In addition to this cost, there are other expenses from pest control actions and the loss of international markets, because fruit importing countries have established stringent quarantine measures to restrict the entry of these pests. For purposes of the programme's implementation, Mexico was divided into three working zones, defined by agro-ecological characteristics, the number of fruit fly species present and the size of fruit growing regions. In addition, a cost:benefit analysis was carried out which indicated that the rate of return, in a 12-year time frame, might be as much as 33:1 in Northern Mexico, and 17:1 in the rest of the country, for an area over 100,000 hectares. Eradication technology involves: 1) surveys of pest populations by trapping and host fruit harvesting to monitor the presence and density of fruit flies, 2) reduction of pest populations applying cultural practices and using selective bait sprays, 3) mass release of sterile flies and augmentative release of parasitoids to eliminate populations and, 4) enforcement of quarantine measures to protect fruit fly free areas

  1. Combining Tactics to Exploit Allee Effects for Eradication of Alien Insect Populations

    Full text: Invasive species increasingly threaten ecosystems, food production, and human welfare worldwide. Hundreds of eradication programs have targeted a wide range of nonnative insect species to mitigate the economic and ecological impacts of biological invasions. Many such programs used multiple tactics to achieve this goal, but interactions between tactics have received little formal consideration, specifically as they interact with Allee dynamics. If a population can be driven below an Allee threshold, extinction becomes more probable because of factors such as the failure to find mates, satiate natural enemies, or successfully exploit food resources, as well as demographic and environmental stochasticity. A key implication of an Allee threshold is that the population can be eradicated without the need and expense of killing the last individuals. Some combinations of control tactics could interact with Allee dynamics to increase the probability of successful eradication. Combinations of tactics can be considered to have synergistic (greater efficiency in achieving extinction from the combination), additive (no improvement over single tactics alone), or antagonistic (reduced efficiency from the combination) effects on Allee dynamics. We highlight examples of combinations of tactics likely to act synergistically, additively, or antagonistically on pest populations. By exploiting the interacting effects of multiple tactics on Allee dynamics, the success and costeffectiveness of eradication programs can be enhanced. (author)

  2. [History of development of the live poliomyelitis vaccine from Sabin attenuated strains in 1959 and idea of poliomyelitis eradication].

    Lashkevich, V A

    2013-01-01

    against poliomyelitis. In some developing countries the vaccination data are falsified, thereby threatening the polio epidemics reappearance and the virus spreading to other countries. Methods must be developed for detection and dealing with extremely rare persistent virus carriers. Because of all these constraints the outcome of poliomyelitis eradication at present is uncertain and vaccination must be continued. The world has become poliovaccine dependent. PMID:23785754

  3. Eradication of malaria through genetic engineering:the current situation

    Wing-Chui Chong; Rusliza Basir; Yam Mun Fei

    2013-01-01

    Malaria is an intra-cellular parasitic protozoon responsible for millions of deaths annually.Host and parasite genetic factors are crucial in affecting susceptibility to malaria and progression of the disease.Recent increased deployment of vector controls and new artemisinin combination therapies have dramatically reduced the mortality and morbidity of malaria worldwide.However, the gradual emergence of parasite and mosquito resistance has raised alarm regarding the effectiveness of current artemisinin-based therapies.In this review, mechanisms of anti-malarial drug resistance in thePlasmodium parasite and new genetically engineered tools of research priorities are discussed.The complexity of the parasite lifecycle demands novel interventions to achieve global eradication.However, turning laboratory discovered transgenic interventions into functional products entails multiple experimental phases in addition to ethical and safety hurdles.Uncertainty over the regulatory status and public acceptance further discourage the implementation of genetically modified organisms.

  4. Managing and eradicating wildlife tuberculosis in New Zealand.

    Warburton, B; Livingstone, P

    2015-06-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) due to Mycobacterium bovis infection was first identified in brushtail possums (Trichosurus vulpecula) in New Zealand in the late 1960s. Since the early 1970s, possums in New Zealand have been controlled as part of an ongoing strategy to manage the disease in livestock. The TB management authority (TBfree New Zealand) currently implements three strategic choices for disease-related possum control: firstly TB eradication in areas selected for eradication of the disease from livestock and wildlife, secondly Free Area Protection in areas in which possums are maintained at low densities, normally along a Vector Risk Area (VRA) boundary, and thirdly Infected Herd Suppression, which includes the remaining parts of VRA where possums are targeted to minimise the infection risk to livestock. Management is primarily through a range of lethal control options. The frequency and intensity of control is driven by a requirement to reduce populations to very low levels (usually to a trap-catch index below 2%), then to hold them at or below this level for 5-10 years to ensure disease eradication.Lethal possum control is implemented using aerial- and ground-based applications, under various regulatory and operational constraints. Extensive research has been undertaken aimed at improving the efficacy and efficiency of control. Aerial applications use sodium fluoroacetate (1080) bait for controlling possums over extensive and rugged areas of forest that are difficult to access by foot. Ground-based control uses a range of toxins (primarily, a potassium cyanide-based product) and traps. In the last 5 years there has been a shift from simple possum population control to the collection of spatial data on possum presence/absence and relative density, using simple possum detection devices using global positioning system-supported data collection tools, with recovery of possum carcasses for diagnostic necropsy. Such data provide information subsequently used in predictive

  5. EFFECT OF TRUNK ROTATION EXERCISE ON SCOLIOSIS IN POST- POLIO RESIDUAL PARALYSIS

    Jibi Paul

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background:This study conducted to find out the effectiveness of trunk flexion rotation, extension rotationand combined flexion rotation & extension rotation exercises in reduction of scoliosis. Twenty fivemale scolioticsubjects secondary to post-polio residual paralysis were selected for the study as per the inclusionand exclusioncriteria.Method:Materials used for the study were Rontgenograph, Protractor, Pencil and Scale to evaluate the Cobb’sangle. Purposive random sampling method used to select the subjects in three groups for the study. Each groupA, B and C performed trunk flexion rotation, extension rotation and combined flexion rotation and extensionrotation exercises respectively. Subjects performed exercise regularly twice a day for five months under thesupervision of the researcher. The subjects did exercise for one hour with one minute rest in between eachmovement. Cobb’s angle was measured before and after the treatment program for each subject.Results:The calculated t’ value of group A, B and C were 11.00, 9.00 and 10.95 respectively at 5% level andP < 0.0001 for all groups, there for it was significant in reduction of angle of scoliosis among post- polio residualparalysis. The comparative study found that there was no significant difference in reduction of scoliosis amongthe groups.Conclusion:Based on the statistical analysis performed it could conclude that all the groups undergone trunkrotation exercises have improvement in terms of reduction of scoliosis but there was no much difference betweenthe groups on reduction of scoliosis

  6. Tracking Vaccination Teams During Polio Campaigns in Northern Nigeria by Use of Geographic Information System Technology: 2013–2015

    Touray, Kebba; Mkanda, Pascal; Tegegn, Sisay G.; Nsubuga, Peter; Erbeto, Tesfaye B.; Banda, Richard; Etsano, Andrew; Shuaib, Faisal; Vaz, Rui G.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Nigeria is among the 3 countries in which polio remains endemic. The country made significant efforts to reduce polio transmission but remains challenged by poor-quality campaigns and poor team performance in some areas. This article demonstrates the application of geographic information system technology to track vaccination teams to monitor settlement coverage, reduce the number of missed settlements, and improve team performance. Methods. In each local government area where tracking was conducted, global positioning system–enabled Android phones were given to each team on a daily basis and were used to record team tracks. These tracks were uploaded to a dashboard to show the level of coverage and identify areas missed by the teams. Results. From 2012 to June 2015, tracking covered 119 immunization days. A total of 1149 tracking activities were conducted. Of these, 681 (59%) were implemented in Kano state. There was an improvement in the geographic coverage of settlements and an overall reduction in the number of missed settlements. Conclusions. The tracking of vaccination teams provided significant feedback during polio campaigns and enabled supervisors to evaluate performance of vaccination teams. The reports supported other polio program activities, such as review of microplans and the deployment of other interventions, for increasing population immunity in northern Nigeria. PMID:26609004

  7. The global eradication of peste des petits ruminants (PPR) within 15 years--is this a pipe dream?

    Taylor, William

    2016-03-01

    Gordon Scott did much to inspire the eradication of rinderpest, probably the most outstanding veterinary achievement of the twentieth century, and one currently inspiring is the proposed eradication of peste des petits ruminants (PPR), a disease of sheep and goats caused by a closely related Morbillivirus. The evolution and geographic spread of PPR along with its epidemiological characteristics are discussed and related to ways in which its spread can be reduced through the provision of diagnostic aids to sanitary livestock movement at local level. Taking a historical look at rinderpest eradication, it was shown that much could be achieved using a legislation-backed zoosanitary approach or, once developed, the build up of herd immunities in isolated populations. As the final cap to this (circa), two hundred-year-long process, major national and internationally funded vaccination programmes falling within the informal coordinatorship of the OIE and FAO showed that final eradication could be achieved with remarkable rapidity if the seat of infection was known and if appropriate national and international interventions were aimed at ending virus transmission. Were such international cooperation to be forthcoming once more, the understanding, tools and experiences now on offer suggest that PPR could be controlled and eradicated far more rapidly than rinderpest. PMID:26851956

  8. Measuring Poverty in order to Eradicate It

    Julien Damon

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In 2000, the UN established its Millennium Development Goals, with the notable aim of halving extreme poverty by 2015. That same year, the European Union launched its Lisbon strategy, containing an injunction to “make a decisive impact on the eradication of poverty by 2010”. Since 2007, France has set a national target of reducing poverty by one third over five years. These proactive policies call, in all three cases, for technical elucidation to define and describe poverty. Each of the three scales – French, European and international – has its own approaches and methods of quantification. And yet their similarities are more significant than their differences.

  9. Eradication of Helicobacter pylori: therapies and clinical implications.

    O'Connor, H J

    1992-01-01

    This review presents a critical evaluation of the role of Helicobacter pylori eradication in the management of peptic ulcer disease and non-ulcer dyspepsia. On current evidence, H. pylori eradication therapy seems likely to emerge as the most rational and cost-effective treatment for duodenal ulcer. The role of H. pylori eradication in the treatment of gastric ulcer and non-ulcer dyspepsia is unclear and requires further study. The emerging problem of antibiotic resistance in H. pylori is of ...

  10. Combination of cyclophosphamide, rituximab, and intratumoral CpG oligodeoxynucleotide successfully eradicates established B cell lymphoma.

    Betting, David J; Hurvitz, Sara A; Steward, Kristopher K; Yamada, Reiko E; Kafi, Kamran; van Rooijen, Nico; Timmerman, John M

    2012-09-01

    Rituximab plus chemotherapy is standard therapy for patients with non-Hodgkin B cell lymphoma, but often complete response or cure is not achieved. Toll-like receptor 9 agonist CpG oligodeoxynucleotides (CpG) can improve antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity and adaptive antitumor immune responses. Using a syngeneic murine B cell lymphoma expressing human CD20 (38C13-huCD20), we previously demonstrated that rituximab plus intratumoral CpG, but not systemic CpG, could eradicate up to half of 7-day established 38C13-huCD20 tumors. However, larger 10-day established tumors could not be cured with this regimen. We thus hypothesized that cytoreduction with cyclophosphamide (Cy) before immunotherapy might permit eradication of these more advanced tumor burdens. Pretreatment with Cy resulted in tumor eradication from 83% of animals treated with rituximab/CpG, whereas Cy/CpG or Cy/rituximab treatments only cured 30% or 17%, respectively (P<0.005). Tumor eradication depended on natural killer cells, but not T cells, macrophages, or complement. Only mice treated with Cy/rituximab/CpG partially resisted rechallenge with tumor cells. Foxp3 Treg and CD11bGr1 myeloid suppressor cells persisted within lymphoid organs after therapy, possibly influencing the ability to establish adaptive tumor immunity. In conclusion, cytoreduction with Cy permitted the cure of large, established lymphomas not otherwise responsive to rituximab plus intratumoral CpG immunotherapy. PMID:22892450

  11. A desk evaluation review of project URT/5/007 tsetse fly eradication. Project desk evaluation

    Project URT/5/007 was initiated in 1984 to assist the Government of the United Republic of Tanzania in developing membrane feeding technology for the mass breeding of tsetse flies, which is required for the application of the sterile insect technique to eradicate the tsetse fly from the island of Zanzibar. As the project progressed the objectives focused on the development of inter-related management practices with SIT to control and eventually eradicate the tsetse species infesting Zanzibar. As depicted by the project title, tsetse fly eradication on Zanzibar is the ultimate goal of on-going work of project URT/5/007; however, tsetse fly eradication is not the immediate objective of this project. The total budget of the project for the years 1984 through 1994 includes 53 man-months of expert services, $402,755 for equipment, and $1,959 for fellowship training. Additional funds for 57 man-months of fellowship training were provided from sources outside of the project. Resources provided by the United Republic of Tanzania for the project included staff, local facilities, and local running costs. A Desk Evaluation Review (DER) of Project URT/5/007 was requested by the Africa Section to provide an assessment of project achievements and to determine to what end the project may lead in the near future. Also the review could help determine how experiences gained during the developments of this project might be utilized in the management and implementation of similar projects in Tanzania or the region

  12. Clinical evaluation of four one-week triple therapy regimens in eradicating Helicobacter pyloriinfection

    Chuan-Yong Guo; Yun-Bin Wu; Heng-Lu Liu; Jian-Ye Wu; Min-Zhang Zhong

    2004-01-01

    AIM: TO evaluate clinical efficacy of four one-week triple therapies in eradicating Helicobacter pylori infection.METHODS: In this clinical trial, 132 patients with duodenal ulcer and chronic gastritis were randomly divided into four 20 mg+ amoxicillin 1 000 mg + clarithromycin 250 mg), OFC (omeprazole 20 mg + furazolidone 100 mg + clarithromycin 250 mg), OFA (omeprazole 20 mg + furazolidone 100 mg + amoxicillin 1000 mg) and OMC (omeprazole 20 mg +metronidazole 200 mg + cladthromycin 250 mg), respectively.Each drug was taken twice daily for one week. The 13C urea breath test was carried out 4-8 weeks after treatment to determine the success of H pylori eradication.RESULTS: A total of 127 patients completed the treatment.The eradication rate for H pylori infection was 90.3%,90.9%, 70.9% and 65.6%, respectively in OAC, OFC OMC and OFA groups.CONCLUSION: A high eradication rate can be achieved with one-week OAC or OFC triple therapy. Thus, oneweek triple therapies with OAC and OFC are recommended for Chinese patients with duodenal ulcers and chronic gastritis.

  13. Improving polio vaccination during supplementary campaigns at areas of mass transit in India

    Bahl Sunil

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In India, children who are traveling during mass immunization campaigns for polio represent a substantial component of the total target population. These children are not easily accessible to health workers and may thus not receive vaccine. Vaccination activities at mass transit sites (such as major intersections, bus depots and train stations, can increase the proportion of children vaccinated but the effectiveness of these activities, and factors associated with their success, have not been rigorously evaluated. Methods We assessed data from polio vaccination activities in Jyotiba Phule Nagar district, Uttar Pradesh, India, conducted in June 2006. We used trends in the vaccination results from the June activities to plan the timing, locations, and human resource requirements for transit vaccination activities in two out of the seven blocks in the district for the July 2006 supplementary immunization activity (SIA. In July, similar data was collected and for the first time vaccination teams also recorded the proportion of children encountered each day who were vaccinated (a new monitoring system. Results In June, out of the 360,937 total children vaccinated, 34,643 (9.6% received vaccinations at mass transit sites. In the July SIA, after implementation of a number of changes based on the June monitoring data, 36,475 children were vaccinated at transit sites (a 5.3% increase. Transit site vaccinations in July increased in the two intervention blocks from 18,194 to 21,588 (18.7% and decreased from 16,449 to 14,887 (9.5% in the five other blocks. The new monitoring system showed the proportion of unvaccinated children at street intersection transit sites in the July campaign decreased from 24% (1,784/7,405 at the start of the campaign to 3% (143/5,057 by the end of the SIA, consistent with findings from the more labor-intensive post-vaccination coverage surveys routinely performed by the program. Conclusions Analysis of

  14. ERAD substrate recognition in budding yeast.

    Xie, Wei; Ng, Davis T W

    2010-07-01

    During protein synthesis, the orderly progression of folding, modification, and assembly is paramount to function and vis-à-vis cellular viability. Accordingly, sophisticated quality control mechanisms have evolved to monitor protein maturation throughout the cell. Proteins failing at any step are segregated and degraded as a preventative measure against potential toxicity. Although protein quality control is generally poorly understood, recent research advances in endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation (ERAD) pathways have provided the most detailed view so far. The discovery of distinct substrate processing sites established a biochemical basis for genetic profiles of model misfolded proteins. Detailed mechanisms for substrate recognition were recently uncovered. For some proteins, sequential glycan trimming steps set a time window for folding. Proteins still unfolded at the final stage expose a specific degradation signal recognized by the ERAD machinery. Through this mechanism, the system does not in fact know that a molecule is "misfolded". Instead, it goes by the premise that proteins past due have veered off their normal folding pathways and therefore aberrant. PMID:20178855

  15. Eradicating Poverty in Fragile States: Prospects of Reaching the "High-Hanging" Fruit by 2030

    Burt, Alison; Hughes, Barry; Milante, Gary

    2014-01-01

    As the world approaches the target year of the Millennium Development Goals and passes into the new, post-2015 era, the development community has made a call for a new international development goal of eradication of extreme poverty by 2030. How feasible is that? For most of the developing world, the goal seems ambitious, yet achievable -- but what about the prospects for fragile states in...

  16. Oral Polio Vaccine Influences the Immune Response to BCG Vaccination. A Natural Experiment

    Sartono, E.; Lisse, I.M.; Terveer, E.M.; van de Sande, P.J.M.; Whittle, H.; Fisker, Bent; Roth, A.; Aaby, Peter; Yazdanbakhsh, M.; Benn, Christine Stabell

    2010-01-01

    Background: Oral polio vaccine (OPV) is recommended to be given at birth together with BCG vaccine. While we were conducting two trials including low-birth-weight (LBW) and normal-birth-weight (NBW) infants in Guinea-Bissau, OPV was not available during some periods and therefore some infants did...... not receive OPV at birth, but only BCG. We investigated the effect of OPV given simultaneously with BCG at birth on the immune response to BCG vaccine. Methods and Findings: We compared the in vitro and the in vivo response to PPD in the infants who received OPV and BCG with that of infants who...... with OPV. Worryingly, the results indicate that the common practice in low-income countries of administering OPV together with BCG at birth may down-regulate the response to BCG vaccine...

  17. Does oral polio vaccine at birth affect the size of the thymus?

    Eriksen, Helle Brander; Lund, Najaaraq; Biering-Sørensen, Sofie;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is increasing evidence that vaccines have an effect on general mortality which goes beyond specific disease protection. Oral polio vaccine (OPV) is widely used in low-income countries, but in observational studies in Guinea-Bissau we observed that not receiving OPV at birth was...... the effect was not seen after 4 weeks (GMR: 0.97 (0.92-1.03)) and 6 weeks (GMR: 0.99 (0.82-1.19)). There were no strong sex-differences. DISCUSSION: Overall there was no effect on thymic size of OPV0 when administered with BCG. The results could indicate that if an effect occurs, it is only within the...

  18. Eradication of tephritid fruit fly pest populations: outcomes and prospects

    BACKGROUND: The number of insect eradication programmes is rising in response to globalisation. A database of arthropod and plant pathogen eradications covers 1050 incursion responses, with 928 eradication programmes on 299 pest and disease taxa in 104 countries (global eradication database b3.net.nz/gerda). METHODS: A subset of the database was assembled with 211 eradication or response programmes against 17 species of fruit flies (Tephritidae) in 31 countries, in order to investigate factors affecting the outcome. RESULTS: The failure rate for fruit fly eradication programmes was about 7%, with 0% for Ceratitis capitata (n=85 programmes) and 0% for two Anastrepha species (n=12 programmes), but 12% for 13 Bactrocera species (n=108 programmes). A number of intended eradication programmesagainst long-established populations were not initiated because of cost and other considerations, or evolved during the planning phase into suppression programmes. Cost was dependent on area, ranged from $US 0.1 million to $US 240 million and averaged about $US 12 million (normalised to $US in 2012). In addition to the routine use of surveillance networks, quarantine and fruit destruction, the key tactics used in eradication programmes were male annihilation, protein bait sprays (which can attract both sexes), fruit destruction and the sterile insect technique. CONCLUSIONS: Eradication success generally required the combination of several tactics applied on an area-wide basis. Because the likelihood of eradication declines with an increase in the area infested, it pays to invest in effective surveillance networks that allow early detection and delimitation while invading populations are small, thereby greatly favouring eradication success. (author)

  19. Strategies for Improving Polio Surveillance Performance in the Security-Challenged Nigerian States of Adamawa, Borno, and Yobe During 2009–2014

    Hamisu, Abdullahi Walla; Johnson, Ticha Muluh; Craig, Kehinde; Mkanda, Pascal; Banda, Richard; Tegegne, Sisay G.; Oyetunji, Ajiboye; Ningi, Nuhu; Mohammed, Said M.; Adamu, Mohammed Isa; Abdulrahim, Khalid; Nsubuga, Peter; Vaz, Rui G.; Muhammed, Ado J. G.

    2016-01-01

    Background.  The security-challenged states of Adamawa, Borno, and Yobe bear most of the brunt of the Boko Haram insurgency in Nigeria. The security challenge has led to the killing of health workers, destruction of health facilities, and displacement of huge populations. To identify areas of polio transmission and promptly detect possible cases of importation in these states, polio surveillance must be very sensitive. Methods.  We conducted a retrospective review of acute flaccid paralysis s...

  20. Control and eradication of endemic infectious diseases in cattle

    Houe, Hans; Nielsen, Liza Rosenbaum; Nielsen, Søren Saxmose

    "Control and eradication of endemic infectious diseases in cattle" provides the key elements that should be addressed in the establishment of bovine disease control and eradication programmes. The book aims to reach a broad group of readers, including: students; professionals in veterinary practice...

  1. Insect Eradication and Containment of Invasive Alien Species

    Insect eradication programs are nearly always targeted at recently arrived invasive species with significant pest potential. They attempt to contain a pest to a defined area and then completely eliminate the pest from that area. From a Federal regulatory standpoint, eradication programs are undert...

  2. Invasive mammal eradication on islands results in substantial conservation gains.

    Jones, Holly P; Holmes, Nick D; Butchart, Stuart H M; Tershy, Bernie R; Kappes, Peter J; Corkery, Ilse; Aguirre-Muñoz, Alfonso; Armstrong, Doug P; Bonnaud, Elsa; Burbidge, Andrew A; Campbell, Karl; Courchamp, Franck; Cowan, Philip E; Cuthbert, Richard J; Ebbert, Steve; Genovesi, Piero; Howald, Gregg R; Keitt, Bradford S; Kress, Stephen W; Miskelly, Colin M; Oppel, Steffen; Poncet, Sally; Rauzon, Mark J; Rocamora, Gérard; Russell, James C; Samaniego-Herrera, Araceli; Seddon, Philip J; Spatz, Dena R; Towns, David R; Croll, Donald A

    2016-04-12

    More than US$21 billion is spent annually on biodiversity conservation. Despite their importance for preventing or slowing extinctions and preserving biodiversity, conservation interventions are rarely assessed systematically for their global impact. Islands house a disproportionately higher amount of biodiversity compared with mainlands, much of which is highly threatened with extinction. Indeed, island species make up nearly two-thirds of recent extinctions. Islands therefore are critical targets of conservation. We used an extensive literature and database review paired with expert interviews to estimate the global benefits of an increasingly used conservation action to stem biodiversity loss: eradication of invasive mammals on islands. We found 236 native terrestrial insular faunal species (596 populations) that benefitted through positive demographic and/or distributional responses from 251 eradications of invasive mammals on 181 islands. Seven native species (eight populations) were negatively impacted by invasive mammal eradication. Four threatened species had their International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Red List extinction-risk categories reduced as a direct result of invasive mammal eradication, and no species moved to a higher extinction-risk category. We predict that 107 highly threatened birds, mammals, and reptiles on the IUCN Red List-6% of all these highly threatened species-likely have benefitted from invasive mammal eradications on islands. Because monitoring of eradication outcomes is sporadic and limited, the impacts of global eradications are likely greater than we report here. Our results highlight the importance of invasive mammal eradication on islands for protecting the world's most imperiled fauna. PMID:27001852

  3. Gastric cancer development after the successful eradication of Helicobacter pylori.

    Uno, Kaname; Iijima, Katsunori; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2016-03-15

    Gastric cancer (GC) develops as a result of inflammation-associated carcinogenesis due to Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection and subsequent defects in genetic/epigenetic events. Although the indication for eradication therapy has become widespread, clinical studies have revealed its limited effects in decreasing the incidence of GC. Moreover, research on biopsy specimens obtained by conventional endoscopy has demonstrated the feasibility of the restoration of some genetic/epigenetic alterations in the gastric mucosa. Practically, the number of sporadic cases of primary/metachronous GC that emerge after successful eradication has increased, while on-going guidelines recommend eradication therapy for patients with chronic gastritis and those with background mucosa after endoscopic resection for GC. Accordingly, regular surveillance of numerous individuals who have received eradication therapy is recommended despite the lack of biomarkers. Recently, the focus has been on functional reversibility after successful eradication as another cue to elucidate the mechanisms of restoration as well as those of carcinogenesis in the gastric mucosa after H. pylori eradication. We demonstrated that Congo-red chromoendoscopy enabled the identification of the multi-focal distribution of functionally irreversible mucosa compared with that of restored mucosa after successful eradication in individuals at extremely high risk for GC. Further research that uses functional imaging may provide new insights into the mechanisms of regeneration and carcinogenesis in the gastric mucosa post-eradication and may allow for the development of useful biomarkers. PMID:26989462

  4. 76 FR 53165 - Certification Related to Aerial Eradication in Colombia

    2011-08-25

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF STATE Certification Related to Aerial Eradication in Colombia Pursuant to the authority vested in the Secretary of... for aerial eradication of illicit crops in Colombia is being used in accordance with EPA...

  5. Predicted costs and benefits of eradicating BVDV from Ireland

    Stott Alistair W

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV causes an economically important endemic disease (BVD of cattle in Ireland and worldwide. Systematic eradication by detection and removal of infectious (BVDV carrier cattle has been successful in several regions. We therefore assessed the benefits (disease losses avoided and costs (testing and culling regime of a potential eradication programme in Ireland. Published bio-economic models of BVDV spread in beef suckler herds and dairy herds were adapted to estimate potential benefits of eradication in Ireland. A simple model of BVDV spread in beef finisher herds was devised to estimate the benefits of eradication in this sector. A six year eradication programme consisting of 5 inter-related virological and serological testing programmes is outlined and costed. We found that the annualised benefits of BVDV eradication in Ireland exceeded the costs by a factor of 5 in the beef suckler sector and a factor of 14 in the dairy sector. Corresponding payback periods were 1.2 and 0.5 years respectively. These results highlight the significant economic impact of BVDV on the Irish cattle industry and suggest a clear economic benefit to eradication using the proposed approach. This type of cost-benefit analysis is considered an essential prerequisite prior to undertaking an eradication campaign of this magnitude.

  6. ‘Do not eat those apples; they’ve been on the ground!’: polio epidemics and preventive measures, Sweden 1880s-1940s

    Axelsson, Per

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available This article will address how Swedish scientists, physicians and public health officers tried to combat the polio epidemics in the pre-vaccine era. It shows that once polio was considered as an epidemic disease the preventive measures used were based on the hindrance of other infectious diseases. It also illustrates how epidemiological and laboratory studies to some degree affected the thoughts of how polio should be prevented, and that Swedish ideas and experiences differed from those put forward in the USA.

    Este artículo trata sobre cómo los científicos, médicos y funcionarios de la sanidad pública de Suecia intentaron combatir la epidemia de la polio en la era anterior a la vacuna y expone que en cuanto la polio fue considerada como una epidemia, las medidas preventivas que se aplicaron se basaban en las de otras enfermedades contagiosas. También ilustra en qué medida los estudios epidemiológicos y los análisis de laboratorio influyeron en la manera de prevenir la polio y también demuestra que las opiniones y experiencias en Suecia eran diferentes a las de los Estados Unidos.

  7. The CIRAD Contribution to Rinderpest Eradication

    Rinderpest, which was a major incentive for establishment of the first veterinary school at Lyon in 1764 and later of OIE, also motivated the implementation of an international training course in Maisons-Alfort (France) in 1921, which aimed to improve the control of rinderpest. This postgraduate teaching in exotic medicine was soon organized into an institute, Institut de medecine veterinaire exotique, then, the Institut d'Elevage et de Medecine Veterinaire Tropicale (IEMVT), which was created in 1948 and merged with other French agronomic institutes in 1984, to create CIRAD. For simplicity, this chapter uses the name CIRAD. All the scientists mentioned work at CIRAD unless otherwise stated. The history of CIRAD's contribution to rinderpest eradication is also the history of strong collaboration with national, regional and international veterinary services (OIE, FAO, AU-IBAR) and animal health research centres. A large and significant body of field and laboratory work was carried out during the period. A few years ago, it was still possible to meet pastoralists in remote areas of Chad or the Central African Republic who remembered seeing French vets use their goats to vaccinate cattle with the 'caprinized' rinderpest vaccine. Pan-African vaccination campaigns and the pledge for eradication. CIRAD was involved in all aspects of rinderpest research and control activities since the early 1950s. Most of this work was conducted in the national laboratories of Chad (Farcha; Provost, 1966), Senegal (Dakar) and Ethiopia (Debre Zeit; Lefevre and Domenech, 1974), which are now important components of their respective national animal disease control and research systems. Dakar and Debre Zeit laboratories are major international stakeholders in disease control, through the networks and reference centres of the West and Central Africa Veterinary Laboratory Network for Avian Influenza and other Transboundary Disease (RESOLAB, coordinated by FAO, OIE and AU-IBAR) and PANVAC

  8. A medfly eradication proposal for Central America

    A survey sponsored by US/AID revealed that in 1970 direct crop losses due to Mediterranean fruit fly Ceratitis capitata (Wiedemann) infestations throughout 10 774 km2 (2.7 million acres) in Costa Rica, Nicaragua and Panama approximated US$2.4 million. Potential annual losses would reach US$6.8 million were the medfly to spread throughout presently uninfested Central America. The survey team members estimated that a 6-year eradication programme involving sterile flies, malathion mixed with protein bait, or malathion alone would cost US$30.8, US$25.7 or US$21.8 million, respectively. The subsequent revision of these estimates by agricultural officials of the OIRSA member countries resulted in a 5-year programme involving both malathion and sterile medflies at a cost of US$20.5 million. The financing would be provided by contributions from the governments of the USA, the five Central American countries, Panama, Mexico and the United Kingdom that would be deposited in CABEI to cover the operational costs. This sum would be repaid to CABEI within 10 years and would constitute the nucleus of an emergency fund to combat plant and animal diseases or pests within the OIRSA region. Additional monetary and/or technical support would be requested of UNDP, IAEA, the University of California and the Interamerican Institute of Agricultural Sciences. Intensive trapping for medflies within OIRSA countries that are ostensibly free of this pest and in Belice should be a prerequisite to an active eradication programme. Supplementary information concerning medfly ecology and methods of marking and aerial release is needed. (author)

  9. Female genital mutilation: strategies for eradication.

    Hosken, F P

    1998-03-01

    Female genital mutilation (FGM) is a term applied to genital cutting that can vary from a nick on the clitoris to total excision of all external genital tissue and closure of the vulva. FGM is practiced in many African countries, in some parts of the Arab peninsula and Persian Gulf, in some groups in Indonesia and Malaysia, and among immigrants in Western countries. The practice has been outlawed in the most European countries and in the US. The US legislation also requires all African countries receiving US aid to begin education programs to eradicate FGM mutilation. The first international recommendations to abolish FGM were made in 1979, and the Inter-African Committee on Traditional Practices Affecting the Health of Women and Children (IAC) was formed in 1984. The IAC, which gained worldwide support at the 1985 UN Conference for women, has affiliated committees in 26 African countries. The IAC supports its affiliates by offering training, networking opportunities, and resources and by holding a major conference every 3 years. The fourth IAC conference, in 1997 in Dakar, attracted about 90 delegates, including two women from Japan and one from the US. The IAC is working to eradicate all forms of traditionally condoned violence against women and girls, including FGM, child marriage, food taboos, and force feeding. Efforts to reach rural populations rely on distribution of childbirth picture books that explain the biological facts of reproduction and then describe the effects of FGM on women's health. These include immediate complications (including death), long-term complications, pregnancy-associated problems, and psychosexual and psychological problems. PMID:12222522

  10. Poliomyelitis in Malaysia: two confirmed cases after 6 years without polio.

    Ismail, H I; Lal, M

    1993-01-01

    Poliomyelitis in Malaysia has not been reported since 1986. We report two cases of poliomyelitis in non-immunized children whose parents, though relatively educated, opted not to vaccinate their children for socio-cultural reasons. This recent trend may interfere with our attempts to eradicate poliomyelitis globally by the year 2000. The clinical features, pathophysiology and differential diagnosis are discussed. PMID:7506880

  11. First-line eradication of Helicobacter pylori:Are the standard triple therapies obsolete? A different perspective

    Gyrgy; Miklós; Buzás

    2010-01-01

    Studies concerning the eradication of Helicobacter pylori have resulted in a proliferation of meta-analyses. To date, there are 303 meta-analyses cited in PubMed, 113 dealing with the therapy of the infection. A chronological analysis of the results of meta-analyses performed between 1998 and 2010 shows that first-line standard triple therapies achieved eradication rates on an intention-to-treat basis of around 80%; prolonging treatment to 14, but not 10 d should improve the results. The proton pump inhibit...

  12. Measles eradication: recommendations from a meeting cosponsored by the World Health Organization, the Pan American Health Organization, and CDC.

    1997-06-13

    Recent successes in interrupting indigenous transmission of measles virus in the Americas and in the United Kingdom prompted the World Health Organization (WHO), Pan American Health Organization (PAHO), and CDC to convene a meeting in July, 1996 to consider the feasibility of global measles eradication. Presentations at the meeting included an overview of global measles control and elimination efforts; detailed reviews of successful measles elimination efforts in Latin America, the English-speaking Caribbean, Canada, and the United States; surveillance for clinical disease; laboratory tools for antibody detection and virus identification; and other factors that might influence the feasibility of disease eradication. With this background information, meeting organizers asked participants to address five questions: 1) Is global measles eradication feasible? 2) Is measles eradication feasible with current vaccines? 3) What are the appropriate vaccination strategies for measles eradication? 4) How should surveillance for measles be carried out? 5) What role should outbreak control play in the strategy to eliminate measles? Participants agreed that measles eradication is technically feasible with available vaccines and recommended adoption of the goal of global eradication with a target date during 2005-2010, with the proviso that measles eradication efforts should not interfere with poliomyelitis eradication but should build on the successes of the global Poliomyelitis Eradication Initiative. Although existing vaccines are adequate for eradication, vaccination strategies that rely on administration of a single dose of vaccine are not. In the Americas, sustained interruption of indigenous measles virus transmission has been achieved through a three-tiered vaccination strategy that includes a) "catch-up" vaccination of all persons aged 1-14 years, regardless of disease history or vaccination status; b) "keep-up" vaccination of > or = 90% of children in each successive

  13. The Role of the Polio Program Infrastructure in Response to Ebola Virus Disease Outbreak in Nigeria 2014

    Vaz, Rui G.; Mkanda, Pascal; Banda, Richard; Komkech, William; Ekundare-Famiyesin, Olubowale O.; Onyibe, Rosemary; Abidoye, Sunday; Nsubuga, Peter; Maleghemi, Sylvester; Hannah-Murele, Bolatito; Tegegne, Sisay G.

    2016-01-01

    Background.  The current West African outbreak of the Ebola virus disease (EVD) began in Guinea in December 2013 and rapidly spread to Liberia and Sierra Leone. On 20 July 2014, a sick individual flew into Lagos, Nigeria, from Monrovia, Liberia, setting off an outbreak in Lagos and later in Port Harcourt city. The government of Nigeria, supported by the World Health Organization and other partners, mounted a response to the outbreak relying on the polio program experiences and infrastructure....

  14. Experiences and perspectives of patients with post-polio syndrome and therapists with exercise and cognitive behavioural therapy

    Bakker, Minne; Schipper, Karen; Koopman, Fieke S.; Nollet, Frans; Abma, Tineke A

    2016-01-01

    Background Many persons affected with poliomyelitis develop post-polio syndrome (PPS) later in their life. Recently, the effectiveness of Exercise Therapy (ET) and Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) for PPS has been evaluated in a randomized controlled trial, but did not show a decrease in fatigue or improvement in secondary endpoints like Quality of Life and self-perceived activity limitations. The aim of this explorative study was to gain insight in the perceived effects and experiences of...

  15. Sero-Survey of Polio Antibodies during Wild Poliovirus Outbreak in Southern Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region, China

    Hai-Bo Wang; Shuang-Li Zhu; Jing-Shan Zheng; Ai-Li Gou; Hui Cui; Yong Zhang; Gui-Jun Ning; Chun-Xiang Fan; Yuan-Sheng Chen; Ke-Li Li; Ping Yuan; Chao Ma; Jing Ma; Hui Zheng; Xin-Chun Fan

    2014-01-01

    Background After being polio free for more than 10 years, an outbreak following importation of wild poliovirus (WPV) was confirmed in Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region, China, in 2011. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted prior to supplementary immunization activities (SIAs), immediately after the confirmation of the WPV outbreak. In selected prefectures, participants aged ≤60 years old who visited hospitals at county-level or above to have their blood drawn for reasons not related to...

  16. Vaccine-associated paralytic poliomyelitis in India during 1999: decreased risk despite massive use of oral polio vaccine.

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Vaccine-associated paralytic poliomyelitis (VAPP) is a rare but serious consequence of the administration of oral polio vaccine (OPV). Intensified OPV administration has reduced wild poliovirus transmission in India but VAPP is becoming a matter of concern. METHODS: We analysed acute flaccid paralysis (AFP) surveillance data in order to estimate the VAPP risk in this country. VAPP was defined as occurring in AFP cases with onset of paralysis in 1999, residual weakness 60 days after...

  17. Implementation of a Systematic Accountability Framework in 2014 to Improve the Performance of the Nigerian Polio Program

    Tegegne, Sisay G.; MKanda, Pascal; Yehualashet, Yared G.; Erbeto, Tesfaye B.; Touray, Kebba; Nsubuga, Peter; Banda, Richard; Vaz, Rui G.

    2016-01-01

    Background. An accountability framework is a central feature of managing human and financial resources. One of its primary goals is to improve program performance through close monitoring of selected priority activities. The principal objective of this study was to determine the contribution of a systematic accountability framework to improving the performance of the World Health Organization (WHO)–Nigeria polio program staff, as well as the program itself. Methods. The effect of implementation of the accountability framework was evaluated using data on administrative actions and select process indicators associated with acute flaccid paralysis (AFP) surveillance, routine immunization, and polio supplemental immunization activities. Data were collected in 2014 during supportive supervision, using Magpi software (a company that provides service to collect data using mobile phones). A total of 2500 staff were studied. Results. Data on administrative actions and process indicators from quarters 2–4 in 2014 were compared. With respect to administrative actions, 1631 personnel (74%) received positive feedback (written or verbal commendation) in quarter 4 through the accountability framework, compared with 1569 (73%) and 1152 (61%) during quarters 3 and 2, respectively. These findings accorded with data on process indicators associated with AFP surveillance and routine immunization, showing statistically significant improvements in staff performance at the end of quarter 4, compared with other quarters. Conclusions. Improvements in staff performance and process indicators were observed for the WHO-Nigeria polio program after implementation of a systematic accountability framework. PMID:26823334

  18. The Opportunity To Eradicate Peste des Petits Ruminants.

    Mariner, Jeffrey C; Jones, Bryony A; Rich, Karl M; Thevasagayam, Samuel; Anderson, John; Jeggo, Martyn; Cai, Yi; Peters, Andrew R; Roeder, Peter L

    2016-05-01

    Peste des petits ruminants (PPR) is a highly infectious disease of sheep and goats that is caused by PPR virus, a member of the genus Morbillivirus that includes the viruses that cause rinderpest (RP) in cattle. RP was the first animal disease to be globally eradicated in 2011 and is only the second disease, after smallpox, to have ever been eradicated. PPR is one of the principal constraints to small ruminant production in Africa, Asia, and the Middle East. The epidemiology of PPR and RP as well as the technologies available for their diagnosis and control are similar. The conditions that favored the eradication of RP are also largely present for PPR. In this work, we outline the evolving strategy for eradication in light of current opportunities and challenges, as well as the lessons from other eradication programs in animal and human health. The global PPR situation and technology for its control are summarized. A strategy based on the lessons from previous eradication efforts that integrate epidemiology, social science, and economics as tools to target and motivate vaccination is summarized. Major aspects of the cost and benefit-cost analysis of the indicated program are presented. The overall undiscounted cost of eradication was estimated as $3.1 billion, and the benefit-cost ratio for the most likely scenario was estimated at 33.8. We close with a discussion of the possible next steps. PMID:27183645

  19. Is concomitant quadruple therapy for Helicobacter pylori eradication really needed for Japanese patients?

    Vincenzo; De; Francesco; Angelo; Zullo; Cesare; Hassan

    2012-01-01

    The study found that the 7 d of concomitant therapy (lansoprazole, amoxicillin, clarithromycin and metronidazole) achieved significantly higher eradication rates compared to 7 d of triple therapy (lansoprazole, amoxicillin, clarithromycin), the intention to treat (ITT) cure rates being 94.9% and 68.3%, respectively. According to our opinion, this study is clinically relevant for Japanese physicians for at least 2 reasons: (1) the standard triple therapy (clarithromycin plus amoxicillin) achieved disappointing cure rates in Japan-in agreement with what was observed in several countries; and (2) the concomitant quadruple therapy is an effective therapeutic alternative.

  20. Treatment of low-grade gastric malt lymphoma using Helicobacter pylori eradication

    Grgov Saša

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Lymphoma of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT lymphoma of the stomach usually occurs as a consequence of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori infection. The aim of this study was to investigate the long-term effect of treatment of low-grade gastric MALT lymphoma with the H. pylori eradication method. Methods. In the period 2002-2012 in 20 patients with dyspepsia, mean age 55.1 years, the endoscopic and histologic diagnosis of gastric MALT lymphoma in the early stages were made. Histological preparations of endoscopic biopsy specimens were stained with hematoxyllineosin (HE, histochemical and immunohistochemical methods. Results. Endoscopic findings of gastritis were documented in 25% of the patients, and 75% of the patients had hypertrophic folds, severe mucosal hyperemia, fragility, nodularity, exulcerations and rigidity. Histopathologically, pathognomonic diagnostic criterion were infiltration and destruction of glandular epithelium with neoplastic lymphoid cells, the so-called lymphoepithelial lesions. In all 20 patients H. pylori was verified by rapid urease test and Giemsa stain. After the triple eradication therapy complete remission of MALT lymphoma was achieved in 85% of the patients, with no recurrence of lymphoma and H. pylori infection in the average follow-up period of 48 months. In 3 (15% of the patients, there was no remission of MALT lymphoma 12 months after the eradication therapy. Of these 3 patients 2 had progression of MALT lymphoma to diffuse large-cell lymphoma. Conclusion. Durable complete re-mission of low-grade gastric MALT lymphoma is achieved in a high percentage after eradication of H. pylori infection, thus preventing the formation of diffuse large-cell lymphoma and gastric adenocarcinoma.

  1. Age-dependent eradication of Helicobacter pylori in Japanese patients

    Satoshi; Mamori; Akihiro; Higashida; Fumiaki; Kawara; Katsuhiro; Ohnishi; Akihiko; Takeda; Eri; Senda; Cho; Ashida; Hajime; Yamada

    2010-01-01

    AIM:To determine the general risk factors affecting the failure rate of first-line eradication therapy in Japanese patients with Helicobacter pylori(H.pylori)infection.METHODS:The present study enrolled 253 patients who had an H.pylori infection,underwent gastroendoscopy,and were treated with H.pylori eradication therapy.Eradication therapy consisted of 30 mg lansoprazole plus 750 mg amoxicillin and 400 mg clarithromycin twice daily for 7 d.All of the patients underwent a 13 C urea breath test at least 1 mo...

  2. Six challenges in the eradication of infectious diseases

    Petra Klepac

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Eradication and elimination are increasingly a part of the global health agenda. Once control measures have driven infection to low levels, the ecology of disease may change posing challenges for eradication efforts. These challenges vary from identifying pockets of susceptibles, improving monitoring during and after the endgame, to quantifying the economics of disease eradication versus sustained control, all of which are shaped and influenced by processes of loss of immunity, susceptible build-up, emergence of resistance, population heterogeneities and non-compliance with control measures. Here we discuss how modelling can be used to address these challenges.

  3. Eradication of multidrug-resistant pseudomonas biofilm with pulsed electric fields.

    Khan, Saiqa I; Blumrosen, Gaddi; Vecchio, Daniela; Golberg, Alexander; McCormack, Michael C; Yarmush, Martin L; Hamblin, Michael R; Austen, William G

    2016-03-01

    Biofilm formation is a significant problem, accounting for over eighty percent of microbial infections in the body. Biofilm eradication is problematic due to increased resistance to antibiotics and antimicrobials as compared to planktonic cells. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of Pulsed Electric Fields (PEF) on biofilm-infected mesh. Prolene mesh was infected with bioluminescent Pseudomonas aeruginosa and treated with PEF using a concentric electrode system to derive, in a single experiment, the critical electric field strength needed to kill bacteria. The effect of the electric field strength and the number of pulses (with a fixed pulse length duration and frequency) on bacterial eradication was investigated. For all experiments, biofilm formation and disruption were confirmed with bioluminescent imaging and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). Computation and statistical methods were used to analyze treatment efficiency and to compare it to existing theoretical models. In all experiments 1500 V are applied through a central electrode, with pulse duration of 50 μs, and pulse delivery frequency of 2 Hz. We found that the critical electric field strength (Ecr) needed to eradicate 100-80% of bacteria in the treated area was 121 ± 14 V/mm when 300 pulses were applied, and 235 ± 6.1 V/mm when 150 pulses were applied. The area at which 100-80% of bacteria were eradicated was 50.5 ± 9.9 mm(2) for 300 pulses, and 13.4 ± 0.65 mm(2) for 150 pulses. 80% threshold eradication was not achieved with 100 pulses. The results indicate that increased efficacy of treatment is due to increased number of pulses delivered. In addition, we that showed the bacterial death rate as a function of the electrical field follows the statistical Weibull model for 150 and 300 pulses. We hypothesize that in the clinical setting, combining systemic antibacterial therapy with PEF will yield a synergistic effect leading to improved

  4. International approach to eradication and surveillance for foot-and-mouth disease in the Americas.

    Rodriguez-Torres, J G

    2000-01-01

    for FMD eradication (PHEFA), has been implemented and today Chile and Uruguay are FMD free without vaccination; Argentina, Paraguay, and the states of Rio Grande do Sul and Santa Catarina in Brazil are also recognized by the OIE to be FMD Free, with vaccination. The use of the continental surveillance system is the main strategy for achieving the eradication of FMD in South America. At this time PANAFTOSA is working to improve the system, and to add other diseases indicated by the governments of the Americas. PMID:11193621

  5. Mid-Columbia - Yellow-flag Iris Eradication 2014

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The project as described was to attempt to eradicate yellow-flag iris from Toppenish, McNary and Columbia National Wildlife Refuges using chemical and, where...

  6. Mid-Columbia - Eradication of Yellow-flag Iris 2013

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The project as described was to attempt to eradicate yellow-flag iris from Toppenish, McNary and Columbia National Wildlife Refuges using chemical and, where...

  7. Attempted eradication of Porphyrio porphyrio Linnaeus in the Florida Everglades

    Dave EGGEMAN

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Porphyrio porphyrio (Fulica porphyrio Linnaeus was reported to the South Florida Water Management District in a Water Conservation Area and in constructed wetlands in the Everglades in 2006. A rapid assessment, including casual observations and surveys of land managers, indicated a limited number of P. porphyrio (~300 birds was present, and an eradication attempt was initiated. From 2006 – 2008, more than 3100 P. porphyrio were killed by shotgun from airboats during 73 hunts, suggesting the initial population assessment was severely underestimated. After removing nearly 1500 P. porphyrio in 2008, we concluded that eradication was not possible. Failure of this eradication attempt is attributed to P. porphyrio’s affinity with dense emergent vegetation, which greatly limited shooting effectiveness. Further, the failed eradication underscores the importance of a reporting network to improve early detection and the chance to eliminate naturalized or feral populations of non‐native species.

  8. Reliability of contractile properties of the knee extensor muscles in individuals with post-polio syndrome.

    Eric L Voorn

    Full Text Available To assess the reliability of contractile properties of the knee extensor muscles in 23 individuals with post-polio syndrome (PPS and 18 age-matched healthy individuals.Contractile properties of the knee extensors were assessed from repeated electrically evoked contractions on 2 separate days, with the use of a fixed dynamometer. Reliability was determined for fatigue resistance, rate of torque development (MRTD, and early and late relaxation time (RT50 and RT25, using the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC and standard error of measurement (SEM, expressed as % of the mean.In both groups, reliability for fatigue resistance was good, with high ICCs (>0.90 and small SEM values (PPS: 7.1%, healthy individuals: 7.0%. Reliability for contractile speed indices varied, with the best values found for RT50 (ICCs>0.82, SEM values <2.8%. We found no systematic differences between test and retest occasions, except for RT50 in healthy subjects (p = 0.016.In PPS and healthy individuals, the reliability of fatigue resistance, as obtained from electrically evoked contractions is high. The reliability of contractile speed is only moderate, except for RT50 in PPS, demonstrating high reliability.This was the first study to examine the reliability of electrically evoked contractile properties in individuals with PPS. Our results demonstrate its potential to study mechanisms underlying muscle fatigue in PPS and to evaluate changes in contractile properties over time in response to interventions or from natural course.

  9. Wearable Monitoring Devices for Assistive Technology: Case Studies in Post-Polio Syndrome

    Giuseppe Andreoni

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The correct choice and customization of an orthosis are crucial to obtain the best comfort and efficiency. This study explored the feasibility of a multivariate quantitative assessment of the functional efficiency of lower limb orthosis through a novel wearable system. Gait basographic parameters and energetic indexes were analysed during a Six-Minute Walking Test (6-MWT through a cost-effective, non-invasive polygraph device, with a multichannel wireless transmission, that carried out electro-cardiograph (ECG; impedance-cardiograph (ICG; and lower-limb accelerations detection. Four subjects affected by Post-Polio Syndrome (PPS were recruited. The wearable device and the semi-automatic post-processing software provided a novel set of objective data to assess the overall efficiency of the patient-orthosis system. Despite the small number of examined subjects, the results obtained with this new approach encourage the application of the method thus enlarging the dataset to validate this promising protocol and measuring system in supporting clinical decisions and out of a laboratory environment.

  10. Evaluation of Radiosensitivity of HeLa Cells Infected with Polio Virus Irradiated by Co 60

    F Seif

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Introduction & Objective: The main purpose of radiotherapy is exposing enough doses of radiation to tumor tissue and protecting the normal tissues around it. Tumor dose for each session in radiotherapy will be considered based on radiosensitivity of the tissues. The presence of viral diseases in tumoral area can affect the radiosensitivity of cells. This study aimed to evaluate the radiosensitivity of Hela cells infected with poliomyelitis virus irradiated by Co 60. Materials & Methods: In this study, the radiosensitivity of HeLa cells, with or without the viral infection, after gamma radiation of cobalt 60, was assessed. Results: Results of comparison of the radisensitivity of infected and uninfected cells indicates that after 2 Gy irradiation by Co 60, polio infection in low, moderate and high virus load, increases the cell death by 20-30%, 30-40% and 70-90% respectively. Conclusion : Radiosensitivity of tumoral cells increase when they are infected with viral agents. Results of this study showed that non cancer diseases should be considered when prescribing dose fraction in radiotherapy of cancers.

  11. The immunological effects of oral polio vaccine provided with BCG vaccine at birth

    Jensen, Kristoffer Jarlov; Karkov, Hanne Sophie; Lund, Najaaraq; Andersen, Andreas; Eriksen, Helle Brander; Barbosa, Amarildo Gomes; Kantsø, Bjørn; Aaby, Peter; Benn, Christine Stabell

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Vaccines may have non-specific effects. An observational study from Guinea-Bissau suggested that oral polio vaccine at birth (OPV0) provided with Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccine was associated with down-regulation of the immune response to BCG vaccine 6 weeks later. Based on the...... BCG alone at birth, and subsequently randomised to have a blood sample taken at 2, 4 or 6 weeks post-randomisation. Excreted levels of cytokines (IL-2, IL-5, IL-10, TNF-α and IFN-γ) were measured from whole blood in vitro stimulations with a panel of recall vaccine antigens (BCG, PPD, OPV), mitogen...... previous finding, we wanted to test our a priori hypothesis that OPV would dampen the immune response to BCG, and secondarily to test immune responses to other antigens. METHODS: The study was conducted at the Bandim Health Project in Guinea-Bissau in 2009-2010. Infants were randomised to OPV0+BCG versus...

  12. Electromyographic and neuromuscular analysis in patients with post-polio syndrome.

    Corrêa, J C F; Rocco, C Chiusoli de Miranda; de Andrade, D Ventura; Peres, J Augusto; Corrêa, F Ishida

    2008-01-01

    Proceed to a comparative analysis of the electromyographic (EMG) activity of the muscles rectus femoris, vastus medialis and vastus lateralis, and to assess muscle strength and fatigue after maximal isometric contraction during knee extension. Eighteen patients with post-polio syndrome, age and weight matched, were utilized in this study. The signal acquisition system utilized consisted of three pairs of surface electrodes positioned on the motor point of the analyzed muscles. It was possible to observe with the results of this study a decreased endurance on initial muscle contraction and during contraction after 15 minutes of the initial maximal voluntary contraction, along with a muscle fatigue that was assessed through linear regression executed with Pearson's test. There were significant differences among the comparative analysis of EMG activity of the muscles rectus femoris, vastus medialis and vastus lateralis after maximal isometric contraction during knee extension. Initial muscle contraction and contraction after a 15 minute-rest from initial contraction decreased considerably, indicating a decreased endurance on muscle contraction, concluding that a lower limb muscle fatigue was present on the analyzed PPS patients. PMID:19097472

  13. Managing and eradicating wildlife tuberculosis in New Zealand

    Warburton, B.; Livingstone, P

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Tuberculosis (TB) due to Mycobacterium bovis infection was first identified in brushtail possums (Trichosurus vulpecula) in New Zealand in the late 1960s. Since the early 1970s, possums in New Zealand have been controlled as part of an ongoing strategy to manage the disease in livestock. The TB management authority (TBfree New Zealand) currently implements three strategic choices for disease-related possum control: firstly TB eradication in areas selected for eradication of the disea...

  14. Mucoadhesive and muco-penetrating delivery systems for eradication of helicobacter pylori

    Saahil Arora

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori, the major culprit for peptic ulcer, has a unique way of survival in harsh acidic environment of the stomach by colonizing deep in the gastric mucosal layer. Failure of conventional therapies against H. pylori for complete eradication has major limitations like low residence time of delivery system in stomach, poor penetration of drug in gastric mucosa, acidic degradation of antibiotics, and development of antibiotics resistance. The poor penetration of antibiotics through thick viscoelastic mucosal gel results in incomplete eradication of H. pylori. Various investigators have formulated novel gastro-retentive drug delivery systems such as floating systems, mucoadhesive systems, pH-sensitive gel systems, and muco-penetrating delivery systems for increasing the concentration of antibiotic in close proximity to the site of H. pylori infection. This review summarizes the novel drug delivery approaches investigated during the last few years and suggests that a high eradication rate can be achieved by therapy comprising of muco-penetrating delivery systems of antibiotics against H. pylori.

  15. Effect of radiotherapy on MALT lymphomas not responding to H. pylori eradication

    Gastric and duodenal mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphomas were classified into 4 groups (Group A, B, C, and D) by the existence of API2-MALT1 chimeric transcript, H. pylori infection and its response to H. pylori eradication. Cases in group A were API2-MALT1 negative, H. pylori positive which responded to H. pylori eradication. Non responders were classified into group B. Cases in group C were API2-MALT1 negative and H. pylori negative. Group D was API2-MALT1 positive. Twenty two cases of clinical stage I in group B, C and D which did not respond to eradication (2 cases also had chemotherapy) received radiotherapy and all of them achieved complete response. Acute toxicities were only grade 1 digestive symptoms and grade 1-2 hematologic toxicities and late toxicity was seen in only one case as grade 2 nephropathy. Nephropathy was avoided by the multi-field technique instead of the 2-field technique. Radiotherapy can be an effective and safe treatment for gastric and duodenal MALT lymphomas in clinical stage I. (author)

  16. Azithromycin in one week quadruple therapy for H pylori eradication in Iran

    Shahrokh Mousavi; Jafar Toussy; Siamak Yaghmaie; Mehrdad Zahmatkesh

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To investigate eradication rates, patient compliance and tolerability of a 1-wk Azithromycin-based quadruple therapy versus the 2-wk conventional therapy.METHODS: A total of 129 H pylori-positive patients were randomized to either omeprazole 20 mg,bismuth subcitrate 240 mg, azithromycin 250 mg, and metronidazole 500 mg, all twice daily for 1-wk (B-OAzM)or omeprazole 20 mg, bismuth subcitrate 240 mg,amoxicillin 1g, and metronidazole 500 mg all twice daily for 2-wk (B-OAM). H pylori infection was defined at entry by histology and rapid urease test and cure of infection was determined by negative urea breath test.RESULTS: H pylori eradication rates produced by B-OAzM and B-OAM were 74.1% and 70.4% respectively based on an intention to treat analysis, and 78.1%versus 75.7% respectively based on a per-protocol analysis. The incidence of poor compliance was lower,although not significantly so, in patients randomized to B-OAzM than for B-OAM (3.5% versus 4.3%) but intolerability was similar in the two groups ( 35% versus33.3%).CONCLUSION: 1-wk azithromycin based quadruple regimen achieves an H pylori eradication rate comparable to that of standard 2-wk quadruple therapy, and is associated with comparable patient compliance and complications.

  17. Brazil: from reduction of poverty to a commitment to eradicate extreme poverty

    Lena Lavinas

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to summarise certain positive results achieved by the Lula government in the sphere of social policy and to highlight the new challenges taken on by President Dilma Rousseff in terms of eradicating extreme poverty, after her first year in government. After Lula’s success with social policy, Rousseff has committed herself to eradicating extreme poverty over the short term (the four years of her mandate in a federation that is marked by weak links in cooperation, a distinct heterogeneity within the federated bodies and profound socio-economic inequality among citizens. Under Lula’s government, the factors that most helped to reduce poverty and inequality were the recovery of the minimum salary’s real value in rates higher than that of inflation, as well as an increase in formal employment, with the creation of approximately 12,000,000 jobs in eight years. For Dilma’s term of office, which began with a downturn in economic growth rates, an even bigger challenge lies ahead. In light of this, the article evaluates the prospects for success of Dilma’s government in terms of eradicating extreme poverty in Brazil.

  18. Endoscopic surveillance of gastric cancers after Helicobacter pylori eradication.

    Kobayashi, Masaaki; Sato, Yuichi; Terai, Shuji

    2015-10-01

    The incidence and mortality of gastric cancer remains high in East Asian countries. Current data suggest that Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) eradication might be more effective for preventing gastric cancer in young people before they develop atrophic gastritis and intestinal metaplasia. However, the long-term effect of H. pylori eradication on metachronous cancer prevention after endoscopic resection (ER) of early gastric cancer remains controversial, with some discordance between results published for Japanese and Korean studies. The detection ability of synchronous lesions before ER and eradication of H. pylori directly influences these results. After eradication, some gastric cancers are more difficult to diagnose by endoscopy because of morphologic changes that lead to a flat or depressed appearance. Narrow-band imaging with magnifying endoscopy (NBI-ME) is expected to be useful for identifying metachronous cancers. However, some gastric cancers after eradication show a "gastritis-like" appearance under NBI-ME. The gastritis-like appearance correlates with the histological surface differentiation of the cancer tubules and superficial non-neoplastic epithelium atop or interspersed with the cancer. Till date, it remains unclear whether H. pylori eradication could prevent progression of gastric cancer. Until we can establish more useful endoscopic examination methodologies, regular endoscopic surveillance of high-risk groups is expected to be the most beneficial approach for detection. PMID:26457015

  19. After Beijing: emphasis on poverty eradication.

    1996-01-01

    In March 1996, during its first meeting since the Fourth World Conference on Women, the UN Commission on the Status of Women (CSW), called for a gender perspective to be integrated into policies and programs dealing with poverty, child and dependent care, and the media. Three expert panels examined each of these areas through a format which encouraged dialogue and led to the adoption of 17 resolutions, decisions, and agreed conclusions as well as a recommendation that the UN adopt a multi-year work program for the CSW to allow it to review progress in elimination of the 12 main obstacles to women's advancement identified at Beijing. Among the resolutions adopted by the CSW were calls to 1) take a broad and integrated approach to poverty eradication, 2) enhance women's empowerment and autonomy, 3) promote equity and equality in the public domain, 4) promote women's employment, 5) give women social and economic protection when they are unable to work, 6) counteract negative images of women and sex-stereotyping in the media, 7) reduce the representation of violence against women in the media, 8) strengthen the role of women in global communications, 9) encourage the participation of men in child and dependent care, and 10) recognize women's double burden of work. The CSW also agreed to pursue further discussions about drafting an optional protocol to the 1979 Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women. Among its other actions, the CSW called for mechanisms to protect the rights of women migrant workers, to protect women and children during armed conflicts, to include gender-based human rights violations in UN activities, and to address the root factors which lead to social ills such as trafficking in women and girls. In addition, the CSW submitted a draft resolution demanding that Israel protect the rights of Palestinian women and their families. PMID:12291684

  20. Cancer Stem Cells: From Identification To Eradication

    A fundamental problem in cancer research is identification of the cells within a tumor that sustain the growth of the neoplastic clone. The concept that only a subpopulation of rare cancer stem cells (CSCs) is responsible for maintenance of the neoplasm emerged nearly 50 years ago: however, conclusive proof for the existence of a CSC was obtained only relatively recently. As definition, cancer stem cells (CSCs) are a sub-population of cancer cells (found within solid tumors or hematological malignancies) that possess characteristics normally associated with stem cells as high self-renewal potential. These cells are believed to be tumorige forming) in contrast to the bulk of cancer cells, which are thought to be non-tumorigenic. The first conclusive evidence for CSCs was published in 1997 in Nature Medicine by Bonnet and Dick who isolated a subpopulation of leukemic cells in AML that express a specific surface marker CD34 but lacks the CD38 marker. The authors established that the CD34+/CD38– subpopulation is capable of initiating leukemia in NOD/SCID mice that is histologically similar to the donor [1]. This subpopulation of cells is termed SCID Leukemia-initiating cells (SLIC). A theory suggests that such cells act as a reservoir for disease recurrence, are the origin of metastasis and exert resistance towards classical antitumor regimens. This resistance was attributed to a combination of several factors [2], suggesting that conventional antitumor regimens are targeting the bulk of the tumor not the dormant stubborn CSCs. Purpose Better understanding of the leukemogenic process and the biology of CSCS to define the most applicable procedures for their identification and isolation in order to design specific targeted therapies aiming at reducing disease burden to very low levels .. up to eradication of the tumor

  1. Malaria eradication: the economic, financial and institutional challenge

    Hanson Kara

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Malaria eradication raises many economic, financial and institutional challenges. This paper reviews these challenges, drawing on evidence from previous efforts to eradicate malaria, with a special focus on resource-poor settings; summarizes more recent evidence on the challenges, drawing on the literature on the difficulties of scaling-up malaria control and strengthening health systems more broadly; and explores the implications of these bodies of evidence for the current call for elimination and intensified control. Economic analyses dating from the eradication era, and more recent analyses, suggest that, in general, the benefits of malaria control outweigh the costs, though few studies have looked at the relative returns to eradication versus long-term control. Estimates of financial costs are scanty and difficult to compare. In the 1960s, the consolidation phase appeared to cost less than $1 per capita and, in 1988, was estimated to be $2.31 per capita (both in 2006 prices. More recent estimates for high coverage of control measures suggest a per capita cost of several dollars. Institutional challenges faced by malaria eradication included limits to the rule of law (a major problem where malaria was concentrated in border areas with movement of people associated with illegal activities, the existence and performance of local implementing structures, and political sustainability at national and global levels. Recent analyses of the constraints to scaling-up malaria control, together with the historical evidence, are used to discuss the economic, financial and institutional challenges that face the renewed call for eradication and intensified control. The paper concludes by identifying a research agenda covering: ∘ issues of the allocative efficiency of malaria eradication, especially using macro-economic modelling to estimate the benefits and costs of malaria eradication and intensified control, and studies of the links between

  2. Distinct Clinic-Pathological Features of Early Differentiated-Type Gastric Cancers after Helicobacter pylori Eradication

    Noriyuki Horiguchi; Tomomitsu Tahara; Tomohiko Kawamura; Masaaki Okubo; Takamitsu Ishizuka; Yoshihito Nakagawa; Mitsuo Nagasaka; Tomoyuki Shibata; Naoki Ohmiya

    2016-01-01

    Background. Gastric cancer is discovered even after successful eradication of H. pylori. We investigated clinic pathological features of early gastric cancers after H. pylori eradication. Methods. 51 early gastric cancers (EGCs) from 44 patients diagnosed after successful H. pylori eradication were included as eradication group. The clinic-pathological features were compared with that of 131 EGCs from 120 patients who did not have a history of H. pylori eradication (control group). Results. C...

  3. Long-term socio-economic consequences and health care costs of poliomyelitis: a historical cohort study involving 3606 polio patients.

    Nielsen, Nete Munk; Kay, Lise; Wanscher, Benedikte; Ibsen, Rikke; Kjellberg, Jakob; Jennum, Poul

    2016-06-01

    Worldwide 10-20 million individuals are living with disabilities after acute poliomyelitis. However, very little is known about the socio-economic consequences and health care costs of poliomyelitis. We carried out a historical register-based study including 3606 individuals hospitalised for poliomyelitis in Copenhagen, Denmark 1940-1954, and 13,795 age and gender-matched Danes. Participants were followed from 1980 until 2012, and family, socio-economic conditions and health care costs were evaluated in different age groups using chi-squared tests, boot-strapped t tests or hazard ratios (HR) calculated in Cox-regression models. The analyses were performed separately for paralytic and non-paralytic polio survivors and their controls, respectively. Compared with controls a higher percentage of paralytic polio survivors remained childless, whereas no difference was observed for non-paralytic polio survivors. The educational level among paralytic as well as non-paralytic polio survivors was higher than that among their controls, employment rate at the ages of 40, 50 and 60 years was slightly lower, whereas total income in the age intervals of 31-40, 41-50 and 51-60 years were similar to controls. Paralytic and non-paralytic polio survivors had a 2.5 [HR = 2.52 (95 % confidence interval (CI); 2.29-2.77)] and 1.4 [HR = 1.35 (95 % CI; 1.23-1.49)]-fold higher risk, respectively, of receiving disability pension compared with controls. Personal health care costs were considerably higher in all age groups in both groups of polio survivors. Individuals with a history of poliomyelitis are well educated, have a slightly lower employment rate, an income similar to controls, but a considerably higher cost in the health care system. PMID:27083562

  4. Expresión en escherichia coli de un peptido perteneciente a la proteina vp1 del virus del polio

    Myriam Sánchez de Gómez

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Una secuencia sintética de 49 pb codificante para un péptido de la cubierta del virus del Polio se clonó en el vector de fusión pEZZ8, basado en el gen de la proteína A del Staphylococcus aureus. La expresión se hizo en Escherichia coli y la proteína de fusión se recuperó en el sobrenadante. Se purificó mediante cromatografía de afinidad con IgG Sepharosa y se identificó por medio de electroforesis en presencia de SDS.

  5. Progress and peril: poliomyelitis eradication efforts in Pakistan, 1994-2013.

    Alexander, James P; Zubair, Mufti; Khan, Muzaffar; Abid, Nima; Durry, Elias

    2014-11-01

    Pakistan is one of 3 countries where transmission of indigenous wild poliovirus (WPV) has never been interrupted. Numbers of confirmed polio cases have declined by >90% from preeradication levels, although outbreaks occurred during 2008-2013. During 2012 and 2013, 58 and 93 WPV cases, respectively, were reported, almost all of which were due to WPV type 1. Of the 151 WPV cases reported during 2012-2013, 123 (81%) occurred in the conflict-affected Federally Administered Tribal Areas (FATA) and in security-compromised Khyber Pakhtunkhwa province. WPV type 3 was isolated from only 3 persons with polio in a single district in 2012. During August 2012-December 2013, 62 circulating vaccine-derived poliovirus type 2 cases were detected, including 40 cases (65%) identified in the FATA during 2013. Approximately 350 000 children in certain districts of the FATA have not received polio vaccine during supplementary immunization activities (SIAs) conducted since mid-2012, because local authorities have banned polio vaccination. In other areas of Pakistan, SIAs have been compromised by attacks targeting polio workers, which started in mid-2012. Further efforts to reach children in conflict-affected and security-compromised areas will be necessary to prevent reintroduction of WPV into other areas of Pakistan and other parts of the world. PMID:25316830

  6. Bilateral lower limb polio, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and recurrent acute coronary syndrome in a poly tobacco user: A preventable triple tragedy

    Ramesh Aggarwal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Non communicable diseases in most of the developing countries have surpassed the morbidity and mortality arising from communicable diseases. However there are people who continue to suffer from the residual disabilities of some communicable disease acquired at younger age like polio and develop non communicable diseases like COPD and coronary syndrome at older age primarily because of their tobacco habits. Both of these combination of communicable and non communicable diseases are preventable if timely preventive measures and healthy life style is adopted. This case highlights one such case where patient despite suffering from polio and restrictive lung disease started using tobacco and suffered from obstructive lung disease and coronary syndrome.

  7. Metachronous gastric cancer after successful Helicobacter pylori eradication.

    Shiotani, Akiko; Haruma, Ken; Graham, David Y

    2014-09-01

    The high incidence of gastric cancer in Japan initially resulted in establishment of a country-wide gastric cancer screening program to detect early and treatable cancers. In 2013 countrywide Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) eradication was approved coupled with endoscopy to assess for the presence of chronic gastritis. Current data support the notion that cure of the infection in those with non-atrophic gastritis will prevent development of gastric cancer. However, while progression to more severe damage is halted in those who have already developed, atrophic gastritis/gastric atrophy remain at risk for subsequent development of gastric cancer. That risk is directly related to the extent and severity of atrophic gastritis. Methods to stratify cancer risk include those based on endoscopic assessment of the atrophic border, histologic grading, and non-invasive methods based on serologic testing of pepsinogen levels. Continued surveillance is required because those with atrophic gastritis/gastric atrophy retain considerable gastric cancer risk even after H. pylori eradication. Those who have already experienced a resectable early gastric cancer are among those at highest risk as metachronous lesions are frequent even after H. pylori eradication. We review the role of H. pylori and effect of H. pylori eradication indicating the incidence and the predictive factors on development of metachronous cancer after endoscopic therapy of early gastric cancer. Studies to refine risk markers to stratify for risk, surveillance methods, intervals, and duration after successful H. pylori eradication, and whether adjuvant therapy would change risk are needed. PMID:25206262

  8. Helicobacter pylori eradication therapy: A review of current trends

    A B Olokoba

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori has been implicated in the formation of chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer disease, mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma and gastric cancer. Eradication of H. Pylori has been recommended as treatment and prevention for these complications. This review is based on a search of Medline, the Cochrane Database of Systemic Reviews, and citation lists of relevant publications. Subject heading and key words used include H. Pylori, current treatment and emerging therapy. Only articles in English were included. There has been a substantial decline in the H. pylori eradication rates over the years, despite the use of proton pump inhibitor and bismuth salts for triple and quadruple therapies respectively. The reasons for eradication failure are diverse, among them, antibiotic resistance is an important factor in the treatment failure. Primary resistance to clarithromycin or metronidazole significantly affects the efficacy of eradication therapy. This has led to the introduction of second line, third line "rescue," and sequential therapies for resistant cases. Subsequently, new antibiotic combinations with proton-pump inhibitors and bismuth salts are being studied in the last decade, to find out the antibiotics that are capable of increasing the eradication rates. Some of these antibiotics include Levofloxacin, Doxycycline, Rifaximin, Rifampicin, Furazolidone based therapies. Studies are ongoing to determine the efficacy of Lactoferrin based therapy.

  9. Eradication Strategies for Chronic Hepatitis B Infection.

    Wilson, Eleanor M P; Tang, Lydia; Kottilil, Shyam

    2016-06-01

    Chronic hepatitis B infection affects >300 million people worldwide and is a leading cause of liver failure and cancer. Current approaches to treatment for chronic hepatitis B involve suppression of hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA with the use of nucleoside analogues. Chronic suppressive therapy rarely results in a "functional cure" or absence of detectable HBV DNA in plasma and loss of detectable hepatitis B surface antigen after cessation of therapy. The major obstacles to achieving a functional cure are the presence of covalently closed circular DNA and ineffective/exhaustive immune system. This review focuses on novel approaches to target viral life cycle and host immunity to achieve a functional cure. PMID:27190322

  10. The effectiveness of the Millennium Development Goals (MDG) as global paradigm shift for poverty eradication in sub-Saharan Africa

    Van Der Elst, Herman Jacobus

    2012-01-01

    Despite isolated progress there seems to be no clear-cut guideline or solution to the collective eradication of extreme poverty in sub-Saharan Africa. In an attempt to overcome the above reality, the objective of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) is short term poverty relief to the poorest of the poor by 2015. This is to be achieved through the realisation of eight pro-poor objectives. Since 2000 there has been notable progress. Developmental organisations such as the Wor...

  11. Estimation of efficiency eradication therapies at sick of inflammatory periodontal diseases against a chronic Helicobacter pylori gastritis

    Bulkina N.V.

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available As a result of the conducted research results of an estimation of efficiency of application of the general eradication are presented therapy and local therapy at sick of inflammatory periodontal diseases against a chronic gastritis. Authors notice a positive effect at application as pathogenetic therapy of balm for gums of "Asepta" that normalisation of level of hygiene of the oral cavity, proof remission of periodontal diseases against a pathology of a gastroenteric path allows to achieve

  12. The Rakiura Titi Islands Restoration Project: community action to eradicate Rattus rattus and Rattus exulans for ecological restoration and cultural wellbeing

    McClelland, P.J; Coote, R.; Trow, M.; Hutchins, P.; Nevins, HannahRose M.; Adams, Josh; Newman, J.; Moller, H.

    2011-01-01

    In 2003, a non-profit group, Ka Mate Nga Kiore, was set up to oversee the restoration of four Maori-owned islands off the south coast of Stewart Island, New Zealand. The first step in the restoration was to eradicate ship rats (Rattus rattus) from three islands and Pacific rats (R. exulans) from another. The eradication was funded by the Command Oil Spill Trustee Council which managed the mitigation money from an oil spill off the Californian coast in 1998. The funding was coordinated via Oikonos Ecosystem Knowledge, a non-profit USA group primarily involved in seabird research and restoration. The project was primarily to benefit sooty shearwater (Puffinus griseus) and to sustain a culturally important customary harvest of their chicks by Rakiura Maori. However, like all island eradications, a wide range of other species also benefited from the removal of rats. The New Zealand Department of Conservation provided technical advice and assistance for the planning and implementation of the eradication programme. This paper describes how, with appropriate funding, community and technical support, rodent eradications can be achieved on private islands. In this case, a range of institutions and individuals joined to achieve a common goal that highlighted a significant international conservation action. We urge that more international and local-community-led restoration projects be initiated in the future.

  13. Helicobacter pylori eradication as a preventive tool against gastric cancer.

    Hamajima, Nobuyuki; Goto, Yasuyuki; Nishio, Kazuko; Tanaka, Daisuke; Kawai, Sayo; Sakakibara, Hisataka; Kondo, Takaaki

    2004-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori), which increases the risk of gastric diseases, including digestive ulcers and gastric cancer, is highly prevalent in Asian countries. There is no doubt that eradication of the bacterium is effective as a treatment of digestive ulcer, but eradication aiming to reduce the gastric cancer risk is still controversial. Observational studies in Japan demonstrated that the eradication decreased the gastric cancer risk among 132 stomach cancer patients undergoing endoscopical resection (65 treated with omeprazol and antibiotics and 67 untreated). In Columbia, 976 participants were randomized into eight groups in a three-treatment factorial design including H. pylori eradication, resulting in significant regression in the H. pylori eradication group. A recent randomized study in China also showed a significant reduction of gastric cancer risk among those without any gastric atrophy, intestinal metaplasia, and dysplasia. Efficacy of eradication may vary in extent among countries with different incidence rates of gastric cancer. Since the lifetime cumulative risk (0 to 84 years old) of gastric cancer in Japan is reported to be 12.7% for males and 4.8% for females (Inoue and Tominaga, 2003), the corresponding values for H. pylori infected Japanese can be estimated at 21.2% in males and 8.0% in females under the assumptions that the relative risk for infected relative to uninfected is 5 and the proportion of those infected is 0.5. Both the fact that not all individuals are infected among those exposed and the knowledge that only a small percentage of individuals infected with the bacterium develop gastric cancer, indicate the importance of gene-environment interactions. Studies on such interactions should provide useful information for anti-H. pylori preventive strategies. PMID:15373702

  14. Assessment of Helicobacter pylori eradication in patients on NSAID treatment

    Vonkeman Harald E

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In this post-hoc analysis of a randomized, double blind, placebo controlled trial, we measured the sensitivity and specificity of Helicobacter pylori IgG-antibody titer changes, hematoxylin and eosin (H&E stains, immunohistochemical (IHC stains and culture results in NSAID using patients, following H. pylori eradication therapy or placebo. Methods 347 NSAID using patients who were H. pylori positive on serological testing for H. pylori IgG-antibodies were randomized for H. pylori eradication therapy or placebo. Three months after randomization, gastric mucosal biopsies were taken for H. pylori culture and histological examination. At 3 and 12 months, blood samples were taken for repeated serological testing. The gold standard for H. pylori infection was based on a positive culture or both a positive histological examination and a positive serological test. Sensitivity, specificity and receiver operating curves (ROC were calculated. Results H. pylori eradication therapy was successful in 91% of patients. Culture provided an overall sensitivity of 82%, and 73% after eradication, with a specificity of 100%. Histological examination with either H&E or IHC stains provided sensitivities and specificities between 93% and 100%. Adding IHC to H&E stains did not improve these results. The ROC curve for percent change in H. pylori IgG-antibody titers had good diagnostic power in identifying H. pylori negative patients, with an area under the ROC curve of 0.70 (95 % CI 0.59 to 0.79, P = 0.085 at 3 months and 0.83 (95% CI 0.76 to 0.89, P H. pylori IgG-antibody titers at 3 months and 58% at 12 months provided a sensitivity of 64% and 87% and a specificity of 81% and 74% respectively, for successful eradication of H. pylori. Conclusions In NSAID using patients, following H. pylori eradication therapy or placebo, histological examination of gastric mucosal tissue biopsies provided good sensitivity and specificity ratios for evaluating

  15. Eradication of viral haemorrhagic septicaemia in Danish aquaculture

    Olesen, Niels Jørgen; Skall, Helle Frank; Jensen, Britt Bang;

    regulations, zoning and intensive inspections and laboratory testing. During the first decades of control and eradication programs the number of infected farms was significantly reduced while the curve flattened the last 20 years. It was only after a large and costly coordinated action in 2009-2013 including...... cases. It is the first time that VHS has been eradicated from an endemically infected country. Among the causes of the success are a close collaboration between industry, stakeholders, veterinary authorities and scientists. Also the reduction of the number of farms and novel farming strategies account...

  16. Public Health Emergency of International Concern (PHEIC has Declared Twice in 2014; Polio and Ebola at the Top

    Mohammed A. Soghaier

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: The current Ebola outbreak in West Africa and the large scale wild Polio virus outbreak in several countries are the top most issues among international public health and scientific communities' debates and concerns. These two outbreaks were judged to be declared as Public Health Emergency of International Concern (PHEIC during 2014. This is the first time ever to have such circumstance of two PHEICs at the same time. Discussion: PHEIC, which has to be declared by WHO Director General after a recommendation of IHR Emergency Committee; is observed to start in countries with fragile health system and conflict areas. Then it rapidly spread to threaten the global public health. The year 2014 has uniquely witnessed declaration of two events as PHEIC according to IHR (2005; Polio and Ebola Virus Disease (EVD. Both outbreaks are caused by viruses such as H1N1 which was previously declared as PHEIC in 2009. Summary: Public Health Emergencies of International Concern in 2014 occurred in countries with weak health systems and conflicts and threatening the whole globe. International collaborative work is required to contain the event and to mobilize resources/capacities between countries. Moreover, public health surveillance systems as core capacity for IHR (2005 should be strengthened in all countries with focus on those with limited capacity and ongoing conflicts. The ultimate aim is timely detection of potential PHEIC events in the future along with early preparedness and response plans.

  17. Campylobacter pylori-associated gastritis: attempts to eradicate the bacteria by various antibiotics and anti-ulcer regimens.

    Glupczynski, Y; Burette, A; Nyst, J F; De Prez, C; De Koster, E; Deltenre, M

    1988-01-01

    The efficacy of various antimicrobial and anti-ulcer agents on the eradication of Campylobacter pylori in patients with antral gastritis or duodenal ulcers was investigated by several open studies or double-blind, placebo-controlled protocols. Among the anti-ulcer agents, ranitidine, cimetidine or sucraflate had no effect on C. pylori. Colloidal bismuth subcitrate achieved clearance of C. pylori in 40% of treated patients at the end of therapy but a high relapse rate (14/16 patients) was observed after a 6-month follow-up period. The antibacterial agents doxycycline, minocycline, ofloxacin, clindamycin, paromomycin and nifuroxazide failed to eradicate C. pylori in most patients. By contrast, short term elimination of C. pylori could be achieved in more than 90% of patients treated with amoxycillin. However, relapse occurred as a rule in all amoxycillin-treated patients within one month after therapy. Overall, we observed no correlation between the in-vitro activity of the different antibacterial agents and their in vivo efficacy. Development of resistance during therapy does not seem to account for this discrepancy since it occurred only with ofloxacin. On the basis of these results, we conclude that long term eradication of C. pylori from the gastric antrum cannot be achieved after monotherapy either with antibiotics or with bismuth salts. PMID:2979039

  18. The eradication of smallpox--an overview of the past, present, and future.

    Henderson, Donald A

    2011-12-30

    The 30th anniversary of the declaration of smallpox eradication is a propitious time to look back on the evolutionary history of the program, its execution, and its legacy for the future. The eradication of history's most feared disease culminated a decade-long World Health Organization campaign which began despite skepticism and doubt and succeeded despite a never ending array of obstacles occasioned by floods, civil war, famine, and bureaucratic inertia. New concepts in public health management, surveillance, and the application of large-scale programs for vaccination were fostered and matured. A new generation of young health workers emerged who applied new approaches and experienced the gratification of public health achievement. A definitive legacy for the future was the extension of the program into an "Expanded Program on Immunization", now functioning world-wide and resulting in dramatic improvements in health through control of vaccine-preventable diseases. No less important are the growing number of multi-national programs whose foundations rest on the development of active case surveillance to measure achievement and to guide progress - poliomyelitis, measles, guinea worm, and rubella. PMID:22188929

  19. Land Right Registration and Property Development for Poverty Eradication and Slum Clearance in Nigeria

    Olusegun Olaopin Olanrele

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The focus of this paper is to unfold the implication of non-registration of land rights on the achievement of the poverty eradication and slum clearance targets of the United Nation's Millennium development goals in Nigeria. The paper is based on empirical survey of land holding in the outskirts of Ibadan city and the rural areas in Oyo State, of Nigeria. A case study research method was adopted and data were collected with the use of questionnaire survey and secondary data was also extracted from the state land registry office in respect of total cost of documentation of subsequent transaction on titled/registered land. The study found that ignorance and government insensitivity in addition to high cost and delay are among major constraints to land titling. Only a few opportune people can afford the land right formalization process and they do so when it becomes necessary. These unequivocally militate against the achievement of the poverty and slum eradication goals of the UN. The paper suggested simplification of the titling procedure, cost reduction, computerization and public enlightenment on the benefits of registered land right to facilitate efficient land right registration towards adequate housing for the citizenry.

  20. The effect of probiotics supplementation on Helicobacter pylori eradication rates and side effects during eradication therapy: a meta-analysis.

    Yini Dang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Previous meta-analyses reported that probiotics improve the effectiveness of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori eradication during antibiotic therapy, while results regarding a possible reduction of side effects remained inconclusive. Moreover, the effectiveness of different strains of probiotics has not been studied so far. It is further conceivable that probiotics will produce additional effects only if antibiotics are relatively ineffective. METHODS: This meta-analysis includes eligible randomized controlled trials examining effects of probiotics supplementation on eradication rates (ER and side effects, published up to May 2014. Sub-group analysis was performed to compare different probiotic strains and antibiotic therapies with different effectiveness in controls (ER 80%. Publication bias was assessed with funnel plots and Harbord's test. The quality of the trials was assessed with the Cochrane risk of bias tool. RESULTS: Thirty-three RCTs involving a total of 4459 patients met the inclusion criteria in case of eradication rates of which 20 assessed total side effects in addition. Overall, the pooled eradication rate in probiotics supplementation groups was significantly higher than in controls (ITT analysis: RR 1.122, 95% CI 1.086-1.159, PP analysis: RR 1.114, 95% CI 1.070-1.159. Sub group-analysis could, however, confirm this finding only for four individual strains (Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus casei DN-114001, Lactobacillus gasseri, and Bifidobacterium infantis 2036 and for relatively ineffective antibiotic therapies. There was a significant difference between groups in the overall incidence of side effects (RR 0.735, 95% CI 0.598-0.902. This result was, however, only confirmed for non-blinded trials. CONCLUSIONS: The pooled data suggest that supplementation with specific strains of probiotics compared with eradication therapy may be considered an option for increasing eradication rates, particularly when antibiotic

  1. Eradication of common pathogens at days 2, 3 and 4 of moxifloxacin therapy in patients with acute bacterial sinusitis

    Benson Alice

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acute bacterial sinusitis (ABS is a common infection in clinical practice. Data on time to bacteriologic eradication after antimicrobial therapy are lacking for most agents, but are necessary in order to optimize therapy. This was a prospective, single-arm, open-label, multicenter study to determine the time to bacteriologic eradication in ABS patients (maxillary sinusitis treated with moxifloxacin. Methods Adult patients with radiologically and clinically confirmed ABS received once-daily moxifloxacin 400 mg for 10 days. Middle meatus secretion sampling was performed using nasal endoscopy pre-therapy, and repeated on 3 consecutive days during treatment. Target enrollment was 30 bacteriologically evaluable patients (pre-therapy culture positive for Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae or Moraxella catarrhalis and evaluable cultures for at least Day 2 and Day 3 during therapy visits, including at least 10 each with S. pneumoniae or H. influenzae. Results Of 192 patients enrolled, 42 were bacteriologically evaluable, with 48 pathogens isolated. Moxifloxacin was started on Day 1. Baseline bacteria were eradicated in 35/42 (83.3% patients by day 2, 42/42 (100% patients by day 3, and 41/42 (97.6% patients by day 4. In terms of individual pathogens, 12/18 S. pneumoniae, 22/23 H. influenzae and 7/7 M. catarrhalis were eradicated by day 2 (total 41/48; 85.4%, and 18/18 S. pneumoniae and 23/23 H. influenzae were eradicated by day 3. On Day 4, S. pneumoniae was isolated from a patient who had negative cultures on Days 2 and 3. Thus, the Day 4 eradication rate was 47/48 (97.9%. Clinical success was achieved in 36/38 (94.7% patients at the test of cure visit. Conclusion In patients with ABS (maxillary sinusitis, moxifloxacin 400 mg once daily for 10 days resulted in eradication of baseline bacteria in 83.3% of patients by Day 2, 100% by Day 3 and 97.6% by Day 4.

  2. Strategies for Improving Polio Surveillance Performance in the Security-Challenged Nigerian States of Adamawa, Borno, and Yobe During 2009–2014

    Hamisu, Abdullahi Walla; Johnson, Ticha Muluh; Craig, Kehinde; Mkanda, Pascal; Banda, Richard; Tegegne, Sisay G.; Oyetunji, Ajiboye; Ningi, Nuhu; Mohammed, Said M.; Adamu, Mohammed Isa; Abdulrahim, Khalid; Nsubuga, Peter; Vaz, Rui G.; Muhammed, Ado J. G.

    2016-01-01

    Background. The security-challenged states of Adamawa, Borno, and Yobe bear most of the brunt of the Boko Haram insurgency in Nigeria. The security challenge has led to the killing of health workers, destruction of health facilities, and displacement of huge populations. To identify areas of polio transmission and promptly detect possible cases of importation in these states, polio surveillance must be very sensitive. Methods. We conducted a retrospective review of acute flaccid paralysis surveillance in the security-compromised states between 2009 and 2014, using the acute flaccid paralysis database at the World Health Organization Nigeria Country Office. We also reviewed the reports of surveillance activities conducted in these security-challenged states, to identify strategies that were implemented to improve polio surveillance. Results. Environmental surveillance was implemented in Borno in 2013 and in Yobe in 2014. All disease surveillance and notification officers in the 3 security-challenged states now receive annual training, and the number of community informants in these states has dramatically increased. Media-based messaging (via radio and television) is now used to sensitize the public to the importance of surveillance, and contact samples have been regularly collected in both states since 2014. Conclusions. The strategies implemented in the security-challenged states improved the quality of polio surveillance during the review period. PMID:26655842

  3. Association of a probiotic to a Helicobacter pylori eradication regimen does not increase efficacy or decreases the adverse effects of the treatment: a prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study

    Navarro-Rodriguez, Tomás; Silva, Fernando Marcuz; Barbuti, Ricardo Correa; MATTAR Rejane; Moraes-Filho, Joaquim Prado; OLIVEIRA Maricê Nogueira; Bogsan, Cristina S; Chinzon, Décio; Eisig, Jaime Natan

    2013-01-01

    Background The treatment for the eradication of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is complex; full effectiveness is rarely achieved and it has many adverse effects. In developing countries, increased resistance to antibiotics and its cost make eradication more difficult. Probiotics can reduce adverse effects and improve the infection treatment efficacy. If the first-line therapy fails a second-line treatment using tetracycline, furazolidone and proton-pump inhibitors has been effective and low ...

  4. The effects of a home-based arm ergometry exercise programme on physical fitness, fatigue and activity in polio survivors: protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    Murray Deirdre

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many Polio survivors have reduced mobility, pain and fatigue, which make access to conventional forms of aerobic exercise difficult. Inactivity leads to increased risk of health problems, many of which are prevalent among Polio survivors. Aerobic exercise programmes in Polio survivors should utilise stable muscle groups and should be designed to minimise exacerbation of pain and fatigue. A home-based arm ergometry aerobic exercise programme may represent an affordable and accessible exercise modality, incorporating exercise prescription principles in this group. Methods/design This is a prospective, single blinded, randomised controlled trial. There are two arms; exercise intervention using arm ergometers and control. Polio survivors meeting eligibility criteria will be recruited and randomly allocated to intervention or control groups. Participants allocated to the intervention group will receive a small arm ergometer and a polar heart rate monitor. They will carry out a home-based moderate intensity (50-70% HRMax aerobic exercise programme for eight weeks, following instruction by the treating physiotherapist. Assessments will occur at baseline and after eight weeks and will include tests of physical fitness, activity, energy cost of walking, fatigue and quality of life. Clinically feasible assessment tools including the Six Minute Arm Test, the Physical Activity Scale for People with Physical Disabilities questionnaire, the Physiological Cost Index, Fatigue Severity Scale and the SF-36v2 will be utilised. Discussion The efficacy of a home-based arm ergometry programme in Polio survivors will be examined. No previous trial has examined such a programme using a wide range of outcome measures pertinent to Polio survivors. This study will provide new information on the impact of arm ergometry on physical fitness, activity, body composition, fatigue, pain, muscle strength, and health related quality of life. Also, the study

  5. Symptom-based tendencies of Helicobacter pylori eradication in patients with functional dyspepsia

    LingLan; ]ingYu; Yu—LongChen; Ya—LiZhong; HaoZhang; Chang HeJia; YuanYuan; Bo—WeiLiu

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether there were symptom-based tendencies in the Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) eradication in functional dyspepsia (FD) patients. METHODS: A randomized, single-blind, placebo-controlled study of H. pylori eradication for FD was conduct- ed. A total of 195 FD patients with H. pylori infection were divided into two groups: 98 patients in the treatment group were treated with rabeprazole 10 mg twice daily for 2 wk, amoxicillin 1.0 g and clarithromycin 0.5 g twice daily for 1 wk; 97 patients in the placebo group were given placebos as control. Symptoms of FD, such as postprandial fullness, early satiety, nausea, belching,epigastric pain and epigastric burning, were assessed 3 mo after H. pylori eradication. RESULTS: By per-protocol analysis in patients with successful H. pylori eradication, higher effective rates of 77.2% and 82% were achieved in the patients with epigastric pain and epigastric burning than those in the placebo group (P 〈 0.05). The effective rates for postprandial fullness, early satiety, nausea and belching were 46%, 36%, 52.5% and 33.3%, respectively, and there was no significant difference from the placebo group (39.3%, 27.1%, 39.1% and 31.4%) (P 〉 0.05). In 84 patients who received H. pylori eradication therapy, the effective rates for epigastric pain (73.8%) and epigastric burning (80.7%) were higher than those in the placebo group (P 〈 0.05). The effective rates for postprandial fullness, early satiety, nausea and belch- ing were 41.4%, 33.3%, 50% and 31.4%, respective- ly, and did not differ from those in the placebo group (P 〉 0.05). By intention-to-treat analysis, patients with epigastric pain and epigastric burning in the treatment group achieved higher effective rates of 60.8% and 65.7% than the placebo group (33.3% and 31.8%) (P 〈 0.05). The effective rates for postprandial fullness, early satiety, nausea and belching were 34.8%, 27.9%, 41.1% and 26

  6. Scenarios for eradicating foot-and-mouth disease

    Bos, E.J.; Leeuwen, van M.G.A.; Vlieger, de J.J.

    2001-01-01

    Research project commissioned by the Ministery of Agriculture, Nature Management and Fisheries. With the help of desk-research and input-output analysis quantitative information is assembled about the differences in cost for agribusiness and tourism of two eradication scenarios for foot-and-mouth di

  7. The effect of Helicobacter pylori eradication on idiopathic chronic urticaria

    Ali Reza Khalilian4

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available (Received 14 April, 2009 ; Accepted 9 November, 2009AbstractBackground and purpose: Chronic idiopathic urticaria (CIU is a recurrent disorder that is characterized by itching wheels lasting more than 6 weeks. Etiology of CIU is unknown. The aim of this study is to assess the efficacy of Helicobacter pylori (Hp infection eradication in improvement of CIU.Materials and methods: In this double blind placebo-controlled clinical trial, 60 CIU patients were enrolled in the study. Urea breath test (UBT was performed for indicating the Hp infection. Hp positive patients were divided in 2 groups: cases that were treated with quadruple therapy for eradication of Hp(Amoxicillin, Omeprazole, Bismuth and Metronidazole and controls (placebo. The gastrointestinal (GI and dermatologic symptoms and signs were recorded and compared in the beginning of the study, and 1 and 3 months after the treatment.Results: From 60 CIU patients, 32 (53% were UBT positive. 15 cases and 13 controls completed the study. There were no significant statistical differences between the two groups for their GI and dermatologic complaints before intervention, and 1 and 3 months after eradication, except for pyrosis that was improved in cases after 3 months (P= 0.029Conclusion: Eradication of Hp does not have any effect on improving CIU symptoms or signs.J Mazand Univ Med Sci 2009; 19(72: 2-8 (Persian.

  8. When are eradication campaigns successful? A test of common assumptions

    Pluess, T.; Cannon, R.; Jarošík, Vojtěch; Pergl, Jan; Pyšek, Petr; Bacher, S.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 14, č. 7 (2012), s. 1365-1378. ISSN 1387-3547 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA206/09/0563; GA AV ČR IAA600050811; GA MŠk LC06073 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : eradication * invasions * management Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 2.509, year: 2012

  9. The role of LP gas in eradicating energy poverty

    Kelly, Michael; Behuria, Sarthak

    2010-09-15

    LP Gas is an ideal solution for dealing with energy poverty. Clean burning, low carbon, extremely efficient, requiring minimal infrastructure or R and D investment and with plentiful long term global supply, LP Gas can be quickly introduced to play an important role in eradicating energy poverty and steering both industrialised and developing countries onto more sustainable energy development paths.

  10. Effects of Helicobacter Pylori Eradication Among Adults with Intellectual Disability

    Wallace, R. A.; Schluter, P. J.; Webb, P. M.

    2004-01-01

    Compared to the general population, Helicobacter pylori infection is more common among adults with intellectual disability (ID) and is associated with greater levels of disability, maladaptive behaviour, and institutionalization. Little information exists about the effects of eradication therapy in this group, so we aimed to evaluate: (1) success…

  11. Macroeconomics, (Adult) Education, and Poverty Eradication in Southern Africa

    Nhamo, Senia; Nhamo, Godwell

    2006-01-01

    The Millennium Summit held in New York in September 2000 outlined the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). The first of these involves the eradication of extreme poverty and hunger, setting two targets: halving by 2015 the percentage of the world's populace in 1990 with income less than US-$1 a day (i.e., cutting this percentage from 27.9 to 14%);…

  12. An Assessment of Poverty Eradication Programme (NAPEP in Nigeria

    Adam Adem ANYEBE

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Poverty situation in Nigeria has become so serious that in 2013 there were as many as 112 million or 70.0% of the country’s population was living below poverty line. It has realized that poverty anywhere is a threat to peace, security and prosperity everywhere hence the conscious efforts by successive administrations in Nigeria to eradicate all forms of extreme poverty and hunger in a country. In spite of these efforts to eradicate absolute poverty in the country, poverty incidence has been on the rise. This study, therefore, attempted to assess NAPEP as a programme to eradicate extreme poverty in the country. Personal interviews and documents were employed in data collection. The data were analyzed using tables, simple percentages and spearman rank correlation. The study showed among others, that NAPEP as a programme targeted at eradicating extreme poverty has not been effective leading to a mixed bag of limited success and continuing challenges. It was therefore, recommended that the programme should be re-examined and possibly re-designed for effective performance instead of scrapping it.

  13. Optimal Strategies for Interception, Detection, and Eradication in Plant Biosecurity.

    Pasquali, Sara; Gilioli, Gianni; Janssen, Dirk; Winter, Stephan

    2015-09-01

    The introduction of invasive species causes damages from the economic and ecological point of view. Interception of plant pests and eradication of the established populations are two management options to prevent or limit the risk posed by an invasive species. Management options generate costs related to the interception at the point of entry, and the detection and eradication of established field populations. Risk managers have to decide how to allocate resources between interception, field detection, containment, and eradication minimizing the expected total costs. In this work is considered an optimization problem aiming at determining the optimal allocation of resources to minimize the expected total costs of the introduction of Bemisia tabaci-transmitted viruses in Europe. The optimization problem takes into account a probabilistic model for the estimation of the percentage of viruliferous insect populations arriving through the trade of commodities, and a population dynamics model describing the process of the vector populations' establishment and spread. The time of field detection of viruliferous insect populations is considered as a random variable. The solution of the optimization problem allows to determine the optimal allocation of the search effort between interception and detection/eradication. The behavior of the search effort as a function of efficacy or search in interception and in detection is then analyzed. The importance of the vector population growth rate and the probability of virus establishment are also considered in the analysis of the optimization problem. PMID:25263711

  14. Low eradication rate of Helicobacter pylori with triple 7-14 days and quadriple therapy in Turkey

    Gumurdulu, Yuksel; Serin, Ender; ÖZER, Birol; Kayaselcuk, Fazilet; Ozsahin, Kursat; Cosar, Arif Mansur; Gursoy, Murat; Gur, Gurden; Yilmaz, Ugur; Boyacioglu, Sedat

    2004-01-01

    AIM: The eradication rate of Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) shows variation among countries and regimens of treatment. We aimed to study the eradication rates of different regimens in our region and some factors affecting the rate of eradication.

  15. Effect of Helicobacter pylori eradication on iron deficiency

    ZHANG Zhi-feng; YANG Ning; ZHAO Gang; ZHU Lei; ZHU Ying; WANG Li-xia

    2010-01-01

    Background Iron deficiency (ID) is still a great challenge to health care worldwide. Results of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) evaluating the effect of Helicobacterpylori (H. Py/on) eradication on ID are contradictory. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of H. Pylori eradication on ID with a meta-analysis of RCTs. Methods Five electronic databases were searched for RCTs evaluating the effect of H. Pylori eradication on ID. Summary effects were assessed with the methods recommended by the Cochrane Collaboration. Results Eight studies involving 800 participants were included in this meta-analysis. The overall analysis showed that H. Pylori eradication accelerated the improvement of ferritin levels in ID people (mean difference (MD), 7.74 μg/L; 95% CI, 4.61 to 10.88; P <0.000 01). In a subgroup analysis, H. Pylori eradication accelerated the improvement of ferritin levels one month (MD, 7.00 pg/L; 95% CI, 1.72 to 12.28; P=0.009) and two months (MD, 9.80 μg/L; 95% CI, 2.22 to 17.40; P=0.01)after the initiation of treatment. However, H. Pylori eradication did not show a beneficial effect on the improvement of ferritin levels three months (MD, 7.20 pg/L; 95% CI, -3.25 to 17.65; P=0.18), one year (MD, 10.17 μg/L; 95% CI, -1.00 to 21.34;P=0.07) and forty months (MD, 1.00 pg/L; 95% CI, -0.57 to 2.57; P=0.21) after the initiation of treatment. H. Pylori eradication did not accelerate the improvement of hemoglobin concentrations in the overall analysis (MD, 0.38 g/dl; 95% CI,-0.45 to 1.22; P=0.37). In a subgroup analysis, H. Pylori eradication did not accelerate the improvement of hemoglobin concentrations one month (MD, -0.48 g/dl; 95% CI, -2.39 to 1.42; P=0.62), three months (MD, -0.10 g/dl; 95% CI, -0.35 to 0.15; P=0.44) and forty months (MD, 0.10 g/dl; 95% CI, -0.37 to 0.57; P=0.68) after the initiation of treatment. However, H. Pylori eradication accelerated the improvement of hemoglobin concentrations two months (MD, 1.96 g/dl; 95% CI, 1.48 to 2.44; P <0

  16. Initial Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in patients with cystic fibrosis: characteristics of eradicated and persistent isolates

    Tramper-Stranders, G. A.; van der Ent, C. K.; Molin, Søren;

    2012-01-01

    were analysed that were either eradicated rapidly or persisted despite multiple antimicrobial treatments. Eighty-six early infection episodes were studied. First P. aeruginosa isolates from patients with eradication (36) or persistent infection (16) were included; isolates from patients with...

  17. Varying efficacy of Helicobacter pylori eradication regimens: cost effectiveness study using a decision analysis model

    Duggan, A E; Tolley, K.; Hawkey, C. J.; Logan, R F A

    1998-01-01

    Objective: To determine how small differences in the efficacy and cost of two antibiotic regimens to eradicate Helicobacter pylori can affect the overall cost effectiveness of H pylori eradication in duodenal ulcer disease.

  18. [Omeprazole/amoxicillin: improved eradication of Helicobacter pylori in smokers because of N-acetylcysteine].

    Zala, G; Flury, R; Wüst, J; Meyenberger, C; Ammann, R; Wirth, H P

    1994-08-01

    Colonization of Helicobacter pylori (HP) beneath the protective film of gastric mucus enables the organism to survive in the hostile environment of the gastric mucosa. N-acetylcysteine (NAC), a sulfhydryl compound with potent mucolytic activity, induces a reduction of gastric barrier mucus thickness of about 75% and reduces mucus viscoelasticity. We therefore tested the hypothesis whether better eradication results could be achieved by addition of NAC to omeprazole/amoxicillin (OME/AMOX). 34 HP positive outpatients with endoscopically documented recurrent duodenal ulcer were included in an ongoing, prospective, randomized trial. Exclusion criteria were: alcoholism, previous gastric surgery, or intake of antibiotics, OME, bismuth salts, corticosteroids or NSAIDs within 4 weeks before study entry. Patients currently smoking > 10 cigarettes/day were classified as smokers. HP infection was confirmed by histology (3 biopsy specimens from gastric antrum and 2 from gastric body; H&E, Giemsa) and at least positive rapid urease test or culture. All 34 patients underwent ulcer therapy with OME (20 mg per day) for 20 days (d 1-20). Group A: in 17 patients (5 females, 12 males, mean age 46 [29-74] years; 8 smokers, 9 nonsmokers) the subsequent eradication therapy, consisting of oral OME (40 mg bid) and AMOX solute (750 mg tid) for 10 days, was combined with NAC solute (2 x 600 mg bid (d 21-30). Group B: 17 patients (2 females, 15 males, mean age 39 [19-70] years; 11 smokers, 6 nonsmokers) underwent eradication therapy without NAC (d 21-30). Control endoscopy was done after a minimal interval of 30 days from the end of treatment.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8091167

  19. A 2-week Nitazoxanide-based quadruple treatment as a rescue therapy for Helicobacter pylori eradication

    Abd-Elsalam, Sherief; Kobtan, Abdelrahman; El-kalla, Ferial; Elkhalawany, Walaa; Nawasany, Sally El; Saif, Sabry Abou; Yousef, Mohamed; Ali, Lobna Abo; Soliman, Samah; Mansour, Loai; Habba, Eslam; Soliman, Hanan; Rizk, Fatma; Shehata, Mona AH

    2016-01-01

    Abstract As there are increasing reports of fluoroquinolone resistance on use as a first- or second-line treatment for Helicobacter pylori (H pylori), we aimed at evaluation of the efficacy and safety of nitazoxanide-based regimen as a rescue regimen in Egyptian patients whose previous traditional treatment for H pylori infection failed.In total, 100 patients from the outpatient clinic of the Tropical medicine department, Tanta University hospital in whom the standard triple therapy (clarithromycin-based triple therapy) failed were enrolled in the study. Nitazoxanide (500 mg bid), levofloxacin (500 mg once daily), omeprazole (40 mg bid), and doxycyclin (100 mg twice daily) were prescribed for 14 days. Eradication was confirmed by stool antigen for H pylori 6 weeks after the end of treatment. Among the patients enrolled in the study, 44% of patients were men and the mean age for the participants in the study was 46.41 ± 8.05, 13% of patients were smokers, and 4% of patients had a previous history of upper gastro-intestinal bleeding. A total of 94 patients (94%) completed the study with excellent compliance. Only 1 patient (1%) discontinued treatment due to intolerable side effects and 5 patients (5%) did not achieve good compliance or were lost during follow up. However, 83 patients had successful eradication of H pylori with total eradication rates 83% (95 % CI 75.7–90.3%) and 88.30% (95 % CI 81.8–94.8%) according to an intention-to-treat and per-protocol analysis, respectively. Adverse events were reported in 21% of patients: abdominal pain (6%), nausea (9%) and constipation (12%), (2%) headache, and (1%) dizziness. A 2-week nitazoxanide-based regimen is an effective and safe rescue therapy in Egyptian patients whose previous standard triple therapy has failed. PMID:27310977

  20. Metabolic consequences of Helicobacter pylori infection and eradication.

    Buzás, György Miklós

    2014-05-14

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is still the most prevalent infection of the world. Colonization of the stomach by this agent will invariably induce chronic gastritis which is a low-grade inflammatory state leading to local complications (peptic ulcer, gastric cancer, lymphoma) and remote manifestations. While H. pylori does not enter circulation, these extragastric manifestations are probably mediated by the cytokines and acute phase proteins produced by the inflammed mucosa. The epidemiologic link between the H. pylori infection and metabolic changes is inconstant and controversial. Growth delay was described mainly in low-income regions with high prevalence of the infection, where probably other nutritional and social factors contribute to it. The timely eradication of the infection will lead to a more healthy development of the young population, along with preventing peptic ulcers and gastric cancer An increase of total, low density lipoprotein and high density liporotein cholesterol levels in some infected people creates an atherogenic lipid profile which could promote atherosclerosis with its complications, myocardial infarction, stroke and peripheral vascular disease. Well designed and adequately powered long-term studies are required to see whether eradication of the infection will prevent these conditions. In case of glucose metabolism, the most consistent association was found between H. pylori and insulin resistance: again, proof that eradication prevents this common metabolic disturbance is expected. The results of eradication with standard regimens in diabetics are significantly worse than in non-diabetic patients, thus, more active regimens must be found to obtain better results. Successful eradication itself led to an increase of body mass index and cholesterol levels in some populations, while in others no such changes were encountered. Uncertainities of the metabolic consequences of H. pylori infection must be clarified in the future. PMID:24833852

  1. A Step Toward Eradication of Human Filariases in Areas Where Loa Is Endemic.

    Geary, Timothy G

    2016-01-01

    Mass drug administration (MDA) programs have achieved remarkable success in limiting the pathology and transmission of the human parasitic infections onchocerciasis and lymphatic filariasis. The full implementation of MDA campaigns for filariasis elimination has been stymied by the unacceptable incidence of severe adverse events observed following drug treatment of a subset of individuals who harbor high loads of Loa loa microfilaria. Extending MDA strategies to regions where loiasis is coendemic could be done confidently if a simple, inexpensive, and rapid diagnostic method was available that could accurately identify individuals who have L. loa microfilarial loads above the risk threshold and could thus be excluded from treatment. A recent paper in mBio reports the discovery of an antigen unique to L. loa microfilaria that can be detected in blood and urine and may form the basis for such an assay. Further work will reveal whether this discovery will smooth the path to achieve filariasis eradication. PMID:27073095

  2. Recommended procedures for disease and serological surveillance as part of the Global Rinderpest Eradication Programme (GREP)

    One important activity of GREP is to recommend to the Office International des Epizooties (OIE) Member Countries a zoosanitary approach for achieving rinderpest eradication and for determining the effectiveness of this achievement. To this end, a Consultants Meeting on Animal Disease Surveillance Systems was held in Vienna from 27 September to 1 October 1993 under the auspices of FAO and IAEA. This document represents the conclusions of the meeting and attempts to outline, in a highly practical manner, the various factors to be taken into account and steps to be undertaken by a country in the process of moving along a zoosanitary pathway culminating in a declaration of freedom from rinderpest virus. 14 refs, 5 figs, 8 tabs

  3. Probiotic supplementation does not improve eradication rate of Helicobacter pylori infection compared to placebo based on standard therapy: a meta-analysis.

    Lu, Chao; Sang, Jianzhong; He, Haijian; Wan, Xingyong; Lin, Yiming; Li, Lan; Li, Youming; Yu, Chaohui

    2016-01-01

    This meta-analysis included eligible randomized controlled trials (RCTs) with the aim of determining whether probiotic supplementation can improve H. pylori eradication rates. PUBMED, EBSCO, Web of Science, and Ovid databases were searched. We included RCTs that investigated the effect of combining probiotics, with or without a placebo, with standard therapy. A total of 21 RCTs that reported standard therapy plus probiotics were included. Compared to the placebo group, the probiotics group was 1.21(OR 1.21, 95% CI: 0.86, 1.69) and 1.28 (OR 1.28, 95% CI: 0.88, 1.86) times more likely to achieve eradication of H. pylori infection in intent-to-treat (ITT) analysis and per protocol (PP) analysis, respectively. Probiotics with triple therapy plus a 14-day course of treatment did not improve the eradication of H. pylori infection (OR 1.44, 95% CI: 0.87, 2.39) compared to the placebo. Moreover, the placebo plus standard therapy did not improve eradication rates compared to standard therapy alone (P = 0.816). However, probiotics did improve the adverse effects of diarrhea and nausea. These pooled data suggest that the use of probiotics plus standard therapy does not improve the eradication rate of H. pylori infection compared to the placebo. PMID:26997149

  4. Lessons for Implementation from the World's Most Successful Programme: The Global Eradication of Smallpox.

    Pratt, David

    1999-01-01

    Focuses on lessons educators might learn from the Intensified Campaign for the Global Eradication of Smallpox. Outlines the history of smallpox eradication. Discusses the eradication effort's obstacles, campaign, and costs and benefits. Considers five factors relevant to the successful implementation of educational programs. (CMK)

  5. 9 CFR 72.6 - Interstate movement of cattle from quarantined areas not eradicating ticks.

    2010-01-01

    ... quarantined areas not eradicating ticks. 72.6 Section 72.6 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH... areas not eradicating ticks. Cattle in quarantined areas where tick eradication is not being conducted 3... inspector just prior to final dipping, found to be apparently free of ticks, and be certified as such...

  6. Simultaneous administration of diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis-polio and hepatitis B vaccines in a simplified immunization program: immune response to diphtheria toxoid, tetanus toxoid, pertussis, and hepatitis B surface antigen.

    Coursaget, P.; Yvonnet, B.; Relyveld, E. H.; Barres, J L; Diop-Mar, I.; Chiron, J. P.

    1986-01-01

    We studied the interactions of hepatitis B vaccine with other vaccines used in the World Health Organization expanded programs of immunization. Three groups of Senegalese children were vaccinated with hepatitis B vaccine (HB) alone, diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis (DTP)-polio vaccine alone, or a combination of hepatitis B vaccine and DTP-polio vaccines simultaneously. The immune responses to HBsAg, tetanus toxoid, diphtheria toxoid, and pertussis were measured after one and two vaccinations at 6...

  7. Development of the New Zealand strategy for local eradication of tuberculosis from wildlife and livestock.

    Livingstone, P G; Hancox, N; Nugent, G; Mackereth, G; Hutchings, S A

    2015-06-01

    We describe the progressive development of New Zealand's national strategy for control of tuberculosis (TB) in its agricultural sector over the last four decades. The strategy is globally unique, reflecting the need for effective and co-ordinated management of TB in a wildlife maintenance host, the brushtail possum (Trichosurus vulpecula), in addition to controlling infection in cattle and farmed deer herds. Since the early 1990s, the strategy has been developed by the Animal Health Board (AHB), formed to empower the farming industry to take the leadership role in funding of TB control, policy development and administration. The AHB became the first non-government organisation to develop and gain acceptance by the funders (farming industry and government) of a National Pest Management Strategy (NPMS) under the Biosecurity Act 1993. A key outcome of the NPMS for TB control was the development and inclusion of very challenging objectives that provided direction for management, research and possum control. This paper describes the process whereby the NPMS was revised twice, following achievement of each successive set of strategy objectives within budget. Success was based on firstly, reorganisation of the AHB and its operational systems to achieve increased efficiency; secondly, improved efficiency through contracting possum and disease control, and thirdly research delivering effective and practical applications, while also providing a scientific basis for setting directions for future control strategies. The last revision of the NPMS was implemented in 2011, and included objectives to eradicate Mycobacterium bovis-infected wildlife populations over 2.5 million hectares by 2026. This ambitious objective was adopted only after extensive forecast modelling enabled stakeholders to identify and select the most cost-effective long-term solution for the management of M. bovis-infected possum populations. The accomplishment of New Zealand's TB control programme, in meeting

  8. How Polyomaviruses Exploit the ERAD Machinery to Cause Infection.

    Dupzyk, Allison; Tsai, Billy

    2016-01-01

    To infect cells, polyomavirus (PyV) traffics from the cell surface to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) where it hijacks elements of the ER-associated degradation (ERAD) machinery to penetrate the ER membrane and reach the cytosol. From the cytosol, the virus transports to the nucleus, enabling transcription and replication of the viral genome that leads to lytic infection or cellular transformation. How PyV exploits the ERAD machinery to cross the ER membrane and access the cytosol, a decisive infection step, remains enigmatic. However, recent studies have slowly unraveled many aspects of this process. These emerging insights should advance our efforts to develop more effective therapies against PyV-induced human diseases. PMID:27589785

  9. Macroeconomics, (Adult) Education, and Poverty Eradication in Southern Africa

    Nhamo, Senia; Nhamo, Godwell

    2006-05-01

    The Millennium Summit held in New York in September 2000 outlined the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). The first of these involves the eradication of extreme poverty and hunger, setting two targets: halving by 2015 the percentage of the world's populace in 1990 with income less than US-1 a day (i.e., cutting this percentage from 27.9 to 14%); and halving the share of people who suffer from hunger. As for education, the MDGs seek to ensure that all children can complete primary schooling by 2015. Drawing on examples from selected southern African countries, the present study examines the need to strengthen economic support for (adult) education as an instrument of poverty eradication. It argues that human capital is one of the fundamental determinants of economic growth, and that this economic resource is essentially determined in both qualitative and quantitative regards by education.

  10. Helicobacter pylori eradication in Nonulcer Dyspepsia: Does it reallymatter

    One-half of the world's population has Helicobater pylori (H.pylori)infection while dyspeptic symptoms affect one-third of the adult population,at least in the Western world. Data from epidemiological studies arecontroversial in terms of the association of H. pylori with non-ulcerdyspepsia (NUD) symptoms. Despite the frequency of occurrence of thisclinical condition, no effective therapy exists in treating this disorder.With the strategic aim of treating NUD, a vast amount of evidence hasaccumulated towards eradicating H. pylori, while an equally compelling amountof evidence exists that counters this very strategy. It is, therefore, vitalthat there is reliable evidence for the efficacy of treatments prescribed toNUD patients. The arguments for and against the eradication of this organismcontinued unabated. We aim to address both sides of this fundamental divideand present the differing perspective in light of the prevalent evidence.(author)

  11. Control and eradication of animal diseases in New Zealand.

    Davidson, R M

    2002-01-01

    New Zealand is free from all the major epidemic (Office International des Epizooties List A) diseases of animals and other important diseases, such as rabies and the transmissible spongiform encephalopathies. The once endemic conditions of sheep scab (Psoroptes ovis), bovine brucellosis (Brucella abortus), hydatids (Echinococcus granulosus) and Aujeszky's disease have been eradicated. Anthrax (Bacillus anthracis) is no longer considered endemic and Pullorum disease (Salmonella Pullorum) has effectively been eradicated from commercial poultry flocks. There are current control programmes for bovine tuberculosis (Mycobacterium bovis), enzootic bovine leucosis in dairy cattle, infectious bursal disease, ovine epididymitis (Brucella ovis), and caprine arthritis encephalitis. Historically, incursions by three important non-endemic diseases, contagious bovine pleuropneumonia, classical swine fever and scrapie, have been successfully eliminated. Any new occurrence of a serious exotic disease would be dealt with swiftly using powerful legislative authorities available for the purpose. PMID:16032229

  12. Eradicating tsetse from the Southern Rift Valley of Ethiopia

    Farming activities in Ethiopia, as in much of sub-Saharan Africa, are restricted by the presence of tsetse flies (Glossina spp.). These carry the livestock and human disease, trypanosomosis, which severely affects agricultural production and human well-being. In collaboration with the Ethiopian authorities, the International Atomic Energy Agency is sponsoring a Sterile Insect Technique (SIT) programme to eradicate tsetse from the Southern Rift Valley of Ethiopia. (IAEA)

  13. Eradicating successfully yaws from India: The strategy & global lessons

    Narain, Jai P.; Jain, S.K.; Bora, D.; Venkatesh, S.

    2015-01-01

    Yaws, a non-venereal treponematosis, affecting primarily the tribal populations, has been considered historically as one of the most neglected tropical diseases in the world. In 1996, India piloted an initiative to eradicate yaws based on a strategy consisting of active case finding through house-to-house search and treatment of cases and their contacts with long acting penicillin. Thereafter, the campaign implemented in all 51 endemic districts in 10 States of the country led to the achievem...

  14. Eradicating Helicobacter pylori reduces hypergastrinaemia during long term omeprazole treatment

    El-Nujumi, A; Williams, C; Ardill, J; Oien, K; McColl, K

    1998-01-01

    Background—Both proton pump inhibitor drug treatment and Helicobacter pylori infection cause hypergastrinaemia in man. 
Aims—To determine whether eradicating H pylori is a means of reducing hypergastrinaemia during subsequent proton pump inhibitor treatment. 
Methods—Patients with H pylori were randomised to treatment with either anti-H pylori or symptomatic treatment. One month later, all received four weeks treatment with omeprazole 40 mg/day for one month followed by 2...

  15. Metachronous gastric cancer after successful Helicobacter pylori eradication

    Shiotani, Akiko; Haruma, Ken; David Y Graham

    2014-01-01

    The high incidence of gastric cancer in Japan initially resulted in establishment of a country-wide gastric cancer screening program to detect early and treatable cancers. In 2013 countrywide Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) eradication was approved coupled with endoscopy to assess for the presence of chronic gastritis. Current data support the notion that cure of the infection in those with non-atrophic gastritis will prevent development of gastric cancer. However, while progression to more s...

  16. Control and eradication of viral diseases of ruminants

    Nuotio, Lasse

    2006-01-01

    The monitoring and control of infectious animal diseases, limiting or prevention of their spread and efforts towards their eradication are central tasks of the veterinary civil service. In addition to the cost-effectiveness of prophylaxis over disease and treatment, the animal welfare aspect is also involved. The purpose of this work is to review, describe and assess the available control measures against selected viral infections or diseases of domestic ruminants. The selected infection...

  17. Polymer-Immobilized Photosensitizers for Continuous Eradication of Bacteria

    Anton Valkov; Faina Nakonechny; Marina Nisnevitch

    2014-01-01

    The photosensitizers Rose Bengal (RB) and methylene blue (MB), when immobilized in polystyrene, were found to exhibit high antibacterial activity in a continuous regime. The photosensitizers were immobilized by dissolution in chloroform, together with polystyrene, with further evaporation of the solvent, yielding thin polymeric films. Shallow reservoirs, bottom-covered with these films, were used for constructing continuous-flow photoreactors for the eradication of Gram-positive Staphylococcu...

  18. Attempted eradication of Porphyrio porphyrio Linnaeus in the Florida Everglades

    Dave EGGEMAN; Marsha WARD; Ellen DONLAN; Scott HARDIN

    2011-01-01

    Porphyrio porphyrio (Fulica porphyrio Linnaeus) was reported to the South Florida Water Management District in a Water Conservation Area and in constructed wetlands in the Everglades in 2006. A rapid assessment, including casual observations and surveys of land managers, indicated a limited number of P. porphyrio (~300 birds) was present, and an eradication attempt was initiated. From 2006 – 2008, more than 3100 P. porphyrio were killed by shotgun from airboats during 73 hunts, suggesting the...

  19. Distinct Clinic-Pathological Features of Early Differentiated-Type Gastric Cancers after Helicobacter pylori Eradication.

    Horiguchi, Noriyuki; Tahara, Tomomitsu; Kawamura, Tomohiko; Okubo, Masaaki; Ishizuka, Takamitsu; Nakagawa, Yoshihito; Nagasaka, Mitsuo; Shibata, Tomoyuki; Ohmiya, Naoki

    2016-01-01

    Background. Gastric cancer is discovered even after successful eradication of H. pylori. We investigated clinic pathological features of early gastric cancers after H. pylori eradication. Methods. 51 early gastric cancers (EGCs) from 44 patients diagnosed after successful H. pylori eradication were included as eradication group. The clinic-pathological features were compared with that of 131 EGCs from 120 patients who did not have a history of H. pylori eradication (control group). Results. Compared with control group, clinic-pathological features of eradication group were characterized as depressed (p EGC after H. pylori eradication are depressed, reddish appearances, which should be treated as a caution because histological diagnosis of cancerous tissue is sometimes difficult by endoscopic biopsy. PMID:27212944

  20. Type 2 diabetes mellitus affects eradication rate of Helicobacter pylori

    Mehmet Sargyn; Oya Uygur-Bayramicli; Haluk Sargyn; Ekrem Orbay; Dilek Yavuzer; Ali Yayla

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To study the eradication rate of Helicobacter pylori (Hp) in a group of type 2 diabetes and compared it with an age and sex matched non-diabetic group.METHODS: 40 diabetic patients (21 females, 19 males;56±7 years) and 40 non-diabetic dyspeptic patients (20females, 20 males; 54±9 years) were evaluated. Diabetic patients with dyspeptic complaints were referred for upper gastrointestinal endoscopies; 2 corpus and 2 antral gastric biopsy specimens were performed on each patient. Patients with positive Hp results on histopathological examination comprised the study group. Non-diabetic dyspeptic patients seen at the Gastroenterology Outpatient Clinic and with the same biopsy and treatment protocol formed the control group.A triple therapy with amoxycillin (1 g b.i.d), clarithromycin (500 mg b.i.d) and omeprazole (20 mg b.i.d.) was given to both groups for 10 days. Cure was defined as the absence of Hp infection assessed by corpus and antrum biopsies in control upper gastrointestinal endoscopies performed 6weeks after completing the antimicrobial therapy.RESULTS: The eradication rate was 50 % in the diabetic group versus 85 % in the non-diabetic control group (P<0.001).CONCLUSION: Type 2 diabetic patients showed a significantly lower eradication rate than controls which may be due to changes in microvasculature of the stomach and to frequent antibiotic usage because of recurrent bacterial infections with the development of resistant strains.

  1. Eradication of H pylori for the prevention of gastric cancer

    Karolin Trautmann; Manfred Stolte; Stephan Miehlke

    2006-01-01

    Tnfection with H pylori is the most important known etiological factor associated with gastric cancer. While colonization of the gastric mucosa with H pylori results in active and chronic gastritis in virtually all individuals infected, the likelihood of developing gastric cancer depends on environmental, bacterial virulence and host specific factors. The majority of all gastric cancer cases are attributable to H pylori infection and therefore theoretically preventable. There is evidence from animal models that eradication of H pylori at an early time point can prevent gastric cancer development. However, randomized clinical trials exploring the prophylactic effect of H pylori eradication on the incidence of gastric cancer in humans remain sparse and have yielded conflicting results. Better markers for the identification of patientsat risk for H pylori induced gastric malignancy are needed to allow the development of a more efficient public eradication strategy. Meanwhile, screening and treatment of H pylori in first-degree relatives of gastric cancer patients as well as certain high-risk populations might be beneficial.

  2. [Commemorative lecture of receiving Imamura Memorial Prize. III. Estimating the year of eradication of tuberculosis in Japan].

    Ohmori, M

    1994-09-01

    The year by which tuberculosis could be eradicated, has been discussed for several foreign countries, and based on those results, new strategic plans and goals have been elaborated. Therefore, in Japan too, it was desired to estimate the point at which eradication of tuberculosis would be achieved. The author estimated the year of eradication of tuberculosis, according to the criterion proposed by Dr. Styblo that "tuberculosis is eradicated when the prevalence of tuberculosis infection in the general population has fallen below 1% and continues to decrease". If the risk of infection is changing at a regular rate, it is possible to estimate the risk of infection at any particular time. Once the risk of infection is determined, it is also possible to calculate the age-specific prevalence of infection and the proportion of the population infected with tubercle bacilli at any given time. In Japan, the risk of infection before World War II was assumed to be around 4%; since then, it has declined on average, by 10 to 11% annually. The incidence rate in Japan also has declined, on average, by 10 to 11% annually. However, since late 1970s, the annual speed of decline of the incidence rate has slowed down. Therefore, I assumed that the recent trend of the infection risk is the same as the trend of the recent incidence rate among the 0-29 year age-group. The size of the effect of age on the risk of infection has been discussed. The author also considered age-effects in the model.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7967319

  3. Active epidemiological surveillance in the program of poliomyelitis eradication in Serbia

    Jevremović Ivana

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The main strategy of the worldwide Program of Poliomyelitis Eradication is based on immunization with oral poliovirus vaccine and active epidemiological surveillance aimed to demonstrate the absence of wild poliovirus circulation. The specification of the surveillance in the program, reporting and investigation of certain syndrome – the acute flaccid paralysis - as a specific feature of surveillance of poliomyelitis, is a new experience both for clinicians and epidemiologists. Along with the achieved results, problems in conducting the active epidemiological surveillance in Serbia, applied measures, and suggestions for improving its quality were presented. This experience might help in implementing the active surveillance for some other diseases that could be prevented by vaccine immunization.

  4. The effect of prophylaxis with chloroquine and proguanil on delayed-type hypersensitivity and antibody production following vaccination with diphtheria, tetanus, polio, and pneumococcal vaccines

    Gyhrs, A; Pedersen, B K; Bygbjerg, I;

    1991-01-01

    diphosphate (1,000 mg/week), or 4) proguanil hydrochloride (200 mg/day) for six weeks. Skin testing was performed on days 0 and 28. Vaccinations with diphtheria, tetanus, polio, and pneumococcal polysaccharide antigen vaccines were performed on day 28, and the presence of specific antibodies was determined on...... days 0, 28, and 42. The skin tests induced a significant increase in skin reactive areas from day 0 to day 28 in all groups. Furthermore, the skin test induced an increase in the level of specific IgG for diphtheria and tetanus, but had no effect on antibodies to antigens not included in the skin test...... chemoprophylactic dosages, does not induce any detectable suppression of delayed-type hypersensitivity or vaccination responses to diphtheria, tetanus, polio, or pneumococcal polysaccharide antigens....

  5. Bilateral lower limb polio, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and recurrent acute coronary syndrome in a poly tobacco user: A preventable triple tragedy

    Ramesh Aggarwal; Shridhar Dwivedi

    2012-01-01

    Non communicable diseases in most of the developing countries have surpassed the morbidity and mortality arising from communicable diseases. However there are people who continue to suffer from the residual disabilities of some communicable disease acquired at younger age like polio and develop non communicable diseases like COPD and coronary syndrome at older age primarily because of their tobacco habits. Both of these combination of communicable and non communicable diseases are preventable...

  6. Helicobacter pylori Eradication Prevents Metachronous Gastric Neoplasms after Endoscopic Resection of Gastric Dysplasia.

    Seung Hwan Shin

    Full Text Available There is insufficient data about the role of eradication of H. pylori after endoscopic resection (ER for gastric dysplasia. The aim was to investigate the benefit of H. pylori eradication after ER in patients with gastric dysplasia to prevent metachronous gastric neoplasms.We retrospectively reviewed 1872 patients who underwent ER of gastric dysplasia. We excluded patients with a follow-up period of <2 years or who had not undergone tests for active H. pylori infection. A total of 282 patients were enrolled. The patients were categorized into those without active H. pylori infection (H. pylori-negative group, n = 124, those who successfully underwent H. pylori eradication (eradicated group, n = 122, and those who failed or did not undergo H. pylori eradication (persistent group, n = 36.Metachronous recurrence was diagnosed in 36 patients, including 19 in the H. pylori-negative group, 10 in the eradicated group, and 7 in the persistent group. The cumulative incidence of metachronous recurrence was significantly lower in the H. pylori-eradicated group in comparison with either of the H. pylori-persistent (non-eradicated or failed groups (p = 0.039. Similarly, the incidence of metachronous recurrence was significantly lower in the H. pylori-eradicated group compared with the H. pylori-negative group (p = 0.041.Successful H. pylori eradication may reduce the development of metachronous gastric neoplasms after ER in patients with gastric dysplasia.

  7. Online Registry for Nationwide Database of Current Trend of Helicobacter pylori Eradication in Korea: Interim Analysis

    2016-01-01

    Eradication of Helicobacter pylori using first-line therapy is becoming less effective. Subjects who had been treated for H. pylori infection were prospectively enrolled through an on-line database registry from October 2010 to December 2012. Demographic data, detection methods, treatment indication, regimens, durations, compliance, adverse events, and eradication results for H. pylori infection were collected. Data of 3,700 patients from 34 hospitals were analyzed. The overall eradication rate of the first-line therapy was 73.0%. Eradication failure was significantly associated with old age, concomitant medication, and comorbidity. Regional differences in eradication rates were observed. The most common first-line therapy was proton pump inhibitor-based triple therapy (standard triple therapy, STT) for 7 days (86.8%). The eradication rates varied with regimens, being 73% in STT, 81.8% in bismuth-based quadruple therapy, 100% in sequential therapy, and 90.3% in concomitant therapy. The eradication rate in treatment-naïve patients was higher than that in patients previously treated for H. pylori infection (73.8% vs. 58.5%, P eradication rate for second-line therapy was 84.3%. There was no statistical difference in eradication rates among various regimens. H. pylori eradication rate using STT is decreasing in Korea and has become sub-optimal, suggesting the need for alternative regimens to improve the efficacy of first-line therapy for H. pylori infection.

  8. The Caribbean amblyomma eradication programme: Success or failure?

    Full text: The Tropical Bont Tick (TBT), Amblyomma variegatum, was introduced into Guadeloupe in the mid 1700's and into Antigua about 100 years later. It was mainly restricted to these islands until the mid-1970's, when the tick spread rapidly, coincident with the introduction and expansion of the cattle egret population. The TBT became established on 18 islands, and it was estimated that potential losses of USD 762 million annually could occur to the livestock industry if the tick and its associated diseases, heartwater and dermatophilosis became widely established. In late 1994, an eradication programme was initiated, with FAO providing the lead technical role. In the TBT-infested countries, the project strategy was based on the two-weekly application of the acaricide, Bayticol pour-on, for a minimum period of 30 months. Farmers were made responsible for regular treatment of their livestock, and the strategy was reinforced through direct and intensive public information programmes using various media and services to ensure sensitisation of farmers and the public. An intensive surveillance programme for the TBT was carried out and all data were entered into customised database 'TickINFO'. Although progress was slower than originally foreseen, 'Declarations of Provisional Freedom from the TBT' were held in St Kitts and St Lucia (November 2001), Anguilla and Montserrat (February 2002), and in Barbados and Dominica (February 2003) after defined periods of apparent freedom from the TBT. Unfortunately, however, St Kitts, St Lucia and Dominica have all had re-infestations or re-crudescences of the TBT since being certified provisionally free. Three CAP islands remain infested: Antigua, Nevis and St Maarten/St Martin. Up to 2004, USDA had provided approximately half of the total operating budget for the TBT eradication programme (approximately USD 12.0 million donor funds) from 1995-2004. To maintain their investment, USDA developed a detailed strategic plan for the

  9. Sterile insect technique for tsetse control and eradication

    The current publication contains the contributions made by scientists who participated in the fourth Co-ordinated Research Programme. A range of topics, covering both field and laboratory activities, was addressed: Eradication of Glossina palpalis palpalis (Robineau-Desvoidy) (Diptera: Glossinidae) from agropastoral land in Central Nigeria by means of the sterile insect technique; Research and development in the IAEA Laboratory at Seibersdorf in support of BICOT for the eradication of Glossina palpalis palpalis; Tsetse fly eradication in Burkina Faso and evaluation of traps and targets; Ecology of Glossina species inhabiting peridomestic agroecosystems in relation to options for tsetse fly control; Population dynamics of Glossina fuscipes fuscipes on Buvuma Island, Lake Victoria, Uganda; Population estimation from mark-recapture data: Equations for a pooled mark system and for pooled data, with applications to a study on island populations of tsetse flies in Zimbabwe; Surveillance of tsetse fly and cattle populations for trypanosomes in the BICOT area during the sterile insect technique control programme; Freeze dried blood and development of an artificial diet for blood feeding anthropods; Effects of the nutritional quality of locally obtained blood diets on the performance of Glossina palpalis palpalis fed in vitro; Mycetomes and symbionts of tsetse flies maintained on a membrane feeding system and the agents interfering with natural reproduction; Virus particles infection in laboratory reared Glossina pallidipes Austen (Diptera: Glossinidae); Influence of different nutritional sources on haemolymph composition and vitellogenesis in haematophagous arthropods; Effect of rearing diet on the injection rate in flies released for the control of tsetse populations by sterile males; Use of juvenile hormone mimics in the sterilization of tsetse flies; Studies of Glossina pallidipes and G. morsitans subspecies related to the genetic control of tsetse flies

  10. Sustainable implementation of microhydro to eradicate poverty in Africa

    Jonker Klunne, Wim

    2010-09-15

    Local, micro scale, village level hydropower plants can play an important role towards eradication of poverty in rural areas. However, despite a good understanding of the technology involved and the enormous potential that exists in Africa, relative small numbers of micro hydro projects are currently in operation in Africa. This paper does look into the current situation on the continent with respect to installed systems and projects that are being implemented. It compares different implementation models and will conclude on ingredients for implementation models that will support the sustainable operation of micro hydroplants once built.

  11. Eradication of viral haemorrhagic septicaemia in Danish aquaculture

    Olsen, N. J.; Skall, Helle Frank; Jensen, B. B.; Henriksen, N. H.; Mellergård, S.; Korsholm, H. H.

    2013-01-01

    regulations and ban on introduction of live salmonids into the country VHSV seemed to have crossed the boarders into Denmark in a couple of cases. It is the first time that VHS has been eradicated from an endemically infected country. Among the causes of the success are a close collaboration between industry......, stakeholders, veterinary authorities and scientists. Also the reduction of the number of farms and novel farming strategies account for the success. Furthermore, in Denmark rainbow trout farming would not survive in the international competition being endemically infected with this serious disease providing a...

  12. [Eradication therapy of antibiotic-resistant strains of Helicobacter pylori].

    Shcherbakov, P L; Belousova, N L; Shcherbakova, M Iu; Kashnikov, V S

    2010-01-01

    Treatment of inflammatory diseases of the upper digestive tract, associated with Helicobacter pylori has recently greatly complicated by the presence of significant number of resistant strains of this microorganism to traditionally used drugs for eradication therapy. Average resistance to metronidazole and clarithromycin in Russia is about 30 and 25% respectively. The article presents the experience of treating patients with metronidazole resistant strains of H. pylori with using triple therapy, which included a drug used nitrofurans--nifuroxazide in suspension, proton pump inhibitors and clarithromycin. PMID:21485525

  13. Eradicating the tsetse fly on Zanzibar Island: A model project

    Tsetse flies infest vast areas of Africa and transmit a parasitic disease which devastates livestock herds and spreads debilitating 'sleeping sickness' amongst people. Past efforts to control the disease - Trypanosomosis - and the carrier insects have met with only limited success. But now an environmentally friendly technology called the Sterile Insect Technique (SIT) may provide a lasting solution to this scourge. Working with the Tanzanian Government and Zanzibar authorities, the Department of Technical Co-operation has sponsored a 'Model Project', with technical support from the Joint FAO/IAEA Division, to eradicate the tsetse fly completely from Zanzibar Island by applying SIT. (IAEA)

  14. Investing in justice: ethics, evidence, and the eradication investment cases for lymphatic filariasis and onchocerciasis.

    Bailey, Theodore C; Merritt, Maria W; Tediosi, Fabrizio

    2015-04-01

    It has been suggested that initiatives to eradicate specific communicable diseases need to be informed by eradication investment cases to assess the feasibility, costs, and consequences of eradication compared with elimination or control. A methodological challenge of eradication investment cases is how to account for the ethical importance of the benefits, burdens, and distributions thereof that are salient in people's experiences of the diseases and related interventions but are not assessed in traditional approaches to health and economic evaluation. We have offered a method of ethical analysis grounded in theories of social justice. We have described the method and its philosophical rationale and illustrated its use in application to eradication investment cases for lymphatic filariasis and onchocerciasis, 2 neglected tropical diseases that are candidates for eradication. PMID:25713967

  15. The Use of Spread Models to Inform Eradication Programs: Application to Red Imported Fire Ants

    Daniel Spring; Oscar Cacho; Craig Jennings

    2010-01-01

    A central theme of the invasion biology literature is to predict the introduction and spread of biological invasions but predictive models rarely are applied to inform invasion management. Here, we demonstrate the utility of a spatio-temporal predictive model that has been used to inform Australia's largest eradication program, the program to eradicate the red imported fire ant (RIFA) from Brisbane. That model has informed eradication efforts in two main ways: estimating the probability of pr...

  16. Saliva Secretion and Efficacy of Helicobacter Pylori Eradication in Peptic Ulcer Patients

    Sh. Abdollahzadeh; AR.Khalilian; Vahedi, M.; Shafiei, N.

    2011-01-01

    Objective It has been noted that the presence of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) in the oral cavity may affect the outcome of eradication therapy. This condition is associated with the recurrence of gastric infection. The optimum secretion of saliva promotes oral health consequently influencing H. pylori eradication. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relation between salivary secretion and the efficacy of H. pylori eradication from the stomach. Materials and Methods Forty five ...

  17. Impact of Helicobacter pylori eradication on refractory thrombocytopenia in patients with chronic HCV awaiting antiviral therapy.

    Hanafy, A S; El Hawary, A T; Hamed, E F; Hassaneen, A M

    2016-07-01

    The possibility of delaying treatment of HCV due to severe thrombocytopenia is challenging. This study aimed to detect the prevalence of active helicobacter infection as a claimed cause of thrombocytopenia in a cohort of Egyptian patients with chronic active HCV awaiting combined anti-viral therapy. The study included 400 chronic HCV patients with thrombocytopenia. Laboratory investigations included liver function tests, real time quantitative PCR, reticulocytic count, ESR, ANA, bone marrow aspiration, measurement of anti-helicobacter antibodies, and helicobacter stool antigen. Positive cases for active H. pylori were given the standard triple therapy for 2 weeks. Helicobacter stool antigen was detected 4 weeks after termination of therapy and the change in platelet count was detected 1 month after eradication. A total of 248 out of 281 seropositive patients for H. pylori (88.3 %) showed positive stool antigen (p = 0.01). Eradication was achieved in 169 (68.1 %) patients with platelet mean count 114.9 ± 18.8 × 10(3)/μl with highly significant statistical difference from pretreatment value (49.7 ± 9.2 × 10(3)/μl, p = 0.000). Seventy-nine patients were resistant to conventional triple therapy and given a 7-day course of moxifloxacin-based therapy; 61 patients responded (77.1 %) with mean platelet improvement from 76.4 ± 17.4 × 10(3)/μl to 104.2 ± 15.2 × 10(3)/μl (p = 0.000). The non-responders showed no improvement in their platelet count (74.6 ± 20.5 vs. 73.6 ± 15.3 × 10(3)/ul, P = 0.5). Eradication of active H. pylori in HCV augments platelet count and enhances the early start of antiviral therapy. PMID:27180243

  18. Eradication of Glossina palpalis palpalis (Robineau-Desvoidy) (Diptera: Glossinidae) from agropastoral land in Central Nigeria by means of the sterile insect technique

    A land area of 1500 km2 under an agropastoral development plan in southern Plateau State, Nigeria, was selected to develop and apply the sterile insect technique (SIT) for the eradication of Glossina palpalis palpalis. In vitro and in vivo feeding techniques were used to mass breed the species in the laboratory for the production of more than 1.5 million sexually sterile males for release. In the field the initial tsetse fly population could be reduced to less than 10% within 6-12 weeks by continuous trapping and placement of insecticide impregnated targets. Extensive trapping or positioning of targets did not lead to eradication of the species. However, eradication was achieved when sufficient sterile males were released on a weekly basis to maintain a minimal ratio of 10 sterile males to 1 fertile wild male fly for at least three generations. The area was divided into three operational zones and after application of SIT one each was found to be free of G.p. palpalis in 1985, 1986 and 1987, respectively. It was further demonstrated that after eradication the entire area of 1500 km2 could be secured against reinvasion by maintaining barriers of insecticide impregnated targets. (author). 18 refs, 5 figs, 1 tab

  19. Distinct Clinic-Pathological Features of Early Differentiated-Type Gastric Cancers after Helicobacter pylori Eradication

    Noriyuki Horiguchi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Gastric cancer is discovered even after successful eradication of H. pylori. We investigated clinic pathological features of early gastric cancers after H. pylori eradication. Methods. 51 early gastric cancers (EGCs from 44 patients diagnosed after successful H. pylori eradication were included as eradication group. The clinic-pathological features were compared with that of 131 EGCs from 120 patients who did not have a history of H. pylori eradication (control group. Results. Compared with control group, clinic-pathological features of eradication group were characterized as depressed (p<0.0001, reddish (p=0.0001, and smaller (p=0.0095 lesions, which was also confirmed in the comparison of six metachronous lesions diagnosed after initial ESD and subsequent successful H. pylori eradication. Prevalence of both SM2 (submucosal invasion greater than 500 μm and unexpected SM2 cases tended to be higher in eradication group (p=0.077, 0.0867, resp.. Prevalence of inconclusive diagnosis of gastric cancer during pretreatment biopsy was also higher in the same group (26.0% versus 1.6%, p<0.0001. Conclusions. Informative clinic pathological features of EGC after H. pylori eradication are depressed, reddish appearances, which should be treated as a caution because histological diagnosis of cancerous tissue is sometimes difficult by endoscopic biopsy.

  20. Distinct Clinic-Pathological Features of Early Differentiated-Type Gastric Cancers after Helicobacter pylori Eradication

    Horiguchi, Noriyuki; Tahara, Tomomitsu; Kawamura, Tomohiko; Okubo, Masaaki; Ishizuka, Takamitsu; Nakagawa, Yoshihito; Nagasaka, Mitsuo; Shibata, Tomoyuki; Ohmiya, Naoki

    2016-01-01

    Background. Gastric cancer is discovered even after successful eradication of H. pylori. We investigated clinic pathological features of early gastric cancers after H. pylori eradication. Methods. 51 early gastric cancers (EGCs) from 44 patients diagnosed after successful H. pylori eradication were included as eradication group. The clinic-pathological features were compared with that of 131 EGCs from 120 patients who did not have a history of H. pylori eradication (control group). Results. Compared with control group, clinic-pathological features of eradication group were characterized as depressed (p < 0.0001), reddish (p = 0.0001), and smaller (p = 0.0095) lesions, which was also confirmed in the comparison of six metachronous lesions diagnosed after initial ESD and subsequent successful H. pylori eradication. Prevalence of both SM2 (submucosal invasion greater than 500 μm) and unexpected SM2 cases tended to be higher in eradication group (p = 0.077, 0.0867, resp.). Prevalence of inconclusive diagnosis of gastric cancer during pretreatment biopsy was also higher in the same group (26.0% versus 1.6%, p < 0.0001). Conclusions. Informative clinic pathological features of EGC after H. pylori eradication are depressed, reddish appearances, which should be treated as a caution because histological diagnosis of cancerous tissue is sometimes difficult by endoscopic biopsy. PMID:27212944

  1. Importance of post-treatment follow-up to secure sufficient eradication therapy for Helicobacter pylori

    Roug, Stine; Madsen, Lone Galmstrup

    2012-01-01

    To optimize the care for Helicobacter pylori-associated diseases, we wanted to evaluate the completeness of follow-up after H. pylori eradication therapy in a single Danish endoscopy unit. Furthermore, the eradication rates and possible clinical characteristics associated with failure of eradicat......To optimize the care for Helicobacter pylori-associated diseases, we wanted to evaluate the completeness of follow-up after H. pylori eradication therapy in a single Danish endoscopy unit. Furthermore, the eradication rates and possible clinical characteristics associated with failure...

  2. Political, social and technical risks in the last stages of disease eradication campaigns.

    Whitty, Christopher J M

    2015-09-01

    Eradication of a disease is one of the greatest gifts any generation can give to subsequent ones, but most attempts have failed. The biggest challenges occur in the final stages of eradication and elimination campaigns. These include falling public support as a disease becomes less common; the emergence of groups who do not support eradication; spiralling costs; and the evolution of drug, vaccine or insecticide resistance. Mass campaigns become less effective as the disease fragments and modelling becomes less reliable. Optimism bias is the biggest risk to any eradication campaign and the long endgame must be planned for from the beginning. PMID:26311754

  3. Hepatitis C eradication: A long way to go.

    Waheed, Yasir

    2015-11-21

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a major global health problem with high morbidity and mortality. About 185 million people are living with HCV, of which 80% are living in low and middle income countries. With the development of new highly effective treatments for HCV, it is considered that the eradication of HCV may only be one step away. The major problem with new treatment options is its high price. The price of sofosbuvir-based treatment for one patient in the United States is US$85000-110000, while the actual production cost of a 12 wk direct-acting antiviral regimen is less than US$250. Another major hindrance in HCV eradication is the lack of quality management of blood transfusion screens. Due to the lack of HCV screening, 75% of people in the United States with HCV infection are unaware of their positive HCV status. The control of massive HCV pandemic will require a significant financial investment, political will, and support from medical, pharmaceutical, and civil organizations around the globe. PMID:26604658

  4. DNA-crosslinker cisplatin eradicates bacterial persister cells.

    Chowdhury, Nityananda; Wood, Thammajun L; Martínez-Vázquez, Mariano; García-Contreras, Rodolfo; Wood, Thomas K

    2016-09-01

    For all bacteria, nearly every antimicrobial fails since a subpopulation of the bacteria enter a dormant state known as persistence, in which the antimicrobials are rendered ineffective due to the lack of metabolism. This tolerance to antibiotics makes microbial infections the leading cause of death worldwide and makes treating chronic infections, including those of wounds problematic. Here, we show that the FDA-approved anti-cancer drug cisplatin [cis-diamminodichloroplatinum(II)], which mainly forms intra-strand DNA crosslinks, eradicates Escherichia coli K-12 persister cells through a growth-independent mechanism. Additionally, cisplatin is more effective at killing Pseudomonas aeruginosa persister cells than mitomycin C, which forms inter-strand DNA crosslinks, and cisplatin eradicates the persister cells of several pathogens including enterohemorrhagic E. coli, Staphylococcus aureus, and P. aeruginosa. Cisplatin was also highly effective against clinical isolates of S. aureus and P. aeruginosa. Therefore, cisplatin has broad spectrum activity against persister cells. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 1984-1992. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26914280

  5. Effect of Helicobacter Pylori Eradication on Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Ahamd Shavakhi

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Ammonia has still essential role in pathogenesis of encephalopathy. It is probable that helicobacter pylori (H. pylori infection leads to hyperammonemia and aggravates the hepatic encephalopathy via urease activity or its effect on zinc level. This study was aimed to assess the effect of H pylori eradication on hepatic encephalopathy. Methods: In a cross-sectional study, 42 cirrhotic patients with encephalopathy were enrolled the study. For evaluation the encephalopathy, flapping tremor, number connection test (NCT and grade of encephalopathy was determined for all of the patients. The prevalence of H pylori infection was evaluated based on positive serology by ELAISA method (Genesis Kit, UK, and/or rapid urease test (RUT during endoscopic evaluation. One month later, after treatment, grading of encephalopathy, NCT and flapping tremor was evaluated again and data were analyzed by software SPSS.Results: Serologic evaluation or RUT showed that 30 patients of 42 (71.42% were positive for H pylori. In comparison between pre and post treatment, grade of encephalopathy and NCT were reduced significantly but alteration in flapping tremor was not statistically significant.Conclusions: Our results indicate that eradication of H pylori may lead to improve the grade of hepatic encephalopathy and NCT.

  6. Polymer-Immobilized Photosensitizers for Continuous Eradication of Bacteria

    Anton Valkov

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The photosensitizers Rose Bengal (RB and methylene blue (MB, when immobilized in polystyrene, were found to exhibit high antibacterial activity in a continuous regime. The photosensitizers were immobilized by dissolution in chloroform, together with polystyrene, with further evaporation of the solvent, yielding thin polymeric films. Shallow reservoirs, bottom-covered with these films, were used for constructing continuous-flow photoreactors for the eradication of Gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus, Gram-negative Escherichia coli and wastewater bacteria under illumination with visible white light using a luminescent lamp at a 1.8 mW·cm−2 fluence rate. The bacterial concentration decreased by two to five orders of magnitude in separate reactors with either immobilized RB or MB, as well as in three reactors connected in series, which contained one of the photosensitizers. Bacterial eradication reached more than five orders of magnitude in two reactors connected in series, where the first reactor contained immobilized RB and the second contained immobilized MB.

  7. The Role of FAO in the Eradication of Rinderpest

    In 1945, when the United Nations was established to succeed the League of Nations, the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) was one of the first specialized agencies to be set up. During its first Conference, held in Quebec (Canada) in the autumn of 1945, both the assets and mandate of the International Institute of Agriculture (IIA), created in May 1908, were handed over to FAO. In line with the IIA vi-sion, FAO convened the first international meeting (1946) on animal health in London (United Kingdom). This aimed to explore how the Organization could best assist the harmonization of efforts to contain high-impact livestock diseases, particularly those that were transboundary in nature and were seriously affecting human nutrition, following the global war that had just ended. Rinderpest was at the top of the list, and continued to dominate the animal health agenda ever since. The first role of FAO was to help develop improved vaccines that were sufficiently low in cost for extensive rinderpest control operations. For the first time there was hope of eradicating the disease (Hambidge, 1955). As there was little international collaboration in rinderpest control and research during that period, FAO took a coordination role, which would lead ? after almost 65 years ? to the global eradication of rinderpest in June 2011.

  8. Comparative analysis of measures of viral reservoirs in HIV-1 eradication studies.

    Susanne Eriksson

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available HIV-1 reservoirs preclude virus eradication in patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART. The best characterized reservoir is a small, difficult-to-quantify pool of resting memory CD4(+ T cells carrying latent but replication-competent viral genomes. Because strategies targeting this latent reservoir are now being tested in clinical trials, well-validated high-throughput assays that quantify this reservoir are urgently needed. Here we compare eleven different approaches for quantitating persistent HIV-1 in 30 patients on HAART, using the original viral outgrowth assay for resting CD4(+ T cells carrying inducible, replication-competent viral genomes as a standard for comparison. PCR-based assays for cells containing HIV-1 DNA gave infected cell frequencies at least 2 logs higher than the viral outgrowth assay, even in subjects who started HAART during acute/early infection. This difference may reflect defective viral genomes. The ratio of infected cell frequencies determined by viral outgrowth and PCR-based assays varied dramatically between patients. Although strong correlations with the viral outgrowth assay could not be formally excluded for most assays, correlations achieved statistical significance only for integrated HIV-1 DNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and HIV-1 RNA/DNA ratio in rectal CD4(+ T cells. Residual viremia was below the limit of detection in many subjects and did not correlate with the viral outgrowth assays. The dramatic differences in infected cell frequencies and the lack of a precise correlation between culture and PCR-based assays raise the possibility that the successful clearance of latently infected cells may be masked by a larger and variable pool of cells with defective proviruses. These defective proviruses are detected by PCR but may not be affected by reactivation strategies and may not require eradication to accomplish an effective cure. A molecular understanding of the discrepancy

  9. Contribution of Contact Sampling in Increasing Sensitivity of Poliovirus Detection During A Polio Outbreak-Somalia, 2013.

    Moturi, Edna; Mahmud, Abdirahman; Kamadjeu, Raoul; Mbaeyi, Chukwuma; Farag, Noha; Mulugeta, Abraham; Gary, Howard; Ehrhardt, Derek

    2016-04-01

    Background.  In May 2013, a wild poliovirus type 1 (WPV1) outbreak reported in Somalia provided an opportunity to examine the contribution of testing contacts to WPV detection. Methods.  We reviewed acute flaccid paralysis (AFP) case-patients and linked contacts reported in the Somalia Surveillance Database from May 9 to December 31, 2013. We restricted our analysis to AFP case-patients that had ≥3 contacts and calculated the contribution of each contact to case detection. Results.  Among 546 AFP cases identified, 328 AFP cases had ≥3 contacts. Among the 328 AFP cases with ≥3 contacts, 93 WPV1 cases were detected: 58 cases (62%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 52%-72%) were detected through testing stool specimens from AFP case-patients; and 35 cases (38%; 95% CI, 28%-48%) were detected through testing stool specimens from contacts, including 19 cases (20%; 95% CI, 14%-30%) from the first contact, 11 cases (12%; 95% CI, 7%-20%) from the second contact, and 5 cases (5%; 95% CI, 2%-12%) from the third contact. Among the 103 AFP cases with ≥4 contacts, 3 (6%; 95% CI, 2%-16%) of 52 WPV1 cases were detected by testing the fourth contact. No additional WPV1 cases were detected by testing >4 contacts. Conclusions.  Stool specimens from 3 to 4 contacts of persons with AFP during polio outbreaks are needed to maximize detection of WPV cases. PMID:27419182

  10. Strengthening Routine Immunization in Areas of Northern Nigeria at High Risk for Polio Transmission During 2012–2014

    Ali, Daniel; Banda, Richard; Mohammed, Abdulaziz; Adagadzu, Julie; Murele, Bolatito; Seruyange, Rachel; Makam, Jeevan; Mkanda, Pascal; Okpessen, Bassey; Tegegne, Sisay G.; Folorunsho, Adeboye S.; Erbeto, Tesfaye B.; Yehualashet, Yared G.; Vaz, Rui G.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Following the 2012 declaration by World Health Organization (WHO) Regional Director for Africa and the WHO Executive Board to ramp up routine immunization (RI) activities, began to intensify activities to strengthen RI. This study assessed how the intensification of RI helped strengthen service delivery in local government areas (LGAs) of northern Nigeria at high risk for polio transmission. Methods. A retrospective study was performed by analyzing RI administrative data and findings from supportive supervisory visits in 107 high-risk LGAs. Results. Our study revealed that administrative coverage with 3rd dose of diphtheria-pertussis-tetanus vaccine in the 107 high-risk LGAs improved from a maximum average coverage of 33% during the preintensification period of 2009–2011 to 74% during the postintensification period of 2012–2014. Conclusions. Routine immunization could be strengthened in areas where coverage is low, and RI has been identified to be weak when certain key routine activities are intensified. PMID:26917576

  11. A Randomized Control Trial Comparing 2 Levofloxacin-Containing Second-Line Therapies for Helicobacter pylori Eradication.

    Chuah, Seng-Kee; Liang, Chih-Ming; Lee, Chen-Hsiang; Chiou, Shue-Shian; Chiu, Yi-Chun; Hu, Ming-Luen; Wu, Keng-Liang; Lu, Lung-Sheng; Chou, Yeh-Pin; Chang, Kuo-Chin; Kuo, Chung-Huang; Kuo, Chung-Mou; Hu, Tsung-Hui; Tai, Wei-Chen

    2016-05-01

    metronidazole in the EALM group.Levofloxacin and metronidazole-containing sequential therapy achieved a >90% eradication rate as a second-line H pylori therapy. Dual antibiotic resistance to levofloxacin and metronidazole was the clinical factor influencing the efficacy of H pylori eradication therapy in the sequential therapy (ClinicalTrials.gov number: NCT02596620). PMID:27175657

  12. A Randomized Control Trial Comparing 2 Levofloxacin-Containing Second-Line Therapies for Helicobacter pylori Eradication

    Chuah, Seng-Kee; Liang, Chih-Ming; Lee, Chen-Hsiang; Chiou, Shue-Shian; Chiu, Yi-Chun; Hu, Ming-Luen; Wu, Keng-Liang; Lu, Lung-Sheng; Chou, Yeh-Pin; Chang, Kuo-Chin; Kuo, Chung-Huang; Kuo, Chung-Mou; Hu, Tsung-Hui; Tai, Wei-Chen

    2016-01-01

    to levofloxacin and metronidazole in the EALM group. Levofloxacin and metronidazole-containing sequential therapy achieved a >90% eradication rate as a second-line H pylori therapy. Dual antibiotic resistance to levofloxacin and metronidazole was the clinical factor influencing the efficacy of H pylori eradication therapy in the sequential therapy (ClinicalTrials.gov number: NCT02596620). PMID:27175657

  13. Achieving Standardization

    Henningsson, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    International e-Customs is going through a standardization process. Driven by the need to increase control in the trade process to address security challenges stemming from threats of terrorists, diseases, and counterfeit products, and to lower the administrative burdens on traders to stay...... competitive, national customs and regional economic organizations are seeking to establish a standardized solution for digital reporting of customs data. However, standardization has proven hard to achieve in the socio-technical e-Customs solution. In this chapter, the authors identify and describe what has...... to be harmonized in order for a global company to perceive e-Customs as standardized. In doing so, they contribute an explanation of the challenges associated with using a standardization mechanism for harmonizing socio-technical information systems....

  14. Achieving Standardization

    Henningsson, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    International e-Customs is going through a standardization process. Driven by the need to increase control in the trade process to address security challenges stemming from threats of terrorists, diseases, and counterfeit products, and to lower the administrative burdens on traders to stay...... competitive, national customs and regional economic organizations are seeking to establish a standardized solution for digital reporting of customs data. However, standardization has proven hard to achieve in the socio-technical e-Customs solution. In this chapter, the authors identify and describe what has...... to be harmonized in order for a global company to perceive e-Customs as standardized. In doing so, they contribute an explanation of the challenges associated with using a standardization mechanism for harmonizing socio-technical information systems....

  15. Eradication of scrapie with selective breeding: are we nearly there?

    Davidse Aart

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Following EU decision 2003/100/EC Member States have recently implemented sheep breeding programmes to reduce the prevalence of sheep with TSE susceptible prion genotypes. The present paper investigates the progress of the breeding programme in the Netherlands. The PrP genotype frequencies were monitored through time using two sets of random samples: one set covers the years 2005 to 2008 and is taken from national surveillance programme; the other is taken from 168 random sheep farms in 2007. The data reveal that although the level of compliance to the breeding programme has been high, the frequency of susceptible genotypes varies substantially between farms. The 168 sheep farms are a subset of 689 farms participating in a postal survey inquiring about management and breeding strategies. This survey aimed to identify how much these strategies varied between farms, in order to inform assessment of the expected future progress towards eradication of classical scrapie. Results On the one hand, we found that compliance to the national breeding program has been high, and the frequency of resistant genotypes is expected to increase further in the next few years. On the other hand, we observed a large variation in prevalence of the scrapie resistant PrP genotype ARR between farms, implicating a large variation of genetic resistance between farms. Substantial between-flock differences in management and breeding strategies were found in the postal survey, suggesting considerable variation in risk of scrapie transmission between farms. Conclusions Our results show that although there has been a good progress in the breeding for scrapie resistance and the average farm-level scrapie susceptibility in the Netherlands has been significantly reduced, still a considerable proportion of farms contain high frequencies of susceptible genotypes in their sheep population. Since 2007 the breeding for genetic resistance is voluntarily again, and

  16. BVD eradication in Switzerland--a new approach.

    Presi, P; Heim, D

    2010-04-21

    Diverse concepts for BVD eradication or control have been applied in several countries with varying success. Results of previous studies conducted in Switzerland have shown that the prevalence of antibody-positive animals is high and that BVDV is widespread in the country causing serious economic losses. A new approach to eradicate BVD in the cattle population in Switzerland was chosen. It consists in testing the whole Swiss cattle population for virus detection in a short period of time, without initial antibody screening. Identified persistently infected (PI) animals have to be slaughtered, and new herd infections should be avoided by movement restrictions. Ear-notches are collected using special tags for labeling the animals, and are analyzed using ELISA or rtRT-PCR methods. Confirmatory tests if needed are performed on blood samples using rtRT-PCR. The eradication program is divided into four phases: (1) Pre-pasturing phase: all young bovines going to transhumance in summer have to be negative tested before. (2) Initial phase: all non-tested bovines have to be tested. Movement restrictions are effective at the same time. (3) Calves phase: all newborn calves have to be tested. (4) Surveillance phase: several strategies will be compared using a modeling approach. After the pre-pasture phase already 595,230 animals (37% of the livestock) have been tested within four months. A prevalence of 1.1% of PIs was observed. The average age of infected animals is 403 days compared to 794 days for non-infected animals, with the oldest PI-animal being over 11 years old. On average PI-animals are slaughtered within 18 days after the last positive result. The pre-pasture phase has shown that sampling and testing a high number of animals in a short time is challenging but possible. The next phase will deal with double the number of animals in a similar time frame. The coordination between all partners as well as the collaboration of farmers is the key factor for ensuring the

  17. [Prognostic factors of efficacy of eradication therapy in patients with duodenal ulcer].

    Kozlova, I V; Eliseev, Iu Iu; Pakhomova, A L; Khan, Sadzhad Akhmad

    2005-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine microorganism-associated predictors of efficacy of eradication therapy in patients with Helicobacter pylori-associated duodenal ulcer. The subjects were 129 such patients. Clinical, endoscopic, microbiological, and immunological examination revealed differences in the initial immune status, the structure of gastroduodenal zone mucosa, and large bowel biocenosis, which predict efficacy of eradication therapy. PMID:16117427

  18. Importance of post-treatment follow-up to secure sufficient eradication therapy for Helicobacter pylori

    Roug, Stine; Madsen, Lone Galmstrup

    2012-01-01

    To optimize the care for Helicobacter pylori-associated diseases, we wanted to evaluate the completeness of follow-up after H. pylori eradication therapy in a single Danish endoscopy unit. Furthermore, the eradication rates and possible clinical characteristics associated with failure of eradicat...

  19. Functional dyspepsia symptom resolution after Helicobacter pylori eradication with two different regimens

    Sarikaya, Murat; Dogan, Zeynal; Ergül, Bilal; Filik, Levent

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Functional dyspepsia (FD), a common functional gastrointestinal disorder, has a complex underlying pathophysiological mechanism that involves changes in gastric motility, visceral hypersensitivity, genetic susceptibility, psychosocial factors and Helicobacter pylori infection. Although there are several H. pylori eradication treatments, there is not enough data that compare these different eradication treatments for FD symptom resolution. Most previous studies have focused on the...

  20. Eradication of Helicobacter pylori Is Associated with the Progression of Dementia: A Population-Based Study

    Yang-Pei Chang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To evaluate the effect of eradication of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori on the progression of dementia in Alzheimer’s disease (AD patients with peptic ulcer. Methods. Participants with the diagnosis of AD and peptic ulcer were recruited between 2001 and 2008. We examined the association between eradication of H. pylori and the progression of AD using the multiple regression models. Medication shift from Donepezil, Rivastgmine, and Galantamine to Mematine is defined as progression of dementia according to the insurance of National Health Insurance (NHI under expert review. Results. Among the 30142 AD patients with peptic ulcers, the ratio of medication shift in AD patients with peptic ulcers is 79.95%. There were significant lower incidence comorbidities (diabetes mellitus, hypertension, cerebrovascular disease, coronary artery disease, congestive heart failure and hyperlipidemia in patients with H. pylori eradication as compared with no H. pylori eradication. Eradication of H. pylori was associated with a decreased risk of AD progression (odds ratio [OR] 0.35 [0.23–0.52] as compared with no H. pylori eradication, which was not modified by comorbidities. Conclusions. Eradication of H. pylori was associated with a decreased progression of dementia as compared to no eradication of H. pylori in AD patients with peptic ulcers.

  1. Can hepatitis C be eradicated in the United States?

    Edlin, Brian R; Winkelstein, Emily R

    2014-10-01

    The advent of highly effective antiviral regimens will make the eradication of hepatitis C in high-income countries such as the United States technically feasible. But eradicating hepatitis C will require escalating our response to the epidemic in key domains, including surveillance and epidemiology, prevention, screening, care and treatment, policy, research, and advocacy. Surveillance must be nimble enough to quickly assess the magnitude of new transmission patterns as they emerge. Basic prevention strategies - community-based outreach and education, testing and counseling, and access to sterile injection equipment and opioid substitution therapies - must be scaled up and adapted to target groups in which new epidemics are emerging. All adults should be screened for hepatitis C, but special efforts must focus on groups with increased prevalence through community outreach and rapid testing. Government, industry, and payers must work together to assure full access to health services and antiviral drugs for everyone who is infected. Access to the new regimens must not be compromised by excessively high prices or arbitrary payer restrictions. Partnerships must be forged between hepatitis providers and programs that serve people who inject illicit drugs. Healthcare providers and systems, especially primary care practitioners, need education and training in treating hepatitis C and caring for substance-using populations. Services must be provided to the disadvantaged and stigmatized members of society who bear a disproportionate burden of the epidemic. Environments must be created where people who use drugs can receive prevention and treatment services without shame or stigma. Action is needed to end the policy of mass incarceration of people who use drugs, reduce the stigma associated with substance use, support the human rights of people who use drugs, expand social safety net services for the poor and the homeless, remove the legal barriers to hepatitis C prevention

  2. SIT for codling moth eradication in British Columbia, Canada

    The codling moth (CM), Cydia pomonella L. (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae), is considered the key pest of apples and pears in the fruit growing regions of south central British Columbia. This region includes about 18,000 acres of commercial production, as well as several urban centres with abundant backyard fruit trees and ornamental crab apples. Now, after 30 years of research and planning, an eradication programme using the sterile insect technique (SIT) has been implemented against CM. This article reviews the progress that the programme has made and how well reality has met expectations in key areas. Proverbs (1982) and Proverbs et al. (1982) reviewed the techniques for mass rearing, sterilising and releasing CM, DeBiasio (1988) developed the initial implementation plan and Dyck et al. (1993) reviewed the history and development of the programme up to 1992 when it became operational

  3. Legal Policy Of Corruption Eradication At State-Owned Enterprises Sector In Indonesia

    Zulkipli

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available A mandate of the constitution of the Republic of Indonesia as the highest law is the creation of Indonesia people that is just and prosperous and then the development in all sectors becomes a necessity for achieving that goal. To achieve continuity and development success the enforcement of law supremacy in the form of prevention and eradication of corruption is a necessary condition condition sine qua non. Type of legal research conducted is normative. This research was carried out by discussion of concepts doctrine and theory principles as well as legislation which is correlated to the philosophical construction on state finances. The results of the research indicated that law enforcement of corruption against the management of limited state-owned enterprises during this that damage SEOs state is one of the important parts in the form of control the management of SOEs whose responsible and integrity. Though on the other hand the debate over the use of the criminal instruments in resolving the problems that occurred in the transaction of SOEs state that damage will continue to occur but against the actor of state-owned companies still put forward the principle of prudence in running the business because in some judicial practice has been expandingconstructing carelessness be a part of unlawful action in corruption crime.

  4. The Global Rinderpest Eradication Programme as the Spearhead for EMPRES

    The significance of the Global Rinderpest Eradication Programme (GREP) cannot be fully understood without recalling its spearheading role in the animal health work of the Emergency Prevention System for Transboundary Animal and Plant Pests and Diseases (EMPRES) at the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO). GREP started in 1994 as a follow-up to the creation of EMPRES. As a single target disease programme, GREP soon became a model for the fight against transboundary animal diseases. EMPRES focuses on a 'shift to the left' in the disease outbreak time line, which seeks to shorten the time between the commencement of an incident, and its detection and the response. EMPRES also follows the adage that prevention is better than cure. Shifting attention to early warning, early detection and early response opens the door to progressive disease control. Rinderpest was singled out as the logical first target because of its high impact and because a growing number of countries had shown that the disease could be eliminated. Knowing that important economic rewards had come within reach, the public veterinary services of countries in Africa and Asia were therefore ready to join forces and implement regional roadmaps for the progressive control and elimination of rinderpest. The GREP success story tells of positive results generated by a broad network of partners. FAO has always sought a facilitatory rather than a leadership role, promoting and securing concerted efforts and assisting the coordination and harmonization of inputs. The predominant role of regional animal health bodies has been vital to success, permitting the streamlining of public veterinary services across ecosystems. Rinderpest eradication brought countries together, and sometimes also overcame the boundaries and moved beyond animal health technical realms. Support to GREP at the international level came through an extensive fabric of finance and technical assistance agencies. GREP also

  5. A Programme for the Eradication of the New World Screwworm from North Africa

    The recent establishment of the New World Screwworm (NWS), Cochliomyia hominivorax, in North Africa poses an enormous threat to that continent, as well as the Mediterranean Basin and the Middle East. Because of the urgent need to initiate an eradication programme as soon as possible, three consultants met in Vienna from 8 to 19 January 1990 to prepare a programme outlining the eradication of the NWS from North Africa. Emphasis was placed on the Sterile Insect Technique (SIT) portion of an eradication programme. At the time the report was prepared the NWS had been reported only from Libya, therefore the report deals with eradication from that country. The document will be used by the Joint FAO/IAEA Division of Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture as a guide to assist FAO in NWS eradication from North Africa.

  6. Evaluation der Wirksamkeit einer häuslichen Kneipp`schen Hydrotherapie bei Patient/innen mit Post-Polio-Syndrom

    Hackermeier, Ursula

    2013-01-01

    Objective Aim of this study was to evaluate changes of quality of life (QoL) and complaints of patients with post-polio-syndrome (PPS) under a self-administered cold water hydrotherapy over a period of 8 weeks. Method This is a randomised, controlled, clinical pilot-study in a waiting group design over 4 weeks with a follow-up of 8 weeks. Complaints and QoL were examined at the time of inclusion into the study, at the end of the waiting period and after 4 and 8 weeks of hydrotherap...

  7. Cine y enseñanza en ciencias de la salud. El caso de la polio. Desde la Anatomía a la Microbiología

    García Merino, Enrique

    2014-01-01

    [ES]Trascurrida la primera década del siglo XXI, la polio sigue siendo una enfermedad que interesa a diversas instituciones, grupos de profesionales de la salud, organizaciones sociales, asociaciones, fundaciones y agencias gubernamentales tanto nacionales como internacionales. Este interés colectivo tiene como fundamentos, entre otros, la lucha por la erradicación, que ya se avista, en la que participan varias instituciones, la persistencia de la forma paralítica en un limitado número de paí...

  8. Integrated strategy for sustainable cattle fever tick eradication in USA is required to mitigate the impact of global change

    Adalberto A. Pérez de León

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The ticks Rhipicephalus (Boophilus annulatus and R. (B. microplus, commonly known as cattle and southern cattle tick, respectively, impede the development and sustainability of livestock industries throughout tropical and other world regions. They affect animal productivity and wellbeing directly through their obligate blood feeding habit and indirectly by serving as vectors of the infectious agents causing bovine babesiosis and anaplasmosis. The monumental scientific discovery of certain arthropod species as vectors of infectious agents is associated with the history of research on bovine babesiosis and R. annulatus. Together, R. microplus and R. annulatus are referred to as cattle fever ticks (CFT. Bovine babesiosis became a regulated foreign animal disease in the United States of America (U.S. through efforts of the Cattle Fever Tick Eradication Program (CFTEP established in 1906. The U.S. was declared free of CFT in 1943, with the exception of a permanent quarantine zone in south Texas along the border with Mexico. This achievement contributed greatly to the development and productivity of animal agriculture in the U.S. The permanent quarantine zone buffers CFT incursions from Mexico where both ticks and babesiosis are endemic. Until recently, the elimination of CFT outbreaks relied solely on the use of coumaphos, an organophosphate acaricide, in dipping vats or as a spray to treat livestock, or the vacation of pastures. However, ecological, societal, and economical changes are shifting the paradigm of systematically treating livestock to eradicate CFT. Keeping the U.S. CFT-free is a critical animal health issue affecting the economic stability of livestock and wildlife enterprises. Here, we describe vulnerabilities associated with global change forces challenging the CFTEP. The concept of integrated CFT eradication is discussed in reference to global change.

  9. A 2-week Nitazoxanide-based quadruple treatment as a rescue therapy for Helicobacter pylori eradication: A single center experience.

    Abd-Elsalam, Sherief; Kobtan, Abdelrahman; El-Kalla, Ferial; Elkhalawany, Walaa; Nawasany, Sally El; Saif, Sabry Abou; Yousef, Mohamed; Ali, Lobna Abo; Soliman, Samah; Mansour, Loai; Habba, Eslam; Soliman, Hanan; Rizk, Fatma; Shehata, Mona Ah

    2016-06-01

    As there are increasing reports of fluoroquinolone resistance on use as a first- or second-line treatment for Helicobacter pylori (H pylori), we aimed at evaluation of the efficacy and safety of nitazoxanide-based regimen as a rescue regimen in Egyptian patients whose previous traditional treatment for H pylori infection failed.In total, 100 patients from the outpatient clinic of the Tropical medicine department, Tanta University hospital in whom the standard triple therapy (clarithromycin-based triple therapy) failed were enrolled in the study. Nitazoxanide (500 mg bid), levofloxacin (500 mg once daily), omeprazole (40 mg bid), and doxycyclin (100 mg twice daily) were prescribed for 14 days. Eradication was confirmed by stool antigen for H pylori 6 weeks after the end of treatment. Among the patients enrolled in the study, 44% of patients were men and the mean age for the participants in the study was 46.41 ± 8.05, 13% of patients were smokers, and 4% of patients had a previous history of upper gastro-intestinal bleeding. A total of 94 patients (94%) completed the study with excellent compliance. Only 1 patient (1%) discontinued treatment due to intolerable side effects and 5 patients (5%) did not achieve good compliance or were lost during follow up. However, 83 patients had successful eradication of H pylori with total eradication rates 83% (95 % CI 75.7-90.3%) and 88.30% (95 % CI 81.8-94.8%) according to an intention-to-treat and per-protocol analysis, respectively. Adverse events were reported in 21% of patients: abdominal pain (6%), nausea (9%) and constipation (12%), (2%) headache, and (1%) dizziness. A 2-week nitazoxanide-based regimen is an effective and safe rescue therapy in Egyptian patients whose previous standard triple therapy has failed. PMID:27310977

  10. Integrated Strategy for Sustainable Cattle Fever Tick Eradication in USA is Required to Mitigate the Impact of Global Change.

    Pérez de León, Adalberto A; Teel, Pete D; Auclair, Allan N; Messenger, Matthew T; Guerrero, Felix D; Schuster, Greta; Miller, Robert J

    2012-01-01

    The ticks Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) annulatus and R. (B.) microplus, commonly known as cattle and southern cattle tick, respectively, impede the development and sustainability of livestock industries throughout tropical and other world regions. They affect animal productivity and wellbeing directly through their obligate blood-feeding habit and indirectly by serving as vectors of the infectious agents causing bovine babesiosis and anaplasmosis. The monumental scientific discovery of certain arthropod species as vectors of infectious agents is associated with the history of research on bovine babesiosis and R. annulatus. Together, R. microplus and R. annulatus are referred to as cattle fever ticks (CFT). Bovine babesiosis became a regulated foreign animal disease in the United States of America (U.S.) through efforts of the Cattle Fever Tick Eradication Program (CFTEP) established in 1906. The U.S. was declared free of CFT in 1943, with the exception of a permanent quarantine zone in south Texas along the border with Mexico. This achievement contributed greatly to the development and productivity of animal agriculture in the U.S. The permanent quarantine zone buffers CFT incursions from Mexico where both ticks and babesiosis are endemic. Until recently, the elimination of CFT outbreaks relied solely on the use of coumaphos, an organophosphate acaricide, in dipping vats or as a spray to treat livestock, or the vacation of pastures. However, ecological, societal, and economical changes are shifting the paradigm of systematically treating livestock to eradicate CFT. Keeping the U.S. CFT-free is a critical animal health issue affecting the economic stability of livestock and wildlife enterprises. Here, we describe vulnerabilities associated with global change forces challenging the CFTEP. The concept of integrated CFT eradication is discussed in reference to global change. PMID:22712018

  11. Eficácia da vacina Sabin em crianças subnutridas da Amazônia The efficacy of oral polio vaccine in malnourished Amazonian children

    Klaus E. Stewien

    1985-02-01

    Full Text Available A eficácia da vacina Sabin foi determinada em 106 crianças normais e subnutridas da Amazônia, após a administração de uma e duas doses de vacina oral (trivalente. Após a aplicação de uma dose de vacina, verificou-se que apenas 9% das crianças com subnutrição pregressa (crônica e 43% das crianças normais formaram anticorpos neutralizantes (protetores contra dois ou três tipos de poliovírus (p = 0,04. Após duas doses de vacina, os níveis de imunidade dos dois grupos de crianças estudadas acusaram, respectivamente, 32% e 75% (p = 0,001. Estes resultados mostram que a resposta imunitária à vacina Sabin foi sensivelmente inferior no grupo das crianças subnutridas, do que no das crianças normais. Em decorrência disto, será necessário administrar um número maior de doses de vacina oral àquelas crianças, a fim de que níveis satisfatórios de imunidade contra a poliomielite sejam atingidos em toda a população infantil.Various hypotheses have been proposed to explain the diminished efficacy of the oral polio vaccine in underdeveloped tropical regions. In this study, the influence of mild to moderate chronic malnutrition on the development of antibodies to the 3 types of polioviruses was investigated in Brazilian Amazonian children. Vaccines were administered to 106 normal and stunted children, between 5 to 14 months of age, who were not suffering from acute malnutrition (wasting, in poor peri-urban slum areas of Manaus (AM and São Luis (MA during the National Poliomyelitis Vaccination Campaigns of 1981 and 1982. Two weeks after vaccination, blood was collected by digital puncture and the prevalence of neutralizing antibodies for the 3 types of polioviruses was determined in serum at a dilution of 1:8. In children who had received one dose of the vaccine, 43% of normal children had antibodies to 2 or 3 types of polioviruses, against only 9% of stunted children (p = .04. In children who had received 2 doses of vaccine, 75

  12. Association of erosive esophagitis with Helicobacter pylori eradication: a role of salivary bicarbonate and glycoprotein secretion.

    Namiot, D B; Namiot, Z; Markowski, A R; Leszczyńska, K; Bucki, R; Kemona, A; Gołebiewska, M

    2009-01-01

    In some populations, Helicobacter pylori eradication is associated with development of erosive esophagitis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the contribution of salivary bicarbonate and glycoprotein secretion to the pathogenesis of erosive esophagitis developing after H. pylori eradication. Gastroscopy and saliva collection were performed at recruitment and 12 months after completion of eradication therapy. Eighty-eight patients with duodenal ulcer were recruited to the study. Erosive esophagitis was found in 13 patients (grade A, 8 patients; grade B, 4 patients; grade C, 1 patient). Among the 74 subjects who completed the study, erosive esophagitis was detected in 21 patients (grade A, 15 patients; grade B, 6 patients); they all were successfully eradicated. Bicarbonate and glycoprotein secretion was not found to differ significantly between the subjects with and without erosive esophagitis both before and 1 year after H. pylori eradication. However, it was lower in H. pylori-infected (baseline) than in H. pylori-noninfected erosive esophagitis subjects (1 year after successful eradication) (bicarbonate 2.34 [1.29-3.40)]vs. 3.64 [2.70-4.58]micromol/min and glycoprotein 0.23 [0.15-0.31]vs. 0.35 [0.28-0.43] mg/min, P= 0.04 and P= 0.04, respectively). We conclude that changes in salivary bicarbonate and glycoprotein secretion related to H. pylori eradication do not promote the development of erosive esophagitis in duodenal ulcer patients. PMID:19222537

  13. Eradicating the Screwworm. An FAO Emergency Programme for North Africa

    The arrival of New World Screwworm fly in Libya in 1988 represented a grave threat not only to Libya, but also to the African continent as a whole. The Screwworm had already proved itself one of the most devastating livestock pests in the Americas, where it had cost farmers thousands of millions of dollars in lost production and governments hundreds of millions in control and eradication measures. Its introduction to North Africa posed a serious health threat to domestic animals, wild animals, and even humans. The fly lays eggs in wounds as small as a tick bite or in orifices such as ears or the nose. The eggs hatch into larvae that eat into the living flesh of the host, enlarging the wound. More Screwworm flies - and other parasites - infest the wound and frequently, if left untreated, the victim dies. Fully grown cattle can be killed within ten days. In 1960, the cost of the Screwworm infestation in the United States of America was estimated at $100 million a year. Clearing Mexico and the southern United States of the pest took more than 20 years and cost nearly $700 million. The fly's mobility makes containment extremely difficult. Adult flies have travelled up to 200 km and, where conditions are favourable, the size and range of the population can expand rapidly. Carried by infested animals, the primary cause of the infestation spreading, Screwworm can travel across continents. The Screwworm presence in Libya, therefore, was a concern of international significance: unless quickly eradicated, it would inevitably spread. Studies carried out by the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation of Australia (CSIRO) showed the Screwworm could easily migrate around the North- and West African coasts and down the Nile valley. Computer models predicted the establishment of permanent infestations throughout Africa and Southern Europe. From this base it would then reach into the Middle East and Asia. Such an infestation would be virtually impossible to

  14. A retrospective study of 5-year outcomes of radiotherapy for gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma refractory to Helicobacter pylori eradication therapy

    The favorable response rate of radiotherapy for localized gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma refractory to Helicobacter pylori eradication has been demonstrated. However, there are limited data available on the long-term outcomes. The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate the long-term outcomes of radiotherapy for localized gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma refractory to Helicobacter pylori eradication. Thirty-four consecutive patients with localized gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma that were refractory to eradication were treated with radiotherapy (a total dose of 30 Gy). The response and adverse events of radiotherapy were retrospectively analyzed as short-term outcomes, and recurrence-free, overall and disease-specific survival rates were calculated as long-term outcomes. Thirty-three (97.1%) patients achieved complete remission and radiotherapy was well tolerated. One patient underwent emergency gastrectomy due to severe hematemesis. Of the 34 patients during the median follow-up period of 7.5 (1.2-13.0) years, one patient had local recurrence after 8.8 years, one patient underwent surgery for bowel obstruction secondary to small bowel metastasis after 5.1 years and one patient had pulmonary metastasis after 10.9 years. Pathologically, all three recurrences revealed mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma without any transformation to high-grade lymphoma. None died of gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma. The 5-year recurrence-free survival rate was 97.0%. The 5-year overall survival rates and disease-specific survival rates were 97.0 and 100%, respectively. Radiotherapy in patients with localized gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma refractory to Helicobacter pylori eradication can achieve excellent overall survival. However, long-term surveillance is necessary to identify late recurrences. (author)

  15. Evidence required for establishing the absence of tsetse and trypanosomosis associated with tsetse eradication programmes

    This paper considers entomological and epidemiological criteria for establishing the absence of tsetse and trypanosomosis associated with tsetse eradication programmes. The sampling goal is simple - to maximise the probability of detecting tsetse flies in the field or trypanosomes in hosts, if they exist. Sampling strategies cannot guarantee the absence of tsetse and trypanosomes but they can be used to estimate the probability of their eradication. Because tsetse eradication programmes are targeted at defined areas, geographical information system (GIS) tools are very useful in guiding spatial sampling strategies. Two approaches to assess tsetse eradication are discussed. The first depends only on information on the sensitivity of tsetse trapping methods used. The second combines information on pre-eradication tsetse trapping and the proportion of time during which no tsetse have been trapped, assuming either a stable or declining (preferred) pre-eradication tsetse population. For establishing the absence of trypanosomosis in host populations, there are standard sampling techniques that can be adjusted for the sensitivity and specificity of the trypanosome detection methods used. Required sample sizes can be calculated for both direct trypanosome detection methods of 100% specificity or indirect tests with imperfect sensitivity and specificity. For the latter, both the sample size and the number of reactors (assumed to be false positive) are estimated for the required confidence level. These entomological and epidemiological methods were then applied to assess the eradication of tsetse and trypanosomosis from Unguja island of Zanzibar using the sterile insect technique (SIT). Pre- and post-eradication data collected were sufficient to establish with 95% confidence that both tsetse and trypanosomosis were eradicated. (author)

  16. One-week triple therapy for eradication of helicobacter pylori

    Objective: The optimum therapy for Helicobacter pylori infection is yet to be defined in Pakistan despite a high prevalence of helicobacter associated diseases in this community. The most popular and effective regimen was therefore chosen among the currently recommended combinations used worldwide to document its efficacy in our symptomatic Helicobacter positive dyspeptic patients. Design: It was a prospective, non-randomized study. Place and duration of Study: The study lasted from January 1998 till June 1999 at the Postgraduate Institute, Government Lady Reading Hospital and Fauji Foundation Hospital, Peshawar. Subjects and Methods: Consecutive dyspeptic patients with peptic ulcer disease as well as non ulcer dyspepsia with a positive H. pylori status on histology from the specimens obtained from the antral region of the stomach, who consented to take part in the study were enrolled. They were given omeprazole 20 mg bd, clarithromycin 500 mg bd. And amoxycillin 1 gm bd for one week. One group comprised patients with confirmed peptic ulcer disease while the second group comprised patients with macroscopic/microscopic antral gastritis. Patients with peptic ulcer disease were given additional course of omerprazol for another 4 weeks to ensure healing of their ulcers. All patients were re scoped after stopping all drugs and their H. pylori status re-assessed on histology. Results: A total of 84 patients consented to enter the study. Fifty-nine were males and twenty-five were females. Fifty-eight patients completed the study while others were lost followup. There were no dropouts due to side effects of the drugs. Sixteen patients had peptic ulcer disease while 68 had macroscopic/microscopic active antral gastric only. The Helicobacter pylori eradication has been successful in only 12 patients giving a cure rate of 20.60% as determined per protocol analysis. The eradication rates were disappointingly low in both groups. Conclusion: The results are extremely

  17. A case of leprosy in Malawi. Making the final push towards eradication: a clinical and public health perspective.

    Roe, Cieron; May, Lucy Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Statistically speaking, Malawi has achieved the World Health Organisation's target for the elimination of leprosy (<1 case per 10 000 people), yet the disease is still considered a leading cause of long term physical disability. In this case study the authors discuss the presentation of a 39-year-old gentleman to a district hospital in Malawi with multibacillary, lepromatous leprosy. The condition was initially managed in the community as an 'allergy' which suggests that local barriers currently hinder the detection of leprosy in this developing primary care system. Leprosy is a multi-system disease and this gentleman demonstrated evidence of lepromatous orchitis. Promoting an awareness of these systemic manifestations will increase the the detection of complications and circumvent long term morbidity. Efforts to optimise systems of detection, management and public and professional education are essential to drive eradication in these at-risk populations. At an international level, we must strive to fulfil the objectives outlined by the 'Enhanced Global Strategy for Further Reducing the Disease Burden due to Leprosy for 2011-2015'. At a national level, local research should delineate community factors that impede the eradication of leprosy. Developing new diagnostic and epidemiologic tools, more efficacious chemoprophylactic regimens and vaccination for endemic regions would facilitate these efforts. PMID:27585828

  18. Influence of Local Leadership in Poverty Eradication among the Orang Asli Communities in the State of Terengganu, Malaysia

    Mohamad Hafis Amat Simin

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Statistics show until now more than 30% of Orang Asli in Malaysia is still living in poverty. The government plans to eradicate the poverty facing many challenges. One of the challenges is related to the local synchronic factors, which include aspects of culture, belief, attitude, values and leadership. A survey was conducted on Kampung Orang Asli Sungai Pergam, Terengganu to identify the importance of the role of local leaders in ensuring the successful implementation of a development project that aims to poverty eradication among the local population. The village is chosen based on its performance in a number of development projects, and has successfully enhance socio-economic status of the population. Objective of the survey is to identify: (i What are the characteristics that are capable of leadership impacts on local poverty alleviation project success. (ii What role should be played by local leaders to make sure every development project undertaken to achieve objective. Survey data were collected by using interviews and observation techniques. Survey findings show personality traits of a leader is an important factor affecting the success of a leader of its own related to the implementation of development projects. In addition to the leadership structure also has a significance practiced in community development. From the point role of leadership, the element of awareness of the responsibility and commitment of the leaders in developing the village is important. Orang Asli leaders in the Kampung Sungai Pergam have initiative and commitment in ensuring their future progress of development for their village.

  19. Guidelines for the use of performance indicators in rinderpest surveillance programmes. A part of the Global Rinderpest Eradication Programme (GREP)

    The IAEA and the Joint FAO/IAEA Division of Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture, through their technical co-operation programme and their co-ordinated research project on rinderpest, are supporting national and regional efforts to complete eradication of rinderpest from Africa under the umbrella of the FAO Global Rinderpest Eradication Programme. This support initially focused on monitoring the success of rinderpest vaccination campaigns through the use of the FAO/IAEA rinderpest enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). It progressively became more concerned with surveillance to detect possible remaining foci of rinderpest following the cessation of vaccination and with assisting countries in achieving official recognition of freedom from rinderpest. The Office International des Epizooties (OIE) has established the criteria and conditions which must be met in order to qualify for this official recognition. They rely on the presence of functioning national rinderpest surveillance systems able to detect, rinderpest if it were present. The present publication introduces performance indicators as a tool for national authorities to monitor the progress made towards establishing effective rinderpest surveillance programmes

  20. Maastricht Ⅱ treatment scheme and efficacy of different proton pump inhibitors in eradicating Helicobacter pylori

    Engin Altintas; Orhan Sezgin; Oguz Ulu; Ozlem Aydin; Handan Camdeviren

    2004-01-01

    AIM: The Maastricht Ⅱ criteria suggest the use of amoxicillin and clarithromycin in addition to a proton pump inhibitor over 7-10 d as a first line therapy in the eradication of Helicobacter pylori(H pylori). For each proton pump inhibitor, various rates of eradication have been reported. The present study was to compare the efficacy of different proton pump inhibitors like omeprazole, lansoprazole and pantoprazole in combination with amoxicillin and clarithromycin in the first line eradication of H pylori and to investigate the success of H pylori eradication in our district.METHODS: A total of 139 patients were included having a Helicobacter pylori(+) gastroduodenal disorders diagnosed by means of histology and urease test. Besides amoxicillin (1 000 mg twice a day) and clarithromycin (500 mg twice a day), they were randomized to take omeprazole (20 mg twice a day), or lansoprazole (30 mg twice a day), or pantoprozole (40 mg twice a day) for 14 d. Four weeks after the therapy, the eradication was assessed by means of histology and urease test. It was evaluated as eradicated if the H pylori was found negative in both. The complaints (pain in epigastrium, nocturnal pain, pyrosis and bloating)were graded in accordance with the Licert scale. The compliance of the patients was recorded.RESULTS: The eradication was found to be 40.8% in the omeprazole group, 43.5% in the lansoprazole group and 47.4% in the pantoprazole group. Sixty-three out of 139patients (45%) had eradication. No statistically significant difference was observed between the groups. Significant improvements were seen in terms of the impact on the symptom scores in each group.CONCLUSION: There was no difference between omeprazole, lansoprazole and pantoprazole in H pylori eradication, and the rate of eradication was as low as 45%.Symptoms were improved independent of the eradication in each treatment group. The iow eradication rates suggest that the antibiotic resistance or the genetic differences of

  1. Book review: Mosquito eradication: The story of killing Campto

    Lapointe, Dennis

    2015-01-01

    In 1826, the paradise that was the Hawaiian Islands was changed forever when the first mosquito species was accidentally introduced to the island of Maui. Though it has not lived up to its potential as a vector of human disease in the islands, Culex quinquefasciatus and the avian pathogens it transmits laid waste to perhaps the world's most remarkable insular avifauna. Today the lowland native forests, once deafening with birdsong, are largely devoid of native birds and Cx. quinquefasciatus has become an inextricable part of our natural areas. In the Hawaiian Islands, the conservation community struggles to keep invasive species out and to control a number of species that have become naturalized. Despite the millions of dollars spent, these efforts never seem enough to slow the erosion of our native biota. The restoration and long-term preservation of Hawaiian forest birds depend on the nearly complete control of mosquito-borne avian disease, an obstacle that to many land managers appears insurmountable. To rally hope in Hawai`i, the conservation community needs to see a success. As a Pacific island, Hawai`i shares similar conservation problems with New Zealand and has often looked to that nation for innovation and inspiration. Mosquito Eradication: The Story of Killing Campto may be our latest inspiration.

  2. The evolving role of interferons in viral eradication strategies.

    Doyle, Tomas

    2016-01-01

    Interferons (IFNs) are a family of pleiotropic cytokines that are released when viral infection is sensed by pattern recognition receptors. They induce an antiviral state in target cells through influencing the expression of hundreds of genes termed IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs), which interfere with the replication of viruses in wide-ranging ways, and they have stimulatory effects on antiviral cell-mediated immunity. Although the role of therapeutic IFNs in the management of infectious diseases has predominantly been restricted to the treatment of chronic hepatotropic viruses, IFNs have effects on the replication of diverse families of viruses in cell culture models, and the potential to harness our endogenous defence system through therapeutic modulation of IFN pathways remains a tantalising prospect for both the broad-spectrum and tailored treatment of viral infections. Additionally, the study of the IFN system has become crucial to our understanding of host/pathogen molecular interactions, which provides plentiful targets for small molecule inhibitors of infection. Although the emergence of directly acting antivirals (DAAs) has resulted in the displacement of pegylated IFNα (pegIFNα) for the treatment of HCV, recent findings have suggested potential roles for IFNs and IFN-related therapies in HIV and HBV eradication strategies, opening up a new avenue of research for this important family of cytokines. PMID:27482449

  3. Spatial pattern formation facilitates eradication of infectious diseases.

    Eisinger, Dirk; Thulke, Hans-Hermann

    2008-04-01

    Control of animal-born diseases is a major challenge faced by applied ecologists and public health managers. To improve cost-effectiveness, the effort required to control such pathogens needs to be predicted as accurately as possible. In this context, we reviewed the anti-rabies vaccination schemes applied around the world during the past 25 years.We contrasted predictions from classic approaches based on theoretical population ecology (which governs rabies control to date) with a newly developed individual-based model. Our spatially explicit approach allowed for the reproduction of pattern formation emerging from a pathogen's spread through its host population.We suggest that a much lower management effort could eliminate the disease than that currently in operation. This is supported by empirical evidence from historic field data. Adapting control measures to the new prediction would save one-third of resources in future control programmes.The reason for the lower prediction is the spatial structure formed by spreading infections in spatially arranged host populations. It is not the result of technical differences between models.Synthesis and applications. For diseases predominantly transmitted by neighbourhood interaction, our findings suggest that the emergence of spatial structures facilitates eradication. This may have substantial implications for the cost-effectiveness of existing disease management schemes, and suggests that when planning management strategies consideration must be given to methods that reflect the spatial nature of the pathogen-host system. PMID:18784795

  4. Willapa - Willapa Bay Early Season Spartina Mapping and Eradication (Phase 1 and 2)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Willapa National Wildlife Refuge (Willapa NWR) continued a successful program aimed at eradicating the non-native cordgrass, Spartina alterniflora (Spartina)...

  5. Eradication of Polynesian Rats (rattus exulans) from Rose Atoll National Wildlife Refuge, American Samoa

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — A 38-day poison and trap campaign was conducted on Rose Atoll National Wildlife Refuge to eradicate Polynesian rats in order to reduce their impact of seabird eggs...

  6. Economic impact of eradicating the New World screw-worm (Cochliomyia hominivorax) from Jamaica

    The purpose of the study is to assess the economic feasibility of eradicating the New World screw-worm (NWS), Cochliomyia hominivorax Coquerel, from Jamaica. The endemic presence of the NWS in Jamaica has caused the livestock sector to incur recurrent economic costs and losses. Eradication of the pest utilising the environmentally-benign sterile insect technique (SIT) has proved technologically feasible on other islands and other parts of the world. Based on these successful experiences, the proposed project to eradicate the NWS from Jamaica is expected to be similarly effective in eliminating the pest from Jamaica in a relatively short period of time. The elimination of the pest from the Caribbean would lessen the significant risk of re-infestation of eradicated areas and pest-free countries in the region

  7. Rabeprazole, clarithromycin, and amoxicillin Helicobacter pylori eradication therapy: Report of an efficacy study

    Onyekwere, Charles Asabamaka; Odiagah, Joan Nwabuaku; Igetei, Rufina; Duro Emanuel, Amancia Olufunmilayo; Ekere, Francis; Smith, Stella

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the efficacy of a standard triple therapy (comprising rabeprazole, clarithromycin, and amoxicillin) for Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) eradication, noting factors that influence the outcome and documenting any adverse events.

  8. Standard triple, bismuth pectin quadruple and sequential therapies for Helicobacter pylori eradication

    Gao, Xiao-Zhong; Qiao, Xiu-li; Song, Wen-chong; Wang, Xiao-Feng; Liu, Feng

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To compare the effectiveness of standard triple, bismuth pectin quadruple and sequential therapies for Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) eradication in a randomized, double-blinded, comparative clinical trial in China.

  9. Eradication of Helicobacter pylori increases childhood growth and serum acylated ghrelin levels

    Yang, Yao-Jong; Sheu, Bor-Shyang; Yang, Hsiao-Bai; Lu, Cheng-Chan; Chuang, Ching-Chun

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To determine whether Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori)-infected children have reduced body weight (BW) and height (BH) growth, and if H. pylori eradication may restore growth while improving serum acylated ghrelin.

  10. Introduced arctic fox eradication at Rat Island, Aleutian Islands, Alaska, summer 1984

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Mechanical means similar to those employed on Amata Island during the summer of 1983 were used to attempt eradication of fox on Rat Island. These labor intensive...

  11. On the Long-term Health Care Crisis. A Possible Eradication Scenario

    Isea, Raul; Bai, Er W.; Lonngren, Karl E.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the present essay is to suggest a possible model to describe the worldwide healthcare crisis, where diseases that have been considered to be eradicated or under our control are re-emerging today.

  12. Falling prevalence of beta-thalassaemia and eradication of malaria in the Maldives

    Firdous, Naila; Gibbons, Stephen; Modell, Bernadette

    2011-01-01

    Carriers of haemoglobin disorders have protection against falciparum malaria. Therefore, where this is common, carrier prevalence rises until this selective advantage is offset by deaths of affected children. Theory predicts a corresponding fall in carrier frequency following malaria eradication, but this has not been reported in practice. In the Maldives, malaria eradication (in 1972–1975) unmasked highly prevalent beta-thalassaemia and led to services for patient care and outreach carrier s...

  13. Global Eradication of Lymphatic Filariasis: The Value of Chronic Disease Control in Parasite Elimination Programmes

    Michael, Edwin; Malecela, Mwele; Zervos, Mihail; Kazura, James

    2008-01-01

    The ultimate goal of the global programme against lymphatic filariasis is eradication through irrevocable cessation of transmission using 4 to 6 years of annual single dose mass drug administration. The costs of eradication, managerial impediments to executing national control programmes, and scientific uncertainty about transmission endpoints, are challenges to the success of this effort, especially in areas of high endemicity where financial resources are limited. We used a combined analysi...

  14. Eradicating female genital mutilation and cutting in Tanzania: an observational study

    Galukande, Moses; Kamara, Joseph; Ndabwire, Violet; Leistey, Elisabeth; Valla, Cecilia; Luboga, Sam

    2015-01-01

    Background Female genital mutilation and cutting (FGM/C) has long been practiced in various parts of the world. The practice is still prevalent in 29 countries on the African continent despite decades of campaigning to eradicate it. The approaches for eradication have been multi-pronged, including but not limited to, health risk campaigns teaching about the health consequences for the girls and the women, recruitment of change agents from within the communities and the enforcement of legal me...

  15. Comparison of the efficacy of proton pump inhibitors used in the eradication of Helicobacter pylori

    ÇETİNKAYA, Züleyha AKKAN; SEZİKLİ, Mesut; Güzelbulut, Fatih; YEŞİL, Atakan; Coşgun, Süleyman; ALTINÖZ, Mustafa Erhan; Atamer, Aytaç; ULU, Nuriye; KURDAŞ, Ayşe Oya ÖVÜNÇ

    2011-01-01

    Background and Aims: Although different therapy regimens are used for the eradication of Helicobacter pylori, an ideal therapy regimen has not yet been determined. The most commonly used and most effective therapy regimens consist of a proton pump inhibitor or bismuth plus 2 antibiotics for 7-14 days. We aimed to compare the efficacies of different PPIs in combination with the same antibiotics on the eradication of Helicobacter pylori. Materials and Methods: This study included 90 patients wi...

  16. Comparison of Azithromycin and Clarithromycin Triple Therapy Regimens for Helicobacter Pylori Eradication in Hemodialysis Patients

    Jalalzadeh, Mojgan; Nazarian, Morteza; Vafaeimanesh, Jamshid; Mirzamohammadi, Fatemeh

    2012-01-01

    Background Helicobacter pylori eradication with clarithromycin is more expensive than with azithromycin. Objectives This study aimed to compare the effectiveness of these two antibiotics in eradicating H. pylori in hemodialysis (HD) patients. Patients and Methods This is a prospective, randomized, double-blinded clinical trial analysis of HD patients. Patients who had dyspepsia and showed positive results for two of three tests, anti-H. pylori serology, H. pylori stool antigen (HpSAg), or Ure...

  17. The Results of Helicobacter Pylori Eradication on Repeated Bleeding in Patients with Stomach Ulcer

    Horvat, Darko; Včev, Aleksandar; Soldo˛, Ivan; Timarac, Jasna; Dmitrović, Branko; Mišević, Tonči; Ivezić, Zdravko; Kraljika, Nikola

    2005-01-01

    The triple therapy of Helicobacter pylori eradication prevents repeated bleeding from stomach ulcer. The aim of this one-way blind prospective study was to evaluate the efficiency of the two-week triple therapy for Helicobacter pylori eradication in preventing renewed bleeding in patients with stomach ulcer within one year. This research included 60 hospitalized patients with bleeding stomach ulcer and positive Helicobacter pylori infection, 34 men and 26 women (average age 59.7 years). The p...

  18. Where the Road Ends, Yaws Begins? The Cost-effectiveness of Eradication versus More Roads

    Asiedu, Kingsley; Fitzpatrick, Christopher; Jannin, Jean

    2014-01-01

    Background Yaws, one of the 17 neglected tropical diseases (NTDs), is targeted for eradication by 2020 in resolution WHA66.12 of the World Health Assembly (2013) and the WHO roadmap on NTDs (2012). The disease frequently affects children who live in poor socioeconomic conditions. Between 1952 and 1964, WHO and the United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF) led a global eradication campaign using injectable benzathine penicillin. Recent developments using a single dose of oral azithromycin have r...

  19. Where the road ends, yaws begins? The cost-effectiveness of eradication versus more roads.

    Christopher Fitzpatrick

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available A disabling and disfiguring disease that "begins where the road ends", yaws is targeted by WHO for eradication by the year 2020. The global campaign is not yet financed. To evaluate yaws eradication within the context of the post-2015 development agenda, we perform a somewhat allegorical cost-effectiveness analysis of eradication, comparing it to a counterfactual in which we simply wait for more roads (the end of poverty.We use evidence from four yaws eradication pilot sites and other mass treatment campaigns to set benchmarks for the cost of eradication in 12 known endemic countries. We construct a compartmental model of long-term health effects to 2050. Conservatively, we attribute zero cost to the counterfactual and allow for gradual exit of the susceptible (at risk population by road (poverty reduction. We report mean, 5th and 95th centile estimates to reflect uncertainty about costs and effects.Our benchmark for the economic cost of yaws eradication is uncertain but not high -US$ 362 (75-1073 million in 12 countries. Eradication would cost US$ 26 (4.2-78 for each year of life lived without disability or disfigurement due to yaws, or US$ 324 (47-936 per disability-adjusted life year (DALY. Excluding drugs, existing staff and assets, the financial cost benchmark is US$ 213 (74-522 million. The real cost of waiting for more roads (poverty reduction would be 13 (7.3-20 million years of life affected by early-stage yaws and 2.3 (1.1-4.2 million years of life affected by late-stage yaws.Endemic countries need financing to begin implementing and adapting global strategy to local conditions. Donations of drugs and diagnostics could reduce cost to the public sector and catalyze financing. Resources may be harnessed from the extractive industries. Yaws eradication should be seen as complementary to universal health coverage and shared prosperity on the post-2015 development agenda.

  20. THE REFORM OF CORRUPTION ERADICATION IN INDONESIA: THE PRISMATIC LAW IN THE RECENT CONTEXT

    Muhammad Fatahillah Akbar; Dian Agung Wicaksono

    2013-01-01

    This paper aims to investigate the reform of corruption eradication in Indonesia from three crucial aspects: the form of the Corruption Eradication Commission (KPK), the formulation of corruption in material and formal aspects, and other additional support system such as asset recovery and the protection of justice collaborator and whistle blower. This paper is a normative-legal research where it dissects secondary data which includes statutory regulations, various legal documents, researches...

  1. Effect of Helicobacter pylori eradication on the natural history of duodenal ulcer disease

    Goggin, N; Rowland, M; Imrie, C; Walsh, D.; Clyne, M.; Drumm, B

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Duodenal ulcer disease is strongly associated with Helicobacter pylori infection of the gastric mucosa. Eradication of H pylori from the gastric mucosa in adults is associated with long term healing of ulcers.
AIMS—To follow a cohort of children with duodenal ulcer disease for a minimum of two years after the eradication of H pylori.
PATIENTS AND METHODS—Over a three year period, all children diagnosed with duodenal ulcer disease had their symptoms documented a...

  2. Effect of Helicobacter Pylori Eradication on Extent of Duodenal Gastric Metaplasia and Grade of Gastritis

    Bago, J; Strinić, D.; Belošić Halle, Ž.; Jandrić, D.; Tomić, M.; Bilić, A.; Bago, P.

    2002-01-01

    The extent of the regression of duodenal gastric metaplasia (DGM) after the eradication of Helicobacter pylori infection is controversial. Therefore, we decided to assess the degree of DGM before, sex weeks and one year after H. pylori eradication. 105 consecutive Helicobacter pylori positive patients with endoscopically proven duodenal ulcer, with DGM and Helicobacter pylori infection were recruited for this study. The diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection was based on CL...

  3. The Efect of Helicobacter Pylori Eradication on Atrophic Gastritis and Intestinal metaplasia

    Guldem Kilciler

    2011-01-01

     Aim: The aim of this prospective study was to evaluate whether helicobacter pylori eradication could improve gastric atropy or intestinal metaplasia. Material and Method: Forty-two pylori infected patients were evaluated for the status of atrophic gastritis and intestinal metaplasia. Two biopsy specimens from antrum and two biopsy specimens from corpus were taken before and 6 months after the helicobacter pylori eradication therapy. Helicobacter pylori status was determined by C-urea br...

  4. Eradication of Helicobacter pylori Is Associated with the Progression of Dementia: A Population-Based Study

    Yang-Pei Chang; Guei-Fen Chiu; Fu-Chen Kuo; Chiou-Lian Lai; Yuan-Han Yang; Huang-Ming Hu; Pi-Yu Chang; Chiao-Yun Chen; Deng-Chyang Wu; Fang-Jung Yu

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the effect of eradication of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) on the progression of dementia in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) patients with peptic ulcer. Methods. Participants with the diagnosis of AD and peptic ulcer were recruited between 2001 and 2008. We examined the association between eradication of H. pylori and the progression of AD using the multiple regression models. Medication shift from Donepezil, Rivastgmine, and Galantamine to Mematine is defined as progres...

  5. Evidence-based assessment of proton-pump inhibitors in Helicobacter pylori eradication: A systematic review

    Nagaraja, Vinayak; Eslick, Guy D.

    2014-01-01

    Peptic ulcer disease continues to be issue especially due to its high prevalence in the developing world. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection associated duodenal ulcers should undergo eradication therapy. There are many regimens offered for H. pylori eradication which include triple, quadruple, or sequential therapy regimens. The central aim of this systematic review is to evaluate the evidence for H. pylori therapy from a meta-analytical outlook. The consequence of the dose, type of pr...

  6. Foot and mouth disease economic impact assessment on production, export losses and eradication expenditure

    Forbes, Rod; Halderen, Andre van

    2014-01-01

    The second paper in this three paper session models the impact of a number of foot and mouth disease (FMD) incursion scenarios on production and export revenues of dairy, meat and other products. The guiding principle was big picture, plausible and estimable Key to this was how processors might respond during FMD eradication and how importing countries might respond once New Zealand becomes FMD free again. Government expenditure for FMD eradication and related livestock compensation was estim...

  7. Dual therapy for third-line Helicobacter pylori eradication and urea breath test prediction

    Toshihiro Nishizawa; Hidekazu Suzuki; Takama Maekawa; Naohiko Harada; Tatsuya Toyokawa; Toshio Kuwai; Masanori Ohara

    2012-01-01

    We evaluated the efficacy and tolerability of a dual therapy with rabeprazole and amoxicillin (AMX) as an empiric third-line rescue therapy.In patients with failure of first-line treatment with a proton pump inhibitor (PPI)-AMX-clarithromycin regimen and second-line treatment with the PPI-AMX-metronidazole regimen,a third-line eradication regimen with mbeprazole (10 mg q.i.d.) and AMX (500 mg q.i.d.) was prescribed for 2 wk.Eradication was confirmed by the results of the 13C-urea breath test (UBT) at 12 wk after the therapy.A total of 46 patients were included; however,two were lost to followup.The eradication rates as determined by per-protocol and intention-to-treat analyses were 65.9% and 63.0%,respectively.The pretreatment UBT results in the subjects showing eradication failure; those patients showing successful eradication comprised 32.9 ± 28.8 permil and 14.8 ± 12.8 permil,respectively.The pretreatment UBT results in the subjects with eradication failure were significantly higher than those in the patients with successful eradication (P =0.019).A low pretreatment UBT result (≤ 28.5 permil) predicted the success of the eradication therapy with a positive predictive value of 81.3% and a sensitivity of 89.7%.Adverse effects were reported in 18.2% of the patients,mainly diarrhea and stomatitis.Dual therapy with rabeprazole and AMX appears to serve as a potential empirical third-line strategy for patients with low values on pretreatment UBT.

  8. How Can the Current Strategies for Helicobacter pylori Eradication Therapy be Improved?

    Ford, Alex; Moayyedi, Paul

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The use of Helicobacter pylori eradication therapy is advocated in an increasing variety of situations. It is therefore important to optimise current strategies to eradicate H pylori infectionOBJECTIVES: To define the optimum dosage, drugs and duration of proton pump inhibitor (PPI) triple therapy.METHODS: A review of the literature was performed to identify randomized controlled trials and systematic reviews addressing these issues.RESULTS: In PPI, amoxicillin and clarithromycin ...

  9. Successful Eradication of Hepatitis C Virus by Interferon-Free Regimens in Two Patients with Advanced Liver Fibrosis following Kidney Transplantation

    Sasaki, Reina; Kanda, Tatsuo; Yasui, Shin; Haga, Yuki; Nakamura, Masato; Yamato, Mutsumi; Wu, Shuang; Nakamoto, Shingo; Arai, Makoto; Mikami, Shigeru; Miyauchi, Hideaki; Matsubara, Hisahiro; Yokosuka, Osamu

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection leads to acute and chronic hepatitis, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Following kidney transplantation, HCV increases the risk of graft loss and patient mortality compared with uninfected patients. The achievement of a sustained virological response with antiviral therapy improves survival and diminishes the risk of hepatic decompensation in HCV patients after a kidney transplant. It has been reported that direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) are relatively safe and highly effective for the eradication of HCV in patients who are liver transplant recipients. In the present study, we investigated HCV eradication via interferon-free therapies with DAAs in two HCV patients with advanced liver fibrosis following renal transplantation. In both cases, the interferon-free regimens with DAAs were effective in eradicating HCV in the patients after kidney transplantation. No adverse events caused by interferon were identified with the exception of anemia. Interferon-free regimens with DAAs for recurrent HCV in patients following kidney transplantation are relatively safe and effective. However, attention should be focused on anemia during these treatments. PMID:27462193

  10. Driven to extinction? The ethics of eradicating mosquitoes with gene-drive technologies.

    Pugh, Jonathan

    2016-09-01

    Mosquito-borne diseases represent a significant global disease burden, and recent outbreaks of such diseases have led to calls to reduce mosquito populations. Furthermore, advances in 'gene-drive' technology have raised the prospect of eradicating certain species of mosquito via genetic modification. This technology has attracted a great deal of media attention, and the idea of using gene-drive technology to eradicate mosquitoes has been met with criticism in the public domain. In this paper, I shall dispel two moral objections that have been raised in the public domain against the use of gene-drive technologies to eradicate mosquitoes. The first objection invokes the concept of the 'sanctity of life' in order to claim that we should not drive an animal to extinction. In response, I follow Peter Singer in raising doubts about general appeals to the sanctity of life, and argue that neither individual mosquitoes nor mosquitoes species considered holistically are appropriately described as bearing a significant degree of moral status. The second objection claims that seeking to eradicate mosquitoes amounts to displaying unacceptable degrees of hubris. Although I argue that this objection also fails, I conclude by claiming that it raises the important point that we need to acquire more empirical data about, inter alia, the likely effects of mosquito eradication on the ecosystem, and the likelihood of gene-drive technology successfully eradicating the intended mosquito species, in order to adequately inform our moral analysis of gene-drive technologies in this context. PMID:27118691

  11. The results of Helicobacter pylori eradication on repeated bleeding in patients with stomach ulcer.

    Horvat, Darko; Vcev, Aleksandar; Soldo, Ivan; Timarac, Jasna; Dmitrović, Branko; Misević, Tonci; Ivezić, Zdravko; Kraljik, Nikola

    2005-06-01

    The triple therapy of Helicobacter pylori eradication prevents repeated bleeding from stomach ulcer. The aim of this one-way blind prospective study was to evaluate the efficiency of the two-week triple therapy for Helicobacter pylori eradication in preventing renewed bleeding in patients with stomach ulcer within one year. This research included 60 hospitalized patients with bleeding stomach ulcer and positive Helicobacter pylori infection, 34 men and 26 women (average age 59.7 years). The patients were given therapeutic scheme of omeprazol--amoxicilin--metrodinazol (OAM) eradication for 14 days. Eradication of H. pylori infection was defined as lack of proof of the infection one month or several months after therapy suspension. By applying triple OAM therapy within two weeks the eradication was successful in 72%. In the group of 17 H. pylori positive patients there were 8 patients (47.6%) with repeated stomach ulcer and 3 patients (18%) with bleeding. Within the group of 43 H. pylori negative patients there were only 2 patients (4.65%) with repeated stomach ulcer and 1 patient (2%) with bleeding, during the observed period of 12 months. This research confirms the hypothesis about the necessity of eradication of Helicobacter pylori infection in patients with bleeding stomach ulcer as prevention of repeated bleeding. PMID:16117312

  12. Saliva Secretion and Efficacy of Helicobacter Pylori Eradication in Peptic Ulcer Patients

    Sh. Abdollahzadeh

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: It has been noted that the presence of Helicobacter pylori (H. pyloriin the oral cavity may affect the outcome of eradication therapy. This condition is associated with the recurrence of gastric infection. The optimum secretion of salivapromotes oral health consequently influencing H. pylori eradication. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relation between salivary secretion and the efficacy of H. pylori eradication from the stomach.Materials and Methods: Forty five patients with gastric H. pylori infection were enrolled in this study. Diagnosis of H. pylori infection was confirmed by endoscopy,biopsy, urease test and histological examination. Salivary secretion of all participants was determined under standard condition before the beginning of antibacterial treatment. Then the patients were treated with a 14-day course anti-H. pylori regimen consisting of amoxicillin, omeprazole, metronidazole and bismuth. The efficacy of eradication therapy was evaluated 4 weeks after the end of the treatment course. Mann-Whitney U test was used to analyze the variables.Results: The median of salivary secretion among successful and unsuccessful H. pylori eradication groups was 0.48 ml/min and 0.24 ml/min, respectively (p=0.005.Conclusion: Although the type of drug regimens is challenging, the efficacy of H. pylori eradication from the stomach might be reduced by lower salivary secretion.

  13. Fostering Micro-Entrepreneurship as Panacea to Poverty Eradication in the Malaysian Economy: A Conceptual Perception

    Muhammad Abi Sofian Abdul Halim

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Entrepreneurs not only create benefits through the expansion and the development of economic and business industry, it also creates challenges for emerging micro-entrepreneurs to effectively compete in an environment characterised by multitude of challenges. The question is whether the development of micro-entrepreneurship industry is a progressive approach that can motivate the small and medium entrepreneurs to eradicate poverty. This paper is a deliberate attempt to revisit the essential concept and practice of micro-entrepreneurship in small and medium industry as well as its role in eradicating poverty in Malaysian. The Malaysian government has launched the New Economic Policy to eradicate hardcore poverty, restructuring employment and developing the rural area of Malaysia. It has been determined that the development of micro-entrepreneurship significantly contributed to small and medium industry and poverty eradication. Furthermore, the success of poverty eradication has significantly created awareness among micro-entrepreneurs in small and medium industry. In this paper, a comprehensive model of micro-entrepreneurship strategy in small and medium industry in eradicating poverty has been constructed with the aim of assisting the Malaysia government in developing their socio-economic policies.

  14. The French national programme of bovine hypodermosis eradication

    The National Federation of Sanitary Defence Organisations (FNGDS) is a professional organisation which brings together more than 95% cattle breeders within its departmental structures (GDS). Working closely with breeders within their local structures, the GDS maintains a high level of efficiency in communicating and informing farmers about sanitary programmes as well as rally them to participate in these programmes. FNGDS has built a solid cooperation with the veterinary administration and private veterinarians in the fight against the most serious animal diseases. In the 1980s, new sanitary guidelines regarding export emphasised the necessity of fighting against the warble fly. As parasitic hypodermosis causes a major decrease in zootechnic performances, as well as is an important immuno depression, the GDS from different regions began the fight against it. Taking into account the fly biology, it was deemed necessary to establish a concerted fight in order to avoid recontamination in their regions as well as improve sanitary conditions. In 1989, FNGDS proposed and implemented a national scheme for the eradication of hypodermis in collaboration with other professional and industrial organisations, scientists, veterinarians and the Ministry of Agriculture. In 1994, a law against the warble fly was enacted. This law required every region to fight against the fly beginning 1 July 1998. Before this deadline, all regions were encouraged to begin regional plans on a voluntary basis, which, nevertheless, had to be approved by a national committee. Under the national scheme which was based on parasitic biology, each region had to build its own programme. It had to be in charge of the details of operation, e.g., regarding topography and the presence of Hypoderma lineatum. Cooperation between animal health partners was greatly encouraged

  15. BIOCIDE TREATMENT OF PONDS IN SCOTLAND TO ERADICATE SIGNAL CRAYFISH

    PEAY S.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This trial aimed to eradicate illegally introduced signal crayfish Pacifastacus leniusculus in the North Esk catchment, Scotland. Sites treated were (1 an isolated gravel-pit (c. 9,000 m3, with crayfish present for 6 years; (2 three dammed ponds, (c. 5,000 m3 and (3 a leaking, offline pond (c. 6,000 m3, with crayfish for two years. Preliminary toxicity tests with substrate present indicated doses. Treatment at sites (1 and (2 (in October 2004, water temperature 13°C comprised deoxygenation with sodium sulphite to stimulate emergence, then application of natural pyrethrum (Pyblast. Exposed margins were sprayed with Pyblast to prevent escapes. Crayfish mortality was high, but one survivor was seen after 5 days. Pyblast was applied from a tank with Na2SO3 residue, which subsequent investigation indicated reduced Pyblast below the target 0.1 mg l-1. Site (1 was re-treated (end October, target 0.15 mg l-1 Pyblast, no Na2SO3, 9°C. Mortality was confirmed using caged crayfish. Prior to treatment at site (2, throughflow was stopped and fish removed. Biomonitoring was carried out with freshwater shrimps Gammarus in the adjacent watercourse. Treatment of site (3 (December, target 0.2 mg l-1, 4°C necessitated continuous back-pumping of leakage for a 2-week recovery period to avoid contamination of the river downstream. Caged crayfish took up to 5 days for 100% mortality. No crayfish were found in a summer survey after the treatments with Pyblast alone, but were caught in the ponds with Na2SO3 pre-treatment. Monitoring is required for 2-5 years.

  16. Helicobacter Pylori eradication therapy: getting research into practice.

    McDonnell, R

    2003-01-01

    Helicobacter Pylori (H. Pylori) is the primary cause of duodenal ulcer (DU). Guidelines recommend that all patients with DU be considered for Helicobacter Pylori Eradication Therapy (HPET). However, the proportion of patients with DU on long term anti-ulcer medication receiving HPET is small. This study examined the effectiveness of the continuing medical education (CME) network of the Irish College of General Practitioners (ICGP) in promoting best practice in DU treatment among GPs in an eastern region of Ireland. Ninty eight GPs recruited from the CME network of the ICGP were randomised in two cohorts. Cohort 1 received an (early) intervention; GPs were asked to identify their patients with DU receiving long term anti-ulcer medication and prescribe HPET according to defined criteria. Cohort 2 received the intervention later. Prescribing of HPET was monitored using routine prescribing data. Twenty per cent (286\\/1,422) of patients in cohort 1 and 19.2% (127\\/661) in cohort 2 had a DU. After exclusions, 53% (152\\/286) in cohort 1 and 30.7% (39\\/127) in cohort 2, were eligible for HPET. A significantly higher proportion of patients in cohort 1 received HPET compared with cohort 2 during the early intervention period (13.8% vs 0.0%, p<0.05). Reasons for not prescribing HPET included concurrent illness in patients, failure to comply with treatment. Best practice guidelines on HPET treatment of DU can be successfully applied using CME networks. This model could be repeated in another therapeutic area where established research is not yet current practice.

  17. What Is Needed to Eradicate Lymphatic Filariasis? A Model-Based Assessment on the Impact of Scaling Up Mass Drug Administration Programs.

    Randee J Kastner

    Full Text Available Lymphatic filariasis (LF is a neglected tropical disease for which more than a billion people in 73 countries are thought to be at-risk. At a global level, the efforts against LF are designed as an elimination program. However, current efforts appear to aim for elimination in some but not all endemic areas. With the 2020 goal of elimination looming, we set out to develop plausible scale-up scenarios to reach global elimination and eradication. We predict the duration of mass drug administration (MDA necessary to reach local elimination for a variety of transmission archetypes using an existing model of LF transmission, estimate the number of treatments required for each scenario, and consider implications of rapid scale-up.We have defined four scenarios that differ in their geographic coverage and rate of scale-up. For each scenario, country-specific simulations and calculations were performed that took into account the pre-intervention transmission intensity, the different vector genera, drug regimen, achieved level of population coverage, previous progress toward elimination, and potential programmatic delays due to mapping, operations, and administration.Our results indicate that eliminating LF by 2020 is unlikely. If MDA programs are drastically scaled up and expanded, the final round of MDA for LF eradication could be delivered in 2028 after 4,159 million treatments. However, if the current rate of scale-up is maintained, the final round of MDA to eradicate LF may not occur until 2050.Rapid scale-up of MDA will decrease the amount of time and treatments required to reach LF eradication. It may also propel the program towards success, as the risk of failure is likely to increase with extended program duration.

  18. Effect of Helicobacter pylori eradication therapy in rosacea patients Efecto del tratamiento erradicador frente a Helicobacter pylori en la rosácea

    D. Boixeda de Miquel

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: the causal relation between rosacea and Helicobacter pylori infection is discussed. We evaluated the clinical evolution of rosacea after infection eradication. Patients and methods: we have prospectively studied 44 patients diagnosed with rosacea. Helicobacter pylori infection was determined, and infected patients were treated with eradication therapy. The evolution of dermatological symptoms in a subgroup of 29 infected patients in whom eradication had been achieved was followed during 16.8 (± 17.8 months. Median age was 50.6 (± 14.1 years for 22 women (75.9% and 7 men (24.1%. Clinical response according to gender and clinical subtype of rosacea was evaluated. Results: complete improvement was observed in 10 patients (34.5%; 95% CI: 18.6-54.3%, relevant improvement in 9 (31.1%; 95% CI: 16-51%, poor improvement in 5 (17.2%; 95% CI: 6.5-36.4%, and absence of improvement in 5 cases (17.2%; 95% CI: 6.5-36.4%. No significant differences in dermatological evolution according to sex were observed. Regarding subtype of rosacea there was a relevant improvement in 83.3% (95% CI: 64.1-93.8% of cases with papulopustular type as opposed to 36.5% (95% CI: 20-56.1% of cases with erythematous predominance, p = 0.02. Conclusions: based on these results, the relation between Helicobacter pylori and rosacea is supported, and infection should be investigated in these patients because an appreciable percentage of patients diagnosed with rosacea and Helicobacter pylori infection can benefit from eradication therapy, mainly in the papulopustular subtype.

  19. A Comparison between Hybrid Therapy and Standard Triple Therapy for Helicobacter pylori Eradication in Patients with Uremia: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Makhlough, Atieh; Fakheri, Hafez; Hojati, Samaneh; Hosseini, Vahid; Bari, Zohreh

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND The prevalence of peptic ulcer disease in hemodialysis patients is more than the general population. They are also more prone to complications including upper gastrointestinal bleeding. The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of 14 days hybrid regimen with 14 days triple therapy for Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori ) eradication in hemodialysis patients. METHODS Forty hemodialysis patients with naïve H.pylori infection were randomized to receive either hybrid regimen (pantoprazole 40 mg + amoxicillin 500 mg, both twice a day during the first 7 days, followed by pantoprazole 40 mg + amoxicillin 500 mg + clarithromycin 500 mg + tinidazole 500 mg, all twice a day, for the second 7 days, or standard triple therapy including pantoprazole 40 mg, clarithromycin 500 mg, and amoxicillin 500 mg, all twice a day for 14 days. H.pylori eradication was assessed by fecal H.pylori antigen test 8 weeks after the treatment. RESULTS All the patients completed the study. According to both intention to treat and per-protocol analyses, H.pylori eradication rates were 100% (95% confidence interval (CI): 100) in those who received hybrid therapy and 70% (95% CI: 69.4 - 70.8) in those who were treated by standard triple therapy (p=0.02). Severe adverse effects were not reported by any patient; however, mild adverse effects were more frequent in those who received standard triple therapy (p<0.05). CONCLUSION Hybrid regimen could achieve ideal H.pylori eradication rates with low rates of adverse effects. PMID:26933480

  20. Screw-worm eradication in the Americas - Overview

    Screw-worms (Cochliomyia hominivorax, Coquerel) are found only in the Americas, and are known, therefore, as the New World Screw-worm (NWS). The larval stages of the fly feed on the living flesh of their host. A screw-worm infestation can kill an adult animal in 7-10 days if not treated. All warm-blooded animals are affected including man. Although screw-worms had long been recognised as a severe pest of animals in the southwestern United States, they had never been detected east of the Mississippi River before 1933. In July 1933, screw-worms were transported on infested cattle to Georgia and became established east of the Mississippi River. Screw-worms spread quickly in the southeastern United States and were able to overwinter in southern Florida. Being new to the region, they were quickly recognised as a severe pest with a tremendous economic impact on livestock production. The livestock owners in the southeastern United States immediately noticed an increase in the number of animal deaths and increased costs of insecticides, veterinary medicines, veterinary services, inspection and handling. At the same time, they observed a decrease in animal weights and in milk production. Due to these observations, the livestock industry in the southeastern United States requested help in controlling screw-worms. Because of these requests, the research community became interested in control and eradication measures for this pest. Early work by Crushing and Patton in 1933 recognised that C. hominivorax was an obligatory animal parasite and different from the secondary blowfly, Cochliomyia macellaria. In 1934, the US Department of Agriculture (USDA), Agricultural Research Service (ARS) opened a research station in Valdosa, Georgia, and E.W. Laake and E.F. Knipling were assigned to work there. In September 1935, R.C. Bushland was hired by ARS to do research related to screw-worms at an ARS Research Laboratory in Dallas, Texas. Melvin and Bushland in 1936 developed artificial

  1. 2009-2013年脊髓灰质炎疫情分析%Analysis of the world polio cases from 2009 to 2013

    韩辉; 谭克为; 宋亚京; 徐宝梁; 左锋

    2015-01-01

    目的:探讨目前脊髓灰质炎在世界范围内的影响及我国口岸防控脊髓灰质炎疫情的措施。方法收集整理世界卫生组织(WHO)网站内的脊髓灰质炎的相关信息,并对2009-2013年之间脊髓灰质炎疫情进行流行病学统计与分析。结果根据 WHO 所统计的脊髓灰质炎的发病数据,该病的发病情况在近几年得到了有效的控制,但是目前还在尼日利亚、巴基斯坦、阿富汗、索马里和乍得等国持续流行。结论由于我国与持续流行脊灰的国家接壤,并且海外劳务输出和进口贸易的规模逐年增大,导致脊髓灰质炎病毒传入我国的风险较高,加强相关的检疫和监测工作至关重要。%Objective This article observes the world epidemic situation from 2009 to 2013 of poliomyelitis,and explores the present influence of it and the relevant prevention and control measures at frontier ports.Methods This article collects the data and the related situation of the outbreak of poliomyelitis from WHO website,and then carries out the epidemiological statistics and analysis.Results According to the data from WHO,although the on-set of poliomyelitis has been effectively controlled in recent years,there has been sustained prevalence in Nigeria, Pakistan,Afghanistan,Somalia and Chad.Conclusion Because of the contiguity between China and some coun-tries which have sustained prevalence of poliomyelitis and the increasing scale of overseas labor service export and import trade,the risk of the import of polio virus is comparatively high.In order to maintain the “polio -free sta-tus”,the prevention and monitoring of the polio virus still needs to be strengthen at frontier ports.

  2. Achieving Universal Primary Education by 2015 : A Chance for Every Child

    Bruns, Barbara; Mingat, Alain; Rakotomalala, Ramahatra

    2003-01-01

    A number of countries committed themselves to the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), aimed at eradicating extreme poverty, and improving the welfare of people by the year 2015. The book assesses whether universal primary education can be achieved by 2015. The study focuses on the largest low-income countries that are furthest from the goal, home to about seventy five percent of the children ...

  3. Novel Vaccine Approach Achieves “Functional Cure” of AIDS Virus in Monkeys | Poster

    By Frank Blanchard, Staff Writer, and Jeff Lifson, Guest Writer Scientists at the Oregon Health & Science University and the AIDS and Cancer Virus Program of the Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research have used a novel vaccine approach to achieve a “functional cure” and apparent eradication of infection with a monkey version of the AIDS virus.

  4. Does Helicobacter pylori Eradication Reduce the Risk of Open Angle Glaucoma in Patients With Peptic Ulcer Disease?

    Chen, Hsin-Yi; Lin, Cheng-Li; Chen, Wen-Chi; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2015-09-01

    To investigate whether Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) eradication would influence the risk of primary open angle glaucoma (POAG) in patients with peptic ulcer disease. From the Longitudinal Health Insurance Database 2000, 6061 patients with peptic ulcer and receiving H pylori eradication therapy were recruited. The study cohort was subdivided into early (within 1 year) and late (after 1 year) eradication cohorts. The 24,244 control cohort subjects were those who without peptic ulcer and without receiving H pylori eradication therapy and were frequency-matched with the H pylori eradication cohort by age, sex, and the year of receiving H pylori eradication therapy. The higher incidence of POAG was observed in late H pylori eradication cohort and in early H pylori eradication cohort than in control cohort (1.57, 1.32, and 0.95, per 1000 person-year, respectively). However, overall risk of glaucoma was not significantly higher in the late eradication than in the early eradication (adjusted hazard ratio = 0.85, 95% confidence interval = 0.48-1.53). The POAG incidence was greater in the late H pylori eradication cohort when follow-up duration ≤ 5 years (1.59, per 1000 person-years). However, when follow-up duration >5 years, the incidence of POAG was greater in the early H pylori eradication cohort (1.68, per 1000 person-years). These relationships were not associated with a significantly increased or decreased risk of POAG in multivariable analyses. Either early or late H pylori eradication does not significantly reduce the risk of glaucoma in patients with peptic ulcer disease compared with normal control. PMID:26426633

  5. Helicobacter pylori Eradication Causes Perturbation of the Human Gut Microbiome in Young Adults.

    Theresa Wan-Chen Yap

    Full Text Available Accumulating evidence shows that Helicobacter pylori protects against some metabolic and immunological diseases in which the development of these diseases coincide with temporal or permanent dysbiosis. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of H. pylori eradication on the human gut microbiome.As part of the currently on-going ESSAY (Eradication Study in Stable Adults/Youths study, we collected stool samples from 17 H. pylori-positive young adult (18-30 years-old volunteers. The same cohort was followed up 6, 12 and 18 months-post H. pylori eradication. The impact of H. pylori on the human gut microbiome pre- and post-eradication was investigated using high throughput 16S rRNA gene (V3-V4 region sequencing using the Illumina Miseq followed by data analysis using Qiime pipeline.We compared the composition and diversity of bacterial communities in the fecal microbiome of the H. pylori-positive volunteers, before and after H. pylori eradication therapy. The 16S rRNA gene was sequenced at an average of 150,000-170,000 reads/sample. The microbial diversity were similar pre- and post-H. pylori eradication with no significant differences in richness and evenness of bacterial species. Despite that the general profile of the gut microbiome was similar pre- and post-eradication, some changes in the bacterial communities at the phylum and genus levels were notable, particularly the decrease in relative abundance of Bacterioidetes and corresponding increase in Firmicutes after H. pylori eradication. The significant increase of short-chain fatty acids (SCFA-producing bacteria genera could also be associated with increased risk of metabolic disorders.Our preliminary stool metagenomics study shows that eradication of H. pylori caused perturbation of the gut microbiome and may indirectly affect the health of human. Clinicians should be aware of the effect of broad spectrum antibiotics used in H. pylori eradication regimen and be cautious in the clinical

  6. Helicobacter pylori Eradication Causes Perturbation of the Human Gut Microbiome in Young Adults

    Yap, Theresa Wan-Chen; Gan, Han-Ming; Lee, Yin-Peng; Leow, Alex Hwong-Ruey; Azmi, Ahmad Najib; Francois, Fritz; Perez-Perez, Guillermo I.; Loke, Mun-Fai; Goh, Khean-Lee; Vadivelu, Jamuna

    2016-01-01

    Background Accumulating evidence shows that Helicobacter pylori protects against some metabolic and immunological diseases in which the development of these diseases coincide with temporal or permanent dysbiosis. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of H. pylori eradication on the human gut microbiome. Methods As part of the currently on-going ESSAY (Eradication Study in Stable Adults/Youths) study, we collected stool samples from 17 H. pylori-positive young adult (18–30 years-old) volunteers. The same cohort was followed up 6, 12 and 18 months-post H. pylori eradication. The impact of H. pylori on the human gut microbiome pre- and post-eradication was investigated using high throughput 16S rRNA gene (V3-V4 region) sequencing using the Illumina Miseq followed by data analysis using Qiime pipeline. Results We compared the composition and diversity of bacterial communities in the fecal microbiome of the H. pylori-positive volunteers, before and after H. pylori eradication therapy. The 16S rRNA gene was sequenced at an average of 150,000–170,000 reads/sample. The microbial diversity were similar pre- and post-H. pylori eradication with no significant differences in richness and evenness of bacterial species. Despite that the general profile of the gut microbiome was similar pre- and post-eradication, some changes in the bacterial communities at the phylum and genus levels were notable, particularly the decrease in relative abundance of Bacterioidetes and corresponding increase in Firmicutes after H. pylori eradication. The significant increase of short-chain fatty acids (SCFA)-producing bacteria genera could also be associated with increased risk of metabolic disorders. Conclusions Our preliminary stool metagenomics study shows that eradication of H. pylori caused perturbation of the gut microbiome and may indirectly affect the health of human. Clinicians should be aware of the effect of broad spectrum antibiotics used in H. pylori eradication regimen

  7. Polio and Prevention

    ... and pain in the limbs. Acute flaccid paralysis (AFP) One in 200 infections leads to irreversible paralysis, ... lifeless – a condition known as acute flaccid paralysis (AFP). All cases of acute flaccid paralysis (AFP) among ...

  8. Rat eradication and the resistance and resilience of passerine bird assemblages in the Falkland Islands.

    Tabak, Michael A; Poncet, Sally; Passfield, Ken; Goheen, Jacob R; Martinez del Rio, Carlos

    2015-05-01

    Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus) were introduced to the Falkland Islands and are detrimental to native passerines. Rat eradication programmes are being used to help protect the avifauna. This study assesses the effectiveness of eradication programmes while using this conservation practice as a natural experiment to explore the ecological resistance, resilience and homeostasis of bird communities. We conducted bird surveys on 230 islands: 85 in the presence of rats, 108 that were historically free of rats and 37 from which rats had been eradicated. Bird detection data were used to build occupancy models for each species and estimate species-area relationships. Count data were used to estimate relative abundance and community structure. Islands with invasive rats had reduced species richness of passerines and a different community structure than islands on which rats were historically absent. Although the species richness of native passerines was remarkably similar on eradicated and historically rat-free islands, community structure on eradicated islands was more similar to that of rat-infested islands than to historically rat-free islands. The results suggest that in the Falkland Islands, species richness of passerines is not resistant to invasive rats, but seems to be resilient following their removal. In contrast, community structure seems to be neither resistant nor resilient. From a conservation perspective, rat eradication programmes in the Falkland Islands appear to be effective at restoring native species richness, but they are not necessarily beneficial for species of conservation concern. For species that do not recolonize, translocations following eradications may be necessary. PMID:25355608

  9. Chagas disease: control, elimination and eradication. Is it possible?

    Jose Rodrigues Coura

    2013-12-01

    wild triatomines in that area. Finally, a characteristic that is greatly in evidence currently is the migration of people with Chagas disease from endemic areas of Latin America to non-endemic countries. This has created a new dilemma for these countries: the risk of transmission through blood transfusion and the onus of controlling donors and treating migrants with the disease. As an enzooty of wild animals and vectors, and as an anthropozoonosis, Chagas disease cannot be eradicated, but it must be controlled by transmission elimination to man.

  10. Does Helicobacter pylori eradication therapy for peptic ulcer prevent gastric cancer?

    Katsuhiro Mabe; Mikako Takahashi; Haruhumi Oizumi; Hideaki Tsukuma; Akiko Shibata; Kazutoshi Fukase; Toru Matsuda; Hiroaki Takeda; Sumio Kawata

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects of Helicobacter pylori (H pylori ) eradication therapy for treatment of peptic ulcer on the incidence of gastric cancer. METHODS: A multicenter prospective cohort study was conducted between November 2000 and December 2007 in Yamagata Prefecture, Japan. The study included patients with H pylori -positive peptic ulcer who decided themselves whether to receive H pylori eradication (eradication group) or conventional antacid therapy (non-eradication group). Incidence of gastric cancer in the two groups was determined based on the results of annual endoscopy and questionnaire surveys, as well as Yamagata Prefectural Cancer Registry data, and was compared between the two groups and by results of H pylori therapy. RESULTS: A total of 4133 patients aged between 13 and 91 years (mean 52.9 years) were registered, and 56 cases of gastric cancer were identified over a mean follow-up of 5.6 years. The sex- and age-adjusted incidence ratio of gastric cancer in the eradication group, as compared with the non-eradication group, was 0.58 (95% CI: 0.28-1.19) and ratios by follow-up period (< 1 year, 1-3 years, > 3 years) were 1.16 (0.27-5.00), 0.50 (0.17-1.49), and 0.34 (0.09-1.28), respectively. Longer follow-up tended to be associated with better prevention of gastric cancer, although not to a significant extent. No significant difference in incidence of gastric cancer was observed between patients with successful eradication therapy (32/2451 patients, 1.31%) and those with treatment failure (11/639 patients, 1.72%). Among patients with duodenal ulcer, which is known to be more prevalent in younger individuals, the incidence of gastric cancer was significantly less in those with successful eradication therapy (2/845 patients, 0.24%) than in those with treatment failure (3/216 patients, 1.39%). CONCLUSION: H pylori eradication therapy for peptic ulcer patients with a mean age of 52.9 years at registration did not significantly decrease the

  11. Using species distribution models to optimize vector control in the framework of the tsetse eradication campaign in Senegal

    Dicko, Ahmadou H.; Lancelot, Renaud; Seck, Momar T.; Guerrini, Laure; Sall, Baba; Lo, Mbargou; Vreysen, Marc J. B.; Lefrançois, Thierry; Fonta, William M.; Peck, Steven L.; Bouyer, Jérémy

    2014-01-01

    Tsetse flies are vectors of human and animal trypanosomoses in sub-Saharan Africa and are the target of the Pan African Tsetse and Trypanosomiasis Eradication Campaign (PATTEC). Glossina palpalis gambiensis (Diptera: Glossinidae) is a riverine species that is still present as an isolated metapopulation in the Niayes area of Senegal. It is targeted by a national eradication campaign combining a population reduction phase based on insecticide-treated targets (ITTs) and cattle and an eradication...

  12. Impact of Helicobacter pylori Eradication Therapy on Platelet Counts in Patients With Chronic Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura.

    Amiri, Mohamadreza

    2016-01-01

    This study was a before and after clinical evaluation of Helicobacter pylori eradication on platelet counts in a group of 23 patients with chronic Idiopathic (Autoimmune) thrombocytopenic purpura (CITP). H. pylori infection was identified in patients by a (13)C-urea breath test and confirmed by an H. pylori stool antigen test. Eradication was conducted in patients testing positive. Infected (n = 10) and uninfected (n = 13) patient groups did not differ with respect to age, gender, history of previous splenectomy, treatment with anti-D, current treatment with corticosteroids, or initial platelet counts. H pylori eradication was successful in eight infected CITP patients, with two patients not responsive to treatment. Compared to the uninfected group, patients in the infected group who responded to eradication therapy had significantly increased platelet counts after six months (56.2 ± 22.2 vs. 233 ± 85.6 ×10(3) million cells/L; P < 0.01), whereas platelet counts in the non-responding patients and uninfected group did not differ after this period of time. H. pylori eradication promotes significant platelet count improvement in patients with CITP. Thus, all patients with CITP should be tested and treated for H. pylori infections. PMID:26925898

  13. Considering native and exotic terrestrial reptiles in island invasive species eradication programmes in the Tropical Pacific

    Fisher, Richard N.

    2010-01-01

    Most island restoration projects with reptiles, either as direct beneficiaries of conservation or as indicators of recovery responses, have been on temperate or xeric islands. There have been decades of research, particularly on temperate islands in New Zealand, on the responses of native reptiles to mammal eradications but very few studies in tropical insular systems. Recent increases in restoration projects involving feral mammal eradications in the tropical Pacific have led to several specific challenges related to native and invasive reptiles. This paper reviews these challenges and discusses some potential solutions to them. The first challenge is that the tropical Pacific herpetofauna is still being discovered, described and understood. There is thus incomplete knowledge of how eradication activities may affect these faunas and the potential risks facing critical populations of these species from these eradication actions. The long term benefit of the removal of invasives is beneficial, but the possible short term impacts to small populations on small islands might be significant. The second challenge is that protocols for monitoring the responses of these species are not well documented but are often different from those used in temperate or xeric habitats. Lizard monitoring techniques used in the tropical Pacific are discussed. The third challenge involves invasive reptiles already in the tropical Pacific, some of which could easily spread accidentally through eradication and monitoring operations. The species posing the greatest threats in this respect are reviewed, and recommendations for biosecurity concerning these taxa are made.

  14. Causal role of Helicobacter pylori infection and eradication therapy in gastric carcinogenesis

    Masanori Ito; Shinji Tanaka; Tomoari Kamada; Ken Haruma; Kazuaki Chayama

    2006-01-01

    Many epidemiological reports indicate that Helicobacter pylori(H pylori) infection plays an important role in gastric carcinogenesis. Several genetic and epigenetic alterations contribute to the initiation, promotion, and progression of the cancer cells in a multi-step manner.H pyloriis known to induce chronic inflammation in the gastric mucosa. Its products, including superoxides,participate in the DNA damage followed by initiation, and the inflammation-derived cytokines and growth factors contribute to the promotion of gastric carcinogenesis.By eradicating H pylori, gastric inflammation can be cured; the therapy diminishes the levels not only of inflammatory cell infiltration, but also atrophyl intestinal metaplasia in part. A randomized controlled trial revealed that the eradication therapy diminished the gastric cancer prevalence in cases without precancerous conditions. In addition, recent epidemiological studies from Japanese groups demonstrated that the development of gastric cancer, especially of the intestinal type, was decreased by successful eradication therapy, although these were designed in a nonrandomized manner. However, it should be mentioned that endoscopic detection is the only way to evaluate the degree of gastric carcinogenesis. We have reported that the endoscopic and histological morphologies could be modified by eradication therapy and it might contribute to the prevalence of gastric cancer development.Considering the biological nature of cancer cell proliferation, it is considered that a sufficiently long-term follow-up would be essential to discuss the anticancer effect of eradication therapy.

  15. Chronic infection phenotypes of Pseudomonas aeruginosa are associated with failure of eradication in children with cystic fibrosis.

    Vidya, P; Smith, L; Beaudoin, T; Yau, Y C; Clark, S; Coburn, B; Guttman, D S; Hwang, D M; Waters, V

    2016-01-01

    Early eradication treatment with inhaled tobramycin is successful in the majority of children with cystic fibrosis (CF) with incident Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection. However, in 10-40 % of cases, eradication fails and the reasons for this are poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to determine whether specific microbial characteristics could explain eradication treatment failure. This was a cross-sectional study of CF patients (aged 0-18 years) with incident P. aeruginosa infection from 2011 to 2014 at the Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Canada. Phenotypic assays were done on all incident P. aeruginosa isolates, and eradicated and persistent isolates were compared using the Mann-Whitney test or the two-sided Chi-square test. A total of 46 children with CF had 51 incident P. aeruginosa infections. In 72 % (33/46) of the patients, eradication treatment was successful, while 28 % failed eradication therapy. Persistent isolates were less likely to be motile, with significantly less twitch motility (p=0.001), were more likely to be mucoid (p=0.002), and more likely to have a tobramycin minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) ≥ 128 μg/mL (p=0.02) compared to eradicated isolates. Although biofilm production was similar, there was a trend towards more persistent isolates with deletions in quorum-sensing genes compared with eradicated isolates (p=0.06). Initial acquisition of P. aeruginosa with characteristics of chronic infection is associated with failure of eradication treatment. PMID:26492874

  16. Strategy to control the invasive alien tree Miconia calvescens in Pacific islands: eradication, containment or something else?

    Goarant, Anne-Claire; Meyer, Jean-Yves

    2011-01-01

     Miconia calvescens (Melastomataceae) is a notorious plant invader in the tropical islands of French Polynesia, Hawaii and New Caledonia. A small tree native to Central and South America, it was fi rst introduced as an ornamental in private botanic gardens in Tahiti (1937), Honolulu (1961), and Nouméa (1970s) where it escaped, became naturalised, and formed dense monospecifi c stands. More than 80,000 ha are currently invaded in French Polynesia, 10,000 ha in the Hawaiian Islands and 140 ha in New Caledonia. Control programmes have been under way in the Hawaiian Islands (Oahu, Maui, Hawaii, Kauai) and French Polynesia (Raiatea, Tahaa, Nuku Hiva, Fatu Hiva) since the early 1990s, and in New Caledonia (Province Sud) since 2006. Despite more than 15 years of intensive control efforts and millions of plants destroyed, eradication has not been achieved in any of these islands, mainly because the species has multiple features that thwart its elimination (e.g., prolific seed production, active dispersal by alien and native frugivorous birds, large and persistent soil seed bank, shade-tolerance), combined with the difficulty of detecting and destroying plants on rough terrain and steep slopes, insufficient control frequency, and limited financial and human resources. Miconia’s life cycle requires at least four years growth from seedling to fruiting. Consequently, prevention of fruit production may be an effective management strategy for small populations. This “juvenilization” process may allow the eradication of small populations when carefully conducted over a quarter century.

  17. Graded Achievement, Tested Achievement, and Validity

    Brookhart, Susan M.

    2015-01-01

    Twenty-eight studies of grades, over a century, were reviewed using the argument-based approach to validity suggested by Kane as a theoretical framework. The review draws conclusions about the meaning of graded achievement, its relation to tested achievement, and changes in the construct of graded achievement over time. "Graded…

  18. Analysis of Pan-European attitudes to the eradication and control of bovine viral diarrhoea.

    Heffernan, C; Misturelli, F; Nielsen, L; Gunn, G J; Yu, J

    2009-02-01

    At present, national-level policies concerning the eradication and control of bovine viral diarrhoea (BVD) differ widely across Europe. Some Scandinavian countries have enacted strong regulatory frameworks to eradicate the disease, whereas other countries have few formal policies. To examine these differences, the attitudes of stakeholders and policy makers in 17 European countries were investigated. A web-based questionnaire was sent to policy makers, government and private sector veterinarians, and representatives of farmers' organisations. In total, 131 individuals responded to the questionnaire and their responses were analysed by applying a method used in sociolinguistics: frame analysis. The results showed that the different attitudes of countries that applied compulsory or voluntary frameworks were associated with different views about the attribution or blame for BVD and the roles ascribed to farmers and other stakeholders in its eradication and control. PMID:19202168

  19. A new frontier of Okinawa's agriculture: An economic evaluation of the melon fly eradication project

    During the post-reversion period (1972-2002), Okinawa's GDP has grown on average by 6.40% annually. In the growth process, agricultural activities have been rapidly replaced by construction and services activities such as public works and tourism. Okinawa's agriculture has been diversifying from traditional sugarcane and pineapple cultivation to flowers, tropical fruits and various healthy foods such as bitter melon or ''goya'' and turmeric. This paper attempts to post-evaluate the area-wide melon fly eradication project in Okinawa which was successfully completed in 1993. The melon flies affected more than 40 important vegetables and fruits in Okinawa. The sterile insect technique (SIT), an environmentally friendly method, was adopted to eradicate the flies. Based on conventional cost-benefit analysis, the project produced net accumulated benefits after 6 years of the eradication. The study shows that the project is viable even on commercial basis

  20. Effect of Helicobacter pylori eradication on gastric hyperplastic polyposis in Cowden's disease

    Hajime Isomoto; Hisashi Furusu; Ken Ohnita; Yusuke Takehara; Chun-Yang Wen; Shigeru Kohno

    2005-01-01

    A 21-year-old woman with complaints of hematochezia was diagnosed as having Cowden's disease (CD), an autosomal dominant condition characterized by multiple hamartomas, since facial papules and gingival papillomas were identified. On endoscopy, multiple hyperplastic polyps were seen in the rectum and left-side colon. There were also esophageal glycogenic acanthosis and hyperplastic polyposis in the antrum accompanied by Helicobacter pylorirelated gastritis. Although gastric hyperplastic polyposis had by no means regressed with unsuccessful first-line eradication therapy for H pylori, following cure of the infection with salvage therapy consisting of rabeprazole,amoxicillin and metronidazole, the polyposis lesions almost disappeared. Follow-up gastroscopy 2 and 3 years after cessation of the second-line eradication therapy revealed almost complete regression of the polyposis lesions with no evidence of H pylori infection. We recommend eradication treatment for CD patients with gastric hyperplastic polyps and the infection, as the occurrence of gastric carcinoma among hyperplastic polyps has been described.

  1. Diagnostic value of CagA IgG in the process to eradicate Helicobacter pylori

    Zhi Bang Yang; Pi Long Wang; Ming Ming Gu; Li Hao Chen; Quan Chen; Lin Zhan

    2000-01-01

    AIM To investigate the diagnostic value of CagA IgG in serum.METHODS Seventy three patients with peptic ulcer infected with HP were eradicated by antibioticstherapy. At pretreatment, wk9 and wk20 after treatment, the detection of Hp in gastric muscosa bybacteriologic method were performed, and CagA and whole-cell antigen of HP igG in serum by ELISAmethod were also performed at the same time.RESULTS The IgG titres of Hp CagA and whole-cell antigen changes in accordance with the efficacy ofHp eradicated. The former with an earlier appearance and a greater number of cases decreased to normallevel in comparison with the latter.CONCLUSION CagA IgG is a better index for observing the effectiveness of the eradication of Hp.

  2. Impact of helicobacter pylori eradication on dyspeptic symptoms in the community

    Abstract: Background: Eradication of Helicobacter pylori (Hp) will cure most Hp positive duodenal ulcers (DU). However, after such treatment, patients often continue to get dyspeptic symptoms. The effects of Hp eradication in patients with proven DU on gastro-oesophageal reflux dis (GORD) symptoms are controversial. Results: Eighty one percent patients had improvement in ulcer-type symptoms. 21% developed new GORD symptoms. 68% discontinued long-term acid-suppression treatment. 79% requiring continued acid suppression therapy had new or continued GORD symptoms. Conclusion: Patients in the community with Hp positive DU disease after eradication, 81% patients got symptomatic improvement, two third discontinued their acid suppressing therapy but 21% developed new GORD symptoms. Among those who required continued acid suppression, 79% had GORD symptoms. (author)

  3. National immunization days and status of poliomyelitis eradication--Philippines, 1993.

    1994-01-14

    The Western Pacific Regional Committee of the World Health Organization (WHO) resolved in 1988 to eradicate poliomyelitis in the region by 1995. Despite intensified surveillance for acute flaccid paralysis (AFP), reported cases of poliomyelitis decreased from 5485 in 1989 to 1909 in 1992. Of the five countries in the region that continue to report endemic poliomyelitis (Cambodia, People's Republic of China Laos, Republic of the Philippines, and Vietnam), reported incidence is lowest in Philippines, which also was the first country in the region to undertake national immunization days (NIDs) with oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV); in addition, other vaccines were administered at vaccination posts by trained health workers. This report assesses the impact of Philippines' first NID, which was initiated as part of its poliomyelitis eradication efforts, and summarizes progress toward eradication of poliomyelitis in Philippines. PMID:8272049

  4. The Economic Impact of Eradicating Peste des Petits Ruminants: A Benefit-Cost Analysis.

    Jones, Bryony A; Rich, Karl M; Mariner, Jeffrey C; Anderson, John; Jeggo, Martyn; Thevasagayam, Sam; Cai, Yi; Peters, Andrew R; Roeder, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Peste des petits ruminants (PPR) is an important cause of mortality and production loss among sheep and goats in the developing world. Despite control efforts in a number of countries, it has continued to spread across Africa and Asia, placing an increasing burden on the livelihoods of livestock keepers and on veterinary resources in affected countries. Given the similarities between PPR and rinderpest, and the lessons learned from the successful global eradication of rinderpest, the eradication of PPR seems appealing, both eliminating an important disease and improving the livelihoods of the poor in developing countries. We conducted a benefit-cost analysis to examine the economic returns from a proposed programme for the global eradication of PPR. Based on our knowledge and experience, we developed the eradication strategy and estimated its costs. The benefits of the programme were determined from (i) the averted mortality costs, based on an analysis of the literature, (ii) the downstream impact of reduced mortality using a social accounting matrix, and (iii) the avoided control costs based on current levels of vaccination. The results of the benefit-cost analysis suggest strong economic returns from PPR eradication. Based on a 15-year programme with total discounted costs of US$2.26 billion, we estimate discounted benefits of US$76.5 billion, yielding a net benefit of US$74.2 billion. This suggests a benefit cost ratio of 33.8, and an internal rate of return (IRR) of 199%. As PPR mortality rates are highly variable in different populations, we conducted a sensitivity analysis based on lower and higher mortality scenarios. All the scenarios examined indicate that investment in PPR eradication would be highly beneficial economically. Furthermore, removing one of the major constraints to small ruminant production would be of considerable benefit to many of the most vulnerable communities in Africa and Asia. PMID:26900944

  5. Efficacy of Helicobacter pylori eradication therapies: a single centre observational study

    Beales Ian LP

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many Helicobacter pylori eradication regimens have been described. There are little data reporting their efficacy or integration in routine clinical practice. The overall results of eradication therapy in a cohort of patients are described and an algorithm for management outlined. Methods 469 patients receiving eradication therapy in routine clinical practice were evaluated. The successes of individual regimes as first, second and third line therapy were determined. Results Overall success after one, two and three courses of therapy were 73% (95% confidence intervals 69–77%, 94% (91–96% and 98% (97–99% respectively. 10 different regimens, including many non-recommended ones were used as primary therapy. Ranitidine bismuth citrate-amoxicillin-clarithromycin triple therapy (94.8%, 90–99% was significantly more effective than any other combination as primary therapy, including all proton pump inhibitor based triple therapies. Quadruple therapy with bismuth chelate-proton pump inhibitor-tetracycline and a nitroimidazole (70%, 52–88% and ranitidine bismuth citrate-based triple therapy (73%, 56–90% where more effective second line combinations than proton pump inhibitor-triple therapies (37.5%, 12–58%. Third line therapy directed by the results of sensitivity testing improved eradication compared to further empirical antibiotics. The use of a proton pump inhibitor with clarithromycin and a nitroimidazole as initial therapy was associated with a significantly worse overall eradication rate than other combinations. Conclusions Helicobacter pylori eradication rates can be maximised by using ranitidine bismuth citrate-clarithromycin-amoxicillin containing triple therapy, followed by bismuth and nitroimidazle containing second-line therapy, with third line combinations directed by sensitivity testing. Proton pump inhibitor-clarithromycin-metronidazole combinations should be avoided.

  6. The Economic Impact of Eradicating Peste des Petits Ruminants: A Benefit-Cost Analysis

    Jones, Bryony A.; Rich, Karl M.; Mariner, Jeffrey C.; Anderson, John; Jeggo, Martyn; Thevasagayam, Sam; Cai, Yi; Peters, Andrew R.; Roeder, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Peste des petits ruminants (PPR) is an important cause of mortality and production loss among sheep and goats in the developing world. Despite control efforts in a number of countries, it has continued to spread across Africa and Asia, placing an increasing burden on the livelihoods of livestock keepers and on veterinary resources in affected countries. Given the similarities between PPR and rinderpest, and the lessons learned from the successful global eradication of rinderpest, the eradication of PPR seems appealing, both eliminating an important disease and improving the livelihoods of the poor in developing countries. We conducted a benefit-cost analysis to examine the economic returns from a proposed programme for the global eradication of PPR. Based on our knowledge and experience, we developed the eradication strategy and estimated its costs. The benefits of the programme were determined from (i) the averted mortality costs, based on an analysis of the literature, (ii) the downstream impact of reduced mortality using a social accounting matrix, and (iii) the avoided control costs based on current levels of vaccination. The results of the benefit-cost analysis suggest strong economic returns from PPR eradication. Based on a 15-year programme with total discounted costs of US$2.26 billion, we estimate discounted benefits of US$76.5 billion, yielding a net benefit of US$74.2 billion. This suggests a benefit cost ratio of 33.8, and an internal rate of return (IRR) of 199%. As PPR mortality rates are highly variable in different populations, we conducted a sensitivity analysis based on lower and higher mortality scenarios. All the scenarios examined indicate that investment in PPR eradication would be highly beneficial economically. Furthermore, removing one of the major constraints to small ruminant production would be of considerable benefit to many of the most vulnerable communities in Africa and Asia. PMID:26900944

  7. The Economic Impact of Eradicating Peste des Petits Ruminants: A Benefit-Cost Analysis.

    Bryony A Jones

    Full Text Available Peste des petits ruminants (PPR is an important cause of mortality and production loss among sheep and goats in the developing world. Despite control efforts in a number of countries, it has continued to spread across Africa and Asia, placing an increasing burden on the livelihoods of livestock keepers and on veterinary resources in affected countries. Given the similarities between PPR and rinderpest, and the lessons learned from the successful global eradication of rinderpest, the eradication of PPR seems appealing, both eliminating an important disease and improving the livelihoods of the poor in developing countries. We conducted a benefit-cost analysis to examine the economic returns from a proposed programme for the global eradication of PPR. Based on our knowledge and experience, we developed the eradication strategy and estimated its costs. The benefits of the programme were determined from (i the averted mortality costs, based on an analysis of the literature, (ii the downstream impact of reduced mortality using a social accounting matrix, and (iii the avoided control costs based on current levels of vaccination. The results of the benefit-cost analysis suggest strong economic returns from PPR eradication. Based on a 15-year programme with total discounted costs of US$2.26 billion, we estimate discounted benefits of US$76.5 billion, yielding a net benefit of US$74.2 billion. This suggests a benefit cost ratio of 33.8, and an internal rate of return (IRR of 199%. As PPR mortality rates are highly variable in different populations, we conducted a sensitivity analysis based on lower and higher mortality scenarios. All the scenarios examined indicate that investment in PPR eradication would be highly beneficial economically. Furthermore, removing one of the major constraints to small ruminant production would be of considerable benefit to many of the most vulnerable communities in Africa and Asia.

  8. Effect of Helicobacter pylori Eradication on Reflux Esophagitis Therapy: A Multi-center Randomized Control Study

    Yan Xue; Li-Ya Zhou; San-Ren Lin; Xiao-Hua Hou; Zhao-Shen Li; Min-Hu Chen; Xiu-E Yan

    2015-01-01

    Background:Helicobacterpylori (H.pylori) frequently colonizes the stomach.Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a common and costly disease.But the relationship ofH.pylori and GERD is still unclear.This study aimed to explore the effect ofH.pylori and its eradication on reflux esophagitis therapy.Methods:Patients diagnosed with reflux esophagitis by endoscopy were enrolled;based on rapid urease test and Warth-Starry stain,they were divided into H.pylori positive and negative groups.H.pylori positive patients were randomly given H.pylori eradication treatment for 1 0 days,then esomeprazole 20 mg bid for 46 days.The other patients received esomeprazole 20 mg bid therapy for 8 weeks.After treatment,three patient groups were obtained:H.pylori positive eradicated,H.pylori positive uneradicated,and H.pylori negative.Before and after therapy,reflux symptoms were scored and compared.Healing rates were compared among groups.The x2 test and t-test were used,respectively,for enumeration and measurement data.Results:There were 176 H.pylori positive (with 92 eradication cases) and 180 negative cases.Healing rates in the H.pylori positive eradicated and H.pylori positive uneradicated groups reached 80.4% and 79.8% (P =0.911),with reflux symptom scores of 0.22 and 0.14 (P =0.588).Healing rates of esophagitis in the H.pylori positive uneradicated and H.pylori negative groups were,respectively,79.8% and 82.2% (P =0.848);reflux symptom scores were 0.14 and 0.21 (P =0.546).Conclusions:Based on esomeprazole therapy,H.pylori infection and eradication have no significant effect on reflux esophagitis therapy.

  9. Furazolidone,amoxicillin,bismuth and rabeprazole quadruple rescue therapy for the eradication of Helicobacter pylori

    Hong Cheng; Fu-Lian Hu

    2009-01-01

    AIM:To compare the efficacy and side effect profiles of three furazolidone and amoxicillin-based quadruple rescue therapies for the eradication of Helicobacter pylori ( H pylori).METHODS: Patients who failed in the H pylori eradication therapy for at least one course were randomly allocated into three groups. Group A received rebaprazole 10 mg + amoxicillin 1 g + furazolidone 100 mg, and bismuth subcitrate 220 mg, twice daily for 1 wk; group B received the same regimen of group A but for 2 wk; and group C received the same regimen of group B, but furazolidone was replaced by furazolidone 100 mg three times daily. To record the side effect profiles at the end of the treatment, H pylori eradication was assessed with 13C-urea breath test 4 wk after therapy. RESULTS: Sixty patients were enrolled including 28 males, and 20 patients in each group. The average age of the patients was 49.2 years, ranging from 18 to 84 years. H pylori eradication rates with per-protocol analysis were 82%, 89% and 90% in the three groups, respectively. Side effects were found in 11 patients, including mild dizziness, nausea, diarrhea and increased bowel movement. None of the 11 patients needed treatment for their side effects. CONCLUSION: One- or two-week furazolidone and amoxicillin-based quadruple rescue therapy with a low dose furazolidone (100 mg bid) for the eradication of H pylori is effective. Extending the antibiotic course to 14 d could improve the eradication rates. 2009 The WJG Press and Baishideng. All rights reserved.

  10. The effectiveness of parallel gamma-interferon testing in New Zealand's bovine tuberculosis eradication programme.

    Sinclair, J A; Dawson, K L; Buddle, B M

    2016-05-01

    valuable tool in a bTB eradication programme, as it enables higher test sensitivity at both herd and animal level. The use of the γ-IFN test over a risk cohort early in a breakdown assists in removal of early infection and some cases of anergy to intradermal tuberculin testing. Parallel γ-IFN with compulsory slaughter of reactors should be considered in breeding and dairy herds in conjunction with tuberculin testing before movement control is revoked, and will assist in achieving TB freedom on a herd level and nationally. PMID:27094146

  11. Eradication of the melon fly from Okinawa, Japan, by means of the sterile insect technique

    A national project to eradicate an introduced pest, the melon fly, from Okinawa was carried out from 1972 to 1992 using the sterile insect technique. After the release of about 50,000 million sterile flies, involving about Y. 10,000 million as investment, the melon fly was completely eradicated. The most important conditions for success were the maintenance of a quality mass reared strain and availability of precise information on the temporal and spatial distribution of wild and released flies for improvement of the release plan. (author). 12 refs, 8 figs

  12. HOGG1 polymorphism in atrophic gastritis and gastric cancer after Helicobacter pylori eradication

    2010-01-01

    AIM:To investigate the association between Ser326Cys human oxoguanine glycosylase 1(hOGG1) polymorphism and atrophic gastritis and gastric cancer after Helicobacter pylori(H.pylori) eradication.METHODS:A total of 488 subjects(73 patients with gastric cancer,160 with atrophic gastritis after H.pylori eradication and 255 controls) were prospectively collected.Polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis was performed to distinguish hOGG1 Ser326Cys polymorphism.Statistical analys...

  13. Reinfection rate and endoscopic changes after successful eradication of Helicobacter pylori

    Kum; Hei; Ryu; Sun; Young; Yi; Youn; Ju; Na; Su; Jung; Baik; Su; Jin; Yoon; Hae-Sun; Jung; Hyun; Joo; Song

    2010-01-01

    AIM:To determine the long-term outcomes regarding reinfection with Helicobacter pylori(H.pylori)and endoscopic changes after successful H.pylori eradication. METHODS:From June 1994 to January 2007,186 patients(M:F=98:88;mean age 50.0±11.4 years), in whom H.pylori had been successfully eradicated, were enrolled.The mean duration of follow up was 41.2±24.0 mo. RESULTS:H.pylori reinfection occurred in 58 patients (31.2%).The average annual reinfection rate was 9.1% per patient year.No recurrence of peptic ulce...

  14. Confirmation of eradication of Helicobacter pylori infection by 14C-urea breath test

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a potent urease producer, a characteristic that has been exploited in the development of the 14C-urea breath test (UBT). 14C-UBT is being used as a highly reliable test for the diagnosis of H. pylori infection. There is paucity of reports on the utility of this test to confirm the H. pylori eradication after its treatment. The study was conducted to determine the utility of 14C-UBT in confirming the eradication of H. pylori

  15. Contain or eradicate? Optimizing the management goal for Australian acacia invasions in the face of uncertainty

    Moore, J.L.; Runge, M.C.; Webber, B.L.; Wilson, J.R.U.

    2011-01-01

    Aim To identify whether eradication or containment is expected to be the most cost-effective management goal for an isolated invasive population when knowledge about the current extent is uncertain. Location Global and South Africa. Methods We developed a decision analysis framework to analyse the best management goal for an invasive species population (eradication, containment or take no action) when knowledge about the current extent is uncertain. We used value of information analysis to identify when investment in learning about the extent will improve this decision-making and tested the sensitivity of the conclusions to different parameters (e.g. spread rate, maximum extent, and management efficacy and cost). The model was applied to Acacia paradoxa DC, an Australian shrub with an estimated invasive extent of 310ha on Table Mountain, South Africa. Results Under the parameters used, attempting eradication is cost-effective for infestations of up to 777ha. However, if the invasion extent is poorly known, then attempting eradication is only cost-effective for infestations estimated as 296ha or smaller. The value of learning is greatest (maximum of 8% saving) when infestation extent is poorly known and if it is close to the maximum extent for which attempting eradication is optimal. The optimal management action is most sensitive to the probability that the action succeeds (which depends on the extent), with the discount rate and cost of management also important, but spread rate less so. Over a 20-year time-horizon, attempting to eradicate A. paradoxa from South Africa is predicted to cost on average ZAR 8 million if the extent is known, and if our current estimate is poor, ZAR 33.6 million as opposed to ZAR 32.8 million for attempting containment. Main conclusions Our framework evaluates the cost-effectiveness of attempting eradication or containment of an invasive population that takes uncertainty in population extent into account. We show that incorporating

  16. Identifying the ERAD ubiquitin E3 ligases for viral and cellular targeting of MHC class I

    van den Boomen, D.J.H.; Lehner, P. J.

    2015-01-01

    The human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) US2 and US11 gene products hijack mammalian ER-associated degradation (ERAD) to induce rapid degradation of major histocompatibility class I (MHC-I) molecules. The rate-limiting step in this pathway is thought to be the polyubiquitination of MHC-I by distinct host ERAD E3 ubiquitin ligases. TRC8 was identified as the ligase responsible for US2-mediated MHC-I degradation and shown to be required for the cleavage-dependent degradation of some tail-anchored prote...

  17. Comparative Efficacy of Two Doses of Nebulized Colistimethate for the Eradication of Pseudomonas Aeruginosa in Children with Cystic Fibrosis

    Marie-Sophie Brochet

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cystic fibrosis (CF affects the respiratory and digestive systems. It evolves toward deterioration of pulmonary function through colonization with Pseudomonas aeruginosa. There is no consensus with respect to its eradication. Nebulized colistimethate is used for eradication treatment, but the optimal dose and duration is yet to be determined.

  18. A pilot study of a randomized controlled trial of pragmatic eradication of Helicobactor pylori in primary care.

    Hippisley-Cox, J; Pringle, M

    1997-01-01

    We report on a pilot study for a randomized control trial of pragmatic eradication of Helicobacter Pylori in primary care. Although the sample size is small, pragmatic eradication is likely to be cost-effective for patients with documented or suspected peptic ulcer disease on maintenance acid suppression therapy in primary care.

  19. Integration of ecologically-based approaches to re-eradicate cattle fever ticks from the U.S.

    Here we summarize highlights of research conducted as part of a NIFA-AFRI funded grant. Cattle fever ticks, Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus and R. (B.) annulatus, have been found on white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) complicating eradication efforts of the USDA’s Cattle Fever Tick Eradic...

  20. Effect of sequential versus standard Helicobacter pylori eradication therapy on the associated iron deficiency anemia in children

    Hamed Said Ali Habib

    2013-01-01

    Conclusions: There is no significant difference in H. pylori eradication rates between sequential and standard therapies in children. Moreover, no significant relationship was found between eradication therapy and serum ferritin. Further studies enrolling more markers of iron deficiency are required to precisely assess this relationship.

  1. A modelling framework for predicting the optimal balance between control and surveillance effort in the local eradication of tuberculosis in New Zealand wildlife.

    Gormley, Andrew M; Holland, E Penelope; Barron, Mandy C; Anderson, Dean P; Nugent, Graham

    2016-03-01

    Bovine tuberculosis (TB) impacts livestock farming in New Zealand, where the introduced marsupial brushtail possum (Trichosurus vulpecula) is the wildlife maintenance host for Mycobacterium bovis. New Zealand has implemented a campaign to control TB using a co-ordinated programme of livestock diagnostic testing and large-scale culling of possums, with the long-term aim of TB eradication. For management of the disease in wildlife, methods that can optimise the balance between control and surveillance effort will facilitate the objective of eradication on a fixed or limited budget. We modelled and compared management options to optimise the balance between the two activities necessary to achieve and verify eradication of TB from New Zealand wildlife: the number of lethal population control operations required to halt the M. bovis infection cycle in possums, and the subsequent surveillance effort needed to confidently declare TB freedom post-control. The approach considered the costs of control and surveillance, as well as the potential costs of re-control resulting from false declaration of TB freedom. The required years of surveillance decreased with increasing numbers of possum lethal control operations but the overall time to declare TB freedom depended on additional factors, such as the probability of freedom from disease after control and the probability of success of mop-up control, i.e. retroactive culling following detection of persistent disease in the residual possum population. The total expected cost was also dependent on a number of factors, many of which had wide cost ranges, suggesting that an optimal strategy is unlikely to be singular and fixed, but will likely vary for each different area being considered. Our approach provides a simple framework that considers the known and potential costs of possum control and TB surveillance, enabling managers to optimise the balance between these two activities to achieve and prove eradication of a wildlife

  2. Communication and mobilization campaigns for immunization (CMCI: need of time for strengthening Immunization services in India

    Samadhan Prakashrao Debaje

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available After 65 years of independence India's growth in health sector is remarkable which is result of flexibility in changes in strategies for achieving goal .Still there is not so well organized and recognizable growth in field of routine immunization. There is not much progress in strategies for communication and social mobilization; communication strategies always was major component in changing behavior of community and change in communities vaccine acceptance which help in preventing disease by improving immunization coverage. Many studies did so far indicate barriers for immunization as fear of AEFI, lack of knowledge of immunization, its benefits and information regarding where to get vaccination. These all barriers can be combined under one roof as communication and social mobilization barriers. When India had launched polio eradication program it had faced same difficulties due to cultural and social differences in India. As there were many regions where refusal and acceptance of vaccine with less coverage over booth observed, so India had revised its strategies of communication and social mobilization and implemented house to house activity through strategic approach to families with refusal and improved acceptance of polio vaccine through communication by house to house visits thus targeted intervention for improving communication and social mobilization for polio eradication initiative. India had achieved polio eradication mainly through revising its strategies for communication and mobilization. So there is urgent need for revising communication and mobilization strategies for strengthening immunization services in India. As India had shown its success through targeted intervention in strategies and we can use current polio work force available for strengthening routine immunization. As done in polio campaign we can use the targeted house to house activity strategy for identifying and planning for identified gaps in communication and

  3. Seven-day PPI-triple therapy with levofloxacin is very effective for Helicobacter pylori eradication.

    Schrauwen, R.W.; Janssen, M.J.R.; Boer, W.A. de

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Helicobacter pylori infection causes lifelong gastritis and is associated with the development of peptic ulcer disease, MALT lymphoma and gastric cancer. Many patients benefit from H. pylori eradication therapy. PPI-triple therapy is recommended as initial therapy. Quadruple therapy, wit

  4. Evaluation of the benefit of addition of clidinium C to a Helicobacter pylori eradication regimen

    Chorami, Maryam; Naderi, Nosratollah; Moghimi-Dehkordi, Bijan; Mirsattari, Dariush; Shalmani, Hamid Mohaghegh

    2013-01-01

    Aim This study aimed to evaluate the success of H.pylori eradication therapy in patients with dyspepsia by therapeutics regimes with and without clidinium C. Background Helicobacter pylori infections are reported in all parts of the world. Appropriate antibiotic therapy can treat infection. The ideal treatment regimen has not been specified. Patients and methods In a randomized, double blind clinical trials study, 250 patients with dyspepsia were enrolled. All patients were treated by Omeprazole, Metronidazole, Amoxicillin and Bismuth (OMAB) for two weeks. One tablet clidinium C before each meal was added to this regimen in the intervention group (A). Urea Breath Test (UBT) was carried out after 8-12 weeks after treatment for evaluation of H.pylori eradication. Results 132 patients in the intervention group (A) and 118 patients in the control group (B) were enrolled to the study. The rate of eradication in group A was significantly higher than group B (62.1% vs. 50%, p=0.04). Conclusion The results supported the effect of clidinium C for increasing of helicobacter pylori eradication, but further studies need to be performed. PMID:24834261

  5. Development of vaccines toward the global control and eradication of foot-and-mouth disease

    Foot and mouth disease (FMD) is one of the most economically and socially devastating diseases affecting animal agriculture throughout the world. Although mortality is low, millions of animals have been killed in efforts to rapidly control and eradicate FMD. The causing virus (FMDV) is a highly vari...

  6. Selected Antimicrobial Essential Oils Eradicate Pseudomonas spp. and Staphylococcus aureus Biofilms

    Kavanaugh, Nicole L.; Ribbeck, Katharina

    2012-01-01

    Biofilms are difficult to eliminate with standard antimicrobial treatments due to their high antibiotic resistance relative to free-living cells. Here, we show that selected antimicrobial essential oils can eradicate bacteria within biofilms with higher efficiency than certain important antibiotics, making them interesting candidates for the treatment of biofilms.

  7. Helicobacter pylori eradication does not exacerbate gastro-oesophageal reflux disease

    Malfertheiner, P

    2004-01-01

    The reciprocal influence of Helicobacter pylori infection and gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD), if both conditions occur concomitantly, has been an issue of debate for many years. The critical question is whether eradication of H pylori has a more beneficial, harmful, or simply no effect on the course of GORD.

  8. Eradication of Polymyxa betae by thermal and anaerobic conditions and in the presence of compost leachate

    Rijn, van E.; Termorshuizen, A.J.

    2007-01-01

    The abiotic conditions required for eradication of Polymyxa betae, the vector of Beet necrotic yellow vein virus in sugar beet, were investigated. Survival of resting spores of P. betae was determined under aerobic (30 min, 4 days and 21 days) and anaerobic (4 days) conditions under several temperat

  9. H pylori eradication:A randomized prospective study of triple therapy with or without ecabet sodium

    2008-01-01

    AIM:To investigate whether adding ecabet sodium to the standard triple therapy for Hpylori infection improve eradication rate.METHODS:Two hundred and fifty-seven H pyloriinfected patients were randomly assigned to standard triple therapy (group A, n=129) or triple therapy plus ecabet sodium(group B, n=128).Successful eradication was defined as a negative 13C-urea breath test 6-8 wk after completion of treatment.RESULTS:After completion of therapy,194/257 patients showed negative 13C-urea breath test results.According to intention-to-treat analysis,the infection was eradicated in 93/129(72.1%)patients in group A and 101/128 (78.9%) in group B (P=0.204).Per-protocol analysis showed successful eradication in 93/118(78.8%)patients from group A and 101/114 (88.6%) from group B (P = 0.044).There were no significant differences in the side effects experienced by the patients in the two treatment groups.CONCLUSION:Our results suggest that the addition of ecabet sodium improves the efficacy of the standard triple therapy for H pylori.

  10. Bioeconomic synergy between tactics for insect eradication in the presence of Allee effects

    Blackwood, J. C.; Berec, Luděk; Yamanaka, T.; Epanchin-Niell, R. S.; Hastings, A.; Liebhold, A. M.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 279, č. 1739 (2012), s. 2807-2815. ISSN 0962-8452 Grant ostatní: National Science Foundation(US) EF-0553768 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50070508 Keywords : Allee effect * eradication * management cost Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 5.683, year: 2012 http://rspb.royalsocietypublishing.org/content/279/1739/2807.full

  11. FACTORS INFLUENCING WEST TENNESSEE FARMERS' WILLINGNESS TO PAY FOR A BOLL WEEVIL ERADICATION PROGRAM

    Larson, James A.; Collins, Rebecca L.; Roberts, Roland K.; English, Burton C.

    1999-01-01

    Data from a survey were used to evaluate Tennessee farmers' willingness to pay for the boll weevil eradication program. Producer experience, boll weevil control costs, and attitudes about boll weevil damage and insecticide usage after the program were significant explanatory variables and had a positive influence on willingness to pay.

  12. The Arab States: A Programme To Renew Primary Education and Eradicate Illiteracy. Literacy Lessons.

    Yousif, Abdelwahid Abdalla

    The United Nations' Regional Programme for the Universalization and Renewal of Primary Education and the Eradication of Adult Illiteracy in the Arab States by the Year 2000 (ARABUPEAL) began in 1987. Among the educational problems confronting Arab States are that their educational objectives do not specifically relate to development objectives,…

  13. Helicobacter pylori Eradication and Gastric Cancer: When Is the Horse Out of the Barn?

    A.C. de Vries; E.J. Kuipers; E.A.J. Rauws

    2009-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is a major risk factor for gastric cancer development. Therefore, H. pylori eradication may be an important approach in the prevention of gastric cancer. However, long-term data proving the efficacy of this approach are lacking. This report describes two patients who de

  14. The Effects of Helicobacter pylori Eradication on Proteinuria in Patients with Primary Glomerulonephritis

    Bahar Caliskan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Membranous nephropathy (MN is a common cause of nephrotic syndrome. In most cases it is idiopathic, while it may also be secondary to many diseases. In this study, prevalence of H. pylori infection and the effects of H. pylori eradication on proteinuria levels were investigated. Methods. Thirty five patients with MN (19 male, 12 patients with IgA nephropathy (4 male and 12 patients with focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS (8 male were studied. The presence of H. pylori antigen was investigated in renal tissues obtained by biopsy, and the effects of H. pylori eradication on proteinuria levels were investigated. Results. Immunohistochemistry with H. pylori antigen revealed no positive staining in the glomeruli of all patients. 19 patients (54% with MN, 10 (83% with IgA nephropathy and 4 (33% with FSGS were positive for H. pylori stool antigen test (P=0.045. Patients with H. pylori infection were administered eradication therapy (lansoprazole, 30 mg twice daily, plus amoxicillin, 0.75 g twice daily, plus clarithromycin, 250 mg twice daily, for 14 days. Before the eradication therapy the mean proteinuria of patients with MN, IgA nephropathy and FSGS were 2.42 ± 3.24 g/day, 2.12 ± 1.63 g/day and 1.80 ± 1.32 g/day, respectively. Three months after eradication, baseline proteinuria levels of patients with MN significantly decreased to 1.26 ± 1.73 g/day (P=0.031. In all three groups there were no significant differences with regard to serum creatinine, albumin and C-reactive protein levels before and after eradication therapy. Conclusions. The eradication of H. pylori infection may be effective to reduce proteinuria in patients with MN, while spontaneous remission of MN could not be excluded in this patient cohort. This trial is registered with NCT00983034.

  15. Oral Helicobacter pylori, its relationship to successful eradication of gastric H. pylori and saliva culture confirmation.

    Wang, X M; Yee, K C; Hazeki-Taylor, N; Li, J; Fu, H Y; Huang, M L; Zhang, G Y

    2014-08-01

    The present study was designed to explore the existence of oral Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori), its relationship in the oral cavity to the success rate of eradication of the gastric H. pylori infection, and to determine if the mouthwash solution contained lysine (0.4%) and glycerol monolaurate (0.2%) (LGM) could eliminate oral H. pylori, as well as using the saliva H. pylori culture to confirm the existence of oral H. pylori. A total of 159 symptomatic individuals with stomach pain and 118 asymptomatic individuals with no stomach complaints, were recruited and tested using the saliva H. pylori antigen test (HPS), the H. pylori flagellin test (HPF), the urea breath test (UBT C(13)) and the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test, which tests were also confirmed by saliva culture. The test subjects also received various treatments. It was found that the H. pylori antigen exists in the oral cavity in UBT C(13) negative individuals. Traditional treatment for gastric eradication had only a 10.67 percent (10.67%) effectiveness rate on the oral H. pylori infection. In groups of patients with the oral H. pylori infection, but with negative UBT C(13), a mouthwash solution provided a 72.58% effectiveness rate in the 95% of the confidence interval (CI) ranges on the oral H. pylori infection. Traditional drug gastric eradication and teeth cleaning (TC) had less than a 10% effectiveness rate. Treatment of the oral infection increased the success rate of eradication of the stomach infection from 61.33% to 82.26% in the 95% CI ranges. We concluded that the successful rate of eradication of gastric H. pylori bears a significant relationship to the oral infection from H. pylori. PMID:25179088

  16. Does delayed gastric emptying shorten the H pylori eradication period? A double blind clinical trial

    Mohammad Hassan Emami; Rahim Bahri-Najafi; Bita Geramizadeh; Abbas Esmaeili; Mohammad Mehdi Saberfiroozi; Abbas Arj; Ali Reza Taghavi; Kamran Bagheri-Lankarani; Najaf Dehbashi; Mohammad Reza Fattahi; Mahvash Alizadeh; Mohammad Javad Kaviani

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the gastric emptying inhibitory effects of sugar and levodopa on H pylori eradication period.METHODS: A total of 139 consecutive patients were randomized into 6 groups. The participants with peptic ulcer disease or non-ulcer dyspepsia non-responding to other medications who were also H pylori-positive patients either with positive rapid urease test (RUT)or positive histology were included. All groups were pretreated with omeprazole for 2 d and then treated with quadruple therapy regimen (omeprazole, bismuth,tetracycline and metronidazole);all drugs were given twice daily. Groups 1 and 2 were treated for 3 d, groups 3, 4 and 5 for 7 d, and group 6 for 14 d. Groups 1 to 4 received sugar in the form of 10% sucrose syrup.Levodopa was prescribed for groups 1 and 3. Patients in groups 2 and 4 were given placebo for levodopa and groups 5 and 6 received placebos for both sugar and levodopa. Upper endoscopy and biopsies were carried out before treatment and two months after treatment.Eradication of H pylori was assessed by RUT and histoloqy 8 wk later.RESULTS: Thirty patients were excluded. Per-protocol analysis showed successful eradication in 53% in group 1, 56% in group 2, 58% in group 3, 33.3% in group 4,28% in group 5, and 53% in group 6. Eradication rate,patient compliance and satisfaction were not significantly different between the groups.CONCLUSION: It seems that adding sugar or levodopa or both to anti H pylori eradication regimens may lead to shorter duration of treatment.

  17. Low eradication rate of Helicobacter pylori with triple 7-14 days and quadriple therapy in Turkey

    Yuksel Gumurdulu; Sedat Boyacioglu; Ender Serin; Birol Ozer; Fazilet Kayaselcuk; Kursat Ozsahin; Arif Mansur Cosar; Mlurat Gursoy; Gurden Gur; Ugur Yilmaz

    2004-01-01

    AIM: The eradication rate of Helicobacter pylori(H pylorl)shows variation among countries and regimens of treatment.We aimed to study the eradication rates of different regimens in our region and some factors affecting the rate of eradication.METHODS: One hundred and sixty- four H pylori positive patients (68 males, 96 females; mean age: 48±12 years)with duodenal or gastric ulcer without a smoking history were included in the study. The patients were divided into three groups according to the treatment regimens. Omeprazole 20 mg, clarithromycin 500 mg, amoxicillin 1 g were given twice daily for 1 week (Group I) and 2 weeks (Group II).Patients in Group III Received bismuth subsitrate 300 mg,tetracyline 500 mg and metronidazole 500 mg four times daily in addition to Omeprazole 20 mg twice daily. Two biopsies each before and after treatment were obtained from antrum and corpus, and histopathologically evaluated.Eradication was assumed to be successful if no H pylorus was detected from four biopsy specimens taken after treatment. The effects of factors like age, sex, H pylori density on antrum and corpus before treatment, the total H pylori density, and the inflammation scores on the rate of H pylori eradication were evaluated.RESULTS: The overall eradication rate was 42%. The rates in groups II and III were statistically higher than that in group I (P<0.05). The rates of eradication were 24.5%,40.7% and 61.5% in groups I, II and III, respectively. The eradication rate was negatively related to either corpus H pylori density or total H pylori density (P<0.05). The median age was older in the group in which the eradication failed in comparison to that with successful eradication (55 yr vs 39 yr, P<0.001). No correlation between sex and H pylori eradication was found.CONCLUSION: Our rates of eradication were significantly lower when compared to those reported in literature. We believe that advanced age and high H pylori density are negative predictive factors for

  18. School Size, Achievement, and Achievement Gaps

    Bradley J. McMillen

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available In order to examine the relationship between school size and achievement, a study was conducted using longitudinal achievement data from North Carolina for three separate cohorts of public school students (one elementary, one middle and one high school. Results revealed several interactions between size and student characteristics, all of which indicated that the achievement gaps typically existing between certain subgroups (i.e., more versus less-advantaged, lower versus higher-achieving were larger in larger schools. Results varied across the grade level cohorts and across subjects, but in general effects were more common in mathematics than in reading, and were more pronounced at the high school level. Study results are discussed in the context of educational equity and cost-effectiveness.

  19. Estimating achievement from fame

    Simkin, M. V.; Roychowdhury, V. P.

    2009-01-01

    We report a method for estimating people's achievement based on their fame. Earlier we discovered (cond-mat/0310049) that fame of fighter pilot aces (measured as number of Google hits) grows exponentially with their achievement (number of victories). We hypothesize that the same functional relation between achievement and fame holds for other professions. This allows us to estimate achievement for professions where an unquestionable and universally accepted measure of achievement does not exi...

  20. Pepsinogen II Can Be a Potential Surrogate Marker of Morphological Changes in Corpus before and after H. pylori Eradication

    Sadegh Massarrat

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The aim of this investigation is to study the relationship between gastric morphology and serum biomarkers before and after Helicobacter pylori eradication. Methods. First-degree relatives of gastric cancer patients underwent gastroscopy before and 2.5 years after H. pylori eradication. The morphological changes in two categories (normal to mild and moderate to severe were compared with level of pepsinogens I and II before eradication (n=369, after eradication (n=115, and in those with persistent infection (n=250. Results: After eradication, pepsinogen I decreased to 70% and pepsinogen II to 45% of the previous values. Unlike pepsinogen II and pepsinogen I to II ratio that were affected by the severity of inflammation and atrophy in corpus in all groups, pepsinogen I generally did not change. After eradication, subjects with high mononuclear infiltration in corpus had lower pepsinogen I (54 versus 77.1 μ/mL, higher pepsinogen II (9.4 versus 6.9 μ/mL, and lower ratio (7.9 versus 11.6 than those without (P<0.05. Conclusion. Pepsinogen II is a good marker of corpus morphological changes before and after H. pylori eradication.

  1. C-type Lectin Receptors for Tumor Eradication: Future Directions

    Streng-Ouwehand, Ingeborg; Unger, Wendy W. J.; Kooyk, Yvette van, E-mail: y.vankooyk@vumc.nl [Department of Molecular Cell Biology and Immunology, VU University Medical Center, P.O. Box 7057, 1007 MB Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2011-08-08

    Dendritic cells are key regulators in directing immune responses and therefore are under extensive research for the induction of anti-tumor responses. DCs express a large array of receptors by which they scan their surroundings for recognition and uptake of pathogens. One of the receptor-families is the C-type lectins (CLR), which bind carbohydrate structures and internalize antigens upon recognition. Intracellular routing of antigen through CLR enhances loading and presentation of antigen through MHC class I and II, inducing antigen-specific CD4{sup +} and CD8{sup +} T-cell proliferation and skewing T-helper cells. These characteristics make CLRs very interesting targets for DC-based immunotherapy. Profound research has been done on targeting specific tumor antigens to CLR using either antibodies or the natural ligands such as glycan structures. In this review we will focus on the current data showing the potency of CLR-targeting and discuss improvements that can be achieved to enhance anti-tumor activity in the near future.

  2. Effect of Hewei-Decoction on chronic atrophic gastritis and eradication of Helicobacter pylori

    Wan-Sheng Ji; Zhi-Xing Gao; Kai-Chun Wu; Jun-Wen Qiu; Bing-Long Shi; Dai-Ming Fan

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To demonstrate the effect of Hewei-Decoction(Decoction for regulating the stomach) on chronic atrophic gastritis (CAG) and eradication of Helicobacter pylori.METHODS: Ninety patients with CAG entering the investigation were divided into six differentiation syndromes, based on their major symptoms and signs.Hewei-Decoction was taken by all the patients orally for 4or 8 wk. The efficacy was assessed by both the composite accumulation of reduced scores of major symptoms and the eradication of H pylori.χ2 test was used to compare the efficacy between Hpylori-positive and negative cases,and to disclose the relationship between efficacy and eradication of H pylori.REStULTS: In patients with six different syndrome types,the efficacy of Hewei-Decoction was 91.67% (11/12),92.86% (13/14), 97.22% (35/36), 87.50% (14/16),75.00% (6/8), 75.00% (3/4) respectively. The rate of highly efficacious was 58.33% (7/12), 50.00% (7/14),77.78% (28/36), 62.50% (10/16), 12.50% (1/8) and25.00% (1/4), respectively. The total efficacy was 91.11%(82/90), and the rate of highly efficacious was 60.00%(54/90). The eradication rate of H pyloriwas 67.86%(38/56). The therapeutic effect of Hewei-Decoction was better in H pylori positive cases than that in Hpylori-negative cases with the total effect of 96.43% vs82.35% (P<0.05).In 56 H pylori positive cases, the therapeutic effect was better in H pylori eradicated cases than that in H pyloriexistent cases with the total effect of 97.37% vs 72.22%(P<0.01).CONCLUSION: Hewei-Decoction is effective in most cases of all the syndrome types. The results indicate that eradication of H pylori is one of the important mechanisms for alleviation of symptoms and signs. Also, the decoction is efficacious in H pylori-negative cases.

  3. Integrated analysis of three bacterial conjunctivitis trials of besifloxacin ophthalmic suspension, 0.6%: microbiological eradication outcomes

    Morris TW

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Timothy W Morris1, Lynne S Gearinger1, Dale W Usner2, Michael R Paterno2, Heleen H DeCory3, Timothy L Comstock3, Wolfgang Haas11Microbiology and Sterilization Sciences, 2Clinical Affairs, 3Global Pharmaceutical Medical Affairs, Bausch & Lomb, Rochester, NY, USAPurpose: To assess clinical antimicrobial efficacy results obtained with besifloxacin ophthalmic suspension, 0.6%, administered three times a day (TID for 5 days, integrated across three clinical trials of bacterial conjunctivitis and to investigate any microbiological eradication failures.Methods: Clinical microbiological eradication data from three randomized, double-masked, parallel group studies of patients with bacterial conjunctivitis (two vehicle controlled; one active controlled with moxifloxacin ophthalmic solution, 0.5% were integrated. All bacterial samples isolated at baseline above the species-specific threshold value were subjected to antimicrobial susceptibility testing. Samples isolated at subsequent visits were subjected to susceptibility testing and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE to investigate the cause of eradication failures and the potential for drug resistance development.Results: Visit 2 (day 4 or 5 and visit 3 (day 8 overall microbiological eradication rates were 92.2% and 88.4% for besifloxacin ophthalmic suspension compared with 61.4% and 72.5% for vehicle and 91.6% and 85.7% for moxifloxacin ophthalmic solution. Visit 2 and visit 3 microbiological eradication rates for Gram-positive and Gram-negative isolates and for individual species were consistent with the overall eradication rates. The majority of observed eradication failures in any treatment group were due to the persistence of the pathogen isolated at baseline. Eradication failures in the besifloxacin treatment group were not associated with lower antimicrobial susceptibility at baseline. PFGE data showed that the majority of bacterial strains in eyes with eradication failures were identical to

  4. Eradication of enteric helicobacters in Mongolian gerbils is complicated by the occurrence of Clostridium difficile enterotoxemia.

    Bergin, Ingrid L; Taylor, Nancy S; Nambiar, Prashant R; Fox, James G

    2005-06-01

    Outbred Mongolian gerbils from a United States commercial source were examined for colonization with naturally occurring enterohepatic Helicobacter spp. Helicobacter spp. were identified in the cecum and colon by culture and by using genus-specific primers in polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays. Nutritionally balanced triple-antibiotic wafers (containing amoxicillin, metronidazole, and bismuth) used previously to eliminate helicobacter infections in mice were administered in an attempt to eradicate the naturally occurring novel helicobacters in the gerbils. After 7 days of antibiotic treatment, two of the experimental animals died due to Clostridium difficile-associated enterotoxemia. However, at 3 weeks after antibiotic cessation, the surviving three animals had no Helicobacter spp. in the cecum or colon according to PCR analysis. Eradication of Helicobacter spp. using dietary administration of antibiotics was complicated by the presence of toxin-producing C. difficile. An alternate method to develop helicobacter-free gerbils (such as Caesarian rederivation) may be necessary. PMID:16089175

  5. Local control of human papillomavirus infection after anal condylomata acuminata eradication

    Thiago da Silveira Manzione

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To verify whether the eradication of anal condylomata acuminata was effective for local control of HPV infection using anal colposcopy and anal brush cytology.METHODS: We evaluated 147 patients treated for anal margin and/or anal canal condyloma, with 108 HIV-positive and 39 HIV-negative individuals. The average age for males was 40 years for HIV-positive and 27.5 for HIV-negative. In females, the mean age was 37.5 years for HIV-positive and 31.5 for HIV-negative.RESULTS: Twenty-four patients (16.3% had normal cytology and anal colposcopy, 16 (10.9% normal cytology and altered anal colposcopy, 52 (35.4% normal anal colposcopy and altered cytology, and 55 (37.4% had altered cytology and anal colposcopy.CONCLUSION: the eradication of clinical lesions failed to locally control HPV infection.

  6. Control and eradication programme of enzootic bovine leucosis (EBL) from selected dairy herds in Turkey.

    Burgu, I; Alkan, F; Karaoglu, T; Bilge-Dagalp, S; Can-Sahna, K; Güngör, B; Demir, B

    2005-07-01

    Serum samples of 15,909 cattle from 31 dairy herds located in various regions of Turkey were tested for the presence of antibodies against bovine leucosis virus (BLV) using Agar Gel Immuno-diffusion technique (AGID). 48.3% (15/31) of the herds had seropositive animals and positivity rates were detected from 0.5-34.4% in these herds. In an EBL control/eradication programme all seropositive animals were culled in the infected herds. Thereafter, a total of 74,347 sera were tested for the presence of BLV specific antibodies. The serological results and detail of EBL control/eradication programme were shown in this paper. PMID:16124702

  7. Description and validation of ERAD: An atmospheric dispersion model for high explosive detonations

    Boughton, B.A.; DeLaurentis, J.M.

    1992-10-01

    The Explosive Release Atmospheric Dispersion (ERAD) model is a three-dimensional numerical simulation of turbulent atmospheric transport and diffusion. An integral plume rise technique is used to provide a description of the physical and thermodynamic properties of the cloud of warm gases formed when the explosive detonates. Particle dispersion is treated as a stochastic process which is simulated using a discrete time Lagrangian Monte Carlo method. The stochastic process approach permits a more fundamental treatment of buoyancy effects, calm winds and spatial variations in meteorological conditions. Computational requirements of the three-dimensional simulation are substantially reduced by using a conceptualization in which each Monte Carlo particle represents a small puff that spreads according to a Gaussian law in the horizontal directions. ERAD was evaluated against dosage and deposition measurements obtained during Operation Roller Coaster. The predicted contour areas average within about 50% of the observations. The validation results confirm the model`s representation of the physical processes.

  8. Quantitative assessment of histological changes in chronic gastritis after eradication of Helicobacter pylori.

    Di Napoli, A; Petrino, R; Boero, M.; Bellis, D; Chiandussi, L

    1992-01-01

    AIMS: To evaluate the effect of 10 day triple treatment on H pylori eradication and associated gastritis. METHODS: Fifty patients with H pylori positive non-ulcer dyspepsia were treated for 10 days with amoxicillin, tinidazole, and bismuth salts. Histological examination of the antral mucosa was performed before (T0), six weeks (T1), and six months (T2) after treatment. The new Sydney classification of gastritis was used, using a score from 0 to 3 to grade degree of inflammation, atrophy, act...

  9. Mucoadhesive and muco-penetrating delivery systems for eradication of helicobacter pylori

    Saahil Arora; Gaurav Bisen; R D Budhiraja

    2012-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori), the major culprit for peptic ulcer, has a unique way of survival in harsh acidic environment of the stomach by colonizing deep in the gastric mucosal layer. Failure of conventional therapies against H. pylori for complete eradication has major limitations like low residence time of delivery system in stomach, poor penetration of drug in gastric mucosa, acidic degradation of antibiotics, and development of antibiotics resistance. The poor penetration of antibio...

  10. Helicobacter pylori eradication lowers serum homocysteine level in patients without gastric atrophy

    Birol Ozer; Ender Serin; Yuksel Gumurdulu; Fazilet Kayaselcuk; Ruksan Anarat; Gurden Gur; Kemal Kul; Mustafa Gu(c)lu; Sedat Boyacioglu

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To determine whether Helicobacter pylori ( H pylori)infection caused hyperhomocysteinemia by altering serum vitamin B12, serum folate and erythrocyte folate levels and whether eradication of this organism decreased serum homocysteine level.METHODS: The study involved 73 dyspeptic H pylori positive patients, none of them had gastric mucosal atrophy based on rapid urease test and histology. Out of 73patients, 41 (56.2%) showed a successful eradication of H pylori 4 wk after the end of treatment. In these 41 patients, fasting serum vitamin B12, folate and homocysteine levels, and erythrocyte folate levels before and 4 wk after H pylorieradication therapy were compared.RESULTS: The group with a successful eradication of Hpylori had significantly higher serum vitamin B12 and erythrocyte folate levels in the post-treatment period compared to those in pre-treatment period (210±97 pg/mL vs 237±94 pg/mL, P<0.001 and 442±212 ng/mL vs 539±304 ng/mL, P = 0.024, respectively), but showed no significant change in serum folate levels (5.6±2.6 ng/mL vs 6.0±2.4 ng/mL, P= 0.341). Also, the serum homocysteine levels in this group were significantly lower after therapy (13.1±5.2 μmol/L vs 11.9±6.2 μmol/L, P = 0.002). Regression analysisshowed that serum homocysteine level was positively correlated with age (P = 0.01) and negatively with serum folate level before therapy (P = 0.003). CONCLUSION: Eradication of H pylori decreases serum homocysteine even in patients who do not exhibit gastric mucosal atrophy. It appears that the level of homocysteine in serum is related to a complex interaction among serum vitamin B12, serum folate and erythrocyte folate levels.

  11. Standard triple versus levofloxacin based regimen for eradication ofHelicobacter pylori

    Raj; Gopal; Thirthar; Palanivelu; Elamurugan; Vikram; Kate; Sadasivan; Jagdish; Debdatta; Basu

    2013-01-01

    AIM:To compare the eradication rates for Helicobacter pylori(H.pylori) and ulcer recurrence of standard triple therapy(STT) and levofloxacin based therapy(LBT).METHODS:Seventy-four patients with perforated duodenal ulcer treated with simple closure and found to be H.pylori infected on 3 mo follow up were randomized to receive either the STT group comprising of amoxicillin 1 g bid,clarithromycin 500 mg bid and omeprazole 20 mg bid or the LBT group comprising of amoxicillin 1 g bid,levofloxacin 500 mg bid and omeprazole 20 mg bid for 10 d each.The H.pylori eradication rates,side effects,compliance and the recurrence of ulcer were assessed in the two groups at 3 mo follow up.RESULTS:Thirty-four patients in the STT group and 32 patients in the levofloxacin group presented at 3 mo follow up.H.pylori eradication rates were similar with STT and the LBT groups on intention-to-treat(ITT) analysis(69% vs 80%,P = 0.425) and(79% vs 87%,P = 0.513) by per-protocol(PP) analysis respectively.Ulcer recurrence in the STT and LBT groups on ITT analysis was(20% vs 14%,P = 0.551) and(9% vs 6%,P = 1.00) by PP analysis.Compliance and side effects were also comparable between the groups.A complete course of STT costs Indian Rupees(INR) 1060.00,while LBT costs only INR 360.00.CONCLUSION:H.pylori eradication rates and the rate of ulcer recurrence were similar between the STT and LBT.The LBT is a more economical option compared to STT.

  12. Rifaximin Plus Levofloxacin-Based Rescue Regimen for the Eradication of Helicobacter pylori

    Yun, Sang-Pil; Seon, Han Gyung; Ok, Chang Soo; Yoo, Kwang Ho; Kang, Min Kyung; Kim, Won Hee; Kwon, Chang Il; Ko, Kwang Hyun; Hwang, Seong Gyu; Park, Pil Won; Hong, Sung Pyo

    2012-01-01

    Background/Aims This study assessed the efficacy of a rifaximin plus levofloxacin-based rescue regimen in patients that had failed both triple and quadruple standard regimens for the eradication of Helicobacter pylori. Methods We treated patients for H. pylori between August 2009 and April 2011. The triple regimen consisted of combined treatment with amoxicillin, clarithromycin, and pantoprazole for 1 week. For failed cases, a quadruple regimen of tetracycline, metronidazole, bismuth dicitrat...

  13. Suppressing Tsetse Flies to Improve Lives. The IAEA Helps Ethiopia Prepare for Tsetse Eradication

    In 2009, the government-run Southern Tsetse Eradication Project (STEP) in Ethopia, with the support of the IAEA, started to carry out intensive activities to suppress the fly population using insecticides. The fly population is now down by 90%. The benefits of tsetse suppression can be seen all over the region. Diary produce is now widely available at markets and healthy animals can be seen everywhere in farming and transport

  14. Lectin-conjugated microspheres for eradication of Helicobacter pylori infection and interaction with mucus

    Adebisi, Adeola O.; Conway, Barbara R

    2014-01-01

    Using second generation mucoadhesives may enhance targeting antibiotics for eradication of Helicobacter pylori from the stomach for the treatment of peptic ulcer. The aim of this research was to prepare and characterise ethylcellulose/chitosan microspheres containing clarithromycin with their surfaces functionalised with concanavalin A to produce a floating-mucoadhesive formulation. The microspheres were prepared using an emulsification-solvent evaporation method. Particle size, surface morph...

  15. Regional multipliers of social accounting matrix and the effective eradication of poverty

    Wannaphong Durongkaveroj and Rossarin Osathanunkul; Rossarin Osathanunkul

    2013-01-01

    Halving poverty became a global responsibility. As decreased poverty was typically related with an increased income, policies relevant to economic growth had been widely implemented throughout all regions. The purpose of this study was to simulate the effects of exogenously macroeconomic shocks on regional poverty through SAM multiplier in various groups of developing country around the world. The study revealed that to eradicate poverty in each region required exogenous shock or income injec...

  16. A new prospect in cancer therapy: targeting cancer stem cells to eradicate cancer

    Yi-Min Zhu; Li-Hua Yuan; Ke-Feng Pu; Bing Dong; An-Xin Wang; Li-Sha Chen

    2012-01-01

    According to the cancer stem cell theory, cancers can be initiated by cancer stem cells. This makes cancer stem cells prime targets for therapeutic intervention. Eradicating cancer stem cells by efficient targeting agents may have the potential to cure cancer. In this review, we summarize recent breakthroughs that have improved our understanding of cancer stem cells, and we discuss the therapeutic strategy of targeting cancer stem cells, a promising future direction for cancer stem cell resea...

  17. Yaws Prevalence, Lessons from the Field and the Way Forward towards Yaws Eradication in Ghana

    Agana-Nsiire, Patrick; Kaitoo, Ekow; Agongo, Emmanuel Erasmus Akurugu; Bonsu, George; Kyei-Faried, Sadik; Amponsa-Achiano, Kwame; Ahmed, Kofi; Appiah-Denkyira, Ebenezer; Asiedu, Kingsley; Amankwa, Joseph; Bonsu, Frank Adae

    2014-01-01

    Despite past WHO/UNICEF led global yaws eradication efforts, the disease seems to persist. The true burden is however not known for comprehensive action. Ghana’s data showed significant increase in notified cases since the 1970s. Recognizing limitations in routine data, we carried out a yaws treatment survey in 2008 in three purposively selected districts to establish the prevalence and learn lessons for renewed action. Of 208,413 school children examined, 4,006 were suspected yaws cases (pre...

  18. Pseudomembranous colitis associated with a triple therapy for Helicobacter pylori eradication

    Trifan, Anca; Girleanu, Irina; Cojocariu, Camelia; Sfarti, Catalin; Singeap, Ana Maria; Dorobat, Carmen; Grigore, Lucia; Stanciu, Carol

    2013-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is one of the most common chronic bacterial infections in humans, affecting half of world’s population. Therapy for H. pylori infection has proven to be both effective and safe. The one-week triple therapy including proton pump inhibitor, clarithromycin, and amoxicillin or metronidazole is still recommended as a first-line treatment to eradicate H. pylori infection in countries with low clarithromycin resistance. Generally, this therapy is well-tolerated, with ...

  19. China and India : challenges and opportunities for poverty eradication and moderating inequality in Malaysia

    Ragayah Haji Mat Zin

    2006-01-01

    Malaysia has employed the mechanism of growth with equity in an effort to eradicate poverty and ameliorate inequality. During the New Economic Policy period, the government intervened extensively to ensure that all levels of society benefited from economic development and thereby maintain social cohesion. However, the increasing pace of liberalization coupled with developments in the region, such as the rise of China and India, has eroded the government’s ability to ensure the equitable shari...

  20. Towards global Guinea worm eradication in 2015: the experience of South Sudan.

    Awofeso, Niyi

    2013-08-01

    For centuries, the Guinea worm parasite (Dracunculus medinensis) has caused disabling misery, infecting people who drink stagnant water contaminated with the worm's larvae. In 2012, there were 542 cases of Guinea worm reported globally, of which 521 (96.1%) were reported in South Sudan. Protracted civil wars, an inadequate workforce, neglect of potable water provision programs, suboptimal Guinea worm surveillance and case containment, and fragmented health systems account for many of the structural and operational factors encumbering South Sudan's Guinea worm eradication efforts. This article reviews the impacts of six established Guinea worm control strategies in South Sudan: (1) surveillance to determine actual caseload distribution and trends in response to control measures; (2) educating community members from whom worms are emerging to avoid immersing affected parts in sources of drinking water; (3) filtering potentially contaminated drinking water using cloth filters or filtered drinking straws; (4) treating potentially contaminated surface water with the copepod larvicide temephos (Abate); (5) providing safe drinking water from boreholes or hand-dug wells; and (6) containment of transmission through voluntary isolation of each patient to prevent contamination of drinking water sources, provision of first aid, and manual extraction of the worm. Surveillance, community education, potable water provision, and case containment remain weak facets of the program. Abate pesticide is not a viable option for Guinea worm control in South Sudan. In light of current case detection and containment trends, as well as capacity building efforts for Guinea worm eradication, South Sudan is more likely to eradicate Guinea worm by 2020, rather than by 2015. The author highlights areas in which substantial improvements are required in South Sudan's Guinea worm eradication program, and suggests improvement strategies. PMID:23623648