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Sample records for acetylcholinesterase insecticide resistance

  1. Resistance-associated point mutations in insecticide-insensitive acetylcholinesterase.

    Mutero, A; Pralavorio, M; Bride, J M; D. Fournier

    1994-01-01

    Extensive utilization of pesticides against insects provides us with a good model for studying the adaptation of a eukaryotic genome to a strong selective pressure. One mechanism of resistance is the alteration of acetylcholinesterase (EC 3.1.1.7), the molecular target for organophosphates and carbamates. Here, we report the sequence analysis of the Ace gene in several resistant field strains of Drosophila melanogaster. This analysis resulted in the identification of five point mutations asso...

  2. COMPARISON OF BIOCHEMICAL AND MOLECULAR TESTS FOR DETECTING INSECTICIDE RESISTANCE DUE TO INSENSITIVE ACETYLCHOLINESTERASE IN CULEX QUINQUEFASCIATUS1

    SCOTT, MARIAH L.; McALLISTER, JANET C.

    2012-01-01

    Insecticide resistance to organophosphates and carbamates can be the result of changes in acetylcholinesterase activity conferred by the ACE-1 mutation. Detection of this altered target site mutation is important in guiding informed decisions for resistance management. In this study we compared a competitive enzyme assay with a polymerase chain reaction assay utilizing a restriction enzyme. Both assays detected the ACE-1 mutation in Culex quinquefasciatus and agreement was 100%. The costs and...

  3. Acetylcholinesterase alterations reveal the fitness cost of mutations conferring insecticide resistance

    Tang Zhen; Frémaux Isabelle; Alies Carole; Lougarre Andrée; Shi Ming; Stojan Jure; Fournier Didier

    2004-01-01

    Abstract Background Insecticide resistance is now common in insects due to the frequent use of chemicals to control them, which provides a useful tool to study the adaptation of eukaryotic genome to new environments. Although numerous potential mutations may provide high level of resistance, only few alleles are found in insect natural populations. Then, we hypothesized that only alleles linked to the highest fitness in the absence of insecticide are selected. Results To obtain information on...

  4. Resistance to Insecticides in Insects

    ÇAKIR, Şükran; Şengül YAMANEL

    2005-01-01

    In recent years, the frequent usage of insecticides in struggle aganist insects, has caused development of resistance to those chemicals in insects. The increase in dosage of insecticide used due to development of resistance in insects, causes important problems in terms of environment and human health. This study includes topics such as insecticides which are used frequently in insect struggle, insecticide resistant types, genetic changes posing resistance, enzymes of resistance and resistan...

  5. Insecticide Resistance in Fleas.

    Rust, Michael K

    2016-01-01

    Fleas are the major ectoparasite of cats, dogs, and rodents worldwide and potential vectors of animal diseases. In the past two decades the majority of new control treatments have been either topically applied or orally administered to the host. Most reports concerning the development of insecticide resistance deal with the cat flea, Ctenocephalides felis felis. Historically, insecticide resistance has developed to many of the insecticides used to control fleas in the environment including carbamates, organophosphates, and pyrethroids. Product failures have been reported with some of the new topical treatments, but actual resistance has not yet been demonstrated. Failures have often been attributed to operational factors such as failure to adequately treat the pet and follow label directions. With the addition of so many new chemistries additional monitoring of flea populations is needed. PMID:26999217

  6. Insecticide resistance in Bemisia tabaci from Cyprus

    Vassilis Vassiliou; Maria Emmanouilidou; Andreas Perrakis; Evangelia Morou; John Vontas; Anastasia Tsagkarakou; Emmanouil Roditakis

    2011-01-01

    A comprehensive study on the Bemisia tabaci(biotype B)resistance to neonicotinoid insecticides imidacloprid,acetamiprid and thiamethoxam,and pyrethroid bifenthrin was conducted in Cyprus.The resistance level to eight field-collected B.tabaci populations was investigated.The activities of enzymes involved in metabolic detoxification and the frequencies of pyrethroid and organophosphates target site resistance mutations were determined.Moderate to high levels of resistance were detected for imidacloprid(resistance factor[RF]77-392)and thiamethoxam(RF 50-164)while low resistance levels were observed for acetamiprid(RF 7-12).Uniform responses by the Cypriot whiteflies could be observed against all neonicotinoid insecticides.No cross-resistance between the neonicotinoids was detected as well as no association with the activity of the P450 microsomal oxidases.Only imidacloprid resistance correlated with carboxylesterase activity.Low to extremely high resistance was observed for insecticide bifenthrin(RF 49-1 243)which was associated with the frequency of the resistant allele in the sodium channel gene but not with the activity of the detoxification enzymes.Finally,the F331W mutation in the acetylcholinesterase enzyme ace1 gene was fixed in all B.tabaci populations from Cyprus.

  7. Insecticide resistence of bumblebee species

    Zarevúcka, Marie

    Rijeka: InTech, 2013 - (Chamy, R.; Rosenkranz, F.), s. 207-228 ISBN 978-953-51-1154-2 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/09/1446; GA TA ČR TA01020969 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : bumblebee * insecticide Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry http://www.intechopen.com/books/biodegradation-life-of-science/insecticide-resistence-of-bumblebee-species

  8. Selective and Irreversible Inhibitors of Aphid Acetylcholinesterases: Steps Toward Human-Safe Insecticides

    Yuan-Ping Pang; Singh, Sanjay K.; Yang Gao; T Leon Lassiter; MISHRA, Rajesh K.; Kun Yan Zhu; Stephen Brimijoin

    2009-01-01

    Aphids, among the most destructive insects to world agriculture, are mainly controlled by organophosphate insecticides that disable the catalytic serine residue of acetylcholinesterase (AChE). Because these agents also affect vertebrate AChEs, they are toxic to non-target species including humans and birds. We previously reported that a cysteine residue (Cys), found at the AChE active site in aphids and other insects but not mammals, might serve as a target for insect-selective pesticides. Ho...

  9. Immobilization of acetylcholinesterase on one-dimensional gold nanoparticles for detection of organophosphorous insecticides

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports a simple method for immobilization of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) on one-dimensional (1D) gold (Au) nanoparticles for detection of organophosphorous (OP) insecticides. 1D Au nanoparticles were prepared by electrodeposition in the pores of an alumina template which was subsequently removed by 2.0 M NaOH solution. They were characterized by XRD and FESEM. The immobilized AChE retained its biological activity and catalyzed the hydrolysis of acetylthiocholine to form thiocholine, which was subsequently oxidized to produce detectable signals. Based on the inhibition toward the enzymatic activity of AChE by OP insecticides, sensitive detection of methamidophos (an OP insecticide) was performed. Under optimal conditions, the sensors could be used for the determination of methamidophos ranging from 0.004 to 24 μg/mL with the detection limit of 0.001 μg/mL. The developed OP insecticide biosensors exhibited satisfactory stability and reproducibility. This work demonstrated that 1D Au nanoparticles could serve as an ideal carrier for immobilization of AChE to fabricate the corresponding biosensor.

  10. Insecticide Resistance Reducing Effectiveness of Malaria Control

    2007-01-24

    Malaria prevention is increasingly insecticide based. Dr. John Gimnig, an entomologist with the Division of Parasitic Diseases, CDC, discusses evidence that mosquito resistance to insecticides, which is measured in the laboratory, could compromise malaria prevention in the field.  Created: 1/24/2007 by Emerging Infectious Diseases.   Date Released: 3/13/2007.

  11. Insecticide resistance selection in rice planthoppers

    2001-01-01

    @@ Brown planthopper (BPH, Nilaparvata lugens Stal) and white backed planthopper (WBPH, Sogatella furcifera Horvath) are the main insects on rice in China. The insecticide resistance of the two planthoppers have often been reported. Availability of the resistant population is a prerequisite for studying the resistance mechanism. In this paper, one method to select methamidophos resistance of the two planthoppers was recommended.

  12. Chromogenic platform based on recombinant Drosophila melanogaster acetylcholinesterase for visible unidirectional assay of organophosphate and carbamate insecticide residues

    Highlight: ► A visible chromogenic platform for rapid analysis of OP and CM insecticide residues was developed. ► The assay has the capabilities of both qualitative measurement and quantitative analysis. ► The sensitivity, capabilities of resisting interferences and storage stability were desirable. ► Matrix effects were acceptable and detection performance was satisfactory in real application. - Abstract: In this study we propose a chromogenic platform for rapid analysis of organophosphate (OP) and carbamate (CM) insecticide residues, based on recombinant Drosophila melanogaster acetylcholinesterase (R-DmAChE) as enzyme and indoxyl acetate as substrate. The visible chromogenic strip had the advantages identical to those of commonly used lateral flow assays (LFAs) with utmost simplicity in sample loading and result observation. After optimization, depending on the color intensity (CI) values, the well-established assay has the capabilities of both qualitative measurement via naked eyes and quantitative analysis by colorimetric reader with the desirable IC50 values against the tested six insecticides (0.06 μg mL−1 of carbofuran, 0.28 μg mL−1 of methomyl, 0.03 μg mL−1 of dichlorvos, 31.6 μg mL−1 of methamidophos, 2.0 μg mL−1 of monocrotophos, 6.3 μg mL−1 of omethoate). Acceptable matrix effects and satisfactory detection performance were confirmed by in-parallel LC–MS/MS analysis in different vegetable varieties at various spiked levels of 10−3 to 101 μg g−1. Overall, the testified suitability and applicability of this novel platform meet the requirements for practical use in food safety management and environmental monitoring, especially in the developing world.

  13. Chromogenic platform based on recombinant Drosophila melanogaster acetylcholinesterase for visible unidirectional assay of organophosphate and carbamate insecticide residues

    Han Zheng [Institute for Agri-food Standards and Testing Technology, Shanghai Academy of Agricultural Sciences, 1018 Jinqi Road, Shanghai 201403 (China); Chi Chensen [School of Life Science and Biotechnology, Bor Luh Food Safety Center, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 800 Dongchuan Road, Shanghai 200240 (China); Bai Bing; Liu Gang; Rao Qinxiong [Institute for Agri-food Standards and Testing Technology, Shanghai Academy of Agricultural Sciences, 1018 Jinqi Road, Shanghai 201403 (China); Peng Shaojie [Institute of Shanghai Food and Drug Supervision, 615 Liuzhou Road, Shanghai 200233 (China); Liu Hong [Shanghai Municipal Center for Disease Control and Prevention, 1380 Zhongshan West Road, Shanghai 200336 (China); Zhao Zhihui [Institute for Agri-food Standards and Testing Technology, Shanghai Academy of Agricultural Sciences, 1018 Jinqi Road, Shanghai 201403 (China); Zhang Dabing [School of Life Science and Biotechnology, Bor Luh Food Safety Center, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 800 Dongchuan Road, Shanghai 200240 (China); Wu Aibo, E-mail: wuaibo@saas.sh.cn [Institute for Agri-food Standards and Testing Technology, Shanghai Academy of Agricultural Sciences, 1018 Jinqi Road, Shanghai 201403 (China)

    2012-03-30

    Highlight: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A visible chromogenic platform for rapid analysis of OP and CM insecticide residues was developed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The assay has the capabilities of both qualitative measurement and quantitative analysis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The sensitivity, capabilities of resisting interferences and storage stability were desirable. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Matrix effects were acceptable and detection performance was satisfactory in real application. - Abstract: In this study we propose a chromogenic platform for rapid analysis of organophosphate (OP) and carbamate (CM) insecticide residues, based on recombinant Drosophila melanogaster acetylcholinesterase (R-DmAChE) as enzyme and indoxyl acetate as substrate. The visible chromogenic strip had the advantages identical to those of commonly used lateral flow assays (LFAs) with utmost simplicity in sample loading and result observation. After optimization, depending on the color intensity (CI) values, the well-established assay has the capabilities of both qualitative measurement via naked eyes and quantitative analysis by colorimetric reader with the desirable IC{sub 50} values against the tested six insecticides (0.06 {mu}g mL{sup -1} of carbofuran, 0.28 {mu}g mL{sup -1} of methomyl, 0.03 {mu}g mL{sup -1} of dichlorvos, 31.6 {mu}g mL{sup -1} of methamidophos, 2.0 {mu}g mL{sup -1} of monocrotophos, 6.3 {mu}g mL{sup -1} of omethoate). Acceptable matrix effects and satisfactory detection performance were confirmed by in-parallel LC-MS/MS analysis in different vegetable varieties at various spiked levels of 10{sup -3} to 10{sup 1} {mu}g g{sup -1}. Overall, the testified suitability and applicability of this novel platform meet the requirements for practical use in food safety management and environmental monitoring, especially in the developing world.

  14. Cloning of Two Acetylcholinesterase Genes and Analysis of Point Mutations Putatively Associated with Triazophos Resistance in Chilo auricilius (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae).

    Luo, Guang-Hua; Li, Xiao-Huan; Zhang, Zhi-Chun; Liu, Bao-Sheng; Huang, Shui-Jin; Fang, Ji-Chao

    2015-06-01

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) is the target of organophosphate (OP) and carbamate insecticides. Mutations in the AChE gene (ace) leading to decreased insecticide susceptibility is the main resistance mechanism in insects. In this study, two Chilo auricilius acetylcholinesterase genes, designated as Caace1 and Caace2, were cloned using RT-PCR and RACE. Caace1 cDNA is 2534 bp, with ORF of 2082 bp, and it encodes an acetylcholinesterase 1 (CaAChE1) protein comprising a calculated 693 amino acid (aa) residues. Caace2 cDNA contains 2280 bp, with a full-length ORF of 1917 bp, encoding acetylcholinesterase 2 (CaAChE2) comprising a calculated 638 aa residues. At the aa level, CaAChE1 displays the highest similarity (97%) with the Chilo suppressalis AChE1, and CaAChE2 shows the highest similarity with the C. suppressalis AChE2 (99%). From the restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) PCR (RFLP-PCR) analysis, one mutation in Caace1, similar to the ace1 mutation associated with triazophos resistance in C. suppressalis, was detected. Detailed examination of field populations of C. auricilius indicated this resistance mutation in C. auricilius is still quite infrequent. Based on the assay of AChE activity and RFLP-PCR testing, an individual that contains resistance mutation has lower AChE activities, while the individual that does not contain the resistance mutation has higher AChE activities. This study provides a basis for future investigations into the mechanism of OP resistance in C. auricilius, as well as a guidance for C. auricilius control with reasonable choice of pesticides. PMID:26470257

  15. Insecticide control of vector-borne diseases : when is insecticide resistance a problem ?

    Rivero, Ana; Vézilier, Julien; Weill, Mylène; Read, Andrew F.; Gandon, Sylvain

    2010-01-01

    Many of the most dangerous human diseases are transmitted by insect vectors. After decades of repeated insecticide use, all of these vector species have demonstrated the capacity to evolve resistance to insecticides. Insecticide resistance is generally considered to undermine control of vector-transmitted diseases because it increases the number of vectors that survive the insecticide treatment. Disease control failure, however, need not follow from vector control failure. Here, we review evi...

  16. Inhibition of rainbow trout acetylcholinesterase by aqueous and suspended particle-associated organophosphorous insecticides.

    Sturm, Armin; Radau, Tanja S; Hahn, Torsten; Schulz, Ralf

    2007-06-01

    Spraydrift and edge-of-field runoff are important routes of pesticide entry into streams. Pesticide contamination originating from spraydrift usually resides in the water phase, while pesticides in contaminated runoff are to a large extent associated with suspended particles (SPs). The effects of two organophosphorous insecticides (OPs), chloropyrifos (CPF) and azinphos-methyl (AZP), on acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity in rainbow trout were compared between two exposure scenarios, simulating spraydrift- and runoff-borne contamination events in the Lourens River (LR), Western Cape, South Africa. NOECs of brain AChE inhibition, determined after 1h of exposure followed by 24h of recovery, were 0.33microgl(-1) for aqueous CPF, 200mgkg(-1) for SP-associated CPF and 20mgkg(-1) for SP-associated AZP (at 0.5gl(-1) SP). The highest aqueous AZP concentration tested (3.3microgl(-1)) was without significant effects. Previously reported peak levels of aqueous CPF in the LR ( approximately 0.2microgl(-1)) are close to its NOEC (this study), suggesting a significant toxicological risk to fish in the LR. By contrast, reported levels of SP-associated OPs in the LR are 20-200-fold lower than their NOECs (this study). In a comparative in situ study, trout were exposed for seven days at agricultural (LR2, LR3) and upstream reference (LR1) sites. No runoff occurred during the study. Brain AChE was significantly inhibited at LR3. However, OP levels at LR3 (CPF 0.01microgl(-1); AZP 0.14microgl(-1)) were minor compared to concentrations having effects in the laboratory (see above). Additionally, muscle AChE activity was significantly higher in caged trout from LR1 than in animals maintained in laboratory tanks. PMID:17418885

  17. Fungal infection counters insecticide resistance in African malaria mosquitoes

    Farenhorst, M.; J. C. Mouatcho; Kikankie, C.K.; Brooke, B.D.; Hunt, R. H.; M. B. Thomas; Koekemoer, L.L.; Knols, B.G.J.; M. Coetzee

    2009-01-01

    The evolution of insecticide resistance in mosquitoes is threatening the effectiveness and sustainability of malaria control programs in various parts of the world. Through their unique mode of action, entomopathogenic fungi provide promising alternatives to chemical control. However, potential interactions between fungal infection and insecticide resistance, such as cross-resistance, have not been investigated. We show that insecticide-resistant Anopheles mosquitoes remain susceptible to inf...

  18. Insecticide resistance and malaria transmission: infection rate and oocyst burden in Culex pipiens mosquitoes infected with Plasmodium relictum

    Rivero Ana

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The control of most vectors of malaria is threatened by the spread of insecticide resistance. One factor that has been hitherto largely overlooked is the potential effects of insecticide resistance on the ability of mosquitoes to transmit malaria: are insecticide-resistant mosquitoes as good vectors of Plasmodium as susceptible ones? The drastic physiological changes that accompany the evolution of insecticide resistance may indeed alter the ability of vectors to transmit diseases, a possibility that, if confirmed, could have major epidemiological consequences. Methods Using a novel experimental system consisting of the avian malaria parasite (Plasmodium relictum and its natural vector (the mosquito Culex pipiens, two of the most common mechanisms of insecticide resistance (esterase overproduction and acetylcholinesterase modification were investigated for their effect on mosquito infection rate and parasite burden. For this purpose two types of experiments were carried out using (i insecticide-resistant and susceptible laboratory isogenic lines of Cx. pipiens and (ii wild Cx. pipiens collected from a population where insecticide resistant and susceptible mosquitoes coexist in sympatry. Results The isogenic line and wild-caught mosquito experiments were highly consistent in showing no effect of either esterase overproduction or of acetylcholinesterase modification on either the infection rate or on the oocyst burden of mosquitoes. The only determinant of these traits was blood meal size, which was similar across the different insecticide resistant categories in both experiments. Conclusions Insecticide resistance was found to have no effect on Plasmodium development within the mosquito. This is the first time this question has been addressed using a natural mosquito-Plasmodium combination, while taking care to standardize the genetic background against which the insecticide resistance genes operate. Infection rate and oocyst

  19. Salivary gland proteome analysis reveals modulation of anopheline unique proteins in insensitive acetylcholinesterase resistant Anopheles gambiae mosquitoes.

    Sylvie Cornelie

    Full Text Available Insensitive acetylcholinesterase resistance due to a mutation in the acetylcholinesterase (ace encoding ace-1 gene confers cross-resistance to organophosphate and carbamate insecticides in Anopheles gambiae populations from Central and West Africa. This mutation is associated with a strong genetic cost revealed through alterations of some life history traits but little is known about the physiological and behavioural changes in insects bearing the ace-1(R allele. Comparative analysis of the salivary gland contents between An. gambiae susceptible and ace-1(R resistant strains was carried out to charaterize factors that could be involved in modifications of blood meal process, trophic behaviour or pathogen interaction in the insecticide-resistant mosquitoes. Differential analysis of the salivary gland protein profiles revealed differences in abundance for several proteins, two of them showing major differences between the two strains. These two proteins identified as saglin and TRIO are salivary gland-1 related proteins, a family unique to anopheline mosquitoes, one of them playing a crucial role in salivary gland invasion by Plasmodium falciparum sporozoites. Differential expression of two other proteins previously identified in the Anopheles sialome was also observed. The differentially regulated proteins are involved in pathogen invasion, blood feeding process, and protection against oxidation, relevant steps in the outcome of malaria infection. Further functional studies and insect behaviour experiments would confirm the impact of the modification of the sialome composition on blood feeding and pathogen transmission abilities of the resistant mosquitoes. The data supports the hypothesis of alterations linked to insecticide resistance in the biology of the primary vector of human malaria in Africa.

  20. Multiple insecticide resistance in Anopheles gambiae s.l. populations from Burkina Faso, West Africa.

    Moussa Namountougou

    Full Text Available Malaria control programs are being jeopardized by the spread of insecticide resistance in mosquito vector populations. The situation in Burkina Faso is emblematic with Anopheles gambiae populations showing high levels of resistance to most available compounds. Although the frequency of insecticide target-site mutations including knockdown resistance (kdr and insensitive acetylcholinesterase (Ace-1(R alleles has been regularly monitored in the area, it is not known whether detoxifying enzymes contribute to the diversity of resistance phenotypes observed in the field. Here, we propose an update on the phenotypic diversity of insecticide resistance in An. gambiae populations sampled from 10 sites in Burkina Faso in 2010. Susceptibility to deltamethrin, permethrin, DDT, bendiocarb and fenithrotion was assessed. Test specimens (N = 30 per locality were identified to species and molecular form and their genotype at the kdr and Ace-1 loci was determined. Detoxifying enzymes activities including non-specific esterases (NSEs, oxydases (cytochrome P450 and Glutathione S-Transferases (GSTs were measured on single mosquitoes (N = 50 from each test locality and compared with the An. gambiae Kisumu susceptible reference strain. In all sites, mosquitoes demonstrated multiple resistance phenotypes, showing reduced mortality to several insecticidal compounds at the same time, although with considerable site-to-site variation. Both the kdr 1014L and Ace-1(R 119S resistant alleles were detected in the M and the S forms of An. gambiae, and were found together in specimens of the S form. Variation in detoxifying enzyme activities was observed within and between vector populations. Elevated levels of NSEs and GSTs were widespread, suggesting multiple resistance mechanisms segregate within An. gambiae populations from this country. By documenting the extent and diversity of insecticide resistance phenotypes and the putative combination of their underlying

  1. Mixture for Controlling Insecticide-Resistant Malaria Vectors

    Pennetier, Cédric; Costantini, Carlo; Corbel, Vincent; Licciardi, Séverine; Dabiré, Roch K.; Lapied, Bruno; Chandre, Fabrice; Hougard, Jean-Marc

    2008-01-01

    The spread of resistance to pyrethroids in the major Afrotropical malaria vectors Anopheles gambiae s.s. necessitates the development of new strategies to control resistant mosquito populations. To test the efficacy of nets treated with repellent and insecticide against susceptible and insecticide-resistant An. gambiae mosquito populations, we impregnated mosquito bed nets with an insect repellent mixed with a low dose of organophosphorous insecticide and tested them in a rice-growing area ne...

  2. Insecticide Resistance and Management Strategies in Urban Ecosystems

    Zhu, Fang; Lavine, Laura; O’Neal, Sally; Lavine, Mark; Foss, Carrie; Walsh, Douglas

    2016-01-01

    The increased urbanization of a growing global population makes imperative the development of sustainable integrated pest management (IPM) strategies for urban pest control. This emphasizes pests that are closely associated with the health and wellbeing of humans and domesticated animals. Concurrently there are regulatory requirements enforced to minimize inadvertent exposures to insecticides in the urban environment. Development of insecticide resistance management (IRM) strategies in urban ecosystems involves understanding the status and mechanisms of insecticide resistance and reducing insecticide selection pressure by combining multiple chemical and non-chemical approaches. In this review, we will focus on the commonly used insecticides and molecular and physiological mechanisms underlying insecticide resistance in six major urban insect pests: house fly, German cockroach, mosquitoes, red flour beetle, bed bugs and head louse. We will also discuss several strategies that may prove promising for future urban IPM programs. PMID:26751480

  3. An Operational Framework for Insecticide Resistance Management Planning

    Chanda, Emmanuel; Thomsen, Edward K.; Musapa, Mulenga; Kamuliwo, Mulakwa; Brogdon, William G.; Norris, Douglas E.; Masaninga, Freddie; Wirtz, Robert; Sikaala, Chadwick H.; Muleba, Mbanga; Craig, Allen; Govere, John M.; Ranson, Hilary; Hemingway, Janet; Seyoum, Aklilu; Macdonald, Michael B.

    2016-01-01

    Arthropod vectors transmit organisms that cause many emerging and reemerging diseases, and their control is reliant mainly on the use of chemical insecticides. Only a few classes of insecticides are available for public health use, and the increased spread of insecticide resistance is a major threat to sustainable disease control. The primary strategy for mitigating the detrimental effects of insecticide resistance is the development of an insecticide resistance management plan. However, few examples exist to show how to implement such plans programmatically. We describe the formulation and implementation of a resistance management plan for mosquito vectors of human disease in Zambia. We also discuss challenges, steps taken to address the challenges, and directions for the future. PMID:27089119

  4. Averting a malaria disaster: will insecticide resistance derail malaria control?

    Hemingway, Janet; Ranson, Hilary; Magill, Alan; Kolaczinski, Jan; Fornadel, Christen; Gimnig, John; Coetzee, Maureen; Simard, Frederic; Roch, Dabiré K; Hinzoumbe, Clément Kerah; Pickett, John; Schellenberg, David; Gething, Peter; Hoppé, Mark; Hamon, Nicholas

    2016-04-23

    World Malaria Day 2015 highlighted the progress made in the development of new methods of prevention (vaccines and insecticides) and treatment (single dose drugs) of the disease. However, increasing drug and insecticide resistance threatens the successes made with existing methods. Insecticide resistance has decreased the efficacy of the most commonly used insecticide class of pyrethroids. This decreased efficacy has increased mosquito survival, which is a prelude to rising incidence of malaria and fatalities. Despite intensive research efforts, new insecticides will not reach the market for at least 5 years. Elimination of malaria is not possible without effective mosquito control. Therefore, to combat the threat of resistance, key stakeholders need to rapidly embrace a multifaceted approach including a reduction in the cost of bringing new resistance management methods to market and the streamlining of associated development, policy, and implementation pathways to counter this looming public health catastrophe. PMID:26880124

  5. Insecticide resistance in the sand fly, Phlebotomus papatasi from Khartoum State, Sudan

    Hassan Mo'awia

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Phlebotomus papatasi the vector of cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL is the most widely spread sand fly in Sudan. No data has previously been collected on insecticide susceptibility and/or resistance of this vector, and a first study to establish a baseline data is reported here. Methods Sand flies were collected from Surogia village, (Khartoum State, Rahad Game Reserve (eastern Sudan and White Nile area (Central Sudan using light traps. Sand flies were reared in the Tropical Medicine Research Institute laboratory. The insecticide susceptibility status of first progeny (F1 of P. papatasi of each population was tested using WHO insecticide kits. Also, P. papatasi specimens from Surogia village and Rahad Game Reserve were assayed for activities of enzyme systems involved in insecticide resistance (acetylcholinesterase (AChE, non-specific carboxylesterases (EST, glutathione-S-transferases (GSTs and cytochrome p450 monooxygenases (Cyt p450. Results Populations of P. papatasi from White Nile and Rahad Game Reserve were sensitive to dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT, permethrin, malathion, and propoxur. However, the P. papatasi population from Surogia village was sensitive to DDT and permethrin but highly resistant to malathion and propoxur. Furthermore, P. papatasi of Surogia village had significantly higher insecticide detoxification enzyme activity than of those of Rahad Game Reserve. The sand fly population in Surogia displayed high AChE activity and only three specimens had elevated levels for EST and GST. Conclusions The study provided evidence for malathion and propoxur resistance in the sand fly population of Surogia village, which probably resulted from anti-malarial control activities carried out in the area during the past 50 years.

  6. Multiple-Insecticide Resistance and Classic Gene Mutations to Japanese Encephalitis Vector Culex tritaeniorhynchus from China.

    Wu, Zhi-Ming; Chu, Hong-Liang; Wang, Gang; Zhu, Xiao-Juan; Guo, Xiao-Xia; Zhang, Ying-Mei; Xing, Dan; Yan, Ting; Zhao, Ming-Hui; Dong, Yan-De; Li, Chun-Xiao; Zhao, Tong-Yan

    2016-06-01

    Widespread resistance of insect pests to insecticides has been widely reported in China and there is consequently an urgent need to adjust pest management strategies appropriately. This requires detailed information on the extent and causes of resistance. The aim of the present study was to investigate levels of resistance to 5 insecticides among 12 strains of Culex tritaeniorhynchus, a major vector of Japanese encephalitis in China. Resistance to deltamethrin, beta-cypermethrin, permethrin, dichlorvos, and propoxur were measured using larval bioassays. The allelic frequency of knockdown resistance (kdr) and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) mutations were determined in all strains. Larval bioassay results indicated that the field strains collected from different sites were resistant to deltamethrin, beta-cypermethrin, permethrin, dichlorvos, and propoxur, with resistance ratio values ranging from 1.70- to 71.98-fold, 7.83- to 43.07-fold, 3.54- to 40.03-fold, 291.85- to 530.89-fold, and 51.32- to 108.83-fold, respectively. A polymerase chain reaction amplification of specific alleles method for individual was developed to detect genotypes of the AChE gene mutation F455W in Cx. tritaeniorhynchus. The frequency of the AChE gene mutation F455W was 100.00% in all strains, making this mutation of no value as a marker of resistance to organophosphorous and carbamate pesticides in Cx. tritaeniorhynchus in China. The kdr allele was present in all strains at frequencies of 10.00-29.55%. Regression analysis indicated a significant correlation between kdr allele frequencies and levels of resistance to deltamethrin, beta-cypermethrin, and permethrin. These results highlight the need to monitor and map insecticide resistance in Cx. tritaeniorhynchus and to adjust pesticide use to minimize the development of resistance in these mosquitoes. PMID:27280353

  7. Resistance Status to the Insecticides Temephos, Deltamethrin, and Diflubenzuron in Brazilian Aedes aegypti Populations

    Diogo Fernandes Bellinato

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Insecticides are still largely applied in public health to control disease vectors. In Brazil, organophosphates (OP and pyrethroids (PY are used against Aedes aegypti for years. Since 2009 Insect Growth Regulators (IGR are also employed in the control of larvae. We quantified resistance to temephos (OP, deltamethrin (PY, and diflubenzuron (IGR of A. aegypti samples from 12 municipalities distributed throughout the country, collected between 2010 and 2012. High levels of resistance to neurotoxic insecticides were detected in almost all populations: RR95 to temephos varied between 4.0 and 27.1; the lowest RR95 to deltamethrin was 13.1, and values higher than 70.0 were found. In contrast, all samples were susceptible to diflubenzuron (RR95 < 2.3. Biochemical tests performed with larvae and adults discarded the participation of acetylcholinesterase, the OP target, and confirmed involvement of the detoxifying enzymes esterases, mixed function oxidases, and glutathione-S-transferases. The results obtained were discussed taking into account the public chemical control component and the increase in the domestic use of insecticides during dengue epidemic seasons in the evaluated municipalities.

  8. Resistance Status to the Insecticides Temephos, Deltamethrin, and Diflubenzuron in Brazilian Aedes aegypti Populations.

    Bellinato, Diogo Fernandes; Viana-Medeiros, Priscila Fernandes; Araújo, Simone Costa; Martins, Ademir J; Lima, José Bento Pereira; Valle, Denise

    2016-01-01

    Insecticides are still largely applied in public health to control disease vectors. In Brazil, organophosphates (OP) and pyrethroids (PY) are used against Aedes aegypti for years. Since 2009 Insect Growth Regulators (IGR) are also employed in the control of larvae. We quantified resistance to temephos (OP), deltamethrin (PY), and diflubenzuron (IGR) of A. aegypti samples from 12 municipalities distributed throughout the country, collected between 2010 and 2012. High levels of resistance to neurotoxic insecticides were detected in almost all populations: RR95 to temephos varied between 4.0 and 27.1; the lowest RR95 to deltamethrin was 13.1, and values higher than 70.0 were found. In contrast, all samples were susceptible to diflubenzuron (RR95 < 2.3). Biochemical tests performed with larvae and adults discarded the participation of acetylcholinesterase, the OP target, and confirmed involvement of the detoxifying enzymes esterases, mixed function oxidases, and glutathione-S-transferases. The results obtained were discussed taking into account the public chemical control component and the increase in the domestic use of insecticides during dengue epidemic seasons in the evaluated municipalities. PMID:27419140

  9. Resistance Status to the Insecticides Temephos, Deltamethrin, and Diflubenzuron in Brazilian Aedes aegypti Populations

    Viana-Medeiros, Priscila Fernandes; Araújo, Simone Costa; Martins, Ademir J.; Lima, José Bento Pereira

    2016-01-01

    Insecticides are still largely applied in public health to control disease vectors. In Brazil, organophosphates (OP) and pyrethroids (PY) are used against Aedes aegypti for years. Since 2009 Insect Growth Regulators (IGR) are also employed in the control of larvae. We quantified resistance to temephos (OP), deltamethrin (PY), and diflubenzuron (IGR) of A. aegypti samples from 12 municipalities distributed throughout the country, collected between 2010 and 2012. High levels of resistance to neurotoxic insecticides were detected in almost all populations: RR95 to temephos varied between 4.0 and 27.1; the lowest RR95 to deltamethrin was 13.1, and values higher than 70.0 were found. In contrast, all samples were susceptible to diflubenzuron (RR95 < 2.3). Biochemical tests performed with larvae and adults discarded the participation of acetylcholinesterase, the OP target, and confirmed involvement of the detoxifying enzymes esterases, mixed function oxidases, and glutathione-S-transferases. The results obtained were discussed taking into account the public chemical control component and the increase in the domestic use of insecticides during dengue epidemic seasons in the evaluated municipalities. PMID:27419140

  10. Insecticide Resistance in the Western Flower Thrips, Frankliniella occidentalis

    Jensen, Sten Erik

    assays used in this study appeared to have modest value for detecting resistance to methiocarb in field populations of F. occidentalis. The particular host plant of a polyphagous insect population may affect activity of detoxification enzymes and tolerance to insecticides. Another part of this study......The western flower thrips, Frankliniella occidentalis (Pergande) is a serious pest on a wide range of crops throughout the world. In Denmark F. occidentalis is a pest in greenhouses. F. occidentalis is difficult to control with insecticides because of its thigmokinetic behaviour and resistance to...... insecticides. Since F. occidentulis spread to become a worldwide pest in 1980’es, resistance to a number of different insecticides has been shown in many populations of F. occidentalis. This flower thrips has the potential of fast development of resistance owing to the short generation time, high fecundity...

  11. Insecticide resistance in vector Chagas disease: evolution, mechanisms and management.

    Mougabure-Cueto, Gastón; Picollo, María Inés

    2015-09-01

    Chagas disease is a chronic parasitic infection restricted to America. The disease is caused by the protozoa Trypanosoma cruzi, which is transmitted to human through the feces of infected triatomine insects. Because no treatment is available for the chronic forms of the disease, vector chemical control represents the best way to reduce the incidence of the disease. Chemical control has been based principally on spraying dwellings with insecticide formulations and led to the reduction of triatomine distribution and consequent interruption of disease transmission in several areas from endemic region. However, in the last decade it has been repeatedly reported the presence triatomnes, mainly Triatoma infestans, after spraying with pyrethroid insecticides, which was associated to evolution to insecticide resistance. In this paper the evolution of insecticide resistance in triatomines is reviewed. The insecticide resistance was detected in 1970s in Rhodnius prolixus and 1990s in R. prolixus and T. infestans, but not until the 2000s resistance to pyrthroids in T. infestans associated to control failures was described in Argentina and Bolivia. The main resistance mechanisms (i.e. enhanced metabolism, altered site of action and reduced penetration) were described in the T. infestans resistant to pyrethrods. Different resistant profiles were demonstrated suggesting independent origin of the different resistant foci of Argentina and Bolivia. The deltamethrin resistance in T. infestans was showed to be controlled by semi-dominant, autosomally inherited factors. Reproductive and developmental costs were also demonstrated for the resistant T. infestans. A discussion about resistance and tolerance concepts and the persistence of T. infestans in Gran Chaco region are presented. In addition, theoretical concepts related to toxicological, evolutionary and ecological aspects of insecticide resistance are discussed in order to understand the particular scenario of pyrethroid

  12. Susceptibility to insecticides and resistance mechanisms in Aedes aegypti from the Colombian Caribbean Region.

    Maestre-Serrano, Ronald; Gomez-Camargo, Doris; Ponce-Garcia, Gustavo; Flores, Adriana E

    2014-11-01

    We determined the susceptibility to insecticides and the biochemical and molecular mechanisms involved in resistance in nine populations of Aedes aegypti (L.) of the Colombian Caribbean region. Bioassays were performed on larvae for susceptibility to temephos and on adults to the insecticides malathion, fenitrothion, pirimiphos-methyl, permethrin, deltamethrin, λ-cyhalothrin and cyfluthrin. The resistance ratio (RR) for each insecticide in the populations was determined, using the susceptible Rockefeller strain as a susceptible control. Additionally, we evaluated the response of the populations to the diagnostic dose (DD) of the organochlorine pesticide DDT. The following biochemical mechanisms associated with resistance were studied: α-esterases, β-esterases, mixed-function oxidases (MFO), glutathione s-transferases (GST) and insensitive acetylcholinesterase (iAChE) as well as the presence of kdr I1,016 mutation and its frequency. All populations studied showed susceptibility to the organophosphates evaluated (RR temephos, respectively, and Sincelejo (Sucre) with moderate resistance to pirimiphos-methyl (RR 5-fold). All populations evaluated with DD of DDT were found to be resistant with 2-28% of mortality. Variability was observed in the resistance to pyrethroids: permethrin (RR 1.2- to 30.8-fold), deltamethrin RR 0.9- to 37.8-fold), λ-cyalothrin (RR 3.4- to 83-fold) and cyfluthrin (RR 0.3- to 33.8-fold). Incipiently α-esterases and MFO levels were found in the Valledupar population; MFO showed the same profile in Cienaga and GST in the Sincelejo population, all other populations showed unaltered profiles of the enzymes evaluated. The kdr I1,016 mutation was found in all populations evaluated with variability in its allelic and genotypic frequencies. PMID:25454522

  13. Management of Insecticide Resistance: Adana Model

    Alptekin, Davut

    2015-01-01

    Many diseases in the world have been transmitted to humans by insects. Chemical substances that are used against pests or insect vectors in agricultural production and public health are called pesticide. Insecticides are chemical substances or a group of substances used to kill Insects which are classified within pesticides forming the class of Insecta including any biological stage of insects (larva, pupa, adult). Insecticides are classified according to their effective biological stage (adu...

  14. RESISTANCE OF THE TOXAPHENE INSECTICIDE IN SOIL

    G MIRSATTARI

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Toxaphene is resistant to degration and has been known as persistent bioaccumulator. In oder to understand the persistence and degradation phenomena of toxaphene in soil a series of tests were run. Methods. All experiments for dry and moist soil were conducted with 10 to 20 kg soil samples, contained in plastic tubs. The experiment was carried out in two parts. The five samples studied in each part are described below. Part I: "Dry samples". Soil control I soil amended with 10 percent gin trash/soil amended with 25 percent gin trash/soil amended with 10 percent gin trash and treated with 500 ppm toxaphene and soil treated with 500 ppm toxaphene. These samples were kept dry during the entire experimental period. Part II: "Moist samples". The samples were the same as described in part I, but they were kept moist by addition of water weekly during the experimental period. Periodically twenty grams of soil were analyzed using a gas chromatograph. Results. Chromatograms of dry and moist samples from soil containers (Part I and II analyzed up to 12 months after initiation of the experiments showed that no toxaphene degradation or dissipation had occurred. GLC profiles of extracts of 12 months soil samples were identical to those of 0 dry samples and almost 100 percent of toxaphene was recovered in all samples after one year regardless of whether samples were dry or moist I amended or not. Discussion. The results suggest that toxaphene dose not undergo degradation in soil" under aerobic condition, so it can be a persistent insecticide in soil under environmental condition.

  15. The insecticide resistance in stripped stem borer, Chilo suppressalis (Walker)

    2001-01-01

    @@ The stripped stem borer (SSB), Chilo suppressalis (Walker) is one of the major insect pests of rice in China. Chemical control has been a common practice in SSB management since 1950s. Insecticides used included BHC before 1983;organophosphorus insecticides (methyl-parathion, trichophon, methamidophos, and monocrotophos), and chlordimeform in mid-1970s-1980s; Shachongshuang (dimehypo) and Shachongdan (monousltap) since early 1980s. In recent years, SSB population and its damage to rice increased rapidly and failures on control has been reported. To find out the cause of failure and to put forward the suitable control methods, we studied the resistance of SSB to major insecticides used in China.

  16. Insecticide Mixtures Could Enhance the Toxicity of Insecticides in a Resistant Dairy Population of Musca domestica L

    Hafiz Azhar Ali Khan; Waseem Akram; Sarfraz Ali Shad; Jong-Jin Lee

    2013-01-01

    House flies, Musca domestica L., are important pests of dairy operations worldwide, with the ability to adapt wide range of environmental conditions. There are a number of insecticides used for their management, but development of resistance is a serious problem. Insecticide mixtures could enhance the toxicity of insecticides in resistant insect pests, thus resulting as a potential resistance management tool. The toxicity of bifenthrin, cypermethrin, deltamethrin, chlorpyrifos, profenofos, em...

  17. Insecticide Resistance and Management Strategies in Urban Ecosystems

    Fang Zhu; Laura Lavine; Sally O’Neal; Mark Lavine; Carrie Foss; Douglas Walsh

    2016-01-01

    The increased urbanization of a growing global population makes imperative the development of sustainable integrated pest management (IPM) strategies for urban pest control. This emphasizes pests that are closely associated with the health and wellbeing of humans and domesticated animals. Concurrently there are regulatory requirements enforced to minimize inadvertent exposures to insecticides in the urban environment. Development of insecticide resistance management (IRM) strategies in urban ...

  18. Deep sequencing of New World screw-worm transcripts to discover genes involved in insecticide resistance

    Azeredo-Espin Ana Maria L

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The New World screw-worm (NWS, Cochliomyia hominivorax, is one of the most important myiasis-causing flies, causing severe losses to the livestock industry. In its current geographical distribution, this species has been controlled by the application of insecticides, mainly organophosphate (OP compounds, but a number of lineages have been identified that are resistant to such chemicals. Despite its economic importance, only limited genetic information is available for the NWS. Here, as a part of an effort to characterize the C. hominivorax genome and identify putative genes involved in insecticide resistance, we sampled its transcriptome by deep sequencing of polyadenylated transcripts using the 454 sequencing technology. Results Deep sequencing on the 454 platform of three normalized libraries (larval, adult male and adult female generated a total of 548,940 reads. Eighteen candidate genes coding for three metabolic detoxification enzyme families, cytochrome P450 monooxygenases, glutathione S-transferases and carboxyl/cholinesterases were selected and gene expression levels were measured using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR. Of the investigated candidates, only one gene was expressed differently between control and resistant larvae with, at least, a 10-fold down-regulation in the resistant larvae. The presence of mutations in the acetylcholinesterase (target site and carboxylesterase E3 genes was investigated and all of the resistant flies presented E3 mutations previously associated with insecticide resistance. Conclusions Here, we provided the largest database of NWS expressed sequence tags that is an important resource, not only for further studies on the molecular basis of the OP resistance in NWS fly, but also for functional and comparative studies among Calliphoridae flies. Among our candidates, only one gene was found differentially expressed in resistant individuals, and its role on

  19. The insecticide resistance in two planthoppers from three areas to three insecticides

    2002-01-01

    @@ Migrating insects brown planthopper (BPH), Nilaparata lugens Stal and white-backed planthopper (WBPH), Sogatellafurcifera Horvath are both most harmful insects on rice in China. Chemical control is thought to be the best way to manage them, but it may cause insecticide resistance.

  20. Multiple insecticide resistance mechanisms involving metabolic changes and insensitive target sites selected in anopheline vectors of malaria in Sri Lanka

    Karunaratne SHP Parakrama

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The current status of insecticide resistance and the underlying resistance mechanisms were studied in the major vector of malaria, Anopheles culicifacies, and the secondary vector, Anopheles subpictus in five districts (Anuradhapura, Kurunegala, Moneragala, Puttalam and Trincomalee of Sri Lanka. Eight other anophelines, Anopheles annularis, Anopheles barbirostris, Anopheles jamesii, Anopheles nigerrimus, Anopheles peditaeniatus, Anopheles tessellatus, Anopheles vagus and Anopheles varuna from Anuradhapura district were also tested. Methods Adult females were exposed to the WHO discriminating dosages of DDT, malathion, fenitrothion, propoxur, λ-cyhalothrin, cyfluthrin, cypermethrin, deltamethrin, permethrin and etofenprox. The presence of metabolic resistance by esterase, glutathione S-transferase (GST and monooxygenase-based mechanisms, and the sensitivity of the acetylcholinesterase target site were assessed using synergists, and biochemical, and metabolic techniques. Results All the anopheline species had high DDT resistance. All An. culicifacies and An. subpictus populations were resistant to malathion, except An. culicifacies from Kurunegala, where there was no malathion carboxylesterase activity. Kurunegala and Puttalam populations of An. culicifacies were susceptible to fenitrothion. All the An. culicifacies populations were susceptible to carbamates. Both species were susceptible to the discriminating dosages of cypermethrin and cyfluthrin, but had different levels of resistance to other pyrethroids. Of the 8 other anophelines, only An. nigerrimus and An. peditaeniatus were resistant to all the insecticides tested, probably due to their high exposure to the insecticides used in agriculture. An. vagus showed some resistance to permethrin. Esterases, GSTs and monooxygenases were elevated in both An. culicifacies and An. subpictus. AChE was most sensitive to insecticides in Kurunegala and Trincomalee An. culicifacies

  1. Bed bugs evolved unique adaptive strategy to resist pyrethroid insecticides

    Fang Zhu; Hemant Gujar; Jennifer R. Gordon; Haynes, Kenneth F; Michael F. Potter; Palli, Subba R.

    2013-01-01

    Recent advances in genomic and post-genomic technologies have facilitated a genome-wide analysis of the insecticide resistance-associated genes in insects. Through bed bug, Cimex lectularius transcriptome analysis, we identified 14 molecular markers associated with pyrethroid resistance. Our studies revealed that most of the resistance-associated genes functioning in diverse mechanisms are expressed in the epidermal layer of the integument, which could prevent or slow down the toxin from reac...

  2. Status of insecticide resistance in high-risk malaria provinces in Afghanistan

    Ahmad, Mushtaq; Buhler, Cyril; Pignatelli, Patricia; Ranson, Hilary; Nahzat, Sami Mohammad; Naseem, Mohammad; Sabawoon, Muhammad Farooq; Siddiqi, Abdul Majeed; Vink, Martijn

    2016-01-01

    Background Insecticide resistance seriously threatens the efficacy of vector control interventions in malaria endemic countries. In Afghanistan, the status of insecticide resistance is largely unknown while distribution of long-lasting insecticidal nets has intensified in recent years. The main objective of this study was thus to measure the level of resistance to four classes of insecticides in provinces with medium to high risk of malaria transmission. Methods Adult female mosquitoes were r...

  3. Insecticide mixtures could enhance the toxicity of insecticides in a resistant dairy population of Musca domestica L [corrected].

    Hafiz Azhar Ali Khan

    Full Text Available House flies, Musca domestica L., are important pests of dairy operations worldwide, with the ability to adapt wide range of environmental conditions. There are a number of insecticides used for their management, but development of resistance is a serious problem. Insecticide mixtures could enhance the toxicity of insecticides in resistant insect pests, thus resulting as a potential resistance management tool. The toxicity of bifenthrin, cypermethrin, deltamethrin, chlorpyrifos, profenofos, emamectin benzoate and fipronil were assessed separately, and in mixtures against house flies. A field-collected population was significantly resistant to all the insecticides under investigation when compared with a laboratory susceptible strain. Most of the insecticide mixtures like one pyrethroid with other compounds evaluated under two conditions (1∶1-"A" and LC50: LC50-"B" significantly increased the toxicity of pyrethroids in the field population. Under both conditions, the combination indices of pyrethroids with other compounds, in most of the cases, were significantly below 1, suggesting synergism. The enzyme inhibitors, PBO and DEF, when used in combination with insecticides against the resistant population, toxicities of bifenthrin, cypermethrin, deltamethrin and emamectin were significantly increased, suggesting esterase and monooxygenase based resistance mechanism. The toxicities of bifenthrin, cypermethrin and deltamethrin in the resistant population of house flies could be enhanced by the combination with chlorpyrifos, profenofos, emamectin and fipronil. The findings of the present study might have practical significance for resistance management in house flies.

  4. Status of insecticide resistance and selection for imidacloprid resistance in the ladybird beetle Propylaea japonica (Thunberg).

    Tang, Liang-De; Qiu, Bao-Li; Cuthbertson, Andrew G S; Ren, Shun-Xiang

    2015-09-01

    Field populations or strains of Propylaea japonica collected from four places in southern China (Guangzhou, Nanning, Guilin, and Yuxi) were tested for susceptibility to four insecticides (abamectin, imidacloprid, beta-cypermethrin, and chlorpyrifos) by the Petri-dish Potter tower method and compared with an insecticide-susceptible strain. Concentrations that proved lethal for 50% of the tested individuals (LC50) were estimated by probit analysis, and resistance factors (RF) were calculated at the LC50 level, which ranged from 1.6 to 10.1, depending on the insecticide. In addition, the Guangzhou strain formed the original population for imidacloprid resistance selection. After selection for 20 generations, the resistance had increased 39.3-fold. Fitness analysis in terms of such traits as fecundity, days to maturity, and survival showed that although both resistant and susceptible populations developed at comparable rates, the resistant strain was less fecund (it laid fewer eggs and a smaller proportion of those eggs hatched and resulted in adults), attaining a fitness score of only 0.56 relative to the susceptible strain. These observations suggest that it is possible to detect strains of P. japonica highly resistant to insecticides under laboratory conditions, and that resistance to imidacloprid carries considerable fitness costs to P. japonica. The study served to expand our understanding of the impact of imidacloprid resistance on biological parameters of P. japonica in more detail and to facilitate the deployment of natural enemies resistant to insecticides in integrated pest management. PMID:26267056

  5. Insecticide Resistance and Metabolic Mechanisms Involved in Larval and Adult Stages of Aedes aegypti Insecticide-Resistant Reference Strains from Cuba.

    Bisset, Juan Andrés; Rodríguez, María Magdalena; French, Leydis; Severson, David W; Gutiérrez, Gladys; Hurtado, Daymi; Fuentes, Ilario

    2014-12-01

    Studies were conducted to compare levels of insecticide resistance and to determine the metabolic resistance mechanisms in larval and adult stages of Aedes aegypti from Cuba. Three insecticide-resistant reference strains of Ae. aegypti from Cuba were examined. These strains were derived from a Santiago de Cuba strain isolated in 1997; it was previously subjected to a strong selection for resistance to temephos (SAN-F6), deltamethrin (SAN-F12), and propoxur (SAN-F13) and routinely maintained in the laboratory under selection pressure up to the present time, when the study was carried out. In addition, an insecticide-susceptible strain was used for comparison. The insecticide resistance in larvae and adults was determined using standard World Health Organization methodologies. Insecticide resistance mechanisms were determined by biochemical assays. The esterases (α EST and β EST) and mixed function oxidase (MFO) activities were significantly higher in adults than in the larvae of the three resistant strains studied. The association of resistance level with the biochemical mechanism for each insecticide was established for each stage. The observed differences between larval and adult stages of Ae. aegypti in their levels of insecticide resistance and the biochemical mechanisms involved should be included as part of monitoring and surveillance activities in Ae. aegypti vector control programs. PMID:25843136

  6. Resistance is not Futile: It Shapes Insecticide Discovery

    Margaret C. Hardy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Conventional chemical control compounds used for the management of insect pests have been much maligned, but still serve a critical role in protecting people and agricultural products from insect pests, as well as conserving biodiversity by eradicating invasive species. Although biological control can be an effective option for area-wide management of established pests, chemical control methods are important for use in integrated pest management (IPM programs, as well as in export treatments, eradicating recently arrived invasive species, and minimizing population explosions of vectors of human disease. Cogitated research and development programs have continued the innovation of insecticides, with a particular focus on combating insecticide resistance. Recent developments in the fields of human health, protecting the global food supply, and biosecurity will be highlighted.

  7. Seasonal dynamics of insecticide resistance, multiple resistance, and morphometric variation in field populations of Culex pipiens.

    Taskin, Belgin Gocmen; Dogaroglu, Taylan; Kilic, Sercan; Dogac, Ersin; Taskin, Vatan

    2016-05-01

    Resistance to insecticides that impairs nervous transmission has been widely investigated in mosquito populations as insecticides are crucial to effective insect control. The development of insecticide resistance is also of special interest to evolutionary biologists since it represents the opportunity to observe the genetic consequences of a well-characterized alteration in the environment. Although the frequencies of resistance alleles in Culex pipiens populations against different groups of insecticides have been reported, no detailed information is available on the relative change in these allele frequencies over time. In this study, we collected mosquitoes of the Cx. pipiens complex from six locations in three seasons in the Aegean region of Turkey and examined the i) seasonal variations in resistance to four different chemical classes of insecticides, ii) seasonal fluctuations in frequencies of resistance-associated target-site mutations of the three genes (ace-1, kdr, and Rdl), and iii) potential seasonal variations in wing morphometric characters that may be modified in resistant mosquitoes. Our bioassay results indicated the presence of different levels of resistance to all tested insecticides for all three seasons in all locations. The results of the PCR-based molecular analysis revealed low frequencies of mutations in ace-1 and Rdl that are associated with resistance to malathion, bendiocarb, and dieldrin and no obvious seasonal changes. In contrast, we detected high frequencies and striking seasonal changes for two kdr mutations associated with resistance to DDT and pyrethroids. In addition, the evaluation of the field populations from all seasons in terms of the combinations of polymorphisms at four resistance-associated mutations did not reveal the presence of insects that are resistant to all pesticides. Results from the morphological analysis displayed a similar pattern for both wings and did not show a clear separation among the samples from the

  8. Resistance to bio-insecticides or how to enhance their sustainability: a review

    Myriam eSIEGWART; Benoit eGraillot; Christine eBlachère-Lopez; Samantha eBesse; Marc eBardin; Philippe eNicot; Miguel eLopez-Ferber

    2015-01-01

    After more than 70 years of chemical pesticide use, modern agriculture is increasingly using biological control products. Resistances to conventional insecticides are wide spread, while those to bio-insecticides have raised less attention, and resistance management is frequently neglected. However, a good knowledge of the limitations of a new technique often provides greater sustainability. In this review, we compile cases of resistance to widely used bio-insecticides and describe the associa...

  9. Insecticide resistance to organophosphates in Culex pipiens complex from Lebanon

    Osta Mike A

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Analysis of Culex pipiens mosquitoes collected from a single site in Lebanon in 2005, revealed an alarming frequency of ace-1 alleles conferring resistance to organophosphate insecticides. Following this, in 2006 the majority of municipalities switched to pyrethroids after a long history of organophosphate usage in the country; however, since then no studies have assessed the impact of changing insecticide class on the frequency of resistant ace-1 alleles in C. pipiens. Methods C. pipiens mosquitoes were captured indoors from 25 villages across the country and subjected to established methods for the analysis of gene amplification at the Ester locus and target site mutations in ace-1 gene that confer resistance to organophosphates. Results We conducted the first large-scale screen for resistance to organosphosphates in C. pipiens mosquitoes collected from Lebanon. The frequency of carboxylesterase (Ester and ace-1 alleles conferring resistance to organophosphates were assessed among C. pipiens mosquitoes collected from 25 different villages across the country between December 2008 and December 2009. Established enzymatic assay and PCR-based molecular tests, both diagnostic of the major target site mutations in ace-1 revealed the absence of the F290V mutation among sampled mosquitoes and significant reduction in the frequency of G119S mutation compared to that previously reported for mosquitoes collected from Beirut in 2005. We also identified a new duplicated ace-1 allele, named ace-1D13, exhibiting a resistant phenotype by associating a susceptible and a resistant copy of ace-1 in a mosquito line sampled from Beirut in 2005. Fisher’s exact test on ace-1 frequencies in the new sample sites, showed that some populations exhibited a significant excess of heterozygotes, suggesting that the duplicated allele is still present. Starch gel electrophoresis indicated that resistance at the Ester locus was mainly attributed to the

  10. Survey of organophosphate resistance and an Ala216Ser substitution of acetylcholinesterase-1 gene associated with chlorpyrifos resistance in Apolygus lucorum (Meyer-Dür) collected from the transgenic Bt cotton fields in China.

    Zhen, Congai; Miao, Ling; Liang, Pei; Gao, Xiwu

    2016-09-01

    The mirid bug is frequently controlled by the application of organophosphorus insecticides in the transgenic Bt cotton field of China. A topical bioassay method was performed to evaluate the toxicities of chlorpyrifos and malathion towards field-collected Chinese populations of Apolygus lucorum from transgenic Bt cotton fields. For chlorpyrifos, the resistance ratios ranged from 0.8 to 9.4-fold compared to a susceptible strain. For malathion, the resistance levels relative to the susceptible strain ranged from 1.2 to 14.4-fold. Compared to a susceptible strain, the Cangzhou population from Hebei province showed the highest resistance ratios towards these insecticides. A comparison of the detoxifying and target enzyme activities between the Cangzhou population and a susceptible strain revealed that altered acetylcholinesterase possibly account for the chlorpyrifos and malathion resistance in the Cangzhou population. Two acetylcholinesterase (AChE-encoding) genes (designated Alace1 and Alace2) from the green mirid bug (A. lucorum) were identified. The Alace1 and Alace2 genes encoded 597 and 645 amino acids, respectively. Both AChE proteins had conserved motifs including a catalytic triad, a choline-binding site, and an acyl pocket. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis showed that Alace1 had a much higher transcriptional level than Alace2, for the expression profiles of both spatial and time distributions. One amino acid substitution, Ala216Ser in Alace1, was found in the Cangzhou population. These results suggest that the mutation Ala216Ser should be most likely involved in organophosphorus resistance in A. lucorum. PMID:27521910

  11. Blocking the evolution of insecticide-resistant malaria vectors with a microsporidian

    Koella, Jacob C; Saddler, Adam; Karacs, Thomas P S

    2011-01-01

    Finding a way to block the evolution insecticide resistance would be a major breakthrough for the control of malaria. We suggest that this may be possible by introducing a stress into mosquito populations that restores the sensitivity of genetically resistant mosquitoes and that decreases their longevity when they are not exposed to insecticide. We use a mathematical model to show that, despite the intense selection pressure imposed by insecticides, moderate levels of stress might tip the evo...

  12. The evolutionary dynamics of insecticide resistance in the whitefly, Bemisia tabaci

    Jones, Christopher Mark

    2011-01-01

    The whitefly Bemisia tabaci (Hempitera: Aleyrodidae), is one of most destructive insect pests of agriculture and horticulture worldwide. B. tabaci has an extensive host-plant range, transmits several plant viruses and is a highly invasive species. Managing B. tabaci is therefore extremely problematic and expensive, with a heavy burden placed upon insecticides. Despite a broad spectrum of insecticidal chemistry available for whitefly control, resistance is widespread and insecticide resistance...

  13. Diagnostic methods of pollen beetle and other winter rape pests resistance to insecticides

    Herman, Jan

    2013-01-01

    The literature review summarizes informations about pests of winter oilseed rape, problem of pest resistance to insecticides, mechanisms of resistance of insects to insecticides and methods, how to evaluate the resistance, and the emergence and development of resistance of pollen beetle to pyrethroids in Europe and in the Czech Republic. In the experimental part of the master‘s thesis, resistance of pollen beetle from 5 locations in the Czech Republic to the three selected pyrethroids (deltam...

  14. Highly Sensitive Detection of Organophosphate Insecticides Using Biosensors Based on Genetically Engineered Acetylcholinesterase and Poly(3,4-Ethylenedioxythiophene

    Tomasz Sikora

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene (PEDOT conducting ink is presented as a new electroactive material to be incorporated in acetylcholinesterase-(AChE- based screen printed biosensors, acting not only as a conducting template but also as an electrochemical mediator for thiocholine oxidation. Two different strategies have been studied for the chemical synthesis of PEDOT: (a a classical oxidative polymerisation and (b a more innovative enzymatic polymerisation, giving a water-soluble PEDOT. The use of this water-soluble conducting polymer as mediator in screen-printed biosensors enables its deposition by printing like the rest of the layers. Highly sensitive acetylcholinesterase-(AChE- based screen-printed biosensors have been constructed using both classical and enzymatic PEDOT, in combination with genetically modified AChE. These electrodes allow the measurement of thiocholine oxidation at potentials of 100 mV versus Ag/AgCl reference electrode through the mediation of PEDOT. Inhibition of thiocholine production in presence of CPO allow for detection of this pesticide in concentrations as low as 1·10−10 M.

  15. Resistance and synergistic effects of insecticides in Bactrocera dorsalis (Diptera: Tephritidae) in Taiwan.

    Hsu, Ju-Chun; Feng, Hai-Tung; Wu, Wen-Jer

    2004-10-01

    Oriental fruit flies, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel), were treated with 10 insecticides, including six organophosphates (naled, trichlorfon, fenitrothion, fenthion, formothion, and malathion), one carbamate (methomyl), and three pyrethroids (cyfluthrin, cypermethrin, and fenvalerate), by a topical application assay under laboratory conditions. Subparental lines of each generation treated with the same insecticide were selected for 30 generations and were designated as x-r lines (x, insecticide; r, resistant). The parent colony was maintained as the susceptible colony. The line treated with naled exhibited the lowest increase in resistance (4.7-fold), whereas the line treated with formothion exhibited the highest increase in resistance (up to 594-fold) compared with the susceptible colony. Synergism bioassays also were carried out. Based on this, S,S,S-tributyl phosphorotrithioate displayed a synergistic effect for naled, trichlorfon, and malathion resistance, whereas piperonyl butoxide displayed a synergistic effect for pyrethroid resistance. All 10 resistant lines also exhibited some cross-resistance to other insecticides, not only to the same chemical class of insecticides but also to other classes. However, none of the organophosphate-resistant or the methomyl-resistant lines exhibited cross-resistance to two of the pyrethroids (cypermethrin and fenvalerate). Overall, the laboratory resistance and cross-resistance data developed here should provide useful tools and information for designing an insecticide management strategy for controlling this fruit fly in the field. PMID:15568360

  16. Role of cytochrome P450s in insecticide resistance: impact on the control of mosquito-borne diseases and use of insecticides on Earth

    David, J.-P.; Ismail, H M; Chandor-Proust, A.; Paine, M. J. I.

    2013-01-01

    The fight against diseases spread by mosquitoes and other insects has enormous environmental, economic and social consequences. Chemical insecticides remain the first line of defence but the control of diseases, especially malaria and dengue fever, is being increasingly undermined by insecticide resistance. Mosquitoes have a large repertoire of P450s (over 100 genes). By pinpointing the key enzymes associated with insecticide resistance we can begin to develop new tools to aid the implementat...

  17. Insecticide resistance in two populations of Tuta absoluta (Meyrick, 1917) (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae) from Turkey

    Yalçın, Melis; Mermer, Serhan; Kozacı, Leyla Didem; Turgut, Cafer

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the resistance of two (Aydın and Urla) populations of T. absoluta against five commonly used insecticides (indoxacarb, spinosad, azadirachtin, chlorantraniliprole and metaflumizone) were determined. Further, the activity of insecticide detoxifying enzymes [gluthation-S-transferase (GST) and esterase (EST)] was also evaluated to confirm the resistance. Aydın population of T. absoluta had higher resistant values 8-fold, 3.79-fold, 6.4-fold and 1.84-fold for indoxacarb, metaflumiz...

  18. Insecticide resistance in malaria-transmitting mosquitoes in Zimbabwe: a review.

    Soko, White; Chimbari, Moses J; Mukaratirwa, Samson

    2015-01-01

    Malaria is a global public health problem, with about 3.2 billion people at risk of infection. The populations at risk mainly reside in Africa, Asia and America, with African populations accounting for the largest burden of the disease. In 2013, close to 198 million malaria cases were reported, leading to 584,000 deaths. Much (90 %) of the mortality rates were recorded from the World Health Organization (WHO) database in the African region and 78 % of these occurred in children under the age of five. In Zimbabwe, approximately half of the population is at risk of infection with malaria.Insecticide residual spraying (IRS) has been documented as an effective way to control malaria and has been adopted globally by the WHO and national governments. However, both insecticide resistance and climate change threaten to reverse the progress made by IRS in malaria control. Resistance has been reported in all four classes of insecticides approved by the WHO for vector control intervention. Variability of environmental temperature is suspected to complicate the situation through alteration in the genetic structure, and enzyme and protein profiles of mosquitoes. In Zimbabwe, little research has been done on the interaction between climate change, temperature variability and insecticide resistance in malarial mosquitoes over time. Such information is important for informing policies on insecticide selection for IRS.We reviewed literature on insecticide sensitivity among malarial mosquitoes in Zimbabwe from 1972 to 2014. International peer-reviewed articles on insecticide sensitivity in Zimbabwe, published in English in this time period, were searched using MEDLINE® (PubMed), Google Scholar, Google and grey literature. Eight publications were eligible for the present study, with one of the articles being a review paper. Six articles covered insecticide resistance, while the other two articles, published in 2000, were about the absence of resistance. Contradicting resistance

  19. Indirect evidence that agricultural pesticides select for insecticide resistance in the malaria vector Anopheles gambiae.

    Luc, Djogbénou S; Benoit, Assogba; Laurette, Djossou; Michel, Makoutode

    2016-06-01

    We investigated the possible relationship between the agricultural use of insecticides and the emergence of insecticide resistance. Bioassays were conducted using simulated mosquito larval habitats and well known Anopheles gambiae strains. Soil samples were collected from vegetable production areas in Benin, including one site with insecticide use, one site where insecticides had not been used for two months, and a third where insecticides had not been used. Pupation and emergence rates were very low in pyrethroid-susceptible strains when exposed to soil that had been recently exposed to insecticides. Pupation and emergence rates in strains with the kdr mutation alone or both the kdr and Ace-1 mutations were much higher. Overall, strains with the kdr mutation survived at higher rates compared to that without kdr mutation. Although this study is observational, we provide indirect evidence indicating that soils from agricultural areas contain insecticide residues that can play a role in the emergence of insecticide resistance in Anopheles. This aspect should be taken into account to better utilize the insecticide in the context of integrated pest management programs. PMID:27232122

  20. Contrasting patterns of insecticide resistance and knockdown resistance (kdr) in the dengue vectors Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus from Malaysia

    Ishak, Intan H; Jaal, Zairi; Ranson, Hilary; Charles S Wondji

    2015-01-01

    Background Knowledge on the extent, distribution and mechanisms of insecticide resistance is essential for successful insecticide-based dengue control interventions. Here, we report an extensive resistance profiling of the dengue vectors Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus across Malaysia and establish the contribution of knockdown resistance mechanism revealing significant contrast between both species. Methods Aedes mosquitoes were collected from four states in Malaysia in 2010 using ovitrap...

  1. The P450 CYP6Z1 confers carbamate/pyrethroid cross-resistance in a major African malaria vector beside a novel carbamate-insensitive N485I acetylcholinesterase-1 mutation.

    Ibrahim, Sulaiman S; Ndula, Miranda; Riveron, Jacob M; Irving, Helen; Wondji, Charles S

    2016-07-01

    Carbamates are increasingly used for vector control notably in areas with pyrethroid resistance. However, a cross-resistance between these insecticides in major malaria vectors such as Anopheles funestus could severely limit available resistance management options. Unfortunately, the molecular basis of such cross-resistance remains uncharacterized in An. funestus, preventing effective resistance management. Here, using a genomewide transcription profiling, we revealed that metabolic resistance through upregulation of cytochrome P450 genes is driving carbamate resistance. The P450s CYP6P9a, CYP6P9b and CYP6Z1 were the most upregulated detoxification genes in the multiple resistant mosquitoes. However, in silico docking simulations predicted CYP6Z1 to metabolize both pyrethroids and carbamates, whereas CYP6P9a and CYP6P9b were predicted to metabolize only the pyrethroids. Using recombinant enzyme metabolism and inhibition assays, we demonstrated that CYP6Z1 metabolizes bendiocarb and pyrethroids, whereas CYP6P9a and CYP6P9b metabolize only the pyrethroids. Other upregulated gene families in resistant mosquitoes included several cuticular protein genes suggesting a possible reduced penetration resistance mechanism. Investigation of the target-site resistance in acetylcholinesterase 1 (ace-1) gene detected and established the association between the new N485I mutation and bendiocarb resistance (odds ratio 7.3; P carbamate resistance and improve the design of effective resistance management strategies to control this malaria vector. PMID:27135886

  2. Insecticidal properties of essential oils against Tribolium castaneum (Herbst) and their inhibitory effects on acetylcholinesterase and adenosine triphosphatases.

    Abou-Taleb, Hamdy K; Mohamed, Magdy I E; Shawir, Mohamed S; Abdelgaleil, Samir A M

    2016-01-01

    Essential oils from 20 Egyptian plants were obtained by using hydrodistillation. The chemical composition of the isolated oils was identified by gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer. Fumigant and contact toxicities of the essential oils were evaluated against the adults of Tribolium castaneum. In fumigation assays, the oil of Origanum vulgare (LC50 = 9.97 mg/L air) displayed the highest toxicity towards the adults of T. castaneum. In contact assays, the oils of Artemisia monosperma (LC50 = 0.07 mg/cm(2)) and O. vulgare (LC50 = 0.07 mg/cm(2)) were the most potent toxicants against the adults of T. castaneum. Biochemical studies showed that the tested oils caused pronounced inhibition of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and adenosine triphosphatases (ATPases) isolated from the larvae of T. castaneum. The oil Cupressus macrocarpa (IC50 = 12.3 mg/L) was the most potent inhibitor of AChE, while the oil of Calistemon viminals (IC50 = 4.4 mg/L) was the most potent inhibitor of ATPases. PMID:25978134

  3. An amperometric biosensor based on acetylcholinesterase immobilized onto iron oxide nanoparticles/multi-walled carbon nanotubes modified gold electrode for measurement of organophosphorus insecticides

    Graphical abstract: The stepwise amperometric biosensor fabrication process and immobilized acetylcholinesterase inhibition in pesticide solution. Highlights: · Constructed a novel composite material using Fe3O4NP and c-MWCNT at Au electrode for electrocatalysis. · The properties of nanoparticles modified electrodes were studied by SEM, FTIR, CVs and EIS. · The biosensor exhibited good sensitivity (0.475 mA μM-1) · The half life of electrode was 2 months. · The sensor was suitable for trace detection of OP pesticide residues in milk and water. - Abstract: An acetylcholinesterase (AChE) purified from maize seedlings was immobilized covalently onto iron oxide nanoparticles (Fe3O4NP) and carboxylated multi walled carbon nanotubes (c-MWCNT) modified Au electrode. An organophosphorus (OP) biosensor was fabricated using this AChE/Fe3O4/c-MWCNT/Au electrode as a working electrode, Ag/AgCl as standard and Pt wire as an auxiliary electrode connected through a potentiostat. The biosensor was based on inhibition of AChE by OP compounds/insecticides. The properties of nanoparticles modified electrodes were studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), cyclic voltammograms (CVs) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The synergistic action of Fe3O4NP and c-MWCNT showed excellent electrocatalytic activity at low potential (+0.4 V). The optimum working conditions for the sensor were pH 7.5, 35 deg. C, 600 μM substrate concentration and 10 min for inhibition by pesticide. Under optimum conditions, the inhibition rates of OP pesticides were proportional to their concentrations in the range of 0.1-40 nM, 0.1-50 nM, 1-50 nM and 10-100 nM for malathion, chlorpyrifos, monocrotophos and endosulfan respectively. The detection limits were 0.1 nM for malathion and chlorpyrifos, 1 nM for monocrotophos and 10 nM for endosulfan. The biosensor exhibited good sensitivity (0.475 mA μM-1), reusability (more than 50 times) and stability (2

  4. An amperometric biosensor based on acetylcholinesterase immobilized onto iron oxide nanoparticles/multi-walled carbon nanotubes modified gold electrode for measurement of organophosphorus insecticides

    Chauhan, Nidhi [Department of Biochemistry, M.D. University, Rohtak 124001, Haryana (India); Pundir, Chandra Shekhar, E-mail: pundircs@rediffmail.com [Department of Biochemistry, M.D. University, Rohtak 124001, Haryana (India)

    2011-09-02

    Graphical abstract: The stepwise amperometric biosensor fabrication process and immobilized acetylcholinesterase inhibition in pesticide solution. Highlights: {center_dot} Constructed a novel composite material using Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}NP and c-MWCNT at Au electrode for electrocatalysis. {center_dot} The properties of nanoparticles modified electrodes were studied by SEM, FTIR, CVs and EIS. {center_dot} The biosensor exhibited good sensitivity (0.475 mA {mu}M{sup -1}) {center_dot} The half life of electrode was 2 months. {center_dot} The sensor was suitable for trace detection of OP pesticide residues in milk and water. - Abstract: An acetylcholinesterase (AChE) purified from maize seedlings was immobilized covalently onto iron oxide nanoparticles (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}NP) and carboxylated multi walled carbon nanotubes (c-MWCNT) modified Au electrode. An organophosphorus (OP) biosensor was fabricated using this AChE/Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}/c-MWCNT/Au electrode as a working electrode, Ag/AgCl as standard and Pt wire as an auxiliary electrode connected through a potentiostat. The biosensor was based on inhibition of AChE by OP compounds/insecticides. The properties of nanoparticles modified electrodes were studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), cyclic voltammograms (CVs) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The synergistic action of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}NP and c-MWCNT showed excellent electrocatalytic activity at low potential (+0.4 V). The optimum working conditions for the sensor were pH 7.5, 35 deg. C, 600 {mu}M substrate concentration and 10 min for inhibition by pesticide. Under optimum conditions, the inhibition rates of OP pesticides were proportional to their concentrations in the range of 0.1-40 nM, 0.1-50 nM, 1-50 nM and 10-100 nM for malathion, chlorpyrifos, monocrotophos and endosulfan respectively. The detection limits were 0.1 nM for malathion and chlorpyrifos, 1 nM for monocrotophos and 10 nM for endosulfan. The

  5. Patterns of insecticide resistance and knock down resistance (kdr) in malaria vectors An. arabiensis, An. coluzzii and An. gambiae from sympatric areas in Senegal

    Niang, El Hadji Amadou; Konaté, Lassana; Diallo, Mawlouth; Faye, Ousmane; Dia, Ibrahima

    2016-01-01

    Background Malaria vector control in Africa relies on insecticides targeting adult mosquito vectors via insecticide treated nets or indoor residual spraying. Despite the proven efficacy of these strategies, the emergence and rapid rise in insecticide resistance in malaria vectors raises many concerns about their sustainability. Therefore, the monitoring of insecticide resistance is essential for resistance management strategies implementation. We investigated the kdr mutation frequencies in 2...

  6. The impact of insecticides management linked with resistance expression in Anopheles spp. populations.

    Silva, Guilherme Liberato da; Pereira, Thiago Nunes; Ferla, Noeli Juarez; Silva, Onilda Santos da

    2016-06-01

    The resistance of some species of Anopheles to chemical insecticides is spreading quickly throughout the world and has hindered the actions of prevention and control of malaria. The main mechanism responsible for resistance in these insects appears to be the target site known as knock-down resistance (kdr), which causes mutations in the sodium channel. Even so, many countries have made significant progress in the prevention of malaria, focusing largely on vector control through long-lasting insecticide nets (LLINs), indoor residual spraying and (IRS) of insecticides. The objective of this review is to contribute with information on the more applied insecticides for the control of the main vectors of malaria, its effects, and the different mechanisms of resistance. Currently it is necessary to look for others alternatives, e.g. biological control and products derived from plants and fungi, by using other organisms as a possible regulator of the populations of malaria vectors in critical outbreaks. PMID:27383351

  7. Studies on the effects of some insecticides on the brain acetylcholinesterase activity of Tilapia zilli in two treated tropical rivers

    With a view to controlling onchocerciasis in West Africa, the Marahoue and Black Volta Rivers in Cote d'Ivoire were treated with chlorphoxim and temephos, respectively, at a concentration of 0.5 mg·L-1 per 10 minute application to kill the Simulium larvae. As part of the Onchocerciasis Control Programme, studies were conducted with caged Tilapia zilli to determine the effects of the two larvicides on the fishery resources in the treated rivers. These showed that chlorphoxim inhibits the brain acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity of the caged T. zilli up to 1 km downstream of the breeding site. The highest level of reduction in AChE activity (32%) was recorded in the caged fish placed near the point of release of the chlorphoxim 24 hours after the river treatment. At 0.5 km downstream of the breeding site, the percentage enzyme reduction was 24%, and at the 1 km point the AChE activity was reduced by 17%. There was no significant reduction (P > 0.05) in the brain enzyme activity of the caged fish placed at a distance of about 3 km downstream of the breeding site. It was further observed that the caged fish had not recovered from the inhibitory effects of the chlorphoxim 48 hours after the river treatment. No evidence of any inhibitory effects on the brain AChE activity of the caged fish was found as a result of temephos treatment of the Black Volta River at any distance from the point of larvicide application. (author). 16 refs, 1 fig., 4 tabs

  8. Spatial and Temporal Potato Intensification Drives Insecticide Resistance in the Specialist Herbivore, Leptinotarsa decemlineata.

    Anders S Huseth

    Full Text Available Landscape-scale intensification of individual crops and pesticide use that is associated with this intensification is an emerging, environmental problem that is expected to have unequal effects on pests with different lifecycles, host ranges, and dispersal abilities. We investigate if intensification of a single crop in an agroecosystem has a direct effect on insecticide resistance in a specialist insect herbivore. Using a major potato pest, Leptinotarsa decemlineata, we measured imidacloprid (neonicotinoid resistance in populations across a spatiotemporal crop production gradient where potato production has increased in Michigan and Wisconsin, USA. We found that concurrent estimates of area and temporal frequency of potato production better described patterns of imidacloprid resistance among L. decemlineata populations than general measures of agricultural production (% cropland, landscape diversity. This study defines the effects individual crop rotation patterns can have on specialist herbivore insecticide resistance in an agroecosystem context, and how impacts of intensive production can be estimated with general estimates of insecticide use. Our results provide empirical evidence that variation in the intensity of neonicotinoid-treated potato in an agricultural landscape can have unequal impacts on L. decemlineata insecticide insensitivity, a process that can lead to resistance and locally intensive insecticide use. Our study provides a novel approach applicable in other agricultural systems to estimate impacts of crop rotation, increased pesticide dependence, insecticide resistance, and external costs of pest management practices on ecosystem health.

  9. Spatial and Temporal Potato Intensification Drives Insecticide Resistance in the Specialist Herbivore, Leptinotarsa decemlineata.

    Huseth, Anders S; Petersen, Jessica D; Poveda, Katja; Szendrei, Zsofia; Nault, Brian A; Kennedy, George G; Groves, Russell L

    2015-01-01

    Landscape-scale intensification of individual crops and pesticide use that is associated with this intensification is an emerging, environmental problem that is expected to have unequal effects on pests with different lifecycles, host ranges, and dispersal abilities. We investigate if intensification of a single crop in an agroecosystem has a direct effect on insecticide resistance in a specialist insect herbivore. Using a major potato pest, Leptinotarsa decemlineata, we measured imidacloprid (neonicotinoid) resistance in populations across a spatiotemporal crop production gradient where potato production has increased in Michigan and Wisconsin, USA. We found that concurrent estimates of area and temporal frequency of potato production better described patterns of imidacloprid resistance among L. decemlineata populations than general measures of agricultural production (% cropland, landscape diversity). This study defines the effects individual crop rotation patterns can have on specialist herbivore insecticide resistance in an agroecosystem context, and how impacts of intensive production can be estimated with general estimates of insecticide use. Our results provide empirical evidence that variation in the intensity of neonicotinoid-treated potato in an agricultural landscape can have unequal impacts on L. decemlineata insecticide insensitivity, a process that can lead to resistance and locally intensive insecticide use. Our study provides a novel approach applicable in other agricultural systems to estimate impacts of crop rotation, increased pesticide dependence, insecticide resistance, and external costs of pest management practices on ecosystem health. PMID:26030877

  10. Fitness costs of an insecticide resistance and their population dynamical consequences in the oriental fruit fly.

    Fang, Chi-Chun; Okuyama, Toshinori; Wu, Wen-Jer; Feng, Hai-Tung; Hsu, Ju-Chun

    2011-12-01

    Naled is a commonly used insecticide for controlling populations of the oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel), in Taiwan and other countries. B. dorsalis has developed resistance to the insecticide, and the resistance management is an important issue. Ecological effects (e.g., fitness costs) of the resistance, when fully understood, can be used for the resistance management. This study examined the effects of the insecticide resistance on important life history traits (i.e., survival rates, stage durations, and fecundity) of the oriental fruit fly by comparing the traits of insecticide resistant individuals and susceptible individuals. Population dynamical properties were also examined using a stage-structured matrix model that was parameterized with the empirical data. The results revealed that susceptible individuals had shorter stage durations (e.g., grew faster) and reproduced more than resistant individuals. The average longevity of sexually mature susceptible adults was longer than that of sexually mature resistant adults. The matrix population model predicted that a population of the susceptible individuals would grow faster than a population of the resistant individuals in the absence of the insecticide. The sensitivity analysis of the model suggests that the sexually immature adult stage is a good candidate for controlling B. dorsalis populations. PMID:22299368

  11. Monitoring of Insecticide Resistance and Genetic Analysis of Triazophos Resistance in Chilo suppressalis (Lepidoptera:Pyralidae)

    LIU Ze-wen; CAO Ming-zhang; HAN Zhao-jun; SHEN Jin-liang; ZHANG Ling-chun; ZHANG Jin-zhen; LU Mei; LIU Xiao-yu; ZHOU Wei-jun

    2004-01-01

    During 2001 and 2002, insecticide resistance in the fourth instar larvae of striped stem borer (Chilo suppressalis), which were collected from Zhejiang, Jiangsu, Anhui and Jiangxi provinces in China, was monitored using topical application method. Low level of resistance to fipronil (6.5-fold) was detected for the first time in RA (Rui'an) population from southeast Zhejiang, but the other six populations tested remained susceptible to this recently introduced insecticide. No resistance to abamectin had been found after examining six populations from Zhejiang, Jiangsu and Anhui provinces. Resistance to triazophos was monitored in ten populations from the four Provinces, and very high level resistance(163.1-fold) was found in RA population, moderate (18.2-fold) in WZ (Wenzhou, Zhejiang Province) population, and low (6.7- to 9.7-fold) in populations of CS (Changshu), XS (Xishan) and JT (Jintan) from south Jiangsu, whereas the other five populations were susceptible. All the nine populations monitored were resistant to monosultap with varying degree, i.e. high level (113.7- and 57.6-fold, respectively) of resistance in RA and YF (Yifeng, Jiangxi Province) populations, moderate (11.0- to 29.7-fold) in WZ, CS, JT and TH (Taihu, Anhui Province) populations, low (6.7- and 7.5-fold, respectively) in XY (Xinyang, Jiangsu Province) and XS populations, and the lowest (3.7-fold) in GY (Guanyun, Jiangsu Province) population. Inheritance of resistance in triazophos selected strain Rts was studied through reciprocal cross and backcross experiments. The preliminary results indicated that inheritance of triazophos resistance in Rts strain was incompletely dominant, with degrees of dominance being 0.46 and 0.68 for reciprocal crosses, and that the resistance was controlled by a major gene, though minor modifying gene(s) might be involved.

  12. Dissecting the mechanisms responsible for the multiple insecticide resistance phenotype in Anopheles gambiae s.s., M form, from Vallée du Kou, Burkina Faso.

    Kwiatkowska, Rachel M; Platt, Naomi; Poupardin, Rodolphe; Irving, Helen; Dabire, Roch K; Mitchell, Sara; Jones, Christopher M; Diabaté, Abdoulaye; Ranson, Hilary; Wondji, Charles S

    2013-04-25

    With the exception of target site mutations, insecticide resistance mechanisms in the principle malaria vector Anopheles gambiae, remains largely uncharacterized in Burkina Faso. Here we detected high prevalence of resistance in Vallée du Kou (VK) to pyrethroids, DDT and dieldrin, moderate level for carbamates and full susceptibility to organophosphates. High frequencies of L1014F kdr (75%) and Rdl (87%) mutations were observed showing strong correlation with pyrethroids/DDT and dieldrin resistance. The frequency of ace1R mutation was low even in carbamate resistant mosquitoes. Microarray analysis identified genes significantly over-transcribed in VK. These include the cytochrome P450 genes, CYP6P3 and CYP6Z2, previously associated with pyrethroid resistance. Gene Ontology (GO) enrichment analysis suggested that elevated neurotransmitter activity is associated with resistance, with the over-transcription of target site resistance genes such as acetylcholinesterase and the GABA receptor. A rhodopsin receptor gene previously associated with pyrethroid resistance in Culex pipiens pallens was also over-transcribed in VK. This study highlights the complex network of mechanisms conferring multiple resistance in malaria vectors and such information should be taken into account when designing and implementing resistance control strategies. PMID:23380570

  13. Correlation between carboxylesterase alleles and insecticide resistance in Culex pipiens complex from China

    Liu Yangyang

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In China, large amounts of chemical insecticides are applied in fields or indoors every year, directly or indirectly bringing selection pressure on vector mosquitoes. Culex pipiens complex has evolved to be resistant to all types of chemical insecticides, especially organophosphates, through carboxylesterases. Six resistant carboxylesterase alleles (Ester were recorded previously and sometimes co-existed in one field population, representing a complex situation for the evolution of Ester genes. Results In order to explore the evolutionary scenario, we analyzed the data from an historical record in 2003 and a recent investigation on five Culex pipiens pallens populations sampled from north China in 2010. Insecticide bioassays showed that these five populations had high resistance to pyrethroids, medium resistance to organophosphates, and low resistance to carbamates. Six types of Ester alleles, EsterB1, Ester2, Ester8, Ester9, EsterB10, and Ester11 were identified, and the overall pattern of their frequencies in geographic distribution was consistent with the report seven years prior to this study. Statistical correlation analysis indicated that Ester8 and Ester9 positively correlated with resistance to four insecticides, and EsterB10 to one insecticide. The occurrences of these three alleles were positively correlated, while the occurrence of EsterB1 was negatively correlated with Ester8, indicating an allelic competition. Conclusion Our analysis suggests that one insecticide can select multiple Ester alleles and one Ester allele can work on multiple insecticides. The evolutionary scenario of carboxylesterases under insecticide selection is possibly "one to many".

  14. Extraordinary resistance to insecticides reveals exotic Q biotype of Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) in the New World

    The whitefly Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) possessing unusually high levels of resistance to a wide range of insecticides were discovered in 2004 in the course of routine resistance monitoring in Arizona. The multiply-resistant insects, collected from poinsettia (Euphorbia pulcherrima) plants purchased...

  15. Extraordinary resistance to insecticides reveals exotic Q biotype of Bemisia tabaci

    The whitefly Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) possessing unusually high levels of resistance to a wide range of insecticides were discovered in 2004 in the course of routine resistance monitoring in Arizona. The multiply-resistant insects, collected from poinsettia (Euphorbia pulcherrima) plants purchased...

  16. Insensitive Acetylcholine Receptor Conferring Resistance of Plutella xylostella to Nereistoxin Insecticides

    CHENG Luo-gen; YU Guang; CHEN Zi-hao; LI Zhong-yin

    2008-01-01

    The combinative rate measurement of (3-[Ⅰ125] iodotyrosyl) α-bungarotoxin was applied in the analysis of the relation between nerve acetylcholine receptor and three types of insecticide resistance in diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella (L.). In the dimehypo-resistant strain and in the cartap-resistant strain, the nerve acetylcholine receptor showed the remarkable insensitivity to dimehypo and cartap, of which the binding rate to ligand was approximately 66 and 60%, respectively, of the susceptible strain. The sensitivity to deltamethrin in the deltamethrin-resistant strain did not show visible change. These results indicated that the decline in the sensitivity of nerve acetylcholine receptor to insecticide might be a potential mechanism to nereistoxin insecticides resistance in the diamondback moth.

  17. Multiple insecticide resistances in the disease vector Culex p. quinquefasciatus from Western Indian Ocean.

    Nicolas Pocquet

    Full Text Available Several mosquito-borne diseases affect the Western Indian Ocean islands. Culex pipiens quinquefasciatus is one of these vectors and transmits filariasis, Rift Valley and West Nile viruses and the Japanese encephalitis. To limit the impact of these diseases on public health, considerable vector control efforts have been implemented since the 50s, mainly through the use of neurotoxic insecticides belonging to Organochlorines (OC, Organophosphates (OP and pyrethroids (PYR families. However, mosquito control failures have been reported on site, and they were probably due to the selection of resistant individuals in response to insecticide exposure. In this study, we used different approaches to establish a first regional assessment of the levels and mechanisms of resistance to various insecticides. Bioassays were used to evaluate resistance to various insecticides, enzyme activity was measured to assess the presence of metabolic resistances through elevated detoxification, and molecular identification of known resistance alleles was investigated to determine the frequency of target-site mutations. These complementary approaches showed that resistance to the most used insecticides families (OC, OP and PYR is widespread at a regional scale. However, the distribution of the different resistance genes is quite heterogeneous among the islands, some being found at high frequencies everywhere, others being frequent in some islands and absent in others. Moreover, two resistance alleles displayed clinal distributions in Mayotte and La Réunion, probably as a result of a heterogeneous selection due to local treatment practices. These widespread and diverse resistance mechanisms reduce the capacity of resistance management through classical strategies (e.g. insecticide rotation. In case of a disease outbreak, it could undermine the efforts of the vector control services, as only few compounds could be used. It thus becomes urgent to find alternatives to

  18. Insecticide resistance and, efficacy of space spraying and larviciding in the control of dengue vectors Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus in Sri Lanka.

    Karunaratne, S H P P; Weeraratne, T C; Perera, M D B; Surendran, S N

    2013-09-01

    Unprecedented incidence of dengue has been recorded in Sri Lanka in recent times. Source reduction and use of insecticides in space spraying/fogging and larviciding, are the primary means of controlling the vector mosquitoes Aedes aegypti and Ae. albopictus in the island nation. A study was carried out to understand insecticide cross-resistance spectra and mechanisms of insecticide resistance of both these vectors from six administrative districts, i.e. Kandy, Kurunegala, Puttalam, Gampaha, Ratnapura and Jaffna, of Sri Lanka. Efficacy of the recommended dosages of frequently used insecticides in space spraying and larviciding in dengue vector control programmes was also tested. Insecticide bioassay results revealed that, in general, both mosquito species were highly resistant to DDT but susceptible to propoxur and malathion except Jaffna Ae. aegypti population. Moderate resistance to malathion shown by Jaffna Ae. aegypti population correlated with esterase and malathion carboxylesterase activities of the population. High levels of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) insensitivity in the absence of malathion and propoxur resistance may be due to non-synaptic forms of AChE proteins. Moderate pyrethroid resistance in the absence of high monooxygenase levels indicated the possible involvement of 'kdr' type resistance mechanism in Sri Lankan dengue vectors. Results of the space spraying experiments revealed that 100% mortality at a 10 m distance and >50% mortality at a 50 m distance can be achieved with malathion, pesguard and deltacide even in a ground with dense vegetation. Pesguard and deltacide spraying gave 100% mortality up to 50 m distance in open area and areas with little vegetation. Both species gave >50% mortalities for deltacide at a distance of 75 m in a dense vegetation area. Larval bioassays conducted in the laboratory showed that a 1 ppm temephos solution can maintain a larval mortality rate of 100% for ten months, and the mortality rate declined to 0% in the

  19. Three years of insecticide resistance monitoring in Anopheles gambiae in Burkina Faso: resistance on the rise?

    Badolo Athanase

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and methods A longitudinal Anopheles gambiae s.l. insecticide-resistance monitoring programme was established in four sentinel sites in Burkina Faso. For three years, between 2008 and 2010, WHO diagnostic dose assays were used to measure the prevalence of resistance to all the major classes of insecticides at the beginning and end of the malaria transmission season. Species identification and genotyping for target site mutations was also performed and the sporozoite rate in adults determined. Results At the onset of the study, resistance to DDT and pyrethroids was already prevalent in An. gambiae s.l. from the south-west of the country but mosquitoes from the two sites in central Burkina Faso were largely susceptible. Within three years, DDT and permethrin resistance was established in all four sites. Carbamate and organophosphate resistance remains relatively rare and largely confined to the south-western areas although a small number of bendiocarb survivors were found in all sites by the final round of monitoring. The ace-1R target site resistance allele was present in all localities and its frequency exceeded 20% in 2010 in two of the sites. The frequency of the 1014F kdr mutation increased throughout the three years and by 2010, the frequency of 1014F in all sites combined was 0.02 in Anopheles arabiensis, 0.56 in An. gambiae M form and 0.96 in An. gambiae S form. This frequency did not differ significantly between the sites. The 1014S kdr allele was only found in An. arabiensis but its frequency increased significantly throughout the study (P = 0.0003 and in 2010 the 1014S allele frequency was 0.08 in An. arabiensis. Maximum sporozoite rates (12% were observed in Soumousso in 2009 and the difference between sites is significant for each year. Conclusion Pyrethroid and DDT resistance is now established in An. gambiae s.l. throughout Burkina Faso. Results from diagnostic dose assays are highly variable within and

  20. Multiple insecticide resistance in Anopheles gambiae (Diptera: Culicidae) from Pointe Noire, Republic of the Congo.

    Koekemoer, Lizette L; Spillings, Belinda L; Christian, Riann N; Lo, Te-Chang M; Kaiser, Maria L; Norton, Ryan A I; Oliver, Shune V; Choi, Kwang S; Brooke, Basil D; Hunt, Richard H; Coetzee, Maureen

    2011-08-01

    Successful implementation of an integrated vector control program will rely on availability of accurate vector information in the specific location. However, such information can be limited in some countries. The aim of this study was to obtain baseline vector information from Pointe Noire on the Congo coast (Republic of the Congo). Field sampling was conducted during April 2009 in the village of Boutoto and its surrounds, close to the city of Pointe Noire. Anopheles gambiae sensu lato mosquitoes were collected resting indoors. Samples were analyzed for insecticide susceptibility, species identification, and Plasmodium sporozoite infection. Molecular and biochemical assays were conducted to characterize insecticide resistance mechanisms. The malaria vector A. gambiae S-form was the only mosquito species identified, and it had a high Plasmodium falciparum infection rate (9.6%). Multiple insecticide resistance was detected in this population with full susceptibility to only one insecticide class, the organophosphates. Dieldrin and DDT resistance was mainly attributed to target-site resistance (the Rdl and L1014F/L1014S kdr mutations respectively), whereas pyrethroid resistance was mainly attributed to P450 metabolic enzyme-mediated detoxification in addition to kdr. The role of various insecticide resistance mechanisms revealed a complex association between metabolic detoxification and reduced target-site sensitivity. PMID:21417925

  1. The classification of esterases: an important gene family involved in insecticide resistance - A review

    Isabela Reis Montella

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The use of chemical insecticides continues to play a major role in the control of disease vector populations, which is leading to the global dissemination of insecticide resistance. A greater capacity to detoxify insecticides, due to an increase in the expression or activity of three major enzyme families, also known as metabolic resistance, is one major resistance mechanisms. The esterase family of enzymes hydrolyse ester bonds, which are present in a wide range of insecticides; therefore, these enzymes may be involved in resistance to the main chemicals employed in control programs. Historically, insecticide resistance has driven research on insect esterases and schemes for their classification. Currently, several different nomenclatures are used to describe the esterases of distinct species and a universal standard classification does not exist. The esterase gene family appears to be rapidly evolving and each insect species has a unique complement of detoxification genes with only a few orthologues across species. The examples listed in this review cover different aspects of their biochemical nature. However, they do not appear to contribute to reliably distinguish among the different resistance mechanisms. Presently, the phylogenetic criterion appears to be the best one for esterase classification. Joint genomic, biochemical and microarray studies will help unravel the classification of this complex gene family.

  2. Chlorpyrifos-induced hormesis in insecticide-resistant and -susceptible Plutella xylostella under normal and high temperatures.

    Deng, Z Z; Zhang, F; Wu, Z L; Yu, Z Y; Wu, G

    2016-06-01

    Hormesis induced by insecticides at the dosage lower than what ostensibly directly causes death on insects was studied. This paper reports the effects of the in vivo application of varied concentrations of chlorpyrifos (CPF) on Plutella xylostella (DBM). The insecticide concentrations applied included 0.000025-2.5 mg l-1, which are far lower than LC1 (7.2 mg l-1), for the CPF-susceptable (Si) DBM, and 250 mg l-1 which is far below LC1 (1286 mg l-1), for the CPF-resistant (Rc) DBM, as well as LC10- and LC50-doses for both strains. Significant hormesis was found with the 'hermetic-CPFs', i.e., 0.0025 mg l-1 for Si DBM and 2.5 mg l-1 for Rc DBM, at the normal or high temperature either in a 24 h or under a long-term treatment. These doses of CPF significantly stimulated the development and increased the fecundity of Si and Rc DBM at 25°C with approximately 23.5-29.8% activity increase on acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and 30.5-91.3% increase on glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) at 25 or 38°C in 4-24 h. The enzymatic activities were significantly reduced by LC50-CPF at 25°C in vivo, but the inhibition was relieved significantly, if the insects were first subjected to a hormetic-CPF pretreatment. It was remarkable that the average rates of enzymatic activity increase were 67.5-76.6% for AChE and 366-546% for GSTs. Consequently, it was concluded that the hormesis on Si and Rc DBM could be induced by CPF doses far below LC1 at normal or high temperature in short- or long-term treatment. These findings might help to improve the current insect control practices in the field. PMID:27241230

  3. Biochemical mechanisms of insecticide resistance in field population of Dengue vector Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae.

    R. Muthusamy

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Insecticide resistance has been known to be prevalent in several insect species including mosquito. It has become a major problem in vector control programme due to pesticide resistance through detoxification enzymes. The present study investigated the toxicity of Ae. aegypti to organophosphates and pyrethroid insecticide and biochemical mechanisms involved in insecticide resistance in larval population. Larval bioassay revealed an LC50 value of 0.734 ppm for dichlorvos and 1.140 ppm for λ-cyhalothrin exposure. Biochemical assay revealed increased activity of AChE (0.3 µmole/mg protein and GST in dichlorvos (1-1.5 µmole/mg protein treatment and esterase activity in λ-cyhalothrin treated compared to control activity. These studies suggest that AChE and GST is associated with organophosphate and esterase associated with pyrethroid resistance in Ae. aegypti.

  4. Resistance of Aedes aegypti from the state of São Paulo, Brazil, to organophosphates insecticides

    Macoris Maria de Lourdes G

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the reintroduction of Aedes aegypti in the state of São Paulo, in the middle of the 1980-decade, organophosphate insecticides are being used to control the dengue vector. In 1996, an annual program for monitoring the susceptibility of Ae. aegypti to the insecticides was implemented. Some of the results of this monitoring program are presented. Ae. aegypti populations from ten localities have been submitted to bioassays with the diagnostic dose of temephos and fenitrothion. Only two (Marília and Presidente Prudente remain susceptible to both insecticides and one (Santos exhibits true resistance. Ae. aegypti from the remaining localities showed an incipient altered susceptibility. Resistance ratios varied from 1.2 to 2.9 for temephos and from 1.5 to 3.2 to fenitrothion, indicating moderate levels of resistance. Biochemical assays did not detect alterations in the enzyme acetilcholinesterase, but indicated that resistance is associated with esterases.

  5. Insecticide resistance and activities of relative enzymes in different populations of the white backed planthopper

    2000-01-01

    @@ White backed planthopper (WBPH), Sogatella furcifera (Horvath), is one of the most devastating insect pests on rice in Asia. Its control mainly depended on the chemical pesticides. Surveys of insecticide susceptibility revealed that organophosphorus and carbamate resistance has emerged since early 1980s in China and Japan. WBPH has the long distance migration property, and Heinrichs(1994) considered that the migration might influence the resistance level of planthoppers. So we conducted the comparative studies on insecticide susceptibility and activities of resistance relative enzymes in four WBPH populations collected from Zhejiang, Yunnan, and Hainan provinces of China in 1997.

  6. Malathion Resistance Status and Mutations in Acetylcholinesterase Gene (Ace) in Japanese Encephalitis and Filariasis Vectors from Endemic Area in India.

    Misra, Brij Ranjan; Gore, Milind

    2015-05-01

    Japanese encephalitis (JE) and lymphatic filariasis (LF) are endemic in estern part of Uttar Pradesh in India and transmitted by Culex mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae). JE vaccination and mass drug administration for JE and LF management is being undertaken respectively. In addition to this, indoor residual spraying and fogging are used for the control of mosquito vectors. Organophosphate resistance in mosquito is dependent on alteration in acetylcholinesterase (Ace) gene. Hence, it is important to evaluate organophosphate resistance in Culex tritaeniorhynchus Giles (JE vector) and Culex quinquefasciatus Say (LF vector). The current study showed the presence of resistant populations and F331W mutation in Cx. tritaeniorhynchus and G119S mutation in Cx. quinquefasciatus insensitive Ace genes. Resistant populations of these two vectors increase the chances of spreading of resistance in the natural population and may cause failure of intervention programs that include organophosphates against these two vectors in future. PMID:26334819

  7. Vectorial status and insecticide resistance of Anopheles funestus from a sugar estate in southern Mozambique

    Nhamahanga Eduardo

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The dual problems of rising insecticide resistance in the malaria vectors and increasing human malaria cases since 2001 in southern Mozambique are cause for serious concern. The selection of insecticides for use in indoor residual spraying (IRS programmes is highly dependent on the extent to which local mosquitoes are susceptible to the approved classes of insecticides. The insecticide resistance status and role in malaria transmission of Anopheles funestus was evaluated at the Maragra Sugar Estate in southern Mozambique where an IRS vector control programme has been in operation for seven years using the carbamate insecticide bendiocarb. Results No Anopheles species were captured inside the sugar estate control area. Anopheles funestus group captured outside of the estate represented 90% (n = 475 of the total collections. Of the specimens identified to species by PCR (n = 167, 95% were An. funestus s.s. One An. rivulorum was identified and seven specimens did not amplify. The Anopheles gambiae complex was less abundant (n = 53 and of those identified (n = 33 76% were An. arabiensis and 24% An. merus. Insecticide susceptibility tests showed that wild-caught and F-1 family An. funestus were resistant to deltamethrin (32.5% mortality and lambda-cyhalothrin (14.6% mortality, less so to bendiocarb (71.5% mortality and fully susceptible to both malathion and DDT (100%. Bendiocarb and pyrethroid resistance was nullified using 4% piperonyl butoxide (Pbo, strongly suggesting that both are mediated by P450 monooxygenase detoxification. ELISA tests of An. funestus for Plasmodium falciparum, gave a sporozoite rate of 6.02% (n = 166. One unidentified member of the An. gambiae complex tested positive for P. falciparum sporozoites. Conclusion Anopheles funestus was found to be the most abundant and principle vector of malaria in this area, with members of the An. gambiae complex being secondary vectors. Despite the continual use of

  8. Lessons from the past: managing insecticide resistance in malaria control and eradication programmes.

    Kelly-Hope, Louise; Ranson, Hilary; Hemingway, Janet

    2008-06-01

    The distribution of insecticide-treated bednets to help combat the burden of malaria in sub-Saharan Africa has accelerated in the past 5 years. Additionally, many countries are also considering, or have already begun, indoor residual spraying campaigns. These are positive developments, since vector control has repeatedly proven to be an effective means of reducing malaria transmission. However, the sustainability of these insecticide-based interventions relies on the continuing susceptibility of the anopheles vectors to the limited number of available insecticides. Continual monitoring for early signs of insecticide resistance and the adoption of carefully considered resistance management strategies are therefore required. Regrettably, this essential monitoring component is frequently given a low priority in the push to meet ambitious coverage targets. We outline the key requirements for establishing an insecticide resistance surveillance system and urge all those involved in malaria vector control, either directly or as facilitators, to ensure that these measures are incorporated into control programmes. Failure to act now will inevitably lead to a future breakdown in disease control and jeopardise hopes of eradicating this major public-health problem. PMID:18374633

  9. Evolution of Resistance by Helicoverpa zea (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) Infesting Insecticidal Crops in the Southern United States.

    Pan, Zaiqi; Onstad, David; Crain, Philip; Crespo, Andre; Hutchison, William; Buntin, David; Porter, Pat; Catchot, Angus; Cook, Don; Pilcher, Clint; Flexner, Lindsey; Higgins, Laura

    2016-04-01

    We created a deterministic, frequency-based model of the evolution of resistance by corn earworm, Helicoverpa zea (Boddie) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), to insecticidal traits expressed in crops planted in the heterogeneous landscapes of the southern United States. The model accounts for four generations of selection by insecticidal traits each year. We used the model results to investigate the influence of three factors on insect resistance management (IRM): 1) how does adding a third insecticidal trait to both corn and cotton affect durability of the products, 2) how does unstructured corn refuge influence IRM, and 3) how do block refuges (50% compliance) and blended refuges compare with regard to IRM? When Bt cotton expresses the same number of insecticidal traits, Bt corn with three insecticidal traits provides longer durability than Bt corn with two pyramided traits. Blended refuge provides similar durability for corn products compared with the same level of required block refuge when the rate of refuge compliance by farmers is 50%. Results for Mississippi and Texas are similar, but durabilities for corn traits are surprisingly lower in Georgia, where unstructured corn refuge is the highest of the three states, but refuge for Bt cotton is the lowest of the three states. Thus, unstructured corn refuge can be valuable for IRM but its influence is determined by selection for resistance by Bt cotton. PMID:26637533

  10. The impact of insecticides management linked with resistance expression in Anopheles spp. populations

    Guilherme Liberato da Silva; Thiago Nunes Pereira; Noeli Juarez Ferla; Onilda Santos da Silva

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The resistance of some species of Anopheles to chemical insecticides is spreading quickly throughout the world and has hindered the actions of prevention and control of malaria. The main mechanism responsible for resistance in these insects appears to be the target site known as knock-down resistance (kdr), which causes mutations in the sodium channel. Even so, many countries have made significant progress in the prevention of malaria, focusing largely on vector control through long-...

  11. Fitness cost in field and laboratory Aedes aegypti populations associated with resistance to the insecticide temephos

    Diniz, Diego Felipe Araujo; de Melo-Santos, Maria Alice Varjal; Santos, Eloína Maria de Mendonça; Beserra, Eduardo Barbosa; Helvecio, Elisama; de Carvalho-Leandro, Danilo; dos Santos, Bianka Santana; de Menezes Lima, Vera Lúcia; Ayres, Constância Flávia Junqueira

    2015-01-01

    Background The continued use of chemical insecticides in the context of the National Program of Dengue Control in Brazil has generated a high selective pressure on the natural populations of Aedes aegypti, leading to their resistance to these compounds in the field. Fitness costs have been described as adaptive consequences of resistance. This study evaluated the biological and reproductive performance of A. aegypti strains and a field population resistant to temephos, the main larvicide used...

  12. Insecticide resistance in Aedes aegypti populations from Ceará, Brazil

    Goulart Marilia OF; de Paiva Neto Clovis C; Barbosa Clarisse; Santana Antonio Euzébio G; de Oliveira Lúcia; da Silva Ulisses; da Silva Éllyda; de Araújo Ana; Paiva Marcelo; Lima Estelita; Wilding Craig; Ayres Constância; de Melo Santos Maria Alice V

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Organophosphates and pyrethroids are used widely in Brazil to control Aedes aegypti, the main vector of dengue viruses, under the auspices of the National Programme for Dengue Control. Resistance to these insecticides is widespread throughout Brazil. In Ceará the vector is present in 98% of districts and resistance to temephos has been reported previously. Here we measure resistance to temephos and the pyrethroid cypermethrin in three populations from Ceará and use biochem...

  13. Mixed function oxidases and insecticide resistance in medically important insects

    A.A. Enayati; Ladonni, H

    2006-01-01

    MFOs are a large diverse superfamily of enzymes found in all insect tissues. They are involved in the metabolism of xenobiotics (e.g. drugs, pesticides and plant toxins) and endogenous compounds (e.g. ecdysteroids and juvenile hormones). They are also involved in bioactivation of phosphorothioate compounds such as organophosphorus insecticides. They have very diverse activities like hydroxylation, epoxidation, N-, O-or S-dealkylation, deamination, sulfoxidation, desulfuration and oxidative de...

  14. Genetic engineering in insects: Cloning and transformation of genes conferring resistance to insecticides

    Genetic engineering and transformation offer the possibility of modifying the genetic material of insects. These techniques will make it possible, for example, to transfer genes conferring resistance to insecticides into the genome of beneficial species, or to develop new methods of combating insect pests and disease carrying insects. We cloned two genes which contain the code for proteins that detoxify insecticides. The first, esterase B1 from Culex quinquefasciatus, is amplified approximately 250 times in Californian mosquitoes resistant to organic phosphate insecticides. A second esterase gene was cloned from bacteria which break down various organic phosphates. Experiments are in progress to transfer these genes to Drosophila and beneficial insects. These same genes could also serve as selection markers for the purpose of developing transformation techniques for different insects whose genome one wishes to modify using genetic engineering techniques. (author). 5 refs

  15. Evolutionary Changes in Gene Expression, Coding Sequence and Copy-Number at the Cyp6g1 Locus Contribute to Resistance to Multiple Insecticides in Drosophila

    Harrop, Thomas W. R.; Tamar Sztal; Christopher Lumb; Good, Robert T.; Daborn, Phillip J.; Philip Batterham; Henry Chung

    2014-01-01

    Widespread use of insecticides has led to insecticide resistance in many populations of insects. In some populations, resistance has evolved to multiple pesticides. In Drosophila melanogaster, resistance to multiple classes of insecticide is due to the overexpression of a single cytochrome P450 gene, Cyp6g1. Overexpression of Cyp6g1 appears to have evolved in parallel in Drosophila simulans, a sibling species of D. melanogaster, where it is also associated with insecticide resistance. However...

  16. Susceptibility of Bonagota salubricola (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) to Insecticides in Brazilian Apple Orchards: Implications for Resistance Management.

    Bernardi, Daniel; Botton, Marcos; Andreazza, Felipe; Arnaldo Batista Neto E Silva, Oscar; João Arioli, Cristiano; Omoto, Celso

    2016-08-01

    The Bonagota salubricola (Meyrick) is a major pest in apple orchards in Brazil, and chemical control has been the primary tool for insect management. To support the development of an insect resistance management (IRM) program, baseline studies of the susceptibility of a reference (laboratory) B. salubricola population were conducted; seven wild B. salubricola populations were monitored for susceptibility to insecticide; and the toxicity of some new chemicals to third-instar larvae and adults was evaluated by a leaf dip and ingestion bioassay, respectively. Neonates from the susceptible (laboratory) population exposed to insecticide showed an LC50 ranging from 0.34 (spinetoram) to 30.19 (novaluron) µg of a.i. ml(-1) (88.8-fold variation), so the diagnostic concentrations for an IRM program in Brazil based on the LC99 were as follows: 19.0 µg of a.i./ml chlorantraniliprole, 510.0 novaluron, 72.0 phosmet, 4.1 spinetoram, 12.8 spinosad, and 110.0 tebufenozide. Based on the LC99, significant differences were not observed in the susceptibility of the field and laboratory populations to chlorantraniliprole, phosmet, spinetoram, spinosad, and tebufenozide insecticides, but there were significant differences in the survival rates of the two populations to novaluron insecticide (3.3%). All insecticides at the diagnostic concentrations showed high toxicity to third-instar larvae (mortality rates between 73 to 97%). Phosmet, spinetoram, and spinosad insecticides were toxic to B. salubricola adults (mortality >85%), while chlorantraniliprole, novaluron, and tebufenozide insecticides caused mortality below 5%. The evaluated insecticides showed high toxicity to different developmental stages of B. salubricola, so the diagnostic concentrations may be used in IRM programs in Brazil. PMID:27341888

  17. Identification of genes involved in pyrethroid-, propoxur-, and dichlorvos- insecticides resistance in the mosquitoes, Culex pipiens complex (Diptera: Culicidae).

    Li, Chun-xiao; Guo, Xiao-xia; Zhang, Ying-mei; Dong, Yan-de; Xing, Dan; Yan, Ting; Wang, Gang; Zhang, Heng-duan; Zhao, Tong-yan

    2016-05-01

    Culex pipiens pallens and Cx. p. quinquefasciatus are important vectors of many diseases, such as West Nile fever and lymphatic filariasis. The widespread use of insecticides to control these disease vectors and other insect pests has led to insecticide resistance becoming common in these species. In this study, high throughout Illumina sequencing was used to identify hundreds of Cx. p. pallens and Cx. p. quinquefasciatus genes that were differentially expressed in response to insecticide exposure. The identification of these genes is a vital first step for more detailed investigation of the molecular mechanisms involved in insecticide resistance in Culex mosquitoes. PMID:26802491

  18. INSECTICIDE RESISTANCE IN THE GROUND SPIDER, Pardosa sumatrana (THORELL, 1890; ARANEAE: LYCOSIDAE).

    Tahir, Hafiz Muhammad; Khizar, Farva; Naseem, Sajida; Yaqoob, Rabia; Samiullah, Khizar

    2016-09-01

    Elevated levels of insecticides detoxifying enzymes, such as esterases, glutathione S-transferases (GSTs), and cytochrome P-450 monooxygenases, act in the resistance mechanisms in insects. In the present study, levels of these enzymes in the insecticide-resistant ground spider Pardosa sumatrana (Thorell, 1890) were compared with a susceptible population (control) of the same species. Standard protocols were used for biochemical estimation of enzymes. The results showed significantly higher levels of nonspecific esterases and monooxygenases in resistant spiders compared to controls. The activity of GSTs was lower in the resistant spiders. Elevated levels of nonspecific esterases and monooxygenases suggest their role in metabolic resistance in P. sumatrana. The reduced levels of total protein contents revealed its possible consumption to meet energy demands. PMID:27312591

  19. Assessment of resistance risk to fipronil and cross resistance to other insecticides in the Musca domestica L. (Diptera: Muscidae).

    Abbas, Naeem; Ijaz, Mamuna; Shad, Sarfraz Ali; Binyameen, Muhammad

    2016-06-15

    Fipronil, a phenyl-pyrazole insecticide has been used frequently for the control of disease vector house flies, Musca domestica L., (Diptera: Muscidae) worldwide including Pakistan. This experiment was performed to determine the selection and assessment of fipronil resistance evolution along with cross resistance to other three insecticides. After 26 generations of selection, the house fly strain developed 430-fold resistance to fipronil compared to a susceptible strain. Realized heritability (h(2)) of resistance to fipronil was 0.05. The projected rate of resistance development revealed that if 30-90% house flies were selected then a tenfold increase in lethal concentration 50 happened after 95.51-26.59 generations for fipronil (h(2)=0.05, Slope=2.34). At similar slope, if h(2)=0.15, then 31.84-8.86 generations are required for tenfold increase in LC50 at 30-90% selection intensity, respectively. Likewise, if h(2)=0.25, then similar would occur in 19.10-5.32 generations. Differences in any of the variable would affect the rate of resistance development. Selection with fipronil did not increase the level of resistance to lambda-cyhalothrin, profenofos and indoxacarb, suggesting no cross resistance to these insecticides. The results of our study concluded that house flies have the potential to develop resistances following continued selection pressure with fipronil. PMID:27198780

  20. Effects of Insecticides on Strawberry Aphid Chaetosiphon fragaefolii (Cockerell) on Resistant and Susceptible Strawberry Genotypes

    Slobodan Milenković; Dejan Marčić; Pantelija Perić

    2011-01-01

    Strawberry aphid, Chaetosiphon fragaefolii (Cockerell), is the most important vector of strawberry virus. Breeding of genotypes resistant to this pest is an important preventive control measure, which can be compatible with rational insecticide application. The aim of the paper was to determine effects of dimethoate and deltamethrin on C. fragaefolii populations reared on two strawberry genotypes different in susceptibility: susceptible strawberry cultivar ...

  1. Monitoring for resistance to organophosphorus and pyrethroid insecticides in varroa mite populations

    The occurrence of resistance in Varroa mite populations is a serious threat to the beekeeping industry and crops that rely on the honey bee for pollination. Integrated pest management strategies for control of this pest include the judicious use of insecticides. To monitor field populations of Varro...

  2. Experimental hut evaluation of bednets treated with an organophosphate (chlorpyrifos-methyl or a pyrethroid (lambdacyhalothrin alone and in combination against insecticide-resistant Anopheles gambiae and Culex quinquefasciatus mosquitoes

    Corbel Vincent

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pyrethroid resistant mosquitoes are becoming increasingly common in parts of Africa. It is important to identify alternative insecticides which, if necessary, could be used to replace or supplement the pyrethroids for use on treated nets. Certain compounds of an earlier generation of insecticides, the organophosphates may have potential as net treatments. Methods Comparative studies of chlorpyrifos-methyl (CM, an organophosphate with low mammalian toxicity, and lambdacyhalothrin (L, a pyrethroid, were conducted in experimental huts in Côte d'Ivoire, West Africa. Anopheles gambiae and Culex quinquefasciatus mosquitoes from the area are resistant to pyrethroids and organophosphates (kdr and insensitive acetylcholinesterase Ace.1R. Several treatments and application rates on intact or holed nets were evaluated, including single treatments, mixtures, and differential wall/ceiling treatments. Results and Conclusion All of the treatments were effective in reducing blood feeding from sleepers under the nets and in killing both species of mosquito, despite the presence of the kdr and Ace.1R genes at high frequency. In most cases, the effects of the various treatments did not differ significantly. Five washes of the nets in soap solution did not reduce the impact of the insecticides on A. gambiae mortality, but did lead to an increase in blood feeding. The three combinations performed no differently from the single insecticide treatments, but the low dose mixture performed encouragingly well indicating that such combinations might be used for controlling insecticide resistant mosquitoes. Mortality of mosquitoes that carried both Ace.1R and Ace.1S genes did not differ significantly from mosquitoes that carried only Ace.1S genes on any of the treated nets, indicating that the Ace.1R allele does not confer effective resistance to chlorpyrifos-methyl under the realistic conditions of an experimental hut.

  3. Toxicity and resistance of field collected Musca domestica (Diptera: Muscidae) against insect growth regulator insecticides.

    Khan, Hafiz Azhar Ali; Akram, Waseem; Arshad, Muhammad; Hafeez, Faisal

    2016-04-01

    The house fly, Musca domestica, is a serious pest of public health importance with the ability to develop insecticide resistance. The focus of the present study was to evaluate toxicity and resistance of the field collected house flies from Punjab, Pakistan, against insect growth regulator (IGR) insecticides. House flies collected from six different localities exhibited very low levels of resistance to cyromazine, triflumuron, and methoxyfenozide compared with the Lab-susceptible reference strain, with resistance ratios (RRs) ranging between 3.56- to 8.19-fold, 1.45- to 3.68-fold, and 2.20- to 8.60-fold, respectively. However, very low to low levels of resistance were observed for pyriproxyfen and very low to moderate levels for lufenuron with RRs ranged from 4.13- to 11.63-fold to 8.57- to 22.75-fold, respectively. There was a significant correlation between RRs of cyromazine and triflumuron (r = 0.976, p < 0.001), suggesting the possibility for cross-resistance. Susceptibility status of different IGRs in Pakistani strains of house flies is reported here for the first time. The trend observed in decreasing susceptibility towards different IGR insecticides tested will continue unless resistance management practices are followed. PMID:26711449

  4. The distribution of insecticide resistance in Anopheles gambiae s.l. populations from Cameroon: an update

    Ndjemai, H. N. M.; Patchoke, S.; Atangana, J.; Etang, J.; Simard, Frédéric; Bilong, C. F. B.; Reimer, L.; Cornel, A.; Lanzaro, G.C.; Fondjo, E

    2009-01-01

    Insecticides are a key component of vector-based malaria control programmes in Cameroon. As part of ongoing resistance surveillance efforts, Anopheles gambiae s.l. female mosquitoes were exposed to organochlorine (DDT), a carbamate (bendiocarb), an organophosphate (malathion), and three pyrethroids (deltamethrin, lambda-cyhalothrin and permethrin) in WHO bioassay test kits. Results indicated a higher level of resistance (reduced mortality and knockdown effect) to DDT and pyrethroids in popula...

  5. Resistance Status to the Insecticides Temephos, Deltamethrin, and Diflubenzuron in Brazilian Aedes aegypti Populations

    Bellinato, Diogo Fernandes; Viana-Medeiros, Priscila Fernandes; Araújo, Simone Costa; Ademir J Martins; Lima, José Bento Pereira; Valle, Denise

    2016-01-01

    Insecticides are still largely applied in public health to control disease vectors. In Brazil, organophosphates (OP) and pyrethroids (PY) are used against Aedes aegypti for years. Since 2009 Insect Growth Regulators (IGR) are also employed in the control of larvae. We quantified resistance to temephos (OP), deltamethrin (PY), and diflubenzuron (IGR) of A. aegypti samples from 12 municipalities distributed throughout the country, collected between 2010 and 2012. High levels of resistance to ne...

  6. Insecticide resistance in two Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae) strains from Costa Rica.

    Bisset, J A; Marín, R; Rodríguez, M M; Severson, D W; Ricardo, Y; French, L; Díaz, M; Pérez, O

    2013-03-01

    Dengue (family Flaviridae, genus Flavivirus, DENV) and dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) are presently important public health problems in Costa Rica. The primary strategy for disease control is based on reducing population densities of the main mosquito vector Aedes aegypti (L.) (Diptera: Culicidae). This is heavily dependent on use of chemical insecticides, thus the development of resistance is a frequent threat to control program effectiveness. The objective of this study was to determine the levels of insecticide resistance and the metabolic resistance mechanisms involved in two Ae. aegypti strains collected from two provinces (Puntarenas and Limon) in Costa Rica. Bioassays with larvae were performed according to World Health Organization guidelines and resistance in adults was measured through standard bottle assays. The activities of beta-esterases, cytochrome P450 monooxygenases, and glutathione S-transferases (GST), were assayed through synergists and biochemical tests, wherein the threshold criteria for each enzyme was established using the susceptible Rockefeller strain. The results showed higher resistance levels to the organophosphate (OP) temephos and the pyrethroid deltamethrin in larvae. The efficacy of commercial formulations of temephos in controlling Ae. aegypti populations was 100% mortality up to 11 and 12 d posttreatment with daily water replacements in test containers. Temephos and deltamethrin resistance in larvae were associated with high esterase activity, but not to cytochrome P450 monooxygenase or GST activities. Adult mosquitoes were resistant to deltamethrin, and susceptible to bendiocarb, chlorpyrifos, and cypermethrin. Because temephos and deltamethrin resistance are emerging at the studied sites, alternative insecticides should be considered. The insecticides chlorpyrifos and cypermethrin could be good candidates to use as alternatives for Ae. aegypti control. PMID:23540124

  7. Detection of resistance to the organophosphate insecticide in wild populations of medfly Ceratitis capitata

    In this study, the wild medfly resistance of the organophosphate insecticide is evaluated by the physiologic mechanism of resistance including the Acethylcholinesterase enzyme. Different representative populations of Ceratitis were collected from different regions of Tunisia. The analysis statistics (ACP) for DL50 and the treatment frequency showed a negative correlation between them. The gene ace was amplified at the level of the exons 4, 5, 6 et 7 by PCR. No mutation of the gene ace was identified with the collected individuals.

  8. Multiple resistance of Culex vishnui Theobald against four major classes of insecticides in an agricultural area in Sekinchan, Selangor, Malaysia.

    Leong, C S; Chen, C D; Low, V L; Karen-Chia, H M; Azidah, A A; Sofian-Azirun, M

    2014-06-01

    The resistance status of riceland Culex vishnui against four major groups of insecticides (i.e., organochlorines, carbamates, organophosphates and pyrethroids) was investigated. Biochemical assays (ESTα, ESTβ, MFO and GST) were also conducted to detect the resistance levels. Throughout a 12-month study period, multiple insecticide resistance was observed in both larvae and adult Cx vishnui. Culex vishnui larvae exhibited low resistance against malathion, temephos and permethrin with resistance ratio (RR) values GST. Spearman rank-order analysis showed that ESTα, ESTβ and GST were involved in multiple resistances in Cx. vishnui. The findings of this study established a baseline of insecticide susceptibility and revealed the effects of agricultural insecticide pressure on the vectors of Japanese encephalitis in Malaysia. PMID:25134893

  9. Allelic Variation of Cytochrome P450s Drives Resistance to Bednet Insecticides in a Major Malaria Vector

    Sulaiman S Ibrahim; Riveron, Jacob M.; Bibby, Jaclyn; Irving, Helen; Yunta, Cristina; Paine, Mark J. I.; Wondji, Charles S.

    2015-01-01

    Scale up of Long Lasting Insecticide Nets (LLINs) has massively contributed to reduce malaria mortality across Africa. However, resistance to pyrethroid insecticides in malaria vectors threatens its continued effectiveness. Deciphering the detailed molecular basis of such resistance and designing diagnostic tools is critical to implement suitable resistance management strategies. Here, we demonstrated that allelic variation in two cytochrome P450 genes is the most important driver of pyrethro...

  10. Allelic Variation of Cytochrome P450s Drives Resistance to Bednet Insecticides in a Major Malaria Vector.

    Sulaiman S Ibrahim; Riveron, Jacob M.; Jaclyn Bibby; Helen Irving; Cristina Yunta; Paine, Mark J. I.; Wondji, Charles S.

    2015-01-01

    Scale up of Long Lasting Insecticide Nets (LLINs) has massively contributed to reduce malaria mortality across Africa. However, resistance to pyrethroid insecticides in malaria vectors threatens its continued effectiveness. Deciphering the detailed molecular basis of such resistance and designing diagnostic tools is critical to implement suitable resistance management strategies. Here, we demonstrated that allelic variation in two cytochrome P450 genes is the most important driver of pyrethro...

  11. Impact of operational effectiveness of long-lasting insecticidal nets (LLINs) on malaria transmission in pyrethroid-resistant areas

    Sovi, Arthur; Azondékon, Roseric; Aïkpon, Rock Y.; Govoétchan, Renaud; Tokponnon, Filémon; Agossa, Fiacre; Salako, Albert S; Oké-Agbo, Frédéric; Aholoukpè, Bruno; Okè, Mariam; Gbénou, Dina; Massougbodji, Achille; Akogbéto, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Background A dynamic study on the transmission of malaria was conducted in two areas (R+ area: Low resistance area; R+++ area: High resistance area) in the department of Plateau in South Eastern Benin, where the population is protected by Long Lasting Insecticidal Nets (LLINs). The aim of this study was to determine if the resistance of malaria vectors to insecticides has an impact on their behavior and on the effectiveness of LLINs in the reduction of malaria transmission. Methods Population...

  12. Contrasting patterns of insecticide resistance and knockdown resistance (kdr in Aedes aegypti populations from Jacarezinho (Brazil after a Dengue Outbreak

    Oscar Alexander Aguirre-Obando

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT After a dengue outbreak, the knowledge on the extent, distribution and mechanisms of insecticide resistance is essential for successful insecticide-based dengue control interventions. Therefore, we evaluated the potential changes to insecticide resistance in natural Aedes aegypti populations to Organophosphates (OP and Pyrethroids (PY after chemical vector control interventions. After a Dengue outbreak in 2010, A. aegypti mosquitoes from the urban area of Jacarezinho (Paraná, Brazil were collected in 2011 and 2012. Insecticide resistance to OP Temephos was assessed in 2011 and 2012 by dose–response bioassays adopting WHO-based protocols. Additionally, in both sampling, PY resistance was also investigated by the Val1016Ile mutation genotyping. In 2011, a random collection of mosquitoes was carried out; while in 2012, the urban area was divided into four regions where mosquitoes were sampled randomly. Bioassays conducted with larvae in 2011 (82 ± 10%; RR95 = 3.6 and 2012 (95 ± 3%; RR95 = 2.5 indicated an incipient altered susceptibility to Temephos. On the other hand, the Val1016IIe mutation analysis in 2011, presented frequencies of the 1016Ilekdr allele equal to 80%. Nevertheless, in 2012, when the urban area of Jacarezinho was analyzed as a single unit, the frequency of the mutant allele was 70%. Additionally, the distribution analysis of the Val1016Ile mutation in 2012 showed the mutant allele frequencies ≥60% in all regions. These outcomes indicated the necessity of developing alternative strategies such as insecticide rotations for delaying the evolution of resistance.

  13. Susceptibility of Adult Cat Fleas (Siphonaptera: Pulicidae) to Insecticides and Status of Insecticide Resistance Mutations at the Rdl and Knockdown Resistance Loci.

    Rust, Michael K; Vetter, Richard; Denholm, Ian; Blagburn, Byron; Williamson, Martin S; Kopp, Steven; Coleman, Glen; Hostetler, Joe; Davis, Wendell; Mencke, Norbert; Rees, Robert; Foit, Sabrina; Böhm, Claudia; Tetzner, Kathrin

    2015-08-01

    The susceptibility of 12 field-collected isolates and 4 laboratory strains of cat fleas, Ctenocephalides felis was determined by topical application of some of the insecticides used as on-animal therapies to control them. In the tested field-collected flea isolates the LD50 values for fipronil and imidacloprid ranged from 0.09 to 0.35 ng/flea and 0.02 to 0.19 ng/flea, respectively, and were consistent with baseline figures published previously. The extent of variation in response to four pyrethroid insecticides differed between compounds with the LD50 values for deltamethrin ranging from 2.3 to 28.2 ng/flea, etofenprox ranging from 26.7 to 86.7 ng/flea, permethrin ranging from 17.5 to 85.6 ng/flea, and d-phenothrin ranging from 14.5 to 130 ng/flea. A comparison with earlier data for permethrin and deltamethrin implied a level of pyrethroid resistance in all isolates and strains. LD50 values for tetrachlorvinphos ranged from 20.0 to 420.0 ng/flea. The rdl mutation (conferring target-site resistance to cyclodiene insecticides) was present in most field-collected and laboratory strains, but had no discernible effect on responses to fipronil, which acts on the same receptor protein as cyclodienes. The kdr and skdr mutations conferring target-site resistance to pyrethroids but segregated in opposition to one another, precluding the formation of genotypes homozygous for both mutations. PMID:26152407

  14. DNA sequencing reveals the midgut microbiota of diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella (L. and a possible relationship with insecticide resistance.

    Xiaofeng Xia

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Insect midgut microbiota is important in host nutrition, development and immune response. Recent studies indicate possible links between insect gut microbiota and resistance to biological and chemical toxins. Studies of this phenomenon and symbionts in general have been hampered by difficulties in culture-based approach. In the present study, DNA sequencing was used to examine the midgut microbiota of diamondback moth (DBM, Plutella xylostella (L., a destructive pest that attacks cruciferous crops worldwide. Its ability to develop resistance to many types of synthetic insecticide and even Bacillus thuringiensis toxins makes it an important species to study. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Bacteria of the DBM larval midgut in a susceptible and two insecticide (chlorpyrifos and fipronil resistant lines were examined by Illumina sequencing sampled from an insect generation that was not exposed to insecticide. This revealed that more than 97% of the bacteria were from three orders: Enterobacteriales, Vibrionales and Lactobacillales. Both insecticide-resistant lines had more Lactobacillales and the much scarcer taxa Pseudomonadales and Xanthomonadales with fewer Enterobacteriales compared with the susceptible strain. Consistent with this, a second study observed an increase in the proportion of Lactobacillales in the midgut of DBM individuals from a generation treated with insecticides. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This is the first report of high-throughput DNA sequencing of the entire microbiota of DBM. It reveals differences related to inter- and intra-generational exposure to insecticides. Differences in the midgut microbiota among susceptible and insecticide-resistant lines are independent of insecticide exposure in the sampled generations. While this is consistent with the hypothesis that Lactobacillales or other scarcer taxa play a role in conferring DBM insecticide resistance, further studies are necessary to rule out other

  15. Insecticide resistance in Anopheles gambiae from south-western Chad, Central Africa

    Etang Josiane

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Indoor residual spraying and insecticide-treated nets (ITN are essential components of malaria vector control in Africa. Pyrethroids are the only recommended compounds for nets treatment because they are fast-acting insecticides with low mammalian toxicity. However, there is growing concern that pyrethroid resistance may threaten the sustainability of ITN scaling-up programmes. Here, insecticide susceptibility was investigated in Anopheles gambiae sensu lato from an area of large scale ITN distribution programme in south-western Chad. Methods Susceptibility to 4% DDT, 0.05% deltamethrin, 0.75% permethrin, 0.1% bendiocarb and 5% malathion was assessed using the WHO standard procedures for adult mosquitoes. Tests were carried out with two to four days-old, non-engorged female mosquitoes. The An. gambiae Kisumu strain was used as a reference. Knockdown effect was recorded every 5 min and mortality scored 24 h after exposure. Mosquitoes were identified to species and molecular form by PCR-RFLP and genotypes at the kdr locus were determined in surviving specimens by Hot Oligonucleotide Ligation Assay (HOLA. Results During this survey, full susceptibility to malathion was recorded in all samples. Reduced susceptibility to bendiocarb (mortality rate of 96.1% was found in one sample out of nine assayed. Increased tolerance to pyrethroids was detected in most samples (8/9 with mortality rates ranging from 70.2 to 96.6% for deltamethrin and from 26.7 to 96.3% for permethrin. Pyrethroid tolerance was not associated with a significant increase of knock-down times. Anopheles arabiensis was the predominant species of the An. gambiae complex in the study area, representing 75 to 100% of the samples. Screening for kdr mutations detected the L1014F mutation in 88.6% (N = 35 of surviving An. gambiae sensu stricto S form mosquitoes. All surviving An. arabiensis (N = 49 and M form An. gambiae s.s. (N = 1 carried the susceptible allele

  16. Multiple insecticide resistance mechanisms in Anopheles gambiae s.l. populations from Cameroon, Central Africa

    Nwane Philippe

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Increasing incidence of DDT and pyrethroid resistance in Anopheles mosquitoes is seen as a limiting factor for malaria vector control. The current study aimed at an in-depth characterization of An. gambiae s.l. resistance to insecticides in Cameroon, in order to guide malaria vector control interventions. Methods Anopheles gambiae s.l. mosquitoes were collected as larvae and pupae from six localities spread throughout the four main biogeographical domains of Cameroon and reared to adults in insectaries. Standard WHO insecticide susceptibility tests were carried out with 4% DDT, 0.75% permethrin and 0.05% deltamethrin. Mortality rates and knockdown times (kdt50 and kdt95 were determined and the effect of pre-exposure to the synergists DEF, DEM and PBO was assessed. Tested mosquitoes were identified to species and molecular forms (M or S using PCR-RFLP. The hot ligation method was used to depict kdr mutations and biochemical assays were conducted to assess detoxifying enzyme activities. Results The An. arabiensis population from Pitoa was fully susceptible to DDT and permethrin (mortality rates > 98% and showed reduced susceptibility to deltamethrin. Resistance to DDT was widespread in An. gambiae s.s. populations and heterogeneous levels of susceptibility to permethrin and deltamethrin were observed. In many cases, prior exposure to synergists partially restored insecticide knockdown effect and increased mortality rates, suggesting a role of detoxifying enzymes in increasing mosquito survival upon challenge by pyrethroids and, to a lower extent DDT. The distribution of kdr alleles suggested a major role of kdr-based resistance in the S form of An. gambiae. In biochemical tests, all but one mosquito population overexpressed P450 activity, whereas baseline GST activity was low and similar in all field mosquito populations and in the control. Conclusion In Cameroon, multiple resistance mechanisms segregate in the S form of An

  17. Role of G-protein-coupled Receptor-related Genes in Insecticide Resistance of the Mosquito, Culex quinquefasciatus

    Ting Li; Lena Liu; Lee Zhang; Nannan Liu

    2014-01-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors regulate signal transduction pathways and play diverse and pivotal roles in the physiology of insects, however, the precise function of GPCRs in insecticide resistance remains unclear. Using quantitative RT-PCR and functional genomic methods, we, for the first time, explored the function of GPCRs and GPCR-related genes in insecticide resistance of mosquitoes, Culex quinquefasciatus. A comparison of the expression of 115 GPCR-related genes at a whole genome level be...

  18. Spatial and Temporal Potato Intensification Drives Insecticide Resistance in the Specialist Herbivore, Leptinotarsa decemlineata

    Huseth, Anders S.; Petersen, Jessica D.; Poveda, Katja; Szendrei, Zsofia; Nault, Brian A.; Kennedy, George G.; Groves, Russell L.

    2015-01-01

    Landscape-scale intensification of individual crops and pesticide use that is associated with this intensification is an emerging, environmental problem that is expected to have unequal effects on pests with different lifecycles, host ranges, and dispersal abilities. We investigate if intensification of a single crop in an agroecosystem has a direct effect on insecticide resistance in a specialist insect herbivore. Using a major potato pest, Leptinotarsa decemlineata, we measured imidacloprid...

  19. Resistance to conventional insecticides in Pakistani populations of Musca domestica L. (Diptera: Muscidae): a potential ectoparasite of dairy animals.

    Khan, Hafiz Azhar Ali; Akram, Waseem; Shad, Sarfraz Ali

    2013-04-01

    The house fly, Musca domestica L., is an important hygienic pest of humans and dairy animals with the potential to develop resistance to most chemical classes of insecticides. Six adult house fly strains from dairy farms in Punjab, Pakistan were evaluated for resistance to selected insecticides from organochlorine, organophosphate, carbamate and pyrethroid classes. For a chlorocyclodiene and two organophosphates tested, the resistance ratios (RR) at LC50 were in the range of 5.60-22.02 fold for endosulfan, 7.66-23.24 fold for profenofos and 2.47-7.44 fold for chlorpyrifos. For two pyrethroids and one carbamate, the RR values at LC50 were 30.22-70.02 for cypermethrin, 5.73-18.31 for deltamethrin, and 4.39-15.50 for methomyl. This is the first report of resistance to different classes of insecticides in Pakistani dairy populations of house flies. Regular insecticide resistance monitoring programs on dairy farms are needed to prevent field control failures. Moreover, integrated approaches including the judicious use of insecticides are needed to delay the development of insecticide resistance in house flies. PMID:23371032

  20. Deltamethrin-mediated survival, behavior, and oenocyte morphology of insecticide-susceptible and resistant yellow fever mosquitos (Aedes aegypti).

    Marriel, Nadja Biondine; Tomé, Hudson Vaner Ventura; Guedes, Raul Carvalho Narciso; Martins, Gustavo Ferreira

    2016-06-01

    Insecticide use is the prevailing control tactic for the mosquito Aedes aegypti, a vector of several human viruses, which leads to ever-increasing problems of insecticide resistance in populations of this insect pest species. The underlying mechanisms of insecticide resistance may be linked to the metabolism of insecticides by various cells, including oenocytes. Oenocytes are ectodermal cells responsible for lipid metabolism and detoxification. The goal of this study was to evaluate the sublethal effects of deltamethrin on survival, behavior, and oenocyte structure in the immature mosquitoes of insecticide-susceptible and resistant strains of A. aegypti. Fourth instar larvae (L4) of both strains were exposed to different concentrations of deltamethrin (i.e., 0.001, 0.003, 0.005, and 0.007 ppm). After exposure, L4 were subjected to behavioral bioassays. Insecticide effects on cell integrity after deltamethrin exposure (at 0.003 or 0.005 ppm) were assessed by processing pupal oenocytes for transmission electron microscopy or TUNEL reaction. The insecticide resistant L4 survived all the tested concentrations, whereas the 0.007-ppm deltamethrin concentration had lethal effects on susceptible L4. Susceptible L4 were lethargic and exhibited less swimming activity than unexposed larvae, whereas the resistant L4 were hyperexcited following exposure to 0.005 ppm deltamethrin. No sublethal effects and no significant cell death were observed in the oenocytes of either susceptible or resistant insects exposed to deltamethrin. The present study illustrated the different responses of susceptible and resistant strains of A. aegypti following exposure to sublethal concentration of deltamethrin, and demonstrated how the behavior of the immature stage of the two strains varied, as well as oenocyte structure following insecticide exposure. PMID:26943998

  1. Using mass-release of engineered insects to manage insecticide resistance

    Alphey, Nina [University of Oxford (United Kingdom). Dept. of Zoology; Alphey, Luke [Oxitec Limited, Oxford (United Kingdom); Coleman, Paul G. [London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine (United Kingdom). Dept. of Infectious and Tropical Diseases; Donnelly, Christl A. [Imperial College Faculty of Medicine, London (United Kingdom). Dept. of Infectious Disease Epidemiology

    2006-07-01

    Transgenic crops expressing insecticidal toxins derived from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) are widely used to control insect pests. The benefits of such crops would be lost if resistance to the toxins spread to a significant proportion of the pest population. The main resistance management method, mandatory in the US, is the high-dose/refuge strategy, requiring nearby refuges of toxin-free crops, and the use of toxin doses sufficiently high to kill not only wild type insects but also insects heterozygous for a resistance allele, thereby rendering the resistance functionally recessive. We propose that mass-release of harmless toxin-sensitive insects could substantially delay or even reverse the spread of resistance. Mass-release of such insects is an integral part of RIDL, a genetics-based method of pest control related to the Sterile Insect Technique. We used a population genetic mathematical model to analyze the effects of releasing male insects homozygous for a female-specific dominant lethal genetic construct, and concluded that this RIDL strategy could form an effective component of a resistance management scheme for insecticidal plants and other toxins. (author)

  2. Using mass-release of engineered insects to manage insecticide resistance

    Transgenic crops expressing insecticidal toxins derived from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) are widely used to control insect pests. The benefits of such crops would be lost if resistance to the toxins spread to a significant proportion of the pest population. The main resistance management method, mandatory in the US, is the high-dose/refuge strategy, requiring nearby refuges of toxin-free crops, and the use of toxin doses sufficiently high to kill not only wild type insects but also insects heterozygous for a resistance allele, thereby rendering the resistance functionally recessive. We propose that mass-release of harmless toxin-sensitive insects could substantially delay or even reverse the spread of resistance. Mass-release of such insects is an integral part of RIDL, a genetics-based method of pest control related to the Sterile Insect Technique. We used a population genetic mathematical model to analyze the effects of releasing male insects homozygous for a female-specific dominant lethal genetic construct, and concluded that this RIDL strategy could form an effective component of a resistance management scheme for insecticidal plants and other toxins. (author)

  3. The Relationship Between Resistance to Controlled Atmosphere and Insecticides of Liposcelis bostrychophila Badonnel (Psocoptera:Liposcelididae)

    DING Wei; ZHAO Zhi-mo; WANG Jin-jun; TAO Hui-ying; ZHANG Yong-qiang

    2004-01-01

    The cross resistance of four resistant strains of Liposcelis bostrychophila Badonnel, an important stored-product insect pest, was investigated. These four strains included the HCO2-R (hypercarbia-resistant strain), HCLO-R (hypoxia and hypercarbia resistant strain),DDVP-R (DDVP-resistant strain) and PH3-R (PH3-resistant strain). The results indicated that there were cross-resistances between CA and insecticides, and the quantities of the cross-resistance were different. The cross-resistance factor (RF) of HCO2-R to hypoxia and hypercarbia was 3.2458, whilst, that of HCLO-R to hypercarbia was 1.8280. The RF of DDVP-R to PH3 was 3.9614, whilst, that of PH3-R to DDVP was 2.7852. The RF values of DDVPR and PH3-R to hypercarbia were 1.3550 and 1.1816, respectively. However, the RF of HCO2-R to DDVP was 2.1372. There also was a low cross-resistance between DDVP-R and HCO2-R. The RF of HCO2-R to PH3 was 3.3698. This sugqested that the insects resistant to high CO2concentration atmosphere would develop significant resistance to PH3. However, the insects resistant to PH3 remain sensitive to hypercarbia atmosphere. Both DDVP-R and PH3-R developed resistance to high CO2 treatment. There was a low cross-resistance between DDVP-R and HCLO-R. The insects resistant to hypoxia and hypercarbia were very sensitive to DDVP. There also was cross-resistance between HCLO-R and PH3-R, but the resistance of PH3-R to hypoxia and hypercarbia was lower than that of HCLO-R to PH3. The difference of the overlapping and separate values indicated that there were differences in the intercross-resistance of four resistant strains.

  4. The distribution of insecticide resistance in Anopheles gambiae s.l. populations from Cameroon: an update.

    Ndjemaï, Hamadou N M; Patchoké, Salomon; Atangana, Jean; Etang, Josiane; Simard, Fréderic; Bilong, Charles F Bilong; Reimer, Lisa; Cornel, Anthony; Lanzaro, Gregory C; Fondjo, Etienne

    2009-11-01

    Insecticides are a key component of vector-based malaria control programmes in Cameroon. As part of ongoing resistance surveillance efforts, Anopheles gambiae s.l. female mosquitoes were exposed to organochlorine (DDT), a carbamate (bendiocarb), an organophosphate (malathion), and three pyrethroids (deltamethrin, lambda-cyhalothrin and permethrin) in WHO bioassay test kits. Results indicated a higher level of resistance (reduced mortality and knockdown effect) to DDT and pyrethroids in populations of A. gambiae s.s. than in A. arabiensis. The West and East African knockdown resistance (kdr) mutations were found in both species but at much higher frequencies in A. gambiae s.s. The West Africa kdr mutant was also more frequent in the A. gambiae S form than in the M form. No resistance to bendiocarb and malathion was found. Carbamate and organophosphorous compounds could thus be used as alternatives in locations in Cameroon where pyrethroid-resistant populations are found. PMID:19155034

  5. Mechanisms of insecticide resistance in field populations of Aedes aegypti (L.) from Quintana Roo, Southern Mexico.

    Flores, Adriana E; Grajales, Jaime Salomon; Salas, Ildefonso Fernandez; Garcia, Gustavo Ponce; Becerra, Ma Haydee Loaiza; Lozano, Saul; Brogdon, William G; Black, William C; Beaty, Barry

    2006-12-01

    Potential insecticide-resistance mechanisms were studied with the use of biochemical assays in Aedes aegypti (L.) collected from 5 municipalities representing the north part of Quintana Roo: Benito Juarez, Cozumel, Isla Mujeres, Lazaro Cardenas, and Solidaridad. The activities of alpha and beta esterases, mixed-function oxidases (MFO), glutathione-S-transferase (GST), acethylcholinesterase (AChE), and insensitive acethylcholinesterase (iAChE) were assayed in microplates. Three replicates were performed for each enzyme and 60 males and 60 females were analyzed in each population. The New Orleans (NO) susceptible strain of Ae. aegypti was used as a susceptible reference and the threshold criteria for each enzyme were the highest NO absorbance values. In none of the 6 tests were absorbance values correlated in males and females. alpha esterases were elevated in Benito Juarez, Cozumel females and in Lazaro Cardenas males and females. beta esterases were elevated in Benito Juarez, Cozumel females and in Cozumel and Lazaro Cardenas males. Elevated esterases suggest potential insecticide-resistance mechanisms against organophosphate, carbamate, and some pyrethroid insecticides. Slightly elevated levels of MFOs appeared in Lazaro Cardenas females and in Cozumel, Isla Mujeres, and Solidaridad males. Mechanisms involving iAChE or GST were not apparent. PMID:17304936

  6. Insecticide resistance mechanisms in the green peach aphid Myzus persicae (Hemiptera: Aphididae II: Costs and benefits.

    Andrea X Silva

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Among herbivorous insects that have exploited agro-ecosystems, the peach-potato aphid, Myzus persicae, is recognized as one of the most important agricultural pests worldwide. Uses over 400 plant species and has evolved different insecticides resistance mechanisms. As M. persicae feeds upon a huge diversity of hosts, it has been exposed to a wide variety of plant allelochemicals, which probably have promoted a wide range of detoxification systems. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this work we (i evaluated whether insecticide resistance mutations (IRM in M. persicae can give an advantage in terms of reproductive fitness when aphids face two hosts, pepper (Capsicum annuum a suitable host and radish (Raphanus sativus the unfavorable host and (ii examined the transcriptional expression of six genes that are known to be up-regulated in response to insecticides. Our results show a significant interaction between host and IRM on the intrinsic rate of increase (r(m. Susceptible genotypes (not carrying insensitivity mutations had a higher r(m on pepper, and the transcriptional levels of five genes increased on radish. The r(m relationship was reversed on the unfavorable host; genotypes with multiple IRM exhibited higher r(m, without altering the transcriptional levels of the studied genes. Genotypes with one IRM kept a similar r(m on both hosts, but they increased the transcriptional levels of two genes. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Although we have studied only nine genotypes, overall our results are in agreement with the general idea that allelochemical detoxification systems could constitute a pre-adaptation for the development of insecticide resistance. Genotypes carrying IRM exhibited a higher r(m than susceptible genotypes on radish, the more unfavorable host. Susceptible genotypes should be able to tolerate the defended host by up-regulating some metabolic genes that are also responding to insecticides. Hence, our results suggest that

  7. Functional haplodiploidy: a mechanism for the spread of insecticide resistance in an important international insect pest.

    Brun, L O; Stuart, J; Gaudichon, V; Aronstein, K; French-Constant, R H

    1995-01-01

    The coffee berry borer, Hypothenemus hampei, is the most important insect pest of coffee worldwide and has an unusual life history that ensures a high degree of inbreeding. Individual females lay a predominantly female brood within individual coffee berries and because males are flightless there is almost entirely full sib mating. We investigated the genetics associated with this interesting life history after the important discovery of resistance to the cyclodiene type insecticide endosulfan. Both the inheritance of the resistance phenotype and the resistance-associated point mutation in the gamma-aminobutyric acid receptor gene Rdl were examined. Consistent with haplodiploidy, males failed to express and transmit paternally derived resistance alleles. Furthermore, while cytological examination revealed that males are diploid, one set of chromosomes was condensed, and probably nonfunctional, in the somatic cells of all males examined. Moreover, although two sets of chromosomes were present in primary spermatocytes, the chromosomes failed to pair before the single meiotic division, and only one set was packaged in sperm. Thus, the coffee berry borer is "functionally" haplodiploid. Its genetics and life history may therefore represent an interesting intermediate step in the evolution of true haplodiploidy. The influence of this breeding system on the spread of insecticide resistance is discussed. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:7568233

  8. Extraordinary resistance to insecticides reveals exotic Q biotype of Bemisia tabaci in the New World.

    Dennehy, Timothy J; Degain, Benjamin A; Harpold, Virginia S; Zaborac, Marni; Morin, Shai; Fabrick, Jeffrey A; Nichols, Robert L; Brown, Judith K; Byrne, Frank J; Li, Xianchun

    2010-12-01

    A strain of the whitefly Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) possessing unusually high levels of resistance to a wide range of insecticides was discovered in 2004 in the course of routine resistance monitoring in Arizona. The multiply resistant insects, collected from poinsettia (Euphorbia pulcherrima Willd. ex Klotzsch) plants purchased at a retail store in Tucson, were subjected to biotype analysis in three laboratories. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of naphthyl esterases and sequencing of the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I gene (780 bp) confirmed the first detection of the Q biotype of B. tabaci in the New World. This U.S. Q biotype strain, referred to as Poinsettia'04, was highly resistant to two selective insect growth regulators, pyriproxyfen and buprofezin, and to mixtures of fenpropathrin and acephate. It was also unusually low in susceptibility to the neonicotinoid insecticides imidacloprid, acetamiprid, and thiamethoxam, relative to B biotype whiteflies. In 100 collections of whiteflies made in Arizona cotton (Gossypium spp.), vegetable, and melon (Cucumis melo L.) fields from 2001 to 2005, no Q biotypes were detected. Regions of the United States that were severely impacted by the introduction of the B biotype of B. tabaci in the 1980s would be well advised to promote measures that limit movement of the Q biotype from controlled environments into field systems and to formulate alternatives for managing this multiply-resistant biotype, in the event that it becomes more widely distributed. PMID:21309242

  9. Profenofos Resistance and the Efficacy of Botanical Insecticide From Extracts Refining Waste of Vetiver (Vetiveria zizanoides L. against Crosidolomia pavonana

    Entun Santosa

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Aims: This study aims to determine the resistance status of C. Pavonana to synthetic insecticides of profenofos and compare with the methanol extract of vetiver oil refining waste in managing resistance C. Pavonana. Study design: The experiments were performed using two testing methods , namely the effect of contact and residual effect of feed on the leaves . Place and Duration of Study: The larvae of C. Pavonana is derived from the population Cikajang taken from three locations: Village Padasuka , Mekarsari , and Cibodas. And the experiment was conducted also at Laboratory of Faculty of Agriculture , University of Padjadjaran , Jatinangor. The experiment conducted from April to June 2013 Methodology: Completely Randomized Design with four replications , each replication using a ten instar larvae II . As a comparison used insect larvae C. Pavonana standards obtained from the Laboratory of Insect Physiology and Toxicology ( Department of Plant Protection , Faculty of Agriculture , IPB . Which has been maintained over 20 generations in the laboratory . Results: The experimental results showed that C. Pavonana populaton of Cikajang had been resistant to synthetic insecticides profenofos , with resistance value ratio ( RV , which is more than one . The highest value found in the village of Padasuka at 3.67 and the lowest value at 2.15 in Cibodas village . The larvae of C. Pavonana resistant to insecticides is sensitive to botanical methanol extract of vetiver oil refining waste . This is evidenced by the resistance value less than one . Resistance value (RV C. Pavonanathe methanol extract of botanical insecticides vetiver oil refining waste ( test method leaves a residual effect on feed at Padasuka Village , Mekarsari village and Cibodas village resistance value respectively 0.62; 0.83 and 0.61 . Thus the methanol extract of vetiver oil refining waste can be used to overcome the problem of resistance C. Pavonana to synthetic insecticides profenofos

  10. Evidence of carbamate resistance in urban populations of Anopheles gambiae s.s. mosquitoes resistant to DDT and deltamethrin insecticides in Lagos, South-Western Nigeria

    Oduola Adedayo O

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Resistance monitoring is essential in ensuring the success of insecticide based vector control programmes. This study was carried out to assess the susceptibility status of urban populations of Anopheles gambiae to carbamate insecticide being considered for vector control in mosquito populations previously reported to be resistant to DDT and permethrin. Methods Two – three day old adult female Anopheles mosquitoes reared from larval collections in 11 study sites from Local Government Areas of Lagos were exposed to test papers impregnated with DDT 4%, deltamethrin 0.05% and propoxur 0.1% insecticides. Additional tests were carried out to determine the susceptibility status of the Anopheles gambiae population to bendiocarb insecticide. Members of the A. gambiae complex, the molecular forms, were identified by PCR assays. The involvement of metabolic enzymes in carbamate resistance was assessed using Piperonyl butoxide (PBO synergist assays. The presence of kdr-w/e and ace-1R point mutations responsible for DDT-pyrethroid and carbamate resistance mechanisms was also investigated by PCR. Results Propoxur resistance was found in 10 out of the 11 study sites. Resistance to three classes of insecticides was observed in five urban localities. Mortality rates in mosquitoes exposed to deltamethrin and propoxur did not show any significant difference (P > 0.05 but was significantly higher (P A. gambiae s.s (M form. The kdr -w point mutation at allelic frequencies between 45%-77% was identified as one of the resistant mechanisms responsible for DDT and pyrethroid resistance. Ace-1R point mutation was absent in the carbamate resistant population. However, the possible involvement of metabolic resistance was confirmed by synergistic assays conducted. Conclusion Evidence of carbamate resistance in A. gambiae populations already harbouring resistance to DDT and permethrin is a clear indication that calls for the implementation of

  11. The effect of engineered disulfide bonds on the stability of Drosophila melanogaster acetylcholinesterase

    Lamouroux Lucille; Lougarre Andrée; Siadat Omid; Ladurantie Caroline; Fournier Didier

    2006-01-01

    Background Acetylcholinesterase is irreversibly inhibited by organophosphate and carbamate insecticides allowing its use in biosensors for detection of these insecticides. Drosophila acetylcholinesterase is the most sensitive enzyme known and has been improved by in vitro mutagenesis. However, its stability has to be improved for extensive utilization. Results To create a disulfide bond that could increase the stability of the Drosophila melanogaster acetylcholinesterase, we selected seven p...

  12. Insecticide resistance monitoring and metabolic mechanism study of the green peach aphid, Myzus persicae (Sulzer) (Hemiptera: Aphididae), in Chongqing, China.

    Li, Yong; Xu, Zhifeng; Shi, Li; Shen, Guangmao; He, Lin

    2016-09-01

    Myzus persicae (Sulzer) is one of the most important agricultural pests in China, which caused serious losses every year. For resistance monitoring, twelve populations of this pest were collected from tobacco field in Chongqing, China, and their sensitivities to 4 insecticides were tested. Results showed that only WL (RR=6.51) and FJ (RR=6.03) populations have developed minor resistance to imidacloprid, and the others still remained susceptible. One population (NC) has reached a high resistance level to cyhalothrin (RR=41.28), five populations showed medium level (10.36≤RR≤20.45), and the other six remained susceptible (0.39≤RR≤3.53). As regards carbosulfan, three populations have developed medium resistance, four populations showed only minor resistance, and the other five (0.81≤RR≤3.97) were still susceptible. Population SZ developed a medium level (RR=14.83) to phoxim, the other 11 were susceptible (0.29≤RR≤2.41). To analysis the potential resistance mechanism, inhibition effects of synergists and detoxifying enzyme activities were detected. The results indicated that the MFO was the most important detoxifying enzyme conferring imidacloprid resistance, and CarE was most important to cyhalothrin, carbosulfan and phoxim. Our study provided a comprehensive survey of insecticide resistance of M. persicae in Chongqing, and suggested that different counties should take corresponding management to delay the insecticide resistance development and prolong the usefulness of insecticides. PMID:27521909

  13. Insecticide resistance in Aedes aegypti populations from Ceará, Brazil

    Goulart Marilia OF

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Organophosphates and pyrethroids are used widely in Brazil to control Aedes aegypti, the main vector of dengue viruses, under the auspices of the National Programme for Dengue Control. Resistance to these insecticides is widespread throughout Brazil. In Ceará the vector is present in 98% of districts and resistance to temephos has been reported previously. Here we measure resistance to temephos and the pyrethroid cypermethrin in three populations from Ceará and use biochemical and molecular assays to characterise resistance mechanisms. Results Resistance to temephos varied widely across the three studied populations, with resistance ratios (RR95 of 7.2, 30 and 192.7 in Juazeiro do Norte, Barbalha and Crato respectively. The high levels of resistance detected in Barbalha and Crato (RR95 ≥ 30 imply a reduction of temephos efficacy, and indeed in simulated field tests reduced effectiveness was observed for the Barbalha population. Two populations (Crato and Barbalha were also resistant to cypermethrin, whilst Juazeiro do Norte showed only an altered susceptibility. The Ile1011Met kdr mutation was detected in all three populations and Val1016Ile in Crato and Juazeiro do Norte. 1011Met was significantly associated with resistance to cypermethrin in the Crato population. Biochemical tests showed that only the activity of esterases and GSTs, among the tested detoxification enzymes, was altered in these populations when compared with the Rockefeller strain. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that two A. aegypti populations from Ceará are under strong selection pressure by temephos, compromising the field effectiveness of this organophosphate. Our results also provide evidence that the process of reducing resistance to this larvicide in the field is difficult and slow and may require more than seven years for reversal. In addition, we show resistance to cypermethrin in two of the three populations studied, and for the first time

  14. Comparing Host Plant Resistance, Engineered Resistance, and Insecticide Treatment for Control of Colorado Potato Beetle and Potato Leafhopper in Potatoes

    Gerald M. Ghidiu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The Colorado potato beetle, Leptinotarsa decemlineata (Say Order Coleoptera and the potato leafhopper, Empoasca fabae (Harris Order Homoptera, are the major insect pests of potato in eastern North America. In two years of field trials, we compared the effectiveness of three pest management options for the control of Colorado potato beetle and potato leafhopper: natural host plant resistance (glandular trichomes, engineered resistance (Bacillus thuringiensis [Bt] Berliner cry3A gene and a susceptible potato cultivar (Superior with an at-planting application of the insecticide thiamethoxam. Similar and acceptable control of the Colorado potato beetle larvae was obtained with the Bt-cry3A lines and the thiamethoxam treated “Superior” variety. The glandular trichome cultivar had significantly less Colorado potato beetle damage than did the untreated “Superior” in 2004, although damage was significantly greater than in the Bt-cry3A lines and the insecticide-treated potatoes for both years, and was the only treatment that consistently had very little potato leafhopper damage. These data demonstrate that although each type of host plant resistance mechanism (Bt-cry3A or glandular trichomes was as effective as the chemical control against one of the insects, neither provides adequate resistance to both Colorado potato beetle and potato leaf hopper.

  15. Additional selection for insecticide resistance in urban malaria vectors: DDT resistance in Anopheles arabiensis from Bobo-Dioulasso, Burkina Faso.

    Christopher M Jones

    Full Text Available In the city of Bobo-Dioulasso in Burkina Faso, Anopheles arabiensis has superseded Anopheles gambiae s.s. as the major malaria vector and the larvae are found in highly polluted habitats normally considered unsuitable for Anopheles mosquitoes. Here we show that An. gambiae s.l. adults emerging from a highly polluted site in the city centre (Dioulassoba have a high prevalence of DDT resistance (percentage mortality after exposure to diagnostic dose=65.8% in the dry season and 70.4% in the rainy season, respectively. An investigation into the mechanisms responsible found an unexpectedly high frequency of the 1014S kdr mutation (allele frequency=0.4, which is found at very low frequencies in An. arabiensis in the surrounding rural areas, and an increase in transcript levels of several detoxification genes, notably from the glutathione transferase and cytochrome P450 gene families. A number of ABC transporter genes were also expressed at elevated levels in the DDT resistant An. arabiensis. Unplanned urbanisation provides numerous breeding grounds for mosquitoes. The finding that Anopheles mosquitoes adapted to these urban breeding sites have a high prevalence of insecticide resistance has important implications for our understanding of the selective forces responsible for the rapid spread of insecticide resistant populations of malaria vectors in Africa.

  16. Impact of insecticide resistance on the field control of Aedes aegypti in the State of São Paulo

    Maria de Lourdes da Graça Macoris

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The need to control dengue transmission by means of insecticides has led to the development of resistance to most of the products used worldwide against mosquitoes. In the State of São Paulo, the Superintendência de Controle de Endemias (SUCEN has annually monitored the susceptibility of Aedes aegypti to insecticides since 1996; since 1999, surveys were conducted in collaboration with the National Network of Laboratories (MoReNAa Network and were coordinated by the Ministry of Health. In this study, in addition to the biological characterization of insecticide resistance in the laboratory, the impact of resistance on field control was evaluated for vector populations that showed resistance in laboratory assays. Methods Field efficacy tests with larvicides and adulticides were performed over a 13-year period, using World Health Organization protocols. Results Data from the field tests showed a reduction in the residual effect of temephos on populations with a resistance ratio of 3. For adults, field control was less effective in populations characterized as resistant in laboratory qualitative assays, and this was confirmed using qualitative assays and field evaluation. Conclusions Our results indicated that management of resistance development needs to be adopted when insect populations show reduced susceptibility. The use of insecticides is a self-limiting tool that needs to be applied cautiously, and dengue control requires more sustainable strategies.

  17. Rhodnius prolixus supergene families of enzymes potentially associated with insecticide resistance.

    Schama, Renata; Pedrini, Nicolás; Juárez, M Patricia; Nelson, David R; Torres, André Q; Valle, Denise; Mesquita, Rafael D

    2016-02-01

    Chagas disease or American trypanosomiasis, is a potentially life-threatening illness caused by the protozoan parasite, Trypanosoma cruzi. Once known as an endemic health problem of poor rural populations in Latin American countries, it has now spread worldwide. The parasite is transmitted by triatomine bugs, of which Rhodnius prolixus (Hemiptera, Reduviidae, Triatominae) is one of the vectors and a model organism. This species occurs mainly in Central and South American countries where the disease is endemic. Disease prevention focuses on vector control programs that, in general, rely intensely on insecticide use. However, the massive use of chemical insecticides can lead to resistance. One of the major mechanisms is known as metabolic resistance that is associated with an increase in the expression or activity of detoxification genes. Three of the enzyme families that are involved in this process - carboxylesterases (CCE), glutathione s-transferases (GST) and cytochrome P450s (CYP) - are analyzed in the R. prolixus genome. A similar set of detoxification genes to those of the Hemipteran Acyrthosiphon pisum but smaller than in most dipteran species was found in R. prolixus genome. All major CCE classes (43 genes found) are present but the pheromone/hormone processing class had fewer genes than usual. One main expansion was detected on the detoxification/dietary class. The phosphotriesterase family, recently associated with insecticide resistance, was also represented with one gene. One microsomal GST gene was found and the cytosolic GST gene count (14 genes) is extremely low when compared to the other hemipteran species with sequenced genomes. However, this is similar to Apis mellifera, a species known for its deficit in detoxification genes. In R. prolixus 88 CYP genes were found, with representatives in the four clans (CYP2, CYP3, CYP4 and mitochondrial) usually found in insects. R. prolixus seems to have smaller species-specific expansions of CYP genes than

  18. Push-pull Strategy with Trap Crops, Neem and Nuclear Polyhedrosis Virus for Insecticide Resistance Management in Helicoverpa armigera (Hubner) in Cotton

    P. Duraimurugan; A. Regupathy

    2005-01-01

    Insecticide resistance in Helicoverpa armigera (Hubner) is a major threat to cotton production in India. The virus infection was found to increase the susceptibility of H. armigera to the insecticides. But, use of Nuclear Polyhedrosis Virus (NPV) on a larger scale and on cotton due to leaf alkalinity poses certain practical problems. Hence, studies were carried out to assess the effects of push-pull strategy with trap crops, neem and NPV in cotton for the management of insecticide resistant H...

  19. Association of esterases with insecticide resistance in Culex quinquefasciatus (Diptera: Culicidae).

    Gordon, Jennifer R; Ottea, James

    2012-06-01

    The southern house mosquito, Culex quinquefasciatus Say, is a competent vector of human disease and an important target of mosquito abatement programs. However, these management programs have been compromised by development of insecticide resistance. In the current study, susceptibilities to naled and resmethrin, two adulticides used in mosquito abatement, were monitored using a topical and contact bioassay, respectively, in five field- collected populations of C. quinquefasciatus (MARC, HOOD1, HOOD2, MINLOVE, and THIB). Frequencies of resistance, measured as survival after treatment with discriminating concentrations (i.e., sufficient to kill > 90% of a reference susceptible strain) were high (88.0-96.8%) in all field collections treated with naled, but were variable (3.3-94.2%) with resmethrin. In addition, esterase activities in mosquitoes from these collections were quantified using alpha-naphthyl acetate and ranged from 1.08 to 3.39 micromol alpha-naphthol produced min(-1) mg prot(-1). Heightened activities were associated with decreased insecticide susceptibility in HOOD1, THIB, and MINLOVE but not HOOD2. Esterases were visualized using native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and intra- and interstrain differences in banding patterns were detected. In addition, esterases from MINLOVE mosquitoes were more numerous and intensely staining when compared with those from a laboratory-susceptible strain. Finally, naled synergized the toxicity of resmethrin in populations with decreased insecticide susceptibility and increased esterase activity by 2.5-(MINLOVE) to three-fold (THIB). Results from this study will allow management strategies for populations of C. quinquefasciatus to be optimized, and provide a foundation for further studies exploring use of esterase inhibitors as synergists of pyrethroid toxicity. PMID:22812138

  20. STUDIES ON AEDES AEGYPTI RESISTANCE TO SOME INSECTICIDES IN THE JAZAN DISTRICT, SAUDI ARABIA.

    Alsheikh, Adel A; Mohammed, W S; Noureldin, E M; Daffalla, O M; Shrwani, Y A; Hobani, K J; Alsheikh, F A; Alzahrani, M H; Binsaeed, A A

    2016-04-01

    The present study provided information on the susceptibility status of the adult and larvae of Aedes aegypti mosquitoes in Jazan region of Saudi Arabia. Bioassay tests were performed on adults and larvae by using WHO recommended concentrations and test kits. Adults of Ae. aegypti mosquitoes were exposed to test papers impregnated with Lambda-cyhalothrin (0.05%), Cyfluthrin (0.15%), Deltamethrin (0.05%), Permethrin (0.75%), Fenitrothion (1%), Bendiocarb (0.1%) and DDT (4%) insecticides. Ae. aegypti mosquitoes were found to be susceptible only to Cyfluthrin; (mortality rate was 100%), whereas variable resistances were observed from the rest of the other insecticides tested (mortality rates ranged between 93.6 and 17%). Larvae were subjected to different concentrations of Diflubenzuron, Methoprene (IGRs) and Temephos (Organophosphate). Adult emergence inhibition (IE₅₀ & IE₉₅) values for the IGRs and the (LC₅₀ & LC₉₅) for Temephos were determined by log-probit regression analysis. Ae. aegypti larvae were resistant to Temephos (LC₅₀ 61.8-LC₉₅ 35600.1 mg/l) and showed high susceptibility to Methoprene than Diflubenzuron (IE₅₀ 0.49-IE₉₅ 10.9 mg/l) and (IE₅₀ 0.86 and IE₉₅ 93.8 mg/l), respectively. Larvae were more susceptible to Methoprene than Diflubenzuron by 1.8 folds. PMID:27363057

  1. Insecticide resistance in the dengue vector Aedes aegypti from Martinique: distribution, mechanisms and relations with environmental factors.

    Sébastien Marcombe

    Full Text Available Dengue is an important mosquito borne viral disease in Martinique Island (French West Indies. The viruses responsible for dengue are transmitted by Aedes aegypti, an indoor day-biting mosquito. The most effective proven method for disease prevention has been by vector control by various chemical or biological means. Unfortunately insecticide resistance has already been observed on the Island and recently showed to significantly reduce the efficacy of vector control interventions. In this study, we investigated the distribution of resistance and the underlying mechanisms in nine Ae. aegypti populations. Statistical multifactorial approach was used to investigate the correlations between insecticide resistance levels, associated mechanisms and environmental factors characterizing the mosquito populations. Bioassays revealed high levels of resistance to temephos and deltamethrin and susceptibility to Bti in the 9 populations tested. Biochemical assays showed elevated detoxification enzyme activities of monooxygenases, carboxylesterases and glutathione S-tranferases in most of the populations. Molecular screening for common insecticide target-site mutations, revealed the presence of the "knock-down resistance" V1016I Kdr mutation at high frequency (>87%. Real time quantitative RT-PCR showed the potential involvement of several candidate detoxification genes in insecticide resistance. Principal Component Analysis (PCA performed with variables characterizing Ae. aegypti from Martinique permitted to underline potential links existing between resistance distribution and other variables such as agriculture practices, vector control interventions and urbanization. Insecticide resistance is widespread but not homogeneously distributed across Martinique. The influence of environmental and operational factors on the evolution of the resistance and mechanisms are discussed.

  2. Assessment of resistance risk in obliquebanded leafroller (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) to the reduced-risk insecticides chlorantraniliprole and spinetoram.

    Sial, Ashfaq A; Brunner, Jay F

    2010-08-01

    Obliquebanded leafroller, Choristoneura rosaceana (Harris) (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae), is a major pest of pome fruit in Washington. The use of broad-spectrum insecticides for decades has led to the development of insecticide resistance in C. rosaceana. Recently registered insecticides with novel modes of action, such as chlorantraniliprole and spinetoram, have provided effective C. rosaceana control, but resistance remains a threat. The risk of insecticide resistance development in a pest can be assessed by artificial selection in the laboratory. Subsequently, this information can be valuable in developing strategies to retain susceptibility in the field. A laboratory population of C. rosaceana was selected after repeated exposure to chlorantraniliprole and spinetoram to determine the risk of resistance evolution. After six generations of selection, 6.58- and 3.64-fold increases in LC50 were recorded for chlorantraniliprole and spinetoram, respectively. The realized heritability (h2) of resistance was estimated as 0.17 for chlorantraniliprole and 0.18 for spinetoram by using threshold trait analysis. The rates of resistance development were compared using the response quotient (Q), which was estimated as 0.11 and 0.07 for chlorantraniliprole and spinetoram, respectively. Projected rates of resistance evolution indicated that if h2 = 0.2 and 80% of the population was killed at each generation, then a 10-fold increase in LC50 would be expected in less than six generations for chlorantraniliprole and 10 generations for spinetoram. These results indicate that the risk of resistance development in C. rosaceana exists to both of these insecticides but that resistance development in C. rosaceana would be slower against spinetoram than chlorantraniliprole. PMID:20857751

  3. Transcriptomic responses of the aphid Myzus persicae nicotianae Blackman (Hemiptera: Aphididae to insecticides: Analyses in the single Chilean clone of the tobacco aphid

    Marco Cabrera-Brandt

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The tobacco aphid Myzus persicae nicotianae Blackman is a subspecies of the highly polyphagous and agricultural pest Myzus persicae (Sulzer. For its control, insecticide applications are widely used, but resistance to numerous molecules has been reported, displaying at least three insecticide resistance mechanisms, including: (i elevated carboxylesterases (E-Carb, (ii modification of the acetylcholinesterase (MACE, and (iii kdr and super-kdr insensitivity mutations. In Chile, populations of the tobacco aphid are characterized by the presence of a single predominant clone, which is also present in high proportions in other countries of the Americas. This aphid clone exhibits low levels of carboxylesterase activity and is kdr susceptible, but the MACE mechanism of insecticide resistance has not been studied. In order to characterize the tobacco aphid in terms of the MACE mechanism and to identify a preliminary group of aphid genes putatively involved in insecticide resistance, a cDNA microarray was used to study the transcriptomic responses when aphids are sprayed with a carbamate insecticide. The single Chilean clone of the tobacco aphid was characterized as MACE susceptible, but we found 38 transcripts significantly regulated by insecticide exposure (13 up- and 25 down-regulated genes. The expression of six of them was validated by qRT-PCR experiments at several time points (6, 12, 18, 24, 30, 36, and 42 h after insecticide application. This mutational and transcriptomic characterization of the tobacco aphid responding to insecticide spray opens new hypotheses in the understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying insecticide resistance.

  4. Effects of Insecticides on Strawberry Aphid Chaetosiphon fragaefolii (Cockerell on Resistant and Susceptible Strawberry Genotypes

    Slobodan Milenković

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Strawberry aphid, Chaetosiphon fragaefolii (Cockerell, is the most important vector ofstrawberry virus. Breeding of genotypes resistant to this pest is an important preventivecontrol measure, which can be compatible with rational insecticide application. The aimof the paper was to determine effects of dimethoate and deltamethrin on C. fragaefoliipopulations reared on two strawberry genotypes different in susceptibility: susceptiblestrawberry cultivar Čačanska rana and medium resistant hybrid, zf/1/94/96 (Senga Fructarinax Del Norte. Lower toxicity of deltamethrin was observed (laboratory assay as well aslower biological efficacy of dimethoate at lower concentrations (field trial for specimensfrom C. fragaefolii population reared on susceptible strawberry cultivar Čačanska rana.

  5. Dynamics of insecticide resistance alleles in house fly populations from New York and Florida.

    Rinkevich, Frank D; Hamm, Ronda L; Geden, Christopher J; Scott, Jeffrey G

    2007-06-01

    The frequency of insecticide-resistance alleles for two genes (Vssc1 and CYP6D1) was studied in field collected populations of house flies from two different climates. While the frequency of these resistance alleles in flies at dairies from four states has recently been reported, there is no information on the relative change of these allele frequencies over time. House flies were collected during the 2003-2004 season from New York and Florida before the first application of permethrin, during the middle of the field season, after the final application, and again the following spring (following months without permethrin use). Bioassay results indicated that homozygous susceptible and extremely resistant flies were rare, while moderately and highly resistant individuals were relatively common at all times in both states. The frequency of resistance alleles at the New York dairy rose during the season and declined over the winter, suggesting an overwintering fitness cost associated with these alleles. The super-kdr allele was detected for the first time in North America at the end of 2003. In Florida the frequency of the resistance alleles did not increase during the spray season or decrease during the winter, suggesting there is substantial immigration of susceptible alleles to the Florida dairy and no overwintering fitness cost associated with resistance alleles in this climate. Resistance to permethrin correlated well with the frequency of the Vssc1 and CYP6D1 resistance alleles in flies from New York, but not as well in the population from Florida. This suggests there may be a new resistance mechanism or allele evolving in Florida. PMID:17517332

  6. Undesirable consequences of insecticide resistance following Aedes aegypti control activities due to a dengue outbreak.

    Rafael Maciel-de-Freitas

    Full Text Available During a dengue outbreak with co-circulation of DENV-1 and -2 in the city of Boa Vista, one patient was diagnosed with DENV-4, a serotype supposed absent from Brazil for almost 30 years. The re-emergence of DENV-4 triggered the intensification of mechanical and chemical Aedes aegypti control activities in order to reduce vector density and avoid DENV-4 dissemination throughout the country.Vector control activities consisted of (a source reduction, (b application of diflubenzuron against larvae and (c vehicle-mounted space spraying of 2% deltamethrin to eliminate adults. Control activity efficacy was monitored by comparing the infestation levels and the number of eggs collected in ovitraps before and after interventions, performed in 22 Boa Vista districts, covering an area of ∼ 80% of the city and encompassing 56,837 dwellings. A total of 94,325 containers were eliminated or treated with diflubenzuron. The most frequently positive containers were small miscellaneous receptacles, which corresponded to 59% of all positive breeding sites. Insecticide resistance to deltamethrin was assessed before, during and after interventions by dose-response bioassays adopting WHO-based protocols. The intense use of the pyrethroid increased fourfold the resistance ratio of the local Ae. aegypti population only six months after the beginning of vector control. Curiously, this trend was also observed in the districts in which no deltamethrin was applied by the public health services. On the other hand, changes in the resistance ratio to the organophosphate temephos seemed less influenced by insecticide in Boa Vista.Despite the intense effort, mosquito infestation levels were only slightly reduced. Besides, the median number of eggs in ovitraps remained unaltered after control activity intensification. The great and rapid increase in pyrethroid resistance levels of natural Ae. aegypti populations is discussed in the context of both public and domestic

  7. Stability of Field-Selected Resistance to Conventional and Newer Chemistry Insecticides in the House Fly, Musca domestica L. (Diptera: Muscidae).

    Abbas, N; Ijaz, M; Shad, S A; Khan, H

    2015-08-01

    The house fly, Musca domestica L. (Diptera: Muscidae), is a pest of livestock and has the ability to develop resistance to different insecticides. We assessed the fluctuations in seasonal stability of house fly resistance to insecticides from poultry facility populations in Pakistan. House fly populations were collected from poultry facilities located at Khanewal, Punjab, Pakistan in three seasons (July, November, and March) to investigate the fluctuations in their resistance to conventional (organophosphate, pyrethroid) and novel chemistry (spinosyn, oxadiazine, neonicotinoid) insecticides. Laboratory bioassays were performed using the feeding method of mixing insecticide concentrations with 20% sugar solutions, and cotton pads dipped in insecticide solutions were provided to tested adult flies. Bioassay results showed that all house fly populations had varying degrees of susceptibility to tested insecticides. Comparisons between populations at different seasons showed a significant fluctuation in susceptibility to organophosphate, pyrethroid, spinosyn, oxadiazine, and neonicotinoid insecticides. Highest resistant levels were found for organophosphate when compared with other tested insecticides. The resistance to conventional insecticides decreased significantly in March compared with July and November, while resistance to oxadiazine and avermectins decreased significantly in November. However, resistance to spinosad and imidacloprid remained stable throughout the seasons. All conventional and novel chemistry insecticides were significantly correlated with each other in all tested seasons except nitenpyram/lambda-cyhalothrin and nitenpyram/imidacloprid. Our data suggests that the variation in house fly resistance among seasons could be due to fitness costs or to the cessation of selection pressure in the off-season. These results have significant implications for the use of insecticides in house fly management. PMID:26174963

  8. [Resistance to the organophosphate insecticides temephos and malathion in Culex pipiens L. (Diptera, Culicidae) from the Adriatic coast near Friuli].

    Zamburlini, R; Bellantone, P

    1993-12-01

    Susceptibility to organophosphorus insecticides Temephos and Malathion was tested in Culex pipiens L. larvae from Friuli Adriatic coast (North-East of Italy). The samples were collected in various sites of three zones with different intensity of insecticidal treatments. Tests were made following the W.H.O. recommendations. The tests were made on larval samples which were exposed for 24 hours to ascending concentrations of each insecticide. From the observed percentage mortalities the LC50 and LC90 values were calculated. The resistance ratio was obtained comparing the CL50 values with reference CL50 values provided by the W.H.O. The obtained data suggest the existence of Cx. pipiens populations resistant to the tested chemicals in the most intensively treated touristic zone (Lignano Sabbiadoro). The samples collected in an agricultural zone with no mosquito control treatments showed a slight reduced susceptibility to the tested compounds. PMID:7520564

  9. On the worldwide spread of an insecticide resistance gene: a role for local selection.

    Labbe, P; Lenormand, T; Raymond, M

    2005-11-01

    Adaptation occurs by gene replacement (or transient balanced polymorphism). Replacement may be caused by selection (local or global) and/or genetic drift among alleles. In addition, historical events may blur the respective effects of selection and drift during the course of replacement. We address the relative importance of these processes in the evolution of insecticide resistance genes in the mosquito Culex pipiens. The resistance allele, Ester2, has a broad geographic distribution compared to the other resistance alleles. To distinguish between the different processes explaining this distribution, we reviewed the literature and analysed updated data from the Montpellier area of southern France. Overall, our data indicate that Ester2 prevails over other Ester resistance alleles in moderately treated areas. Such conditions are common and favour the hypothesis of selection acting at a local level. This places an emphasis on the importance of ecological conditions during the evolution of resistance. Finally, we highlight that historical events have contributed to its spread in some areas. PMID:16313460

  10. Evaluating an Action Threshold-Based Insecticide Program on Onion Cultivars Varying in Resistance to Onion Thrips (Thysanoptera: Thripidae).

    Nault, Brian A; Huseth, Anders S

    2016-08-01

    Onion thrips, Thrips tabaci Lindeman (Thysanoptera: Thripidae), is a highly destructive pest of onion, Allium cepa L., and its management relies on multiple applications of foliar insecticides. Development of insecticide resistance is common in T. tabaci populations, and new strategies are needed to relax existing levels of insecticide use, but still provide protection against T. tabaci without compromising marketable onion yield. An action threshold-based insecticide program combined with or without a thrips-resistant onion cultivar was investigated as an improved approach for managing T. tabaci infestations in commercial onion fields. Regardless of cultivar type, the average number of insecticide applications needed to manage T. tabaci infestations in the action-threshold based program was 4.3, while the average number of sprays in the standard weekly program was 7.2 (a 40% reduction). The mean percent reduction in numbers of applications following the action threshold treatment in the thrips-resistant onion cultivar, 'Advantage', was 46.7% (range 40-50%) compared with the standard program, whereas the percentage reduction in applications in action threshold treatments in the thrips-susceptible onion cultivar, 'Santana', was 34.3% (range 13-50%) compared with the standard program, suggesting a benefit of the thrips-resistant cultivar. Marketable bulb yields for both 'Advantage' and 'Santana' in the action threshold-based program were nearly identical to those in the standard program, indicating that commercially acceptable bulb yields will be generated with fewer insecticide sprays following an action threshold-based program, saving money, time and benefiting the environment. PMID:27329626

  11. Geographic variation in cypermethrin insecticide resistance and morphometry in Spodoptera litura (Fabricius) (Lepidoptera:Noctuidae)

    Anbalagan Santhosh Kumar; Kathirvelu Baskar; Ajith Johnson; Savarior Vincent

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To find out the most resistant strain of Spodoptera litura (S. litura) from Tamil Nadu, Kerala and Karnataka by synthetic insecticide treatment. Methods:Using leaf disc no-choice method, the insects were tested with different doses for pesticides. The LC50 and LC90 values were calculated by probit analysis. Results:In the insect bioassay, the cypermethrin insecticide showed significantly higher LC50 values of 14.699 g/L and 15.738 g/L against the Tamil Nadu and Kerala S. litura insect cultures respectively. The body length of 2nd, 3rd and 4th instar larvae were significantly higher (P≤0.05) in TTP insect population [(19.2±2.3) mm, (28.05±3.20) mm, (36.1±2.0) mm], when compared with KTK [(18.5±2.7) mm, (23.38±2.00) mm, (31.75±2.70) mm] and control, KBB [(15.65±2.30) mm, (23.65±2.70) mm, (33.2±2.2) mm] populations. The body breadth of 3rd instar larvae was significantly higher (P≤0.05) in TTP insect population (4.9±1.1) mm, when compared with KTK (3.93±0.80) mm and control, KBB (3.65±0.70) mm populations. Conclusions: The present study clearly showed that field collected strains were highly resistant when compared to control. Based on our study, we conclude that reduced use of synthetic pesticides is necessary and IPM is a better way to reduce the development of pesticide resistance among strains of S. litura.

  12. Chromosomal inversions among insecticide-resistant strains of Anopheles stephensi Liston, a malaria mosquito.

    Shetty, N J; Hariprasad, T P N; Sanil, D; Zin, T

    2013-11-01

    Polytene chromosomes were prepared from the ovarian nurse cells of semi-gravid females of ten insecticide-resistant strains of Anopheles stephensi. Altogether, 16 heterozygous paracentric inversions, namely b/+ (11D-16C) in alphamethrin; i/+ (14B-18A) and h/+ (27B-28A) in DDT; j/+ (14A-16B) in chlorpyrifos; k/+ (11D-16B) in cyfluthrin; l/+ (11A-16C) in deltamethrin; m/+ (14B-15C) and e/+ (32A-33B) in bifenthrin; n/+ (12D-14B), f/+ (33A-36A) and g/+ (33C-34A) in propoxur; o/+ (11A-12D), h/+ (37A-37C) and i/+ (31C-32C) in temephos; d/+ (33D-35C) in carbofuran and a/+ (41C-43B) in neem strains, were reported. No inversions were observed in X chromosome so far. The frequency of inversions in different insecticides was found to be highest in the 2R arm, followed by the 3R arm. Such inversions were not reported in the corresponding susceptible strains or in the parental stocks. PMID:23982309

  13. Cycloxaprid: A novel cis-nitromethylene neonicotinoid insecticide to control imidacloprid-resistant cotton aphid (Aphis gossypii).

    Cui, Li; Qi, Haoliang; Yang, Daibin; Yuan, Huizhu; Rui, Changhui

    2016-09-01

    Imidacloprid is a nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) agonist with potent insecticidal activity. However, resistance to imidacloprid is a significant threat and has been identified in several pest species. Cycloxaprid with cis-configuration is a novel neonicotinoid insecticide, which shows high activity against imidacloprid-resistant pests. The LC50 of imidacloprid against the resistant Aphis gossypii was 14.33mgL(-1) while it was only 0.70mgL(-1) for the susceptible population, giving a resistance ratio of 20.47. In this imidacloprid-resistant population, a point mutation (R81T) located in the loop D region of the nAChR β1 subunit was found out. But this point mutation did not decrease the activity of cycloxaprid against A. gossypii. The LC50 of cycloxaprid was 1.05 and 1.36mgL(-1) for the imidacloprid-susceptible and imidacloprid-resistant populations, respectively. In addition, cycloxaprid provided better efficacies against resistant A. gossypii than imidacloprid in the fields. Although cycloxaprid was highly toxic to A. gossypii, it showed high selective activity between A. gossypii and its predominant natural enemies, Harmonia axyridis and Chrysoperla sinica. These results demonstrate that cycloxaprid is a promising insecticide against imidacloprid-resistant A. gossypii and suitable for the integrated pest management. PMID:27521919

  14. Identification and characterization of mutations in housefly (Musca domestica) acetylcholinesterase involved in insecticide resistance

    Walsh, Sinead B.; Dolden, Tracey A.; Moores, Graham D.;

    2001-01-01

    -type residues and are located within the active site of the enzyme, close to the catalytic triad. The likely influence of these substitutions on the accessibility of the different types of inhibitor and the orientation of key catalytic residues are discussed in the light of the three-dimensional structures of...

  15. Insecticide resistance in Culex quinquefasciatus from Zanzibar: implications for vector control programmes

    Jones Christopher M

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Zanzibar has a long history of lymphatic filariasis (LF caused by the filarial parasite Wuchereria bancrofti, and transmitted by the mosquito Culex quinquefasciatus Say. The LF Programme in Zanzibar has successfully implemented mass drug administration (MDA to interrupt transmission, and is now in the elimination phase. Monitoring infections in mosquitoes, and assessing the potential role of interventions such as vector control, is important in case the disease re-emerges as a public health problem. Here, we examine Culex mosquito species from the two main islands to detect W. bancrofti infection and to determine levels of susceptibility to the insecticides used for vector control. Methods Culex mosquitoes collected during routine catches in Vitongoji, Pemba Island, and Makadara, Unguja Island were tested for W. bancrofti infection using PCR. Insecticide bioassays on Culex mosquitoes were performed to determine susceptibility to permethrin, deltamethrin, lambda-cyhalothrin, DDT and bendiocarb. Additional synergism assays with piperonyl butoxide (PBO were used for lambda-cyhalothrin. Pyrosequencing was used to determine the kdr genotype and sequencing of the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I (mtCOI subunit performed to identify ambiguous Culex species. Results None of the wild-caught Culex mosquitoes analysed were found to be positive for W. bancrofti. High frequencies of resistance to all insecticides were found in Wete, Pemba Island, whereas Culex from the nearby site of Tibirinzi (Pemba and in Kilimani, Unguja Island remained relatively susceptible. Species identification confirmed that mosquitoes from Wete were Culex quinquefasciatus. The majority of the Culex collected from Tibirinzi and all from Kilimani could not be identified to species by molecular assays. Two alternative kdr alleles, both resulting in a L1014F substitution were detected in Cx. quinquefasciatus from Wete with no homozygote susceptible detected

  16. Discovery of genes related to insecticide resistance in Bactrocera dorsalis by functional genomic analysis of a de novo assembled transcriptome.

    Ju-Chun Hsu

    Full Text Available Insecticide resistance has recently become a critical concern for control of many insect pest species. Genome sequencing and global quantization of gene expression through analysis of the transcriptome can provide useful information relevant to this challenging problem. The oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis, is one of the world's most destructive agricultural pests, and recently it has been used as a target for studies of genetic mechanisms related to insecticide resistance. However, prior to this study, the molecular data available for this species was largely limited to genes identified through homology. To provide a broader pool of gene sequences of potential interest with regard to insecticide resistance, this study uses whole transcriptome analysis developed through de novo assembly of short reads generated by next-generation sequencing (NGS. The transcriptome of B. dorsalis was initially constructed using Illumina's Solexa sequencing technology. Qualified reads were assembled into contigs and potential splicing variants (isotigs. A total of 29,067 isotigs have putative homologues in the non-redundant (nr protein database from NCBI, and 11,073 of these correspond to distinct D. melanogaster proteins in the RefSeq database. Approximately 5,546 isotigs contain coding sequences that are at least 80% complete and appear to represent B. dorsalis genes. We observed a strong correlation between the completeness of the assembled sequences and the expression intensity of the transcripts. The assembled sequences were also used to identify large numbers of genes potentially belonging to families related to insecticide resistance. A total of 90 P450-, 42 GST-and 37 COE-related genes, representing three major enzyme families involved in insecticide metabolism and resistance, were identified. In addition, 36 isotigs were discovered to contain target site sequences related to four classes of resistance genes. Identified sequence motifs were also

  17. The effect of engineered disulfide bonds on the stability of Drosophila melanogaster acetylcholinesterase

    Lamouroux Lucille

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Background Acetylcholinesterase is irreversibly inhibited by organophosphate and carbamate insecticides allowing its use in biosensors for detection of these insecticides. Drosophila acetylcholinesterase is the most sensitive enzyme known and has been improved by in vitro mutagenesis. However, its stability has to be improved for extensive utilization. Results To create a disulfide bond that could increase the stability of the Drosophila melanogaster acetylcholinesterase, we selected seven positions taking into account first the distance between Cβ of two residues, in which newly introduced cysteines will form the new disulfide bond and second the conservation of the residues in the cholinesterase family. Most disulfide bonds tested did not increase and even decreased the stability of the protein. However, one engineered disulfide bridge, I327C/D375C showed significant stability increase toward denaturation by temperature (170 fold at 50°C, urea, organic solvent and provided resistance to protease degradation. The new disulfide bridge links the N-terminal domain (first 356 aa to the C-terminal domain. The quantities produced by this mutant were the same as in wild-type flies. Conclusion Addition of a disulfide bridge may either stabilize or unstabilize proteins. One bond out of the 7 tested provided significant stabilisation.

  18. FAO/IAEA Consultants Group Meeting on The Potential for Tsetse Flies to Develop Resistance to Insecticides

    Chemical insecticides are playing an increasingly important role in control of tsetse flies (Glossina spp), vectors of human and animal trypanosomiasis in large regions of Africa. Although insecticide resistance has not yet been reported in tsetse, there is no cause for complacency regarding its occurrence in the future. As new reports of insecticide resistance in other disease vectors and agronomic pests continue to accumulate at a rapid rate, it is increasingly clear that no comprehensive approach to tsetse control can afford to ignore the potential resistance problem, as the loss of insecticides from the limited set of options for control would be disastrous. it is likely that one or more of the pyrethroid resistance mechanisms already known from several other species of Diptera will manifest itself in tsetse, in response to the increased selection engendered by the wider adoption of deltamethrin-treated targets in tsetse control at the local level and in eradication efforts. Also, selection for behavioural avoidance of traps and targets could result in decreased control efficiency, although the mechanisms that might cause such behavioural resistance are poorly understood at present. There is thus an increasingly urgent need for information on the potential for resistance development in tsetse, on accurate and feasible methods for detection, monitoring, and characterization of resistance, on properties of resistant strains, and on appropriate tactics for resistance prevention and management. Because of the extraordinary difficulties in rearing posed by tsetse life history, it is essential that these research efforts get underway immediately. The Consultants Group on the Possibility of Development of Insecticide Resistance in Tsetse has accordingly prepared this report with a consideration of the present state of knowledge, a discussion of the essential elements of a resistance research program, and specific recommendations. A summary of the recommendations in

  19. Profenofos Resistance and the Efficacy of Botanical Insecticide From Extracts Refining Waste of Vetiver (Vetiveria zizanoides L.) against Crosidolomia pavonana

    Entun Santosa

    2015-01-01

    Aims: This study aims to determine the resistance status of C. Pavonana to synthetic insecticides of profenofos and compare with the methanol extract of vetiver oil refining waste in managing resistance C. Pavonana. Study design: The experiments were performed using two testing methods , namely the effect of contact and residual effect of feed on the leaves . Place and Duration of Study: The larvae of C. Pavonana is derived from the population Cikajang taken from three locations: Villag...

  20. Impacts of Agricultural Practices on Insecticide Resistance in the Malaria Vector Anopheles arabiensis in Khartoum State, Sudan

    Abuelmaali, Sara A.; Elaagip, Arwa H.; Basheer, Mohammed A.; Frah, Ehab A.; Ahmed, Fayez T. A.; Elhaj, Hassabelrasoul F. A.; Seidahmed, Osama M. E.; Weetman, David; Mahdi Abdel Hamid, Muzamil

    2013-01-01

    Background Agricultural pesticides may play a profound role in selection of resistance in field populations of mosquito vectors. The objective of this study is to investigate possible links between agricultural pesticide use and development of resistance to insecticides by the major malaria vector Anopheles arabiensis in northern Sudan. Methodology/Principal Findings Entomological surveys were conducted during two agricultural seasons in six urban and peri-urban sites in Khartoum state. Agro-...

  1. Spinosad and the tomato borer Tuta absoluta: a bioinsecticide, an invasive pest threat, and high insecticide resistance.

    Campos, Mateus R; Rodrigues, Agna Rita S; Silva, Wellington M; Silva, Tadeu Barbosa M; Silva, Vitória Regina F; Guedes, Raul Narciso C; Siqueira, Herbert Alvaro A

    2014-01-01

    The introduction of an agricultural pest species into a new environment is a potential threat to agroecosystems of the invaded area. The phytosanitary concern is even greater if the introduced pest's phenotype expresses traits that will impair the management of that species. The invasive tomato borer, Tuta absoluta (Meyrick) (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae), is one such species and the characterization of the insecticide resistance prevailing in the area of origin is important to guide management efforts in new areas of introduction. The spinosad is one the main insecticides currently used in Brazil for control of the tomato borer; Brazil is the likely source of the introduction of the tomato borer into Europe. For this reason, spinosad resistance in Brazilian populations of this species was characterized. Spinosad resistance has been reported in Brazilian field populations of this pest species, and one resistant population that was used in this study was subjected to an additional seven generations of selection for spinosad resistance reaching levels over 180,000-fold. Inheritance studies indicated that spinosad resistance is monogenic, incompletely recessive and autosomal with high heritability (h(2) = 0.71). Spinosad resistance was unstable without selection pressure with a negative rate of change in the resistance level ( = -0.51) indicating an associated adaptive cost. Esterases and cytochrome P450-dependent monooxygenases titration decreased with spinosad selection, indicating that these detoxification enzymes are not the underlying resistance mechanism. Furthermore, the cross-resistance spectrum was restricted to the insecticide spinetoram, another spinosyn, suggesting that altered target site may be the mechanism involved. Therefore, the suspension of spinosyn use against the tomato borer would be a useful component in spinosad resistance management for this species. Spinosad use against this species in introduced areas should be carefully monitored to

  2. Spinosad and the tomato borer Tuta absoluta: a bioinsecticide, an invasive pest threat, and high insecticide resistance.

    Mateus R Campos

    Full Text Available The introduction of an agricultural pest species into a new environment is a potential threat to agroecosystems of the invaded area. The phytosanitary concern is even greater if the introduced pest's phenotype expresses traits that will impair the management of that species. The invasive tomato borer, Tuta absoluta (Meyrick (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae, is one such species and the characterization of the insecticide resistance prevailing in the area of origin is important to guide management efforts in new areas of introduction. The spinosad is one the main insecticides currently used in Brazil for control of the tomato borer; Brazil is the likely source of the introduction of the tomato borer into Europe. For this reason, spinosad resistance in Brazilian populations of this species was characterized. Spinosad resistance has been reported in Brazilian field populations of this pest species, and one resistant population that was used in this study was subjected to an additional seven generations of selection for spinosad resistance reaching levels over 180,000-fold. Inheritance studies indicated that spinosad resistance is monogenic, incompletely recessive and autosomal with high heritability (h(2 = 0.71. Spinosad resistance was unstable without selection pressure with a negative rate of change in the resistance level ( = -0.51 indicating an associated adaptive cost. Esterases and cytochrome P450-dependent monooxygenases titration decreased with spinosad selection, indicating that these detoxification enzymes are not the underlying resistance mechanism. Furthermore, the cross-resistance spectrum was restricted to the insecticide spinetoram, another spinosyn, suggesting that altered target site may be the mechanism involved. Therefore, the suspension of spinosyn use against the tomato borer would be a useful component in spinosad resistance management for this species. Spinosad use against this species in introduced areas should be carefully

  3. Cross-resistance to pyrethroid and organophosphorus insecticides in the southern house mosquito (Diptera:Culicidae) from Cuba.

    Bisset, J; Rodriguez, M; Soca, A; Pasteur, N; Raymond, M

    1997-03-01

    A sample of the southern house mosquito, Culex pipiens quinquefasciatus Say, from Cuba was subjected to lambda-cyhalothrin selection to evaluate the usefulness of this pyrethroid insecticide for mosquito control. High resistance developed after 6 generations of selection. Little or no cross-resistance was observed to other pyrethroids (deltamethrin and cypermethrin), to a carbamate (propoxur) and to some organophosphates (chlorpyrifos and pirimiphos-methyl), but high cross-resistance was found to malathion (organophosphate). Possible resistance mechanisms responsible for this phenomenon are discussed. PMID:9103771

  4. Insecticide Resistance in Areas under Investigation by the International Centers of Excellence for Malaria Research: A Challenge for Malaria Control and Elimination

    Quiñones, Martha L.; Norris, Douglas E.; Conn, Jan E.; Moreno, Marta; Burkot, Thomas R.; Bugoro, Hugo; Keven, John B.; Cooper, Robert; Yan, Guiyun; Rosas, Angel; Palomino, Miriam; Donnelly, Martin J.; Mawejje, Henry D.; Eapen, Alex; Montgomery, Jacqui; Coulibaly, Mamadou B.; Beier, John C.; Kumar, Ashwani

    2015-01-01

    Scale-up of the main vector control interventions, residual insecticides sprayed on walls or structures and/or impregnated in bed nets, together with prompt diagnosis and effective treatment, have led to a global reduction in malaria transmission. However, resistance in vectors to almost all classes of insecticides, particularly to the synthetic pyrethroids, is posing a challenge to the recent trend of declining malaria. Ten International Centers of Excellence for Malaria Research (ICEMR) located in the most malaria-endemic regions of the world are currently addressing insecticide resistance in the main vector populations, which not only threaten hope for elimination in malaria-endemic countries but also may lead to reversal where notable reductions in malaria have been documented. This communication illustrates the current status of insecticide resistance with a focus on the countries where activities are ongoing for 9 out of the 10 ICEMRs. Most of the primary malaria vectors in the ICEMR countries exhibit insecticide resistance, albeit of varying magnitude, and spanning all mechanisms of resistance. New alternatives to the insecticides currently available are still to be fully developed for deployment. Integrated vector management principles need to be better understood and encouraged, and viable insecticide resistance management strategies need to be developed and implemented. PMID:26259947

  5. Differential expression of glutathione s-transferase enzyme in different life stages of various insecticide-resistant strains of Anopheles stephensi: A malaria vector

    D. Sanil

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Interest in insect glutathione s-transferases (GSTs has primarily focused on their role in insecticide resistance. These play an important role in biotransformation and detoxification of many different xenobiotic and endogenous substances including insecticides. The GST activity among 10 laboratory selected insecticide resistant and susceptible/control strains of Anopheles stephensi was compared using the substrates 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB. The difference in the GST activities of different life stages of diverse insecticide resistant strains was compared and presented. Methods: About 100 larvae, pupae, adult males, adult females and eggs (100 μg in total weight were collected and used for the experiment. The extracts were prepared from each of the insecticide-resistant strains and control. Protein contents of the enzyme homogenate and GST activities were determined. Results: Deltamethrin and cyfluthrin-resistant strains of An. stephensi showed significantly higher GST activity. Larvae and pupae of DDT-resistant strain showed peak GST activity followed by the propoxur-resistant strain. On contrary, the GST activity was found in reduced quantity in alphamethrin, bifenthrin, carbofuran and chloropyrifos resistant strains. Adults of either sexes showed higher GST activity in mosquito strain resistant to organophosphate group of insecticides namely, temephos and chloropyrifos. Interpretation & conclusion: The GST activity was closely associated with almost all of the insecticides used in the study, strengthening the fact that one of the mechanisms associated with resistance includes an increase of GST activity. This comparative data on GST activity in An. stephensi can be useful database to identify possible underlying mechanisms governing insecticide-resistance by GSTs.

  6. Exploring the molecular basis of insecticide resistance in the dengue vector Aedes aegypti: a case study in Martinique Island (French West Indies

    Yébakima André

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The yellow fever mosquito Aedes aegypti is a major vector of dengue and hemorrhagic fevers, causing up to 100 million dengue infections every year. As there is still no medicine and efficient vaccine available, vector control largely based on insecticide treatments remains the only method to reduce dengue virus transmission. Unfortunately, vector control programs are facing operational challenges with mosquitoes becoming resistant to commonly used insecticides. Resistance of Ae. aegypti to chemical insecticides has been reported worldwide and the underlying molecular mechanisms, including the identification of enzymes involved in insecticide detoxification are not completely understood. Results The present paper investigates the molecular basis of insecticide resistance in a population of Ae. aegypti collected in Martinique (French West Indies. Bioassays with insecticides on adults and larvae revealed high levels of resistance to organophosphate and pyrethroid insecticides. Molecular screening for common insecticide target-site mutations showed a high frequency (71% of the sodium channel 'knock down resistance' (kdr mutation. Exposing mosquitoes to detoxification enzymes inhibitors prior to bioassays induced a significant increased susceptibility of mosquitoes to insecticides, revealing the presence of metabolic-based resistance mechanisms. This trend was biochemically confirmed by significant elevated activities of cytochrome P450 monooxygenases, glutathione S-transferases and carboxylesterases at both larval and adult stages. Utilization of the microarray Aedes Detox Chip containing probes for all members of detoxification and other insecticide resistance-related enzymes revealed the significant constitutive over-transcription of multiple detoxification genes at both larval and adult stages. The over-transcription of detoxification genes in the resistant strain was confirmed by using real-time quantitative RT

  7. Monitoring of insecticides resistance in main malaria vectors in a malarious area of Kahnooj district, Kerman province, southeastern Iran

    H. Vatandoost, M. Mashayekhi, M.R. Abaie, M.R. Aflatoonian,A.A. Hanafi-Bojd & I. Sharifi

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Kahnooj district in south of Iran is an endemic area for malaria where Anophelesstephensi (Liston is a main malaria vector and An. dthali (Patton a secondary vector. According tothe national strategy plan on monitoring of insecticides resistance, this study was performed on susceptibilityand irritability levels of An. stephensi and An. dthali to different insecticides in the district.Methods: The susceptibility and irritability levels of field strains of An. stephensi and An. dthali at theadult and larval stages to discriminative dose of different imagicides was determined as recommendedby WHO.Results: Using discriminative dose and WHO criteria it was found that An. stephensi is resistant toDDT and dieldrin with 36.1 + 2.3 and 62.2 + 1.95 mortality rates, respectively; but susceptible to otherinsecticides. An. dthali was found to susceptible to all tested insecticides. The larvae of An. stephensi,exhibited 100% mortality for temephos and malathion, but 44 + 4.32 for discriminative dose offenitrothion. The results of irritability level for DDT and pyrethroids showed that permethrin had themost irritancy effect on An. stephensi and An. dthali. DDT and deltamethrin showed the least irritancyeffect against An. stephensi with 0.42 + 0.08 and 0.77 + 0.12 take-offs/min/adult, respectively, however,lambdacyhalothrin had the least irritancy effect against An. dthali with 0.096 + 0.02 take-offs/min/adult. The mean number of take-offs/min/adult with permethrin showed significant difference to DDT,lambdacyhalothrin, cyfluthrin and deltamethrin.Interpretation & conclusion: Pyrethroid insecticides are being used as indoor residual sprays in Iran.Based on our results, the main malaria vectors in the region are still susceptible to pyrethroid insecticides.Therefore, we propose the use of pyrethroids with low irritancy effect in rotation with carbamateinsecticides in two interval seasonal peaks of malaria transmission. Biological control

  8. Allelic Variation of Cytochrome P450s Drives Resistance to Bednet Insecticides in a Major Malaria Vector.

    Sulaiman S Ibrahim

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Scale up of Long Lasting Insecticide Nets (LLINs has massively contributed to reduce malaria mortality across Africa. However, resistance to pyrethroid insecticides in malaria vectors threatens its continued effectiveness. Deciphering the detailed molecular basis of such resistance and designing diagnostic tools is critical to implement suitable resistance management strategies. Here, we demonstrated that allelic variation in two cytochrome P450 genes is the most important driver of pyrethroid resistance in the major African malaria vector Anopheles funestus and detected key mutations controlling this resistance. An Africa-wide polymorphism analysis of the duplicated genes CYP6P9a and CYP6P9b revealed that both genes are directionally selected with alleles segregating according to resistance phenotypes. Modelling and docking simulations predicted that resistant alleles were better metabolizers of pyrethroids than susceptible alleles. Metabolism assays performed with recombinant enzymes of various alleles confirmed that alleles from resistant mosquitoes had significantly higher activities toward pyrethroids. Additionally, transgenic expression in Drosophila showed that flies expressing resistant alleles of both genes were significantly more resistant to pyrethroids compared with those expressing the susceptible alleles, indicating that allelic variation is the key resistance mechanism. Furthermore, site-directed mutagenesis and functional analyses demonstrated that three amino acid changes (Val109Ile, Asp335Glu and Asn384Ser from the resistant allele of CYP6P9b were key pyrethroid resistance mutations inducing high metabolic efficiency. The detection of these first DNA markers of metabolic resistance to pyrethroids allows the design of DNA-based diagnostic tools to detect and track resistance associated with bednets scale up, which will improve the design of evidence-based resistance management strategies.

  9. Allelic Variation of Cytochrome P450s Drives Resistance to Bednet Insecticides in a Major Malaria Vector.

    Ibrahim, Sulaiman S; Riveron, Jacob M; Bibby, Jaclyn; Irving, Helen; Yunta, Cristina; Paine, Mark J I; Wondji, Charles S

    2015-10-01

    Scale up of Long Lasting Insecticide Nets (LLINs) has massively contributed to reduce malaria mortality across Africa. However, resistance to pyrethroid insecticides in malaria vectors threatens its continued effectiveness. Deciphering the detailed molecular basis of such resistance and designing diagnostic tools is critical to implement suitable resistance management strategies. Here, we demonstrated that allelic variation in two cytochrome P450 genes is the most important driver of pyrethroid resistance in the major African malaria vector Anopheles funestus and detected key mutations controlling this resistance. An Africa-wide polymorphism analysis of the duplicated genes CYP6P9a and CYP6P9b revealed that both genes are directionally selected with alleles segregating according to resistance phenotypes. Modelling and docking simulations predicted that resistant alleles were better metabolizers of pyrethroids than susceptible alleles. Metabolism assays performed with recombinant enzymes of various alleles confirmed that alleles from resistant mosquitoes had significantly higher activities toward pyrethroids. Additionally, transgenic expression in Drosophila showed that flies expressing resistant alleles of both genes were significantly more resistant to pyrethroids compared with those expressing the susceptible alleles, indicating that allelic variation is the key resistance mechanism. Furthermore, site-directed mutagenesis and functional analyses demonstrated that three amino acid changes (Val109Ile, Asp335Glu and Asn384Ser) from the resistant allele of CYP6P9b were key pyrethroid resistance mutations inducing high metabolic efficiency. The detection of these first DNA markers of metabolic resistance to pyrethroids allows the design of DNA-based diagnostic tools to detect and track resistance associated with bednets scale up, which will improve the design of evidence-based resistance management strategies. PMID:26517127

  10. Efficacy of Brahman breeding in the management of insecticide-resistant horn flies (Diptera: Muscidae) on beef cattle.

    Steelman, C D; McNew, R W; Brown, M A; Tolley, G; Phillips, J M

    1994-02-01

    The efficacy of Brahman breeding used as an alternative tactic to manage insecticide-resistant populations of adult horn flies, Haematobia irritans irritans (L.), was determined. Concentration-mortality bioassays done at Booneville and Hope, AR, in 1988 and 1989, respectively, showed that horn fly populations were resistant to diazinon, pirimiphos methyl, tetrachlorvinphos, and methoxychlor. Data showed loss of field efficacy for coumaphos and delnav. Mean horn fly counts on Braham cows were significantly lower than on Angus cows for all sampling dates in 1989 and 1990. Mean fly counts on Brahman x Angus cows were approximately intermediate to the two purebred mean fly counts. Brahman breeding caused significant reductions in the number of organophosphate-resistant horn flies, which had been equal to or greater than that obtained from continued spraying with organophosphate insecticides. The Brahman x Hereford cows, which have one-eighth greater Brahman breeding than the Brangus cows, had fewer horn flies on 48 of 56 sampling dates in 1988-1990 and significantly fewer flies on 37 sampling dates. The effectiveness of Brahman breeding in causing lower numbers of insecticide-resistant horn flies significantly increased as the percentage of Brahman breeding increased. PMID:8144749

  11. Acetylcholinesterases from the Disease Vectors Aedes aegypti and Anopheles gambiae: Functional Characterization and Comparisons with Vertebrate Orthologues.

    Engdahl, Cecilia; Knutsson, Sofie; Fredriksson, Sten-Åke; Linusson, Anna; Bucht, Göran; Ekström, Fredrik

    2015-01-01

    Mosquitoes of the Anopheles (An.) and Aedes (Ae.) genus are principal vectors of human diseases including malaria, dengue and yellow fever. Insecticide-based vector control is an established and important way of preventing transmission of such infections. Currently used insecticides can efficiently control mosquito populations, but there are growing concerns about emerging resistance, off-target toxicity and their ability to alter ecosystems. A potential target for the development of insecticides with reduced off-target toxicity is the cholinergic enzyme acetylcholinesterase (AChE). Herein, we report cloning, baculoviral expression and functional characterization of the wild-type AChE genes (ace-1) from An. gambiae and Ae. aegypti, including a naturally occurring insecticide-resistant (G119S) mutant of An. gambiae. Using enzymatic digestion and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry we found that the secreted proteins were post-translationally modified. The Michaelis-Menten constants and turnover numbers of the mosquito enzymes were lower than those of the orthologous AChEs from Mus musculus and Homo sapiens. We also found that the G119S substitution reduced the turnover rate of substrates and the potency of selected covalent inhibitors. Furthermore, non-covalent inhibitors were less sensitive to the G119S substitution and differentiate the mosquito enzymes from corresponding vertebrate enzymes. Our findings indicate that it may be possible to develop selective non-covalent inhibitors that effectively target both the wild-type and insecticide resistant mutants of mosquito AChE. PMID:26447952

  12. Acetylcholinesterases from the Disease Vectors Aedes aegypti and Anopheles gambiae: Functional Characterization and Comparisons with Vertebrate Orthologues.

    Cecilia Engdahl

    Full Text Available Mosquitoes of the Anopheles (An. and Aedes (Ae. genus are principal vectors of human diseases including malaria, dengue and yellow fever. Insecticide-based vector control is an established and important way of preventing transmission of such infections. Currently used insecticides can efficiently control mosquito populations, but there are growing concerns about emerging resistance, off-target toxicity and their ability to alter ecosystems. A potential target for the development of insecticides with reduced off-target toxicity is the cholinergic enzyme acetylcholinesterase (AChE. Herein, we report cloning, baculoviral expression and functional characterization of the wild-type AChE genes (ace-1 from An. gambiae and Ae. aegypti, including a naturally occurring insecticide-resistant (G119S mutant of An. gambiae. Using enzymatic digestion and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry we found that the secreted proteins were post-translationally modified. The Michaelis-Menten constants and turnover numbers of the mosquito enzymes were lower than those of the orthologous AChEs from Mus musculus and Homo sapiens. We also found that the G119S substitution reduced the turnover rate of substrates and the potency of selected covalent inhibitors. Furthermore, non-covalent inhibitors were less sensitive to the G119S substitution and differentiate the mosquito enzymes from corresponding vertebrate enzymes. Our findings indicate that it may be possible to develop selective non-covalent inhibitors that effectively target both the wild-type and insecticide resistant mutants of mosquito AChE.

  13. Insecticide resistance and genetic variability in natural populations of Aedes (Stegomyia aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae from Colombia

    Oscar A. Aguirre-Obando

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Mosquito control prevails as the most efficient method to protect humans from the dengue virus, despite recent efforts to find a vaccine for this disease. We evaluated insecticide resistance and genetic variability in natural populations of Aedes aegypti (Linnaeus, 1762 from Colombia. This is the first Colombian study examining kdr mutations and population structure. Bioassays with larvae of three mosquito populations (Armenia, Calarcá and Montenegro were performed according to the World Health Organization (WHO guidelines, using Temephos. For the analysis of the Val1016Ile mutation and genetic diversity, we sampled recently-emerged adults from four mosquito populations (Armenia, Calarcá, Montenegro and Barcelona. Following the WHO protocol, bioassays implemented with larvae showed resistance to Temephos in mosquito populations from Armenia (77% ± 2 and Calarcá (62% ± 14, and an incipient altered susceptibility at Montenegro (88% ± 8. The RR95 of mosquito populations ranged from 3.7 (Montenegro to 6.0 (Calarca. The Val1016Ile mutation analysis of 107 genotyped samples indicates that 94% of the specimens were homozygous for the wild allele (1016Val and 6% were heterozygous (Val1016Ile. The 1016Ile allele was not found in Barcelona. Genetic variability analysis found three mitochondrial lineages with low genetic diversity and gene flow. In comparison with haplotypes from the American continent, those from this study suggest connections with Mexican and North American populations. These results confirm that a continuous monitoring and managing program of A. aegypti resistance in the state of Quindío is required.

  14. If you see one, have you seen them all?: Community-wide effects of insecticide cross-resistance in zooplankton populations near and far from agriculture.

    Bendis, Randall J; Relyea, Rick A

    2016-08-01

    The worldwide use of pesticides has led to increases in agricultural yields by reducing crop losses. However, increased pesticide use has resulted in pesticide-resistant pest species and recent studies have discovered pesticide-resistance in non-target species living close to farms. Such increased tolerance not only affects the species, but can alter the entire food web. Given that some species can evolve not only resistance to a single pesticide, but also cross-resistance to other pesticides that share the same mode of action, one would predict that cross-resistance to pesticides would also have effects on the entire community and affect community stability. To address this hypothesis, we conducted an outdoor mesocosm experiment comprised of 200 identical aquatic communities with phytoplankton, periphyton, and leopard frog (Lithobates pipiens) tadpoles. To these communities, we added one of four Daphnia pulex populations that we previously discovered were either resistant or sensitive to the insecticide of chlorpyrifos as a result of living close to or far from agriculture, respectively. We then exposed the communities to either no insecticide or three different concentrations of AChE-inhibiting insecticides (chlorpyrifos, malathion or carbaryl) or sodium channel-inhibiting insecticides (permethrin or cypermethrin). We discovered that communities containing sensitive Daphnia pulex experienced phytoplankton blooms and subsequent cascades through all trophic groups including amphibians at moderate to high concentrations of all five insecticides. However, communities containing resistant D. pulex were buffered from these effects at low to moderate concentrations of all AChE-inhibiting insecticides, but were not buffered against the pyrethroid insecticides. These data suggest that a simple change in the population-level resistance of zooplankton to a single insecticide can have widespread consequences for community stability and that the effects can be extrapolated

  15. Evolutionary changes in gene expression, coding sequence and copy-number at the Cyp6g1 locus contribute to resistance to multiple insecticides in Drosophila.

    Thomas W R Harrop

    Full Text Available Widespread use of insecticides has led to insecticide resistance in many populations of insects. In some populations, resistance has evolved to multiple pesticides. In Drosophila melanogaster, resistance to multiple classes of insecticide is due to the overexpression of a single cytochrome P450 gene, Cyp6g1. Overexpression of Cyp6g1 appears to have evolved in parallel in Drosophila simulans, a sibling species of D. melanogaster, where it is also associated with insecticide resistance. However, it is not known whether the ability of the CYP6G1 enzyme to provide resistance to multiple insecticides evolved recently in D. melanogaster or if this function is present in all Drosophila species. Here we show that duplication of the Cyp6g1 gene occurred at least four times during the evolution of different Drosophila species, and the ability of CYP6G1 to confer resistance to multiple insecticides exists in D. melanogaster and D. simulans but not in Drosophila willistoni or Drosophila virilis. In D. virilis, which has multiple copies of Cyp6g1, one copy confers resistance to DDT and another to nitenpyram, suggesting that the divergence of protein sequence between copies subsequent to the duplication affected the activity of the enzyme. All orthologs tested conferred resistance to one or more insecticides, suggesting that CYP6G1 had the capacity to provide resistance to anthropogenic chemicals before they existed. Finally, we show that expression of Cyp6g1 in the Malpighian tubules, which contributes to DDT resistance in D. melanogaster, is specific to the D. melanogaster-D. simulans lineage. Our results suggest that a combination of gene duplication, regulatory changes and protein coding changes has taken place at the Cyp6g1 locus during evolution and this locus may play a role in providing resistance to different environmental toxins in different Drosophila species.

  16. Obtaining High Pest-resistant Tobacco Plants Carrying B.t. insecticidal Gene

    2000-01-01

    To increase the expression level of CryIA(c) gene in transgenic plants, a plant expression vector pBinMoBc carrying the CryIA(c) gene under control of chimeric OM promoter and Ω factor was constructed. As a control, pBinoBc carrying the CryIA(c) gene with the CaMV 35S promoter was also constructed. The vectors were transferred into tobacco plants respectively via Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. ELISA assay showed that the expression level of the CryIA(c) gene in pBinMoBc transgenic tobacco plants was 2.44-times that in pBinoBc transgenic tobacco plants, and it could be up to 0.255% of total soluble proteins. Bioassay showed that pBinMoBc transgenic tobacco plants had more notable insecticidal effect than pBinoBc transgenic tobacco plants. The above results showed that the chimeric OM promoter was a stronger promoter than CaMV 35S promoter that was widely used in plant genetic engineering, and this is very useful in pest-resistant plant genetic engineering.

  17. Mechanism of action of organophosphorus and carbamate insecticides.

    Fukuto, T R

    1990-01-01

    Organophosphorus and carbamate insecticides are toxic to insects and mammals by virtue of their ability to inactivate the enzyme acetylcholinesterase. This review addresses the mechanism of inhibition of acetylcholinesterase by organophosphorus and carbamate esters, focusing on structural requirements necessary for anticholinesterase activity. The inhibition of acetylcholinesterase by these compounds is discussed in terms of reactivity and steric effects. The role of metabolic activation or d...

  18. Surveillance, insecticide resistance and control of an invasive Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae) population in California.

    Cornel, Anthony J; Holeman, Jodi; Nieman, Catelyn C; Lee, Yoosook; Smith, Charles; Amorino, Mark; Brisco, Katherine K; Barrera, Roberto; Lanzaro, Gregory C; Mulligan Iii, F Stephen

    2016-01-01

    The invasion and subsequent establishment in California of Aedes aegypti in 2013 has created new challenges for local mosquito abatement and vector control districts. Studies were undertaken to identify effective and economical strategies to monitor the abundance and spread of this mosquito species as well as for its control. Overall, BG Sentinel (BGS) traps were found to be the most sensitive trap type to measure abundance and spread into new locations. Autocidal-Gravid-Ovitraps (AGO-B), when placed at a site for a week, performed equally to BGS in detecting the presence of female Ae. aegypti. Considering operational cost and our findings, we recommend use of BGS traps for surveillance in response to service requests especially in locations outside the known infestation area. We recommend AGO-Bs be placed at fixed sites, cleared and processed once a week to monitor mosquito abundance within a known infestation area. Long-term high density placements of AGO-Bs were found to show promise as an environmentally friendly trap-kill control strategy. California Ae. aegypti were found to be homozygous for the V1016I mutation in the voltage gated sodium channel gene, which is implicated to be involved in insecticide resistance. This strain originating from Clovis, California was resistant to some pyrethroids but not to deltamethrin in bottle bio-assays. Sentinel cage ultra-low-volume (ULV) trials using a new formulation of deltamethrin (DeltaGard®) demonstrated that it provided some control (average of 56% death in sentinel cages in a 91.4 m spray swath) after a single truck mounted aerial ULV application in residential areas. PMID:27158450

  19. "Insecticide Resistance /Susceptibility Monitoring in Anopheles pulcherrimus (Diptera: Culicidae in Ghasreghand District, Sistan and Baluchistan Province, Iran"

    AH Zahirnia

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available Two organochlorine, one organophosphate, two carbamate and two pyrethroid insecticides have been studied for their comparative study against fieldcollected An.pulcherrimus. The trail was conducted in Ghasreghand district, Sistan and Baluchistan province, Southeastern Iran using WHO impregnated papers at the diagnostic dose. Results revealed that this species exhibit resistant to 0.4% dieldrin (mortality 86 ± 2.07. Dose response regression line from interval exposure times to 0.4% dieldrin showed that LT50 and LT90 was 14 and 76 minutes, respectively. The efficacles of other insecticides such as 4% DDT, 5% malathion, 0.1% bendiocarb, 0.1% propoxur, 0.25% permethrin and 0.1% lambdacyhalothrin were maximum when mosquitoes exposed 1 hour at diagnostic dose followed by 24 hour recovery period.

  20. Novel point mutations in the German cockroach para sodium channel gene are associated with knockdown resistance (kdr) to pyrethroid insecticides.

    Liu, Z; Valles, S M; Dong, K

    2000-10-01

    Knockdown resistance (kdr) to pyrethroid insecticides has been attributed to point mutations in the para sodium channel gene in more than a half dozen insect pest species. In this study, we identified two novel para mutations in five highly resistant kdr-type German cockroach strains. The two mutations, from glutamic acid (E434) to lysine (K434) and from cysteine (C764) to arginine (R764), respectively, are located in the first intracellular linker connecting domains I and II. E434K is located near the beginning of the linker (closest to domain I), whereas C764R is found toward the end of the linker (closest to domain II). Two additional mutations from aspartic acid (D58) to glycine (G58), and from proline (P1880) to leucine (L1888), respectively, were found in one of the resistant strains. The four mutations coexist with the previously identified leucine to phenylalanine (L993F) kdr mutation in IIS6, and are present only in the highly resistant individuals of a given strain. These findings suggest that these mutations might be responsible for high levels of knockdown resistance toward pyrethroid insecticides in the German cockroach. PMID:10899465

  1. Quantification of the efficiency of treatment of Anopheles gambiae breeding sites with petroleum products by local communities in areas of insecticide resistance in the Republic of Benin

    Doannio Julien MC MC

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The emergence of Anopheles populations capable of withstanding lethal doses of insecticides has weakened the efficacy of most insecticide based strategies of vector control and, has highlighted the need for developing new insecticidal molecules or, improving the efficacy of existing insecticides or abandoning those to which resistance has emerged. The use of petroleum products (PP against mosquito larvae had an immense success during early programmes of malaria control, but these compounds were abandoned and replaced in the 1950s by synthetic insecticides probably because of the high performances given by these new products. In the current context of vector resistance, it is important to elucidate the empirical use of PP by quantifying their efficiencies on resistant strains of Anopheles. Methods Larvae of Anopheles Ladji a local resistant strain were exposed to increasing concentrations of various PP (kerosene, petrol and engine oils for 24 hours and the lethal activities recorded. The highest concentration (HiC having no lethal activity (also referred as the NOEL or no effect level and the lowest concentration (LoC100 yielding 100% mortality were rated for each PP on the Ladji strain. Prior to laboratory analysis, KAP studies were conducted in three traditional communities were insecticide resistance is clearly established to confirm the use of PP against mosquitoes. Results Laboratory analysis of petrol, kerosene and engine oils, clearly established their lethal activities on resistant strains of Anopheles larvae. Contrary to existing references, this research revealed that exposed larvae of Anopheles were mostly killed by direct contact toxicity and not by suffocation as indicated in some earlier reports. Conclusion This research could serve as scientific basis to backup the empirical utilisation of PP on mosquito larvae and to envisage possibilities of using PP in some traditional settings where Anopheles have developed

  2. Characterization of mechanisms of resistance to common insecticides in noctuid pest species and resistance risk assessment for the new lepidopteran specific compound flubendiamide

    Konanz, Stefanie

    2009-01-01

    Noctuid species, such as the beet armyworm Spodoptera exigua, the cotton bollworm Helicoverpa armigera and the tobacco budworm Heliothis virescens, are well-known pests in many agricultural cropping systems worldwide. The extensive and widespread use of insecticides against these species has led to the development of resistance against almost all commercially used compounds. The focus of this thesis was on the novel lepidopteran specific compound flubendiamde, to get a detailed overview about...

  3. Quantification of insecticide resistance in the tobacco-adapted form of the green peach aphid, Myzus persicae (Sulzer)(Hemiptera: Aphididae)

    Srigiriraju, Lakshmipathi

    2008-01-01

    The tobacco-adapted form of the green peach aphid, Myzus persicae (Sulzer), is one of the most important insect pests of tobacco in the United States and around the world. Insecticides play a major role in controlling the aphid on tobacco because natural enemies usually fail to maintain its populations below damaging levels. The aphid has a history of developing resistance to many insecticides. Therefore, baseline information on the aphidâ s susceptibility to imidacloprid and other insect...

  4. Effect of Moringa oleifera flower extract on larval trypsin and acetylcholinesterase activities in Aedes aegypti.

    Pontual, Emmanuel Viana; Napoleão, Thiago Henrique; Dias de Assis, Caio Rodrigo; de Souza Bezerra, Ranilson; Xavier, Haroudo Satiro; Navarro, Daniela Maria do Amaral Ferraz; Coelho, Luana Cassandra Breitenbach Barroso; Paiva, Patrícia Maria Guedes

    2012-03-01

    Aedes aegypti control is crucial to reducing dengue fever. Aedes aegypti larvae have developed resistance to organophosporous insecticides and the use of natural larvicides may help manage larval resistance by increasing elements in insecticide rotation programs. Here, we report on larvicidal activity of Moringa oleifera flower extract against A. aegypti L(1), L(2), L(3), and L(4) as well as the effect of flower extract on gut trypsin and whole-larval acetylcholinesterase from L(4.) In addition, the heated flower extract was investigated for larvicidal activity against L(4) and effect on larval gut trypsin. Moringa oleifera flower extract contains a proteinaceous trypsin inhibitor (M. oleifera flower trypsin inhibitor, MoFTI), triterpene (β-amyrin), sterol (β-sitosterol) as well as flavonoids (kaempferol and quercetin). Larvicidal activity was detected against L(2), L(3), and L(4) (LC(50) of 1.72%, 1.67%, and 0.92%, respectively). Flower extract inhibited L(4) gut trypsin (MoFTI K(i) = 0.6 nM) and did not affect acetylcholinesterase activity. In vivo assay showed that gut trypsin activity from L(4) treated with M. oleifera flower extract decreased over time (0-1,440 min) and was strongly inhibited (98.6%) after 310 min incubation; acetylcholinesterase activity was not affected. Thermal treatment resulted in a loss of trypsin inhibitor and larvicidal activities, supporting the hypothesis that flower extract contains a proteinaceous trypsin inhibitor that may be responsible for the deleterious effects on larval mortality. PMID:22392801

  5. De novo sequencing-based transcriptome and digital gene expression analysis reveals insecticide resistance-relevant genes in Propylaea japonica (Thunberg (Coleoptea: Coccinellidae.

    Liang-De Tang

    Full Text Available The ladybird Propylaea japonica (Thunberg is one of most important natural enemies of aphids in China. This species is threatened by the extensive use of insecticides but genomics-based information on the molecular mechanisms underlying insecticide resistance is limited. Hence, we analyzed the transcriptome and expression profile data of P. japonica in order to gain a deeper understanding of insecticide resistance in ladybirds. We performed de novo assembly of a transcriptome using Illumina's Solexa sequencing technology and short reads. A total of 27,243,552 reads were generated. These were assembled into 81,458 contigs and 33,647 unigenes (6,862 clusters and 26,785 singletons. Of the unigenes, 23,965 (71.22% have putative homologues in the non-redundant (nr protein database from NCBI, using BLASTX, with a cut-off E-value of 10(-5. We examined COG, GO and KEGG annotations to better understand the functions of these unigenes. Digital gene expression (DGE libraries showed differences in gene expression profiles between two insecticide resistant strains. When compared with an insecticide susceptible profile, a total of 4,692 genes were significantly up- or down- regulated in a moderately resistant strain. Among these genes, 125 putative insecticide resistance genes were identified. To confirm the DGE results, 16 selected genes were validated using quantitative real time PCR (qRT-PCR. This study is the first to report genetic information on P. japonica and has greatly enriched the sequence data for ladybirds. The large number of gene sequences produced from the transcriptome and DGE sequencing will greatly improve our understanding of this important insect, at the molecular level, and could contribute to the in-depth research into insecticide resistance mechanisms.

  6. Dynamics of knockdown pyrethroid insecticide resistance alleles in a field population of Anopheles gambiae s.s. in southwestern Nigeria

    T.S. Awolola, A.O. Oduola, I.O. Oyewole, J.B. Obansa, C.N. Amajoh

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Pyrethroid insecticide resistance in the malaria vector Anopheles gambiaeGiles is mainly associated with reduced target site sensitivity arising from a single point mutation inthe sodium channel gene, often referred to as knockdown resistance (kdr. This resistance mechanismis widespread in West Africa and was reported for the first time in Nigeria in 2002. Here we presentchanges in the susceptibility/resistance status of the molecular ‘M’ and ‘S’ forms of An. gambiae andthe frequency of the kdr alleles from 2002–05.Methods: Adult anophelines were sampled quarterly inside human dwellings from January 2002 toDecember 2005 and adults reared from wild larvae were identified using morphological keys. Samplesbelonging to the An. gambiae complex were subjected to PCR assays for species identification anddetection of molecular ‘M’ and ‘S’ forms. Insecticide susceptibility tests were carried out usingstandard WHO procedures and test kits only on 2–3 days old adult An. gambiae s.s. reared fromlarval collections. The kdr genotypes were determined in both live and dead specimens of An. gambiaes.s. using alleles-specific polymerase chain reaction diagnostic tests.Results: The overall collection showed that the molecular ‘S’ form was predominant (>60% but theproportions of both forms in the mosquito populations from 2002–05 were not statistically different.Both forms also occurred throughout the period without apparent relationship to wet or dry season.Insecticide susceptibility tests did not show any significant increase in the resistance status recordedfor either Permethrin or DDT from 2002–05, rather, an improvement in the susceptibility status ofthe mosquitoes to these insecticides was observed from 2004–05 relative to the tests performed in2002–03.Conclusion: The proportion of the molecular ‘M’ and ‘S’ form of An. gambiae and the kdr frequencieshave not increased significantly from 2002

  7. Pyrosequencing the Bemisia tabaci transcriptome reveals a highly diverse bacterial community and a robust system for insecticide resistance.

    Wen Xie

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius is a phloem-feeding insect poised to become one of the major insect pests in open field and greenhouse production systems throughout the world. The high level of resistance to insecticides is a main factor that hinders continued use of insecticides for suppression of B. tabaci. Despite its prevalence, little is known about B. tabaci at the genome level. To fill this gap, an invasive B. tabaci B biotype was subjected to pyrosequencing-based transcriptome analysis to identify genes and gene networks putatively involved in various physiological and toxicological processes. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using Roche 454 pyrosequencing, 857,205 reads containing approximately 340 megabases were obtained from the B. tabaci transcriptome. De novo assembly generated 178,669 unigenes including 30,980 from insects, 17,881 from bacteria, and 129,808 from the nohit. A total of 50,835 (28.45% unigenes showed similarity to the non-redundant database in GenBank with a cut-off E-value of 10-5. Among them, 40,611 unigenes were assigned to one or more GO terms and 6,917 unigenes were assigned to 288 known pathways. De novo metatranscriptome analysis revealed highly diverse bacterial symbionts in B. tabaci, and demonstrated the host-symbiont cooperation in amino acid production. In-depth transcriptome analysis indentified putative molecular markers, and genes potentially involved in insecticide resistance and nutrient digestion. The utility of this transcriptome was validated by a thiamethoxam resistance study, in which annotated cytochrome P450 genes were significantly overexpressed in the resistant B. tabaci in comparison to its susceptible counterparts. CONCLUSIONS: This transcriptome/metatranscriptome analysis sheds light on the molecular understanding of symbiosis and insecticide resistance in an agriculturally important phloem-feeding insect pest, and lays the foundation for future functional genomics research of the

  8. Novel Selective and Irreversible Mosquito Acetylcholinesterase Inhibitors for Controlling Malaria and Other Mosquito-Borne Diseases

    Dou, Dengfeng; Park, Jewn Giew; Rana, Sandeep; Madden, Benjamin J.; Jiang, Haobo; Pang, Yuan-Ping

    2013-01-01

    We reported previously that insect acetylcholinesterases (AChEs) could be selectively and irreversibly inhibited by methanethiosulfonates presumably through conjugation to an insect-specific cysteine in these enzymes. However, no direct proof for the conjugation has been published to date, and doubts remain about whether such cysteine-targeting inhibitors have desirable kinetic properties for insecticide use. Here we report mass spectrometric proof of the conjugation and new chemicals that irreversibly inhibited African malaria mosquito AChE with bimolecular inhibition rate constants (kinact/KI) of 3,604-458,597 M-1sec-1 but spared human AChE. In comparison, the insecticide paraoxon irreversibly inhibited mosquito and human AChEs with kinact/KI values of 1,915 and 1,507 M-1sec-1, respectively, under the same assay conditions. These results further support our hypothesis that the insect-specific AChE cysteine is a unique and unexplored target to develop new insecticides with reduced insecticide resistance and low toxicity to mammals, fish, and birds for the control of mosquito-borne diseases.

  9. Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation of rice with the spider insecticidal gene conferring resistance to leaffolder and striped stem borer

    2001-01-01

    Immature embryos of rice varieties “Xiushui11” and “Chunjiang 11” precultured for 4d were infected and transformed by Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain EHA101/pExT7(containing the spider insecticidal gene).The resistant calli were transferred onto the differentiation medium and plants were regenerated.The transformation frequency reached 56%~72% measured as numbers of Geneticin(G418)-resistant calli produced and 36%~60% measured as numbers of transgenic plants regenerated,respectively.PCR and Southern blot analysis of transgenic plants confirmed that the T-DNA had been integrated into the rice genome.Insect bioassays using T1 transgenic plants indicated that the mortality of the leaffolder(Cnaphalocrasis medinalis)after 7d of leaf feeding reached 38%~61% and the corrected mortality of the striped stem borer(Chilo suppressalis)after 7d of leaf feeding reached 16%~75%.The insect bioassay results demonstrated that the transgenic plants expressing the spider insecticidal protein conferred enhanced resistance to these pests.

  10. The entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana reduces instantaneous blood feeding in wild multi-insecticide-resistant Culex quinquefasciatus mosquitoes in Benin, West Africa

    A.F.V. Howard; R. N'Guessan; C.J.M. Koenraadt; A. Asidi; M. Farenhorst; M. Akogbeto; M.B. Thomas; B.G.J. Knols; W. Takken

    2010-01-01

    Background: Mosquito-borne diseases are still a major health risk in many developing countries, and the emergence of multi-insecticide-resistant mosquitoes is threatening the future of vector control. Therefore, new tools that can manage resistant mosquitoes are required. Laboratory studies show tha

  11. Resistance to insect growth regulator insecticides in populations of sheep lice as assessed by a moulting disruption assay.

    James, P J; Cramp, A P; Hook, S E

    2008-12-01

    Low-volume, backline applications with the benzoylphenyl urea insecticides triflumuron and diflubenzuron represent in excess of 70% of treatments for the control of sheep lice, Bovicola ovis (Schrank) (Phthiraptera: Trichodectidae), in Australia. Reports of reduced effectiveness from 2003 and subsequent controlled treatment trials suggested the emergence of resistance to these compounds in B. ovis populations. A laboratory assay based on the measurement of moulting success in nymphs was developed and used to assess susceptibility to diflubenzuron and triflumuron in louse populations collected from sheep where a control failure had occurred. These tests confirmed the development of resistance to triflumuron and diflubenzuron in at least two instances, with estimated resistance ratios of 67-94X at LC(50). PMID:19120959

  12. Multiple Cytochrome P450 genes: their constitutive overexpression and permethrin induction in insecticide resistant mosquitoes, Culex quinquefasciatus.

    Nannan Liu

    Full Text Available Four cytochrome P450 cDNAs, CYP6AA7, CYP9J40, CYP9J34, and CYP9M10, were isolated from mosquitoes, Culex quinquefasciatus. The P450 gene expression and induction by permethrin were compared for three different mosquito populations bearing different resistance phenotypes, ranging from susceptible (S-Lab, through intermediate (HAmCq(G0, the field parental population to highly resistant (HAmCq(G8, the 8(th generation of permethrin selected offspring of HAmCq(G0. A strong correlation was found for P450 gene expression with the levels of resistance and following permethrin selection at the larval stage of mosquitoes, with the highest expression levels identified in HAmCq(G8, suggesting the importance of CYP6AA7, CYP9J40, CYP9J34, and CYP9M10 in the permethrin resistance of larva mosquitoes. Only CYP6AA7 showed a significant overexpression in HAmCq(G8 adult mosquitoes. Other P450 genes had similar expression levels among the mosquito populations tested, suggesting different P450 genes may be involved in the response to insecticide pressure in different developmental stages. The expression of CYP6AA7, CYP9J34, and CYP9M10 was further induced by permethrin in resistant mosquitoes. Taken together, these results indicate that multiple P450 genes are up-regulated in insecticide resistant mosquitoes through both constitutive overexpression and induction mechanisms, thus increasing the overall expression levels of P450 genes.

  13. Why insecticides are more toxic to insects than people: The unique toxicology of insects

    Casida, J E; Quistad, G B

    2004-01-01

    The unique toxicology of insects provides the safety mechanisms for the major insecticides. The selectivity of insecticidal nerve poisons is attributable to structural differences in binding subsites (acetylcholinesterase and nicotinic receptor) or receptor subunit interfaces (gamma-aminobutyric acid receptor) or transmembrane regions (voltage-sensitive sodium channel) supplemented by metabolic activation and detoxification. Slow action limits the use of the remarkably selective insecticides ...

  14. The Role of Oxidative Stress in the Longevity and Insecticide Resistance Phenotype of the Major Malaria Vectors Anopheles arabiensis and Anopheles funestus.

    Shüné V Oliver

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress plays numerous biological roles, both functional and pathological. The role of oxidative stress in various epidemiologically relevant biological traits in Anopheles mosquitoes is not well established. In this study, the effects of oxidative stress on the longevity and insecticide resistance phenotype in the major malaria vector species An. arabiensis and An. funestus were examined. Responses to dietary copper sulphate and hydrogen peroxide were used as proxies for the oxidative stress phenotype by determining the effect of copper on longevity and hydrogen peroxide lethal dose. Glutathione peroxidase and catalase activities were determined colorimetrically. Oxidative burden was quantified as protein carbonyl content. Changes in insecticide resistance phenotype were monitored by WHO bioassay. Insecticide resistant individuals showed an increased capacity for coping with oxidative stress, mediated by increased glutathione peroxidase and catalase activity. This effect was observed in both species, as well as in laboratory strains and F1 individuals derived from wild-caught An. funestus mothers. Phenotypic capacity for coping with oxidative stress was greatest in strains with elevated Cytochrome P450 activity. Synergism of oxidative stress defence enzymes by dietary supplementation with haematin, 3-Amino-1, 2, 4-triazole and Sodium diethyldithiocarbamate significantly increased pyrethroid-induced mortality in An. arabiensis and An. funestus. It is therefore concluded that defence against oxidative stress underlies the augmentation of the insecticide resistance phenotype associated with multiple blood-feeding. This is because multiple blood-feeding ultimately leads to a reduction of oxidative stress in insecticide resistant females, and also reduces the oxidative burden induced by DDT and pyrethroids, by inducing increased glutathione peroxidase activity. This study highlights the importance of oxidative stress in the longevity and

  15. Malaria entomological profile in Tanzania from 1950 to 2010: a review of mosquito distribution, vectorial capacity and insecticide resistance.

    Kabula, Bilali; Derua, Yahya A; Tungui, Patrick; Massue, Dennis J; Sambu, Edward; Stanley, Grades; Mosha, Franklin W; Kisinza, William N

    2011-12-01

    In Sub Saharan Africa where most of the malaria cases and deaths occur, members of the Anopheles gambiae species complex and Anophelesfunestus species group are the important malaria vectors. Control efforts against these vectors in Tanzania like in most other Sub Saharan countries have failed to achieve the set objectives of eliminating transmission due to scarcity of information about the enormous diversity of Anopheles mosquito species and their susceptibility status to insecticides used for malaria vector control. Understanding the diversity and insecticide susceptibility status of these vectors and other factors relating to their importance as vectors (such as malaria transmission dynamics, vector biology, ecology, behaviour and population genetics) is crucial to developing a better and sound intervention strategies that will reduce man-vector contact and also manage the emergency of insecticide resistance early and hence .a success in malaria control. The objective of this review was therefore to obtain the information from published and unpublished documents on spatial distribution and composition of malaria vectors, key features of their behaviour, transmission indices and susceptibility status to insecticides in Tanzania. All data available were collated into a database. Details recorded for each data source were the locality, latitude/longitude, time/period of study, species, abundance, sampling/collection methods, species identification methods, insecticide resistance status, including evidence of the kdr allele, and Plasmodium falciparum sporozoite rate. This collation resulted in a total of 368 publications, encompassing 806,273 Anopheles mosquitoes from 157 georeferenced locations being collected and identified across Tanzania from 1950s to 2010. Overall, the vector species most often reported included An. gambiae complex (66.8%), An. funestus complex (21.8%), An. gambiae s.s. (2.1%) and An. arabiensis (9%). A variety of sampling/ collection and

  16. Genome analysis of cytochrome P450s and their expression profiles in insecticide resistant mosquitoes, Culex quinquefasciatus.

    Ting Yang

    Full Text Available Here we report a study of the 204 P450 genes in the whole genome sequence of larvae and adult Culex quinquefasciatus mosquitoes. The expression profiles of the P450 genes were compared for susceptible (S-Lab and resistant mosquito populations, two different field populations of mosquitoes (HAmCq and MAmCq, and field parental mosquitoes (HAmCq(G0 and MAmCq(G0 and their permethrin selected offspring (HAmCq(G8 and MAmCq(G6. While the majority of the P450 genes were expressed at a similar level between the field parental strains and their permethrin selected offspring, an up- or down-regulation feature in the P450 gene expression was observed following permethrin selection. Compared to their parental strains and the susceptible S-Lab strain, HAmCq(G8 and MAmCq(G6 were found to up-regulate 11 and 6% of total P450 genes in larvae and 7 and 4% in adults, respectively, while 5 and 11% were down-regulated in larvae and 4 and 2% in adults. Although the majority of these up- and down-regulated P450 genes appeared to be developmentally controlled, a few were either up- or down-regulated in both the larvae and adult stages. Interestingly, a different gene set was found to be up- or down-regulated in the HAmCq(G8 and MAmCq(G6 mosquito populations in response to insecticide selection. Several genes were identified as being up- or down-regulated in either the larvae or adults for both HAmCq(G8 and MAmCq(G6; of these, CYP6AA7 and CYP4C52v1 were up-regulated and CYP6BY3 was down-regulated across the life stages and populations of mosquitoes, suggesting a link with the permethrin selection in these mosquitoes. Taken together, the findings from this study indicate that not only are multiple P450 genes involved in insecticide resistance but up- or down-regulation of P450 genes may also be co-responsible for detoxification of insecticides, insecticide selection, and the homeostatic response of mosquitoes to changes in cellular environment.

  17. Genomic and Transcriptomic Associations Identify a New Insecticide Resistance Phenotype for the Selective Sweep at the Cyp6g1 Locus of Drosophila melanogaster.

    Battlay, Paul; Schmidt, Joshua M; Fournier-Level, Alexandre; Robin, Charles

    2016-01-01

    Scans of the Drosophila melanogaster genome have identified organophosphate resistance loci among those with the most pronounced signature of positive selection. In this study, the molecular basis of resistance to the organophosphate insecticide azinphos-methyl was investigated using the Drosophila Genetic Reference Panel, and genome-wide association. Recently released full transcriptome data were used to extend the utility of the Drosophila Genetic Reference Panel resource beyond traditional genome-wide association studies to allow systems genetics analyses of phenotypes. We found that both genomic and transcriptomic associations independently identified Cyp6g1, a gene involved in resistance to DDT and neonicotinoid insecticides, as the top candidate for azinphos-methyl resistance. This was verified by transgenically overexpressing Cyp6g1 using natural regulatory elements from a resistant allele, resulting in a 6.5-fold increase in resistance. We also identified four novel candidate genes associated with azinphos-methyl resistance, all of which are involved in either regulation of fat storage, or nervous system development. In Cyp6g1, we find a demonstrable resistance locus, a verification that transcriptome data can be used to identify variants associated with insecticide resistance, and an overlap between peaks of a genome-wide association study, and a genome-wide selective sweep analysis. PMID:27317781

  18. Efficacy of Olyset® Plus, a new long-lasting insecticidal net incorporating permethrin and piperonyl-butoxide against multi-resistant malaria vectors [corrected].

    Cédric Pennetier

    Full Text Available Due to the rapid extension of pyrethroid resistance in malaria vectors worldwide, manufacturers are developing new vector control tools including insecticide mixtures containing at least two active ingredients with different mode of action as part of insecticide resistance management. Olyset® Plus is a new long-lasting insecticidal net (LLIN incorporating permethrin and a synergist, piperonyl butoxide (PBO, into its fibres in order to counteract metabolic-based pyrethroid resistance of mosquitoes. In this study, we evaluated the efficacy of Olyset® Plus both in laboratory and field against susceptible and multi-resistant malaria vectors and compared with Olyset Net, which is a permethrin incorporated into polyethylene net. In laboratory, Olyset® Plus performed better than Olyset® Net against susceptible Anopheles gambiae strain with a 2-day regeneration time owing to an improved permethrin bleeding rate with the new incorporation technology. It also performed better than Olyset® Net against multiple resistant populations of An. gambiae in experimental hut trials in West Africa. Moreover, the present study showed evidence for a benefit of incorporating a synergist, PBO, with a pyrethroid insecticide into mosquito netting. These results need to be further validated in a large-scale field trial to assess the durability and acceptability of this new tool for malaria vector control.

  19. Mutation of a nicotinic acetylcholine receptor β subunit is associated with resistance to neonicotinoid insecticides in the aphid Myzus persicae

    Field Linda M

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Myzus persicae is a globally important aphid pest with a history of developing resistance to insecticides. Unusually, neonicotinoids have remained highly effective as control agents despite nearly two decades of steadily increasing use. In this study, a clone of M. persicae collected from southern France was found, for the first time, to exhibit sufficiently strong resistance to result in loss of the field effectiveness of neonicotinoids. Results Bioassays, metabolism and gene expression studies implied the presence of two resistance mechanisms in the resistant clone, one based on enhanced detoxification by cytochrome P450 monooxygenases, and another unaffected by a synergist that inhibits detoxifying enzymes. Binding of radiolabeled imidacloprid (a neonicotinoid to whole body membrane preparations showed that the high affinity [3H]-imidacloprid binding site present in susceptible M. persicae is lost in the resistant clone and the remaining lower affinity site is altered compared to susceptible clones. This confers a significant overall reduction in binding affinity to the neonicotinoid target: the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR. Comparison of the nucleotide sequence of six nAChR subunit (Mpα1-5 and Mpβ1 genes from resistant and susceptible aphid clones revealed a single point mutation in the loop D region of the nAChR β1 subunit of the resistant clone, causing an arginine to threonine substitution (R81T. Conclusion Previous studies have shown that the amino acid at this position within loop D is a key determinant of neonicotinoid binding to nAChRs and this amino acid change confers a vertebrate-like character to the insect nAChR receptor and results in reduced sensitivity to neonicotinoids. The discovery of the mutation at this position and its association with the reduced affinity of the nAChR for imidacloprid is the first example of field-evolved target-site resistance to neonicotinoid insecticides and also

  20. Distribution of Voltage-Gated Sodium Channel (Nav) Alleles among the Aedes aegypti Populations In Central Java Province and Its Association with Resistance to Pyrethroid Insecticides

    Sayono, Sayono; Hidayati, Anggie Puspa Nur; Fahri, Sukmal; Sumanto, Didik; Dharmana, Edi; Hadisaputro, Suharyo; Asih, Puji Budi Setia; Syafruddin, Din

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of insecticide resistant Aedes aegypti mosquitoes has hampered dengue control efforts. WHO susceptibility tests, using several pyrethroid compounds, were conducted on Ae. aegypti larvae that were collected and raised to adulthood from Semarang, Surakarta, Kudus and Jepara in Java. The AaNaV gene fragment encompassing kdr polymorphic sites from both susceptible and resistant mosquitoes was amplified, and polymorphisms were associated with the resistant phenotype. The insecticide susceptibility tests demonstrated Ae, aegypti resistance to the pyrethroids, with mortality rates ranging from 1.6%–15.2%. Three non-synonymous polymorphisms (S989P, V1016G and F1534C) and one synonymous polymorphism (codon 982) were detected in the AaNaV gene. Eight AaNaV alleles were observed in specimens from Central Java. Allele 3 (SGF) and allele 7 (PGF) represent the most common alleles found and demonstrated strong associations with resistance to pyrethroids (OR = 2.75, CI: 0.97–7.8 and OR = 7.37, CI: 2.4–22.5, respectively). This is the first report of 8 Ae. aegypti AaNaV alleles, and it indicates the development of resistance in Ae. aegypti in response to pyrethroid insecticide-based selective pressure. These findings strongly suggest the need for an appropriate integrated use of insecticides in the region. The 989P, 1016G and 1534C polymorphisms in the AaNaV gene are potentially valuable molecular markers for pyrethroid insecticide resistance monitoring. PMID:26939002

  1. Density-independent population projection trajectories of chromosome-substituted lines resistant and susceptible to organophosphate insecticides in Drosophila melanogaster

    Miyo Takahiro

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Seasonal fluctuations in susceptibility to organophosphate insecticides were observed in the Katsunuma population of Drosophila melanogaster for two consecutive years; susceptibility to three organophosphates tended to increase in the fall. To examine the hypothesis that variation in fitness among resistant and susceptible genotypes could trigger the change of genetic constitution within the fall population, we investigated density-independent population projection trajectories starting from single adult females with characteristics of chromosome-substituted lines resistant and susceptible to the three organophosphates. Results Density-independent population projection trajectories, expressed as the ratios of the number of each chromosome-substituted line to that of line SSS, for which all chromosomes were derived from the susceptible line, showed significant declines in numbers with time for all the resistant chromosome-substituted lines. Conclusion The declining tendency in the density-independent population projection trajectories of the resistant chromosome-substituted lines could explain the simultaneous decline in the levels of resistance to the three organophosphates, observed in the Katsunuma population in the fall.

  2. Multiple insecticide resistance/susceptibility status of Culex quinquefasciatus, principal vector of bancroftian filariasis from filaria endemic areas of northern India

    Kaushal Kumar; Abhay K Sharma; Sarita Kumar; Sunita Patel; Manas Sarkar; Chauhan LS

    2011-01-01

    Objective:To understand the insecticide resistance status of Culex quinquefasciatus Say (Diptera:Culicidae) (Cx. Quinquefasciatus) to deltamethrin, cyfluthrin, permethrin, lambdacyhalothrin, DDT and malathion in filarial endemic areas of Uttar Pradesh, India. Methods:Insecticide susceptibility assays were performed on wild-caught adult female Cx. quinquefasciatus mosquitoes to deltamethrin (0.05%), cyfluthrin (0.15%), permethrin (0.75%), lambdacyhalothrin (0.05%), malathion (5.0%) and DDT (4.0%), the discriminating doses recommended by the World Health Organisation (WHO). Results: The data showed that Cx. quinquefasciatus is highly resistant to DDT and malathion;the mortality was 28.33%and 27.5%, respectively and incipient resistance to synthetic pyrethroids (deltamethrin, cyfluthrin, permethrin, and lambdacyhalothrin), where mortality ranged from 95.83%in permethrin to 98.33%in cyfluthrin and lambdacyhalothrin. Knockdown times (KDT50) in response to synthetic pyrethroids varied significantly between different insecticides (P<0.01) from 31.480 min for permethrin to 21.650 for cyfluthrin. Conclusions:The results presents here provide the status report of the insecticide resistance/susceptibility of Cx. quinquefasciatus in major filaria endemic areas of northern India.

  3. Effect of transmission reduction by insecticide-treated bednets (ITNs on antimalarial drug resistance in western Kenya.

    Monica Shah

    Full Text Available Despite the clear public health benefit of insecticide-treated bednets (ITNs, the impact of malaria transmission-reduction by vector control on the spread of drug resistance is not well understood. In the present study, the effect of sustained transmission reduction by ITNs on the prevalence of Plasmodium falciparum gene mutations associated with resistance to the antimalarial drugs sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP and chloroquine (CQ in children under the age of five years was investigated during an ITN trial in Asembo area, western Kenya. During the ITN trial, the national first line antimalarial treatment changed from CQ to SP. Smear-positive samples collected from cross sectional surveys prior to ITN introduction (baseline, n = 250 and five years post-ITN intervention (year 5 survey, n = 242 were genotyped for single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs at dhfr-51, 59, 108, 164 and dhps-437, 540 (SP resistance, and pfcrt-76 and pfmdr1-86 (CQ resistance. The association between the drug resistance mutations and epidemiological variables was evaluated. There were significant increases in the prevalence of SP dhps mutations and the dhfr/dhps quintuple mutant, and a significant reduction in the proportion of mixed infections detected at dhfr-51, 59 and dhps-437, 540 SNPs from baseline to the year 5 survey. There was no change in the high prevalence of pfcrt-76 and pfmdr1-86 mutations. Multivariable regression analysis further showed that current antifolate use and year of survey were significantly associated with more SP drug resistance mutations. These results suggest that increased antifolate drug use due to drug policy change likely led to the high prevalence of SP mutations 5 years post-ITN intervention and reduced transmission had no apparent effect on the existing high prevalence of CQ mutations. There is no evidence from the current study that sustained transmission reduction by ITNs reduces the prevalence of genes associated with malaria

  4. Proteases as Insecticidal Agents

    Harrison, Robert L.; Bonning, Bryony C.

    2010-01-01

    Proteases from a variety of sources (viruses, bacteria, fungi, plants, and insects) have toxicity towards insects. Some of these insecticidal proteases evolved as venom components, herbivore resistance factors, or microbial pathogenicity factors, while other proteases play roles in insect development or digestion, but exert an insecticidal effect when over-expressed from genetically engineered plants or microbial pathogens. Many of these proteases are cysteine proteases, although insect-toxic...

  5. Improvement of Drosophila acetylcholinesterase stability by elimination of a free cysteine

    Ladurantie Caroline; Arnaud Muriel; Brisson-Lougarre Andrée; Mazères Serge; Fremaux Isabelle; Fournier Didier

    2002-01-01

    Abstract Background Acetylcholinesterase is irreversibly inhibited by organophosphate and carbamate insecticides allowing its use for residue detection with biosensors. Drosophila acetylcholinesterase is the most sensitive enzyme known and has been improved by in vitro mutagenesis. However, it is not sufficiently stable for extensive utilization. It is a homodimer in which both subunits contain 8 cysteine residues. Six are involved in conserved intramolecular disulfide bridges and one is invo...

  6. Assay of Acetylcholinesterase Activity and Electrochemical Determination of Fenthion in Oil-in-water Emulsion

    Sun Kai; He JingJing; Miao YuQing

    2009-01-01

    @@ Organophosphates (OPs) have been widely used as pesticides,insecticides or even chemical warfare agents.Acetylcholinesterase (ACHE) inhibition has been employed to develop verious assay methods for detection of pesticides with the advantages of low cost,simple procedure and quick assay time.The study of acetylcholinesterase (ACHE) activity and OPs inhibition in the solution containing organic solvent is extremely important owing to poor solubility of Ops in water and a higher solubility in organic solvents.

  7. Development of vegetable farming: a cause of the emergence of insecticide resistance in populations of Anopheles gambiae in urban areas of Benin

    Braïma James

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A fast development of urban agriculture has recently taken place in many areas in the Republic of Benin. This study aims to assess the rapid expansion of urban agriculture especially, its contribution to the emergence of insecticide resistance in populations of Anopheles gambiae. Methods The protocol was based on the collection of sociological data by interviewing vegetable farmers regarding various agricultural practices and the types of pesticides used. Bioassay tests were performed to assess the susceptibility of malaria vectors to various agricultural insecticides and biochemical analysis were done to characterize molecular status of population of An. gambiae. Results This research showed that: (1 The rapid development of urban agriculture is related to unemployment observed in cities, rural exodus and the search for a balanced diet by urban populations; (2 Urban agriculture increases the farmers' household income and their living standard; (3 At a molecular level, PCR revealed the presence of three sub-species of An. gambiae (An. gambiae s.s., Anopheles melas and Anopheles arabiensis and two molecular forms (M and S. The kdr west mutation recorded in samples from the three sites and more specifically on the M forms seems to be one of the major resistance mechanisms found in An. gambiae from agricultural areas. Insecticide susceptibility tests conducted during this research revealed a clear pattern of resistance to permethrin (76% mortality rate at Parakou; 23.5% at Porto-Novo and 17% at Cotonou. Conclusion This study confirmed an increase activity of the vegetable farming in urban areas of Benin. This has led to the use of insecticide in an improper manner to control vegetable pests, thus exerting a huge selection pressure on mosquito larval population, which resulted to the emergence of insecticide resistance in malaria vectors.

  8. Inheritance Pattern of Temephos Resistance, an Organophosphate Insecticide, in Aedes aegypti (L.)

    Vinaya Shetty; Deepak Sanil; Shetty, N. J.

    2015-01-01

    The present paper reports the mode of inheritance of resistance in laboratory induced temephos resistant and susceptible strains of Ae. aegypti. Homozygous resistant and susceptible strains of Ae. aegypti were generated by selective inbreeding at a diagnostic dose of 0.02 mg/L of temephos. Genetic crosses were carried out between these strains to determine the inheritance pattern of temephos resistance. The log-dosage probit mortality relationships and degree of dominance (D) ...

  9. Transcriptome Analysis of an Insecticide Resistant Housefly Strain: Insights about SNPs and Regulatory Elements in Cytochrome P450 Genes

    Asp, Torben; Kristensen, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Background Insecticide resistance in the housefly, Musca domestica, has been investigated for more than 60 years. It will enter a new era after the recent publication of the housefly genome and the development of multiple next generation sequencing technologies. The genetic background of the xenobiotic response can now be investigated in greater detail. Here, we investigate the 454-pyrosequencing transcriptome of the spinosad-resistant 791spin strain in relation to the housefly genome with focus on P450 genes. Results The de novo assembly of clean reads gave 35,834 contigs consisting of 21,780 sequences of the spinosad resistant strain. The 3,648 sequences were annotated with an enzyme code EC number and were mapped to 124 KEGG pathways with metabolic processes as most highly represented pathway. One hundred and twenty contigs were annotated as P450s covering 44 different P450 genes of housefly. Eight differentially expressed P450s genes were identified and investigated for SNPs, CpG islands and common regulatory motifs in promoter and coding regions. Functional annotation clustering of metabolic related genes and motif analysis of P450s revealed their association with epigenetic, transcription and gene expression related functions. The sequence variation analysis resulted in 12 SNPs and eight of them found in cyp6d1. There is variation in location, size and frequency of CpG islands and specific motifs were also identified in these P450s. Moreover, identified motifs were associated to GO terms and transcription factors using bioinformatic tools. Conclusion Transcriptome data of a spinosad resistant strain provide together with genome data fundamental support for future research to understand evolution of resistance in houseflies. Here, we report for the first time the SNPs, CpG islands and common regulatory motifs in differentially expressed P450s. Taken together our findings will serve as a stepping stone to advance understanding of the mechanism and role of P450s

  10. Partial purification and characterization of {alpha}-amylases from one insecticide-resistant population of Sitophilus zeamais

    Lopes, K.V.; Oliveira, M.G.A.; Paixao, G.P.; Visotto, L.E. [Universidade Federal de Vicosa (UFV), MG (Brazil). Dept. de Bioquimica e Biologia Molecular; Veloso, R.V.S.; Marinho, J.S.; Guedes, R.N.C. [Universidade Federal de Vicosa (UFV), MG (Brazil). Dept. de Biologia Animal; Oliveira, J.A. [Universidade Federal de Vicosa (UFV), MG (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica

    2008-07-01

    Full text: {alpha}-Amylases (EC 3.2.1.1) constitute a family of endo-amylases that catalyze the hydrolysis of a-D- (1,4)-glucan linkages in st ach components and various other related carbohydrates. They play a central role in carbohydrate metabolism of animals, plants and microorganisms. Many insects, especially those that feed on grain products during larval and/or adult life, depend on their amylases for survival. This is particularly true for the Sitophilus zeamais Motschulsky, a cosmopolitan pest of stored products. It is mainly controlled by insecticides. Amylases from adults of S.zeamais insecticide-resistant were purified by using a sequential procedure of glycogen-complex precipitation and ion exchange chromatography. Specific activity increased from 58,0454 AU/dL/mg protein in the crude homogenate to 2558,8720 AU/dL/mg protein in the final purified sample. Amylase unit (AU/dL) refers to the amount of amylase that hydrolysis 10 mg starch in 30 min at 37 deg C. The purified amylase ran as a single protein band on SDS-PAGE. From a plot of log molecular weight against relative mobility in 10% acrylamide gel, molecular weight was estimated to be 56 kDa. The enzyme had a K{sub m} of 0,2243 g/L for soluble starch and was most active at ph 5,0. The temperature of major activity was 40 deg C. The activity of enzyme was unaffected by presence or absence of Cl{sup -} and Ca{sup 2+}.

  11. Partial purification and characterization of α-amylases from one insecticide-resistant population of Sitophilus zeamais

    Full text: α-Amylases (EC 3.2.1.1) constitute a family of endo-amylases that catalyze the hydrolysis of a-D- (1,4)-glucan linkages in st ach components and various other related carbohydrates. They play a central role in carbohydrate metabolism of animals, plants and microorganisms. Many insects, especially those that feed on grain products during larval and/or adult life, depend on their amylases for survival. This is particularly true for the Sitophilus zeamais Motschulsky, a cosmopolitan pest of stored products. It is mainly controlled by insecticides. Amylases from adults of S.zeamais insecticide-resistant were purified by using a sequential procedure of glycogen-complex precipitation and ion exchange chromatography. Specific activity increased from 58,0454 AU/dL/mg protein in the crude homogenate to 2558,8720 AU/dL/mg protein in the final purified sample. Amylase unit (AU/dL) refers to the amount of amylase that hydrolysis 10 mg starch in 30 min at 37 deg C. The purified amylase ran as a single protein band on SDS-PAGE. From a plot of log molecular weight against relative mobility in 10% acrylamide gel, molecular weight was estimated to be 56 kDa. The enzyme had a Km of 0,2243 g/L for soluble starch and was most active at ph 5,0. The temperature of major activity was 40 deg C. The activity of enzyme was unaffected by presence or absence of Cl- and Ca2+

  12. Inheritance Pattern of Temephos Resistance, an Organophosphate Insecticide, in Aedes aegypti (L.).

    Shetty, Vinaya; Sanil, Deepak; Shetty, N J

    2015-01-01

    The present paper reports the mode of inheritance of resistance in laboratory induced temephos resistant and susceptible strains of Ae. aegypti. Homozygous resistant and susceptible strains of Ae. aegypti were generated by selective inbreeding at a diagnostic dose of 0.02 mg/L of temephos. Genetic crosses were carried out between these strains to determine the inheritance pattern of temephos resistance. The log-dosage probit mortality relationships and degree of dominance (D) were calculated. The dosage-mortality (d-m) line of the F 1 generation was nearer to the resistant parent than the susceptible one. The "D" value was calculated as 0.15 indicating that the temephos resistant gene is incompletely dominant. The d-m lines of the F 2 generation and progeny from the backcross exhibited clear plateaus of mortality across a range of doses indicating that temephos resistance is controlled by a single gene. Comparison of the mortality data with the theoretical expectations using the χ (2) test revealed no significant difference, confirming a monogenic pattern of inheritance. In conclusion, the study provides evidence that the temephos resistance in Ae. aegypti follows an incompletely dominant and monogenic mode of inheritance. PMID:25861478

  13. Probabilistic tools for assessment of pest resistance risk associated to insecticidal transgenic crops

    Maia Aline de Holanda Nunes

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the main risks associated to transgenic crops expressing Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt toxins is the evolution of pest resistance. The adoption of Bt crops requires environmental risk assessment that includes resistance risk estimation, useful for definition of resistance management strategies aiming to delay resistance evolution. In this context, resistance risk is defined as the probability of the Bt toxin resistance allele frequency (RFreq exceeding a critical value (CriticalFreq. Mathematical simulation models have been used to estimate (RFreq over pest generations. In 1998, Caprio developed a deterministic simulation model with few parameters that can be used to obtain RFreq point estimates from point information about model parameters and decision variables involved in that process. In this work, the resistance risk was estimated using Caprio´s model, by incorporating uncertainty to the resistance allele initial frequency (InitialFreq. The main objective was to evaluate the influence of different probability distribution functions on the risk estimates. The simulation results showed that the influence of InitialFreq input distributions on the risk estimates changes along pest generations. The risk estimates considering input Normal distribution for InitialFreq are similar to those ones obtained considering Triangular distribution if their variances are equal. The use of Uniform distribution instead the Normal or Triangular due to the lack of information about InitialFreq leads to an overestimation of risk estimates for the initial generations and sub estimation for the generations after the one for which the critical frequency is achieved.

  14. Development of vegetable farming: a cause of the emergence of insecticide resistance in populations of Anopheles gambiae in urban areas of Benin

    Braïma James; Djouaka Rousseau F; Asidi Alex; Yadouleton Anges; Agossou Christian D; Akogbeto Martin C

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background A fast development of urban agriculture has recently taken place in many areas in the Republic of Benin. This study aims to assess the rapid expansion of urban agriculture especially, its contribution to the emergence of insecticide resistance in populations of Anopheles gambiae. Methods The protocol was based on the collection of sociological data by interviewing vegetable farmers regarding various agricultural practices and the types of pesticides used. Bioassay tests we...

  15. Islands and Stepping-Stones: Comparative Population Structure of Anopheles gambiae sensu stricto and Anopheles arabiensis in Tanzania and Implications for the Spread of Insecticide Resistance.

    Deodatus Maliti; Hilary Ranson; Stephen Magesa; William Kisinza; Juma Mcha; Khamis Haji; Gerald Killeen; David Weetman

    2014-01-01

    Population genetic structures of the two major malaria vectors Anopheles gambiae s.s. and An. arabiensis, differ markedly across Sub-Saharan Africa, which could reflect differences in historical demographies or in contemporary gene flow. Elucidation of the degree and cause of population structure is important for predicting the spread of genetic traits such as insecticide resistance genes or artificially engineered genes. Here the population genetics of An. gambiae s.s. and An. arabiensis in ...

  16. Toxicities of several insecticides and inhibition of acetylcholinesterase in Aphis gossypii%几种常用杀虫剂对瓜蚜的毒力和对乙酰胆碱酯酶的抑制作用

    于永成; 刁青云; 李海平

    2011-01-01

    The toxicities of 4 common insecticides to Aphis gossypii Glover on cucumber plants were studied in the greenhouses using leave-dipping method. The results showed that A. gossypii was most sensitive to imidacloprid in the insecticides tested, and LC50 was 4. 203 mg/L. The LC50 values for omethoate, phoxim and triazophos were 21.70, 38.86 and 43.30 mg/L, respectively. It was shown that 3OP insecticides tested could significantly inhibit the activity of AChE in A. gossypii, and their inhibition activities increased over time. The I50 values of omethoate, phoxim and triazophos to AChE were 9.6× 10-6 , 11.4× 10-6 and 17.1 × 10-6 mol/L, respectively.%用叶片药膜法测定了4种常用杀虫剂氧乐果、辛硫磷、三唑磷、吡虫啉对呼和浩特市郊蔬菜基地温室黄瓜上发生的瓜蚜的毒力.结果表明,瓜蚜对吡虫啉最敏感,LC仅为4.203 mg/L,氧乐果、辛硫磷、三唑磷对瓜蚜的LC分别为21.70、38.86、43.30 mg/L.研究明确了3种有机磷杀虫剂对瓜蚜体内乙酰胆碱酯酶AChE均有明显的抑制作用,并随着抑制时间的延长,抑制率增加.I值分别为氧乐果9.6×10mol/L,辛硫磷11.4×10mol/L,三唑磷17.1×10mol/L.

  17. Comparing Host Plant Resistance, Engineered Resistance, and Insecticide Treatment for Control of Colorado Potato Beetle and Potato Leafhopper in Potatoes

    Coombs, Joseph J.; Felcher, Kimberly J.; Douches, David S; Ghidiu, Gerald M.

    2011-01-01

    The Colorado potato beetle, Leptinotarsa decemlineata (Say) Order Coleoptera and the potato leafhopper, Empoasca fabae (Harris) Order Homoptera, are the major insect pests of potato in eastern North America. In two years of field trials, we compared the effectiveness of three pest management options for the control of Colorado potato beetle and potato leafhopper: natural host plant resistance (glandular trichomes), engineered resistance (Bacillus thuringiensis [Bt] Berliner cry3A gene) and a ...

  18. Breeding and Identification of Insect-Resistant Rice by Transferring Two Insecticidal Genes, sbk and sck

    ZHANG Qi-jun; LI Cong; LIU Shao-kui; LAI Dong; QI Qing-ming; LU Chuan-gen

    2013-01-01

    The plasmid of pCDMARUBA-Hyg,which contained two insect-resistance genes,sbk (modified from Cry1A(c)) and sck (modified from CpTI),was transformed into an Agrobacterium EHA105 for infection of the calli of a super japonica rice Nanjing 45.Primarily,using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) detection with the primers of sbk and sck genes,42 positive transgenic plants that were marker-free and contained the two target genes were selected from 97 regenerated plants.Results of southern-blotting indicated that 23,11,5,2 and 1 plants had one,two,three,four and five copies of the transformed genes,respectively.Analysis of reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR) and Bt gene testing paper showed that 28 T3 generation plants derived from four transgenic plants having a single copy were insect-resistant.Feeding experiment with rice stem borer revealed that the insect resistance was greatly increased with the larva mortality ranging from 94% to 100%.In addition,among the transgenic plants,three T3 transgenic plants possessed some desirable characteristics for breeding and production,such as plant height,seed-setting rate,1000-grain weight and larva mortality.The mechanism of insect resistance of Bt gene and its application in rice transgenic research were also briefly discussed.

  19. Surveillance, insecticide resistance and control of an invasive Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae population in California [version 3; referees: 2 approved

    Anthony J. Cornel

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The invasion and subsequent establishment in California of Aedes aegypti in 2013 has created new challenges for local mosquito abatement and vector control districts. Studies were undertaken to identify effective and economical strategies to monitor the abundance and spread of this mosquito species as well as for its control. Overall, BG Sentinel (BGS traps were found to be the most sensitive trap type to measure abundance and spread into new locations. Autocidal-Gravid-Ovitraps (AGO-B, when placed at a site for a week, performed equally to BGS in detecting the presence of female Ae. aegypti. Considering operational cost and our findings, we recommend use of BGS traps for surveillance in response to service requests especially in locations outside the known infestation area. We recommend AGO-Bs be placed at fixed sites, cleared and processed once a week to monitor mosquito abundance within a known infestation area. Long-term high density placements of AGO-Bs were found to show promise as an environmentally friendly trap-kill control strategy. California Ae. aegypti were found to be homozygous for the V1016I mutation in the voltage gated sodium channel gene, which is implicated to be involved in insecticide resistance. This strain originating from Clovis, California was resistant to some pyrethroids but not to deltamethrin in bottle bio-assays. Sentinel cage ultra-low-volume (ULV trials using a new formulation of deltamethrin (DeltaGard® demonstrated that it provided some control (average of 56% death in sentinel cages in a 91.4 m spray swath after a single truck mounted aerial ULV application in residential areas.

  20. Role of a γ-aminobutryic acid (GABA) receptor mutation in the evolution and spread of Diabrotica virgifera virgifera resistance to cyclodiene insecticides.

    Wang, H; Coates, B S; Chen, H; Sappington, T W; Guillemaud, T; Siegfried, B D

    2013-10-01

    The western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera, is a damaging pest of cultivated corn that was controlled by applications of cyclodiene insecticides from the late 1940s until resistance evolved ∼10 years later. Range expansion from the western plains into eastern USA coincides with resistance development. An alanine to serine amino acid substitution within the Rdl subunit of the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor confers resistance to cyclodiene insecticides in many species. We found that the non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) G/T at the GABA receptor cDNA position 838 (G/T(838)) of D. v. virgifera resulted in the alanine to serine change, and the codominant SNP allele T(838) was genetically linked to survival of beetles in aldrin bioassays. A phenotypic gradient of decreasing susceptibility from west to east was correlated with higher frequencies of the resistance-conferring T(838) allele in the eastern-most populations. This pattern exists in opposition to perceived selective pressures since the more eastern and most resistant populations probably experienced reduced exposure. The reasons for the observed distribution are uncertain, but historical records of the range expansion combined with the distribution of susceptible and resistant phenotypes and genotypes provide an opportunity to better understand factors affecting the species' range expansion. PMID:23841833

  1. Effects of piperonyl butoxide on the toxicity of the organophosphate temephos and the role of esterases in the insecticide resistance of Aedes aegypti

    Boscolli Barbosa Pereira; Jean Ezequiel Limongi; Edimar Olegário de Campos Júnior; Denis Prudencio Luiz; Warwick Estevam Kerr

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The effects of piperonyl butoxide (PBO) on the toxicity of the organophosphate temephos (TE) and the role of esterases in the resistance of Aedes aegypti to this insecticide were evaluated. Methods A. aegypti L4 larvae susceptible and resistant to TE were pre-treated with PBO solutions in acetone at concentrations of 0.125, 0.25, 0.5, 1, and 2% for 24h and subsequently exposed to a diagnostic concentration of 0.02mg/L aqueous TE solution. The esterase activity of the larvae ext...

  2. Insecticide susceptibility of surviving Cotesia plutellae (Hym: Braconidae) and Diaeretiella rapae (M'Intosh) (Hym: Aphidiidae) as affected by sublethal insecticide dosages on host insects.

    Lin, Yong Wen; Wu, Gang; Miyata, Tadashi

    2007-09-01

    The effects of sublethal dosages of insecticides applied to Plutella xylostella L. (Lepidoptera: Yponomeutidae) and Lipaphis erysimi Kaltenbach (Homoptera: Aphidiidae) on the insecticide susceptibility of the surviving endoparasitoids, Cotesia plutellae Kurdjumov (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) and Diaeretiella rapae (M'Intosh) (Hymenoptera: Aphidiidae), were studied in Shangjie, Minhou, China. The susceptibility to methamidophos and the sensitivity of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) to methamidophos and dichlorvos in the adults of host insects were substantially lower than those in the two parasitoids. The host insects were treated with sublethal dosages of methamidophos in P. xylostella and of methamidophos and avermectin in L. erysimi. The cocoon formation in the two parasitoids decreased significantly, from 35.0% (control) to 13.0% (with methamidophos treatment) for C. plutellae; from 20.6% (control) to 9.0% (with methamidophos treatment) and from 24.3% (control) to 16.7% (with avermectin treatment) for D. rapae. The susceptibility to methamidophos of the resultant emerging adults of the two parasitoids was found to be significantly lower than that of the control when the parasitoids were left in contact with the same dosages of methamidophos. The average AChE activity inhibition by methamidophos and dichlorvos in 34-60 adults of the two parasitoids that emerged from the treatments (15.1% and 31.8% respectively for C. plutellae, and 21.1% and 26.9% for D. rapae) was also significantly lower than those of the controls (55.4% and 48.3% respectively for C. plutellae, and 42.9% and 51.7% for D. rapae). The bimolecular rate constant (k(i)) values of AChE to methamidophos and dichlorvos in the adults of parasitoids without the insecticide treatment were 1.78 and 1.56 times as high as those that emerged from the host insects treated with methamidophos for C. plutellae, and 1.91 and 1.66 times as high as those in the case of D. rapae. It is suggested that there is a difference

  3. Comparing malaria surveillance with periodic spraying in the presence of insecticide-resistant mosquitoes: Should we spray regularly or based on human infections?

    Church, Kevin E M; Smith, Robert J

    2016-06-01

    There is an urgent need for more understanding of the effects of surveillance on malaria control. Indoor residual spraying has had beneficial effects on global malaria reduction, but resistance to the insecticide poses a threat to eradication. We develop a model of impulsive differential equations to account for a resistant strain of mosquitoes that is entirely immune to the insecticide. The impulse is triggered either due to periodic spraying or when a critical number of malaria cases are detected. For small mutation rates, the mosquito-only submodel exhibits either a single mutant-only equilibrium, a mutant-only equilibrium and a single coexistence equilibrium, or a mutant-only equilibrium and a pair of coexistence equilibria. Bistability is a likely outcome, while the effect of impulses is to introduce a saddle-node bifurcation, resulting in persistence of malaria in the form of impulsive periodic orbits. If certain parameters are small, triggering the insecticide based on number of malaria cases is asymptotically equivalent to spraying periodically. PMID:27055608

  4. Effect of isodillapiole on the expression of the insecticide resistance genes GSTE7 and CYP6N12 in Aedes aegypti from central Amazonia.

    Lima, V S; Pinto, A C; Rafael, M S

    2015-01-01

    The yellow fever mosquito Aedes (Stegomyia) aegypti is the main vector of dengue arbovirus and other arboviruses. Dengue prevention measures for the control of A. aegypti involve mainly the use of synthetic insecticides. The constant use of insecticides has caused resistance in this mosquito. Alternative studies on plant extracts and their products have been conducted with the aim of controlling the spread of the mosquito. Dillapiole is a compound found in essential oils of the plant Piper aduncum (Piperaceae) which has been effective as a biopesticide against A. aegypti. Isodillapiole is a semisynthetic substance obtained by the isomerization of dillapiole. In the present study, isodillapiole was evaluated for its potential to induce differential expression of insecticide resistance genes (GSTE7 and CYP6N12) in 3rd instar larvae of A. aegypti. These larvae were exposed to this compound at two concentrations (20 and 40 μg/mL) for 4 h during four generations (G1, G2, G3, and G4). Quantitative RT-PCR was used to assess the expression of GSTE7 and CYP6N12 genes. GSTE7 and CYP6N12 relative expression levels were higher at 20 than at 40 μg/mL and varied among generations. The decrease in GSTE7 and CYP6N12 expression levels at the highest isodillapiole concentration suggests that larvae may have suffered from metabolic stress, revealing a potential alternative product in the control of A. aegypti. PMID:26681019

  5. Anopheles gambiae distribution and insecticide resistance in the cities of Douala and Yaoundé (Cameroon: influence of urban agriculture and pollution

    Awono-Ambene Parfait

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Urban malaria is becoming a major health priority across Africa. A study was undertaken to assess the importance of urban pollution and agriculture practice on the distribution and susceptibility to insecticide of malaria vectors in the two main cities in Cameroon. Methods Anopheline larval breeding sites were surveyed and water samples analysed monthly from October 2009 to December 2010. Parameters analysed included turbidity, pH, temperature, conductivity, sulfates, phosphates, nitrates, nitrites, ammonia, aluminium, alkalinity, iron, potassium, manganese, magnesium, magnesium hardness and total hardness. Characteristics of water bodies in urban areas were compared to rural areas and between urban sites. The level of susceptibility of Anopheles gambiae to 4% DDT, 0.75% permethrin, 0.05% deltamethrin, 0.1% bendiocarb and 5% malathion were compared between mosquitoes collected from polluted, non polluted and cultivated areas. Results A total of 1,546 breeding sites, 690 in Yaoundé and 856 in Douala, were sampled in the course of the study. Almost all measured parameters had a concentration of 2- to 100-fold higher in urban compare to rural breeding sites. No resistance to malathion was detected, but bendiocarb resistance was present in Yaounde. Very low mortality rates were observed following DDT or permethrin exposure, associated with high kdr frequencies. Mosquitoes collected in cultivated areas, exhibited the highest resistant levels. There was little difference in insecticide resistance or kdr allele frequency in mosquitoes collected from polluted versus non-polluted sites. Conclusion The data confirm high selection pressure on mosquitoes originating from urban areas and suggest urban agriculture rather than pollution as the major factor driving resistance to insecticide.

  6. Impact of Insecticide Resistance on the Effectiveness of Pyrethroid-Based Malaria Vectors Control Tools in Benin: Decreased Toxicity and Repellent Effect.

    Fiacre R Agossa

    Full Text Available Since the first evidence of pyrethroids resistance in 1999 in Benin, mutations have rapidly increased in mosquitoes and it is now difficult to design a study including a control area where malaria vectors are fully susceptible. Few studies have assessed the after effect of resistance on the success of pyrethroid based prevention methods in mosquito populations. We therefore assessed the impact of resistance on the effectiveness of pyrethroids based indoor residual spraying (IRS in semi-field conditions and long lasting insecticidal nets (LLINs in laboratory conditions. The results observed showed low repulsion and low toxicity of pyrethroids compounds in the test populations. The toxicity of pyrethroids used in IRS was significantly low with An. gambiae s.l (< 46% but high for other predominant species such as Mansonia africana (93% to 97%. There were significant differences in terms of the repellent effect expressed as exophily and deterrence compared to the untreated huts (P<0.001. Furthermore, mortality was 23.71% for OlyseNet® and 39.06% for PermaNet®. However, with laboratory susceptible "Kisumu", mortality was 100% for both nets suggesting a resistance within the wild mosquito populations. Thus treatment with pyrethroids at World Health Organization recommended dose will not be effective at reducing malaria in the coming years. Therefore it is necessary to study how insecticide resistance decreases the efficacy of particular pyrethroids used in pyrethroid-based vector control so that a targeted approach can be adopted.

  7. Susceptibility profile of Aedes aegypti from Santiago Island, Cabo Verde, to insecticides.

    Rocha, Hélio Daniel Ribeiro; Paiva, Marcelo Henrique Santos; Silva, Norma Machado; de Araújo, Ana Paula; Camacho, Denise dos Reis da Rosa de Azevedo; Moura, Aires Januário Fernandes da; Gómez, Lara Ferrero; Ayres, Constância Flávia Junqueira; Santos, Maria Alice Varjal de Melo

    2015-12-01

    In 2009, Cabo Verde diagnosed the first dengue cases, with 21,137 cases reported and Aedes aegypti was identified as the vector. Since the outbreak, chemical insecticides and source reduction were used to control the mosquito population. This study aimed to assess the susceptibility of A. aegypti populations from Santiago, Cabo Verde to insecticides and identify the mechanisms of resistance. Samples of A. aegypti eggs were obtained at two different time periods (2012 and 2014), using ovitraps in different locations in Santiago Island to establish the parental population. F1 larvae were exposed to different concentrations of insecticides (Bacillus thuringiensis var israelensis (Bti), diflubenzuron and temephos) to estimate the lethal concentrations (LC90) and calculate the respective rate of resistance (RR90). Semi-field tests using temephos-ABATE(®) were performed to evaluate the persistence of the product. Bottle tests using female mosquitoes were carried out to determine the susceptibility to the adulticides malathion, cypermethrin and deltamethrin. Biochemical and molecular tests were performed to investigate the presence of metabolic resistance mechanisms, associated with the enzymes glutathione S-transferases (GSTs), esterases and mixed-function oxidases (MFO) and to detect mutations or alterations in the sodium channel and acetylcholinesterase genes. A. aegypti mosquitoes from Santiago exhibited resistance to deltamethrin, cypermethrin (mortality<80%) and temephos (RR90=4.4) but susceptibility to malathion (mortality≥98%), Bti and diflubenzuron. The low level of resistance to temephos did not affect the effectiveness of Abate(®). The enzymatic analysis conducted in 2012 revealed slight changes in the activities of GST (25%), MFO (18%), α-esterase (19%) and β-esterase (17%), but no significant changes in 2014. Target site resistance mutations were not detected. Our results suggest that the A. aegypti population from Santiago is resistant to two major

  8. Experimental hut evaluation of bednets treated with an organophosphate (chlorpyrifos-methyl) or a pyrethroid (lambdacyhalothrin) alone and in combination against insecticide-resistant Anopheles gambiae and Culex quinquefasciatus mosquitoes.

    Corbel Vincent; Chandre Fabrice; Hougard Jean-Marc; Curtis Christopher F; Koffi Alphonsine A; N'Guessan Raphael; Asidi Alex N; Darriet Frédéric; Zaim Morteza; Rowland Mark W

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Background Pyrethroid resistant mosquitoes are becoming increasingly common in parts of Africa. It is important to identify alternative insecticides which, if necessary, could be used to replace or supplement the pyrethroids for use on treated nets. Certain compounds of an earlier generation of insecticides, the organophosphates may have potential as net treatments. Methods Comparative studies of chlorpyrifos-methyl (CM), an organophosphate with low mammalian toxicity, and lambdacyha...

  9. Photodestruction of acetylcholinesterase

    Ultraviolet irradiation of 11S acetylcholinesterase (acetylcholine acetylhydrolase, EC 3.1.1.7) produces a loss of tryptophan fluorescence which is best described as the sum of two separable first-order processes, one much more rapid than the other. In addition, the enzyme undergoes an all-or-none inactivation that is monotonically first order. Simultaneous with activity loss, photoscission takes place and results in a molecular weight drop. The extreme sensitivity of acetylcholinesterase to photodestruction upon photon absorption and the several events that follow it not only suggest that these findings might be a basis for a useful molecular probe of the structure of this enzyme, but also indicate that additional care should be taken when conducting spectroscopic studies in the uv region

  10. Molecular Dynamics of Acetylcholinesterase

    Shen, T Y.; Tai, Kaihsu; Henchman, Richard H.; Mccammon, Andy

    2002-06-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations are leading to a deeper understanding of the activity of the enzyme acetylcholinesterase. Simulations have shown how breathing motions in the enzyme facilitate the displacement of substrate from the surface of the enzyme to the buried active site. The most recent work points to the complex and spatially extensive nature of such motions and suggests possible modes of regulation of the activity of the enzyme.

  11. Push-pull Strategy with Trap Crops, Neem and Nuclear Polyhedrosis Virus for Insecticide Resistance Management in Helicoverpa armigera (Hubner in Cotton

    P. Duraimurugan

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Insecticide resistance in Helicoverpa armigera (Hubner is a major threat to cotton production in India. The virus infection was found to increase the susceptibility of H. armigera to the insecticides. But, use of Nuclear Polyhedrosis Virus (NPV on a larger scale and on cotton due to leaf alkalinity poses certain practical problems. Hence, studies were carried out to assess the effects of push-pull strategy with trap crops, neem and NPV in cotton for the management of insecticide resistant H. armigera. Field experiments were conducted on cotton (MCU5 with trap crops (okra and pigeonpea and neem was used to diversify the pests to trap crops whereby the control of these pests was assessed with the application of NPV. The preference of H. armigera was towards okra and pigeonpea as a trap crop compared to cotton. Application of NSKE on cotton diversified the H. armigera towards untreated okra and pigeonpea. Push-pull strategy with the conjunctive use of trap crops, restricted application of NSKE on cotton leaving trap crops and restricted application of NPV on trap crops was highly effective in reducing the incidence of H. armigera and damage to fruiting bodies, boll, locule and inter locule basis over cotton sole crop (untreated check. The percent recovery of NPV infected larvae varied from 37.5-47.5, 32.8-39.2 and 14.2-20.2% on okra, pigeon pea and cotton respectively. The synthetic pyrethroids resistance in field survived H. armigera at the end of the season was reduced from 87.5-93.1% to 76.4-84.3%.

  12. The entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana reduces instantaneous blood feeding in wild multi-insecticide-resistant Culex quinquefasciatus mosquitoes in Benin, West Africa

    Howard Annabel FV

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mosquito-borne diseases are still a major health risk in many developing countries, and the emergence of multi-insecticide-resistant mosquitoes is threatening the future of vector control. Therefore, new tools that can manage resistant mosquitoes are required. Laboratory studies show that entomopathogenic fungi can kill insecticide-resistant malaria vectors but this needs to be verified in the field. Methods The present study investigated whether these fungi will be effective at infecting, killing and/or modifying the behaviour of wild multi-insecticide-resistant West African mosquitoes. The entomopathogenic fungi Metarhizium anisopliae and Beauveria bassiana were separately applied to white polyester window netting and used in combination with either a permethrin-treated or untreated bednet in an experimental hut trial. Untreated nets were used because we wanted to test the effect of fungus alone and in combination with an insecticide to examine any potential additive or synergistic effects. Results In total, 1125 female mosquitoes were collected during the hut trial, mainly Culex quinquefasciatus Say. Unfortunately, not enough wild Anopheles gambiae Giles were collected to allow the effect the fungi may have on this malaria vector to be analysed. None of the treatment combinations caused significantly increased mortality of Cx. quinquefasciatus when compared to the control hut. The only significant behaviour modification found was a reduction in blood feeding by Cx. quinquefasciatus, caused by the permethrin and B. bassiana treatments, although no additive effect was seen in the B. bassiana and permethrin combination treatment. Beauveria bassiana did not repel blood foraging mosquitoes either in the laboratory or field. Conclusions This is the first time that an entomopathogenic fungus has been shown to reduce blood feeding of wild mosquitoes. This behaviour modification indicates that B. bassiana could potentially be a new

  13. Genetic divergence between two sympatric species of the Lutzomyia longipalpis complex in the paralytic gene, a locus associated with insecticide resistance and lovesong production

    RMMA Lins

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available The sandfly Lutzomyia longipalpis s.l. is the main vector of American Visceral Leishmaniasis. L. longipalpis s.l. is a species complex but until recently the existence of cryptic sibling species among Brazilian populations was a controversial issue. A fragment of paralytic (para, a voltage dependent sodium channel gene associated with insecticide resistance and courtship song production in Drosophila, was isolated and used as a molecular marker to study the divergence between two sympatric siblings of the L. longipalpis complex from Sobral, Brazil. The results revealed para as the first single locus DNA marker presenting fixed differences between the two species in this locality. In addition, two low frequency amino-acid changes in an otherwise very conserved region of the channel were observed, raising the possibility that it might be associated with incipient resistance in this vector. To the best of our knowledge, the present study represents the first population genetics analysis of insecticide resistance genes in this important leishmaniasis vector.

  14. Radiotracer Approaches to Carbamate Insecticide Toxicology

    Methylcarbamates constitute one of the major groups of insecticides. Many unresolved problems in their toxicology may be readily approached with radiotracer studies. Dimethylcarbamates have been prepared with carbonyl-C14-labelling and methylcarbamates withmethyl-, carbonyl-and ring-labelling utilizing carbon-14. The pharmacological action of these.compounds presumably results from acetylcholinesterase inhibition and may involve carbamylation. Reaction of carbonyl- or methyl-labelled carbamates with purified cholinesterase or other esterases would allow a critical examination of this carbamylation reaction and the ease of spontaneous and induced reactivation or decarbamylation. The physiological significance of cholinesterase inhibition might be examined by administering acetate-C14 and analysis for radiolabelled acetylcholine accumulation in nervous tissue, or by utilizing acetyl-C14-choline as the substrate for in vitro determination of the degree of cholinesterase inhibition in tissues of poisoned animals with minimal dilution of the inhibitors and enzymes during analysis. Some progress has been made with radiolabelled materials in investigating the metabolism of carbamate insecticides. Sevin (1-naphthyl methylcarbamate) has been most extensively studied along with its potential hydrolysis products. The assumption that the metabolism of Sevin involves an initial hydrolysis and then further decomposition of the fragments was not supported by carbon-14 studies. The major detoxification mechanism in mammals, and probably also in insects, results from initial oxidative attack on the carbamate by the microsomes in the presence of reduced nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide phosphate. Sevin is rapidly metabolized in mammals, but the fate of certain of the fragments has not been resolved. Some of the metabolites appear in the milk of lactating animals. One step in the metabolism appears to be formation of the N-methylol derivative. Preliminary studies on the metabolism

  15. Acetylcholinesterase Inhibitors: Pharmacology and Toxicology

    Čolović, Mirjana B; Krstić, Danijela Z; Lazarević-Pašti, Tamara D; Bondžić, Aleksandra M; Vasić, Vesna M

    2013-01-01

    Acetylcholinesterase is involved in the termination of impulse transmission by rapid hydrolysis of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine in numerous cholinergic pathways in the central and peripheral nervous systems. The enzyme inactivation, induced by various inhibitors, leads to acetylcholine accumulation, hyperstimulation of nicotinic and muscarinic receptors, and disrupted neurotransmission. Hence, acetylcholinesterase inhibitors, interacting with the enzyme as their primary target, are appl...

  16. Acetylcholinesterase: From 3D Structure to Function

    Dvir, Hay; Silman, Israel; Harel, Michal; Rosenberry, Terrone L.; Sussman, Joel L.

    2010-01-01

    By rapid hydrolysis of the neurotransmitter, acetylcholine, acetylcholinesterase terminates neurotransmission at cholinergic synapses. Acetylcholinesterase is a very fast enzyme, functioning at a rate approaching that of a diffusion-controlled reaction. The powerful toxicity of organophosphate poisons is attributed primarily to their potent inhibition of acetylcholinesterase. Acetylcholinesterase inhibitors are utilized in the treatment of various neurological disorders, and are the principal...

  17. The Influence of Insecticide Resistance, Age, Sex, and Blood Feeding Frequency on Thermal Tolerance of Wild and Laboratory Phenotypes of Anopheles funestus (Diptera: Culicidae).

    Lyons, C L; Oliver, S V; Hunt, R H; Coetzee, M

    2016-03-01

    Resistance to insecticides is a global phenomenon and is increasing at an unprecedented rate. How resistant and susceptible strains of malaria vectors might differ in terms of life history and basic biology is often overlooked, despite the potential importance of such information in light of changing climates. Here, we investigated the upper thermal limits (ULT50) of wild and laboratory strains of Anopheles funestus Giles mosquitoes, including resistance status, sex, age, and blood feeding status as potential factors influencing ULT50. No significant differences in ULT50 were observed between strains displaying different resistance patterns, nor was there a significant difference between wild and laboratory strains. In some instances, strains showed a senescence response, displaying decreased ULT50 with an increase in age, and differences between males and females (females displaying higher ULT50 than males). Blood feeding did not seem to influence ULT50 in any way. For An. funestus, it seems evident that there is no cost to resistance despite what is displayed in other anopheline species. This could have significant impacts for vector control, with resistant populations of An. funestus performing just as well, if not better, than susceptible strains, especially under changing environmental conditions such as those expected to occur with climate change. PMID:26718714

  18. Larvicidal activities of chinaberry, neem and Bacillus thuringiensis israelensis (Bti) to an insecticide resistant population of Anopheles arabiensis from Tolay, Southwest Ethiopia

    Assalif Demissew; Meshesha Balkew; Melaku Girma

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To elucidate the larvicidal potency of neem, chinaberry and Bacillus thur-ingiensis israelensis (Bti) to larvae of Anopheles arabiensis under semi-field condition and adult susceptibility/resistance to the conventionally used insecticides in Tolay, Southwestern Ethiopia. Methods: Wild collected 3rd and 4th stage larvae were exposed to neem, and chinaberry seed powder dissolved in water and Bti in artificial containers at three treatment levels:0.2, 0.1 and 0.05 g/m2 and controls were free of treatments. Larval and pupal mortalities were monitored daily and residual activities were determined. The experiments were replicated three times. The World Health Organization tube test for all classes of in-secticides was conducted on adult Anopheles arabiensis reared from field collected larvae and pupae. Data were analyzed using STATA software version 11. Results: In the first application, neem powder caused 88.9%, 87.9%and 79.4%larval and pupal mortality at 0.2, 0.1 and 0.05 g/m2 after 4.3, 6.0 and 5.7 days, respectively. The cor-responding killing effect of chinaberry was 80.3%, 62.1%and 30.3%after 7.0, 7.7 and 8.3 days respectively. Bti at all treatments killed 100%after 24 h except 2.7 days for 0.05 g/m2. Adult mosquitoes were susceptible only for fenitrothion and pirimiphos-methyl with 100%mortality while resistant to deltamethrin, alpha-cypermethrin, etofenprox and dichloro-diphenyl-tricgloroethane with only 9.0%, 3.0%, 5.1%and 2.0%mortalities respectively. Conclusions: Neem, chinaberry and Bti showed potent larvicidal and pupicidal activ-ities. However, in the area, high level of mosquito resistance to pyrethroids and dichloro-diphenyl-tricgloroethane was seen which will pose serious challenge to vector control in the future. Therefore, using integrated approach including these botanical larvicides is warranted to manage insecticide resistance.

  19. Temephos resistance in field Aedes (Stegomyia) albopictus (Skuse) from Selangor, Malaysia.

    Chen, C D; Nazni, W A; Lee, H L; Norma-Rashid, Y; Lardizabal, M L; Sofian-Azirun, M

    2013-06-01

    Larvae of Aedes albopictus obtained from dengue endemic areas in Selangor, Malaysia were evaluated for their susceptibility to operational dosage of temephos (1 mg/L). Larval bioassays were carried out in accordance to modified WHO standard methods. Biochemical microassay of enzymes in Ae. albopictus was conducted to detect the emergence of insecticide resistance and to define the mechanisms involved in temephos resistance. The 50% mortality lethal time (LT50) for Ae. albopictus tested against temephos ranged between 58.65 to 112.50 minutes, with resistance ratio ranging from 0.75 - 1.45. This study addressed the fluctuation of time-related susceptibility status of Ae. albopictus towards insecticide. Significant difference on the weekly enzyme levels of non-specific esterases, mixed function oxidases and glutathione S-transferases was detected (p ≤ 0.05). No significant correlation was found between temephos resistance and enzyme activity (p > 0.05). Only glutathione S-transferases displayed high level of activity, indicating that Ae. albopictus may be resistant to other groups of insecticide. The insensitive acetylcholinesterase was detected in some field collected Ae. albopictus populations, indicating the possibility of emergence of carbamate or other organophosphate resistance in the field populations. Continuous resistance monitoring should be conducted regularly to confirm the efficacy of insecticides for dengue control. PMID:23959487

  20. Effects of hunger level and nutrient balance on survival and acetylcholinesterase activity of dimethoate exposed wolf spiders

    Pedersen, Lars-Flemming; Dall, Lars G.; Sorensen, Bo C.; Mayntz, David; Toft, Soren

    2002-01-01

    were created by feeding them fruit flies of either high or low nutrient content for 28 days. Both groups were then split into satiated and 14 days starved subgroups. Each of these was further divided into insecticide treated and control halves. Survivorship and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity...

  1. Complexity of acetylcholinesterases in biting flies and ticks

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitors function as pesticides for invertebrates, vertebrate nerve agents, and medicine to reduce cognitive effects of Alzheimer’s disease. Organophosphate (OP) pesticides have been widely used to control biting flies and ticks, however, OP-resistance has compromised c...

  2. Simultaneous detection of pyrethroid, organophosphate, and cyclodiene target site resistance in Haematobia irritans (Diptera: Muscidae) by multiplex polymerase chain reaction.

    Domingues, Luísa N; Guerrero, Felix D; Foil, Lane D

    2014-09-01

    The horn fly, Haematobia irritans irritans (L., 1758) (Diptera: Muscidae), is an important pest that causes significant economic losses to the livestock industry, but insecticide resistance in horn fly populations has made horn fly control increasingly difficult to achieve. In this study, we developed a multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay to simultaneously detect target site resistance to pyrethroids (kdr mutation), organophosphates (G262A acetylcholinesterase mutation), and cyclodienes (Rdl mutation) and used the new procedure to follow the progression of these three mutations after exposure to different insecticide pressure. We assayed flies collected at the Macon Ridge research station, Winnsboro, LA, from 2008 to 2012. The multiplex PCR showed robust results in all our assays. The kdr mutation remained at high frequencies during all years, even after 4 yr with no use of pyrethroids. The G262A acetylcholinesterase mutation fluctuated from 7.5 to 23.8% during the studied years, while the Rdl mutation was rare in 2008, 2009, and June 2010, and then significantly increased after the first use of endosulfan. The possibility of screening for all the known target site resistance mutations in a single PCR reaction makes the multiplex PCR a useful and affordable tool that can be used to help diagnose insecticide resistance. PMID:25276924

  3. Concentration-dependent interactions of the organophosphates chlorpyrifos oxon and methyl paraoxon with human recombinant acetylcholinesterase

    For many decades it has been thought that oxygen analogs (oxons) of organophosphorus insecticides phosphorylate the catalytic site of acetylcholinesterase by a mechanism that follows simple Michaelis-Menten kinetics. More recently, the interactions of at least some oxons have been shown to be far more complex and likely involve binding of oxons to a second site on acetylcholinesterase that modulates the inhibitory capacity of other oxon molecules at the catalytic site. The current study has investigated the interactions of chlorpyrifos oxon and methyl paraoxon with human recombinant acetylcholinesterase. Both chlorpyrifos oxon and methyl paraoxon were found to have k i's that change as a function of oxon concentration. Furthermore, 10 nM chlorpyrifos oxon resulted in a transient increase in acetylthiocholine hydrolysis, followed by inhibition. Moreover, in the presence of 100 nM chlorpyrifos oxon, acetylthiocholine was found to influence both the K d (binding affinity) and k 2 (phosphorylation constant) of this oxon. Collectively, these results demonstrate that the interactions of chlorpyrifos oxon and methyl paraoxon with acetylcholinesterase cannot be described by simple Michaelis-Menten kinetics but instead support the hypothesis that these oxons bind to a secondary site on acetylcholinesterase, leading to activation/inhibition of the catalytic site, depending on the nature of the substrate and inhibitor. Additionally, these data raise questions regarding the adequacy of estimating risk of low levels of insecticide exposure from direct extrapolation of insecticide dose-response curves since the capacity of individual oxon molecules at low oxon levels could be greater than individual oxon molecules in vivo associated with the dose-response curve

  4. Update on resistance status of Anopheles gambiae s.s. to conventional insecticides at a previous WHOPES field site, "Yaokoffikro", 6 years after the political crisis in Côte d'Ivoire

    Koffi Alphonsine A

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background At Yaokoffikro field site near Bouaké, in central Côte d'Ivoire, a group of experimental huts built in 1996 served over many years for the evaluation of insecticides against highly resistant mosquitoes. Breeding sites of mosquitoes and selection pressure in the area were maintained by local farming practices until a war broke out in September 2002. Six years after the crisis, we conducted bioassays and biochemical analysis to update the resistance status of Anopheles gambiae s.s. populations and detect other potential mechanisms of resistance that might have evolved. Methods An. gambiae s.s. larvae from Yaokoffikro were collected in breeding sites and reared to adults. Resistance status of this population to insecticides was assessed using WHO bioassay test kits for adult mosquitoes with seven insecticides: two pyrethroids, a pseudo-pyrethroid, an organochloride, two carbamates and an organophosphate. Molecular and biochemical assays were carried out to identify the L1014F kdr and ace-1R alleles in individual mosquitoes and to detect potential increase in mixed function oxidases (MFO, non-specific esterases (NSE and glutathione S-transferases (GST activity. Results High pyrethroids, DDT and carbamate resistance was confirmed in An. gambiae s.s. populations from Yaokoffikro. Mortality rates were less than 70% with pyrethroids and etofenprox, 12% with DDT, and less than 22% with the carbamates. Tolerance to fenitrothion was observed, with 95% mortality after 24 h. PCR analysis of samples from the site showed high allelic frequency of the L1014F kdr (0.94 and the ace-1R (0.50 as before the crisis. In addition, increased activity of NSE, GST and to a lesser extent MFO was found relative to the reference strain Kisumu. This was the first report detecting enhanced activity of these enzymes in An. gambiae s.s from Yaokoffikro, which could have serious implications in detoxification of insecticides. Their specific roles in

  5. An Acetylcholinesterase-Based Chronoamperometric Biosensor for Fast and Reliable Assay of Nerve Agents

    Rene Kizek; Vojtech Adam; Miroslav Pohanka

    2013-01-01

    The enzyme acetylcholinesterase (AChE) is an important part of cholinergic nervous system, where it stops neurotransmission by hydrolysis of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine. It is sensitive to inhibition by organophosphate and carbamate insecticides, some Alzheimer disease drugs, secondary metabolites such as aflatoxins and nerve agents used in chemical warfare. When immobilized on a sensor (physico-chemical transducer), it can be used for assay of these inhibitors. In the experiments desc...

  6. MOLECULAR CLONING, EXPRESSION PATTERN OF MULTIDRUG RESISTANCE ASSOCIATED PROTEIN 1 (MRP1, ABCC1) GENE, AND THE SYNERGISTIC EFFECTS OF VERAPAMIL ON TOXICITY OF TWO INSECTICIDES IN THE BIRD CHERRY-OAT APHID.

    Kang, Xin-Le; Zhang, Meng; Wang, Kang; Qiao, Xian-Feng; Chen, Mao-Hua

    2016-05-01

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are important transmembrane proteins encoded by a supergene family. The majority of ABC proteins are primary active transporters that bind and hydrolyze ATP to mediate the efflux of a diverse range of substrates across lipid membranes. In this study, we cloned and characterized a putative multidrug resistance associated protein 1 (MRP1) from Rhopalosiphum padi encoded by ABCC1. Structural analysis showed that this protein has structural features typical of the ABC transporter family. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that the amino acid sequence was highly similar that of the corresponding protein from Acyrthosiphon pisum. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis showed that ABCC1 was expressed throughout all R. padi developmental stages, with the highest level of expression in the fourth larval instar. We also examined ABCC1 expression in four different tissue types and found that it was most highly expressed in the midgut. Exposing R. padi to imidacloprid and chlorpyrifos increased ABCC1 expression. Furthermore, ABCC1 expression was higher in the imidacloprid-resistant (IR) and chlorpyrifos-resistant (CR) strains than in an insecticide-susceptible strain (SS) of R. padi. Exposing R. padi to verapamil in combination with insecticides significantly increased the toxicity of the insecticides. The respective synergy factor of CR and IR R. padi strain was 1.33 and 1.26, which was lower than that (2.72 and 1.64, respectively) of the SS. Our results clarify the biological function of ABCC1 in R. padi, particularly its role in insecticide resistance, and suggest novel strategies for pest management that use ABC transporter inhibitors to increase the effectiveness of insecticides. PMID:27110952

  7. Pyrethroid resistance in Aedes aegypti larvae (Diptera: Culicidae) from Singapore.

    Koou, Sin-Ying; Chong, Chee-Seng; Vythilingam, Indra; Ng, Lee-Ching; Lee, Chow-Yang

    2014-01-01

    We report the first comprehensive insecticide susceptibility status ofAedes aegypti (L.) larvae from Singapore. The study indicated that Ae. aegypti is susceptible to temephos, although resistance (RR50 = 1.29-4.43-fold) couldbe developing. Of high concern is the detection of moderate to high resistance to permethrin (RR50 = 29-47-fold) and etofenprox (RR50 = 14-34-fold). Biolarvicide Bacillus thuringiensis israelensis (Bti) remains effective. The insecticide susceptibility profile of Ae. aegypti larvae was found to be homogenous among the different sites studied across the island city. The addition of synergists piperonyl butoxide, S,S,S,-tributyl phosphorotrithioate, and triphenyl phosphate generally failed to enhance the toxicity of the insecticides investigated, suggesting an insignificant role of metabolic-based resistance, and a possible involvement of target site resistance. Further biochemical investigation of specific metabolic enzyme activities suggested that detoxifying enzymes, mono-oxygenases, esterases, glutathione S-transferases, and altered acetylcholinesterases, generally did not contribute to the resistance observed. This study clearly demonstrated that pyrethroid resistance is widespread among Ae. aegypti population and lowered susceptibility to organophosphates is developing. PMID:24605467

  8. Disulfide bonds of acetylcholinesterase

    The positions of the inter- and intrasubunit disulfide bridges were established for the 11S form of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) isolated from Torpedo californica. A major form of AChE localized within the basal lamina of the synapse is a dimensionally asymmetric molecule which contains either two (13S) or three (17S) sets of catalytic subunits linked to collagenous and non-collagenous structural subunits. Limited proteolysis yields a tetramer of catalytic subunits which sediments at 11S. Each catalytic subunit contains 8 cysteine residues. Initially, these Cys residues were identified following trypsin digestion of the reduced protein alkylated with [14C]-iodoacetate. Peptides were resolved by gel filtration followed by reverse phase HPLC. To determine the disulfide bonding profile, native non-reduced 11S AChE was treated with a fluorescent, sulfhydryl-specific reagent, monobromobimane, prior to proteolytic digestion. One fluorescent Cys peptide was identified indicating that a single sulfhydryl residue was present in its reduced form. Three pairs of disulfide bonded peptides were identified, sequenced, and localized in the polypeptide chain. The Cys residue that is located in the C-terminal tryptic peptide was disulfide bonded to an identical peptide and thus forms the intersubunit crosslink. Finally, the cysteine positions have been compared with the sequence of the homologous protein, thyroglobulin. Both likely share a common pattern of folding

  9. Insecticide Resistanca in Maleria Vector An. sacharovi

    Üniversitesi, Çukurova; ABD, Tıp Fakültesi Tıbbi Biyoloji; Balcalı,; Adana-TÜRKİYE,

    2000-01-01

    Susceptibility tests have been successfully used for many years to determine insecticide resistance raised in pest and vector insects, including An. sacharovi,the primary human malaria vector in Turkey. As this method does not provide sufficient information about physiological resistance, an alternative method of enzyme tests based on biochemical and genetic evaluations has been developed. In this study, both methods were used for comparison. First of all, susceptibility to insecticides w...

  10. Effects of piperonyl butoxide on the toxicity of the organophosphate temephos and the role of esterases in the insecticide resistance of Aedes aegypti

    Boscolli Barbosa Pereira

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The effects of piperonyl butoxide (PBO on the toxicity of the organophosphate temephos (TE and the role of esterases in the resistance of Aedes aegypti to this insecticide were evaluated. Methods A. aegypti L4 larvae susceptible and resistant to TE were pre-treated with PBO solutions in acetone at concentrations of 0.125, 0.25, 0.5, 1, and 2% for 24h and subsequently exposed to a diagnostic concentration of 0.02mg/L aqueous TE solution. The esterase activity of the larvae extracts pre-treated with varying PBO concentrations and exposed to TE for three time periods was determined. Results At concentrations of 0.25, 0.5, 1, and 2%, PBO showed a significant synergistic effect with TE toxicity. High levels of esterase activity were associated with the survival of A. aegypti L4 larvae exposed to TE only. Conclusions The results of the biochemical assays suggest that PBO has a significant inhibitory effect on the total esterase activity in A. aegypti larvae.

  11. Stimulo-deterrent Diversionary Strategy with Conjunctive Use of Trap Crops, Neem and Bacillus thuringiensis Berliner for the Management of Insecticide Resistant Helicoverpa armigera (Hubner in Cotton

    P. Duraimurugan

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Studies were carried out to assess the effects of stimulo-deterrent diversionary strategy with trap crops, neem and Bacillus thuringiensis Berliner in cotton for the management of insecticide resistant Helicoverpa armigera (Hubner at Agricultural Research Station, Vaigaidam and Agricultural Research Station, Bhavanisagar, Tamil Nadu Agricultural University, Tamil Nadu during 2003-2004. Field experiments were conducted on cotton (MCU7 with trap crops (okra and pigeonpea and neem was used to diversify the pests to trap crops where by the control of these pest was assessed with the application of Bt (Delfin�. The preference of H. armigera was towards okra and pigeonpea as a trap crop compared to cotton. Application of NSKE on cotton diversified the H. armigera towards untreated okra and pigeonpea. Stimulo-deterrent diversionary strategy with conjunctive use of trap crops (okra and pigeonpea, restricted application of NSKE on cotton leaving trap crops and restricted application of Bt on trap crops was highly effective in reducing the incidence of H. armigera and damage to fruiting bodies, boll, locule and inter locule basis over cotton sole crop (untreated check. The percent recovery of Bt infected larvae varied from 43.3-48.8, 40.0-48.3 and 32.7-38.6% on okra, pigeonpea and cotton, respectively. The synthetic pyrethroids resistance in field survived H. armigera at the end of the season was reduced from 88.0-92.7 to 81.1-89.7%.

  12. Organophosphorus and carbamate insecticide poisoning.

    Vale, Allister; Lotti, Marcello

    2015-01-01

    Both organophosphorus (OP) and carbamate insecticides inhibit acetylcholinesterase (AChE), which results in accumulation of acetylcholine (ACh) at autonomic and some central synapses and at autonomic postganglionic and neuromuscular junctions. As a consequence, ACh binds to, and stimulates, muscarinic and nicotinic receptors, thereby producing characteristic features. With OP insecticides (but not carbamates), "aging" may also occur by partial dealkylation of the serine group at the active site of AChE; recovery of AChE activity requires synthesis of new enzyme in the liver. Relapse after apparent resolution of cholinergic symptoms has been reported with OP insecticides and is termed the intermediate syndrome. This involves the onset of muscle paralysis affecting particularly upper-limb muscles, neck flexors, and cranial nerves some 24-96 hours after OP exposure and is often associated with the development of respiratory failure. OP-induced delayed neuropathy results from phosphorylation and subsequent aging of at least 70% of neuropathy target esterase. Cramping muscle pain in the lower limbs, distal numbness, and paresthesiae are followed by progressive weakness, depression of deep tendon reflexes in the lower limbs and, in severe cases, in the upper limbs. The therapeutic combination of oxime, atropine, and diazepam is well established experimentally in the treatment of OP pesticide poisoning. However, there has been controversy as to whether oximes improve morbidity and mortality in human poisoning. The explanation may be that the solvents in many formulations are primarily responsible for the high morbidity and mortality; oximes would not be expected to reduce toxicity in these circumstances. even if given in appropriate dose. PMID:26563788

  13. Resistance of Culex pipiens pallens to common used insecticides and its control strategy%淡色库蚊对常用杀虫剂的抗药性及防治对策研究

    臧继荣; 余加席; 黄立业

    2011-01-01

    目的 了解徐州市淡色库蚊幼虫对8种常用杀虫剂的抗药性现状,为合理选用杀虫剂,指导蚊虫防治提供科学依据.方法 采用WHO统一的蚊虫幼虫浸渍法,测定淡色库蚊幼虫半数致死浓度(LC50).结果 与实验室敏感品系比较,淡色库蚊幼虫对高效氯氰菊酯、氯菊酯、生物丙烯菊酯、残杀威、仲丁威抗性为敏感水平;对溴氰菊酯、双硫磷的抗药性较低;对敌敌畏呈高抗药性.结论 在蚊虫治理中,提倡采取综合防治措施,结合抗药性实际情况,合理选择杀虫剂.%Objective To investigate the resistance of Culex pipiens palllens larvae to 8 kinds of common used insecticide in Xuzhou, and guide the control of Culex pipiens palllens larvae by choosing appropriate chemical insecticide. Methods Selecting 8 insecticides to test the larvae resistance of Culex pipiens palllens according to the method provided by WHO, and assaying the medium lethal concentration( LC50 ) of Culex pipiens palllens larvae. Results Compared with the laboratory susceptible strain, the resistance of Culex pipiens palllens larvae to beta-cypermethrin, permethrin, bioallethrin,propoxur and BPMC was in sensitive level. Its resistance to trichlorine and temephos was in lower level. Culex pipiens palllens larvae to DDVP had the highest resistance. Conclusion In mosquito control, it is necessary to take prevention measures, combining the actual conditions and rational selection of reasonable insecticide.

  14. Insecticide-induced hormesis and arthropod pest management.

    Guedes, Raul Narciso C; Cutler, G Christopher

    2014-05-01

    Ecological backlashes such as insecticide resistance, resurgence and secondary pest outbreaks are frequent problems associated with insecticide use against arthropod pest species. The last two have been particularly important in sparking interest in the phenomenon of insecticide-induced hormesis within entomology and acarology. Hormesis describes a biphasic dose-response relationship that is characterized by a reversal of response between low and high doses of a stressor (e.g. insecticides). Although the concept of insecticide-induced hormesis often does not receive sufficient attention, or has been subject to semantic confusion, it has been reported in many arthropod pest species and natural enemies, and has been linked to pest outbreaks and potential problems with insecticide resistance. The study of hormesis remains largely neglected in entomology and acarology. Here, we examined the concept of insecticide-induced hormesis in arthropods, its functional basis and potential fitness consequences, and its importance in arthropod pest management and other areas. PMID:24155227

  15. Comparative Effectiveness of Insecticides for Use Against the House Fly (Diptera: Muscidae): Determination of Resistance Levels on a Malaysian Poultry Farm.

    Ong, Song-Quan; Ahmad, Hamdan; Jaal, Zairi; Rus, Adanan Che

    2016-02-01

    In this study, the toxicology of two commercial larvicides--cyromazine (Neporex 50SP) and ChCy (combination of chlorpyrifos and cypermethrin, Naga 505)--and five commercial adulticides--thiamethoxam (Agita 10WG), cyfluthrin (Responsar WP), lambda-cyhalothrin (Icon 2.8EC), fipronil (Regent 50SC), and imidacloprid (Toxilat 10WP)--was examined against the WHO/VCRU (World Health Organization/ Vector Control Research Unit) susceptible strain and the AYTW (Ayer Tawar) field strain of house fly, Musca domestica L. These pesticides were administered topically, in the diet, or as a dry residue treatment on plywood. Probit analysis using at least five concentrations and the concentration that was lethal to 50% (LC(50)) of the organisms was applied to compare the toxicology and resistance levels of the AYTW population to different insecticides. In the larvicide laboratory study, ChCy was more effective than cyromazine, with a significantly lower LC(50) value when administered topically or in the diet, although the AYTW population was susceptible to both larvicides with a resistance ratio (RR) <10. For the adulticide laboratory study, cyfluthrin and fipronil exhibited the lowest LC50 values of the adulticides, indicating that they are both effective at controlling adult flies, although lambda-cyhalothrin showed moderate resistance (RR = 11.60 by topical application; 12.41 by plywood treatment). Further investigation of ChCy, cyromazine, cyfluthrin, and fipronil under field conditions confirmed that ChCy and cyromazine strikingly reduced larval density, and surprisingly, ChCy also exhibited adulticidal activity, which significantly reduced adult fly numbers compared with the control group. Cyfluthrin and fipronil were also confirmed to be effective, with a significant reduction in adult fly numbers compared with the control group. PMID:26546486

  16. Resistance of Brazilian diamondback moth populations to insecticides Resistência de populações brasileiras de traça das brássicas a inseticidas

    Alexandre Conte de Oliveira

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Plutella xylostella is a recurring pest on cruciferous crops around the world. In Brazil, it typically requires large number of insecticide sprays, which may lead to fast evolution of resistance. The aim of this study was to assess the susceptibility of Brazilian diamondback moth populations to the insecticides abamectin, deltamethrin, and spinosad. Leaf dip bioassays were used to determine mortality data obtained after 48 h of exposure to insecticides and subjected to Probit analysis. The population from Bonito, state of Pernambuco, Brazil, had the highest toxicity ratio (20.2 - fold to abamectin compared to the reference population. The LC50 values for deltamethrin ranged from 85.2 to 360.1 mg L-1, demonstrating a high survival of populations in relation to this insecticide field dose rate (7.5 mg L-1. The toxicity ratios of the estimated LC50s, however, were very low (varying from 2.2 - to 4.2 - fold. Most populations exhibited toxicity ratios for spinosad, ranging from 2.3 - to 5.1 - fold, while both the LC50 and LC95 values reflected a high susceptibility to the spinosad field dosage (120 mg L-1. Only the Bonito - PE population resisted to abamectin, while all P. xylostella populations were resistant to deltamethrin, but particularly susceptible to spinosad because of the absence of selection pressure with it in these areas.Plutella xylostella é uma praga recorrente em brássicas de todo o mundo. No Brasil, normalmente exige grande número de pulverizações de inseticidas, que pode levar à rápida evolução da resistência. Avaliou-se a suscetibilidade de populações brasileiras da traça das crucíferas aos inseticidas abamectina, deltametrina e espinosade. Bioensaios de imersão de folhas foram utilizados para determinar a mortalidade, sendo os dados obtidos após 48 h de exposição aos inseticidas e submetidos à análise de Probit. A população de Bonito-PE apresentou a maior razão de toxicidade (20,2 vezes para abamectina em

  17. Islands and stepping-stones: comparative population structure of Anopheles gambiae sensu stricto and Anopheles arabiensis in Tanzania and implications for the spread of insecticide resistance.

    Deodatus Maliti

    Full Text Available Population genetic structures of the two major malaria vectors Anopheles gambiae s.s. and An. arabiensis, differ markedly across Sub-Saharan Africa, which could reflect differences in historical demographies or in contemporary gene flow. Elucidation of the degree and cause of population structure is important for predicting the spread of genetic traits such as insecticide resistance genes or artificially engineered genes. Here the population genetics of An. gambiae s.s. and An. arabiensis in the central, eastern and island regions of Tanzania were compared. Microsatellite markers were screened in 33 collections of female An. gambiae s.l., originating from 22 geographical locations, four of which were sampled in two or three years between 2008 and 2010. An. gambiae were sampled from six sites, An. arabiensis from 14 sites, and both species from two sites, with an additional colonised insectary sample of each species. Frequencies of the knock-down resistance (kdr alleles 1014S and 1014F were also determined. An. gambiae exhibited relatively high genetic differentiation (average pairwise FST = 0.131, significant even between nearby samples, but without clear geographical patterning. In contrast, An. arabiensis exhibited limited differentiation (average FST = 0.015, but strong isolation-by-distance (Mantel test r = 0.46, p = 0.0008. Most time-series samples of An. arabiensis were homogeneous, suggesting general temporal stability of the genetic structure. An. gambiae populations from Dar es Salaam and Bagamoyo were found to have high frequencies of kdr 1014S (around 70%, with almost 50% homozygote but was at much lower frequency on Unguja Island, with no. An. gambiae population genetic differentiation was consistent with an island model of genetic structuring with highly restricted gene flow, contrary to An. arabiensis which was consistent with a stepping-stone model of extensive, but geographically-restricted gene flow.

  18. Acetylcholinesterase Inhibition by Biofumigant (Coumaran) from Leaves of Lantana camara in Stored Grain and Household Insect Pests

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies proved that the biofumigants could be an alternative to chemical fumigants against stored grain insect pests. For this reason, it is necessary to understand the mode of action of biofumigants. In the present study the prospectus of utilising Lantana camara as a potent fumigant insecticide is being discussed. Inhibition of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) by Coumaran, an active ingredient extracted from the plant L. camara, was studied. The biofumigant was used as an enzyme inhibitor...

  19. Potentiation effect of metolachlor on toxicity of organochlorine and organophosphate insecticides in earthworm Eisenia andrei.

    Stepić, Sandra; Hackenberger, Branimir K; Velki, Mirna; Hackenberger, Davorka K; Lončarić, Zeljka

    2013-07-01

    Acetylcholinesterase, glutathione-S-transferase and catalase activities were determined in earthworms Eisenia andrei exposed to insecticides (endosulfan, temephos, malathion, pirimiphos-methyl) alone and in a binary combination with the herbicide metolachlor. Metolachlor individually was not acutely toxic, even at high concentrations applied; however, in the treated earthworms metolachlor enhanced the toxicity of endosulfan and temephos by significantly reducing the acetylcholinesterase activity. In binary combination with malathion and pirimiphos-methyl, metolachlor did not increase toxicity. The potentiation character of metolachlor is specific rather than general, and probably depends on the chemical structure of pesticides in the mixture. PMID:23666323

  20. Possibility of Acetylcholinesterase Overexpression in Alzheimer Disease Patients after Therapy with Acetylcholinesterase Inhibitors

    Alžběta Kračmarová

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Acetylcholinesterase is an enzyme responsible for termination of excitatory transmission at cholinergic synapses by the hydrolyzing of a neurotransmitter acetylcholine. Nowadays, other functions of acetylcholinesterase in the organism are considered, for example its role in regulation of apoptosis. Cholinergic nervous system as well as acetylcholinesterase activity is closely related to pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease. The mostly used therapy of Alzheimer disease is based on enhancing cholinergic function using inhibitors of acetylcholinesterase like rivastigmine, donepezil or galantamine. These drugs can influence not only the acetylcholinesterase activity but also other processes in treated organism. The paper is aimed mainly on possibility of increased expression and protein level of acetylcholinesterase caused by the therapy with acetylcholinesterase inhibitors.

  1. Virus and calcium : an unexpected tandem to optimize insecticide efficacy

    Apaire-Marchais, V; Ogliastro, M.; Chandre, Fabrice; Pennetier, Cédric; Raymond, V; Lapied, B

    2016-01-01

    The effective control of insect pests is based on the rational use of the most efficient and safe insecticide treatments. To increase the effects of classical insecticides and to avoid the ability of certain pest insects to develop resistance, it is essential to propose novel strategies. Previous studies have shown that calcium-dependent phosphorylation/dephosphorylation is now considered as a new cellular mechanism for increasing the target sensitivity to insecticides. Because it is known th...

  2. Innovative applications for insect viruses : towards insecticide sensitization

    Lapied, B; Pennetier, Cédric; Apaire Marchais, V.; P. Licznar; Corbel, Vincent

    2009-01-01

    The effective management of emerging insect-borne disease is dependent on the use of safe and efficacious chemical insecticides. Given the inherent ability of insects to develop resistance, it is essential to propose innovative strategies because insecticides remain the most important element of integrated approaches to vector control. Recently, intracellular phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of membrane receptors and ion channels targeted by insecticides have been described as new proces...

  3. Resistência a inseticidas em populações de Simulium (Diptera, Simuliidae Insecticide resistance in Simulium populations (Diptera, Simuliidae

    Jairo Campos

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Populações de Simulium (Chirostilbia pertinax Kollar, 1832 do Sul e Sudeste do Brasil, foram analisadas quanto à susceptibilidade ao Temephos, considerando-se os históricos de controle e possível resistência. Bioensaios in situ foram realizados para populações dos estados do Paraná (Tibaji e Rolândia, Rio de Janeiro (Muriqui e São Paulo (Barra do Una, Ilhabela, e Morungaba. As populações foram caracterizadas como susceptíveis (S ou resistentes (R submetendo-se larvas nos últimos estádios a uma concentração operacional (0,1ppm i.a./10min de Temephos (Abate 500E como diagnóstica. Os possíveis mecanismos para o desenvolvimento de resistência ao organofosforado são discutidos considerando-se antigas e novas estratégias de controle.Populations of Simulium (Chirostilbia pertinax Kollar, 1832 from Southern and Southeastern States of Brazil were analyzed for temephos susceptibility considering control historical information and possible resistance. In situ bioassays were carried out for populations from the states of Paraná (Tibaji and Rolândia, Rio de Janeiro (Muriqui and São Paulo (Barra do Una, Ilhabela and Morungaba. The populations were characterized as susceptible (S or resistant (R by submitting larvae in the last instars to an operational concentration (0.1ppm a.i./10min of temephos (Abate 500E as diagnostic. The possible mechanisms for the organophosphorus resistance development are discussed considering old and new control strategies.

  4. Insecticide solvents: interference with insecticidal action.

    Brattsten, L B; Wilkinson, C F

    1977-06-10

    Several commercial solvent mixtures commonly used as insecticide carriers in spray formulations increase by more than threefold the microsomal N-demethylation of p-chloro N-methylaniline in midgut preparations of southern army-worm (Spodoptera eridania) larvae exposed orally to the test solvents. Under laboratory conditions, the same solvent mixtures exhibit a protective action against the in vivo toxicity of the insecticide carbaryl to the larvae. The data are discussed with respect to possible solvent-insecticide interactions occurring under field conditions and, more broadly, to potential toxicological hazards of these solvents to humans. PMID:860135

  5. Acetylcholinesterase: Enhanced Fluctuations and Alternative

    Bui, Jennifer M.; Tai, Kaihsu; Mccammon, J Andrew A.

    2004-05-21

    A 15 ns molecular dynamics simulation is reported for the complex of mouse acetylcholinesterase (mAChE) and the protein neurotoxin fasciculin-2. As compared to a 15 ns simulation of apo-mAChE, the structural fluctuations of the enzyme are substantially increased in magnitude for the enzyme in the complex. Fluctuations of part of the long omega loop (residues 69-96) are particularly enhanced. This loop forms one wall of the active site, and the enhanced fluctuations lead to additional routes of access to the active site.

  6. Effects of insecticides with rotational application on resistance development of the western flower thrips, Frankliniella occidentalis%室内药剂交替使用对西花蓟马抗药性发展的影响

    沈宝明; 符伟; 刘勇; 谭新球; 魏娟; 王秋丽; 张德咏

    2012-01-01

    分别单独使用毒死蜱、多杀菌素和两种农药交替使用连续处理西花蓟马(Frankliniella occidentalis)18代,采用浸渍法从第6至第18代每隔2世代测定3个汰选种群对毒死蜱和多杀菌素的敏感性.结果表明,毒死蜱和多杀菌素交替汰选种群比单一药剂连续汰选种群抗性上升趋势缓慢,F18代时交替使用汰选种群对毒死蜱和多杀菌素的抗性倍数分别为10.89倍和17.19倍,而毒死蜱单一汰选种群对毒死蜱的抗性倍数达到24.19倍,多杀菌素单一汰选种群对多杀菌素的抗性倍数达到20.78倍.因此,交替或轮换使用药剂可以延缓西花蓟马抗药性的发展.%Three different populations of Frankliniella occidentalis were established under rearing conditions through insecticide selection with chlorpyrifos, spinosad and their rotational application for 18 generations) respectively. Toxicity assay from the 6th to the 18th generation of the three different populations to chlorpyrifos and spinosad was performed every two generations by immersion method. The results showed that the resistance developed more slowly when the F. occidentalis was selected with rotational application of chlorpyrifos and spinosad than with single insecticides. The resistance level of the population selected by chlorpyrifos was up to 24. 19 fold at the 18th generation, and the population selected by spinosad, 20. 78 fold. However, the population selected by rotational application of the two pesticides showed 10. 89 and 17. 19 fold higher resistance to chlorpyrifos and spinosad, respectively. The results suggest that the rational application of insecticides could delay the development of resistance of the western flower thrips to target insecticides.

  7. Insecticidal and Nematicidal Activities of Novel Mimosine Derivatives

    Binh Cao Quan Nguyen

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Mimosine, a non-protein amino acid, is found in several tropical and subtropical plants, which has high value for medicine and agricultural chemicals. Here, in continuation of works aimed to development of natural product-based pesticidal agents, we present the first significant findings for insecticidal and nematicidal activities of novel mimosine derivatives. Interestingly, mimosinol and deuterated mimosinol (D-mimosinol from mimosine had strong insecticidal activity which could be a result of tyrosinase inhibition (IC50 = 31.4 and 46.1 μM, respectively. Of synthesized phosphoramidothionate derivatives from two these amino alcohols, two compounds (1a and 1b showed high insecticidal activity (LD50 = 0.5 and 0.7 μg/insect, respectively with 50%–60% mortality at 50 μg/mL which may be attributed to acetylcholinesterase inhibition. Compounds 1a and 1b also had strong nematicidal activity with IC50 = 31.8 and 50.2 μM, respectively. Our results suggest that the length of the alkyl chain and the functional group at the C5-position of phosphoramidothionates derived from mimosinol and d-mimosinol are essential for the insecticidal and nematicidal activities. These results reveal an unexplored scaffold as new insecticide and nematicide.

  8. Resistência a inseticidas em populações de Simulium (Diptera, Simuliidae) Insecticide resistance in Simulium populations (Diptera, Simuliidae)

    Jairo Campos; Carlos Fernando S. de Andrade

    2002-01-01

    Populações de Simulium (Chirostilbia) pertinax Kollar, 1832 do Sul e Sudeste do Brasil, foram analisadas quanto à susceptibilidade ao Temephos, considerando-se os históricos de controle e possível resistência. Bioensaios in situ foram realizados para populações dos estados do Paraná (Tibaji e Rolândia), Rio de Janeiro (Muriqui) e São Paulo (Barra do Una, Ilhabela, e Morungaba). As populações foram caracterizadas como susceptíveis (S) ou resistentes (R) submetendo-se larvas nos últimos estádio...

  9. Acetylcholinesterase Immobilized on Magnetic Beads for Pesticides Detection: Application to Olive Oil Analysis

    Ihya Ait-Ichou

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This work presents the development of bioassays and biosensors for the detection of insecticides widely used in the treatment of olive trees. The systems are based on the covalent immobilisation of acetylcholinesterase on magnetic microbeads using either colorimetry or amperometry as detection technique. The magnetic beads were immobilised on screen-printed electrodes or microtitration plates and tested using standard solutions and real samples. The developed devices showed good analytical performances with limits of detection much lower than the maximum residue limit tolerated by international regulations, as well as a good reproducibility and stability.

  10. Acetylcholinesterase Inhibitory Activities of Flavonoids from the Leaves of Ginkgo biloba against Brown Planthopper

    Xiao Ding; Ming-An Ouyang; Xiang Liu; Rei-Zhen Wang

    2013-01-01

    Ginkgo biloba is a traditional Chinese medicinal plant which has potent insecticidal activity against brown planthopper. The MeOH extract was tested in the acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitory assay with IC50 values of 252.1 μg/mL. Two ginkgolides and thirteen flavonoids were isolated from the leaves of Ginkgo biloba. Their structures were established on the basis of spectroscopic data interpretation. It revealed that the 13 isolated flavonoids were found to inhibit AChE with IC50 values ra...

  11. The use of insecticides to control insect pests

    M Wojciechowska

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Pesticides are used as plants protection products. Among those, insecticides serve as agents to control insects. When incorrectly applied, however these substances may negatively affect people's health and natural environment. Administration routes of insecticides depend on many factors and vary from spraying to fertilizers. These different methods influence how insects prey and how pests develop. Additionally, too frequent use of the same chemicals can lead to development of resistance of insects to these insecticides. In order to prevent occurrence of negative effects of insecticides on surroundings, the effects of these compounds should be studied

  12. Insecticide tolerance of Culex nigripalpus in Florida.

    Boike, A H; Rathburn, C B; Floore, T G; Rodriguez, H M; Coughlin, J S

    1989-12-01

    Larval susceptibility tests of Culex nigripalpus populations from various areas of Florida have shown resistance to several organophosphorus insecticides since 1984. Although the degree of resistance is low (2 to 7 times), it can be termed tolerance and appears to be the greatest for fenthion, followed by temephos, naled and malathion. It is suggested that pesticide runoff from lawns, golf courses and agricultural and urban areas may play a role in developing resistance in Florida mosquito populations. PMID:2614401

  13. 山东省棕榈蓟马田间种群对7种杀虫剂的抗药性%Resistance of Thrips palmi to seven kinds of insecticides in Shandong Province

    侯海霞; 于毅; 周仙红; 刘永杰; 张安盛

    2015-01-01

    Resistance of Thrips palmi collected from four vegetables production areas of Shandong Province to 7 kinds of insecticides was evaluated by using leaf tube residue method.LC50 value detection results showed that the toxicity orders of these insecticides were spinosad > abamectin-aminomethyl > imidacloprid > thiamethoxam >pymetrozine > lambda-cyhalothrin > phoxim.T .palmi populations collected from Ji’nan,Tai’an and Li-aocheng districts were relatively sensitive to the 7 insecticides.The Shouguang population exhibited low level re-sistance to spinosad,abamectin-aminomethyl,imidacloprid and pymetrozine,with a range of 6.99 to 10.83 fold.%采用叶管药膜法测定了山东省4个蔬菜产区棕榈蓟马对7种杀虫剂的抗药性水平。结果表明,供试药剂毒力由大到小依次为多杀霉素>甲氨基阿维菌素苯甲酸盐>吡虫啉>噻虫嗪>吡蚜酮>高效氯氟氰菊酯>辛硫磷;济南、聊城和泰安地区的棕榈蓟马种群对7种药剂基本处于敏感状态,寿光地区的棕榈蓟马对多杀霉素、甲氨基阿维菌素苯甲酸盐、吡虫啉和吡蚜酮产生了6.99~10.83倍的低水平抗性。

  14. 柑橘木虱对4种新烟碱类杀虫剂的交互抗性%Cross-resistance of Asian Citrus Psylla to 4 Neonicotinoid Insecticides

    邓明学; 潘振兴; 谭有龙; 唐际飞; 覃旭; 陈贵峰; 唐明丽

    2012-01-01

    [目的]探明柑橘木虱在新烟碱类杀虫剂之间是否存在交互抗药性,为开发和应用这类杀虫剂提供依据.[方法]用药膜法测定了不同来源的柑橘木虱成虫对吡虫啉、噻虫嗪、呋虫胺的LC50、LC95和抗性指数.[结果]已对吡虫啉、啶虫脒产生抗药性的柑橘木虱种群,虽然从未施用过噻虫嗪、呋虫胺和其他新烟碱类杀虫剂,但对它们的抗性倍数也已达低抗至中等抗性水平.[结论]柑橘木虱在新烟碱类杀虫剂噻虫嗪、呋虫胺、吡虫啉、啶虫脒之间可能存在交互抗性.%[Aims] To explore if Asian citrus psylla has cross-resistance between neonicotinoid insecticides, which will be the basis to develop and apply the pesticides. [Methods] Both LC50, LC95 of imidacloprid, thiamethoxam, dinotefuran and resistance index of citrus psyllid adults were determined with the drug film methods. [Results] Although citrus psylla population which had developed resistance to imidacloprid and acetamiprid had never been applied thiamethoxam, dinotefuran and others neonicotinoid, resistance to them has been reached a low to medial level. [Conclusions] Citrus psyllid may exists cross-resistance between the new neonicotinoid insecticide, thiamethoxam, dinotefuran, imidacloprid and acetamiprid.

  15. Possibility of Acetylcholinesterase Overexpression in Alzheimer Disease Patients after Therapy with Acetylcholinesterase Inhibitors

    Alžběta Kračmarová; Lucie Drtinová; Miroslav Pohanka

    2015-01-01

    Acetylcholinesterase is an enzyme responsible for termination of excitatory transmission at cholinergic synapses by the hydrolyzing of a neurotransmitter acetylcholine. Nowadays, other functions of acetylcholinesterase in the organism are considered, for example its role in regulation of apoptosis. Cholinergic nervous system as well as acetylcholinesterase activity is closely related to pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease. The mostly used therapy of Alzheimer disease is based on enhancing choli...

  16. Conifer flavonoid compounds inhibit detoxification enzymes and synergize insecticides.

    Wang, Zhiling; Zhao, Zhong; Cheng, Xiaofei; Liu, Suqi; Wei, Qin; Scott, Ian M

    2016-02-01

    Detoxification by glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) and esterases are important mechanisms associated with insecticide resistance. Discovery of novel GST and esterase inhibitors from phytochemicals could provide potential new insecticide synergists. Conifer tree species contain flavonoids, such as taxifolin, that inhibit in vitro GST activity. The objectives were to test the relative effectiveness of taxifolin as an enzyme inhibitor and as an insecticide synergist in combination with the organophosphorous insecticide, Guthion (50% azinphos-methyl), and the botanical insecticide, pyrethrum, using an insecticide-resistant Colorado potato beetle (CPB) Leptinotarsa decemlineata (Say) strain. Both taxifolin and its isomer, quercetin, increased the mortality of 1(st) instar CPB larvae after 48h when combined with Guthion, but not pyrethrum. Taxifolin had greater in vitro esterase inhibition compared with the commonly used esterase inhibitor, S, S, S-tributyl phosphorotrithioate (DEF). An in vivo esterase and GST inhibition effect after ingestion of taxifolin was measured, however DEF caused a greater suppression of esterase activity. This study demonstrated that flavonoid compounds have both in vitro and in vivo esterase inhibition, which is likely responsible for the insecticide synergism observed in insecticide-resistant CPB. PMID:26821651

  17. Les mécanismes responsables de la résistance aux insecticides chez les insectes et les acariens

    Amichot M.; Haubruge E.

    1998-01-01

    Insect and mite resistance mechanisms to insecticides. Insecticide resistance is documented in nearly all insects and mitesin which it has been studied. It is a major obstacle to control agriculturally important pests. Next to the already ancientknowledge on resistance this review discusses recent major breakthroughs in understanding the mechanisms, at molecularlevel, by which insects acquire resistance to natural, synthetic or bioengineered insecticides. Resistance is due either to amodifica...

  18. Detecção e monitoramento da resistência do tripes Frankliniella occidentalis ao inseticida espinosade Detection and monitoring of resistance to the insecticide spinosad in the thrips Frankliniella occidentalis

    Débora Soller Rais

    2013-01-01

    pests in greenhouses, especially on ornamental plants and vegetables. Among the problems faced by farmers are the difficulties in the control of this pest with the use of insecticides because of its preference for the inner parts of the flowers and the evolution of resistance to agrochemicals. The objective of this research was to characterize the spinosad resistance in F. occidentalis and to assess the frequency of resistant insects in commercial chrysanthemum fields from several counties in the state of São Paulo (SP. Selections for resistance to spinosad were performed under laboratory conditions, using a population of F. occidentalis collected in 2007 in a commercial chrysanthemum field in Campinas (SP. In the course of seven selections for resistance, the LC50 of spinosad increased from 8.41 mg a.i. L-1 to 1,111 mg a.i. L-1. Comparing the resistant (R and the susceptible (S strains, the resistance ratio (LC50 R / LC50 S reached values up to 280-folds. A discriminating concentration of 98 mg a.i. L-1 was established for monitoring the spinosad resistance in F. occidentalis. The survey was conducted by collecting 19 populations of thrips in commercial chrysanthemum fields in the state of São Paulo. The bioassays were conducted with second ínstar nymphs of F. occidentalis, placed in bean leaf disc arenas. The spinosad was sprayed at the discriminating concentration on the nymphs of thrips, using a Potter spray tower. The results indicated high variability in the susceptibility to spinosad among F. occidentalis populations. Populations with up to 40.7% of resistant insects were found. This is the first report on spinosad resistance in F. occidentalis in Brazil.

  19. Cyanobacterial secondary metabolites as acetylcholinesterase inhibitors

    Zelík, Petr; Masojídek, Jiří; Štys, Dalibor; Kopecký, Jiří

    Kunming : Verlag, 2006, s. 52-53. [International Conference on Applied Phycology /10./. Kunming (CN), 24.07.2005-28.07.2005] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : cyanobacteria * acetylcholinesterase inhibitors Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology

  20. Resistance of Culex pipiens pallens to four insecticides in Nanyang city%南阳市淡色库蚊对4种杀虫剂的抗药性测定

    崔士磊; 李峰; 王庭柱; 丁新阳

    2012-01-01

    目的 了解南阳市淡色库蚊对双硫磷、仲丁威、溴氰菊酯及高效氯氰菊酯4种杀虫剂的抗药性现状,为制定防治对策提供科学依据.方法 浸渍法,测定淡色库蚊4龄期幼虫的半数致死浓度( LC50).结果 淡色库蚊对双硫磷、仲丁威抗性指数分别为1.65、1.33,处于敏感水平;对溴氰菊酯和高效氯氰菊酯抗性指数分别为25.79和10.00,抗性水平分别为高抗和中抗.结论 南阳市淡色库蚊对溴氰菊酯和高效氯氰菊酯抗性较高,在今后的蚊虫防治工作中应注意科学合理使用杀虫剂.%Objective To investigate the resistance of Culex pipiens pallens to four insecticides in Nanyang and provide scientific evidence for its control. Methods The dipping method recommended by WHO was used to assay the media lethal concentration ( LC50 ) of the forth-instar larvae. Results The resistance rates of Culex pipiens pallens to temephos, fenobucard were 1. 65 ,1. 33 respectively. The resistance rate to deltamethrin was 25. 79 reaching the high level. The resiatance rate to beta-cypermethrin was in medium level of 10. 00. Conclusion The result shows that the resistance level of Culex pipiens pallens to deltamethrin and beta-cypermethrin is higher and these insecticides should be used scientifically.

  1. Irreversible thermal denaturation of Torpedo californica acetylcholinesterase.

    Kreimer, D. I.; Shnyrov, V. L.; Villar, E.; Silman, I.; Weiner, L

    1995-01-01

    Thermal denaturation of Torpedo californica acetylcholinesterase, a disulfide-linked homodimer with 537 amino acids in each subunit, was studied by differential scanning calorimetry. It displays a single calorimetric peak that is completely irreversible, the shape and temperature maximum depending on the scan rate. Thus, thermal denaturation of acetylcholinesterase is an irreversible process, under kinetic control, which is described well by the two-state kinetic scheme N-->D, with activation...

  2. Histochemical demonstration of acetylcholinesterase in neuroblastoma.

    Variend, S; Loughlin, M A

    1984-01-01

    The presence of acetylcholinesterase in the tumour cells of neuroblastoma has been shown by enzyme histochemistry. For comparison, some other tumours likely to be found in children and commonly presenting histologically as small cell tumours have also been studied. Acetylcholinesterase activity was seen in rhabdomyosarcoma, but, compared with neuroblastoma, the activity was focal and sparse. One Ewing's tumour and a lymphoblastic lymphoma were negative for the enzyme reaction. Some of the ult...

  3. Surface display of recombinant Drosophila melanogaster acetylcholinesterase for detection of organic phosphorus and carbamate pesticides.

    Jingquan Li

    Full Text Available Acetylcholinesterase (AChE is commonly used for the detection of organophosphate (OP and carbamate (CB insecticides. However, the cost of this commercially available enzyme is high, making high-throughput insecticide detection improbable. In this study we constructed a new AChE yeast expression system in Saccharomyces cerevisiae for the expression of a highly reactive recombinant AChE originating from Drosophila melanogaster (DmAChE. Specifically, the coding sequence of DmAChE was fused with the 3'-terminal half of an α-agglutinin anchor region, along with an antigen tag for the detection of the recombinant protein. The target sequence was cloned into the yeast expression vector pYes-DEST52, and the signal peptide sequence was replaced with a glucoamylase secretion region for induced expression. The resultant engineered vector was transformed into S. cerevisiae. DmAChE was expressed and displayed on the cell surface after galactose induction. Our results showed that the recombinant protein displayed activity comparable to the commercial enzyme. We also detected different types of OP and CB insecticides through enzyme inhibition assays, with the expressed DmAChE showing high sensitivity. These results show the construction of a new yeast expression system for DmAChE, which can subsequently be used for detecting OP and CB insecticides with reduced economic costs.

  4. Positive correlation of methamidophos resistance between Lipaphis erysimi and Diaeretilla rapae and effects of methamidophos ingested by host insect on the parasitoid

    Gang Wu; Yong-Wen Lin; Tadashi Miyata; Shu-Ren Jiang; Lian-Hui Xie

    2009-01-01

    Temporal and spatial correlated variations on the methamidophos resistance and biomolecular rate constant of acetylcholinesterase to insecticides were found between the turnip aphid, Lipaphis erysimi and its endoparasitoid, Diaeretilla rapae, collected from field colonies and an insecticide-free field insectarium in Fujian, China. Compared to the related susceptible iusectarium population, L. erysimi and D. rapae displayed 7.4-29.2- and 2.6-9.2-fold resistance ratios, respectively. In addition, two populations of L. erysimi with different methamidophos resistance levels, that is, a field (with 5.8-fold resistance ratio) and an insectarium population, were used to study the effects of methamidophos ingested by the host insect on D. rapae development. The percentage of D. rapae cocoon formation decreased significantly when the parasitized L. erysimi were fed on cauliflower leaves treated with methamidophos at lethal concentration dosages 10 (LC10) or LC50. At LC50 dosages the percentage of D. rapae cocoon formation and adult emergence decreased significantly. When the parasitized L. erysimi were fed on methamidophos at LC50 dosage, no D. rapae cocoons were found. When the field or insectarium L. erysimi were treated with methamidophos at LC10, the susceptibility to methamidophos in the adult D. rapae emerged from the treated host insect was similar to the control. However, the susceptibility to methamidophos in the adult D. rapae became lower than the control when the host insects were treated at LC50 dosages. The data thus suggested that the methamidophos ingested by the host insect L. erysimi could be an important factor in the endoparasitoids' insecticide resistance development. The natural selectivity would favor the parasitoids that had developed an insensitivity to the insecticide(s).

  5. Control of pyrethroid and DDT-resistant Anopheles gambiae by application of indoor residual spraying or mosquito nets treated with a long-lasting organophosphate insecticide, chlorpyrifos-methyl

    Chabi Joseph

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Scaling up of long-lasting insecticidal nets (LLINs and indoor residual spraying (IRS with support from the Global Fund and President's Malaria Initiative is providing increased opportunities for malaria control in Africa. The most cost-effective and longest-lasting residual insecticide DDT is also the most environmentally persistent. Alternative residual insecticides exist, but are too short-lived or too expensive to sustain. Dow Agrosciences have developed a microencapsulated formulation (CS of the organophosphate chlorpyrifos methyl as a cost-effective, long-lasting alternative to DDT. Methods Chlorpyrifos methyl CS was tested as an IRS or ITN treatment in experimental huts in an area of Benin where Anopheles gambiae and Culex quinquefasiactus are resistant to pyrethroids, but susceptible to organophosphates. Efficacy and residual activity was compared to that of DDT and the pyrethroid lambdacyalothrin. Results IRS with chlorpyrifos methyl killed 95% of An. gambiae that entered the hut as compared to 31% with lambdacyhalothrin and 50% with DDT. Control of Cx. quinquefasciatus showed a similar trend; although the level of mortality with chlorpyrifos methyl was lower (66% it was still much higher than for DDT (14% or pyrethroid (15% treatments. Nets impregnated with lambdacyhalothrin were compromized by resistance, killing only 30% of An. gambiae and 8% of Cx. quinquefasciatus. Nets impregnated with chlorpyrifos methyl killed more (45% of An gambiae and 15% of Cx. quinquefasciatus, but its activity on netting was of short duration. Contact bioassays on the sprayed cement-sand walls over the nine months of monitoring showed no loss of activity of chlorpyrifos methyl, whereas lambdacyhalothrin and DDT lost activity within a few months of spraying. Conclusion As an IRS treatment against pyrethroid resistant mosquitoes chlorpyrifos methyl CS outperformed DDT and lambdacyhalothrin. In IRS campaigns, chlorpyrifos methyl CS should

  6. Inhibition of aflatoxin production by selected insecticides.

    Draughon, F A; Ayres, J C

    1981-04-01

    The insecticide naled completed inhibition production of aflatoxins B1, B2, G1, and G2 by and growth of Aspergillus parasiticus at a 100-ppm (100 microgram/ml) concentration. The insecticides dichlorvos, Landrin, pyrethrum, Sevin, malathion, and Diazinon significantly (P = 0.05) inhibited production of aflatoxins at a 100-ppm concentration. However, at a concentration of 10 ppm, significant inhibition in production of aflatoxins was found only with naled, dichlorvos, Sevin, Landrin, and pyrethrum. Dichlorvos, Landrin, Sevin, and naled inhibited growth of A. parasiticus by 28.9 , 18.9, 15.7, and 100%, respectively, at 100 ppm. Stimulation of growth was observed when diazinon was added to cultures. Aflatoxin B1 was most resistant to inhibition by insecticides, followed by G1, G2, and B2, respectively. PMID:6786222

  7. Insecticides and Biological Control

    Furness, G. O.

    1972-01-01

    Use of insecticides has been questioned due to their harmful effects on edible items. Biological control of insects along with other effective practices for checking spread of parasites on crops are discussed. (PS)

  8. Insecticide susceptibility of Anopheles coluzzii and Anopheles gambiae mosquitoes in Ibadan, South-West Nigeria

    Okorie, Patricia N.; Ademowo, George O.; Irving, Helen; Kelly-Hope, Louise A; Wondji, Charles S

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of insecticide resistance in Anopheles mosquitoes has great implications for malaria control in Nigeria. This study aimed to determine the dynamics of insecticide susceptibility levels and frequency of knockdown resistance (kdr) mutations (L1014F) in wild Anopheles coluzzii Coetzee & Wilkerson sp. n. and An. gambiae Giles ( (Diptera: Culicidae) from Ojoo and Bodija areas of Ibadan, South-West, Nigeria. Insecticide susceptibility to pyrethroids, organophosphates, carbamates and o...

  9. More about Insecticides

    E.K. Hartwig

    1980-01-01

    An insecticide is a chemical used to kill insects. Insect control can also include other materials such as repellents, oils, antifeedants and attractants. Ideally, an insecticide would effectively control any target insect exposed to it and would be harmless to man and his domestic animals. It would also be readily available in necessary quantitie s , s table chemically, noninflammable, easily prepared and applied, noncorrosive, non-staining, and would have no undesirable odour.

  10. More about Insecticides

    E.K. Hartwig

    1980-09-01

    Full Text Available An insecticide is a chemical used to kill insects. Insect control can also include other materials such as repellents, oils, antifeedants and attractants. Ideally, an insecticide would effectively control any target insect exposed to it and would be harmless to man and his domestic animals. It would also be readily available in necessary quantitie s , s table chemically, noninflammable, easily prepared and applied, noncorrosive, non-staining, and would have no undesirable odour.

  11. Synthesis of Novel Chalcones as Acetylcholinesterase Inhibitors

    Thanh-Dao Tran

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available A new series of benzylaminochalcone derivatives with different substituents on ring B were synthesized and evaluated as inhibitors of acetylcholinesterase. The study is aimed at identification of novel benzylaminochalcones capable of blocking acetylcholinesterase activity for further development of an approach to Alzheimer’s disease treatment. These compounds were produced in moderate to good yields via Claisen-Schmidt condensation and subjected to an in vitro acetylcholinesterase inhibition assay, using Ellman’s method. The in silico docking procedure was also employed to identify molecular interactions between the chalcone compounds and the enzyme. Compounds with ring B bearing pyridin-4-yl, 4-nitrophenyl, 4-chlorophenyl and 3,4-dimethoxyphenyl moieties were discovered to exhibit significant inhibitory activities against acetylcholinesterase, with IC50 values ranging from 23 to 39 µM. The molecular modeling studies are consistent with the hypothesis that benzylaminochalcones could exert their effects as dual-binding-site acetylcholinesterase inhibitors, which might simultaneously enhance cholinergic neurotransmission and inhibit β-amyloid aggregation through binding to both catalytic and peripheral sites of the enzyme. These derivatives could be further developed to provide novel leads for the discovery of new anti-Alzheimer drugs in the future.

  12. Investigation of resistance of Musca domestica to insecticides in the four areas of Shaanxi province%陕西省不同地区家蝇抗药性调查

    吕文; 霍丽霞; 孙养信

    2012-01-01

    目的 了解陕西省安康、渭南、宝鸡、铜川市家蝇抗药性情况,指导科学合理地使用杀虫剂.方法 现场试虫采自城区蝇类孳生场所,敏感试虫为实验室不接触杀虫剂的家蝇,采用点滴法,以丙酮为对照,检查不同药物浓度对应的试虫死亡率,用POLO软件分析获得半数致死量(LD50).结果 实验室家蝇对敌敌畏、双硫磷、DDT、残杀威、高效氯氰菊酯、溴氰菊酯、氯氰菊酯和氯菊酯的LD50依次为0.004、0.113、0.010、0.214、0.003 07、0.000 63、0.003和0.013μg/只.安康、渭南、宝鸡、铜川市的家蝇对8种常用杀虫剂均产生了不同程度的抗药性,对敌敌畏、双硫磷、DDT、残杀威、高效氯氰菊酯、溴氰菊酯、氯氰菊酯和氯菊酯的LD50分别为0.051~0.301、4.429~14.480、1.259~1.573、13.579~33.556、0.024~0.303、0.017~0.046、0.047~0.269和0.016~0.053 μg/只;8种杀虫剂的平均LD50为0.028~23.549μg/只,抗性倍数为2.54~140.20倍,以DDT最高,氯菊酯最低.结论 应采取科学的方法使用杀虫剂,延缓家蝇抗性增长.%Objective To understand the resistance of Musca domestica to insecticides in the four areas of Shaanxi province for providing evidence for scientific application of insecticides. Methods Insects were collected in the fields in urban areas where flies bred and sensitive insects were reared in laboratory without exposure to insecticides. Topical dropping method was used to determine the death rate by different drug concentrations, with LD50 obtained by POLO software analysis. Results The LD50 of sensitive insects to DDVP, temephos, DDT, propoxur, beta-cypermethrin, deltamethrin, cypermethrin and permethrin was 0.004, 0.113, 0.010, 0.214, 0.003 07, 0.000 63, 0.003 and 0.013 μg/♀ , respectively. Different degrees of resistance of M. domestica to the eight commonly used insecticides were observed in Ankang, Weinan, Baoji, Tongchuan city of Shaanxi province. The LD50 of M

  13. Use of acetylcholinesterase inhibitors in Alzheimer's disease.

    Moghul, S; Wilkinson, D

    2001-09-01

    Alzheimer's disease is a growing problem in an aging Western world, estimated to have cost the US economy USD 1.75 trillion. Until recently, the management of Alzheimer's disease largely comprised support for the family, nursing care and the use of unlicensed medication to control behavioral disturbances. The three new acetylcholinesterase inhibitors licensed to treat Alzheimer's disease (donepezil, rivastigmine and galantamine) have provided clinicians with a major impetus to their desire to diagnose and treat this lethal disease. Their effects on cognition are proven. More recent work on the effects of acetylcholinesterase inhibitors on behavioral symptoms, activities of daily living and caregiver burden have also been encouraging. Emerging work indicates their likely efficacy in other dementias (e.g., vascular dementia, dementia with Lewy bodies). This review summarizes the evidence concerning the impact of acetylcholinesterase inhibitors in dementia both currently and over the next 5 years. PMID:19811047

  14. Methods for field detection of resistance to temephos in simuliids. Larval esterase level and topical application of the insecticide to adults

    Carlos Fernando S. de Andrade

    1990-09-01

    Full Text Available Two practical field methods for indirect detection of simuliid populations resistant to temephos are proposed. The first is based on high esterase activity in resistant larvae and involves adaptations of a filter paper test in which faintly stained spots indicate susceptible populations and strongly stained ones reveal populations resistant to temephos. The second is based on the resistance to the larvicide when adults are topically exposed, and involves the use of diagnostic doses obtained by the comparison between the LD50 for susceptible and resistant populations. The relevance of such methods is discussed in order to help resistance detection in Simulium pertinax Kollar control programmes.

  15. Inactivation of acetylcholinesterase by various fluorophores

    Guo, Lilu; Suarez, Alirica I.; Thompson, Charles M.

    2010-01-01

    The inhibition of recombinant mouse acetylcholinesterase (rMAChE) and electric eel acetylcholinesterase (EEAChE) by seven, structurally different chromophore-based (dansyl, pyrene, dabsyl, diethylamino- and methoxycoumarin, Lissamine rhodamine B, and Texas Red) propargyl carboxamides or sulfonamides was studied. Diethylaminocoumarin, Lissamine, and Texas Red amides inhibited rMAChE with IC50 values of 1.00 µM, 0.05 µM, and 0.70 µM, respectively. Lissamine and Texas Red amides inhibited EEAChE...

  16. Methods for field detection of resistance to temephos in simuliids. Larval esterase level and topical application of the insecticide to adults

    Carlos Fernando S. de Andrade; Armando Castello Branco Junior

    1990-01-01

    Two practical field methods for indirect detection of simuliid populations resistant to temephos are proposed. The first is based on high esterase activity in resistant larvae and involves adaptations of a filter paper test in which faintly stained spots indicate susceptible populations and strongly stained ones reveal populations resistant to temephos. The second is based on the resistance to the larvicide when adults are topically exposed, and involves the use of diagnostic doses obtained b...

  17. 淡色库蚊幼虫对7种杀虫剂的敏感性和抗性调查%Survey on the sensitivity and resistance of Culex pipiens pallens larva to seven kinds of insecticide

    陈志龙; 陈东亚; 刘慧; 杨维芳; 褚宏亮; 刘大鹏; 张爱军; 徐燕; 孙俊

    2011-01-01

    Objective To investigate the resistance of Culex pipiens pallens larva to insecticides in Jiangsu Province and provide scientific evidence for control. Methods Larva immersion method. Results The lab population was the most susceptive with LC50 of 0.001 3 mg/L to deltamethrin, 0.003 8 mg/L to beta -cypermethrin, 0.027 7 mg/L to permethrin, 0. 181 3 mg/L to esbiothrin,0. 018 3 mg/L to DDVP, 0.096 8 mg/L to propoxur and 0. 000 4 mg/L to temephos. The highest resistance ratio of insecticide was 200 in Nanjing, Xuzhou, Lianyungang and Wuxi. Conclusion In Jiangsu Province C. pipens pallens have developed different resistance to DDVP, temephos, deltamethrin, beta - cypermethrin and propoxur. It is necessary to use the result of survey to prevent the resistance from developing.%目的 为了解江苏省淡色库蚊幼虫对卫生杀虫剂的敏感性和抗药性发生发展状况进行生物学抗性调查.方法 幼虫浸渍法.结果 实验室淡色库蚊幼虫对溴氰菊酯、高效氯氰菊酯、氯菊酯、生物丙烯菊酯、敌敌畏、残杀威和双硫磷幼虫敏感性LC50分别为0.001 3、0.003 8、0.027 7,0.181 3、0.018 3、0.096 8、0.000 4 mg/L.南京、徐州、连云港和无锡等地蚊虫幼虫抗性分别是敏感品系的数倍到200倍不等.结论 江苏省淡色库蚊幼虫对敌敌畏、双硫磷、溴氰菊酯、高效氯氰菊酯和残杀威等杀虫剂均产生不同程度的抗性.抗性调查的结果为指导江苏省蚊虫防治以及合理使用卫生杀虫剂提供科学依据.

  18. Resistance Mechanisms of Anopheles stephensi (Diptera: Culicidae to Temephos

    Aboozar Soltani

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Anopheles stephensi is a sub-tropical species and has been considered as one of the most important vector of human malaria throughout the Middle East and South Asian region including the malarious areas of southern Iran. Current reports confirmed An. stephensi resistance to temephos in Oman and India. However, there is no comprehensive research on mechanisms of temephos resistance in An. stephensi in the literature. This study was designed in order to clarify the enzymatic and molecular mechanisms of temephos resistance in this species.Methods: Profile activities of α- and ß-esterases, mixed function oxidase (MFO, glutathione-S-transferase (GST, insensitive acetylcholinesterase, and para-nitrophenyl acetate (PNPA-esterase enzymes were tested for An. stephensi strain with resistance ratio of 15.82 to temephos in comparison with susceptible strain.Results: Results showed that the mean activity of α-EST, GST and AChE enzymes were classified as altered indicating metabolic mechanisms have considerable role in resistance of An. stephensi to temephos. Molecular study using PCR-RFLP method to trace the G119S mutation in ACE-1 gene showed lack of the mutation responsible for organophosphate insecticide resistance in the temephos-selected strain of An. stephensi.Conclusion: This study showed that the altered enzymes but not targets site insensitivity of ACE-1 are responsible for temephos resistance in An. stephensi in south of Iran.

  19. A short history of insecticides

    Oberemok Volodymyr Volodymyrovych; Laikova Kateryna Volodymyrivna; Gninenko Yuri Ivanovich; Zaitsev Aleksei Sergeevich; Nyadar Palmah Mutah; Adeyemi Tajudeen Adesoji

    2015-01-01

    This review contains a brief history of the use of insecticides. The peculiarities, main advantages, and disadvantages of some modern insecticides are described. The names of the discoverers of some of the most popular insecticide preparations on the world market, are listed. The tendencies to find new insecticides to control the quantity of phytophagous insects are discussed. Special attention is paid to the perspective of creating preparations based on nucleic acids, in particular DNA insec...

  20. Botanical Insecticides in Plant Protection

    Martina Grdiša; Kristina Gršić

    2013-01-01

    Botanical insecticides are natural compounds with insecticidal properties and their use in crop protection is as old as agricultural practice. Although they have been in use for over one hundred years, the advent of synthetic insecticides has unfortunately displaced their use today. Due to fast action, low cost, easy application and efficiency against a wide range of harmful species, synthetic insecticides have become an important part of pest management in modern agricultural systems...

  1. Acetylcholinesterase and Butyrylcholinesterase Inhibited by Paraoxon

    Kuča, K.; Musilová, L.; Paleček, J.; Církva, Vladimír; Paar, M.; Musílek, K.; Hrabinová, M.; Pohanka, M.; Zdarová Karasová, J.; Jun, D.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 14, č. 12 (2009), s. 4915-4921. ISSN 1420-3049 Grant ostatní: MO0(CZ) FZV0000604 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : acetylcholinesterase * reactivator * oxime Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 1.738, year: 2009

  2. Modeling the integration of parasitoid, insecticide, and transgenic insecticidal crop for the long-term control of an insect pest.

    Onstad, David W; Liu, Xiaoxia; Chen, Mao; Roush, Rick; Shelton, Anthony M

    2013-06-01

    The tools of insect pest management include host plant resistance, biological control, and insecticides and how they are integrated will influence the durability of each. We created a detailed model of the population dynamics and population genetics of the diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella L., and its parasitoid, Diadegma insulare (Cresson), to study long-term pest management in broccoli Brassica oleracea L. Given this pest's history of evolving resistance to various toxins, we also evaluated the evolution of resistance to transgenic insecticidal Bt broccoli (expressing Cry1Ac) and two types of insecticides. Simulations demonstrated that parasitism provided the most reliable, long-term control of P. xylostella populations. Use of Bt broccoli with a 10% insecticide-free refuge did not reduce the long-term contribution of parasitism to pest control. Small refuges within Bt broccoli fields can delay evolution of resistance > 30 generations if resistance alleles are rare in the pest population. However, the effectiveness of these refuges can be compromised by insecticide use. Rainfall mortality during the pest's egg and neonate stages significantly influences pest control but especially resistance management. Our model results support the idea that Bt crops and biological control can be integrated in integrated pest management and actually synergistically support each other. However, the planting and maintenance of toxin-free refuges are critical to this integration. PMID:23865173

  3. Impact of Insecticide Resistance on the Effectiveness of Pyrethroid-Based Malaria Vectors Control Tools in Benin: Decreased Toxicity and Repellent Effect

    Agossa, Fiacre R; Virgile Gnanguenon; Rodrigue Anagonou; Roseric Azondekon; Nazaire Aïzoun; Arthur Sovi; Frédéric Oké-Agbo; Michel Sèzonlin; Akogbéto, Martin C.

    2015-01-01

    Since the first evidence of pyrethroids resistance in 1999 in Benin, mutations have rapidly increased in mosquitoes and it is now difficult to design a study including a control area where malaria vectors are fully susceptible. Few studies have assessed the after effect of resistance on the success of pyrethroid based prevention methods in mosquito populations. We therefore assessed the impact of resistance on the effectiveness of pyrethroids based indoor residual spraying (IRS) in semi-field...

  4. An Indigenously Developed Insecticidal Aerosol

    R. N. Varma

    1969-10-01

    Full Text Available A total of 6 "Test" insecticidal aerosols (TA-I to VI indigenously produced were tested during the years 1966-67 as suitable replacements for imported aerosols.TA-I produced deep yellow staining and a yellowish spray mist. Its capacity was only 120 ml fluid. TA-III types II and III containing modified aerosol formulation with "Esso solvent 3245" and mineral turpentine oil (Burmah Shelland Freon 12 11 (all indigenouswere comparable to he "SRA" in insecticidial efficacy. The container was also manufactured in the country and it compared well with the "SRA" in construction, resistance against rough usage and mechanical function. They were both finally approved for introduction in the services as replacement for imported aerosols. TA-IV performed well in inscticidial assessment, but the aerosols formulation. TA-V and VI were similar to TA-III types II and III respectively.

  5. Synergism of insecticides by enzyme inhibitors in the resistant populations of Spodoptera litura (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae)%斜纹夜蛾抗性种群中酶抑制剂对杀虫剂的增效作用

    Mushtaq AHMAD

    2009-01-01

    The effect of enzyme inhibitors piperonyl butoxide (PBO) and tribufos (DEF) was studied in combination with insecticides profenofos, methomyl, thiodicarb, cypermethrin, λ-cyhalothrin, bifenthrin, indoxacarb, and spinosad in the resistant Pakistani populations of Spodoptera litura using a leaf-dip bioassay. Both the inhibitors synergised carbamates methomyl and thiodicarb but showed no synergistic effect on an organophosphate profenofos. These inhibitors produced a synergism with cypermethrin but had no synergism with bifenthrin. PBO and DEF enhanced the toxicity of λ-cyhalothrin and indoxacarb in one population but not in the other. Spinosad was synergised by DEF but not by PBO. The potent synergism of carbamates, pyrethroids, indoxacarb and spinosad by PBO and DEF in the present study indicates that detoxification by cytochrome P450 monooxygenases and esterases is at least partially involved in imparting resistance to these insecticides in S. litura. However, a limited synergism of insecticides shown by both the synergists implies that other mechanisms such as target site insensitivity and reduced cuticular penetration may be more important mechanisms of resistance in the Pakistani populations of S. litura.%采用浸液生测法研究了斜纹夜蛾Spodoptera litura巴基斯坦抗性种群中酶抑制剂[胡椒基丁醚(PBO)和脱叶膦(DEF)]对丙溴磷、灭多威、硫双灭多威、氯氰菊酯、氯氟氰菊酯、联苯菊酯、茚虫威和多杀菌素等杀虫剂的增效作用.结果表明:PPO和DEF对氨基甲酸酯杀虫剂灭多威和硫双灭多威均具有增效作用,但对有机磷杀虫剂丙溴磷不具有增效作用.两种抑制剂对氯氰菊酯均产生增效作用,但对联苯菊酯没有增效作用.PPO 和DEF增加了氯氟氰菊酯对Multan种群的毒性,但没有增加其对Mailsi种群的毒性.DEF对多杀菌素具有增效作用,但PBO对其没有增效作用.PBO和DEF对氨基甲酸酯杀虫剂、拟除虫菊酯杀虫

  6. Mutagenic and cytotoxic activities of benfuracarb insecticide.

    Eren, Yasin; Erdoğmuş, Sevim Feyza; Akyıl, Dilek; Özkara, Arzu

    2016-08-01

    Benfuracarb is a carbamate insecticide used to control insect pests in vegetables and it has anti-acetylcholinesterase activity lower than other carbamates. Cytotoxic effects of benfuracarb were evaluated by using root growth inhibition (EC50), mitotic index (MI), and mitotic phase determinations on the root meristem cells of Allium cepa and mutagenic effects were determined in Salmonella typhymurium Ames test by TA98 and TA100 strains with and without metabolic activation. In Allium test, 1 % DMSO was used as negative control group and 10 ppm MMS was used as positive control group. 75 ppm concentration of benfuracarb was found as EC50. In MI and mitotic phases determination study, 37.5, 75 and 150 ppm doses of benfuracarb were used. Dose-dependent cytotoxic activity was found by root growth inhibition and MI studies. It was identified that mitotic inhibition activity of benfuracarb was higher than 10 ppm MMS. In Ames test, mutagenic activity was not observed and over 200 µg/plate of benfuracarb was determined as cytotoxic to S. typhymurium strains. Benfuracarb can be called as "mitotic inhibitor" but not called as mutagen. PMID:25381170

  7. Virus and calcium: an unexpected tandem to optimize insecticide efficacy.

    Apaire-Marchais, Véronique; Ogliastro, Mylène; Chandre, Fabrice; Pennetier, Cédric; Raymond, Valérie; Lapied, Bruno

    2016-04-01

    The effective control of insect pests is based on the rational use of the most efficient and safe insecticide treatments. To increase the effects of classical insecticides and to avoid the ability of certain pest insects to develop resistance, it is essential to propose novel strategies. Previous studies have shown that calcium-dependent phosphorylation/dephosphorylation is now considered as a new cellular mechanism for increasing the target sensitivity to insecticides. Because it is known that virus entry is correlated with intracellular calcium concentration rise, this report attempts to present the most important data relevant to the feasibility of combining an insect virus such as baculovirus or densovirus with an insecticide. In this case, the insect virus is not used as a bioinsecticide but acts as a synergistic agent able to trigger calcium rise and to activate calcium-dependent intracellular signalling pathways involved in the increase of the membrane receptors and/or ion channels sensitivity to insecticides. This virus-insecticide mixture represents a promising alternative to optimize the efficacy of insecticides against insect pests while reducing the doses. PMID:26743399

  8. ACETYLCHOLINESTERASE HISTOCHEMISTRY OF THE THALAMUS IN THE PRIMATE

    2001-01-01

    Objective To observe the distribution of acetylcholinesterase activity in the thalamus of the monkey.Methods Histochemical method was used to detect the acetylcholinesterase activity in the thalamus.Results Acetylcholinesterase was found to be inhomogeneous distribution in the primate thalamus and to reveal previously uncovered inhomogeneity within certain thalamic nuclei and their subdivisions. The medial, ventral and posterior nuclear groups displayed markedly uneven acetylcholinesterase reaction.In the mediodorsal nucleus,three distinct sbudivisions were revealed by acetylcholinesterase histochemistry, medial magnocellular part, ventral sector of central parvicellular part and dorsolateral sector of lateral pars multiformity showed weak, moderate and strong acetylcholinesterase activity, respectively. In the ventral nuclear group, acetylcholinesterase histochemistry was strong in the medial part of ventral posterior nucleus, moderate in the magnocellular part of ventral anterior, caudal, medial, oral and pars postrema parts of ventral lateral nucleus, as well as lateral part of ventral posterior nucleus, poor and weak in the inferior part of ventral posterior nucleus, par compacta of the medial part of ventral posterior nucleus and parvicellular part of ventral anterior nucleus. In the pulvinar nucleus, acetylcholinesterase reaction ranged from weak, moderate to strong in the parts of the oral, medial and lateral, as well as inferior of this nucleus, respectively. Regional variations of acetylcholinesterase activity within the thalamic nuclei and their subdivisions can help to identify them by acetylcholinesterase histochemistry. In addition, the dark patches of strong acetylcholinesterase activity contrasting with a lighter surrounding matrix were revealed within the parvicellular part and pars multiformis of mediodorsal nucleus, paracentral nucleus, central lateral nucleus, pars postrema part of ventral lateral nucleus and medial habenula nucleus, as well as

  9. Insecticidal and repellent effect of extracts of Pluchea sericea (Nutt.) on adults of Bemisia tabaci (Genn.)

    Carlos Enrique Ail-Catzim; Alejandro Manelik García-López; Rosalba Troncoso-Rojas; Rosario Esmeralda González-Rodríguez; Yuliana Sánchez-Segura

    2015-01-01

    T he use of repeated insecticide applications in agricultural crops to control Bemisia tabaci (Genn.) has resulted in resistance problems and environmental pollution. Inputs from plant species are an alternative to reduce this problem. Plants are a source of bioactive chemicals that can have insecticidal, repellent, attractant, anti-feeding or growth regulator effects. The aim of this study was to determine the insecticidal and repellent activity of ethanolic, acetonic and aqueous extracts of...

  10. Isolation of an Orally Active Insecticidal Toxin from the Venom of an Australian Tarantula

    Hardy, Margaret C.; Daly, Norelle L.; Mehdi Mobli; Rodrigo A. V. Morales; Glenn F. King

    2013-01-01

    Many insect pests have developed resistance to existing chemical insecticides and consequently there is much interest in the development of new insecticidal compounds with novel modes of action. Although spiders have deployed insecticidal toxins in their venoms for over 250 million years, there is no evolutionary selection pressure on these toxins to possess oral activity since they are injected into prey and predators via a hypodermic needle-like fang. Thus, it has been assumed that spider-v...

  11. Isolation, characterisation and synthesis of insecticidal natural products of the Myrtaceae family

    Beddie, David G.

    1998-01-01

    New insecticidal natural products are required to find compounds with higher intrinsic activities to lower field application rates, and with novel modes of action to combat insect pest species which have developed resistance to current commercial insecticides. Using a taxonomic approach, studies on plants of the Myrtaceae family led to the isolation and characterisation of a range of insecticidal natural products 1 - 9 (figure 1). These compounds are all structurally related as they conta...

  12. Acetylcholinesterase Inhibitory Activities of Flavonoids from the Leaves of Ginkgo biloba against Brown Planthopper

    Xiao Ding

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Ginkgo biloba is a traditional Chinese medicinal plant which has potent insecticidal activity against brown planthopper. The MeOH extract was tested in the acetylcholinesterase (AChE inhibitory assay with IC50 values of 252.1 μg/mL. Two ginkgolides and thirteen flavonoids were isolated from the leaves of Ginkgo biloba. Their structures were established on the basis of spectroscopic data interpretation. It revealed that the 13 isolated flavonoids were found to inhibit AChE with IC50 values ranging from 57.8 to 133.1 μg/mL in the inhibitory assay. AChE was inhibited dose dependently by all tested flavonoids, and compound 6 displayed the highest inhibitory effect against AChE with IC50 values of 57.8 μg/mL.

  13. Acetylcholinesterase inhibition and altered locomotor behavior in the carabid beetle pterostichus

    Jensen, Charlotte S.; Krause-Jensen, Lone; Baatrup, Erik

    1997-01-01

    The establishment of cause–effect relationships is fundamental for the interpretation and the predictive value of biomarker responses measured at all levels of biological complexity. In the present study, the biochemical exposure biomarker acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibition was related to...... locomotor behavior, representing a general effect biomarker at the organismal level. Both sexes of the carabid beetle Pterostichus cupreus were intoxicated with three doses of the organophosphorous insecticide dimethoate. Five elements of their locomotor behavior were measured for 4 h employing computer......-aided video tracking, whereupon the whole body AChE activity was measured in the individual beetle. AChE inhibition was strongly correlated with dimethoate dose in both sexes. Alterations in the locomotor behavior were directly correlated with AChE inhibition in male beetles, which responded by reducing the...

  14. Current Perspectives on Plague Vector Control in Madagascar: Susceptibility Status of Xenopsylla cheopis to 12 Insecticides.

    Miarinjara, Adélaïde; Boyer, Sébastien

    2016-02-01

    Plague is a rodent disease transmissible to humans by infected flea bites, and Madagascar is one of the countries with the highest plague incidence in the world. This study reports the susceptibility of the main plague vector Xenopsylla cheopis to 12 different insecticides belonging to 4 insecticide families (carbamates, organophosphates, pyrethroids and organochlorines). Eight populations from different geographical regions of Madagascar previously resistant to deltamethrin were tested with a World Health Organization standard bioassay. Insecticide susceptibility varied amongst populations, but all of them were resistant to six insecticides belonging to pyrethroid and carbamate insecticides (alphacypermethrin, lambdacyhalothrin, etofenprox, deltamethrin, bendiocarb and propoxur). Only one insecticide (dieldrin) was an efficient pulicide for all flea populations. Cross resistances were suspected. This study proposes at least three alternative insecticides (malathion, fenitrothion and cyfluthrin) to replace deltamethrin during plague epidemic responses, but the most efficient insecticide may be different for each population studied. We highlight the importance of continuous insecticide susceptibility surveillance in the areas of high plague risk in Madagascar. PMID:26844772

  15. Probabilistic tools for assessment of pest resistance risk associated to insecticidal transgenic crops Métodos probabilísticos para quantificação de risco de resistência de pragas a culturas transgênicas inseticidas

    Aline de Holanda Nunes Maia; Durval Dourado Neto

    2004-01-01

    One of the main risks associated to transgenic crops expressing Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) toxins is the evolution of pest resistance. The adoption of Bt crops requires environmental risk assessment that includes resistance risk estimation, useful for definition of resistance management strategies aiming to delay resistance evolution. In this context, resistance risk is defined as the probability of the Bt toxin resistance allele frequency (RFreq) exceeding a critical value (CriticalFreq). M...

  16. Flavanone glycosides as acetylcholinesterase inhibitors: Computational and experimental evidence

    C Remya

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Acetylcholinesterase hydrolyzes the neurotransmitter called acetylcholine and is crucially involved in the regulation of neurotransmission. One of the observable facts in the neurodegenerative disorders like Alzheimer′s disease is the decrease in the level of acetylcholine. Available drugs that are used for the treatment of Alzheimer′s disease are primarily acetylcholinesterase inhibitors with multiple activities. They maintain the level of acetylcholine in the brain by inhibiting the acetylcholinesterase function. Hence acetylcholinesterase inhibitors can be used as lead compounds for the development of drugs against AD. In the present study, the binding potential of four flavanone glycosides such as naringin, hesperidin, poncirin and sakuranin against acetylcholinesterase was analysed by using the method of molecular modeling and docking. The activity of the top scored compound, naringin was further investigated by enzyme inhibition studies and its inhibitory concentration (IC 50 towards acetylcholinesterase was also determined.

  17. Altered Levels of Acetylcholinesterase in Alzheimer Plasma

    García Ayllón, María Salud; Riba Llena, Iolanda; Serra Basante, Carol; Alom, Jordi; Boopathy, Rathnam; Sáez-Valero, Javier

    2010-01-01

    Background Many studies have been conducted in an extensive effort to identify alterations in blood cholinesterase levels as a consequence of disease, including the analysis of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) in plasma. Conventional assays using selective cholinesterase inhibitors have not been particularly successful as excess amounts of butyrylcholinesterase (BuChE) pose a major problem. Principal Findings Here we have estimated the levels of AChE activity in human plasma by first imm...

  18. Inhibitors of Acetylcholinesterase and Butyrylcholinesterase Meet Immunity

    Miroslav Pohanka

    2014-01-01

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitors are widely used for the symptomatic treatment of Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias. More recent use is for myasthenia gravis. Many of these inhibitors interact with the second known cholinesterase, butyrylcholinesterase (BChE). Further, evidence shows that acetylcholine plays a role in suppression of cytokine release through a “cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway” which raises questions about the role of these inhibitors in the immune system. Thi...

  19. Insecticide-Driven Patterns of Genetic Variation in the Dengue Vector Aedes aegypti in Martinique Island

    Sébastien Marcombe; Margot Paris; Christophe Paupy; Charline Bringuier; André Yebakima; Fabrice Chandre; Jean-Philippe David; Vincent Corbel; Laurence Despres

    2013-01-01

    Effective vector control is currently challenged worldwide by the evolution of resistance to all classes of chemical insecticides in mosquitoes. In Martinique, populations of the dengue vector Aedes aegypti have been intensively treated with temephos and deltamethrin insecticides over the last fifty years, resulting in heterogeneous levels of resistance across the island. Resistance spreading depends on standing genetic variation, selection intensity and gene flow among populations. To determ...

  20. Diatomaceous Earths - Natural Insecticides

    Zlatko Korunić

    2013-01-01

    The regulatory issues for diatomaceous earth (DE) cover three fields: consumer safety, worker safety, and proof of efficacy against pests. For consumer safety, regulatory issues are similar to those for other additives, and a principal benefit of DEs is their removal by normal processing methods. For worker safety, regulatory issues are similar to those for other dusts, such as lime. The proof of potential insecticide values of DE may be assessed by using t...

  1. Botanical Insecticides in Plant Protection

    Martina Grdiša

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Botanical insecticides are natural compounds with insecticidal properties and their use in crop protection is as old as agricultural practice. Although they have been in use for over one hundred years, the advent of synthetic insecticides has unfortunately displaced their use today. Due to fast action, low cost, easy application and efficiency against a wide range of harmful species, synthetic insecticides have become an important part of pest management in modern agricultural systems. However, after decades of use, their negative side effects, such as toxicity to humans and animals, environmental contamination, and toxicity to non-target insects have become apparent and interest in less hazardous alternatives of pest control is therefore being renewed. Plant species with known insecticidal actions are being promoted and research is being conducted to find new sources of botanical insecticides. The most important botanical insecticide is pyrethrin, a secondary metabolite of Dalmatian pyrethrum, neem, followed by insecticides based on the essential oils, rotenone, quassia, ryania and sabadilla. They have various chemical properties and modes of action. However, some general characteristics include fast degradation in sunlight, air and moisture, and selectivity to non-target insects. Unfortunately, neither of these insecticides is widely used as a pest control agent but is recognized by organic crop producers in industrialized countries.

  2. Biochemical alterations in the rat following exposure to the organophosphorus insecticide cyanox

    Cyanox is an organophosphorus insecticide with an oral LD50 of 580 mg/kg for male rats. For the assessment of the subacute toxicity, two groups of male rats were treated with 11.6 and 29 mg/kg/day of the pesticide for 28 days. Animals were sacrificed on day 2,4,10,16,22 and 8. The compound significantly altered plasma protein electrophoretic pattern, brain and erythrocytes acetylcholinesterase (AchE), serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST), serum alkaline phosphatase (ALP), creatinine, inorganic phosphorus, triiodothyronine (T3) and thyroxine (T4)

  3. Organophosphorus insecticide induced decrease in plasma luteinizing hormone concentration in white-footed mice

    Rattner, B.A.; Michael, S.D.

    1985-01-01

    Oral intubation of 50 and 100 mg/kg acephate inhibited brain acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity by 45% and 56%, and reduced basal luteinizing hormone (LH) concentration by 29% and 25% after 4 h in white-footed mice (Peromyscus leucopus noveboracensis). Dietary exposure to 25, 100, and 400 ppm acephate for 5 days substantially inhibited brain AChE activity, but did not affect plasma LH concentration. These preliminary findings suggest that acute exposure to organophosphorus insecticides may affect LH secretion and possibly reproductive function.

  4. Loss of protection with insecticide-treated nets against pyrethroid-resistant Culex quinquefasciatus mosquitoes once nets become holed: an experimental hut study

    Irish SR

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An important advantage of pyrethroid-treated nets over untreated nets is that once nets become worn or holed a pyrethroid treatment will normally restore protection. The capacity of pyrethroids to kill or irritate any mosquito that comes into contact with the net and prevent penetration of holes or feeding through the sides are the main reasons why treated nets continue to provide protection despite their condition deteriorating over time. Pyrethroid resistance is a growing problem among Anopheline and Culicine mosquitoes in many parts of Africa. When mosquitoes become resistant the capacity of treated nets to provide protection might be diminished, particularly when holed. An experimental hut trial against pyrethroid-resistant Culex quinquefasciatus was therefore undertaken in southern Benin using a series of intact and holed nets, both untreated and treated, to assess any loss of protection as nets deteriorate with use and time. Results There was loss of protection when untreated nets became holed; the proportion of mosquitoes blood feeding increased from 36.2% when nets were intact to between 59.7% and 68.5% when nets were holed to differing extents. The proportion of mosquitoes blood feeding when treated nets were intact was 29.4% which increased to 43.6–57.4% when nets were holed. The greater the number of holes the greater the loss of protection regardless of whether nets were untreated or treated. Mosquito mortality in huts with untreated nets was 12.9–13.6%; treatment induced mortality was less than 12%. The exiting rate of mosquitoes into the verandas was higher in huts with intact nets. Conclusion As nets deteriorate with use and become increasingly holed the capacity of pyrethroid treatments to restore protection is greatly diminished against resistant Culex quinquefasciatus mosquitoes.

  5. Polymorphism of intron-1 in the voltage-gated sodium channel gene of Anopheles gambiae s.s. populations from Cameroon with emphasis on insecticide knockdown resistance mutations

    Etang, J; Vicente, J. L.; Nwane, P.; Chouaibou, M.; Morlais, Isabelle; Do Rosario, V. E.; Simard, Frédéric; Awono Ambéné, P.; Toto, J. C.; Pinto, J

    2009-01-01

    Sequence variation at the intron-1 of the voltage-gated sodium channel gene in Anopheles gambiae M- and S-forms from Cameroon was assessed to explore the number of mutational events originating knockdown resistance (kdr) alleles. Mosquitoes were sampled between December 2005 and June 2006 from three geographical areas: (i) Magba in the western region; (ii) Loum, Tiko, Douala, Kribi, and Campo along the Atlantic coast; and (iii) Bertoua, in the eastern continental plateau. Both 1014S and 1014F...

  6. 广东省韶关市白纹伊蚊抗药性现状调查%Investigation on the current status of Aedes albopictus resistance to commonly used insecticides in Shaoguan

    邓惠; 刘旭振; 蓝志忠; 胡应辉; 邹钦

    2015-01-01

    Objective In order to provide a basis for scientific and reasonable use of pesticides, we investigated the resistance of Aedes albopictus to commonly used insecticides in urban area of Shaoguan city. Methods WHO standard bioassay method was applied to calculate LC50 and to obtain resistance index by comparing with susceptible strains. Results The median lethal concentration of Ae. albopictus to beta⁃cypermethrin, decamethrin, dichlorvos, propoxur are 0.0036, 0.0060, 0.2606, 2.1266 mg/L respectively. The resistance index are 3.60, 2.73, 1.53, 1.24 respectively. Conclusion Aedes albopictus in urban area of Shaoguan had low level resistance to beta⁃cypermethrin and decamethrin. It is important to alternate pesticides and choose appropriate doses in mosquito prevention and control.%目的:调查韶关市白纹伊蚊对常用杀虫剂的抗药性,为科学合理使用杀虫剂提供依据。方法按照WHO生物测试法,计算半数致死浓度(LC50)并与敏感品系进行比较得出抗性指数。结果韶关市白纹伊蚊对溴氰菊酯、高效氯氰菊酯、敌敌畏、残杀威的LC50分别为0.0036、0.0060、0.2606和2.1266 mg/L,抗性指数分别为3.60、2.73、1.53和1.24倍。结论韶关市白纹伊蚊对溴氰菊酯、高效氯氰菊酯杀虫剂已产生低度抗性,在实际防治中应注意轮换、合理用药。

  7. 山东省历城区三带喙库蚊对常用杀虫剂的抗药性%Resistance of Culex tritaeniorhynchus in Licheng district,Shandong province to commonly used insecticides

    陈云; 张世水; 宫学诗; 岳克三; 赵云; 孟凤霞; 王学军; 卢慧明; 李袁飒; 刘起勇; 康殿民; 景晓; 王君

    2012-01-01

    resistance of larvae and adult of Culex tritaeniorhynchus in Licheng district, Shandong province to the commonly used insecticides, providing the basis for chemical control of the insects. Methods A large number of adult Cx. Tritaeniorhynchus were collected outdoors in the peak seasons. The first filial generation of larvae was obtained by feeding the collected adults with blood from mice. The larvae obtained and the adult female mosquitoes, which had been captured in the field and had laid the first eggs in the lab, were used as test insects. The susceptibility of the adult and larvae to commonly used insecticides were determined with the drug membrane contact method and the impregnation method respectively, as the WHO protocol, with the knockdown rate and mortality of the adult mosquitoes and the LC50 (95% Cl) for the larvae calculated and their resistance levels to commonly used insecticides compared. Results The mortality of the adult exposed to 0.05% deltamethrin (contact for 1 h), 0.05% beta-cypermethrin (1 h), 0.25% permethrin (3 h), 0.45% permethrin (3 h), 0.05% cypermethrin (l.h), 0.45% tetramethrin (1 h), 1% fenitrothion (2 h), 0.1% propoxur (2 h) and 4%DDT (4 h) beyond 24 h were 85.0%, 74.6%, 38.0%, 92.9%, 36.2%, 43.6%, 16.1%, 16.9% and 36.4%, respectively. The LC50 and the corresponding 95%C/ of deltamethrin, beta-cypermethrin, and permethrin for Cx. Tritaeniorhynchus larvae were 0.0046 (0.0037-0.0055), 0.0113 (0.0092-0.0136), 0.0325 (0.0289-0.0369) mg/L, respectively; the LC50(95%C/) of dichlorvos, temephos, fenitrothion and malathion and BPMC were 4.9047 (3.8612-6.4215), 9.5733 (7.4644-12.5296), 1.2694 (1.0280-1.5055), 0.7750 (0.6060-0.9842) and 4.4237 (3.7406-5.2769) mg/L, respectively. Compared to the susceptible strains reported in previous literature, the resistance coefficients of the larvae of Cx. Tritaeniorhynchus were 11.5, 1.9 and 8.8 to deltamethrin, beta-cypermethrin and permethrin,' respectively, and 76.6, 1911 .I, 256.4 and 84.2 to dichlorvos

  8. Distribution of ace-1R and resistance to carbamates and organophosphates in Anopheles gambiae s.s. populations from Côte d'Ivoire

    Ahoua Alou Ludovic P

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The spread of pyrethroid resistance in Anopheles gambiae s.s. is a critical issue for malaria vector control based on the use of insecticide-treated nets. Carbamates and organophosphates insecticides are regarded as alternatives or supplements to pyrethroids used in nets treatment. It is, therefore, essential to investigate on the susceptibility of pyrethroid resistant populations of An. gambiae s.s. to these alternative products. Methods In September 2004, a cross sectional survey was conducted in six localities in Côte d'Ivoire: Toumbokro, Yamoussoukro, Toumodi in the Southern Guinea savannah, Tiassalé in semi-deciduous forest, then Nieky and Abidjan in evergreen forest area. An. gambiae populations from these localities were previously reported to be highly resistant to pyrethroids insecticides. Anopheline larvae were collected from the field and reared to adults. Resistance/susceptibility to carbamates (0.4% carbosulfan, 0.1% propoxur and organophosphates (0.4% chlorpyrifos-methyl, 1% fenitrothion was assessed using WHO bioassay test kits for adult mosquitoes. Then, PCR assays were run to determine the molecular forms (M and (S, as well as phenotypes for insensitive acetylcholinesterase (AChE1 due to G119S mutation. Results Bioassays showed carbamates (carbosulfan and propoxur resistance in all tested populations of An. gambiae s.s. In addition, two out of the six tested populations (Toumodi and Tiassalé were also resistant to organophosphates (mortality rates ranged from 29.5% to 93.3%. The M-form was predominant in tested samples (91.8%. M and S molecular forms were sympatric at two localities but no M/S hybrids were detected. The highest proportion of S-form (7.9% of An. gambiae identified was in sample from Toumbokro, in the southern Guinea savannah. The G119S mutation was found in both M and S molecular forms with frequency from 30.9 to 35.2%. Conclusion This study revealed a wide distribution of insensitive

  9. A simple radiometric in vitro assay for acetylcholinesterase inhibitors

    A radiometric method for screening acetylcholinesterase inhibitors has been described. The method is based on the production of [14C]carbon dioxide from the hydrolysis of acetylcholine. The inhibitory concentration at 50% (IC50) values for several known acetylcholinesterase inhibitors were in agreement with literature values. The new radiometric method is simple, inexpensive, and has the potential for automation

  10. Acetylcholinesterase: diffusional encounter rate constants for dumbbell models of ligand.

    Antosiewicz, J; Gilson, M K; Lee, I H; McCammon, J A

    1995-01-01

    For some enzymes, virtually every substrate molecule that encounters the entrance to the active site proceeds to reaction, at low substrate concentrations. Such diffusion-limited enzymes display high apparent bimolecular rate constants ((kcat/KM)), which depend strongly upon solvent viscosity. Some experimental studies provide evidence that acetylcholinesterase falls into this category. Interestingly, the asymmetric charge distribution of acetylcholinesterase, apparent from the crystallograph...

  11. Variation of Musca domestica L. acetylcholinesterase in Danish housefly populations

    Kristensen, Michael; Huang, Jing; Qiao, Chuan-Ling;

    2006-01-01

    data to provide advice for management strategies and gathering information for resistance risk assessment on the organophosphates azamethiphos and dimethoate and the carbamate methomyl, which have been the primary insecticides used against adult houseflies in Denmark. Cluster analysis was performed and...

  12. Toxicity of non-pyrethroid insecticides against Triatoma infestans (Hemiptera: Reduviidae

    Guillermo Carvajal

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Triatoma infestans (Klug is the main vector of Chagas disease, which is a public health concern in most Latin American countries. The prevention of Chagas disease is based on the chemical control of the vector using pyrethroid insecticides. In the last decade, different levels of deltamethrin resistance have been detected in certain areas of Argentina and Bolivia. Because of this, alternative non-pyrethroid insecticides from different chemical groups were evaluated against two T. infestans populations, NFS and El Malá, with the objective of finding new insecticides to control resistant insect populations. Toxicity to different insecticides was evaluated in a deltamethrin-susceptible and a deltamethrin-resistant population. Topical application of the insecticides fenitrothion and imidacloprid to first nymphs had lethal effects on both populations, producing 50% lethal dose (LD50 values that ranged from 5.2-28 ng/insect. However, amitraz, flubendiamide, ivermectin, indoxacarb and spinosad showed no insecticidal activity in first instars at the applied doses (LD50 > 200 ng/insect. Fenitrothion and imidacloprid were effective against both deltamethrin-susceptible and deltamethrin-resistant populations of T. infestans. Therefore, they may be considered alternative non-pyrethroid insecticides for the control of Chagas disease.

  13. Potential use of acetylcholinesterase, glutathione-S-transferase and metallothionein for assessment of contaminated sediment in tropical chironomid, Chironomus javanus.

    Somparn, A; Iwai, C B; Noller, B

    2015-11-01

    Heavy metals and organophosphorus insecticide is known to act as disruptors for the enzyme system, leading to physiologic disorders. The present study was conducted to investigate the potential use of these enzymes as biomarkers in assessment of contaminated sediments on tropical chironomid species. Acetylcholinesterase (AChE), glutathione-S-transferase (GST) and metallothionein (MT) activity was measured in the fourth-instar chironomid larvae, Chironomus javanus, Kieffer, after either 48-hr or 96-hr exposure to organophosphorus insecticide, chlorpyrifos (0.01- 0.25 mg kg(-1)) or heavy metal cadmium (0.1-25 mg kg(-1)). Exposure to chlorpyrifos (0.01 mg kg(-1)) at 48 and 96 hr significantly of AChE activity (64.2%-85.9%) and induced GST activity (33.9-63.8%) when compared with control (P GST activity (11.7-40%) and MT level (9.0%-70.5%) when compared with control (P impact of enzyme activity on chlorpyrifos and cadmium contamination. Activity of AChE, GST and MT could serve as potential biomarkers for assessment and biomonitoring the effects of insecticide and heavy metal contamination in tropical aquatic ecosystems. PMID:26688973

  14. Chemical composition and insecticidal activity of plant essential oils from Benin against Anopheles gambiae (Giles)

    Bossou, Annick; Mangelinckx, Sven; Yedomonhan, Hounnankpon; Boko, Pelagie M; Akogbeto, Martin C; De Kimpe, Norbert; Avlessi, Felicien; Sohounhloue, Dominique CK

    2013-01-01

    Background Insecticide resistance in sub-Saharan Africa and especially in Benin is a major public health issue hindering the control of the malaria vectors. Each Anopheles species has developed a resistance to one or several classes of the insecticides currently in use in the field. Therefore, it is urgent to find alternative compounds to conquer the vector. In this study, the efficacies of essential oils of nine plant species, which are traditionally used to avoid mosquito bites in Benin, we...

  15. Multi-insecticide susceptibility evaluation of dengue vectors Stegomyia albopicta and St. aegypti in Assam, India

    Yadav, Kavita; Rabha, Bipul; Dhiman, Sunil; Veer, Vijay

    2015-01-01

    Background Dengue is rapidly expanding mosquito-borne viral infection globally facing operational challenges due to insecticide resistance in dengue vectors. We have studied the susceptibility status of potential dengue vectors St. albopicta and St. aegypti to the commonly used insecticides. Methods Stegomyia larval bioassays were carried out to determine LC10, LC50 and LC99 values and resistance ratios (RR50 and RR99) for temephos. Adult susceptibility bioassay to 4% DDT, 0.05% deltamethrin,...

  16. Acetylcholinesterase-inhibiting Alkaloids from Zephyranthes concolor

    Sebastien Arseneau

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The bulbs and aerial parts of Zephyranthes concolor (Lindl. Benth. & Hook. f. (Amaryllidaceae, an endemic species to Mexico, were found to contain the alkaloids chlidanthine, galanthamine, galanthamine N-oxide, lycorine, galwesine, and epinorgalanthamine. Since currently only partial and low resolution 1H-NMR data for chlidanthine acetate are available, and none for chlidanthine, its 1D and 2D high resolution 1H- and 13C-NMR spectra were recorded. Unambiguous assignations were achieved with HMBC, and HSQC experiments, and its structure was corroborated by X-ray diffraction. Minimum energy conformation for structures of chlidanthine, and its positional isomer galanthamine, were calculated by molecular modelling. Galanthamine is a well known acetylcholinesterase inhibitor; therefore, the isolated alkaloids were tested for this activity. Chlidanthine and galanthamine N-oxide inhibited electric eel acetylcholinesterase (2.4 and 2.6 × 10−5 M, respectively, indicating they are about five times less potent than galanthamine, while galwesine was inactive at 10−3 M. Inhibitory activity of HIV-1 replication, and cytotoxicity of the isolated alkaloids were evaluated in human MT-4 cells; however, the alkaloids showed poor activity as compared with standard anti-HIV drugs, but most of them were not cytotoxic.

  17. Botanical Insecticides in Plant Protection

    Martina Grdiša

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 21 false false false MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 Botanical insecticides are natural compounds with insecticidal properties and their use in crop protection is as old as agricultural practice. Although they have been in use for over one hundred years, the advent of synthetic insecticides has unfortunately displaced their use today. Due to fast action, low cost, easy application and efficiency against a wide range of harmful species, synthetic insecticides have become an important part of pest management in modern agricultural systems. However, after decades of use, their negative side effects, such as toxicity to humans and animals, environmental contamination, and toxicity to non-target insects have become apparent and interest in less hazardous alternatives of pest control is therefore being renewed. Plant species with known insecticidal actions are being promoted and research is being conducted to find new sources of botanical insecticides. The most important botanical insecticide is pyrethrin, a secondary metabolite of Dalmatian pyrethrum, neem, followed by insecticides based on the essential oils, rotenone, quassia, ryania and sabadilla. Th ey have various chemical properties and modes of action. However, some general characteristics include fast degradation in sunlight, air and moisture, and selectivity to non-target insects. Unfortunately, neither of these insecticides is widely used as a pest control agent but is recognized by organic crop producers in industrialized countries. /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Obična tablica"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-ansi-language:#0400; mso-fareast-language:#0400; mso-bidi-language:#0400;}

  18. Effect of organophosphorus insecticides on phosphorylation of the M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor

    Shuyin Li; Liming Zou; Carry Pope

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Organophosphorus insecticides may promote the accumulation of acetylcholine at synapses and the neuromuscular junction by inhibiting acetylcholinesterase activity to cause disturbance of neural signal conduction and induce a toxic reaction. Organophosphorus insecticides may act on M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors, whose combination with G proteins is regulated by phosphorylation of G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2.OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effects of organophosphorus insecticides on the phosphorylation of G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2-mediated M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors and to reveal other possible actions of organophosphorus insecticides.DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: An observational study, which was performed in the Central Laboratory of Shenyang Medical College, and Department of Physiological Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Oklahoma State University from June 2002 to December 2004.METHODS: The M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor was extracted and purified from pig brain using affinity chromatography. Subsequently, the purified M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor, G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2, and [OP32] ATP were incubated with different concentrations of paraoxon and chlorpyrifos oxon together. The mixture then underwent polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and the gel film was dried and radioactively autographed to detect phosphorylation of the M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor. Finally, the radio-labeled phosphorylated M2 receptor protein band was excised for counting with an isotope liquid scintillation counter.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Effects of chlorpyrifos oxon, paraoxon, chlorpyrifos, and parathion in different concentrations on the phosphorylation of the M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor; effects of chlorpyrifos oxon on the phosphorylation of the adrenergic receptor.CONCLUSION: Different kinds of organophosphorus insecticides have different effects on the phosphorylation of the G protein

  19. Temperature and pressure adaptation of the binding site of acetylcholinesterase.

    Hochachka, P W

    1974-12-01

    1. Studies with a carbon substrate analogue, 3,3-dimethylbutyl acetate, indicate that the hydrophobic contribution to binding at the anionic site of acetylcholinesterase is strongly disrupted at low temperatures and high pressures. 2. Animals living in different physical environments circumvent this problem by adjusting the enthalpic and entropic contributions to binding. 3. An extreme example of this adaptational strategy is supplied by brain acetylcholinesterase extracted from an abyssal fish living at 2 degrees C and up to several hundred atmospheres of pressure. This acetylcholinesterase appears to have a smaller hydrophobic binding region in the anionic site, playing a measurably decreased role in ligand binding. PMID:4462739

  20. A renaissance for botanical insecticides?

    Isman, Murray B

    2015-12-01

    Botanical insecticides continue to be a subject of keen interest among the international research community, reflected in the steady growth in scientific publications devoted to the subject. Until very recently though, the translation of that theory to practice, i.e. the commercialisation and adoption of new botanical insecticides in the marketplace, has seriously lagged behind. Strict regulatory regimes, long the bane of small pesticide producers, are beginning to relax some of the data requirements for 'low-risk' pesticide products, facilitating movement of more botanicals into the commercial arena. In this paper I discuss some of the jurisdictions where botanicals are increasingly finding favour, some of the newer botanical insecticides in the plant and animal health arsenal and some of the specific sectors where botanicals are most likely to compete effectively with other types of insecticidal product. PMID:26251334

  1. Soluble monomeric acetylcholinesterase from mouse: expression, purification, and crystallization in complex with fasciculin.

    Marchot, P.; Ravelli, R. B.; Raves, M. L.; Bourne, Y.; Vellom, D. C.; Kanter, J.; Camp, S; Sussman, J. L.; Taylor, P

    1996-01-01

    A soluble, monomeric form of acetylcholinesterase from mouse (mAChE), truncated at its carboxyl-terminal end, was generated from a cDNA encoding the glycophospholipid-linked form of the mouse enzyme by insertion of an early stop codon at position 549. Insertion of the cDNA behind a cytomegalovirus promoter and selection by aminoglycoside resistance in transfected HEK cells yielded clones secreting large quantities of mAChE into the medium. The enzyme sediments as a soluble monomer at 4.8 S. H...

  2. Contrasting patterns of tolerance between chemical and biological insecticides in mosquitoes exposed to UV-A.

    Tetreau, Guillaume; Chandor-Proust, Alexia; Faucon, Frédéric; Stalinski, Renaud; Akhouayri, Idir; Prud'homme, Sophie M; Raveton, Muriel; Reynaud, Stéphane

    2013-09-15

    Mosquitoes are vectors of major human diseases, such as malaria, dengue or yellow fever. Because no efficient treatments or vaccines are available for most of these diseases, control measures rely mainly on reducing mosquito populations by the use of insecticides. Numerous biotic and abiotic factors are known to modulate the efficacy of insecticides used in mosquito control. Mosquito breeding sites vary from opened to high vegetation covered areas leading to a large ultraviolet gradient exposure. This ecological feature may affect the general physiology of the insect, including the resistance status against insecticides. In the context of their contrasted breeding sites, we assessed the impact of low-energetic ultraviolet exposure on mosquito sensitivity to biological and chemical insecticides. We show that several mosquito detoxification enzyme activities (cytochrome P450, glutathione S-transferases, esterases) were increased upon low-energy UV-A exposure. Additionally, five specific genes encoding detoxification enzymes (CYP6BB2, CYP6Z7, CYP6Z8, GSTD4, and GSTE2) previously shown to be involved in resistance to chemical insecticides were found over-transcribed in UV-A exposed mosquitoes, revealed by RT-qPCR experiments. More importantly, toxicological bioassays revealed that UV-exposed mosquitoes were more tolerant to four main chemical insecticide classes (DDT, imidacloprid, permethrin, temephos), whereas the bioinsecticide Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis (Bti) appeared more toxic. The present article provides the first experimental evidence of the capacity of low-energy UV-A to increase mosquito tolerance to major chemical insecticides. This is also the first time that a metabolic resistance to chemical insecticides is linked to a higher susceptibility to a bioinsecticide. These results support the use of Bti as an efficient alternative to chemical insecticides when a metabolic resistance to chemicals has been developed by mosquitoes. PMID:23911355

  3. Inhibitors of Acetylcholinesterase and Butyrylcholinesterase Meet Immunity

    Miroslav Pohanka

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Acetylcholinesterase (AChE inhibitors are widely used for the symptomatic treatment of Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias. More recent use is for myasthenia gravis. Many of these inhibitors interact with the second known cholinesterase, butyrylcholinesterase (BChE. Further, evidence shows that acetylcholine plays a role in suppression of cytokine release through a “cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway” which raises questions about the role of these inhibitors in the immune system. This review covers research and discussion of the role of the inhibitors in modulating the immune response using as examples the commonly available drugs, donepezil, galantamine, huperzine, neostigmine and pyridostigmine. Major attention is given to the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway, a well-described link between the central nervous system and terminal effector cells in the immune system.

  4. Inhibitors of acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase meet immunity.

    Pohanka, Miroslav

    2014-01-01

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitors are widely used for the symptomatic treatment of Alzheimer's disease and other dementias. More recent use is for myasthenia gravis. Many of these inhibitors interact with the second known cholinesterase, butyrylcholinesterase (BChE). Further, evidence shows that acetylcholine plays a role in suppression of cytokine release through a "cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway" which raises questions about the role of these inhibitors in the immune system. This review covers research and discussion of the role of the inhibitors in modulating the immune response using as examples the commonly available drugs, donepezil, galantamine, huperzine, neostigmine and pyridostigmine. Major attention is given to the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway, a well-described link between the central nervous system and terminal effector cells in the immune system. PMID:24893223

  5. Sub-acute Toxicity of Carbofuran on Acetylcholinesterase Activity in the Freshwater Catfish, Clarias batrachus

    2005-01-01

    The inhibition of acetylcholinesterase (ACHE) activity has been widely used as a biomarker in an animal exposed to the pesticides. However, the interaction of extensively used organocarbamate insecticide, carbofuran, with the nervous system of the aquatic organisms is not properly studied. AChE is a key enzyme which catalyses the hydrolysis of acetylcholine, a neurotransmitter at the neuromuscular junctions, and thus regulates the neurotransmission system. In the present study, we have evaluated the impact of sub-acute concentrations (0.01 and 0.02 mg/L i.e. 1/20th and 1/10th of LC50) of carbofuran on the activity of acetylcholinesterase,from different tissues of Clarias batrachus, a fresh water teleost, after 96 hr and 15 days exposure periods in vivo. The carbofuran significantly reduced the activity of AChE in different tissues of C. batrachus at both concentrations and periods of exposure. The greater inhibition of AChE activities were recorded in fish tissues at higher carbofuran concentration (0.02 mg/L) after longer (15days) treatment period. The inhibition of AChE activity in all fish tissues tested was dependent on pesticide concentration and the duration of treatment. AChE from the tissues of C. batrachus was found to be a true cholinesterase as it was completely inhibited by the small concentration (nM) of eserine as tested in vitro. It was found that carbofuran at very low concentration exerted significant inhibitory effect on AChE activity in fish tissues.

  6. Pralidoxime in acute organophosphorus insecticide poisoning--a randomised controlled trial.

    Michael Eddleston

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Poisoning with organophosphorus (OP insecticides is a major global public health problem, causing an estimated 200,000 deaths each year. Although the World Health Organization recommends use of pralidoxime, this antidote's effectiveness remains unclear. We aimed to determine whether the addition of pralidoxime chloride to atropine and supportive care offers benefit. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We performed a double-blind randomised placebo-controlled trial of pralidoxime chloride (2 g loading dose over 20 min, followed by a constant infusion of 0.5 g/h for up to 7 d versus saline in patients with organophosphorus insecticide self-poisoning. Mortality was the primary outcome; secondary outcomes included intubation, duration of intubation, and time to death. We measured baseline markers of exposure and pharmacodynamic markers of response to aid interpretation of clinical outcomes. Two hundred thirty-five patients were randomised to receive pralidoxime (121 or saline placebo (114. Pralidoxime produced substantial and moderate red cell acetylcholinesterase reactivation in patients poisoned by diethyl and dimethyl compounds, respectively. Mortality was nonsignificantly higher in patients receiving pralidoxime: 30/121 (24.8% receiving pralidoxime died, compared with 18/114 (15.8% receiving placebo (adjusted hazard ratio [HR] 1.69, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.88-3.26, p = 0.12. Incorporating the baseline amount of acetylcholinesterase already aged and plasma OP concentration into the analysis increased the HR for patients receiving pralidoxime compared to placebo, further decreasing the likelihood that pralidoxime is beneficial. The need for intubation was similar in both groups (pralidoxime 26/121 [21.5%], placebo 24/114 [21.1%], adjusted HR 1.27 [95% CI 0.71-2.29]. To reduce confounding due to ingestion of different insecticides, we further analysed patients with confirmed chlorpyrifos or dimethoate poisoning alone, finding no evidence of

  7. Insecticide susceptibility of natural populations of Anopheles coluzzii and Anopheles gambiae (sensu stricto) from Okyereko irrigation site, Ghana, West Africa

    Chabi, Joseph; Baidoo, Philip K.; Datsomor, Alex K.; Okyere, Dora; Ablorde, Aikins; Iddrisu, Alidu; Wilson, Michael D; Dadzie, Samuel K.; Jamet, Helen P.; Diclaro, Joseph W.

    2016-01-01

    Background The increasing spread of insecticide resistance in malaria vectors has been well documented across sub-Saharan Africa countries. The influence of irrigation on increasing vector resistance is poorly understood, and is critical to successful and ethical implementation of food security policies. This study investigated the insecticide resistance status of An. gambiae (s.l.) mosquitoes collected from the irrigated rice area of Okyereko, a village containing about 42 hectares of irriga...

  8. Identification and Biochemical Properties of Two New Acetylcholinesterases in the Pond Wolf Spider (Pardosa pseudoannulata)

    Meng, Xiangkun; Li, Chunrui; Xiu, Chunli; Zhang, Jianhua; Li, Jingjing; Huang, Lixin; Zhang, Yixi; Liu, Zewen

    2016-01-01

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE), an important neurotransmitter hydrolase in both invertebrates and vertebrates, is targeted by organophosphorus and carbamate insecticides. In this study, two new AChEs were identified in the pond wolf spider Pardosa pseudoannulata, an important predatory natural enemy of several insect pests. In total, four AChEs were found in P. pseudoannulata (including two AChEs previously identified in our laboratory). The new putative AChEs PpAChE3 and PpAChE4 contain most of the common features of the AChE family, including cysteine residues, choline binding sites, the conserved sequence ‘FGESAG’ and conserved aromatic residues but with a catalytic triad of ‘SDH’ rather than ‘SEH’. Recombinant enzymes expressed in Sf9 cells showed significant differences in biochemical properties compared to other AChEs, such as the optimal pH, substrate specificity, and catalytic efficiency. Among three test substrates, PpAChE1, PpAChE3 and PpAChE4 showed the highest catalytic efficiency (Vmax/KM) for ATC (acetylthiocholine iodide), with PpAChE3 exhibiting a clear preference for ATC based on the VmaxATC/VmaxBTC ratio. In addition, the four PpAChEs were more sensitive to the AChE-specific inhibitor BW284C51, which acts against ATC hydrolysis, than to the BChE-specific inhibitor ISO-OMPA, which acts against BTC hydrolysis, with at least a 8.5-fold difference in IC50 values for each PpAChE. PpAChE3, PpAChE4, and PpAChE1 were more sensitive than PpAChE2 to the tested Carb insecticides, and PpAChE3 was more sensitive than the other three AChEs to the tested OP insecticides. Based on all the results, two new functional AChEs were identified from P. pseudoannulata. The differences in AChE sequence between this spider and insects enrich our knowledge of invertebrate AChE diversity, and our findings will be helpful for understanding the selectivity of insecticides between insects and natural enemy spiders. PMID:27337188

  9. Identification and Biochemical Properties of Two New Acetylcholinesterases in the Pond Wolf Spider (Pardosa pseudoannulata).

    Meng, Xiangkun; Li, Chunrui; Xiu, Chunli; Zhang, Jianhua; Li, Jingjing; Huang, Lixin; Zhang, Yixi; Liu, Zewen

    2016-01-01

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE), an important neurotransmitter hydrolase in both invertebrates and vertebrates, is targeted by organophosphorus and carbamate insecticides. In this study, two new AChEs were identified in the pond wolf spider Pardosa pseudoannulata, an important predatory natural enemy of several insect pests. In total, four AChEs were found in P. pseudoannulata (including two AChEs previously identified in our laboratory). The new putative AChEs PpAChE3 and PpAChE4 contain most of the common features of the AChE family, including cysteine residues, choline binding sites, the conserved sequence 'FGESAG' and conserved aromatic residues but with a catalytic triad of 'SDH' rather than 'SEH'. Recombinant enzymes expressed in Sf9 cells showed significant differences in biochemical properties compared to other AChEs, such as the optimal pH, substrate specificity, and catalytic efficiency. Among three test substrates, PpAChE1, PpAChE3 and PpAChE4 showed the highest catalytic efficiency (Vmax/KM) for ATC (acetylthiocholine iodide), with PpAChE3 exhibiting a clear preference for ATC based on the VmaxATC/VmaxBTC ratio. In addition, the four PpAChEs were more sensitive to the AChE-specific inhibitor BW284C51, which acts against ATC hydrolysis, than to the BChE-specific inhibitor ISO-OMPA, which acts against BTC hydrolysis, with at least a 8.5-fold difference in IC50 values for each PpAChE. PpAChE3, PpAChE4, and PpAChE1 were more sensitive than PpAChE2 to the tested Carb insecticides, and PpAChE3 was more sensitive than the other three AChEs to the tested OP insecticides. Based on all the results, two new functional AChEs were identified from P. pseudoannulata. The differences in AChE sequence between this spider and insects enrich our knowledge of invertebrate AChE diversity, and our findings will be helpful for understanding the selectivity of insecticides between insects and natural enemy spiders. PMID:27337188

  10. Identification and Biochemical Properties of Two New Acetylcholinesterases in the Pond Wolf Spider (Pardosa pseudoannulata.

    Xiangkun Meng

    Full Text Available Acetylcholinesterase (AChE, an important neurotransmitter hydrolase in both invertebrates and vertebrates, is targeted by organophosphorus and carbamate insecticides. In this study, two new AChEs were identified in the pond wolf spider Pardosa pseudoannulata, an important predatory natural enemy of several insect pests. In total, four AChEs were found in P. pseudoannulata (including two AChEs previously identified in our laboratory. The new putative AChEs PpAChE3 and PpAChE4 contain most of the common features of the AChE family, including cysteine residues, choline binding sites, the conserved sequence 'FGESAG' and conserved aromatic residues but with a catalytic triad of 'SDH' rather than 'SEH'. Recombinant enzymes expressed in Sf9 cells showed significant differences in biochemical properties compared to other AChEs, such as the optimal pH, substrate specificity, and catalytic efficiency. Among three test substrates, PpAChE1, PpAChE3 and PpAChE4 showed the highest catalytic efficiency (Vmax/KM for ATC (acetylthiocholine iodide, with PpAChE3 exhibiting a clear preference for ATC based on the VmaxATC/VmaxBTC ratio. In addition, the four PpAChEs were more sensitive to the AChE-specific inhibitor BW284C51, which acts against ATC hydrolysis, than to the BChE-specific inhibitor ISO-OMPA, which acts against BTC hydrolysis, with at least a 8.5-fold difference in IC50 values for each PpAChE. PpAChE3, PpAChE4, and PpAChE1 were more sensitive than PpAChE2 to the tested Carb insecticides, and PpAChE3 was more sensitive than the other three AChEs to the tested OP insecticides. Based on all the results, two new functional AChEs were identified from P. pseudoannulata. The differences in AChE sequence between this spider and insects enrich our knowledge of invertebrate AChE diversity, and our findings will be helpful for understanding the selectivity of insecticides between insects and natural enemy spiders.

  11. Flavanone glycosides as acetylcholinesterase inhibitors: Computational and experimental evidence

    Remya, C.; K V Dileep; I Tintu; Variyar, E. J.; Sadasivan, C.

    2014-01-01

    Acetylcholinesterase hydrolyzes the neurotransmitter called acetylcholine and is crucially involved in the regulation of neurotransmission. One of the observable facts in the neurodegenerative disorders like Alzheimer′s disease is the decrease in the level of acetylcholine. Available drugs that are used for the treatment of Alzheimer′s disease are primarily acetylcholinesterase inhibitors with multiple activities. They maintain the level of acetylcholine in the brain by inhibiting the acetylc...

  12. Insect sodium channels and insecticide resistance

    Dong, Ke

    2007-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels are essential for the generation and propagation of action potentials (i.e., electrical impulses) in excitable cells. Although most of our knowledge about sodium channels is derived from decades of studies of mammalian isoforms, research on insect sodium channels is revealing both common and unique aspects of sodium channel biology. In particular, our understanding of the molecular dynamics and pharmacology of insect sodium channels has advanced greatly in recent...

  13. Diatomaceous Earths - Natural Insecticides

    Zlatko Korunić

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The regulatory issues for diatomaceous earth (DE cover three fields: consumer safety,worker safety, and proof of efficacy against pests. For consumer safety, regulatory issuesare similar to those for other additives, and a principal benefit of DEs is their removal bynormal processing methods. For worker safety, regulatory issues are similar to those forother dusts, such as lime. The proof of potential insecticide values of DE may be assessedby using the analysis of physical and chemical properties of DE and its effect on grainproperties and the proof of efficacy may be regulated by bioassay of standard design.Integrated pest management (IPM, a knowledge-based system, is rapidly providing aframework to reduce dependence on synthetic chemical pesticides. The main principleof post-harvest IPM is to prevent problems rather than to react to them. The specificcurative measures using synthetic pesticides should be applied only when infestationoccurs. DE and enhanced diatomaceous earth (EDE formulations hold significant promiseto increase the effectiveness and broaden the adoption of IPM strategies, thereby reducingthe need for synthetic pesticides. By incorporating DE in an effective IPM program,grain is protected against infestation, loss caused by insects is prevented and grain qualityis maintained until the grain is processed. Cases study data on the use of DE for commodityand structural treatment show that DE is already a practical alternative to syntheticpesticides in some applications.

  14. How heterogeneous is the involvement of ABC transporters against insecticides?

    Porretta, Daniele; Epis, Sara; Mastrantonio, Valentina; Ferrari, Marco; Bellini, Romeo; Favia, Guido; Urbanelli, Sandra

    2016-05-01

    Understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying cellular defense against xenobiotic compounds is a main research issue in medical and veterinary entomology, as insecticide/acaricide resistance is a major threat in the control of arthropods. ABC transporters are recognized as a component of the detoxifying mechanism in arthropods. We investigated the possible involvement of ABC transporters in defense to the organophosphate insecticide temephos in the malarial vector Anopheles stephensi. We performed bioassays on larvae of An. stephensi, using insecticide alone and in combination with ABC-transporter inhibitors, to assess synergism between these compounds. Next, we investigated the expression profiles of six ABC transporter genes in larvae exposed to temephos. Surprisingly, neither bioassays nor gene expression analyses provided any evidence for a major role of ABC transporters in defense against temephos in An. stephensi. We thus decided to review existing literature to generate a record of other studies that failed to reveal a role for ABC transporters against particular insecticides/acaricides. A review of the scientific literature led to the recovery of 569 papers about ABC transporters; among these, 50 involved arthropods, and 10 reported negative results. Our study on An. stephensi and accompanying literature review highlight the heterogeneity that exists in ABC transporter involvement in defense/resistance mechanisms in arthropods. PMID:26855383

  15. Population Responses of Potato Leafhopper (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae) to Insecticide in Glandular-Haired and Non-glandular-Haired Alfalfa Cultivars.

    Sulc, R Mark; McCormick, John S; Hammond, Ronald B; Miller, David J

    2014-12-01

    Conflicting results have been reported on the ability of glandular-haired alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) cultivars to reduce potato leafhopper, Empoasca fabae Harris, population abundance in field environments. We measured potato leafhopper adult and nymph abundance and yield responses in a cultivar selected for high potato leafhopper resistance ('54H91') and in a non-glandular-haired susceptible cultivar ('54V54') with and without insecticide treatment across 3 yr. Treatments included no insecticide and insecticide applied either early or late in each summer growth cycle. Date × cultivar × treatment interactions were found for potato leafhopper population abundance. In the absence of insecticides, total potato leafhopper abundance (adults + nymphs per sweep) was lower in 54H91 than in 54V54 on 85% of sampling dates; cultivar differences were especially evident as potato leafhopper abundance peaked. Insecticide treatment reduced potato leafhopper populations in both cultivars, but populations recovered and often exceeded the normal action threshold in both cultivars within 2-3 wk of insecticide application. Yield gain from early insecticide treatment of 54V54 was >400 kg/ha in 11 of 14 summer harvests, whereas in 54H91 the yield gain was potato leafhopper resistance significantly suppress potato leafhopper adult and nymph abundance, reduce yield losses in the absence of insecticides, and have potential within an integrated pest management strategy to reduce insecticide use in alfalfa production systems. PMID:26470072

  16. Insecticide management strategies for control of swede midge (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae) on cole crops.

    Hallett, Rebecca H; Chen, Mao; Sears, Mark K; Shelton, Anthony M

    2009-12-01

    Insecticide field trials were conducted in Ontario, Canada, and New York state to identify insecticides effective against the swede midge, Contarinia nasturtii Kieffer (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae), a new invasive pest in North America. Field trials indicated that foliar applications of lambda-cyhalothrin, permethrin, acetamiprid, chlorpyrifos, and dimethoate could provide control of C. nasturtii. Foliar insecticide applications were effective in keeping damage within marketable limits in all cabbage and some broccoli trials during the early phase of regional colonization by C. nasturtii (2001-2002). However by 2005-2006, treatments were rarely able to maintain damage levels within marketable limits. Low efficacy suggested the possibility of insecticide resistance in Canadian C. nasturtii populations, but laboratory assays revealed no evidence for resistance. Thus, eventual control failures on a season-long basis were apparently due to very high populations during later phases of colonization in Ontario. Early season applications (e.g., seed treatments, greenhouse plug tray drenches and/or band sprays) of neonicotinoid insecticides proved effective for 3-5 wk after transplanting in New York. These early season treatments would require supplemental control with foliar insecticides, but would reduce the number of foliar applications required and thus reduce insecticide usage. Our results suggest that acceptable control with foliar insecticides will be difficult where C. nasturtii populations are high, because of multiple and overlapping generations, and difficulty in achieving adequate spray coverage. An integrated pest management program that uses cultural control methods and host plant resistance, with judicious use of insecticides, is needed for sustainable management of this newly invasive pest. PMID:20069854

  17. Cholinesterase Activity in Health Workers Involved in Handling and Spraying of Organophosphorous Insecticides

    Himanshu Madaan

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Recent era of agricultural boon is partially the result of extensive use of insecticides and pesticides. But these compounds also have potential to significantly alter the ecosystem and can cause acute poisonings as well as long term detrimental health effects in humans. These compounds can cause toxicity through all routes of exposure. They exert their effect mainly by the inhibition of Acetylcholinesterase (AC hE, which functions by removing acetylcholine (AC h from its postsynaptic receptors. Aims and Objectives: Human exposure to Organophosphorous (OP pesticides can develop lowered cholinesterase levels. The aim of the present study was to estimate the plasma levels of AC hE in personnel involved in handling of these compounds, during the period of active spraying operations. Methodology: The present study was conducted on 38 subjects working as Multipurpose Health Workers (MPHW GROUP-1 and Field Workers (FW GROUP-2 involved in the actual spraying of the insecticides, in District Rohtak, Haryana, India to see the effect of exposure to OP insecticides. Plasma cholinesterase activity was measured by a kinetic method based on hydrolysis of butrylthiocholine. The data was statistically analyzed using SPSS statistical package (SPSS version 5.0. Results and interpretation: The mean cholinesterase activity in group-2 was lower by 27.76% than that in group-1 and this difference was statistically significant (p < 0.05. The workers involved in actual spraying of the insecticides had a more marked reduction in the levels of Plasma AC hE, compared to the workers involved only in the handling of the insecticides indicating that this group is at a bigger risk.

  18. Organophosphorus insecticides: Toxic effects and bioanalytical tests for evaluating toxicity during degradation processes

    Čolović Mirjana B.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Organophosphorus insecticides have been the most applied group of insecticides for the last two decades. Their main toxic effects are related to irreversible inactivation of acetylcholinesterase (AChE. Actually, they covalently bind to serine OH group in the enzyme active site forming phosphorylated enzyme that cannot hydrolyze acetylcholine. Organophosphorus insecticides in the environment undergo the natural degradation pathway including mainly homogeneous and heterogeneous hydrolysis (especially at high pH generating non-inhibiting products. Additionally, thio organophosphates are easily oxidized by naturally present oxidants and UV light, forming more toxic and stable oxons. Thus, oxidative degradation procedures, generally referred as advanced oxidation processes (AOP, have been applied for their efficient removal from contaminated waters. The most applied bioassays to monitor the organophosphate toxicity i.e. the detoxification degree during AOP are Vibrio fischeri and AChE bioassays. Vibrio fischeri toxicity test exploits bioluminescence as the measure of luciferase activity of this marine bacterium, whereas AChE bioassay is based on AChE activity inhibition. Both bioanalytical techniques are rapid (several minutes, simple, sensitive and reproducible. Vibrio fischeri test seems to be a versatile indicator of toxic compounds generated in AOP for organophosphorus insecticides degradation. However, detection of neurotoxic AChE inhibitors, which can be formed in AOP of some organophosphates, requires AChE bioassays. Therefore, AChE toxicity test is more appropriate for monitoring the degradation processes of thio organophosphates, because more toxic oxo organophosphates might be formed and overlooked by Vibrio fischeri bioluminescence inhibition. In addition, during organophosphates removal by AOP, compounds with strong genotoxic potential may be formed, which cannot be detected by standard toxicity tests. For this reason, determination of

  19. Synthesis of insecticidal sucrose esters

    Song Zi-juan; Li Shu-jun; Chen Xi; Liu Li-mei; Song Zhan-qian

    2006-01-01

    Some synthetic sucrose esters (SE) are a relatively new class of insecticidal compounds produced by reacting sugars with fatty acids, which are safe for the environment. Especially, sucrose esters composed of C6-C12 fatty acids have desirable insecticidal properties against many soft-bodied arthropod pests. In our study, sucrose octanoate which has the highest activity against a range of arthropod species was synthesized by a trans-esterification method and proved its insecticidal property. Under the condition of a homogeneous liquid, sucrose octanoate was prepared by reacting ethyl octanoate with sucrose at reduced pressure; the yield was 79.11%. Sucrose octanoate synthesized was identified and its property analyzed by IR, TLC and spectrophotometric analysis. It was shown that the ratio of monoester to polyester in sucrose octanoate was 1.48:1. The insecticidal activity of the synthetic sucrose octanoate was evaluated at a concentration of 4 and 8 mg·mL-1. The mortality of first-instar larvae ofLymantria dispar from its contact toxicity was 72.5% after 36 hours, the revision insect reduced rate of Aphis glycines reached above 80% at 4 and 8 mg·mL-1 after being treated for 5 days. Since the SE products are nontoxic to humans and higher animals, fully biodegradable and hydrolyzed to readily metabolizable sucrose and fatty acid, they are not harmful to crops and appear to be good insecticide candidates.

  20. Acetylcholinesterase-R increases germ cell apoptosis but enhances sperm motility

    Mor, I.; Sklan, EH; Podoly, E; Pick, M; Kirschner, M.; Yogev, L.; Bar-Sheshet Itach, S; Schreiber, L; B. Geyer; Mor, T.; Grisaru, D.; Soreq, H.

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Changes in protein subdomains through alternative splicing often modify protein-protein interactions, altering biological processes. A relevant example is that of the stress-induced up-regulation of the acetylcholinesterase (AChE-R) splice variant, a common response in various tissues. In germ cells of male transgenic TgR mice, AChE-R excess associates with reduced sperm differentiation and sperm counts. To explore the mechanism(s) by which AChE-R up-regulation affects spermatogenesi...

  1. Acetylcholinesterase mutations and organophosphate resistance in sand flies and mosquitoes

    The sand fly, Phlebotomus papatasi (Scopoli) is a major vector of Leishamnia major, the principle causative agent of human cutaneous leishmaniasis in the Middle East, southern Europe, northern Africa, and Southern Asia. Sand fly bites and leishmaniasis significantly impacted U.S. military operations...

  2. Insecticides are not always the answer for combatting pests in onion fields

    Hutchinson, Harlie

    2016-01-01

    Onion thrips are the insect vector of a severe virus in onion, Iris yellow spot virus. The thrips and virus are primary threats to the economic stability of onion production worldwide. Overuse of insecticides to suppress onion thrips has resulted in the development of resistance, reduced performance of insecticides, and reduced onion yields. There is a compelling desire to find alternatives to better manage these pests. In this study, we assessed onion thrips populations on onions with low...

  3. Toxicity of non-pyrethroid insecticides against Triatoma infestans (Hemiptera: Reduviidae)

    Guillermo Carvajal; Gastón Mougabure-Cueto; Ariel Ceferino Toloza

    2012-01-01

    Triatoma infestans (Klug) is the main vector of Chagas disease, which is a public health concern in most Latin American countries. The prevention of Chagas disease is based on the chemical control of the vector using pyrethroid insecticides. In the last decade, different levels of deltamethrin resistance have been detected in certain areas of Argentina and Bolivia. Because of this, alternative non-pyrethroid insecticides from different chemical groups were evaluated against two T. infestans p...

  4. Current Perspectives on Plague Vector Control in Madagascar: Susceptibility Status of Xenopsylla cheopis to 12 Insecticides

    Miarinjara, Adélaïde; Boyer, Sébastien

    2016-01-01

    Plague is a rodent disease transmissible to humans by infected flea bites, and Madagascar is one of the countries with the highest plague incidence in the world. This study reports the susceptibility of the main plague vector Xenopsylla cheopis to 12 different insecticides belonging to 4 insecticide families (carbamates, organophosphates, pyrethroids and organochlorines). Eight populations from different geographical regions of Madagascar previously resistant to deltamethrin were tested with ...

  5. Impact of Insecticides on Parasitoids of the Leafminer, Liriomyza trifolii, in Pepper in South Texas

    Hernández, Ricardo; Harris, Marvin; Liu, Tong-Xian

    2011-01-01

    Liriomyza leafminers (Diptera: Agromyzidae) are cosmopolitan, polyphagous pests of horticultural plants and many are resistant to insecticides. Producers in South Texas rely on insecticides as the primary management tool for leafminers, and several compounds are available. The objective of this study is to address the efficacy of these compounds for controlling Liriomyza while minimizing their effects against natural enemies. Research plots were established at Texas AgriLife research center a...

  6. The selectivity of DNA insecticides

    Oberemok V.; Nyadar P.

    2014-01-01

    Single-stranded LdMNPV iap3 gene fragments on tobacco hornworm and black cutworm, and a significant effect of single-stranded TnSNPV iap3 gene fragments on the viability of cabbage looper and their harmlessness on black cutworm was found. DNA insecticides based on LdMNPV iap3 and TnSNPV iap3 gene fragments are selective in action. Our findings emphasize the importance of appropriate concentrations of DNA insecticides used to control phyllophagous insects. This article has b...

  7. Pyrethroid resistance in mosquitoes

    NANNAN LIU; QIANG XU; FANG ZHU; LEE ZHANG

    2006-01-01

    Repeated blood feedings throughout their life span have made mosquitoes ideal transmitters of a wide variety of disease agents. Vector control is a very important part of the current global strategy for the control of mosquito-associated diseases and insecticide application is the most important component in this effort. Pyrethroids, which account for 25% of the world insecticide market, are currently the most widely used insecticides for the indoor control of mosquitoes and are the only chemical recommended for the treatment of mosquito nets, the main tool for preventing malaria in Africa. However, mosquito-borne diseases are now resurgent, largely because of insecticide resistance that has developed in mosquito vectors and the anti-parasite drug resistance of parasites. This paper reviews our current knowledge of the molecular mechanisms governing metabolic detoxification and the development of target site insensitivity that leads to pyrethroid resistance in mosquitoes.

  8. The Effects of Exercise-induced Fatigue on Acetylcholinesterase Expression and Activity at Rat Neuromuscular Junctions

    Wen, Guo; Hui, Wang; Dan, Chen; Xiao-Qiong, Wu; Jian-Bin, Tong; Chang-Qi, Li; De-Liang, Lei; Wei-Jun, Cai; Zhi-Yuan, Li; Xue-Gang, Luo

    2009-01-01

    Acetylcholinesterase is the enzyme that terminates neurotransmission by hydrolyzing the acetylcholine released by the motoneurons at the neuromuscular junctions. Although acetylcholinesterase has been studied for almost a century, the underlying relationship between exercise-induced fatigue and acetylcholinesterase activity at the synaptic cleft is not clear. The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of exercise-induced fatigue on the expression and activity of acetylcholinesterase ...

  9. Mutation at codon 322 in the human acetylcholinesterase (ACHE) gene accounts for YT blood group polymorphism.

    Bartels, C F; Zelinski, T; Lockridge, O

    1993-01-01

    Acetylcholinesterase is present in innervated tissues, where its function is to terminate nerve impulse transmission. It is also found in the red blood cell membrane, where its function is unknown. We report the first genetic variant of human acetylcholinesterase and support the identity of acetylcholinesterase as the YT blood group antigen. DNA sequencing shows that the wild-type sequence of acetylcholinesterase with His322 (CAC) is the YT1 blood group antigen and that the rare variant of ac...

  10. Effect of dichlorvos on the acetylcholinesterase from tambaqui (Colossoma macropomum) brain.

    Assis, Caio Rodrigo Dias; Amaral, Ian Porto Gurgel; Castro, Patrícia Fernandes; Carvalho, Luiz Bezerra Júnior; Bezerra, Ranilson Souza

    2007-07-01

    Dichlorvos is an acutely toxic organophosphorous pesticide that is known as a classical acetylcholinesterase (AChE; EC 3.1.1.7) inhibitor. Here, the brain AChE from the important Amazonian fish tambaqui (Colossoma macropomum) was assayed in the presence of this insecticide and also of deltamethrin, a classical sodium and potassium channel inhibitor (negative control). Four tissue homogenates were analyzed in triplicate for AChE activity using acetylthiocholine as the substrate and 5,5'-dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoic) acid (DTNB) as the color-developing agent. Each tissue homogenate represented pooled brains from five fish. The inhibitory effect of dichlorvos on AChE activities was determined at concentrations from 0.001 to 10 ppm and compared to controls. This effect followed an exponential decay model (y = 9.420 + 26.192e(-x/5.380); r2 = 0.989), presenting IC50 (the concentration of dichlorvos that is required for 50% of AChE inhibition) of 0.081 ppm (0.368 micromol/L). No effect was observed for the deltamethrin, and the concentration 0.0452 micromol/L of dichlorvos was significantly different from this control. These results suggest that tambaqui brain AChE can be proposed as a biomarker for dichlorvos and can be used as a tool for aquatic environment monitoring. PMID:17665685

  11. An Acetylcholinesterase-Based Chronoamperometric Biosensor for Fast and Reliable Assay of Nerve Agents

    Rene Kizek

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The enzyme acetylcholinesterase (AChE is an important part of cholinergic nervous system, where it stops neurotransmission by hydrolysis of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine. It is sensitive to inhibition by organophosphate and carbamate insecticides, some Alzheimer disease drugs, secondary metabolites such as aflatoxins and nerve agents used in chemical warfare. When immobilized on a sensor (physico-chemical transducer, it can be used for assay of these inhibitors. In the experiments described herein, an AChE- based electrochemical biosensor using screen printed electrode systems was prepared. The biosensor was used for assay of nerve agents such as sarin, soman, tabun and VX. The limits of detection achieved in a measuring protocol lasting ten minutes were 7.41 × 10−12 mol/L for sarin, 6.31 × 10−12 mol /L for soman, 6.17 × 10−11 mol/L for tabun, and 2.19 × 10−11 mol/L for VX, respectively. The assay was reliable, with minor interferences caused by the organic solvents ethanol, methanol, isopropanol and acetonitrile. Isopropanol was chosen as suitable medium for processing lipophilic samples.

  12. Toxicity of azodrin on the morphology and acetylcholinesterase activity of the earthworm Eisenia foetida

    The acute toxicity of azodrin (monocrotophos, an organophosphorus insecticide) was determined on a soil organism, Eisenia foetida. The median lethal concentrations (LC50) were derived from a 48-h paper contact test and from artificial soil tests. The LC50 of azodrin in the paper contact test was 0.46±0.1 μg cm-2 (23±6 mg L-1) and those in the 7- and 14-day artificial soil tests were 171±21 and 132±20 mg kg-1, respectively. The neurotoxic potentiality of azodrin was assessed by using a marker enzyme, acetylcholinesterase (AChE; EC 3.1.1.7) in both in vitro and in vivo experiments. The progressive signs of morphological destruction are correlated with percentage inhibition of AChE in the in vivo experiments. The kinetics of AChE activity in the presence and absence of azodrin indicated that the toxicant is competitive in nature. This study demonstrated that azodrin causes concentration-dependent changes in the morphology and AChE activity of the earthworm E. foetida

  13. Increased Acetylcholinesterase Expression in Bumble Bees During Neonicotinoid-Coated Corn Sowing.

    Samson-Robert, Olivier; Labrie, Geneviève; Mercier, Pierre-Luc; Chagnon, Madeleine; Derome, Nicolas; Fournier, Valérie

    2015-01-01

    While honey bee exposure to systemic insecticides has received much attention, impacts on wild pollinators have not been as widely studied. Neonicotinoids have been shown to increase acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity in honey bees at sublethal doses. High AChE levels may therefore act as a biomarker of exposure to neonicotinoids. This two-year study focused on establishing whether bumble bees living and foraging in agricultural areas using neonicotinoid crop protection show early biochemical signs of intoxication. Bumble bee colonies (Bombus impatiens) were placed in two different agricultural cropping areas: 1) control (≥ 3 km from fields planted with neonicotinoid-treated seeds) or 2) exposed (within 500 m of fields planted with neonicotinoid-treated seeds), and maintained for the duration of corn sowing. As determined by Real Time qPCR, AChE mRNA expression was initially significantly higher in bumble bees from exposed sites, then decreased throughout the planting season to reach a similar endpoint to that of bumble bees from control sites. These findings suggest that exposure to neonicotinoid seed coating particles during the planting season can alter bumble bee neuronal activity. To our knowledge, this is the first study to report in situ that bumble bees living in agricultural areas exhibit signs of neonicotinoid intoxication. PMID:26223214

  14. An acetylcholinesterase-based chronoamperometric biosensor for fast and reliable assay of nerve agents.

    Pohanka, Miroslav; Adam, Vojtech; Kizek, Rene

    2013-01-01

    The enzyme acetylcholinesterase (AChE) is an important part of cholinergic nervous system, where it stops neurotransmission by hydrolysis of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine. It is sensitive to inhibition by organophosphate and carbamate insecticides, some Alzheimer disease drugs, secondary metabolites such as aflatoxins and nerve agents used in chemical warfare. When immobilized on a sensor (physico-chemical transducer), it can be used for assay of these inhibitors. In the experiments described herein, an AChE- based electrochemical biosensor using screen printed electrode systems was prepared. The biosensor was used for assay of nerve agents such as sarin, soman, tabun and VX. The limits of detection achieved in a measuring protocol lasting ten minutes were 7.41 × 10(-12) mol/L for sarin, 6.31 × 10(-12) mol /L for soman, 6.17 × 10(-11) mol/L for tabun, and 2.19 × 10(-11) mol/L for VX, respectively. The assay was reliable, with minor interferences caused by the organic solvents ethanol, methanol, isopropanol and acetonitrile. Isopropanol was chosen as suitable medium for processing lipophilic samples. PMID:23999806

  15. Paraoxonase 1 (PON1) Status and Risk of Insecticide Exposure

    Furlong, Clement E.; Cole, Toby B.; Walter, Betsy J.; Shih, Diana M.; Tward, Aaron; Lusis, Aldons J.; Timchalk, Chuck; Richter, Rebecca J.; Costa, Lucio G.

    2005-06-23

    Paraoxonase 1 (PON1) is an HDL associated enzyme that catalyzes a number of different reactions including the hydrolysis of the toxic oxon metabolites of the insecticides diazinon and chlorpyrifos. PON1 has also been implicated in the detoxication of oxidized lipids and the metabolism of a number of drugs, activating some, while inactivating others. There are two common PON1 coding region polymorphisms (L55M and Q192R). The latter determines the catalytic efficiency of hydrolysis of a number of substrates including chlorpyrifos oxon, but not diazoxon. Evidence for the physiological importance of PON1 in modulating exposures to these two insecticides comes from several different studies. Early studies noted that species with high levels of PON1 were much more resistant to certain organophosphorus (OP) insecticides than were species with low levels. Another early study by Main demonstrated that injected rabbit paraoxonase protected rats from paraoxon toxicity. Our research group began the development of a mouse model system for examining the importance of PON1 in the detoxication of OP insecticides.

  16. Adaptive introgression in an African malaria mosquito coincident with the increased usage of insecticide-treated bed nets.

    Norris, Laura C; Main, Bradley J; Lee, Yoosook; Collier, Travis C; Fofana, Abdrahamane; Cornel, Anthony J; Lanzaro, Gregory C

    2015-01-20

    Animal species adapt to changes in their environment, including man-made changes such as the introduction of insecticides, through selection for advantageous genes already present in populations or newly arisen through mutation. A possible alternative mechanism is the acquisition of adaptive genes from related species via a process known as adaptive introgression. Differing levels of insecticide resistance between two African malaria vectors, Anopheles coluzzii and Anopheles gambiae, have been attributed to assortative mating between the two species. In a previous study, we reported two bouts of hybridization observed in the town of Selinkenyi, Mali in 2002 and 2006. These hybridization events did not appear to be directly associated with insecticide-resistance genes. We demonstrate that during a brief breakdown in assortative mating in 2006, A. coluzzii inherited the entire A. gambiae-associated 2L divergence island, which includes a suite of insecticide-resistance alleles. In this case, introgression was coincident with the start of a major insecticide-treated bed net distribution campaign in Mali. This suggests that insecticide exposure altered the fitness landscape, favoring the survival of A. coluzzii/A. gambiae hybrids, and provided selection pressure that swept the 2L divergence island through A. coluzzii populations in Mali. We propose that the work described herein presents a unique description of the temporal dynamics of adaptive introgression in an animal species and represents a mechanism for the rapid evolution of insecticide resistance in this important vector of human malaria in Africa. PMID:25561525

  17. Specific Synergist for Neonicotinoid Insecticides: IPPA08, a cis-Neonicotinoid Compound with a Unique Oxabridged Substructure.

    Bao, Haibo; Shao, Xusheng; Zhang, Yixi; Deng, Yayun; Xu, Xiaoyong; Liu, Zewen; Li, Zhong

    2016-06-29

    Insecticide synergists are key components to increase the control efficacy and reduce active ingredient use. Here, we describe a novel insecticide synergist with activity specific for insecticidal neonicotinoids. The synergist IPPA08, a cis configuration neonicotinoid compound with a unique oxabridged substructure, could increase the toxicity of most neonicotinoid insecticides belonging to the Insecticide Resistance Action Committee (IRAC) 4A subgroup against a range of insect species, although IPPA08 itself was almost inactive to insects at synergistic concentrations. Unfortunately, similar effects were observed on the honey bee (Apis mellifera) and the brown planthopper (Nilaparvata lugens), resistant to imidacloprid. IPPA08 did not show any effects on toxicity of insecticides with different targets, which made us define it as a neonicotinoid-specific synergist. Unlike most insecticide synergists, by inhibition of activities of detoxification enzymes, IPPA08 showed no effects on enzyme activities. The results revealed that IPPA08 worked as a synergist through a distinct way. Although the modulating insect nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs, targets of neonicotinoid insecticides) were supposed as a possible mode of action for IPPA08 as a neonicotinoid-specific synergist, direct evidence is needed in further studies. In insect pest control, IPPA08 acts as a target synergist to increase neonicotinoid toxicity and reduce the amount of neonicotinoid used. Combinations of IPPA08 and insecticidal neonicotinoids may be developed into new insecticide formulations. In summary, combining an active ingredient with a "custom" synergist appears to be a very promising approach for the development of effective new insecticide products. PMID:27281691

  18. Life stage toxicity and residual activity of insecticides to codling moth and oriental fruit moth (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae).

    Magalhaes, Leonardo C; Walgenbach, James F

    2011-12-01

    The codling moth, Cydia pomonella (L.), and oriental fruit moth, Grapholita molesta (Busck), are two key pests of apple (Malus domestica Borkh.) in North Carolina. Growers extensively relied on organophosphate insecticides, primarily azinphosmethyl, for > 40 yr to manage these pests. Because of organophosphate resistance development and regulatory actions, growers are transitioning to management programs that use new, reduced-risk, and OP-replacement insecticides. This study evaluated the toxicity of a diversity of replacement insecticides to eggs, larvae, and adults, as well as an assessment of their residual activity, to codling moth and oriental fruit moth. Laboratory-susceptible strains of both species were used for all bioassays. Fresh field-harvested apples were used as a media for assessing the ovicidal activity of insecticides. For larval studies, insecticides were topically applied to the surface of lima bean-based diet, onto which neonates were placed. Toxicity was based on two measures of mortality; 5-d mortality and development to adult stage. Ovicidal bioassays showed that oriental fruit moth eggs were generally more tolerant than codling moth eggs to insecticides, with novaluron, acetamiprid, and azinphoshmethyl having the highest levels of toxicity to eggs of both species. In contrast, codling moth larvae generally were more tolerant than oriental fruit moth to most insecticides. Methoxyfenozide and pyriproxyfen were the only insecticides with lower LC50 values against codling moth than oriental fruit moth neonates. Moreover, a number of insecticides, particularly the IGRs methoxyfenozide and novaluron, the anthranilic diamide chlorantriliprole, and the spinosyn spinetoram, provided equal or longer residual activity against codling moth compared with azinphosmethyl in field studies. Results are discussed in relation to their use in devising field use patterns of insecticides and for insecticide resistance monitoring programs. PMID:22299357

  19. Susceptibility of Anopheles maculipennis to different classes of insecticides in West Azarbaijan Province, Northwestern Iran

    Ali Reza Chavshin

    2015-05-01

    Conclusions: The pattern of resistance in An. maculipennis could be attributed to the agricultural landscapes, agricultural pesticides used and the exposure of the mosquitoes to insecticides. Logical cooperation is needed between the agriculture and health sectors to ensure the judicious use of pesticides in each sector and the management of probable resistance.

  20. Antioxidative/acetylcholinesterase inhibitory activity of some Asteraceae plants.

    Mekinić, Ivana Generalić; Burcul, Franko; Blazević, Ivica; Skroza, Danijela; Kerum, Daniela; Katalinić, Visnja

    2013-04-01

    The extracts obtained by 80% EtOH from some Asteraceae plants (Calendula officinalis, Inula helenium, Arctium lappa, Artemisia absinthium and Achillea millefolium) were studied. Rosmarinic acid, one of the main compounds identified in all extracts, was determined quantitatively by using HPLC. In addition, spectrophotometric methods were evaluated as an alternative for rosmarinic acid content determination. Total phenolic content was also established for all extracts. A. millefolium extract was found to have the highest content of rosmarinic acid as well as total phenols. All extracts were tested for antioxidant and acetylcholinesterase inhibitory activity. A. millefolium was shown to possess the best antioxidant activity (for all tested methods) as well as acetylcholinesterase inhibitory activity. Highly positive linear relationships were obtained between antioxidant/acetylcholinesterase inhibitory activity and the determined rosmarinic acid content indicating its significance for the observed activities. PMID:23738456

  1. The potentiality of botanicals and their products as an alternative to chemical insecticides to sandflies (Diptera: Psychodidae: A review

    Diwakar Singh Dinesh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Use of chemical pesticides is the current method for controlling sandflies. However, resistance is being developed in sandflies against the insecticide of choice that is DDT (dichlorodiphenyl trichloroethane. Botanicals have potential to act as an alternative to chemical insecticides as the crude extracts and active molecules of some plants show insecticidal effect to sandflies. This will lead to safe, easy and environment friendly method for control of sandflies. Therefore, information regarding botanicals acting as alternative to chemical insecticide against sandflies assumes importance in the context of development of resistance to insecticides as well as to prevent environment from contamination. This review deals with some plants and their products having repellent and insecticidal effect to sandflies in India and abroad. Different methods of extraction and their bioassay on sandflies have been emphasized in the text. Various extracts of some plants like Ricinus communis (Euphorbiaceae, Solanum jasminoides (Solanaceae, Bougainvillea glabra (Nyctaginaceae, Capparis spinosa (Capparidaceae, Acalypha fruticosa (Euphorbiaceae and Tagetes minuta (Asteraceae had shown repellent/insecticidal effect on sandflies. This review will be useful in conducting the research work to find out botanicals of Indian context having insecticidal effect on sandflies.

  2. Display of Biologically Functional Insecticidal Toxin on the Surface of λ Phage

    Vílchez, Susana; Jacoby, Juliette; Ellar, David J.

    2004-01-01

    The successful use of Bacillus thuringiensis insecticidal toxins to control agricultural pests could be undermined by the evolution of insect resistance. Under selection pressure in the laboratory, a number of insects have gained resistance to the toxins, and several cases of resistance in the diamondback moth have been reported from the field. The use of protein engineering to develop novel toxins active against resistant insects could offer a solution to this problem. The display of protein...

  3. Caffeine Inhibits Acetylcholinesterase, But Not Butyrylcholinesterase

    Petr Dobes

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Caffeine is an alkaloid with a stimulant effect in the body. It can interfere in transmissions based on acetylcholine, epinephrine, norepinephrine, serotonin, dopamine and glutamate. Clinical studies indicate that it can be involved in the slowing of Alzheimer disease pathology and some other effects. The effects are not well understood. In the present work, we focused on the question whether caffeine can inhibit acetylcholinesterase (AChE and/or, butyrylcholinesterase (BChE, the two enzymes participating in cholinergic neurotransmission. A standard Ellman test with human AChE and BChE was done for altering concentrations of caffeine. The test was supported by an in silico examination as well. Donepezil and tacrine were used as standards. In compliance with Dixon’s plot, caffeine was proved to be a non-competitive inhibitor of AChE and BChE. However, inhibition of BChE was quite weak, as the inhibition constant, Ki, was 13.9 ± 7.4 mol/L. Inhibition of AChE was more relevant, as Ki was found to be 175 ± 9 µmol/L. The predicted free energy of binding was −6.7 kcal/mol. The proposed binding orientation of caffeine can interact with Trp86, and it can be stabilize by Tyr337 in comparison to the smaller Ala328 in the case of human BChE; thus, it can explain the lower binding affinity of caffeine for BChE with reference to AChE. The biological relevance of the findings is discussed.

  4. Altered levels of acetylcholinesterase in Alzheimer plasma.

    María-Salud García-Ayllón

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Many studies have been conducted in an extensive effort to identify alterations in blood cholinesterase levels as a consequence of disease, including the analysis of acetylcholinesterase (AChE in plasma. Conventional assays using selective cholinesterase inhibitors have not been particularly successful as excess amounts of butyrylcholinesterase (BuChE pose a major problem. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we have estimated the levels of AChE activity in human plasma by first immunoprecipitating BuChE and measuring AChE activity in the immunodepleted plasma. Human plasma AChE activity levels were approximately 20 nmol/min/mL, about 160 times lower than BuChE. The majority of AChE species are the light G(1+G(2 forms and not G(4 tetramers. The levels and pattern of the molecular forms are similar to that observed in individuals with silent BuChE. We have also compared plasma AChE with the enzyme pattern obtained from human liver, red blood cells, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF and brain, by sedimentation analysis, Western blotting and lectin-binding analysis. Finally, a selective increase of AChE activity was detected in plasma from Alzheimer's disease (AD patients compared to age and gender-matched controls. This increase correlates with an increase in the G(1+G(2 forms, the subset of AChE species which are increased in Alzheimer's brain. Western blot analysis demonstrated that a 78 kDa immunoreactive AChE protein band was also increased in Alzheimer's plasma, attributed in part to AChE-T subunits common in brain and CSF. CONCLUSION: Plasma AChE might have potential as an indicator of disease progress and prognosis in AD and warrants further investigation.

  5. La biosynthèse des isoprénoïdes chez les pucerons : une cible potentielle de nouveaux bio-insecticides ?

    Haubruge E.; Francis F.; Cusson M.; Vandermoten S.

    2008-01-01

    Isoprenoid metabolism in aphids: a new target for bio-insecticides development? Currently, the control of aphids is largely dependent on the use of broad-spectrum chemical insecticides. Their adverse effects on the environment, combined with the ability of insects to quickly develop resistance to them, has prompted a search for alternative control products. One of the approaches currently under consideration involves the design of novel bio-rational insecticides targeting and disrupting speci...

  6. The Dynamics of Ligand Barrier Crossing Inside the Acetylcholinesterase Gorge

    Bui, Jennifer M.(University of California, San Diego); Henchman, Richard H.(University of California, San Diego); Mccammon, Andy (University of California, San Diego)

    2003-10-01

    The dynamics of ligand movement through the constricted region of the acetylcholinesterase gorge is important in understanding how the ligand gains access to and is released from the active site of the enzyme. Molecular dynamics simulations of the simple ligand, tetramethylammonium, crossing this bottleneck region are conducted using umbrella potential sampling and activated .ux techniques. The low potential of mean force obtained is consistent with the fast reaction rate of acetylcholinesterase observed experimentally. From the results of the activated dynamics simulations, local conformational .uctuations of the gorge residues and larger scale collective motions of the protein are found to correlate highly with the ligand crossing.

  7. Species-specific differences in biomarker responses in two ecologically different earthworms exposed to the insecticide dimethoate.

    Velki, Mirna; Hackenberger, Branimir K

    2012-08-01

    Earthworms ingest large amounts of soil and therefore are continuously exposed to contaminants through their alimentary surfaces. Additionally, several studies have shown that earthworm skin is a significant route of contaminant uptake as well. In order to determine effects of dimethoate, a broad-spectrum organophosphorous insecticide, two ecologically different earthworm species were used - Eisenia andrei and Octolasion lacteum. Although several studies used soil organisms to investigate the effects of dimethoate, none of these studies included investigations of dimethoate effects on biochemical biomarkers in earthworms. Earthworms were exposed to 0.001, 0.005, 0.01, 0.5 and 1 μg/cm(2) of dimethoate for 24 h, and the activities of acetylcholinesterase, carboxylesterase, catalase and efflux pump were measured. In both earthworm species dimethoate caused significant inhibition of acetylcholinesterase and carboxylesterase activities, however in E. andrei an hormetic effect was evident. Efflux pump activity was inhibited only in E. andrei, and catalase activity was significantly inhibited in both earthworm species. Additionally, responses of earthworm acetylcholinesterase, carboxylesterase and catalase activity to dimethoate were examined through in vitro experiments. Comparison of responses between E. andrei and O. lacteum has shown significant differences, and E. andrei has proved to be less susceptible to dimethoate exposure. PMID:22609974

  8. Comparisons of Properties of Acetylcholinesterase from Two Field-Collected Populations of Oxya chinensis Thunberg (Orthoptera: Acrididae) and the Role of Acetylcholinesterase in the Susceptibility to Malathion

    WU Hai-hua; YANG Mei-ling; GUO Ya-ping; MA En-bo

    2005-01-01

    In this study, acetylcholinesterase (AChE) was extracted from two field-collected populations of Oxya chinensis (Xinxiang City, Henan Province and Changzhi City, Shanxi Province). AChE activities were decreased when concentrations of ATC increased, showing a characteristic phenomenon of substrate inhibition at high concentration in both populations. Such inhibition occurred at relatively low concentration for AChE from Xinxiang population but relatively high for AChE from Changzhi population. The kinetic study showed that there were no significant differences between the two populations in the Km values. The Km value in Changzhi population was only 1.09-fold higher than that in Xinxiang population. However,significant differences were observed between the two populations in Vmax values. The Vmaxvalue in Changzhi population was 1.32-fold higher than that in Xinxiang population. The inhibition study in vitro showed that the AChE from both populations exhibited similar rank order in sensitivity to inhibition by three OPs, as determined by comparison of their bimolecular rate constants (ki), from the most potent inhibition to the least was chlopyrifos-oxon > paraoxon >demeton-s-methyl for AChE from the two populations and that the ki values in Xinxiang population were lower than those in Changzhi population. The I50 values of AChE from Xinxiang population were 4.84-, 2.66-, and 1.92-fold less sensitive to inhibition by paraoxon, chlopyrifos-oxon, and demeton-s-methyl. These results were consistent with the results in bioassay. It is inferred that AChE insensitivity to OP insecticides plays an important role in the differences of insusceptibility of Oxya chinensis to malathion between the two populations.

  9. Effect of Wolbachia on insecticide susceptibility in lines of Aedes aegypti.

    Endersby, N M; Hoffmann, A A

    2013-06-01

    Two stable infections of Wolbachia pipientis, wMelPop and wMel, now established in Aedes aegypti, are being used in a biocontrol program to suppress the transmission of dengue. Any effects of Wolbachia infection on insecticide resistance of mosquitoes may undermine the success of this program. Bioassays of Ae. aegypti were conducted to test for differences in response to insecticides between Wolbachia infected (wMelPop, wMel) and uninfected lines. Insecticides screened were bifenthrin, the pyrethroid commonly used for adult knockdown, as well as larvicides: Bacillus thuringiensis var. israelensis, the organophosphate, temephos and the insect growth regulator, s-methoprene. While differences in response between lines were detected for some insecticides, no obvious or consistent effects related to presence of Wolbachia infection were observed. Spreading Wolbachia infections are, therefore, unlikely to affect the efficacy of traditional chemical control of mosquito outbreaks. PMID:23149015

  10. Screening Test for Detection of Leptinotarsa decemlineata (Say Sensitivity to Insecticides

    Dušanka Inđić

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In 2009, the sensitivity of 15 field populations of Colorado potato beetle (Leptinotarsadecemlineata Say. - CPB was assessed to chlorpyrifos, cypermethrin, thiamethoxam and fipronil,four insecticides which are mostly used for its control in Serbia. Screening test that allows rapidassessment of sensitivity of overwintered adults to insecticides was performed. Insecticideswere applied at label rates, and two, five and 10 fold higher rates by soaking method (5 sec.Mortality was assessed after 72h. From 15 monitored populations of CPB, two were sensitiveto label rate of chlorpyrifos, one was slightly resistant, 11 were resistant and one populationwas highly resistant. Concerning cypermethrin, two populations were sensitive, two slightlyresistant, five were resistant and six highly resistant. Highly sensitive to thiamethoxam labelrate were 12 populations, while three were sensitive. In the case of fipronil applied at label rate,two populations were highly sensitive, six sensitive, one slightly resistant and six were resistant.The application of insecticides at higher rates (2, 5 and 10 fold, that is justified only in bioassays,provided a rapid insight into sensitivity of field populations of CPB to insecticides.

  11. Status of insecticide susceptibility in Anopheles arabiensis from Mwea rice irrigation scheme, Central Kenya

    Vulule John M

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Control of the Anopheline mosquito vectors of malaria by use of insecticides has been shown to impact on both morbidity and mortality due to this disease. Evidence of insecticide resistance in different settings necessitates surveillance studies to allow prompt detection of resistance should it arise and thus enable its management. Possible resistance by Anopheles arabiensis mosquitoes from Mwea rice irrigation scheme in Central Kenya to insecticides in the four classes of insecticides approved by WHO for indoor residual spraying was investigated. Methods Susceptibility to DDT (an organochlorine, fenitrothion (an organophosphate, bendiocarb (a carbamate, lambdacyhalothrin and permethrin (both pyrethroids was tested using standard WHO diagnostic bioassay kits. Bioassays were performed on non-blood fed mosquitoes one- to three-day old. Knockdown was recorded every 10 min and mortality 24 h post-exposure was noted. Results Mortality 24 h post-exposure was 100% for all insecticides except for lambdacyhalothrin, which averaged 99.46%. Knockdown rates at 10 min intervals were not significantly different between the Mwea population and the susceptible KISUMU strain of Anopheles gambiae sensu stricto control. The KDT50 and KDT95 values for the Mwea population were either lower than those for the control or higher by factors of no more than 2 for most comparisons and compared well with those of An. gambiae sensu lato categorized as susceptible in other studies. Conclusion These results suggest that the Mwea population of An. arabiensis is susceptible to all the insecticides tested. This implies that vector control measures employing any of these insecticides would not be hampered by resistance.

  12. Neonicotinoid insecticides alter induced defenses and increase susceptibility to spider mites in distantly related crop plants.

    Adrianna Szczepaniec

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chemical suppression of arthropod herbivores is the most common approach to plant protection. Insecticides, however, can cause unintended, adverse consequences for non-target organisms. Previous studies focused on the effects of pesticides on target and non-target pests, predatory arthropods, and concomitant ecological disruptions. Little research, however, has focused on the direct effects of insecticides on plants. Here we demonstrate that applications of neonicotinoid insecticides, one of the most important insecticide classes worldwide, suppress expression of important plant defense genes, alter levels of phytohormones involved in plant defense, and decrease plant resistance to unsusceptible herbivores, spider mites Tetranychus urticae (Acari: Tetranychidae, in multiple, distantly related crop plants. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using cotton (Gossypium hirsutum, corn (Zea mays and tomato (Solanum lycopersicum plants, we show that transcription of phenylalanine ammonia lyase, coenzyme A ligase, trypsin protease inhibitor and chitinase are suppressed and concentrations of the phytohormone OPDA and salicylic acid were altered by neonicotinoid insecticides. Consequently, the population growth of spider mites increased from 30% to over 100% on neonicotinoid-treated plants in the greenhouse and by nearly 200% in the field experiment. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our findings are important because applications of neonicotinoid insecticides have been associated with outbreaks of spider mites in several unrelated plant species. More importantly, this is the first study to document insecticide-mediated disruption of plant defenses and link it to increased population growth of a non-target herbivore. This study adds to growing evidence that bioactive agrochemicals can have unanticipated ecological effects and suggests that the direct effects of insecticides on plant defenses should be considered when the ecological costs of insecticides

  13. Depression of plasma luteinizing hormone concentration in quail by the anticholinesterase insecticide parathion

    Rattner, B.A.; Clarke, R.N.; Ottinger, M.A.

    1986-01-01

    To examine the effects of parathion on basal plasma luteinizing hormone (LH) concentration, male Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica) were orally intubated with 0, 5 or 10 mg/kg parathion and sacrificed after 4, 8 and 24 hr. At the 5 mg/kg dose, plasma LH levels were reduced at 4 and 8 hr, but returned to control values by 24 hr. Brain acetylcholinesterase activity was substantially reduced by 10 mg/kg parathion (52, 75 and 37% inhibition at 4, 8 and 24 hr, respectively) and plasma LH concentration remained depressed through the 24-hr period. These findings suggest that the organophosphorus insecticide parathion may alter plasma LH concentration in a manner which might impair reproductive activity, and provide indirect evidence for a cholinergic component in the regulation of LH secretion in quail.

  14. Insecticidal and Enzyme Inhibitory Activities of Sparassol and Its Analogues against Drosophila suzukii.

    Kim, Junheon; Jang, Miyeon; Lee, Kyoung-Tae; Yoon, Kyungjae Andrew; Park, Chung Gyoo

    2016-07-13

    Drosophila suzukii is an economically important pest in America and Europe as well as in Asia. Sparassol and methyl orsellinate are naturally produced by the cultivating mushrooms Sparassis cripta and Sparassis latifolia. Fumigant and contact toxicities of synthetic sparassol and its analogues, methyl orsellinate and methyl 2,4-dimethoxy-6-methylbenzoate (DMB), were investigated. Negligible fumigant activity was observed from the tested compounds. However, DMB showed the strongest contact toxicity, followed by sparassol and methyl orsellinate. The possible modes of action of the compounds were assessed for their acetylcholinesterase (AChE)- and glutathione S-transferase (GST)-inhibiting activities. AChE activity was weakly inhibited by methyl orsellinate and DMB, but GST was inhibited by sparassol, methyl orsellinate, and DMB. Thus, DMB could be a promising alternative to common insecticides as it can be easily synthesized from sparassol, which is the natural product of Sparassis species. Sparassis species could be an industrial resource of DMB. PMID:27327201

  15. Isolation of an orally active insecticidal toxin from the venom of an Australian tarantula.

    Margaret C Hardy

    Full Text Available Many insect pests have developed resistance to existing chemical insecticides and consequently there is much interest in the development of new insecticidal compounds with novel modes of action. Although spiders have deployed insecticidal toxins in their venoms for over 250 million years, there is no evolutionary selection pressure on these toxins to possess oral activity since they are injected into prey and predators via a hypodermic needle-like fang. Thus, it has been assumed that spider-venom peptides are not orally active and are therefore unlikely to be useful insecticides. Contrary to this dogma, we show that it is possible to isolate spider-venom peptides with high levels of oral insecticidal activity by directly screening for per os toxicity. Using this approach, we isolated a 34-residue orally active insecticidal peptide (OAIP-1 from venom of the Australian tarantula Selenotypus plumipes. The oral LD50 for OAIP-1 in the agronomically important cotton bollworm Helicoverpa armigera was 104.2±0.6 pmol/g, which is the highest per os activity reported to date for an insecticidal venom peptide. OAIP-1 is equipotent with synthetic pyrethroids and it acts synergistically with neonicotinoid insecticides. The three-dimensional structure of OAIP-1 determined using NMR spectroscopy revealed that the three disulfide bonds form an inhibitor cystine knot motif; this structural motif provides the peptide with a high level of biological stability that probably contributes to its oral activity. OAIP-1 is likely to be synergized by the gut-lytic activity of the Bacillus thuringiensis Cry toxin (Bt expressed in insect-resistant transgenic crops, and consequently it might be a good candidate for trait stacking with Bt.

  16. Isolation of an orally active insecticidal toxin from the venom of an Australian tarantula.

    Hardy, Margaret C; Daly, Norelle L; Mobli, Mehdi; Morales, Rodrigo A V; King, Glenn F

    2013-01-01

    Many insect pests have developed resistance to existing chemical insecticides and consequently there is much interest in the development of new insecticidal compounds with novel modes of action. Although spiders have deployed insecticidal toxins in their venoms for over 250 million years, there is no evolutionary selection pressure on these toxins to possess oral activity since they are injected into prey and predators via a hypodermic needle-like fang. Thus, it has been assumed that spider-venom peptides are not orally active and are therefore unlikely to be useful insecticides. Contrary to this dogma, we show that it is possible to isolate spider-venom peptides with high levels of oral insecticidal activity by directly screening for per os toxicity. Using this approach, we isolated a 34-residue orally active insecticidal peptide (OAIP-1) from venom of the Australian tarantula Selenotypus plumipes. The oral LD50 for OAIP-1 in the agronomically important cotton bollworm Helicoverpa armigera was 104.2±0.6 pmol/g, which is the highest per os activity reported to date for an insecticidal venom peptide. OAIP-1 is equipotent with synthetic pyrethroids and it acts synergistically with neonicotinoid insecticides. The three-dimensional structure of OAIP-1 determined using NMR spectroscopy revealed that the three disulfide bonds form an inhibitor cystine knot motif; this structural motif provides the peptide with a high level of biological stability that probably contributes to its oral activity. OAIP-1 is likely to be synergized by the gut-lytic activity of the Bacillus thuringiensis Cry toxin (Bt) expressed in insect-resistant transgenic crops, and consequently it might be a good candidate for trait stacking with Bt. PMID:24039872

  17. NEUROTOXICITY OF PARATHION-INDUCED ACETYLCHOLINESTERASE INHIBITION IN NEONATAL RATS

    The biochemical and morphological neurotoxic effects of postnatal acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibition were examined in rat pups dosed with parathion, at time points critical to hippocampal neurogenesis and synaptogenesis (i.e., D5-20). ippocampal cytopathology as assessed by l...

  18. Inhibition of acetylcholinesterase activity by essential oil from Citrus paradisi.

    Miyazawa, M; Tougo, H; Ishihara, M

    2001-01-01

    Inhibition of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity by essential oils of Citrus paradisi (grapefruit pink in USA) was studied. Inhibition of AChE was measured by the colorimetric method. Nootkatone and auraptene were isolated from C. paradisi oil and showed 17-24% inhibition of AChE activity at the concentration of 1.62 microg/mL. PMID:11858553

  19. Effects of Sequential Applications of Bassa 50EC (Fenobucarb) and Vitashield 40EC (Chlorpyrifos ethyl) on Acetylcholinesterase Activity in Climbing Perch (Anabas testudineus) Cultured in Rice Fields in the Mekong Delta, Vietnam.

    Tam, Nguyen Thanh; Berg, Håkan; Laureus, Jenny; Cong, Nguyen Van; Tedengren, Michael

    2016-07-01

    This study assesses the effects of sequential applications of the insecticides Bassa 50EC (fenobucarb-F) and Vitashield 40EC (chlorpyrifos ethyl-CPF), sprayed at concentrations used by rice farmers in the Mekong Delta, on the brain acetylcholinesterase (AChE) in climbing perch fingerlings. After spraying the pesticides on the rice fields, the water concentrations of both insecticides decreased below the detection levels within 3 days. The sequential applications caused significant inhibition on the brain AChE activity in the exposed fish. The inhibition by F was quicker, but less prolonged, than for CPF. The inhibition levels caused by the sequential applications were lower than those caused by only CPF and by a mixture of CPF and F. The results indicate that sequential applications of pesticides could have a negative impact on aquatic organisms and fish yields, with implication for the aquatic biodiversity, local people's livelihood and the aquaculture industry in the Mekong Delta. PMID:27075585

  20. Acetylcholinesterase assay for cerebrospinal fluid using bupivacaine to inhibit butyrylcholinesterase

    Anders Jens

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most test systems for acetylcholinesterase activity (E.C.3.1.1.7. are using toxic inhibitors (BW284c51 and iso-OMPA to distinguish the enzyme from butyrylcholinesterase (E.C.3.1.1.8. which occurs simultaneously in the cerebrospinal fluid. Applying Ellman's colorimetric method, we were looking for a non-toxic inhibitor to restrain butyrylcholinesterase activity. Based on results of previous in vitro studies bupivacaine emerged to be a suitable inhibitor. Results Pharmacokinetic investigations with purified cholinesterases have shown maximum inhibition of butyrylcholinesterase activity and minimal interference with acetylcholinesterase activity at bupivacaine final concentrations between 0.1 and 0.5 mmol/l. Based on detailed analysis of pharmacokinetic data we developed three equations representing enzyme inhibition at bupivacaine concentrations of 0.1, 0.2 and 0.5 mmol/l. These equations allow us to calculate the acetylcholinesterase activity in solutions containing both cholinesterases utilizing the extinction differences measured spectrophotometrically in samples with and without bupivacaine. The accuracy of the bupivacaine-inhibition test could be confirmed by investigations on solutions of both purified cholinesterases and on samples of human cerebrospinal fluid. If butyrylcholinesterase activity has to be assessed simultaneously an independent test using butyrylthiocholine iodide as substrate (final concentration 5 mmol/l has to be conducted. Conclusions The bupivacaine-inhibition test is a reliable method using spectrophotometrical techniques to measure acetylcholinesterase activity in cerebrospinal fluid. It avoids the use of toxic inhibitors for differentiation of acetylcholinesterase from butyrylcholinesterase in fluids containing both enzymes. Our investigations suggest that bupivacaine concentrations of 0.1, 0.2 or 0.5 mmol/l can be applied with the same effect using 1 mmol/l acetylthiocholine iodide as substrate.

  1. The risk of insecticides to pollinating insects

    Connolly, Christopher N.

    2013-01-01

    A key new risk to our pollinators has been identified as exposure to neonicotinoid insecticides. These discoveries have refuelled the debate over whether or not the neonicotinoid insecticides should be banned and conflicting evidence is used in this battle. However, the issue is not black or white, but gray. It is not an issue of whether the neonicotinoids are toxic to insects or not. Clearly, all insecticides were designed and optimized for this attribute. The real question is, or at least s...

  2. Prenatal Insecticide Exposure and Children's Cognitive Development

    Gaspar, Fraser William

    2014-01-01

    Although approximately 123 million people may be exposed to high levels of insecticides through the use of indoor residual spraying (IRS) for malaria control, very little data exists on exposure levels and risk to residents. In addition, certain populations may be more susceptible to the unintended health effects of insecticide exposure from IRS including the developing fetus. The aims of this dissertation were as follows: 1) build indoor transport and fate models to estimate insecticide expo...

  3. Behavioral swimming effects and acetylcholinesterase activity changes in Jenynsia multidentata exposed to chlorpyrifos and cypermethrin individually and in mixtures.

    Bonansea, Rocío Inés; Wunderlin, Daniel Alberto; Amé, María Valeria

    2016-07-01

    The pesticides cypermethrin (CYP) and chlorpyrifos (CPF) were found together in water bodies located in agricultural and urban areas. However, the impact to non-target biota from exposure to mixtures has received little attention. In the current study, we evaluated changes in swimming behavior and cholinesterase enzymes activity in Jenynsia multidentata, to investigate the possible effects of these insecticides individually and in mixtures. Moreover, differences between technical and commercial mixtures of the pesticides were evaluated. Females of J. multidentata were exposed over 96-h to CYP (0.04 and 0.4µgL(-1)), CPF (0.4 and 4µgL(-1)), individually and in a technical and commercial mixtures. Swimming behavior was recorded after 24h and 96h of exposure. Also, we measured cholinesterase enzymes activity in brain and muscle after 96h of exposure. Exposure to CYP increased the exploratory activity of J. multidentata in the upper area of the aquarium. Fish exposed to CPF (4µg L(-1)) showed a decrease in swimming activity and an increase in the time spent at the bottom of the aquarium. Interestingly, fish exposed to the technical and commercial mixture of CYP and CPF displayed a different behavior based on the concentration of exposure. Low concentration of pesticides elicited an increase in J. multidentata swimming activity with preference for the upper area of the aquarium, and high concentrations caused decrease in swimming activity with preference for the bottom area of the aquarium. Based on the response of cholinesterase enzymes, acetylcholinesterase in muscle was more sensitive to exposure to CYP, CPF and their mixtures than in brain. A decrease in swimming behavior correlates significantly with the inhibition of acetylcholinesterase activity in muscle of J. multidentata exposed to high concentrations of pesticides. These results draw attention to the need of more studies on the potential ecotoxicological impact of pesticides and its mixtures at

  4. Spiroindolines identify the vesicular acetylcholine transporter as a novel target for insecticide action.

    Ann Sluder

    Full Text Available The efficacy of all major insecticide classes continues to be eroded by the development of resistance mediated, in part, by selection of alleles encoding insecticide insensitive target proteins. The discovery of new insecticide classes acting at novel protein binding sites is therefore important for the continued protection of the food supply from insect predators, and of human and animal health from insect borne disease. Here we describe a novel class of insecticides (Spiroindolines encompassing molecules that combine excellent activity against major agricultural pest species with low mammalian toxicity. We confidently assign the vesicular acetylcholine transporter as the molecular target of Spiroindolines through the combination of molecular genetics in model organisms with a pharmacological approach in insect tissues. The vesicular acetylcholine transporter can now be added to the list of validated insecticide targets in the acetylcholine signalling pathway and we anticipate that this will lead to the discovery of novel molecules useful in sustaining agriculture. In addition to their potential as insecticides and nematocides, Spiroindolines represent the only other class of chemical ligands for the vesicular acetylcholine transporter since those based on the discovery of vesamicol over 40 years ago, and as such, have potential to provide more selective tools for PET imaging in the diagnosis of neurodegenerative disease. They also provide novel biochemical tools for studies of the function of this protein family.

  5. Select small core structure carbamates exhibit high contact toxicity to "carbamate-resistant" strain malaria mosquitoes, Anopheles gambiae (Akron.

    Dawn M Wong

    Full Text Available Acetylcholinesterase (AChE is a proven target for control of the malaria mosquito (Anopheles gambiae. Unfortunately, a single amino acid mutation (G119S in An. gambiae AChE-1 (AgAChE confers resistance to the AChE inhibitors currently approved by the World Health Organization for indoor residual spraying. In this report, we describe several carbamate inhibitors that potently inhibit G119S AgAChE and that are contact-toxic to carbamate-resistant An. gambiae. PCR-RFLP analysis was used to confirm that carbamate-susceptible G3 and carbamate-resistant Akron strains of An. gambiae carry wild-type (WT and G119S AChE, respectively. G119S AgAChE was expressed and purified for the first time, and was shown to have only 3% of the turnover number (k(cat of the WT enzyme. Twelve carbamates were then assayed for inhibition of these enzymes. High resistance ratios (>2,500-fold were observed for carbamates bearing a benzene ring core, consistent with the carbamate-resistant phenotype of the G119S enzyme. Interestingly, resistance ratios for two oxime methylcarbamates, and for five pyrazol-4-yl methylcarbamates were found to be much lower (4- to 65-fold. The toxicities of these carbamates to live G3 and Akron strain An. gambiae were determined. As expected from the enzyme resistance ratios, carbamates bearing a benzene ring core showed low toxicity to Akron strain An. gambiae (LC(50>5,000 μg/mL. However, one oxime methylcarbamate (aldicarb and five pyrazol-4-yl methylcarbamates (4a-e showed good to excellent toxicity to the Akron strain (LC(50 = 32-650 μg/mL. These results suggest that appropriately functionalized "small-core" carbamates could function as a resistance-breaking anticholinesterase insecticides against the malaria mosquito.

  6. Sequence Analysis of Insecticide Action and Detoxification-Related Genes in the Insect Pest Natural Enemy Pardosa pseudoannulata.

    Meng, Xiangkun; Zhang, Yixi; Bao, Haibo; Liu, Zewen

    2015-01-01

    The pond wolf spider Pardosa pseudoannulata, an important natural predatory enemy of rice planthoppers, is found widely distributed in paddy fields. However, data on the genes involved in insecticide action, detoxification, and response are very limited for P. pseudoannulata, which inhibits the development and appropriate use of selective insecticides to control insect pests on rice. We used transcriptome construction from adult spider cephalothoraxes to analyze and manually identify genes enconding metabolic enzymes and target receptors related to insecticide action and detoxification, including 90 cytochrome P450s, 14 glutathione S-transferases (GSTs), 17 acetylcholinesterases (AChEs), 17 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), and 17 gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptors, as well as 12 glutamate-gated chloride channel (GluCl) unigenes. Sequence alignment and phylogenetic analysis revealed the different subclassifications of P450s and GSTs, some important sequence diversities in nAChRs and GABA receptors, polymorphism in AChEs, and high similarities in GluCls. For P450s in P. pseudoannulata, the number of unigenes belonging to the CYP2 clade was much higher than that in CYP3 and CYP4 clades. The results differed from insects in which most P450 genes were in CYP3 and CYP4 clades. For GSTs, most unigenes belonged to the delta and sigma classes, and no epsilon GST class gene was found, which differed from the findings for insects and acarina. Our results will be useful for studies on insecticide action, selectivity, and detoxification in the spider and other related animals, and the sequence differences in target genes between the spider and insects will provide important information for the design of selective insecticides. PMID:25923714

  7. Sequence Analysis of Insecticide Action and Detoxification-Related Genes in the Insect Pest Natural Enemy Pardosa pseudoannulata.

    Xiangkun Meng

    Full Text Available The pond wolf spider Pardosa pseudoannulata, an important natural predatory enemy of rice planthoppers, is found widely distributed in paddy fields. However, data on the genes involved in insecticide action, detoxification, and response are very limited for P. pseudoannulata, which inhibits the development and appropriate use of selective insecticides to control insect pests on rice. We used transcriptome construction from adult spider cephalothoraxes to analyze and manually identify genes enconding metabolic enzymes and target receptors related to insecticide action and detoxification, including 90 cytochrome P450s, 14 glutathione S-transferases (GSTs, 17 acetylcholinesterases (AChEs, 17 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs, and 17 gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA receptors, as well as 12 glutamate-gated chloride channel (GluCl unigenes. Sequence alignment and phylogenetic analysis revealed the different subclassifications of P450s and GSTs, some important sequence diversities in nAChRs and GABA receptors, polymorphism in AChEs, and high similarities in GluCls. For P450s in P. pseudoannulata, the number of unigenes belonging to the CYP2 clade was much higher than that in CYP3 and CYP4 clades. The results differed from insects in which most P450 genes were in CYP3 and CYP4 clades. For GSTs, most unigenes belonged to the delta and sigma classes, and no epsilon GST class gene was found, which differed from the findings for insects and acarina. Our results will be useful for studies on insecticide action, selectivity, and detoxification in the spider and other related animals, and the sequence differences in target genes between the spider and insects will provide important information for the design of selective insecticides.

  8. Insecticide-driven patterns of genetic variation in the dengue vector Aedes aegypti in Martinique Island.

    Sébastien Marcombe

    Full Text Available Effective vector control is currently challenged worldwide by the evolution of resistance to all classes of chemical insecticides in mosquitoes. In Martinique, populations of the dengue vector Aedes aegypti have been intensively treated with temephos and deltamethrin insecticides over the last fifty years, resulting in heterogeneous levels of resistance across the island. Resistance spreading depends on standing genetic variation, selection intensity and gene flow among populations. To determine gene flow intensity, we first investigated neutral patterns of genetic variability in sixteen populations representative of the many environments found in Martinique and experiencing various levels of insecticide pressure, using 6 microsatellites. Allelic richness was lower in populations resistant to deltamethrin, and consanguinity was higher in populations resistant to temephos, consistent with a negative effect of insecticide pressure on neutral genetic diversity. The global genetic differentiation was low, suggesting high gene flow among populations, but significant structure was found, with a pattern of isolation-by-distance at the global scale. Then, we investigated adaptive patterns of divergence in six out of the 16 populations using 319 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs. Five SNP outliers displaying levels of genetic differentiation out of neutral expectations were detected, including the kdr-V1016I mutation in the voltage-gated sodium channel gene. Association tests revealed a total of seven SNPs associated with deltamethrin resistance. Six other SNPs were associated with temephos resistance, including two non-synonymous substitutions in an alkaline phosphatase and in a sulfotransferase respectively. Altogether, both neutral and adaptive patterns of genetic variation in mosquito populations appear to be largely driven by insecticide pressure in Martinique.

  9. Etude des salives de pucerons : un préalable au développement de nouveaux bio-insecticides

    Harmel, N.; Haubruge, E.; Francis, F.

    2010-01-01

    Study of aphid saliva: a prerequisite to new bio-insecticides development. Aphids, major insect pests of forests, cereal, vegetable, fruit and ornamental crops, are controlled mainly by synthetic insecticides. However, due to the adverse effects of these ones on the environment and the development of resistant populations of aphids, it is essential to adopt alternative control. Aphid saliva plays a key role during insect feeding. It contains a wide variety of compounds whose specificity of ac...

  10. Could biorational insecticides be used in the management of aflatoxigenic Aspergillus parasiticus and its insect vectors in stored wheat?

    Khan, Tiyyabah; Shahid, Ahmad Ali; Khan, Hafiz Azhar Ali

    2016-01-01

    Insect pests in stored wheat cause significant losses and play an important role in the dispersal of viable fungal spores of various species including aflatoxin producing Aspergillus parasiticus. The problem of insecticide resistance in stored insects and environmental hazards associated with fumigants and conventional grain protectants underscore the need to explore reduced risk insecticides to control stored insects with the ultimate effect on aflatoxin production. The purpose of this study...

  11. Toxicity of Pyrethroid and Organophosphorous Insecticides against Two Field Collected Strains of the German Cockroach Blattella germanica (Blattaria: Blattellidae)

    Limoee, Mojtaba; Davari, Behroz; Moosa-Kazemi, Seyed Hassan

    2012-01-01

    Background: The German cockroach, Blattella germanica is a major hygienic pest and mechanical vector for pathogenic agents in hospitals and residential areas. The development of insecticide resistance is a serious problem in controlling of this pest. Toxicity of four commonly used insecticides (permethrin, cypermethrin, malathion and chlorpyrifos) against two hospital- collected strains of the German cockroach was investigated. Methods: Topical bioassay methods were carried out for detecting ...

  12. Multi-function oxidases are responsible for the synergistic interactions occurring between repellents and insecticides in mosquitoes

    Duchon Stéphane; Pennetier Cédric; Bonnet Julien; Lapied Bruno; Corbel Vincent

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background With the spread of pyrethroid resistance in mosquitoes, the combination of an insecticide (carbamate or organophosphate) with a repellent (DEET) is considered as a promising alternative strategy for the treatment of mosquito nets and other relevant materials. The efficacy of these mixtures comes from the fact that they reproduce pyrethroid features and that positive interactions occur between insecticides and repellent. To better understand the mechanisms involved and asse...

  13. Stress for invasion success? Temperature stress of preceding generations modifies the response to insecticide stress in an invasive pest insect

    Piiroinen, Saija; Lyytinen, Anne; Lindström, Leena

    2012-01-01

    Adaptation to stressful environments is one important factor influencing species invasion success. Tolerance to one stress may be complicated by exposure to other stressors experienced by the preceding generations. We studied whether parental temperature stress affects tolerance to insecticide in the invasive Colorado potato beetle Leptinotarsa decemlineata. Field-collected pyrethroid-resistant beetles were reared under either stressful (17°C) or favourable (23°C) insecticide-free environment...

  14. Characterization of acetylcholinesterase inhibition and energy allocation in Daphnia magna exposed to carbaryl.

    Jeon, Junho; Kretschmann, Andreas; Escher, Beate I; Hollender, Juliane

    2013-12-01

    The inhibition of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity and energy allocation in the freshwater organism Daphnia magna exposed to carbaryl and potential recovery from the effects was examined. The binding of carbaryl-AChE was characterized through in vitro assays. To evaluate the recovery from inhibition and the alteration in energy budget, in vivo exposure and recovery regime tests were conducted. In comparison to diazoxon, the active metabolite of the insecticide diazinon, the stability of enzyme-carbaryl complex was fifteen times lower and the reactivity toward the active site was two times lower, resulting in approximately 30 times lower overall inhibition rate than for diazoxon. The in vitro reactivation rate constant of the inhibited enzyme and the in vivo recovery rate constant of AChE activity were 1.9 h⁻¹ and 0.12 h⁻¹ for carbaryl, respectively, which are much higher than the corresponding rate constants for diazoxon. The lower AChE inhibition and greater reactivation/recovery rates are in accordance with the lower toxicity of carbaryl compared to diazinon. Carbaryl exposure also altered the profile of the energy reserve: the decrease in lipid and glycogen and the increase in protein content resulted in the reduction of the total energy budget by about 45 mJ/g(ww). This corresponds to 26 percent of the available energy, which might allocate for external stressors. The mechanistic model of AChE inhibition is helpful to get an insight into (eco-)toxicological effects of AChE inhibitors on freshwater crustaceans under environmentally realistic conditions. PMID:24139064

  15. Magnetic Electrochemical Immunoassays with Quantum Dot Labels for Detection of Phosphorylated Acetylcholinesterase in Plasma

    Wang, Hua; Wang, Jun; Timchalk, Charles; Lin, Yuehe

    2008-11-01

    A new magnetic electrochemical immunoassay has been developed as a tool for biomonitoring exposures to organophosphate (OP) compounds, e.g., insecticides and chemical nerve agents, by directly detecting organophosphorylated acetylcholinesterase (OP-AChE). This immunoassay uniquely incorporates highly efficient magnetic separation with ultrasensitive square wave voltammetry (SWV) analysis with quantum dots (QDs) as labels. A pair of antibodies was used to achieve the specific recognition of OP-AChE that was prepared with paraoxon as an OP model agent. Antiphosphoserine polyclonal antibodies were anchored on amorphous magnetic particles preferably chosen to capture OP-AChE from the sample matrixes by binding their phosphoserine moieties that were exposed through unfolding the protein adducts. This was validated by electrochemical examinations and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Furthermore, antihuman AChE monoclonal antibodies were labeled with cadmium-source QDs to selectively recognize the captured OP-AChE, as characterized by transmission electron microscopy. The subsequent electrochemical SWV analysis of the cadmium component released by acid from the coupled QDs was conducted on disposable screen-printed electrodes. Experimental results indicated that the SWV-based immunoassays could yield a linear response over a broad concentration range of 0.3-300 ng/mL OP-AChE in human plasma with a detection limit of 0.15 ng/mL. Such a novel electrochemical immunoassay holds great promise as a simple, selective, sensitive, and field-deployable tool for the effective biomonitoring and diagnosis of potential exposures to nerve agents and pesticides.

  16. Minireview: Mode of action of meta-diamide insecticides.

    Nakao, Toshifumi; Banba, Shinichi

    2015-06-01

    Meta-diamides [3-benzamido-N-(4-(perfluoropropan-2-yl)phenyl)benzamides] are a distinct class of RDL GABA receptor noncompetitive antagonists showing high insecticidal activity against Spodoptera litura. The mode of action of the meta-diamides was demonstrated to be distinct from that of conventional noncompetitive antagonists (NCAs) such as fipronil, picrotoxin, lindane, dieldrin, and α-endosulfan. It was suggested that meta-diamides act at or near G336 in the M3 region of the Drosophila RDL GABA receptor. Although the site of action of the meta-diamides appears to overlap with that of macrocyclic lactones including avermectins and milbemycins, differential effects of mutations on the actions of the meta-diamides and the macrocyclic lactones were observed. Molecular modeling studies revealed that the meta-diamides may bind to an inter-subunit pocket near G336 in the Drosophila RDL GABA receptor better when in the closed state, which is distinct from the NCA-binding site, which is in a channel formed by M2s. In contrast, the macrocyclic lactones were suggested to bind to an inter-subunit pocket near G336 in the Drosophila RDL GABA receptor when in the open state. Furthermore, mechanisms underlying the high selectivity of meta-diamides are discussed. This minireview highlights the unique features of novel meta-diamide insecticides and demonstrates why meta-diamides are anticipated to become prominent insecticides that are effective against pests resistant to cyclodienes and fipronil. PMID:26047110

  17. Effects of immature cashew nut-shell liquid (Anacardium occidentale) against oxidative damage in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and inhibition of acetylcholinesterase activity.

    De Lima, S G; Feitosa, C M; Citó, A M G L; Moita Neto, J M; Lopes, J A D; Leite, A S; Brito, M C; Dantas, S M M; Cavalcante, A A C Melo

    2008-01-01

    The cashew tree (Anacardium occidentale) represents one of the major cheapest sources of non-isoprenoid phenolic lipids, which have a variety of biological properties: they can act as molluscicides, insecticides, fungicides, have anti-termite properties, have medicinal applications, and demonstrate antioxidant activity in vitro. Immature cashew nut-shell liquid (iCNSL) is a unique natural source of unsaturated long-chain phenols. Their use has stimulated much research in order to prepare drug analogues for application in several fields. The objective of the present study was to determine whether iCNSL has antioxidant properties when used in strains of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and to measure the inhibitory activity of acetylcholinesterase. The constituents were identified using thin-layer chromatography, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and (1)H and (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance. The iCNSL contains anacardic acid, cardanol, cardol, and 2-methyl cardol. Immature cashew nut oil contains triacylglycerols, fatty acids, alkyl-substituted phenols, and cholesterol. The main constituents of the free fatty acids are palmitic (C(16:0)) and oleic acid (C(18:1)). iCNSL has excellent protective activities in strains of S. cerevisiae against oxidative damage induced by hydrogen peroxide and inhibits acetylcholinesterase activity. iCNSL may have an important role in protecting DNA against damage induced by reactive oxygen species, as well as hydrogen peroxide, generated by intra- and extracellular mechanisms. PMID:18949700

  18. Insecticide Recommendations for Arkansas. MP 144.

    Jones, Bill F.; Barnes, Gordon

    This publication gives, in chart form, insecticides for use on animals, field crops, fruits, flowers, trees and shrubs, household pests, recreation areas, lawn and turf grass, pecans, stored grain, and vegetables. Included in the charts are the insecticides recommended for each insect, formulation to be used, amount, time to apply, and other…

  19. Insecticidal compounds from Kalanchoe daigremontiana x tubiflora.

    Supratman, U; Fujita, T; Akiyama, K; Hayashi, H

    2001-09-01

    Methyl daigremonate, an insecticidal bufadienolide, was isolated from the leaves of Kalanchoe daigremontianaxtubiflora (Crassulaceae) along with four known bufadienolides. Its structure was established by spectroscopic analysis, and insecticidal activities were assessed against the third instar larvae of silkworm (Bombyx mori). The results suggest that the orthoester and alpha-pyrone moieties played an important role in the activity. PMID:11551556

  20. Poisoning by organophosphorus insecticides and sensory neuropathy

    Moretto, A; M. Lotti

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—Poisoning by organophosphate insecticides causes cholinergic toxicity. Organophosphate induced delayed polyneuropathy (OPIDP) is a sensory-motor distal axonopathy which usually occurs after ingestion of large doses of certain organophosphate insecticides and has so far only been reported in patients with preceding cholinergic toxicity. Surprisingly, it was recently reported by other authors that an exclusively sensory neuropathy developed in eight patients afte...

  1. Biochemical basis of synergism between pathogenic fungus Metarhizium anisopliae and insecticide chlorantraniliprole in Locusta migratoria (Meyen)

    Jia, Miao; Cao, Guangchun; Li, Yibo; Tu, Xiongbing; Wang, Guangjun; Nong, Xiangqun; Whitman, Douglas W.; Zhang, Zehua

    2016-01-01

    We challenged Locusta migratoria (Meyen) grasshoppers with simultaneous doses of both the insecticide chlorantraniliprole and the fungal pathogen, Metarhizium anisopliae. Our results showed synergistic and antagonistic effects on host mortality and enzyme activities. To elucidate the biochemical mechanisms that underlie detoxification and pathogen-immune responses in insects, we monitored the activities of 10 enzymes. After administration of insecticide and fungus, activities of glutathione-S-transferase (GST), general esterases (ESTs) and phenol oxidase (PO) decreased in the insect during the initial time period, whereas those of aryl acylamidase (AA) and chitinase (CHI) increased during the initial period and that of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) increased during a later time period. Activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and peroxidase (POD) decreased at a later time period post treatment. Interestingly, treatment with chlorantraniliprole and M. anisopliae relieved the convulsions that normally accompany M. anisopliae infection. We speculate that locust mortality increased as a result of synergism via a mechanism related to Ca2+ disruption in the host. Our study illuminates the biochemical mechanisms involved in insect immunity to xenobiotics and pathogens as well as the mechanisms by which these factors disrupt host homeostasis and induce death. We expect this knowledge to lead to more effective pest control. PMID:27328936

  2. Osmoregulatory function in ducks following ingestion of the organophosphorus insecticide fenthion

    Rattner, B.A.; Fleming, W.J.; Murray, H.C.

    1983-01-01

    Salt gland function and osmoregulation in aquatic birds drinking hyperosmotic water has been suggested to be impaired by organophosphorus insecticides. To test this hypothesis, adult black ducks (Anas rubripes) were provided various regimens of fresh or salt (1.5% NaCl) water before, during, and after ingestion of mash containing 21 ppm fenthion. Ducks were bled by jugular venipuncture after I, 7. and 12 days of treatment, and were then killed. Brain and salt gland acetylcholinesterase activities were substantially inhibited (44-61% and 14-36%) by fenthion. However, salt gland weight and Na + -K + -ATPase activity, and plasma Na + , CI- , and osmolality, were uniformly elevated in all groups receiving salt water including those ingesting fenthion. In a second study, salt gland Na + -K + -ATPase activity in mallards (A. platyrhynchos) was not affected after in vitro incubation with either fenthion or fenthion oxon at concentrations ranging from 0.04 to 400 ?M, but was reduced in the presence of 40 and 400 ?M DDE (positive control). These findings suggest that environmentally realistic concentrations of organophosphorus insecticides do not markedly affect osmoregulatory function in adult black ducks.

  3. Acupuncture on Gnosia and Acetylcholinesterase in Senile Dementia Patients

    TANG Yong; YU Shu-guang; CHEN Jin; ZHANG Wei

    2003-01-01

    Purpose To observe the effect of acupuncture on gnosia and acetylcholinesterase in patients with senile dementia. Methods Eight patients diagnosed with mild or moderate senile dementia were treated by acupuncture of Sishencong ( Ex-HN 1 ), Shenmen ( HT 7) and Taixi ( KI 3) for I month; gnosia was evaluated by Mini-mental state examination before and after the treatment; plasma acetylcholin esterase activity was measured by flourier before and after the treatment. Results There was a significant difference in gnosia between pre- and post--treatment with acupuncture (P<0.01); there was no significant difference in acetyl- cholinesterase activity between pre- and posttreatment ( P>0.05 ). Conclusion Acupuncture has a certain improving effect on gnosia in senile dementia;one month's acupuncture treatment had little effect on plasma acetyl-cholinesterase activity.

  4. Presence of a soluble form of acetylcholinesterase in human ocular fluids.

    Appleyard, M E; McDonald, B.; Benjamin, L

    1991-01-01

    Samples of ocular fluid obtained from normal persons at necropsy and during eye surgery have been assayed for the presence of acetylcholinesterase. Measurable levels could be detected in all samples examined, but levels of acetylcholinesterase in vitreous humour were consistently higher than those in aqueous humour, indicating a possible retinal origin. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed that the enzyme of ocular fluid had the same mobility as that of acetylcholinesterase from cerebr...

  5. Three-dimensional structures of Drosophila melanogaster acetylcholinesterase and of its complexes with two potent inhibitors.

    Harel, M; Kryger, G.; Rosenberry, T. L.; Mallender, W. D.; Lewis, T.; Fletcher, R. J.; Guss, J.M.; Silman, I.; Sussman, J. L.

    2000-01-01

    We have crystallized Drosophila melanogaster acetylcholinesterase and solved the structure of the native enzyme and of its complexes with two potent reversible inhibitors, 1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-N-(phenylmethyl)-9-acridinamine and 1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-N-(3-iodophenyl-methyl)-9-acridinamine--all three at 2.7 A resolution. The refined structure of D. melanogaster acetylcholinesterase is similar to that of vertebrate acetylcholinesterases, for example, human, mouse, and fish, in its overall fold, char...

  6. A human acetylcholinesterase gene identified by homology to the Ace region of Drosophila.

    Soreq, H.; Zevin-Sonkin, D; Avni, A.; Hall, L. M.; Spierer, P

    1985-01-01

    The Ace locus of the Drosophila genome controls biosynthesis of the neurotransmitter-hydrolyzing enzyme acetylcholinesterase (acetylcholine acetylhydrolase, EC 3.1.1.7). We injected the mRNA species hybridizing with DNA fragments from this region into Xenopus oocytes, in which acetylcholinesterase mRNA is translated into active acetylcholinesterase. A 2.0-kilobase (kb) fragment of DNA from this region selectively hybridizes with Drosophila mRNA capable of inducing the biosynthesis of acetylch...

  7. Immobilization of Acetylcholinesterase on Screen-Printed Electrodes. Application to the Determination of Arsenic(III)

    M. Julia Arcos-Martínez; Olga Domínguez-Renedo; Silvia Sanllorente-Méndez

    2010-01-01

    Enzymatic amperometric procedures for measuring arsenic, based on the inhibitive action of this metal on acetylcholinesterase enzyme activity, have been developed. Screen-printed carbon electrodes (SPCEs) were used with acetylcholinesterase covalently bonded directly to its surface. The amperometric response of acetylcholinesterase was affected by the presence of arsenic ions, which caused a decrease in the current intensity. The experimental optimum working conditions of pH, substrate concen...

  8. Development of translationally active mRNA for larval muscle acetylcholinesterase during ascidian embryogenesis.

    Meedel, T H; Whittaker, J R

    1983-01-01

    Relative quantities of translationally active acetylcholinesterase (acetylcholine acetylhydrolase, EC 3.1.1.7) mRNA present at various developmental stages were compared in embryos of the ascidian Ciona intestinalis. Purified RNA was tested for its translational capacity by microinjection into Xenopus laevis oocytes; the acetylcholinesterase produced was immunoprecipitated with antibody to Ciona acetylcholinesterase and enzyme activity was assayed radiometrically. With this protocol, enzyme s...

  9. Dual Binding Site and Selective Acetylcholinesterase Inhibitors Derived from Integrated Pharmacophore Models and Sequential Virtual Screening

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we have employed in silico methodology combining double pharmacophore based screening, molecular docking, and ADME/T filtering to identify dual binding site acetylcholinesterase inhibitors that can preferentially inhibit acetylcholinesterase and simultaneously inhibit the butyrylcholinesterase also but in the lesser extent than acetylcholinesterase. 3D-pharmacophore models of AChE and BuChE enzyme inhibitors have been developed from xanthostigmine derivatives through HypoGen an...

  10. Acetylcholinesterase assay for cerebrospinal fluid using bupivacaine to inhibit butyrylcholinesterase

    Anders Jens; Pietsch Stefan; Bauer Heike I; Kluge Harald H; Kluge Wolfram H; Venbrocks Rudolf A

    2001-01-01

    Abstract Background Most test systems for acetylcholinesterase activity (E.C.3.1.1.7.) are using toxic inhibitors (BW284c51 and iso-OMPA) to distinguish the enzyme from butyrylcholinesterase (E.C.3.1.1.8.) which occurs simultaneously in the cerebrospinal fluid. Applying Ellman's colorimetric method, we were looking for a non-toxic inhibitor to restrain butyrylcholinesterase activity. Based on results of previous in vitro studies bupivacaine emerged to be a suitable inhibitor. Results Pharmaco...

  11. Acetylcholinesterase Biosensors for Electrochemical Detection of Organophosphorus Compounds: A Review

    Vikas Dhull; Anjum Gahlaut; Neeraj Dilbaghi; Vikas Hooda

    2013-01-01

    The exponentially growing population, with limited resources, has exerted an intense pressure on the agriculture sector. In order to achieve high productivity the use of pesticide has increased up to many folds. These pesticides contain organophosphorus (OP) toxic compounds which interfere with the proper functioning of enzyme acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and finally affect the central nervous system (CNS). So, there is a need for routine, continuous, on spot detection of OP compounds which ar...

  12. Latent acetylcholinesterase in secretory vesicles isolated from adrenal medulla

    Gratzl, Manfred; Krieger-Brauer, H.; Ekerdt, R

    1981-01-01

    A new procedure is described for the preparation of highly purified and stable secretory vesicles from adrenal medulla. Two forms of acetylcholinesterase, a membrane bound form as well as a soluble form, were found within these vesicles. The secretory vesicles, isolated by differential centrifugation, were further purified on a continuous isotonic Percoll™ gradient. In this way, secretory vesicles were separated from mitochondrial, microsomal and cell membrane contamination. The secretory ves...

  13. Geranylphenazinediol, an Acetylcholinesterase Inhibitor Produced by aStreptomycesSpecies

    Ohlendorf, Birgit; Schulz, Dirk; Erhard, Arlette; Nagel, Kerstin; Imhoff, Johannes F.

    2012-01-01

    Geranylphenazinediol (1), a new phenazine natural product, was produced by the Streptomyces sp. strain LB173, which was isolated from a marine sediment sample. The structure was established by analysis of NMR and MS data. 1 inhibited the enzyme acetylcholinesterase in the low micromolar range and showed weak antibacterial activity. In order to get a more detailed picture of the activity profile of 1, its inhibitory potential was compared to that of related structures

  14. The Dynamics of Ligand Barrier Crossing inside the Acetylcholinesterase Gorge

    Bui, Jennifer M.; Henchman, Richard H.; McCammon, J. Andrew

    2003-01-01

    The dynamics of ligand movement through the constricted region of the acetylcholinesterase gorge is important in understanding how the ligand gains access to and is released from the active site of the enzyme. Molecular dynamics simulations of the simple ligand, tetramethylammonium, crossing this bottleneck region are conducted using umbrella potential sampling and activated flux techniques. The low potential of mean force obtained is consistent with the fast reaction rate of acetylcholineste...

  15. Conformational preferences of a 14-residue fibrillogenic peptide from acetylcholinesterase

    Vijayan, Ranjit; Biggin, Philip C

    2010-01-01

    A 14-residue fragment from near the C-terminus of the enzyme acetylcholinesterase (AChE) is believed to have a neurotoxic/neurotrophic effect acting via an unknown pathway. While the peptide is α-helical in the full-length enzyme, the structure and association mechanism of the fragment are unknown. Using multiple molecular dynamics simulations, starting from a tetrameric complex of the association domain of AChE and systematically disassembled subsets that include the peptide fragment, we sho...

  16. Effects of gamma radiation on solutions of acetylcholinesterase

    Dilute solutions of bovine erythrocyte acetylcholinesterase were irradiated by 30, 60, 90, and 120 krad of 60Co gamma rays under air at around 50C. The enzyme activity decreased progressively with radiation dose. Ultraviolet spectra measurements indicated conformational changes in the enzyme with radiation dose. Part of the decrease in the activity of the enzyme after irradiation by 120 krad could be accounted for by the splitting of the enzyme into two pieces of molecular weights 73,000 and 7500

  17. Binding partners for mouse acetylcholinesterase in the central nervous system

    Paraoanu, Laura Elena

    2004-01-01

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) is the enzyme that hydrolyses the neurotransmitter acetylcholine at the cholinergic synapses. Besides this principal role, called the classical function, AChE shows also other non-classical functions related to processes during embryonic development and diseases. The existence of multiple molecular forms, the homology with other neuronal cell adhesion molecules, and the early expression pattern, suggest that AChE may function in cell adhesion, and thus in neurite g...

  18. Functional redundancy of acetylcholinesterase and neuroligin in mammalian neuritogenesis

    Grifman, Mirta; Galyam, Nilly; Seidman, Shlomo; Soreq, Hermona

    1998-01-01

    Accumulated evidence attributes noncatalytic morphogenic activitie(s) to acetylcholinesterase (AChE). Despite sequence homologies, functional overlaps between AChE and catalytically inactive AChE-like cell surface adhesion proteins have been demonstrated only for the Drosophila protein neurotactin. Furthermore, no mechanism had been proposed to enable signal transduction by AChE, an extracellular enzyme. Here, we report impaired neurite outgrowth and loss of neurexin Iα mRNA under antisense s...

  19. Acetylcholinesterase Clustering at the Neuromuscular Junction Involves Perlecan and Dystroglycan

    Peng, H. Benjamin; Xie, Hongbo; Rossi, Susanna G.; Rotundo, Richard L.

    1999-01-01

    Formation of the synaptic basal lamina at vertebrate neuromuscular junction involves the accumulation of numerous specialized extracellular matrix molecules including a specific form of acetylcholinesterase (AChE), the collagenic-tailed form. The mechanisms responsible for its localization at sites of nerve– muscle contact are not well understood. To understand synaptic AChE localization, we synthesized a fluorescent conjugate of fasciculin 2, a snake α-neurotoxin that tightly binds to the ca...

  20. Asymmetric acetylcholinesterase is assembled in the Golgi apparatus.

    Rotundo, R. L.

    1984-01-01

    The synthesis, assembly, and processing of the multiple molecular forms of acetylcholinesterase (AcChoEase; acetylcholine acetylhydrolase, EC 3.1.1.7) in quail muscle cultures was studied by using lectins to distinguish enzyme molecules residing in different subcellular compartments. Special emphasis was given to the assembly of asymmetric AcChoEase molecules because these appear to be the predominant, if not unique, forms of AcChoEase at the vertebrate neuromuscular junction. All cell surfac...

  1. Geranylphenazinediol, an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor produced by a Streptomyces species.

    Ohlendorf, Birgit; Schulz, Dirk; Erhard, Arlette; Nagel, Kerstin; Imhoff, Johannes F

    2012-07-27

    Geranylphenazinediol (1), a new phenazine natural product, was produced by the Streptomyces sp. strain LB173, which was isolated from a marine sediment sample. The structure was established by analysis of NMR and MS data. 1 inhibited the enzyme acetylcholinesterase in the low micromolar range and showed weak antibacterial activity. In order to get a more detailed picture of the activity profile of 1, its inhibitory potential was compared to that of related structures. PMID:22775474

  2. Enzymatic and biochemical characterization of Bungarus sindanus snake venom acetylcholinesterase

    M Ahmed

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study analyses venom from the elapid krait snake Bungarus sindanus, which contains a high level of acetylcholinesterase (AChE activity. The enzyme showed optimum activity at alkaline pH (8.5 and 45ºC. Krait venom AChE was inhibited by substrate. Inhibition was significantly reduced by using a high ionic strength buffer; low ionic strength buffer (10 mM PO4 pH 7.5 inhibited the enzyme by 1. 5mM AcSCh, while high ionic strength buffer (62 mM PO4 pH 7.5 inhibited it by 1 mM AcSCh. Venom acetylcholinesterase was also found to be thermally stable at 45ºC; it only lost 5% of its activity after incubation at 45ºC for 40 minutes. The Michaelis-Menten constant (Km for acetylthiocholine iodide hydrolysis was found to be 0.068 mM. Krait venom acetylcholinesterase was also inhibited by ZnCl2, CdCl2, and HgCl2 in a concentrationdependent manner. Due to the elevated levels of AChE with high catalytic activity and because it is more stable than any other sources, Bungarus sindanus venom is highly valuable for biochemical studies of this enzyme.

  3. Natural factors as potential insecticides

    In order to reduce environmental pollution, it is of great interest to find alternative methods for controlling insect pests. With the progress made in the isolation and identification of peptides and endogenous toxins from insects, the question can be raised whether or not these natural factors are potentially useful as insecticides. The aim of the present study was to test certain toxins and myotropic peptides isolated from insects for their usefulness as insecticides. Over twenty neuropeptides isolated from different insect species have been isolated and identified in the laboratory. To date, tests have been carried out on the influence of four neuropeptides on the food intake of L1 larvae of Mamestra brassicae. Also, the crude haemolymph, as well as some of the purified fractions of the Colorado potato beetle, have been tested. At least one of the neuropeptides and some of the compounds present in the haemolymph and the purified fraction D have a negative influence on the development of L1 larvae of M. brassicae after oral intake. (author). 6 refs, 1 fig

  4. Impacts of Bt crops on non-target organisms and insecticide use patterns

    Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt), a bacterium capable of producing insecticidal proteins is ubiquitous in the environment, and the genes coding for these proteins are now becoming ubiquitous in major crop plants via recombinant DNA technology where they provide host plant resistance to major lepidopteran...

  5. The activity of detoxifying enzymes in the infective juveniles of Heterorhabditis bacteriophora strains: Purification and characterization of two acetylcholinesterases.

    Mohamed, Magda A; Mahdy, El-Sayed M E; Ghazy, Abd-El-Hady M; Ibrahim, Nihal M; El-Mezayen, Hatem A; Ghanem, Manal M E

    2016-02-01

    The infectivity and detoxifying enzyme activities including glutathione-S-transferase (GST), acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and carboxylesterase (CaE) are investigated in the infective juveniles (IJs) of six different strains of Heterorhabditis bacteriophora as a biocontrol agent against insect pests. The specific activities ranged from 10.8-29.8 and 50-220units/mg protein for GST and AChE, respectively; and from 24.7-129 and 22.6-77.3units/mg protein for CaE as estimated by P-nitrophenyl and α-naphthyl acetates, respectively. H. bacteriophora EM2 strain has the highest infectivity and the highest enzymatic activities as well. AChE is the predominant detoxifying enzyme that might imply its major role in the detoxification of insecticide(s). The isoenzyme pattern demonstrated two major slow-moving isoforms in all EPN strains examined. Purification of two AChE isoforms, AChEAII and AChEBI, from H. bacteriophora EM2 strain is performed by ammonium sulfate precipitation, gel filtration on Sephacryl S-200 and chromatography on DEAE-Sepharose. AChEAII and AChEBII have specific activities of 1207 and 1560unit/mg protein, native molecular weights of 180 and 68kDa, and are found in dimeric and monomeric forms, respectively. Both isoforms showed optimum activity at pH8.5 and 35°C. AChEBI exhibited higher thermal stability and higher activation energy than AChEAII. The enzymatic activities of purified AChEs are completely inhibited by Hg(+2) and Ni(+2) and greatly enhanced by Mn(+2). The substrate specificity, the relative efficiency of substrates hydrolysis, substrate inhibition and inhibition by BW284C51, but not by iso-OMPA, clearly indicated that they are true AChEs; their properties are compared with those recorded for insects as target hosts for H. bacteriophora EM2. PMID:26545490

  6. Effects of individual and binary-combined commercial insecticides endosulfan, temephos, malathion and pirimiphos-methyl on biomarker responses in earthworm Eisenia andrei.

    Stepić, Sandra; Hackenberger, Branimir K; Velki, Mirna; Lončarić, Zeljka; Hackenberger, Davorka K

    2013-09-01

    Laboratory tests were conducted in order to investigate the effects of individual and binary-combined commercial insecticides endosulfan, temephos, malathion and pirimiphos-methyl on the earthworm Eisenia andrei. The effects of individual insecticides were determined by measuring the activities of acetylcholinesterase (AChE), catalase (CAT) and glutathione-S-transferase (GST). After exposure to studied insecticides, dose-dependent decrease in AChE activity and dose-dependent increase in CAT activity was recorded. The activity of GST was without consistent dose-response reaction, but generally the investigated insecticides caused the increase in GST activity. In order to determine the effects of binary-combined mixtures, and interactions between the components in the mixture, the relationship between effective concentration of AChE inhibition for mixture and effective concentration of AChE inhibition for each component in the mixture was investigated. The obtained results showed additive effect for mixtures endosulfan+malathion; endosulfan+pirimiphos-methyl; temephos+malathion and temephos+pirimiphos-methyl, synergistic effect for mixture endosulfan+temephos and in the case of mixture malathion+pirimiphos-methyl the antagonistic effect was indicated. PMID:23896224

  7. A field evaluation of frogs as a potential source of secondary organophosphorus insecticide poisoning

    Powell, G.V.N.; DeWeese, L.R.; Lamont, T.G.

    1982-01-01

    Because amphibians are relatively resistant to organophosphorus insecticides and can bioaccumulate residues to high levels, they may be a source of secondary poisoning for vertebrates that feed on them. This hypothesis was tested by determining residues in breeding upland chorus frogs Pseudacris triseriata, that were collected from ponds treated with the organophosphorus insecticide fenthion. Frogs were collected up to 3-days posttreatment in four areas that were treated with fenthion formulated in either diesel oil or water. No residues of fenthion were detected above the 0.01 ppm level of analytical sensitivity. These results indicate that the frogs were not a likely source of secondary poisoning for predatory vertebrates.

  8. Soil Applied Systemic Insecticides for Control of Asian citrus psyllid in Newly Planted Citrus Trees

    Stansly, Phil; Kostyk, Barry

    2014-01-01

    Orchard renewal is a special challenge where HLB is endemic.  Young trees are especially susceptible to the disease and continuously attractive to the psyllid vector due to frequent flushing.  Heavy reliance is placed on systemic insecticides to protect young trees.  However, all presently labeled for citrus are neonicotinoids (IRAC Group 4a) making resistance likely and the long term viability of this strategy questionable.  Rotation partners are needed to forestall selection for resistance....

  9. Acetylcholinesterase activity in the terrestrial snail Xeropicta derbentina transplanted in apple orchards with different pesticide management strategies

    Apple orchards are highly manipulated crops in which large amounts of pesticides are used. Some of these pesticides lack target specificity and can cause adverse effects in non-target organisms. In order to evaluate the environmental risk of these products, the use of transplanted sentinel organisms avoids side-effects from past events and facilitate comparison of multiple sites in a short time. We released specimens of the terrestrial snail Xeropicta derbentina in each 5 of two kinds of apple orchards with either conventional or organic management strategies plus in a single abandoned orchard. After one month, individuals were retrieved in order to measure acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity. Mean values of AChE activity were significantly reduced in all conventional apple orchards compared to the others. Results show that the measurement of biomarkers such as AChE inhibition in transplated X. derbentina could be useful in the environmental risk assessment of post-authorized pesticides. - Snails as sentinel species to evaluate insecticide impacts in apple orchards.

  10. Acetylcholinesterase activity in the terrestrial snail Xeropicta derbentina transplanted in apple orchards with different pesticide management strategies

    Mazzia, Christophe, E-mail: christophe.mazzia@univ-avignon.f [Universite d' Avignon et des Pays de Vaucluse, Laboratoire de Toxicologie Environnementale, UMR 406 UAPV/INRA, ' Abeilles et Environnement' , Domaine St Paul, Site Agroparc, 84914 Avignon Cedex 9 France (France); Capowiez, Yvan [INRA, UR 1115 ' Plante et Systemes Horticoles' , Domaine St Paul, Site Agroparc, 84914 Avignon Cedex 9 France (France); Sanchez-Hernandez, Juan C. [Laboratory of Ecotoxicology, Faculty of Environmental Science, University of Castilla-La Mancha, Avda. Carlos III s/n, 45071 Toledo (Spain); Koehler, Heinz-R. [Animal Physiological Ecology, Institute for Evolution and Ecology, University of Tuebingen, Konrad-Adenauer-Str. 20, D-72072 Tuebingen (Germany); Triebskorn, Rita [Animal Physiological Ecology, Institute for Evolution and Ecology, University of Tuebingen, Konrad-Adenauer-Str. 20, D-72072 Tuebingen (Germany); Steinbeis-Transfer Center for Ecotoxicology and Ecophysiology, Blumenstrasse 13, D-72108 Rottenburg (Germany); Rault, Magali [Universite d' Avignon et des Pays de Vaucluse, Laboratoire de Toxicologie Environnementale, UMR 406 UAPV/INRA, ' Abeilles et Environnement' , Domaine St Paul, Site Agroparc, 84914 Avignon Cedex 9 France (France)

    2011-01-15

    Apple orchards are highly manipulated crops in which large amounts of pesticides are used. Some of these pesticides lack target specificity and can cause adverse effects in non-target organisms. In order to evaluate the environmental risk of these products, the use of transplanted sentinel organisms avoids side-effects from past events and facilitate comparison of multiple sites in a short time. We released specimens of the terrestrial snail Xeropicta derbentina in each 5 of two kinds of apple orchards with either conventional or organic management strategies plus in a single abandoned orchard. After one month, individuals were retrieved in order to measure acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity. Mean values of AChE activity were significantly reduced in all conventional apple orchards compared to the others. Results show that the measurement of biomarkers such as AChE inhibition in transplated X. derbentina could be useful in the environmental risk assessment of post-authorized pesticides. - Snails as sentinel species to evaluate insecticide impacts in apple orchards.

  11. Effects of chlorpyrifos ethyl on acetylcholinesterase activity in climbing perch cultured in rice fields in the Mekong Delta, Vietnam.

    Nguyen, Tam Thanh; Berg, Håkan; Nguyen, Hang Thi Thuy; Nguyen, Cong Van

    2015-07-01

    Climbing perch is commonly harvested in rice fields and associated wetlands in the Mekong Delta. Despite its importance in providing food and income to local households, there is little information how this fish species is affected by the high use of pesticides in rice farming. Organophosphate insecticides, such as chlorpyrifos ethyl, which are highly toxic to aquatic organisms, are commonly used in the Mekong Delta. This study shows that the brain acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity in climbing perch fingerlings cultured in rice fields, was significantly inhibited by a single application of chlorpyrifos ethyl, at doses commonly applied by rice farmers (0.32-0.64 kg/ha). The water concentration of chlorpyrifos ethyl decreased below the detection level within 3 days, but the inhibition of brain AChE activity remained for more than 12 days. In addition, the chlorpyrifos ethyl treatments had a significant impact on the survival and growth rates of climbing perch fingerlings, which were proportional to the exposure levels. The results indicate that the high use of pesticides among rice farmers in the Mekong Delta could have a negative impact on aquatic organisms and fish yields, with implications for the aquatic biodiversity, local people's livelihoods and the aquaculture industry in the Mekong Delta. PMID:25828891

  12. Stress for invasion success? Temperature stress of preceding generations modifies the response to insecticide stress in an invasive pest insect.

    Piiroinen, Saija; Lyytinen, Anne; Lindström, Leena

    2013-02-01

    Adaptation to stressful environments is one important factor influencing species invasion success. Tolerance to one stress may be complicated by exposure to other stressors experienced by the preceding generations. We studied whether parental temperature stress affects tolerance to insecticide in the invasive Colorado potato beetle Leptinotarsa decemlineata. Field-collected pyrethroid-resistant beetles were reared under either stressful (17°C) or favourable (23°C) insecticide-free environments for three generations. Then, larvae were exposed to pyrethroid insecticides in common garden conditions (23°C). Beetles were in general tolerant to stress. The parental temperature stress alone affected beetles positively (increased adult weight) but it impaired their tolerance to insecticide exposure. In contrast, offspring from the favourable temperature regime showed compensatory weight gain in response to insecticide exposure. Our study emphasizes the potential of cross-generational effects modifying species stress tolerance. When resistant pest populations invade benign environments, a re-application of insecticides may enhance their performance via hormetic effects. In turn, opposite effects may arise if parental generations have been exposed to temperature stress. Thus, the outcome of management practices of invasive pest species is difficult to predict unless we also incorporate knowledge of the evolutionary and recent (preceding generations) stress history of the given populations into pest management. PMID:23467574

  13. Characterization of acetylcholinesterase from the brain of the Amazonian tambaqui (Colossoma macropomum) and in vitro effect of organophosphorus and carbamate pesticides.

    Assis, Caio Rodrigo Dias; Castro, Patrícia Fernandes; Amaral, Ian Porto Gurgel; Carvalho, Elba Verônica Matoso Maciel; Carvalho, Luiz Bezerra; Bezerra, Ranilson Souza

    2010-10-01

    In the present study, acetylcholinesterase (AChE) from the brain of the Amazonian fish tambaqui (Colossoma macropomum) was partially characterized and its activity was assayed in the presence of five organophosphates (dichlorvos, diazinon, chlorpyrifos, and tetraethyl pyrophosphate [TEPP]) and two carbamates (carbaryl and carbofuran) insecticides. Optimal pH and temperature were 7.0 to 8.0 and 45°C, respectively. The enzyme retained approximately 70% of activity after incubation at 50°C for 30 min. The insecticide concentration capable of inhibiting half of the enzyme activity (IC50) for dichlorvos, chlorpyrifos, and TEPP were calculated as 0.04 µmol/L, 7.6 µmol/L, and 3.7 µmol/L, respectively. Diazinon and temephos did not inhibit the enzyme. The IC50 values for carbaryl and carbofuran were estimated as 33.8 µmol/L and 0.92 µmol/L, respectively. These results suggest that AChE from the juvenile C. macropomum brain could be used as an alternative biocomponent of organophosphorus and carbamate biosensors in routine pesticide screening in the environment. PMID:20872688

  14. Complex genome evolution in Anopheles coluzzii associated with increased insecticide usage in Mali.

    Main, Bradley J; Lee, Yoosook; Collier, Travis C; Norris, Laura C; Brisco, Katherine; Fofana, Abdrahamane; Cornel, Anthony J; Lanzaro, Gregory C

    2015-10-01

    In certain cases, a species may have access to important genetic variation present in a related species via adaptive introgression. These novel alleles may interact with their new genetic background, resulting in unexpected phenotypes. In this study, we describe a selective sweep on standing variation on the X chromosome in the mosquito Anopheles coluzzii, a principal malaria vector in West Africa. This event may have been influenced by the recent adaptive introgression of the insecticide resistance gene known as kdr from the sister species Anopheles gambiae. Individuals carrying both kdr and a nearly fixed X-linked haplotype, encompassing at least four genes including the P450 gene CYP9K1 and the cuticular protein CPR125, have rapidly increased in relative frequency. In parallel, a reproductively isolated insecticide-susceptible A. gambiae population (Bamako form) has been driven to local extinction, likely due to strong selection from increased insecticide-treated bed net usage. PMID:26359110

  15. History and Current Status of Development and Use of Viral Insecticides in China

    Xiulian Sun

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of insect viruses as biological control agents started in the early 1960s in China. To date, more than 32 viruses have been used to control insect pests in agriculture, forestry, pastures, and domestic gardens in China. In 2014, 57 products from 11 viruses were authorized as commercial viral insecticides by the Ministry of Agriculture of China. Approximately 1600 tons of viral insecticidal formulations have been produced annually in recent years, accounting for about 0.2% of the total insecticide output of China. The development and use of Helicoverpa armigera nucleopolyhedrovirus, Mamestra brassicae nucleopolyhedrovirus, Spodoptera litura nucleopolyhedrovirus, and Periplaneta fuliginosa densovirus are discussed as case studies. Additionally, some baculoviruses have been genetically modified to improve their killing rate, infectivity, and ultraviolet resistance. In this context, the biosafety assessment of a genetically modified Helicoverpa armigera nucleopolyhedrovirus is discussed.

  16. Susceptibility of Choristoneura rosaceana (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) to two new reduced-risk insecticides.

    Sial, Ashfaq A; Brunner, Jay F; Doerr, Michael D

    2010-02-01

    The response of field-collected populations of the obliquebanded leafroller, Choristoneura rosaceana (Harris) (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae), to chlorantraniliprole, spinetoram, spinosad, and azinphosmethyl was assessed using a diet incorporation bioassay. Populations of obliquebanded leafroller were collected from nine orchards in Chelan, Douglas, Grant, and Okanogan counties of Washington. The neonates of the F1 or F2 generation were used in all assays. The parameters of probit regression lines were estimated and lethal concentration ratios were calculated for all populations compared with a susceptible laboratory population. Significant variation was detected in response to all four insecticides including chlorantraniliprole and spinetoram, which had never been used in the field, lethal concentration ratios were 3.9-39.7 for azinphosmethyl, 0.5-3.6 for spinosad, 1.2-5.3 for chlorantraniliprole, and 0.5-4.1 for spinetoram. Correlation analysis indicated possibility of cross-resistance between spinosad and spinetoram, which are both members of spinosyn class. The occurrence of low but significant levels of resistance against chlorantraniliprole and spinetoram in field-collected populations of C. rosaceana before their first field application indicates that the risk of resistance evolution against these two new reduced-risk insecticides exists. However, it is likely that these low levels of resistance can be managed if the insecticides are used judiciously in conjunction with sound resistance management programs. Implications of these results for developing and implementing resistance management strategies are discussed. PMID:20214379

  17. Induction of plasma acetylcholinesterase activity in mice challenged with organophosphorus poisons

    The restoration of plasma acetylcholinesterase activity in mice following inhibition by organophosphorus pesticides and nerve agents has been attributed to synthesis of new enzyme. It is generally assumed that activity levels return to normal, are stable and do not exceed the normal level. We have observed over the past 10 years that recovery of acetylcholinesterase activity levels in mice treated with organophosphorus agents (OP) exceeds pretreatment levels and remains elevated for up to 2 months. The most dramatic case was in mice treated with tri-cresyl phosphate and tri-ortho-cresyl phosphate, where plasma acetylcholinesterase activity rebounded to a level 250% higher than the pretreatment activity. The present report summarizes our observations on plasma acetylcholinesterase activity in mice treated with chlorpyrifos, chlorpyrifos oxon, diazinon, tri-ortho-cresyl phosphate, tri-cresyl phosphate, tabun thiocholine, parathion, dichlorvos, and diisopropylfluorophosphate. We have developed a hypothesis to explain the excess acetylcholinesterase activity, based on published observations. We hypothesize that acetylcholinesterase activity is induced when cells undergo apoptosis and that consequently there is a rise in the level of plasma acetylcholinesterase. - Highlights: → Acetylcholinesterase activity is induced by organophosphorus agents. → AChE induction is related to apoptosis. → Induction of AChE activity by OP is independent of BChE.

  18. Surface display and bioactivity of Bombyx mori acetylcholinesterase on Pichia pastoris

    To construct the Pichia pastoris (P. pastoris) cell surface display system of Bombyx mori acetylcholinesterase (BmAChE), the gene for the anchor protein (AGa1) was obtained from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and was fused with the modified Bombyx mori acetylcholinesterase gene (bmace) and transformed int...

  19. Pest insect olfaction in an insecticide-contaminated environment : info-disruption or hormesis effect

    Hélène eTricoire-Leignel

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Most animals, including pest insects, live in an odour world and depend strongly on chemical stimuli to get information on their biotic and abiotic environment. Although integrated pest management strategies including the use of insect growth regulators (IGRs are increasingly developed, most insect pest treatments rely on neurotoxic chemicals. These molecules are known to disrupt synaptic transmission, affecting therefore sensory systems. The wide-spread use of neurotoxic insecticides and the growing use of IGRs result in residual accumulation of low concentrations in the environment. These insecticide residues could act as an info-disruptor by modifying the chemical communication system, and therefore decrease chances of reproduction in target insects. However, residues can also induce a non-expected hormesis effect by enhancing reproduction abilities. Low insecticide doses might thus induce adaptive processes in the olfactory pathway of target insects, favouring the development of resistance. The effect of sublethal doses of insecticides has mainly been studied in beneficial insects such as honeybees. We review here what is known on the effects of sublethal doses of insecticides on the olfactory system of insect pests.

  20. Impact of insecticides on parasitoids of the leafminer, Liriomyza trifolii, in pepper in south Texas.

    Hernández, Ricardo; Harris, Marvin; Liu, Tong-Xian

    2011-01-01

    Liriomyza leafminers (Diptera: Agromyzidae) are cosmopolitan, polyphagous pests of horticultural plants and many are resistant to insecticides. Producers in South Texas rely on insecticides as the primary management tool for leafminers, and several compounds are available. The objective of this study is to address the efficacy of these compounds for controlling Liriomyza while minimizing their effects against natural enemies. Research plots were established at Texas AgriLife research center at Weslaco, Texas in fall 2007 and spring 2008 seasons, and peppers were used as a model crop. Plots were sprayed with novaluron, abamectin, spinetoram, lambda-cyhalothrin and water as treatments according to leafminer infestation; insecticide efficacy was monitored by collecting leaves and infested foliage. Plant phenology was also monitored. Novaluron was the most effective insecticide and lambda-cyhalothrin showed resurgence in leafminer density in fall 2007 and no reduction in spring 2008. Other compounds varied in efficacy. Novaluron showed the least number of parasitoids per leafminer larva and the lowest parasitoid diversity index among treatments followed by spinetoram. Liriomyza trifolii (Burgess) was the sole leafminer species on peppers, and 19 parasitoid species were found associated with this leafminer. Application of these insecticides for management of leafminers with conservation of natural enemies is discussed. PMID:21864155

  1. Pest insect olfaction in an insecticide-contaminated environment: info-disruption or hormesis effect.

    Tricoire-Leignel, Hélène; Thany, Steeve Hervé; Gadenne, Christophe; Anton, Sylvia

    2012-01-01

    Most animals, including pest insects, live in an "odor world" and depend strongly on chemical stimuli to get information on their biotic and abiotic environment. Although integrated pest management strategies including the use of insect growth regulators (IGRs) are increasingly developed, most insect pest treatments rely on neurotoxic chemicals. These molecules are known to disrupt synaptic transmission, affecting therefore sensory systems. The wide-spread use of neurotoxic insecticides and the growing use of IGRs result in residual accumulation of low concentrations in the environment. These insecticide residues could act as an "info-disruptor" by modifying the chemical communication system, and therefore decrease chances of reproduction in target insects. However, residues can also induce a non-expected hormesis effect by enhancing reproduction abilities. Low insecticide doses might thus induce adaptive processes in the olfactory pathway of target insects, favoring the development of resistance. The effect of sublethal doses of insecticides has mainly been studied in beneficial insects such as honeybees. We review here what is known on the effects of sublethal doses of insecticides on the olfactory system of insect pests. PMID:22457653

  2. Inhibition of aflatoxin production by selected insecticides.

    Draughon, F A; Ayres, J. C.

    1981-01-01

    The insecticide naled completed inhibition production of aflatoxins B1, B2, G1, and G2 by and growth of Aspergillus parasiticus at a 100-ppm (100 microgram/ml) concentration. The insecticides dichlorvos, Landrin, pyrethrum, Sevin, malathion, and Diazinon significantly (P = 0.05) inhibited production of aflatoxins at a 100-ppm concentration. However, at a concentration of 10 ppm, significant inhibition in production of aflatoxins was found only with naled, dichlorvos, Sevin, Landrin, and pyret...

  3. High Efficiency Acetylcholinesterase Immobilization on DNA Aptamer Modified Surfaces

    Orada Chumphukam; Thao T. Le; Cass, Anthony E. G.

    2014-01-01

    We report here the in vitro selection of DNA aptamers for electric eel acetylcholinesterase (AChE). One selected aptamer sequence (R15/19) has a high affinity towards the enzyme (Kd = 157 ± 42 pM). Characterization of the aptamer showed its binding is not affected by low ionic strength (~20 mM), however significant reduction in affinity occurred at high ionic strength (~1.2 M). In addition, this aptamer does not inhibit the catalytic activity of AChE that we exploit through immobilization of ...

  4. Acetylcholinesterase Modulates Presenilin-1 Levels and γ-Secretase Activity

    Campanari, María-Letizia; García Ayllón, María Salud; Belbin, Olivia; Galcerán, Joan; Lleó, Alberto; Sáez-Valero, Javier

    2014-01-01

    The cholinergic enzyme acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and the catalytic component of the ¿-secretase complex, presenilin-1 (PS1), are known to interact. In this study, we investigate the consequences of AChE-PS1 interactions, particularly the influence of AChE in PS1 levels and ¿-secretase activity. PS1 is able to co-immunoprecipitate all AChE variants (AChE-R and AChE-T) and molecular forms (tetramers and light subunits) present in the human brain. Overexpression of AChE-R or AChE-T, or their r...

  5. Assembly and regulation of acetylcholinesterase at the vertebrate neuromuscular junction

    Rotundo, R. L.; Ruiz, C.A.; Marrero, E.; Kimbell, L. M.; Rossi, S.G.; Rosenberry, T.; Darr, A; Tsoulfas, P.

    2008-01-01

    The collagen-tailed form of acetylcholinesterase (ColQ-AChE) is the major if not unique form of the enzyme associated with the neuromuscular junction (NMJ). This enzyme form consists of catalytic and non-catalytic subunits encoded by separate genes, assembled as three enzymatic tetramers attached to the three-stranded collagen-like tail (ColQ). This synaptic form of the enzyme is tightly attached to the basal lamina associated with the glycosaminoglycan perlecan. Fasciculin-2 is a snake toxin...

  6. Production of the Acetylcholinesterase Inhibitor from Yarrowia lipolytica S-3

    Lee, Dae-Hyung; Lee, Ji-Su; Yi, Sung-Hun; Lee, Jong-Soo

    2008-01-01

    The acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitor of Yarrowia lipolytica S-3 was maximally produced when it was incubated at 30℃ for 36 h in an optimal medium containing 1% yeast extract, 2% peptone and 2% glucose, with an initial pH 6.0. The final AChE inhibitory activity under these conditions was an IC50 value of 64 mg/ml. After partial purification of the AChE inhibitor by means of systematic solvent extraction, the final IC50 value of the partially purified AChE inhibitor was 0.75 mg/ml. We prep...

  7. Anti-Acetylcholinesterase Alkaloids from Annona glabra Leaf.

    Lee, Shoei-Sheng; Wu, Dong-Yi; Tsai, Sheng-Fa; Chen, Chien-Kuang

    2015-06-01

    Bioassay guided fractionation and separation of the EtOH extract of Annona glabra leaf against acetylcholinesterse led to the characterization of 15 alkaloids. Among them, (-)-actinodaphnine (2) and (-)-(6aS,7R)-7-hydroxyactinodaphnine (9) are new aporphines, although (+)-2 and (±)-2 have been found in several plants. Their structures were established by spectroscopic analysis. (-)-Anolobine (5) and (-)-roemeroline (8) showed moderate inhibitory activity against eel acetylcholinesterase with IC50 values of 22.4 and 26.3 μM, respectively. PMID:26197510

  8. ACETYLCHOLINESTERASE LEVELS IN FARMERS EXPOSED TO PESTICIDES IN MALAYSIA

    Ismarulyusda Ishak; Syarif Husin Lubis; Zariyantey Abd Hamid; Nihayah Mohammad; Hidayatulfathi Othman; Ahmad Rohi Ghazali; Muhammad Faiz Mohd Ismail; Shobna Sasitharan

    2015-01-01

    Agriculture is an important component of the Malaysian economy. Pesticides are widely used by farmers to increase crop production. Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) is known to play an important role in the degradation of acetylcholine (ACh) at the neuromuscular junction of the nervous system. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of pesticide exposure on serum levels of AChE of farmers. A cross-sectional study was conducted. A total of 95 farmers from Kelantan (n = 49) and Selangor...

  9. Imaging and acetylcholinesterase inhibitor response in dementia with Lewy bodies.

    Graff-Radford, Jonathan; Boeve, Bradley F; Pedraza, Otto; Ferman, Tanis J; Przybelski, Scott; Lesnick, Timothy G; Vemuri, Prashanthi; Senjem, Matthew L; Smith, Glenn E; Knopman, David S; Lowe, Val; Jack, Clifford R; Petersen, Ronald C; Kantarci, Kejal

    2012-08-01

    Acetylcholinesterase inhibitors are commonly used to treat patients with dementia with Lewy bodies. Hippocampal atrophy on magnetic resonance imaging and amyloid-β load on positron emission tomography are associated with the Alzheimer's disease-related pathology in patients with dementia with Lewy bodies. To date, few studies have investigated imaging markers that predict treatment response in patients with dementia with Lewy bodies. Our objective was to determine whether imaging markers of Alzheimer's disease-related pathology such as hippocampal volume, brain amyloid-β load on (11)C Pittsburgh compound B positron emission tomography predict treatment response to acetylcholinesterase inhibitors in patients with dementia with Lewy bodies. We performed a retrospective analysis on consecutive treatment-naive patients with dementia with Lewy bodies (n = 54) from the Mayo Clinic Alzheimer's Disease Research Centre who subsequently received acetylcholinesterase inhibitors and underwent magnetic resonance imaging with hippocampal volumetry. Baseline and follow-up assessments were obtained with the Mattis Dementia Rating Scale. Subjects were divided into three groups (reliable improvement, stable or reliable decline) using Dementia Rating Scale reliable change indices determined previously. Associations between hippocampal volumes and treatment response were tested with analysis of covariance adjusting for baseline Dementia Rating Scale, age, gender, magnetic resonance field strength and Dementia Rating Scale interval. Seven subjects underwent (11)C Pittsburgh compound B imaging within 12 weeks of magnetic resonance imaging. Global cortical (11)C Pittsburgh compound B retention (scaled to cerebellar retention) was calculated in these patients. Using a conservative psychometric method of assessing treatment response, there were 12 patients with reliable decline, 29 stable cases and 13 patients with reliable improvement. The improvers had significantly larger

  10. Insecticidal sugar baits for adult biting midges.

    Snyder, D; Cernicchiaro, N; Allan, S A; Cohnstaedt, L W

    2016-06-01

    The mixing of an insecticide with sugar solution creates an oral toxin or insecticidal sugar bait (ISB) useful for reducing adult insect populations. The ability of ISBs to kill the biting midge Culicoides sonorensis Wirth and Jones (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae), a vector of bluetongue virus, epizootic hemorrhagic disease and vesicular stomatitis viruses, was tested. The commercial insecticide formulations (percentage active ingredient) tested included bifenthrin, cyfluthrin, deltamethrin, permethrin, dinotefuran, imidacloprid, thiamethoxam and spinosad. Mortality rates were determined for various concentrations of commercial formulations (0.01, 0.05, 0.1, 1, 2 and 3%) and observed at 1, 4, 10 and 24 h post-exposure to the ISB. In the first set of assays, laboratory-reared midges were fed sugar ad libitum and then exposed to insecticide-treated sugar solutions to measure mortality. The second assay assessed competitive feeding: midges were provided with a control sugar solution (10% sucrose) in one vial, and a sugar and insecticide solution in another. Pyrethroid treatments resulted in the greatest mortality in the first hour at the lowest concentrations and spinosad consumption resulted in the least mortality. Biting midges were not deterred from feeding on the 1% ISB solutions despite the presence of an insecticide-free alternative source of sugar. PMID:26789534

  11. A study on oxidative stress and antioxidant status of agricultural workers exposed to organophosphorus insecticides during spraying

    Rastogi S

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress status and Acetylcholinesterase (AChE activity were studied in blood samples obtained from 61 agricultural workers engaged in spraying organophosphorus (OP insecticides in the mango plantation, with a minimum work history of one year, in the age range of 12-55 years. Controls were age-matched, unexposed workers, who never had any exposure to OP pesticides. They were evaluated for oxidative stress markers MDA (end product of lipid peroxidation, reduced glutathione (GSH, and Acetylcholinesterase (AChE and butyrylcholinesterase (BChE levels in blood. The results showed a marked inhibition of the AChE and BChE activities in the sprayers as compared to the controls. The malondialdehyde(MDA, the last product of lipid peroxidation was found to be increased significantly in sprayers(p< 0.05, while depletion in the concentration of antioxidant glutathione(GSH was also observed in the sprayers but the difference was statistically not significant. It was concluded on the basis of biochemical analysis that pesticides sprayers are exposed to more oxidative stress as evidenced by the changes in antioxidant status. The measurement of the AChE and BChE activities in agricultural workers who spray OPs could be a good biomonitoring factor and is recommended to be performed on a regular basis.

  12. Acetylcholinesterase inhibitory effects of some plants from Rosaceae

    S. Esmaeili

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: Alzheimer's disease (AD is an age dependent disorder. AD is associated with decrease of brain acetylcholine level. Nowadays, one of the methods for progression inhibition of AD is using acetylcholinesterase inhibitors. Rosaceae is a large plant family. Different biological effects of some species of this family have been reported. The aim of the present study was to assess the acetylcholinesterase inhibitory (AChEI activity of the selected plants belonging to Rosaceae family. Methods: AChEI activity of six species from Rosaceae including Cotoneaster nummularia, Cerasus microcarpa, Amygdalus scoparia, Agrimonia eupatoria, Rosa canina and Rosa damascena were evaluated based on Ellman’s method in concentration of 300 µg/mL using total extracts and methanol fractions which were obtained by maceration. Results: The results showed that the total extract and methanol fraction of the aerial parts of A. eupatoria demonstrated significant AChEI activity with 46.5% and 56.2% inhibition of the enzyme, respectively. Conclusion: According to the results of the AChEI activity of the methanol fraction of A. eupatoria, it seems that the polar components of the species such as flavonoids may be responsible for its effectiveness.

  13. Antioxidant Activity and Acetylcholinesterase Inhibition of Grape Skin Anthocyanin (GSA

    Mehnaz Pervin

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available We aimed to investigate the antioxidant and acetylcholinesterase inhibitory activities of the anthocyanin rich extract of grape skin. Grape skin anthocyanin (GSA neutralized free radicals in different test systems, such as 2,-2'-azinobis-(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid (ABTS and 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH assays, to form complexes with Fe2+ preventing 2,2'-azobis(2-amidinopropane dihydrochloride (AAPH-induced erythrocyte hemolysis and oxidative DNA damage. Moreover, GSA decreased reactive oxygen species (ROS generation in isolated mitochondria thus inhibiting 2',-7'-dichlorofluorescin (DCFH oxidation. In an in vivo study, female BALB/c mice were administered GSA, at 12.5, 25, and 50 mg per kg per day orally for 30 consecutive days. Herein, we demonstrate that GSA administration significantly elevated the level of antioxidant enzymes in mice sera, livers, and brains. Furthermore, GSA inhibited acetylcholinesterase (AChE in the in vitro assay with an IC50 value of 363.61 µg/mL. Therefore, GSA could be an excellent source of antioxidants and its inhibition of cholinesterase is of interest with regard to neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease.

  14. Pyrethroid insecticides in municipal wastewater.

    Weston, Donald P; Ramil, Heather L; Lydy, Michael J

    2013-11-01

    Pyrethroids are widely used insecticides, but minimal information has been published on their presence in municipal wastewater in the United States. Pyrethroids in wastewater from the Sacramento, California, USA, area consisted of permethrin, bifenthrin, cypermethrin, and cyhalothrin, with a combined concentration of 200 ng/L to 500 ng/L. Sampling within the wastewater collection system leading to the treatment plant suggested pyrethroids did not originate primarily from urban runoff, but could be from any of several drain disposal practices. Wastewater from residential areas was similar in pyrethroid composition and concentration to that from the larger metropolitan area as a whole. Secondary treatment removed approximately 90% of pyrethroids, but those remaining exceeded concentrations acutely toxic to sensitive species. Toxicity to the amphipod, Hyalella azteca, was consistently evident in the final effluent. The large river into which this particular plant discharged provided sufficient dilution such that pyrethroids were undetected in the river, and there was only slight toxicity of unknown cause in 1 river sample, but effects in receiving waters elsewhere will be site-specific. PMID:23893650

  15. Laboratory Evaluation of Toxicity of Insecticide Formulations from Different Classes against American Cockroach (Dictyoptera: Blattidae.

    Ruhma Syed

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The present study was designed to investigate the insecticidal efficacy of four different classes of insecticides: pyrethroids, organophosphates, phenyl-pyrazoles and neo-nicotenoids. One representative chemical from each class was selected to compare the toxicity: deltamethrin from pyrethroids, Dichlorovinyl Dimethyl Phosphate (DDVP from organophosphates, fipronil from phenyl-pyrazoles and imidacloprid from neo-nicotenoids. The objective of this study was to determine which of these insecticides were most effective against American cockroach.These insecticides were tested for their LC50 values against Periplaneta americana under topical bioassay method, using different concentrations for each chemical.Fipronil 2.5% EC was highly effective at all concentrations applied, while DDVP 50% EC was least toxic amongst all. One way analysis of variance confirmed significant differences between mortality of P. americana and different concentrations applied (P< 0.05.Locality differentiation is an important factor in determining the range of resistance between various localities, as all three localities behaved differently in terms of their levels of resistance.

  16. Studies on resistance mechanism of Bombyx mori against Bacillus thuringiensis insecticidal Cry1Ac toxin-Role of Cry1Ac binding proteins localizing on peritrophic and epithelial cell membranes of midgut-

    Shitomi, Yasuyuki; 蔀, 泰幸

    2006-01-01

    Bombyx mori, hybrid Shunrei x Shogetsu, is susceptible to Cry1Aa and insensitive to Cry1Ac. Toxicity of Cry toxin can be correlated with the presence of a specific receptor in midgut epithelial cell membrane in insect. In surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and ligand blot analysis, however, many kinds of brush border membrane vesicle (BBMV) proteins were shown to bind to Cry1Ac with almost equal intensity in both resistance and susceptible insects. This suggests that majority of the bindings bet...

  17. Modeling global distribution of agricultural insecticides in surface waters

    Agricultural insecticides constitute a major driver of animal biodiversity loss in freshwater ecosystems. However, the global extent of their effects and the spatial extent of exposure remain largely unknown. We applied a spatially explicit model to estimate the potential for agricultural insecticide runoff into streams. Water bodies within 40% of the global land surface were at risk of insecticide runoff. We separated the influence of natural factors and variables under human control determining insecticide runoff. In the northern hemisphere, insecticide runoff presented a latitudinal gradient mainly driven by insecticide application rate; in the southern hemisphere, a combination of daily rainfall intensity, terrain slope, agricultural intensity and insecticide application rate determined the process. The model predicted the upper limit of observed insecticide exposure measured in water bodies (n = 82) in five different countries reasonably well. The study provides a global map of hotspots for insecticide contamination guiding future freshwater management and conservation efforts. - Highlights: • First global map on insecticide runoff through modelling. • Model predicts upper limit of insecticide exposure when compared to field data. • Water bodies in 40% of global land surface may be at risk of adverse effects. • Insecticide application rate, terrain slope and rainfall main drivers of exposure. - We provide the first global map on insecticide runoff to surface water predicting that water bodies in 40% of global land surface may be at risk of adverse effects

  18. Challenges in estimating insecticide selection pressures from mosquito field data.

    Susana Barbosa

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Insecticide resistance has the potential to compromise the enormous effort put into the control of dengue and malaria vector populations. It is therefore important to quantify the amount of selection acting on resistance alleles, their contributions to fitness in heterozygotes (dominance and their initial frequencies, as a means to predict the rate of spread of resistance in natural populations. We investigate practical problems of obtaining such estimates, with particular emphasis on Mexican populations of the dengue vector Aedes aegypti. Selection and dominance coefficients can be estimated by fitting genetic models to field data using maximum likelihood (ML methodology. This methodology, although widely used, makes many assumptions so we investigated how well such models perform when data are sparse or when spatial and temporal heterogeneity occur. As expected, ML methodologies reliably estimated selection and dominance coefficients under idealised conditions but it was difficult to recover the true values when datasets were sparse during the time that resistance alleles increased in frequency, or when spatial and temporal heterogeneity occurred. We analysed published data on pyrethroid resistance in Mexico that consists of the frequency of a Ile1,016 mutation. The estimates for selection coefficient and initial allele frequency on the field dataset were in the expected range, dominance coefficient points to incomplete dominance as observed in the laboratory, although these estimates are accompanied by strong caveats about possible impact of spatial and temporal heterogeneity in selection.

  19. Insecticidal suppression of Asian citrus psyllid Diaphorina citri (Hemiptera: Liviidae vector of huanglongbing pathogens.

    Jawwad A Qureshi

    Full Text Available Diaphorina citri vectors pathogens that cause 'huanglongbing' or citrus greening disease which poses a serious threat to citrus production worldwide. Vector suppression is critical to reduce disease spread. Efficacy is a main concern when choosing an insecticide. Insecticidal treatments of 49 products or 44 active ingredients (a.i labeled or experimental were field tested between 2005-2013 as foliar sprays (250 treatments, 39 a.i or soil applications (47 treatments, 9 a.i to control D. citri in citrus. A combined effect of nymphal and adult suppression in response to sprays of 23 insecticides representing 9 modes of action (MoA groups and 3 unknown MoA provided more than 90% reduction of adult D. citri over 24-68 days. Observable effects on nymphs were generally of shorter duration due to rapid maturation of flush. However, reduction of 76-100% nymphs or adults over 99-296 days was seen on young trees receiving drenches of the neonicotinoids imidacloprid, thiamethoxam or clothianidin (MoA 4A and a novel anthranilic diamide, cyantraniliprole (MoA 28. Effective products identified for foliar sprays to control D. citri provide sufficient MoA groups for rotation to delay evolution of insecticide resistance by D. citri and other pests. However, cyantraniliprole is now the only available alternative for rotation with neonicotinoids in soil application to young trees. Sprays of up to eight of the most effective insecticides could be rotated over a year without repetition of any MoA and little or no recourse to neonicotinoids or cyantraniliprole, so important for protection of young trees. Other considerations effecting decisions of what and when to spray include prevalence of huanglongbing, pest pressure, pre-harvest intervals, overall budget, equipment availability, and conservation of beneficial arthropods. Examples of spray programs utilizing broad-spectrum and relatively selective insecticides are provided to improve vector management and may vary

  20. Neurobehavioral toxicology of pyrethroid insecticides

    Pyrethroid insecticides are classified as either Type I or Type II based upon in vivo toxic signs, and neurophysiological and biochemical data. Both axonal sodium channels and the γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor complex have been proposed as the major site of action of the Type II pyrethroids. This investigation characterized the behavior and biochemical effects of low dosages of pyrethroids in rats. Type I and II pyrethroids were tested for effects on figure-eight maze activity and the acoustic startle response (ASR). All compounds decreased figure-eight maze activity. Interactions of Type I and II pyrethroids with the three major binding sites on the GABA complex were determined in vivo. Radioligand binding experiments assessed in vitro interactions of pyrethroids with the three major GABA-complex binding sites. None of the pyrethroids competed for [3H]-muscimol or [3H]-flunitrazepam binding. Only Type II pyrethroids inhibited binding of [35S]-t-butylbicyclophosphorothionate (TBPS) in cortical synaptosome preparations with K/sub i/ values of 5 to 10 μM. The [35S]-TBPS data implicate the TBPS/picrotoxinin binding site in the mechanism of Type II pyrethroid toxicity. The results of these experiments support the classification of pyrethroids into two classes, and demonstrate the utility of the figure-eight maze and the ASR in studies to elucidate neurotoxic mechanisms. The interaction of the Type II pyrethroids is probably restricted to the TBPS/picrotoxinin binding domain on the GABA complex as shown by both the in vivo and in vitro studies

  1. Toxicity of Pyrethroid and Organophosphorous Insecticides against Two Field Collected Strains of the German Cockroach Blattella Germanica (Blattaria: Blattellidae from Hospitals in Hamadan, Iran

    Mojtaba Limoee

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The German cockroach, Blattella germanica is a major hygienic pest and mechanical vector for path­ogenic agents in hospitals and residential areas. The development of insecticide resistance is a serious problem in controlling of this pest. Toxicity of four commonly used insecticides (permethrin, cypermethrin, malathion and chlorpyrifos against two hospital- collected strains of the German cockroach was investigated.Methods: Topical bioassay methods were carried out for detecting insecticide susceptibility of adult male cock­roaches. For each insecticide, four to six concentrations resulting in >0% and <100% mortality were used. Three to six replicates of 10 cockroaches per concentration were conducted. The differences between LD50 (µg/g values were considered statistically significant only when the 95% confidence intervals did not overlap.Results: Two hospital- collected strains of the German cockroach showed low to moderate levels of resistance to chlorpyrifos, permethrin, malathion and cypermethrin based on resistance ratios compared with susceptible strain.Conclusion: The low level chlorpyrifos resistance suggesting this insecticide may still provide adequate control of these strains. While the obsereved moderate levels of resistance to cypermethrin could imply developing resistance to this compound.

  2. Design, synthesis and bioassay of new mosquito insecticides and repellents

    New compounds and classes of compounds are needed to protect deployed military personnel from diseases transmitted by medically important arthropods. Historically, the synthetic insecticides and repellents have been effective tools for mosquito control. To develop new synthetic insecticides and repe...

  3. Susceptibility of Culicidae Mosquitoes to Some Insecticides Recommended by WHO in a Malaria Endemic Area of Southeastern Iran

    Mousa Fathian

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: According to the national strategy plan on monitoring of insecticides resistance, this study was carried out to determine the base line susceptibility of the Culicidae mosquitoes to the WHO-recommended insecticides in an endemic focus of malaria in southeastern Iran.Methods: Larval collection was carried out by dipping method and adult collection occurred by suction tube from January to December 2010. The susceptibility test was assessed to DDT 4 %, malathion 5 %, propoxur 0.1 %, deltamethrin 0.05 %, lambda-cyhalothrin 0.05 %, and cyfluthrin 0.15 % at different interval times (discriminative dose followed by 24 h recovery period . The LT50 and LT90 values were calculated for plotting the regression line using Microsoft office Excel software ver. 2007.Results: Anopheles stephensi was quite resistant to DDT and showed susceptible or tolerant to other insecticides. The LT50 and LT90 values to DDT in this species were 29.07, and 98.26 minutes, respectively. Anopheles culicifacies and Anopheles dthali were found susceptible or tolerant to insecticides. Culex pipiens was found resistance to DDT, propoxur, lambda-cyhalothrin and cyfluthrin whereas observed susceptible to malathion and tolerant to deltamethrin. Ochlerotatus caspius sl. was resistant to DDT, whereas found susceptible to other insecticides. Culisita longiareolatawas susceptible to deltamethrin, whereas tolerant to other insecticides. The LT50 and LT90 values of Cs. longiareolata to DDT were 17.82, and 51.26 minutes.Conclusion: We suggested the same study in different parts of the country for monitoring and evaluation of control measures.

  4. Behavioral and metabolic effects of sublethal doses of two insecticides, chlorpyrifos and methomyl, in the Egyptian cotton leafworm, Spodoptera littoralis (Boisduval) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae)

    Dewer, Youssef; Pottier, Marie-Anne; Lalouette, Lisa; Maria, Annick; Dacher, Matthieu; Belzunces, Luc; Kairo, Guillaume; Renault, David; Maibeche, Martine

    2016-01-01

    International audience Insecticides have long been used as the main method in limiting agricultural pests, but their widespread use has resulted in environmental pollution, development of resistances, and biodiversity reduction. The effects of insecticides at low residual doses on both the targeted crop pest species and beneficial insects have become a major concern. In particular, these low doses can induce unexpected positive (hormetic) effects on pest insects, such as surges in populati...

  5. Toxicity of Pyrethroid and Organophosphorous Insecticides against Two Field Collected Strains of the German Cockroach Blattella Germanica (Blattaria: Blattellidae) from Hospitals in Hamadan, Iran

    Mojtaba Limoee; Behroz Davari; Seyad Hassan Moosa-Kazemi

    2012-01-01

    Background: The German cockroach, Blattella germanica is a major hygienic pest and mechanical vector for path­ogenic agents in hospitals and residential areas. The development of insecticide resistance is a serious problem in controlling of this pest. Toxicity of four commonly used insecticides (permethrin, cypermethrin, malathion and chlorpyrifos) against two hospital- collected strains of the German cockroach was investigated.Methods: Topical bioassay methods were carried out for detecting ...

  6. Insecticidal activity of the essential oil from fruits and seeds of Schinus terebinthifolia Raddi against African malaria vectors

    Mosha Franklin; Nyindo Mramba; Kweka Eliningaya J; Silva Ary G

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Alternative insecticides for the control of malaria and filarial vectors are of paramount need as resistance is increasing among classes of insecticides currently in use in the public health sector. In this study, mosquitocidal activity of Schinus terebinthifolia essential oil against Anopheles gambiae s.s., An. arabiensis and Culex quinquefasciatus was assessed in laboratory, semi- field and full- field conditions Method Twenty third instar larvae of both Anopheles gambia...

  7. Esterase mediated resistance in deltamethrin resistant reference tick colony of Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus.

    Gupta, Snehil; Ajith Kumar, K G; Sharma, Anil Kumar; Nagar, Gaurav; Kumar, Sachin; Saravanan, B C; Ravikumar, Gandham; Ghosh, Srikant

    2016-06-01

    Monitoring of acaricide resistance is considered as one of the important facets of integrated tick management. In an attempt of development of resistance monitoring indicators, in the present study two reference tick lines of Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus maintained in the Entomology laboratory, Indian Veterinary Research Institute (IVRI), Izatnagar, India, were studied to determine the possible contributing factors involved in development of resistance to deltamethrin. Electrophoretic profiling of esterase enzymes detected high activities of EST-1 in reference resistant tick colony designated as IVRI-IV whereas it was not detectable in reference susceptible IVRI-I line of R. (B.) microplus. Esterases were further characterized as carboxylesterase or acetylcholinesterase based on inhibitor study using PMSF, eserine sulphate, malathion, TPP and copper sulphate. It was concluded that an acetylcholinesterase, EST-1, possibly plays an important role for development of deltamethrin resistance in IVRI-IV colony of R. (B.) microplus. PMID:26979585

  8. Gene duplication in the major insecticide target site, Rdl, in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Remnant, Emily J; Good, Robert T; Schmidt, Joshua M; Lumb, Christopher; Robin, Charles; Daborn, Phillip J; Batterham, Philip

    2013-09-01

    The Resistance to Dieldrin gene, Rdl, encodes a GABA-gated chloride channel subunit that is targeted by cyclodiene and phenylpyrazole insecticides. The gene was first characterized in Drosophila melanogaster by genetic mapping of resistance to the cyclodiene dieldrin. The 4,000-fold resistance observed was due to a single amino acid replacement, Ala(301) to Ser. The equivalent change was subsequently identified in Rdl orthologs of a large range of resistant insect species. Here, we report identification of a duplication at the Rdl locus in D. melanogaster. The 113-kb duplication contains one WT copy of Rdl and a second copy with two point mutations: an Ala(301) to Ser resistance mutation and Met(360) to Ile replacement. Individuals with this duplication exhibit intermediate dieldrin resistance compared with single copy Ser(301) homozygotes, reduced temperature sensitivity, and altered RNA editing associated with the resistant allele. Ectopic recombination between Roo transposable elements is involved in generating this genomic rearrangement. The duplication phenotypes were confirmed by construction of a transgenic, artificial duplication integrating the 55.7-kb Rdl locus with a Ser(301) change into an Ala(301) background. Gene duplications can contribute significantly to the evolution of insecticide resistance, most commonly by increasing the amount of gene product produced. Here however, duplication of the Rdl target site creates permanent heterozygosity, providing unique potential for adaptive mutations to accrue in one copy, without abolishing the endogenous role of an essential gene. PMID:23959864

  9. Molecular characterization of DDT resistance in Anopheles gambiae from Benin

    Djègbè, Innocent; Agossa, Fiacre R; Jones, Christopher M.; Poupardin, Rodolphe; Cornelie, Sylvie; Akogbéto, Martin; Ranson, Hilary; Corbel, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    Background Insecticide resistance in the mosquito vector is the one of the main obstacles against effective malaria control. In order to implement insecticide resistance management strategies, it is important to understand the genetic factors involved. In this context, we investigated the molecular basis of DDT resistance in the main malaria vector from Benin. Methods Anopheles gambiae mosquitoes were collected from four sites across Benin and identified to species/molecular form. Mosquitoes ...

  10. Molecular characterization of DDT resistance in Anopheles gambiae from Benin

    Djegbe, I.; Agossa, F. R.; Jones, C. M.; Poupardin, R; Cornélie, Sylvie; Akogbeto, M; Ranson, H.; Corbel, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    Background: Insecticide resistance in the mosquito vector is the one of the main obstacles against effective malaria control. In order to implement insecticide resistance management strategies, it is important to understand the genetic factors involved. In this context, we investigated the molecular basis of DDT resistance in the main malaria vector from Benin. Methods: Anopheles gambiae mosquitoes were collected from four sites across Benin and identified to species/molecular form. Mosquitoe...

  11. Electronic structure of pesticides: 1. Organochlorine insecticides

    Novak, Igor, E-mail: inovak@csu.edu.au [Charles Sturt University, POB 883, Orange, NSW 2800 (Australia); Kovac, Branka [Physical Chemistry Division, ' R. Boskovic' Institute, HR-10000 Zagreb (Croatia)

    2011-11-15

    Highlights: {yields} Electronic structure of several organochlorine insecticides has been determined by UV photoelectron spectroscopy and high-level ab initio calculations. {yields} The electronic structure obtained from spectra has been related to their biological activity. {yields} The molecular modes of binding to appropriate receptors are rationalized in view of the molecule's electronic structure and conformational flexibility. - Abstract: The electronic structures of six organochlorine insecticides: {gamma}-lindane (I), aldrin (II), dieldrin (III), DDD (IV), DDE (V) and DDT (VI) have been investigated by UV photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS), quantum chemical calculations and comparison with molecular modelling studies. Their electronic and molecular structures are discussed in order to rationalize their biological activity. In this work we relate the biological activity of these insecticides to their experimentally observed electronic and molecular structures.

  12. Bioassay improvements for assessing pyrethroid resistance in horn flies

    The horn fly (Haematobia irritans) is a major cattle pest in the American continent, causing yearly economic losses of over US $860 million in Brazil. Frequent use of chemical insecticides has led to the development of insecticide resistance, leading to significant economic losses and environmental ...

  13. Acetylcholinesterase inhibition and micronucleus frequency in oysters (Crassostrea corteziensis exposed to chlorpyrifos

    AB Benitez-Trinidad1

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Chlorpyrifos (CPF is an Organophosphorous pesticide (OP that has been widely used for both agricultural and domestic pest control. To date, there is little information regarding the effects of this pesticide on aquatic organisms, particularly oysters. The aim of this study was to evaluate Acetylcholinesterase (AChE activity and Micronucleus (MN frequency in the oyster Crassostrea corteziensis in laboratory exposure with CPF (20, 40, 60, 80, and 160 μg/L and in a field study. The results showed that AChE was reduced 60 - 82 % in oysters exposed to CPF, relative to the negative control. Similar AChE results were observed in oysters collected from the Boca de Camichín Estuary in Nayarit, Mexico; with respect to genetic damage, evaluated through MN, treatment with CPF did not induce the MN frequency, nor did the oyster from the field study exhibit an increase in this biomarker. These results suggest that C. corteziensis is a sensitive model for evaluating the acute toxicity of OP in laboratory studies as well in the field. In addition, it generates prospects on studying mechanisms through which the oyster could possess resistance to genotoxic agents, as well as its being a reliable model for evaluating the genotoxic effects of xenobiotics through the MN technique.

  14. Sex-specific spinosad resistance in Danish houseflies

    Højland, Dorte Heidi

    Spinosad is a novel insecticide which is useful for control of multiple insect pests and it was introduced for housefly control within the last decade. Prior to the introduction of spinosad in Denmark, a survey of Danish houseflies from farms all over the country was initiated, and we discovered a...... strain that was resistant to spinosad. However, this cross-resistance was unusual because females were 26-fold resistant, while males were only 6-fold resistant. This pattern of resistance does not match any known resistance to other insecticides and is different from spinosad resistance in other...

  15. A congenital myasthenic syndrome refractory to acetylcholinesterase inhibitors.

    Triggs, W J; Beric, A; Butler, I J; Roongta, S M

    1992-03-01

    We studied 4 siblings (3 men and 1 woman), ages 22 to 43 years, with congenital ptosis, external ophthalmoplegia, proximal muscle weakness and fatigability unresponsive to acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitors. Repetitive nerve stimulation showed a significant compound muscle action potential (CMAP) area decrement at 2 or 3 Hz. Nerve conduction studies and concentric needle electromyography were normal, and repetitive CMAPs to single nerve stimulation were not observed. Voluntary single fiber electromyography (SFEMG) showed increased jitter and blocking. Assessment of individual end-plates using SFEMG with intramuscular axonal microstimulation showed no uniform relationship between jitter and the rate of stimulation, consistent with a postsynaptic defect of neuromuscular transmission. Edrophonium eliminated the decremental response to repetitive nerve stimulation, but caused no significant clinical improvement, suggesting an additional mechanism for weakness in these patients. PMID:1313543

  16. High Efficiency Acetylcholinesterase Immobilization on DNA Aptamer Modified Surfaces

    Orada Chumphukam

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available We report here the in vitro selection of DNA aptamers for electric eel acetylcholinesterase (AChE. One selected aptamer sequence (R15/19 has a high affinity towards the enzyme (Kd = 157 ± 42 pM. Characterization of the aptamer showed its binding is not affected by low ionic strength (~20 mM, however significant reduction in affinity occurred at high ionic strength (~1.2 M. In addition, this aptamer does not inhibit the catalytic activity of AChE that we exploit through immobilization of the DNA on a streptavidin-coated surface. Subsequent immobilization of AChE by the aptamer results in a 4-fold higher catalytic activity when compared to adsorption directly on to plastic.

  17. Acetylcholinesterase inhibitory properties of some benzoic acid derivatives

    Yildiz, Melike; Kiliç, Deryanur; Ünver, Yaǧmur; Şentürk, Murat; Askin, Hakan; Küfrevioǧlu, Ömer Irfan

    2016-04-01

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) hydrolyses the neurotransmitter acetylcholine to acetic acid and choline. AChE inhibitors are used in treatment of several neurodegeneartive disorder and Alzheimer's disease. In the present study, inhibition of AChE with some benzoic acid derivatives were investigated. 3-Chloro-benzoic acid (1), 2-hydroxy-5-sulfobenzoic acid (2), 2-(sulfooxy) benzoic acid (3), 2-hydroxybenzoic acid (4), 2,3-dimethoxybenzoic (5), and 3,4,5-trimethoxybenzoic (6) were calculated IC50 values AChE enzyme. Kinetic investigations showed that similarly to AChE inhibitors. Benzoic acid derivatives (1-6) investigated are encouraging agents which may be used as lead molecules in order to derivative novel AChE inhibitors that might be useful in medical applications.

  18. Effect of fluorocarbons on acetylcholinesterase activity and some counter measures

    Young, W.; Parker, J. A.

    1975-01-01

    An isolated vagal sympathetic heart system has been successfully used for the study of the effect of fluorocarbons (FCs) on cardiac performance and in situ enzyme activity. Dichlorodifluoromethane sensitizes this preparation to sympathetic stimulation and to exogenous epinephrine challenge. Partial and complete A-V block and even cardiac arrest have been induced by epinephrine challenge in the FC sensitized heart. Potassium chloride alone restores the rhythmicity but not the normal contractility of the heart in such a situation. Addition of glucose will, however, completely restore the normal function of the heart which is sensitized by dichlorodifluoromethane. The ED 50 values of acetylcholinesterase activity which are used as a measure of relative effectiveness of fluorocarbons are compared with the maximum permissible concentration. Kinetic studies indicate that all the fluorocarbons tested so far are noncompetitive.

  19. Enzymatic and biochemical characterization of Bungarus sindanus snake venom acetylcholinesterase

    Ahmed, M; Latif, N.; Khan RA; Ahmad, A.; JBT Rocha; CM Mazzanti; MD Bagatini; VM Morsch; MRC Schetinger

    2012-01-01

    This study analyses venom from the elapid krait snake Bungarus sindanus, which contains a high level of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity. The enzyme showed optimum activity at alkaline pH (8.5) and 45ºC. Krait venom AChE was inhibited by substrate. Inhibition was significantly reduced by using a high ionic strength buffer; low ionic strength buffer (10 mM PO4 pH 7.5) inhibited the enzyme by 1. 5mM AcSCh, while high ionic strength buffer (62 mM PO4 pH 7.5) inhibited it by 1 mM AcSCh. Venom...

  20. Interleukin 6 modulates acetylcholinesterase activity of brain neurons

    Classically, radiation injuries results in a peripheral inflammatory process, and we have previously observed an early systemic interleukin 6 (IL-6) release following whole-body irradiation. Besides, we have demonstrated an early decrease of rat or primate brain acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity a gamma exposure. The object of the present study is to find possible IL-6 systemic effects on the brain AChE activity. We show that, though intravenous (i.v.) or intra-cerebro-ventricular (ICV) injection of IL-6 can induce a drop in rat brain AChE activity, this cytokine induces only a slight decrease of the AChE release in cultured brain cells. (author)