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Sample records for acetylcholine receptor antagonists

  1. Synthesis and pharmacological evaluation of DHβE analogs as neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor antagonists

    Jepsen, Tue H.; Jensen, Anders A.; Lund, Mads Henrik; Glibstrup, Emil; Kristensen, Jesper Langgaard

    2014-01-01

    Dihydro-β-erythroidine (DHβE) is a member of the Erythrina family of alkaloids and a potent competitive antagonist of the α4β2-subtype of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). Guided by an X-ray structure of DHβE in complex with an ACh binding protein, we detail the design, synthesis, and...

  2. Tying up Nicotine: New Selective Competitive Antagonist of the Neuronal Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors

    Petersen, Ida Nymann; Crestey, François; Jensen, Anders A; Indurthi, Dinesh C; Pedersen, Henrik; Andreasen, Jesper T; Balle, Thomas; Kristensen, Jesper L

    2015-01-01

    Conformational restriction of the pyrrolidine nitrogen in nicotine by the introduction of an ethylene bridge provided a potent and selective antagonist of the α4β2-subtype of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. Resolution by chiral SFC, pharmacological characterization of the two enantiomers...

  3. Catharanthine alkaloids are noncompetitive antagonists of muscle-type nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Arias, Hugo R; Feuerbach, Dominik; Targowska-Duda, Katarzyna M; Jozwiak, Krzysztof

    2010-09-01

    We compared the interaction of several catharanthine alkaloids including, ibogaine, vincristine, and vinblastine, with that for the noncompetitive antagonist phencyclidine (PCP) at muscle nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) in different conformational states. The results established that catharanthine alkaloids: (a) inhibit, in a noncompetitive manner, (+/-)-epibatidine-induced Ca(2+) influx in TE671-halpha1beta1gammadelta cells with similar potencies (IC(50)=17-25microM), (b) inhibit [(3)H]TCP binding to the desensitized Torpedo AChR with higher affinity compared to the resting AChR, and (c) enhance [(3)H]cytisine binding to resting but activatable Torpedo AChRs, suggesting desensitizing properties. Interestingly, PCP inhibits [(3)H]ibogaine binding to the AChR in a steric fashion. This is corroborated by additional docking experiments indicating that the amino groups of neutral ibogaine form hydrogen bonds with the serine ring (position 6'), a location shared with PCP. Since protonated ibogaine forms a salt bridge with one of the acidic residues at the outer ring (position 20'), this ligand could be first attracted to the entrance of the channel by electrostatic interactions. Our data indicate that the catharanthine moiety is a minimum structural requirement for AChR inhibition including, ion channel blocking and desensitization, and that ibogaine and PCP bind to overlapping sites in the desensitized AChR ion channel. PMID:20493225

  4. Effect of α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonists and antagonists on motor function in mice

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are ligand-gated cation channels found throughout the body, and serve to mediate diverse physiological functions. Muscle-type nAChRs located in the motor endplate region of muscle fibers play an integral role in muscle contraction and thus motor function. The toxicity and teratogenicity of many plants (which results in millions of dollars in losses annually to the livestock industry) are due to various toxins that bind to nAChRs including deltaline and methyllycaconitine (MLA) from larkspur (Delphinium) species, and nicotine and anabasine from tobacco (Nicotiana) species. The primary result of the actions of these alkaloids at nAChRs is neuromuscular paralysis and respiratory failure. The objective of this study was to further characterize the motor coordination deficiencies that occur upon exposure to a non-lethal dose of nAChR antagonists MLA and deltaline as well as nAChR agonists nicotine and anabasine. We evaluated the effect of nAChR agonists and antagonists on the motor function and coordination in mice using a balance beam, grip strength meter, rotarod, open field analysis and tremor monitor. These analyses demonstrated that within seconds after treatment the mice had significant loss of motor function and coordination that lasted up to 1 min, followed by a short period of quiescence. Recovery to normal muscle coordination was rapid, typically within approximately 10 min post-dosing. However, mice treated with the nAChR agonist nicotine and anabasine required a slightly longer time to recover some aspects of normal muscle function in comparison to mice treated with the nAChR antagonist MLA or deltaline. -- Highlights: ► Mice treated with nAChR agonists and antagonists have a loss in motor function. ► These deficits are temporary as near normal motor function returns within 10 min. ► There are compound-specific differences in the effects on motor function.

  5. Solid-phase synthesis and pharmacological evaluation of analogues of PhTX-12-A potent and selective nicotinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist

    Strømgaard, Kristian; Mellor, Ian R; Andersen, Kim;

    2002-01-01

    Philanthotoxin-12 (PhTX-12) is a novel potent and selective, noncompetitive antagonist of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). Homologues of PhTX-12 with 7-11 methylene groups between the primary amino group and the aromatic head-group were synthesized using solid-phase methodology. In vit...

  6. Solution structure of α-conotoxin PIA, a novel antagonist of α6 subunit containing nicotinic acetylcholine receptors

    α-Conotoxin PIA is a novel nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) antagonist isolated from Conus purpurascens that targets nAChR subtypes containing α6 and α3 subunits. α-conotoxin PIA displays 75-fold higher affinity for rat α6/α3β2β3 nAChRs than for rat α3β2 nAChRs. We have determined the three-dimensional structure of α-conotoxin PIA by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The α-conotoxin PIA has an 'ω-shaped' overall topology as other α4/7 subfamily conotoxins. Yet, unlike other neuronally targeted α4/7-conotoxins, its N-terminal tail Arg1-Asp2-Pro3 protrudes out of its main molecular body because Asp2-Pro3-Cys4-Cys5 forms a stable type I β-turn. In addition, a kink introduced by Pro15 in the second loop of this toxin provides a distinct steric and electrostatic environment from those in α-conotoxins MII and GIC. By comparing the structure of α-conotoxin PIA with other functionally related α-conotoxins we suggest structural features in α-conotoxin PIA that may be associated with its unique receptor recognition profile

  7. Different interaction between the agonist JN403 and the competitive antagonist methyllycaconitine with the human alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor.

    Arias, Hugo R; Gu, Ruo-Xu; Feuerbach, Dominik; Wei, Dong-Qing

    2010-05-18

    The interaction of the agonist JN403 with the human (h) alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR) was compared to that for the competitive antagonist methyllycaconitine (MLA). The receptor selectivity of JN403 was studied on the halpha7, halpha3beta4, and halpha4beta2 AChRs. The results established that the cationic center and the hydrophobic group found in JN430 and MLA are important for the interaction with the AChRs. MLA preincubation inhibits JN403-induced Ca(2+) influx in GH3-halpha7 cells with a potency 160-fold higher than that when MLA is co-injected with JN403. The most probable explanation, based on our dynamics results, is that MLA (more specifically the 3-methyl-2,5-dioxopyrrole ring and the B-D rings) stabilizes the resting conformational state. The order of receptor specificity for JN403 is as follows: halpha7 > halpha3beta4 ( approximately 40-fold) > halpha4beta2 ( approximately 500-fold). This specificity is based on a larger number of hydrogen bonds between the carbamate group (another pharmacophore) of JN403 and the halpha7 sites, the electrostatic repulsion between the positively charged residues around the halpha3beta4 sites and the cationic center of JN403, fewer hydrogen bonds for the interaction of JN403 with the halpha3beta4 AChR, and an unfavorable van der Waals interaction between JN403 and the alpha4-beta2 interface. The higher receptor specificity for JN403 could be important for the treatment of alpha7-related disorders, including dementias, pain-related ailments, depression, anxiety, and wound healing. PMID:20377277

  8. Effect of α{sub 7} nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonists and antagonists on motor function in mice

    Welch, Kevin D., E-mail: kevin.welch@ars.usda.gov [USDA/ARS Poisonous Plant Research Laboratory, 1150 E. 1400N., Logan, UT 84341 (United States); Pfister, James A. [USDA/ARS Poisonous Plant Research Laboratory, 1150 E. 1400N., Logan, UT 84341 (United States); Lima, Flavia G. [Federal University of Goías, School of Veterinary Medicine, Goiânia, Goías (Brazil); Green, Benedict T.; Gardner, Dale R. [USDA/ARS Poisonous Plant Research Laboratory, 1150 E. 1400N., Logan, UT 84341 (United States)

    2013-02-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are ligand-gated cation channels found throughout the body, and serve to mediate diverse physiological functions. Muscle-type nAChRs located in the motor endplate region of muscle fibers play an integral role in muscle contraction and thus motor function. The toxicity and teratogenicity of many plants (which results in millions of dollars in losses annually to the livestock industry) are due to various toxins that bind to nAChRs including deltaline and methyllycaconitine (MLA) from larkspur (Delphinium) species, and nicotine and anabasine from tobacco (Nicotiana) species. The primary result of the actions of these alkaloids at nAChRs is neuromuscular paralysis and respiratory failure. The objective of this study was to further characterize the motor coordination deficiencies that occur upon exposure to a non-lethal dose of nAChR antagonists MLA and deltaline as well as nAChR agonists nicotine and anabasine. We evaluated the effect of nAChR agonists and antagonists on the motor function and coordination in mice using a balance beam, grip strength meter, rotarod, open field analysis and tremor monitor. These analyses demonstrated that within seconds after treatment the mice had significant loss of motor function and coordination that lasted up to 1 min, followed by a short period of quiescence. Recovery to normal muscle coordination was rapid, typically within approximately 10 min post-dosing. However, mice treated with the nAChR agonist nicotine and anabasine required a slightly longer time to recover some aspects of normal muscle function in comparison to mice treated with the nAChR antagonist MLA or deltaline. -- Highlights: ► Mice treated with nAChR agonists and antagonists have a loss in motor function. ► These deficits are temporary as near normal motor function returns within 10 min. ► There are compound-specific differences in the effects on motor function.

  9. Design, synthesis and biological evaluation of Erythrina alkaloid analogues as neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor antagonists

    Crestey, François; Jensen, Anders A.; Borch, Morten;

    2013-01-01

    -selective antagonists for the nAChRs and thereby probe the potential of using these natural products as scaffolds for further ligand optimization. The most selective and potent nAChR ligand to come from the series, 6,7-dimethoxy-2-methyl-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinoline (3c) (also a natural product by the name of O...

  10. Nicotine ameliorates NMDA receptor antagonist-induced deficits in contextual fear conditioning through high-affinity nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in the hippocampus.

    André, Jessica M; Leach, Prescott T; Gould, Thomas J

    2011-03-01

    NMDA glutamate receptors (NMDARs) and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are both involved in learning and synaptic plasticity. Increasing evidence suggests processes mediated by these receptors may interact to modulate learning; however, little is known about the neural substrates involved in these interactive processes. The present studies investigated the effects of nicotine on MK-801 hydrogen maleate (MK-801) and DL-2-Amino-5-phosphonovaleric acid (APV)-induced disruption of contextual fear conditioning in male C57BL/6J mice, using direct drug infusion and selective nAChR antagonists to define the brain regions and the nAChR subtypes involved. Mice treated with MK-801 showed a deficit in contextual fear conditioning that was ameliorated by nicotine. Direct drug infusion demonstrated that the NMDAR antagonists disrupted hippocampal function and that nicotine acted in the dorsal hippocampus to ameliorate the deficit in learning. The high-affinity nAChR antagonist Dihydro-β-erythroidine hydrobromide (DhβE) blocked the effects of nicotine on MK-801-induced deficits while the α7 nAChR antagonist methyllycaconitine citrate salt hydrate (MLA) did not. These results suggest that NMDARs and nAChRs may mediate similar hippocampal processes involved in contextual fear conditioning. Furthermore, these results may have implications for developing effective therapeutics for the cognitive deficits associated with schizophrenia because a large subset of patients with schizophrenia exhibit cognitive deficits that may be related to NMDAR dysfunction and smoke at much higher rates than the healthy population, which may be an attempt to ameliorate cognitive deficits. PMID:21167848

  11. Nicotine Ameliorates NMDA Receptor Antagonist-Induced Deficits in Contextual Fear Conditioning through High Affinity Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors in the Hippocampus

    André, Jessica M.; Leach, Prescott T.; Gould, Thomas J.

    2010-01-01

    NMDA glutamate receptors (NMDARs) and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are both involved in learning and synaptic plasticity. Increasing evidence suggests processes mediated by these receptors may interact to modulate learning; however, little is known about the neural substrates involved in these interactive processes. The present studies investigated the effects of nicotine on MK-801 hydrogen maleate (MK-801) and DL-2-Amino-5-phosphonovaleric acid (APV) induced disruption of conte...

  12. The non-competitive acetylcholinesterase inhibitor APS12-2 is a potent antagonist of skeletal muscle nicotinic acetylcholine receptors

    Grandič, Marjana [Institute of Physiology, Pharmacology and Toxicology, Veterinary Faculty, University of Ljubljana, Gerbičeva 60, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Aráoz, Romulo; Molgó, Jordi [CNRS, Institut de Neurobiologie Alfred Fessard, FRC 2118, Laboratoire de Neurobiologie et Développement, UPR 3294, F-91198 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Turk, Tom; Sepčić, Kristina [Department of Biology, Biotechnical Faculty, University of Ljubljana, Večna pot 111, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Benoit, Evelyne [CNRS, Institut de Neurobiologie Alfred Fessard, FRC 2118, Laboratoire de Neurobiologie et Développement, UPR 3294, F-91198 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Frangež, Robert, E-mail: robert.frangez@vf.uni-lj.si [Institute of Physiology, Pharmacology and Toxicology, Veterinary Faculty, University of Ljubljana, Gerbičeva 60, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2012-12-01

    APS12-2, a non-competitive acetylcholinesterase inhibitor, is one of the synthetic analogs of polymeric alkylpyridinium salts (poly-APS) isolated from the marine sponge Reniera sarai. In the present work the effects of APS12-2 were studied on isolated mouse phrenic nerve–hemidiaphragm muscle preparations, using twitch tension measurements and electrophysiological recordings. APS12-2 in a concentration-dependent manner blocked nerve-evoked isometric muscle contraction (IC{sub 50} = 0.74 μM), without affecting directly-elicited twitch tension up to 2.72 μM. The compound (0.007–3.40 μM) decreased the amplitude of miniature endplate potentials until a complete block by concentrations higher than 0.68 μM, without affecting their frequency. Full size endplate potentials, recorded after blocking voltage-gated muscle sodium channels, were inhibited by APS12-2 in a concentration-dependent manner (IC{sub 50} = 0.36 μM) without significant change in the resting membrane potential of the muscle fibers up to 3.40 μM. The compound also blocked acetylcholine-evoked inward currents in Xenopus oocytes in which Torpedo (α1{sub 2}β1γδ) muscle-type nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) have been incorporated (IC{sub 50} = 0.0005 μM), indicating a higher affinity of the compound for Torpedo (α1{sub 2}β1γδ) than for the mouse (α1{sub 2}β1γε) nAChR. Our data show for the first time that APS12-2 blocks neuromuscular transmission by a non-depolarizing mechanism through an action on postsynaptic nAChRs of the skeletal neuromuscular junction. -- Highlights: ► APS12-2 produces concentration-dependent inhibition of nerve-evoked muscle contraction in vitro. ► APS12-2 blocks MEPPs and EPPs at the neuromuscular junction. APS12-2 blocks ACh-activated current in Xenopus oocytes incorporated with Torpedo nAChRs.

  13. The non-competitive acetylcholinesterase inhibitor APS12-2 is a potent antagonist of skeletal muscle nicotinic acetylcholine receptors

    APS12-2, a non-competitive acetylcholinesterase inhibitor, is one of the synthetic analogs of polymeric alkylpyridinium salts (poly-APS) isolated from the marine sponge Reniera sarai. In the present work the effects of APS12-2 were studied on isolated mouse phrenic nerve–hemidiaphragm muscle preparations, using twitch tension measurements and electrophysiological recordings. APS12-2 in a concentration-dependent manner blocked nerve-evoked isometric muscle contraction (IC50 = 0.74 μM), without affecting directly-elicited twitch tension up to 2.72 μM. The compound (0.007–3.40 μM) decreased the amplitude of miniature endplate potentials until a complete block by concentrations higher than 0.68 μM, without affecting their frequency. Full size endplate potentials, recorded after blocking voltage-gated muscle sodium channels, were inhibited by APS12-2 in a concentration-dependent manner (IC50 = 0.36 μM) without significant change in the resting membrane potential of the muscle fibers up to 3.40 μM. The compound also blocked acetylcholine-evoked inward currents in Xenopus oocytes in which Torpedo (α12β1γδ) muscle-type nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) have been incorporated (IC50 = 0.0005 μM), indicating a higher affinity of the compound for Torpedo (α12β1γδ) than for the mouse (α12β1γε) nAChR. Our data show for the first time that APS12-2 blocks neuromuscular transmission by a non-depolarizing mechanism through an action on postsynaptic nAChRs of the skeletal neuromuscular junction. -- Highlights: ► APS12-2 produces concentration-dependent inhibition of nerve-evoked muscle contraction in vitro. ► APS12-2 blocks MEPPs and EPPs at the neuromuscular junction. APS12-2 blocks ACh-activated current in Xenopus oocytes incorporated with Torpedo nAChRs.

  14. Human Secreted Ly-6/uPAR Related Protein-1 (SLURP-1 Is a Selective Allosteric Antagonist of α7 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor.

    Ekaterina N Lyukmanova

    Full Text Available SLURP-1 is a secreted toxin-like Ly-6/uPAR protein found in epithelium, sensory neurons and immune cells. Point mutations in the slurp-1 gene cause the autosomal inflammation skin disease Mal de Meleda. SLURP-1 is considered an autocrine/paracrine hormone that regulates growth and differentiation of keratinocytes and controls inflammation and malignant cell transformation. The majority of previous studies of SLURP-1 have been made using fusion constructs containing, in addition to the native protein, extra polypeptide sequences. Here we describe the activity and pharmacological profile of a recombinant analogue of human SLURP-1 (rSLURP-1 differing from the native protein only by one additional N-terminal Met residue. rSLURP-1 significantly inhibited proliferation (up to ~ 40%, EC50 ~ 4 nM of human oral keratinocytes (Het-1A cells. Application of mecamylamine and atropine,--non-selective inhibitors of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs and muscarinic acetylcholine receptors, respectively, and anti-α7-nAChRs antibodies revealed α7 type nAChRs as an rSLURP-1 target in keratinocytes. Using affinity purification from human cortical extracts, we confirmed that rSLURP-1 binds selectively to the α7-nAChRs. Exposure of Xenopus oocytes expressing α7-nAChRs to rSLURP-1 caused a significant non-competitive inhibition of the response to acetylcholine (up to ~ 70%, IC50 ~ 1 μM. It was shown that rSLURP-1 binds to α7-nAChRs overexpressed in GH4Cl cells, but does not compete with 125I-α-bungarotoxin for binding to the receptor. These findings imply an allosteric antagonist-like mode of SLURP-1 interaction with α7-nAChRs outside the classical ligand-binding site. Contrary to rSLURP-1, other inhibitors of α7-nAChRs (mecamylamine, α-bungarotoxin and Lynx1 did not suppress the proliferation of keratinocytes. Moreover, the co-application of α-bungarotoxin with rSLURP-1 did not influence antiproliferative activity of the latter. This supports the

  15. Immunisation with Torpedo acetylcholine receptor.

    Elfman, L

    1984-01-01

    Acetylcholine mediates the transfer of information between neurons in the electric organ of, for example, Torpedo as well as in vertebrate skeletal muscle. The nicotinic acetylcholine receptor complex translates the binding of acetylcholine into ion permeability changes. This leads to an action potential in the muscle fibre. The nicotinic acetylcholine receptor protein has been purified from Torpedo by use of affinity chromatography. The receptor is an intrinsic membrane glycoprotein composed of five polypeptide chains. When various animals are immunised with the receptor they demonstrate clinical signs of severe muscle weakness coincident with high antibody titres in their sera. The symptoms resemble those found in the autoimmune neuromuscular disease myasthenia gravis in humans. This animal model has constituted a unique model for studying autoimmune diseases. This paper reviews some of the work using Torpedo acetylcholine receptor in order to increase the understanding of the motor nervous system function and myasthenia gravis. It is now known that the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor protein is the antigen involved in myasthenia gravis. The mechanism of immune damage involves a direct block of the receptor function. This depends on the presence of antibodies which crosslink the postsynaptic receptors leading to their degradation. The questions to be answered in the future are; (a) what initiates or triggers the autoimmune response, (b) how do the antibodies cause the symptoms--is there a steric hindrance of the interaction of acetylcholine and the receptor, (c) why is there not a strict relationship between antibody titre and severity of symptoms, and (d) why are some muscles affected and other spared? With help of the experimental model, answers to these questions may result in improved strategies for the treatment of the autoimmune disease myasthenia gravis. PMID:6097937

  16. Tubular crystals of acetylcholine receptor

    1984-01-01

    Well-ordered tubular crystals of acetylcholine receptor were obtained from suspensions of Torpedo marmorata receptor-rich vesicles. They are composed of pairs of oppositely oriented molecules arranged on the surface lattice with the symmetry of the plane group p2 (average unit cell dimensions: a = 90 A, b = 162 A, gamma = 117 degrees). The receptor in this lattice has an asymmetric distribution of mass around its perimeter, yet a regular pentagonal shape; thus its five transmembrane subunits ...

  17. Functional partial agonism at cloned human muscarinic acetylcholine receptors

    Bräuner-Osborne, Hans; Ebert, B; Brann, M R;

    1996-01-01

    of maximal response, depending on the molar ratio of agonist and antagonist used. Using recombinant human muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (m1 and m5) and the functional assay, receptor selection and amplification technology (R-SAT), we have now shown that co-administration of the full agonist...

  18. A synthetic combinatorial strategy for developing a-conotoxin analogs as potent a7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor antagonists

    Armishaw, Christopher J; Singh, Narender; Medina-Franco, Jose L; Clark, Richard J; Scott, Krystle C M; Houghten, Richard A; Jensen, Anders Asbjørn

    2010-01-01

    alpha-Conotoxins are peptide neurotoxins isolated from venomous cone snails that display exquisite selectivity for different subtypes of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR). They are valuable research tools that have profound implications in the discovery of new drugs for a myriad of...

  19. Antidepressant-like effects of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor antagonists, but not agonists, in the mouse forced swim and mouse tail suspension tests

    Andreasen T., Jesper; Olsen, G M; Wiborg, O;

    2009-01-01

    Current literature suggests involvement of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) in major depression. However, it is controversial whether the antidepressant-like effect of nAChR modulation is induced by activation, desensitization or inhibition of central nAChRs. In addition, the specific n...

  20. Human Secreted Ly-6/uPAR Related Protein-1 (SLURP-1) Is a Selective Allosteric Antagonist of α7 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor

    Lyukmanova, Ekaterina N; Shulepko, Mikhail A; Kudryavtsev, Denis;

    2016-01-01

    SLURP-1 is a secreted toxin-like Ly-6/uPAR protein found in epithelium, sensory neurons and immune cells. Point mutations in the slurp-1 gene cause the autosomal inflammation skin disease Mal de Meleda. SLURP-1 is considered an autocrine/paracrine hormone that regulates growth and differentiation...... recombinant analogue of human SLURP-1 (rSLURP-1) differing from the native protein only by one additional N-terminal Met residue. rSLURP-1 significantly inhibited proliferation (up to ~ 40%, EC50 ~ 4 nM) of human oral keratinocytes (Het-1A cells). Application of mecamylamine and atropine......,-non-selective inhibitors of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) and muscarinic acetylcholine receptors, respectively, and anti-α7-nAChRs antibodies revealed α7 type nAChRs as an rSLURP-1 target in keratinocytes. Using affinity purification from human cortical extracts, we confirmed that rSLURP-1 binds selectively...

  1. Two types of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in Drosophila and other arthropods

    Collin, Caitlin Alexis; Hauser, Frank; Gonzalez de Valdivia, Ernesto I; Li, Shizhong; Reisenberger, Julia; Carlsen, Eva M.M.; Khan, Zaid; Hansen, Niels Ø.; Puhm, Florian; Søndergaard, Leif; Niemiec, Justyna; Heninger, Magdalena; Ren, Guilin Robin; Grimmelikhuijzen, Cornelis

    2013-01-01

    Muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) play a central role in the mammalian nervous system. These receptors are G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), which are activated by the agonists acetylcholine and muscarine, and blocked by a variety of antagonists. Mammals have five mAChRs (m1-m5). In ...... (Hydra), had two A-type mAChRs. From these data we propose a model for the evolution of mAChRs....

  2. Histamine H3 receptors regulate acetylcholine release from the guinea pig ileum myenteric plexus

    The effect of selective histamine H3-receptor agonists and antagonists on the acetylcholine release from peripheral nerves was evaluated in the guinea pig longitudinal muscle-myenteric plexus preparations, preloaded with (3H)choline. In the presence of H1 and H2 blockade, histamine and (R)-α-methylhistamine inhibited the electrically-evoked acetylcholine release, being (R)-α-methylhistamine more active than histamine, but behaving as a partial agonist. The effect of histamine was completely reversed by selective H3-blocking drugs, thioperamide and impromidine, while only submaximal doses of (R)-α-methylhistamine were antagonized. Furthermore, thioperamide and impromidine enhanced the electrically-evoked acetylcholine release. On the contrary, the new H3-blocker, HST-7, was found substantially ineffective, both as histamine antagonist and as acetylcholine overflow enhancer. These data suggest that histamine exerts an inhibitory control on the acetylcholine release from intestinal cholinergic nerves through the activation of H3 receptors

  3. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors mediate lung cancer growth

    PaulDGardner

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Ion channels modulate ion flux across cell membranes, activate signal transduction pathways, and influence cellular transport – vital biological functions that are inexorably linked to cellular processes that go awry during carcinogenesis. Indeed, deregulation of ion channel function has been implicated in cancer-related phenomena such as unrestrained cell proliferation and apoptotic evasion. As the prototype for ligand-gated ion channels, nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs have been extensively studied in the context of neuronal cells but accumulating evidence also indicate a role for nAChRs in carcinogenesis. Recently, variants in the nAChR genes CHRNA3, CHRNA5, and CHRNB4 have been implicated in nicotine dependence and lung cancer susceptibility. Here, we silenced the expression of these three genes to investigate their function in lung cancer. We show that these genes are necessary for the viability of small cell lung carcinomas (SCLC, the most aggressive type of lung cancer. Furthermore, we show that nicotine promotes SCLC cell viability whereas an α3β4-selective antagonist, α-conotoxin AuIB, inhibits it. Our findings posit a mechanism whereby signaling via α3/α5/β4-containing nAChRs promotes lung carcinogenesis.

  4. Selective orexin receptor antagonists.

    Lebold, Terry P; Bonaventure, Pascal; Shireman, Brock T

    2013-09-01

    The orexin, or hypocretin, neuropeptides (orexin-A and orexin-B) are produced on neurons in the hypothalamus which project to key areas of the brain that control sleep-wake states, modulation of food intake, panic, anxiety, emotion, reward and addictive behaviors. These neuropeptides exert their effects on a pair of G-protein coupled receptors termed the orexin-1 (OX1) and orexin-2 (OX2) receptors. Emerging biology suggests the involvement of these receptors in psychiatric disorders as they are thought to play a key role in the regulation of multiple systems. This review is intended to highlight key selective OX1 or OX2 small-molecule antagonists. PMID:23891187

  5. Allosteric Modulation of Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptors

    Esam E. El-Fakahany

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available An allosteric modulator is a ligand that binds to an allosteric site on the receptor and changes receptor conformation to produce increase (positive cooperativity or decrease (negative cooperativity in the binding or action of an orthosteric agonist (e.g., acetylcholine. Since the identification of gallamine as the first allosteric modulator of muscarinic receptors in 1976, this unique mode of receptor modulation has been intensively studied by many groups. This review summarizes over 30 years of research on the molecular mechanisms of allosteric interactions of drugs with the receptor and for new allosteric modulators of muscarinic receptors with potential therapeutic use. Identification of positive modulators of acetylcholine binding and function that enhance neurotransmission and the discovery of highly selective allosteric modulators are mile-stones on the way to novel therapeutic agents for the treatment of schizophrenia, Alzheimer’s disease and other disorders involving impaired cognitive function.

  6. Allosteric Modulation of Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptors

    Jakubík, Jan; El-Fakahany, E. E.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 3, č. 9 (2010), s. 2838-2860. ISSN 1424-8247 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA305/09/0681 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : muscarinic acetylcholine receptors * allosteric modulation * Alzheimer ´s disease Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry

  7. Parazoanthoxanthin A blocks Torpedo nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Rozman, Klara Bulc; Araoz, Romulo; Sepcić, Kristina; Molgo, Jordi; Suput, Dusan

    2010-09-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors are implicated in different nervous system-related disorders, and their modulation could improve existing therapy of these diseases. Parazoanthoxanthin A (ParaA) is a fluorescent pigment of the group of zoanthoxanthins. Since it is a potent acetylcholinesterase inhibitor, it may also bind to nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). For this reason its effect on Torpedo nAChR (alpha1(2)betagammadelta) transplanted to Xenopus laevis oocytes was evaluated, using the voltage-clamp technique. ParaA dose-dependently reduced the acetylcholine-induced currents. This effect was fully reversible only at lower concentrations. ParaA also reduced the Hill coefficient and the time to peak current, indicating a channel blocking mode of action. On the other hand, the combined effect of ParaA and d-tubocurarine (d-TC) on acetylcholine-induced currents exhibited only partial additivity, assuming a competitive mode of action of ParaA on nAChR. These results indicate a dual mode of action of ParaA on the Torpedo AChR. PMID:20230806

  8. Positive cooperativity of acetylcholine and other agonists with allosteric ligands on muscarinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Jakubík, J; Bacáková, L; El-Fakahany, E E; Tucek, S

    1997-07-01

    It is well known that allosteric modulators of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors can both diminish and increase the affinity of receptors for their antagonists. We investigated whether the allosteric modulators can also increase the affinity of receptors for their agonists. Twelve agonists and five allosteric modulators were tested in experiments on membranes of CHO cells that had been stably transfected with genes for the M1-M4 receptor subtypes. Allosterically induced changes in the affinities for agonists were computed from changes in the ability of a fixed concentration of each agonist to compete with [3H]N-methylscopolamine for the binding to the receptors in the absence and the presence of varying concentrations of allosteric modulators. The effects of allosteric modulators varied greatly depending on the agonists and the subtypes of receptors. The affinity for acetylcholine was augmented by (-)-eburnamonine on the M2 and M4 receptors and by brucine on the M1 and M3 receptors. Brucine also enhanced the affinities for carbachol, bethanechol, furmethide, methylfurmethide, pilocarpine, 3-(3-pentylthio-1,2,5-thiadiazol-4-yl)-1,2,5,6-tetrahydro-1- methylpyridine (pentylthio-TZTP), oxotremorine-M, and McN-A-343 on the M1, M3, and M4 receptors, for pentylthio-TZTP on the M2 receptors, and for arecoline on the M3 receptors. (-)-Eburnamonine enhanced the affinities for carbachol, bethanechol, furmethide, methylfurmethide, pentylthio-TZTP, pilocarpine, oxotremorine and oxotremorine-M on the M2 receptors and for pilocarpine on the M4 receptors. Vincamine, strychnine, and alcuronium displayed fewer positive allosteric interactions with the agonists, but each allosteric modulator displayed positive cooperativity with at least one agonist on at least one muscarinic receptor subtype. The highest degrees of positive cooperativity were observed between (-)-eburnamonine and pilocarpine and (-)-eburnamonine and oxotremorine-M on the M2 receptors (25- and 7-fold increases in

  9. A new family of insect muscarinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Xia, R-Y; Li, M-Q; Wu, Y-S; Qi, Y-X; Ye, G-Y; Huang, J

    2016-08-01

    Most currently used insecticides are neurotoxic chemicals that target a limited number of sites and insect cholinergic neurotransmission is the major target. A potential target for insecticide development is the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR), which is a metabotropic G-protein-coupled receptor. Insects have A- and B-type mAChRs and the five mammalian mAChRs are close to the A-type. We isolated a cDNA (CG12796) from the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster. After heterologous expression in Chinese hamster ovary K1 cells, CG12796 could be activated by acetylcholine [EC50 (half maximal effective concentration), 73 nM] and the mAChR agonist oxotremorine M (EC50 , 48.2 nM) to increase intracellular Ca(2+) levels. Thus, the new mAChR is coupled to Gq/11 but not Gs and Gi/o . The classical mAChR antagonists atropine and scopolamine N-butylbromide at 100 μM completely blocked the acetylcholine-induced responses. The orthologues of CG12796 can also be found in the genomes of other insects, but not in the genomes of the honeybee or parasitoid wasps. Knockdown of CG12796 in the central nervous system had no effect on male courtship behaviours. We suggest that CG12796 represents the first recognized member of a novel mAChR class. PMID:27003873

  10. Molecular alteration of a muscarinic acetylcholine receptor system during synaptogenesis

    Biochemical properties of the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor system of the avian retina were found to change during the period when synapses form in ovo. Comparison of ligand binding to membranes obtained before and after synaptogenesis showed a significant increase in the affinity, but not proportion, of the high affinity agonist-binding state. There was no change in receptor sensitivity to antagonists during this period. Pirenzepine binding, which can discriminate muscarinic receptor subtypes, showed the presence of a single population of low affinity sites (M2) before and after synaptogenesis. The change in agonist binding was not due to the late development of receptor function. However, detergent-solubilization of membranes eliminated differences in agonist binding between receptors from embryos and hatched chicks, suggesting a developmental change in interactions of the receptor with functionally related membrane components. A possible basis for altered interactions was obtained from isoelectric point data showing that the muscarinic receptor population underwent a transition from a predominantly low pI form (4.25) in 13 day embryos to a predominantly high pI form (4.50) in newly hatched chicks. The possibility that biochemical changes in the muscarinic receptor play a role in differentiation of the system by controlling receptor position on the surface of nerve cells is discussed

  11. Cloning, synthesis, and characterization of αO-conotoxin GeXIVA, a potent α9α10 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist.

    Luo, Sulan; Zhangsun, Dongting; Harvey, Peta J; Kaas, Quentin; Wu, Yong; Zhu, Xiaopeng; Hu, Yuanyan; Li, Xiaodan; Tsetlin, Victor I; Christensen, Sean; Romero, Haylie K; McIntyre, Melissa; Dowell, Cheryl; Baxter, James C; Elmslie, Keith S; Craik, David J; McIntosh, J Michael

    2015-07-28

    We identified a previously unidentified conotoxin gene from Conus generalis whose precursor signal sequence has high similarity to the O1-gene conotoxin superfamily. The predicted mature peptide, αO-conotoxin GeXIVA (GeXIVA), has four Cys residues, and its three disulfide isomers were synthesized. Previously pharmacologically characterized O1-superfamily peptides, exemplified by the US Food and Drug Administration-approved pain medication, ziconotide, contain six Cys residues and are calcium, sodium, or potassium channel antagonists. However, GeXIVA did not inhibit calcium channels but antagonized nicotinic AChRs (nAChRs), most potently on the α9α10 nAChR subtype (IC50 = 4.6 nM). Toxin blockade was voltage-dependent, and kinetic analysis of toxin dissociation indicated that the binding site of GeXIVA does not overlap with the binding site of the competitive antagonist α-conotoxin RgIA. Surprisingly, the most active disulfide isomer of GeXIVA is the bead isomer, comprising, according to NMR analysis, two well-resolved but uncoupled disulfide-restrained loops. The ribbon isomer is almost as potent but has a more rigid structure built around a short 310-helix. In contrast to most α-conotoxins, the globular isomer is the least potent and has a flexible, multiconformational nature. GeXIVA reduced mechanical hyperalgesia in the rat chronic constriction injury model of neuropathic pain but had no effect on motor performance, warranting its further investigation as a possible therapeutic agent. PMID:26170295

  12. Expression and function of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in stem cells

    Carlos M. Carballosa

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors are prototypical ligand gated ion channels typically found in muscular and neuronal tissues. Functional nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, however, have also recently been identified on other cell types, including stem cells. Activation of these receptors by the binding of agonists like choline, acetylcholine, or nicotine has been implicated in many cellular changes. In regards to stem cell function, nicotinic acetylcholine receptor activation leads to changes in stem cell proliferation, migration and differentiation potential. In this review we summarize the expression and function of known nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in different classes of stem cells including: pluripotent stem cells, mesenchymal stem cells, periodontal ligament derived stem cells, and neural progenitor cells and discuss the potential downstream effects of receptor activation on stem cell function.

  13. The α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor complex

    Thomsen, Morten Skøtt; Mikkelsen, Jens D

    2012-01-01

    The α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) is a promising drug target for a number of diseases ranging from schizophrenia and Alzheimer's disease to chronic pain and inflammatory diseases. Focusing on the central nervous system, we describe how endogenous and experimental compounds and...... compounds in vivo is highly dependent on α7 nAChR-interacting proteins, such as RIC-3 and lynx1, which modulate expression and function of the receptor. These regulatory proteins are often not expressed in in vitro models used to study α7 nAChR function, and it is not known to what extent they are involved...... in diseases such as schizophrenia and Alzheimer's disease. Furthermore, α7 nAChR agonists and allosteric modulators differentially alter expression and functionality of the α7 nAChR with repeated administration, which suggests that there may be fundamentally different outcomes of long...

  14. Old and new pharmacology: positive allosteric modulation of the alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor by the 5-hydroxytryptamine(2B/C) receptor antagonist SB-206553 (3,5-dihydro-5-methyl-N-3-pyridinylbenzo[1,2-b:4,5-b']di pyrrole-1(2H)-carboxamide).

    Dunlop, John; Lock, Tim; Jow, Brian; Sitzia, Fabrizio; Grauer, Steven; Jow, Flora; Kramer, Angela; Bowlby, Mark R; Randall, Andrew; Kowal, Dianne; Gilbert, Adam; Comery, Thomas A; Larocque, James; Soloveva, Veronica; Brown, Jon; Roncarati, Renza

    2009-03-01

    The alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) has been implicated in Alzheimer's disease and schizophrenia, leading to efforts targeted toward discovering agonists and positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) of this receptor. In a Ca2+ flux fluorometric imaging plate reader assay, SB-206553 (3,5-dihydro-5-methyl -N-3-pyridinylbenzo [1, 2-b:4,5 -b']-di pyrrole-1(2H)-carboxamide), a compound known as a 5-hydroxytryptamine(2B/2C) receptor antagonist, produced an 8-fold potentiation of the evoked calcium signal in the presence of an EC(20) concentration of nicotine and a corresponding EC(50) of 1.5 muM for potentiation of EC(20) nicotine responses in GH4C1 cells expressing the alpha7 receptor. SB-206553 was devoid of direct alpha7 receptor agonist activity and selective against other nicotinic receptors. Confirmation of the PAM activity of SB-206553 on the alpha7 nAChR was obtained in patch-clamp electrophysiological experiments in GH4C1 cells, where it failed to evoke any detectable currents when applied alone, yet dramatically potentiated the currents evoked by an EC(20) (17 microM) and EC(100) (124 microM) of acetylcholine (ACh). Native nicotinic receptors in CA1 stratum radiatum interneurons of rat hippocampal slices could also be activated by ACh (200 microM), an effect that was entirely blocked by the alpha7-selective antagonist methyllycaconitine (MLA). These ACh currents were potentiated by SB-206553, which increased the area of the current response significantly, resulting in a 40-fold enhancement at 100 microM. In behavioral experiments in rats, SB-206553 reversed an MK-801 (dizocilpine maleate)-induced deficit in the prepulse inhibition of acoustic startle response, an effect attenuated in the presence of MLA. This latter observation provides further evidence in support of the potential therapeutic utility of alpha7 nAChR PAMs in schizophrenia. PMID:19050173

  15. Excitatory amino acid receptor antagonists

    Johansen, T N; Frydenvang, Karla Andrea; Ebert, B;

    1997-01-01

    We have previously shown that (RS)-2-amino-2-(5-tert-butyl-3-hydroxyisoxazol-4-yl)acetic acid (ATAA) is an antagonist at N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) and (RS)-2-amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazol-4-yl)propionic acid (AMPA) receptors. We have now resolved ATAA via diastereomeric salt formation...

  16. Pharmacological and biochemical characterization of the D-1 dopamine receptor mediating acetylcholine release in rabbit retina

    Hensler, J.G.; Cotterell, D.J.; Dubocovich, M.L.

    1987-12-01

    Superfusion with dopamine (0.1 microM-10 mM) evokes calcium-dependent (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine release from rabbit retina labeled in vitro with (/sup 3/H)choline. This effect is antagonized by the D-1 dopamine receptor antagonist SCH 23390. Activation or blockade of D-2 dopamine, alpha-2 or beta receptors did not stimulate or attenuate the release of (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine from rabbit retina. Dopamine receptor agonists evoke the release of (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine with the following order of potency: apomorphine less than or equal to SKF(R)82526 < SKF 85174 < SKF(R)38393 less than or equal to pergolide less than or equal to dopamine (EC50 = 4.5 microM) < SKF(S)82526 less than or equal to SKF(S)38393. Dopamine receptor antagonists inhibited the dopamine-evoked release of (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine: SCH 23390 (IC50 = 1 nM) < (+)-butaclamol less than or equal to cis-flupenthixol < fluphenazine < perphenazine < trans-flupenthixol < R-sulpiride. The potencies of dopamine receptor agonists and antagonists at the dopamine receptor mediating (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine release is characteristic of the D-1 dopamine receptor. These potencies were correlated with the potencies of dopamine receptor agonists and antagonists at the D-1 dopamine receptor in rabbit retina as labeled by (/sup 3/H)SCH 23390, or as determined by adenylate cyclase activity. (/sup 3/H)SCH 23390 binding in rabbit retinal membranes was stable, saturable and reversible. Scatchard analysis of (/sup 3/H)SCH 23390 saturation data revealed a single high affinity binding site (Kd = 0.175 +/- 0.002 nM) with a maximum binding of 482 +/- 12 fmol/mg of protein. The potencies of dopamine receptor agonists to stimulate (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine release were correlated with their potencies to stimulate adenylate cyclase (r = 0.784, P less than .05, n = 7) and with their affinities at (/sup 3/H)SCH 23390 binding sites (r = 0.755, P < .05, n = 8).

  17. Influence of melatonin on the development of functional nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in cultured chick retinal cells

    L.F.S. Sampaio

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available The influence of melatonin on the developmental pattern of functional nicotinic acetylcholine receptors was investigated in embryonic 8-day-old chick retinal cells in culture. The functional response to acetylcholine was measured in cultured retina cells by microphysiometry. The maximal functional response to acetylcholine increased 2.7 times between the 4th and 5th day in vitro (DIV4, DIV5, while the Bmax value for [125I]-alpha-bungarotoxin was reduced. Despite the presence of alpha8-like immunoreactivity at DIV4, functional responses mediated by alpha-bungarotoxin-sensitive nicotinic acetylcholine receptors were observed only at DIV5. Mecamylamine (100 µM was essentially without effect at DIV4 and DIV5, while dihydro-ß-erythroidine (10-100 µM blocked the response to acetylcholine (3.0 nM-2.0 µM only at DIV4, with no effect at DIV5. Inhibition of melatonin receptors with the antagonist luzindole, or melatonin synthesis by stimulation of D4 dopamine receptors blocked the appearance of the alpha-bungarotoxin-sensitive response at DIV5. Therefore, alpha-bungarotoxin-sensitive receptors were expressed in retinal cells as early as at DIV4, but they reacted to acetylcholine only after DIV5. The development of an alpha-bungarotoxin-sensitive response is dependent on the production of melatonin by the retinal culture. Melatonin, which is produced in a tonic manner by this culture, and is a key hormone in the temporal organization of vertebrates, also potentiates responses mediated by alpha-bungarotoxin-sensitive receptors in rat vas deferens and cerebellum. This common pattern of action on different cell models that express alpha-bungarotoxin-sensitive receptors probably reflects a more general mechanism of regulation of these receptors.

  18. Mapping of the acetylcholine binding site of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor: [3H]nicotine as an agonist photoaffinity label

    The agonist [3H]nicotine was used as a photoaffinity label for the acetylcholine binding sties on the Torpedo nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR). [3H]Nicotine binds at equilibrium with Keq = 0.6 μM to the agonist binding sites. Irradiation with 254-nm light of AChR-rich membranes equilibrated with [3H]nicotine resulted in covalent incorporation into the α- and γ-subunits, which was inhibited by agonists and competitive antagonists but not by noncompetitive antagonists. Inhibition of labeling by d-tubocurarine demonstrated that the α-subunit was labeled via both agonist sites but the γ-subunit was labeled only via the site that binds d-tubocurarine with high affinity. Chymotryptic digestion of the α-subunit confirmed that Try-198 was the principal amino acid labeled by [3H]nicotine. This confirmation required a novel radiosequencing strategy employing o-phthalaldehyde [3H]Nicotine, which is the first photoaffinity agonist used, labels primarily Tyr-198 in contrast to competitive antagonist affinity labels, which label primarily Tyr-190 and Cys-192/Cys-193

  19. Functional Characterization of a Novel Class of Morantel-Sensitive Acetylcholine Receptors in Nematodes.

    Elise Courtot

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Acetylcholine receptors are pentameric ligand-gated channels involved in excitatory neuro-transmission in both vertebrates and invertebrates. In nematodes, they represent major targets for cholinergic agonist or antagonist anthelmintic drugs. Despite the large diversity of acetylcholine-receptor subunit genes present in nematodes, only a few receptor subtypes have been characterized so far. Interestingly, parasitic nematodes affecting human or animal health possess two closely related members of this gene family, acr-26 and acr-27 that are essentially absent in free-living or plant parasitic species. Using the pathogenic parasitic nematode of ruminants, Haemonchus contortus, as a model, we found that Hco-ACR-26 and Hco-ACR-27 are co-expressed in body muscle cells. We demonstrated that co-expression of Hco-ACR-26 and Hco-ACR-27 in Xenopus laevis oocytes led to the functional expression of an acetylcholine-receptor highly sensitive to the anthelmintics morantel and pyrantel. Importantly we also reported that ACR-26 and ACR-27, from the distantly related parasitic nematode of horses, Parascaris equorum, also formed a functional acetylcholine-receptor highly sensitive to these two drugs. In Caenorhabditis elegans, a free-living model nematode, we demonstrated that heterologous expression of the H. contortus and P. equorum receptors drastically increased its sensitivity to morantel and pyrantel, mirroring the pharmacological properties observed in Xenopus oocytes. Our results are the first to describe significant molecular determinants of a novel class of nematode body wall muscle AChR.

  20. Acetylcholine affects osteocytic MLO-Y4 cells via acetylcholine receptors.

    Ma, Yuanyuan; Li, Xianxian; Fu, Jing; Li, Yue; Gao, Li; Yang, Ling; Zhang, Ping; Shen, Jiefei; Wang, Hang

    2014-03-25

    The identification of the neuronal control of bone remodeling has become one of the many significant recent advances in bone biology. Cholinergic activity has recently been shown to favor bone mass accrual by complex cellular regulatory networks. Here, we identified the gene expression of the muscarinic and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (m- and nAChRs) in mice tibia tissue and in osteocytic MLO-Y4 cells. Acetylcholine, which is a classical neurotransmitter and an osteo-neuromediator, not only influences the mRNA expression of the AChR subunits but also significantly induces the proliferation and viability of osteocytes. Moreover, acetylcholine treatment caused the reciprocal regulation of RANKL and OPG mRNA expression, which resulted in a significant increase in the mRNA ratio of RANKL:OPG in osteocytes via acetylcholine receptors. The expression of neuropeptide Y and reelin, which are two neurogenic markers, was also modulated by acetylcholine via m- and nAChRs in MLO-Y4 cells. These results indicated that osteocytic acetylcholine receptors might be a new valuable mediator for cell functions and even for bone remodeling. PMID:24508663

  1. Structural Studies of Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors: Using Acetylcholine Binding Protein as a Structural Surrogate

    Shahsavar, Azadeh; Gajhede, Michael; Kastrup, Jette; Balle, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are members of the pentameric ligand-gated ion channel superfamily that play important roles in control of neurotransmitter release in the central and peripheral nervous system. These receptors are important therapeutic targets for development of drugs a...

  2. Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor (nAChR Dependent Chorda Tympani Taste Nerve Responses to Nicotine, Ethanol and Acetylcholine.

    Zuo Jun Ren

    Full Text Available Nicotine elicits bitter taste by activating TRPM5-dependent and TRPM5-independent but neuronal nAChR-dependent pathways. The nAChRs represent common targets at which acetylcholine, nicotine and ethanol functionally interact in the central nervous system. Here, we investigated if the nAChRs also represent a common pathway through which the bitter taste of nicotine, ethanol and acetylcholine is transduced. To this end, chorda tympani (CT taste nerve responses were monitored in rats, wild-type mice and TRPM5 knockout (KO mice following lingual stimulation with nicotine free base, ethanol, and acetylcholine, in the absence and presence of nAChR agonists and antagonists. The nAChR modulators: mecamylamine, dihydro-β-erythroidine, and CP-601932 (a partial agonist of the α3β4* nAChR, inhibited CT responses to nicotine, ethanol, and acetylcholine. CT responses to nicotine and ethanol were also inhibited by topical lingual application of 8-chlorophenylthio (CPT-cAMP and loading taste cells with [Ca2+]i by topical lingual application of ionomycin + CaCl2. In contrast, CT responses to nicotine were enhanced when TRC [Ca2+]i was reduced by topical lingual application of BAPTA-AM. In patch-clamp experiments, only a subset of isolated rat fungiform taste cells exposed to nicotine responded with an increase in mecamylamine-sensitive inward currents. We conclude that nAChRs expressed in a subset of taste cells serve as common receptors for the detection of the TRPM5-independent bitter taste of nicotine, acetylcholine and ethanol.

  3. Endothelin receptors and their antagonists.

    Maguire, Janet J; Davenport, Anthony P

    2015-03-01

    All three members of the endothelin (ET) family of peptides, ET-1, ET-2, and ET-3, are expressed in the human kidney, with ET-1 being the predominant isoform. ET-1 and ET-2 bind to two G-protein-coupled receptors, ETA and ETB, whereas at physiological concentrations ET-3 has little affinity for the ET(A) receptor. The human kidney is unusual among the peripheral organs in expressing a high density of ET(B). The renal vascular endothelium only expresses the ET(B) subtype and ET-1 acts in an autocrine or paracrine manner to release vasodilators. Endothelial ETB in kidney, as well as liver and lungs, also has a critical role in scavenging ET-1 from the plasma. The third major function is ET-1 activation of ET(B) in in the nephron to reduce salt and water re-absorption. In contrast, ET(A) predominate on smooth muscle, causing vasoconstriction and mediating many of the pathophysiological actions of ET-1. The role of the two receptors has been delineated using highly selective ET(A) (BQ123, TAK-044) and ET(B) (BQ788) peptide antagonists. Nonpeptide antagonists, bosentan, macitentan, and ambrisentan, that are either mixed ET(A)/ET(B) antagonists or display ET(A) selectivity, have been approved for clinical use but to date are limited to pulmonary hypertension. Ambrisentan is in clinical trials in patients with type 2 diabetic nephropathy. This review summarizes ET-receptor antagonism in the human kidney, and considers the relative merits of selective versus nonselective antagonism in renal disease. PMID:25966344

  4. Activation of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors elicits pigment granule dispersion in retinal pigment epithelium isolated from bluegill

    Crittenden Elizabeth L

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In fish, melanin pigment granules in the retinal pigment epithelium disperse into apical projections as part of the suite of responses the eye makes to bright light conditions. This pigment granule dispersion serves to reduce photobleaching and occurs in response to neurochemicals secreted by the retina. Previous work has shown that acetylcholine may be involved in inducing light-adaptive pigment dispersion. Acetylcholine receptors are of two main types, nicotinic and muscarinic. Muscarinic receptors are in the G-protein coupled receptor superfamily, and five different muscarinic receptors have been molecularly cloned in human. These receptors are coupled to adenylyl cyclase, calcium mobilization and ion channel activation. To determine the receptor pathway involved in eliciting pigment granule migration, we isolated retinal pigment epithelium from bluegill and subjected it to a battery of cholinergic agents. Results The general cholinergic agonist carbachol induces pigment granule dispersion in isolated retinal pigment epithelium. Carbachol-induced pigment granule dispersion is blocked by the muscarinic antagonist atropine, by the M1 antagonist pirenzepine, and by the M3 antagonist 4-DAMP. Pigment granule dispersion was also induced by the M1 agonist 4-[N-(4-chlorophenyl carbamoyloxy]-4-pent-2-ammonium iodide. In contrast the M2 antagonist AF-DX 116 and the M4 antagonist tropicamide failed to block carbachol-induced dispersion, and the M2 agonist arecaidine but-2-ynyl ester tosylate failed to elicit dispersion. Conclusions Our results suggest that carbachol-mediated pigment granule dispersion occurs through the activation of Modd muscarinic receptors, which in other systems couple to phosphoinositide hydrolysis and elevation of intracellular calcium. This conclusion must be corroborated by molecular studies, but suggests Ca2+-dependent pathways may be involved in light-adaptive pigment dispersion.

  5. Flavonoids with M1 Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptor Binding Activity

    Meyyammai Swaminathan

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Muscarinic acetylcholine receptor-active compounds have potential for the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease. In this study, a series of natural and synthetic flavones and flavonols was assayed in vitro for their ability to inhibit radioligand binding at human cloned M1 muscarinic receptors. Several compounds were found to possess competitive binding affinity (Ki = 40–110 µM, comparable to that of acetylcholine (Ki = 59 µM. Despite the fact that these compounds lack a positively-charged ammonium group under physiological conditions, molecular modelling studies suggested that they bind to the orthosteric site of the receptor, mainly through non-polar interactions.

  6. Benzodiazepine receptor antagonists for hepatic encephalopathy

    Als-Nielsen, B; Gluud, L L; Gluud, C

    2004-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy may be associated with accumulation of substances that bind to a receptor-complex in the brain resulting in neural inhibition. Benzodiazepine receptor antagonists may have a beneficial effect on patients with hepatic encephalopathy.......Hepatic encephalopathy may be associated with accumulation of substances that bind to a receptor-complex in the brain resulting in neural inhibition. Benzodiazepine receptor antagonists may have a beneficial effect on patients with hepatic encephalopathy....

  7. Regulating role of acetylcholine and its antagonists in inward rectified K+ channels from guard cell protoplasts of Vicia faba

    2000-01-01

    The inward rectified potassium current of Vicia faba guard cell protoplasts treated with acetylcholine (ACh) or the antagonists of its receptors were recorded by employing the patch clamp technique. The results show that ACh at lower concentrations increases the inward K+ current, in contrast, ACh at higher concentrations inhibits it. Treated with d-Tubocurarine (d-Tub), an antagonist of the nicotine ACh receptor (nAChR) inhibits the inward K+ current by 30%. Treated with atropine (Atr), an antagonist of the muscarine (Mus) ACh receptor (mAChR) also inhibits it by 36%.However,if guard cell protoplasts are treated with d-Tub and Atr together, the inward K+ current is inhibited by 60%-75%. Tetraethylammonium chloride (TEA), a strong inhibitor of K+ channels has no effect on the inward K+ current regulated by ACh, suggesting that there are inward K+ channels modulated by AChRs on the membrane of the guard cell protoplasts. These data demonstrate an ACh-regulated mechanism for stomatal movement.

  8. Regulating role of acetylcholine and its antagonists in inward rectified K~+ channels from guard cell protoplasts of Vicia faba

    冷强; 花宝光; 郭玉海; 娄成后

    2000-01-01

    The inward rectified potassium current of Vicia faba guard cell protoplasts treated with acetylcholine (ACh) or the antagonists of its receptors were recorded by employing the patch clamp technique. The results show that ACh at lower concentrations increases the inward K+ current, in contrast, ACh at higher concentrations inhibits it. Treated with d-Tubocurarine (d-Tub), an antagonist of the nicotine ACh receptor (nAChR) inhibits the inward K+ current by 30%. Treated with atropine (Atr), an antagonist of the muscarine (Mus) ACh receptor (mAChR) also inhibits it by 36%. However, if guard cell protoplasts are treated with d-Tub and Atr together, the inward K+ current is inhibited by 60%-75%. Tetraethylammonium chloride (TEA), a strong inhibitor of K+ channels has no effect on the inward K+ current regulated by ACh, suggesting that there are inward K+ channels modulated by AChRs on the membrane of the guard cell protoplasts. These data demonstrate an ACh-regulated mechanism for stomatal movement.

  9. GLUCOSE ATTENUATES IMPAIRMENTS IN MEMORY AND CREB ACTIVATION PRODUCED BY AN α4β2 BUT NOT AN α7 NICOTINIC RECEPTOR ANTAGONIST

    Morris, Ken A.; Li, Sisi; Bui, Duat D.; Gold, Paul E.

    2012-01-01

    Glucose improves memory for a variety of tasks when administered to rats and mice near the time of training. Prior work indicates glucose may enhance memory by increasing the synthesis and release of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine in the brain. To investigate if specific acetylcholine receptor subtypes may mediate some of the memory-enhancing actions of glucose, we examined the effects of subtype-specific nicotinic acetylcholine receptor antagonists on memory in Fischer-344 rats and also ...

  10. Ca2+ is involved in muscarine-acetylcholine-receptor-mediated acetylcholine signal transduction in guard cells of Vicia faba L.

    MENG Fanxia; MIAO Long; ZHANG Shuqiu; LOU Chenghou

    2004-01-01

    Acetylcholine (ACh) is an important neurochemical transmitter in animals; it also exists in plants and plays a significant role in various kinds of physiological functions in plants. ACh has been known to induce the stomatal opening. By monitoring the changes of cytosolic Ca2+ with fluorescent probe Fluo-3 AM under the confocal microscopy,we found that exogenous ACh increased cytosolic Ca2+ concentration of guard cells of Vicia faba L. Muscarine, an agonist of muscarine acetylcholine receptor (mAChR), could do so as well. In contrast, atropine, the antagonist of mAChR abolished the ability of ACh to increase Ca2+ in guard cells.This mechanism is similar to mAChR in animals. When EGTA was used to chelate Ca2+ or ruthenium red to block Ca2+ released from vacuole respectively, the results showed that the increased cytosolic Ca2+ mainly come from intracellular Ca2+ store. The evidence supports that Ca2+ is involved in guard-cell response to ACh and that Ca2+ signal is coupled to mAChRs in ACh signal transduction in guard cells.

  11. Synthesis, Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor Binding, and Pharmacological Properties of 3’- (Substituted phenyl) Deschloroepibatidine Analogs

    F. Ivy Carroll; Yokota, Yasuno; Ma, Wei; Lee, Jeffrey R.; Brieaddy, Lawrence E.; Burgess, Jason P.; Navarro, Hernán A.; Damaj, M. I.; Martin, Billy R.

    2007-01-01

    A series of 3’-(substituted phenyl)deschloroepibatidine analogs (5a–j) were synthesized. The α4β2* and α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) binding properties and functional activity in the tail-flick, hot-plate, locomotor, and body temperature tests in mice of 5a–j were compared to those of the nAChR agonist, nicotine (1), epibatidine (4), and deschloroepibatidine (13) the partial agonist, varenicline (3) and the antagonist 2’-fluoro-3’-(substituted phenyl)deschloroepibatidine analogs...

  12. High-affinity neuropeptide Y receptor antagonists.

    Daniels, A J; Matthews, J. E.; Slepetis, R J; Jansen, M; Viveros, O. H.; Tadepalli, A.; Harrington, W; Heyer, D; Landavazo, A; Leban, J J

    1995-01-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is one of the most abundant peptide transmitters in the mammalian brain. In the periphery it is costored and coreleased with norepinephrine from sympathetic nerve terminals. However, the physiological functions of this peptide remain unclear because of the absence of specific high-affinity receptor antagonists. Three potent NPY receptor antagonists were synthesized and tested for their biological activity in in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo functional assays. We describe he...

  13. GABAA receptor partial agonists and antagonists

    Krall, Jacob; Balle, Thomas; Krogsgaard-Larsen, Niels;

    2015-01-01

    A high degree of structural heterogeneity of the GABAA receptors (GABAARs) has been revealed and is reflected in multiple receptor subtypes. The subunit composition of GABAAR subtypes is believed to determine their localization relative to the synapses and adapt their functional properties to the...... antagonists have been essential in defining the tonic current but both remaining issues concerning the GABAARs involved and the therapeutic possibilities of modulating tonic inhibition underline the need for GABAAR antagonists with improved selectivity....

  14. Structural Studies of Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors: Using Acetylcholine-Binding Protein as a Structural Surrogate.

    Shahsavar, Azadeh; Gajhede, Michael; Kastrup, Jette S; Balle, Thomas

    2016-06-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are members of the pentameric ligand-gated ion channel superfamily that play important roles in the control of neurotransmitter release in the central and peripheral nervous system. These receptors are important therapeutic targets for the development of drugs against a number of mental health disorders and for marketed smoking cessation aids. Unfortunately, drug discovery has been hampered by difficulties in obtaining sufficiently selective compounds. Together with functional complexity of the receptors, this has made it difficult to obtain drugs with sufficiently high-target to off-target affinity ratios. The recent and ongoing progress in structural studies holds promise to help understand structure-function relationships of nAChR drugs at the atomic level. This will undoubtedly lead to the design of more efficient drugs with fewer side effects. As a high-resolution structure of a nAChR is yet to be determined, structural studies are to a large extent based on acetylcholine-binding proteins (AChBPs) that despite low overall sequence identity display a high degree of conservation of overall structure and amino acids at the ligand-binding site. Further, AChBPs reproduce relative binding affinities of ligands at nAChRs. Over the past decade, AChBPs have been used extensively as models for nAChRs and have aided the understanding of drug receptor interactions at nAChRs significantly. PMID:26572235

  15. Localization of muscarinic acetylcholine receptor in plant guard cells

    2001-01-01

    Acetylcholine (ACh), as an important neurotransmitter in animals, also plays a significant role in various kinds of physiological functions in plants. But relatively little is known about its receptors in plants. A green fluorescence BODIPY FL-labeled ABT, which is a high affinity ligand of muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR), was used to localize mAChR in plant guard cells. In Vicia faba L. and Pisum sativum L., mAChR was found both on the plasma membrane of guard cells. mAChR may also be distributed on guard cell chloroplast membrane of Vicia faba L. The evidence that mAChR localizes in the guard cells provides a new possible signal transduction pathway in ACh mediated stomata movement.

  16. Structural model of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor isotypes bound to acetylcholine and nicotine

    Abagyan Ruben

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nicotine is a psychoactive drug presenting a diverse array of biological activities, some positive, such as enhancement of cognitive performances, others negative, such as addiction liability. Ligands that discriminate between the different isotypes of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs could present improved pharmacology and toxicity profile. Results Based on the recent crystal structure of a soluble acetylcholine binding protein from snails, we have built atomic models of acetylcholine and nicotine bound to the pocket of four different human nAChR subtypes. The structures of the docked ligands correlate with available biochemical data, and reveal that the determinants for isotype selectivity are relying essentially on four residues, providing diversity of the ligand binding pocket both in terms of Van der Waals boundary, and electrostatic potential. We used our models to screen in silico a large compound database and identify a new ligand candidate that could display subtype selectivity. Conclusion The nAChR-agonist models should be useful for the design of nAChR agonists with diverse specificity profiles.

  17. Histamine-2 Receptor Antagonists and Semen Quality.

    Banihani, Saleem A

    2016-01-01

    Histamine-2 receptor antagonists are a class of drugs used to treat the acid-related gastrointestinal diseases such as ulcer and gastro-oesophageal reflux disease. Although such drugs, especially ranitidine and famotidine, are still widely used, their effects on semen quality, and hence on male infertility, is still unclear. This MiniReview systematically addresses and summarizes the effect of histamine-2 receptor antagonists (cimetidine, ranitidine, nizatidine and famotidine) on semen quality, particularly, on sperm function. Cimetidine appears to have adverse effects on semen quality. While the effects of ranitidine and nizatidine on semen quality are still controversial, famotidine does not appear to change semen quality. Therefore, additional studies will be required to clarify whether histamine-2 receptor-independent effects of these drugs play a role in semen quality as well as further clinical studies including direct comparison of the histamine-2 receptor antagonists. PMID:26176290

  18. Cocaine inhibition of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors influences dopamine release

    Alexandra eAcevedo-Rodriguez; Lifen eZhang; Fuwen eZhou; Suzhen eGong; Howard eGu; Mariella eDe Biasi; Fu-Ming eZhou; Dani, John A.

    2014-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) potently regulate dopamine (DA) release in the striatum and alter cocaine’s ability to reinforce behaviors. Since cocaine is a weak nAChR inhibitor, we hypothesized that cocaine may alter DA release by inhibiting the nAChRs in DA terminals in the striatum and thus contribute to cocaine's reinforcing properties primarily associated with the inhibition of DA transporters. We found that biologically relevant concentrations of cocaine can mildly inhibit...

  19. Threonine in the selectivity filter of the acetylcholine receptor channel.

    Villarroel, A.; Sakmann, B

    1992-01-01

    The acetylcholine receptor (AChR) is a cation selective channel whose biophysical properties as well as its molecular composition are fairly well characterized. Previous studies on the rat muscle alpha-subunit indicate that a threonine residue located near the cytoplasmic side of the M2 segment is a determinant of ion flow. We have studied the role of this threonine in ionic selectivity by measuring conductance sequences for monovalent alkali cations and bionic reversal potentials of the wild...

  20. Subtype Differences in Pre-Coupling of Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptors

    Jakubík, Jan; Janíčková, Helena; Randáková, Alena; El-Fakahany, E. E.; Doležal, Vladimír

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. 11 (2011), e27732. E-ISSN 1932-6203 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA305/09/0681; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA500110703; GA MŠk(CZ) LC554 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : acetylcholine muscarinic receptors * G proteins * subtype differences Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 4.092, year: 2011

  1. Vasopressin and Vasopressin Receptor Antagonists

    Oh, Yun Kyu

    2008-01-01

    Vasopressin, a neurohypophyseal peptide hormone, is the endogenous agonist at V1a, V1b, and V2 receptors. The most important physiological function of vasopressin is the maintenance of water homeostasis through interaction with V2 receptors in the kidney. Vasopressin binds to V2 receptor and increases the number of aquaporin-2 at the apical plasma membrane of collecting duct principal cells. That induces high water permeability across the membrane. Several non-peptide vasopressin receptor ant...

  2. Gold nanoparticle–choline complexes can block nicotinic acetylcholine receptors

    Chur Chin

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Chur Chin1, In Kyeom Kim2, Dong Yoon Lim3, Ki Suk Kim4, Hyang Ae Lee4, Eun Joo Kim41Department of Pediatrics, Fatima Hospital, Daegu, Korea; 2Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Kyungpook National University, Daegu, Korea; 3Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Chosun University, Gwangju, Korea; 4Korea Institute of Toxicology, Daejeon, KoreaAbstract: We identified a novel class of direct ion-channel blockers of ligand-gated ion channels called the gold nanoparticle–choline complex. Negatively charged gold nanoparticles (1.4 nm block ion pores by binding to the sulfur group of the cysteine loop of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs, and currents evoked by acetylcholine (Ach can break these bonds. The current evoked by ACh in nAChRs was blocked directly in ion pores by the gold nanoparticle–choline complex. In adrenal-gland perfusion studies, the complex also blocked nAChRs by diminishing catecholamine release by about 75%. An in vivo study showed muscle relaxation in rats after injection of the complex. These results will foster the application of gold nanoparticles as a direct ion-channel blocker. Keywords: negatively charged gold nanoparticle, choline, gold–sulfur bond, nicotinic acetylcholine receptor, direct ion-channel blocker

  3. α4 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor modulated by galantamine on nigrostriatal terminals regulates dopamine receptor-mediated rotational behavior.

    Inden, Masatoshi; Takata, Kazuyuki; Yanagisawa, Daijiro; Ashihara, Eishi; Tooyama, Ikuo; Shimohama, Shun; Kitamura, Yoshihisa

    2016-03-01

    Galantamine, an acetylcholine esterase (AChE) inhibitor used to treat dementia symptoms, also acts as an allosteric potentiating ligand (APL) at nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). This study was designed to evaluate the allosteric effect of galantamine on nAChR regulation of nigrostrial dopaminergic neuronal function in the hemiparkinsonian rat model established by unilateral nigral 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) injection. Methamphetamine, a dopamine releaser, induced ipsilateral rotation, whereas dopamine agonists apomorphine (a non-selective dopamine receptor agonist), SKF38393 (a selective dopamine D1 receptor agonist), and quinpirole (a selective dopamine D2 receptor agonist) induced contralateral rotation. When 6-OHDA-injected rats were co-treated with nomifensine, a dopamine transporter inhibitor, a more pronounced and a remarkable effect of nicotine and galantamine was observed. Under these conditions, the combination of nomifensine with nicotine or galantamine induced the ipsilateral rotation similar to the methamphetamine-induced rotational behavior, indicating that nicotine and galantamine also induce dopamine release from striatal terminals. Both nicotine- and galantamine-induced rotations were significantly blocked by flupenthixol (an antagonist of both D1 and D2 dopamine receptors) and mecamylamine (an antagonist of nAChRs), suggesting that galantamine modulation of nAChRs on striatal dopaminergic terminals regulates dopamine receptor-mediated movement. Immunohistochemical staining showed that α4 nAChRs were highly expressed on striatal dopaminergic terminals, while no α7 nAChRs were detected. Pretreatment with the α4 nAChR antagonist dihydroxy-β-erythroidine significantly inhibited nicotine- and galantamine-induced rotational behaviors, whereas pretreatment with the α7 nAChR antagonist methyllycaconitine was ineffective. Moreover, the α4 nAChR agonist ABT-418 induced ipsilateral rotation, while the α7 nAChR agonist PNU282987 had no

  4. Medicinal chemistry of competitive kainate receptor antagonists.

    Larsen, Ann M; Bunch, Lennart

    2011-02-16

    Kainic acid (KA) receptors belong to the group of ionotropic glutamate receptors and are expressed throughout in the central nervous system (CNS). The KA receptors have been shown to be involved in neurophysiological functions such as mossy fiber long-term potentiation (LTP) and synaptic plasticity and are thus potential therapeutic targets in CNS diseases such as schizophrenia, major depression, neuropathic pain and epilepsy. Extensive effort has been made to develop subtype-selective KA receptor antagonists in order to elucidate the physiological function of each of the five subunits known (GluK1-5). However, to date only selective antagonists for the GluK1 subunit have been discovered, which underlines the strong need for continued research in this area. The present review describes the structure-activity relationship and pharmacological profile for 10 chemically distinct classes of KA receptor antagonists comprising, in all, 45 compounds. To the medicinal chemist this information will serve as reference guidance as well as an inspiration for future effort in this field. PMID:22778857

  5. Quinuclidine compounds differently act as agonists of Kenyon cell nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and induced distinct effect on insect ganglionic depolarizations.

    Mathé-Allainmat, Monique; Swale, Daniel; Leray, Xavier; Benzidane, Yassine; Lebreton, Jacques; Bloomquist, Jeffrey R; Thany, Steeve H

    2013-12-01

    We have recently demonstrated that a new quinuclidine benzamide compound named LMA10203 acted as an agonist of insect nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. Its specific pharmacological profile on cockroach dorsal unpaired median neurons (DUM) helped to identify alpha-bungarotoxin-insensitive nAChR2 receptors. In the present study, we tested its effect on cockroach Kenyon cells. We found that it induced an inward current demonstrating that it bounds to nicotinic acetylcholine receptors expressed on Kenyon cells. Interestingly, LMA10203-induced currents were completely blocked by the nicotinic antagonist α-bungarotoxin. We suggested that LMA10203 effect occurred through the activation of α-bungarotoxin-sensitive receptors and did not involve α-bungarotoxin-insensitive nAChR2, previously identified in DUM neurons. In addition, we have synthesized two new compounds, LMA10210 and LMA10211, and compared their effects on Kenyon cells. These compounds were members of the 3-quinuclidinyl benzamide or benzoate families. Interestingly, 1 mM LMA10210 was not able to induce an inward current on Kenyon cells compared to LMA10211. Similarly, we did not find any significant effect of LMA10210 on cockroach ganglionic depolarization, whereas these three compounds were able to induce an effect on the central nervous system of the third instar M. domestica larvae. Our data suggested that these three compounds could bind to distinct cockroach nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. PMID:23884575

  6. Adult celiac disease with acetylcholine receptor antibody positive myasthenia gravis

    Hugh J Freeman; Helen R Gillett; Peter M Gillett; Joel Oger

    2009-01-01

    Celiac disease has been associated with some autoimmune disorders. A 40-year-old competitive strongman with celiac disease responded to a glutenfree diet, but developed profound and generalized motor weakness with acetylcholine receptor antibody positive myasthenia gravis, a disorder reported to occur in about 1 in 5000. This possible relationship between myasthenia gravis and celiac disease was further explored in serological studies. Frozen stored serum samples from 23 acetylcholine receptor antibody positive myasthenia gravis patients with no intestinal symptoms were used to screen for celiac disease. Both endomysial and tissue transglutaminase antibodies were examined. One of 23 (or, about 4.3%) was positive for both IgA-endomysial and IgA tissue transglutaminase antibodies. Endoscopic studies subsequently showed duodenal mucosal scalloping and biopsies confirmed the histopathological changes of celiac disease. Celiac disease and myasthenia gravis may occur together more often than is currently appreciated. The presence of motor weakness in celiac disease may be a clue to occult myasthenia gravis, even in the absence of intestinal symptoms.

  7. Bicycloorthocarboxylate convulsants. Potent GABAA receptor antagonists

    4-t-Butyl-1-(4-bromophenyl)-bicycloorthocarboxylate antagonizes gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-mediated relaxation at a functional insect nerve-muscle synapse, mimicking the action of picrotoxinin, suggesting that it causes GABA antagonism through blockade of the chloride ionophore. It is also a potent GABAA receptor antagonist, inhibiting the binding of [35S]t-butyl-bicyclophosphorothionate ([35S]TBPS) to EDTA/water-dialyzed human brain P2 membranes. Structure-activity relationships of 74 1,4-bis-substituted bicycloorthocarboxylates, mostly new compounds, reveal that for high potency as a GABAA receptor antagonist the optimal 4-substituent is a C4 to C6 branched chain alkyl or cycloalkyl group (e.g., t-butyl, s-butyl, or cyclohexyl) and the optimal 1-substituent is a phenyl moiety with one or more electron-withdrawing groups (e.g., 4-cyano, 4-bromo, 4-chloro, 3,4-dichloro, or pentafluoro). Bicycloorthocarboxylate inhibitors of [35S]TBPS binding with IC50 values of 5-10 nM exceed by several-fold the potency of any GABAA receptor antagonist previously reported. The 4-t-butyl-1-(4-azidophenyl) analog, synthesized as a candidate photoaffinity label, gives an IC50 of 315 nM. The potency of bicycloorthocarboxylates for decreasing [35S]TBPS binding generally correlates with their toxicity, i.e., compounds without inhibitory activity in this brain receptor assay are of low toxicity on intraperitoneal administration to mice, and the analogs most potent as inhibitors are generally those most toxic to mice (e.g., IC50 of 5 nM and LD50 of 0.06 mg/kg for 4-t-butyl-1-(4-cyanophenyl)-bicycloorthocarboxylate). The effects of phenyl substituents on the potency of the orthobenzoates as GABAA receptor antagonists are similar to those on toxicity

  8. Implementation of a fluorescence-based screening assay identifies histamine H3 receptor antagonists clobenpropit and iodophenpropit as subunit-selective N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonists

    Hansen, Kasper Bø; Mullasseril, Praseeda; Dawit, Sara; Kurtkaya, Natalie L; Yuan, Hongjie; Vance, Katie M; Orr, Anna G; Kvist, Trine; Ogden, Kevin K; Le, Phuong; Vellano, Kimberly M; Lewis, Iestyn; Kurtkaya, Serdar; Du, Yuhong; Qui, Min; Murphy, T J; Snyder, James P; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans; Traynelis, Stephen F

    2010-01-01

    NMDA receptor function, including the histamine H3 receptor antagonists clobenpropit and iodophenpropit, as well as the vanilloid receptor transient receptor potential cation channel, subfamily V, member 1 (TRPV1) antagonist capsazepine. These compounds are noncompetitive antagonists and the histamine...

  9. Vasopressin receptor antagonists: Characteristics and clinical role.

    Rondon-Berrios, Helbert; Berl, Tomas

    2016-03-01

    Hyponatremia, the most common electrolyte disorder in hospitalized patients is associated with increased risk of mortality even when mild and apparently asymptomatic. Likewise morbidity manifested as attention deficits, gait disturbances, falls, fractures, and osteoporosis is more prevalent in hyponatremic subjects. Hyponatremia also generates a significant financial burden. Therefore, it is important to explore approaches that effectively and safely treat hyponatremia. Currently available strategies are physiologically sound and affordable but lack evidence from clinical trials and are limited by variable efficacy, slow response, and/or poor compliance. The recent emergence of vasopressin receptor antagonists provides a class of drugs that target the primary pathophysiological mechanism, namely vasopressin mediated impairment of free water excretion. This review summarizes the historical development, pharmacology, clinical trials supporting efficacy and safety, shortcomings, as well as practical suggestions for the use of vasopressin receptor antagonists. PMID:27156765

  10. Bispyridinium Compounds Inhibit Both Muscle and Neuronal Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors in Human Cell Lines.

    Avi Ring

    Full Text Available Standard treatment of poisoning by organophosphorus anticholinesterases uses atropine to reduce the muscarinic effects of acetylcholine accumulation and oximes to reactivate acetylcholinesterase (the effectiveness of which depends on the specific anticholinesterase, but does not directly address the nicotinic effects of poisoning. Bispyridinium molecules which act as noncompetitive antagonists at nicotinic acetylcholine receptors have been identified as promising compounds and one has been shown to improve survival following organophosphorus poisoning in guinea-pigs. Here, we have investigated the structural requirements for antagonism and compared inhibitory potency of these compounds at muscle and neuronal nicotinic receptors and acetylcholinesterase. A series of compounds was synthesised, in which the length of the polymethylene linker between the two pyridinium moieties was increased sequentially from one to ten carbon atoms. Their effects on nicotinic receptor-mediated calcium responses were tested in muscle-derived (CN21 and neuronal (SH-SY5Y cells. Their ability to inhibit acetylcholinesterase activity was tested using human erythrocyte ghosts. In both cell lines, the nicotinic response was inhibited in a dose-dependent manner and the inhibitory potency of the compounds increased with greater linker length between the two pyridinium moieties, as did their inhibitory potency for human acetylcholinesterase activity in vitro. These results demonstrate that bispyridinium compounds inhibit both neuronal and muscle nicotinic receptors and that their potency depends on the length of the hydrocarbon chain linking the two pyridinium moieties. Knowledge of structure-activity relationships will aid the optimisation of molecular structures for therapeutic use against the nicotinic effects of organophosphorus poisoning.

  11. Modulation of acetylcholine release from rat striatal slices by the GABA/benzodiazepine receptor complex

    Supavilai, P.; Karobath, M.

    1985-02-04

    GABA, THIP and muscimol enhance spontaneous and inhibit electrically induced release of tritium labelled compounds from rat striatal slices which have been pre-labelled with /sup 3/H-choline. Baclofen is inactive in this model. Muscimol can inhibit electrically induced release of tritiated material by approximately 75% with half maximal effects at 2 ..mu..M. The response to muscimol can be blocked by the GABA antagonists bicuculline methobromide, picrotoxin, anisatin, R 5135 and CPTBO (cyclopentylbicyclophosphate). Drugs which act on the benzodiazepine receptor (BR) require the presence of muscimol to be effective and they modulate the effects of muscimol in a bidirectional manner. Thus BR agonists enhance and inverse BR agonists attenuate the inhibitory effects of muscimol on electrically induced release. Ro15-1788, a BR antagonist, does not modulate the inhibitory effects of muscimol but antagonizes the actions of clonazepam, a BR agonist, and of DMCM, an inverse BR agonist. These results demonstrate that a GABA/benzodiazepine receptor complex can modulate acetylcholine release from rat striatal slices in vitro. 24 references, 3 figures, 5 table.

  12. Modulation of acetylcholine release from rat striatal slices by the GABA/benzodiazepine receptor complex

    GABA, THIP and muscimol enhance spontaneous and inhibit electrically induced release of tritium labelled compounds from rat striatal slices which have been pre-labelled with 3H-choline. Baclofen is inactive in this model. Muscimol can inhibit electrically induced release of tritiated material by approximately 75% with half maximal effects at 2 μM. The response to muscimol can be blocked by the GABA antagonists bicuculline methobromide, picrotoxin, anisatin, R 5135 and CPTBO (cyclopentylbicyclophosphate). Drugs which act on the benzodiazepine receptor (BR) require the presence of muscimol to be effective and they modulate the effects of muscimol in a bidirectional manner. Thus BR agonists enhance and inverse BR agonists attenuate the inhibitory effects of muscimol on electrically induced release. Ro15-1788, a BR antagonist, does not modulate the inhibitory effects of muscimol but antagonizes the actions of clonazepam, a BR agonist, and of DMCM, an inverse BR agonist. These results demonstrate that a GABA/benzodiazepine receptor complex can modulate acetylcholine release from rat striatal slices in vitro. 24 references, 3 figures, 5 table

  13. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptor-based blockade: applications of molecular targets for cancer therapy.

    Wu, Chih-Hsiung; Lee, Chia-Hwa; Ho, Yuan-Soon

    2011-06-01

    The nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) was first characterized in 1970 as a membrane receptor of a neurotransmitter and an ion channel. nAChRs have been shown to be involved in smoking-induced cancer formation in multiple types of human cancer cells. In vitro and in vivo animal studies have shown that homopentameric nAChR inhibitors, such as methyllycaconitine and α-Bgtx, can attenuate nicotine-induced proliferative, angiogenic, and metastatic effects in lung, colon, and bladder cancer cells. Recent publications have shown that α9-nAChR is important for breast cancer formation, and in many in vivo studies, α9-nAChR-specific antagonists (e.g., α-ImI, α-ImI, Vc1.1, RgIA, and It14a) produced an analgesic effect. Vc1.1 functions in a variety of animal pain models and currently has entered phase II clinical trials. For cancer therapy, natural compounds such as garcinol and EGCG have been found to block nicotine- and estrogen-induced breast cancer cell proliferation through inhibition of the α9-nAChR signaling pathway. A detailed investigation of the carcinogenic effects of nAChRs and their specific antagonists would enhance our understanding of their value as targets for clinical translation. PMID:21444681

  14. Effect of organophosphorus insecticides on phosphorylation of the M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor

    Shuyin Li; Liming Zou; Carry Pope

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Organophosphorus insecticides may promote the accumulation of acetylcholine at synapses and the neuromuscular junction by inhibiting acetylcholinesterase activity to cause disturbance of neural signal conduction and induce a toxic reaction. Organophosphorus insecticides may act on M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors, whose combination with G proteins is regulated by phosphorylation of G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2.OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effects of organophosphorus insecticides on the phosphorylation of G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2-mediated M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors and to reveal other possible actions of organophosphorus insecticides.DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: An observational study, which was performed in the Central Laboratory of Shenyang Medical College, and Department of Physiological Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Oklahoma State University from June 2002 to December 2004.METHODS: The M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor was extracted and purified from pig brain using affinity chromatography. Subsequently, the purified M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor, G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2, and [OP32] ATP were incubated with different concentrations of paraoxon and chlorpyrifos oxon together. The mixture then underwent polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and the gel film was dried and radioactively autographed to detect phosphorylation of the M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor. Finally, the radio-labeled phosphorylated M2 receptor protein band was excised for counting with an isotope liquid scintillation counter.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Effects of chlorpyrifos oxon, paraoxon, chlorpyrifos, and parathion in different concentrations on the phosphorylation of the M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor; effects of chlorpyrifos oxon on the phosphorylation of the adrenergic receptor.CONCLUSION: Different kinds of organophosphorus insecticides have different effects on the phosphorylation of the G protein

  15. Schizophrenia and the alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor.

    Martin, Laura F; Freedman, Robert

    2007-01-01

    In addition to the devastating symptoms of psychosis, many people with schizophrenia also suffer from cognitive impairment. These cognitive symptoms lead to marked dysfunction and can impact employability, treatment adherence, and social skills. Deficits in P50 auditory gating are associated with attentional impairment and may contribute to cognitive symptoms and perceptual disturbances. This nicotinic cholinergic-mediated inhibitory process represents a potential new target for therapeutic intervention in schizophrenia. This chapter will review evidence implicating the nicotinic cholinergic, and specifically, the alpha7 nicotinic receptor system in the pathology of schizophrenia. Impaired auditory sensory gating has been linked to the alpha7 nicotinic receptor gene on the chromosome 15q14 locus. A majority of persons with schizophrenia are heavy smokers. Although nicotine can acutely reverse diminished auditory sensory gating in people with schizophrenia, this effect is lost on a chronic basis due to receptor desensitization. The alpha7 nicotinic agonist 3-(2,4 dimethoxy)benzylidene-anabaseine (DMXBA) can also enhance auditory sensory gating in animal models. DMXBA is well tolerated in humans and a new study in persons with schizophrenia has found that DMXBA enhances both P50 auditory gating and cognition. alpha7 Nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonists appear to be viable candidates for the treatment of cognitive disturbances in schizophrenia. PMID:17349863

  16. Azines as histamine H4 receptor antagonists.

    Lazewska, Dorota; Kiec-Kononowicz, Katarzyna

    2012-01-01

    Since 2000, when the histamine H4 receptor (H4R) was cloned, it has constituted an interesting target for drug development. Pharmacological studies suggest the potential utility of histamine H4R antagonists/inverse agonists in the treatment of inflammatory diseases, e.g. allergic rhinitis, asthma, atopic dermatitis, colitis, or pruritus. The first H4R ligands were non-selective compounds, but intensive chemical and pharmacological work has led to the discovery of highly potent and selective H4R antagonists (e.g. JNJ7777120, CZC-13788, PF-2988403, A-940894, A-987306). The first compound (UR-63325) has finally entered into clinical studies for the treatment of allergic respiratory diseases (completing the phase I ascending dose trial) and has been found to be safe and well tolerated. The number of scientific publications and patent applications in the H4 field is increasing annually. Among the diverse chemical structures of the H4R antagonists described a 2-aminopyrimidine scaffold is repeatedly found. This review looked at recent advances in the search for H4R antagonists as reflected in patent applications/patents and peer-reviewed publications over the last two years. The work concerns azines (mono-, di-, triazines) and their fused analogues. The chemistry and pharmacology has been described. PMID:22202103

  17. Valence of acetylcholine-receptor-antibody-titers in myasthenia gravis

    In a retrospective study in 47 patients with myasthenia gravis acetylcholine-receptor-antibody-titers (AChR-AB) were correlated with the severity of the disease. In 18 patients the course of titers was studied and two groups of patients could be differentiated: patients with relative constant and patients with fluctuating titers. Age, age of begin of myasthenia and sex did not influence the titers. Also the duration of the disease and the severity of symptoms did not influence the level of AChR-AB-titers. In this retrospective study the influence of immunsuppressive therapy on the intra-individual course of AB-titers and their correlation with the clinical symptoms could not be judged. Measurement of AChR-AB is of value for the diagnosis of myasthenia gravis and important for judging the clinical course and the effect of therapy. (Author)

  18. Conformationally restrained carbamoylcholine homologues. Synthesis, pharmacology at neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and biostructural considerations

    de la Fuente Revenga, M; Balle, Thomas; Jensen, Anders A.; Frølund, Bente

    2015-01-01

    Exploration of small selective ligands for the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) based on acetylcholine (ACh) has led to the development of potent agonists with clear preference for the α4β2 nAChR, the most prevalent nAChR subtype in the central nervous system. In this work we present the...

  19. Endothelin receptor antagonists in pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    Dupuis, J; Hoeper, M M

    2008-02-01

    The endothelin (ET) system, especially ET-1 and the ET(A) and ET(B) receptors, has been implicated in the pathogenesis of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Together with prostanoids and phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitors, ET receptor antagonists have become mainstays in the current treatment of PAH. Three substances are currently available for the treatment of PAH. One of these substances, bosentan, blocks both ET(A) and ET(B) receptors, whereas the two other compounds, sitaxsentan and ambrisentan, are more selective blockers of the ET(A) receptor. There is ongoing debate as to whether selective or nonselective ET receptor blockade is advantageous in the setting of PAH, although there is no clear evidence that receptor selectivity is relevant with regard to the clinical effects of these drugs. For the time being, other features, such as safety profiles and the potential for pharmacokinetic interactions with other drugs used in the treatment of PAH, may be more important than selectivity or nonselectivity when selecting treatments for individual patients. PMID:18238950

  20. Serotonin 2A receptor antagonists for treatment of schizophrenia

    Ebdrup, Bjørn Hylsebeck; Rasmussen, Hans; Arnt, Jørn; Glenthøj, Birte Yding

    2011-01-01

    receptor antagonists is evaluated. Moreover, the investigational pipeline of major pharmaceutical companies is examined and an Internet search conducted to identify other pharmaceutical companies investigating 5-HT2A receptor antagonists for the treatment of schizophrenia. Expert opinion: 5-HT2A receptor...

  1. Brain α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in MPTP-lesioned monkeys and parkinsonian patients.

    Morissette, Marc; Morin, Nicolas; Grégoire, Laurent; Rajput, Alex; Rajput, Ali H; Di Paolo, Thérèse

    2016-06-01

    L-DOPA-induced dyskinesias (LID) appear in the majority of Parkinson's disease (PD) patients. Nicotinic acetylcholine (nACh) receptor-mediated signaling has been implicated in PD and LID and modulation of brain α7 nACh receptors might be a potential therapeutic target for PD. This study used [(125)I]α-Bungarotoxin autoradiography to investigate α7 nACh receptors in LID in post-mortem brains from PD patients (n=14) and control subjects (n=11), and from 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)-lesioned monkeys treated with saline (n=5), L-DOPA (n=4) or L-DOPA+2-methyl-6-(phenylethynyl)pyridine (MPEP) (n=5), and control monkeys (n=4). MPEP is the prototypal metabotropic glutamate 5 (mGlu5) receptor antagonist; it reduced the development of LID in these monkeys. [(125)I]α-Bungarotoxin specific binding to striatal and pallidal α7 nACh receptors were only increased in L-DOPA-treated dyskinetic MPTP monkeys as compared to controls, saline and L-DOPA+MPEP MPTP monkeys; dyskinesia scores correlated positively with this binding. The total group of Parkinsonian patients had higher [(125)I]α-Bungarotoxin specific binding compared to controls in the caudate nucleus but not in the putamen. PD patients without motor complications had higher [(125)I]α-Bungarotoxin specific binding compared to controls only in the caudate nucleus. PD patients with LID only had higher [(125)I]α-Bungarotoxin specific binding compared to controls in the caudate nucleus and compared to those without motor complications and controls in the putamen. PD patients with wearing-off only, had [(125)I]α-Bungarotoxin specific binding at control values in the caudate nucleus and lower in the putamen. Reduced motor complications were associated with normal striatal α7 nACh receptors, suggesting the potential of this receptor to manage motor complications in PD. PMID:27038656

  2. Molecular Modeling of the M3 Acetylcholine Muscarinic Receptor and Its Binding Site

    Marlet Martinez-Archundia

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study reports the results of a combined computational and site mutagenesis study designed to provide new insights into the orthosteric binding site of the human M3 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor. For this purpose a three-dimensional structure of the receptor at atomic resolution was built by homology modeling, using the crystallographic structure of bovine rhodopsin as a template. Then, the antagonist N-methylscopolamine was docked in the model and subsequently embedded in a lipid bilayer for its refinement using molecular dynamics simulations. Two different lipid bilayer compositions were studied: one component palmitoyl-oleyl phosphatidylcholine (POPC and two-component palmitoyl-oleyl phosphatidylcholine/palmitoyl-oleyl phosphatidylserine (POPC-POPS. Analysis of the results suggested that residues F222 and T235 may contribute to the ligand-receptor recognition. Accordingly, alanine mutants at positions 222 and 235 were constructed, expressed, and their binding properties determined. The results confirmed the role of these residues in modulating the binding affinity of the ligand.

  3. Evaluation of PET Radioligands for the neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor

    Full text: A-186253.1, a compound made by Abbott laboratories, was labelled with carbon-11 and evaluated as a PET ligand for the neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR). The compound was labelled with C-11 by methylation with 11C-MeI of the desmethyl precursor A-183828.1. The affinity of A-186253.1 for the α4β2 and the α7 subtype of the nAChR was determined in displacement studies. PET-studies were performed in rats and pigs Inhibitory constants (Ki) versus cytsine were 461 ± 99 pM for A-186253.1 and versus α-Bungarotoxin >100 μM. which means a very high selectivity for the α4β2-receptor (>227,000). Highest uptake of [11C]-A-186253.1 was observed in the thalamus where an increase in radiotracer uptake was seen until 45 min p.i.. Thereafter, the radiotracer concentration remained constant until the end of the scan indicating slow washout of [11C]-A-186253.1. Application of cold A-186253.1 (0.5 mg/kg) 40 min p.i. resulted in a decrease in radiotracer concentration in the thalamus and the cortex indicating displacement of [11C]-A-186253.1. Blockade studies with cytisine (0.5 mg/kg), a selective ligand for the α4β2 nicotinic receptor, showed just a slight reduction of the radioligand uptake in the thalamus and in the cortex whereas the blockade with cold A-186253.1 (1 mg/kg) resulted in a 50 % reduction. These results suggest, that 50 % of the [11C]-A-186253.1 in the brain corresponds to specifically bound radioligand, but not to the α4β2 subtype of the nicotinic receptor. (author)

  4. Increased expression of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor in stimulated muscle.

    O'Reilly, Clare; Pette, Dirk; Ohlendieck, Kay

    2003-01-10

    Chronic low-frequency stimulation has been used as a model for investigating responses of skeletal muscle fibres to enhanced neuromuscular activity under conditions of maximum activation. Fast-to-slow isoform shifting of markers of the sarcoplasmic reticulum and the contractile apparatus demonstrated successful fibre transitions prior to studying the effect of chronic electro-stimulation on the expression of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor. Comparative immunoblotting revealed that the alpha- and delta-subunits of the receptor were increased in 10-78 day stimulated specimens, while an associated component of the surface utrophin-glycoprotein complex, beta-dystroglycan, was not drastically changed in stimulated fast skeletal muscle. Previous studies have shown that electro-stimulation induces degeneration of fast glycolytic fibres, trans-differentiation leading to fast-to-slow fibre transitions and activation of muscle precursor cells. In analogy, our results indicate a molecular modification of the central functional unit of the post-synaptic muscle surface within existing neuromuscular junctions and/or during remodelling of nerve-muscle contacts. PMID:12504123

  5. Effects of two oxadiazolidinones on cholinesterases and acetylcholine receptors

    Inhibition of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyryl cholinesterase (BuChE) by 3-(2,3-dihydro-2,2-dimethyl-benzofuran-'7-yl)-5-methoxy-1,3,4-oxadiazol-2(3H)-one (DBOX) and 3-(2-methoxyphenyl)-5-methoxy-1,3,4-oxadiazol-2(3H)-one (MPOX) was measured by the Ellmann spectrophotometric method. Inhibition was quasi first order and irreversible. DBOX was 2-3 orders of magnitude more potent than MPOX. Housefly brain AChE and horse serum BuChE were more sensitive than AChEs of red blood cells or eel and Torpedo electric organs. It is suggested that the nonesteratic oxadiazolidinones are activated to carbanillates on the surface of the enzyme and produce a carbanillated enzyme which ages rapidly. Carbamate anticholinesterases protected AChE against carbanillation as they did against phosphorylation. At higher concentrations, the two oxadiazolidinones also affected binding of [125I] α bungarotoxin and [3H]perhydrohistrionicotoxin to Torpedo nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, but did not affect binding of [3H]quinuclidinyl benzilate to rat brain muscarinic receptors

  6. Therapeutic Potential of α7 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors.

    Bertrand, Daniel; Lee, Chih-Hung L; Flood, Dorothy; Marger, Fabrice; Donnelly-Roberts, Diana

    2015-10-01

    Progress in the fields of neuroscience and molecular biology has identified the forebrain cholinergic system as being important in many higher order brain functions. Further analysis of the genes encoding the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) has highlighted, in particular, the role of α7 nAChRs in these higher order brain functions as evidenced by their peculiar physiologic and pharmacological properties. As this receptor has gained the attention of scientists from academia and industry, our knowledge of its roles in various brain and bodily functions has increased immensely. We have also seen the development of small molecules that have further refined our understanding of the roles of α7 nAChRs, and these molecules have begun to be tested in clinical trials for several indications. Although a large body of data has confirmed a role of α7 nAChRs in cognition, the translation of small molecules affecting α7 nAChRs into therapeutics has to date only progressed to the stage of testing in clinical trials. Notably, however, most recent human genetic and biochemical studies are further underscoring the crucial role of α7 nAChRs and associated genes in multiple organ systems and disease states. The aim of this review is to discuss our current knowledge of α7 nAChRs and their relevance as a target in specific functional systems and disease states. PMID:26419447

  7. Expression of the α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor in human lung cells

    Schuller Hildegard M; Dhar Madhu; Plummer Howard K

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Background We and others have shown that one of the mechanisms of growth regulation of small cell lung cancer cell lines and cultured pulmonary neuroendocrine cells is by the binding of agonists to the α7 neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor. In addition, we have shown that the nicotine-derived carcinogenic nitrosamine, 4(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK), is a high affinity agonist for the α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor. In the present study, our goal was t...

  8. Nicotine induces fibrogenic changes in human liver via nicotinic acetylcholine receptors expressed on hepatic stellate cells

    Highlights: ► Cigarette smoke may induce liver fibrosis via nicotine receptors. ► Nicotine induces proliferation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs). ► Nicotine activates hepatic fibrogenic pathways. ► Nicotine receptor antagonists attenuate HSC proliferation. ► Nicotinic receptor antagonists may have utility as novel anti-fibrotic agents. -- Abstract: Background and aims: Cigarette smoke (CS) may cause liver fibrosis but possible involved mechanisms are unclear. Among the many chemicals in CS is nicotine – which affects cells through nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR). We studied the effects of nicotine, and involved pathways, on human primary hepatic stellate cells (hHSCs), the principal fibrogenic cells in the liver. We then determined possible disease relevance by assaying nAChR in liver samples from human non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Methods: hHSC were isolated from healthy human livers and nAChR expression analyzed – RT-PCR and Western blotting. Nicotine induction of hHSC proliferation, upregulation of collagen1-α2 and the pro-fibrogenic cytokine transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1) was determined along with involved intracellular signaling pathways. nAChR mRNA expression was finally analyzed in whole liver biopsies obtained from patients diagnosed with non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Results: hHSCs express muscle type (α1, β1, delta and epsilon) and neuronal type (α3, α6, α7, β2 and β4) nAChR subunits at the mRNA level. Among these subunits, α3, α7, β1 and ε were predominantly expressed as confirmed by Western blotting. Nicotine induced hHSC proliferation was attenuated by mecamylamine (p < 0.05). Additionally, collagen1-α2 and TGF-β1 mRNA expression were significantly upregulated by nicotine and inhibited by mecamylamine. α1 and α3-nAChR mRNA expression was significantly upregulated in NASH fibrosis compared to normal livers. Conclusion: Nicotine at levels in smokers’ blood is pro-fibrogenic, through

  9. Nicotine induces fibrogenic changes in human liver via nicotinic acetylcholine receptors expressed on hepatic stellate cells

    Soeda, Junpei; Morgan, Maelle; McKee, Chad; Mouralidarane, Angelina; Lin, ChingI [University College London, Centre for Hepatology, Royal Free Hospital, London NW3 2PF (United Kingdom); Roskams, Tania [Department of Morphology and Molecular Pathology, University of Leuven (Belgium); Oben, Jude A., E-mail: j.oben@ucl.ac.uk [University College London, Centre for Hepatology, Royal Free Hospital, London NW3 2PF (United Kingdom); Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Guy' s and St Thomas' Hospital, London SE1 7EH (United Kingdom)

    2012-01-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cigarette smoke may induce liver fibrosis via nicotine receptors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nicotine induces proliferation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nicotine activates hepatic fibrogenic pathways. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nicotine receptor antagonists attenuate HSC proliferation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nicotinic receptor antagonists may have utility as novel anti-fibrotic agents. -- Abstract: Background and aims: Cigarette smoke (CS) may cause liver fibrosis but possible involved mechanisms are unclear. Among the many chemicals in CS is nicotine - which affects cells through nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR). We studied the effects of nicotine, and involved pathways, on human primary hepatic stellate cells (hHSCs), the principal fibrogenic cells in the liver. We then determined possible disease relevance by assaying nAChR in liver samples from human non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Methods: hHSC were isolated from healthy human livers and nAChR expression analyzed - RT-PCR and Western blotting. Nicotine induction of hHSC proliferation, upregulation of collagen1-{alpha}2 and the pro-fibrogenic cytokine transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-{beta}1) was determined along with involved intracellular signaling pathways. nAChR mRNA expression was finally analyzed in whole liver biopsies obtained from patients diagnosed with non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Results: hHSCs express muscle type ({alpha}1, {beta}1, delta and epsilon) and neuronal type ({alpha}3, {alpha}6, {alpha}7, {beta}2 and {beta}4) nAChR subunits at the mRNA level. Among these subunits, {alpha}3, {alpha}7, {beta}1 and {epsilon} were predominantly expressed as confirmed by Western blotting. Nicotine induced hHSC proliferation was attenuated by mecamylamine (p < 0.05). Additionally, collagen1-{alpha}2 and TGF-{beta}1 mRNA expression were significantly upregulated by nicotine and inhibited by

  10. VISUALIZATION OF CHOLINOCEPTIVE NEURONS IN THE RAT NEOCORTEX - COLOCALIZATION OF MUSCARINIC AND NICOTINIC ACETYLCHOLINE-RECEPTORS

    VANDERZEE, EA; STREEFLAND, C; STROSBERG, AD; SCHRODER, H; LUITEN, PGM

    1992-01-01

    The present investigation analyzes the cellular distribution of muscarinic and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in rat neocortex, by use of monoclonal antibodies raised against purified receptor proteins. The degree of colocalization of both types of receptors was determined by way of immunofluores

  11. Visualization of cholinoceptive neurons in the rat neocortex : colocalization of muscarinic and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors

    Zee, E.A. van der; Streefland, C.; Strosberg, A.D.; Schröder, H.; Luiten, P.G.M.

    1992-01-01

    The present investigation analyzes the cellular distribution of muscarinic and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in rat neocortex, by use of monoclonal antibodies raised against purified receptor proteins. The degree of colocalization of both types of receptors was determined by way of immunofluores

  12. Cocaine Inhibition of Nicotinic Acetylcholine ReceptorsInfluences Dopamine Release

    Alexandra eAcevedo-Rodriguez

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs potently regulate dopamine (DA release in the striatum and alter cocaine’s ability to reinforce behaviors. Since cocaine is a weak nAChR inhibitor, we hypothesized that cocaine may alter DA release by inhibiting the nAChRs in DA terminals in the striatum and thus contribute to cocaine's reinforcing properties primarily associated with the inhibition of DA transporters. We found that biologically relevant concentrations of cocaine can mildly inhibit nAChR-mediated currents in midbrain DA neurons and consequently alter DA release in the dorsal and ventral striatum. At very high concentrations, cocaine also inhibits voltage-gated Na channels in DA neurons. Furthermore, our results show that partial inhibition of nAChRs by cocaine reduces evoked DA release. This diminution of DA release via nAChR inhibition more strongly influences release evoked at low or tonic stimulation frequencies than at higher (phasic stimulation frequencies, particularly in the dorsolateral striatum. This cocaine-induced shift favoring phasic DA release may contribute to the enhanced saliency and motivational value of cocaine-associated memories and behaviors.

  13. Alpha-conotoxins as pharmacological probes of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors

    Layla AZAM; J Michael MCINTOSH

    2009-01-01

    Cysteine-rich peptides from the venom of cone snails (Conus) target a wide variety of different ion channels. One family of conopeptides, the a-conotoxins, specifically target different isoforms of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) found both in the neuromuscular junction and central nervous system. This family is further divided into subfamilies based on the number of amino acids between cysteine residues. The exquisite subtype selectivity of certain a-conotoxins has been key to the characterization of native nAChR isoforms involved in modulation of neurotransmitter release, the pathophysiol-ogy of Parkinson's disease and nociception. Structure/function characterization of a-conotoxins has led to the development of analogs with improved potency and/or subtype selectivity. Cyclization of the backbone structure and addition of lipo-philic moieties has led to improved stability and bioavailability of a-conotoxins, thus paving the way for orally available therapeutics. The recent advances in phylogeny, exogenomics and molecular modeling promises the discovery of an even greater number of a-conotoxins and analogs with improved selectivity for specific subtypes of nAChRs.

  14. Novel positive allosteric modulators of the human α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor.

    Arias, Hugo R; Gu, Ruo-Xu; Feuerbach, Dominik; Guo, Bao-Bao; Ye, Yong; Wei, Dong-Qing

    2011-06-14

    The pharmacological activity of a series of novel amide derivatives was characterized on several nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (AChRs). Ca(2+) influx results indicate that these compounds are not agonists of the human (h) α4β2, α3β4, α7, and α1β1γδ AChRs; compounds 2-4 are specific positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) of hα7 AChRs, whereas compounds 1-4, 7, and 12 are noncompetitive antagonists of the other AChRs. Radioligand binding results indicate that PAMs do not inhibit binding of [(3)H]methyllycaconitine but enhance binding of [(3)H]epibatidine to hα7 AChRs, indicating that these compounds do not directly, but allosterically, interact with the hα7 agonist sites. Additional competition binding results indicate that the antagonistic action mediated by these compounds is produced by direct interaction with neither the phencyclidine site in the Torpedo AChR ion channel nor the imipramine and the agonist sites in the hα4β2 and hα3β4 AChRs. Molecular dynamics and docking results suggest that the binding site for compounds 2-4 is mainly located in the inner β-sheet of the hα7-α7 interface, ∼12 Å from the agonist locus. Hydrogen bond interactions between the amide group of the PAMs and the hα7 AChR binding site are found to be critical for their activity. The dual PAM and antagonistic activities elicited by compounds 2-4 might be therapeutically important. PMID:21510634

  15. DEFICIENCY OF INTERLEUKIN-1 RECEPTOR ANTAGONIST RESPONSIVE TO ANAKINRA

    SCHNELLBACHER, CHARLOTTE; CIOCCA, GIOVANNA; MENENDEZ, ROXANNA; Aksentijevich, Ivona; Goldbach-Mansky, Raphaela; DUARTE, ANAM.; RIVAS-CHACON, RAFAEL

    2012-01-01

    We describe a 3-month-old infant who presented to our institution with interleukin (IL)-1 receptor antagonist deficiency (DIRA), which consists of neutrophilic pustular dermatosis, periostitis, aseptic multifocal osteomyelitis, and persistently high acutephase reactants. Skin findings promptly improved upon initiation of treatment with anakinra (recombinant human IL-1 receptor antagonist), and the bony lesions and systemic inflammation resolved with continued therapy.

  16. Secreted Isoform of Human Lynx1 (SLURP-2): Spatial Structure and Pharmacology of Interactions with Different Types of Acetylcholine Receptors

    Lyukmanova, E. N.; Shulepko, M. A.; Shenkarev, Z. O.; Bychkov, M. L.; Paramonov, A. S.; Chugunov, A. O.; Kulbatskii, D. S.; Arvaniti, M.; Dolejsi, Eva; Schaer, T.; Arseniev, A. S.; Efremov, R. G.; Thomsen, M. S.; Dolezal, V.; Bertrand, D.; Dolgikh, D. A.; Kirpichnikov, M. P.

    2016-08-01

    Human-secreted Ly-6/uPAR-related protein-2 (SLURP-2) regulates the growth and differentiation of epithelial cells. Previously, the auto/paracrine activity of SLURP-2 was considered to be mediated via its interaction with the α3β2 subtype of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). Here, we describe the structure and pharmacology of a recombinant analogue of SLURP-2. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy revealed a ‘three-finger’ fold of SLURP-2 with a conserved β-structural core and three protruding loops. Affinity purification using cortical extracts revealed that SLURP-2 could interact with the α3, α4, α5, α7, β2, and β4 nAChR subunits, revealing its broader pharmacological profile. SLURP-2 inhibits acetylcholine-evoked currents at α4β2 and α3β2-nAChRs (IC50 ~0.17 and >3 μM, respectively) expressed in Xenopus oocytes. In contrast, at α7-nAChRs, SLURP-2 significantly enhances acetylcholine-evoked currents at concentrations inhibition at higher concentrations. SLURP-2 allosterically interacts with human M1 and M3 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) that are overexpressed in CHO cells. SLURP-2 was found to promote the proliferation of human oral keratinocytes via interactions with α3β2-nAChRs, while it inhibited cell growth via α7-nAChRs. SLURP-2/mAChRs interactions are also probably involved in the control of keratinocyte growth. Computer modeling revealed possible SLURP-2 binding to the ‘classical’ orthosteric agonist/antagonist binding sites at α7 and α3β2-nAChRs.

  17. Secreted Isoform of Human Lynx1 (SLURP-2): Spatial Structure and Pharmacology of Interactions with Different Types of Acetylcholine Receptors

    Lyukmanova, E. N.; Shulepko, M. A.; Shenkarev, Z. O.; Bychkov, M. L.; Paramonov, A. S.; Chugunov, A. O.; Kulbatskii, D. S.; Arvaniti, M.; Dolejsi, Eva; Schaer, T.; Arseniev, A. S.; Efremov, R. G.; Thomsen, M. S.; Dolezal, V.; Bertrand, D.; Dolgikh, D. A.; Kirpichnikov, M. P.

    2016-01-01

    Human-secreted Ly-6/uPAR-related protein-2 (SLURP-2) regulates the growth and differentiation of epithelial cells. Previously, the auto/paracrine activity of SLURP-2 was considered to be mediated via its interaction with the α3β2 subtype of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). Here, we describe the structure and pharmacology of a recombinant analogue of SLURP-2. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy revealed a ‘three-finger’ fold of SLURP-2 with a conserved β-structural core and three protruding loops. Affinity purification using cortical extracts revealed that SLURP-2 could interact with the α3, α4, α5, α7, β2, and β4 nAChR subunits, revealing its broader pharmacological profile. SLURP-2 inhibits acetylcholine-evoked currents at α4β2 and α3β2-nAChRs (IC50 ~0.17 and >3 μM, respectively) expressed in Xenopus oocytes. In contrast, at α7-nAChRs, SLURP-2 significantly enhances acetylcholine-evoked currents at concentrations <1 μM but induces inhibition at higher concentrations. SLURP-2 allosterically interacts with human M1 and M3 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) that are overexpressed in CHO cells. SLURP-2 was found to promote the proliferation of human oral keratinocytes via interactions with α3β2-nAChRs, while it inhibited cell growth via α7-nAChRs. SLURP-2/mAChRs interactions are also probably involved in the control of keratinocyte growth. Computer modeling revealed possible SLURP-2 binding to the ‘classical’ orthosteric agonist/antagonist binding sites at α7 and α3β2-nAChRs. PMID:27485575

  18. Positive allosteric action of eburnamonine on cardiac muscarinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Proska, J; Tucek, S

    1996-06-01

    It was discovered recently that alcuronium and strychnine (which is a precursor of alcuronium) allosterically increase the affinity of cardiac muscarinic receptors for the antagonist, N-methylscopolamine. We have now investigated the effects of l-eburnamonine and vincamine, which are both closely related to strychnine. In experiments on rat heart atria, l-eburnamonine was found to increase the binding of [3H]N-methylscopolamine with Ehlert's cooperativity coefficient alpha = 0.35, which indicates that the strength of its allosteric action is close to that of alcuronium and strychnine (alpha = 0.31 and 0.44, respectively). However, the affinity of l-eburnamonine for the cardiac muscarinic receptors is lower than the affinities of alcuronium and strychnine (KAR = 22.6 microM, 0.15 microM, and 3.4 microM, respectively). In spite of its extremely close similarity to l-eburnamonine, vincamine has a negative allosteric effect on the binding of [3H]N-methylscopolamine (alpha = 4.1; KAR = 22.8 microM). It is likely that a systematic investigation of the allosteric effects of the analogues of strychnine will not only yield new allosteric effectors on muscarinic receptors, but also clarify the structural features responsible for the direction (positive or negative) of their allosteric effect. PMID:8813554

  19. Multiple Targeting Approaches on Histamine H3 Receptor Antagonists

    Mohammad eKhanfar

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available With the very recent market approval of pitolisant (Wakix®, the interest in clinical applications of novel multifunctional histamine H3 receptor antagonists has clearly increased. Since histamine H3 receptor antagonists in clinical development have been tested for a variety of different indications, the combination of pharmacological properties in one molecule for improved pharmacological effects and reduced unwanted side-effects is rationally based on the increasing knowledge on the complex neurotransmitter regulations. The polypharmacological approaches on histamine H3 receptor antagonists on different G-protein coupled receptors, transporters, enzymes as well as on NO-signaling mechanism are described, supported with some lead structures.

  20. Physiological and biochemical studies of newly synthesized muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in embryonic chicken heart

    Exposure of either chicken embryos in ovo or cultured embryonic chicken cardiac cells in vitro to the muscarinic agonist carbachol results in a 70-90% decrease in the number of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChR) expressed in cardiac cells. Block of agonist-receptor interactions in ovo with the antagonist atropine or removal of the agonist in vitro results in a gradual increase in mAChR number, reaching the control level in 14 hr. Measurements of physiological sensitivity of atria or cultured cells show that, even after the complete recovery of receptor number, the sensitivity to agonist is reduced. The sensitivity of the mAChR-mediated inhibition of adenylate cyclase is also decreased at this time. Newly synthesized mAChR which appear following affinity alkylation in cultured cells are also poorly coupled to the stimulation of 86Rb+ efflux, indicating that decreased physiological sensitivity is not due to an unknown effect of long-term agonist exposure on general cellular function, but rather reflects an intrinsic property of newly synthesized mAChR. This increase in sensitivity is also not blocked by cycloheximide. The increase in sensitivity of the mAChR-mediated responses is due neither to a lack of expression of newly synthesized mAChR on the surface nor to reduced agonist affinity of the mAChR. The diminished sensitivity and subsequent maturation observed in cells containing newly synthesized receptors is due either to a small change in mAChR, or to a change in an as-yet-undefined component of the mAChR transduction system; this alteration represents a novel locus for modulation of cholinergic signals in the heart

  1. Effects of the α subunit on imidacloprid sensitivity of recombinant nicotinic acetylcholine receptors

    Matsuda, K; Buckingham, S D; Freeman, J.C.; Squire, M D; Baylis, H. A.; Sattelle, D B

    1998-01-01

    Imidacloprid is a new insecticide with selective toxicity for insects over vertebrates. Recombinant (α4β2) chicken neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) and a hybrid nicotinic AChR formed by co-expression of a Drosophila melanogaster neuronal α subunit (SAD) with the chicken β2 subunit were heterologously expressed in Xenopus oocytes by nuclear injection of cDNAs. The agonist actions of imidacloprid and other nicotinic AChR ligands ((+)-epibatidine, (−)-nicotine and acetylcholine...

  2. Acetylcholine receptors in dementia and mild cognitive impairment

    Sabri, Osama; Kendziorra, Kai [University of Leipzig, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Leipzig (Germany); Wolf, Henrike; Gertz, Hermann-Josef [University of Leipzig, Department of Psychiatry, Leipzig (Germany); Brust, Peter [Institute of Interdisciplinary Isotope Research, Leipzig (Germany)

    2008-03-15

    To clarify whether changes in the cholinergic transmission occur early in the course of Alzheimer's disease (AD), we carried out positron emission tomography (PET) with the radioligand 2-[{sup 18}F]F-A-85380, which is supposed to be specific for {alpha}4{beta}2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). We included patients with moderate to severe AD and patients with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (MCI), presumed to present preclinical AD. Both patients with AD and MCI showed significant reductions in {alpha}4{beta}2 nAChRs in brain regions typically affected by AD pathology. These findings indicate that a reduction in {alpha}4{beta}2 nAChRs occurs during early symptomatic stages of AD. The {alpha}4{beta}2 nAChR availability in these regions correlated with the severity of cognitive impairment, indicating a stage sensitivity of the {alpha}4{beta}2 nAChR status. Together, our results provide evidence for the potential of 2-[{sup 18}]F-A-85380 nAChR PET in the diagnosis of patients at risk for AD. Because of the extraordinary long acquisition time with 2-[{sup 18}F]F-A-85380, we developed the new {alpha}4{beta}2 nAChR-specific radioligands (+)- and (-)-[{sup 18}F]norchloro-fluoro-homoepibatidine (NCFHEB) and evaluated them preclinically. (-)-[{sup 18}F]NCFHEB shows twofold higher brain uptake and significantly shorter acquisition times. Therefore, (-)-[{sup 18}F]NCFHEB should be a suitable radioligand for larger clinical investigations. (orig.)

  3. Acetylcholine receptors in dementia and mild cognitive impairment

    To clarify whether changes in the cholinergic transmission occur early in the course of Alzheimer's disease (AD), we carried out positron emission tomography (PET) with the radioligand 2-[18F]F-A-85380, which is supposed to be specific for α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). We included patients with moderate to severe AD and patients with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (MCI), presumed to present preclinical AD. Both patients with AD and MCI showed significant reductions in α4β2 nAChRs in brain regions typically affected by AD pathology. These findings indicate that a reduction in α4β2 nAChRs occurs during early symptomatic stages of AD. The α4β2 nAChR availability in these regions correlated with the severity of cognitive impairment, indicating a stage sensitivity of the α4β2 nAChR status. Together, our results provide evidence for the potential of 2-[18]F-A-85380 nAChR PET in the diagnosis of patients at risk for AD. Because of the extraordinary long acquisition time with 2-[18F]F-A-85380, we developed the new α4β2 nAChR-specific radioligands (+)- and (-)-[18F]norchloro-fluoro-homoepibatidine (NCFHEB) and evaluated them preclinically. (-)-[18F]NCFHEB shows twofold higher brain uptake and significantly shorter acquisition times. Therefore, (-)-[18F]NCFHEB should be a suitable radioligand for larger clinical investigations. (orig.)

  4. Enhanced self-administration of alcohol in muscarinic acetylcholine M4 receptor knockout mice

    de la Cour, Cecilie; Sørensen, Gunnar; Wörtwein, Gitta;

    2015-01-01

    Modulation of cholinergic neurotransmission via nicotinic acetylcholine receptors is known to alter alcohol-drinking behavior. It is not known if muscarinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes have similar effects. The muscarinic M4 receptor is highly expressed in the brain reinforcement system and i......4+/+ littermates. The highest alcohol concentration used (10%) did not immediately result in divergent drinking patterns, but after 4 weeks of 10% alcohol self-administration, baseline levels as well as a pattern of M4-/- mice consuming more alcohol than their M4+/+ controls were re...... as a potential target for pharmacological (positive allosteric modulators or future agonists) treatment of alcohol use disorders....

  5. Visualization of cholinoceptive neurons in the rat neocortex: colocalization of muscarinic and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors

    Zee, E.A. van der; Streefland, C.; Strosberg, A D; Schröder, H.; Luiten, P.G.M.

    1992-01-01

    The present investigation analyzes the cellular distribution of muscarinic and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in rat neocortex, by use of monoclonal antibodies raised against purified receptor proteins. The degree of colocalization of both types of receptors was determined by way of immunofluorescent double-labeling techniques. For both classes of receptors, pyramidal and nonpyramidal cells were found immunostained and an identical laminar distribution pattern of immunopositive neurons in ...

  6. Neuronal Acetylcholine Nicotinic Receptors as New Targets for Lung Cancer Treatment.

    Mucchietto, Vanessa; Crespi, Arianna; Fasoli, Francesca; Clementi, Francesco; Gotti, Cecilia

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Smoking accounts for approximately 70% of the cases of non- small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and 90% of the cases of small-cell lung cancer (SCLC), although some patients develop lung cancer without a history of smoking. Nicotine is the most active addictive component of tobacco smoke. It does not initiate tumorigenesis in humans and rodents, but it alters the pathophysiology of lung cells by inducing the secretion of growth factors, neurotransmitters and cytokines, and promotes tumour growth and metastases by inducing cell cycle progression, migration, invasion, angiogenesis and the evasion of apoptosis. Most of these effects are a result of nicotine binding and activation of cell-surface neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) and downstream intracellular signalling cascades, and many are blocked by nAChR subtype-selective antagonists. Recent genome-wide association studies have revealed single nucleotide polymorphisms of nAChR subunits that influence nicotine dependence and lung cancer. This review describes the molecular basis of nAChR structural and functional diversity in normal and cancer lung cells, and the genetic alterations facilitating smoking-induced lung cancers. It also summarises current knowledge concerning the intracellular pathways activated by nicotine and other compounds present in tobacco smoke. PMID:26845123

  7. Alpha9 alpha10 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors as target for the treatment of chronic pain.

    Del Bufalo, Alessandra; Cesario, Alfredo; Salinaro, Gianluca; Fini, Massimo; Russo, Patrizia

    2014-01-01

    Chronic pain is a widespread healthcare problem affecting not only the patient but in many ways all the society. Chronic pain is a disease itself that endures for a long period of time and it is resistant to the majority of medical treatments that provide modest improvements in pain and minimum improvements in physical and emotional functioning. More co-existing chronic pain conditions may be present in the same individual (patient). The α9α10 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) may be a potential target in the pathophysiology of chronic pain, as well in the development of breast and lung cancers. α-conotoxins (α-CNT) are small peptides used offensively by carnivorous marine snails known as Conus that target nAChR. Among α-CNT there are potent and selective antagonists of α9α10 nAChR such as RgIA and Vc1.1 that produces both acute and long lasting analgesia. Moreover, these peptides accelerate the recovery of nerve function after injury, likely through immune/inflammatory-mediated mechanisms. We review the background, findings, implications and problems in using compounds that act on α9α10 nAChR. PMID:24641230

  8. Oseltamivir produces hypothermic and neuromuscular effects by inhibition of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor functions: comparison to procaine and bupropion.

    Fukushima, Akihiro; Chazono, Kaori; Hashimoto, Yuichi; Iwajima, Yui; Yamamoto, Shohei; Maeda, Yasuhiro; Ohsawa, Masahiro; Ono, Hideki

    2015-09-01

    Oseltamivir, an anti-influenza virus drug, induces marked hypothermia in normal mice. We have proposed that the hypothermic effect arises from inhibition of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor function of sympathetic ganglion neurons which innervate the brown adipose tissue (a heat generator). It has been reported that local anesthetics inhibit nicotinic acetylcholine receptor function by acting on its ionic channels, and that bupropion, a nicotinic antagonist, induces hypothermia. In this study, we compared the effects of oseltamivir, procaine and bupropion on body temperature, cardiovascular function and neuromuscular transmission. Intraperitoneal administration of oseltamivir (100mg/kg), procaine (86.6mg/kg) and bupropion (86.7mg/kg) lowered the core body temperature of normal mice. At lower doses (10-30mg/kg oseltamivir, 8.7-26mg/kg procaine and bupropion), when administered subcutaneously, the three drugs antagonized the hypothermia induced by intraperitoneal injection of nicotine (1mg/kg). In anesthetized rats, intravenous oseltamivir (30-100mg/kg), procaine (10mg/kg) and bupropion (10mg/kg) induced hypotension and bradycardia. Oseltamivir alone (100mg/kg) did not inhibit neuromuscular twitch contraction of rats, but at 3-30mg/kg it augmented the muscle-relaxing effect of d-tubocurarine. Similar effects were observed when lower doses of procaine (10-30mg/kg) and bupropion (3-10mg/kg) were administered, suggesting that systemic administration of oseltamivir inhibits muscular nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. These results support the idea that the hypothermic effect of oseltamivir is due to its effects on sympathetic ganglia which innervate the brown adipose tissue, and suggest that oseltamivir may exert non-selective ion channel blocking effects like those of ester-type local anesthetics. PMID:26049014

  9. Theoretical investigation of interaction between the set of ligands and α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor

    Glukhova, O. E.; Prytkova, T. R.; Shmygin, D. S.

    2016-03-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are neuron receptor proteins that provide a transmission of nerve impulse through the synapses. They are composed of a pentametric assembly of five homologous subunits (5 α7 subunits for α7nAChR, for example), oriented around the central pore. These receptors might be found in the chemical synapses of central and peripheral nervous system, and also in the neuromuscular synapses. Transmembrane domain of the one of such receptors constitutes ion channel. The conductive properties of ion channel strongly depend on the receptor conformation changes in the response of binding with some molecule, f.e. acetylcholine. Investigation of interaction between ligands and acetylcholine receptor is important for drug design. In this work we investigate theoretically the interaction between the set of different ligands (such as vanillin, thymoquinone, etc.) and the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (primarily with subunit of the α7nAChR) by different methods and packages (AutodockVina, GROMACS, KVAZAR, HARLEM, VMD). We calculate interaction energy between different ligands in the subunit using molecular dynamics. On the base of obtained calculation results and using molecular docking we found an optimal location of different ligands in the subunit.

  10. Insensitive Acetylcholine Receptor Conferring Resistance of Plutella xylostella to Nereistoxin Insecticides

    CHENG Luo-gen; YU Guang; CHEN Zi-hao; LI Zhong-yin

    2008-01-01

    The combinative rate measurement of (3-[Ⅰ125] iodotyrosyl) α-bungarotoxin was applied in the analysis of the relation between nerve acetylcholine receptor and three types of insecticide resistance in diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella (L.). In the dimehypo-resistant strain and in the cartap-resistant strain, the nerve acetylcholine receptor showed the remarkable insensitivity to dimehypo and cartap, of which the binding rate to ligand was approximately 66 and 60%, respectively, of the susceptible strain. The sensitivity to deltamethrin in the deltamethrin-resistant strain did not show visible change. These results indicated that the decline in the sensitivity of nerve acetylcholine receptor to insecticide might be a potential mechanism to nereistoxin insecticides resistance in the diamondback moth.

  11. Rapid antidepressant actions of scopolamine: Role of medial prefrontal cortex and M1-subtype muscarinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Navarria, Andrea; Wohleb, Eric S; Voleti, Bhavya; Ota, Kristie T; Dutheil, Sophie; Lepack, Ashley E; Dwyer, Jason M; Fuchikami, Manabu; Becker, Astrid; Drago, Filippo; Duman, Ronald S

    2015-10-01

    Clinical studies demonstrate that scopolamine, a non-selective muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAchR) antagonist, produces rapid therapeutic effects in depressed patients, and preclinical studies report that the actions of scopolamine require glutamate receptor activation and the mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1). The present study extends these findings to determine the role of the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and specific muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (M-AchR) subtypes in the actions of scopolamine. The administration of scopolamine increases the activity marker Fos in the mPFC, including the infralimbic (IL) and prelimbic (PrL) subregions. Microinfusions of scopolamine into either the IL or the PrL produced significant antidepressant responses in the forced swim test, and neuronal silencing of IL or PrL blocked the antidepressant effects of systemic scopolamine. The results also demonstrate that the systemic administration of a selective M1-AChR antagonist, VU0255035, produced an antidepressant response and stimulated mTORC1 signaling in the PFC, similar to the actions of scopolamine. Finally, we used a chronic unpredictable stress model as a more rigorous test of rapid antidepressant actions and found that a single dose of scopolamine or VU0255035 blocked the anhedonic response caused by CUS, an effect that requires the chronic administration of typical antidepressants. Taken together, these findings indicate that mPFC is a critical mediator of the behavioral actions of scopolamine and identify the M1-AChR as a therapeutic target for the development of novel and selective rapid-acting antidepressants. PMID:26102021

  12. Stimulation of brain muscarinic acetylcholine receptors acutely reverses radiogenic hypodipsia

    A sufficiently large dose of ionizing radiation produces changes in water consumption. However, the direction, durations, and physiological substrates of these alterations remain in question. Here we report a 5-d hypodipsia in rats exposed to 600 rads 60Co but a more transient, albeit larger, reduction in drinking after 1000 60Co. Brain cholinergic neurons have been implicated as mediators of thirst. Therefore, we explored the role of hypothalamic muscarinic receptors in the production of radiation-induced hypodipsia. This was accomplished through the intrahypothalamic injection of carbachol (a muscarinic agonist) or atropine (a muscarinic antagonist) in irradiated rats. Intracranial carbachol produced acute reversal of radiogenic hypodipsia while atropine potentiated the hypodipsia. These post-irradiation drug-induced behaviors were similar to those observed after the same drug treatments before irradiation. Since cholinergic neuronal functions persist and are labile (can be pharmacologically stimulated and blocked) after irradiation, this suggests that other neuronal systems and/or neurochemicals may be more prominently involved in radiogenic hypodipsia

  13. Inhibition of cortical acetylcholine release and cognitive performance by histamine H3 receptor activation in rats.

    Blandina, P.; Giorgetti, M.; L. Bartolini; M.Cecchi; Timmerman, H.; Leurs, R.; Pepeu, G; Giovannini, M. G.

    1996-01-01

    1. The effects of histamine and agents at histamine receptors on spontaneous and 100 mM K(+)-evoked release of acetylcholine, measured by microdialysis from the cortex of freely moving, rats, and on cognitive tests are described. 2. Local administration of histamine (0.1-100 microM) failed to affect spontaneous but inhibited 100 mM K(+)-stimulated release of acetylcholine up to about 50%. The H3 receptor agonists (R)-alpha-methylhistamine (RAMH) (0.1-10 microM), imetit (0.01-10 microM) and im...

  14. Deficiency of interleukin-1 receptor antagonist responsive to anakinra.

    Schnellbacher, Charlotte; Ciocca, Giovanna; Menendez, Roxanna; Aksentijevich, Ivona; Goldbach-Mansky, Raphaela; Duarte, Ana M; Rivas-Chacon, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    We describe a 3-month-old infant who presented to our institution with interleukin (IL)-1 receptor antagonist deficiency (DIRA), which consists of neutrophilic pustular dermatosis, periostitis, aseptic multifocal osteomyelitis, and persistently high acute-phase reactants. Skin findings promptly improved upon initiation of treatment with anakinra (recombinant human IL-1 receptor antagonist), and the bony lesions and systemic inflammation resolved with continued therapy. PMID:22471702

  15. Interleukin-2 receptor antagonists as induction therapy after heart transplantation

    Møller, Christian H; Gustafsson, Finn; Gluud, Christian;

    2008-01-01

    About half of the transplantation centers use induction therapy after heart transplantation. Interleukin-2 receptor antagonists (IL-2Ras) are used increasingly for induction therapy. We conducted a systematic review of randomized trials assessing IL-2Ras.......About half of the transplantation centers use induction therapy after heart transplantation. Interleukin-2 receptor antagonists (IL-2Ras) are used increasingly for induction therapy. We conducted a systematic review of randomized trials assessing IL-2Ras....

  16. Colorimetric microtiter plate receptor-binding assay for the detection of freshwater and marine neurotoxins targeting the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors

    Rubio, Fernando; Kamp, Lisa; Carpino, Justin; Faltin, Erin; Loftin, Keith A.; Molgó, Jordi; Aráoz, Rómulo

    2014-01-01

    Anatoxin-a and homoanatoxin-a, produced by cyanobacteria, are agonists of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). Pinnatoxins, spirolides, and gymnodimines, produced by dinoflagellates, are antagonists of nAChRs. In this study we describe the development and validation of a competitive colorimetric, high throughput functional assay based on the mechanism of action of freshwater and marine toxins against nAChRs. Torpedo electrocyte membranes (rich in muscle-type nAChR) were immobilized and stabilized on the surface of 96-well microtiter plates. Biotinylated α-bungarotoxin (the tracer) and streptavidin-horseradish peroxidase (the detector) enabled the detection and quantitation of anatoxin-a in surface waters and cyclic imine toxins in shellfish extracts that were obtained from different locations across the US. The method compares favorably to LC/MS/MS and provides accurate results for anatoxin-a and cyclic imine toxins monitoring. Study of common constituents at the concentrations normally found in drinking and environmental waters, as well as the tolerance to pH, salt, solvents, organic and inorganic compounds did not significantly affect toxin detection. The assay allowed the simultaneous analysis of up to 25 samples within 3.5 h and it is well suited for on-site or laboratory monitoring of low levels of toxins in drinking, surface, and ground water as well as in shellfish extracts.

  17. Inhibition of human α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors by cyclic monoterpene carveol.

    Lozon, Yosra; Sultan, Ahmed; Lansdell, Stuart J; Prytkova, Tatiana; Sadek, Bassem; Yang, Keun-Hang Susan; Howarth, Frank Christopher; Millar, Neil S; Oz, Murat

    2016-04-01

    Cyclic monoterpenes are a group of phytochemicals with antinociceptive, local anesthetic, and anti-inflammatory actions. Effects of cyclic monoterpenes including vanilin, pulegone, eugenole, carvone, carvacrol, carveol, thymol, thymoquinone, menthone, and limonene were investigated on the functional properties of the cloned α7 subunit of the human nicotinic acetylcholine receptor expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Monoterpenes inhibited the α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor in the order carveol>thymoquinone>carvacrol>menthone>thymol>limonene>eugenole>pulegone≥carvone≥vanilin. Among the monoterpenes, carveol showed the highest potency on acetylcholine-induced responses, with IC50 of 8.3µM. Carveol-induced inhibition was independent of the membrane potential and could not be reversed by increasing the concentration of acetylcholine. In line with functional experiments, docking studies indicated that cyclic monoterpenes such as carveol may interact with an allosteric site located in the α7 transmembrane domain. Our results indicate that cyclic monoterpenes inhibit the function of human α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, with varying potencies. PMID:26849939

  18. Blockage of muscle and neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors by fluoxetine (Prozac)

    García-Colunga, J; Awad, J. N.; Miledi, R

    1997-01-01

    Fluoxetine (Prozac), a widely used antidepressant, is said to exert its medicinal effects almost exclusively by blocking the serotonin uptake systems. The present study shows that both muscle and neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors are blocked, in a noncompetitive and voltage-dependent way, by fluoxetine, which also increases the rate of desensitization of the nicotinic receptors. Because these receptors are very widely distributed in the both central and peripheral nervous systems, th...

  19. Use of intact rat brain cells as a model to study regulation of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors

    Lee, J.H.; El-Fakahany, E.E.

    1985-08-12

    Intact rat brain cells were dissociated and used to study the regulation of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors upon exposure to muscarinic receptor agonists. Incubation of cells with carbamylcholine resulted in a time-dependent decrease in subsequent (/sup 3/H)N-methylscopolamine specific binding, an effect which reached a steady state after 3 hr at 37/sup 0/C. This effect of carbamylcholine was dependent on the concentration of the agonist in the incubation medium and was due to a reduction in the maximal binding capacity of the receptor with no decrease in the affinity of the remaining receptors. This preparation might be useful in future studies to elucidate the mechanisms underlying the regulation of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in the central nervous system. 20 references, 3 tables.

  20. Differences in muscarinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes in the central nervous system of long sleep and short sleep mice

    Differences in voluntary ethanol consumption have been noted in various inbred strains of mice and pharmacogenetic approaches have been used to study the mechanisms of action of many drugs such as ethanol. Long-sleep (LS) and short-sleep (SS) mice, selectively bred for differences in ethanol induced narcosis, provide a method by which a relationship between the differential responsiveness of these geno-types and muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChR) may be evaluated. Sleep times after injection of 3ml ethanol/kg (i.p.) verified the higher sensitivity of LS vs. SS. Mean body weights of LS (26.5g) vs. SS (22g) were also significantly (p3H](-) quinuclidinylbenzilate ([3H](-)QNB), a specific but nonsubtype selective mAChR antagonist, [3H]pirenzepine ([3H]PZ), a specific M1 mAChR antagonist and [3H]11-2-[[2-[(diethylamino) methyl]-1-piperidinyl] acetyl]-5,11-dihydro-6H-pyrido (2,3-b) (1,4) benzodiazepine-6-one, ([3H]AF-DX 116), an M2 selective antagonist were performed to determine mAChR affinity (Kd) and density (Bmax) in CNS regions such as the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, corpus striatum and other areas. Significantly lower (30-40%) [3H](-)QNB binding suggests that SS have fewer mAChR's than LS in many areas. These differences may relate to their differential ethanol sensitivity

  1. Comparison of the activation kinetics of the M3 acetylcholine receptor and a constitutively active mutant receptor in living cells.

    Hoffmann, Carsten; Nuber, Susanne; Zabel, Ulrike; Ziegler, Nicole; Winkler, Christiane; Hein, Peter; Berlot, Catherine H; Bünemann, Moritz; Lohse, Martin J

    2012-08-01

    Activation of G-protein-coupled receptors is the first step of the signaling cascade triggered by binding of an agonist. Here we compare the activation kinetics of the G(q)-coupled M(3) acetylcholine receptor (M(3)-AChR) with that of a constitutively active mutant receptor (M(3)-AChR-N514Y) using M(3)-AChR constructs that report receptor activation by changes in the fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) signal. We observed a leftward shift in the concentration-dependent FRET response for acetylcholine and carbachol with M(3)-AChR-N514Y. Consistent with this result, at submaximal agonist concentrations, the activation kinetics of M(3)-AChR-N514Y were significantly faster, whereas at maximal agonist concentrations the kinetics of receptor activation were identical. Receptor deactivation was significantly faster with carbachol than with acetylcholine and was significantly delayed by the N514Y mutation. Receptor-G-protein interaction was measured by FRET between M(3)-AChR-yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) and cyan fluorescent protein (CFP)-Gγ(2). Agonist-induced receptor-G-protein coupling was of a time scale similar to that of receptor activation. As observed for receptor deactivation, receptor-G-protein dissociation was slower for acetylcholine than that for carbachol. Acetylcholine-stimulated increases in receptor-G-protein coupling of M(3)-AChR-N514Y reached only 12% of that of M(3)-AChR and thus cannot be kinetically analyzed. G-protein activation was measured using YFP-tagged Gα(q) and CFP-tagged Gγ(2). Activation of G(q) was significantly slower than receptor activation and indistinguishable for the two agonists. However, G(q) deactivation was significantly prolonged for acetylcholine compared with that for carbachol. Consistent with decreased agonist-stimulated coupling to G(q), agonist-stimulated G(q) activation by M(3)-AChR-N514Y was not detected. Taken together, these results indicate that the N514Y mutation produces constitutive activation of M(3

  2. P2Y13 receptors mediate presynaptic inhibition of acetylcholine release induced by adenine nucleotides at the mouse neuromuscular junction.

    Guarracino, Juan F; Cinalli, Alejandro R; Fernández, Verónica; Roquel, Liliana I; Losavio, Adriana S

    2016-06-21

    It is known that adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) is released along with the neurotransmitter acetylcholine (ACh) from motor nerve terminals. At mammalian neuromuscular junctions (NMJs), we have previously demonstrated that ATP is able to decrease ACh secretion by activation of P2Y receptors coupled to pertussis toxin-sensitive Gi/o protein. In this group, the receptor subtypes activated by adenine nucleotides are P2Y12 and P2Y13. Here, we investigated, by means of pharmacological and immunohistochemical assays, the P2Y receptor subtype that mediates the modulation of spontaneous and evoked ACh release in mouse phrenic nerve-diaphragm preparations. First, we confirmed that the preferential agonist for P2Y12-13 receptors, 2-methylthioadenosine 5'-diphosphate trisodium salt hydrate (2-MeSADP), reduced MEPP frequency without affecting MEPP amplitude as well as the amplitude and quantal content of end-plate potentials (EPPs). The effect on spontaneous secretion disappeared after the application of the selective P2Y12-13 antagonists AR-C69931MX or 2-methylthioadenosine 5'-monophosphate triethylammonium salt hydrate (2-MeSAMP). 2-MeSADP was more potent than ADP and ATP in reducing MEPP frequency. Then we demonstrated that the selective P2Y13 antagonist MRS-2211 completely prevented the inhibitory effect of 2-MeSADP on MEPP frequency and EPP amplitude, whereas the P2Y12 antagonist MRS-2395 failed to do this. The preferential agonist for P2Y13 receptors inosine 5'-diphosphate sodium salt (IDP) reduced spontaneous and evoked ACh secretion and MRS-2211 abolished IDP-mediated modulation. Immunohistochemical studies confirmed the presence of P2Y13 but not P2Y12 receptors at the end-plate region. Disappearance of P2Y13 receptors after denervation suggests the presynaptic localization of the receptors. We conclude that, at motor nerve terminals, the Gi/o protein-coupled P2Y receptors implicated in presynaptic inhibition of spontaneous and evoked ACh release are of the subtype P2Y

  3. Agonist actions of clothianidin on synaptic and extrasynaptic nicotinic acetylcholine receptors expressed on cockroach sixth abdominal ganglion.

    Thany, Steeve H

    2009-11-01

    Clothianidin is new neonicotinoid insecticide acting selectively on insect nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). Its effects on nAChRs expressed on cercal afferent/giant interneuron synapses and DUM neurons have been studied using mannitol-gap and whole-cell patch-clamp techniques, respectively. Bath-application of clothianidin-induced dose-dependent depolarizations of cockroach cercal afferent/giant interneuron synapses which were not reversed after wash-out suggesting a strong desensitization of postsynaptic interneurons at the 6th abdominal ganglion (A6). Clothinidin activity on the nerve preparation was characterized by an increased firing rate of action potentials which then ceased when the depolarization reached a peak. Clothianidin responses were insensitive to all muscarinic antagonists tested but were blocked by co-application of specific nicotinic antagonists methyllicaconitine, alpha-bungarotoxin and d-tubocurarine. In a second round of experiment, clothianidin actions were tested on DUM neurons isolated from the A6. There was a strong desensitization of nAChRs which was not affected by muscarinic antagonists, pirenzepine and atropine, but was reduced with nicotinic antagonist alpha-bungarotoxin. In addition, clothianidin-induced currents were completely blocked by methyllicaconitine suggesting that (1) clothianidin acted as a specific agonist of nAChR subtypes and (2) a small proportion of receptors blocked by MLA was insensitive to alpha-bungarotoxin. Moreover, because clothianidin currents were blocked by d-tubocurarine and mecamylamine, we provided that clothianidin was an agonist of both nAChRs: imidacloprid-sensitive nAChR1 and -insensitive nAChR2 subtypes. PMID:19583978

  4. MUSCARINIC ACETYLCHOLINE RECEPTOR-EXPRESSION IN ASTROCYTES IN THE CORTEX OF YOUNG AND AGED RATS

    VANDERZEE, EA; DEJONG, GI; STROSBERG, AD; LUITEN, PGM

    1993-01-01

    The present report describes the cellular and subcellular distribution pattern of immunoreactivity to M35, a monoclonal antibody raised against purified muscarinic acetylcholine receptor protein, in astrocytes in the cerebral cortex of young and aged rats. Most M35-positive astrocytes were localized

  5. Distinct neural pathways mediate alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor-dependent activation of the forebrain

    Thomsen, Morten S; Hay-Schmidt, Anders; Hansen, Henrik H; Mikkelsen, Jens D

    2010-01-01

    alpha(7) nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) agonists are candidates for the treatment of cognitive deficits in schizophrenia. Selective alpha(7) nAChR agonists, such as SSR180711, activate neurons in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and nucleus accumbens shell (ACCshell) in rats, regions...

  6. alpha(7) Nicotinic acetylcholine receptor activation prevents behavioral and molecular changes induced by repeated phencyclidine treatment

    Thomsen, Morten Skøtt; Christensen, Ditte Z; Hansen, Henrik H; Redrobe, John P; Mikkelsen, Jens D

    determined in a modified Y-maze test. Polymorphisms in the alpha(7) nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) gene have been linked to schizophrenia. Here we demonstrate that acute administration of the selective alpha(7) nAChR partial agonist SSR180711 dose-dependently reversed the behavioral impairment...

  7. Photolabeling of membrane-bound Torpedo nicotinic acetylcholine receptor with the hydrophobic probe 3-trifluoromethyl-3-(m-[125I]iodophenyl)diazirine

    The hydrophobic, photoactivatable probe 3-trifluoromethyl-3-(m-[125I]iodophenyl)diazirine ([125I]TID) was used to label acetylcholine receptor rich membranes purified from Torpedo californica electric organ. All four subunits of the acetylcholine receptor (AChR) were found to incorporate label, with the γ-subunit incorporating approximately 4 times as much as each of the other subunits. Carbamylcholine, an agonist, and histrionicotoxin, a noncompetitive antagonist, both strongly inhibited labeling of all AChR subunits in a specific and dose-dependent manner. In contrast, the competitive antagonist α-bungarotoxin and the noncompetitive antagonist phencyclidine had only modest effect on [125I]TID labeling of the AChR. The regions of the AChR α-subunit that incorporate [125]TID were mapped by Staphylococcus aureus V8 protest digestion. The carbamylcholine-sensitive site of labeling was localized to a 20-kDa V8 cleavage fragment that begins at Ser-173 and is of sufficient length to contain the three hydrophobic regions M1, M2, and M3. A 10-kDa fragment beginning at Asn-339 and containing the hydrophobic region M4 also incorporated [125I]TID but in a carbamylcholine-insensitive manner. Two further cleavage fragments, which together span about one-third of the α-subunit amino terminus, incorporated no detectable [125I]TID. The mapping results place constraints on suggested models of AChR subunit topology

  8. Increases in muscle Ca2+ mediate changes in acetylcholinesterase and acetylcholine receptors caused by muscle contraction.

    Rubin, L L

    1985-01-01

    The synthesis of acetylcholinesterase (AcChoE; acetylcholine acetylhydrolase, EC 3.1.1.7) and of acetylcholine receptors (AcChoR) by cultured rat muscle fibers is influenced strongly by the level of muscle contractile activity. If fibers are grown in the presence of tetrodotoxin (TTX) to block spontaneous contraction, the total amount of AcChoE decreases markedly, as does the percentage of AcChoE assembled as the collagen-tailed presumed synaptic form of the enzyme. Under these conditions, ho...

  9. On homology modeling of the M-2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor subtype

    Jakubík, Jan; Randáková, Alena; Doležal, Vladimír

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 27, č. 6 (2013), s. 525-538. ISSN 0920-654X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA305/09/0681; GA ČR(CZ) GBP304/12/G069 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : muscarinic acetylcholine receptor * G-protein coupled receptor * homology energy estimation * MM-GBSA Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 2.782, year: 2013

  10. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptor: subunit structure, functional binding sites, and ion transport properties

    The structure of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor has been highly conserved during animal evolution, and in all the species and tissues studied so far, including mammals, it is a pseudosymmetric, pentameric complex of related subunits with very similar physical properties. All subunits of these nicotinic receptors were derived from a common ancestral gene, probably by way of gene duplications occurring very early in animal evolution. 45 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs

  11. CHRNB2 Is the Second Acetylcholine Receptor Subunit Associated with Autosomal Dominant Nocturnal Frontal Lobe Epilepsy*

    Phillips, Hilary A.; Favre, Isabelle; Kirkpatrick, Martin; Zuberi, Sameer M; Goudie, David; Heron, Sarah E.; Scheffer, Ingrid E.; Sutherland, Grant R.; Berkovic, Samuel F; Bertrand, Daniel; Mulley, John C

    2000-01-01

    Autosomal dominant nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy (ADNFLE) is an uncommon, idiopathic partial epilepsy characterized by clusters of motor seizures occurring in sleep. We describe a mutation of the β2 subunit of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor, effecting a V287M substitution within the M2 domain. The mutation, in an evolutionary conserved region of CHRNB2, is associated with ADNFLE in a Scottish family. Functional receptors with the V287M mutation are highly expressed in Xenopus oocytes ...

  12. CaMKIIα, a modulator of M4 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors

    Guo, Ming-Lei; Liu, Zhenguo; Chu, Xiang-Ping; Mao, Li-Min; WANG, John Q.

    2010-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are subject to the regulation by protein kinases. By controlling the phosphorylation-dephosphorylation balance, protein kinases actively modify GPCR expression and function. In a recent study, we have identified a novel phosphorylation-dependent regulation of Gαi/o-coupled muscarinic acetylcholine receptors. A synapse-enriched protein kinase, Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKIIα), binds directly and selectively to second intracellular loops ...

  13. 5-HT6 Receptor Antagonists: Potential Efficacy for the Treatment of Cognitive Impairment in Schizophrenia.

    de Bruin, Natasja M W J; Kruse, Chris G

    2015-01-01

    5-hydroxytryptamine6 receptor (5-HT6R) antagonists have shown efficacy in animal models for cognitive impairment in multiple cognitive domains relevant for schizophrenia. Improvements were found with 5-HT6R antagonists in preclinical tests for episodic memory, social cognition, executive function, working memory and several other tests for both learning and memory. In contrast, there is little evidence for efficacy on attention. It will be interesting to further investigate 5-HT6R antagonists in neurodevelopmental animal models which are based on prenatal exposure to specific environmental insults, and are characterized by a high level of face, construct and predictive validity for cognitive impairments associated with schizophrenia. It is also important to do more add-on preclinical studies of 5-HT6 antagonists with antipsychotics. Possible mechanisms of action to improve cognition have been described. 5-HT6R antagonists decrease GABA release and GABAergic interneuron excitability, which subsequently disinhibits glutamate and/or acetylcholine release and results in enhancement of synaptic plasticity. Furthermore, cognition could be improved by 5-HT6R antagonists, because these compounds increase the number of NCAM PSA-immunoreactive neurons in the dendate gyrus, inhibit mTOR and Fyn-tyrosine kinase and interact with DARPP-32. Interestingly, there is increasing preclinical evidence that could support additional benefits of 5-HT6R ligandson comorbid conditions in schizophrenia such as drug abuse, depression, anxiety, obesity andantipsychotic-induced EPS. Finally, we briefly give an overview of the 5-HT6R compounds that are currently in clinical development for the treatment of cognitive impairment in both schizophrenia and Alzheimer's disease. PMID:26044973

  14. Dynamic Regulation of Quaternary Organization of the M1 Muscarinic Receptor by Subtype-selective Antagonist Drugs.

    Pediani, John D; Ward, Richard J; Godin, Antoine G; Marsango, Sara; Milligan, Graeme

    2016-06-17

    Although rhodopsin-like G protein-coupled receptors can exist as both monomers and non-covalently associated dimers/oligomers, the steady-state proportion of each form and whether this is regulated by receptor ligands are unknown. Herein we address these topics for the M1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor, a key molecular target for novel cognition enhancers, by using spatial intensity distribution analysis. This method can measure fluorescent particle concentration and assess oligomerization states of proteins within defined regions of living cells. Imaging and analysis of the basolateral surface of cells expressing some 50 molecules·μm(-2) human muscarinic M1 receptor identified a ∼75:25 mixture of receptor monomers and dimers/oligomers. Both sustained and shorter term treatment with the selective M1 antagonist pirenzepine resulted in a large shift in the distribution of receptor species to favor the dimeric/oligomeric state. Although sustained treatment with pirenzepine also resulted in marked up-regulation of the receptor, simple mass action effects were not the basis for ligand-induced stabilization of receptor dimers/oligomers. The related antagonist telenzepine also produced stabilization and enrichment of the M1 receptor dimer population, but the receptor subtype non-selective antagonists atropine and N-methylscopolamine did not. In contrast, neither pirenzepine nor telenzepine altered the quaternary organization of the related M3 muscarinic receptor. These data provide unique insights into the selective capacity of receptor ligands to promote and/or stabilize receptor dimers/oligomers and demonstrate that the dynamics of ligand regulation of the quaternary organization of G protein-coupled receptors is markedly more complex than previously appreciated. This may have major implications for receptor function and behavior. PMID:27080256

  15. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptor α7 subunits with a C2 cytoplasmic loop yellow fluorescent protein insertion form functional receptors

    Teresa A MURRAY; Qiang LIU; Paul WHITEAKER; Jie WU; Ronald J LUKAS

    2009-01-01

    Aim: Several nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) subunits have been engineered as fluorescent protein (FP) fusions and exploited to illuminate features of nAChRs. The aim of this work was to create a FP fusion in the nAChR a.7 subunit without compromising formation of functional receptors.Methods: A gene construct was generated to introduce yellow fluorescent protein (YFP), in frame, into the otherwise unaltered, large, second cytoplamsic loop between the third and fourth transmembrane domains of the mouse nAChR al sub-unit (a7Y). SH-EP1 cells were transfected with mouse nAChR wild type a.7 subunits (a.7) or with a7Y subunits, alone or with the chaperone protein, hRJC-3. Receptor function was assessed using whole-cell current recording. Receptor expression was measured with 125I-labeled a-bungarotoxin (I-Bgt) binding, laser scanning confocal microscopy, and total internal reflectance fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy.Results: Whole-cell currents revealed that a7Y nAChRs and al nAChRs were functional with comparable EC50 values for the a7 nAChR-selective agonist, choline, and IC50 values for the a.7 nAChR-selective antagonist, methyllycaconitine. I-Bgt binding was detected only after co-expression with hRIC-3. Confocal microscopy revealed that a7Y had primarily intracel-lular rather than surface expression. TIRF microscopy confirmed that little a7Y localized to the plasma membrane, typical of a7 nAChRs.Conclusion: nAChRs composed as homooligomers of a7Y subunits containing cytoplasmic loop YFP have functional, ligand binding, and trafficking characteristics similar to those of a.7 nAChRs. a7Y nAChRs may be used to elucidate properties of a.7 nAChRs and to identify and develop novel probes for these receptors, perhaps in high-throughput fashion.

  16. Muscarinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes which selectively couple to phospholipase C: Pharmacological and biochemical properties

    The pharmacological and biochemical properties of rat m1 and m3 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChR) stably transfected into Chinese hamster ovary-K1 (CHO) cells were characterized with ligand binding, affinity labeling and biochemical assays. Both mAChR subtypes display saturable, high affinity binding of [3H]-quinuclidinyl benzilate (QNB) and a rank order of antagonist potency of QNB greater than atropine greater than pirenzepine greater than AF-DX 116. Carbachol displacement of [3H]-QNB binding to the m3 mAChR revealed an approximate 17-fold higher affinity than observed with the m1 mAChR. [3H]-propylbenzilylcholine mustard (PrBCM) labeling of mAChR revealed that m1 and m3 mAChR migrated on SDS-polyacrylamide gels with apparent molecular masses of 80,000 and 94,000 daltons, respectively, consistent with the known differences in their molecular sizes. Both m1 and m3 mAChR elicited dose-dependent increases in the hydrolysis of phosphoinositides; however, the maximal increase in total inositol phosphates elicited with the m1 mAChR was approximately 2-fold greater than that observed in cells expressing similar densities of m3 mAChR. Agonist activation of the m1 mAChR also elicited increases in basal and forskolin-stimulated cAMP, whereas the m3 mAChR had no effect on intracellular cAMP levels. These data suggest that although m1 and m3 mAChR display a considerable degree of structural homology, they exhibit distinct pharmacological and biochemical properties

  17. Muscarinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes which selectively couple to phospholipase C: Pharmacological and biochemical properties

    Buck, M.A.; Fraser, C.M. (National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, Rockville, MD (USA))

    1990-12-14

    The pharmacological and biochemical properties of rat m1 and m3 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChR) stably transfected into Chinese hamster ovary-K1 (CHO) cells were characterized with ligand binding, affinity labeling and biochemical assays. Both mAChR subtypes display saturable, high affinity binding of (3H)-quinuclidinyl benzilate (QNB) and a rank order of antagonist potency of QNB greater than atropine greater than pirenzepine greater than AF-DX 116. Carbachol displacement of (3H)-QNB binding to the m3 mAChR revealed an approximate 17-fold higher affinity than observed with the m1 mAChR. (3H)-propylbenzilylcholine mustard (PrBCM) labeling of mAChR revealed that m1 and m3 mAChR migrated on SDS-polyacrylamide gels with apparent molecular masses of 80,000 and 94,000 daltons, respectively, consistent with the known differences in their molecular sizes. Both m1 and m3 mAChR elicited dose-dependent increases in the hydrolysis of phosphoinositides; however, the maximal increase in total inositol phosphates elicited with the m1 mAChR was approximately 2-fold greater than that observed in cells expressing similar densities of m3 mAChR. Agonist activation of the m1 mAChR also elicited increases in basal and forskolin-stimulated cAMP, whereas the m3 mAChR had no effect on intracellular cAMP levels. These data suggest that although m1 and m3 mAChR display a considerable degree of structural homology, they exhibit distinct pharmacological and biochemical properties.

  18. Pemphigus vulgaris antibodies target the mitochondrial nicotinic acetylcholine receptors that protect keratinocytes from apoptolysis.

    Chernyavsky, Alex; Chen, Yumay; Wang, Ping H; Grando, Sergei A

    2015-11-01

    The mechanism of detachment and death of keratinocytes in pemphigus vulgaris (PV) involves pro-apoptotic action of constellations of autoantibodies determining disease severity and response to treatment. The presence of antibodies to nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) and the therapeutic efficacy of cholinomimetics in PV is well-established. Recently, adsorption of anti-mitochondrial antibodies abolished the ability of PVIgGs to cause acantholysis, demonstrating their pathophysiological significance. Since, in addition to cell membrane, nAChRs are also present on the mitochondrial outer membrane, wherein they act to prevent activation of intrinsic (mitochondrial apoptosis), we hypothesized that mitochondrial (mt)-nAChRs might be targeted by PVIgGs. To test this hypothesis, we employed the immunoprecipitation-western blot assay of keratinocyte mitochondrial proteins that visualized the α3, α5, α7, α9, α10, β2 and β4 mt-nAChR subunits precipitated by PV IgGs, suggesting that functions of mt-nAChRs are compromised in PV. To pharmacologically counteract the pro-apoptotic action of anti-mitochondrial antibodies in PV, we exposed naked keratinocyte mitochondria to PVIgGs in the presence of the nicotinic agonist nicotine ± antagonists, and measured cytochrome c (CytC) release. Nicotine abolished PVIgG-dependent CytC release, showing a dose-dependent effect, suggesting that protection of mitochondria can be a novel mechanism of therapeutic action of nicotinic agonists in PV. The obtained results indicated that the mt-nAChRs targeted by anti-mitochondrial antibodies produced by PV patients are coupled to inhibition of CytC release, and that nicotinergic stimulation can abolish PVIgG-dependent activation of intrinsic apoptosis in KCs. Future studies should determine if and how the distinct anti-mt-nAChR antibodies penetrate KCs and correlate with disease severity. PMID:25998908

  19. Regional distribution of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in the telencephalon of the pigeon (Columba livia f. domestica)

    The distribution of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors was studied autoradiographically in croystat sections of the pigeon telencephalon using 3H-quinuclidinylbenzylate as a ligand. Highest receptor density was observed in the hyperstriatum ventrale, palaeostriatum augmentatum, septum, and parts of the archistriatum. In sites of known sensory input of neostriatum (field L) and ectostriatum low receptor binding was observed. Acetylcholinesterase distribution is in good agreement with the receptor picture only in the basal telencephalon. In the pallium differences in the pattern of these two components can be seen. (author)

  20. Muscarinic acetylcholine receptor subtype 4 is essential for cholinergic stimulation of duodenal bicarbonate secretion in mice - relationship to D cell/somatostatin.

    Takeuchi, K; Kita, K; Takahashi, K; Aihara, E; Hayashi, S

    2015-06-01

    We investigated the roles of muscarinic (M) acetylcholine receptor subtype in the cholinergic stimulation of duodenal HCO3(-) secretion using knockout (KO) mice. Wild-type and M1-M5 KO C57BL/6J mice were used. The duodenal mucosa was mounted on an Ussing chamber, and HCO3(-) secretion was measured at pH 7.0 using a pH-stat method in vitro. Carbachol (CCh) or other agents were added to the serosal side. CCh dose-dependently stimulated HCO3(-) secretion in wild-type mice, and this effect was completely inhibited in the presence of atropine. The HCO3(-) response to CCh in wild-type mice was also inhibited by pirenzepine (M1 antagonist), 4DAMP (M3 antagonist), and tropicamide (M4 antagonist), but not by methoctramine (M2 antagonist). CCh stimulated HCO3(-) secretion in M2 and M5 KO animals as effectively as in WT mice; however, this stimulatory effect was significantly attenuated in M1, M3, and M4 KO mice. The decrease observed in the CCh-stimulated HCO3(-) response in M4 KO mice was reversed by the co-application of CYN154806, a somatostatin receptor type 2 (SST2) antagonist. Octreotide (a somatostatin analogue) decreased the basal and CCh-stimulated secretion of HCO3(-) in wild-type mice. The co-localized expression of somatostatin and M4 receptors was confirmed immunohistologically in the duodenum. We concluded that the duodenal HCO3(-) response to CCh was directly mediated by M1/M3 receptors and indirectly modified by M4 receptors. The activation of M4 receptors was assumed to inhibit the release of somatostatin from D cells and potentiate the HCO3(-) response by removing the negative influence of somatostatin via the activation of SST2 receptors. PMID:26084221

  1. Expression of somatostatin receptor genes and acetylcholine receptor development in rat skeletal muscle during postnatal development.

    Peng, M; Conforti, L; Millhorn, D E

    1998-05-01

    Our laboratory reported previously that somatostatin (SST) is transiently expressed in rat motoneurons during the first 14 days after birth. We investigated the possibility that the SST receptor (SSTR) is expressed in skeletal muscle. We found that two of the five subtypes of SSTR (SSTR3 and SSTR4) are expressed in skeletal muscle with a time course that correlates with the transient expression of SST in motoneurons. In addition, SSTR2A is expressed from birth to adulthood in skeletal muscle. Both SSTR2A and SSTR4 are also expressed in L6 cells, a skeletal muscle cell line. Somatostatin acting through its receptors has been shown to stimulate tyrosine phosphatase activity in a number of different tissues. We found that several proteins (50, 65, 90, 140, 180 and 200 kDa) exhibited a reduced degree of tyrosine phosphorylation following SST treatment. Inhibition of tyrosine phosphatase activity with sodium orthovanadate increased expression of the nicotinic acetyl-choline receptor (nAChR) epsilon subunit mRNA by three fold. Somatostatin reversed the elevated epsilon mRNA following orthovanadate treatment. These findings show that SSTR is expressed in skeletal muscle and that SST acting via the SSTR regulates tyrosine phosphorylation and expression of the epsilon subunit of the AChR in the rat skeletal muscle. PMID:9852305

  2. Neuroprotection by NMDA receptor antagonists in a variety of neuropathologies.

    Palmer, G C

    2001-09-01

    Because of adverse reactions, early efforts to introduce high affinity competitive or use-dependent NMDA receptor antagonists into patients suffering from stroke, head trauma or epilepsy met with failure. Later it was discovered that both low affinity use-dependent NMDA receptor antagonists and compounds with selective affinity for the NR2B receptor subunit met the criteria for safe administration into patients. Furthermore, these low affinity antagonists exhibit significant mechanistic differences from their higher affinity counterparts. Success of the latter is attested to the ability of the following low affinity compounds to be marketed: 1) Cough suppressant-dextromethorphan (available for decades); 2) Parkinson's disease--amantadine, memantine and budipine; 3) Dementia--memantine; and 4) Epilepsy--felbamate. Moreover, Phase III clinical trials are ongoing with remacemide for epilepsy and Huntington's disease and head trauma for HU-211. A host of compounds are or were under evaluation for the possible treatment of stroke, head trauma, hyperalgesia and various neurodegenerative disorders. Despite the fact that other drugs with associated NMDA receptor mechanisms have reached clinical status, this review focuses only on those competitive and use-dependent NMDA receptor antagonists that reached clinical trails. The ensuing discussions link the in vivo pharmacological investigations that led to the success/mistakes/ failures for eventual testing of promising compounds in the clinic. PMID:11554551

  3. Acetylcholine receptor-inducing factor from chicken brain increases the level of mRNA encoding the receptor α subunit

    A 42-kDa glycoprotein isolated from chicken brain, referred to as acetylcholine receptor-inducing activity (ARIA), that stimulates the rate of incorporation of acetylcholine receptors into the surface of chicken myotubes may play a role in the nerve-induced accumulation of receptors at developing neuromuscular synapses. Using nuclease-protection assays, the authors have found that ARIA causes a 2- to 16-fold increase in the level of mRNA encoding the α subunit of the receptor, with little or no change in the levels of γ- and δ-subunit messengers. ARIA also increases the amount of a putative nuclear precursor of α-subunit mRNA, consistent with an activation of gene transcription. These results suggest that the concentration of α subunit may limit the rate of biosynthesis of the acetylcholine receptors in chicken myotubes. They also indicate that neuronal factors can regulate the expression of receptor subunit genes in a selective manner. Tetrodotoxin, 8-bromo-cAMP, and forskolin also increase the amount of α-subunit mRNA, with little change in the amount of γ- and δ-subunit mRNAs. Unlike ARIA, however, these agents have little effect on the concentration of the α-subunit nuclear precursor

  4. Selective effects of carbamate pesticides on rat neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and rat brain acetylcholinesterase

    Effects of commonly used carbamate pesticides on rat neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes have been investigated using the two-electrode voltage clamp technique. The potencies of these effects have been compared to the potencies of the carbamates to inhibit rat brain acetylcholinesterase. The potency order of six carbamates to inhibit α4β4 nicotinic receptors is fenoxycarb > EPTC > carbaryl, bendiocarb > propoxur > aldicarb with IC50 values ranging from 3 μM for fenoxycarb to 165 μM for propoxur and >1 mM for aldicarb. Conversely, the potency order of these carbamates to inhibit rat brain acetylcholinesterase is bendiocarb > propoxur, aldicarb > carbaryl >> EPTC, fenoxycarb with IC50 values ranging from 1 μM for bendiocarb to 17 μM for carbaryl and >>1 mM for EPTC and fenoxycarb. The α4β2, α3β4, and α3β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors are inhibited by fenoxycarb, EPTC, and carbaryl with potency orders similar to that for α4β4 receptors. Comparing the potencies of inhibition of the distinct subtypes of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors shows that the α3β2 receptor is less sensitive to inhibition by fenoxycarb and EPTC. The potency of inhibition depends on the carbamate as well as on a combination of α and β subunit properties. It is concluded that carbamate pesticides affect different subtypes of neuronal nicotinic receptors independently of acetylcholinesterase inhibition. This implicates that neuronal nicotinic receptors are additional targets for some carbamate pesticides and that these receptors may contribute to carbamate pesticide toxicology, especially after long-term exposure

  5. Evidence for the extramembranous location of the putative amphipathic helix of acetylcholine receptor

    Evidence has been obtained demonstrating that the peptides GVKYIAE and AIKYIAE found in the potential amphipathic helices of the α and β subunits, respectively, of acetylcholine receptor are not buried in the membrane. The peptide KYIAE was synthesized, and polyclonal antibodies were prepared against a conjugate of bovine serum albumin and synthetic peptide. An immunoadsorbent capable of binding and subsequently releasing peptides ending with the sequence-YIAE was produced by attaching these specific antibodies to agarose. Native acetylcholine receptor was labeled with pyridoxal phosphate and Na[3H]BH4. The labeled protein was stripped of phospholipid and digested with the protease from Staphylococcus aureus strain V8. The digest was submitted to immunoadsorption to isolate the labeled indigenous peptides. As a control, α and β polypeptides prepared by gel filtration of a solution of acetylcholine receptor in detergent were stripped of detergent and labeled with pyridoxal phosphate and Na[3H]BH4 in the presence of 8 M urea. The labeled α and β polypeptides were digested and submitted to immunoadsorption. The specific radioactivities of the indigenous peptides from the α and β subunits labeled under native and denaturing conditions were nearly equal. In similar experiments using isethionyl (2',4'-dinitrophenyl)-3-aminopropionimidate as the labeling agent, the indigenous peptides from native and denatured receptor were also labeled to the same extent. Since these peptides are labeled to the same extent whether or not the protein is denatured, they cannot be buried in the membrane

  6. Crystal structures of the M1 and M4 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Thal, David M; Sun, Bingfa; Feng, Dan; Nawaratne, Vindhya; Leach, Katie; Felder, Christian C; Bures, Mark G; Evans, David A; Weis, William I; Bachhawat, Priti; Kobilka, Tong Sun; Sexton, Patrick M; Kobilka, Brian K; Christopoulos, Arthur

    2016-03-17

    Muscarinic M1-M5 acetylcholine receptors are G-protein-coupled receptors that regulate many vital functions of the central and peripheral nervous systems. In particular, the M1 and M4 receptor subtypes have emerged as attractive drug targets for treatments of neurological disorders, such as Alzheimer's disease and schizophrenia, but the high conservation of the acetylcholine-binding pocket has spurred current research into targeting allosteric sites on these receptors. Here we report the crystal structures of the M1 and M4 muscarinic receptors bound to the inverse agonist, tiotropium. Comparison of these structures with each other, as well as with the previously reported M2 and M3 receptor structures, reveals differences in the orthosteric and allosteric binding sites that contribute to a role in drug selectivity at this important receptor family. We also report identification of a cluster of residues that form a network linking the orthosteric and allosteric sites of the M4 receptor, which provides new insight into how allosteric modulation may be transmitted between the two spatially distinct domains. PMID:26958838

  7. Histamine-2 receptor antagonists as immunomodulators: new therapeutic views?

    Nielsen, Hans Jørgen

    1996-01-01

    from such studies are currently accumulating and suggest that the histamine-2 receptor antagonists have potential beneficial effects in the treatment of certain malignant, autoimmune and skin diseases, either alone or in combination with other drugs. The beneficial effect of histamine-2 receptor......Considerable evidence has emerged to suggest that histamine participates in the regulation of the inflammatory response, immune reaction, coagulation cascade, and cardiovascular function. Furthermore, histamine may play a major role in the growth of normal and malignant tissue as a regulator of...... proliferation and angiogenesis. Specific histamine receptors have been identified on the surface of bone marrow cells, immune competent cells, endothelial cells, fibroblasts, and also on malignant cells. This has prompted research in regulation by specific histamine receptor agonists and antagonists. Results...

  8. Endothelin receptor antagonists as disease modifiers in systemic sclerosis.

    Shetty, Nagalakshmi; Derk, Chris T

    2011-02-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a multisystem connective tissue disease of unknown etiology that is characterized by inflammation, vascular dysfunction and fibrosis of the skin and visceral organs. SSc is clinically diverse both in terms of the burden of skin and organ involvement and the rate of progression of the disease. Recent studies indicate that the endothelin system, especially ET-1 and the ETA and ETB receptors may play a key role in the pathogenesis of SSc. A new class of drugs, endothelin receptor antagonists has been introduced for treatment of patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Bosentan, a dual endothelin receptor antagonist as well as Sitaxsentan and Ambrisentan, selective blockers of the ETA receptor have proven effective in SSc-PAH. This effect may be mediated through both a vasodilatory and antifibrotic effect, thus making these agents attractive as potential disease modifying agents for SSc. PMID:21184655

  9. Anti-acetylcholine receptor antibody titres in the sera of myasthenia patients treated with plasma exchange combined with immunosuppressive therapy.

    Carter, B.; Harrison, R.; Lunt, G G; Behan, P O; Simpson, J. A.

    1980-01-01

    Anti-acetylcholine receptor antibody titres have been monitored in the sera of 19 myasthenic patients treated with plasma exchange combined with a three month period of immunosuppressive therapy. In general the post-exchange titres stabilised at below pre-exchange levels for prolonged periods which were associated with clinical improvement. In seven instances recurrence of symptoms occurred and in six of these cases relapse was shown to be associated with a rise in anti-acetylcholine receptor...

  10. The role of α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor in modulation of heart rate dynamics in endotoxemic rats.

    Mazloom, Roham; Eftekhari, Golnar; Rahimi-Balaei, Maryam; Rahimi, Maryam; Khori, Vahid; Hajizadeh, Sohrab; Dehpour, Ahmad R; Mani, Ali R

    2013-01-01

    Previous reports have indicated that artificial stimulation of the vagus nerve reduces systemic inflammation in experimental models of sepsis. This phenomenon is a part of a broader cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway which activates the vagus nerve to modulate inflammation through activation of alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (α7nACHR). Heart rate variability represents the complex interplay between autonomic nervous system and cardiac pacemaker cells. Reduced heart rate variability and increased cardiac cycle regularity is a hallmark of clinical conditions that are associated with systemic inflammation (e.g. endotoxemia and sepsis). The present study was aimed to assess the role of α7nACHR in modulation of heart rate dynamics during systemic inflammation. Systemic inflammation was induced by injection of endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide) in rats. Electrocardiogram and body temperature were recorded in conscious animals using a telemetric system. Linear and non-linear indices of heart rate variability (e.g. sample entropy and fractal-like temporal structure) were assessed. RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry studies showed that α7nACHR is expressed in rat atrium and is mainly localized at the endothelial layer. Systemic administration of an α7nACHR antagonist (methyllycaconitine) did not show a significant effect on body temperature or heart rate dynamics in naïve rats. However, α7nACHR blockade could further reduce heart rate variability and elicit a febrile response in endotoxemic rats. Pre-treatment of endotoxemic animals with an α7nACHR agonist (PHA-543613) was unable to modulate heart rate dynamics in endotoxemic rats but could prevent the effect of endotoxin on body temperature within 24 h experiment. Neither methyllycaconitine nor PHA-543613 could affect cardiac beating variability of isolated perfused hearts taken from control or endotoxemic rats. Based on our observations we suggest a tonic role for nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in

  11. Neonicotinoid binding, toxicity and expression of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunits in the aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum.

    Emiliane Taillebois

    Full Text Available Neonicotinoid insecticides act on nicotinic acetylcholine receptor and are particularly effective against sucking pests. They are widely used in crops protection to fight against aphids, which cause severe damage. In the present study we evaluated the susceptibility of the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum to the commonly used neonicotinoid insecticides imidacloprid (IMI, thiamethoxam (TMX and clothianidin (CLT. Binding studies on aphid membrane preparations revealed the existence of high and low-affinity binding sites for [3H]-IMI (Kd of 0.16 ± 0.04 nM and 41.7 ± 5.9 nM and for the nicotinic antagonist [125I]-α-bungarotoxin (Kd of 0.008 ± 0.002 nM and 1.135 ± 0.213 nM. Competitive binding experiments demonstrated that TMX displayed a higher affinity than IMI for [125I]-α-bungarotoxin binding sites while CLT affinity was similar for both [125I]-α-bungarotoxin and [3H]-IMI binding sites. Interestingly, toxicological studies revealed that at 48 h, IMI (LC50 = 0.038 µg/ml and TMX (LC50 = 0.034 µg/ml were more toxic than CLT (LC50 = 0.118 µg/ml. The effect of TMX could be associated to its metabolite CLT as demonstrated by HPLC/MS analysis. In addition, we found that aphid larvae treated either with IMI, TMX or CLT showed a strong variation of nAChR subunit expression. Using semi-quantitative PCR experiments, we detected for all insecticides an increase of Apisumα10 and Apisumβ1 expressions levels, whereas Apisumβ2 expression decreased. Moreover, some other receptor subunits seemed to be differently regulated according to the insecticide used. Finally, we also demonstrated that nAChR subunit expression differed during pea aphid development. Altogether these results highlight species specificity that should be taken into account in pest management strategies.

  12. Synthesis and evaluation of new imaging agent for central nicotinic acetylcholine receptor α7 subtype

    Introduction: The nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) α7 subtype (α7 nAChR) is one of the major nAChR subtypes in the brain. We synthesized C-11 labeled α7 nAChR ligands, (R)-2-[11C]methylamino-benzoic acid 1-aza-bicyclo[2.2.2]oct-3-yl ester ([11C](R)-MeQAA) and its isomer (S)-[11C]MeQAA, for in vivo investigation with positron emission tomography (PET). Then, the potential of (R)- and (S)-[11C]MeQAA for in vivo imaging of α7 nAChR in the brain was evaluated in mice and monkeys. Methods: The binding affinity for α7 nAChR was measured using rat brain. Biodistribution and in vivo receptor blocking studies were undertaken in mice. Dynamic PET scans were performed in conscious monkeys. Results: The affinity for α7 nAChR was 41 and 182 nM for (R)- and (S)-MeQAA, respectively. The initial uptake in the mouse brain was high ([11C](R)-MeQAA: 7.68 and [11C](S)-MeQAA: 6.65 %dose/g at 5 min). The clearance of [11C](R)-MeQAA was slow in the hippocampus (α7 nAChR-rich region) but was rapid in the cerebellum (α7 nAChR-poor region). On the other hand, the clearance was fast for [11C](S)-MeQAA in all regions. The brain uptake of [11C](R)-MeQAA was decreased by methyllycaconitine (α7 nAChR antagonist) treatment. In monkeys, α7 nAChRs were highly distributed in the thalamus and cortex but poorly distributed in the cerebellum. The high accumulation was observed in the cortex and thalamus for [11C](R)-MeQAA, while the uptake was rather homogeneous for [11C](S)-MeQAA. Conclusions: [11C](R)-MeQAA was successfully synthesized and showed high uptake to the brain. However, since the in vivo selectivity for α7 nAChR was not enough, further PET kinetic analysis or structure optimization is needed for specific visualization of brain α7 nAChRs in vivo.

  13. The distribution of cerebral muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in vivo in patients with dementia. A controlled study with 123IQNB and single photon emission computed tomography

    A high-affinity muscarinic receptor antagonist, 123IQNB (3-quinuclidinyl-4-iodobenzilate labeled with iodine 123), was used with single photon emission computed tomography to image muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in 14 patients with dementia and in 11 healthy controls. High-resolution single photon emission computed tomographic scanning was performed 21 hours after the intravenous administration of approximately 5 mCi of IQNB. In normal subjects, the images of retained ligand showed a consistent regional pattern that correlated with postmortem studies of the relative distribution of muscarinic receptors in the normal human brain, having high radioactivity counts in the basal ganglia, occipital cortex, and insular cortex, low counts in the thalamus, and virtually no counts in the cerebellum. Eight of 12 patients with a clinical diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease had obvious focal cortical defects in either frontal or posterior temporal cortex. Both patients with a clinical diagnosis of Pick's disease had obvious frontal and anterior temporal defects. A region of interest statistical analysis of relative regional activity revealed a significant reduction bilaterally in the posterior temporal cortex of the patients with Alzheimer's disease compared with controls. This study demonstrates the practicability of acetylcholine receptor imaging with 123IQNB and single photon emission computed tomography. The data suggest that focal abnormalities in muscarinic binding in vivo may characterize some patients with Alzheimer's disease and Pick's disease, but further studies are needed to address questions about partial volume artifacts and receptor quantification

  14. A neuronal acetylcholine receptor regulates the balance of muscle excitation and inhibition in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Maelle Jospin

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available In the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, cholinergic motor neurons stimulate muscle contraction as well as activate GABAergic motor neurons that inhibit contraction of the contralateral muscles. Here, we describe the composition of an ionotropic acetylcholine receptor that is required to maintain excitation of the cholinergic motor neurons. We identified a gain-of-function mutation that leads to spontaneous muscle convulsions. The mutation is in the pore domain of the ACR-2 acetylcholine receptor subunit and is identical to a hyperactivating mutation in the muscle receptor of patients with myasthenia gravis. Screens for suppressors of the convulsion phenotype led to the identification of other receptor subunits. Cell-specific rescue experiments indicate that these subunits function in the cholinergic motor neurons. Expression of these subunits in Xenopus oocytes demonstrates that the functional receptor is comprised of three alpha-subunits, UNC-38, UNC-63 and ACR-12, and two non-alpha-subunits, ACR-2 and ACR-3. Although this receptor exhibits a partially overlapping subunit composition with the C. elegans muscle acetylcholine receptor, it shows distinct pharmacology. Recordings from intact animals demonstrate that loss-of-function mutations in acr-2 reduce the excitability of the cholinergic motor neurons. By contrast, the acr-2(gf mutation leads to a hyperactivation of cholinergic motor neurons and an inactivation of downstream GABAergic motor neurons in a calcium dependent manner. Presumably, this imbalance between excitatory and inhibitory input into muscles leads to convulsions. These data indicate that the ACR-2 receptor is important for the coordinated excitation and inhibition of body muscles underlying sinusoidal movement.

  15. Expression of the α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor in human lung cells

    Schuller Hildegard M

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We and others have shown that one of the mechanisms of growth regulation of small cell lung cancer cell lines and cultured pulmonary neuroendocrine cells is by the binding of agonists to the α7 neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor. In addition, we have shown that the nicotine-derived carcinogenic nitrosamine, 4(methylnitrosamino-1-(3-pyridyl-1-butanone (NNK, is a high affinity agonist for the α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor. In the present study, our goal was to determine the extent of α7 mRNA and protein expression in the human lung. Methods Experiments were done using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR, a nuclease protection assay and western blotting using membrane proteins. Results We detected mRNA for the neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor α7 receptor in seven small cell lung cancer (SCLC cell lines, in two pulmonary adenocarcinoma cell lines, in cultured normal human small airway epithelial cells (SAEC, one carcinoid cell line, three squamous cell lines and tissue samples from nine patients with various types of lung cancer. A nuclease protection assay showed prominent levels of α7 in the NCI-H82 SCLC cell line while α7 was not detected in SAEC, suggesting that α7 mRNA levels may be higher in SCLC compared to normal cells. Using a specific antibody to the α7 nicotinic receptor, protein expression of α7 was determined. All SCLC cell lines except NCI-H187 expressed protein for the α7 receptor. In the non-SCLC cells and normal cells that express the α7 nAChR mRNA, only in SAEC, A549 and NCI-H226 was expression of the α7 nicotinic receptor protein shown. When NCI-H69 SCLC cell line was exposed to 100 pm NNK, protein expression of the α7 receptor was increased at 60 and 150 min. Conclusion Expression of mRNA for the neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor α7 seems to be ubiquitously expressed in all human lung cancer cell lines tested (except for NCI-H441 as well as normal

  16. The muscarinic antagonists scopolamine and atropine are competitive antagonists at 5-HT3 receptors.

    Lochner, Martin; Thompson, Andrew J

    2016-09-01

    Scopolamine is a high affinity muscarinic antagonist that is used for the prevention of post-operative nausea and vomiting. 5-HT3 receptor antagonists are used for the same purpose and are structurally related to scopolamine. To examine whether 5-HT3 receptors are affected by scopolamine we examined the effects of this drug on the electrophysiological and ligand binding properties of 5-HT3A receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes and HEK293 cells, respectively. 5-HT3 receptor-responses were reversibly inhibited by scopolamine with an IC50 of 2.09 μM. Competitive antagonism was shown by Schild plot (pA2 = 5.02) and by competition with the 5-HT3 receptor antagonists [(3)H]granisetron (Ki = 6.76 μM) and G-FL (Ki = 4.90 μM). The related molecule, atropine, similarly inhibited 5-HT evoked responses in oocytes with an IC50 of 1.74 μM, and competed with G-FL with a Ki of 7.94 μM. The reverse experiment revealed that granisetron also competitively bound to muscarinic receptors (Ki = 6.5 μM). In behavioural studies scopolamine is used to block muscarinic receptors and induce a cognitive deficit, and centrally administered concentrations can exceed the IC50 values found here. It is therefore possible that 5-HT3 receptors are also inhibited. Studies that utilise higher concentrations of scopolamine should be mindful of these potential off-target effects. PMID:27108935

  17. Classical and atypical agonists activate M1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors through common mechanisms

    Randáková, Alena; Dolejší, Eva; Rudajev, Vladimír; Zimčík, Pavel; Doležal, Vladimír; El-Fakahany, E. E.; Jakubík, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 97, Jul 2015 (2015), s. 27-39. ISSN 1043-6618 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA305/09/0681; GA ČR(CZ) GBP304/12/G069; GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0025 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : muscarinic acetylcholine receptors * atypical agonists * xanomeline * activation mechanism Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 4.408, year: 2014

  18. M2 Muscarinic acetylcholine receptor modulates rat airway smooth muscle cell proliferation

    Placeres-Uray, Fabiola A; Febres-Aldana, Christopher A; Fernandez-Ruiz, Ruth; Gonzalez de Alfonzo, Ramona; Lippo de Becemberg, Itala A; Alfonzo, Marcelo J

    2013-01-01

    Airways chronic inflammatory conditions in asthma and COPD are characterized by tissue remodeling, being smooth muscle hyperplasia, the most important feature. Non-neuronal and neuronal Acetylcholine acting on muscarinic receptors (MAChRs) has been postulated as determinant of tissue remodeling in asthma and COPD by promoting proliferation and phenotypic changes of airway smooth muscle cells (ASMC). The objective was to evaluate proliferative responses to muscarinic agonist as carbamylcholine...

  19. Neonicotinoid Binding, Toxicity and Expression of Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor Subunits in the Aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum

    Taillebois, Emiliane; Beloula, Abdelhamid; Quinchard, Sophie; Jaubert-Possamai, Stéphanie; Daguin, Antoine; Servent, Denis; Tagu, Denis; Thany, Steeve H.; Tricoire-Leignel, Helene

    2014-01-01

    Neonicotinoid insecticides act on nicotinic acetylcholine receptor and are particularly effective against sucking pests. They are widely used in crops protection to fight against aphids, which cause severe damage. In the present study we evaluated the susceptibility of the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum to the commonly used neonicotinoid insecticides imidacloprid (IMI), thiamethoxam (TMX) and clothianidin (CLT). Binding studies on aphid membrane preparations revealed the existence of high and ...

  20. Minor structural changes in nicotinoid insecticides confer differential subtype selectivity for mammalian nicotinic acetylcholine receptors

    Tomizawa, Motohiro; Casida, John E.

    1999-01-01

    The major nitroimine insecticide imidacloprid (IMI) and the nicotinic analgesics epibatidine and ABT-594 contain the 6-chloro-3-pyridinyl moiety important for high activity and/or selectivity. ABT-594 has considerable nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR) subtype specificity which might carry over to the chloropyridinyl insecticides. This study considers nine IMI analogues for selectivity in binding to immuno-isolated α1, α3 and α7 containing nicotinic AChRs and to purported α4β2 nicotinic ...

  1. Utilization of Superfused Cerebral Slices in Probing Muscarinic Receptor Autoregulation of Acetylcholine Release

    Alquicer, Glenda; Doležal, Vladimír; El-Fakahany, E. E.

    New York: Springer, 2016 - (Mysliveček, J.; Jakubík, J.), s. 221-233. (Neuromethods. 107). ISBN 978-1-4939-2857-6 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-05696S; GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0025 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : muscarinic receptors * acetylcholine release * autoregulation * superfusion Subject RIV: FH - Neurology

  2. Variants in nicotinic acetylcholine receptors α5 and α3 increase risks to nicotine dependence†

    Chen, Xiangning; Chen, Jingchun; Williamson, Vernell S; An, Seon-Sook; Hettema, John M.; Aggen, Steven H.; Neale, Michael C.; Kendler, Kenneth S.

    2009-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors bind to nicotine and initiate the physiological and pharmacological responses to tobacco smoking. In this report, we studied the association of α5 and α3 subunits with nicotine dependence and with the symptoms of alcohol and cannabis abuse and dependence in two independent epidemiological samples (n = 815 and 1,121, respectively). In this study, seven single nucleotide polymorphisms were genotyped in the CHRNA5 and CHRNA3 genes. In both samples, we found that...

  3. Evidence that coated vesicles transport acetylcholine receptors to the surface membrane of chick myotubes

    1984-01-01

    Coated vesicles are present in the myoplasm of embryonic chick myotubes grown in vitro. They are most numerous beneath regions of the surface membrane that contain a high density of acetylcholine receptors (AChR). Prolonged exposure of myotubes to saline extract of chick brain increases the number of intracellular AChR and the number of coated vesicles. This suggests that coated vesicles contain AChR, and this hypothesis was tested with horseradish peroxidase-alpha-bungarotoxin (HRP-alpha BTX...

  4. Quantitative Molecular Imaging of Neuronal Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors in the Human Brain with A-85380 Radiotracers

    Lotfipour, Shahrdad; Mandelkern, Mark; Brody, Arthur L.

    2011-01-01

    Neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) have been implicated in a spectrum of cognitive functions as well as psychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders, including tobacco addiction and Alzheimer's Disease. The examination of neuronal nAChRs in living humans is a relatively new field. Researchers have developed brain-imaging radiotracers for nAChRs, with radiolabeled A-85380 compounds having the most widespread use. We provide a brief background on nAChRs, followed by a discussion...

  5. Isolation of acetylcholine receptor clusters in substrate-associated material from cultured rat myotubes using saponin

    1984-01-01

    After exposure of rat myotube cultures to saponin, less than 1% of the cellular protein was found to remain associated with the tissue culture substrate. This substrate-associated material contained approximately 10% of the acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) and greater than 80% of the large, ventral AChR clusters present in the original culture. The domain structure evident in intact cells was maintained in AChR clusters after isolation using saponin. However, vinculin, present at the clusters ...

  6. Regulation of Synaptic Transmission and Plasticity by Neuronal Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors

    McKay, Bruce E.; Placzek, Andon N; Dani, John A.

    2007-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are widely expressed throughout the central nervous system and participate in a variety of physiological functions. Recent advances have revealed roles of nAChRs in the regulation of synaptic transmission and synaptic plasticity, particularly in the hippocampus and midbrain dopamine centers. In general, activation of nAChRs causes membrane depolarization and directly and indirectly increases the intracellular calcium concentration. Thus, when nAChRs ...

  7. The neuromedin B receptor antagonist, BIM-23127, is a potent antagonist at human and rat urotensin-II receptors

    Herold, Christopher L; Behm, David J.; Buckley, Peter T.; Foley, James J; William E Wixted; Sarau, Henry M; Douglas, Stephen A

    2003-01-01

    The functional activity of the peptidic neuromedin B receptor antagonist BIM-23127 was investigated at recombinant and native urotensin-II receptors (UT receptors). Human urotensin-II (hU-II) promoted intracellular calcium mobilization in HEK293 cells expressing the human UT (hUT) or rat UT (rUT) receptors with pEC50 values of 9.80±0.34 (n=6) and 9.06±0.32 (n=4), respectively. While BIM-23127 alone had no effect on calcium responses in either cell line, it was a potent and competitive antagon...

  8. ETA-receptor antagonists or allosteric modulators?

    De Mey, Jo G R; Compeer, Matthijs G; Lemkens, Pieter; Meens, Merlijn J P M T

    2011-01-01

    The paracrine signaling peptide endothelin-1 (ET1) is involved in cardiovascular diseases, cancer and chronic pain. It acts on class A G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) but displays atypical pharmacology. It binds tightly to ET receptor type A (ET(A)) and causes long-lasting effects. In resista...... that discriminate between ET(A)-mediated effects of the endogenous isopeptides ET1, ET2 and ET3 and that become more effective when the activity of the endogenous endothelin system is elevated....

  9. Differences in muscarinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes in the central nervous system of long sleep and short sleep mice. [Ethanol effects

    Watson, M.; Ming, X.; McArdle, J.J. (Univ of Medical, Newark, NJ (USA))

    1989-02-09

    Differences in voluntary ethanol consumption have been noted in various inbred strains of mice and pharmacogenetic approaches have been used to study the mechanisms of action of many drugs such as ethanol. Long-sleep (LS) and short-sleep (SS) mice, selectively bred for differences in ethanol induced narcosis, provide a method by which a relationship between the differential responsiveness of these geno-types and muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChR) may be evaluated. Sleep times after injection of 3ml ethanol/kg (i.p.) verified the higher sensitivity of LS vs. SS. Mean body weights of LS (26.5g) vs. SS (22g) were also significantly (p<.01) greater. Binding assays for ({sup 3}H)(-) quinuclidinylbenzilate (({sup 3}H)(-)QNB), a specific but nonsubtype selective mAChR antagonist, ({sup 3}H)pirenzepine (({sup 3}H)PZ), a specific M1 mAChR antagonist and ({sup 3}H)11-2-((2-((diethylamino) methyl)-1-piperidinyl) acetyl)-5,11-dihydro-6H-pyrido (2,3-b) (1,4) benzodiazepine-6-one, (({sup 3}H)AF-DX 116), an M2 selective antagonist were performed to determine mAChR affinity (K{sub d}) and density (B{sub max}) in CNS regions such as the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, corpus striatum and other areas. Significantly lower (30-40%) ({sup 3}H)(-)QNB binding suggests that SS have fewer mAChR's than LS in many areas. These differences may relate to their differential ethanol sensitivity.

  10. Muscarinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes: localization and structure/function

    Brann, M R; Ellis, J; Jørgensen, H;

    1993-01-01

    Based on the sequence of the five cloned muscarinic receptor subtypes (m1-m5), subtype selective antibody and cDNA probes have been prepared. Use of these probes has demonstrated that each of the five subtypes has a markedly distinct distribution within the brain and among peripheral tissues. The...... are described, as well as the implied structures of these functional domains....

  11. P2X7 receptor antagonist activity of the anti-allergic agent oxatomide.

    Yoshida, Kazuki; Ito, Masaaki; Matsuoka, Isao

    2015-11-15

    Activation of the P2X7 receptor by extracellular ATP is associated with various immune responses including allergic inflammation. Anti-allergic agents, such as H1-antihistamines, are known to inhibit the effects of different chemical mediators such as acetylcholine and platelet-activating factor. Therefore, we hypothesized that some anti-allergic agents might affect P2X7 receptor function. Using N18TG2 and J774 cells, which express functional P2X7 receptors, the effects of several anti-allergic agents on P2X7 receptor function were investigated by monitoring the ATP-induced increase in intracellular Ca(2+) concentrations ([Ca(2+)]i). Among the various agents tested, oxatomide significantly inhibited P2X7 receptor-mediated [Ca(2+)]i elevation in a concentration-dependent manner without affecting the P2Y2 receptor-mediated response in both N18TG2 and J774 cells. Consistently, oxatomide inhibited P2X7 receptor-mediated membrane current and downstream responses such as mitogen-activated protein kinase activation, inflammation-related gene induction, and cell death. In addition, oxatomide inhibited P2X7 receptor-mediated degranulation in mouse bone marrow-derived mast cells. Whole cell patch clamp analyses in HEK293 cells expressing human, mouse, and rat P2X7 receptors revealed that the inhibitory effect of oxatomide on ATP-induced current was most prominent for the human P2X7 receptor and almost non-existent for the rat P2X7 receptor. The potent inhibitory effects of oxatomide on human P2X7 receptor-mediated function were confirmed in RPMI8226 human B cell-like myeloma cells, which endogenously express the P2X7 receptor. Our results demonstrated that the antihistamine oxatomide also acts as a P2X7 receptor antagonist. Future studies should thus evaluate whether P2X7 receptor antagonism contributes to the anti-allergic effects of oxatomide. PMID:26463039

  12. μ Opioid receptor: novel antagonists and structural modeling

    Kaserer, Teresa; Lantero, Aquilino; Schmidhammer, Helmut; Spetea, Mariana; Schuster, Daniela

    2016-02-01

    The μ opioid receptor (MOR) is a prominent member of the G protein-coupled receptor family and the molecular target of morphine and other opioid drugs. Despite the long tradition of MOR-targeting drugs, still little is known about the ligand-receptor interactions and structure-function relationships underlying the distinct biological effects upon receptor activation or inhibition. With the resolved crystal structure of the β-funaltrexamine-MOR complex, we aimed at the discovery of novel agonists and antagonists using virtual screening tools, i.e. docking, pharmacophore- and shape-based modeling. We suggest important molecular interactions, which active molecules share and distinguish agonists and antagonists. These results allowed for the generation of theoretically validated in silico workflows that were employed for prospective virtual screening. Out of 18 virtual hits evaluated in in vitro pharmacological assays, three displayed antagonist activity and the most active compound significantly inhibited morphine-induced antinociception. The new identified chemotypes hold promise for further development into neurochemical tools for studying the MOR or as potential therapeutic lead candidates.

  13. Characterization of a putative acetylcholine receptor in chick ciliary ganglion neurons

    Monoclonal antibodies to the main immunogenic region on the alpha subunit of acetylcholine receptors in muscle and electric organ recognize membrane components in chick brain and ciliary ganglia that are candidates for the neuronal receptor. The component in chick brain has been purified by immunoaffinity chromatography. It specifically binds nicotine but not alpha-bungarotoxin, and can be affinity labeled with (3H)bromoacetylcholine. The cross-reacting component in ciliary ganglion neurons is concentrated in synaptic membrane, and can be modulated by exposure of the cells to cholinergic ligands in culture. The cross-reacting component in ciliary ganglion neurons is an integral membrane component that binds concanavalin A, and it is distinct from the alpha-bungarotoxin binding component. The acetylcholine receptor function in these neurons can be locked by affinity alkylation with bromoacetylcholine, indicating similarity in this respect to receptors from muscle and electric organ. Antisera raised against the partially purified component from chick brain also block receptor function on ciliary ganglion neurons. The subcellular distribution of the ganglion component in culture is assessed, and it is shown that approximately 2/3 of the cross-reacting components are intracellular; the majority of these seem not to be destined for insertion into the plasma membrane

  14. Multiple Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor Subtypes in the Mouse Amygdala Regulate Affective Behaviors and Response to Social Stress.

    Mineur, Yann S; Fote, Gianna M; Blakeman, Sam; Cahuzac, Emma L M; Newbold, Sylvia A; Picciotto, Marina R

    2016-05-01

    Electrophysiological and neurochemical studies implicate cholinergic signaling in the basolateral amygdala (BLA) in behaviors related to stress. Both animal studies and human clinical trials suggest that drugs that alter nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) activity can affect behaviors related to mood and anxiety. Clinical studies also suggest that abnormalities in cholinergic signaling are associated with major depressive disorder, whereas pre-clinical studies have implicated both β2 subunit-containing (β2*) and α7 nAChRs in the effects of nicotine in models of anxiety- and depression-like behaviors. We therefore investigated whether nAChR signaling in the amygdala contributes to stress-mediated behaviors in mice. Local infusion of the non-competitive non-selective nAChR antagonist mecamylamine or viral-mediated downregulation of the β2 or α7 nAChR subunit in the amygdala all induced robust anxiolytic- and antidepressant-like effects in several mouse behavioral models. Further, whereas α7 nAChR subunit knockdown was somewhat more effective at decreasing anxiety-like behavior, only β2 subunit knockdown decreased resilience to social defeat stress and c-fos immunoreactivity in the BLA. In contrast, α7, but not β2, subunit knockdown effectively reversed the effect of increased ACh signaling in a mouse model of depression. These results suggest that signaling through β2* nAChRs is essential for baseline excitability of the BLA, and a decrease in signaling through β2 nAChRs alters anxiety- and depression-like behaviors even in unstressed animals. In contrast, stimulation of α7 nAChRs by acetylcholine may mediate the increased depression-like behaviors observed during the hypercholinergic state observed in depressed individuals. PMID:26471256

  15. Changes in acetylcholine content, release and muscarinic receptors in rat hippocampus under cold stress

    The aim was to study the mechanism of the previously established decrease in acetylcholine (ACh) concentration in the rat hippocampus under cold stress. Male rats were exposed for 14 days to cold (5 degree C) or kept (controls) at room temperature (24 degree C). Acetylcholine content, release and muscarinic receptor binding were investigated in the hippocampus. Cold exposure resulted in a decrease of ACh concentration in the dorsal hippocampus. Moreover, the potassium-evoked release of ACh from hippocampal slices was increased and an increase of maximal binding capacity of [3H](-) quinuclidinyl benzilate in the dorsal hippocampus of cold exposed animals was also observed. Thus the decrease of hippocampal ACh concentration under cold exposure is probably due to its increased release. On balance then, our results demonstrate that cold stress in the rat induces significant activation of the hippocampal cholinergic system

  16. Interleukin-1-receptor antagonist in type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Larsen, Claus M; Faulenbach, Mirjam; Vaag, Allan;

    2007-01-01

    proliferation, and apoptosis. METHODS: In this double-blind, parallel-group trial involving 70 patients with type 2 diabetes, we randomly assigned 34 patients to receive 100 mg of anakinra (a recombinant human interleukin-1-receptor antagonist) subcutaneously once daily for 13 weeks and 36 patients to receive......BACKGROUND: The expression of interleukin-1-receptor antagonist is reduced in pancreatic islets of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, and high glucose concentrations induce the production of interleukin-1beta in human pancreatic beta cells, leading to impaired insulin secretion, decreased cell...... (P=0.03); C-peptide secretion was enhanced (P=0.05), and there were reductions in the ratio of proinsulin to insulin (P=0.005) and in levels of interleukin-6 (P<0.001) and C-reactive protein (P=0.002). Insulin resistance, insulin-regulated gene expression in skeletal muscle, serum adipokine levels...

  17. Attenuation of cocaine's reinforcing and discriminative stimulus effects via muscarinic M1 acetylcholine receptor stimulation

    Thomsen, Morgane; Conn, P Jeffrey; Lindsley, Craig;

    2010-01-01

    Muscarinic cholinergic receptors modulate dopaminergic function in brain pathways thought to mediate cocaine's abuse-related effects. Here, we sought to confirm and extend in the mouse species findings that nonselective muscarinic receptor antagonists can enhance cocaine's discriminative stimulus....... More importantly, we tested the hypothesis that muscarinic receptor agonists with varied receptor subtype selectivity can blunt cocaine's discriminative stimulus and reinforcing effects; we hypothesized a critical role for the M(1) and/or M(4) receptor subtypes in this modulation. Mice were trained to...... discriminate cocaine from saline, or to self-administer intravenous cocaine chronically. The nonselective muscarinic antagonists scopolamine and methylscopolamine, the nonselective muscarinic agonists oxotremorine and pilocarpine, the M(1)/M(4)-preferring agonist xanomeline, the putative M(1)-selective agonist...

  18. Montelukast: More than a Cysteinyl Leukotriene Receptor Antagonist?

    Tintinger, Gregory R.; Charles Feldman; Theron, Annette J.; Ronald Anderson

    2010-01-01

    The prototype cysteinyl leukotriene receptor antagonist, montelukast, is generally considered to have a niche application in the therapy of exercise- and aspirin-induced asthma. It is also used as add-on therapy in patients whose asthma is poorly controlled with inhaled corticosteroid monotherapy, or with the combination of a long-acting β(2)-agonist and an inhaled corticosteroid. Recently, however, montelukast has been reported to possess secondary anti-inflammatory properties, apparently un...

  19. Optimization of amide-based EP3 receptor antagonists.

    Lee, Esther C Y; Futatsugi, Kentaro; Arcari, Joel T; Bahnck, Kevin; Coffey, Steven B; Derksen, David R; Kalgutkar, Amit S; Loria, Paula M; Sharma, Raman

    2016-06-01

    Prostaglandin E receptor subtype 3 (EP3) antagonism may treat a variety of symptoms from inflammation to cardiovascular and metabolic diseases. Previously, most EP3 antagonists were large acidic ligands that mimic the substrate, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). This manuscript describes the optimization of a neutral small molecule amide series with improved lipophilic efficiency (LipE) also known as lipophilic ligand efficiency (LLE) ((a) Nat. Rev. Drug Disc.2007, 6, 881; (b) Annu. Rep. Med. Chem.2010, 45, 380). PMID:27107947

  20. Role of acetylcholine receptors in proliferation and differentiation of P19 embryonal carcinoma cells

    Coordinated proliferation and differentiation of progenitor cells is the base for production of appropriate numbers of neurons and glia during neuronal development in order to establish normal brain functions. We have used murine embryonal carcinoma P19 cells as an in vitro model for early differentiation to study participation of nicotinic (nAChR) and muscarinic acetylcholine (mAChR) receptors in the proliferation of neural progenitor cells and their differentiation to neurons. We have previously shown that functional nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) already expressed in embryonic cells mediate elevations in cytosolic free calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) via calcium influx through nAChR channels whereas intracellular stores contribute to nAChR- and mAChR-mediated calcium fluxes in differentiated cells [Resende et al., Cell Calcium 43 (2008) 107-121]. In the present study, we have demonstrated that nicotine provoked inhibition of proliferation in embryonic cells as determined by BrdU labeling. However, in neural progenitor cells nicotine stimulated proliferation which was reversed in the presence of inhibitors of calcium mobilization from intracellular stores, indicating that liberation of intracellular calcium contributed to this proliferation induction. Muscarine induced proliferation stimulation in progenitor cells by activation of Gαq/11-coupled M1, M3 and M5 receptors and intracellular calcium stores, whereas Gαi/o-protein coupled M2 receptor activity mediated neuronal differentiation

  1. Novel potent selective phenylglycine antagonists of metabotropic glutamate receptors.

    Bedingfield, J S; Jane, D E; Kemp, M C; Toms, N J; Roberts, P J

    1996-08-01

    The metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptor antagonist properties of novel phenylglycine analogues were investigated in adult rat cortical slices (mGlu receptors negatively coupled to adenylyl cyclase), neonatal rat cortical slices and in cultured rat cerebellar granule cells (mGlu receptors coupled to phosphoinositide hydrolysis). (RS)-alpha-methyl-4-phosphonophenylglycine (MPPG), (RS)-alpha-methyl-4-sulphonophenylglycine (MSPG), (RS)-alpha-methyl-4-tetrazolylphenylglycine (MTPG), (RS)-alpha-methyl-3-carboxymethyl-4-hydroxyphenylglycine (M3CM4HPG) and (RS)-alpha-methyl-4-hydroxy-3-phosphonomethylphenylglycine (M4H3PMPG) were demonstrated to have potent and selective effects against 10 microM L-2-amino-4-phosphonobutyrate (L-AP4)- and 0.3 microM (2S,1'S,2'S)-2-(2-carboxycyclopropyl)glycine (L-CCG-1)-mediated inhibition of forskolin-stimulated cAMP accumulation in the adult rat cortex. In contrast, these compounds demonstrated either weak or no antagonism at mGlu receptors coupled to phosphoinositide hydrolysis in either neonatal rat cortex or in cultured cerebellar granule cells. These compounds thus appear to be useful discriminatory pharmacological tools for mGlu receptors and form the basis for the further development of novel antagonists. PMID:8864696

  2. Radiolabelled GLP-1 receptor antagonist binds to GLP-1 receptor-expressing human tissues

    Waser, Beatrice; Reubi, Jean Claude [University of Berne, Division of Cell Biology and Experimental Cancer Research, Institute of Pathology, PO Box 62, Berne (Switzerland)

    2014-06-15

    Radiolabelled glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists have recently been shown to successfully image benign insulinomas in patients. For the somatostatin receptor targeting of tumours, however, it was recently reported that antagonist tracers were superior to agonist tracers. The present study therefore evaluated various forms of the {sup 125}iodinated-Bolton-Hunter (BH)-exendin(9-39) antagonist tracer for the in vitro visualization of GLP-1 receptor-expressing tissues in rats and humans and compared it with the agonist tracer {sup 125}I-GLP-1(7-36)amide. Receptor autoradiography studies with {sup 125}I-GLP-1(7-36)amide agonist or {sup 125}I-BH-exendin(9-39) antagonist radioligands were performed in human and rat tissues. The antagonist {sup 125}I-BH-exendin(9-39) labelled at lysine 19 identifies all human and rat GLP-1 target tissues and GLP-1 receptor-expressing tumours. Binding is of high affinity and is comparable in all tested tissues in its binding properties with the agonist tracer {sup 125}I-GLP-1(7-36)amide. For comparison, {sup 125}I-BH-exendin(9-39) with the BH labelled at lysine 4 did identify the GLP-1 receptor in rat tissues but not in human tissues. The GLP-1 receptor antagonist exendin(9-39) labelled with {sup 125}I-BH at lysine 19 is an excellent GLP-1 radioligand that identifies human and rat GLP-1 receptors in normal and tumoural tissues. It may therefore be the molecular basis to develop suitable GLP-1 receptor antagonist radioligands for in vivo imaging of GLP-1 receptor-expressing tissues in patients. (orig.)

  3. Effects of alpha-7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor positive allosteric modulator on lipopolysaccharide-induced neuroinflammatory pain in mice.

    Abbas, Muzaffar; Rahman, Shafiqur

    2016-07-15

    Evidence indicates that microglial activation contributes to the pathophysiology and maintenance of neuroinflammatory pain involving central nervous system alpha-7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. The objective of the present study was to determine the effects of 3a,4,5,9b-Tetrahydro-4-(1-naphthalenyl)-3H-cyclopentan[c]quinoline-8-sulfonamide (TQS), an alpha-7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor positive allosteric modulator (PAM), on tactile allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia following lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced microglial activation in hippocampus, a neuroinflammatory pain model in mice. In addition, we examined the effects of TQS on microglial activation marker, an ionized calcium-binding adapter molecule 1 (Iba-1), in the hippocampus may be associated with neuroinflammatory pain. Pretreatment of TQS (4mg/kg) significantly reduced LPS (1mg/kg)-induced tactile allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia. Moreover, pretreatment of methyllycaconitine (3mg/kg) significantly reversed TQS-induced antiallodynic and antihyperalgesic responses indicating the involvement of alpha-7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor. Pretreatment of TQS significantly decreased LPS-induced increased in hippocampal Iba-1 expression. Overall, these results suggest that TQS reduces LPS-induced neuroinflammatory pain like symptoms via modulating microglial activation likely in the hippocampus and/or other brain region by targeting alpha-7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor. Therefore, alpha-7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor PAM such as TQS could be a potential drug candidate for the treatment of neuroinflammatory pain. PMID:27154173

  4. Muscarinic acetylcholine receptor-mediated stimulation of retinal ganglion cell photoreceptors.

    Sodhi, Puneet; Hartwick, Andrew T E

    2016-09-01

    Melanopsin-dependent phototransduction in intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs) involves a Gq-coupled phospholipase C (PLC) signaling cascade. Acetylcholine, released in the mammalian retina by starburst amacrine cells, can also activate Gq-PLC pathways through certain muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs). Using multielectrode array recordings of rat retinas, we demonstrate that robust spiking responses can be evoked in neonatal and adult ipRGCs after bath application of the muscarinic agonist carbachol. The stimulatory action of carbachol on ipRGCs was a direct effect, as confirmed through calcium imaging experiments on isolated ipRGCs in purified cultures. Using flickering (6 Hz) yellow light stimuli at irradiances below the threshold for melanopsin activation, spiking responses could be elicited in ipRGCs that were suppressed by mAChR antagonism. Therefore, this work identified a novel melanopsin-independent pathway for stimulating sustained spiking in ganglion cell photoreceptors. This mAChR-mediated pathway could enhance ipRGC spiking responses in conditions known to evoke retinal acetylcholine release, such as those involving flickering or moving visual stimuli. Furthermore, this work identifies a pharmacological approach for light-independent ipRGC stimulation that could be targeted by mAChR agonists. PMID:27055770

  5. An allosteric enhancer of M4muscarinic acetylcholine receptor function inhibits behavioral and neurochemical effects of cocaine

    Dencker, Ditte; Weikop, Pia; Sørensen, Gunnar;

    2012-01-01

    The mesostriatal dopamine system plays a key role in mediating the reinforcing effects of psychostimulant drugs like cocaine. The muscarinic M4 acetylcholine receptor subtype is centrally involved in the regulation of dopamine release in striatal areas. Consequently, striatal M4 receptors could be...

  6. A subpopulation of neuronal M4 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors plays a critical role in modulating dopamine-dependent behaviors

    Jeon, Jongrye; Nielsen, Ditte Dencker; Wörtwein, Gitta;

    2010-01-01

    Acetylcholine (ACh) regulates many key functions of the CNS by activating cell surface receptors referred to as muscarinic ACh receptors (M(1)-M(5) mAChRs). Like other mAChR subtypes, the M(4) mAChR is widely expressed in different regions of the forebrain. Interestingly, M(4) mAChRs are coexpres...

  7. Attenuation of cocaine's reinforcing and discriminative stimulus effects via muscarinic M1 acetylcholine receptor stimulation

    Thomsen, Morgane; Conn, P Jeffrey; Lindsley, Craig;

    2010-01-01

    Muscarinic cholinergic receptors modulate dopaminergic function in brain pathways thought to mediate cocaine's abuse-related effects. Here, we sought to confirm and extend in the mouse species findings that nonselective muscarinic receptor antagonists can enhance cocaine's discriminative stimulus......) conferred lesser nonspecific rate-suppressing effects, with no rate suppression for TBPB. In mutant mice lacking M(1) and M(4) receptors, xanomeline failed to diminish cocaine discrimination while rate-decreasing effects were intact. Our data suggest that central M(1) receptor activation attenuates cocaine...

  8. Functionalized Congeners of P2Y1 Receptor Antagonists:

    de Castro, Sonia [National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health; Maruoka, Hiroshi [National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health; Hong, Kunlun [ORNL; Kilbey, II, S Michael [ORNL; Costanzi, Stefano [National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health; Hechler, Béatrice [University of Strasbourg; Gachet, Christian [EFS-Alsace, Strasbourg, France; Harden, T. Kendall [University of North Carolina School of Medicine; Jacobson, Kenneth A. [National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health

    2010-01-01

    The P2Y{sub 1} receptor is a prothrombotic G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) activated by ADP. Preference for the North (N) ring conformation of the ribose moiety of adenine nucleotide 3',5'-bisphosphate antagonists of the P2Y{sub 1} receptor was established by using a ring-constrained methanocarba (a bicyclo[3.1.0]hexane) ring as a ribose substitute. A series of covalently linkable N{sup 6}-methyl-(N)-methanocarba-2'-deoxyadenosine-3',5'-bisphosphates containing extended 2-alkynyl chains was designed, and binding affinity at the human (h) P2Y{sub 1} receptor determined. The chain of these functionalized congeners contained hydrophilic moieties, a reactive substituent, or biotin, linked via an amide. Variation of the chain length and position of an intermediate amide group revealed high affinity of carboxylic congener 8 (K{sub i} 23 nM) and extended amine congener 15 (K{sub i} 132 nM), both having a 2-(1-pentynoyl) group. A biotin conjugate 18 containing an extended {epsilon}-aminocaproyl spacer chain exhibited higher affinity than a shorter biotinylated analogue. Alternatively, click coupling of terminal alkynes of homologous 2-dialkynyl nucleotide derivatives to alkyl azido groups produced triazole derivatives that bound to the P2Y{sub 1} receptor following deprotection of the bisphosphate groups. The preservation of receptor affinity of the functionalized congeners was consistent with new P2Y{sub 1} receptor modeling and ligand docking. Attempted P2Y{sub 1} antagonist conjugation to PAMAM dendrimer carriers by amide formation or palladium-catalyzed reaction between an alkyne on the dendrimer and a 2-iodopurine-derivatized nucleotide was unsuccessful. A dialkynyl intermediate containing the chain length favored in receptor binding was conjugated to an azide-derivatized dendrimer, and the conjugate inhibited ADP-promoted human platelet aggregation. This is the first example of attaching a strategically functionalized P2Y receptor

  9. Regulation of phosphorylation of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in mouse BC3H1 myocytes

    Smith, M.M.; Merlie, J.P.; Lawrence, J.C. Jr.

    1987-09-01

    By using /sup 32/P-labeling methods and performing immunoprecipitations with specific antibodies, the authors have found that three subunits of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor and phosphorylated in mouse skeletal muscle cells. In nonstimulated cells, the molar ratios of phosphate estimated in ..cap alpha.., ..beta.., and delta subunits were 0.02, 0.05, and 0.5, respectively. All three subunits contained predominantly phosphoserine with some phosphothreonine; the ..beta.., subunit also contained phosphotyrosine. Incubating cells with agents that stimulate cAMP-dependent pathways (isoproterenol, forskolin, 8-Br-cAMP) increased the phosphorylation of the delta subunit by 50%, but phosphate labeling of the ..beta.. subunit was depressed by a third. In contrast, when cells were incubated with the divalent cation ionophores A-23187 or ionomycin, phosphorylation of both the delta and ..beta.. subunits increased. The results indicate that acetylcholine receptors are phosphorylated to significant levels in skeletal muscle cells and that cAMP-dependent and Ca/sup 2 +/-dependent pathways exist for controlling the phosphorylation state of the receptor subunits.

  10. m1 Acetylcholine Receptor Expression is Decreased in Hippocampal CA1 region of Aged Epileptic Animals

    Cavarsan, Clarissa Fantin; Avanzi, Renata Della Torre; Queiroz, Claudio Marcos; Xavier, Gilberto Fernando; Mello, Luiz Eugênio; Covolan, Luciene

    2011-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated the possible additive effects of epilepsy and aging on the expression of m1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (AChR) in the rat hippocampus. Young (3 months) and Aged (20 months) male, Wistar rats were treated with pilocarpine to induce status epilepticus (SE). Immunohistochemical procedure for m1 AChR detection was performed 2 months after pilocarpine-induced SE. In the CA1 pyramidal region m1 AChR staining was significantly decreased in aged epileptic ...

  11. Prostate stem cell antigen interacts with nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and is affected in Alzheimer's disease

    Jensen, Majbrit Myrup; Mikkelsen, Jens D.; Arvaniti, Maria; Pinborg, Lars Hageman; Thomsen, Morten Skøtt

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder involving impaired cholinergic neurotransmission and dysregulation of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). Ly-6/neurotoxin (Lynx) proteins have been shown to modulate cognition and neural plasticity by binding to nAChR subtypes and...... are present in the human brain. We further showed that PSCA forms stable complexes with the α4 nAChR subunit and decreases nicotine-induced extracellular-signal regulated kinase phosphorylation in PC12 cells. In addition, we analyzed protein levels of PSCA and Lypd6 in postmortem tissue of medial...

  12. alpha4beta2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors on dopaminergic neurons mediate nicotine reward and anxiety relief

    McGranahan, Tresa M.; Patzlaff, Natalie E.; Grady, Sharon R; Heinemann, Stephen F.; Booker, T.K.

    2011-01-01

    Nicotine is the primary psychoactive substance in tobacco and it exerts its effects by interaction with various subtypes of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) in the brain. One of the major subtypes expressed in brain, the alpha4beta2-nAChR, endogenously modulates neuronal excitability and thereby, modifies certain normal, as well as nicotine-induced, behaviors. Although alpha4-containing nAChRs are widely expressed across the brain, a major focus has been on their roles within midbra...

  13. The role of alpha4 containing nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in dopamine neurons

    McGranahan, Tresa Michelle

    2011-01-01

    Nicotine is the primary psychoactive substance in tobacco and it exerts its effects by interaction with various subtypes of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) in the brain. One of the major subtypes expressed in brain, the alpha4beta2-nAChR, endogenously modulates neuronal excitability and, thereby, modifies certain normal, as well as nicotine-induced, behaviors. Although alpha4- containing nAChRs are widely expressed across the brain, a major focus has been on their roles within midb...

  14. The nicotinic acetylcholine receptor gene family of the silkworm, Bombyx mori

    Zhang Chuan-Xi; Dong Ke; Shao Ya-Ming

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) mediate fast synaptic cholinergic transmission in the insect central nervous system. The insect nAChR is the molecular target of a class of insecticides, neonicotinoids. Like mammalian nAChRs, insect nAChRs are considered to be made up of five subunits, coded by homologous genes belonging to the same family. The nAChR subunit genes of Drosophila melanogaster, Apis mellifera and Anopheles gambiae have been cloned previously based o...

  15. Interaction of 18-methoxycoronaridine with nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in different conformational states

    Arias, Hugo R.; Rosenberg, Avraham; Feuerbach, Dominik; Targowska-Duda, Katarzyna M.; Maciejewski, Ryszard; Jozwiak, Krzysztof; Moaddel, Ruin; Glick, Stanley D.; Wainer, Irving W.

    2010-01-01

    The interaction of 18-methoxycoronaridine (18-MC) with nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) was compared with that for ibogaine and phencyclidine (PCP). The results established that 18-MC: (a) is more potent than ibogaine and PCP inhibiting (±)-epibatidine-induced AChR Ca2+ influx. The potency of 18-MC is increased after longer pre-incubation periods, which is in agreement with the enhancement of [3H]cytisine binding to resting but activatable Torpedo AChRs, (b) binds to a single site in...

  16. Interaction of ibogaine with human α3β4-nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in different conformational states

    Arias, Hugo R.; Rosenberg, Avraham; Targowska-Duda, Katarzyna M.; Feuerbach, Dominik; Yuan, Xiao Juan; Jozwiak, Krzysztof; Moaddel, Ruin; Wainer, Irving W.

    2010-01-01

    The interaction of ibogaine and phencyclidine (PCP) with human (h) α3β4-nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) in different conformational states was determined by functional and structural approaches including, radioligand binding assays, Ca2+ influx detections, and thermodynamic and kinetics measurements. The results established that (a) ibogaine inhibits (±)-epibatidine-induced Ca2+ influx in hα3β4 AChRs with ~9-fold higher potency than that for PCP, (b) [3H]ibogaine binds to a single s...

  17. Block by acetylcholine of mouse muscle nicotinic receptors, stably expressed in fibroblasts

    1995-01-01

    We have measured the concentration and voltage dependence of block by acetylcholine (ACh) of fetal- and adult-type mouse muscle nicotinic receptors, expressed in a fibroblast cell line. Data, obtained at a transmembrane potential of -60 mV and with ACh concentrations of 1 mM and above, are broadly consistent with the occlusion of an open channel with a single ACh+ ion (simple open channel block). The rate of recovery from block is approximately 40,000s-1 and has only a weak voltage dependence...

  18. Acetylcholine induces GABA release onto rod bipolar cells through heteromeric nicotinic receptors expressed in A17 amacrine cells

    Elgueta, Claudio; Vielma, Alex H.; Palacios, Adrian G.; Schmachtenberg, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    Acetylcholine (ACh) is a major retinal neurotransmitter that modulates visual processing through a large repertoire of cholinergic receptors expressed on different retinal cell types. ACh is released from starburst amacrine cells (SACs) under scotopic conditions, but its effects on cells of the rod pathway have not been investigated. Using whole-cell patch clamp recordings in slices of rat retina, we found that ACh application triggers GABA release onto rod bipolar (RB) cells. GABA was released from A17 amacrine cells and activated postsynaptic GABAA and GABAC receptors in RB cells. The sensitivity of ACh-induced currents to nicotinic ACh receptor (nAChR) antagonists (TMPH ~ mecamylamine > erysodine > DhβE > MLA) together with the differential potency of specific agonists to mimic ACh responses (cytisine >> RJR2403 ~ choline), suggest that A17 cells express heteromeric nAChRs containing the β4 subunit. Activation of nAChRs induced GABA release after Ca2+ accumulation in A17 cell dendrites and varicosities mediated by L-type voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) and intracellular Ca2+ stores. Inhibition of acetylcholinesterase depolarized A17 cells and increased spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents in RB cells, indicating that endogenous ACh enhances GABAergic inhibition of RB cells. Moreover, injection of neostigmine or cytisine reduced the b-wave of the scotopic flash electroretinogram (ERG), suggesting that cholinergic modulation of GABA release controls RB cell activity in vivo. These results describe a novel regulatory mechanism of RB cell inhibition and complement our understanding of the neuromodulatory control of retinal signal processing. PMID:25709566

  19. Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor Gene Family of the Pea Aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum

    LIU Yi-peng; LIN Ke-jian; LIU Yang; GUI Fu-rong; WANG Gui-rong

    2013-01-01

    The nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAchRs) are cholinergic receptors that form ligand-gated ion channels by ifve subunits in insect and vertebrate nervous systems. The insect nAChR is the molecular target of a class of insecticides, neonicotinoids. Here, we identiifed and cloned 11 candidate nAChR subunit genes in Acyrthosiphon pisum using genome-based bioinformatics combined modern molecular techniques. Most A. pisum nAChRs including α1, α2, α3, α4, α6, α8, and β1 show highly sequence identities with the counterparts of other insects examined. Expression proifles analysis showed that all subunit genes were expressed in adult head. At least two subunits have alternative splicing that obviously increase A. pisum nicotinic receptor diversity. This study will be invaluable for exploring the molecular mechanisms of neonicotinoid-like insecticides in sucking pests, and for ultimately establishing the screening platform of novel insecticides.

  20. Antipsychotic-induced catalepsy is attenuated in mice lacking the M4 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor

    Fink-Jensen, Anders; Schmidt, Lene S.; Dencker, Ditte; Schülein, Christina; Wess, Jürgen; Wörtwein, Gitta; Woldbye, David P.D.

    2011-01-01

    A delicate balance exists between the central dopaminergic and cholinergic neurotransmitter systems with respect to motor function. An imbalance can result in motor dysfunction as observed in Parkinson’s disease patients and in patients treated with antipsychotic compounds. Cholinergic receptor antagonists can alleviate extrapyramidal symptoms in Parkinson’s disease and motor side effects induced by antipsychotics. The effects of anticholinergics are mediated by muscarinic receptors of which ...

  1. Characterization of a novel non-steroidal glucocorticoid receptor antagonist

    Li, Qun-Yi; Zhang, Meng [The National Center for Drug Screening, Shanghai (China); State Key Laboratory of Drug Research, Shanghai Institute of Materia Medica, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai (China); Hallis, Tina M.; DeRosier, Therese A. [Cell Systems Division, Invitrogen, Madison, WI (United States); Yue, Jian-Min; Ye, Yang [State Key Laboratory of Drug Research, Shanghai Institute of Materia Medica, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai (China); Mais, Dale E. [The National Center for Drug Screening, Shanghai (China); MPI Research, Mattawan, MI (United States); Wang, Ming-Wei, E-mail: wangmw@mail.shcnc.ac.cn [The National Center for Drug Screening, Shanghai (China); State Key Laboratory of Drug Research, Shanghai Institute of Materia Medica, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai (China)

    2010-01-15

    Selective antagonists of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) are desirable for the treatment of hypercortisolemia associated with Cushing's syndrome, psychic depression, obesity, diabetes, neurodegenerative diseases, and glaucoma. NC3327, a non-steroidal small molecule with potent binding affinity to GR (K{sub i} = 13.2 nM), was identified in a high-throughput screening effort. As a full GR antagonist, NC3327 greatly inhibits the dexamethasone (Dex) induction of marker genes involved in hepatic gluconeogenesis, but has a minimal effect on matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9), a GR responsive pro-inflammatory gene. Interestingly, the compound recruits neither coactivators nor corepressors to the GR complex but competes with glucocorticoids for the interaction between GR and a coactivator peptide. Moreover, NC3327 does not trigger GR nuclear translocation, but significantly blocks Dex-induced GR transportation to the nucleus, and thus appears to be a 'competitive' GR antagonist. Therefore, the non-steroidal compound, NC3327, may represent a new class of GR antagonists as potential therapeutics for a variety of cortisol-related endocrine disorders.

  2. Characterization of a novel non-steroidal glucocorticoid receptor antagonist

    Selective antagonists of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) are desirable for the treatment of hypercortisolemia associated with Cushing's syndrome, psychic depression, obesity, diabetes, neurodegenerative diseases, and glaucoma. NC3327, a non-steroidal small molecule with potent binding affinity to GR (Ki = 13.2 nM), was identified in a high-throughput screening effort. As a full GR antagonist, NC3327 greatly inhibits the dexamethasone (Dex) induction of marker genes involved in hepatic gluconeogenesis, but has a minimal effect on matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9), a GR responsive pro-inflammatory gene. Interestingly, the compound recruits neither coactivators nor corepressors to the GR complex but competes with glucocorticoids for the interaction between GR and a coactivator peptide. Moreover, NC3327 does not trigger GR nuclear translocation, but significantly blocks Dex-induced GR transportation to the nucleus, and thus appears to be a 'competitive' GR antagonist. Therefore, the non-steroidal compound, NC3327, may represent a new class of GR antagonists as potential therapeutics for a variety of cortisol-related endocrine disorders.

  3. Adenosine receptor antagonists alter the stability of human epileptic GABAA receptors

    Roseti, Cristina; Martinello, Katiuscia; Fucile, Sergio; Piccari, Vanessa; Mascia, Addolorata; Di Gennaro, Giancarlo; Quarato, Pier Paolo; Manfredi, Mario; Esposito, Vincenzo; Cantore, Gianpaolo; Arcella, Antonella; Simonato, Michele; Fredholm, Bertil B.; Limatola, Cristina; Miledi, Ricardo; Eusebi, Fabrizio

    2008-01-01

    We examined how the endogenous anticonvulsant adenosine might influence γ-aminobutyric acid type A (GABAA) receptor stability and which adenosine receptors (ARs) were involved. Upon repetitive activation (GABA 500 μM), GABAA receptors, microtransplanted into Xenopus oocytes from neurosurgically resected epileptic human nervous tissues, exhibited an obvious GABAA-current (IGABA) run-down, which was consistently and significantly reduced by treatment with the nonselective adenosine receptor antagonist CGS15943 (100 nM) or with adenosine deaminase (ADA) (1 units/ml), that inactivates adenosine. It was also found that selective antagonists of A2B (MRS1706, 10 nM) or A3 (MRS1334, 30 nM) receptors reduced IGABA run-down, whereas treatment with the specific A1 receptor antagonist DPCPX (10 nM) was ineffective. The selective A2A receptor antagonist SCH58261 (10 nM) reduced or potentiated IGABA run-down in ≈40% and ≈20% of tested oocytes, respectively. The ADA-resistant, AR agonist 2-chloroadenosine (2-CA) (10 μM) potentiated IGABA run-down but only in ≈20% of tested oocytes. CGS15943 administration again decreased IGABA run-down in patch-clamped neurons from either human or rat neocortex slices. IGABA run-down in pyramidal neurons was equivalent in A1 receptor-deficient and wt neurons but much larger in neurons from A2A receptor-deficient mice, indicating that, in mouse cortex, GABAA-receptor stability is tonically influenced by A2A but not by A1 receptors. IGABA run-down from wt mice was not affected by 2-CA, suggesting maximal ARs activity by endogenous adenosine. Our findings strongly suggest that cortical A2–A3 receptors alter the stability of GABAA receptors, which could offer therapeutic opportunities. PMID:18809912

  4. Topological dispositions of lysine α380 and lysine γ486 in the acetylcholine receptor from Torpedo californica

    The locations have been determined, with respect to the plasma membrane, of lysine α380 and lysine γ486 in the α subunit and the γ subunit, respectively, of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor from Torpedo californica. Immunoadsorbents were constructed that recognize the carboxy terminus of the peptide GVKYIAE released by proteolytic digestion from positions 378-384 in the amino acid sequence of the α subunit of the acetylcholine receptor and the carboxy terminus of the peptide KYVP released by proteolytic digestion from positions 486-489 in the amino acid sequence of the γ subunit. They were used to isolate these peptides from proteolytic digests of polypeptides from the acetylcholine receptor. Sealed vesicles containing the native acetylcholine receptor were labeled with pyridoxal phosphate and sodium [3H]-borohydride. The effect of saponin on the incorporation of pyridoxamine phosphate into lysine α380 and lysine γ486 from the acetylcholine receptor in these vesicles was assessed with the immunoadsorbents. The conclusions that follow from these results are that lysine α380 is on the inside surface of a vesicle and lysine γ486 is on the outside surface. Because a majority (85%) of the total binding sites for α-bungarotoxin bind the toxin in the absence of saponin, the majority of the vesicles are right side out with the inside of the vesicle corresponding to the cytoplasmic surface and the outside of the vesicle corresponding to the extracytoplasmic, synaptic surface. Because lysine α380 and lysine γ486 lie on opposite sides of the membrane, a membrane-spanning segment must be located between the two positions occupied by these two amino acids in the common sequence of a polypeptide of the acetylcholine receptor

  5. Topological dispositions of lysine. alpha. 380 and lysine. gamma. 486 in the acetylcholine receptor from Torpedo californica

    Dwyer, B.P. (Univ. of California, San Diego, La Jolla (USA))

    1991-04-23

    The locations have been determined, with respect to the plasma membrane, of lysine {alpha}380 and lysine {gamma}486 in the {alpha} subunit and the {gamma} subunit, respectively, of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor from Torpedo californica. Immunoadsorbents were constructed that recognize the carboxy terminus of the peptide GVKYIAE released by proteolytic digestion from positions 378-384 in the amino acid sequence of the {alpha} subunit of the acetylcholine receptor and the carboxy terminus of the peptide KYVP released by proteolytic digestion from positions 486-489 in the amino acid sequence of the {gamma} subunit. They were used to isolate these peptides from proteolytic digests of polypeptides from the acetylcholine receptor. Sealed vesicles containing the native acetylcholine receptor were labeled with pyridoxal phosphate and sodium ({sup 3}H)-borohydride. The effect of saponin on the incorporation of pyridoxamine phosphate into lysine {alpha}380 and lysine {gamma}486 from the acetylcholine receptor in these vesicles was assessed with the immunoadsorbents. The conclusions that follow from these results are that lysine {alpha}380 is on the inside surface of a vesicle and lysine {gamma}486 is on the outside surface. Because a majority (85%) of the total binding sites for {alpha}-bungarotoxin bind the toxin in the absence of saponin, the majority of the vesicles are right side out with the inside of the vesicle corresponding to the cytoplasmic surface and the outside of the vesicle corresponding to the extracytoplasmic, synaptic surface. Because lysine {alpha}380 and lysine {gamma}486 lie on opposite sides of the membrane, a membrane-spanning segment must be located between the two positions occupied by these two amino acids in the common sequence of a polypeptide of the acetylcholine receptor.

  6. Potential Clinical Implications of the Urotensin II Receptor Antagonists

    Emilie Kane

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Urotensin-II (UII, which binds to its receptor UT, plays an important role in the heart, kidneys, pancreas, adrenal gland and CNS. In the vasculature, it acts as a potent endothelium-independent vasoconstrictor and endothelium-dependent vasodilator. In disease states, this constriction-dilation equilibrium is disrupted. There is an upregulation of the UII system in heart disease, metabolic syndrome and kidney failure. The increase in UII release and UT expression suggest that UII system may be implicated in the pathology and pathogenesis of these diseases by causing an increase in ACAT-1 activity leading to SMC proliferation and foam cell infiltration, insulin resistance (DMII, as well as inflammation, high blood pressure and plaque formation. Recently, UT antagonists such as SB-611812, palosuran, and most recently a piperazino-isoindolinone based antagonist have been developed in the hope of better understanding the UII system and treating its associated diseases.

  7. Mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists: emerging roles in cardiovascular medicine

    Funder JW

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available John W FunderPrince Henry's Institute, Clayton, Victoria, AustraliaAbstract: Spironolactone was first developed over 50 years ago as a potent mineralocorticoid receptor (MR antagonist with undesirable side effects; it was followed a decade ago by eplerenone, which is less potent but much more MR-specific. From a marginal role as a potassium-sparing diuretic, spironolactone was shown to be an extraordinarily effective adjunctive agent in the treatment of progressive heart failure, as was eplerenone in subsequent heart failure trials. Neither acts as an aldosterone antagonist in the heart as the cardiac MR are occupied by cortisol, which becomes an aldosterone mimic in conditions of tissue damage. The accepted term “MR antagonist”, (as opposed to “aldosterone antagonist” or, worse, “aldosterone blocker”, should be retained, despite the demonstration that they act not to deny agonist access but as inverse agonists. The prevalence of primary aldosteronism is now recognized as accounting for about 10% of hypertension, with recent evidence suggesting that this figure may be considerably higher: in over two thirds of cases of primary aldosteronism therapy including MR antagonists is standard of care. MR antagonists are safe and vasoprotective in uncomplicated essential hypertension, even in diabetics, and at low doses they also specifically lower blood pressure in patients with so-called resistant hypertension. Nowhere are more than 1% of patients with primary aldosteronism ever diagnosed and specifically treated. Given the higher risk profile in patients with primary aldosteronism than that of age, sex, and blood pressure matched essential hypertension, on public health grounds alone the guidelines for first-line treatment of all hypertension should mandate inclusion of a low-dose MR antagonist.Keywords: spironolactone, eplerenone, primary aldosteronism, public health, inverse agonists

  8. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptor polymorphism, smoking behavior, and tobacco-related cancer and lung and cardiovascular diseases: a cohort study

    Kaur-Knudsen, Diljit; Bojesen, Stig E; Tybjærg-Hansen, Anne; Nordestgaard, Børge G

    2011-01-01

    We examined the associations between the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor polymorphism (rs1051730) on chromosome 15q25 marking the gene cluster CHRNA3-CHRNB4-CHRNA5, smoking behavior, and tobacco-related cancer and lung and cardiovascular diseases in the general population.......We examined the associations between the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor polymorphism (rs1051730) on chromosome 15q25 marking the gene cluster CHRNA3-CHRNB4-CHRNA5, smoking behavior, and tobacco-related cancer and lung and cardiovascular diseases in the general population....

  9. Contrasting Effects of Allosteric and Orthosteric Agonists on M1 Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptor Internalization and Down-regulation

    Thomas, Rachel L.; Christopher J Langmead; Wood, Martyn D; Challiss, R.A. John

    2009-01-01

    A new class of subtype-selective muscarinic acetylcholine (mACh) receptor agonist that activates the receptor through interaction at a site distinct from the orthosteric acetylcholine binding site has been reported recently. Here, we have compared the effects of orthosteric (oxotremorine-M, arecoline, pilocarpine) and allosteric [4-n-butyl-1-[4-(2-methylphenyl)-4-oxo-1-butyl] piperidine (AC-42); 1-[3-(4-butyl-1-piperidinyl)propyl]-3,4-dihydro-2(1H)-quinolinone (77-LH-28-1)] agonists on M1 mAC...

  10. In vivo occupancy of dopamine D3 receptors by antagonists produces neurochemical and behavioral effects of potential relevance to attention-deficit-hyperactivity disorder.

    Barth, V; Need, A B; Tzavara, E T; Giros, B; Overshiner, C; Gleason, S D; Wade, M; Johansson, A M; Perry, K; Nomikos, G G; Witkin, J M

    2013-02-01

    Dopamine D(3) receptors have eluded definitive linkage to neurologic and psychiatric disorders since their cloning over 20 years ago. We report a new method that does not employ a radiolabel for simultaneously defining in vivo receptor occupancy of D(3) and D(2) receptors in rat brain after systemic dosing using the tracer epidepride (N-[[(2S)-1-ethylpyrrolidin-2-yl]methyl]-5-iodo-2,3-dimethoxybenzamide). Decreases in epidepride binding in lobule 9 of cerebellum (rich in D(3) receptors) were compared with nonspecific binding in the lateral cerebellum. The in vivo occupancy of the dopamine D(3) receptors was dose dependently increased by SB-277011A (trans-N-[4-[2-(6-cyano-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinolin-2-yl)ethyl]cyclohexyl]-4-quinolinecarboxamide) and U99194 (2,3-dihydro-5,6-dimethoxy- N,N-dipropyl-1H-inden-2-amine). Both antagonists increased extracellular levels of acetylcholine (ACh) in the medial prefrontal cortex of rats and modified brain-tissue levels of ACh and choline. Consistent with these findings, the D(3) receptor antagonists enhanced the acquisition of learning of rats either alone or in the presence of the norepinephrine uptake blocker reboxetine as with the attention-deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) drug methylphenidate. Like reboxetine, the D(3) receptor antagonists also prevented deficits induced by scopolamine in object recognition memory of rats. Mice in which the dopamine transporter (DAT) has been deleted exhibit hyperactivity that is normalized by compounds that are effective in the treatment of ADHD. Both D(3) receptor antagonists decreased the hyperactivity of DAT(-/-) mice without affecting the activity of wild type controls. The present findings indicate that dopamine D(3) receptor antagonists engender cognition-enhancing and hyperactivity-dampening effects. Thus, D(3) receptor blockade could be considered as a novel treatment approach for cognitive deficits and hyperactivity syndromes, including those observed in ADHD. PMID:23197772

  11. Aspects of dopamine and acetylcholine release induced by glutamate receptors; Aspectos das liberacoes de dopamina e acetilcolina mediadas por receptores de glutamato

    Paes, Paulo Cesar de Arruda

    2002-07-01

    The basal ganglia play an important role in the motor control of rats and humans. This control involves different neurotransmitters and the mutual control of these key elements has been subject to several studies. In this work we determined the role of glutamate on the release of radioactively labelled dopamine and acetylcholine from chopped striatal tissue in vitro. The values of Effective Concentration 50% for glutamate, NMDA, kainic, quisqualic acids and AMPA on the release of dopamine and acetylcholine were obtained. The inhibitory effects of magnesium, tetrodotoxin, MK-801, AP5 and MCPG, as well as the effects of glycin were evaluated. The results suggested that dopamine is influenced by the NMDA type glutamate receptor while acetylcholine seems to be influenced by NMDA, kainate and AMPA receptors. Tetrodotoxin experiments suggested that kainate receptors are both present in cholinergic terminals and cell bodies while AMPA and NMDA receptors are preferentially distributed in cell bodies. Magnesium effectively blocked the NMDA stimulation and unexpectedly also AMPA- and quisqualate-induced acetylcholine release. The latter could not be blocked by MCPG ruling out the participation of methabotropic receptors. MK-801 also blocked NMDA-receptors. Results point out the importance of the glutamic acid control of dopamine and acetylcholine release in striatal tissue. (author)

  12. The Anti-Acetylcholine Receptor Antibody Test in Suspected Ocular Myasthenia Gravis

    Jung Jin Lee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To estimate the clinical significance of anti-acetylcholine receptor antibody (anti-AChR-Ab levels in suspected ocular myasthenia gravis. Methods. In total, 144 patients complaining of fluctuating diplopia and ptosis were evaluated for serum levels of anti-acetylcholine receptor antibody and their medical charts were retrospectively reviewed. Subjects were classified into three groups: variable diplopia only, ptosis only, and both variable diplopia and ptosis. We investigated serum anti-AChR-Ab titer levels and performed thyroid autoantibody tests. Results. Patients’ chief complaints were diplopia (N=103, ptosis (N=12, and their concurrence (N=29. Abnormal anti-AChR-Ab was observed in 21 of 144 patients (14.1%. Between the three groups, mean age, number of seropositive patients, and mean anti-AChR-Ab level were not significantly different (P=0.224, 0.073, and 0.062, resp.. Overall, 27.5% of patients had abnormal thyroid autoantibodies. Conclusion. The sensitivity of anti-AChR-Ab was 14.1% in suspected ocular myasthenia gravis and seropositivity in myasthenia gravis patients showed a high correlation with the presence of thyroid autoantibodies.

  13. Muscarinic acetylcholine receptor down-regulation limits the extent of inhibition of cell cycle progression in Chinese hamster ovary cells.

    Detjen, K.; Yang, J; Logsdon, C D

    1995-01-01

    Cellular desensitization is believed to be important for growth control but direct evidence is lacking. In the current study we compared effects of wild-type and down-regulation-resistant mutant m3 muscarinic receptors on Chinese hamster ovary (CHO-K1) cell desensitization, proliferation, and transformation. We found that down-regulation of m3 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors was the principal mechanism of desensitization of receptor-activated inositol phosphate phospholipid hydrolysis in t...

  14. The M4 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor play a key role in the control of murine hair follicle cycling and pigmentation

    Hasse, Sybille; Chernyavsky, Alex I; Grando, Sergei A.; Paus, Ralf

    2007-01-01

    Cholinergic receptors of the muscarinic class (M1-M5) are expressed in epidermal keratinocytes and melanocytes as well as in the hair follicle. Knockout (KO) mice of all five receptors have been created and resulted in different phenotypes. KO mice with a deletion of the M4 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (M4R) present a striking hair phenotype, which we have analyzed here in greater detail by quantitative histomorphometry. Earlier studies revealed a retarded hair follicle morphogenesis in ...

  15. Synthesis, Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor Binding, and Antinociceptive Properties of 3′-(Substituted Phenyl)epibatidine Analogues. Nicotinic Partial Agonists⊥

    Carroll, F. Ivy; Ma, Wei; Deng, Liu; Navarro, Hernán A.; Damaj, M. Imad; Martin, Billy R.

    2010-01-01

    In 1992, John Daly et al. reported the isolation and structure determination of epibatidine. Epibatidine’s unique structure and its potent nicotinic agonist activity have had a tremendous impact on nicotine receptor research. This research has led to a better understanding of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) pharmacophore and to epibatidine analogues with potential as pharmacotherapies for treating various CNS disorders. In this study, we report the synthesis, receptor binding ([3...

  16. Immunological studies on the structure and function of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor in mammalian muscle

    Gu, Y.

    1989-01-01

    The specificity of the antibodies in the serum of a patient with myasthenia gravis for a the {alpha}-bungarotoxin binding sites of the acetylcholine receptor (AChR) was examined using AChRs in the C2 mouse muscle cell line as a model. The antibodies were shown to be specific for one of the two toxin-binding sites. The effect of the antibodies in this myasthenic serum on the functional response of the receptor to cholinergic agonists was also examined using carbamylcholine-induced {sup 22}Na uptake into C2 myotubes as a measured of the receptor function. Antibodies specific for the {gamma}, {delta}, and {epsilon} subunit, respectively, of mammalian muscle AChRs were developed using subunit-specific synthetic peptides as antigens. Using these antibodies and monoclonal antibodies for other subunits as probes, I have identified four ({alpha}, {beta}, {gamma}, and {delta}) subunits of mammalian muscle AChRs on immunoblots. When AChRs from embryonic, neonatal, normal and denervated adult muscles were compared on immunoblots, the {alpha}, {beta}, and {delta} subunits were identical in all four receptor preparations, with or without endoglycosidase digestion. The spatial and temporal distribution of the {gamma}- and {epsilon}- AChRs in developing and in denervated muscles corresponds to the distribution of AChRs with slow and fast channels, respectively, and that the development changes in the channel properties of the receptor arise from a change in the subunit composition of the receptor, in which the {gamma} is replaced by {epsilon}.

  17. GABAA receptor modulating steroid antagonists (GAMSA) are functional in vivo.

    Johansson, Maja; Strömberg, Jessica; Ragagnin, Gianna; Doverskog, Magnus; Bäckström, Torbjörn

    2016-06-01

    GABAA receptor modulating steroid antagonists (GAMSA) selectively inhibit neurosteroid-mediated enhancement of GABA-evoked currents at the GABAA receptor. 3α-hydroxy-neurosteroids, notably allopregnanolone and tetrahydrodeoxycorticosterone (THDOC), potentiate GABAA receptor-mediated currents. On the contrary, various 3β-hydroxy-steroids antagonize this positive neurosteroid-mediated modulation. Importantly, GAMSAs are specific antagonists of the positive neurosteroid-modulation of the receptor and do not inhibit GABA-evoked currents. Allopregnanolone and THDOC have both negative and positive actions. Allopregnanolone can impair encoding/consolidation and retrieval of memories. Chronic administration of a physiological allopregnanolone concentration reduces cognition in mice models of Alzheimer's disease. In humans an allopregnanolone challenge impairs episodic memory and in hepatic encephalopathy cognitive deficits are accompanied by increased brain ammonia and allopregnanolone. Hippocampal slices react in vitro to ammonia by allopregnanolone synthesis in CA1 neurons, which blocks long-term potentiation (LTP). Thus, allopregnanolone may impair learning and memory by interfering with hippocampal LTP. Contrary, pharmacological treatment with allopregnanolone can promote neurogenesis and positively influence learning and memory of trace eye-blink conditioning in mice. In rat the GAMSA UC1011 inhibits an allopregnanolone-induced learning impairment and the GAMSA GR3027 restores learning and motor coordination in rats with hepatic encephalopathy. In addition, the GAMSA isoallopregnanolone antagonizes allopregnanolone-induced anesthesia in rats, and in humans it antagonizes allopregnanolone-induced sedation and reductions in saccadic eye velocity. 17PA is also an effective GAMSA in vivo, as it antagonizes allopregnanolone-induced anesthesia and spinal analgesia in rats. In vitro the allopregnanolone/THDOC-increased GABA-mediated GABAA receptor activity is antagonized

  18. Expression of Interleukin 1 Receptor Antagonist in Human Cornea

    Heur, Martin; Shyam S. Chaurasia; Wilson, Steven E.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to confirm the expression of interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1 Ra) in the human cornea. Four samples of human ex vivo corneal epithelium were obtained from patients undergoing photorefractive keratectomy. RT-PCR was performed using mRNA isolated from the corneal epithelium and oligo-dT primers. PCR was performed on the cDNA products using primers specific for human IL-1Ra. The PCR products were subcloned and sequenced. Human cornea sections were prepared fr...

  19. Steroids induce acetylcholine receptors on cultured human muscle: Implications for myasthenia gravis

    Antibodies to the acetylcholine receptor (AChR), which are diagnostic of the human autoimmune disease myasthenia gravis, block AChR function and increase the rate of AChR degradation leading to impaired neuromuscular transmission. Steroids are frequently used to alleviate symptoms of muscle fatigue and weakness in patients with myasthenia gravis because of their well-documented immunosuppressive effects. The authors show here that the steroid dexamethasone significantly increases total surface AChRs on cultured human muscle exposed to myasthenia gravis sera. The results suggest that the clinical improvement observed in myasthenic patients treated with steroids is due not only to an effect on the immune system but also a direct effect on muscle. They propose that the identification and development of pharmacologic agents that augment receptors and other proteins that are reduced by human genetic or autoimmune disease will have broad therapeutic applications

  20. Steroids induce acetylcholine receptors on cultured human muscle: Implications for myasthenia gravis

    Kaplan, I.; Blakely, B.T.; Pavlath, G.K.; Travis, M.; Blau, H.M. (Stanford Univ. School of Medicine, CA (USA))

    1990-10-01

    Antibodies to the acetylcholine receptor (AChR), which are diagnostic of the human autoimmune disease myasthenia gravis, block AChR function and increase the rate of AChR degradation leading to impaired neuromuscular transmission. Steroids are frequently used to alleviate symptoms of muscle fatigue and weakness in patients with myasthenia gravis because of their well-documented immunosuppressive effects. The authors show here that the steroid dexamethasone significantly increases total surface AChRs on cultured human muscle exposed to myasthenia gravis sera. The results suggest that the clinical improvement observed in myasthenic patients treated with steroids is due not only to an effect on the immune system but also a direct effect on muscle. They propose that the identification and development of pharmacologic agents that augment receptors and other proteins that are reduced by human genetic or autoimmune disease will have broad therapeutic applications.

  1. A novel inhibitor of α9α10 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors from Conus vexillum delineates a new conotoxin superfamily.

    Sulan Luo

    Full Text Available Conotoxins (CTxs selectively target a range of ion channels and receptors, making them widely used tools for probing nervous system function. Conotoxins have been previously grouped into superfamilies according to signal sequence and into families based on their cysteine framework and biological target. Here we describe the cloning and characterization of a new conotoxin, from Conus vexillum, named αB-conotoxin VxXXIVA. The peptide does not belong to any previously described conotoxin superfamily and its arrangement of Cys residues is unique among conopeptides. Moreover, in contrast to previously characterized conopeptide toxins, which are expressed initially as prepropeptide precursors with a signal sequence, a ''pro'' region, and the toxin-encoding region, the precursor sequence of αB-VxXXIVA lacks a ''pro'' region. The predicted 40-residue mature peptide, which contains four Cys, was synthesized in each of the three possible disulfide arrangements. Investigation of the mechanism of action of αB-VxXXIVA revealed that the peptide is a nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR antagonist with greatest potency against the α9α10 subtype. (1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectra indicated that all three αB-VxXXIVA isomers were poorly structured in aqueous solution. This was consistent with circular dichroism (CD results which showed that the peptides were unstructured in buffer, but adopted partially helical conformations in aqueous trifluoroethanol (TFE solution. The α9α10 nAChR is an important target for the development of analgesics and cancer chemotherapeutics, and αB-VxXXIVA represents a novel ligand with which to probe the structure and function of this protein.

  2. Transient Receptor Potential Channel Opening Releases Endogenous Acetylcholine, which Contributes to Endothelium-Dependent Relaxation Induced by Mild Hypothermia in Spontaneously Hypertensive Rat but Not Wistar-Kyoto Rat Arteries.

    Zou, Q; Leung, S W S; Vanhoutte, P M

    2015-08-01

    Mild hypothermia causes endothelium-dependent relaxations, which are reduced by the muscarinic receptor antagonist atropine. The present study investigated whether endothelial endogenous acetylcholine contributes to these relaxations. Aortic rings of spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs) and normotensive Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats were contracted with prostaglandin F2 α and exposed to progressive mild hypothermia (from 37 to 31°C). Hypothermia induced endothelium-dependent, Nω-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester-sensitive relaxations, which were reduced by atropine, but not by mecamylamine, in SHR but not in WKY rat aortae. The responses in SHR aortae were also reduced by acetylcholinesterase (the enzyme responsible for acetylcholine degradation), bromoacetylcholine (inhibitor of acetylcholine synthesis), hemicholinium-3 (inhibitor of choline uptake), and vesamicol (inhibitor of acetylcholine release). The mild hypothermia-induced relaxations in both SHR and WKY rat aortae were inhibited by AMTB [N-(3-aminopropyl)-2-[(3-methylphenyl)methoxy]-N-(2-thienylmethyl)-benzamide; the transient receptor potential (TRP) M8 inhibitor]; only those in SHR aortae were inhibited by HC-067047 [2-methyl-1-[3-(4-morpholinyl)propyl]-5-phenyl-N-[3-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]-1H-pyrrole-3-carboxamide; TRPV4 antagonist] while those in WKY rat aortae were reduced by HC-030031 [2-(1,3-dimethyl-2,6-dioxo-1,2,3,6-tetrahydro-7H-purin-7-yl)-N-(4-isopropylphenyl)acetamide; TRPA1 antagonist]. The endothelial uptake of extracellular choline and release of cyclic guanosine monophosphate was enhanced by mild hypothermia and inhibited by HC-067047 in SHR but not in WKY rat aortae. Compared with WKY rats, the SHR preparations expressed similar levels of acetylcholinesterase and choline acetyltransferase, but a lesser amount of vesicular acetylcholine transporter, located mainly in the endothelium. Thus, mild hypothermia causes nitric oxide-dependent relaxations by opening TRPA1 channels in WKY rat aortae

  3. The role of protein kinase-G in the antidepressant-like response of sildenafil in combination with muscarinic acetylcholine receptor antagonism

    Liebenberg, Nico; Wegener, Gregers; Brink, Christiaan; Harvey, Brian

    2010-01-01

    Background Recently we reported on a novel antidepressant-like response following simultaneous administration of sildenafil (PDE5 inhibitor, thereby increasing cGMP levels), and atropine (muscarinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist) in the rat forced swim test (FST). It is unclear whether the...... antidepressant-like activity of sildenafil + atropine is mediated via the activation of PK-G, a downstream effector for cGMP, and whether this may target known pathways in antidepressant action. Purpose We investigated whether the antidepressant-like response of sildenafil ± atropine could be reversed by Rp-8-Br......-PET-cGMP, a PK-G inhibitor, and also whether a combination of 8-Br-cGMP (PK-G activator) ± atropine would likewise be active in the FST, and whether this combination could be attenuated by a PK-G inhibitor. Study methods The FST consisted of a 15 minute pre-conditioning swim session on the first day of the...

  4. Coupling the Torpedo Microplate-Receptor Binding Assay with Mass Spectrometry to Detect Cyclic Imine Neurotoxins

    Aráoz, Rómulo; Ramos, Suzanne; Pelissier, Franck; Guérineau, Vincent; Benoit, Evelyne; Vilariño, Natalia; Botana, Luis M.; Zakarian, Armen; Molgó, Jordi

    2012-01-01

    Cyclic imine neurotoxins constitute an emergent family of neurotoxins of dinoflagellate origin that are potent antagonists of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. We developed a target-directed functional method based on the mechanism of action of competitive agonists/antagonists of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors for the detection of marine cyclic imine neurotoxins. The key step for method development was the immobilization of Torpedo electrocyte membranes rich in nicotinic acetylcholine rec...

  5. Evodiamine as a novel antagonist of aryl hydrocarbon receptor

    Yu, Hui [State Key Laboratory of Trauma, Burns, and Combined Injury, Department 1, Research Institute of Surgery, Daping Hospital, The Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400042 (China); Department of Laboratory Medicine, The Affiliated Tenth People' s Hospital, Tongji University, Shanghai 200072 (China); Tu, Yongjiu; Zhang, Chun; Fan, Xia; Wang, Xi [State Key Laboratory of Trauma, Burns, and Combined Injury, Department 1, Research Institute of Surgery, Daping Hospital, The Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400042 (China); Wang, Zhanli [College of Pharmaceutical Science, Zhejiang University of Technology, Hangzhou 310014 (China); Liang, Huaping, E-mail: huaping_liang@yahoo.com.cn [State Key Laboratory of Trauma, Burns, and Combined Injury, Department 1, Research Institute of Surgery, Daping Hospital, The Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400042 (China)

    2010-11-05

    Research highlights: {yields} Evodiamine interacted with the AhR. {yields} Evodiamine inhibited the specific binding of [{sup 3}H]-TCDD to the AhR. {yields} Evodiamine acts as an antagonist of the AhR. -- Abstract: Evodiamine, the major bioactive alkaloid isolated from Wu-Chu-Yu, has been shown to interact with a wide variety of proteins and modify their expression and activities. In this study, we investigated the interaction between evodiamine and the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). Molecular modeling results revealed that evodiamine directly interacted with the AhR. Cytosolic receptor binding assay also provided the evidence that evodiamine could interact with the AhR with the K{sub i} value of 28.4 {+-} 4.9 nM. In addition, we observed that evodiamine suppressed the 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) induced nuclear translocation of the AhR and the expression of CYP1A1 dose-dependently. These results suggested that evodiamine was able to bind to the AhR as ligand and exhibit antagonistic effects.

  6. Hippocampal α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor levels in patients with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, or major depressive disorder

    Thomsen, Morten Skøtt; Weyn, Annelies; Mikkelsen, Jens D

    The α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) is involved in cognitive function and synaptic plasticity. Consequently, changes in α7 nAChR function have been implicated in a variety of mental disorders, especially schizophrenia. However, there is little knowledge regarding the levels of the α7 n...

  7. Changes in Temperature Have Opposing Effects on Current Amplitude in alpha 7 and alpha 4 beta 2 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors

    Jindřichová, Marie; Lansdell, S. J.; Millar, N. S.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 2 (2012), e32073. E-ISSN 1932-6203 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : effect of temperature * nicotinic acetylcholine receptor * voltage - clamp recording Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 3.730, year: 2012

  8. Pharmacological Evaluation of the Long-Term Effects of Xanomeline on the M1 Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptor

    Grant, M.K.O.; Noetzel, M.J.; De Lorme, K.C.; Jakubík, Jan; Doležal, Vladimír; El-Fakahany, E. E.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 5, č. 12 (2010), e15722-16. E-ISSN 1932-6203 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA305/09/0681 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : Xanomeline * muscarinic acetylcholine receptor Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 4.411, year: 2010

  9. Utrophin abundance is reduced at neuromuscular junctions of patients with both inherited and acquired acetylcholine receptor deficiencies

    Slater, CR; Young, C; Wood, SJ; Bewick, GS; Anderson, LVB; Baxter, P; Fawcett, PRW; Roberts, M; Jacobson, L; Kuks, J; Vincent, A; NewsomDavis, J

    1997-01-01

    Congenital myasthenic syndromes are a heterogenous group of conditions in which muscle weakness resulting from impaired neuromuscular transmission is often present from infancy. One form of congenital myasthenic syndrome is due to a reduction of the number of acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) at the n

  10. Determination of anti-acetylcholine receptor antibodies in myasthenic patients by use of time-resolved fluorescence

    Říčný, Jan; Šimková, L.; Vincent, A.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 48, č. 3 (2002), s. 549-554. ISSN 0009-9147 R&D Projects: GA MZd NF4646 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : nicotinic acetylcholine receptor * time-resolved fluorescence method * myasthenia gravis Subject RIV: FR - Pharmacology ; Medidal Chemistry Impact factor: 4.788, year: 2002

  11. Gamma-lactams--a novel scaffold for highly potent and selective alpha 7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonists.

    Enz, Albert; Feuerbach, Dominik; Frederiksen, Mathias U; Gentsch, Conrad; Hurth, Konstanze; Müller, Werner; Nozulak, Joachim; Roy, Bernard L

    2009-03-01

    A novel class of alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) agonists has been discovered through high-throughput screening. The cis gamma-lactam scaffold has been optimized to reveal highly potent and selective alpha7 nAChR agonists with in vitro activity and selectivity and with good brain penetration in mice. PMID:19208472

  12. Regulation of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor phosphorylation in rat myotubes by forskolin and cAMP

    Miles, K.; Anthony, D.T.; Rubin, L.L.; Greengard, P.; Huganir, R.L.

    1987-09-01

    The nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (Ac-ChoR) from rat myotubes prelabeled in culture with (/sup 32/P)orthophosphate was isolated by acetylcholine affinity chromatography followed by immunoaffinity chromatography. Under basal conditions, the nicotinic AcChoR was shown to be phosphorylated in situ on the ..beta.. and delta subunits. Regulation of AcChoR phosphorylation by cAMP-dependent protein kinase was explored by the addition of forskolin or cAMP analogues to prelabeled cell cultures. Forskolin, an activator of adenylate cyclase, stimulated the phosphorylation of the delta subunit 20-fold over basal phosphorylation and induced phosphorylation of the ..cap alpha.. subunit. The effect of forskolin was dose dependent with a half-maximal response at 8 ..mu..M in the presence of 35 ..mu..M Ro 20-1724, a phosphodiesterase inhibitor. Stimulation of delta subunit phosphorylation was almost maximal within 5 min, whereas stimulation of ..cap alpha.. subunit phosphorylation was not maximal until 45 min after forskolin treatment. Stimulation of AcChoR phosphorylation by 8-benzylthioadenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate was identical to that obtained by forskolin. Two-dimensional thermolytic phosphopeptide maps of the delta subunit revealed a single major phosphopeptide. These results correlate closely with the observed effects of forskolin on AcChoR desensitization in muscle and suggest that cAMP-dependent phosphorylation of the delta subunit increases the rate of AcChoR desensitization in rat myotubes.

  13. Regulation of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor phosphorylation in rat myotubes by forskolin and cAMP

    The nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (Ac-ChoR) from rat myotubes prelabeled in culture with [32P]orthophosphate was isolated by acetylcholine affinity chromatography followed by immunoaffinity chromatography. Under basal conditions, the nicotinic AcChoR was shown to be phosphorylated in situ on the β and δ subunits. Regulation of AcChoR phosphorylation by cAMP-dependent protein kinase was explored by the addition of forskolin or cAMP analogues to prelabeled cell cultures. Forskolin, an activator of adenylate cyclase, stimulated the phosphorylation of the δ subunit 20-fold over basal phosphorylation and induced phosphorylation of the α subunit. The effect of forskolin was dose dependent with a half-maximal response at 8 μM in the presence of 35 μM Ro 20-1724, a phosphodiesterase inhibitor. Stimulation of δ subunit phosphorylation was almost maximal within 5 min, whereas stimulation of α subunit phosphorylation was not maximal until 45 min after forskolin treatment. Stimulation of AcChoR phosphorylation by 8-benzylthioadenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate was identical to that obtained by forskolin. Two-dimensional thermolytic phosphopeptide maps of the δ subunit revealed a single major phosphopeptide. These results correlate closely with the observed effects of forskolin on AcChoR desensitization in muscle and suggest that cAMP-dependent phosphorylation of the δ subunit increases the rate of AcChoR desensitization in rat myotubes

  14. Differential effect of glucocorticoid receptor antagonists on glucocorticoid receptor nuclear translocation and DNA binding

    Spiga, Francesca; Knight, David M; Droste, Susanne K; Conway-Campbell, Becky; Kershaw, Yvonne; MacSweeney, Cliona P; Thomson, Fiona J; Craighead, Mark; Peeters, Bernard WMM; Lightman, Stafford L

    2016-01-01

    The effects of RU486 and S-P, a more selective glucocorticoid receptor antagonist from Schering-Plough, were investigated on glucocorticoid receptor nuclear translocation and DNA binding. In the in vitro study, AtT20 cells were treated with vehicle or with RU486, S-P or corticosterone (3–300 nM) or co-treated with vehicle or glucocorticoid receptor antagonists (3–300 nM) and 30 nM corticosterone. Both glucocorticoid receptor antagonists induced glucocorticoid receptor nuclear translocation but only RU486 induced DNA binding. RU486 potentiated the effect of corticosterone on glucocorticoid receptor nuclear translocation and DNA binding, S-P inhibited corticosterone-induced glucocorticoid receptor nuclear translocation, but not glucocorticoid receptor-DNA binding. In the in vivo study, adrenalectomized rats were treated with vehicle, RU486 (20 mg/kg) and S-P (50 mg/kg) alone or in combination with corticosterone (3 mg/kg). RU486 induced glucocorticoid receptor nuclear translocation in the pituitary, hippocampus and prefrontal cortex and glucocorticoid receptor-DNA binding in the hippocampus, whereas no effect of S-P on glucocorticoid receptor nuclear translocation or DNA binding was observed in any of the areas analysed. These findings reveal differential effects of RU486 and S-P on areas involved in regulation of hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis activity in vivo and they are important in light of the potential use of this class of compounds in the treatment of disorders associated with hyperactivity of the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis. PMID:20093322

  15. A tale of two receptors: Dual roles for ionotropic acetylcholine receptors in regulating motor neuron excitation and inhibition.

    Philbrook, Alison; Barbagallo, Belinda; Francis, Michael M

    2013-07-01

    Nicotinic or ionotropic acetylcholine receptors (iAChRs) mediate excitatory signaling throughout the nervous system, and the heterogeneity of these receptors contributes to their multifaceted roles. Our recent work has characterized a single iAChR subunit, ACR-12, which contributes to two distinct iAChR subtypes within the C. elegans motor circuit. These two receptor subtypes regulate the coordinated activity of excitatory (cholinergic) and inhibitory (GABAergic) motor neurons. We have shown that the iAChR subunit ACR-12 is differentially expressed in both cholinergic and GABAergic motor neurons within the motor circuit. In cholinergic motor neurons, ACR-12 is incorporated into the previously characterized ACR-2 heteromeric receptor, which shows non-synaptic localization patterns and plays a modulatory role in controlling circuit function.(1) In contrast, a second population of ACR-12-containing receptors in GABAergic motor neurons, ACR-12GABA, shows synaptic expression and regulates inhibitory signaling.(2) Here, we discuss the two ACR-12-containing receptor subtypes, their distinct expression patterns, and functional roles in the C. elegans motor circuit. We anticipate our continuing studies of iAChRs in the C. elegans motor circuit will lead to novel insights into iAChR function in the nervous system as well as mechanisms for their regulation. PMID:24778941

  16. Differential sleep-promoting effects of dual orexin receptor antagonists and GABAA receptor modulators

    Gotter, Anthony L.; Garson, Susan L.; Stevens, Joanne; Munden, Regina L; Fox, Steven V.; Tannenbaum, Pamela L.; Yao, Lihang; Kuduk, Scott D.; McDonald, Terrence; Uslaner, Jason M.; Tye, Spencer J.; Coleman, Paul J.; Winrow, Christopher J; Renger, John J.

    2014-01-01

    Background The current standard of care for insomnia includes gamma-aminobutyric acid receptor A (GABAA) activators, which promote sleep as well as general central nervous system depression. Dual orexin receptor antagonists (DORAs) represent an alternative mechanism for insomnia treatment that induces somnolence by blocking the wake-promoting effects of orexin neuropeptides. The current study compares the role and interdependence of these two mechanisms on their ability to influence sleep arc...

  17. α7-Nicotinic acetylcholine receptor: role in early odor learning preference in mice.

    Jennifer L Hellier

    Full Text Available Recently, we have shown that mice with decreased expression of α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (α7 in the olfactory bulb were associated with a deficit in odor discrimination compared to wild-type mice. However, it is unknown if mice with decreased α7-receptor expression also show a deficit in early odor learning preference (ELP, an enhanced behavioral response to odors with attractive value observed in rats. In this study, we modified ELP methods performed in rats and implemented similar conditions in mice. From post-natal days 5-18, wild-type mice were stroked simultaneously with an odor presentation (conditioned odor for 90 s daily. Control mice were only stroked, exposed to odor, or neither. On the day of testing (P21, mice that were stroked in concert with a conditioned odor significantly investigated the conditioned odor compared to a novel odor, as observed similarly in rats. However, mice with a decrease in α7-receptor expression that were stroked during a conditioned odor did not show a behavioral response to that odorant. These results suggest that decreased α7-receptor expression has a role in associative learning, olfactory preference, and/or sensory processing deficits.

  18. Kinetics of Carbamylcholine Binding to Membrane-Bound Acetylcholine Receptor Monitored by Fluorescence Changes of a Covalently Bound Probe

    Dunn, Susan M.J.; Blanchard, Steven G.; Raftery, Michael A.

    1980-01-01

    The fluorescent probe 5-(iodoacetamido)salicylic acid has been used to alkylate acetylcholine receptor enriched membrane fragments from Torpedo californica following their reduction with low concentrations of dithiothreitol. This modification did not affect the equilibrium binding of carbamylcholine to the receptor. The fluorescence of bound 5-(iodoacetamido)salicylic acid was enhanced when the labeled membrane fragments were mixed with carbamylcholine. This increase in fluorescence was ab...

  19. Requirement of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor β2 subunit for the anatomical and functional development of the visual system

    Rossi, Francesco Mattia; Pizzorusso, Tommaso; Porciatti, Vittorio; Marubio, Lisa M.; Maffei, Lamberto; Changeux, Jean-Pierre

    2001-01-01

    In the mammalian visual system the formation of eye-specific layers at the thalamic level depends on retinal waves of spontaneous activity, which rely on nicotinic acetylcholine receptor activation. We found that in mutant mice lacking the β2 subunit of the neuronal nicotinic receptor, but not in mice lacking the α4 subunit, retinofugal projections do not segregate into eye-specific areas, both in the dorso-lateral geniculate nucleus and in the superior colliculus. ...

  20. [3H]imidacloprid: synthesis of a candidate radioligand for the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor

    Imidacloprid is an exceptionally potent insecticide known from physiological studies to act at the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor. To prepare [3H]imidacloprid as a candidate radioligand, 6-chloronicotinoyl chloride was reduced with NaB2H4 (in model studies) or NaB3H4 in absolute ethanol to 2-chloro-5-pyridinylmethanol which was transformed to 2-chloro-5-chloromethylpyridine on refluxing with thionyl chloride. Coupling with 4,5-dihydro-N-nitro-1H-imidazol-2-amine then gave [2H2]imidacloprid incorporating about 95% of the deuterium or [3H2]imidacloprid (25 Ci/mmol) in 80% radiochemical yield. In studies not detailed here [3H] imidacloprid was found to undergo high affinity, specific and saturable binding to a site in insect brain. (author)

  1. Dynamic heterogeneity and non-Gaussian statistics for acetylcholine receptors on live cell membrane

    He, W.; Song, H.; Su, Y.; Geng, L.; Ackerson, B. J.; Peng, H. B.; Tong, P.

    2016-05-01

    The Brownian motion of molecules at thermal equilibrium usually has a finite correlation time and will eventually be randomized after a long delay time, so that their displacement follows the Gaussian statistics. This is true even when the molecules have experienced a complex environment with a finite correlation time. Here, we report that the lateral motion of the acetylcholine receptors on live muscle cell membranes does not follow the Gaussian statistics for normal Brownian diffusion. From a careful analysis of a large volume of the protein trajectories obtained over a wide range of sampling rates and long durations, we find that the normalized histogram of the protein displacements shows an exponential tail, which is robust and universal for cells under different conditions. The experiment indicates that the observed non-Gaussian statistics and dynamic heterogeneity are inherently linked to the slow-active remodelling of the underlying cortical actin network.

  2. Neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors serve as sensitive targets that mediate β-amyloid neurotoxicity

    Qiang LIU; Jie WU

    2006-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of brain dementia characterized by the accumulation of β-amyloid peptides (Aβ) and loss of forebrain cholinergic neurons. Aβ accumulation and aggregation are thought to contribute to cholinergic neuronal degeneration, in turn causing learning and memory deficits, but the specific targets that mediate Aβ neurotoxicity remain elusive. Recently, accumlating lines of evidence have demonstrated that Aβ directly modulates the function of neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), which leads to the new hypothesis that neuronal nAChRs may serve as important targets that mediate Aβ neurotoxicity. In this review, we summarize current studies performed in our laboratory and in others to address the question of how Aβ modulates neuronal nAChRs, especially nAChR subunit function.

  3. Curiouser and Curiouser: The Macrocyclic Lactone, Abamectin, Is also a Potent Inhibitor of Pyrantel/Tribendimidine Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors of Gastro-Intestinal Worms.

    Abongwa, Melanie; Buxton, Samuel K; Robertson, Alan P; Martin, Richard J

    2016-01-01

    Nematode parasites may be controlled with drugs, but their regular application has given rise to concerns about the development of resistance. Drug combinations may be more effective than single drugs and delay the onset of resistance. A combination of the nicotinic antagonist, derquantel, and the macrocyclic lactone, abamectin, has been found to have synergistic anthelmintic effects against gastro-intestinal nematode parasites. We have observed in previous contraction and electrophysiological experiments that derquantel is a potent selective antagonist of nematode parasite muscle nicotinic receptors; and that abamectin is an inhibitor of the same nicotinic receptors. To explore these inhibitory effects further, we expressed muscle nicotinic receptors of the nodular worm, Oesophagostomum dentatum (Ode-UNC-29:Ode-UNC-63:Ode-UNC-38), in Xenopus oocytes under voltage-clamp and tested effects of abamectin on pyrantel and acetylcholine responses. The receptors were antagonized by 0.03 μM abamectin in a non-competitive manner (reduced Rmax, no change in EC50). This antagonism increased when abamectin was increased to 0.1 μM. However, when we increased the concentration of abamectin further to 0.3 μM, 1 μM or 10 μM, we found that the antagonism decreased and was less than with 0.1 μM abamectin. The bi-phasic effects of abamectin suggest that abamectin acts at two allosteric sites: one high affinity negative allosteric (NAM) site causing antagonism, and another lower affinity positive allosteric (PAM) site causing a reduction in antagonism. We also tested the effects of 0.1 μM derquantel alone and in combination with 0.3 μM abamectin. We found that derquantel on these receptors, like abamectin, acted as a non-competitive antagonist, and that the combination of derquantel and abamectin produced greater inhibition. These observations confirm the antagonistic effects of abamectin on nematode nicotinic receptors in addition to GluCl effects, and illustrate more complex

  4. Curiouser and Curiouser: The Macrocyclic Lactone, Abamectin, Is also a Potent Inhibitor of Pyrantel/Tribendimidine Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors of Gastro-Intestinal Worms.

    Melanie Abongwa

    Full Text Available Nematode parasites may be controlled with drugs, but their regular application has given rise to concerns about the development of resistance. Drug combinations may be more effective than single drugs and delay the onset of resistance. A combination of the nicotinic antagonist, derquantel, and the macrocyclic lactone, abamectin, has been found to have synergistic anthelmintic effects against gastro-intestinal nematode parasites. We have observed in previous contraction and electrophysiological experiments that derquantel is a potent selective antagonist of nematode parasite muscle nicotinic receptors; and that abamectin is an inhibitor of the same nicotinic receptors. To explore these inhibitory effects further, we expressed muscle nicotinic receptors of the nodular worm, Oesophagostomum dentatum (Ode-UNC-29:Ode-UNC-63:Ode-UNC-38, in Xenopus oocytes under voltage-clamp and tested effects of abamectin on pyrantel and acetylcholine responses. The receptors were antagonized by 0.03 μM abamectin in a non-competitive manner (reduced Rmax, no change in EC50. This antagonism increased when abamectin was increased to 0.1 μM. However, when we increased the concentration of abamectin further to 0.3 μM, 1 μM or 10 μM, we found that the antagonism decreased and was less than with 0.1 μM abamectin. The bi-phasic effects of abamectin suggest that abamectin acts at two allosteric sites: one high affinity negative allosteric (NAM site causing antagonism, and another lower affinity positive allosteric (PAM site causing a reduction in antagonism. We also tested the effects of 0.1 μM derquantel alone and in combination with 0.3 μM abamectin. We found that derquantel on these receptors, like abamectin, acted as a non-competitive antagonist, and that the combination of derquantel and abamectin produced greater inhibition. These observations confirm the antagonistic effects of abamectin on nematode nicotinic receptors in addition to GluCl effects, and

  5. Taurolithocholic acid promotes intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma cell growth via muscarinic acetylcholine receptor and EGFR/ERK1/2 signaling pathway

    AMONYINGCHAROEN, SUMET; SURIYO, TAWIT; THIANTANAWAT, APINYA; WATCHARASIT, PIYAJIT; SATAYAVIVAD, JUTAMAAD

    2015-01-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) is a malignant cancer of the biliary tract and its occurrence is associated with chronic cholestasis which causes an elevation of bile acids in the liver and bile duct. The present study aimed to investigate the role and mechanistic effect of bile acids on the CCA cell growth. Intrahepatic CCA cell lines, RMCCA-1 and HuCCA-1, were treated with bile acids and their metabolites to determine the growth promoting effect. Cell viability, cell cycle analysis, EdU incorporation assays were conducted. Intracellular signaling proteins were detected by western immunoblotting. Among eleven forms of bile acids and their metabolites, only taurolithocholic acid (TLCA) concentration dependently (1–40 μM) increased the cell viability of RMCCA-1, but not HuCCA-1 cells. The cell cycle analysis showed induction of cells in the S phase and the EdU incorporation assay revealed induction of DNA synthesis in the TLCA-treated RMCCA-1 cells. Moreover, TLCA increased the phosphorylation of EGFR, ERK 1/2 and also increased the expression of cyclin D1 in RMCCA-1 cells. Furthermore, TLCA-induced RMCCA-1 cell growth could be inhibited by atropine, a non-selective muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR) antagonist, AG 1478, a specific EGFR inhibitor, or U 0126, a specific MEK 1/2 inhibitor. These results suggest that TLCA induces CCA cell growth via mAChR and EGFR/EKR1/2 signaling pathway. Moreover, the functional presence of cholinergic system plays a certain role in TLCA-induced CCA cell growth. PMID:25815516

  6. Angiotensin II type 2 receptor- and acetylcholine-mediated relaxation: essential contribution of female sex hormones and chromosomes.

    Pessôa, Bruno Sevá; Slump, Denise E; Ibrahimi, Khatera; Grefhorst, Aldo; van Veghel, Richard; Garrelds, Ingrid M; Roks, Anton J M; Kushner, Steven A; Danser, A H Jan; van Esch, Joep H M

    2015-08-01

    Angiotensin-induced vasodilation, involving type 2 receptor (AT2R)-induced generation of nitric oxide (NO; by endothelial NO synthase) and endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factors, may be limited to women. To distinguish the contribution of female sex hormones and chromosomes to AT2R function and endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor-mediated vasodilation, we made use of the four-core genotype model, where the testis-determining Sry gene has been deleted (Y(-)) from the Y chromosome, allowing XY(-) mice to develop a female gonadal phenotype. Simultaneously, by incorporating the Sry gene onto an autosome, XY(-)Sry and XXSry transgenic mice develop into gonadal male mice. Four-core genotype mice underwent a sham or gonadectomy (GDX) operation, and after 8 weeks, iliac arteries were collected to assess vascular function. XY(-)Sry male mice responded more strongly to angiotensin than XX female mice, and the AT2R antagonist PD123319 revealed that this was because of a dilator AT2R-mediated effect occurring exclusively in XX female mice. The latter could not be demonstrated in XXSry male and XY(-) female mice nor in XX female mice after GDX, suggesting that it depends on both sex hormones and chromosomes. Indeed, treating C57bl/6 GDX male mice with estrogen could not restore angiotensin-mediated, AT2R-dependent relaxation. To block acetylcholine-induced relaxation of iliac arteries obtained from four-core genotype XX mice, both endothelial NO synthase and endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor inhibition were required, whereas in four-core genotype XY animals, endothelial NO synthase inhibition alone was sufficient. These findings were independent of gonadal sex and unaltered after GDX. In conclusion, AT2R-induced relaxation requires both estrogen and the XX chromosome sex complement, whereas only the latter is required for endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factors. PMID:26056343

  7. Neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors: Common molecular substrates of nicotine and alcohol dependence

    AndrewR.Tapper

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Alcohol and nicotine are often co-abused. As many as 80-95% of alcoholics are also smokers, suggesting that ethanol and nicotine, the primary addictive component of tobacco smoke, may functionally interact in the central nervous system and/or share a common mechanism of action. While nicotine initiates dependence by binding to and activating neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs, ligand-gated cation channels normally activated by endogenous acetylcholine (ACh, ethanol is much less specific with the ability to modulate multiple gene products including those encoding voltage-gated ion channels, and excitatory/inhibitory neurotransmitter receptors. However, emerging data indicate that ethanol interacts with nAChRs, both directly and indirectly, in the mesocorticolimbic dopaminergic (DAergic reward circuitry to affect brain reward systems. Like nicotine, ethanol activates DAergic neurons of the ventral tegmental area (VTA which project to the nucleus accumbens (NAc. Blockade of VTA nAChRs reduces ethanol-mediated activation of DAergic neurons, NAc DA release, consumption, and operant responding for ethanol in rodents. Thus, ethanol may increase ACh release into the VTA driving activation of DAergic neurons through nAChRs. In addition, ethanol potentiates distinct nAChR subtype responses to ACh and nicotine in vitro and in DAergic neurons. The smoking cessation therapeutic and nAChR partial agonist, varenicline, reduces alcohol consumption in heavy drinking smokers and rodent models of alcohol consumption. Finally, single nucleotide polymorphisms in nAChR subunit genes are associated with alcohol dependence phenotypes and smoking behaviors in human populations. Together, results from preclinical, clinical, and genetic studies indicate that nAChRs may have an inherent role in the abusive properties of ethanol, as well as in nicotine and alcohol co-dependence.

  8. Design and synthesis of new agents for neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChRs) imaging

    Introduction: The most abundant subtype of cerebral nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR), α4β2, plays a critical role in various brain functions and pathological states. Due to rapid technological progress in chemistry, bioinformatics, structural biology and computer technology, computer aided drug design (CADD) plays a more and more important role in today's drug discovery. Methods: Two novel 3-pyridyl ether nicotinic ligands-3-((pyridine-2-yl)methoxy)-5-iodopyridine, and 3-(((S)-pyrrolidin-2-yl)methoxy)-5-((4-iodobenzyloxy)-methyl)pyridine were designed and synthesized and radiolabeled with I-125 based on our 3D-QSAR models reported previously. Their ability to label high-affinity brain nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) was evaluated. Results: [125I]3-((pyridin-2-yl)methoxy)-5-iodopyridine shows rapid accumulation and elimination with peak (1.86%ID/g) at 5 min post injection, but has high blood uptake. [125I]3-(((S)-pyrrolidin-2-yl)methoxy)-5-((4-iodobenzyloxy)methyl)pyridine entered the brain with maximal uptake value 3.01%ID/g at 15 min after injection, and showed approximately 27% inhibition of radioactivity uptake in thalamus in mice pretreated with nicotine. Conclusions: The results of this preliminary study show that [125I]3-(((S)-pyrrolidin-2-yl)methoxy)-5-((4-iodobenzyloxy)methyl)pyridine shows relatively high uptake to the brain, however, since the in vivo selectivity for α4β2 nAChRs was not enough, [125I]3-(((S)-pyrrolidin-2-yl)methoxy)-5-((4-iodobenzyloxy)methyl)pyridine does not have the required properties for imaging nAChRs using SPECT. Structure optimization is needed for specific visualization of brain α4β2 nAChRs in vivo.

  9. Covalent Trapping of Methyllycaconitine at the α4-α4 Interface of the α4β2 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor

    Absalom, Nathan L; Quek, Gracia; Lewis, Trevor M;

    2013-01-01

    The α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are widely expressed in the brain and are implicated in a variety of physiological processes. There are two stoichiometries of the α4β2 nAChR, (α4)2(β2)3 and (α4)3(β2)2, with different sensitivities to acetylcholine (ACh), but their pharmacologi......The α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are widely expressed in the brain and are implicated in a variety of physiological processes. There are two stoichiometries of the α4β2 nAChR, (α4)2(β2)3 and (α4)3(β2)2, with different sensitivities to acetylcholine (ACh), but their...... competitive antagonism and an apparently insurmountable mechanism that only occurs after preincubation with MLA. We hypothesized an additional MLA binding site in the α4-α4 interface that is unique to this stoichiometry. To prove this, we covalently trapped a cysteine-reactive MLA analog at an α4β2 receptor...... containing an α4(D204C) mutation predicted by homology modeling to be within reach of the reactive probe. We demonstrate that covalent trapping results in irreversible reduction of ACh-elicited currents in the (α4)3(β2)2 stoichiometry, indicating that MLA binds to the α4-α4 interface of the (α4)3(β2)2 and...

  10. Activation of the Macrophage α7 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor and Control of Inflammation.

    Báez-Pagán, Carlos A; Delgado-Vélez, Manuel; Lasalde-Dominicci, José A

    2015-09-01

    Inflammatory responses to stimuli are essential body defenses against foreign threats. However, uncontrolled inflammation may result in serious health problems, which can be life-threatening. The α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor, a ligand-gated ion channel expressed in the nervous and immune systems, has an essential role in the control of inflammation. Activation of the macrophage α7 receptor by acetylcholine, nicotine, or other agonists, selectively inhibits production of pro-inflammatory cytokines while leaving anti-inflammatory cytokines undisturbed. The neural control of this regulation pathway was discovered recently and it was named the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway (CAP). When afferent vagus nerve terminals are activated by cytokines or other pro-inflammatory stimuli, the message travels through the afferent vagus nerve, resulting in action potentials traveling down efferent vagus nerve fibers in a process that eventually leads to macrophage α7 activation by acetylcholine and inhibition of pro-inflammatory cytokines production. The mechanism by which activation of α7 in macrophages regulates pro-inflammatory responses is subject of intense research, and important insights have thus been made. The results suggest that activation of the macrophage α7 controls inflammation by inhibiting NF-κB nuclear translocation, and activating the JAK2/STAT3 pathway among other suggested pathways. While the α7 is well characterized as a ligand-gated ion channel in neurons, whole-cell patch clamp experiments suggest that α7's ion channel activity, defined as the translocation of ions across the membrane in response to ligands, is absent in leukocytes, and therefore, ion channel activity is generally assumed not to be required for the operation of the CAP. In this perspective, we briefly review macrophage α7 activation as it relates to the control of inflammation, and broaden the current view by providing single-channel currents as evidence that the α7

  11. Orexin receptor antagonists as therapeutic agents for insomnia

    Ana Clementina Equihua

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Insomnia is a common clinical condition characterized by difficulty initiating or maintaining sleep, or non-restorative sleep with impairment of daytime functioning.Currently, treatment for insomnia involves a combination of cognitive behavioral therapy and pharmacological therapy. Among pharmacological interventions, the most evidence exists for benzodiazepine receptor agonist drugs (GABAA receptor, although concerns persist regarding their safety and their limited efficacy. The use of these hypnotic medications must be carefully monitored for adverse effects.Orexin (hypocretin neuropeptides have been shown to regulate transitions between wakefulness and sleep by promoting cholinergic/monoaminergic neural pathways. This has led to the development of a new class of pharmacological agents that antagonize the physiological effects of orexin. The development of these agents may lead to novel therapies for insomnia without the side effect profile of hypnotics (e.g. impaired cognition, disturbed arousal, and motor balance difficulties. However, antagonizing a system that regulates the sleep-wake cycle may create an entirely different side effect profile. In this review, we discuss the role of orexin and its receptors on the sleep-wake cycle and that of orexin antagonists in the treatment of insomnia.

  12. Bovine pancreatic polypeptide as an antagonist of muscarinic cholinergic receptors

    In dispersed acini from rat pancreas, it was found that bovine pancreatic polypeptide (BPP) and its C-fragment hexapeptide amide (PP-6), at concentrations of 0.1 and 30 μM, respectively, could significantly inhibit amylase secretion stimulated by carbachol, and this inhibition by BPP was dose dependent. 45Ca outflux induced by carbachol was also inhibited by BPP or PP-6, but they had no effect on cholecystokinin octapeptide- (CCK-8) or A23187-stimulated 45Ca outflux. BPP was also capable of displacing the specific binding of [3H]-quinuclidinyl benzilate to its receptors, and it possessed a higher affinity (K/sub i/35nM) than carbachol (K/sub i/ 1.8 μM) in binding with M-receptors. It is concluded from this study that BPP acts as an antagonist of muscarinic cholinergic receptors in rat pancreatic acini. In addition, BPP inhibited the potentiation of amylase secretion caused by the combination of carbachol plus secretin or vasoactive intestinal peptide. This may be a possible explanation of the inhibitory effect of BPP on secretin-induced pancreatic enzyme secretion shown in vivo, since pancreatic enzyme secretion stimulated by secretin under experimental conditions may be the result of potentiation of enzyme release produced by the peptide in combination with a cholinergic stimulant

  13. Discovery and mapping of an intracellular antagonist binding site at the chemokine receptor CCR2

    Zweemer, Annelien J M; Bunnik, Julia; Veenhuizen, Margo; Miraglia, Fabiana; Lenselink, Eelke B; Vilums, Maris; de Vries, Henk; Gibert, Arthur; Thiele, Stefanie; Rosenkilde, Mette M; IJzerman, Adriaan P; Heitman, Laura H

    2014-01-01

    The chemokine receptor CCR2 is a G protein-coupled receptor that is involved in many diseases characterized by chronic inflammation, and therefore a large variety of CCR2 small molecule antagonists has been developed. On the basis of their chemical structures these antagonists can roughly be divi...

  14. Study of acetylcholine and barium receptors in the rat duodeno-jejunum by means of labelled molecules

    The purpose of this work is the determination of the number and the localization of Acetylcholine and Barium receptors in the rat intestine. We used 'radioactive labelled' drugs to reach a high sensitiveness of detection. So we were able to point out the number of 'effective' molecules of drugs, that is to say the only ones combining with receptors. With the aid of some assumptions, we determine on the one hand the receptors localization by an assessment of the drug penetration depth before reaching their level and on the other hand the number of these receptors. (author)

  15. Bronchoprotection with a leukotriene receptor antagonist in asthmatic preschool children

    Bisgaard, H; Nielsen, K G

    2000-01-01

    We hypothesized that a leukotriene receptor antagonist (LTRA) could provide bronchoprotection against the cold, dry air-induced response in asthmatic preschool children. In a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover study, we examined the effect of the specific LTRA montelukast at 5...... repeatability of the bronchoprotection was examined by repeating the placebo-controlled study in six of the 13 children. sRaw increased by an average of 46% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 30 to 63%) after placebo treatment and 17% (95% CI: 3 to 31%) after montelukast (p < 0.01). Eight of the children were...... receiving regular treatment with budesonide delivered by an inhaler with a spacer in a mean daily dose of 350 microg, but the bronchoprotection provided by montelukast was independent of concurrent steroid treatment. There was no convincing evidence of failure to respond, and the protective effect of...

  16. Stoichiometry for α-bungarotoxin block of α7 acetylcholine receptors

    Dacosta, Corrie J. B.; Free, Chris R.; Sine, Steven M.

    2015-08-01

    α-Bungarotoxin (α-Btx) binds to the five agonist binding sites on the homopentameric α7-acetylcholine receptor, yet the number of bound α-Btx molecules required to prevent agonist-induced channel opening remains unknown. To determine the stoichiometry for α-Btx blockade, we generate receptors comprised of wild-type and α-Btx-resistant subunits, tag one of the subunit types with conductance mutations to report subunit stoichiometry, and following incubation with α-Btx, monitor opening of individual receptor channels with defined subunit stoichiometry. We find that a single α-Btx-sensitive subunit confers nearly maximal suppression of channel opening, despite four binding sites remaining unoccupied by α-Btx and accessible to the agonist. Given structural evidence that α-Btx locks the agonist binding site in an inactive conformation, we conclude that the dominant mechanism of antagonism is non-competitive, originating from conformational arrest of the binding sites, and that the five α7 subunits are interdependent and maintain conformational symmetry in the open channel state.

  17. Binding affinities of anti-acetylcholine receptor autoantibodies in myasthenia gravis

    Antibodies directed against acetylcholine (ACh) receptors are present in the sera of nearly 90% of patients with myasthenia gravis (MG), and are involved in the pathogenesis of this autoimmune disease. However, the antibody titers measured by the standard radioimmunoassay correspond poorly with the clinical severity of the disease. To determine whether this disparity could be accounted for by differences in the binding affinities of anti-ACh receptor antibodies in different patients, we have measured the binding affinities of these autoantibodies in 15 sera from MG patients. The affinity constants (K/sub o/), as determined by Scatchard analysis, were all in the range of 1010 M-1, comparable to the highest values reported in immunized animals. The affinity constants were truly representative of the population of autoantibodies detected by the radioimmunoassay, as shown by the remarkable linearity of the Scatchard plots (r2>0.90) and the close correlation between the antibody titers determined by extrapolation of the Scatchard plots and by saturation analysis (r = 0.99; p < 0.001). There was only a 6-fold variation in affinity constants measured in this series of patients despite widely differing antibody titers and severity of the disease. Factors other than the titer and affinity of anti-ACh receptor antibodies may correlate better with the clinical manifestations of MG

  18. Binding affinities of anti-acetylcholine receptor autoantibodies in myasthenia gravis

    Bray, J.J.; Drachman, D.B.

    1982-01-01

    Antibodies directed against acetylcholine (ACh) receptors are present in the sera of nearly 90% of patients with myasthenia gravis (MG), and are involved in the pathogenesis of this autoimmune disease. However, the antibody titers measured by the standard radioimmunoassay correspond poorly with the clinical severity of the disease. To determine whether this disparity could be accounted for by differences in the binding affinities of anti-ACh receptor antibodies in different patients, we have measured the binding affinities of these autoantibodies in 15 sera from MG patients. The affinity constants (K/sub o/), as determined by Scatchard analysis, were all in the range of 10/sup 10/ M/sup -1/, comparable to the highest values reported in immunized animals. The affinity constants were truly representative of the population of autoantibodies detected by the radioimmunoassay, as shown by the remarkable linearity of the Scatchard plots (r/sup 2/>0.90) and the close correlation between the antibody titers determined by extrapolation of the Scatchard plots and by saturation analysis (r = 0.99; p < 0.001). There was only a 6-fold variation in affinity constants measured in this series of patients despite widely differing antibody titers and severity of the disease. Factors other than the titer and affinity of anti-ACh receptor antibodies may correlate better with the clinical manifestations of MG.

  19. The subpopulation of microglia expressing functional muscarinic acetylcholine receptors expands in stroke and Alzheimer's disease.

    Pannell, Maria; Meier, Maria Almut; Szulzewsky, Frank; Matyash, Vitali; Endres, Matthias; Kronenberg, Golo; Prinz, Vincent; Waiczies, Sonia; Wolf, Susanne A; Kettenmann, Helmut

    2016-03-01

    Microglia undergo a process of activation in pathology which is controlled by many factors including neurotransmitters. We found that a subpopulation (11 %) of freshly isolated adult microglia respond to the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor agonist carbachol with a Ca(2+) increase and a subpopulation of similar size (16 %) was observed by FACS analysis using an antibody against the M3 receptor subtype. The carbachol-sensitive population increased in microglia/brain macrophages isolated from tissue of mouse models for stroke (60 %) and Alzheimer's disease (25 %), but not for glioma and multiple sclerosis. Microglia cultured from adult and neonatal brain contained a carbachol-sensitive subpopulation (8 and 9 %), which was increased by treatment with interferon-γ to around 60 %. This increase was sensitive to blockers of protein synthesis and correlated with an upregulation of the M3 receptor subtype and with an increased expression of MHC-I and MHC-II. Carbachol was a chemoattractant for microglia and decreased their phagocytic activity. PMID:25523105

  20. Expression of histamine H4 receptor in human epidermal tissues and attenuation of experimental pruritus using H4 receptor antagonist.

    Yamaura, Katsunori; Oda, Manabu; Suwa, Eriko; Suzuki, Masahiko; Sato, Hiromi; Ueno, Koichi

    2009-10-01

    Many medicines exist which can cause pruritus (itching) as "serious adverse events." Many severe pruritic conditions respond poorly to histamine H1 receptor antagonists; there is no generally accepted antipruritic treatment. Recently described histamine H4 receptors are expressed in haematopoietic cells and have been linked to the pathology of allergy and asthma. We previously reported their expression in human dermal fibroblasts; in this study we have investigated H4 receptor expression in human epidermal tissue and found it to be greater in keratinocytes in the epidermal upper layer than in the lower layer. We have also investigated the effect of histamine H4 receptor antagonists on histamine H1 receptor antagonist-resistant pruritus using a mouse model. Scratching behavior was induced by histamine (300 nmol) or substance P (100 nmol) injected intradermally into the rostral part of the back of each mouse. Fexofenadine, a histamine H1 receptor antagonist, reduced scratching induced by histamine but not by substance P, whereas JNJ7777120, a histamine H4 receptor antagonist, significantly reduced both histamine- and substance P-induced scratching. These results suggest that H4 receptor antagonists may be useful for treatment of H1 receptor antagonist-resistant pruritus. PMID:19652466

  1. Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptor Subtypes as Potential Drug Targets for the Treatment of Schizophrenia, Drug Abuse and Parkinson's Disease

    Dencker, Ditte; Thomsen, Morgane; Wörtwein, Gitta;

    2011-01-01

    's disease and drug abuse. Dopaminergic systems are regulated by cholinergic, especially muscarinic, input. Not surprisingly, increasing evidence implicates muscarinic acetylcholine receptor-mediated pathways as potential targets for the treatment of these disorders classically viewed as "dopamine based......) acetylcholine binding site. Such agents may lead to the development of novel classes of drugs useful for the treatment of psychosis, drug abuse and Parkinson's disease. The present review highlights recent studies carried out using muscarinic receptor knock-out mice and new subtype-selective allosteric ligands...... to assess the roles of M(1), M(4), and M(5) receptors in various central processes that are under strong dopaminergic control. The outcome of these studies opens new perspectives for the use of novel muscarinic drugs for several severe disorders of the CNS....

  2. Acetylcholine muscarinic receptors and response to anti-cholinesterase therapy in patients with Alzheimer's disease

    An acetylcholine deficit remains the most consistent neurotransmitter abnormality found in Alzheimer's disease and various therapeutic agents have been targeted at this. In this study we investigated the action of Donepezil, a cholinesterase inhibitor that has few side-effects. In particular we set out to investigate whether muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR) availability influences the response to this therapy. We used the novel single-photon emission tomography (SPET) tracer (R,R)[123I]I-quinuclidinyl benzilate (R,R[123I]I-QNB), which has high affinity for the M1 subtype of mAChR. Regional cerebral perfusion was also assessed using technetium-99m hexamethylpropylene amine oxime. We investigated 20 patients on Donepezil treatment and ten age-matched controls. The results showed a reduction in (R,R)[123I]I-QNB binding in the caudal anterior cingulate in patients compared with controls and relatively high binding in the putamen and rostral anterior cingulate, suggesting a relative sparing of mAChR in these regions. The main finding of the study was that mAChR availability as assessed by (R,R)[123I]I-QNB binding did not distinguish responders from non-responders. Interestingly, we found that the extent of cognitive improvement showed no positive correlation with (R,R)[123I]I-QNB binding in any brain region but was inversely related to binding in the insular cortex. This suggests that, within the advised cognitive performance band for use of Donepezil, response is greater in those patients with evidence of a more marked cholinergic deficit. A larger study should investigate this. (orig.)

  3. Inhibition of radiation-induced polyuria by histamine receptor antagonists

    In previous studies the authors have demonstrated that gamma radiation results in polyuria, which is preceded by polydypsia. This suggests that the increased thirst elicited by radiation causes increased urinary volume (UV). Histamine, which is released following radiation exposure, also elicits drinking by nonirradiated rats when administered exogenously. In this study the authors have investigated both the role of water deprivation and the effect of histamine receptor antagonists (HRA) on radiation-induced polyuria. Sprague-Dawley rats were housed individually in metabolic cages. Water was allowed ad libitum except in deprivation experiments where water was removed for 24 hr immediately following radiation. Cimetidine (CIM), an H2 HRA, and dexbromopheniramine (DXB), an H1 HRA, were administered i.p. (16 and 1 mg/kg, respectively) 30 min prior to irradiation (950 rads from a cobalt source). UV was determined at 24-hr intervals for 3 days preceding irradiation and 24 hr postirradiation. UV in DXB treated rats was significantly reduced 24 hr postirradiation (CON = 427 +/- 54%; DXB = 247 +/- 39% of preirradiated CON) compared to postirradiation control values. CIM did not affect postirradiation UV. These data suggest that radiation-induced polyuria is caused by polydypsia which is, in part, mediated by histamine induced by an H1 receptor

  4. Nicotine promotes cell proliferation via α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor and catecholamine-synthesizing enzymes-mediated pathway in human colon adenocarcinoma HT-29 cells

    Cigarette smoking has been implicated in colon cancer. Nicotine is a major alkaloid in cigarette smoke. In the present study, we showed that nicotine stimulated HT-29 cell proliferation and adrenaline production in a dose-dependent manner. The stimulatory action of nicotine was reversed by atenolol and ICI 118,551, a β1- and β2-selective antagonist, respectively, suggesting the role of β-adrenoceptors in mediating the action. Nicotine also significantly upregulated the expression of the catecholamine-synthesizing enzymes [tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), dopamine-β-hydroxylase (DβH) and phenylethanolamine N-methyltransferase]. Inhibitor of TH, a rate-limiting enzyme in the catecholamine-biosynthesis pathway, reduced the actions of nicotine on cell proliferation and adrenaline production. Expression of α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7-nAChR) was demonstrated in HT-29 cells. Methyllycaconitine, an α7-nAChR antagonist, reversed the stimulatory actions of nicotine on cell proliferation, TH and DβH expression as well as adrenaline production. Taken together, through the action on α7-nAChR nicotine stimulates HT-29 cell proliferation via the upregulation of the catecholamine-synthesis pathway and ultimately adrenaline production and β-adrenergic activation. These data reveal the contributory role α7-nAChR and β-adrenoceptors in the tumorigenesis of colon cancer cells and partly elucidate the carcinogenic action of cigarette smoke on colon cancer

  5. Functional Human α7 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor (nAChR) Generated from Escherichia coli.

    Tillman, Tommy S; Alvarez, Frances J D; Reinert, Nathan J; Liu, Chuang; Wang, Dawei; Xu, Yan; Xiao, Kunhong; Zhang, Peijun; Tang, Pei

    2016-08-26

    Human Cys-loop receptors are important therapeutic targets. High-resolution structures are essential for rational drug design, but only a few are available due to difficulties in obtaining sufficient quantities of protein suitable for structural studies. Although expression of proteins in E. coli offers advantages of high yield, low cost, and fast turnover, this approach has not been thoroughly explored for full-length human Cys-loop receptors because of the conventional wisdom that E. coli lacks the specific chaperones and post-translational modifications potentially required for expression of human Cys-loop receptors. Here we report the successful production of full-length wild type human α7nAChR from E. coli Chemically induced chaperones promote high expression levels of well-folded proteins. The choice of detergents, lipids, and ligands during purification determines the final protein quality. The purified α7nAChR not only forms pentamers as imaged by negative-stain electron microscopy, but also retains pharmacological characteristics of native α7nAChR, including binding to bungarotoxin and positive allosteric modulators specific to α7nAChR. Moreover, the purified α7nAChR injected into Xenopus oocytes can be activated by acetylcholine, choline, and nicotine, inhibited by the channel blockers QX-222 and phencyclidine, and potentiated by the α7nAChR specific modulators PNU-120596 and TQS. The successful generation of functional human α7nAChR from E. coli opens a new avenue for producing mammalian Cys-loop receptors to facilitate structure-based rational drug design. PMID:27385587

  6. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptor-mediated calcium signaling in the nervous system

    Jian-xin SHEN; Jerrel L YAKEL

    2009-01-01

    Based on the composition of the five subunits forming functional neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), they are grouped into either heteromeric (comprising both α and β subunits) or homomeric (comprising only α subunits) recep-tors. The nAChRs are known to be differentially permeable to calcium ions, with the α7 nAChR subtype having one of the highest permeabilities to calcium. Calcium influx through nAChRs, particularly through the α-bungarotoxin-sensitive α7-containing nAChRs, is a very efficient way to raise cytoplasmic calcium levels. The activation of nAChRs can mediate three types of cytoplasmic calcium signals: (1) direct calcium influx through the nAChRs, (2) indirect calcium influx through voltage-dependent calcium channels (VDCCs) which are activated by the nAChR-mediated depolarization, and (3) calcium-induced calcium release (CICR) (triggered by the first two sources) from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) through the ryanodine receptors and inositol (1,4,5)-triphosphate receptors (IP3Rs). Downstream signaling events mediated by nAChR-mediated calcium responses can be grouped into instantaneous effects (such as neurotransmitter release, which can occur in milliseconds after nAChR activation), short-term effects (such as the recovery of nAChR desensitization through cellular signaling cascades), and long-term effects (such as neuroprotection via gene expression). In addition, nAChR activity can be regulated by cytoplasmic calcium levels, suggesting a complex reciprocal relationship. Further advances in imaging techniques, animal models, and more potent and subtype-selective ligands for neuronal nAChRs would help in understand-ing the neuronal nAChR-mediated calcium signaling, and lead to the development of improved therapeutic treatments.

  7. Thrombin action decreases acetylcholine receptor aggregate number and stability in cultured mouse myotubes.

    Davenport, R W; Lanuza, M; Kim, S; Jia, M; Snyder, E; Nelson, P G

    2000-08-30

    Neurons develop and make very stable, long-term synaptic connections with other nerve cells and with muscle. Synaptic stability at the neuromuscular junction changes over development in that a proliferation of synaptic input are made to individual myotubes and synapses from all but one neuron are lost during development. In an established co-culture paradigm in which spinal motoneurons synaptically contact myotubes, thrombin and associated protease inhibitors have been shown to affect the loss of functional synaptic contacts [6]. Evidence has not been provided which clearly demonstrate whether protease/protease inhibitors affect either the pre- or postsynaptic terminal, or both. In an effort to determine whether these reagents directly affect postsynaptic receptors on myotubes, myotubes were cultured in the absence of neurons and the spontaneous presence and stability of aggregates of acetylcholine receptors (AChR) in control and thrombin-containing media were evaluated. In dishes fixed after treatment and in dishes in which individual aggregates were observed live, thrombin action appeared to increase loss of AChR aggregates over time. Hirudin, a specific inhibitor of the thrombin protease, diminished this loss. Neither reagent affected the overall incorporation or degradation of AChR; therefore, it appears these protease/protease inhibitors affect the state of AChR aggregation. PMID:10960680

  8. Synthesis of carbon-11 labeled dexetimide and levetimide for studying muscarinic acetylcholine receptors

    The localization and quantitation of the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (m-AChR) in the living human brain using a non-invasive method, such as positron emission tomography (PET), may provide valuable information about receptor changes which have been observed post mortem in patients with Huntington's chorea and Alzheimer's dementia, as well as normal brain mechanisms mediated by the m-AChR. Although quinuclidinyl benzilate has been radioiodinated and radiomethylatd, the former is not useful with PET and the latter does not penetrate the blood-brain barrier; therefore, the authors chose to radiolabel dexetimide, a ligand which labels m-AChR in vitro and in vivo, and levetimide, its inactive enantiomer. Carbon-11 labeled carbon dioxide is bubbled through a tetrahydrofuran (THF) solution of phenylmagnesium chloride (1 M, l ml) after which 2 mg of lithium aluminium hydride is added in THF (500 μl). After evaporation of the solvent, 48% hydriodic acid (l ml) is added and the solution is heated for 1 minute. Carbon-11 labeled benzyl iodide is extracted into methylene chloride, added to a solution of nor-benzyl dexetimide or levetimide, and heated for several minutes. Purification is accomplished using semi-preparative reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Analytical HPLC is used to determine the radiochemical purity and specific activity

  9. Interaction of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors with neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Arias, Hugo R; Feuerbach, Dominik; Targowska-Duda, Katarzyna M; Russell, Megan; Jozwiak, Krzysztof

    2010-07-13

    We compared the interaction of fluoxetine and paroxetine, two selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), with the human (h) alpha4beta2, alpha3beta4, and alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) in different conformational states, using Ca(2+) influx, radioligand binding, and molecular docking approaches. The results established that (1) fluoxetine was more potent than paroxetine in inhibiting agonist-activated Ca(2+) influx on halpha4beta2 and halpha7 AChRs, whereas the potency of both SSRIs was practically the same in the halpha3beta4 AChR. [corrected] (2) SSRIs bind to the [(3)H]imipramine locus with a [corrected] higher affinity when the AChRs are in the desensitized states compared to the resting states. (3) The different receptor specificity for fluoxetine determined by their inhibitory potencies or binding affinities suggests different modes of interaction when the AChR is in the closed or activated state. (4) Neutral and protonated fluoxetine interacts with a binding domain located in the middle of the AChR ion channel. In conclusion, SSRIs inhibit the most important neuronal AChRs with potencies and affinities that are clinically relevant by binding to a luminal site that is shared with tricyclic antidepressants. PMID:20527991

  10. Gating of long-term potentiation by nicotinic acetylcholine receptors at the cerebellum input stage.

    Francesca Prestori

    Full Text Available The brain needs mechanisms able to correlate plastic changes with local circuit activity and internal functional states. At the cerebellum input stage, uncontrolled induction of long-term potentiation or depression (LTP or LTD between mossy fibres and granule cells can saturate synaptic capacity and impair cerebellar functioning, which suggests that neuromodulators are required to gate plasticity processes. Cholinergic systems innervating the cerebellum are thought to enhance procedural learning and memory. Here we show that a specific subtype of acetylcholine receptors, the α7-nAChRs, are distributed both in cerebellar mossy fibre terminals and granule cell dendrites and contribute substantially to synaptic regulation. Selective α7-nAChR activation enhances the postsynaptic calcium increase, allowing weak mossy fibre bursts, which would otherwise cause LTD, to generate robust LTP. The local microperfusion of α7-nAChR agonists could also lead to in vivo switching of LTD to LTP following sensory stimulation of the whisker pad. In the cerebellar flocculus, α7-nAChR pharmacological activation impaired vestibulo-ocular-reflex adaptation, probably because LTP was saturated, preventing the fine adjustment of synaptic weights. These results show that gating mechanisms mediated by specific subtypes of nicotinic receptors are required to control the LTD/LTP balance at the mossy fibre-granule cell relay in order to regulate cerebellar plasticity and behavioural adaptation.

  11. A Subpopulation of Neuronal M4 Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptors Plays a Critical Role in Modulating Dopamine-Dependent Behaviors

    Jeon, Jongrye; Dencker, Ditte; Wortwein, Gitta; Woldbye, David P.D.; Cui, Yinghong; Davis, Albert A.; Levey, Allan I.; Schütz, Günther; Sager, Thomas; Mørk, Arne; Li, Cuiling; Deng, Chu-Xia; Fink-Jensen, Anders; Wess, Jürgen

    2010-01-01

    Acetylcholine (ACh) regulates many key functions of the CNS by activating cell surface receptors referred to as muscarinic ACh receptors (M1–M5 mAChRs). Like other mAChR subtypes, the M4 mAChR is widely expressed in different regions of the forebrain. Interestingly, M4 mAChRs are coexpressed with D1 dopamine receptors in a specific subset of striatal projection neurons. To investigate the physiological relevance of this M4 mAChR subpopulation in modulating dopamine-dependent behaviors, we use...

  12. Adenosine A1 Receptor Antagonist Versus Montelukast on Airway Reactivity and Inflammation

    Nadeem, Ahmed; Obiefuna, Peter C.M.; Wilson, Constance N.; Mustafa, S. Jamal

    2006-01-01

    Adenosine produces bronchoconstriction in allergic rabbits, primates, and humans by activating adenosine A1 receptors. Previously, it is reported that a high dose of L-97-1, a water-soluble, small molecule adenosine A1 receptor antagonist, blocks early and late allergic responses, and bronchial hyper-responsiveness to histamine in a hyper-responsive rabbit model of allergic asthma. Effects of a lower dose of L-97-1 are compared to montelukast, a cysteinyl leukotriene-1 receptor antagonist on ...

  13. Radiolabeled somatostatin receptor antagonists are preferable to agonists for in vivo peptide receptor targeting of tumors

    Ginj, Mihaela; Zhang, Hanwen; Waser, Beatrice; Cescato, Renzo; Wild, Damian; Wang, Xuejuan; Erchegyi, Judit; Rivier, Jean; Mäcke, Helmut R.; Reubi, Jean Claude

    2006-01-01

    Targeting neuroendocrine tumors expressing somatostatin receptor subtypes (sst) with radiolabeled somatostatin agonists is an established diagnostic and therapeutic approach in oncology. While agonists readily internalize into tumor cells, permitting accumulation of radioactivity, radiolabeled antagonists do not, and they have not been considered for tumor targeting. The macrocyclic chelator 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA) was coupled to two potent somatostatin...

  14. Endothelin receptor B antagonists decrease glioma cell viability independently of their cognate receptor

    Endothelin receptor antagonists inhibit the progression of many cancers, but research into their influence on glioma has been limited. We treated glioma cell lines, LN-229 and SW1088, and melanoma cell lines, A375 and WM35, with two endothelin receptor type B (ETRB)-specific antagonists, A-192621 and BQ788, and quantified viable cells by the capacity of their intracellular esterases to convert non-fluorescent calcein AM into green-fluorescent calcein. We assessed cell proliferation by labeling cells with carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester and quantifying the fluorescence by FACS analysis. We also examined the cell cycle status using BrdU/propidium iodide double staining and FACS analysis. We evaluated changes in gene expression by microarray analysis following treatment with A-192621 in glioma cells. We examined the role of ETRB by reducing its expression level using small interfering RNA (siRNA). We report that two ETRB-specific antagonists, A-192621 and BQ788, reduce the number of viable cells in two glioma cell lines in a dose- and time-dependent manner. We describe similar results for two melanoma cell lines. The more potent of the two antagonists, A-192621, decreases the mean number of cell divisions at least in part by inducing a G2/M arrest and apoptosis. Microarray analysis of the effects of A-192621 treatment reveals up-regulation of several DNA damage-inducible genes. These results were confirmed by real-time RT-PCR. Importantly, reducing expression of ETRB with siRNAs does not abrogate the effects of either A-192621 or BQ788 in glioma or melanoma cells. Furthermore, BQ123, an endothelin receptor type A (ETRA)-specific antagonist, has no effect on cell viability in any of these cell lines, indicating that the ETRB-independent effects on cell viability exhibited by A-192621 and BQ788 are not a result of ETRA inhibition. While ETRB antagonists reduce the viability of glioma cells in vitro, it appears unlikely that this effect is mediated by

  15. Comparison of sigma- and kappa-opiate receptor ligands as excitatory amino acid antagonists.

    Berry, S. C.; Dawkins, S. L.; Lodge, D.

    1984-01-01

    Using the technique of microelectrophoresis in pentobarbitone-anaesthetized cats and rats, the effects of benzomorphans, with known actions at sigma- and kappa- opioid receptors, were tested on responses of spinal neurones to amino acids and acetylcholine. The racemic mixture and both enantiomers of the sigma opiate receptor agonist, N-allylnormetazocine (SKF 10, 047), and the dissociative anaesthetic, ketamine, reduced or abolished excitation evoked by N-methyl-aspartate (NMA) with only smal...

  16. Development of prolactin receptor antagonists with reduced pH-dependence of receptor binding

    Hansen, Mathilde Johanne Kaas; Olsen, Johan Gotthardt; Bernichtein, Sophie;

    2011-01-01

    H than at physiological pH and since the extracellular environment around solid tumors often is acidic, it is desirable to develop antagonists that have improved binding affinity at low pH. The pK(a) value of a histidine side chain is ~6.8 making histidine residues obvious candidates for examination....... From evaluation of known molecular structures of human prolactin, of the prolactin receptor and of different complexes of the two, three histidine residues in the hormone-receptor binding site 1 were selected for mutational studies. We analyzed 10 variants by circular dichroism spectroscopy, affinity...... and thermodynamic characterization of receptor binding by isothermal titration calorimetry combined with in vitro bioactivity in living cells. Histidine residue 27 was recognized as a central hot spot for pH sensitivity and conservative substitutions at this site resulted in strong receptor binding at...

  17. 6-Bromohypaphorine from Marine Nudibranch Mollusk Hermissenda crassicornis is an Agonist of Human α7 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor

    Kasheverov, Igor E.; Irina V. Shelukhina; Kudryavtsev, Denis S.; Tatyana N. Makarieva; Spirova, Ekaterina N.; Alla G. Guzii; Stonik, Valentin A.; Tsetlin, Victor I.

    2015-01-01

    6-Bromohypaphorine (6-BHP) has been isolated from the marine sponges Pachymatisma johnstoni, Aplysina sp., and the tunicate Aplidium conicum, but data on its biological activity were not available. For the nudibranch mollusk Hermissenda crassicornis no endogenous compounds were known, and here we describe the isolation of 6-BHP from this mollusk and its effects on different nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR). Two-electrode voltage-clamp experiments on the chimeric α7 nAChR (built of ch...

  18. Effects of extracts from Cordyceps sinensis on M1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor in vitro and in vivo

    Chiba, Tomohiro

    2010-01-01

    Tomohiro Chiba1, Marina Yamada1, Kosuke Torii2, Masataka Suzuki1, Jumpei Sasabe1, Minoru Ito2, Kenzo Terashita1, Sadakazu Aiso11Department of Anatomy, Keio University, School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan; 2Department of Research and Development, Noevir Co. Ltd., Tokyo, JapanAbstract: Cholinergic dysfunction is implicated in the pathogenesis of memory impairment related to Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Accordingly, regulation of M1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (M1 mAChR) has been one o...

  19. Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor Agonists Attenuate Septic Acute Kidney Injury in Mice by Suppressing Inflammation and Proteasome Activity

    Chatterjee, Prodyot K.; Yeboah, Michael M.; Oonagh Dowling; Xiangying Xue; Powell, Saul R.; Yousef Al-Abed; Metz, Christine N

    2012-01-01

    Sepsis is one of the leading causes of acute kidney injury (AKI). Septic patients who develop acute kidney injury (AKI) are at increased risk of death. To date there is no effective treatment for AKI or septic AKI. Based on their anti-inflammatory properties, we examined the effects of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonists on renal damage using a mouse model of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced AKI where localized LPS promotes inflammation-mediated kidney damage. Administration of nicotine...

  20. Biophysical and ion channel functional characterization of the Torpedo californica nicotinic acetylcholine receptor in varying detergent-lipid environments

    Asmar-Rovira, Guillermo A.; Asseo-García, Aloysha M.; Quesada, Orestes; Hanson, Michael A.; Nogueras, Carlos; Lasalde-Dominicci, José A.; Stevens, Raymond C.

    2008-01-01

    The nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) of Torpedo electric rays has been extensively characterized over the last three decades. However, the molecular mechanisms by which detergents influence membrane protein stability and function remain poorly understood, and elucidation of the dynamic detergent-lipid-protein interactions of solubilized membrane proteins is a largely unexplored research field. This study examined nine detergents upon nAChR solubilization and purification, to assess re...

  1. Thymus cells in myasthenia gravis selectively enhance production of anti-acetylcholine-receptor antibody by autologous blood lymphocytes

    We investigated the role of the thymus in 16 patients with myasthenia gravis without thymoma by studying the production of anti-acetylcholine-receptor antibody by thymic and blood lymphocytes cultured alone or together. In 10 responders (with the highest receptor-antibody titers in their plasma), cultured thymic cells spontaneously produced measurable receptor antibody. Receptor-antibody production by autologous blood lymphocytes was enhanced by the addition of responder's thymic cells, irradiated to abrogate antibody production and suppression (P<0.01). This enhancement was greater and more consistent than that by pokeweed mitogen; it depended on viable thymic cells, appeared to be selective for receptor antibody, and correlated with the ratio of thymic helper (OKT4-positive or OKT4+) to suppressor (OKT8+) T cells (P<0.01). These results suggest that myasthenic thymus contains cell-bound acetylcholine-receptor-like material or specific T cells (or both) that can aid receptor-antibody production. This may be relevant to the benefits of thymectomy in myasthenia and to the breakdown in self-tolerance in this and other autoimmune diseases

  2. Thymus cells in myasthenia gravis selectively enhance production of anti-acetylcholine-receptor antibody by autologous blood lymphocytes

    Newsom-Davis, J.; Willcox, N.; Calder, L.

    1981-11-26

    We investigated the role of the thymus in 16 patients with myasthenia gravis without thymoma by studying the production of anti-acetylcholine-receptor antibody by thymic and blood lymphocytes cultured alone or together. In 10 responders (with the highest receptor-antibody titers in their plasma), cultured thymic cells spontaneously produced measurable receptor antibody. Receptor-antibody production by autologous blood lymphocytes was enhanced by the addition of responder's thymic cells, irradiated to abrogate antibody production and suppression (P<0.01). This enhancement was greater and more consistent than that by pokeweed mitogen; it depended on viable thymic cells, appeared to be selective for receptor antibody, and correlated with the ratio of thymic helper (OKT4-positive or OKT4+) to suppressor (OKT8+) T cells (P<0.01). These results suggest that myasthenic thymus contains cell-bound acetylcholine-receptor-like material or specific T cells (or both) that can aid receptor-antibody production. This may be relevant to the benefits of thymectomy in myasthenia and to the breakdown in self-tolerance in this and other autoimmune diseases.

  3. The substance P/NK-1 receptor system: NK-1 receptor antagonists as anti-cancer drugs

    Miguel Muñoz; Rafael Coveñas; Francisco Esteban; Maximino Redondo

    2015-06-01

    The substance P (SP)/neurokinin (NK)-1 receptor system plays an important role in cancer. SP promotes the proliferation of tumour cells, angiogenesis and the migration of tumour cells. We review the involvement of SP, the NK-1 receptor and NK-1 receptor antagonists in cancer. Tumour cells overexpress NK-1 receptors, which are involved in their viability. This overexpression suggests the possibility of specific treatment against tumour cells using NK-1 receptor antagonists, thus promoting a considerable decrease in the side effects of the treatment. This strategy opens up new approaches for cancer treatment, since these antagonists, after binding to their molecular target, induce the death of tumour cells by apoptosis, exert an antiangiogenic action and inhibit the migration of tumour cells. The use of NK-1 receptor antagonists such as aprepitant (used in clinical practice) as antitumour agents could be a promising innovation. The value of aprepitant as an antitumour agent could be determined faster than for less well-known compounds because many studies addressing its safety and characterization have already been completed. The NK-1 receptor may be a promising target in the treatment of cancer; NK-1 receptor antagonists could act as specific drugs against tumour cells; and these antagonists could be new candidate anti-cancer drugs.

  4. Antagonist of prostaglandin E2 receptor 4 induces metabolic alterations in liver of mice.

    Li, Ning; Zhang, Limin; An, Yanpeng; Zhang, Lulu; Song, Yipeng; Wang, Yulan; Tang, Huiru

    2015-03-01

    Prostaglandin E2 receptor 4 (EP4) is one of the receptors for prostaglandin E2 and plays important roles in various biological functions. EP4 antagonists have been used as anti-inflammatory drugs. To investigate the effects of an EP4 antagonist (L-161982) on the endogenous metabolism in a holistic manner, we employed a mouse model, and obtained metabolic and transcriptomic profiles of multiple biological matrixes, including serum, liver, and urine of mice with and without EP4 antagonist (L-161982) exposure. We found that this EP4 antagonist caused significant changes in fatty acid metabolism, choline metabolism, and nucleotide metabolism. EP4 antagonist exposure also induced oxidative stress to mice. Our research is the first of its kind to report information on the alteration of metabolism associated with an EP4 antagonist. This information could further our understanding of current and new biological functions of EP4. PMID:25669961

  5. Chromatographic resolution of angiotensin II receptor antagonists (sartans).

    Tahir, Muhammad Saqlain; Adnan, Ahmad; Syed, Quratulain

    2016-08-01

    First time a simple, sensitive and unified quantification method has been developed to analyze the complete class of angiotensin II receptor antagonists which are used in the treatment of hypertension either alone or in combination with some other drugs. The most important advantage of developed method was that the eight separate drugs can be determined on a single chromatographic system without modifications in detection wavelength and mobile phase. The drugs were separated on a Purospher Star 4.6mm×25cm, 5μm, C18 column maintained at 40°C with 1mLmin(-1) flow rate using ultra violet detection at 254nm. Good separation (Rs>2.0) was achieved in a short analysis allowing simultaneous determination of all eight sartans. The effect of variation in flow rate, detection wavelength and column oven temperature was also studied. The proposed method was statistically validated in terms of precision, accuracy, linearity, specificity and robustness. The newly developed method proved to be specific, robust and accurate for the quantification of eight sartans in commercial pharmaceutical formulations. PMID:27258943

  6. Cetirizine a histamine H1 receptor antagonist improves viral myocarditis

    Yamamoto Kanjo

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We showed that mast cells played a critical role in the progression of heart failure induced by pressure overload and viral myocarditis in mice. In this study, we investigated the effect of cetirizine, a selective H1 receptor antagonist, on experimental viral myocarditis induced by encephalomyocarditis (EMC virus. Methods Four-week-old inbred male DBA/2 mice were inoculated intraperitoneally with 10 plaque-forming units (pfu of the EMC virus. Cetirizine was administered orally at a dose of 1 or 10 mg/kg per day for the survival study, and 1 mg/kg for the histologic and gene expression studies, beginning on the day of viral inoculation. Results Cetirizine improved survival dose dependently. Heart weight to body weight ratio was significantly decreased in mice treated with cetirizine. The area of myocardial necrosis was significantly smaller in the hearts of mice treated with cetirizine compared with controls. Gene expressions of tumor necrosis factor, interleukin 6, and metalloproteinase 2 were significantly suppressed in the hearts of mice treated with cetirizine. Conclusion These results suggest that cetirizine exerts its beneficial effects on viral myocarditis by suppressing expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, genes related to cardiac remodeling in the hearts of mice.

  7. The kappa opioid receptor antagonist JDTic attenuates alcohol seeking and withdrawal anxiety

    Schank, Jesse R.; Goldstein, Andrea L.; Rowe, Kelly E.; King, Courtney E.; Marusich, Julie A.; Wiley, Jenny L; Carroll, F. Ivy; Thorsell, Annika; Heilig, Markus

    2012-01-01

    The role of kappa-opioid receptors (KOR) in regulation of alcohol-related behaviors is not completely understood. For example, alcohol consumption has been reported to increase following treatment with KOR antagonists in rats, but was decreased in mice with genetic deletion of KOR. Recent studies have further suggested that KOR antagonists may selectively decrease alcohol self-administration in rats following a history of dependence. We assessed the effects of the KOR antagonist JDTic on alco...

  8. A Selective TSH Receptor Antagonist Inhibits Stimulation of Thyroid Function in Female Mice

    Neumann, Susanne; Nir, Eshel A; Eliseeva, Elena; Huang, Wenwei; Marugan, Juan; Xiao, Jingbo; Dulcey, Andrés E.; Gershengorn, Marvin C.

    2013-01-01

    Because the TSH receptor (TSHR) plays an important role in the pathogenesis of thyroid disease, a TSHR antagonist could be a novel treatment. We attempted to develop a small molecule, drug-like antagonist of TSHR signaling that is selective and active in vivo. We synthesized NCGC00242364 (ANTAG3) by chemical modification of a previously reported TSHR antagonist. We tested its potency, efficacy, and selectivity in a model cell system in vitro by measuring its activity to inhibit stimulation of...

  9. Neonicotinoids target distinct nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and neurons, leading to differential risks to bumblebees

    Moffat, Christopher; Buckland, Stephen T.; Samson, Andrew J.; McArthur, Robin; Chamosa Pino, Victor; Bollan, Karen A.; Huang, Jeffrey T.-J.; Connolly, Christopher N.

    2016-04-01

    There is growing concern over the risk to bee populations from neonicotinoid insecticides and the long-term consequences of reduced numbers of insect pollinators to essential ecosystem services and food security. Our knowledge of the risk of neonicotinoids to bees is based on studies of imidacloprid and thiamethoxam and these findings are extrapolated to clothianidin based on its higher potency at nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. This study addresses the specificity and consequences of all three neonicotinoids to determine their relative risk to bumblebees at field-relevant levels (2.5 ppb). We find compound-specific effects at all levels (individual cells, bees and whole colonies in semi-field conditions). Imidacloprid and clothianidin display distinct, overlapping, abilities to stimulate Kenyon cells, indicating the potential to differentially influence bumblebee behavior. Bee immobility was induced only by imidacloprid, and an increased vulnerability to clothianidin toxicity only occurred following chronic exposure to clothianidin or thiamethoxam. At the whole colony level, only thiamethoxam altered the sex ratio (more males present) and only clothianidin increased queen production. Finally, both imidacloprid and thiamethoxam caused deficits in colony strength, while no detrimental effects of clothianidin were observed. Given these findings, neonicotinoid risk needs to be considered independently for each compound and target species.

  10. Different patterns of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunit transcription in human thymus.

    Bruno, Roxana; Sabater, Lidia; Tolosa, Eva; Sospedra, Mireia; Ferrer-Francesch, Xavier; Coll, Jaume; Foz, Marius; Melms, Arthur; Pujol-Borrell, Ricardo

    2004-04-01

    Clinical observations suggest that the thymus is strongly implicated in the pathogenesis of myasthenia gravis (MG), but questions such as the level and location of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR) subunit expression that are fundamental to postulate any pathogenic mechanism, remain controversial. We have re-examined this question by combining calibrated RT-PCR and real-time PCR to study nicotinic AChR subunit mRNA expression in a panel of normal and myasthenic thymi. The results suggest that the expression of the different AChR subunits follows three distinct patterns: constitutive for, neonatal for gamma and individually variable for alpha1, beta1 and delta. Experiments using confocal laser microdissection suggest that AChR is mainly expressed in the medullary compartment of the thymus but there is not a clear compartmentalization of subunit expression. The different patterns of subunit expression may influence decisively the level of central tolerance to the subunits and explain the focusing of the T cell response to the alpha and gamma subunits. PMID:15020075

  11. Interaction of 18-methoxycoronaridine with nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in different conformational states.

    Arias, Hugo R; Rosenberg, Avraham; Feuerbach, Dominik; Targowska-Duda, Katarzyna M; Maciejewski, Ryszard; Jozwiak, Krzysztof; Moaddel, Ruin; Glick, Stanley D; Wainer, Irving W

    2010-06-01

    The interaction of 18-methoxycoronaridine (18-MC) with nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) was compared with that for ibogaine and phencyclidine (PCP). The results established that 18-MC: (a) is more potent than ibogaine and PCP inhibiting (+/-)-epibatidine-induced AChR Ca(2+) influx. The potency of 18-MC is increased after longer pre-incubation periods, which is in agreement with the enhancement of [(3)H]cytisine binding to resting but activatable Torpedo AChRs, (b) binds to a single site in the Torpedo AChR with high affinity and inhibits [(3)H]TCP binding to desensitized AChRs in a steric fashion, suggesting the existence of overlapping sites. This is supported by our docking results indicating that 18-MC interacts with a domain located between the serine (position 6') and valine (position 13') rings, and (c) inhibits [(3)H]TCP, [(3)H]ibogaine, and [(3)H]18-MC binding to desensitized AChRs with higher affinity compared to resting AChRs. This can be partially attributed to a slower dissociation rate from the desensitized AChR compared to that from the resting AChR. The enthalpic contribution is more important than the entropic contribution when 18-MC binds to the desensitized AChR compared to that for the resting AChR, and vice versa. Ibogaine analogs inhibit the AChR by interacting with a luminal domain that is shared with PCP, and by inducing desensitization. PMID:20303928

  12. Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor α4 Subunit Gene Variation Associated with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

    HUANG Xuezhu; XU Yong; LI Qianqian; LIU Pozi; YANG Yuan; ZHANG Fuquan; GUO Tianyou; YANG Chuang; GUO Lanting

    2009-01-01

    Previous pharmacological, human genetics, and animal models have implicated the nicotinic ace-tylcholine receptor a4 subunit (CHRNA4) gene in the pathogenesis of attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The objective of this study is to examine the genetic association between single nucleotide poly-morphisms in the CHRNA4 gene (rs2273502, rs1044396, rs1044397, and rs3827020 loci) and ADHD. Both case-control and family-based designs are used. Children aged 6 to 16 years were interviewed and as-sessed with the children behavior checklist and the revised conner' parent rating scale to identify probands. No significant differences in the frequency distribution of genotypes or alleles were found between the case and control groups. However, further haplotype analyses showed the CCGG haplotype on dsk for ADHD in 164 case-control samples and the standard transmission disequilibrium test analyses suggest that the allele C of rs2273502 was over-transferred in 98 ADHD parent-offspring tdos. These findings suggest that the CHRNA4 gene may play a role in the pathogenesis of ADHD.

  13. Functional nicotinic acetylcholine receptor reconstitution in Au(111)-supported thiolipid monolayers

    Pissinis, Diego E.; Diaz, Carolina; Maza, Eliana; Bonini, Ida C.; Barrantes, Francisco J.; Salvarezza, Roberto C.; Schilardi, Patricia L.

    2015-09-01

    The insertion and function of the muscle-type nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) in Au(111)-supported thiolipid self-assembled monolayers have been studied by atomic force microscopy (AFM), surface plasmon resonance (SPR), and electrochemical techniques. It was possible for the first time to resolve the supramolecular arrangement of the protein spontaneously inserted in a thiolipid monolayer in an aqueous solution. Geometric supramolecular arrays of nAChRs were observed, most commonly in a triangular form compatible with three nAChR dimers of ~20 nm each. Addition of the full agonist carbamoylcholine activated and opened the nAChR ion channel, as revealed by the increase in capacitance relative to that of the nAChR-thiolipid system under basal conditions. Thus, the self-assembled system appears to be a viable biomimetic model to measure ionic conductance mediated by ion-gated ion channels under different experimental conditions, with potential applications in biotechnology and pharmacology.

  14. Synthesis and 125I labelling of a precursor for imaging nicotinic acetylcholine receptors

    Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors (nAChRs) are involved in various pharmacological effects or diseases, such as Alzheimer's Disease, Parkinson's Disease and tobacco addiction. It will be very appealing to image nAChRs in vivo, diagnose and treat the above diseases, and probe the mechanism of nAChRs in tobacco addiction if the suitable radioactive labeled compound can be synthesized. In this study, (s)-5-(tri-butylstannyl)-3{[1-(tert-butoxycarbonyl)-2-azetidinyl]methoxy} pyridine, a precursor for imaging nAChRs, was synthesized with commercial 2-furfurylamine and (s)-2-azetidinecarboxylic acid as starting materials, and was further labeled with 125/123I. The whole procedure for radiosynthesis needs 50-55 min and more than 30% of the 125I are found in the purified 5-[125I]-A-85380. Even staying for 3 days at room temperature in vitro, the purified 5-[125I]-I-85380 can maintain its stability, with a radiochemical purity of more than 95%. (authors)

  15. A radioimmunoassay for the quantitative evaluation of anti-human acetylcholine receptor antibodies in myasthenia gravis

    A radioimmunoassay was developed for the quantitative evaluation of antibodies to the acetylcholine receptor in the serum of myasthenic patients. AcChR was extracted from human muscle. A detailed preparation of the 125I-labelled α-Bgt-AcChR complex used as antigen is reported. Usually, an average of 20 pmol were obtained from 100 g muscle. This preparation is stable for 1 month in presence of an inhibitor of proteolysis and sufficient for performing about fifteen assays. The labelled complex was incubated with increasing amounts of sera and precipitated with anti-human IgG serum. Titres were expressed in pmol 125I-labelled α-Bgt-AcChR complex precipitated per ml serum. Out of thirty-nine sera tested thirty-six had positive titres ranging from 0.1 to 46 pmol/ml. No anti-AcChR were detected in the sera from twenty-seven patients used as controls. (author)

  16. Neuronal Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors: Neuroplastic Changes underlying Alcohol and Nicotine Addictions

    Allison Anne Feduccia

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Addictive drugs can activate systems involved in normal reward-related learning, creating long-lasting memories of the drug’s reinforcing effects and the environmental cues surrounding the experience. These memories significantly contribute to the maintenance of compulsive drug use as well as cue-induced relapse which can occur even after long periods of abstinence. Synaptic plasticity is thought to be a prominent molecular mechanism underlying drug-induced learning and memories. Ethanol and nicotine are both widely abused drugs that share a common molecular target in the brain, the neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs. The nAChRs are ligand-gated ion channels that are vastly distributed throughout the brain and play a key role in synaptic neurotransmission. In this review, we will delineate the role of nAChRs in the development of ethanol and nicotine addiction. We will characterize both ethanol and nicotine’s effects on nAChR-mediated synaptic transmission and plasticity in several key brain areas that are important for addiction. Finally, we will discuss some of the behavioral outcomes of drug-induced synaptic plasticity in animal models. An understanding of the molecular and cellular changes that occur following administration of ethanol and nicotine will lead to better therapeutic strategies.

  17. Metabolic stabilization of acetylcholine receptors in vertebrate neuromuscular junction by muscle activity

    The effects of muscle activity on the growth of synaptic acetylcholine receptor (AChR) accumulations and on the metabolic AChR stability were investigated in rat skeletal muscle. Ectopic end plates induced surgically in adult soleus muscle were denervated early during development when junctional AChR number and stability were still low and, subsequently, muscles were either left inactive or they were kept active by chronic exogenous stimulation. AChR numbers per ectopic AChR cluster and AChR stabilities were estimated from the radioactivity and its decay with time, respectively, of end plate sites whose AChRs had been labeled with 125I-alpha-bungarotoxin (alpha-butx). The results show that the metabolic stability of the AChRs in ectopic clusters is reversibly increased by muscle activity even when innervation is eliminated very early in development. 1 d of stimulation is sufficient to stabilize the AChRs in ectopic AChR clusters. Muscle stimulation also produced an increase in the number of AChRs at early denervated end plates. Activity-induced cluster growth occurs mainly by an increase in area rather than in AChR density, and for at least 10 d after denervation is comparable to that in normally developing ectopic end plates. The possible involvement of AChR stabilization in end plate growth is discussed

  18. Interaction of bupropion with muscle-type nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in different conformational states.

    Arias, Hugo R; Gumilar, Fernanda; Rosenberg, Avraham; Targowska-Duda, Katarzyna M; Feuerbach, Dominik; Jozwiak, Krzysztof; Moaddel, Ruin; Wainer, Irving W; Bouzat, Cecilia

    2009-06-01

    To characterize the binding sites and the mechanisms of inhibition of bupropion on muscle-type nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (AChRs), structural and functional approaches were used. The results established that bupropion (a) inhibits epibatidine-induced Ca(2+) influx in embryonic muscle AChRs, (b) inhibits adult muscle AChR macroscopic currents in the resting/activatable state with approximately 100-fold higher potency compared to that in the open state, (c) increases the desensitization rate of adult muscle AChRs from the open state and impairs channel opening from the resting state, (d) inhibits binding of [(3)H]TCP and [(3)H]imipramine to the desensitized/carbamylcholine-bound Torpedo AChR with higher affinity compared to the resting/alpha-bungarotoxin-bound AChR, (e) binds to the Torpedo AChR in either state mainly by an entropy-driven process, and (f) interacts with a binding domain located between the serine (position 6') and valine (position 13') rings, by a network of van der Waals, hydrogen bond, and polar interactions. Collectively, our data indicate that bupropion first binds to the resting AChR, decreasing the probability of ion channel opening. The remnant fraction of open ion channels is subsequently decreased by accelerating the desensitization process. Bupropion interacts with a luminal binding domain shared with PCP that is located between the serine and valine rings, and this interaction is mediated mainly by an entropy-driven process. PMID:19334677

  19. Interaction of Bupropion with Muscle-Type Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors in Different Conformational States†

    Arias, Hugo R.; Gumilar, Fernanda; Rosenberg, Avraham; Targowska-Duda, Katarzyna M.; Feuerbach, Dominik; Jozwiak, Krzysztof; Moaddel, Ruin; Wainer, Irving W.; Bouzat, Cecilia

    2009-01-01

    To characterize the binding sites and the mechanisms of inhibition of bupropion on muscle-type nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (AChRs), structural and functional approaches were used. The results established that bupropion: (a) inhibits epibatidine-induced Ca2+ influx in embryonic muscle AChRs, (b) inhibits adult muscle AChR macroscopic currents in the resting/activatable state with ~100-fold higher potency compared to that in the open state, (c) increases desensitization rate of adult muscle AChRs from the open state and impairs channel opening from the resting state, (d) inhibits [3H]TCP and [3H]imipramine binding to the desensitized/carbamylcholine-bound Torpedo AChR with higher affinity compared to the resting/α-bungarotoxin-bound AChR, (e) binds to the Torpedo AChR in either state mainly by an entropy–driven process, and (f) interacts with a binding domain located between the serine (position 6’) and valine (position 13’) rings, by a network of van der Waals, hydrogen bond, and polar interactions. Collectively our data indicate that bupropion first binds to the resting AChR, decreasing the probability of ion channel opening. The remnant fraction of open ion channels is subsequently decreased by accelerating the desensitization process. Bupropion interacts with a luminal binding domain shared with PCP that is located between the serine and valine rings, and this interaction is mediated mainly by an entropy-driven process. PMID:19334677

  20. Multiple Transmembrane Binding Sites for p-Trifluoromethyldiazirinyl-etomidate, a Photoreactive Torpedo Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor Allosteric Inhibitor*

    Hamouda, Ayman K.; Stewart, Deirdre S.; Husain, S. Shaukat; Cohen, Jonathan B.

    2011-01-01

    Photoreactive derivatives of the general anesthetic etomidate have been developed to identify their binding sites in γ-aminobutyric acid, type A and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. One such drug, [3H]TDBzl-etomidate (4-[3-(trifluoromethyl)-3H-diazirin-3-yl]benzyl-[3H]1-(1-phenylethyl)-1H-imidazole-5-carboxylate), acts as a positive allosteric potentiator of Torpedo nACh receptor (nAChR) and binds to a novel site in the transmembrane domain at the γ-α subunit interface. To extend our unders...

  1. Propofol and AZD3043 Inhibit Adult Muscle and Neuronal Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors Expressed in Xenopus Oocytes

    Malin Jonsson Fagerlund

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Propofol is a widely used general anaesthetic with muscle relaxant properties. Similarly as propofol, the new general anaesthetic AZD3043 targets the GABAA receptor for its anaesthetic effects, but the interaction with nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs has not been investigated. Notably, there is a gap of knowledge about the interaction between propofol and the nAChRs found in the adult neuromuscular junction. The objective was to evaluate whether propofol or AZD3043 interact with the α1β1δε, α3β2, or α7 nAChR subtypes that can be found in the neuromuscular junction and if there are any differences in affinity for those subtypes between propofol and AZD3043. Human nAChR subtypes α1β1δε, α3β2, and α7 were expressed into Xenopus oocytes and studied with an automated voltage-clamp. Propofol and AZD3043 inhibited ACh-induced currents in all of the nAChRs studied with inhibitory concentrations higher than those needed for general anaesthesia. AZD3043 was a more potent inhibitor at the adult muscle nAChR subtype compared to propofol. Propofol and AZD3043 inhibit nAChR subtypes that can be found in the adult NMJ in concentrations higher than needed for general anaesthesia. This finding needs to be evaluated in an in vitro nerve-muscle preparation and suggests one possible explanation for the muscle relaxant effect of propofol seen during higher doses.

  2. (-)-Reboxetine inhibits muscle nicotinic acetylcholine receptors by interacting with luminal and non-luminal sites.

    Arias, Hugo R; Ortells, Marcelo O; Feuerbach, Dominik

    2013-11-01

    The interaction of (-)-reboxetine, a non-tricyclic norepinephrine selective reuptake inhibitor, with muscle-type nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) in different conformational states was studied by functional and structural approaches. The results established that (-)-reboxetine: (a) inhibits (±)-epibatidine-induced Ca(2+) influx in human (h) muscle embryonic (hα1β1γδ) and adult (hα1β1εδ) AChRs in a non-competitive manner and with potencies IC50=3.86±0.49 and 1.92±0.48 μM, respectively, (b) binds to the [(3)H]TCP site with ~13-fold higher affinity when the Torpedo AChR is in the desensitized state compared to the resting state, (c) enhances [(3)H]cytisine binding to the resting but activatableTorpedo AChR but not to the desensitized AChR, suggesting desensitizing properties, (d) overlaps the PCP luminal site located between rings 6' and 13' in the Torpedo but not human muscle AChRs. In silico mutation results indicate that ring 9' is the minimum structural component for (-)-reboxetine binding, and (e) interacts to non-luminal sites located within the transmembrane segments from the Torpedo AChR γ subunit, and at the α1/ε transmembrane interface from the adult muscle AChR. In conclusion, (-)-reboxetine non-competitively inhibits muscle AChRs by binding to the TCP luminal site and by inducing receptor desensitization (maybe by interacting with non-luminal sites), a mechanism that is shared by tricyclic antidepressants. PMID:23917086

  3. Nicotine and 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone induce cyclooxygenase-2 activity in human gastric cancer cells: Involvement of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) and β-adrenergic receptor signaling pathways

    Induction of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) associates with cigarette smoke exposure in many malignancies. Nicotine and its derivative, 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK), are the two important components in cigarette smoke that contributes to cancer development. However, the molecular mechanism(s) by which nicotine or NNK promotes gastric carcinogenesis remains largely unknown. We found that nicotine and NNK significantly enhanced cell proliferation in AGS cells that expressed both alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7 nAChR) and β-adrenergic receptors. Treatment of cells with α-bungarotoxin (α-BTX, α7nAChR antagonist) or propranolol (β-adrenergic receptor antagonist) blocked NNK-induced COX-2/PGE2 and cell proliferation, while nicotine-mediated cell growth and COX-2/PGE2 induction can only be suppressed by propranolol, but not α-BTX. Moreover, in contrast to the dependence of growth promoting effect of nicotine on Erk activation, inhibitor of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) repressed NNK-induced COX-2 upregulation and resulted in suppression of cell growth. In addition, nicotine and NNK mediated COX-2 induction via different receptors to modulate several G1/S transition regulatory proteins and promote gastric cancer cell growth. Selective COX-2 inhibitor (SC-236) caused G1 arrest and abrogated nicotine/NNK-induced cell proliferation. Aberrant expression of cyclin D1 and other G1 regulatory proteins are reversed by blockade of COX-2. These results pointed to the importance of adrenergic and nicotinic receptors in gastric tumor growth through MAPK/COX-2 activation, which may perhaps provide a chemoprevention strategy for cigarette smoke-related gastric carcinogenesis

  4. Kynurenic acid amides as novel NR2B selective NMDA receptor antagonists.

    Borza, István; Kolok, Sándor; Galgóczy, Kornél; Gere, Anikó; Horváth, Csilla; Farkas, Sándor; Greiner, István; Domány, György

    2007-01-15

    A novel series of kynurenic acid amides, ring-enlarged derivatives of indole-2-carboxamides, was prepared and identified as in vivo active NR2B subtype selective NMDA receptor antagonists. The synthesis and SAR studies are discussed. PMID:17074483

  5. Could antagonists of excitatory amino acid receptors be used as antiepileptics in pediatric epileptology?

    Mareš, Pavel

    2006. s. 76-76. [Eilat conference on new antiepileptic drugs /8./. 10.09.2006-14.09.2006, Sitges] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : anticonvulsive effect * antagonists * glutamate receptors Subject RIV: ED - Physiology

  6. Acetylcholine Attenuates Hypoxia/ Reoxygenation-Induced Mitochondrial and Cytosolic ROS Formation in H9c2 Cells via M2 Acetylcholine Receptor

    Yi Miao

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: The anti-infammatory and cardioprotective effect of acetylcholine (ACh has been reported; nevertheless, whether and how ACh exhibits an antioxidant property against ischemia/reperfusion (I/R-induced oxidative stress remains obscure. Methods: In the present study, H9c2 rat cardiomyocytes were exposed to hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R to mimic I/R injury. We estimated intracellular different sources of reactive oxygen species (ROS by measuring mitochondrial ROS (mtROS, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA copy number, xanthine oxidase (XO and NADPH oxidase (NOX activity and expression of rac 1. Cell injury was determined by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH release and cleaved caspase-3 expression. The siRNA transfection was performed to knockdown of M2 acetylcholine receptor (M2 AChR expression. Results: 12-h hypoxia followed by 2-h reoxygenation resulted in an abrupt burst of ROS in H9c2 cells. Administration of ACh reduced the levels of ROS in a concentration-dependent manner. Compared to the H/R group, ACh decreased mtROS, recovered mtDNA copy number, diminished XO and NOX activity, rac 1 expression as well as cell injury. Co- treatment with atropine rather than hexamethonium abolished the antioxidant and cardioprotective effect of ACh. Moreover, knockdown of M2 AChR by siRNA showed the similar trends as atropine co-treatment group. Conclusions: ACh inhibits mitochondria-, XO- and NOX-derived ROS production thus protecting H9c2 cells against H/R-induced oxidative stress, and these benefcial effects are mainly mediated by M2 AChR. Our findings suggested that increasing ACh release could be a potential therapeutic strategy for treatment and prevention of I/R injury.

  7. Influence of Y151 F mutation in loop B on the agonist potency in insect nicotinic acetylcholine receptor

    Feng Song; Yi-Xi Zhang; Xiang-Mei Yao; Ze-Wen Liu

    2009-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are ligand-gated ion channels,which mediate fast cholinergic synaptic transmission in insect and vertebrate nervous systems.The nAChR agonist-binding site is present at the interface of adjacent subunits and is formed by loops A-C present in α subunits together with loops D-F present in either non-α subunits or homomer-forrning α subunits.Although Y151 in loop B has been identified as important in agonist binding,various residues at the 151-site are found among vertebrate and invertebrate nAChR ot subunits,such as F151.In Xenopus oocytes expressing N1α1 or N1α1~(Y151F) plus rat β2,Y151F mutation was found to significantly change the rate of receptor desensitization and altered the pharmacological properties of acetylcholine,but not imidacloprid,including the decrease of I_(max),the increase of EC_(50)(the concentration causing 50% of the maximum response) and the fast time-constant of decay (τ_f).By comparisons of residue structure,the hydroxyl group in the side chain of Y151 was thought to be important in the interaction between N1α1/β2 nAChRs and acetylcholine,and the phenyl group to be important between N1α1/β2 nAChRs and imidacloprid.

  8. Effects of combining opioids and clinically available NMDA receptor antagonists in the treatment of pain

    Snijdelaar, D.G.

    2005-01-01

    This thesis concerns the effects of combining opioids with clinically available NMDA receptor antagonists in the treatment of acute and chronic pain. There are a number of problems with the use of opioids, such as, the development of tolerance/hyperalgesia, the reduced effectiveness in (central) neuropathic pain, and troublesome adverse effects. These problems might be resolved by the combined use of opioids and clinically available drugs with N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist p...

  9. Competitive dopamine receptor antagonists increase the equiactive cocaine concentration during self-administration

    Norman, Andrew B.; Norman, Mantana K.; Tabet, Michael R.; Tsibulsky, Vladimir L.; Pesce, Amadeo J

    2010-01-01

    Competitive dopamine receptor antagonists increase the rate of cocaine self-administration. As the rate of self-administration at a particular unit dose is determined by the satiety threshold and the elimination half-life (t1/2) of cocaine, we investigated whether dopamine receptor antagonists altered these parameters. The plasma cocaine concentration at the time of each self-administration was constant during a session demonstrating that this satiety threshold concentration represents an equ...

  10. The classification of peripheral 5-HT2-like receptors using tryptamine agonist and antagonist analogues.

    Leff, P.; Martin, G. R.; Morse, J. M.

    1986-01-01

    In a previous study, we attempted to verify the classification of 5-hydroxytryptamine2 (5-HT2) receptors in three vascular tissues, by use of the conventional antagonists, ketanserin, spiperone, methysergide and trazodone. However, it was not possible to conclude homogeneity of the receptor type in the three tissues due to the inconsistent behaviour of these antagonists, in particular, their apparently variable affinities between the tissues. These results led to the reliability of the conven...

  11. Effect of acetylcholine receptors on the pain-related electrical activities in the hippocampal CA3 region of morphine-addicted rats

    Guan Zeng Li

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s:To determine the effect of acetylcholine (ACh, pilocarpine, and atropine on pain evoked responses of pain excited neurons (PEN and pain inhibited neurons (PIN in hippocampal CA3 region of morphine addicted rats. Materials and Methods:Female Wistar rats, weighing between 230-260 g were used in this study. Morphine addicted rats were generated by subcutaneous injection of increasing concentrations of morphine hydrochloride for six days. Trains of electrical impulses applied to the sciatic nerve were used as noxious stimulation and the evoked electrical activities of PEN or PIN in hippocampal CA3 area were recorded using extracellular electrophysiological recording techniques in hippocampal slices. The effect of acetylcholine receptor stimulation byACh, the muscarinic agonist pilocarpine, and the muscarinic antagonist atropine on the pain evoked responses of pain related electrical activities was analyzed in hippocampal CA3 area of morphine addicted rats. Results:Intra-CA3 microinjection of ACh (2 μg/1 μl or pilocarpine (2 μg/1 μl decreased the discharge frequency and prolonged the firing latency of PEN, but increased the discharge frequency and shortened the firing inhibitory duration (ID of PIN. The intra-CA3 administration of atropine (0.5 μg/1 μl produced opposite effect. The peak activity of cholinergic modulators was 2 to 4 min later in morphine addicted rats compared to peak activity previously observed in normal rats. Conclusion: ACh dependent modulation of noxious stimulation exists in hippocampal CA3 area of morphine addicted rats. Morphine treatment may shift the sensitivity of pain related neurons towards a delayed response to muscarinergic neurotransmission in hippocampal CA3 region.

  12. Synergistic effect between 5-HT4 receptor agonist and phosphodiesterase 4-inhibitor in releasing acetylcholine in pig gastric circular muscle in vitro.

    Lefebvre, Romain A; Van Colen, Inge; Pauwelyn, Vicky; De Maeyer, Joris H

    2016-06-15

    5-HT4 receptor agonists have a gastroprokinetic effect by facilitating acetylcholine release from cholinergic nerves innervating gastrointestinal smooth muscle. The role of phosphodiesterase (PDE) 4 in the signal transduction pathway of the 5-HT4 receptors located on the cholinergic neurons towards the circular muscle layer in pig stomach was investigated by analysis of acetylcholine release. Circular muscle strips were prepared from pig proximal stomach and tritium outflow, induced by electrical field stimulation, was studied as a marker for acetylcholine release after incubation with [(3)H]-choline. The PDE4-inhibitor roflumilast concentration-dependently (0.1-1µM) enhanced the facilitating effect of a submaximally effective concentration of the 5-HT4 receptor agonist prucalopride (0.01µM) on electrically induced acetylcholine release. Roflumilast (0.3µM) enhanced acetylcholine release per se but in the combined presence of roflumilast and prucalopride, acetylcholine release was enhanced more than the sum of the effect of the 2 compounds alone. The 5-HT4 receptor agonist velusetrag concentration-dependently (0.01-0.1µM) enhanced acetylcholine release; the effect of the minimally effective concentration (0.01µM) was significantly enhanced by 1µM of the PDE4-inhibitor rolipram, again to a level higher than the sum of the effect of the 2 compounds alone. The synergistic effect between 5-HT4 receptor agonists and PDE4-inhibitors demonstrates that the intracellular pathway of the 5-HT4 receptors located on cholinergic neurons towards pig gastric circular muscle is controlled by PDE4. Combining a 5-HT4 receptor agonist with a PDE4-inhibitor might thus enhance its gastroprokinetic effect. PMID:27060014

  13. Update on leukotriene receptor antagonists in preschool children wheezing disorders

    Montella Silvia

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Asthma is the most common chronic disease in young children. About 40% of all preschool children regularly wheeze during common cold infections. The heterogeneity of wheezing phenotypes early in life and various anatomical and emotional factors unique to young children present significant challenges in the clinical management of this problem. Anti-inflammatory therapy, mainly consisting of inhaled corticosteroids (ICS, is the cornerstone of asthma management. Since Leukotrienes (LTs are chemical mediators of airway inflammation in asthma, the leukotriene receptor antagonists (LTRAs are traditionally used as potent anti-inflammatory drugs in the long-term treatment of asthma in adults, adolescents, and school-age children. In particular, montelukast decreases airway inflammation, and has also a bronchoprotective effect. The main guidelines on asthma management have confirmed the clinical utility of LTRAs in children older than five years. In the present review we describe the most recent advances on the use of LTRAs in the treatment of preschool wheezing disorders. LTRAs are effective in young children with virus-induced wheeze and with multiple-trigger disease. Conflicting data do not allow to reach definitive conclusions on LTRAs efficacy in bronchiolitis or post-bronchiolitis wheeze, and in acute asthma. The excellent safety profile of montelukast and the possibility of oral administration, that entails better compliance from young children, represent the main strengths of its use in preschool children. Montelukast is a valid alternative to ICS especially in poorly compliant preschool children, or in subjects who show adverse effects related to long-term steroid therapy.

  14. Endothelin receptor antagonist and airway dysfunction in pulmonary arterial hypertension

    Borst Mathias M

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH, peripheral airway obstruction is frequent. This is partially attributed to the mediator dysbalance, particularly an excess of endothelin-1 (ET-1, to increased pulmonary vascular and airway tonus and to local inflammation. Bosentan (ET-1 receptor antagonist improves pulmonary hemodynamics, exercise limitation, and disease severity in IPAH. We hypothesized that bosentan might affect airway obstruction. Methods In 32 IPAH-patients (19 female, WHO functional class II (n = 10, III (n = 22; (data presented as mean ± standard deviation pulmonary vascular resistance (11 ± 5 Wood units, lung function, 6 minute walk test (6-MWT; 364 ± 363.7 (range 179.0-627.0 m, systolic pulmonary artery pressure, sPAP, 79 ± 19 mmHg, and NT-proBNP serum levels (1427 ± 2162.7 (range 59.3-10342.0 ng/L were measured at baseline, after 3 and 12 months of oral bosentan (125 mg twice per day. Results and Discussion At baseline, maximal expiratory flow at 50 and 25% vital capacity were reduced to 65 ± 25 and 45 ± 24% predicted. Total lung capacity was 95.6 ± 12.5% predicted and residual volume was 109 ± 21.4% predicted. During 3 and 12 months of treatment, 6-MWT increased by 32 ± 19 and 53 ± 69 m, respectively; p Conclusion This study gives first evidence in IPAH, that during long-term bosentan, improvement of hemodynamics, functional parameters or serum biomarker occur independently from persisting peripheral airway obstruction.

  15. Analogues of neuroactive polyamine wasp toxins that lack inner basic sites exhibit enhanced antagonism toward a muscle-type mammalian nicotinic acetylcholine receptor

    Stromgaard, K; Brierley, M J; Andersen, K; Sløk, F A; Mellor, I R; Usherwood, P N; Krogsgaard-Larsen, P; Jaroszewski, J W

    1999-01-01

    noncompetitively antagonized the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) in a concentration-, time-, and voltage-dependent manner. The amplitudes of acetylcholine-induced currents were compared at their peaks and at the end of a 1 s application in the presence or absence of the analogues. Most of the analogues...... properties (stepwise macroscopic pK(a) values) were determined by (13)C NMR titrations. All analogues are fully protonated at physiological pH. The effects of these compounds on acetylcholine-induced currents in TE671 cells clamped at various holding potentials were determined. All of the analogues...

  16. Synthetic. cap alpha. subunit peptide 125-147 of human nicotinic acetylcholine receptor induces antibodies to native receptor

    McCormick, D.J.; Griesmann, G.E.; Huang, Z.; Lennon, V.A.

    1986-03-05

    A synthetic peptide corresponding to residues 125-147 of the Torpedo acetylcholine receptor (AChR) ..cap alpha.. subunit proved to be a major antigenic region of the AChR. Rats inoculated with 50 ..mu..g of peptide (T ..cap alpha.. 125-147) developed T cell immunity and antibodies to native AChR and signs of experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis. They report the synthesis and preliminary testing of a disulfide-looped peptide comprising residues 125-147 of the human AChR ..cap alpha.. subunit. Peptide H ..cap alpha.. 125-147 differs from T ..cap alpha.. 125-147 at residues 139 (Glu for Gln) and 143 (Ser for Thr). In immunoprecipitation assays, antibodies to Torpedo AChR bound /sup 125/I-labelled H..cap alpha.. 125-147 antibody bound H..cap alpha.. 125-147, but monoclonal antibodies to an immunodominant region of native AChR bound neither H..cap alpha.. 125-147 nor T ..cap alpha.. 125-147. Rats immunized with H ..cap alpha.. 125-147 produced anti-mammalian muscle AChR antibodies that induced modulation of AChRs from cultured human myotubes. Thus, region 125-147 of the human AChR ..cap alpha.. subunit is extracellular in muscle, and is both antigenic and immunogenic. It remains to be determined whether or not autoantibodies to this region may in part cause the weakness or myasthenia gravis in man.

  17. Phosphocholine - an agonist of metabotropic but not of ionotropic functions of α9-containing nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Richter, K; Mathes, V; Fronius, M; Althaus, M; Hecker, A; Krasteva-Christ, G; Padberg, W; Hone, A J; McIntosh, J M; Zakrzewicz, A; Grau, V

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrated previously that phosphocholine and phosphocholine-modified macromolecules efficiently inhibit ATP-dependent release of interleukin-1β from human and murine monocytes by a mechanism involving nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR). Interleukin-1β is a potent pro-inflammatory cytokine of innate immunity that plays pivotal roles in host defence. Control of interleukin-1β release is vital as excessively high systemic levels cause life threatening inflammatory diseases. In spite of its structural similarity to acetylcholine, there are no other reports on interactions of phosphocholine with nAChR. In this study, we demonstrate that phosphocholine inhibits ion-channel function of ATP receptor P2X7 in monocytic cells via nAChR containing α9 and α10 subunits. In stark contrast to choline, phosphocholine does not evoke ion current responses in Xenopus laevis oocytes, which heterologously express functional homomeric nAChR composed of α9 subunits or heteromeric receptors containing α9 and α10 subunits. Preincubation of these oocytes with phosphocholine, however, attenuated choline-induced ion current changes, suggesting that phosphocholine may act as a silent agonist. We conclude that phophocholine activates immuno-modulatory nAChR expressed by monocytes but does not stimulate canonical ionotropic receptor functions. PMID:27349288

  18. Phosphocholine – an agonist of metabotropic but not of ionotropic functions of α9-containing nicotinic acetylcholine receptors

    Richter, K.; Mathes, V.; Fronius, M.; Althaus, M.; Hecker, A.; Krasteva-Christ, G.; Padberg, W.; Hone, A. J.; McIntosh, J. M.; Zakrzewicz, A.; Grau, V.

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrated previously that phosphocholine and phosphocholine-modified macromolecules efficiently inhibit ATP-dependent release of interleukin-1β from human and murine monocytes by a mechanism involving nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR). Interleukin-1β is a potent pro-inflammatory cytokine of innate immunity that plays pivotal roles in host defence. Control of interleukin-1β release is vital as excessively high systemic levels cause life threatening inflammatory diseases. In spite of its structural similarity to acetylcholine, there are no other reports on interactions of phosphocholine with nAChR. In this study, we demonstrate that phosphocholine inhibits ion-channel function of ATP receptor P2X7 in monocytic cells via nAChR containing α9 and α10 subunits. In stark contrast to choline, phosphocholine does not evoke ion current responses in Xenopus laevis oocytes, which heterologously express functional homomeric nAChR composed of α9 subunits or heteromeric receptors containing α9 and α10 subunits. Preincubation of these oocytes with phosphocholine, however, attenuated choline-induced ion current changes, suggesting that phosphocholine may act as a silent agonist. We conclude that phophocholine activates immuno-modulatory nAChR expressed by monocytes but does not stimulate canonical ionotropic receptor functions. PMID:27349288

  19. alpha4beta2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors on dopaminergic neurons mediate nicotine reward and anxiety relief

    McGranahan, Tresa M.; Patzlaff, Natalie E.; Grady, Sharon R.; Heinemann, Stephen F.; Booker, T.K.

    2012-01-01

    Nicotine is the primary psychoactive substance in tobacco and it exerts its effects by interaction with various subtypes of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) in the brain. One of the major subtypes expressed in brain, the alpha4beta2-nAChR, endogenously modulates neuronal excitability and thereby, modifies certain normal, as well as nicotine-induced, behaviors. Although alpha4-containing nAChRs are widely expressed across the brain, a major focus has been on their roles within midbrain dopaminergic regions involved in drug addition, mental illness and movement control in humans. We developed a unique model system to examine the role of alpha4-nAChRs within dopaminergic neurons by a targeted genetic deletion of the alpha4 subunit from dopaminergic neurons in mice. The loss alpha4 mRNA and alpha4beta2-nAChRs from dopaminergic neurons was confirmed, as well as selective loss of alpha4beta2-nAChR function from dopaminergic but not GABAergic neurons. Two behaviors central to nicotine dependence, reward and anxiety relief, were examined. Alpha4-nAChRs specifically on dopaminergic neurons were demonstrated to be necessary for nicotine reward as measured by nicotine place preference, but not for another drug of addiction, cocaine. Alpha4-nAChRs are necessary for the anxiolytic effects of nicotine in the elevated plus maze and elimination of alpha4-beta2-nAChRs specifically from dopaminergic neurons decreased sensitivity to the anxiolytic effects of nicotine. Deletion of alpha4-nAChRs specifically from dopaminergic neurons also increased sensitivity to nicotine-induced locomotor depression, however nicotine-induced hypothermia was unaffected. This is the first work to develop a dopaminergic specific deletion of a nAChR subunit and examine resulting changes in nicotine behaviors. PMID:21795541

  20. α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors on dopaminergic neurons mediate nicotine reward and anxiety relief.

    McGranahan, Tresa M; Patzlaff, Natalie E; Grady, Sharon R; Heinemann, Stephen F; Booker, T K

    2011-07-27

    Nicotine is the primary psychoactive substance in tobacco, and it exerts its effects by interaction with various subtypes of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) in the brain. One of the major subtypes expressed in brain, the α4β2-nAChR, endogenously modulates neuronal excitability and thereby, modifies certain normal as well as nicotine-induced behaviors. Although α4-containing nAChRs are widely expressed across the brain, a major focus has been on their roles within midbrain dopaminergic regions involved in drug addiction, mental illness, and movement control in humans. We developed a unique model system to examine the role of α4-nAChRs within dopaminergic neurons by a targeted genetic deletion of the α4 subunit from dopaminergic neurons in mice. The loss α4 mRNA and α4β2-nAChRs from dopaminergic neurons was confirmed, as well as selective loss of α4β2-nAChR function from dopaminergic but not GABAergic neurons. Two behaviors central to nicotine dependence, reward and anxiety relief, were examined. α4-nAChRs specifically on dopaminergic neurons were demonstrated to be necessary for nicotine reward as measured by nicotine place preference, but not for another drug of addiction, cocaine. α4-nAChRs are necessary for the anxiolytic effects of nicotine in the elevated plus maze, and elimination of α4β2-nAChRs specifically from dopaminergic neurons decreased sensitivity to the anxiolytic effects of nicotine. Deletion of α4-nAChRs specifically from dopaminergic neurons also increased sensitivity to nicotine-induced locomotor depression; however, nicotine-induced hypothermia was unaffected. This is the first work to develop a dopaminergic specific deletion of a nAChR subunit and examine resulting changes in nicotine-related behaviors. PMID:21795541

  1. Interaction of ibogaine with human alpha3beta4-nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in different conformational states.

    Arias, Hugo R; Rosenberg, Avraham; Targowska-Duda, Katarzyna M; Feuerbach, Dominik; Yuan, Xiao Juan; Jozwiak, Krzysztof; Moaddel, Ruin; Wainer, Irving W

    2010-09-01

    The interaction of ibogaine and phencyclidine (PCP) with human (h) alpha3beta4-nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) in different conformational states was determined by functional and structural approaches including, radioligand binding assays, Ca2+ influx detections, and thermodynamic and kinetics measurements. The results established that (a) ibogaine inhibits (+/-)-epibatidine-induced Ca2+ influx in h(alpha)3beta4 AChRs with approximately 9-fold higher potency than that for PCP, (b) [3H]ibogaine binds to a single site in the h(alpha)3beta4 AChR ion channel with relatively high affinity (Kd = 0.46 +/- 0.06 microM), and ibogaine inhibits [3H]ibogaine binding to the desensitized h(alpha)3beta4 AChR with slightly higher affinity compared to the resting AChR. This is explained by a slower dissociation rate from the desensitized ion channel compared to the resting ion channel, and (c) PCP inhibits [3H]ibogaine binding to the h(alpha)3beta4 AChR, suggesting overlapping sites. The experimental results correlate with the docking simulations suggesting that ibogaine and PCP interact with a binding domain located between the serine (position 6') and valine/phenylalanine (position 13') rings. This interaction is mediated mainly by van der Waals contacts, which is in agreement with the observed enthalpic contribution determined by non-linear chromatography. However, the calculated entropic contribution also indicates local conformational changes. Collectively our data suggest that ibogaine and PCP bind to overlapping sites located between the serine and valine/phenylalanine rings, to finally block the AChR ion channel, and in the case of ibogaine, to probably maintain the AChR in the desensitized state for longer time. PMID:20684041

  2. Structure-activity relationship of ibogaine analogs interacting with nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in different conformational states.

    Arias, Hugo R; Feuerbach, Dominik; Targowska-Duda, Katarzyna M; Jozwiak, Krzysztof

    2011-09-01

    The interaction of ibogaine analogs with nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) in different conformational states was studied by functional and structural approaches. The results established that ibogaine analogs: (a) inhibit (±)-epibatidine-induced Ca²⁺ influx in human embryonic muscle AChRs with the following potency sequence (IC(50) in μM): (±)-18-methylaminocoronaridine (5.9±0.3)∼(±)-18-methoxycoronaridine (18-MC) (6.8±0.8)>(-)-ibogaine (17±3)∼(+)-catharanthine (20±1)>(±)-albifloranine (46±13), (b) bind to the [³H]TCP binding site with higher affinity when the Torpedo AChR is in the desensitized state compared to that in the resting state. Similar results were obtained using [³H]18-MC. These and docking results suggest a steric interaction between TCP and ibogaine analogs for the same site, (c) enhance [³H]cytisine binding to resting but not to desensitized AChRs, with desensitizing potencies (apparent EC₅₀) that correlate very well with the pK(i) values in the desensitized state, and (d) there are good bilinear correlations between the ligand molecular volumes and their affinities in the desensitized and resting states, with an optimal volume of ∼345 ų for the ibogaine site. These results indicate that the size of the binding sites for ibogaine analogs, located between the serine and nonpolar rings and shared with TCP, is an important structural feature for binding and for inducing desensitization. PMID:21642011

  3. Alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonists and PAMs as adjunctive treatment in schizophrenia. An experimental study.

    Marcus, Monica M; Björkholm, Carl; Malmerfelt, Anna; Möller, Annie; Påhlsson, Ninni; Konradsson-Geuken, Åsa; Feltmann, Kristin; Jardemark, Kent; Schilström, Björn; Svensson, Torgny H

    2016-09-01

    Nicotine has been found to improve cognition and reduce negative symptoms in schizophrenia and a genetic and pathophysiological link between the α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) and schizophrenia has been demonstrated. Therefore, there has been a large interest in developing drugs affecting the α7 nAChRs for schizophrenia. In the present study we investigated, in rats, the effects of a selective α7 agonist (PNU282987) and a α7 positive allosteric modulator (PAM; NS1738) alone and in combination with the atypical antipsychotic drug risperidone for their utility as adjunct treatment in schizophrenia. Moreover we also investigated their utility as adjunct treatment in depression in combination with the SSRI citalopram. We found that NS1738 and to some extent also PNU282987, potentiated a subeffective dose of risperidone in the conditioned avoidance response test. Both drugs also potentiated the effect of a sub-effective concentration of risperidone on NMDA-induced currents in pyramidal cells of the medial prefrontal cortex. Moreover, NS1738 and PNU282987 enhanced recognition memory in the novel object recognition test, when given separately. Both drugs also potentiated accumbal but not prefrontal risperidone-induced dopamine release. Finally, PNU282987 reduced immobility in the forced swim test, indicating an antidepressant-like effect. Taken together, our data support the utility of drugs targeting the α7 nAChRs, perhaps especially α7 PAMs, to potentiate the effect of atypical antipsychotic drugs. Moreover, our data suggest that α7 agonists and PAMs can be used to ameliorate cognitive symptoms in schizophrenia and depression. PMID:27474687

  4. [Treatment approach to congenital myasthenic syndrome in a patient with acetylcholine receptor deficiency].

    Ishigaki, Keiko; Murakami, Terumi; Ito, Yasushi; Yanagisawa, Akiko; Kodaira, Kayano; Shishikura, Keiko; Suzuki, Haruko; Hirayama, Yoshito; Osawa, Makiko

    2009-01-01

    Congenital myasthenic syndromes (CMS) are rare heterogeneous disorders of neurotransmission caused by genetic defects of neuromuscular junction molecules. While CMS patients have been reported worldwide, in Japan there have been only a few descriptions of adult CMS patients with acetylcholinesterase (AChE) deficiency and slow channel syndrome. Herein, we report a Japanese CMS patient with acetylcholine receptor (AChR) deficiency, diagnosed during childhood, and our treatment approach to the patient. This 13-year-old Japanese boy had had severe myasthenic symptoms since infancy. Ptosis, his first symptom, appeared at 5 months and nasal voice was recognized at 2 years of age. AchR and anti-muscle-specific tyrosine kinase (Musk) antibody remained negative. A positive tensilon test and decremental response on electromyogram supported the diagnosis of sero-negative myasthenia gravis. Despite thymectomy and strong immunosuppressive therapy including steroid pulse and FK 506, he gradually deteriorated and became wheelchair bound. Genetic analyses for AchR, Rapsyn, Musk and AChE were negative. At age 11 years, a muscle biopsy was performed in the deltoid muscle for neuromuscular junction sampling. Electron microscopic and confocal microscopic analysis of endplates showed almost complete loss of AChR and the diagnosis of CMS with AChR deficiency was confirmed. All immunosuppressive therapies were discontinued. Instead, we started Ubretide and 3,4-diaminopyridine (DAP) after obtaining informed consent. Although not approved in Japan for this use, 3,4-DAP is reportedly effective in refractory cases of CMS. The patient experienced no side effects. Despite all of the objective data were improving, his subjective symptoms and ADL remained poor. There are still many challenges in the treatment of the patient. PMID:19172815

  5. Association of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunit alpha-4 polymorphisms with smoking behaviors in Chinese male smokers

    CHU Cheng-jing; YANG Yan-chun; WEI Jin-xue; ZHANG Lan

    2011-01-01

    Background It has been reported that the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunit a4 gene (CHRNA4) might be associated with smoking behaviors in the previous studies. Up to now, there are few reports on the relationship between CHRNA4 and smoking initiation. In this study, we tried to explore the role of two polymorphisms in CHRNA4 (rs 1044396 and rs 1044397) in smoking initiation and nicotine dependence in Chinese male smokers.Methods Nine hundred and sixty-six Chinese male lifetime nonsmokers and smokers were assessed by the Fagerstr(o)m test for nicotine dependence (FTND), smoking quantity (SQ) and the heaviness of smoking index (HSI). All subjects were divided into four groups based on their tobacco use history and the FTND scores. The polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) was performed to find two polymorphisms of CHRNA4 in these subjects.Results The x2 test showed that rs1044396 was significantly associated with smoking initiation (x2=4.65, P=0.031),while both rs1044396 and rs1044397 were significantly associated with nicotine dependence (x2=5.42, P=0.020; x2=758,P=0.005). Furthermore, the T-G (3.9%) haplotype of rs1044396-rs1044397 showed significant association with smoking initiation (x2=6.30, P=0.012) and the C-G haplotype (58.9%) remained positive association with nicotine dependence (x2=8.64, P=0.003) after Bonferroni correction. The C-G haplotype also significantly increased the HSI (P=0.002) and FTND scores (P=0.001) after Bonferroni correction.Conclusion These findings suggest that CHRNA4 may be associated with smoking initiation and the C-G haplotype of rs1044396-rs1044397 might increase the vulnerability to nicotine dependence in Chinese male smokers.

  6. Inhibitory mechanisms and binding site location for serotonin selective reuptake inhibitors on nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Arias, Hugo R; Feuerbach, Dominik; Bhumireddy, Pankaj; Ortells, Marcelo O

    2010-05-01

    Functional and structural approaches were used to examine the inhibitory mechanisms and binding site location for fluoxetine and paroxetine, two serotonin selective reuptake inhibitors, on nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) in different conformational states. The results establish that: (a) fluoxetine and paroxetine inhibit h alpha1beta1 gammadelta AChR-induced Ca(2+) influx with higher potencies than dizocilpine. The potency of fluoxetine is increased approximately 10-fold after longer pre-incubation periods, which is in agreement with the enhancement of [(3)H]cytisine binding to resting but activatable Torpedo AChRs elicited by these antidepressants, (b) fluoxetine and paroxetine inhibit the binding of the phencyclidine analog piperidyl-3,4-(3)H(N)]-(N-(1-(2 thienyl)cyclohexyl)-3,4-piperidine to the desensitized Torpedo AChR with higher affinities compared to the resting AChR, and (c) fluoxetine inhibits [(3)H]dizocilpine binding to the desensitized AChR, suggesting a mutually exclusive interaction. This is supported by our molecular docking results where neutral dizocilpine and fluoxetine and the conformer of protonated fluoxetine with the highest LUDI score interact with the domain between the valine (position 13') and leucine (position 9') rings. Molecular mechanics calculations also evidence electrostatic interactions of protonated fluoxetine at positions 20', 21', and 24'. Protonated dizocilpine bridges these two binding domains by interacting with the valine and outer (position 20') rings. The high proportion of protonated fluoxetine and dizocilpine calculated at physiological pH suggests that the protonated drugs can be attracted to the channel mouth before binding deeper within the AChR ion channel between the leucine and valine rings, a domain shared with phencyclidine, finally blocking ion flux and inducing AChR desensitization. PMID:20079457

  7. Interaction of ibogaine with human α3β4-nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in different conformational states

    Arias, Hugo R.; Rosenberg, Avraham; Targowska-Duda, Katarzyna M.; Feuerbach, Dominik; Yuan, Xiao Juan; Jozwiak, Krzysztof; Moaddel, Ruin; Wainer, Irving W.

    2015-01-01

    The interaction of ibogaine and phencyclidine (PCP) with human (h) α3β4-nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) in different conformational states was determined by functional and structural approaches including, radioligand binding assays, Ca2+ influx detections, and thermodynamic and kinetics measurements. The results established that (a) ibogaine inhibits (±)-epibatidine-induced Ca2+ influx in hα3β4 AChRs with ~9-fold higher potency than that for PCP, (b) [3H]ibogaine binds to a single site in the hα3β4 AChR ion channel with relatively high affinity (Kd = 0.46 ± 0.06 µM), and ibogaine inhibits [3H]ibogaine binding to the desensitized hα3β4 AChR with slightly higher affinity compared to the resting AChR. This is explained by a slower dissociation rate from the desensitized ion channel compared to the resting ion channel, and (c) PCP inhibits [3H]ibogaine binding to the hα3β4 AChR, suggesting overlapping sites. The experimental results correlate with the docking simulations suggesting that ibogaine and PCP interact with a binding domain located between the serine (position 6′) and valine/phenylalanine (position 13′) rings. This interaction is mediated mainly by van der Waals contacts, which is in agreement with the observed enthalpic contribution determined by non-linear chromatography. However, the calculated entropic contribution also indicates local conformational changes. Collectively our data suggest that ibogaine and PCP bind to overlapping sites located between the serine and valine/phenylalanine rings, to finally block the AChR ion channel, and in the case of ibogaine, to probably maintain the AChR in the desensitized state for longer time. PMID:20684041

  8. Functional and structural interaction of (-)-reboxetine with the human α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor.

    Arias, Hugo R; Fedorov, Nikolai B; Benson, Lisa C; Lippiello, Patrick M; Gatto, Greg J; Feuerbach, Dominik; Ortells, Marcelo O

    2013-01-01

    The interaction of the selective norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (-)-reboxetine with the human α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) in different conformational states was studied by several functional and structural approaches. Patch-clamp and Ca(2+)-influx results indicate that (-)-reboxetine does not activate hα4β2 nAChRs via interaction with the orthosteric sites, but inhibits agonist-induced hα4β2 activation by a noncompetitive mechanism. Consistently, the results from the electrophysiology-based functional approach suggest that (-)-reboxetine may act via open channel block; therefore, it is capable of producing a use-dependent type of inhibition of the hα4β2 nAChR function. We tested whether (-)-reboxetine binds to the luminal [(3)H]imipramine site. The results indicate that, although (-)-reboxetine binds with low affinity to this site, it discriminates between the resting and desensitized hα4β2 nAChR ion channels. Patch-clamp results also indicate that (-)-reboxetine progressively inhibits the hα4β2 nAChR with two-fold higher potency at the end of one-second application of agonist, compared with the peak current. The molecular docking studies show that (-)-reboxetine blocks the ion channel at the level of the imipramine locus, between M2 rings 6' and 14'. In addition, we found a (-)-reboxetine conformer that docks in the helix bundle of the α4 subunit, near the middle region. According to molecular dynamics simulations, (-)-reboxetine binding is stable for both sites, albeit less stable than imipramine. The interaction of these drugs with the helix bundle might alter allostericaly the functionality of the channel. In conclusion, the clinical action of (-)-reboxetine may be produced (at least partially) by its inhibitory action on hα4β2 nAChRs. PMID:23010362

  9. Clinical significance of detection of antibodies to fetal and adult acetylcholine receptors in myasthenia gravis

    Qi-Guang Shi; Zhi-Hong Wang; Xiao-Wei Ma; Da-Qi Zhang; Chun-Sheng Yang; Fu-Dong Shi; Li Yang

    2012-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the frequency,distribution and clinical significance of the antibodies to the fetal and/or adult acetylcholine receptor (AChR) in patients with myasthenia gravis (MG).Methods AChR antibodies were detected by cell-based assay in the serum of ocular MG (OMG) (n =90) and generalized MG (GMG) patients (n =110).The fetaltype (2α∶ β∶ γ∶ δ) and adult-type (2α∶ β∶ ε∶ δ) AChR were used as antigens,and their relevance to disease presentation was assessed.Results The overall frequencies of anti-adult and anti-fetal AChR antibodies were similar in all 200 patients examined,with 14 having serum specific to the AChR-γ subunit,and 22 to the AChR-ε subunit.The overall sensitivity when using the fetal and adult AChR antibodies was higher than that when using the fetal AChR antibody only (P =0.015).Compared with OMG patients,the mean age at disease onset and the positive ratio of antibodies to both isoforms of the AChR were significantly higher in patients who subsequently progressed to GMG.Older patients and patients with both anti-fetal and anti-adult AChR antibodies had a greater risk for developing generalized disease [odds ratio (OR),1.03;95% confidence interval (CI),1.01-1.06 and OR,5.09;95% CI,2.23-11.62].Conclusion Using both fetal-and adulttype AChRs as the antigens may be more sensitive than using either subtype.Patients with serum specific to both isoforms are at a greater risk of progressing to GMG.Patients with disease onset at an advanced age appear to have a higher frequency of GMG conversion.

  10. The Oxytocin-Oxytocin Receptor System and Its Antagonists as Tocolytic Agents

    Nikolaos Vrachnis

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxytocin, a hormone involved in numerous physiologic processes, plays a central role in the mechanisms of parturition and lactation. It acts through its receptor, which belongs to the G-protein-coupled receptor superfamily, while Gq/phospholipase C (PLC/inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate (InsP3 is the main pathway via which it exerts its action in the myometrium. Changes in receptor levels, receptor desensitization, and locally produced oxytocin are factors that influence the effect of oxytocin on uterine contractility in labor. Activation of oxytocin receptor causes myometrial contractions by increasing intracellular Ca+2 and production of prostaglandins. Since oxytocin induces contractions, the inhibition of its action has been a target in the management of preterm labor. Atosiban is today the only oxytocin receptor antagonist that is available as a tocolytic. However, the quest for oxytocin receptor antagonists with a better pharmacological profile has led to the synthesis of peptide and nonpeptide molecules such as barusiban, retosiban, L-368,899, and SSR-126768A. Many of these oxytocin receptor antagonists are used only as pharmacological tools, while others have tocolytic action. In this paper, we summarize the action of oxytocin and its receptor and we present an overview of the clinical and experimental data of oxytocin antagonists and their tocolytic action.

  11. THE CANNABINOID RECEPTOR ANTAGONIST AM251 INCREASES PARAOXON AND CHLORPYRIFOS OXON TOXICITY IN RATS

    Liu, Jing; Pope, Carey

    2014-01-01

    Organophosphorus anticholinesterases (OPs) elicit acute toxicity by inhibiting acetylcholinesterase (AChE), leading to acetylcholine accumulation and overstimulation of cholinergic receptors. Endocannabinoids (eCBs, e.g., arachidonoyl ethanolamide [AEA] and 2-arachidonoyl glycerol [2-AG]) are neuromodulators that regulate neurotransmission by reducing neurotransmitter release. The eCBs are degraded by the enzymes fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH, primarily involved in hydrolysis of AEA) and m...

  12. The angiotensin II type 1 receptor antagonist Losartan binds and activates bradykinin B2 receptor signaling

    Bonde, Marie Mi; Olsen, Kristine Boisen; Erikstrup, Niels;

    2011-01-01

    The angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) blocker (ARB) Losartan has cardioprotective effects during ischemia-reperfusion injury and inhibits reperfusion arrhythmias -effects that go beyond the benefits of lowering blood pressure. The renin-angiotensin and kallikrein-kinin systems are intricately...... connected and some of the cardioprotective effects of Losartan are abolished by blocking the bradykinin B2 receptor (B2R) signaling. In this study, we investigated the ability of six clinically available ARBs to specifically bind and activate the B2R. First, we investigated their ability to activate...... phosphoinositide (PI) hydrolysis in COS-7 cells transiently expressing the B2R. We found that only Losartan activated the B2R, working as a partial agonist compared to the endogenous ligand bradykinin. This effect was blocked by the B2R antagonist HOE 140. A competitive binding analysis revealed that Losartan does...

  13. “Warming yang and invigorating qi” acupuncture alters acetylcholine receptor expression in the neuromuscular junction of rats with experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis

    Huang, Hai-peng; Pan, Hong; Wang, Hong-feng

    2016-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis is an autoimmune disorder in which antibodies have been shown to form against the nicotinic acetylcholine nicotinic postsynaptic receptors located at the neuromuscular junction. “Warming yang and invigorating qi” acupuncture treatment has been shown to reduce serum inflammatory cytokine expression and increase transforming growth factor beta expression in rats with experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis. However, few studies have addressed the effects of this type of acupuncture on the acetylcholine receptors at the neuromuscular junction. Here, we used confocal laser scanning microscopy to examine the area and density of immunoreactivity for an antibody to the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor at the neuromuscular junction in the phrenic nerve of rats with experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis following “warming yang and invigorating qi” acupuncture therapy. Needles were inserted at acupressure points Shousanli (LI10), Zusanli (ST36), Pishu (BL20), and Shenshu (BL23) once daily for 7 consecutive days. The treatment was repeated after 1 day of rest. We found that area and the integrated optical density of the immunoreactivity for the acetylcholine receptor at the neuromuscular junction of the phrenic nerve was significantly increased following acupuncture treatment. This outcome of the acupuncture therapy was similar to that of the cholinesterase inhibitor pyridostigmine bromide. These findings suggest that “warming yang and invigorating qi” acupuncture treatment increases acetylcholine receptor expression at the neuromuscular junction in a rat model of autoimmune myasthenia gravis. PMID:27127487

  14. "Warming yang and invigorating qi" acupuncture alters acetylcholine receptor expression in the neuromuscular junction of rats with experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis.

    Huang, Hai-Peng; Pan, Hong; Wang, Hong-Feng

    2016-03-01

    Myasthenia gravis is an autoimmune disorder in which antibodies have been shown to form against the nicotinic acetylcholine nicotinic postsynaptic receptors located at the neuromuscular junction. "Warming yang and invigorating qi" acupuncture treatment has been shown to reduce serum inflammatory cytokine expression and increase transforming growth factor beta expression in rats with experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis. However, few studies have addressed the effects of this type of acupuncture on the acetylcholine receptors at the neuromuscular junction. Here, we used confocal laser scanning microscopy to examine the area and density of immunoreactivity for an antibody to the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor at the neuromuscular junction in the phrenic nerve of rats with experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis following "warming yang and invigorating qi" acupuncture therapy. Needles were inserted at acupressure points Shousanli (LI10), Zusanli (ST36), Pishu (BL20), and Shenshu (BL23) once daily for 7 consecutive days. The treatment was repeated after 1 day of rest. We found that area and the integrated optical density of the immunoreactivity for the acetylcholine receptor at the neuromuscular junction of the phrenic nerve was significantly increased following acupuncture treatment. This outcome of the acupuncture therapy was similar to that of the cholinesterase inhibitor pyridostigmine bromide. These findings suggest that "warming yang and invigorating qi" acupuncture treatment increases acetylcholine receptor expression at the neuromuscular junction in a rat model of autoimmune myasthenia gravis. PMID:27127487

  15. "Warming yang and invigorating qi" acupuncture alters acetylcholine receptor expression in the neuromuscular junction of rats with experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis

    Hai-peng Huang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Myasthenia gravis is an autoimmune disorder in which antibodies have been shown to form against the nicotinic acetylcholine nicotinic postsynaptic receptors located at the neuromuscular junction. "Warming yang and invigorating qi" acupuncture treatment has been shown to reduce serum inflammatory cytokine expression and increase transforming growth factor beta expression in rats with experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis. However, few studies have addressed the effects of this type of acupuncture on the acetylcholine receptors at the neuromuscular junction. Here, we used confocal laser scanning microscopy to examine the area and density of immunoreactivity for an antibody to the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor at the neuromuscular junction in the phrenic nerve of rats with experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis following "warming yang and invigorating qi" acupuncture therapy. Needles were inserted at acupressure points Shousanli (LI10, Zusanli (ST36, Pishu (BL20, and Shenshu (BL23 once daily for 7 consecutive days. The treatment was repeated after 1 day of rest. We found that area and the integrated optical density of the immunoreactivity for the acetylcholine receptor at the neuromuscular junction of the phrenic nerve was significantly increased following acupuncture treatment. This outcome of the acupuncture therapy was similar to that of the cholinesterase inhibitor pyridostigmine bromide. These findings suggest that "warming yang and invigorating qi" acupuncture treatment increases acetylcholine receptor expression at the neuromuscular junction in a rat model of autoimmune myasthenia gravis.

  16. The α4β2 nicotine acetylcholine receptor agonist ispronicline induces c-Fos expression in selective regions of the rat forebrain

    Jacobsen, Julie; Hansen, Henrik H; Kiss, Alexander;

    2012-01-01

    The dominant nicotine acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) subtype in the brain is the pentameric receptor containing both α4 and β2 subunits (α4β2). Due to the lack of selective agonists it has not been ruled out what neuronal circuits that are stimulated after systemic administration with nicotine. We...

  17. Blockade of Cocaine or σ Receptor Agonist Self Administration by Subtype-Selective σ Receptor Antagonists.

    Katz, Jonathan L; Hiranita, Takato; Kopajtic, Theresa A; Rice, Kenner C; Mesangeau, Christophe; Narayanan, Sanju; Abdelazeem, Ahmed H; McCurdy, Christopher R

    2016-07-01

    The identification of sigma receptor (σR) subtypes has been based on radioligand binding and, despite progress with σ1R cellular function, less is known about σR subtype functions in vivo. Recent findings that cocaine self administration experience will trigger σR agonist self administration was used in this study to assess the in vivo receptor subtype specificity of the agonists (+)-pentazocine, PRE-084 [2-(4-morpholinethyl) 1-phenylcyclohexanecarboxylate hydrochloride], and 1,3-di-o-tolylguanidine (DTG) and several novel putative σR antagonists. Radioligand binding studies determined in vitro σR selectivity of the novel compounds, which were subsequently studied for self administration and antagonism of cocaine, (+)-pentazocine, PRE-084, or DTG self administration. Across the dose ranges studied, none of the novel compounds were self administered, nor did they alter cocaine self administration. All compounds blocked DTG self administration, with a subset also blocking (+)-pentazocine and PRE-084 self administration. The most selective of the compounds in binding σ1Rs blocked cocaine self administration when combined with a dopamine transport inhibitor, either methylphenidate or nomifensine. These drug combinations did not decrease rates of responding maintained by food reinforcement. In contrast, the most selective of the compounds in binding σ2Rs had no effect on cocaine self administration in combination with either dopamine transport inhibitor. Thus, these results identify subtype-specific in vivo antagonists, and the utility of σR agonist substitution for cocaine self administration as an assay capable of distinguishing σR subtype selectivity in vivo. These results further suggest that effectiveness of dual σR antagonism and dopamine transport inhibition in blocking cocaine self administration is specific for σ1Rs and further support this dual targeting approach to development of cocaine antagonists. PMID:27189970

  18. The nicotinic acetylcholine receptor gene family of the silkworm, Bombyx mori

    Zhang Chuan-Xi

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs mediate fast synaptic cholinergic transmission in the insect central nervous system. The insect nAChR is the molecular target of a class of insecticides, neonicotinoids. Like mammalian nAChRs, insect nAChRs are considered to be made up of five subunits, coded by homologous genes belonging to the same family. The nAChR subunit genes of Drosophila melanogaster, Apis mellifera and Anopheles gambiae have been cloned previously based on their genome sequences. The silkworm Bombyx mori is a model insect of Lepidoptera, among which are many agricultural pests. Identification and characterization of B. mori nAChR genes could provide valuable basic information for this important family of receptor genes and for the study of the molecular mechanisms of neonicotinoid action and resistance. Results We searched the genome sequence database of B. mori with the fruit fly and honeybee nAChRs by tBlastn and cloned all putative silkworm nAChR cDNAs by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR and rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE methods. B. mori appears to have the largest known insect nAChR gene family to date, including nine α-type subunits and three β-type subunits. The silkworm possesses three genes having low identity with others, including one α and two β subunits, α9, β2 and β3. Like the fruit fly and honeybee counterparts, silkworm nAChR gene α6 has RNA-editing sites, and α4, α6 and α8 undergo alternative splicing. In particular, alternative exon 7 of Bmα8 may have arisen from a recent duplication event. Truncated transcripts were found for Bmα4 and Bmα5. Conclusion B. mori possesses a largest known insect nAChR gene family characterized to date, including nine α-type subunits and three β-type subunits. RNA-editing, alternative splicing and truncated transcripts were found in several subunit genes, which might enhance the diversity of the gene family.

  19. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptor induces lateral segregation of phosphatidic acid and phosphatidylcholine in reconstituted membranes.

    Wenz, Jorge J; Barrantes, Francisco J

    2005-01-11

    Purified nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR) protein was reconstituted into synthetic lipid membranes having known effects on receptor function in the presence and absence of cholesterol (Chol). The phase behavior of a lipid system (DPPC/DOPC) possessing a known lipid phase profile and favoring nonfunctional, desensitized AChR was compared with that of a lipid system (POPA/POPC) containing the anionic phospholipid phosphatidic acid (PA), which stabilizes the functional resting form of the AChR. Fluorescence quenching of diphenylhexatriene (DPH) extrinsic fluorescence and AChR intrinsic fluorescence by a nitroxide spin-labeled phospholipid showed that the AChR diminishes the degree of DPH quenching and promotes DPPC lateral segregation into an ordered lipid domain, an effect that was potentiated by Chol. Fluorescence anisotropy of the probe DPH increased in the presence of AChR or Chol and also made apparent shifts to higher values in the transition temperature of the lipid system in the presence of Chol and/or AChR. The values were highest when both Chol and AChR were present, further reinforcing the view that their effect on lipid segregation is additive. These results can be accounted for by the increase in the size of quencher-free, ordered lipid domains induced by AChR and/or Chol. Pyrene phosphatidylcholine (PyPC) excimer (E) formation was strongly reduced owing to the restricted diffusion of the probe induced by the AChR protein. The analysis of Forster energy transfer (FRET) from the protein to DPH further indicates that AChR partitions preferentially into these ordered lipid microdomains, enriched in saturated lipid (DPPC or POPA), which segregate from liquid phase-enriched DOPC or POPC domains. Taken together, the results suggest that the AChR organizes its immediate microenvironment in the form of microdomains with higher lateral packing density and rigidity. The relative size of such microdomains depends not only on the phospholipid polar headgroup

  20. Structural and functional changes induced in the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor by membrane phospholipids.

    Fernández-Carvajal, Asia M; Encinar, José A; Poveda, José Antonio; de Juan, Entilio; Martínez-Pinna, Juan; Ivorra, Isabel; Ferragut, José Antonio; Morales, Andrés; González-Ros, José Manuel

    2006-01-01

    Ligand-gated ion channels (LGICs) constitute an important family of complex membrane proteins acting as receptors for neurotransmitters (Barnard, 1992; Ortells and Lunt, 1995). The nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) from Torpedo is the most extensively studied member of the LGIC family and consists of a pentameric transmembrane glycoprotein composed of four different polypeptide subunits (alpha, beta, gamma, and delta) in a 2:1:1:1 stoichiometry (Galzi and Changeux, 1995; Hucho et al., 1996) that are arranged pseudosymmetrically around a central cation-selective ion channel. Conformational transitions, from the closed (nonconducting), to agonist-induced open (ion-conducting), to desensitized (nonconducting) states, are critical for functioning of the nAChR (Karlin, 2002). The ability of the nAChR to undergo these transitions is profoundly influenced by the lipid composition of the bilayer (Barrantes, 2004). Despite existing information on lipid dependence of AChR function, no satisfactory explanation has been given on the molecular events by which specific lipids exert such effects on the activity of an integral membrane protein. To date, several hypotheses have been entertained, including (1) indirect effects of lipids through the alteration of properties of the bilayer, such as fluidity (an optimal fluidity hypothesis [Fong and McNamee, 1986]) or membrane curvature and lateral pressure (Cantor, 1997; de Kruijff, 1997), or (2) direct effects through binding of lipids to defined sites on the transmembrane portion of the protein (Jones and McNamee, 1988; Blanton and Wang, 1990; Fernández et al., 1993; Fernández-Ballester et al., 1994), which has led to the postulation of a possible role of certain lipids as peculiar allosteric ligands of the protein. In this paper we have reconstituted purified AChRs from Torpedo into complex multicomponent lipid vesicles in which the phospholipid composition has been systematically altered. Stopped-flow rapid kinetics of

  1. Design and Synthesis of Benzimidazoles As Novel Corticotropin-Releasing Factor 1 Receptor Antagonists.

    Mochizuki, Michiyo; Kori, Masakuni; Kobayashi, Katsumi; Yano, Takahiko; Sako, Yuu; Tanaka, Maiko; Kanzaki, Naoyuki; Gyorkos, Albert C; Corrette, Christopher P; Cho, Suk Young; Pratt, Scott A; Aso, Kazuyoshi

    2016-03-24

    Benzazole derivatives with a flexible aryl group bonded through a one-atom linker as a new scaffold for a corticotropin-releasing factor 1 (CRF1) receptor antagonist were designed, synthesized, and evaluated. We expected that structural diversity could be expanded beyond that of reported CRF1 receptor antagonists. In a structure-activity relationship study, 4-chloro-N(2)-(4-chloro-2-methoxy-6-methylphenyl)-1-methyl-N(7),N(7)-dipropyl-1H-benzimidazole-2,7-diamine 29g had the most potent binding activity against a human CRF1 receptor and the antagonistic activity (IC50 = 9.5 and 88 nM, respectively) without concerns regarding cytotoxicity at 30 μM. Potent CRF1 receptor-binding activity in brain in an ex vivo test and suppression of stress-induced activation of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) axis were also observed at 138 μmol/kg of compound 29g after oral administration in mice. Thus, the newly designed benzimidazole 29g showed in vivo CRF1 receptor antagonistic activity and good brain penetration, indicating that it is a promising lead for CRF1 receptor antagonist drug discovery research. PMID:26901666

  2. Effect of tissue-specific acetylcholinesterase inhibitor C-547 on α3β4 and αβεδ acetylcholine receptors in COS cells.

    Lindovský, Jiří; Petrov, Konstantin; Krůšek, Jan; Reznik, Vladimir S; Nikolsky, Eugeny E; Vyskočil, František

    2012-08-01

    The C-547 is the most effective muscle and tissue-specific anticholinesterase among alkylammonium derivatives of 6-methyluracil (ADEMS) acting in nanomolar concentrations on locomotor muscles but not on respiratory muscles, smooth muscles and heart and brain acetylcholine esterases (AChE). When applied systematically it could influence peripheral acetylcholine receptors. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of C-547 on rat α3β4 (ganglionic type) and αβεδ (muscle type) nicotinic receptors expressed in COS cells. Currents evoked by rapid application of acetylcholine or nicotine were recorded in whole-cell mode by electrophysiological patch-clamp technique 2-4 days after cell transfection by plasmids coding the α3β4 or αβεδ combination of receptor subunits. In cells sensitive to acetylcholine, the application of C-547 evoked no responses. When acetylcholine was applied during an already running application of C-547, acetylcholine responses were only inhibited at concentrations higher than 10(-7)M. This inhibition is not voltage-dependent, but is accompanied by an increased rate of desensitization. Thus in both types of receptors, effective doses are approximately 100 times higher than those inhibiting AChE in leg muscles and similar to those inhibiting respiratory diaphragm muscles and external intercostal muscles. These observations show that C-547 can be considered for symptomatic treatment of myasthenia gravis and other congenital myasthenic syndromes as an inhibitor of AChE in leg muscles at concentrations much lower than those inhibiting muscle and ganglion types of acetylcholine receptors. PMID:22634638

  3. No effect of angiotensin II AT(2)-receptor antagonist PD 123319 on cerebral blood flow autoregulation

    Estrup, T M; Paulson, O B; Strandgaard, S

    2001-01-01

    Blockade of the renin-angiotensin system with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACE-I) or angiotensin AT1-receptor antagonists shift the limits of autoregulation of cerebral blood flow (CBF) towards lower blood pressure (BP). The role of AT2-receptors in the regulation of the cerebral cir...

  4. Calcium-dependent effect of the thymic polypeptide thymopoietin on the desensitization of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor

    The effects of the thymic polypeptide thymopoietin (Tpo) on the properties of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AcChoR) were investigated by patch clamp techniques on mouse C2 myotubes and by biochemical assays on AcChoR-rich membrane fragments purified from the Torpedo marmorata electric organ. At high concentrations (> 100 nM), Tpo inhibits the binding of cholinergic agonists to the AcChoR in a Ca2+-insensitive manner. At lower concentrations (2 nM), Tpo applied on C2 myotubes simultaneously with nondesensitizing concentrations of acetylcholine results in the appearance of long closed times separating groups of openings. This effect depends on the presence of Ca2+ in the external medium. Outside-out recordings, performed with various concentrations of EGTA in the intracellular medium, suggest that Ca2+ acts on the cytoplasmic face of the membrane after entry through acetylcholine-activated channels. Parallel studies with T. marmorata AcChoR-rich membranes show that in the presence of Ca2+ Tpo causes a decrease in the apparent equilibrium dissociation constant of the noncompetitive blocker [3H]phencyclidine, enhances, at low concentrations, the binding of [3H]acetylcholine, and also alters the binding kinetics of the fluorescent agonist 6-(5-dimethylamino-1-naphthalenesulfonamido)-n-hexanoic acid β-(N-trimethylammonium bromide) ethyl ester to the AcChoR. It was concluded that, in the presence of Ca2+, Tpo displaces the conformational equilibrium of the AcChoR towards a high-affinity desensitized state and increases the transition rate towards the same state

  5. Comparison of the antagonistic effects of different angiotensin II receptor blockers in human coronary arteries

    Pantev, Emil; Stenman, Emelie; Wackenfors, Angelica;

    2002-01-01

    undertaken to evaluate the inhibitory effects of ARBs on vasoconstriction in humans. METHODS: Vasomotor tone was analyzed in endothelium denuded, human coronary artery (HCA) segments. Ang II type 1 (AT(1)) and type 2 (AT(2)) receptor mRNA expression was examined by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain...... presence of 100 nM losartan elicited a depression of the Ang II response to 32%. Its active metabolite, EXP 3174 (1 nM),abolished the Ang II contraction. The AT(1) receptor antagonists had the following order of blocking effect; EXP 3174 > candesartan = valsartan > losartan. The AT(2) receptor antagonist...

  6. Synthesis and Biological Evaluation of Substituted Desloratadines as Potent Arginine Vasopressin V2 Receptor Antagonists

    Shuai Mu

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Twenty-one non-peptide substituted desloratadine class compounds were synthesized as novel arginine vasopressin receptor antagonists from desloratadine via successive acylation, reduction and acylation reactions. Their structures were characterized by 1H-NMR and HRMS, their biological activity was evaluated by in vitro and in vivo studies. The in vitro binding assay and cAMP accumulation assay indicated that these compounds are potent selective V2 receptor antagonists. Among them compounds 1n, 1t and 1v exhibited both high affinity and promising selectivity for V2 receptors. The in vivo diuretic assay demonstrated that 1t presented remarkable diuretic activity. In conclusion, 1t is a potent novel AVP V2 receptor antagonist candidate.

  7. Acetylcholine sensitivity of biphasic Ca2+ mobilization induced by nicotinic receptor activation at the mouse skeletal muscle endplate

    Dezaki, Katsuya; Kimura, Ikuko

    1998-01-01

    Acetylcholine (ACh) was locally applied onto the endplate region in a mouse phrenic nerve-diaphragm muscle preparation to measure intracellular free calcium ([Ca2+]i) entry through nicotinic ACh receptors (AChRs) by use of Ca2+-aequorin luminescence.ACh (0.1–3 mM, 20 μl) elicited biphasic elevation of [Ca2+]i (fast and slow Ca2+ mobilization) in muscle cells. The peak amplitude of the slow Ca2+ mobilization (not accompanied by twitch tension) was concentration-dependently increased by ACh, wh...

  8. Expression of the α-bungarotoxin binding site of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor by Escherichia coli transformants

    Restriction fragments of DNA derived from a cDNA clone of the α subunit of the acetylcholine receptor were subcloned in Escherichia coli by using the trpE fusion vector, pATH2. Transformants expressing the amino acid sequences 166-315 or 166-200 are shown to produce a chimeric protein that bound α-bungarotoxin. Moreover, it is shown that sufficient amounts of toxin-binding proteins can be generated by individual colonies of bacteria. This provides a new approach for gene selection via functional expression-i.e., ligand overlays of colony blots

  9. The regulation of M1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor desensitization by synaptic activity in cultured hippocampal neurons1

    Willets, Jonathon M.; Nelson, Carl P.; Nahorski, Stefan R; Challiss, R.A. John

    2007-01-01

    To better understand metabotropic/ionotropic integration in neurons we have examined the regulation of M1 muscarinic acetylcholine (mACh) receptor signalling in mature (> 14 days in vitro), synaptically-active hippocampal neurons in culture. Using a protocol where neurons are exposed to an EC50 concentration of the muscarinic agonist methacholine (MCh) prior to (R1), and following (R2) a desensitizing pulse of a high concentration of this agonist, we have found that the reduction in M1 mACh r...

  10. Structure and transmembrane nature of the acetylcholine receptor in amphibian skeletal muscle as revealed by cross-reacting monoclonal antibodies

    1984-01-01

    A collection of 126 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) made against acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) from the electric organs of Torpedo californica or Electrophorus electricus was tested for cross-reactivity with AChRs in cryostat sections of skeletal muscle from Rana pipiens and Xenopus laevis by indirect immunofluorescence. 49 mAbs (39%) cross- reacted with AChRs from Rana, and 25 mAbs (20%) cross-reacted with AChRs from Xenopus. mAbs specific for each of the four subunits of electric organ AChR ...

  11. Wash-resistantly bound xanomeline inhibits acetylcholine release by persistent activation of presynaptic M2 and M4 muscarinic receptors

    Machová, Eva; Jakubík, Jan; El-Fakahany, E. E.; Doležal, Vladimír

    Praha : 2.Lékařská fakulta UK, 2007. s. 55-55. [Vědecká konference 2007 - věda, sport a rock ´n´roll. 25.04.2007-26.04.2007, Praha] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA305/05/0452; GA MŠk(CZ) LC554 Grant ostatní: NIH(US) NS25732 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : spo2 * xanomeline * acetylcholine * presynaptic muscarinic receptors Subject RIV: FH - Neurology

  12. Carbamoylcholine analogs as nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonists--structural modifications of 3-(dimethylamino)butyl dimethylcarbamate (DMABC)

    Hansen, Camilla Petrycer; Jensen, Anders Asbjørn; Balle, Thomas;

    2009-01-01

    Compounds based on the 3-(dimethylamino)butyl dimethylcarbamate (DMABC) scaffold were synthesized and pharmacologically characterized at the alpha(4)beta(2), alpha(3)beta(4,) alpha(4)beta(4) and alpha(7) neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). The carbamate functionality and a small...... hydrophobic substituent in the C-3 position were found to be vital for the binding affinity to the nAChRs, whereas the carbamate nitrogen substituents were important for nAChR subtype selectivity. Finally, the compounds were found to be agonists at the alpha(3)beta(4) nAChR....

  13. Bupropion-induced inhibition of α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors expressed in heterologous cells and neurons from dorsal raphe nucleus and hippocampus.

    Vázquez-Gómez, Elizabeth; Arias, Hugo R; Feuerbach, Dominik; Miranda-Morales, Marcela; Mihailescu, Stefan; Targowska-Duda, Katarzyna M; Jozwiak, Krzysztof; García-Colunga, Jesús

    2014-10-01

    The pharmacological activity of bupropion was compared between α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors expressed in heterologous cells and hippocampal and dorsal raphe nucleus neurons. The inhibitory activity of bupropion was studied on GH3-α7 cells by Ca2+ influx, as well as on neurons from the dorsal raphe nucleus and interneurons from the stratum radiatum of the hippocampal CA1 region by using a whole-cell voltage-clamp technique. In addition, the interaction of bupropion with the α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor was determined by [3H]imipramine competition binding assays and molecular docking. The fast component of acetylcholine- and choline-induced currents from both brain regions was inhibited by methyllycaconitine, indicating the participation of α7-containing nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. Choline-induced currents in hippocampal interneurons were partially inhibited by 10 µM bupropion, a concentration that could be reached in the brain during clinical administration. Additionally, both agonist-induced currents were reversibly inhibited by bupropion at concentrations that coincide with its inhibitory potency (IC50=54 µM) and binding affinity (Ki=63 µM) for α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors from heterologous cells. The [3H]imipramine competition binding and molecular docking results support a luminal location for the bupropion binding site(s). This study may help to understand the mechanisms of actions of bupropion at neuronal and molecular levels related with its therapeutic actions on depression and for smoking cessation. PMID:25016090

  14. 5-HT2B Receptor Antagonists Inhibit Fibrosis and Protect from RV Heart Failure

    Wiebke Janssen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The serotonin (5-HT pathway was shown to play a role in pulmonary hypertension (PH, but its functions in right ventricular failure (RVF remain poorly understood. The aim of the current study was to investigate the effects of Terguride (5-HT2A and 2B receptor antagonist or SB204741 (5-HT2B receptor antagonist on right heart function and structure upon pulmonary artery banding (PAB in mice. Methods. Seven days after PAB, mice were treated for 14 days with Terguride (0.2 mg/kg bid or SB204741 (5 mg/kg day. Right heart function and remodeling were assessed by right heart catheterization, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, and histomorphometric methods. Total secreted collagen content was determined in mouse cardiac fibroblasts isolated from RV tissues. Results. Chronic treatment with Terguride or SB204741 reduced right ventricular fibrosis and showed improved heart function in mice after PAB. Moreover, 5-HT2B receptor antagonists diminished TGF-beta1 induced collagen synthesis of RV cardiac fibroblasts in vitro. Conclusion. 5-HT2B receptor antagonists reduce collagen deposition, thereby inhibiting right ventricular fibrosis. Chronic treatment prevented the development and progression of pressure overload-induced RVF in mice. Thus, 5-HT2B receptor antagonists represent a valuable novel therapeutic approach for RVF.

  15. Pathophysiology of the cysteinyl leukotrienes and effects of leukotriene receptor antagonists in asthma.

    Bisgaard, H

    2001-01-01

    Cysteinyl leukotrienes, synthesized de novo from cell membrane phospholipids, are proinflammatory mediators that play an important role in the pathophysiology of asthma. These mediators are among the most potent of bronchoconstrictors and cause vasodilation, increased microvascular permeability, exudation of macromolecules and edema. The cysteinyl leukotrienes also have potent chemoattractant properties for eosinophils, causing an influx of eosinophils into the airway mucosa, which further fuels the inflammatory process. In addition, the cysteinyl leukotrienes are potent secretagogues and reduce ciliary motility, which may hinder mucociliary clearance. Asthmatic patients demonstrate increased production of cysteinyl leukotrienes during naturally occurring asthma and acute asthma attacks as well as after allergen and exercise challenge. The leukotriene receptor antagonists montelukast, zafirlukast and pranlukast inhibit bronchoconstriction in asthmatic patients undergoing allergen, exercise, cold air or aspirin challenge. They attenuate the hallmarks of asthmatic inflammation, including eosinophilia in the airway mucosa and peripheral blood. Moreover, exhaled nitric oxide concentrations, another correlate of airway inflammation, are decreased during montelukast treatment in children. Cysteinyl leukotriene synthesis is not blocked by corticosteroid therapy. This important observation suggests that the leukotriene receptor antagonists represent a novel therapeutic approach, one that may provide benefits that are additive with corticosteroid therapy. This supposition is supported by clinical observations that treatment with leukotriene receptor antagonists significantly improve asthma control when added to inhaled corticosteroid therapy. Moreover, the bronchodilator properties of the leukotriene receptor antagonists are additive with those of beta agonists. These data provide strong support for the use of leukotriene receptor antagonists for treating asthma. PMID

  16. Novel dimeric DOTA-coupled peptidic Y1-receptor antagonists for targeting of neuropeptide Y receptor-expressing cancers

    Chatenet, David; Cescato, Renzo; Waser, Beatrice; Erchegyi, Judit; Jean E Rivier; Reubi, Jean Claude

    2011-01-01

    Background Several peptide hormone receptors were identified that are specifically over-expressed on the cell surface of certain human tumors. For example, high incidence and density of the Y1 subtype of neuropeptide Y (NPY) receptors are found in breast tumors. Recently, we demonstrated that the use of potent radiolabeled somatostatin or bombesin receptor antagonists considerably improved the sensitivity of in vivo imaging when compared to agonists. We report here on the first DOTA-coupled p...

  17. (−) Arctigenin and (+) Pinoresinol Are Antagonists of the Human Thyroid Hormone Receptor β

    Ogungbe, Ifedayo Victor; Crouch, Rebecca A.; Demeritte, Teresa

    2014-01-01

    Lignans are important biologically active dietary polyphenolic compounds. Consumption of foods that are rich in lignans is associated with positive health effects. Using modeling tools to probe the ligand-binding pockets of molecular receptors, we found that lignans have high docking affinity for the human thyroid hormone receptor β. Follow-up experimental results show that lignans (−) arctigenin and (+) pinoresinol are antagonists of the human thyroid hormone receptor β. The modeled complexe...

  18. Agonists, antagonists and modulators of excitatory amino acid receptors in the guinea-pig myenteric plexus.

    Luzzi, S; Zilletti, L.; S.Franchi-Micheli; Gori, A M; Moroni, F

    1988-01-01

    1. The receptors for glutamic acid (L-Glu) present in the guinea-pig myenteric plexus-ileal longitudinal muscle preparation have been studied by measuring the muscle contraction induced by numerous putative endogenous agonists acting at these receptors. Furthermore, the actions of different concentrations of antagonists, glycine, Mg2+ and Ca2+ on the ileal contractions induced by L-Glu have been evaluated. 2. The EC50 values of the most common putative endogenous agonists of these receptors w...

  19. IDENTIFICATION OF VDR ANTAGONISTS AMONG NUCLEAR RECEPTOR LIGANDS USING VIRTUAL SCREENING

    Kelly Teske; Premchendar Nandhikonda; Bogart, Jonathan W.; Belaynesh Feleke; Preetpal Sidhu; Yuan, Nina Y.; Joshua Preston; Robin Goy; Lanlan Han; Silvaggi, Nicholas R; Singh, Rakesh K.; Bikle, Daniel D.; Cook, James M.; Arnold, Leggy A.

    2014-01-01

    Herein, we described the development of two virtual screens to identify new vitamin D receptor (VDR) antagonists among nuclear receptor (NR) ligands. Therefore, a database of 14330 nuclear receptor ligands and their NR affinities was assembled using the online available “Binding Database.” Two different virtual screens were carried out in conjunction with a reported VDR crystal structure applying a stringent and less stringent pharmacophore model to filter docked NR ligand conformations. The ...

  20. Rigidified 2-aminopyrimidines as histamine H4 receptor antagonists: effects of substitution about the rigidifying ring.

    Koenig, John R; Liu, Huaqing; Drizin, Irene; Witte, David G; Carr, Tracy L; Manelli, Arlene M; Milicic, Ivan; Strakhova, Marina I; Miller, Thomas R; Esbenshade, Timothy A; Brioni, Jorge D; Cowart, Marlon

    2010-03-15

    Three novel series of histamine H(4) receptor (H(4)R) antagonists containing the 2-aminopyrimidine motif are reported. The best of these compounds display good in vitro potency in both functional and binding assays. In addition, representative compounds are able to completely block itch responses when dosed ip in a mouse model of H(4)-agonist induced scratching, thus demonstrating their activities as H(4)R antagonists. PMID:20171098

  1. Nitric oxide (NO) and an NMDA receptor antagonist in pentylenetetrazole-induced convulsions

    Jelenković Ankica V.; Jovanović Marina D.; Ninković Milica; Maksimović Milan; Bošković Bogdan

    2003-01-01

    Controversy about proconvulsant and anticonvulsant nitric oxide (NO) effects and the place of oxidative stress in convulsions, are still a matter of research. We investigated the interaction between 2-amino-5-phosphonovaleric acid (APV), a competitive N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist and Nw-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), a nonselective nitric oxide synthase (NOS) antagonist, in pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-induced convulsions. Pentylenetetrazole was applied to adult Wistar...

  2. Growth Hormone Receptor Antagonist Treatment Reduces Exercise Performance in Young Males

    Goto, K.; Doessing, S.; Nielsen, R.H.; Flyvbjerg, A.; Kjaer, M.

    2009-01-01

    Context: The effects of GH on exercise performance remain unclear. Objective: The aim of the study was to examine the effects of GH receptor (GHR) antagonist treatment on exercise performance. Design: Subjects were treated with the GHR antagonist pegvisomant or placebo for 16 d. After the treatment...... period, they exercised to determine exercise performance and hormonal and metabolic responses. Participants: Twenty healthy males participated in the study. Intervention: Subjects were treated with the GHR antagonist (n = 10; 10 mg/d) or placebo (n = 10). After the treatment period, they performed a...

  3. The effect of H 1 and H 2 receptor antagonists on melanogenesis

    Tag S Anbar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Histamine was found to stimulate melanogenesis in cultured human melanocytes specifically mediated by histamine H 2 receptors via protein kinase A activation. Based on this finding, the effect of topically applied H 2 antagonist on UVB-irradiated Guinea pigs′ skin was examined and found to be suppressive on the post-irradiation melanogenesis. Aims: In this study, we tried to explore the role of topically applied H 1 and H 2 receptor antagonists, in inhibition of UVB-induced melanization. Methods: The effect of topically applied H 1 and H 2 receptor antagonists in inhibition of melanization was done clinically and histochemically using Fontana Masson and DOPA reactions compared with placebo. Results: The post-irradiation pigmentation was found to be brownish/black instead of the original light brown color. This color change occurred below the shaved orange-red fur suggesting a switch of melanogenesis from pheomelanin to eumelanin. The induced pigmentation was suppressed by topically applied H 2 antagonist while both H 1 antagonist and vehicle had no effect. The microscopic examination showed that the keratinocytes in the H 2 antagonist-treated areas contained few melanosomes while the nearby dendrites are full of them. Conclusion: H 2 antagonists′ inhibition of UVB-induced pigmentation is not only due to suppression of melanization but also due to a specific action on melanosomes′ transfer.

  4. Functional Characterization of CCHamide and Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptor Signalling in Drosophila melanogaster

    Ren, Guilin Robin

    mutants created with the CRISP/Cas9 technique showed thatCCHamide-2 is probly an orexigenic peptide and also that is an important factor for larvaldevelopmental timing.In mammals, muscarinic acetylcholine signalling is involved in the signal transmission of theparasympathetic nervous system. However...

  5. Mechanisms of the inhibition of endplate acetylcholine receptors by antiseptic chlorhexidine (experiments and models)

    Shaihutdinova, A.R.; Nikolsky, E. E.; Vyskočil, František; Skorinkin, A.I.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 380, č. 6 (2009), s. 551-560. ISSN 0028-1298 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA500110905 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : acetylcholine * endplate currents Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 2.631, year: 2009

  6. Mood and anxiety regulation by nicotinic acetylcholine receptors: A potential pathway to modulate aggression and related behavioral states.

    Picciotto, Marina R; Lewis, Alan S; van Schalkwyk, Gerrit I; Mineur, Yann S

    2015-09-01

    The co-morbidity between smoking and mood disorders is striking. Preclinical and clinical studies of nicotinic effects on mood, anxiety, aggression, and related behaviors, such as irritability and agitation, suggest that smokers may use the nicotine in tobacco products as an attempt to self-medicate symptoms of affective disorders. The role of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) in circuits regulating mood and anxiety is beginning to be elucidated in animal models, but the mechanisms underlying the effects of nicotine on aggression-related behavioral states (ARBS) are still not understood. Clinical trials of nicotine or nicotinic medications for neurological and psychiatric disorders have often found effects of nicotinic medications on ARBS, but few trials have studied these outcomes systematically. Similarly, the increase in ARBS resulting from smoking cessation can be resolved by nicotinic agents, but the effects of nicotinic medications on these types of mental states and behaviors in non-smokers are less well understood. Here we review the literature on the role of nAChRs in regulating mood and anxiety, and subsequently on the closely related construct of ARBS. We suggest avenues for future study to identify how nAChRs and nicotinic agents may play a role in these clinically important areas. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'The Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor: From Molecular Biology to Cognition'. PMID:25582289

  7. Kinetic properties of 'dual' orexin receptor antagonists at OX1R and OX2R orexin receptors.

    Gabrielle Elizabeth Callander

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Orexin receptor antagonists represent attractive targets for the development of drugs for the treatment of insomnia. Both efficacy and safety are crucial in clinical settings and thorough investigations of pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics can predict contributing factors such as duration of action and undesirable effects. To this end, we studied the interactions between various ‘dual’ orexin receptor antagonists and the orexin receptors, OX1R and OX2R, over time using saturation and competition radioligand binding with [3H]-BBAC ((S-N-([1,1'-biphenyl]-2-yl-1-(2-((1-methyl-1H-benzo[d]imidazol-2-ylthioacetylpyrrolidine-2-carboxamide. In addition, the kinetics of these compounds were investigated in cells expressing human, mouse and rat OX1R and OX2R using FLIPR® assays for calcium accumulation. We demonstrate that almorexant reaches equilibrium very slowly at OX2R, whereas SB-649868, suvorexant and filorexant may take hours to reach steady state at both orexin receptors. By contrast, compounds such as BBAC or the selective OX2R antagonist IPSU ((2-((1H-Indol-3-ylmethyl-9-(4-methoxypyrimidin-2-yl-2,9-diazaspiro[5.5]undecan-1-one bind rapidly and reach equilibrium very quickly in both binding and / or functional assays. Overall, the dual antagonists tested here tend to be rather unselective under non-equilibrium conditions and reach equilibrium very slowly. Once equilibrium is reached, each ligand demonstrates a selectivity profile that is however, distinct from the non-equilibrium condition. The slow kinetics of the dual antagonists tested suggest that in vitro receptor occupancy may be longer lasting than would be predicted. This raises questions as to whether pharmacokinetic studies measuring plasma or brain levels of these antagonists are accurate reflections of receptor occupancy in vivo.

  8. Orexin 1 receptor antagonists in compulsive behaviour and anxiety: possible therapeutic use.

    Emilio eMerlo-Pich

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Fifteen years after the discovery of hypocretin/orexin a large body of evidence has been collected supporting its critical role in the modulation of several regulatory physiological functions. While reduced levels of hypocretin/orexin were early on associated with narcolepsy, increased levels have been linked in recent years to pathological states of hypervigilance and, in particular, to insomnia. The filing to FDA of the dual-activity orexin receptor antagonist (DORA suvorexant for the indication of insomnia further corroborates the robustness of such evidences. However, as excessive vigilance is also typical of anxiety and panic episodes, as well as of abstinence and craving in substance misuse disorders, in this review we briefly discuss the evidence supporting the development of hypocretin/orexin receptor 1 (OX1 antagonists for these indications. Experiments using the OX1 antagonist SB-334867 and mutant mice have involved the OX1 receptor in mediating the compulsive reinstatement of drug seeking for ethanol, nicotine, cocaine, cannabinoids and morphine. More recently, data have been generated with the novel selective OX1 antagonists GSK1059865 and ACT-335827 on behavioural and cardiovascular response to stressors and panic-inducing agents in animals. Concluding, while waiting for pharmacologic data to become available in humans, risks and benefits for the development of an OX1 receptor antagonist for Binge Eating and Anxiety Disorders are discussed.

  9. Functional antagonistic properties of clozapine at the 5-HT3 receptor.

    Hermann, B; Wetzel, C H; Pestel, E; Zieglgänsberger, W; Holsboer, F; Rupprecht, R

    1996-08-23

    The atypical neuroleptic clozapine is thought to exert its psychopharmacological actions through a variety of neurotransmitter receptors. It binds preferentially to D4 and 5-HT2 receptors; however, little is known on it's interaction with the 5-HT3 receptor. Using a cell line stably expressing the 5-HT3 receptor, whole-cell voltage-clamp analysis revealed functional antagonistic properties of clozapine at low nanomolar concentrations in view of a binding affinity in the upper nanomolar range. Because the concentration of clozapine required for an interaction with the 5-HT3 receptor can be achieved with therapeutical doses, functional antagonistic properties at this ligand-gated ion channel may contribute to its unique psychopharmacological profile. PMID:8780717

  10. Identification of short-acting κ-opioid receptor antagonists with anxiolytic-like activity.

    Peters, Matthew F; Zacco, Anna; Gordon, John; Maciag, Carla M; Litwin, Linda C; Thompson, Carolann; Schroeder, Patricia; Sygowski, Linda A; Piser, Timothy M; Brugel, Todd A

    2011-07-01

    The κ-opioid receptor plays a central role in mediating the response to stressful life events. Inhibiting κ-opioid receptor signaling is proposed as a mechanism for treating stress-related conditions such as depression and anxiety. Preclinical testing consistently confirms that disruption of κ-opioid signaling is efficacious in animal models of mood disorders. However, concerns about the feasibility of developing antagonists into drugs stem from an unusual pharmacodynamic property of prototypic κ-opioid receptor-selective antagonists; they inhibit receptor signaling for weeks to months after a single dose. Several fundamental questions include - is it possible to identify short-acting antagonists; is long-lasting inhibition necessary for efficacy; and is it safe to develop long-acting antagonists in the clinic. Here, we test representative compounds (AZ-ECPC, AZ-MTAB, and LY-DMPF) from three new chemical series of κ-opioid receptor ligands for long-lasting inhibition. Each compound dose-dependently reversed κ-opioid agonist-induced diuresis. However, unlike the prototypic antagonist, nBNI, which fully inhibited evoked diuresis for at least four weeks, the new compounds showed no inhibition after one week. The two compounds with greater potency and selectivity were tested in prenatally-stressed rats on the elevated plus maze, an exploration-based model of anxiety. Spontaneous exploration of open arms in the elevated plus maze was suppressed by prenatal stress and restored with both compounds. These findings indicate that persistent inhibition is not an inherent property of κ-opioid-selective antagonists and that post-stress dosing with transient inhibitors can be effective in a mood disorder model. This further supports κ-opioid receptor as a promising target for developing novel psychiatric medications. PMID:21539838

  11. Pathophysiology of the cysteinyl leukotrienes and effects of leukotriene receptor antagonists in asthma

    Bisgaard, H

    2001-01-01

    ciliary motility, which may hinder mucociliary clearance. Asthmatic patients demonstrate increased production of cysteinyl leukotrienes during naturally occurring asthma and acute asthma attacks as well as after allergen and exercise challenge. The leukotriene receptor antagonists montelukast, zafirlukast...... provide benefits that are additive with corticosteroid therapy. This supposition is supported by clinical observations that treatment with leukotriene receptor antagonists significantly improve asthma control when added to inhaled corticosteroid therapy. Moreover, the bronchodilator properties of the......Cysteinyl leukotrienes, synthesized de novo from cell membrane phospholipids, are proinflammatory mediators that play an important role in the pathophysiology of asthma. These mediators are among the most potent of bronchoconstrictors and cause vasodilation, increased microvascular permeability...

  12. Benzodiazepine receptor antagonists for acute and chronic hepatic encephalopathy

    Als-Nielsen, B; Kjaergard, L L; Gluud, C

    2001-01-01

    The pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy is unknown. It has been suggested that liver failure leads to the accumulation of substances that bind to a receptor-complex in the brain resulting in neural inhibition which may progress to coma. Several trials have assessed benzodiazepine receptor...

  13. Orexin receptor antagonists as therapeutic agents for insomnia

    Equihua, Ana C.; Alberto K De La Herrán-Arita; Drucker-Colin, Rene

    2013-01-01

    Insomnia is a common clinical condition characterized by difficulty initiating or maintaining sleep, or non-restorative sleep with impairment of daytime functioning. Currently, treatment for insomnia involves a combination of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBTi) and pharmacological therapy. Among pharmacological interventions, the most evidence exists for benzodiazepine (BZD) receptor agonist drugs (GABAA receptor), although concerns persist regarding their safety and their limited efficacy. T...

  14. Rational Design of Potent Antagonists to the Human Growth Hormone Receptor

    Fuh, Germaine; Cunningham, Brian C.; Fukunaga, Rikiro; Nagata, Shigekazu; Goeddel, David V.; Wells, James A.

    1992-06-01

    A hybrid receptor was constructed that contained the extracellular binding domain of the human growth hormone (hGH) receptor linked to the transmembrane and intracellular domains of the murine granulocyte colony-stimulating factor receptor. Addition of hGH to a myeloid leukemia cell line (FDC-P1) that expressed the hybrid receptor caused proliferation of these cells. The mechanism for signal transduction of the hybrid receptor required dimerization because monoclonal antibodies to the hGH receptor were agonists whereas their monovalent fragments were not. Receptor dimerization occurs sequentially-a receptor binds to site 1 on hGH, and then a second receptor molecule binds to site 2 on hGH. On the basis of this sequential mechanism, which may occur in many other cytokine receptors, inactive hGH analogs were designed that were potent antagonists to hGH-induced cell proliferation. Such antagonists could be useful for treating clinical conditions of hGH excess, such as acromegaly.

  15. (−) Arctigenin and (+) Pinoresinol Are Antagonists of the Human Thyroid Hormone Receptor β

    2015-01-01

    Lignans are important biologically active dietary polyphenolic compounds. Consumption of foods that are rich in lignans is associated with positive health effects. Using modeling tools to probe the ligand-binding pockets of molecular receptors, we found that lignans have high docking affinity for the human thyroid hormone receptor β. Follow-up experimental results show that lignans (−) arctigenin and (+) pinoresinol are antagonists of the human thyroid hormone receptor β. The modeled complexes show key plausible interactions between the two ligands and important amino acid residues of the receptor. PMID:25383984

  16. (-) Arctigenin and (+) pinoresinol are antagonists of the human thyroid hormone receptor β.

    Ogungbe, Ifedayo Victor; Crouch, Rebecca A; Demeritte, Teresa

    2014-11-24

    Lignans are important biologically active dietary polyphenolic compounds. Consumption of foods that are rich in lignans is associated with positive health effects. Using modeling tools to probe the ligand-binding pockets of molecular receptors, we found that lignans have high docking affinity for the human thyroid hormone receptor β. Follow-up experimental results show that lignans (-) arctigenin and (+) pinoresinol are antagonists of the human thyroid hormone receptor β. The modeled complexes show key plausible interactions between the two ligands and important amino acid residues of the receptor. PMID:25383984

  17. Slow receptor dissociation kinetics differentiate macitentan from other endothelin receptor antagonists in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells.

    John Gatfield

    Full Text Available Two endothelin receptor antagonists (ERAs, bosentan and ambrisentan, are currently approved for the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH, a devastating disease involving an activated endothelin system and aberrant contraction and proliferation of pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMC. The novel ERA macitentan has recently concluded testing in a Phase III morbidity/mortality clinical trial in PAH patients. Since the association and dissociation rates of G protein-coupled receptor antagonists can influence their pharmacological activity in vivo, we used human PASMC to characterize inhibitory potency and receptor inhibition kinetics of macitentan, ambrisentan and bosentan using calcium release and inositol-1-phosphate (IP(1 assays. In calcium release assays macitentan, ambrisentan and bosentan were highly potent ERAs with K(b values of 0.14 nM, 0.12 nM and 1.1 nM, respectively. Macitentan, but not ambrisentan and bosentan, displayed slow apparent receptor association kinetics as evidenced by increased antagonistic potency upon prolongation of antagonist pre-incubation times. In compound washout experiments, macitentan displayed a significantly lower receptor dissociation rate and longer receptor occupancy half-life (ROt(1/2 compared to bosentan and ambrisentan (ROt(1/2:17 minutes versus 70 seconds and 40 seconds, respectively. Because of its lower dissociation rate macitentan behaved as an insurmountable antagonist in calcium release and IP(1 assays, and unlike bosentan and ambrisentan it blocked endothelin receptor activation across a wide range of endothelin-1 (ET-1 concentrations. However, prolongation of the ET-1 stimulation time beyond ROt(1/2 rendered macitentan a surmountable antagonist, revealing its competitive binding mode. Bosentan and ambrisentan behaved as surmountable antagonists irrespective of the assay duration and they lacked inhibitory activity at high ET-1 concentrations. Thus, macitentan is a competitive

  18. Slow receptor dissociation kinetics differentiate macitentan from other endothelin receptor antagonists in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells.

    Gatfield, John; Mueller Grandjean, Celia; Sasse, Thomas; Clozel, Martine; Nayler, Oliver

    2012-01-01

    Two endothelin receptor antagonists (ERAs), bosentan and ambrisentan, are currently approved for the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), a devastating disease involving an activated endothelin system and aberrant contraction and proliferation of pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMC). The novel ERA macitentan has recently concluded testing in a Phase III morbidity/mortality clinical trial in PAH patients. Since the association and dissociation rates of G protein-coupled receptor antagonists can influence their pharmacological activity in vivo, we used human PASMC to characterize inhibitory potency and receptor inhibition kinetics of macitentan, ambrisentan and bosentan using calcium release and inositol-1-phosphate (IP(1)) assays. In calcium release assays macitentan, ambrisentan and bosentan were highly potent ERAs with K(b) values of 0.14 nM, 0.12 nM and 1.1 nM, respectively. Macitentan, but not ambrisentan and bosentan, displayed slow apparent receptor association kinetics as evidenced by increased antagonistic potency upon prolongation of antagonist pre-incubation times. In compound washout experiments, macitentan displayed a significantly lower receptor dissociation rate and longer receptor occupancy half-life (ROt(1/2)) compared to bosentan and ambrisentan (ROt(1/2):17 minutes versus 70 seconds and 40 seconds, respectively). Because of its lower dissociation rate macitentan behaved as an insurmountable antagonist in calcium release and IP(1) assays, and unlike bosentan and ambrisentan it blocked endothelin receptor activation across a wide range of endothelin-1 (ET-1) concentrations. However, prolongation of the ET-1 stimulation time beyond ROt(1/2) rendered macitentan a surmountable antagonist, revealing its competitive binding mode. Bosentan and ambrisentan behaved as surmountable antagonists irrespective of the assay duration and they lacked inhibitory activity at high ET-1 concentrations. Thus, macitentan is a competitive ERA with

  19. AMPA and GABA receptor antagonists and their interaction in rats with a genetic form of absence epilepsy

    Kaminski, R.M.; Rijn, C.M. van; Turski, W.A.; Czuczwar, S.J.; Luijtelaar, E.L.J.M. van

    2001-01-01

    The effects of combined and single administration of the -amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptor antagonist, 7,8-methylenedioxy-1-(4-aminophenyl)-4-methyl-3-acetyl-4,5-dihydro-2,3 -benzodiazepine (LY 300164), and of the GABAB receptor antagonist -aminopropyl-n-butyl-phosp

  20. Ginkgolide X is a potent antagonist of anionic Cys-loop receptors with a unique selectivity profile at glycine receptors

    Jensen, Anders Asbjørn; Bergmann, Marianne Lerbæk; Sander, Tommy; Balle, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    the study with high nanomolar/low micromolar IC50 values, except the rho1 receptor at which it was a significantly weaker antagonist. Ginkgolide X also displayed high nanomolar/low micromolar IC50 values at the homomeric alpha1 and alpha2 GlyRs, whereas it was inactive at the heteromeric alpha1beta...... ginkgolides could arise from different flexibility and thus different binding modes to the ion channel of the anionic Cys-loop receptor....

  1. TC-1734: an orally active neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor modulator with antidepressant, neuroprotective and long-lasting cognitive effects.

    Gatto, Gregory J; Bohme, G Andrees; Caldwell, William S; Letchworth, Sharon R; Traina, Vincent M; Obinu, M Carmen; Laville, Michel; Reibaud, Michel; Pradier, Laurent; Dunbar, Geoffrey; Bencherif, Merouane

    2004-01-01

    The development of selective ligands targeting neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors to alleviate symptoms associated with neurodegenerative diseases presents the advantage of affecting multiple deficits that are the hallmarks of these pathologies. TC-1734 is an orally active novel neuronal nicotinic agonist with high selectivity for neuronal nicotinic receptors. Microdialysis studies indicate that TC-1734 enhances the release of acetylcholine from the cortex. TC-1734, by either acute or repeated administration, exhibits memory enhancing properties in rats and mice and is neuroprotective following excitotoxic insult in fetal rat brain in cultures and against alterations of synaptic transmission induced by deprivation of glucose and oxygen in hippocampal slices. At submaximal doses, TC-1734 produced additive cognitive effects when used in combination with tacrine or donepezil. Unlike (-)-nicotine, behavioral sensitization does not develop following repeated administration of TC-1734. Its pharmacokinetic (PK) profile (half-life of 2 h) contrasts with the long lasting improvement in working memory (18 h) demonstrating that cognitive improvement extends beyond the lifetime of the compound. The very low acute toxicity of TC-1734 and its receptor activity profile provides additional mechanistic basis for its suggested potential as a clinical candidate. TC-1734 was very well tolerated in acute and chronic oral toxicity studies in mice, rats and dogs. Phase I clinical trials demonstrated TC-1734's favorable pharmacokinetic and safety profile by acute oral administration at doses ranging from 2 to 320 mg. The bioavailability, pharmacological, pharmacokinetic, and safety profile of TC-1734 provides an example of a safe, potent and efficacious neuronal nicotinic modulator that holds promise for the management of the hallmark symptomatologies observed in dementia. PMID:15179444

  2. Natural Compounds Interacting with Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors: From Low-Molecular Weight Ones to Peptides and Proteins

    Denis Kudryavtsev

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs fulfill a variety of functions making identification and analysis of nAChR subtypes a challenging task. Traditional instruments for nAChR research are d-tubocurarine, snake venom protein α-bungarotoxin (α-Bgt, and α-conotoxins, neurotoxic peptides from Conus snails. Various new compounds of different structural classes also interacting with nAChRs have been recently identified. Among the low-molecular weight compounds are alkaloids pibocin, varacin and makaluvamines C and G. 6-Bromohypaphorine from the mollusk Hermissenda crassicornis does not bind to Torpedo nAChR but behaves as an agonist on human α7 nAChR. To get more selective α-conotoxins, computer modeling of their complexes with acetylcholine-binding proteins and distinct nAChRs was used. Several novel three-finger neurotoxins targeting nAChRs were described and α-Bgt inhibition of GABA-A receptors was discovered. Information on the mechanisms of nAChR interactions with the three-finger proteins of the Ly6 family was found. Snake venom phospholipases A2 were recently found to inhibit different nAChR subtypes. Blocking of nAChRs in Lymnaea stagnalis neurons was shown for venom C-type lectin-like proteins, appearing to be the largest molecules capable to interact with the receptor. A huge nAChR molecule sensible to conformational rearrangements accommodates diverse binding sites recognizable by structurally very different compounds.

  3. Histamine H3 receptor antagonist decreases cue-induced alcohol reinstatement in mice.

    Nuutinen, Saara; Mäki, Tiia; Rozov, Stanislav; Bäckström, Pia; Hyytiä, Petri; Piepponen, Petteri; Panula, Pertti

    2016-07-01

    We have earlier found that the histamine H3 receptor (H3R) antagonism diminishes motivational aspects of alcohol reinforcement in mice. Here we studied the role of H3Rs in cue-induced reinstatement of alcohol seeking in C57BL/6J mice using two different H3R antagonists. Systemic administration of H3R antagonists attenuated cue-induced alcohol seeking suggesting that H3R antagonists may reduce alcohol craving. To understand how alcohol affects dopamine and histamine release, a microdialysis study was performed on C57BL/6J mice and the levels of histamine, dopamine and dopamine metabolites were measured in the nucleus accumbens. Alcohol administration was combined with an H3R antagonist pretreatment to reveal whether modulation of H3R affects the effects of alcohol on neurotransmitter release. Alcohol significantly increased the release of dopamine in the nucleus accumbens but did not affect histamine release. Pretreatment with H3R antagonist ciproxifan did not modify the effect of alcohol on dopamine release. However, histamine release was markedly increased with ciproxifan. In conclusion, our findings demonstrate that H3R antagonism attenuates cue-induced reinstatement of alcohol seeking in mice. Alcohol alone does not affect histamine release in the nucleus accumbens but H3R antagonist instead increases histamine release significantly suggesting that the mechanism by which H3R antagonist inhibits alcohol seeking found in the present study and the decreased alcohol reinforcement, reward and consumption found earlier might include alterations in the histaminergic neurotransmission in the nucleus accumbens. These findings imply that selective antagonists of H3Rs could be a therapeutic strategy to prevent relapse and possibly diminish craving to alcohol use. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'Histamine Receptors'. PMID:26107118

  4. Combined α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonism and partial serotonin transporter inhibition produce antidepressant-like effects in the mouse forced swim and tail suspension tests

    Andreasen, Jesper T; Redrobe, John P; Nielsen, Elsebet Ø

    2012-01-01

    Emerging evidence points to an involvement of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) in major depression. Nicotine improves symptoms of depression in humans and shows antidepressant-like effects in rodents. Monoamine release is facilitated by nAChR stimulation, and nicotine-evoked serotonin (...

  5. 11C-NS14492 as a novel PET radioligand for imaging cerebral alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors: in vivo evaluation and drug occupancy measurements

    Ettrup, Anders; Mikkelsen, Jens D; Lehel, Szabolcs; Madsen, Jacob; Nielsen, Elsebet Ø; Palner, Mikael; Timmermann, Daniel B; Peters, Dan; Knudsen, Gitte M

    2011-01-01

    Small-molecule α(7) nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α(7)nAChR) agonists are currently validated for use as treatment for cognitive disturbances in schizophrenia and in Alzheimer disease. A suitable radiolabeled α(7)nAChR PET tracer would be important for in vivo quantification of α(7)nAChR bind...

  6. Pharmacological characterisation of α6β4* nicotinic acetylcholine receptors assembled from three different α6/α3 subunit chimeras in tsA201 cells

    Jensen, Anne Bjørnskov; Hoestgaard-Jensen, Kirsten; Jensen, Anders A.

    2014-01-01

    on these results should be made keeping the molecular modifications in the α6 surrogate subunits in mind, this study sheds light on the pharmacological properties of α6β4⁎ nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and demonstrates the applicability of the C6F223L and C16F223L chimeras for studies of these...

  7. The α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor ligands methyllycaconitine, NS6740 and GTS-21 reduce lipopolysaccharide-induced TNF-α release from microglia

    Thomsen, Morten Skøtt; Mikkelsen, Jens D

    The anti-inflammatory properties of, particularly the α7, nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) in the peripheral immune system are well documented. There are also reports of anti-inflammatory actions of nicotine in the CNS, but it is unclear, whether this is due to activation or inhibition ...

  8. Structural and functional studies of the modulator NS9283 reveal agonist-like mechanism of action at α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors

    Olsen, Jeppe A; Ahring, Philip K; Kastrup, Jette Sandholm Jensen;

    2014-01-01

    Modulation of Cys loop receptor ion channels is a proven drug discovery strategy, but many underlying mechanisms of the mode of action are poorly understood. We report the x-ray structure of the acetylcholine-binding protein from Lymnaea stagnalis with NS9283, a stoichiometry selective positive m...

  9. Type I and II positive allosteric modulators differentially modulate agonist-induced up-regulation of α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors

    Thomsen, Morten Skøtt; Mikkelsen, Jens D

    2012-01-01

    Long-term treatment with nicotine or selective α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) agonists increases the number of α7 nAChRs and this up-regulation may be involved in the mechanism underlying the sustained procognitive effect of these compounds. Here, we investigate the influence of type...

  10. PASSIVE-AVOIDANCE TRAINING INDUCES ENHANCED LEVELS OF IMMUNOREACTIVITY FOR MUSCARINIC ACETYLCHOLINE-RECEPTOR AND COEXPRESSED PKC-GAMMA AND MAP-2 IN RAT CORTICAL-NEURONS

    VANDERZEE, EA; DOUMA, BRK; BOHUS, B; LUITEN, PGM

    1994-01-01

    Changes in neocortical immunoreactivity (ir) for muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs), protein kinase C gamma (PKC gamma), microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP-2), and the calcium-binding protein parvalbumin (PARV) induced by the performance of a one-trial passive shock avoidance (PSA) task

  11. Orexin receptor antagonists as therapeutic agents for insomnia

    Ana Clementina Equihua; Alberto K De La Herrán-Arita; RENE eDRUCKER-COLIN

    2013-01-01

    Insomnia is a common clinical condition characterized by difficulty initiating or maintaining sleep, or non-restorative sleep with impairment of daytime functioning.Currently, treatment for insomnia involves a combination of cognitive behavioral therapy and pharmacological therapy. Among pharmacological interventions, the most evidence exists for benzodiazepine receptor agonist drugs (GABAA receptor), although concerns persist regarding their safety and their limited efficacy. The use of thes...

  12. Bradykinin as a pain mediator: receptors are localized to sensory neurons, and antagonists have analgesic actions

    Autoradiographic studies localize [3H]bradykinin receptor binding sites to the substantia gelatinosa, dorsal root, and a subset of small cells in both the dorsal root and trigeminal ganglia of the guinea pig. [3H]Bradykinin labeling is also observed over myocardinal/coronary visceral afferent fibers. The localization of [3H]bradykinin receptors to nociceptive pathways supports a role for bradykinin in pain mediation. Several bradkykinin antagonists block bradykinin-induced acute vascular pain in the rat. The bradykinin antagonists also relieve bradykinin- and urate-induced hyperalgesia in the rat paw. These results indicate that bradykinin is a physiologic mediator of pain and that bradykinin antagonists have analgesic activity in both acute and chronic pain models

  13. Structure-based design of eugenol analogs as potential estrogen receptor antagonists.

    Anita, Yulia; Radifar, Muhammad; Kardono, Leonardus Bs; Hanafi, Muhammad; Istyastono, Enade P

    2012-01-01

    Eugenol is an essential oil mainly found in the buds and leaves of clove (Syzygium aromaticum (L.) Merrill and Perry), which has been reported to have activity on inhibition of cell proliferation and apoptosis induction in human MCF-7 breast cancer cells. This biological activity is correlated to its activity as an estrogen receptor antagonist. In this article, we present the construction and validation of structure-based virtual screening (SBVS) protocols to identify the potent estrogen receptor α (ER) antagonists. The selected protocol, which gave acceptable enrichment factors as a virtual screening protocol, subsequently used to virtually screen eugenol, its analogs and their dimers. Based on the virtual screening results, dimer eugenol of 4-[4-hydroxy-3-(prop-2-en-1- yl)phenyl]-2-(prop-2-en-1-yl)phenol is recommended to be developed further in order to discover novel and potent ER antagonists. PMID:23144548

  14. Orexin Receptor Antagonists: New Therapeutic Agents for the Treatment of Insomnia.

    Roecker, Anthony J; Cox, Christopher D; Coleman, Paul J

    2016-01-28

    Since its discovery in 1998, the orexin system, composed of two G-protein coupled receptors, orexins 1 and 2, and two neuropeptide agonists, orexins A and B, has captured the attention of the scientific community as a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of obesity, anxiety, and sleep/wake disorders. Genetic evidence in rodents, dogs, and humans was revealed between 1999 and 2000, demonstrating a causal link between dysfunction or deletion of the orexin system and narcolepsy, a disorder characterized by hypersomnolence during normal wakefulness. These findings encouraged efforts to discover agonists to treat narcolepsy and, alternatively, antagonists to treat insomnia. This perspective will focus on the discovery and development of structurally diverse orexin antagonists suitable for preclinical pharmacology studies and human clinical trials. The work described herein culminated in the 2014 FDA approval of suvorexant as a first-in-class dual orexin receptor antagonist for the treatment of insomnia. PMID:26317591

  15. Ionotropic excitatory amino acid receptor ligands. Synthesis and pharmacology of a new amino acid AMPA antagonist

    Madsen, U; Sløk, F A; Stensbøl, T B;

    2000-01-01

    We have previously described the potent and selective (RS)-2-amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolyl)propionic acid (AMPA) receptor agonist, (RS)-2-amino-3-(3-carboxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolyl)propionic acid (ACPA), and the AMPA receptor antagonist (RS)-2-amino-3-[3-(carboxymethoxy)-5-methyl-4...... excitatory amino acid (EAA) receptors using receptor binding and electrophysiological techniques, and for activity at metabotropic EAA receptors using second messenger assays. Compounds 1 and 4 were essentially inactive. (RS)-2-Amino-3-[3-(2-carboxyethyl)-5-methyl-4-isoxazolyl]propionic acid (ACMP, 2), on......-isoxazolyl]propionic acid (AMOA). Using these AMPA receptor ligands as leads, a series of compounds have been developed as tools for further elucidation of the structural requirements for activation and blockade of AMPA receptors. The synthesized compounds have been tested for activity at ionotropic...

  16. New benzoyl urea derivatives as novel NR2B selective NMDA receptor antagonists.

    Borza, I; Greiner, I; Kolok, S; Galgóczy, K; Ignácz-Szendrei, Gy; Horváth, Cs; Farkas, S; Gáti, T; Háda, V; Domány, Gy

    2006-09-01

    A novel series of benzoyl urea derivatives was prepared and identified as NR2B selective NMDA receptor antagonists. The influence of the substitution of the piperidine ring on the biological activity of the compounds was studied. Compound 9 was active in the formalin test in mice. PMID:17020160

  17. I. Effects of a Dopamine Receptor Antagonist on Fathead Minnow, Pimephales promelas ,Reproduction

    This study used a 21 d fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) reproduction assay to test the hypothesis that exposure to the dopamine 2 receptor (D2R) antagonist, haloperidol, would impair fish reproduction. Additionally, a 96 h experiment with fathead minnows and zebrafish (Danio ...

  18. Attenuation of antagonist-induced impairment of dopamine receptors by L-prolyl-L-leucyl-glycinamide

    The present study was undertaken in order to determine whether chronic,long-term postnatal challenge of rat pups per se, with specific dopamine D1 and D2 receptor antagonists, would modify the ontogeny of the respective receptor types. Since the neuropeptide L-prolyl-L-leucyl-glycinamide (PLG) attenuates the effect of haloperidol on dopamine D2 receptors in adult rats it was of interest to determine whether PLG would modulate antagonists-induced alterations in the ontogeny of striatal dopamine D1 and D2 receptors. Half of the rats were treated daily for 32 days from birth with SCH-23390, a selective dopamine D1 antagonist; or spiroperidol, a selective dopamine D2 antagonists; or both SCH-23390 and spiroperidol; or saline. The other half of the litters were treated with PLG, in combination with the other treatments. Animals were decapitated at 5, 8, and 12 weeks from birth for neurochemical analysis of the striatum. Chronic SCH-23390 treatment produced a 70-80% decrease in the binding of [3H] SCH-23390 to striatal homogenates. The alteration at 5 weeks was associated with a 78% decrease in the Bmax for [3H] SCH-23390 binding, and no change in the KD. Similarly, at 5, 8, and 12 weeks, chronic spiroperidol treatment reduced the binding of [3H] spiroperidol to striatal homogenates by 70-80%

  19. Bicyclams, selective antagonists of the human chemokine receptor CXCR4, potently inhibit feline immunodeficiency virus replication

    Horzinek, M.C.; Egberink, H.F.; Clercq, E. de; Vliet, A.L.W. van; Balzarini, J.; Bridger, G.J.; Henson, G.; Schols, D.

    1999-01-01

    Bicyclams are low-molecular-weight anti-human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) agents that have been shown to act as potent and selective CXC chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4) antagonists. Here, we demonstrate that bicyclams are potent inhibitors of feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) replication when evalua

  20. Inhibition of Acetylcholinesterase Modulates NMDA Receptor Antagonist Mediated Alterations in the Developing Brain

    Ivo Bendix

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Exposure to N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA receptor antagonists has been demonstrated to induce neurodegeneration in newborn rats. However, in clinical practice the use of NMDA receptor antagonists as anesthetics and sedatives cannot always be avoided. The present study investigated the effect of the indirect cholinergic agonist physostigmine on neurotrophin expression and the extracellular matrix during NMDA receptor antagonist induced injury to the immature rat brain. The aim was to investigate matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-2 activity, as well as expression of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP-2 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF after co-administration of the non-competitive NMDA receptor antagonist MK801 (dizocilpine and the acetylcholinesterase (AChE inhibitor physostigmine. The AChE inhibitor physostigmine ameliorated the MK801-induced reduction of BDNF mRNA and protein levels, reduced MK801-triggered MMP-2 activity and prevented decreased TIMP-2 mRNA expression. Our results indicate that AChE inhibition may prevent newborn rats from MK801-mediated brain damage by enhancing neurotrophin-associated signaling pathways and by modulating the extracellular matrix.

  1. A cross-laboratory preclinical study on the effectiveness of interleukin-1 receptor antagonist in stroke.

    Maysami, Samaneh; Wong, Raymond; Pradillo, Jesus M; Denes, Adam; Dhungana, Hiramani; Malm, Tarja; Koistinaho, Jari; Orset, Cyrille; Rahman, Mahbubur; Rubio, Marina; Schwaninger, Markus; Vivien, Denis; Bath, Philip M; Rothwell, Nancy J; Allan, Stuart M

    2016-03-01

    Stroke represents a global challenge and is a leading cause of permanent disability worldwide. Despite much effort, translation of research findings to clinical benefit has not yet been successful. Failure of neuroprotection trials is considered, in part, due to the low quality of preclinical studies, low level of reproducibility across different laboratories and that stroke co-morbidities have not been fully considered in experimental models. More rigorous testing of new drug candidates in different experimental models of stroke and initiation of preclinical cross-laboratory studies have been suggested as ways to improve translation. However, to our knowledge, no drugs currently in clinical stroke trials have been investigated in preclinical cross-laboratory studies. The cytokine interleukin 1 is a key mediator of neuronal injury, and the naturally occurring interleukin 1 receptor antagonist has been reported as beneficial in experimental studies of stroke. In the present paper, we report on a preclinical cross-laboratory stroke trial designed to investigate the efficacy of interleukin 1 receptor antagonist in different research laboratories across Europe. Our results strongly support the therapeutic potential of interleukin 1 receptor antagonist in experimental stroke and provide further evidence that interleukin 1 receptor antagonist should be evaluated in more extensive clinical stroke trials. PMID:26661169

  2. Mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists for heart failure with reduced ejection fraction : integrating evidence into clinical practice

    Zannad, Faiez; Stough, Wendy Gattis; Rossignol, Patrick; Bauersachs, Johann; McMurray, John J. V.; Swedberg, Karl; Struthers, Allan D.; Voors, Adriaan A.; Ruilope, Luis M.; Bakris, George L.; O'Connor, Christopher M.; Gheorghiade, Mihai; Mentz, Robert J.; Cohen-Solal, Alain; Maggioni, Aldo P.; Beygui, Farzin; Filippatos, Gerasimos S.; Massy, Ziad A.; Pathak, Atul; Pina, Ileana L.; Sabbah, Hani N.; Sica, Domenic A.; Tavazzi, Luigi; Pitt, Bertram

    2012-01-01

    Mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists (MRAs) improve survival and reduce morbidity in patients with heart failure, reduced ejection fraction (HFREF), and mild-to-severe symptoms, and in patients with left ventricular systolic dysfunction and heart failure after acute myocardial infarction. These cl

  3. In silico modelling of prostacyclin and other lipid mediators to nuclear receptors reveal novel thyroid hormone receptor antagonist properties.

    Perez Diaz, Noelia; Zloh, Mire; Patel, Pryank; Mackenzie, Louise S

    2016-01-01

    Prostacyclin (PGI2) is a key mediator involved in cardiovascular homeostasis, acting predominantly on two receptor types; cell surface IP receptor and cytosolic peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR) β/δ. Having a very short half-life, direct methods to determine its long term effects on cells is difficult, and little is known of its interactions with nuclear receptors. Here we used computational chemistry methods to investigate the potential for PGI2, beraprost (IP receptor agonist), and GW0742 (PPARβ/δ agonist), to bind to nuclear receptors, confirmed with pharmacological methods. In silico screening predicted that PGI2, beraprost, and GW0742 have the potential to bind to different nuclear receptors, in particular thyroid hormone β receptor (TRβ) and thyroid hormone α receptor (TRα). Docking analysis predicts a binding profile to residues thought to have allosteric control on the TR ligand binding site. Luciferase reporter assays confirmed that beraprost and GW0742 display TRβ and TRα antagonistic properties; beraprost IC50 6.3×10(-5)mol/L and GW0742 IC50 4.9×10(-6)mol/L. Changes to triiodothyronine (T3) induced vasodilation of rat mesenteric arteries measured on the wire myograph were measured in the presence of the TR antagonist MLS000389544 (10(-5)mol/L), beraprost (10(-5)mol/L) and GW0742 (10(-5)mol/L); all significantly inhibited T3 induced vasodilation compared to controls. We have shown that both beraprost and GW0742 exhibit TRβ and TRα antagonist behaviour, and suggests that PGI2 has the ability to affect the long term function of cells through binding to and inactivating thyroid hormone receptors. PMID:26686607

  4. An interspecies comparison of mercury inhibition on muscarinic acetylcholine receptor binding in the cerebral cortex and cerebellum

    Mercury (Hg) is a ubiquitous pollutant that can disrupt neurochemical signaling pathways in mammals. It is well documented that inorganic Hg (HgCl2) and methyl Hg (MeHg) can inhibit the binding of radioligands to the muscarinic acetylcholine (mACh) receptor in rat brains. However, little is known concerning this relationship in specific anatomical regions of the brain or in other species, including humans. The purpose of this study was to explore the inhibitory effects of HgCl2 and MeHg on [3H]-quinuclidinyl benzilate ([3H]-QNB) binding to the mACh receptor in the cerebellum and cerebral cortex regions from human, rat, mouse, mink, and river otter brain tissues. Saturation binding curves were obtained from each sample to calculate receptor density (B max) and ligand affinity (K d). Subsequently, samples were exposed to HgCl2 or MeHg to derive IC50 values and inhibition constants (K i). Results demonstrate that HgCl2 is a more potent inhibitor of mACh receptor binding than MeHg, and the receptors in the cerebellum are more sensitive to Hg-mediated mACh receptor inhibition than those in the cerebral cortex. Species sensitivities, irrespective of Hg type and brain region, can be ranked from most to least sensitive: river otter > rat > mink > mouse > humans. In summary, our data demonstrate that Hg can inhibit the binding [3H]-QNB to the mACh receptor in a range of mammalian species. This comparative study provides data on interspecies differences and a framework for interpreting results from human, murine, and wildlife studies

  5. Histamine H₄ Receptor Antagonists: A New Approach for Tinnitus Treatment?

    Hagenow, Jens; Stark, Holger

    2015-01-01

    Tinnitus, a disorder with disruptive sound perception in the head without an external source, affects around 15 % of the worldwide adult population. Since there is no approved drug for the treatment for this symptom, novel strategies need to be developed to provide relief for the patient. A patent from the small French start-up company Sensorion suggests the use of histamine H4 receptor (H4R) inhibitors as potential treatment. Since histamine and its receptor subtypes are strongly involved in neuronal and inflammatory processes in vestibular areas, targeting the H4R could be a novel way to gain a treatment for tinnitus. Although mRNA and protein levels of H4R have been demonstrated on isolated spiral ganglion neurons from mice, the methods of receptor detection as well as the species relevance of the data are under discussion and require considerable further verification, especially on a disease with a high medical need like tinnitus. PMID:25909438

  6. Endothelin Receptors and Their Antagonists ☆ ☆☆

    Maguire, Janet J; Davenport, Anthony P.

    2015-01-01

    Summary All three members of the endothelin (ET) family of peptides, ET-1, ET-2, and ET-3, are expressed in the human kidney, with ET-1 being the predominant isoform. ET-1 and ET-2 bind to two G-protein–coupled receptors, ETA and ETB, whereas at physiological concentrations ET-3 has little affinity for the ETA receptor. The human kidney is unusual among the peripheral organs in expressing a high density of ETB. The renal vascular endothelium only expresses the ETB subtype and ET-1 acts in an ...

  7. It's not “either/or”: activation and desensitization of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors both contribute to behaviors related to nicotine addiction and mood

    Picciotto, Marina R.; Addy, Nii A.; Mineur, Yann S.; Brunzell, Darlene H.

    2007-01-01

    Nicotine can both activate and desensitize/inactivate nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). An ongoing controversy in the field is to what extent the behavioral effects of nicotine result from activation of nAChRs, and to what extent receptor desensitization is involved in these behavioral processes. Recent electrophysiological studies have shown that both nAChR activation and desensitization contribute to the effects of nicotine in the brain, and these experiments have provided cellula...

  8. Identifying Barbiturate Binding Sites in a Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor with [3H]Allyl m-Trifluoromethyldiazirine Mephobarbital, a Photoreactive Barbiturate

    Hamouda, Ayman K.; Stewart, Deirdre S.; Chiara, David C.; Savechenkov, Pavel Y.; Bruzik, Karol S.; Cohen, Jonathan B.

    2014-01-01

    At concentrations that produce anesthesia, many barbituric acid derivatives act as positive allosteric modulators of inhibitory GABAA receptors (GABAARs) and inhibitors of excitatory nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). Recent research on [3H]R-mTFD-MPAB ([3H]R-5-allyl-1-methyl-5-(m-trifluoromethyldiazirinylphenyl)barbituric acid), a photoreactive barbiturate that is a potent and stereoselective anesthetic and GABAAR potentiator, has identified a second class of intersubunit binding si...

  9. Activation of α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors protects potentiated synapses from depotentiation during theta pattern stimulation in the hippocampal CA1 region of rats.

    Galvez, Bryan; Gross, Noah; Sumikawa, Katumi

    2016-06-01

    Long-term potentiation (LTP) shows memory-like consolidation and thus becomes increasingly resistant to disruption by low-frequency stimulation (LFS). However, it is known that nicotine application during LFS uniquely depotentiates consolidated LTP. Here, we investigated how nicotine contributes to the disruption of stabilized LTP in the hippocampal CA1 region. We found that nicotine-induced depotentiation is not due to masking LTP by inducing long-term depression and requires the activation of GluN2A-containing NMDARs. We further examined whether nicotine-induced depotentiation involves the reversal of LTP mechanisms. LTP causes phosphorylation of Ser-831 on GluA1 subunits of AMPARs that increases the single-channel conductance of AMPARs. This phosphorylation remained unchanged after depotentiation. LTP involves the insertion of new AMPARs into the synapse and the internalization of AMPARs is associated with dephosphorylation of Ser-845 on GluA1 and caspase-3 activity. Nicotine-induced depotentiation occurred without dephosphorylation of the Ser-845 and in the presence of a caspase-3 inhibitor. LTP is also accompanied by increased filamentous actin (F-actin), which controls spine size. Nicotine-induced depotentiation was prevented by jasplakinolide, which stabilizes F-actin, suggesting that nicotine depotentiates consolidated LTP by destabilizing F-actin. α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) antagonists mimicked the effect of nicotine and selective removal of hippocampal cholinergic input caused depotentiation in the absence of nicotine, suggesting that nicotine depotentiates consolidated LTP by inducing α7 nAChR desensitization. Our results demonstrate a new role for nicotinic cholinergic systems in protecting potentiated synapses from depotentiation by preventing GluN2A-NMDAR-mediated signaling for actin destabilization. PMID:26867505

  10. Activation of α-7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor reduces ischemic stroke injury through reduction of pro-inflammatory macrophages and oxidative stress.

    Zhenying Han

    Full Text Available Activation of α-7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α-7 nAchR has a neuro-protective effect on ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke. However, the underlying mechanism is not completely understood. We hypothesized that α-7 nAchR agonist protects brain injury after ischemic stroke through reduction of pro-inflammatory macrophages (M1 and oxidative stress. C57BL/6 mice were treated with PHA568487 (PHA, α-7 nAchR agonist, methyllycaconitine (MLA, nAchR antagonist, or saline immediately and 24 hours after permanent occlusion of the distal middle cerebral artery (pMCAO. Behavior test, lesion volume, CD68(+, M1 (CD11b(+/Iba1(+ and M2 (CD206/Iba1+ microglia/macrophages, and phosphorylated p65 component of NF-kB in microglia/macrophages were quantified using histological stained sections. The expression of M1 and M2 marker genes, anti-oxidant genes and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH oxidase were quantified using real-time RT-PCR. Compared to the saline-treated mice, PHA mice had fewer behavior deficits 3 and 7 days after pMCAO, and smaller lesion volume, fewer CD68(+ and M1 macrophages, and more M2 macrophages 3 and 14 days after pMCAO, whereas MLA's effects were mostly the opposite in several analyses. PHA increased anti-oxidant genes and NADPH oxidase expression associated with decreased phosphorylation of NF-kB p65 in microglia/macrophages. Thus, reduction of inflammatory response and oxidative stress play roles in α-7 nAchR neuro-protective effect.

  11. Multiple transmembrane binding sites for p-trifluoromethyldiazirinyl-etomidate, a photoreactive Torpedo nicotinic acetylcholine receptor allosteric inhibitor.

    Hamouda, Ayman K; Stewart, Deirdre S; Husain, S Shaukat; Cohen, Jonathan B

    2011-06-10

    Photoreactive derivatives of the general anesthetic etomidate have been developed to identify their binding sites in γ-aminobutyric acid, type A and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. One such drug, [(3)H]TDBzl-etomidate (4-[3-(trifluoromethyl)-3H-diazirin-3-yl]benzyl-[(3)H]1-(1-phenylethyl)-1H-imidazole-5-carboxylate), acts as a positive allosteric potentiator of Torpedo nACh receptor (nAChR) and binds to a novel site in the transmembrane domain at the γ-α subunit interface. To extend our understanding of the locations of allosteric modulator binding sites in the nAChR, we now characterize the interactions of a second aryl diazirine etomidate derivative, TFD-etomidate (ethyl-1-(1-(4-(3-trifluoromethyl)-3H-diazirin-3-yl)phenylethyl)-1H-imidazole-5-carboxylate). TFD-etomidate inhibited acetylcholine-induced currents with an IC(50) = 4 μM, whereas it inhibited the binding of [(3)H]phencyclidine to the Torpedo nAChR ion channel in the resting and desensitized states with IC(50) values of 2.5 and 0.7 mm, respectively. Similar to [(3)H]TDBzl-etomidate, [(3)H]TFD-etomidate bound to a site at the γ-α subunit interface, photolabeling αM2-10 (αSer-252) and γMet-295 and γMet-299 within γM3, and to a site in the ion channel, photolabeling amino acids within each subunit M2 helix that line the lumen of the ion channel. In addition, [(3)H]TFD-etomidate photolabeled in an agonist-dependent manner amino acids within the δ subunit M2-M3 loop (δIle-288) and the δ subunit transmembrane helix bundle (δPhe-232 and δCys-236 within δM1). The fact that TFD-etomidate does not compete with ion channel blockers at concentrations that inhibit acetylcholine responses indicates that binding to sites at the γ-α subunit interface and/or within δ subunit helix bundle mediates the TFD-etomidate inhibitory effect. These results also suggest that the γ-α subunit interface is a binding site for Torpedo nAChR negative allosteric modulators (TFD-etomidate) and for positive

  12. Enantiopure Indolo[2,3-a]quinolizidines: Synthesis and Evaluation as NMDA Receptor Antagonists

    Nuno A. L. Pereira

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Enantiopure tryptophanol is easily obtained from the reduction of its parent natural amino acid trypthophan (available from the chiral pool, and can be used as chiral auxiliary/inductor to control the stereochemical course of a diastereoselective reaction. Furthermore, enantiopure tryptophanol is useful for the syntheses of natural products or biological active molecules containing the aminoalcohol functionality. In this communication, we report the development of a small library of indolo[2,3-a]quinolizidines and evaluation of their activity as N-Methyl d-Aspartate (NMDA receptor antagonists. The indolo[2,3-a]quinolizidine scaffold was obtained using the following key steps: (i a stereoselective cyclocondensation of (S- or (R-tryptophanol with appropriate racemic δ-oxoesters; (ii a stereocontrolled cyclization on the indole nucleus. The synthesized enantiopure indolo[2,3-a]quinolizidines were evaluated as NMDA receptor antagonists and one compound was identified to be 2.9-fold more potent as NMDA receptor blocker than amantadine (used in the clinic for Parkinson’s disease. This compound represents a hit compound for the development of novel NMDA receptor antagonists with potential applications in neurodegenerative disorders associated with overactivation of NMDA receptors.

  13. Effect of the calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptor antagonist telcagepant in human cranial arteries

    Edvinsson, Lars; Chan, Kayi Y; Eftekhari, Sajedeh;

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is a neuronal messenger in intracranial sensory nerves and is considered to play a significant role in migraine pathophysiology. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We investigated the effect of the CGRP receptor antagonist, telcagepant, on CGRP-induced cra......INTRODUCTION: Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is a neuronal messenger in intracranial sensory nerves and is considered to play a significant role in migraine pathophysiology. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We investigated the effect of the CGRP receptor antagonist, telcagepant, on CGRP......-induced cranial vasodilatation in human isolated cerebral and middle meningeal arteries. We also studied the expression of the CGRP receptor components in cranial arteries with immunocytochemistry. Concentration response curves to αCGRP were performed in human isolated cerebral and middle meningeal arteries in...

  14. Drug Insight: endothelin-receptor antagonists for pulmonary arterial hypertension in systemic rheumatic diseases.

    Humbert, Marc; Simonneau, Gérald

    2005-12-01

    Rapid advances in the understanding of endothelin as a naturally occurring peptide with developmental and regulatory roles in normal physiology, along with a number of deleterious effects under pathologic conditions (including vasoconstriction, fibrosis, vascular hypertrophy, and inflammation) have led to the development of endothelin-receptor antagonists (ERAs). Bosentan, an antagonist with dual specificity for the endothelin-receptor subtypes A and B, has been shown to be efficacious and well tolerated in placebo-controlled clinical trials and is now approved in many countries, including the US, Canada, and Europe, for treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), including PAH associated with rheumatic diseases. ERAs with specificity for the endothelin-receptor subtype A, including sitaxsentan and ambrisentan, are currently undergoing investigation. This article reviews PAH associated with systemic rheumatic diseases and describes the role of ERAs in this setting. PMID:16932638

  15. Small-molecule endothelin receptor antagonists: a review of patenting activity across therapeutic areas.

    Mucke, Hermann A M

    2009-06-01

    In the field of nonpeptide NCEs with endothelin receptor antagonist activity, a burst in corporate IP filings occurred in the 1990s once the human endothelin system had been characterized, but patent activity has declined in the past decade. Universities have not been active in this area of research to a degree that would have led to many patent applications. While three endothelin receptor antagonists (bosentan, sitaxentan and ambrisentan) are already available for the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension, the use of such compounds for the larger therapy areas of heart failure, cancer and nephropathy is still being evaluated in late-stage clinical trials. Marketed and advanced-stage endothelin receptor blockers have remarkably little chemical diversity; thus, the substantially larger chemical space defined by patenting remains to be explored. PMID:19517317

  16. Tetrazolyl isoxazole amino acids as ionotropic glutamate receptor antagonists: synthesis, modelling and molecular pharmacology

    Frølund, Bente; Greenwood, Jeremy R; Holm, Mai Marie;

    2005-01-01

    and 1b were pharmacologically characterized in receptor binding assays, and electrophysiologically on homomeric AMPA receptors (GluR1-4), homomeric (GluR5 and GluR6) and heteromeric (GluR6/KA2) kainic acid receptors, using two-electrode voltage-clamped Xenopus laevis oocytes expressing these receptors...... kainic acid receptor subtypes (GluR5 and GluR6/KA2), showing sevenfold preference for GluR6/KA2 (Kb=19 microM). Unlike the iGluR antagonist (S)-2-amino-3-[5-tert-butyl-3-(phosphonomethoxy)-4-isoxazolyl]propionic acid [(S)-ATPO], the corresponding tetrazolyl analogue, 1b, lacks kainic acid receptor...

  17. An Antibody Biosensor Establishes the Activation of the M1 Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptor during Learning and Memory.

    Butcher, Adrian J; Bradley, Sophie J; Prihandoko, Rudi; Brooke, Simon M; Mogg, Adrian; Bourgognon, Julie-Myrtille; Macedo-Hatch, Timothy; Edwards, Jennifer M; Bottrill, Andrew R; Challiss, R A John; Broad, Lisa M; Felder, Christian C; Tobin, Andrew B

    2016-04-22

    Establishing the in vivo activation status of G protein-coupled receptors would not only indicate physiological roles of G protein-coupled receptors but would also aid drug discovery by establishing drug/receptor engagement. Here, we develop a phospho-specific antibody-based biosensor to detect activation of the M1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (M1 mAChR) in vitro and in vivo Mass spectrometry phosphoproteomics identified 14 sites of phosphorylation on the M1 mAChR. Phospho-specific antibodies to four of these sites established that serine at position 228 (Ser(228)) on the M1 mAChR showed extremely low levels of basal phosphorylation that were significantly up-regulated by orthosteric agonist stimulation. In addition, the M1 mAChR-positive allosteric modulator, 1-(4-methoxybenzyl)-4-oxo-1,4-dihydroquinoline-3-carboxylic acid, enhanced acetylcholine-mediated phosphorylation at Ser(228) These data supported the hypothesis that phosphorylation at Ser(228) was an indicator of M1 mAChR activation. This was further supported in vivo by the identification of phosphorylated Ser(228) on the M1 mAChR in the hippocampus of mice following administration of the muscarinic ligands xanomeline and 1-(4-methoxybenzyl)-4-oxo-1,4-dihydroquinoline-3-carboxylic acid. Finally, Ser(228) phosphorylation was seen to increase in the CA1 region of the hippocampus following memory acquisition, a response that correlated closely with up-regulation of CA1 neuronal activity. Thus, determining the phosphorylation status of the M1 mAChR at Ser(228) not only provides a means of establishing receptor activation following drug treatment both in vitro and in vivo but also allows for the mapping of the activation status of the M1 mAChR in the hippocampus following memory acquisition thereby establishing a link between M1 mAChR activation and hippocampus-based memory and learning. PMID:26826123

  18. An Antibody Biosensor Establishes the Activation of the M1 Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptor during Learning and Memory*♦

    Butcher, Adrian J.; Bradley, Sophie J.; Prihandoko, Rudi; Brooke, Simon M.; Mogg, Adrian; Bourgognon, Julie-Myrtille; Macedo-Hatch, Timothy; Edwards, Jennifer M.; Bottrill, Andrew R.; Challiss, R. A. John; Broad, Lisa M.; Felder, Christian C.; Tobin, Andrew B.

    2016-01-01

    Establishing the in vivo activation status of G protein-coupled receptors would not only indicate physiological roles of G protein-coupled receptors but would also aid drug discovery by establishing drug/receptor engagement. Here, we develop a phospho-specific antibody-based biosensor to detect activation of the M1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (M1 mAChR) in vitro and in vivo. Mass spectrometry phosphoproteomics identified 14 sites of phosphorylation on the M1 mAChR. Phospho-specific antibodies to four of these sites established that serine at position 228 (Ser228) on the M1 mAChR showed extremely low levels of basal phosphorylation that were significantly up-regulated by orthosteric agonist stimulation. In addition, the M1 mAChR-positive allosteric modulator, 1-(4-methoxybenzyl)-4-oxo-1,4-dihydroquinoline-3-carboxylic acid, enhanced acetylcholine-mediated phosphorylation at Ser228. These data supported the hypothesis that phosphorylation at Ser228 was an indicator of M1 mAChR activation. This was further supported in vivo by the identification of phosphorylated Ser228 on the M1 mAChR in the hippocampus of mice following administration of the muscarinic ligands xanomeline and 1-(4-methoxybenzyl)-4-oxo-1,4-dihydroquinoline-3-carboxylic acid. Finally, Ser228 phosphorylation was seen to increase in the CA1 region of the hippocampus following memory acquisition, a response that correlated closely with up-regulation of CA1 neuronal activity. Thus, determining the phosphorylation status of the M1 mAChR at Ser228 not only provides a means of establishing receptor activation following drug treatment both in vitro and in vivo but also allows for the mapping of the activation status of the M1 mAChR in the hippocampus following memory acquisition thereby establishing a link between M1 mAChR activation and hippocampus-based memory and learning. PMID:26826123

  19. A7DB: a relational database for mutational, physiological and pharmacological data related to the α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor

    Sansom Mark SP

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs are pentameric proteins that are important drug targets for a variety of diseases including Alzheimer's, schizophrenia and various forms of epilepsy. One of the most intensively studied nAChR subunits in recent years has been α7. This subunit can form functional homomeric pentamers (α75, which can make interpretation of physiological and structural data much simpler. The growing amount of structural, pharmacological and physiological data for these receptors indicates the need for a dedicated and accurate database to provide a means to access this information in a coherent manner. Description A7DB http://www.lgics.org/a7db/ is a new relational database of manually curated experimental physiological data associated with the α7 nAChR. It aims to store as much of the pharmacology, physiology and structural data pertaining to the α7 nAChR. The data is accessed via web interface that allows a user to search the data in multiple ways: 1 a simple text query 2 an incremental query builder 3 an interactive query builder and 4 a file-based uploadable query. It currently holds more than 460 separately reported experiments on over 85 mutations. Conclusions A7DB will be a useful tool to molecular biologists and bioinformaticians not only working on the α7 receptor family of proteins but also in the more general context of nicotinic receptor modelling. Furthermore it sets a precedent for expansion with the inclusion of all nicotinic receptor families and eventually all cys-loop receptor families.

  20. Critical evaluation of P2X7 receptor antagonists in selected seizure models

    Fischer, Wolfgang; Franke, Heike; Krügel, Ute; Müller, Heiko; Dinkel, Klaus; Lord, Brian; Letavic, Michael A; Henshall, David C.; Engel, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    The ATP-gated P2X7 receptor (P2X7R) is a non-selective cation channel which senses high extracellular ATP concentrations and has been suggested as a target for the treatment of neuroinflammation and neurodegenerative diseases. The use of P2X7R antagonists may therefore be a viable approach for treating CNS pathologies, including epileptic disorders. Recent studies showed anticonvulsant potential of P2X7R antagonists in certain animal models. To extend this work, we tested three CNS-permeable ...

  1. Chemogenomic discovery of allosteric antagonists at the GPRC6A receptor

    Gloriam, David E.; Wellendorph, Petrine; Johansen, Lars Dan; Thomsen, Alex Rojas Bie; Phonekeo, Karina; Pedersen, Daniel Sejer; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans

    2011-01-01

    pharmacological character: (1) chemogenomic lead identification through the first, to our knowledge, ligand inference between two different GPCR families, Families A and C; and (2) the discovery of the most selective GPRC6A allosteric antagonists discovered to date. The unprecedented inference of...... pharmacological activity across GPCR families provides proof-of-concept for in silico approaches against Family C targets based on Family A templates, greatly expanding the prospects of successful drug design and discovery. The antagonists were tested against a panel of seven Family A and C G protein-coupled receptors...

  2. NMDA Receptor Antagonist Attenuates Bleomycin-Induced Acute Lung Injury

    LI Yang; Liu, Yong; Peng, XiangPing; Liu, Wei; Zhao, FeiYan; Feng, Dandan; Han, Jianzhong; Huang, Yanhong; Luo, Siwei; Li, Lian; Yue, Shao Jie; Cheng, QingMei; Huang,Xiaoting; Luo, Ziqiang

    2015-01-01

    Background Glutamate is a major neurotransmitter in the central nervous system (CNS). Large amount of glutamate can overstimulate N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR), causing neuronal injury and death. Recently, NMDAR has been reported to be found in the lungs. The aim of this study is to examine the effects of memantine, a NMDAR channel blocker, on bleomycin-induced lung injury mice. Methods C57BL/6 mice were intratracheally injected with bleomycin (BLM) to induce lung injury. Mice were ra...

  3. CysLT1 leukotriene receptor antagonists inhibit the effects of nucleotides acting at P2Y receptors

    Mamedova, Liaman; Capra, Valérie; Accomazzo, Maria Rosa; Gao, Zhan-Guo; Ferrario, Silvia; Fumagalli, Marta; Abbracchio, Maria P.; Rovati, G. Enrico; Jacobson, Kenneth A.

    2016-01-01

    Montelukast and pranlukast are orally active leukotriene receptor antagonists selective for the CysLT1 receptor. Conversely, the hP2Y1,2,4,6,11,12,13,14 receptors represent a large family of GPCRs responding to either adenine or uracil nucleotides, or to sugar-nucleotides. Montelukast and pranlukast were found to inhibit nucleotide-induced calcium mobilization in a human monocyte-macrophage like cell line, DMSO-differentiated U937 (dU937). Montelukast and pranlukast inhibited the effects of UTP with IC50 values of 7.7 and 4.3 μM, respectively, and inhibited the effects of UDP with IC50 values of 4.5 and 1.6 μM, respectively, in an insurmountable manner. Furthermore, ligand binding studies using [3H]LTD4 excluded the possibility of orthosteric nucleotide binding to the CysLT1 receptor. dU937 cells were shown to express P2Y2, P2Y4, P2Y6, P2Y11, P2Y13 and P2Y14 receptors. Therefore, these antagonists were studied functionally in a heterologous expression system for the human P2Y receptors. In 1321N1 astrocytoma cells stably expressing human P2Y1,2,4,6 receptors, CysLT1 antagonists inhibited both the P2Y agonist-induced activation of phospholipase C and intracellular Ca2+ mobilization. IC50 values at P2Y1 and P2Y6 receptors were astrocytoma cells expressing an endogenous M3 muscarinic receptor, 10 μM montelukast had no effect on the carbachol-induced rise in intracellular Ca2+. These data demonstrated that CysLT1 receptor antagonists interact functionally with signaling pathways of P2Y receptors, and this should foster the study of possible implications for the clinical use of these compounds in asthma or in other inflammatory conditions. PMID:16280122

  4. Distribution of the a2, a3, and a5 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunits in the chick brain

    Torrão A.S.

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs are ionotropic receptors comprised of a and ß subunits. These receptors are widely distributed in the central nervous system, and previous studies have revealed specific patterns of localization for some nAChR subunits in the vertebrate brain. In the present study we used immunohistochemical methods and monoclonal antibodies to localize the a2, a3, and a5 nAChR subunits in the chick mesencephalon and diencephalon. We observed a differential distribution of these three subunits in the chick brain, and showed that the somata and neuropil of many central structures contain the a5 nAChR subunit. The a2 and a3 subunits, on the other hand, exhibited a more restricted distribution than a5 and other subunits previously studied, namely a7, a8 and ß2. The patterns of distribution of the different nAChR subunits suggest that neurons in many brain structures may contain several subtypes of nAChRs and that in a few regions one particular subtype may determine the cholinergic nicotinic responses

  5. Preladenant, a selective A(2A) receptor antagonist, is active in primate models of movement disorders.

    Hodgson, Robert A; Bedard, Paul J; Varty, Geoffrey B; Kazdoba, Tatiana M; Di Paolo, Therese; Grzelak, Michael E; Pond, Annamarie J; Hadjtahar, Abdallah; Belanger, Nancy; Gregoire, Laurent; Dare, Aurelie; Neustadt, Bernard R; Stamford, Andrew W; Hunter, John C

    2010-10-01

    Parkinson's Disease (PD) and Extrapyramidal Syndrome (EPS) are movement disorders that result from degeneration of the dopaminergic input to the striatum and chronic inhibition of striatal dopamine D(2) receptors by antipsychotics, respectively. Adenosine A(2A) receptors are selectively localized in the basal ganglia, primarily in the striatopallidal ("indirect") pathway, where they appear to operate in concert with D(2) receptors and have been suggested to drive striatopallidal output balance. In cases of dopaminergic hypofunction, A(2A) receptor activation contributes to the overdrive of the indirect pathway. A(2A) receptor antagonists, therefore, have the potential to restore this inhibitor imbalance. Consequently, A(2A) receptor antagonists have therapeutic potential in diseases of dopaminergic hypofunction such as PD and EPS. Targeting the A(2A) receptor may also be a way to avoid the issues associated with direct dopamine agonists. Recently, preladenant was identified as a potent and highly selective A(2A) receptor antagonist, and has produced a significant improvement in motor function in rodent models of PD. Here we investigate the effects of preladenant in two primate movement disorder models. In MPTP-treated cynomolgus monkeys, preladenant (1 or 3 mg/kg; PO) improved motor ability and did not evoke any dopaminergic-mediated dyskinetic or motor complications. In Cebus apella monkeys with a history of chronic haloperidol treatment, preladenant (0.3-3.0 mg/kg; PO) delayed the onset of EPS symptoms evoked by an acute haloperidol challenge. Collectively, these data support the use of preladenant for the treatment of PD and antipsychotic-induced movement disorders. PMID:20655910

  6. 5-HT2 Receptor Regulation of Mitochondrial Genes: Unexpected Pharmacological Effects of Agonists and Antagonists.

    Harmon, Jennifer L; Wills, Lauren P; McOmish, Caitlin E; Demireva, Elena Y; Gingrich, Jay A; Beeson, Craig C; Schnellmann, Rick G

    2016-04-01

    In acute organ injuries, mitochondria are often dysfunctional, and recent research has revealed that recovery of mitochondrial and renal functions is accelerated by induction of mitochondrial biogenesis (MB). We previously reported that the nonselective 5-HT2 receptor agonist DOI [1-(4-iodo-2,5-dimethoxyphenyl)propan-2-amine] induced MB in renal proximal tubular cells (RPTCs). The goal of this study was to determine the role of 5-HT2 receptors in the regulation of mitochondrial genes and oxidative metabolism in the kidney. The 5-HT2C receptor agonist CP-809,101 [2-[(3-chlorophenyl)methoxy]-6-(1-piperazinyl)pyrazine] and antagonist SB-242,084 [6-chloro-2,3-dihydro-5-methyl-N-[6-[(2-methyl-3-pyridinyl)oxy]-3-pyridinyl]-1H-indole-1-carboxyamide dihydrochloride] were used to examine the induction of renal mitochondrial genes and oxidative metabolism in RPTCs and in mouse kidneys in the presence and absence of the 5-HT2C receptor. Unexpectedly, both CP-809,101 and SB-242,084 increased RPTC respiration and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) mRNA expression in RPTCs at 1-10 nM. In addition, CP-809,101 and SB-242,084 increased mRNA expression of PGC-1α and the mitochondrial proteins NADH dehydrogenase subunit 1 and NADH dehydrogenase (ubiquinone) β subcomplex 8 in mice. These compounds increased mitochondrial genes in RPTCs in which the 5-HT2C receptor was downregulated with small interfering RNA and in the renal cortex of mice lacking the 5-HT2C receptor. By contrast, the ability of these compounds to increase PGC-1α mRNA and respiration was blocked in RPTCs treated with 5-HT2A receptor small interfering RNA or the 5-HT2A receptor antagonist eplivanserin. In addition, the 5-HT2A receptor agonist NBOH-2C-CN [4-[2-[[(2-hydroxyphenyl)methyl]amino]ethyl]-2,5-dimethoxybenzonitrile] increased RPTC respiration at 1-100 nM. These results suggest that agonism of the 5-HT2A receptor induces MB and that the classic 5-HT2C receptor agonist CP

  7. The stereotypy-inducing and OCD-like effects of chronic ‘binge’ cocaine are modulated by distinct subtypes of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors

    Metaxas, A; Keyworth, HL; Yoo, JH; Chen, Y; Kitchen, I; Bailey, A

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE High rates of cigarette smoking occur in cocaine-dependent individuals, reflecting an involvement of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) in cocaine-elicited behaviour. This study was designed to assess the contribution of different nAChR subtypes to the behavioural and neurochemical effects of chronic cocaine treatment. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Cocaine (15 mg·kg−1, i.p.) was administered to male C57BL/6J mice in a chronic ‘binge’ paradigm, with and without the coadministration of the α7 preferring nAChR antagonist methyllycaconitine (MLA; 5 mg·kg−1, i.p.) or the β2* nAChR antagonist dihydro-β-erythroidine (DHβE; 2 mg·kg−1, i.p.). Quantitative autoradiography was used to examine the effect of cocaine exposure on α7 and α4β2* nAChRs, and on the high-affinity choline transporter. KEY RESULTS MLA+cocaine administration induced an intense self-grooming behaviour, indicating a likely role for α7 nAChRs in modulating this anxiogenic, compulsive-like effect of cocaine. In the major island of Calleja, a key area of action for neuroleptics, MLA+cocaine reduced choline transporter binding compared with cocaine (with or without DHβE) administration. DHβE treatment prevented the induction of stereotypy sensitisation to cocaine but prolonged locomotor sensitisation, implicating heteromeric β2* nAChRs in the neuroadaptations mediating cocaine-induced behavioural sensitisation. ‘Binge’ cocaine treatment region-specifically increased α4β2* nAChR binding in the midbrain dopaminergic regions: ventral tegmental area and substantia nigra pars compacta. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS We have shown a differential, subtype-selective, contribution of nAChRs to the behavioural and neurochemical sequelae of chronic cocaine administration. These data support the clinical utility of targeting specific nAChR subtypes for the alleviation of cocaine-abuse symptomatology. PMID:22568685

  8. Cheiradone: a vascular endothelial cell growth factor receptor antagonist

    Ahmed Nessar

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Angiogenesis, the growth of new blood vessels from the pre-existing vasculature is associated with physiological (for example wound healing and pathological conditions (tumour development. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2 and epidermal growth factor (EGF are the major angiogenic regulators. We have identified a natural product (cheiradone isolated from a Euphorbia species which inhibited in vivo and in vitro VEGF- stimulated angiogenesis but had no effect on FGF-2 or EGF activity. Two primary cultures, bovine aortic and human dermal endothelial cells were used in in vitro (proliferation, wound healing, invasion in Matrigel and tube formation and in vivo (the chick chorioallantoic membrane models of angiogenesis in the presence of growth factors and cheiradone. In all cases, the concentration of cheiradone which caused 50% inhibition (IC50 was determined. The effect of cheiradone on the binding of growth factors to their receptors was also investigated. Results Cheiradone inhibited all stages of VEGF-induced angiogenesis with IC50 values in the range 5.20–7.50 μM but did not inhibit FGF-2 or EGF-induced angiogenesis. It also inhibited VEGF binding to VEGF receptor-1 and 2 with IC50 values of 2.9 and 0.61 μM respectively. Conclusion Cheiradone inhibited VEGF-induced angiogenesis by binding to VEGF receptors -1 and -2 and may be a useful investigative tool to study the specific contribution of VEGF to angiogenesis and may have therapeutic potential.

  9. Novel acetylcholine and carbamoylcholine analogues

    Hansen, Camilla Petrycer; Jensen, Anders Asbjørn; Christensen, Jeppe K.;

    2008-01-01

    A series of carbamoylcholine and acetylcholine analogues were synthesized and characterized pharmacologically at neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). Several of the compounds displayed low nanomolar binding affinities to the alpha 4beta 2 nAChR and pronounced selectivity for this ...

  10. Neurokinin-1 (NK₁) receptor antagonists as possible therapeutics for psychostimulant use disorders.

    Olive, Michael F

    2015-01-01

    Abuse of and addiction to psychostimulants such as cocaine or amphetamines remain a significant societal burden, and attempts at successfully developing effective treatments for substance use disorders involving psychostimulants have been disappointingly unsuccessful to date. In addition, most pharmacologically based approaches to treating psychostimulant use disorders have largely focused on targeting monoaminergic or amino acid neurotransmission, with little emphasis being placed on neuropeptide systems. One such neuropeptide system that has received little attention is the tachykinin family of peptides and their corresponding neurokinin (NK) receptor subtypes designated NK1, NK2, and NK3. Tachykinins and their receptors are widely expressed in numerous cell types in the periphery and central nervous system, and in the latter, regulate fundamental processes such as nociception, reward, motivation, affect, and stress responses. In recent years, various small molecule brain penetrant NK1 antagonists have been developed which appear to be beneficial and well tolerated in patients undergoing treatment for chemotherapy-induced and post-operative nausea and vomiting. The purpose of this review is to summarize the small body of preclinical and clinical studies that suggest NK1 antagonists may be of potential use in the treatment of substance use disorders involving psychostimulants. Additional topics of discussion will be the importance of full receptor occupancy and known species differences in NK1 receptor ligand binding, which represent significant obstacles to utilizing standard rodent models of psychostimulant addiction for future screening of potentially efficacious NK1 antagonists. PMID:26022261

  11. Optimizing endothelin receptor antagonist use in the management of pulmonary arterial hypertension

    M Kathryn Steiner

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available M Kathryn Steiner1, Ioana R Preston21Pulmonary Critical Care Unit, Department of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, USA; 2Pulmonary Critical Care and Sleep Division, Department of Medicine, Tufts Medical Center, Boston, MA, USAAbstract: Endothelin receptor antagonism has emerged as an important therapeutic approach in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH. Bench to bedside scientific research has shown that endothelin-1 (ET-1 is overexpressed in several forms of pulmonary vascular disease and may play an important pathogenetic role in the development and progression of PAH. Oral endothelin receptor antagonists (ERAs improved exercise capacity, functional status, pulmonary hemodymanics, and delayed the time to clinical worsening in several randomized placebo-controlled trials. Two ERAs are currently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration: bosentan, a dual ERA for patients with class III and IV PAH, and ambrisentan, a selective ERA for patients with class II and III PAH. Sitaxsentan, another selective ERA, has been approved in Europe, Canada, and Australia. The objective of this review is to evaluate the available evidence describing the pharmacology, efficacy, safety, and tolerability, and patient-focused perspectives regarding the different types of endothelin receptor antagonists. Ongoing and forthcoming randomized trials are also highlighted including the approach of combining this class of drugs with other drugs that target different cellular pathways believed to be etiologically important in PAH.Keywords: ambrisentan, bosentan, endothelin receptor antagonists, pulmonary arterial hypertension, sitaxsentan

  12. The necessity and effectiveness of mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist in the treatment of diabetic nephropathy.

    Sato, Atsuhisa

    2015-06-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a major cause of chronic kidney disease (CKD), and diabetic nephropathy is the most common primary disease necessitating dialysis treatment in the world including Japan. Major guidelines for treatment of hypertension in Japan, the United States and Europe recommend the use of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin-receptor blockers, which suppress the renin-angiotensin system (RAS), as the antihypertensive drugs of first choice in patients with coexisting diabetes. However, even with the administration of RAS inhibitors, failure to achieve adequate anti-albuminuric, renoprotective effects and a reduction in cardiovascular events has also been reported. Inadequate blockade of aldosterone may be one of the reasons why long-term administration of RAS inhibitors may not be sufficiently effective in patients with diabetic nephropathy. This review focuses on treatment in diabetic nephropathy and discusses the significance of aldosterone blockade. In pre-nephropathy without overt nephropathy, a mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist can be used to enhance the blood pressure-lowering effects of RAS inhibitors, improve insulin resistance and prevent clinical progression of nephropathy. In CKD categories A2 and A3, the addition of a mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist to an RAS inhibitor can help to maintain 'long-term' antiproteinuric and anti-albuminuric effects. However, in category G3a and higher, sufficient attention must be paid to hyperkalemia. Mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists are not currently recommended as standard treatment in diabetic nephropathy. However, many studies have shown promise of better renoprotective effects if mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists are appropriately used. PMID:25762415

  13. Differential effects of GABAA receptor antagonists in the control of respiratory neuronal discharge patterns.

    Dogas, Z; Krolo, M; Stuth, E A; Tonkovic-Capin, M; Hopp, F A; McCrimmon, D R; Zuperku, E J

    1998-11-01

    To ascertain the role of the inhibitory neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in shaping and controlling the phasic discharge patterns of medullary respiratory premotor neurons, localized pressure applications of the competitive GABAA receptor antagonist bicuculline (BIC) and the noncompetitive GABAA receptor antagonist picrotoxin (PIC) were studied. Multibarrel micropipettes were used in halothane anesthetized, paralyzed, ventilated, vagotomized dogs to record single unit activity from inspiratory and expiratory neurons in the caudal ventral respiratory group and to picoeject GABAA receptor antagonists. The moving time average of phrenic nerve activity was used to determine respiratory phase durations and to synchronize cycle-triggered histograms of discharge patterns. Picoejection of BIC and PIC had qualitatively different effects on the discharge patterns of respiratory neurons. BIC caused an increase in the discharge rate during the neuron's active phase without inducing activity during the neuron's normally silent phase. The resulting discharge patterns were amplified replicas (x2-3) of the underlying preejection phasic patterns. In contrast, picoejection of PIC did not increase the peak discharge rate during the neuron's active phase but induced a tonic level of activity during the neuron's normally silent phase. The maximum effective BIC dose (15 +/- 1.8 pmol/min) was considerably smaller than that for PIC (280 +/- 53 pmol/min). These findings suggest that GABAA receptors with differential pharmacology mediate distinct functions within the same neuron, 1) gain modulation that is BIC sensitive but PIC insensitive and 2) silent-phase inhibition blocked by PIC. These studies also suggest that the choice of an antagonist is an important consideration in the determination of GABA receptor function within the respiratory motor control system. PMID:9819249

  14. The neurokinin 1 receptor antagonist, ezlopitant, reduces appetitive responding for sucrose and ethanol.

    Pia Steensland

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The current obesity epidemic is thought to be partly driven by over-consumption of sugar-sweetened diets and soft drinks. Loss-of-control over eating and addiction to drugs of abuse share overlapping brain mechanisms including changes in motivational drive, such that stimuli that are often no longer 'liked' are still intensely 'wanted' [7], . The neurokinin 1 (NK1 receptor system has been implicated in both learned appetitive behaviors and addiction to alcohol and opioids; however, its role in natural reward seeking remains unknown. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We sought to determine whether the NK1-receptor system plays a role in the reinforcing properties of sucrose using a novel selective and clinically safe NK1-receptor antagonist, ezlopitant (CJ-11,974, in three animal models of sucrose consumption and seeking. Furthermore, we compared the effect of ezlopitant on ethanol consumption and seeking in rodents. The NK1-receptor antagonist, ezlopitant decreased appetitive responding for sucrose more potently than for ethanol using an operant self-administration protocol without affecting general locomotor activity. To further evaluate the selectivity of the NK1-receptor antagonist in decreasing consumption of sweetened solutions, we compared the effects of ezlopitant on water, saccharin-, and sodium chloride (NaCl solution consumption. Ezlopitant decreased intake of saccharin but had no effect on water or salty solution consumption. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The present study indicates that the NK1-receptor may be a part of a common pathway regulating the self-administration, motivational and reinforcing aspects of sweetened solutions, regardless of caloric value, and those of substances of abuse. Additionally, these results indicate that the NK1-receptor system may serve as a therapeutic target for obesity induced by over-consumption of natural reinforcers.

  15. Endothelin receptor antagonists for pulmonary arterial hypertension: rationale and place in therapy.

    Price, Laura C; Howard, Luke S G E

    2008-01-01

    The last decade has seen significant advances in the understanding and treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Three main pathways, involving endothelin, nitric oxide, and prostacyclin, have been identified in its pathogenesis and these have all led to the development of therapies in current use. While the nitric oxide and prostacyclin pathways require augmentation, the endothelin system is overactive in PAH, with increased endothelin synthesis and receptor expression and, therefore, requires blockade. There are two known endothelin receptors. The type A receptor, expressed in pulmonary artery media, mediates vasoconstriction and remodeling, whereas the function of the type B receptor is more complex. Like the type A receptor, the type B receptor mediates vasoconstriction and remodeling effects when expressed on smooth muscle cells and (myo)fibroblasts, yet functions to clear endothelin from the circulation and induce release of endogenous nitric oxide and prostacyclin, when activated in the pulmonary artery endothelium. Consequently, it is not clear from in vitro data whether the optimal strategy is to block only the type A receptor or both receptors. Phase III clinical studies show clear short-term physiologic benefit with both dual and selective endothelin blockade in PAH. Longer-term experience with bosentan, a dual receptor antagonist, has shown improved outcomes compared with historic control data and comparable survival to intravenous prostacyclin therapy. The newer selective blockers, sitaxsentan and ambrisentan, appear to have similar short-term efficacy, but long-term data are as yet either lacking or unpublished. They may be less hepatotoxic than bosentan, although long-term follow-up of patients receiving bosentan has shown this is not a significant problem. On the basis of available evidence, the endothelin receptor antagonists have become first-line therapy for patients with PAH, except in the most severely affected who still require

  16. Differential Effects of Quercetin and Quercetin Glycosides on Human α7 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor-Mediated Ion Currents.

    Lee, Byung-Hwan; Choi, Sun-Hye; Kim, Hyeon-Joong; Jung, Seok-Won; Hwang, Sung-Hee; Pyo, Mi-Kyung; Rhim, Hyewhon; Kim, Hyoung-Chun; Kim, Ho-Kyoung; Lee, Sang-Mok; Nah, Seung-Yeol

    2016-07-01

    Quercetin is a flavonoid usually found in fruits and vegetables. Aside from its antioxidative effects, quercetin, like other flavonoids, has a various neuropharmacological actions. Quercetin-3-O-rhamnoside (Rham1), quercetin-3-O-rutinoside (Rutin), and quercetin- 3-(2(G)-rhamnosylrutinoside (Rham2) are mono-, di-, and tri-glycosylated forms of quercetin, respectively. In a previous study, we showed that quercetin can enhance α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7 nAChR)-mediated ion currents. However, the role of the carbohydrates attached to quercetin in the regulation of α7 nAChR channel activity has not been determined. In the present study, we investigated the effects of quercetin glycosides on the acetylcholine induced peak inward current (IACh) in Xenopus oocytes expressing the α7 nAChR. IACh was measured with a two-electrode voltage clamp technique. In oocytes injected with α7 nAChR copy RNA, quercetin enhanced IACh, whereas quercetin glycosides inhibited IACh. Quercetin glycosides mediated an inhibition of IACh, which increased when they were pre-applied and the inhibitory effects were concentration dependent. The order of IACh inhibition by quercetin glycosides was Rutin≥Rham1>Rham2. Quercetin glycosides-mediated IACh enhancement was not affected by ACh concentration and appeared voltage-independent. Furthermore, quercetin-mediated IACh inhibition can be attenuated when quercetin is co-applied with Rham1 and Rutin, indicating that quercetin glycosides could interfere with quercetin-mediated α7 nAChR regulation and that the number of carbohydrates in the quercetin glycoside plays a key role in the interruption of quercetin action. These results show that quercetin and quercetin glycosides regulate the α7 nAChR in a differential manner. PMID:27098860

  17. Acetylcholine muscarinic receptors and response to anti-cholinesterase therapy in patients with Alzheimer's disease

    Brown, Derek [Department of Psychiatry, Stobhill Hospital, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Chisholm, Jennifer A.; Patterson, Jim; Wyper, David [Department of Clinical Physics, Southern General Hospital, Glasgow, G51 4TF (United Kingdom); Owens, Jonathan; Pimlott, Sally [Department of Clinical Physics, Western Infirmary, Glasgow (United Kingdom)

    2003-02-01

    An acetylcholine deficit remains the most consistent neurotransmitter abnormality found in Alzheimer's disease and various therapeutic agents have been targeted at this. In this study we investigated the action of Donepezil, a cholinesterase inhibitor that has few side-effects. In particular we set out to investigate whether muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR) availability influences the response to this therapy. We used the novel single-photon emission tomography (SPET) tracer (R,R)[{sup 123}I]I-quinuclidinyl benzilate (R,R[{sup 123}I]I-QNB), which has high affinity for the M1 subtype of mAChR. Regional cerebral perfusion was also assessed using technetium-99m hexamethylpropylene amine oxime. We investigated 20 patients on Donepezil treatment and ten age-matched controls. The results showed a reduction in (R,R)[{sup 123}I]I-QNB binding in the caudal anterior cingulate in patients compared with controls and relatively high binding in the putamen and rostral anterior cingulate, suggesting a relative sparing of mAChR in these regions. The main finding of the study was that mAChR availability as assessed by (R,R)[{sup 123}I]I-QNB binding did not distinguish responders from non-responders. Interestingly, we found that the extent of cognitive improvement showed no positive correlation with (R,R)[{sup 123}I]I-QNB binding in any brain region but was inversely related to binding in the insular cortex. This suggests that, within the advised cognitive performance band for use of Donepezil, response is greater in those patients with evidence of a more marked cholinergic deficit. A larger study should investigate this. (orig.)

  18. The safety of interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (anakinra in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis

    L. Riente

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The safety profile of interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (anakinra has been studied with randomised, placebo-controlled trials involving 2932 patients affected by rheumatoid arthritis. The most frequently reported adverse events were represented by injection site reactions (71% and headache (13.6%. No statistically significant difference in the incidence of infections was observed among the patients treated with the interleukin-1 receptor antagonist and the patients receiving placebo. In particular, the incidence of serious infections was 1,8% in rheumatoid arthritis patients on anakinra therapy and 0,7% in patients on placebo. The reported serious infections consisted of pneumonia, cellulitis, bone and joint infections, bursitis. No case of opportunistic infections or tubercolosis was observed. The results of clinical studies suggest that anakinra is a new well-tolerated drug for the treatment of patients affected by rheumatoid arthritis.

  19. ANALYSIS OF INTERLEUKIN-1 RECEPTOR ANTAGONIST GENE POLYMORPHISM IN CHINESE PATIENTS WITH ALZHEIMER'S DISEASE

    Sheng Bi; De-sheng Wang; Guo-lin Li; Shang-ha Pan

    2004-01-01

    Objective To identify an interaction between the interleukin-1 receptor antagonist gene polymorphism and risk of Alzheimer's disease.Methods The study included 117 healthy controls, 85 patients with Alzheimer's disease in a Northeastern Chinese population of Han nationality. Genotypes were determined by a polymerase chain reaction amplification of the intron 2 fragment,harbouring a variable number of short tandem nucleotide sequences. Amplification products were separated on a 2% agarose gel.Results The allele 2 frequency was 27% in healthy controls, and 21% in patients with Alzheimer's disease. Thus for allele 2 as well as for all other alleles, genotypes, or carriage rates, no significant differences compared with controls.Conclusions No association ofinterleukin-1 receptor antagonist gene polymorphism with Alzheimer's disease was identified in this population. It is also possible that the increased risk and disease modifying effects are caused by linkage disequilibrium with other genomic variants in other nearby genes.

  20. Differential binding of urokinase and peptide antagonists to the urokinase receptor

    Engelholm, L H; Behrendt, N

    2001-01-01

    though these sequences contain very few substitutions relative to the human uPAR, the receptor protein products differ markedly in terms of ligand selectivity. Thus, a well described competitive peptide antagonist directed against the human uPAR reacts with only one of the monkey receptors (chimpanzee u......PAR), in spite of the fact that uPAR from all of the four species cross-reacts with human uPA. Notably, uPAR from African green monkey, which is completely devoid of reactivity with the peptide, contains only three substitutions relative to chimpanzee uPAR in the molecular regions critical for binding....... These findings aid the elucidation of the structure/function relationship of uPAR and, unexpectedly, identify a structural distinction governing the binding of uPA and a very similar peptide antagonist....

  1. Androgen receptor antagonists compromise T cell response against prostate cancer leading to early tumor relapse.

    Pu, Yang; Xu, Meng; Liang, Yong; Yang, Kaiting; Guo, Yajun; Yang, Xuanming; Fu, Yang-Xin

    2016-04-01

    Surgical and medical androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) is a cornerstone for prostate cancer treatment, but relapse usually occurs. We herein show that orchiectomy synergizes with immunotherapy, whereas the more widely used treatment of medical ADT involving androgen receptor (AR) antagonists suppresses immunotherapy. Furthermore, we observed that the use of medical ADT could unexpectedly impair the adaptive immune responses through interference with initial T cell priming rather than in the reactivation or expansion phases. Mechanistically, we have revealed that inadvertent immunosuppression might be potentially mediated by a receptor shared with γ-aminobutyric acid. Our data demonstrate that the timing and dosing of antiandrogens are critical to maximizing the antitumor effects of combination therapy. This study highlights an underappreciated mechanism of AR antagonist-mediated immunosuppression and provides a new strategy to enhance immune response and prevent the relapse of advanced prostate cancer. PMID:27053771

  2. Slow Receptor Dissociation Kinetics Differentiate Macitentan from Other Endothelin Receptor Antagonists in Pulmonary Arterial Smooth Muscle Cells

    Gatfield, John; Mueller Grandjean, Celia; Sasse, Thomas; Clozel, Martine; Nayler, Oliver

    2012-01-01

    Two endothelin receptor antagonists (ERAs), bosentan and ambrisentan, are currently approved for the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), a devastating disease involving an activated endothelin system and aberrant contraction and proliferation of pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMC). The novel ERA macitentan has recently concluded testing in a Phase III morbidity/mortality clinical trial in PAH patients. Since the association and dissociation rates of G protein-couple...

  3. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors: a comparison of the nAChRs of Caenorhabditis elegans and parasitic nematodes.

    Holden-Dye, Lindy; Joyner, Michelle; O'Connor, Vincent; Walker, Robert J

    2013-12-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) play a key role in the normal physiology of nematodes and provide an established target site for anthelmintics. The free-living nematode, Caenorhabditis elegans, has a large number of nAChR subunit genes in its genome and so provides an experimental model for testing novel anthelmintics which act at these sites. However, many parasitic nematodes lack specific genes present in C. elegans, and so care is required in extrapolating from studies using C. elegans to the situation in other nematodes. In this review the properties of C. elegans nAChRs are reviewed and compared to those of parasitic nematodes. This forms the basis for a discussion of the possible subunit composition of nAChRs from different species of parasitic nematodes. Currently our knowledge on this is largely based on studies using heterologous expression and pharmacological analysis of receptor subunits in Xenopus laevis oocytes. It is concluded that more information is required regarding the subunit composition and pharmacology of endogenous nAChRs in parasitic nematodes. PMID:23500392

  4. Role of β4* Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors in the Habenulo-Interpeduncular Pathway in Nicotine Reinforcement in Mice.

    Harrington, Lauriane; Viñals, Xavier; Herrera-Solís, Andrea; Flores, Africa; Morel, Carole; Tolu, Stefania; Faure, Philippe; Maldonado, Rafael; Maskos, Uwe; Robledo, Patricia

    2016-06-01

    Nicotine exerts its psychopharmacological effects by activating the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR), composed of alpha and/or beta subunits, giving rise to a diverse population of receptors with a distinct pharmacology. β4-containing (β4*) nAChRs are located almost exclusively in the habenulo-interpeduncular pathway. We examined the role of β4* nAChRs in the medial habenula (MHb) and the interpeduncular nucleus (IPN) in nicotine reinforcement using behavioral, electrophysiological, and molecular techniques in transgenic mice. Nicotine intravenous self-administration (IVSA) was lower in constitutive β4 knockout (KO) mice at all doses tested (7.5, 15, 30, and 60 μg/kg/infusion) compared with wild-type (WT) mice. In vivo microdialysis showed that β4KO mice have higher extracellular dopamine (DA) levels in the nucleus accumbens than in WT mice, and exhibit a differential sensitivity to nicotine-induced DA outflow. Furthermore, electrophysiological recordings in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) demonstrated that DA neurons of β4KO mice are more sensitive to lower doses of nicotine than that of WT mice. Re-expression of β4* nAChRs in IPN neurons fully restored nicotine IVSA, and attenuated the increased sensitivity of VTA DA neurons to nicotine. These findings suggest that β4* nAChRs in the IPN have a role in maintaining nicotine IVSA. PMID:26585290

  5. Accumulation of human full-length tau induces degradation of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor α4 via activating calpain-2

    Yin, Yaling; Wang, Yali; Gao, Di; Ye, Jinwang; Wang, Xin; Fang, Lin; Wu, Dongqin; Pi, Guilin; Lu, Chengbiao; Zhou, Xin-Wen; Yang, Ying; Wang, Jian-Zhi

    2016-01-01

    Cholinergic impairments and tau accumulation are hallmark pathologies in sporadic Alzheimer’s disease (AD), however, the intrinsic link between tau accumulation and cholinergic deficits is missing. Here, we found that overexpression of human wild-type full-length tau (termed hTau) induced a significant reduction of α4 subunit of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) with an increased cleavage of the receptor producing a ~55kDa fragment in primary hippocampal neurons and in the rat brains, meanwhile, the α4 nAChR currents decreased. Further studies demonstrated that calpains, including calpain-1 and calpain-2, were remarkably activated with no change of caspase-3, while simultaneous suppression of calpain-2 by selective calpain-2 inhibitor but not calpain-1 attenuated the hTau-induced degradation of α4 nAChR. Finally, we demonstrated that hTau accumulation increased the basal intracellular calcium level in primary hippocampal neurons. We conclude that the hTau accumulation inhibits nAChRs α4 by activating calpain-2. To our best knowledge, this is the first evidence showing that the intracellular accumulation of tau causes cholinergic impairments. PMID:27277673

  6. Radioligand imaging of α4β2* nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease

    The α4β2* nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (α4β2*-nAChR) are highly abundant in the human brain. As neuromodulators they play an important role in cognitive functions such as memory, learning and attention as well as mood and motor function. Post mortem studies suggest that abnormalities of α4β2*-nAChRs are closely linked to histopathological hallmarks of Alzheimer’s disease (AD), such as amyloid aggregates/oligomers and tangle pathology and of Parkinson’s disease (PD) such as Lewy body pathology and the nigrostriatal dopaminergic deficit. In this review we summarize and discuss nicotinic receptor imaging findings of 2-[18F]FA-85380 PET, [11C]nicotine PET and 5-[123I]IA-85380 SPECT studies investigating α4β2*-nAChR binding in vivo and their relationship to mental dysfunction in the brain of patients with AD and patients out of the spectrum of Lewy body disorders such as PD and Lewy body dementia (DLB). Furthermore, recent developments of novel α4β2*-nAChR-specific PET radioligands, such as (-)[18F]Flubatine or [18F]AZAN are summarized. We conclude that α4β2*-nAChR-specific PET might become a biomarker for early diagnostics and drug developments in patients with AD, DLB and PD, even at early or prodromal stages.

  7. NMDA Receptor Antagonist Attenuates Bleomycin-Induced Acute Lung Injury.

    Yang Li

    Full Text Available Glutamate is a major neurotransmitter in the central nervous system (CNS. Large amount of glutamate can overstimulate N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR, causing neuronal injury and death. Recently, NMDAR has been reported to be found in the lungs. The aim of this study is to examine the effects of memantine, a NMDAR channel blocker, on bleomycin-induced lung injury mice.C57BL/6 mice were intratracheally injected with bleomycin (BLM to induce lung injury. Mice were randomized to receive saline, memantine (Me, BLM, BLM plus Me. Lungs and BALF were harvested on day 3 or 7 for further evaluation.BLM caused leukocyte infiltration, pulmonary edema and increase in cytokines, and imposed significant oxidative stress (MDA as a marker in lungs. Memantine significantly mitigated the oxidative stress, lung inflammatory response and acute lung injury caused by BLM. Moreover, activation of NMDAR enhances CD11b expression on neutrophils.Memantine mitigates oxidative stress, lung inflammatory response and acute lung injury in BLM challenged mice.

  8. Cysteinyl leukotriene receptor antagonist regulates allergic airway inflammation in an organ- and cytokine-specific manner

    Kawano, Tetsuya; Matsuse, Hiroto; Tsuchida, Tomoko; Fukahori, Susumu; Fukushima, Chizu; Nishino, Tomoya; Kohno, Shigeru

    2014-01-01

    Background Cysteinyl leukotrienes (cys-LTs) are very important factors in the pathophysiology of bronchial asthma. Cys-LT receptor antagonists (LTRAs) decrease allergic airway inflammation. The aim of the present study was to determine the differential effects of LTRAs and corticosteroids on allergic airway inflammation and allergen-specific cytokine production from lymphoid tissues using a murine model of asthma. Material/Methods Four groups of female BALB/c mice [control (Cont); Dermatophag...

  9. Cysteinyl Leukotriene Receptor Antagonists Inhibit Tumor Metastasis by Inhibiting Capillary Permeability

    Nozaki, Masako; Yoshikawa, Masanobu; Ishitani, Kunihiko; Kobayashi, Hiroyuki; HOUKIN, KIYOHIRO; Imai, Kohzoh; Ito, Yoichiro; Muraki, Takamura

    2010-01-01

    We explored the possibility of the cysteinyl leukotriene receptor antagonists, pranlukast and montelukast, preventing tumor cell migration through both cerebral and peripheral capillaries. To study tumor cell migration through brain capillaries, male Fisher rats were cannulated via the cisterna magna under pentobarbital anesthesia. RCN9 cells labeled with a fluorescent marker PKH67 were intravenously administered following arachidonic acid administration into the subarachnoid space, and speci...

  10. Effect of Leukotriene Receptor Antagonist Montelukast Along with Curcumin against Gastric Ulceration

    UM Viradia; Shenoy AM; Rajan MS; AR Shabaraya; Kothadia AD; Patel NH

    2011-01-01

    Curcumin, a yellow pigment in the spice turmeric, has been used for centuries as a treatment for inflammatory diseases. This yellow pigment has anti-secretary property in different experimental ulcer models. Montelukast, a leukotriene receptor antagonist has been used for the treatment of inflammatory disease. This substance has antioxidant property in different experimental models. This data supports to evaluate the synergistic effect of Montelukast along with Curcumin against gastric ulcera...

  11. Complex Actions of Thyroid Hormone Receptor Antagonist NH-3 on Gene Promoters in Different Cell Lines

    Shah, Vanya; Nguyen, Van Phuong; Nguyen, Ngoc-Ha; Togashi, Marie; Scanlan, Thomas S.; Baxter, John D.; Webb, Paul

    2008-01-01

    It is desirable to obtain new antagonists for thyroid hormone (TRs) and other nuclear receptors (NRs). We previously used X-ray structural models of TR ligand binding domains (LBDs) to design compounds, such as NH-3, that impair coactivator binding to activation function 2 (AF-2) and block thyroid hormone (triiodothyronine, T3) actions. However, TRs bind DNA and are transcriptionally active without ligand. Thus, NH-3 could modulate TR activity via effects on other coregulator interaction surf...

  12. Benzimidazole-2-carboxamides as novel NR2B selective NMDA receptor antagonists.

    Borza, István; Kolok, Sándor; Gere, Anikó; Nagy, József; Fodor, László; Galgóczy, Kornél; Fetter, József; Bertha, Ferenc; Agai, Béla; Horváth, Csilla; Farkas, Sándor; Domány, György

    2006-09-01

    A novel series of benzimidazole-2-carboxamide derivatives was prepared and identified as NR2B selective NMDA receptor antagonists. The influence of some structural elements, like H-bond donor groups placed on the benzimidazole skeleton and the substitution pattern of the piperidine ring, on the biological activity was studied. Compound 6a showed excellent analgetic activity in the mouse formalin test following po administration. PMID:16782335

  13. Pathophysiology of a severe case of Puumala hantavirus infection successfully treated with bradykinin receptor antagonist icatibant.

    Vaheri, Antti; Strandin, Tomas; Jääskeläinen, Anne J; Vapalahti, Olli; Jarva, Hanna; Lokki, Marja-Liisa; Antonen, Jaakko; Leppänen, Ilona; Mäkelä, Satu; Meri, Seppo; Mustonen, Jukka

    2014-11-01

    We recently described a patient with very severe Puumala hantavirus infection manifested by capillary leakage syndrome and shock. He was successfully treated with the bradykinin receptor antagonist, icatibant (Antonen et al., 2013). Here we report analysis of the pathophysiology which indicated pronounced complement activation, prolonged leukocytosis, extensive fibrinolysis, circulating histones, and defects in liver function. The patient had an uncommon HLA-phenotype, which may have contributed to the severe course of the disease. PMID:25194993

  14. Orexin / hypocretin 1 receptor antagonist reduces heroin self-administration and cue-induced heroin seeking

    Smith, Rachel J; Aston-Jones, Gary

    2012-01-01

    The orexin / hypocretin system is involved in several addiction-related behaviors. The present experiments examined the involvement of orexin in heroin reinforcement and relapse by administering the orexin 1 receptor antagonist SB-334867 prior to heroin self-administration or prior to cue- or heroin-induced reinstatement of extinguished heroin seeking in male Sprague Dawley rats. SB-334867 (30 mg/kg, i.p.) reduced heroin intake during self-administration under fixed ratio-1 (FR-1) and progres...

  15. Discovery and characterization of a potent and selective EP4 receptor antagonist.

    Schiffler, Matthew A; Chandrasekhar, Srinivasan; Fisher, Matthew J; Harvey, Anita; Kuklish, Steven L; Wang, Xu-Shan; Warshawsky, Alan M; York, Jeremy S; Yu, Xiao-Peng

    2015-08-15

    EP4 is a prostaglandin E2 receptor that is a target for potential anti-nociceptive therapy. Described herein is a class of amphoteric EP4 antagonists which reverses PGE2-induced suppression of TNFα production in human whole blood. From this class, a potent and highly bioavailable compound (6) has been selected for potential clinical studies. EP4 binding and functional data, selectivity, and pharmacokinetic properties of this compound are included. PMID:26091726

  16. Potent anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive activity of the endothelin receptor antagonist bosentan in monoarthritic mice

    Imhof, Anne-Katja; Glück, Laura; Gajda, Mieczyslaw; Bräuer, Rolf; Schaible, Hans-Georg; Schulz, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Endothelins are involved in tissue inflammation, pain, edema and cell migration. Our genome-wide microarray analysis revealed that endothelin-1 (ET-1) and endothelin-2 (ET-2) showed a marked up-regulation in dorsal root ganglia during the acute phase of arthritis. We therefore examined the effects of endothelin receptor antagonists on the development of arthritis and inflammatory pain in monoarthritic mice. Methods Gene expression was examined in lumbar dorsal root ganglia two da...

  17. Investigation of the presence and antinociceptive function of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in the African naked mole-rat (Heterocephalus glaber)

    Jørgensen, Kristine B.; Krogh-Jensen, Karen; Pickering, Darryl S;

    2016-01-01

    musculus) using basic local alignment search tool (BLAST). The presence and function of M1 and M4 was investigated in vivo, using the formalin test with the muscarinic receptor agonists xanomeline and VU0152100. Spinal cord tissue from the naked mole-rat was used for receptor saturation binding studies...... with [3H]-N-methylscopolamine. The BLAST test revealed 95 % protein sequence homology showing the naked mole-rat to have the genetic potential to express all five muscarinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes. A significant reduction in pain behavior was demonstrated after administration of 8.4 mg/kg in...

  18. Examining SLV-323, a novel NK1 receptor antagonist, in a chronic psychosocial stress model for depression

    Czeh, B; Pudovkina, O; van der Hart, MGC; Simon, M; Heilbronner, U; Michaelis, T; Watanabe, T; Frahm, J; Fuchs, E

    2005-01-01

    Rationale: Substance P antagonists have been proposed as candidates for a new class of antidepressant compounds. Objectives: We examined the effects of SLV-323, a novel neurokinin 1 receptor (NK1R) antagonist, in the chronic psychosocial stress paradigm of adult male tree shrews. Methods: Animals we

  19. Estrogen receptor α AF-2 mutation results in antagonist reversal and reveals tissue selective function of estrogen receptor modulators

    Arao, Yukitomo; Hamilton, Katherine J.; Ray, Manas K.; Scott, Gregory; Mishina, Yuji; Korach, Kenneth S.

    2011-01-01

    The estrogen receptor (ER) is a ligand-dependent transcription factor containing two transcriptional activation domains. AF-1 is in the N terminus of the receptor protein and AF-2 activity is dependent on helix 12 of the C-terminal ligand-binding domain. Two point mutations of leucines 543 and 544 to alanines (L543A, L544A) in helix 12 minimized estrogen-dependent transcriptional activation and reversed the activity of the estrogen antagonists ICI182780 (ICI) and tamoxifen (TAM) into agonists...

  20. G-receptor antagonists increased the activating effect of mastoparan on low Km GTPase of mouse PAG.

    Martínez-Peña, Y; Sánchez-Blázquez, P; Garzón, J

    1995-02-01

    Mastoparan activated in a concentration-dependent manner the low Km GTPase activity in P2 fractions from mouse periaquedultal grey matter (PAG). This peptide at 1-10 mM produced increases of 30-70% over the basal value of 90-120 pmol Pi/mg/min. A series of substances displaying antagonist activity at cellular receptors and not modifying the GTPase function, when used at nanomolar and micromolar concentrations enhanced the effect of mastoparan upon this enzyme. These included antagonists of receptors coupling G proteins: naloxone (non selective opioid antagonist), CTOP (m opioid receptors), ICI 174,864 (d opioid receptors), nor-BNI (k opioid receptors), sulpiride (D2 dopaminergic antagonist), idazoxan (a2 adrenergic antagonist). Bicuculline, antagonist of a receptor not linked to G proteins, GABAA, did not alter the effect of mastoparan on the GTPase. The m opioid agonist, DAMGO, prevented naloxone from increasing the function of the mastoparan-activated enzyme. Thus, mastoparan appears to act on Gi/Go proteins at a site not directly related to the receptor binding domain. PMID:7794687

  1. Attenuation of morphine antinociceptive tolerance by cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptor antagonists.

    Altun, Ahmet; Yildirim, Kemal; Ozdemir, Ercan; Bagcivan, Ihsan; Gursoy, Sinan; Durmus, Nedim

    2015-09-01

    Cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptor antagonists may be useful for their potential to increase or prolong opioid analgesia while attenuating the development of opioid tolerance. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of AM251 (a selective CB1 antagonist) and JTE907 (a selective CB2 antagonist) on morphine analgesia and tolerance in rats. Adult male Wistar albino rats weighing 205-225 g were used in these experiments. To constitute morphine tolerance, we used a 3 day cumulative dosing regimen. After the last dose of morphine was injected on day 4, morphine tolerance was evaluated by analgesia tests. The analgesic effects of morphine (5 mg/kg), ACEA (a CB1 receptor agonist, 5 mg/kg), JWH-015 (a CB2 receptor agonist, 5 mg/kg), AM251 (1 mg/kg) and JTE907 (5 mg/kg) were considered at 30-min intervals (0, 30, 60, 90, and 120 min) by tail-flick and hot-plate analgesia tests. Our findings indicate that ACEA and JWH907 significantly increased morphine analgesia and morphine antinociceptive tolerance in the analgesia tests. In contrast, the data suggested that AM251 and JTE907 significantly attenuated the expression of morphine tolerance. In conclusion, we observed that co-injection of AM251 and JTE907 with morphine attenuated expression of tolerance to morphine analgesic effects and decreased the morphine analgesia. PMID:25894754

  2. Dynamics of the Development of Amnesia Caused by Disruption of Memory Reconsolidation by Neurotransmitter Receptors Antagonists.

    Nikitin, V P; Solntseva, S V; Kozyrev, S A

    2016-03-01

    The dynamics of amnesia development under conditions of memory reconsolidation disruption by serotonin receptor antagonist methiothepin or NMDA glutamate receptor antagonist MK-801 was studied in snails trained in conventional food aversion. In 2 days after training, injection of methiothepin or MK-801 before reminder induced amnesia development. During repeated training in 3 days after amnesia induction, the skill was formed more rapidly than during the initial training. During repeated training in 10 days after administration of methiothepin and reminder, the dynamics of habit formation was similar to that during initial learning. At the same time, repeated training in 10 days after MK-801 administration and reminder did not result in long-term memory formation. Disruption of reconsolidation of conditioned food aversion memory by antagonists of serotonin or NMDA glutamate receptors led to the development of different types of amnesia that had similar strengthening gradient at the early stages, but differed by the possibility of memory formation during re-training at the late stage. PMID:27021109

  3. Clinical pharmacokinetics and drug-drug interactions of endothelin receptor antagonists in pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    Venitz, Jürgen; Zack, Julia; Gillies, Hunter; Allard, Martine; Regnault, Jean; Dufton, Christopher

    2012-12-01

    The authors review the basic pharmacology and potential for adverse drug-drug interactions (DDIs) of bosentan and ambrisentan, the 2 endothelin receptor antagonists currently approved for pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) treatment. Bosentan, an endothelin (ET) receptor-type ET(A) and ET(B) antagonist, is metabolized to active metabolites by and an inducer of cytochrome P450 (CYP)2C9 and CYP3A. Ambrisentan, a selective ET(A) receptor antagonist, is metabolized primarily by uridine 5'diphosphate glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs) 1A9S, 2B7S, and 1A3S and, to a lesser extent, by CYP3A and CYP2C19. Drug interactions observed with bosentan DDI studies have demonstrated a potential for significant clinical implications during PAH management: bosentan is contraindicated with cyclosporine A and glyburide, and additional monitoring/dose adjustments are required when coadministered with hormonal contraceptives, simvastatin, lopinavir/ritonavir, and rifampicin. As bosentan carries a boxed warning regarding risks of liver injury and showed dose-dependant increases in serum aminotransferase abnormalities, drug interactions that increase bosentan exposure are of particular clinical concern. Ambrisentan DDI studies performed to date have shown only one clinically relevant DDI, an interaction with cyclosporine A that requires ambrisentan dose reduction. As the treatment of PAH moves toward multimodal combination therapy, scrutiny should be placed on ensuring that drug combinations achieve maximal clinical benefit while minimizing side effects. PMID:22205719

  4. Novel benzo[1,4]diazepin-2-one derivatives as endothelin receptor antagonists.

    Bolli, Martin H; Marfurt, Judith; Grisostomi, Corinna; Boss, Christoph; Binkert, Christoph; Hess, Patrick; Treiber, Alexander; Thorin, Eric; Morrison, Keith; Buchmann, Stephan; Bur, Daniel; Ramuz, Henri; Clozel, Martine; Fischli, Walter; Weller, Thomas

    2004-05-20

    Since its discovery in 1988 by Yanagisawa et al., endothelin (ET), a potent vasoconstrictor, has been widely implicated in the pathophysiology of cardiovascular, cerebrovascular, and renal diseases. Many research groups have embarked on the discovery and development of ET receptor antagonists for the treatment of such diseases. While several compounds, e.g., ambrisentan 2, are in late clinical trials for various indications, one compound (bosentan, Tracleer) is being marketed to treat pulmonary arterial hypertension. Inspired by the structure of ambrisentan 2, we designed a novel class of ET receptor antagonists based on a 1,3,4,5-tetrahydro-1H-benzo[e][1,4]diazepin-2-one scaffold. Here, we report on the preparation as well as the in vitro and in vivo structure-activity relationships of these derivatives. Potent dual ET(A)/ET(B) receptor antagonists with affinities in the low nanomolar range have been identified. In addition, several compounds efficiently reduced arterial blood pressure after oral administration to Dahl salt sensitive rats. In this animal model, the efficacy of the benzo[e][1,4]diazepin-2-one derivative rac-39au was superior to that of racemic ambrisentan, rac-2. PMID:15139756

  5. New P2X3 receptor antagonists. Part 1: Discovery and optimization of tricyclic compounds.

    Szántó, Gábor; Makó, Attila; Bata, Imre; Farkas, Bence; Kolok, Sándor; Vastag, Mónika; Cselenyák, Attila

    2016-08-15

    Purinergic P2X3 receptors are trimeric ligand-gated ion channels whose antagonism is an appealing yet challenging and not fully validated drug development idea. With the aim of identification of an orally active, potent human P2X3 receptor antagonist compound that can penetrate the central nervous system, the compound collection of Gedeon Richter was screened. A hit series of tricyclic compounds was subjected to a rapid, two-step optimization process focusing on increasing potency, improving metabolic stability and CNS penetrability. Attempts resulted in compound 65, a potential tool compound for testing P2X3 inhibitory effects in vivo. PMID:27423478

  6. The urotensin II receptor antagonist, urantide, protects against atherosclerosis in rats

    YU, QUAN-XIN; Zhao, Juan; Kong, Wei; REN, LI-QUN; GAO, HAI-CHENG; XIE, YA-QIN; Sun, Bo

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the use of urantide as an antagonist of the urotensin II (UII) receptor, G protein-coupled receptor 14 (GPR14), to protect against atherosclerosis (AS) in rats. The AS rat model was induced by an intraperitoneal injection of vitamin D3 (VD3) into rats fed with a high-fat diet for four weeks. Urantide was then injected into the rats. Immunohistochemical staining, serum biochemical assay, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and western b...

  7. A CXCL8 receptor antagonist based on the structure of N-Acetyl-Proline-Glycine-Proline

    Jackson, Patricia L; Noerager, Brett D.; Jablonsky, Michael J; Hardison, Matthew T.; Cox, Bryan D; Patterson, James C.; Dhanapal, Boopathy; Blalock, J Edwin; Muccio, Donald D

    2011-01-01

    A role for the collagen-derived tripeptide, N-acetyl proline-glycine-proline (NAc-PGP), in neutrophil recruitment in chronic airway inflammatory diseases, including COPD and cystic fibrosis, has recently been delineated. Due to structural similarity to an important motif for interleukin-8 (CXCL8) binding to its receptor, NAc-PGP binds to CXCR1/2 receptors, leading to neutrophil activation and chemotaxis. In an effort to develop novel CXCL8 antagonists, we describe the synthesis of four chiral...

  8. Pharmacological Characterization of Novel A3 Adenosine Receptor-selective Antagonists

    Jacobson, Kenneth A.; Park, Kyung-Sun; JIANG, JI-LONG; KIM, YONG-CHUL; Olah, Mark E.; Stiles, Gary L.; Ji, Xiao-duo

    1997-01-01

    The effects of putative A3 adenosine receptor antagonists of three diverse chemical classes (the flavonoid MRS 1067, the 6-phenyl-1,4-dihydropyridines MRS 1097 and MRS 1191, and the triazoloquinazo-line MRS 1220) were characterized in receptor binding and functional assays. MRS1067, MRS 1191 and MRS 1220 were found to be competitive in saturation binding studies using the agonist radioligand [125I]AB-MECA (N6-(4-amino-3-iodobenzyl)adenosine-5'-N-methyluronamide) at cloned human brain A3 recep...

  9. Cholinesterases: structure of the active site and mechanism of the effect of cholinergic receptor blockers on the rate of interaction with ligands

    Modern views on the structure of cholinesterase active sites and the mechanism of their interaction with organophosphorus inhibitors are considered. The attention is focused on the mechanism of the effect of cholinergic receptor blockers, acetylcholine antagonists, on the rate of interaction of acetylcholine esterase with organophosphorus inhibitors.

  10. Discovery of piperidine ethers as selective orexin receptor antagonists (SORAs) inspired by filorexant.

    Raheem, Izzat T; Breslin, Michael J; Bruno, Joseph; Cabalu, Tamara D; Cooke, Andrew; Cox, Christopher D; Cui, Donghui; Garson, Susan; Gotter, Anthony L; Fox, Steven V; Harrell, C Meacham; Kuduk, Scott D; Lemaire, Wei; Prueksaritanont, Thomayant; Renger, John J; Stump, Craig; Tannenbaum, Pamela L; Williams, Peter D; Winrow, Christopher J; Coleman, Paul J

    2015-02-01

    Highly selective orexin receptor antagonists (SORAs) of the orexin 2 receptor (OX2R) have become attractive targets both as potential therapeutics for insomnia as well as biological tools to help further elucidate the underlying pharmacology of the orexin signaling pathway. Herein, we describe the discovery of a novel piperidine ether 2-SORA class identified by systematic lead optimization beginning with filorexant, a dual orexin receptor antagonist (DORA) that recently completed Phase 2 clinical trials. Changes to the ether linkage and pendant heterocycle of filorexant were found to impart significant selectivity for OX2R, culminating in lead compound PE-6. PE-6 displays sub-nanomolar binding affinity and functional potency on OX2R while maintaining >1600-fold binding selectivity and >200-fold functional selectivity versus the orexin 1 receptor (OX1R). PE-6 bears a clean off-target profile, a good overall preclinical pharmacokinetic (PK) profile, and reduces wakefulness with increased NREM and REM sleep when evaluated in vivo in a rat sleep study. Importantly, subtle structural changes to the piperidine ether class impart dramatic changes in receptor selectivity. To this end, our laboratories have identified multiple piperidine ether 2-SORAs, 1-SORAs, and DORAs, providing access to a number of important biological tool compounds from a single structural class. PMID:25577040

  11. An assessment of radioimmunoassay procedures for determination of anti-acetylcholine receptor antibodies in the sera of patients with myasthenia gravis

    A reproducible radioimmunoassay procedure for the determination of anti-acetylcholine receptor antibodies in the sera of patients with myasthenia gravis is described and examined in detail. The assay combines features of a number of methods previously outlined and allows repeat determinations of antibody titre in a given myasthenic serum sample with coefficient of variation 6%. The mean +- standard deviation for normal human serum anti-acetylcholine receptor antibodies was found by this procedure to be 0.024 +- 0.033 nmol/l α-bungarotoxin binding sites whereas the range for myasthenic patients was 0-139.14 nmol/l with a mean value of 7.55 nmol/l α-bungarotoxin binding sites. (author)

  12. 5α-Bile alcohols function as farnesoid X receptor antagonists

    The farnesoid X receptor (FXR) is a bile acid/alcohol-activated nuclear receptor that regulates lipid homeostasis. Unlike other steroid receptors, FXR binds bile acids in an orientation that allows the steroid nucleus A to face helix 12 in the receptor, a crucial domain for coactivator-recruitment. Because most naturally occurring bile acids and alcohols contain a cis-oriented A, which is distinct from that of other steroids and cholesterol metabolites, we investigated the role of this 5β-configuration in FXR activation. The results showed that the 5β-(A/B cis) bile alcohols 5β-cyprinol and bufol are potent FXR agonists, whereas their 5α-(A/B trans) counterparts antagonize FXR transactivation and target gene expression. Both isomers bound to FXR, but their ability to induce coactivator-recruitment and thereby induce transactivation differed. These findings suggest a critical role for the A orientation of bile salts in agonist/antagonist function

  13. Design, synthesis, and pharmacological characterization of novel, potent NMDA receptor antagonists

    Conti, Paola; De Amici, Marco; Grazioso, Giovanni;

    2004-01-01

    The two diastereomeric pairs of acidic amino acids 5-(2-amino-2-carboxyethyl)-4,5-dihydroisoxazole-3-carboxylic acid (8A/8B) and 4-(2-amino-2-carboxyethyl)-5,5-dimethyl-4,5-dihydroisoxazole-3-carboxylic acid (10A/10B) were prepared via a strategy based on a 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition. The four amino...... acids were tested at ionotropic and metabotropic glutamate receptors. None of the compounds was active, neither as agonists nor as antagonists, at 1 mM on metabotropic receptors (mGluR1, -2, -4, and -5 expressed in CHO cell lines). Conversely, the pair of stereoisomers 8A/8B showed a remarkable affinity...... in in vivo tests on DBA/2 mice. Derivative 10A was inactive at all ionotropic glutamate receptors, whereas its stereoisomer 10B displayed a seizable binding to both NMDA and AMPA receptors....

  14. Early Use of the NMDA Receptor Antagonist Ketamine in Refractory and Superrefractory Status Epilepticus

    F. A. Zeiler

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Refractory status epilepticus (RSE and superrefractory status epilepticus (SRSE pose a difficult clinical challenge. Multiple cerebral receptor and transporter changes occur with prolonged status epilepticus leading to pharmacoresistance patterns unfavorable for conventional antiepileptics. In particular, n-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA receptor upregulation leads to glutamate mediated excitotoxicity. Targeting these NMDA receptors may provide a novel approach to otherwise refractory seizures. Ketamine has been utilized in RSE. Recent systematic review indicates 56.5% and 63.5% cessation in seizures in adults and pediatrics, respectively. No complications were described. We should consider earlier implementation of ketamine or other NMDA receptor antagonists, for RSE. Prospective study of early implementation of ketamine should shed light on the role of such medications in RSE.

  15. A selective TSH receptor antagonist inhibits stimulation of thyroid function in female mice.

    Neumann, Susanne; Nir, Eshel A; Eliseeva, Elena; Huang, Wenwei; Marugan, Juan; Xiao, Jingbo; Dulcey, Andrés E; Gershengorn, Marvin C

    2014-01-01

    Because the TSH receptor (TSHR) plays an important role in the pathogenesis of thyroid disease, a TSHR antagonist could be a novel treatment. We attempted to develop a small molecule, drug-like antagonist of TSHR signaling that is selective and active in vivo. We synthesized NCGC00242364 (ANTAG3) by chemical modification of a previously reported TSHR antagonist. We tested its potency, efficacy, and selectivity in a model cell system in vitro by measuring its activity to inhibit stimulation of cAMP production stimulated by TSH, LH, or FSH. We tested the in vivo activity of ANTAG3 by measuring its effects to lower serum free T4 and thyroid gene expression in female BALB/c mice continuously treated with ANTAG3 for 3 days and given low doses of TRH continuously or stimulated by a single administration of a monoclonal thyroid-stimulating antibody M22. ANTAG3 was selective for TSHR inhibition; half-maximal inhibitory doses were 2.1 μM for TSHR and greater than 30 μM for LH and FSH receptors. In mice treated with TRH, ANTAG3 lowered serum free T4 by 44% and lowered mRNAs for sodium-iodide cotransporter and thyroperoxidase by 75% and 83%, respectively. In mice given M22, ANTAG3 lowered serum free T4 by 38% and lowered mRNAs for sodium-iodide cotransporter and thyroperoxidase by 73% and 40%, respectively. In conclusion, we developed a selective TSHR antagonist that is effective in vivo in mice. This is the first report of a small-molecule TSHR antagonist active in vivo and may lead to a drug to treat Graves' disease. PMID:24169564

  16. Resolution of complex fluorescence spectra of lipids and nicotinic acetylcholine receptor by multivariate analysis reveals protein-mediated effects on the receptor's immediate lipid microenvironment

    Wenz, Jorge J; 10.1186/1757-5036-1-6

    2009-01-01

    Analysis of fluorescent spectra from complex biological systems containing various fluorescent probes with overlapping emission bands is a challenging task. Valuable information can be extracted from the full spectra, however, by using multivariate analysis (MA) of measurements at different wavelengths. We applied MA to spectral data of purified Torpedo nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR) protein reconstituted into liposomes made up of dioleoylphosphatidic acid (DOPA) and dioleoylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC) doped with two extrinsic fluorescent probes (NBD-cholesterol/pyrene-PC). Forster resonance energy transfer (FRET) was observed between the protein and pyrene-PC and between pyrene-PC and NBD-cholesterol, leading to overlapping emission bands. Partial least squares analysis was applied to ...

  17. Comparison of anticonvulsant effect of competitive non-NMDA and noncompetitive NMDA receptor antagonists in adult rats

    Lojková, Denisa; Živanovič, Dragana; Mareš, Pavel

    -, - (2005), s. 160-160. [Conference of the Czech Neuroscience Society /5./, The Annual Meeting of the Network of European Neuroscience Institutes. 19.11.2005-21.11.2005, Prague] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC554 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : anticonvulsant effect * non-NMDA- receptor antagonist * NMDA receptor antagonist * rats Subject RIV: ED - Physiology

  18. Direction-Specific Disruption of Subcortical Visual Behavior and Receptive Fields in Mice Lacking the Beta2 Subunit of Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor

    Wang, Lupeng; Rangarajan, Krsna V.; Lawhn-Heath, Courtney A.; Sarnaik, Rashmi; Wang, Bor-Shuen; Liu, Xiaorong; Cang, Jianhua

    2009-01-01

    Retinotopic mapping is a basic feature of visual system organization, but its role in processing visual information is unknown. Mutant mice lacking β2 subunit of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor have imprecise maps in both visual cortex (V1) and the superior colliculus (SC) due to the disruption of spontaneous retinal activity during development. Here, we use behavioral and physiological approaches to study their visual functions. We find that β2−/− mice fail to track visual stimuli moving al...

  19. The Duration of Nicotine Withdrawal-Associated Deficits in Contextual Fear Conditioning Parallels Changes in Hippocampal High Affinity Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor Upregulation

    Gould, Thomas J.; Portugal, George S.; André, Jessica M.; Tadman, Matthew P.; Marks, Michael J.; Kenney, Justin W.; YILDIRIM, Emre; Adoff, Michael

    2012-01-01

    A predominant symptom of nicotine withdrawal is cognitive deficits, yet understanding of the neural basis for these deficits is limited. Withdrawal from chronic nicotine disrupts contextual learning in mice and this deficit is mediated by direct effects of nicotine in the hippocampus. Chronic nicotine treatment upregulates nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR); however, it is unknown whether upregulation is related to the observed withdawal-induced cognitive deficits. If a relationship be...

  20. Novel class of medications, orexin receptor antagonists, in the treatment of insomnia - critical appraisal of suvorexant.

    Norman, Jessica L; Anderson, Sarah L

    2016-01-01

    Insomnia, a highly prevalent disorder, can be detrimental to patients' overall health and worsen existing comorbidities. Patients may have acute episodes of insomnia related to a traumatic event, but more commonly insomnia occurs chronically. While proper sleep hygiene and behavioral therapy play important roles in the nonpharmacologic management of short-term and chronic insomnia, medications may also be required. Historically, insomnia has been treated with agents such as benzodiazepines, nonbenzodiazepine receptor agonists, and melatonin agonists. Dual orexin receptor antagonists represent a new class of medications for the treatment of insomnia, which block the binding of wakefulness-promoting neuropeptides orexin A and orexin B to their respective receptor sites. Suvorexant (Belsomra) is the first dual orexin receptor antagonist to be approved in the US and Japan and has demonstrated efficacy in decreasing time to sleep onset and increasing total sleep time. Its unique mechanism of action, data to support efficacy and safety over 12 months of use, and relative lack of withdrawal effects when discontinued may represent an alternative for patients with chronic insomnia who cannot tolerate or do not receive benefit from more traditional sleep agents. Suvorexant is effective and well tolerated, but precautions exist for certain patient populations, including females, obese patients, and those with respiratory disease. Suvorexant has only been studied vs placebo, and hence it is unknown how it directly compares with other medications approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for insomnia. Suvorexant is not likely to replace benzodiazepines or nonbenzodiazepine receptor antagonists as a first-line sleep agent but does represent a novel option for the treatment of patients with chronic insomnia. PMID:27471419

  1. Antipsychotic-induced catalepsy is attenuated in mice lacking the M4 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor

    Fink-Jensen, Anders; Schmidt, Lene S; Dencker, Ditte;

    2011-01-01

    A delicate balance exists between the central dopaminergic and cholinergic neurotransmitter systems with respect to motor function. An imbalance can result in motor dysfunction as observed in Parkinson's disease patients and in patients treated with antipsychotic compounds. Cholinergic receptor a...

  2. Pharmacological characterisation of strychnine and brucine analogues at glycine and alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors

    Jensen, Anders A.; Gharagozloo, Parviz; Birdsall, Nigel J M;

    2006-01-01

    of tertiary and quaternary analogues as well as bisquaternary dimers of strychnine and brucine at human alpha1 and alpha1beta glycine receptors and at a chimera consisting of the amino-terminal domain of the alpha7 nicotinic receptor (containing the orthosteric ligand binding site) and the ion...... profiles of strychnine and brucine, none of the analogues displayed significant selectivity between the alpha1 and alpha1beta subtypes. The structure-activity relationships for the compounds at the alpha7/5-HT3 chimera were significantly different from those at the glycine receptors. Most strikingly......, quaternization of strychnine and brucine with substituents possessing different steric and electronic properties completely eliminated the activity at the glycine receptors, whereas binding affinity to the alpha7/5-HT3 chimera was retained for the majority of the quaternary analogues. This study provides an...

  3. Therapeutic potential of vanilloid receptor TRPV1 agonists and antagonists as analgesics: Recent advances and setbacks.

    Wong, Gilbert Y; Gavva, Narender R

    2009-04-01

    The vanilloid receptor TRPV1 is a homotetrameric, non-selective cation channel abundantly expressed in the nociceptors (c-fibers). TRPV1 is considered as a highly validated pain target because, i) its agonists such as capsaicin cause desensitization of TRPV1 channels that relieves pain behaviors in preclinical species, and ii) its antagonists relieve pain behaviors in rodent models of inflammation, osteoarthritis, and cancer. Hence, both agonists and antagonists of TRPV1 are being evaluated as potential analgesics in clinical trials. Clinical trial results of TRPV1 agonists such as resiniferatoxin in interstitial cystitis, NGX 4010 in post-herpetic neuralgia, and 4975 (Adlea) in osteoarthritis, bunionectomy, and Morton's neuroma have been reported. Similarly, clinical trial results of TRPV1 antagonists such as SB-705498 and AMG 517 have also been published recently. Overall, some molecules (e.g., capsaicin) demonstrated potential analgesia in certain conditions (postsurgical pain, postherpetic neuralgia, pain in diabetic neuropathy, osteoarthritis, bunionectomy, and Morton's neuroma), whereas others fell out of the clinic due to on-target liabilities or failed to demonstrate efficacy. This review summarizes recent advances and setbacks of TRPV1 agonists and antagonists in the clinic and predicts future directions. PMID:19150372

  4. Short-term regulation of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors: An assessment utilizing mouse brain and mouse neuroblastoma cells

    Cioffi, C.L.

    1988-01-01

    The effects of muscarinic agonists and diisopropylfluorophosphate (DFP) on muscarinic receptor density and muscarinic receptor-mediated responses was assessed in mouse brain and mouse neuroblastoma cells (clone N1E-115). Utilizing the antagonist ({sup 3}H)quinuclidinyl benzilate (({sup 3}H)QNB), there was no difference in the maximal binding capacity (B{sub max}) or equilibrium dissociation constant (K{sub d}) between untreated and 24 hour DFP-treated mice. However, one administration of DFP produced a 24% and 33% decrease in B{sub max} measured by ({sup 3}H)N-methylscopolamine (({sup 3}H)NMS) after 18 and 24 hours which was rapidly reversible within 36 hours after DFP treatment. The loss of ({sup 3}H)NMS binding sites following acute DFP treatment was not accompanied by a change in a particular muscarinic receptor binding conformation. Furthermore, the magnitude of muscarinic receptor-mediated phosphoinositide hydrolysis was unchanged following short-term DFP treatment.

  5. Scorpion venom-induced neutrophilia is inhibited by a PAF receptor antagonist in the rat.

    Borges, C M; Silveira, M R; Aparecida, M; Beker, C L; Freire-Maia, L; Teixeira, M M

    2000-04-01

    A dramatic blood neutrophilia is an important feature of the severe envenoming caused by the Brazilian scorpion Tityus serrulatus and may contribute to the development of lung injury in children. We examined the effects of an intravenous injection of T. serrulatus scorpion venom (TsV) on the total number of leukocytes and neutrophils in the blood of anesthetized rats. Injection of TsV (250 microg/kg) induces a significant leukocytosis 2 and 3 h after its injection, explained by an increase in the number of neutrophils. The release of catecholamines and action on adrenoceptors is responsible for most of the systemic manifestations of TsV. However, pretreatment with the beta-adrenoceptor antagonists metoprolol and propranolol or the alpha1-adrenoceptor antagonist prazosin (0.25 mg/kg) did not prevent TsV-induced neutrophilia. Blood neutrophilia induced by TsV occurred simultaneously with a significant reduction of mature neutrophils in bone marrow. Pretreatment with the platelet-activating factor (PAF) receptor antagonists UK-74505 or WEB-2086 prevented TsV-induced increase in blood neutrophils and reduction in the number of neutrophils in the bone marrow. It is concluded that scorpion venom induces blood neutrophilia in rats, explained by a PAF receptor-dependent mobilization of neutrophils from the bone marrow. PMID:10770284

  6. Functional potencies of dopamine agonists and antagonists at human dopamine D₂ and D₃ receptors.

    Tadori, Yoshihiro; Forbes, Robert A; McQuade, Robert D; Kikuchi, Tetsuro

    2011-09-01

    We measured the functional agonist potencies of dopamine agonists including antiparkinson drugs, and functional antagonist potencies of antipsychotics at human dopamine D(2) and D(3) receptors. In vitro pharmacological assessment included inhibition of forskolin-stimulated cAMP accumulation and the reversal of dopamine-induced inhibition in clonal Chinese hamster ovary cells expressing low and high densities of human dopamine D(2L) and D(2S) receptors (hD(2L)-Low, hD(2L)-High, hD(2S)-Low and hD(2S)-High, respectively) and human dopamine D(3) Ser-9 and D(3) Gly-9 receptors (hD(3)-Ser-9 and hD(3)-Gly-9, respectively). Cabergoline, bromocriptine, pergolide, (±)-7-hydroxy-N,N-di-n-propyl-2-aminotetralin (7-OH-DPAT), talipexole, pramipexole, R-(+)-trans-3,4,4a,10b-tetrahydro-4-propyl-2H,5H-[1]benzopyrano[4,3-b]-1,4-oxazin-9-olhydrochloride (PD128907) and ropinirole behaved as dopamine D(2) and D(3) receptor full agonists and showed higher potencies in hD(2L)-High and hD(2S)-High compared to hD(2L)-Low and hD(2S)-Low. In hD(3)-Ser-9 and hD(3)-Gly-9 compared to hD(2L)-Low and hD(2S)-Low, dopamine, ropinirole, PD128907, and pramipexole potencies were clearly higher; talipexole and 7-OH-DPAT showed slightly higher potencies; pergolide showed slightly lower potency; and, cabergoline and bromocriptine potencies were lower. Aripiprazole acted as an antagonist in hD(2L)-Low; a low intrinsic activity partial agonist in hD(2S)-Low; a moderate partial agonist in hD(3)-Ser-9 and hD(3)-Gly-9; a robust partial agonist in hD(2L)-High; and a full agonist in hD(2S)-High. Amisulpride, sulpiride and perphenazine behaved as preferential antagonists; and chlorpromazine and asenapine behaved as modest preferential antagonists; whereas fluphenazine, haloperidol, and blonanserin behaved as non-preferential antagonists in hD(2S)-Low and hD(2S)-High compared to hD(3)-Ser-9 and hD(3)-Gly-9. These findings may help to elucidate the basis of therapeutic benefit observed with these drugs, with

  7. Molecular docking study on the α3β2 neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor complexed with α-Conotoxin GIC

    Chewook Lee

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs are a diverse familyof homo- or heteropentameric ligand-gated ion channels.Understanding the physiological role of each nAChR subtypeand the key residues responsible for normal and pathologicalstates is important. α-Conotoxin neuropeptides are highly selectiveprobes capable of discriminating different subtypes ofnAChRs. In this study, we performed homology modeling togenerate the neuronal α3, β2 and β4 subunits using the x-raystructure of the α1 subunit as a template. The structures of theextracellular domains containing ligand binding sites in theα3β2 and α3β4 nAChR subtypes were constructed using MDsimulations and ligand docking processes in their free and ligand-bound states using α-conotoxin GIC, which exhibited thehighest α3β2 vs. α3β4 discrimination ratio. The results providea reasonable structural basis for such a discriminatoryability, supporting the idea that the present strategy can beused for future investigations on nAChR-ligand complexes.[BMB reports 2012; 45(5: 275-280

  8. At-Line Cellular Screening Methodology for Bioactives in Mixtures Targeting the α7-Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor.

    Otvos, Reka A; Mladic, Marija; Arias-Alpizar, Gabriela; Niessen, Wilfried M A; Somsen, Govert W; Smit, August B; Kool, Jeroen

    2016-06-01

    The α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7-nAChR) is a ligand-gated ion channel expressed in different regions of the central nervous system (CNS). The α7-nAChR has been associated with Alzheimer's disease, epilepsy, and schizophrenia, and therefore is extensively studied as a drug target for the treatment of these diseases. Important sources for new compounds in drug discovery are natural extracts. Since natural extracts are complex mixtures, identification of the bioactives demands the use of analytical techniques to separate a bioactive from inactive compounds. This study describes screening methodology for identifying bioactive compounds in mixtures acting on the α7-nAChR. The methodology developed combines liquid chromatography (LC) coupled via a split with both an at-line calcium (Ca(2+))-flux assay and high-resolution mass spectrometry (MS). This allows evaluation of α7-nAChR responses after LC separation, while parallel MS enables compound identification. The methodology was optimized for analysis of agonists and positive allosteric modulators, and was successfully applied to screening of the hallucinogen mushroom Psilocybe Mckennaii The crude mushroom extract was analyzed using both reversed-phase and hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography. Matching retention times and peak shapes of bioactives found with data from the parallel MS measurements allowed rapid pinpointing of accurate masses corresponding to the bioactives. PMID:26738519

  9. Polymorphisms in the neural nicotinic acetylcholine receptor α4 subunit (CHRNA4) are associated with ADHD in a genetic isolate.

    Wallis, Deeann; Arcos-Burgos, Mauricio; Jain, Mahim; Castellanos, F Xavier; Palacio, Juan David; Pineda, David; Lopera, Francisco; Stanescu, Horia; Pineda, Daniel; Berg, Kate; Palacio, Luis Guillermo; Bailey-Wilson, Joan E; Muenke, Maximilian

    2009-05-01

    The neural nicotinic acetylcholine receptor α4 subunit (CHRNA4), at 20q13.2-q13.3, is an important candidate gene for conferring susceptibility to attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Several studies have already looked for association/linkage between ADHD and CHRNA4 in different populations. We used the Pedigree Disequilibrium Test to search for evidence of association between ADHD and six SNP marker loci in families from the isolated Paisa population. We found that the T allele of SNP rs6090384 exhibits a deficit of transmission in unaffected individuals (OR = 5.43, IC 1.54-19.13) (global P value = 0.014). We also found significant association and linkage to extended haplotypes rs2273502-rs6090384 (combination of variants C-T, respectively) (P = 0.02) and rs6090384-rs6090387 (P = 0.04) (combination of variants T-G, respectively). SNP rs6090384, variant T, has also been reported to be associated with inattention in a previous study. This makes ours the ninth study to examine the association of CHRNA4 with ADHD and the seventh one to find evidence for association in a population with a different ethnicity. PMID:21432576

  10. The selective alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonist A-582941 activates immediate early genes in limbic regions of the forebrain

    Thomsen, M S; Mikkelsen, J D; Timmermann, D B;

    2008-01-01

    Due to the cognitive-enhancing properties of alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (alpha7 nAChR) agonists, they have attracted interest for the treatment of cognitive disturbances in schizophrenia. Schizophrenia typically presents in late adolescence or early adulthood. It is therefore important...... juvenile and adult rat forebrain using two markers, activity-regulated cytoskeleton-associated protein (Arc) and c-Fos, to map neuronal activity. Acute administration of A-582941 (1, 3, 10 mg/kg) induced a dose-dependent increase in Arc mRNA expression in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and the ventral...... in the mPFC, VO/LO, and shell of the nucleus accumbens, in both juvenile and adult rats. The A-582941-induced c-Fos protein expression was significantly greater in the mPFC and VO/LO of juvenile compared with adult rats. These data indicate that A-582941-induced alpha7 nAChR stimulation activates...

  11. A Multi-Route Model of Nicotine-Cotinine Pharmacokinetics, Pharmacodynamics and Brain Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor Binding in Humans

    Teeguarden, Justin G.; Housand, Conrad; Smith, Jordan N.; Hinderliter, Paul M.; Gunawan, Rudy; Timchalk, Charles

    2013-02-01

    The pharmacokinetics of nicotine, the pharmacologically active alkaloid in tobacco responsible for addiction, are well characterized in humans. We developed a physiologically based pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic model of nicotine pharmacokinetics, brain dosimetry and brain nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChRs) occupancy. A Bayesian framework was applied to optimize model parameters against multiple human data sets. The resulting model was consistent with both calibration and test data sets, but in general underestimated variability. A pharmacodynamic model relating nicotine levels to increases in heart rate as a proxy for the pharmacological effects of nicotine accurately described the nicotine related changes in heart rate and the development and decay of tolerance to nicotine. The PBPK model was utilized to quantitatively capture the combined impact of variation in physiological and metabolic parameters, nicotine availability and smoking compensation on the change in number of cigarettes smoked and toxicant exposure in a population of 10,000 people presented with a reduced toxicant (50%), reduced nicotine (50%) cigarette Across the population, toxicant exposure is reduced in some but not all smokers. Reductions are not in proportion to reductions in toxicant yields, largely due to partial compensation in response to reduced nicotine yields. This framework can be used as a key element of a dosimetry-driven risk assessment strategy for cigarette smoke constituents.

  12. Up-regulated expression of the alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunit on inflammatory infiltrates during Dictyocaulus viviparus infection.

    Lazari, O; Kipar, A; Johnson, D R; Selkirk, M E; Matthews, J B

    2006-09-01

    Cholinergic signalling is known to affect immune cell function, but few studies have addressed its relevance during nematode infection. We therefore analysed the anatomical distribution and expression pattern of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) alpha7 subunit in lungs obtained from Dictyocaulus viviparus-infected and uninfected control cattle. The analysis was performed on trachea and lung parenchyma from uninfected animals and animals necropsied at 15, 22 and 43 days post-infection (DPI). Localization of the alpha7 nAChR was evaluated by immunohistology and mRNA expression analysed by gene-specific reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). In uninfected animals, tracheal, bronchial and bronchiolar epithelium and smooth muscle cells constitutively expressed the alpha7 nAChR, as did type I and II alveolar epithelial cells and alveolar macrophages and a few infiltrating leucocytes. By 15 DPI, immunohistology revealed a massive influx of alpha7 nAChR+ inflammatory cells into the lung parenchyma and tracheal wall. This was reflected in the RT-PCR results. At later time points, both parenchyma and tracheal wall contained large numbers of alpha7 nAChR+ leucocytes, but detection of transcript was restricted to the trachea. Recruitment of nAChR-containing leucocytes to the lungs of D. viviparus-infected cattle suggests that these cells may represent possible downstream targets for parasite-secreted acetylcholinesterases. PMID:16916366

  13. Antagonist of the amylin receptor blocks beta-amyloid toxicity in rat cholinergic basal forebrain neurons.

    Jhamandas, Jack H; MacTavish, David

    2004-06-16

    Salvage of cholinergic neurons in the brain through a blockade of the neurotoxic effects of amyloidbeta protein (Abeta) is one of the major, but still elusive, therapeutic goals of current research in Alzheimer's disease (AD). To date, no receptor has been unequivocally identified for Abeta. Human amylin, which acts via a receptor composed of the calcitonin receptor-like receptor and a receptor-associated membrane protein, possesses amyloidogenic properties and has a profile of neurotoxicity that is strikingly similar to Abeta. In this study, using primary cultures of rat cholinergic basal forebrain neurons, we show that acetyl-[Asn30, Tyr32] sCT(8-37) (AC187), an amylin receptor antagonist, blocks Abeta-induced neurotoxicity. Treatment of cultures with AC187 before exposure to Abeta results in significantly improved neuronal survival as judged by MTT and live-dead cell assays. Quantitative measures of Abeta-evoked apoptotic cell death, using Hoechst and phosphotidylserine staining, confirm neuroprotective effects of AC187. We also demonstrate that AC187 attenuates the activation of initiator and effector caspases that mediate Abeta-induced apoptotic cell death. These data are the first to show that expression of Abeta toxicity may occur through the amylin receptor and suggest a novel therapeutic target for the treatment of AD. PMID:15201330

  14. CRF receptor antagonist astressin-B reverses and prevents alopecia in CRF over-expressing mice.

    Lixin Wang

    Full Text Available Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF signaling pathways are involved in the stress response, and there is growing evidence supporting hair growth inhibition of murine hair follicle in vivo upon stress exposure. We investigated whether the blockade of CRF receptors influences the development of hair loss in CRF over-expressing (OE-mice that display phenotypes of Cushing's syndrome and chronic stress, including alopecia. The non-selective CRF receptors antagonist, astressin-B (5 µg/mouse injected peripherally once a day for 5 days in 4-9 months old CRF-OE alopecic mice induced pigmentation and hair re-growth that was largely retained for over 4 months. In young CRF-OE mice, astressin-B prevented the development of alopecia that occurred in saline-treated mice. Histological examination indicated that alopecic CRF-OE mice had hair follicle atrophy and that astressin-B revived the hair follicle from the telogen to anagen phase. However, astressin-B did not show any effect on the elevated plasma corticosterone levels and the increased weights of adrenal glands and visceral fat in CRF-OE mice. The selective CRF₂ receptor antagonist, astressin₂-B had moderate effect on pigmentation, but not on hair re-growth. The commercial drug for alopecia, minoxidil only showed partial effect on hair re-growth. These data support the existence of a key molecular switching mechanism triggered by blocking peripheral CRF receptors with an antagonist to reset hair growth in a mouse model of alopecia associated with chronic stress.

  15. Evidence that the angiotensin at 2-receptor agonist compound 21 is also a low affinity thromboxane TXA2-receptor antagonist

    Fredgart, M.; Leurgans, T.; Stenelo, M.;

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to test whether Compound 21 (C21), a high-affinity, non-peptide angiotensinAT2-receptor agonist, is also an antagonist of thromboxane A2 (TXA2) receptors thus reducing both vasoconstriction and platelet aggregation. Design and method: Binding of C21 to the...... TXA2 receptor was determined by TBXA2R Arrestin Biosensor Assay. Mouse mesenteric arteries were mounted in wire myographs, and responses to increasing concentrations of C21 (1nM- 10muM) were recorded during submaximal contractions with 0.1muM U46619 (TXA2 analogue) or 1muMphenylephrine. To control for...

  16. Increased cocaine self-administration in M4 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor knockout mice

    Schmidt, Lene Sørensen; Thomsen, Morgane; Weikop, Pia;

    2011-01-01

    Rationale The reinforcing effects of cocaine are mediated by the mesolimbic dopamine system. Behavioral and neurochemical studies have shown that the cholinergic muscarinic M4 receptor subtype plays an important role in regulation of dopaminergic neurotransmission. Objectives Here we investigated...... for the first time the involvement of M4 receptors in the reinforcing effects of cocaine using chronic intravenous cocaine self-administration in extensively backcrossed M4 receptor knockout (M4 -/-) mice. Methods We evaluated acquisition of cocaine self-administration in experimentally naïve mice....... Both cocaine self-administration and food-maintained operant behavior were evaluated under fixed ratio 1 (FR 1) and progressive ratio (PR) schedules of reinforcement. In addition, cocaine-induced dopamine release and cocaine-induced hyperactivity were evaluated. Results M4 -/- mice earned significantly...

  17. Pharmacophore Distance Mapping and Docking Study of Some Benzimidazole Analogs as A2A Receptor Antagonists

    Santosh P. Ghatol

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular adenosine regulates a wide range of functions in higher organisms, in which the effects are mediated by a family of four class A (rhodopsin-like GPCRs, a, adenosine receptors known as A1, A2A, A2B, and A3. A2A antagonists, either alone or in combination with dopamine agonists, can have a role in the treatment of neurodegenerative movement disorders such as Parkinson’s disease and Huntington’s disease. The concept of a pharmacophore is widely used in modern drug design and it is generally defined as the 3D arrangement of certain features in the ligand that are responsible for its activity against a particular protein target. Docking involves, the process of fitting the ligand into receptor, and the compounds which fit in them properly are assumed to be active for that receptor and it gives corresponding docking scores.

  18. Radiolabeling with fluorine-18 of a protein, interleukin-1 receptor antagonist

    IL-1RA is a naturally occurring antagonist of the pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-1 (IL-1) with high therapeutic promise, but its pharmacokinetic remains poorly documented. In this report, we describe the radiolabeling of recombinant human interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (rhIL-1RA) with fluorine-18 to allow pharmacokinetic studies by positron emission tomography (PET). rhIL-1RA was labeled randomly by reductive alkylation of free amino groups (the ε-amino group of lysine residues or amino-terminal residues) using [18F]fluoroacetaldehyde under mild reaction conditions. Radiosyntheses used a remotely controlled experimental rig within 100 min and the radiochemical yield was in the range 7.1-24.2% (decay corrected, based on seventeen syntheses). We showed that the produced [18F]fluoroethyl-rhIL-1ra retained binding specificity by conducting an assay on rat brain sections, allowing its pharmakokinetic study using PET.

  19. Design, synthesis, and pharmacological characterization of novel spirocyclic quinuclidinyl-Delta2 -isoxazoline derivatives as potent and selective agonists of alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors

    Dallanoce, Clelia; Magrone, Pietro; Matera, Carlo;

    2011-01-01

    A set of racemic spirocyclic quinuclidinyl-¿(2) -isoxazoline derivatives was synthesized using a 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition-based approach. Target compounds were assayed for binding affinity toward rat neuronal homomeric (a7) and heteromeric (a4ß2) nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. ¿(2) -Isoxazol...... (-)-dibenzoyl-D-tartaric acid as resolving agents. Enantiomer (R)-(-)-6¿a was found to be the eutomer, with K(i) values of 4.6 and 48.7 nM against rat and human a7 receptors, respectively....

  20. 6-bromohypaphorine from marine nudibranch mollusk Hermissenda crassicornis is an agonist of human α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor.

    Kasheverov, Igor E; Shelukhina, Irina V; Kudryavtsev, Denis S; Makarieva, Tatyana N; Spirova, Ekaterina N; Guzii, Alla G; Stonik, Valentin A; Tsetlin, Victor I

    2015-03-01

    6-Bromohypaphorine (6-BHP) has been isolated from the marine sponges Pachymatisma johnstoni, Aplysina sp., and the tunicate Aplidium conicum, but data on its biological activity were not available. For the nudibranch mollusk Hermissenda crassicornis no endogenous compounds were known, and here we describe the isolation of 6-BHP from this mollusk and its effects on different nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR). Two-electrode voltage-clamp experiments on the chimeric α7 nAChR (built of chicken α7 ligand-binding and glycine receptor transmembrane domains) or on rat α4β2 nAChR expressed in Xenopus oocytes revealed no action of 6-BHP. However, in radioligand analysis, 6-BHP competed with radioiodinated α-bungarotoxin for binding to human α7 nAChR expressed in GH4C1 cells (IC50 23 ± 1 μM), but showed no competition on muscle-type nAChR from Torpedo californica. In Ca2+-imaging experiments on the human α7 nAChR expressed in the Neuro2a cells, 6-BHP in the presence of PNU120596 behaved as an agonist (EC50 ~80 μM). To the best of our knowledge, 6-BHP is the first low-molecular weight compound from marine source which is an agonist of the nAChR subtype. This may have physiological importance because H. crassicornis, with its simple and tractable nervous system, is a convenient model system for studying the learning and memory processes. PMID:25775422