WorldWideScience

Sample records for acetylcholine vesicular transporter

  1. Spiroindolines identify the vesicular acetylcholine transporter as a novel target for insecticide action.

    Ann Sluder

    Full Text Available The efficacy of all major insecticide classes continues to be eroded by the development of resistance mediated, in part, by selection of alleles encoding insecticide insensitive target proteins. The discovery of new insecticide classes acting at novel protein binding sites is therefore important for the continued protection of the food supply from insect predators, and of human and animal health from insect borne disease. Here we describe a novel class of insecticides (Spiroindolines encompassing molecules that combine excellent activity against major agricultural pest species with low mammalian toxicity. We confidently assign the vesicular acetylcholine transporter as the molecular target of Spiroindolines through the combination of molecular genetics in model organisms with a pharmacological approach in insect tissues. The vesicular acetylcholine transporter can now be added to the list of validated insecticide targets in the acetylcholine signalling pathway and we anticipate that this will lead to the discovery of novel molecules useful in sustaining agriculture. In addition to their potential as insecticides and nematocides, Spiroindolines represent the only other class of chemical ligands for the vesicular acetylcholine transporter since those based on the discovery of vesamicol over 40 years ago, and as such, have potential to provide more selective tools for PET imaging in the diagnosis of neurodegenerative disease. They also provide novel biochemical tools for studies of the function of this protein family.

  2. Cholinergic neurons and terminal fields revealed by immunohistochemistry for the vesicular acetylcholine transporter. II. The peripheral nervous system.

    Schäfer, M K; Eiden, L E; Weihe, E

    1998-05-01

    The peripheral sympathetic and parasympathetic cholinergic innervation was investigated with antibodies directed against the C-terminus of the rat vesicular acetylcholine transporter. Immunohistochemistry for the vesicular acetylcholine transporter resulted in considerably more detailed visualization of cholinergic terminal fields in the peripheral nervous system than reported previously and was well suited to also identify cholinergic perikarya. Vesicular acetylcholine transporter immunoreactivity completely delineated the preganglionic sympathetic terminals in pre- and paravertebral sympathetic ganglia, and in the adrenal medulla as well as postganglionic cholinergic neurons in the paravertebral chain. Cholinergic terminals of sudomotor and vasomotor nerves of skeletal muscle were optimally visualized. Mixed peripheral ganglia, including periprostatic and uterovaginal ganglia, exhibited extensive preganglionic cholinergic innervation of both noradrenergic and cholinergic postganglionic principal neurons which were intermingled in these ganglia. Varicose vesicular acetylcholine transporter-positive fibres and terminals, representing the cranial parasympathetic innervation of the cerebral vasculature, of salivary and lacrimal glands, of the eye, of the respiratory tract and of the upper digestive tract innervated various target structures including seromucous gland epithelium and myoepithelium, respiratory epithelium, and smooth muscle of the tracheobronchial tree. The only macrovascular elements receiving vesicular acetylcholine transporter-positive innervation were the cerebral arteries. The microvasculature throughout the viscera, with the exception of lymphoid tissues, the liver and kidney, received vesicular acetylcholine transporter-positive innervation while the microvasculature of limb and trunk skeletal muscle appeared to be the only relevant somatic target of vesicular acetylcholine transporter innervation. Vesicular acetylcholine transporter

  3. Elimination of the vesicular acetylcholine transporter in the striatum reveals regulation of behaviour by cholinergic-glutamatergic co-transmission.

    Monica S Guzman; Xavier De Jaeger; Sanda Raulic; Souza, Ivana A; Li, Alex X.; Susanne Schmid; Menon, Ravi S.; Gainetdinov, Raul R.; Caron, Marc G.; Robert Bartha; Prado, Vania F.; Prado, Marco A. M.

    2011-01-01

    Cholinergic neurons in the striatum are thought to play major regulatory functions in motor behaviour and reward. These neurons express two vesicular transporters that can load either acetylcholine or glutamate into synaptic vesicles. Consequently cholinergic neurons can release both neurotransmitters, making it difficult to discern their individual contributions for the regulation of striatal functions. Here we have dissected the specific roles of acetylcholine release for striatal-dependent...

  4. Evaluation of radioiodinated (-)-o-iodovesamicol as a radiotracer for mapping the vesicular acetylcholine transporter

    We evaluated the potencies of radioiodinated (-)-o-iodovesamicol [(-)-oIV] as a selective vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT) mapping agent. (-)-[125I]oIV exhibited significant accumulation (about 2.8% of the injected dose) in rat brain. The regional brain distribution of radioactivity was similar for both (-)-[125I]oIV and (-)-[3H]vesamicol. The accumulation of (-)-[125I]oIV in the brain was significant reduced by post-administration of unlabeled vesamicol (0.5 μmol/kg-1) and (-)-oIV (0.5 μmol/kg-1). On the other hand, the post-administration of sigma ligands hardly affected the accumulation of (-)-[125I]oIV in the brain. These studies showed that (-)-[125I]oIV, as well as [3H]vesamicol, bound to VAChT with high affinity in the rat brain. Furthermore, (-)-[125I]oIV binding in the ipsilateral cortex to the lesion was significantly reduced by 17.0%, compared with that in the contralateral cortex in a unilateral nucleus basalis magnocellularis (NBM)-lesioned rat. These results suggested that radioiodinated (-)-oIV may potentially be useful for the diagnosis of cholinergic neurodegenerative disorders. (author)

  5. Elimination of the vesicular acetylcholine transporter in the striatum reveals regulation of behaviour by cholinergic-glutamatergic co-transmission.

    Guzman, Monica S; De Jaeger, Xavier; Raulic, Sanda; Souza, Ivana A; Li, Alex X; Schmid, Susanne; Menon, Ravi S; Gainetdinov, Raul R; Caron, Marc G; Bartha, Robert; Prado, Vania F; Prado, Marco A M

    2011-11-01

    Cholinergic neurons in the striatum are thought to play major regulatory functions in motor behaviour and reward. These neurons express two vesicular transporters that can load either acetylcholine or glutamate into synaptic vesicles. Consequently cholinergic neurons can release both neurotransmitters, making it difficult to discern their individual contributions for the regulation of striatal functions. Here we have dissected the specific roles of acetylcholine release for striatal-dependent behaviour in mice by selective elimination of the vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT) from striatal cholinergic neurons. Analysis of several behavioural parameters indicates that elimination of VAChT had only marginal consequences in striatum-related tasks and did not affect spontaneous locomotion, cocaine-induced hyperactivity, or its reward properties. However, dopaminergic sensitivity of medium spiny neurons (MSN) and the behavioural outputs in response to direct dopaminergic agonists were enhanced, likely due to increased expression/function of dopamine receptors in the striatum. These observations indicate that previous functions attributed to striatal cholinergic neurons in spontaneous locomotor activity and in the rewarding responses to cocaine are mediated by glutamate and not by acetylcholine release. Our experiments demonstrate how one population of neurons can use two distinct neurotransmitters to differentially regulate a given circuitry. The data also raise the possibility of using VAChT as a target to boost dopaminergic function and decrease high striatal cholinergic activity, common neurochemical alterations in individuals affected with Parkinson's disease. PMID:22087075

  6. Elimination of the vesicular acetylcholine transporter in the striatum reveals regulation of behaviour by cholinergic-glutamatergic co-transmission.

    Monica S Guzman

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Cholinergic neurons in the striatum are thought to play major regulatory functions in motor behaviour and reward. These neurons express two vesicular transporters that can load either acetylcholine or glutamate into synaptic vesicles. Consequently cholinergic neurons can release both neurotransmitters, making it difficult to discern their individual contributions for the regulation of striatal functions. Here we have dissected the specific roles of acetylcholine release for striatal-dependent behaviour in mice by selective elimination of the vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT from striatal cholinergic neurons. Analysis of several behavioural parameters indicates that elimination of VAChT had only marginal consequences in striatum-related tasks and did not affect spontaneous locomotion, cocaine-induced hyperactivity, or its reward properties. However, dopaminergic sensitivity of medium spiny neurons (MSN and the behavioural outputs in response to direct dopaminergic agonists were enhanced, likely due to increased expression/function of dopamine receptors in the striatum. These observations indicate that previous functions attributed to striatal cholinergic neurons in spontaneous locomotor activity and in the rewarding responses to cocaine are mediated by glutamate and not by acetylcholine release. Our experiments demonstrate how one population of neurons can use two distinct neurotransmitters to differentially regulate a given circuitry. The data also raise the possibility of using VAChT as a target to boost dopaminergic function and decrease high striatal cholinergic activity, common neurochemical alterations in individuals affected with Parkinson's disease.

  7. (E)-[125I]-5-AOIBV: a SPECT radioligand for the vesicular acetylcholine transporter

    The premise that, over the course of Alzheimer's disease (AD), changes in the levels of the vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT) occur in parallel with changes to other cholinergic marker proteins provides the basis for the applicability of benzovesamicol derivatives as radioligands for AD studies by single photon emission computed tomography or positron emission tomography. We report the synthesis of enantiopure benzovesamicol derivatives: (R,R) or (S,S)-(E)-2-hydroxy-5-(3-iodoprop-2-en-1-oxy)-3- (4-phenylpiperidino)tetralin [(R,R)-AOIBV: Kd=0.45 nM or (S,S)-5-AOIBV: Kd=4.3 nM] and their corresponding tributyltin precursors for radioiodination. (R,R or S,S)-5-AOIBV was labeled with iodine-125 from their corresponding n-tributyltin precursors. Both compounds were obtained with radiochemical and optical purity greater than 97% and in radiochemical yields ranging 34-36%. To determine if these compounds could provide an advantage when compared to [125I]-iodo benzovesamicol (IBVM), IBVM was also labeled and used as the reference compound in all ex vivo experiments. Ex vivo biodistribution experiments in rats revealed that [125I]-(R,R)-5-AOIBV displayed the most suitable pharmacological profile as the radioactivity distribution corresponded well with the known VAChT brain density. Moreover, pre-injection of vesamicol prevented the uptake of [125I]-(R,R)-5-AOIBV in striatum, cortex and hippocampus, demonstrating selectivity for the VAChT. However, even if time activity curves of [125I]-(R,R)-5-AOIBV confirmed that this compound could be used to visualize the VAChT in vivo, at each point of the kinetic study, [125I]-(R,R)-5-AOIBV showed a lower specific binding compared to [125I]-IBVM. These results made [125I]-( R,R)-5-AOIBV inferior to [125I]-IBVM for the VAChT exploration in vivo

  8. Cholinergic activation of the murine trachealis muscle via non-vesicular acetylcholine release involving low-affinity choline transporters.

    Nassenstein, Christina; Wiegand, Silke; Lips, Katrin S; Li, Guanfeng; Klein, Jochen; Kummer, Wolfgang

    2015-11-01

    In addition to quantal, vesicular release of acetylcholine (ACh), there is also non-quantal release at the motor endplate which is insufficient to evoke postsynaptic responses unless acetylcholinesterase (AChE) is inhibited. We here addressed potential non-quantal release in the mouse trachea by organ bath experiments and (immuno)histochemical methods. Electrical field stimulation (EFS) of nerve terminals elicited tracheal constriction that is largely due to ACh release. Classical enzyme histochemistry demonstrated acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity in nerve fibers in the muscle and butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) activity in the smooth muscle cells. Acute inhibition of both esterases by eserine significantly raised tracheal tone which was fully sensitive to atropine. This effect was reduced, but not abolished, in AChE, but not in BChE gene-deficient mice. The eserine-induced increase in tracheal tone was unaffected by vesamicol (10(-5)M), an inhibitor of the vesicular acetylcholine transporter, and by corticosterone (10(-4)M), an inhibitor of organic cation transporters. Hemicholinium-3, in low concentrations an inhibitor of the high-affinity choline transporter-1 (CHT1), completely abrogated the eserine effects when applied in high concentrations (10(-4)M) pointing towards an involvement of low-affinity choline transporters. To evaluate the cellular sources of non-quantal ACh release in the trachea, expression of low-affinity choline transporter-like family (CTL1-5) was evaluated by RT-PCR analysis. Even though these transporters were largely abundant in the epithelium, denudation of airway epithelial cells had no effect on eserine-induced tracheal contraction, indicating a non-quantal release of ACh from non-epithelial sources in the airways. These data provide evidence for an epithelium-independent non-vesicular, non-quantal ACh release in the mouse trachea involving low-affinity choline transporters. PMID:26278668

  9. Automated production of [¹⁸F]VAT suitable for clinical PET study of vesicular acetylcholine transporter.

    Yue, Xuyi; Bognar, Christopher; Zhang, Xiang; Gaehle, Gregory G; Moerlein, Stephen M; Perlmutter, Joel S; Tu, Zhude

    2016-01-01

    Automated production of a promising radiopharmaceutical (-)-(1-(8-(2-[(18)F]fluoroethoxy)-3-hydroxy-1,2,3,4-tetrahydronaphthalen-2-yl)-piperidin-4-yl)(4-fluorophenyl)methanone ([(18)F]VAT) for the vesicular acetylcholine transporter(VAChT) was achieved using a two-step procedure in a current Good Manufacturing Practices fashion. The production of [(18)F]VAT was accomplished in approximately 140 min, with radiochemical yield of ~15.0% (decay corrected), specific activity>111 GBq/µmol, radiochemical purity>99% and mass of VAT ~3.4 μg/batch (n>10). The radiopharmaceutical product meets all quality control criteria for human use, and is suitable for clinical PET studies of VAChT. PMID:26408913

  10. Molecular imaging of acetylcholine vesicular transporter (VAChT) in demented patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) by IBVM-SPECT

    Alzheimer's disease (A.D.) is characterized by a premature decline of cholinergic neurons. The 5-I.B.V.M. is an analogue of the Vesamicol that binds to the presynaptic vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT). The exploration of this target should be useful to make an early diagnosis of A.D.. Our first aim was to propose a method of non invasive VAChT quantification according to 5-I.B.V.M. kinetic. 5-I.B.V.M. was injected to four A.D. patients (age = 77 ± 3.9 years and M.M.S.E. = 24.5 ± 1.02) were included in this methodological study. The single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) images were obtained at five, 20, 35 and 50 minutes, at then at three, five and 22 hours after intravenous injection of 5-I.B.V.M. (185 MBq). The time activity curves were obtained after SPECT images co registration on a MRI masque. Specific volume of interest (S.P.E. SPEcific) were manually drawn on striatum, pons, thalamus and para-hippocampic gyrus including hippocampus; reference volumes of interest (R.E.F. = REFerence) were drawn on frontal and occipital cerebral cortex. On the basis of uptake kinetic, two modeling approaches were considered: transient equilibrium model for reversible ligand (binding potential (B.P.) (S.P.E. - R.E.F.)/R.E.F.) and Patlak graphical analysis for irreversible tracers (slope given by Ki/DVref where Ki is the influx constant and DVref is the distribution volume of the reference region). We observed an inflection or a steady state of the activity curves in the different regions studied between 250 and 1400 minutes, what seems to confirm that the tracer is little reversible. B.P. values obtained at 21 hours with occipital areas as reference and Ki/DVref values were respectively 4.62 ± 0.42 and 0.07 ± 0.01. The S.P.E. classification according to B.P. and Ki/DVref values were similar to the classification according to the compartmental analysis (Kuhl 1994). The transient equilibrium model with late acquisition seems the more suitable because I

  11. Positron emission tomography imaging of (2R,3R)-5-[18F]fluoroethoxybenzovesamicol in rat and monkey brain: a radioligand for the vesicular acetylcholine transporter

    Introduction: The regional brain distribution of (2R,3R)-5-[18F]fluoroethoxy-benzovesamicol ((-)-[18F]FEOBV), a radioligand for the vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT), was examined in vivo in mice, rats and rhesus monkeys. Methods: Regional brain distributions of (-)-[18F]FEOBV in mice were determined using ex vivo dissection. MicroPET imaging was used to determine the regional brain pharmacokinetics of the radioligand in rat and rhesus monkey brains. Results: In all three species, clear heterogeneous regional brain distributions were obtained, with the rank order of brain tissues (striatum>thalamus>cortex>cerebellum) consistent with the distribution of cholinergic nerve terminals containing the VAChT. Conclusions: (-)-[18F]FEOBV remains a viable candidate for further development as an in vivo imaging agent for positron emission tomography (PET) studies of the VAChT in the human brain.

  12. Mice deficient for striatal Vesicular Acetylcholine Transporter (VAChT) display impaired short-term but normal long-term object recognition memory.

    Palmer, Daniel; Creighton, Samantha; Prado, Vania F; Prado, Marco A M; Choleris, Elena; Winters, Boyer D

    2016-09-15

    Substantial evidence implicates Acetylcholine (ACh) in the acquisition of object memories. While most research has focused on the role of the cholinergic basal forebrain and its cortical targets, there are additional cholinergic networks that may contribute to object recognition. The striatum contains an independent cholinergic network comprised of interneurons. In the current study, we investigated the role of this cholinergic signalling in object recognition using mice deficient for Vesicular Acetylcholine Transporter (VAChT) within interneurons of the striatum. We tested whether these striatal VAChT(D2-Cre-flox/flox) mice would display normal short-term (5 or 15min retention delay) and long-term (3h retention delay) object recognition memory. In a home cage object recognition task, male and female VAChT(D2-Cre-flox/flox) mice were impaired selectively with a 15min retention delay. When tested on an object location task, VAChT(D2-Cre-flox/flox) mice displayed intact spatial memory. Finally, when object recognition was tested in a Y-shaped apparatus, designed to minimize the influence of spatial and contextual cues, only females displayed impaired recognition with a 5min retention delay, but when males were challenged with a 15min retention delay, they were also impaired; neither males nor females were impaired with the 3h delay. The pattern of results suggests that striatal cholinergic transmission plays a role in the short-term memory for object features, but not spatial location. PMID:27233822

  13. Non-vesicular sterol transport in cells

    Prinz, William A.

    2007-01-01

    Sterols such as cholesterol are important components of cellular membranes. They are not uniformly distributed among organelles and maintaining the proper distribution of sterols is critical for many cellular functions. Both vesicular and non-vesicular pathways move sterols between membranes and into and out of cells. There is growing evidence that a number of non-vesicular transport pathways operate in cells and, in the past few years, a number of proteins have been proposed to facilitate th...

  14. Are vesicular neurotransmitter transporters potential treatment targets for temporal lobe epilepsy?

    Joeri eVan Liefferinge

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The vesicular neurotransmitter transporters (VNTs are small proteins responsible for packing synaptic vesicles with neurotransmitters thereby determining the amount of neurotransmitter released per vesicle through fusion in both neurons and glial cells. Each transporter subtype was classically seen as a specific neuronal marker of the respective nerve cells containing that particular neurotransmitter or structurally related neurotransmitters. More recently, however, it has become apparent that common neurotransmitters can also act as co-transmitters, adding complexity to neurotransmitter release and suggesting intriguing roles for VNTs therein. We will first describe the current knowledge on vesicular glutamate transporters (VGLUT1/2/3, the vesicular excitatory amino acid transporter (VEAT, the vesicular nucleotide transporter (VNUT, vesicular monoamine transporters (VMAT1/2, the vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT and the vesicular γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA transporter (VGAT in the brain. We will focus on evidence regarding transgenic mice with disruptions in VNTs in different models of seizures and epilepsy. We will also describe the known alterations and reorganizations in the expression levels of these VNTs in rodent models for temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE and in human tissue resected for epilepsy surgery. Finally, we will discuss perspectives on opportunities and challenges for VNTs as targets for possible future epilepsy therapies.

  15. Model of reversible vesicular transport with exclusion

    Bressloff, Paul C.; Karamched, Bhargav R.

    2016-08-01

    A major question in neurobiology concerns the mechanics behind the motor-driven transport and delivery of vesicles to synaptic targets along the axon of a neuron. Experimental evidence suggests that the distribution of vesicles along the axon is relatively uniform and that vesicular delivery to synapses is reversible. A recent modeling study has made explicit the crucial role that reversibility in vesicular delivery to synapses plays in achieving uniformity in vesicle distribution, so called synaptic democracy (Bressloff et al 2015 Phys. Rev. Lett. 114 168101). In this paper we generalize the previous model by accounting for exclusion effects (hard-core repulsion) that may occur between molecular motor-cargo complexes (particles) moving along the same microtubule track. The resulting model takes the form of an exclusion process with four internal states, which distinguish between motile and stationary particles, and whether or not a particle is carrying vesicles. By applying a mean field approximation and an adiabatic approximation we reduce the system of ODEs describing the evolution of occupation numbers of the sites on a 1D lattice to a system of hydrodynamic equations in the continuum limit. We find that reversibility in vesicular delivery allows for synaptic democracy even in the presence of exclusion effects, although exclusion does exacerbate nonuniform distributions of vesicles in an axon when compared with a model without exclusion. We also uncover the relationship between our model and other models of exclusion processes with internal states.

  16. Molecular physiology of vesicular glutamate transporters in the digestive system

    Tao Li; Fayez K. Ghishan; Liqun Bai

    2005-01-01

    Glutamate is the major excitatory neurotransmitter in the mammalian central nervous system (CNS). Packaging and storage of glutamate into glutamatergic neuronal vesicles require ATP-dependent vesicular glutamate uptake systems, which utilize the electrochemical proton gradient as a driving force. Three vesicular glutamate transporters (VGLUT1-3) have been recently identified from neuronal tissue where they play a key role to maintain the vesicular glutamate level. Recently, it has been demonstrated that glutamate signaling is also functional in peripheral neuronal and non-neuronal tissues, and occurs in sites of pituitary, adrenal, pineal glands, bone, GI tract, pancreas,skin, and testis. The glutamate receptors and VGLUTs in digestivesystem have been found in both neuronal and endocrinal cells. The glutamate signaling in the digestive system may have significant relevance to diabetes and GI tract motility disorders. This review will focus on the most recent update of molecular physiology of digestive VGLUTs.

  17. Expression of Vesicular Nucleotide Transporter in Rat Odontoblasts

    Ikeda, Erina; Goto, Tetsuya; Gunjigake, Kaori; Kuroishi, Kayoko; Ueda, Masae; Kataoka, Shinji; Toyono, Takashi; Nakatomi, Mitsushiro; Seta, Yuji; Kitamura, Chiaki; NISHIHARA, Tatsuji; Kawamoto, Tatsuo

    2016-01-01

    Several theories have been proposed regarding pain transmission mechanisms in tooth. However, the exact signaling mechanism from odontoblasts to pulp nerves remains to be clarified. Recently, ATP-associated pain transmission has been reported, but it is unclear whether ATP is involved in tooth pain transmission. In the present study, we focused on the vesicular nucleotide transporter (VNUT), a transporter of ATP into vesicles, and examined whether VNUT was involved in ATP release from odontob...

  18. Synaptic Democracy and Vesicular Transport in Axons

    Bressloff, Paul C.; Levien, Ethan

    2015-04-01

    Synaptic democracy concerns the general problem of how regions of an axon or dendrite far from the cell body (soma) of a neuron can play an effective role in neuronal function. For example, stimulated synapses far from the soma are unlikely to influence the firing of a neuron unless some sort of active dendritic processing occurs. Analogously, the motor-driven transport of newly synthesized proteins from the soma to presynaptic targets along the axon tends to favor the delivery of resources to proximal synapses. Both of these phenomena reflect fundamental limitations of transport processes based on a localized source. In this Letter, we show that a more democratic distribution of proteins along an axon can be achieved by making the transport process less efficient. This involves two components: bidirectional or "stop-and-go" motor transport (which can be modeled in terms of advection-diffusion), and reversible interactions between motor-cargo complexes and synaptic targets. Both of these features have recently been observed experimentally. Our model suggests that, just as in human societies, there needs to be a balance between "efficiency" and "equality".

  19. Role of the atypical vesicular glutamate transporter VGLUT3 in l-DOPA-induced dyskinesia.

    Gangarossa, Giuseppe; Guzman, Monica; Prado, Vania F; Prado, Marco A M; Daumas, Stephanie; El Mestikawy, Salah; Valjent, Emmanuel

    2016-03-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is characterized by the degeneration of dopaminergic neurons. The gold standard therapy relies on dopamine (DA) replacement by the administration of levodopa (l-DOPA). However, with time l-DOPA treatment induces severe motor side effects characterized by abnormal and involuntary movements, or dyskinesia. Although earlier studies point to a role of striatal cholinergic interneurons, also known as striatal tonically active neurons (TANs), in l-DOPA-induced dyskinesia (LID), the underlying mechanisms remain to be fully characterized. Here, we find that DA depletion is accompanied by increased expression of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT), the vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT) as well as the atypical vesicular glutamate transporter type 3 (VGLUT3). TANs number and soma size are not changed. In dyskinetic mice, the VAChT levels remain high whereas the expression of VGLUT3 decreases. LID is attenuated in VGLUT3-deficient mice but not in mice bearing selective inactivation of VAChT in TANs. Finally, the absence of VGLUT3 is accompanied by a reduction of l-DOPA-induced phosphorylation of ERK1/2, ribosomal subunit (rpS6) and GluA1. Our results reveal that VGLUT3 plays an important role in the development of LID and should be considered as a potential and promising therapeutic target for prevention of LID. PMID:26711621

  20. Distribution of vesicular glutamate transporters in the human brain

    Erika eVigneault

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Glutamate is the major excitatory transmitter in the brain. Vesicular glutamate transporters (VGLUT1-3 are responsible for uploading glutamate into synaptic vesicles. VGLUT1 and VGLUT2 are considered as specific markers of canonical glutamatergic neurons, while VGLUT3 is found in neurons previously shown to use other neurotransmitters than glutamate. Although there exists a rich literature on the localization of these glutamatergic markers in the rodent brain, little is currently known about the distribution of VGLUT1-3 in the human brain. In the present study, using subtype specific probes and antisera, we examined the localization of the three vesicular glutamate transporters in the human brain by in situ hybridization, immunoautoradiography and immunohistochemistry. We found that the VGLUT1 transcript was highly expressed in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus and cerebellum, whereas VGLUT2 mRNA was mainly found in the thalamus and brainstem. VGLUT3 mRNA was localized in scarce neurons within the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, striatum and raphe nuclei. Following immunoautoradiographic labeling, intense VGLUT1- and VGLUT2-immunoreactivities were observed in all regions investigated (cerebral cortex, hippocampus, caudate-putamen, cerebellum, thalamus, amygdala, substantia nigra, raphe while VGLUT3 was absent from the thalamus and cerebellum. This extensive mapping of VGLUT1-3 in human brain reveals distributions that correspond for the most part to those previously described in rodent brains.

  1. Spontaneous release of acetylcholine and acetylhomocholine from mouse forebrain minces: cytoplasmic or vesicular origin

    The objective of this study was to determine the subcellular origin of cholinergic transmitter released spontaneously from mouse forebrain minces. To accomplish this objective, minces were pretreated in ionic media and then loaded with [14C]homocholine, an analog of choline, to form the false transmitter [14Cy]acetylhomocholine [( 14C]AHCh). The ratio of the false transmitter [14C]AHCh to the true transmitter ACh was then used as an index of cholinergic transmitter contents for both the cytoplasmic (S3) and vesicle-bound (P3) fractions. Three different pretreatment procedures were used to cause the following changes in S3 and P3 false to true transmitter ratios prior to spontaneous release: 1) a small increase in the S3 ratio of [14C]AHCh to acetylcholine (ACh) and a large increase in the P3 ratio of [14C] AHCh to ACh; 2) a decrease in the S3 ratio of [14C]AHCh to ACh and an increase in the P3 ratio of [14C]AHCh to ACh; 3) an increase in the P3 ratio of [14C]AHCh to ACh without affecting the S3 ratio of [14C]AHCh to ACh. The influence of each pretreatment on these subcellular ratios was then compared with its influence on the spontaneous release ratio of [14C]AHCh to ACh. In all 3 instances, the influence of pretreatment on the ratio of spontaneously released false and true cholinergic transmitters from minces coincided with the effect of pretreatment on the pre-release ratio of false to true transmitter in the S3 fraction. These results suggest that much of the cholinergic transmitter which is spontaneously released from mouse forebrain occurs from the cytoplasmic fraction

  2. Expression of Vesicular Nucleotide Transporter in Rat Odontoblasts.

    Ikeda, Erina; Goto, Tetsuya; Gunjigake, Kaori; Kuroishi, Kayoko; Ueda, Masae; Kataoka, Shinji; Toyono, Takashi; Nakatomi, Mitsushiro; Seta, Yuji; Kitamura, Chiaki; Nishihara, Tatsuji; Kawamoto, Tatsuo

    2016-02-27

    Several theories have been proposed regarding pain transmission mechanisms in tooth. However, the exact signaling mechanism from odontoblasts to pulp nerves remains to be clarified. Recently, ATP-associated pain transmission has been reported, but it is unclear whether ATP is involved in tooth pain transmission. In the present study, we focused on the vesicular nucleotide transporter (VNUT), a transporter of ATP into vesicles, and examined whether VNUT was involved in ATP release from odontoblasts. We examined the expression of VNUT in rat pulp by RT-PCR and immunostaining. ATP release from cultured odontoblast-like cells with heat stimulation was evaluated using ATP luciferase methods. VNUT was expressed in pulp tissue, and the distribution of VNUT-immunopositive vesicles was confirmed in odontoblasts. In odontoblasts, some VNUT-immunopositive vesicles were colocalized with membrane fusion proteins. Additionally P2X3, an ATP receptor, immunopositive axons were distributed between odontoblasts. The ATP release by thermal stimulation from odontoblast-like cells was inhibited by the addition of siRNA for VNUT. These findings suggest that cytosolic ATP is transported by VNUT and that the ATP in the vesicles is then released from odontoblasts to ATP receptors on axons. ATP vesicle transport in odontoblasts seems to be a key mechanism for signal transduction from odontoblasts to axons in the pulp. PMID:27006518

  3. GLTP Mediated Non-Vesicular GM1 Transport between Native Membranes

    Lauria, Ines; van Üüm, Jan; Mjumjunov-Crncevic, Esmina; Walrafen, David; Spitta, Luis; Thiele, Christoph; Lang, Thorsten

    2013-01-01

    Lipid transfer proteins (LTPs) are emerging as key players in lipid homeostasis by mediating non-vesicular transport steps between two membrane surfaces. Little is known about the driving force that governs the direction of transport in cells. Using the soluble LTP glycolipid transfer protein (GLTP), we examined GM1 (monosialotetrahexosyl-ganglioside) transfer to native membrane surfaces. With artificial GM1 donor liposomes, GLTP can be used to increase glycolipid levels over natural levels i...

  4. Aggregation–fragmentation model of vesicular transport in neurons

    We develop a mathematical model of the motor-based transport and delivery of vesicles to synaptic targets of an axon. Our model incorporates the ‘stop-and-go’ nature of bidirectional motor transport (which can be modeled in terms of advection–diffusion) and the reversible exchange of vesicles between motors and targets, both of which have been observed experimentally. Since motor-target interactions are reversible, it is necessary to keep track of the cluster size of vesicles bound to each motor-complex. This naturally leads to a modified version of the Becker–Doring model of aggregation–fragmentation processes. We analyze steady-state solutions of the transport model and obtain an explicit solution that supports a uniform distribution of synaptic resources along an axon. We thus establish a possible mechanism for the democratic distribution of synaptic resources along the length of an axon, based on reversible motor-target interactions. In the irreversible case, one finds that the motor-driven transport of newly synthesized proteins from the soma to presynaptic targets along the axon tends to favor the delivery of resources to more proximal synapses. (paper)

  5. Altered vesicular glutamate transporter expression in human temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis

    Van Liefferinge, J.; Jensen, C.J.; Albertini, G.; Bentea, E.; Demuyser, T.; Merckx, E.; Aronica, E.; Smolders, I; Massie, A.

    2015-01-01

    Vesicular glutamate transporters (VGLUTs) are responsible for loading glutamate into synaptic vesicles. Altered VGLUT protein expression has been suggested to affect quantal size and glutamate release under both physiological and pathological conditions. In this study, we investigated mRNA and protein expression levels of the three VGLUT subtypes in hippocampal tissue of patients suffering from temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) with hippocampal sclerosis (HS), International League Against Epilepsy...

  6. Exclusion of close linkage between the synaptic vesicular monoamine transporter locus and schizophrenia spectrum disorders

    Persico, A.M.; Uhl, G.R. [Johns Hopkins Univ. School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Wang, Zhe Wu [Universitario Campus Bio-Medico, Rome (Italy)] [and others

    1995-12-18

    The principal brain synaptic vesicular monoamine transporter (VMAT2) is responsible for the reuptake of serotonin, dopamine, norepinephrine, epinephrine, and histamine from the cytoplasm into synaptic vesicles, thus contributing to determination of the size of releasable neurotransmitter vesicular pools. Potential involvement of VMAT2 gene variants in the etiology of schizophrenia and related disorders was tested using polymorphic VMAT2 gene markers in 156 subjects from 16 multiplex pedigrees with schizophrenia, schizophreniform, schizoaffective, and schizotypal disorders and mood incongruent psychotic depression. Assuming genetic homogeneity, complete ({theta} = 0.0) linkage to the schizophrenia spectrum was excluded under both dominant and recessive models. Allelic variants at the VMAT2 locus do not appear to provide major genetic contributions to the etiology of schizophrenia spectrum disorders in these pedigrees. 16 refs.

  7. GLTP mediated non-vesicular GM1 transport between native membranes.

    Ines Lauria

    Full Text Available Lipid transfer proteins (LTPs are emerging as key players in lipid homeostasis by mediating non-vesicular transport steps between two membrane surfaces. Little is known about the driving force that governs the direction of transport in cells. Using the soluble LTP glycolipid transfer protein (GLTP, we examined GM1 (monosialotetrahexosyl-ganglioside transfer to native membrane surfaces. With artificial GM1 donor liposomes, GLTP can be used to increase glycolipid levels over natural levels in either side of the membrane leaflet, i.e., external or cytosolic. In a system with native donor- and acceptor-membranes, we find that GLTP balances highly variable GM1 concentrations in a population of membranes from one cell type, and in addition, transfers lipids between membranes from different cell types. Glycolipid transport is highly efficient, independent of cofactors, solely driven by the chemical potential of GM1 and not discriminating between the extra- and intracellular membrane leaflet. We conclude that GLTP mediated non-vesicular lipid trafficking between native membranes is driven by simple thermodynamic principles and that for intracellular transport less than 1 µM GLTP would be required in the cytosol. Furthermore, the data demonstrates the suitability of GLTP as a tool for artificially increasing glycolipid levels in cellular membranes.

  8. GLTP mediated non-vesicular GM1 transport between native membranes.

    Lauria, Ines; van Üüm, Jan; Mjumjunov-Crncevic, Esmina; Walrafen, David; Spitta, Luis; Thiele, Christoph; Lang, Thorsten

    2013-01-01

    Lipid transfer proteins (LTPs) are emerging as key players in lipid homeostasis by mediating non-vesicular transport steps between two membrane surfaces. Little is known about the driving force that governs the direction of transport in cells. Using the soluble LTP glycolipid transfer protein (GLTP), we examined GM1 (monosialotetrahexosyl-ganglioside) transfer to native membrane surfaces. With artificial GM1 donor liposomes, GLTP can be used to increase glycolipid levels over natural levels in either side of the membrane leaflet, i.e., external or cytosolic. In a system with native donor- and acceptor-membranes, we find that GLTP balances highly variable GM1 concentrations in a population of membranes from one cell type, and in addition, transfers lipids between membranes from different cell types. Glycolipid transport is highly efficient, independent of cofactors, solely driven by the chemical potential of GM1 and not discriminating between the extra- and intracellular membrane leaflet. We conclude that GLTP mediated non-vesicular lipid trafficking between native membranes is driven by simple thermodynamic principles and that for intracellular transport less than 1 µM GLTP would be required in the cytosol. Furthermore, the data demonstrates the suitability of GLTP as a tool for artificially increasing glycolipid levels in cellular membranes. PMID:23555818

  9. Reduced vesicular monoamine transport disrupts serotonin signaling but does not cause serotonergic degeneration

    Alter, Shawn P.; Stout, Kristen A.; Lohr, Kelly M.; Taylor, Tonya N.; Shepherd, Kennie R.; Wang, Minzheng; Guillot, Thomas S.; Miller, Gary W.

    2016-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that mice with reduced expression of the vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2 LO) undergo age-related degeneration of the catecholamine-producing neurons of the substantia nigra pars compacta and locus ceruleus and exhibit motor disturbances and depressive-like behavior. In this work, we investigated the effects of reduced vesicular transport on the function and viability of serotonin neurons in these mice. Adult (4–6 months of age), VMAT2 LO mice exhibit dramatically reduced (90%) serotonin release capacity, as measured by fast scan cyclic voltammetry. We observed changes in serotonin receptor responsivity in in vivo pharmacological assays. Aged (months) VMAT2 LO mice exhibited abolished 5-HT1A autoreceptor sensitivity, as determined by 8-OH-DPAT (0.1 mg/kg) induction of hypothermia. When challenged with the 5HT2 agonist, 2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodoamphetamine (1 mg/kg), VMAT2 LO mice exhibited a marked increase (50%) in head twitch responses. We observed sparing of serotonergic terminals in aged mice (18–24 months) throughout the forebrain by SERT immunohistochemistry and [3H]-paroxetine binding in striatal homogenates of aged VMAT2 LO mice. In contrast to their loss of catecholamine neurons of the substantia nigra and locus ceruleus, aged VMAT2 LO mice do not exhibit a change in the number of serotonergic (TPH2 +) neurons within the dorsal raphe, as measured by unbiased stereology at 26–30 months. Collectively, these data indicate that reduced vesicular monoamine transport significantly disrupts serotonergic signaling, but does not drive degeneration of serotonin neurons. PMID:26428905

  10. Brain dopamine-serotonin vesicular transport disease presenting as a severe infantile hypotonic parkinsonian disorder.

    Jacobsen, Jessie C; Wilson, Callum; Cunningham, Vicki; Glamuzina, Emma; Prosser, Debra O; Love, Donald R; Burgess, Trent; Taylor, Juliet; Swan, Brendan; Hill, Rosamund; Robertson, Stephen P; Snell, Russell G; Lehnert, Klaus

    2016-03-01

    Two male siblings from a consanguineous union presented in early infancy with marked truncal hypotonia, a general paucity of movement, extrapyramidal signs and cognitive delay. By mid-childhood they had made little developmental progress and remained severely hypotonic and bradykinetic. They developed epilepsy and had problems with autonomic dysfunction and oculogyric crises. They had a number of orthopaedic problems secondary to their hypotonia. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) neurotransmitters were initially normal, apart from mildly elevated 5-hydroxyindolacetic acid, and the children did not respond favourably to a trial of levodopa-carbidopa. The youngest died from respiratory complications at 10 years of age. Repeat CSF neurotransmitters in the older sibling at eight years of age showed slightly low homovanillic acid and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid levels. Whole-exome sequencing revealed a novel mutation homozygous in both children in the monoamine transporter gene SLC18A2 (p.Pro237His), resulting in brain dopamine-serotonin vesicular transport disease. This is the second family to be described with a mutation in this gene. Treatment with the dopamine agonist pramipexole in the surviving child resulted in mild improvements in alertness, communication, and eye movements. This case supports the identification of the causal mutation in the original case, expands the clinical phenotype of brain dopamine-serotonin vesicular transport disease and confirms that pramipexole treatment may lead to symptomatic improvement in affected individuals. PMID:26497564

  11. Orf virus interferes with MHC class I surface expression by targeting vesicular transport and Golgi

    Rohde Jörg

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Orf virus (ORFV, a zoonotic Parapoxvirus, causes pustular skin lesions in small ruminants (goat and sheep. Intriguingly, ORFV can repeatedly infect its host, despite the induction of a specific immunity. These immune modulating and immune evading properties are still unexplained. Results Here, we describe that ORFV infection of permissive cells impairs the intracellular transport of MHC class I molecules (MHC I as a result of structural disruption and fragmentation of the Golgi apparatus. Depending on the duration of infection, we observed a pronounced co-localization of MHC I and COP-I vesicular structures as well as a reduction of MHC I surface expression of up to 50%. These subversion processes are associated with early ORFV gene expression and are accompanied by disturbed carbohydrate trimming of post-ER MHC I. The MHC I population remaining on the cell surface shows an extended half-life, an effect that might be partially controlled also by late ORFV genes. Conclusions The presented data demonstrate that ORFV down-regulates MHC I surface expression in infected cells by targeting the late vesicular export machinery and the structure and function of the Golgi apparatus, which might aid to escape cellular immune recognition.

  12. Vesicular glutamate transporter 1 orchestrates recruitment of other synaptic vesicle cargo proteins during synaptic vesicle recycling.

    Pan, Ping-Yue; Marrs, Julia; Ryan, Timothy A

    2015-09-11

    A long standing question in synaptic physiology is how neurotransmitter-filled vesicles are rebuilt after exocytosis. Among the first steps in this process is the endocytic retrieval of the transmembrane proteins that are enriched in synaptic vesicles (SVs). At least six types of transmembrane proteins must be recovered, but the rules for how this multiple cargo selection is accomplished are poorly understood. Among these SV cargos is the vesicular glutamate transporter (vGlut). We show here that vGlut1 has a strong influence on the kinetics of retrieval of half of the known SV cargos and that specifically impairing the endocytosis of vGlut1 in turn slows down other SV cargos, demonstrating that cargo retrieval is a collective cargo-driven process. Finally, we demonstrate that different cargos can be retrieved in the same synapse with different kinetics, suggesting that additional post-endocytic sorting steps likely occur in the nerve terminal. PMID:26224632

  13. Motor dysfunction in cerebellar Purkinje cell-specific vesicular GABA transporter knockout mice

    Mikiko eKayakabe

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA is a major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the adult mammalian central nervous system and plays modulatory roles in neural development. The vesicular GABA transporter (VGAT is an essential molecule for GABAergic neurotransmission due to its role in vesicular GABA release. Cerebellar Purkinje cells (PCs are GABAergic projection neurons that are indispensable for cerebellar function. To elucidate the significance of VGAT in cerebellar PCs, we generated and characterized PC-specific VGAT knockout (L7-VGAT mice. VGAT mRNAs and proteins were specifically absent in the 40-week-old L7-VGAT PCs. The morphological charactereistics, such as lamination and foliation of the cerebellar cortex, of the L7-VGAT mice were similar to those of the control littermate mice. Moreover, the protein expression levels and patterns of pre- (calbindin and parvalbumin and postsynaptic (GABA-A receptor α1 subunit (GABAARα1 and gephyrin molecules between the L7-VGAT and control mice were similar in the deep cerebellar nuclei that receive PC projections. However, the L7-VGAT mice performed poorly in the accelerating rotarod test and displayed ataxic gait in the footprint test. The L7-VGAT mice also exhibited severer ataxia as VGAT deficits progressed. These results suggest that VGAT in cerebellar Purkinje cells is not essential for the rough maintenance of cerebellar structure, but does play an important role in motor coordination. The L7-VGAT mice are a novel model of ataxia without PC degeneration, and would also be useful for studying the role of Purkinje cells in cognition and emotion.

  14. New Insights on Plant Cell Elongation: A Role for Acetylcholine

    Gian-Pietro Di Sansebastiano

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the effect of auxin and acetylcholine on the expression of the tomato expansin gene LeEXPA2, a specific expansin gene expressed in elongating tomato hypocotyl segments. Since auxin interferes with clathrin-mediated endocytosis, in order to regulate cellular and developmental responses we produced protoplasts from tomato elongating hypocotyls and followed the endocytotic marker, FM4-64, internalization in response to treatments. Tomato protoplasts were observed during auxin and acetylcholine treatments after transient expression of chimerical markers of volume-control related compartments such as vacuoles. Here we describe the contribution of auxin and acetylcholine to LeEXPA2 expression regulation and we support the hypothesis that a possible subcellular target of acetylcholine signal is the vesicular transport, shedding some light on the characterization of this small molecule as local mediator in the plant physiological response.

  15. New insights on plant cell elongation: a role for acetylcholine.

    Di Sansebastiano, Gian-Pietro; Fornaciari, Silvia; Barozzi, Fabrizio; Piro, Gabriella; Arru, Laura

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the effect of auxin and acetylcholine on the expression of the tomato expansin gene LeEXPA2, a specific expansin gene expressed in elongating tomato hypocotyl segments. Since auxin interferes with clathrin-mediated endocytosis, in order to regulate cellular and developmental responses we produced protoplasts from tomato elongating hypocotyls and followed the endocytotic marker, FM4-64, internalization in response to treatments. Tomato protoplasts were observed during auxin and acetylcholine treatments after transient expression of chimerical markers of volume-control related compartments such as vacuoles. Here we describe the contribution of auxin and acetylcholine to LeEXPA2 expression regulation and we support the hypothesis that a possible subcellular target of acetylcholine signal is the vesicular transport, shedding some light on the characterization of this small molecule as local mediator in the plant physiological response. PMID:24642879

  16. Vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (Vmat2) knockdown elicits anxiety-like behavior in zebrafish.

    Wang, Yali; Li, Siyue; Liu, Wenwen; Wang, Fen; Hu, Li-Fang; Zhong, Zhao-Min; Wang, Han; Liu, Chun-Feng

    2016-02-19

    Vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (Vmat2) is widely distributed in the central nervous system, and responsible for uptaking transmitters into the vesicles. However, whether Vmat2-deficiency is related to the anxiety is rarely investigated, especially in zebrafish. Here, we reported Vmat2 heterzygous mutant zebrafish displayed anxiety-like behavior. The mutants spent less time in the top area and took longer latency to the top in the novel tank test. Consistently, they showed dark avoidance in the light/dark box test, with longer duration in the light zone and increased number of crossing between the two zones. Monoamine concentration analysis showed that the levels of monoamine neurotransmitters including dopamine (DA), 5-hydroxy tryptamine (5-HT) and norepinephrine (NE), as well as their metabolites were decreased in VMAT mutants. Taken together, these findings suggest that Vmat2 heterzygous mutant zebrafish may serve as a new model of anxiety, which may be related with the low level of DA, 5-HT and NE. PMID:26801555

  17. Genomic convergence analysis of schizophrenia: mRNA sequencing reveals altered synaptic vesicular transport in post-mortem cerebellum.

    Joann Mudge

    Full Text Available Schizophrenia (SCZ is a common, disabling mental illness with high heritability but complex, poorly understood genetic etiology. As the first phase of a genomic convergence analysis of SCZ, we generated 16.7 billion nucleotides of short read, shotgun sequences of cDNA from post-mortem cerebellar cortices of 14 patients and six, matched controls. A rigorous analysis pipeline was developed for analysis of digital gene expression studies. Sequences aligned to approximately 33,200 transcripts in each sample, with average coverage of 450 reads per gene. Following adjustments for confounding clinical, sample and experimental sources of variation, 215 genes differed significantly in expression between cases and controls. Golgi apparatus, vesicular transport, membrane association, Zinc binding and regulation of transcription were over-represented among differentially expressed genes. Twenty three genes with altered expression and involvement in presynaptic vesicular transport, Golgi function and GABAergic neurotransmission define a unifying molecular hypothesis for dysfunction in cerebellar cortex in SCZ.

  18. Newly synthesized G protein of vesicular stomatitis virus is not transported to the cell surface during mitosis

    1983-01-01

    Indirect immunofluorescence, immunoelectron microscopy, and digestion by protease were used to study intracellular transport of the G protein of vesicular stomatitis virus in mitotic and interphase cells. Quantitation showed that the appearance of G protein on the surface of mitotic cells was inhibited at least 10-fold when compared with that on interphase cells, even though similar amounts of viral protein were being synthesized. This dramatic inhibition, taken together with the simultaneous...

  19. Quantification of striatal vesicular monoamine transporters in the human brain with [18F]AV133

    Full text:Background: Vesicular monoamine transporter type 2 (VMAT2) imaging with 11C-DTBZ has proven useful for the evaluation of monoaminergic terminals in vivo with PET. However, the 20 min half-life of C-11 restricts the use of 11C-DTBZ to PET centres with on-site cyclotron. The aim of this study was to assess 18F-AV133, a novel VMAT2 binding ligand, in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients, age-matched healthy controls (HC), as well as in dementia with Lewy Bodies (DLB) and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Methods: Twenty-two participants (10 PD; 7 HC, 4 DLB and 1 AD) underwent PET imaging after iv injection of 250 MBq of 18F-AV133. Distribution volume ratios (DVR) were calculated through graphical analysis using a reference tissue model with the primary visual cortex as input function. Results: Significantly lower striatal DVRs were observed in PD (1.74±0.46) when compared with HC (3.0±0.20; p<0.001, effect size = 5.7). VMAT2 reductions were greatest in posterior putamen (-55%) than in anterior putamen (-45%) or caudate nuclei (-25%). Similar reductions were observed in DLB patients. Both HC and AD scans were clearly distinguishable from PD subjects. Conclusions: Our results show that striatal VMAT2 can be quantified in vivo with 18F-AV133. The longer half-life of F-18 will allow for wider application of monoaminergic imaging with PET in a variety of neurodegenerative and neurotoxic conditions, allowing better differential diagnosis and treatment monitoring.

  20. A glial variant of the vesicular monoamine transporter is required to store histamine in the Drosophila visual system.

    Rafael Romero-Calderón

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Unlike other monoamine neurotransmitters, the mechanism by which the brain's histamine content is regulated remains unclear. In mammals, vesicular monoamine transporters (VMATs are expressed exclusively in neurons and mediate the storage of histamine and other monoamines. We have studied the visual system of Drosophila melanogaster in which histamine is the primary neurotransmitter released from photoreceptor cells. We report here that a novel mRNA splice variant of Drosophila VMAT (DVMAT-B is expressed not in neurons but rather in a small subset of glia in the lamina of the fly's optic lobe. Histamine contents are reduced by mutation of dVMAT, but can be partially restored by specifically expressing DVMAT-B in glia. Our results suggest a novel role for a monoamine transporter in glia that may be relevant to histamine homeostasis in other systems.

  1. Differential maturation of vesicular glutamate and GABA transporter expression in the mouse auditory forebrain during the first weeks of hearing.

    Hackett, Troy A; Clause, Amanda R; Takahata, Toru; Hackett, Nicholas J; Polley, Daniel B

    2016-06-01

    Vesicular transporter proteins are an essential component of the presynaptic machinery that regulates neurotransmitter storage and release. They also provide a key point of control for homeostatic signaling pathways that maintain balanced excitation and inhibition following changes in activity levels, including the onset of sensory experience. To advance understanding of their roles in the developing auditory forebrain, we tracked the expression of the vesicular transporters of glutamate (VGluT1, VGluT2) and GABA (VGAT) in primary auditory cortex (A1) and medial geniculate body (MGB) of developing mice (P7, P11, P14, P21, adult) before and after ear canal opening (~P11-P13). RNA sequencing, in situ hybridization, and immunohistochemistry were combined to track changes in transporter expression and document regional patterns of transcript and protein localization. Overall, vesicular transporter expression changed the most between P7 and P21. The expression patterns and maturational trajectories of each marker varied by brain region, cortical layer, and MGB subdivision. VGluT1 expression was highest in A1, moderate in MGB, and increased with age in both regions. VGluT2 mRNA levels were low in A1 at all ages, but high in MGB, where adult levels were reached by P14. VGluT2 immunoreactivity was prominent in both regions. VGluT1 (+) and VGluT2 (+) transcripts were co-expressed in MGB and A1 somata, but co-localization of immunoreactive puncta was not detected. In A1, VGAT mRNA levels were relatively stable from P7 to adult, while immunoreactivity increased steadily. VGAT (+) transcripts were rare in MGB neurons, whereas VGAT immunoreactivity was robust at all ages. Morphological changes in immunoreactive puncta were found in two regions after ear canal opening. In the ventral MGB, a decrease in VGluT2 puncta density was accompanied by an increase in puncta size. In A1, perisomatic VGAT and VGluT1 terminals became prominent around the neuronal somata. Overall, the

  2. Effects of Acetylcholine, Cytochalasin B and Amiprophos methyl on Phloem Transport in Radish (Raphanus sativas)

    Chong-Jun Yang; Zhi-Xi Zhai; Yu-Hai Guo; Peng Gao

    2007-01-01

    We investigated the role of the "sieve tube-companion cell complex" lining the tube periphery, particularly the microfilament and microtubule, in assisting the pushing of phloem sap flow. We made a simple phloem transport system with a living radish plant, in which the conducting channel was exposed for local treatment with chemicals that are effective in modulating protoplasmic movement (acetylcholine, (ACh) a neurotransmitter in animals and insects; cytochalasin B, (CB) a specific inhibitor of many cellular responses that are mediated by microfilament systems and amiprophos-methyl, (APM) a specific inhibitor of many cellular responses that are mediated by microtubule systems). Their effects on phloem transport were estimated by two experimental devices: (i) a comparison of changes in the amount of assimilates in terms of carbohydrates and 14C-labeled photosynthetic production that is left in the leaf blade of treated plants; and (ii) distribution patterns of 14C-labeled leaf assimilates in the phloem transport system. The results indicate that CB and APM markedly inhibited the transfer of photosynthetic product from leaf to root via the leaf vein, while ACh enhanced the transfer of photosynthetic product in low concentrations (5.0×10-4 mol/L) but inhibited it in higher concentrations (2.0×10-3 mol/L) from leaf to root via the leaf vein. Autoradiograph imaging clearly reveals that ACh treatment is more effective than the control, and both CB and APM treatments effectively inhibit the passage of radioactive assimilates. All of the results support the postulation that the peripheral protoplasm in the sieve tube serves not only as a passive semi-permeable membrane, but is also directly involved in phloem transport.

  3. Phosphatidylserine flipping enhances membrane curvature and negative charge required for vesicular transport

    Xu, Peng; Baldridge, Ryan D.; Chi, Richard J.; Burd, Christopher G.; Graham, Todd R.

    2013-01-01

    Vesicle-mediated protein transport between organelles of the secretory and endocytic pathways is strongly influenced by the composition and organization of membrane lipids. In budding yeast, protein transport between the trans-Golgi network (TGN) and early endosome (EE) requires Drs2, a phospholipid translocase in the type IV P-type ATPase family. However, downstream effectors of Drs2 and specific phospholipid substrate requirements for protein transport in this pathway are unknown. Here, we ...

  4. Vesicular glutamate transporter VGLUT1 has a role in hippocampal long-term potentiation and spatial reversal learning.

    Balschun, Detlef; Moechars, Diederik; Callaerts-Vegh, Zsuzsanna; Vermaercke, Ben; Van Acker, Nathalie; Andries, Luc; D'Hooge, Rudi

    2010-03-01

    Vesicular glutamate transporters 1 and 2 (VGLUT1, VGLUT2) show largely complementary distribution in the mature rodent brain and tend to segregate to synapses with different physiological properties. In the hippocampus, VGLUT1 is the dominate subtype in adult animals, whereas VGLUT2 is transiently expressed during early postnatal development. We generated and characterized VGLUT1 knockout mice in order to examine the functional contribution of this transporter to hippocampal synaptic plasticity and hippocampus-dependent spatial learning. Because complete deletion of VGLUT1 resulted in postnatal lethality, we used heterozygous animals for analysis. Here, we report that deletion of VGLUT1 resulted in impaired hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP) in the CA1 region in vitro. In contrast, heterozygous VGLUT2 mice that were investigated for comparison did not show any changes in LTP. The reduced ability of VGLUT1-deficient mice to express LTP was accompanied by a specific deficit in spatial reversal learning in the water maze. Our data suggest a functional role of VGLUT1 in forms of hippocampal synaptic plasticity that are required to adapt and modify acquired spatial maps to external stimuli and changes. PMID:19574394

  5. Hyphal transport by a vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus of N applied to the soil as ammonium or nitrate

    Johansen, A.; Jakobsen, I.; Jensen, E.S.

    1993-01-01

    Transport of N by hyphae of a vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus was studied under controlled experimental conditions. The N source was applied to the soil as (NH4+)-N-15 or (NH3-)N-15. Cucumis sativus was grown for 25 days, either alone or in symbiosis with Glomus intraradices, in containers...... compartment at 7 and 12 days after labelling, and the concentration of mineral N in the samples was measured from 2 M KCl extracts. Mycorrhizal colonization did not affect plant dry weight. The recovery of N-15 in mycorrhizal plants was 38 or 40%, respectively, when (NH4+)-N-15 or (NO3-)-N-15 was applied. The...... corresponding values for non-mycorrhizal plants were 7 and 16%. The higher N-15 recovery observed in mycorrhizal plants than in non-mycorrhizal plants suggests that hyphal transport of N from the applied N-15 sources towards the host plant had occurred. The concentration of mineral N in the soil of hyphal...

  6. Vesicular Glutamate Transporter 2 Expression in the Rat Pineal Gland: Detailed Analysis of Expression Pattern and Regulatory Mechanism

    Yoshida, Sachine; Hisano, Setsuji

    Melatonin, a hormone secreted by the pineal gland, is closely related physiologically to circadian rhythm, sleep and reproduction, and also psychiatrically to mood disorders in humans. Under circadian control, melatonin secretion is modulated via nocturnal autonomic (adrenergic) stimulation to the gland, which expresses vesicular glutamate transporter (VGLUT) 1, VGLUT2 and a VGLUT1 splice variant (VGLUT1v), glutamatergic markers. Expression of VGLUT2 gene and protein in the intact gland has been reported to exhibit a rhythmic change during a day. To study VGLUT2 expression is under adrenergic control, we here performed an in vitro experiment using dispersed pineal cells of rats. Stimulation of either β-adrenergic receptor or cAMP production to the pineal cells was shown to increase mRNA level of VGLUT2, but not VGLUT1 and VGLUT1v. Because an ability of glutamate to inhibit melatonin production was previously reported in the cultured gland, it is likely that pineal VGLUT2 transports glutamate engaged in the inhibition of melatonin production.

  7. Purification of an N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive protein catalyzing vesicular transport.

    Block, M.R.; Glick, B S; Wilcox, C A; Wieland, F. T.; Rothman, J E

    1988-01-01

    N-Ethylmaleimide (NEM) inhibits protein transport between successive compartments of the Golgi stack in a cell-free system. After inactivation of the Golgi membranes by NEM, transport can be rescued by adding back an appropriately prepared cytosol fraction. This complementation assay has allowed us to purify the NEM-sensitive factor, which we term NSF. The NEM-sensitive factor is a tetramer of 76-kDa subunits, and appears to act catalytically, one tetramer leading to the metabolism of numerou...

  8. Vesicular glutamate transporter 2 (VGLUT2) is co-stored with PACAP in projections from the rat melanopsin-containing retinal ganglion cells

    Engelund, Anna Iversen; Fahrenkrug, Jan; Harrison, Adrian Paul;

    2010-01-01

    locomotor activity (masking), and pupillary light reflex. Two neurotransmitters have been identified in ipRGCs, glutamate and pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP). To date, little is known about their release and interplay. Here, we describe the presence and co-localization of...... probably released from the same nerve terminals. Furthermore, we conclude that VGLUT2 is the preferred subtype of vesicular transporter used by these cells....

  9. How molecular motors are arranged on a cargo is important for vesicular transport.

    Robert P Erickson

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The spatial organization of the cell depends upon intracellular trafficking of cargos hauled along microtubules and actin filaments by the molecular motor proteins kinesin, dynein, and myosin. Although much is known about how single motors function, there is significant evidence that cargos in vivo are carried by multiple motors. While some aspects of multiple motor function have received attention, how the cargo itself--and motor organization on the cargo--affects transport has not been considered. To address this, we have developed a three-dimensional Monte Carlo simulation of motors transporting a spherical cargo, subject to thermal fluctuations that produce both rotational and translational diffusion. We found that these fluctuations could exert a load on the motor(s, significantly decreasing the mean travel distance and velocity of large cargos, especially at large viscosities. In addition, the presence of the cargo could dramatically help the motor to bind productively to the microtubule: the relatively slow translational and rotational diffusion of moderately sized cargos gave the motors ample opportunity to bind to a microtubule before the motor/cargo ensemble diffuses out of range of that microtubule. For rapidly diffusing cargos, the probability of their binding to a microtubule was high if there were nearby microtubules that they could easily reach by translational diffusion. Our simulations found that one reason why motors may be approximately 100 nm long is to improve their 'on' rates when attached to comparably sized cargos. Finally, our results suggested that to efficiently regulate the number of active motors, motors should be clustered together rather than spread randomly over the surface of the cargo. While our simulation uses the specific parameters for kinesin, these effects result from generic properties of the motors, cargos, and filaments, so they should apply to other motors as well.

  10. Familial Dysautonomia (FD Human Embryonic Stem Cell Derived PNS Neurons Reveal that Synaptic Vesicular and Neuronal Transport Genes Are Directly or Indirectly Affected by IKBKAP Downregulation.

    Sharon Lefler

    Full Text Available A splicing mutation in the IKBKAP gene causes Familial Dysautonomia (FD, affecting the IKAP protein expression levels and proper development and function of the peripheral nervous system (PNS. Here we found new molecular insights for the IKAP role and the impact of the FD mutation in the human PNS lineage by using a novel and unique human embryonic stem cell (hESC line homozygous to the FD mutation originated by pre implantation genetic diagnosis (PGD analysis. We found that IKBKAP downregulation during PNS differentiation affects normal migration in FD-hESC derived neural crest cells (NCC while at later stages the PNS neurons show reduced intracellular colocalization between vesicular proteins and IKAP. Comparative wide transcriptome analysis of FD and WT hESC-derived neurons together with the analysis of human brains from FD and WT 12 weeks old embryos and experimental validation of the results confirmed that synaptic vesicular and neuronal transport genes are directly or indirectly affected by IKBKAP downregulation in FD neurons. Moreover we show that kinetin (a drug that corrects IKBKAP alternative splicing promotes the recovery of IKAP expression and these IKAP functional associated genes identified in the study. Altogether, these results support the view that IKAP might be a vesicular like protein that might be involved in neuronal transport in hESC derived PNS neurons. This function seems to be mostly affected in FD-hESC derived PNS neurons probably reflecting some PNS neuronal dysfunction observed in FD.

  11. Role of acetylcholine and polyspecific cation transporters in serotonin-induced bronchoconstriction in the mouse

    Koepsell Hermann

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has been proposed that serotonin (5-HT-mediated constriction of the murine trachea is largely dependent on acetylcholine (ACh released from the epithelium. We recently demonstrated that ACh can be released from non-neuronal cells by corticosteroid-sensitive polyspecific organic cation transporters (OCTs, which are also expressed by airway epithelial cells. Hence, the hypothesis emerged that 5-HT evokes bronchoconstriction by inducing release of ACh from epithelial cells via OCTs. Methods We tested this hypothesis by analysing bronchoconstriction in precision-cut murine lung slices using OCT and muscarinic ACh receptor knockout mouse strains. Epithelial ACh content was measured by HPLC, and the tissue distribution of OCT isoforms was determined by immunohistochemistry. Results Epithelial ACh content was significantly higher in OCT1/2 double-knockout mice (42 ± 10 % of the content of the epithelium-denuded trachea, n = 9 than in wild-type mice (16.8 ± 3.6 %, n = 11. In wild-type mice, 5-HT (1 μM caused a bronchoconstriction that slightly exceeded that evoked by muscarine (1 μM in intact bronchi but amounted to only 66% of the response to muscarine after epithelium removal. 5-HT-induced bronchoconstriction was undiminished in M2/M3 muscarinic ACh receptor double-knockout mice which were entirely unresponsive to muscarine. Corticosterone (1 μM significantly reduced 5-HT-induced bronchoconstriction in wild-type and OCT1/2 double-knockout mice, but not in OCT3 knockout mice. This effect persisted after removal of the bronchial epithelium. Immunohistochemistry localized OCT3 to the bronchial smooth muscle. Conclusion The doubling of airway epithelial ACh content in OCT1/2-/- mice is consistent with the concept that OCT1 and/or 2 mediate ACh release from the respiratory epithelium. This effect, however, does not contribute to 5-HT-induced constriction of murine intrapulmonary bronchi. Instead, this activity involves 1 a non

  12. Altered microtubule dynamics and vesicular transport in mouse and human MeCP2-deficient astrocytes.

    Delépine, Chloé; Meziane, Hamid; Nectoux, Juliette; Opitz, Matthieu; Smith, Amos B; Ballatore, Carlo; Saillour, Yoann; Bennaceur-Griscelli, Annelise; Chang, Qiang; Williams, Emily Cunningham; Dahan, Maxime; Duboin, Aurélien; Billuart, Pierre; Herault, Yann; Bienvenu, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a rare X-linked neurodevelopmental disorder, characterized by normal post-natal development followed by a sudden deceleration in brain growth with progressive loss of acquired motor and language skills, stereotypic hand movements and severe cognitive impairment. Mutations in the methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MECP2) cause more than 95% of classic cases. Recently, it has been shown that the loss of Mecp2 from glia negatively influences neurons in a non-cell-autonomous fashion, and that in Mecp2-null mice, re-expression of Mecp2 preferentially in astrocytes significantly improved locomotion and anxiety levels, restored respiratory abnormalities to a normal pattern and greatly prolonged lifespan compared with globally null mice. We now report that microtubule (MT)-dependent vesicle transport is altered in Mecp2-deficient astrocytes from newborn Mecp2-deficient mice compared with control wild-type littermates. Similar observation has been made in human MECP2 p.Arg294* iPSC-derived astrocytes. Importantly, administration of Epothilone D, a brain-penetrant MT-stabilizing natural product, was found to restore MT dynamics in Mecp2-deficient astrocytes and in MECP2 p.Arg294* iPSC-derived astrocytes in vitro. Finally, we report that relatively low weekly doses of Epothilone D also partially reversed the impaired exploratory behavior in Mecp2(308/y) male mice. These findings represent a first step toward the validation of an innovative treatment for RTT. PMID:26604147

  13. Association study of the vesicular monoamine transporter 1 (VMAT1 gene with schizophrenia in a Japanese population

    Arima Kunimasa

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vesicular monoamine transporters (VMATs mediate accumulation of monoamines such as serotonin, dopamine, adrenaline, and noradrenaline from the cytoplasm into storage organelles. The VMAT1 (alternatively solute carrier family 18: SLC18A1 regulates such biogenic amines in neuroendocrine systems. The VMAT1 gene maps to chromosome 8p21.3, a locus with strong evidence of linkage with schizophrenia. A recent study reported that a non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP of the gene (Pro4Thr was associated with schizophrenia. Methods We attempted to replicate this finding in a Japanese sample of 354 schizophrenics and 365 controls. In addition, we examined 3 other non-synonymous SNPs (Thr98Ser, Thr136Ile, and Val392Leu. Genotyping was performed by the TaqMan allelic discrimination assay. Results There was no significant difference in genotype or allele distribution of the three SNPs of Pro4Thr, Thr136Ile, or Val392Leu between patients and controls. There was, however, a significant difference in genotype and allele distributions for the Thr98Ser polymorphism between the two groups (P = 0.01 for genotype and allele. When sexes were examined separately, significant differences were observed in females (P = 0.006 for genotype, P = 0.003 for allele, but not in males. The Thr98 allele was more common in female patients than in female controls (odds ratio 1.69, 95% CI 1.19–2.40, P = 0.003. Haplotype-based analyses also provided evidence for a significant association in females. Conclusion We failed to replicate the previously reported association of Pro4Thr of the VMAT1 gene with schizophrenia. However, we obtained evidence for a possible role of the Thr98Ser in giving susceptibility to schizophrenia in women.

  14. INTERACTION OF VESICULAR MONOAMINE TRANSPORTER 2 (VMAT2 AND NEUROMELANIN PIGMENT AMONG THE MIDBRAIN DOPAMINERGIC NEURONS, IN MAN

    P. Pasbakhsh

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Neuromelanin (NM pigment accumulates with age in catecholaminergic neurons in man, and the ventral substantia nigra dopaminergic neurons that are the most vulnerable to degeneration in Parkinson's disease (PD contain the greatest amount of this pigment. In vitro data indicate that NM pigment is formed from the excess cytosolic catecholamine that is not accumulated into synaptic vesicles via the vesicular monoamine transporter2 (VMAT2. Using semi-quantitative immunohistochemical methods in human postmortem brain, we sought to examine the relationship between the contents of VMAT2 and NM pigment. The immunostaining intensity (ISI was measured for VMAT2 in two regions of the midbrain dopaminergic cell complex. The ISI of the cells was related to the density of NM pigment within the cells. We also measured the ISI for tyrosine hydroxylase (TH and examined the noradrenergic neurons in the locus coeruleus (LC. In brains 22-65 years of age: 1 ventral substantia nigra neurons had the lowest VMAT2 ISI of all neurons in the midbrain cell complex, whereas over 2-fold higher levels are found in most ventral tegmental area neurons; 2 there was an inverse relationship between VMAT2 ISI and neuromelanin pigment in the midbrain dompaminergic neurons; 3 neurons with the highest VMAT2 ISI resided in the LC; 4 neurons with high VMAT2 ISI also had high TH ISI; and 5 in the newborn brain, which has not yet accumulated neuromelanin pigment in the aminergic neurons, the regional distribution of VMAT2 and TH-ISI was similar to that found in the adult brain. These data support the hypothesis that among the midbrain dopaminergic neurons, the ventral substantia nigra dopamine neurons accumulate the highest levels of NM pigment because they have the lowest levels of VMAT2, which thereby renders them especially vulnerable to degeneration in PD.

  15. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptor: subunit structure, functional binding sites, and ion transport properties

    The structure of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor has been highly conserved during animal evolution, and in all the species and tissues studied so far, including mammals, it is a pseudosymmetric, pentameric complex of related subunits with very similar physical properties. All subunits of these nicotinic receptors were derived from a common ancestral gene, probably by way of gene duplications occurring very early in animal evolution. 45 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs

  16. Evidence that coated vesicles transport acetylcholine receptors to the surface membrane of chick myotubes

    1984-01-01

    Coated vesicles are present in the myoplasm of embryonic chick myotubes grown in vitro. They are most numerous beneath regions of the surface membrane that contain a high density of acetylcholine receptors (AChR). Prolonged exposure of myotubes to saline extract of chick brain increases the number of intracellular AChR and the number of coated vesicles. This suggests that coated vesicles contain AChR, and this hypothesis was tested with horseradish peroxidase-alpha-bungarotoxin (HRP-alpha BTX...

  17. Binding characteristics of 9-fluoropropyl-(+)-dihydrotetrabenzazine (AV-133) to the vesicular monoamine transporter type 2 in rats

    Tsao, H.-H. [Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Lin, K.-J. [Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Department of Nuclear Medicine, Chang Gung University and Memorial Hospital, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Juang, J.-H. [Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Chung Gung University and Chung Gung Memorial Hospital, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Skovronsky, Daniel M. [Avid Radiopharmaceuticals, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Yen, T.-C. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Chang Gung University and Memorial Hospital, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Wey, S.-P. [Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Kung, M.-P. [Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States)], E-mail: kungmp@sunmac.spect.upenn.edu

    2010-05-15

    The vesicular monoamine transporter type 2 (VMAT2) is highly expressed in pancreatic {beta}-cells and thus has been proposed to be a potential target for measuring {beta}-cell mass (BCM) by molecular imaging. C-11- and F-18-labeled tetrabenazine derivatives targeting VMAT2 have shown some promising results as potential biomarkers for BCM. In the present study, we examined the binding characteristics of 9-fluoropropyl-(+)-dihydrotetrabenzazine ([{sup 18}F]AV-133), a potential PET tracer for BCM imaging, in rat pancreas and rat brain. Methods: Pancreatic exocrine cells and pancreatic islet cells were isolated and purified from Sprague-Dawley rats. Membrane homogenates, prepared from both pancreatic exocrine and islet cells as well as from brain striatum and hypothalamus regions, were used for in vitro binding studies. In vitro and ex vivo autoradiography studies with [{sup 18}F]AV-133 were performed on rat brain and rat pancreas sections. Immunohistochemistry studies were performed to confirm the distribution of VMAT2 on islet {beta}-cells. Results: Excellent binding affinities of [{sup 18}F]AV-133 were observed in rat striatum and hypothalamus homogenates with K{sub d} values of 0.19 and 0.25 nM, respectively. In contrast to single-site binding observed in rat striatum homogenates, rat islet cell homogenates showed two saturable binding sites (site A: K{sub d}=6.76 nM, B{sub max}=60 fmol/mg protein; site B: K{sub d}=241 nM, B{sub max}=1500 fmol/mg protein). Rat exocrine pancreas homogenates showed only a single low-affinity binding site (K{sub d}=209 nM), which was similar to site B in islet cells. In vitro autoradiography of [{sup 18}F]AV-133 using frozen sections of rat pancreas showed specific labeling of islets, as evidenced by co-localization with anti-insulin antibody. Ex vivo VMAT2 pancreatic autoradiography in the rat, however, was not successful, in contrast to the excellent ex vivo autoradiography of VMAT2 binding sites in the brain. In vivo/ex vivo islet

  18. In vivo imaging of vesicular monoamine transporter 2 in pancreas using an {sup 18}F epoxide derivative of tetrabenazine

    Kung, Hank F. [Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Department of Pharmacology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States)], E-mail: kunghf@sunmac.spect.upenn.edu; Lieberman, Brian P. [Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Zhuang Zhiping [Avid Radiopharmaceuticals, Inc., Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Oya, Shunichi; Kung Meiping [Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Choi, Seok Rye [Avid Radiopharmaceuticals, Inc., Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Poessl, Karl; Blankemeyer, Eric; Hou, Catherine [Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Skovronsky, Daniel [Avid Radiopharmaceuticals, Inc., Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Kilbourn, Michael [Department of Radiology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

    2008-11-15

    Objectives: Development of imaging agents for pancreatic beta cell mass may provide tools for studying insulin-secreting beta cells and their relationship with diabetes mellitus. In this paper, a new imaging agent, [{sup 18}F](+)-2-oxiranyl-3-isobutyl-9-(3-fluoropropoxy)-10-methoxy-2,3,4,6,7, 11b-hexahydro-1H-pyrido[2,1-a]isoquinoline [{sup 18}F](+)4, which displays properties targeting vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2) binding sites of beta cells in the pancreas, was evaluated as a positron emission tomography (PET) agent for estimating beta cell mass in vivo. The hydrolyzable epoxide group of (+)4 may provide a mechanism for shifting biodistribution from liver to kidney, thus reducing the background signal. Methods: Both {sup 18}F- and {sup 19}F-labeled (+) and (-) isomers of 4 were synthesized and evaluated. Organ distribution was carried out in normal rats. Uptake of [{sup 18}F](+)4 in pancreas of normal rats was measured and correlated with blocking studies using competing drugs, (+)dihydrotetrabenazine [(+)-DTBZ] or 9-fluoropropyl-(+)dihydro tetrabenazine [FP-(+)-DTBZ, (+)2]. Results: In vitro binding study of VMAT2 using rat brain striatum showed a K{sub i} value of 0.08 and 0.15 nM for the (+)4 and ({+-})4, respectively. The in vivo biodistribution of [{sup 18}F](+)4 in rats showed the highest uptake in the pancreas (2.68 %ID/g at 60 min postinjection). In vivo competition experiments with cold FP-(+)-DTBZ, (+)2, (3.5 mg/kg, 5 min iv pretreatment) led to a significant reduction of pancreas uptake (85% blockade at 60 min). The inactive isomer [{sup 18}F](-)4 showed significantly lower pancreas uptake (0.22 %ID/g at 30 min postinjection). Animal PET imaging studies of [{sup 18}F](+)4 in normal rats demonstrated an avid pancreatic uptake in rats. Conclusion: The preliminary results suggest that the epoxide, [{sup 18}F](+)4, is highly selective in binding to VMAT2 and it has an excellent uptake in the pancreas of rats. The liver uptake was significantly

  19. In vivo imaging of vesicular monoamine transporter 2 in pancreas using an 18F epoxide derivative of tetrabenazine

    Objectives: Development of imaging agents for pancreatic beta cell mass may provide tools for studying insulin-secreting beta cells and their relationship with diabetes mellitus. In this paper, a new imaging agent, [18F](+)-2-oxiranyl-3-isobutyl-9-(3-fluoropropoxy)-10-methoxy-2,3,4,6,7, 11b-hexahydro-1H-pyrido[2,1-a]isoquinoline [18F](+)4, which displays properties targeting vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2) binding sites of beta cells in the pancreas, was evaluated as a positron emission tomography (PET) agent for estimating beta cell mass in vivo. The hydrolyzable epoxide group of (+)4 may provide a mechanism for shifting biodistribution from liver to kidney, thus reducing the background signal. Methods: Both 18F- and 19F-labeled (+) and (-) isomers of 4 were synthesized and evaluated. Organ distribution was carried out in normal rats. Uptake of [18F](+)4 in pancreas of normal rats was measured and correlated with blocking studies using competing drugs, (+)dihydrotetrabenazine [(+)-DTBZ] or 9-fluoropropyl-(+)dihydro tetrabenazine [FP-(+)-DTBZ, (+)2]. Results: In vitro binding study of VMAT2 using rat brain striatum showed a Ki value of 0.08 and 0.15 nM for the (+)4 and (±)4, respectively. The in vivo biodistribution of [18F](+)4 in rats showed the highest uptake in the pancreas (2.68 %ID/g at 60 min postinjection). In vivo competition experiments with cold FP-(+)-DTBZ, (+)2, (3.5 mg/kg, 5 min iv pretreatment) led to a significant reduction of pancreas uptake (85% blockade at 60 min). The inactive isomer [18F](-)4 showed significantly lower pancreas uptake (0.22 %ID/g at 30 min postinjection). Animal PET imaging studies of [18F](+)4 in normal rats demonstrated an avid pancreatic uptake in rats. Conclusion: The preliminary results suggest that the epoxide, [18F](+)4, is highly selective in binding to VMAT2 and it has an excellent uptake in the pancreas of rats. The liver uptake was significantly reduced through the use of the epoxide group. Therefore, it

  20. An improved radiosynthesis of [{sup 18}F]AV-133: a PET imaging agent for vesicular monoamine transporter 2

    Zhu Lin; Liu Yajing [Key Laboratory of Radiopharmaceuticals, Beijing Normal University, Ministry of Education, Beijing 100875 (China); Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Ploessl, Karl; Lieberman, Brian [Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Liu Jingying [Key Laboratory of Radiopharmaceuticals, Beijing Normal University, Ministry of Education, Beijing 100875 (China); Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Kung, Hank F. [Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Department of Pharmacology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States)], E-mail: kunghf@sunmac.spect.upenn.edu

    2010-02-15

    Introduction: Recently, a PET tracer, 9-[{sup 18}F]fluoropropyl-(+)-dihydrotetrabenazine ([{sup 18}F]AV-133), targeting vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2) in the central nervous system has been reported. It is currently under Phase II clinical trials to establish its usefulness in the diagnosis of neurodegenerative diseases including dementia with Lewy bodies and Parkinson's disease. The radiolabeling of [{sup 18}F]AV-133, nucleophilic fluorination reaction and potential effects of pseudo-carrier were evaluated by in vivo biodistribution. Methods: The preparation of [{sup 18}F]AV-133 was evaluated under different conditions, specifically by employing different precursors (-OTs or -Br as the leaving group at the 9-propoxy position), reagents (K222/K{sub 2}CO{sub 3} vs. tributylammonium bicarbonate) and solvents (acetonitrile vs. DMSO), reaction temperature and reaction time. With optimized conditions from these experiments, radiosynthesis and purification with solid-phase extraction (SPE) of [{sup 18}F]AV-133 were performed by an automated nucleophilic [{sup 18}F]fluorination module. In vivo biodistribution in mice on [{sup 18}F]AV-133 purified by either HPLC (no-carrier-added) or the SPE method (containing a pseudo-carrier) was performed and the results compared. Results: Under a mild fluorination condition (heating at 115 deg. C for 5 min in dimethyl sulfoxide), [{sup 18}F]AV-133 was obtained in a high yield using either -OTs or -Br as the leaving group. However, the -OTs precursor gave better radiochemical yields (>70%, thin layer chromatography analysis) compared to those of the -Br precursor. The optimized reaction conditions were successfully implemented to an automated nucleophilic fluorination module. Labeling and purification of [{sup 18}F]AV133 were readily achieved via this automatic module in good radiochemical yield of 21-41% (n=10) in 40 min. The radiochemical purity was larger than 95%. Biodistribution of SPE-purified product (containing a

  1. Phosphoinositides and vesicular membrane traffic

    Mayinger, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Phosphoinositide lipids were initially discovered as precursors for specific second messengers involved in signal transduction, but have now taken the center stage in controlling many essential processes at virtually every cellular membrane. In particular, phosphoinositides play a critical role in regulating membrane dynamics and vesicular transport. The unique distribution of certain phosphoinositides at specific intracellular membranes makes these molecules uniquely suited to direct organel...

  2. Dopamine D1, D2, D3 receptors, vesicular monoamine transporter type-2 (VMAT2 and dopamine transporter (DAT densities in aged human brain.

    Jianjun Sun

    Full Text Available The dopamine D(1, D(2, D(3 receptors, vesicular monoamine transporter type-2 (VMAT2, and dopamine transporter (DAT densities were measured in 11 aged human brains (aged 77-107.8, mean: 91 years by quantitative autoradiography. The density of D(1 receptors, VMAT2, and DAT was measured using [(3H]SCH23390, [(3H]dihydrotetrabenazine, and [(3H]WIN35428, respectively. The density of D(2 and D(3 receptors was calculated using the D(3-preferring radioligand, [(3H]WC-10 and the D(2-preferring radioligand [(3H]raclopride using a mathematical model developed previously by our group. Dopamine D(1, D(2, and D(3 receptors are extensively distributed throughout striatum; the highest density of D(3 receptors occurred in the nucleus accumbens (NAc. The density of the DAT is 10-20-fold lower than that of VMAT2 in striatal regions. Dopamine D(3 receptor density exceeded D(2 receptor densities in extrastriatal regions, and thalamus contained a high level of D(3 receptors with negligible D(2 receptors. The density of dopamine D(1 linearly correlated with D(3 receptor density in the thalamus. The density of the DAT was negligible in the extrastriatal regions whereas the VMAT2 was expressed in moderate density. D(3 receptor and VMAT2 densities were in similar level between the aged human and aged rhesus brain samples, whereas aged human brain samples had lower range of densities of D(1 and D(2 receptors and DAT compared with the aged rhesus monkey brain. The differential density of D(3 and D(2 receptors in human brain will be useful in the interpretation of PET imaging studies in human subjects with existing radiotracers, and assist in the validation of newer PET radiotracers having a higher selectivity for dopamine D(2 or D(3 receptors.

  3. Vesicular Location and Transport of S100A8 and S100A9 Proteins in Monocytoid Cells.

    Paramita Chakraborty

    Full Text Available We show here, by using surface biotinylation, followed by Western blotting or surface plasmon resonance analysis, that very low levels of S100A8 and/or S100A9 can be detected on the surface of THP-1 cells or freshly isolated human monocytes. This was supported by immune-electron microscopy where we observed membrane-associated expression of the proteins restricted to small patches. By using confocal microscopy we could determine that S100A8 and S100A9 protein in THP-1 cells or freshly isolated human monocytes was mostly present in vesicular structures. This finding was confirmed using immune-electron microscopy. Subcellular fractionation and confocal microscopy showed that these vesicular structures are mainly early endosomes and endolysosomes. Our subsequent studies showed that accumulation of S100A8 and S100A9 in the endolysosomal compartment is associated with induction of their release from the cells. Furthermore, an inhibitor of lysosomal activity could modulate the release of S100A8 and S100A9 in the extracellular milieu. Our current results suggest that the S100A8 and S100A9 proteins are primarily associated with certain kinds of cytosolic vesicles and may be secreted via an endolysosomal pathway.

  4. Vesicular Location and Transport of S100A8 and S100A9 Proteins in Monocytoid Cells.

    Chakraborty, Paramita; Bjork, Per; Källberg, Eva; Olsson, Anders; Riva, Matteo; Mörgelin, Matthias; Liberg, David; Ivars, Fredrik; Leanderson, Tomas

    2015-01-01

    We show here, by using surface biotinylation, followed by Western blotting or surface plasmon resonance analysis, that very low levels of S100A8 and/or S100A9 can be detected on the surface of THP-1 cells or freshly isolated human monocytes. This was supported by immune-electron microscopy where we observed membrane-associated expression of the proteins restricted to small patches. By using confocal microscopy we could determine that S100A8 and S100A9 protein in THP-1 cells or freshly isolated human monocytes was mostly present in vesicular structures. This finding was confirmed using immune-electron microscopy. Subcellular fractionation and confocal microscopy showed that these vesicular structures are mainly early endosomes and endolysosomes. Our subsequent studies showed that accumulation of S100A8 and S100A9 in the endolysosomal compartment is associated with induction of their release from the cells. Furthermore, an inhibitor of lysosomal activity could modulate the release of S100A8 and S100A9 in the extracellular milieu. Our current results suggest that the S100A8 and S100A9 proteins are primarily associated with certain kinds of cytosolic vesicles and may be secreted via an endolysosomal pathway. PMID:26661255

  5. Selective expression of alpha-synuclein-immunoreactivity in vesicular acetylcholine transporter-immunoreactive axons in the guinea pig rectum and human colon

    Sharrad, Dale F.; de Vries, Elsbeth; Brookes, Simon J. H.

    2013-01-01

    Parkinson's disease is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by motor and nonmotor impairments, including constipation. The hallmark pathological features of Parkinson's disease are Lewy bodies and neurites, of which aggregated a-synuclein is a major constituent. Frequently, Lewy pathology is i

  6. DNA-Fragments Are Transcytosed across CaCo-2 Cells by Adsorptive Endocytosis and Vesicular Mediated Transport

    Johannessen, Lene E.; Spilsberg, Bjørn; Wiik-Nielsen, Christer R.; Kristoffersen, Anja B.; Holst-Jensen, Arne; Berdal, Knut G.

    2013-01-01

    Dietary DNA is degraded into shorter DNA-fragments and single nucleosides in the gastrointestinal tract. Dietary DNA is mainly taken up as single nucleosides and bases, but even dietary DNA-fragments of up to a few hundred bp are able to cross the intestinal barrier and enter the blood stream. The molecular mechanisms behind transport of DNA-fragments across the intestine and the effects of this transport on the organism are currently unknown. Here we investigate the transport of DNA-fragment...

  7. Distribution of Vesicular Glutamate Transporter 2 and Ionotropic Glutamate Receptors in the Auditory Ganglion and Cochlear Nuclei of Pigeons (Columba livia).

    Karim, M R; Atoji, Y

    2016-02-01

    Glutamate is a principal excitatory neurotransmitter in the auditory system. Our previous studies revealed localization of glutamate receptor mRNAs in the pigeon cochlear nuclei, suggesting the existence of glutamatergic input from the auditory nerve to the brainstem. This study demonstrated localization of mRNAs for vesicular glutamate transporter 2 (vGluT2) and ionotropic glutamate receptors (AMPA, kainate and NMDA) in the auditory ganglion (AG) and cochlear nuclei (magnocellular, angular and laminar nuclei). VGluT2 mRNA was intensely expressed in AG and intensely or moderately in the cochlear nuclei. The AG and cochlear nuclei showed intense-to-moderate mRNA signals for GluA2, GluA3, GluA4, GluK4 and GluN1. These results suggest that the pigeon AG neurons receives glutamatergic input from hair cells and in turn projects to the magnocellular and angular nuclei. Glutamate may play a pivotal role in the excitatory synapse transmission in the peripheral auditory pathway of birds. PMID:25639143

  8. Vesicular monoamine transporter protein expression correlates with clinical features, tumor biology, and MIBG avidity in neuroblastoma: a report from the Children's Oncology Group

    Temple, William; Mendelsohn, Lori; Nekritz, Erin; Gustafson, W.C.; Matthay, Katherine K. [UCSF School of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, San Francisco, CA (United States); UCSF Benioff Children' s Hospital, San Francisco, CA (United States); Kim, Grace E. [UCSF School of Medicine, Department of Pathology, San Francisco, CA (United States); Lin, Lawrence; Giacomini, Kathy [UCSF School of Pharmacy, Department of Bioengineering and Therapeutic Sciences, San Francisco, CA (United States); Naranjo, Arlene; Van Ryn, Collin [University of Florida, Children' s Oncology Group Statistics and Data Center, Gainesville, FL (United States); Yanik, Gregory A. [University of Michigan, CS Mott Children' s Hospital, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Kreissman, Susan G. [Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Hogarty, Michael [University of Pennsylvania, Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia and Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA (United States); DuBois, Steven G. [UCSF School of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, San Francisco, CA (United States); UCSF Benioff Children' s Hospital, San Francisco, CA (United States); UCSF School of Medicine, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2016-03-15

    Vesicular monoamine transporters 1 and 2 (VMAT1 and VMAT2) are thought to mediate MIBG uptake in adult neuroendocrine tumors. In neuroblastoma, the norepinephrine transporter (NET) has been investigated as the principal MIBG uptake protein, though some tumors without NET expression concentrate MIBG. We investigated VMAT expression in neuroblastoma and correlated expression with MIBG uptake and clinical features. We evaluated VMAT1 and VMAT2 expression by immunohistochemistry (IHC) in neuroblastoma tumors from 76 patients with high-risk metastatic disease treated in a uniform cooperative group trial (COG A3973). All patients had baseline MIBG diagnostic scans centrally reviewed. IHC results were scored as the product of intensity grading (0 - 3+) and percent of tumor cells expressing the protein of interest. The association between VMAT1 and VMAT2 scores and clinical and biological features was tested using Wilcoxon rank-sum tests. Patient characteristics were typical of high-risk neuroblastoma, though the cohort was intentionally enriched in patients with MIBG-nonavid tumors (n = 20). VMAT1 and VMAT2 were expressed in 62 % and 75 % of neuroblastoma tumors, respectively. VMAT1 and VMAT2 scores were both significantly lower in MYCN amplified tumors and in tumors with high mitotic karyorrhectic index. MIBG-avid tumors had significantly higher VMAT2 scores than MIBG-nonavid tumors (median 216 vs. 45; p = 0.04). VMAT1 expression did not correlate with MIBG avidity. VMAT1 and VMAT2 are expressed in the majority of neuroblastomas. Expression correlates with other biological features. The expression level of VMAT2 but not that of VMAT1 correlates with avidity for MIBG. (orig.)

  9. Vesicular monoamine transporter protein expression correlates with clinical features, tumor biology, and MIBG avidity in neuroblastoma: a report from the Children's Oncology Group

    Vesicular monoamine transporters 1 and 2 (VMAT1 and VMAT2) are thought to mediate MIBG uptake in adult neuroendocrine tumors. In neuroblastoma, the norepinephrine transporter (NET) has been investigated as the principal MIBG uptake protein, though some tumors without NET expression concentrate MIBG. We investigated VMAT expression in neuroblastoma and correlated expression with MIBG uptake and clinical features. We evaluated VMAT1 and VMAT2 expression by immunohistochemistry (IHC) in neuroblastoma tumors from 76 patients with high-risk metastatic disease treated in a uniform cooperative group trial (COG A3973). All patients had baseline MIBG diagnostic scans centrally reviewed. IHC results were scored as the product of intensity grading (0 - 3+) and percent of tumor cells expressing the protein of interest. The association between VMAT1 and VMAT2 scores and clinical and biological features was tested using Wilcoxon rank-sum tests. Patient characteristics were typical of high-risk neuroblastoma, though the cohort was intentionally enriched in patients with MIBG-nonavid tumors (n = 20). VMAT1 and VMAT2 were expressed in 62 % and 75 % of neuroblastoma tumors, respectively. VMAT1 and VMAT2 scores were both significantly lower in MYCN amplified tumors and in tumors with high mitotic karyorrhectic index. MIBG-avid tumors had significantly higher VMAT2 scores than MIBG-nonavid tumors (median 216 vs. 45; p = 0.04). VMAT1 expression did not correlate with MIBG avidity. VMAT1 and VMAT2 are expressed in the majority of neuroblastomas. Expression correlates with other biological features. The expression level of VMAT2 but not that of VMAT1 correlates with avidity for MIBG. (orig.)

  10. Effects of proton irradiation of the lumbar intumescence on intra-axonal transport of acetylcholine and cholinergic enzymes in rat sciatic nerve

    The content and intra-axonal transport of acetylcholine (ACh) and the cholinergic enzymes cholineacetyl-transferase (CAT) and ACh-esterase (AChE) in sciatic nerve were investigated in rats following single dose proton irradiation of the lumbar intumescence of the spinal cord with 60 Gy or 200 Gy. One, 7 or 30 days after irradiation nerve-crush operations were performed 12 hours before killing and the levels of ACh and enzyme activities in nerve segments relative to the crushes were estimated by biologic (ACh) to chemical (enzyme) methods. The results indicate that alterations in intra-neuronal dynamics of ACh and related enzymes are not a major cause for the development of neurologic symptoms of the motor system after irradiation, and that descending myelinated axons are of minor importance for the regulation of cholinergic substances in rat motor nerves. (Auth.)

  11. Isolation and characterization of vesicular and non-vesicular microRNAs circulating in sera of partially hepatectomized rats

    Castoldi, Mirco; Kordes, Claus; Sawitza, Iris; Häussinger, Dieter

    2016-01-01

    Circulating microRNAs are protected from degradation by their association with either vesicles or components of the RNAi machinery. Although increasing evidence indicates that cell-free microRNAs are transported in body fluids by different types of vesicles, current research mainly focuses on the characterization of exosome-associated microRNAs. However, as isolation and characterization of exosomes is challenging, it is yet unclear whether exosomes or other vesicular elements circulating in serum are the most reliable source for discovering disease-associated biomarkers. In this study, circulating microRNAs associated to the vesicular and non-vesicular fraction of sera isolated from partially hepatectomized rats were measured. Here we show that independently from their origin, levels of miR-122, miR-192, miR-194 and Let-7a are up-regulated two days after partial hepatectomy. The inflammation-associated miR-150 and miR-155 are up-regulated in the vesicular-fraction only, while the regeneration-associated miR-21 and miR-33 are up-regulated in the vesicular- and down-regulated in the non-vesicular fraction. Our study shows for the first time the modulation of non-vesicular microRNAs in animals recovering from partial hepatectomy, suggesting that, in the search for novel disease-associated biomarkers, the profiling of either vesicular or non-vesicular microRNAs may be more relevant than the analysis of microRNAs isolated from unfractionated serum. PMID:27535708

  12. Isolation and characterization of vesicular and non-vesicular microRNAs circulating in sera of partially hepatectomized rats.

    Castoldi, Mirco; Kordes, Claus; Sawitza, Iris; Häussinger, Dieter

    2016-01-01

    Circulating microRNAs are protected from degradation by their association with either vesicles or components of the RNAi machinery. Although increasing evidence indicates that cell-free microRNAs are transported in body fluids by different types of vesicles, current research mainly focuses on the characterization of exosome-associated microRNAs. However, as isolation and characterization of exosomes is challenging, it is yet unclear whether exosomes or other vesicular elements circulating in serum are the most reliable source for discovering disease-associated biomarkers. In this study, circulating microRNAs associated to the vesicular and non-vesicular fraction of sera isolated from partially hepatectomized rats were measured. Here we show that independently from their origin, levels of miR-122, miR-192, miR-194 and Let-7a are up-regulated two days after partial hepatectomy. The inflammation-associated miR-150 and miR-155 are up-regulated in the vesicular-fraction only, while the regeneration-associated miR-21 and miR-33 are up-regulated in the vesicular- and down-regulated in the non-vesicular fraction. Our study shows for the first time the modulation of non-vesicular microRNAs in animals recovering from partial hepatectomy, suggesting that, in the search for novel disease-associated biomarkers, the profiling of either vesicular or non-vesicular microRNAs may be more relevant than the analysis of microRNAs isolated from unfractionated serum. PMID:27535708

  13. Ion Transport in Human Pancreatic Duct Epithelium, Capan-1 Cells, Is Regulated by Secretin, VIP, Acetylcholine, and Purinergic Receptors

    Wang, Jing; Novak, Ivana

    2013-01-01

    , purinergic receptors, and determine their effects on ion transport. METHODS: Human adenocarcinoma cell line Capan-1 cells were grown on permeable supports and set in Ussing chambers for electrophysiological recordings. Transepithelial voltage (Vte), resistance, and short-circuit currents (Isc) were measured...

  14. Stochastic Model of Maturation and Vesicular Exchange in Cellular Organelles

    Vagne, Quentin

    2016-01-01

    The dynamical organization of membrane-bound organelles along intracellular transport pathways relies on vesicular exchange between organelles and on biochemical maturation of the organelle content by specific enzymes. The relative importance of each mechanism in controlling organelle dynamics remains controversial, in particular for transport through the Golgi apparatus. Using a stochastic model, we show that full maturation of membrane-bound compartments can be seen as the stochastic escape from a steady-state in which export is dominated by vesicular exchange. We show that full maturation can contribute a significant fraction of the total out-flux for small organelles such as endosomes and Golgi cisternae.

  15. Transcriptomic effects of depleted uranium on acetylcholine and cholesterol metabolisms in Alzheimer's disease model; Effets transcriptomiques de l'uranium appauvri sur les metabolismes de l'acetylcholine et du cholesterol chez un modele de maladie d'Alzheimer

    Lestaevel, Ph.; Bensoussan, H.; Racine, R.; Airault, F.; Gourmelon, P.; Souidi, M. [Direction de la radioprotection de l' Homme, service de radiobiologie et d' epidemiologie, laboratoire de radiotoxicologie experimentale, institut de radioprotection et de surete nucleaire, BP no 17, 92262 Fontenay-aux-Roses cedex (France)

    2011-02-15

    Some heavy metals, or aluminium, could participate in the development of Alzheimer disease (AD). Depleted uranium (DU), another heavy metal, modulates the cholinergic system and the cholesterol metabolism in the brain of rats, but without neurological disorders. The aim of this study was to determine what happens in organisms exposed to DU that will/are developing the AD. This study was thus performed on a transgenic mouse model for human amyloid precursor protein (APP), the Tg2576 strain. The possible effects of DU through drinking water (20 mg/L) over an 8-month period were analyzed on acetylcholine and cholesterol metabolisms at gene level in the cerebral cortex. The mRNA levels of choline acetyl transferase (ChAT) vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT) and ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABC A1) decreased in control Tg2576 mice in comparison with wild-type mice (respectively -89%, -86% and -44%, p < 0.05). Chronic exposure of Tg2576 mice to DU increased mRNA levels of ChAT (+189%, p < 0.05), VAChT (+120%, p < 0.05) and ABC A1 (+52%, p < 0.05) compared to control Tg2576 mice. Overall, these modifications of acetylcholine and cholesterol metabolisms did not lead to increased disturbances that are specific of AD, suggesting that chronic DU exposure did not worsen the pathology in this experimental model. (authors)

  16. Chloride in vesicular trafficking and function.

    Stauber, Tobias; Jentsch, Thomas J

    2013-01-01

    Luminal acidification is of pivotal importance for the physiology of the secretory and endocytic pathways and its diverse trafficking events. Acidification by the proton-pumping V-ATPase requires charge compensation by counterion currents that are commonly attributed to chloride. The molecular identification of intracellular chloride transporters and the improvement of methodologies for measuring intraorganellar pH and chloride have facilitated the investigation of the physiology of vesicular chloride transport. New data question the requirement of chloride for pH regulation of various organelles and furthermore ascribe functions to chloride that are beyond merely electrically shunting the proton pump. This review surveys the currently established and proposed intracellular chloride transporters and gives an overview of membrane-trafficking steps that are affected by the perturbation of chloride transport. Finally, potential mechanisms of membrane-trafficking modulation by chloride are discussed and put into the context of organellar ion homeostasis in general. PMID:23092411

  17. Combined α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonism and partial serotonin transporter inhibition produce antidepressant-like effects in the mouse forced swim and tail suspension tests

    Andreasen, Jesper T; Redrobe, John P; Nielsen, Elsebet Ø

    2012-01-01

    Emerging evidence points to an involvement of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) in major depression. Nicotine improves symptoms of depression in humans and shows antidepressant-like effects in rodents. Monoamine release is facilitated by nAChR stimulation, and nicotine-evoked serotonin (...

  18. Vesicular system: Versatile carrier for transdermal delivery of bioactives.

    Singh, Deependra; Pradhan, Madhulika; Nag, Mukesh; Singh, Manju Rawat

    2015-01-01

    The transdermal route of drug delivery has gained immense interest for pharmaceutical researchers. The major hurdle for diffusion of drugs and bioactives through transdermal route is the stratum corneum, the outermost layer of the skin. Currently, various approaches such as physical approach, chemical approach, and delivery carriers have been used to augment the transdermal delivery of bioactives. This review provides a brief overview of mechanism of drug transport across skin, different lipid vesicular systems, with special emphasis on lipid vesicular systems including transfersomes, liposomes, niosomes, ethosomes, virosomes, and pharmacosomes and their application for the delivery of different bioactives. PMID:24564350

  19. Aluminium toxicity targets PIN2 in Arabidopsis root apices: Effects on PIN2 endocytosis, vesicular recycling,and polar auxin transport

    SHEN Hong; HOU NingYan; Markus SCHLICHT; WAN YingLang; Stefano MANCUSO; Frantisek BALUSKA

    2008-01-01

    The most obvious symptom of AI toxicity is the inhibition of root growth.However,the mechanism of AI-inhibiting root growth remains to be elucidated.In this study,auxin transport and vesicle movement of an auxin-efflux carrier (PIN2) were investigated in Arabidopsis roots in response to AI stress.Results indicated that AI inhibited the apical transport of auxin in root tips of Arabidopsis significantly.The severe inhibition was localized in the cells of transition zone,where the concentration of auxin was only 34% that of the control.Brefeldin A (BFA),an inhibitor of vesicle transport,induced the dot-like structure of PIN2 vesicle significantly.Al decreased the size of dot-like structure of PIN2 vesicles.Re-sults of real-time RT-PCR and Western-blotting analysis showed that Al increased the transcript level of PIN2 and the accumulation of PIN2 protein in horizontal direction of plasma membrane,but decreased its distribution in endosomes,suggesting that AI inhibited the transport of PIN2 vesicles from plasma membrane to endosomes.Results of cytoskeleton-depolymering drugs indicated that it was via the pathway of disruption of actin microfilaments that AI inhibited the transport of PIN2 vesicles.Exposed to AI stress,the cells of elongation zone had less AI uptake and less transport frequency of vesicles than cells of transition zone.Taken together,our results suggested that AI inhibited root growth mainly by modulating the transport of PIN2 vesicles between plasma membrane and endosomes,thus block-ing auxin transport and root growth.

  20. PHARMACOSOMES: A POTENTIAL VESICULAR DRUG DELIVERY SYSTEM

    De Pintu Kumar; De, Arnab

    2012-01-01

    Pharmacosome is a potential approach in the vesicular drug delivery system which exhibit several advantages over conventional vesicular drug delivery systems. Pharmacosomes are amphiphilic lipid vesicular system possessing phospholipid complexes of drugs. Drugs bearing active hydrogen atom can be esterified to the lipid. This type of vesicular system improves permeation of drugs across the biomembranes and thus results in an improvement in the bioavailability and can also improve the pharmaco...

  1. Morphogenetic roles of acetylcholine.

    Lauder, J. M.; Schambra, U B

    1999-01-01

    In the adult nervous system, neurotransmitters mediate cellular communication within neuronal circuits. In developing tissues and primitive organisms, neurotransmitters subserve growth regulatory and morphogenetic functions. Accumulated evidence suggests that acetylcholine, (ACh), released from growing axons, regulates growth, differentiation, and plasticity of developing central nervous system neurons. In addition to intrinsic cholinergic neurons, the cerebral cortex and hippocampus receive ...

  2. Localization of vesicular glutamate transporters in the peripheral vestibular system of rat%囊泡膜谷氨酸转运体在前庭外周系统中的分布

    王远; 庞有旺; 董玉琳; 张富兴; 李金莲; 李云庆

    2007-01-01

    Objective To examine the vesicular glutamate transporters (VGluTs: VGluT1-VGluT3) in the peripheral vestibular system. Methods The vestibular structures, including Scarpa's ganglion (vestibular ganglion, VG), maculae of utricle and saccule, and ampullary cristae, from normal Sprague-Dawley rats were processed immunohistochemically for VGluTs,by avidin-biotinylated peroxidase complex method, with 3-3'-diaminobenzidine (DAB) as chromogen. Results (1) VGluT1was localized to partial neurons of VG and to the putative primary afferent fibers innervating vestibular end-organs. (2)Intense VGluT3 immunoreactivity was detected in large number of sensory epithelia cells, and weak labeling of VGluT3-positive afferent fibers was in the maculae and ampullary cristae. (3) No or very weak VGluT2 immunoreactivity was observed in the VG and acoustic maculae. Conclusion These results provide the morphological support that glutamate exists in the peripheral vestibular system, and it may play an important role in the centripetal vestibular transmission.%目的 检查囊泡膜谷氨酸转运体(vesicular glutamate transporter,VGluT)在前庭外周系统中的分布特征.方法 采用ABC(avidin-biotinylated peroxidase complex)免疫组织化学方法,二氨基联苯作为染色剂,观察VGluT1-3在正常成年SD大鼠前庭外周系统,包括球囊、椭圆囊、壶腹嵴和前庭神经节(Scarpa神经节)的表达.结果 (1)VGluT1样免疫阳性产物位于前庭神经节和传入纤维支配的前庭外周终末感受器.(2)大部分感觉上皮细胞表达高密度的VGluT3样免疫阳性产物,但在球囊斑和椭圆囊斑,VGluT3样免疫阳性传入纤维表达较弱.(3)在上述部位,没有或仅有很弱的VGluT2样免疫反应.结论 VGluT1和VGluT3参与了初级前庭传入纤维和毛细胞中将谷氨酸转运入囊泡的过程,可能在调节前庭终末感受器通过前庭核向大脑传递信息的传导通路中具有重要作用.

  3. Role of Intermediate Filaments in Vesicular Traffic

    Azzurra Margiotta

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Intermediate filaments are an important component of the cellular cytoskeleton. The first established role attributed to intermediate filaments was the mechanical support to cells. However, it is now clear that intermediate filaments have many different roles affecting a variety of other biological functions, such as the organization of microtubules and microfilaments, the regulation of nuclear structure and activity, the control of cell cycle and the regulation of signal transduction pathways. Furthermore, a number of intermediate filament proteins have been involved in the acquisition of tumorigenic properties. Over the last years, a strong involvement of intermediate filament proteins in the regulation of several aspects of intracellular trafficking has strongly emerged. Here, we review the functions of intermediate filaments proteins focusing mainly on the recent knowledge gained from the discovery that intermediate filaments associate with key proteins of the vesicular membrane transport machinery. In particular, we analyze the current understanding of the contribution of intermediate filaments to the endocytic pathway.

  4. A Functional Vesicular Monoamine Transporter 1 (VMAT1) Gene Variant Is Associated with Affect and the Prevalence of Anxiety, Affective, and Alcohol Use Disorders in a Longitudinal Population-Representative Birth Cohort Study

    Vaht, Mariliis; Kiive, Evelyn; Veidebaum, Toomas

    2016-01-01

    Background: Inter-individual differences in the monoaminergic systems have been shown to moderate the risk for a lifetime history of anxiety, affective, and alcohol use disorders. A common single nucleotide polymorphism in the vesicular monoamine transporter 1 gene (VMAT1 rs1390938 G/A; Thr136Ile) has been reported as functional in vitro and associated with bipolar disorder and anxiety. We aimed at assessing the association between the VMAT1 genotype, affect, and affect-related psychiatric disorders in a longitudinal population-representative study. Methods: We used the database of the Estonian Children Personality Behaviour and Health Study (beginning in 1998). Cohorts of initially 9- (recalled at ages 15 and 18 years, n=579) and 15- (recalled at ages 18 and 25 years; n=654) year-old children provided self-reports on impulsivity, anxiety, depressiveness, neuroticism, and alcohol use. In addition, psychiatric assessment based on DSM-IV was carried out in the older cohort at age 25 years. Results: Subjects homozygous for the less prevalent A (136Ile) allele reported lower maladaptive impulsivity, state and trait anxiety, depressiveness, and neuroticism and were less likely to have been diagnosed with an affective, anxiety, and/or alcohol use disorder by young adulthood. While in the younger cohort alcohol use started at younger age, this birth cohort effect was dependent on genotype: only G allele carriers and in particular the GG homozygotes started alcohol use earlier. Conclusions: VMAT1 rs1390938/Thr136Ile is associated with mood, personality, and alcohol use in the general population. Subjects homozygous for the “hyperfunction” allele (AA; Ile/Ile) appear to be more resilient to these disorders. PMID:26861143

  5. Novel acetylcholine and carbamoylcholine analogues

    Hansen, Camilla Petrycer; Jensen, Anders Asbjørn; Christensen, Jeppe K.;

    2008-01-01

    A series of carbamoylcholine and acetylcholine analogues were synthesized and characterized pharmacologically at neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). Several of the compounds displayed low nanomolar binding affinities to the alpha 4beta 2 nAChR and pronounced selectivity for this ...

  6. PHARMACOSOMES: A POTENTIAL VESICULAR DRUG DELIVERY SYSTEM

    De Pintu Kumar

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Pharmacosome is a potential approach in the vesicular drug delivery system which exhibit several advantages over conventional vesicular drug delivery systems. Pharmacosomes are amphiphilic lipid vesicular system possessing phospholipid complexes of drugs. Drugs bearing active hydrogen atom can be esterified to the lipid. This type of vesicular system improves permeation of drugs across the biomembranes and thus results in an improvement in the bioavailability and can also improve the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of various types of drug molecules.This vesicular system can be characterized by surface morphology, solubility study, differential scanning calorimrtry, x-ray powder diffraction, in vitro dissolution study. Pharmacosomes are suitable for incorporating both hydrophilic and lipophilic drugs.Preparations of pharmacosomes are basically performed for various non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, proteins, cardiovascular and antineoplastic drugs.

  7. VESICULAR DRUG DELIVERY SYSTEM: A NOVEL APPROACH

    KALPESH CHHOTALAL ASHARA

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available A novel drug delivery system is that delivers drug at predetermined rate decided as per the requirement, pharmacological aspects, drug profile, physiological conditions of body etc. In current conditions not a single novel drug delivery system behaves ideally those high goals with fewer side effects. A Vesicular drug delivery system (VDDS is the system in which encapsulation of active moieties in vesicular structure, which bridges gap between ideal and available of novel drug delivery system.Varrious types of vesicular drug delivery system like liposome, niosome, archeosome, transferosome etc. were developed. Advances have since been made in vesicular drug delivery system. Focus of this review is to bring about a brief of vesicular drug delivery system as novel approach.

  8. Emulsomes: An emerging vesicular drug delivery system

    Bhawandeep Gill; Jatinder Singh; Vikas Sharma; S L Hari Kumar

    2012-01-01

    The oral route is the easiest, cost effective, and most vital method for drug administration. Therefore, improvement of dosage forms mainly for the prolonged release purpose has been a challenge for scientists. Vesicular drug delivery systems are developed with a purpose to overcome problems coupled with the drugs such a poor bioavailability, protection from harsh gastric environment, and from gastric enzymes, which degrade the drug. Vesicular drug delivery systems such as liposomes, emulsion...

  9. VESICULAR DRUG DELIVERY SYSTEM: A NOVEL APPROACH

    KALPESH CHHOTALAL ASHARA; Jalpa S. Paun; M. M. Soniwala; J.R.CHAVDA; S. V. NATHAWANI; NITIN M. MORI; Mendapara, Vishal P.

    2014-01-01

    A novel drug delivery system is that delivers drug at predetermined rate decided as per the requirement, pharmacological aspects, drug profile, physiological conditions of body etc. In current conditions not a single novel drug delivery system behaves ideally those high goals with fewer side effects. A Vesicular drug delivery system (VDDS) is the system in which encapsulation of active moieties in vesicular structure, which bridges gap between ideal and available of novel drug delivery system...

  10. Transient Receptor Potential Channel Opening Releases Endogenous Acetylcholine, which Contributes to Endothelium-Dependent Relaxation Induced by Mild Hypothermia in Spontaneously Hypertensive Rat but Not Wistar-Kyoto Rat Arteries.

    Zou, Q; Leung, S W S; Vanhoutte, P M

    2015-08-01

    Mild hypothermia causes endothelium-dependent relaxations, which are reduced by the muscarinic receptor antagonist atropine. The present study investigated whether endothelial endogenous acetylcholine contributes to these relaxations. Aortic rings of spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs) and normotensive Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats were contracted with prostaglandin F2 α and exposed to progressive mild hypothermia (from 37 to 31°C). Hypothermia induced endothelium-dependent, Nω-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester-sensitive relaxations, which were reduced by atropine, but not by mecamylamine, in SHR but not in WKY rat aortae. The responses in SHR aortae were also reduced by acetylcholinesterase (the enzyme responsible for acetylcholine degradation), bromoacetylcholine (inhibitor of acetylcholine synthesis), hemicholinium-3 (inhibitor of choline uptake), and vesamicol (inhibitor of acetylcholine release). The mild hypothermia-induced relaxations in both SHR and WKY rat aortae were inhibited by AMTB [N-(3-aminopropyl)-2-[(3-methylphenyl)methoxy]-N-(2-thienylmethyl)-benzamide; the transient receptor potential (TRP) M8 inhibitor]; only those in SHR aortae were inhibited by HC-067047 [2-methyl-1-[3-(4-morpholinyl)propyl]-5-phenyl-N-[3-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]-1H-pyrrole-3-carboxamide; TRPV4 antagonist] while those in WKY rat aortae were reduced by HC-030031 [2-(1,3-dimethyl-2,6-dioxo-1,2,3,6-tetrahydro-7H-purin-7-yl)-N-(4-isopropylphenyl)acetamide; TRPA1 antagonist]. The endothelial uptake of extracellular choline and release of cyclic guanosine monophosphate was enhanced by mild hypothermia and inhibited by HC-067047 in SHR but not in WKY rat aortae. Compared with WKY rats, the SHR preparations expressed similar levels of acetylcholinesterase and choline acetyltransferase, but a lesser amount of vesicular acetylcholine transporter, located mainly in the endothelium. Thus, mild hypothermia causes nitric oxide-dependent relaxations by opening TRPA1 channels in WKY rat aortae

  11. Cholinergic neurotransmission in human corpus cavernosum. II. Acetylcholine synthesis

    Physiological and histochemical evidence indicates that cholinergic nerves may participate in mediating penile erection. Acetylcholine synthesis and release was studied in isolated human corporal tissue. Human corpus cavernosum incubated with [3H]choline accumulated [3H]choline and synthesized [3H]acethylcholine in an concentration-dependent manner. [3H]Acetylcholine accumulation by the tissue was inhibited by hemicholinium-3, a specific antagonist of the high-affinity choline transport in cholinergic nerves. Transmural electrical field stimulation caused release of [3H]acetylcholine which was significantly diminished by inhibiting neurotransmission with calcium-free physiological salt solution or tetrodotoxin. These observations provide biochemical and physiological evidence for the existence of cholinergic innervation in human corpus cavernosum

  12. Immunisation with Torpedo acetylcholine receptor.

    Elfman, L

    1984-01-01

    Acetylcholine mediates the transfer of information between neurons in the electric organ of, for example, Torpedo as well as in vertebrate skeletal muscle. The nicotinic acetylcholine receptor complex translates the binding of acetylcholine into ion permeability changes. This leads to an action potential in the muscle fibre. The nicotinic acetylcholine receptor protein has been purified from Torpedo by use of affinity chromatography. The receptor is an intrinsic membrane glycoprotein composed of five polypeptide chains. When various animals are immunised with the receptor they demonstrate clinical signs of severe muscle weakness coincident with high antibody titres in their sera. The symptoms resemble those found in the autoimmune neuromuscular disease myasthenia gravis in humans. This animal model has constituted a unique model for studying autoimmune diseases. This paper reviews some of the work using Torpedo acetylcholine receptor in order to increase the understanding of the motor nervous system function and myasthenia gravis. It is now known that the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor protein is the antigen involved in myasthenia gravis. The mechanism of immune damage involves a direct block of the receptor function. This depends on the presence of antibodies which crosslink the postsynaptic receptors leading to their degradation. The questions to be answered in the future are; (a) what initiates or triggers the autoimmune response, (b) how do the antibodies cause the symptoms--is there a steric hindrance of the interaction of acetylcholine and the receptor, (c) why is there not a strict relationship between antibody titre and severity of symptoms, and (d) why are some muscles affected and other spared? With help of the experimental model, answers to these questions may result in improved strategies for the treatment of the autoimmune disease myasthenia gravis. PMID:6097937

  13. Pramipexole increases vesicular dopamine uptake: implications for treatment of Parkinson's neurodegeneration.

    Truong, Jannine G; Rau, Kristi S; Hanson, Glen R; Fleckenstein, Annette E

    2003-08-01

    Pramipexole is a dopamine D2/D3 receptor agonist used to treat Parkinson's disease. Both human and animal studies suggest that pramipexole may exhibit neuroprotective properties involving dopamine neurons. However, mechanisms underlying its neuroprotective effects remain uncertain. The present results reveal a novel cellular action of this agent. Specifically, pramipexole rapidly increases vesicular dopamine uptake in synaptic vesicles prepared from striata of treated rats. This effect is: (1) associated with a redistribution of vesicular monoamine transporter-2 (VMAT-2) immunoreactivity within nerve terminals; and, (2) prevented by pretreatment with the dopamine D2 receptor antagonist, eticlopride. The implications of this finding relevant to the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders are discussed. PMID:12921866

  14. Regulation of vesicular traffic by a GTP-binding protein on the cytoplasmic surface of secretory vesicles in yeast

    Vesicular transport is an important mechanism for the intracellular traffic of proteins and lipids in eukaryotic cells. Vesicles mediate the passage of proteins between the various organelles of the secretory pathway and the exocytic release of these proteins into the extracellular environment. Vesicles also mediate the uptake of proteins and fluid from the external environment, delivering them to endosomes. Despite the generality of the vesicular transport mechanism, the process is not yet understood at a molecular level. The key questions that are addressed are (1) How are vesicles formed from the membrane of the donor organelle? (2) How are these vesicles transported? (3) How do the vesicles recognize the membrane of the target (acceptor) organelle? (4) How is membrane fusion accomplished? The genetic flexibility of yeast has been exploited to identify components of the cellular machinery required for vesicular transport

  15. Cocaine inhibition of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors influences dopamine release

    Alexandra eAcevedo-Rodriguez; Lifen eZhang; Fuwen eZhou; Suzhen eGong; Howard eGu; Mariella eDe Biasi; Fu-Ming eZhou; Dani, John A.

    2014-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) potently regulate dopamine (DA) release in the striatum and alter cocaine’s ability to reinforce behaviors. Since cocaine is a weak nAChR inhibitor, we hypothesized that cocaine may alter DA release by inhibiting the nAChRs in DA terminals in the striatum and thus contribute to cocaine's reinforcing properties primarily associated with the inhibition of DA transporters. We found that biologically relevant concentrations of cocaine can mildly inhibit...

  16. Tubular crystals of acetylcholine receptor

    1984-01-01

    Well-ordered tubular crystals of acetylcholine receptor were obtained from suspensions of Torpedo marmorata receptor-rich vesicles. They are composed of pairs of oppositely oriented molecules arranged on the surface lattice with the symmetry of the plane group p2 (average unit cell dimensions: a = 90 A, b = 162 A, gamma = 117 degrees). The receptor in this lattice has an asymmetric distribution of mass around its perimeter, yet a regular pentagonal shape; thus its five transmembrane subunits ...

  17. Acetylcholine functionally reorganizes neocortical microcircuits

    Runfeldt, Melissa J.; Sadovsky, Alexander J.; MacLean, Jason N.

    2014-01-01

    Sensory information is processed and transmitted through the synaptic structure of local cortical circuits, but it is unclear how modulation of this architecture influences the cortical representation of sensory stimuli. Acetylcholine (ACh) promotes attention and arousal and is thought to increase the signal-to-noise ratio of sensory input in primary sensory cortices. Using high-speed two-photon calcium imaging in a thalamocortical somatosensory slice preparation, we recorded action potential...

  18. Dose protocols of acetylcholine test in Chinese

    向定成; 龚志华; 何建新; 洪长江; 邱建; 马骏

    2004-01-01

    @@ Acetylcholine test has been widely used clinically in several countries as a practical test provoking coronary artery spasm.1-3 Although it has also been launched recently in a few hospitals in China, the dose protocol for acetylcholine test used in these hospitals were from abroad.4,5 This study was aimed at developing a dose protocol for acetylcholine test suitable for Chinese people.

  19. Emulsomes: An emerging vesicular drug delivery system

    Bhawandeep Gill

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The oral route is the easiest, cost effective, and most vital method for drug administration. Therefore, improvement of dosage forms mainly for the prolonged release purpose has been a challenge for scientists. Vesicular drug delivery systems are developed with a purpose to overcome problems coupled with the drugs such a poor bioavailability, protection from harsh gastric environment, and from gastric enzymes, which degrade the drug. Vesicular drug delivery systems such as liposomes, emulsions, niosomes, proniosomes, solid lipid-nano particles, ethosomes, nanoparticles, and pharmacosomes, etc have gained much attention, but emulsomes have rouse as system, which bypasses many disadvantages associated with other systems, developed as novel lipoidal vesicular system with internal solid fat core surrounded by phospholipid bilayer. This technology is designed to act as vehicle for poorly soluble drugs. The drug is enclosed in the emulsomes and provide prolong existence of drug in systemic circulation. Furthermore, emulsomal-based formulations of genetic drugs such as antisense oligonucleotides and plasmids for gene therapy that have clear potential for systemic utility are increasingly available. This review addresses the concept of emulsomal drug delivery system, summarizes the success of emulsomes for the delivery of small molecules, and special attention has been paid to its formulation design, advantages, biopharmaceutical aspects, stability aspects, and various aspects related to drug delivery including future aspects.

  20. Recombinant vesicular stomatitis viruses from DNA.

    1995-01-01

    We assembled a DNA clone containing the 11,161-nt sequence of the prototype rhabdovirus, vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), such that it could be transcribed by the bacteriophage T7 RNA polymerase to yield a full-length positive-strand RNA complementary to the VSV genome. Expression of this RNA in cells also expressing the VSV nucleocapsid protein and the two VSV polymerase subunits resulted in production of VSV with the growth characteristics of wild-type VSV. Recovery of virus from DNA was v...

  1. Vesicular demyelination induced by raised intracellular calcium.

    Smith, K J; Hall, S M; Schauf, C L

    1985-11-01

    Incubation of nerve with high concentrations of the divalent cation ionophore A23187 produces myelin vesiculation (Schlaepfer 1977). This observation has now been extended using segments of rat ventral or dorsal root incubated with high (19 microM, 10 micrograms/ml) or low (1-1.5 microM) concentrations of A23187, or another divalent ionophore, ionomycin. Low concentrations of A23187 induced no vesiculation within a 2-h period. However, subsequent incubation of these roots in fresh, ionophore-free medium for 20 h, resulted in a prominent vesicular demyelination at the Schmidt-Lanterman incisures and paranodes of many fibres. At this time (22 h) the Schwann cells associated with some demyelinating internodes appeared vital upon ultrastructural examination: the cells also excluded the nuclear dye nigrosin. High concentrations of A23187 induced a similar vesicular demyelination in affected fibres within only 15-20 min. While the Schwann cells continued to exclude nigrosin for a further 4 h, their ultrastructural appearance indicated that they were probably in the early stages of necrosis. Incubation of moribund root with the ionophore produced no myelin vesiculation. At all ionophore concentrations, the myelin vesiculation was dependent upon the presence of extracellular Ca2+, and could be modulated in severity by varying this concentration. Other divalent cations (Ba2+, Co2+, Mg2+, Mn2+, Ni2+, Sr2+) could not substitute for Ca2+. The vesiculation induced by A23187 could be entirely prevented by the addition of Zn2+ (greater than or equal to 1 microM), Ni2+ (greater than or equal to 1-10 microM), Co2+ (greater than or equal to 100 microM) or Mn2+ (greater than or equal to 100 microM) to the bathing medium. A23187 applied to only part of an isolated internode resulted in a localization of the myelin disruption to that region. Ionomycin (greater than or equal to 1 microM), an ionophore with a greater selectivity for Ca2+ than A23187, also induced a prompt Ca2+-dependent

  2. Systematic colocalization errors between acridine orange and EGFP in astrocyte vesicular organelles

    Nadrigny, F.; Li, D.; Kemnitz, K; Ropert, N.; Koulakoff, A; Rudolph, S.; Vitali, M.; Giaume, C.; Kirchhoff, F.; Oheim, M

    2007-01-01

    Dual-color imaging of acridine orange (AO) and EGFP fused to a vesicular glutamate transporter or the vesicle-associated membrane proteins 2 or 3 has been used to visualize a supposedly well-defined subpopulation of glutamatergic astrocytic secretory vesicles undergoing regulated exocytosis. However, AO metachromasy results in the concomitant emission of green and red fluorescence from AO-stained tissue. Therefore, the question arises whether AO and EGFP fluorescence can be distinguished reli...

  3. Localization and secretory pathways of a 58K-like protein in multi-vesicular bodies in callus of Arabidopsis thaliana

    2008-01-01

    Multi-vesicular bodies in endocytosis and protoplasts are special cellular structures that are consid-ered to be originated from invagination of plasma membranes. However, the genesis and function of multi-vesicular bodies, the relationship with Golgi bodies and cell walls, and their secretory pathways remain controversial and ambiguous. Using a monoclonal antibody against an animal 58K protein, we have detected, by Western blotting and confocal microscopy, that a 58K-like protein is present in the calli of Arabidopsis thaliana and Hypericum perforatum. The results of immuno-electron microscopy showed that the 58K-like protein was located in the cisternae of Golgi bodies, secretory vesicles, multi-vesicular bodies, cell walls and vacuoles in callus of Arabidopsis thaliana, suggesting that the multi-vesicular bodies may be originated from Golgi bodies and function as a transporter carrying substances synthesized in Golgi bodies to cell walls and vacuoles. It seems that multi-vesicular bodies have a close relationship with the development of the cell wall and vacuole. The possible secretory pathways of multi-vesicular bodies might be in exocytosis, in which multi-vesicular bodies carry sub-stances to the cell wall for its construction, and in endocytosis, in which multi-vesicular bodies carry substances to the vacuole for its development, depending on what they carry and where the materials are transported. We hence propose that there is more than one pathway for the secretion of multi-vesicular bodies. In addition, our results provided a paradigm that a plant molecule, such as the 58k-like protein in callus of Arabidopsis thaliana, can be detected using a cross-reactive monoclonal antibody induced by an animal protein, and illustrate the existence of analog molecules in both animal and plant kingdoms.

  4. Pharmacosomes: A Potential Vesicular Drug Delivery System

    D. Nagasamy Venkatesh

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Lipid based drug delivery systems have been examined in various studies and exhibited their potential in controlled and targeted drug delivery. Pharmacosomes, a novel vesicular drug delivery system, offering a unique advantage over liposomes and niosomes, and serve as potential alternative to these conventional vesicles. They constitute an amphiphilic phospholipid complex with drug bearing an active hydrogen atom covalently that bind to phospholipids. They provide an efficient delivery of drug required at the site of action, which ultimately reduces the drug toxicity with reduced adverse effects and also reduces the cost of therapy by imparting better biopharmaceutical properties to the drug, resulting in increases bioavailability, especially in case of poorly soluble drugs. As the system is formed by binding the drug (pharmakon to carrier (soma, they are termed as pharmacosomes. Depending upon the chemical structure of the drug lipid complex they may exist as ultrafine vesicular, micellar and hexagonal aggregate. Drug having active hydrogen group such as carboxyl, hydroxyl group can be esterified to lipids, resulting in amphiphilic compound. Pharmacosomes are widely used as carriers for various non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, proteins, cardiovascular and antineoplastic drugs. The release of drug from pharmacosomes is generally governed by the process of enzymatic reaction and acid hydrolysis. Here, in the present review paper we have discussed the potential of pharmacosomes as a controlled and targeted drug delivery system and highlighted the method of preparation and characterization.

  5. Distribution of metallothionein I + II and vesicular zinc in the developing central nervous system: correlative study in the rat

    Penkowa, M; Nielsen, H; Hidalgo, J;

    1999-01-01

    candidates for chelating unbound Zn released from Zn-containing nerve terminals or transported into the brain. Whether vesicular Zn and MT I + II occur in identical regions of the developing brain is unknown. Accordingly, the developmental distribution of MT I + II and vesicular Zn was mapped. By using...... ventricles in the brainstem. By contrast, astrocytes were widespread throughout the developing brain. In embryonic and neonatal brain, MT I + IIir astrocytes were almost selectively observed in the septum and fascia dentate hilus (hi) of the hippocampus. With increasing postnatal age, they also occurred in...

  6. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors mediate lung cancer growth

    PaulDGardner

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Ion channels modulate ion flux across cell membranes, activate signal transduction pathways, and influence cellular transport – vital biological functions that are inexorably linked to cellular processes that go awry during carcinogenesis. Indeed, deregulation of ion channel function has been implicated in cancer-related phenomena such as unrestrained cell proliferation and apoptotic evasion. As the prototype for ligand-gated ion channels, nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs have been extensively studied in the context of neuronal cells but accumulating evidence also indicate a role for nAChRs in carcinogenesis. Recently, variants in the nAChR genes CHRNA3, CHRNA5, and CHRNB4 have been implicated in nicotine dependence and lung cancer susceptibility. Here, we silenced the expression of these three genes to investigate their function in lung cancer. We show that these genes are necessary for the viability of small cell lung carcinomas (SCLC, the most aggressive type of lung cancer. Furthermore, we show that nicotine promotes SCLC cell viability whereas an α3β4-selective antagonist, α-conotoxin AuIB, inhibits it. Our findings posit a mechanism whereby signaling via α3/α5/β4-containing nAChRs promotes lung carcinogenesis.

  7. Transferosomes - A vesicular transdermal delivery system for enhanced drug permeation

    Reshmy Rajan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Transdermal administration of drugs is generally limited by the barrier function of the skin. Vesicular systems are one of the most controversial methods for transdermal delivery of active substances. The interest in designing transdermal delivery systems was relaunched after the discovery of elastic vesicles like transferosomes, ethosomes, cubosomes, phytosomes, etc. This paper presents the composition, mechanisms of penetration, manufacturing and characterization methods of transferosomes as transdermal delivery systems of active substances. For a drug to be absorbed and distributed into organs and tissues and eliminated from the body, it must pass through one or more biological membranes/barriers at various locations. Such a movement of drug across the membrane is called as drug transport. For the drugs to be delivered to the body, they should cross the membranous barrier. The concept of these delivery systems was designed in an attempt to concentrate the drug in the tissues of interest, while reducing the amount of drug in the remaining tissues. Hence, surrounding tissues are not affected by the drug. In addition, loss of drug does not happen due to localization of drug, leading to get maximum efficacy of the medication. Therefore, the phospholipid based carrier systems are of considerable interest in this era.

  8. Critical issues related to transfersomes - novel vesicular system

    Kombath Ravindran Vinod

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available It has become increasingly apparent that vesicular drug delivery elicits modest possessions in drug targeting. Transfersomes are a form of elastic or deformable vesicle, which were first introduced in the early 1990s. Elas ticity can be achieved by using an edge activator in the lipid bilayer structure. Molecules greater than 500 Da normally do not cross the skin. This prevents epicutaneous delivery of the high molecular weight therapeutics as well as non-invasive transcutaneous immunisation. Transdermal route will always remain a lucrative area for drug delivery. With the advent of new categories of drugs like peptides this route has captured more focus to combat the problems related to their delivery through oral route. But the transdermal route is equally filled with the hopes and disappointments as the transport of drug through this route faces many problems especially for the large molecules. To answer this problem many approaches were adopted. One of the very recent approaches is the use of ultra-deformable carrier systems (transfersomes. They have been used as drug carriers for a range of small molecules, peptides, proteins and vaccines, both in vitro and in vivo. Transfersomes penetrate through the pores of stratum corneum which are smaller than its size and get into the underlying viable skin in intact form. This is because of its deformable nature. The aim of this article is explanation the formation of micelle and vesicles, various types of vesicles, specifically focusing on transfersomes.

  9. Transferosomes - A vesicular transdermal delivery system for enhanced drug permeation.

    Rajan, Reshmy; Jose, Shoma; Mukund, V P Biju; Vasudevan, Deepa T

    2011-07-01

    Transdermal administration of drugs is generally limited by the barrier function of the skin. Vesicular systems are one of the most controversial methods for transdermal delivery of active substances. The interest in designing transdermal delivery systems was relaunched after the discovery of elastic vesicles like transferosomes, ethosomes, cubosomes, phytosomes, etc. This paper presents the composition, mechanisms of penetration, manufacturing and characterization methods of transferosomes as transdermal delivery systems of active substances. For a drug to be absorbed and distributed into organs and tissues and eliminated from the body, it must pass through one or more biological membranes/barriers at various locations. Such a movement of drug across the membrane is called as drug transport. For the drugs to be delivered to the body, they should cross the membranous barrier. The concept of these delivery systems was designed in an attempt to concentrate the drug in the tissues of interest, while reducing the amount of drug in the remaining tissues. Hence, surrounding tissues are not affected by the drug. In addition, loss of drug does not happen due to localization of drug, leading to get maximum efficacy of the medication. Therefore, the phospholipid based carrier systems are of considerable interest in this era. PMID:22171309

  10. Astrocytic vesicles and gliotransmitters: Slowness of vesicular release and synaptobrevin2-laden vesicle nanoarchitecture.

    Zorec, R; Verkhratsky, A; Rodríguez, J J; Parpura, V

    2016-05-26

    Neurotransmitters released at synapses activate neighboring astrocytes, which in turn, modulate neuronal activity by the release of diverse neuroactive substances that include classical neurotransmitters such as glutamate, GABA or ATP. Neuroactive substances are released from astrocytes through several distinct molecular mechanisms, for example, by diffusion through membrane channels, by translocation via plasmalemmal transporters or by vesicular exocytosis. Vesicular release regulated by a stimulus-mediated increase in cytosolic calcium involves soluble N-ethyl maleimide-sensitive fusion protein attachment protein receptor (SNARE)-dependent merger of the vesicle membrane with the plasmalemma. Up to 25 molecules of synaptobrevin 2 (Sb2), a SNARE complex protein, reside at a single astroglial vesicle; an individual neuronal, i.e. synaptic, vesicle contains ∼70 Sb2 molecules. It is proposed that this paucity of Sb2 molecules in astrocytic vesicles may determine the slow secretion. In the present essay we shall overview multiple aspects of vesicular architecture and types of vesicles based on their cargo and dynamics in astroglial cells. PMID:25727638

  11. Metabolism of acetylcholine in human erythrocytes

    In order to examine the possible role of erythrocyte acetylcholinesterase in the maintenance of membrane phospholipid content and membrane fluidity, experiments were performed to monitor the activity of the enzyme and follow the fate of one of its hydrolytic products, choline. Intact human erythrocytes were incubated with acetylcholine (choline methyl-14C). The incubation resulted in the hydrolysis of acetylcholine to acetate and choline; the reaction was catalyzed by membrane acetylcholinesterase. The studies demonstrate the further metabolism of choline. Experiments were carried out to determine rate of hydrolysis of acetylcholine, uptake of choline, identification of intracellular metabolites of choline, and identification of radiolabeled membrane components. Erythrocytes at a 25% hematocrit were incubated in an isoosmotic bicarbonate buffer pH 7.4, containing glucose, adenosine, streptomycin and penicillin with 0.3 μCi of acetylcholine (choline methyl-14C), for 24 hours. Aliquots of the erythrocyte suspension were taken throughout for analysis. Erythrocytes were washed free of excess substrate, lysed, and the hemolysate was extracted for choline and its metabolites. Blank samples containing incubation buffer and radiolabeled acetylcholine only, and erythrocyte hemolysate extracts were analyzed for choline content, the difference between blank samples and hemolysate extracts was the amount of choline originating from acetylcholine and attributable to acetylcholinesterase activity. The conversion of choline to 14C-betaine is noted after several minutes of incubation; at 30 minutes, more than 80% of 14C-choline is taken up and after several hours, detectable levels of radiolabeled S-adenosylmethionine were present in the hemolysate extract

  12. Uptake of 3H-choline and synthesis of 3H-acetylcholine by human penile corpus cavernosum

    The neuroeffectors which relax penile smooth muscle and lead to erection are unknown; physiological studies of human corpus cavernosum, in vitro, have suggested a significant role of cholinergic neurotransmission. To further characterize the importance of cholinergic nerves, biopsies of human corpus cavernosum were obtained at the time of penile prosthesis implantation. Tissues were incubated in 3H-choline (10-5M, 80 Ci/mmol) in oxygenated physiological salt solution at 370C, pH 7.4 for 1 hour. Radiolabelled compounds were extracted with perchloric acid (0.4 M) and acetylcholine and choline were separated by HPLC; 14C-acetylcholine was used as internal standard. 3H-choline was accumulated by the tissues (20 +/- 1.9 fmol/mg), and 3H-acetylcholine was synthesized (4.0 +/- 1.1 fmol/mg). In control experiments, heating of the tissue blocked synthesis of 3H-acetylcholine. Inhibition of high affinity choline transport by hemicholinium-3 (10-5M) diminished tissue accumulation of 3H-choline and significantly reduced the synthesis of 3H-acetylcholine (0.5 +/ 0.2 fmol/mg, p < 0.05). These results provide direct evidence of neuronal accumulation of choline and enzymatic conversion to acetylcholine in human corpus cavernosum. Taken together with the physiological studies, it can be concluded that cholinergic neurotransmission in human corpus cavernosum plays a role in penile erection

  13. Depletion of vesicular zinc in dorsal horn of spinal cord causes increased neuropathic pain in mice

    Jo, Seung; Danscher, Gorm; Schrøder, Henrik;

    2008-01-01

    neuropathic pain we applied Chung's rodent pain model on BALB/c mice, and traced zinc transporter 3 (ZnT3) proteins and zinc ions with immunohistochemistry and autometallography (AMG), respectively. Under anesthesia the left fifth lumbar spinal nerve was ligated in male mice in order to produced neuropathic...... pain. The animals were then sacrificed 5 days later. The ZnT3 immunoreactivity was found to have decreased significantly in dorsal horn of fourth, fifth, and sixth lumbar segments. In parallel with the depressed ZnT3 immunoreactivity the amount of vesicular zinc decreased perceptibly in superficial...

  14. Allosteric Modulation of Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptors

    Jakubík, Jan; El-Fakahany, E. E.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 3, č. 9 (2010), s. 2838-2860. ISSN 1424-8247 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA305/09/0681 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : muscarinic acetylcholine receptors * allosteric modulation * Alzheimer ´s disease Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry

  15. Parazoanthoxanthin A blocks Torpedo nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Rozman, Klara Bulc; Araoz, Romulo; Sepcić, Kristina; Molgo, Jordi; Suput, Dusan

    2010-09-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors are implicated in different nervous system-related disorders, and their modulation could improve existing therapy of these diseases. Parazoanthoxanthin A (ParaA) is a fluorescent pigment of the group of zoanthoxanthins. Since it is a potent acetylcholinesterase inhibitor, it may also bind to nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). For this reason its effect on Torpedo nAChR (alpha1(2)betagammadelta) transplanted to Xenopus laevis oocytes was evaluated, using the voltage-clamp technique. ParaA dose-dependently reduced the acetylcholine-induced currents. This effect was fully reversible only at lower concentrations. ParaA also reduced the Hill coefficient and the time to peak current, indicating a channel blocking mode of action. On the other hand, the combined effect of ParaA and d-tubocurarine (d-TC) on acetylcholine-induced currents exhibited only partial additivity, assuming a competitive mode of action of ParaA on nAChR. These results indicate a dual mode of action of ParaA on the Torpedo AChR. PMID:20230806

  16. Acetylcholine affects osteocytic MLO-Y4 cells via acetylcholine receptors.

    Ma, Yuanyuan; Li, Xianxian; Fu, Jing; Li, Yue; Gao, Li; Yang, Ling; Zhang, Ping; Shen, Jiefei; Wang, Hang

    2014-03-25

    The identification of the neuronal control of bone remodeling has become one of the many significant recent advances in bone biology. Cholinergic activity has recently been shown to favor bone mass accrual by complex cellular regulatory networks. Here, we identified the gene expression of the muscarinic and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (m- and nAChRs) in mice tibia tissue and in osteocytic MLO-Y4 cells. Acetylcholine, which is a classical neurotransmitter and an osteo-neuromediator, not only influences the mRNA expression of the AChR subunits but also significantly induces the proliferation and viability of osteocytes. Moreover, acetylcholine treatment caused the reciprocal regulation of RANKL and OPG mRNA expression, which resulted in a significant increase in the mRNA ratio of RANKL:OPG in osteocytes via acetylcholine receptors. The expression of neuropeptide Y and reelin, which are two neurogenic markers, was also modulated by acetylcholine via m- and nAChRs in MLO-Y4 cells. These results indicated that osteocytic acetylcholine receptors might be a new valuable mediator for cell functions and even for bone remodeling. PMID:24508663

  17. Skin delivery of ferulic acid from different vesicular systems.

    Chen, Ming; Liu, Xiangli; Fahr, Alfred

    2010-10-01

    The aim of the present research is to evaluate the skin delivery capabilities of different vesicular systems, including conventional liposomes (CL), Tween 80-based deformable liposomes (DL), invasomes (INS) and ethosomes bearing ferulic acid (FA) being an antioxidant exhibiting a wide range of therapeutic effects against various diseases. All of the test formulations were characterized for particle size distribution, zeta-potential, vesicular shape and surface morphology, in vitro human skin permeation and skin deposition. Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) defined that all of liposomal vesicles were almost spherical, displaying unilamellar structures with low polydispersity (PDI ethosomal system containing 18.0 mg/ml of ferulic acid with an significantly (P ethosomes are promising vesicular carriers for delivering ferulic acid into or across the skin. PMID:21329050

  18. Some Ideas to Improve Pyroclast Density and Vesicularity Data Analysis

    Bernard, B.; Kueppers, U.; Ortiz, H. D.

    2014-12-01

    Pyroclast density and vesicularity are critical parameters in physical volcanology used to reconstruct eruptive dynamics and feed numerical models. Pyroclastic deposits typically present a wide range of density and vesicularity values, so measurements must be repeated tens of times. These data are generally treated using classical statistical analysis including averages and frequency histograms. One issue in this approach is that density and vesicularity are intensive properties and therefore they cannot be added or averaged directly. We encourage the use of weighted density and vesicularity averages and histograms, which is, until now, done only in few studies. In order to insure an adequate and efficient use of the weighting equations, we introduce an open-source R code to calculate the most common statistical parameters such as range and weighted averages, and produce abundance histograms. An important question when working with statistics is whether or not the sample size is large enough. To address this matter we also included a stability analysis based on a Monte Carlo approach which enables to quantify the reliability of the results. To illustrate this methodology we chose two large datasets from Chachimbiro (Ecuador) and Unzen (Japan) volcanoes. Our first results indicate that the use of weighted analysis instead of frequency analysis can change the density and vesicularity averages up to 4% and the shape of the abundance histogram leading to different interpretations. The stability analysis reveals that the number of measurements required for reliable results depends greatly on the distribution of density and vesicularity values. Therefore the number of measurements must be fixed on an ipso facto basis using a large sample size at the beginning and reducing it to achieve time efficiency.

  19. Molecular mechanisms of Sar/Arf GTPases in vesicular trafficking in yeast and plants

    Tomohiro eYorimitsu

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Small GTPase proteins play essential roles in the regulation of vesicular trafficking systems in eukaryotic cells. Two types of small GTPases, secretion-associated Ras-related protein (Sar and ADP-ribosylation factor (Arf, act in the biogenesis of transport vesicles. Sar/Arf GTPases function as molecular switches by cycling between active, GTP-bound and inactive, GDP-bound forms, catalyzed by guanine nucleotide exchange factors and GTPase-activating proteins, respectively. Activated Sar/Arf GTPases undergo a conformational change, exposing the N-terminal amphipathic α-helix for insertion into membranes. The process triggers the recruitment and assembly of coat proteins to the membranes, followed by coated vesicle formation and scission. In higher plants, Sar/Arf GTPases also play pivotal roles in maintaining the dynamic identity of organelles in the secretory pathway. Sar1 GTPase strictly controls anterograde transport from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER through the recruitment of plant COPII coat components onto membranes. COPII vesicle transport is responsible for the organization of highly conserved polygonal ER networks. In contrast, Arf GTPases contribute to the regulation of multiple trafficking routes, including transport through the Golgi complex and endocytic transport. These transport systems have diversified in the plant kingdom independently and exhibit several plant-specific features with respect to Golgi organization, endocytic cycling, cell polarity and cytokinesis. The functional diversification of vesicular trafficking systems ensures the multicellular development of higher plants. This review focuses on the current knowledge of Sar/Arf GTPases, highlighting the molecular details of GTPase regulation in vesicle formation in yeast and advances in knowledge of the characteristics of vesicle trafficking in plants.

  20. Allosteric Modulation of Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptors

    Esam E. El-Fakahany

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available An allosteric modulator is a ligand that binds to an allosteric site on the receptor and changes receptor conformation to produce increase (positive cooperativity or decrease (negative cooperativity in the binding or action of an orthosteric agonist (e.g., acetylcholine. Since the identification of gallamine as the first allosteric modulator of muscarinic receptors in 1976, this unique mode of receptor modulation has been intensively studied by many groups. This review summarizes over 30 years of research on the molecular mechanisms of allosteric interactions of drugs with the receptor and for new allosteric modulators of muscarinic receptors with potential therapeutic use. Identification of positive modulators of acetylcholine binding and function that enhance neurotransmission and the discovery of highly selective allosteric modulators are mile-stones on the way to novel therapeutic agents for the treatment of schizophrenia, Alzheimer’s disease and other disorders involving impaired cognitive function.

  1. Vesicular-Arbuscular Mycorrhiza in Field-Grown Crops

    Jakobsen, Iver

    1986-01-01

    The importance of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhiza (VAM) and P fertilizer for P nutrition and dry matter production in field peas (Pisum sativum L.) was studied in moderately P-deficient soil. Half of the experimental plots were fumigated to reduce the level of VAM infection. Shoots and 0 to 30 cm...

  2. Vesicularity of basalt erupted at Reykjanes Ridge crest

    Duffield, W.A.

    1978-01-01

    Average vesicularity of basalt drilled at three sites on the west flank of the Reykjanes Ridge increases with decreasing age. This change apparently records concomitant decrease in water depth at the ridge crest where the basalt was erupted and suggests substantial upward growth of the crest during the past 35 Myr. ?? 1978 Nature Publishing Group.

  3. INFECTIVITY AND PERSISTENCE OF VESICULAR STOMATITIS VIRUS IN CULICOIDES CELLS

    The biting midge, Culicoides sonorensis, was recently shown to be a biologically competent vector for the arbovirus, vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV). While arboviruses can be extremely pathogenic to mammalian cells, they typically do not exert deleterious effects on their insect vectors. Infectio...

  4. The Role of Acetylcholine in Cocaine Addiction

    Williams, Mark J.; Adinoff, Bryon

    2007-01-01

    Central nervous system cholinergic neurons arise from several discrete sources, project to multiple brain regions, and exert specific effects on reward, learning, and memory. These processes are critical for the development and persistence of addictive disorders. Although other neurotransmitters, including dopamine, glutamate, and serotonin, have been the primary focus of drug research to date, a growing preclinical literature reveals a critical role of acetylcholine (ACh) in the experience a...

  5. Deficient vesicular storage: A common theme in catecholaminergic neurodegeneration.

    Goldstein, David S; Holmes, Courtney; Sullivan, Patti; Mash, Deborah C; Sidransky, Ellen; Stefani, Alessandro; Kopin, Irwin J; Sharabi, Yehonatan

    2015-09-01

    Several neurodegenerative diseases involve loss of catecholamine neurons--Parkinson's disease (PD) is a prototypical example. Catecholamine neurons are rare in the nervous system, and why they are lost has been mysterious. Accumulating evidence supports the concept of "autotoxicity"--inherent cytotoxicity caused by catecholamine metabolites. Since vesicular sequestration limits the buildup of toxic products of enzymatic and spontaneous oxidation of catecholamines, a vesicular storage defect could play a pathogenic role in the death of catecholaminergic neurons in a variety of neurodegenerative diseases. In putamen, deficient vesicular storage is revealed in vivo by accelerated loss of (18)F-DOPA-derived radioactivity and post-mortem by decreased tissue dopamine (DA):DOPA ratios; in myocardium in vivo by accelerated loss of (18)F-dopamine-derived radioactivity and post-mortem by increased 3,4-dihydroxyphenylglycol:norepinephrine (DHPG:NE) ratios; and in sympathetic noradrenergic nerves overall in vivo by increased plasma F-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (F-DOPAC):DHPG ratios. We retrospectively analyzed data from 20 conditions with decreased or intact catecholaminergic innervation, involving different etiologies, pathogenetic mechanisms, and lesion locations. All conditions involving parkinsonism had accelerated loss of putamen (18)F-DOPA-derived radioactivity; in those with post-mortem data there were also decreased putamen DA:DOPA ratios. All conditions involving cardiac sympathetic denervation had accelerated loss of myocardial (18)F-dopamine-derived radioactivity; in those with post-mortem data there were increased myocardial DHPG:NE ratios. All conditions involving localized loss of catecholaminergic innervation had evidence of decreased vesicular storage specifically in the denervated regions. Thus, across neurodegenerative diseases, loss of catecholaminergic neurons seems to be associated with decreased vesicular storage in the residual neurons. PMID:26255205

  6. Rapid Recovery of Vesicular Dopamine Levels in Methamphetamine Users in Early Abstinence.

    Boileau, Isabelle; McCluskey, Tina; Tong, Junchao; Furukawa, Yoshiaki; Houle, Sylvain; Kish, Stephen J

    2016-03-01

    We previously reported very low levels of dopamine in post-mortem striatum of chronic methamphetamine users, raising the possibility that restoration of normal dopamine levels could help in this addiction and perhaps prevent early relapse. To establish relevance of this finding to the living brain, we tested whether striatal [(11)C]-(+)-dihydrotetrabenazine binding, a vesicular monoamine transporter probe sensitive to changes in (stored) vesicular dopamine, is elevated in methamphetamine users. Chronic methamphetamine users underwent [(11)C]-(+)-dihydrotetrabenazine positron emission tomography scans during early (mean 2.6 days) and later (~10 days) abstinence. Striatal [(11)C]-(+)-dihydrotetrabenazine binding was elevated (suggesting low stored dopamine) in methamphetamine users (n=28; 2.6 days after last use) relative to controls (n=22) (+28%, pimaging data support post-mortem findings and suggest that chronic methamphetamine users have low brain levels of stored dopamine during very early abstinence from MA, which could contribute to behavioral and cognitive deficits. Findings also suggest a rapid recovery of stored dopamine in some methamphetamine users who become abstinent and who therefore might not benefit from dopamine replacement medication (eg, levodopa). Further study is necessary to establish whether those users who could not maintain abstinence for the second scan might have a more severe and persistent dopamine deficiency and who could benefit from this medication. PMID:26321315

  7. Structural Studies of Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors: Using Acetylcholine Binding Protein as a Structural Surrogate

    Shahsavar, Azadeh; Gajhede, Michael; Kastrup, Jette; Balle, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are members of the pentameric ligand-gated ion channel superfamily that play important roles in control of neurotransmitter release in the central and peripheral nervous system. These receptors are important therapeutic targets for development of drugs a...

  8. Punctuated equilibrium and positive Darwinian evolution in vesicular stomatitis virus.

    Nichol, S.T.; Rowe, J. E.; Fitch, W M

    1993-01-01

    RNA viruses possess the potential for rapid evolution and serve as excellent models to test evolutionary theory. Molecular phylogenetic analysis of the P gene for a larger number of diverse natural isolates of vesicular stomatitis virus reveals no evidence for a molecular clock but instead shows a stepwise evolutionary pattern unlike that ever seen before. Each step out from the tree's ancestral root to terminal branch tips correlates not with time of virus isolation but with a south-to-north...

  9. Evolution of Fitness in Experimental Populations of Vesicular Stomatitis Virus

    Elena, S F; Gonzalez-Candelas, F.; Novella, I S; Duarte, E A; Clarke, D. K.; Domingo, E; Holland, J J; Moya, A.

    1996-01-01

    The evolution of fitness in experimental clonal populations of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) has been compared under different genetic (fitness of initial clone) and demographic (population dynamics) regimes. In spite of the high genetic heterogeneity among replicates within experiments, there is a clear effect of population dynamics on the evolution of fitness. Those populations that went through strong periodic bottlenecks showed a decreased fitness in competition experiments with wild t...

  10. Transferosomes - A vesicular transdermal delivery system for enhanced drug permeation

    Reshmy Rajan; Shoma Jose; V P Biju Mukund; Deepa T Vasudevan

    2011-01-01

    Transdermal administration of drugs is generally limited by the barrier function of the skin. Vesicular systems are one of the most controversial methods for transdermal delivery of active substances. The interest in designing transdermal delivery systems was relaunched after the discovery of elastic vesicles like transferosomes, ethosomes, cubosomes, phytosomes, etc. This paper presents the composition, mechanisms of penetration, manufacturing and characterization methods of transferosomes a...

  11. The effect of ketamine on intraspinal acetylcholine release

    Abelson, Klas S P; Goldkuhl, Renée Röstlinger; Nylund, Anders;

    2006-01-01

    The general anaesthetic ketamine affects the central cholinergic system in several manners, but its effect on spinal acetylcholine release, which may be an important transmitter in spinal antinociception, is unknown. This study aimed to investigate the effect of ketamine on spinal acetylcholine...... release. Microdialysis probes were placed intraspinally in male rats, and acetylcholine was quantified with HPLC. Anaesthesia was switched from isoflurane (1.3%) to ketamine (150 mg/kg h), which resulted in a 500% increased acetylcholine release. The increase was attenuated during nicotinic receptor...... blockade (50 microM mecamylamine). The nicotinic receptor agonist epibatidine (175 microM) produced a ten-fold higher relative increase of acetylcholine release during isoflurane anaesthesia compared to ketamine anaesthesia (270% to 27%). Intraspinal administration of ketamine and norketamine both...

  12. Expression and function of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in stem cells

    Carlos M. Carballosa

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors are prototypical ligand gated ion channels typically found in muscular and neuronal tissues. Functional nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, however, have also recently been identified on other cell types, including stem cells. Activation of these receptors by the binding of agonists like choline, acetylcholine, or nicotine has been implicated in many cellular changes. In regards to stem cell function, nicotinic acetylcholine receptor activation leads to changes in stem cell proliferation, migration and differentiation potential. In this review we summarize the expression and function of known nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in different classes of stem cells including: pluripotent stem cells, mesenchymal stem cells, periodontal ligament derived stem cells, and neural progenitor cells and discuss the potential downstream effects of receptor activation on stem cell function.

  13. Lead Exposure during Synaptogenesis Alters Vesicular Proteins and Impairs Vesicular Release: Potential Role of NMDA Receptor–Dependent BDNF Signaling

    Neal, April P.; Stansfield, Kirstie H.; Worley, Paul F.; Thompson, Richard E.; Guilarte, Tomás R.

    2010-01-01

    Lead (Pb2+) exposure is known to affect presynaptic neurotransmitter release in both in vivo and cell culture models. However, the precise mechanism by which Pb2+ impairs neurotransmitter release remains unknown. In the current study, we show that Pb2+ exposure during synaptogenesis in cultured hippocampal neurons produces the loss of synaptophysin (Syn) and synaptobrevin (Syb), two proteins involved in vesicular release. Pb2+ exposure also increased the number of presynaptic contact sites. H...

  14. Characterization of depolarization-coupled release of glutamate from cultured mouse cerebellar granule cells using DL-threo-beta-benzyloxyaspartate (DL-TBOA) to distinguish between the vesicular and cytoplasmic pools

    Bak, Lasse K; Schousboe, Arne; Waagepetersen, Helle S

    distinguished employing the competitive, non-transportable glutamate transport inhibitor DL-threo-beta-benzyloxyaspartate (DL-TBOA). NMDA (300 microM)-induced release was enhanced (50%) by a simultaneous elevation of the extracellular potassium concentration to 15 mM, which lifts the voltage-dependent magnesium...... addition to the vesicular release while the NMDA/K(+)-induced release is vesicular in nature. It is likely that the high glutamate concentration (100 microM) may facilitate heteroexchange of the preloaded [3H]D-aspartate....

  15. Studies of two naturally occurring compounds which effect release of acetylcholine from synaptosomes

    Two naturally occurring compounds which effect the release of neurotransmitter from synaptosomes have been purified to apparent homogeneity. Iotrochotin (IOT) isolated from wound exudate of the Caribbean purple bleeder sponge promotes release in a manner that is independent of the extracellular Ca2+ ion concentration. Leptinotarsin (LPT-d), a protein taken from hemolymph of the Colorado potato beetle, Leptinotarsa decemlineata, stimulates Ca2+-dependent release. IOT is slightly acidic and has a molecular weight of approximately 18 kD. [3H]acetylcholine which has been introduced into synaptosomes as [3H]choline can be released by IOT. The toxin releasable pool of labelled neurotransmitter is not depleted by depolarization of the synaptosomes with high potassium, and therefore seems to be primarily extravesicular. LPT-d is a larger protein (molecular weight = 45 kD) than IOT, and seems to effect primarily vesicular release by opening at least one type of presynaptic Ca2+ channel. The facilitatory effects of the toxin on synaptosomal release can be inhibited by inorganic Ca2+ channel antagonists, but are not generally affected by organic antagonists

  16. Chemical stimulation of adherent cells by localized application of acetylcholine from a microfluidic system.

    Zibek, Susanne; Hagmeyer, Britta; Stett, Alfred; Stelzle, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Chemical stimulation of cells is inherently cell type selective in contrast to electro-stimulation. The availability of a system for localized application of minute amounts of chemical stimulants could be useful for dose related response studies to test new compounds. It could also bring forward the development of a novel type of neuroprostheses. In an experimental setup microdroplets of an acetylcholine solution were ejected from a fluidic microsystem and applied to the bottom of a nanoporous membrane. The solution traveled through the pores to the top of the membrane on which TE671 cells were cultivated. Calcium imaging was used to visualize cellular response with temporal and spatial resolution. Experimental demonstration of chemical stimulation for both threshold gated stimulation as well as accumulated dose-response was achieved by either employing acetylcholine as chemical stimulant or applying calcein uptake, respectively. Numerical modeling and simulation of transport mechanisms involved were employed to gain a theoretical understanding of the influence of pore size, concentration of stimulant and droplet volume on the spatial-temporal distribution of stimulant and on the cellular response. Diffusion, pressure driven flow and evaporation effects were taken into account. Fast stimulation kinetic is achieved with pores of 0.82 μm diameter, whereas sustained substance delivery is obtained with nanoporous membranes. In all cases threshold concentrations ranging from 0.01 to 0.015 μM acetylcholine independent of pore size were determined. PMID:21151808

  17. Chemical Stimulation of Adherent Cells by Localized Application of Acetylcholine from a Microfluidic System

    Zibek, Susanne; Hagmeyer, Britta; Stett, Alfred; Stelzle, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Chemical stimulation of cells is inherently cell type selective in contrast to electro-stimulation. The availability of a system for localized application of minute amounts of chemical stimulants could be useful for dose related response studies to test new compounds. It could also bring forward the development of a novel type of neuroprostheses. In an experimental setup microdroplets of an acetylcholine solution were ejected from a fluidic microsystem and applied to the bottom of a nanoporous membrane. The solution traveled through the pores to the top of the membrane on which TE671 cells were cultivated. Calcium imaging was used to visualize cellular response with temporal and spatial resolution. Experimental demonstration of chemical stimulation for both threshold gated stimulation as well as accumulated dose–response was achieved by either employing acetylcholine as chemical stimulant or applying calcein uptake, respectively. Numerical modeling and simulation of transport mechanisms involved were employed to gain a theoretical understanding of the influence of pore size, concentration of stimulant and droplet volume on the spatial-temporal distribution of stimulant and on the cellular response. Diffusion, pressure driven flow and evaporation effects were taken into account. Fast stimulation kinetic is achieved with pores of 0.82 μm diameter, whereas sustained substance delivery is obtained with nanoporous membranes. In all cases threshold concentrations ranging from 0.01 to 0.015 μM acetylcholine independent of pore size were determined. PMID:21151808

  18. Mutational changes in the vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein affect the requirement of carbohydrate in morphogenesis.

    Chatis, P A; Morrison, T G

    1981-01-01

    The role of carbohydrate in the morphogenesis of vesicular stomatitis virus was studied, using the antibiotic tunicamycin to inhibit glycosylation. It has been reported previously (Gibson et al., J. Biol. Chem. 254:3600-3607, 1979) that the San Juan strain of vesicular stomatitis virus requires carbohydrate for efficient migration of the glycoprotein (G) to the cell surface and for virion formation, whereas the prototype or Orsay strain of vesicular stomatitis virus is less stringent in its c...

  19. Structural model of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor isotypes bound to acetylcholine and nicotine

    Abagyan Ruben

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nicotine is a psychoactive drug presenting a diverse array of biological activities, some positive, such as enhancement of cognitive performances, others negative, such as addiction liability. Ligands that discriminate between the different isotypes of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs could present improved pharmacology and toxicity profile. Results Based on the recent crystal structure of a soluble acetylcholine binding protein from snails, we have built atomic models of acetylcholine and nicotine bound to the pocket of four different human nAChR subtypes. The structures of the docked ligands correlate with available biochemical data, and reveal that the determinants for isotype selectivity are relying essentially on four residues, providing diversity of the ligand binding pocket both in terms of Van der Waals boundary, and electrostatic potential. We used our models to screen in silico a large compound database and identify a new ligand candidate that could display subtype selectivity. Conclusion The nAChR-agonist models should be useful for the design of nAChR agonists with diverse specificity profiles.

  20. The α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor complex

    Thomsen, Morten Skøtt; Mikkelsen, Jens D

    2012-01-01

    The α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) is a promising drug target for a number of diseases ranging from schizophrenia and Alzheimer's disease to chronic pain and inflammatory diseases. Focusing on the central nervous system, we describe how endogenous and experimental compounds and...... compounds in vivo is highly dependent on α7 nAChR-interacting proteins, such as RIC-3 and lynx1, which modulate expression and function of the receptor. These regulatory proteins are often not expressed in in vitro models used to study α7 nAChR function, and it is not known to what extent they are involved...... in diseases such as schizophrenia and Alzheimer's disease. Furthermore, α7 nAChR agonists and allosteric modulators differentially alter expression and functionality of the α7 nAChR with repeated administration, which suggests that there may be fundamentally different outcomes of long...

  1. Inhibition of acetylcholine synthesis in vitro

    In order to better understand diseases that stem from deficiencies in cholinergic activity, reproducible in vitro and in vivo models displaying cholinergic hypofunction are desirable. This necessitates the availability of specific inhibitors. This paper examines the design, synthesis and evaluation of quinuclidinyl compounds with structural features previously reported, but with certain key differences. Structure activity studies with in vitro assay systems are presented. In a few studies, choline was held constant and acetyl-CoA concentration was varied, but with a constant amount of (14C) - acetyl CoA. Acetylcholine synthesis and CO2 production from labelled glucose were measured in cerebral cortex slices from male rats after decapitation. The nanomoles of ACh and CO2 produced from (14C) -glucose were calculated from glucose specific activity. Results are presented

  2. Cocaine Inhibition of Nicotinic Acetylcholine ReceptorsInfluences Dopamine Release

    Alexandra eAcevedo-Rodriguez

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs potently regulate dopamine (DA release in the striatum and alter cocaine’s ability to reinforce behaviors. Since cocaine is a weak nAChR inhibitor, we hypothesized that cocaine may alter DA release by inhibiting the nAChRs in DA terminals in the striatum and thus contribute to cocaine's reinforcing properties primarily associated with the inhibition of DA transporters. We found that biologically relevant concentrations of cocaine can mildly inhibit nAChR-mediated currents in midbrain DA neurons and consequently alter DA release in the dorsal and ventral striatum. At very high concentrations, cocaine also inhibits voltage-gated Na channels in DA neurons. Furthermore, our results show that partial inhibition of nAChRs by cocaine reduces evoked DA release. This diminution of DA release via nAChR inhibition more strongly influences release evoked at low or tonic stimulation frequencies than at higher (phasic stimulation frequencies, particularly in the dorsolateral striatum. This cocaine-induced shift favoring phasic DA release may contribute to the enhanced saliency and motivational value of cocaine-associated memories and behaviors.

  3. Role of acetylcholine on plant root-shoot signal transduction

    2003-01-01

    The role of acetylcholine (ACh) on plant root- shoot communication was investigated using the root-split system of Vicia faba L. In the experiments, slight osmotic stress caused the decrease of ACh content in root tips and the xylem sap transported up per time unit from root tip to the shoot when the water potential of the shoot was kept unchanged. It also caused the decrease of ACh content in the abaxial epidermis. The decrease was highly correlative to the changes of transpiration rate, suggesting that the decrease of ACh content probably functions as a signal to regulate stomatal behavior. The effect of osmotic stress might be mainly through the inhibition of the ACh synthesis in root tip; thus further influences the ACh content in root tip, xylem sap and abaxial epidermis and resulting in the changes of stomatal behavior. These results provide new evidence that plants transduce positive and negative signals among roots and shoots to coordinate stomatal behavior and adapt to variable environments.

  4. Passage of an integral membrane protein, the vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein, through the Golgi apparatus en route to the plasma membrane.

    Bergmann, J E; Tokuyasu, K. T.; Singer, S. J.

    1981-01-01

    The intracellular pathway of biogenesis of the vesicular stomatitis virus transmembrane glycoprotein was investigated in situ by using indirect immunofluorescence of whole infected Chinese hamster ovary cells and immunoelectron microscopy of ultrathin frozen sections of infected cells. Transport of the glycoprotein was synchronized by using the temperature-sensitive virus mutant Orsay-45 and a temperature shift-down protocol. Sequential appearance of the glycoprotein in the rough endoplasmic ...

  5. Lycopene from tomatoes: vesicular nanocarrier formulations for dermal delivery.

    Ascenso, Andreia; Pinho, Sónia; Eleutério, Carla; Praça, Fabíola Garcia; Bentley, Maria Vitória Lopes Badra; Oliveira, Helena; Santos, Conceição; Silva, Olga; Simões, Sandra

    2013-07-31

    This experimental work aimed to develop a simple, fast, economic, and environmentally friendly process for the extraction of lycopene from tomato and incorporate this lycopene-rich extract into ultradeformable vesicular nanocarriers suitable for topical application. Lycopene extraction was conducted without a cosolvent for 30 min. The extracts were analyzed and incorporated in transfersomes and ethosomes. These formulations were characterized, and the cellular uptake was observed by confocal microscopy. Dermal delivery of lycopene formulations was tested under in vitro and in vivo conditions. Lycopene extraction proved to be quite safe and selective. The vesicular formulation was taken up by the cells, being more concentrated around the nucleus. Epicutaneous application of lycopene formulations decreased the level of anthralin-induced ear swelling by 97 and 87%, in a manner nonstatistically different from the positive control. These results support the idea that the lycopene-rich extract may be a good alternative to the expensive commercial lycopene for incorporation into advanced topical delivery systems. PMID:23826819

  6. Vesicularity, bubble formation and noble gas fractionation during MORB degassing

    Aubry, G; Guillot, B

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study is to use molecular dynamics simulation (MD) to evaluate the vesicularity and noble gas fractionation, and to shed light on bubble formation during MORB degassing. A previous simulation study (Guillot and Sator (2011) GCA 75, 1829-1857) has shown that the solubility of CO2 in basaltic melts increases steadily with the pressure and deviates significantly from Henry's law at high pressures (e.g. 9.5 wt% CO2 at 50 kbar as compared with 2.5 wt% from Henry's law). From the CO2 solubility curve and the equations of state of the two coexisting phases (silicate melt and supercritical CO2), deduced from the MD simulation, we have evaluated the evolution of the vesicularity of a MORB melt at depth as function of its initial CO2 contents. An excellent agreement is obtained between calculations and data on MORB samples collected at oceanic ridges. Moreover, by implementing the test particle method (Guillot and Sator (2012) GCA 80, 51-69), the solubility of noble gases in the two coexisting pha...

  7. Chemical stimulation of adherent cells by localized application of acetylcholine from a microfluidic system

    Susanne Zibek

    2010-11-01

    Numerical modelling and simulation of transport mechanisms involved were employed to gain a theoretical understanding of the influence of pore size, concentration of stimulant and droplet volume on the spatial-temporal distribution of stimulant and on the cellular response. Diffusion, pressure driven flow and evaporation effects were taken into account. Fast stimulation kinetic is achieved with pores of 0.82 µm diameter, whereas sustained substance delivery is obtained with nanoporous membranes. In all cases threshold concentrations ranging from 0.01 to 0.015 µM acetylcholine independent of pore size were determined.

  8. Methodologic aspects of acetylcholine-evoked relaxation of rabbit aorta.

    Hansen, K; Nedergaard, O A

    1999-08-01

    The acetylcholine-evoked relaxation of rabbit isolated thoracic aorta precontracted by phenylephrine was studied. Phenylephrine caused a steady contraction that was maintained for 6 h. In the presence of calcium disodium ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA) and ascorbic acid the contraction decreased with time. N(G)-Nitro-L-arginine abolished the inhibitory effect of EDTA and ascorbic acid. Acetylcholine evoked a rapid concentration-dependent relaxation that recovered spontaneously and slowly, but fully, with time. Relaxation evoked by equieffective concentrations of carbachol and acetylcholine had the same time course. Cumulative addition of acetylcholine (10(-7)-3 x 10(-5) M) caused a marked relaxation that was reverted slightly at high concentrations. The relaxation was the same with rings derived from the upper, middle, and lower part of the thoracic aorta. Two consecutive concentration-response curves for acetylcholine obtained at a 2-h interval demonstrated a slight development of tachyphylaxis. The relaxation was inversely related to precontractile tension evoked by phenylephrine when expressed as a percentage, but independent when expressed as g tension. Storage of aorta in cold salt solution for 24 h did not alter the relaxation. EDTA and ascorbic acid did not alter the relaxation. It is concluded that (1) EDTA and ascorbic acid can not be used with impunity to stabilize catecholamines used as preconstriction agents; (2) the reversal of the acetylcholine-evoked relaxation is not due to hydrolysis of acetylcholine; (3) the relaxation is uniform in all segments of thoracic aorta; (4) cold storage of aorta does not alter the relaxation; and (5) acetylcholine releases the same amount of relaxing factor, irrespective of the precontractile tension. PMID:10691020

  9. Experimental infection of Didelphis marsupialis with Vesicular Stomatitis New Jersey Virus

    Although vesicular stomatitis has been present for many years in the Americas, many aspects of its natural history remain undefined. In this study we challenged five adult Virginia opossums (Didelphis marsupialis) with vesicular stomatitis New Jersey serotype virus (VSNJV). Opossums had no detecta...

  10. Field inoculation procedures with vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhiza

    The goal of field studies with vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhiza (VAM) is to improve crop yield by establishing vigorous VAM infections that will substantially enhance the uptake of phosphate. This objective is usually approached by introducing efficient inoculum into a field crop early enough and at a high enough rate to affect plant growth. Some consideration should also be given to ways of manipulating the native mycorrhizas because satisfactory field inoculation procedures for large-scale application are not yet well developed and the indigenous soil populations of VAM fungi are sometimes symbiotically efficient but too sparse to be effective. Thus mixed cropping systems and crop rotations that include strongly mycorrhizal plant species may well prove to be useful for building up the native VAM population. However, in this article, we are concerned primarily with the methodology of field inoculation, using VAM endophytes that have already been cultured on stock plants and tested for their symbiotic potential and soil/plant preferences

  11. Vesicular signalling and immune modulation as hedonic fingerprints

    Bisgaard, Christina F; Bak, Steffen; Christensen, Trine;

    2012-01-01

    the chronic mild stress (CMS) model of depression using chronic administration with two selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), escitalopram and sertraline. We isolated granular cells using Laser-Capture Microdissection (LCM) and we identified their regulated proteins using two-dimensional (2D......) differential gel electrophoresis (DIGE) and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). The majority of the proteins we identified were enzymes involved in different metabolic activities. Additional proteins were functionally classified as vesicular proteins and immune system proteins. Rab GDP dissociation inhibitor...... alpha (GDIA) and syntaxin-binding protein 1 (STXB1) were potential markers for stress reactivity. Dynamin 1 (DYN1), glutathione S-transferase omega-1 (GSTO1) and peroxiredoxin (PRDX6) were associated with treatment response. In addition, an imbalance between different post-translationally modified...

  12. Vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal populations in stored topsoil

    Harris, J.A.; Hunter, D.; Birch, P.; Short, K.C. (North East London Polytechnic, London (UK). Environment and Industry Research Unit, Dept. of Biology and Biochemistry)

    1987-01-01

    Two soil stores of different ages were sampled to investigate their vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal (VAM) populations. The soils collected were assessed for pH, moisture content, loss on ignition, spore numbers, number and size of root fragments present and percentage of these roots infected with VAM. A corn-root bioassay was used to determine soil infectivity. Root fragment number, size, % root infection and soil infectivity were negatively correlated with soil depth. VAM spore number was not significantly correlated with depth in either store. It appears that infected root fragments and fresh roots were the source of inoculum although there may have been a contribution from spores in the younger store. The infectivity of the older store soil was less than that of the younger store. 12 refs., 5 tabs.

  13. Structural Studies of Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors: Using Acetylcholine-Binding Protein as a Structural Surrogate.

    Shahsavar, Azadeh; Gajhede, Michael; Kastrup, Jette S; Balle, Thomas

    2016-06-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are members of the pentameric ligand-gated ion channel superfamily that play important roles in the control of neurotransmitter release in the central and peripheral nervous system. These receptors are important therapeutic targets for the development of drugs against a number of mental health disorders and for marketed smoking cessation aids. Unfortunately, drug discovery has been hampered by difficulties in obtaining sufficiently selective compounds. Together with functional complexity of the receptors, this has made it difficult to obtain drugs with sufficiently high-target to off-target affinity ratios. The recent and ongoing progress in structural studies holds promise to help understand structure-function relationships of nAChR drugs at the atomic level. This will undoubtedly lead to the design of more efficient drugs with fewer side effects. As a high-resolution structure of a nAChR is yet to be determined, structural studies are to a large extent based on acetylcholine-binding proteins (AChBPs) that despite low overall sequence identity display a high degree of conservation of overall structure and amino acids at the ligand-binding site. Further, AChBPs reproduce relative binding affinities of ligands at nAChRs. Over the past decade, AChBPs have been used extensively as models for nAChRs and have aided the understanding of drug receptor interactions at nAChRs significantly. PMID:26572235

  14. Transport

    Transport is one of the major causes of environmental damage in Austria. Energy consumption, pollutants emissions, noise emissions, use of surfaces, sealing of surfaces, dissection of ecosystems and impact on landscape are the most significant environmental impacts caused by it. An overview of the transport development of passengers and freight in Austria is presented. Especially the energy consumption growth, carbon dioxide and nitrogen oxide emissions by type of transport, and the emissions development (HC, particle and carbon monoxide) of goods and passengers transport are analyzed covering the years 1980 - 1999. The health cost resulting from transport-related air pollution in Austria is given and measures to be taken for an effective control of the transport sector are mentioned. Figs. 8, Table 1. (nevyjel)

  15. Organophosphate acetylcholine esterase inhibitor poisoning from a home-made shampoo

    Sadaka, Yair; Broides, Arnon; Tzion, Raffi Lev; Lifshitz, Matitiahu

    2011-01-01

    Organophosphate acetylcholine esterase inhibitor poisoning is a major health problem in children. We report an unusual cause of organophosphate acetylcholine esterase inhibitor poisoning. Two children were admitted to the pediatric intensive care unit due to organophosphate acetylcholine esterase inhibitor poisoning after exposure from a home-made shampoo that was used for the treatment of head lice. Owing to no obvious source of poisoning, the diagnosis of organophosphate acetylcholine ester...

  16. Flavonoids with M1 Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptor Binding Activity

    Meyyammai Swaminathan

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Muscarinic acetylcholine receptor-active compounds have potential for the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease. In this study, a series of natural and synthetic flavones and flavonols was assayed in vitro for their ability to inhibit radioligand binding at human cloned M1 muscarinic receptors. Several compounds were found to possess competitive binding affinity (Ki = 40–110 µM, comparable to that of acetylcholine (Ki = 59 µM. Despite the fact that these compounds lack a positively-charged ammonium group under physiological conditions, molecular modelling studies suggested that they bind to the orthosteric site of the receptor, mainly through non-polar interactions.

  17. Dendrisomes: vesicular structures derived from a cationic lipidic dendron.

    Al-Jamal, Khuloud T; Sakthivel, Thiagarajan; Florence, Alexander T

    2005-01-01

    The behavior of a novel synthetic lipidic cationic lysine-based dendron (partial dendrimer) in aqueous media and its ability, with and without cholesterol, to self-assemble into higher order structures was studied to gain an understanding of these structures as potential drug carriers. The dendron was prepared by solid-phase peptide synthesis. A reverse-phase evaporation (REV) technique was used to prepare cationic vesicular aggregates of the dendron with different molar ratios of cholesterol. The size and zeta potential of these supramolecular aggregates or "dendrisomes" was determined by photon correlation spectroscopy (PCS). Dendrisome morphology and thermotropic properties were studied by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Radiolabeled penicillin G was used as a model of a negatively charged water-soluble compound to investigate the encapsulation efficiency of the dendrisomes. In vitro release of the drug was determined using as a comparator a REV liposome formulation. Dendrisomes of all compositions have higher encapsulation efficiencies and slower release rates compared to the comparator. Cholesterol was found both to increase the size of the aggregates from around 310 to 560 nm and to increase shape irregularities, but did not change the positive zeta potential, in the order of +50 mV, of the dendrisomes. Cholesterol decreases penicillin G entrapment efficiency but increases solute leakage at 25 degrees C. PMID:15761934

  18. Asymmetric packaging of polymerases within vesicular stomatitis virus

    Highlights: •The VSV polymerases (L proteins) are localized to the blunt end of the virus. •The VSV phosphoproteins (P proteins) are localized to the blunt end of the virus. •Each VSV virion packages a variable number of P and L proteins. -- Abstract: Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) is a prototypic negative sense single-stranded RNA virus. The bullet-shape appearance of the virion results from tightly wound helical turns of the nucleoprotein encapsidated RNA template (N-RNA) around a central cavity. Transcription and replication require polymerase complexes, which include a catalytic subunit L and a template-binding subunit P. L and P are inferred to be in the cavity, however lacking direct observation, their exact position has remained unclear. Using super-resolution fluorescence imaging and atomic force microscopy (AFM) on single VSV virions, we show that L and P are packaged asymmetrically towards the blunt end of the virus. The number of L and P proteins varies between individual virions and they occupy 57 ± 12 nm of the 150 nm central cavity of the virus. Our finding positions the polymerases at the opposite end of the genome with respect to the only transcriptional promoter

  19. Asymmetric packaging of polymerases within vesicular stomatitis virus

    Hodges, Jeffery; Tang, Xiaolin; Landesman, Michael B. [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah (United States); Center for Cell and Genome Science, University of Utah (United States); Ruedas, John B. [Dept. of Biology, San Diego State University (United States); Ghimire, Anil [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah (United States); Gudheti, Manasa V. [Vutara, Inc., Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Dept. of Biology, University of Utah (United States); Perrault, Jacques [Dept. of Biology, San Diego State University (United States); Jorgensen, Erik M. [Howard Hughes Medical Institute (United States); Dept. of Biology, University of Utah (United States); Gerton, Jordan M. [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah (United States); Dept. of Bioengineering, University of Utah (United States); Saffarian, Saveez, E-mail: saffarian@physics.utah.edu [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah (United States); Center for Cell and Genome Science, University of Utah (United States); Dept. of Biology, University of Utah (United States)

    2013-10-18

    Highlights: •The VSV polymerases (L proteins) are localized to the blunt end of the virus. •The VSV phosphoproteins (P proteins) are localized to the blunt end of the virus. •Each VSV virion packages a variable number of P and L proteins. -- Abstract: Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) is a prototypic negative sense single-stranded RNA virus. The bullet-shape appearance of the virion results from tightly wound helical turns of the nucleoprotein encapsidated RNA template (N-RNA) around a central cavity. Transcription and replication require polymerase complexes, which include a catalytic subunit L and a template-binding subunit P. L and P are inferred to be in the cavity, however lacking direct observation, their exact position has remained unclear. Using super-resolution fluorescence imaging and atomic force microscopy (AFM) on single VSV virions, we show that L and P are packaged asymmetrically towards the blunt end of the virus. The number of L and P proteins varies between individual virions and they occupy 57 ± 12 nm of the 150 nm central cavity of the virus. Our finding positions the polymerases at the opposite end of the genome with respect to the only transcriptional promoter.

  20. In Vitro Percutaneous Permeation and Skin Accumulation of Finasteride Using Vesicular Ethosomal Carriers

    Rao, Yuefeng; Zheng, Feiyue; Zhang, Xingguo; Gao, Jianqing; Liang, Wenquan

    2008-01-01

    In order to develop a novel transdermal drug delivery system that facilitates the skin permeation of finasteride encapsulated in novel lipid-based vesicular carriers (ethosomes)finasteride ethosomes were constructed and the morphological characteristics were studied by transmission electron microscopy. The particle size, zeta potential and the entrapment capacity of ethosome were also determined. In contrast to liposomes ethosomes were of more condensed vesicular structure and they were found...

  1. Homology between the glycoproteins of vesicular stomatitis virus and rabies virus.

    Rose, J. K.; Doolittle, R. F.; Anilionis, A; Curtis, P J; Wunner, W H

    1982-01-01

    We compared the predicted amino acid sequences of the vesicular stomatitis virus and rabies virus glycoproteins by using a computer program which provides an optimal alignment and a statistical significance for the match. Highly significant homology between these two proteins was detected, including identical positioning of one glycosylation site. A significant homology between the predicted amino acid sequences of vesicular stomatitis virus and influenza virus matrix proteins was also found.

  2. Functional partial agonism at cloned human muscarinic acetylcholine receptors

    Bräuner-Osborne, Hans; Ebert, B; Brann, M R;

    1996-01-01

    of maximal response, depending on the molar ratio of agonist and antagonist used. Using recombinant human muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (m1 and m5) and the functional assay, receptor selection and amplification technology (R-SAT), we have now shown that co-administration of the full agonist...

  3. Enzyme-linked DNA dendrimer nanosensors for acetylcholine

    Walsh, Ryan; Morales, Jennifer M.; Skipwith, Christopher G.; Ruckh, Timothy T.; Clark, Heather A.

    2015-10-01

    It is currently difficult to measure small dynamics of molecules in the brain with high spatial and temporal resolution while connecting them to the bigger picture of brain function. A step towards understanding the underlying neural networks of the brain is the ability to sense discrete changes of acetylcholine within a synapse. Here we show an efficient method for generating acetylcholine-detecting nanosensors based on DNA dendrimer scaffolds that incorporate butyrylcholinesterase and fluorescein in a nanoscale arrangement. These nanosensors are selective for acetylcholine and reversibly respond to levels of acetylcholine in the neurophysiological range. This DNA dendrimer architecture has the potential to overcome current obstacles to sensing in the synaptic environment, including the nanoscale size constraints of the synapse and the ability to quantify the spatio-temporal fluctuations of neurotransmitter release. By combining the control of nanosensor architecture with the strategic placement of fluorescent reporters and enzymes, this novel nanosensor platform can facilitate the development of new selective imaging tools for neuroscience.

  4. Tissue-specific effects of acetylcholine in the canine heart

    Callø, Kirstine; Goodrow, Robert; Olesen, Søren-Peter;

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Acetylcholine (ACh) release from the vagus nerve slows heart rate and atrioventricular conduction. ACh stimulates a variety of receptors and channels, including an inward rectifying current (IK,ACh). The effect of ACh in ventricle is still debated. We compare the effect of ACh on...

  5. Polyester with Pendent Acetylcholine-Mimicking Functionalities Promotes Neurite Growth.

    Wang, Shaofei; Jeffries, Eric; Gao, Jin; Sun, Lijie; You, Zhengwei; Wang, Yadong

    2016-04-20

    Successful regeneration of nerves can benefit from biomaterials that provide a supportive biochemical and mechanical environment while also degrading with controlled inflammation and minimal scar formation. Herein, we report a neuroactive polymer functionalized by covalent attachment of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine (Ach). The polymer was readily synthesized in two steps from poly(sebacoyl diglyceride) (PSeD), which previously demonstrated biocompatibility and biodegradation in vivo. Distinct from prior acetylcholine-biomimetic polymers, PSeD-Ach contains both quaternary ammonium and free acetyl moieties, closely resembling native acetylcholine structure. The polymer structure was confirmed via (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. Hydrophilicity, charge, and thermal properties of PSeD-Ach were determined by tensiometer, zetasizer, differential scanning calorimetry, and thermal gravimetric analysis, respectively. PC12 cells exhibited the greatest proliferation and neurite outgrowth on PSeD-Ach and laminin substrates, with no significant difference between these groups. PSeD-Ach yielded much longer neurite outgrowth than the control polymer containing ammonium but no the acetyl group, confirming the importance of the entire acetylcholine-like moiety. Furthermore, PSeD-Ach supports adhesion of primary rat dorsal root ganglions and subsequent neurite sprouting and extension. The sprouting rate is comparable to the best conditions from previous report. Our findings are significant in that they were obtained with acetylcholine-like functionalities in 100% repeating units, a condition shown to yield significant toxicity in prior publications. Moreover, PSeD-Ach exhibited favorable mechanical and degradation properties for nerve tissue engineering application. Humidified PSeD-Ach had an elastic modulus of 76.9 kPa, close to native neural tissue, and could well recover from cyclic dynamic compression. PSeD-Ach showed a gradual in

  6. Positive cooperativity of acetylcholine and other agonists with allosteric ligands on muscarinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Jakubík, J; Bacáková, L; El-Fakahany, E E; Tucek, S

    1997-07-01

    It is well known that allosteric modulators of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors can both diminish and increase the affinity of receptors for their antagonists. We investigated whether the allosteric modulators can also increase the affinity of receptors for their agonists. Twelve agonists and five allosteric modulators were tested in experiments on membranes of CHO cells that had been stably transfected with genes for the M1-M4 receptor subtypes. Allosterically induced changes in the affinities for agonists were computed from changes in the ability of a fixed concentration of each agonist to compete with [3H]N-methylscopolamine for the binding to the receptors in the absence and the presence of varying concentrations of allosteric modulators. The effects of allosteric modulators varied greatly depending on the agonists and the subtypes of receptors. The affinity for acetylcholine was augmented by (-)-eburnamonine on the M2 and M4 receptors and by brucine on the M1 and M3 receptors. Brucine also enhanced the affinities for carbachol, bethanechol, furmethide, methylfurmethide, pilocarpine, 3-(3-pentylthio-1,2,5-thiadiazol-4-yl)-1,2,5,6-tetrahydro-1- methylpyridine (pentylthio-TZTP), oxotremorine-M, and McN-A-343 on the M1, M3, and M4 receptors, for pentylthio-TZTP on the M2 receptors, and for arecoline on the M3 receptors. (-)-Eburnamonine enhanced the affinities for carbachol, bethanechol, furmethide, methylfurmethide, pentylthio-TZTP, pilocarpine, oxotremorine and oxotremorine-M on the M2 receptors and for pilocarpine on the M4 receptors. Vincamine, strychnine, and alcuronium displayed fewer positive allosteric interactions with the agonists, but each allosteric modulator displayed positive cooperativity with at least one agonist on at least one muscarinic receptor subtype. The highest degrees of positive cooperativity were observed between (-)-eburnamonine and pilocarpine and (-)-eburnamonine and oxotremorine-M on the M2 receptors (25- and 7-fold increases in

  7. Acetylcholine Protects against Candida albicans Infection by Inhibiting Biofilm Formation and Promoting Hemocyte Function in a Galleria mellonella Infection Model

    Rajendran, R.; Borghi, E.; M. Falleni; F Perdoni; Tosi, D.; D.F. Lappin; L. O'Donnell; Greetham, D.; G. Ramage; C. Nile

    2015-01-01

    Both neuronal acetylcholine and nonneuronal acetylcholine have been demonstrated to modulate inflammatory responses. Studies investigating the role of acetylcholine in the pathogenesis of bacterial infections have revealed contradictory findings with regard to disease outcome. At present, the role of acetylcholine in the pathogenesis of fungal infections is unknown. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine whether acetylcholine plays a role in fungal biofilm formation and the pathoge...

  8. Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor (nAChR Dependent Chorda Tympani Taste Nerve Responses to Nicotine, Ethanol and Acetylcholine.

    Zuo Jun Ren

    Full Text Available Nicotine elicits bitter taste by activating TRPM5-dependent and TRPM5-independent but neuronal nAChR-dependent pathways. The nAChRs represent common targets at which acetylcholine, nicotine and ethanol functionally interact in the central nervous system. Here, we investigated if the nAChRs also represent a common pathway through which the bitter taste of nicotine, ethanol and acetylcholine is transduced. To this end, chorda tympani (CT taste nerve responses were monitored in rats, wild-type mice and TRPM5 knockout (KO mice following lingual stimulation with nicotine free base, ethanol, and acetylcholine, in the absence and presence of nAChR agonists and antagonists. The nAChR modulators: mecamylamine, dihydro-β-erythroidine, and CP-601932 (a partial agonist of the α3β4* nAChR, inhibited CT responses to nicotine, ethanol, and acetylcholine. CT responses to nicotine and ethanol were also inhibited by topical lingual application of 8-chlorophenylthio (CPT-cAMP and loading taste cells with [Ca2+]i by topical lingual application of ionomycin + CaCl2. In contrast, CT responses to nicotine were enhanced when TRC [Ca2+]i was reduced by topical lingual application of BAPTA-AM. In patch-clamp experiments, only a subset of isolated rat fungiform taste cells exposed to nicotine responded with an increase in mecamylamine-sensitive inward currents. We conclude that nAChRs expressed in a subset of taste cells serve as common receptors for the detection of the TRPM5-independent bitter taste of nicotine, acetylcholine and ethanol.

  9. Vesicular stomatitis virus (indiana 2 serotype as experimental model to study acute encephalitis – morphological features Vírus da estomatite vesicular (sorotipo indiana 2 como modelo experimental para o estudo de encefalite aguda – aspectos morfológicos

    Florêncio Figueiredo Cavalcanti Neto

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available The Vesicular Stomatitis Virus (VSV is a Vesiculovirus of the Rhabdoviridae family that infects mammals and causes vesicular lesions similar to those of foot-and-mouth disease. VSV experimental encephalitis can be induced in rodents and the symptoms are similar to those observed in rabies. However, the lesions observed in the animals´ encephalon are different. Inclusion bodies are not observed. There is necrosis, particularly in the region of the olfactory bulb, and, in some cases, ventriculitis. It was observed that the time pattern of VSV dissemination and the morphological aspects of the lesions are similar to those described in literature. The virus seems to be disseminated through the brain ventricles, being multiplied in the ependyma cells and in the neurons, besides using retrograde and anterograde transport. It was noticed that, due to the facility of virus manipulation, this experimental model has been used in innumerable research studies in several fields. If, on the one hand there are plenty of reports on the infection pathogenesis, on the other hand there are many gaps involving, for instance, aspects about virus transmission, recovery of infected animals and participation of glial cells in the acute as well as in the recovery phases.   O vírus da estomatite vesicular (VEV é um Vesiculovírus da família Rhabdoviridae que infecta mamíferos e causa lesões vesiculares semelhantes às observadas na febre aftosa. A encefalite experimental pode ser induzida em roedores e os sintomas são semelhantes aos observados na raiva; entretanto, as lesões observadas no encéfalo dos animais são diferentes. Corpúsculos de inclusão não são observados, há necrose especialmente da região do bulbo olfatório e em alguns casos, ventriculite. Observamos que o padrão temporal de disseminação do VEV e os aspectos morfológicos das lesões são similares aos descritos na literatura. O vírus parece se disseminar através dos ventr

  10. Computed tomography of the vesicular glands: anatomical animal model (Oryctolagus cuniculus)

    Spiral CT is a non-invasive imaging method of choice for animal anatomical studies. The aim of the study was to establish the imaging anatomical features of the vesicular glands in the rabbit. Eight sexually mature healthy clinically male New Zealand rabbits of 18 months of age with body weight from 2.8 kg to 3.2 kg were used. The animals were anesthetized. As contrast medium Opti-ray350 was administrated. The computed tomography scan was complied with certain bone and soft tissue markers. For this purpose, a whole body multi-slice spiral computed tomography scanner was used. The both soft tissue glands were heterogeneous and relatively hyperdense structures, and defined in detail from the adjacent soft tissues. The urinary bladder neck was ventrally to the glands. Both vesicular glands were better differentiated each other when the rabbit is examined in abdominal recumbence. In dorsal recumbence the shape of the transversal image of the glandular finding was oval. In abdominal recumbence both the left and right soft tissue vesicular gland were defined. Transversal anatomical computed tomographic investigation of the rabbit vesicular gland is a detailed and definitive method, to study the normal morphology of these glands. Key words: Vesicular Gland. Helical Computed Tomography. Anatomy. Rabbit

  11. Localization of muscarinic acetylcholine receptor in plant guard cells

    2001-01-01

    Acetylcholine (ACh), as an important neurotransmitter in animals, also plays a significant role in various kinds of physiological functions in plants. But relatively little is known about its receptors in plants. A green fluorescence BODIPY FL-labeled ABT, which is a high affinity ligand of muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR), was used to localize mAChR in plant guard cells. In Vicia faba L. and Pisum sativum L., mAChR was found both on the plasma membrane of guard cells. mAChR may also be distributed on guard cell chloroplast membrane of Vicia faba L. The evidence that mAChR localizes in the guard cells provides a new possible signal transduction pathway in ACh mediated stomata movement.

  12. Structures of acetylcholine picrate and methoxycarbonylcholine picrate hemihydrate

    Frydenvang, Karla Andrea; Grønborg, L; Jensen, B

    Acetylcholine picrate, C7H16NO2+.C6H2N3-O7-, Mr = 374.3, orthorhombic, Pbca, at 105 K: a = 18.799 (4), b = 7.726 (2), c = 22.878 (4) A, V = 3323 (2) A3, Z = 8, Dm(295 K, flotation) = 1.44, D chi(105 K) = 1.496 Mg m-3, mu(Mo K alpha) = 0.120 mm-1, F(000) = 1568, m.p. (hot-stage microscope) 381-382 K......(295 K, flotation) = 1.49, D chi(105 K) = 1.539 Mg m-3, mu(Mo K alpha) = 0.126 mm-1, F(000) = 836, m.p. (hot-stage microscope) 391-391.5 K, R = 0.033 for 6359 observed [I greater than or equal to 3.0 sigma(I)] reflections. The acetylcholine ion as well as the methoxycarbonylcholine ion have as first...

  13. Long release latencies are increased by acetylcholine at frog endplate

    Samigullin, D.; Bukharaeva, E. A.; Nikolsky, E.; Adámek, S.; Vyskočil, František

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 52, č. 4 (2003), s. 475-480. ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA305/02/1333; GA ČR GA202/02/1213 Grant ostatní: RFBR(RU) 02/04/48901 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922; CEZ:MSM 113100003 Keywords : quantal release * acetylcholine * synaptic latency Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 0.939, year: 2003

  14. Threonine in the selectivity filter of the acetylcholine receptor channel.

    Villarroel, A.; Sakmann, B

    1992-01-01

    The acetylcholine receptor (AChR) is a cation selective channel whose biophysical properties as well as its molecular composition are fairly well characterized. Previous studies on the rat muscle alpha-subunit indicate that a threonine residue located near the cytoplasmic side of the M2 segment is a determinant of ion flow. We have studied the role of this threonine in ionic selectivity by measuring conductance sequences for monovalent alkali cations and bionic reversal potentials of the wild...

  15. Subtype Differences in Pre-Coupling of Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptors

    Jakubík, Jan; Janíčková, Helena; Randáková, Alena; El-Fakahany, E. E.; Doležal, Vladimír

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. 11 (2011), e27732. E-ISSN 1932-6203 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA305/09/0681; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA500110703; GA MŠk(CZ) LC554 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : acetylcholine muscarinic receptors * G proteins * subtype differences Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 4.092, year: 2011

  16. Alteration in cellular acetylcholine influences dauer formation in Caenorhabditis elegans

    Lee, Jeeyong; Kim, Kwang-Youl; Paik, Young-Ki

    2014-01-01

    Altered acetylcholine (Ach) homeostasis is associated with loss of viability in flies, developmental defects in mice, and cognitive deficits in human. Here, we assessed the importance of Ach in Caenorhabditis elegans development, focusing on the role of Ach during dauer formation. We found that dauer formation was disturbed in choline acetyltransferase (cha-1) and acetylcholinesterase (ace) mutants defective in Ach biosynthesis and degradation, respectively. When examined the potential role o...

  17. Acetylcholine in plants: presence, metabolism and mechanism of action

    Tretyn, Andrzej; Kendrick, Richard E.

    1991-01-01

    Acetylcholine (ACh) has been detected in representatives of many taxonomic groups throughout the plant kingdom. The site of its synthesis in plants is probably young leaves. In some plant species choline acetyltransferase (CHAT) activity has been found. This enzyme showing properties similar to animal CHAT, probably participates in ACh synthesis from its precursors, choline and acetyl-Coenzyme A. Acetylcholinesterase (ACHE) activity has also been found in many plant tissues. Th...

  18. Leukocytic acetylcholine in chronic rejection of renal allografts

    Wilczynska, Joanna

    2011-01-01

    Leukocytes, which accumulate in graft blood vessels during fatal acute rejection of experimental renal allografts, synthesise and release acetylcholine (ACh). In this study, I tested the hypothesis that ACh produced by leukocytes accumulating in graft blood vessels contributes to the pathogenesis of chronic renal allograft vasculopathy (CAV). Kidneys were transplanted in the allogeneic Fischer 344 to Lewis rat strain combination. Isogeneic transplantations were performed in Lew...

  19. High-resolution mass spectrometry for detecting Acetylcholine in Arabidopsis

    Murata, Jun; Watanabe, Takehiro; Sugahara, Kohtaro; Yamagaki, Tohru; Takahashi, Toshio

    2015-01-01

    Acetylcholine (ACh) was first identified a century ago, and has long been known as a neurotransmitter in animals. However, it has been shown recently that the occurrence of ACh is widespread among various non-animal species including higher plants. Although previous reports suggest that various plant species are capable of responding to exogenously applied ACh, the molecular basis for ACh biosynthesis and regulatory mechanisms mediated by endogenous ACh are largely unclear. This is partly bec...

  20. New Insights on Plant Cell Elongation: A Role for Acetylcholine

    Gian-Pietro Di Sansebastiano; Silvia Fornaciari; Fabrizio Barozzi; Gabriella Piro; Laura Arru

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the effect of auxin and acetylcholine on the expression of the tomato expansin gene LeEXPA2, a specific expansin gene expressed in elongating tomato hypocotyl segments. Since auxin interferes with clathrin-mediated endocytosis, in order to regulate cellular and developmental responses we produced protoplasts from tomato elongating hypocotyls and followed the endocytotic marker, FM4-64, internalization in response to treatments. Tomato protoplasts were observed during auxin and...

  1. A new family of insect muscarinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Xia, R-Y; Li, M-Q; Wu, Y-S; Qi, Y-X; Ye, G-Y; Huang, J

    2016-08-01

    Most currently used insecticides are neurotoxic chemicals that target a limited number of sites and insect cholinergic neurotransmission is the major target. A potential target for insecticide development is the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR), which is a metabotropic G-protein-coupled receptor. Insects have A- and B-type mAChRs and the five mammalian mAChRs are close to the A-type. We isolated a cDNA (CG12796) from the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster. After heterologous expression in Chinese hamster ovary K1 cells, CG12796 could be activated by acetylcholine [EC50 (half maximal effective concentration), 73 nM] and the mAChR agonist oxotremorine M (EC50 , 48.2 nM) to increase intracellular Ca(2+) levels. Thus, the new mAChR is coupled to Gq/11 but not Gs and Gi/o . The classical mAChR antagonists atropine and scopolamine N-butylbromide at 100 μM completely blocked the acetylcholine-induced responses. The orthologues of CG12796 can also be found in the genomes of other insects, but not in the genomes of the honeybee or parasitoid wasps. Knockdown of CG12796 in the central nervous system had no effect on male courtship behaviours. We suggest that CG12796 represents the first recognized member of a novel mAChR class. PMID:27003873

  2. Gold nanoparticle–choline complexes can block nicotinic acetylcholine receptors

    Chur Chin

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Chur Chin1, In Kyeom Kim2, Dong Yoon Lim3, Ki Suk Kim4, Hyang Ae Lee4, Eun Joo Kim41Department of Pediatrics, Fatima Hospital, Daegu, Korea; 2Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Kyungpook National University, Daegu, Korea; 3Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Chosun University, Gwangju, Korea; 4Korea Institute of Toxicology, Daejeon, KoreaAbstract: We identified a novel class of direct ion-channel blockers of ligand-gated ion channels called the gold nanoparticle–choline complex. Negatively charged gold nanoparticles (1.4 nm block ion pores by binding to the sulfur group of the cysteine loop of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs, and currents evoked by acetylcholine (Ach can break these bonds. The current evoked by ACh in nAChRs was blocked directly in ion pores by the gold nanoparticle–choline complex. In adrenal-gland perfusion studies, the complex also blocked nAChRs by diminishing catecholamine release by about 75%. An in vivo study showed muscle relaxation in rats after injection of the complex. These results will foster the application of gold nanoparticles as a direct ion-channel blocker. Keywords: negatively charged gold nanoparticle, choline, gold–sulfur bond, nicotinic acetylcholine receptor, direct ion-channel blocker

  3. Cryogenic transmission electron microscopy study: preparation of vesicular dispersions by quenching microemulsions.

    Lee, H S; Morrison, E D; Zhang, Q; McCormick, A V

    2016-09-01

    We previously showed that long-lived nanoemulsions, seeming initially vesicular, might be prepared simply by diluting and cooling (quenching) warm microemulsions with n-hexadecane with precooled water. In this paper, we confirm that these systems are vesicular dispersions when fresh, and they can be made with similar structures and compositional dependence using alkanes with chain lengths ranging from octane to hexadecane. The nanostructures of fresh nanoemulsions are imaged with cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM). We confirm that water-continuous microemulsions give simple dispersions of vesicles (sometimes unilamellar), typically less than 100 nm in diameter; these systems can avoid separation for over 2 months. Selected samples were also prepared using halogenated alkanes to create additional contrast in the cryo-TEM, allowing us to confirm that the oil is located in the observed vesicular structures. PMID:26937849

  4. Real-Time Reverse Transcription PCR Assay for Detection of Senecavirus A in Swine Vesicular Diagnostic Specimens.

    Alexa J Bracht

    Full Text Available Senecavirus A (SV-A, formerly, Seneca Valley virus (SVV, has been detected in swine with vesicular lesions and is thought to be associated with swine idiopathic vesicular disease (SIVD, a vesicular disease syndrome that lacks a defined causative agent. The clinical presentation of SIVD resembles that of other more contagious and economically devastating vesicular diseases, such as foot-and-mouth disease (FMD, swine vesicular disease (SVD, and vesicular stomatitis (VS, that typically require immediate rule out diagnostics to lift restrictions on animal quarantine, movement, and trade. This study presents the development of a sensitive, SYBR Green RT-qPCR assay suitable for detection of SV-A in diagnostic swine specimens. After testing 50 pigs with clinical signs consistent with vesicular disease, 44 (88% were found to be positive for SV-A by RT-qPCR as compared to none from a negative cohort of 35 animals without vesicular disease, indicating that the assay is able to successfully detect the virus in an endemic population. SV-A RNA was also detectable at a low level in sera from a subset of pigs that presented with (18% or without (6% vesicular signs. In 2015, there has been an increase in the occurrence of SV-A in the US, and over 200 specimens submitted to our laboratory for vesicular investigation have tested positive for the virus using this method. SV-A RNA was detectable in all common types of vesicular specimens including swabs and tissue from hoof lesions, oral and snout epithelium, oral swabs, scabs, and internal organ tissues such as liver and lymph node. Genome sequencing analysis from recent virus isolates was performed to confirm target amplicon specificity and was aligned to previous isolates.

  5. Brief communication: A 61-year-old woman with vesicular eruption after varicella zoster vaccination

    Spriet, Sarah; Banks, Taylor A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Vesicular rashes are associated with a variety of infectious and noninfectious causes. Objective: To discuss the differential diagnoses of vesicular rashes. Methods: We present the clinical case of an adult woman who was immunocompetent and who developed several clear fluid-filled vesicles on her upper extremity within days of receiving the varicella zoster vaccine. Over the next several days, the skin eruption generalized, and she developed new lesions in various stages of healing. Results: After a detailed history and further studies were obtained, a final diagnosis was made. Conclusion: In patients who have recently been vaccinated, a high index of suspicion for an adverse vaccine reaction should be maintained. PMID:27349562

  6. Vesicular-arbuscular-/ecto-mycorrhiza succession in seedlings of. Eucalyptus spp. Sucessão de micorrizas vesicular-arbuscular e ectomicorrizas em mudas de Eucalyptus spp.

    Vera Lúcia dos Santos; Rosa Maria Muchovej; Arnaldo Chaer Borges; Júlio César L. Neves; Maria Catarina M. Kasuya

    2001-01-01

    The occurrence of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizae (AM) and ectomycorrhizae (ECM) in the same root system was observed when species of Eucalyptus urophylla S.T. Blake, E. citriodora Hook f., E. grandis W. Hill ex Maiden, E. cloeziana F. Muell. and E. camaldulensis Dehnh were simultaneously inoculated with Glomus etunicatum Becker & Gederman and Pisolithus tinctorius (Per.) Cocker & Couch, isolate Pt 90A. The succession between the two fungi was observed. In general ectomycorrhizal colonizatio...

  7. Comparison of [3H]nicotine and [3H]acetylcholine binding in mouse brain: regional distribution

    In a continuing study of nicotine binding sites, the authors determined the relative amount of nicotine binding and acetylcholine binding in various brain regions of C57/BL and of DBA mice. Although midbrain showed the highest and cerebellum the lowest binding for both [3H]nicotine and [3H]acetylcholine, the ratio of nicotine to acetylcholine binding showed a three-fold regional variation. Acetylcholine inhibition of [3H]nicotine binding indicated that a portion of nicotine binding was not inhibited by acetylcholine. These results indicate important differences between the binding of (+/-)-[3H]nicotine and that of [3H]acetylcholine

  8. Effects of cooling on the response of the snail bursting neuron to acetylcholine.

    Nedeljković, Miodrag; Kartelija, Gordana; Radenović, Lidija

    2005-06-01

    The Br-type neuron of the snail Helix pomatia, involved in neuronal regulation of various homeostatic and adaptive mechanisms, represents an interesting model for studying effects of temperature change on neuronal activity of poikilotherms. Acetylcholine induces a transient, inward dose-dependent current in the identified Br neuron. In the work presented, we analyzed the effects of cooling on the acetylcholine-induced inward current. The amplitude of acetylcholine-induced inward current was markedly decreased after cooling, and the speed of the decay of acetylcholine response was decreased. PMID:16154950

  9. Subcellular distribution of swine vesicular disease virus proteins and alterations induced in infected cells: A comparative study with foot-and-mouth disease virus and vesicular stomatitis virus

    The intracellular distribution of swine vesicular disease virus (SVDV) proteins and the induced reorganization of endomembranes in IBRS-2 cells were analyzed. Fluorescence to new SVDV capsids appeared first upon infection, concentrated in perinuclear circular structures and colocalized to dsRNA. As in foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV)-infected cells, a vesicular pattern was predominantly found in later stages of SVDV capsid morphogenesis that colocalized with those of non-structural proteins 2C, 2BC and 3A. These results suggest that assembly of capsid proteins is associated to the replication complex. Confocal microscopy showed a decreased fluorescence to ER markers (calreticulin and protein disulfide isomerase), and disorganization of cis-Golgi gp74 and trans-Golgi caveolin-1 markers in SVDV- and FMDV-, but not in vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV)-infected cells. Electron microscopy of SVDV-infected cells at an early stage of infection revealed fragmented ER cisternae with expanded lumen and accumulation of large Golgi vesicles, suggesting alterations of vesicle traffic through Golgi compartments. At this early stage, FMDV induced different patterns of ER fragmentation and Golgi alterations. At later stages of SVDV cytopathology, cells showed a completely vacuolated cytoplasm containing vesicles of different sizes. Cell treatment with brefeldin A, which disrupts the Golgi complex, reduced SVDV (∼ 5 log) and VSV (∼ 4 log) titers, but did not affect FMDV growth. Thus, three viruses, which share target tissues and clinical signs in natural hosts, induce different intracellular effects in cultured cells

  10. Near-complete genome sequencing of swine vesicular disease virus using the Roche GS FLX sequencing platform

    Nielsen, Sandra Cathrine Abel; Bruhn, Christian Anders Wathne; Samaniego Castruita, Jose Alfredo; Wadsworth, Jemma; Knowles, Nick J.; Gilbert, M Thomas P

    2014-01-01

    Swine vesicular disease virus (SVDV) is an enterovirus that is both genetically and antigenically closely related to human coxsackievirus B5 within the Picornaviridae family. SVDV is the causative agent of a highly contagious (though rarely fatal) vesicular disease in pigs. We report a rapid meth...

  11. The beneficial effect of dual inoculation of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizae + rhizobium on growth of white clover

    Lin, XG.

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available Investigation on the effect of phosphorus on vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal infection, and dual inoculation of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizae + rhizobium on growth of white clover under field microplots and pot experiments was conducted on fluvo-aquic soils of semi-arid region in north China. The results showed that 60 kg P205 ha in form of superphosphate was the most favorable phosphorus level for vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal infection ; mycorrhizal infection, nodulation, dry weight of shoots and roots, total uptake of nitrogen, phosphorus and other elements, the final yields and recovery of phosphorus of white clover were significantly increased by vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal inoculation and dual inoculation with vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and rhizobium. The highest response of inoculation was obtained by adding fertilizer phosphorus at the level of 60 kg P205 ha in form of superphosphate.

  12. Habituation-Like Decrease of Acetylcholine-Induced Inward Current in Helix Command Neurons: Role of Microtubule Motor Proteins.

    Vasil'yeva, Natal'ya A; Murzina, Galina B; Pivovarov, Arkady S

    2015-07-01

    The role of kinesin and dynein microtubule-associated molecular motors in the cellular mechanism of depression of acetylcholine-induced inward chloride current (ACh-current) was examined in command neurons of land snails (Helix lucorum) in response to repeated applications of ACh to neuronal soma. This pharmacological stimulation imitated the protocol of tactile stimulation evoking behavioural habituation of the defensive reaction. In this system, a dynein inhibitor (erythro-9-(2-hydroxy-3-nonyl)adenine, 50 µM) decreased the ACh-current depression rate. Kinesin Eg5 inhibitors (Eg5 inhibitor III, 10 µM and Eg5 inhibitor V, trans-24, 15 µM) reduced the degree of current depression, and Eg5 inhibitor V also reduced the initial rate of depression. The results of electrophysiological experiments in combination with mathematical modelling provided evidence of the participation of dyneins and kinesin Eg5 proteins in the radial transport of acetylcholine receptors in command neurons of H. lucorum in the cellular analogue of habituation. Furthermore, these results suggest that the reciprocal interaction between dynein and kinesin proteins located on the same vesicle can lead to reverse their usual direction of transport (dyneins-in exocytosis and kinesin Eg5-in endocytosis). PMID:25687906

  13. 9 CFR 94.12 - Pork and pork products from regions where swine vesicular disease exists.

    2010-01-01

    ... List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding Aids section of the printed volume and on... where swine vesicular disease exists. 94.12 Section 94.12 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT... POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS RINDERPEST, FOOT-AND-MOUTH DISEASE, EXOTIC NEWCASTLE DISEASE, AFRICAN...

  14. Detection of three porcine vesicular viruses using multiplex real-time primer-probe energy transfer

    Rasmussen, Thomas Bruun; Uttenthal, Åse; Aguero, M.

    2006-01-01

    Rapid identification of the etiologic agent in infected animals is important for the control of an outbreak of vesicular disease in livestock. We have in the present study developed a multiplex real-time reverse transcription-PCR, based on primer-probe energy transfer (PriProET), for simultaneous...

  15. Influence of the preparation route on the supramolecular organization of lipids in a vesicular system

    Elizondo, Elisa; Larsen, Jannik; Hatzakis, Nikos;

    2012-01-01

    A confocal fluorescence microscopy-based assay was used for studying the influence of the preparation route on the supramolecular organization of lipids in a vesicular system. In this work, vesicles composed of cholesterol and CTAB (1/1 mol %) or cholesterol and DOPC (2/8 mol %) and incorporating...

  16. Signifiance of Arginine 20 in the 2A protease for swine vesicular disease virus pathogenicity

    Inoue, Toru; Zhang, Zhidong; Wang, Leyuan; West, Laura; Bashiruddin, John B.; Belsham, Graham

    2007-01-01

    Pathogenic and attenuated strains of swine vesicular disease virus (SVDV), an enterovirus, have been characterized previously and, by using chimeric infectious cDNA clones, the key determinants of pathogenicity in pigs have been mapped to the coding region for 1D–2A. Within this region, residue 20...

  17. Viral meningitis epidemics and a single, recent, recombinant and anthroponotic origin of swine vesicular disease virus

    Bruhn, Christian Anders Wathne; Nielsen, Sandra Cathrine Abel; Samaniego Castruita, Jose Alfredo; Wadsworth, Jemma; Knowles, Nick J.; Gilbert, M. Thomas P.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Swine vesicular disease virus (SVDV) is a close relative of the human Enterovirus B serotype, coxsackievirus B5. As the etiological agent of a significant emergent veterinary disease, several studies have attempted to explain its origin. However, several key questions r...

  18. Disrupting Vesicular Trafficking at the Endosome Attenuates Transcriptional Activation by Gcn4

    Zhang, F.; Gaur, N. A.; Hašek, Jiří; Kim, S.-j.; Qiu, H.; Swanson, M. J.; Hinnebusch, A. G.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 28, č. 22 (2008), s. 6796-6818. ISSN 0270-7306 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC545; GA MŠk ME 939 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : endosome * vesicular * gcn4 Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 5.942, year: 2008

  19. CULICOIDES SONORENSIS AS A POTENTIAL BIOLOGICAL VECTOR FOR VESICULAR STOMATITIS VIRUS

    Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) causes an economically important arboviral disease in cattle, horses and swine. No insect vector has been established for VSV transmission in the western U.S. The biting midge, Culicoides sonorensis, is a known vector of other arboviruses and is a prevalent livestock...

  20. Genome sequences of nine Vesicular Stomatitis Virus isolates from South America

    We report nine full-genome sequences of vesicular stomatitis virus obtrained by Illumina next-generation sequencing of RNA, isolated from either cattle epithelial suspensions or cell culture supernatants. Seven of these viral genomes belonged to the New Jersey serotype/species, clade III, while two...

  1. Acetylcholine synthesis and possible functions during sea urchin development

    C Angelini

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Cholinergic neurotransmitter system molecules were found to play a role during fertilisation and early cell cycles of a large number of invertebrate and vertebrate organisms. In this study, we investigated the presence and possible function of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT, the biosynthetic enzyme of acetylcholine in gametes of the sea urchin, Paracentrotus lividus, through localisation and functional studies. ChAT-like molecules were detected in oocytes, mature eggs and zygotes with indirect immunofluorescence methods. Positive immunoreactivity was found in the ovarian egg cytoplasm and surface as well as at the zygote surface. This suggests the eggs' capacity to autonomously synthesise acetylcholine (ACh, the signal molecule of the cholinergic system. Acetylcholinesterase (AChE, the lytic enzyme of acetylcholine was also found in ovarian eggs, with a similar distribution; however, it disappeared after fertilisation. Ultrastructural ChAT localisation in sperms, which was carried out with the immuno-gold method, showed immunoreactivity in the acrosome of unreacted sperms and at the head surface of reacted sperms. In order to verify a functional role of ACh during fertilization and sea urchin development, in vivo experiments were performed. Exposure of the eggs before fertilisation to 1 mM ACh + 1 ?M eserine caused an incomplete membrane depolarisation and consequently enhanced polyspermy, while lower concentrations of ACh caused developmental anomalies. The exposure of zygotes to 0,045 AChE Units/mL of sea water caused developmental anomalies as well, in 50% of the embryos. Altogether, these findings and other previously obtained results, suggest that the cholinergic system may subserve two different tasks during development, according to which particular type of ACh receptor is active during each temporal window. The first function, taking place in the course of fertilisation is a result of autonomously synthesised ACh in sperms, while the

  2. Synthesis of poly(ester-carbonate) with a pendant acetylcholine analog for promoting neurite growth.

    Xing, Dongming; Ma, Lie; Gao, Changyou

    2014-10-01

    The modification of biodegradable polyesters with bioactive molecules has become an important strategy for controlling neuron adhesion and neurite outgrowth in nerve regeneration. In this study we report a biodegradable poly(ester-carbonate) with a pendant acetylcholine analog, which a neurotransmitter for the enhancement of neuron adhesion and outgrowth. The acetylcholine-functionalized poly(ester-carbonate) (Ach-P(LA-ClTMC)) was prepared by copolymerizing l-lactide (LA) and 5-methyl-5-chloroethoxycarbonyl trimethylene carbonate (ClTMC), followed by quaternization with trimethylamine. The acetylcholine analog content could be modulated by changing the molar feeding fraction of ClTMC. The incorporation of the acetylcholine analog improved the hydrophilicity of the films, but the acetylcholine analog content did not significantly influence the surface morphology of the acetylcholine-functionalized films. The results of PC12 cell culture showed that the acetylcholine analog promoted cell viability and neurite outgrowth in a concentration-dependent manner. The longest length of neurite and the percentage of cells bearing neurites were obtained on the Ach-P(LA-ClTMC)-10 film. All the results indicate that the integration of the acetylcholine analog at an appropriate fraction could be an effective strategy for optimizing the existing biodegradable polyesters for nerve regeneration applications. PMID:24998182

  3. Conformationally restrained carbamoylcholine homologues. Synthesis, pharmacology at neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and biostructural considerations

    de la Fuente Revenga, M; Balle, Thomas; Jensen, Anders A.; Frølund, Bente

    2015-01-01

    Exploration of small selective ligands for the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) based on acetylcholine (ACh) has led to the development of potent agonists with clear preference for the α4β2 nAChR, the most prevalent nAChR subtype in the central nervous system. In this work we present the...

  4. Differential effects of natural rewards and pain on vesicular glutamate transporter expression in the nucleus accumbens

    Tukey, David S.; Lee, Michelle; Xu, Duo; Eberle, Sarah E.; Goffer, Yossef; Manders, Toby R.; Ziff, Edward B.; Wang, Jing

    2013-01-01

    Background Pain and natural rewards such as food elicit different behavioral effects. Both pain and rewards, however, have been shown to alter synaptic activities in the nucleus accumbens (NAc), a key component of the brain reward system. Mechanisms by which external stimuli regulate plasticity at NAc synapses are largely unexplored. Medium spiny neurons (MSNs) from the NAc receive excitatory glutamatergic inputs and modulatory dopaminergic and cholinergic inputs from a variety of cortical an...

  5. Histamine H3 receptors regulate acetylcholine release from the guinea pig ileum myenteric plexus

    The effect of selective histamine H3-receptor agonists and antagonists on the acetylcholine release from peripheral nerves was evaluated in the guinea pig longitudinal muscle-myenteric plexus preparations, preloaded with (3H)choline. In the presence of H1 and H2 blockade, histamine and (R)-α-methylhistamine inhibited the electrically-evoked acetylcholine release, being (R)-α-methylhistamine more active than histamine, but behaving as a partial agonist. The effect of histamine was completely reversed by selective H3-blocking drugs, thioperamide and impromidine, while only submaximal doses of (R)-α-methylhistamine were antagonized. Furthermore, thioperamide and impromidine enhanced the electrically-evoked acetylcholine release. On the contrary, the new H3-blocker, HST-7, was found substantially ineffective, both as histamine antagonist and as acetylcholine overflow enhancer. These data suggest that histamine exerts an inhibitory control on the acetylcholine release from intestinal cholinergic nerves through the activation of H3 receptors

  6. Adult celiac disease with acetylcholine receptor antibody positive myasthenia gravis

    Hugh J Freeman; Helen R Gillett; Peter M Gillett; Joel Oger

    2009-01-01

    Celiac disease has been associated with some autoimmune disorders. A 40-year-old competitive strongman with celiac disease responded to a glutenfree diet, but developed profound and generalized motor weakness with acetylcholine receptor antibody positive myasthenia gravis, a disorder reported to occur in about 1 in 5000. This possible relationship between myasthenia gravis and celiac disease was further explored in serological studies. Frozen stored serum samples from 23 acetylcholine receptor antibody positive myasthenia gravis patients with no intestinal symptoms were used to screen for celiac disease. Both endomysial and tissue transglutaminase antibodies were examined. One of 23 (or, about 4.3%) was positive for both IgA-endomysial and IgA tissue transglutaminase antibodies. Endoscopic studies subsequently showed duodenal mucosal scalloping and biopsies confirmed the histopathological changes of celiac disease. Celiac disease and myasthenia gravis may occur together more often than is currently appreciated. The presence of motor weakness in celiac disease may be a clue to occult myasthenia gravis, even in the absence of intestinal symptoms.

  7. Stochastic Models of Vesicular Sorting in Cellular Organelles

    Vagne, Quentin

    2016-01-01

    The proper sorting of membrane components by regulated exchange between cellular organelles is crucial to intra-cellular organization. This process relies on the budding and fusion of transport vesicles, and should be strongly influenced by stochastic fluctuations considering the relatively small size of many organelles. We identify the perfect sorting of two membrane components initially mixed in a single compartment as a first passage process, and we show that the mean sorting time exhibits two distinct regimes as a function of the ratio of vesicle fusion to budding rates. Low ratio values leads to fast sorting, but results in a broad size distribution of sorted compartments dominated by small entities. High ratio values result in two well defined sorted compartments but is exponentially slow. Our results suggests an optimal balance between vesicle budding and fusion for the rapid and efficient sorting of membrane components, and highlight the importance of stochastic effects for the steady-state organizati...

  8. Ca2+ is involved in muscarine-acetylcholine-receptor-mediated acetylcholine signal transduction in guard cells of Vicia faba L.

    MENG Fanxia; MIAO Long; ZHANG Shuqiu; LOU Chenghou

    2004-01-01

    Acetylcholine (ACh) is an important neurochemical transmitter in animals; it also exists in plants and plays a significant role in various kinds of physiological functions in plants. ACh has been known to induce the stomatal opening. By monitoring the changes of cytosolic Ca2+ with fluorescent probe Fluo-3 AM under the confocal microscopy,we found that exogenous ACh increased cytosolic Ca2+ concentration of guard cells of Vicia faba L. Muscarine, an agonist of muscarine acetylcholine receptor (mAChR), could do so as well. In contrast, atropine, the antagonist of mAChR abolished the ability of ACh to increase Ca2+ in guard cells.This mechanism is similar to mAChR in animals. When EGTA was used to chelate Ca2+ or ruthenium red to block Ca2+ released from vacuole respectively, the results showed that the increased cytosolic Ca2+ mainly come from intracellular Ca2+ store. The evidence supports that Ca2+ is involved in guard-cell response to ACh and that Ca2+ signal is coupled to mAChRs in ACh signal transduction in guard cells.

  9. Mapping of the acetylcholine binding site of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor: [3H]nicotine as an agonist photoaffinity label

    The agonist [3H]nicotine was used as a photoaffinity label for the acetylcholine binding sties on the Torpedo nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR). [3H]Nicotine binds at equilibrium with Keq = 0.6 μM to the agonist binding sites. Irradiation with 254-nm light of AChR-rich membranes equilibrated with [3H]nicotine resulted in covalent incorporation into the α- and γ-subunits, which was inhibited by agonists and competitive antagonists but not by noncompetitive antagonists. Inhibition of labeling by d-tubocurarine demonstrated that the α-subunit was labeled via both agonist sites but the γ-subunit was labeled only via the site that binds d-tubocurarine with high affinity. Chymotryptic digestion of the α-subunit confirmed that Try-198 was the principal amino acid labeled by [3H]nicotine. This confirmation required a novel radiosequencing strategy employing o-phthalaldehyde [3H]Nicotine, which is the first photoaffinity agonist used, labels primarily Tyr-198 in contrast to competitive antagonist affinity labels, which label primarily Tyr-190 and Cys-192/Cys-193

  10. Mechanistic insights into the oncolytic activity of vesicular stomatitis virus in cancer immunotherapy

    Simovic B

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Boris Simovic, Scott R Walsh, Yonghong Wan Department of Pathology and Molecular Medicine, McMaster Immunology Research Centre, Faculty of Health Sciences, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada Abstract: Immunotherapy and oncolytic virotherapy have both shown anticancer efficacy in the clinic as monotherapies but the greatest promise lies in therapies that combine these approaches. Vesicular stomatitis virus is a prominent oncolytic virus with several features that promise synergy between oncolytic virotherapy and immunotherapy. This review will address the cytotoxicity of vesicular stomatitis virus in transformed cells and what this means for antitumor immunity and the virus' immunogenicity, as well as how it facilitates the breaking of tolerance within the tumor, and finally, we will outline how these features can be incorporated into the rational design of new treatment strategies in combination with immunotherapy. Keywords: virotherapy, rhabdovirus, anti-tumor immunity, t cell, natural killer cell, therapeutic vaccine

  11. Continuous Microfluidic Self-Assembly of Hybrid Janus-Like Vesicular Motors: Autonomous Propulsion and Controlled Release.

    Wang, Lei; Liu, Yijing; He, Jie; Hourwitz, Matthew J; Yang, Yunlong; Fourkas, John T; Han, Xiaojun; Nie, Zhihong

    2015-08-01

    A microfluidic strategy is developed for the continuous fabrication of hybrid Janus vesicular motors that uniquely combine the capability of autonomous propulsion and externally controlled delivery of encapsulated payload. PMID:25925707

  12. Vesicular-arbuscular-/ecto-mycorrhiza succession in seedlings of. Eucalyptus spp.

    Santos Vera Lúcia dos; Muchovej Rosa Maria; Borges Arnaldo Chaer; Neves Júlio César L.; Kasuya Maria Catarina M.

    2001-01-01

    The occurrence of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizae (AM) and ectomycorrhizae (ECM) in the same root system was observed when species of Eucalyptus urophylla S.T. Blake, E. citriodora Hook f., E. grandis W. Hill ex Maiden, E. cloeziana F. Muell. and E. camaldulensis Dehnh were simultaneously inoculated with Glomus etunicatum Becker & Gederman and Pisolithus tinctorius (Per.) Cocker & Couch, isolate Pt 90A. The succession between the two fungi was observed. In general ectomycorrhizal colonizatio...

  13. N protein alone satisfies the requirement for protein synthesis during RNA replication of vesicular stomatitis virus.

    Patton, J T; Davis, N L; Wertz, G W

    1984-01-01

    Genomic replication of the negative-strand RNA viruses is dependent upon protein synthesis. To examine the requirement for protein synthesis in replication, we developed an in vitro system that supports the genome replication of defective interfering particles of the negative-strand rhabdovirus vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), as a function of protein synthesis (Wertz, J. Virol. 46:513-522, 1983). The system consists of defective interfering nucleocapsid templates and an mRNA-dependent retic...

  14. Purification of Regucalcin from the Seminal Vesicular Fluid: A Calcium Binding Multi-Functional Protein.

    Harikrishna, P; Shende, A M; Reena, K K; Thomas, Jobin; Bhure, S K

    2016-08-01

    Regucalcin is a multi-functional protein having roles in calcium homeostasis as well as in anti-apoptotic, anti-prolific and anti-oxidative functions. Recently, it has been reported from the male reproductive tract, but its role in male reproduction needs further investigation; for which the native regucalcin of reproductive origin will be more appropriate. The gel exclusion chromatography followed by diethyl aminoethane cellulose chromatography and two-dimentional cellulose acetate membrane electrophoresis used for its purification are time consuming and less specific. Here, the regucalcin gene from buffalo testis has been cloned, expressed and purified in recombinant form, and subsequently used for raising hyper-immune serum. The Western blot of seminal vesicular fluid probed with anti-regucalcin polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies showed the presence of 28 and 34 kDa bands specific to regucalcin. Further, an affinity matrix has been prepared using anti-regucalcin polyclonal antibodies. An immuno-affinity chromatography method has been standardized to isolate regucalcin from seminal vesicular fluid. The initial complexity of the protein mixture in the seminal vesicular fluid has been reduced by a heat coagulation step. The purified protein on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis showed a single band at 68 kDa that has been further confirmed as regucalcin by Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry. The RGN purified from seminal vesicular fluid will be more appropriate for studying its possible role in male reproduction, especially sperm cell capacitation, hyperactivation, acrosome reaction and cryopreservation. The study can be applied in purifying regucalcin from different tissues or species with minor modifications in the methodology. PMID:27460579

  15. Dermal delivery of drugs using different vesicular carriers: A comparative review

    Saahil Arora; Harleen Singh Lamba; Ravindra Tiwari

    2012-01-01

    Many skin diseases are based in the dermal layer of the skin like-acne, alopecia, psoriasis, herpes zoster, etc. Conventional topical formulations have not proved to be effective in managing these conditions because of poor retention in the skin. Some formulations do not penetrate through the stratum corneum and some pass through the skin very quickly. Therefore, there is need to develop a strategy to deliver drugs to the dermis for better management of these conditions. Vesicular systems lik...

  16. Vesicular systems for delivering conventional small organic molecules and larger macromolecules to and through human skin

    El Maghraby, Gamal M.; Williams, Adrian Christopher

    2009-01-01

    The history of using vesicular systems for drug delivery to and through skin started nearly three decades ago with a study utilizing phospholipid liposomes to improve skin deposition and reduce systemic effects of triamcinolone acetonide. Subsequently, many researchers evaluated liposomes with respect to skin delivery, with the majority of them recording localized effects and relatively few studies showing transdermal delivery effects. Shortly after this, Transfersomes were developed with cla...

  17. PEGylation of a Vesicular Stomatitis Virus G Pseudotyped Lentivirus Vector Prevents Inactivation in Serum

    Croyle, Maria A.; Callahan, Shellie M.; Auricchio, Alberto; Schumer, Gregg; Linse, Klause D.; Wilson, James M.; Brunner, Lane J.; Kobinger, Gary P.

    2004-01-01

    One disadvantage of vesicular stomatitis virus G (VSV-G) pseudotyped lentivirus vectors for clinical application is inactivation of the vector by human serum complement. To prevent this, monomethoxypoly(ethylene) glycol was conjugated to a VSV-G-human immunodeficiency virus vector expressing Escherichia coli beta-galactosidase. The modification did not affect transduction efficiency in vitro and protected the vector from inactivation in complement-active human and mouse sera. Blood from mice ...

  18. Site-specific phosphorylation regulates the transcriptive activity of vesicular stomatitis virus NS protein.

    C. H. Hsu; Morgan, E M; Kingsbury, D. W.

    1982-01-01

    In vitro transcription by vesicular stomatitis virus nucleocapsids is inhibited by enzymatic dephosphorylation of the NS protein. We provide evidence that specific, partial dephosphorylation of NS molecules is the only detectable change in nucleocapsids treated with bacterial alkaline phosphatase under conditions that prevent the action of adventitious protease. Dephosphorylation appeared to affect only the rate of transcription; there were no changes in sedimentation rates of transcripts. To...

  19. Potent systemic therapy of Multiple Myeloma utilizing Oncolytic Vesicular stomatitis virus coding for Interferon-beta

    Naik, Shruthi; Nace, Rebecca; Barber, Glen N.; Russell, Stephen J.

    2012-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is an incurable malignancy of plasma secreting B-cells disseminated in the bone marrow. Successful utilization of oncolytic virotherapy for myeloma treatment requires a systemically administered virus that selectively destroys disseminated myeloma cells in an immune-competent host. Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) expressing Interferon-β (IFNβ) is a promising new oncolytic agent that exploits tumor-associated defects in innate immune signaling pathways to specifically de...

  20. Inhibition of skin inflammation in mice by diclofenac in vesicular carriers: liposomes, ethosomes and PEVs.

    Caddeo, Carla; Sales, Octavio Diez; Valenti, Donatella; Saurí, Amparo Ruiz; Fadda, Anna Maria; Manconi, Maria

    2013-02-25

    Diclofenac-loaded phospholipid vesicles, namely conventional liposomes, ethosomes and PEVs (penetration enhancer-containing vesicles) were developed and their efficacy in TPA (phorbol ester) induced skin inflammation was examined. Vesicles were made from a cheap and unpurified mixture of phospholipids and diclofenac sodium; Transcutol P and propylene glycol were added to obtain PEVs, and ethanol to produce ethosomes. The structure and lamellar organization of the vesicle bilayer were investigated by transmission electron microscopy and small and wide angle X-ray scattering, as well as the main physico-chemical features. The formulations, along with a diclofenac solution and commercial Voltaren Emulgel, were tested in a comparative trial for anti-inflammatory efficacy on TPA-treated mice dorsal skin. Vesicles were around 100 nm, negatively charged, able to encapsulate diclofenac in good yields, and disclosed different lamellarity, as a function of the formulation composition. Vesicular formulations promoted drug accumulation and reduced the permeation. Administration of vesicular diclofenac on TPA-inflamed skin resulted in marked attenuation of oedema and leucocyte infiltration, especially using PEVs. Histology confirmed the effectiveness of vesicles, since they provided an amelioration of the tissual damage induced by TPA. The proposed approach based on vesicular nanocarriers may hold promising therapeutic value for treating a variety of inflammatory skin disorders. PMID:23299087

  1. Detection of multiple viral infections in cattle and buffalo with suspected vesicular disease in Brazil.

    Laguardia-Nascimento, Mateus; Sales, Érica Bravo; Gasparini, Marcela Ribeiro; de Souza, Natália Mendes; da Silva, Josiane Aparecida Gonçalina; Souza, Giovana Gonçalves; Carani, Fernanda Rezek; Dos Santos, Alyane Figueiredo; Rivetti Júnior, Anselmo Vasconcelos; Camargos, Marcelo Fernandes; Fonseca Júnior, Antônio Augusto

    2016-07-01

    Vesicular diseases are of high importance for livestock, primarily because of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD), which is a high-morbidity disease that generates direct losses caused by low milk production, weight loss, and indirect losses because of the need for sanitary barriers. Other vesicular diseases are also of importance for livestock because of direct impacts or because their clinical signs may be confused with those of FMD. We report herein the detection of multiple infections in cattle with suspected vesicular disease in the Brazilian states of Amazonas (AM), Mato Grosso (MT), and Roraima. Thirty-seven epithelial samples from cattle and 1 sample from a buffalo were sent to the laboratory for testing for FMDV and similar disease agents. All samples from MT were positive for parapoxvirus (Pseudocowpox virus and Bovine papular stomatitis virus). In addition, 3 samples were positive for Bluetongue virus, and 5 samples were positive for Bovine herpesvirus 1 Among these samples, 1 was positive for all of these 3 agents. Only 2 samples from AM were negative for parapoxvirus. The molecular tests conducted in this study detected multiple infections, with a high prevalence of parapoxvirus. PMID:27154321

  2. Experimental infection of Didelphis marsupialis with vesicular stomatitis New Jersey virus.

    Trujillo, Carlos M; Rodriguez, Luis; Rodas, Juan D; Arboleda, John Jairo

    2010-01-01

    Although vesicular stomatitis has been present for many years in the Americas, many aspects of its natural history remain undefined. In this study, we challenged five adult Virginia opossums (Didelphis marsupialis) with vesicular stomatitis New Jersey serotype virus (VSNJV). Opossums had no detectable antibodies against VSNJV prior to being inoculated with 10(6.5) median tissue culture infective doses (TCID(50)) of VSNJV by two routes; intraepithelial/subepithelial (IE/SE) inoculation and scarification in the muzzle (SM). Clinical response was monitored daily and animals were tested for viral shedding. All infected animals developed vesicles and ulcers on the tongue and inflammation of the nasal alar folds. Virus was isolated from esophagus-pharynx, nasal, and from ocular swabs and lesions samples. The failure to detect viremia in these animals indicates that a source other than blood may be required for transmission to insect vectors. Our results suggest that D. marsupialis could play a role in the maintenance of VSNJV outside of domestic animal populations and could provide a model to study vesicular stomatitis virus pathogenesis. PMID:20090034

  3. A novel fluorescent vesicular sensor for saccharides based on boronic acid-diol interaction.

    Zhang, Yujian; He, Zhenfeng; Li, Guowen

    2010-04-15

    A novel amphiphile containing two functional groups of both naphthalene and boronic acid, 2-(hexadecyloxy)-naphthalene-6-boronic acid (HNBA), has been synthesized. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) indicated the formation of bilayer vesicles in the ethanol/water solution (Phi=0.6). Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) established the presence of crystal-to-liquid crystal transition at 63.36 degrees C. The vesicular fluorescence properties upon binding with carbohydrates have been studied in ethanol/water buffer at pH 7.4. Addition of saccharides to the vesicular solution, the fluorescent intensities of naphthalene in HNBA vesicles centered at 348 nm decreased dramatically with increasing concentration of saccharides. The change tendency of fluorescent intensities of the HNAB vesicles with concentration of saccharides followed in the order of fructose>galactose>maltose>glucose. The pH profiles of the fluorescence intensity were studied in the absence and in the presence of sugars. Also, the urine sample induced spectral changes of the HNBA vesicles were studied. These results suggest that the HNBA vesicles may be developed as a continuous monitoring and implantable fluorescence vesicular sensor, which might be applied in the practical field. PMID:20188967

  4. In vitro percutaneous permeation and skin accumulation of finasteride using vesicular ethosomal carriers.

    Rao, Yuefeng; Zheng, Feiyue; Zhang, Xingguo; Gao, Jianqing; Liang, Wenquan

    2008-01-01

    In order to develop a novel transdermal drug delivery system that facilitates the skin permeation of finasteride encapsulated in novel lipid-based vesicular carriers (ethosomes)finasteride ethosomes were constructed and the morphological characteristics were studied by transmission electron microscopy. The particle size, zeta potential and the entrapment capacity of ethosome were also determined. In contrast to liposomes ethosomes were of more condensed vesicular structure and they were found to be oppositely charged. Ethosomes were found to be more efficient delivery carriers with high encapsulation capacities. In vitro percutaneous permeation experiments demonstrated that the permeation of finasteride through human cadaver skin was significantly increased when ethosomes were used. The finasteride transdermal fluxes from ethosomes containing formulation (1.34 +/- 0.11 microg/cm(2)/h) were 7.4, 3.2 and 2.6 times higher than that of finasteride from aqueous solution, conventional liposomes and hydroethanolic solution respectively (P ethosomes produced a significant (P formulation. The study demonstrated that ethosomes are promising vesicular carriers for enhancing percutaneous absorption of finasteride. PMID:18649143

  5. Effects of cholinoblockers on acetylcholine content in rat striatum in neuroleptic-induced parkinsonism.

    Dagaev, S G; Kosmachev, A B; Soloveva, N E; Filko, O A; Sanotskii, V I; Dolgo-Saburov, V B

    2004-02-01

    Correction of neuroleptic-induced parkinsonism in rats with two central cholinoblockers atropine and pentifine (acetylene aminoalcohol synthesized at Institute of Toxicology) were studied by measuring the content of acetylcholine in the striatum. The content of the transmitter secretion was estimated from the content of bound acetylcholine fraction in homogenates of the above-mentioned compartment of the brain. The results indicate that atropine and pentifine in doses equally effectively preventing catalepsy in rats had different effects on acetylcholine secretion in the striatum. Hence, cholinolytics with different pharmacological selective effects differently interact with central muscarine receptor subtypes. PMID:15273765

  6. Alteration in cellular acetylcholine influences dauer formation in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Lee, Jeeyong; Kim, Kwang-Youl; Paik, Young-Ki

    2014-02-01

    Altered acetylcholine (Ach) homeostasis is associated with loss of viability in flies, developmental defects in mice, and cognitive deficits in human. Here, we assessed the importance of Ach in Caenorhabditis elegans development, focusing on the role of Ach during dauer formation. We found that dauer formation was disturbed in choline acetyltransferase (cha-1) and acetylcholinesterase (ace) mutants defective in Ach biosynthesis and degradation, respectively. When examined the potential role of G-proteins in dauer formation, goa-1 and egl-30 mutant worms, expressing mutated versions of mammalian G(o) and G(q) homolog, respectively, showed some abnormalities in dauer formation. Using quantitative mass spectrometry, we also found that dauer larvae had lower Ach content than did reproductively grown larvae. In addition, a proteomic analysis of acetylcholinesterase mutant worms, which have excessive levels of Ach, showed differential expression of metabolic genes. Collectively, these results indicate that alterations in Ach release may influence dauer formation in C. elegans. PMID:24219868

  7. Valence of acetylcholine-receptor-antibody-titers in myasthenia gravis

    In a retrospective study in 47 patients with myasthenia gravis acetylcholine-receptor-antibody-titers (AChR-AB) were correlated with the severity of the disease. In 18 patients the course of titers was studied and two groups of patients could be differentiated: patients with relative constant and patients with fluctuating titers. Age, age of begin of myasthenia and sex did not influence the titers. Also the duration of the disease and the severity of symptoms did not influence the level of AChR-AB-titers. In this retrospective study the influence of immunsuppressive therapy on the intra-individual course of AB-titers and their correlation with the clinical symptoms could not be judged. Measurement of AChR-AB is of value for the diagnosis of myasthenia gravis and important for judging the clinical course and the effect of therapy. (Author)

  8. Structure and superorganization of acetylcholine receptor–rapsyn complexes

    Zuber, Benoît; Unwin, Nigel

    2013-01-01

    The scaffolding protein at the neuromuscular junction, rapsyn, enables clustering of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in high concentration and is critical for muscle function. Patients with insufficient receptor clustering suffer from muscle weakness. However, the detailed organization of the receptor–rapsyn network is poorly understood: it is unclear whether rapsyn first forms a wide meshwork to which receptors can subsequently dock or whether it only forms short bridges linking receptors together to make a large cluster. Furthermore, the number of rapsyn-binding sites per receptor (a heteropentamer) has been controversial. Here, we show by cryoelectron tomography and subtomogram averaging of Torpedo postsynaptic membrane that receptors are connected by up to three rapsyn bridges, the minimum number required to form a 2D network. Half of the receptors belong to rapsyn-connected groups comprising between two and fourteen receptors. Our results provide a structural basis for explaining the stability and low diffusion of receptors within clusters. PMID:23754381

  9. Facilitation of acetylcholine signaling by the dithiocarbamate fungicide propineb.

    Marinovich, Marina; Viviani, Barbara; Capra, Valerie; Corsini, Emanuela; Anselmi, Laura; D'Agostino, Gianluigi; Di Nucci, Amalia; Binaglia, Marco; Tonini, Marcello; Galli, Corrado L

    2002-01-01

    Dithiocarbamates (DTCs) are used mainly in agriculture as pesticides and as alcohol deterrent drugs. Neurological complications as well as movement disorders characterized by plastic rigidity, muscle twitch and paralysis are the prevailing symptoms in chronically exposed animals and humans. We investigated whether propineb interfered with peripheral cholinergic transmission in various isolated model systems. In electrically stimulated longitudinal muscle-myenteric plexus preparations (LMMPs), propineb (0.01-1000 nM) concentration-dependently enhanced the amplitude of both neurogenic twitch contractions and tritiated acetylcholine ([3H]ACh) release. The maximum percent increase was achieved by 10 nM propineb and was 19% and 14%, respectively. The effect on twitch contractions was partially antagonized by hexamethonium, a ganglionic nicotinic receptor blocker. In unstimulated LMMPs, propineb (10 pM, 10 nM, 10 microM) did not affect contractions to applied acetylcholine (ACh; 1 nM-10 microM), a finding indicating that propineb has no anticholinesterase activity. In human neuroblastoma cells (SH-SY5Y), propineb facilitated ACh release evoked by KCl depolarization. The increase in ACh release was not associated with detectable alterations of intracellular Ca2+([Ca2+]i) homeostasis. Binding studies carried out with alpha-bungarotoxin in striated muscle cells (L6) failed to demonstrate any influence of propineb on both affinity and capacity of skeletal muscle nicotinic receptors. In conclusion, propineb was found to interfere with cholinergic transmission in LMMPs and SH-SY5Y cells. In LMMPs, the potentiation of cholinergic transmission is partly dependent on the activation of ganglionic nicotinic receptors. Other targets relevant to cholinergic transmission seem not to be affected by propineb. PMID:11800594

  10. Electrolyte and protein secretion by the perfused rabbit mandibular gland stimulated with acetylcholine or catecholamines

    Case, R M; Conigrave, A D; Novak, I;

    1980-01-01

    1. A method is described for the isolation and vascular perfusion in vitro of the mandibular gland of the rabbit. The perfusate is a physiological salt solution containing glucose as the only metabolic substrate.2. During perfusion with solutions containing acetylcholine, the gland secretes......) concentrations and the osmolality of acetylcholine evoked saliva exhibited flow-dependency similar to that seen in vivo. The concentrations of Na and Cl, but not K and HCO(3), increased by about 25 mmol l(-1) during periods of prolonged stimulation with acetylcholine even though the salivary secretory rate was...... composition of isoproterenol-evoked saliva was vastly different from that evoked by acetylcholine, being particularly rich in K and HCO(3). The isoproterenol-evoked saliva was also extremely rich in protein so that the total protein secretion evoked by isoproterenol was much greater than that evoked by...

  11. A family of acetylcholine-gated chloride channel subunits in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Putrenko, Igor; Zakikhani, Mahvash; Dent, Joseph A

    2005-02-25

    The genome of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans encodes a surprisingly large and diverse superfamily of genes encoding Cys loop ligand-gated ion channels. Here we report the first cloning, expression, and pharmacological characterization of members of a family of anion-selective acetylcholine receptor subunits. Two subunits, ACC-1 and ACC-2, form homomeric channels for which acetylcholine and arecoline, but not nicotine, are efficient agonists. These channels are blocked by d-tubocurarine but not by alpha-bungarotoxin. We provide evidence that two additional subunits, ACC-3 and ACC-4, interact with ACC-1 and ACC-2. The acetylcholine-binding domain of these channels appears to have diverged substantially from the acetylcholine-binding domain of nicotinic receptors. PMID:15579462

  12. Inhibition by substance P of some peripheral actions of acetylcholine in the cat

    Clark, S.L.; Ryall, R. W.

    1982-01-01

    1 The effect of substance P on contractions of the nictitating membrane and pressor responses to acetylcholine (ACh) and dimethylphenyl-piperazinium (DMPP) which were mediated via nocotinic receptors was studied in cats anaesthetized with chloralose.

  13. Notexin preferentially inhibits the release of newly synthesized acetylcholine from rat brain synaptosomal fractions

    An investigation was made of the effects of the snake venom neurotoxin, notexin, on acetylcholine turnover in rat brain P2 fractions using a gas chromatographic mass spectrometric assay for acetylcholine and choline. In contrast to earlier reports, we found a stimulation of the uptake and acetylation of labeled choline by toxin-treated P2 fractions. More significantly, notexin inhibited the release of this newly synthesized transmitter. These effects were found to be dependent on the dose of the toxin and the time of exposure of the P2 fraction to notexin. Longer exposure to notexin or experiments involving resuspension of notexin-treated P2 fractions appeared to result in considerable lysis of the transmitter-containing particles. Thus, notexin may alter acetylcholine compartmentation in the nerve ending and thereby affect acetylcholine synthesis

  14. Effect of spontaneous diffusion in micro/nanoporous chemically crosslinked poly (N-vinyl imidazole) gel on the conformational changes of acetylcholine

    Vaganova, Evgenia; Pierola, Ines F.; Ovadia, Haim; Lyshevski, Sergey E.; Yitzchaik, Shlomo

    2009-02-01

    Interdependent structural properties such as molecular conformation, flexibility and charge redistribution control the intermolecular interactions of acetylcholine (ACh) with adjacent molecules. This paper reports the results of an investigation of the effect of the diffusion of ACh through a nano/microporous poly (N-vinylimidazole) (PVI) gel on its structural properties, namely on changes in its conformation. To investigate the conformational changes of ACh during spontaneous diffusion through the gel, the fluorescence lifetime of the label molecule - fluorescein - was monitored. To clarify the results, analogous experiments were conducted with nicotinic acid and dopamine. In contrast to the nicotinic acid and dopamine, ACh can play the role of a regulator in molecular transport.

  15. Expression of the α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor in human lung cells

    Schuller Hildegard M; Dhar Madhu; Plummer Howard K

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Background We and others have shown that one of the mechanisms of growth regulation of small cell lung cancer cell lines and cultured pulmonary neuroendocrine cells is by the binding of agonists to the α7 neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor. In addition, we have shown that the nicotine-derived carcinogenic nitrosamine, 4(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK), is a high affinity agonist for the α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor. In the present study, our goal was t...

  16. Effects of the α subunit on imidacloprid sensitivity of recombinant nicotinic acetylcholine receptors

    Matsuda, K; Buckingham, S D; Freeman, J.C.; Squire, M D; Baylis, H. A.; Sattelle, D B

    1998-01-01

    Imidacloprid is a new insecticide with selective toxicity for insects over vertebrates. Recombinant (α4β2) chicken neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) and a hybrid nicotinic AChR formed by co-expression of a Drosophila melanogaster neuronal α subunit (SAD) with the chicken β2 subunit were heterologously expressed in Xenopus oocytes by nuclear injection of cDNAs. The agonist actions of imidacloprid and other nicotinic AChR ligands ((+)-epibatidine, (−)-nicotine and acetylcholine...

  17. Two types of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in Drosophila and other arthropods

    Collin, Caitlin Alexis; Hauser, Frank; Gonzalez de Valdivia, Ernesto I; Li, Shizhong; Reisenberger, Julia; Carlsen, Eva M.M.; Khan, Zaid; Hansen, Niels Ø.; Puhm, Florian; Søndergaard, Leif; Niemiec, Justyna; Heninger, Magdalena; Ren, Guilin Robin; Grimmelikhuijzen, Cornelis

    2013-01-01

    Muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) play a central role in the mammalian nervous system. These receptors are G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), which are activated by the agonists acetylcholine and muscarine, and blocked by a variety of antagonists. Mammals have five mAChRs (m1-m5). In ...... (Hydra), had two A-type mAChRs. From these data we propose a model for the evolution of mAChRs....

  18. Effect of organophosphorus insecticides on phosphorylation of the M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor

    Shuyin Li; Liming Zou; Carry Pope

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Organophosphorus insecticides may promote the accumulation of acetylcholine at synapses and the neuromuscular junction by inhibiting acetylcholinesterase activity to cause disturbance of neural signal conduction and induce a toxic reaction. Organophosphorus insecticides may act on M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors, whose combination with G proteins is regulated by phosphorylation of G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2.OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effects of organophosphorus insecticides on the phosphorylation of G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2-mediated M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors and to reveal other possible actions of organophosphorus insecticides.DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: An observational study, which was performed in the Central Laboratory of Shenyang Medical College, and Department of Physiological Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Oklahoma State University from June 2002 to December 2004.METHODS: The M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor was extracted and purified from pig brain using affinity chromatography. Subsequently, the purified M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor, G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2, and [OP32] ATP were incubated with different concentrations of paraoxon and chlorpyrifos oxon together. The mixture then underwent polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and the gel film was dried and radioactively autographed to detect phosphorylation of the M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor. Finally, the radio-labeled phosphorylated M2 receptor protein band was excised for counting with an isotope liquid scintillation counter.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Effects of chlorpyrifos oxon, paraoxon, chlorpyrifos, and parathion in different concentrations on the phosphorylation of the M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor; effects of chlorpyrifos oxon on the phosphorylation of the adrenergic receptor.CONCLUSION: Different kinds of organophosphorus insecticides have different effects on the phosphorylation of the G protein

  19. Methamphetamine Self-Administration Acutely Decreases Monoaminergic Transporter Function

    McFadden, Lisa M.; Stout, Kristen A.; Vieira-Brock, Paula L.; Allen, Scott C.; Nielsen, Shannon M.; Wilkins, Diana G.; Hanson, Glen R.; Fleckenstein, Annette E.

    2011-01-01

    Numerous pre-clinical studies have demonstrated that non-contingent methamphetamine (METH) administration rapidly decreases both dopamine (DA) transporter (DAT) and vesicular monoamine-2 transporter (VMAT-2) function. Because of the importance of transporter function to the abuse and neurotoxic liabilities of METH, and previous research indicating that the effects of non-contingent METH treatment do not necessarily predict effects of contingent exposure, the present study examined the acute i...

  20. Expression of Neurotransmitter Transporters for Structural and Biochemical Studies

    Elbaz, Yael; Danieli, Tsafi; Kanner, Baruch I.; Schuldiner, Shimon

    2010-01-01

    Neurotransmitter transporters play essential roles in the process of neurotransmission. Vesicular neurotransmitter transporters mediate storage inside secretory vesicles in a process that involves the exchange of lumenal H+ for cytoplasmic transmitter. Retrieval of the neurotransmitter from the synaptic cleft catalyzed by sodium-coupled transporters is critical for the termination of the synaptic actions of the released neurotransmitter. Our current understanding of the mechanism of these tra...

  1. Immunogenicity of an aphthovirus chimera of the glycoprotein of vesicular stomatitis virus.

    Grigera, P R; Garcia-Briones, M; Periolo, O; La Torre, J L; Wagner, R R

    1996-01-01

    An oligodeoxynucleotide coding for amino acids 139 through 149 of antigenic site A (ASA) of the VP1 capsid protein of the foot-and-mouth disease virus C3 serotype (FMDV C3) was inserted into three different in-frame sites of the vesicular stomatitis virus New Jersey serotype (VSV-NJ) glycoprotein (G) gene cDNA present in plasmid pKG97 under control of the bacteriophage T7 polymerase promoter. Transfection of these plasmids into CV1 cells coinfected with the T7 polymerase-expressing vaccinia v...

  2. Evectins: Vesicular proteins that carry a pleckstrin homology domain and localize to post-Golgi membranes

    Krappa, Ralf; Nguyen, Andrew Van; Burrola, Patrick; Deretic, Dusanka; Lemke, Greg

    1999-01-01

    We have identified two vesicular proteins, designated evectin (evt)-1 and -2. These proteins are ≈25 kDa in molecular mass, lack a cleaved N-terminal signal sequence, and appear to be inserted into membranes through a C-terminal hydrophobic anchor. They also carry a pleckstrin homology domain at their N termini, which potentially couples them to signal transduction pathways that result in the production of lipid second messengers. evt-1 is specific to the nervous system, where it is expressed...

  3. Botulinum neurotoxin type A modulates vesicular release of glutamate from satellite glial cells

    da Silva, Larissa Bittencourt; Poulsen, Jeppe Nørgaard; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Gazerani, Parisa

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the presence of cell membrane docking proteins synaptosomal-associated protein, 25 and 23 kD (SNAP-25 and SNAP-23) in satellite glial cells (SGCs) of rat trigeminal ganglion; whether cultured SGCs would release glutamate in a time- and calcium-dependent manner following calcium-ionophore ionomycin stimulation; and if botulinum neurotoxin type A (BoNTA), in a dose-dependent manner, could block or decrease vesicular release of glutamate. SGCs were isolated from the trige...

  4. Overexpressing OsPIN2 enhances aluminium internalization by elevating vesicular trafficking in rice root apex

    Wu, Daoming; Shen, Hong; Yokawa, Ken; Baluška, František

    2015-01-01

    Aluminium (Al) sequestration is required for internal detoxification of Al in plant cells. In this study, it was found that the rice OsPIN2 overexpression line (OX1) had significantly reduced Al content in its cell wall and increased Al concentration in cell sap only in rice root tips relative to the wild-type (WT). In comparison with WT, OX1 reduced morin staining of cytosolic Al, enhanced FM 4–64 staining of membrane vesicular trafficking in root tip sections (0–1mm), and showed morin-FM 4–...

  5. SOME PRELIMINARY DATA ABOUT VESICULAR – ARBUSCULAR MYCORRHIZAS AT DIFFERENT SPECIES OF PLANTAGO

    Nicoleta IANOVICI

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Vesicular – arbuscular mycorrhizas are though widely distributed. Root colonization of VAM fungi was studied in seven different species of Plantago. Colonization was high among all species. The highest intensity of root cortex colonization (M%, relative arbuscular richness (A% and arbuscule richness in root fragments were found in the Plantago schwarzenbergiana. Comparison of the VAM colonization in roots from different ecosystems suggested that plants grown in the saline habitats might be more dependence on VAM. There is a suggestion that AM fungi were able to detect variations in land. There is also an indication that VAM abundance was a response to stress.

  6. The management of VA (vesicular-arbuscular) mycorrhizae in semi-arid environments

    Miller, R.M.

    1987-01-01

    The need for management of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizae in semi-arid ecosystems represent an important challenge to belowground researchers especially as we increase our utilization of these stressed habitats. Within the laser couple of years several reviews have been prepared on the effects of disturbance to shrub and grasslands and their mycorrhizae. The purpose of this presentation is to discuss some research findings and management needs using examples from a high elevation cold desert, and from research in mid-grass and tallgrass prairies.

  7. A recombinant rabies virus expressing vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein fails to protect against rabies virus infection

    Foley, Heather D.; McGettigan, James P.; Siler, Catherine A.; Dietzschold, Bernhard; Schnell, Matthias J.

    2000-01-01

    To investigate the importance of the rabies virus (RV) glycoprotein (G) in protection against rabies, we constructed a recombinant RV (rRV) in which the RV G ecto- and transmembrane domains were replaced with the corresponding regions of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) glycoprotein (rRV-VSV-G). We were able to recover rRV-VSV-G and found that particle production was equal to rRV. However, the budding of the chimeric virus was delayed and infectious titers were red...

  8. Depolarization by K*O+ and glutamate activates different neurotransmitter release mechanisms in gabaergic neurons: vesicular versus non-vesicular release of gaba

    Belhage, Bo; Hansen, G.H.; Schousboe, Arne

    1993-01-01

    Neurotransmitter release, gaba release, membrane transporter, vesicles, intracellular CA*OH, neuron cultures......Neurotransmitter release, gaba release, membrane transporter, vesicles, intracellular CA*OH, neuron cultures...

  9. Identification of petrogenic produced water components as acetylcholine esterase inhibitors.

    Froment, Jean; Langford, Katherine; Tollefsen, Knut Erik; Bråte, Inger Lise N; Brooks, Steven J; Thomas, Kevin V

    2016-08-01

    Effect-directed analysis (EDA) was applied to identify acetylcholine esterase (AChE) inhibitors in produced water. Common produced water components from oil production activities, such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), alkylphenols, and naphthenic acids were tested for AChE inhibition using a simple mixture of PAHs and naphthenic acids. Produced water samples collected from two offshore platforms in the Norwegian sector of the North Sea were extracted by solid phase extraction and fractionated by open-column liquid solid chromatography and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) before being tested using a high-throughput and automated AChE assay. The HPLC fractions causing the strongest AChE inhibition were analysed by gas chromatography coupled to a high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC-HR-ToF-MS). Butylated hydroxytoluene and 4-phenyl-1,2-dihydronaphthalene were identified as two produced water components capable of inhibiting AChE at low concentrations. In order to assess the potential presence of such compounds discharged into aquatic ecosystems, AChE activity in fish tissues was measured. Saithe (Pollachius virens) caught near two offshore platforms showed lower enzymatic activity than those collected from a reference location. Target analysis of saithe did not detected the presence of these two putative AChE inhibitors and suggest that additional compounds such as PAHs, naphthenic acids and yet un-identified compounds may also contribute to the purported AChE inhibition observed in saithe. PMID:27176761

  10. Schizophrenia and the alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor.

    Martin, Laura F; Freedman, Robert

    2007-01-01

    In addition to the devastating symptoms of psychosis, many people with schizophrenia also suffer from cognitive impairment. These cognitive symptoms lead to marked dysfunction and can impact employability, treatment adherence, and social skills. Deficits in P50 auditory gating are associated with attentional impairment and may contribute to cognitive symptoms and perceptual disturbances. This nicotinic cholinergic-mediated inhibitory process represents a potential new target for therapeutic intervention in schizophrenia. This chapter will review evidence implicating the nicotinic cholinergic, and specifically, the alpha7 nicotinic receptor system in the pathology of schizophrenia. Impaired auditory sensory gating has been linked to the alpha7 nicotinic receptor gene on the chromosome 15q14 locus. A majority of persons with schizophrenia are heavy smokers. Although nicotine can acutely reverse diminished auditory sensory gating in people with schizophrenia, this effect is lost on a chronic basis due to receptor desensitization. The alpha7 nicotinic agonist 3-(2,4 dimethoxy)benzylidene-anabaseine (DMXBA) can also enhance auditory sensory gating in animal models. DMXBA is well tolerated in humans and a new study in persons with schizophrenia has found that DMXBA enhances both P50 auditory gating and cognition. alpha7 Nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonists appear to be viable candidates for the treatment of cognitive disturbances in schizophrenia. PMID:17349863

  11. Increased expression of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor in stimulated muscle.

    O'Reilly, Clare; Pette, Dirk; Ohlendieck, Kay

    2003-01-10

    Chronic low-frequency stimulation has been used as a model for investigating responses of skeletal muscle fibres to enhanced neuromuscular activity under conditions of maximum activation. Fast-to-slow isoform shifting of markers of the sarcoplasmic reticulum and the contractile apparatus demonstrated successful fibre transitions prior to studying the effect of chronic electro-stimulation on the expression of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor. Comparative immunoblotting revealed that the alpha- and delta-subunits of the receptor were increased in 10-78 day stimulated specimens, while an associated component of the surface utrophin-glycoprotein complex, beta-dystroglycan, was not drastically changed in stimulated fast skeletal muscle. Previous studies have shown that electro-stimulation induces degeneration of fast glycolytic fibres, trans-differentiation leading to fast-to-slow fibre transitions and activation of muscle precursor cells. In analogy, our results indicate a molecular modification of the central functional unit of the post-synaptic muscle surface within existing neuromuscular junctions and/or during remodelling of nerve-muscle contacts. PMID:12504123

  12. Effects of two oxadiazolidinones on cholinesterases and acetylcholine receptors

    Inhibition of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyryl cholinesterase (BuChE) by 3-(2,3-dihydro-2,2-dimethyl-benzofuran-'7-yl)-5-methoxy-1,3,4-oxadiazol-2(3H)-one (DBOX) and 3-(2-methoxyphenyl)-5-methoxy-1,3,4-oxadiazol-2(3H)-one (MPOX) was measured by the Ellmann spectrophotometric method. Inhibition was quasi first order and irreversible. DBOX was 2-3 orders of magnitude more potent than MPOX. Housefly brain AChE and horse serum BuChE were more sensitive than AChEs of red blood cells or eel and Torpedo electric organs. It is suggested that the nonesteratic oxadiazolidinones are activated to carbanillates on the surface of the enzyme and produce a carbanillated enzyme which ages rapidly. Carbamate anticholinesterases protected AChE against carbanillation as they did against phosphorylation. At higher concentrations, the two oxadiazolidinones also affected binding of [125I] α bungarotoxin and [3H]perhydrohistrionicotoxin to Torpedo nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, but did not affect binding of [3H]quinuclidinyl benzilate to rat brain muscarinic receptors

  13. Therapeutic Potential of α7 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors.

    Bertrand, Daniel; Lee, Chih-Hung L; Flood, Dorothy; Marger, Fabrice; Donnelly-Roberts, Diana

    2015-10-01

    Progress in the fields of neuroscience and molecular biology has identified the forebrain cholinergic system as being important in many higher order brain functions. Further analysis of the genes encoding the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) has highlighted, in particular, the role of α7 nAChRs in these higher order brain functions as evidenced by their peculiar physiologic and pharmacological properties. As this receptor has gained the attention of scientists from academia and industry, our knowledge of its roles in various brain and bodily functions has increased immensely. We have also seen the development of small molecules that have further refined our understanding of the roles of α7 nAChRs, and these molecules have begun to be tested in clinical trials for several indications. Although a large body of data has confirmed a role of α7 nAChRs in cognition, the translation of small molecules affecting α7 nAChRs into therapeutics has to date only progressed to the stage of testing in clinical trials. Notably, however, most recent human genetic and biochemical studies are further underscoring the crucial role of α7 nAChRs and associated genes in multiple organ systems and disease states. The aim of this review is to discuss our current knowledge of α7 nAChRs and their relevance as a target in specific functional systems and disease states. PMID:26419447

  14. Alpha-conotoxins as pharmacological probes of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors

    Layla AZAM; J Michael MCINTOSH

    2009-01-01

    Cysteine-rich peptides from the venom of cone snails (Conus) target a wide variety of different ion channels. One family of conopeptides, the a-conotoxins, specifically target different isoforms of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) found both in the neuromuscular junction and central nervous system. This family is further divided into subfamilies based on the number of amino acids between cysteine residues. The exquisite subtype selectivity of certain a-conotoxins has been key to the characterization of native nAChR isoforms involved in modulation of neurotransmitter release, the pathophysiol-ogy of Parkinson's disease and nociception. Structure/function characterization of a-conotoxins has led to the development of analogs with improved potency and/or subtype selectivity. Cyclization of the backbone structure and addition of lipo-philic moieties has led to improved stability and bioavailability of a-conotoxins, thus paving the way for orally available therapeutics. The recent advances in phylogeny, exogenomics and molecular modeling promises the discovery of an even greater number of a-conotoxins and analogs with improved selectivity for specific subtypes of nAChRs.

  15. Acetylcholine esterase activity in mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease

    Impairment of cholinergic neurotransmission is a well-established fact in Alzheimer's disease (AD), but there is controversy about its relevance at the early stages of the disease and in mild cognitive impairment (MCI). In vivo positron emission tomography imaging of cortical acetylcholine esterase (AChE) activity as a marker of cholinergic innervation that is expressed by cholinergic axons and cholinoceptive neurons has demonstrated a reduction of this enzyme activity in manifest AD. The technique is also useful to measure the inhibition of cerebral AChE induced by cholinesterase inhibitors for treatment of dementia symptoms. A reduction of cortical AchE activity was found consistently in all studies of AD and in few cases of MCI who later concerted to AD. The in vivo findings in MCI and very mild AD are still preliminary, and studies seem to suggest that cholinergic innervation and AChE as the main degrading enzyme are both reduced, which might result in partial compensation of their effect. (orig.)

  16. Bolus injection of acetylcholine terminates atrial fibrillation in rats.

    Fleidervish, Ilya A; Goldberg, Yuri; Ovsyshcher, I Eli

    2008-01-28

    It is well established that a tonic increase in the availability of the atrial muscarinic K(+) channels, either by enhanced vagal tone or by steady infusion of a low-dose of cholinergic or adenosine receptor agonists, promotes the genesis of atrial fibrillation. Here, we aimed to test the hypothesis that bolus administration of a muscarinic receptor agonist would destabilize and terminate atrial arrhythmia by uniformly and transiently activating K(+) channels throughout the atria, and that if the agonist was rapidly hydrolysable, it would dissipate before the more tonic, pro-arrhythmic effects could take hold. The episodes of untreated atrial fibrillation, induced in anesthetized rats by programmed electrical stimulation via trans-esophageal bipolar catheter, lasted on average 8.6+/-2.2 min (n=32). Intravenous injection of a model hydrolysable muscarinic agonist, acetylcholine (0.2 mg/kg body weight), converted atrial fibrillation into sinus rhythm within 8.4+/-1.9 s (n=10, Ppre-atrial fibrillation values within 10-20 s of injection. In conclusion, our evidence indicates that bolus administration of rapidly hydrolysable muscarinic agonist could be an effective way to pharmacologically terminate atrial fibrillation and restore sinus rhythm. PMID:18078927

  17. Molecular alteration of a muscarinic acetylcholine receptor system during synaptogenesis

    Biochemical properties of the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor system of the avian retina were found to change during the period when synapses form in ovo. Comparison of ligand binding to membranes obtained before and after synaptogenesis showed a significant increase in the affinity, but not proportion, of the high affinity agonist-binding state. There was no change in receptor sensitivity to antagonists during this period. Pirenzepine binding, which can discriminate muscarinic receptor subtypes, showed the presence of a single population of low affinity sites (M2) before and after synaptogenesis. The change in agonist binding was not due to the late development of receptor function. However, detergent-solubilization of membranes eliminated differences in agonist binding between receptors from embryos and hatched chicks, suggesting a developmental change in interactions of the receptor with functionally related membrane components. A possible basis for altered interactions was obtained from isoelectric point data showing that the muscarinic receptor population underwent a transition from a predominantly low pI form (4.25) in 13 day embryos to a predominantly high pI form (4.50) in newly hatched chicks. The possibility that biochemical changes in the muscarinic receptor play a role in differentiation of the system by controlling receptor position on the surface of nerve cells is discussed

  18. Presynaptic mechanisms of lead neurotoxicity: effects on vesicular release, vesicle clustering and mitochondria number.

    Zhang, Xiao-Lei; Guariglia, Sara R; McGlothan, Jennifer L; Stansfield, Kirstie H; Stanton, Patric K; Guilarte, Tomás R

    2015-01-01

    Childhood lead (Pb2+) intoxication is a global public health problem and accounts for 0.6% of the global burden of disease associated with intellectual disabilities. Despite the recognition that childhood Pb2+ intoxication contributes significantly to intellectual disabilities, there is a fundamental lack of knowledge on presynaptic mechanisms by which Pb2+ disrupts synaptic function. In this study, using a well-characterized rodent model of developmental Pb2+ neurotoxicity, we show that Pb2+ exposure markedly inhibits presynaptic vesicular release in hippocampal Schaffer collateral-CA1 synapses in young adult rats. This effect was associated with ultrastructural changes which revealed a reduction in vesicle number in the readily releasable/docked vesicle pool, disperse vesicle clusters in the resting pool, and a reduced number of presynaptic terminals with multiple mitochondria with no change in presynaptic calcium influx. These studies provide fundamental knowledge on mechanisms by which Pb2+ produces profound inhibition of presynaptic vesicular release that contribute to deficits in synaptic plasticity and intellectual development. PMID:26011056

  19. Presynaptic mechanisms of lead neurotoxicity: effects on vesicular release, vesicle clustering and mitochondria number.

    Xiao-Lei Zhang

    Full Text Available Childhood lead (Pb2+ intoxication is a global public health problem and accounts for 0.6% of the global burden of disease associated with intellectual disabilities. Despite the recognition that childhood Pb2+ intoxication contributes significantly to intellectual disabilities, there is a fundamental lack of knowledge on presynaptic mechanisms by which Pb2+ disrupts synaptic function. In this study, using a well-characterized rodent model of developmental Pb2+ neurotoxicity, we show that Pb2+ exposure markedly inhibits presynaptic vesicular release in hippocampal Schaffer collateral-CA1 synapses in young adult rats. This effect was associated with ultrastructural changes which revealed a reduction in vesicle number in the readily releasable/docked vesicle pool, disperse vesicle clusters in the resting pool, and a reduced number of presynaptic terminals with multiple mitochondria with no change in presynaptic calcium influx. These studies provide fundamental knowledge on mechanisms by which Pb2+ produces profound inhibition of presynaptic vesicular release that contribute to deficits in synaptic plasticity and intellectual development.

  20. Nonionic surfactant vesicular systems for effective drug delivery—an overview

    Gannu P. Kumar

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Vesicular systems are a novel means of drug delivery that can enhance bioavailability of encapsulated drug and provide therapeutic activity in a controlled manner for a prolonged period of time. Liposomes were the first such system but they suffer from a number of drawbacks including high cost and lack of stability at various pHs. Niosomes are a nonionic surfactant vesicular system, which can be easily and reliably made in the laboratory. Many factors affect noisome formation such as the method of manufacture, nature of surfactant and encapsulated drug, temperature at which the lipids are hydrated and the critical packing parameter. This review describes all aspects of niosomes including their different compositions, the various methods of preparation, the effect of changing manufacturing parameters, methods of characterization, factors that affect their stability, their use by various routes of administration, their therapeutic applications and the most important patents. The review also provides detailed information of the various types of niosomes that provide effective drug delivery.

  1. Adaptor protein complexes and intracellular transport

    2014-01-01

    The AP (adaptor protein) complexes are heterotetrameric protein complexes that mediate intracellular membrane trafficking along endocytic and secretory transport pathways. There are five different AP complexes: AP-1, AP-2 and AP-3 are clathrin-associated complexes; whereas AP-4 and AP-5 are not. These five AP complexes localize to different intracellular compartments and mediate membrane trafficking in distinct pathways. They recognize and concentrate cargo proteins into vesicular carriers th...

  2. Inhibition of human α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors by cyclic monoterpene carveol.

    Lozon, Yosra; Sultan, Ahmed; Lansdell, Stuart J; Prytkova, Tatiana; Sadek, Bassem; Yang, Keun-Hang Susan; Howarth, Frank Christopher; Millar, Neil S; Oz, Murat

    2016-04-01

    Cyclic monoterpenes are a group of phytochemicals with antinociceptive, local anesthetic, and anti-inflammatory actions. Effects of cyclic monoterpenes including vanilin, pulegone, eugenole, carvone, carvacrol, carveol, thymol, thymoquinone, menthone, and limonene were investigated on the functional properties of the cloned α7 subunit of the human nicotinic acetylcholine receptor expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Monoterpenes inhibited the α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor in the order carveol>thymoquinone>carvacrol>menthone>thymol>limonene>eugenole>pulegone≥carvone≥vanilin. Among the monoterpenes, carveol showed the highest potency on acetylcholine-induced responses, with IC50 of 8.3µM. Carveol-induced inhibition was independent of the membrane potential and could not be reversed by increasing the concentration of acetylcholine. In line with functional experiments, docking studies indicated that cyclic monoterpenes such as carveol may interact with an allosteric site located in the α7 transmembrane domain. Our results indicate that cyclic monoterpenes inhibit the function of human α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, with varying potencies. PMID:26849939

  3. Loss of Acetylcholine Signaling Reduces Cell Clearance Deficiencies in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Sérgio M Pinto

    Full Text Available The ability to eliminate undesired cells by apoptosis is a key mechanism to maintain organismal health and homeostasis. Failure to clear apoptotic cells efficiently can cause autoimmune diseases in mammals. Genetic studies in Caenorhabditis elegans have greatly helped to decipher the regulation of apoptotic cell clearance. In this study, we show that the loss of levamisole-sensitive acetylcholine receptor, but not of a typical neuronal acetylcholine receptor causes a reduction in the number of persistent cell corpses in worms suffering from an engulfment deficiency. This reduction is not caused by impaired or delayed cell death but rather by a partial restoration of the cell clearance capacity. Mutants in acetylcholine turn-over elicit a similar phenotype, implying that acetylcholine signaling is the process responsible for these observations. Surprisingly, tissue specific RNAi suggests that UNC-38, a major component of the levamisole-sensitive receptor, functions in the dying germ cell to influence engulfment efficiency. Animals with loss of acetylcholine receptor exhibit a higher fraction of cell corpses positive for the "eat-me" signal phosphatidylserine. Our results suggest that modulation by ion channels of ion flow across plasma membrane in dying cells can influence the dynamics of phosphatidylserine exposure and thus clearance efficiency.

  4. Cognitive effects of dopamine depletion in the context of diminished acetylcholine signaling capacity in mice

    Lilia Zurkovsky

    2013-01-01

    A subset of patients with Parkinson’s disease acquires a debilitating dementia characterized by severe cognitive impairments (i.e. Parkinson’s disease dementia; PDD. Brains from PDD patients show extensive cholinergic loss as well as dopamine (DA depletion. We used a mutant mouse model to directly test whether combined cholinergic and DA depletion leads to a cognitive profile resembling PDD. Mice carrying heterozygous deletion of the high-affinity, hemicholinium-3-sensitive choline transporter (CHTHET show reduced levels of acetylcholine throughout the brain. We achieved bilateral DA depletion in CHTHET and wild-type (WT littermates via intra-striatal infusion of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA, or used vehicle as control. Executive function and memory were evaluated using rodent versions of cognitive tasks commonly used with human subjects: the set-shifting task and spatial and novel-object recognition paradigms. Our studies revealed impaired acquisition of attentional set in the set-shifting paradigm in WT-6OHDA and CHTHET-vehicle mice that was exacerbated in the CHTHET-6OHDA mice. The object recognition test following a 24-hour delay was also impaired in CHTHET-6OHDA mice compared with all other groups. Treatment with acetylcholinesterase (AChE inhibitors physostigmine (0.05 or 0.1 mg/kg and donepezil (0.1 and 0.3 mg/kg reversed the impaired object recognition of the CHTHET-6OHDA mice. Our data demonstrate an exacerbated cognitive phenotype with dual ACh and DA depletion as compared with either insult alone, with traits analogous to those observed in PDD patients. The results suggest that combined loss of DA and ACh could be sufficient for pathogenesis of specific cognitive deficits in PDD.

  5. Evaluation of PET Radioligands for the neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor

    Full text: A-186253.1, a compound made by Abbott laboratories, was labelled with carbon-11 and evaluated as a PET ligand for the neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR). The compound was labelled with C-11 by methylation with 11C-MeI of the desmethyl precursor A-183828.1. The affinity of A-186253.1 for the α4β2 and the α7 subtype of the nAChR was determined in displacement studies. PET-studies were performed in rats and pigs Inhibitory constants (Ki) versus cytsine were 461 ± 99 pM for A-186253.1 and versus α-Bungarotoxin >100 μM. which means a very high selectivity for the α4β2-receptor (>227,000). Highest uptake of [11C]-A-186253.1 was observed in the thalamus where an increase in radiotracer uptake was seen until 45 min p.i.. Thereafter, the radiotracer concentration remained constant until the end of the scan indicating slow washout of [11C]-A-186253.1. Application of cold A-186253.1 (0.5 mg/kg) 40 min p.i. resulted in a decrease in radiotracer concentration in the thalamus and the cortex indicating displacement of [11C]-A-186253.1. Blockade studies with cytisine (0.5 mg/kg), a selective ligand for the α4β2 nicotinic receptor, showed just a slight reduction of the radioligand uptake in the thalamus and in the cortex whereas the blockade with cold A-186253.1 (1 mg/kg) resulted in a 50 % reduction. These results suggest, that 50 % of the [11C]-A-186253.1 in the brain corresponds to specifically bound radioligand, but not to the α4β2 subtype of the nicotinic receptor. (author)

  6. Acetylcholine receptors in dementia and mild cognitive impairment

    Sabri, Osama; Kendziorra, Kai [University of Leipzig, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Leipzig (Germany); Wolf, Henrike; Gertz, Hermann-Josef [University of Leipzig, Department of Psychiatry, Leipzig (Germany); Brust, Peter [Institute of Interdisciplinary Isotope Research, Leipzig (Germany)

    2008-03-15

    To clarify whether changes in the cholinergic transmission occur early in the course of Alzheimer's disease (AD), we carried out positron emission tomography (PET) with the radioligand 2-[{sup 18}F]F-A-85380, which is supposed to be specific for {alpha}4{beta}2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). We included patients with moderate to severe AD and patients with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (MCI), presumed to present preclinical AD. Both patients with AD and MCI showed significant reductions in {alpha}4{beta}2 nAChRs in brain regions typically affected by AD pathology. These findings indicate that a reduction in {alpha}4{beta}2 nAChRs occurs during early symptomatic stages of AD. The {alpha}4{beta}2 nAChR availability in these regions correlated with the severity of cognitive impairment, indicating a stage sensitivity of the {alpha}4{beta}2 nAChR status. Together, our results provide evidence for the potential of 2-[{sup 18}]F-A-85380 nAChR PET in the diagnosis of patients at risk for AD. Because of the extraordinary long acquisition time with 2-[{sup 18}F]F-A-85380, we developed the new {alpha}4{beta}2 nAChR-specific radioligands (+)- and (-)-[{sup 18}F]norchloro-fluoro-homoepibatidine (NCFHEB) and evaluated them preclinically. (-)-[{sup 18}F]NCFHEB shows twofold higher brain uptake and significantly shorter acquisition times. Therefore, (-)-[{sup 18}F]NCFHEB should be a suitable radioligand for larger clinical investigations. (orig.)

  7. Acetylcholine receptors in dementia and mild cognitive impairment

    To clarify whether changes in the cholinergic transmission occur early in the course of Alzheimer's disease (AD), we carried out positron emission tomography (PET) with the radioligand 2-[18F]F-A-85380, which is supposed to be specific for α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). We included patients with moderate to severe AD and patients with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (MCI), presumed to present preclinical AD. Both patients with AD and MCI showed significant reductions in α4β2 nAChRs in brain regions typically affected by AD pathology. These findings indicate that a reduction in α4β2 nAChRs occurs during early symptomatic stages of AD. The α4β2 nAChR availability in these regions correlated with the severity of cognitive impairment, indicating a stage sensitivity of the α4β2 nAChR status. Together, our results provide evidence for the potential of 2-[18]F-A-85380 nAChR PET in the diagnosis of patients at risk for AD. Because of the extraordinary long acquisition time with 2-[18F]F-A-85380, we developed the new α4β2 nAChR-specific radioligands (+)- and (-)-[18F]norchloro-fluoro-homoepibatidine (NCFHEB) and evaluated them preclinically. (-)-[18F]NCFHEB shows twofold higher brain uptake and significantly shorter acquisition times. Therefore, (-)-[18F]NCFHEB should be a suitable radioligand for larger clinical investigations. (orig.)

  8. Insensitive Acetylcholine Receptor Conferring Resistance of Plutella xylostella to Nereistoxin Insecticides

    CHENG Luo-gen; YU Guang; CHEN Zi-hao; LI Zhong-yin

    2008-01-01

    The combinative rate measurement of (3-[Ⅰ125] iodotyrosyl) α-bungarotoxin was applied in the analysis of the relation between nerve acetylcholine receptor and three types of insecticide resistance in diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella (L.). In the dimehypo-resistant strain and in the cartap-resistant strain, the nerve acetylcholine receptor showed the remarkable insensitivity to dimehypo and cartap, of which the binding rate to ligand was approximately 66 and 60%, respectively, of the susceptible strain. The sensitivity to deltamethrin in the deltamethrin-resistant strain did not show visible change. These results indicated that the decline in the sensitivity of nerve acetylcholine receptor to insecticide might be a potential mechanism to nereistoxin insecticides resistance in the diamondback moth.

  9. Prejunctional inhibition of norepinephrine release caused by acetylcholine in the human saphenous vein

    We performed experiments to determine whether or not acetylcholine exerts a prejunctional inhibitory effect on adrenergic neurotransmission in the human blood vessel wall. Rings of human greater saphenous veins were prepared 2 to 15 hours after death and mounted for isometric tension recording in organ chambers filled with Krebs-Ringer solution. Acetylcholine depressed contractile responses to electric activation of the sympathetic nerve endings significantly more than those to exogenous norepinephrine; the relaxations caused by the cholinergic transmitter were antagonized by atropine. Helical strips were incubated with [/sub 3/H]norepinephrine and mounted for superfusion. Electric stimulation augmented the fractional release of labeled norepinephrine. Acetylcholine caused a depression of the evoked /sub 3/H release which was antagonized by atropine but not by hexamethonium. These experiments demonstrate that, as in animal cutaneous veins, there are prejunctional inhibitory muscarinic receptors on the adrenergic nerve endings in the human saphenous vein. By contrast, the human vein also contains postjunctional inhibitory muscarinic receptors

  10. Reduced acetylcholine synthesis in Alzheimer's disease is a clinically relevant change

    This paper presents a study of patients in the presenium. Psychological assessment was carried out to provide measures of relative severity of dementia, with which pathological and chemical indices of impairment could be compared. Fresh cortical biopsy tissue permitted the assay of ChAT activity, and also the determination of acetylcholine synthesis in a preparation enriched in cortical synaptosomes. Additionally, choline uptake has been measured for comparison. Nuerosurgical samples from all patients were handled and processed for measuring acetylcholine synthesis by incorporation of U-14C-glucoase into C 14-acetylcholine in neocortical tissue prisms. Cortical sections from most of the patients were found on light microscopy to contain the characteristic changes of Alzheimer's disease

  11. Calcium transport abnormality in uremic rat brain synaptosomes.

    Fraser, C.L.; Sarnacki, P; Arieff, A I

    1985-01-01

    Brain calcium is elevated in patients and laboratory animals with uremia. The significance of this finding is unclear. We evaluated calcium transport in brain of both normal and acutely uremic rats (blood urea nitrogen = 250 mg/dl) by performing studies in synaptosomes from rat brain cerebral cortex. Synaptosomes are vesicular presynaptic nerve endings from brain that contain mitochondria and are metabolically active. Two mechanisms of calcium transport were evaluated using radioactive 45Ca++...

  12. Endosome-to-cytosol transport of viral nucleocapsids.

    Le Blanc, Isabelle; Luyet, Pierre-Philippe; Pons, Véronique; Ferguson, Charles; Emans, Neil; Petiot, Anne; Mayran, Nathalie; Demaurex, Nicolas; Fauré, Julien; Sadoul, Rémy; Parton, Robert,; Gruenberg, Jean

    2005-01-01

    During viral infection, fusion of the viral envelope with endosomal membranes and nucleocapsid release were thought to be concomitant events. We show here that for the vesicular stomatitis virus they occur sequentially, at two successive steps of the endocytic pathway. Fusion already occurs in transport intermediates between early and late endosomes, presumably releasing the nucleocapsid within the lumen of intra-endosomal vesicles, where it remains hidden. Transport to late endosomes is then...

  13. Influence of melatonin on the development of functional nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in cultured chick retinal cells

    L.F.S. Sampaio

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available The influence of melatonin on the developmental pattern of functional nicotinic acetylcholine receptors was investigated in embryonic 8-day-old chick retinal cells in culture. The functional response to acetylcholine was measured in cultured retina cells by microphysiometry. The maximal functional response to acetylcholine increased 2.7 times between the 4th and 5th day in vitro (DIV4, DIV5, while the Bmax value for [125I]-alpha-bungarotoxin was reduced. Despite the presence of alpha8-like immunoreactivity at DIV4, functional responses mediated by alpha-bungarotoxin-sensitive nicotinic acetylcholine receptors were observed only at DIV5. Mecamylamine (100 µM was essentially without effect at DIV4 and DIV5, while dihydro-ß-erythroidine (10-100 µM blocked the response to acetylcholine (3.0 nM-2.0 µM only at DIV4, with no effect at DIV5. Inhibition of melatonin receptors with the antagonist luzindole, or melatonin synthesis by stimulation of D4 dopamine receptors blocked the appearance of the alpha-bungarotoxin-sensitive response at DIV5. Therefore, alpha-bungarotoxin-sensitive receptors were expressed in retinal cells as early as at DIV4, but they reacted to acetylcholine only after DIV5. The development of an alpha-bungarotoxin-sensitive response is dependent on the production of melatonin by the retinal culture. Melatonin, which is produced in a tonic manner by this culture, and is a key hormone in the temporal organization of vertebrates, also potentiates responses mediated by alpha-bungarotoxin-sensitive receptors in rat vas deferens and cerebellum. This common pattern of action on different cell models that express alpha-bungarotoxin-sensitive receptors probably reflects a more general mechanism of regulation of these receptors.

  14. Vesicular Trafficking Defects, Developmental Abnormalities, and Alterations in the Cellular Death Process Occur in Cell Lines that Over-Express Dictyostelium GTPase, Rab2, and Rab2 Mutants

    Katherine Maringer

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Small molecular weight GTPase Rab2 has been shown to be a resident of pre-Golgi intermediates and required for protein transport from the ER to the Golgi complex, however, the function of Rab2 in Dictyostelium has yet to be fully characterized. Using cell lines that over-express DdRab2, as well as cell lines over-expressing constitutively active (CA, and dominant negative (DN forms of the GTPase, we report a functional role in vesicular transport specifically phagocytosis, and endocytosis. Furthermore, Rab2 like other GTPases cycles between an active GTP-bound and an inactive GDP-bound state. We found that this GTP/GDP cycle for DdRab2 is crucial for normal Dictyostelium development and cell–cell adhesion. Similar to Rab5 and Rab7 in C. elegans, we found that DdRab2 plays a role in programmed cell death, possibly in the phagocytic removal of apoptotic corpses.

  15. [Intern(euron)al affairs : The role of specific neocortical interneuron classes in the interaction between acetylcholine and GABAergic anesthetics].

    Liebig, L; Grasshoff, C; Hentschke, H

    2016-08-01

    Acetylcholine is a neuromodulator which is released throughout the central nervous system and plays an essential role in consciousness and cognitive processes including attention and learning. Due to its 'activating' effect on the neuronal and behavioral level its interaction with anesthetics has long been of interest to anesthesiologists. It is widely held that a reduction of the release of acetylcholine by general anesthetics constitutes part of the anesthetic effect. This notion is backed by numerous human and animal studies, but is also in seeming contradiction to findings that acetylcholine activates specific classes of inhibitory neurons: if acetylcholine excites elements within the neuronal network responsible for the release of the inhibitory neurotransmitter γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), its withdrawal should diminish, not enhance, the effect of anesthetics.Focusing on cortical circuits, we present an overview of recent advances in cellular neurophysiology, particularly the interactions between inhibitory neuron classes, which provide insights on the interaction between acetylcholine and GABA. PMID:27380048

  16. Contribution of vesicular and cytosolic dopamine to the increased striatal dopamine efflux elicited by intrastriatal injection of dexamphetamine.

    Watanabe, S.; Aono, Y.; Fusa, K.; Takada, K.; Saigusa, T.; Koshikawa, N.; Cools, A.R.

    2005-01-01

    Systemic administration of high doses of dexamphetamine induces a dopamine efflux that has its intracellular origin in both the vesicular, reserpine-sensitive dopamine pool and the cytosolic, alpha-methyl-para-tyrosine-sensitive, newly synthesized dopamine pool. It remains unknown whether locally ad

  17. Chemotactic response of plant-growth-promoting bacteria towards roots of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal tomato plants.

    Gupta Sood, Sushma

    2003-08-01

    The chemotactic responses of the plant-growth-promoting rhizobacteria Azotobacter chroococcum and Pseudomonas fluorescens to roots of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal (Glomus fasciculatum) tomato plants were determined. A significantly (P=0.05) greater number of bacterial cells of wild strains were attracted towards vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal tomato roots compared to non-vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal tomato roots. Substances exuded by roots served as chemoattractants for these bacteria. P. fluorescens was strongly attracted towards citric and malic acids, which were predominant constituents in root exudates of tomato plants. A. chroococcum showed a stronger response towards sugars than amino acids, but the response was weakest towards organic acids. The effects of temperature, pH, and soil water matric potential on bacterial chemotaxis towards roots were also investigated. In general, significantly (P=0.05) greater chemotactic responses of bacteria were observed at higher water matric potentials (0, -1, and -5 kPa), slightly acidic to neutral pH (6, 6.5 and 7), and at 20-30 degrees C (depending on the bacterium) than in other environmental conditions. It is suggested that chemotaxis of P. fluorescens and A. chroococcum towards roots and their exudates is one of the several steps in the interaction process between bacteria and vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal roots. PMID:19719591

  18. Quantitative multiplex assay for simultaneous detection and identification of Indiana and New Jersey serotypes of vesicular stomatitis virus

    Rasmussen, Thomas Bruun; Uttenthal, Åse; Fernandez, Jovita; Storgaard, Torben

    2005-01-01

    In order to establish a rapid and reliable system for the detection of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), we developed a quantitative reverse transcription-PCR assay for the detection, quantification, and differentiation of the major serotypes, VSV Indiana and VSV New Jersey, using a closed-tube...

  19. Autophagic flux data in differentiated C2C12 myotubes following exposure to acetylcholine and caffeine

    Darin Bloemberg

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The C2C12 line of mouse myoblasts is a useful cell culture model in which to conduct in vitro analyses related to skeletal muscle. Here we present data regarding the autophagic response induced by two chemicals known to influence calcium release and contraction in skeletal muscles and C2C12 cells: acetylcholine and caffeine. More specifically, by concurrently administering acetylcholine or caffeine along with chloroquine to differentiated myotubes for various amounts of time and assessing the protein expression of LC3 and p62, we report data on the relative level of autophagic flux induced by these two calcium- and contraction-regulating chemicals.

  20. Enhanced self-administration of alcohol in muscarinic acetylcholine M4 receptor knockout mice

    de la Cour, Cecilie; Sørensen, Gunnar; Wörtwein, Gitta;

    2015-01-01

    Modulation of cholinergic neurotransmission via nicotinic acetylcholine receptors is known to alter alcohol-drinking behavior. It is not known if muscarinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes have similar effects. The muscarinic M4 receptor is highly expressed in the brain reinforcement system and i......4+/+ littermates. The highest alcohol concentration used (10%) did not immediately result in divergent drinking patterns, but after 4 weeks of 10% alcohol self-administration, baseline levels as well as a pattern of M4-/- mice consuming more alcohol than their M4+/+ controls were re...... as a potential target for pharmacological (positive allosteric modulators or future agonists) treatment of alcohol use disorders....

  1. Increases in muscle Ca2+ mediate changes in acetylcholinesterase and acetylcholine receptors caused by muscle contraction.

    Rubin, L L

    1985-01-01

    The synthesis of acetylcholinesterase (AcChoE; acetylcholine acetylhydrolase, EC 3.1.1.7) and of acetylcholine receptors (AcChoR) by cultured rat muscle fibers is influenced strongly by the level of muscle contractile activity. If fibers are grown in the presence of tetrodotoxin (TTX) to block spontaneous contraction, the total amount of AcChoE decreases markedly, as does the percentage of AcChoE assembled as the collagen-tailed presumed synaptic form of the enzyme. Under these conditions, ho...

  2. Inhibition of cortical acetylcholine release and cognitive performance by histamine H3 receptor activation in rats.

    Blandina, P.; Giorgetti, M.; L. Bartolini; M.Cecchi; Timmerman, H.; Leurs, R.; Pepeu, G; Giovannini, M. G.

    1996-01-01

    1. The effects of histamine and agents at histamine receptors on spontaneous and 100 mM K(+)-evoked release of acetylcholine, measured by microdialysis from the cortex of freely moving, rats, and on cognitive tests are described. 2. Local administration of histamine (0.1-100 microM) failed to affect spontaneous but inhibited 100 mM K(+)-stimulated release of acetylcholine up to about 50%. The H3 receptor agonists (R)-alpha-methylhistamine (RAMH) (0.1-10 microM), imetit (0.01-10 microM) and im...

  3. Autophagic flux data in differentiated C2C12 myotubes following exposure to acetylcholine and caffeine.

    Bloemberg, Darin; Quadrilatero, Joe

    2016-06-01

    The C2C12 line of mouse myoblasts is a useful cell culture model in which to conduct in vitro analyses related to skeletal muscle. Here we present data regarding the autophagic response induced by two chemicals known to influence calcium release and contraction in skeletal muscles and C2C12 cells: acetylcholine and caffeine. More specifically, by concurrently administering acetylcholine or caffeine along with chloroquine to differentiated myotubes for various amounts of time and assessing the protein expression of LC3 and p62, we report data on the relative level of autophagic flux induced by these two calcium- and contraction-regulating chemicals. PMID:27054179

  4. Dermal delivery of drugs using different vesicular carriers: A comparative review

    Saahil Arora

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Many skin diseases are based in the dermal layer of the skin like-acne, alopecia, psoriasis, herpes zoster, etc. Conventional topical formulations have not proved to be effective in managing these conditions because of poor retention in the skin. Some formulations do not penetrate through the stratum corneum and some pass through the skin very quickly. Therefore, there is need to develop a strategy to deliver drugs to the dermis for better management of these conditions. Vesicular systems like liposomes, niosomes, ethosomes and transfersomes have been used by many researchers to localize drugs in the dermal layer and have been fairly successful. Some vesicles were found to be more effective in retaining drug to the skin and some were more effective in transdermal delivery. This article summarizes and compares the work done in the last decade on this topic and provides a conclusion.

  5. Effects of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal (VAM) fungi on the seedling growth of three Pistacia species.

    Caglar, S; Akgun, A

    2006-07-01

    The experiment was undertaken to test the efficiency of inoculation of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal (VAM) fungi on the seedling growth of three Pistacia species used as rootstocks. The stratified Pistacia seeds were inoculated with VAM fungi. The highest rate of inoculated roots was 96.7% in P. khinjuck seedlings with G. clarum and G. etunicatum, 83.3% in P. vera seedlings with G. caledonium and 73.3% in P. terebinthus seedlings with G. caledonium. Mycorrhizal inoculations improved seedling height only in P. terebinthus. Certain mycorrhizal inoculations increased the leaf N, but not P and K contents. Seedlings inoculated with G. caledonium had higher reducing sugar contents. It was concluded that pre-inoculated Pistacia seedlings could have a better growth in the harsh field conditions. PMID:17402238

  6. Phosphorus use efficiency of tomato as influenced by phosphorus and vesicular arbuscular mycorrhizal (VAM) fungi inoculation

    A pot experiment was conducted on tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum L.var. CO3) grown in red non-calcareous soil (Paralythic Ustochrept) to study the effect of different P treatments involving single superphosphate (SSP) and Mussoorie rock phosphate (MRP) added at different levels, viz. 100 and 75 kg P2O5/ha along with and without vesicular arbuscular mycorrhizal (VAM) fungi inoculation. The results revealed that the P application as superphosphate at 100 kg P2O5/ha significantly increased the yield of tomato but the application of VAM fungi did not have any pronounced effect on tomato yield. The 32P studies confirmed the increased uptake of P by the plants at higher level of P application. P content and its uptake by tomato fruit increased with the increasing levels of P application and VAM inoculation. The VAM fungi inoculation was also helpful in increasing the fertilizer use efficiency and also per cent P derived from fertilizer. (author)

  7. Interactions of macrophages with probiotic bacteria lead to increased antiviral response against vesicular stomatitis virus

    Ivec, Martin; Botic, Tanja; Koren, Srecko;

    2007-01-01

    producing chemokines and immunoregulatory cytokines that enable the adaptive immune response to recognize infected cells and perform antiviral effector functions. Probiotics, as a part of the normal gut intestinal flora, are important in supporting a functional yet balanced immune system. Improving our...... understanding of their role in the activation of macrophages and their stimulation of proinflammatory cytokine production in early viral infection was the main goal of this study. Our in vitro model study showed that probiotic bacteria, either from the species Lactobacillus or Bifidobacteria have the ability to...... dehydrogenases activity could be implied as the first indicator of potential inhibitory effects of the probiotics on virus replication. The interactions between probiotic bacteria, macrophages and vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), markedly depended on the bacterial strain studied....

  8. Preparation of vesicular stomatitis virus pseudotype with Chikungunya virus envelope protein.

    Tong, W; Yin, X-X; Lee, B-J; Li, Y-G

    2015-06-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a mosquito-transmitted alphavirus that causes Chikungunya fever (CHIKF) in millions of people mainly in developing countries. CHIKF is characterized by high fever, fatigue, headache, nausea, vomiting, rash, myalgia and severe arthralgia. To date, there is no specific treatment and no licensed vaccine against CHIKV infection. In this study, we developed a safe, efficient and easy neutralization assay of CHIKV based on vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) pseudotype with CHIKV envelope protein and the green fluorescent protein (GFP) or luciferase as reporter gene, which could be used under a reduced safety level. The VSV pseudotype can be applied to the epidemic survey by measuring the expression of GFP or luciferase activity in infected cells. This system can also be used to study the mechanisms of virus entry. PMID:26104337

  9. Experimental vesicular stomatitis virus infection in horses: effect of route of inoculation and virus serotype.

    Howerth, E W; Mead, D G; Mueller, P O; Duncan, L; Murphy, M D; Stallknecht, D E

    2006-11-01

    Horses were inoculated with Vesicular stomatitis New Jersey and Indiana viruses by routes simulating contact and vector transmission. Clinical signs, lesions, antibody development, viral shedding and persistence, and viremia were monitored. Horses were infected with both viruses by all routes as confirmed by seroconversion. Salivation, primary lesions at inoculation sites, and secondary oral lesions were the most common clinical findings. Viral shedding was most often from the oral cavity, followed by the nasal cavity; titers were highest from oral cavity samples. Virus was rarely isolated from the conjunctival sac and never from feces or blood. Development of neutralizing antibody coincided with cessation of lesion development and detection of virus by isolation. Circulating virus-specific IgM, IgG, IgA, and neutralizing antibodies developed in most animals postinoculation (PI) days 6 to 12, depending on the route of inoculation. At postmortem (PI days 12 to 15), lesions were healing, were not vesicular, and did not contain detectable virus by isolation, reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, or immunohistochemistry. Numerous infiltrating lymphocytes and plasma cells suggested that lesion resolution was partially due to local immunity. Detection of viral RNA from tonsil and lymph nodes of head at necropsy suggests that these tissues play a role in the pathogenesis of the disease; molecular techniques targeting these tissues may be useful for confirming infection in resolving stages of disease. The routes of inoculation used in this study reflect the diversity of transmission routes that may occur during outbreaks and can be used to further study contact and vector transmission, vaccine development, and clarify pathogenesis of the disease in horses. PMID:17099151

  10. Potential fossil endoliths in vesicular pillow basalt, Coral Patch Seamount, eastern North Atlantic Ocean.

    Cavalazzi, Barbara; Westall, Frances; Cady, Sherry L; Barbieri, Roberto; Foucher, Frédéric

    2011-09-01

    The chilled rinds of pillow basalt from the Ampère-Coral Patch Seamounts in the eastern North Atlantic were studied as a potential habitat of microbial life. A variety of putative biogenic structures, which include filamentous and spherical microfossil-like structures, were detected in K-phillipsite-filled amygdules within the chilled rinds. The filamentous structures (∼2.5 μm in diameter) occur as K-phillipsite tubules surrounded by an Fe-oxyhydroxide (lepidocrocite) rich membranous structure, whereas the spherical structures (from 4 to 2 μm in diameter) are associated with Ti oxide (anatase) and carbonaceous matter. Several lines of evidence indicate that the microfossil-like structures in the pillow basalt are the fossilized remains of microorganisms. Possible biosignatures include the carbonaceous nature of the spherical structures, their size distributions and morphology, the presence and distribution of native fluorescence, mineralogical and chemical composition, and environmental context. When taken together, the suite of possible biosignatures supports the hypothesis that the fossil-like structures are of biological origin. The vesicular microhabitat of the rock matrix is likely to have hosted a cryptoendolithic microbial community. This study documents a variety of evidence for past microbial life in a hitherto poorly investigated and underestimated microenvironment, as represented by the amygdules in the chilled pillow basalt rinds. This kind of endolithic volcanic habitat would have been common on the early rocky planets in our Solar System, such as Earth and Mars. This study provides a framework for evaluating traces of past life in vesicular pillow basalts, regardless of whether they occur on early Earth or Mars. PMID:21875356

  11. pARIS-htt: an optimised expression platform to study huntingtin reveals functional domains required for vesicular trafficking

    Pardo Raúl

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Huntingtin (htt is a multi-domain protein of 350 kDa that is mutated in Huntington's disease (HD but whose function is yet to be fully understood. This absence of information is due in part to the difficulty of manipulating large DNA fragments by using conventional molecular cloning techniques. Consequently, few studies have addressed the cellular function(s of full-length htt and its dysfunction(s associated with the disease. Results We describe a flexible synthetic vector encoding full-length htt called pARIS-htt (Adaptable, RNAi Insensitive &Synthetic. It includes synthetic cDNA coding for full-length human htt modified so that: 1 it is improved for codon usage, 2 it is insensitive to four different siRNAs allowing gene replacement studies, 3 it contains unique restriction sites (URSs dispersed throughout the entire sequence without modifying the translated amino acid sequence, 4 it contains multiple cloning sites at the N and C-ter ends and 5 it is Gateway compatible. These modifications facilitate mutagenesis, tagging and cloning into diverse expression plasmids. Htt regulates dynein/dynactin-dependent trafficking of vesicles, such as brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF-containing vesicles, and of organelles, including reforming and maintenance of the Golgi near the cell centre. We used tests of these trafficking functions to validate various pARIS-htt constructs. We demonstrated, after silencing of endogenous htt, that full-length htt expressed from pARIS-htt rescues Golgi apparatus reformation following reversible microtubule disruption. A mutant form of htt that contains a 100Q expansion and a htt form devoid of either HAP1 or dynein interaction domains are both unable to rescue loss of endogenous htt. These mutants have also an impaired capacity to promote BDNF vesicular trafficking in neuronal cells. Conclusion We report the validation of a synthetic gene encoding full-length htt protein that will facilitate

  12. Exocrine secretion of epidermal growth factor from Brunner's glands. Stimulation by VIP and acetylcholine

    Poulsen, Steen Seier

    1983-01-01

    Brunner's glands of the duodenum are innervated by cholinergic and VIP-ergic nerves, and the glands have been shown to contain epidermal growth factor (EGF). In this study the effect of VIP and acetylcholine (Ach) on secretion of EGF from Brunner's glands was investigated in the rat. Intravenous ...

  13. Functional Characterization of a Novel Class of Morantel-Sensitive Acetylcholine Receptors in Nematodes.

    Elise Courtot

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Acetylcholine receptors are pentameric ligand-gated channels involved in excitatory neuro-transmission in both vertebrates and invertebrates. In nematodes, they represent major targets for cholinergic agonist or antagonist anthelmintic drugs. Despite the large diversity of acetylcholine-receptor subunit genes present in nematodes, only a few receptor subtypes have been characterized so far. Interestingly, parasitic nematodes affecting human or animal health possess two closely related members of this gene family, acr-26 and acr-27 that are essentially absent in free-living or plant parasitic species. Using the pathogenic parasitic nematode of ruminants, Haemonchus contortus, as a model, we found that Hco-ACR-26 and Hco-ACR-27 are co-expressed in body muscle cells. We demonstrated that co-expression of Hco-ACR-26 and Hco-ACR-27 in Xenopus laevis oocytes led to the functional expression of an acetylcholine-receptor highly sensitive to the anthelmintics morantel and pyrantel. Importantly we also reported that ACR-26 and ACR-27, from the distantly related parasitic nematode of horses, Parascaris equorum, also formed a functional acetylcholine-receptor highly sensitive to these two drugs. In Caenorhabditis elegans, a free-living model nematode, we demonstrated that heterologous expression of the H. contortus and P. equorum receptors drastically increased its sensitivity to morantel and pyrantel, mirroring the pharmacological properties observed in Xenopus oocytes. Our results are the first to describe significant molecular determinants of a novel class of nematode body wall muscle AChR.

  14. Functional Characterization of CCHamide and Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptor Signalling in Drosophila melanogaster

    Ren, Guilin Robin

    mutants created with the CRISP/Cas9 technique showed thatCCHamide-2 is probly an orexigenic peptide and also that is an important factor for larvaldevelopmental timing.In mammals, muscarinic acetylcholine signalling is involved in the signal transmission of theparasympathetic nervous system. However...

  15. Characterization of the positive and negative inotropic effects of acetylcholine in the human myocardium

    X.Y. Du (Xiaoyi); R.G. Schoemaker (Regien); E. Bos (Egbert); P.R. Saxena (Pramod Ranjan)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractIn the human isolated myocardium, acetylcholine (10−9 to 10−3 M) elicited a biphasic inotropic effect (a decrease in the lower and an increase in the higher concentration range) in atrial and a positive inotropic effect in ventricular trabeculae. However, under conditions of raised contr

  16. MUSCARINIC ACETYLCHOLINE RECEPTOR-EXPRESSION IN ASTROCYTES IN THE CORTEX OF YOUNG AND AGED RATS

    VANDERZEE, EA; DEJONG, GI; STROSBERG, AD; LUITEN, PGM

    1993-01-01

    The present report describes the cellular and subcellular distribution pattern of immunoreactivity to M35, a monoclonal antibody raised against purified muscarinic acetylcholine receptor protein, in astrocytes in the cerebral cortex of young and aged rats. Most M35-positive astrocytes were localized

  17. Synthesis and pharmacological evaluation of DHβE analogs as neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor antagonists

    Jepsen, Tue H.; Jensen, Anders A.; Lund, Mads Henrik; Glibstrup, Emil; Kristensen, Jesper Langgaard

    2014-01-01

    Dihydro-β-erythroidine (DHβE) is a member of the Erythrina family of alkaloids and a potent competitive antagonist of the α4β2-subtype of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). Guided by an X-ray structure of DHβE in complex with an ACh binding protein, we detail the design, synthesis, and...

  18. Tying up Nicotine: New Selective Competitive Antagonist of the Neuronal Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors

    Petersen, Ida Nymann; Crestey, François; Jensen, Anders A; Indurthi, Dinesh C; Pedersen, Henrik; Andreasen, Jesper T; Balle, Thomas; Kristensen, Jesper L

    2015-01-01

    Conformational restriction of the pyrrolidine nitrogen in nicotine by the introduction of an ethylene bridge provided a potent and selective antagonist of the α4β2-subtype of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. Resolution by chiral SFC, pharmacological characterization of the two enantiomers...

  19. Distinct neural pathways mediate alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor-dependent activation of the forebrain

    Thomsen, Morten S; Hay-Schmidt, Anders; Hansen, Henrik H; Mikkelsen, Jens D

    2010-01-01

    alpha(7) nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) agonists are candidates for the treatment of cognitive deficits in schizophrenia. Selective alpha(7) nAChR agonists, such as SSR180711, activate neurons in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and nucleus accumbens shell (ACCshell) in rats, regions...

  20. alpha(7) Nicotinic acetylcholine receptor activation prevents behavioral and molecular changes induced by repeated phencyclidine treatment

    Thomsen, Morten Skøtt; Christensen, Ditte Z; Hansen, Henrik H; Redrobe, John P; Mikkelsen, Jens D

    determined in a modified Y-maze test. Polymorphisms in the alpha(7) nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) gene have been linked to schizophrenia. Here we demonstrate that acute administration of the selective alpha(7) nAChR partial agonist SSR180711 dose-dependently reversed the behavioral impairment...

  1. Apolipoprotein E4 reduces evoked hippocampal acetylcholine release in adult mice

    Dolejší, Eva; Liraz, O.; Rudajev, Vladimír; Zimčík, Pavel; Doležal, Vladimír; Michaelson, D. M.

    Roč. 136, č. 3 ( 2016 ), s. 503-509. ISSN 0022-3042 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LH13269 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : acetylcholine release * Alzheimer's disease (AD) * apolipoprotein E4 (apoE4) * hippocampus Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 4.281, year: 2014

  2. Acetylcholine Release in the Hippocampus and Striatum during Place and Response Training

    Pych, Jason C.; Chang, Qing; Colon-Rivera, Cynthia; Haag, Renee; Gold, Paul E.

    2005-01-01

    These experiments examined the release of acetylcholine in the hippocampus and striatum when rats were trained, within single sessions, on place or response versions of food-rewarded mazes. Microdialysis samples of extra-cellular fluid were collected from the hippocampus and striatum at 5-min increments before, during, and after training. These…

  3. Theoretical investigation of interaction between the set of ligands and α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor

    Glukhova, O. E.; Prytkova, T. R.; Shmygin, D. S.

    2016-03-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are neuron receptor proteins that provide a transmission of nerve impulse through the synapses. They are composed of a pentametric assembly of five homologous subunits (5 α7 subunits for α7nAChR, for example), oriented around the central pore. These receptors might be found in the chemical synapses of central and peripheral nervous system, and also in the neuromuscular synapses. Transmembrane domain of the one of such receptors constitutes ion channel. The conductive properties of ion channel strongly depend on the receptor conformation changes in the response of binding with some molecule, f.e. acetylcholine. Investigation of interaction between ligands and acetylcholine receptor is important for drug design. In this work we investigate theoretically the interaction between the set of different ligands (such as vanillin, thymoquinone, etc.) and the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (primarily with subunit of the α7nAChR) by different methods and packages (AutodockVina, GROMACS, KVAZAR, HARLEM, VMD). We calculate interaction energy between different ligands in the subunit using molecular dynamics. On the base of obtained calculation results and using molecular docking we found an optimal location of different ligands in the subunit.

  4. Mechanisms of the inhibition of endplate acetylcholine receptors by antiseptic chlorhexidine (experiments and models)

    Shaihutdinova, A.R.; Nikolsky, E. E.; Vyskočil, František; Skorinkin, A.I.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 380, č. 6 (2009), s. 551-560. ISSN 0028-1298 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA500110905 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : acetylcholine * endplate currents Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 2.631, year: 2009

  5. VISUALIZATION OF CHOLINOCEPTIVE NEURONS IN THE RAT NEOCORTEX - COLOCALIZATION OF MUSCARINIC AND NICOTINIC ACETYLCHOLINE-RECEPTORS

    VANDERZEE, EA; STREEFLAND, C; STROSBERG, AD; SCHRODER, H; LUITEN, PGM

    1992-01-01

    The present investigation analyzes the cellular distribution of muscarinic and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in rat neocortex, by use of monoclonal antibodies raised against purified receptor proteins. The degree of colocalization of both types of receptors was determined by way of immunofluores

  6. Visualization of cholinoceptive neurons in the rat neocortex : colocalization of muscarinic and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors

    Zee, E.A. van der; Streefland, C.; Strosberg, A.D.; Schröder, H.; Luiten, P.G.M.

    1992-01-01

    The present investigation analyzes the cellular distribution of muscarinic and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in rat neocortex, by use of monoclonal antibodies raised against purified receptor proteins. The degree of colocalization of both types of receptors was determined by way of immunofluores

  7. Concomitant release of ventral tegmental acetylcholine and accumbal dopamine by ghrelin in rats.

    Elisabet Jerlhag

    Full Text Available Ghrelin, an orexigenic peptide, regulates energy balance specifically via hypothalamic circuits. Growing evidence suggest that ghrelin increases the incentive value of motivated behaviours via activation of the cholinergic-dopaminergic reward link. It encompasses the cholinergic afferent projection from the laterodorsal tegmental area (LDTg to the dopaminergic cells of the ventral tegmental area (VTA and the mesolimbic dopamine system projecting from the VTA to nucleus accumbens (N.Acc.. Ghrelin receptors (GHS-R1A are expressed in these reward nodes and ghrelin administration into the LDTg increases accumbal dopamine, an effect involving nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in the VTA. The present series of experiments were undertaken directly to test this hypothesis. Here we show that ghrelin, administered peripherally or locally into the LDTg concomitantly increases ventral tegmental acetylcholine as well as accumbal dopamine release. A GHS-R1A antagonist blocks this synchronous neurotransmitter release induced by peripheral ghrelin. In addition, local perfusion of the unselective nicotinic antagonist mecamylamine into the VTA blocks the ability of ghrelin (administered into the LDTg to increase N.Acc.-dopamine, but not VTA-acetylcholine. Collectively our data indicate that ghrelin activates the LDTg causing a release of acetylcholine in the VTA, which in turn activates local nicotinic acetylcholine receptors causing a release of accumbal dopamine. Given that a dysfunction in the cholinergic-dopaminergic reward system is involved in addictive behaviours, including compulsive overeating and alcohol use disorder, and that hyperghrelinemia is associated with such addictive behaviours, ghrelin-responsive circuits may serve as a novel pharmacological target for treatment of alcohol use disorder as well as binge eating.

  8. Development of a reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification assay for the detection of vesicular stomatitis New Jersey virus: Use of rapid molecular assays to differentiate between vesicular disease viruses.

    Fowler, Veronica L; Howson, Emma L A; Madi, Mikidache; Mioulet, Valérie; Caiusi, Chiara; Pauszek, Steven J; Rodriguez, Luis L; King, Donald P

    2016-08-01

    Vesicular stomatitis (VS) is endemic in Central America and northern regions of South America, where sporadic outbreaks in cattle and pigs can cause clinical signs that are similar to foot-and-mouth disease (FMD). There is therefore a pressing need for rapid, sensitive and specific differential diagnostic assays that are suitable for decision making in the field. RT-LAMP assays have been developed for vesicular diseases such as FMD and swine vesicular disease (SVD) but there is currently no RT-LAMP assay that can detect VS virus (VSV), nor are there any multiplex RT-LAMP assays which permit rapid discrimination between these 'look-a-like' diseases in situ. This study describes the development of a novel RT-LAMP assay for the detection of VSV focusing on the New Jersey (VSNJ) serotype, which has caused most of the recent VS cases in the Americas. This RT-LAMP assay was combined in a multiplex format combining molecular lateral-flow devices for the discrimination between FMD and VS. This assay was able to detect representative VSNJV's and the limit of detection of the singleplex and multiplex VSNJV RT-LAMP assays were equivalent to laboratory based real-time RT-PCR assays. A similar multiplex RT-LAMP assay was developed to discriminate between FMDV and SVDV, showing that FMDV, SVDV and VSNJV could be reliably detected within epithelial suspensions without the need for prior RNA extraction, providing an approach that could be used as the basis for a rapid and low cost assay for differentiation of FMD from other vesicular diseases in the field. PMID:27118518

  9. Historia natural del virus de la estomatitis vesicular en zonas enzoóticas de Antioquia

    John Arboleda

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available

    La Estomatitis Vesicular (EV es una enfermedad producida
    por el virus de la Estomatitis Vesicular, serotipos New Jersey (VSV-NJ e Indiana (VSV-IN, afecta bovinos y equinos, porcinos y causa infección natural en humanos, principalmente granjeros, ordeñadores y personal de laboratorio.
    Se caracteriza por producir vesículas en las membranas mucosas
    de la boca (epitelio de la lengua y el paladar, bandas coronarias,
    pezones y tejidos blandos de los cascos; hay pérdida de peso y decrecimiento en la producción de leche. Está clasificada en la Lista A de la Organización Internacional de Epizootias, debido a su gran poder de difusión, a las graves consecuencias socioeconómicas y a las restricciones comerciales. Además, clínicamente la EV es indistinguible de la Fiebre Aftosa (FA (1.
    La enfermedad se presenta por ciclos estacionales; la mayoría
    de ellos ocurre en las épocas de transición de los períodos de lluvias a los de verano y viceversa (2. Estudios serológicos realizados en áreas endémicas han demostrado que VSV-NJ y VSV-IN infectan en forma natural una amplia variedad de animales silvestres, los cuales están posiblemente implicados en la ecozootiología de la EV, bien como hospederos portadores, amplificadores o reservorios. Igualmente, dos especies de artrópodos, Lutzomyia shannoni y Simulium vittatum son infectados naturalmente, replican y transmiten experimentalmente
    el VSV, convirtiéndolos en posibles vectores y/o reservorios.
    Sin embargo, en ningún animal se produce la viremia necesaria para infectar los artrópodos hematófagos. El reservorio natural nunca ha sido encontrado entre los animales domésticos y silvestres investigados (3.

    El objetivo es identificar los factores ecológicos (cobertura
    vegetal, temperatura promedio, pluviosidad y humedad relativa, los vectores artrópodos y los mamíferos reservorios asociados con el antenimiento y transmisión de la VSV en

  10. Chronic nicotine modifies skeletal muscle Na,K-ATPase activity through its interaction with the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor and phospholemman.

    Alexander V Chibalin

    Full Text Available Our previous finding that the muscle nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR and the Na,K-ATPase interact as a regulatory complex to modulate Na,K-ATPase activity suggested that chronic, circulating nicotine may alter this interaction, with long-term changes in the membrane potential. To test this hypothesis, we chronically exposed rats to nicotine delivered orally for 21-31 days. Chronic nicotine produced a steady membrane depolarization of ∼3 mV in the diaphragm muscle, which resulted from a net change in electrogenic transport by the Na,K-ATPase α2 and α1 isoforms. Electrogenic transport by the α2 isoform increased (+1.8 mV while the activity of the α1 isoform decreased (-4.4 mV. Protein expression of Na,K-ATPase α1 or α2 isoforms and the nAChR did not change; however, the content of α2 subunit in the plasma membrane decreased by 25%, indicating that its stimulated electrogenic transport is due to an increase in specific activity. The physical association between the nAChR, the Na,K-ATPase α1 or α2 subunits, and the regulatory subunit of the Na,K-ATPase, phospholemman (PLM, measured by co-immuno precipitation, was stable and unchanged. Chronic nicotine treatment activated PKCα/β2 and PKCδ and was accompanied by parallel increases in PLM phosphorylation at Ser(63 and Ser(68. Collectively, these results demonstrate that nicotine at chronic doses, acting through the nAChR-Na,K-ATPase complex, is able to modulate Na,K-ATPase activity in an isoform-specific manner and that the regulatory range includes both stimulation and inhibition of enzyme activity. Cholinergic modulation of Na,K-ATPase activity is achieved, in part, through activation of PKC and phosphorylation of PLM.

  11. Multi-vesicular pulmonary hydatid cyst, the potent underestimated factor in the formation of daughter cysts of pulmonary hydatid disease

    Mohsen Sokouti

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary multi-vesicular hydatid disease (HD with Echinococcus granulosus is rare. A 28-year-old woman presented to our center with cough and respiratory distress. Chest x-ray and computerized tomography scan revealed bilateral giant cysts with water-lily sign (ruptured hydatid cysts. The left cyst was in vicinity of heart. With thoracotomy cysts of both lungs were removed. Thousands of translucent, homogenized small daughter cysts were discovered from the left side cyst. Pathologic examinations revealed the ruptured hydatid cysts of both lungs with daughter cysts on the left lung cyst. To best of our knowledge probably this is the first report of multi-vesicular HD in lung. We suppose that the heart pulsation was effective in the formation of daughter cysts.

  12. Multi-vesicular pulmonary hydatid cyst, the potent underestimated factor in the formation of daughter cysts of pulmonary hydatid disease.

    Sokouti, Mohsen; Sokouti, Babak; Shokouhi, Behrooz; Rahimi-Rad, Mohammad Hossein

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary multi-vesicular hydatid disease (HD) with Echinococcus granulosus is rare. A 28-year-old woman presented to our center with cough and respiratory distress. Chest x-ray and computerized tomography scan revealed bilateral giant cysts with water-lily sign (ruptured hydatid cysts). The left cyst was in vicinity of heart. With thoracotomy cysts of both lungs were removed. Thousands of translucent, homogenized small daughter cysts were discovered from the left side cyst. Pathologic examinations revealed the ruptured hydatid cysts of both lungs with daughter cysts on the left lung cyst. To best of our knowledge probably this is the first report of multi-vesicular HD in lung. We suppose that the heart pulsation was effective in the formation of daughter cysts. PMID:26180389

  13. Calmodulin as a major calcium buffer shaping vesicular release and short-term synaptic plasticity: facilitation through buffer dislocation

    Yulia Timofeeva

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Action potential-dependent release of synaptic vesicles and short-term synaptic plasticity are dynamically regulated by the endogenous Ca2+ buffers that shape [Ca2+] profiles within a presynaptic bouton. Calmodulin is one of the most abundant presynaptic proteins and it binds Ca2+ faster than any other characterized endogenous neuronal Ca2+ buffer. Direct effects of calmodulin on fast presynaptic Ca2+ dynamics and vesicular release however have not been studied in detail. Using experimentally constrained three-dimensional diffusion modeling of Ca2+ influx–exocytosis coupling at small excitatory synapses we show that, at physiologically relevant concentrations, Ca2+ buffering by calmodulin plays a dominant role in inhibiting vesicular release and in modulating short-term synaptic plasticity. We also propose a novel and potentially powerful mechanism for short-term facilitation based on Ca2+-dependent dynamic dislocation of calmodulin molecules from the plasma membrane within the active zone.

  14. Infective viruses produced from full-length complementary DNA of swine vesicular disease viruses HK/70 strain

    ZHENG Haixue; FENG Xia; YIN Shuanghui; GUO Jianhong; CONG Guozheng; LIU Zaixin; CHANG Huiyun; MA Junwu; XIE Qingge; LIU Xiangtao; SHANG Youjun; WU Jinyan; BAI Xingwen; JIN Ye; SUN Shiqi; GUO Huichen; TIAN Hong

    2006-01-01

    The full-length cDNA clone of swine vesicular disease virus HK/70 strain named pSVOK12 was constructed in order to study the antigenicity, replication, maturation and pathogenicity of swine vesicular disease virus. In vitro transcription RNA from pSVOK12 transfected IBRS-2 cells and the recovered virus RNA were isolated and sequenced, then indirect hemagglutination test, indirect immunofluorescence assays, eleectron microscope test, 50% tissue culture infecting dose (TCID50) assays and mouse virulence studies were performed to study the antigenicity and virulence of the recovered virus. The result showed that the infectious clones we obtained and the virus derived from pSVOK12 had the same biological properties as the parental strain HK/70. The full-length infectious cDNA clone, pSVOK12, will be very useful in studies of the antigenicity, virulence, pathogenesis, maturation and replication of SVDV.

  15. Effects of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizae on survival and growth of perennial grasses in lignite overburden in Texas

    Call, C.A.; Davies, F.T.

    1988-12-01

    Seedlings of sideoats grama (Bouteloua curtipendula), Indiangrass (Sorghastrum nutans), and kleingrass (Panicum coloratum) were inoculated with vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal (VAM) fungi (Glomus fasciculatum and Gigaspora margarita) in a containerized system and transplanted into lignite overburden in the Post Oak Savannah region of Texas, U.S.A. After three growing seasons without cultural inputs, plants inoculated with VAM fungi had greater survival percentages, basal diameters, and above-ground biomass than noninoculated plants. Inoculated plants had higher levels of nitrogen and phosphorus in above-ground biomass than noninoculated plants. Root colonization percentages of inoculated plants remained fairly stable while noninoculated plants showed low levels of colonization over the 3-year study period. Vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizae enhanced the survival and growth of the 3 grass species by making effective use of limited resources in the lignite overburden. 31 refs., 3 tabs.

  16. α4 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor modulated by galantamine on nigrostriatal terminals regulates dopamine receptor-mediated rotational behavior.

    Inden, Masatoshi; Takata, Kazuyuki; Yanagisawa, Daijiro; Ashihara, Eishi; Tooyama, Ikuo; Shimohama, Shun; Kitamura, Yoshihisa

    2016-03-01

    Galantamine, an acetylcholine esterase (AChE) inhibitor used to treat dementia symptoms, also acts as an allosteric potentiating ligand (APL) at nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). This study was designed to evaluate the allosteric effect of galantamine on nAChR regulation of nigrostrial dopaminergic neuronal function in the hemiparkinsonian rat model established by unilateral nigral 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) injection. Methamphetamine, a dopamine releaser, induced ipsilateral rotation, whereas dopamine agonists apomorphine (a non-selective dopamine receptor agonist), SKF38393 (a selective dopamine D1 receptor agonist), and quinpirole (a selective dopamine D2 receptor agonist) induced contralateral rotation. When 6-OHDA-injected rats were co-treated with nomifensine, a dopamine transporter inhibitor, a more pronounced and a remarkable effect of nicotine and galantamine was observed. Under these conditions, the combination of nomifensine with nicotine or galantamine induced the ipsilateral rotation similar to the methamphetamine-induced rotational behavior, indicating that nicotine and galantamine also induce dopamine release from striatal terminals. Both nicotine- and galantamine-induced rotations were significantly blocked by flupenthixol (an antagonist of both D1 and D2 dopamine receptors) and mecamylamine (an antagonist of nAChRs), suggesting that galantamine modulation of nAChRs on striatal dopaminergic terminals regulates dopamine receptor-mediated movement. Immunohistochemical staining showed that α4 nAChRs were highly expressed on striatal dopaminergic terminals, while no α7 nAChRs were detected. Pretreatment with the α4 nAChR antagonist dihydroxy-β-erythroidine significantly inhibited nicotine- and galantamine-induced rotational behaviors, whereas pretreatment with the α7 nAChR antagonist methyllycaconitine was ineffective. Moreover, the α4 nAChR agonist ABT-418 induced ipsilateral rotation, while the α7 nAChR agonist PNU282987 had no

  17. Transdermal delivery of ethosomes as a novel vesicular carrier for paroxetine hydrochloride: In vitro evaluation and In vivo study

    PATHAN, Inayat Bashir

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to develop, characterisation of stable ethosomal formulation as a carrier for transdermal delivery of paroxetine hydrochloride. To prepare this ethosome different concentration of soya lecithin and ethanol was taken. Vesicular size, polydispersity index, zeta potential, entrapment effiency was determined by photon correlation spectroscopy and ultracentrifugation techniques. The in vitro permeation study across human cadaver skin was done. Stability study was do...

  18. Multi-vesicular pulmonary hydatid cyst, the potent underestimated factor in the formation of daughter cysts of pulmonary hydatid disease

    Mohsen Sokouti; Babak Sokouti; Behrooz Shokouhi; Mohammad Hossein Rahimi-Rad

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary multi-vesicular hydatid disease (HD) with Echinococcus granulosus is rare. A 28-year-old woman presented to our center with cough and respiratory distress. Chest x-ray and computerized tomography scan revealed bilateral giant cysts with water-lily sign (ruptured hydatid cysts). The left cyst was in vicinity of heart. With thoracotomy cysts of both lungs were removed. Thousands of translucent, homogenized small daughter cysts were discovered from the left side cyst. Pathologic examin...

  19. Calmodulin as a major calcium buffer shaping vesicular release and short-term synaptic plasticity: facilitation through buffer dislocation

    Yulia Timofeeva; Kirill Volynski

    2015-01-01

    Action potential-dependent release of synaptic vesicles and short-term synaptic plasticity are dynamically regulated by the endogenous Ca(2+) buffers that shape [Ca(2+)] profiles within a presynaptic bouton. Calmodulin is one of the most abundant presynaptic proteins and it binds Ca(2+) faster than any other characterized endogenous neuronal Ca(2+) buffer. Direct effects of calmodulin on fast presynaptic Ca(2+) dynamics and vesicular release however have not been studied in detail. Using expe...

  20. Effects of chloroquine and cytochalasin B on the infection of cells by Sindbis virus and vesicular stomatitis virus.

    Coombs, K; Mann, E; Edwards, J; Brown, D T

    1981-01-01

    The effects of cytochalasin B and chloroquine on the process of endocytosis of Sindbis virus particles and polystyrene spheres were determined by electron microscopy. The effects of these agents on the process of infection (attachment, penetration, and uncoating) of BHK-21 cells by Sindbis virus and vesicular stomatitis virus were also determined. Cytochalasin B completely blocked ingestion of Sindbis virus particles or latex spheres by BHK cells but had no effect on the ability of Sindbis vi...

  1. Mapping regions of the matrix protein of vesicular stomatitis virus which bind to ribonucleocapsids, liposomes, and monoclonal antibodies.

    Ogden, J R; Pal, R; Wagner, R R

    1986-01-01

    The matrix (M) protein of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) appears to function as a bridge between the ribonucleocapsid (RNP) core and the envelope in assembly of the virion. Two such properties would necessitate at least one site for interaction with the nucleocapsid and one with the envelope. In this study M protein was found to mediate the in vitro binding to RNP cores of phospholipid vesicles, representing membrane structures. The M protein could bind initially to either the vesicles or t...

  2. The Leishmania donovani lipophosphoglycan excludes the vesicular proton-ATPase from phagosomes by impairing the recruitment of synaptotagmin V.

    Vinet, Adrien F.; Mitsunori Fukuda; Turco, Salvatore J.; Albert Descoteaux

    2009-01-01

    We recently showed that the exocytosis regulator Synaptotagmin (Syt) V is recruited to the nascent phagosome and remains associated throughout the maturation process. In this study, we investigated the possibility that Syt V plays a role in regulating interactions between the phagosome and the endocytic organelles. Silencing of Syt V by RNA interference revealed that Syt V contributes to phagolysosome biogenesis by regulating the acquisition of cathepsin D and the vesicular proton-ATPase. In ...

  3. Recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus vaccine vectors expressing filovirus glycoproteins lack neurovirulence in nonhuman primates.

    Chad E Mire

    Full Text Available The filoviruses, Marburg virus and Ebola virus, cause severe hemorrhagic fever with high mortality in humans and nonhuman primates. Among the most promising filovirus vaccines under development is a system based on recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (rVSV that expresses an individual filovirus glycoprotein (GP in place of the VSV glycoprotein (G. The main concern with all replication-competent vaccines, including the rVSV filovirus GP vectors, is their safety. To address this concern, we performed a neurovirulence study using 21 cynomolgus macaques where the vaccines were administered intrathalamically. Seven animals received a rVSV vector expressing the Zaire ebolavirus (ZEBOV GP; seven animals received a rVSV vector expressing the Lake Victoria marburgvirus (MARV GP; three animals received rVSV-wild type (wt vector, and four animals received vehicle control. Two of three animals given rVSV-wt showed severe neurological symptoms whereas animals receiving vehicle control, rVSV-ZEBOV-GP, or rVSV-MARV-GP did not develop these symptoms. Histological analysis revealed major lesions in neural tissues of all three rVSV-wt animals; however, no significant lesions were observed in any animals from the filovirus vaccine or vehicle control groups. These data strongly suggest that rVSV filovirus GP vaccine vectors lack the neurovirulence properties associated with the rVSV-wt parent vector and support their further development as a vaccine platform for human use.

  4. Foot & Mouth Disease & Ulcerative/Vesicular Rule-outs: Challenges Encountered in Recent Outbreaks

    Hullinger, P

    2008-01-28

    development and subsequent rupturing of vesicles at the coronary band and in the oral cavity. Vesicles and ulcerations can also occur on the mammary gland. Recovery in adult animals usually occurs in 8-15 days. Clinical signs for most serotypes are less dramatic in sheep and goats. Swine can develop very severe coronary band lesions and high mortality in piglets has been observed. One of the challenges of diagnosing FMD is that it may be clinically similar to several other vesicular or ulcerative diseases. FMD is clinically indistinguishable from Vesicular stomatitis, Swine vesicular disease and Vesicular exanthema of swine. It may also resemble Bovine viral diarrhea, Mucosal disease, Infectious bovine rhinotracheitis, Bluetongue, Bovine papular stomatitis, Bovine mammillitis and Rinderpest.

  5. N-terminal of L protein of vesicular stomatitis virus contains a new signal sequence

    NIE Yuchun; KE Yeyan; WANG Zai; YU Xiang; DENG Hongkui; DING Mingxiao

    2003-01-01

    The L protein (241 kD) of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) is the mostimportant subunit of the replication complex. The existence of specific localization signal in the L protein was investigated by making recombinant constructs expressing truncated mutants of the L protein fused to green fluorescent protein(GFP) in transient transfection assays. The chimeric genes encoding varied N-terminal of L and GFP gene were put under the control of T7 promoter or CMV promoter. The fusion proteins were transiently expressed in BHK-21, COS-7, CHO or Hep G2 cells. When more than 120 residues were deleted or only 96 residues were kepton the N-terminal, the fusion proteins were shown to be distributed throughout the cells, cytoplasm and nucleus under the confocal microscope. However, other chimeric proteins with 120 or more amino acids were dotted and distributed in theperinuclear regions. And the fusion protein with 96-120 aa has the similar distribution. A thirteen-residue peptide QGYSFLHEVDKEA (108-120) was identified as localization signal, whose function would be absolutely distributed with the deficiency of D or V. Our results show that there is an independent localizing signal in N-terminal domain of L protein of VSV and this functional signal is conserved in different cell lines.

  6. Interaction of Vesicular-Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi with Erosion in an Oxisol †

    Habte, M.; Fox, R. L.; Aziz, T.; El-Swaify, S. A.

    1988-01-01

    The development of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal (VAM) symbiosis was monitored in Leucaena leucocephala grown in an Oxisol subjected to incremental simulated erosion. The density of VAM infective propagules in the soil diminished as the level of simulated erosion (removal of surface soil) was increased from 0 to 50 cm. The level of infection on L. leucocephala roots observed at harvest was not significantly influenced by simulated erosion unless removal of surface soil exceeded 25 cm. Inoculation of this soil and the uneroded soil with Glomus aggregatum enhanced the early onset of infection but did not significantly influence the level of infection observed at the time of harvest. Simulated erosion in excess of 7.5 cm of surface soil removal significantly delayed the development of VAM effectiveness monitored in terms of the P status of L. leucocephala subleaflets and also curtailed the level of maximum effectiveness observed. Decreases in VAM effectiveness were significantly correlated with decreases in soil chemical constituents. However, VAM effectiveness in a soil subjected to 30 cm of surface soil removal was not restored to a significant extent unless the soil was amended with P, even though other nutrients were restored to sufficiency levels. Our results demonstrate that the development of VAM effectiveness is the phase of the VAM symbiosis that is most adversely influenced by simulated erosion and that this effect appears to be caused primarily by insufficient P in the soil solution. PMID:16347615

  7. PEGylation of a Vesicular Stomatitis Virus G Pseudotyped Lentivirus Vector Prevents Inactivation in Serum

    Croyle, Maria A.; Callahan, Shellie M.; Auricchio, Alberto; Schumer, Gregg; Linse, Klause D.; Wilson, James M.; Brunner, Lane J.; Kobinger, Gary P.

    2004-01-01

    One disadvantage of vesicular stomatitis virus G (VSV-G) pseudotyped lentivirus vectors for clinical application is inactivation of the vector by human serum complement. To prevent this, monomethoxypoly(ethylene) glycol was conjugated to a VSV-G-human immunodeficiency virus vector expressing Escherichia coli beta-galactosidase. The modification did not affect transduction efficiency in vitro and protected the vector from inactivation in complement-active human and mouse sera. Blood from mice dosed intravenously with either the unmodified or the PEGylated virus particles was assayed for active vector by a limiting-dilution assay to evaluate transduction efficiency and for p24, an indicator of the total number of virus particles present. PEGylation extended the circulation half-life of active vector by a factor of 5 and reduced the rate of vector inactivation in the serum by a factor of 1,000. Pharmacokinetic profiles for the total number of virus particles present in the circulation were unaffected by PEGylation. Modification of the vector with poly(ethylene) glycol significantly enhanced transduction efficiency in the bone marrow and in the spleen 14 days after systemic administration of the virus. These results, in concert with the pharmacokinetic profiles, indicate that PEGylation does protect the virus from inactivation in the serum and, as a result, improves the transduction efficiency of VSV-G pseudotyped lentivirus vectors in susceptible organs in vivo. PMID:14694122

  8. Anterograde or Retrograde Transsynaptic Circuit Tracing in Vertebrates with Vesicular Stomatitis Virus Vectors.

    Beier, Kevin T; Mundell, Nathan A; Pan, Y Albert; Cepko, Constance L

    2016-01-01

    Viruses have been used as transsynaptic tracers, allowing one to map the inputs and outputs of neuronal populations, due to their ability to replicate in neurons and transmit in vivo only across synaptically connected cells. To date, their use has been largely restricted to mammals. In order to explore the use of such viruses in an expanded host range, we tested the transsynaptic tracing ability of recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (rVSV) vectors in a variety of organisms. Successful infection and gene expression were achieved in a wide range of organisms, including vertebrate and invertebrate model organisms. Moreover, rVSV enabled transsynaptic tracing of neural circuitry in predictable directions dictated by the viral envelope glycoprotein (G), derived from either VSV or rabies virus (RABV). Anterograde and retrograde labeling, from initial infection and/or viral replication and transmission, was observed in Old and New World monkeys, seahorses, jellyfish, zebrafish, chickens, and mice. These vectors are widely applicable for gene delivery, afferent tract tracing, and/or directional connectivity mapping. Here, we detail the use of these vectors and provide protocols for propagating virus, changing the surface glycoprotein, and infecting multiple organisms using several injection strategies. PMID:26729030

  9. Vesicular stomatitis virus polymerase's strong affinity to its template suggests exotic transcription models.

    Tang, Xiaolin; Bendjennat, Mourad; Saffarian, Saveez

    2014-12-01

    Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) is the prototype for negative sense non segmented (NNS) RNA viruses which include potent human and animal pathogens such as Rabies, Ebola and measles. The polymerases of NNS RNA viruses only initiate transcription at or near the 3' end of their genome template. We measured the dissociation constant of VSV polymerases from their whole genome template to be 20 pM. Given this low dissociation constant, initiation and sustainability of transcription becomes nontrivial. To explore possible mechanisms, we simulated the first hour of transcription using Monte Carlo methods and show that a one-time initial dissociation of all polymerases during entry is not sufficient to sustain transcription. We further show that efficient transcription requires a sliding mechanism for non-transcribing polymerases and can be realized with different polymerase-polymerase interactions and distinct template topologies. In conclusion, we highlight a model in which collisions between transcribing and sliding non-transcribing polymerases result in release of the non-transcribing polymerases allowing for redistribution of polymerases between separate templates during transcription and suggest specific experiments to further test these mechanisms. PMID:25501005

  10. Structure of the L Protein of Vesicular Stomatitis Virus from Electron Cryomicroscopy.

    Liang, Bo; Li, Zongli; Jenni, Simon; Rahmeh, Amal A; Morin, Benjamin M; Grant, Timothy; Grigorieff, Nikolaus; Harrison, Stephen C; Whelan, Sean P J

    2015-07-16

    The large (L) proteins of non-segmented, negative-strand RNA viruses, a group that includes Ebola and rabies viruses, catalyze RNA-dependent RNA polymerization with viral ribonucleoprotein as template, a non-canonical sequence of capping and methylation reactions, and polyadenylation of viral messages. We have determined by electron cryomicroscopy the structure of the vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) L protein. The density map, at a resolution of 3.8 Å, has led to an atomic model for nearly all of the 2109-residue polypeptide chain, which comprises three enzymatic domains (RNA-dependent RNA polymerase [RdRp], polyribonucleotidyl transferase [PRNTase], and methyltransferase) and two structural domains. The RdRp resembles the corresponding enzymatic regions of dsRNA virus polymerases and influenza virus polymerase. A loop from the PRNTase (capping) domain projects into the catalytic site of the RdRp, where it appears to have the role of a priming loop and to couple product elongation to large-scale conformational changes in L. PMID:26144317

  11. Occurrence of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizae in mixed overburden mine spoils of Texas

    Mott, J.B.; Zuberer, D.A.

    1987-07-01

    Presently in east Texas, lignite surface mines are reclaimed and revegetated using mixed overburden materials which are equivalent to or better in physical-chemical properties than the poor topsoils removed during mining. Little information is available regarding the biological characteristics of levelled mixed overburden and the re-establishment of endomycorrhizal associations on revegetated mixed overburden sites. Therefore, the authors investigated the occurrence of infection of coastal bermudagrass (Cynodon dactylon), planted vegetatively on reclamation sites (1-10 years post-mining), with vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal (VAM) fungi. Numbers of spores were also monitored. For comparison, infection of coastal bermudagrass and spore numbers were determined for an unmined old field succession on soil typical of the region. VAM infection, measured as a percentage of root length infected or as a percentage of root segments exhibiting infection, returned to pre-mining levels by 3-7 years after disturbance. Intensity of infection was not altered by disturbance, age of reclaimed site, or season. Significantly greater numbers of spores (ca. 10-fold) were observed in the unmined soil and no differences were found between numbers of spores from variously aged mine spoil sites. 35 refs., 3 tabs.

  12. Curcumin and Boswellia serrata gum resin extract inhibit chikungunya and vesicular stomatitis virus infections in vitro.

    von Rhein, Christine; Weidner, Tatjana; Henß, Lisa; Martin, Judith; Weber, Christopher; Sliva, Katja; Schnierle, Barbara S

    2016-01-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a mosquito-transmitted alphavirus that causes chikungunya fever and has infected millions of people mainly in developing countries. The associated disease is characterized by rash, high fever, and severe arthritis that can persist for years. CHIKV has adapted to Aedes albopictus, which also inhabits temperate regions including Europe and the United States of America. CHIKV has recently caused large outbreaks in Latin America. No treatment or licensed CHIKV vaccine exists. Traditional medicines are known to have anti-viral effects; therefore, we examined whether curcumin or Boswellia serrata gum resin extract have antiviral activity against CHIKV. Both compounds blocked entry of CHIKV Env-pseudotyped lentiviral vectors and inhibited CHIKV infection in vitro. In addition, vesicular stomatitis virus vector particles and viral infections were also inhibited to the same extent, indicating a broad antiviral activity. Although the bioavailability of these compounds is rather poor, they might be used as a lead structure to develop more effective antiviral drugs or might be used topically to prevent CHIKV spread in the skin after mosquito bites. PMID:26611396

  13. Different effect of proteasome inhibition on vesicular stomatitis virus and poliovirus replication.

    Nickolay Neznanov

    Full Text Available Proteasome activity is an important part of viral replication. In this study, we examined the effect of proteasome inhibitors on the replication of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV and poliovirus. We found that the proteasome inhibitors significantly suppressed VSV protein synthesis, virus accumulation, and protected infected cells from toxic effect of VSV replication. In contrast, poliovirus replication was delayed, but not diminished in the presence of the proteasome inhibitors MG132 and Bortezomib. We also found that inhibition of proteasomes stimulated stress-related processes, such as accumulation of chaperone hsp70, phosphorylation of eIF2alpha, and overall inhibition of translation. VSV replication was sensitive to this stress with significant decline in replication process. Poliovirus growth was less sensitive with only delay in replication. Inhibition of proteasome activity suppressed cellular and VSV protein synthesis, but did not reduce poliovirus protein synthesis. Protein kinase GCN2 supported the ability of proteasome inhibitors to attenuate general translation and to suppress VSV replication. We propose that different mechanisms of translational initiation by VSV and poliovirus determine their sensitivity to stress induced by the inhibition of proteasomes. To our knowledge, this is the first study that connects the effect of stress induced by proteasome inhibition with the efficiency of viral infection.

  14. A plausible mechanism of biosorption in dual symbioses by vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal in plants.

    Azmat, Rafia; Hamid, Neelofer

    2015-03-01

    Dual symbioses of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal (VAM) fungi with growth of Momordica charantia were elucidated in terms of plausible mechanism of biosorption in this article. The experiment was conducted in green house and mixed inoculum of the VAM fungi was used in the three replicates. Results demonstrated that the starch contents were the main source of C for the VAM to builds their hyphae. The increased plant height and leaves surface area were explained in relation with an increase in the photosynthetic rates to produce rapid sugar contents for the survival of plants. A decreased in protein, and amino acid contents and increased proline and protease activity in VAM plants suggested that these contents were the main bio-indicators of the plants under biotic stress. The decline in protein may be due to the degradation of these contents, which later on converted into dextrose where it can easily be absorbed by for the period of symbioses. A mechanism of C chemisorption in relation with physiology and morphology of plant was discussed. PMID:25730809

  15. Neonatal Mortality, Vesicular Lesions and Lameness Associated with Senecavirus A in a U.S. Sow Farm.

    Canning, P; Canon, A; Bates, J L; Gerardy, K; Linhares, D C L; Piñeyro, P E; Schwartz, K J; Yoon, K J; Rademacher, C J; Holtkamp, D; Karriker, L

    2016-08-01

    A 300-sow farrow-to-finish swine operation in the United States experienced a sudden and severe increase in mortality in neonatal piglets with high morbidity followed by vesicular lesions on the snout and feet of adult females and males. Affected live piglets were submitted for diagnostic investigation. Samples tested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) negative for foot-and-mouth disease virus, porcine delta coronavirus, porcine epidemic diarrhoea virus, porcine rotavirus types A, B and C, transmissible gastroenteritis virus, and porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus. Senecavirus A (SV-A) formerly known as Seneca Valley virus was detected by real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (rRT-PCR) from serum, skin and faeces of piglets and from serum and faeces of sows. SV-A was isolated in cell culture from piglet samples. SV-A VP1 gene region sequencing from piglet tissues was also successful. A biosecurity and disease entry evaluation was conducted and identified potential biosecurity risks factors for the entry of new pathogens into the operation. This is the first case report in the United States associating SV-A with a clinical course of severe but transient neonatal morbidity and mortality followed by vesicular lesions in breeding stock animals. Veterinarians and animal caretakers must remain vigilant for vesicular foreign animal diseases and report suspicious clinical signs and lesions to state animal health authorities for diagnostic testing and further investigation. PMID:27213868

  16. Pharmacological and biochemical characterization of the D-1 dopamine receptor mediating acetylcholine release in rabbit retina

    Hensler, J.G.; Cotterell, D.J.; Dubocovich, M.L.

    1987-12-01

    Superfusion with dopamine (0.1 microM-10 mM) evokes calcium-dependent (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine release from rabbit retina labeled in vitro with (/sup 3/H)choline. This effect is antagonized by the D-1 dopamine receptor antagonist SCH 23390. Activation or blockade of D-2 dopamine, alpha-2 or beta receptors did not stimulate or attenuate the release of (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine from rabbit retina. Dopamine receptor agonists evoke the release of (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine with the following order of potency: apomorphine less than or equal to SKF(R)82526 < SKF 85174 < SKF(R)38393 less than or equal to pergolide less than or equal to dopamine (EC50 = 4.5 microM) < SKF(S)82526 less than or equal to SKF(S)38393. Dopamine receptor antagonists inhibited the dopamine-evoked release of (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine: SCH 23390 (IC50 = 1 nM) < (+)-butaclamol less than or equal to cis-flupenthixol < fluphenazine < perphenazine < trans-flupenthixol < R-sulpiride. The potencies of dopamine receptor agonists and antagonists at the dopamine receptor mediating (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine release is characteristic of the D-1 dopamine receptor. These potencies were correlated with the potencies of dopamine receptor agonists and antagonists at the D-1 dopamine receptor in rabbit retina as labeled by (/sup 3/H)SCH 23390, or as determined by adenylate cyclase activity. (/sup 3/H)SCH 23390 binding in rabbit retinal membranes was stable, saturable and reversible. Scatchard analysis of (/sup 3/H)SCH 23390 saturation data revealed a single high affinity binding site (Kd = 0.175 +/- 0.002 nM) with a maximum binding of 482 +/- 12 fmol/mg of protein. The potencies of dopamine receptor agonists to stimulate (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine release were correlated with their potencies to stimulate adenylate cyclase (r = 0.784, P less than .05, n = 7) and with their affinities at (/sup 3/H)SCH 23390 binding sites (r = 0.755, P < .05, n = 8).

  17. Vesicular-arbuscular-/ecto-mycorrhiza succession in seedlings of. Eucalyptus spp. Sucessão de micorrizas vesicular-arbuscular e ectomicorrizas em mudas de Eucalyptus spp.

    Vera Lúcia dos Santos

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available The occurrence of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizae (AM and ectomycorrhizae (ECM in the same root system was observed when species of Eucalyptus urophylla S.T. Blake, E. citriodora Hook f., E. grandis W. Hill ex Maiden, E. cloeziana F. Muell. and E. camaldulensis Dehnh were simultaneously inoculated with Glomus etunicatum Becker & Gederman and Pisolithus tinctorius (Per. Cocker & Couch, isolate Pt 90A. The succession between the two fungi was observed. In general ectomycorrhizal colonization increased followed by a decrease in AM. Pisolithus tinctorius was favored in simultaneous inoculation with G. etunicatum, and the positive effect of the simultaneous inoculation of both fungi in the percent colonization by the AM fungus occurred up to 60 days after inoculation. After 120 days, colonization of roots by G. etunicatum decreased in the presence of P. tinctorius. When inoculated simultaneously, the proportion of AM and ECM varied with evaluation time, while the combined percentage of mycorrhizal roots approached the maximum and remained more or less constant after 60 days, suggesting that there could be competition between the fungi for limiting substrate. The maximum percent mycorrhizal colonization varied with Eucalyptus species and the highest value was observed for E. camaldulensis, followed in order by E. citriodora, E. urophylla, E. grandis and E. cloeziana.A ocorrência de micorrizas arbusculares (AM e ectomicorrizas (ECM no mesmo sistema radicular foi observada quando Eucalyptus urophylla S.T. Blake, E. citriodora Hook F., E. grandis W. Hill ex Maiden, E. cloeziana F. Muell e E. camaldulensis Dehnh foram inoculadas simultaneamente com Glomus etunicatum Becker & Gederman and Pisolithus tinctorius (Per. Cocker & Couch. A sucessão entre os dois fungos foi observada. De modo geral, o aumento da colonização ECM foi acompanhado de um decréscimo em AM. A inoculação simultânea resultou em percentagens de colonização diferenciadas das

  18. Skin penetration and deposition of carboxyfluorescein and temoporfin from different lipid vesicular systems: In vitro study with finite and infinite dosage application.

    Chen, Ming; Liu, Xiangli; Fahr, Alfred

    2011-04-15

    The aim of the present research is to evaluate the influence of different lipid vesicular systems as well as the effect of application mode on skin penetration and deposition behaviors of carboxyfluorescein (hydrophilic model drug) and temoporfin (lipophilic model drug). All of the lipid vesicular systems, including conventional liposomes, invasomes and ethosomes, were prepared by film hydration method and characterized for particle size distribution, ζ-potential, vesicular shape and surface morphology, in vitro human skin penetration and skin deposition. Dynamic light scattering (DLS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) defined that all of lipid vesicles had almost spherical structures with low polydispersity (PDI ethosomes and invasomes, compared with non-vesicular systems, can significantly improve the delivery of hydrophilic drug such as carboxyfluorescein into skin deep layers or across the skin. While in the case of mTHPC with finite and infinite dose application, most of drug accumulation was observed in the skin superficial layer for both lipid vesicular systems and non-vesicular systems. The results also revealed that the factors influencing the drug skin distribution concern the physicochemical characteristics of the drug, the choice of the vehicle formulation and the application mode applied. PMID:21316430

  19. Anti-acetylcholine receptor antibody titres in the sera of myasthenia patients treated with plasma exchange combined with immunosuppressive therapy.

    Carter, B.; Harrison, R.; Lunt, G G; Behan, P O; Simpson, J. A.

    1980-01-01

    Anti-acetylcholine receptor antibody titres have been monitored in the sera of 19 myasthenic patients treated with plasma exchange combined with a three month period of immunosuppressive therapy. In general the post-exchange titres stabilised at below pre-exchange levels for prolonged periods which were associated with clinical improvement. In seven instances recurrence of symptoms occurred and in six of these cases relapse was shown to be associated with a rise in anti-acetylcholine receptor...

  20. Modulatory effect of neuropeptide Y on acetylcholine-induced oedema and vasoconstriction in isolated perfused lungs of rabbit.

    Delaunois, A; Gustin, P; Dessy-Doize, C; Ansay, M

    1994-01-01

    1. The modulatory role of neuropeptide Y (NPY) on pulmonary oedema induced by acetylcholine and capsaicin was investigated. The effects of NPY on the haemodynamic response to acetylcholine, phenylephrine and substance P were also investigated. 2. Isolated, ventilated, exsanguinated lungs of the rabbit were perfused with a constant flow of recirculating blood-free perfusate. The double/arterial/venous occlusion method was used to partition the total pressure gradient (delta Pt) into four compo...

  1. Combination of Ca2+-activated K+ channel blockers inhibits acetylcholine-evoked nitric oxide release in rat superior mesenteric artery

    Stankevičius, E; Lopez-Valverde, V; Rivera, L; Hughes, A D; Mulvany, M J; Simonsen, Ulf

    2006-01-01

    Background and purpose: The present study investigated whether calcium-activated K+ channels are involved in acetylcholine-evoked nitric oxide (NO) release and relaxation. Experimental approach: Simultaneous measurements of NO concentration and relaxation were performed in rat superior mesenteric artery and endothelial cell membrane potential and intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i) were measured. Key results. A combination of apamin plus charybotoxin, which are, respectively, blockers of small-conductance and of intermediate- and large-conductance Ca2+-activated K channels abolished acetylcholine (10 μM)-evoked hyperpolarization of endothelial cell membrane potential. Acetylcholine-evoked NO release was reduced by 68% in high K+ (80 mM) and by 85% in the presence of apamin plus charybdotoxin. In noradrenaline-contracted arteries, asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA), an inhibitor of NO synthase inhibited acetylcholine-evoked NO release and relaxation. However, only further addition of oxyhaemoglobin or apamin plus charybdotoxin eliminated the residual acetylcholine-evoked NO release and relaxation. Removal of extracellular calcium or an inhibitor of calcium influx channels, SKF96365, abolished acetylcholine-evoked increase in NO concentration and [Ca2+]i. Cyclopiazonic acid (CPA, 30 μM), an inhibitor of sarcoplasmic Ca2+-ATPase, caused a sustained NO release in the presence, but only a transient increase in the absence, of extracellular calcium. Incubation with apamin and charybdotoxin did not change acetylcholine or CPA-induced increases in [Ca2+]i, but inhibited the sustained NO release induced by CPA. Conclusions and Implications: Acetylcholine increases endothelial cell [Ca2+]i by release of stored calcium and calcium influx resulting in activation of apamin and charybdotoxin-sensitive K channels, hyperpolarization and release of NO in the rat superior mesenteric artery. PMID:16967048

  2. Hyphal N transport by a vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus associated with cucumber grown at three nitrogen levels

    Johansen, A.; Jakobsen, I.; Jensen, E.S.

    1994-01-01

    mg N which were applied gradually to the RC during the experiment. N-15 was supplied to HC(A) 42 d after planting, at 50 mg (NH4+)-N-15-N kg-1 soil. Lateral movement of the applied N-15 towards the roots was minimized by using a nitrification inhibitor and a hyphal buffer compartment. Non...... colonization at all three levels of N supply, but this effect was strongest in plants of low N status. The results indicated that this increase was due partly to the improved inflow of N via the external hyphae. Root colonization by G. intraradices was unaffected by the amount of N supplied to the RC, while...... hyphal length increased in HC(A) compared to HC(B). Although a considerable N-15 content was detected in mycorrhizal roots adjacent to HC(B), only insignificant amounts of N-15 were found in the external hyphae in HC(B). The external hyphae depleted the soil of inorganic N in both HC(A) and HC(B), while...

  3. Vesicular Trans-Cell Wall Transport in Fungi: A Mechanism for the Delivery of Virulence-Associated Macromolecules?

    Marcio L. Rodrigues

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Fungal cells are encaged in rigid, complex cell walls. Until recently, there was remarkably little information regarding the trans-fungal cell wall transfer of intracellular macromolecules to the extracellular space. Recently, several studies have begun to elucidate the mechanisms that fungal cells utilize to secrete a wide variety of macromolecules through the cell wall. The combined use of transmission electron microscopy, serology, biochemistry, proteomics and lipidomics have revealed that the fungal pathogens Cryptococcus neoformans, Histoplasma capsulatum, Candida albicans, Candida parapsilosis and Sporothrix schenckii, as well as the model yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, each produces extracellular vesicles that carry lipids, proteins, polysaccharides and pigment-like structures of unquestionable biological significance. Compositional analysis of the C. neoformans and H. capsulatum extracellular vesicles suggests that they may function as ‘virulence bags’, with the potential to modulate the host-pathogen interaction in favor of the fungus. The cellular origin of the extracellular vesicles remains unknown, but morphological and biochemical features indicate that they are similar to the well-described mammalian exosomes.

  4. Acetylcholine produces contraction mediated by cyclooxigenase pathway in arterial vessels in the marine fish (Isacia conceptionis).

    Moraga, F A; Urriola-Urriola, N

    2015-05-01

    Preliminary studies showed that dorsal artery contraction mediated by acetylcholine (ACh) is blocked with indomethacin in intertidal fish (G. laevifrons). Our objective was to characterize the cholinergic pathway in several artery vessels of the I. conceptionis. Afferent and efferent branchial, dorsal and mesenteric arteries were dissected of 6 juvenile specimens, isometric tension studies were done using doses response curves (DRC) for Ach (10(-13) to 10(-3) M), and cholinergic pathways were obtained by blocking with atropine or indomethacin. CRC to ACh showed a pattern of high sensitivity only in efferente branchial artery and low sensibility in all vessels. Furthermore, these contractions were blocked in the presence of atropine and indomethacin in all vessels. Our results corroborate previous results observed in intertidal species that contraction induced by acetylcholine is mediated by receptors that activate a cyclooxygenase contraction pathway. PMID:26132019

  5. Theoretical studies of interaction models of human acetylcholine esterase with different inhibitors

    2009-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease(AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder and one of the most common causes of dementia in the elderly.Acetylcholine esterase inhibitors(AChEI) are the main drugs used in the treatment of AD.In this work,docking studies have been performed in order to understand the interaction between a number of inhibitors(tacrine,rivastigmine,huperzine A,TV-3326(ladostigil),donepezil and anseculin) and acetylcholine esterase(AChE).The calculated binding affinities between inhibitors and AChE increase in the order tacrine

  6. Use of intact rat brain cells as a model to study regulation of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors

    Lee, J.H.; El-Fakahany, E.E.

    1985-08-12

    Intact rat brain cells were dissociated and used to study the regulation of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors upon exposure to muscarinic receptor agonists. Incubation of cells with carbamylcholine resulted in a time-dependent decrease in subsequent (/sup 3/H)N-methylscopolamine specific binding, an effect which reached a steady state after 3 hr at 37/sup 0/C. This effect of carbamylcholine was dependent on the concentration of the agonist in the incubation medium and was due to a reduction in the maximal binding capacity of the receptor with no decrease in the affinity of the remaining receptors. This preparation might be useful in future studies to elucidate the mechanisms underlying the regulation of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in the central nervous system. 20 references, 3 tables.

  7. Changes in acetylcholine content, release and muscarinic receptors in rat hippocampus under cold stress

    The aim was to study the mechanism of the previously established decrease in acetylcholine (ACh) concentration in the rat hippocampus under cold stress. Male rats were exposed for 14 days to cold (5 degree C) or kept (controls) at room temperature (24 degree C). Acetylcholine content, release and muscarinic receptor binding were investigated in the hippocampus. Cold exposure resulted in a decrease of ACh concentration in the dorsal hippocampus. Moreover, the potassium-evoked release of ACh from hippocampal slices was increased and an increase of maximal binding capacity of [3H](-) quinuclidinyl benzilate in the dorsal hippocampus of cold exposed animals was also observed. Thus the decrease of hippocampal ACh concentration under cold exposure is probably due to its increased release. On balance then, our results demonstrate that cold stress in the rat induces significant activation of the hippocampal cholinergic system

  8. Acetylcholine determination of microdialysates of fetal neocortex grafts that induce recovery of learning.

    Miranda, M I; Bermúdez-Rattoni, F

    1998-03-01

    The microdialysis technique for acetylcholine (ACh) first became possible when sensitive and specific assays for ACh (pmol/sample range) were developed [G. Damsma, B.H.C. Westerink, P. de Boer, J.B. de Vries, A.S. Horn, Determination of basal acetylcholine release in freely moving rats by transstriatal dialysis coupled to on-line HPLC analysis: pharmacological aspects, Life Sci. 43 (1988) 1161-1168; G. Damsma, B.H.C. Westerink, A. Imperato, H. Rollema, J.B. de Vries, A. S. Horn, Automated brain dialysis of acetylcholine in freely moving rats: detection of basal acetylcholine, Life Sci. 41 (1987) 873-876; P.E. Potter, J.L. Meek, N.H. Neff, Acetylcholine and choline in neural tissue measured by HPLC with electrochemical detection, J. Neurochem. 41 (1983) 188-194; B.H.C. Westerink, G. Damsma, Determination of acetylcholine in microdialysates by HPLC and electrochemical detection, Neurosci. Protocols 20 (1993) 1-9.]. In the present protocol, the microdialysis technique was used to correlate ACh release with the recovery of the ability to acquire a conditioning taste aversion (CTA), by fetal brain grafts in insular cortex (IC) lesioned rats [M.I. Miranda, A.M. Lopez-Colome, F. Bermúdez Rattoni, Recovery of conditional taste aversion induced by fetal neocortex grafts. In vivo correlation of acetylcholine levels, Brain Res. 759 (1997) 141-148]. Three groups of IC lesioned rats showing disrupted CTA received cell suspension grafts of fetal tissue dissected from either the IC or occipital cortex (OC) of 16-day-old rat fetuses. One of the groups of IC-grafted animals was tested after 15 days post-graft; the other groups, IC- and OC-grafted animals, were tested after a recovery time of 45 days, as well as the groups of lesioned and unoperated animals used as control. After the CTA test, guide cannulas were stereotaxically implanted into the IC of all groups. Two days later, microdialysis was performed to determine the extracellular levels of ACh inside the graft. The

  9. Acetylcholine as a neuromodulator: cholinergic signaling shapes nervous system function and behavior

    Picciotto, Marina R.; Higley, Michael J.; Mineur, Yann S.

    2012-01-01

    Acetylcholine in the brain alters neuronal excitability, influences synaptic transmission, induces synaptic plasticity and coordinates the firing of groups of neurons. As a result, it changes the state of neuronal networks throughout the brain and modifies their response to internal and external inputs: the classical role of a neuromodulator. Here we identify actions of cholinergic signaling on cellular and synaptic properties of neurons in several brain areas and discuss the consequences of ...

  10. On homology modeling of the M-2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor subtype

    Jakubík, Jan; Randáková, Alena; Doležal, Vladimír

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 27, č. 6 (2013), s. 525-538. ISSN 0920-654X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA305/09/0681; GA ČR(CZ) GBP304/12/G069 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : muscarinic acetylcholine receptor * G-protein coupled receptor * homology energy estimation * MM-GBSA Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 2.782, year: 2013

  11. Acetylcholine Elevation Relieves Cognitive Rigidity and Social Deficiency in a Mouse Model of Autism

    Karvat, Golan; Kimchi, Tali

    2013-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are defined by behavioral deficits in social interaction and communication, repetitive stereotyped behaviors, and restricted interests/cognitive rigidity. Recent studies in humans and animal-models suggest that dysfunction of the cholinergic system may underlie autism-related behavioral symptoms. Here we tested the hypothesis that augmentation of acetylcholine (ACh) in the synaptic cleft by inhibiting acetylcholinesterase may ameliorate autistic phenotypes. We ...

  12. CHRNB2 Is the Second Acetylcholine Receptor Subunit Associated with Autosomal Dominant Nocturnal Frontal Lobe Epilepsy*

    Phillips, Hilary A.; Favre, Isabelle; Kirkpatrick, Martin; Zuberi, Sameer M; Goudie, David; Heron, Sarah E.; Scheffer, Ingrid E.; Sutherland, Grant R.; Berkovic, Samuel F; Bertrand, Daniel; Mulley, John C

    2000-01-01

    Autosomal dominant nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy (ADNFLE) is an uncommon, idiopathic partial epilepsy characterized by clusters of motor seizures occurring in sleep. We describe a mutation of the β2 subunit of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor, effecting a V287M substitution within the M2 domain. The mutation, in an evolutionary conserved region of CHRNB2, is associated with ADNFLE in a Scottish family. Functional receptors with the V287M mutation are highly expressed in Xenopus oocytes ...

  13. Classical and atypical agonists activate M1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors through common mechanisms

    Randáková, Alena; Dolejší, Eva; Rudajev, Vladimír; Zimčík, Pavel; Doležal, Vladimír; El-Fakahany, E. E.; Jakubík, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 97, Jul 2015 (2015), s. 27-39. ISSN 1043-6618 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA305/09/0681; GA ČR(CZ) GBP304/12/G069; GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0025 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : muscarinic acetylcholine receptors * atypical agonists * xanomeline * activation mechanism Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 4.408, year: 2014

  14. Evidence for a neurotransmitter function of acetylcholine in rabbit superior colliculus.

    Wichmann, T; Illing, R B; Starke, K

    1987-12-01

    Acetylcholinesterase staining and studies on the uptake of [3H]choline into the subsequent efflux of tritium from collicular slices were carried out in order to provide evidence for a neurotransmitter function of acetylcholine in rabbit superior colliculus. Acetylcholinesterase staining was dense and homogeneous in superficial layers whereas the staining was arranged in patches with slightly higher density caudally than rostrally in the intermediate layers. The accumulation of tritium in slices incubated with [3H]choline depended on time, temperature and concentration, and was inhibited by hemicholinium-3. Accumulation was slightly higher in caudal than in rostral slices. Electrical stimulation enhanced tritium outflow from slices preincubated with [3H]choline. Tetrodotoxin and a low calcium medium inhibited the evoked overflow whereas hemicholinium-3 caused an enhancement. Oxotremorine decreased the evoked overflow; atropine prevented this effect. The opioids [D-Ala2, MePhe4, Glycol5]enkephalin, [D-Ala2, D-Leu5]enkephalin and ethylketocyclazocine caused an inhibition. The effects of the latter two agonists were antagonized by naloxone. The GABAB-receptor-agonist (-)-baclofen decreased the evoked overflow at lower concentrations than GABA, whereas the GABAA-receptor-agonist muscimol was ineffective. Serotonin produced an inhibition which was prevented by metitepin, alpha- and beta-adrenoceptor as well as dopamine-receptor ligands caused no change. It is concluded that in the rabbit superior colliculus the pattern of acetylcholinesterase staining is comparable, but not identical to the distribution in other species. The accumulation of [3H]choline, as well as the tetrodotoxin-sensitive and calcium-dependent overflow of tritium upon electrical stimulation (reflecting presumably release of [3H]acetylcholine) indicate that acetylcholine has a neurotransmitter function in this tissue. The release of [3H]acetylcholine was modulated by various transmitter substances and

  15. Chemical Stimulation of Adherent Cells by Localized Application of Acetylcholine from a Microfluidic System

    Susanne Zibek

    2010-01-01

    Chemical stimulation of cells is inherently cell type selective in contrast to electro-stimulation. The availability of a system for localized application of minute amounts of chemical stimulants could be useful for dose related response studies to test new compounds. It could also bring forward the development of a novel type of neuroprostheses. In an experimental setup micro-droplets of an acetylcholine solution were ejected from a fluidic microsystem and applied to the bottom of a nanop...

  16. M2 Muscarinic acetylcholine receptor modulates rat airway smooth muscle cell proliferation

    Placeres-Uray, Fabiola A; Febres-Aldana, Christopher A; Fernandez-Ruiz, Ruth; Gonzalez de Alfonzo, Ramona; Lippo de Becemberg, Itala A; Alfonzo, Marcelo J

    2013-01-01

    Airways chronic inflammatory conditions in asthma and COPD are characterized by tissue remodeling, being smooth muscle hyperplasia, the most important feature. Non-neuronal and neuronal Acetylcholine acting on muscarinic receptors (MAChRs) has been postulated as determinant of tissue remodeling in asthma and COPD by promoting proliferation and phenotypic changes of airway smooth muscle cells (ASMC). The objective was to evaluate proliferative responses to muscarinic agonist as carbamylcholine...

  17. A photonic crystal based sensing scheme for acetylcholine and acetylcholinesterase inhibitors

    Fenzl, Christoph; Genslein, Christa; Zöpfl, Alexander; Baeumner, Antje; Hirsch, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    We present a new scheme for sensing biomolecules by combining an enzyme hydrogel with a photonic crystal hydrogel layer that responds to ionic strength and pH changes. We demonstrate this unique combination by successfully detecting acetylcholine (ACh) and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitors. Specifically, the sandwich assembly is composed of layers of photonic crystals and a polyacrylamide hydrogel functionalized with AChE. The photonic crystal film has a red color and turns dark purple w...

  18. Acetylcholine release by human colon cancer cells mediates autocrine stimulation of cell proliferation

    Cheng, Kunrong; Samimi, Roxana; Xie, Guofeng; Shant, Jasleen; Drachenberg, Cinthia; Wade, Mark; Davis, Richard J.; Nomikos, George; Raufman, Jean-Pierre

    2008-01-01

    Most colon cancers overexpress M3 muscarinic receptors (M3R), and post-M3R signaling stimulates human colon cancer cell proliferation. Acetylcholine (ACh), a muscarinic receptor ligand traditionally regarded as a neurotransmitter, may be produced by nonneuronal cells. We hypothesized that ACh release by human colon cancer cells results in autocrine stimulation of proliferation. H508 human colon cancer cells, which have robust M3R expression, were used to examine effects of muscarinic receptor...

  19. INFLUENCE OF ANTIBIOTICS ON THE MECHANICAL RESPONSES OF GUINEA-PIG ILEUM TO ACETYLCHOLINE AND HISTAMINE

    1998-01-01

    The side effects of antibiotics have been extensively described during the last decades, however, their role on digestive motility must be better investigated. Following a line of research, the influence of penicillin, chloranfenicol tetracycline and gentamicine on longitudinal smooth muscle responses to acetylcholine and histamine were studied on guinea-pig ileum. There were no differences between the responses before and after the addition of each antibiotic. Further investigations must be ...

  20. Neonicotinoid Binding, Toxicity and Expression of Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor Subunits in the Aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum

    Taillebois, Emiliane; Beloula, Abdelhamid; Quinchard, Sophie; Jaubert-Possamai, Stéphanie; Daguin, Antoine; Servent, Denis; Tagu, Denis; Thany, Steeve H.; Tricoire-Leignel, Helene

    2014-01-01

    Neonicotinoid insecticides act on nicotinic acetylcholine receptor and are particularly effective against sucking pests. They are widely used in crops protection to fight against aphids, which cause severe damage. In the present study we evaluated the susceptibility of the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum to the commonly used neonicotinoid insecticides imidacloprid (IMI), thiamethoxam (TMX) and clothianidin (CLT). Binding studies on aphid membrane preparations revealed the existence of high and ...

  1. Minor structural changes in nicotinoid insecticides confer differential subtype selectivity for mammalian nicotinic acetylcholine receptors

    Tomizawa, Motohiro; Casida, John E.

    1999-01-01

    The major nitroimine insecticide imidacloprid (IMI) and the nicotinic analgesics epibatidine and ABT-594 contain the 6-chloro-3-pyridinyl moiety important for high activity and/or selectivity. ABT-594 has considerable nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR) subtype specificity which might carry over to the chloropyridinyl insecticides. This study considers nine IMI analogues for selectivity in binding to immuno-isolated α1, α3 and α7 containing nicotinic AChRs and to purported α4β2 nicotinic ...

  2. Utilization of Superfused Cerebral Slices in Probing Muscarinic Receptor Autoregulation of Acetylcholine Release

    Alquicer, Glenda; Doležal, Vladimír; El-Fakahany, E. E.

    New York: Springer, 2016 - (Mysliveček, J.; Jakubík, J.), s. 221-233. (Neuromethods. 107). ISBN 978-1-4939-2857-6 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-05696S; GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0025 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : muscarinic receptors * acetylcholine release * autoregulation * superfusion Subject RIV: FH - Neurology

  3. Acetylcholine promotes the emergence and elongation of lateral roots of Raphanus sativus

    Sugiyama, Kou-ichi; Tezuka, Takafumi

    2011-01-01

    Radish (Raphanus sativus L.) was grown on four layers of paper towel moistened with distilled water with and without acetylcholine (ACh) for five days in the dark after sowing. ACh at 1 nM promoted the growth (emergence and elongation) of lateral roots of radish plants, but had no effect on the stems and main roots. Moreover, ACh enhanced the dry weight of roots [main (primary) + lateral roots]. Neostigmine, an inhibitor of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) also promoted the emergence and elongatio...

  4. Variants in nicotinic acetylcholine receptors α5 and α3 increase risks to nicotine dependence†

    Chen, Xiangning; Chen, Jingchun; Williamson, Vernell S; An, Seon-Sook; Hettema, John M.; Aggen, Steven H.; Neale, Michael C.; Kendler, Kenneth S.

    2009-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors bind to nicotine and initiate the physiological and pharmacological responses to tobacco smoking. In this report, we studied the association of α5 and α3 subunits with nicotine dependence and with the symptoms of alcohol and cannabis abuse and dependence in two independent epidemiological samples (n = 815 and 1,121, respectively). In this study, seven single nucleotide polymorphisms were genotyped in the CHRNA5 and CHRNA3 genes. In both samples, we found that...

  5. Ionomycin-induced acetylcholine release and its inhibition by adenosine at frog motor nerve endings.

    Hunt, J M; Silinsky, E. M.

    1993-01-01

    1. Acetylcholine (ACh) evoked secretion by the calcium ionophore, ionomycin, was studied at frog motor nerve endings. 2. Bath application of ionomycin stimulated an irreversible increase in the rate of spontaneous, quantal ACh release in the presence of extracellular Ca2+. In contrast, local application of ionomycin stimulated a rapid, reversible acceleration of spontaneous ACh release. 3. The magnitude of the secretory response to ionomycin was dependent both upon the concentration of ionoph...

  6. Bitter triggers acetylcholine release from polymodal urethral chemosensory cells and bladder reflexes

    Deckmann, Klaus; Filipski, Katharina; Krasteva-Christ, Gabriela; Fronius, Martin; Althaus, Mike; Rafiq, Amir; Papadakis, Tamara; Renno, Liane; Jurastow, Innokentij; Wessels, Lars; Wolff, Miriam; Schütz, Burkhard; Weihe, Eberhard; Chubanov, Vladimir; Gudermann, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    We report the presence of a previously unidentified cholinergic, polymodal chemosensory cell in the mammalian urethra, the potential portal of entry for bacteria and harmful substances into the urogenital system. These cells exhibit structural markers of respiratory chemosensory cells (“brush cells”). They use the classical taste transduction cascade to detect potential hazardous compounds (bitter, umami, uropathogenic bacteria) and release acetylcholine in response. They lie next to sensory ...

  7. Synthesis of [11C]N-methyl tetrahydroaminoacridine, a potent acetylcholine esterase inhibitor

    Tetrahydroaminoacridine (THA) is a potent central acting acetylcholine esterase (AChE) inhibitor which might be used as therapeutic agent in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease (AZD). In order to study the AChE activity in the brain by PET, the authors selected N-methyl THA, a potent AChE inhibitor, as a potential radioligand. In this paper, they report the synthesis and labelling of N-methyl THA with [11C]methyl iodide

  8. Quantitative Molecular Imaging of Neuronal Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors in the Human Brain with A-85380 Radiotracers

    Lotfipour, Shahrdad; Mandelkern, Mark; Brody, Arthur L.

    2011-01-01

    Neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) have been implicated in a spectrum of cognitive functions as well as psychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders, including tobacco addiction and Alzheimer's Disease. The examination of neuronal nAChRs in living humans is a relatively new field. Researchers have developed brain-imaging radiotracers for nAChRs, with radiolabeled A-85380 compounds having the most widespread use. We provide a brief background on nAChRs, followed by a discussion...

  9. Inducibility of human atrial fibrillation in an in silico model reflecting local acetylcholine distribution and concentration

    Hwang, Minki; Lee, Hyun-Seung; Pak, Hui-Nam; Shim, Eun Bo

    2015-01-01

    Vagal nerve activity has been known to play a crucial role in the induction and maintenance of atrial fibrillation (AF). However, it is unclear how the distribution and concentration of local acetylcholine (ACh) promotes AF. In this study, we investigated the effect of the spatial distribution and concentration of ACh on fibrillation patterns in an in silico human atrial model. A human atrial action potential model with an ACh-dependent K+ current (IKAch) was used to examine the effect of vag...

  10. Isolation of acetylcholine receptor clusters in substrate-associated material from cultured rat myotubes using saponin

    1984-01-01

    After exposure of rat myotube cultures to saponin, less than 1% of the cellular protein was found to remain associated with the tissue culture substrate. This substrate-associated material contained approximately 10% of the acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) and greater than 80% of the large, ventral AChR clusters present in the original culture. The domain structure evident in intact cells was maintained in AChR clusters after isolation using saponin. However, vinculin, present at the clusters ...

  11. CaMKIIα, a modulator of M4 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors

    Guo, Ming-Lei; Liu, Zhenguo; Chu, Xiang-Ping; Mao, Li-Min; WANG, John Q.

    2010-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are subject to the regulation by protein kinases. By controlling the phosphorylation-dephosphorylation balance, protein kinases actively modify GPCR expression and function. In a recent study, we have identified a novel phosphorylation-dependent regulation of Gαi/o-coupled muscarinic acetylcholine receptors. A synapse-enriched protein kinase, Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKIIα), binds directly and selectively to second intracellular loops ...

  12. Visualization of cholinoceptive neurons in the rat neocortex: colocalization of muscarinic and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors

    Zee, E.A. van der; Streefland, C.; Strosberg, A D; Schröder, H.; Luiten, P.G.M.

    1992-01-01

    The present investigation analyzes the cellular distribution of muscarinic and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in rat neocortex, by use of monoclonal antibodies raised against purified receptor proteins. The degree of colocalization of both types of receptors was determined by way of immunofluorescent double-labeling techniques. For both classes of receptors, pyramidal and nonpyramidal cells were found immunostained and an identical laminar distribution pattern of immunopositive neurons in ...

  13. Hippocampal acetylcholine release during memory testing in rats: augmentation by glucose.

    Ragozzino, M E; Unick, K E; Gold, P. E.

    1996-01-01

    Several lines of evidence indicate that a modest increase in circulating glucose levels enhances memory. One mechanism underlying glucose effects on memory may be an increase in acetylcholine (ACh) release. The present experiment determined whether enhancement of spontaneous alternation performance by systemic glucose treatment is related to an increase in hippocampal ACh output. Samples of extracellular ACh were assessed at 12-min intervals using in vivo microdialysis with HPLC-EC. Twenty-fo...

  14. Blockage of muscle and neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors by fluoxetine (Prozac)

    García-Colunga, J; Awad, J. N.; Miledi, R

    1997-01-01

    Fluoxetine (Prozac), a widely used antidepressant, is said to exert its medicinal effects almost exclusively by blocking the serotonin uptake systems. The present study shows that both muscle and neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors are blocked, in a noncompetitive and voltage-dependent way, by fluoxetine, which also increases the rate of desensitization of the nicotinic receptors. Because these receptors are very widely distributed in the both central and peripheral nervous systems, th...

  15. ACETYLCHOLINE RELEASE IN THE HIPPOCAMPUS AND PRELIMBIC CORTEX DURING ACQUISITION OF A SOCIALLY TRANSMITTED FOOD PREFERENCE

    Gold, P E; Countryman, R.A.; Dukala, D.; Chang, Q.

    2011-01-01

    Interference with cholinergic functions in hippocampus and prefrontal cortex impairs learning and memory for social transmission of food preference, suggesting that acetylcholine (ACh) release in the two brain regions may be important for acquiring the food preference. This experiment examined release of ACh in the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex of rats during training for social transmission of food preference. After demonstrator rats ate a food with novel flavor and odor, a social transm...

  16. The control of chick myoblast fusion by ion channels operated by prostaglandins and acetylcholine

    1988-01-01

    Chick myoblast fusion in culture was investigated using prostanoid synthesis inhibitors to delay spontaneous fusion. During this delay myoblast fusion could be induced by prostaglandin E1 (PGE1), by raising extracellular potassium and by addition of carbachol. Carbachol-induced fusion, but not PGE-induced fusion, was prevented by the acetylcholine receptor blocker alpha-bungarotoxin. Fusion induced by any of these agents was prevented by the Ca channel blockers lanthanum and D600. The thresho...

  17. Regulation of Synaptic Transmission and Plasticity by Neuronal Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors

    McKay, Bruce E.; Placzek, Andon N; Dani, John A.

    2007-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are widely expressed throughout the central nervous system and participate in a variety of physiological functions. Recent advances have revealed roles of nAChRs in the regulation of synaptic transmission and synaptic plasticity, particularly in the hippocampus and midbrain dopamine centers. In general, activation of nAChRs causes membrane depolarization and directly and indirectly increases the intracellular calcium concentration. Thus, when nAChRs ...

  18. Dopamine modulates acetylcholine release via octopamine and CREB signaling in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Satoshi Suo

    Full Text Available Animals change their behavior and metabolism in response to external stimuli. cAMP response element binding protein (CREB is a signal-activated transcription factor that enables the coupling of extracellular signals and gene expression to induce adaptive changes. Biogenic amine neurotransmitters regulate CREB and such regulation is important for long-term changes in various nervous system functions, including learning and drug addiction. In Caenorhabditis elegans, the amine neurotransmitter octopamine activates a CREB homolog, CRH-1, in cholinergic SIA neurons, whereas dopamine suppresses CREB activation by inhibiting octopamine signaling in response to food stimuli. However, the physiological role of this activation is unknown. In this study, the effect of dopamine, octopamine, and CREB on acetylcholine signaling was analyzed using the acetylcholinesterase inhibitor aldicarb. Mutants with decreased dopamine signaling exhibited reduced acetylcholine signaling, and octopamine and CREB functioned downstream of dopamine in this regulation. This study demonstrates that the regulation of CREB by amine neurotransmitters modulates acetylcholine release from the neurons of C. elegans.

  19. Muscarinic acetylcholine receptor-mediated stimulation of retinal ganglion cell photoreceptors.

    Sodhi, Puneet; Hartwick, Andrew T E

    2016-09-01

    Melanopsin-dependent phototransduction in intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs) involves a Gq-coupled phospholipase C (PLC) signaling cascade. Acetylcholine, released in the mammalian retina by starburst amacrine cells, can also activate Gq-PLC pathways through certain muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs). Using multielectrode array recordings of rat retinas, we demonstrate that robust spiking responses can be evoked in neonatal and adult ipRGCs after bath application of the muscarinic agonist carbachol. The stimulatory action of carbachol on ipRGCs was a direct effect, as confirmed through calcium imaging experiments on isolated ipRGCs in purified cultures. Using flickering (6 Hz) yellow light stimuli at irradiances below the threshold for melanopsin activation, spiking responses could be elicited in ipRGCs that were suppressed by mAChR antagonism. Therefore, this work identified a novel melanopsin-independent pathway for stimulating sustained spiking in ganglion cell photoreceptors. This mAChR-mediated pathway could enhance ipRGC spiking responses in conditions known to evoke retinal acetylcholine release, such as those involving flickering or moving visual stimuli. Furthermore, this work identifies a pharmacological approach for light-independent ipRGC stimulation that could be targeted by mAChR agonists. PMID:27055770

  20. Evidence for the extramembranous location of the putative amphipathic helix of acetylcholine receptor

    Evidence has been obtained demonstrating that the peptides GVKYIAE and AIKYIAE found in the potential amphipathic helices of the α and β subunits, respectively, of acetylcholine receptor are not buried in the membrane. The peptide KYIAE was synthesized, and polyclonal antibodies were prepared against a conjugate of bovine serum albumin and synthetic peptide. An immunoadsorbent capable of binding and subsequently releasing peptides ending with the sequence-YIAE was produced by attaching these specific antibodies to agarose. Native acetylcholine receptor was labeled with pyridoxal phosphate and Na[3H]BH4. The labeled protein was stripped of phospholipid and digested with the protease from Staphylococcus aureus strain V8. The digest was submitted to immunoadsorption to isolate the labeled indigenous peptides. As a control, α and β polypeptides prepared by gel filtration of a solution of acetylcholine receptor in detergent were stripped of detergent and labeled with pyridoxal phosphate and Na[3H]BH4 in the presence of 8 M urea. The labeled α and β polypeptides were digested and submitted to immunoadsorption. The specific radioactivities of the indigenous peptides from the α and β subunits labeled under native and denaturing conditions were nearly equal. In similar experiments using isethionyl (2',4'-dinitrophenyl)-3-aminopropionimidate as the labeling agent, the indigenous peptides from native and denatured receptor were also labeled to the same extent. Since these peptides are labeled to the same extent whether or not the protein is denatured, they cannot be buried in the membrane

  1. Vesicular stomatitis virus-based ebola vaccine is well-tolerated and protects immunocompromised nonhuman primates.

    Thomas W Geisbert

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Ebola virus (EBOV is a significant human pathogen that presents a public health concern as an emerging/re-emerging virus and as a potential biological weapon. Substantial progress has been made over the last decade in developing candidate preventive vaccines that can protect nonhuman primates against EBOV. Among these prospects, a vaccine based on recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV is particularly robust, as it can also confer protection when administered as a postexposure treatment. A concern that has been raised regarding the replication-competent VSV vectors that express EBOV glycoproteins is how these vectors would be tolerated by individuals with altered or compromised immune systems such as patients infected with HIV. This is especially important as all EBOV outbreaks to date have occurred in areas of Central and Western Africa with high HIV incidence rates in the population. In order to address this concern, we evaluated the safety of the recombinant VSV vector expressing the Zaire ebolavirus glycoprotein (VSVDeltaG/ZEBOVGP in six rhesus macaques infected with simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV. All six animals showed no evidence of illness associated with the VSVDeltaG/ZEBOVGP vaccine, suggesting that this vaccine may be safe in immunocompromised populations. While one goal of the study was to evaluate the safety of the candidate vaccine platform, it was also of interest to determine if altered immune status would affect vaccine efficacy. The vaccine protected 4 of 6 SHIV-infected macaques from death following ZEBOV challenge. Evaluation of CD4+ T cells in all animals showed that the animals that succumbed to lethal ZEBOV challenge had the lowest CD4+ counts, suggesting that CD4+ T cells may play a role in mediating protection against ZEBOV.

  2. Self-assembled cylindrical and vesicular molecular templates for polyaniline nanofibers and nanotapes.

    Anilkumar, P; Jayakannan, M

    2009-08-27

    We report a soft template approach based on a custom-designed novel surfactant-cum-dopant for size and shape tuning of polyaniline nanomaterials such as nanofibers and nanotapes via emulsion and dispersion polymerization routes. A new amphiphilic 4-(3-dodecyl-8-enylphenyloxy) butane sulfonic acid was synthesized by ring-opening of butanesultone with renewable resource cardanol. The new amphiphilic dopant forms spherical micelles in water and its critical micelle concentration was determined by dye encapsulation and surface tension methods. In the emulsion route, the amphiphilic dopant complexed with aniline to produce cylindrical micellar aggregates that template exclusively for polyaniline nanofibers. The dispersion of aniline+dopant in water/toluene solvent mixture produces vesicles that selectively template for polyaniline nanotapes. The mechanism of the polyaniline nanomaterials formation was investigated by dynamic light scattering (DLS) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM). DLS of the polymerization templates in water proved the presence of micrometer range aggregates, and TEM images confirmed the shape of the cylindrical and vesicular templates. The polyaniline nanomaterials were found soluble in water and polar organic solvents for structural characterization and composition analysis by 1H NMR spectroscopy. Absorbance spectra of the nanomaterials showed free carrier tail above 900 nm in the near IR region for the delocalization of electrons in the polaron band corresponding to expanded conformation of polyaniline chains. Wide angle X-ray diffraction showed two new peaks at low angle region with d-spacing of 26.5 and 13.6 A corresponding to lamellar ordering of polyaniline chains followed by interdigitations of the amphiphilic dopant in the nanomaterials. PMID:19642663

  3. Current Good Manufacturing Practice Production of an Oncolytic Recombinant Vesicular Stomatitis Viral Vector for Cancer Treatment

    Meseck, M.; Derecho, I.; Lopez, P.; Knoblauch, C.; McMahon, R.; Anderson, J.; Dunphy, N.; Quezada, V.; Khan, R.; Huang, P.; Dang, W.; Luo, M.; Hsu, D.; Woo, S.L.C.; Couture, L.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) is an oncolytic virus currently being investigated as a promising tool to treat cancer because of its ability to selectively replicate in cancer cells. To enhance the oncolytic property of the nonpathologic laboratory strain of VSV, we generated a recombinant vector [rVSV(MΔ51)-M3] expressing murine gammaherpesvirus M3, a secreted viral chemokine-binding protein that binds to a broad range of mammalian chemokines with high affinity. As previously reported, when rVSV(MΔ51)-M3 was used in an orthotopic model of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in rats, it suppressed inflammatory cell migration to the virus-infected tumor site, which allowed for enhanced intratumoral virus replication leading to increased tumor necrosis and substantially prolonged survival. These encouraging results led to the development of this vector for clinical translation in patients with HCC. However, a scalable current Good Manufacturing Practice (cGMP)-compliant manufacturing process has not been described for this vector. To produce the quantities of high-titer virus required for clinical trials, a process that is amenable to GMP manufacturing and scale-up was developed. We describe here a large-scale (50-liter) vector production process capable of achieving crude titers on the order of 109 plaque-forming units (PFU)/ml under cGMP. This process was used to generate a master virus seed stock and a clinical lot of the clinical trial agent under cGMP with an infectious viral titer of approximately 2 × 1010 PFU/ml (total yield, 1 × 1013 PFU). The lot has passed all U.S. Food and Drug Administration-mandated release testing and will be used in a phase 1 clinical translational trial in patients with advanced HCC. PMID:21083425

  4. Metastatic vesicular thyroid cancer associated to an hyperthyroidism: about two cases

    We report the observation of two patients suffering of vesicular thyroid cancers, immediately metastatic, revealed by second bone injuries of the skull. At the time of diagnosis, these two patients were in clinical and biological hyperthyroidism. This hyperthyroidism continued after complete thyroidectomy, without hormonal substitution and needed the implementation of a treatment by synthetic antithyroid drugs. Every patient received after complete thyroidectomy ablative doses of 131I. the whole body scintigraphy and conventional imaging enlightened a major extension: big size bone and lungs injuries. Ira-therapy and other therapy lead a partial improvement or a relatively prolonged stabilisation. A moderated biological hypothyroidism was got in the first case after 5.55 GBq of 131I administration. and in the second case after 3.7 GBq of 131I administration. Allowing to stop synthesis antithyroid drugs. The death came three years after the diagnosis for the first case and was in relation with a cardiovascular disease. In the second case, the patient died two years after the diagnosis because a hemorrhage on a second injury on the 'falx cerebri'. We emphasize the late diagnosis in these patients; the rarity of the clinic presentation; the very good uptake of 131I on the second injuries in spite of a reduced TSH, because the very well differentiated character of metastases; unfavourable final evolution. It exists a relative uncertainty about etiology of these persistent hyperthyroidism after complete thyroidectomy in patients with multiple metastases of a differentiated thyroid cancer. Were evoked the presence of antibodies anti receptors of TSH, missing in our two patients and a hormonal hyper-secretion linked to a very important metastases volume, the neoplasms tissue staying well differentiated. (N.C.)

  5. Vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhiza response to crossed carbon and phosphorus resource gradients

    Whitbeck, J.L. (Pennyslvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States))

    1994-06-01

    Employing the annual herb Hemizonia luzulaefolia, native to nutrient limited grassland ecosystem in California, and a community of indigenous vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal (VAM) fungi, this study examined mycorrhizal response to interacting plant- and fungus-acquired resources. Plant carbon supply was manipulated through atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO[sub 2]) concentration, and substrate phosphorus (P) supply was varied in the nutrient solution. H. luzulaefolia responded strongly to VAM association, showing increased root and shoot biomass, greater leaf area, higher shoot P content and lower specific root length relative to non-mycorrhizal plants. Elevated (700 ppm) CO[sub 2] plants had lower mass, lower root:shoot ratios and slightly greater specific root length than ambient pCO[sub 2]-grown plants. VAM colonization of roots was stimulated by elevated CO[sub 2] early in the experiment. Low P plants showed greater leaf mass per area and lower shoot P concentration than plus-P plants. P effects on measures of VAM changed over time. While ambient pCO[sub 2]-grown plants responsed to added P with increased biomass, plants grown at elevated CO[sub 2] showed equivalent or lower biomass in plus-P treatments than in those with no added P. At the same time, ambient pCO[sub 2]-grown plants developed greater VAM colonization of roots in low P treatments, while at 700 ppm CO[sub 2]. VAM colonization was higher in plus-P treatments. It appears that atmospheric pCO[sub 2] affects the patterns of belowground allocation in H. luzulaefolia: ambient pCO[sub 2] plants direct carbon resources to VAM when P is low and to roots when P is available, while elevated CO[sub 2] plants maintain VAM colonization regardless of P environment and allocate to roots when P is low.

  6. Distribution of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in coal, lignite and calcite mine spoils of India

    Ganesan, V.; Ragupathy, S.; Parthipan, B.; Rani, D.B.R.; Mahadevan, A.

    1991-12-31

    Vesicular-arbuscular mycorhizzal (VAM) status was assessed for coal, lignite and calcite mine spoils. The three study sites were: The Kothagudem coal field in the south central region where waste materials are piled 1 to 2 m high on the soil surface. Samples were collected from plants growing on the waste. Neyveli, on the southeastern coast, is a lignite coal mine where the spoil is piled 70 to 100 m high on the soil surface. Samples were collected from recently revegetated mine spoil and from 25 year old revegetated sites. The calcite mine at Thazhaiyuthu in the south where the spoil is piled up 2 to 3 m on the soil surface. Samples were collected from 4 to 7 year old reclaimed sites. The wastes generally supported different plant species. The level of VAM infection of plants was markedly different in each mine spoil, with the maximum infection in the coal and calcite spoils, and the least in the lignite spoil. There was more infection in the 25 year old lignite spoil than in the newly revegetated spoil. There were different VAM species in each spoil, and no one species was present in all of the samples. The authors conclude that one of the factors leading to the differences between spoils is the amount of topsoil contained in the spoil (least in the lignite spoils which are very deep). The other is age of the spoils. Unfortunately the authors concluded that the best approach is to enrich the spoils with VAM rather than salvaging and replacing topsoil

  7. Development of a convenient immunochromatographic strip for the diagnosis of vesicular stomatitis virus serotype Indiana infections.

    Sun, Chen; Zhao, Kui; Chen, Keyan; He, Wenqi; Su, Gaoli; Sun, Xiuping; Wang, Li; Pan, Wei; Zhang, Wei; Gao, Feng; Song, Deguang

    2013-03-01

    A rapid and simple immunochromatography strip (ICS) test for the specific detection of vesicular stomatitis virus serotype Indiana (VSV-IND) using two distinct monoclonal antibodies MAbs (1A2 and 4C3) against the G protein of VSV-IND was developed. The MAb 1A2 was conjugated with colloidal gold, and the MAb 4C3 and goat anti-mouse IgG were sprayed onto a nitrocellulose membrane in strips at positions designated T and C, respectively. The results showed that samples of VSV-IND combined with CG-MAb 1A2, and that these complexes were captured by MAb 4C3 at the test line (T), resulting in the appearance of a purple band. When samples did not contain VSV-IND or when they contained a quantity of VSV-IND below the detection limit of the test, only the control line (C) was visible. The analysis of the sensitivity of the test demonstrated that the lowest detected quantity of VSV-IND was 1.85×10(3.0)TCID50/ml. Storage of the ICS test at room temperature for 6 months or at 4°C for 12 months did not change their sensitivity and specificity. In clinical trials using RT-PCR as a reference test, the relative specificity and sensitivity of the ICS were determined to be 98.9% and 91.4%, respectively. Based on these results, the ICS test developed may be a suitable tool for rapid on-site testing for VSV-IND infection. PMID:23261799

  8. Strains of Lentinula edodes suppress growth of phytopathogenic fungi and inhibit Alagoas serotype of vesicular stomatitis virus Linhagens de Lentinula edodes inibem fungos fitopatogênicos e o vírus da estomatite vesicular, sorotipo Alagoas

    Selma H. Sasaki

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available Four Lentinula edodes strains (Le10, 46, K2, Assai were assessed for their antagonistic effect on four filamentous fungus species of agricultural importance (Helminthosporium euphorbiae, Helminthosporium sp, Fusarium solani and Phomopsis sojae and on Alagoas serotype of Vesicular Stomatitis Virus (VSA. The L. edodes strains studied had variable effects on the filamentous fungi and on VSA. The K2 and Le10 strains were antagonistic on the fungi assessed and the 46 and K2 strains were efficient on the Vesicular Stomatitis Virus. The results widened the list of beneficial effects of L. edodes on the control and prevention of animal pathogenic virus and filamentous fungi.Quatro linhagens de Lentinula edodes (Le10, 46, K2, ASSAI foram avaliadas quanto ao seu efeito inibitório sobre quatro espécies de fungos filamentosos de importância agrícola (Helminthosporium euphorbiae, Helminthosporium sp., Fusarium solani, Phomopsis sojae e sobre o sorotipo Alagoas vírus da estomatite vesicular (VSA. Foi observado que as linhagens de L. edodes estudadas apresentaram variabilidade quanto ao seu efeito, tanto sobre os fungos filamentosos quanto sobre o vírus VSA. As linhagens K2 e Le10 apresentaram-se antagônicas sobre os fungos e as linhagens 46 e K2 foram eficientes na inibição do vírus VSA. Os resultados obtidos permitem ampliar a lista de efeitos benéficos de algumas linhagens de L. edodes no controle e prevenção de vírus patogênicos animais e de fungos filamentosos.

  9. Synaptic GABA release prevents GABA transporter type-1 reversal during excessive network activity

    Savtchenko, L.; Megalogeni, M.; Rusakov, D. A.; Walker, M. C.; Pavlov, I.

    2015-01-01

    GABA transporters control extracellular GABA, which regulates the key aspects of neuronal and network behaviour. A prevailing view is that modest neuronal depolarization results in GABA transporter type-1 (GAT-1) reversal causing non-vesicular GABA release into the extracellular space during intense network activity. This has important implications for GABA uptake-targeting therapies. Here we combined a realistic kinetic model of GAT-1 with experimental measurements of tonic GABAA receptor cu...

  10. Requirement of nucleotide exchange factor for Ypt1 GTPase mediated protein transport

    1995-01-01

    Small GTPases of the rab family are involved in the regulation of vesicular transport. It is believed that cycling between the GTP- and GDP-bound forms, and accessory factors regulating this cycling are crucial for rab function. However, an essential role for rab nucleotide exchange factors has not yet been demonstrated. In this report we show the requirement of nucleotide exchange factor activity for Ypt1 GTPase mediated protein transport. The Ypt1 protein, a member of the rab family, plays ...

  11. Activity assay of membrane transport proteins

    Hao Xie

    2008-01-01

    Membrane transport proteins are integral membrane proteins and considered as potential drug targets. Activity assay of transport proteins is essential for developing drugs to target these proteins. Major issues related to activity assessment of transport proteins include availability of transporters,transport activity of transporters, and interactions between ligands and transporters. Researchers need to consider the physiological status of proteins (bound in lipid membranes or purified), availability and specificity of substrates, and the purpose of the activity assay (screening, identifying, or comparing substrates and inhibitors) before choosing appropriate assay strategies and techniques. Transport proteins bound in vesicular membranes can be assayed for transporting substrate across membranes by means of uptake assay or entrance counterflow assay. Alternatively, transport proteins can be assayed for interactions with ligands by using techniques such as isothermal titration calorimetry, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, or surface plasmon resonance. Other methods and techniques such as fluorometry, scintillation proximity assay, electrophysiological assay, or stopped-flow assay could also be used for activity assay of transport proteins. In this paper the major strategies and techniques for activity assessment of membrane transport proteins are reviewed.

  12. The Leishmania donovani lipophosphoglycan excludes the vesicular proton-ATPase from phagosomes by impairing the recruitment of synaptotagmin V.

    Vinet, Adrien F; Fukuda, Mitsunori; Turco, Salvatore J; Descoteaux, Albert

    2009-10-01

    We recently showed that the exocytosis regulator Synaptotagmin (Syt) V is recruited to the nascent phagosome and remains associated throughout the maturation process. In this study, we investigated the possibility that Syt V plays a role in regulating interactions between the phagosome and the endocytic organelles. Silencing of Syt V by RNA interference revealed that Syt V contributes to phagolysosome biogenesis by regulating the acquisition of cathepsin D and the vesicular proton-ATPase. In contrast, recruitment of cathepsin B, the early endosomal marker EEA1 and the lysosomal marker LAMP1 to phagosomes was normal in the absence of Syt V. As Leishmania donovani promastigotes inhibit phagosome maturation, we investigated their potential impact on the phagosomal association of Syt V. This inhibition of phagolysosome biogenesis is mediated by the virulence glycolipid lipophosphoglycan, a polymer of the repeating Galbeta1,4Manalpha1-PO(4) units attached to the promastigote surface via an unusual glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchor. Our results showed that insertion of lipophosphoglycan into ganglioside GM1-containing microdomains excluded or caused dissociation of Syt V from phagosome membranes. As a consequence, L. donovani promatigotes established infection in a phagosome from which the vesicular proton-ATPase was excluded and which failed to acidify. Collectively, these results reveal a novel function for Syt V in phagolysosome biogenesis and provide novel insight into the mechanism of vesicular proton-ATPase recruitment to maturing phagosomes. We also provide novel findings into the mechanism of Leishmania pathogenesis, whereby targeting of Syt V is part of the strategy used by L. donovani promastigotes to prevent phagosome acidification. PMID:19834555

  13. The Leishmania donovani lipophosphoglycan excludes the vesicular proton-ATPase from phagosomes by impairing the recruitment of synaptotagmin V.

    Adrien F Vinet

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available We recently showed that the exocytosis regulator Synaptotagmin (Syt V is recruited to the nascent phagosome and remains associated throughout the maturation process. In this study, we investigated the possibility that Syt V plays a role in regulating interactions between the phagosome and the endocytic organelles. Silencing of Syt V by RNA interference revealed that Syt V contributes to phagolysosome biogenesis by regulating the acquisition of cathepsin D and the vesicular proton-ATPase. In contrast, recruitment of cathepsin B, the early endosomal marker EEA1 and the lysosomal marker LAMP1 to phagosomes was normal in the absence of Syt V. As Leishmania donovani promastigotes inhibit phagosome maturation, we investigated their potential impact on the phagosomal association of Syt V. This inhibition of phagolysosome biogenesis is mediated by the virulence glycolipid lipophosphoglycan, a polymer of the repeating Galbeta1,4Manalpha1-PO(4 units attached to the promastigote surface via an unusual glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchor. Our results showed that insertion of lipophosphoglycan into ganglioside GM1-containing microdomains excluded or caused dissociation of Syt V from phagosome membranes. As a consequence, L. donovani promatigotes established infection in a phagosome from which the vesicular proton-ATPase was excluded and which failed to acidify. Collectively, these results reveal a novel function for Syt V in phagolysosome biogenesis and provide novel insight into the mechanism of vesicular proton-ATPase recruitment to maturing phagosomes. We also provide novel findings into the mechanism of Leishmania pathogenesis, whereby targeting of Syt V is part of the strategy used by L. donovani promastigotes to prevent phagosome acidification.

  14. Peripheral, but not central nervous system, type I interferon expression in mice in response to intranasal vesicular stomatitis virus infection

    Trottier, Mark D.; Lyles, Douglas S.; REISS, CAROL SHOSHKES

    2007-01-01

    Type I interferon (IFN) is critical for resistance of mice to infection with vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV). Wild type (wt) VSV infection did not induce type I IFN production in vitro or in the central nervous system (CNS) of mice; however IFN-β was detected in lungs, spleen, and serum within 24 h. The M protein mutant VSV, T1026R1 (also referred to as M51R), induced type I IFN production in vitro and in the CNS, with poor expression in spleens. In addition, VSV T1026R1 was not pathogenic t...

  15. Effect of plant species, soil and environmental factors on vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal (VAM) infection and nutrient uptake

    The vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal (VAM) system should meaningfully be considered as a 3-way interaction between plant, soil and fungus. By disassembling the complex VA mycorrhizal symbiosis and considering each component in turn, it has become evident that many factors, such as plant species, soil and environmental conditions can affect the overall balance of the complete system. For the plant to gain maximum benefits from the association, the best possible contribution of plant, fungus and environmental conditions need to be identified and maintained. (author)

  16. Mutations in the C-Terminal Loop of the Nucleocapsid Protein Affect Vesicular Stomatitis Virus RNA Replication and Transcription Differentially▿

    Harouaka, Djamila; Wertz, Gail W.

    2009-01-01

    The 2.9-Å structure of the vesicular stomatitis virus nucleocapsid (N) protein bound to RNA shows the RNA to be tightly sequestered between the two lobes of the N protein. Domain movement of the lobes of the N protein has been postulated to facilitate polymerase access to the RNA template. We investigated the roles of individual amino acid residues in the C-terminal loop, involved in long-range interactions between N protein monomers, in forming functional ribonucleoprotein (RNP) templates. T...

  17. Injection of mice with antibody to interferon renders peritoneal macrophages permissive for vesicular stomatitis virus and encephalomyocarditis virus.

    Belardelli, F.; Vignaux, F; Proietti, E; Gresser, I

    1984-01-01

    Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) and encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV) multiply in only a small percentage of peritoneal macrophages freshly explanted from 4- to 6-week-old male or female DBA/2, BALB/c, C3H, C57BL/6, or Swiss mice. However, when these mice were injected intraperitoneally with potent sheep (or goat) anti-mouse interferon alpha/beta globulin 4 days prior to harvesting peritoneal macrophages, the viruses multiplied to high titers and most of the cells were infected, as determine...

  18. Effects of alpha-7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor positive allosteric modulator on lipopolysaccharide-induced neuroinflammatory pain in mice.

    Abbas, Muzaffar; Rahman, Shafiqur

    2016-07-15

    Evidence indicates that microglial activation contributes to the pathophysiology and maintenance of neuroinflammatory pain involving central nervous system alpha-7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. The objective of the present study was to determine the effects of 3a,4,5,9b-Tetrahydro-4-(1-naphthalenyl)-3H-cyclopentan[c]quinoline-8-sulfonamide (TQS), an alpha-7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor positive allosteric modulator (PAM), on tactile allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia following lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced microglial activation in hippocampus, a neuroinflammatory pain model in mice. In addition, we examined the effects of TQS on microglial activation marker, an ionized calcium-binding adapter molecule 1 (Iba-1), in the hippocampus may be associated with neuroinflammatory pain. Pretreatment of TQS (4mg/kg) significantly reduced LPS (1mg/kg)-induced tactile allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia. Moreover, pretreatment of methyllycaconitine (3mg/kg) significantly reversed TQS-induced antiallodynic and antihyperalgesic responses indicating the involvement of alpha-7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor. Pretreatment of TQS significantly decreased LPS-induced increased in hippocampal Iba-1 expression. Overall, these results suggest that TQS reduces LPS-induced neuroinflammatory pain like symptoms via modulating microglial activation likely in the hippocampus and/or other brain region by targeting alpha-7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor. Therefore, alpha-7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor PAM such as TQS could be a potential drug candidate for the treatment of neuroinflammatory pain. PMID:27154173

  19. Acetylcholine Attenuates Hypoxia/ Reoxygenation-Induced Mitochondrial and Cytosolic ROS Formation in H9c2 Cells via M2 Acetylcholine Receptor

    Yi Miao

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: The anti-infammatory and cardioprotective effect of acetylcholine (ACh has been reported; nevertheless, whether and how ACh exhibits an antioxidant property against ischemia/reperfusion (I/R-induced oxidative stress remains obscure. Methods: In the present study, H9c2 rat cardiomyocytes were exposed to hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R to mimic I/R injury. We estimated intracellular different sources of reactive oxygen species (ROS by measuring mitochondrial ROS (mtROS, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA copy number, xanthine oxidase (XO and NADPH oxidase (NOX activity and expression of rac 1. Cell injury was determined by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH release and cleaved caspase-3 expression. The siRNA transfection was performed to knockdown of M2 acetylcholine receptor (M2 AChR expression. Results: 12-h hypoxia followed by 2-h reoxygenation resulted in an abrupt burst of ROS in H9c2 cells. Administration of ACh reduced the levels of ROS in a concentration-dependent manner. Compared to the H/R group, ACh decreased mtROS, recovered mtDNA copy number, diminished XO and NOX activity, rac 1 expression as well as cell injury. Co- treatment with atropine rather than hexamethonium abolished the antioxidant and cardioprotective effect of ACh. Moreover, knockdown of M2 AChR by siRNA showed the similar trends as atropine co-treatment group. Conclusions: ACh inhibits mitochondria-, XO- and NOX-derived ROS production thus protecting H9c2 cells against H/R-induced oxidative stress, and these benefcial effects are mainly mediated by M2 AChR. Our findings suggested that increasing ACh release could be a potential therapeutic strategy for treatment and prevention of I/R injury.

  20. Mecanismos moleculares de resistencia a las enfermedades vesiculares virales del ganado criollo colombiano blanco orejinegro (BON

    Jorge Eliécer Ossa Londoño

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available

    En Colombia circulan dos virus que producen enfermedad vesicular en bovinos: Fiebre Aftosa (VFA y Estomatitis Vesicular (VEV. El genoma de estos es ssRNA, el cual durante la replicación da lugar a dsRNA, que es el más potente inductor de interferón (IFN tipo I

  1. Selective effects of carbamate pesticides on rat neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and rat brain acetylcholinesterase

    Effects of commonly used carbamate pesticides on rat neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes have been investigated using the two-electrode voltage clamp technique. The potencies of these effects have been compared to the potencies of the carbamates to inhibit rat brain acetylcholinesterase. The potency order of six carbamates to inhibit α4β4 nicotinic receptors is fenoxycarb > EPTC > carbaryl, bendiocarb > propoxur > aldicarb with IC50 values ranging from 3 μM for fenoxycarb to 165 μM for propoxur and >1 mM for aldicarb. Conversely, the potency order of these carbamates to inhibit rat brain acetylcholinesterase is bendiocarb > propoxur, aldicarb > carbaryl >> EPTC, fenoxycarb with IC50 values ranging from 1 μM for bendiocarb to 17 μM for carbaryl and >>1 mM for EPTC and fenoxycarb. The α4β2, α3β4, and α3β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors are inhibited by fenoxycarb, EPTC, and carbaryl with potency orders similar to that for α4β4 receptors. Comparing the potencies of inhibition of the distinct subtypes of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors shows that the α3β2 receptor is less sensitive to inhibition by fenoxycarb and EPTC. The potency of inhibition depends on the carbamate as well as on a combination of α and β subunit properties. It is concluded that carbamate pesticides affect different subtypes of neuronal nicotinic receptors independently of acetylcholinesterase inhibition. This implicates that neuronal nicotinic receptors are additional targets for some carbamate pesticides and that these receptors may contribute to carbamate pesticide toxicology, especially after long-term exposure

  2. A neuronal acetylcholine receptor regulates the balance of muscle excitation and inhibition in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Maelle Jospin

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available In the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, cholinergic motor neurons stimulate muscle contraction as well as activate GABAergic motor neurons that inhibit contraction of the contralateral muscles. Here, we describe the composition of an ionotropic acetylcholine receptor that is required to maintain excitation of the cholinergic motor neurons. We identified a gain-of-function mutation that leads to spontaneous muscle convulsions. The mutation is in the pore domain of the ACR-2 acetylcholine receptor subunit and is identical to a hyperactivating mutation in the muscle receptor of patients with myasthenia gravis. Screens for suppressors of the convulsion phenotype led to the identification of other receptor subunits. Cell-specific rescue experiments indicate that these subunits function in the cholinergic motor neurons. Expression of these subunits in Xenopus oocytes demonstrates that the functional receptor is comprised of three alpha-subunits, UNC-38, UNC-63 and ACR-12, and two non-alpha-subunits, ACR-2 and ACR-3. Although this receptor exhibits a partially overlapping subunit composition with the C. elegans muscle acetylcholine receptor, it shows distinct pharmacology. Recordings from intact animals demonstrate that loss-of-function mutations in acr-2 reduce the excitability of the cholinergic motor neurons. By contrast, the acr-2(gf mutation leads to a hyperactivation of cholinergic motor neurons and an inactivation of downstream GABAergic motor neurons in a calcium dependent manner. Presumably, this imbalance between excitatory and inhibitory input into muscles leads to convulsions. These data indicate that the ACR-2 receptor is important for the coordinated excitation and inhibition of body muscles underlying sinusoidal movement.

  3. Partial nicotinic acetylcholine (α4β2 agonists as promising new medications for smoking cessation

    Singh J

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To review the pharmacology, clinical efficacy and safety of partial agonists of a4β 2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor. Data Sources: Primary literature and review articles were obtained via a PUBMED search (1988-August 2006 using the key terms smoking cessation, partial agonist alpha4beta2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor, varenicline, cytisine and SSR591813. Additional studies and abstracts were identified from the bibliographies of reviewed literature. Study Selection and Data Extraction: Studies and review articles related to varenicline, cytisine and the partial agonist alpha4beta2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor were reviewed. Data Synthesis: Smoking is widely recognized as a serious health problem. Smoking cessation has major health benefits. According to the US Public Health Services, all patients attempting to quit smoking should be encouraged to use one or more effective pharmacotherapy. Currently, along with nicotine replacement therapy, bupropion, nortriptyline and clonidine, are the mainstay of pharmacotherapy. More than ¾ of patients receiving treatment for smoking cessation return to smoking within the first year. Nicotine, through stimulating α4β 2 nAChR, releases dopamine in the reward pathway. Partial agonist of α4β 2 nAChR elicits moderate and sustained release of dopamine, which is countered during the cessation attempts; it simultaneously blocks the effects of nicotine by binding with α4β 2 receptors during smoking. Recently, varenicline, a partial agonist at α4β 2 nAChR, has been approved by the FDA (Food and Drug Administration for smoking cessation. Conclusion: Partial agonist α4β 2 nAChR appears to be a promising target in smoking cessation. Varenicline of this group is approved for treatment of smoking cessation by the FDA in May 2006.

  4. Didelphis marsupialis como un reservorio potencial u hospedero amplificador del virus de la estomatitis vesicular, serotipo new jersey en Antioquia

    John Arboleda

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available

    La Estomatitis Vesicular (EV es una enfermedad viral, aguda
    y autolimitante que afecta principalmente bovinos, equinos y
    porcinos. Es producida por el virus de estomatitis vesicular (VEV, serotipos New Jersey (VEV-NJ e Indiana (VEV-IN, que son los as importantes epidemiológicamente (1. Los estudios serológicos demuestran que VEV-NJ y VEV-IN infectan en forma natural una gran variedad de animales silvestres, que están posiblemente implicados en la  coepizootiología de la EV, como hospederos portadores, mplificadores o reservorios (2.

    La zarigüeya (Didelphis marsupialis es un buen candidato
    para cumplir esta función, debido a que es la especie silvestre
    mayormente capturada en zonas enzoóticas; presenta altos
    porcentajes de infección natural (3, resiste la antropización y
    además, su comportamiento le permite interactuar con
    diferentes poblaciones de vectores u otros reservorios en los
    bosques y servir como fuente de infección para las especies
    domésticas susceptibles.

     

     

  5. Shear deformation experiments on vesicular rhyolite: Implications for brittle fracturing, degassing, and compaction of magmas in volcanic conduits

    Okumura, S.; Nakamura, M.; Nakano, T.; Uesugi, K.; Tsuchiyama, A.

    2009-12-01

    Shear-induced brittle fractures in vesicular magmas are thought to be possible pathways for open-system degassing that controls the explosivity of volcanic eruptions. To investigate the detailed processes of degassing through the fractures, we performed torsional deformation experiments on columnar rhyolitic samples with an initial water content of 0.5 wt% and averaged vesicularities of 20-41 vol%, at temperatures of 780-930°C and strain rates SPring-8, Japan). At relatively high temperatures (>830°C), the columnar samples were homogeneously twisted and deformed, resulting in shear-induced bubble coalescence and deformation. At temperatures ≤830°C, the deformation was localized, and finally resulted in brittle failure into a column and a disk, which was followed by a slip deformation at the fractured interface. The slip prevented further brittle fracturing and shear-induced bubble coalescence in the remaining parts of the sample. A permeable fragment zone was formed only near the fractured interface, and the bubbles remained isolated and the permeability did not increase in the rest of the sample. We infer that a single event of magma fracturing may enhance open-system degassing locally near the fracture, but repeated fracturing and healing processes are necessary for effective degassing of the entire magma that leads to non-explosive eruptions.

  6. Eleven cases of vesicular cutaneous lupus erythematosus in Shetland sheepdogs and rough collies: clinical management and prognosis.

    Jackson, H A

    2004-02-01

    A cutaneous ulcerative disease is recognized to affect the adult Shetland sheepdog and rough collie. This has a distinct clinical and histological appearance consistent with a vesicular variant of cutaneous lupus erythematosus (VCLE). Retrospective information on the clinical outcome and response to therapy was collected from 11 cases of histologically confirmed VCLE. In 8/11 dogs the onset of disease was in the summer; in three dogs recrudescence occurred in subsequent summers. In eight dogs the skin disease was judged to be 75-100% controlled with therapy after a minimum follow-up of 9 months. Successful treatment in seven of these cases comprised immunosuppressive doses of oral glucocorticoids, alone (one dog), in combination with azathioprine (five dogs) and doxycycline (one dog). One case responded to topical fluocinolone. Three dogs were euthanised for reasons directly related to the disease, one prior to initiating any therapy. Vesicular cutaneous lupus erythematosus in the rough collie and Shetland sheepdog can be a debilitating skin disease which is best managed with aggressive immunosuppressive therapy. Sun avoidance or the use of sunscreens is an important additional management recommendation. PMID:14989704

  7. m1 Acetylcholine Receptor Expression is Decreased in Hippocampal CA1 region of Aged Epileptic Animals

    Cavarsan, Clarissa Fantin; Avanzi, Renata Della Torre; Queiroz, Claudio Marcos; Xavier, Gilberto Fernando; Mello, Luiz Eugênio; Covolan, Luciene

    2011-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated the possible additive effects of epilepsy and aging on the expression of m1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (AChR) in the rat hippocampus. Young (3 months) and Aged (20 months) male, Wistar rats were treated with pilocarpine to induce status epilepticus (SE). Immunohistochemical procedure for m1 AChR detection was performed 2 months after pilocarpine-induced SE. In the CA1 pyramidal region m1 AChR staining was significantly decreased in aged epileptic ...

  8. Temperature effect on proximal to distal gradient of quantal release of acetylcholine at frog endplate

    Samigullin, D.; Bukharaeva, E.; Nikolsky, E.; Vyskočil, František

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 28, 3-4 (2003), s. 507-514. ISSN 0364-3190 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA7011902; GA ČR GA305/02/1333; GA ČR GA202/02/1213 Grant ostatní: RFBR(RU) 02/04/48901 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922; CEZ:MSM 113100003 Keywords : neuromuscular junction * acetylcholine release * temperature Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 1.511, year: 2003

  9. INFLUENCE OF ANTIBIOTICS ON THE MECHANICAL RESPONSES OF GUINEA-PIG ILEUM TO ACETYLCHOLINE AND HISTAMINE

    Petroianu Andy

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available The side effects of antibiotics have been extensively described during the last decades, however, their role on digestive motility must be better investigated. Following a line of research, the influence of penicillin, chloranfenicol tetracycline and gentamicine on longitudinal smooth muscle responses to acetylcholine and histamine were studied on guinea-pig ileum. There were no differences between the responses before and after the addition of each antibiotic. Further investigations must be performed in order to find a possible influence of antibiotics on digestive motility.

  10. Expression of the α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor in human lung cells

    Schuller Hildegard M

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We and others have shown that one of the mechanisms of growth regulation of small cell lung cancer cell lines and cultured pulmonary neuroendocrine cells is by the binding of agonists to the α7 neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor. In addition, we have shown that the nicotine-derived carcinogenic nitrosamine, 4(methylnitrosamino-1-(3-pyridyl-1-butanone (NNK, is a high affinity agonist for the α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor. In the present study, our goal was to determine the extent of α7 mRNA and protein expression in the human lung. Methods Experiments were done using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR, a nuclease protection assay and western blotting using membrane proteins. Results We detected mRNA for the neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor α7 receptor in seven small cell lung cancer (SCLC cell lines, in two pulmonary adenocarcinoma cell lines, in cultured normal human small airway epithelial cells (SAEC, one carcinoid cell line, three squamous cell lines and tissue samples from nine patients with various types of lung cancer. A nuclease protection assay showed prominent levels of α7 in the NCI-H82 SCLC cell line while α7 was not detected in SAEC, suggesting that α7 mRNA levels may be higher in SCLC compared to normal cells. Using a specific antibody to the α7 nicotinic receptor, protein expression of α7 was determined. All SCLC cell lines except NCI-H187 expressed protein for the α7 receptor. In the non-SCLC cells and normal cells that express the α7 nAChR mRNA, only in SAEC, A549 and NCI-H226 was expression of the α7 nicotinic receptor protein shown. When NCI-H69 SCLC cell line was exposed to 100 pm NNK, protein expression of the α7 receptor was increased at 60 and 150 min. Conclusion Expression of mRNA for the neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor α7 seems to be ubiquitously expressed in all human lung cancer cell lines tested (except for NCI-H441 as well as normal

  11. Catecholamines and acetylcholine are key regulators of the interaction between microbes and the immune system.

    Weinstein, Leon Islas; Revuelta, Alberto; Pando, Rogelio Hernandez

    2015-09-01

    Recent studies suggest that catecholamines (CAs) and acetylcholine (ACh) play essential roles in the crosstalk between microbes and the immune system. Host cholinergic afferent fibers sense pathogen-associated molecular patterns and trigger efferent cholinergic and catecholaminergic pathways that alter immune cell proliferation, differentiation, and cytokine production. On the other hand, microbes have the ability to produce and degrade ACh and also regulate autogenous functions in response to CAs. Understanding the role played by these neurotransmitters in host-microbe interactions may provide valuable information for the development of novel therapies. PMID:26378438

  12. Prostate stem cell antigen interacts with nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and is affected in Alzheimer's disease

    Jensen, Majbrit Myrup; Mikkelsen, Jens D.; Arvaniti, Maria; Pinborg, Lars Hageman; Thomsen, Morten Skøtt

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder involving impaired cholinergic neurotransmission and dysregulation of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). Ly-6/neurotoxin (Lynx) proteins have been shown to modulate cognition and neural plasticity by binding to nAChR subtypes and...... are present in the human brain. We further showed that PSCA forms stable complexes with the α4 nAChR subunit and decreases nicotine-induced extracellular-signal regulated kinase phosphorylation in PC12 cells. In addition, we analyzed protein levels of PSCA and Lypd6 in postmortem tissue of medial...

  13. alpha4beta2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors on dopaminergic neurons mediate nicotine reward and anxiety relief

    McGranahan, Tresa M.; Patzlaff, Natalie E.; Grady, Sharon R; Heinemann, Stephen F.; Booker, T.K.

    2011-01-01

    Nicotine is the primary psychoactive substance in tobacco and it exerts its effects by interaction with various subtypes of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) in the brain. One of the major subtypes expressed in brain, the alpha4beta2-nAChR, endogenously modulates neuronal excitability and thereby, modifies certain normal, as well as nicotine-induced, behaviors. Although alpha4-containing nAChRs are widely expressed across the brain, a major focus has been on their roles within midbra...

  14. The role of alpha4 containing nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in dopamine neurons

    McGranahan, Tresa Michelle

    2011-01-01

    Nicotine is the primary psychoactive substance in tobacco and it exerts its effects by interaction with various subtypes of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) in the brain. One of the major subtypes expressed in brain, the alpha4beta2-nAChR, endogenously modulates neuronal excitability and, thereby, modifies certain normal, as well as nicotine-induced, behaviors. Although alpha4- containing nAChRs are widely expressed across the brain, a major focus has been on their roles within midb...

  15. The nicotinic acetylcholine receptor gene family of the silkworm, Bombyx mori

    Zhang Chuan-Xi; Dong Ke; Shao Ya-Ming

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) mediate fast synaptic cholinergic transmission in the insect central nervous system. The insect nAChR is the molecular target of a class of insecticides, neonicotinoids. Like mammalian nAChRs, insect nAChRs are considered to be made up of five subunits, coded by homologous genes belonging to the same family. The nAChR subunit genes of Drosophila melanogaster, Apis mellifera and Anopheles gambiae have been cloned previously based o...

  16. Interaction of 18-methoxycoronaridine with nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in different conformational states

    Arias, Hugo R.; Rosenberg, Avraham; Feuerbach, Dominik; Targowska-Duda, Katarzyna M.; Maciejewski, Ryszard; Jozwiak, Krzysztof; Moaddel, Ruin; Glick, Stanley D.; Wainer, Irving W.

    2010-01-01

    The interaction of 18-methoxycoronaridine (18-MC) with nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) was compared with that for ibogaine and phencyclidine (PCP). The results established that 18-MC: (a) is more potent than ibogaine and PCP inhibiting (±)-epibatidine-induced AChR Ca2+ influx. The potency of 18-MC is increased after longer pre-incubation periods, which is in agreement with the enhancement of [3H]cytisine binding to resting but activatable Torpedo AChRs, (b) binds to a single site in...

  17. Interaction of ibogaine with human α3β4-nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in different conformational states

    Arias, Hugo R.; Rosenberg, Avraham; Targowska-Duda, Katarzyna M.; Feuerbach, Dominik; Yuan, Xiao Juan; Jozwiak, Krzysztof; Moaddel, Ruin; Wainer, Irving W.

    2010-01-01

    The interaction of ibogaine and phencyclidine (PCP) with human (h) α3β4-nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) in different conformational states was determined by functional and structural approaches including, radioligand binding assays, Ca2+ influx detections, and thermodynamic and kinetics measurements. The results established that (a) ibogaine inhibits (±)-epibatidine-induced Ca2+ influx in hα3β4 AChRs with ~9-fold higher potency than that for PCP, (b) [3H]ibogaine binds to a single s...

  18. Changes in acetylcholine release from the chick retina are not associated with myopia development

    Full text: The effectiveness of muscarinic receptor antagonists in inhibiting myopia progression in animal models and humans implicates cholinergic signalling in ocular growth regulation. Therefore to determine if changes in the release of acetylcholine from the retina are involved in myopia development, the efflux of acetylcholine from the in vitro retina of normal and myopic chick eyes was investigated. Chicks were monocularly deprived (MD) of pattern vision with translucent occluders for 2 or 7 days and refractive error of MD groups and age matched normals was monitored using retinoscopy (n=6 each group). 3H-choline-Cl (1 Ci in 7μL) was injected into the vitreous of each eye under 2.5% halothane anaesthesia. After 1hr, the eyes were enucleated, under terminal anaesthesia (sodium pentobarbital, 120 mg/kg, im). Retinas were flat-mounted on acetate filter discs and superfused with oxygenated physiological saline solution (PSS) for 30min at 0.4mL/min. Five baseline fractions were collected (B1-B5), then three stimulated fractions were collected in the presence of PSS containing 50mM KCl (K1-K3) at 2min intervals. 3H-acetylcholine ( 3H-ACh) in each fraction was quantified by liquid scintillation counting. Significant amounts of myopia were induced in MD eyes after 2 (-5.1±0.8D) and 7 days (-18.8±2.4D) relative to control eyes (paired t-test p3H-ACh release was 146±15% above basal levels (K2/B1%) from retinas of normal animals. After 2 days MD, there was no significant difference between KCl-evoked release of 3H-ACh from deprived eyes (147 39%) compared to control eyes (198±61%, paired t-test, p=0.27) or the eyes of normal animals (ANOVA, p>0.5). Similar results were obtained following 7 days MD. The results demonstrate that evoked acetylcholine release from the chick retina of myopic eyes is unaltered relative to control or normal eyes using an in vitro approach. Copyright (2002) Australian Neuroscience Society

  19. Block by acetylcholine of mouse muscle nicotinic receptors, stably expressed in fibroblasts

    1995-01-01

    We have measured the concentration and voltage dependence of block by acetylcholine (ACh) of fetal- and adult-type mouse muscle nicotinic receptors, expressed in a fibroblast cell line. Data, obtained at a transmembrane potential of -60 mV and with ACh concentrations of 1 mM and above, are broadly consistent with the occlusion of an open channel with a single ACh+ ion (simple open channel block). The rate of recovery from block is approximately 40,000s-1 and has only a weak voltage dependence...

  20. Synthesis, Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor Binding, and Pharmacological Properties of 3’- (Substituted phenyl) Deschloroepibatidine Analogs

    F. Ivy Carroll; Yokota, Yasuno; Ma, Wei; Lee, Jeffrey R.; Brieaddy, Lawrence E.; Burgess, Jason P.; Navarro, Hernán A.; Damaj, M. I.; Martin, Billy R.

    2007-01-01

    A series of 3’-(substituted phenyl)deschloroepibatidine analogs (5a–j) were synthesized. The α4β2* and α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) binding properties and functional activity in the tail-flick, hot-plate, locomotor, and body temperature tests in mice of 5a–j were compared to those of the nAChR agonist, nicotine (1), epibatidine (4), and deschloroepibatidine (13) the partial agonist, varenicline (3) and the antagonist 2’-fluoro-3’-(substituted phenyl)deschloroepibatidine analogs...

  1. Spontaneous quantal and non-quantal release of acetylcholine at mouse endplate during onset of hypoxia

    Bukharaeva, E.A.; Salakhutdinov, R.I.; Vyskočil, František; Nikolsky, E.E.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 54, č. 2 (2005), s. 251-255. ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA5011411; GA ČR(CZ) GA305/02/1333 Grant ostatní: RFBR(RU) 05-04-49723; Scientific Schools of Russia(RU) 1063.2003.4 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : hypoxia * non-quantal * acetylcholine Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 1.806, year: 2005

  2. Regional distribution of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in the telencephalon of the pigeon (Columba livia f. domestica)

    The distribution of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors was studied autoradiographically in croystat sections of the pigeon telencephalon using 3H-quinuclidinylbenzylate as a ligand. Highest receptor density was observed in the hyperstriatum ventrale, palaeostriatum augmentatum, septum, and parts of the archistriatum. In sites of known sensory input of neostriatum (field L) and ectostriatum low receptor binding was observed. Acetylcholinesterase distribution is in good agreement with the receptor picture only in the basal telencephalon. In the pallium differences in the pattern of these two components can be seen. (author)

  3. An extract of lionfish (Pterois volitans) spine tissue contains acetylcholine and a toxin that affects neuromuscular transmission.

    Cohen, A S; Olek, A J

    1989-01-01

    A soluble toxic extract derived from spine tissue of the lionfish (Pterois volitans) decreased heart rate and force of contraction in isolated clam and frog hearts. These actions were due to the presence of micromolar concentrations of acetylcholine in the extract. Toxicity was retained after hydrolysis of acetylcholine by exogenous acetylcholinesterase, but heart function was no longer affected. Toxin treated in this way induced muscle fibrillation in an isolated nerve-muscle preparation, followed by blockade of neuromuscular transmission. Bursts of transient depolarizations were recorded at the muscle endplate shortly after toxin addition that correlated in time with the duration of toxin-induced muscle fibrillation. These effects are thought to be due to the increased release and then depletion of acetylcholine from the nerve terminal. PMID:2560846

  4. Use of automated real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) to monitor experimental swine vesicular disease virus infection in pigs

    Reid, S.M.; Paton, D.J.; Wilsden, G.; Hutchings, G.H.; King, D. P.; Ferris, N.P.; Alexandersen, Søren

    2004-01-01

    optimization of the template extraction method was required to counteract the effects of RT-PCR inhibitors in faeces. It was concluded that the automated real-time RT-PCR is a useful diagnostic method for SVD in clinically or subclinically affected pigs and contributed to the study of the pathogenesis of SVD......Automated real-time RT-PCR was evaluated as a diagnostic tool for swine vesicular disease virus (SVDV) infection on a range of samples (vesicular epithelium, serum, nasal swabs, faeces) from four inoculated and three in-contact pigs over a period of 28 days. Traditional diagnostic procedures (virus...

  5. Critical Evaluation of Acetylcholine Determination in Rat Brain Microdialysates using Ion-Pair Liquid Chromatography with Amperometric Detection

    Yvette Michotte

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Liquid chromatography with amperometric detection remains the most widely used method for acetylcholine quantification in microdialysis samples. Separation of acetylcholine from choline and other matrix components on a microbore chromatographic column (1 mm internal diameter, conversion of acetylcholine in an immobilized enzyme reactor and detection of the produced hydrogen peroxide on a horseradish peroxidase redox polymer coated glassy carbon electrode, achieves sufficient sensitivity for acetylcholine quantification in rat brain microdialysates. However, a thourough validation within the concentration range required for this application has not been carried out before. Furthermore, a rapid degradation of the chromatographic columns and enzyme systems have been reported. In the present study an ion-pair liquid chromatography assay with amperometric detection was validated and its long-term stability evaluated. Working at pH 6.5 dramatically increased chromatographic stability without a loss in sensitivity compared to higher pH values. The lower limit of quantification of the method was 0.3 nM. At this concentration the repeatability was 15.7%, the inter-day precision 8.7% and the accuracy 103.6%. The chromatographic column was stable over 4 months, the immobilized enzyme reactor up to 2-3 months and the enzyme coating of the amperometric detector up to 1-2 months. The concentration of acetylcholine in 30 μl microdialysates obtained under basal conditions from the hippocampus of freely moving rats was 0.40 ± 0.12 nM (mean ± SD, n = 30. The present method is therefore suitable for acetylcholine determination in rat brain microdialysates.

  6. Topological dispositions of lysine α380 and lysine γ486 in the acetylcholine receptor from Torpedo californica

    The locations have been determined, with respect to the plasma membrane, of lysine α380 and lysine γ486 in the α subunit and the γ subunit, respectively, of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor from Torpedo californica. Immunoadsorbents were constructed that recognize the carboxy terminus of the peptide GVKYIAE released by proteolytic digestion from positions 378-384 in the amino acid sequence of the α subunit of the acetylcholine receptor and the carboxy terminus of the peptide KYVP released by proteolytic digestion from positions 486-489 in the amino acid sequence of the γ subunit. They were used to isolate these peptides from proteolytic digests of polypeptides from the acetylcholine receptor. Sealed vesicles containing the native acetylcholine receptor were labeled with pyridoxal phosphate and sodium [3H]-borohydride. The effect of saponin on the incorporation of pyridoxamine phosphate into lysine α380 and lysine γ486 from the acetylcholine receptor in these vesicles was assessed with the immunoadsorbents. The conclusions that follow from these results are that lysine α380 is on the inside surface of a vesicle and lysine γ486 is on the outside surface. Because a majority (85%) of the total binding sites for α-bungarotoxin bind the toxin in the absence of saponin, the majority of the vesicles are right side out with the inside of the vesicle corresponding to the cytoplasmic surface and the outside of the vesicle corresponding to the extracytoplasmic, synaptic surface. Because lysine α380 and lysine γ486 lie on opposite sides of the membrane, a membrane-spanning segment must be located between the two positions occupied by these two amino acids in the common sequence of a polypeptide of the acetylcholine receptor

  7. Topological dispositions of lysine. alpha. 380 and lysine. gamma. 486 in the acetylcholine receptor from Torpedo californica

    Dwyer, B.P. (Univ. of California, San Diego, La Jolla (USA))

    1991-04-23

    The locations have been determined, with respect to the plasma membrane, of lysine {alpha}380 and lysine {gamma}486 in the {alpha} subunit and the {gamma} subunit, respectively, of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor from Torpedo californica. Immunoadsorbents were constructed that recognize the carboxy terminus of the peptide GVKYIAE released by proteolytic digestion from positions 378-384 in the amino acid sequence of the {alpha} subunit of the acetylcholine receptor and the carboxy terminus of the peptide KYVP released by proteolytic digestion from positions 486-489 in the amino acid sequence of the {gamma} subunit. They were used to isolate these peptides from proteolytic digests of polypeptides from the acetylcholine receptor. Sealed vesicles containing the native acetylcholine receptor were labeled with pyridoxal phosphate and sodium ({sup 3}H)-borohydride. The effect of saponin on the incorporation of pyridoxamine phosphate into lysine {alpha}380 and lysine {gamma}486 from the acetylcholine receptor in these vesicles was assessed with the immunoadsorbents. The conclusions that follow from these results are that lysine {alpha}380 is on the inside surface of a vesicle and lysine {gamma}486 is on the outside surface. Because a majority (85%) of the total binding sites for {alpha}-bungarotoxin bind the toxin in the absence of saponin, the majority of the vesicles are right side out with the inside of the vesicle corresponding to the cytoplasmic surface and the outside of the vesicle corresponding to the extracytoplasmic, synaptic surface. Because lysine {alpha}380 and lysine {gamma}486 lie on opposite sides of the membrane, a membrane-spanning segment must be located between the two positions occupied by these two amino acids in the common sequence of a polypeptide of the acetylcholine receptor.

  8. Peri-Golgi vesicles contain retrograde but not anterograde proteins consistent with the cisternal progression model of intra-Golgi transport

    José A Martínez-Menárguez; Prekeris, Rytis; Oorschot, Viola M J; Scheller, Richard; Slot, Jan W.; Geuze, Hans J.; Klumperman, Judith

    2001-01-01

    A cisternal progression mode of intra-Golgi transport requires that Golgi resident proteins recycle by peri-Golgi vesicles, whereas the alternative model of vesicular transport predicts anterograde cargo proteins to be present in such vesicles. We have used quantitative immuno-EM on NRK cells to distinguish peri-Golgi vesicles from other vesicles in the Golgi region. We found significant levels of the Golgi resident enzyme mannosidase II and the transport machinery proteins giantin, KDEL-rece...

  9. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptor polymorphism, smoking behavior, and tobacco-related cancer and lung and cardiovascular diseases: a cohort study

    Kaur-Knudsen, Diljit; Bojesen, Stig E; Tybjærg-Hansen, Anne; Nordestgaard, Børge G

    2011-01-01

    We examined the associations between the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor polymorphism (rs1051730) on chromosome 15q25 marking the gene cluster CHRNA3-CHRNB4-CHRNA5, smoking behavior, and tobacco-related cancer and lung and cardiovascular diseases in the general population.......We examined the associations between the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor polymorphism (rs1051730) on chromosome 15q25 marking the gene cluster CHRNA3-CHRNB4-CHRNA5, smoking behavior, and tobacco-related cancer and lung and cardiovascular diseases in the general population....

  10. Contrasting Effects of Allosteric and Orthosteric Agonists on M1 Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptor Internalization and Down-regulation

    Thomas, Rachel L.; Christopher J Langmead; Wood, Martyn D; Challiss, R.A. John

    2009-01-01

    A new class of subtype-selective muscarinic acetylcholine (mACh) receptor agonist that activates the receptor through interaction at a site distinct from the orthosteric acetylcholine binding site has been reported recently. Here, we have compared the effects of orthosteric (oxotremorine-M, arecoline, pilocarpine) and allosteric [4-n-butyl-1-[4-(2-methylphenyl)-4-oxo-1-butyl] piperidine (AC-42); 1-[3-(4-butyl-1-piperidinyl)propyl]-3,4-dihydro-2(1H)-quinolinone (77-LH-28-1)] agonists on M1 mAC...

  11. Regulation of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor phosphorylation in rat myotubes by forskolin and cAMP

    Miles, K.; Anthony, D.T.; Rubin, L.L.; Greengard, P.; Huganir, R.L.

    1987-09-01

    The nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (Ac-ChoR) from rat myotubes prelabeled in culture with (/sup 32/P)orthophosphate was isolated by acetylcholine affinity chromatography followed by immunoaffinity chromatography. Under basal conditions, the nicotinic AcChoR was shown to be phosphorylated in situ on the ..beta.. and delta subunits. Regulation of AcChoR phosphorylation by cAMP-dependent protein kinase was explored by the addition of forskolin or cAMP analogues to prelabeled cell cultures. Forskolin, an activator of adenylate cyclase, stimulated the phosphorylation of the delta subunit 20-fold over basal phosphorylation and induced phosphorylation of the ..cap alpha.. subunit. The effect of forskolin was dose dependent with a half-maximal response at 8 ..mu..M in the presence of 35 ..mu..M Ro 20-1724, a phosphodiesterase inhibitor. Stimulation of delta subunit phosphorylation was almost maximal within 5 min, whereas stimulation of ..cap alpha.. subunit phosphorylation was not maximal until 45 min after forskolin treatment. Stimulation of AcChoR phosphorylation by 8-benzylthioadenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate was identical to that obtained by forskolin. Two-dimensional thermolytic phosphopeptide maps of the delta subunit revealed a single major phosphopeptide. These results correlate closely with the observed effects of forskolin on AcChoR desensitization in muscle and suggest that cAMP-dependent phosphorylation of the delta subunit increases the rate of AcChoR desensitization in rat myotubes.

  12. Regulation of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor phosphorylation in rat myotubes by forskolin and cAMP

    The nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (Ac-ChoR) from rat myotubes prelabeled in culture with [32P]orthophosphate was isolated by acetylcholine affinity chromatography followed by immunoaffinity chromatography. Under basal conditions, the nicotinic AcChoR was shown to be phosphorylated in situ on the β and δ subunits. Regulation of AcChoR phosphorylation by cAMP-dependent protein kinase was explored by the addition of forskolin or cAMP analogues to prelabeled cell cultures. Forskolin, an activator of adenylate cyclase, stimulated the phosphorylation of the δ subunit 20-fold over basal phosphorylation and induced phosphorylation of the α subunit. The effect of forskolin was dose dependent with a half-maximal response at 8 μM in the presence of 35 μM Ro 20-1724, a phosphodiesterase inhibitor. Stimulation of δ subunit phosphorylation was almost maximal within 5 min, whereas stimulation of α subunit phosphorylation was not maximal until 45 min after forskolin treatment. Stimulation of AcChoR phosphorylation by 8-benzylthioadenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate was identical to that obtained by forskolin. Two-dimensional thermolytic phosphopeptide maps of the δ subunit revealed a single major phosphopeptide. These results correlate closely with the observed effects of forskolin on AcChoR desensitization in muscle and suggest that cAMP-dependent phosphorylation of the δ subunit increases the rate of AcChoR desensitization in rat myotubes

  13. Characterization of a putative acetylcholine receptor in chick ciliary ganglion neurons

    Monoclonal antibodies to the main immunogenic region on the alpha subunit of acetylcholine receptors in muscle and electric organ recognize membrane components in chick brain and ciliary ganglia that are candidates for the neuronal receptor. The component in chick brain has been purified by immunoaffinity chromatography. It specifically binds nicotine but not alpha-bungarotoxin, and can be affinity labeled with (3H)bromoacetylcholine. The cross-reacting component in ciliary ganglion neurons is concentrated in synaptic membrane, and can be modulated by exposure of the cells to cholinergic ligands in culture. The cross-reacting component in ciliary ganglion neurons is an integral membrane component that binds concanavalin A, and it is distinct from the alpha-bungarotoxin binding component. The acetylcholine receptor function in these neurons can be locked by affinity alkylation with bromoacetylcholine, indicating similarity in this respect to receptors from muscle and electric organ. Antisera raised against the partially purified component from chick brain also block receptor function on ciliary ganglion neurons. The subcellular distribution of the ganglion component in culture is assessed, and it is shown that approximately 2/3 of the cross-reacting components are intracellular; the majority of these seem not to be destined for insertion into the plasma membrane

  14. Regulation of phosphorylation of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in mouse BC3H1 myocytes

    Smith, M.M.; Merlie, J.P.; Lawrence, J.C. Jr.

    1987-09-01

    By using /sup 32/P-labeling methods and performing immunoprecipitations with specific antibodies, the authors have found that three subunits of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor and phosphorylated in mouse skeletal muscle cells. In nonstimulated cells, the molar ratios of phosphate estimated in ..cap alpha.., ..beta.., and delta subunits were 0.02, 0.05, and 0.5, respectively. All three subunits contained predominantly phosphoserine with some phosphothreonine; the ..beta.., subunit also contained phosphotyrosine. Incubating cells with agents that stimulate cAMP-dependent pathways (isoproterenol, forskolin, 8-Br-cAMP) increased the phosphorylation of the delta subunit by 50%, but phosphate labeling of the ..beta.. subunit was depressed by a third. In contrast, when cells were incubated with the divalent cation ionophores A-23187 or ionomycin, phosphorylation of both the delta and ..beta.. subunits increased. The results indicate that acetylcholine receptors are phosphorylated to significant levels in skeletal muscle cells and that cAMP-dependent and Ca/sup 2 +/-dependent pathways exist for controlling the phosphorylation state of the receptor subunits.

  15. The Anti-Acetylcholine Receptor Antibody Test in Suspected Ocular Myasthenia Gravis

    Jung Jin Lee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To estimate the clinical significance of anti-acetylcholine receptor antibody (anti-AChR-Ab levels in suspected ocular myasthenia gravis. Methods. In total, 144 patients complaining of fluctuating diplopia and ptosis were evaluated for serum levels of anti-acetylcholine receptor antibody and their medical charts were retrospectively reviewed. Subjects were classified into three groups: variable diplopia only, ptosis only, and both variable diplopia and ptosis. We investigated serum anti-AChR-Ab titer levels and performed thyroid autoantibody tests. Results. Patients’ chief complaints were diplopia (N=103, ptosis (N=12, and their concurrence (N=29. Abnormal anti-AChR-Ab was observed in 21 of 144 patients (14.1%. Between the three groups, mean age, number of seropositive patients, and mean anti-AChR-Ab level were not significantly different (P=0.224, 0.073, and 0.062, resp.. Overall, 27.5% of patients had abnormal thyroid autoantibodies. Conclusion. The sensitivity of anti-AChR-Ab was 14.1% in suspected ocular myasthenia gravis and seropositivity in myasthenia gravis patients showed a high correlation with the presence of thyroid autoantibodies.

  16. Role of acetylcholine receptors in proliferation and differentiation of P19 embryonal carcinoma cells

    Coordinated proliferation and differentiation of progenitor cells is the base for production of appropriate numbers of neurons and glia during neuronal development in order to establish normal brain functions. We have used murine embryonal carcinoma P19 cells as an in vitro model for early differentiation to study participation of nicotinic (nAChR) and muscarinic acetylcholine (mAChR) receptors in the proliferation of neural progenitor cells and their differentiation to neurons. We have previously shown that functional nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) already expressed in embryonic cells mediate elevations in cytosolic free calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) via calcium influx through nAChR channels whereas intracellular stores contribute to nAChR- and mAChR-mediated calcium fluxes in differentiated cells [Resende et al., Cell Calcium 43 (2008) 107-121]. In the present study, we have demonstrated that nicotine provoked inhibition of proliferation in embryonic cells as determined by BrdU labeling. However, in neural progenitor cells nicotine stimulated proliferation which was reversed in the presence of inhibitors of calcium mobilization from intracellular stores, indicating that liberation of intracellular calcium contributed to this proliferation induction. Muscarine induced proliferation stimulation in progenitor cells by activation of Gαq/11-coupled M1, M3 and M5 receptors and intracellular calcium stores, whereas Gαi/o-protein coupled M2 receptor activity mediated neuronal differentiation

  17. Relation between Pro-inflammatory Cytokines and Acetylcholine Levels in Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis Patients

    Ada Maria Tata

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS is a chronic inflammatory, demyelinating and neurodegenerative disorder. Since acetylcholine (ACh is known to participate in the inflammatory response, we investigated the possible relationship between pro-inflammatory cytokines and acetylcholine levels in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RR-MS patients. Levels of ACh and pro-inflammatory cytokines IL1-β and IL-17 were measured both in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF and sera of 22 RR-MS patients in the relapsing phase and in 17 control subjects affected by other non-neurological diseases (OND. We observed higher levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-1β and IL-17 in both CSF and serum of RR-MS patients compared to control subjects. Moreover, ACh levels were lower in CSF and serum of RR-MS patients compared to levels of control subjects. Although the relationship between high inflammatory cytokine levels and low ACh levels need to be further investigated in the future, our data suggest that IL-1β, and cytokines induced by it, such as IL-17 and ACh, may be involved in the pathogenesis of MS.

  18. Crystal structures of the M1 and M4 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Thal, David M; Sun, Bingfa; Feng, Dan; Nawaratne, Vindhya; Leach, Katie; Felder, Christian C; Bures, Mark G; Evans, David A; Weis, William I; Bachhawat, Priti; Kobilka, Tong Sun; Sexton, Patrick M; Kobilka, Brian K; Christopoulos, Arthur

    2016-03-17

    Muscarinic M1-M5 acetylcholine receptors are G-protein-coupled receptors that regulate many vital functions of the central and peripheral nervous systems. In particular, the M1 and M4 receptor subtypes have emerged as attractive drug targets for treatments of neurological disorders, such as Alzheimer's disease and schizophrenia, but the high conservation of the acetylcholine-binding pocket has spurred current research into targeting allosteric sites on these receptors. Here we report the crystal structures of the M1 and M4 muscarinic receptors bound to the inverse agonist, tiotropium. Comparison of these structures with each other, as well as with the previously reported M2 and M3 receptor structures, reveals differences in the orthosteric and allosteric binding sites that contribute to a role in drug selectivity at this important receptor family. We also report identification of a cluster of residues that form a network linking the orthosteric and allosteric sites of the M4 receptor, which provides new insight into how allosteric modulation may be transmitted between the two spatially distinct domains. PMID:26958838

  19. Luminescent silica nanoparticles for sensing acetylcholinesterase-catalyzed hydrolysis of acetylcholine.

    Mukhametshina, Alsu R; Fedorenko, Svetlana V; Zueva, Irina V; Petrov, Konstantin A; Masson, Patrick; Nizameev, Irek R; Mustafina, Asiya R; Sinyashin, Oleg G

    2016-03-15

    This work highlights the H-function of Tb(III)-doped silica nanoparticles in aqueous solutions of acetic acid as a route to sense acetylcholinesterase-catalyzed hydrolysis of acetylcholine (ACh). The H-function results from H(+)-induced quenching of Tb(III)-centered luminescence due to protonation of Tb(III) complexes located close to silica/water interface. The H-function can be turned on/switched off by the concentration of complexes within core or nanoparticle shell zones, by the silica surface decoration and adsorption of both organic and inorganic cations on silica surface. Results indicate the optimal synthetic procedure for making nanoparticles capable of sensing acetic acid produced by enzymatic hydrolysis of acetylcholine. The H-function of nanoparticles was determined at various concentrations of ACh and AChE. The measurements show experimental conditions for fitting the H-function to Michaelis-Menten kinetics. Results confirm that reliable fluorescent monitoring AChE-catalyzed hydrolysis of ACh is possible through the H-function properties of Tb(III)-doped silica nanoparticles. PMID:26516688

  20. Sulfated polysaccharides are potent and selective inhibitors of various enveloped viruses, including herpes simplex virus, cytomegalovirus, vesicular stomatitis virus, and human immunodeficiency virus.

    Baba, M.; Snoeck, R; Pauwels, R; De Clercq, E

    1988-01-01

    Several sulfated polysaccharides (dextran sulfate, pentosan polysulfate, fucoidan, and carrageenans) proved to be potent inhibitors for herpes simplex virus, human cytomegalovirus, vesicular stomatitis virus, Sindbis virus, and human immunodeficiency virus. They were moderately inhibitory to vaccinia virus but not inhibitory to adenovirus, coxsackievirus, poliovirus, parainfluenza virus, and reovirus. These results indicate that, with the exception of parainfluenza virus, enveloped viruses ar...

  1. In vitro isolation and characterization of a calicivirus causing a vesicular disease of the hands and feet.

    Smith, A W; Berry, E S; Skilling, D E; Barlough, J E; Poet, S E; Berke, T; Mead, J; Matson, D O

    1998-02-01

    We report that a calicivirus of oceanic origin, San Miguel sea lion virus serotype 5 (SMSV-5), is a human pathogen. This biotype was isolated originally from blisters on the flippers of northern fur seals (Callorhinus ursinus) and replicates readily in primate and human cell lines. It infects a phylogenetically diverse array of hosts (poikilotherms to primates) and induces type-specific neutralizing antibodies in exposed humans. Group antibody against a pooled antigen of SMSV-5 and two other serotypes was also observed in 18% of 300 blood donors from a population in the northwestern United States. The human calicivirus isolate designated SMSV-5 Homosapien-1 (SMSV-5 Hom-1) was recovered from a laboratory worker with systemic illness, including vesicular lesions on all four extremities. We believe this newly described human disease represents a paradigmatic shift in calicivirus disease recognition. PMID:9502467

  2. The lipidomes of vesicular stomatitis virus, semliki forest virus, and the host plasma membrane analyzed by quantitative shotgun mass spectrometry

    Kalvodova, Lucie; Sampaio, Julio L; Cordo, Sandra; Ejsing, Christer S.; Shevchenko, Andrej; Simons, Kai

    2009-01-01

    Although enveloped virus assembly in the host cell is a crucial step in the virus life cycle, it remains poorly understood. One issue is how viruses include lipids in their membranes during budding from infected host cells. To analyze this issue, we took advantage of the fact that baby hamster...... kidney cells can be infected by two different viruses, namely, vesicular stomatitis virus and Semliki Forest virus, from the Rhabdoviridae and Togaviridae families, respectively. We purified the host plasma membrane and the two different viruses after exit from the host cells and analyzed the lipid....... Taken together, the facts that the lipid compositions of the two viruses are so similar and that they strongly resemble the composition of the plasma membrane suggest that these viruses exert little selection in including lipids in their envelopes....

  3. Cooperation of B cells and T cells is required for survival of mice infected with vesicular stomatitis virus

    Thomsen, Allan Randrup; Nansen, A; Andersen, C; Johansen, J; Marker, O; Christensen, Jan Pravsgaard

    1997-01-01

    some antiviral activity, but CD4+ T cells sufficed for survival and were required for optimal resistance. Consistent with this it was found that in nude mice a lethal outcome could be prevented by transfer of CD8-depleted cells from B cell-deficient mice. Thus our results clearly demonstrate that while......To define the role of T cells and B cells in resistance to vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) infection, knockout mice with different specific immune defects on an identical background were infected i.v. and the outcome of infection was compared; in this way a more complete picture of the relative...... importance of various host defence mechanisms could be obtained. Compared to T and B cell-deficient SCID mice which all succumbed from encephalitis within 5-9 days of infection, T cell-deficient nude mice generally lived longer, but within a period of approximately 1 month after challenge all died. In...

  4. Effects of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizae on the drought resistance of wild jujube (Zizyphs spinosus Hu) seedlings

    LU Jinying; LIU Min; MAO Yongmin; SHEN Lianying

    2007-01-01

    The current study explored the effects of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizae (VAM) inoculation on the growth and water requirement of pot-grown wild jujube (Zizyphs spinosus Hu).Three water regimes (20%,40% and 60% of soil water content) were conducted.The VAM inoculation could significantly increase plant growth (including plant height,leaf area,and fresh and dry mass),enhance relative leaf water content,photosynthetic rates,transpiration rates and stomatal conductance,and improve plant drought tolerance.The water consumption of the mycorrhizal plants producing 1 g of dry matter was 18.7%-26.6% lower than the consumption of non-mycorrhizal plants grown under the same soil water content conditions.

  5. X-Ray Inactivation of Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus and Vesicular Stomatitis Virus in Aqueous Media

    Radiation induced modifications to the biological activities and morphology of viruses are very dependent upon the techniques used in irradiation. Inactivation of foot-and-mouth disease virus and vesicular stomatitis virus by the effects of X-irradiation in dilute aqueous solutions has been studied and the post-irradiation effects and virus sensitization effects are described. Comparisons are made between X-radiation and hydrogen peroxide as virus inactivating agents. Survival curves resulting from these modes of inactivation give information on the reaction kinetics and on the function of the virus protein. Virus morphology, as detected in electron micrographs, is more readily changed by irradiation in solution (indirect effect) than by irradiation of the virus in the frozen state (direct effect). In each case the observed physical changes are related to loss of infectivity and the results are shown to be consistent with the inactivation processes previously inferred. (author)

  6. Vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizae and the enzymatic utilization of inorganic phosphate by plant roots: Progress report 1985

    Marx, D. H.

    1985-01-01

    It is well known that phosphorus absorption, especially from soil with low phosphorus levels, by plant roots can be enhanced by mycorrhizal infection. Root cortical cells colonized by vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (VAM) have higher concentrations of phosphorus than noninfected cells. Polyphosphate is the major phosphorus reserve in many fungi and is reported to be present abundantly in young and proliferating arbuscules. We propose that mycorrhizal polyphosphate can be utilized by the VAM-plant symbiont system as a phosphorus donor and an energy source in the glycolytic pathway, possibly after being hydrolyzed to pytrophosphate (PPi). The VAM systems of infected and noninfected roots of sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua L.) and onion (Allium cepa L. var. Texas Grand) were used to compare the activity of PPI-dependent phosphofructokinase (PFK), an enzyme utilizing PPi to convert frutose-6-phosphate into fructosel,6-bisphosphate. The ATP-PKF activity was measured also. 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  7. Vesicular stomatitis virus infects resident cells of the central nervous system and induces replication-dependent inflammatory responses

    Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) infection of mice via intranasal administration results in a severe encephalitis with rapid activation and proliferation of microglia and astrocytes. We have recently shown that these glial cells express RIG-I and MDA5, cytosolic pattern recognition receptors for viral RNA. However, it is unclear whether VSV can replicate in glial cells or if such replication is required for their inflammatory responses. Here we demonstrate that primary microglia and astrocytes are permissive for VSV infection and limited productive replication. Importantly, we show that viral replication is required for robust inflammatory mediator production by these cells. Finally, we have confirmed that in vivo VSV administration can result in viral infection of glial cells in situ. These results suggest that viral replication within resident glial cells might play an important role in CNS inflammation following infection with VSV and possibly other neurotropic nonsegmented negative-strand RNA viruses.

  8. Hippocampal α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor levels in patients with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, or major depressive disorder

    Thomsen, Morten Skøtt; Weyn, Annelies; Mikkelsen, Jens D

    The α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) is involved in cognitive function and synaptic plasticity. Consequently, changes in α7 nAChR function have been implicated in a variety of mental disorders, especially schizophrenia. However, there is little knowledge regarding the levels of the α7 n...

  9. Changes in Temperature Have Opposing Effects on Current Amplitude in alpha 7 and alpha 4 beta 2 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors

    Jindřichová, Marie; Lansdell, S. J.; Millar, N. S.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 2 (2012), e32073. E-ISSN 1932-6203 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : effect of temperature * nicotinic acetylcholine receptor * voltage - clamp recording Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 3.730, year: 2012

  10. An allosteric enhancer of M4muscarinic acetylcholine receptor function inhibits behavioral and neurochemical effects of cocaine

    Dencker, Ditte; Weikop, Pia; Sørensen, Gunnar;

    2012-01-01

    The mesostriatal dopamine system plays a key role in mediating the reinforcing effects of psychostimulant drugs like cocaine. The muscarinic M4 acetylcholine receptor subtype is centrally involved in the regulation of dopamine release in striatal areas. Consequently, striatal M4 receptors could be...

  11. Pharmacological Evaluation of the Long-Term Effects of Xanomeline on the M1 Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptor

    Grant, M.K.O.; Noetzel, M.J.; De Lorme, K.C.; Jakubík, Jan; Doležal, Vladimír; El-Fakahany, E. E.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 5, č. 12 (2010), e15722-16. E-ISSN 1932-6203 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA305/09/0681 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : Xanomeline * muscarinic acetylcholine receptor Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 4.411, year: 2010

  12. Utrophin abundance is reduced at neuromuscular junctions of patients with both inherited and acquired acetylcholine receptor deficiencies

    Slater, CR; Young, C; Wood, SJ; Bewick, GS; Anderson, LVB; Baxter, P; Fawcett, PRW; Roberts, M; Jacobson, L; Kuks, J; Vincent, A; NewsomDavis, J

    1997-01-01

    Congenital myasthenic syndromes are a heterogenous group of conditions in which muscle weakness resulting from impaired neuromuscular transmission is often present from infancy. One form of congenital myasthenic syndrome is due to a reduction of the number of acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) at the n

  13. Covalent Trapping of Methyllycaconitine at the α4-α4 Interface of the α4β2 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor

    Absalom, Nathan L; Quek, Gracia; Lewis, Trevor M;

    2013-01-01

    The α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are widely expressed in the brain and are implicated in a variety of physiological processes. There are two stoichiometries of the α4β2 nAChR, (α4)2(β2)3 and (α4)3(β2)2, with different sensitivities to acetylcholine (ACh), but their pharmacologi......The α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are widely expressed in the brain and are implicated in a variety of physiological processes. There are two stoichiometries of the α4β2 nAChR, (α4)2(β2)3 and (α4)3(β2)2, with different sensitivities to acetylcholine (ACh), but their...... competitive antagonism and an apparently insurmountable mechanism that only occurs after preincubation with MLA. We hypothesized an additional MLA binding site in the α4-α4 interface that is unique to this stoichiometry. To prove this, we covalently trapped a cysteine-reactive MLA analog at an α4β2 receptor...... containing an α4(D204C) mutation predicted by homology modeling to be within reach of the reactive probe. We demonstrate that covalent trapping results in irreversible reduction of ACh-elicited currents in the (α4)3(β2)2 stoichiometry, indicating that MLA binds to the α4-α4 interface of the (α4)3(β2)2 and...

  14. A subpopulation of neuronal M4 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors plays a critical role in modulating dopamine-dependent behaviors

    Jeon, Jongrye; Nielsen, Ditte Dencker; Wörtwein, Gitta;

    2010-01-01

    Acetylcholine (ACh) regulates many key functions of the CNS by activating cell surface receptors referred to as muscarinic ACh receptors (M(1)-M(5) mAChRs). Like other mAChR subtypes, the M(4) mAChR is widely expressed in different regions of the forebrain. Interestingly, M(4) mAChRs are coexpres...

  15. Determination of anti-acetylcholine receptor antibodies in myasthenic patients by use of time-resolved fluorescence

    Říčný, Jan; Šimková, L.; Vincent, A.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 48, č. 3 (2002), s. 549-554. ISSN 0009-9147 R&D Projects: GA MZd NF4646 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : nicotinic acetylcholine receptor * time-resolved fluorescence method * myasthenia gravis Subject RIV: FR - Pharmacology ; Medidal Chemistry Impact factor: 4.788, year: 2002

  16. Gamma-lactams--a novel scaffold for highly potent and selective alpha 7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonists.

    Enz, Albert; Feuerbach, Dominik; Frederiksen, Mathias U; Gentsch, Conrad; Hurth, Konstanze; Müller, Werner; Nozulak, Joachim; Roy, Bernard L

    2009-03-01

    A novel class of alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) agonists has been discovered through high-throughput screening. The cis gamma-lactam scaffold has been optimized to reveal highly potent and selective alpha7 nAChR agonists with in vitro activity and selectivity and with good brain penetration in mice. PMID:19208472

  17. Ensemble Structure of the Highly Flexible Complex Formed between Vesicular Stomatitis Virus Unassembled Nucleoprotein and its Phosphoprotein Chaperone.

    Yabukarski, Filip; Leyrat, Cedric; Martinez, Nicolas; Communie, Guillaume; Ivanov, Ivan; Ribeiro, Euripedes A; Buisson, Marlyse; Gerard, Francine C; Bourhis, Jean-Marie; Jensen, Malene Ringkjøbing; Bernadó, Pau; Blackledge, Martin; Jamin, Marc

    2016-07-01

    Nucleocapsid assembly is an essential process in the replication of the non-segmented, negative-sense RNA viruses (NNVs). Unassembled nucleoprotein (N(0)) is maintained in an RNA-free and monomeric form by its viral chaperone, the phosphoprotein (P), forming the N(0)-P complex. Our earlier work solved the structure of vesicular stomatitis virus complex formed between an N-terminally truncated N (NΔ21) and a peptide of P (P60) encompassing the N(0)-binding site, but how the full-length P interacts with N(0) remained unknown. Here, we combine several experimental biophysical methods including size exclusion chromatography with detection by light scattering and refractometry, small-angle X-ray and neutron scattering and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy with molecular dynamics simulation and computational modeling to characterize the NΔ21(0)-PFL complex formed with dimeric full-length P. We show that for multi-molecular complexes, simultaneous multiple-curve fitting using small-angle neutron scattering data collected at varying contrast levels provides additional information and can help refine structural ensembles. We demonstrate that (a) vesicular stomatitis virus PFL conserves its high flexibility within the NΔ21(0)-PFL complex and interacts with NΔ21(0) only through its N-terminal extremity; (b) each protomer of P can chaperone one N(0) client protein, leading to the formation of complexes with stoichiometries 1N:P2 and 2N:P2; and (c) phosphorylation of residues Ser60, Thr62 and Ser64 provides no additional interactions with N(0) but creates a metal binding site in PNTR. A comparison with the structures of Nipah virus and Ebola virus N(0)-P core complex suggests a mechanism for the control of nucleocapsid assembly that is common to all NNVs. PMID:27107640

  18. L-DOPA elicits non-vesicular releases of serotonin and dopamine in hemiparkinsonian rats in vivo.

    Miguelez, Cristina; Navailles, Sylvia; Delaville, Claire; Marquis, Loïse; Lagière, Mélanie; Benazzouz, Abdelhamid; Ugedo, Luisa; De Deurwaerdère, Philippe

    2016-08-01

    The control of the secretory activity of serotonergic neurons has been pointed out to reduce motor and non-motor side effects of the antiparkinsonian drug L-DOPA. This strategy deserves further investigation because it is presently unclear whether L-DOPA promotes a non-vesicular release of dopamine and serotonin from serotonergic neurons. To get a full neurochemical picture compatible with the existence of such a mechanism, we combined multisite intracerebral microdialysis, post mortem tissue measurement and single unit extracellular recordings in the dorsal raphe nucleus from hemiparkinsonian rats. L-DOPA (3-100mg/kg, ip.) non-homogeneously decreased extracellular serotonin levels in the striatum, substantia nigra pars reticulata, hippocampus and prefrontal cortex and homogenously serotonin tissue content in the striatum, cortex and cerebellum. L-DOPA (12mg/kg) did not modify the firing rate or pattern of serotonergic-like neurons recorded in the dorsal raphe nucleus. When focusing on serotonin release in the prefrontal cortex and the hippocampus, we found that L-DOPA (12 or 100mg/kg) enhanced serotonin extracellular levels in both regions upon Ca(2+) removal. Concomitantly, L-DOPA-stimulated dopamine release partly persisted in the absence of Ca(2+) in a region-dependent manner. Local application of the serotonin reuptake inhibitor citalopram (1µM) blunted the responses to L-DOPA (3-12mg/kg), measured as extracellular dopamine levels, most prominently in the hippocampus. These data stress that L-DOPA, already at low to moderate doses, promotes non-vesicular releases of serotonin and dopamine in a region-dependent manner. PMID:27234917

  19. Serological and Molecular Detection of Senecavirus A Associated with an Outbreak of Swine Idiopathic Vesicular Disease and Neonatal Mortality.

    Gimenez-Lirola, Luis Gabriel; Rademacher, Chris; Linhares, Daniel; Harmon, Karen; Rotolo, Marisa; Sun, Yaxuan; Baum, David H; Zimmerman, Jeffrey; Piñeyro, Pablo

    2016-08-01

    We performed a longitudinal field study in a swine breeding herd that presented with an outbreak of vesicular disease (VD) that was associated with an increase in neonatal mortality. Initially, a USDA Foreign Animal Disease (FAD) investigation confirmed the presence of Senecavirus A (SVA) and ruled out the presence of exotic agents that produce vesicular lesions, e.g., foot-and-mouth disease virus and others. Subsequently, serum samples, tonsil swabs, and feces were collected from sows (n = 22) and their piglets (n = 33) beginning 1 week after the onset of the clinical outbreak and weekly for 6 weeks. The presence of SVA RNA was evaluated in all specimens collected by reverse transcriptase quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) targeting a conserved region of the 5' untranslated region (5'-UTR). The serological response (IgG) to SVA was evaluated by the weekly testing of sow and piglet serum samples on a SVA VP1 recombinant protein (rVP1) indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The rVP1 ELISA detected seroconversion against SVA in clinically affected and non-clinically affected sows at early stages of the outbreak as well as maternal SVA antibodies in offspring. Overall, the absence of vesicles (gross lesions) in SVA-infected animals and the variability of RT-qPCR results among specimen type demonstrated that a diagnostic algorithm based on the combination of clinical observations, RT-qPCR in multiple diagnostic specimens, and serology are essential to ensure an accurate diagnosis of SVA. PMID:27225408

  20. Maximal acetylcholine dose of 200 μg into the left coronary artery as a spasm provocation test: comparison with 100 μg of acetylcholine.

    Sueda, Shozo; Kohno, Hiroaki; Miyoshi, Toru; Sakaue, Tomoki; Sasaki, Yasuhiro; Habara, Hirokazu

    2015-11-01

    As a spasm provocation test of acetylcholine (ACH), incremental dose up (20/50/100 μg) into the left coronary artery (LCA) is recommended in the guidelines established by Japanese Circulation Society. Recently, Ong et al. reported the ACOVA study which maximal ACH dose was 200 μg in the LCA. We compared the angiographic findings between ACH 100 μg and ACH 200 μg in the LCA and also examined the usefulness and safety of ACH 200 μg in Japanese patients without variant angina. As a spasm provocation test, we performed intracoronary injection of ACH 200 μg after ACH 100 μg in 88 patients (55 males, 68.4 ± 11.7 years old) including 59 ischemic heart disease (IHD) patients and 29 non-IHD patients. Positive spasm was defined as >99 % transient stenosis (focal spasm) or 90 % severe diffuse vasoconstriction (diffuse spasm). Positive spasm by ACH 200 μg was significantly higher than that by ACH 100 μg (36 pts: 40.9 % vs. 17 pts: 19.3 %, p LCA was safe and useful. We may reexamine the maximal ACH dose into the LCA. PMID:25179297

  1. Activation of the Macrophage α7 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor and Control of Inflammation.

    Báez-Pagán, Carlos A; Delgado-Vélez, Manuel; Lasalde-Dominicci, José A

    2015-09-01

    Inflammatory responses to stimuli are essential body defenses against foreign threats. However, uncontrolled inflammation may result in serious health problems, which can be life-threatening. The α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor, a ligand-gated ion channel expressed in the nervous and immune systems, has an essential role in the control of inflammation. Activation of the macrophage α7 receptor by acetylcholine, nicotine, or other agonists, selectively inhibits production of pro-inflammatory cytokines while leaving anti-inflammatory cytokines undisturbed. The neural control of this regulation pathway was discovered recently and it was named the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway (CAP). When afferent vagus nerve terminals are activated by cytokines or other pro-inflammatory stimuli, the message travels through the afferent vagus nerve, resulting in action potentials traveling down efferent vagus nerve fibers in a process that eventually leads to macrophage α7 activation by acetylcholine and inhibition of pro-inflammatory cytokines production. The mechanism by which activation of α7 in macrophages regulates pro-inflammatory responses is subject of intense research, and important insights have thus been made. The results suggest that activation of the macrophage α7 controls inflammation by inhibiting NF-κB nuclear translocation, and activating the JAK2/STAT3 pathway among other suggested pathways. While the α7 is well characterized as a ligand-gated ion channel in neurons, whole-cell patch clamp experiments suggest that α7's ion channel activity, defined as the translocation of ions across the membrane in response to ligands, is absent in leukocytes, and therefore, ion channel activity is generally assumed not to be required for the operation of the CAP. In this perspective, we briefly review macrophage α7 activation as it relates to the control of inflammation, and broaden the current view by providing single-channel currents as evidence that the α7

  2. Membrane glycoprotein folding, oligomerization and intracellular transport: effects of dithiothreitol in living cells

    Braakman, L.J.; Tatu, U.; Helenius, A

    1993-01-01

    Using influenza hemagglutinin (HA0) and vesicular stomatitis virus G protein as model proteins, we have analyzed the effects of dithiothreitol (DTT) on conformational maturation and transport of glycoproteins in the secretory pathway of living cells. While DTT caused reduction of folding intermediates and misfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), it did not affect molecules that had already acquired a mature trimeric conformation, whether present in the ER or elsewhere. The conver...

  3. Sterol Transport In Yeast and the Oxysterol Binding Protein Homologue (OSH) Family

    Schulz, Timothy A.; Prinz, William A.

    2007-01-01

    Sterols such as cholesterol are a significant component of eukaryotic cellular membranes, and their unique physical properties influence a wide variety of membrane processes. It is known that the concentration of sterol within the membrane varies widely between organelles, and that the cell actively maintains this distribution through various transport processes. Vesicular pathways such as secretion or endocytosis may account for this traffic, but increasing evidence highlights the importance...

  4. Analogues of neuroactive polyamine wasp toxins that lack inner basic sites exhibit enhanced antagonism toward a muscle-type mammalian nicotinic acetylcholine receptor

    Stromgaard, K; Brierley, M J; Andersen, K; Sløk, F A; Mellor, I R; Usherwood, P N; Krogsgaard-Larsen, P; Jaroszewski, J W

    1999-01-01

    noncompetitively antagonized the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) in a concentration-, time-, and voltage-dependent manner. The amplitudes of acetylcholine-induced currents were compared at their peaks and at the end of a 1 s application in the presence or absence of the analogues. Most of the analogues...... properties (stepwise macroscopic pK(a) values) were determined by (13)C NMR titrations. All analogues are fully protonated at physiological pH. The effects of these compounds on acetylcholine-induced currents in TE671 cells clamped at various holding potentials were determined. All of the analogues...

  5. [3H]imidacloprid: synthesis of a candidate radioligand for the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor

    Imidacloprid is an exceptionally potent insecticide known from physiological studies to act at the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor. To prepare [3H]imidacloprid as a candidate radioligand, 6-chloronicotinoyl chloride was reduced with NaB2H4 (in model studies) or NaB3H4 in absolute ethanol to 2-chloro-5-pyridinylmethanol which was transformed to 2-chloro-5-chloromethylpyridine on refluxing with thionyl chloride. Coupling with 4,5-dihydro-N-nitro-1H-imidazol-2-amine then gave [2H2]imidacloprid incorporating about 95% of the deuterium or [3H2]imidacloprid (25 Ci/mmol) in 80% radiochemical yield. In studies not detailed here [3H] imidacloprid was found to undergo high affinity, specific and saturable binding to a site in insect brain. (author)

  6. Dynamic heterogeneity and non-Gaussian statistics for acetylcholine receptors on live cell membrane

    He, W.; Song, H.; Su, Y.; Geng, L.; Ackerson, B. J.; Peng, H. B.; Tong, P.

    2016-05-01

    The Brownian motion of molecules at thermal equilibrium usually has a finite correlation time and will eventually be randomized after a long delay time, so that their displacement follows the Gaussian statistics. This is true even when the molecules have experienced a complex environment with a finite correlation time. Here, we report that the lateral motion of the acetylcholine receptors on live muscle cell membranes does not follow the Gaussian statistics for normal Brownian diffusion. From a careful analysis of a large volume of the protein trajectories obtained over a wide range of sampling rates and long durations, we find that the normalized histogram of the protein displacements shows an exponential tail, which is robust and universal for cells under different conditions. The experiment indicates that the observed non-Gaussian statistics and dynamic heterogeneity are inherently linked to the slow-active remodelling of the underlying cortical actin network.

  7. Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor Gene Family of the Pea Aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum

    LIU Yi-peng; LIN Ke-jian; LIU Yang; GUI Fu-rong; WANG Gui-rong

    2013-01-01

    The nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAchRs) are cholinergic receptors that form ligand-gated ion channels by ifve subunits in insect and vertebrate nervous systems. The insect nAChR is the molecular target of a class of insecticides, neonicotinoids. Here, we identiifed and cloned 11 candidate nAChR subunit genes in Acyrthosiphon pisum using genome-based bioinformatics combined modern molecular techniques. Most A. pisum nAChRs including α1, α2, α3, α4, α6, α8, and β1 show highly sequence identities with the counterparts of other insects examined. Expression proifles analysis showed that all subunit genes were expressed in adult head. At least two subunits have alternative splicing that obviously increase A. pisum nicotinic receptor diversity. This study will be invaluable for exploring the molecular mechanisms of neonicotinoid-like insecticides in sucking pests, and for ultimately establishing the screening platform of novel insecticides.

  8. The effect of cooling on the acetylcholine-induced current of identified Helix pomatia Br neuron.

    Nedeljkovic, Miodrag; Kartelija, Gordana; Radenovic, Lidija; Todorovic, Natasa

    2005-05-01

    The Br neuron of the snail Helix pomatia, involved in neuronal regulation of various homeostatic and adaptive mechanisms, represents an interesting model for studying effects of temperature changes on neuronal activity of poikilotherms. The acetylcholine (ACh) induces a transient, inward dose-dependent current in the identified Br neuron. In the work presented, we analyses the effects of cooling on the ACh-induced inward current. The amplitude of ACh-induced inward current was markedly decreased after cooling and the speed of the decay of ACh response was decreased. Sensitivity to cooling of Ach-activated current on the Br neuron is mediated by a mechanism that does not involve change in the apparent receptor affinity or the cooperativity of binding. PMID:15759140

  9. Steroids induce acetylcholine receptors on cultured human muscle: Implications for myasthenia gravis

    Antibodies to the acetylcholine receptor (AChR), which are diagnostic of the human autoimmune disease myasthenia gravis, block AChR function and increase the rate of AChR degradation leading to impaired neuromuscular transmission. Steroids are frequently used to alleviate symptoms of muscle fatigue and weakness in patients with myasthenia gravis because of their well-documented immunosuppressive effects. The authors show here that the steroid dexamethasone significantly increases total surface AChRs on cultured human muscle exposed to myasthenia gravis sera. The results suggest that the clinical improvement observed in myasthenic patients treated with steroids is due not only to an effect on the immune system but also a direct effect on muscle. They propose that the identification and development of pharmacologic agents that augment receptors and other proteins that are reduced by human genetic or autoimmune disease will have broad therapeutic applications

  10. Neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors serve as sensitive targets that mediate β-amyloid neurotoxicity

    Qiang LIU; Jie WU

    2006-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of brain dementia characterized by the accumulation of β-amyloid peptides (Aβ) and loss of forebrain cholinergic neurons. Aβ accumulation and aggregation are thought to contribute to cholinergic neuronal degeneration, in turn causing learning and memory deficits, but the specific targets that mediate Aβ neurotoxicity remain elusive. Recently, accumlating lines of evidence have demonstrated that Aβ directly modulates the function of neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), which leads to the new hypothesis that neuronal nAChRs may serve as important targets that mediate Aβ neurotoxicity. In this review, we summarize current studies performed in our laboratory and in others to address the question of how Aβ modulates neuronal nAChRs, especially nAChR subunit function.

  11. Steroids induce acetylcholine receptors on cultured human muscle: Implications for myasthenia gravis

    Kaplan, I.; Blakely, B.T.; Pavlath, G.K.; Travis, M.; Blau, H.M. (Stanford Univ. School of Medicine, CA (USA))

    1990-10-01

    Antibodies to the acetylcholine receptor (AChR), which are diagnostic of the human autoimmune disease myasthenia gravis, block AChR function and increase the rate of AChR degradation leading to impaired neuromuscular transmission. Steroids are frequently used to alleviate symptoms of muscle fatigue and weakness in patients with myasthenia gravis because of their well-documented immunosuppressive effects. The authors show here that the steroid dexamethasone significantly increases total surface AChRs on cultured human muscle exposed to myasthenia gravis sera. The results suggest that the clinical improvement observed in myasthenic patients treated with steroids is due not only to an effect on the immune system but also a direct effect on muscle. They propose that the identification and development of pharmacologic agents that augment receptors and other proteins that are reduced by human genetic or autoimmune disease will have broad therapeutic applications.

  12. NUTRIENT TRANSFER IN VESICULAR-ARBUSCULAR MYCORRHIZAS: A NEW MODEL BASED ON THE DISTRIBUTION OF ATPases ON FUNGAL AND PLANT MEMBRANES

    S.E. SMITH

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we review the membrane transport processes that are involved in the transfer of mineral nutrients and organic carbon between the symbiotic partners in mycorrhizas. In particular, we reassess the prevailing hypothesis that transfer in vesicular-arbuscular (VA mycorrhizas occurs simultaneously and bidirectionally across the same interface and that arbuscules are the main sites of transfer. Using cytochemical techniques, we and our collaborators have reexamined the distribution of ATPases in the arbuscular and intercellular hyphal interfaces in VA mycorrhizas formed between roots ofAllium cepa (onion and the fungus Glomus intraradices. The results showed that H +-ATPases have different localisation on plant and fungal membranes in arbuscular and hyphal interfaces (Gianinazzi-Pearson et al. 1991. While some arbuscular interfaces had H+-ATPase activity on both fungal and plant membranes, in most cases the fungal membrane lacked this activity. In contrast, the plasma membranes of intercellular hyphae always had H + -ATPase and the adjacent root cells did not. This suggests that the different interfaces in a VA mycorrhiza may have different functions. We propose that passive loss of P from the arbuscules is associated with active uptake by the energised (ATPase-bearing plant membrane and that passive loss of carbohydrate from the root cells is followed by active uptake by the intercellular hyphae. If this model is correct, then variations in "mycorrhizal efficiency" (i.e. the extent to which mycorrhizal plants grow better than non-mycorrhizal controls might be determined by differences in the numbers of active arbuscules as a proportion of the total fungal biomass within the root. As a first step towards investigating this possibility, we have developed methods for measuring the surface areas of arbuscular and hyphal interfaces in different fungus-host combinations, Glomus spp./ Allium porrum (leek. We have also measured fluxes of P from

  13. Neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors: Common molecular substrates of nicotine and alcohol dependence

    AndrewR.Tapper

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Alcohol and nicotine are often co-abused. As many as 80-95% of alcoholics are also smokers, suggesting that ethanol and nicotine, the primary addictive component of tobacco smoke, may functionally interact in the central nervous system and/or share a common mechanism of action. While nicotine initiates dependence by binding to and activating neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs, ligand-gated cation channels normally activated by endogenous acetylcholine (ACh, ethanol is much less specific with the ability to modulate multiple gene products including those encoding voltage-gated ion channels, and excitatory/inhibitory neurotransmitter receptors. However, emerging data indicate that ethanol interacts with nAChRs, both directly and indirectly, in the mesocorticolimbic dopaminergic (DAergic reward circuitry to affect brain reward systems. Like nicotine, ethanol activates DAergic neurons of the ventral tegmental area (VTA which project to the nucleus accumbens (NAc. Blockade of VTA nAChRs reduces ethanol-mediated activation of DAergic neurons, NAc DA release, consumption, and operant responding for ethanol in rodents. Thus, ethanol may increase ACh release into the VTA driving activation of DAergic neurons through nAChRs. In addition, ethanol potentiates distinct nAChR subtype responses to ACh and nicotine in vitro and in DAergic neurons. The smoking cessation therapeutic and nAChR partial agonist, varenicline, reduces alcohol consumption in heavy drinking smokers and rodent models of alcohol consumption. Finally, single nucleotide polymorphisms in nAChR subunit genes are associated with alcohol dependence phenotypes and smoking behaviors in human populations. Together, results from preclinical, clinical, and genetic studies indicate that nAChRs may have an inherent role in the abusive properties of ethanol, as well as in nicotine and alcohol co-dependence.

  14. Design and synthesis of new agents for neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChRs) imaging

    Introduction: The most abundant subtype of cerebral nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR), α4β2, plays a critical role in various brain functions and pathological states. Due to rapid technological progress in chemistry, bioinformatics, structural biology and computer technology, computer aided drug design (CADD) plays a more and more important role in today's drug discovery. Methods: Two novel 3-pyridyl ether nicotinic ligands-3-((pyridine-2-yl)methoxy)-5-iodopyridine, and 3-(((S)-pyrrolidin-2-yl)methoxy)-5-((4-iodobenzyloxy)-methyl)pyridine were designed and synthesized and radiolabeled with I-125 based on our 3D-QSAR models reported previously. Their ability to label high-affinity brain nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) was evaluated. Results: [125I]3-((pyridin-2-yl)methoxy)-5-iodopyridine shows rapid accumulation and elimination with peak (1.86%ID/g) at 5 min post injection, but has high blood uptake. [125I]3-(((S)-pyrrolidin-2-yl)methoxy)-5-((4-iodobenzyloxy)methyl)pyridine entered the brain with maximal uptake value 3.01%ID/g at 15 min after injection, and showed approximately 27% inhibition of radioactivity uptake in thalamus in mice pretreated with nicotine. Conclusions: The results of this preliminary study show that [125I]3-(((S)-pyrrolidin-2-yl)methoxy)-5-((4-iodobenzyloxy)methyl)pyridine shows relatively high uptake to the brain, however, since the in vivo selectivity for α4β2 nAChRs was not enough, [125I]3-(((S)-pyrrolidin-2-yl)methoxy)-5-((4-iodobenzyloxy)methyl)pyridine does not have the required properties for imaging nAChRs using SPECT. Structure optimization is needed for specific visualization of brain α4β2 nAChRs in vivo.

  15. Carbon monoxide-induced delayed amnesia, delayed neuronal death and change in acetylcholine concentration in mice

    Nabeshima, T.; Katoh, A.; Ishimaru, H.; Yoneda, Y.; Ogita, K.; Murase, K.; Ohtsuka, H.; Inari, K.; Fukuta, T.; Kameyama, T. (Meijo Univ., Nagoya (Japan))

    1991-01-01

    We investigated the interrelationship of delayed amnesia, delayed neuronal death and changes in acetylcholine concentration induced by carbon monoxide (CO)-exposure in mice. In the test for retention of the passive avoidance task, amnesia was observed 5 and 7 days after CO-exposure when the mice were exposed to CO 1 day after training; in the case when the mice were exposed to CO 5 and 7 days before training, amnesia was also observed in a retention test given 1 day after training. The number of pyramidal cells in the hippocampal CA1 subfield was lower than that of the control 3, 5 and 7 days after CO-exposure. But the neurodegeneration in the parietal cortex, area 1, was not observed until 7 days after CO-exposure. The findings indicated that the amnesia and the neuronal death were produced after a delay when the mice were exposed to CO. In addition, the delayed amnesia was closely related to the delayed neuronal death in the hippocampal CA1 subfield. Moreover, (3H)glutamate and (3H)glycine binding sites did not change after CO-exposure but, 7 days after CO-exposure, the concentration of acetylcholine and the binding of (3H)quinuclidinyl benzilate in the frontal cortex and the striatum were found to have significantly changed, but those in the hippocampus did not show significant change. Therefore, we suggest that delayed amnesia induced by CO-exposure may result from delayed neuronal death in the hippocampal CA1 subfield and dysfunction in the acetylcholinergic neurons, in the frontal cortex, the striatum and/or the hippocampus.

  16. Acetylcholine modulates human working memory and subsequent familiarity based recognition via alpha oscillations.

    Eckart, Cindy; Woźniak-Kwaśniewska, Agata; Herweg, Nora A; Fuentemilla, Lluis; Bunzeck, Nico

    2016-08-15

    Working memory (WM) can be defined as the ability to maintain and process physically absent information for a short period of time. This vital cognitive function has been related to cholinergic neuromodulation and, in independent work, to theta (4-8Hz) and alpha (9-14Hz) band oscillations. However, the relationship between both aspects remains unclear. To fill this apparent gap, we used electroencephalography (EEG) and a within-subject design in healthy humans who either received the acetylcholinesterase inhibitor galantamine (8mg) or a placebo before they performed a Sternberg WM paradigm. Here, sequences of sample images were memorized for a delay of 5s in three different load conditions (two, four or six items). On the next day, long-term memory (LTM) for the images was tested according to a remember/know paradigm. As a main finding, we can show that both theta and alpha oscillations scale during WM maintenance as a function of WM load; this resembles the typical performance decrease. Importantly, cholinergic stimulation via galantamine administration slowed down retrieval speed during WM and reduced associated alpha but not theta power, suggesting a functional relationship between alpha oscillations and WM performance. At LTM, this pattern was accompanied by impaired familiarity based recognition. These findings show that stimulating the healthy cholinergic system impairs WM and subsequent recognition, which is in line with the notion of a quadratic relationship between acetylcholine levels and cognitive functions. Moreover, our data provide empirical evidence for a specific role of alpha oscillations in acetylcholine dependent WM and associated LTM formation. PMID:27222217

  17. Escherichia coli Protein Expression System for Acetylcholine Binding Proteins (AChBPs.

    Nikita Abraham

    Full Text Available Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR are ligand gated ion channels, identified as therapeutic targets for a range of human diseases. Drug design for nAChR related disorders is increasingly using structure-based approaches. Many of these structural insights for therapeutic lead development have been obtained from co-crystal structures of nAChR agonists and antagonists with the acetylcholine binding protein (AChBP. AChBP is a water soluble, structural and functional homolog of the extracellular, ligand-binding domain of nAChRs. Currently, AChBPs are recombinantly expressed in eukaryotic expression systems for structural and biophysical studies. Here, we report the establishment of an Escherichia coli (E. coli expression system that significantly reduces the cost and time of production compared to the existing expression systems. E. coli can efficiently express unglycosylated AChBP for crystallography and makes the expression of isotopically labelled forms feasible for NMR. We used a pHUE vector containing an N-terminal His-tagged ubiquitin fusion protein to facilitate AChBP expression in the soluble fractions, and thus avoid the need to recover protein from inclusion bodies. The purified protein yield obtained from the E. coli expression system is comparable to that obtained from existing AChBP expression systems. E. coli expressed AChBP bound nAChR agonists and antagonists with affinities matching those previously reported. Thus, the E. coli expression system significantly simplifies the expression and purification of functional AChBP for structural and biophysical studies.

  18. The role of visual cortex acetylcholine in learning to discriminate temporally modulated visual stimuli

    Victor H Minces

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Cholinergic neurons in the basal forebrain innervate discrete regions of the cortical mantle, bestowing the cholinergic system with the potential to dynamically modulate sub-regions of the cortex according to behavioral demands. Cortical cholinergic activity has been shown to facilitate learning and modulate attention. Experiments addressing these issues have primarily focused on widespread cholinergic depletions, extending to areas involved in general cognitive processes and sleep cycle regulation, making a definitive interpretation of the behavioral role of cholinergic projections difficult. Furthermore, a review of the electrophysiological literature suggests that cholinergic modulation is particularly important in representing the fine temporal details of stimuli, an issue rarely addressed in behavioral experimentation. The goal of this work is to understand the role cholinergic projections, specific to the sensory cortex, in learning to discriminate fine differences in the temporal structure of stimuli. A novel visual Go/No-Go task was developed to assess the ability of rats to learn and discriminate fine differences in the temporal structure of visual stimuli (lights flashing at various frequencies. The cholinergic contribution to this task was examined by selectively eliminating acetylcholine projections to visual cortex (using 192 IgG-saporin, either before or after discrimination training.We find that in the face of compromised cholinergic input to the visual cortex, the rats’ ability to learn to perform fine discriminations is impaired, whereas their ability to perform discriminations remains unaffected.These results suggest that acetylcholine serves the role of facilitating plastic changes in the sensory cortices that are needed for an animal to refine their sensitivity to the temporal characteristics of relevant stimuli.

  19. The role of visual cortex acetylcholine in learning to discriminate temporally modulated visual stimuli.

    Minces, V H; Alexander, A S; Datlow, M; Alfonso, S I; Chiba, A A

    2013-01-01

    Cholinergic neurons in the basal forebrain innervate discrete regions of the cortical mantle, bestowing the cholinergic system with the potential to dynamically modulate sub-regions of the cortex according to behavioral demands. Cortical cholinergic activity has been shown to facilitate learning and modulate attention. Experiments addressing these issues have primarily focused on widespread cholinergic depletions, extending to areas involved in general cognitive processes and sleep cycle regulation, making a definitive interpretation of the behavioral role of cholinergic projections difficult. Furthermore, a review of the electrophysiological literature suggests that cholinergic modulation is particularly important in representing the fine temporal details of stimuli, an issue rarely addressed in behavioral experimentation. The goal of this work is to understand the role of cholinergic projections, specific to the sensory cortices, in learning to discriminate fine differences in the temporal structure of stimuli. A novel visual Go/No-Go task was developed to assess the ability of rats to learn to discriminate fine differences in the temporal structure of visual stimuli (lights flashing at various frequencies). The cholinergic contribution to this task was examined by selective reduction of acetylcholine projections to visual cortex (VCx) (using 192 IgG-saporin), either before or after discrimination training. We find that in the face of compromised cholinergic input to the VCx, the rats' ability to learn to perform fine discriminations is impaired, whereas their ability to perform previously learned discriminations remains unaffected. These results suggest that acetylcholine serves the role of facilitating plastic changes in the sensory cortices that are necessary for an animal to refine its sensitivity to the temporal characteristics of relevant stimuli. PMID:23519084

  20. Activation of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors elicits pigment granule dispersion in retinal pigment epithelium isolated from bluegill

    Crittenden Elizabeth L

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In fish, melanin pigment granules in the retinal pigment epithelium disperse into apical projections as part of the suite of responses the eye makes to bright light conditions. This pigment granule dispersion serves to reduce photobleaching and occurs in response to neurochemicals secreted by the retina. Previous work has shown that acetylcholine may be involved in inducing light-adaptive pigment dispersion. Acetylcholine receptors are of two main types, nicotinic and muscarinic. Muscarinic receptors are in the G-protein coupled receptor superfamily, and five different muscarinic receptors have been molecularly cloned in human. These receptors are coupled to adenylyl cyclase, calcium mobilization and ion channel activation. To determine the receptor pathway involved in eliciting pigment granule migration, we isolated retinal pigment epithelium from bluegill and subjected it to a battery of cholinergic agents. Results The general cholinergic agonist carbachol induces pigment granule dispersion in isolated retinal pigment epithelium. Carbachol-induced pigment granule dispersion is blocked by the muscarinic antagonist atropine, by the M1 antagonist pirenzepine, and by the M3 antagonist 4-DAMP. Pigment granule dispersion was also induced by the M1 agonist 4-[N-(4-chlorophenyl carbamoyloxy]-4-pent-2-ammonium iodide. In contrast the M2 antagonist AF-DX 116 and the M4 antagonist tropicamide failed to block carbachol-induced dispersion, and the M2 agonist arecaidine but-2-ynyl ester tosylate failed to elicit dispersion. Conclusions Our results suggest that carbachol-mediated pigment granule dispersion occurs through the activation of Modd muscarinic receptors, which in other systems couple to phosphoinositide hydrolysis and elevation of intracellular calcium. This conclusion must be corroborated by molecular studies, but suggests Ca2+-dependent pathways may be involved in light-adaptive pigment dispersion.

  1. Bispyridinium Compounds Inhibit Both Muscle and Neuronal Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors in Human Cell Lines.

    Avi Ring

    Full Text Available Standard treatment of poisoning by organophosphorus anticholinesterases uses atropine to reduce the muscarinic effects of acetylcholine accumulation and oximes to reactivate acetylcholinesterase (the effectiveness of which depends on the specific anticholinesterase, but does not directly address the nicotinic effects of poisoning. Bispyridinium molecules which act as noncompetitive antagonists at nicotinic acetylcholine receptors have been identified as promising compounds and one has been shown to improve survival following organophosphorus poisoning in guinea-pigs. Here, we have investigated the structural requirements for antagonism and compared inhibitory potency of these compounds at muscle and neuronal nicotinic receptors and acetylcholinesterase. A series of compounds was synthesised, in which the length of the polymethylene linker between the two pyridinium moieties was increased sequentially from one to ten carbon atoms. Their effects on nicotinic receptor-mediated calcium responses were tested in muscle-derived (CN21 and neuronal (SH-SY5Y cells. Their ability to inhibit acetylcholinesterase activity was tested using human erythrocyte ghosts. In both cell lines, the nicotinic response was inhibited in a dose-dependent manner and the inhibitory potency of the compounds increased with greater linker length between the two pyridinium moieties, as did their inhibitory potency for human acetylcholinesterase activity in vitro. These results demonstrate that bispyridinium compounds inhibit both neuronal and muscle nicotinic receptors and that their potency depends on the length of the hydrocarbon chain linking the two pyridinium moieties. Knowledge of structure-activity relationships will aid the optimisation of molecular structures for therapeutic use against the nicotinic effects of organophosphorus poisoning.

  2. Carbon monoxide-induced delayed amnesia, delayed neuronal death and change in acetylcholine concentration in mice

    We investigated the interrelationship of delayed amnesia, delayed neuronal death and changes in acetylcholine concentration induced by carbon monoxide (CO)-exposure in mice. In the test for retention of the passive avoidance task, amnesia was observed 5 and 7 days after CO-exposure when the mice were exposed to CO 1 day after training; in the case when the mice were exposed to CO 5 and 7 days before training, amnesia was also observed in a retention test given 1 day after training. The number of pyramidal cells in the hippocampal CA1 subfield was lower than that of the control 3, 5 and 7 days after CO-exposure. But the neurodegeneration in the parietal cortex, area 1, was not observed until 7 days after CO-exposure. The findings indicated that the amnesia and the neuronal death were produced after a delay when the mice were exposed to CO. In addition, the delayed amnesia was closely related to the delayed neuronal death in the hippocampal CA1 subfield. Moreover, [3H]glutamate and [3H]glycine binding sites did not change after CO-exposure but, 7 days after CO-exposure, the concentration of acetylcholine and the binding of [3H]quinuclidinyl benzilate in the frontal cortex and the striatum were found to have significantly changed, but those in the hippocampus did not show significant change. Therefore, we suggest that delayed amnesia induced by CO-exposure may result from delayed neuronal death in the hippocampal CA1 subfield and dysfunction in the acetylcholinergic neurons, in the frontal cortex, the striatum and/or the hippocampus

  3. Acetylcholine muscarinic receptors and response to anti-cholinesterase therapy in patients with Alzheimer's disease

    An acetylcholine deficit remains the most consistent neurotransmitter abnormality found in Alzheimer's disease and various therapeutic agents have been targeted at this. In this study we investigated the action of Donepezil, a cholinesterase inhibitor that has few side-effects. In particular we set out to investigate whether muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR) availability influences the response to this therapy. We used the novel single-photon emission tomography (SPET) tracer (R,R)[123I]I-quinuclidinyl benzilate (R,R[123I]I-QNB), which has high affinity for the M1 subtype of mAChR. Regional cerebral perfusion was also assessed using technetium-99m hexamethylpropylene amine oxime. We investigated 20 patients on Donepezil treatment and ten age-matched controls. The results showed a reduction in (R,R)[123I]I-QNB binding in the caudal anterior cingulate in patients compared with controls and relatively high binding in the putamen and rostral anterior cingulate, suggesting a relative sparing of mAChR in these regions. The main finding of the study was that mAChR availability as assessed by (R,R)[123I]I-QNB binding did not distinguish responders from non-responders. Interestingly, we found that the extent of cognitive improvement showed no positive correlation with (R,R)[123I]I-QNB binding in any brain region but was inversely related to binding in the insular cortex. This suggests that, within the advised cognitive performance band for use of Donepezil, response is greater in those patients with evidence of a more marked cholinergic deficit. A larger study should investigate this. (orig.)

  4. Regional selectivity of a gamma-aminobutyric acid-induced (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine release sensitive to inhibitors of gamma-aminobutyric acid uptake

    Bonanno, G.; Raiteri, M.

    1987-05-01

    The effects of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) on the release of (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine ((/sup 3/H)ACh) were studied in synaptosomes prepared from rat hippocampus, cerebral cortex, hypothalamus, and striatum and prelabelled with (/sup 3/H)choline. When synaptosomes were exposed in superfusion to exogenous GABA (0.01-0.3 mM) the basal release of newly synthesized (/sup 3/H)ACh was increased in a concentration-dependent way in hippocampus, cortex, and hypothalamus nerve endings. In contrast, the release of (/sup 3/H)ACh was not significantly affected by GABA in striatal synaptosomes. The effect of GABA was not antagonized significantly by bicuculline or picrotoxin. Muscimol caused only a slight not significant increase of (/sup 3/H)ACh release when tested at 0.3 mM whereas, at this concentration, (-)-baclofen was totally inactive. The GABA-induced release of (/sup 3/H)ACh was counteracted by SKF 89976A, SKF 100561, and SKF 100330A, three strong and selective GABA uptake inhibitors. The data suggest that, in selective areas of the rat brain, GABA causes release of (/sup 3/H)ACh following penetration into cholinergic nerve terminals through a GABA transport system.

  5. Expression of Neurotransmitter Transporters for Structural and Biochemical Studies

    Elbaz, Yael; Danieli, Tsafi; Kanner, Baruch I.; Schuldiner, Shimon

    2010-01-01

    Neurotransmitter transporters play essential roles in the process of neurotransmission. Vesicular neurotransmitter transporters mediate storage inside secretory vesicles in a process that involves the exchange of lumenal H+ for cytoplasmic transmitter. Retrieval of the neurotransmitter from the synaptic cleft catalyzed by sodium-coupled transporters is critical for the termination of the synaptic actions of the released neurotransmitter. Our current understanding of the mechanism of these transporters is based on functional and biochemical characterization but is lacking high-resolution structural information. Very few structures of membrane transport systems from mammalian origin have been solved to atomic resolution, mainly because of the difficulty in obtaining large amounts of purified protein. Development of high yield heterologous expression systems suitable for mammalian neurotransmitter transporters is essential to enable the production of purified protein for structural studies. Such a system makes possible also the production of mutants that can be used in biochemical and biophysical studies. We describe here a screen for the expression of the vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2) in cell-free and baculovirus expression systems and discuss the expression of VMAT2 in other systems as well (bacterial, yeast and mammalian cell lines). After screening and optimization, we achieved high yield (2–2.5 mg/liter) expression of functional VMAT2 in insect cells. The system was also used for the expression of three additional plasma membrane neurotransmitter transporters. All were functional and expressed to high levels. Our results demonstrate the advantages of the baculovirus expression system for the expression of mammalian neurotransmitter transporters in a functional state. PMID:20566324

  6. Comparison of the activation kinetics of the M3 acetylcholine receptor and a constitutively active mutant receptor in living cells.

    Hoffmann, Carsten; Nuber, Susanne; Zabel, Ulrike; Ziegler, Nicole; Winkler, Christiane; Hein, Peter; Berlot, Catherine H; Bünemann, Moritz; Lohse, Martin J

    2012-08-01

    Activation of G-protein-coupled receptors is the first step of the signaling cascade triggered by binding of an agonist. Here we compare the activation kinetics of the G(q)-coupled M(3) acetylcholine receptor (M(3)-AChR) with that of a constitutively active mutant receptor (M(3)-AChR-N514Y) using M(3)-AChR constructs that report receptor activation by changes in the fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) signal. We observed a leftward shift in the concentration-dependent FRET response for acetylcholine and carbachol with M(3)-AChR-N514Y. Consistent with this result, at submaximal agonist concentrations, the activation kinetics of M(3)-AChR-N514Y were significantly faster, whereas at maximal agonist concentrations the kinetics of receptor activation were identical. Receptor deactivation was significantly faster with carbachol than with acetylcholine and was significantly delayed by the N514Y mutation. Receptor-G-protein interaction was measured by FRET between M(3)-AChR-yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) and cyan fluorescent protein (CFP)-Gγ(2). Agonist-induced receptor-G-protein coupling was of a time scale similar to that of receptor activation. As observed for receptor deactivation, receptor-G-protein dissociation was slower for acetylcholine than that for carbachol. Acetylcholine-stimulated increases in receptor-G-protein coupling of M(3)-AChR-N514Y reached only 12% of that of M(3)-AChR and thus cannot be kinetically analyzed. G-protein activation was measured using YFP-tagged Gα(q) and CFP-tagged Gγ(2). Activation of G(q) was significantly slower than receptor activation and indistinguishable for the two agonists. However, G(q) deactivation was significantly prolonged for acetylcholine compared with that for carbachol. Consistent with decreased agonist-stimulated coupling to G(q), agonist-stimulated G(q) activation by M(3)-AChR-N514Y was not detected. Taken together, these results indicate that the N514Y mutation produces constitutive activation of M(3

  7. Role of nitric oxide and carbon monoxide in N(omega)-Nitro-L-arginine methyl ester-resistant acetylcholine-induced relaxation in chicken carotid artery.

    Leo, Marie Dennis Marcus; Siddegowda, Yeshavanth K B; Kumar, Dinesh; Tandan, Surendra K; Sastry, Kochiganti V H; Prakash, Vellanki Ravi; Mishra, Santosh K

    2008-10-31

    The current study examined the hypothesis that acetylcholine-induced N(omega)-Nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME)-resistant endothelium-dependent relaxations in the chicken carotid artery are mediated by nitric oxide and carbon monoxide. Acetylcholine (1 nM-3 microM) caused a concentration-dependent relaxation (pD(2) 6.81+/-0.05, R(max) 115+/-3%) of the artery segments precontracted with phenylephrine (3 microM). L-NAME (1 mM) decreased the sensitivity (pD(2) 6.44+/-0.06), but not the efficacy (R(max) 108+/-3%) of acetylcholine. It also partially decreased the acetylcholine (3 microM)-stimulated nitrite release. While treatment with N(omega)-Nitro-L-arginine (l-NNA; 1 mM) plus L-NAME (1 mM) decreased the acetylcholine-stimulated nitrite release to the basal level, it moderately inhibited (R(max) 77+/-3%) the maximal relaxation elicited with the muscarinic agonist. 2-Phenyl-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl 3-oxide (PTIO; 100 microM) a specific scavenger of nitric oxide (NO) plus the two NOS inhibitors further decreased the acetylcholine-evoked relaxation (R(max) 34+/-2%). Although soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) inhibitor 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ; 10 microM) markedly inhibited the acetylcholine-stimulated increase in tissue cGMP to less than the basal levels, it only decreased the sensitivity, but not the efficacy of the agonist either in the presence or absence of L-NAME (1 mM). Zinc Protoporphyrin-IX (ZnPP; 10 microM), a hemeoxygenase (HO) inhibitor, partially inhibited (R(max) 72+/-3%) the L-NAME-resistant acetylcholine-induced relaxations. A combined treatment of the arterial rings with L-NAME, l-NNA, PTIO and ZnPP nearly abolished (R(max) 7+/-0.9%) the vasodilator responses to acetylcholine. Endothelium removal abolished the relaxation response to acetylcholine. In conclusion, it is suggested that the acetylcholine-induced L-NAME-resistant relaxation is primarily, mediated by NO with a small but significant contribution from

  8. Supplementing female rats with DHA-lysophosphatidylcholine increases docosahexaenoic acid and acetylcholine contents in the brain and improves the memory and learning capabilities of the pups.

    Rojas, I.; Zañartu, P.; Nieto, S.; Sanhueza, J.; Morgado, N.; A. Valenzuela

    2010-01-01

    Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) is supplied to the foetus and newborn through the mother from their own reserves and their diet. No consensus about the best form to supplement DHA has been established. We propose that DHAcontaining lysophosphatidylcholine (DHA-LPC), obtained from DHA-rich eggs may be a suitable form of DHA and choline (the precursor of acetylcholine) supplementation. We evaluated the effectiveness of DHA-LPC to increase DHA and acetylcholine concentration in the brain of pups born...

  9. Insights into the mechanisms of sterol transport between organelles.

    Mesmin, Bruno; Antonny, Bruno; Drin, Guillaume

    2013-09-01

    In cells, the levels of sterol vary greatly among organelles. This uneven distribution depends largely on non-vesicular routes of transfer, which are mediated by soluble carriers called lipid-transfer proteins (LTPs). These proteins have a domain with a hydrophobic cavity that accommodates one sterol molecule. However, a demonstration of their role in sterol transport in cells remains difficult. Numerous LTPs also contain membrane-binding elements, but it is not clear how these LTPs couple their ability to target organelles with lipid transport activity. This issue appears critical, since many sterol transporters are thought to act at contact sites between two membrane-bound compartments. Here, we emphasize that biochemical and structural studies provide precious insights into the mode of action of sterol-binding proteins. Recent studies on START, Osh/ORP and NPC proteins suggest models on how these proteins could transport sterol between organelles and, thereby, influence cellular functions. PMID:23283302

  10. Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptor Subtypes as Potential Drug Targets for the Treatment of Schizophrenia, Drug Abuse and Parkinson's Disease

    Dencker, Ditte; Thomsen, Morgane; Wörtwein, Gitta;

    2011-01-01

    's disease and drug abuse. Dopaminergic systems are regulated by cholinergic, especially muscarinic, input. Not surprisingly, increasing evidence implicates muscarinic acetylcholine receptor-mediated pathways as potential targets for the treatment of these disorders classically viewed as "dopamine based......) acetylcholine binding site. Such agents may lead to the development of novel classes of drugs useful for the treatment of psychosis, drug abuse and Parkinson's disease. The present review highlights recent studies carried out using muscarinic receptor knock-out mice and new subtype-selective allosteric ligands...... to assess the roles of M(1), M(4), and M(5) receptors in various central processes that are under strong dopaminergic control. The outcome of these studies opens new perspectives for the use of novel muscarinic drugs for several severe disorders of the CNS....

  11. Structural Properties of the C Terminus of Vesicular Stomatitis Virus N Protein Dictate N-RNA Complex Assembly, Encapsidation, and RNA Synthesis

    Heinrich, Bianca S.; Morin, Benjamin; Rahmeh, Amal A.; Whelan, Sean P. J.

    2012-01-01

    The vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) nucleoprotein (N) associates tightly with the viral genomic RNA. This N-RNA complex constitutes the template for the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase L, which engages the nucleocapsid via its phosphoprotein cofactor P. While N and P proteins play important roles in regulating viral gene expression, the molecular basis of this regulation remains incompletely understood. Here we show that mutations in the extreme C terminus of N cause defects in viral gene expre...

  12. Upon intranasal vesicular stomatitis virus infection, astrocytes in the olfactory bulb are important interferon Beta producers that protect from lethal encephalitis.

    Claudia N. Detje; Lienenklaus, Stefan; Chhatbar, Chintan; Spanier, Julia; Prajeeth, Chittappen K; Soldner, Claudia; Tovey, Michael G.; Schlüter, Dirk; Weiss, Siegfried; STANGEL, MARTIN; Kalinke, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    Previously we found that following intranasal (i.n.) infection with neurotropic vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) type I interferon receptor (IFNAR) triggering of neuroectodermal cells was critically required to constrain intracerebral virus spread. To address whether locally active IFN-β was induced proximally, we studied spatiotemporal conditions of VSV-mediated IFN-β induction. To this end, we performed infection studies with IFN-β reporter mice. One day after intravenous (i.v.) VSV infecti...

  13. The Lipidomes of Vesicular Stomatitis Virus, Semliki Forest Virus, and the Host Plasma Membrane Analyzed by Quantitative Shotgun Mass Spectrometry ▿ †

    Kalvodova, Lucie; Sampaio, Julio L; Cordo, Sandra; Ejsing, Christer S.; Shevchenko, Andrej; Simons, Kai

    2009-01-01

    Although enveloped virus assembly in the host cell is a crucial step in the virus life cycle, it remains poorly understood. One issue is how viruses include lipids in their membranes during budding from infected host cells. To analyze this issue, we took advantage of the fact that baby hamster kidney cells can be infected by two different viruses, namely, vesicular stomatitis virus and Semliki Forest virus, from the Rhabdoviridae and Togaviridae families, respectively. We purified the host pl...

  14. A Vesicular Stomatitis Virus-Based Therapeutic Vaccine Generates a Functional CD8 T Cell Response to Hepatitis B Virus in Transgenic Mice

    Cobleigh, Melissa A.; Wei, Xin; Robek, Michael D.

    2013-01-01

    Recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) is a promising therapeutic vaccine platform. Using a transgenic mouse model of chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection, we evaluated the therapeutic potential of a VSV vector expressing the HBV middle surface envelope glycoprotein (MS). VSV-MS immunization generated HBV-specific CD8 T cell and antibody responses in transgenic mice that express low HBV antigen levels. These findings support the further development of VSV as a therapeutic vaccine v...

  15. Cell-specific targeting of lentiviral vectors mediated by fusion proteins derived from Sindbis virus, vesicular stomatitis virus, or avian sarcoma/leukosis virus

    Marino Michael P; Bialkowska Agnieszka; Kutner Robert H; Zhang Xian-Yang; Klimstra William B; Reiser Jakob

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background The ability to efficiently and selectively target gene delivery vectors to specific cell types in vitro and in vivo remains one of the formidable challenges in gene therapy. We pursued two different strategies to target lentiviral vector delivery to specific cell types. In one of the strategies, vector particles bearing a membrane-bound stem cell factor sequence plus a separate fusion protein based either on Sindbis virus strain TR339 glycoproteins or the vesicular stomati...

  16. Regulation of viral transcription by the matrix protein of vesicular stomatitis virus probed by monoclonal antibodies and temperature-sensitive mutants.

    Pal, R; Grinnell, B.W.; Snyder, R M; Wagner, R R

    1985-01-01

    The ability of the matrix (M) protein of wild-type vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) to regulate viral transcription was studied with monoclonal antibodies and temperature-sensitive (ts) mutants in complementation group III, the M proteins of which are restricted in transcription inhibition. The marked inhibition of transcription by VSV ribonucleoprotein (RNP) cores complexed with M protein (RNP/M) was reversed by antibody to epitope 1. Antibodies to epitopes 2 and 3 not only failed to reverse...

  17. Increased efflux of amyloid-β peptides through the blood-brain barrier by muscarinic acetylcholine receptor inhibition reduces pathological phenotypes in mouse models of brain amyloidosis.

    Paganetti, Paolo; Antoniello, Katia; Devraj, Kavi; Toni, Nicolas; Kieran, Dairin; Madani, Rime; Pihlgren, Maria; Adolfsson, Oskar; Froestl, Wolfgang; Schrattenholz, André; Liebner, Stefan; Havas, Daniel; Windisch, Manfred; Cirrito, John R; Pfeifer, Andrea; Muhs, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    The formation and accumulation of toxic amyloid-β peptides (Aβ) in the brain may drive the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. Accordingly, disease-modifying therapies for Alzheimer's disease and related disorders could result from treatments regulating Aβ homeostasis. Examples are the inhibition of production, misfolding, and accumulation of Aβ or the enhancement of its clearance. Here we show that oral treatment with ACI-91 (Pirenzepine) dose-dependently reduced brain Aβ burden in AβPPPS1, hAβPPSL, and AβPP/PS1 transgenic mice. A possible mechanism of action of ACI-91 may occur through selective inhibition of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (AChR) on endothelial cells of brain microvessels and enhanced Aβ peptide clearance across the blood-brain barrier. One month treatment with ACI-91 increased the clearance of intrathecally-injected Aβ in plaque-bearing mice. ACI-91 also accelerated the clearance of brain-injected Aβ in blood and peripheral tissues by favoring its urinal excretion. A single oral dose of ACI-91 reduced the half-life of interstitial Aβ peptide in pre-plaque mhAβPP/PS1d mice. By extending our studies to an in vitro model, we showed that muscarinic AChR inhibition by ACI-91 and Darifenacin augmented the capacity of differentiated endothelial monolayers for active transport of Aβ peptide. Finally, ACI-91 was found to consistently affect, in vitro and in vivo, the expression of endothelial cell genes involved in Aβ transport across the Blood Brain Brain (BBB). Thus increased Aβ clearance through the BBB may contribute to reduced Aβ burden and associated phenotypes. Inhibition of muscarinic AChR restricted to the periphery may present a therapeutic advantage as it avoids adverse central cholinergic effects. PMID:24072071

  18. The effect of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhiza isolated from Syrian soil on alfalfa growth and nitrogen fixation in saline soil

    The influence of vesicular - arbuscular Mycorrhiza fungi (VAM) on symbiotic fixation of N2 n alfalfa plants has been observed. Beneficial effects of study the effect of VAM or phosphorous fertilization on alfalfa (Medicago sativa L,) yields, umber of nodules and N2 fixation by N15 isotope dilution at different salinity levels. This experiment was realized in green house conditions, using soil of 2.3 dsm-1 conductivity mixed with sand (5: 2V) for alfalfa plants growing at various levels of phosphorus, or infected by Mycorrhiza fungi. Different conductivities (13.18, 22.2, 28.8, 43.5 dsm-1) were applied on these treatment by increasing concentrations of Nacl, CaCl2 and MgCl2 and MgCl2 by salinity soil irrigation. Ten days after planting, soil was enriched with 2 ppm of (NH415)2 SO4. Plant were grown under greenhouse condition for ten weeks. Our results confirmed that increased salinity reduced nitrogen - fixation and the number of nodules. The negative effect with increasing salinity was less in Mycorrhiza plants than in plants fertilized with various levels of phosphorus, and only the higher levels of salinity reduced significantly, the percentage of Mycorrhiza colonization, However, at all levels of salinity, VAM stimulated plant growth and nutrient uptake. (author)

  19. Vesicular Arbuscular Mycorrhizae—Mediated Uptake and Translocation of P and Zn by Wheat in Calcareous Soil

    TUSHIHUA; T.B.GOH; 等

    1997-01-01

    Vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal(VMA) fungi have been credited with improving the growth and mineral nutritons of many host plants but these effects are moderated by soil factors and nutrient balance.The combined effects of VAM,Zn and P application on the growth and translocation of nutrients in wheat were investigated using a calcareous soil marginal in P and Zn concentrations.Wheat was grown in a growth chamber under various combinations of VAM,P and Zn with measurements done at heading stage and maturity,Vegetative dry matter accumlation was increased by P application and reduced by VAM treatments.Both P and VAM increased grain yield.Zince oncentration and uptake were generally reduced by P addition and VAM infection,There were no antagonistic effects of Zn on P acquisition in the plant,The role of VAM in enhancing the translocation of Zn and P from root to grain would be beneficial to seed setting and yield.

  20. Efficient generation of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV)-pseudotypes bearing morbilliviral glycoproteins and their use in quantifying virus neutralising antibodies.

    Logan, Nicola; McMonagle, Elizabeth; Drew, Angharad A; Takahashi, Emi; McDonald, Michael; Baron, Michael D; Gilbert, Martin; Cleaveland, Sarah; Haydon, Daniel T; Hosie, Margaret J; Willett, Brian J

    2016-02-01

    Morbillivirus neutralising antibodies are traditionally measured using either plaque reduction neutralisation tests (PRNTs) or live virus microneutralisation tests (micro-NTs). While both test formats provide a reliable assessment of the strength and specificity of the humoral response, they are restricted by the limited number of viral strains that can be studied and often present significant biological safety concerns to the operator. In this study, we describe the adaptation of a replication-defective vesicular stomatitis virus (VSVΔG) based pseudotyping system for the measurement of morbillivirus neutralising antibodies. By expressing the haemagglutinin (H) and fusion (F) proteins of canine distemper virus (CDV) on VSVΔG pseudotypes bearing a luciferase marker gene, neutralising antibody titres could be measured rapidly and with high sensitivity. Further, by exchanging the glycoprotein expression construct, responses against distinct viral strains or species may be measured. Using this technique, we demonstrate cross neutralisation between CDV and peste des petits ruminants virus (PPRV). As an example of the value of the technique, we demonstrate that UK dogs vary in the breadth of immunity induced by CDV vaccination; in some dogs the neutralising response is CDV-specific while, in others, the neutralising response extends to the ruminant morbillivirus PPRV. This technique will facilitate a comprehensive comparison of cross-neutralisation to be conducted across the morbilliviruses. PMID:26706278