WorldWideScience

Sample records for acetyltransferase tip60 targets

  1. The adipogenic acetyltransferase Tip60 targets activation function 1 of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma

    van Beekum, Olivier; Brenkman, Arjan B; Grøntved, Lars;

    2008-01-01

    proteins with which this nuclear receptor interacts under specific conditions. Here we identify the HIV-1 Tat-interacting protein 60 (Tip60) as a novel positive regulator of PPARgamma transcriptional activity. Using tandem mass spectrometry, we found that PPARgamma and the acetyltransferase Tip60 interact......-mediated reduction of Tip60 protein impairs differentiation of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes. Taken together, these findings qualify the acetyltransferase Tip60 as a novel adipogenic factor....

  2. Rational design and validation of a Tip60 histone acetyltransferase inhibitor

    Gao, Chunxia; Bourke, Emer; Scobie, Martin; Famme, Melina Arcos; Koolmeister, Tobias; Helleday, Thomas; Eriksson, Leif A.; Lowndes, Noel F.; Brown, James A. L.

    2014-06-01

    Histone acetylation is required for many aspects of gene regulation, genome maintenance and metabolism and dysfunctional acetylation is implicated in numerous diseases, including cancer. Acetylation is regulated by histone acetyltransferases (HATs) and histone deacetylases and currently, few general HAT inhibitors have been described. We identified the HAT Tip60 as an excellent candidate for targeted drug development, as Tip60 is a key mediator of the DNA damage response and transcriptional co-activator. Our modeling of Tip60 indicated that the active binding pocket possesses opposite charges at each end, with the positive charges attributed to two specific side chains. We used structure based drug design to develop a novel Tip60 inhibitor, TH1834, to fit this specific pocket. We demonstrate that TH1834 significantly inhibits Tip60 activity in vitro and treating cells with TH1834 results in apoptosis and increased unrepaired DNA damage (following ionizing radiation treatment) in breast cancer but not control cell lines. Furthermore, TH1834 did not affect the activity of related HAT MOF, as indicated by H4K16Ac, demonstrating specificity. The modeling and validation of the small molecule inhibitor TH1834 represents a first step towards developing additional specific, targeted inhibitors of Tip60 that may lead to further improvements in the treatment of breast cancer.

  3. The acetyltransferase Tip60 contributes to mammary tumorigenesis by modulating DNA repair.

    Bassi, C; Li, Y-T; Khu, K; Mateo, F; Baniasadi, P S; Elia, A; Mason, J; Stambolic, V; Pujana, M A; Mak, T W; Gorrini, C

    2016-07-01

    The acetyltransferase Tip60/Kat5 acetylates both histone and non-histone proteins, and is involved in a variety of biological processes. By acetylating p53, Tip60 controls p53-dependent transcriptional activity and so is implicated as a tumor suppressor. However, many breast cancers with low Tip60 also show p53 mutation, implying that Tip60 has a tumor suppressor function independent of its acetylation of p53. Here, we show in a p53-null mouse model of sporadic invasive breast adenocarcinoma that heterozygosity for Tip60 deletion promotes mammary tumorigenesis. Low Tip60 reduces DNA repair in normal and tumor mammary epithelial cells, both under resting conditions and following genotoxic stress. We demonstrate that Tip60 controls homologous recombination (HR)-directed DNA repair, and that Tip60 levels correlate inversely with a gene expression signature associated with defective HR-directed DNA repair. In human breast cancer data sets, Tip60 mRNA is downregulated, with low Tip60 levels correlating with p53 mutations in basal-like breast cancers. Our findings indicate that Tip60 is a novel breast tumor suppressor gene whose loss results in genomic instability leading to cancer formation. PMID:26915295

  4. Sirt1 physically interacts with Tip60 and negatively regulates Tip60-mediated acetylation of H2AX

    Yamagata, Kazutsune, E-mail: kyamagat@ncc.go.jp [Department of Molecular Oncology Division, National Cancer Center Research Institute, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045 (Japan); Kitabayashi, Issay [Department of Molecular Oncology Division, National Cancer Center Research Institute, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045 (Japan)

    2009-12-25

    Sirt1 appear to be NAD(+)-dependent deacetylase that deacetylates histones and several non-histone proteins. In this study, we identified Sirt1 as a physical interaction partner of Tip60, which is a mammalian MYST-type histone acetyl-transferase that specifically acetylates histones H2A and H4. Although Tip60 also acetylates DNA damage-specific histone H2A variant H2AX in response to DNA damage, which is a process required for appropriate DNA damage response, overexpression of Sirt1 represses Tip60-mediated acetylation of H2AX. Furthermore, Sirt1 depletion by RNAi causes excessive acetylation of H2AX, and enhances accumulation of {gamma}-ray irradiation-induced MDC1, BRCA1, and Rad51 foci in nuclei. These findings suggest that Sirt1 functions as negative regulator of Tip60-mediated acetylation of H2AX. Moreover, Sirt1 deacetylates an acetylated Tip60 in response to DNA damage and stimulates proteasome-dependent Tip60 degradation in vivo, suggesting that Sirt1 negatively regulates the protein level of Tip60 in vivo. Sirt1 may thus repress excessive activation of the DNA damage response and Rad51-homologous recombination repair by suppressing the function of Tip60.

  5. Allele compensation in tip60+/- mice rescues white adipose tissue function in vivo.

    Yuan Gao

    Full Text Available Adipose tissue is a key regulator of energy homestasis. The amount of adipose tissue is largely determined by adipocyte differentiation (adipogenesis, a process that is regulated by the concerted actions of multiple transcription factors and cofactors. Based on in vitro studies in murine 3T3-L1 preadipocytes and human primary preadipocytes, the transcriptional cofactor and acetyltransferase Tip60 was recently identified as an essential adipogenic factor. We therefore investigated the role of Tip60 on adipocyte differentiation and function, and possible consequences on energy homeostasis, in vivo. Because homozygous inactivation results in early embryonic lethality, Tip60+/- mice were used. Heterozygous inactivation of Tip60 had no effect on body weight, despite slightly higher food intake by Tip60+/- mice. No major effects of heterozygous inactivation of Tip60 were observed on adipose tissue and liver, and Tip60+/- displayed normal glucose tolerance, both on a low fat and a high fat diet. While Tip60 mRNA was reduced to 50% in adipose tissue, the protein levels were unaltered, suggesting compensation by the intact allele. These findings indicate that the in vivo role of Tip60 in adipocyte differentiation and function cannot be properly addressed in Tip60+/- mice, but requires the generation of adipose tissue-specific knock out animals or specific knock-in mice.

  6. Tip60 HAT Action Mediates Environmental Enrichment Induced Cognitive Restoration.

    Xu, Songjun; Panikker, Priyalakshmi; Iqbal, Sahira; Elefant, Felice

    2016-01-01

    Environmental enrichment (EE) conditions have beneficial effects for reinstating cognitive ability in neuropathological disorders like Alzheimer's disease (AD). While EE benefits involve epigenetic gene control mechanisms that comprise histone acetylation, the histone acetyltransferases (HATs) involved remain largely unknown. Here, we examine a role for Tip60 HAT action in mediating activity- dependent beneficial neuroadaptations to EE using the Drosophila CNS mushroom body (MB) as a well-characterized cognition model. We show that flies raised under EE conditions display enhanced MB axonal outgrowth, synaptic marker protein production, histone acetylation induction and transcriptional activation of cognition linked genes when compared to their genotypically identical siblings raised under isolated conditions. Further, these beneficial changes are impaired in both Tip60 HAT mutant flies and APP neurodegenerative flies. While EE conditions provide some beneficial neuroadaptive changes in the APP neurodegenerative fly MB, such positive changes are significantly enhanced by increasing MB Tip60 HAT levels. Our results implicate Tip60 as a critical mediator of EE-induced benefits, and provide broad insights into synergistic behavioral and epigenetic based therapeutic approaches for treatment of cognitive disorder. PMID:27454757

  7. Deficiency of DNA double-strand break repair and enhanced radiosensitivity in Tip60 silenced cells

    Objective: To investigate the effect of Tip60 on the cellular radiosensitivity,and to explore the related mechanism. Methods: siRNA and anacardic acid (AA, an inhibitor of Tip60 acetyltransferase) were used to inhibit Tip60 expression and its acetyltransferase activity, respectively. Radiosensitivity was analyzed by colony-forming ability assay. γ-H2AX foci were detected to analyze the DNA double-strand break (DSB). Immunoprecipitation was used to determine the interaction of proteins. Results: siRNA-mediated silencing of Tip60 led to enhanced sensitivity of U2OS cells at 1, 2 Gy after γ-ray irradiation, but had no significant effect at 4 Gy post-irradiation (t=3.364, 3.979, P<0.05).γ-H2AX foci detection indicated that Tip60 silencing resulted in a decreased capability of DNA double-strand break repair at 1, 4 and 8 h after irradiation (t=3.875, 3.183 and 3.175, respectively, P<0.05). The interaction of Tip60 and DNA-PKcs was prompted by ionizing radiation. Anacardic acid largely abrogated the phosphorylation of DNA-PKcs at T2609 site induced by irradiation. Conclusions: Tip60 plays a role in the cellular response to ionizing radiation-induced DNA damage through, at least in part, interacting with DNA-PKcs and regulating its phosphorylation. (authors)

  8. Histone acetyltransferase inhibitor CPTH6 preferentially targets lung cancer stem-like cells

    Di Martile, Marta; Desideri, Marianna; De Luca, Teresa; Gabellini, Chiara; Buglioni, Simonetta; Eramo, Adriana; Sette, Giovanni; Milella, Michele; Rotili, Dante; Mai, Antonello; Carradori, Simone; Secci, Daniela; De Maria, Ruggero; Del Bufalo, Donatella; Trisciuoglio, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) play an important role in tumor initiation, progression, therapeutic failure and tumor relapse. In this study, we evaluated the efficacy of the thiazole derivative 3-methylcyclopentylidene-[4-(4′-chlorophenyl)thiazol-2-yl]hydrazone (CPTH6), a novel pCAF and Gcn5 histone acetyltransferase inhibitor, as a small molecule that preferentially targets lung cancer stem-like cells (LCSCs) derived from non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. Notably, although CPTH6 inhibits the growth of both LCSC and NSCLC cell lines, LCSCs exhibit greater growth inhibition than established NSCLC cells. Growth inhibitory effect of CPTH6 in LCSC lines is primarily due to apoptosis induction. Of note, differentiated progeny of LCSC lines is more resistant to CPTH6 in terms of loss of cell viability and reduction of protein acetylation, when compared to their undifferentiated counterparts. Interestingly, in LCSC lines CPTH6 treatment is also associated with a reduction of stemness markers. By using different HAT inhibitors we provide clear evidence that inhibition of HAT confers a strong preferential inhibitory effect on cell viability of undifferentiated LCSC lines when compared to their differentiated progeny. In vivo, CPTH6 is able to inhibit the growth of LCSC-derived xenografts and to reduce cancer stem cell content in treated tumors, as evidenced by marked reduction of tumor-initiating capacity in limiting dilution assays. Strikingly, the ability of CPTH6 to inhibit tubulin acetylation is also confirmed in vivo. Overall, our studies propose histone acetyltransferase inhibition as an attractive target for cancer therapy of NSCLC. PMID:26870991

  9. Histone acetyltransferase inhibitor CPTH6 preferentially targets lung cancer stem-like cells.

    Di Martile, Marta; Desideri, Marianna; De Luca, Teresa; Gabellini, Chiara; Buglioni, Simonetta; Eramo, Adriana; Sette, Giovanni; Milella, Michele; Rotili, Dante; Mai, Antonello; Carradori, Simone; Secci, Daniela; De Maria, Ruggero; Del Bufalo, Donatella; Trisciuoglio, Daniela

    2016-03-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) play an important role in tumor initiation, progression, therapeutic failure and tumor relapse. In this study, we evaluated the efficacy of the thiazole derivative 3-methylcyclopentylidene-[4-(4'-chlorophenyl)thiazol-2-yl]hydrazone (CPTH6), a novel pCAF and Gcn5 histone acetyltransferase inhibitor, as a small molecule that preferentially targets lung cancer stem-like cells (LCSCs) derived from non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. Notably, although CPTH6 inhibits the growth of both LCSC and NSCLC cell lines, LCSCs exhibit greater growth inhibition than established NSCLC cells. Growth inhibitory effect of CPTH6 in LCSC lines is primarily due to apoptosis induction. Of note, differentiated progeny of LCSC lines is more resistant to CPTH6 in terms of loss of cell viability and reduction of protein acetylation, when compared to their undifferentiated counterparts. Interestingly, in LCSC lines CPTH6 treatment is also associated with a reduction of stemness markers. By using different HAT inhibitors we provide clear evidence that inhibition of HAT confers a strong preferential inhibitory effect on cell viability of undifferentiated LCSC lines when compared to their differentiated progeny. In vivo, CPTH6 is able to inhibit the growth of LCSC-derived xenografts and to reduce cancer stem cell content in treated tumors, as evidenced by marked reduction of tumor-initiating capacity in limiting dilution assays. Strikingly, the ability of CPTH6 to inhibit tubulin acetylation is also confirmed in vivo. Overall, our studies propose histone acetyltransferase inhibition as an attractive target for cancer therapy of NSCLC. PMID:26870991

  10. Andrographolide: A potent antituberculosis compound that targets Aminoglycoside 2'-N-acetyltransferase in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Prabu, Amudha; Hassan, Sameer; Prabuseenivasan; Shainaba, A S; Hanna, L E; Kumar, Vanaja

    2015-09-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) still remains a major challenging infectious disease. The increased rate of emergence of multi-drug resistant and extensively-drug resistant strains of the organism has further complicated the situation, resulting in an urgent need for new anti-TB drugs. Antimycobacterial activity of Andrographis paniculata was evaluated using a rapid LRP assay and the probable targets were identified by docking analysis. The methanolic extract of A. paniculata showed maximum antimycobacterial activity at 250μg/ml against all the tested strains of M. tuberculosis (H37Rv, MDR, and drug sensitive). Based on bioassay guided fractionation, andrographolide was identified as the potent molecule. With the docking analysis, both ICDH (Isocitrate Dehydrogenase) and AAC (Aminoglycoside 2'-N-acetyltransferase) were predicted as targets of andrographolide in M. tuberculosis. Molecular simulation revealed that, ICDH showed low binding affinity to andrographolide. However, for AAC, the andrographolide was observed to be well within the active site after 10ns of molecular simulation. This suggests that ACC (PDB ID 1M4I) could be the probable target for andrographolide. PMID:26245695

  11. The effects of over-expressing Tip60 on cellular DNA damage repair and cell cycle progression

    To investigate the effects of Tip60 on DNA damage repair, cell cycle and the related mechanism as well, the proliferative activity, DNA double strand break (DSB) repair competency and cell cycle arrest were analyzed in stable Tip60-overexpression U2OS cells established by transfecting with exogenous Tip60 gene. It was found that the overexpression of Tip60 inhibited the proliferative activity but increased the DNA damage repair competency. The radiation-induced G2/M arrest was prolonged in Tip60 over-expressed U2OS cells, which was associated with a decreasing level of cell cycle checkpoint protein Cyclin B/CDC2 complex. (authors)

  12. SMCX and components of the TIP60 complex contribute to E2 regulation of the HPV E6/E7 promoter

    Smith, Jennifer A.; Haberstroh, Friederike S.; White, Elizabeth A.; Livingston, David M.; DeCaprio, James A.; Howley, Peter M.

    2014-01-01

    An important step in the malignant progression of HPV-associated lesions is the dysregulation of expression of the viral E6 and E7 oncogenes. This is often achieved through the loss of expression of E2, which represses the HPV LCR promoter and E6/E7 expression. Our previous studies confirmed a role for Brd4 in mediating the E2 transcriptional repression function, and identified JARID1C/SMCX and EP400 as contributors to E2-mediated repression. Here we show that TIP60, a component of the TIP60/TRRAP histone acetyltransferase complex, also contributes to the E2 repression function, and we extend our studies on SMCX. Di- and tri-methyl marks on histone H3K4 are reduced in the presence of E2 and SMCX, suggesting a mechanism by which SMCX contributes to E2-mediated repression of the HPV LCR. Together, these findings lead us to hypothesize that E2 recruits histone-modifying cellular proteins to the HPV LCR, resulting in transcriptional repression of E6 and E7. PMID:25222147

  13. SMCX and components of the TIP60 complex contribute to E2 regulation of the HPV E6/E7 promoter.

    Smith, Jennifer A; Haberstroh, Friederike S; White, Elizabeth A; Livingston, David M; DeCaprio, James A; Howley, Peter M

    2014-11-01

    An important step in the malignant progression of HPV-associated lesions is the dysregulation of expression of the viral E6 and E7 oncogenes. This is often achieved through the loss of expression of E2, which represses the HPV LCR promoter and E6/E7 expression. Our previous studies confirmed a role for Brd4 in mediating the E2 transcriptional repression function, and identified JARID1C/SMCX and EP400 as contributors to E2-mediated repression. Here we show that TIP60, a component of the TIP60/TRRAP histone acetyltransferase complex, also contributes to the E2 repression function, and we extend our studies on SMCX. Di- and tri-methyl marks on histone H3K4 are reduced in the presence of E2 and SMCX, suggesting a mechanism by which SMCX contributes to E2-mediated repression of the HPV LCR. Together, these findings lead us to hypothesize that E2 recruits histone-modifying cellular proteins to the HPV LCR, resulting in transcriptional repression of E6 and E7. PMID:25222147

  14. MDR1 mediated chemoresistance: BMI1 and TIP60 in action.

    Banerjee Mustafi, Soumyajit; Chakraborty, Prabir Kumar; Naz, Sarwat; Dwivedi, Shailendra Kumar Dhar; Street, Mark; Basak, Rumki; Yang, Da; Ding, Kai; Mukherjee, Priyabrata; Bhattacharya, Resham

    2016-08-01

    Chemotherapy-induced emergence of drug resistant cells is frequently observed and is exemplified by the expression of family of drug resistance proteins including, multidrug resistance protein 1 (MDR1). However, a concise mechanism for chemotherapy-induced MDR1 expression is unclear. Mechanistically, mutational selection, epigenetic alteration, activation of the Wnt pathway or impaired p53 function have been implicated. The present study describes that the surviving fraction of cisplatin resistant cells co- upregulate MDR1, BMI1 and acetyl transferase activity of TIP60. Using complementary gain and loss of function approaches, we demonstrate that the expression of MDR1 is positively regulated by BMI1, a stem-cell factor classically known as a transcriptional repressor. Our study establishes a functional interaction between TIP60 and BMI-1 resulting in upregulation of MDR1 expression. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays further establish that the proximal MDR1 promoter responds to cisplatin in a BMI1 dependent manner. BMI1 interacts with a cluster of E-box elements on the MDR1 promoter and recruits TIP60 resulting in acetylation of histone H2A and H3. Collectively, our data establish a hitherto unknown liaison among MDR1, BMI1 and TIP60 and provide mechanistic insights into cisplatin-induced MDR1 expression resulting in acquired cross-resistance against paclitaxel, doxorubicin and likely other drugs. In conclusion, our results advocate utilizing anti-BMI1 strategies to alleviate acquired resistance to chemotherapy. PMID:27295567

  15. Tip60-mediated acetylation activates transcription independent apoptotic activity of Abl

    Pandita Tej K

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The proto-oncogene, c-Abl encodes a ubiquitously expressed tyrosine kinase that critically governs the cell death response induced by genotoxic agents such as ionizing radiation and cisplatin. The catalytic function of Abl, which is essential for executing DNA damage response (DDR, is normally tightly regulated but upregulated several folds upon IR exposure due to ATM-mediated phosphorylation on S465. However, the mechanism/s leading to activation of Abl's apoptotic activity is currently unknown. Results We investigated the role of acetyl modification in regulating apoptotic activity of Abl and the results showed that DNA strand break-inducing agents, ionizing radiation and bleomycin induced Abl acetylation. Using mass spectrophotometry and site-specific acetyl antibody, we identified Abl K921, located in the DNA binding domain, and conforming to one of the lysine residue in the consensus acetylation motif (KXXK--X3-5--SGS is acetylated following DNA damage. We further observed that the S465 phosphorylated Abl is acetyl modified during DNA damage. Signifying the modification, cells expressing the non acetylatable K921R mutant displayed attenuated apoptosis compared to wild-type in response to IR or bleomycin treatment. WT-Abl induced apoptosis irrespective of new protein synthesis. Furthermore, upon γ-irradiation K921R-Abl displayed reduced chromatin binding compared to wild type. Finally, loss of Abl K921 acetylation in Tip60-knocked down cells and co-precipitation of Abl with Tip60 in DNA damaged cells identified Tip60 as an Abl acetylase. Conclusion Collective data showed that DNA damage-induced K921 Abl acetylation, mediated by Tip60, stimulates transcriptional-independent apoptotic activity and chromatin-associative property thereby defining a new regulatory mechanism governing Abl's DDR function.

  16. The yeast SAS (something about silencing) protein complex contains a MYST-type putative acetyltransferase and functions with chromatin assembly factor ASF1

    Osada, Shigehiro; Sutton, Ann; Muster, Nemone; Brown, Christine E.; Yates, John R.; Sternglanz, Rolf; Workman, Jerry L.

    2001-01-01

    It is well established that acetylation of histone and nonhistone proteins is intimately linked to transcriptional activation. However, loss of acetyltransferase activity has also been shown to cause silencing defects, implicating acetylation in gene silencing. The something about silencing (Sas) 2 protein of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a member of the MYST (MOZ, Ybf2/Sas3, Sas2, and TIP60) acetyltransferase family, promotes silencing at HML and telomeres. Here we identify a ∼450-kD SAS complex...

  17. FOXP3 interactions with histone acetyltransferase and class II histone deacetylases are required for repression

    Li, Bin; Samanta, Arabinda; Song, Xiaomin; Iacono, Kathryn T.; Bembas, Kathryn; Tao, Ran; Basu, Samik; Riley, James L.; Hancock, Wayne W.; Shen, Yuan; Saouaf, Sandra J.; Mark I. Greene

    2007-01-01

    The forkhead family protein FOXP3 acts as a repressor of transcription and is both an essential and sufficient regulator of the development and function of regulatory T cells. The molecular mechanism by which FOXP3-mediated transcriptional repression occurs remains unclear. Here, we report that transcriptional repression by FOXP3 involves a histone acetyltransferase–deacetylase complex that includes histone acetyltransferase TIP60 (Tat-interactive protein, 60 kDa) and class II histone deacety...

  18. Targeting cancer using KAT inhibitors to mimic lethal knockouts

    Brown, James A.L.; Bourke, Emer; Eriksson, Leif A.; Kerin, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Two opposing enzyme classes regulate fundamental elements of genome maintenance, gene regulation and metabolism, either through addition of an acetyl moiety by histone acetyltransferases (HATs) or its removal by histone de-acetyltransferases (HDAC), and are exciting targets for drug development. Importantly, dysfunctional acetylation has been implicated in numerous diseases, including cancer. Within the HAT superfamily the MYST family holds particular interest, as its members are directly involved in the DNA damage response and repair pathways and crucially, several members have been shown to be down-regulated in common cancers (such as breast and prostate). In the present study we focus on the development of lysine (K) acetyltransferase inhibitors (KATi) targeting the MYST family member Tip60 (Kat5), an essential protein, designed or discovered through screening libraries. Importantly, Tip60 has been demonstrated to be significantly down-regulated in many cancers which urgently require new treatment options. We highlight current and future efforts employing these KATi as cancer treatments and their ability to synergize and enhance current cancer treatments. We investigate the different methods of KATi production or discovery, their mechanisms and their validation models. Importantly, the utility of KATi is based on a key concept: using KATi to abrogate the activity of an already down-regulated essential protein (effectively creating a lethal knockout) provides another innovative mechanism for targeting cancer cells, while significantly minimizing any off-target effects to normal cells. This approach, combined with the rapidly developing interest in KATi, suggests that KATi have a bright future for providing truly personalized therapies. PMID:27528742

  19. Expression Analysis of cPLA2 Alpha Interacting TIP60 in Diabetic KKAy and Non-Diabetic C57BL Wild-Type Mice: No Impact of Transient and Stable TIP60 Overexpression on Glucose-Stimulated Insulin Secretion in Pancreatic Beta-Cells

    Nordentoft, Iver; Jeppesen, Per B; Nielsen, Anders L;

    2007-01-01

    In the present study we investigate the expression levels of cytosolic phospholipase A2 alpha (cPLA2alpha) interacting histone acetyl transferase proteins TIP60alpha and TIP60beta in non-diabetic C57BL wild-type mice and obese type 2 diabetic KKAy model mice. The aim was to test our hypothesis that...

  20. SMCX and components of the TIP60 complex contribute to E2 regulation of the HPV E6/E7 promoter

    Smith, Jennifer A.; Haberstroh, Friederike S.; White, Elizabeth A.; Livingston, David M.; DeCaprio, James A.; Howley, Peter M.

    2014-01-01

    An important step in the malignant progression of HPV-associated lesions is the dysregulation of expression of the viral E6 and E7 oncogenes. This is often achieved through the loss of expression of E2, which represses the HPV LCR promoter and E6/E7 expression. Our previous studies confirmed a role for Brd4 in mediating the E2 transcriptional repression function, and identified JARID1C/SMCX and EP400 as contributors to E2-mediated repression. Here we show that TIP60, a component of the TIP60/...

  1. Human red cell acetyltransferase

    Acetyltransferase was isolated by histone-Sepharose affinity chromatography from human cord blood red cells. The enzyme was detected only in very young red cells. The semipurified enzyme and [14C]acetyl-CoA were used to acetylate isolated Hb F tetramer and α and γ subunits. The in vitro acetylated products were characterized by globin chain separation by CM-cellulose chromatography and tryptic peptide analysis by reverse-phase HPLC. Acetylation of both the γ-chains and the α-chains could occur within the Hb F tetramer. Acetylation also could take place on intact subunits. It appears that some Hb F/sub Ic/ could be formed in the cells by utilizing Hb F or free γ-chains as acetylation substrate

  2. The Functional Analysis of Histone Acetyltransferase MOF in Tumorigenesis

    Su, Jiaming; Wang, Fei; Cai, Yong; Jin, Jingji

    2016-01-01

    Changes in chromatin structure and heritably regulating the gene expression by epigenetic mechanisms, such as histone post-translational modification, are involved in most cellular biological processes. Thus, abnormal regulation of epigenetics is implicated in the occurrence of various diseases, including cancer. Human MOF (males absent on the first) is a member of the MYST (Moz-Ybf2/Sas3-Sas2-Tip60) family of histone acetyltransferases (HATs). As a catalytic subunit, MOF can form at least two distinct multiprotein complexes (MSL and NSL) in human cells. Both complexes can acetylate histone H4 at lysine 16 (H4K16); however, the NSL complex possesses broader substrate specificity and can also acetylate histone H4 at lysines 5 and 8 (H4K5 and H4K8), suggesting the complexity of the intracellular functions of MOF. Silencing of MOF in cells leads to genomic instability, inactivation of gene transcription, defective DNA damage repair and early embryonic lethality. Unbalanced MOF expression and its corresponding acetylation of H4K16 have been found in certain primary cancer tissues, including breast cancer, medulloblastoma, ovarian cancer, renal cell carcinoma, colorectal carcinoma, gastric cancer, as well as non-small cell lung cancer. In this review, we provide a brief overview of MOF and its corresponding histone acetylation, introduce recent research findings that link MOF functions to tumorigenesis and speculate on the potential role that may be relevant to tumorigenic pathways. PMID:26784169

  3. The Functional Analysis of Histone Acetyltransferase MOF in Tumorigenesis

    Jiaming Su

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Changes in chromatin structure and heritably regulating the gene expression by epigenetic mechanisms, such as histone post-translational modification, are involved in most cellular biological processes. Thus, abnormal regulation of epigenetics is implicated in the occurrence of various diseases, including cancer. Human MOF (males absent on the first is a member of the MYST (Moz-Ybf2/Sas3-Sas2-Tip60 family of histone acetyltransferases (HATs. As a catalytic subunit, MOF can form at least two distinct multiprotein complexes (MSL and NSL in human cells. Both complexes can acetylate histone H4 at lysine 16 (H4K16; however, the NSL complex possesses broader substrate specificity and can also acetylate histone H4 at lysines 5 and 8 (H4K5 and H4K8, suggesting the complexity of the intracellular functions of MOF. Silencing of MOF in cells leads to genomic instability, inactivation of gene transcription, defective DNA damage repair and early embryonic lethality. Unbalanced MOF expression and its corresponding acetylation of H4K16 have been found in certain primary cancer tissues, including breast cancer, medulloblastoma, ovarian cancer, renal cell carcinoma, colorectal carcinoma, gastric cancer, as well as non-small cell lung cancer. In this review, we provide a brief overview of MOF and its corresponding histone acetylation, introduce recent research findings that link MOF functions to tumorigenesis and speculate on the potential role that may be relevant to tumorigenic pathways.

  4. Regulation of the histone acetyltransferase activity of hMOF via autoacetylation of Lys274

    Bingfa Sun; Shunling Guo; Qingyu Tang; Chen Li; Rong Zeng; Zhiqi Xiong; Chen Zhong; Jianping Ding

    2011-01-01

    Dear Editor, Males-absent-on-the-first (MOF, also called MYST1 or KAT8) is a histone acetyltransferase (HAT) belonging to the MOZ, Ybf2/Sas3, Sas2 and Tip60 (MYST) family.MOF has been shown to possess a specific HAT activity towards Lysl6 of histone H4 (H4K16) [1].Homozygous knockout of MOF in mice results in loss of H4K16 acetylation and embryonic lethality, indicating that MOF and H4K16 acetylation are essential for embryogenesis and genome stability in mammals [2].Downregulation of human MOF (hMOF) leads to dramatic nuclear morphological deformation and inhibition of cell cycle progression [3], and has recently been correlated with primary breast carcinoma and medulloblastoma [4].

  5. Spermidine induces autophagy by inhibiting the acetyltransferase EP300.

    Pietrocola, F; Lachkar, S; Enot, D P; Niso-Santano, M; Bravo-San Pedro, J M; Sica, V; Izzo, V; Maiuri, M C; Madeo, F; Mariño, G; Kroemer, G

    2015-03-01

    Several natural compounds found in health-related food items can inhibit acetyltransferases as they induce autophagy. Here we show that this applies to anacardic acid, curcumin, garcinol and spermidine, all of which reduce the acetylation level of cultured human cells as they induce signs of increased autophagic flux (such as the formation of green fluorescent protein-microtubule-associated protein 1A/1B-light chain 3 (GFP-LC3) puncta and the depletion of sequestosome-1, p62/SQSTM1) coupled to the inhibition of the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1). We performed a screen to identify the acetyltransferases whose depletion would activate autophagy and simultaneously inhibit mTORC1. The knockdown of only two acetyltransferases (among 43 candidates) had such effects: EP300 (E1A-binding protein p300), which is a lysine acetyltranferase, and NAA20 (N(α)-acetyltransferase 20, also known as NAT5), which catalyzes the N-terminal acetylation of methionine residues. Subsequent studies validated the capacity of a pharmacological EP300 inhibitor, C646, to induce autophagy in both normal and enucleated cells (cytoplasts), underscoring the capacity of EP300 to repress autophagy by cytoplasmic (non-nuclear) effects. Notably, anacardic acid, curcumin, garcinol and spermidine all inhibited the acetyltransferase activity of recombinant EP300 protein in vitro. Altogether, these results support the idea that EP300 acts as an endogenous repressor of autophagy and that potent autophagy inducers including spermidine de facto act as EP300 inhibitors. PMID:25526088

  6. Structure of Patt1 human proapoptotic histone acetyltransferase

    Jędrzejewski, Roch Paweł; Kaźmierkiewicz, Rajmund

    2013-01-01

    The results of modeling of a novel human histone acetyltransferase Patt1 are presented here. This protein belongs to the GNAT GCN5 family and shows proapoptotic activity in human hepatocellular carcinoma cells. Patt1 is an attractive therapeutic target. The sequence analysis, fold recognition predictions and homology modeling of Patt1 protein structure were performed. N- and C- termini of Patt1 were unstructured. Central part revealed classical GNAT fold–central 7-stranded beta sheet core sur...

  7. MYST Family Histone Acetyltransferases in the Protozoan Parasite Toxoplasma gondii

    Smith, Aaron T.; Tucker-Samaras, Samantha D.; Fairlamb, Alan H; Sullivan, William J.

    2005-01-01

    The restructuring of chromatin precedes tightly regulated events such as DNA transcription, replication, and repair. One type of chromatin remodeling involves the covalent modification of nucleosomes by histone acetyltransferase (HAT) complexes. The observation that apicidin exerts antiprotozoal activity by targeting a histone deacetyltransferase has prompted our search for more components of the histone modifying machinery in parasitic protozoa. We have previously identified GNAT family HATs...

  8. Inhibition of Lysine Acetyltransferase KAT3B/p300 Activity by a Naturally Occurring Hydroxynaphthoquinone, Plumbagin*

    Ravindra, Kodihalli C.; Selvi, B. Ruthrotha; Arif, Mohammed; Reddy, B. A. Ashok; Thanuja, Gali R.; Agrawal, Shipra; Pradhan, Suman Kalyan; Nagashayana, Natesh; Dasgupta, Dipak; Tapas K. Kundu

    2009-01-01

    Lysine acetyltransferases (KATs), p300 (KAT3B), and its close homologue CREB-binding protein (KAT3A) are probably the most widely studied KATs with well documented roles in various cellular processes. Hence, the dysfunction of p300 may result in the dysregulation of gene expression leading to the manifestation of many disorders. The acetyltransferase activity of p300/CREB-binding protein is therefore considered as a target for new generation therapeutics. We describe here a natural compound, ...

  9. Acetyltransferase and human hemoglobin acetylation

    A minor component of human fetal hemoglobin (Hb F) is acetylated at the amino-terminus of the γ-globin chains. A similar minor component of Hb F is formed during translation of cord blood mRNA in the rabbit reticulocyte lysate system. The acetylation appeared to be enzymatic. This system contains an acetyltransferase capable of acetylating histones and hemoglobins. The enzyme, partially purified by histone-Sepharose affinity chromatography was capable of incorporating labeled acetyl- group from 1-[14C-acetyl]-CoA into both human Hb F0 and HB A0, but at a lower rate than for histones. Characterization of the labeled products indicated that the α-chains of both hemoglobins were being acetylated presumably at a lysyl-residue, but in the case of Hb F0 the amino-terminus of the γ-globin chains was acetylated as well. While histone-Sepharose bound more than 95% of the enzyme, Sepharose linked Hb F0, γ-globin chains, and Hb Bart's bound 14, 5, and 12% of the activity, respectively. Enzyme bound to these resins was not any more active on the hemoglobins than was the enzyme bound to the histone-Sepharose. The histone-Sepharose was also used to detect the enzyme in human cord blood red cells separated by dextran 40 density gradient centrifugation. Activity was found mostly in the young cells, and was directly related to the number of reticulocytes present in any one fraction

  10. Neisseria meningitidis serogroup A capsular polysaccharide acetyltransferase, methods and compositions

    Stephens, David S. (Stone Mountain, GA); Gudlavalleti, Seshu K. (Kensington, MD); Tzeng, Yih-Ling (Atlanta, GA); Datta, Anup K. (San Diego, CA); Carlson, Russell W. (Athens, GA)

    2011-02-08

    Provided are methods for recombinant production of an O-acetyltransferase and methods for acetylating capsular polysaccharides, especially those of a Serogroup A Neisseria meningitidis using the recombinant O-acetyltransferase, and immunogenic compositions comprising the acetylated capsular polysaccharide.

  11. Cloning of Drosophila choline acetyltransferase cDNA.

    Itoh, N; Slemmon, J.R.; Hawke, D.H.; Williamson, R.; Morita, E.; Itakura, K; Roberts, E; Shively, J. E.; Crawford, G D; Salvaterra, P M

    1986-01-01

    Choline acetyltransferase (EC 2.3.1.6) is the biosynthetic enzyme for the neurotransmitter acetylcholine. To isolate choline acetyltransferase cDNA clones, a cDNA library was constructed from poly(A)+ RNA of Drosophila melanogaster heads, these being one of the richest known sources of the enzyme. By screening the cDNA library with a mixture of three different monoclonal antibodies to Drosophila choline acetyltransferase, we isolated 14 positive clones. Only 1 of these clones was identified t...

  12. Escherichia coli N-Acetylglucosamine-1-Phosphate-Uridyltransferase/Glucosamine-1-Phosphate-Acetyltransferase (GlmU) Inhibitory Activity of Terreic Acid Isolated from Aspergillus terreus.

    Sharma, Rashmi; Lambu, Mallikharjuna Rao; Jamwal, Urmila; Rani, Chitra; Chib, Reena; Wazir, Priya; Mukherjee, Debaraj; Chaubey, Asha; Khan, Inshad Ali

    2016-04-01

    Secondary metabolite of Aspergillus terreus, terreic acid, is a reported potent antibacterial that was identified more than 60 years ago, but its cellular target(s) are still unknown. Here we screen its activity against the acetyltransferase domain of a bifunctional enzyme, Escherichia coli N-acetylglucosamine-1-phosphate-uridyltransferase/glucosamine-1-phosphate-acetyltransferase (GlmU). An absorbance-based assay was used to screen terreic acid against the acetyltransferase activity of E. coli GlmU. Terreic acid was found to inhibit the acetyltransferase domain of E. coli GlmU with an IC50 of 44.24 ± 1.85 µM. Mode of inhibition studies revealed that terreic acid was competitive with AcCoA and uncompetitive with GlcN-1-P. It also exhibited concentration-dependent killing of E. coli ATCC 25922 up to 4× minimum inhibitory concentration and inhibited the growth of biofilms generated by E. coli. Characterization of resistant mutants established mutation in the acetyltransferase domain of GlmU. Terreic acid was also found to be metabolically stable in the in vitro incubations with rat liver microsome in the presence of a NADPH regenerating system. The studies reported here suggest that terreic acid is a potent antimicrobial agent and support that E. coli GlmU acetyltransferase is a molecular target of terreic acid, resulting in its antibacterial activity. PMID:26762501

  13. N-hydroxyarylamine O-acetyltransferase of Salmonella typhimurium: proposal for a common catalytic mechanism of arylamine acetyltransferase enzymes.

    Watanabe, M.(Niigata University, 950-2181, Niigata, Japan); Igarashi, T; Kaminuma, T; Sofuni, T; Nohmi, T

    1994-01-01

    Acetyl-CoA:N-hydroxyarylamine O-acetyltransferase is an enzyme involved in the metabolic activation of N-hydroxyarylamines derived from mutagenic and carcinogenic aromatic amines and nitroarenes. The O-acetyltransferase gene of Salmonella typhimurium has been cloned, and new Ames tester substrains highly sensitive to mutagenic aromatic amines and nitroarenes have been established in our laboratory. The nucleotide sequence of the O-acetyltransferase gene was determined. There was an open readi...

  14. Structure of a putative acetyltransferase (PA1377) from Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Davies, Anna M.; Tata, Renée; Chauviac, François-Xavier; Sutton, Brian J; Brown, Paul R.

    2008-01-01

    The crystal structure of an acetyltransferase encoded by the gene PA1377 from Pseudomonas aeruginosa has been determined at 2.25 Å resolution. Comparison with a related acetyltransferase revealed a structural difference in the active site that was taken to reflect a difference in substrate binding and/or specificity between the two enzymes.

  15. Pseudosecretion of Escherichia coli chloramphenicol acetyltransferase by Bacillus subtilis.

    Le Grice, S F; Gentz, R; Bannwarth, W; Kocher, H. P.

    1987-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis harboring the vector 25RBSII secrets an Escherichia coli-derived chloramphenicol acetyltransferase into culture supernatants. The secreted enzyme lacks 18 amino acids; these are removed externally rather than during secretion.

  16. Identification and characterization of novel small molecule inhibitors of the acetyltransferase activity of Escherichia coli N-acetylglucosamine-1-phosphate-uridyltransferase/glucosamine-1-phosphate-acetyltransferase (GlmU).

    Sharma, Rashmi; Rani, Chitra; Mehra, Rukmankesh; Nargotra, Amit; Chib, Reena; Rajput, Vikrant S; Kumar, Sunil; Singh, Samsher; Sharma, Parduman R; Khan, Inshad A

    2016-04-01

    This study aims at identifying novel chemical scaffolds as inhibitors specific to the acetyltransferase domain of a bifunctional enzyme, Escherichia coli GlmU, involved in the cell wall biosynthesis of Gram-negative organisms. A two-pronged approach was used to screen a 50,000 small-molecule library. Using the first approach, the library was in silico screened by docking the library against acetyltransferase domain of E. coli GlmU studies. In the second approach, complete library was screened against Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 to identify the whole cell active compounds. Active compounds from both the screens were screened in a colorimetric absorbance-based assay to identify inhibitors of acetyltransferase domain of E. coli GlmU which resulted in the identification of 1 inhibitor out of 56 hits identified by in silico screening and 4 inhibitors out of 35 whole cell active compounds on Gram-negative bacteria with the most potent inhibitor showing IC50 of 1.40 ± 0.69 μM. Mode of inhibition studies revealed these inhibitors to be competitive with AcCoA and uncompetitive with GlcN-1-P. These selected inhibitors were also tested for their antibacterial and cytotoxic activities. Compounds 5175178 and 5215319 exhibited antibacterial activity that co-related with GlmU inhibition. These compounds, therefore, represent novel chemical scaffolds targeting acetyltransferase activity of E. coli GlmU. PMID:26563552

  17. Dissociable roles for histone acetyltransferases p300 and PCAF in hippocampus and perirhinal cortex-mediated object memory.

    Mitchnick, K A; Creighton, S D; Cloke, J M; Wolter, M; Zaika, O; Christen, B; Van Tiggelen, M; Kalisch, B E; Winters, B D

    2016-07-01

    The importance of histone acetylation for certain types of memory is now well established. However, the specific contributions of the various histone acetyltransferases to distinct memory functions remain to be determined; therefore, we employed selective histone acetyltransferase protein inhibitors and short-interference RNAs to evaluate the roles of CREB-binding protein (CBP), E1A-binding protein (p300) and p300/CBP-associated factor (PCAF) in hippocampus and perirhinal cortex (PRh)-mediated object memory. Rats were tested for short- (STM) and long-term memory (LTM) in the object-in-place task, which relies on the hippocampus and PRh for spatial memory and object identity processing, respectively. Selective inhibition of these histone acetyltransferases by small-interfering RNA and pharmacological inhibitors targeting the HAT domain produced dissociable effects. In the hippocampus, CBP or p300 inhibition impaired long-term but not short-term object memory, while inhibition of PCAF impaired memory at both delays. In PRh, HAT inhibition did not impair STM, and only CBP and PCAF inhibition disrupted LTM; p300 inhibition had no effects. Messenger RNA analyses revealed findings consistent with the pattern of behavioral effects, as all three enzymes were upregulated in the hippocampus (dentate gyrus) following learning, whereas only CBP and PCAF were upregulated in PRh. These results demonstrate, for the first time, the necessity of histone acetyltransferase activity for PRh-mediated object memory and indicate that the specific mnemonic roles of distinctive histone acetyltransferases can be dissociated according to specific brain regions and memory timeframe. PMID:27251651

  18. Rapid quantitative assay for chloramphenicol acetyltransferase

    Measuring the expression of exogenous genetic material in mammalian cells is commonly done by fusing the DNA of interest to a gene encoding an easily-detected enzyme. Chloramphenicol acetyltransferase(CAT) is a convenient marker because it is not normally found in eukaryotes. CAT activity has usually been detected using a thin-layer chromatographic separation followed by autoradiography. An organic solvent extraction-based method for CAT detection has also been described, as well as a procedure utilizing HPLC analysis. Building on the extraction technique, they developed a rapid sensitive kinetic method for measuring CAT activity in cell homogenates. The method exploits the differential organic solubility of the substrate ([3H] or [14C]acetyl CoA) and the product (labeled acetylchloramphenicol). The assay is a simple one-vial, two-phase procedure and requires no tedious manipulations after the initial setup. Briefly, a 0.25 ml reaction with 100mM Tris-HCL, 1mM chloramphenicol, 0.1mM [14C]acetyl CoA and variable amounts of cell homogenate is pipetted into a miniscintillation vial, overlaid with 5 ml of a water-immiscible fluor, and incubated at 370C. At suitable intervals the vial is counted and the CAT level is quantitatively determined as the rate of increase in counts/min of the labeled product as it diffuses into the fluor phase, compared to a standard curve. When used to measure CAT in transfected Balb 3T3 cells the method correlated well with the other techniques

  19. Structure of a putative acetyltransferase (PA1377) from Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    The crystal structure of an acetyltransferase encoded by the gene PA1377 from Pseudomonas aeruginosa has been determined at 2.25 Å resolution. Comparison with a related acetyltransferase revealed a structural difference in the active site that was taken to reflect a difference in substrate binding and/or specificity between the two enzymes. Gene PA1377 from Pseudomonas aeruginosa encodes a 177-amino-acid conserved hypothetical protein of unknown function. The structure of this protein (termed pitax) has been solved in space group I222 to 2.25 Å resolution. Pitax belongs to the GCN5-related N-acetyltransferase family and contains all four sequence motifs conserved among family members. The β-strand structure in one of these motifs (motif A) is disrupted, which is believed to affect binding of the substrate that accepts the acetyl group from acetyl-CoA

  20. 40 CFR 174.522 - Phosphinothricin Acetyltransferase (PAT); exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Phosphinothricin Acetyltransferase...-INCORPORATED PROTECTANTS Tolerances and Tolerance Exemptions § 174.522 Phosphinothricin Acetyltransferase (PAT); exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Residues of the Phosphinothricin Acetyltransferase...

  1. Kinetic characterisation of arylamine N-acetyltransferase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Sim Edith

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Arylamine N-acetyltransferases (NATs are important drug- and carcinogen-metabolising enzymes that catalyse the transfer of an acetyl group from a donor, such as acetyl coenzyme A, to an aromatic or heterocyclic amine, hydrazine, hydrazide or N-hydroxylamine acceptor substrate. NATs are found in eukaryotes and prokaryotes, and they may also have an endogenous function in addition to drug metabolism. For example, NAT from Mycobacterium tuberculosis has been proposed to have a role in cell wall lipid biosynthesis, and is therefore of interest as a potential drug target. To date there have been no studies investigating the kinetic mechanism of a bacterial NAT enzyme. Results We have determined that NAT from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which has been described as a model for NAT from M. tuberculosis, follows a Ping Pong Bi Bi kinetic mechanism. We also describe substrate inhibition by 5-aminosalicylic acid, in which the substrate binds both to the free form of the enzyme and the acetyl coenzyme A-enzyme complex in non-productive reaction pathways. The true kinetic parameters for the NAT-catalysed acetylation of 5-aminosalicylic acid with acetyl coenzyme A as the co-factor have been established, validating earlier approximations. Conclusion This is the first reported study investigating the kinetic mechanism of a bacterial NAT enzyme. Additionally, the methods used herein can be applied to investigations of the interactions of NAT enzymes with new chemical entities which are NAT ligands. This is likely to be useful in the design of novel potential anti-tubercular agents.

  2. Histone acetyltransferase PCAF is required for Hedgehog-Gli-dependent transcription and cancer cell proliferation

    Malatesta, Martina; Steinhauer, Cornelia; Mohammad, Faizaan;

    2013-01-01

    The Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway plays an important role in embryonic patterning and development of many tissues and organs as well as in maintaining and repairing mature tissues in adults. Uncontrolled activation of the Hh-Gli pathway has been implicated in developmental abnormalities as well...... of neural stem cells in vivo. In summary, our study identified the acetyltransferase PCAF as a positive cofactor of the Hh-Gli signaling pathway, leading us to propose PCAF as a candidate therapeutic target for the treatment of patients with medulloblastoma and glioblastoma.......The Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway plays an important role in embryonic patterning and development of many tissues and organs as well as in maintaining and repairing mature tissues in adults. Uncontrolled activation of the Hh-Gli pathway has been implicated in developmental abnormalities as well...... show that the histone acetyltransferase PCAF/KAT2B is an important factor of the Hh pathway. Specifically, we show that PCAF depletion impairs Hh activity and reduces expression of Hh target genes. Consequently, PCAF downregulation in medulloblastoma and glioblastoma cells leads to decreased...

  3. Retinal rhythms in chicks: circadian variation in melantonin and serotonin N-acetyltransferase activity.

    Hamm, H E; Menaker, M

    1980-01-01

    There is a large-amplitude circadian rhythm of indoleamine metabolism in the retina-pigment epithelium of the chicken. N-Acetyltransferase activity (arylamine acetyltransferase; acetyl-CoA:arylamine N-acetyltransferase, EC 2.3.1.5) and melatonin content are 15-fold higher at night than during the day in a cycle of a 4-fold increase during the subjective night. Light at midnight inactivates N-acetyltransferase and lowers melatonin. N-Acetyltransferase activity is found predominantly in the ret...

  4. N-acetyltransferase in human skin and keratinocytes

    Vogel, Tanja; Bonifas, Jutta; Wiegman, Marjon; Pas, Hendrikus; Blömeke, Brunhilde; Coenraads, Pieter Jan; Schuttelaar, Marie-Louise

    2014-01-01

    Background: N-acetyltransferase 1 (NAT1) mediated Nacetylation in human skin and keratinocytes is an important detoxification pathway for aromatic amines including the strong sensitizer para-phenylenediamine (PPD), an important component of oxidative hair dyes. Objectives: Human skin and keratinocyt

  5. Erythromycin induces expression of the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene cat-86.

    Rogers, E J; Lovett, P S

    1990-01-01

    The plasmid gene cat-86 specifies chloramphenicol-inducible chloramphenicol acetyltransferase in Bacillus subtilis. This gene, like the erythromycin-inducible erm genes, is regulated by translational attenuation. Here we show that cat-86 is also inducibly regulated by erythromycin. cat-86 does not confer resistance to erythromycin.

  6. Structure and Biochemical Characterization of Protein Acetyltransferase from Sulfolobus solfataricus

    Brent, Michael M.; Iwata, Ayaka; Carten, Juliana; Zhao, Kehao; Marmorstein, Ronen; (UPENN)

    2009-09-02

    The Sulfolobus solfataricus protein acetyltransferase (PAT) acetylates ALBA, an abundant nonspecific DNA-binding protein, on Lys{sup 16} to reduce its DNA affinity, and the Sir2 deacetylase reverses the modification to cause transcriptional repression. This represents a 'primitive' model for chromatin regulation analogous to histone modification in eukaryotes. We report the 1.84-{angstrom} crystal structure of PAT in complex with coenzyme A. The structure reveals homology to both prokaryotic GNAT acetyltransferases and eukaryotic histone acetyltransferases (HATs), with an additional 'bent helix' proximal to the substrate binding site that might play an autoregulatory function. Investigation of active site mutants suggests that PAT does not use a single general base or acid residue for substrate deprotonation and product reprotonation, respectively, and that a diffusional step, such as substrate binding, may be rate-limiting. The catalytic efficiency of PAT toward ALBA is low relative to other acetyltransferases, suggesting that there may be better, unidentified substrates for PAT. The structural similarity of PAT to eukaryotic HATs combined with its conserved role in chromatin regulation suggests that PAT is evolutionarily related to the eukaryotic HATs.

  7. Chloramphenicol acetyltransferase should not provide methanogens with resistance to chloramphenicol.

    Beckler, G S; Hook, L A; Reeve, J N

    1984-01-01

    Growth of the four methanogens investigated was inhibited by chloramphenicol-3-acetate; therefore, introduction of chloramphenicol acetyltransferase-encoding genes should not confer chloramphenicol resistance on these methanogens. Reduction of the aryl nitro group of chloramphenicol produced a compound which did not inhibit the growth of these methanogens.

  8. Radioenzymatic assays for aminoglycosides with kanamycin 6'- acetyltransferase

    To facilitate the rapid and accurate quantitation of parenterally administered aminoglycosides, the optimum conditions (pH, duration of incubation, and cofactor concentrations) were defined to permit radioenzymatic assays with kanamycin acetyltransferase. The accuracy in quantitating tobramycin, netilmicin, kanamycin, and amikacin at concentrations in the therapeutic range was greater than 90%, with a mean recovery of 102.8%. The mean of the interassay coefficient of variation was 7.8%. Typical standard curves at six different concentrations resulted in a correlation coefficient (r value) of greater than 0.99 for each aminoglycoside. The radioenzymatic assay correlates well with the bioassay (tobramycin and netilmicin) and radioimmunoassay (amikacin and kanamycin); the correlation coefficient is greater than 0.90 for all. The authors conclude that the radioenzymatic assay utilizing kanamycin 6'-acetyltransferase is feasible for all commercially available parenterally administered aminoglycosides

  9. Evolution of arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase: Emergence and divergence

    Coon, Steven L.; Klein, David C.

    2006-01-01

    The melatonin rhythm-generating enzyme, arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase (AANAT) is known to have recognizable ancient homologs in bacteria and fungi, but not in other eukaryotes. Analysis of new cDNA and genomic sequences has identified several additional homologs in other groupings. First, an AANAT homolog has been found in the genome of the cephalochordate amphioxus, representing the oldest homolog in chordates. Second, two AANAT homologs have been identified in unicellular green algae. ...

  10. Radioenzymatic assays for aminoglycosides with kanamycin 6'-acetyltransferase.

    Weber, A; Smith, A L; Opheim, K E

    1985-01-01

    To facilitate the rapid and accurate quantitation of parenterally administered aminoglycosides, we defined the optimum conditions (pH, duration of incubation, and cofactor concentrations) to permit radioenzymatic assays with kanamycin acetyltransferase. The accuracy in quantitating tobramycin, netilmicin, kanamycin, and amikacin at concentrations in the therapeutic range was greater than 90%, with a mean recovery of 102.8%. The mean of the interassay coefficient of variation was 7.8%. Typical...

  11. Dysregulation of Histone Acetyltransferases and Deacetylases in Cardiovascular Diseases

    Yonggang Wang; Xiao Miao; Yucheng Liu; Fengsheng Li; Quan Liu; Jian Sun; Lu Cai

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) remains a leading cause of mortality worldwide despite advances in its prevention and management. A comprehensive understanding of factors which contribute to CVD is required in order to develop more effective treatment options. Dysregulation of epigenetic posttranscriptional modifications of histones in chromatin is thought to be associated with the pathology of many disease models, including CVD. Histone acetyltransferases (HATs) and deacetylases (HDACs) are reg...

  12. Unusual regioversatility of acetyltransferase Eis, a cause of drug resistance in XDR-TB

    Chen, Wenjing; Biswas, Tapan; Porter, Vanessa R.; Tsodikov, Oleg V.; Garneau-Tsodikova, Sylvie (Michigan)

    2011-09-06

    The emergence of multidrug-resistant and extensively drug-resistant (XDR) tuberculosis (TB) is a serious global threat. Aminoglycoside antibiotics are used as a last resort to treat XDR-TB. Resistance to the aminoglycoside kanamycin is a hallmark of XDR-TB. Here, we reveal the function and structure of the mycobacterial protein Eis responsible for resistance to kanamycin in a significant fraction of kanamycin-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis clinical isolates. We demonstrate that Eis has an unprecedented ability to acetylate multiple amines of many aminoglycosides. Structural and mutagenesis studies of Eis indicate that its acetylation mechanism is enabled by a complex tripartite fold that includes two general control non-derepressible 5 (GCN5)-related N-acetyltransferase regions. An intricate negatively charged substrate-binding pocket of Eis is a potential target of new antitubercular drugs expected to overcome aminoglycoside resistance.

  13. Density Functional Theory Study on the Histidine-assisted Mechanism of Arylamine N-Acetyltransferase Acetylation

    QIAO Qing-An; GAO Shan-Min; JIN Yue-Qing; CHEN Xin; SUN Xiao-Min; YANG Chuan-Lu

    2008-01-01

    Arylamine N-acetyltransferases (NATs, EC 2.3.1.5) catalyze the N-acetylation of primary arylamines, and play a key role in the biotransformation and metabolism of drugs, carcinogens, etc.In this paper, three possible reaction mechanisms are investigated and the results indicate that if the acetyl group directly transfers from the donor to the acceptor, the high activation energies will make it hard to obtain the target products.When using histidine to mediate the acetylation process, these energies will drop in the 15~45 kJ/mol range.If the histidine residue is protonated, the corresponding energies will be decreased by about 35~87 kJ/mol.The calculations predict an enzymatic acetylation mechanism that undergoes a thiolate-imidazolium pair, which agrees with the experimental results very well.

  14. Development of highly glyphosate-tolerant tobacco by coexpression of glyphosate acetyltransferase gat and EPSPS G2-aroA genes

    Baoqing Dun; Xujing Wang; Wei Lu; Ming Chen; Wei Zhang; Shuzhen Ping; Zhixing Wang; Baoming Zhang; Min Lin

    2014-01-01

    The widely used herbicide glyphosate targets 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS). Glyphosate acetyltransferase (GAT) effectively detoxifies glyphosate by N-acetylation. With the aim of identifying a new strategy for development of glyphosate-tolerant crops, the plant expression vector pG2-GAT harboring gat and G2-aroA (encoding EPSPS) has been transformed into tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) to develop novel plants with higher tolerance to glyphosate. Results from Southern and Wes...

  15. Two different subcellular-localized Acetoacetyl-CoA acetyltransferases differentiate diverse functions in Magnaporthe oryzae.

    Zhong, Zhenhui; Norvienyeku, Justice; Yu, Jie; Chen, Meilian; Cai, Renli; Hong, Yonghe; Chen, Liqiong; Zhang, Dongmei; Wang, Baohua; Zhou, Jie; Lu, Guodong; Chen, Xiaofeng; Wang, Zonghua

    2015-10-01

    The mevalonate pathway is an efficient biosynthesis pathway that yields isoprenoids for promoting different crucial cellular functions, including ergosterol synthesis and growth regulation. Acetoacetyl-CoA acetyltransferase (EC2.3.1.9) is the first major catalytic enzyme constituting the mevalonate pathway and catalyzes the transformation of Acetoacetyl-CoA from two molecules of acetyl-CoA enroute ergosterol production in fungi. We identified two homologous genes encoding Acetoacetyl-CoA acetyltransferase (MoAcat1 and MoAcat2) in Magnaporthe oryzae, the rice blast fungus. Phylogenetic analysis indicates these two genes have different evolutionary history. We subsequently, conducted targeted gene deletion using homologous recombination technology to ascertain the unique roles of the two MoAcat homologues during the fungal morphogenesis and pathogenesis. The findings from our investigations showed that the activity of MoAcat1 promoted virulence in the rice blast fungus as such, the ΔMoacat1 mutants generated exhibited defect in virulence, whilst ΔMoacat1 mutants did not portray growth defects. ΔMoacat2 mutants on the other hand were characterized by reduction in growth and virulence. Furthermore, MoAcat1 and MoAcat2 showed different expression patterns and subcellular localizations in M. oryzae. From our investigations we came to the conclusion that, different subcellular localization contributes to the diverse functions of MoAcat1 and MoAcat2, which helps the successful establishment of blast disease by promoting efficient development of cell morphology and effective colonization of host tissue. PMID:26318870

  16. Suppression of exogenous gene expression by spermidine/spermine N1-acetyltransferase 1 (SSAT1) cotransfection.

    Lee, Seung Bum; Park, Jong Hwan; Woster, Patrick M; Casero, Robert A; Park, Myung Hee

    2010-05-14

    Spermidine/spermine N(1)-acetyltransferase 1 (SSAT1), which catalyzes the N(1)-acetylation of spermidine and spermine to form acetyl derivatives, is a rate-limiting enzyme in polyamine catabolism. We now report a novel activity of transiently transfected SSAT1 in suppressing the exogenous expression of other proteins, i.e. green fluorescent protein (GFP) or GFP-eIF5A. Spermidine/spermine N(1)-acetyltransferase 2 (SSAT2) or inactive SSAT1 mutant enzymes (R101A or R101K) were without effect. The loss of exogenous gene expression is not due to accelerated protein degradation, because various inhibitors of proteases, lysosome, or autophagy did not mitigate the effects. This SSAT1 effect cannot be attributed to the depletion of overall cellular polyamines or accumulation of N(1)-acetylspermidine (N(1)-AcSpd) because of the following: (i) addition of putrescine, spermidine, spermine, or N(1)-AcSpd did not restore the expression of GFP or GFP-eIF5A; (ii) depletion of cellular polyamines with alpha-difluoromethylornithine, an inhibitor of ornithine decarboxylase, did not inhibit exogenous gene expression; and (iii) N(1),N(11)-bis(ethyl)norspermine caused a drastic depletion of cellular polyamines through induction of endogenous SSAT1 but did not block exogenous gene expression. SSAT1 transient transfection did not affect stable expression of GFP, and stably expressed SSAT1 did not affect exogenous expression of GFP, suggesting that only transiently (episomally) expressed SSAT1 blocks exogenous (episomal) expression of other proteins. SSAT1 may regulate exogenous gene expression by blocking steps involved in transcription/translation from an episomal vector by targeting non-polyamine substrate(s) critical for this pathway. PMID:20212040

  17. Structural and functional characterization of an arylamine N-acetyltransferase from the pathogen Mycobacterium abscessus

    Cocaign, Angélique; Kubiak, Xavier Jean Philippe; Xu, Ximing;

    2014-01-01

    functional characterization of an arylamine N-acetyltransferase (NAT) from M. abscessus [(MYCAB)NAT1] are reported. This novel prokaryotic NAT displays significant N-acetyltransferase activity towards aromatic substrates, including antibiotics such as isoniazid and p-aminosalicylate. The enzyme is...

  18. Requirement for TAFII250 Acetyltransferase Activity in Cell Cycle Progression

    Dunphy, Elizabeth L.; Johnson, Theron; Auerbach, Scott s.; Wang, Edith H.

    2000-01-01

    The TATA-binding protein (TBP)-associated factor TAFII250 is the largest component of the basal transcription factor IID (TFIID). A missense mutation that maps to the acetyltransferase domain of TAFII250 induces the temperature-sensitive (ts) mutant hamster cell lines ts13 and tsBN462 to arrest in late G1. At the nonpermissive temperature (39.5°C), transcription from only a subset of protein encoding genes, including the G1 cyclins, is dramatically reduced in the mutant cells. Here we demonst...

  19. Rapid, sensitive, and inexpensive assay for chloramphenicol acetyltransferase

    We present a rapid, sensitive enzymatic assay for chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) that does not require chromatography, HPLC, or autoradiography. The assay is based on the use of an inexpensive substrate, tritiated acetate, instead of [14C]chloramphenicol. The method is adapted from one originally used by de Crombrugghe et al. and by Shaw, but with simplifications appropriate for routine use. In our hands, the method is as sensitive as the customary thin-layer chromatography assay and is far more efficient for the performance of many assays, both in terms of labor and expense

  20. Histone acetyltransferase Rtt109 is required for Candida albicans pathogenesis

    Lopes da Rosa, Jessica; Boyartchuk, Victor L.; Zhu, Lihua Julie; Kaufman, Paul D.

    2010-01-01

    Candida albicans is a ubiquitous opportunistic pathogen that is the most prevalent cause of hospital-acquired fungal infections. In mammalian hosts, C. albicans is engulfed by phagocytes that attack the pathogen with DNA-damaging reactive oxygen species (ROS). Acetylation of histone H3 lysine 56 (H3K56) by the fungal-specific histone acetyltransferase Rtt109 is important for yeast model organisms to survive DNA damage and maintain genome integrity. To assess the importance of Rtt109 for C. al...

  1. Molecular mechanism underlying promiscuous polyamine recognition by spermidine acetyltransferase.

    Sugiyama, Shigeru; Ishikawa, Sae; Tomitori, Hideyuki; Niiyama, Mayumi; Hirose, Mika; Miyazaki, Yuma; Higashi, Kyohei; Murata, Michio; Adachi, Hiroaki; Takano, Kazufumi; Murakami, Satoshi; Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Mori, Yusuke; Kashiwagi, Keiko; Igarashi, Kazuei; Matsumura, Hiroyoshi

    2016-07-01

    Spermidine acetyltransferase (SAT) from Escherichia coli, which catalyses the transfer of acetyl groups from acetyl-CoA to spermidine, is a key enzyme in controlling polyamine levels in prokaryotic cells. In this study, we determined the crystal structure of SAT in complex with spermidine (SPD) and CoA at 2.5Å resolution. SAT is a dodecamer organized as a hexamer of dimers. The secondary structural element and folding topology of the SAT dimer resemble those of spermidine/spermine N(1)-acetyltransferase (SSAT), suggesting an evolutionary link between SAT and SSAT. However, the polyamine specificity of SAT is distinct from that of SSAT and is promiscuous. The SPD molecule is also located at the inter-dimer interface. The distance between SPD and CoA molecules is 13Å. A deep, highly acidic, water-filled cavity encompasses the SPD and CoA binding sites. Structure-based mutagenesis and in-vitro assays identified SPD-bound residues, and the acidic residues lining the walls of the cavity are mostly essential for enzymatic activities. Based on mutagenesis and structural data, we propose an acetylation mechanism underlying promiscuous polyamine recognition for SAT. PMID:27163532

  2. Enzyme kinetics and inhibition of histone acetyltransferase KAT8.

    Wapenaar, Hannah; van der Wouden, Petra E; Groves, Matthew R; Rotili, Dante; Mai, Antonello; Dekker, Frank J

    2015-11-13

    Lysine acetyltransferase 8 (KAT8) is a histone acetyltransferase (HAT) responsible for acetylating lysine 16 on histone H4 (H4K16) and plays a role in cell cycle progression as well as acetylation of the tumor suppressor protein p53. Further studies on its biological function and drug discovery initiatives will benefit from the development of small molecule inhibitors for this enzyme. As a first step towards this aim we investigated the enzyme kinetics of this bi-substrate enzyme. The kinetic experiments indicate a ping-pong mechanism in which the enzyme binds Ac-CoA first, followed by binding of the histone substrate. This mechanism is supported by affinity measurements of both substrates using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). Using this information, the KAT8 inhibition of a focused compound collection around the non-selective HAT inhibitor anacardic acid has been investigated. Kinetic studies with anacardic acid were performed, based on which a model for the catalytic activity of KAT8 and the inhibitory action of anacardic acid (AA) was proposed. This enabled the calculation of the inhibition constant Ki of anacardic acid derivatives using an adaptation of the Cheng-Prusoff equation. The results described in this study give insight into the catalytic mechanism of KAT8 and present the first well-characterized small-molecule inhibitors for this HAT. PMID:26505788

  3. Characterization of an acetyltransferase that detoxifies aromatic chemicals in Legionella pneumophila

    Kubiak, Xavier Jean Philippe; Dervins-Ravault, Delphine; Pluvinage, Benjamin;

    2012-01-01

    molecular and functional levels. In the present paper we report the identification and biochemical and functional characterization of a unique acetyltransferase that metabolizes aromatic amine chemicals in three characterized clinical strains of L. pneumophila (Paris, Lens and Philadelphia). Strain......-specific sequence variations in this enzyme, an atypical member of the arylamine N-acetyltransferase family (EC 2.3.1.5), produce enzymatic variants with different structural and catalytic properties. Functional inactivation and complementation experiments showed that this acetyltransferase allows L. pneumophila to...

  4. Choline acetyltransferase-containing neurons in the human parietal neocortex

    V Benagiano

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available A number of immunocytochemical studies have indicated the presence of cholinergic neurons in the cerebral cortex of various species of mammals. Whether such cholinergic neurons in the human cerebral cortex are exclusively of subcortical origin is still debated. In this immunocytochemical study, the existence of cortical cholinergic neurons was investigated on surgical samples of human parietal association neocortex using a highly specific monoclonal antibody against choline acetyltransferase (ChAT, the acetylcholine biosynthesising enzyme. ChAT immunoreactivity was detected in a subpopulation of neurons located in layers II and III. These were small or medium-sized pyramidal neurons which showed cytoplasmic immunoreactivity in the perikarya and processes, often in close association to blood microvessels. This study, providing demonstration of ChAT neurons in the human parietal neocortex, strongly supports the existence of intrinsic cholinergic innervation of the human neocortex. It is likely that these neurons contribute to the cholinergic innervation of the intracortical microvessels.

  5. Crystal structure of homoserine O-acetyltransferase from Leptospira interrogans

    Homoserine O-acetyltransferase (HTA, EC 2.3.1.31) initiates methionine biosynthesis pathway by catalyzing the transfer of acetyl group from acetyl-CoA to homoserine. This study reports the crystal structure of HTA from Leptospira interrogans determined at 2.2 A resolution using selenomethionyl single-wavelength anomalous diffraction method. HTA is modular and consists of two structurally distinct domains-a core α/β domain containing the catalytic site and a helical bundle called the lid domain. Overall, the structure fold belongs to α/β hydrolase superfamily with the characteristic 'catalytic triad' residues in the active site. Detailed structure analysis showed that the catalytic histidine and serine are both present in two conformations, which may be involved in the catalytic mechanism for acetyl transfer

  6. Reduction of choline acetyltransferase activities in APP770 transgenic mice

    2000-01-01

    Transgenic mice overexpressing the 770-amino acid isoform of human Alzheimer amyloid precursor protein exhibit extracellular b -amyloid deposits in brain regions including cerebral cortex and hippocampus, which are severely affected in Alzheimer's disease patients. Significant reduction in choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) activities has been observed in both cortical and hippocampal brain regions in the transgenic mice at the age of 10 months compared with the age-matched non-transgenic mice, but such changes have not been observed in any brain regions of the transgenic mice under the age of 5 months. These results suggest that deposition of b -amyloid can induce changes in the brain cholinergic system of the transgenic mice.

  7. Structure of Mesorhizobium loti arylamine N-acetyltransferase 1

    The crystal structure of a M. loti arylamine N-acetyltransferase 1 has been determined at 2.0 Å resolution. The arylamine N-acetyltransferase (NAT) enzymes have been found in a broad range of both eukaryotic and prokaryotic organisms. The NAT enzymes catalyse the transfer of an acetyl group from acetyl Co-enzyme A onto the terminal nitrogen of a range of arylamine, hydrazine and arylhydrazine compounds. Recently, several NAT structures have been reported from different prokaryotic sources including Salmonella typhimurium, Mycobacterium smegmatis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Bioinformatics analysis of the Mesorhizobium loti genome revealed two NAT paralogues, the first example of multiple NAT isoenzymes in a eubacterial organism. The M. loti NAT 1 enzyme was recombinantly expressed and purified for X-ray crystallographic studies. The purified enzyme was crystallized in 0.5 M Ca(OAc)2, 16% PEG 3350, 0.1 M Tris–HCl pH 8.5 using the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method. A data set diffracting to 2.0 Å was collected from a single crystal at 100 K. The crystal belongs to the orthorhombic spacegroup P212121, with unit-cell parameters a = 53.2, b = 97.3, c = 114.3 Å. The structure was refined to a final free-R factor of 24.8%. The structure reveals that despite low sequence homology, M. loti NAT1 shares the common fold as reported in previous NAT structures and exhibits the same catalytic triad of residues (Cys-His-Asp) in the active site

  8. Physiology: Kinetics of Acetyl Coenzyme A: Arylamine N-Acetyltransferase from Human Cumulus Cells

    Chang, Chi-Chen; Hsieh, Yao-Yuan; CHUNG, JING-GUNG; Tsai, Horng-Der; Tsai, Chang-Hai

    2001-01-01

    Purpose:N-acetyltransferase (NAT) activity is involved in the detoxification of exogenous amines. We aimed to evaluate the kinetics of acetyl coenzyme A (AcCoA): arylamine NAT for human cumulus cells.

  9. Comparative genomic and phylogenetic investigation of the xenobiotic metabolizing arylamine N-acetyltransferase enzyme family

    Arylamine N-acetyltransferases (NATs) are xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes characterized in several bacteria and eukaryotic organisms. We report a comprehensive phylogenetic analysis employing an exhaustive dataset of NAT-homologous sequences recovered through inspection of 2445 genomes. We describe ...

  10. Inflammatory cytokines suppress arylamine N-acetyltransferase 1 in cholangiocarcinoma cells

    Buranrat, Benjaporn; Prawan, Auemduan; Sripa, Banchob; Kukongviriyapan, Veerapol

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the effect of inflammatory cytokines on arylamine N-acetyltransferase 1 (NAT1), which is a phase-II enzyme involved in the biotransformation of aromatic and heterocyclic amines found in food, drugs and the environment.

  11. Leukemia Inhibitory Factor Decreases the Arylamine N-Acetyltransferase Activity in Human Cumulus Granulosa Cells

    Chang, Chi-Chen; Hsieh, Yao-Yuan; CHUNG, JING-GUNG; Tsai, Horng-Der; Tsai, Chang-Hai

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the activities of acetyl coenzyme A (AcCoA): arylamine N-acetyltransferase (NAT) of intact cumulus granulosa cells and the role of leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) upon their NAT activities.

  12. An aminoglycoside sensing riboswitch controls the expression of aminoglycoside resistance acetyltransferase and adenyltransferases.

    Chen, Dongrong; Murchie, Alastair I H

    2014-10-01

    The emergence of antibiotic resistance in human pathogens is an increasing threat to public health. The fundamental mechanisms that control the high levels of expression of antibiotic resistance genes are not yet completely understood. The aminoglycosides are one of the earliest classes of antibiotics that were introduced in the 1940s. In the clinic aminoglycoside resistance is conferred most commonly through enzymatic modification of the drug although resistance through enzymatic modification of the target rRNA through methylation or the overexpression of efflux pumps is also appearing. An aminoglycoside sensing riboswitch has been identified that controls expression of the aminoglycoside resistance genes that encode the aminoglycoside acetyltransferase (AAC) and aminoglycoside nucleotidyltransferase (ANT) (adenyltransferase (AAD)) enzymes. AAC and ANT cause resistance to aminoglycoside antibiotics through modification of the drugs. Expression of the AAC and ANT resistance genes is regulated by aminoglycoside binding to the 5' leader RNA of the aac/aad genes. The aminoglycoside sensing RNA is also associated with the integron cassette system that captures antibiotic resistance genes. Specific aminoglycoside binding to the leader RNA induces a structural transition in the leader RNA, and consequently induction of resistance protein expression. Reporter gene expression, direct measurements of drug RNA binding, chemical probing and UV cross-linking combined with mutational analysis demonstrated that the leader RNA functioned as an aminoglycoside sensing riboswitch in which drug binding to the leader RNA leads to the induction of aminoglycoside antibiotic resistance. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Riboswitches. PMID:24631585

  13. Perturbation of the yeast N-acetyltransferase NatB induces elevation of protein phosphorylation levels

    Timmers Marc HTH

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The addition of an acetyl group to protein N-termini is a widespread co-translational modification. NatB is one of the main N-acetyltransferases that targets a subset of proteins possessing an N-terminal methionine, but so far only a handful of substrates have been reported. Using a yeast nat3Δ strain, deficient for the catalytic subunit of NatB, we employed a quantitative proteomics strategy to identify NatB substrates and to characterize downstream effects in nat3Δ. Results Comparing by proteomics WT and nat3Δ strains, using metabolic 15N isotope labeling, we confidently identified 59 NatB substrates, out of a total of 756 detected acetylated protein N-termini. We acquired in-depth proteome wide measurements of expression levels of about 2580 proteins. Most remarkably, NatB deletion led to a very significant change in protein phosphorylation. Conclusions Protein expression levels change only marginally in between WT and nat3Δ. A comparison of the detected NatB substrates with their orthologous revealed remarkably little conservation throughout the phylogenetic tree. We further present evidence of post-translational N-acetylation on protein variants at non-annotated N-termini. Moreover, analysis of downstream effects in nat3Δ revealed elevated protein phosphorylation levels whereby the kinase Snf1p is likely a key element in this process.

  14. Structural Basis for Microcin C7 Inactivation by the MccE Acetyltransferase

    Agarwal, Vinayak; Metlitskaya, Anastasiya; Severinov, Konstantin; Nair, Satish K. (Rutgers); (Russ. Acad. Sci.); (UIUC)

    2015-10-15

    The antibiotic microcin C7 (McC) acts as a bacteriocide by inhibiting aspartyl-tRNA synthetase and stalling the protein translation machinery. McC is synthesized as a heptapeptide-nucleotide conjugate, which is processed by cellular peptidases within target strains to yield the biologically active compound. As unwanted processing of intact McC can result in self-toxicity, producing strains utilize multiple mechanisms for autoimmunity against processed McC. We have shown previously that the mccE gene within the biosynthetic cluster can inactivate processed McC by acetylating the antibiotic. Here, we present the characterization of this acetylation mechanism through biochemical and structural biological studies of the MccE acetyltransferase domain (MccE{sup AcTase}). We have also determined five crystal structures of the MccE-acetyl-CoA complex with bound substrates, inhibitor, and reaction product. The structural data reveal an unexpected mode of substrate recognition through p-stacking interactions similar to those found in cap-binding proteins and nucleotidyltransferases. These studies provide a rationale for the observation that MccE{sup AcTase} can detoxify a range of aminoacylnucleotides, including those that are structurally distinct from microcin C7.

  15. Microfluidic Mobility Shift Profiling of Lysine Acetyltransferases Enables Screening and Mechanistic Analysis of Cellular Acetylation Inhibitors.

    Sorum, Alexander W; Shrimp, Jonathan H; Roberts, Allison M; Montgomery, David C; Tiwari, Neil K; Lal-Nag, Madhu; Simeonov, Anton; Jadhav, Ajit; Meier, Jordan L

    2016-03-18

    Lysine acetyltransferases (KATs) are critical regulators of signaling in many diseases, including cancer. A major challenge in establishing the targetable functions of KATs in disease is a lack of well-characterized, cell-active KAT inhibitors. To confront this challenge, here we report a microfluidic mobility shift platform for the discovery and characterization of small molecule KAT inhibitors. Novel fluorescent peptide substrates were developed for four well-known KAT enzymes (p300, Crebbp, Morf, and Gcn5). Enzyme-catalyzed acetylation alters the electrophoretic mobility of these peptides in a microfluidic chip, allowing facile and direct monitoring of KAT activity. A pilot screen was used to demonstrate the utility of microfluidic mobility shift profiling to identify known and novel modulators of KAT activity. Real-time kinetic monitoring of KAT activity revealed that garcinol, a natural product KAT inhibitor used in cellular studies, exhibits time-dependent and detergent-sensitive inhibition, consistent with an aggregation-based mechanism. In contrast, the cell-permeable bisubstrate inhibitor Tat-CoA exhibited potent and time-independent KAT inhibition, highlighting its potential utility as a cellular inhibitor of KAT activity. These studies define microfluidic mobility shift profiling as a powerful platform for the discovery and characterization of small molecule inhibitors of KAT activity, and provide mechanistic insights potentially important for the application of KAT inhibitors in cellular contexts. PMID:26428393

  16. Crystal Structures of Murine Carnitine Acetyltransferase in Ternary Complexes with Its Substrates

    Hsiao,Y.; Jogl, G.; Tong, L.

    2006-01-01

    Carnitine acyltransferases catalyze the reversible exchange of acyl groups between coenzyme A (CoA) and carnitine. They have important roles in many cellular processes, especially the oxidation of long-chain fatty acids in the mitochondria for energy production, and are attractive targets for drug discovery against diabetes and obesity. To help define in molecular detail the catalytic mechanism of these enzymes, we report here the high resolution crystal structure of wild-type murine carnitine acetyltransferase (CrAT) in a ternary complex with its substrates acetyl-CoA and carnitine, and the structure of the S554A/M564G double mutant in a ternary complex with the substrates CoA and hexanoylcarnitine. Detailed analyses suggest that these structures may be good mimics for the Michaelis complexes for the forward and reverse reactions of the enzyme, representing the first time that such complexes of CrAT have been studied in molecular detail. The structural information provides significant new insights into the catalytic mechanism of CrAT and possibly carnitine acyltransferases in general.

  17. Identification and Functional Characterization of Arylamine N-Acetyltransferases in Eubacteria: Evidence for Highly Selective Acetylation of 5-Aminosalicylic Acid

    Deloménie, Claudine; Fouix, Sylvaine; Longuemaux, Sandrine; Brahimi, Naïma; Bizet, Chantal; Picard, Bertrand; Denamur, Erick; Dupret, Jean-Marie

    2001-01-01

    Arylamine N-acetyltransferase activity has been described in various bacterial species. Bacterial N-acetyltransferases, including those from bacteria of the gut flora, may be involved in the metabolism of xenobiotics, thereby exerting physiopathological effects. We characterized these enzymes further by steady-state kinetics, time-dependent inhibition, and DNA hybridization in 40 species, mostly from the human intestinal microflora. We report for the first time N-acetyltransferase activity in...

  18. Serum Aminoglycoside Assay by Enzyme-Mediated Immunoassay (EMIT): Correlation with Radioimmunoassay, Fluoroimmunoassay, and Acetyltransferase and Microbiological Assays

    White, L O; Scammell, L. M.; Reeves, D S

    1981-01-01

    Enzyme-mediated immunoassay (EMIT) serum aminoglycoside assay results were accurate and precise and correlated well with radioimmunoassay, fluoroimmunoassay, and acetyltransferase and microbiological assay determinations.

  19. C646, a Novel p300/CREB-Binding Protein-Specific Inhibitor of Histone Acetyltransferase, Attenuates Influenza A Virus Infection.

    Zhao, Dongming; Fukuyama, Satoshi; Sakai-Tagawa, Yuko; Takashita, Emi; Shoemaker, Jason E; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro

    2016-03-01

    New strategies to develop novel broad-spectrum antiviral drugs against influenza virus infections are needed due to the emergence of antigenic variants and drug-resistant viruses. Here, we evaluated C646, a novel p300/CREB-binding protein-specific inhibitor of histone acetyltransferase (HAT), as an anti-influenza virus agent in vitro and in vivo and explored how C646 affects the viral life cycle and host response. Our studies highlight the value of targeting HAT activity for anti-influenza drug development. PMID:26711748

  20. Recombinant genomes which express chloramphenicol acetyltransferase in mammalian cells

    Gorman, C.M.; Moffat, L.F.; Howard, B.H.

    1982-09-01

    The authors constructed a series of recombinant genomes which directed expression of the enzyme chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) in mammalian cells. The prototype recombinant in this series, pSV2-cat, consisted of the beta-lactamase gene and origin of replication from pBR322 coupled to a simian virus 40 (SV40) early transcription region into which CAT coding sequences were inserted. Readily measured levels of CAT accumulated within 48 h after the introduction of pSV2-cat DNA into African green monkey kidney CV-1 cells. Because endogenous CAT activity is not present in CV-1 or other mammalian cells, and because rapid, sensitive assays for CAT activity are available, these recombinants provided a uniquely convenient system for monitoring the expression of foreign DNAs in tissue culture cells. To demonstrate the usefulness of this system, we constructed derivatives of pSV2-cat from which part or all of the SV 40 promoter region was removed. Deletion of one copy of the 72-base-pair repeat sequence in the SV40 promoter caused no significant decrease in CAT synthesis in monkey kidney CV-1 cells; however, an additional deletion of 50 base pairs from the second copy of the repeats reduced CAT synthesis to 11% of its level in the wild type. They also constructed a recombinant, pSVO-cat, in which the entire SV40 promoter region was removed and a unique HindIII site was substituted for the insertion of other promoter sequences.

  1. Obesity and lipid stress inhibit carnitine acetyltransferase activity.

    Seiler, Sarah E; Martin, Ola J; Noland, Robert C; Slentz, Dorothy H; DeBalsi, Karen L; Ilkayeva, Olga R; An, Jie; Newgard, Christopher B; Koves, Timothy R; Muoio, Deborah M

    2014-04-01

    Carnitine acetyltransferase (CrAT) is a mitochondrial matrix enzyme that catalyzes the interconversion of acetyl-CoA and acetylcarnitine. Emerging evidence suggests that this enzyme functions as a positive regulator of total body glucose tolerance and muscle activity of pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH), a mitochondrial enzyme complex that promotes glucose oxidation and is feedback inhibited by acetyl-CoA. Here, we used tandem mass spectrometry-based metabolic profiling to identify a negative relationship between CrAT activity and muscle content of lipid intermediates. CrAT specific activity was diminished in muscles from obese and diabetic rodents despite increased protein abundance. This reduction in enzyme activity was accompanied by muscle accumulation of long-chain acylcarnitines (LCACs) and acyl-CoAs and a decline in the acetylcarnitine/acetyl-CoA ratio. In vitro assays demonstrated that palmitoyl-CoA acts as a direct mixed-model inhibitor of CrAT. Similarly, in primary human myocytes grown in culture, nutritional and genetic manipulations that promoted mitochondrial influx of fatty acids resulted in accumulation of LCACs but a pronounced decrease of CrAT-derived short-chain acylcarnitines. These results suggest that lipid-induced antagonism of CrAT might contribute to decreased PDH activity and glucose disposal in the context of obesity and diabetes. PMID:24395925

  2. Carnitine Acetyltransferase Mitigates Metabolic Inertia and Muscle Fatigue during Exercise.

    Seiler, Sarah E; Koves, Timothy R; Gooding, Jessica R; Wong, Kari E; Stevens, Robert D; Ilkayeva, Olga R; Wittmann, April H; DeBalsi, Karen L; Davies, Michael N; Lindeboom, Lucas; Schrauwen, Patrick; Schrauwen-Hinderling, Vera B; Muoio, Deborah M

    2015-07-01

    Acylcarnitine metabolites have gained attention as biomarkers of nutrient stress, but their physiological relevance and metabolic purpose remain poorly understood. Short-chain carnitine conjugates, including acetylcarnitine, derive from their corresponding acyl-CoA precursors via the action of carnitine acetyltransferase (CrAT), a bidirectional mitochondrial matrix enzyme. We show here that contractile activity reverses acetylcarnitine flux in muscle, from net production and efflux at rest to net uptake and consumption during exercise. Disruption of this switch in mice with muscle-specific CrAT deficiency resulted in acetyl-CoA deficit, perturbed energy charge, and diminished exercise tolerance, whereas acetylcarnitine supplementation produced opposite outcomes in a CrAT-dependent manner. Likewise, in exercise-trained compared to untrained humans, post-exercise phosphocreatine recovery rates were positively associated with CrAT activity and coincided with dramatic shifts in muscle acetylcarnitine dynamics. These findings show acetylcarnitine serves as a critical acetyl buffer for working muscles and provide insight into potential therapeutic strategies for combatting exercise intolerance. PMID:26154055

  3. Dysregulation of Histone Acetyltransferases and Deacetylases in Cardiovascular Diseases

    Yonggang Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disease (CVD remains a leading cause of mortality worldwide despite advances in its prevention and management. A comprehensive understanding of factors which contribute to CVD is required in order to develop more effective treatment options. Dysregulation of epigenetic posttranscriptional modifications of histones in chromatin is thought to be associated with the pathology of many disease models, including CVD. Histone acetyltransferases (HATs and deacetylases (HDACs are regulators of histone lysine acetylation. Recent studies have implicated a fundamental role of reversible protein acetylation in the regulation of CVDs such as hypertension, pulmonary hypertension, diabetic cardiomyopathy, coronary artery disease, arrhythmia, and heart failure. This reversible acetylation is governed by enzymes that HATs add or HDACs remove acetyl groups respectively. New evidence has revealed that histone acetylation regulators blunt cardiovascular and related disease states in certain cellular processes including myocyte hypertrophy, apoptosis, fibrosis, oxidative stress, and inflammation. The accumulating evidence of the detrimental role of histone acetylation in cardiac disease combined with the cardioprotective role of histone acetylation regulators suggests that the use of histone acetylation regulators may serve as a novel approach to treating the millions of patients afflicted by cardiac diseases worldwide.

  4. Characterization of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae ARG7 gene encoding ornithine acetyltransferase, an enzyme also endowed with acetylglutamate synthase activity.

    Crabeel, M; Abadjieva, A; Hilven, P; Desimpelaere, J; Soetens, O

    1997-12-01

    We have cloned by functional complementation and characterized the yeast ARG7 gene encoding mitochondrial ornithine acetyltransferase, the enzyme catalyzing the fifth step in arginine biosynthesis. While forming ornithine, this enzyme regenerates acetylglutamate, also produced in the first step by the ARG2-encoded acetylglutamate synthase. Interestingly, total deletion of the genomic ARG7 ORF resulted in an arginine-leaky phenotype, indicating that yeast cells possess an alternative route for generating ornithine from acetylornithine. Yeast ornithine acetyltransferase has been purified and characterized previously as a heterodimer of two subunits proposed to derive from a single precursor protein [Liu, Y-S., Van Heeswijck R., Hoj, P. & Hoogenraad, N. (1995) Eur. J. Biochem. 228, 291-296]; those authors further suggested that the internal processing of Arg7p, which is a mitochondrial enzyme, might occur in the matrix, while the leader peptide would be of the non-cleavable-type. The characterization of the gene (a) establishes that Arg7p is indeed encoded by a single gene, (b) demonstrates the existence of a cleaved mitochondrial prepeptide of eight residues, and (c) shows that the predicted internal processing site is unlike the mitochondrial proteolytic peptidase target sequence. Yeast Arg7p shares between 32-43% identity in pairwise comparisons with the ten analogous bacterial ArgJ enzymes characterized. Among these evolutionarily related enzymes, some but not all appear bifunctional, being able to produce acetylglutamate not only from acetylornithine but also from acetyl-CoA, thus catalyzing the same reaction as the apparently unrelated acetylglutamate synthase. We have addressed the question of the bifunctionality of the eucaryotic enzyme, showing that overexpressed ARG7 can complement yeast arg2 and Escherichia coli argA mutations (affecting acetylglutamate synthase). Furthermore, Arg7p-linked acetylglutamate synthase activity was measurable in an assay. The

  5. N-Alpha-Acetyltransferases and Regulation of CFTR Expression.

    Vetter, Ali J; Karamyshev, Andrey L; Patrick, Anna E; Hudson, Henry; Thomas, Philip J

    2016-01-01

    The majority of cystic fibrosis (CF)-causing mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) lead to the misfolding, mistrafficking, and degradation of the mutant protein. Inhibition of degradation does not effectively increase the amount of trafficking competent CFTR, but typically leads to increased ER retention of misfolded forms. Thus, the initial off pathway steps occur early in the processing of the protein. To identify proteins that interact with these early forms of CFTR, in vitro crosslink experiments identified cotranslational partners of the nascent chain of the severe misfolded mutant, G85E CFTR. The mutant preferentially interacts with a subunit of an N-alpha-acetyltransferase A. Based on recent reports that acetylation of the N-termini of some N-end rule substrates control their ubiquitination and subsequent degradation, a potential role for this modification in regulation of CFTR expression was assessed. Knockdown experiments identified two complexes, which affect G85E CFTR proteins levels, NatA and NatB. Effects of the knockdowns on mRNA levels, translation rates, and degradation rates established that the two complexes regulate G85E CFTR through two separate mechanisms. NatA acts indirectly by regulating transcription levels and NatB acts through a previously identified, but incompletely understood posttranslational mechanism. This regulation did not effect trafficking of G85E CFTR, which remains retained in the ER, nor did it alter the degradation rate of CFTR. A mutation predicted to inhibit N-terminal acetylation of CFTR, Q2P, was without effect, suggesting neither system acts directly on CFTR. These results contradict the prediction that N-terminal acetylation of CFTR determines its fitness as a proteasome substrate, but rather NatB plays a role in the conformational maturation of CFTR in the ER through actions on an unidentified protein. PMID:27182737

  6. Nickel and Cobalt Resistance Engineered in Escherichia coli by Overexpression of Serine Acetyltransferase from the Nickel Hyperaccumulator Plant Thlaspi goesingense

    Freeman, John L; Persans, Michael W.; Nieman, Ken; Salt, David E.

    2005-01-01

    The overexpression of serine acetyltransferase from the Ni-hyperaccumulating plant Thlaspi goesingense causes enhanced nickel and cobalt resistance in Escherichia coli. Furthermore, overexpression of T. goesingense serine acetyltransferase results in enhanced sensitivity to cadmium and has no significant effect on resistance to zinc. Enhanced nickel resistance is directly related to the constitutive overactivation of sulfur assimilation and glutathione biosynthesis, driven by the overproducti...

  7. DNA hybridization and phosphinothricin acetyltransferase gene sequence detection based on zirconia/nanogold film modified electrode

    Zhang, Wei; Yang, Tao; Jiang, Chen; Jiao, Kui

    2008-05-01

    This study reports a novel electrochemical DNA biosensor based on zirconia (ZrO 2) and gold nanoparticles (NG) film modified glassy carbon electrode (GCE). NG was electrodeposited onto the glassy carbon electrode at 1.5 V, and then zirconia thin film on the NG/GCE was fabricated by cyclic voltammetric method (CV) in an aqueous electrolyte of ZrOCl 2 and KCl at a scan rate of 20 mV/s. DNA probes were attached onto the ZrO 2/NG/GCE due to the strong binding of the phosphate group of DNA with the zirconia film and the excellent biocompatibility of nanogold with DNA. CV and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) were used to characterize the modification of the electrode and the probe DNA immobilization. The electrochemical response of the DNA hybridization was measured by differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) using methylene blue (MB) as the electroactive indicator. After the hybridization of DNA probe (ssDNA) with the complementary DNA (cDNA), the cathodic peak current of MB decreased obviously. The difference of the cathodic peak currents of MB between before and after the hybridization of the probe DNA was used as the signal for the detection of the target DNA. The sequence-specific DNA of phosphinothricin acetyltransferase (PAT) gene in the transgenic plants was detected with a detection range from 1.0 × 10 -10 to 1.0 × 10 -6 mol/L, and a detection limit of 3.1 × 10 -11 mol/L.

  8. Arylamine N-acetyltransferase 2 (NAT2 genetic diversity and traditional subsistence: a worldwide population survey.

    Audrey Sabbagh

    Full Text Available Arylamine N-acetyltransferase 2 (NAT2 is involved in human physiological responses to a variety of xenobiotic compounds, including common therapeutic drugs and exogenous chemicals present in the diet and the environment. Many questions remain about the evolutionary mechanisms that have led to the high prevalence of slow acetylators in the human species. Evidence from recent surveys of NAT2 gene variation suggests that NAT2 slow-causing variants might have become targets of positive selection as a consequence of the shift in modes of subsistence and lifestyle in human populations in the last 10,000 years. We aimed to test more extensively the hypothesis that slow acetylation prevalence in humans is related to the subsistence strategy adopted by the past populations. To this end, published frequency data on the most relevant genetic variants of NAT2 were collected from 128 population samples (14,679 individuals representing different subsistence modes and dietary habits, allowing a thorough analysis at both a worldwide and continent scale. A significantly higher prevalence of the slow acetylation phenotype was observed in populations practicing farming (45.4% and herding (48.2% as compared to populations mostly relying on hunting and gathering (22.4% (P = 0.0007. This was closely mirrored by the frequency of the slow 590A variant that was found to occur at a three-fold higher frequency in food producers (25% as compared to hunter-gatherers (8%. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that the Neolithic transition to subsistence economies based on agricultural and pastoral resources modified the selective regime affecting the NAT2 acetylation pathway. Furthermore, the vast amount of data collected enabled us to provide a comprehensive and up-to-date description of NAT2 worldwide genetic diversity, thus building up a useful resource of frequency data for further studies interested in epidemiological or anthropological research

  9. Suppression of Exogenous Gene Expression by Spermidine/Spermine N1-Acetyltransferase 1 (SSAT1) Cotransfection*

    Lee, Seung Bum; Park, Jong Hwan; Woster, Patrick M.; CASERO, ROBERT A.; Park, Myung Hee

    2010-01-01

    Spermidine/spermine N1-acetyltransferase 1 (SSAT1), which catalyzes the N1-acetylation of spermidine and spermine to form acetyl derivatives, is a rate-limiting enzyme in polyamine catabolism. We now report a novel activity of transiently transfected SSAT1 in suppressing the exogenous expression of other proteins, i.e. green fluorescent protein (GFP) or GFP-eIF5A. Spermidine/spermine N1-acetyltransferase 2 (SSAT2) or inactive SSAT1 mutant enzymes (R101A or R101K) were without effect. The loss...

  10. Cigarette Smoking, N-Acetyltransferase 2 Acetylation Status, and Bladder Cancer Risk

    Marcus, P.M.; Hayes, R.B.; Vineis, P.;

    2000-01-01

    Tobacco use is an established cause of bladder cancer. The ability to detoxify aromatic amines, which are present in tobacco and are potent bladder carcinogens, is compromised in persons with the N-acetyltransferase 2 slow acetylation polymorphism. The relationship of cigarette smoking with bladder...... interaction between smoking and N-acetyltransferase 2 slow acetylation (OR, 1.3; 95% confidence interval, 1.0-1.6) that was somewhat stronger when analyses were restricted to studies conducted in Europe (OR, 1.5; confidence interval, 1.1-1.9), a pooling that included nearly 80% of the collected data. Using...

  11. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of PAT, an acetyltransferase from Sulfolobus solfataricus

    PAT, an acetyltransferase from the archaeon S. solfataricus that specifically acetylates the chromatin protein Alba, was expressed, purified and crystallized. PAT is an acetyltransferase from the archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus that specifically acetylates the chromatin protein Alba. The enzyme was expressed, purified and subsequently crystallized using the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion technique. Native diffraction data were collected to 1.70 Å resolution on the BL13C1 beamline of NSRRC from a flash-frozen crystal at 100 K. The crystals belonged to space group P212121, with unit-cell parameters a = 44.30, b = 46.59, c = 68.39 Å

  12. Crystallization of ornithine acetyltransferase from yeast by counter-diffusion and preliminary X-ray study

    Maes, Dominique; Crabeel, Marjolaine; Van de Weerdt, Cécile; Martial, Joseph; Peeters, Eveline; Charlier, Daniël; Decanniere, Klaas; Vanhee, Celine; Wyns, Lode; Zegers, Ingrid

    2006-01-01

    A study on the crystallization of ornithine acetyltransferase from yeast, catalysing the fifth step in microbial arginine synthesis, is presented. The use of the counter-diffusion technique removes the disorder present in one dimension in crystals grown by either batch or hanging-drop techniques.

  13. Genetic Variation at the N-acetyltransferase (NAT) Genes in Global Populations

    Functional variability at the N-acetyltransferase (NAT) genes is associated with adverse drug reactions and cancer susceptibility in humans. Previous studies of small sets of ethnic groups have indicated that the NAT genes have high levels of amino acid variation that differ in f...

  14. Unintended Consequences: High phosphinothricin acetyltransferase activity causes reduced fitness in barley

    Selectable markers used in plant transformation, such as phosphinothricin acetyltransferase (PAT) derived from the bar gene, have been chosen for selection efficacy as well as for the absence of pleiotropic effects. Recent research has suggested that expression of bar in Arabidopsis affects the tran...

  15. Chloramphenicol acetyltransferase may confer resistance to fusidic acid by sequestering the drug.

    Proctor, G N; McKell, J.; Rownd, R H

    1983-01-01

    Enterobacterial chloramphenicol acetyltransferase bound fusidic acid with high affinity, but did not acetylate the drug at an experimentally detectable rate. The enzyme may therefore confer resistance to fusidic acid by sequestering the drug and thereby preventing the drug from binding to translational elongation factor G.

  16. Comparative investigation of the xenobiotic metabolizing arylamine N-acetyltransferase enzyme family among fungi

    Arylamine N-acetyltransferases (NATs) are xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes well-characterized in several bacteria and higher eukaryotes. The role of NATs in fungal biology has only recently been investigated. The NAT1 gene of Gibberella moniliformis was the first NAT cloned and characterized from fun...

  17. Structure of soybean serine acetyltransferase and formation of the cysteine regulatory complex as a molecular chaperone

    Serine acetyltransferase (SAT) catalyzes the limiting reaction in plant and microbial biosynthesis of cysteine. In addition to its enzymatic function, SAT forms a macromolecular complex with O-acetylserine sulfhydrylase (OASS). Formation of the cysteine regulatory complex (CRC) is a critical biochem...

  18. Structure of homoserine O-acetyltransferase from Staphylococcus aureus: the first Gram-positive ortholog structure

    Thangavelu, Bharani; Pavlovsky, Alexander G.; Viola, Ronald

    2014-01-01

    The structure of homoserine O-acetyltransferase (HTA) from the human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus has been determined. Despite a similar overall fold and active site architecture to other α/β-hydrolases, this more compact HTA structure has a more narrow access to the active site than can confer important specificity differences.

  19. Delphinidin, a specific inhibitor of histone acetyltransferase, suppresses inflammatory signaling via prevention of NF-κB acetylation in fibroblast-like synoviocyte MH7A cells

    Highlights: → Delphinidin is a novel inhibitor of p300/CBP histone acetyltransferase. → Delphinidin prevents the hyperacetylation of p65 by inhibiting the HAT activity of p300/CBP. → Delphinidin efficiently suppresses the expression of inflammatory cytokines in MH7A cells via hypoacetylation of NF-κB. → Delphinidin inhibits cytokine release in the Jurkat T lymphocyte cell line. -- Abstract: Histone acetyltransferase (HAT) inhibitors (HATi) isolated from dietary compounds have been shown to suppress inflammatory signaling, which contributes to rheumatoid arthritis. Here, we identified a novel HATi in Punica granatum L. known as delphinidin (DP). DP did not affect the activity of other epigenetic enzymes (histone deacetylase, histone methyltransferase, or sirtuin1). DP specifically inhibited the HAT activities of p300/CBP. It also inhibited p65 acetylation in MH7A cells, a human rheumatoid arthritis synovial cell line. DP-induced hypoacetylation was accompanied by cytosolic accumulation of p65 and nuclear localization of IKBα. Accordingly, DP treatment inhibited TNFα-stimulated increases in NF-κB function and expression of NF-κB target genes in these cells. Importantly, DP suppressed lipopolysaccharide-induced pro-inflammatory cytokine expression in Jurkat T lymphocytes, demonstrating that HATi efficiently suppresses cytokine-mediated immune responses. Together, these results show that the HATi activity of DP counters anti-inflammatory signaling by blocking p65 acetylation and that this compound may be useful in preventing inflammatory arthritis.

  20. Delphinidin, a specific inhibitor of histone acetyltransferase, suppresses inflammatory signaling via prevention of NF-{kappa}B acetylation in fibroblast-like synoviocyte MH7A cells

    Seong, Ah-Reum; Yoo, Jung-Yoon; Choi, KyungChul [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Center for Chronic Metabolic Disease Research, College of Medicine, Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Mee-Hee [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Center for Chronic Metabolic Disease Research, College of Medicine, Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Brain Korea 21 Project for Medical Sciences, Yonsei University, College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Yoo-Hyun [Department of Food Science and Nutrition, The University of Suwon, Kyunggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jeongmin [Department of Medical Nutrition, Kyung Hee University, Kyunggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Jun, Woojin [Department of Food and Nutrition, Chonnam National University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sunoh, E-mail: sunoh@korea.ac.kr [Jeollanamdo Institute of Natural Resources Research, Jeonnam (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Ho-Geun, E-mail: yhgeun@yuhs.ac [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Center for Chronic Metabolic Disease Research, College of Medicine, Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Brain Korea 21 Project for Medical Sciences, Yonsei University, College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-07-08

    Highlights: {yields} Delphinidin is a novel inhibitor of p300/CBP histone acetyltransferase. {yields} Delphinidin prevents the hyperacetylation of p65 by inhibiting the HAT activity of p300/CBP. {yields} Delphinidin efficiently suppresses the expression of inflammatory cytokines in MH7A cells via hypoacetylation of NF-{kappa}B. {yields} Delphinidin inhibits cytokine release in the Jurkat T lymphocyte cell line. -- Abstract: Histone acetyltransferase (HAT) inhibitors (HATi) isolated from dietary compounds have been shown to suppress inflammatory signaling, which contributes to rheumatoid arthritis. Here, we identified a novel HATi in Punica granatum L. known as delphinidin (DP). DP did not affect the activity of other epigenetic enzymes (histone deacetylase, histone methyltransferase, or sirtuin1). DP specifically inhibited the HAT activities of p300/CBP. It also inhibited p65 acetylation in MH7A cells, a human rheumatoid arthritis synovial cell line. DP-induced hypoacetylation was accompanied by cytosolic accumulation of p65 and nuclear localization of IKB{alpha}. Accordingly, DP treatment inhibited TNF{alpha}-stimulated increases in NF-{kappa}B function and expression of NF-{kappa}B target genes in these cells. Importantly, DP suppressed lipopolysaccharide-induced pro-inflammatory cytokine expression in Jurkat T lymphocytes, demonstrating that HATi efficiently suppresses cytokine-mediated immune responses. Together, these results show that the HATi activity of DP counters anti-inflammatory signaling by blocking p65 acetylation and that this compound may be useful in preventing inflammatory arthritis.

  1. A bacterial acetyltransferase destroys plant microtubule networks and blocks secretion

    The eukaryotic cytoskeleton is essential for structural support and intracellular transport, and is therefore a common target of animal pathogens. However, no phytopathogenic effector has yet been demonstrated to specifically target the plant cytoskeleton. Here we show that the Pseudomonas syringae...

  2. Sex-biased transcription enhancement by a 5' tethered Gal4-MOF histone acetyltransferase fusion protein in Drosophila

    Belikoff Esther J

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In male Drosophila melanogaster, the male specific lethal (MSL complex is somehow responsible for a two-fold increase in transcription of most X-linked genes, which are enriched for histone H4 acetylated at lysine 16 (H4K16ac. This acetylation requires MOF, a histone acetyltransferase that is a component of the MSL complex. MOF also associates with the non-specific lethal or NSL complex. The MSL complex is bound within active genes on the male X chromosome with a 3' bias. In contrast, the NSL complex is enriched at promoter regions of many autosomal and X-linked genes in both sexes. In this study we have investigated the role of MOF as a transcriptional activator. Results MOF was fused to the DNA binding domain of Gal4 and targeted to the promoter region of UAS-reporter genes in Drosophila. We found that expression of a UAS-red fluorescent protein (DsRed reporter gene was strongly induced by Gal4-MOF. However, DsRed RNA levels were about seven times higher in female than male larvae. Immunostaining of polytene chromosomes showed that Gal4-MOF co-localized with MSL1 to many sites on the X chromosome in male but not female nuclei. However, in female nuclei that express MSL2, Gal4-MOF co-localized with MSL1 to many sites on polytene chromosomes but DsRed expression was reduced. Mutation of conserved active site residues in MOF (Glu714 and Cys680 reduced HAT activity in vitro and UAS-DsRed activation in Drosophila. In the presence of Gal4-MOF, H4K16ac levels were enriched over UAS-lacZ and UAS-arm-lacZ reporter genes. The latter utilizes the constitutive promoter from the arm gene to drive lacZ expression. In contrast to the strong induction of UAS-DsRed expression, UAS-arm-lacZ expression increased by about 2-fold in both sexes. Conclusions Targeting MOF to reporter genes led to transcription enhancement and acetylation of histone H4 at lysine 16. Histone acetyltransferase activity was required for the full transcriptional

  3. Nickel and cobalt resistance engineered in Escherichia coli by overexpression of serine acetyltransferase from the nickel hyperaccumulator plant Thlaspi goesingense.

    Freeman, John L; Persans, Michael W; Nieman, Ken; Salt, David E

    2005-12-01

    The overexpression of serine acetyltransferase from the Ni-hyperaccumulating plant Thlaspi goesingense causes enhanced nickel and cobalt resistance in Escherichia coli. Furthermore, overexpression of T. goesingense serine acetyltransferase results in enhanced sensitivity to cadmium and has no significant effect on resistance to zinc. Enhanced nickel resistance is directly related to the constitutive overactivation of sulfur assimilation and glutathione biosynthesis, driven by the overproduction of O-acetyl-L-serine, the product of serine acetyltransferase and a positive regulator of the cysteine regulon. Nickel in the serine acetyltransferase-overexpressing strains is not detoxified by coordination or precipitation with sulfur, suggesting that glutathione is involved in reducing the oxidative damage imposed by nickel. PMID:16332856

  4. Choline acetyltransferase expressed by radial neuroglia cells in the development of telencephalon: A validated study

    Li Zhou; Lingling Ding; Zhisuo Xiao; Yuanyuan Qin; Guibin Li

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cholinergic neuron directly participants in human motion, learning and memory and is a target cell for multiple degenerative diseases of central nervous system.OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether the mitotic cell is the radial glial cell expressing choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) in ventricle zone (VZ) of telencephalon and whether cholinergic neuron is derived from radial glial cell in ventricle zone of telencephalon.DESIGN: Observational study.SETTING: Department of Histology and Embryology, Basic Medical College of Jilin University.MATERIALS: Nine healthy Wistar rats included 6 females and 3 male. Male and female rats were mated routinely, and the day when spermatozoa or vaginal plug were found was regarded as embryonic 0 (E0).Primary monoclonal antibodies ChAT and vimentin were provided respectively by Wuhan Boster Company,and Biogenex Company, USA.METHODS: The experiment was carried out in the Laboratory of Cell Culture and Immunohistochemistry,Department of Histology and Embryology from march 2002 to January 2003. Firstly, fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) was used to confirm the time of generation of cholinergic neuron; secondly,telencephalons of rats at embryonic 14 days (E14) were performed coronary sections, then immunohistochemistry double staining for vimentin (a protein marker of radial neuroglia cell) and ChAT (a protein marker of cholinergic neuron) were used to test whether ChAT was expressed in the radial neuroglia cells.results of immunohistochemistry double staining.RESULTS: It is confirmed using by flow cytometer that embryogenesis time of cholinergic neuron was at E12, and shown the population of cells in VZ of dorsal telencephalon of E14 rat co-expressed vimentin and ChAT through immunohistochemistry double staining. A lot of vimentin-positive cells and ChAT-positive cells respectively were observed in VZ of lateral ganglionic eminence.CONCLUSION: Cholinergic neuron in cerebral cortex is derived from radial glial cells in VZ

  5. Glycyl-L-glutamine opposes the fall in choline acetyltransferase in the denervated superior cervical ganglion of the cat.

    Koelle, G B; O'Neill, J J; Thampi, N S; Han, M S; Caccese, R

    1989-01-01

    Intracarotid infusion of 3 microM glycyl-L-glutamine was found to oppose the fall in the choline acetyl-transferase content of the preganglionically denervated cat superior cervical ganglion; this same effect has been demonstrated previously for acetylcholinesterase content. Because choline acetyltransferase, in contrast to acetylcholinesterase, occurs exclusively in the preganglionic axons and their terminals, this finding raises the possibility that glycyl-L-glutamine opposes postsectional ...

  6. Choline acetyltransferase detection in normal and denervated electrocyte from Electrophorus electricus (L.) using a Confocal Scanning Optical Microscopy Analysis

    NILSON NUNES-TAVARES; NARCISA LEAL CUNHA-E-SILVA; AÍDA HASSÓN-VOLOCH

    2000-01-01

    Acetylcholine is the neurotransmitter responsible for the transmission of impulses from cholinergic neurons to cells of innervated tissues. Its biosynthesis is catalyzed by the enzyme Choline acetyltransferase that is considered to be a phenotypically specific marker for cholinergic system. It is well known that the regulation of Choline acetyltransferase activity under physiological and pathological conditions is important for development and neuronal activities of cholinergic functions. We ...

  7. System-wide Studies of N-Lysine Acetylation in Rhodopseudomonas palustris Reveals Substrate Specificity of Protein Acetyltransferases

    Crosby, Heidi A [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Pelletier, Dale A [ORNL; Hurst, Gregory {Greg} B [ORNL; Escalante-Semerena, Jorge C [University of Wisconsin, Madison

    2012-01-01

    Background: Protein acetylation is widespread in prokaryotes. Results: Six new acyl-CoA synthetases whose activities are controlled by acetylation were identified, and their substrate preference established. A new protein acetyltransferase was also identified and its substrate specificity determined. Conclusion: Protein acetyltransferases acetylate a conserved lysine residue in protein substrates. Significance: The R. palustris Pat enzyme specifically acetylates AMP-forming acyl-CoA synthetases and regulates fatty acid metabolism.

  8. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray characterization of Bacillus cereus arylamine N-acetyltransferase 3 [(BACCR)NAT3

    Kubiak, Xavier Jean Philippe; Pluvinage, Benjamin; Li de la Sierra-Gallay, Inès;

    2012-01-01

    Arylamine N-acetyltransferases (NATs) are xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes (XMEs) that catalyze the acetylation of arylamines. All functional NATs described to date possess a strictly conserved Cys-His-Asp catalytic triad. Here, the purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray characterizat......Arylamine N-acetyltransferases (NATs) are xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes (XMEs) that catalyze the acetylation of arylamines. All functional NATs described to date possess a strictly conserved Cys-His-Asp catalytic triad. Here, the purification, crystallization and preliminary X...

  9. Co-expression of G2-EPSPS and glyphosate acetyltransferase GAT genes conferring high tolerance to glyphosate in soybean

    Bingfu eGuo

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Glyphosate is a widely used non-selective herbicide with broad spectrum of weed control around the world. At present, most of the commercial glyphosate tolerant soybeans utilize glyphosate tolerant gene CP4-EPSPS or glyphosate acetyltransferase gene GAT separately. In this study, both glyphosate tolerant gene G2-EPSPS and glyphosate degraded gene GAT were co-transferred into soybean and transgenic plants showed high tolerance to glyphosate. Molecular analysis including PCR, Sothern blot, qRT-PCR and Western blot revealed that target genes have been integrated into genome and expressed effectively at both mRNA and protein levels. Furthermore, the glyphosate tolerance analysis showed that no typical symptom was observed when compared with a glyphosate tolerant line HJ06-698 derived from GR1 transgenic soybean even at four-fold labeled rate of Roundup. Chlorophyll and shikimic acid content analysis of transgenic plant also revealed that these two indexes were not significantly altered after glyphosate application. These results indicated that co-expression of G2-EPSPS and GAT conferred high tolerance to the herbicide glyphosate in soybean. Therefore, combination of tolerant and degraded genes provides a new strategy for developing glyphosate tolerant transgenic crops.

  10. Neuropeptide Y-like immunoreactivity in rat cranial parasympathetic neurons: coexistence with vasoactive intestinal peptide and choline acetyltransferase

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is widely distributed in the sympathetic nervous system, where it is colocalized with norepinephrine. The authors report here that NPY-immunoreactive neurons are also abundant in three cranial parasympathetic ganglia, the otic, sphenopalatine, and ciliary, in the rat measured by radioimmunoassay. High-performance liquid chromatographic analysis of the immunoreactive material present in the otic ganglion indicates that this material is very similar to porcine NPY and indistinguishable from the NPY-like immunoreactivity present in rat sympathetic neurons. These findings raise the possibility that NPY acts as a neuromodulator in the parasympathetic as well as the sympathetic nervous system. In contrast to what had been observed for sympathetic neurons, NPY-immunoreactive neurons in cranial parasympathetic ganglia do not contain detectable catecholamines or tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactivity, and many do contain immunoreactivity for vasoactive intestinal peptide and/or choline acetyltransferase. These findings suggest that there is no simple rule governing coexpression of NPY with norepinephrine, acetylcholine, or vasoactive intestinal peptide in autonomic neurons. Further, while functional studies have indicated that NPY exerts actions on the peripheral vasculature which are antagonistic to those of acetylcholine and vasoactive intestinal peptide, the present results raise the possibility that these three substances may have complementary effects on other target tissues

  11. G9a-mediated methylation of ERα links the PHF20/MOF histone acetyltransferase complex to hormonal gene expression.

    Zhang, Xi; Peng, Danni; Xi, Yuanxin; Yuan, Chao; Sagum, Cari A; Klein, Brianna J; Tanaka, Kaori; Wen, Hong; Kutateladze, Tatiana G; Li, Wei; Bedford, Mark T; Shi, Xiaobing

    2016-01-01

    The euchromatin histone methyltransferase 2 (also known as G9a) methylates histone H3K9 to repress gene expression, but it also acts as a coactivator for some nuclear receptors. The molecular mechanisms underlying this activation remain elusive. Here we show that G9a functions as a coactivator of the endogenous oestrogen receptor α (ERα) in breast cancer cells in a histone methylation-independent manner. G9a dimethylates ERα at K235 both in vitro and in cells. Dimethylation of ERαK235 is recognized by the Tudor domain of PHF20, which recruits the MOF histone acetyltransferase (HAT) complex to ERα target gene promoters to deposit histone H4K16 acetylation promoting active transcription. Together, our data suggest the molecular mechanism by which G9a functions as an ERα coactivator. Along with the PHF20/MOF complex, G9a links the crosstalk between ERα methylation and histone acetylation that governs the epigenetic regulation of hormonal gene expression. PMID:26960573

  12. The Acetyl Group Buffering Action of Carnitine Acetyltransferase Offsets Macronutrient-Induced Lysine Acetylation of Mitochondrial Proteins

    Michael N. Davies

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Lysine acetylation (AcK, a posttranslational modification wherein a two-carbon acetyl group binds covalently to a lysine residue, occurs prominently on mitochondrial proteins and has been linked to metabolic dysfunction. An emergent theory suggests mitochondrial AcK occurs via mass action rather than targeted catalysis. To test this hypothesis, we performed mass spectrometry-based acetylproteomic analyses of quadriceps muscles from mice with skeletal muscle-specific deficiency of carnitine acetyltransferase (CrAT, an enzyme that buffers the mitochondrial acetyl-CoA pool by converting short-chain acyl-CoAs to their membrane permeant acylcarnitine counterparts. CrAT deficiency increased tissue acetyl-CoA levels and susceptibility to diet-induced AcK of broad-ranging mitochondrial proteins, coincident with diminished whole body glucose control. Sub-compartment acetylproteome analyses of muscles from obese mice and humans showed remarkable overrepresentation of mitochondrial matrix proteins. These findings reveal roles for CrAT and L-carnitine in modulating the muscle acetylproteome and provide strong experimental evidence favoring the nonenzymatic carbon pressure model of mitochondrial AcK.

  13. The Acetyl Group Buffering Action of Carnitine Acetyltransferase Offsets Macronutrient-Induced Lysine Acetylation of Mitochondrial Proteins.

    Davies, Michael N; Kjalarsdottir, Lilja; Thompson, J Will; Dubois, Laura G; Stevens, Robert D; Ilkayeva, Olga R; Brosnan, M Julia; Rolph, Timothy P; Grimsrud, Paul A; Muoio, Deborah M

    2016-01-12

    Lysine acetylation (AcK), a posttranslational modification wherein a two-carbon acetyl group binds covalently to a lysine residue, occurs prominently on mitochondrial proteins and has been linked to metabolic dysfunction. An emergent theory suggests mitochondrial AcK occurs via mass action rather than targeted catalysis. To test this hypothesis, we performed mass spectrometry-based acetylproteomic analyses of quadriceps muscles from mice with skeletal muscle-specific deficiency of carnitine acetyltransferase (CrAT), an enzyme that buffers the mitochondrial acetyl-CoA pool by converting short-chain acyl-CoAs to their membrane permeant acylcarnitine counterparts. CrAT deficiency increased tissue acetyl-CoA levels and susceptibility to diet-induced AcK of broad-ranging mitochondrial proteins, coincident with diminished whole body glucose control. Sub-compartment acetylproteome analyses of muscles from obese mice and humans showed remarkable overrepresentation of mitochondrial matrix proteins. These findings reveal roles for CrAT and L-carnitine in modulating the muscle acetylproteome and provide strong experimental evidence favoring the nonenzymatic carbon pressure model of mitochondrial AcK. PMID:26748706

  14. G9a-mediated methylation of ERα links the PHF20/MOF histone acetyltransferase complex to hormonal gene expression

    Zhang, Xi; Peng, Danni; Xi, Yuanxin; Yuan, Chao; Sagum, Cari A.; Klein, Brianna J.; Tanaka, Kaori; Wen, Hong; Kutateladze, Tatiana G.; Li, Wei; Bedford, Mark T.; Shi, Xiaobing

    2016-01-01

    The euchromatin histone methyltransferase 2 (also known as G9a) methylates histone H3K9 to repress gene expression, but it also acts as a coactivator for some nuclear receptors. The molecular mechanisms underlying this activation remain elusive. Here we show that G9a functions as a coactivator of the endogenous oestrogen receptor α (ERα) in breast cancer cells in a histone methylation-independent manner. G9a dimethylates ERα at K235 both in vitro and in cells. Dimethylation of ERαK235 is recognized by the Tudor domain of PHF20, which recruits the MOF histone acetyltransferase (HAT) complex to ERα target gene promoters to deposit histone H4K16 acetylation promoting active transcription. Together, our data suggest the molecular mechanism by which G9a functions as an ERα coactivator. Along with the PHF20/MOF complex, G9a links the crosstalk between ERα methylation and histone acetylation that governs the epigenetic regulation of hormonal gene expression. PMID:26960573

  15. Crystallization of ornithine acetyltransferase from yeast by counter-diffusion and preliminary X-ray study

    Maes, Dominique, E-mail: dominique.maes@vub.ac.be; Crabeel, Marjolaine [Laboratorium voor Ultrastructuur, Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB) and Vlaams Interuniversitair Instituut voor Biotechnologie (VIB), Pleinlaan 2, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium); Van de Weerdt, Cécile; Martial, Joseph [Laboratoire de Biologie Moléculaire et de Génie Génétique, Université de Liège, Allée de la Chimie 3, B-4000 Liège (Belgium); Peeters, Eveline; Charlier, Daniël [Erfelijkheidsleer en Microbiologie, Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB), Pleinlaan 2, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium); Decanniere, Klaas; Vanhee, Celine; Wyns, Lode; Zegers, Ingrid [Laboratorium voor Ultrastructuur, Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB) and Vlaams Interuniversitair Instituut voor Biotechnologie (VIB), Pleinlaan 2, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium)

    2006-12-01

    A study on the crystallization of ornithine acetyltransferase from yeast, catalysing the fifth step in microbial arginine synthesis, is presented. The use of the counter-diffusion technique removes the disorder present in one dimension in crystals grown by either batch or hanging-drop techniques. A study is presented on the crystallization of ornithine acetyltransferase from yeast, which catalyzes the fifth step in microbial arginine synthesis. The use of the counter-diffusion technique removes the disorder present in one dimension in crystals grown by either the batch or hanging-drop techniques. This makes the difference between useless crystals and crystals that allow successful determination of the structure of the protein. The crystals belong to space group P4, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 66.98, c = 427.09 Å, and a data set was collected to 2.76 Å.

  16. Crystallization of ornithine acetyltransferase from yeast by counter-diffusion and preliminary X-ray study

    A study on the crystallization of ornithine acetyltransferase from yeast, catalysing the fifth step in microbial arginine synthesis, is presented. The use of the counter-diffusion technique removes the disorder present in one dimension in crystals grown by either batch or hanging-drop techniques. A study is presented on the crystallization of ornithine acetyltransferase from yeast, which catalyzes the fifth step in microbial arginine synthesis. The use of the counter-diffusion technique removes the disorder present in one dimension in crystals grown by either the batch or hanging-drop techniques. This makes the difference between useless crystals and crystals that allow successful determination of the structure of the protein. The crystals belong to space group P4, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 66.98, c = 427.09 Å, and a data set was collected to 2.76 Å

  17. Mutations in KAT6B, Encoding a Histone Acetyltransferase, Cause Genitopatellar Syndrome

    Campeau, Philippe M.; Kim, Jaeseung C.; Lu, James T.; Schwartzentruber, Jeremy A.; Abdul-Rahman, Omar A.; Schlaubitz, Silke; Murdock, David M.; Jiang, Ming-Ming; Lammer, Edward J.; Enns, Gregory M.; Rhead, William J.; Rowland, Jon; Robertson, Stephen P.; Cormier-Daire, Valérie; Bainbridge, Matthew N.

    2012-01-01

    Genitopatellar syndrome (GPS) is a skeletal dysplasia with cerebral and genital anomalies for which the molecular basis has not yet been determined. By exome sequencing, we found de novo heterozygous truncating mutations in KAT6B (lysine acetyltransferase 6B, formerly known as MYST4 and MORF) in three subjects; then by Sanger sequencing of KAT6B, we found similar mutations in three additional subjects. The mutant transcripts do not undergo nonsense-mediated decay in cells from subjects with G...

  18. Synthesis of 4′-aminopantetheine and derivatives to probe aminoglycoside N-6′-acetyltransferase

    Yan, Xuxu; Akinnusi, T. Olukayode; Larsen, Aaron T.; Auclair, Karine

    2011-01-01

    A convenient synthesis of 4′-aminopantetheine from commercial D-pantethine is reported. The amino group was introduced by reductive amination in order to avoid substitution at a sterically congested position. Derivatives of 4′-aminopantetheine were also prepared to evaluate the effect of O-to-N substitution on inhibitors of the resistance-causing enzyme aminoglycoside N-6′-acetyltransferase. The biological results combined with docking studies indicate that in spite of its reported unusual fl...

  19. Mechanism of the lysosomal membrane enzyme acetyl coenzyme A: alpha-glucosaminide N-acetyltransferase

    Acetyl-CoA:α-glucosaminide N-acetyltransferase is a lysosomal membrane enzyme, deficient in the genetic disease Sanfilippo C syndrome. The enzyme catalyzes the transfer of an acetyl group from cytoplasmic acetyl-CoA to terminal α-glucosamine residues of heparan sulfate within the organelle. The reaction mechanism was examined using high purified lysosomal membranes from rat liver and human fibroblasts. The N-acetyltransferase reaction is optimal above pH 5.5 and a 2-3 fold stimulation of activity is observed in the presence of 0.1% taurodeoxycholate. Double reciprocal analysis and product inhibition studies indicate that the enzyme works by a Di-Iso Ping Pong Bi Bi mechanism. The binding of acetyl-CoA to the enzyme is measured by exchange label from [3H]CoA to acetyl-CoA, and is optimal at pH's above 7.0. The acetyl-enzyme intermediate is formed by incubating membranes with [3H]acetyl-CoA. The acetyl group can be transferred to glucosamine, forming [3H]N-acetylglucosamine; the transfer is optimal between pH 4 and 5. Lysosomal membranes from Sanfilippo C fibroblasts confirm that these half reactions carried out by the N-acetyltransferase. The enzyme is inactivated by N-bromosuccinimide and diethylpyrocarbonate, indicating that a histidine is involved in the reaction. These results suggest that the histidine residue is at the active site of the enzyme. The properties of the N-acetyltransferase in the membrane, the characterization of the enzyme kinetics, the chemistry of a histidine mediated acetylation and the pH difference across the lysosomal membrane all support a transmembrane acetylation mechanism

  20. Cryptococcus neoformans Histone Acetyltransferase Gcn5 Regulates Fungal Adaptation to the Host ▿ † ‡

    O'Meara, Teresa R.; Hay, Christie; Price, Michael S.; Giles, Steve; Alspaugh, J. Andrew

    2010-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans is an environmental fungus and an opportunistic human pathogen. Previous studies have demonstrated major alterations in its transcriptional profile as this microorganism enters the hostile environment of the human host. To assess the role of chromatin remodeling in host-induced transcriptional responses, we identified the C. neoformans Gcn5 histone acetyltransferase and demonstrated its function by complementation studies of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The C. neoformans ...

  1. Response of ATP sulfurylase and serine acetyltransferase towards cadmium in hyperaccumulator Sedum alfredii Hance*

    Guo, Wei-Dong; Liang, Jun; Yang, Xiao-e; Chao, Yue-en; Feng, Ying

    2009-01-01

    We studied the responses of the activities of adenosine-triphosphate (ATP) sulfurylase (ATPS) and serine acetyltransferase (SAT) to cadmium (Cd) levels and treatment time in hyperaccumulating ecotype (HE) Sedum alfredii Hance, as compared with its non-hyperaccumulating ecotype (NHE). The results show that plant growth was inhibited in NHE but promoted in HE when exposed to high Cd level. Cd concentrations in leaves and shoots rapidly increased in HE rather than in NHE, and they became much hi...

  2. GCN5 Acetyltransferase Inhibits PGC1α-induced Hepatitis B Virus Biosynthesis

    Xiaohui Tian; Fei Zhao; Zhikui Cheng; Ming Zhou; Xiaoguang Zhi; Jiafu Li; Kanghong Hu

    2013-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) biosynthesis is primarily restricted to hepatocytes due to the goveming of liver-enriched nuclear receptors (NRs) on viral RNA synthesis.The liver-enriched NR hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α (HNF4α),the key regulator of genes implicated in hepatic glucose metabolism,is also a primary determinant of HBV pregenomic RNA synthesis and HBV replication.Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator lα (PGC1α) coactivates and further enhances the effect of HNF4α on HBV biosynthesis.Here,we showed that the acetyltransferase General Control Non-repressed Protein 5 (GCN5) acetylated PGC1α,leading to alteration of PGC1α from a transcriptionally active state into an inactive state.As a result,the coactivation activity of PGClα on HBV transcription and replication was suppressed.Apparently,an acetylation site mutant of PGC 1α (PGC1αR13) still had coactivation activity as GCN5 could not suppress the coactivation activity of the mutant.Moreover,a catalytically inactive acetyltransferase mutant GCN5m,due to the loss of acetylation activity,failed to inhibit the coactivation function of PGC 1α in HBV biosynthesis.Our results demonstrate that GCN5,through its acetyltransferase activity,inhibits PGClα-induced enhancement of HBV transcription and replication both in vitro and in vivo.

  3. Cryptococcus neoformans histone acetyltransferase Gcn5 regulates fungal adaptation to the host.

    O'Meara, Teresa R; Hay, Christie; Price, Michael S; Giles, Steve; Alspaugh, J Andrew

    2010-08-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans is an environmental fungus and an opportunistic human pathogen. Previous studies have demonstrated major alterations in its transcriptional profile as this microorganism enters the hostile environment of the human host. To assess the role of chromatin remodeling in host-induced transcriptional responses, we identified the C. neoformans Gcn5 histone acetyltransferase and demonstrated its function by complementation studies of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The C. neoformans gcn5Delta mutant strain has defects in high-temperature growth and capsule attachment to the cell surface, in addition to increased sensitivity to FK506 and oxidative stress. Treatment of wild-type cells with the histone acetyltransferase inhibitor garcinol mimics cellular effects of the gcn5Delta mutation. Gcn5 regulates the expression of many genes that are important in responding to the specific environmental conditions encountered by C. neoformans inside the host. Accordingly, the gcn5Delta mutant is avirulent in animal models of cryptococcosis. Our study demonstrates the importance of chromatin remodeling by the conserved histone acetyltransferase Gcn5 in regulating the expression of specific genes that allow C. neoformans to respond appropriately to the human host. PMID:20581290

  4. Effect of increased yeast alcohol acetyltransferase activity on flavor profiles of wine and distillates.

    Lilly, M; Lambrechts, M G; Pretorius, I S

    2000-02-01

    The distinctive flavor of wine, brandy, and other grape-derived alcoholic beverages is affected by many compounds, including esters produced during alcoholic fermentation. The characteristic fruity odors of the fermentation bouquet are primarily due to a mixture of hexyl acetate, ethyl caproate (apple-like aroma), iso-amyl acetate (banana-like aroma), ethyl caprylate (apple-like aroma), and 2-phenylethyl acetate (fruity, flowery flavor with a honey note). The objective of this study was to investigate the feasibility of improving the aroma of wine and distillates by overexpressing one of the endogenous yeast genes that controls acetate ester production during fermentation. The synthesis of acetate esters by the wine yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae during fermentation is ascribed to at least three acetyltransferase activities, namely, alcohol acetyltransferase (AAT), ethanol acetyltransferase, and iso-amyl AAT. To investigate the effect of increased AAT activity on the sensory quality of Chenin blanc wines and distillates from Colombar base wines, we have overexpressed the alcohol acetyltransferase gene (ATF1) of S. cerevisiae. The ATF1 gene, located on chromosome XV, was cloned from a widely used commercial wine yeast strain of S. cerevisiae, VIN13, and placed under the control of the constitutive yeast phosphoglycerate kinase gene (PGK1) promoter and terminator. Chromoblot analysis confirmed the integration of the modified copy of ATF1 into the genome of three commercial wine yeast strains (VIN7, VIN13, and WE228). Northern blot analysis indicated constitutive expression of ATF1 at high levels in these yeast transformants. The levels of ethyl acetate, iso-amyl acetate, and 2-phenylethyl acetate increased 3- to 10-fold, 3.8- to 12-fold, and 2- to 10-fold, respectively, depending on the fermentation temperature, cultivar, and yeast strain used. The concentrations of ethyl caprate, ethyl caprylate, and hexyl acetate only showed minor changes, whereas the acetic acid

  5. Chromatin-regulating proteins as targets for cancer therapy

    Oike, Takahiro; Ogiwara, Hideaki; Amornwichet, Napapat; Nakano, Takashi; Kohno, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    Chromatin-regulating proteins represent a large class of novel targets for cancer therapy. In the context of radiotherapy, acetylation and deacetylation of histones by histone acetyltransferases (HATs) and histone deacetylases (HDACs) play important roles in the repair of DNA double-strand breaks generated by ionizing irradiation, and are therefore attractive targets for radiosensitization. Small-molecule inhibitors of HATs (garcinol, anacardic acid and curcumin) and HDACs (vorinostat, sodium...

  6. New N-Acetyltransferase Fold in the Structure and Mechanism of the Phosphonate Biosynthetic Enzyme FrbF

    Bae, Brian; Cobb, Ryan E.; DeSieno, Matthew A.; Zhao, Huimin; Nair, Satish K. (UIUC)

    2015-10-15

    The enzyme FrbF from Streptomyces rubellomurinus has attracted significant attention due to its role in the biosynthesis of the antimalarial phosphonate FR-900098. The enzyme catalyzes acetyl transfer onto the hydroxamate of the FR-900098 precursors cytidine 5'-monophosphate-3-aminopropylphosphonate and cytidine 5'-monophosphate-N-hydroxy-3-aminopropylphosphonate. Despite the established function as a bona fide N-acetyltransferase, FrbF shows no sequence similarity to any member of the GCN5-like N-acetyltransferase (GNAT) superfamily. Here, we present the 2.0 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure of FrbF in complex with acetyl-CoA, which demonstrates a unique architecture that is distinct from those of canonical GNAT-like acetyltransferases. We also utilized the co-crystal structure to guide structure-function studies that identified the roles of putative active site residues in the acetyltransferase mechanism. The combined biochemical and structural analyses of FrbF provide insights into this previously uncharacterized family of N-acetyltransferases and also provide a molecular framework toward the production of novel N-acyl derivatives of FR-900098.

  7. The molecular structure of ornithine acetyltransferase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis bound to ornithine, a competitive inhibitor.

    Sankaranarayanan, Ramasamy; Cherney, Maia M; Garen, Craig; Garen, Grace; Niu, Chunying; Yuan, Marshall; James, Michael N G

    2010-04-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis ornithine acetyltransferase (Mtb OAT; E.C. 2.3.1.35) is a key enzyme of the acetyl recycling pathway during arginine biosynthesis. It reversibly catalyzes the transfer of the acetyl group from N-acetylornithine (NAORN) to L-glutamate. Mtb OAT is a member of the N-terminal nucleophile fold family of enzymes. The crystal structures of Mtb OAT in native form and in its complex with ornithine (ORN) have been determined at 1.7 and 2.4 A resolutions, respectively. ORN is a competitive inhibitor of this enzyme against L-glutamate as substrate. Although the acyl-enzyme complex of Streptomyces clavuligerus ornithine acetyltransferase has been determined, ours is the first crystal structure to be reported of an ornithine acetyltransferase in complex with an inhibitor. ORN binding does not alter the structure of Mtb OAT globally. However, its presence stabilizes the three C-terminal residues that are disordered and not observed in the native structure. Also, stabilization of the C-terminal residues by ORN reduces the size of the active-site pocket volume in the structure of the ORN complex. The interactions of ORN and the protein residues of Mtb OAT unambiguously delineate the active-site residues of this enzyme in Mtb. Moreover, modeling studies carried out with NAORN based on the structure of the ORN-Mtb OAT complex reveal important interactions of the carbonyl oxygen of the acetyl group of NAORN with the main-chain nitrogen atom of Gly128 and with the side-chain oxygen of Thr127. These interactions likely help in the stabilization of oxyanion formation during enzymatic reaction and also will polarize the carbonyl carbon-oxygen bond, thereby enabling the side-chain atom O(gamma 1) of Thr200 to launch a nucleophilic attack on the carbonyl-carbon atom of the acetyl group of NAORN. PMID:20184895

  8. Untersuchung lysosomaler Membranproteine mit dem Schwerpunkt der Charakterisierung der Acetyl-Coenzym A: a-Glucosaminid N-Acetyltransferase aus lysosomalen Membranpräparationen aus humaner Plazenta

    Wätzig, Kristin Irene

    2007-01-01

    Die Acetyl-CoA-Glucosaminid-N-Acetyltransferase ist ein lysosomales Protein, dessen Ausfall das Sanfilippo C-Syndrom (Mukopolysaccharidose Typ IIIC, OMIM 252930) bedingt. Dabei handelt es sich um eine von elf durch distinkte Enzymdefekte bedingten Mukopolysaccharidosen. Durch den Ausfall der lysosomalen Acetyltransferase kommt es zu einer Störung des Heparansulfatabbaus mit einer Ansammlung von Stoffwechselprodukten im Ly...

  9. Expression, crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analyses of two N-terminal acetyltransferase-related proteins from Thermoplasma acidophilum

    Han, Sang Hee; Ha, Jun Yong; Kim, Kyoung Hoon; Oh, Sung Jin; Kim, Do Jin; Kang, Ji Yong; Yoon, Hye Jin; Kim, Se-Hee; Seo, Ji Hae; Kim, Kyu-Won; Suh, Se Won

    2006-01-01

    An N-terminal acetyltransferase ARD1 subunit-related protein (Ta0058) and an N-terminal acetyltransferase-related protein (Ta1140) from T. acidophilum were crystallized. X-ray diffraction data were collected to 2.17 and 2.40 Å, respectively.

  10. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray characterization of Bacillus cereus arylamine N-acetyltransferase 3 [(BACCR)NAT3

    B. cereus arylamine N-acetyltransferase 3 was expressed, purified and crystallized. X-ray diffraction data were collected to 2.42 Å resolution and the crystals belonged to the monoclinic space group C121. Arylamine N-acetyltransferases (NATs) are xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes (XMEs) that catalyze the acetylation of arylamines. All functional NATs described to date possess a strictly conserved Cys-His-Asp catalytic triad. Here, the purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray characterization of Bacillus cereus arylamine N-acetyltransferase 3 [(BACCR)NAT3], a putative NAT isoenzyme that possesses a unique catalytic triad containing a glutamate residue, is reported. The crystal diffracted to 2.42 Å resolution and belonged to the monoclinic space group C121, with unit-cell parameters a = 90.44, b = 44.52, c = 132.98 Å, β = 103.8°

  11. Synthesis of 4′-aminopantetheine and derivatives to probe aminoglycoside N-6′-acetyltransferase

    Yan, Xuxu; Akinnusi, T. Olukayode; Larsen, Aaron T.; Auclair, Karine

    2011-01-01

    Summary A convenient synthesis of 4′-aminopantetheine from commercial D-pantethine is reported. The amino group was introduced by reductive amination in order to avoid substitution at a sterically congested position. Derivatives of 4′-aminopantetheine were also prepared to evaluate the effect of O-to-N substitution on inhibitors of the resistance-causing enzyme aminoglycoside N-6′-acetyltransferase. The biological results combined with docking studies indicate that in spite of its reported unusual flexibility and ability to adopt different folds, this enzyme is highly specific for AcCoA. PMID:21225062

  12. Synthesis of 4'-aminopantetheine and derivatives to probe aminoglycoside N-6'-acetyltransferase.

    Yan, Xuxu; Akinnusi, T Olukayode; Larsen, Aaron T; Auclair, Karine

    2011-03-01

    A convenient synthesis of 4'-aminopantetheine from commercial D-pantethine is reported. The amino group was introduced by reductive amination in order to avoid substitution at a sterically congested position. Derivatives of 4'-aminopantetheine were also prepared to evaluate the effect of O-to-N substitution on inhibitors of the resistance-causing enzyme aminoglycoside N-6'-acetyltransferase. The biological results combined with docking studies indicate that in spite of its reported unusual flexibility and ability to adopt different folds, this enzyme is highly specific for AcCoA. PMID:21225062

  13. Epigenetic change in kidney tumor: downregulation of histone acetyltransferase MYST1 in human renal cell carcinoma

    Wang Yong; Zhang Rui; Wu Donglu; Lu Zhihua; Sun Wentao; Cai Yong; Wang Chunxi; Jin Jingji

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background MYST1 (also known as hMOF), a member of the MYST family of histone acetyltransferases (HATs) as an epigenetic mark of active genes, is mainly responsible for histone H4K16 acetylation in the cells. Recent studies have shown that the abnormal gene expression of hMOF is involved in certain primary cancers. Here we examined the involvement of hMOF expression and histone H4K16 acetylation in primary renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Simultaneously, we investigated the correlation be...

  14. Choline Acetyltransferase Activity in Striatum of Neonatal Rats Increased by Nerve Growth Factor

    Mobley, William C.; Rutkowski, J. Lynn; Tennekoon, Gihan I.; Buchanan, Karen; Johnston, Michael V.

    1985-07-01

    Some neurodegenerative disorders may be caused by abnormal synthesis or utilization of trophic molecules required to support neuronal survival. A test of this hypothesis requires that trophic agents specific for the affected neurons be identified. Cholinergic neurons in the corpus striatum of neonatal rats were found to respond to intracerebroventricular administration of nerve growth factor with prominent, dose-dependent, selective increases in choline acetyltransferase activity. Cholinergic neurons in the basal forebrain also respond to nerve growth factor in this way. These actions of nerve growth factor may indicate its involvement in the normal function of forebrain cholinergic neurons as well as in neurodegenerative disorders involving such cells.

  15. Horizontal gene transfer of acetyltransferases, invertases and chorismate mutases from different bacteria to diverse recipients

    Noon, Jason B.; Baum, Thomas J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Hoplolaimina plant-parasitic nematodes (PPN) are a lineage of animals with many documented cases of horizontal gene transfer (HGT). In a recent study, we reported on three likely HGT candidate genes in the soybean cyst nematode Heterodera glycines, all of which encode secreted candidate effectors with putative functions in the host plant. Hg-GLAND1 is a putative GCN5-related N-acetyltransferase (GNAT), Hg-GLAND13 is a putative invertase (INV), and Hg-GLAND16 is a putative chorismat...

  16. Differential regulation of rat beta-casein-chloramphenicol acetyltransferase fusion gene expression in transgenic mice.

    Lee, K. F.; Atiee, S H; Rosen, J. M.

    1989-01-01

    Previous studies in our laboratory have demonstrated the mammary-specific expression of the entire rat beta-casein gene with 3.5 kilobases (kb) of 5' and 3.0 kb of 3' DNA in transgenic mice (Lee et al., Nucleic Acids Res. 16:1027-1041, 1988). In an attempt to localize sequences that dictate this specificity, lines of transgenic mice carrying two different rat beta-casein promoter-bacterial chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (cat) fusion genes have been established. Twenty and eight lines of tr...

  17. Biochemical analysis and structure determination of bacterial acetyltransferases responsible for the biosynthesis of UDP-N,N'-diacetylbacillosamine.

    Morrison, Michael J; Imperiali, Barbara

    2013-11-01

    UDP-N,N'-diacetylbacillosamine (UDP-diNAcBac) is a unique carbohydrate produced by a number of bacterial species and has been implicated in pathogenesis. The terminal step in the formation of this important bacterial sugar is catalyzed by an acetyl-CoA (AcCoA)-dependent acetyltransferase in both N- and O-linked protein glycosylation pathways. This bacterial acetyltransferase is a member of the left-handed β-helix family and forms a homotrimer as the functional unit. Whereas previous endeavors have focused on the Campylobacter jejuni acetyltransferase (PglD) from the N-linked glycosylation pathway, structural characterization of the homologous enzymes in the O-linked glycosylation pathways is lacking. Herein, we present the apo-crystal structures of the acetyltransferase domain (ATD) from the bifunctional enzyme PglB (Neisseria gonorrhoeae) and the full-length acetyltransferase WeeI (Acinetobacter baumannii). Additionally, a PglB-ATD structure was solved in complex with AcCoA. Surprisingly, this structure reveals a contrasting binding mechanism for this substrate when compared with the AcCoA-bound PglD structure. A comparison between these findings and the previously solved PglD crystal structures illustrates a dichotomy among N- and O-linked glycosylation pathway enzymes. Based upon these structures, key residues in the UDP-4-amino and AcCoA binding pockets were mutated to determine their effect on binding and catalysis in PglD, PglB-ATD, and WeeI. Last, a phylogenetic analysis of the aforementioned acetyltransferases was employed to illuminate the diversity among N- and O-linked glycosylation pathway enzymes. PMID:24064219

  18. Epigenetic regulation of proliferation and invasion in hepatocellular carcinoma cells by CBP/p300 histone acetyltransferase activity.

    Inagaki, Yuji; Shiraki, Katsuya; Sugimoto, Kazushi; Yada, Takazumi; Tameda, Masahiko; Ogura, Suguru; Yamamoto, Norihiko; Takei, Yoshiyuki; Ito, Masaaki

    2016-02-01

    Altered epigenetic control of gene expression plays a substantial role in tumor development and progression. Accumulating studies suggest that somatic mutations of CREB binding proteins (CBP)/p300 occur in some cancer cells. CBP/p300 possess histone acetyltransferase (HAT) activity, and are involved in many cellular processes. In this study, we investigated the expression and functional role of CBP/p300 in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) using the specific inhibitor C646 of CBP/p300 HAT activity. We examined its effect on several apoptosis-related proteins and invasion-related genes. The results showed that CBP/p300 were highly expressed in HCC tissues and that expression of p300, but not of CBP, was strongly correlated with the malignant character of HCC. C646 inhibited proliferation of HCC cell lines in a dose dependent manner. C646 significantly augmented TRAIL-induced apoptotic sensitivity, which was accompanied by reduced levels of survivin, in HepG2, HLE and SK-HEP1 cells. C646 significantly inhibited invasion of Huh7, HLE and SK-HEP1 cells. The level of matrix metallopeptidase 15 (MMP15) mRNA expression was significantly reduced, whereas the level of laminin alpha 3 (LAMA3) and secreted phosphoprotein 1 (SPP1) mRNA expression was significantly increased in Huh7 cells following exposure to C646. In conclusion, our results suggest that CBP/p300 HAT activity has an important role in malignant transformation, proliferation, apoptotic sensitivity and invasion in HCC. CBP/p300 could be a promising therapeutic target in HCC. PMID:26676548

  19. Effects of human arylamine N-acetyltransferase I knockdown in triple-negative breast cancer cell lines

    Expression of human arylamine N-acetyltransferase I (NAT1) has been associated with various cancer subtypes and inhibition of this enzyme with small molecule inhibitors or siRNA affects cell growth and survival. Here, we have investigated the role of NAT1 in the invasiveness of breast cancer cells both in vitro and in vivo. We knocked down NAT1 using a lentivirus-based shRNA approach and observed marked changes in cell morphology in the triple-negative breast cancer cell lines MDA-MB-231, MDA-MB-436, and BT-549. Most notable was a reduction in the number and size of the filopodia protrusions on the surface of the cells. The loss of filopodia could be rescued by the reintroduction of NAT1 into the knockdown cells. NAT1 expression was localized to the lamellipodia and extended into the filopodia protrusions. In vitro invasion through Geltrex was significantly inhibited in both the MDA cell lines but not in the BT-549 cells. The expression of Snail increased when NAT1 was knocked down, while other genes associated with mesenchymal to epithelial transition (vimentin, cytokeratin-18, and Twist) did not show any changes. By contrast, both N-cadherin and β-catenin were significantly reduced. When MDA-MB-231 cells expressing shRNA were injected in vivo into BALB/c nu/nu nude mice, a significant reduction in the number of colonies that formed in the lungs was observed. Taken together, the results show that NAT1 can alter the invasion and metastatic properties of some triple-negative breast cancer cells but not all. The study suggests that NAT1 may be a novel therapeutic target in a subset of breast cancers

  20. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray characterization of Bacillus cereus arylamine N-acetyltransferase 3 [(BACCR)NAT3].

    Kubiak, Xavier; Pluvinage, Benjamin; Li de la Sierra-Gallay, Inès; Weber, Patrick; Haouz, Ahmed; Dupret, Jean-Marie; Rodrigues-Lima, Fernando

    2012-02-01

    Arylamine N-acetyltransferases (NATs) are xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes (XMEs) that catalyze the acetylation of arylamines. All functional NATs described to date possess a strictly conserved Cys-His-Asp catalytic triad. Here, the purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray characterization of Bacillus cereus arylamine N-acetyltransferase 3 [(BACCR)NAT3], a putative NAT isoenzyme that possesses a unique catalytic triad containing a glutamate residue, is reported. The crystal diffracted to 2.42 Å resolution and belonged to the monoclinic space group C121, with unit-cell parameters a = 90.44, b = 44.52, c = 132.98 Å, β = 103.8°. PMID:22297998

  1. Mutations in KAT6B, encoding a histone acetyltransferase, cause Genitopatellar syndrome.

    Campeau, Philippe M; Kim, Jaeseung C; Lu, James T; Schwartzentruber, Jeremy A; Abdul-Rahman, Omar A; Schlaubitz, Silke; Murdock, David M; Jiang, Ming-Ming; Lammer, Edward J; Enns, Gregory M; Rhead, William J; Rowland, Jon; Robertson, Stephen P; Cormier-Daire, Valérie; Bainbridge, Matthew N; Yang, Xiang-Jiao; Gingras, Marie-Claude; Gibbs, Richard A; Rosenblatt, David S; Majewski, Jacek; Lee, Brendan H

    2012-02-10

    Genitopatellar syndrome (GPS) is a skeletal dysplasia with cerebral and genital anomalies for which the molecular basis has not yet been determined. By exome sequencing, we found de novo heterozygous truncating mutations in KAT6B (lysine acetyltransferase 6B, formerly known as MYST4 and MORF) in three subjects; then by Sanger sequencing of KAT6B, we found similar mutations in three additional subjects. The mutant transcripts do not undergo nonsense-mediated decay in cells from subjects with GPS. In addition, human pathological analyses and mouse expression studies point to systemic roles of KAT6B in controlling organismal growth and development. Myst4 (the mouse orthologous gene) is expressed in mouse tissues corresponding to those affected by GPS. Phenotypic differences and similarities between GPS, the Say-Barber-Biesecker variant of Ohdo syndrome (caused by different mutations of KAT6B), and Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome (caused by mutations in other histone acetyltransferases) are discussed. Together, the data support an epigenetic dysregulation of the limb, brain, and genital developmental programs. PMID:22265014

  2. Structure and Functional Diversity of GCN5-Related N-Acetyltransferases (GNAT

    Abu Iftiaf Md Salah Ud-Din

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available General control non-repressible 5 (GCN5-related N-acetyltransferases (GNAT catalyze the transfer of an acyl moiety from acyl coenzyme A (acyl-CoA to a diverse group of substrates and are widely distributed in all domains of life. This review of the currently available data acquired on GNAT enzymes by a combination of structural, mutagenesis and kinetic methods summarizes the key similarities and differences between several distinctly different families within the GNAT superfamily, with an emphasis on the mechanistic insights obtained from the analysis of the complexes with substrates or inhibitors. It discusses the structural basis for the common acetyltransferase mechanism, outlines the factors important for the substrate recognition, and describes the mechanism of action of inhibitors of these enzymes. It is anticipated that understanding of the structural basis behind the reaction and substrate specificity of the enzymes from this superfamily can be exploited in the development of novel therapeutics to treat human diseases and combat emerging multidrug-resistant microbial infections.

  3. Improvement of L-citrulline production in Corynebacterium glutamicum by ornithine acetyltransferase.

    Hao, N; Mu, J; Hu, N; Xu, S; Yan, M; Li, Y; Guo, K; Xu, L

    2015-02-01

    In this study, Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC 13032 was engineered to produce L-citrulline through a metabolic engineering strategy. To prevent the flux away from L-citrulline and to increase the expression levels of genes involved in the citrulline biosynthesis pathway, the argininosuccinate synthase gene (argG) and the repressor gene (argR) were inactivated. The engineered C. glutamicum ATCC 13032 ∆argG ∆argR (CIT 2) produced higher amounts of L-citrulline (5.43 g/L) compared to the wildtype strain (0.15 g/L). To determine new strategies for further enhancement of L-citrulline production, the effect of L-citrulline on ornithine acetyltransferase (EC 2.3.1.35; OATase; ArgJ) was first investigated. Citrulline was determined to inhibit Ornithine acetyltransferase; for 50 % inhibition, citrulline concentration was 30 mM. The argJ gene from C. glutamicum ATCC 13032 was cloned, and the recombinant shuttle plasmid pXMJ19-argJ was constructed and expressed in C. glutamicum ATCC 13032 ∆argG ∆argR (CIT 2). Overexpression of the argJ gene exhibited increased OAT activity and resulted in a positive effect on citrulline production (8.51 g/L). These results indicate that OAT plays a vital role during L-citrulline production in C. glutamicum. PMID:25492493

  4. Preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of ornithine acetyltransferase (Rv1653) from Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Rv1653, an ornithine acetyltransferase from M. tuberculosis, has been crystallized and diffraction data have been collected to 1.7 Å resolution. The gene product of open reading frame Rv1653 from Mycobacterium tuberculosis is annotated as encoding a probable ornithine acetyltransferase (OATase; EC 2.3.1.35), an enzyme that catalyzes two steps in the arginine-biosynthesis pathway. It transfers an acetyl group from N-acetylornithine to l-glutamate to produce N-acetylglutamate and l-ornithine. Rv1653 was crystallized using the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method. The native crystals diffracted to a resolution of 1.7 Å and belonged to space group P212121, with unit-cell parameters a = 60.1, b = 99.7, c = 155.3 Å. The preliminary X-ray study showed the presence of a dimer in the asymmetric unit of the crystals, which had a Matthews coefficient VM of 2.8 Å3 Da−1

  5. Purification and characterization of glutamate N-acetyltransferase involved in citrulline accumulation in wild watermelon.

    Takahara, Kentaro; Akashi, Kinya; Yokota, Akiho

    2005-10-01

    Citrulline is an efficient hydroxyl radical scavenger that can accumulate at concentrations of up to 30 mm in the leaves of wild watermelon during drought in the presence of strong light; however, the mechanism of this accumulation remains unclear. In this study, we characterized wild watermelon glutamate N-acetyltransferase (CLGAT) that catalyses the transacetylation reaction between acetylornithine and glutamate to form acetylglutamate and ornithine, thereby functioning in the first and fifth steps in citrulline biosynthesis. CLGAT enzyme purified 7000-fold from leaves was composed of two subunits with different N-terminal amino acid sequences. Analysis of the corresponding cDNA revealed that these two subunits have molecular masses of 21.3 and 23.5 kDa and are derived from a single precursor polypeptide, suggesting that the CLGAT precursor is cleaved autocatalytically at the conserved ATML motif, as in other glutamate N-acetyltransferases of microorganisms. A green fluorescence protein assay revealed that the first 26-amino acid sequence at the N-terminus of the precursor functions as a chloroplast transit peptide. The CLGAT exhibited thermostability up to 70 degrees C, suggesting an increase in enzyme activity under high leaf temperature conditions during drought/strong-light stresses. Moreover, CLGAT was not inhibited by citrulline or arginine at physiologically relevant high concentrations. These findings suggest that CLGAT can effectively participate in the biosynthesis of citrulline in wild watermelon leaves during drought/strong-light stress. PMID:16218965

  6. Diurnal cycles in serotonin acetyltransferase activity and cyclic GMP content of cultured chick pineal glands.

    Wainwright, S D

    1980-06-12

    Levels of serotonin N-acetyltransferase (NAT: acetul CoA:arylamine N-acetyltransferase; EC 2.1.1.5.) activity in the chick pineal gland exhibit a marked diurnal variation in birds kept under a diurnal cycle of ilumination. Activity begins to rise rapidly at the start of the dark phase of the cycle and reaches maximum levels at mid-dark phase about 25-fold greater than the minimum basal level at mid-light phase. Thereafter, the level of activity declines to the basal level about the start of the light phase. This diurnal cycle in chick pineal NAT activity found in vivo has recently been reproduced in vitro with intact glands incubated in organ culture. The mechanism of the 'biological clock' which regulates these variations in level of chick pineal NAT activity is unknown. However, I now report that chick pineal glands cultured under a diurnal cycle of illumination exhibit a diurnal cycle in content of cyclic GMP which roughly parallels the cycles in NAT activity. In contrast, there was no correlation between variations in pineal content of cyclic AMP and in level of NAT activity. PMID:6250035

  7. Construction and Use of a Replication-Competent Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV-1) that Expresses the Chloramphenicol Acetyltransferase Enzyme

    Terwilliger, E. F.; Godin, B.; Sodroski, J. G.; Haseltine, W. A.

    1989-05-01

    The construction and properties of an infectious human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) that expresses the bacterial gene chloramphenicol acetyltransferase are described. This virus can be used in vitro to screen for drugs that inhibit HIV infection. The marked virus may also be used to trace the routes of infection from the site of inoculation in animal experiments.

  8. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of the aminoglycoside-6′-acetyltransferase AAC(6′)-Im

    Toth, Marta; Vakulenko, Sergei B.; Smith, Clyde A.

    2012-01-01

    AAC(6′)-Im is an N-acetyltransferase enzyme responsible for aminoglycoside resistance in E. faecium and E. coli isolates. Crystals of the kanamycin complex of this enzyme have been prepared and preliminary X-ray diffraction experiments have been undertaken.

  9. Comparative genomic, phylogenetic, and functional investigation of the xenobiotic metabolizing arylamine N-acetyltransferase enzyme family among fungi

    Arylamine N-acetyltransferases (NATs) are xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes well-characterized in several bacteria and higher eukaryotes. The role of NATs in fungal biology has only recently been investigated (Glenn and Bacon, 2009; Glenn et al., 2010). The NAT1 gene of Gibberella moniliformis was the...

  10. Homologues of xenobiotic metabolizing N-acetyltransferases in plant-associated fungi: Novel functions for an old enzyme family

    Plant-pathogenic fungi and their hosts engage in chemical warfare, attacking each other with toxic products of secondary metabolism and defending themselves via an arsenal of xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes. One such enzyme is homologous to arylamine N-acetyltransferase (NAT) and has been identified...

  11. Genetic variants in the choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) gene are modestly associated with normal cognitive function in the elderly

    Mengel-From, J; Christensen, K; Thinggaard, M; McGue, M; Christiansen, L

    2011-01-01

    Genetic variants in the choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) gene have been suggested as risk factors for neurodegenerative Alzheimer's disease (AD). Here we tested the importance of genetic variants in the ChAT gene in normal cognitive function of elderly in a study sample of Danish twins and single...

  12. Association with the origin recognition complex suggests a novel role for histone acetyltransferase Hat1p/Hat2p

    Greenblatt Jack F

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Histone modifications have been implicated in the regulation of transcription and, more recently, in DNA replication and repair. In yeast, a major conserved histone acetyltransferase, Hat1p, preferentially acetylates lysine residues 5 and 12 on histone H4. Results Here, we report that a nuclear sub-complex consisting of Hat1p and its partner Hat2p interacts physically and functionally with the origin recognition complex (ORC. While mutational inactivation of the histone acetyltransferase (HAT gene HAT1 alone does not compromise origin firing or initiation of DNA replication, a deletion in HAT1 (or HAT2 exacerbates the growth defects of conditional orc-ts mutants. Thus, the ORC-associated Hat1p-dependent histone acetyltransferase activity suggests a novel linkage between histone modification and DNA replication. Additional genetic and biochemical evidence points to the existence of partly overlapping histone H3 acetyltransferase activities in addition to Hat1p/Hat2p for proper DNA replication efficiency. Furthermore, we demonstrated a dynamic association of Hat1p with chromatin during S-phase that suggests a role of this enzyme at the replication fork. Conclusion We have found an intriguing new association of the Hat1p-dependent histone acetyltransferase in addition to its previously known role in nuclear chromatin assembly (Hat1p/Hat2p-Hif1p. The participation of a distinct Hat1p/Hat2p sub-complex suggests a linkage of histone H4 modification with ORC-dependent DNA replication.

  13. The Yeast ATF1 Acetyltransferase Efficiently Acetylates Insect Pheromone Alcohols: Implications for the Biological Production of Moth Pheromones.

    Ding, Bao-Jian; Lager, Ida; Bansal, Sunil; Durrett, Timothy P; Stymne, Sten; Löfstedt, Christer

    2016-04-01

    Many moth pheromones are composed of mixtures of acetates of long-chain (≥10 carbon) fatty alcohols. Moth pheromone precursors such as fatty acids and fatty alcohols can be produced in yeast by the heterologous expression of genes involved in insect pheromone production. Acetyltransferases that subsequently catalyze the formation of acetates by transfer of the acetate unit from acetyl-CoA to a fatty alcohol have been postulated in pheromone biosynthesis. However, so far no fatty alcohol acetyltransferases responsible for the production of straight chain alkyl acetate pheromone components in insects have been identified. In search for a non-insect acetyltransferase alternative, we expressed a plant-derived diacylglycerol acetyltransferase (EaDAcT) (EC 2.3.1.20) cloned from the seed of the burning bush (Euonymus alatus) in a yeast system. EaDAcT transformed various fatty alcohol insect pheromone precursors into acetates but we also found high background acetylation activities. Only one enzyme in yeast was shown to be responsible for the majority of that background activity, the acetyltransferase ATF1 (EC 2.3.1.84). We further investigated the usefulness of ATF1 for the conversion of moth pheromone alcohols into acetates in comparison with Ea DAcT. Overexpression of ATF1 revealed that it was capable of acetylating these fatty alcohols with chain lengths from 10 to 18 carbons with up to 27- and 10-fold higher in vivo and in vitro efficiency, respectively, compared to Ea DAcT. The ATF1 enzyme thus has the potential to serve as the missing enzyme in the reconstruction of the biosynthetic pathway of insect acetate pheromones from precursor fatty acids in yeast. PMID:26801935

  14. Development of highly glyphosate-tolerant tobacco by coexpression of glyphosate acetyltransferase gat and EPSPS G2-aroA genes

    Baoqing; Dun; Xujing; Wang; Wei; Lu; Ming; Chen; Wei; Zhang; Shuzhen; Ping; Zhixing; Wang; Baoming; Zhang; Min; Lin

    2014-01-01

    The widely used herbicide glyphosate targets 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase(EPSPS).Glyphosate acetyltransferase(GAT)effectively detoxifies glyphosate by N-acetylation.With the aim of identifying a new strategy for development of glyphosate-tolerant crops,the plant expression vector pG2-GAT harboring gat and G2-aroA(encoding EPSPS)has been transformed into tobacco(Nicotiana tabacum)to develop novel plants with higher tolerance to glyphosate.Results from Southern and Western blotting analyses indicated that the target genes were integrated into tobacco chromosomes and expressed effectively at the protein level.Glyphosate tolerance was compared among transgenic tobacco plants containing gat,G2-aroA,or both genes.Plants containing both gat and G2-aroA genes were the most glyphosate-tolerant.This study has shown that a combination of different strategies may result in higher tolerance in transgenic crops,providing a new approach for development of glyphosate-tolerant crops.

  15. RNAi-mediated knock-down of arylamine N-acetyltransferase-1 expression induces E-cadherin up-regulation and cell-cell contact growth inhibition.

    Tiang, Jacky M; Butcher, Neville J; Cullinane, Carleen; Humbert, Patrick O; Minchin, Rodney F

    2011-01-01

    Arylamine N-acetyltransferase-1 (NAT1) is an enzyme that catalyzes the biotransformation of arylamine and hydrazine substrates. It also has a role in the catabolism of the folate metabolite p-aminobenzoyl glutamate. Recent bioinformatics studies have correlated NAT1 expression with various cancer subtypes. However, a direct role for NAT1 in cell biology has not been established. In this study, we have knocked down NAT1 in the colon adenocarcinoma cell-line HT-29 and found a marked change in cell morphology that was accompanied by an increase in cell-cell contact growth inhibition and a loss of cell viability at confluence. NAT1 knock-down also led to attenuation in anchorage independent growth in soft agar. Loss of NAT1 led to the up-regulation of E-cadherin mRNA and protein levels. This change in E-cadherin was not attributed to RNAi off-target effects and was also observed in the prostate cancer cell-line 22Rv1. In vivo, NAT1 knock-down cells grew with a longer doubling time compared to cells stably transfected with a scrambled RNAi or to parental HT-29 cells. This study has shown that NAT1 affects cell growth and morphology. In addition, it suggests that NAT1 may be a novel drug target for cancer therapeutics. PMID:21347396

  16. RNAi-mediated knock-down of arylamine N-acetyltransferase-1 expression induces E-cadherin up-regulation and cell-cell contact growth inhibition.

    Jacky M Tiang

    Full Text Available Arylamine N-acetyltransferase-1 (NAT1 is an enzyme that catalyzes the biotransformation of arylamine and hydrazine substrates. It also has a role in the catabolism of the folate metabolite p-aminobenzoyl glutamate. Recent bioinformatics studies have correlated NAT1 expression with various cancer subtypes. However, a direct role for NAT1 in cell biology has not been established. In this study, we have knocked down NAT1 in the colon adenocarcinoma cell-line HT-29 and found a marked change in cell morphology that was accompanied by an increase in cell-cell contact growth inhibition and a loss of cell viability at confluence. NAT1 knock-down also led to attenuation in anchorage independent growth in soft agar. Loss of NAT1 led to the up-regulation of E-cadherin mRNA and protein levels. This change in E-cadherin was not attributed to RNAi off-target effects and was also observed in the prostate cancer cell-line 22Rv1. In vivo, NAT1 knock-down cells grew with a longer doubling time compared to cells stably transfected with a scrambled RNAi or to parental HT-29 cells. This study has shown that NAT1 affects cell growth and morphology. In addition, it suggests that NAT1 may be a novel drug target for cancer therapeutics.

  17. Integration of Bioorthogonal Probes and Q-FRET for the Detection of Histone Acetyltransferase Activity.

    Han, Zhen; Luan, Yepeng; Zheng, Yujun George

    2015-12-01

    Histone acetyltransferases (HATs) are key players in the epigenetic regulation of gene function. The recent discovery of diverse HAT substrates implies a broad spectrum of cellular functions of HATs. Many pathological processes are also intimately associated with the dysregulation of HAT levels and activities. However, detecting the enzymatic activity of HATs has been challenging, and this has significantly impeded drug discovery. To advance the field, we developed a convenient one-pot, mix-and-read strategy that is capable of directly detecting the acylated histone product through a fluorescent readout. The strategy integrates three technological platforms-bioorthogonal HAT substrate labeling, alkyne-azide click chemistry, and quenching FRET-into one system for effective probing of HAT enzyme activity. PMID:26455821

  18. Preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of ornithine acetyltransferase (Rv1653) from Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Sankaranarayanan, R; Garen, C R; Cherney, M M; Yuan, M; Lee, C; James, M N G

    2009-02-01

    The gene product of open reading frame Rv1653 from Mycobacterium tuberculosis is annotated as encoding a probable ornithine acetyltransferase (OATase; EC 2.3.1.35), an enzyme that catalyzes two steps in the arginine-biosynthesis pathway. It transfers an acetyl group from N-acetylornithine to L-glutamate to produce N-acetylglutamate and L-ornithine. Rv1653 was crystallized using the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method. The native crystals diffracted to a resolution of 1.7 A and belonged to space group P2(1)2(1)2(1), with unit-cell parameters a = 60.1, b = 99.7, c = 155.3 A. The preliminary X-ray study showed the presence of a dimer in the asymmetric unit of the crystals, which had a Matthews coefficient V(M) of 2.8 A(3) Da(-1). PMID:19194014

  19. Primary structure of the human M2 mitochondrial autoantigen of primary biliary cirrhosis: Dihydrolipoamide acetyltransferase

    Primary biliary cirrhosis is a chronic, destructive autoimmune liver disease of humans. Patient sera are characterized by a high frequency of autoantibodies to a Mr 70,000 mitochondrial antigen a component of the M2 antigen complex. The authors have identified a human cDNA clone encoding the complete amino acid sequence of this autoantigen. The predicted structure has significant similarity with the dihydrolipoamide acetyltransferase of the Escherichia coli pyruvate dehydrogenase multienzyme complex. The human sequence preserves the Glu-Thr-Asp-Lys-Ala motif of the lipoyl-binding site and has two potential binding sites. Expressed fragments of the cDNA react strongly with sera from patients with primary biliary cirrhosis but not with sera from patients with autoimmune chronic active hepatitis or sera from healthy subjects

  20. Changes in pineal N-acetyltransferase activity in gamma irradiated rats

    Male Wistar rats were exposed to whole-body irradiation with 14.35 Gy gamma rays after adaptation to the light/dark cycle (LD 12:12). Three groups of rats were studied: A) rats irradiated at night and placed in the 12 h LD cycle again, B) rats irradiated at daytime and placed in the 12 LD cycle, and C) rats irradiated at night and kept in constant darkness. All analyses were carried out in the dark. Radiation enhanced the activity of pineal N-acetyltransferase 3-4 days after exposure in all groups, in the C group significantly on the 4th day. Different light regimes during and after irradiation did not substantially affect the activity of this key enzyme of melatonin synthesis. (author) 1 fig., 8 refs

  1. Effects of acute ethanol administration on nocturnal pineal serotonin N-acetyltransferase activity

    The effect of acute ethanol administration on pineal serotonin N-acetyltransferase (NAT) activity, norepinephrine and indoleamine content was examined in male rats. When ethanol was administered in two equal doses (2 g/kg body weight) over a 4 hour period during the light phase, the nocturnal rise in NAT activity was delayed by seven hours. The nocturnal pineal norepinephrine content was not altered by ethanol except for a delay in the reduction of NE with the onset of the following light phase. Although ethanol treatment led to a significant reduction in nocturnal levels of pineal serotonin content, there was no significant effect upon pineal content of 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA). The data indicate that ethanol delays the onset of the rise of nocturnal pineal NAT activity

  2. Coenzyme A Binding to the Aminoglycoside Acetyltransferase (3)-IIIb Increases Conformational Sampling of Antibiotic Binding Site

    Hu, Xiaohu [ORNL; Norris, Adrianne [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Baudry, Jerome Y [ORNL; Serpersu, Engin H [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

    2011-01-01

    NMR spectroscopy experiments and molecular dynamics simulations were performed to describe the dynamic properties of the aminoglycoside acetyltransferase (3)-IIIb (AAC) in its apo and coenzyme A (CoASH) bound forms. The {sup 15}N-{sup 1}H HSQC spectra indicate a partial structural change and coupling of the CoASH binding site with another region in the protein upon the CoASH titration into the apo enzyme. Molecular dynamics simulations indicate a significant structural and dynamic variation of the long loop in the antibiotic binding domain in the form of a relatively slow (250 ns), concerted opening motion in the CoASH enzyme complex and that binding of the CoASH increases the structural flexibility of the loop, leading to an interchange between several similar equally populated conformations.

  3. Depression of nocturnal pineal serotonin N-acetyltransferase activity in castrate male rats

    Pineal serotonin N-acetyltransferase (NAT) activity was examined in intact rats, castrated rats, and in rats that had been castrated and had received testosterone proprionate. Castration resulted in significantly depressing nocturnal levels of pineal NAT (p<0.05) when compared to enzyme activity in intact rats. Testosterone proprionate administration restored plasma LH levels to normal values in castrate rats but did not induce nocturnal pineal enzyme activity to levels seen in the pineal glands of intact rats. The data substantiate the existence of a feedback control of pineal biosynthetic activity by the hypophyseal-gonadal system, but the identity of the hormone(s) responsible for regulation of pineal NAT activity is not known. (author)

  4. A method to detect transfected chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene expression in intact animals

    A rapid procedure is described for assaying chloramphenicol acetyltransferase enzyme activity in intact animals following transfection of the RSV CAT plasmid into mouse bone marrow cells by electroporation. The reconstituted mice were injected with [14C]chloramphenicol and ethyl acetate extracts of 24-h urine samples were analyzed by TLC autoradiography for the excretion of 14C-labeled metabolites. CAT expression in vivo can be detected by the presence of acetylated 14C-labeled metabolites in the urine within 1 week after bone marrow transplantation and, under the conditions described, these metabolites can be detected for at least 3 months. CAT expression in intact mice as monitored by the urine assay correlates with the CAT expression in the hematopoietic tissues assayed in vitro. This method offers a quick mode of screening for introduced CAT gene expression in vivo without sacrificing the mice

  5. Potent Inhibitors of Acetyltransferase Eis Overcome Kanamycin Resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Willby, Melisa J; Green, Keith D; Gajadeera, Chathurada S; Hou, Caixia; Tsodikov, Oleg V; Posey, James E; Garneau-Tsodikova, Sylvie

    2016-06-17

    A major cause of tuberculosis (TB) resistance to the aminoglycoside kanamycin (KAN) is the Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) acetyltransferase Eis. Upregulation of this enzyme is responsible for inactivation of KAN through acetylation of its amino groups. A 123 000-compound high-throughput screen (HTS) yielded several small-molecule Eis inhibitors that share an isothiazole S,S-dioxide heterocyclic core. These were investigated for their structure-activity relationships. Crystal structures of Eis in complex with two potent inhibitors show that these molecules are bound in the conformationally adaptable aminoglycoside binding site of the enzyme, thereby obstructing binding of KAN for acetylation. Importantly, we demonstrate that several Eis inhibitors, when used in combination with KAN against resistant Mtb, efficiently overcome KAN resistance. This approach paves the way toward development of novel combination therapies against aminoglycoside-resistant TB. PMID:27010218

  6. Mechanism of p300 specific histone acetyltransferase inhibition by small molecules.

    Arif, M; Pradhan, Suman Kalyan; Thanuja, G R; Vedamurthy, B M; Agrawal, Shipra; Dasgupta, Dipak; Kundu, Tapas K

    2009-01-22

    Dysfunction of histone acetyltransferases (HATs) leads to several diseases including cancer, diabetes, and asthma. Therefore, small molecule inhibitors and activators of HATs are being considered as new generation therapeutics. Here, we report the molecular mechanisms of p300 HAT inhibition by specific and nonspecific HAT inhibitors: garcinol, isogarcinol, and 1 (LTK14). The p300 specific HAT inhibitor 1 behaves as a noncompetitive inhibitor for both acetyl-CoA and histone, unlike nonspecific HAT inhibitors garcinol and isogarcinol. The isothermal calorimetric data suggest that there is a high affinity enthalpy driven single binding site for 1 on p300HAT domain in contrast to two binding sites for garcinol and isogarcinol. Furthermore, the precise nature of molecular interactions was determined by using fluorescence, docking, and mutational studies. On the basis of these observations, we have proposed the mechanisms of specific versus nonspecific HAT inhibition by these small molecule compounds, which may be useful to design therapeutically favorable HAT inhibitors. PMID:19086895

  7. Interferon-Induced Spermidine-Spermine Acetyltransferase and Polyamine Depletion Restrict Zika and Chikungunya Viruses.

    Mounce, Bryan C; Poirier, Enzo Z; Passoni, Gabriella; Simon-Loriere, Etienne; Cesaro, Teresa; Prot, Matthieu; Stapleford, Kenneth A; Moratorio, Gonzalo; Sakuntabhai, Anavaj; Levraud, Jean-Pierre; Vignuzzi, Marco

    2016-08-10

    Polyamines are small, positively charged molecules derived from ornithine and synthesized through an intricately regulated enzymatic pathway. Within cells, they are abundant and play several roles in diverse processes. We find that polyamines are required for the life cycle of the RNA viruses chikungunya virus (CHIKV) and Zika virus (ZIKV). Depletion of spermidine and spermine via type I interferon signaling-mediated induction of spermidine/spermine N1-acetyltransferase (SAT1), a key catabolic enzyme in the polyamine pathway, restricts CHIKV and ZIKV replication. Polyamine depletion restricts these viruses in vitro and in vivo, due to impairment of viral translation and RNA replication. The restriction is released by exogenous replenishment of polyamines, further supporting a role for these molecules in virus replication. Thus, SAT1 and, more broadly, polyamine depletion restrict viral replication and suggest promising avenues for antiviral therapies. PMID:27427208

  8. Characterization of two metagenome-derived esterases that reactivate chloramphenicol by counteracting chloramphenicol acetyltransferase.

    Tao, Weixin; Lee, Myung Hwan; Yoon, Mi-Young; Kim, Jin-Cheol; Malhotra, Shweta; Wu, Jing; Hwang, Eul Chul; Lee, Seon-Woo

    2011-12-01

    Function-driven metagenomic analysis is a powerful approach to screening for novel biocatalysts. In this study, we investigated lipolytic enzymes selected from an alluvial soil metagenomic library, and identified two novel esterases, EstDL26 and EstDL136. EstDL26 and EstDL136 reactivated chloramphenicol from its acetyl derivates by counteracting the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) activity in Escherichia coli. These two enzymes showed only 27% identity in amino acid sequence to each other; however both preferentially hydrolyzed short-chain p-nitrophenyl esters (lipase (HSL), and since chloramphenicol acetate esterase (CAE) activity was detected from two other soil esterases in the HSL family, this suggests a distribution of CAE among the soil microorganisms. The isolation and characterization of EstDL26 and EstDL136 in this study may be helpful in understanding the diversity of CAE enzymes and their potential role in releasing active chloramphenicol in the producing bacteria. PMID:22210605

  9. Structure of homoserine O-acetyltransferase from Staphylococcus aureus: the first Gram-positive ortholog structure.

    Thangavelu, Bharani; Pavlovsky, Alexander G; Viola, Ronald

    2014-10-01

    Homoserine O-acetyltransferase (HTA) catalyzes the formation of L-O-acetyl-homoserine from L-homoserine through the transfer of an acetyl group from acetyl-CoA. This is the first committed step required for the biosynthesis of methionine in many fungi, Gram-positive bacteria and some Gram-negative bacteria. The structure of HTA from Staphylococcus aureus (SaHTA) has been determined to a resolution of 2.45 Å. The structure belongs to the α/β-hydrolase superfamily, consisting of two distinct domains: a core α/β-domain containing the catalytic site and a lid domain assembled into a helical bundle. The active site consists of a classical catalytic triad located at the end of a deep tunnel. Structure analysis revealed some important differences for SaHTA compared with the few known structures of HTA. PMID:25286936

  10. Sulphoacetaldehyde acetyltransferase yields acetyl phosphate: purification from Alcaligenes defragrans and gene clusters in taurine degradation.

    Ruff, Jürgen; Denger, Karin; Cook, Alasdair M

    2003-01-15

    The facultatively anaerobic bacterium Alcaligenes defragrans NKNTAU was found to oxidize taurine (2-aminoethanesulphonate) with nitrate as the terminal electron acceptor. Taurine was transaminated to 2-sulphoacetaldehyde. This was not converted into sulphite and acetate by a "sulphoacetaldehyde sulpho-lyase" (EC 4.4.1.12), but into sulphite and acetyl phosphate, which was identified by three methods. The enzyme, which required the addition of phosphate, thiamin diphosphate and Mg(2+) ions for activity, was renamed sulphoacetaldehyde acetyltransferase (Xsc; EC 2.3.1.-). Inducible Xsc was expressed at high levels, and a three-step 11-fold purification yielded an essentially homogeneous soluble protein, which was a homotetramer in its native form; the molecular mass of the subunit was found to be between about 63 kDa (SDS/PAGE) and 65.3 kDa (matrix-assisted laser-desorption ionization-time-of-flight MS). The N-terminal and two internal amino acid sequences were determined, and PCR primers were generated. The xsc gene was amplified and sequenced; the derived molecular mass of the processed protein was 65.0 kDa. The downstream gene presumably encoded the inducible phosphate acetyltransferase (Pta) found in crude extracts. The desulphonative enzymes ("EC 4.4.1.12") from Achromobacter xylosoxidans NCIMB 10751 and Desulfonispora thiosulfatigenes GKNTAU were shown to be Xscs. We detected at least three subclasses of xsc in Proteobacteria and in Gram-positive bacteria, and they comprised a distinct group within the acetohydroxyacid synthase supergene family. Genome sequencing data revealed xsc genes in Burkholderia fungorum (80% sequence identity) and Sinorhizobium meliloti (61%) with closely linked pta genes. Different patterns of regulation for the transport and dissimilation of taurine were hypothesized for S. meliloti and B. fungorum. PMID:12358600

  11. Epigenetic change in kidney tumor: downregulation of histone acetyltransferase MYST1 in human renal cell carcinoma

    Wang Yong

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background MYST1 (also known as hMOF, a member of the MYST family of histone acetyltransferases (HATs as an epigenetic mark of active genes, is mainly responsible for histone H4K16 acetylation in the cells. Recent studies have shown that the abnormal gene expression of hMOF is involved in certain primary cancers. Here we examined the involvement of hMOF expression and histone H4K16 acetylation in primary renal cell carcinoma (RCC. Simultaneously, we investigated the correlation between the expression of hMOF and clear cell RCC (ccRCC biomarker carbohydrase IX (CA9 in RCC. Materials and methods The frozen RCC tissues and RCC cell lines as materials, the reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR, western blotting and immunohistochemical staining approaches were used. Results RT-PCR results indicate that hMOF gene expression levels frequently downregulated in 90.5% of patients (19/21 with RCC. The reduction of hMOF protein in both RCC tissues and RCC cell lines is tightly correlated with acetylation of histone H4K16. In addition, overexpression of CA9 was detected in 100% of ccRCC patients (21/21. However, transient transfection of hMOF in ccRCC 786–0 cells did not affect both the gene and protein expression of CA9. Conclusion hMOF as an acetyltransferase of H4K16 might be involved in the pathogenesis of kidney cancer, and this epigenetic changes might be a new CA9-independent RCC diagnostic maker.

  12. Structural and functional characterization of TRI3 trichothecene 15-O-acetyltransferase from Fusarium sporotrichioides

    Garvey, Graeme S.; McCormick, Susan P.; Alexander, Nancy J.; Rayment, Ivan; (US-Agriculture); (UW)

    2009-08-14

    Fusarium head blight is a devastating disease of cereal crops whose worldwide incidence is increasing and at present there is no satisfactory way of combating this pathogen or its associated toxins. There is a wide variety of trichothecene mycotoxins and they all contain a 12,13-epoxytrichothecene skeleton but differ in their substitutions. Indeed, there is considerable variation in the toxin profile across the numerous Fusarium species that has been ascribed to differences in the presence or absence of biosynthetic enzymes and their relative activity. This article addresses the source of differences in acetylation at the C15 position of the trichothecene molecule. Here, we present the in vitro structural and biochemical characterization of TRI3, a 15-O-trichothecene acetyltransferase isolated from F. sporotrichioides and the 'in vivo' characterization of Deltatri3 mutants of deoxynivalenol (DON) producing F. graminearum strains. A kinetic analysis shows that TRI3 is an efficient enzyme with the native substrate, 15-decalonectrin, but is inactive with either DON or nivalenol. The structure of TRI3 complexed with 15-decalonectrin provides an explanation for this specificity and shows that Tri3 and Tri101 (3-O-trichothecene acetyltransferase) are evolutionarily related. The active site residues are conserved across all sequences for TRI3 orthologs, suggesting that differences in acetylation at C15 are not due to differences in Tri3. The tri3 deletion mutant shows that acetylation at C15 is required for DON biosynthesis even though DON lacks a C15 acetyl group. The enzyme(s) responsible for deacetylation at the 15 position of the trichothecene mycotoxins have not been identified.

  13. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray characterization of Bacillus cereus arylamine N-­acetyltransferase 3 [(BACCR)NAT3

    Kubiak, Xavier; Pluvinage, Benjamin; Li de la Sierra-Gallay, Inès; Weber, Patrick; Haouz, Ahmed; Dupret, Jean-Marie; Rodrigues-Lima, Fernando

    2012-01-01

    B. cereus arylamine N-acetyltransferase 3 was expressed, purified and crystallized. X-ray diffraction data were collected to 2.42 Å resolution and the crystals belonged to the monoclinic space group C121.

  14. Effects of F171 Mutations in the 6′-N-Acetyltransferase Type Ib [AAC(6′)-Ib] Enzyme on Susceptibility to Aminoglycosides

    Chavideh, Ramona; Sholly, Steven; Panaite, Doina; Tolmasky, Marcelo E.

    1999-01-01

    Substitutions at position F171 of 6′-N-acetyltransferase type Ib cause variable loss of aminoglycoside resistance, indicating that this residue plays an important role in the structure and/or function of the enzyme.

  15. Two Proteins with Ornithine Acetyltransferase Activity Show Different Functions in Streptomyces clavuligerus: Oat2 Modulates Clavulanic Acid Biosynthesis in Response to Arginine

    de la Fuente, A.; Martín, J F; Rodríguez-García, A.; Liras, P

    2004-01-01

    The oat2 gene, located in the clavulanic acid gene cluster in Streptomyces clavuligerus, is similar to argJ, which encodes N-acetylornithine:glutamic acid acetyltransferase activity. Purified proteins obtained by expression in Escherichia coli of the argJ and oat2 genes of S. clavuligerus posses N-acetyltransferase activity. The kinetics and substrate specificities of both proteins are very similar. Deletion of the oat2 gene did not affect the total N-acetylornithine transferase activity and ...

  16. Aminoglycoside 6′-N-Acetyltransferase Variants of the Ib Type with Altered Substrate Profile in Clinical Isolates of Enterobacter cloacae and Citrobacter freundii

    Casin, Isabelle; Bordon, Florence; Bertin, Philippe; Coutrot, Anne; Podglajen, Isabelle; Brasseur, Robert; Collatz, Ekkehard

    1998-01-01

    Three clinical isolates, Enterobacter cloacae EC1562 and EC1563 and Citrobacter freundii CFr564, displayed an aminoglycoside resistance profile evocative of low-level 6′-N acetyltransferase type II [AAC(6′)-II] production, which conferred reduced susceptibility to gentamicin but not to amikacin or isepamicin. Aminoglycoside acetyltransferase assays suggested the synthesis in the three strains of an AAC(6′) which acetylated amikacin practically as well as it acetylated gentamicin in vitro. Bot...

  17. Small molecule inhibition of arylamine N-acetyltransferase Type I inhibits proliferation and invasiveness of MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells

    Tiang, Jacky M. [School of Biomedical Sciences, University of Queensland, St. Lucia, Qld 4072 (Australia); Butcher, Neville J., E-mail: n.butcher@uq.edu.au [School of Biomedical Sciences, University of Queensland, St. Lucia, Qld 4072 (Australia); Minchin, Rodney F. [School of Biomedical Sciences, University of Queensland, St. Lucia, Qld 4072 (Australia)

    2010-02-26

    Arylamine N-acetyltransferase 1 is a phase II metabolizing enzyme that has been associated with certain breast cancer subtypes. While it has been linked to breast cancer risk because of its role in the metabolic activation and detoxification of carcinogens, recent studies have suggested it may be important in cell growth and survival. To address the possible importance of NAT1 in breast cancer, we have used a novel small molecule inhibitor (Rhod-o-hp) of the enzyme to examine growth and invasion of the breast adenocarcinoma line MDA-MB-231. The inhibitor significantly reduced cell growth by increasing the percent of cells in G2/M phase of the cell cycle. Rhod-o-hp also reduced the ability of the MDA-MB-231 cells to grow in soft agar. Using an in vitro invasion assay, the inhibitor significantly reduced the invasiveness of the cells. To test whether this effect was due to inhibition of NAT1, the enzyme was knocked down using a lentivirus-based shRNA approach and invasion potential was significantly reduced. Taken together, the results of this study demonstrate that NAT1 activity may be important in breast cancer growth and metastasis. The study suggests that NAT1 is a novel target for breast cancer treatment.

  18. Small molecule inhibition of arylamine N-acetyltransferase Type I inhibits proliferation and invasiveness of MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells

    Arylamine N-acetyltransferase 1 is a phase II metabolizing enzyme that has been associated with certain breast cancer subtypes. While it has been linked to breast cancer risk because of its role in the metabolic activation and detoxification of carcinogens, recent studies have suggested it may be important in cell growth and survival. To address the possible importance of NAT1 in breast cancer, we have used a novel small molecule inhibitor (Rhod-o-hp) of the enzyme to examine growth and invasion of the breast adenocarcinoma line MDA-MB-231. The inhibitor significantly reduced cell growth by increasing the percent of cells in G2/M phase of the cell cycle. Rhod-o-hp also reduced the ability of the MDA-MB-231 cells to grow in soft agar. Using an in vitro invasion assay, the inhibitor significantly reduced the invasiveness of the cells. To test whether this effect was due to inhibition of NAT1, the enzyme was knocked down using a lentivirus-based shRNA approach and invasion potential was significantly reduced. Taken together, the results of this study demonstrate that NAT1 activity may be important in breast cancer growth and metastasis. The study suggests that NAT1 is a novel target for breast cancer treatment.

  19. Genetic variants in microsomal epoxide hydrolase and N-acetyltransferase 2 in susceptibility of IBD in the Danish population

    Ernst, Anja; Andersen, Vibeke; Østergaard, Mette;

    induce or sustain an immune response. Changes in detoxification of substances that causes epithelial damage may confer susceptibility to IBD. Hence, polymorphic enzymes involved in the detoxification processes may be risk factors of IBD. Methods. The two biotransformation enzymes microsomal epoxide...... hydrolase and N-acetyltransferase 2 were genotyped using TaqMan based Real-Time PCR in 388 patients with Crohn's disease (CD), 565 patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) and 796 healthy Danish controls. Results. No association was found between low microsomal epoxide hydrolase activity or slow N......-acetyltransferase 2 acetylator status and IBD. An association between high activity of microsomal epoxide hydrolase and disease diagnosis before age 40 in CD with an OR of 2.2(1.1- 4.2) P=0.02) was found. No other phenotypic associations were found for the two enzymes and IBD, regarding age at onset, disease location...

  20. Regulation of KAT6 Acetyltransferases and Their Roles in Cell Cycle Progression, Stem Cell Maintenance, and Human Disease.

    Huang, Fu; Abmayr, Susan M; Workman, Jerry L

    2016-07-15

    The lysine acetyltransferase 6 (KAT6) histone acetyltransferase (HAT) complexes are highly conserved from yeast to higher organisms. They acetylate histone H3 and other nonhistone substrates and are involved in cell cycle regulation and stem cell maintenance. In addition, the human KAT6 HATs are recurrently mutated in leukemia and solid tumors. Therefore, it is important to understand the mechanisms underlying the regulation of KAT6 HATs and their roles in cell cycle progression. In this minireview, we summarize the identification and analysis of the KAT6 complexes and discuss the regulatory mechanisms governing their enzymatic activities and substrate specificities. We further focus on the roles of KAT6 HATs in regulating cell proliferation and stem cell maintenance and review recent insights that aid in understanding their involvement in human diseases. PMID:27185879

  1. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of the glucosamine-6-phosphate N-acetyltransferase from human liver

    Glucosamine-6-phosphate N-acetyltransferase from human liver was expressed, purified and crystallized. Diffraction data have been collected to 2.6 Å resolution. Glucosamine-6-phosphate N-acetyltransferase from human liver, which catalyzes the transfer of an acetyl group from acetyl coenzyme A (AcCoA) to the primary amine of d-glucosamine 6-phosphate to form N-acetyl-d-glucosamine 6-phosphate, was expressed in a soluble form from Escherichia coli strain BL21 (DE3). The protein was purified to homogeneity using Ni2+-chelating chromatography followed by size-exclusion chromatography. Crystals of the protein were obtained by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method and diffracted to 2.6 Å resolution. The crystals belonged to space group P41212 or P43212, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 50.08, c = 142.88 Å

  2. Co-expression of G2-EPSPS and glyphosate acetyltransferase GAT genes conferring high tolerance to glyphosate in soybean

    Guo, Bingfu; Guo, Yong; Hong, Huilong; Jin, Longguo; Zhang, Lijuan; Chang, Ru-Zhen; Lu, Wei; Lin, Min; Qiu, Li-Juan

    2015-01-01

    Glyphosate is a widely used non-selective herbicide with broad spectrum of weed control around the world. At present, most of the commercial glyphosate tolerant soybeans utilize glyphosate tolerant gene CP4-EPSPS or glyphosate acetyltransferase gene GAT separately. In this study, both glyphosate tolerant gene G2-EPSPS and glyphosate degraded gene GAT were co-transferred into soybean and transgenic plants showed high tolerance to glyphosate. Molecular analysis including PCR, Sothern blot, qRT-...

  3. Mutation of the CH1 Domain in the Histone Acetyltransferase CREBBP Results in Autism-Relevant Behaviors in Mice

    Fei Zheng; Lawryn H Kasper; Bedford, David C.; Stephanie Lerach; Teubner, Brett J.W.; Brindle, Paul K.

    2016-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) are a group of neurodevelopmental afflictions characterized by repetitive behaviors, deficits in social interaction, and impaired communication skills. For most ASD patients, the underlying causes are unknown. Genetic mutations have been identified in about 25 percent of ASD cases, including mutations in epigenetic regulators, suggesting that dysregulated chromatin or DNA function is a critical component of ASD. Mutations in the histone acetyltransferase CREB ...

  4. Cohesin acetyltransferase Esco2 is a cell viability factor and is required for cohesion in pericentric heterochromatin

    Whelan, Gabriela; Kreidl, Emanuel; Wutz, Gordana; Egner, Alexander; Peters, Jan-Michael; Eichele, Gregor

    2012-01-01

    Sister chromatid cohesion, mediated by cohesin and regulated by Sororin, is essential for chromosome segregation. In mammalian cells, cohesion establishment and Sororin recruitment to chromatin‐bound cohesin depends on the acetyltransferases Esco1 and Esco2. Mutations in Esco2 cause Roberts syndrome, a developmental disease in which mitotic chromosomes have a ‘railroad’ track morphology. Here, we show that Esco2 deficiency leads to termination of mouse development at pre‐ and post‐implantatio...

  5. Maintenance of Neuronal Laterality in Caenorhabditis elegans Through MYST Histone Acetyltransferase Complex Components LSY-12, LSY-13 and LIN-49

    O'Meara, M. Maggie; Zhang, Feifan; Hobert, Oliver

    2010-01-01

    Left/right asymmetrically expressed genes permit an animal to perform distinct tasks with the right vs. left side of its brain. Once established during development, lateralized gene expression patterns need to be maintained during the life of the animal. We show here that a histone modifying complex, composed of the LSY-12 MYST-type histone acetyltransferase, the ING-family PHD domain protein LSY-13, and PHD/bromodomain protein LIN-49, is required to first initiate and then actively maintain ...

  6. Sequence analysis and complementation studies of the argJ gene encoding ornithine acetyltransferase from Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    Martin, P R; Mulks, M H

    1992-01-01

    Clinical isolates of Neisseria gonorrhoeae frequently are deficient in arginine biosynthesis. These auxotrophs often have defects in the fifth step of the arginine biosynthetic pathway, the conversion of acetylornithine to ornithine. This reaction is catalyzed by the enzyme ornithine acetyltransferase, which is a product of the argJ gene. We have cloned and sequenced the gonococcal argJ gene and found that it contains an open reading frame of 1,218 nucleotides and encodes a peptide with a ded...

  7. Crystal structure of the histone acetyltransferase domain of the human PCAF transcriptional regulator bound to coenzyme A.

    Clements, A.; Rojas, J R; Trievel, R C; Wang, L.; Berger, S L; Marmorstein, R

    1999-01-01

    The human p300/CBP-associating factor, PCAF, mediates transcriptional activation through its ability to acetylate nucleosomal histone substrates as well as transcriptional activators such as p53. We have determined the 2.3 A crystal structure of the histone acetyltransferase (HAT) domain of PCAF bound to coenzyme A. The structure reveals a central protein core associated with coenzyme A binding and a pronounced cleft that sits over the protein core and is flanked on opposite sides by the N- a...

  8. N-Acetyltransferase 1 (NAT1) Genotype: A Risk Factor for Urinary Bladder Cancer in a Lebanese Population

    Yassine, Ibrahim A.; Loulou Kobeissi; Jabbour, Michel E.; Dhaini, Hassan R

    2012-01-01

    In Lebanon, bladder cancer is the second most incident cancer among men. This study investigates a possible association between N-acetyltransferase 1 (NAT1) genotype, a drug-metabolizing enzyme coding gene, and bladder cancer in Lebanese men. A case-control study (54 cases and 105 hospital-based controls) was conducted in two major hospitals in Beirut. Cases were randomly selected from patients diagnosed in the period of 2002–2008. Controls were conveniently identified and selected from the s...

  9. The histone acetyltransferase p300 inhibitor C646 reduces pro-inflammatory gene expression and inhibits histone deacetylases

    van den Bosch, Thea; Boichenko, Alexander; Leus, Niek G. J.; Eleni Ourailidou, Maria; Wapenaar, Hannah; Rotili, Dante; Mai, Antonello; Imhof, Axel; Bischoff, Rainer; Haisma, Hidde J.; Dekker, Frank J.

    2016-01-01

    Lysine acetylations are reversible posttranslational modifications of histone and non-histone proteins that play important regulatory roles in signal transduction cascades and gene expression. Lysine acetylations are regulated by histone acetyltransferases as writers and histone deacetylases as erasers. Because of their role in signal transduction cascades, these enzymes are important players in inflammation. Therefore, applications of histone acetyltransferase inhibitors to reduce inflammatory responses are interesting. Among the few histone acetyltransferase inhibitors described, C646 is one of the most potent (Ki of 0.4 μM for histone acetyltransferase p300). C646 was described to regulate the NF-κB pathway; an important pathway in inflammatory responses, which is regulated by acetylation. Interestingly, this pathway has been implicated in asthma and COPD. Therefore we hypothesized that via regulation of the NF-κB signaling pathway, C646 can inhibit pro-inflammatory gene expression, and have potential for the treatment of inflammatory lung diseases. In line with this, here we demonstrate that C646 reduces pro-inflammatory gene expression in RAW264.7 murine macrophages and murine precision-cut lung slices. To unravel its effects on cellular substrates we applied mass spectrometry and found, counterintuitively, a slight increase in acetylation of histone H3. Based on this finding, and structural features of C646, we presumed inhibitory activity of C646 on histone deacetylases, and indeed found inhibition of histone deacetylases from 7 μM and higher concentrations. This indicates that C646 has potential for further development towards applications in the treatment of inflammation, however, its newly discovered lack of selectivity at higher concentrations needs to be taken into account. PMID:26718586

  10. Homologues of xenobiotic metabolizing N-acetyltransferases in plant-associated fungi: Novel functions for an old enzyme family

    Karagianni, Eleni P.; Evanthia Kontomina; Britton Davis; Barbara Kotseli; Theodora Tsirka; Vasiliki Garefalaki; Edith Sim; Glenn, Anthony E; Sotiria Boukouvala

    2015-01-01

    Plant-pathogenic fungi and their hosts engage in chemical warfare, attacking each other with toxic products of secondary metabolism and defending themselves via an arsenal of xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes. One such enzyme is homologous to arylamine N-acetyltransferase (NAT) and has been identified in Fusarium infecting cereal plants as responsible for detoxification of host defence compound 2-benzoxazolinone. Here we investigate functional diversification of NAT enzymes in crop-compromising...

  11. Cloning, sequencing, characterisation and implications for vaccine design of the novel dihydrolipoyl acetyltransferase of Neisseria meningitidis.

    Ala' Aldeen, D A; Westphal, A H; De Kok, A; Weston, V; Atta, M S; Baldwin, T J; Bartley, J; Borriello, S P

    1996-12-01

    A lambdaZap-II expression library of Neisseria meningitidis was screened with a rabbit polyclonal antiserum (R-70) raised against c. 70-kDa proteins purified from outer membrane vesicles by elution from preparative SDS-polyacrylamide gels. Selected clones were isolated, further purified, and their recombinant pBluescript SKII plasmids were excised. The cloned DNA insert was sequenced from positive clones and analysed. Four open reading frames (ORFs) were identified, three of which showed a high degree of homology with the pyruvate dehydrogenase (E1p), dihydrolipoyl acetyltransferase (E2p) and dihydrolipoyl dehydrogenase (E3) components of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDHC) of a number of prokaryotic and eukaryotic species. Sequence analysis indicated that the meningococcal E2p (Men-E2p) contains two N-terminal lipoyl domains, an E1/E3 binding domain and a catalytic domain. The domains are separated by hinge regions rich in alanine, proline and charged residues. Another lipoyl domain with high sequence similarity to the Men-E2p lipoyl domain was found at the N-terminal of the E3 component. A further ORF, coding for a 16.5-kDa protein, was found between the ORFs encoding the E2p and E3 components. The identity and functional characteristics of the expressed and purified heterologous Men-E2p were confirmed as dihydrolipoyl acetyltransferase by immunological and biochemical assays. N-terminal amino-acid analysis confirmed the sequence of the DNA-derived mature protein. Purified Men-E2p reacted with monospecific antisera raised against the whole E2p molecule and against the lipoyl domain of the Azotobacter vinelandii E2p. Conversely, rabbit antiserum raised against Men-E2p reacted with protein extracts of A. vinelandii, Escherichia coli and N. gonorrhoeae and with the lipoyl and catalytic domains of E2p obtained by limited proteolysis. In contrast, the original R-70 antiserum reacted almost exclusively with the lipoyl domain, indicating the strong immunogenicity

  12. Molecular Evolution of Aralkylamine N-Acetyltransferase in Fish: A Genomic Survey

    Jia Li

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available All living organisms synchronize biological functions with environmental changes; melatonin plays a vital role in regulating daily and seasonal variations. Due to rhythmic activity of the timezyme aralkylamine N-acetyltransferase (AANAT, the blood level of melatonin increases at night and decreases during daytime. Whereas other vertebrates have a single form of AANAT, bony fishes possess various isoforms of aanat genes, though the reasons are still unclear. Here, we have taken advantage of multiple unpublished teleost aanat sequences to explore and expand our understanding of the molecular evolution of aanat in fish. Our results confirm that two rounds of whole-genome duplication (WGD led to the existence of three fish isoforms of aanat, i.e., aanat1a, aanat1b, and aanat2; in addition, gene loss led to the absence of some forms from certain special fish species. Furthermore, we suggest the different roles of two aanat1s in amphibious mudskippers, and speculate that the loss of aanat1a, may be related to terrestrial vision change. Several important sites of AANAT proteins and regulatory elements of aanat genes were analyzed for structural comparison and functional forecasting, respectively, which provides insights into the molecular evolution of the differences between AANAT1 and AANAT2.

  13. Interaction of human arylamine N-acetyltransferase 1 with different nanomaterials.

    Deng, Zhou J; Butcher, Neville J; Mortimer, Gysell M; Jia, Zhongfan; Monteiro, Michael J; Martin, Darren J; Minchin, Rodney F

    2014-03-01

    Humans are exposed to nanoparticles in the environment as well as those in nanomaterials developed for biomedical applications. However, the safety and biologic effects of many nanoparticles remain to be elucidated. Over the past decade, our understanding of the interaction of proteins with various nanomaterials has grown. The protein corona can determine not only how nanoparticles interact with cells but also their biologic effects and toxicity. In this study, we describe the effects that several different classes of nanoparticles exert on the enzymatic activity of the cytosolic protein human arylamine N-acetyltransferase 1 (NAT1), a drug-metabolizing enzyme widely distributed in the body that is also responsible for the activation and detoxification of known carcinogens. We investigated three metal oxides (zinc oxide, titanium dioxide, and silicon dioxide), two synthetic clay nanoparticles (layered double hydroxide and layered silicate nanoparticles), and a self-assembling thermo-responsive polymeric nanoparticle that differ in size and surface characteristics. We found that the different nanoparticles induced very different responses, ranging from inhibition to marked enhancement of enzyme activity. The layered silicates did not directly inactivate NAT1, but was found to enhance substrate-dependent inhibition. These differing effects demonstrate the multiplicity of nanoparticle-protein interactions and suggest that enzyme activity may be compromised in organs exposed to nanoparticles, such as the lungs or reticulo-endothelial system. PMID:24346836

  14. Application of the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) diffusion assay to transgenic plant tissues.

    Peach, C; Velten, J

    1992-02-01

    Chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) activity was quantified in crude extracts from tobacco callus tissues using a modification of a previously reported diffusion assay. We describe here the alterations necessary in applying this rapid and simple assay procedure to plant materials. Due to the high concentration of nonspecific oxidases present in most plant tissues, some type of protective agent is required to maintain enzyme activity. We have tested beta-mercaptoethanol, cysteine, dithiothreitol, ascorbic acid and polyvinyl pyrrolidone as protective agents within the initial extraction buffer. We also investigated the effect of heat (60 degrees C, 10 min) and 5 mM EDTA on CAT activity. The highest CAT activity was obtained using 5 mM cysteine plus 5 mM EDTA in 40 mM Tris-HCl (pH 7.8) as the initial extraction buffer followed by a heat treatment. Using this buffer, CAT activity was stable on ice for more than two hours. In our hands, total acetyl-coenzyme A concentration within the assay mixture was found to be saturating at 250 microM and the Km determined to be 100 microM. Assays performed using the same crude plant extract indicate that 1) duplicate assays show less than 1.5% variation in activities and 2) CAT activity increases linearly with respect to volume of extract used. PMID:1616705

  15. Structural model of carnitine palmitoyltransferase I based on the carnitine acetyltransferase crystal.

    Morillas, Montserrat; López-VViñas, Eduardo; Valencia, Alfonso; Serra, Dolors; Gómez-Puertas, Paulino; Hegardt, Fausto G; Asins, Guillermina

    2004-01-01

    CPT I (carnitine palmitoyltransferase I) catalyses the conversion of palmitoyl-CoA into palmitoylcarnitine in the presence of L-carnitine, facilitating the entry of fatty acids into mitochondria. We propose a 3-D (three-dimensional) structural model for L-CPT I (liver CPT I), based on the similarity of this enzyme to the recently crystallized mouse carnitine acetyltransferase. The model includes 607 of the 773 amino acids of L-CPT I, and the positions of carnitine, CoA and the palmitoyl group were assigned by superposition and docking analysis. Functional analysis of this 3-D model included the mutagenesis of several amino acids in order to identify putative catalytic residues. Mutants D477A, D567A and E590D showed reduced L-CPT I activity. In addition, individual mutation of amino acids forming the conserved Ser685-Thr686-Ser687 motif abolished enzyme activity in mutants T686A and S687A and altered K(m) and the catalytic efficiency for carnitine in mutant S685A. We conclude that the catalytic residues are His473 and Asp477, while Ser687 probably stabilizes the transition state. Several conserved lysines, i.e. Lys455, Lys505, Lys560 and Lys561, were also mutated. Only mutants K455A and K560A showed decreases in activity of 50%. The model rationalizes the finding of nine natural mutations in patients with hereditary L-CPT I deficiencies. PMID:14711372

  16. Effects of humic acid-metal complexes on hepatic carnitine palmitoyltransferase, carnitine acetyltransferase and catalase activities

    Fungjou Lu; Youngshin Chen (National Taiwan Univ., Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China). Dept. of Biochemistry); Tienshang Huang (National Taiwan Univ., Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China). Dept. of Medicine)

    1994-03-01

    A significant increase in activities of hepatic carnitine palmitoyltransferase and carnitine acetyltransferase was observed in male Balb/c mice intraperitoneally injected for 40 d with 0.125 mg/0.1 ml/d humic acid-metal complexes. Among these complexes, the humic acid-As complex was relatively effective, whereas humic acid-25 metal complex was more effective, and humic acid-26 metal complex was most effective. However, humic acid or metal mixtures, or metal such as As alone, was not effective. Humic acid-metal complexes also significantly decreased hepatic catalase activity. A marked decrease of 60-kDa polypeptide in liver cytoplasm was also observed on SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis after the mice had been injected with the complexes. Morphological analysis of a histopathological biopsy of such treated mice revealed several changes in hepatocytes, including focal necrosis and cell infiltration, mild fatty changes, reactive nuclei, and hypertrophy. Humic acid-metal complexes affect activities of metabolic enzymes of fatty acids, and this results in accumulation of hydrogen peroxide and increase of the lipid peroxidation. The products of lipid peroxidation may be responsible for liver damage and possible carcinogenesis. Previous studies in this laboratory had shown that humic acid-metal complex altered the coagulation system and that humic acid, per se, caused vasculopathy. Therefore, humic acid-metal complexes may be main causal factors of not only so-called blackfoot disease, but also the liver cancer prevailing on the southwestern coast of Taiwan.

  17. Implication of ornithine acetyltransferase activity on l-ornithine production in Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    Hao, Ning; Mu, Jingrui; Hu, Nan; Xu, Sheng; Shen, Peng; Yan, Ming; Li, Yan; Xu, Lin

    2016-01-01

    l-Ornithine is an intermediate of the l-arginine biosynthetic pathway in Corynebacterium glutamicum. The effect of ornithine acetyltransferase (OATase; ArgJ) on l-ornithine production was investigated, and C. glutamicum 1006 was engineered to overproduce l-ornithine as a major product by inactivating regulatory repressor argR gene and overexpressing argJ gene. A genome sequence analysis indicated that the argF gene encoding ornithine carbamoyltransferase in C. glutamicum 1006 was mutated, resulting in the accumulation of a certain amount of l-ornithine (20.5 g/L). The assays using a crude extract of C. glutamicum 1006 indicated that the l-ornithine concentration for 50% inhibition of OAT was 5 mM. To enhance l-ornithine production, the argJ gene from C. glutamicum ATCC 13032 was overexpressed. In flask cultures, the resulting strain, C. glutamicum 1006∆argR-argJ, produced 31.6 g/L l-ornithine, which is 54.15% more than that produced by C. glutamicum 1006. The OAT activity of C. glutamicum 1006∆argR-argJ was significantly greater than that of C. glutamicum 1006, and this study achieved the highest conversion ratio of sugar to acid (0.396 g/g) compared with those of previous reports. ArgJ strongly influences the production of l-ornithine in C. glutamicum. PMID:25630515

  18. Comparison of Protein Acetyltransferase Action of CRTAase with the Prototypes of HAT

    Prija Ponnan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Our laboratory is credited for the discovery of enzymatic acetylation of protein, a phenomenon unknown till we identified an enzyme termed acetoxy drug: protein transacetylase (TAase, catalyzing the transfer of acetyl group from polyphenolic acetates to receptor proteins (RP. Later, TAase was identified as calreticulin (CR, an endoplasmic reticulum luminal protein. CR was termed calreticulin transacetylase (CRTAase. Our persistent study revealed that CR like other families of histone acetyltransferases (HATs such as p300, Rtt109, PCAF, and ESA1, undergoes autoacetylation. The autoacetylated CR was characterized as a stable intermediate in CRTAase catalyzed protein acetylation, and similar was the case with ESA1. The autoacetylation of CR like that of HATs was found to enhance protein-protein interaction. CR like HAT-1, CBP, and p300 mediated the acylation of RP utilizing acetyl CoA and propionyl CoA as the substrates. The similarities between CRTAase and HATs in mediating protein acylation are highlighted in this review.

  19. Molecular functions of the histone acetyltransferase chaperone complex Rtt109-Vps75

    Berndsen, Christopher E; Tsubota, Toshiaki; Lindner, Scott E; Lee, Susan; Holton, James M; Kaufman, Paul D; Keck, James L; Denu, John M [UMASS, MED; (UCB); (UW-MED)

    2010-01-12

    Histone acetylation and nucleosome remodeling regulate DNA damage repair, replication and transcription. Rtt109, a recently discovered histone acetyltransferase (HAT) from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, functions with the histone chaperone Asf1 to acetylate lysine K56 on histone H3 (H3K56), a modification associated with newly synthesized histones. In vitro analysis of Rtt109 revealed that Vps75, a Nap1 family histone chaperone, could also stimulate Rtt109-dependent acetylation of H3K56. However, the molecular function of the Rtt109-Vps75 complex remains elusive. Here we have probed the molecular functions of Vps75 and the Rtt109-Vps75 complex through biochemical, structural and genetic means. We find that Vps75 stimulates the kcat of histone acetylation by {approx}100-fold relative to Rtt109 alone and enhances acetylation of K9 in the H3 histone tail. Consistent with the in vitro evidence, cells lacking Vps75 showed a substantial reduction (60%) in H3K9 acetylation during S phase. X-ray structural, biochemical and genetic analyses of Vps75 indicate a unique, structurally dynamic Nap1-like fold that suggests a potential mechanism of Vps75-dependent activation of Rtt109. Together, these data provide evidence for a multifunctional HAT-chaperone complex that acetylates histone H3 and deposits H3-H4 onto DNA, linking histone modification and nucleosome assembly.

  20. Arylamine N-acetyltransferase activity in bronchial epithelial cells and its inhibition by cellular oxidants

    Bronchial epithelial cells express xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes (XMEs) that are involved in the biotransformation of inhaled toxic compounds. The activities of these XMEs in the lung may modulate respiratory toxicity and have been linked to several diseases of the airways. Arylamine N-acetyltransferases (NAT) are conjugating XMEs that play a key role in the biotransformation of aromatic amine pollutants such as the tobacco-smoke carcinogens 4-aminobiphenyl (4-ABP) and β-naphthylamine (β-NA). We show here that functional human NAT1 or its murine counterpart Nat2 are present in different lung epithelial cells i.e. Clara cells, type II alveolar cells and bronchial epithelial cells, thus indicating that inhaled aromatic amines may undergo NAT-dependent biotransformation in lung epithelium. Exposure of these cells to pathophysiologically relevant amounts of oxidants known to contribute to lung dysfunction, such as H2O2 or peroxynitrite, was found to impair the NAT1/Nat2-dependent cellular biotransformation of aromatic amines. Genetic and non genetic impairment of intracellular NAT enzyme activities has been suggested to compromise the important detoxification pathway of aromatic amine N-acetylation and subsequently to contribute to an exacerbation of untoward effects of these pollutants on health. Our study suggests that oxidative/nitroxidative stress in lung epithelial cells, due to air pollution and/or inflammation, could contribute to local and/or systemic dysfunctions through the alteration of the functions of pulmonary NAT enzymes.

  1. In vitro inhibition of choline acetyltransferase by a series of 2-benzylidene-3-quinuclidinones

    Ten substituted 2-benzylidene-3-quinuclidinones were synthesized and evaluated for their relative potency as in vitro inhibitors of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT). Acetylcholine (ACh) synthesis was followed radiometrically by the incorporation of labeled acetate originating from 14C-acetyl-CoA. Woolf-Augustinsson-Hofstee data analysis was used to calculate Vmax, Km, and Ki values. The inhibition was found to be noncompetitive or uncompetitive with respect to choline. Quantitative structure activity relationship correlations demonstrated a primary dependence on κ-σ, as well as steric properties of the substituted benzene ring. Additional radiometric and spectrophotometric were performed with 2-(3'-methyl)-benzylidene-3-quinuclidinone, one of the more potent analogs, to further elucidate the inhibitory mechanism. ChAT-mediated cleavage of ACh was measured spectrophotometrically by following the appearance of NADH at 340 nanometers in an enzyme coupled assay. Lineweaver-Burk analysis indicated mixed or uncompetitive inhibition with respect to both substrates of the forward reaction, suggesting interference with a rate limiting step

  2. In Silico Identification and Characterization of N-Terminal Acetyltransferase Genes of Poplar (Populus trichocarpa

    Hang-Yong Zhu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available N-terminal acetyltransferase (Nats complex is responsible for protein N-terminal acetylation (Nα-acetylation, which is one of the most common covalent modifications of eukaryotic proteins. Although genome-wide investigation and characterization of Nat catalytic subunits (CS and auxiliary subunits (AS have been conducted in yeast and humans they remain unexplored in plants. Here we report on the identification of eleven genes encoding eleven putative Nat CS polypeptides, and five genes encoding five putative Nat AS polypeptides in Populus. We document that the expansion of Nat CS genes occurs as duplicated blocks distributed across 10 of the 19 poplar chromosomes, likely only as a result of segmental duplication events. Based on phylogenetic analysis, poplar Nat CS were assigned to six subgroups, which corresponded well to the Nat CS types (CS of Nat A–F, being consistent with previous reports in humans and yeast. In silico analysis of microarray data showed that in the process of normal development of the poplar, their Nat CS and AS genes are commonly expressed at one relatively low level but share distinct tissue-specific expression patterns. This exhaustive survey of Nat genes in poplar provides important information to assist future studies on their functional role in poplar.

  3. Distinct Localization of Peripheral and Central Types of Choline Acetyltransferase in the Rat Cochlea

    We previously discovered a splice variant of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) mRNA, and designated the variant protein pChAT because of its preferential expression in peripheral neuronal structures. In this study, we examined the immunohistochemical localization of pChAT in rat cochlea and compared the distribution pattern to those of common ChAT (cChAT) and acetylcholinesterase. Some neuronal cell bodies and fibers in the spiral ganglia showed immunoreactivity for pChAT, predominantly the small spiral ganglion cells, indicating outer hair cell type II neurons. In contrast, cChAT- and acetylcholinesterase-positive structures were localized to fibers and not apparent in ganglion cells. After ablation of the cochlear nuclei, many pChAT-positive cochlear nerve fibers became clearly visible, whereas fibers immunopositive for cChAT and acetylcholine esterase disappeared. These results suggested that pChAT and cChAT are localized in different systems of the rat cochlea; pChAT in the afferent and cChAT in the efferent structures

  4. Insulin stimulates choline acetyltransferase activity in cultured embryonic chicken retina neurons

    The effect of insulin on the appearance of the enzyme choline acetyltransferase in embryonic chicken retina neurons cultured in defined medium was studied. In the presence of a minimal level of insulin (1 ng/ml), ChoAcT activity increased with time in culture. A correspondence between the insulin concentration in the defined medium (1-100 ng/ml) and both the rate of increase and maximum attained level of ChoAcT activity was observed. Maximal ChoAcT activity was 2- to 3-fold greater in cells cultured in the presence of 100 ng of insulin per ml than in cells cultured in the presence of 1 ng of insulin per ml. To elicit maximum ChoAcT activity, insulin at 100 ng/ml was required in the medium for only the first 4 days of the culture period, at which time insulin could be reduced to maintenance levels (10 ng/ml) without affecting ChoAcT activity. Insulin binding assays performed during a 7-day culture period revealed that irrespective of the 125I-insulin concentration in the medium during culture, cell-surface insulin receptors decreased by ≅ 90% between 4 and 7 days in culture. This decrease in insulin binding corresponded to the observed decrease in the sensitivity of ChoAcT activity to insulin. The findings suggest that insulin plays a role in mediating cholinergic differentiation in the embryonic chicken retina

  5. Structural Analysis of a Putative Aminoglycoside N-Acetyltransferase from Bacillus anthracis

    Klimecka, Maria M.; Chruszcz, Maksymilian; Font, Jose; Skarina, Tatiana; Shumilin, Igor; Onopryienko, Olena; Porebski, Przemyslaw J.; Cymborowski, Marcin; Zimmerman, Matthew D.; Hasseman, Jeremy; Glomski, Ian J.; Lebioda, Lukasz; Savchenko, Alexei; Edwards, Aled; Minor, Wladek (SC); (Toronto); (UV)

    2012-02-15

    For the last decade, worldwide efforts for the treatment of anthrax infection have focused on developing effective vaccines. Patients that are already infected are still treated traditionally using different types of standard antimicrobial agents. The most popular are antibiotics such as tetracyclines and fluoroquinolones. While aminoglycosides appear to be less effective antimicrobial agents than other antibiotics, synthetic aminoglycosides have been shown to act as potent inhibitors of anthrax lethal factor and may have potential application as antitoxins. Here, we present a structural analysis of the BA2930 protein, a putative aminoglycoside acetyltransferase, which may be a component of the bacterium's aminoglycoside resistance mechanism. The determined structures revealed details of a fold characteristic only for one other protein structure in the Protein Data Bank, namely, YokD from Bacillus subtilis. Both BA2930 and YokD are members of the Antibiotic-NAT superfamily (PF02522). Sequential and structural analyses showed that residues conserved throughout the Antibiotic-NAT superfamily are responsible for the binding of the cofactor acetyl coenzyme A. The interaction of BA2930 with cofactors was characterized by both crystallographic and binding studies.

  6. The lysine acetyltransferase activator Brpf1 governs dentate gyrus development through neural stem cells and progenitors.

    Linya You

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Lysine acetylation has recently emerged as an important post-translational modification in diverse organisms, but relatively little is known about its roles in mammalian development and stem cells. Bromodomain- and PHD finger-containing protein 1 (BRPF1 is a multidomain histone binder and a master activator of three lysine acetyltransferases, MOZ, MORF and HBO1, which are also known as KAT6A, KAT6B and KAT7, respectively. While the MOZ and MORF genes are rearranged in leukemia, the MORF gene is also mutated in prostate and other cancers and in four genetic disorders with intellectual disability. Here we show that forebrain-specific inactivation of the mouse Brpf1 gene causes hypoplasia in the dentate gyrus, including underdevelopment of the suprapyramidal blade and complete loss of the infrapyramidal blade. We trace the developmental origin to compromised Sox2+ neural stem cells and Tbr2+ intermediate neuronal progenitors. We further demonstrate that Brpf1 loss deregulates neuronal migration, cell cycle progression and transcriptional control, thereby causing abnormal morphogenesis of the hippocampus. These results link histone binding and acetylation control to hippocampus development and identify an important epigenetic regulator for patterning the dentate gyrus, a brain structure critical for learning, memory and adult neurogenesis.

  7. MYST2 acetyltransferase expression and Histone H4 Lysine acetylation are suppressed in AML.

    Sauer, Tim; Arteaga, Maria Francisca; Isken, Fabienne; Rohde, Christian; Hebestreit, Katja; Mikesch, Jan-Henrik; Stelljes, Matthias; Cui, Chunhong; Zhou, Fengbiao; Göllner, Stefanie; Bäumer, Nicole; Köhler, Gabriele; Krug, Utz; Thiede, Christian; Ehninger, Gerhard; Edemir, Bayram; Schlenke, Peter; Berdel, Wolfgang E; Dugas, Martin; Müller-Tidow, Carsten

    2015-09-01

    Chromatin-modifying enzymes are frequently altered in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). In the current study, we identified MYST2, a core histone acetyltransferase, to be suppressed in blast cells from AML patients compared with nonmalignant hematopoietic progenitor cells. Functionally, loss of MYST2 accelerated leukemic growth and colony formation, while forced expression of MYST2 induced H4K5 acetylation (H4K5Ac) and suppressed hematopoietic progenitor cell growth. Consistently, global H4K5Ac levels were frequently decreased in AML blasts. Low levels of H4K5Ac were most prominent in patients with complex karyotype AML and were associated with inferior overall survival in univariate but not multivariate analysis. ChIP-seq experiments in primary AML patients' blasts revealed widespread H4K5Ac deregulation, most prominent at gene promoters. Taken together, MYST2 is a repressed growth suppressor in AML mediating reduced acetylation of histone 4 at residue 5 and is associated with inferior AML patient survival. PMID:26072331

  8. Disubstituted naphthyl β-D-xylopyranosides: Synthesis, GAG priming, and histone acetyltransferase (HAT) inhibition.

    Thorsheim, Karin; Persson, Andrea; Siegbahn, Anna; Tykesson, Emil; Westergren-Thorsson, Gunilla; Mani, Katrin; Ellervik, Ulf

    2016-04-01

    Xylosides are a group of compounds that can induce glycosaminoglycan (GAG) chain synthesis independently of a proteoglycan core protein. We have previously shown that the xyloside 2-(6-hydroxynaphthyl)β-D-xylopyranoside has a tumor-selective growth inhibitory effect both in vitro and in vivo, and that the effect in vitro was correlated to a reduction in histone H3 acetylation. In addition, GAG chains have previously been reported to inhibit histone acetyltransferases (HAT). To investigate if xylosides, or the corresponding xyloside-primed GAG chains, can be used as HAT inhibitors, we have synthesized a series of naphthoxylosides carrying structural motifs similar to the aromatic moieties of the known HAT inhibitors garcinol and curcumin, and studied their biological activities. Here, we show that the disubstituted naphthoxylosides induced GAG chain synthesis, and that the ones with at least one free phenolic group exhibited moderate HAT inhibition in vitro, without affecting histone H3 acetylation in cell culture. The xyloside-primed GAG chains, on the other hand, had no effect on HAT activity, possibly explaining why the effect of the xylosides on histone H3 acetylation was absent in cell culture as the xylosides were recruited for GAG chain synthesis. Further investigations are required to find xylosides that are effective HAT inhibitors or xylosides producing GAG chains with HAT inhibitory effects. PMID:27023911

  9. Garcinol Inhibits GCN5-Mediated Lysine Acetyltransferase Activity and Prevents Replication of the Parasite Toxoplasma gondii.

    Jeffers, Victoria; Gao, Hongyu; Checkley, Lisa A; Liu, Yunlong; Ferdig, Michael T; Sullivan, William J

    2016-04-01

    Lysine acetylation is a critical posttranslational modification that influences protein activity, stability, and binding properties. The acetylation of histone proteins in particular is a well-characterized feature of gene expression regulation. In the protozoan parasiteToxoplasma gondii, a number of lysine acetyltransferases (KATs) contribute to gene expression and are essential for parasite viability. The natural product garcinol was recently reported to inhibit enzymatic activities of GCN5 and p300 family KATs in other species. Here we show that garcinol inhibits TgGCN5b, the only nuclear GCN5 family KAT known to be required forToxoplasmatachyzoite replication. Treatment of tachyzoites with garcinol led to a reduction of global lysine acetylation, particularly on histone H3 and TgGCN5b itself. We also performed transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq), which revealed increasing aberrant gene expression coincident with increasing concentrations of garcinol. The majority of the genes that were most significantly affected by garcinol were also associated with TgGCN5b in a previously reported chromatin immunoprecipitation assay with microarray technology (ChIP-chip) analysis. The dysregulated gene expression induced by garcinol significantly inhibitsToxoplasmatachyzoite replication, and the concentrations used exhibit no overt toxicity on human host cells. Garcinol also inhibitsPlasmodium falciparumasexual replication with a 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) similar to that forToxoplasma Together, these data support that pharmacological inhibition of TgGCN5b leads to a catastrophic failure in gene expression control that prevents parasite replication. PMID:26810649

  10. N-acetyltransferase Mpr1 confers ethanol tolerance on Saccharomyces cerevisiae by reducing reactive oxygen species

    Du, Xiaoyi [Fukui Prefectural Univ., Fukui (Japan). Dept. of Bioscience; Takagi, Hiroshi [Nara Inst. of Science and Technology, Ikoma, Nara (Japan). Graduate School of Biological Sciences

    2007-07-15

    N-Acetyltransferase Mpr1 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae can reduce intracellular oxidation levels and protect yeast cells under oxidative stress, including H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, heat-shock, or freeze-thaw treatment. Unlike many antioxidant enzyme genes induced in response to oxidative stress, the MPR1 gene seems to be constitutively expressed in yeast cells. Based on a recent report that ethanol toxicity is correlated with the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), we examined here the role of Mpr1 under ethanol stress conditions. The null mutant of the MPR1 and MPR2 genes showed hypersensitivity to ethanol stress, and the expression of the MPR1 gene conferred stress tolerance. We also found that yeast cells exhibited increased ROS levels during exposure to ethanol stress, and that Mpr1 protects yeast cells from ethanol stress by reducing intracellular ROS levels. When the MPR1 gene was overexpressed in antioxidant enzyme-deficient mutants, increased resistance to H{sub 2}O{sub 2} or heat shock was observed in cells lacking the CTA1, CTT1, or GPX1 gene encoding catalase A, catalase T, or glutathione peroxidase, respectively. These results suggest that Mpr1 might compensate the function of enzymes that detoxify H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. Hence, Mpr1 has promising potential for the breeding of novel ethanol-tolerant yeast strains. (orig.)

  11. Response of ATP sulfurylase and serine acetyltransferase towards cadmium in hyperaccumulator Sedum alfredii Hance.

    Guo, Wei-dong; Liang, Jun; Yang, Xiao-e; Chao, Yue-en; Feng, Ying

    2009-04-01

    We studied the responses of the activities of adenosine-triphosphate (ATP) sulfurylase (ATPS) and serine acetyltransferase (SAT) to cadmium (Cd) levels and treatment time in hyperaccumulating ecotype (HE) Sedum alfredii Hance, as compared with its non-hyperaccumulating ecotype (NHE). The results show that plant growth was inhibited in NHE but promoted in HE when exposed to high Cd level. Cd concentrations in leaves and shoots rapidly increased in HE rather than in NHE, and they became much higher in HE than in NHE along with increasing treatment time and Cd supply levels. ATPS activity was higher in HE than in NHE in all Cd treatments, and increased with increasing Cd supply levels in both HE and NHE when exposed to Cd treatment within 8 h. However, a marked difference of ATPS activity between HE and NHE was found with Cd treatment for 168 h, where ATPS activity increased in HE but decreased in NHE. Similarly, SAT activity was higher in HE than in NHE at all Cd treatments, but was more sensitive in NHE than in HE. Both ATPS and SAT activities in NHE leaves tended to decrease with increasing treatment time after 8 h at all Cd levels. The results reveal the different responses in sulfur assimilation enzymes and Cd accumulation between HE and NHE. With increasing Cd stress, the activities of sulfur assimilation enzymes (ATPS and SAT) were induced in HE, which may contribute to Cd accumulation in the hyperaccumulator Sedum alfredii Hance. PMID:19353742

  12. Response of ATP sulfurylase and serine acetyltransferase towards cadmium in hyperaccumulator Sedum alfredii Hance

    Wei-dong GUO; Jun LIANG; Xiao-e YANG; Yue-en CHAO; Ying FENG

    2009-01-01

    We studied the responses of the activities of adenosine-triphosphate (ATP) sulfurylase (ATPS) and serine acetyl-transferase (SAT) to cadmium (Cd) levels and treatment time in hyperaccumulating ecotype (HE) Sedum alfredii Hance, as compared with its non-hyperaccumulating ecotype (NHE). The results show that plant growth was inhibited in NHE but promoted in HE when exposed to high Cd level. Cd concentrations in leaves and shoots rapidly increased in HE rather than in NHE, and they became much higher in HE than in NHE along with increasing treatment time and Cd supply levels. ATPS activity was higher in HE than in NHE in all Cd treatments, and increased with increasing Cd supply levels in both HE and NHE when exposed to Cd treatment within 8 h. However, a marked difference of ATPS activity between HE and NHE was found with Cd treatment for 168 h, where ATPS activity increased in HE but decreased in NHE. Similarly, SAT activity was higher in HE than in NHE at all Cd treatments, but was more sensitive in NHE than in HE. Both ATPS and SAT activities in NHE leaves tended to decrease with increasing treatment time after 8 h at all Cd levels. The results reveal the different responses in sulfur assimilation enzymes and Cd accumulation between HE and NHE. With increasing Cd stress, the activities of sulfur assimilation enzymes (ATPS and SAT) were induced in HE, which may contribute to Cd accumulation in the hyperaccumulator Sedum alfredii Hance.

  13. Response of ATP sulfurylase and serine acetyltransferase towards cadmium in hyperaccumulator Sedum alfredii Hance*

    Guo, Wei-dong; Liang, Jun; Yang, Xiao-e; Chao, Yue-en; Feng, Ying

    2009-01-01

    We studied the responses of the activities of adenosine-triphosphate (ATP) sulfurylase (ATPS) and serine acetyltransferase (SAT) to cadmium (Cd) levels and treatment time in hyperaccumulating ecotype (HE) Sedum alfredii Hance, as compared with its non-hyperaccumulating ecotype (NHE). The results show that plant growth was inhibited in NHE but promoted in HE when exposed to high Cd level. Cd concentrations in leaves and shoots rapidly increased in HE rather than in NHE, and they became much higher in HE than in NHE along with increasing treatment time and Cd supply levels. ATPS activity was higher in HE than in NHE in all Cd treatments, and increased with increasing Cd supply levels in both HE and NHE when exposed to Cd treatment within 8 h. However, a marked difference of ATPS activity between HE and NHE was found with Cd treatment for 168 h, where ATPS activity increased in HE but decreased in NHE. Similarly, SAT activity was higher in HE than in NHE at all Cd treatments, but was more sensitive in NHE than in HE. Both ATPS and SAT activities in NHE leaves tended to decrease with increasing treatment time after 8 h at all Cd levels. The results reveal the different responses in sulfur assimilation enzymes and Cd accumulation between HE and NHE. With increasing Cd stress, the activities of sulfur assimilation enzymes (ATPS and SAT) were induced in HE, which may contribute to Cd accumulation in the hyperaccumulator Sedum alfredii Hance. PMID:19353742

  14. Molecular Evolution of Multiple Arylalkylamine N-Acetyltransferase (AANAT in Fish

    Bina Zilberman-Peled

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase (AANAT catalyzes the transfer of an acetyl group from acetyl coenzyme A (AcCoA to arylalkylamines, including indolethylamines and phenylethylamines. Multiple aanats are present in teleost fish as a result of whole genome and gene duplications. Fish aanat1a and aanat2 paralogs display different patterns of tissue expression and encode proteins with different substrate preference: AANAT1a is expressed in the retina, and acetylates both indolethylamines and phenylethylamines; while AANAT2 is expressed in the pineal gland, and preferentially acetylates indolethylamines. The two enzymes are therefore thought to serve different roles. Here, the molecular changes that led to their specialization were studied by investigating the structure-function relationships of AANATs in the gilthead seabream (sb, Sperus aurata. Acetylation activity of reciprocal mutated enzymes pointed to specific residues that contribute to substrate specificity of the enzymes. Inhibition tests followed by complementary analyses of the predicted three-dimensional models of the enzymes, suggested that both phenylethylamines and indolethylamines bind to the catalytic pocket of both enzymes. These results suggest that substrate selectivity of AANAT1a and AANAT2 is determined by the positioning of the substrate within the catalytic pocket, and its accessibility to catalysis. This illustrates the evolutionary process by which enzymes encoded by duplicated genes acquire different activities and play different biological roles.

  15. Human Neural Stem Cells Overexpressing Choline Acetyltransferase Restore Unconditioned Fear in Rats with Amygdala Injury

    Kyungha Shin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Amygdala is involved in the fear memory that recognizes certain environmental cues predicting threatening events. Manipulation of neurotransmission within the amygdala affects the expression of conditioned and unconditioned emotional memories such as fear freezing behaviour. We previously demonstrated that F3.ChAT human neural stem cells (NSCs overexpressing choline acetyltransferase (ChAT improve cognitive function of Alzheimer’s disease model rats with hippocampal or cholinergic nerve injuries by increasing acetylcholine (ACh level. In the present study, we examined the effect of F3.ChAT cells on the deficit of unconditioned fear freezing. Rats given N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA in their amygdala 2 weeks prior to cat odor exposure displayed very short resting (freezing time compared to normal animals. NMDA induced neuronal degeneration in the amygdala, leading to a decreased ACh concentration in cerebrospinal fluid. However, intracerebroventricular transplantation of F3.ChAT cells attenuated amygdala lesions 4 weeks after transplantation. The transplanted cells were found in the NMDA-injury sites and produced ChAT protein. In addition, F3.ChAT-receiving rats recuperated freezing time staying remote from the cat odor source, according to the recovery of brain ACh concentration. The results indicate that human NSCs overexpressing ChAT may facilitate retrieval of unconditioned fear memory by increasing ACh level.

  16. Human Neural Stem Cells Overexpressing Choline Acetyltransferase Restore Unconditioned Fear in Rats with Amygdala Injury.

    Shin, Kyungha; Cha, Yeseul; Kim, Kwang Sei; Choi, Ehn-Kyoung; Choi, Youngjin; Guo, Haiyu; Ban, Young-Hwan; Kim, Jong-Choon; Park, Dongsun; Kim, Yun-Bae

    2016-01-01

    Amygdala is involved in the fear memory that recognizes certain environmental cues predicting threatening events. Manipulation of neurotransmission within the amygdala affects the expression of conditioned and unconditioned emotional memories such as fear freezing behaviour. We previously demonstrated that F3.ChAT human neural stem cells (NSCs) overexpressing choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) improve cognitive function of Alzheimer's disease model rats with hippocampal or cholinergic nerve injuries by increasing acetylcholine (ACh) level. In the present study, we examined the effect of F3.ChAT cells on the deficit of unconditioned fear freezing. Rats given N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) in their amygdala 2 weeks prior to cat odor exposure displayed very short resting (freezing) time compared to normal animals. NMDA induced neuronal degeneration in the amygdala, leading to a decreased ACh concentration in cerebrospinal fluid. However, intracerebroventricular transplantation of F3.ChAT cells attenuated amygdala lesions 4 weeks after transplantation. The transplanted cells were found in the NMDA-injury sites and produced ChAT protein. In addition, F3.ChAT-receiving rats recuperated freezing time staying remote from the cat odor source, according to the recovery of brain ACh concentration. The results indicate that human NSCs overexpressing ChAT may facilitate retrieval of unconditioned fear memory by increasing ACh level. PMID:27087745

  17. Garcinol, a Histone Acetyltransferase Inhibitor, Radiosensitizes Cancer Cells by Inhibiting Non-Homologous End Joining

    Purpose: Non-homologous end joining (NHEJ), a major pathway used to repair DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) generated by ionizing radiation (IR), requires chromatin remodeling at DSB sites through the acetylation of histones by histone acetyltransferases (HATs). However, the effect of compounds with HAT inhibitory activities on the DNA damage response (DDR), including the NHEJ and cell cycle checkpoint, as well as on the radiosensitivity of cancer cells, remains largely unclear. Here, we investigated whether garcinol, a HAT inhibitor found in the rinds of Garcinia indica fruit (called mangosteens), has effects on DDR, and whether it can be used for radiosensitization. Methods and Materials: The following assays were used to examine the effect of garcinol on the inhibition of DSB repair, including the following: a conventional neutral comet assay; a cell-based assay recently developed by us, in which NHEJ repair of DSBs on chromosomal DNA was evaluated; the micrococcal nuclease sensitivity assay; and immunoblotting for autophosphorylation of DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs). We assessed the effect of garcinol on the cell cycle checkpoint after IR treatment by analyzing the phosphorylation levels of checkpoint kinases CHK1 and CHK2 and histone H3, and by cell cycle profile analysis using flow cytometry. The radiosensitizing effect of garcinol was assessed by a clonogenic survival assay, whereas its effects on apoptosis and senescence were examined by annexin V and senescence-associated β-galactosidase (SA-β-Gal) staining, respectively. Results: We found that garcinol inhibits DSB repair, including NHEJ, without affecting cell cycle checkpoint. Garcinol radiosensitized A549 lung and HeLa cervical carcinoma cells with dose enhancement ratios (at 10% surviving fraction) of 1.6 and 1.5, respectively. Cellular senescence induced by IR was enhanced by garcinol. Conclusion: These results suggest that garcinol is a radiosensitizer that inhibits NHEJ

  18. Garcinol, a Histone Acetyltransferase Inhibitor, Radiosensitizes Cancer Cells by Inhibiting Non-Homologous End Joining

    Oike, Takahiro [Division of Multistep Carcinogenesis, National Cancer Center Research Institute, Chuo-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Division of Genome Biology, National Cancer Center Research Institute, Chuo-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Department of Radiation Oncology, Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, Maebashi, Gunma (Japan); Ogiwara, Hideaki [Division of Genome Biology, National Cancer Center Research Institute, Chuo-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Torikai, Kohta [Gunma University Heavy Ion Medical Center, Maebashi, Gunma (Japan); Nakano, Takashi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, Maebashi, Gunma (Japan); Yokota, Jun [Division of Multistep Carcinogenesis, National Cancer Center Research Institute, Chuo-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Kohno, Takashi, E-mail: tkkohno@ncc.go.jp [Division of Genome Biology, National Cancer Center Research Institute, Chuo-ku, Tokyo (Japan)

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: Non-homologous end joining (NHEJ), a major pathway used to repair DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) generated by ionizing radiation (IR), requires chromatin remodeling at DSB sites through the acetylation of histones by histone acetyltransferases (HATs). However, the effect of compounds with HAT inhibitory activities on the DNA damage response (DDR), including the NHEJ and cell cycle checkpoint, as well as on the radiosensitivity of cancer cells, remains largely unclear. Here, we investigated whether garcinol, a HAT inhibitor found in the rinds of Garcinia indica fruit (called mangosteens), has effects on DDR, and whether it can be used for radiosensitization. Methods and Materials: The following assays were used to examine the effect of garcinol on the inhibition of DSB repair, including the following: a conventional neutral comet assay; a cell-based assay recently developed by us, in which NHEJ repair of DSBs on chromosomal DNA was evaluated; the micrococcal nuclease sensitivity assay; and immunoblotting for autophosphorylation of DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs). We assessed the effect of garcinol on the cell cycle checkpoint after IR treatment by analyzing the phosphorylation levels of checkpoint kinases CHK1 and CHK2 and histone H3, and by cell cycle profile analysis using flow cytometry. The radiosensitizing effect of garcinol was assessed by a clonogenic survival assay, whereas its effects on apoptosis and senescence were examined by annexin V and senescence-associated {beta}-galactosidase (SA-{beta}-Gal) staining, respectively. Results: We found that garcinol inhibits DSB repair, including NHEJ, without affecting cell cycle checkpoint. Garcinol radiosensitized A549 lung and HeLa cervical carcinoma cells with dose enhancement ratios (at 10% surviving fraction) of 1.6 and 1.5, respectively. Cellular senescence induced by IR was enhanced by garcinol. Conclusion: These results suggest that garcinol is a radiosensitizer that

  19. N-Acetyltransferase 2 genetic polymorphisms and risk of colorectal cancer

    Tiago Donizetti da Silva

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To investigate the possible association between meat intake, cigarette smoking and N-acetyltransferase 2 (NAT2 genetic polymorphisms on colorectal cancer (CRC risk.METHODS: Patients with CRC were matched for gender and age to healthy controls. Meat intake and cigarette smoking were assessed using a specific frequency questionnaire. DNA was extracted from peripheral blood and the genotypes of the polymorphism were assessed by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism. Five NAT2 alleles were studied (WT, M1, M2, M3 and M4 using specific digestion enzymes.RESULTS: A total of 147 patients with colorectal cancer (76 women and 90 men with colon cancer and 212 controls were studied. The mean age of the two groups was 62 years. More than half the subjects (59.8% in the case group and 51.9% in the control group were NAT2 slow acetylators. The odds ratio for colorectal cancer was 1.38 (95% CI: 0.90-2.12 in slow acetylators. Although the number of women was small (n = 76 in the case group, the cancer risk was found to be lower in intermediate (W/Mx acetylators [odds ratio (OR: 0.55, 95% confidence interval (95% CI: 0.29-1.02]. This difference was not observed in men (OR: 0.56, 95% CI: 0.16-2.00. Among NAT2 fast acetylators (W/W or W/Mx, meat consumption more than 3 times a week increased the risk of colorectal cancer (OR: 2.05, 95% CI: 1.01-4.16. In contrast, cigarette smoking increased the risk of CRC among slow acetylators (OR: 1.97, 95% CI: 1.02-3.79.CONCLUSION: The risk of CRC was higher among fast acetylators who reported a higher meat intake. Slow NAT2 acetylation was associated with an increased risk of CRC.

  20. N-Acetyltransferase 2 gene polymorphism in a group of senile dementia patients in Shanghai suburb

    Wei-chao GUO; Guo-fang LIN; Yong-lin ZHA; Ke-jian LOU; Qing-wen MA; Jian-hua SHEN

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the possible association of hereditary polymorphism of N-acetyltransferase 2 (NAT2) gene with the susceptibility towards senile dementia in farmer population of Shanghai suburb. METHODS: NAT2 gene genotyping was performed at 7 major polymorphic loci (G191A, C282T, T341C, C481T, G590A, A803G, and .G857A) with a polymerase chain reaction-based restriction fragment length polymorphism based procedure in 2 groups of farmer subjects in Shanghai suburb. A group of 51 diagnosed dementia patients [comprising 29 sporadic Alzheimer disease(AD) patients and 22 sporadic vascular dementia (VD) patients] and a group of 112 healthy individuals were in the same area. RESULTS: The homogenous rapid genotypes (R/R, including*4/*4, *13/*13, and *4/*13) was found over-present in both groups of patients, compared with healthy individuals, for all farmer dementia patients, 52.9 %vs 33.0 %, P=0.016, OR (95 % CI): 2.28(1.16-4.48); for AD group only, 51.7 % vs 33.0 %, P=0.063, OR (95 %CI): 2.18 (0.95-4.97); for VD group 54.5 % vs 33.0 %, P=0.055, OR (95 % CI): 2.43 (0.96-2.43). The significant frequency difference of genotype *4/* 7B between farmer dementia patients and healthy individuals, and that of solo-alleles *13, and *7B were observed between the healthy individuals and both groups of dementia patients.CONCLUSION: Our data suggest the involvement of various NAT2 rapid-acetylating genotypes in the individual susceptibility to senile dementia. Variant genotypes of NAT2 might serve as a hereditary risk factor for AD and VD in Chinese population.

  1. Improvement of L-arginine production by overexpression of a bifunctional ornithine acetyltransferase in Corynebacterium crenatum.

    Dou, Wenfang; Xu, Meijuan; Cai, Dongmei; Zhang, Xiaomei; Rao, Zhiming; Xu, Zhenghong

    2011-10-01

    Ornithine acetyltransferase (EC 2.3.1.35; OATase) gene (argJ) from the L-arginine-producing mutant Corynebacterium crenatum SYPA5-5 was cloned, sequenced, and expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3). Analysis of the argJ sequence revealed that the argJ coded a polypeptide of 388 amino acids with a calculated molecular weight of 39.7 kDa. In this study, the function of the OATase (argJ) of C. crenatum SYPA5-5 has been identified as a conserved ATML sequence for the autolysis of the protein to α- and β-subunits. When the argJ regions corresponding to the α- and β-subunits were cloned and expressed separately in E. coli BL21, OATase activities were abolished. At the same time, a functional study revealed that OATase from C. crenatum SYPA5-5 was a bifunctional enzyme with the functions of acetylglutamate synthase (EC 2.3.1.1, NAGS) and acetylornithine deacetylase (EC 3.5.1.16, AOase) activities. In order to investigate the effects of the overexpression of the argJ gene on L: -arginine production, the argJ gene was inserted into pJCtac to yield the recombinant shuttle plasmid pJCtac-argJ and then transformed into C. crenatum SYPA5-5. The results showed that the engineered strains could not only express more OATase (90.9%) but also increase the production of L: -arginine significantly (16.8%). PMID:21785983

  2. Acetyl coenzyme A: alpha-glucosaminide N-acetyltransferase. Evidence for a transmembrane acetylation mechanism

    The lysosomal membrane enzyme acetyl-CoA: alpha-glucosaminide N-acetyltransferase catalyzes the transfer of an acetyl group from acetyl-CoA to terminal alpha-linked glucosamine residues of heparan sulfate. The reaction mechanism was examined using highly purified lysosomal membranes from rat liver. The reaction was followed by measuring the acetylation of a monosaccharide acetyl acceptor, glucosamine. The enzyme reaction was optimal above pH 5.5, and a 2-3-fold stimulation of activity was observed when the membranes were assayed in the presence of 0.1% taurodeoxycholate. Double reciprocal analysis and product inhibition studies indicated that the enzyme works by a Di-Iso Ping Pong Bi Bi mechanism. Further evidence to support this mechanism was provided by characterization of the enzyme half-reactions. Membranes incubated with acetyl-CoA and [3H]CoA were found to produce acetyl-[3H]CoA. This exchange was optimal at pH values above 7.0. Treating membranes with [3H] acetyl-CoA resulted in the formation of an acetyl-enzyme intermediate. The acetyl group could then be transferred to glucosamine, forming [3H]N-acetylglucosamine. The transfer of the acetyl group from the enzyme to glucosamine was optimal between pH 4 and 5. The results suggest that acetyl-CoA does not cross the lysosomal membrane. Instead, the enzyme is acetylated on the cytoplasmic side of the lysosome and the acetyl group is then transferred to the inside where it is used to acetylate heparan sulfate

  3. The Spt-Ada-Gcn5 Acetyltransferase (SAGA complex in Aspergillus nidulans.

    Paraskevi Georgakopoulos

    Full Text Available A mutation screen in Aspergillus nidulans uncovered mutations in the acdX gene that led to altered repression by acetate, but not by glucose. AcdX of A. nidulans is highly conserved with Spt8p of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and since Spt8p is a component of the Spt-Ada-Gcn5 Acetyltransferase (SAGA complex, the SAGA complex may have a role in acetate repression in A. nidulans. We used a bioinformatic approach to identify genes encoding most members of the SAGA complex in A. nidulans, and a proteomic analysis to confirm that most protein components identified indeed exist as a complex in A. nidulans. No apparent compositional differences were detected in mycelia cultured in acetate compared to glucose medium. The methods used revealed apparent differences between Yeast and A. nidulans in the deubiquitination (DUB module of the complex, which in S. cerevisiae consists of Sgf11p, Sus1p, and Ubp8p. Although a convincing homologue of S. cerevisiae Ubp8p was identified in the A. nidulans genome, there were no apparent homologues for Sus1p and Sgf11p. In addition, when the SAGA complex was purified from A. nidulans, members of the DUB module were not co-purified with the complex, indicating that functional homologues of Sus1p and Sgf11p were not part of the complex. Thus, deubiquitination of H2B-Ub in stress conditions is likely to be regulated differently in A. nidulans compared to S. cerevisiae.

  4. Polymorphisms of arylamine N-acetyltransferase2 and risk of lung and colorectal cancer

    Amjad Mahasneh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The arylamine N-acetyltransferase 2 (NAT2 enzymes detoxify a wide range of naturally occurring xenobiotics including carcinogens and drugs. Point mutations in the NAT2 gene result in the variant alleles M1 (NAT2 *5A, M2 (NAT2*6A, M3 (NAT2*7 and M4 (NAT2 *14A from the wild-type WT (NAT2 *4 allele. The current study was aimed at screening genetic polymorphisms of NAT2 gene in 49 lung cancer patients, 54 colorectal cancer patients and 99 cancer-free controls, using PCR-RFLP. There were significant differences in allele frequencies between lung cancer patients and controls in the WT, M2 and M3 alleles (p < 0.05. However, only M2 and M3 allele frequencies were different between colorectal cancer patients and controls (p < 0.05. There was a marginal significant difference in the distribution of rapid and slow acetylator genotypes between lung cancer patients and controls (p = 0.06 and p = 0.05, respectively, but not between colorectal cancer patients and controls (p = 1.0 and p = 0.95, respectively. Risk of lung cancer development was found to be lower in slow acetylators [odds ratio (OR: 0.51, 95% confidence interval (95% CI: 0.25, 1.02, p-value = 0.07]. No effect was observed in case of colorectal cancer. Our results showed that NAT2 genotypes and phenotypes might be involved in lung cancer but not colorectal cancer susceptibility in Jordan.

  5. Characterization and kinetic mechanism of mono- and bifunctional ornithine acetyltransferases from thermophilic microorganisms.

    Marc, F; Weigel, P; Legrain, C; Almeras, Y; Santrot, M; Glansdorff, N; Sakanyan, V

    2000-08-01

    The argJ gene coding for N2-acetyl-L-ornithine: L-glutamate N-acetyltransferase, the key enzyme involved in the acetyl cycle of L-arginine biosynthesis, has been cloned from thermophilic procaryotes: the archaeon Methanoccocus jannaschii, and the bacteria Thermotoga neapolitana and Bacillus stearothermophilus. Archaeal argJ only complements an Escherichia coli argE mutant (deficient in acetylornithinase, which catalyzes the fifth step in the linear biosynthetic pathway), whereas bacterial genes additionally complement an argA mutant (deficient in N-acetylglutamate synthetase, the first enzyme of the pathway). In keeping with these in vivo data the purified His-tagged ArgJ enzyme of M. jannaschii only catalyzes N2-acetylornithine conversion to ornithine, whereas T. neapolitana and B. stearothermophilus ArgJ also catalyze the conversion of glutamate to N-acetylglutamate using acetylCoA as the acetyl donor. M. jannaschii ArgJ is therefore a monofunctional enzyme, whereas T. neapolitana and B. stearothermophilus encoded ArgJ are bifunctional. Kinetic data demonstrate that in all three thermophilic organisms ArgJ-mediated catalysis follows ping-pong bi-bi kinetic mechanism. Acetylated ArgJ intermediates were detected in semireactions using [14C]acetylCoA or [14C]N2-acetyl-L-glutamate as acetyl donors. In this catalysis L-ornithine acts as an inhibitor; this amino acid therefore appears to be a key regulatory molecule in the acetyl cycle of L-arginine synthesis. Thermophilic ArgJ are synthesized as protein precursors undergoing internal cleavage to generate alpha and beta subunits which appear to assemble to alpha2beta2 heterotetramers in E. coli. The cleavage occurs between alanine and threonine residues within the highly conserved PXM-ATML motif detected in all available ArgJ sequences. PMID:10931207

  6. Benzodiazepines: rat pinealocyte binding sites and augmentation of norepinephrine-stimulated N-acetyltransferase activity

    Matthew, E.; Parfitt, A.G.; Sugden, D.; Engelhardt, D.L.; Zimmerman, E.A.; Klein, D.C.

    1984-02-01

    Studies of (/sup 3/H)diazepam binding to intact rat pineal cells were carried out in tissue culture preparations. The binding was saturable, reversible and proportional to the number of cells used. Scatchard analysis resulted in a linear plot (Kd . 23 nM, maximum binding sites (Bmax) . 1.56 pmol/mg of protein for cells in monolayer culture; Kd . 7 nM, Bmax . 1.3 pmol/mg of protein for cells in suspension culture). Inhibition constants (Ki) for clonazepam (500 nM), flunitrazepam (38 nM) and Ro-5-4864 (5 nM) indicated that the binding sites were probably of the ''peripheral'' type. In addition, the effects of diazepam on norepinephrine-stimulated N-acetyltransferase (NAT) activity were studied in organ culture and dissociated cell culture. Diazepam (10-50 microM) both prolonged and increased the magnitude of the norepinephrine-induced increase in NAT activity but did not affect the initial rate of rise of enzyme activity. The effect was dose-dependent and was also seen with clonazepam, flunitrazepam and Ro-5-4864, but not with Ro-15-1788. Diazepam, by itself, at these concentrations, had no effect on NAT, but enzyme activity was increased by higher concentrations (0.1-1 mM). Although a relationship between the (/sup 3/H)diazepam binding sites described here and the effect of benzodiazepines on NAT cannot be established from these studies, the data suggest that the benzodiazepines may alter melatonin levels through their action on NAT.

  7. Benzodiazepines: rat pinealocyte binding sites and augmentation of norepinephrine-stimulated N-acetyltransferase activity

    Studies of [3H]diazepam binding to intact rat pineal cells were carried out in tissue culture preparations. The binding was saturable, reversible and proportional to the number of cells used. Scatchard analysis resulted in a linear plot [Kd . 23 nM, maximum binding sites (Bmax) . 1.56 pmol/mg of protein for cells in monolayer culture; Kd . 7 nM, Bmax . 1.3 pmol/mg of protein for cells in suspension culture]. Inhibition constants (Ki) for clonazepam (500 nM), flunitrazepam (38 nM) and Ro-5-4864 (5 nM) indicated that the binding sites were probably of the ''peripheral'' type. In addition, the effects of diazepam on norepinephrine-stimulated N-acetyltransferase (NAT) activity were studied in organ culture and dissociated cell culture. Diazepam (10-50 microM) both prolonged and increased the magnitude of the norepinephrine-induced increase in NAT activity but did not affect the initial rate of rise of enzyme activity. The effect was dose-dependent and was also seen with clonazepam, flunitrazepam and Ro-5-4864, but not with Ro-15-1788. Diazepam, by itself, at these concentrations, had no effect on NAT, but enzyme activity was increased by higher concentrations (0.1-1 mM). Although a relationship between the [3H]diazepam binding sites described here and the effect of benzodiazepines on NAT cannot be established from these studies, the data suggest that the benzodiazepines may alter melatonin levels through their action on NAT

  8. The MYST histone acetyltransferases are essential for gametophyte development in Arabidopsis

    Zhou Dao-Xiu

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Histone acetyltransferases (HATs play critical roles in the regulation of chromatin structure and gene expression. Arabidopsis genome contains 12 HAT genes, but the biological functions of many of them are still unknown. In this work, we studied the evolutionary relationship and cellular functions of the two Arabidopsis HAT genes homologous to the MYST family members. Results An extensive phylogenetic analysis of 105 MYST proteins revealed that they can be divided into 5 classes, each of which contains a specific combination of protein modules. The two Arabidopsis MYST proteins, HAM1 and HAM2, belong to a "green clade", clearly separated from other families of HATs. Using a reverse genetic approach, we show that HAM1 and HAM2 are a functionally redundant pair of genes, as single Arabidopsis ham1 and ham2 mutants displayed a wild-type phenotype, while no double mutant seedling could be recovered. Genetic analysis and cytological study revealed that ham1ham2 double mutation induced severe defects in the formation of male and female gametophyte, resulting in an arrest of mitotic cell cycle at early stages of gametogenesis. RT-PCR experiments and the analysis of transgenic plants expressing the GUS reporter gene under the HAM1 or the HAM2 promoter showed that both genes displayed an overlapping expression pattern, mainly in growing organs such as shoots and flower buds. Conclusion The work presented here reveals novel properties for MYST HATs in Arabidopsis. In addition to providing an evolutionary relationship of this large protein family, we show the evidence of a link between MYST and gamete formation as previously suggested in mammalian cells. A possible function of the Arabidopsis MYST protein-mediated histone acetylation during cell division is suggested.

  9. N-acetyltransferase 2, exposure to aromatic and heterocyclic amines, and receptor-defined breast cancer.

    Rabstein, Sylvia; Brüning, Thomas; Harth, Volker; Fischer, Hans-Peter; Haas, Susanne; Weiss, Tobias; Spickenheuer, Anne; Pierl, Christiane; Justenhoven, Christina; Illig, Thomas; Vollmert, Caren; Baisch, Christian; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Hamann, Ute; Brauch, Hiltrud; Pesch, Beate

    2010-03-01

    The role of N-acetyltransferase 2 (NAT2) polymorphism in breast cancer is still unclear. We explored the associations between potential sources of exposure to aromatic and heterocyclic amines (AHA), acetylation status and receptor-defined breast cancer in 1020 incident cases and 1047 population controls of the German GENICA study. Acetylation status was assessed as slow or fast. Therefore, NAT2 haplotypes were estimated using genotype information from six NAT2 polymorphisms. Most probable haplotypes served as alleles for the deduction of NAT2 acetylation status. The risks of developing estrogen receptor alpha (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR)-positive or negative tumors were estimated for tobacco smoking, consumption of red meat, grilled food, coffee, and tea, as well as expert-rated occupational exposure to AHA with logistic regression conditional on age and adjusted for potential confounders. Joint effects of these factors and NAT2 acetylation status were investigated. Frequent consumption of grilled food and coffee showed higher risks in slow acetylators for receptor-negative tumors [grilled food: ER-: odds ratio (OR) 2.57, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.07-6.14 for regular vs. rare; coffee: ER-: OR 2.55, 95% CI 1.22-5.33 for >or=4 vs. 0 cups/day]. We observed slightly higher risks for never smokers that are fast acetylators for receptor-positive tumors compared with slow acetylators (ER-: OR 1.32, 95% CI 1.00-1.73). Our results support differing risk patterns for receptor-defined breast cancer. However, the modifying role of NAT2 for receptor-defined breast cancer is difficult to interpret in the light of complex mixtures of exposure to AHA. PMID:19996973

  10. N-Acetyltransferase 2 genetic polymorphisms and risk of colorectal cancer

    Tiago Donizetti da Silva; Aledson Vitor Felipe; Jacqueline Miranda de Lima; Celina Tizuko Fujiyama Oshima; Nora Manoukian Forones

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the possible association between meat intake, cigarette smoking and N-acetyltransferase 2 (NAT2) genetic polymorphisms on colorectal cancer (CRC) risk.METHODS: Patients with CRC were matched for gender and age to healthy controls. Meat intake and cigarette smoking were assessed using a specific frequency questionnaire. DNA was extracted from peripheral blood and the genotypes of the polymorphism were assessed by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism. Five NAT2 alleles were studied (WT, M1,M2, M3 and M4) using specific digestion enzymes.RESULTS: A total of 147 patients with colorectal cancer (76 women and 90 men with colon cancer) and 212 controls were studied. The mean age of the two groups was 62 years. More than half the subjects (59.8% in the case group and 51.9% in the control group) were NAT2 slow acetylators. The odds ratio for colorectal cancer was 1.38 (95% CI: 0.90-2.12) in slow acetylators. Although the number of women was small (n = 76 in the case group),the cancer risk was found to be lower in intermediate (W/Mx) acetylators [odds ratio (OR): 0.55, 95% confidence interval (95% CI): 0.29-1.02]. This difference was not observed in men (OR: 0.56, 95% CI: 0.16-2.00). Among NAT2 fast acetylators (W/W or W/Mx), meat consumption more than 3 times a week increased the risk of colorectal cancer (OR: 2.05, 95% CI: 1.01-4.16). In contrast,cigarette smoking increased the risk of CRC among slow acetylators (OR: 1.97, 95% CI: 1.02-3.79).CONCLUSION: The risk of CRC was higher among fast acetylators who reported a higher meat intake. Slow NAT2 acetylation was associated with an increased risk of CRC.

  11. Estrogen intervention in microvascular morphology and choline acetyltransferase expression in rat hippocampal neurons in chronic cerebral ischemia

    Zhenjun Yang; Hongwei Yan; Guomin Zhang; Zhihong Chen; Jingfeng Xue

    2011-01-01

    We observed dynamic changes in microvessels and a protective effect of estrogen on chronic cerebral ischemia ovariectomized rat models established through permanent occlusion of bilateral carotid arteries at 7, 14 and 21 days. The results revealed that estrogen improved microvasculature in the hippocampus of chronic cerebral ischemic rats, upregulated Bcl-2 protein expression, downregulated Bax protein expression, increased choline acetyltransferase expression in hippocampal cholinergic neurons, and suppressed hippocampal neuronal apoptosis. These findings indicate that estrogen can protect hippocampal neurons in rats with chronic cerebral ischemia.

  12. Three-dimensional structure of a Streptomyces sviceus GNAT acetyltransferase with similarity to the C-terminal domain of the human GH84 O-GlcNAcase

    The crystal structure of a bacterial acetyltransferase with 27% sequence identity to the C-terminal domain of human O-GlcNAcase has been solved at 1.5 Å resolution. This S. sviceus protein is compared with known GCN5-related acetyltransferases, adding to the diversity observed in this superfamily. The mammalian O-GlcNAc hydrolysing enzyme O-GlcNAcase (OGA) is a multi-domain protein with glycoside hydrolase activity in the N-terminus and with a C-terminal domain that has low sequence similarity to known acetyltransferases, prompting speculation, albeit controversial, that the C-terminal domain may function as a histone acetyltransferase (HAT). There are currently scarce data available regarding the structure and function of this C-terminal region. Here, a bacterial homologue of the human OGA C-terminal domain, an acetyltransferase protein (accession No. ZP-05014886) from Streptomyces sviceus (SsAT), was cloned and its crystal structure was solved to high resolution. The structure reveals a conserved protein core that has considerable structural homology to the acetyl-CoA (AcCoA) binding site of GCN5-related acetyltransferases (GNATs). Calorimetric data further confirm that SsAT is indeed able to bind AcCoA in solution with micromolar affinity. Detailed structural analysis provided insight into the binding of AcCoA. An acceptor-binding cavity was identified, indicating that the physiological substrate of SsAT may be a small molecule. Consistent with recently published work, the SsAT structure further questions a HAT function for the human OGA domain

  13. Three-dimensional structure of a Streptomyces sviceus GNAT acetyltransferase with similarity to the C-terminal domain of the human GH84 O-GlcNAcase

    He, Yuan [Northwest University, Xi’an 710069 (China); The University of York, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); Roth, Christian; Turkenburg, Johan P.; Davies, Gideon J., E-mail: gideon.davies@york.ac.uk [The University of York, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); Northwest University, Xi’an 710069 (China)

    2014-01-01

    The crystal structure of a bacterial acetyltransferase with 27% sequence identity to the C-terminal domain of human O-GlcNAcase has been solved at 1.5 Å resolution. This S. sviceus protein is compared with known GCN5-related acetyltransferases, adding to the diversity observed in this superfamily. The mammalian O-GlcNAc hydrolysing enzyme O-GlcNAcase (OGA) is a multi-domain protein with glycoside hydrolase activity in the N-terminus and with a C-terminal domain that has low sequence similarity to known acetyltransferases, prompting speculation, albeit controversial, that the C-terminal domain may function as a histone acetyltransferase (HAT). There are currently scarce data available regarding the structure and function of this C-terminal region. Here, a bacterial homologue of the human OGA C-terminal domain, an acetyltransferase protein (accession No. ZP-05014886) from Streptomyces sviceus (SsAT), was cloned and its crystal structure was solved to high resolution. The structure reveals a conserved protein core that has considerable structural homology to the acetyl-CoA (AcCoA) binding site of GCN5-related acetyltransferases (GNATs). Calorimetric data further confirm that SsAT is indeed able to bind AcCoA in solution with micromolar affinity. Detailed structural analysis provided insight into the binding of AcCoA. An acceptor-binding cavity was identified, indicating that the physiological substrate of SsAT may be a small molecule. Consistent with recently published work, the SsAT structure further questions a HAT function for the human OGA domain.

  14. A unique GCN5-related glucosamine N-acetyltransferase region exist in the fungal multi-domain glycoside hydrolase family 3 β-N-acetylglucosaminidase.

    Qin, Zhen; Xiao, Yibei; Yang, Xinbin; Mesters, Jeroen R; Yang, Shaoqing; Jiang, Zhengqiang

    2015-01-01

    Glycoside hydrolase (GH) family 3 β-N-acetylglucosaminidases widely exist in the filamentous fungi, which may play a key role in chitin metabolism of fungi. A multi-domain GH family 3 β-N-acetylglucosaminidase from Rhizomucor miehei (RmNag), exhibiting a potential N-acetyltransferase region, has been recently reported to show great potential in industrial applications. In this study, the crystal structure of RmNag was determined at 2.80 Å resolution. The three-dimensional structure of RmNag showed four distinctive domains, which belong to two distinguishable functional regions--a GH family 3 β-N-acetylglucosaminidase region (N-terminal) and a N-acetyltransferase region (C-terminal). From structural and functional analysis, the C-terminal region of RmNag was identified as a unique tandem array linking general control non-derepressible 5 (GCN5)-related N-acetyltransferase (GNAT), which displayed glucosamine N-acetyltransferase activity. Structural analysis of this glucosamine N-acetyltransferase region revealed that a unique glucosamine binding pocket is located in the pantetheine arm binding terminal region of the conserved CoA binding pocket, which is different from all known GNAT members. This is the first structural report of a glucosamine N-acetyltransferase, which provides novel structural information about substrate specificity of GNATs. The structural and functional features of this multi-domain β-N-acetylglucosaminidase could be useful in studying the catalytic mechanism of GH family 3 proteins. PMID:26669854

  15. The chromatin remodeling factor CSB recruits histone acetyltransferase PCAF to rRNA gene promoters in active state for transcription initiation.

    Meili Shen

    Full Text Available The promoters of poised rRNA genes (rDNA are marked by both euchromatic and heterochromatic histone modifications and are associated with two transcription factors, UBF and SL1 that nucleate transcription complex formation. Active rRNA genes contain only euchromatic histone modifications and are loaded with all components of transcriptional initiation complex including RNA polymerase I. Coupled with histone acetylation and RNA polymerase I targeting, poised promoters can be converted to active ones by ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling factor CSB for initiation of rDNA transcription. However, it is not clear how dynamic histone modifications induce the assembly of polymerase I transcription initiation complex to active promoters during such conversion. Here we show that a complex consisting of CSB, RNA polymerase I and histone acetyltransferase PCAF is present at the rDNA promoters in active state. CSB is required for the association of PCAF with rDNA, which induces acetylation of histone H4 and histone H3K9. Overexpression of CSB promotes the association of PCAF with rDNA. Knockdown of PCAF leads to decreased levels of H4ac and H3K9ac at rDNA promoters, prevents the association of RNA polymerase I and inhibits pre-rRNA synthesis. The results demonstrate that CSB recruits PCAF to rDNA, which allows histone acetylation that is required for the assembly of polymerase I transcription initiation complex during the transition from poised to active state of rRNA genes, suggesting that CSB and PCAF play cooperative roles to establish the active state of rRNA genes by histone acetylation.

  16. Three-dimensional collagen I promotes gemcitabine resistance in vitro in pancreatic cancer cells through HMGA2-dependent histone acetyltransferase expression.

    Surabhi Dangi-Garimella

    Full Text Available Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC is associated with a pronounced collagen-rich stromal reaction that has been shown to contribute to chemo-resistance. We have previously shown that PDAC cells are resistant to gemcitabine chemotherapy in the collagen microenvironment because of increased expression of the chromatin remodeling protein high mobility group A2 (HMGA2. We have now found that human PDAC tumors display higher levels of histone H3K9 and H3K27 acetylation in fibrotic regions. We show that relative to cells grown on tissue culture plastic, PDAC cells grown in three-dimensional collagen gels demonstrate increased histone H3K9 and H3K27 acetylation, along with increased expression of p300, PCAF and GCN5 histone acetyltransferases (HATs. Knocking down HMGA2 attenuates the effect of collagen on histone H3K9 and H3K27 acetylation and on collagen-induced p300, PCAF and GCN5 expression. We also show that human PDAC tumors with HMGA2 demonstrate increased histone H3K9 and H3K27 acetylation. Additionally, we show that cells in three-dimensional collagen gels demonstrate increased protection against gemcitabine. Significantly, down-regulation of HMGA2 or p300, PCAF and GCN5 HATs sensitizes the cells to gemcitabine in three-dimensional collagen. Overall, our results increase our understanding of how the collagen microenvironment contributes to chemo-resistance in vitro and identify HATs as potential therapeutic targets against this deadly cancer.

  17. Polymorphisms in the Human Cytochrome P450 and Arylamine N-Acetyltransferase: Susceptibility to Head and Neck Cancers

    Rim Khlifi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The occurrence of head and neck cancer (HNC is associated with smoking and alcohol drinking. Tobacco smoking exposes smokers to a series of carcinogenic chemicals. Cytochrome P450 enzymes (CYP450s, such as CYP1A1, CYP1B1, and CYP2D6, usually metabolize carcinogens to their inactive derivatives, but they occasionally convert the chemicals to more potent carcinogens. In addition, via CYP450 (CYP2E1 oxidase, alcohol is metabolized to acetaldehyde, a highly toxic compound, which plays an important role in carcinogenesis. Furthermore, two N-acetyltransferase isozymes (NATs, NAT1 and NAT2, are polymorphic and catalyze both N-acetylation and O-acetylation of aromatic and heterocyclic amine carcinogens. Genetic polymorphisms are associated with a number of enzymes involved in the metabolism of carcinogens important in the induction of HNC. It has been suggested that such polymorphisms may be linked to cancer susceptibility. In this paper, we select four cytochrome P450 enzymes (CYP1A1, CYP1BA1, CYP2D6, and CYP2E1, and two N-acetyltransferase isozymes (NAT1 and NAT2 in order to summarize and analyze findings from the literature related to HNC risk by focusing on (i the interaction between these genes and the environment, (ii the impact of genetic defect on protein activity and/or expression, and (iii the eventual involvement of race in such associations.

  18. Biochemical evidence for relaxed substrate specificity of Nα-acetyltransferase (Rv3420c/rimI) of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Pathak, Deepika; Bhat, Aadil Hussain; Sapehia, Vandana; Rai, Jagdish; Rao, Alka

    2016-01-01

    Nα-acetylation is a naturally occurring irreversible modification of N-termini of proteins catalyzed by Nα-acetyltransferases (NATs). Although present in all three domains of life, it is little understood in bacteria. The functional grouping of NATs into six types NatA - NatF, in eukaryotes is based on subunit requirements and stringent substrate specificities. Bacterial orthologs are phylogenetically divergent from eukaryotic NATs, and only a couple of them are characterized biochemically. Accordingly, not much is known about their substrate specificities. Rv3420c of Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a NAT ortholog coding for RimI(Mtb). Using in vitro peptide-based enzyme assays and mass-spectrometry methods, we provide evidence that RimI(Mtb) is a protein Nα-acetyltransferase of relaxed substrate specificity mimicking substrate specificities of eukaryotic NatA, NatC and most competently that of NatE. Also, hitherto unknown acetylation of residues namely, Asp, Glu, Tyr and Leu by a bacterial NAT (RimI(Mtb)) is elucidated, in vitro. Based on in vivo acetylation status, in vitro assay results and genetic context, a plausible cellular substrate for RimI(Mtb) is proposed. PMID:27353550

  19. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray characterization of arylamine N-acetyltransferase C (BanatC) from Bacillus anthracis

    Bacillus anthracis arylamine N-acetyltransferase C (BanatC) is an enzyme that metabolizes the drug sulfamethoxazole. Crystals of the purified enzyme that diffract at 1.95 Å are reported. The arylamine N-acetyltransferase (NAT) enzymes are xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes that have been found in a large range of eukaryotes and prokaryotes. These enzymes catalyse the acetylation of arylamine drugs and/or pollutants. Recently, a Bacillus anthracis NAT isoform (BanatC) has been cloned and shown to acetylate the sulfonamide antimicrobial sulfamethoxazole (SMX). Subsequently, it was shown that BanatC contributes to the resistance of this bacterium to SMX. Here, the crystallization and the X-ray characterization of BanatC (Y38F mutant) are reported. The crystals belong to the tetragonal space group P41212 or P43212, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 53.70, c = 172.40 Å, and diffract to 1.95 Å resolution on a synchrotron source

  20. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of the aminoglycoside-6′-acetyltransferase AAC(6′)-Im

    AAC(6′)-Im is an N-acetyltransferase enzyme responsible for aminoglycoside resistance in E. faecium and E. coli isolates. Crystals of the kanamycin complex of this enzyme have been prepared and preliminary X-ray diffraction experiments have been undertaken. Bacterial resistance to the aminoglycoside antibiotics is primarily the result of enzymatic deactivation of the drugs. The aminoglycoside N-acetyltransferases (AACs) are a large family of bacterial enzymes that are responsible for coenzyme-A-facilitated acetylation of aminoglycosides. The gene encoding one of these enzymes, AAC(6′)-Im, has been cloned and the protein (comprising 178 amino-acid residues) was expressed in Escherichia coli, purified and crystallized as the kanamycin complex. Synchrotron diffraction data to approximately 2.0 Å resolution were collected from a crystal of this complex on beamline BL12-2 at SSRL (Stanford, California, USA). The crystals belonged to the hexagonal space group P65, with approximate unit-cell parameters a = 107.75, c = 37.33 Å, and contained one molecule in the asymmetric unit. Structure determination is under way using molecular replacement

  1. Histone acetyltransferase HAT4 modulates navigation across G2/M and re-entry into G1 in Leishmania donovani.

    Yadav, Aarti; Chandra, Udita; Saha, Swati

    2016-01-01

    Histone acetyltransferases impact multiple processes. This study investigates the role of histone acetyltransferase HAT4 in Leishmania donovani. Though HAT4 was dispensable for survival, its elimination decreased cell viability and caused cell cycle defects, with HAT4-nulls experiencing an unusually long G2/M. Survival of HAT4-nulls in macrophages was also substantially compromised. DNA microarray analysis revealed that HAT4 modestly regulated the expression of only a select number of genes, thus not being a major modulator of global gene expression. Significantly, cdc20 was among the downregulated genes. To ascertain if decreased expression of cdc20 was responsible for HAT4-null growth and cell cycle defects we expressed LdCdc20 ectopically in HAT4-nulls. We found this to alleviate the aberrant growth and cell cycle progression patterns displayed by HAT4-nulls, with cells navigating G2/M phase and re-entering G1 phase smoothly. HAT4-nulls expressing LdCdc20 ectopically showed survival rates comparable to wild type within macrophages, suggesting that G2/M defects were responsible for poor survival of HAT4-nulls within host cells also. These are the first data analyzing the in vivo functional role of HAT4 in any trypanosomatid. Our results directly demonstrate for the first time a role for Cdc20 in regulating trypanosomatid G2/M events, opening avenues for further research in this area. PMID:27272906

  2. The human serotonin N-acetyltransferase (EC 2.3.1.87) gene (AANAT): Structure, chromosomal localization, and tissue expression

    Coon, S.L.; Bernard, M.; Roseboom, P.H. [National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States)] [and others

    1996-05-15

    Serotonin N-acetyltransferase (arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase, AA-NAT, HGMW-approved symbol AANAT;EC 2.3.1.87) is the penultimate enzyme in melatonin synthesis and controls the night/day rhythm in melatonin production in the vertebrate pineal gland. We have found that the human AA-NAT gene spans {approx}2.5 kb, contains four exons, and is located at chromosome 17q25. The open reading frame encodes a 23.2-kDa protein that is {approx}80% identical to sheep and rat AA-NAT. The AA-NAT transcript ({approx}1 kb) is highly abundant in the pineal gland and is expressed at lower levels in the retina and in the Y79 retinoblastoma cell line. AA-NAT mRNA is also detectable at low levels in several brain regions and the pituitary gland, but not in several peripheral tissues examined. Brain and pituitary AA-NAT could modulate serotonin-dependent aspects of human behavior and pituitary function. 31 refs., 5 figs.

  3. Biochemical evidence for relaxed substrate specificity of Nα-acetyltransferase (Rv3420c/rimI) of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Pathak, Deepika; Bhat, Aadil Hussain; Sapehia, Vandana; Rai, Jagdish; Rao, Alka

    2016-01-01

    Nα-acetylation is a naturally occurring irreversible modification of N-termini of proteins catalyzed by Nα-acetyltransferases (NATs). Although present in all three domains of life, it is little understood in bacteria. The functional grouping of NATs into six types NatA - NatF, in eukaryotes is based on subunit requirements and stringent substrate specificities. Bacterial orthologs are phylogenetically divergent from eukaryotic NATs, and only a couple of them are characterized biochemically. Accordingly, not much is known about their substrate specificities. Rv3420c of Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a NAT ortholog coding for RimIMtb. Using in vitro peptide-based enzyme assays and mass-spectrometry methods, we provide evidence that RimIMtb is a protein Nα-acetyltransferase of relaxed substrate specificity mimicking substrate specificities of eukaryotic NatA, NatC and most competently that of NatE. Also, hitherto unknown acetylation of residues namely, Asp, Glu, Tyr and Leu by a bacterial NAT (RimIMtb) is elucidated, in vitro. Based on in vivo acetylation status, in vitro assay results and genetic context, a plausible cellular substrate for RimIMtb is proposed. PMID:27353550

  4. Plasmodium falciparum Histone Acetyltransferase, a Yeast GCN5 Homologue Involved in Chromatin Remodeling

    QiFan; LijiaAn; LiwangCui

    2005-01-01

    The yeast transcriptional coactivator GCN5 (yGCN5), a histone acetyltransferase (HAT), is part of large multimeric complexes that are required for chromatin remodeling and transcriptional activation. Like other eukaryotes, the malaria parasite DNA is organized into nucleosomes and the genome encodes components of chromatin-remodeling complexes. Here we show that GCN5 is conserved in Plasmodium species and that the most homologous regions are within the HAT domain and the bromodomain. The Plasmodiumfalclparum GCN5 homologue (PfGCN5) is spliced with three introns, encoding a protein of 1,464 residues. Mapping of the ends of the PfGCN5 transcript suggests that the mRNA is 5.2 to 5.4 kb, consistent with the result from Northern analysis. Using free core histones, we determined that recombinant PfGCN5 proteins have conserved HAT activity with a substrate preference for histone H3. Using substrate-specific antibodies, we determined that both Lys-8 and -14 of H3 were acetylated by the recombinant PfGCN5. In eukaryotes, GCN5 homologues interact with yeast ADA2 homologues and form large multiprotein HAT complexes. We have identified an ADA2 homologue in P. falciparum, PfADA2. Yeast two-hybrid and in vitro binding assays verified the interactions between PfGCN5 and PfADA2, suggesting that they may be associated with each other in vivo. The conserved function of the HAT domain in PfGCN5 was further illustrated with yeast complementation experiments, which showed that the PfGCN5 region corresponding to the full-length yGCN5 could partially complement the yGCN5 deletion mutation. Furthermore, a chimera comprising the PfGCN5 HAT domain fused to the remainder of yeast GCN5 (yGCN5) fully rescued the yGCN5 deletion mutant. These data demonstrate that PfGCN5 is an authentic GCN5 family member and may exist in chromatin-remodeling complexes to regulate gene expression in P. falciparum.

  5. Over-expression, purification, and characterization of recombinant human arylamine N-acetyltransferase 1.

    Wang, Haiqing; Vath, Gregory M; Kawamura, Akane; Bates, Caleb A; Sim, Edith; Hanna, Patrick E; Wagner, Carston R

    2005-02-01

    Human arylamine N-acetyltransferase 1 (NAT1) has been overexpressed in E. coli as a mutant dihydrofolic acid reductase (DHFR) fusion protein with a thrombin sensitive linker. An initial DEAE anion-exchange chromatography resulted in partial purification of the fusion protein. The fusion protein was cleaved with thrombin, and human rNAT1 was purified with a second DEAE column. A total of 8 mg of human rNAT1 from 2 1 of cell culture was purified to homogeneity with this methodology. Arylamine substrate specificities were determined for human rNATI and hamster rNAT2. With both NATs, the second order rate constants (k(cat)/ Kmb) for p-aminobenzoic acid (PABA) and 2-aminofluorene (2-AF) were several thousand-fold higher than those for procainamide (PA), consistent with the expected substrate specificities of the enzymes. However, p-aminosalicylic acid (PAS), previously reported to be a human NAT1 and hamster NAT2 selective substrate, exhibits 20-fold higher specificity for hamster rNAT2 (k(cat)/Kmb 3410 microM(-1) s(-1)) than for human rNAT1 (k(cat)/Kmb 169.4 microM(-1) s(-1)). p-aminobenzoyl-glutamic acid (pABglu) was acetylated 10-fold more efficiently by human rNAT1 than by hamster rNAT2. Inhibition studies of human rNAT1 and hamster rNAT2 revealed that folic acid and methotrexate (MTX) are competitive inhibitors of both the unacetylated and acetylated forms of the enzymes, with K(I) values in 50 - 300 micro range. Dihydrofolic acid (DHF) was a much poorer inhibitor of human rNAT1 than of hamster rNAT2. The combined results demonstrate that human rNAT1 and hamster rNAT2 have similar but distinct kinetic properties with certain substrates, and suggest that folic acid, at least in the non-polyglutamate form, may not have an effect on human NAT1 activity in vivo. PMID:16003948

  6. Urinary acetylated metabolites and N-acetyltransferase-2 genotype in human subjects treated with a para-phenylenediamine-containing oxidative hair dye

    Nohynek, G.J.; Skare, J.A.; Meuling, W.J.A.; Hein, D.W.; Bie, A.T.H.J. de; Toutain, H.

    2004-01-01

    In the organism of mammals, important detoxification pathways of arylamines are catalysed by N-acetyltransferase 2 (NAT2). A recent case-control epidemiology study suggested that human NAT2 slow acetylators exposed to oxidative hair dyes may be at greater risk to develop bladder cancer. We therefore

  7. Bioprospecting for Trichothecene 3-O-acetyltransferases in the fungal genus Fusarium yields functional enzymes that vary in their Aaility to modify the mycotoxin deoxynivalenol

    The trichothecene mycotoxin deoxynivalenol (DON) is a common contaminant of small grains, such as wheat and barley, in the United States. New strategies to mitigate the threat of DON need to be developed and implemented. TRI101 and TRI201 are trichothecene 3-O-acetyltransferases that are able to mod...

  8. Resistance to glufosinate is proportional to phosphinothricin acetyltransferase expression and activity in LibertyLink® and WideStrike® Cotton

    LibertyLink® cotton cultivars are engineered for glufosinate resistance by overexpressing the bar gene that encodes phosphinothricin acetyltransferase (PAT), whereas the insect-resistant WideStrike® cultivars were obtained by using the similar pat gene as a selectable marker. The latter cultivars ca...

  9. Some properties of acetyl-CoA:arylamine N-acetyltransferase (EC 2.3.1.5) from rat pineal gland

    N-acetylation of serotonin to N-acetylserotonin in the pineal gland is catalysed by acetyl-CoA:arylamine N-acetyltransferase (SNAT). The present investigation was an attempt to design an assay technique which would permit sensitive evaluation of SNAT in order to evaluate some kinetic properties of the enzyme

  10. Effects of chronic renal failure rat serum on histone acetyltransferase p300 and activation of activating transcription factor 4 of arterial smooth muscle cells cultured in vitro

    张耀全

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of the rat serum with chronic renal failure(CRF)on ubiquitin-proteasome pathway,histone acetyltransferase p300 and activation of activating transcription factor 4(ATF4)of rat arterial vascular smooth muscle cells(VSMCs)cultured in vitro,and explore the possible mechanism.Methods Objective To establish the rat model of

  11. Garcinol, an acetyltransferase inhibitor, suppresses proliferation of breast cancer cell line MCF-7 promoted by 17β-estradiol.

    Ye, Xia; Yuan, Lei; Zhang, Li; Zhao, Jing; Zhang, Chun-Mei; Deng, Hua-Yu

    2014-01-01

    The acetyltransferase inhibitor garcinol, a polyisoprenylated benzophenone, is extracted from the rind of the fruit of Garcinia indica, a plant found extensively in tropical regions. Anti-cancer activity has been suggested but there is no report on its action via inhibiting acetylation against cell proliferation, cell cycle progression, and apoptosis-inhibtion induced by estradiol (E2) in human breast cancer MCF-7 cells. The main purposes of this study were to investigate the effects of the acetyltransferase inhibitor garcinol on cell proliferation, cell cycle progression and apoptosis inhibition in human breast cancer MCF-7 cells treated with estrogen, and to explore the significance of changes in acetylation levels in this process. We used a variety of techniques such as CCK-8 analysis of cell proliferation, FCM analysis of cell cycling and apoptosis, immunofluorescence analysis of NF-κB/ p65 localization, and RT-PCR and Western blotting analysis of ac-H3, ac-H4, ac-p65, cyclin D1, Bcl-2 and Bcl- xl. We found that on treatment with garcinol in MCF-7 cells, E2-induced proliferation was inhibited, cell cycle progression was arrested at G0/G1 phase, and the cell apoptosis rate was increased. Expression of ac-H3, ac-H4 and NF-κB/ac-p65 proteins in E2-treated MCF-7 cells was increased, this being inhibited by garcinol but not ac- H4.The nuclear translocation of NF-κB/p65 in E2-treated MCF-7 cells was also inhibited, along with cyclin D1, Bcl-2 and Bcl-xl in mRNA and protein expression levels. These results suggest that the effect of E2 on promoting proliferation and inhibiting apoptosis is linked to hyperacetylation levels of histones and nonhistone NF-κB/ p65 in MCF-7 cells. The acetyltransferase inhibitor garcinol plays an inhibitive role in MCF-7 cell proliferation promoted by E2. Mechanisms are probably associated with decreasing ac-p65 protein expression level in the NF-κB pathway, thus down-regulating the expression of cyclin D1, Bcl-2 and Bcl-xl. PMID

  12. Computational study of the three-dimensional structure of N-acetyltransferase 2-acetyl coenzyme a complex.

    Oda, Akifumi; Kobayashi, Kana; Takahashi, Ohgi

    2010-01-01

    N-Acetyltransferase 2 (NAT2) is one of the most important polymorphic drug-metabolizing enzymes and plays a significant role in individual differences of drug efficacies and/or side effects. Coenzyme A (CoA) is a cofactor in the experimentally determined crystal structure of NAT2, although the acetyl source of acetylation reactions catalyzed by NAT is not CoA, but rather acetyl CoA. In this study, the three-dimensional structure of NAT2, including acetyl CoA, was calculated using molecular dynamics simulation. By substituting acetyl CoA for CoA the amino acid residue Gly286, which is known to transform into a glutamate residue by NAT2*7A and NAT2*7B, comes close to the cofactor binding site. In addition, the binding pocket around the sulfur atom of acetyl CoA expanded in the NAT2-acetyl CoA complex. PMID:20930369

  13. Mutation of the CH1 Domain in the Histone Acetyltransferase CREBBP Results in Autism-Relevant Behaviors in Mice.

    Fei Zheng

    Full Text Available Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs are a group of neurodevelopmental afflictions characterized by repetitive behaviors, deficits in social interaction, and impaired communication skills. For most ASD patients, the underlying causes are unknown. Genetic mutations have been identified in about 25 percent of ASD cases, including mutations in epigenetic regulators, suggesting that dysregulated chromatin or DNA function is a critical component of ASD. Mutations in the histone acetyltransferase CREB binding protein (CBP, CREBBP cause Rubinstein-Taybi Syndrome (RTS, a developmental disorder that includes ASD-like symptoms. Recently, genomic studies involving large numbers of ASD patient families have theoretically modeled CBP and its paralog p300 (EP300 as critical hubs in ASD-associated protein and gene interaction networks, and have identified de novo missense mutations in highly conserved residues of the CBP acetyltransferase and CH1 domains. Here we provide animal model evidence that supports this notion that CBP and its CH1 domain are relevant to autism. We show that mice with a deletion mutation in the CBP CH1 (TAZ1 domain (CBPΔCH1/ΔCH1 have an RTS-like phenotype that includes ASD-relevant repetitive behaviors, hyperactivity, social interaction deficits, motor dysfunction, impaired recognition memory, and abnormal synaptic plasticity. Our results therefore indicate that loss of CBP CH1 domain function contributes to RTS, and possibly ASD, and that this domain plays an essential role in normal motor function, cognition and social behavior. Although the key physiological functions affected by ASD-associated mutation of epigenetic regulators have been enigmatic, our findings are consistent with theoretical models involving CBP and p300 in ASD, and with a causative role for recently described ASD-associated CBP mutations.

  14. Mutation of the CH1 Domain in the Histone Acetyltransferase CREBBP Results in Autism-Relevant Behaviors in Mice.

    Zheng, Fei; Kasper, Lawryn H; Bedford, David C; Lerach, Stephanie; Teubner, Brett J W; Brindle, Paul K

    2016-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) are a group of neurodevelopmental afflictions characterized by repetitive behaviors, deficits in social interaction, and impaired communication skills. For most ASD patients, the underlying causes are unknown. Genetic mutations have been identified in about 25 percent of ASD cases, including mutations in epigenetic regulators, suggesting that dysregulated chromatin or DNA function is a critical component of ASD. Mutations in the histone acetyltransferase CREB binding protein (CBP, CREBBP) cause Rubinstein-Taybi Syndrome (RTS), a developmental disorder that includes ASD-like symptoms. Recently, genomic studies involving large numbers of ASD patient families have theoretically modeled CBP and its paralog p300 (EP300) as critical hubs in ASD-associated protein and gene interaction networks, and have identified de novo missense mutations in highly conserved residues of the CBP acetyltransferase and CH1 domains. Here we provide animal model evidence that supports this notion that CBP and its CH1 domain are relevant to autism. We show that mice with a deletion mutation in the CBP CH1 (TAZ1) domain (CBPΔCH1/ΔCH1) have an RTS-like phenotype that includes ASD-relevant repetitive behaviors, hyperactivity, social interaction deficits, motor dysfunction, impaired recognition memory, and abnormal synaptic plasticity. Our results therefore indicate that loss of CBP CH1 domain function contributes to RTS, and possibly ASD, and that this domain plays an essential role in normal motor function, cognition and social behavior. Although the key physiological functions affected by ASD-associated mutation of epigenetic regulators have been enigmatic, our findings are consistent with theoretical models involving CBP and p300 in ASD, and with a causative role for recently described ASD-associated CBP mutations. PMID:26730956

  15. The Candida albicans Histone Acetyltransferase Hat1 Regulates Stress Resistance and Virulence via Distinct Chromatin Assembly Pathways.

    Michael Tscherner

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Human fungal pathogens like Candida albicans respond to host immune surveillance by rapidly adapting their transcriptional programs. Chromatin assembly factors are involved in the regulation of stress genes by modulating the histone density at these loci. Here, we report a novel role for the chromatin assembly-associated histone acetyltransferase complex NuB4 in regulating oxidative stress resistance, antifungal drug tolerance and virulence in C. albicans. Strikingly, depletion of the NuB4 catalytic subunit, the histone acetyltransferase Hat1, markedly increases resistance to oxidative stress and tolerance to azole antifungals. Hydrogen peroxide resistance in cells lacking Hat1 results from higher induction rates of oxidative stress gene expression, accompanied by reduced histone density as well as subsequent increased RNA polymerase recruitment. Furthermore, hat1Δ/Δ cells, despite showing growth defects in vitro, display reduced susceptibility to reactive oxygen-mediated killing by innate immune cells. Thus, clearance from infected mice is delayed although cells lacking Hat1 are severely compromised in killing the host. Interestingly, increased oxidative stress resistance and azole tolerance are phenocopied by the loss of histone chaperone complexes CAF-1 and HIR, respectively, suggesting a central role for NuB4 in the delivery of histones destined for chromatin assembly via distinct pathways. Remarkably, the oxidative stress phenotype of hat1Δ/Δ cells is a species-specific trait only found in C. albicans and members of the CTG clade. The reduced azole susceptibility appears to be conserved in a wider range of fungi. Thus, our work demonstrates how highly conserved chromatin assembly pathways can acquire new functions in pathogenic fungi during coevolution with the host.

  16. Mutation of the CH1 Domain in the Histone Acetyltransferase CREBBP Results in Autism-Relevant Behaviors in Mice

    Zheng, Fei; Kasper, Lawryn H.; Bedford, David C.; Lerach, Stephanie; Teubner, Brett J. W.; Brindle, Paul K.

    2016-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) are a group of neurodevelopmental afflictions characterized by repetitive behaviors, deficits in social interaction, and impaired communication skills. For most ASD patients, the underlying causes are unknown. Genetic mutations have been identified in about 25 percent of ASD cases, including mutations in epigenetic regulators, suggesting that dysregulated chromatin or DNA function is a critical component of ASD. Mutations in the histone acetyltransferase CREB binding protein (CBP, CREBBP) cause Rubinstein-Taybi Syndrome (RTS), a developmental disorder that includes ASD-like symptoms. Recently, genomic studies involving large numbers of ASD patient families have theoretically modeled CBP and its paralog p300 (EP300) as critical hubs in ASD-associated protein and gene interaction networks, and have identified de novo missense mutations in highly conserved residues of the CBP acetyltransferase and CH1 domains. Here we provide animal model evidence that supports this notion that CBP and its CH1 domain are relevant to autism. We show that mice with a deletion mutation in the CBP CH1 (TAZ1) domain (CBPΔCH1/ΔCH1) have an RTS-like phenotype that includes ASD-relevant repetitive behaviors, hyperactivity, social interaction deficits, motor dysfunction, impaired recognition memory, and abnormal synaptic plasticity. Our results therefore indicate that loss of CBP CH1 domain function contributes to RTS, and possibly ASD, and that this domain plays an essential role in normal motor function, cognition and social behavior. Although the key physiological functions affected by ASD-associated mutation of epigenetic regulators have been enigmatic, our findings are consistent with theoretical models involving CBP and p300 in ASD, and with a causative role for recently described ASD-associated CBP mutations. PMID:26730956

  17. Repression of c-Myc and inhibition of G1 exit in cells conditionally overexpressing p300 that is not dependent on its histone acetyltransferase activity

    Baluchamy, Sudhakar; Rajabi, Hasan N.; Thimmapaya, Rama; Navaraj, Arunasalam; Thimmapaya, Bayar

    2003-01-01

    p300 and cAMP response element binding protein (CREB)-binding protein (CBP) are two highly homologous, conserved transcriptional coactivators, and histone acetyltransferases (HATs) that link chromatin remodeling with transcription. Cell transformation by viral oncogene products such as adenovirus E1A and SV40 large T antigen depends on their ability to inactivate p300 and CBP. To investigate the role of p300 in cell-cycle progression, we constructed stable rat cell lin...

  18. Downregulation of the Polyamine Regulator Spermidine/Spermine N1-Acetyltransferase by Epstein-Barr Virus in a Burkitt's Lymphoma Cell Line

    Shi, Mingxia; Gan, Yan-Jun; Davis, Timothy O.; Scott, Rona S.

    2013-01-01

    Transition of Akata Burkitt's lymphoma (BL) from a malignant to nonmalignant phenotype upon loss of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is evidence for a viral contribution to tumorigenesis despite the tight restriction of EBV gene expression in BL. Examination of global cellular gene expression in Akata subclones that retained or lost EBV identified spermidine/spermine N1-acetyltransferase (SAT1), an inducible enzyme whose catabolism of polyamines affects both apoptosis and cell growth, as one of a lim...

  19. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma and spermidine/spermine N1-acetyltransferase gene expressions are significantly correlated in human colorectal cancer

    Cavallini Aldo; Notarnicola Maria; Giannini Romina; Linsalata Michele

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) is a transcription factor that regulates adipogenic differentiation and glucose homeostasis. Spermidine/spermine N1-acetyltransferase (SSAT) and ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) are key enzymes involved in the metabolism of polyamines, compounds that play an important role in cell proliferation. While the PPARγ role in tumour growth has not been clearly defined, the involvement of the altered polyamine metabolism in col...

  20. DOM-fold: A structure with crossing loops found in DmpA, ornithine acetyltransferase, and molybdenum cofactor-binding domain

    Cheng, Hua; Grishin, Nick V.

    2005-01-01

    Understanding relationships between sequence, structure, and evolution is important for functional characterization of proteins. Here, we define a novel DOM-fold as a consensus structure of the domains in DmpA (L-aminopeptidase D-Ala-esterase/amidase), OAT (ornithine acetyltransferase), and MocoBD (molybdenum cofactor-binding domain), and discuss possible evolutionary scenarios of its origin. As shown by a comprehensive structure similarity search, DOM-fold distinguished by a two-layered β/α ...

  1. Single Residue Mutation in Active Site of Serine Acetyltransferase Isoform 3 from Entamoeba histolytica Assists in Partial Regaining of Feedback Inhibition by Cysteine

    Kumar, Sudhir; Mazumder, Mohit; Dharavath, Sudhaker; Gourinath, S.

    2013-01-01

    The cysteine biosynthetic pathway is essential for survival of the protist pathogen Entamoeba histolytica, and functions by producing cysteine for countering oxidative attack during infection in human hosts. Serine acetyltransferase (SAT) and O-acetylserine sulfhydrylase (OASS) are involved in cysteine biosynthesis and are present in three isoforms each. While EhSAT1 and EhSAT2 are feedback inhibited by end product cysteine, EhSAT3 is nearly insensitive to such inhibition. The active site res...

  2. Probable mechanism of catalysis of acetyl coenzyme A:arylamine N-acetyltransferase (EC 2.3.1.5.) from rat pineal gland

    The hormone melatonin is produced in the pineal gland by O-methylation of N-acetylserotonin. The enzyme responsible for O-methylation in the pineal, hydroxy-indole O-methyltransferase, can utilize serotonin only one-tenth as efficiently as it can use N-acetylserotonin, implying that N-acetylation precedes O-methylation. Serotonin has been shown to be N-acetylated to N-acetylserotonin in vivo, and this reaction is catalysed by an N-acetyltransferase (SNAT) enzyme. This enzyme would be more accurately termed acetyl coenzyme A: arylamine N-acetyltransferase and is not unique to the pineal gland, being found in other tissues such as the liver. The pineal enzyme, however, is unique in that it is under beta-adrenergic cyclic AMP control, levels rising during the dark phase. It is the formation of N-acetylserotonin that is rate-limiting in the formation of melatonin. The lability of pineal N-acetyltransferase has precluded any in-depth investigation and few kinetic determinations have been made. The assay for SNAT involved transfer of a 14C-acetyl group from [1-14C]acetyl coenzyme A (AcCoA) to tryptamine HCl (Tryp) to form N-acetyltryptamine (NAT). The present study is the first successful attempt to elucidate the catalytic behaviour of the enzyme. This information increases understanding of pineal biochemistry and enables more accurate interpretation of any physiological or pharmacological effects exerted on the enzyme

  3. Structural analysis of PseH, the Campylobacter jejuni N-acetyltransferase involved in bacterial O-linked glycosylation

    Song, Wan Seok; Nam, Mi Sun; Namgung, Byeol [Department of Systems Immunology, College of Biomedical Science, Kangwon National University, Chuncheon 200-701 (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Sung-il, E-mail: sungil@kangwon.ac.kr [Department of Systems Immunology, College of Biomedical Science, Kangwon National University, Chuncheon 200-701 (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Kangwon National University, Chuncheon 200-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-03-20

    Campylobacter jejuni is a bacterium that uses flagella for motility and causes worldwide acute gastroenteritis in humans. The C. jejuni N-acetyltransferase PseH (cjPseH) is responsible for the third step in flagellin O-linked glycosylation and plays a key role in flagellar formation and motility. cjPseH transfers an acetyl group from an acetyl donor, acetyl coenzyme A (AcCoA), to the amino group of UDP-4-amino-4,6-dideoxy-N-acetyl-β-L-altrosamine to produce UDP-2,4-diacetamido-2,4,6-trideoxy-β-L-altropyranose. To elucidate the catalytic mechanism of cjPseH, crystal structures of cjPseH alone and in complex with AcCoA were determined at 1.95 Å resolution. cjPseH folds into a single-domain structure of a central β-sheet decorated by four α-helices with two continuously connected grooves. A deep groove (groove-A) accommodates the AcCoA molecule. Interestingly, the acetyl end of AcCoA points toward an open space in a neighboring shallow groove (groove-S), which is occupied by extra electron density that potentially serves as a pseudosubstrate, suggesting that the groove-S may provide a substrate-binding site. Structure-based comparative analysis suggests that cjPseH utilizes a unique catalytic mechanism of acetylation that has not been observed in other glycosylation-associated acetyltransferases. Thus, our studies on cjPseH will provide valuable information for the design of new antibiotics to treat C. jejuni-induced gastroenteritis. - Highlights: • cjPseH adopts a single-domain structure of a central β-sheet decorated by α-helices. • cjPseH features two continuously connected grooves on the protein surface. • Acetyl coenzyme A (AcCoA) binds into a deep groove of cjPseH in an ‘L’ shape. • The acetyl end of AcCoA points to a wide groove, a potential substrate-binding site.

  4. Structural analysis of PseH, the Campylobacter jejuni N-acetyltransferase involved in bacterial O-linked glycosylation

    Campylobacter jejuni is a bacterium that uses flagella for motility and causes worldwide acute gastroenteritis in humans. The C. jejuni N-acetyltransferase PseH (cjPseH) is responsible for the third step in flagellin O-linked glycosylation and plays a key role in flagellar formation and motility. cjPseH transfers an acetyl group from an acetyl donor, acetyl coenzyme A (AcCoA), to the amino group of UDP-4-amino-4,6-dideoxy-N-acetyl-β-L-altrosamine to produce UDP-2,4-diacetamido-2,4,6-trideoxy-β-L-altropyranose. To elucidate the catalytic mechanism of cjPseH, crystal structures of cjPseH alone and in complex with AcCoA were determined at 1.95 Å resolution. cjPseH folds into a single-domain structure of a central β-sheet decorated by four α-helices with two continuously connected grooves. A deep groove (groove-A) accommodates the AcCoA molecule. Interestingly, the acetyl end of AcCoA points toward an open space in a neighboring shallow groove (groove-S), which is occupied by extra electron density that potentially serves as a pseudosubstrate, suggesting that the groove-S may provide a substrate-binding site. Structure-based comparative analysis suggests that cjPseH utilizes a unique catalytic mechanism of acetylation that has not been observed in other glycosylation-associated acetyltransferases. Thus, our studies on cjPseH will provide valuable information for the design of new antibiotics to treat C. jejuni-induced gastroenteritis. - Highlights: • cjPseH adopts a single-domain structure of a central β-sheet decorated by α-helices. • cjPseH features two continuously connected grooves on the protein surface. • Acetyl coenzyme A (AcCoA) binds into a deep groove of cjPseH in an ‘L’ shape. • The acetyl end of AcCoA points to a wide groove, a potential substrate-binding site

  5. A naturally-occurring histone acetyltransferase inhibitor derived from Garcinia indica impairs newly acquired and reactivated fear memories.

    Stephanie A Maddox

    Full Text Available The study of the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the consolidation and reconsolidation of traumatic fear memories has progressed rapidly in recent years, yet few compounds have emerged that are readily useful in a clinical setting for the treatment of anxiety disorders such as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD. Here, we use a combination of biochemical, behavioral, and neurophysiological methods to systematically investigate the ability of garcinol, a naturally-occurring histone acetyltransferase (HAT inhibitor derived from the rind of the fruit of the Kokum tree (Garcina indica, to disrupt the consolidation and reconsolidation of Pavlovian fear conditioning, a widely studied rodent model of PTSD. We show that local infusion of garcinol into the rat lateral amygdala (LA impairs the training and retrieval-related acetylation of histone H3 in the LA. Further, we show that either intra-LA or systemic administration of garcinol within a narrow window after either fear conditioning or fear memory retrieval significantly impairs the consolidation and reconsolidation of a Pavlovian fear memory and associated neural plasticity in the LA. Our findings suggest that a naturally-occurring compound derived from the diet that regulates chromatin function may be useful in the treatment of newly acquired or recently reactivated traumatic memories.

  6. Melatonin production in Escherichia coli by dual expression of serotonin N-acetyltransferase and caffeic acid O-methyltransferase.

    Byeon, Yeong; Back, Kyoungwhan

    2016-08-01

    Melatonin is a well-known bioactive molecule produced in animals and plants and a well-studied natural compound. Two enzymatic steps are required for the biosynthesis of melatonin from serotonin. First, serotonin N-acetyltransferase (SNAT) catalyzes serotonin to N-acetylserotonin (NAS) followed by the action of N-acetylserotonin O-methyltransferase (ASMT), resulting in the synthesis of O-methylated NAS, also known as melatonin. Attempts to document melatonin production in Escherichia coli have been unsuccessful to date due to either low enzyme activity or inactive ASMT expression. Here, we employed caffeic acid O-methyltransferase (COMT) instead of ASMT, as COMT is a multifunctional enzyme that has ASMT activity as well. Among several combinations of dual expression cassettes, recombinant E. coli that expressed sheep SNAT with rice COMT produced a high quantity of melatonin, which was measured in a culture medium (1.46 mg/L in response to 1 mM serotonin). This level was several orders of magnitude higher than that produced in transgenic rice and tomato overexpressing sheep SNAT and ASMT, respectively. This heterologous expression system can be widely employed to screen various putative SNAT or ASMT genes from animals and plants as well as to overproduce melatonin in various useful microorganisms. PMID:27005412

  7. Crohn's disease in Japanese is associated with a SNP-haplotype of N-acetyltransferase 2 gene

    Haruhisa Machida; Ikuo Murata; Shigeru Kohno; Chen-Yang Wen; Kazuhiro Tsukamoto; Chun-Yang Wen; Saburou Shikuwa; Hajime Isomoto; Yohei Mizuta; Fuminao Takeshima; Kunihiko Murase; Naomichi Matsumoto

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the frequency and distribution of N-acetyltransferase 2 (NAT2) and uridine 5′-diphosphate (UDP)-glucuronosyltransferase 1A7 (UGT1A7) genes in patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD).METHODS: Frequencies and distributions of NAT2 and UGT1A7SNPs as well as their haplotypes were investigated in 95 patients with UC, 60 patients with CD, and 200gender-matched, unrelated, healthy, control volunteers by PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP),PCR-denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC), and direct DNA sequencing.RESULTS: Multiple logistic regression analysis revealed that the frequency of haplotype, NAT2*7B, significantly increased in CD patients, compared to that in controls (P= 0.0130, OR = 2.802, 95%CI = 1.243-6.316). However,there was no association between NAT2 haplotypes and UC, or between any UGT1A7haplotypes and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD).CONCLUSION: It is likely that the NAT2 gene is one of the determinants for CD in Japanese. Alternatively, a new CD determinant may exist in the 8p22 region, whereNAT2is located.

  8. Adolescent, but not adult, binge ethanol exposure leads to persistent global reductions of choline acetyltransferase expressing neurons in brain.

    Ryan P Vetreno

    Full Text Available During the adolescent transition from childhood to adulthood, notable maturational changes occur in brain neurotransmitter systems. The cholinergic system is composed of several distinct nuclei that exert neuromodulatory control over cognition, arousal, and reward. Binge drinking and alcohol abuse are common during this stage, which might alter the developmental trajectory of this system leading to long-term changes in adult neurobiology. In Experiment 1, adolescent intermittent ethanol (AIE; 5.0 g/kg, i.g., 2-day on/2-day off from postnatal day [P] 25 to P55 treatment led to persistent, global reductions of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT expression. Administration of the Toll-like receptor 4 agonist lipopolysaccharide to young adult rats (P70 produced a reduction in ChAT+IR that mimicked AIE. To determine if the binge ethanol-induced ChAT decline was unique to the adolescent, Experiment 2 examined ChAT+IR in the basal forebrain following adolescent (P28-P48 and adult (P70-P90 binge ethanol exposure. Twenty-five days later, ChAT expression was reduced in adolescent, but not adult, binge ethanol-exposed animals. In Experiment 3, expression of ChAT and vesicular acetylcholine transporter expression was found to be significantly reduced in the alcoholic basal forebrain relative to moderate drinking controls. Together, these data suggest that adolescent binge ethanol decreases adult ChAT expression, possibly through neuroimmune mechanisms, which might impact adult cognition, arousal, or reward sensitivity.

  9. Cereboost™, an American ginseng extract, improves cognitive function via up-regulation of choline acetyltransferase expression and neuroprotection.

    Shin, Kyungha; Guo, Haiyu; Cha, Yeseul; Ban, Young-Hwan; Seo, Da Woom; Choi, Youngjin; Kim, Tae-Su; Lee, Sung-Pyo; Kim, Jong-Choon; Choi, Ehn-Kyoung; Yon, Jung-Min; Kim, Yun-Bae

    2016-07-01

    In Alzheimer disease (AD), amyloid-beta (Aβ) peptides induce the degeneration of presynaptic cholinergic system, in which decreased activity of enzyme choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) responsible for acetylcholine synthesis is observed. Cereboost™, an extract of American ginseng extract, contains a high concentration of Rb1 ginsenoside which is a well-known ingredient improving human cognitive function. We investigated the effects of Cereboost™ on learning and memory function of mice challenged with an Aβ1-42 peptide and the underlying mechanisms in vitro. Cereboost™ protected against Aβ1-42-induced cytotoxicity in F3.ChAT stem cells, and enhanced the ChAT gene expression. Aβ1-42 injection into the mouse brain impaired the cognitive function, which was recovered by oral administration of Cereboost™. In addition, Cereboost™ restored brain microtubule-associated protein 2 and synaptophysin as well as acetylcholine concentration. The results demonstrate that Cereboost™ administration recovered the cognitive function of AD model animals by enhancing acetylcholine level via ChAT gene expression and neuroprotection. PMID:27112419

  10. C646, a selective small molecule inhibitor of histone acetyltransferase p300, radiosensitizes lung cancer cells by enhancing mitotic catastrophe

    Background and purpose: Chromatin remodeling through histone modifications, including acetylation, plays an important role in the appropriate response to DNA damage induced by ionizing radiation (IR). Here we investigated the radiosensitizing effect of C646, a selective small molecule inhibitor of p300 histone acetyltransferase, and explored the underlying mechanisms. Materials and methods: A549, H157 and H460 human non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) cells, and HFL-III human lung fibroblasts were assessed by clonogenic survival assay. Apoptosis and necrosis were assessed by annexin V staining. Senescence was assessed by Senescence-associated β-galactosidase staining. Mitotic catastrophe was assessed by evaluating nuclear morphology with DAPI staining. Cell cycle profiles were analyzed by flow cytometry. Protein expression was analyzed by immunoblotting. Results: C646 sensitized A549, H460 and H157 cells to IR with a dose enhancement ratio at 10% surviving fraction of 1.4, 1.2 and 1.2, respectively. C646 did not radiosensitize HFL-III cells. In A549 cells, but not in HFL-III cells, C646 (i) enhanced mitotic catastrophe but not apoptosis, necrosis, or senescence after IR; (ii) increased the hyperploid cell population after IR; and (iii) suppressed the phosphorylation of CHK1 after IR. Conclusions: C646 radiosensitizes NSCLC cells by enhancing mitotic catastrophe through the abrogation of G2 checkpoint maintenance

  11. Competitive Inhibition of Lysine Acetyltransferase 2B by a Small Motif of the Adenoviral Oncoprotein E1A.

    Shi, Shasha; Liu, Ke; Chen, Yanheng; Zhang, Shijun; Lin, Juanyu; Gong, Chenfang; Jin, Quanwen; Yang, Xiang-Jiao; Chen, Ruichuan; Ji, Zhiliang; Han, Aidong

    2016-07-01

    The adenovirus early region 1A (E1A) oncoprotein hijacks host cells via direct interactions with many key cellular proteins, such as KAT2B, also known as PCAF (p300/CBP associated factor). E1A binds the histone acetyltransferase (HAT) domain of KAT2B to repress its transcriptional activation. However, the molecular mechanism by which E1A inhibits the HAT activity is not known. Here we demonstrate that a short and relatively conserved N-terminal motif (cNM) in the intrinsically disordered E1A protein is crucial for KAT2B interaction, and inhibits its HAT activity through a direct competition with acetyl-CoA, but not its substrate histone H3. Molecular modeling together with a series of mutagenesis experiments suggests that the major helix of E1A cNM binds to a surface of the acetyl-CoA pocket of the KAT2B HAT domain. Moreover, transient expression of the cNM peptide is sufficient to inhibit KAT2B-specific H3 acetylation H3K14ac in vivo Together, our data define an essential motif cNM in N-terminal E1A as an acetyl-CoA entry blocker that directly associates with the entrance of acetyl-CoA binding pocket to block the HAT domain access to its cofactor. PMID:27143356

  12. The early response of pineal N-acetyltransferase activity, melatonin and catecholamine levels in rats irradiated with gamma rays

    Male Wistar rats adapted to an artificial light-dark regimen were whole-body gamma-irradiated with a dose of 14.35 Gy. Irradiation, sham-irradiation and decapitation 30, 60 and 120 min after the exposure were performed between 2000 h and 0100 h in the darkness. The serotonin N-acetyltransferase activity (NAT), the concentration of melatonin and corticosterone were also determined. Ionizing radiation did not change the activity of NAT, the key enzyme of melatonin synthesis; however, it decreased the concentration of pineal melatonin. The concentration of pineal dopamine and norepinephrine decreased 30 and 120 min after exposure, while the concentration of epinephrine was elevated 30 min after irradiation, though later it was markedly decreased. The serum melatonin level was not changed but an increase in corticosterone level was observed. In the early period after exposure a decrease in pineal melatonin occurred, accompanied by a decrease in pineal catecholamines. On the contrary, in the phase of developed radiation injury the signs of increased melatonin synthesis were observed on days 3 and 4 after the exposure. (author) 6 figs., 25 refs

  13. Raman and surface enhanced Raman spectroscopic studies of specific, small molecule activator of histone acetyltransferase p300

    Kundu, Partha P.; Pavan Kumar, G. V.; Mantelingu, Kempegowda; Kundu, Tapas K.; Narayana, Chandrabhas

    2011-07-01

    We report for the first time, the Raman and surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) studies of N-(4-chloro-3-trifluoromethyl-phenyl)-2-ethoxy-benzamide (CTB). This molecule is specific activator of human histone acetyltransferase (HAT), p300, and serves as lead molecule to design anti-neoplastic therapeutics. A detailed Raman and SERS band assignments have been performed for CTB, which are compared with the density functional theory calculations. The observed red shift of N sbnd H stretching frequency from the computed wavenumber indicates the weakening of N sbnd H bond resulting from proton transfer to the neighboring oxygen atom. We observe Ag sbnd N vibrational mode at 234 cm -1 in SERS of CTB. This indicates there is a metal-molecule bond leading to chemical enhancement in SERS. We also observe, enhancement in the modes pertaining to substituted benzene rings and methyl groups. Based on SERS analysis we propose the adsorption sites and the orientation of CTB on silver surface.

  14. New spectrophotometric and radiochemical assays for acetyl-CoA: arylamine N-acetyltransferase applicable to a variety of arylamines

    Simple and sensitive spectrophotometric and radiochemical procedures are described for the assay of acetyl-CoA:arylamine N-acetyltransferase (NAT), which catalyzes the reaction acetyl-CoA + arylamine----N-acetylated arylamine + CoASH. The methods are applicable to crude tissue homogenates and blood lysates. The spectrophotometric assay is characterized by two features: (i) NAT activity is measured by quantifying the disappearance of the arylamine substrate as reflected by decreasing Schiff's base formation with dimethylaminobenzaldehyde. (ii) During the enzymatic reaction, the inhibitory product CoASH is recycled by the system acetyl phosphate/phosphotransacetylase to the substrate acetyl-CoA. The radiochemical procedure depends on enzymatic synthesis of [3H]acetyl-CoA in the assay using [3H]acetate, ATP, CoASH, and acetyl-CoA synthetase. NAT activity is measured by quantifying N-[3H]acetylarylamine after separation from [3H]acetate by extraction. Product inhibition by CoASH is prevented in this system by the use of acetyl-CoA synthetase

  15. Insights into the O-Acetylation Reaction of Hydroxylated Heterocyclic Amines by Human Arylamine N-Acetyltransferases: A Computational Study

    Lau, E Y; Felton, J S; Lightstone, F C

    2006-06-06

    A computational study was performed to better understand the differences between human arylamine N-acetyltransferase (NAT) 1 and 2. Homology models were constructed from available crystal structures and comparisons of the active site residues 125, 127, and 129 for these two enzymes provide insight into observed substrate differences. The NAT2 model provided a basis for understanding how some of the common mutations may affect the structure of the protein. Molecular dynamics simulations of the human NAT models and the template structure (NAT from Mycobacterium smegmatis) were performed and showed the models to be stable and reasonable. Docking studies of hydroxylated heterocyclic amines in the models of NAT1 and NAT2 probed the differences exhibited by these two proteins with mutagenic agents. The hydroxylated heterocyclic amines were only able to fit into the NAT2 active site, and an alternative binding site by the P-loop was found using our models and will be discussed. Additionally, quantum mechanical calculations were performed to study the O-acetylation reaction of the hydroxylated heterocyclic amines N-OH MeIQx and N-OH PhIP. This study has given us insight into why there are substrate differences among isoenzymes and explains some of the polymorphic activity differences.

  16. Method to produce acetyldiacylglycerols (ac-TAGs) by expression of an acetyltransferase gene isolated from Euonymus alatus (burning bush)

    Durrett, Timothy; Ohlrogge, John; Pollard, Michael

    2016-05-03

    The present invention relates to novel diacylglycerol acyltransferase genes and proteins, and methods of their use. In particular, the invention describes genes encoding proteins having diacylglycerol acetyltransferase activity, specifically for transferring an acetyl group to a diacylglycerol substrate to form acetyl-Triacylglycerols (ac-TAGS), for example, a 3-acetyl-1,2-diacyl-sn-glycerol. The present invention encompasses both native and recombinant wild-type forms of the transferase, as well as mutants and variant forms. The present invention also relates to methods of using novel diacylglycerol acyltransferase genes and proteins, including their expression in transgenic organisms at commercially viable levels, for increasing production of 3-acetyl-1,2-diacyl-sn-glycerols in plant oils and altering the composition of oils produced by microorganisms, such as yeast, by increasing ac-TAG production. Additionally, oils produced by methods of the present inventions comprising genes and proteins are contemplated for use as biodiesel fuel, in polymer production and as naturally produced food oils with reduced calories.

  17. Severe congenital myasthenia gravis of the presynaptic type with choline acetyltransferase mutation in a Chinese infant with respiratory failure.

    Yeung, Wai L; Lam, Ching W; Fung, Lai W E; Hon, Kam L E; Ng, Pak C

    2009-01-01

    We report a severe case of congenital myasthenia gravis in a Chinese newborn who presented with complete ptosis, severe hypotonia, dysphagia and respiratory insufficiency with recurrent apnea that required mechanical ventilatory support since birth. Routine neurophysiologic studies, including the 3-Hz repetitive stimulation test and electromyogram were normal. Neostigmine and edrophonium tests were also negative. However, decremental response to 3-Hz stimulation became apparent after depleting the muscles with trains of 10-Hz stimuli for 10 min. The infant was subsequently confirmed to have heterozygous mutations in the choline acetyltransferase genes, p.T553N and p.S704P. Both missense mutations are novel mutations. The child remained on positive pressure ventilation at 3 years of age despite treatment with high-dose anticholinesterase. This case highlights the difficulty of making an early diagnosis based on clinical presentation and routine electrophysiologic tests, especially when neonatologists are not familiar with this condition. Further, as there are different genetic defects causing different types of congenital myasthenia gravis, anticholinesterase therapy may be beneficial to some but detrimental to others. Therefore, the exact molecular diagnosis is an important guide to therapy. A high index of suspicion coupled with extended electrodiagnostic tests in clinically suspected patients will ensure the selection of appropriate genetic molecular study for confirming the diagnosis. PMID:18797171

  18. Autoacetylation induced specific structural changes in histone acetyltransferase domain of p300: probed by surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy.

    Arif, Mohammed; Kumar, G V Pavan; Narayana, Chandrabhas; Kundu, Tapas K

    2007-10-18

    Reversible acetylation of histone and non-histone proteins plays an important role in the regulation of gene expression and cellular homeostasis. A balance between acetylation and deacetylation of these proteins are maintained by histone acetyltransferases (HATs) and histone deacetylases (HDACs). Among different HATs, p300/CBP is the most widely studied chromatin modifying enzymes. p300 is involved in several physiological processes like cell growth, regulation of gene expression, development, and tumor suppressor, and therefore its dysfunction causes different diseases. The autoacetylation of p300 is one of the key regulators of its catalytic activity. Mechanistically, autoacetylation induced structural changes in the p300 HAT domain acts as a master switch. In this report, we have shown that the natural HAT inhibitor garcinol could potently inhibit the autoacetylation activity. Furthermore, for the first time, we demonstrate that indeed autoacetylation induces structural changes in p300 HAT domain, as probed by surface-enhanced Raman scattering. Presumably, SERS will be a very useful tool to find out the structural changes in the other self-modifying enzymes like kinases and methyltransferases. PMID:17894486

  19. A naturally-occurring histone acetyltransferase inhibitor derived from Garcinia indica impairs newly acquired and reactivated fear memories.

    Maddox, Stephanie A; Watts, Casey S; Doyère, Valérie; Schafe, Glenn E

    2013-01-01

    The study of the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the consolidation and reconsolidation of traumatic fear memories has progressed rapidly in recent years, yet few compounds have emerged that are readily useful in a clinical setting for the treatment of anxiety disorders such as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Here, we use a combination of biochemical, behavioral, and neurophysiological methods to systematically investigate the ability of garcinol, a naturally-occurring histone acetyltransferase (HAT) inhibitor derived from the rind of the fruit of the Kokum tree (Garcina indica), to disrupt the consolidation and reconsolidation of Pavlovian fear conditioning, a widely studied rodent model of PTSD. We show that local infusion of garcinol into the rat lateral amygdala (LA) impairs the training and retrieval-related acetylation of histone H3 in the LA. Further, we show that either intra-LA or systemic administration of garcinol within a narrow window after either fear conditioning or fear memory retrieval significantly impairs the consolidation and reconsolidation of a Pavlovian fear memory and associated neural plasticity in the LA. Our findings suggest that a naturally-occurring compound derived from the diet that regulates chromatin function may be useful in the treatment of newly acquired or recently reactivated traumatic memories. PMID:23349897

  20. N-Acetyltransferase 1 (NAT1) Genotype: A Risk Factor for Urinary Bladder Cancer in a Lebanese Population

    Yassine, Ibrahim A.; Kobeissi, Loulou; Jabbour, Michel E.; Dhaini, Hassan R.

    2012-01-01

    In Lebanon, bladder cancer is the second most incident cancer among men. This study investigates a possible association between N-acetyltransferase 1 (NAT1) genotype, a drug-metabolizing enzyme coding gene, and bladder cancer in Lebanese men. A case-control study (54 cases and 105 hospital-based controls) was conducted in two major hospitals in Beirut. Cases were randomly selected from patients diagnosed in the period of 2002–2008. Controls were conveniently identified and selected from the same settings. Data was collected using interview questionnaire and blood analysis. NAT1 genotypes were determined by PCR-RFLP. Statistical analysis revolved around univariate, bivariate, and multivariate logistic regression models, along with checks for effect modification. Results showed NAT1∗14A allele, smoking, occupational exposure to combustion fumes, and prostate-related symptoms, to be risk factors for bladder cancer. The odds of carrying at least one NAT1∗14A allele are 7 times higher in cases compared to controls (OR = 7.86, 95% CI: 1.53–40.39). A gene-environment interaction was identified for NAT1∗14A allele with occupational exposure to combustion fumes. Among carriers of NAT1∗14A allele, the odds of bladder cancer dropped to 2.03 from 3.72. Our study suggests NAT1∗14A allele as a possible biomarker for bladder cancer. Further research is recommended to confirm this association. PMID:22956951

  1. N-Acetyltransferase 1 (NAT1 Genotype: A Risk Factor for Urinary Bladder Cancer in a Lebanese Population

    Ibrahim A. Yassine

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In Lebanon, bladder cancer is the second most incident cancer among men. This study investigates a possible association between N-acetyltransferase 1 (NAT1 genotype, a drug-metabolizing enzyme coding gene, and bladder cancer in Lebanese men. A case-control study (54 cases and 105 hospital-based controls was conducted in two major hospitals in Beirut. Cases were randomly selected from patients diagnosed in the period of 2002–2008. Controls were conveniently identified and selected from the same settings. Data was collected using interview questionnaire and blood analysis. NAT1 genotypes were determined by PCR-RFLP. Statistical analysis revolved around univariate, bivariate, and multivariate logistic regression models, along with checks for effect modification. Results showed NAT1∗14A allele, smoking, occupational exposure to combustion fumes, and prostate-related symptoms, to be risk factors for bladder cancer. The odds of carrying at least one NAT1∗14A allele are 7 times higher in cases compared to controls (OR=7.86, 95% CI: 1.53–40.39. A gene-environment interaction was identified for NAT1∗14A allele with occupational exposure to combustion fumes. Among carriers of NAT1∗14A allele, the odds of bladder cancer dropped to 2.03 from 3.72. Our study suggests NAT1∗14A allele as a possible biomarker for bladder cancer. Further research is recommended to confirm this association.

  2. What a Role did Histidine Residue Play in Arylamine N-Acetyltransferase 2 Acetylation? A Quantum Chemistry Study

    QIAO Qing-An; CAI Zheng-Ting; YANG Chuan-Lu; WANG Mei-Shan

    2006-01-01

    Arylamine N-acetyltransferases (NATs, EC 2.3.1.5) catalyze an acetyl group transfer from acetyl coenzyme A (AcCoA) to primary arylamines and play a very important role in the metabolism and bioactivation of drugs and carcinogens. Experiments revealed that His-107 was likely the residues responsible for mediating acetyl transfer.The full catalytic mechanism of acetylation process has been examined by density functional theory. The results indicate that, if the acetyl group is directly transferred from the donor, p-nitrophenyl acetate, to the acceptor, cysteine,the high activation energy will be a great hindrance. These energies have dropped in a little range of 20-25 k J/mol when His-107 assisted the transfer process. However, when protonated His-107 mediated the reaction, the activation energies have been dropped about 73-85 kJ/mol. Our calculations strongly supported an enzyme acetylation mechanism that experiences a thiolate-imidazolium pair, and verified the presumption from experiments.

  3. Synergistic action of histone acetyltransferase GCN5 and receptor CLAVATA1 negatively affects ethylene responses in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Poulios, Stylianos; Vlachonasios, Konstantinos E

    2016-02-01

    GENERAL CONTROL NON-REPRESSIBLE 5 (GCN5) is a histone acetyltransferase (HAT) and the catalytic subunit of several multicomponent HAT complexes that acetylate lysine residues of histone H3. Mutants in AtGCN5 display pleiotropic developmental defects including aberrant meristem function. Shoot apical meristem (SAM) maintenance is regulated by CLAVATA1 (CLV1), a receptor kinase that controls the size of the shoot and floral meristems. Upon activation through CLV3 binding, CLV1 signals to the transcription factor WUSCHEL (WUS), restricting WUS expression and thus the meristem size. We hypothesized that GCN5 and CLV1 act together to affect SAM function. Using genetic and molecular approaches, we generated and characterized clv gcn5 mutants. Surprisingly, the clv1-1 gcn5-1 double mutant exhibited constitutive ethylene responses, suggesting that GCN5 and CLV signaling act synergistically to inhibit ethylene responses in Arabidopsis. This genetic and molecular interaction was mediated by ETHYLENE INSENSITIVE 3/ EIN3-LIKE1 (EIN3/EIL1) transcription factors. Our data suggest that signals from the CLV transduction pathway reach the GCN5-containing complexes in the nucleus and alter the histone acetylation status of ethylene-responsive genes, thus translating the CLV information to transcriptional activity and uncovering a link between histone acetylation and SAM maintenance in the complex mode of ethylene signaling. PMID:26596766

  4. Prevalence of the N-Acetyltransferase (NAT2 gene polymorphism 282C>T in Peruvian population and health implications

    Salazar-Granara Alberto

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the frequency of the C282T polymorphism of the NAT2 gene (N acetyltransferase in Peruvian populations. Field work, focused on exploring genetic risk factor in Peruvian populations, which has influence in the response to drugs and malignancies aetiology. Material and Methods: Cross-sectional study. 166 voluntaries from Lima, Lambayeque, Apurimac, Puno, San Martin, Amazonas and Loreto were enrolled. The sampling was done by convenience and it was use the RFLP-PCR conventional technique was used. Results: The allele frequency were 54% (n=126 for C282 and 46% (n=106 for T282. For the T allele, by its orign , stand out 2 those which origins were Lima 42% (n=25, Amazonas 47% (n=16, San Martin 74% (n=28 and Apurimac 50% (n=13 (X , p>0.05. A global genotype frequency were 26.7% (n=31 for C282/C282, 56.0% (n=65 for C282/T282 and 17.2% (n=20 for T282/T282 (Hardy Weinberg Test p>0.05. By origin, Puno presented allelic imbalance (Hardy Weinberg test p0.05. Conclusion: The overall frequency of NAT2 allele T282 was 46%; San Martin had the highest prevalence (74%. The T282 allele is linked to neoplastic diseases and adverse reactions to anti-TB drugs, these results will be used for the application of pharmacogenetics in Peru

  5. Homologues of xenobiotic metabolizing N-acetyltransferases in plant-associated fungi: Novel functions for an old enzyme family.

    Karagianni, Eleni P; Kontomina, Evanthia; Davis, Britton; Kotseli, Barbara; Tsirka, Theodora; Garefalaki, Vasiliki; Sim, Edith; Glenn, Anthony E; Boukouvala, Sotiria

    2015-01-01

    Plant-pathogenic fungi and their hosts engage in chemical warfare, attacking each other with toxic products of secondary metabolism and defending themselves via an arsenal of xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes. One such enzyme is homologous to arylamine N-acetyltransferase (NAT) and has been identified in Fusarium infecting cereal plants as responsible for detoxification of host defence compound 2-benzoxazolinone. Here we investigate functional diversification of NAT enzymes in crop-compromising species of Fusarium and Aspergillus, identifying three groups of homologues: Isoenzymes of the first group are found in all species and catalyse reactions with acetyl-CoA or propionyl-CoA. The second group is restricted to the plant pathogens and is active with malonyl-CoA in Fusarium species infecting cereals. The third group generates minimal activity with acyl-CoA compounds that bind non-selectively to the proteins. We propose that fungal NAT isoenzymes may have evolved to perform diverse functions, potentially relevant to pathogen fitness, acetyl-CoA/propionyl-CoA intracellular balance and secondary metabolism. PMID:26245863

  6. CERN: Fixed target targets

    Full text: While the immediate priority of CERN's research programme is to exploit to the full the world's largest accelerator, the LEP electron-positron collider and its concomitant LEP200 energy upgrade (January, page 1), CERN is also mindful of its long tradition of diversified research. Away from LEP and preparations for the LHC proton-proton collider to be built above LEP in the same 27-kilometre tunnel, CERN is also preparing for a new generation of heavy ion experiments using a new source, providing heavier ions (April 1992, page 8), with first physics expected next year. CERN's smallest accelerator, the LEAR Low Energy Antiproton Ring continues to cover a wide range of research topics, and saw a record number of hours of operation in 1992. The new ISOLDE on-line isotope separator was inaugurated last year (July, page 5) and physics is already underway. The remaining effort concentrates around fixed target experiments at the SPS synchrotron, which formed the main thrust of CERN's research during the late 1970s. With the SPS and LEAR now approaching middle age, their research future was extensively studied last year. Broadly, a vigorous SPS programme looks assured until at least the end of 1995. Decisions for the longer term future of the West Experimental Area of the SPS will have to take into account the heavy demand for test beams from work towards experiments at big colliders, both at CERN and elsewhere. The North Experimental Area is the scene of larger experiments with longer lead times. Several more years of LEAR exploitation are already in the pipeline, but for the longer term, the ambitious Superlear project for a superconducting ring (January 1992, page 7) did not catch on. Neutrino physics has a long tradition at CERN, and this continues with the preparations for two major projects, the Chorus and Nomad experiments (November 1991, page 7), to start next year in the West Area. Delicate neutrino oscillation effects could become

  7. Sputter target

    Gates, Willard G.; Hale, Gerald J.

    1980-01-01

    The disclosure relates to an improved sputter target for use in the deposition of hard coatings. An exemplary target is given wherein titanium diboride is brazed to a tantalum backing plate using a gold-palladium-nickel braze alloy.

  8. Identification and functional characterization of novel polymorphisms associated with the genes for arylamine N-acetyltransferases in mice.

    Boukouvala, Sotiria; Price, Naomi; Sim, Edith

    2002-07-01

    Arylamine N-acetyltransferase (NAT) polymorphism in humans has been associated with variation in susceptibility to drug toxicity and cancer. In mice, three NAT isoenzymes are encoded by Nat1, Nat2 and Nat3 genes. Only Nat2 has been shown previously to be polymorphic, a single nucleotide substitution causing the slow acetylator phenotype in the A/J strain. We sequenced the Nat genes from inbred (CBA and 129/Ola), outbred (PO and TO) and wild-derived inbred (Mus spretus and Mus musculus castaneus) mouse strains and report polymorphism in all three Nat genes of M. spretus and in Nat2 and Nat3 genes of M. m. castaneus. Enzymatic activity assays using liver homogenates demonstrated that M. m. castaneus is a 'fast' and M. spretus a 'slow' acetylator. Western blot analysis indicated that hepatic NAT2 protein is less abundant in M. spretus than M. m. castaneus. The new allozymes were expressed in a mammalian cell line and NAT enzymatic activity was measured with a series of substrates. NAT1 and NAT2 isoenzymes of M. m. castaneus exhibited a higher rate of acetylation, compared with those of M. spretus. Activity of the NAT3 allozymes was hardly detectable, although the Nat3 gene does appear to be transcribed, since mRNA was detected by RT-PCR in the spleen. Additional polymorphisms, useful for Nat-related genetic studies, have been identified between BALB/c, C57Bl/6J, A/J, 129/Ola, CBA, PO, TO, M. m. castaneus and M. spretus strains in four microsatellite repeats located close to the Nat genes. PMID:12142728

  9. The histone acetyltransferase p300 regulates the expression of pluripotency factors and odontogenic differentiation of human dental pulp cells.

    Tong Wang

    Full Text Available p300 is a well-known histone acetyltransferase (HAT and coactivator that plays vital roles in many physiological processes. Despite extensive research on the involvement of p300 in the regulation of transcription in numerous cell lines, the roles of this protein in regulating pluripotency genes and odontogenic differentiation in human dental pulp cells (HDPCs are poorly understood. To address this issue, we investigated the expression of OCT4, NANOG and SOX2 and the proliferation and odontogenic differentiation capacity of HDPCs following p300 overexpression. We found that p300 overexpression did not overtly affect the ability of HDPCs to proliferate. The overexpression of p300 upregulated the promoter activity and the mRNA and protein expression of NANOG and SOX2. The HAT activity of p300 appeared to partially mediate the regulation of these factors; indeed, when a mutant form of p300 lacking the HAT domain was overexpressed, the promoter activity and expression of NANOG and SOX2 decreased relative to p300 overexpression but was greater than in the control. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the mRNA levels of the odontogenic marker genes dentine matrix protein-1 (DMP-1, dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP, dentin sialoprotein (DSP, osteopontin (OPN and osteocalcin (OCN were significantly decreased in HDPCs overexpressing p300 cultured under normal culture conditions and increased in HDPCs inducted to undergo odontogenic differentiation. This finding was further confirmed by measuring levels of alkaline phosphatase (ALP activity and assessing the formation of mineralized nodules. The HAT activity of p300 had no significant effect on odontogenic differentiation. p300 was recruited to the promoter regions of OCN and DSPP and might be acting as a coactivator to increase the acetylation of lysine 9 of histone H3 of OCN and DSPP. Collectively, our results show that p300 plays an important role in regulating the expression of key pluripotency genes in

  10. Mechanism of action of peptidoglycan O-acetyltransferase B involves a Ser-His-Asp catalytic triad.

    Moynihan, Patrick J; Clarke, Anthony J

    2014-10-01

    The O-acetylation of the essential cell wall polymer peptidoglycan is essential in many bacteria for their integrity and survival, and it is catalyzed by peptidoglycan O-acetlytransferase B (PatB). Using PatB from Neisseria gonorrhoeae as the model, we have shown previously that the enzyme has specificity for polymeric muropeptides that possess tri- and tetrapeptide stems and that rates of reaction increase with increasing degrees of polymerization. Here, we present the catalytic mechanism of action of PatB, the first to be described for an O-acetyltransferase of any bacterial exopolysaccharide. The influence of pH on PatB activity was investigated, and pKa values of 6.4-6.45 and 6.25-6.35 for the enzyme-substrate complex (kcat vs pH) and the free enzyme (kcat·KM(-1) vs pH), respectively, were determined for the respective cosubstrates. The enzyme is partially inactivated by sulfonyl fluorides but not by EDTA, suggesting the participation of a serine residue in its catalytic mechanism. Alignment of the known and hypothetical PatB amino acid sequences identified Ser133, Asp302, and His305 as three invariant amino acid residues that could potentially serve as a catalytic triad. Replacement of Asp302 with Ala resulted in an enzyme with less than 20% residual activity, whereas activity was barely detectable with (His305 → Ala)PatB and (Ser133 → Ala)PatB was totally inactive. The reaction intermediate of the transferase reaction involving acetyl- and propionyl-acyl donors was trapped on both the wild-type and (Asp302 → Ala) enzymes and LC-MS/MS analysis of tryptic peptides identified Ser133 as the catalytic nucleophile. A transacetylase mechanism is proposed based on the mechanism of action of serine esterases. PMID:25215566

  11. Spt-Ada-Gcn5-Acetyltransferase (SAGA Complex in Plants: Genome Wide Identification, Evolutionary Conservation and Functional Determination.

    Rakesh Srivastava

    Full Text Available The recruitment of RNA polymerase II on a promoter is assisted by the assembly of basal transcriptional machinery in eukaryotes. The Spt-Ada-Gcn5-Acetyltransferase (SAGA complex plays an important role in transcription regulation in eukaryotes. However, even in the advent of genome sequencing of various plants, SAGA complex has been poorly defined for their components and roles in plant development and physiological functions. Computational analysis of Arabidopsis thaliana and Oryza sativa genomes for SAGA complex resulted in the identification of 17 to 18 potential candidates for SAGA subunits. We have further classified the SAGA complex based on the conserved domains. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the SAGA complex proteins are evolutionary conserved between plants, yeast and mammals. Functional annotation showed that they participate not only in chromatin remodeling and gene regulation, but also in different biological processes, which could be indirect and possibly mediated via the regulation of gene expression. The in silico expression analysis of the SAGA components in Arabidopsis and O. sativa clearly indicates that its components have a distinct expression profile at different developmental stages. The co-expression analysis of the SAGA components suggests that many of these subunits co-express at different developmental stages, during hormonal interaction and in response to stress conditions. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis of SAGA component genes further confirmed their expression in different plant tissues and stresses. The expression of representative salt, heat and light inducible genes were affected in mutant lines of SAGA subunits in Arabidopsis. Altogether, the present study reveals expedient evidences of involvement of the SAGA complex in plant gene regulation and stress responses.

  12. Catalytic Mechanism of Perosamine N-Acetyltransferase Revealed by High-Resolution X-ray Crystallographic Studies and Kinetic Analyses

    Thoden, James B.; Reinhardt, Laurie A.; Cook, Paul D.; Menden, Patrick; Cleland, W.W.; Holden, Hazel M. (UW); (Mount Union); (UW-MED)

    2012-09-17

    N-Acetylperosamine is an unusual dideoxysugar found in the O-antigens of some Gram-negative bacteria, including the pathogenic Escherichia coli strain O157:H7. The last step in its biosynthesis is catalyzed by PerB, an N-acetyltransferase belonging to the left-handed {beta}-helix superfamily of proteins. Here we describe a combined structural and functional investigation of PerB from Caulobacter crescentus. For this study, three structures were determined to 1.0 {angstrom} resolution or better: the enzyme in complex with CoA and GDP-perosamine, the protein with bound CoA and GDP-N-acetylperosamine, and the enzyme containing a tetrahedral transition state mimic bound in the active site. Each subunit of the trimeric enzyme folds into two distinct regions. The N-terminal domain is globular and dominated by a six-stranded mainly parallel {beta}-sheet. It provides most of the interactions between the protein and GDP-perosamine. The C-terminal domain consists of a left-handed {beta}-helix, which has nearly seven turns. This region provides the scaffold for CoA binding. On the basis of these high-resolution structures, site-directed mutant proteins were constructed to test the roles of His 141 and Asp 142 in the catalytic mechanism. Kinetic data and pH-rate profiles are indicative of His 141 serving as a general base. In addition, the backbone amide group of Gly 159 provides an oxyanion hole for stabilization of the tetrahedral transition state. The pH-rate profiles are also consistent with the GDP-linked amino sugar substrate entering the active site in its unprotonated form. Finally, for this investigation, we show that PerB can accept GDP-3-deoxyperosamine as an alternative substrate, thus representing the production of a novel trideoxysugar.

  13. Paradoxical attenuation of autoimmune hepatitis by oral isoniazid in wild-type and N-acetyltransferase-deficient mice.

    Metushi, Imir G; Cai, Ping; Vega, Libia; Grant, Denis M; Uetrecht, Jack

    2014-06-01

    Isoniazid (INH) treatment can cause serious liver injury and autoimmunity. There are now several lines of evidence that INH-induced liver injury is immune mediated, but this type of liver injury has not been reproduced in animals, possibly because immune tolerance is the dominant response of the liver. In this study, we immunized mice with isonicotinic acid (INA)-modified proteins and Freund's adjuvant, which led to mild experimental autoimmune hepatitis (EAH) with an increase in cells staining positive for F4/80, CD11b, CD8, CD4, CD45R, and KI67. We expected that subsequent treatment of mice with oral INH would lead to more serious immune-mediated liver injury, but paradoxically it markedly attenuated the EAH caused by immunization with INA-modified hepatic proteins. In addition, patients of the slow acetylator phenotype are at increased risk of INH-induced liver injury. Treatment of arylamine N-acetyltransferase-deficient Nat1/2(-/-) mice with INH for up to 5 weeks produced mild increases in glutamate and sorbitol dehydrogenase activities, but not severe liver injury. Female Nat1/2(-/-) mice treated with INH for 1, 3, or 7 days developed steatosis, an increase in Oil Red O staining, and abnormal mitochondrial morphology in the liver. A decrease in M1 and an increase in M2a and M2b macrophages was observed in female Nat1/2(-/-) mice treated with INH for 1, 3, or 7 days; these changes returned to baseline levels by day 35. These data indicate that INH has immunosuppressive effects, even though it is also known to induce autoantibody production and a lupus-like autoimmune syndrome in humans. PMID:24623063

  14. Enteric plexuses of two choline-acetyltransferase transgenic mouse lines: chemical neuroanatomy of the fluorescent protein-expressing nerve cells.

    Wilhelm, Márta; Lawrence, J Josh; Gábriel, Robert

    2015-02-01

    We studied cholinergic circuit elements in the enteric nervous system (ENS) of two distinct transgenic mouse lines in which fluorescent protein expression was driven by the choline-acetyltransferase (ChAT) promoter. In the first mouse line, green fluorescent protein was fused to the tau gene. This construct allowed the visualization of the fiber tracts and ganglia, however the nerve cells were poorly resolved. In the second mouse line (ChATcre-YFP), CRE/loxP recombination yielded cytosolic expression of yellow fluorescent protein (YFP). In these preparations the morphology of enteric neurons could be well studied. We also determined the neurochemical identity of ENS neurons in muscular and submucous layers using antibodies against YFP, calretinin (CALR), calbindin (CALB), and vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP). Confocal microscopic imaging was used to visualize fluorescently-conjugated secondary antibodies. In ChATcre-YFP preparations, YFP was readily apparent in somatodendritic regions of ENS neurons. In the myenteric plexus, YFP/CALR/VIP staining revealed that 34% of cholinergic cells co-labeled with CALR. Few single-stained CR-positive cells were observed. Neither YFP nor CALR co-localized with VIP. In GFP/CALB/CALR staining, all co-localization combinations were represented. In the submucosal plexus, YFP/CALR/VIP staining revealed discrete neuronal populations. However, in separate preparations, double labeling was observed for YFP/CALR and CALR/VIP. In YFP/CALR/CALB staining, all combinations of double staining and triple labeling were verified. In conclusion, the neurochemical coding of ENS neurons in these mouse lines is consistent with many observations in non-transgenic animals. Thus, they provide useful tools for physiological and pharmacological studies on distinct neurochemical subtypes of ENS neurons. PMID:25592616

  15. No evidence for role of extracellular choline-acetyltransferase in generation of gamma oscillations in rat hippocampal slices in vitro.

    Hollnagel, J O; ul Haq, R; Behrens, C J; Maslarova, A; Mody, I; Heinemann, U

    2015-01-22

    Acetylcholine (ACh) is well known to induce persistent γ-oscillations in the hippocampus when applied together with physostigmine, an inhibitor of the ACh degrading enzyme acetylcholinesterase (AChE). Here we report that physostigmine alone can also dose-dependently induce γ-oscillations in rat hippocampal slices. We hypothesized that this effect was due to the presence of choline in the extracellular space and that this choline is taken up into cholinergic fibers where it is converted to ACh by the enzyme choline-acetyltransferase (ChAT). Release of ACh from cholinergic fibers in turn may then induce γ-oscillations. We therefore tested the effects of the choline uptake inhibitor hemicholinium-3 (HC-3) on persistent γ-oscillations either induced by physostigmine alone or by co-application of ACh and physostigmine. We found that HC-3 itself did not induce γ-oscillations and also did not prevent physostigmine-induced γ-oscillation while washout of physostigmine and ACh-induced γ-oscillations was accelerated. It was recently reported that ChAT might also be present in the extracellular space (Vijayaraghavan et al., 2013). Here we show that the effect of physostigmine was prevented by the ChAT inhibitor (2-benzoylethyl)-trimethylammonium iodide (BETA) which could indicate extracellular synthesis of ACh. However, when we tested for effects of extracellularly applied acetyl-CoA, a substrate of ChAT for synthesis of ACh, physostigmine-induced γ-oscillations were attenuated. Together, these findings do not support the idea that ACh can be synthesized by an extracellularly located ChAT. PMID:25453770

  16. Valproic acid exposure decreases Cbp/p300 protein expression and histone acetyltransferase activity in P19 cells.

    Lamparter, Christina L; Winn, Louise M

    2016-09-01

    The teratogenicity of the antiepileptic drug valproic acid (VPA) is well established and its inhibition of histone deacetylases (HDAC) is proposed as an initiating factor. Recently, VPA-mediated HDAC inhibition was demonstrated to involve transcriptional downregulation of histone acetyltransferases (HATs), which was proposed to compensate for the increased acetylation resulting from HDAC inhibition. Cbp and p300 are HATs required for embryonic development and deficiencies in either are associated with congenital malformations and embryolethality. The objective of the present study was to characterize Cbp/p300 following VPA exposure in P19 cells. Consistent with previous studies, exposure to 5mM VPA over 24h induced a moderate decrease in Cbp/p300 mRNA, which preceded a strong decrease in total cellular protein mediated by ubiquitin-proteasome degradation. Nuclear Cbp/p300 protein was also decreased following VPA exposure, although to a lesser extent. Total cellular and nuclear p300 HAT activity was reduced proportionately to p300 protein levels, however while total cellular HAT activity also decreased, nuclear HAT activity was unaffected. Using the Cbp/p300 HAT inhibitor C646, we demonstrated that HAT inhibition similarly affected many of the same endpoints as VPA, including increased reactive oxygen species and caspase-3 cleavage, the latter of which could be attenuated by pre-treatment with the antioxidant catalase. C646 exposure also decreased NF-κB/p65 protein, which was not due to reduced mRNA and was not attenuated with catalase pre-treatment. This study provides support for an adaptive HAT response following VPA exposure and suggests that reduced Cbp/p300 HAT activity could contribute to VPA-mediated alterations. PMID:27381264

  17. Cloning and characterization of the serotonin N-acetyltransferase-2 gene (SNAT2) in rice (Oryza sativa).

    Byeon, Yeong; Lee, Hyoung Yool; Back, Kyoungwhan

    2016-09-01

    The penultimate enzyme in melatonin synthesis is serotonin N-acetyltransferase (SNAT), which exists as a single copy in mammals and plants. Our recent studies of the Arabidopsis snat-knockout mutant and SNAT RNAi rice (Oryza sativa) plants predicted the presence of at least one other SNAT isogene in plants; that is, the snat-knockout mutant of Arabidopsis and the SNAT RNAi rice plants still produced melatonin, even in the absence or the suppression of SNAT expression. Here, we report a molecular cloning of an SNAT isogene (OsSNAT2) from rice. The mature amino acid sequences of SNAT proteins indicated that OsSNAT2 and OsSNAT1 proteins had 39% identity values and 60% similarity. The Km and Vmax values of the purified recombinant OsSNAT2 were 371 μm and 4700 pmol/min/mg protein, respectively; the enzyme's optimal activity temperature was 45°C. Confocal microscopy showed that the OsSNAT2 protein was localized to both the cytoplasm and chloroplasts. The in vitro enzyme activity of OsSNAT2 was severely inhibited by melatonin, but the activities of sheep SNAT (OaSNAT) and rice OsSNAT1 proteins were not. The enzyme activity of OsSNAT2 was threefold higher than that of OsSNAT1, but 232-fold lower than that of OaSNAT. The OsSNAT1 and OsSNAT2 transcripts were similarly suppressed in rice leaves during the melatonin induction after cadmium treatment. Phylogenetic analyses indicated that OsSNAT1 and OsSNAT2 are distantly related, suggesting that they evolved independently from Cyanobacteria prior to the endosymbiosis event. PMID:27121038

  18. Characterization of N-acetyltransferase 1 and 2 polymorphisms and haplotype analysis for inflammatory bowel disease and sporadic colorectal carcinoma

    Cobbs Gary A

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background N-acetyltransferase 1 (NAT1 and 2 (NAT2 are polymorphic isoenzymes responsible for the metabolism of numerous drugs and carcinogens. Acetylation catalyzed by NAT1 and NAT2 are important in metabolic activation of arylamines to electrophilic intermediates that initiate carcinogenesis. Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD consist of Crohn's disease (CD and ulcerative colitis (UC, both are associated with increased colorectal cancer (CRC risk. We hypothesized that NAT1 and/or NAT2 polymorphisms contribute to the increased cancer evident in IBD. Methods A case control study was performed with 729 Caucasian participants, 123 CRC, 201 CD, 167 UC, 15 IBD dysplasia/cancer and 223 controls. NAT1 and NAT2 genotyping were performed using Taqman based techniques. Eight single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs were characterized for NAT1 and 7 SNPs for NAT2. Haplotype frequencies were estimated using an Expectation-Maximization (EM method. Disease groups were compared to a control group for the frequencies at each individual SNP separately. The same groups were compared for the frequencies of NAT1 and NAT2 haplotypes and deduced NAT2 phenotypes. Results No statistically significant differences were found for any comparison. Strong linkage disequilibrium was present among both the NAT1 SNPs and the NAT2 SNPs. Conclusion This study did not demonstrate an association between NAT1 and NAT2 polymorphisms and IBD or sporadic CRC, although power calculations indicate this study had sufficient sample size to detect differences in frequency as small as 0.05 to 0.15 depending on SNP or haplotype.

  19. Expression, crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analyses of two N-terminal acetyltransferase-related proteins from Thermoplasma acidophilum

    An N-terminal acetyltransferase ARD1 subunit-related protein (Ta0058) and an N-terminal acetyltransferase-related protein (Ta1140) from T. acidophilum were crystallized. X-ray diffraction data were collected to 2.17 and 2.40 Å, respectively. N-terminal acetylation is one of the most common protein modifications in eukaryotes, occurring in approximately 80–90% of cytosolic mammalian proteins and about 50% of yeast proteins. ARD1 (arrest-defective protein 1), together with NAT1 (N-acetyltransferase protein 1) and possibly NAT5, is responsible for the NatA activity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In mammals, ARD1 is involved in cell proliferation, neuronal development and cancer. Interestingly, it has been reported that mouse ARD1 (mARD1225) mediates ∊-acetylation of hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) and thereby enhances HIF-1α ubiquitination and degradation. Here, the preliminary X-ray crystallographic analyses of two N-terminal acetyltransferase-related proteins encoded by the Ta0058 and Ta1140 genes of Thermoplasma acidophilum are reported. The Ta0058 protein is related to an N-terminal acetyltransferase complex ARD1 subunit, while Ta1140 is a putative N-terminal acetyltransferase-related protein. Ta0058 shows 26% amino-acid sequence identity to both mARD1225 and human ARD1235.The sequence identity between Ta0058 and Ta1140 is 28%. Ta0058 and Ta1140 were overexpressed in Escherichia coli fused with an N-terminal purification tag. Ta0058 was crystallized at 297 K using a reservoir solution consisting of 0.1 M sodium acetate pH 4.6, 8%(w/v) polyethylene glycol 4000 and 35%(v/v) glycerol. X-ray diffraction data were collected to 2.17 Å. The Ta0058 crystals belong to space group P41 (or P43), with unit-cell parameters a = b = 49.334, c = 70.384 Å, α = β = γ = 90°. The asymmetric unit contains a monomer, giving a calculated crystal volume per protein weight (VM) of 2.13 Å3 Da−1 and a solvent content of 42.1%. Ta1140 was also crystallized at 297 K using

  20. Conversion of deoxynivalenol to 3-acetyldeoxynivalenol in barley-derived fuel ethanol co-products with yeast expressing trichothecene 3-O-acetyltransferases

    Brooks Wynse S

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The trichothecene mycotoxin deoxynivalenol (DON may be concentrated in distillers dried grains with solubles (DDGS; a co-product of fuel ethanol fermentation when grain containing DON is used to produce fuel ethanol. Even low levels of DON (≤ 5 ppm in DDGS sold as feed pose a significant threat to the health of monogastric animals. New and improved strategies to reduce DON in DDGS need to be developed and implemented to address this problem. Enzymes known as trichothecene 3-O-acetyltransferases convert DON to 3-acetyldeoxynivalenol (3ADON, and may reduce its toxicity in plants and animals. Results Two Fusarium trichothecene 3-O-acetyltransferases (FgTRI101 and FfTRI201 were cloned and expressed in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae during a series of small-scale ethanol fermentations using barley (Hordeum vulgare. DON was concentrated 1.6 to 8.2 times in DDGS compared with the starting ground grain. During the fermentation process, FgTRI101 converted 9.2% to 55.3% of the DON to 3ADON, resulting in DDGS with reductions in DON and increases in 3ADON in the Virginia winter barley cultivars Eve, Thoroughbred and Price, and the experimental line VA06H-25. Analysis of barley mashes prepared from the barley line VA04B-125 showed that yeast expressing FfTRI201 were more effective at acetylating DON than those expressing FgTRI101; DON conversion for FfTRI201 ranged from 26.1% to 28.3%, whereas DON conversion for FgTRI101 ranged from 18.3% to 21.8% in VA04B-125 mashes. Ethanol yields were highest with the industrial yeast strain Ethanol Red®, which also consumed galactose when present in the mash. Conclusions This study demonstrates the potential of using yeast expressing a trichothecene 3-O-acetyltransferase to modify DON during commercial fuel ethanol fermentation.

  1. RNAi-Mediated Knock-Down of Arylamine N-acetyltransferase-1 Expression Induces E-cadherin Up-Regulation and Cell-Cell Contact Growth Inhibition

    Tiang, Jacky M; Butcher, Neville J.; Cullinane, Carleen; Humbert, Patrick O.; Minchin, Rodney F

    2011-01-01

    Arylamine N-acetyltransferase-1 (NAT1) is an enzyme that catalyzes the biotransformation of arylamine and hydrazine substrates. It also has a role in the catabolism of the folate metabolite p-aminobenzoyl glutamate. Recent bioinformatics studies have correlated NAT1 expression with various cancer subtypes. However, a direct role for NAT1 in cell biology has not been established. In this study, we have knocked down NAT1 in the colon adenocarcinoma cell-line HT-29 and found a marked change in c...

  2. Circadian Dynamics of the Cone-Rod Homeobox (CRX) Transcription Factor in the Rat Pineal Gland and Its Role in Regulation of Arylalkylamine N-Acetyltransferase (AANAT)

    Rohde, Kristian; Rovsing, Louise; Ho, Anthony K;

    2014-01-01

    The cone-rod homeobox (Crx) gene encodes a transcription factor in the retina and pineal gland. Crx deficiency influences the pineal transcriptome, including a reduced expression of arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase (Aanat), a key enzyme in nocturnal pineal melatonin production. However, previou...... the rhythmic nature of pineal CRX protein may directly modulate the daily profile of Aanat expression by inducing nighttime expression of this enzyme, thus facilitating nocturnal melatonin synthesis in addition to its role in ensuring a correct tissue distribution of Aanat expression....

  3. N-Acetyltransferase Genotypes and the Pharmacokinetics and Tolerability of para-Aminosalicylic Acid in Patients with Drug-Resistant Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    Sherwin K. B. Sy; de Kock, Lizanne; Diacon, Andreas H.; Werely, Cedric J.; Xia, Huiming; Rosenkranz, Bernd; van der Merwe, Lize; Donald, Peter R.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the relationships between N-acetyltransferase genotypes, pharmacokinetics, and tolerability of granular slow-release para-aminosalicylic acid (GSR-PAS) in tuberculosis patients. The study was a randomized, two-period, open-label, crossover design wherein each patient received 4 g GSR-PAS twice daily or 8 g once daily alternately. The PAS concentration-time profiles were modeled by a one-compartment disposition model with three transit compartments in serie...

  4. Identification of a novel 6'-N-aminoglycoside acetyltransferase, AAC(6')-Iak, from a multidrug-resistant clinical isolate of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia.

    Tada, Tatsuya; Miyoshi-Akiyama, Tohru; Dahal, Rajan K; Mishra, Shyam K; Shimada, Kayo; Ohara, Hiroshi; Kirikae, Teruo; Pokhrel, Bharat M

    2014-10-01

    Stenotrophomonas maltophilia IOMTU250 has a novel 6'-N-aminoglycoside acetyltransferase-encoding gene, aac(6')-Iak. The encoded protein, AAC(6')-Iak, consists of 153 amino acids and has 86.3% identity to AAC(6')-Iz. Escherichia coli transformed with a plasmid containing aac(6')-Iak exhibited decreased susceptibility to arbekacin, dibekacin, neomycin, netilmicin, sisomicin, and tobramycin. Thin-layer chromatography showed that AAC(6')-Iak acetylated amikacin, arbekacin, dibekacin, isepamicin, kanamycin, neomycin, netilmicin, sisomicin, and tobramycin but not apramycin, gentamicin, or lividomycin. PMID:25092711

  5. Target capture and target ghosts

    Auerbach, Steven P.

    1996-05-01

    Optimal detection methods for small targets rely on whitened matched filters, which convolve the measured data with the signal model, and whiten the result with the noise covariance. In real-world implementations of such filters, the noise covariance must be estimated from the data, and the resulting covariance estimate may be corrupted by presence of the target. The resulting loss in SNR is called 'target capture'. Target capture is often thought to be a problem only for bright targets. This presentation shows that target capture also arises for dim targets, leading to an SNR loss which is independent of target strength and depends on the averaging method used to estimate the noise covariance. This loss is due to a 'coherent beat' between the true noise and that portion of the estimated noise covariance due to the target. This beat leads to 'ghost targets', which diminish the target SNR by producing a negative target ghost at the target's position. A quantitative estimate of this effect will be given, and shown to agree with numerical results. The effect of averaging on SNR is also discussed for data scenes with synthetic injected targets, in cases where the noise covariance is estimated using 'no target' data. For these cases, it is shown that the so-called 'optimal' filter, which uses the true noise covariance, is actually worse than a 'sub-optimal' filter which estimates the noise from scene. This apparent contradiction is resolved by showing that the optimal filter is best if the same filter is used for many scenes, but is outperformed by a filter adapted to a specific scene.

  6. Platelet-activating factor (PAF) stimulates the PAF-synthesizing enzyme acetyl-CoA:1-alkyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine O2-acetyltransferase and PAF synthesis in neutrophils.

    Doebber, T W; Wu, M. S.

    1987-01-01

    Platelet activating factor (1-alkyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine; PAF) induced in isolated rat peritoneal and human peripheral neutrophils a rapid and potent activation of the PAF biosynthetic enzyme acetyl-CoA:1-alkyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine O2-acetyltransferase (EC 2.3.1.67). The PAF-induced activation of the neutrophil acetyltransferase (8-10 times basal neutrophil activity) was maximal within 30 sec after PAF addition, as was the PAF-stimulated degranulation. After 1 min of PA...

  7. 3D structure prediction of histone acetyltransferase (HAC proteins of the p300/CBP family and their interactome in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Amar Cemanovic

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Histone acetylation is an important posttranslational modification correlated with gene activation. In Arabidopsis thaliana the histone acetyltransferase (HAC proteins of the CBP family are homologous to animal p300/CREB (cAMP-responsive element-binding proteins, which are important histone acetyltransferases participating in many physiological processes, including proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. In this study the 3-D structure of all HAC protein subunits in Arabidopsis thaliana: HAC1, HAC2, HAC4, HAC5 and HAC12 is predicted by homology modeling and confirmed by Ramachandran plot analysis. The amino acid sequences HAC family members are highly similar to the sequences of the homologous human p300/CREB protein. Conservation of p300/CBP domains among the HAC proteins was examined further by sequence alignment and pattern search. The domains of p300/CBP required for the HAC function, such as PHD, TAZ and ZZ domains, are conserved in all HAC proteins. Interactome analysis revealed that HAC1, HAC5 and HAC12 proteins interact with S-adenosylmethionine-dependent methyltransferase domaincontaining protein that shows methyltransferase activity, suggesting an additional function of the HAC proteins. Additionally, HAC5 has a strong interaction value for the putative c-myb-like transcription factor MYB3R-4, which suggests that it also may have a function in regulation of DNA replication.

  8. Two proteins with ornithine acetyltransferase activity show different functions in Streptomyces clavuligerus: Oat2 modulates clavulanic acid biosynthesis in response to arginine.

    de la Fuente, A; Martín, J F; Rodríguez-García, A; Liras, P

    2004-10-01

    The oat2 gene, located in the clavulanic acid gene cluster in Streptomyces clavuligerus, is similar to argJ, which encodes N-acetylornithine:glutamic acid acetyltransferase activity. Purified proteins obtained by expression in Escherichia coli of the argJ and oat2 genes of S. clavuligerus posses N-acetyltransferase activity. The kinetics and substrate specificities of both proteins are very similar. Deletion of the oat2 gene did not affect the total N-acetylornithine transferase activity and slightly reduced the formation of clavulanic acid under standard culture conditions. However, the oat2 mutant produced more clavulanic acid than the parental strain in cultures supplemented with high levels (above 1 mM) of arginine. The purified S. clavuligerus ArgR protein bound the arginine box in the oat2 promoter, and the expression of oat2 was higher in mutants with a disruption in argR (arginine-deregulated), confirming that the Arg boxes of oat2 are functional in vivo. Our results suggest that the Oat2 protein or one of its reaction products has a regulatory role that modulates clavulanic acid biosynthesis in response to high arginine concentrations. PMID:15375131

  9. Effects of single nucleotide polymorphisms on human N-acetyltransferase 2 structure and dynamics by molecular dynamics simulation.

    M Rajasekaran

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Arylamine N-acetyltransferase 2 (NAT2 is an important catalytic enzyme that metabolizes the carcinogenic arylamines, hydrazine drugs and chemicals. This enzyme is highly polymorphic in different human populations. Several polymorphisms of NAT2, including the single amino acid substitutions R64Q, I114T, D122N, L137F, Q145P, R197Q, and G286E, are classified as slow acetylators, whereas the wild-type NAT2 is classified as a fast acetylator. The slow acetylators are often associated with drug toxicity and efficacy as well as cancer susceptibility. The biological functions of these 7 mutations have previously been characterized, but the structural basis behind the reduced catalytic activity and reduced protein level is not clear. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We performed multiple molecular dynamics simulations of these mutants as well as NAT2 to investigate the structural and dynamical effects throughout the protein structure, specifically the catalytic triad, cofactor binding site, and the substrate binding pocket. None of these mutations induced unfolding; instead, their effects were confined to the inter-domain, domain 3 and 17-residue insert region, where the flexibility was significantly reduced relative to the wild-type. Structural effects of these mutations propagate through space and cause a change in catalytic triad conformation, cofactor binding site, substrate binding pocket size/shape and electrostatic potential. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results showed that the dynamical properties of all the mutant structures, especially in inter-domain, domain 3 and 17-residue insert region were affected in the same manner. Similarly, the electrostatic potential of all the mutants were altered and also the functionally important regions such as catalytic triad, cofactor binding site, and substrate binding pocket adopted different orientation and/or conformation relative to the wild-type that may affect the functions of the mutants

  10. Chromatin-regulating proteins as targets for cancer therapy

    Chromatin-regulating proteins represent a large class of novel targets for cancer therapy. In the context of radiotherapy, acetylation and deacetylation of histones by histone acetyltransferases (HATs) and histone deacetylases (HDACs) play important roles in the repair of DNA double-strand breaks generated by ionizing irradiation, and are therefore attractive targets for radiosensitization. Small-molecule inhibitors of HATs (garcinol, anacardic acid and curcumin) and HDACs (vorinostat, sodium butyrate and valproic acid) have been shown to sensitize cancer cells to ionizing irradiation in preclinical models, and some of these molecules are being tested in clinical trials, either alone or in combination with radiotherapy. Meanwhile, recent large-scale genome analyses have identified frequent mutations in genes encoding chromatin-regulating proteins, especially in those encoding subunits of the SWI/SNF chromatin-remodeling complex, in various human cancers. These observations have driven researchers toward development of targeted therapies against cancers carrying these mutations. DOT1L inhibition in MLL-rearranged leukemia, EZH2 inhibition in EZH2-mutant or MLL-rearranged hematologic malignancies and SNF5-deficient tumors, BRD4 inhibition in various hematologic malignancies, and BRM inhibition in BRG1-deficient tumors have demonstrated promising anti-tumor effects in preclinical models, and these strategies are currently awaiting clinical application. Overall, the data collected so far suggest that targeting chromatin-regulating proteins is a promising strategy for tomorrow's cancer therapy, including radiotherapy and molecularly targeted chemotherapy. (author)

  11. Chromatin-regulating proteins as targets for cancer therapy.

    Oike, Takahiro; Ogiwara, Hideaki; Amornwichet, Napapat; Nakano, Takashi; Kohno, Takashi

    2014-07-01

    Chromatin-regulating proteins represent a large class of novel targets for cancer therapy. In the context of radiotherapy, acetylation and deacetylation of histones by histone acetyltransferases (HATs) and histone deacetylases (HDACs) play important roles in the repair of DNA double-strand breaks generated by ionizing irradiation, and are therefore attractive targets for radiosensitization. Small-molecule inhibitors of HATs (garcinol, anacardic acid and curcumin) and HDACs (vorinostat, sodium butyrate and valproic acid) have been shown to sensitize cancer cells to ionizing irradiation in preclinical models, and some of these molecules are being tested in clinical trials, either alone or in combination with radiotherapy. Meanwhile, recent large-scale genome analyses have identified frequent mutations in genes encoding chromatin-regulating proteins, especially in those encoding subunits of the SWI/SNF chromatin-remodeling complex, in various human cancers. These observations have driven researchers toward development of targeted therapies against cancers carrying these mutations. DOT1L inhibition in MLL-rearranged leukemia, EZH2 inhibition in EZH2-mutant or MLL-rearranged hematologic malignancies and SNF5-deficient tumors, BRD4 inhibition in various hematologic malignancies, and BRM inhibition in BRG1-deficient tumors have demonstrated promising anti-tumor effects in preclinical models, and these strategies are currently awaiting clinical application. Overall, the data collected so far suggest that targeting chromatin-regulating proteins is a promising strategy for tomorrow's cancer therapy, including radiotherapy and molecularly targeted chemotherapy. PMID:24522270

  12. Antiproton Target

    1980-01-01

    Antiproton target used for the AA (antiproton accumulator). The first type of antiproton production target used from 1980 to 1982 comprised a rod of copper 3mm diameter and 120mm long embedded in a graphite cylinder that was itself pressed into a finned aluminium container. This assembly was air-cooled and it was used in conjunction with the Van der Meer magnetic horn. In 1983 Fermilab provided us with lithium lenses to replace the horn with a view to increasing the antiproton yield by about 30%. These lenses needed a much shorter target made of heavy metal - iridium was chosen for this purpose. The 50 mm iridium rod was housed in an extension to the original finned target container so that it could be brought very close to the entrance to the lithium lens. Picture 1 shows this target assembly and Picture 2 shows it mounted together with the lithium lens. These target containers had a short lifetime due to a combination of beam heating and radiation damage. This led to the design of the water-cooled target in...

  13. Structures of the N-acetyltransferase domain of Xylella fastidiosa N-acetyl-l-glutamate synthase/kinase with and without a His tag bound to N-acetyl-l-glutamate

    Zhao, Gengxiang; Jin, Zhongmin; Allewell, Norma M.; Tuchman, Mendel; Shi, Dashuang

    2015-01-01

    Structures of the catalytic N-acetyltransferase (NAT) domain of the bifunctional N-acetyl-l-glutamate synthase/kinase (NAGS/K) from Xylella fastidiosa bound to N-acetyl-l-glutamate (NAG) with and without an N-terminal His tag have been solved and refined at 1.7 and 1.4 Å resolution, respectively.

  14. Phenotypic variability in 49 cases of ESCO2 mutations, including novel missense and codon deletion in the acetyltransferase domain, correlates with ESCO2 expression and establishes the clinical criteria for Roberts syndrome

    Vega, H; Trainer, A H; Gordillo, M;

    2010-01-01

    Roberts syndrome (RBS) and SC phocomelia are caused by mutations in ESCO2, which codes for an acetyltransferase involved in the regulation of sister chromatid cohesion. Of 26 mutations described to date, only one missense mutation has been reported and all others are predicted to be truncating mu...

  15. The increase of choline acetyltransferase activity by docosahexaenoic acid in NG108-15 cells grown in serum-free medium is independent of its effect on cell growth

    Machová, Eva; Málková, Barbora; Lisá, Věra; Nováková, Jana; Doležal, Vladimír

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 31, č. 10 (2006), s. 1239-1246. ISSN 0364-3190 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA5011206; GA MŠk(CZ) LC554 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : choline acetyltransferase activity * docosahexaenoic acid * defined medium Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 2.139, year: 2006

  16. The epigenetic regulators CBP and p300 facilitate leukemogenesis and represent therapeutic targets in acute myeloid leukemia.

    Giotopoulos, G; Chan, W-I; Horton, S J; Ruau, D; Gallipoli, P; Fowler, A; Crawley, C; Papaemmanuil, E; Campbell, P J; Göttgens, B; Van Deursen, J M; Cole, P A; Huntly, B J P

    2016-01-21

    Growing evidence links abnormal epigenetic control to the development of hematological malignancies. Accordingly, inhibition of epigenetic regulators is emerging as a promising therapeutic strategy. The acetylation status of lysine residues in histone tails is one of a number of epigenetic post-translational modifications that alter DNA-templated processes, such as transcription, to facilitate malignant transformation. Although histone deacetylases are already being clinically targeted, the role of histone lysine acetyltransferases (KAT) in malignancy is less well characterized. We chose to study this question in the context of acute myeloid leukemia (AML), where, using in vitro and in vivo genetic ablation and knockdown experiments in murine models, we demonstrate a role for the epigenetic regulators CBP and p300 in the induction and maintenance of AML. Furthermore, using selective small molecule inhibitors of their lysine acetyltransferase activity, we validate CBP/p300 as therapeutic targets in vitro across a wide range of human AML subtypes. We proceed to show that growth retardation occurs through the induction of transcriptional changes that induce apoptosis and cell-cycle arrest in leukemia cells and finally demonstrate the efficacy of the KAT inhibitors in decreasing clonogenic growth of primary AML patient samples. Taken together, these data suggest that CBP/p300 are promising therapeutic targets across multiple subtypes in AML. PMID:25893291

  17. Targeted Learning

    van der Laan, Mark J

    2011-01-01

    The statistics profession is at a unique point in history. The need for valid statistical tools is greater than ever; data sets are massive, often measuring hundreds of thousands of measurements for a single subject. The field is ready to move towards clear objective benchmarks under which tools can be evaluated. Targeted learning allows (1) the full generalization and utilization of cross-validation as an estimator selection tool so that the subjective choices made by humans are now made by the machine, and (2) targeting the fitting of the probability distribution of the data toward the targe

  18. Insight into the secondary structure of chloramphenicol acetyltransferase type I — computer analysis and FT-IR spectroscopic characterization of the protein structure

    Andreeva, A. E.; Karamancheva, I. R.

    2001-05-01

    The secondary structure of chloramphenicol O-acetyltransferase type I (CAT I) and an N-terminal deleted mutant has been studied by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The analysis of the amide I band of different samples (KBr, hydrated films and buffer solution) by Fourier self-deconvolution followed by a curve fitting was performed. The spectroscopic data have been utilized to determine the α-helix and β-structure % contents, which depend strongly on the protein sample preparation. Furthermore, the secondary structure of the enzyme-inhibitor Crystal Violet complex was analyzed. The observed difference in the secondary structural contents suggests that some conformational changes of the enzyme are induced by the inhibitor after binding.

  19. Acetylation of retinal histones in diabetes increases inflammatory proteins: effects of minocycline and manipulation of histone acetyltransferase (HAT) and histone deacetylase (HDAC).

    Kadiyala, Chandra Sekhar Rao; Zheng, Ling; Du, Yunpeng; Yohannes, Elizabeth; Kao, Hung-Ying; Miyagi, Masaru; Kern, Timothy S

    2012-07-27

    Histone acetylation was significantly increased in retinas from diabetic rats, and this acetylation was inhibited in diabetics treated with minocycline, a drug known to inhibit early diabetic retinopathy in animals. Histone acetylation and expression of inflammatory proteins that have been implicated in the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy were increased likewise in cultured retinal Müller glia grown in a diabetes-like concentration of glucose. Both the acetylation and induction of the inflammatory proteins in elevated glucose levels were significantly inhibited by inhibitors of histone acetyltransferase (garcinol and antisense against the histone acetylase, p300) or activators of histone deacetylase (theophylline and resveratrol) and were increased by the histone deacetylase inhibitor, suberolylanilide hydroxamic acid. We conclude that hyperglycemia causes acetylation of retinal histones (and probably other proteins) and that the acetylation contributes to the hyperglycemia-induced up-regulation of proinflammatory proteins and thereby to the development of diabetic retinopathy. PMID:22648458

  20. A novel method to quantify the activity of alcohol acetyltransferase Using a SnO2-based sensor of electronic nose.

    Hu, Zhongqiu; Li, Xiaojing; Wang, Huxuan; Niu, Chen; Yuan, Yahong; Yue, Tianli

    2016-07-15

    Alcohol acetyltransferase (AATFase) extensively catalyzes the reactions of alcohols to acetic esters in microorganisms and plants. In this work, a novel method has been proposed to quantify the activity of AATFase using a SnO2-based sensor of electronic nose, which was determined on the basis of its higher sensitivity to the reducing alcohol than the oxidizing ester. The maximum value of the first-derivative of the signals from the SnO2-based sensor was therein found to be an eigenvalue of isoamyl alcohol concentration. Quadratic polynomial regression perfectly fitted the correlation between the eigenvalue and the isoamyl alcohol concentration. The method was used to determine the AATFase activity in this type of reaction by calculating the conversion rate of isoamyl alcohol. The proposed method has been successfully applied to determine the AATFase activity of a cider yeast strain. Compared with GC-MS, the method shows promises with ideal recovery and low cost. PMID:26948643

  1. N-acetyltransferase 2 (NAT2) gene polymorphism as a predisposing factor for phenytoin intoxication in tuberculous meningitis or tuberculoma patients having seizures - A pilot study

    Adole, Prashant S.; Kharbanda, Parampreet S.; Sharma, Sadhna

    2016-01-01

    Background & objectives: Simultaneous administration of phenytoin and isoniazid (INH) in tuberculous meningitis (TBM) or tuberculoma patients with seizures results in higher plasma phenytoin level and thus phenytoin intoxication. N-acetyltransferase 2 (NAT2) enzyme catalyses two acetylation reactions in INH metabolism and NAT2 gene polymorphism leads to slow and rapid acetylators. The present study was aimed to evaluate the effect of allelic variants of N-acetyltransferase 2 (NAT2) gene as a predisposing factor for phenytoin toxicity in patients with TBM or tuberculoma having seizures, and taking INH and phenytoin simultaneously. Methods: Sixty patients with TBM or tuberculoma with seizures and taking INH and phenytoin simultaneously for a minimum period of seven days were included in study. Plasma phenytoin was measured by high performance liquid chromatography. NAT2 gene polymorphism was studied using restriction fragment length polymorphism and allele specific PCR. Results: The patients were grouped into those having phenytoin intoxication and those with normal phenytoin level, and also classified as rapid or slow acetylators by NAT2 genotyping. Genotypic analysis showed that of the seven SNPs (single nucleotide polymorphisms) of NAT2 gene studied, six mutations were found to be associated with phenytoin intoxication. For rs1041983 (C282T), rs1799929 (C481T), rs1799931 (G857A), rs1799930 (G590A), rs1208 (A803G) and rs1801280 (T341C) allelic variants, the proportion of homozygous mutant was higher in phenytoin intoxicated group than in phenytoin non-intoxicated group. Interpretation & conclusions: Homozygous mutant allele of NAT2 gene at 481site may act as a predisposing factor for phenytoin intoxication among TBM or tuberculoma patients having seizures. PMID:27488001

  2. Lysosome-dependent p300/FOXP3 degradation and limits Treg cell functions and enhances targeted therapy against cancers.

    Du, Taofeng; Nagai, Yasuhiro; Xiao, Yan; Greene, Mark I; Zhang, Hongtao

    2013-08-01

    p300 is one of several acetyltransferases that regulate FOXP3 acetylation and functions. Our recent studies have defined a complex set of histone acetyltransferase interactions which can lead to enhanced or repressed changes in FOXP3 function. We have explored the use of a natural p300 inhibitor, Garcinol, as a tool to understand mechanisms by which p300 regulates FOXP3 acetylation. In the presence of Garcinol, p300 appears to become disassociated from the FOXP3 complex and undergoes lysosome-dependent degradation. As a consequence of p300's physical absence, FOXP3 becomes less acetylated and eventually degraded, a process that cannot be rescued by the proteasome inhibitor MG132. p300 plays a complex role in FOXP3 acetylation, as it could also acetylate a subset of four Lys residues that repressively regulate total FOXP3 acetylation. Garcinol acts as a degradation device to reduce the suppressive activity of regulatory T cells (Treg) and to enhance the in vivo anti-tumor activity of a targeted therapeutic anti-p185(her2/neu) (ERBB2) antibody in MMTV-neu transgenics implanted with neu transformed breast tumor cells. Our studies provide the rationale for molecules that disrupt p300 stability to limit Treg functions in targeted therapies for cancers. PMID:23644046

  3. Accelerator target

    Schlyer, David J. (Bellport, NY); Ferrieri, Richard A. (Patchogue, NY); Koehler, Conrad (Miller Place, NY)

    1999-01-01

    A target includes a body having a depression in a front side for holding a sample for irradiation by a particle beam to produce a radioisotope. Cooling fins are disposed on a backside of the body opposite the depression. A foil is joined to the body front side to cover the depression and sample therein. A perforate grid is joined to the body atop the foil for supporting the foil and for transmitting the particle beam therethrough. A coolant is circulated over the fins to cool the body during the particle beam irradiation of the sample in the depression.

  4. Differences in Enzymatic Properties of the Saccharomyces kudriavzevii and Saccharomyces uvarum Alcohol Acetyltransferases and Their Impact on Aroma-Active Compounds Production

    Stribny, Jiri; Querol, Amparo; Pérez-Torrado, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Higher alcohols and acetate esters belong to the most important yeast secondary metabolites that significantly contribute to the overall flavor and aroma profile of fermented products. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, esterification of higher alcohols is catalyzed mainly by the alcohol acetyltransferases encoded by genes ATF1 and ATF2. Previous investigation has shown other Saccharomyces species, e.g., S. kudriavzevii and S. uvarum, to vary in aroma-active higher alcohols and acetate esters formation when compared to S. cerevisiae. Here, we aimed to analyze the enzymes encoded by the ATF1 and ATF2 genes from S. kudriavzevii (SkATF1, SkATF2) and S. uvarum (SuATF1, SuATF2). The heterologous expression of the individual ATF1 and ATF2 genes in a host S. cerevisiae resulted in the enhanced production of several higher alcohols and acetate esters. Particularly, an increase of 2-phenylethyl acetate production by the strains that harbored ATF1 and ATF2 genes from S. kudriavzevii and S. uvarum was observed. When grown with individual amino acids as the nitrogen source, the strain that harbored SkATF1 showed particularly high 2-phenylethyl acetate production and the strains with introduced SkATF2 or SuATF2 revealed increased production of isobutyl acetate, isoamyl acetate, and 2-phenylethyl acetate compared to the reference strains with endogenous ATF genes. The alcohol acetyltransferase activities of the individual Atf1 and Atf2 enzymes measured in the cell extracts of the S. cerevisiae atf1 atf2 iah1 triple-null strain were detected for all the measured substrates. This indicated that S. kudriavzevii and S. uvarum Atf enzymes had broad range substrate specificity as S. cerevisiae Atf enzymes. Individual Atf1 enzymes exhibited markedly different kinetic properties since SkAtf1p showed c. twofold higher and SuAtf1p c. threefold higher Km for isoamyl alcohol than ScAtf1p. Together these results indicated that the differences found among the three Saccharomyces species during the

  5. Modeling the Interaction between β-Amyloid Aggregates and Choline Acetyltransferase Activity and Its Relation with Cholinergic Dysfunction through Two-Enzyme/Two-Compartment Model

    Hedia Fgaier

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of β-amyloid aggregates on activity of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT which is responsible for synthesizing acetylcholine (ACh in human brain is investigated through the two-enzyme/two-compartment (2E2C model where the presynaptic neuron is considered as compartment 1 while both the synaptic cleft and the postsynaptic neuron are considered as compartment 2 through suggesting three different kinetic mechanisms for the inhibition effect. It is found that the incorporation of ChAT inhibition by β-amyloid aggregates into the 2E2C model is able to yield dynamic solutions for concentrations of generated β-amyloid, ACh, choline, acetate, and pH in addition to the rates of ACh synthesis and ACh hydrolysis in compartments 1 and 2. It is observed that ChAT activity needs a high concentration of β-amyloid aggregates production rate. It is found that ChAT activity is reduced significantly when neurons are exposed to high levels of β-amyloid aggregates leading to reduction in levels of ACh which is one of the most significant physiological symptoms of AD. Furthermore, the system of ACh neurocycle is dominated by the oscillatory behavior when ChAT enzyme is completely inhibited by β-amyloid. It is observed that the direct inactivation of ChAT by β-amyloid aggregates may be a probable mechanism contributing to the development of AD.

  6. Chemically induced oxidative stress increases polyamine levels by activating the transcription of ornithine decarboxylase and spermidine/spermine-N1-acetyltransferase in human hepatoma HUH7 cells.

    Smirnova, Olga A; Isaguliants, Maria G; Hyvonen, Mervi T; Keinanen, Tuomo A; Tunitskaya, Vera L; Vepsalainen, Jouko; Alhonen, Leena; Kochetkov, Sergey N; Ivanov, Alexander V

    2012-09-01

    Biogenic polyamines spermine and spermidine participate in numerous cellular processes including transcription, RNA processing and translation. Specifically, they counteract oxidative stress, an alteration of cell redox balance involved in generation and progression of various pathological states including cancer. Here, we investigated how chemically induced oxidative stress affects polyamine metabolism, specifically the expression and activities of enzymes catalyzing polyamine synthesis (ornithine decarboxylase; ODC) and degradation (spermidine/spermine-N(1)-acetyltransferase; SSAT), in human hepatoma cells. Oxidative stress induced the up-regulation of ODC and SSAT gene transcription mediated by Nrf2, and in case of SSAT, also by NF-κB transcription factors. Activation of transcription led to the elevated intracellular activities of both enzymes. The balance in antagonistic activities of ODC and SSAT in the stressed hepatoma cells was shifted towards polyamine biosynthesis, which resulted in increased intracellular levels of putrescine, spermidine, and spermine. Accumulation of putrescine is indicating for accelerated degradation of polyamines by SSAT - acetylpolyamine oxidase (APAO) pathway generating toxic products that promote carcinogenesis, whereas accelerated polyamine synthesis via activation of ODC is favorable for proliferation of cells including those sub-lethally damaged by oxidative stress. PMID:22579641

  7. Lipopolysaccharide-induced anti-inflammatory acute phase response is enhanced in spermidine/spermine N1-acetyltransferase (SSAT) overexpressing mice.

    Pirnes-Karhu, Sini; Sironen, Reijo; Alhonen, Leena; Uimari, Anne

    2012-02-01

    Bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is an effective activator of the components of innate immunity. It has been shown that polyamines and their metabolic enzymes affect the LPS-induced immune response by modulating both pro- and anti-inflammatory actions. On the other hand, LPS causes changes in cellular polyamine metabolism. In this study, the LPS-induced inflammatory response in spermidine/spermine N(1)-acetyltransferase overexpressing transgenic mice (SSAT mice) was analyzed. In liver and kidneys, LPS enhanced the activity of the polyamine biosynthetic enzyme ornithine decarboxylase and increased the intracellular putrescine content in both SSAT overexpressing and wild-type mice. In survival studies, the enhanced polyamine catabolism and concomitantly altered cellular polyamine pools in SSAT mice did not affect the LPS-induced mortality of these animals. However, in the acute phase of LPS-induced inflammatory response, the serum levels of proinflammatory cytokines interleukin-1β and interferon-γ were significantly reduced and, on the contrary, anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-10 was significantly increased in the sera of SSAT mice compared with the wild-type animals. In addition, hepatic acute-phase proteins C-reactive protein, haptoglobin and α(1)-acid glycoprotein were expressed in higher amounts in SSAT mice than in the wild-type animals. In summary, the study suggests that SSAT overexpression obtained in SSAT mice enhances the anti-inflammatory actions in the acute phase of LPS-induced immune response. PMID:21814792

  8. Isolation of Two Unknown Genes Potentially Involved in Differentiation of the Hematopoietic Pathway, and Studies of Spermidine/Spermine Acetyltransferase Regulation

    Kubera, C.; Gavin, I.; Huberman, E.

    2002-01-01

    Differential display identified a number of candidate genes involved with growth and differentiation in the human leukemia cell lines HL-60 and HL-525. Two of these genes were previously unknown, and one is the gene for the enzyme spermidine/spermine acetyltransferase (SSAT). One of our objectives is to isolate and sequence the unknown genes, 631A1 and 510C1, in order to characterize them and determine their functions. The other is to determine how SSAT is regulated, and look at how the polyamines that SSAT regulates effect macrophage differentiation. By screening the CEM T-cell DNA library and the fetal brain library, we were able to identify clones that had inserts with homology to the 631A1 cDNA probe sequence. The insert was amplified using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and is currently being sent to the University of Chicago for automated sequencing. The library screens for 510C1 are currently underway, but hybridization of the 510C1 cDNA probe with nylon membranes containing CEM library phage DNA produced strong signal, indicating the gene is there. SSAT experiments identified that the rate-limiting enzyme that marks the polyamines spermidine and spermine for degradation is regulated by PKC and a transcription factor called Nrf2. The knowledge of regulation and function of these genes involved in macrophage differentiation will provide new insight into this cellular process, potentially making it possible to discover the roots of the problems that cause cancerous diseases.

  9. An antioxidative mechanism mediated by the yeast N-acetyltransferase Mpr1: oxidative stress-induced arginine synthesis and its physiological role.

    Nishimura, Akira; Kotani, Tetsuya; Sasano, Yu; Takagi, Hiroshi

    2010-09-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiaeSigma1278b has the MPR1 gene encoding the N-acetyltransferase Mpr1 that acetylates the proline metabolism intermediate Delta(1)-pyrroline-5-carboxylate (P5C)/glutamate-gamma-semialdehyde (GSA) in vitro. In addition, Mpr1 protects cells from various oxidative stresses by regulating the levels of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). However, the relationship between P5C/GSA acetylation and antioxidative mechanism involving Mpr1 remains unclear. Here, we report the synthesis of oxidative stress-induced arginine via P5C/GSA acetylation catalyzed by Mpr1. Gene disruption analysis revealed that Mpr1 converts P5C/GSA into N-acetyl-GSA for arginine synthesis in the mitochondria, indicating that Mpr1 mediates the proline and arginine metabolic pathways. More importantly, Mpr1 regulate ROS generation by acetylating toxic P5C/GSA. Under oxidative stress conditions, the transcription of PUT1 encoding the proline oxidase Put1 and MPR1 was strongly induced, and consequently, the arginine content was significantly increased. We also found that two deletion mutants (Deltampr1/2 and Deltaput1) were more sensitive to high-temperature stress than the wild-type strain, but that direct treatment with arginine restored the cell viability of these mutants. These results suggest that Mpr1-dependent arginine synthesis confers stress tolerance. We propose an antioxidative mechanism that is involved in stress-induced arginine synthesis requiring Mpr1 and Put1. PMID:20550582

  10. A novel cell-permeable, selective, and noncompetitive inhibitor of KAT3 histone acetyltransferases from a combined molecular pruning/classical isosterism approach.

    Milite, Ciro; Feoli, Alessandra; Sasaki, Kazuki; La Pietra, Valeria; Balzano, Amodio Luca; Marinelli, Luciana; Mai, Antonello; Novellino, Ettore; Castellano, Sabrina; Tosco, Alessandra; Sbardella, Gianluca

    2015-03-26

    Selective inhibitors of the two paralogue KAT3 acetyltransferases (CBP and p300) may serve not only as precious chemical tools to investigate the role of these enzymes in physiopathological mechanisms but also as lead structures for the development of further antitumor agents. After the application of a molecular pruning approach to the hardly optimizable and not very cell-permeable garcinol core structure, we prepared many analogues that were screened for their inhibitory effects using biochemical and biophysical (SPR) assays. Further optimization led to the discovery of the benzylidenebarbituric acid derivative 7h (EML425) as a potent and selective reversible inhibitor of CBP/p300, noncompetitive versus both acetyl-CoA and a histone H3 peptide, and endowed with good cell permeability. Furthermore, in human leukemia U937 cells, it induced a marked and time-dependent reduction in the acetylation of lysine H4K5 and H3K9, a marked arrest in the G0/G1 phase and a significant increase in the hypodiploid nuclei percentage. PMID:25730130

  11. Human acetyl-CoA:glucosamine-6-phosphate N-acetyltransferase 1 has a relaxed donor specificity and transfers acyl groups up to four carbons in length.

    Brockhausen, Inka; Nair, Dileep G; Chen, Min; Yang, Xiaojing; Allingham, John S; Szarek, Walter A; Anastassiades, Tassos

    2016-04-01

    Glucosamine-6-phosphate N-acetyltransferase1 (GNA1) catalyses the transfer of an acetyl group from acetyl coenzyme A (AcCoA) to glucosamine-6-phosphate (GlcN6P) to form N-acetylglucosamine-6-phosphate (GlcNAc6P), which is an essential intermediate in UDP-GlcNAc biosynthesis. An analog of GlcNAc, N-butyrylglucosamine (GlcNBu) has shown healing properties for bone and articular cartilage in animal models of arthritis. The goal of this work was to examine whether GNA1 has the ability to transfer a butyryl group from butyryl-CoA to GlcN6P to form GlcNBu6P, which can then be converted to GlcNBu. We developed fluorescent and radioactive assays and examined the donor specificity of human GNA1. Acetyl, propionyl, n-butyryl, and isobutyryl groups were all transferred to GlcN6P, but isovaleryl-CoA and decanoyl-CoA did not serve as donor substrates. Site-specific mutants were produced to examine the role of amino acids potentially affecting the size and properties of the AcCoA binding pocket. All of the wild type and mutant enzymes showed activities of both acetyl and butyryl transfer and can therefore be used for the enzymatic synthesis of GlcNBu for biomedical applications. PMID:26935656

  12. The Histone Acetyltransferase Gcn5 Regulates ncRNA-ICR1 and FLO11 Expression during Pseudohyphal Development in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Long-Chi Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Filamentous growth is one of the key features of pathogenic fungi during the early infectious phase. The pseudohyphal development of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae shares similar characteristics with hyphae elongation in pathogenic fungi. The expression of FLO11 is essential for adhesive growth and filament formation in yeast and is governed by a multilayered transcriptional network. Here we discovered a role for the histone acetyltransferase general control nonderepressible 5 (Gcn5 in regulating FLO11-mediated pseudohyphal growth. The expression patterns of FLO11 were distinct in haploid and diploid yeast under amino acid starvation induced by 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole (3AT. In diploids, FLO11 expression was substantially induced at a very early stage of pseudohyphal development and decreased quickly, but in haploids, it was gradually induced. Furthermore, the transcription factor Gcn4 was recruited to the Sfl1-Flo8 toggle sites at the FLO11 promoter under 3AT treatment. Moreover, the histone acetylase activity of Gcn5 was required for FLO11 induction. Finally, Gcn5 functioned as a negative regulator of the noncoding RNA ICR1, which is known to suppress FLO11 expression. Gcn5 plays an important role in the regulatory network of FLO11 expression via Gcn4 by downregulating ICR1 expression, which derepresses FLO11 for promoting pseudohyphal development.

  13. Inhibition of p300 lysine acetyltransferase activity by luteolin reduces tumor growth in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) xenograft mouse model.

    Selvi, Ruthrotha B; Swaminathan, Amrutha; Chatterjee, Snehajyoti; Shanmugam, Muthu K; Li, Feng; Ramakrishnan, Gowsica B; Siveen, Kodappully Sivaraman; Chinnathambi, Arunachalam; Zayed, M Emam; Alharbi, Sulaiman Ali; Basha, Jeelan; Bhat, Akshay; Vasudevan, Madavan; Dharmarajan, Arunasalam; Sethi, Gautam; Kundu, Tapas K

    2015-12-22

    Chromatin acetylation is attributed with distinct functional relevance with respect to gene expression in normal and diseased conditions thereby leading to a topical interest in the concept of epigenetic modulators and therapy. We report here the identification and characterization of the acetylation inhibitory potential of an important dietary flavonoid, luteolin. Luteolin was found to inhibit p300 acetyltransferase with competitive binding to the acetyl CoA binding site. Luteolin treatment in a xenografted tumor model of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), led to a dramatic reduction in tumor growth within 4 weeks corresponding to a decrease in histone acetylation. Cells treated with luteolin exhibit cell cycle arrest and decreased cell migration. Luteolin treatment led to an alteration in gene expression and miRNA profile including up-regulation of p53 induced miR-195/215, let7C; potentially translating into a tumor suppressor function. It also led to down-regulation of oncomiRNAs such as miR-135a, thereby reflecting global changes in the microRNA network. Furthermore, a direct correlation between the inhibition of histone acetylation and gene expression was established using chromatin immunoprecipitation on promoters of differentially expressed genes. A network of dysregulated genes and miRNAs was mapped along with the gene ontology categories, and the effects of luteolin were observed to be potentially at multiple levels: at the level of gene expression, miRNA expression and miRNA processing. PMID:26517526

  14. Human T-cell leukemia virus type-1-encoded protein HBZ represses p53 function by inhibiting the acetyltransferase activity of p300/CBP and HBO1

    Hoang, Kimson; Ankney, John A.; Nguyen, Stephanie T.; Rushing, Amanda W.; Polakowski, Nicholas; Miotto, Benoit; Lemasson, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    Adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) is an often fatal malignancy caused by infection with the complex retrovirus, human T-cell Leukemia Virus, type 1 (HTLV-1). In ATL patient samples, the tumor suppressor, p53, is infrequently mutated; however, it has been shown to be inactivated by the viral protein, Tax. Here, we show that another HTLV-1 protein, HBZ, represses p53 activity. In HCT116 p53+/+ cells treated with the DNA-damaging agent, etoposide, HBZ reduced p53-mediated activation of p21/CDKN1A and GADD45A expression, which was associated with a delay in G2 phase-arrest. These effects were attributed to direct inhibition of the histone acetyltransferase (HAT) activity of p300/CBP by HBZ, causing a reduction in p53 acetylation, which has be linked to decreased p53 activity. In addition, HBZ bound to, and inhibited the HAT activity of HBO1. Although HBO1 did not acetylate p53, it acted as a coactivator for p53 at the p21/CDKN1A promoter. Therefore, through interactions with two separate HAT proteins, HBZ impairs the ability of p53 to activate transcription. This mechanism may explain how p53 activity is restricted in ATL cells that do not express Tax due to modifications of the HTLV-1 provirus, which accounts for a majority of patient samples. PMID:26625199

  15. Improved production of isoamyl acetate by a sake yeast mutant resistant to an isoprenoid analog and its dependence on alcohol acetyltransferase activity, but not on isoamyl alcohol production.

    Hirooka, Kiyoo; Yamamoto, Yoshihiro; Tsutsui, Nobuo; Tanaka, Toshio

    2005-02-01

    1-Farnesylpyridinium (FPy), an analog of isoprenoid farnesol, strongly inhibited the growth of sake yeast at 120 microM in YPD medium, whereas at 30 microM it reduced cellular production of isoamyl acetate to 20% of the control level despite the absence of inhibitory effect on CO2 evolution. The FPy-resistant mutant A1 was characterized by the high production of flavor compounds represented by a nearly threefold increase in the level of isoamyl acetate in YPD medium in which the level of isoamyl alcohol as its precursor remained almost unchanged. The FPy resistance phenotype of strain A1 was not accompanied by cellular resistance to either the L-leucine analog or L-canavanine, which alters yeast amino acid metabolism in favor of isoamyl alcohol production. Alcohol acetyltransferase (AATase) activity was high in strain A1, which further increased in response to isoamyl alcohol accumulation in medium. Flavor compound production in sake brewing could be improved using strain A1, resulting in a 1.4-fold increase in isoamyl acetate production in spite of a limited production of isoamyl alcohol. PMID:16233768

  16. Reduced expression of choline acetyltransferase in vagal motoneurons and gastric motor dysfunction in a 6-OHDA rat model of Parkinson's disease.

    Zheng, Li-Fei; Wang, Zhi-Yong; Li, Xiao-feng; Song, Jin; Hong, Feng; Lian, Hui; Wang, Qian; Feng, Xiao-Yan; Tang, Yuan-yuan; Zhang, Yue; Zhu, Jin-Xia

    2011-10-28

    Parkinson's disease (PD) has been characterized by dopaminergic neuron degeneration in the substantia nigra (SN) accompanied by pathology of the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus (DMV). PD patients have often experienced gastrointestinal dysfunctions, such as gastroparesis. However, the mechanism underlying these symptoms in PD patients is not clear. In the present study, we investigated alterations of cholinergic and catecholaminergic neurons in the DMV and gastric motor function in rats microinjected with 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) bilaterally into the SN (referred to as 6-OHDA rats) and explored possible mechanisms. A strain gauge force transducer was used to record gastric motility in vivo. Expression of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) was evaluated by immunofluorescence and western blot analysis. Acetylcholine (Ach) content was measured using ultra-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC/MS/MS) analysis. After treatment with 6-OHDA for 6weeks, 6-OHDA rats exhibited decreased ChAT and enhanced TH expression in the DMV and decreased Ach content in the gastric muscular layer. Delayed gastric emptying and impaired gastric motility in vivo were observed in 6-OHDA rats. The results of the present study indicated that decreased ChAT and enhanced TH expression in the DMV may be correlated with the development of delayed gastric emptying and impaired gastric motility, which may be partly due to the decreased Ach release from the vagus. PMID:21955729

  17. Arsenic Trioxide Reduces Global Histone H4 Acetylation at Lysine 16 through Direct Binding to Histone Acetyltransferase hMOF in Human Cells.

    Liu, Da; Wu, Donglu; Zhao, Linhong; Yang, Yang; Ding, Jian; Dong, Liguo; Hu, Lianghai; Wang, Fei; Zhao, Xiaoming; Cai, Yong; Jin, Jingji

    2015-01-01

    Histone post-translational modification heritably regulates gene expression involved in most cellular biological processes. Experimental studies suggest that alteration of histone modifications affects gene expression by changing chromatin structure, causing various cellular responses to environmental influences. Arsenic (As), a naturally occurring element and environmental pollutant, is an established human carcinogen. Recently, increasing evidence suggests that As-mediated epigenetic mechanisms may be involved in its toxicity and carcinogenicity, but how this occurs is still unclear. Here we present evidence that suggests As-induced global histone H4K16 acetylation (H4K16ac) partly due to the direct physical interaction between As and histone acetyltransferase (HAT) hMOF (human male absent on first) protein, leading to the loss of hMOF HAT activity. Our data show that decreased global H4K16ac and increased deacetyltransferase HDAC4 expression occurred in arsenic trioxide (As2O3)-exposed HeLa or HEK293T cells. However, depletion of HDAC4 did not affect global H4K16ac, and it could not raise H4K16ac in cells exposed to As2O3, suggesting that HDAC4 might not directly be involved in histone H4K16 de-acetylation. Using As-immobilized agarose, we confirmed that As binds directly to hMOF, and that this interaction was competitively inhibited by free As2O3. Also, the direct interaction of As and C2CH zinc finger peptide was verified by MAIDI-TOF mass and UV absorption. In an in vitro HAT assay, As2O3 directly inhibited hMOF activity. hMOF over-expression not only increased resistance to As and caused less toxicity, but also effectively reversed reduced H4K16ac caused by As exposure. These data suggest a theoretical basis for elucidating the mechanism of As toxicity. PMID:26473953

  18. Immunoreactivity for Choline Acetyltransferase of Peripheral-Type (pChAT) in the Trigeminal Ganglion Neurons of the Non-Human Primate Macaca fascicularis

    Transcripts of the choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) gene reveal a number of different splice variants including ChAT of a peripheral type (pChAT). Immunohistochemical staining of the brain using an antibody against pChAT clearly revealed peripheral cholinergic neurons, but failed to detect cholinergic neurons in the central nervous system. In rodents, pChAT-immunoreactivity has been detected in cholinergic parasympathetic postganglionic and enteric ganglion neurons. In addition, pChAT has been observed in non-cholinergic neurons such as peripheral sensory neurons in the trigeminal and dorsal root ganglia. The common type of ChAT (cChAT) has been investigated in many parts of the brain and the spinal cord of non-human primates, but little information is available about the localization of pChAT in primate species. Here, we report the detection of pChAT immunoreactivity in trigeminal ganglion (TG) neurons and its co-localization with Substance P (SP) and/or calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) in the cynomolgus monkey, Macaca fascicularis. Neurons positive for pChAT were observed in a rather uniform pattern in approximately half of the trigeminal neurons throughout the TG. Most pChAT-positive neurons had small or medium-sized cell bodies. Double-immunofluorescence staining showed that 85.1% of SP-positive cells and 74.0% of CGRP-positive cells exhibited pChAT immunoreactivity. Most pChAT-positive cells were part of a larger population of neurons that co-expressed SP and/or CGRP

  19. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma and spermidine/spermine N1-acetyltransferase gene expressions are significantly correlated in human colorectal cancer

    Cavallini Aldo

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ is a transcription factor that regulates adipogenic differentiation and glucose homeostasis. Spermidine/spermine N1-acetyltransferase (SSAT and ornithine decarboxylase (ODC are key enzymes involved in the metabolism of polyamines, compounds that play an important role in cell proliferation. While the PPARγ role in tumour growth has not been clearly defined, the involvement of the altered polyamine metabolism in colorectal carcinogenesis has been established. In this direction, we have evaluated the PPARγ expression and its relationship with polyamine metabolism in tissue samples from 40 patients operated because of colorectal carcinoma. Since it is known that the functional role of K-ras mutation in colorectal tumorigenesis is associated with cell growth and differentiation, polyamine metabolism and the PPARγ expression were also investigated in terms of K-ras mutation. Methods PPARγ, ODC and SSAT mRNA levels were evaluated by reverse transcriptase and real-time PCR. Polyamines were quantified by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC. ODC and SSAT activity were measured by a radiometric technique. Results PPARγ expression, as well as SSAT and ODC mRNA levels were significantly higher in cancer as compared to normal mucosa. Tumour samples also showed significantly higher polyamine levels and ODC and SSAT activities in comparison to normal samples. A significant and positive correlation between PPARγ and the SSAT gene expression was observed in both normal and neoplastic tissue (r = 0.73, p Conclusion In conclusion, our data demonstrated a close relationship between PPARγ and SSAT in human colorectal cancer and this could represent an attempt to decrease polyamine levels and to reduce cell growth and tumour development. Therefore, pharmacological activation of PPARγ and/or induction of SSAT may represent a therapeutic or preventive strategy for treating

  20. Generation patterns of four groups of cholinergic neurons in rat cervical spinal cord: a combined tritiated thymidine autoradiographic and choline acetyltransferase immunocytochemical study

    This report examines the generation of cholinergic neurons in the spinal cord in order to determine whether the transmitter phenotype of neurons is associated with specific patterns of neurogenesis. Previous immunocytochemical studies identified four groups of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT)-positive neurons in the cervical enlargement of the rat spinal cord. These cell groups vary in both somatic size and location along the previously described ventrodorsal neurogenic gradient of the spinal cord. Thus, large (and small) motoneurons are located in the ventral horn, medium-sized partition cells are found in the intermediate gray matter, small central canal cluster cells are situated within lamina X, and small dorsal horn neurons are scattered predominantly through laminae III-V. The relationships among the birthdays of these four subsets of cholinergic neurons have been examined by combining 3H-thymidine autoradiography and ChAT immunocytochemistry. Embryonic day 11 was the earliest time that neurons were generated within the cervical enlargement. Large and small ChAT-positive motoneurons were produced on E11 and 12, with 70% of both groups being born on E11. ChAT-positive partition cells were produced between E11 and 13, with their peak generation occurring on E12. Approximately 70% of the cholinergic central canal cluster and dorsal horn cells were born on E13, and the remainder of each of these groups was generated on E14. Other investigators have shown that all neurons within the rat cervical spinal cord are produced in a ventrodorsal sequence between E11 and E16. In contrast, ChAT-positive neurons are born only from E11 to E14 and are among the earliest cells generated in the ventral, intermediate, and dorsal subdivisions of the spinal cord

  1. Molecular Structure of WlbB, a Bacterial N-Acetyltransferase Involved in the Biosynthesis of 2,3-Diacetamido-2,3-dideoxy-d-mannuronic Acid

    Thoden, James B.; Holden, Hazel M. (UW)

    2010-09-08

    The pathogenic bacteria Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Bordetella pertussis contain in their outer membranes the rare sugar 2,3-diacetamido-2,3-dideoxy-D-mannuronic acid. Five enzymes are required for the biosynthesis of this sugar starting from UDP-N-acetylglucosamine. One of these, referred to as WlbB, is an N-acetyltransferase that converts UDP-2-acetamido-3-amino-2,3-dideoxy-D-glucuronic acid (UDP-GlcNAc3NA) to UDP-2,3-diacetamido-2,3-dideoxy-D-glucuronic acid (UDP-GlcNAc3NAcA). Here we report the three-dimensional structure of WlbB from Bordetella petrii. For this analysis, two ternary structures were determined to 1.43 {angstrom} resolution: one in which the protein was complexed with acetyl-CoA and UDP and the second in which the protein contained bound CoA and UDP-GlcNAc3NA. WlbB adopts a trimeric quaternary structure and belongs to the L{beta}H superfamily of N-acyltransferases. Each subunit contains 27 {beta}-strands, 23 of which form the canonical left-handed {beta}-helix. There are only two hydrogen bonds that occur between the protein and the GlcNAc3NA moiety, one between O{sup {delta}1} of Asn 84 and the sugar C-3{prime} amino group and the second between the backbone amide group of Arg 94 and the sugar C-5{prime} carboxylate. The sugar C-3{prime} amino group is ideally positioned in the active site to attack the si face of acetyl-CoA. Given that there are no protein side chains that can function as general bases within the GlcNAc3NA binding pocket, a reaction mechanism is proposed for WlbB whereby the sulfur of CoA ultimately functions as the proton acceptor required for catalysis.

  2. Role of the yeast acetyltransferase Mpr1 in oxidative stress: regulation of oxygen reactive species caused by a toxic proline catabolism intermediate.

    Nomura, Michiyo; Takagi, Hiroshi

    2004-08-24

    The MPR1 gene, which is found in the Sigma1278b strain but is not present in the sequenced laboratory strain S288C, of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae encodes a previously uncharacterized N-acetyltransferase that detoxifies the proline analogue azetidine-2-carboxylate (AZC). However, it is unlikely that AZC is a natural substrate of Mpr1 because AZC is found only in some plant species. In our search for the physiological function of Mpr1, we found that mpr1-disrupted cells were hypersensitive to oxidative stresses and contained increased levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS). In contrast, overexpression of MPR1 leads to an increase in cell viability and a decrease in ROS level after oxidative treatments. These results indicate that Mpr1 can reduce intracellular oxidation levels. Because put2-disrupted yeast cells lacking Delta(1)-pyrroline-5-carboxylate (P5C) dehydrogenase have increased ROS, we examined the role of Mpr1 in put2-disrupted strains. When grown on media containing urea and proline as the nitrogen source, put2-disrupted cells did not grow as well as WT cells and accumulated intracellular levels of P5C that were first detected in yeast cells and ROS. On the other hand, put2-disrupted cells that overexpressed MPR1 had considerably lower ROS levels. In vitro studies with bacterially expressed Mpr1 demonstrated that Mpr1 can acetylate P5C, or, more likely, its equilibrium compound glutamate-gamma-semialdehyde, at neutral pH. These results suggest that the proline catabolism intermediate P5C is toxic to yeast cells because of the formation of ROS, and Mpr1 regulates the ROS level under P5C-induced oxidative stress. PMID:15308773

  3. Nucleotide sequence and genetic analysis of the Azotobacter chroococcum nifUSVWZM gene cluster, including a new gene (nifP) which encodes a serine acetyltransferase.

    Evans, D J; Jones, R; Woodley, P R; Wilborn, J R; Robson, R L

    1991-09-01

    Nucleotide sequence was obtained for a region of 7,099 bp spanning the nifU, nifS, nifV, nifW, nifZ, and nifM genes from Azotobacter chroococcum. Chromosomal mutations constructed at several sites within the locus confirmed a requirement for this region for expression of the molybdenum nitrogenase in this organism. The genes are tightly clustered and ordered as in Klebsiella pneumoniae except for two additional open reading frames (ORFs) between nifV and nifW. The arrangement of genes in A. chroococcum closely matches that described for Azotobacter vinelandii. The polypeptide encoded by ORF4 immediately downstream from nifV is 41% identical over 186 amino acids to the product of the cysE gene from Escherichia coli, which encodes serine acetyltransferase (SAT), a key enzyme in cysteine biosynthesis. Plasmids which potentially express ORF4 complemented E. coli JM39, a cysteine auxotroph which lacks SAT. SAT activity was detected in crude extracts of one such complemented strain. A strain of A. chroococcum carrying a chromosomal disruption of ORF4 grew normally with ammonium as the N source but more slowly than the parental strain when N2 was the sole N source. These data suggest that ORF4 encodes a nif-specific SAT required for optimizing expression of nitrogenase activity. ORF4 was assigned the name nifP. nifP may be required to boost rates of synthesis or intracellular concentrations of cysteine or methionine. Sequence identity between nifV and leuA gene products suggests that nifV may catalyze a condensation reaction analogous to that carried out by isopropylmalate synthase (LEUA) but in which acetyl coenzyme and alpha-ketoglutarate are substrates for the formation of homocitrate, the proposed product of NIFV activity. PMID:1885524

  4. Polymorphism of N-acetyltransferase 2 (NAT2) Gene Polymorphism in Shanghai population:Occupational and Non-occupational Bladder Cancer Patient Groups

    QING-WEN MA; GUO-FANG LIN; JI-GANG CHEN; CUI-QING XIANG; WEI-CHAO GUO; KLAUS GOLKA; JIAN-HUA SHEN

    2004-01-01

    Arylamine N-acetyltransferases (NATs) are involved in the detoxification of aromatic amines and hydrazine. In order to explore the possible association of NAT2 polymorphism with bladder cancer risk in benzidine exposed or non-exposed Chinese individuals, healthy subjects, subjects with bladder cancer of a former benzidine exposed cohort in Shanghai dyestuff industry and a group of bladder cancer patients without known occupational exposure to aromatic amines were genotyped for NAT2 gene polymorphism. Methods NAT2 genotyping was performed with a set of RFLP procedures at seven major polymorphic loci of gene coding area: G191A, C282T, T341C, C481T, G590A, A803G and G857A. Results The wild allele NAT2 *4 was the most prevalent allele (59%) in healthy individuals. The alleles NAT2*6A and NAT2*7B were also frequently observed (21% and 17%, respectively). In contrast to Caucasians, the percentage of slow acetylators was lower (12% in Chinese vs. 58% in Caucasians, P<0.001). No relevant differences were observed for homogenous rapid, heterogeneous rapid/slow and homogeneous slow acetylation genotypes between the healthy subjects and both groups of bladder cancer patients. Conclusion The present work did not support the association of slow acetylating genotypes of NAT2 gene with elevated risk of bladder cancer in Chinese whereas it was documented as an important genetically determined risk factor in Caucasians. Different mechanisms might play a role in individual susceptibility to bladder cancer related with aromatic amine exposure in various races or ethnic groups.

  5. Histone acetyltransferase (HAT) activity of p300 modulates human T lymphotropic virus type 1 p30II-mediated repression of LTR transcriptional activity

    Human T-lymphotropic virus type-1 (HTLV-1) is a deltaretrovirus that causes adult T cell leukemia/lymphoma, and is implicated in a variety of lymphocyte-mediated inflammatory disorders. HTLV-1 provirus has regulatory and accessory genes in four pX open reading frames. HTLV-1 pX ORF-II encodes two proteins, p13II and p30II, which are incompletely defined in virus replication or pathogenesis. We have demonstrated that pX ORF-II mutations block virus replication in vivo and that ORF-II encoded p30II, a nuclear-localizing protein that binds with CREB-binding protein (CBP)/p300, represses CREB and Tax responsive element (TRE)-mediated transcription. Herein, we have identified p30II motifs important for p300 binding and in regulating TRE-mediated transcription in the absence and presence of HTLV-1 provirus. Within amino acids 100-179 of p30II, a region important for repression of LTR-mediated transcription, we identified a single lysine residue at amino acid 106 (K3) that significantly modulates the ability of p30II to repress TRE-mediated transcription. Exogenous p300, in a dose-responsive manner, reverses p30II-dependent repression of TRE-mediated transcription, in the absence or presence of the provirus, In contrast to wild type p300, p300 HAT mutants (defective in histone acetyltransferase activity) only partially rescued p30II-mediated LTR repression. Deacetylation by histone deacetylase-1 (HDAC-1) enhanced p30II-mediated LTR repression, while inhibition of deacetylation by trichostatin A decreases p30II-mediated LTR repression. Collectively, our data indicate that HTLV-1 p30II modulates viral gene expression in a cooperative manner with p300-mediated acetylation

  6. Differential co-localization with choline acetyltransferase in nervus terminalis suggests functional differences for GnRH isoforms in bonnethead sharks (Sphyrna tiburo).

    Moeller, John F; Meredith, Michael

    2010-12-17

    The nervus terminalis (NT) is a vertebrate cranial nerve whose function in adults is unknown. In bonnethead sharks, the nerve is anatomically independent of the olfactory system, with two major cell populations within one or more ganglia along its exposed length. Most cells are immunoreactive for either gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) or RF-amide-like peptides. To define further the cell populations and connectivity, we used double-label immunocytochemistry with antisera to different isoforms of GnRH and to choline acetyltransferase (ChAT). The labeling patterns of two GnRH antisera revealed different populations of GnRH-immunoreactive (ir) cell profiles in the NT ganglion. One antiserum labeled a large group of cells and fibers, which likely contain mammalian GnRH (GnRH-I) as described in previous studies and which were ChAT immunoreactive. The other antiserum labeled large club-like structures, which were anuclear, and a sparse number of fibers, but with no clear labeling of cell bodies in the ganglion. These club structures were choline acetyltrasferase (ChAT)-negative, and preabsorption control tests suggest they may contain chicken-GnRH-II (GnRH-II) or dogfish GnRH. The second major NT ganglion cell-type was immunoreactive for RF-amides, which regulate GnRH release in other vertebrates, and may provide an intraganglionic influence on GnRH release. The immunocytochemical and anatomical differences between the two GnRH-immunoreactive profile types indicate possible functional differences for these isoforms in the NT. The club-like structures may be sites of GnRH release into the general circulation since these structures were observed near blood vessels and resembled structures seen in the median eminence of rats. PMID:20950589

  7. A human parvovirus, adeno-associated virus, as a eucaryotic vector: Transient expression and encapsidation of the procaryotic gene for chloramphenicol acetyltransferase

    Tratschin, J.D.; West, M.H.P.; Sandbank, T.; Carter, B.J.

    1984-10-01

    The authors have used the defective human parvovirus adeno-associated virus (AAV) as a novel eurocaryotic vector (parvector) for the expression of a foreign gene in human cells. The recombinant, pAV2, contains the AAV genome in a pBR322-derived bacterial plasmid. When pAV2 is transfected into human cells together with helper adenovirus particles, the AAV genome is rescued from the recombinant plasmid and replicated to produce infectious AAV particles at high efficiency. To create a vector, we inserted a procaryotic sequence coding for chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) into derivatives of pAV2 following either of the AAV promoters p/sub 40/ (pAVHiCAT) and p/sub 19/ (pAVBcCAT). When transfected into human 293 cells or HeLa cells, pAVHiCAT expressed CAT activity in the absence of adenovirus. In the presence of adenovirus, this vector produced increased amounts of CAT activity and the recombinant AAV-CAT genome was replicated. In 293 cells, pAVBcCAT expressed a similar amount of CAT activity in the absence or presence of adenovirus and the recombinant AAV-CAT genome was not replicated. In HeLa cells, pAVBcCAT expressed low levels of CAT activity, but this level was elevated by coinfection with adenovirus particles or by cotransfection with a plasmid which expressed the adenovirus early region 1A (E1A) product. The E1A product is a transcriptional activator and is expressed in 293 cells. Thus, expression from two AAV promoters is differentially regulated: expression from p/sub 19/ is increased by E1A, whereas p/sub 40/ yields high levels of constitutive expression in the absence of E1A. Both AAV vectors were packaged into AAV particles by complementation with wild-type AAV and yielded CAT activity when subsequently infected into cells in the presence of adenovirus.

  8. No germline mutations in the histone acetyltransferase gene EP300 in BRCA1 and BRCA2 negative families with breast cancer and gastric, pancreatic, or colorectal cancer

    Mutations in BRCA1, BRCA2, ATM, TP53, CHK2 and PTEN account for many, but not all, multiple-case breast and ovarian cancer families. The histone acetyltransferase gene EP300 may function as a tumour suppressor gene because it is sometimes somatically mutated in breast, colorectal, gastric and pancreatic cancers, and is located on a region of chromosome 22 that frequently undergoes loss of heterozygosity in many cancer types. We hypothesized that germline mutations in EP300 may account for some breast cancer families that include cases of gastric, pancreatic and/or colorectal cancer. We screened the entire coding region of EP300 for mutations in the youngest affected members of 23 non-BRCA1/BRCA2 breast cancer families with at least one confirmed case of gastric, pancreatic and/or colorectal cancer. These families were ascertained in Australia through the Kathleen Cuningham Foundation Consortium for Research into Familial Breast Cancer. Denaturing HPLC analysis identified a heterozygous alteration at codon 211, specifically a GGC to AGC (glycine to serine) alteration, in two individuals. This conservative amino acid change was not within any known functional domains of EP300. The frequency of the Ser211 variant did not differ significanlty between a series of 352 breast cancer patients (4.0%) and 254 control individuals (2.8%; P = 0.5). The present study does not support a major role for EP300 mutations in breast and ovarian cancer families with a history of gastric, pancreatic and/or colorectal cancer

  9. Histone and Non-Histone Targets of Dietary Deacetylase Inhibitors.

    Kim, Eunah; Bisson, William H; Löhr, Christiane V; Williams, David E; Ho, Emily; Dashwood, Roderick H; Rajendran, Praveen

    2016-01-01

    Acetylation is an important, reversible post-translational modification affecting histone and non-histone proteins with critical roles in gene transcription, DNA replication, DNA repair, and cell cycle progression. Key regulatory enzymes include histone deacetylase (HDACs) and histone acetyltransferases (HATs). Overexpressed HDACs have been identified in many human cancers, resulting in repressed chromatin states that interfere with vital tumor suppressor functions. Inhibition of HDAC activity has been pursued as a mechanism for re-activating repressed genes in cancers, with some HDAC inhibitors showing promise in the clinical setting. Dietary compounds and their metabolites also have been shown to modulate HDAC activity or expression. Out of this body of research, attention increasingly has shifted towards non-histone targets of HDACs and HATs, such as transcriptions factors, hormone receptors, DNA repair proteins, and cytoskeletal components. These aspects are covered in present review, along with the possible clinical significance. Where such data are available, examples are cited from the literature of studies with short chain fatty acids, polyphenols, isoflavones, indoles, organosulfur compounds, organoselenium compounds, sesquiterpene lactones, isoflavones, and various miscellaneous agents. By virtue of their effects on both histone and non-histone proteins, dietary chemopreventive agents modulate the cellular acetylome in ways that are only now becoming apparent. A better understanding of the molecular mechanisms will likely enhance the potential to more effectively combat diseases harboring altered epigenetic landscapes and dysregulated protein signaling. PMID:26303421

  10. Crystal Structure of the N-Acetyltransferase Domain of Human N-Acetyl-L-Glutamate Synthase in Complex with N-Acetyl-L-Glutamate Provides Insights into Its Catalytic and Regulatory Mechanisms

    Zhao, Gengxiang; Jin, Zhongmin; Allewell, Norma M.; Tuchman, Mendel; Shi, Dashuang

    2013-01-01

    N-acetylglutamate synthase (NAGS) catalyzes the conversion of AcCoA and L-glutamate to CoA and N-acetyl-L-glutamate (NAG), an obligate cofactor for carbamyl phosphate synthetase I (CPSI) in the urea cycle. NAGS deficiency results in elevated levels of plasma ammonia which is neurotoxic. We report herein the first crystal structure of human NAGS, that of the catalytic N-acetyltransferase (hNAT) domain with N-acetyl-L-glutamate bound at 2.1 Å resolution. Functional studies indicate that the hNA...

  11. Target Awareness: Lupus

    ... Target Awareness: Lupus Jan. 15, 2009 Target Awareness: Lupus Target Awareness: Lupus provides a brief overview of ... Email Print Tags for this Story treatments symptoms Lupus FAQ What is lupus? What are the common ...

  12. Target Awareness: Lupus

    Full Text Available ... Target Awareness: Lupus Jan. 15, 2009 Target Awareness: Lupus Target Awareness: Lupus provides a brief overview of ... Email Print Tags for this Story treatments symptoms Lupus FAQ What is lupus? What are the common ...

  13. Target factory in perspective

    A target factory diagram has been constructed for an analysis of the shell coating process system in relation to target production. The number of deposition units needed to achieve the coating requirements will be a major target production operating cost

  14. Regulated Extracellular Choline Acetyltransferase Activity- The Plausible Missing Link of the Distant Action of Acetylcholine in the Cholinergic Anti-Inflammatory Pathway.

    Swetha Vijayaraghavan

    Full Text Available Acetylcholine (ACh, the classical neurotransmitter, also affects a variety of nonexcitable cells, such as endothelia, microglia, astrocytes and lymphocytes in both the nervous system and secondary lymphoid organs. Most of these cells are very distant from cholinergic synapses. The action of ACh on these distant cells is unlikely to occur through diffusion, given that ACh is very short-lived in the presence of acetylcholinesterase (AChE and butyrylcholinesterase (BuChE, two extremely efficient ACh-degrading enzymes abundantly present in extracellular fluids. In this study, we show compelling evidence for presence of a high concentration and activity of the ACh-synthesizing enzyme, choline-acetyltransferase (ChAT in human cerebrospinal fluid (CSF and plasma. We show that ChAT levels are physiologically balanced to the levels of its counteracting enzymes, AChE and BuChE in the human plasma and CSF. Equilibrium analyses show that soluble ChAT maintains a steady-state ACh level in the presence of physiological levels of fully active ACh-degrading enzymes. We show that ChAT is secreted by cultured human-brain astrocytes, and that activated spleen lymphocytes release ChAT itself rather than ACh. We further report differential CSF levels of ChAT in relation to Alzheimer's disease risk genotypes, as well as in patients with multiple sclerosis, a chronic neuroinflammatory disease, compared to controls. Interestingly, soluble CSF ChAT levels show strong correlation with soluble complement factor levels, supporting a role in inflammatory regulation. This study provides a plausible explanation for the long-distance action of ACh through continuous renewal of ACh in extracellular fluids by the soluble ChAT and thereby maintenance of steady-state equilibrium between hydrolysis and synthesis of this ubiquitous cholinergic signal substance in the brain and peripheral compartments. These findings may have important implications for the role of cholinergic

  15. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma and spermidine/spermine N1-acetyltransferase gene expressions are significantly correlated in human colorectal cancer

    The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) is a transcription factor that regulates adipogenic differentiation and glucose homeostasis. Spermidine/spermine N1-acetyltransferase (SSAT) and ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) are key enzymes involved in the metabolism of polyamines, compounds that play an important role in cell proliferation. While the PPARγ role in tumour growth has not been clearly defined, the involvement of the altered polyamine metabolism in colorectal carcinogenesis has been established. In this direction, we have evaluated the PPARγ expression and its relationship with polyamine metabolism in tissue samples from 40 patients operated because of colorectal carcinoma. Since it is known that the functional role of K-ras mutation in colorectal tumorigenesis is associated with cell growth and differentiation, polyamine metabolism and the PPARγ expression were also investigated in terms of K-ras mutation. PPARγ, ODC and SSAT mRNA levels were evaluated by reverse transcriptase and real-time PCR. Polyamines were quantified by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). ODC and SSAT activity were measured by a radiometric technique. PPARγ expression, as well as SSAT and ODC mRNA levels were significantly higher in cancer as compared to normal mucosa. Tumour samples also showed significantly higher polyamine levels and ODC and SSAT activities in comparison to normal samples. A significant and positive correlation between PPARγ and the SSAT gene expression was observed in both normal and neoplastic tissue (r = 0.73, p < 0.0001; r = 0.65, p < 0.0001, respectively). Moreover, gene expression, polyamine levels and enzymatic activities were increased in colorectal carcinoma samples expressing K-ras mutation as compared to non mutated K-ras samples. In conclusion, our data demonstrated a close relationship between PPARγ and SSAT in human colorectal cancer and this could represent an attempt to decrease polyamine levels and to reduce cell

  16. Characterization of an antagonistic switch between histone H3 lysine 27 methylation and acetylation in the transcriptional regulation of Polycomb group target genes

    Pasini, Diego; Malatesta, Martina; Jung, Hye Ryung; Valfridsson, Julian Osmond A; Willer, Anton; Olsson, Linda; Skotte, Julie; Wutz, Anton; Porse, Bo; Jensen, Ole Nørregaard; Helin, Kristian

    2010-01-01

    Polycomb group (PcG) proteins are transcriptional repressors, which regulate proliferation and cell fate decisions during development, and their deregulated expression is a frequent event in human tumours. The Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) catalyzes trimethylation (me3) of histone H3 lysine...... 27 (K27), and it is believed that this activity mediates transcriptional repression. Despite the recent progress in understanding PcG function, the molecular mechanisms by which the PcG proteins repress transcription, as well as the mechanisms that lead to the activation of PcG target genes are....... The methylation to acetylation switch correlates with the transcriptional activation of PcG target genes, both during ES cell differentiation and in MLL-AF9-transduced hematopoietic stem cells. Moreover, we provide evidence that the acetylation of H3K27 is catalyzed by the acetyltransferases p300 and...

  17. Identification of chromatin-associated regulators of MSL complex targeting in Drosophila dosage compensation.

    Erica Larschan

    Full Text Available Sex chromosome dosage compensation in Drosophila provides a model for understanding how chromatin organization can modulate coordinate gene regulation. Male Drosophila increase the transcript levels of genes on the single male X approximately two-fold to equal the gene expression in females, which have two X-chromosomes. Dosage compensation is mediated by the Male-Specific Lethal (MSL histone acetyltransferase complex. Five core components of the MSL complex were identified by genetic screens for genes that are specifically required for male viability and are dispensable for females. However, because dosage compensation must interface with the general transcriptional machinery, it is likely that identifying additional regulators that are not strictly male-specific will be key to understanding the process at a mechanistic level. Such regulators would not have been recovered from previous male-specific lethal screening strategies. Therefore, we have performed a cell culture-based, genome-wide RNAi screen to search for factors required for MSL targeting or function. Here we focus on the discovery of proteins that function to promote MSL complex recruitment to "chromatin entry sites," which are proposed to be the initial sites of MSL targeting. We find that components of the NSL (Non-specific lethal complex, and a previously unstudied zinc-finger protein, facilitate MSL targeting and display a striking enrichment at MSL entry sites. Identification of these factors provides new insight into how MSL complex establishes the specialized hyperactive chromatin required for dosage compensation in Drosophila.

  18. Effective neutron targets

    Because of the lack of a free neutron target, deuterium targets have been used extensively in studying the neutron structure. The unique spin structure of the 3He ground state wave function and the recent developments in laser technologies made polarized 3He targets widely used in many experiments from neutron electromagnetic form factor studies to nucleon spin structure function measurements at all major electron accelerator facilities. In this talk, the current status of the polarized 3He targets will be reviewed. The author will focus on neutron electromagnetic form factor studies using polarized 3He targets. The polarized nucleon spin structure function measurements using polarized 3He targets will also be discussed

  19. Molecular Targets for Targeted Radionuclide Therapy

    Molecular targeted radionuclide cancer therapy is becoming of increasing importance, especially for disseminated diseases. Systemic chemotherapies often lack selectivity while targeted radionuclide therapy has important advantages as the radioactive cytotoxic unit of the targeting vector is specifically directed to the cancer, sparing normal tissues. The principle strategy to improve cancer selectivity is to couple therapeutic agents to tumour-targeting vectors. In targeted radionuclide therapy (TRT), the cytotoxic portion of the conjugates normally contains a therapeutic radiometal immobilised by a bifunctional chelator. The aim is therefore to use as ligand-targeted therapeutics vectors coupled to Auger-, alpha- and/or beta-emitting radionuclides. An advantage of using radiation instead of chemotherapeutics as the cytotoxic agent is the so called 'crossfire effect'. This allows sterilisation of tumour cells that are not directly targeted due to heterogeneity in target molecule expression or inhomogeneous vector delivery. However, before the targeting ligands can be selected, the target molecule on the tumour has to be selected. It should be uniquely expressed, or at least highly overexpressed, on or in the target cells relative to normal tissues. The target should be easily accessible for ligand delivery and should not be shed or down- regulated after ligand binding. An important property of a receptor (or antigen) is its potential to be internalized upon binding of the ligand. This provides an active uptake mechanism and allows the therapeutic agent to be trapped within the tumour cells. Molecular targets of current interest include: Receptors: G-protein coupled receptors are overexpressed on many major human tumours. The prototype of these receptors are somatostatin receptors which show very high density in neuroendocrine tumours, but there are many other most interesting receptors to be applied for TRT. The targeting ligands for these receptors are

  20. Price level targeting

    Shukayev, Malik; Ueberfeldt, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    Various papers have suggested that Price-Level targeting is a welfare improving policy relative to Inflation targeting. From a practical standpoint, this raises an important yet unanswered question: What is the optimal price index to target? This paper derives the optimal price level targeting index defined over the eight main components of the Consumer Price Index. It finds that such an index places a heavier weight, relative to the expenditure weight, on sectors with slow price adjustments....

  1. Multilayer polymer microspot targets

    Last year the authors reported on the development of a seeded microspot x-ray diagnostic target. This target consisted of a 300-μm-diam, 2-μm-thick disk of silicon or sulfur-seeded hydrocarbon polymer nested tightly in a hole in a 2-μm-thick film of pure hydrocarbon polymer. This year they extended our work on the microspot target, fully encapsulating the microspot in what they call the multilayer polymer microspot target

  2. Target Price Accuracy

    Alexander G. Kerl

    2011-01-01

    This study analyzes the accuracy of forecasted target prices within analysts’ reports. We compute a measure for target price forecast accuracy that evaluates the ability of analysts to exactly forecast the ex-ante (unknown) 12-month stock price. Furthermore, we determine factors that explain this accuracy. Target price accuracy is negatively related to analyst-specific optimism and stock-specific risk (measured by volatility and price-to-book ratio). However, target price accuracy is positive...

  3. The Targeting of Advertising

    Ganesh Iyer; David Soberman; J. Miguel Villas-Boas

    2005-01-01

    An important question that firms face in advertising is developing effective media strategy. Major improvements in the quality of consumer information and the growth of targeted media vehicles allow firms to precisely target advertising to consumer segments within a market. This paper examines advertising strategy when competing firms can target advertising to different groups of consumers within a market. With targeted advertising, we find that firms advertise more to consumers who have a st...

  4. TARGET COSTING FUNCTIONS

    Dimi OFILEANU

    2015-01-01

    This article aims to highlight the concept of Target Costing. Based on the characteristics of Target Costing, identified in specialized literature, the article presents its main advantages and disadvantages. Also, a comparison is being made between Target Cost and Traditional Cost (in its traditional form, the cost represents an independent variable on the basis of which the sell price is established; and in the Target Cost form the cost represents a dependent variable which is determined on ...

  5. An actionable climate target

    Geden, Oliver

    2016-05-01

    The Paris Agreement introduced three mitigation targets. In the future, the main focus should not be on temperature targets such as 2 or 1.5 °C, but on the target with the greatest potential to effectively guide policy: net zero emissions.

  6. Structures of the N-acetyltransferase domain of Xylella fastidiosa N-acetyl-L-glutamate synthase/kinase with and without a His tag bound to N-acetyl-L-glutamate.

    Zhao, Gengxiang; Jin, Zhongmin; Allewell, Norma M; Tuchman, Mendel; Shi, Dashuang

    2015-01-01

    Structures of the catalytic N-acetyltransferase (NAT) domain of the bifunctional N-acetyl-L-glutamate synthase/kinase (NAGS/K) from Xylella fastidiosa bound to N-acetyl-L-glutamate (NAG) with and without an N-terminal His tag have been solved and refined at 1.7 and 1.4 Å resolution, respectively. The NAT domain with an N-terminal His tag crystallized in space group P4(1)2(1)2, with unit-cell parameters a=b=51.72, c=242.31 Å. Two subunits form a molecular dimer in the asymmetric unit, which contains ∼41% solvent. The NAT domain without an N-terminal His tag crystallized in space group P21, with unit-cell parameters a=63.48, b=122.34, c=75.88 Å, β=107.6°. Eight subunits, which form four molecular dimers, were identified in the asymmetric unit, which contains ∼38% solvent. The structures with and without the N-terminal His tag provide an opportunity to evaluate how the His tag affects structure and function. Furthermore, multiple subunits in different packing environments allow an assessment of the plasticity of the NAG binding site, which might be relevant to substrate binding and product release. The dimeric structure of the X. fastidiosa N-acetytransferase (xfNAT) domain is very similar to that of human N-acetyltransferase (hNAT), reinforcing the notion that mammalian NAGS is evolutionally derived from bifunctional bacterial NAGS/K. PMID:25615976

  7. Targeted cancer therapies

    Li Yan; Neal Rosen; Carlos Arteaga

    2011-01-01

    With unprecedented understanding of molecular events underlying human cancer in this genomic era, a large number of drugs specifically targeting hypothesized oncogenic drivers to which tumors are potentially addicted to have been developed and continue to be developed. These targeted cancer therapies are being actively tested in clinical trials with mixed successes. This editorial provides an overview on successful targeted cancer drugs on the market and those drugs that are in late clinical development stages. Importantly, the article lays out main challenges in developing molecular targeted therapies and potential path forward to overcome these challenges, as well as opportunities for China in this new era of targeted agents. The editorial serves as an introduction to the Targeted Cancer Therapies serias that will review in depth of major pathways and drugs targeting these pathways to be published in the coming issues of the Chinese Journal of Cancer.

  8. Polarized targets and beams

    First the experimental situation of the single-pion photoproduction and the photodisintegration of the deuteron is briefly discussed. Then a description of the Bonn polarization facilities is given. The point of main effort is put on the polarized target which plays a vital role in the program. A facility for photon induced double polarization experiments at ELSA will be presented in section 4. Properties of a tensor polarized deuteron target are discussed in section 5. The development in the field of polarized targets, especially on new target materials, enables a new generation of polarized target experiments with (polarized) electrons. Some comments on the use of a polarized target in combination with electron beams will be discussed in section 6. Electron deuteron scattering from a tensor polarized deuteron target is considered and compared with other experimental possibilities. (orig./HSI)

  9. Butenolide inhibits marine fouling by altering the primary metabolism of three target organisms

    Zhang, Yifan

    2012-06-15

    Butenolide is a very promising antifouling compound that inhibits ship hull fouling by a variety of marine organisms, but its antifouling mechanism was previously unknown. Here we report the first study of butenolides molecular targets in three representative fouling organisms. In the barnacle Balanus (=Amphibalanus) amphitrite, butenolide bound to acetyl-CoA acetyltransferase 1 (ACAT1), which is involved in ketone body metabolism. Both the substrate and the product of ACAT1 increased larval settlement under butenolide treatment, suggesting its functional involvement. In the bryozoan Bugula neritina, butenolide bound to very long chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (ACADVL), actin, and glutathione S-transferases (GSTs). ACADVL is the first enzyme in the very long chain fatty acid β-oxidation pathway. The inhibition of this primary pathway for energy production in larvae by butenolide was supported by the finding that alternative energy sources (acetoacetate and pyruvate) increased larval attachment under butenolide treatment. In marine bacterium Vibrio sp. UST020129-010, butenolide bound to succinyl-CoA synthetase β subunit (SCSβ) and inhibited bacterial growth. ACAT1, ACADVL, and SCSβ are all involved in primary metabolism for energy production. These findings suggest that butenolide inhibits fouling by influencing the primary metabolism of target organisms. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  10. GWAS and drug targets

    Cao, Chen; Moult, John

    2014-01-01

    Background Genome wide association studies (GWAS) have revealed a large number of links between genome variation and complex disease. Among other benefits, it is expected that these insights will lead to new therapeutic strategies, particularly the identification of new drug targets. In this paper, we evaluate the power of GWAS studies to find drug targets by examining how many existing drug targets have been directly 'rediscovered' by this technique, and the extent to which GWAS results may ...

  11. Deuterium high pressure target

    The design of the deuterium high-pressure target is presented. The target having volume of 76 cm3 serves to provide the experimental research of muon catalyzed fusion reactions in ultra-pure deuterium in the temperature range 80-800 K under pressures of up to 150 MPa. The operation of the main systems of the target is described: generation and purification of deuterium gas, refrigeration, heating, evacuation, automated control system and data collection system

  12. Inertial Confinement fusion targets

    Hendricks, C. D.

    1982-01-01

    Inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets are made as simple flat discs, as hollow shells or as complicated multilayer structures. Many techniques were devised for producing the targets. Glass and metal shells are made by using drop and bubble techniques. Solid hydrogen shells are also produced by adapting old methods to the solution of modern problems. Some of these techniques, problems, and solutions are discussed. In addition, the applications of many of the techniques to fabrication of ICF targets is presented.

  13. Deuterium High Pressure Target

    Perevozchikov, V; Vinogradov, Yu I; Vikharev, M D; Ganchuk, N S; Golubkov, A N; Grishenchkin, S K; Demin, A M; Demin, D L; Zinov, V G; Kononenko, A A; Lobanov, V N; Malkov, I L; Yukhimchuk, S A

    2001-01-01

    The design of the deuterium high-pressure target is presented. The target having volume of 76 cm^3 serves to provide the experimental research of muon catalyzed fusion reactions in ultra-pure deuterium in the temperature range 80-800 K under pressures of up to 150 MPa. The operation of the main systems of the target is described: generation and purification of deuterium gas, refrigeration, heating, evacuation, automated control system and data collection system.

  14. The ISOLDE target robots

    Maximilein Brice

    2002-01-01

    ISOLDE targets need to be changed frequently, around 80 times per year. The high radiation levels do not permit this to be done by human hands and the target changes are effected by 2 industrial robots (picture _01). On the left, in the distance, the front-end of the GPS (General Purpose Separator) is seen, while the HRS (High Resolution Separator) is at the right. Also seen are the doors to the irradiated-target storage.

  15. Moving Target Defense

    Jajodia, Sushil; Swarup, Vipin; Wang, Cliff; Wang, X Sean

    2011-01-01

    Moving Target Defense: Creating Asymmetric Uncertainty for Cyber Threats was developed by a group of leading researchers. It describes the fundamental challenges facing the research community and identifies new promising solution paths. Moving Target Defense which is motivated by the asymmetric costs borne by cyber defenders takes an advantage afforded to attackers and reverses it to advantage defenders. Moving Target Defense is enabled by technical trends in recent years, including virtualization and workload migration on commodity systems, widespread and redundant network connectivity, instr

  16. Target Window Reliability

    Woloshun, Keith Albert [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-02-11

    The target window design implemented and tested in experiments at ANL have performed without failure for the available beam of 6 mm FWHM on a 12 mm diameter target. However, scaling that design to a 25 mm diameter target size for a 12 mm FWHM beam has proven problematic. Combined thermal and mechanical (pressure induced) stresses and strains are too high to maintain the small coolant gaps and provide adequate fatigue lifetime.

  17. Target Assembly Facility

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Target Assembly Facility integrates new armor concepts into actual armored vehicles. Featuring the capability ofmachining and cutting radioactive materials, it...

  18. Targeting the tumor microenvironment

    Kenny, P.A.; Lee, G.Y.; Bissell, M.J.

    2006-11-07

    Despite some notable successes cancer remains, for the most part, a seemingly intractable problem. There is, however, a growing appreciation that targeting the tumor epithelium in isolation is not sufficient as there is an intricate mutually sustaining synergy between the tumor epithelial cells and their surrounding stroma. As the details of this dialogue emerge, new therapeutic targets have been proposed. The FDA has already approved drugs targeting microenvironmental components such as VEGF and aromatase and many more agents are in the pipeline. In this article, we describe some of the 'druggable' targets and processes within the tumor microenvironment and review the approaches being taken to disrupt these interactions.

  19. Bayesian multiple target tracking

    Streit, Roy L

    2013-01-01

    This second edition has undergone substantial revision from the 1999 first edition, recognizing that a lot has changed in the multiple target tracking field. One of the most dramatic changes is in the widespread use of particle filters to implement nonlinear, non-Gaussian Bayesian trackers. This book views multiple target tracking as a Bayesian inference problem. Within this framework it develops the theory of single target tracking, multiple target tracking, and likelihood ratio detection and tracking. In addition to providing a detailed description of a basic particle filter that implements

  20. The Target Visitation Problem

    Hildenbrandt, Achim

    2015-01-01

    The thesis considers the target visitation problem, a combinatorial optimization problem, which merges the classical traveling salesman problem with the linear ordering problem. In more detail, we are looking for a tour which visits a set of targets and which is optimal with respect to two different aspects: On the one hand, we have given a travel cost from each target to every other. On the other hand, we have preference values which tell us how much we would like to visit one target before ...

  1. Strategic Targeted Advertising

    A. Galeotti; J.L. Moraga-Gonzalez (José Luis)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractWe present a strategic game of pricing and targeted-advertising. Firms can simultaneously target price advertisements to different groups of customers, or to the entire market. Pure strategy equilibria do not exist and thus market segmentation cannot occur surely. Equilibria exhibit rand

  2. Pure HD polarized targets

    The HD polarized target project is now ready to use a target in a physics experiment. This must be done in early 1998 at LEGS (BNL). The IPN cryogenic group takes its part in this venture by doing the transfer and in-beam cryostats. (authors)

  3. The CNGS target

    Patrice Loïez

    2005-01-01

    The CERN Neutrinos to Gran Sasso (CNGS) target ‘magazine’ of five target units. Each unit contains a series of 10-cm long graphite rods distributed over a length of 2 m. It is designed to maximize the number of secondary particles produced and hence the number of neutrinos. One unit is used at a time to prevent over heating.

  4. Targeted therapy in lymphoma

    Cavalli Franco

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Discovery of new treatments for lymphoma that prolong survival and are less toxic than currently available agents represents an urgent unmet need. We now have a better understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of lymphoma, such as aberrant signal transduction pathways, which have led to the discovery and development of targeted therapeutics. The ubiquitin-proteasome and the Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR pathways are examples of pathological mechanisms that are being targeted in drug development efforts. Bortezomib (a small molecule protease inhibitor and the mTOR inhibitors temsirolimus, everolimus, and ridaforolimus are some of the targeted therapies currently being studied in the treatment of aggressive, relapsed/refractory lymphoma. This review will discuss the rationale for and summarize the reported findings of initial and ongoing investigations of mTOR inhibitors and other small molecule targeted therapies in the treatment of lymphoma.

  5. Molecular Basis for Defining the Pineal Gland and Pinealocytes as Targets for Tumor Necrosis Factor

    Cláudia Emanuele Carvalho-Sousa; Sanseray eda Silveira Cruz-Machado; Eduardo Koji Tamura; Pedro A C. M. Fernandes; Luciana ePinato; Muxel, Sandra M.; Erika eCecon; Markus, Regina P.

    2011-01-01

    The pineal gland, which is the gland that translates darkness into an endocrine signal by releasing melatonin at night, is now considered a key player in the mounting of an innate immune response. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF), the first pro-inflammatory cytokine to be released by an inflammatory response, suppresses the translation of the key enzyme of melatonin synthesis (arylalkylamine-N-acetyltransferase-alkyl-N-acetyltransferase, Aa-nat). Here we show that TNF receptors of the subtype 1 (T...

  6. Association between hippocampal Choline acetyltransferase expression and cognition in diabetes mellitus rats%糖尿病大鼠海马胆碱乙酰转移酶表达与认知功能的相关性

    张栋珉; 肖谦

    2009-01-01

    目的:观察糖尿病人鼠海马胆碱乙酰转移酶(ChAT)mRNA和蛋白表达及其与认知功能的关系,探讨糖尿病脑病的发病机制.方法:38只sD雄性大鼠随机分为正常对照组(C组)和糖尿病组(D组),腹腔注射链脲佐菌素建市糖尿病大鼠模型.建模成功后11 wk用Moms水迷宫测试大鼠学习和记忆能力;RT-PCR,原位杂交法检测ChAT mRNA表达;免疫组化,Western Blot法检测ChAT蛋白表达.结果:D组大鼠学习和记忆能力明显减退,其逃避潜伏期时间延长;c组40.90 4±10.90与D组77.56±27.86相比较,差异具有统计学意义(P<0.05).穿越目标区域次数c组(3.93±0.44)次与D组(1.37±0.85)次相比较明显减少(P<0.05);中心区域停留时间百分率c组(5.41±0.97)%与D组(2.20±1.28)%相比较明显下降(P<0.05).海马ChAT mRNA和ChAT蛋白表达c组0.48 4+0.03,0.55 4±0.02与D组0.37 4±0.01,0.33 4±0.01相比较均明显降低(P<0.05).结论:糖尿病大鼠海马ChAT mRNA和蛋白低水平表达可能是糖尿病脑病的发病机制之一.%AIM: To observe the relation between the expression of Choline acetyltransferase protein and mRNA of hippocampus and the cognitive function of diabetic rats and to explore the pathogenetic mechanism of diabetic encephalopathy. METHODS : Thirty eight SD male rats were randomly divided into normal control group (group C) and diabetic model group (group D). Diabetes was induced by a single peritoneal injection of streptozotocin. Eleven weeks later, learning and memory behaviors were investigated using a spatial version of the Morris water maze test. The expression of choline acetyhransferase mRNA in hippocampus was examined by RT-PCR and in situ hybridization. The expression of choline acetyhransferase protein was examined with immunohistochemistry and Western Blot. RESULTS: Compared with group C, group D showed a significant increase in the mean time of escape latencies ( P < 0.05 ) and a decrease in percentage of stay time in the central area

  7. AA antiproton production target

    1979-01-01

    The first version of the antiproton production target was a tungsten rod, 11 cm long and 3 mm in diameter. The rod was embedded in graphite, pressure-seated into an outer casing of stainless steel. At the entrance to the target assembly was a scintillator screen, imprinted with circles every 5 mm in radius, which allowed to precisely aim the 26 GeV high-intensity proton beam from the PS onto the centre of the target rod. The scintillator screen was a 1 mm thick plate of Cr-doped alumina. See also 7903034 and 7905091.

  8. Targeted therapies for cancer

    ... to be untrue. Possible side effects from targeted therapies include: Diarrhea Liver problems Skin problems such as rash, dry skin, and nail changes Problems with blood clotting and wound healing High blood pressure As with any treatment, you ...

  9. SETI target selection.

    Latham, D. W.; Soderblom, D. R.

    1995-06-01

    The NASA High Resolution Microwave Survey consists of two complementary elements: a Sky Survey of the entire sky to a moderate level of sensitivity; and a Targeted Search of nearby stars, one at a time, to a much deeper level of sensitivity. The authors propose strategies for target selection with two goals: to improve the chances of successful detection of signals from technical civilizations that inhabit planets around solar-type stars, and to minimize the chances of missing signals from unexpected sites.

  10. High pressure gas target

    Gelbart, W.; Johnson, R. R.; Abeysekera, B.

    2012-12-01

    Compact, high pressure, high current gas target features all metal construction and semi-automatic window assembly change. The unique aspect of this target is the domed-shaped window. The Havar alloy window is electron beam welded to a metal ring, thus forming one, interchangeable assembly. The window assembly is sealed by knife-edges locked by a pneumatic toggle allowing a quick, in situ window change.

  11. An ISOLDE target unit

    Maximilien Brice

    2002-01-01

    A good dozen different targets are available for ISOLDE, made of different materials and equipped with different kinds of ion-sources, according to the needs of the experiments. Each separator (GPS: general purpose; HRS: high resolution) has its own target. Because of the high radiation levels, robots effect the target changes, about 80 times per year. In the standard unit shown in picture _01, the target is the cylindrical object in the front. It contains uranium-carbide kept at a temperature of 2200 deg C, necessary for the isotopes to be able to escape. At either end, one sees the heater current leads, carrying 700 A. The Booster beam, some 3E13 protons per pulse, enters the target from left. The evaporated isotope atoms enter a hot-plasma ion source (the black object behind the target). The whole unit sits at 60 kV potential (pulsed in synchronism with the arrival of the Booster beam) which accelerates the ions (away from the viewer) towards one of the 2 separators.

  12. Radar target detection simulation

    Tarig Ibrahim Osman

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Standard radar detection process requires that the sensor output is compared to a predetermined threshold. The threshold is selected based on a-priori knowledge available and/or certain assumptions. However, any knowledge and/or assumptions become in adequate due to the presence of multiple targets with varying signal return and usually non stationary background. Thus, any predetermined threshold may result in either increased false alarm rate or increased track loss. Even approaches where the threshold is adaptively varied will not perform well in situations when the signal return from the target of interest is too low compared to the average level of the background .Track-before-detect techniques eliminate the need for a detection threshold and provide detecting and tracking targets with lower signal-to-noise ratios than standard methods. However, although trackbefore-detect techniques eliminate the need for detection threshold at sensor's signal processing stage, they often use tuning thresholds at the output of the filtering stage .This paper presents a computerized simulation model for target detection process. Moreover, the proposed model method is based on the target motion models, the output of the detection process can easily be employed for maneuvering target tracking.

  13. Combinatorial H3K9acS10ph Histone Modification in IgH Locus S Regions Targets 14-3-3 Adaptors and AID to Specify Antibody Class-Switch DNA Recombination

    Guideng Li

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Class-switch DNA recombination (CSR is central to the antibody response, in that it changes the immunoglobulin heavy chain (IgH constant region, thereby diversifying biological effector functions of antibodies. The activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID-centered CSR machinery excises and rejoins DNA between an upstream (donor and a downstream (acceptor S region, which precede the respective constant region DNA. AID is stabilized on S regions by 14-3-3 adaptors. These adaptors display a high affinity for 5′-AGCT-3′ repeats, which recur in all S regions. However, how 14-3-3, AID, and the CSR machinery target exclusively the donor and acceptor S regions is poorly understood. Here, we show that histone methyltransferases and acetyltransferases are induced by CD40 or Toll-like receptor signaling and catalyze H3K4me3 and H3K9ac/K14ac histone modifications, which are enriched in S regions but do not specify the S region targets of CSR. By contrast, the combinatorial H3K9acS10ph modification specifically marks the S regions set to recombine and directly recruits 14-3-3 adaptors for AID stabilization there. Inhibition of the enzymatic activity of GCN5 and PCAF histone acetyltransferases reduces H3K9acS10ph in S regions, 14-3-3 and AID stabilization, and CSR. Thus, H3K9acS10ph is a histone code that is “written” specifically in S regions and is “read” by 14-3-3 adaptors to target AID for CSR as an important biological outcome.

  14. NAT2*6A,a haplotype of the N-acetyltransferase 2 gene, is an important biomarker for risk of anti-tuberculosis drug-induced hepatotoxicity in Japanese patients with tuberculosis

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To investigate an association between N-acetyltransferase 2 (NAT2)-haplotypes/diplotypes and adverse effects in apanese pulmonary tuberculosis patients.METHODS: We studied 100 patients with pulmonary TB treated with anti-TB drugs including INH. The frequencies and distributions of single nucleotide polymorphisms, haplotypes, and diplotypes of NAT2 were determined by the PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism method, and the results were compared between TB patients with and without adverse effect,using multivariate logistic regression analysis.RESULTS: Statistical analysis revealed that the frequency of a variant haplotype, NAT2*6A, was significantly increased in TB patients with hepatotoxicity,compared with those without hepatotoxicity [P = 0.001,odds ratio (OR) = 3.535]. By contrast, the frequency of a wild-type (major) haplotype,"NAT2*4″, was significantly lower in TB patients with hepatotoxicity than those without hepatotoxicity (P < 0.001, OR = 0.265).There was no association between NAT2-haplotypes and skin rash or eosinophilia.CONCLUSION: The present study shows that NAT2 is one of the determinants of anti-TB drug-induced hepatotoxicity. Moreover, the haplotypes, NAT2*4 and NAT2*6A, are useful new biomarkers for predicting antiTB drug-induced hepatotoxicity.

  15. Crystal structure of the N-acetyltransferase domain of human N-acetyl-L-glutamate synthase in complex with N-acetyl-L-glutamate provides insights into its catalytic and regulatory mechanisms.

    Gengxiang Zhao

    Full Text Available N-acetylglutamate synthase (NAGS catalyzes the conversion of AcCoA and L-glutamate to CoA and N-acetyl-L-glutamate (NAG, an obligate cofactor for carbamyl phosphate synthetase I (CPSI in the urea cycle. NAGS deficiency results in elevated levels of plasma ammonia which is neurotoxic. We report herein the first crystal structure of human NAGS, that of the catalytic N-acetyltransferase (hNAT domain with N-acetyl-L-glutamate bound at 2.1 Å resolution. Functional studies indicate that the hNAT domain retains catalytic activity in the absence of the amino acid kinase (AAK domain. Instead, the major functions of the AAK domain appear to be providing a binding site for the allosteric activator, L-arginine, and an N-terminal proline-rich motif that is likely to function in signal transduction to CPS1. Crystalline hNAT forms a dimer similar to the NAT-NAT dimers that form in crystals of bifunctional N-acetylglutamate synthase/kinase (NAGS/K from Maricaulis maris and also exists as a dimer in solution. The structure of the NAG binding site, in combination with mutagenesis studies, provide insights into the catalytic mechanism. We also show that native NAGS from human and mouse exists in tetrameric form, similar to those of bifunctional NAGS/K.

  16. Crystal structure of the N-acetyltransferase domain of human N-acetyl-L-glutamate synthase in complex with N-acetyl-L-glutamate provides insights into its catalytic and regulatory mechanisms.

    Zhao, Gengxiang; Jin, Zhongmin; Allewell, Norma M; Tuchman, Mendel; Shi, Dashuang

    2013-01-01

    N-acetylglutamate synthase (NAGS) catalyzes the conversion of AcCoA and L-glutamate to CoA and N-acetyl-L-glutamate (NAG), an obligate cofactor for carbamyl phosphate synthetase I (CPSI) in the urea cycle. NAGS deficiency results in elevated levels of plasma ammonia which is neurotoxic. We report herein the first crystal structure of human NAGS, that of the catalytic N-acetyltransferase (hNAT) domain with N-acetyl-L-glutamate bound at 2.1 Å resolution. Functional studies indicate that the hNAT domain retains catalytic activity in the absence of the amino acid kinase (AAK) domain. Instead, the major functions of the AAK domain appear to be providing a binding site for the allosteric activator, L-arginine, and an N-terminal proline-rich motif that is likely to function in signal transduction to CPS1. Crystalline hNAT forms a dimer similar to the NAT-NAT dimers that form in crystals of bifunctional N-acetylglutamate synthase/kinase (NAGS/K) from Maricaulis maris and also exists as a dimer in solution. The structure of the NAG binding site, in combination with mutagenesis studies, provide insights into the catalytic mechanism. We also show that native NAGS from human and mouse exists in tetrameric form, similar to those of bifunctional NAGS/K. PMID:23894642

  17. The Sinuous Target

    Zwaska, R. [Fermilab

    2015-06-01

    We report on the concept for a target material comprised of a multitude of interlaced wires of small dimension. This target material concept is primarily directed at high-power neutrino targets where the thermal shock is large due to small beam sizes and short durations; it also has applications to other high-power targets, particularly where the energy deposition is great or a high surface area is preferred. This approach ameliorates the problem of thermal shock by engineering a material with high strength on the micro-scale, but a very low modulus of elasticity on the meso-scale. The low modulus of elasticity is achieved by constructing the material of spring-like wire segments much smaller than the beam dimension. The intrinsic bends of the wires will allow them to absorb the strain of thermal shock with minimal stress. Furthermore, the interlaced nature of the wires provides containment of any segment that might become loose. We will discuss the progress on studies of analogue materials and fabrication techniques for sinuous target materials.

  18. Targeted assets risk analysis.

    Bouwsema, Barry

    2013-01-01

    Risk assessments utilising the consolidated risk assessment process as described by Public Safety Canada and the Centre for Security Science utilise the five threat categories of natural, human accidental, technological, human intentional and chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear or explosive (CBRNE). The categories of human intentional and CBRNE indicate intended actions against specific targets. It is therefore necessary to be able to identify which pieces of critical infrastructure represent the likely targets of individuals with malicious intent. Using the consolidated risk assessment process and the target capabilities list, coupled with the CARVER methodology and a security vulnerability analysis, it is possible to identify these targeted assets and their weaknesses. This process can help emergency managers to identify where resources should be allocated and funding spent. Targeted Assets Risk Analysis (TARA) presents a new opportunity to improve how risk is measured, monitored, managed and minimised through the four phases of emergency management, namely, prevention, preparation, response and recovery. To reduce risk throughout Canada, Defence Research and Development Canada is interested in researching the potential benefits of a comprehensive approach to risk assessment and management. The TARA provides a framework against which potential human intentional threats can be measured and quantified, thereby improving safety for all Canadians. PMID:23615063

  19. Production Target Design Report

    Woloshun, Keith Albert [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Dale, Gregory E. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Olivas, Eric Richard [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-07-28

    The Northstar 99Mo production target, a cylindrical length of 100Mo rod, has evolved considerably since its first conception.  The cylinder was very early sliced into disks to increase the heat transfer area, first to 1 mm thick disks then to the current 0.5 mm thick.  The coolant was changed early in the target development from water to helium to eliminate corrosion and dissolution.  The diameter has increased from initially 6 mm to 12 mm, the current diameter of the test target now at ANL, to nominally 28 mm (26-30.6 mm, depending upon optimal beam spot size and shape).  The length has also changed to improve the production to cost ratio, so now the target is nominally 41 mm long (excluding coolant gaps between disks), and irradiated on both ends.  This report summarizes the current status of the plant target design.

  20. Inflation Forecast Targeting: Implementing and Monitoring Inflation Targets

    Lars E.O. Svensson

    1996-01-01

    Inflation targeting is shown to imply inflation forecast targeting: the central bank's inflation forecast becomes an intermediate target. Inflation forecast targeting simplifies both implementing and monitoring of monetary policy. The inflation forecast is actually an ideal intermediate target: it is most correlated with the goal, easier to control than the goal, more observable than the goal, and very transparent. Money growth targeting generally leads to higher inflation variability than in...

  1. Setting reference targets

    Reference Targets are used to represent virtual quantities like the magnetic axis of a magnet or the definition of a coordinate system. To explain the function of reference targets in the sequence of the alignment process, this paper will first briefly discuss the geometry of the trajectory design space and of the surveying space, then continue with an overview of a typical alignment process. This is followed by a discussion on magnet fiducialization. While the magnetic measurement methods to determine the magnetic centerline are only listed (they will be discussed in detail in a subsequent talk), emphasis is given to the optical/mechanical methods and to the task of transferring the centerline position to reference targets

  2. Modelling Recycling Targets

    Hill, Amanda Louise; Leinikka Dall, Ole; Andersen, Frits M.

    2014-01-01

    Within the European Union (EU) a paradigm shift is currently occurring in the waste sector, where EU waste directives and national waste strategies are placing emphasis on resource efficiency and recycling targets. The most recent Danish resource strategy calculates a national recycling rate of 22......% for household waste, and sets an ambitious goal of a 50% recycling rate by 2020. This study integrates the recycling target into the FRIDA model to project how much waste and from which streams should be diverted from incineration to recycling in order to achieve the target. Furthermore, it discusses...... how the existing technological, organizational and legislative frameworks may affect recycling activities. The results of the analysis show that with current best practice recycling rates, the 50% recycling rate cannot be reached without recycling of household biowaste. It also shows that all Danish...

  3. Targeted Phototherapy (newer phototherapy

    Zonunsanga

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Conventional phototherapy uses a whole body cabinet or body part machine such as hand, foot or scalp machines. They have many disadvantages due to which new phototherapy technique was then developed to overcome this situation. This new technique is called targeted phototherapy which includes excimer laser, intense pulse light system (IPL, photodynamic therapy and ultraviolet (UV light source with a sophisticated delivery system which is easy to be operated by hands. The mechanisms of action of targeted phototherapy systems are similar to those in conventional UVB/UVA therapy. They have many advantages like less chances of side effects, avoidance of exposure of unnecessary sites, faster response, shortening of the duration of treatments. But they have disadvantages like high costs and inability to use for extensive areas. This review article discusses targeted phototherapy in considerable to the mechanism of actions and advantages and disadvantages in comparison to the conventional phototherapy.

  4. Phoenix Color Targets

    2008-01-01

    These images of three Phoenix color targets were taken on sols 1 and 2 by the Surface Stereo Imager (SSI) on board the Phoenix lander. The bottom target was imaged in approximate color (SSI's red, green, and blue filters: 600, 530, and 480 nanometers), while the others were imaged with an infrared filter (750 nanometers). All of them will be imaged many times over the mission to monitor the color calibration of the camera. The two at the top show grains 2 to 3 millimeters in size that were likely lifted to the Phoenix deck during landing. Each of the large color chips on each target contains a strong magnet to protect the interior material from Mars' magnetic dust. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  5. Targeted polypeptide degradation

    Church, George M.; Janse, Daniel M.

    2008-05-13

    This invention pertains to compositions, methods, cells and organisms useful for selectively localizing polypeptides to the proteasome for degradation. Therapeutic methods and pharmaceutical compositions for treating disorders associated with the expression and/or activity of a polypeptide by targeting these polypeptides for degradation, as well as methods for targeting therapeutic polypeptides for degradation and/or activating therapeutic polypeptides by degradation are provided. The invention provides methods for identifying compounds that mediate proteasome localization and/or polypeptide degradation. The invention also provides research tools for the study of protein function.

  6. Fine target of deuterium

    A fine target of deuterium on a tantalum plate by the absorption method is obtained. In order to obtain the de gasification temperature an induction generator of high frequency is used and the deuterium pass is regulated by means of a palladium valve. Two vacuum measures are available, one to measure the high vacuum in the de gasification process of the tantalum plate and the other, for low vacuum, to measure the deuterium inlet in the installation and the deuterium pressure change in the installation after the absorption in the tantalum plate. A target of 48 μ gr/cm2 thick is obtained. (Author) 1 refs

  7. AA antiproton production target

    1979-01-01

    The first version of the antiproton production target was a tungsten rod, 11 cm long (actually a row of 11 rods, each 1 cm long) and 3 mm in diameter. The rod was embedded in graphite, pressure-seated into an outer casing made of stainless steel. The casing had fins for forced-air cooling. In this picture, the 26 GeV high-intensity beam from the PS enters from the right, where a scintillator screen, with circles every 5 mm in radius, permits precise aim at the target centre. See also 7903034 and 7905094.

  8. Phage-mediated Delivery of Targeted sRNA Constructs to Knock Down Gene Expression in E. coli

    Lindner, Ariel B.; Wintermute, Edwin H.

    2016-01-01

    RNA-mediated knockdowns are widely used to control gene expression. This versatile family of techniques makes use of short RNA (sRNA) that can be synthesized with any sequence and designed to complement any gene targeted for silencing. Because sRNA constructs can be introduced to many cell types directly or using a variety of vectors, gene expression can be repressed in living cells without laborious genetic modification. The most common RNA knockdown technology, RNA interference (RNAi), makes use of the endogenous RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC) to mediate sequence recognition and cleavage of the target mRNA. Applications of this technique are therefore limited to RISC-expressing organisms, primarily eukaryotes. Recently, a new generation of RNA biotechnologists have developed alternative mechanisms for controlling gene expression through RNA, and so made possible RNA-mediated gene knockdowns in bacteria. Here we describe a method for silencing gene expression in E. coli that functionally resembles RNAi. In this system a synthetic phagemid is designed to express sRNA, which may designed to target any sequence. The expression construct is delivered to a population of E. coli cells with non-lytic M13 phage, after which it is able to stably replicate as a plasmid. Antisense recognition and silencing of the target mRNA is mediated by the Hfq protein, endogenous to E. coli. This protocol includes methods for designing the antisense sRNA, constructing the phagemid vector, packaging the phagemid into M13 bacteriophage, preparing a live cell population for infection, and performing the infection itself. The fluorescent protein mKate2 and the antibiotic resistance gene chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) are targeted to generate representative data and to quantify knockdown effectiveness. PMID:27023729

  9. Major Targets for 2010

    2010-01-01

    @@ This year, the main targets we have set for economic and social development are: increasing GDP by approximately 8 percent, creating jobs for more than 9 million people, keeping the urban registered unemployment rate no higher than 4.6 percent, holding the rise in consumer prices to around 3 percent, and improving the balance of payments.

  10. 12. Target fabrication

    This series of papers presents the requirements and critical issues for IFE (inertial fusion energy) target fabrication and injection. The critical issues for target fabrication are: -) ability to fabricate target capsules and hohlraums, -) ability to fabricate them economically, and -) ability to fabricate, assemble, fill and layer at the required rate. Potential fabrication processes or methodologies include: micro-encapsulation (for foam shells and thick ablators), phase-inversion technique (for CH foams), super-fast cooling techniques, emulsion technique, injection molding (for higher density foam shells), sputter coating (for density high-Z coating), permeation (for DT filling) and cryogenic fluidized beds (for layering of individual capsules). The cooling-induced deformation (CID) of polystyrene shells is characterized in detail (2 papers). Another paper deals with the fabrication of hollow pellets with high Z metal oxide coating of the inner surface. In order to achieve high density compression in laser experiments, the non-contact suspension of pellets is required, Japanese teams propose 2 ways to get it: magnetic suspension and the use of electromagnetic force. The last paper summarizes the major steps in cost reduction that will be taken to economically supply targets for IFE power plants. (A.C.)

  11. Target Chamber Manipulator

    Tantillo, Anthony; Watson, Matthew

    2015-11-01

    A system has been developed to allow remote actuation of sensors in a high vacuum target chamber used with a particle accelerator. Typically, sensors of various types are placed into the target chamber at specific radial and angular positions relative to the beam line and target. The chamber is then evacuated and the experiments are performed for those sensor positions. Then, the chamber is opened, the sensors are repositioned to new angles or radii, and the process is repeated, with a separate pump-down cycle for each set of sensor positions. The new sensor positioning system allows scientists to pre-set the radii of up to a dozen sensors, and then remotely actuate their angular positions without breaking the vacuum of the target chamber. This reduces the time required to reposition sensors from 6 hours to 1 minute. The sensors are placed into one of two tracks that are separately actuated using vacuum-grade stepping motors. The positions of the sensors are verified using absolute optical rotary encoders, and the positions are accurate to 0.5 degrees. The positions of the sensors are electronically recorded and time-stamped after every change. User control is through a GUI using LabVIEW.

  12. ISOLDE back on target

    Anaïs Schaeffer

    2014-01-01

    Today, Friday 1 August, the ISOLDE installation, supplied by the beams of the PS Booster, restarted its physics programme. After a shutdown of almost a year and a half, there was a real buzz in the air as the first beam of protons hit the target of the first post-LS1 ISOLDE experiment.   One of the new target-handling robots installed by ISOLDE during LS1. Many improvements have been made to the ISOLDE installation during LS1. One of the main projects was the installation of new robots for handling the targets (see photo 1). “Our targets are bombarded by protons from the PS Booster’s beams and become very radioactive,” explains Maria Jose Garcia Borge, spokesperson for the ISOLDE collaboration. “They therefore need to be handled carefully, which is where the robots come in. The robots we had until now were already over 20 years old and were starting to suffer from the effects of radiation. So LS1 was a perfect opportunity to replace them with more moder...

  13. Enhanced target factor analysis.

    Rostami, Akram; Abdollahi, Hamid; Maeder, Marcel

    2016-03-10

    Target testing or target factor analysis, TFA, is a well-established soft analysis method. TFA answers the question whether an independent target test vector measured at the same wavelengths as the collection of spectra in a data matrix can be excluded as the spectrum of one of the components in the system under investigation. Essentially, TFA cannot positively prove that a particular test spectrum is the true spectrum of one of the components, it can, only reject a spectrum. However, TFA will not reject, or in other words TFA will accept, many spectra which cannot be component spectra. Enhanced Target Factor Analysis, ETFA addresses the above problem. Compared with traditional TFA, ETFA results in a significantly narrower range of positive results, i.e. the chance of a false positive test result is dramatically reduced. ETFA is based on feasibility testing as described in Refs. [16-19]. The method has been tested and validated with computer generated and real data sets. PMID:26893084

  14. The targets of curcumin.

    Zhou, Hongyu; Beevers, Christopher S; Huang, Shile

    2011-03-01

    Curcumin (diferuloylmethane), an orange-yellow component of turmeric or curry powder, is a polyphenol natural product isolated from the rhizome of the plant Curcuma longa. For centuries, curcumin has been used in some medicinal preparation or used as a food-coloring agent. In recent years, extensive in vitro and in vivo studies suggested curcumin has anticancer, antiviral, antiarthritic, anti-amyloid, antioxidant, and anti-inflammatory properties. The underlying mechanisms of these effects are diverse and appear to involve the regulation of various molecular targets, including transcription factors (such as nuclear factor-kB), growth factors (such as vascular endothelial cell growth factor), inflammatory cytokines (such as tumor necrosis factor, interleukin 1 and interleukin 6), protein kinases (such as mammalian target of rapamycin, mitogen-activated protein kinases, and Akt) and other enzymes (such as cyclooxygenase 2 and 5 lipoxygenase). Thus, due to its efficacy and regulation of multiple targets, as well as its safety for human use, curcumin has received considerable interest as a potential therapeutic agent for the prevention and/or treatment of various malignant diseases, arthritis, allergies, Alzheimer's disease, and other inflammatory illnesses. This review summarizes various in vitro and in vivo pharmacological aspects of curcumin as well as the underlying action mechanisms. The recently identified molecular targets and signaling pathways modulated by curcumin are also discussed here. PMID:20955148

  15. Polarization discrimination between repeater false-target and radar target

    SHI LongFei; WANG XueSong; XIAO ShunPing

    2009-01-01

    High fidelity repeater false-target badly affects a radar system's detecting, tracking, and data processing. It is an available approach of confronting false-target for radar that discriminates firstly and then eliminates. Whereas for the technique progress about the repeater false-target jam, it is more and more difficult to discriminate this jam in the time-domain, frequency-domain, or space-domain. The technique using polarization information to discriminate the target and false-target is discussed in this paper. With the difference that false-target signal vector's polarization ratio is fixed and target echo signal vector's polarization ratio is variational along with radar transmission signal's polarization, we transform the discrimination problem to beeline distinguish problem in the 2-dim complex space. The distributing characteristic expression of the false-target discrimination statistic is constructed, with which the discrimination ratio of false-target is analyzed. For the target case, the decomposed model of target scattering matrix and the concept of distinguish quantity are proposed. Then, the discrimination ratio of target can be forecasted according to target distinguish quantity. Thus, the performance of discrimination method has been analyzed integrally. The simulation results demonstrate the method in this paper is effective on the discrimination of target and false-target.

  16. Evolution with Drifting Targets

    Kanade, Varun; Vaughan, Jennifer Wortman

    2010-01-01

    We consider the question of the stability of evolutionary algorithms to gradual changes, or drift, in the target concept. We define an algorithm to be resistant to drift if, for some inverse polynomial drift rate in the target function, it converges to accuracy 1 -- \\epsilon , with polynomial resources, and then stays within that accuracy indefinitely, except with probability \\epsilon , at any one time. We show that every evolution algorithm, in the sense of Valiant (2007; 2009), can be converted using the Correlational Query technique of Feldman (2008), into such a drift resistant algorithm. For certain evolutionary algorithms, such as for Boolean conjunctions, we give bounds on the rates of drift that they can resist. We develop some new evolution algorithms that are resistant to significant drift. In particular, we give an algorithm for evolving linear separators over the spherically symmetric distribution that is resistant to a drift rate of O(\\epsilon /n), and another algorithm over the more general prod...

  17. Physics of polarized targets

    Niinikoski, Tapio

    2014-01-01

    For developing, building and operating solid polarized targets we need to understand several fields of physics that have seen sub stantial advances during the last 50 years. W e shall briefly review a selection of those that are important today. These are: 1) quantum statistical methods to describe saturation and relaxation in magnetic resonance; 2) equal spin temperature model for dy namic nuclear polarization; 3 ) weak saturation during NMR polarization measurement; 4 ) refrigeration using the quantum fluid properties of helium isotopes. These, combined with superconducting magnet technologies, permit today to reach nearly complete pola rization of almost any nuclear spins. Targets can be operated in frozen spin mode in rather low and inhomogeneous field of any orientation, and in DNP mode in beams of high intensity. Beyond such experiments of nuclear and particle physics, applications a re also emerging in macromolecular chemistry and in magnetic resonance imaging. This talk is a tribute to Michel Borghini...

  18. Autonomous Target Ranging Techniques

    Jørgensen, Peter Siegbjørn; Jørgensen, John Leif; Denver, Troelz;

    2003-01-01

    determination two ranging strategies are presented. One is an improved laser ranger with an effective range with non-cooperative targets of at least 10,000 km, demonstrated in ground tests. The accuracy of the laser ranging will be approximately 1 m. The laser ranger may furthermore be used for trajectory...... determination of nano-gravity probes, which will perform direct mass measurements of selected targets. The other is triangulation from two spacecraft. For this method it is important to distinguish between detection and tracking range, which will be different for Bering since different instruments are used for......For the deep space asteroid mission, Bering, the main goal is the detection and tracking of near Earth objects (NEOs) and asteroids. One of the key science instruments is the 0.3-m telescope used for imaging and tracking of the detected asteroidal objects. For efficient use of the observation time...

  19. Careful price level targeting

    Waters , George A.

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines a class of interest rate rules that respond to public expectations and to lagged variables. Varying levels of commitment correspond to varying degrees of response to lagged output and targeting of the price level. If the response rises (unintentionally) above the optimal level, the outcome deteriorates severely. Hence, the optimal level of commitment is sensitive to the method of expectations formation and partial commitment is the robust, optimal policy.

  20. Targeting fragile X

    Gantois, Ilse; Kooy, R. Frank

    2002-01-01

    Ten years after the identification of the gene responsible for fragile X syndrome, recent studies have revealed a list of mRNAs bound by the fragile X gene product and have identified specific sequences required for the interaction between the fragile X protein and its targets. These results are a breakthrough in understanding why absence of the fragile X protein leads to mental retardation.

  1. Inflation targeting and core inflation

    Julie Smith

    2005-01-01

    This paper examines the interaction of core inflation and inflation targeting as a monetary policy regime. Interest in core inflation has grown because of inflation targeting. Core inflation is defined in numerous ways giving rise to many potential measures; this paper defines core inflation as the best forecaster of inflation. A cross-country study finds before the start of inflation targeting, but not after, core inflation differs between non-inflation targeters and inflation targeters. Thr...

  2. Relationship between genetic polymorphism of N-acetyltransferase and early-onset Parkinson disease%N-乙酰基转移酶基因多态性与早发性帕金森病关系的研究

    刘平; 杨静芳; 董秀敏; 陈彪; 邵明; 刘振华; 郭艳平

    2001-01-01

    Objective To investigate the relationship between the slowacetylator genotype induced by the genetic polymorphism of N-acetyltransferase 2 (NAT2) gene and the early-onset Parkinson disease. Methods Polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) method was used and three mutant alleles M1, M2 and M3 of NAT2 were studied in 126 patients with idiopathic early-onset Parkinson disease and 122 age-matched randomly selected controls. Results The frequencies of alleles M1, M2 and M3 of NAT2 in patients were 8.7%,26.6% and 13.1%,respectively,however,there were 2.9%,19.7% and 14.8% in controls, respectively. The difference in frequency of allele M1 was statistically significant(P=0.005). The frequency of slow acetylator genotype was higher in patients (23.0%) than in controls (10.7%), showing an OR of 2.507(P=0.009). Conclusion Our study suggests that the slow acetylator genotype of N-acetyltransferase 2 might be associated with the occurrence of the idiopathic early-onset Parkinson′s disease.%目的 探讨N-乙酰基转移酶基因(NAT2)的多态性所导致的慢乙酰化基因型与早发性帕金森病(PD)的关系。方法 利用聚合酶链式反应-限制性片段长度多态性(PCR-RFLP)技术分析了126例早发性帕金森病患者(发病年龄≤50岁)与122名正常健康成人对照组NAT2基因3个常见突变的等位基因M1、M2、M3的分布频率,比较慢乙酰化基因型在早发性PD病人与正常人之间的分布差异。结果 等位基因M1、M2、M3在病例组中的分布频率分别为8.7%、26.6%、13.1%;在对照组中为2.9%、19.3%、14.8%,等位基因M1在两组中之间差异有显著意义(P=0.005)。病例组慢乙酰化型基因频率为23.0%,对照组为10.7%,两者差异有显著意义(P=0.009)。OR值为2.507。结论 N-乙酰基转移酶慢乙酰化基因型可能与早发性PD的发病有关。

  3. 5-methyl-tetrahydrofolate and the S-adenosylmethionine cycle in C57BL/6J mouse tissues: gender differences and effects of arylamine N-acetyltransferase-1 deletion.

    Katey L Witham

    Full Text Available Folate catabolism involves cleavage of the C(9-N(10 bond to form p-aminobenzoylgluamate (PABG and pterin. PABG is then acetylated by human arylamine N-acetyltransferase 1 (NAT1 before excretion in the urine. Mice null for the murine NAT1 homolog (Nat2 show several phenotypes consistent with altered folate homeostasis. However, the exact role of Nat2 in the folate pathway in vivo has not been reported. Here, we examined the effects of Nat2 deletion in male and female mice on the tissue levels of 5-methyl-tetrahydrofolate and the methionine-S-adenosylmethionine cycle. We found significant gender differences in hepatic and renal homocysteine, S-adenosylmethionine and methionine levels consistent with a more active methionine-S-adenosylmethionine cycle in female tissues. In addition, methionine levels were significantly higher in female liver and kidney. PABG was higher in female liver tissue but lower in kidney compared to male tissues. In addition, qPCR of mRNA extracted from liver tissue suggested a significantly lower level of Nat2 expression in female animals. Deletion of Nat2 affected liver 5- methyl-tetrahydrofolate in female mice but had little effect on other components of the methionine-S-adenosylmethionine cycle. No N-acetyl-PABG was observed in any tissues in Nat2 null mice, consistent with the role of Nat2 in PABG acetylation. Surprisingly, tissue PABG levels were similar between wild type and Nat2 null mice. These results show that Nat2 is not required to maintain tissue PABG homeostasis in vivo under normal conditions.

  4. Regulation of serotonin N-acetyltransferase activity in the chick pineal gland by UV-A and white light: role of MK-801- and SCH 23390-sensitive retinal signals.

    Zawilska, Jolanta B; Lorenc, Anna; Berezińska, Małgorzata

    2007-01-01

    The rhythmic melatonin synthesis in the pineal gland is one of the most extensively studied circadian rhythms in vertebrates. Light is the dominant environmental factor controlling this process. Light at night acutely suppresses pineal melatonin content and activity of serotonin N-acetyltransferase (AANAT; the key and penultimate enzyme in the hormone biosynthetic pathway). In addition, pulses of light appropriately timed reset the circadian oscillator generating the melatonin rhythm. Although the avian pineal gland is a directly photosensitive organ, it has recently been demonstrated that light perceived by the eyes only regulates its activity. The present study shows that ocular exposure of chicks to UV-A radiation or white light during the second half of the subjective night markedly decreased AANAT activity in the pineal gland, and produced a significant phase advance of the circadian rhythm of the enzyme activity. Both the suppressive and phase-shifting effects of UV-A light were antagonized by intraocular pretreatment of birds with MK 801 (a selective blocker of NMDA glutamate receptors), but were not modified by SCH 23390 (a selective antagonist of D1-dopamine receptors). On the other hand, the suppressive and phase-shifting effects of retinally perceived white light were antagonized by intraocular injection of SCH 23390, and not affected by MK 801. Our results demonstrate that retinal illumination with UV-A radiation and white light provide powerful signals that shift phase of the circadian oscillator generating melatonin rhythm in the chick pineal gland. It is suggested that control of pineal melatonin synthesis by retinally perceived UV-A and white light might involve input from different photoreceptors. PMID:17901569

  5. Overexpression of Shati/Nat8l, an N-acetyltransferase, in the nucleus accumbens attenuates the response to methamphetamine via activation of group II mGluRs in mice.

    Miyamoto, Yoshiaki; Ishikawa, Yudai; Iegaki, Noriyuki; Sumi, Kazuyuki; Fu, Kequan; Sato, Keiji; Furukawa-Hibi, Yoko; Muramatsu, Shin-Ichi; Nabeshima, Toshitaka; Uno, Kyosuke; Nitta, Atsumi

    2014-08-01

    A novel N-acetyltransferase, Shati/Nat8l, was identified in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) of mice with methamphetamine (METH) treatment. Previously we reported that suppression of Shati/Nat8l enhanced METH-induced behavioral alterations via dopaminergic neuronal regulation. However, the physiological mechanisms of Shati/Nat8l on the dopaminergic system in the brain are unclear. In this study, we injected adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector containing Shati/Nat8l into the NAc or dorsal striatum (dS) of mice, to increase Shati/Nat8l expression. Overexpression of Shati/Nat8l in the NAc, but not in the dS, attenuated METH-induced hyperlocomotion, locomotor sensitization, and conditioned place preference in mice. Moreover, the Shati/Nat8l overexpression in the NAc attenuated the elevation of extracellular dopamine levels induced by METH in in vivo microdialysis experiments. These behavioral and neurochemical alterations due to Shati/Nat8l overexpression in the NAc were inhibited by treatment with selective group II metabotropic glutamate receptor type 2 and 3 (mGluR2/3) antagonist LY341495. In the AAV vector-injected NAc, the tissue contents of both N-acetylaspartate and N-acetylaspartylglutamate (NAAG), endogenous mGluR3 agonist, were elevated. The injection of peptidase inhibitor of NAAG or the perfusion of NAAG itself reduced the basal levels of extracellular dopamine in the NAc of naive mice. These results indicate that Shati/Nat8l in the NAc, but not in the dS, plays an important suppressive role in the behavioral responses to METH by controlling the dopaminergic system via activation of group II mGluRs. PMID:24559655

  6. Pelvic nerve injury causes a rapid decrease in expression of choline acetyltransferase and upregulation of c-Jun and ATF-3 in a distinct population of sacral preganglionic neurons

    JanetRKeast

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Autonomic regulation of the urogenital organs is impaired by injuries sustained during pelvic surgery or compression of lumbosacral spinal nerves (e.g. cauda equina syndrome. To understand the impact of injury on both sympathetic and parasympathetic components of this nerve supply, we performed an experimental surgical and immunohistochemical study on adult male rats, where the structure of this complex part of the nervous system has been well defined. We performed unilateral transection of pelvic or hypogastric nerves and analysed relevant regions of lumbar and sacral spinal cord, up to four weeks after injury. Expression of c-Jun, the neuronal injury marker activating transcription factor-3 (ATF-3, and choline acetyltransferase (ChAT were examined. We found little evidence for chemical or structural changes in substantial numbers of functionally related but uninjured spinal neurons (e.g. in sacral preganglionic neurons after hypogastric nerve injury, failing to support the concept of compensatory events. The effects of injury were greatest in sacral cord, ipsilateral to pelvic nerve transection. Here, around half of all preganglionic neurons expressed c-Jun within one week of injury, and substantial ATF-3 expression also occurred, especially in neurons with complete loss of ChAT-immunoreactivity. There did not appear to be any death of retrogradely labelled neurons, in contrast to axotomy studies performed on other regions of spinal cord or sacral ventral root avulsion models. Each of the effects we observed occurred in only a subpopulation of preganglionic neurons at that spinal level, raising the possibility that distinct functional subgroups have different susceptibility to trauma-induced degeneration and potentially different regenerative abilities. Identification of the cellular basis of these differences may provide insights into organ-specific strategies for attenuating degeneration or promoting regeneration of these circuits after

  7. Genetic polymorphism of N-acetyltransferases, glutathione S-transferase M1 and NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase in relation to malignant and benign pancreatic disease risk. The International Pancreatic Disease Study Group.

    Bartsch, H; Malaveille, C; Lowenfels, A B; Maisonneuve, P; Hautefeuille, A; Boyle, P

    1998-06-01

    Carcinogens present in cigarette smoke and diet have been associated with pancreatic cancer. We hypothesized that heterocyclic and aromatic amines implicated in these exposures could be involved as causative agents and that therefore genetic variation in enzymes metabolizing these carcinogens could modify the risk of developing malignant and benign pancreatic disease. The effect of the genetic polymorphism of acetyltransferases (NAT1) and NAT2), glutathione S-transferase M1 (GSTM1) and NAD(P)H: quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) on the risk of pancreatic diseases (cancer, pancreatitis) was examined in a case-control study. PCR-based assays were used for genotype analysis of genomic DNA from whole blood cells. Samples collected from Caucasian patients with diagnosed pancreatic cancer (n = 81), with non-alcoholic (n = 41) and alcoholic pancreatitis (n = 73) and from asymptomatic control subjects (n = 78) were analysed. The prevalence of GSTM1 null genotype and of NAT2 fast and slow acetylator genotypes and the distribution of frequencies for NQO1 genotypes did not differ in subjects with pancreatic diseases vs controls. For NAT1 slow acetylators a non-significant excess (P = 0.18) was found among pancreatic cancer cases vs controls. There was a significant over-representation of the GSTM1 AB or B genotype in all pancreatic disease cases combined (OR = 2.6; P < 0.05). When concurrent controls were pooled with literature controls (n = 1427), OR was 1.4 (P = 0.08). The results of this study, requiring confirmation, suggest that the polymorphism of GSTM1 and NAT1 enzymes may be associated with a modest increase in susceptibility to pancreatic diseases. PMID:9696930

  8. Lysosome-dependent p300/FOXP3 degradation and limits Treg cell functions and enhances targeted therapy against cancers

    Du, Taofeng; Nagai, Yasuhiro; Xiao, Yan; Greene, Mark I.; Zhang, Hongtao

    2013-01-01

    p300 is one of several acetyltransferases that regulate FOXP3 acetylation and functions. Our recent studies have defined a complex set of histone acetyltransferase interactions which can lead to enhanced or repressed changes in FOXP3 function. We have explored the use of a natural p300 inhibitor, Garcinol, as a tool to understand mechanisms by which p300 regulates FOXP3 acetylation. In the presence of Garcinol, p300 appears to become disassociated from the FOXP3 complex and undergoes lysosome...

  9. Targeted therapy for sarcomas

    Forscher C

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Charles Forscher,1 Monica Mita,2 Robert Figlin3 1Sarcoma Program, Samuel Oschin Comprehensive Cancer Institute, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA, USA; 2Experimental Therapeutics Program, Samuel Oschin Comprehensive Cancer Institute, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA, USA; 3Academic Development Program, Samuel Oschin Comprehensive Cancer Institute, and Division of Hematology/Oncology, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA, USA Abstract: Sarcomas are tumors of mesenchymal origin that make up approximately 1% of human cancers. They may arise as primary tumors in either bone or soft tissue, with approximately 11,280 soft tissue tumors and 2,650 bone tumors diagnosed each year in the United States. There are at least 50 different subtypes of soft tissue sarcoma, with new ones described with ever-increasing frequency. One way to look at sarcomas is to divide them into categories on the basis of their genetic make-up. One group of sarcomas has an identifiable, relatively simple genetic signature, such as the X:18 translocation seen in synovial sarcoma or the 11:22 translocation seen in Ewing's sarcoma. These specific abnormalities often lead to the presence of fusion proteins, such as EWS-FLI1 in Ewing's sarcoma, which are helpful as diagnostic tools and may become therapeutic targets in the future. Another group of sarcomas is characterized by complex genetic abnormalities as seen in leiomyosarcoma, osteosarcoma, and undifferentiated sarcoma. It is important to keep these distinctions in mind when contemplating the development of targeted agents for sarcomas. Different abnormalities in sarcoma could be divided by tumor subtype or by the molecular or pathway abnormality. However, some existing drugs or drugs in development may interfere with or alter more than one of the presented pathways. Keywords: sarcoma, targeted agents, tyrosine kinase inhibitors, mTor inhibition

  10. Low intensity beam target unit

    1976-01-01

    This is a wheel fitted with many targets around its periphery (each with three longitudinally arranged thin rods) of which one is placed into the beam via a rotation of the wheel. Upstream of each target is placed a luminescent screen, aligbed on each target axis and viewed with a TV camera, to make sure that one is hitting the target. This target unit was probably used to study target's behaviour (like beam heating). Gualtiero Del Torre stands on the left, Pierre Gerdil on the right.

  11. Target Housing Material Options

    Woloshun, Keith Albert [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-02-11

    With gas cooling, heat transfer coefficients are low compared to water. The benefit of gas from a heat transfer point of view is that there is really no upper temperature limit for the coolant, as compared to water, which is limited ultimately by the critical point, and in practice the critical heat flux. In our case with parallel flow channels, water is limited to even lower operating limits by nucleate boiling. So gas can get as hot as the containment material will allow, but to get the density and heat transfer up to something reasonable, we must also increase pressure, thus increasing stress on the containment, namely the front and back faces. We are designing to ASME BPVC, which, for most materials allows a maximum stress of UTS/3. So we want the highest possible UTS. For reference, the front face stress in the 12 mm target at 300 psi was about 90 MPa. The inconel 718 allowable stress at 900°C is 1/3 of 517 or 172 MPa. So we are in a very safe place, but the uTS is dropping rapidly with temperature above 900°C. As we increase target diameter, the challenge will be to keep the stress down. We are probably looking at keeping the allowable at or above the present value, and at as high a temperature as possible.

  12. Some Issues in Inflation Targeting

    Andrew Haldane

    1997-01-01

    This paper discusses some of the operational issues relevant to the implementation of an inflation-targeting regime. In particular it focuses on: whether inflation targeting is 'new'; whether (and how) the forward-looking nature of inflation-targeting helps to prevent instabilities in inflation; whether inflation-targeting potentially destabilises output; and whether it requires too much knowledge on the part of the authorities. The paper argues that none of these propositions is in general c...

  13. Targeting of Antibodies using Aptamers

    Missailidis, Sotiris

    2003-01-01

    The chapter presents a methodology for the rapid selection of aptamers against antibody targets. It is a detailed account of the various methodological steps that describe the selection of aptamers, including PCR steps, buffers to be used, target immobilisation, partitioning and amplification of aptamers, clonning and sequencing, to results in high affinity and specificity ligands for the chosen target antibody.

  14. STRATEGIES (LEVELS) OF TARGET MARKET

    Ramakrishna Mohan Rao Munaga

    2015-01-01

    Generally target marketing can be carried out in several different levels. They are Target-Market Strategies or Mass (Undifferentiated) Marketing: Choosing the Number of Markets to Target, Multi segment (Differentiated) Marketing, Concentrated Marketing or Niche Marketing, Micro Marketing or Single or Individual Marketing. Firms that compete in the global marketplace can use any combination of the segmenting strategies or none at all.

  15. After treat-to-target

    Wakefield, Richard J; D'Agostino, Maria Antonietta; Naredo, Esperanza;

    2012-01-01

    rheumatologists who have recently formed a research network - the Targeted Ultrasound Initiative (TUI) group. The statement proposes that targeting therapy to PD activity provides superior outcomes compared with treating to clinical targets alone and introduces the rationale for a new randomised trial using...

  16. After treat-to-target

    Wakefield, Richard J; D'Agostino, Maria Antonietta; Naredo, Esperanza;

    2012-01-01

    rheumatologists who have recently formed a research network--the Targeted Ultrasound Initiative (TUI) group. The statement proposes that targeting therapy to PD activity provides superior outcomes compared with treating to clinical targets alone and introduces the rationale for a new randomised trial using...

  17. Targets for heavy ion fusion

    This paper describes some of the basic principles of fusion target implosions, using some simple targets designed for irradiation by ion beams. Present estimates are that ion beams with 1-5 MJ, and 100-500 TW will be required to ignite high gain targets. (orig.)

  18. ORION laser target diagnostics

    The ORION laser facility is one of the UK's premier laser facilities which became operational at AWE in 2010. Its primary mission is one of stockpile stewardship, ORION will extend the UK's experimental plasma physics capability to the high temperature, high density regime relevant to Atomic Weapons Establishment's (AWE) program. The ORION laser combines ten laser beams operating in the ns regime with two sub ps short pulse chirped pulse amplification beams. This gives the UK a unique combined long pulse/short pulse laser capability which is not only available to AWE personnel but also gives access to our international partners and visiting UK academia. The ORION laser facility is equipped with a comprehensive suite of some 45 diagnostics covering optical, particle, and x-ray diagnostics all able to image the laser target interaction point. This paper focuses on a small selection of these diagnostics.

  19. ORION laser target diagnosticsa)

    Bentley, C. D.; Edwards, R. D.; Andrew, J. E.; James, S. F.; Gardner, M. D.; Comley, A. J.; Vaughan, K.; Horsfield, C. J.; Rubery, M. S.; Rothman, S. D.; Daykin, S.; Masoero, S. J.; Palmer, J. B.; Meadowcroft, A. L.; Williams, B. M.; Gumbrell, E. T.; Fyrth, J. D.; Brown, C. R. D.; Hill, M. P.; Oades, K.; Wright, M. J.; Hood, B. A.; Kemshall, P.

    2012-10-01

    The ORION laser facility is one of the UK's premier laser facilities which became operational at AWE in 2010. Its primary mission is one of stockpile stewardship, ORION will extend the UK's experimental plasma physics capability to the high temperature, high density regime relevant to Atomic Weapons Establishment's (AWE) program. The ORION laser combines ten laser beams operating in the ns regime with two sub ps short pulse chirped pulse amplification beams. This gives the UK a unique combined long pulse/short pulse laser capability which is not only available to AWE personnel but also gives access to our international partners and visiting UK academia. The ORION laser facility is equipped with a comprehensive suite of some 45 diagnostics covering optical, particle, and x-ray diagnostics all able to image the laser target interaction point. This paper focuses on a small selection of these diagnostics.

  20. ORION laser target diagnostics.

    Bentley, C D; Edwards, R D; Andrew, J E; James, S F; Gardner, M D; Comley, A J; Vaughan, K; Horsfield, C J; Rubery, M S; Rothman, S D; Daykin, S; Masoero, S J; Palmer, J B; Meadowcroft, A L; Williams, B M; Gumbrell, E T; Fyrth, J D; Brown, C R D; Hill, M P; Oades, K; Wright, M J; Hood, B A; Kemshall, P

    2012-10-01

    The ORION laser facility is one of the UK's premier laser facilities which became operational at AWE in 2010. Its primary mission is one of stockpile stewardship, ORION will extend the UK's experimental plasma physics capability to the high temperature, high density regime relevant to Atomic Weapons Establishment's (AWE) program. The ORION laser combines ten laser beams operating in the ns regime with two sub ps short pulse chirped pulse amplification beams. This gives the UK a unique combined long pulse/short pulse laser capability which is not only available to AWE personnel but also gives access to our international partners and visiting UK academia. The ORION laser facility is equipped with a comprehensive suite of some 45 diagnostics covering optical, particle, and x-ray diagnostics all able to image the laser target interaction point. This paper focuses on a small selection of these diagnostics. PMID:23126904

  1. Influence of a combination of two tetrachlorobiphenyl congeners (PCB 47; PCB 77) on thyroid status, choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) activity, and short- and long-term memory in 30-day-old Sprague-Dawley rats

    The important role of thyroid hormones in growth and development, maintenance of body temperature, digestion, cardiac function, and normal brain development can be disrupted by environmental contaminants like polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB). Polychlorinated biphenyls are environmental contaminants that are widespread, persistent, lipophilic, and bioaccumulate through food webs, concentrating in adipose tissue. Placental and lactational PCB exposure of offspring causes metabolic and endocrine disruptions including hypothyroxinemia, spatial learning and memory deficits, neurochemical and neurobehavioral alterations, and reproductive problems. Previous studies in our lab using the individual congeners PCB 47 (2,2',4,4'-tetrachlorobiphenyl, ortho-substituted) and PCB 77 (3,3',4,4'-tetrachlorobiphenyl, non-ortho-substituted) have demonstrated alterations in thyroid hormone levels, alterations in brain choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) activity, and spatial learning deficits. In the present study, pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a diet with or without a mixture of PCB 47/77 at 1.25 ppm, 12.5 ppm or 25.0 ppm (w/w). Rat pups were swum in the Morris water maze four times a day on days 21-29 in order for the animals to learn the position of a submerged fixed platform. A probe test was run on day 24 (30 min after last swim) for short-term memory, and on day 29 (24 h after the last swim) for long-term memory after removal of the platform. Time spent in the quadrant previously containing the platform was recorded. Rats were decapitated on day 30, serum collected and frozen at -20 deg. ChAT activity was measured radiometrically in basal forebrain and hippocampus. All PCB-treated animals experienced a depression in both triiodothyronine (T3) and thyroxine (T4). The present study found that all doses of PCB depressed ChAT activity in hippocampus with no significant alteration in the basal forebrain. In PCB-treated animals, short-term memory showed a trend toward improvement

  2. 褪黑素对异氟醚麻醉大鼠海马胆碱乙酰基转移酶的影响%Effects of melatonin on choline acetyltransferase in rat hippocampus after isoflurane anesthesia

    倪诚; 谭刚; 罗爱伦

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of melatonin on choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) in the hippocampus of rats after isoflurane anesthesia.Methods Sixty male SD rats weighing 390-440 g were randomized into five groups (n =12 each):control group (group C),1% isoflurane group (group Ⅰ),1% isoflurane + melatonin group (group IM),2% isoflurane group (group J) and 2% isoflurane + melatonin group (group JM).Rats in groups IM and JM received intraperitoneal injection of melatonin (10 mg/kg) for 7 days,and rats in other groups received normal saline.On the 7th day of injection,rats in groups Ⅰ and IM inhaled 1% isoflurane for 4 hours,and rats in groups J and JM inhaled 2% isoflurane for 4 hours.One day after anesthesia,all the rats began Morris water maze to assess the learning and memory ability,which was made for continuous 5 days.At the end of probe test,6 rats in each group were randomly selected,blood samples were collected to detect plasma melatonin level,and the hippocampi were removed to evaluate the expression and activity of ChAT.The other rats were sacrificed to perform immunofluorescence to detect ChAT in hippocampal CA1 region and dentate gyrus.Results The plasma melatonin level,and the expression and activity of ChAT were significantly lower in group Ⅰ than in group C (P < 0.01).The escape latency was significantly longer,the probe time was significantly shorter,and the plasma melatonin level and the expression and activity of ChAT were significantly lower in group J than in group C (P < 0.05 or 0.01).The escape latency was significantly shorter,the probe time was significantly longer,and the plasma melatonin level and the expression and activity of ChAT were significantly higher in group IM than in group Ⅰ (P < 0.05 or 0.01).The escape latency was significantly shorter,and the plasma melatonin level and the ChAT activity were significantly higher in group JM than in group J (P< 0.05 or 0.01).Conclusion Melatonin can attenuate

  3. Hypoxia targeting copper complexes

    The importance and incidence of tumour hypoxia, its measurement and current treatments available, including pharmacological and radiopharmacological methods of targeting hypoxia, are discussed. A variety of in vitro and in vivo methods for imposing hypoxia have been developed and are reviewed. Copper, its chemistry, biochemistry and radiochemistry, the potential for use of copper radionuclides and its use to date in this field is considered with particular reference to the thiosemicarbazones. Their biological activity, metal chelation, in vitro and in vivo studies of their radiocopper complexes and the potential for their use as hypoxia targeting radiopharmaceuticals is described. The reduction of the copper(II) complex to copper(l), its pivotal importance in their biological behaviour, and the potential for manipulation of this to effect hypoxia selectivity are described. An in vitro method for assessing the hypoxia selectivity of radiopharmaceuticals is reported. The rapid deoxygenation and high viability of a mammalian cell culture in this system is discussed and factors which may affect the cellular uptake of a radiopharmaceutical are described. The design, synthesis and complexation with copper and radiocopper of a range of bis(thiosemicarbazones) is reported. Synthesis of these compounds is simple giving high yields of pure products. The characteristics of the radiocopper complexes (64Cu) including lipophilicity and redox activity are reported (reduction potentials in the range -0.314 - -0.590 V). High cellular uptakes of the radiocopper complexes of the ligands, in hypoxic and normoxic EMT6 and CHO320 cells, were observed. Extremes of selectivity are shown ranging from the hypoxia selective 64Cu(II)ATSM to normoxic cell selective 64Cu(II)GTS. The selectivities observed are compared with the physico chemical characteristics of the complexes. A good correlation exists between selectivity of the complex and its Cu(II)/Cu(I) reduction potential, with hypoxia

  4. Hypoxia targeting copper complexes

    Dearling, J.L

    1998-11-01

    The importance and incidence of tumour hypoxia, its measurement and current treatments available, including pharmacological and radiopharmacological methods of targeting hypoxia, are discussed. A variety of in vitro and in vivo methods for imposing hypoxia have been developed and are reviewed. Copper, its chemistry, biochemistry and radiochemistry, the potential for use of copper radionuclides and its use to date in this field is considered with particular reference to the thiosemicarbazones. Their biological activity, metal chelation, in vitro and in vivo studies of their radiocopper complexes and the potential for their use as hypoxia targeting radiopharmaceuticals is described. The reduction of the copper(II) complex to copper(l), its pivotal importance in their biological behaviour, and the potential for manipulation of this to effect hypoxia selectivity are described. An in vitro method for assessing the hypoxia selectivity of radiopharmaceuticals is reported. The rapid deoxygenation and high viability of a mammalian cell culture in this system is discussed and factors which may affect the cellular uptake of a radiopharmaceutical are described. The design, synthesis and complexation with copper and radiocopper of a range of bis(thiosemicarbazones) is reported. Synthesis of these compounds is simple giving high yields of pure products. The characteristics of the radiocopper complexes ({sup 64}Cu) including lipophilicity and redox activity are reported (reduction potentials in the range -0.314 - -0.590 V). High cellular uptakes of the radiocopper complexes of the ligands, in hypoxic and normoxic EMT6 and CHO320 cells, were observed. Extremes of selectivity are shown ranging from the hypoxia selective {sup 64}Cu(II)ATSM to normoxic cell selective {sup 64}Cu(II)GTS. The selectivities observed are compared with the physico chemical characteristics of the complexes. A good correlation exists between selectivity of the complex and its Cu(II)/Cu(I) reduction potential

  5. Targeting Specific HATs for Neurodegenerative Disease Treatment: Translating Basic Biology to Therapeutic Possibilities

    Sheila K. Pirooznia

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic epigenetic regulation of neurons is emerging as a fundamental mechanism by which neurons adapt their transcriptional responses to specific developmental and environmental cues. While defects within the neural epigenome have traditionally been studied in the context of early developmental and heritable cognitive disorders, recent studies point to aberrant histone acetylation status as a key mechanism underlying acquired inappropriate alterations of genome structure and function in post-mitotic neurons during the aging process. Indeed, it is becoming increasingly evident that chromatin acetylation status can be impaired during the lifetime of neurons through mechanisms related to loss of function of histone acetyltransferase (HATs activity. Several HATs have been shown to participate in vital neuronal functions such as regulation of neuronal plasticity and memory formation. As such, dysregulation of such HATs has been implicated in the pathogenesis associated with age-associated neurodegenerative diseases and cognitive decline. In order to counteract the loss of HAT function in neurodegenerative diseases, the current therapeutic strategies involve the use of small molecules called histone deacetylase (HDAC inhibitors that antagonize HDAC activity and thus enhance acetylation levels. Although this strategy has displayed promising therapeutic effects, currently used HDAC inhibitors lack target specificity, raising concerns about their applicability. With rapidly evolving literature on HATs and their respective functions in mediating neuronal survival and higher order brain function such as learning and memory, modulating the function of specific HATs holds new promises as a therapeutic tool in neurodegenerative diseases. In this review, we focus on the recent progress in research regarding epigenetic histone acetylation mechanisms underlying neuronal activity and cognitive function. We discuss the current understanding of specific HDACs and

  6. Molecularly targeted therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals

    Full text: It is generally agreed that current focus of nuclear medicine development should be on molecular imaging and therapy. Though, the widespread use of the terminology 'molecular imaging' is quite recent, nuclear medicine has used molecular imaging techniques for more than 20 years ago. A variety of radiopharmaceuticals have been introduced for the internal therapy of malignant and inflammatory lesions in nuclear medicine. In the field of bio/medical imaging, nuclear medicine is one of the disciplines which has the privilege of organized and well developed chemistry/ pharmacy section; radio-chemistry/radiopharmacy. Fundamental principles have been developed more than 40 years ago and advanced research is going well into postgenomic era. The genomic revolution and dramatically increased insight in the molecular mechanisms underlying pathology have led to paradigm shift in drug development. Likewise does in the nuclear medicine. Here, the author will present current clinical and pre-clinical therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals based on molecular targets such as membrane-bound receptors, enzymes, nucleic acids, sodium iodide symporter, etc, in correlation with fundamentals of radiopharmacy. (author)

  7. Magnetic targeted drug delivery

    Timothy Wiedmann

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is the most common cause of death from cancer in both men and women. Treatment by intravenous or oral administration of chemotherapy agents results in serious and often treatment-limiting side effects. Delivery of drugs directly to the lung by inhalation of an aerosol holds the promise of achieving a higher concentration in the lung with lower blood levels. To further enhance the selective lung deposition, it may be possible to target deposition by using external magnetic fields to direct the delivery of drug coupled to magnetic particles. Moreover, alternating magnetic fields can be used to induce particle heating, which in turn controls the drug release rate with the appropriate thermal sensitive material.With this goal, superparamagetic nanoparticles (SPNP were prepared and characterized, and enhanced magnetic deposition was demonstrated in vitro and in vivo. SPNPs were also incorporated into a lipid-based/SPNP aerosol formulation, and drug release was shown to be controlled by thermal activation. Because of the inherent imaging potential of SPNPs, this use of nanotechnology offers the possibility of coupling the diagnosis of lung cancer to drug release, which perhaps will ultimately provide the “magic bullet” that Paul Ehrlich originally sought.

  8. ICF target positioning robot system

    Based on the function analysis of target positioner for inertial confinement fusion, a kind of ICF target positioning robot system is designed to realize the adjustment and the alignment of a target. The robot system includes a target storage sub-system, a target exchange subsystem, a target transport subsystem and a 6-degree of freedom precision parallel robot subsystem, the structure and principle of every subsystem are dissertated. The system realizes micro scale position by parallel structure which is in the front of the system, and has the advantages of low mass, high stiffness, small cone angle, small volume and high precision. The robot system can position a target into a very small micro scale scope around the center of the target chamber whose diameter is several meters, the precision of the position reaches micro scale. Motion parameter of the positioning robot system has been tested. Experiment proves that the robot system has realized precision target position and target exchange on the condition of vacuum. (authors)

  9. Windowless target: Design of the XT-ADS spallation target

    The design of the XT-ADS spallation target is performed within the European integrated project EUROTRANS (FP6 Contract FI6W-516520) that has started in April 2005. At the current status of the spallation target design process, the boundary conditions for the spallation target loop with respect to the XT-ADS performance requirements and the design of the subcritical core and primary system have been established. The next steps will concentrate on further development of the spallation target nozzle, the vacuum and spallation product confinement system and the pumping, LIDAR (LIght Detection And Ranging) and cooling system

  10. Facility target insert shielding assessment

    Mocko, Michal [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-10-06

    Main objective of this report is to assess the basic shielding requirements for the vertical target insert and retrieval port. We used the baseline design for the vertical target insert in our calculations. The insert sits in the 12”-diameter cylindrical shaft extending from the service alley in the top floor of the facility all the way down to the target location. The target retrieval mechanism is a long rod with the target assembly attached and running the entire length of the vertical shaft. The insert also houses the helium cooling supply and return lines each with 2” diameter. In the present study we focused on calculating the neutron and photon dose rate fields on top of the target insert/retrieval mechanism in the service alley. Additionally, we studied a few prototypical configurations of the shielding layers in the vertical insert as well as on the top.

  11. Oxide Fiber Targets at ISOLDE

    Köster, U; Carminati, D; Catherall, R; Cederkäll, J; Correia, J G; Crepieux, B; Dietrich, M; Elder, K; Fedosseev, V; Fraile-Prieto, L M; Franchoo, S; Fynbo, H O U; Georg, U; Giles, T; Joinet, A; Jonsson, O C; Kirchner, R; Lau, C; Lettry, Jacques; Maier, H J; Mishin, V I; Oinonen, M; Peräjärvi, K; Ravn, H L; Rinaldi, T; Santana-Leitner, M; Wahl, U; Weissman, L

    2003-01-01

    Many elements are rapidly released from oxide matrices. Some oxide powder targets show a fast sintering, thus losing their favorable release characteristics. Loosely packed oxyde fiber targets are less critical since they may maintain their open structure even when starting to fuse together at some contact points. The experience with various oxyde fiber targets (titania, zirconia, ceria and thoria) used in the last years at ISOLDE is reviewed. For short-lived isotopes of Cu, Ga and Xe the zirconia and ceria targets respectively provided significantly higher yields than any other target (metal foils, oxide powders, etc.) tested before. Titania fibers, which were not commercially available, were produced in a relic process by impregnation of a rayon felt in a titanium chloride solution and subsequent calcination by heating the dried felt in air. Thoria fibers were obtained either by the same process or by burning commercial gas lantern mantle cloth. In the future a beryllia fiber target could be used to produce...

  12. The OLYMPUS Internal Hydrogen Target

    Bernauer, J C; Ciullo, G; Henderson, B S; Ihloff, E; Kelsey, J; Lenisa, P; Milner, R; Schmidt, A; Statera, M

    2014-01-01

    An internal hydrogen target system was developed for the OLYMPUS experiment at DESY, in Hamburg, Germany. The target consisted of a long, thin-walled, tubular cell within an aluminum scattering chamber. Hydrogen entered at the center of the cell and exited through the ends, where it was removed from the beamline by a multistage pumping system. A cryogenic coldhead cooled the target cell to counteract heating from the beam and increase the density of hydrogen in the target. A fixed collimator protected the cell from synchrotron radiation and the beam halo. A series of wakefield suppressors reduced heating from beam wakefields. The target system was installed within the DORIS storage ring and was successfully operated during the course of the OLYMPUS experiment in 2012. Information on the design, fabrication, and performance of the target system is reported.

  13. Target support for inertial confinement fusion

    General Atomics (GA) plays an important industrial support role for the US Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) program in the area of target technology. This includes three major activities: target fabrication support, target handling systems development, and target chamber design. The work includes target fabrication for existing ICF experiments, target and target system development for future experiments, and target research and target chamber design for experiments on future machines, such as the National Ignition Facility (NIF)

  14. Target properties and nuclear data

    The influence of the properties of the target on nuclear data was shown. In the case of targets consisting of fissionable material, this influence was demonstrated in experiments involving fission cross-section, average number of neutrons, and prompt fission neutron spectrum. The experimental methods for determining certain corrections were analysed. The method of tritium density determination for a solid target used as neutron source was likewise demonstrated. (author). 10 refs, 4 figs

  15. 'Inflation Targeting and Inflation Persistence'

    George J. Bratsiotis; Jakob Madsen; Christopher Martin

    2015-01-01

    This paper argues that the adoption of an inflation target reduces the persistence of inflation. We develop the theoretical literature on inflation persistence by introducing a Taylor rule for monetary policy into a model of persistence and showing that inflation targets reduce inflation persistence. We investigate changes in the time series properties of inflation in seven countries that introduced inflation targets in the late 1980s or early 1990s. We find that the persistenc...

  16. Learning About Intervention Target Zones

    Michael W. Klein; Karen K. Lewis

    1991-01-01

    This paper provides a framework for evaluating how market participants' beliefs about foreign exchange target zones change as they learn about central bank intervention policy. In order to examine this behavior, we first generalize the standard target zone model to allow for intra-marginal intervention. Intra-marginal intervention implies that the position of market participants' beliefs about the target zone can be determined from their beliefs about the likelihood of intervention. As an app...

  17. Target repurposing for neglected diseases

    Pollastri, Michael P.; Campbell, Robert K.

    2011-01-01

    Infectious diseases are an enormous burden to global health and since drug discovery is costly, those infectious diseases that affect the developing world are often not pursued by commercial drug-discovery efforts. Therefore, pragmatic means by which new therapeutics can be discovered are needed. One such approach is target repurposing, where pathogen targets are matched with homologous human targets that have been pursued for drug discovery for other indications. In many cases, the medicinal...

  18. Targeting Nominal Income: A Note

    Kenneth D. West

    1986-01-01

    This paper compares nominal income and monetary targets in a standard aggregate demand - aggregate supply framework. If the desirability of policies is measured by their effect on the unconditional variance of output, nominal income targeting is preferable if and only if the aggregate elasticity of demand for real balances is greater than one. This is precisely the opposite of the condition that in Bean (1984) is sufficient to make nominal income targeting preferable.This points out the impor...

  19. Nominal Income and Inflation Targeting

    Arayssi, Mahmoud

    2014-01-01

    In this paper a macro- economic model in the area of monetary policy game theory is extended to one-sided dismissal rules concerning observed nominal output and inflation targets for the central banker. These rules specify firing the central banker if some observed policy targets have been exceeded. Such rules are shown to reduce inflationary bias if the central banker perceives her reappointment chances as being strong and is preferred to discretionary monetary policy. Various policy targets...

  20. The Bering Target Tracking Instrumentation

    Denver, Troelz; Jørgensen, John Leif; Betto, Maurizio; Jørgensen, Peter Siegbjørn

    2003-01-01

    The key science instrument on the Bering satellite mission is a relative small telescope with an entrance aperture of 300 mm and a focal length between 500 and 1000 mm. The detection of potential targets is performed by one of the target scanning advanced stellar compasses (ASCs). This procedure results in a simple prioritized list of right ascension, declination, proper motion and intensity of each prospective target. The telescope itself has a dedicated ASC Camera Head Unit (CHU) mounted on...

  1. Inertial-confinement-fusion targets

    Inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets are made as simple flat discs, as hollow shells or as complicated multilayer structures. Many techniques have been devised for producing the targets. Glass and metal shells are made by using drop and bubble techniques. Solid hydrogen shells are also produced by adapting old methods to the solution of modern problems. Some of these techniques, problems and solutions are discussed. In addition, the applications of many of the techniques to fabrication of ICF targets is presented

  2. Limits of Inflation Targeting Strategy

    Aura Niculescu

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper evaluates the trade-off between output volatility and the variability of the inflation rate around its target (Romanian case. The optimal choice for National Bank of Romania (NBR, in our opinion, is the flexible inflation targeting. For this purpose, NBR must explain the loss function and the optimal monetary policy rule. We then argued that this Romanian authority – NBR – can substantially improve its credibility under inflation targeting policy regime by becoming more accountable and transparent. Is the direct inflation targeting the best choice for the monetary policy regime in Romanian economy?

  3. Targeted Therapies for Kidney Cancer

    ... for kidney cancer Targeted therapies for kidney cancer Biologic therapy (immunotherapy) for kidney cancer Chemotherapy for kidney cancer Pain control for kidney cancer Treatment choices by stage for ...

  4. The Bering Target Tracking Instrumentation

    Denver, Troelz; Jørgensen, John Leif; Betto, Maurizio; Jørgensen, Peter Siegbjørn

    2003-01-01

    's pointing direction. To achieve fast tracking over a large solid angle, the telescope pointing is achieved by means of a folding mirror in the optical pathway. When a prospective target approaches the telescope FOV, the ASC on the secondary will guide the folding mirror into position such that the target is...... inside the telescope FOV. During the telescope observation time, the ASC will constantly control the folding mirror to correctly position the target at the center of the telescope, basically performing a standard telescope tracking service. The telescope will alter the initial target acquisition track...

  5. Therapeutic Targeting of Telomerase.

    Jäger, Kathrin; Walter, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Telomere length and cell function can be preserved by the human reverse transcriptase telomerase (hTERT), which synthesizes the new telomeric DNA from a RNA template, but is normally restricted to cells needing a high proliferative capacity, such as stem cells. Consequently, telomerase-based therapies to elongate short telomeres are developed, some of which have successfully reached the stage I in clinical trials. Telomerase is also permissive for tumorigenesis and 90% of all malignant tumors use telomerase to obtain immortality. Thus, reversal of telomerase upregulation in tumor cells is a potential strategy to treat cancer. Natural and small-molecule telomerase inhibitors, immunotherapeutic approaches, oligonucleotide inhibitors, and telomerase-directed gene therapy are useful treatment strategies. Telomerase is more widely expressed than any other tumor marker. The low expression in normal tissues, together with the longer telomeres in normal stem cells versus cancer cells, provides some degree of specificity with low risk of toxicity. However, long term telomerase inhibition may elicit negative effects in highly-proliferative cells which need telomerase for survival, and it may interfere with telomere-independent physiological functions. Moreover, only a few hTERT molecules are required to overcome senescence in cancer cells, and telomerase inhibition requires proliferating cells over a sufficient number of population doublings to induce tumor suppressive senescence. These limitations may explain the moderate success rates in many clinical studies. Despite extensive studies, only one vaccine and one telomerase antagonist are routinely used in clinical work. For complete eradication of all subpopulations of cancer cells a simultaneous targeting of several mechanisms will likely be needed. Possible technical improvements have been proposed including the development of more specific inhibitors, methods to increase the efficacy of vaccination methods, and

  6. Therapeutic Targeting of Telomerase

    Jäger, Kathrin; Walter, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Telomere length and cell function can be preserved by the human reverse transcriptase telomerase (hTERT), which synthesizes the new telomeric DNA from a RNA template, but is normally restricted to cells needing a high proliferative capacity, such as stem cells. Consequently, telomerase-based therapies to elongate short telomeres are developed, some of which have successfully reached the stage I in clinical trials. Telomerase is also permissive for tumorigenesis and 90% of all malignant tumors use telomerase to obtain immortality. Thus, reversal of telomerase upregulation in tumor cells is a potential strategy to treat cancer. Natural and small-molecule telomerase inhibitors, immunotherapeutic approaches, oligonucleotide inhibitors, and telomerase-directed gene therapy are useful treatment strategies. Telomerase is more widely expressed than any other tumor marker. The low expression in normal tissues, together with the longer telomeres in normal stem cells versus cancer cells, provides some degree of specificity with low risk of toxicity. However, long term telomerase inhibition may elicit negative effects in highly-proliferative cells which need telomerase for survival, and it may interfere with telomere-independent physiological functions. Moreover, only a few hTERT molecules are required to overcome senescence in cancer cells, and telomerase inhibition requires proliferating cells over a sufficient number of population doublings to induce tumor suppressive senescence. These limitations may explain the moderate success rates in many clinical studies. Despite extensive studies, only one vaccine and one telomerase antagonist are routinely used in clinical work. For complete eradication of all subpopulations of cancer cells a simultaneous targeting of several mechanisms will likely be needed. Possible technical improvements have been proposed including the development of more specific inhibitors, methods to increase the efficacy of vaccination methods, and

  7. Therapeutic Targeting of Telomerase

    Kathrin Jäger

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Telomere length and cell function can be preserved by the human reverse transcriptase telomerase (hTERT, which synthesizes the new telomeric DNA from a RNA template, but is normally restricted to cells needing a high proliferative capacity, such as stem cells. Consequently, telomerase-based therapies to elongate short telomeres are developed, some of which have successfully reached the stage I in clinical trials. Telomerase is also permissive for tumorigenesis and 90% of all malignant tumors use telomerase to obtain immortality. Thus, reversal of telomerase upregulation in tumor cells is a potential strategy to treat cancer. Natural and small-molecule telomerase inhibitors, immunotherapeutic approaches, oligonucleotide inhibitors, and telomerase-directed gene therapy are useful treatment strategies. Telomerase is more widely expressed than any other tumor marker. The low expression in normal tissues, together with the longer telomeres in normal stem cells versus cancer cells, provides some degree of specificity with low risk of toxicity. However, long term telomerase inhibition may elicit negative effects in highly-proliferative cells which need telomerase for survival, and it may interfere with telomere-independent physiological functions. Moreover, only a few hTERT molecules are required to overcome senescence in cancer cells, and telomerase inhibition requires proliferating cells over a sufficient number of population doublings to induce tumor suppressive senescence. These limitations may explain the moderate success rates in many clinical studies. Despite extensive studies, only one vaccine and one telomerase antagonist are routinely used in clinical work. For complete eradication of all subpopulations of cancer cells a simultaneous targeting of several mechanisms will likely be needed. Possible technical improvements have been proposed including the development of more specific inhibitors, methods to increase the efficacy of vaccination

  8. Assaying the reporter gene chloramphenicol acetyltransferase

    These experiments document the presence of enzymatic activities in extracts of commonly used cell lines which interfere with the determination of CAT activity. We suspect that the deacetylase activity is the most important, as the extract of the H4IIE C3 cells was capable of completely deacetylating the mono- and diacetylchloramphenicol formed during a 2-hr incubation of CAT with chloramphenicol and acetyl-CoA. The results of the inhibitor experiments are consistent with the presence of proteases which degrade CAT, or a serine carboxylesterase. The interference was also reduced by about half by EDTA; a metalloenzyme (either a protease or esterase) may therefore be involved. This interference appears to be a common phenomenon. We have surveyed 23 different cell types for the presence of the interfering activity and found it in 15. The interference was particularly prominent in several neuroendocrine and hepatoma cells. We took advantage of the effect of EDTA and the heat stability of CAT to eliminate the interference. Addition of 5 mM EDTA and a 10-min incubation of the sonicated cell suspension at 60 degrees prior to centrifugation abolished the interference in all cell lines tested. It is important to note that in order to reveal any CAT activity in some of the extracts (e.g., PC-12 or Hep3B), it was necessary to run the CAT assay for 2 hr. The control assays were therefore run almost to completion, and were well beyond the linear range of the assay. Therefore, the small differences which we observed between the heat-treated and control samples in some instances (e.g., rice, corn, or HeLa cells) will be dramatically amplified when the CAT assay is performed under conditions in which only a small percentage of the substrate is converted to product

  9. Radiopharmaceuticals targeting melanoma

    Pham, T.Q.; Berghofer, P.; Liu, X.; Greguric, I.; Dikic, B.; Ballantyne, P.; Mattner, F.; Nguyen, V.; Loc' h, C.; Katsifis, A. [Radiopharmaceuticals Research Institute, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Menai, N.S.W., Sydney (Australia)

    2008-02-15

    Melanoma is one of the most aggressive cancers known with a high rate of mortality and increasing global incidence. So, the development of radiopharmaceuticals for either diagnostic or therapeutic purposes could make enormous contributions to melanoma patient health care. We have been studying melanoma tumours through several targeting mechanisms including melanin or specific receptor based radiopharmaceuticals Structure activity studies indicate that the substitution patterns on radioiodinated benzamides significantly influence the uptake mechanism from melanin to sigma-receptor binding. Furthermore, the position of the iodine as well as the presence of key functional groups and substituents has resulted in compounds with varying degrees of activity uptake and retention in tumours. From these results, a novel molecule 2-(2-(4-(4-iodo benzyl)piperazin-1-yl)-2-oxo-ethyl)isoindoline- 1,3-dione (M.E.L.037) was synthesized, labelled with iodine-123 and evaluated for application in melanoma tumour scintigraphy and radiotherapy. The tumour imaging potential of {sup 123}IM.E.L.037 was studied in vivo in C.57 B.L./ 6 J female mice bearing the B.16 F.0. murine melanoma tumour and in BALB/c nude mice bearing the A.375 human amelanotic melanoma tumour by biodistribution, competition studies and by SPECT imaging. {sup 123}I-M.E.L.037 exhibited high and rapid uptake in the B.16 F.0 melanoma tumour at 1 h (13 % I.D./g) increasing with time to reach 25 % I.D./g at 6 h. A significant uptake was also observed in the eyes (2% I.D., at 3-6 h p.i.) of black mice. No uptake was observed in the tumour or in the eyes of nude mice bearing the A.375 tumour. Due to high uptake and long retention in the tumour and rapid body clearance, standardized uptake values(S.U.V.) of {sup 123}I-M.E.L.037 were 30 and 60, at 24 and 48 h p.i.,respectively. SPECT imaging of mice bearing the B.16 melanoma indicated the radioactivity was predominately located in the tumour followed by the eyes, while no

  10. LAMPF polarized 13C targets

    Ethylene glycol, 1-butanol, and toluene highly enriched in 13C have been used at LAMPF to produce dynamically polarized 13C targets for scattering experiments with protons and pions. Preparation of the materials and characteristic properties of these targets are described. 17 refs., 1 fig

  11. High performance inertial fusion targets

    Inertial confinement fusion (ICF) target designs are considered which may have very high gains (approximately 1000) and low power requirements (< 100 TW) for input energies of approximately one megajoule. These include targets having very low density shells, ultra thin shells, central ignitors, magnetic insulation, and non-ablative acceleration

  12. Treating rheumatoid arthritis to target

    Smolen, Josef S; Aletaha, Daniel; Bijlsma, Johannes W J;

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Aiming at therapeutic targets has reduced the risk of organ failure in many diseases such as diabetes or hypertension. Such targets have not been defined for rheumatoid arthritis (RA). OBJECTIVE: /st> To develop recommendations for achieving optimal therapeutic outcomes in RA. METHODS...

  13. Treating rheumatoid arthritis to target

    Smolen, Josef S; Breedveld, Ferdinand C; Burmester, Gerd R;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Reaching the therapeutic target of remission or low-disease activity has improved outcomes in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) significantly. The treat-to-target recommendations, formulated in 2010, have provided a basis for implementation of a strategic approach towards this...

  14. Targeted anti-cancerous therapies

    Crowning decades of efforts in fundamental and applied research, the first generation of targeted anti cancerous drugs is now on the market. Drugs coming from a new approach, conceived from molecular knowledge of cancer and directed against beforehand identified targets. In theory: a miracle of precision and technical success. In practice: a new sources of questions and new problems. (N.C.)

  15. Target recognition by wavelet transform

    Li Zheng Dong; He Wu Liang; Pei Chun Lan; Peng Wen; SongChen; Zheng Xiao Dong

    2002-01-01

    Wavelet transform has an important character of multi-resolution power, which presents pyramid structure, and this character coincides the way by which people distinguish object from coarse to fineness and from large to tiny. In addition to it, wavelet transform benefits to reducing image noise, simplifying calculation, and embodying target image characteristic point. A method of target recognition by wavelet transform is provided

  16. High-Purity Chromium Targets

    Rudoy, A.; Milman, Yu.; Korzhova, N.

    1995-01-01

    A procedure for producing large-scale chromium ingots by means of induction-arc melting was developed. From the high-purity, low-alloyed chromium ingots obtained, chromium targets were produced by of thermoplastic treatment techniques. The method of electron-beam evaporation of high-purity chromium was also used for production of targets.

  17. Nominal GDP: Target or Benchmark?

    Hetzel, Robert L.

    2015-01-01

    Some observers have argued that the Federal Reserve would best fulfill its mandate by adopting a target for nominal gross domestic product (GDP). Insights from the monetarist tradition suggest that nominal GDP targeting could be destabilizing. However, adopting benchmarks for both nominal and real GDP could offer useful information about when monetary policy is too tight or too loose.

  18. Target recognition by wavelet transform

    Wavelet transform has an important character of multi-resolution power, which presents pyramid structure, and this character coincides the way by which people distinguish object from coarse to fineness and from large to tiny. In addition to it, wavelet transform benefits to reducing image noise, simplifying calculation, and embodying target image characteristic point. A method of target recognition by wavelet transform is provided

  19. ISOLDE target zone control room

    2016-01-01

    Operating the ISOLDE target handling robots from the dedicated control room in building 197. Monitors showing the movements of the robots (GPS in this case) in the target zone. The footage shows the actual operation by the operator as well as the different equipment such as camera electronics, camera motor controls, camera monitors and Kuka robot controls touch panel.

  20. The proteome targets of intracellular targeting antimicrobial peptides.

    Shah, Pramod; Hsiao, Felix Shih-Hsiang; Ho, Yu-Hsuan; Chen, Chien-Sheng

    2016-04-01

    Antimicrobial peptides have been considered well-deserving candidates to fight the battle against microorganisms due to their broad-spectrum antimicrobial activities. Several studies have suggested that membrane disruption is the basic mechanism of AMPs that leads to killing or inhibiting microorganisms. Also, AMPs have been reported to interact with macromolecules inside the microbial cells such as nucleic acids (DNA/RNA), protein synthesis, essential enzymes, membrane septum formation and cell wall synthesis. Proteins are associated with many intracellular mechanisms of cells, thus protein targets may be specifically involved in mechanisms of action of AMPs. AMPs like pyrrhocoricin, drosocin, apidecin and Bac 7 are documented to have protein targets, DnaK and GroEL. Moreover, the intracellular targeting AMPs are reported to influence more than one protein targets inside the cell, suggesting for the multiple modes of actions. This complex mechanism of intracellular targeting AMPs makes them more difficult for the development of resistance. Herein, we have summarized the current status of AMPs in terms of their mode of actions, entry to cytoplasm and inhibition of macromolecules. To reveal the mechanism of action, we have focused on AMPs with intracellular protein targets. We have also included the use of high-throughput proteome microarray to determine the unidentified AMP protein targets in this review. PMID:26648572

  1. Oxide fiber targets at ISOLDE

    Köster, U.; Bergmann, U.C.; Carminati, D.; Catherall, R.; Cederkäll, J.; Correia, J.G.; Crepieux, B.; Dietrich, M.; Elder, K.; Fedoseyev, V.N.; Fraile, L.; Franchoo, S.; Fynbo, Hans Otto Uldall; Georg, U.; Giles, T.; Joinet, A.; Jonsson, Olle; Lau, Ch.; Lettry, J.; Oinonen, M.; Peräjärvi, K.; Ravn, H.L.; Rinaldi, T.; Santana-Leitner, M.; Weissman, L.; Mishin, V.I.; Kirchner, R.; Maier, H.J.; Wahl, U.; Rinaldi Barkat, Tania

    2003-01-01

    Many elements are rapidly released from oxide matrices. Some oxide powder targets show a fast sintering, thus losing their favorable release characteristics. Loosely packed oxide fiber targets are less critical since they may maintain their open structure even when starting to fuse together at some...... contact points. The experience with various oxide fiber targets (titania, zirconia, ceria and thoria) used in the last years at ISOLDE is reviewed. For short-lived isotopes of Cu, Ga and Xe the zirconia and ceria targets respectively provided significantly higher yields than any other target (metal foils......, oxide powders, etc.) tested before. Titania fibers, which were not commercially available, were produced in a relic process by impregnation of a rayon felt in a titanium chloride solution and subsequent calcination by heating the dried felt in air. Thoria fibers were obtained either by the same process...

  2. Target-Searching on Percolation

    2005-01-01

    We study target-searching processes on a percolation, on which a hunter tracks a target by smelling odors it emits. The odor intensity is supposed to be inversely proportional to the distance it propagates. The Monte Carlo simulation is performed on a 2-dimensional bond-percolation above the threshold. Having no idea of the location of the target, the hunter determines its moves only by random attempts in each direction. For lager percolation connectivity p (>~) 0.90, it reveals a scaling law for the searching time versus the distance to the position of the target. The scaling exponent is dependent on the sensitivity of the hunter. For smaller p, the scaling law is broken and the probability of finding out the target significantly reduces. The hunter seems trapped in the cluster of the percolation and can hardly reach the goal.

  3. Target animacy influences gorilla handedness.

    Forrester, Gillian S; Leavens, David A; Quaresmini, Caterina; Vallortigara, Giorgio

    2011-11-01

    We investigated the unimanual actions of a biological family group of twelve western lowland gorillas (Gorilla gorilla gorilla) using a methodological approach designed to assess behavior within social context from a bottom-up perspective. Measures of both the lateralization of unimanual actions (left, right) and the target of the action (animate, inanimate) were assessed during dual, synchronized video observations of naturalistic behavior. This paper demonstrates a corelationship between handedness and the animate quality of the target object. Analyses demonstrated a significant interaction between lateralized unimanual actions and target animacy and a right-hand bias for actions directed toward inanimate targets. We suggest that lateralized motor preference reflects the different processing capabilities of the left and right hemispheres, as influenced by the emotive (animate) and/or functional (inanimate) characteristics of the target, respectively. PMID:21562817

  4. 2-Amino-3,8-dimethylimidazo-[4,5-f]quinoxaline-induced DNA adduct formation and mutagenesis in DNA repair-deficient Chinese hamster ovary cells expressing human cytochrome P4501A1 and rapid or slow acetylator N-acetyltransferase 2.

    Bendaly, Jean; Zhao, Shuang; Neale, Jason R; Metry, Kristin J; Doll, Mark A; States, J Christopher; Pierce, William M; Hein, David W

    2007-07-01

    2-Amino-3,8-dimethylimidazo-[4,5-f]quinoxaline (MeIQx) is one of the most potent and abundant mutagens in the western diet. Bioactivation includes N-hydroxylation catalyzed by cytochrome P450s followed by O-acetylation catalyzed by N-acetyltransferase 2 (NAT2). In humans, NAT2*4 allele is associated with rapid acetylator phenotype, whereas NAT2*5B allele is associated with slow acetylator phenotype. We hypothesized that rapid acetylator phenotype predisposes humans to DNA damage and mutagenesis from MeIQx. Nucleotide excision repair-deficient Chinese hamster ovary cells were constructed by stable transfection of human cytochrome P4501A1 (CYP1A1) and a single copy of either NAT2*4 (rapid acetylator) or NAT2*5B (slow acetylator) alleles. CYP1A1 and NAT2 catalytic activities were undetectable in untransfected Chinese hamster ovary cell lines. CYP1A1 activity did not differ significantly (P > 0.05) among the CYP1A1-transfected cell lines. Cells transfected with NAT2*4 had 20-fold significantly higher levels of sulfamethazine N-acetyltransferase (P = 0.0001) and 6-fold higher levels of N-hydroxy-MeIQx O-acetyltransferase (P = 0.0093) catalytic activity than cells transfected with NAT2*5B. Only cells transfected with both CYP1A1 and NAT2*4 showed concentration-dependent cytotoxicity and hypoxanthine phosphoribosyl transferase mutagenesis following MeIQx treatment. Deoxyguanosine-C8-MeIQx was the primary DNA adduct formed and levels were dose dependent in each cell line and in the following order: untransfected < transfected with CYP1A1 < transfected with CYP1A1 and NAT2*5B < transfected with CYP1A1 and NAT2*4. MeIQx DNA adduct levels were significantly higher (P < 0.001) in CYP1A1/NAT2*4 than CYP1A1/NAT2*5B cells at all concentrations of MeIQx tested. MeIQx-induced DNA adduct levels correlated very highly (r2 = 0.88) with MeIQx-induced mutants. These results strongly support extrahepatic activation of MeIQx by CYP1A1 and a robust effect of human NAT2 genetic polymorphism

  5. Preparation of thin nuclear targets

    Thin film backings, sources and targets are needed for many applications in low energy nuclear physics and nuclear chemistry experiments. A survey of techniques used in the preparation of nuclear targets is first briefly discussed. These are classified as chemical, mechanical and physical preparations. Vacuum evaporation, being the most generally used technique, is discussed in detail. It is highly desirable to monitor the film thickness and control the deposition rate during evaporation and to measure the final target thickness after deposition has concluded. The relative merits of various thickness measuring techniques are described. Stages in the fabrication and mounting of self-supporting foils are described in detail, with emphasis given to the preparation of thin self-supporting carbon foils used as target backings and stripper foils. Various target backings, and the merits of the more generally used release agents are described in detail. The preparations of more difficult elemental targets are discussed, and a comprehensive list of the common targets is presented

  6. AcEST: DK960553 [AcEST

    Full Text Available 553 Tissue type prothallia with plantlets Developmental stage gametophytes with sporophyt...Swiss-Prot sp_hit_id Q29RT0 Definition sp|Q29RT0|HNRPG_BOVIN Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein G OS=Bo...nces producing significant alignments: (bits) Value sp|Q29RT0|HNRPG_BOVIN Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleopr...sociated protein 4-12 OS=Homo sa... 30 3.2 sp|Q960X4|TIP60_DROME Histone acetyltransferase Tip60 OS=Drosoph....tus norv... 30 4.3 sp|P25940|CO5A3_HUMAN Collagen alpha-3(V) chain OS=Homo sapiens ... 30 4.3 >sp|Q29RT0|HNRPG_BOVIN Heterogeneo

  7. Tracking Target and Spiral Waves

    Jensen, Flemming G.; Sporring, Jon; Nielsen, Mads;

    2002-01-01

    A new algorithm for analyzing the evolution of patterns of spiral and target waves in large aspect ratio chemical systems is introduced. The algorithm does not depend on finding the spiral tip but locates the center of the pattern by a new concept, called the spiral focus, which is defined...... by the evolutes of the actual spiral or target wave. With the use of Gaussian smoothing, a robust method is developed that permits the identification of targets and spirals foci independently of the wave profile. Examples of an analysis of long image sequences from experiments with the Belousov...

  8. Mycothiol: a promising antitubercular target.

    Nilewar, S S; Kathiravan, M K

    2014-02-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is the world's second commonest cause of death next to HIV/AIDS. The increasing emergence of multi drug resistance and the recalcitrant nature of persistent infections pose an additional challenge for the treatment of TB. Due to the development of resistance to conventional antibiotics there is a need for new therapeutic strategies to combat M. tuberculosis. One such target is Mycothiol (MSH), a major low molecular-mass thiol in mycobacteria, an important cellular anti-oxidant. MSH is present only in actinomycetes and hence is a good target. This review explores mycothiol as a potential target against tuberculosis and various research ongoing worldwide. PMID:24368170

  9. Development of targeted radiotherapy systems

    Conventional or external beam radiotherapy, has been a viable alternative for cancer treatment. Although this technique is effective, its use is limited if the patient has multiple malignant lesions (metastases). An alternative approach is based on the design of radiopharmaceuticals that, to be administered in the patient, are directed specifically toward the target cell producing a selective radiation delivery. This treatment is known as targeted radiotherapy. We have summarized and discussed some results related to our investigations on the development of targeted radiotherapy systems, including aspects of internal dosimetry

  10. Targeted therapy: tailoring cancer treatment

    Min Yan; Quentin Qiang Liu

    2013-01-01

    Targeted therapies include small-molecule inhibitors and monoclonal antibodies,have made treatment more tumor-specific and less toxic,and have opened new possibilities for tailoring cancer treatment.Nevertheless,there remain several challenges to targeted therapies,including molecular identification,drug resistance,and exploring reliable biomarkers.Here,we present several selected signaling pathways and molecular targets involved in human cancers including Aurora kinases,PI3K/mTOR signaling,FOXO-FOXM1 axis,and MDM2/MDM4-p53 interaction.Understanding the molecular mechanisms for tumorigenesis and development of drug resistance will provide new insights into drug discovery and design of therapeutic strategies for targeted therapies.

  11. Heavy flavors at fixed target

    The current situation of Heavy Flavor physics at fixed target experiments is reviewed. High statistics charm production and decay data are summarized and new results on beauty physics are presented. (author)

  12. Physics of Automatic Target Recognition

    Sadjadi, Firooz

    2007-01-01

    Physics of Automatic Target Recognition addresses the fundamental physical bases of sensing, and information extraction in the state-of-the art automatic target recognition field. It explores both passive and active multispectral sensing, polarimetric diversity, complex signature exploitation, sensor and processing adaptation, transformation of electromagnetic and acoustic waves in their interactions with targets, background clutter, transmission media, and sensing elements. The general inverse scattering, and advanced signal processing techniques and scientific evaluation methodologies being used in this multi disciplinary field will be part of this exposition. The issues of modeling of target signatures in various spectral modalities, LADAR, IR, SAR, high resolution radar, acoustic, seismic, visible, hyperspectral, in diverse geometric aspects will be addressed. The methods for signal processing and classification will cover concepts such as sensor adaptive and artificial neural networks, time reversal filt...

  13. Special hydrogen target (Prop. 210)

    This guide contains a description of the electrical control and automatic vacuum systems for the Special Hydrogen Target (Prop. 210) together with the flow diagram and the mimic control panel layout for the system. (U.K.)

  14. Inertial-confinement-fusion targets

    Much of the research in laser fusion has been done using simple ball on-stalk targets filled with a deuterium-tritium mixture. The targets operated in the exploding pusher mode in which the laser energy was delivered in a very short time (approx. 100 ps or less) and was absorbed by the glass wall of the target. The high energy density in the glass literally exploded the shell with the inward moving glass compressing the DT fuel to high temperatures and moderate densities. Temperatures achieved were high enough to produce DT reactions and accompanying thermonuclear neutrons and alpha particles. The primary criteria imposed on the target builders were: (1) wall thickness, (2) sphere diameter, and (3) fuel in the sphere

  15. IUCF liquid hydrogen target system

    A liquid hydrogen or deuterium target system is described for use with intermediate energy light ion beams at IUCF. In its present use as a production target for polarized neutrons, the target cell is mounted within the beamline. Thus, certain safety features are required which prevent a possible hydrogen explosion inside the beamline or the cyclotron. These safety devices include an acoustical delay line which slows the hydrogen gas shock wave and a fast valve which closes before any large volume of escaping gas reaches it. Other safety interlocks to reduce the chances of target cell breakage and to quickly shut off ignition sources are discussed. A device involving a variable heat load which is coupled directly to the cryocondenser and is used to continually monitor and stabilize the pressure and temperature of the liquid hydrogen is described here

  16. National Ignition Facility Target Chamber

    Wavrik, R W; Cox, J R; Fleming, P J

    2000-10-05

    On June 11, 1999 the Department of Energy dedicated the single largest piece of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in Livermore, California. The ten (10) meter diameter aluminum target high vacuum chamber will serve as the working end of the largest laser in the world. The output of 192 laser beams will converge at the precise center of the chamber. The laser beams will enter the chamber in two by two arrays to illuminate 10 millimeter long gold cylinders called hohlraums enclosing 2 millimeter capsule containing deuterium, tritium and isotopes of hydrogen. The two isotopes will fuse, thereby creating temperatures and pressures resembling those found only inside stars and in detonated nuclear weapons, but on a minute scale. The NIF Project will serve as an essential facility to insure safety and reliability of our nation's nuclear arsenal as well as demonstrating inertial fusion's contribution to creating electrical power. The paper will discuss the requirements that had to be addressed during the design, fabrication and testing of the target chamber. A team from Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and LLNL with input from industry performed the configuration and basic design of the target chamber. The method of fabrication and construction of the aluminum target chamber was devised by Pitt-Des Moines, Inc. (PDM). PDM also participated in the design of the chamber in areas such as the Target Chamber Realignment and Adjustment System, which would allow realignment of the sphere laser beams in the event of earth settlement or movement from a seismic event. During the fabrication of the target chamber the sphericity tolerances had to be addressed for the individual plates. Procedures were developed for forming, edge preparation and welding of individual plates. Construction plans were developed to allow the field construction of the target chamber to occur parallel to other NIF construction activities. This

  17. National Ignition Facility Target Chamber

    On June 11, 1999 the Department of Energy dedicated the single largest piece of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in Livermore, California. The ten (10) meter diameter aluminum target high vacuum chamber will serve as the working end of the largest laser in the world. The output of 192 laser beams will converge at the precise center of the chamber. The laser beams will enter the chamber in two by two arrays to illuminate 10 millimeter long gold cylinders called hohlraums enclosing 2 millimeter capsule containing deuterium, tritium and isotopes of hydrogen. The two isotopes will fuse, thereby creating temperatures and pressures resembling those found only inside stars and in detonated nuclear weapons, but on a minute scale. The NIF Project will serve as an essential facility to insure safety and reliability of our nation's nuclear arsenal as well as demonstrating inertial fusion's contribution to creating electrical power. The paper will discuss the requirements that had to be addressed during the design, fabrication and testing of the target chamber. A team from Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and LLNL with input from industry performed the configuration and basic design of the target chamber. The method of fabrication and construction of the aluminum target chamber was devised by Pitt-Des Moines, Inc. (PDM). PDM also participated in the design of the chamber in areas such as the Target Chamber Realignment and Adjustment System, which would allow realignment of the sphere laser beams in the event of earth settlement or movement from a seismic event. During the fabrication of the target chamber the sphericity tolerances had to be addressed for the individual plates. Procedures were developed for forming, edge preparation and welding of individual plates. Construction plans were developed to allow the field construction of the target chamber to occur parallel to other NIF construction activities. This was

  18. Targeting cancer with peptide aptamers

    Seigneuric, Renaud; Gobbo, Jessica; Colas, Pierre; Garrido, Carmen

    2011-01-01

    A major endeavour in cancer chemotherapy is to develop agents that specifically target a biomolecule of interest. There are two main classes of targeting agents: small molecules and biologics. Among biologics (e.g.: antibodies), DNA, RNA but also peptide aptamers are relatively recent agents. Peptide aptamers are seldom described but represent attractive agents that can inhibit a growing panel of oncotargets including Heat Shock Proteins. Potential pitfalls and coming challenges towards succe...

  19. Proactive Steering Toward Oriented Targets

    Boulic, R

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we introduce a real-time steering controller ensuring the reach of a (possible mobile) target position and orientation, without requiring to build/update the full trajectory to that target. We name it the funnelling control. The final orientation is achieved through the continuous adjustment of the heading direction. This control mode is proactive in the sense that it anticipates the success/failure of the reach and adjusts the desired speed accordingly. Both features rely on an...

  20. Plug Off: Target Group Perception

    Kortbaek, Allan; Neubauer, Nathalie; Carreras, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    This project is a study of how a sample of defined target group of a campaign, build meaning through their introduction to such a campaign. With ethno-methodology as a focal point within the overlying context of discourse psychology and more importantly, social constructivism, the aim is to analyze how a defined target group make sense of a proto awareness raising campaign. Proto in this case denotes a planned communication effort in the form of a campaign encouraging responsible use of wirel...