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Sample records for acetylcholine release induced

  1. Dithiocarbamate propineb induces acetylcholine release through cytoskeletal actin depolymerization in PC12 cells.

    Viviani, Barbara; Bartesaghi, Stefano; Binaglia, Marco; Corsini, Emanuela; Boraso, Mariaserena; Grazi, Enrico; Galli, Corrado L; Marinovich, Marina

    2008-11-10

    Neurological complications as well as movement disorders are relevant symptoms in animals and humans chronically exposed to dithiocarbamates. Using rat pheochromocytoma cells differentiated by NGF (PC12), we investigated whether propineb affects acetylcholine (Ach) release and the molecular mechanisms involved. Propineb (0.001-100 nM) dose-dependently increased Ach release from PC12. Thus, 0.001-1 nM propineb-induced Ach release, reaching a maximal effect ( approximately 50%) at 0.1-1 nM. Higher concentrations of propineb (10-100 nM) caused a progressive disappearance of the effect. Chelation of extra- and intracellular Ca(2+) did not affect Ach release by propineb, which was prevented by the actin stabilizer jasplakinolide (500 nM). Accordingly, actin depolymerization was observed after exposure of differentiated PC12 to 0.1-1 nM propineb, a loss of effect was evident at higher concentrations (100 nM), and the effect was Ca(2+)-independent. Disulfiram, a related dithiocarbamate not coordinated with Zn(2+), also depolymerized actin, suggesting the involvement of the organic structure of dithiocarbamates rather than the leakage of Zn(2+). Nevertheless, propineb did not depolymerize actin in a cell-free system. These data suggest that dithiocarbamates, through the activation of intracellular cascade(s), impair cytoskeletal actin. This effect may contribute to affect synaptic vesicles processing resulting in an impaired cholinergic transmission. PMID:18822360

  2. Ionomycin-induced acetylcholine release and its inhibition by adenosine at frog motor nerve endings.

    Hunt, J M; Silinsky, E. M.

    1993-01-01

    1. Acetylcholine (ACh) evoked secretion by the calcium ionophore, ionomycin, was studied at frog motor nerve endings. 2. Bath application of ionomycin stimulated an irreversible increase in the rate of spontaneous, quantal ACh release in the presence of extracellular Ca2+. In contrast, local application of ionomycin stimulated a rapid, reversible acceleration of spontaneous ACh release. 3. The magnitude of the secretory response to ionomycin was dependent both upon the concentration of ionoph...

  3. Aspects of dopamine and acetylcholine release induced by glutamate receptors; Aspectos das liberacoes de dopamina e acetilcolina mediadas por receptores de glutamato

    Paes, Paulo Cesar de Arruda

    2002-07-01

    The basal ganglia play an important role in the motor control of rats and humans. This control involves different neurotransmitters and the mutual control of these key elements has been subject to several studies. In this work we determined the role of glutamate on the release of radioactively labelled dopamine and acetylcholine from chopped striatal tissue in vitro. The values of Effective Concentration 50% for glutamate, NMDA, kainic, quisqualic acids and AMPA on the release of dopamine and acetylcholine were obtained. The inhibitory effects of magnesium, tetrodotoxin, MK-801, AP5 and MCPG, as well as the effects of glycin were evaluated. The results suggested that dopamine is influenced by the NMDA type glutamate receptor while acetylcholine seems to be influenced by NMDA, kainate and AMPA receptors. Tetrodotoxin experiments suggested that kainate receptors are both present in cholinergic terminals and cell bodies while AMPA and NMDA receptors are preferentially distributed in cell bodies. Magnesium effectively blocked the NMDA stimulation and unexpectedly also AMPA- and quisqualate-induced acetylcholine release. The latter could not be blocked by MCPG ruling out the participation of methabotropic receptors. MK-801 also blocked NMDA-receptors. Results point out the importance of the glutamic acid control of dopamine and acetylcholine release in striatal tissue. (author)

  4. Acetylcholine induces GABA release onto rod bipolar cells through heteromeric nicotinic receptors expressed in A17 amacrine cells

    Elgueta, Claudio; Vielma, Alex H.; Palacios, Adrian G.; Schmachtenberg, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    Acetylcholine (ACh) is a major retinal neurotransmitter that modulates visual processing through a large repertoire of cholinergic receptors expressed on different retinal cell types. ACh is released from starburst amacrine cells (SACs) under scotopic conditions, but its effects on cells of the rod pathway have not been investigated. Using whole-cell patch clamp recordings in slices of rat retina, we found that ACh application triggers GABA release onto rod bipolar (RB) cells. GABA was released from A17 amacrine cells and activated postsynaptic GABAA and GABAC receptors in RB cells. The sensitivity of ACh-induced currents to nicotinic ACh receptor (nAChR) antagonists (TMPH ~ mecamylamine > erysodine > DhβE > MLA) together with the differential potency of specific agonists to mimic ACh responses (cytisine >> RJR2403 ~ choline), suggest that A17 cells express heteromeric nAChRs containing the β4 subunit. Activation of nAChRs induced GABA release after Ca2+ accumulation in A17 cell dendrites and varicosities mediated by L-type voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) and intracellular Ca2+ stores. Inhibition of acetylcholinesterase depolarized A17 cells and increased spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents in RB cells, indicating that endogenous ACh enhances GABAergic inhibition of RB cells. Moreover, injection of neostigmine or cytisine reduced the b-wave of the scotopic flash electroretinogram (ERG), suggesting that cholinergic modulation of GABA release controls RB cell activity in vivo. These results describe a novel regulatory mechanism of RB cell inhibition and complement our understanding of the neuromodulatory control of retinal signal processing. PMID:25709566

  5. Regional selectivity of a gamma-aminobutyric acid-induced (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine release sensitive to inhibitors of gamma-aminobutyric acid uptake

    Bonanno, G.; Raiteri, M.

    1987-05-01

    The effects of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) on the release of (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine ((/sup 3/H)ACh) were studied in synaptosomes prepared from rat hippocampus, cerebral cortex, hypothalamus, and striatum and prelabelled with (/sup 3/H)choline. When synaptosomes were exposed in superfusion to exogenous GABA (0.01-0.3 mM) the basal release of newly synthesized (/sup 3/H)ACh was increased in a concentration-dependent way in hippocampus, cortex, and hypothalamus nerve endings. In contrast, the release of (/sup 3/H)ACh was not significantly affected by GABA in striatal synaptosomes. The effect of GABA was not antagonized significantly by bicuculline or picrotoxin. Muscimol caused only a slight not significant increase of (/sup 3/H)ACh release when tested at 0.3 mM whereas, at this concentration, (-)-baclofen was totally inactive. The GABA-induced release of (/sup 3/H)ACh was counteracted by SKF 89976A, SKF 100561, and SKF 100330A, three strong and selective GABA uptake inhibitors. The data suggest that, in selective areas of the rat brain, GABA causes release of (/sup 3/H)ACh following penetration into cholinergic nerve terminals through a GABA transport system.

  6. P2Y13 receptors mediate presynaptic inhibition of acetylcholine release induced by adenine nucleotides at the mouse neuromuscular junction.

    Guarracino, Juan F; Cinalli, Alejandro R; Fernández, Verónica; Roquel, Liliana I; Losavio, Adriana S

    2016-06-21

    It is known that adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) is released along with the neurotransmitter acetylcholine (ACh) from motor nerve terminals. At mammalian neuromuscular junctions (NMJs), we have previously demonstrated that ATP is able to decrease ACh secretion by activation of P2Y receptors coupled to pertussis toxin-sensitive Gi/o protein. In this group, the receptor subtypes activated by adenine nucleotides are P2Y12 and P2Y13. Here, we investigated, by means of pharmacological and immunohistochemical assays, the P2Y receptor subtype that mediates the modulation of spontaneous and evoked ACh release in mouse phrenic nerve-diaphragm preparations. First, we confirmed that the preferential agonist for P2Y12-13 receptors, 2-methylthioadenosine 5'-diphosphate trisodium salt hydrate (2-MeSADP), reduced MEPP frequency without affecting MEPP amplitude as well as the amplitude and quantal content of end-plate potentials (EPPs). The effect on spontaneous secretion disappeared after the application of the selective P2Y12-13 antagonists AR-C69931MX or 2-methylthioadenosine 5'-monophosphate triethylammonium salt hydrate (2-MeSAMP). 2-MeSADP was more potent than ADP and ATP in reducing MEPP frequency. Then we demonstrated that the selective P2Y13 antagonist MRS-2211 completely prevented the inhibitory effect of 2-MeSADP on MEPP frequency and EPP amplitude, whereas the P2Y12 antagonist MRS-2395 failed to do this. The preferential agonist for P2Y13 receptors inosine 5'-diphosphate sodium salt (IDP) reduced spontaneous and evoked ACh secretion and MRS-2211 abolished IDP-mediated modulation. Immunohistochemical studies confirmed the presence of P2Y13 but not P2Y12 receptors at the end-plate region. Disappearance of P2Y13 receptors after denervation suggests the presynaptic localization of the receptors. We conclude that, at motor nerve terminals, the Gi/o protein-coupled P2Y receptors implicated in presynaptic inhibition of spontaneous and evoked ACh release are of the subtype P2Y

  7. The effect of ketamine on intraspinal acetylcholine release

    Abelson, Klas S P; Goldkuhl, Renée Röstlinger; Nylund, Anders;

    2006-01-01

    The general anaesthetic ketamine affects the central cholinergic system in several manners, but its effect on spinal acetylcholine release, which may be an important transmitter in spinal antinociception, is unknown. This study aimed to investigate the effect of ketamine on spinal acetylcholine...... release. Microdialysis probes were placed intraspinally in male rats, and acetylcholine was quantified with HPLC. Anaesthesia was switched from isoflurane (1.3%) to ketamine (150 mg/kg h), which resulted in a 500% increased acetylcholine release. The increase was attenuated during nicotinic receptor...... blockade (50 microM mecamylamine). The nicotinic receptor agonist epibatidine (175 microM) produced a ten-fold higher relative increase of acetylcholine release during isoflurane anaesthesia compared to ketamine anaesthesia (270% to 27%). Intraspinal administration of ketamine and norketamine both...

  8. Cocaine Inhibition of Nicotinic Acetylcholine ReceptorsInfluences Dopamine Release

    Alexandra eAcevedo-Rodriguez

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs potently regulate dopamine (DA release in the striatum and alter cocaine’s ability to reinforce behaviors. Since cocaine is a weak nAChR inhibitor, we hypothesized that cocaine may alter DA release by inhibiting the nAChRs in DA terminals in the striatum and thus contribute to cocaine's reinforcing properties primarily associated with the inhibition of DA transporters. We found that biologically relevant concentrations of cocaine can mildly inhibit nAChR-mediated currents in midbrain DA neurons and consequently alter DA release in the dorsal and ventral striatum. At very high concentrations, cocaine also inhibits voltage-gated Na channels in DA neurons. Furthermore, our results show that partial inhibition of nAChRs by cocaine reduces evoked DA release. This diminution of DA release via nAChR inhibition more strongly influences release evoked at low or tonic stimulation frequencies than at higher (phasic stimulation frequencies, particularly in the dorsolateral striatum. This cocaine-induced shift favoring phasic DA release may contribute to the enhanced saliency and motivational value of cocaine-associated memories and behaviors.

  9. Transient Receptor Potential Channel Opening Releases Endogenous Acetylcholine, which Contributes to Endothelium-Dependent Relaxation Induced by Mild Hypothermia in Spontaneously Hypertensive Rat but Not Wistar-Kyoto Rat Arteries.

    Zou, Q; Leung, S W S; Vanhoutte, P M

    2015-08-01

    Mild hypothermia causes endothelium-dependent relaxations, which are reduced by the muscarinic receptor antagonist atropine. The present study investigated whether endothelial endogenous acetylcholine contributes to these relaxations. Aortic rings of spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs) and normotensive Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats were contracted with prostaglandin F2 α and exposed to progressive mild hypothermia (from 37 to 31°C). Hypothermia induced endothelium-dependent, Nω-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester-sensitive relaxations, which were reduced by atropine, but not by mecamylamine, in SHR but not in WKY rat aortae. The responses in SHR aortae were also reduced by acetylcholinesterase (the enzyme responsible for acetylcholine degradation), bromoacetylcholine (inhibitor of acetylcholine synthesis), hemicholinium-3 (inhibitor of choline uptake), and vesamicol (inhibitor of acetylcholine release). The mild hypothermia-induced relaxations in both SHR and WKY rat aortae were inhibited by AMTB [N-(3-aminopropyl)-2-[(3-methylphenyl)methoxy]-N-(2-thienylmethyl)-benzamide; the transient receptor potential (TRP) M8 inhibitor]; only those in SHR aortae were inhibited by HC-067047 [2-methyl-1-[3-(4-morpholinyl)propyl]-5-phenyl-N-[3-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]-1H-pyrrole-3-carboxamide; TRPV4 antagonist] while those in WKY rat aortae were reduced by HC-030031 [2-(1,3-dimethyl-2,6-dioxo-1,2,3,6-tetrahydro-7H-purin-7-yl)-N-(4-isopropylphenyl)acetamide; TRPA1 antagonist]. The endothelial uptake of extracellular choline and release of cyclic guanosine monophosphate was enhanced by mild hypothermia and inhibited by HC-067047 in SHR but not in WKY rat aortae. Compared with WKY rats, the SHR preparations expressed similar levels of acetylcholinesterase and choline acetyltransferase, but a lesser amount of vesicular acetylcholine transporter, located mainly in the endothelium. Thus, mild hypothermia causes nitric oxide-dependent relaxations by opening TRPA1 channels in WKY rat aortae

  10. Cocaine inhibition of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors influences dopamine release

    Alexandra eAcevedo-Rodriguez; Lifen eZhang; Fuwen eZhou; Suzhen eGong; Howard eGu; Mariella eDe Biasi; Fu-Ming eZhou; Dani, John A.

    2014-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) potently regulate dopamine (DA) release in the striatum and alter cocaine’s ability to reinforce behaviors. Since cocaine is a weak nAChR inhibitor, we hypothesized that cocaine may alter DA release by inhibiting the nAChRs in DA terminals in the striatum and thus contribute to cocaine's reinforcing properties primarily associated with the inhibition of DA transporters. We found that biologically relevant concentrations of cocaine can mildly inhibit...

  11. Combination of Ca2+-activated K+ channel blockers inhibits acetylcholine-evoked nitric oxide release in rat superior mesenteric artery

    Stankevičius, E; Lopez-Valverde, V; Rivera, L; Hughes, A D; Mulvany, M J; Simonsen, Ulf

    2006-01-01

    Background and purpose: The present study investigated whether calcium-activated K+ channels are involved in acetylcholine-evoked nitric oxide (NO) release and relaxation. Experimental approach: Simultaneous measurements of NO concentration and relaxation were performed in rat superior mesenteric artery and endothelial cell membrane potential and intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i) were measured. Key results. A combination of apamin plus charybotoxin, which are, respectively, blockers of small-conductance and of intermediate- and large-conductance Ca2+-activated K channels abolished acetylcholine (10 μM)-evoked hyperpolarization of endothelial cell membrane potential. Acetylcholine-evoked NO release was reduced by 68% in high K+ (80 mM) and by 85% in the presence of apamin plus charybdotoxin. In noradrenaline-contracted arteries, asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA), an inhibitor of NO synthase inhibited acetylcholine-evoked NO release and relaxation. However, only further addition of oxyhaemoglobin or apamin plus charybdotoxin eliminated the residual acetylcholine-evoked NO release and relaxation. Removal of extracellular calcium or an inhibitor of calcium influx channels, SKF96365, abolished acetylcholine-evoked increase in NO concentration and [Ca2+]i. Cyclopiazonic acid (CPA, 30 μM), an inhibitor of sarcoplasmic Ca2+-ATPase, caused a sustained NO release in the presence, but only a transient increase in the absence, of extracellular calcium. Incubation with apamin and charybdotoxin did not change acetylcholine or CPA-induced increases in [Ca2+]i, but inhibited the sustained NO release induced by CPA. Conclusions and Implications: Acetylcholine increases endothelial cell [Ca2+]i by release of stored calcium and calcium influx resulting in activation of apamin and charybdotoxin-sensitive K channels, hyperpolarization and release of NO in the rat superior mesenteric artery. PMID:16967048

  12. Long release latencies are increased by acetylcholine at frog endplate

    Samigullin, D.; Bukharaeva, E. A.; Nikolsky, E.; Adámek, S.; Vyskočil, František

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 52, č. 4 (2003), s. 475-480. ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA305/02/1333; GA ČR GA202/02/1213 Grant ostatní: RFBR(RU) 02/04/48901 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922; CEZ:MSM 113100003 Keywords : quantal release * acetylcholine * synaptic latency Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 0.939, year: 2003

  13. Changes in acetylcholine content, release and muscarinic receptors in rat hippocampus under cold stress

    The aim was to study the mechanism of the previously established decrease in acetylcholine (ACh) concentration in the rat hippocampus under cold stress. Male rats were exposed for 14 days to cold (5 degree C) or kept (controls) at room temperature (24 degree C). Acetylcholine content, release and muscarinic receptor binding were investigated in the hippocampus. Cold exposure resulted in a decrease of ACh concentration in the dorsal hippocampus. Moreover, the potassium-evoked release of ACh from hippocampal slices was increased and an increase of maximal binding capacity of [3H](-) quinuclidinyl benzilate in the dorsal hippocampus of cold exposed animals was also observed. Thus the decrease of hippocampal ACh concentration under cold exposure is probably due to its increased release. On balance then, our results demonstrate that cold stress in the rat induces significant activation of the hippocampal cholinergic system

  14. Concomitant release of ventral tegmental acetylcholine and accumbal dopamine by ghrelin in rats.

    Elisabet Jerlhag

    Full Text Available Ghrelin, an orexigenic peptide, regulates energy balance specifically via hypothalamic circuits. Growing evidence suggest that ghrelin increases the incentive value of motivated behaviours via activation of the cholinergic-dopaminergic reward link. It encompasses the cholinergic afferent projection from the laterodorsal tegmental area (LDTg to the dopaminergic cells of the ventral tegmental area (VTA and the mesolimbic dopamine system projecting from the VTA to nucleus accumbens (N.Acc.. Ghrelin receptors (GHS-R1A are expressed in these reward nodes and ghrelin administration into the LDTg increases accumbal dopamine, an effect involving nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in the VTA. The present series of experiments were undertaken directly to test this hypothesis. Here we show that ghrelin, administered peripherally or locally into the LDTg concomitantly increases ventral tegmental acetylcholine as well as accumbal dopamine release. A GHS-R1A antagonist blocks this synchronous neurotransmitter release induced by peripheral ghrelin. In addition, local perfusion of the unselective nicotinic antagonist mecamylamine into the VTA blocks the ability of ghrelin (administered into the LDTg to increase N.Acc.-dopamine, but not VTA-acetylcholine. Collectively our data indicate that ghrelin activates the LDTg causing a release of acetylcholine in the VTA, which in turn activates local nicotinic acetylcholine receptors causing a release of accumbal dopamine. Given that a dysfunction in the cholinergic-dopaminergic reward system is involved in addictive behaviours, including compulsive overeating and alcohol use disorder, and that hyperghrelinemia is associated with such addictive behaviours, ghrelin-responsive circuits may serve as a novel pharmacological target for treatment of alcohol use disorder as well as binge eating.

  15. The α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor ligands methyllycaconitine, NS6740 and GTS-21 reduce lipopolysaccharide-induced TNF-α release from microglia

    Thomsen, Morten Skøtt; Mikkelsen, Jens D

    The anti-inflammatory properties of, particularly the α7, nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) in the peripheral immune system are well documented. There are also reports of anti-inflammatory actions of nicotine in the CNS, but it is unclear, whether this is due to activation or inhibition ...

  16. Histamine H3 receptors regulate acetylcholine release from the guinea pig ileum myenteric plexus

    The effect of selective histamine H3-receptor agonists and antagonists on the acetylcholine release from peripheral nerves was evaluated in the guinea pig longitudinal muscle-myenteric plexus preparations, preloaded with (3H)choline. In the presence of H1 and H2 blockade, histamine and (R)-α-methylhistamine inhibited the electrically-evoked acetylcholine release, being (R)-α-methylhistamine more active than histamine, but behaving as a partial agonist. The effect of histamine was completely reversed by selective H3-blocking drugs, thioperamide and impromidine, while only submaximal doses of (R)-α-methylhistamine were antagonized. Furthermore, thioperamide and impromidine enhanced the electrically-evoked acetylcholine release. On the contrary, the new H3-blocker, HST-7, was found substantially ineffective, both as histamine antagonist and as acetylcholine overflow enhancer. These data suggest that histamine exerts an inhibitory control on the acetylcholine release from intestinal cholinergic nerves through the activation of H3 receptors

  17. Impaired acetylcholine release from the myenteric plexus of Trichinella-infected rats

    We examined the release of acetylcholine (ACh) from jejunal longitudinal muscle-myenteric plexus preparations in noninfected control rats and in rats infected 6, 23, or 40 days previously with Trichinella spiralis. ACh release was assessed by preincubating the tissue with [3H]choline and measuring the evoked release of tritium. The uptake of 3H was significantly less in tissue from T. spiralis-infected rats compared with control. In tissues from either infected or control animals, electrical field stimulation (30 V, 0.5 ms, 10 Hz for 1 min), or veratridine (6-30 microM) induced 3H release that was tetrodotoxin sensitive. Depolarization by KCl (25-75 mM) also caused 3H release, but this was only partially reduced by tetrodotoxin. Radiochromatographic analysis indicated evoked release of 3H to be almost entirely [3H]ACh. In rats infected 6 days previously with T. spiralis, [3H]ACh release induced by KCl, veratridine, and field stimulation were decreased at least 80%. The suppression of [3H]ACh release induced by veratridine or KCl was fully reversible after 40 days postinfection, but field-stimulated responses remained approximately 50% of control values. These results indicate that T. spiralis infection in the rat is accompanied by a reversible suppression of ACh release from the longitudinal muscle-myenteric plexus of the jejunum

  18. Dopamine modulates acetylcholine release via octopamine and CREB signaling in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Satoshi Suo

    Full Text Available Animals change their behavior and metabolism in response to external stimuli. cAMP response element binding protein (CREB is a signal-activated transcription factor that enables the coupling of extracellular signals and gene expression to induce adaptive changes. Biogenic amine neurotransmitters regulate CREB and such regulation is important for long-term changes in various nervous system functions, including learning and drug addiction. In Caenorhabditis elegans, the amine neurotransmitter octopamine activates a CREB homolog, CRH-1, in cholinergic SIA neurons, whereas dopamine suppresses CREB activation by inhibiting octopamine signaling in response to food stimuli. However, the physiological role of this activation is unknown. In this study, the effect of dopamine, octopamine, and CREB on acetylcholine signaling was analyzed using the acetylcholinesterase inhibitor aldicarb. Mutants with decreased dopamine signaling exhibited reduced acetylcholine signaling, and octopamine and CREB functioned downstream of dopamine in this regulation. This study demonstrates that the regulation of CREB by amine neurotransmitters modulates acetylcholine release from the neurons of C. elegans.

  19. Dopamine regulation of [3H]acetylcholine release from guinea-pig stomach

    The involvement of dopamine receptors in cholinergic transmission of guinea-pig stomach was investigated by analyzing the effects of dopamine receptor agonists and antagonists on acetylcholine (ACh) release from this organ. Electrical stimulation (1-20 Hz) of strips of guinea-pig stomach preloaded with [3H] choline induced a [3H]ACh release that was calcium dependent and tetrodotoxin sensitive. Dopamine inhibited this transmural stimulation-induced [3H]ACh release in a concentration-dependent manner (10(-8)-10(-4) M). This effect of dopamine was not altered by 10(-5) M hexamethonium, thereby suggesting that the major dopamine receptors are located on the postganglionic cholinergic neurons. Concentration-response curves for dopamine on [3H]ACh release were inhibited by haloperidol, sulpiride and domperidone but not by prazosin, yohimbine, propranolol and ketanserin. LY 171555, an agonist for the D2 dopamine receptor, but not SKF 38-393, an agonist for the D1 dopamine receptor, to some extent decreased the release of [3H]ACh induced by transmural stimulation. In view of the results, the release of ACh from postganglionic cholinergic neurons is probably required through dopamine receptors antagonized by D2 antagonists but not by adrenergic or serotonin receptor antagonists

  20. Changes in acetylcholine release from the chick retina are not associated with myopia development

    Full text: The effectiveness of muscarinic receptor antagonists in inhibiting myopia progression in animal models and humans implicates cholinergic signalling in ocular growth regulation. Therefore to determine if changes in the release of acetylcholine from the retina are involved in myopia development, the efflux of acetylcholine from the in vitro retina of normal and myopic chick eyes was investigated. Chicks were monocularly deprived (MD) of pattern vision with translucent occluders for 2 or 7 days and refractive error of MD groups and age matched normals was monitored using retinoscopy (n=6 each group). 3H-choline-Cl (1 Ci in 7μL) was injected into the vitreous of each eye under 2.5% halothane anaesthesia. After 1hr, the eyes were enucleated, under terminal anaesthesia (sodium pentobarbital, 120 mg/kg, im). Retinas were flat-mounted on acetate filter discs and superfused with oxygenated physiological saline solution (PSS) for 30min at 0.4mL/min. Five baseline fractions were collected (B1-B5), then three stimulated fractions were collected in the presence of PSS containing 50mM KCl (K1-K3) at 2min intervals. 3H-acetylcholine ( 3H-ACh) in each fraction was quantified by liquid scintillation counting. Significant amounts of myopia were induced in MD eyes after 2 (-5.1±0.8D) and 7 days (-18.8±2.4D) relative to control eyes (paired t-test p3H-ACh release was 146±15% above basal levels (K2/B1%) from retinas of normal animals. After 2 days MD, there was no significant difference between KCl-evoked release of 3H-ACh from deprived eyes (147 39%) compared to control eyes (198±61%, paired t-test, p=0.27) or the eyes of normal animals (ANOVA, p>0.5). Similar results were obtained following 7 days MD. The results demonstrate that evoked acetylcholine release from the chick retina of myopic eyes is unaltered relative to control or normal eyes using an in vitro approach. Copyright (2002) Australian Neuroscience Society

  1. Modulation of acetylcholine release from rat striatal slices by the GABA/benzodiazepine receptor complex

    Supavilai, P.; Karobath, M.

    1985-02-04

    GABA, THIP and muscimol enhance spontaneous and inhibit electrically induced release of tritium labelled compounds from rat striatal slices which have been pre-labelled with /sup 3/H-choline. Baclofen is inactive in this model. Muscimol can inhibit electrically induced release of tritiated material by approximately 75% with half maximal effects at 2 ..mu..M. The response to muscimol can be blocked by the GABA antagonists bicuculline methobromide, picrotoxin, anisatin, R 5135 and CPTBO (cyclopentylbicyclophosphate). Drugs which act on the benzodiazepine receptor (BR) require the presence of muscimol to be effective and they modulate the effects of muscimol in a bidirectional manner. Thus BR agonists enhance and inverse BR agonists attenuate the inhibitory effects of muscimol on electrically induced release. Ro15-1788, a BR antagonist, does not modulate the inhibitory effects of muscimol but antagonizes the actions of clonazepam, a BR agonist, and of DMCM, an inverse BR agonist. These results demonstrate that a GABA/benzodiazepine receptor complex can modulate acetylcholine release from rat striatal slices in vitro. 24 references, 3 figures, 5 table.

  2. Modulation of acetylcholine release from rat striatal slices by the GABA/benzodiazepine receptor complex

    GABA, THIP and muscimol enhance spontaneous and inhibit electrically induced release of tritium labelled compounds from rat striatal slices which have been pre-labelled with 3H-choline. Baclofen is inactive in this model. Muscimol can inhibit electrically induced release of tritiated material by approximately 75% with half maximal effects at 2 μM. The response to muscimol can be blocked by the GABA antagonists bicuculline methobromide, picrotoxin, anisatin, R 5135 and CPTBO (cyclopentylbicyclophosphate). Drugs which act on the benzodiazepine receptor (BR) require the presence of muscimol to be effective and they modulate the effects of muscimol in a bidirectional manner. Thus BR agonists enhance and inverse BR agonists attenuate the inhibitory effects of muscimol on electrically induced release. Ro15-1788, a BR antagonist, does not modulate the inhibitory effects of muscimol but antagonizes the actions of clonazepam, a BR agonist, and of DMCM, an inverse BR agonist. These results demonstrate that a GABA/benzodiazepine receptor complex can modulate acetylcholine release from rat striatal slices in vitro. 24 references, 3 figures, 5 table

  3. Synergistic effect between 5-HT4 receptor agonist and phosphodiesterase 4-inhibitor in releasing acetylcholine in pig gastric circular muscle in vitro.

    Lefebvre, Romain A; Van Colen, Inge; Pauwelyn, Vicky; De Maeyer, Joris H

    2016-06-15

    5-HT4 receptor agonists have a gastroprokinetic effect by facilitating acetylcholine release from cholinergic nerves innervating gastrointestinal smooth muscle. The role of phosphodiesterase (PDE) 4 in the signal transduction pathway of the 5-HT4 receptors located on the cholinergic neurons towards the circular muscle layer in pig stomach was investigated by analysis of acetylcholine release. Circular muscle strips were prepared from pig proximal stomach and tritium outflow, induced by electrical field stimulation, was studied as a marker for acetylcholine release after incubation with [(3)H]-choline. The PDE4-inhibitor roflumilast concentration-dependently (0.1-1µM) enhanced the facilitating effect of a submaximally effective concentration of the 5-HT4 receptor agonist prucalopride (0.01µM) on electrically induced acetylcholine release. Roflumilast (0.3µM) enhanced acetylcholine release per se but in the combined presence of roflumilast and prucalopride, acetylcholine release was enhanced more than the sum of the effect of the 2 compounds alone. The 5-HT4 receptor agonist velusetrag concentration-dependently (0.01-0.1µM) enhanced acetylcholine release; the effect of the minimally effective concentration (0.01µM) was significantly enhanced by 1µM of the PDE4-inhibitor rolipram, again to a level higher than the sum of the effect of the 2 compounds alone. The synergistic effect between 5-HT4 receptor agonists and PDE4-inhibitors demonstrates that the intracellular pathway of the 5-HT4 receptors located on cholinergic neurons towards pig gastric circular muscle is controlled by PDE4. Combining a 5-HT4 receptor agonist with a PDE4-inhibitor might thus enhance its gastroprokinetic effect. PMID:27060014

  4. Notexin preferentially inhibits the release of newly synthesized acetylcholine from rat brain synaptosomal fractions

    An investigation was made of the effects of the snake venom neurotoxin, notexin, on acetylcholine turnover in rat brain P2 fractions using a gas chromatographic mass spectrometric assay for acetylcholine and choline. In contrast to earlier reports, we found a stimulation of the uptake and acetylation of labeled choline by toxin-treated P2 fractions. More significantly, notexin inhibited the release of this newly synthesized transmitter. These effects were found to be dependent on the dose of the toxin and the time of exposure of the P2 fraction to notexin. Longer exposure to notexin or experiments involving resuspension of notexin-treated P2 fractions appeared to result in considerable lysis of the transmitter-containing particles. Thus, notexin may alter acetylcholine compartmentation in the nerve ending and thereby affect acetylcholine synthesis

  5. Inhibition of cortical acetylcholine release and cognitive performance by histamine H3 receptor activation in rats.

    Blandina, P.; Giorgetti, M.; L. Bartolini; M.Cecchi; Timmerman, H.; Leurs, R.; Pepeu, G; Giovannini, M. G.

    1996-01-01

    1. The effects of histamine and agents at histamine receptors on spontaneous and 100 mM K(+)-evoked release of acetylcholine, measured by microdialysis from the cortex of freely moving, rats, and on cognitive tests are described. 2. Local administration of histamine (0.1-100 microM) failed to affect spontaneous but inhibited 100 mM K(+)-stimulated release of acetylcholine up to about 50%. The H3 receptor agonists (R)-alpha-methylhistamine (RAMH) (0.1-10 microM), imetit (0.01-10 microM) and im...

  6. Prejunctional inhibition of norepinephrine release caused by acetylcholine in the human saphenous vein

    We performed experiments to determine whether or not acetylcholine exerts a prejunctional inhibitory effect on adrenergic neurotransmission in the human blood vessel wall. Rings of human greater saphenous veins were prepared 2 to 15 hours after death and mounted for isometric tension recording in organ chambers filled with Krebs-Ringer solution. Acetylcholine depressed contractile responses to electric activation of the sympathetic nerve endings significantly more than those to exogenous norepinephrine; the relaxations caused by the cholinergic transmitter were antagonized by atropine. Helical strips were incubated with [/sub 3/H]norepinephrine and mounted for superfusion. Electric stimulation augmented the fractional release of labeled norepinephrine. Acetylcholine caused a depression of the evoked /sub 3/H release which was antagonized by atropine but not by hexamethonium. These experiments demonstrate that, as in animal cutaneous veins, there are prejunctional inhibitory muscarinic receptors on the adrenergic nerve endings in the human saphenous vein. By contrast, the human vein also contains postjunctional inhibitory muscarinic receptors

  7. Apolipoprotein E4 reduces evoked hippocampal acetylcholine release in adult mice

    Dolejší, Eva; Liraz, O.; Rudajev, Vladimír; Zimčík, Pavel; Doležal, Vladimír; Michaelson, D. M.

    Roč. 136, č. 3 ( 2016 ), s. 503-509. ISSN 0022-3042 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LH13269 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : acetylcholine release * Alzheimer's disease (AD) * apolipoprotein E4 (apoE4) * hippocampus Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 4.281, year: 2014

  8. Acetylcholine Release in the Hippocampus and Striatum during Place and Response Training

    Pych, Jason C.; Chang, Qing; Colon-Rivera, Cynthia; Haag, Renee; Gold, Paul E.

    2005-01-01

    These experiments examined the release of acetylcholine in the hippocampus and striatum when rats were trained, within single sessions, on place or response versions of food-rewarded mazes. Microdialysis samples of extra-cellular fluid were collected from the hippocampus and striatum at 5-min increments before, during, and after training. These…

  9. ACETYLCHOLINE RELEASE IN THE HIPPOCAMPUS AND PRELIMBIC CORTEX DURING ACQUISITION OF A SOCIALLY TRANSMITTED FOOD PREFERENCE

    Gold, P E; Countryman, R.A.; Dukala, D.; Chang, Q.

    2011-01-01

    Interference with cholinergic functions in hippocampus and prefrontal cortex impairs learning and memory for social transmission of food preference, suggesting that acetylcholine (ACh) release in the two brain regions may be important for acquiring the food preference. This experiment examined release of ACh in the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex of rats during training for social transmission of food preference. After demonstrator rats ate a food with novel flavor and odor, a social transm...

  10. Pharmacological and biochemical characterization of the D-1 dopamine receptor mediating acetylcholine release in rabbit retina

    Hensler, J.G.; Cotterell, D.J.; Dubocovich, M.L.

    1987-12-01

    Superfusion with dopamine (0.1 microM-10 mM) evokes calcium-dependent (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine release from rabbit retina labeled in vitro with (/sup 3/H)choline. This effect is antagonized by the D-1 dopamine receptor antagonist SCH 23390. Activation or blockade of D-2 dopamine, alpha-2 or beta receptors did not stimulate or attenuate the release of (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine from rabbit retina. Dopamine receptor agonists evoke the release of (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine with the following order of potency: apomorphine less than or equal to SKF(R)82526 < SKF 85174 < SKF(R)38393 less than or equal to pergolide less than or equal to dopamine (EC50 = 4.5 microM) < SKF(S)82526 less than or equal to SKF(S)38393. Dopamine receptor antagonists inhibited the dopamine-evoked release of (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine: SCH 23390 (IC50 = 1 nM) < (+)-butaclamol less than or equal to cis-flupenthixol < fluphenazine < perphenazine < trans-flupenthixol < R-sulpiride. The potencies of dopamine receptor agonists and antagonists at the dopamine receptor mediating (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine release is characteristic of the D-1 dopamine receptor. These potencies were correlated with the potencies of dopamine receptor agonists and antagonists at the D-1 dopamine receptor in rabbit retina as labeled by (/sup 3/H)SCH 23390, or as determined by adenylate cyclase activity. (/sup 3/H)SCH 23390 binding in rabbit retinal membranes was stable, saturable and reversible. Scatchard analysis of (/sup 3/H)SCH 23390 saturation data revealed a single high affinity binding site (Kd = 0.175 +/- 0.002 nM) with a maximum binding of 482 +/- 12 fmol/mg of protein. The potencies of dopamine receptor agonists to stimulate (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine release were correlated with their potencies to stimulate adenylate cyclase (r = 0.784, P less than .05, n = 7) and with their affinities at (/sup 3/H)SCH 23390 binding sites (r = 0.755, P < .05, n = 8).

  11. Cholinergic activation of the murine trachealis muscle via non-vesicular acetylcholine release involving low-affinity choline transporters.

    Nassenstein, Christina; Wiegand, Silke; Lips, Katrin S; Li, Guanfeng; Klein, Jochen; Kummer, Wolfgang

    2015-11-01

    In addition to quantal, vesicular release of acetylcholine (ACh), there is also non-quantal release at the motor endplate which is insufficient to evoke postsynaptic responses unless acetylcholinesterase (AChE) is inhibited. We here addressed potential non-quantal release in the mouse trachea by organ bath experiments and (immuno)histochemical methods. Electrical field stimulation (EFS) of nerve terminals elicited tracheal constriction that is largely due to ACh release. Classical enzyme histochemistry demonstrated acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity in nerve fibers in the muscle and butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) activity in the smooth muscle cells. Acute inhibition of both esterases by eserine significantly raised tracheal tone which was fully sensitive to atropine. This effect was reduced, but not abolished, in AChE, but not in BChE gene-deficient mice. The eserine-induced increase in tracheal tone was unaffected by vesamicol (10(-5)M), an inhibitor of the vesicular acetylcholine transporter, and by corticosterone (10(-4)M), an inhibitor of organic cation transporters. Hemicholinium-3, in low concentrations an inhibitor of the high-affinity choline transporter-1 (CHT1), completely abrogated the eserine effects when applied in high concentrations (10(-4)M) pointing towards an involvement of low-affinity choline transporters. To evaluate the cellular sources of non-quantal ACh release in the trachea, expression of low-affinity choline transporter-like family (CTL1-5) was evaluated by RT-PCR analysis. Even though these transporters were largely abundant in the epithelium, denudation of airway epithelial cells had no effect on eserine-induced tracheal contraction, indicating a non-quantal release of ACh from non-epithelial sources in the airways. These data provide evidence for an epithelium-independent non-vesicular, non-quantal ACh release in the mouse trachea involving low-affinity choline transporters. PMID:26278668

  12. Centrally injected histamine increases posterior hypothalamic acetylcholine release in hemorrhage-hypotensive rats.

    Altinbas, Burcin; Yilmaz, Mustafa S; Savci, Vahide; Jochem, Jerzy; Yalcin, Murat

    2015-01-01

    Histamine, acting centrally as a neurotransmitter, evokes a reversal of hemorrhagic hypotension in rats due to the activation of the sympathetic and the renin-angiotensin systems as well as the release of arginine vasopressin and proopiomelanocortin-derived peptides. We demonstrated previously that central nicotinic cholinergic receptors are involved in the pressor effect of histamine. The aim of the present study was to examine influences of centrally administrated histamine on acetylcholine (ACh) release at the posterior hypothalamus-a region characterized by location of histaminergic and cholinergic neurons involved in the regulation of the sympathetic activity in the cardiovascular system-in hemorrhage-hypotensive anesthetized rats. Hemodynamic and microdialysis studies were carried out in Sprague-Dawley rats. Hemorrhagic hypotension was induced by withdrawal of a volume of 1.5 ml blood/100 g body weight over a period of 10 min. Acute hemorrhage led to a severe and long-lasting decrease in mean arterial pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR), and an increase in extracellular posterior hypothalamic ACh and choline (Ch) levels by 56% and 59%, respectively. Intracerebroventricularly (i.c.v.) administered histamine (50, 100, and 200 nmol) dose- and time-dependently increased MAP and HR and caused an additional rise in extracellular posterior hypothalamic ACh and Ch levels at the most by 102%, as compared to the control saline-treated group. Histamine H1 receptor antagonist chlorpheniramine (50 nmol; i.c.v.) completely blocked histamine-evoked hemodynamic and extracellular posterior hypothalamic ACh and Ch changes, whereas H2 and H3/H4 receptor blockers ranitidine (50 nmol; i.c.v.) and thioperamide (50 nmol; i.c.v.) had no effect. In conclusion, centrally administered histamine, acting via H1 receptors, increases ACh release at the posterior hypothalamus and causes a pressor and tachycardic response in hemorrhage-hypotensive anesthetized rats. PMID:25468497

  13. Hippocampal acetylcholine release during memory testing in rats: augmentation by glucose.

    Ragozzino, M E; Unick, K E; Gold, P. E.

    1996-01-01

    Several lines of evidence indicate that a modest increase in circulating glucose levels enhances memory. One mechanism underlying glucose effects on memory may be an increase in acetylcholine (ACh) release. The present experiment determined whether enhancement of spontaneous alternation performance by systemic glucose treatment is related to an increase in hippocampal ACh output. Samples of extracellular ACh were assessed at 12-min intervals using in vivo microdialysis with HPLC-EC. Twenty-fo...

  14. Acetylcholine release by human colon cancer cells mediates autocrine stimulation of cell proliferation

    Cheng, Kunrong; Samimi, Roxana; Xie, Guofeng; Shant, Jasleen; Drachenberg, Cinthia; Wade, Mark; Davis, Richard J.; Nomikos, George; Raufman, Jean-Pierre

    2008-01-01

    Most colon cancers overexpress M3 muscarinic receptors (M3R), and post-M3R signaling stimulates human colon cancer cell proliferation. Acetylcholine (ACh), a muscarinic receptor ligand traditionally regarded as a neurotransmitter, may be produced by nonneuronal cells. We hypothesized that ACh release by human colon cancer cells results in autocrine stimulation of proliferation. H508 human colon cancer cells, which have robust M3R expression, were used to examine effects of muscarinic receptor...

  15. Utilization of Superfused Cerebral Slices in Probing Muscarinic Receptor Autoregulation of Acetylcholine Release

    Alquicer, Glenda; Doležal, Vladimír; El-Fakahany, E. E.

    New York: Springer, 2016 - (Mysliveček, J.; Jakubík, J.), s. 221-233. (Neuromethods. 107). ISBN 978-1-4939-2857-6 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-05696S; GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0025 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : muscarinic receptors * acetylcholine release * autoregulation * superfusion Subject RIV: FH - Neurology

  16. Bitter triggers acetylcholine release from polymodal urethral chemosensory cells and bladder reflexes

    Deckmann, Klaus; Filipski, Katharina; Krasteva-Christ, Gabriela; Fronius, Martin; Althaus, Mike; Rafiq, Amir; Papadakis, Tamara; Renno, Liane; Jurastow, Innokentij; Wessels, Lars; Wolff, Miriam; Schütz, Burkhard; Weihe, Eberhard; Chubanov, Vladimir; Gudermann, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    We report the presence of a previously unidentified cholinergic, polymodal chemosensory cell in the mammalian urethra, the potential portal of entry for bacteria and harmful substances into the urogenital system. These cells exhibit structural markers of respiratory chemosensory cells (“brush cells”). They use the classical taste transduction cascade to detect potential hazardous compounds (bitter, umami, uropathogenic bacteria) and release acetylcholine in response. They lie next to sensory ...

  17. Acetylcholine determination of microdialysates of fetal neocortex grafts that induce recovery of learning.

    Miranda, M I; Bermúdez-Rattoni, F

    1998-03-01

    The microdialysis technique for acetylcholine (ACh) first became possible when sensitive and specific assays for ACh (pmol/sample range) were developed [G. Damsma, B.H.C. Westerink, P. de Boer, J.B. de Vries, A.S. Horn, Determination of basal acetylcholine release in freely moving rats by transstriatal dialysis coupled to on-line HPLC analysis: pharmacological aspects, Life Sci. 43 (1988) 1161-1168; G. Damsma, B.H.C. Westerink, A. Imperato, H. Rollema, J.B. de Vries, A. S. Horn, Automated brain dialysis of acetylcholine in freely moving rats: detection of basal acetylcholine, Life Sci. 41 (1987) 873-876; P.E. Potter, J.L. Meek, N.H. Neff, Acetylcholine and choline in neural tissue measured by HPLC with electrochemical detection, J. Neurochem. 41 (1983) 188-194; B.H.C. Westerink, G. Damsma, Determination of acetylcholine in microdialysates by HPLC and electrochemical detection, Neurosci. Protocols 20 (1993) 1-9.]. In the present protocol, the microdialysis technique was used to correlate ACh release with the recovery of the ability to acquire a conditioning taste aversion (CTA), by fetal brain grafts in insular cortex (IC) lesioned rats [M.I. Miranda, A.M. Lopez-Colome, F. Bermúdez Rattoni, Recovery of conditional taste aversion induced by fetal neocortex grafts. In vivo correlation of acetylcholine levels, Brain Res. 759 (1997) 141-148]. Three groups of IC lesioned rats showing disrupted CTA received cell suspension grafts of fetal tissue dissected from either the IC or occipital cortex (OC) of 16-day-old rat fetuses. One of the groups of IC-grafted animals was tested after 15 days post-graft; the other groups, IC- and OC-grafted animals, were tested after a recovery time of 45 days, as well as the groups of lesioned and unoperated animals used as control. After the CTA test, guide cannulas were stereotaxically implanted into the IC of all groups. Two days later, microdialysis was performed to determine the extracellular levels of ACh inside the graft. The

  18. Temperature effect on proximal to distal gradient of quantal release of acetylcholine at frog endplate

    Samigullin, D.; Bukharaeva, E.; Nikolsky, E.; Vyskočil, František

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 28, 3-4 (2003), s. 507-514. ISSN 0364-3190 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA7011902; GA ČR GA305/02/1333; GA ČR GA202/02/1213 Grant ostatní: RFBR(RU) 02/04/48901 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922; CEZ:MSM 113100003 Keywords : neuromuscular junction * acetylcholine release * temperature Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 1.511, year: 2003

  19. Role of nitric oxide and carbon monoxide in N(omega)-Nitro-L-arginine methyl ester-resistant acetylcholine-induced relaxation in chicken carotid artery.

    Leo, Marie Dennis Marcus; Siddegowda, Yeshavanth K B; Kumar, Dinesh; Tandan, Surendra K; Sastry, Kochiganti V H; Prakash, Vellanki Ravi; Mishra, Santosh K

    2008-10-31

    The current study examined the hypothesis that acetylcholine-induced N(omega)-Nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME)-resistant endothelium-dependent relaxations in the chicken carotid artery are mediated by nitric oxide and carbon monoxide. Acetylcholine (1 nM-3 microM) caused a concentration-dependent relaxation (pD(2) 6.81+/-0.05, R(max) 115+/-3%) of the artery segments precontracted with phenylephrine (3 microM). L-NAME (1 mM) decreased the sensitivity (pD(2) 6.44+/-0.06), but not the efficacy (R(max) 108+/-3%) of acetylcholine. It also partially decreased the acetylcholine (3 microM)-stimulated nitrite release. While treatment with N(omega)-Nitro-L-arginine (l-NNA; 1 mM) plus L-NAME (1 mM) decreased the acetylcholine-stimulated nitrite release to the basal level, it moderately inhibited (R(max) 77+/-3%) the maximal relaxation elicited with the muscarinic agonist. 2-Phenyl-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl 3-oxide (PTIO; 100 microM) a specific scavenger of nitric oxide (NO) plus the two NOS inhibitors further decreased the acetylcholine-evoked relaxation (R(max) 34+/-2%). Although soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) inhibitor 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ; 10 microM) markedly inhibited the acetylcholine-stimulated increase in tissue cGMP to less than the basal levels, it only decreased the sensitivity, but not the efficacy of the agonist either in the presence or absence of L-NAME (1 mM). Zinc Protoporphyrin-IX (ZnPP; 10 microM), a hemeoxygenase (HO) inhibitor, partially inhibited (R(max) 72+/-3%) the L-NAME-resistant acetylcholine-induced relaxations. A combined treatment of the arterial rings with L-NAME, l-NNA, PTIO and ZnPP nearly abolished (R(max) 7+/-0.9%) the vasodilator responses to acetylcholine. Endothelium removal abolished the relaxation response to acetylcholine. In conclusion, it is suggested that the acetylcholine-induced L-NAME-resistant relaxation is primarily, mediated by NO with a small but significant contribution from

  20. Studies of two naturally occurring compounds which effect release of acetylcholine from synaptosomes

    Two naturally occurring compounds which effect the release of neurotransmitter from synaptosomes have been purified to apparent homogeneity. Iotrochotin (IOT) isolated from wound exudate of the Caribbean purple bleeder sponge promotes release in a manner that is independent of the extracellular Ca2+ ion concentration. Leptinotarsin (LPT-d), a protein taken from hemolymph of the Colorado potato beetle, Leptinotarsa decemlineata, stimulates Ca2+-dependent release. IOT is slightly acidic and has a molecular weight of approximately 18 kD. [3H]acetylcholine which has been introduced into synaptosomes as [3H]choline can be released by IOT. The toxin releasable pool of labelled neurotransmitter is not depleted by depolarization of the synaptosomes with high potassium, and therefore seems to be primarily extravesicular. LPT-d is a larger protein (molecular weight = 45 kD) than IOT, and seems to effect primarily vesicular release by opening at least one type of presynaptic Ca2+ channel. The facilitatory effects of the toxin on synaptosomal release can be inhibited by inorganic Ca2+ channel antagonists, but are not generally affected by organic antagonists

  1. Effects of cholinoblockers on acetylcholine content in rat striatum in neuroleptic-induced parkinsonism.

    Dagaev, S G; Kosmachev, A B; Soloveva, N E; Filko, O A; Sanotskii, V I; Dolgo-Saburov, V B

    2004-02-01

    Correction of neuroleptic-induced parkinsonism in rats with two central cholinoblockers atropine and pentifine (acetylene aminoalcohol synthesized at Institute of Toxicology) were studied by measuring the content of acetylcholine in the striatum. The content of the transmitter secretion was estimated from the content of bound acetylcholine fraction in homogenates of the above-mentioned compartment of the brain. The results indicate that atropine and pentifine in doses equally effectively preventing catalepsy in rats had different effects on acetylcholine secretion in the striatum. Hence, cholinolytics with different pharmacological selective effects differently interact with central muscarine receptor subtypes. PMID:15273765

  2. The relationship between twitch depression and twitch fade during neuromuscular block produced by vecuronium: correlation with the release of acetylcholine

    Amann Anton

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Train-of-four stimulation pattern following the administration of non-depolarizing neuromuscular blocking drugs reveals fade on successive contractions. Fade is caused by the release of fewer acetylcholine molecules by the fourth (A4 than by the first stimulus (A1. The current study was conducted to define the relationship between the clinically observed fade and the simulated decline in acetylcholine release (A4/A1 that would be necessary to produce it. Methods The T4/T1 ratios produced by different doses of vecuronium (15–80 μg·kg-1 were plotted as a function of the concomitant T1. Separately in a model of neuromuscular transmission, T1, T4, and T4/T1 were estimated using simulations in the presence and in the absence of a neuromuscular blocking drug and a stepwise decrease in A4, but constant A1. Results Vecuronium induced neuromuscular block was associated with larger T4/T1 ratios (less fade during the onset than during the offset of the block. All doses caused similar fade during offset. Simulations revealed that the smallest T4/T1 was associated with the nadir of A4/A1 and occurred at the beginning of T1 recovery. The nadir of A4/A1 was only marginally affected by the dose of vecuronium: 15 μg·kg-1 producing the minimum A4/A1 of 0.8 and 80 μg·kg-1 the minimum A4/A1 of 0.7. Conclusion The hysteresis in the fade between onset and offset appears to be caused by a delayed decrease of A4/A1 as compared with the decrease in T1. Tentative estimates of the decrease in A4/A1 during fade produced by vecuronium are offered. However, the validity of these estimates is dependent on the validity of the assumptions made in simulations.

  3. Acetylcholine Attenuates Hypoxia/ Reoxygenation-Induced Mitochondrial and Cytosolic ROS Formation in H9c2 Cells via M2 Acetylcholine Receptor

    Yi Miao

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: The anti-infammatory and cardioprotective effect of acetylcholine (ACh has been reported; nevertheless, whether and how ACh exhibits an antioxidant property against ischemia/reperfusion (I/R-induced oxidative stress remains obscure. Methods: In the present study, H9c2 rat cardiomyocytes were exposed to hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R to mimic I/R injury. We estimated intracellular different sources of reactive oxygen species (ROS by measuring mitochondrial ROS (mtROS, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA copy number, xanthine oxidase (XO and NADPH oxidase (NOX activity and expression of rac 1. Cell injury was determined by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH release and cleaved caspase-3 expression. The siRNA transfection was performed to knockdown of M2 acetylcholine receptor (M2 AChR expression. Results: 12-h hypoxia followed by 2-h reoxygenation resulted in an abrupt burst of ROS in H9c2 cells. Administration of ACh reduced the levels of ROS in a concentration-dependent manner. Compared to the H/R group, ACh decreased mtROS, recovered mtDNA copy number, diminished XO and NOX activity, rac 1 expression as well as cell injury. Co- treatment with atropine rather than hexamethonium abolished the antioxidant and cardioprotective effect of ACh. Moreover, knockdown of M2 AChR by siRNA showed the similar trends as atropine co-treatment group. Conclusions: ACh inhibits mitochondria-, XO- and NOX-derived ROS production thus protecting H9c2 cells against H/R-induced oxidative stress, and these benefcial effects are mainly mediated by M2 AChR. Our findings suggested that increasing ACh release could be a potential therapeutic strategy for treatment and prevention of I/R injury.

  4. Tetrodotoxin effects in the stimulated acetylcholine release by agonist of glutamate in mice striatum tissue

    The toxins of animal venoms have been used as important tools for biochemical studies of physiological and pathological processes of diverse systems. In this work we used the action of tetrodotoxin on sodium channels to map the localization of glutamate receptors in cholinergic neurons from striatum tissue of rats. All glutamate receptors are exciting, so they promote the release of other neurotransmitters. In this work we focus on acetylcholine. The localization of glutamate receptor, on the soma or on the excitatory terminal, may contribute for a better understanding of its function. For this work we applied the in vitro method of tritiated neurotransmitter release. The agonists of glutamate receptors chosen were glutamic acid 500μM, NMDA 100μM, kainic acid 300μM, quisqualic acid 300μM and AMPA 1mM. In the first part of the assay the basal and stimulated releases were measured and in the second, the same protocol was performed in the presence of tetrodotoxin 1μM. The reductions observed in basal and stimulated release in the presence of tetrodotoxin suggested that the receptors type AMPA and NMDA were located in soma of cholinergic cell preferentially and the other ones presented a more equilibrate distribution among the axons and the soma. (author)

  5. Spontaneous release of acetylcholine and acetylhomocholine from mouse forebrain minces: cytoplasmic or vesicular origin

    The objective of this study was to determine the subcellular origin of cholinergic transmitter released spontaneously from mouse forebrain minces. To accomplish this objective, minces were pretreated in ionic media and then loaded with [14C]homocholine, an analog of choline, to form the false transmitter [14Cy]acetylhomocholine [( 14C]AHCh). The ratio of the false transmitter [14C]AHCh to the true transmitter ACh was then used as an index of cholinergic transmitter contents for both the cytoplasmic (S3) and vesicle-bound (P3) fractions. Three different pretreatment procedures were used to cause the following changes in S3 and P3 false to true transmitter ratios prior to spontaneous release: 1) a small increase in the S3 ratio of [14C]AHCh to acetylcholine (ACh) and a large increase in the P3 ratio of [14C] AHCh to ACh; 2) a decrease in the S3 ratio of [14C]AHCh to ACh and an increase in the P3 ratio of [14C]AHCh to ACh; 3) an increase in the P3 ratio of [14C]AHCh to ACh without affecting the S3 ratio of [14C]AHCh to ACh. The influence of each pretreatment on these subcellular ratios was then compared with its influence on the spontaneous release ratio of [14C]AHCh to ACh. In all 3 instances, the influence of pretreatment on the ratio of spontaneously released false and true cholinergic transmitters from minces coincided with the effect of pretreatment on the pre-release ratio of false to true transmitter in the S3 fraction. These results suggest that much of the cholinergic transmitter which is spontaneously released from mouse forebrain occurs from the cytoplasmic fraction

  6. Naloxone-insensitive inhibition of acetylcholine release from parasympathetic nerves innervating guinea-pig trachea by the novel opioid, nociceptin

    Patel, Hema J; Giembycz, Mark A; Spicuzza, Lucia; Barnes, Peter J; Belvisi, Maria G

    1997-01-01

    The novel peptide, nociceptin and the μ-opioid agonist [D-Ala2, N-Me-Phe4, Gly5-ol]-enkephalin (DAMGO) produced a concentration-dependent inhibition of electrical field stimulation (EFS)-evoked release of acetylcholine (ACh) from cholinergic nerves innervating guinea-pig trachea. The non-selective opioid receptor antagonist, naloxone, did not antagonize the inhibitory action of nociceptin under conditions where the inhibition of ACh release evoked by DAMGO was completely reversed. It is sugge...

  7. Effect of elevated potassium ion concentrations on electrically evoked release of [3H]acetylcholine in slices of rat hippocampus

    To establish the effect of raising the concentration of extracellular potassium ions on axonal conduction and transmitter release in a mammalian central pathway, the septohippocampal cholinergic tract, the rate of [3H] acetylcholine release evoked by electrical stimulation was measured in rat hippocampal slices superfused with Krebs' solution containing 3-15 mM K+ The evoked release of [3H] acetylcholine was abolished by the presence of tetrodotoxin or by the omission of Ca2+ in the superfusion medium, indicating that it originated from terminals depolarized by conducted action potentials. Potassium concentrations between 3 and 8 mM had no effect but 10-15 mM K+ reduced the rate of evoked release and decreased the size of the releasable pool of [3H] acetylcholine. Decreasing the sodium content of the Krebs' solution to 97 mM or less had effects similar to those of elevated [K+]. Elevated K+ (10-15 mM) reversibly reduced the size of compound action potentials in the fimbria and the alveus. The results suggest that extracellular potassium concentrations occurring under physiological conditions do not affect axonal conduction and transmitter release but that both are reduced in pathological states when extracellular [K+] above 8 mM occur. (author)

  8. N-methyl-d-aspartate-evoked release of [{sup 3}H]acetylcholine in striatal compartments of the rat: regulatory roles of dopamine and GABA

    Glowinski, J.; Perez, S.; Desban, M.; Gauchy, C.; Kemel, M.L.; Blanchet, F. [Chaire de Neuropharmacologie, INSERM U114, College de France, 11 place Marcelin Berthelot, 75231 Paris (France)

    1997-08-26

    The N-methyl-d-aspartate-evoked release of [{sup 3}H]acetylcholine previously formed from [{sup 3}H]choline was estimated in striosome- (identified by [{sup 3}H]naloxone binding) or matrix-enriched areas of the rat striatum using an in vitro microsuperfusion procedure. Experiments were performed in either the absence or the presence of dopaminergic and/or GABAergic receptor antagonists. Although the cell bodies of the cholinergic interneurons were mainly found in the matrix, in the absence of magnesium, N-methyl-d-aspartate (50 {mu}M) stimulated the release of [{sup 3}H]acetylcholine in both striatal compartments. These responses were blocked by either magnesium, dizocilpine maleate, 7-chlorokynurenate or tetrodotoxin. N-Methyl-d-aspartate responses were concentration-dependent, but the 1 mM N-methyl-d-aspartate response was higher in striosomes than in the matrix. The co-application of d-serine (10 {mu}M) enhanced the 10 {mu}M N-methyl-d-aspartate response in both compartments, but reduced those induced by 1 mM N-methyl-d-aspartate, this reduction being higher in striosomes. The blockade of dopaminergic transmission with the D{sub 2} and D{sub 1} dopaminergic receptor antagonists, (-)-sulpiride (1 {mu}M) and SCH23390 (1 {mu}M), was without effect on the 50 {mu}M N-methyl-d-aspartate-evoked release of [{sup 3}H]acetylcholine, but markedly enhanced the 1 mM N-methyl-d-aspartate + d-serine-evoked response in striosomes and to a lesser extent in the matrix. Disinhibitory responses of similar amplitude were observed not only in striosomes but also in the matrix when (-)-sulpiride was used alone, while SCH23390 alone enhanced the 1 mM N-methyl-d-aspartate + d-serine response only in striosomes and to a lower extent than (-)-sulpiride. These results indicate that D{sub 2} receptors are mainly involved in the inhibitory effect of dopamine on the 1 mM N-methyl-d-aspartate + d-serine-evoked release of [{sup 3}H]acetylcholine. They also show that the stimulation of D{sub 1

  9. Role of voltage-dependent potassium channels and myo-endothelial gap junctions in 4-aminopyridine-induced inhibition of acetylcholine relaxation in rat carotid artery.

    Gupta, Praveen K; Subramani, Jaganathan; Leo, Marie Dennis Marcus; Sikarwar, Anurag S; Parida, Subhashree; Prakash, Vellanki Ravi; Mishra, Santosh K

    2008-09-01

    The present study examined the role of voltage-gated potassium (K(v)) channels and myo-endothelial gap junctions in 4-aminopyridine-induced inhibition of acetylcholine-evoked endothelium-dependent relaxation and NO release in the rat carotid artery. The acetylcholine-induced relaxation was drastically inhibited by 94% and 82%, respectively in the presence of either 100 microM N(G)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) or 10 microM 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3,a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ), while it was abolished following endothelium removal. 4-aminopyridine (1 mM), a preferential blocker of the K(v) channels significantly decreased the vasodilator potency, as well as efficacy of acetylcholine (pD(2) 5.7+/-0.09, R(max) 86.1+/-3.5% versus control 6.7+/-0.10 R(max) 106+/-3.5%, n=6), but had no effect on the relaxations elicited by either sodium nitroprusside (SNP) or 8-bromo-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (8-Br-cGMP). 4-AP (1 mM) also inhibited acetylcholine (3 microM)-stimulated nitrite release in the carotid artery segments (99.4+/-4.93 pmol/mg tissue weight wt; n=6 versus control 123.8+/-7.43 pmol/mg tissue weight wt, n=6). 18alpha-glycyrrhetinic acid (18alpha-GA, 5 microM), a gap junction blocker, completely prevented the inhibition of acetylcholine-induced relaxation, as well as nitrite release by 4-AP. In the pulmonary artery, however antagonism of acetylcholine-evoked relaxation by 4-AP was not reversed by 18alpha-GA. These results suggest that 4-AP-induced inhibition of endothelium-dependent relaxation and NO release involves electrical coupling between vascular smooth muscle and endothelial cells via myo-endothelial gap junctions in the rat carotid artery, but not in the pulmonary artery. Further, direct activation of 4-AP-sensitive vascular K(v) channels by endothelium-derived NO is not evident in the carotid blood vessel, while this appears to be an important mechanism of acetylcholine-induced relaxation in the pulmonary artery. PMID:18577383

  10. Role of acetylcholine and polyspecific cation transporters in serotonin-induced bronchoconstriction in the mouse

    Koepsell Hermann

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has been proposed that serotonin (5-HT-mediated constriction of the murine trachea is largely dependent on acetylcholine (ACh released from the epithelium. We recently demonstrated that ACh can be released from non-neuronal cells by corticosteroid-sensitive polyspecific organic cation transporters (OCTs, which are also expressed by airway epithelial cells. Hence, the hypothesis emerged that 5-HT evokes bronchoconstriction by inducing release of ACh from epithelial cells via OCTs. Methods We tested this hypothesis by analysing bronchoconstriction in precision-cut murine lung slices using OCT and muscarinic ACh receptor knockout mouse strains. Epithelial ACh content was measured by HPLC, and the tissue distribution of OCT isoforms was determined by immunohistochemistry. Results Epithelial ACh content was significantly higher in OCT1/2 double-knockout mice (42 ± 10 % of the content of the epithelium-denuded trachea, n = 9 than in wild-type mice (16.8 ± 3.6 %, n = 11. In wild-type mice, 5-HT (1 μM caused a bronchoconstriction that slightly exceeded that evoked by muscarine (1 μM in intact bronchi but amounted to only 66% of the response to muscarine after epithelium removal. 5-HT-induced bronchoconstriction was undiminished in M2/M3 muscarinic ACh receptor double-knockout mice which were entirely unresponsive to muscarine. Corticosterone (1 μM significantly reduced 5-HT-induced bronchoconstriction in wild-type and OCT1/2 double-knockout mice, but not in OCT3 knockout mice. This effect persisted after removal of the bronchial epithelium. Immunohistochemistry localized OCT3 to the bronchial smooth muscle. Conclusion The doubling of airway epithelial ACh content in OCT1/2-/- mice is consistent with the concept that OCT1 and/or 2 mediate ACh release from the respiratory epithelium. This effect, however, does not contribute to 5-HT-induced constriction of murine intrapulmonary bronchi. Instead, this activity involves 1 a non

  11. Galanin inhibits acetylcholine release in the ventral hippocampus of the rat: histochemical, autoradiographic, in vivo, and in vitro studies

    A high density of galanin binding sites was found by using 125I-labeled galanin, iodinated by chloramine-T, followed by autoradiography in the ventral, but not in the dorsal, hippocampus of the rat. Lesions of the fimbria and of the septum caused disappearance of a major population of these binding sites, suggesting that a large proportion of them is localized on cholinergic nerve terminals of septal afferents. As a functional correlate to these putative galanin receptor sites, it was shown, both in vivo and in vitro, that galanin, in a concentration-dependent manner, inhibited the evoked release of acetylcholine in the ventral, but not in the dorsal, hippocampus. Intracerebroventricularly applied galanin fully inhibited the scopolamine stimulated release of acetylcholine in the ventral, but not in the dorsal, hippocampus, as measured by the microdialysis technique. In vitro, galanin inhibited the 25 mM K+-evoked release of [3H]acetylcholine from slices of the ventral hippocampus, with an IC50 value of ≅ 50 nM. These results are discussed with respect to the colocalization of galanin- and choline acetyltransferase-like immunoreactivity in septal somata projecting to the hippocampus

  12. Intrahippocampal Infusions of Anisomycin Produce Amnesia: Contribution of Increased Release of Norepinephrine, Dopamine, and Acetylcholine

    Qi, Zhenghan; Gold, Paul E.

    2009-01-01

    Intra-amygdala injections of anisomycin produce large increases in the release of norepinephrine (NE), dopamine (DA), and serotonin in the amygdala. Pretreatment with intra-amygdala injections of the beta-adrenergic receptor antagonist propranolol attenuates anisomycin-induced amnesia without reversing the inhibition of protein synthesis, and…

  13. Modulatory effect of neuropeptide Y on acetylcholine-induced oedema and vasoconstriction in isolated perfused lungs of rabbit.

    Delaunois, A; Gustin, P; Dessy-Doize, C; Ansay, M

    1994-01-01

    1. The modulatory role of neuropeptide Y (NPY) on pulmonary oedema induced by acetylcholine and capsaicin was investigated. The effects of NPY on the haemodynamic response to acetylcholine, phenylephrine and substance P were also investigated. 2. Isolated, ventilated, exsanguinated lungs of the rabbit were perfused with a constant flow of recirculating blood-free perfusate. The double/arterial/venous occlusion method was used to partition the total pressure gradient (delta Pt) into four compo...

  14. Effects of alpha-7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor positive allosteric modulator on lipopolysaccharide-induced neuroinflammatory pain in mice.

    Abbas, Muzaffar; Rahman, Shafiqur

    2016-07-15

    Evidence indicates that microglial activation contributes to the pathophysiology and maintenance of neuroinflammatory pain involving central nervous system alpha-7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. The objective of the present study was to determine the effects of 3a,4,5,9b-Tetrahydro-4-(1-naphthalenyl)-3H-cyclopentan[c]quinoline-8-sulfonamide (TQS), an alpha-7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor positive allosteric modulator (PAM), on tactile allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia following lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced microglial activation in hippocampus, a neuroinflammatory pain model in mice. In addition, we examined the effects of TQS on microglial activation marker, an ionized calcium-binding adapter molecule 1 (Iba-1), in the hippocampus may be associated with neuroinflammatory pain. Pretreatment of TQS (4mg/kg) significantly reduced LPS (1mg/kg)-induced tactile allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia. Moreover, pretreatment of methyllycaconitine (3mg/kg) significantly reversed TQS-induced antiallodynic and antihyperalgesic responses indicating the involvement of alpha-7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor. Pretreatment of TQS significantly decreased LPS-induced increased in hippocampal Iba-1 expression. Overall, these results suggest that TQS reduces LPS-induced neuroinflammatory pain like symptoms via modulating microglial activation likely in the hippocampus and/or other brain region by targeting alpha-7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor. Therefore, alpha-7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor PAM such as TQS could be a potential drug candidate for the treatment of neuroinflammatory pain. PMID:27154173

  15. Spontaneous quantal and non-quantal release of acetylcholine at mouse endplate during onset of hypoxia

    Bukharaeva, E.A.; Salakhutdinov, R.I.; Vyskočil, František; Nikolsky, E.E.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 54, č. 2 (2005), s. 251-255. ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA5011411; GA ČR(CZ) GA305/02/1333 Grant ostatní: RFBR(RU) 05-04-49723; Scientific Schools of Russia(RU) 1063.2003.4 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : hypoxia * non-quantal * acetylcholine Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 1.806, year: 2005

  16. The effect of cooling on the acetylcholine-induced current of identified Helix pomatia Br neuron.

    Nedeljkovic, Miodrag; Kartelija, Gordana; Radenovic, Lidija; Todorovic, Natasa

    2005-05-01

    The Br neuron of the snail Helix pomatia, involved in neuronal regulation of various homeostatic and adaptive mechanisms, represents an interesting model for studying effects of temperature changes on neuronal activity of poikilotherms. The acetylcholine (ACh) induces a transient, inward dose-dependent current in the identified Br neuron. In the work presented, we analyses the effects of cooling on the ACh-induced inward current. The amplitude of ACh-induced inward current was markedly decreased after cooling and the speed of the decay of ACh response was decreased. Sensitivity to cooling of Ach-activated current on the Br neuron is mediated by a mechanism that does not involve change in the apparent receptor affinity or the cooperativity of binding. PMID:15759140

  17. Captopril augments acetylcholine-induced bronchial smooth muscle contractions in vitro via kinin-dependent mechanisms.

    Agrawal, Naman; Akella, Aparna; Deshpande, Shripad B

    2016-06-01

    Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors therapy is aassociated with bothersome dry cough as an adverse effect. The mechanisms underlying this adverse effect are not clear. Therefore, influence of captopril (an ACE inhibitor) on acetylcholine (ACh)-induced bronchial smooth muscle contractions was investigated. Further, the mechanisms underlying the captopril-induced changes were also explored. In vitro contractions of rat bronchial smooth muscle to cumulative concentrations of ACh were recorded before and after exposure to captopril. Further, the involvement of kinin and inositol triphosphate (IP₃) pathways for captopril-induced alterations were explored. ACh produced concentration-dependent (5-500 µM) increase in bronchial smooth muscle contractions. Pre-treatment with captopril augmented the ACh-induced contractions at each concentration significantly. Pre-treatment with aprotinin (kinin synthesis inhibitor) or heparin (inositol triphosphate, IP₃-inhibitor), blocked the captopril-induced augmentation of bronchial smooth muscle contractions evoked by ACh. Further, captopril-induced augmentation was absent in calcium-free medium. These results suggest that captopril sensitizes bronchial smooth muscles to ACh-induced contractions. This sensitization may be responsible for dry cough associated with captopril therapy. PMID:27468462

  18. Effect of anoxia on choline uptake and release of acetylcholine in brain slices estimated with a bioradiographic technique using [11C] choline

    The uptake of choline for the synthesis and release of acetylcholine and the metabolism of glucose under anoxic conditions was investigated in brain slices by bioradiography using [N-methyl-11C]choline ([11C]choline) and [18F]2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose ([18F]FDG). [11C]Choline uptake and the release of accumulated 11C radioactivity in brain slices decreased with anoxic treatment, whereas [18F]FDG uptake increased. The decrease of [11C]choline uptake and the 11C radioactivity accumulated in striatal slices were recovered by acetyl-L-carnitine, an acetyl-donor. However, this effect was not seen in cerebral cortex. These results indicate that choline uptake for the synthesis and release of acetylcholine in brain are energy sensitive. The cholinergic dysfunction in ischemic brain might be improved by compensating for energy loss. (author)

  19. Carbon monoxide-induced delayed amnesia, delayed neuronal death and change in acetylcholine concentration in mice

    Nabeshima, T.; Katoh, A.; Ishimaru, H.; Yoneda, Y.; Ogita, K.; Murase, K.; Ohtsuka, H.; Inari, K.; Fukuta, T.; Kameyama, T. (Meijo Univ., Nagoya (Japan))

    1991-01-01

    We investigated the interrelationship of delayed amnesia, delayed neuronal death and changes in acetylcholine concentration induced by carbon monoxide (CO)-exposure in mice. In the test for retention of the passive avoidance task, amnesia was observed 5 and 7 days after CO-exposure when the mice were exposed to CO 1 day after training; in the case when the mice were exposed to CO 5 and 7 days before training, amnesia was also observed in a retention test given 1 day after training. The number of pyramidal cells in the hippocampal CA1 subfield was lower than that of the control 3, 5 and 7 days after CO-exposure. But the neurodegeneration in the parietal cortex, area 1, was not observed until 7 days after CO-exposure. The findings indicated that the amnesia and the neuronal death were produced after a delay when the mice were exposed to CO. In addition, the delayed amnesia was closely related to the delayed neuronal death in the hippocampal CA1 subfield. Moreover, (3H)glutamate and (3H)glycine binding sites did not change after CO-exposure but, 7 days after CO-exposure, the concentration of acetylcholine and the binding of (3H)quinuclidinyl benzilate in the frontal cortex and the striatum were found to have significantly changed, but those in the hippocampus did not show significant change. Therefore, we suggest that delayed amnesia induced by CO-exposure may result from delayed neuronal death in the hippocampal CA1 subfield and dysfunction in the acetylcholinergic neurons, in the frontal cortex, the striatum and/or the hippocampus.

  20. Carbon monoxide-induced delayed amnesia, delayed neuronal death and change in acetylcholine concentration in mice

    We investigated the interrelationship of delayed amnesia, delayed neuronal death and changes in acetylcholine concentration induced by carbon monoxide (CO)-exposure in mice. In the test for retention of the passive avoidance task, amnesia was observed 5 and 7 days after CO-exposure when the mice were exposed to CO 1 day after training; in the case when the mice were exposed to CO 5 and 7 days before training, amnesia was also observed in a retention test given 1 day after training. The number of pyramidal cells in the hippocampal CA1 subfield was lower than that of the control 3, 5 and 7 days after CO-exposure. But the neurodegeneration in the parietal cortex, area 1, was not observed until 7 days after CO-exposure. The findings indicated that the amnesia and the neuronal death were produced after a delay when the mice were exposed to CO. In addition, the delayed amnesia was closely related to the delayed neuronal death in the hippocampal CA1 subfield. Moreover, [3H]glutamate and [3H]glycine binding sites did not change after CO-exposure but, 7 days after CO-exposure, the concentration of acetylcholine and the binding of [3H]quinuclidinyl benzilate in the frontal cortex and the striatum were found to have significantly changed, but those in the hippocampus did not show significant change. Therefore, we suggest that delayed amnesia induced by CO-exposure may result from delayed neuronal death in the hippocampal CA1 subfield and dysfunction in the acetylcholinergic neurons, in the frontal cortex, the striatum and/or the hippocampus

  1. Electrically-evoked dopamine and acetylcholine release from rat striatal slices perfused without magnesium: regulation by glutamate acting on NMDA receptors

    Jin, Shaoyu; Fredholm, Bertil B

    1997-01-01

    Rat striatal slices, preincubated with [3H]-dopamine and [14C]-choline, were continuously superfused and electrically stimulated. Electrically evoked release of [3H]-dopamine and [14C]-acetylcholine (ACh) was not significantly changed by elimination of Mg2+ from superfusion buffer, but the basal release of [3H]-dopamine was doubled.Kynurenic acid (100–800  μM) caused, in the absence but not presence of Mg2+, a concentration-dependent decrease in the evoked release of these two transmitters. T...

  2. Meandering and unstable reentrant wave fronts induced by acetylcholine in isolated canine right atrium.

    Ikeda, T; Wu, T J; Uchida, T; Hough, D; Fishbein, M C; Mandel, W J; Chen, P S; Karagueuzian, H S

    1997-07-01

    The mechanism(s) by which acetylcholine (ACh) increases atrial vulnerability to reentry and maintains its activity for longer durations remains poorly defined. In the present study we used high-resolution activation maps to test the hypothesis that ACh promotes meandering of atrial reentrant wave fronts, resulting in breakup and the generation of new wave fronts that sustain the activity. Reentry was induced in 11 isolated canine right atrial tissues (3.8 x 3.2 cm) by a premature point stimulus (S2) before and after superfusion with ACh (15 x 10(-6) M). Endocardial isochronal activation maps were constructed with the use of 509 bipolar electrodes (1.6-mm spatial resolution), and the dynamics of the activation wave fronts were visualized with animation. A vulnerable period was found during which an S2 current strength > 4.4 +/- 2.5 mA [lower limit of vulnerability (LLV)] and vulnerability (ULV)] induced a single stationary reentrant wave front that lasted 3 +/- 2.5 s with a period of 159 +/- 17 ms (16 episodes). AC shortened the refractory period from 100 +/- 12 to 59 +/- 9 ms (P vulnerability to reentry induction by simultaneous decrease in the LLV (0.7 +/- 0.2 mA, P single reentrant wave front, leading to breakup and the generation of new wave fronts. Single meandering and complex wave front dynamics cause fibrillation-like activity and sustain the activity for longer duration. PMID:9249511

  3. Quinuclidine compounds differently act as agonists of Kenyon cell nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and induced distinct effect on insect ganglionic depolarizations.

    Mathé-Allainmat, Monique; Swale, Daniel; Leray, Xavier; Benzidane, Yassine; Lebreton, Jacques; Bloomquist, Jeffrey R; Thany, Steeve H

    2013-12-01

    We have recently demonstrated that a new quinuclidine benzamide compound named LMA10203 acted as an agonist of insect nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. Its specific pharmacological profile on cockroach dorsal unpaired median neurons (DUM) helped to identify alpha-bungarotoxin-insensitive nAChR2 receptors. In the present study, we tested its effect on cockroach Kenyon cells. We found that it induced an inward current demonstrating that it bounds to nicotinic acetylcholine receptors expressed on Kenyon cells. Interestingly, LMA10203-induced currents were completely blocked by the nicotinic antagonist α-bungarotoxin. We suggested that LMA10203 effect occurred through the activation of α-bungarotoxin-sensitive receptors and did not involve α-bungarotoxin-insensitive nAChR2, previously identified in DUM neurons. In addition, we have synthesized two new compounds, LMA10210 and LMA10211, and compared their effects on Kenyon cells. These compounds were members of the 3-quinuclidinyl benzamide or benzoate families. Interestingly, 1 mM LMA10210 was not able to induce an inward current on Kenyon cells compared to LMA10211. Similarly, we did not find any significant effect of LMA10210 on cockroach ganglionic depolarization, whereas these three compounds were able to induce an effect on the central nervous system of the third instar M. domestica larvae. Our data suggested that these three compounds could bind to distinct cockroach nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. PMID:23884575

  4. Inducibility of human atrial fibrillation in an in silico model reflecting local acetylcholine distribution and concentration.

    Hwang, Minki; Lee, Hyun-Seung; Pak, Hui-Nam; Shim, Eun Bo

    2016-01-01

    Vagal nerve activity has been known to play a crucial role in the induction and maintenance of atrial fibrillation (AF). However, it is unclear how the distribution and concentration of local acetylcholine (ACh) promotes AF. In this study, we investigated the effect of the spatial distribution and concentration of ACh on fibrillation patterns in an in silico human atrial model. A human atrial action potential model with an ACh-dependent K(+) current (IKAch) was used to examine the effect of vagal activation. A simulation of cardiac wave dynamics was performed in a realistic 3D model of the atrium. A model of the ganglionated plexus (GP) and nerve was developed based on the "octopus hypothesis". The pattern of cardiac wave dynamics was examined by applying vagal activation to the GP areas or randomly. AF inducibility in the octopus hypothesis-based GP and nerve model was tested. The effect of the ACh concentration level was also examined. In the single cell simulation, an increase in the ACh concentration shortened APD90 and increased the maximal slope of the restitution curve. In the 3D simulation, a random distribution of vagal activation promoted wavebreaks while ACh secretion limited to the GP areas did not induce a noticeable change in wave dynamics. The octopus hypothesis-based model of the GP and nerve exhibited AF inducibility at higher ACh concentrations. In conclusion, a 3D in silico model of the GP and parasympathetic nerve based on the octopus model exhibited higher AF inducibility with higher ACh concentrations. PMID:26807030

  5. Acetylcholine receptor-inducing factor from chicken brain increases the level of mRNA encoding the receptor α subunit

    A 42-kDa glycoprotein isolated from chicken brain, referred to as acetylcholine receptor-inducing activity (ARIA), that stimulates the rate of incorporation of acetylcholine receptors into the surface of chicken myotubes may play a role in the nerve-induced accumulation of receptors at developing neuromuscular synapses. Using nuclease-protection assays, the authors have found that ARIA causes a 2- to 16-fold increase in the level of mRNA encoding the α subunit of the receptor, with little or no change in the levels of γ- and δ-subunit messengers. ARIA also increases the amount of a putative nuclear precursor of α-subunit mRNA, consistent with an activation of gene transcription. These results suggest that the concentration of α subunit may limit the rate of biosynthesis of the acetylcholine receptors in chicken myotubes. They also indicate that neuronal factors can regulate the expression of receptor subunit genes in a selective manner. Tetrodotoxin, 8-bromo-cAMP, and forskolin also increase the amount of α-subunit mRNA, with little change in the amount of γ- and δ-subunit mRNAs. Unlike ARIA, however, these agents have little effect on the concentration of the α-subunit nuclear precursor

  6. Morphogenetic roles of acetylcholine.

    Lauder, J. M.; Schambra, U B

    1999-01-01

    In the adult nervous system, neurotransmitters mediate cellular communication within neuronal circuits. In developing tissues and primitive organisms, neurotransmitters subserve growth regulatory and morphogenetic functions. Accumulated evidence suggests that acetylcholine, (ACh), released from growing axons, regulates growth, differentiation, and plasticity of developing central nervous system neurons. In addition to intrinsic cholinergic neurons, the cerebral cortex and hippocampus receive ...

  7. Nicotine induces fibrogenic changes in human liver via nicotinic acetylcholine receptors expressed on hepatic stellate cells

    Highlights: ► Cigarette smoke may induce liver fibrosis via nicotine receptors. ► Nicotine induces proliferation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs). ► Nicotine activates hepatic fibrogenic pathways. ► Nicotine receptor antagonists attenuate HSC proliferation. ► Nicotinic receptor antagonists may have utility as novel anti-fibrotic agents. -- Abstract: Background and aims: Cigarette smoke (CS) may cause liver fibrosis but possible involved mechanisms are unclear. Among the many chemicals in CS is nicotine – which affects cells through nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR). We studied the effects of nicotine, and involved pathways, on human primary hepatic stellate cells (hHSCs), the principal fibrogenic cells in the liver. We then determined possible disease relevance by assaying nAChR in liver samples from human non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Methods: hHSC were isolated from healthy human livers and nAChR expression analyzed – RT-PCR and Western blotting. Nicotine induction of hHSC proliferation, upregulation of collagen1-α2 and the pro-fibrogenic cytokine transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1) was determined along with involved intracellular signaling pathways. nAChR mRNA expression was finally analyzed in whole liver biopsies obtained from patients diagnosed with non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Results: hHSCs express muscle type (α1, β1, delta and epsilon) and neuronal type (α3, α6, α7, β2 and β4) nAChR subunits at the mRNA level. Among these subunits, α3, α7, β1 and ε were predominantly expressed as confirmed by Western blotting. Nicotine induced hHSC proliferation was attenuated by mecamylamine (p < 0.05). Additionally, collagen1-α2 and TGF-β1 mRNA expression were significantly upregulated by nicotine and inhibited by mecamylamine. α1 and α3-nAChR mRNA expression was significantly upregulated in NASH fibrosis compared to normal livers. Conclusion: Nicotine at levels in smokers’ blood is pro-fibrogenic, through

  8. Nicotine induces fibrogenic changes in human liver via nicotinic acetylcholine receptors expressed on hepatic stellate cells

    Soeda, Junpei; Morgan, Maelle; McKee, Chad; Mouralidarane, Angelina; Lin, ChingI [University College London, Centre for Hepatology, Royal Free Hospital, London NW3 2PF (United Kingdom); Roskams, Tania [Department of Morphology and Molecular Pathology, University of Leuven (Belgium); Oben, Jude A., E-mail: j.oben@ucl.ac.uk [University College London, Centre for Hepatology, Royal Free Hospital, London NW3 2PF (United Kingdom); Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Guy' s and St Thomas' Hospital, London SE1 7EH (United Kingdom)

    2012-01-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cigarette smoke may induce liver fibrosis via nicotine receptors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nicotine induces proliferation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nicotine activates hepatic fibrogenic pathways. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nicotine receptor antagonists attenuate HSC proliferation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nicotinic receptor antagonists may have utility as novel anti-fibrotic agents. -- Abstract: Background and aims: Cigarette smoke (CS) may cause liver fibrosis but possible involved mechanisms are unclear. Among the many chemicals in CS is nicotine - which affects cells through nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR). We studied the effects of nicotine, and involved pathways, on human primary hepatic stellate cells (hHSCs), the principal fibrogenic cells in the liver. We then determined possible disease relevance by assaying nAChR in liver samples from human non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Methods: hHSC were isolated from healthy human livers and nAChR expression analyzed - RT-PCR and Western blotting. Nicotine induction of hHSC proliferation, upregulation of collagen1-{alpha}2 and the pro-fibrogenic cytokine transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-{beta}1) was determined along with involved intracellular signaling pathways. nAChR mRNA expression was finally analyzed in whole liver biopsies obtained from patients diagnosed with non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Results: hHSCs express muscle type ({alpha}1, {beta}1, delta and epsilon) and neuronal type ({alpha}3, {alpha}6, {alpha}7, {beta}2 and {beta}4) nAChR subunits at the mRNA level. Among these subunits, {alpha}3, {alpha}7, {beta}1 and {epsilon} were predominantly expressed as confirmed by Western blotting. Nicotine induced hHSC proliferation was attenuated by mecamylamine (p < 0.05). Additionally, collagen1-{alpha}2 and TGF-{beta}1 mRNA expression were significantly upregulated by nicotine and inhibited by

  9. alpha(7) Nicotinic acetylcholine receptor activation prevents behavioral and molecular changes induced by repeated phencyclidine treatment

    Thomsen, Morten Skøtt; Christensen, Ditte Z; Hansen, Henrik H; Redrobe, John P; Mikkelsen, Jens D

    determined in a modified Y-maze test. Polymorphisms in the alpha(7) nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) gene have been linked to schizophrenia. Here we demonstrate that acute administration of the selective alpha(7) nAChR partial agonist SSR180711 dose-dependently reversed the behavioral impairment...

  10. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptor induces lateral segregation of phosphatidic acid and phosphatidylcholine in reconstituted membranes.

    Wenz, Jorge J; Barrantes, Francisco J

    2005-01-11

    Purified nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR) protein was reconstituted into synthetic lipid membranes having known effects on receptor function in the presence and absence of cholesterol (Chol). The phase behavior of a lipid system (DPPC/DOPC) possessing a known lipid phase profile and favoring nonfunctional, desensitized AChR was compared with that of a lipid system (POPA/POPC) containing the anionic phospholipid phosphatidic acid (PA), which stabilizes the functional resting form of the AChR. Fluorescence quenching of diphenylhexatriene (DPH) extrinsic fluorescence and AChR intrinsic fluorescence by a nitroxide spin-labeled phospholipid showed that the AChR diminishes the degree of DPH quenching and promotes DPPC lateral segregation into an ordered lipid domain, an effect that was potentiated by Chol. Fluorescence anisotropy of the probe DPH increased in the presence of AChR or Chol and also made apparent shifts to higher values in the transition temperature of the lipid system in the presence of Chol and/or AChR. The values were highest when both Chol and AChR were present, further reinforcing the view that their effect on lipid segregation is additive. These results can be accounted for by the increase in the size of quencher-free, ordered lipid domains induced by AChR and/or Chol. Pyrene phosphatidylcholine (PyPC) excimer (E) formation was strongly reduced owing to the restricted diffusion of the probe induced by the AChR protein. The analysis of Forster energy transfer (FRET) from the protein to DPH further indicates that AChR partitions preferentially into these ordered lipid microdomains, enriched in saturated lipid (DPPC or POPA), which segregate from liquid phase-enriched DOPC or POPC domains. Taken together, the results suggest that the AChR organizes its immediate microenvironment in the form of microdomains with higher lateral packing density and rigidity. The relative size of such microdomains depends not only on the phospholipid polar headgroup

  11. Modification of the acetylcholine-induced current of the snail Helix pomatia L. by fast temperature changes

    Nedeljković M.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Using the single electrode voltage clamp method, we found that acetylcholine (aCh induces transient inward dose-dependent current on the membrane of the identified Helix pomatia Br neuron. We analyzed the effects of fast cooling and heating as well as thermal acclimation on the aCh inward current. the experiments were conducted on active and dormant snails acclimated to either 20 or 7°C for at least four weeks. the Hill coefficient remained approximately 1 in all cases, which means that there is a single aCh binding site on the membrane. Fast temperature alternations induce binding affinity changes. in the work presented, we analyzed the effects of cooling on the aCh-induced inward current. the amplitude of aCh-induced inward current was markedly reduced after cooling, and the speed of decay of the aCh response was lower.

  12. Acetylcholine release in the mesocorticolimbic dopamine system during cocaine-seeking: Conditioned and unconditioned contributions to reward and motivation

    You, Zhi-Bing; Wang, Bin; Zitzman, Dawnya; Wise, Roy A.

    2008-01-01

    Microdialysis was used to assess the contribution to cocaine-seeking of cholinergic input to the mesocorticolimbic dopamine system in ventral tegmental area (VTA). VTA acetylcholine (ACh) was elevated in animals lever-pressing for IV cocaine and in cocaine-experienced and cocaine-naïve animals passively receiving similar “yoked” injections. In cocaine-trained animals, the elevations comprised an initial (first hour) peak to about 160% of baseline and a subsequent plateau of 140% of baseline f...

  13. Structural and functional changes induced in the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor by membrane phospholipids.

    Fernández-Carvajal, Asia M; Encinar, José A; Poveda, José Antonio; de Juan, Entilio; Martínez-Pinna, Juan; Ivorra, Isabel; Ferragut, José Antonio; Morales, Andrés; González-Ros, José Manuel

    2006-01-01

    Ligand-gated ion channels (LGICs) constitute an important family of complex membrane proteins acting as receptors for neurotransmitters (Barnard, 1992; Ortells and Lunt, 1995). The nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) from Torpedo is the most extensively studied member of the LGIC family and consists of a pentameric transmembrane glycoprotein composed of four different polypeptide subunits (alpha, beta, gamma, and delta) in a 2:1:1:1 stoichiometry (Galzi and Changeux, 1995; Hucho et al., 1996) that are arranged pseudosymmetrically around a central cation-selective ion channel. Conformational transitions, from the closed (nonconducting), to agonist-induced open (ion-conducting), to desensitized (nonconducting) states, are critical for functioning of the nAChR (Karlin, 2002). The ability of the nAChR to undergo these transitions is profoundly influenced by the lipid composition of the bilayer (Barrantes, 2004). Despite existing information on lipid dependence of AChR function, no satisfactory explanation has been given on the molecular events by which specific lipids exert such effects on the activity of an integral membrane protein. To date, several hypotheses have been entertained, including (1) indirect effects of lipids through the alteration of properties of the bilayer, such as fluidity (an optimal fluidity hypothesis [Fong and McNamee, 1986]) or membrane curvature and lateral pressure (Cantor, 1997; de Kruijff, 1997), or (2) direct effects through binding of lipids to defined sites on the transmembrane portion of the protein (Jones and McNamee, 1988; Blanton and Wang, 1990; Fernández et al., 1993; Fernández-Ballester et al., 1994), which has led to the postulation of a possible role of certain lipids as peculiar allosteric ligands of the protein. In this paper we have reconstituted purified AChRs from Torpedo into complex multicomponent lipid vesicles in which the phospholipid composition has been systematically altered. Stopped-flow rapid kinetics of

  14. Impaired hippocampal acetylcholine release parallels spatial memory deficits in Tg2576 mice subjected to basal forebrain cholinergic degeneration

    Laursen, Bettina; Mørk, Arne; Plath, Niels; Kristiansen, Uffe; Bastlund, Jesper Frank

    2013-01-01

    (BFCD) in 3 months old male Tg2576 mice to co-express cholinergic degeneration with Aβ overexpression as these characteristics constitutes key hallmarks of AD. At 9 months, SAP lesioned Tg2576 mice were cognitively impaired in two spatial paradigms addressing working memory and mid to long-term memory...... cortex and the reduction was comparable between groups. Our results suggest that partial BFCD acts collectively with increased levels of Aβ to induce cognitive decline and to compromise cholinergic release. Tg2576 mice with BFCD may constitute a new and suitable AD mouse model to study the interrelations...

  15. Bupropion-induced inhibition of α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors expressed in heterologous cells and neurons from dorsal raphe nucleus and hippocampus.

    Vázquez-Gómez, Elizabeth; Arias, Hugo R; Feuerbach, Dominik; Miranda-Morales, Marcela; Mihailescu, Stefan; Targowska-Duda, Katarzyna M; Jozwiak, Krzysztof; García-Colunga, Jesús

    2014-10-01

    The pharmacological activity of bupropion was compared between α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors expressed in heterologous cells and hippocampal and dorsal raphe nucleus neurons. The inhibitory activity of bupropion was studied on GH3-α7 cells by Ca2+ influx, as well as on neurons from the dorsal raphe nucleus and interneurons from the stratum radiatum of the hippocampal CA1 region by using a whole-cell voltage-clamp technique. In addition, the interaction of bupropion with the α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor was determined by [3H]imipramine competition binding assays and molecular docking. The fast component of acetylcholine- and choline-induced currents from both brain regions was inhibited by methyllycaconitine, indicating the participation of α7-containing nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. Choline-induced currents in hippocampal interneurons were partially inhibited by 10 µM bupropion, a concentration that could be reached in the brain during clinical administration. Additionally, both agonist-induced currents were reversibly inhibited by bupropion at concentrations that coincide with its inhibitory potency (IC50=54 µM) and binding affinity (Ki=63 µM) for α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors from heterologous cells. The [3H]imipramine competition binding and molecular docking results support a luminal location for the bupropion binding site(s). This study may help to understand the mechanisms of actions of bupropion at neuronal and molecular levels related with its therapeutic actions on depression and for smoking cessation. PMID:25016090

  16. Inducibility of human atrial fibrillation in an in silico model reflecting local acetylcholine distribution and concentration

    Hwang, Minki; Lee, Hyun-Seung; Pak, Hui-Nam; Shim, Eun Bo

    2015-01-01

    Vagal nerve activity has been known to play a crucial role in the induction and maintenance of atrial fibrillation (AF). However, it is unclear how the distribution and concentration of local acetylcholine (ACh) promotes AF. In this study, we investigated the effect of the spatial distribution and concentration of ACh on fibrillation patterns in an in silico human atrial model. A human atrial action potential model with an ACh-dependent K+ current (IKAch) was used to examine the effect of vag...

  17. Wash-resistantly bound xanomeline inhibits acetylcholine release by persistent activation of presynaptic M2 and M4 muscarinic receptors

    Machová, Eva; Jakubík, Jan; El-Fakahany, E. E.; Doležal, Vladimír

    Praha : 2.Lékařská fakulta UK, 2007. s. 55-55. [Vědecká konference 2007 - věda, sport a rock ´n´roll. 25.04.2007-26.04.2007, Praha] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA305/05/0452; GA MŠk(CZ) LC554 Grant ostatní: NIH(US) NS25732 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : spo2 * xanomeline * acetylcholine * presynaptic muscarinic receptors Subject RIV: FH - Neurology

  18. Habituation-Like Decrease of Acetylcholine-Induced Inward Current in Helix Command Neurons: Role of Microtubule Motor Proteins.

    Vasil'yeva, Natal'ya A; Murzina, Galina B; Pivovarov, Arkady S

    2015-07-01

    The role of kinesin and dynein microtubule-associated molecular motors in the cellular mechanism of depression of acetylcholine-induced inward chloride current (ACh-current) was examined in command neurons of land snails (Helix lucorum) in response to repeated applications of ACh to neuronal soma. This pharmacological stimulation imitated the protocol of tactile stimulation evoking behavioural habituation of the defensive reaction. In this system, a dynein inhibitor (erythro-9-(2-hydroxy-3-nonyl)adenine, 50 µM) decreased the ACh-current depression rate. Kinesin Eg5 inhibitors (Eg5 inhibitor III, 10 µM and Eg5 inhibitor V, trans-24, 15 µM) reduced the degree of current depression, and Eg5 inhibitor V also reduced the initial rate of depression. The results of electrophysiological experiments in combination with mathematical modelling provided evidence of the participation of dyneins and kinesin Eg5 proteins in the radial transport of acetylcholine receptors in command neurons of H. lucorum in the cellular analogue of habituation. Furthermore, these results suggest that the reciprocal interaction between dynein and kinesin proteins located on the same vesicle can lead to reverse their usual direction of transport (dyneins-in exocytosis and kinesin Eg5-in endocytosis). PMID:25687906

  19. PASSIVE-AVOIDANCE TRAINING INDUCES ENHANCED LEVELS OF IMMUNOREACTIVITY FOR MUSCARINIC ACETYLCHOLINE-RECEPTOR AND COEXPRESSED PKC-GAMMA AND MAP-2 IN RAT CORTICAL-NEURONS

    VANDERZEE, EA; DOUMA, BRK; BOHUS, B; LUITEN, PGM

    1994-01-01

    Changes in neocortical immunoreactivity (ir) for muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs), protein kinase C gamma (PKC gamma), microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP-2), and the calcium-binding protein parvalbumin (PARV) induced by the performance of a one-trial passive shock avoidance (PSA) task

  20. Flow- and acetylcholine-induced dilation in small arteries from rats with renovascular hypertension - effect of tempol treatment

    Christensen, Frank Holden; Stankevicius, Edgaras; Hansen, Thomas;

    2007-01-01

    ). In isolated pressurized mesenteric small arteries NO-mediated dilatation was obtained by increasing flow rate and EDHF-mediated dilatation by acetylcholine. In arteries from hypertensive rats, flow-induced dilatation was blunted, as compared to normotensive and tempol-treated rats, while......We investigated whether renovascular hypertension alters vasodilatation mediated by nitric oxide (NO) and endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor (EDHF) and the influence of the superoxide dismutase mimetic tempol on vasodilatation. One-kidney one-clip hypertensive Sprague–Dawley rats, treated...... with either vehicle or tempol (from weeks 5 to 10 after placement of the clip), and uninephrectomized control rats were investigated. In renal hypertensive rats systolic blood pressure increased to 171±6 mmHg (n=10), while in tempol-treated rats systolic blood pressure remained normal (139±7 mmHg, n=5...

  1. Steroids induce acetylcholine receptors on cultured human muscle: Implications for myasthenia gravis

    Antibodies to the acetylcholine receptor (AChR), which are diagnostic of the human autoimmune disease myasthenia gravis, block AChR function and increase the rate of AChR degradation leading to impaired neuromuscular transmission. Steroids are frequently used to alleviate symptoms of muscle fatigue and weakness in patients with myasthenia gravis because of their well-documented immunosuppressive effects. The authors show here that the steroid dexamethasone significantly increases total surface AChRs on cultured human muscle exposed to myasthenia gravis sera. The results suggest that the clinical improvement observed in myasthenic patients treated with steroids is due not only to an effect on the immune system but also a direct effect on muscle. They propose that the identification and development of pharmacologic agents that augment receptors and other proteins that are reduced by human genetic or autoimmune disease will have broad therapeutic applications

  2. Steroids induce acetylcholine receptors on cultured human muscle: Implications for myasthenia gravis

    Kaplan, I.; Blakely, B.T.; Pavlath, G.K.; Travis, M.; Blau, H.M. (Stanford Univ. School of Medicine, CA (USA))

    1990-10-01

    Antibodies to the acetylcholine receptor (AChR), which are diagnostic of the human autoimmune disease myasthenia gravis, block AChR function and increase the rate of AChR degradation leading to impaired neuromuscular transmission. Steroids are frequently used to alleviate symptoms of muscle fatigue and weakness in patients with myasthenia gravis because of their well-documented immunosuppressive effects. The authors show here that the steroid dexamethasone significantly increases total surface AChRs on cultured human muscle exposed to myasthenia gravis sera. The results suggest that the clinical improvement observed in myasthenic patients treated with steroids is due not only to an effect on the immune system but also a direct effect on muscle. They propose that the identification and development of pharmacologic agents that augment receptors and other proteins that are reduced by human genetic or autoimmune disease will have broad therapeutic applications.

  3. Accumulation of human full-length tau induces degradation of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor α4 via activating calpain-2

    Yin, Yaling; Wang, Yali; Gao, Di; Ye, Jinwang; Wang, Xin; Fang, Lin; Wu, Dongqin; Pi, Guilin; Lu, Chengbiao; Zhou, Xin-Wen; Yang, Ying; Wang, Jian-Zhi

    2016-01-01

    Cholinergic impairments and tau accumulation are hallmark pathologies in sporadic Alzheimer’s disease (AD), however, the intrinsic link between tau accumulation and cholinergic deficits is missing. Here, we found that overexpression of human wild-type full-length tau (termed hTau) induced a significant reduction of α4 subunit of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) with an increased cleavage of the receptor producing a ~55kDa fragment in primary hippocampal neurons and in the rat brains, meanwhile, the α4 nAChR currents decreased. Further studies demonstrated that calpains, including calpain-1 and calpain-2, were remarkably activated with no change of caspase-3, while simultaneous suppression of calpain-2 by selective calpain-2 inhibitor but not calpain-1 attenuated the hTau-induced degradation of α4 nAChR. Finally, we demonstrated that hTau accumulation increased the basal intracellular calcium level in primary hippocampal neurons. We conclude that the hTau accumulation inhibits nAChRs α4 by activating calpain-2. To our best knowledge, this is the first evidence showing that the intracellular accumulation of tau causes cholinergic impairments. PMID:27277673

  4. Localized low-level re-expression of high-affinity mesolimbic nicotinic acetylcholine receptors restores nicotine-induced locomotion but not place conditioning.

    Mineur, Y S; Brunzell, D H; Grady, S R; Lindstrom, J M; McIntosh, J M; Marks, M J; King, S L; Picciotto, M R

    2009-04-01

    High-affinity, beta2-subunit-containing (beta2*) nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are essential for nicotine reinforcement; however, these nAChRs are found on both gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and dopaminergic (DA) neurons in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and also on terminals of glutamatergic and cholinergic neurons projecting from the pedunculopontine tegmental area and the laterodorsal tegmental nucleus. Thus, systemic nicotine administration stimulates many different neuronal subtypes in various brain nuclei. To identify neurons in which nAChRs must be expressed to mediate effects of systemic nicotine, we investigated responses in mice with low-level, localized expression of beta2* nAChRs in the midbrain/VTA. Nicotine-induced GABA and DA release were partially rescued in striatal synaptosomes from transgenic mice compared with tissue from beta2 knockout mice. Nicotine-induced locomotor activation, but not place preference, was rescued in mice with low-level VTA expression, suggesting that low-level expression of beta2* nAChRs in DA neurons is not sufficient to support nicotine reward. In contrast to control mice, transgenic mice with low-level beta2* nAChR expression in the VTA showed no increase in overall levels of cyclic AMP response element-binding protein (CREB) but did show an increase in CREB phosphorylation in response to exposure to a nicotine-paired chamber. Thus, CREB activation in the absence of regulation of total CREB levels during place preference testing was not sufficient to support nicotine place preference in beta2 trangenic mice. This suggests that partial activation of high-affinity nAChRs in VTA might block the rewarding effects of nicotine, providing a potential mechanism for the ability of nicotinic partial agonists to aid in smoking cessation. PMID:19077117

  5. Inhibition of the mitochondrial unfolded protein response by acetylcholine alleviated hypoxia/reoxygenation-induced apoptosis of endothelial cells.

    Xu, Man; Bi, Xueyuan; He, Xi; Yu, Xiaojiang; Zhao, Ming; Zang, Weijin

    2016-05-18

    The mitochondrial unfolded protein response (UPR(mt)) is involved in numerous diseases that have the common feature of mitochondrial dysfunction. However, its pathophysiological relevance in the context of hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R) in endothelial cells remains elusive. Previous studies have demonstrated that acetylcholine (ACh) protects against cardiomyocyte injury by suppressing generation of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mtROS). This study aimed to explore the role of UPR(mt) in endothelial cells during H/R and to clarify the beneficial effects of ACh. Our results demonstrated that H/R triggered UPR(mt) in endothelial cells, as evidenced by the elevation of heat shock protein 60 and LON protease 1 protein levels, and resulted in release of mitochondrial pro-apoptotic proteins, including cytochrome C, Omi/high temperature requirement protein A 2 and second mitochondrial activator of caspases/direct inhibitor of apoptosis-binding protein with low PI, from the mitochondria to cytosol. ACh administration markedly decreased UPR(mt) by inhibiting mtROS and alleviating the mitonuclear protein imbalance. Consequently, ACh alleviated the release of pro-apoptotic proteins and restored mitochondrial ultrastructure and function, thereby reducing the number of terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase mediated dUTP-biotin nick end labeling (TUNEL)-positive cells. Intriguingly, 4-diphenylacetoxy-N-methylpiperidine methiodide, a type-3 muscarinic ACh receptor (M3AChR) inhibitor, abolished the ACh-elicited attenuation of UPR(mt) and TUNEL positive cells, indicating that the salutary effects of ACh were likely mediated by M3AChR in endothelial cells. In conclusion, our studies demonstrated that UPR(mt) might be essential for triggering the mitochondrion-associated apoptotic pathway during H/R. ACh markedly suppressed UPR(mt) by inhibiting mtROS and alleviating the mitonuclear protein imbalance, presumably through M3AChR. PMID:27111378

  6. Phosphocholine-Modified Macromolecules and Canonical Nicotinic Agonists Inhibit ATP-Induced IL-1β Release.

    Hecker, Andreas; Küllmar, Mira; Wilker, Sigrid; Richter, Katrin; Zakrzewicz, Anna; Atanasova, Srebrena; Mathes, Verena; Timm, Thomas; Lerner, Sabrina; Klein, Jochen; Kaufmann, Andreas; Bauer, Stefan; Padberg, Winfried; Kummer, Wolfgang; Janciauskiene, Sabina; Fronius, Martin; Schweda, Elke K H; Lochnit, Günter; Grau, Veronika

    2015-09-01

    IL-1β is a potent proinflammatory cytokine of the innate immune system that is involved in host defense against infection. However, increased production of IL-1β plays a pathogenic role in various inflammatory diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, gout, sepsis, stroke, and transplant rejection. To prevent detrimental collateral damage, IL-1β release is tightly controlled and typically requires two consecutive danger signals. LPS from Gram-negative bacteria is a prototypical first signal inducing pro-IL-1β synthesis, whereas extracellular ATP is a typical second signal sensed by the ATP receptor P2X7 that triggers activation of the NLRP3-containing inflammasome, proteolytic cleavage of pro-IL-1β by caspase-1, and release of mature IL-1β. Mechanisms controlling IL-1β release, even in the presence of both danger signals, are needed to protect from collateral damage and are of therapeutic interest. In this article, we show that acetylcholine, choline, phosphocholine, phosphocholine-modified LPS from Haemophilus influenzae, and phosphocholine-modified protein efficiently inhibit ATP-mediated IL-1β release in human and rat monocytes via nicotinic acetylcholine receptors containing subunits α7, α9, and/or α10. Of note, we identify receptors for phosphocholine-modified macromolecules that are synthesized by microbes and eukaryotic parasites and are well-known modulators of the immune system. Our data suggest that an endogenous anti-inflammatory cholinergic control mechanism effectively controls ATP-mediated release of IL-1β and that the same mechanism is used by symbionts and misused by parasites to evade innate immune responses of the host. PMID:26202987

  7. Nicotine Ameliorates NMDA Receptor Antagonist-Induced Deficits in Contextual Fear Conditioning through High Affinity Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors in the Hippocampus

    André, Jessica M.; Leach, Prescott T.; Gould, Thomas J.

    2010-01-01

    NMDA glutamate receptors (NMDARs) and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are both involved in learning and synaptic plasticity. Increasing evidence suggests processes mediated by these receptors may interact to modulate learning; however, little is known about the neural substrates involved in these interactive processes. The present studies investigated the effects of nicotine on MK-801 hydrogen maleate (MK-801) and DL-2-Amino-5-phosphonovaleric acid (APV) induced disruption of conte...

  8. Autophagic flux data in differentiated C2C12 myotubes following exposure to acetylcholine and caffeine.

    Bloemberg, Darin; Quadrilatero, Joe

    2016-06-01

    The C2C12 line of mouse myoblasts is a useful cell culture model in which to conduct in vitro analyses related to skeletal muscle. Here we present data regarding the autophagic response induced by two chemicals known to influence calcium release and contraction in skeletal muscles and C2C12 cells: acetylcholine and caffeine. More specifically, by concurrently administering acetylcholine or caffeine along with chloroquine to differentiated myotubes for various amounts of time and assessing the protein expression of LC3 and p62, we report data on the relative level of autophagic flux induced by these two calcium- and contraction-regulating chemicals. PMID:27054179

  9. Autophagic flux data in differentiated C2C12 myotubes following exposure to acetylcholine and caffeine

    Darin Bloemberg

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The C2C12 line of mouse myoblasts is a useful cell culture model in which to conduct in vitro analyses related to skeletal muscle. Here we present data regarding the autophagic response induced by two chemicals known to influence calcium release and contraction in skeletal muscles and C2C12 cells: acetylcholine and caffeine. More specifically, by concurrently administering acetylcholine or caffeine along with chloroquine to differentiated myotubes for various amounts of time and assessing the protein expression of LC3 and p62, we report data on the relative level of autophagic flux induced by these two calcium- and contraction-regulating chemicals.

  10. Synthetic. cap alpha. subunit peptide 125-147 of human nicotinic acetylcholine receptor induces antibodies to native receptor

    McCormick, D.J.; Griesmann, G.E.; Huang, Z.; Lennon, V.A.

    1986-03-05

    A synthetic peptide corresponding to residues 125-147 of the Torpedo acetylcholine receptor (AChR) ..cap alpha.. subunit proved to be a major antigenic region of the AChR. Rats inoculated with 50 ..mu..g of peptide (T ..cap alpha.. 125-147) developed T cell immunity and antibodies to native AChR and signs of experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis. They report the synthesis and preliminary testing of a disulfide-looped peptide comprising residues 125-147 of the human AChR ..cap alpha.. subunit. Peptide H ..cap alpha.. 125-147 differs from T ..cap alpha.. 125-147 at residues 139 (Glu for Gln) and 143 (Ser for Thr). In immunoprecipitation assays, antibodies to Torpedo AChR bound /sup 125/I-labelled H..cap alpha.. 125-147 antibody bound H..cap alpha.. 125-147, but monoclonal antibodies to an immunodominant region of native AChR bound neither H..cap alpha.. 125-147 nor T ..cap alpha.. 125-147. Rats immunized with H ..cap alpha.. 125-147 produced anti-mammalian muscle AChR antibodies that induced modulation of AChRs from cultured human myotubes. Thus, region 125-147 of the human AChR ..cap alpha.. subunit is extracellular in muscle, and is both antigenic and immunogenic. It remains to be determined whether or not autoantibodies to this region may in part cause the weakness or myasthenia gravis in man.

  11. Novel role for cyclin-dependent kinase 2 in neuregulin-induced acetylcholine receptor epsilon subunit expression in differentiated myotubes.

    Lu, Gang; Seta, Karen A; Millhorn, David E

    2005-06-10

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) are a family of evolutionarily conserved serine/threonine kinases. CDK2 acts as a checkpoint for the G(1)/S transition in the cell cycle. Despite a down-regulation of CDK2 activity in postmitotic cells, many cell types, including muscle cells, maintain abundant levels of CDK2 protein. This led us to hypothesize that CDK2 may have a function in postmitotic cells. We show here for the first time that CDK2 can be activated by neuregulin (NRG) in differentiated C2C12 myotubes. In addition, this activity is required for expression of the acetylcholine receptor (AChR) epsilon subunit. The switch from the fetal AChRgamma subunit to the adult-type AChRepsilon is required for synapse maturation and the neuromuscular junction. Inhibition of CDK2 activity with either the specific CDK2 inhibitory peptide Tat-LFG or by RNA interference abolished neuregulin-induced AChRepsilon expression. Neuregulin-induced activation of CDK2 also depended on the ErbB receptor, MAPK, and PI3K, all of which have previously been shown to be required for AChRepsilon expression. Neuregulin regulated CDK2 activity through coordinating phosphorylation of CDK2 on Thr-160, accumulation of CDK2 in the nucleus, and down-regulation of the CDK2 inhibitory protein p27 in the nucleus. In addition, we also observed a novel mechanism of regulation of CDK2 activity by a low molecular weight variant of cyclin E in response to NRG. These findings establish CDK2 as an intermediate molecule that integrates NRG-activated signals from both the MAPK and PI3K pathways to AChRepsilon expression and reveal an undiscovered physiological role for CDK2 in postmitotic cells. PMID:15824106

  12. Interaction of glutamate- and adenosine-induced decrease of acetylcholine quantal release at frog neuromuscular junction

    Adámek, S.; Shakirzyanova, V.; Malomouzh, A. I.; Naumenko, N. V.; Vyskočil, František

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 59, č. 5 (2010), s. 803-810. ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA500110905; GA ČR GA202/09/0806 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : Endplate potentials * Guanylyl cyclase Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 1.646, year: 2010

  13. Methamphetamine induces the release of endothelin.

    Seo, Jeong-Woo; Jones, Susan M; Hostetter, Trisha A; Iliff, Jeffrey J; West, G Alexander

    2016-02-01

    Methamphetamine is a potent psychostimulant drug of abuse that increases release and blocks reuptake of dopamine, producing intense euphoria, factors that may contribute to its widespread abuse. It also produces severe neurotoxicity resulting from oxidative stress, DNA damage, blood-brain barrier disruption, microgliosis, and mitochondrial dysfunction. Intracerebral hemorrhagic and ischemic stroke have been reported after intravenous and oral abuse of methamphetamine. Several studies have shown that methamphetamine causes vasoconstriction of vessels. This study investigates the effect of methamphetamine on endothelin-1 (ET-1) release in mouse brain endothelial cells by ELISA. ET-1 transcription as well as endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activation and transcription were measured following methamphetamine treatment. We also examine the effect of methamphetamine on isolated cerebral arteriolar vessels from C57BL/6 mice. Penetrating middle cerebral arterioles were cannulated at both ends with a micropipette system. Methamphetamine was applied extraluminally, and the vascular response was investigated. Methamphetamine treatment of mouse brain endothelial cells resulted in ET-1 release and a transient increase in ET-1 message. The activity and transcription of eNOS were only slightly enhanced after 24 hr of treatment with methamphetamine. In addition, methamphetamine caused significant vasoconstriction of isolated mouse intracerebral arterioles. The vasoconstrictive effect of methamphetamine was attenuated by coapplication of the endothelin receptor antagonist PD145065. These findings suggest that vasoconstriction induced by methamphetamine is mediated through the endothelin receptor and may involve an endothelin-dependent pathway. PMID:26568405

  14. BLOCKADE OF CENTRAL NICOTINE ACETYLCHOLINE RECEPTOR SIGNALING ATTENUATE GHRELIN-INDUCED FOOD INTAKE IN RODENTS

    S.L. Dickson; Hrabovszky, E; Hansson, C.; Jerlhag, E.; Alvarez-Crespo, M.; Skibicka, K. P.; Molnar, C. S.; Liposits, Z; Engel, J. A.; Egecioglu, E.

    2010-01-01

    Here we sought to determine whether ghrelin's central effects on food intake can be interrupted by nicotinic cholinergic receptor (nAChR) blockade. Ghrelin regulates mesolimbic dopamine neurons projecting from the ventral tegmental area (VTA) to the nucleus accumbens (NAcc), partly via cholinergic VTA afferents originating in the laterodorsal tegmental area (LDTg). Given that these cholinergic projections to the VTA have been implicated in natural as well as drug-induced reinforcement, we sou...

  15. Antipsychotic-induced catalepsy is attenuated in mice lacking the M4 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor

    Fink-Jensen, Anders; Schmidt, Lene S.; Dencker, Ditte; Schülein, Christina; Wess, Jürgen; Wörtwein, Gitta; Woldbye, David P.D.

    2011-01-01

    A delicate balance exists between the central dopaminergic and cholinergic neurotransmitter systems with respect to motor function. An imbalance can result in motor dysfunction as observed in Parkinson’s disease patients and in patients treated with antipsychotic compounds. Cholinergic receptor antagonists can alleviate extrapyramidal symptoms in Parkinson’s disease and motor side effects induced by antipsychotics. The effects of anticholinergics are mediated by muscarinic receptors of which ...

  16. IL-13R alpha 2 reverses the effects of IL-13 and IL-4 on bronchial reactivity and acetylcholine-induced Ca2+ signaling

    Kellner, Julia; Gamarra, Fernando; Welsch, Ulrich; Joerres, Rudolf A.; Huber, Rudolf M; Bergner, Albrecht

    2007-01-01

    Background: The interleukins IL-4 and IL-13 play a key role in the pathophysiology of asthma. The interleukin receptor IL-13R alpha 2 is believed to act as a decoy receptor, but until now, the functional significance of IL-13R alpha 2 remains vague. Methods: Bronchial reactivity was quantified in murine lung slices by digital video microscopy and acetylcholine (ACH)-induced Ca2+ signaling was measured in human airway smooth muscle cells (ASMC) using fluorescence microscopy. Results: IL-4 or I...

  17. Acetylcholine sensitivity of biphasic Ca2+ mobilization induced by nicotinic receptor activation at the mouse skeletal muscle endplate

    Dezaki, Katsuya; Kimura, Ikuko

    1998-01-01

    Acetylcholine (ACh) was locally applied onto the endplate region in a mouse phrenic nerve-diaphragm muscle preparation to measure intracellular free calcium ([Ca2+]i) entry through nicotinic ACh receptors (AChRs) by use of Ca2+-aequorin luminescence.ACh (0.1–3 mM, 20 μl) elicited biphasic elevation of [Ca2+]i (fast and slow Ca2+ mobilization) in muscle cells. The peak amplitude of the slow Ca2+ mobilization (not accompanied by twitch tension) was concentration-dependently increased by ACh, wh...

  18. An extract of lionfish (Pterois volitans) spine tissue contains acetylcholine and a toxin that affects neuromuscular transmission.

    Cohen, A S; Olek, A J

    1989-01-01

    A soluble toxic extract derived from spine tissue of the lionfish (Pterois volitans) decreased heart rate and force of contraction in isolated clam and frog hearts. These actions were due to the presence of micromolar concentrations of acetylcholine in the extract. Toxicity was retained after hydrolysis of acetylcholine by exogenous acetylcholinesterase, but heart function was no longer affected. Toxin treated in this way induced muscle fibrillation in an isolated nerve-muscle preparation, followed by blockade of neuromuscular transmission. Bursts of transient depolarizations were recorded at the muscle endplate shortly after toxin addition that correlated in time with the duration of toxin-induced muscle fibrillation. These effects are thought to be due to the increased release and then depletion of acetylcholine from the nerve terminal. PMID:2560846

  19. Bothropstoxin-I reduces evoked acetylcholine release from rat motor nerve terminals: radiochemical and real-time video-microscopy studies.

    Correia-de-Sá, Paulo; Noronha-Matos, José B; Timóteo, Maria A; Ferreirinha, Fátima; Marques, Patrícia; Soares, Andreimar M; Carvalho, Cicilia; Cavalcante, Walter L G; Gallacci, Márcia

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the biological activity profile of the snake venom components is fundamental for improving the treatment of snakebite envenomings and may also contribute for the development of new potential therapeutic agents. In this work, we tested the effects of BthTX-I, a Lys49 PLA(2) homologue from the Bothrops jararacussu snake venom. While this toxin induces conspicuous myonecrosis by a catalytically independent mechanism, a series of in vitro studies support the hypothesis that BthTX-I might also exert a neuromuscular blocking activity due to its ability to alter the integrity of muscle cell membranes. To gain insight into the mechanisms of this inhibitory neuromuscular effect, for the first time, the influence of BthTX-I on nerve-evoked ACh release was directly quantified by radiochemical and real-time video-microscopy methods. Our results show that the neuromuscular blockade produced by in vitro exposure to BthTX-I (1 μM) results from the summation of both pre- and postsynaptic effects. Modifications affecting the presynaptic apparatus were revealed by the significant reduction of nerve-evoked [(3)H]-ACh release; real-time measurements of transmitter exocytosis using the FM4-64 fluorescent dye fully supported radiochemical data. The postsynaptic effect of BthTX-I was characterized by typical histological alterations in the architecture of skeletal muscle fibers, increase in the outflow of the intracellular lactate dehydrogenase enzyme and progressive depolarization of the muscle resting membrane potential. In conclusion, these findings suggest that the neuromuscular blockade produced by BthTX-I results from transient depolarization of skeletal muscle fibers, consequent to its general membrane-destabilizing effect, and subsequent decrease of evoked ACh release from motor nerve terminals. PMID:23142504

  20. Tetrodotoxin effects in the stimulated acetylcholine release by agonist of glutamate in mice striatum tissue; Efeito da tetrodotoxina na liberacao de acetilcolina estimulada por agonistas glutamatergicos em tecido estriatal de ratos

    Paes, Paulo Cesar de Arruda; Camillo, Maria A.P.; Rogero, Jose Roberto [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Lab. de Biologia Molecular; Troncone, Lanfranco R.P. [Instituto Butantan, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Lab. de Farmacologia

    2002-07-01

    The toxins of animal venoms have been used as important tools for biochemical studies of physiological and pathological processes of diverse systems. In this work we used the action of tetrodotoxin on sodium channels to map the localization of glutamate receptors in cholinergic neurons from striatum tissue of rats. All glutamate receptors are exciting, so they promote the release of other neurotransmitters. In this work we focus on acetylcholine. The localization of glutamate receptor, on the soma or on the excitatory terminal, may contribute for a better understanding of its function. For this work we applied the in vitro method of tritiated neurotransmitter release. The agonists of glutamate receptors chosen were glutamic acid 500{mu}M, NMDA 100{mu}M, kainic acid 300{mu}M, quisqualic acid 300{mu}M and AMPA 1mM. In the first part of the assay the basal and stimulated releases were measured and in the second, the same protocol was performed in the presence of tetrodotoxin 1{mu}M. The reductions observed in basal and stimulated release in the presence of tetrodotoxin suggested that the receptors type AMPA and NMDA were located in soma of cholinergic cell preferentially and the other ones presented a more equilibrate distribution among the axons and the soma. (author)

  1. Temperature effect on carbachol-induced depression of spontaneous quantal transmitter release in frog neuromuscular junction

    Strunsky, E. G.; Borisover, M. D.; Nikolsky, E. E.; Vyskočil, František

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 26, 8-9 (2001), s. 891-897. ISSN 0364-3190 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA7011902; GA MŠk OK 267 Grant ostatní: RFBR(RU) 99-04-48286; EU(XX) Nesting Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : carbachol * temperature * acetylcholine release Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 1.638, year: 2001

  2. Elimination of the vesicular acetylcholine transporter in the striatum reveals regulation of behaviour by cholinergic-glutamatergic co-transmission.

    Guzman, Monica S; De Jaeger, Xavier; Raulic, Sanda; Souza, Ivana A; Li, Alex X; Schmid, Susanne; Menon, Ravi S; Gainetdinov, Raul R; Caron, Marc G; Bartha, Robert; Prado, Vania F; Prado, Marco A M

    2011-11-01

    Cholinergic neurons in the striatum are thought to play major regulatory functions in motor behaviour and reward. These neurons express two vesicular transporters that can load either acetylcholine or glutamate into synaptic vesicles. Consequently cholinergic neurons can release both neurotransmitters, making it difficult to discern their individual contributions for the regulation of striatal functions. Here we have dissected the specific roles of acetylcholine release for striatal-dependent behaviour in mice by selective elimination of the vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT) from striatal cholinergic neurons. Analysis of several behavioural parameters indicates that elimination of VAChT had only marginal consequences in striatum-related tasks and did not affect spontaneous locomotion, cocaine-induced hyperactivity, or its reward properties. However, dopaminergic sensitivity of medium spiny neurons (MSN) and the behavioural outputs in response to direct dopaminergic agonists were enhanced, likely due to increased expression/function of dopamine receptors in the striatum. These observations indicate that previous functions attributed to striatal cholinergic neurons in spontaneous locomotor activity and in the rewarding responses to cocaine are mediated by glutamate and not by acetylcholine release. Our experiments demonstrate how one population of neurons can use two distinct neurotransmitters to differentially regulate a given circuitry. The data also raise the possibility of using VAChT as a target to boost dopaminergic function and decrease high striatal cholinergic activity, common neurochemical alterations in individuals affected with Parkinson's disease. PMID:22087075

  3. Elimination of the vesicular acetylcholine transporter in the striatum reveals regulation of behaviour by cholinergic-glutamatergic co-transmission.

    Monica S Guzman

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Cholinergic neurons in the striatum are thought to play major regulatory functions in motor behaviour and reward. These neurons express two vesicular transporters that can load either acetylcholine or glutamate into synaptic vesicles. Consequently cholinergic neurons can release both neurotransmitters, making it difficult to discern their individual contributions for the regulation of striatal functions. Here we have dissected the specific roles of acetylcholine release for striatal-dependent behaviour in mice by selective elimination of the vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT from striatal cholinergic neurons. Analysis of several behavioural parameters indicates that elimination of VAChT had only marginal consequences in striatum-related tasks and did not affect spontaneous locomotion, cocaine-induced hyperactivity, or its reward properties. However, dopaminergic sensitivity of medium spiny neurons (MSN and the behavioural outputs in response to direct dopaminergic agonists were enhanced, likely due to increased expression/function of dopamine receptors in the striatum. These observations indicate that previous functions attributed to striatal cholinergic neurons in spontaneous locomotor activity and in the rewarding responses to cocaine are mediated by glutamate and not by acetylcholine release. Our experiments demonstrate how one population of neurons can use two distinct neurotransmitters to differentially regulate a given circuitry. The data also raise the possibility of using VAChT as a target to boost dopaminergic function and decrease high striatal cholinergic activity, common neurochemical alterations in individuals affected with Parkinson's disease.

  4. External Dentin Stimulation Induces ATP Release in Human Teeth.

    Liu, X; Wang, C; Fujita, T; Malmstrom, H S; Nedergaard, M; Ren, Y F; Dirksen, R T

    2015-09-01

    ATP is involved in neurosensory processing, including nociceptive transduction. Thus, ATP signaling may participate in dentin hypersensitivity and dental pain. In this study, we investigated whether pannexins, which can form mechanosensitive ATP-permeable channels, are present in human dental pulp. We also assessed the existence and functional activity of ecto-ATPase for extracellular ATP degradation. We further tested if ATP is released from dental pulp upon dentin mechanical or thermal stimulation that induces dentin hypersensitivity and dental pain and if pannexin or pannexin/gap junction channel blockers reduce stimulation-dependent ATP release. Using immunofluorescence staining, we demonstrated immunoreactivity of pannexin 1 and 2 in odontoblasts and their processes extending into the dentin tubules. Using enzymatic histochemistry staining, we also demonstrated functional ecto-ATPase activity within the odontoblast layer, subodontoblast layer, dental pulp nerve bundles, and blood vessels. Using an ATP bioluminescence assay, we found that mechanical or cold stimulation to the exposed dentin induced ATP release in an in vitro human tooth perfusion model. We further demonstrated that blocking pannexin/gap junction channels with probenecid or carbenoxolone significantly reduced external dentin stimulation-induced ATP release. Our results provide evidence for the existence of functional machinery required for ATP release and degradation in human dental pulp and that pannexin channels are involved in external dentin stimulation-induced ATP release. These findings support a plausible role for ATP signaling in dentin hypersensitivity and dental pain. PMID:26130258

  5. Task- and Treatment Length-Dependent Effects of Vortioxetine on Scopolamine-Induced Cognitive Dysfunction and Hippocampal Extracellular Acetylcholine in Rats.

    Pehrson, Alan L; Hillhouse, Todd M; Haddjeri, Nasser; Rovera, Renaud; Porter, Joseph H; Mørk, Arne; Smagin, Gennady; Song, Dekun; Budac, David; Cajina, Manuel; Sanchez, Connie

    2016-09-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a common psychiatric disorder that often features impairments in cognitive function, and these cognitive symptoms can be important determinants of functional ability. Vortioxetine is a multimodal antidepressant that may improve some aspects of cognitive function in patients with MDD, including attention, processing speed, executive function, and memory. However, the cause of these effects is unclear, and there are several competing theories on the underlying mechanism, notably including regionally-selective downstream enhancement of glutamate neurotransmission and increased acetylcholine (ACh) neurotransmission. The current work sought to evaluate the ACh hypothesis by examining vortioxetine's ability to reverse scopolamine-induced impairments in rodent tests of memory and attention. Additionally, vortioxetine's effects on hippocampal extracellular ACh levels were examined alongside studies of vortioxetine's pharmacokinetic profile. We found that acute vortioxetine reversed scopolamine-induced impairments in social and object recognition memory, but did not alter scopolamine-induced impairments in attention. Acute vortioxetine also induced a modest and short-lived increase in hippocampal ACh levels. However, this short-term effect is at variance with vortioxetine's moderately long brain half life (5.1 hours). Interestingly, subchronic vortioxetine treatment failed to reverse scopolamine-induced social recognition memory deficits and had no effects on basal hippocampal ACh levels. These data suggest that vortioxetine has some effects on memory that could be mediated through cholinergic neurotransmission, however these effects are modest and only seen under acute dosing conditions. These limitations may argue against cholinergic mechanisms being the primary mediator of vortioxetine's cognitive effects, which are observed under chronic dosing conditions in patients with MDD. PMID:27402279

  6. Gliclazide directly inhibits arginine-induced glucagon release

    Cejvan, Kenan; Coy, David H; Holst, Jens Juul;

    2002-01-01

    Arginine-stimulated insulin and somatostatin release is enhanced by the sulfonylurea gliclazide. In contrast, gliclazide inhibits the glucagon response. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether this inhibition of glucagon release was mediated by a direct suppressive effect of...... specific antagonist of type 2 somatostatin receptor, DC-41-33 (2 micro mol/l), which fully antagonizes the suppressive somatostatin effect on rat A cells. Gliclazide (30 micro mol/l) inhibited glucagon release by 54% in the perfusion experiments, whereas the somatostatin response was nearly abolished. In...... islet perifusions with DC-41-33, arginine-induced glucagon release was inhibited by 66%. We therefore concluded that gliclazide inhibits glucagon release by a direct action on the pancreatic A cell....

  7. Ionizing Radiation Induces HMGB1 Cytoplasmic Translocation and Extracellular Release

    Lili Wang; Li He; Guoqiang Bao; Xin He; Saijun Fan; Haichao Wang

    2016-01-01

    Objective A nucleosomal protein,HMGBI,can be secreted by activated immune cells or passively released by dying cells,thereby amplifying rigorous inflammatory responses.In this study we aimed to test the possibility that radiation similarly induces cytoplasmic HMGB1 translocation and release.Methods Human skin fibroblast (GM0639) and bronchial epithelial (16HBE) cells and rats were exposed to X-ray radiation,and HMGB1 translocation and release were then assessed by immunocytochemistry and immunoassay,respectively.Results At a wide dose range(4.0-12.0 Gy),X-ray radiation induced a dramatic cytoplasmic HMGB1 translocation,and triggered a time-and dose-dependent HMGB1 release both in vitro and in vivo.The radiation-mediated HMGB1 release was also associated with noticeable chromosomal DNA damage and loss of cell viability.Conclusions Radiation induces HMGB1 cytoplasmic translocation and extracellular release through active secretion and passive leakage processes.

  8. Acetylcholine affects osteocytic MLO-Y4 cells via acetylcholine receptors.

    Ma, Yuanyuan; Li, Xianxian; Fu, Jing; Li, Yue; Gao, Li; Yang, Ling; Zhang, Ping; Shen, Jiefei; Wang, Hang

    2014-03-25

    The identification of the neuronal control of bone remodeling has become one of the many significant recent advances in bone biology. Cholinergic activity has recently been shown to favor bone mass accrual by complex cellular regulatory networks. Here, we identified the gene expression of the muscarinic and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (m- and nAChRs) in mice tibia tissue and in osteocytic MLO-Y4 cells. Acetylcholine, which is a classical neurotransmitter and an osteo-neuromediator, not only influences the mRNA expression of the AChR subunits but also significantly induces the proliferation and viability of osteocytes. Moreover, acetylcholine treatment caused the reciprocal regulation of RANKL and OPG mRNA expression, which resulted in a significant increase in the mRNA ratio of RANKL:OPG in osteocytes via acetylcholine receptors. The expression of neuropeptide Y and reelin, which are two neurogenic markers, was also modulated by acetylcholine via m- and nAChRs in MLO-Y4 cells. These results indicated that osteocytic acetylcholine receptors might be a new valuable mediator for cell functions and even for bone remodeling. PMID:24508663

  9. Effect of angiotensin II, catecholamines and glucocorticoid on corticotropin releasing factor (CRF-induced ACTH release in pituitary cell cultures.

    Murakami,Kazuharu

    1984-08-01

    Full Text Available The effects of angiotensin II, catecholamines and glucocorticoid on CRF-induced ACTH release were examined using rat anterior pituitary cells in monolayer culture. Synthetic ovine CRF induced a significant ACTH release in this system. Angiotensin II produced an additive effect on CRF-induced ACTH release. The ACTH releasing activity of CRF was potentiated by epinephrine and norepinephrine. Dopamine itself at 0.03-30 ng/ml did not show any significant effect on ACTH release, but it inhibited CRF-induced ACTH release. Corticosterone at 10(-7 and 10(-6M inhibited CRF-induced ACTH release. These results indicate that angiotensin II, catecholamines and glucocorticoid modulate ACTH release at the pituitary level.

  10. Structural Studies of Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors: Using Acetylcholine Binding Protein as a Structural Surrogate

    Shahsavar, Azadeh; Gajhede, Michael; Kastrup, Jette; Balle, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are members of the pentameric ligand-gated ion channel superfamily that play important roles in control of neurotransmitter release in the central and peripheral nervous system. These receptors are important therapeutic targets for development of drugs a...

  11. Trypanosoma cruzi infection induces up-regulation of cardiac muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in vivo and in vitro

    K. Peraza-Cruces

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The pathogenesis of chagasic cardiomyopathy is not completely understood, but it has been correlated with parasympathetic denervation (neurogenic theory and inflammatory activity (immunogenic theory that could affect heart muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR expression. In order to further understand whether neurogenic and/or immunogenic alterations are related to changes in mAChR expression, we studied two models of Trypanosoma cruzi infection: 1 in 3-week-old male Sprague Dawley rats chronically infected with T. cruzi and 2 isolated primary cardiomyocytes co-cultured with T. cruzi and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC. Using [³H]-quinuclidinylbenzilate ([³H]-QNB binding assays, we evaluated mAChR expression in homogenates from selected cardiac regions, PBMC, and cultured cardiomyocytes. We also determined in vitro protein expression and pro-inflammatory cytokine expression in serum and cell culture medium by ELISA. Our results showed that: 1 mAChR were significantly (P < 0.05 up-regulated in right ventricular myocardium (means ± SEM; control: 58.69 ± 5.54, N = 29; Chagas: 72.29 ± 5.79 fmol/mg, N = 34 and PBMC (control: 12.88 ± 2.45, N = 18; Chagas: 20.22 ± 1.82 fmol/mg, N = 19, as well as in cardiomyocyte transmembranes cultured with either PBMC/T. cruzi co-cultures (control: 24.33 ± 3.83; Chagas: 43.62 ± 5.08 fmol/mg, N = 7 for both or their conditioned medium (control: 37.84 ± 3.84, N = 4; Chagas: 54.38 ± 6.28 fmol/mg, N = 20; 2 [³H]-leucine uptake was increased in cardiomyocytes co-cultured with PBMC/T. cruzi-conditioned medium (Chagas: 21,030 ± 2321; control 10,940 ± 2385 dpm, N = 7 for both; P < 0.05; 3 plasma IL-6 was increased in chagasic rats, IL-1β, was increased in both plasma of chagasic rats and in the culture medium, and TNF-α level was decreased in the culture medium. In conclusion, our results suggest that cytokines are involved in the up-regulation of mAChR in chronic Chagas disease.

  12. Disassembly of the cholinergic postsynaptic apparatus induced by axotomy in mouse sympathetic neurons: the loss of dystrophin and beta-dystroglycan immunoreactivity precedes that of the acetylcholine receptor.

    Zaccaria, M L; De Stefano, M E; Properzi, F; Gotti, C; Petrucci, T C; Paggi, P

    1998-08-01

    In mouse sympathetic superior cervical ganglion (SCG), cortical cytoskeletal proteins such as dystrophin (Dys) and beta1sigma2 spectrin colocalize with beta-dystroglycan (beta-DG), a transmembrane dystrophin-associated protein, and the acetylcholine receptor (AChR) at the postsynaptic specialization. The function of the dystrophin-dystroglycan complex in the organization of the neuronal cholinergic postsynaptic apparatus was studied following changes in the immunoreactivity of these proteins during the disassembly and subsequent reassembly of the postsynaptic specializations induced by axotomy of the ganglionic neurons. After axotomy, a decrease in the number of intraganglionic synapses was observed (t1/2 8 h 45'), preceded by a rapid decline of postsynaptic specializations immunopositive for beta-DG, Dys, and alpha3 AChR subunit (alpha3AChR) (t1/2 3 h 45', 4 h 30' and 6 h, respectively). In contrast, the percentage of postsynaptic densities immunopositive for beta1sigma2 spectrin remained unaltered. When the axotomized neurons began to regenerate their axons, the number of intraganglionic synapses increased, as did that of postsynaptic specializations immunopositive for beta-DG, Dys, and alpha3AChR. The latter number increased more slowly than that of Dys and beta-DG. These observations suggest that in SCG neurons, the dystrophin-dystroglycan complex might play a role in the assembly-disassembly of the postsynaptic apparatus, and is probably involved in the stabilization of AChR clusters. PMID:9720492

  13. Inhibitory effects of the volatile oils of Callistemon citrinus (Curtis) Skeels and Eucalyptus citriodora Hook (Myrtaceae) on the acetylcholine induced contraction of isolated rat ileum.

    Adesina, Ayinde Buniyamin; Josephine, Owolabi Omonkhelin

    2012-04-01

    Using steam distillation method, the volatile oils of Eucalyptus citriodora and Callistemon citrinus were obtained and their chromatographic profiles examined in hexane: ethylacetate (4:1; 7:3) and hexane-chloroform (7:3). The effects of the volatile oils on acetylcholine (Ach) induced contraction of the rat isolated ileum were investigated based on the ethnomedicinal use of the volatile oil of E. citriodora in treating diarrhoea. Relative to the weight of the fresh leaves (200g in each case), E. citriodora produced 0.75% of the volatile oil while the C. citrinus yielded 0.5%. Combination of hexane-ethylacetate (4:1) gave the best resolution of the constituents as E. citriodora produced six major spots while Callistemon citrinus produced three. The concentration-dependent contractions of the ileum produced by the increasing concentration of the Ach were observed to be remarkably attenuated in the presence of the volatile oils at 5 and 10 mg/ml. At 5mg/ ml, the volatile oils of E. citriodora and C. citrinus independently reduced the Ach maximum contraction to 74.11 ± 12.4 and 19.05 ± 5.17% respectively. At 10mg/ml, the volatile oils further significantly (Pcitriodora in reducing ilea contractions occasioned by diarrhoea. However, C. citrinus volatile oil seems to be more effective. PMID:22459474

  14. Rescue of amyloid-Beta-induced inhibition of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors by a peptide homologous to the nicotine binding domain of the alpha 7 subtype.

    Arthur A Nery

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD is characterized by brain accumulation of the neurotoxic amyloid-β peptide (Aβ and by loss of cholinergic neurons and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs. Recent evidence indicates that memory loss and cognitive decline in AD correlate better with the amount of soluble Aβ than with the extent of amyloid plaque deposits in affected brains. Inhibition of nAChRs by soluble Aβ40 is suggested to contribute to early cholinergic dysfunction in AD. Using phage display screening, we have previously identified a heptapeptide, termed IQ, homologous to most nAChR subtypes, binding with nanomolar affinity to soluble Aβ40 and blocking Aβ-induced inhibition of carbamylcholine-induced currents in PC12 cells expressing α7 nAChRs. Using alanine scanning mutagenesis and whole-cell current recording, we have now defined the amino acids in IQ essential for reversal of Aβ40 inhibition of carbamylcholine-induced responses in PC12 cells, mediated by α7 subtypes and other endogenously expressed nAChRs. We further investigated the effects of soluble Aβ, IQ and analogues of IQ on α3β4 nAChRs recombinantly expressed in HEK293 cells. Results show that nanomolar concentrations of soluble Aβ40 potently inhibit the function of α3β4 nAChRs, and that subsequent addition of IQ or its analogues does not reverse this effect. However, co-application of IQ makes the inhibition of α3β4 nAChRs by Aβ40 reversible. These findings indicate that Aβ40 inhibits different subtypes of nAChRs by interacting with specific receptor domains homologous to the IQ peptide, suggesting that IQ may be a lead for novel drugs to block the inhibition of cholinergic function in AD.

  15. Imaging of dopamine release induced by pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic stimulations

    Cho, Sang Soo; Kim, Sang Eun [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-04-15

    Technological advances in molecular imaging made it possible to image synaptic neurotransmitter concentration in living human brain. The dopaminergic system has been most intensively studied because of its importance in neurological as well as psychiatric disorders. This paper provides a brief overview of recent progress in imaging studies of dopamine release induced by pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic stimulations.

  16. Nicotine ameliorates NMDA receptor antagonist-induced deficits in contextual fear conditioning through high-affinity nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in the hippocampus.

    André, Jessica M; Leach, Prescott T; Gould, Thomas J

    2011-03-01

    NMDA glutamate receptors (NMDARs) and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are both involved in learning and synaptic plasticity. Increasing evidence suggests processes mediated by these receptors may interact to modulate learning; however, little is known about the neural substrates involved in these interactive processes. The present studies investigated the effects of nicotine on MK-801 hydrogen maleate (MK-801) and DL-2-Amino-5-phosphonovaleric acid (APV)-induced disruption of contextual fear conditioning in male C57BL/6J mice, using direct drug infusion and selective nAChR antagonists to define the brain regions and the nAChR subtypes involved. Mice treated with MK-801 showed a deficit in contextual fear conditioning that was ameliorated by nicotine. Direct drug infusion demonstrated that the NMDAR antagonists disrupted hippocampal function and that nicotine acted in the dorsal hippocampus to ameliorate the deficit in learning. The high-affinity nAChR antagonist Dihydro-β-erythroidine hydrobromide (DhβE) blocked the effects of nicotine on MK-801-induced deficits while the α7 nAChR antagonist methyllycaconitine citrate salt hydrate (MLA) did not. These results suggest that NMDARs and nAChRs may mediate similar hippocampal processes involved in contextual fear conditioning. Furthermore, these results may have implications for developing effective therapeutics for the cognitive deficits associated with schizophrenia because a large subset of patients with schizophrenia exhibit cognitive deficits that may be related to NMDAR dysfunction and smoke at much higher rates than the healthy population, which may be an attempt to ameliorate cognitive deficits. PMID:21167848

  17. Somatic ATP release from guinea pig sympathetic neurons does not require calcium-induced calcium release from internal stores

    Merriam, Laura A.; Locknar, Sarah A.; Girard, Beatrice M.; Parsons, Rodney L.

    2010-01-01

    Prior studies indicated that a Ca2+-dependent release of ATP can be initiated from the soma of sympathetic neurons dissociated from guinea pig stellate ganglia. Previous studies also indicated that Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release (CICR) can modulate membrane excitability in these same neurons. As Ca2+ release from internal stores is thought to support somatodendritic transmitter release in other neurons, the present study investigated whether CICR is essential for somatic ATP release from dissociat...

  18. Parazoanthoxanthin A blocks Torpedo nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Rozman, Klara Bulc; Araoz, Romulo; Sepcić, Kristina; Molgo, Jordi; Suput, Dusan

    2010-09-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors are implicated in different nervous system-related disorders, and their modulation could improve existing therapy of these diseases. Parazoanthoxanthin A (ParaA) is a fluorescent pigment of the group of zoanthoxanthins. Since it is a potent acetylcholinesterase inhibitor, it may also bind to nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). For this reason its effect on Torpedo nAChR (alpha1(2)betagammadelta) transplanted to Xenopus laevis oocytes was evaluated, using the voltage-clamp technique. ParaA dose-dependently reduced the acetylcholine-induced currents. This effect was fully reversible only at lower concentrations. ParaA also reduced the Hill coefficient and the time to peak current, indicating a channel blocking mode of action. On the other hand, the combined effect of ParaA and d-tubocurarine (d-TC) on acetylcholine-induced currents exhibited only partial additivity, assuming a competitive mode of action of ParaA on nAChR. These results indicate a dual mode of action of ParaA on the Torpedo AChR. PMID:20230806

  19. α7 Nicotinic acetylcholine receptor-specific antibody induces inflammation and amyloid β42 accumulation in the mouse brain to impair memory.

    Olena Lykhmus

    Full Text Available Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs expressed in the brain are involved in regulating cognitive functions, as well as inflammatory reactions. Their density is decreased upon Alzheimer disease accompanied by accumulation of β-amyloid (Aβ42, memory deficit and neuroinflammation. Previously we found that α7 nAChR-specific antibody induced pro-inflammatory interleukin-6 production in U373 glioblastoma cells and that such antibodies were present in the blood of humans. We raised a hypothesis that α7 nAChR-specific antibody can cause neuroinflammation when penetrating the brain. To test this, C57Bl/6 mice were either immunized with extracellular domain of α7 nAChR subunit α7(1-208 or injected with bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS for 5 months. We studied their behavior and the presence of α3, α4, α7, β2 and β4 nAChR subunits, Aβ40 and Aβ42 and activated astrocytes in the brain by sandwich ELISA and confocal microscopy. It was found that either LPS injections or immunizations with α7(1-208 resulted in region-specific decrease of α7 and α4β2 and increase of α3β4 nAChRs, accumulation of Aβ42 and activated astrocytes in the brain of mice and worsening of their episodic memory. Intravenously transferred α7 nAChR-specific-antibodies penetrated the brain parenchyma of mice pre-injected with LPS. Our data demonstrate that (1 neuroinflammation is sufficient to provoke the decrease of α7 and α4β2 nAChRs, Aβ42 accumulation and memory impairment in mice and (2 α7(1-208 nAChR-specific antibodies can cause inflammation within the brain resulting in the symptoms typical for Alzheimer disease.

  20. Alpha5 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor mediates nicotine-induced HIF-1α and VEGF expression in non-small cell lung cancer

    By binding to nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), nicotine induces the proliferation and apoptosis of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Previous studies have indicated that α5-nAChR is highly associated with lung cancer risk and nicotine dependence. However, the mechanisms through which α5-nAChRs may influence lung carcinogenesis are far from clear. In the present study, we investigated the roles of α5-nAChR in the nicotine-induced expression of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Immunohistochemistry was used to detect the expression of α5-nAChR and HIF-1α in 60 specimens of lung cancer and para-carcinoma tissue. The correlations between the expression levels of α5-nAChR and HIF-1α and other clinicopathological data were analyzed. In a cell line that highly expressed α5-nAChR, the loss of α5-nAChR function by siRNA was used to study whether α5-nAChR is involved in the nicotine-induced expression of HIF-1α and VEGF through the activation of the ERK1/2 and PI3K/Akt signaling pathways. Cell growth was detected using the cell counting kit-8 (CCK-8). α5-nAChR (78.3%) and HIF-1α (88.3%) were both overexpressed in NSCLC, and their expression levels were found to be correlated with each other (P < 0.05). In the A549 cell line, α5-nAChR and HIF-1α were found to be expressed under normal conditions, and their expression levels were significantly increased in response to nicotine treatment. The silencing of α5-nAChR significantly inhibited the nicotine-induced cell proliferation compared with the control group and attenuated the nicotine-induced upregulation of HIF-1α and VEGF, and these effects required the cooperation of the ERK1/2 and PI3K/Akt signaling pathways. These results show that the α5-nAChR/HIF-1α/VEGF axis is involved in nicotine-induced tumor cell proliferation, which suggests that α5-nAChR may serve as a potential anticancer target in nicotine-associated lung cancer. - Highlights

  1. Alpha5 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor mediates nicotine-induced HIF-1α and VEGF expression in non-small cell lung cancer

    Ma, Xiaoli; Jia, Yanfei; Zu, Shanshan [Central Laboratory, Jinan Central Hospital Affiliated to Shandong University, Jinan 250013 (China); Li, Ruisheng [Institute of Infectious Diseases, 302 Military Hospital, Beijing 100039 (China); Jia, Ying; Zhao, Yun; Xiao, Dongjie [Central Laboratory, Jinan Central Hospital Affiliated to Shandong University, Jinan 250013 (China); Dang, Ningning [Department of Dermatology, Jinan Central Hospital Affiliated to Shandong University, Jinan 250013 (China); Wang, Yunshan [Central Laboratory, Jinan Central Hospital Affiliated to Shandong University, Jinan 250013 (China)

    2014-07-15

    By binding to nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), nicotine induces the proliferation and apoptosis of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Previous studies have indicated that α5-nAChR is highly associated with lung cancer risk and nicotine dependence. However, the mechanisms through which α5-nAChRs may influence lung carcinogenesis are far from clear. In the present study, we investigated the roles of α5-nAChR in the nicotine-induced expression of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Immunohistochemistry was used to detect the expression of α5-nAChR and HIF-1α in 60 specimens of lung cancer and para-carcinoma tissue. The correlations between the expression levels of α5-nAChR and HIF-1α and other clinicopathological data were analyzed. In a cell line that highly expressed α5-nAChR, the loss of α5-nAChR function by siRNA was used to study whether α5-nAChR is involved in the nicotine-induced expression of HIF-1α and VEGF through the activation of the ERK1/2 and PI3K/Akt signaling pathways. Cell growth was detected using the cell counting kit-8 (CCK-8). α5-nAChR (78.3%) and HIF-1α (88.3%) were both overexpressed in NSCLC, and their expression levels were found to be correlated with each other (P < 0.05). In the A549 cell line, α5-nAChR and HIF-1α were found to be expressed under normal conditions, and their expression levels were significantly increased in response to nicotine treatment. The silencing of α5-nAChR significantly inhibited the nicotine-induced cell proliferation compared with the control group and attenuated the nicotine-induced upregulation of HIF-1α and VEGF, and these effects required the cooperation of the ERK1/2 and PI3K/Akt signaling pathways. These results show that the α5-nAChR/HIF-1α/VEGF axis is involved in nicotine-induced tumor cell proliferation, which suggests that α5-nAChR may serve as a potential anticancer target in nicotine-associated lung cancer. - Highlights

  2. Ca2+ is involved in muscarine-acetylcholine-receptor-mediated acetylcholine signal transduction in guard cells of Vicia faba L.

    MENG Fanxia; MIAO Long; ZHANG Shuqiu; LOU Chenghou

    2004-01-01

    Acetylcholine (ACh) is an important neurochemical transmitter in animals; it also exists in plants and plays a significant role in various kinds of physiological functions in plants. ACh has been known to induce the stomatal opening. By monitoring the changes of cytosolic Ca2+ with fluorescent probe Fluo-3 AM under the confocal microscopy,we found that exogenous ACh increased cytosolic Ca2+ concentration of guard cells of Vicia faba L. Muscarine, an agonist of muscarine acetylcholine receptor (mAChR), could do so as well. In contrast, atropine, the antagonist of mAChR abolished the ability of ACh to increase Ca2+ in guard cells.This mechanism is similar to mAChR in animals. When EGTA was used to chelate Ca2+ or ruthenium red to block Ca2+ released from vacuole respectively, the results showed that the increased cytosolic Ca2+ mainly come from intracellular Ca2+ store. The evidence supports that Ca2+ is involved in guard-cell response to ACh and that Ca2+ signal is coupled to mAChRs in ACh signal transduction in guard cells.

  3. Selective activation of M4 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors reverses MK-801-induced behavioral impairments and enhances associative learning in rodents

    Bubser, Michael; Bridges, Thomas M; Dencker, Ditte;

    2014-01-01

    . VU0467154 produced a robust dose-dependent reversal of MK-801-induced hyperlocomotion and deficits in preclinical models of associative learning and memory functions, including the touchscreen pairwise visual discrimination task in wild-type mice, but failed to reverse these stimulant-induced...... antipsychotic drug-like profile in rodents after amphetamine challenge. Previous studies suggest that enhanced cholinergic activity may also improve cognitive function and reverse deficits observed with reduced signaling through the N-methyl-d-aspartate subtype of the glutamate receptor (NMDAR) in the central...... nervous system. Prior to this study, the M1 mAChR subtype was viewed as the primary candidate for these actions relative to the other mAChR subtypes. Here we describe the discovery of a novel M4 PAM, VU0467154, with enhanced in vitro potency and improved pharmacokinetic properties relative to other M4...

  4. A calcium-induced calcium release mechanism mediated by calsequestrin.

    Lee, Young-Seon; Keener, James P

    2008-08-21

    Calcium (Ca(2+))-induced Ca(2+) release (CICR) is widely accepted as the principal mechanism linking electrical excitation and mechanical contraction in cardiac cells. The CICR mechanism has been understood mainly based on binding of cytosolic Ca(2+) with ryanodine receptors (RyRs) and inducing Ca(2+) release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR). However, recent experiments suggest that SR lumenal Ca(2+) may also participate in regulating RyR gating through calsequestrin (CSQ), the SR lumenal Ca(2+) buffer. We investigate how SR Ca(2+) release via RyR is regulated by Ca(2+) and calsequestrin (CSQ). First, a mathematical model of RyR kinetics is derived based on experimental evidence. We assume that the RyR has three binding sites, two cytosolic sites for Ca(2+) activation and inactivation, and one SR lumenal site for CSQ binding. The open probability (P(o)) of the RyR is found by simulation under controlled cytosolic and SR lumenal Ca(2+). Both peak and steady-state P(o) effectively increase as SR lumenal Ca(2+) increases. Second, we incorporate the RyR model into a CICR model that has both a diadic space and the junctional SR (jSR). At low jSR Ca(2+) loads, CSQs are more likely to bind with the RyR and act to inhibit jSR Ca(2+) release, while at high SR loads CSQs are more likely to detach from the RyR, thereby increasing jSR Ca(2+) release. Furthermore, this CICR model produces a nonlinear relationship between fractional jSR Ca(2+) release and jSR load. These findings agree with experimental observations in lipid bilayers and cardiac myocytes. PMID:18538346

  5. Effects of cooling on the response of the snail bursting neuron to acetylcholine.

    Nedeljković, Miodrag; Kartelija, Gordana; Radenović, Lidija

    2005-06-01

    The Br-type neuron of the snail Helix pomatia, involved in neuronal regulation of various homeostatic and adaptive mechanisms, represents an interesting model for studying effects of temperature change on neuronal activity of poikilotherms. Acetylcholine induces a transient, inward dose-dependent current in the identified Br neuron. In the work presented, we analyzed the effects of cooling on the acetylcholine-induced inward current. The amplitude of acetylcholine-induced inward current was markedly decreased after cooling, and the speed of the decay of acetylcholine response was decreased. PMID:16154950

  6. Osteodifferentiation of Human Preadipocytes Induced by Strontium Released from Hydrogels

    Valeria Nardone

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, there has been an increasing interest in interactive application principles of biology and engineering for the development of valid biological systems for tissue regeneration, such as for the treatment of bone fractures or skeletal defects. The application of stem cells together with biomaterials releasing bioactive factors promotes the formation of bone tissue by inducing proliferation and/or cell differentiation. In this study, we used a clonal cell line from human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hADSCs or preadipocytes, named PA2-E12, to evaluate the effects of strontium (Sr2+ released in the culture medium from an amidated carboxymethylcellulose (CMCA hydrogel enriched with different Sr2+ concentrations on osteodifferentiation. The osteoinductive effect was evaluated through both the expression of alkaline phophatase (ALP activity and the hydroxyapatite (HA production during 42 days of induction. Present data have shown that Sr2+ released from CMCA promotes the osteodifferentiation induced by an osteogenic medium as shown by the increase of ALP activity at 7 and 14 days and of HA production at 14 days. In conclusion, the use of biomaterials able to release in situ osteoinductive agents, like Sr2+, could represent a new strategy for future applications in bone tissue engineering.

  7. Mercury induces inflammatory mediator release from human mast cells

    Peterson Erika

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mercury is known to be neurotoxic, but its effects on the immune system are less well known. Mast cells are involved in allergic reactions, but also in innate and acquired immunity, as well as in inflammation. Many patients with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD have "allergic" symptoms; moreover, the prevalence of ASD in patients with mastocytosis, characterized by numerous hyperactive mast cells in most tissues, is 10-fold higher than the general population suggesting mast cell involvement. We, therefore, investigated the effect of mercuric chloride (HgCl2 on human mast cell activation. Methods Human leukemic cultured LAD2 mast cells and normal human umbilical cord blood-derived cultured mast cells (hCBMCs were stimulated by HgCl2 (0.1-10 μM for either 10 min for beta-hexosaminidase release or 24 hr for measuring vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF and IL-6 release by ELISA. Results HgCl2 induced a 2-fold increase in β-hexosaminidase release, and also significant VEGF release at 0.1 and 1 μM (311 ± 32 pg/106 cells and 443 ± 143 pg/106 cells, respectively from LAD2 mast cells compared to control cells (227 ± 17 pg/106 cells, n = 5, p 2 (0.1 μM to the proinflammatory neuropeptide substance P (SP, 0.1 μM had synergestic action in inducing VEGF from LAD2 mast cells. HgCl2 also stimulated significant VEGF release (360 ± 100 pg/106 cells at 1 μM, n = 5, p 6 cells, and IL-6 release (466 ± 57 pg/106 cells at 0.1 μM compared to untreated cells (13 ± 25 pg/106 cells, n = 5, p 2 (0.1 μM to SP (5 μM further increased IL-6 release. Conclusions HgCl2 stimulates VEGF and IL-6 release from human mast cells. This phenomenon could disrupt the blood-brain-barrier and permit brain inflammation. As a result, the findings of the present study provide a biological mechanism for how low levels of mercury may contribute to ASD pathogenesis.

  8. Type I and II positive allosteric modulators differentially modulate agonist-induced up-regulation of α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors

    Thomsen, Morten Skøtt; Mikkelsen, Jens D

    2012-01-01

    Long-term treatment with nicotine or selective α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) agonists increases the number of α7 nAChRs and this up-regulation may be involved in the mechanism underlying the sustained procognitive effect of these compounds. Here, we investigate the influence of type...

  9. The α4β2 nicotine acetylcholine receptor agonist ispronicline induces c-Fos expression in selective regions of the rat forebrain

    Jacobsen, Julie; Hansen, Henrik H; Kiss, Alexander;

    2012-01-01

    The dominant nicotine acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) subtype in the brain is the pentameric receptor containing both α4 and β2 subunits (α4β2). Due to the lack of selective agonists it has not been ruled out what neuronal circuits that are stimulated after systemic administration with nicotine. We...

  10. The stereotypy-inducing and OCD-like effects of chronic ‘binge’ cocaine are modulated by distinct subtypes of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors

    Metaxas, A; Keyworth, HL; Yoo, JH; Chen, Y; Kitchen, I; Bailey, A

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE High rates of cigarette smoking occur in cocaine-dependent individuals, reflecting an involvement of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) in cocaine-elicited behaviour. This study was designed to assess the contribution of different nAChR subtypes to the behavioural and neurochemical effects of chronic cocaine treatment. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Cocaine (15 mg·kg−1, i.p.) was administered to male C57BL/6J mice in a chronic ‘binge’ paradigm, with and without the coadministration of the α7 preferring nAChR antagonist methyllycaconitine (MLA; 5 mg·kg−1, i.p.) or the β2* nAChR antagonist dihydro-β-erythroidine (DHβE; 2 mg·kg−1, i.p.). Quantitative autoradiography was used to examine the effect of cocaine exposure on α7 and α4β2* nAChRs, and on the high-affinity choline transporter. KEY RESULTS MLA+cocaine administration induced an intense self-grooming behaviour, indicating a likely role for α7 nAChRs in modulating this anxiogenic, compulsive-like effect of cocaine. In the major island of Calleja, a key area of action for neuroleptics, MLA+cocaine reduced choline transporter binding compared with cocaine (with or without DHβE) administration. DHβE treatment prevented the induction of stereotypy sensitisation to cocaine but prolonged locomotor sensitisation, implicating heteromeric β2* nAChRs in the neuroadaptations mediating cocaine-induced behavioural sensitisation. ‘Binge’ cocaine treatment region-specifically increased α4β2* nAChR binding in the midbrain dopaminergic regions: ventral tegmental area and substantia nigra pars compacta. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS We have shown a differential, subtype-selective, contribution of nAChRs to the behavioural and neurochemical sequelae of chronic cocaine administration. These data support the clinical utility of targeting specific nAChR subtypes for the alleviation of cocaine-abuse symptomatology. PMID:22568685

  11. Activation of the dorsal hippocampal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors improves tamoxifen-induced memory retrieval impairment in adult female rats.

    Tajik, Azam; Rezayof, Ameneh; Ghasemzadeh, Zahra; Sardari, Maryam

    2016-07-01

    Tamoxifen (TAM), a selective estrogen receptor modulator, has frequently been used in the treatment of breast cancer. In view of the fact that cognitive deficits in women who receive adjuvant chemotherapy for breast cancer is a common health problem, using female animal models for investigating the cognitive effects of TAM administration may improve our knowledge of TAM therapy. Therefore, the present study assessed the role of dorsal hippocampal cholinergic nicotinic receptors (nAChRs) in the effect of TAM administration on memory retrieval in ovariectomized (OVX) and non-OVX female rats using a passive avoidance learning task. Our results showed that pre-test administration of TAM (2-6mg/kg) impaired memory retrieval. Pre-test intra-CA1 microinjection of nicotine (0.3-0.5μg/rat) reversed TAM-induced memory impairment. Pre-test intra-CA1 microinjection of mecamylamine (0.1-0.3μg/rat) plus 2mg/kg (an ineffective dose) of TAM impaired memory retrieval. Pre-test intra-CA1 microinjection of the same doses of nicotine and mecamylamine by themselves had no effect on memory retrieval. In OVX rats, the administration of TAM (6mg/kg) produced memory impairment but pre-test intra-CA1 microinjection of nicotine (0.5μg/rat) had no effect on TAM response. Moreover, the administration of an ineffective dose of TAM (2mg/kg) had no effect on memory retrieval in OVX rats, while pre-test intra-CA1 microinjection of mecamylamine (0.3μg/rat) impaired memory retrieval. Taken together, it can be concluded that the impairing effect of TAM on memory formation may be modulated by nAChRs of the CA1 regions. It seems that memory impairment may be considered as an important side effect of TAM. PMID:27072849

  12. Methodologic aspects of acetylcholine-evoked relaxation of rabbit aorta.

    Hansen, K; Nedergaard, O A

    1999-08-01

    The acetylcholine-evoked relaxation of rabbit isolated thoracic aorta precontracted by phenylephrine was studied. Phenylephrine caused a steady contraction that was maintained for 6 h. In the presence of calcium disodium ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA) and ascorbic acid the contraction decreased with time. N(G)-Nitro-L-arginine abolished the inhibitory effect of EDTA and ascorbic acid. Acetylcholine evoked a rapid concentration-dependent relaxation that recovered spontaneously and slowly, but fully, with time. Relaxation evoked by equieffective concentrations of carbachol and acetylcholine had the same time course. Cumulative addition of acetylcholine (10(-7)-3 x 10(-5) M) caused a marked relaxation that was reverted slightly at high concentrations. The relaxation was the same with rings derived from the upper, middle, and lower part of the thoracic aorta. Two consecutive concentration-response curves for acetylcholine obtained at a 2-h interval demonstrated a slight development of tachyphylaxis. The relaxation was inversely related to precontractile tension evoked by phenylephrine when expressed as a percentage, but independent when expressed as g tension. Storage of aorta in cold salt solution for 24 h did not alter the relaxation. EDTA and ascorbic acid did not alter the relaxation. It is concluded that (1) EDTA and ascorbic acid can not be used with impunity to stabilize catecholamines used as preconstriction agents; (2) the reversal of the acetylcholine-evoked relaxation is not due to hydrolysis of acetylcholine; (3) the relaxation is uniform in all segments of thoracic aorta; (4) cold storage of aorta does not alter the relaxation; and (5) acetylcholine releases the same amount of relaxing factor, irrespective of the precontractile tension. PMID:10691020

  13. Novel acetylcholine and carbamoylcholine analogues

    Hansen, Camilla Petrycer; Jensen, Anders Asbjørn; Christensen, Jeppe K.;

    2008-01-01

    A series of carbamoylcholine and acetylcholine analogues were synthesized and characterized pharmacologically at neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). Several of the compounds displayed low nanomolar binding affinities to the alpha 4beta 2 nAChR and pronounced selectivity for this ...

  14. Cholinergic neurotransmission in human corpus cavernosum. II. Acetylcholine synthesis

    Physiological and histochemical evidence indicates that cholinergic nerves may participate in mediating penile erection. Acetylcholine synthesis and release was studied in isolated human corporal tissue. Human corpus cavernosum incubated with [3H]choline accumulated [3H]choline and synthesized [3H]acethylcholine in an concentration-dependent manner. [3H]Acetylcholine accumulation by the tissue was inhibited by hemicholinium-3, a specific antagonist of the high-affinity choline transport in cholinergic nerves. Transmural electrical field stimulation caused release of [3H]acetylcholine which was significantly diminished by inhibiting neurotransmission with calcium-free physiological salt solution or tetrodotoxin. These observations provide biochemical and physiological evidence for the existence of cholinergic innervation in human corpus cavernosum

  15. Imaging dynamic insulin release using a fluorescent zinc indicator for monitoring induced exocytotic release (ZIMIR).

    Li, Daliang; Chen, Shiuhwei; Bellomo, Elisa A; Tarasov, Andrei I; Kaut, Callan; Rutter, Guy A; Li, Wen-hong

    2011-12-27

    Current methods of monitoring insulin secretion lack the required spatial and temporal resolution to adequately map the dynamics of exocytosis of native insulin granules in intact cell populations in three dimensions. Exploiting the fact that insulin granules contain a high level of Zn(2+), and that Zn(2+) is coreleased with insulin during secretion, we have developed a fluorescent, cell surface-targeted zinc indicator for monitoring induced exocytotic release (ZIMIR). ZIMIR displayed a robust fluorescence enhancement on Zn(2+) chelation and bound Zn(2+) with high selectivity against Ca(2+) and Mg(2+). When added to cultured β cells or intact pancreatic islets at low micromolar concentrations, ZIMIR labeled cells rapidly, noninvasively, and stably, and it reliably reported changes in Zn(2+) concentration near the sites of granule fusion with high sensitivity that correlated well with membrane capacitance measurement. Fluorescence imaging of ZIMIR-labeled β cells followed the dynamics of exocytotic activity at subcellular resolution, even when using simple epifluorescence microscopy, and located the chief sites of insulin release to intercellular junctions. Moreover, ZIMIR imaging of intact rat islets revealed that Zn(2+)/insulin release occurred largely in small groups of adjacent β cells, with each forming a "secretory unit." Concurrent imaging of ZIMIR and Fura-2 showed that the amplitude of cytosolic Ca(2+) elevation did not necessarily correlate with insulin secretion activity, suggesting that events downstream of Ca(2+) signaling underlie the cell-cell heterogeneity in insulin release. In addition to studying stimulation-secretion coupling in cells with Zn(2+)-containing granules, ZIMIR may find applications in β-cell engineering and screening for molecules regulating insulin secretion on high-throughput platforms. PMID:22160693

  16. Safety consequences of the release of radiation induced stored energy

    Due to the disposal of HLW in a salt formation gamma energy will be deposited in the rock salt. Most of this energy will be converted into heat, whilst a small part will create defects in the salt crystals. Energy is stored in the damaged crystals. Due to uncertainties in the models and differences in the disposal concepts the estimated values for the stored energy range from 10 to 1000 J/g in the most heavily damaged crystals close to the waste containers. The amount of radiation damage decays exponentially with increasing distance from the containers and at distances larger than 0.2 m the stored energy can be neglected. Given the uncertainties in the model predictions and in the possible release mechanism an instantaneous release of stored energy cannot be excluded completely. Therefore the thermo-mechanical consequences of a postulated instantaneous release of an extremely high amount of radiation induced stored energy have been estimated. These estimations are based on the quasi-static solutions for line and point sources. To account for the dynamic effects and the occurrence of fractures an amplification factor has been derived from mining experience with explosives. A validation of this amplification factor has been given using post experimental observations of two nuclear explosions in a salt formation. For some typical disposal concepts in rock salt the extent of the fractured zone has been estimated. It appeared that the radial extent of the fractured zone is limited to 5 m. Given the much larger distance between the individual boreholes and the distance between the boreholes and the boundary of the salt formation (more than 100 m), the probability of a release of radiation induced stored energy creating a pathway for the nuclides from the containers to the groundwater, is extremely low. The radiological consequences of a groundwater intrusion scenario induced by this very unprobable pathway are bounded by the 'standard' groundwater intrusion

  17. Tissue-specific effects of acetylcholine in the canine heart

    Callø, Kirstine; Goodrow, Robert; Olesen, Søren-Peter;

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Acetylcholine (ACh) release from the vagus nerve slows heart rate and atrioventricular conduction. ACh stimulates a variety of receptors and channels, including an inward rectifying current (IK,ACh). The effect of ACh in ventricle is still debated. We compare the effect of ACh on...

  18. Characterization of nicotinic receptors involved in the release of noradrenaline from the hippocampus

    The pharmacological features of putative nicotinic acetylcholine receptor sites involved in the release of [3H]noradrenaline were assessed in rat hippocampus. The effect of nicotinic agonists to induce [3H]noradrenaline release was examined in superfused slices. The nicotinic agonists (-)-epibatidine, (+)-anatoxin-a, dimethylphenylpiperazinium, (-)-nicotine and (-)-lobeline released [3H]noradrenaline. The dose-response curves to nicotinic agonists were bell shaped, and indicated that their functional efficacies and potency vary across agonists. Maximal efficacy was seen with dimethylphenylpiperazinium and lobeline (Emax values two to three times higher than other agonists). The rank order of potency for the agonists to release [3H]noradrenaline was (-)-epibatidine (+)-anatoxin-a dimethylphenylpiperazinium cytisine nicotine (-)-lobeline. The nicotinic acetylcholine receptor antagonists [n-bungarotoxin (+)-tubocurarine hexamethonium>>α-bungarotoxin=dihydro-β-erythroidine] and tetrodotoxin antagonized the effect of dimethylphenylpiperazinium to release [3H]noradrenaline. The results, based on these pharmacological profiles, suggest the possible involvement of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor α3 and β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunits in the control of [3H]noradrenaline release from hippocampal slices. The absence of effect of α-bungarotoxin and α-conotoxin-IMI excludes the possible involvement of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors containing the α7 subunit. The release of [3H]noradrenaline by dimethylphenylpiperazinium was Ca2+ dependent. Nifedipine failed to prevent the dimethylphenylpiperazinium-induced release of [3H]noradrenaline, but Cd2+, ω-conotoxin and Ca2+-free conditions significantly reduced the dimethylphenylpiperazinium-induced release, suggesting that N-type voltage-sensitive Ca2+ channels are involved in the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor response. These voltage-sensitive Ca2+ channels are activated by the local depolarization produced

  19. A spinosyn-sensitive Drosophila melanogaster nicotinic acetylcholine receptor identified through chemically induced target site resistance, resistance gene identification, and heterologous expression.

    Watson, Gerald B; Chouinard, Scott W; Cook, Kevin R; Geng, Chaoxian; Gifford, Jim M; Gustafson, Gary D; Hasler, James M; Larrinua, Ignacio M; Letherer, Ted J; Mitchell, Jon C; Pak, William L; Salgado, Vincent L; Sparks, Thomas C; Stilwell, Geoff E

    2010-05-01

    Strains of Drosophila melanogaster with resistance to the insecticides spinosyn A, spinosad, and spinetoram were produced by chemical mutagenesis. These spinosyn-resistant strains were not cross-resistant to other insecticides. The two strains that were initially characterized were subsequently found to have mutations in the gene encoding the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) subunit Dalpha6. Subsequently, additional spinosyn-resistant alleles were generated by chemical mutagenesis and were also found to have mutations in the gene encoding Dalpha6, providing convincing evidence that Dalpha6 is a target site for the spinosyns in D. melanogaster. Although a spinosyn-sensitive receptor could not be generated in Xenopus laevis oocytes simply by expressing Dalpha6 alone, co-expression of Dalpha6 with an additional nAChR subunit, Dalpha5, and the chaperone protein ric-3 resulted in an acetylcholine- and spinosyn-sensitive receptor with the pharmacological properties anticipated for a native nAChR. PMID:19944756

  20. [Intern(euron)al affairs : The role of specific neocortical interneuron classes in the interaction between acetylcholine and GABAergic anesthetics].

    Liebig, L; Grasshoff, C; Hentschke, H

    2016-08-01

    Acetylcholine is a neuromodulator which is released throughout the central nervous system and plays an essential role in consciousness and cognitive processes including attention and learning. Due to its 'activating' effect on the neuronal and behavioral level its interaction with anesthetics has long been of interest to anesthesiologists. It is widely held that a reduction of the release of acetylcholine by general anesthetics constitutes part of the anesthetic effect. This notion is backed by numerous human and animal studies, but is also in seeming contradiction to findings that acetylcholine activates specific classes of inhibitory neurons: if acetylcholine excites elements within the neuronal network responsible for the release of the inhibitory neurotransmitter γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), its withdrawal should diminish, not enhance, the effect of anesthetics.Focusing on cortical circuits, we present an overview of recent advances in cellular neurophysiology, particularly the interactions between inhibitory neuron classes, which provide insights on the interaction between acetylcholine and GABA. PMID:27380048

  1. Immunisation with Torpedo acetylcholine receptor.

    Elfman, L

    1984-01-01

    Acetylcholine mediates the transfer of information between neurons in the electric organ of, for example, Torpedo as well as in vertebrate skeletal muscle. The nicotinic acetylcholine receptor complex translates the binding of acetylcholine into ion permeability changes. This leads to an action potential in the muscle fibre. The nicotinic acetylcholine receptor protein has been purified from Torpedo by use of affinity chromatography. The receptor is an intrinsic membrane glycoprotein composed of five polypeptide chains. When various animals are immunised with the receptor they demonstrate clinical signs of severe muscle weakness coincident with high antibody titres in their sera. The symptoms resemble those found in the autoimmune neuromuscular disease myasthenia gravis in humans. This animal model has constituted a unique model for studying autoimmune diseases. This paper reviews some of the work using Torpedo acetylcholine receptor in order to increase the understanding of the motor nervous system function and myasthenia gravis. It is now known that the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor protein is the antigen involved in myasthenia gravis. The mechanism of immune damage involves a direct block of the receptor function. This depends on the presence of antibodies which crosslink the postsynaptic receptors leading to their degradation. The questions to be answered in the future are; (a) what initiates or triggers the autoimmune response, (b) how do the antibodies cause the symptoms--is there a steric hindrance of the interaction of acetylcholine and the receptor, (c) why is there not a strict relationship between antibody titre and severity of symptoms, and (d) why are some muscles affected and other spared? With help of the experimental model, answers to these questions may result in improved strategies for the treatment of the autoimmune disease myasthenia gravis. PMID:6097937

  2. Teaching Calcium-Induced Calcium Release in Cardiomyocytes Using a Classic Paper by Fabiato

    Liang, Willmann

    2008-01-01

    This teaching paper utilizes the materials presented by Dr. Fabiato in his review article entitled "Calcium-induced release of calcium from the cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum." In the review, supporting evidence of calcium-induced calcium release (CICR) is presented. Data concerning potential objections to the CICR theory are discussed as well. In…

  3. Trolox reduces the effect of ethanol on acetylcholine-induced contractions and oxidative stress in the isolated rabbit duodenum El Trolox reduce el efecto del etanol sobre las contracciones inducidas a la acetilcolina y el estrés oxidativo en duodeno aislado de conejo

    Diego S. Fagundes; Sergio Gonzalo; Laura Grasa; Marta Castro; M.ª Pilar Arruebo; Miguel Ángel Plaza; M.ª Divina Murillo

    2011-01-01

    Trolox is a hydrophilic analogue of vitamin E and a free radical scavenger. Ethanol diminishes the amplitude of spontaneous contractions and acetylcholine (ACh)-induced contractions in rabbit duodenum. The aim of this work was to study the effect of Trolox on the alterations induced by ethanol on contractility and lipid peroxidation in the duodenum. The duodenal contractility studies in vitro were carried out in an organ bath and the levels of malondialdehyde and 4-hydroxyalkenals (MDA+4-HAD)...

  4. Angiotensin II induced release of prostaglandins from rat uterus.

    Campos, G A; Guerra, F A; Israel, E J

    1983-08-01

    The effect of Angiotensin II (A-II) on 6-keto-prostaglandin F1 (6-keto-PGF1 alpha) and prostaglandin F (PGF) production by the rat uterus was studied using a novel superfusion technique. The method of superfusion used allows prostaglandin synthesis in the myometrium and endometrium to be measured independently while their anatomical relationship is undisturbed. Prostaglandins were measured by radioimmunoassay. In uterine horns from castrated, estrogen treated rats, A-II (10(-6)M) stimulated the production rate of 6-keto-PGF1 alpha in the myometrium nd PGF in the endometrium. Sterile horns and pregnant horns coexisting in the same animals showed different responses when superfused with culture medium containing A-II (10(-6)M). In the sterile horns A-II failed to stimulate prostaglandin synthesis whereas in the pregnant horns there was a significant increase in the production rate of both 6-keto-PGF1 alpha and PGF in the decidua (endometrium) and of 6-keto-PGF1 alpha in the myometrium. Our results suggests that the effect of A-II on prostaglandin synthesis by the rat uterus appears to be dependent of the hormonal milieu of the experimental animal. Estrogen stimulated A-II induced PG synthesis. Progesterone inhibited the synthesis of PGs caused by A-II in non-decidualized uterus but stimulated the release of PG in the decidualized uterus. The apparent differential effect of A-II in stimulating prostaglandin synthesis in the whole uterus indicates that there are different pathways for prostaglandin production in both the endometrium and myometrium. PMID:6689628

  5. Antigen-induced and non-antigen-induced histamine release from rat mast cells sensitized with mouse antiserum.

    Kurose,Masao

    1981-10-01

    Full Text Available Marked IgE-mediated histamine release from rat mast cells sensitized in vitro with mouse antiserum occurs in the presence of added Ca++ and phosphatidylserine (PS, although a considerable degree of antigen-induced histamine release which may utilize intracellular or cell-bound calcium is also observed. The decay in the responsiveness to Ca++ of the sensitized cells stimulated by antigen in Ca++-free medium in the presence of PS is relatively slow, and maximum release is produced by Ca++ added 1 min after antigen. Histamine release also occurs when Ca++ is added after PS in the absence of antigen to the sensitized cells suspended in Ca++-free medium. Unlike the antigen-induced release, the intensity of this non-antigen-induced release varies depending on both mast-cell and antiserum pools. A heat-labile factor(s, which is different from antigen-specific IgE antibody and is also contained in normal mouse serum, is involved in this reaction. In the antigen-nondependent (PS + Ca++-induced release, no decay in the responsiveness to Ca++ is observed after PS addition. Both the antigen-induced and non-antigen-induced release are completed fairly rapidly and are dependent of temperature, pH and energy.

  6. Enzyme-linked DNA dendrimer nanosensors for acetylcholine

    Walsh, Ryan; Morales, Jennifer M.; Skipwith, Christopher G.; Ruckh, Timothy T.; Clark, Heather A.

    2015-10-01

    It is currently difficult to measure small dynamics of molecules in the brain with high spatial and temporal resolution while connecting them to the bigger picture of brain function. A step towards understanding the underlying neural networks of the brain is the ability to sense discrete changes of acetylcholine within a synapse. Here we show an efficient method for generating acetylcholine-detecting nanosensors based on DNA dendrimer scaffolds that incorporate butyrylcholinesterase and fluorescein in a nanoscale arrangement. These nanosensors are selective for acetylcholine and reversibly respond to levels of acetylcholine in the neurophysiological range. This DNA dendrimer architecture has the potential to overcome current obstacles to sensing in the synaptic environment, including the nanoscale size constraints of the synapse and the ability to quantify the spatio-temporal fluctuations of neurotransmitter release. By combining the control of nanosensor architecture with the strategic placement of fluorescent reporters and enzymes, this novel nanosensor platform can facilitate the development of new selective imaging tools for neuroscience.

  7. Leukocytic acetylcholine in chronic rejection of renal allografts

    Wilczynska, Joanna

    2011-01-01

    Leukocytes, which accumulate in graft blood vessels during fatal acute rejection of experimental renal allografts, synthesise and release acetylcholine (ACh). In this study, I tested the hypothesis that ACh produced by leukocytes accumulating in graft blood vessels contributes to the pathogenesis of chronic renal allograft vasculopathy (CAV). Kidneys were transplanted in the allogeneic Fischer 344 to Lewis rat strain combination. Isogeneic transplantations were performed in Lew...

  8. Elimination of the vesicular acetylcholine transporter in the striatum reveals regulation of behaviour by cholinergic-glutamatergic co-transmission.

    Monica S Guzman; Xavier De Jaeger; Sanda Raulic; Souza, Ivana A; Li, Alex X.; Susanne Schmid; Menon, Ravi S.; Gainetdinov, Raul R.; Caron, Marc G.; Robert Bartha; Prado, Vania F.; Prado, Marco A. M.

    2011-01-01

    Cholinergic neurons in the striatum are thought to play major regulatory functions in motor behaviour and reward. These neurons express two vesicular transporters that can load either acetylcholine or glutamate into synaptic vesicles. Consequently cholinergic neurons can release both neurotransmitters, making it difficult to discern their individual contributions for the regulation of striatal functions. Here we have dissected the specific roles of acetylcholine release for striatal-dependent...

  9. Apomorphine-induced inhibition of histamine release in rat peritoneal mast cells.

    Battistella, A.; Boarato, E.; Bruni, A; Mietto, L.; Palatini, P.; Toffano, G.

    1986-01-01

    The apomorphine-induced inhibition of histamine release in rat peritoneal mast cells was studied by means of secretagogues stimulating different pathways of mast cell activation. Apomorphine inhibited the mast cell response to all releasing agents (lysophosphatidylserine plus nerve growth factor, compound 48/80, substance P, ATP, tetradecanoylphorbolacetate, melittin). The IC50 ranged from 4 microM to 24 microM at concentrations of secretagogues releasing 30-50% of mast cell histamine. Howeve...

  10. Nutrient-induced glucagon like peptide-1 release is modulated by serotonin

    Ripken, Dina; Wielen, van der, F.W.M.; Wortelboer, Heleen M.; Meijerink, Jocelijn; Witkamp, Renger F.; Hendriks, Henk F. J.

    2016-01-01

    Glucagon like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and serotonin are both involved in food intake regulation. GLP-1 release is stimulated upon nutrient interaction with G-protein coupled receptors by enteroendocrine cells (EEC), whereas serotonin is released from enterochromaffin cells (ECC). The central hypothesis for the current study was that nutrient-induced GLP-1 release from EECs is modulated by serotonin through a process involving serotonin receptor interaction. This was studied by assessing the effects...

  11. Human, recombinant interleukin-2 induces in vitro histamine release in a dose-dependent manner

    Nielsen, Hans Jørgen; Petersen, L J; Skov, P S

    1995-01-01

    We previously observed that human, recombinant interleukin-2 in a pharmacologic dose (200 u/ml) induced histamine release from monocyte-depleted peripheral blood mononuclear cells in vitro. Therefore, we studied the role of various pharmacologic doses of rIL-2 on in vitro histamine release...

  12. Lipopolysaccharide-induced leptin release is neurally controlled

    Mastronardi, C. A.; Yu, W. H.; Srivastava, V. K.; Dees, W L; McCann, S M

    2001-01-01

    Our hypothesis is that leptin release is controlled neurohormonally. Conscious, male rats bearing indwelling, external, jugular catheters were injected with the test drug or 0.9% NaCl (saline), and blood samples were drawn thereafter to measure plasma leptin. Anesthesia decreased plasma leptin concentrations within 10 min to a minimum at 120 min, followed by a rebound at 360 min. Administration (i.v.) of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) increased plasma leptin to almost tw...

  13. Glutamate Release by Primary Brain Tumors Induces Epileptic Activity

    Buckingham, Susan C.; Campbell, Susan L.; Haas, Brian R.; Montana, Vedrana; Robel, Stefanie; Ogunrinu, Toyin; Sontheimer, Harald

    2011-01-01

    Epileptic seizures are a common and poorly understood co-morbidity for individuals with primary brain tumors. To investigate peritumoral seizure etiology, we implanted patient-derived glioma cells into scid mice. Within 14–18 days, glioma-bearing animals developed spontaneous, recurring abnormal EEG events consistent with epileptic activity that progressed over time. Acute brain slices from these animals showed significant glutamate release from the tumor mediated by the system xc − cystine/g...

  14. Neisseria gonorrhoeae infection induces altered amphiregulin processing and release.

    Sonja Löfmark

    Full Text Available Adhesion of the human pathogen Neisseria gonorrhoeae has established effects on the host cell and evokes a variety of cellular events including growth factor activation. In the present study we report that infection with N. gonorrhoeae causes altered amphiregulin processing and release in human epithelial cells. Amphiregulin is a well-studied growth factor with functions in various cell processes and is upregulated in different forms cancer and proliferative diseases. The protein is prototypically cleaved on the cell surface in response to external stimuli. We demonstrate that upon infection, a massive upregulation of amphiregulin mRNA is seen. The protein changes its subcellular distribution and is also alternatively cleaved at the plasma membrane, which results in augmented release of an infection-specific 36 kDa amphiregulin product from the surface of human cervical epithelial cells. Further, using antibodies directed against different domains of the protein we could determine the impact of infection on pro-peptide processing. In summary, we present data showing that the infection of N. gonorrhoeae causes an alternative amphiregulin processing, subcellular distribution and release in human epithelial cervical cells that likely contribute to the predisposition cellular abnormalities and anti-apoptotic features of N. gonorrhoeae infections.

  15. Rituximab-Induced Splenic Rupture and Cytokine Release

    Nair, Ranjit; Gheith, Shereen; Lamparella, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Female, 55 Final Diagnosis: Mantle cell lymphoma Symptoms: Cytokine release syndrome • hypoglycemia • hypotension • splenic rupture • splenomegaly • vision loss Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Case Report Specialty: Oncology Objective: Unusual clinical course Background: Rituximab is a therapeutic monoclonal antibody that is used for many different lymphomas. Post-marketing surveillance has revealed that the risk of fatal reaction with rituximab use is extremely low. Splenic rupture and cytokine release syndrome are rare fatal adverse events related to the use of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies, especially in aggressive malignancies with high tumor burden. Case Report: A 55-year-old woman presented with abdominal pain and type B symptoms and was diagnosed with mantle cell lymphoma. Initial peripheral blood flow cytometry showed findings that mimicked features of chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Further treatment with rituximab led to catastrophic treatment complications that proved to be fatal for the patient. Conclusions: Severe cytokine release syndrome associated with biologics carries a very high morbidity and case fatality rate. With this case report we aim to present the diagnostic challenge with small B-cell neoplasms, especially mantle cell lymphoma and chronic lymphocytic lymphomas, and underscore the importance of thorough risk assessment for reactions prior to treatment initiation. PMID:26972227

  16. Tubular crystals of acetylcholine receptor

    1984-01-01

    Well-ordered tubular crystals of acetylcholine receptor were obtained from suspensions of Torpedo marmorata receptor-rich vesicles. They are composed of pairs of oppositely oriented molecules arranged on the surface lattice with the symmetry of the plane group p2 (average unit cell dimensions: a = 90 A, b = 162 A, gamma = 117 degrees). The receptor in this lattice has an asymmetric distribution of mass around its perimeter, yet a regular pentagonal shape; thus its five transmembrane subunits ...

  17. Acetylcholine functionally reorganizes neocortical microcircuits

    Runfeldt, Melissa J.; Sadovsky, Alexander J.; MacLean, Jason N.

    2014-01-01

    Sensory information is processed and transmitted through the synaptic structure of local cortical circuits, but it is unclear how modulation of this architecture influences the cortical representation of sensory stimuli. Acetylcholine (ACh) promotes attention and arousal and is thought to increase the signal-to-noise ratio of sensory input in primary sensory cortices. Using high-speed two-photon calcium imaging in a thalamocortical somatosensory slice preparation, we recorded action potential...

  18. Photoreactivation of ultraviolet radiation-induced release of arachidonic acid from marsupial cells

    Exposure of an established marsupial cell line, PtK2 (Potorous tridactylus), to ultraviolet radiation (UVR) from an FS-40 sunlamp (280-400 nm) resulted in a fluence-dependent release of radiolabeled arachidonic acid (AA) from cell membrane. Post-UVR, but not pre-UVR, exposure to photoreactivating light reversed UVR-induced pyrimidine dimers in DNA and suppressed the UVR-induced release of AA. These data indicate that DNA damage contributes to the release of AA from membrane phospholipids. (author)

  19. Photoreactivation of ultraviolet radiation-induced release of arachidonic acid from marsupial cells

    Kaleta, E.W.; Applegate, L.A.; Ley, R.D. (Lovelace Foundation for Medical Education and Research, Albuquerque, NM (United States))

    1991-11-01

    Exposure of an established marsupial cell line, PtK{sub 2} (Potorous tridactylus), to ultraviolet radiation (UVR) from an FS-40 sunlamp (280-400 nm) resulted in a fluence-dependent release of radiolabeled arachidonic acid (AA) from cell membrane. Post-UVR, but not pre-UVR, exposure to photoreactivating light reversed UVR-induced pyrimidine dimers in DNA and suppressed the UVR-induced release of AA. These data indicate that DNA damage contributes to the release of AA from membrane phospholipids. (author).

  20. Nicotine and 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone induce cyclooxygenase-2 activity in human gastric cancer cells: Involvement of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) and β-adrenergic receptor signaling pathways

    Induction of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) associates with cigarette smoke exposure in many malignancies. Nicotine and its derivative, 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK), are the two important components in cigarette smoke that contributes to cancer development. However, the molecular mechanism(s) by which nicotine or NNK promotes gastric carcinogenesis remains largely unknown. We found that nicotine and NNK significantly enhanced cell proliferation in AGS cells that expressed both alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7 nAChR) and β-adrenergic receptors. Treatment of cells with α-bungarotoxin (α-BTX, α7nAChR antagonist) or propranolol (β-adrenergic receptor antagonist) blocked NNK-induced COX-2/PGE2 and cell proliferation, while nicotine-mediated cell growth and COX-2/PGE2 induction can only be suppressed by propranolol, but not α-BTX. Moreover, in contrast to the dependence of growth promoting effect of nicotine on Erk activation, inhibitor of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) repressed NNK-induced COX-2 upregulation and resulted in suppression of cell growth. In addition, nicotine and NNK mediated COX-2 induction via different receptors to modulate several G1/S transition regulatory proteins and promote gastric cancer cell growth. Selective COX-2 inhibitor (SC-236) caused G1 arrest and abrogated nicotine/NNK-induced cell proliferation. Aberrant expression of cyclin D1 and other G1 regulatory proteins are reversed by blockade of COX-2. These results pointed to the importance of adrenergic and nicotinic receptors in gastric tumor growth through MAPK/COX-2 activation, which may perhaps provide a chemoprevention strategy for cigarette smoke-related gastric carcinogenesis

  1. Envenomations by Bothrops and Crotalus snakes induce the release of mitochondrial alarmins.

    Irene Zornetta

    Full Text Available Skeletal muscle necrosis is a common manifestation of viperid snakebite envenomations. Venoms from snakes of the genus Bothrops, such as that of B. asper, induce muscle tissue damage at the site of venom injection, provoking severe local pathology which often results in permanent sequelae. In contrast, the venom of the South American rattlesnake Crotalus durissus terrificus, induces a clinical picture of systemic myotoxicity, i.e., rhabdomyolysis, together with neurotoxicity. It is known that molecules released from damaged muscle might act as 'danger' signals. These are known as 'alarmins', and contribute to the inflammatory reaction by activating the innate immune system. Here we show that the venoms of B. asper and C. d. terrificus release the mitochondrial markers mtDNA (from the matrix and cytochrome c (Cyt c from the intermembrane space, from ex vivo mouse tibialis anterior muscles. Cyt c was released to a similar extent by the two venoms whereas B. asper venom induced the release of higher amounts of mtDNA, thus reflecting hitherto some differences in their pathological action on muscle mitochondria. At variance, injection of these venoms in mice resulted in a different time-course of mtDNA release, with B. asper venom inducing an early onset increment in plasma levels and C. d. terrificus venom provoking a delayed release. We suggest that the release of mitochondrial 'alarmins' might contribute to the local and systemic inflammatory events characteristic of snakebite envenomations.

  2. Dose protocols of acetylcholine test in Chinese

    向定成; 龚志华; 何建新; 洪长江; 邱建; 马骏

    2004-01-01

    @@ Acetylcholine test has been widely used clinically in several countries as a practical test provoking coronary artery spasm.1-3 Although it has also been launched recently in a few hospitals in China, the dose protocol for acetylcholine test used in these hospitals were from abroad.4,5 This study was aimed at developing a dose protocol for acetylcholine test suitable for Chinese people.

  3. Structural Studies of Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors: Using Acetylcholine-Binding Protein as a Structural Surrogate.

    Shahsavar, Azadeh; Gajhede, Michael; Kastrup, Jette S; Balle, Thomas

    2016-06-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are members of the pentameric ligand-gated ion channel superfamily that play important roles in the control of neurotransmitter release in the central and peripheral nervous system. These receptors are important therapeutic targets for the development of drugs against a number of mental health disorders and for marketed smoking cessation aids. Unfortunately, drug discovery has been hampered by difficulties in obtaining sufficiently selective compounds. Together with functional complexity of the receptors, this has made it difficult to obtain drugs with sufficiently high-target to off-target affinity ratios. The recent and ongoing progress in structural studies holds promise to help understand structure-function relationships of nAChR drugs at the atomic level. This will undoubtedly lead to the design of more efficient drugs with fewer side effects. As a high-resolution structure of a nAChR is yet to be determined, structural studies are to a large extent based on acetylcholine-binding proteins (AChBPs) that despite low overall sequence identity display a high degree of conservation of overall structure and amino acids at the ligand-binding site. Further, AChBPs reproduce relative binding affinities of ligands at nAChRs. Over the past decade, AChBPs have been used extensively as models for nAChRs and have aided the understanding of drug receptor interactions at nAChRs significantly. PMID:26572235

  4. T-2 Toxin Regulated Ganoderma lucidum Induced Cytokine Release

    Kazem Ahmadi

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The water-soluble extract of Ganoderma lucidum (Reishi has been used as immunomodulator to stimulate spleen cells proliferation and cytokine expression. It has also been shown that at some level of exposure, T-2 toxin typically act as immunosuppressive agent and can increase disease susceptibility. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of T-2 toxin on cytokine production by Ganoderma lucidum (G. lucidum treated-cells. Mice peritoneal macrophages and lymphoid T cells were prepared by usual manner and plated out at 1106 or 1104 cell/well respectively in RPMI 1640 supplemented with 10% FCS, 50 µg streptomycin and 50U penicillin. Cells were incubated with different concentrations of G. lucidum in the presence or absence of 1 ng mL-­1 T-2 toxin at 37°C and 5% CO2 for 48 h. Cell free medium was removed and used for cytokine assay by ELISA method. The results showed that T-2 toxin in the absence of G.lucidum enhanced IL-2, IFN-γ release compared with control group, but it reduced the production of other cytokines. G. lucidum enhanced the production of IL-1β TNF-α, IL-12, IL-2 and IFN-γ compared with control group, but reduced IL-4 and IL-10 release. T-2 toxin, up regulated the enhancement effect of G. lucidum on IFN-γ, IL-2 and TNF-α, but it down regulated its effect on the production of other cytokines. In conclution our results indicate that T-2 toxin at 1 ng mL-1 may augment the immunomodulating effects of G. lucidum on cytokine release.

  5. The mechanism of gastrin release in cysteamine-induced duodenal ulcer

    Poulsen, Steen Seier

    1982-01-01

    Duodenal ulcer can be induced in rats by a single dose of cysteamine. The ulcer formation is accompanied by acid hypersecretion and elevated serum gastrin levels. This study was performed to elucidate the mechanisms of gastrin release after an ulcerogenic dose of cysteamine. Cysteamine induced a...

  6. Inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate-induced calcium release from platelet plasma membrane vesicles

    A platelet membrane preparation, enriched in plasma membrane markers, took up 45Ca2+ in exchange for intravesicular Na+ and released it after the addition of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3). The possibility that contaminating dense tubular membrane (DTS) vesicles contributed the Ca2+ released by IP3 was eliminated by the addition of vanadate to inhibit Ca+-ATPase-mediated DTS Ca2+ sequestration and by the finding that only plasma membrane vesicles exhibit Na+-dependent Ca2+ uptake. Ca2+ released by IP3 was dependent on low extravesicular Ca2+ concentrations. IP3-induced Ca2+ release was additive to that released by Na+ addition while GTP or polyethylene glycol (PEG) had no effect. These results strongly suggest that IP3 facilitates extracellular Ca2+ influx in addition to release from DTS membranes

  7. Stimulus-secretion coupling of arginine-induced insulin release: Comparison with histidine-induced insulin release

    L-Histidine, when tested at a 10-mM concentration, caused a rapid and sustained stimulation of insulin release from rat islets exposed to either D-glucose (7.0 or 8.3 mM) or L-leucine (10.0 mM). The stimulation of insulin release could not be ascribed to an increase in oxygen uptake, to the generation of histamine from L-histidine, or to its participation in a transglutaminase-catalyzed reaction. Like other cationic amino acids, however, L-histidine rapidly accumulated in islet cells, increased 86Rb outflow from prelabeled islets perifused in the presence or absence of extracellular Ca2+, and stimulated the entry of Ca2+ into islet cells. Yet, the amount of exogenous L-histidine present in the islet cells with a positively charged side chain was estimated to be below the threshold value required for stimulation of insulin release by fully ionized cationic amino acids, such as L-arginine. Hence, the present findings argue against the view that the insulinotropic action of cationic amino acids is solely attributable to the accumulation of these positively charged molecules inside the islet B cell with subsequent depolarization of the plasma membrane

  8. fMLP-Induced IL-8 Release Is Dependent on NADPH Oxidase in Human Neutrophils

    Hidalgo, María A; Carretta, María D.; Teuber, Stefanie E.; Zárate, Cristian; Cárcamo, Leonardo; Concha, Ilona I.; Burgos, Rafael A.

    2015-01-01

    N-Formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP) and platelet-activating factor (PAF) induce similar intracellular signalling profiles; but only fMLP induces interleukin-8 (IL-8) release and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate reduced (NADPH) oxidase activity in neutrophils. Because the role of ROS on IL-8 release in neutrophils is until now controversial, we assessed if NADPH oxidase is involved in the IL-8 secretions and PI3K/Akt, MAPK, and NF-κB pathways activity induced by fMLP. Neu...

  9. OZONE-INDUCED ETHYLENE RELEASE FROM LEAF SURFACES

    Ozone-induced stress ethylene emissions from the adaxial and abaxial leaf surfaces of four plant species (Glycine max (L) Merr. cv. Dare, Lycopersicon esculentum Mill cv. Roma VF, Eucalyptus globulus Labill. and Hedera helix L.) were studied to determine if the stress ethylene di...

  10. Phosphocholine - an agonist of metabotropic but not of ionotropic functions of α9-containing nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Richter, K; Mathes, V; Fronius, M; Althaus, M; Hecker, A; Krasteva-Christ, G; Padberg, W; Hone, A J; McIntosh, J M; Zakrzewicz, A; Grau, V

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrated previously that phosphocholine and phosphocholine-modified macromolecules efficiently inhibit ATP-dependent release of interleukin-1β from human and murine monocytes by a mechanism involving nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR). Interleukin-1β is a potent pro-inflammatory cytokine of innate immunity that plays pivotal roles in host defence. Control of interleukin-1β release is vital as excessively high systemic levels cause life threatening inflammatory diseases. In spite of its structural similarity to acetylcholine, there are no other reports on interactions of phosphocholine with nAChR. In this study, we demonstrate that phosphocholine inhibits ion-channel function of ATP receptor P2X7 in monocytic cells via nAChR containing α9 and α10 subunits. In stark contrast to choline, phosphocholine does not evoke ion current responses in Xenopus laevis oocytes, which heterologously express functional homomeric nAChR composed of α9 subunits or heteromeric receptors containing α9 and α10 subunits. Preincubation of these oocytes with phosphocholine, however, attenuated choline-induced ion current changes, suggesting that phosphocholine may act as a silent agonist. We conclude that phophocholine activates immuno-modulatory nAChR expressed by monocytes but does not stimulate canonical ionotropic receptor functions. PMID:27349288

  11. Phosphocholine – an agonist of metabotropic but not of ionotropic functions of α9-containing nicotinic acetylcholine receptors

    Richter, K.; Mathes, V.; Fronius, M.; Althaus, M.; Hecker, A.; Krasteva-Christ, G.; Padberg, W.; Hone, A. J.; McIntosh, J. M.; Zakrzewicz, A.; Grau, V.

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrated previously that phosphocholine and phosphocholine-modified macromolecules efficiently inhibit ATP-dependent release of interleukin-1β from human and murine monocytes by a mechanism involving nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR). Interleukin-1β is a potent pro-inflammatory cytokine of innate immunity that plays pivotal roles in host defence. Control of interleukin-1β release is vital as excessively high systemic levels cause life threatening inflammatory diseases. In spite of its structural similarity to acetylcholine, there are no other reports on interactions of phosphocholine with nAChR. In this study, we demonstrate that phosphocholine inhibits ion-channel function of ATP receptor P2X7 in monocytic cells via nAChR containing α9 and α10 subunits. In stark contrast to choline, phosphocholine does not evoke ion current responses in Xenopus laevis oocytes, which heterologously express functional homomeric nAChR composed of α9 subunits or heteromeric receptors containing α9 and α10 subunits. Preincubation of these oocytes with phosphocholine, however, attenuated choline-induced ion current changes, suggesting that phosphocholine may act as a silent agonist. We conclude that phophocholine activates immuno-modulatory nAChR expressed by monocytes but does not stimulate canonical ionotropic receptor functions. PMID:27349288

  12. Pulsating aurora induced by upper atmospheric barium releases

    Deehr, C.; Romick, G.

    1977-01-01

    The paper reports the apparent generation of pulsating aurora by explosive releases of barium vapor near 250 km altitude. This effect occurred only when the explosions were in the path of precipitating electrons associated with the visible aurora. Each explosive charge was a standard 1.5 kg thermite mixture of Ba and CuO with an excess of Ba metal which was vaporized and dispersed by the thermite explosion. Traces of Sr, Na, and Li were added to some of the charges, and monitoring was achieved by ground-based spectrophotometric observations. On March 28, 1976, an increase in emission at 5577 A and at 4278 A was observed in association with the first two bursts, these emissions pulsating with roughly a 10 sec period for approximately 60 to 100 sec after the burst.

  13. Fluoxetine-induced inhibition of synaptosomal [3H]5-HT release: Possible Ca2+-channel inhibition

    Fluoxetine, a selective 5-Ht uptake inhibitor, inhibited 15 mM K+-induced [3H]5-HT release from rat spinal cord and cortical synaptosomes at concentrations > 0.5 uM. This effect reflected a property shared by another selective 5-HT uptake inhibitor paroxetine but not by less selective uptake inhibitors such as amitriptyline, desipramine, imipramine or nortriptyline. Inhibition of release by fluoxetine was inversely related to both the concentration of K+ used to depolarize the synaptosomes and the concentration of external Ca2+. Experiments aimed at determining a mechanism of action revealed that fluoxetine did not inhibit voltage-independent release of [3H]5-HT release induced by the Ca2+-ionophore A 23187 or Ca2+-independent release induced by fenfluramine. Moreover the 5-HT autoreceptor antagonist methiothepin did not reverse the inhibitory actions of fluoxetine on K+-induced release. Further studies examined the effects of fluoxetine on voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels and Ca2+ entry

  14. Characterization of degradation fragments released by arc-induced ablation of polymers in air

    Polymers exposed to high intensity arc plasmas release material in a process called arc-induced ablation. In order to investigate the degradation fragments released due to this process, two different polymeric materials, poly(oxymethylene) copolymer (POM-C) and poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), were exposed to a transient, high-power arc plasma in air. A small fraction of the ablated material drifting away from the arcing volume was deposited on a fixed glass substrate during the total duration of a 2 kA ac current semicycle. In addition, another fraction of the released material was deposited on a second moving substrate to obtain a time-resolved streak ‘image’ of the arc-induced ablation process. For the first time, mass spectra of degradation fragments produced by arc-induced ablation were obtained from the material deposited on the substrates by using laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LDI-ToF-MS). It was found that oligomers with mean molecular weight ranging between 400 and 600 Da were released from the surface of the studied polymers. The obtained spectra suggest that the detected degradation fragments of POM could be released by random chain scission of the polymer backbone. In turn, random chain scission and splitting-off the side groups are suggested as the main chemical mechanism leading to the release of PMMA fragments under arc-induced ablation. (paper)

  15. Tyrosine 402 phosphorylation of Pyk2 is involved in ionomycin-induced neurotransmitter release.

    Zhao Zhang

    Full Text Available Protein tyrosine kinases, which are highly expressed in the central nervous system, are implicated in many neural processes. However, the relationship between protein tyrosine kinases and neurotransmitter release remains unknown. In this study, we found that ionomycin, a Ca²⁺ ionophore, concurrently induced asynchronous neurotransmitter release and phosphorylation of a non-receptor protein tyrosine kinase, proline-rich tyrosine kinase 2 (Pyk2, in clonal rat pheochromocytoma PC12 cells and cerebellar granule cells, whereas introduction of Pyk2 siRNA dramatically suppressed ionomycin-induced neurotransmitter release. Further study indicated that Tyr-402 (Y402 in Pyk2, instead of other tyrosine sites, underwent rapid phosphorylation after ionomycin induction in 1 min to 2 min. We demonstrated that the mutant of Pyk2 Y402 could abolish ionomycin-induced dopamine (DA release by transfecting cells with recombinant Pyk2 and its mutants (Y402F, Y579F, Y580F, and Y881F. In addition, Src inhibition could prolong phosphorylation of Pyk2 Y402 and increase DA release. These findings suggested that Pyk2 was involved in ionomycin-induced neurotransmitter release through phosphorylation of Y402.

  16. Calcium Dysregulation Induces Apoptosis-inducing Factor Release: Cross-talk Between PARP-1- and Calpain- Signaling Pathways

    Vosler, Peter S.; Sun, Dandan; Wang, Suping; Gao, Yanqin; Kintner, Douglas B.; Signore, Armando P.; Cao, Guodong; Chen, Jun

    2009-01-01

    Recent discoveries show that caspase-independent cell death pathways are a pervasive mechanism in neurodegenerative diseases, and apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) is an important effector of this mode of neuronal death. There are currently two known mechanisms underlying AIF release following excitotoxic stress, PARP-1 and calpain. To test whether there is an interaction between PARP-1 and calpain in triggering AIF release, we used the NMDA toxicity model in rat primary cortical neurons. Expos...

  17. Mechanism of histamine release from rat mast cells induced by the ionophore A23187: effects of calcium and temperature

    Johansen, Torben

    1978-01-01

    1 The mechanism of histamine release from a pure population of rat mast cells induced by the lipid soluble antibiotic, A23187, has been studied and compared with data for anaphylactic histamine release reported in the literature. 2 Histamine release induced by A23187 in the presence of calcium 10...

  18. Histamine release induced from rat mast cells by the ionophore A23187 in the absence of extracellular calcium

    Johansen, Torben

    1980-01-01

    Isolated rat mast cells were used to study whether ionophore A23187 could induce histamine release by mobilizing cellular calcium. The histamine release was a slow process which was completed after about 20 min incubation with A23187. The A23187-induced histamine release was inhibited after...

  19. Radiation-induced increase in the release of amino acids by isolated, perfused skeletal muscle

    Local exposure of the hindquarter of the rat to 15Gy of gamma-radiation resulted, 4-6h after irradiation, in increased release of amino acids by the isolated, perfused hindquarter preparation, 70% of which is skeletal muscle. This increase in release involves not only alanine and glutamine, but also those amino acids not metabolized by muscle and, therefore, released in proportion to their occurrence in muscle proteins. Because metabolic parameters and content of energy-rich phosphate compounds in muscle remain unchanged, it is unlikely that general cellular damage is the underlying cause of the radiation-induced increase in amino acid release. The findings strongly favour the hypothesis that increased availability of amino acids results from enhanced protein break-down in skeletal muscle which has its onset shortly after irradiation. This radiation-induced disturbance in protein metabolism might be one of the pathogenetic factors in the aetiology of radiation myopathy. (author)

  20. Off-gassing induced tracer release from molten basalt pools

    Two in situ vitrification (ISV) field tests were conducted at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) during the summer of 1990 to assess ISV suitability for long-term stabilization of buried waste that contains transuranic and other radionuclide contaminants. The ISV process uses electrical resistance heating to melt buried waste and soil in place, which upon cooldown and resolidification fixes the waste into a vitrified (glass-like) form. In these two ISV field tests, small quantities of rare-earth oxides (tracers DY2O3, Yb2O3, and Tb4O7) were placed in the test pits to simulate the presence of plutonium oxides and assess plutonium retention/release behavior. The analysis presented in this report indicates that dissolution of tracer oxides into basaltic melts can be expected with subsequent tracer molecular or microparticle carry-off by escaping gas bubbles, which is similar to adsorptive bubble separation and ion flotation processes employed in the chemical industry to separate dilute heavy species from liquids under gas sparging conditions. Gaseous bubble escape from the melt surface and associated aerosolization is believed to be responsible for small quantities of tracer ejection from the melt surface to the cover hood and off-gas collection system. Methods of controlling off-gassing during ISV would be expected to improve the overall retention of such heavy oxide contaminants during melting/vitrification of buried waste

  1. Repeated potentiation of the metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 and the alpha 7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor modulates behavioural and GABAergic deficits induced by early postnatal phencyclidine (PCP) treatment

    Kjaerby, Celia; Bundgaard, Christoffer; Fejgin, Kim; Kristiansen, Uffe; Dalby, Nils Ole

    2013-01-01

    ADX47273 or SSR180711. We examined GABAergic transmission by whole cell patch-clamp recordings of miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents (mIPSC) in pyramidal neurons in layer II/III of prefrontal cortex (PFC) and by activation of extrasynaptic δ-containing GABAA receptors by THIP. Following PCP...... treatment, pyramidal neurons displayed a reduced mIPSC frequency and up-regulation of extrasynaptic THIP-induced current. ADX47273 treatment restored this up-regulation of THIP-induced current. Reduced receptor function seems to be the underlying cause of the reported changes, since repeated treatment with...

  2. Effect of ginseng saponina on nicotine-induced dopamine release in the rat nucleus accumbens and striatum

    Kim, Sang Eun [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Shim, In Sop [Kyunghee University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chung, June Key; Lee, Myung Chul [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-10-01

    We investigated the effect of ginseng total saponin (GTS) on nicotine-induced dopamine (DA) release in the striatum and nucleus accumbens of freely moving rats using in vivo microdialysis technique. Systemic pretreatment with GTS decreased striatal DA release induced by local infusion of nicotine into the striatum. However, GTS had no effect on the resting levels of extracellular DA in the striatum. GTS also blocked nicotine-induced DA release in the nucleus accumbens. The results of the present study suggest that GTS acts on the DA terminals to prevent DA release induced by nicotine. This may reflect the blocking effect of GTS on behavioral hyperactivity induced by psychostimulants.

  3. Effect of ginseng saponina on nicotine-induced dopamine release in the rat nucleus accumbens and striatum

    We investigated the effect of ginseng total saponin (GTS) on nicotine-induced dopamine (DA) release in the striatum and nucleus accumbens of freely moving rats using in vivo microdialysis technique. Systemic pretreatment with GTS decreased striatal DA release induced by local infusion of nicotine into the striatum. However, GTS had no effect on the resting levels of extracellular DA in the striatum. GTS also blocked nicotine-induced DA release in the nucleus accumbens. The results of the present study suggest that GTS acts on the DA terminals to prevent DA release induced by nicotine. This may reflect the blocking effect of GTS on behavioral hyperactivity induced by psychostimulants

  4. Potentiation of Vancomycin-Induced Histamine Release by Muscle Relaxants and Morphine in Rats

    Shuto, Hideki; Sueyasu, Masanori; Otsuki, Shuji; Hara, Tomoko; Tsuruta, Yuki; Kataoka, Yasufumi; Oishi,Ryozo

    1999-01-01

    The intravenous injection of vancomycin sometimes causes anaphylactoid reactions, in which histamine release may play a major role. These reactions are more frequently manifested when vancomycin is injected into anesthetized patients. We examined the vancomycin-induced histamine release and the interaction of vancomycin with muscle relaxants or opioid in rats. In an in vitro study with rat peritoneal mast cells, treatment with vancomycin at concentrations of greater than 1.25 mM produced sign...

  5. Pasteurella haemolytica leukotoxin induces histamine release from bovine pulmonary mast cells.

    Adusu, T E; Conlon, P D; Shewen, P.E.; Black, W D

    1994-01-01

    Pasteurella haemolytica A1 leukotoxic culture supernatant was evaluated for its ability to induce histamine release from bovine pulmonary mast cells isolated by enzymatic dispersion of lung tissue. Histamine was measured by a radioimmunoassay technique. Leukotoxic culture supernatant of P. haemolytica significantly released histamine in a time and concentration-related manner. This effect was lost when culture supernatant was heat-inactivated or preincubated with leukotoxin neutralizing rabbi...

  6. Tyrosine 402 Phosphorylation of Pyk2 Is Involved in Ionomycin-Induced Neurotransmitter Release

    Zhao Zhang; Yun Zhang; Zheng Mou; Shifeng Chu; Xiaoyu Chen; Wenbin He; Xiaofeng Guo; Yuhe Yuan; Masami Takahashi; Naihong Chen

    2014-01-01

    Protein tyrosine kinases, which are highly expressed in the central nervous system, are implicated in many neural processes. However, the relationship between protein tyrosine kinases and neurotransmitter release remains unknown. In this study, we found that ionomycin, a Ca²⁺ ionophore, concurrently induced asynchronous neurotransmitter release and phosphorylation of a non-receptor protein tyrosine kinase, proline-rich tyrosine kinase 2 (Pyk2), in clonal rat pheochromocytoma PC12 cells and ce...

  7. Genetic deletion of the adenosine A(2A) receptor prevents nicotine-induced upregulation of α7, but not α4β2* nicotinic acetylcholine receptor binding in the brain.

    Metaxas, Athanasios; Al-Hasani, Ream; Farshim, Pamela; Tubby, Kristina; Berwick, Amy; Ledent, Catherine; Hourani, Susanna; Kitchen, Ian; Bailey, Alexis

    2013-08-01

    Considerable evidence indicates that adenosine A(2A) receptors (A(2A)Rs) modulate cholinergic neurotransmission, nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) function, and nicotine-induced behavioural effects. To explore the interaction between A(2A) and nAChRs, we examined if the complete genetic deletion of adenosine A(2A)Rs in mice induces compensatory alterations in the binding of different nAChR subtypes, and whether the long-term effects of nicotine on nAChR regulation are altered in the absence of the A(2A)R gene. Quantitative autoradiography was used to measure cytisine-sensitive [¹²⁵I]epibatidine and [¹²⁵I]α-bungarotoxin binding to α4β2* and α7 nAChRs, respectively, in brain sections of drug-naïve (n = 6) or nicotine treated (n = 5-7), wild-type and adenosine A(2A)R knockout mice. Saline or nicotine (7.8 mg/kg/day; free-base weight) were administered to male CD1 mice via subcutaneous osmotic minipumps for a period of 14 days. Blood plasma levels of nicotine and cotinine were measured at the end of treatment. There were no compensatory developmental alterations in nAChR subtype distribution or density in drug-naïve A(2A)R knockout mice. In nicotine treated wild-type mice, both α4β2* and α7 nAChR binding sites were increased compared with saline treated controls. The genetic ablation of adenosine A(2A)Rs prevented nicotine-induced upregulation of α7 nAChRs, without affecting α4β2* receptor upregulation. This selective effect was observed at plasma levels of nicotine that were within the range reported for smokers (10-50 ng ml⁻¹). Our data highlight the involvement of adenosine A(2A)Rs in the mechanisms of nicotine-induced α7 nAChR upregulation, and identify A(2A)Rs as novel pharmacological targets for modulating the long-term effects of nicotine on α7 receptors. PMID:23583933

  8. The stimulus-induced release of 5-hydroxytryptamine and tryptophan from superfused rat brain synaptosomes

    The synthesis of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) from 3H-tryptophan in rat forebrain synaptosomes was studied. Synaptosomes which had been preincubated with 3H-tryptophan were perfused with Krebs solution and the release of tryptophan, 5-HT and 5-hydroxyindoleactic acid (5-HIAA) was determined. K+ depolarization induced a Ca2+ -dependent release of 5-HT and tryptophan but had no effect on 5-HIAA efflux. This finding suggests that the release of tryptophan is unlikely to be a non-specific effect of depolarization. (Author)

  9. Atrial natriuretic peptide and oxytocin induce natriuresis by release of cGMP

    Soares, T. J.; Coimbra, T. M.; Martins, A. R.; Pereira, A. G. F.; Carnio, E. C.; Branco, L. G. S.; Albuquerque-Araujo, W. I. C.; de Nucci, G.; Favaretto, A. L. V.; Gutkowska, J.; McCann, S. M.; Antunes-Rodrigues, J.

    1999-01-01

    Our hypothesis is that oxytocin (OT) causes natriuresis by activation of renal NO synthase that releases NO followed by cGMP that mediates the natriuresis. To test this hypothesis, an inhibitor of NO synthase, l-nitroarginine methyl ester (NAME), was injected into male rats. Blockade of NO release by NAME had no effect on natriuresis induced by atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP). This natriuresis presumably is caused by cGMP because ANP also activates guanylyl cyclase, which synthesizes cGMP from GTP. The 18-fold increase in sodium (Na+) excretion induced by OT (1 μg) was accompanied by an increase in urinary cGMP and preceded by 20 min a 20-fold increase in NO3− excretion. NAME almost completely inhibited OT-induced natriuresis and increased NO3− excretion; however, when the dose of OT was increased 10-fold, a dose that markedly increases plasma ANP concentrations, NAME only partly inhibited the natriuresis. We conclude that the natriuretic action of OT is caused by a dual action: generation of NO leading to increased cGMP and at higher doses release of ANP that also releases cGMP. OT-induced natriuresis is caused mainly by decreased tubular Na+ reabsorption mediated by cGMP. In contrast to ANP that releases cGMP in the renal vessels and the tubules, OT acts on its receptors on NOergic cells demonstrated in the macula densa and proximal tubules to release cGMP that closes Na+ channels. Both ANP- and OT-induced kaliuresis also appear to be mediated by cGMP. We conclude that cGMP mediates natriuresis and kaliuresis induced by both ANP and OT. PMID:9874809

  10. Signaling Mechanism of Cannabinoid Receptor-2 Activation-Induced β-Endorphin Release.

    Gao, Fang; Zhang, Ling-Hong; Su, Tang-Feng; Li, Lin; Zhou, Rui; Peng, Miao; Wu, Cai-Hua; Yuan, Xiao-Cui; Sun, Ning; Meng, Xian-Fang; Tian, Bo; Shi, Jing; Pan, Hui-Lin; Li, Man

    2016-08-01

    Activation of cannabinoid receptor-2 (CB2) results in β-endorphin release from keratinocytes, which then acts on primary afferent neurons to inhibit nociception. However, the underlying mechanism is still unknown. The CB2 receptor is generally thought to couple to Gi/o to inhibit cAMP production, which cannot explain the peripheral stimulatory effects of CB2 receptor activation. In this study, we found that in a keratinocyte cell line, the Gβγ subunits from Gi/o, but not Gαs, were involved in CB2 receptor activation-induced β-endorphin release. Inhibition of MAPK kinase, but not PLC, abolished CB2 receptor activation-induced β-endorphin release. Also, CB2 receptor activation significantly increased intracellular Ca(2+). Treatment with BAPTA-AM or thapsigargin blocked CB2 receptor activation-induced β-endorphin release. Using a rat model of inflammatory pain, we showed that the MAPK kinase inhibitor PD98059 abolished the peripheral effect of the CB2 receptor agonist on nociception. We thus present a novel mechanism of CB2 receptor activation-induced β-endorphin release through Gi/o-Gβγ-MAPK-Ca(2+) signaling pathway. Our data also suggest that stimulation of MAPK contributes to the peripheral analgesic effect of CB2 receptor agonists. PMID:26108183

  11. A dual modulatory effect of progesterone on the LHRH-induced LH release.

    Prilusky, J; Vermouth, N T; Deis, R P

    1984-07-01

    The role of progesterone on the release of LH induced by 25 or 50 ng of LHRH was studied in proestrus rats in which spontaneous preovulatory release of LH was prevented by sodium pentobarbitone. After the s.c. administration of progesterone (5 mg) at 18.00 h of diestrus day 2 or at 12.00 h of proestrus, serum LH was not detectable at 17.15 h of proestrus. Injections of 25 or 50 ng of LHRH at 17.00 h of proestrus induced a dose response release of LH 15 min after. However, the LH response to LHRH administration increased significantly when progesterone was injected at 12.00 h of proestrus. The potentiating effect of progesterone seems to be exerted at pituitary level. The effect of LHRH and the enhanced response of the pituitary after progesterone treatment was prevented by the administration of the antiestrogen Tamoxifen in diestrus day 2. The release of LH induced by 50 ng of LHRH on proestrus day was blocked by the previous injection of progesterone on diestrus day 2. The inhibition was maintained even though a second dose of progesterone was given at 12.00 h of proestrus. The simultaneous administration of estrogen and progesterone on diestrus day 2 did not prevent the inhibitory effect of progesterone. It is concluded that the facilitatory or inhibitory effect of progesterone on the release of LH induced by LHRH is dependent upon the previous sensitization of the pituitary to estrogen. PMID:6379303

  12. Activation of sensory nerves participates in stress-induced histamine release from mast cells in rats.

    Huang, Z L; Mochizuki, T; Watanabe, H; Maeyama, K

    1999-08-01

    To elucidate the mechanism by which stress induces rapid histamine release from mast cells, Wistar rats, pretreated as neonates with capsaicin, were subjected to immobilization stress for 2 h, and histamine release was measured in paws of anesthetized rats by using in vivo microdialysis after activation of sensory nerves by electrical or chemical stimulation. Immobilization stress studies indicated that in control rats stress induced a 2.7-fold increase in the level of plasma histamine compared to that in freely moving rats. Whereas pretreatment with capsaicin significantly decreased stress-induced elevation of plasma histamine. Microdialysis studies showed that electrical stimulation of the sciatic nerve resulted in a 4-fold increase of histamine release in rat paws. However, this increase was significantly inhibited in rats pretreated with capsaicin. Furthermore, injection of capsaicin into rat paw significantly increased histamine release in a dose-dependent manner. These results suggest that activation of sensory nerves participates in stress-induced histamine release from mast cells. PMID:10462124

  13. Gold nanoparticle–choline complexes can block nicotinic acetylcholine receptors

    Chur Chin

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Chur Chin1, In Kyeom Kim2, Dong Yoon Lim3, Ki Suk Kim4, Hyang Ae Lee4, Eun Joo Kim41Department of Pediatrics, Fatima Hospital, Daegu, Korea; 2Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Kyungpook National University, Daegu, Korea; 3Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Chosun University, Gwangju, Korea; 4Korea Institute of Toxicology, Daejeon, KoreaAbstract: We identified a novel class of direct ion-channel blockers of ligand-gated ion channels called the gold nanoparticle–choline complex. Negatively charged gold nanoparticles (1.4 nm block ion pores by binding to the sulfur group of the cysteine loop of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs, and currents evoked by acetylcholine (Ach can break these bonds. The current evoked by ACh in nAChRs was blocked directly in ion pores by the gold nanoparticle–choline complex. In adrenal-gland perfusion studies, the complex also blocked nAChRs by diminishing catecholamine release by about 75%. An in vivo study showed muscle relaxation in rats after injection of the complex. These results will foster the application of gold nanoparticles as a direct ion-channel blocker. Keywords: negatively charged gold nanoparticle, choline, gold–sulfur bond, nicotinic acetylcholine receptor, direct ion-channel blocker

  14. AQW051, a novel and selective nicotinic acetylcholine receptor α7 partial agonist, reduces l-Dopa-induced dyskinesias and extends the duration of l-Dopa effects in parkinsonian monkeys.

    Di Paolo, Thérèse; Grégoire, Laurent; Feuerbach, Dominik; Elbast, Walid; Weiss, Markus; Gomez-Mancilla, Baltazar

    2014-11-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR)-mediated signaling has been implicated in levodopa (l-Dopa)-induced dyskinesias (LID). This study investigated the novel selective α7 nAChR partial agonist (R)-3-(6-ρ-Tolyl-pyridin-3-yloxy)-1-aza-bicyclo(2.2.2)octane (AQW051) for its antidyskinetic activity in l-Dopa-treated 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)-lesioned cynomolgus monkeys. Six MPTP monkeys were repeatedly treated with l-Dopa to develop reproducible dyskinesias. AQW051 (2, 8, and 15 mg/kg) administered 1 h before l-Dopa treatment did not affect their parkinsonian scores or locomotor activity, but did significantly extend the duration of the l-Dopa antiparkinsonian response, by 30 min at the highest AQW051 dose (15 mg/kg). Dyskinesias were significantly reduced for the total period of l-Dopa effect following treatment with 15 mg/kg; achieving a reduction of 60% in median values. Significant reductions in 1 h peak dyskinesia scores and maximal dyskinesias were also observed with AQW051 (15 mg/kg). To understand the exposure-effect relationship and guide dose selection in clinical trials, plasma concentration-time data for the 15 mg/kg AQW051 dose were collected from three of the MPTP monkeys in a separate pharmacokinetic experiment. No abnormal behavioral or physiological effects were reported following AQW051 treatment. Our results show that AQW051 at a high dose can reduce LID without compromising the benefits of l-Dopa and extend the duration of the l-Dopa antiparkinsonian response in MPTP monkeys. This supports the clinical testing of α7 nAChR agonists to modulate LID and extend the duration of the therapeutic effect of l-Dopa. PMID:25172125

  15. Concurrent synthesis and release of nod-gene-inducing flavonoids from alfalfa roots

    Flavonoid signals from alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) induce transcription of nodulation (nod) genes in Rhizobium meliloti. Alfalfa roots release three major nod-gene inducers: 4',7-dihydroxyflavanone, 4',7-dihydroxyflavone, and 4,4'-dihydroxy-2'-methoxychalcone. The objective of the present study was to define temporal relationships between synthesis and exudation for those flavonoids. Requirements for concurrent flavonoid biosynthesis were assessed by treating roots of intact alfalfa seedlings with [U-14C]-L-phenylalanine in the presence or absence of the phenylalanine ammonia-lyase inhibitor L-2-aminoxy-3-phenylpropionic acid (AOPP). In the absence of AOPP, each of the three flavonoids in exudates contained 14C. In the presence of AOPP, 14C labeling and release of all the exuded nod-gene inducers were reduced significantly. AOPP inhibited labeling and release of the strongest nod-gene inducer, methoxychalcone, by more than 90%. The release process responsible for exudation of nod-gene inducers appears to be specific rather than a general phenomenon such as a sloughing off of cells during root growth

  16. Intracellular accumulation of indium ions released from nanoparticles induces oxidative stress, proinflammatory response and DNA damage.

    Tabei, Yosuke; Sonoda, Akinari; Nakajima, Yoshihiro; Biju, Vasudevanpillai; Makita, Yoji; Yoshida, Yasukazu; Horie, Masanori

    2016-02-01

    Due to the widespread use of indium tin oxide (ITO), it is important to investigate its effect on human health. In this study, we evaluated the cellular effects of ITO nanoparticles (NPs), indium chloride (InCl3) and tin chloride (SnCl3) using human lung epithelial A549 cells. Transmission electron microscopy and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry were employed to study cellular ITO NP uptake. Interestingly, greater uptake of ITO NPs was observed, as compared with soluble salts. ITO NP species released could be divided into two types: 'indium release ITO' or 'tin release ITO'. We incubated A549 cells with indium release ITO, tin release ITO, InCl3 or SnCl2 and investigated oxidative stress, proinflammatory response, cytotoxicity and DNA damage. We found that intracellular reactive oxygen species were increased in cells incubated with indium release ITO, but not tin release ITO, InCl3 or SnCl2. Messenger RNA and protein levels of the inflammatory marker, interleukin-8, also increased following exposure to indium release ITO. Furthermore, the alkaline comet assay revealed that intracellular accumulation of indium ions induced DNA damage. Our results demonstrate that the accumulation of ionic indium, but not ionic tin, from ITO NPs in the intracellular matrix has extensive cellular effects. PMID:26378248

  17. Ganglioside GQ1b induces dopamine release through the activation of Pyk2.

    Zhang, Zhao; Chu, Shi-Feng; Mou, Zheng; Gao, Yan; Wang, Zhen-Zhen; Wei, Gui-Ning; Chen, Nai-Hong

    2016-03-01

    Growing evidence indicates that GQ1b, one of the gangliosides members, contributes to synaptic transmission and synapse formation. Previous studies have shown that GQ1b could enhance depolarization induced neurotransmitter release, while the role of GQ1b in asynchronous release is still largely unknown. Here in our result, we found low concentration of GQ1b, but not GT1b or GD1b (which were generated from GQ1b by plasma membrane-associated sialidases), evoked asynchronous dopamine (DA) release from both clonal rat pheochromocytoma PC12 cells and rat striatal slices significantly. The release peaked at 2min after GQ1b exposure, and lasted for more than 6min. This effect was caused by the enhancement of intracellular Ca(2+) and the activation of Pyk2. Inhibition of Pyk2 by PF-431396 (a dual inhibitor of Pyk2 and FAK) or Pyk2 siRNA abolished DA release induced by GQ1b. Moreover, Pyk2 Y402, but not other tyrosine site, was phosphorylated at the peaking time. The mutant of Pyk2 Y402 (Pyk2-Y402F) was built to confirm the essential role of Y402 activation. Further studies revealed that activated Pyk2 stimulated ERK1/2 and p-38, while only the ERK1/2 activation was indispensable for GQ1b induced DA release, which interacted with Synapsin I directly and led to its phosphorylation, then depolymerization of F-actin, thus contributed to DA release. In conclusion, low concentration of GQ1b is able to enhance asynchronous DA release through Pyk2/ERK/Synapsin I/actin pathway. Our findings provide new insights into the role of GQ1b in neuronal communication, and implicate the potential application of GQ1b in neurological disorders. PMID:26704905

  18. Effect of MK-801 on methamphetamine-induced dopaminergic neurotoxicity: long-term attenuation of methamphetamine-induced dopamine release

    Repeated administration of methamphetamine (METH) produces high extracellular levels of dopamine (DA) and subsequent striatal DA terminal damage. The effect of MK-801, a noncompetitive N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist, on METH-induced changes in DA transporter (DAT) and DA release evoked by an acute METH challenge was evaluated in rodent striatum using [3H] WIN 38,428 ex vivo auto-radiography and in vivo microdialysis. Four injections of METH (10 mg/kg, i.p.), each given 2 h apart, produced 71% decrease in DAT levels in mouse striatum 3 d after administration. Pretreatment with MK-801 (2.5 g/kg, i.p.) 15 min before each of the four METH injections protected completely against striatal DAT depletions. Four injections of MK-801 alone did not significantly change striatal DAT levels. Striatal DA release evoked by an acute METH challenge (4mg/kg, i.p.) at 3 d after repeated administration of METH in rats was decreased but significant compared with controls, which was attenuated by repeated pretreatment with MK-801. Also, repeated injections of MK-801 alone attenuated acute METH-induced striatal DA release 3 d after administration. These results suggest that repeated administration of MK-801 may exert a preventive effect against METH-induced DA terminal injury through long-term attenuation of DA release induced by METH and other stimuli

  19. Involvement of arachidonate metabolism in neurotensin-induced prolactin release in vitro

    Neurotensin increased in a concentration-dependent manner the level of hypophyseal [3H]arachidonic acid in vitro as well as prolactin release from hemipituitary glands. The effect of 1 microM neurotensin on arachidonate release was already present at 2.5 min, maximal at 5, and disappeared after a 10-min incubation. Neurotensin analogues produced an enhancement of hypophyseal arachidonate similar to their relative potencies in other cellular systems, whereas other peptides (somatostatin and vasoactive intestinal peptide) were devoid of any effect on the concentration of the fatty acid in the pituitary. Seventy micromoles RHC 80267, a rather selective inhibitor of diacylglycerol lipase, completely prevented the neurotensin-stimulated prolactin release and decreased arachidonate release both in basal or in neurotensin-induced conditions. Similar results were obtained with 50 microM quinacrine, a phospholipase A2 inhibitor. To clarify whether arachidonate released by neurotensin requires a further metabolism through specific pathways to stimulate prolactin release, the authors used indomethacin and BW 755c, two blockers of cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase pathways. Thirty micromoles indomethacin, a dose active to inhibit cyclooxygenase, did not affect unesterified arachidonate levels either in basal or in neurotensin-induced conditions; moreover, the drug did not modify basal prolactin release but slightly potentiated the stimulatory effect of neurotensin on the release of the hormone. On the other hand, 250 microM BW 755c, an inhibitor of both cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase pathways, significantly inhibited both basal and neurotensin-stimulated prolactin release and further potentiated the increase of the fatty acid concentrations produced by 1 microM neurotensin

  20. Myelin basic protein peptide 45–89 induces the release of nitric oxide from microglial cells.

    Shanshiashvili, L.; Pichkhadze, B.; Machaidze, G.; Ramsden, Jeremy J.; Mikeladze, D.

    2002-01-01

    Continuous (24 h) exposure of mixed oligodendrocyte/microglial cells to peptides 45–89 derived from citrullinated C8 isoforms of myelin basic protein (MBP) induces cell death. In contrast, MBP-C8 at the same molecular concentration is not toxic to oligodendrocyte/microglial cells as detected by the MTT test and trypan blue exclusion method. The loss of oligodendrocyte/microglial cells resulted in the release of cytochrome c from mitochondria, suggesting MBP 45–89-induced apo...

  1. Epigenetic Upregulation of Corticotrophin-Releasing Hormone Mediates Postnatal Maternal Separation-Induced Memory Deficiency

    Wang, Aiyun; Nie, Wenying; Li, Haixia; Hou, Yuhua; Yu, Zhen; Fan, Qing; Sun, Ruopeng

    2014-01-01

    Accumulating evidences demonstrated that early postnatal maternal separation induced remarkable social and memory defects in the adult rodents. Early-life stress induced long-lasting functional adaptation of neuroendocrine hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, including neuropeptide corticotrophin-releasing hormone (CRH) in the brain. In the present study, a significantly increased hippocampal CRH was observed in the adult rats with postnatal maternal separation, and blockade of CRHR1 signalin...

  2. TRPM8-independent menthol-induced Ca2+ release from endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi

    Mahieu, Frank; Owsianik, Grzegorz; Verbert, Leen; Janssens, Annelies; De Smedt, Humbert; Nilius, Bernd; Voets, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    Menthol, a secondary alcohol produced by the peppermint herb, Mentha piperita, is widely used in the food and pharmaceutical industries as a cooling/ soothing compound and odorant. It induces Ca2+ influx in a subset of sensory neurons from dorsal root and trigeminal ganglia, due to activation of TRPM8, a Ca2+-permeable, cold-activated member of the TRP superfamily of cation channels. Menthol also induces Ca2+ release from intracellular stores in several TRPM8-expressing cell types, which has ...

  3. Effect of organophosphorus insecticides on phosphorylation of the M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor

    Shuyin Li; Liming Zou; Carry Pope

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Organophosphorus insecticides may promote the accumulation of acetylcholine at synapses and the neuromuscular junction by inhibiting acetylcholinesterase activity to cause disturbance of neural signal conduction and induce a toxic reaction. Organophosphorus insecticides may act on M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors, whose combination with G proteins is regulated by phosphorylation of G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2.OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effects of organophosphorus insecticides on the phosphorylation of G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2-mediated M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors and to reveal other possible actions of organophosphorus insecticides.DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: An observational study, which was performed in the Central Laboratory of Shenyang Medical College, and Department of Physiological Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Oklahoma State University from June 2002 to December 2004.METHODS: The M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor was extracted and purified from pig brain using affinity chromatography. Subsequently, the purified M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor, G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2, and [OP32] ATP were incubated with different concentrations of paraoxon and chlorpyrifos oxon together. The mixture then underwent polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and the gel film was dried and radioactively autographed to detect phosphorylation of the M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor. Finally, the radio-labeled phosphorylated M2 receptor protein band was excised for counting with an isotope liquid scintillation counter.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Effects of chlorpyrifos oxon, paraoxon, chlorpyrifos, and parathion in different concentrations on the phosphorylation of the M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor; effects of chlorpyrifos oxon on the phosphorylation of the adrenergic receptor.CONCLUSION: Different kinds of organophosphorus insecticides have different effects on the phosphorylation of the G protein

  4. Depolarization-induced release of amino acids from the vestibular nuclear complex.

    Godfrey, Donald A; Sun, Yizhe; Frisch, Christopher; Godfrey, Matthew A; Rubin, Allan M

    2012-04-01

    There is evidence from immunohistochemistry, quantitative microchemistry, and pharmacology for several amino acids as neurotransmitters in the vestibular nuclear complex (VNC), including glutamate, γ-aminobutyrate (GABA), and glycine. However, evidence from measurements of release has been limited. The purpose of this study was to measure depolarization-stimulated calcium-dependent release of amino acids from the VNC in brain slices. Coronal slices containing predominantly the VNC were prepared from rats and perfused with artificial cerebrospinal fluid (ACSF) in an interface chamber. Fluid was collected from the chamber just downstream from the VNC using a microsiphon. Depolarization was induced by 50 mM potassium in either control calcium and magnesium concentrations or reduced calcium and elevated magnesium. Amino acid concentrations in effluent fluid were measured by high performance liquid chromatography. Glutamate release increased fivefold during depolarization in control calcium concentration and twofold in low calcium/high magnesium. These same ratios were 6 and 1.5 for GABA, 2 and 1.3 for glycine, and 2 and 1.5 for aspartate. Differences between release in control and low calcium/high magnesium ACSF were statistically significant for glutamate, GABA, and glycine. Glutamine release decreased during and after depolarization, and taurine release slowly increased. No evidence for calcium-dependent release was found for serine, glutamine, alanine, threonine, arginine, taurine, or tyrosine. Our results support glutamate and GABA as major neurotransmitters in the VNC. They also support glycine as a neurotransmitter and some function for taurine. PMID:22147284

  5. Delivery of fullerene-containing complexes via microgel swelling and shear-induced release.

    Tarabukina, Elena; Zoolshoev, Zoolsho; Melenevskaya, Elena; Budtova, Tatiana

    2010-01-15

    The absorption and release of poly(vinylpyrrolidone)-fullerene C60 complexes (PVP/C60) from a model microgel is studied. A dry microgel based on a chemically cross-linked sodium polyacrylate was swollen in the aqueous solutions of complexes which were afterwards released under shear stress. First, gel swelling degree in static conditions in the excess of PVP/C60 solutions was studied: the degree of swelling decreases with the increase in PVP/C60 concentration. While pure PVP is homogeneously distributed between the gel and the surrounding solution, a slight concentration of complexes outside the gel was recorded. It was attributed to PVP/C60 hydrophobicity leading to the decrease in the thermodynamic quality of fullerene-containing solution being gel solvent. The release of PVP/C60 solutions induced by shear was studied with counter-rotating rheo-optical technique and compared with PVP solution release under the same conditions. The amount of solution released depends on polymer concentration and shear strain. Contrary to pure PVP solutions in which rate of release decreases with the increase in polymer concentration, PVP/C60 complexes are released faster when fullerene concentration inside the gel is higher. PMID:19766708

  6. Inhibitory effects of ginseng total saponins on behavioral sensitization and dopamine release induced by cocaine.

    Lee, BomBi; Yang, Chae Ha; Hahm, Dae-Hyun; Lee, Hye-Jung; Han, Seung-Moo; Kim, Kyung-Soo; Shim, Insop

    2008-03-01

    Many studies have suggested that the behavioral and reinforcing effects of cocaine can be mediated by the central dopaminergic systems. It has been shown that repeated injections of cocaine produce an increase in locomotor activity, the expression of the immediate-early gene, c-fos, and the release of dopamine (DA) in the nucleus accumbens (NAc), which is one of the main dopaminergic terminal areas. Several studies have shown that behavioral activation and changes in extracellular dopamine levels in the central nervous system induced by psychomotor stimulants are prevented by ginseng total saponins (GTS). In order to investigate the effects of GTS on the repeated cocaine-induced behavioral and neurochemical alterations, we examined the influence of GTS on the cocaine-induced behavioral sensitization and on c-Fos expression in the brain using immunohistochemistry in rats repeatedly treated with cocaine. We also examined the effect of GTS on cocaine-induced dopamine release in the NAc of freely moving rats repeatedly treated with cocaine using an in vivo microdialysis technique. Pretreatment with GTS (100, 200, 400 mg/kg, i.p.) 30 min before the daily injections of cocaine (15 mg/kg, i.p.) significantly inhibited the repeated cocaine-induced increase in locomotor activity as well as the c-Fos expression in the core and shell in a dose-dependent manner. Also, pretreatment with GTS significantly decreased the repeated cocaine-induced increase in dopamine release in the NAc. Our data demonstrate that the inhibitory effects of GTS on the repeated cocaine-induced behavioral sensitization were closely associated with the reduction of dopamine release and the postsynaptic neuronal activity. The results of the present study suggest that GTS may be effective for inhibiting the behavioral effects of cocaine by possibly modulating the central dopaminergic system. These results also suggest that GTS may prove to be a useful therapeutic agent for cocaine addiction. PMID:18310906

  7. Triazolam-induced modulation of muscarinic acetylcholine receptor in living brain slices as revealed by a new positron-based imaging technique

    The effect of triazolam, a potent benzodiazepine (BZ) agonist, on muscarinic acetylcholinergic receptor (mAChR) binding was investigated in living brain slices by use of a novel positron-based imaging technique. Fresh rat brain slices were incubated with [11C]N-methyl-4-piperidylbenzilate ([11C]NMPB), a mAChR antagonist, in oxygenated Krebs-Ringer solution at 37 degree C. During incubation, time-resolved imaging of [11C]NMPB binding in the slices was constructed on the storage phosphor screens. Addition of triazolam (1 μM) plus muscimol (30 μM), a GABAA receptor agonist, to the incubation mixture decreased the specific binding of [11C]NMPB. Ro15-1788, a BZ receptor antagonist, prevented this effect, indicating that the effect was exerted through the GABAA/BZ receptor complex. These results demonstrated that stimulation of the GABAA/BZ receptor lowers the affinity of the mAChR for its ligand, which may underlie the BZ-induced amnesia, a serious clinical side effect of BZ. No such effect in the P2-fraction instead implies that the integrity of the neuronal cells and/or their environment is prerequisite for the modulation of mAChR by GABAA/BZ stimulation. (author)

  8. Role of arachidonic acid metabolism on corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF)-release induced by interleukin-1 from superfused rat hypothalami.

    Cambronero, J C; Rivas, F J; Borrell, J; Guaza, C

    1992-07-01

    The present work shows that the corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF)-releasing activity of interleukin-1 (IL-1) is partially inhibited by a phospholipase A2 (mepacrine) or a cyclooxygenase (indomethacin) inhibitor, but is not affected by inhibition of the lypoxygenase pathway with norhydroguaiaretic acid. These results indicate that the metabolism of arachidonic acid plays an important role as mediator of the effects of IL-1 on CRF release. It is also shown that products of the cyclooxygenase activity such as prostaglandins can stimulate CRF secretion by a direct action on the hypothalamus. Whereas PGE2 failed to induce increases on CRF release, PGF2 alpha stimulated in a dose-dependent manner (21-340 nM), the CRF release from continuous perifused hypothalami. It is suggested that PGF2 alpha could be involved as a messenger in the hypothalamic CRF secretion induced by IL-1. PMID:1619039

  9. A new family of insect muscarinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Xia, R-Y; Li, M-Q; Wu, Y-S; Qi, Y-X; Ye, G-Y; Huang, J

    2016-08-01

    Most currently used insecticides are neurotoxic chemicals that target a limited number of sites and insect cholinergic neurotransmission is the major target. A potential target for insecticide development is the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR), which is a metabotropic G-protein-coupled receptor. Insects have A- and B-type mAChRs and the five mammalian mAChRs are close to the A-type. We isolated a cDNA (CG12796) from the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster. After heterologous expression in Chinese hamster ovary K1 cells, CG12796 could be activated by acetylcholine [EC50 (half maximal effective concentration), 73 nM] and the mAChR agonist oxotremorine M (EC50 , 48.2 nM) to increase intracellular Ca(2+) levels. Thus, the new mAChR is coupled to Gq/11 but not Gs and Gi/o . The classical mAChR antagonists atropine and scopolamine N-butylbromide at 100 μM completely blocked the acetylcholine-induced responses. The orthologues of CG12796 can also be found in the genomes of other insects, but not in the genomes of the honeybee or parasitoid wasps. Knockdown of CG12796 in the central nervous system had no effect on male courtship behaviours. We suggest that CG12796 represents the first recognized member of a novel mAChR class. PMID:27003873

  10. κ-银环蛇毒素敏感的烟碱受体激活引起的去甲肾上腺素释放参与烟碱诱导的长时程增强样反应%Noradrenaline release by activation of κ-bungarotoxin-sensitive nicotinic acetylcholine receptors participates in long-term potentiation-like response inducea by nicotine

    余剑平; 何进; 刘丹; 邓春玉; 朱小南; 汪雪兰; 王勇; 陈汝筑

    2007-01-01

    烟碱可以增强学习记忆功能,但其相关机制仍不清楚.海马长时程增强被认为是学习记忆的细胞机制.本研究室以往研究表明,当单脉冲的强度为诱发80%最大群体锋电位时,烟碱(10μmol/L)可以在海马CAI区诱导长时程增强样反应.本文通过细胞外记录离体海马脑片CA1区锥体细胞层群体锋电位,探讨烟碱诱导长时程增强样反应所涉及的烟碱受体亚型与相应的神经递质释放.结果显示,烟碱诱导的长时程增强样反应可以被美加明(mecamylamine,1 μmol/L)或κ-银环蛇毒素(κ-bungarotoxin,0.1μmol/L)阻断,但不被dihydro-β-erythtroidine(DHβE,10μmol/L)阻断.烟碱诱导的长时程增强样反应可以被普萘洛尔(propranolol,10μmol/L)阻断,但不被酚妥拉明(phentolamine,10μmol/L)或阿托品(atropine,10 μmol/L)阻断.以上结果提示,κ-银环蛇毒素敏感的烟碱受体激活引起的去甲肾上腺素释放参与烟碱诱导的海马CA1区长时程增强样反应.%Nicotine enhances the function of learning and memory,but the underlying mechanism still remains unclear.Hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP)is assumed to be a cellular mechanism of learning and memory.Our previous experiments showed that with the single pulses evoking 80% of the maximal population spike(PS) amplitude,nicotine(10 μmol/L)induced LTP-like response in the hippocampal CA1 region.In the present study,the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor(nAChR)subtypes and relevant neurotransmitter releases involved in LTP-like response induced by nicotine were investigated by extracellularly recording the PS in the pyramidal cell layer in the hippocampal CA1 region in vitro.LTP-like response induced by nicotine was blocked by mecamylamine(1μmol/L) or κ-bungarotoxin(0.1 μmol/L),but not by dihydro-β-erythtroidine(DHIβE,10 μmol/L).Moreover,it was inhibited by propranolol(10μmol/L),but not by phentolamine(10 μmol/L)or atropine(10 μmol/L).The results suggest that

  11. α4 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor modulated by galantamine on nigrostriatal terminals regulates dopamine receptor-mediated rotational behavior.

    Inden, Masatoshi; Takata, Kazuyuki; Yanagisawa, Daijiro; Ashihara, Eishi; Tooyama, Ikuo; Shimohama, Shun; Kitamura, Yoshihisa

    2016-03-01

    Galantamine, an acetylcholine esterase (AChE) inhibitor used to treat dementia symptoms, also acts as an allosteric potentiating ligand (APL) at nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). This study was designed to evaluate the allosteric effect of galantamine on nAChR regulation of nigrostrial dopaminergic neuronal function in the hemiparkinsonian rat model established by unilateral nigral 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) injection. Methamphetamine, a dopamine releaser, induced ipsilateral rotation, whereas dopamine agonists apomorphine (a non-selective dopamine receptor agonist), SKF38393 (a selective dopamine D1 receptor agonist), and quinpirole (a selective dopamine D2 receptor agonist) induced contralateral rotation. When 6-OHDA-injected rats were co-treated with nomifensine, a dopamine transporter inhibitor, a more pronounced and a remarkable effect of nicotine and galantamine was observed. Under these conditions, the combination of nomifensine with nicotine or galantamine induced the ipsilateral rotation similar to the methamphetamine-induced rotational behavior, indicating that nicotine and galantamine also induce dopamine release from striatal terminals. Both nicotine- and galantamine-induced rotations were significantly blocked by flupenthixol (an antagonist of both D1 and D2 dopamine receptors) and mecamylamine (an antagonist of nAChRs), suggesting that galantamine modulation of nAChRs on striatal dopaminergic terminals regulates dopamine receptor-mediated movement. Immunohistochemical staining showed that α4 nAChRs were highly expressed on striatal dopaminergic terminals, while no α7 nAChRs were detected. Pretreatment with the α4 nAChR antagonist dihydroxy-β-erythroidine significantly inhibited nicotine- and galantamine-induced rotational behaviors, whereas pretreatment with the α7 nAChR antagonist methyllycaconitine was ineffective. Moreover, the α4 nAChR agonist ABT-418 induced ipsilateral rotation, while the α7 nAChR agonist PNU282987 had no

  12. Localized Ca2+ uncaging induces Ca2+ release through IP3R in smooth muscle

    Min WANG; Zheng CHEN; Yan XING; Xu ZHANG; Xian-zhi DONG; Guang-ju JI

    2006-01-01

    Aim: Our previous study indicated that there are two types of Ca2+ release events seen in intact mouse bladder tissue. In this study our aim is to investigate the mechanism that underlies the phenomena of Ca2+ release in smooth muscle. Methods: Single cells were isolated and tissue segments were prepared by cutting the detrusor into 0.1 cm × O.5 cm strips running along the axis from the neck to the fundus. Single cells and intact tissue strips were co-loaded with the Ca2+ indicator and caged Ca2+ by incubation with 10 μmol/L Fluo-4 AM and DMNP-EDTA-AM. Fluo-4 AM fluorescence was detected by laser scanning confocal microscopy, and local uncaging of DMNP-EGTA was achieved by brief exposure to the output of a diode-pumped, Ti:sapphire laser tuned to 730 nm. Results: Local uncaging of caged Ca2+ was able to trigger Ca2+ release events in both single cells and tissue strips from mouse bladder. The Ca2+ release events could not be blocked by ryanodine alone, but the property of the Ca2+ release was markedly altered. Surprisingly, in the presence of ryanodine, Xestospongin C completely inhibited the Ca2+ release events both in single cell and tissue experiments. Conclusion: (1) Two photon flash photolysis (TPFP) triggers Ca2+ induced Ca2+ release. This process involves release through type 2 ryanodine receptor channels; (2) TPFP results in the release of Ca2+ through inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors in the absence of phospholipase C activation.

  13. Mechanical stretch induces MMP-2 release and activation in lung endothelium: role of EMMPRIN.

    Haseneen, Nadia A; Vaday, Gayle G; Zucker, Stanley; Foda, Hussein D

    2003-03-01

    High-volume mechanical ventilation leads to ventilator-induced lung injury. This type of lung injury is accompanied by an increased release and activation of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). To investigate the mechanism leading to the increased MMP release, we systematically studied the effect of mechanical stretch on human microvascular endothelial cells isolated from the lung. We exposed cells grown on collagen 1 BioFlex plates to sinusoidal cyclic stretch at 0.5 Hz using the Flexercell system with 17-18% elongation of cells. After 4 days of cell stretching, conditioned media and cell lysate were collected and analyzed by gelatin, casein, and reverse zymograms as well as Western blotting. RT-PCR of mRNA extracted from stretched cells was performed. Our results show that 1) cyclic stretch led to increased release and activation of MMP-2 and MMP-1; 2) the activation of MMP-2 was accompanied by an increase in membrane type-1 MMP (MT1-MMP) and inhibited by a hydroxamic acid-derived inhibitor of MMPs (Prinomastat, AG3340); and 3) the MMP-2 release and activation were preceded by an increase in production of extracellular MMP inducer (EMMPRIN). These results suggest that cyclic mechanical stretch leads to MMP-2 activation through an MT1-MMP mechanism. EMMPRIN may play an important role in the release and activation of MMPs during lung injury. PMID:12456388

  14. Ethanol-induced cell damage in cultured rat antral mucosa assessed by chromium-51 release

    We have developed an in vitro method for studying ethanol-induced injury to gastric mucosa using organ culture of rat antrum. Cell damage was assessed by measurement of the release of [51Cr]sodium chromate from preloaded cells, a method adapted from a standard immunologic technique. This system provided rapid and highly reproducible quantitation of tissue injury as assessed by 51Cr release into the culture medium. The threshold concentration for ethanol-induced damage was between 10 and 15% v/v, similar to in vivo thresholds observed by others. 51Cr release could also be induced by very short exposure to ethanol (5-15 min), and then continued despite ethanol removal. Interestingly, after continuous ethanol exposure, a plateau of maximum 51Cr release was reached 60 min after exposure to ethanol over the concentration range 20-50%, suggesting tissue adaptation to ethanol damage. This organ culture system, which allows precise control of experimental conditions, may be useful for studying mechanisms of gastric mucosal injury and protection

  15. Role of cytoplasmic and releasable ADP in platelet aggregation induced by laminar shear stress

    We examined the extent of lytic and sublytic platelet injury after exposure of platelets to shear stress and the role in shear-induced PAG of ADP liberated from platelets as a result of shear-induced platelet dense body release and/or platelet damage. Platelets in C-PRP or TAS were subjected to well-defined, laminar shear stress in a rotational viscometer, and PAG (loss of single, nonaggregated platelets), 14C-serotonin release, and loss from platelets of LDH and 51Cr were determined. Increased PAG with increasing shear stresses was associated with progressive loss of LDH and 51Cr. Loss of 51Cr was consistently in excess of that of LDH, indicating sublytic platelet injury, which was confirmed by electron microscopy. At the lowest shear stress used (50 dynes/cm2), PAG in C-PRP was observed in the absence of detectable loss of 51Cr or LDH. When platelets in TAS were sheared in the presence of CP/CPK, an enzyme system capable of removing extracellular ADP, PAG was only partially (approximately 40%) inhibited. However, when platelets were preincubated with CP/CPK and ATP (to saturate platelet ADP receptors), shear-induced PAG was almost completely suppressed. Similar results were obtained with PAG induced by collagen in the aggregometer. The findings indicate that (1) shear-induced PAG in this system may occur without measurable lytic or sublytic platelet damage and (2) ADP liberated from platelets as a result of shear-induced release or damage may represent the major if not sole mediator of shear-induced PAG

  16. Rhinovirus-induced basic fibroblast growth factor release mediates airway remodeling features

    Skevaki Chrysanthi L

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human rhinoviruses, major precipitants of asthma exacerbations, induce lower airway inflammation and mediate angiogenesis. The purpose of this study was to assess the possibility that rhinoviruses may also contribute to the fibrotic component of airway remodeling. Methods Levels of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF mRNA and protein were measured following rhinovirus infection of bronchial epithelial cells. The profibrotic effect of epithelial products was assessed by DNA synthesis and matrix metalloproteinase activity assays. Moreover, epithelial cells were exposed to supernatants from cultured peripheral blood mononuclear cells, obtained from healthy donors or atopic asthmatic subjects and subsequently infected by rhinovirus and bFGF release was estimated. bFGF was also measured in respiratory secretions from atopic asthmatic patients before and during rhinovirus-induced asthma exacerbations. Results Rhinovirus epithelial infection stimulated mRNA expression and release of bFGF, the latter being positively correlated with cell death under conditions promoting rhinovirus-induced cytotoxicity. Supernatants from infected cultures induced lung fibroblast proliferation, which was inhibited by anti-bFGF antibody, and demonstrated increased matrix metalloproteinase activity. Rhinovirus-mediated bFGF release was significantly higher in an in vitro simulation of atopic asthmatic environment and, importantly, during rhinovirus-associated asthma exacerbations. Conclusions Rhinovirus infection induces bFGF release by airway epithelium, and stimulates stroma cell proliferation contributing to airway remodeling in asthma. Repeated rhinovirus infections may promote asthma persistence, particularly in the context of atopy; prevention of such infections may influence the natural history of asthma.

  17. fMLP-Induced IL-8 Release Is Dependent on NADPH Oxidase in Human Neutrophils

    María A. Hidalgo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available N-Formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP and platelet-activating factor (PAF induce similar intracellular signalling profiles; but only fMLP induces interleukin-8 (IL-8 release and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate reduced (NADPH oxidase activity in neutrophils. Because the role of ROS on IL-8 release in neutrophils is until now controversial, we assessed if NADPH oxidase is involved in the IL-8 secretions and PI3K/Akt, MAPK, and NF-κB pathways activity induced by fMLP. Neutrophils were obtained from healthy volunteers. IL-8 was measured by ELISA, IL-8 mRNA by qPCR, and ROS production by luminol-amplified chemiluminescence, reduction of ferricytochrome c, and FACS. Intracellular pH changes were detected by spectrofluorescence. ERK1/2, p38 MAPK, and Akt phosphorylation were analysed by immunoblotting and NF-κB was analysed by immunocytochemistry. Hydroxy-3-methoxyaceto-phenone (HMAP, diphenyleneiodonium (DPI, and siRNA Nox2 reduced the ROS and IL-8 release in neutrophils treated with fMLP. HMAP, DPI, and amiloride (a Na+/H+ exchanger inhibitor inhibited the Akt phosphorylation and did not affect the p38 MAPK and ERK1/2 activity. DPI and HMAP reduced NF-κB translocation induced by fMLP. We showed that IL-8 release induced by fMLP is dependent on NADPH oxidase, and ROS could play a redundant role in cell signalling, ultimately activating the PI3K/Akt and NF-κB pathways in neutrophils.

  18. Valproic acid potentiates both typical and atypical antipsychotic-induced prefrontal cortical dopamine release.

    Ichikawa, Junji; Chung, Young-Chul; Dai, Jin; Meltzer, Herbert Y

    2005-08-01

    Antipsychotic drugs (APD)s and anticonvulsant mood-stabilizers are now frequently used in combination with one another in treating both schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. We have recently reported that the atypical APDs, e.g. clozapine and risperidone, as well as the anticonvulsant mood-stabilizers, valproic acid (VPA), zonisamide, and carbamazepine, but not the typical APD haloperidol, increase dopamine (DA) release in rat medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). The increased DA release was partially (atypical APDs) or completely (mood-stabilizers) blocked by the serotonin (5-HT)1A receptor antagonist WAY100635. Diminished prefrontal cortical DA activity may contribute to cognitive impairment in virtually all the patients with schizophrenia and, perhaps, bipolar disorder. Thus, the enhanced release of cortical DA by these agents may be beneficial in this regard. It is, therefore, of considerable interest to determine whether combined administration of these agents augments prefrontal cortical DA release, and if so, whether the increase is dependent upon 5-HT1A receptor activation. VPA (50 mg/kg), which was insufficient by itself to increase prefrontal cortical DA release, potentiated the ability of clozapine (20 mg/kg) and risperidone (1 mg/kg) to increase DA release in the mPFC, but not in the nucleus accumbens (NAC). VPA (50 mg/kg) also potentiated haloperidol (0.5 mg/kg)-induced DA release in the mPFC; this increase was completely abolished by WAY100635 (0.2 mg/kg). These results suggest that, in combination with VPA, both typical and atypical APDs produce greater increases in prefrontal cortical DA release than either type of drug alone via a mechanism dependent upon 5-HT(1A) receptor activation. Furthermore, they provide a strong rationale for testing for possible clinical synergism of an APD and anticonvulsant mood-stabilizer in improving the cognitive deficits present in patients with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. PMID:16061211

  19. Inhibition of human α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors by cyclic monoterpene carveol.

    Lozon, Yosra; Sultan, Ahmed; Lansdell, Stuart J; Prytkova, Tatiana; Sadek, Bassem; Yang, Keun-Hang Susan; Howarth, Frank Christopher; Millar, Neil S; Oz, Murat

    2016-04-01

    Cyclic monoterpenes are a group of phytochemicals with antinociceptive, local anesthetic, and anti-inflammatory actions. Effects of cyclic monoterpenes including vanilin, pulegone, eugenole, carvone, carvacrol, carveol, thymol, thymoquinone, menthone, and limonene were investigated on the functional properties of the cloned α7 subunit of the human nicotinic acetylcholine receptor expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Monoterpenes inhibited the α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor in the order carveol>thymoquinone>carvacrol>menthone>thymol>limonene>eugenole>pulegone≥carvone≥vanilin. Among the monoterpenes, carveol showed the highest potency on acetylcholine-induced responses, with IC50 of 8.3µM. Carveol-induced inhibition was independent of the membrane potential and could not be reversed by increasing the concentration of acetylcholine. In line with functional experiments, docking studies indicated that cyclic monoterpenes such as carveol may interact with an allosteric site located in the α7 transmembrane domain. Our results indicate that cyclic monoterpenes inhibit the function of human α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, with varying potencies. PMID:26849939

  20. Temperature dependence of the atractyloside-induced mitochondrial Ca2+ release.

    Chávez, E; Osornio, A

    1988-01-01

    1. Mitochondrial Ca2+, accumulated by succinate oxidation was released by addition of 50 microM atractyloside. Beside this Ca2+ efflux, a large oxidation of pyridine nucleotides and sustained membrane depolarization occurs. An absolute requirement for acetate to support Ca2+ release is demonstrated. 2. Membrane de-energization, NAD(P)H oxidation, and Ca2+ efflux as induced by atractyloside were temperature-dependent, since it occurs when mitochondria are incubated at 22 degrees C and was abolished at 4 degrees C. 3. Taking into account this latter, the effects of atractyloside on mitochondrial Ca2+ release appears not to be a simple result of the binding of the inhibitor to adenine nucleotide translocase. 4. It is proposed that the mechanism involved in atractyloside-driven membrane permeability to Ca2+ must be related with the transference of the conformational change of the carrier, to another membrane structure responsible for the maintenance permeability to ions. PMID:3181602

  1. Human, recombinant interleukin-2 induces in vitro histamine release in a dose-dependent manner

    Nielsen, Hans Jørgen; Petersen, L J; Skov, P S

    1995-01-01

    We previously observed that human, recombinant interleukin-2 in a pharmacologic dose (200 u/ml) induced histamine release from monocyte-depleted peripheral blood mononuclear cells in vitro. Therefore, we studied the role of various pharmacologic doses of rIL-2 on in vitro histamine release....... Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (5 x 10(6) cells/ml), which also contain basophils, from 13 patients scheduled for elective colorectal cancer surgery and 10 age and sex matched healthy volunteers were stimulated with rIL-2 in concentrations of 0, 50, 100, 200, 450, 900, 1,800 and 3,600 u/ml, respectively...... release. Supernatant histamine concentration from unstimulated cells was 17.2 +/- 1.5 ng/ml in patients compared to 7.9 +/- 1.0 ng/ml in volunteers (#p < 0.05) after 1 hour stimulation, and no further increase was observed after 24 and 48 hours, respectively. Histamine concentration increased...

  2. Acacetin inhibits glutamate release and prevents kainic acid-induced neurotoxicity in rats.

    Tzu-Yu Lin

    Full Text Available An excessive release of glutamate is considered to be a molecular mechanism associated with several neurological diseases that causes neuronal damage. Therefore, searching for compounds that reduce glutamate neurotoxicity is necessary. In this study, the possibility that the natural flavone acacetin derived from the traditional Chinese medicine Clerodendrum inerme (L. Gaertn is a neuroprotective agent was investigated. The effect of acacetin on endogenous glutamate release in rat hippocampal nerve terminals (synaptosomes was also investigated. The results indicated that acacetin inhibited depolarization-evoked glutamate release and cytosolic free Ca(2+ concentration ([Ca(2+]C in the hippocampal nerve terminals. However, acacetin did not alter synaptosomal membrane potential. Furthermore, the inhibitory effect of acacetin on evoked glutamate release was prevented by the Cav2.2 (N-type and Cav2.1 (P/Q-type channel blocker known as ω-conotoxin MVIIC. In a kainic acid (KA rat model, an animal model used for excitotoxic neurodegeneration experiments, acacetin (10 or 50 mg/kg was administrated intraperitoneally to the rats 30 min before the KA (15 mg/kg intraperitoneal injection, and subsequently induced the attenuation of KA-induced neuronal cell death and microglia activation in the CA3 region of the hippocampus. The present study demonstrates that the natural compound, acacetin, inhibits glutamate release from hippocampal synaptosomes by attenuating voltage-dependent Ca(2+ entry and effectively prevents KA-induced in vivo excitotoxicity. Collectively, these data suggest that acacetin has the therapeutic potential for treating neurological diseases associated with excitotoxicity.

  3. The control of chick myoblast fusion by ion channels operated by prostaglandins and acetylcholine

    1988-01-01

    Chick myoblast fusion in culture was investigated using prostanoid synthesis inhibitors to delay spontaneous fusion. During this delay myoblast fusion could be induced by prostaglandin E1 (PGE1), by raising extracellular potassium and by addition of carbachol. Carbachol-induced fusion, but not PGE-induced fusion, was prevented by the acetylcholine receptor blocker alpha-bungarotoxin. Fusion induced by any of these agents was prevented by the Ca channel blockers lanthanum and D600. The thresho...

  4. Bed rest decreases mechanically induced myofiber wounding and consequent wound-mediated FGF release.

    Clarke, M S; Bamman, M M; Feeback, D L

    1998-08-01

    Using a terrestrial model of spaceflight (i.e., bed rest), we investigated the amount of myofiber wounding and fibroblast growth factor (FGF) release that occurs during unloading. Myofiber wounding was determined by serum levels of the creatine kinase MM (CKMM) isoform before and after bed rest. Serum levels of both acidic FGF (aFGF) and basic FGF were also determined. A second group of subjects was treated in an identical fashion except that they underwent a resistive exercise program during bed rest. Bed rest alone caused significant (P size. In contrast, bed rest plus resistive exercise resulted in significant (P < 0.05; n = 7) increases in post-bed-rest serum levels of both CKMM and aFGF, which were paralleled by inhibition of the atrophic response. These results suggest that mechanically induced, myofiber wound-mediated FGF release may play an important role in the etiology of unloading-induced skeletal muscle atrophy. PMID:9688737

  5. Sulfide induces phosphate release from polyphosphate in cultures of a marine Beggiatoa strain

    Brock, Jörg; Schulz-Vogt, Heide N.

    2010-01-01

    Sulfur bacteria such as Beggiatoa or Thiomargarita have a particularly high capacity for storage because of their large size. In addition to sulfur and nitrate, these bacteria also store phosphorus in the form of polyphosphate. Thiomargarita namibiensis has been shown to release phosphate from internally stored polyphosphate in pulses creating steep peaks of phosphate in the sediment and thereby inducing the precipitation of phosphorus-rich minerals. Large sulfur bacteria populate sediments a...

  6. Central release of nitric oxide mediates antinociception induced by aerobic exercise

    Galdino, G.S.; Duarte, I D; Perez, A C

    2014-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a soluble gas that participates in important functions of the central nervous system, such as cognitive function, maintenance of synaptic plasticity for the control of sleep, appetite, body temperature, neurosecretion, and antinociception. Furthermore, during exercise large amounts of NO are released that contribute to maintaining body homeostasis. Besides NO production, physical exercise has been shown to induce antinociception. Thus, the present study aimed to investiga...

  7. Central release of nitric oxide mediates antinociception induced by aerobic exercise.

    Galdino, G S; Duarte, I D; Perez, A C

    2015-09-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a soluble gas that participates in important functions of the central nervous system, such as cognitive function, maintenance of synaptic plasticity for the control of sleep, appetite, body temperature, neurosecretion, and antinociception. Furthermore, during exercise large amounts of NO are released that contribute to maintaining body homeostasis. Besides NO production, physical exercise has been shown to induce antinociception. Thus, the present study aimed to investigate the central involvement of NO in exercise-induced antinociception. In both mechanical and thermal nociceptive tests, central [intrathecal (it) and intracerebroventricular (icv)] pretreatment with inhibitors of the NO/cGMP/KATP pathway (L-NOArg, ODQ, and glybenclamide) prevented the antinociceptive effect induced by aerobic exercise (AE). Furthermore, pretreatment (it, icv) with specific NO synthase inhibitors (L-NIO, aminoguanidine, and L-NPA) also prevented this effect. Supporting the hypothesis of the central involvement of NO in exercise-induced antinociception, nitrite levels in the cerebrospinal fluid increased immediately after AE. Therefore, the present study suggests that, during exercise, the NO released centrally induced antinociception. PMID:25517916

  8. Central release of nitric oxide mediates antinociception induced by aerobic exercise

    G.S. Galdino

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide (NO is a soluble gas that participates in important functions of the central nervous system, such as cognitive function, maintenance of synaptic plasticity for the control of sleep, appetite, body temperature, neurosecretion, and antinociception. Furthermore, during exercise large amounts of NO are released that contribute to maintaining body homeostasis. Besides NO production, physical exercise has been shown to induce antinociception. Thus, the present study aimed to investigate the central involvement of NO in exercise-induced antinociception. In both mechanical and thermal nociceptive tests, central [intrathecal (it and intracerebroventricular (icv] pretreatment with inhibitors of the NO/cGMP/KATP pathway (L-NOArg, ODQ, and glybenclamide prevented the antinociceptive effect induced by aerobic exercise (AE. Furthermore, pretreatment (it, icv with specific NO synthase inhibitors (L-NIO, aminoguanidine, and L-NPA also prevented this effect. Supporting the hypothesis of the central involvement of NO in exercise-induced antinociception, nitrite levels in the cerebrospinal fluid increased immediately after AE. Therefore, the present study suggests that, during exercise, the NO released centrally induced antinociception.

  9. Granuloma induced by sustained-release fluorouracil implants misdiagnosed as a hepatic tumor: A case report.

    Bai, Dou-Sheng; Jin, Sheng-Jie; He, Rong; Jiang, Guo-Qing; Yao, Jie

    2014-08-01

    Sustained-release fluorouracil (FU) implants have been extensively used in peritoneal interstitial chemotherapy, and during surgery for gastrointestinal tumors, breast cancer and hepatic tumors. Currently, studies regarding the complications associated with sustained-release FU implants are rare. The present study describes the case of a 61-year-old male who presented with a space-occupying lesion of the left lobe of the liver six months after undergoing a radical total gastrectomy. Thus, laparoscopic exploration was performed to remove the tumor. Postoperative histological examination demonstrated that the lesion in the left lobe comprised of necrotic tissue with granulation tissue hyperplasia. Based on the surgical and postoperative histological findings, the mass was proposed to be due to a high concentration of local sustained-release FU implants. Furthermore, the drug was partially surrounded and had been insufficiently metabolized over a long time period, which was proposed to have caused necrosis, proliferation and fibrillation, and induced granuloma. In conclusion, local high concentrations of sustained-release FU implants may be associated with granuloma and this finding may enable improved management of sustained-release FU implants during surgery. PMID:25013494

  10. Pregnenolone sulfate induces NMDA receptor dependent release of dopamine from synaptic terminals in the striatum.

    Whittaker, Matthew T; Gibbs, Terrell T; Farb, David H

    2008-10-01

    Neuromodulators that alter the balance between lower-frequency glutamate-mediated excitatory and higher-frequency GABA-mediated inhibitory synaptic transmission are likely to participate in core mechanisms for CNS function and may contribute to the pathophysiology of neurological disorders such as schizophrenia and Alzheimer's disease. Pregnenolone sulfate (PS) modulates both ionotropic glutamate and GABA(A) receptor mediated synaptic transmission. The enzymes necessary for PS synthesis and degradation are found in brain tissue of several species including human and rat, and up to 5 nM PS has been detected in extracts of postmortem human brain. Here, we ask whether PS could modulate transmitter release from nerve terminals located in the striatum. Superfusion of a preparation of striatal nerve terminals comprised of mixed synaptosomes and synaptoneurosomes with brief-duration (2 min) pulses of 25 nM PS demonstrates that PS increases the release of newly accumulated [3H]dopamine ([3H]DA), but not [14C]glutamate or [3H]GABA, whereas pregnenolone is without effect. PS does not affect dopamine transporter (DAT) mediated uptake of [3H]DA, demonstrating that it specifically affects the transmitter release mechanism. The PS-induced [3H]DA release occurs via an NMDA receptor (NMDAR) dependent mechanism as it is blocked by D-2-amino-5-phosphonovaleric acid. PS modulates DA release with very high potency, significantly increasing [3H]DA release at PS concentrations as low as 25 pM. This first report of a selective direct enhancement of synaptosomal dopamine release by PS at picomolar concentrations via an NMDAR dependent mechanism raises the possibility that dopaminergic axon terminals may be a site of action for this neurosteroid. PMID:18710414

  11. UTP-induced ATP release is a fine-tuned signalling pathway in osteocytes.

    Kringelbach, Tina M; Aslan, Derya; Novak, Ivana; Schwarz, Peter; Jørgensen, Niklas R

    2014-01-01

    Osteocytes reside as a cellular network throughout the mineralised matrix of bone and are considered the primary mechanosensors of this tissue. They sense mechanical stimulation such as fluid flow and are able to regulate osteoblast and osteoclast functions on the bone surface. Previously, we found that ATP is released load-dependently from osteocytes from the onset of mechanical stimulation. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate whether and how ATP release can be evoked in osteocytes via purinergic receptor activation. ATP release was quantified by real-time determination using the luciferin-luciferase assay and the release pathway was investigated using pharmacological inhibition. The P2Y receptor profile was analysed using gene expression analysis by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, while functional testing was performed using measurements of intracellular calcium responses to P2 receptor agonists. These investigations demonstrated that MLO-Y4 osteocytes express functional P2Y(2), P2Y(4), P2Y(12) and P2Y(13) receptors in addition to the previously reported P2X receptors. Further, we found that osteocytes respond to nucleotides such as ATP, UTP and ADP by increasing the intracellular calcium concentration and that they release ATP dose-dependently upon stimulation with 1-10 μM UTP. In addition to this, osteocytes release large amounts of ATP upon cell rupture, which might also be a source for other nucleotides, such as UTP. These findings indicate that mechanically induced ATP signals may be propagated by P2 receptor activation and further ATP release in the osteocyte network and implicate purinergic signalling as a central signalling pathway in osteocyte mechanotransduction. PMID:24374572

  12. Model Scramjet Inlet Unstart Induced by Mass Addition and Heat Release

    Im, Seong-Kyun; Baccarella, Damiano; McGann, Brendan; Liu, Qili; Wermer, Lydiy; Do, Hyungrok

    2015-11-01

    The inlet unstart phenomena in a model scramjet are investigated at an arc-heated hypersonic wind tunnel. The unstart induced by nitrogen or ethylene jets at low or high enthalpy Mach 4.5 freestream flow conditions are compared. The jet injection pressurizes the downstream flow by mass addition and flow blockage. In case of the ethylene jet injection, heat release from combustion increases the backpressure further. Time-resolved schlieren imaging is performed at the jet and the lip of the model inlet to visualize the flow features during unstart. High frequency pressure measurements are used to provide information on pressure fluctuation at the scramjet wall. In both of the mass and heat release driven unstart cases, it is observed that there are similar flow transient and quasi-steady behaviors of unstart shockwave system during the unstart processes. Combustion driven unstart induces severe oscillatory flow motions of the jet and the unstart shock at the lip of the scramjet inlet after the completion of the unstart process, while the unstarted flow induced by solely mass addition remains relatively steady. The discrepancies between the processes of mass and heat release driven unstart are explained by flow choking mechanism.

  13. Roles of intracellular Ca2+ and cyclic AMP in mast cell histamine release induced by radiographic contrast media.

    Saito, Mami; Itoh, Yoshinori; Yano, Takahisa; Sendo, Toshiaki; Goromaru, Takeshi; Sakai, Naoko; Oishi, Ryozo

    2003-04-01

    Mast cell histamine release is considered to be associated with the etiology of anaphylactoid reactions to iodinated radiographic contrast media (RCM). In the present study, the effects of various ionic and non-ionic RCM on histamine release from mast cells were compared, and the possible mechanisms of the histamine release were subsequently determined. Both ionic (ioxaglate and amidotrizoate) and non-ionic (iohexol, ioversol, iomeprol, iopamidol and iotrolan) RCM increased histamine release from the dissociated rat pulmonary cells, whereby ionic materials were more potent than non-ionic agents. There was no significant correlation between the extent of histamine release and the osmolarity of each RCM solution. In addition, hyperosmotic mannitol solution (1000 mOsm/kg) caused no marked histamine release. Thus, it is unlikely that the hyperosmolarity of RCM solutions contributes to the histamine release. RCM also stimulated, but to a lesser extent, the histamine release from rat peritoneal cells. The RCM-induced histamine release from both types of cells was inhibited by dibutyl cyclic AMP or combined treatment with forskolin and 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine. Corresponding to these results, RCM markedly reduced the cellular cyclic AMP content. On the other hand, the removal of intracellular but not the extracellular Ca2+ attenuated the RCM-induced mast cell histamine release. From these findings, it is suggested that the decrease in cellular cyclic AMP content and an increase in intracellular Ca2+ contribute at least in part to the RCM-induced mast cell histamine release. PMID:12690428

  14. The proapoptotic protein BNIP3 interacts with VDAC to induce mitochondrial release of endonuclease G.

    Xiaosha Zhang

    Full Text Available BNIP3 is a proapoptotic protein that induces cell death through a mitochondria-mediated pathway. We reported previously that mitochondrial localization of BNIP3 and translocation of EndoG from mitochondria to the nucleus are critical steps of the BNIP3 pathway. It is not clear, however, that how BNIP3 interacts with mitochondria. Here we show that expression of BNIP3 resulted in mitochondrial release and nuclear translocation of EndoG. Incubation of a recombinant GST-BNIP3 protein with freshly isolated mitochondria led to the integration of BNIP3 into mitochondria, reduction in the levels of EndoG in mitochondria and the presence of EndoG in the supernatant that was able to cleave chromatin DNA. Co-immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry analysis reveals that BNIP3 interacted with the voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC to increase opening probabilities of mitochondrial permeability transition (PT pores and induce mitochondrial release of EndoG. Blocking VDAC with a VDAC antibody largely abolished mitochondrial localization of BNIP3 and prevented EndoG release. Together, the data identify VDAC as an interacting partner of BNIP3 and support endonuclease G as a mediator of the BNIP3 pathway.

  15. The Effects of Exercise-induced Fatigue on Acetylcholinesterase Expression and Activity at Rat Neuromuscular Junctions

    Wen, Guo; Hui, Wang; Dan, Chen; Xiao-Qiong, Wu; Jian-Bin, Tong; Chang-Qi, Li; De-Liang, Lei; Wei-Jun, Cai; Zhi-Yuan, Li; Xue-Gang, Luo

    2009-01-01

    Acetylcholinesterase is the enzyme that terminates neurotransmission by hydrolyzing the acetylcholine released by the motoneurons at the neuromuscular junctions. Although acetylcholinesterase has been studied for almost a century, the underlying relationship between exercise-induced fatigue and acetylcholinesterase activity at the synaptic cleft is not clear. The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of exercise-induced fatigue on the expression and activity of acetylcholinesterase ...

  16. Is Liver Enzyme Release Really Associated with Cell Necrosis Induced by Oxidant Stress?

    Martha Lucinda Contreras-Zentella

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepatic diseases are a major concern worldwide. Increased specific plasma enzyme activities are considered diagnostic features for liver diseases, since enzymes are released into the blood compartment following the deterioration of the organ. Release of liver mitochondrial enzymes is considered strong evidence for hepatic necrosis, which is associated with an increased production of ROS, often leading to greater hepatic lipid peroxidation. Lipotoxic mediators and intracellular signals activated Kupffer cells, which provides evidence strongly suggesting the participation of oxidant stress in acute liver damage, inducing the progression of liver injury to chronic liver damage. Elevated transaminase activities are considered as an index marker of hepatotoxicity, linked to oxidant stress. However, a drastic increase of serum activities of liver enzyme markers ought not necessarily to reflect liver cell death. In fact, increased serum levels of cytoplasmic enzymes have readily been observed after partial hepatectomy (PH in the regenerating liver of rats. In this regard, we are now showing that in vitro modifications of the oxidant status affect differentially the release of liver enzymes, indicating that this release is a strictly controlled event and not directly related to the onset of oxidant stress of the liver.

  17. Mechanisms of the induction of apoptosis mediated by radiation-induced cytokine release

    The aim of the present work was to investigate the mechanisms of radiation-induced bystander signalling leading to apoptosis in non-irradiated co-cultured cells. Cultured non-transformed cells were irradiated, and the effect on the apoptosis rate on co-cultured non-irradiated malignant cells was determined. For this, two different levels of the investigation are presented, i.e. release of signalling proteins and transcriptomic profiling of the irradiated and non-irradiated co-cultured cells. Concerning the signalling proteins, in this study, the attention was focussed on the release of the active and latent forms of the transforming growth factor-β1 protein. Moreover, global gene expression profiles of non-transformed and transformed cells in untreated co-cultures were compared with those of 0.5-Gy-irradiated non-transformed cells co-cultured with the transformed cells. The results show an effect of radiation on the release of signalling proteins in the medium, although no significant differences in release rates were detectable when varying the doses in the range from 0.25 to 1 Gy. Moreover, gene expression results suggest an effect of radiation on both cell populations, pointing out specific signalling pathways that might be involved in the enhanced induction of apoptosis. (authors)

  18. The effect of sodium ions on the light-induced 86Rb release from the isolated crayfish retina

    The effect of low external Na+ concentrations on the light-induced K+ release from crayfish photoreceptor cells was tested by labelling intracellular K+ with the isotope 86Rb. The amount of isotope released per light, stimulus is roughly proportional to the external Na+ concentration if the osmolarity is kept constant by replacing Na+ with Tris, choline or sucrose. When sucrose is used to replace the depleted Na+ the light-induced K+ release is a linear function of the external Na+ concentration and is reduced by approx. 95% at an external Na+ concentration of 5 mmol/l. For choline and Tris substitutions the relationships are less clear but at Na+ concentrations + release is smaller in a Tris solution and larger in a choline solution. It is suggested that the light-induced K+ release is due mainly to an activation of voltage sensitive K+ channels. (orig.)

  19. High K+-induced contraction requires depolarization-induced Ca2+ release from internal stores in rat gut smooth muscle

    Timo KIRSCHSTEIN; Mirko REHBERG; Rika BAJORAT; Tursonjan TOKAY; Katrin PORATH; Rudiger KOHLING

    2009-01-01

    Aim: Depolarization-induced contraction of smooth muscle is thought to be mediated by Ca2+influx through voltage-gated L-type Ca2+channels. We describe a novel contraction mechanism that is independent of Ca2+ entry.Methods: Pharmacological experiments were carried out on isolated rat gut longitudinal smooth muscle preparations, measuring iso-metric contraction strength upon high K+-induced depolarization.Results: Treatment with verapamil, which presumably leads to a conformational change in the channel, completely abolished K+-induced contraction, while residual contraction still occurred when Ca2+ entry was blocked with Cd2+. These results were further con-firmed by measuring intracellular Ca2+ transients using Fura-2. Co-application of Cd2+ and the ryanodine receptor blocker DHBP further reduced contraction, albeit incompletely. Additional blockage of either phospholipase C (U 73122) or inositol 1,4,5-trisphophate (IP3)receptors (2-APB) abolished most contractions, while sole application of these blockers and Cd2+ (without parallel ryanodine receptor manipulation) also resulted in incomplete contraction block.Conclusion: We conclude that there are parallel mechanisms of depolarization-induced smooth muscle contraction via (a) Ca2+ entry and (b) Ca2+ entry-independent, depolarization-induced Ca2+-release through ryanodine receptors and IP3, with the latter being depen-dent on phospholipase C activation.

  20. Metabolism of acetylcholine in human erythrocytes

    In order to examine the possible role of erythrocyte acetylcholinesterase in the maintenance of membrane phospholipid content and membrane fluidity, experiments were performed to monitor the activity of the enzyme and follow the fate of one of its hydrolytic products, choline. Intact human erythrocytes were incubated with acetylcholine (choline methyl-14C). The incubation resulted in the hydrolysis of acetylcholine to acetate and choline; the reaction was catalyzed by membrane acetylcholinesterase. The studies demonstrate the further metabolism of choline. Experiments were carried out to determine rate of hydrolysis of acetylcholine, uptake of choline, identification of intracellular metabolites of choline, and identification of radiolabeled membrane components. Erythrocytes at a 25% hematocrit were incubated in an isoosmotic bicarbonate buffer pH 7.4, containing glucose, adenosine, streptomycin and penicillin with 0.3 μCi of acetylcholine (choline methyl-14C), for 24 hours. Aliquots of the erythrocyte suspension were taken throughout for analysis. Erythrocytes were washed free of excess substrate, lysed, and the hemolysate was extracted for choline and its metabolites. Blank samples containing incubation buffer and radiolabeled acetylcholine only, and erythrocyte hemolysate extracts were analyzed for choline content, the difference between blank samples and hemolysate extracts was the amount of choline originating from acetylcholine and attributable to acetylcholinesterase activity. The conversion of choline to 14C-betaine is noted after several minutes of incubation; at 30 minutes, more than 80% of 14C-choline is taken up and after several hours, detectable levels of radiolabeled S-adenosylmethionine were present in the hemolysate extract

  1. Changes in presynaptic release, but not reuptake, of bioamines induced by long-term antidepressant treatment

    This paper describes an investigation into the effect of long-term administration of antidepressants on neuronal uptake of NA and 5-HT and on their release, induced by electrical stimulation, in rat brain slices. The effects of the test substances on neuronal uptake of 14C-NA and 3H-5-HT by the slices was investigated. Values of IC50 and EC2 were found and compared in the experiments and control. The inhibitory effect of clonidine (10-4 M) and of 5-HT (10-5 M) on presynaptic release of 14C-NA and 3H-5-HT also was studied in brain slices from intact rats and rats treated for two weeks with antidepressants

  2. Facilitation of acetylcholine signaling by the dithiocarbamate fungicide propineb.

    Marinovich, Marina; Viviani, Barbara; Capra, Valerie; Corsini, Emanuela; Anselmi, Laura; D'Agostino, Gianluigi; Di Nucci, Amalia; Binaglia, Marco; Tonini, Marcello; Galli, Corrado L

    2002-01-01

    Dithiocarbamates (DTCs) are used mainly in agriculture as pesticides and as alcohol deterrent drugs. Neurological complications as well as movement disorders characterized by plastic rigidity, muscle twitch and paralysis are the prevailing symptoms in chronically exposed animals and humans. We investigated whether propineb interfered with peripheral cholinergic transmission in various isolated model systems. In electrically stimulated longitudinal muscle-myenteric plexus preparations (LMMPs), propineb (0.01-1000 nM) concentration-dependently enhanced the amplitude of both neurogenic twitch contractions and tritiated acetylcholine ([3H]ACh) release. The maximum percent increase was achieved by 10 nM propineb and was 19% and 14%, respectively. The effect on twitch contractions was partially antagonized by hexamethonium, a ganglionic nicotinic receptor blocker. In unstimulated LMMPs, propineb (10 pM, 10 nM, 10 microM) did not affect contractions to applied acetylcholine (ACh; 1 nM-10 microM), a finding indicating that propineb has no anticholinesterase activity. In human neuroblastoma cells (SH-SY5Y), propineb facilitated ACh release evoked by KCl depolarization. The increase in ACh release was not associated with detectable alterations of intracellular Ca2+([Ca2+]i) homeostasis. Binding studies carried out with alpha-bungarotoxin in striated muscle cells (L6) failed to demonstrate any influence of propineb on both affinity and capacity of skeletal muscle nicotinic receptors. In conclusion, propineb was found to interfere with cholinergic transmission in LMMPs and SH-SY5Y cells. In LMMPs, the potentiation of cholinergic transmission is partly dependent on the activation of ganglionic nicotinic receptors. Other targets relevant to cholinergic transmission seem not to be affected by propineb. PMID:11800594

  3. Analogues of neuroactive polyamine wasp toxins that lack inner basic sites exhibit enhanced antagonism toward a muscle-type mammalian nicotinic acetylcholine receptor

    Stromgaard, K; Brierley, M J; Andersen, K; Sløk, F A; Mellor, I R; Usherwood, P N; Krogsgaard-Larsen, P; Jaroszewski, J W

    1999-01-01

    noncompetitively antagonized the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) in a concentration-, time-, and voltage-dependent manner. The amplitudes of acetylcholine-induced currents were compared at their peaks and at the end of a 1 s application in the presence or absence of the analogues. Most of the analogues...... properties (stepwise macroscopic pK(a) values) were determined by (13)C NMR titrations. All analogues are fully protonated at physiological pH. The effects of these compounds on acetylcholine-induced currents in TE671 cells clamped at various holding potentials were determined. All of the analogues...

  4. Anandamide induces sperm release from oviductal epithelia through nitric oxide pathway in bovines.

    Claudia Osycka-Salut

    Full Text Available Mammalian spermatozoa are not able to fertilize an egg immediately upon ejaculation. They acquire this ability during their transit through the female genital tract in a process known as capacitation. The mammalian oviduct acts as a functional sperm reservoir providing a suitable environment that allows the maintenance of sperm fertilization competence until ovulation occurs. After ovulation, spermatozoa are gradually released from the oviductal reservoir in the caudal isthmus and ascend to the site of fertilization. Capacitating-related changes in sperm plasma membrane seem to be responsible for sperm release from oviductal epithelium. Anandamide is a lipid mediator that participates in the regulation of several female and male reproductive functions. Previously we have demonstrated that anandamide was capable to release spermatozoa from oviductal epithelia by induction of sperm capacitation in bovines. In the present work we studied whether anandamide might exert its effect by activating the nitric oxide (NO pathway since this molecule has been described as a capacitating agent in spermatozoa from different species. First, we demonstrated that 1 µM NOC-18, a NO donor, and 10 mM L-Arginine, NO synthase substrate, induced the release of spermatozoa from the oviductal epithelia. Then, we observed that the anandamide effect on sperm oviduct interaction was reversed by the addition of 1 µM L-NAME, a NO synthase inhibitor, or 30 µg/ml Hemoglobin, a NO scavenger. We also demonstrated that the induction of bull sperm capacitation by nanomolar concentrations of R(+-methanandamide or anandamide was inhibited by adding L-NAME or Hemoglobin. To study whether anandamide is able to produce NO, we measured this compound in both sperm and oviductal cells. We observed that anandamide increased the levels of NO in spermatozoa, but not in oviductal cells. These findings suggest that anandamide regulates the sperm release from oviductal epithelia probably by

  5. Compound 48/80-induced serotonin release from brain mast cells

    Lambracht-Hall, M.; Marathias, K.P.; Theoharides, T.C.

    1986-03-01

    Mast cells secrete a variety of potent mediators and are mostly known to participate in allergic reactions. Here the authors report that perfused brain mast cells can take up and release serotonin (5-HT) in response to compound 48/80. Thalamic or hypothalamic slices were loaded with /sup 3/H-5-HT (5 x 10/sup -7/M, for 12 min at 37/sup 0/C), washed and placed in individual 2 ml-perfusion wells. A Krebs-Ringer bicarbonate buffer with 1 x 10/sup -6/M imipramine (KRB + IMI) saturated with 5% CO/sub 2//95% O/sub 2/ at 37/sup 0/C and pH 7.4, was used throughout at a perfusion rate of 1 ml/min. After a 60 min wash in KRB + IMI, with or without Ca/sup +2/ + 0.1 M EDTA, the slices were perfused for 45 min with 100 ..mu..g/ml compound 48/80 with or without Ca/sup +2/. The tissue was washed for 30 min as before and then perfused with high K/sup +/ KRB (40mM KCl) for 45 min to induce neuronal depolarization. Finally, calcium was restored to Ca/sup +2/-depleted tissues and all samples were again perfused for 45 min with high K/sup +/ KRB. The first 5-HT peak due to 48/80-induced mast cell release was independent of extracellular Ca/sup +2/, while the second 5-HT peak due to high K/sup +/ was not. These studies indicate that the 48/80-induced 5-HT release was not of neuronal origin and that brain mast cells can utilize intracellular Ca/sup +2/, much like their peritoneal counterparts. The authors are now studying brain mast cells secretion in response to neuropeptides.

  6. Development and Optimization of a Novel Prolonged Release Formulation to Resist Alcohol-Induced Dose Dumping.

    Gujjar, Chaitanya Yogananda; Rallabandi, Balaramesha Chary; Gannu, Ramesh; Deulkar, Vallabh Subashrao

    2016-04-01

    Alcohol-induced dose dumping is a serious concern for the orally administered prolonged release dosage forms. The study was designed to optimize the independent variables, propylene glycol alginate (PGA), Eudragit RS PO (ERS) and coating in mucoadhesive quetiapine prolonged release tablets 200 mg required for preventing the alcohol-induced dose dumping. Optimal design based on response surface methodology was employed for the optimization of the composition. The formulations are evaluated for in vitro drug release in hydrochloric acid alone and with 40% v/v ethanol. The responses, dissolution at 120 min without alcohol (R1) and dissolution at 120 min with alcohol (R2), were statistically evaluated and regression equations are generated. PGA as a hydrophilic polymeric matrix was dumping the dose when dissolutions are carried in 0.1 N hydrochloric acid containing 40% v/v ethanol. ERS addition was giving structural support to the swelling and gelling property of PGA, and thus, was reducing the PGA erosion in dissolution media containing ethanol. Among the formulations, four formulations with diverse composition were meeting the target dissolution (30-40%) in both the conditions. The statistical validity of the mathematical equations was established, and the optimum concentration of the factors was established. Validation of the study with six confirmatory runs indicated high degree of prognostic ability of response surface methodology. Further coating with ReadiLycoat was providing an additional resistance to the alcohol-induced dose dumping. Optimized compositions showed resistance to dose dumping in the presence of alcohol. PMID:26162975

  7. Sulfhydryl oxidation overrides Mg(2+) inhibition of calcium-induced calcium release in skeletal muscle triads.

    Donoso, P; Aracena, P; Hidalgo, C.

    2000-01-01

    We studied the effect of oxidation of sulfhydryl (SH) residues on the inhibition by Mg(2+) of calcium-induced calcium release (CICR) in triad-enriched sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles isolated from rabbit skeletal muscle. Vesicles were either passively or actively loaded with calcium before eliciting CICR by dilution at pCa 4.6-4.4 in the presence of 1.2 mM free [ATP] and variable free [Mg(2+)]. Native triads exhibited a significant inhibition of CICR by Mg(2+), with a K(0.5) approximately 50 ...

  8. The impact of an endurance training programme on exercise-induced cardiac biomarker release

    López Arrese, Alejandro; López Laval, Isaac; GEORGE, Keith; Puente Lanzarote, Juan José; Mayolas Pi, María del Carmen; Serrano Ostáriz, Enrique; Revilla Martí, Pablo; Moliner Urdiales, Diego; Reverter Masià, Joaquín

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated the influence of a 14-wk endurance running program on the exercise-induced release of high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T (hscTnT) and NH2-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP). Fifty-eight untrained participants were randomized to supervised endurance exercise (14 wk, 3–4 days/wk, 120–240 min/wk, 65–85% of maximum heart rate) or a control group. At baseline and after the training program, hs-cTnT and NT-proBNP were assessed before and 5 min, 1 h, 3 h, 6 h, 12 h, ...

  9. Striatal dopamine release induced by repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation over dorsolateral prefrontal cortex: effect of aging

    We previously demonstrated dopamine (DA) release in the bilateral striatal regions following prefrontal repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) in young subjects. Several lines of evidence support substantial age-related changes in human dopaminergic neurotransmission. One possible explanation is alteration of cortico striatal neural connection with aging. Therefore, we investigated how frontal activation by rTMS influences striatal DA release in the elderly with SPECT measurements of striatal binding of [123I]iodobenzamide (lBZM), a DA D2 receptor radioligand that is sensitive to endogenous DA. Five healthy elderly male subjects (age, 64 3 y) were studied with brain [123I]IBZM SPECT under three conditions (resting, sham stimulation, and active rTMS over left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC)), while receiving a bolus plus constant infusion of [123I]IBZM. rTMS session consisted of three blocks. In each block, 15 trains of 2 sec duration were delivered with 10 Hz stimulation frequency and 100% motor threshold. Striatal V3', calculated as (striatal - occipital)/occipital radioactivity, was measured under equilibrium condition at baseline and after sham and active rTMS. Sham stimulation did not affect striatal V3'. rTMS over left DLPFC induced no significant change in V3' in the right striatum compared with baseline condition (0.91 0.25 vs. 0.96 0.25, P = NS). Interestingly, left striatal V3' showed a significant increase after rTMS over left DLPFC compared with sham condition (1.09 0.33 vs. 0.93 0.27, P < 0.05; 17.0 11.1% increase). These results are discrepant from previous ones from young subjects, who showed frontal rTMS-induced reduction of striatal V3', indicating rTMS-induced striatal DA release. We found no significant striatal DA release induced by rTMS over DLPFC in healthy elderly subjects using in vivo binding competition techniques. These results may support an altered cortico striatal circuit in normal aging

  10. Lysophosphatidate induces chemo-resistance by releasing breast cancer cells from taxol-induced mitotic arrest.

    Nasser Samadi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Taxol is a microtubule stabilizing agent that arrests cells in mitosis leading to cell death. Taxol is widely used to treat breast cancer, but resistance occurs in 25-69% of patients and it is vital to understand how Taxol resistance develops to improve chemotherapy. The effects of chemotherapeutic agents are overcome by survival signals that cancer cells receive. We focused our studies on autotaxin, which is a secreted protein that increases tumor growth, aggressiveness, angiogenesis and metastasis. We discovered that autotaxin strongly antagonizes the Taxol-induced killing of breast cancer and melanoma cells by converting the abundant extra-cellular lipid, lysophosphatidylcholine, into lysophosphatidate. This lipid stimulates specific G-protein coupled receptors that activate survival signals. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study we determined the basis of these antagonistic actions of lysophosphatidate towards Taxol-induced G2/M arrest and cell death using cultured breast cancer cells. Lysophosphatidate does not antagonize Taxol action in MCF-7 cells by increasing Taxol metabolism or its expulsion through multi-drug resistance transporters. Lysophosphatidate does not lower the percentage of cells accumulating in G2/M by decreasing exit from S-phase or selective stimulation of cell death in G2/M. Instead, LPA had an unexpected and remarkable action in enabling MCF-7 and MDA-MB-468 cells, which had been arrested in G2/M by Taxol, to normalize spindle structure and divide, thus avoiding cell death. This action involves displacement of Taxol from the tubulin polymer fraction, which based on inhibitor studies, depends on activation of LPA receptors and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This work demonstrates a previously unknown consequence of lysophosphatidate action that explains why autotaxin and lysophosphatidate protect against Taxol-induced cell death and promote resistance to the action of this