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Sample records for acetone vapor sensing

  1. Acetone vapor sensing using a vertical cavity surface emitting laser diode coated with polystyrene

    Ansbæk, Thor; Nielsen, Claus Højgaard; Larsen, Niels Bent;

    2009-01-01

    We report theoretical and experimental on a new vapor sensor, using a single-mode vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) coated with a polymer sensor coating, which can detect acetone vapor at a volume fraction of 2.5%. The sensor provides the advantage of standard packaging, small form...

  2. An analysis of human response to the irritancy of acetone vapors.

    Arts, J H E; Mojet, J; van Gemert, L J; Emmen, H H; Lammers, J H C M; Marquart, J; Woutersen, R A; Feron, V J

    2002-01-01

    Studies on the irritative effects of acetone vapor in humans and experimental animals have revealed large differences in the lowest acetone concentration found to be irritative to the respiratory tract and eyes. This has brought on much confusion in the process of setting occupational exposure limits for acetone. A literature survey was carried out focusing on the differences in results between studies using subjective (neuro)behavioral methods (questionnaires) and studies using objective measurements to detect odor and irritation thresholds. A critical review of published studies revealed that the odor detection threshold of acetone ranges from about 20 to about 400 ppm. Loss of sensitivity due to adaptation and/or habituation to acetone odor may occur, as was shown in studies comparing workers previously exposed to acetone with previously unexposed subjects. It further appeared that the sensory irritation threshold of acetone lies between 10,000 and 40,000 ppm. Thus, the threshold for sensory irritation is much higher than the odor detection limit, a conclusion that is supported by observations in anosmics, showing a ten times higher irritation threshold level than the odor threshold found in normosmics. The two-times higher sensory irritation threshold observed in acetone-exposed workers compared with previously nonexposed controls can apart from adaptation be ascribed to habituation. An evaluation of studies on subjectively reported irritation at acetone concentrations < 1000 ppm shows that perception of odor intensity, information bias, and exposure history (i.e., habituation) are confounding factors in the reporting of irritation thresholds and health symptoms. In conclusion, subjective measures alone are inappropriate for establishing sensory irritation effects and sensory irritation threshold levels of odorants such as acetone. Clearly, the sensory irritation threshold of acetone should be based on objective measurements. PMID:11852913

  3. Remote sensing of water vapor features

    Fuelberg, Henry E.

    1991-01-01

    The three major objectives of the project are outlined: (1) to describe atmospheric water vapor features as functions of space and time; (2) to evaluate remotely sensed measurements of water vapor content; and (3) to study relations between fine-scale water vapor fields and convective activity. Data from several remote sensors were used. The studies used the GOES/VAS, HIS, and MAMS instruments have provided a progressively finer scale view of water vapor features.

  4. Properties of a-C:H:O plasma polymer films deposited from acetone vapors

    Drabik, M., E-mail: martin.drabik@gmail.com [Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Lerchenfeldstrasse 5, 9014 St. Gallen (Switzerland); Celma, C. [Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Lerchenfeldstrasse 5, 9014 St. Gallen (Switzerland); Kousal, J.; Biederman, H. [Charles University in Prague, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Department of Macromolecular Physics, V Holešovičkách 2, 180 00 Prague 8 (Czech Republic); Hegemann, D. [Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Lerchenfeldstrasse 5, 9014 St. Gallen (Switzerland)

    2014-12-31

    To gain insight into the deposition and stability of oxygen-containing plasma polymer films, the properties of amorphous oxygenated hydrocarbon (a-C:H:O) plasma polymer coatings deposited from acetone vapors under various experimental conditions are investigated. Apart from the discharge power, the influence of the reactive carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) gas on the structure of the resulting films is studied. It is found by characterization using X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy and Fourier-Transform Infrared Spectroscopy that the experimental conditions particularly influence the amount of oxygen in the deposited a-C:H:O plasma polymer films. The O/C elemental ratio increases with increasing amount of CO{sub 2} in the working gas mixture (up to 0.2 for 24 sccm of CO{sub 2} at 30 W) and decreases with increasing RF discharge power (down to 0.17 for 50 W). Furthermore, the nature of bonds between the oxygen and carbon atoms has been examined. Only low amounts of double and triple bonded carbon are observed. This has a particular influence on the aging of the plasma polymer films which is studied both in ambient air and in distilled water for up to 4 months. Overall, stable a-C:H:O plasma polymer films are deposited comprising low amounts (up to about 5%) of ester/carboxyl groups. - Highlights: • Hydrocarbon plasma polymer films with variable oxygen content can be prepared. • Stable oxygenated hydrocarbon plasma polymers contain max 5% of ester/carboxyl groups. • Acetone-derived plasma polymer films can be used as permanent hydrophilic surfaces.

  5. Properties of a-C:H:O plasma polymer films deposited from acetone vapors

    To gain insight into the deposition and stability of oxygen-containing plasma polymer films, the properties of amorphous oxygenated hydrocarbon (a-C:H:O) plasma polymer coatings deposited from acetone vapors under various experimental conditions are investigated. Apart from the discharge power, the influence of the reactive carbon dioxide (CO2) gas on the structure of the resulting films is studied. It is found by characterization using X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy and Fourier-Transform Infrared Spectroscopy that the experimental conditions particularly influence the amount of oxygen in the deposited a-C:H:O plasma polymer films. The O/C elemental ratio increases with increasing amount of CO2 in the working gas mixture (up to 0.2 for 24 sccm of CO2 at 30 W) and decreases with increasing RF discharge power (down to 0.17 for 50 W). Furthermore, the nature of bonds between the oxygen and carbon atoms has been examined. Only low amounts of double and triple bonded carbon are observed. This has a particular influence on the aging of the plasma polymer films which is studied both in ambient air and in distilled water for up to 4 months. Overall, stable a-C:H:O plasma polymer films are deposited comprising low amounts (up to about 5%) of ester/carboxyl groups. - Highlights: • Hydrocarbon plasma polymer films with variable oxygen content can be prepared. • Stable oxygenated hydrocarbon plasma polymers contain max 5% of ester/carboxyl groups. • Acetone-derived plasma polymer films can be used as permanent hydrophilic surfaces

  6. Remote sensing of water vapor features

    Fuelberg, Henry E.

    1993-01-01

    Water vapor plays a critical role in the atmosphere. It is an important medium of energy exchange between air, land, and water; it is a major greenhouse gas, providing a crucial radiative role in the global climate system; and it is intimately involved in many regional scale atmospheric processes. Our research has been aimed at improving satellite remote sensing of water vapor and better understanding its role in meteorological processes. Our early studies evaluated the current GOES VAS system for measuring water vapor and have used VAS-derived water vapor data to examine pre-thunderstorm environments. Much of that research was described at the 1991 Research Review. A second research component has considered three proposed sensors--the High resolution Interferometer Sounder (HIS), the Multispectral Atmospheric Mapping Sensor (MAMS), and the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU). We have focused on MAMS and AMSU research during the past year and the accomplishments made in this effort are presented.

  7. Effect of Gold Dispersion on the Photocatalytic Activity of Mesoporous Titania for the Vapor-Phase Oxidation of Acetone

    S. V. Awate

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesostructured titanium dioxide photocatalyst, having uniform crystallite size (6–12 nm and average pore diameter of ∼4.2 nm, was synthesized by using a low-temperature nonsurfactant hydrothermal route, employing tartaric acid as a templating agent. Gold additions from 0.5 to 2 wt% were incorporated, either during the hydrothermal process or by postsynthesis wet impregnation. Compared to the impregnation-prepared samples, the samples synthesized hydrothermally contained smaller-size (≤1 nm gold clusters occluded in the pores of the host matrix. Whereas CO2 and H2O were the main reaction products in UV-assisted vapor-phase oxidation of acetone using these catalysts, C2H6 and HCO2CH3 were also produced for higher acetone concentrations in air. The conversion of acetone was found to increase with decrease in the size of both TiO2 and gold particles. In situ IR spectroscopy revealed that titania and gold particles serve as independent adsorption and reaction sites for acetone and oxygen molecules. Acetone molecules adsorb exclusively at TiO2 surface, giving rise to a strongly adsorbed (condensed state as well as to the formation of formate- and methyl formate-type surface species. Hydroxyl groups at titania surface participate directly in these adsorption steps. Nanosize gold particles, on the other hand, were primarily responsible for the adsorption and activation of oxygen molecules. Mechanistic aspects of the photochemical processes are discussed on the basis of these observations.

  8. Acetone Gas Sensing Properties of a Multiple-Networked Fe2O3-Functionalized CuO Nanorod Sensor

    Sunghoon Park

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Fe2O3-decorated CuO nanorods were prepared by Cu thermal oxidation followed by Fe2O3 decoration via a solvothermal route. The acetone gas sensing properties of multiple-networked pristine and Fe2O3-decorated CuO nanorod sensors were examined. The optimal operating temperature of the sensors was found to be 240°C. The pristine and Fe2O3-decorated CuO nanorod sensors showed responses of 586 and 1,090%, respectively, to 1,000 ppm of acetone at 240°C. The Fe2O3-decorated CuO nanorod sensor also showed faster response and recovery than the latter sensor. The acetone gas sensing mechanism of the Fe2O3-decorated CuO nanorod sensor is discussed in detail. The origin of the enhanced sensing performance of the multiple-networked Fe2O3-decorated CuO nanorod sensor to acetone gas was explained by modulation of the potential barrier at the Fe2O3-CuO interface, highly catalytic activity of Fe2O3 for acetone oxidation, and the creation of active adsorption sites by Fe2O3 nanoparticles.

  9. Influence of Ce doping on microstructure of ZnO nanoparticles and their acetone sensing properties

    Li, F.M.; Li, X.B. [College of Physics and Electronic Engineering, Key Laboratory of Atomic and Molecular Physics & Functional Materials of Gansu Province, Northwest Normal University, Lanzhou, Gansu 730070 (China); National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures & Eco-Materials and Renewable Energy Research Center (ERERC) at Department of Physics, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Ma, S.Y., E-mail: lifaming1108074@sina.com [College of Physics and Electronic Engineering, Key Laboratory of Atomic and Molecular Physics & Functional Materials of Gansu Province, Northwest Normal University, Lanzhou, Gansu 730070 (China); Chen, L.; Li, W.Q.; Zhu, C.T.; Xu, X.L. [College of Physics and Electronic Engineering, Key Laboratory of Atomic and Molecular Physics & Functional Materials of Gansu Province, Northwest Normal University, Lanzhou, Gansu 730070 (China); Chen, Y. [Northwest University for Nationality, Lanzhou, Gansu 730030 (China); Li, Y.F.; Lawson, G. [Atech Systems, 6110 W. Highway 290, Austin, TX 78735 (United States)

    2015-11-15

    Electrospinning technology was generally used to synthesis nanofiber, here we use it to fabricate pure ZnO nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) and Ce-doped (0.1 wt%, 0.8 wt%, 1.5 wt%) ZnO nanoparticles (ZnO:Ce NPs) via decrease the molecular weight of PVP in precursor liquid. Their microstructures were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, Brunauer-Emmet-Teller and photoluminescence spectra. The results clearly indicated that the 0.8 wt% ZnO:Ce NPs shows smaller average grain size (70 nm) and a higher specific surface area (21.5 m{sup 2}/g). The testing on gas sensing performance revealed that the 0.8 wt% ZnO:Ce NPs based sensor shows the highest response values and a well selectivity to acetone. The response and recovery time of ZnO NPs based sensors to 100 ppm acetone was about 13 and 7 s while these are about 10 and 9 s in ZnO:Ce NPs based sensors, respectively. These results demonstrated that the 0.8 wt% ZnO:Ce NPs based sensor can rapidly be detect and distinguish accurately acetone in ambient air. Moreover, the sensor shows good long-term stability and reproducibility of response. The sensing mechanism was also discussed and the results indicated that the gas diffusing channels and the electron depleted layer of the ZnO NPs based sensor was increased markedly after Ce-doped, which results in the response of the ZnO:Ce NPs based sensor increased. - Highlights: • The loose mesostructured provide more channel for gas diffusion. • Smaller average grain size (70 nm) and higher specific surface area (21.5 m{sup 2}/g). • The response and recovery time of ZnO:Ce NPs based sensor was about 10 and 9 s. • Suitable Ce-doped could improve the response of the ZnO NPs base sensors.

  10. Acetone Gas Sensing Properties of a Multiple-Networked Fe2O3-Functionalized CuO Nanorod Sensor

    Sunghoon Park; Hyejoon Kheel; Gun-Joo Sun; Taegyung Ko; Wan In Lee; Chongmu Lee

    2015-01-01

    Fe2O3-decorated CuO nanorods were prepared by Cu thermal oxidation followed by Fe2O3 decoration via a solvothermal route. The acetone gas sensing properties of multiple-networked pristine and Fe2O3-decorated CuO nanorod sensors were examined. The optimal operating temperature of the sensors was found to be 240°C. The pristine and Fe2O3-decorated CuO nanorod sensors showed responses of 586 and 1,090%, respectively, to 1,000 ppm of acetone at 240°C. The Fe2O3-decorated CuO nanorod sensor also s...

  11. Gas sensing behaviour of Cr2O3 and W6+: Cr2O3 nanoparticles towards acetone

    Kohli, Nipin; Hastir, Anita; Singh, Ravi Chand

    2016-05-01

    This paper reports the acetone gas sensing properties of Cr2O3 and 2% W6+ doped Cr2O3 nanoparticles. The simple cost-effective hydrolysis assisted co-precipitation method was adopted. Synthesized samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) techniques. XRD revealed that synthesized nanoparticles have corundum structure. The lattice parameters have been calculated by Rietveld refinement; and strain and crystallite size have been calculated by using the Williamson-Hall plots. For acetone gas sensing properties, the nanoparticles were applied as thick film onto alumina substrate and tested at different operating temperatures. The results showed that the optimum operating temperature of both the gas sensors is 250°C. At optimum operating temperature, the response of Cr2O3 and 2% W6+ doped Cr2O3 gas sensor towards 100 ppm acetone was found to be 25.5 and 35.6 respectively. The investigations revealed that the addition of W6+ as a dopant enhanced the sensing response of Cr2O3 nanoparticles appreciably.

  12. Radiometric remote sensing of mesospheric and stratospheric water vapor

    Croskey, Charles L.; Olivero, John J.; Martone, Joseph P.

    1991-01-01

    The remote sensing of stratospheric and mesospheric water vapor by microwave and millimeter radiometry is described. The received radiation is emitted by and interacts with all levels of the atmosphere. The pressure dependence of the linewidth for the absorption cross section of water vapor permits retrieval of vapor mixing ratios. The 183.31-GHz line of water vapor can also be used for remote sensing of the water vapor concentration in the upper atmosphere, but due to the much stronger absorption cross section for this line, ground-based observations are difficult. To date all measurements at 183 GHz have been made from platforms above the troposphere.

  13. Bionanomaterials and Bioinspired Nanostructures for Selective Vapor Sensing

    Potyrailo, Radislav; Naik, Rajesh R.

    2013-07-01

    At present, monitoring of air at the workplace, in urban environments, and on battlefields; exhaled air from medical patients; air in packaged food containers; and so forth can be accomplished with different types of analytical instruments. Vapor sensors have their niche in these measurements when an unobtrusive, low-power, and cost-sensitive technical solution is required. Unfortunately, existing vapor sensors often degrade their vapor-quantitation accuracy in the presence of high levels of interferences and cannot quantitate several components in complex gas mixtures. Thus, new sensing approaches with improved sensor selectivity are required. This technological task can be accomplished by the careful design of sensing materials with new performance properties and by coupling these materials with the suitable physical transducers. This review is focused on the assessment of the capabilities of bionanomaterials and bioinspired nanostructures for selective vapor sensing. We demonstrate that these sensing materials can operate with diverse transducers based on electrical, mechanical, and optical readout principles and can provide vapor-response selectivity previously unattainable by using other sensing materials. This ability for selective vapor sensing provides opportunities to significantly impact the major directions in development and application scenarios of vapor sensors.

  14. Photoinduced charge transfer and acetone sensitivity of single-walled carbon nanotube-titanium dioxide hybrids.

    Ding, Mengning; Sorescu, Dan C; Star, Alexander

    2013-06-19

    The unique physical and chemical properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) make them ideal building blocks for the construction of hybrid nanostructures. In addition to increasing the material complexity and functionality, SWNTs can probe the interfacial processes in the hybrid system. In this work, SWNT-TiO2 core/shell hybrid nanostructures were found to exhibit unique electrical behavior in response to UV illumination and acetone vapors. By experimental and theoretical studies of UV and acetone sensitivities of different SWNT-TiO2 hybrid systems, we established a fundamental understanding on the interfacial charge transfer between photoexcited TiO2 and SWNTs as well as the mechanism of acetone sensing. We further demonstrated a practical application of photoinduced acetone sensitivity by fabricating a microsized room temperature acetone sensor that showed fast, linear, and reversible detection of acetone vapors with concentrations in few parts per million range. PMID:23734594

  15. Biofiltration of a styrene/acetone vapor mixture in two reactor types under conditions of styrene overloading

    Lubos Zapotocky

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This aim of study was to compare the performance of a biofilter (BF and trickle bed reactor (TBR under increased styrene loading with a constant acetone load, 2 gc/m3/h. At styrene loading rates up to 30 gc/m3/h, the BF showed higher styrene removal than TBR. However, the BF efficiency started to drop beyond this threshold loading and could never reach steady state, whereas the TBR continued to yield a 50% styrene removal. The acetone removal remained constant (93-98% in both the reactors at any styrene loading. Once the overloading was lifted, the BF recovered within 26 min, whereas the TBR efficiency bounced back only to 95%, gradually returning to complete removal only in 10 h.

  16. Acetone poisoning

    ... JavaScript. Acetone is a chemical used in many household products. This article discusses poisoning from swallowing acetone-based ... A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Household Products Browse the Encyclopedia A.D.A.M., Inc. ...

  17. Nickel oxide nanowires: vapor liquid solid synthesis and integration into a gas sensing device

    Kaur, N.; Comini, E.; Zappa, D.; Poli, N.; Sberveglieri, G.

    2016-05-01

    In the field of advanced sensor technology, metal oxide nanostructures are promising materials due to their high charge carrier mobility, easy fabrication and excellent stability. Among all the metal oxide semiconductors, nickel oxide (NiO) is a p-type semiconductor with a wide band gap and excellent optical, electrical and magnetic properties, which has not been much investigated. Herein, we report the growth of NiO nanowires by using the vapor liquid solid (VLS) technique for gas sensing applications. Platinum, palladium and gold have been used as a catalyst for the growth of NiO nanowires. The surface morphology of the nanowires was investigated through scanning electron microscopy to find out which catalyst and growth conditions are best for the growth of nanowires. GI-XRD and Raman spectroscopies were used to confirm the crystalline structure of the material. Different batches of sensors have been prepared, and their sensing performances towards different gas species such as carbon monoxide, ethanol, acetone and hydrogen have been explored. NiO nanowire sensors show interesting and promising performances towards hydrogen.

  18. Hybrid Vapor Stripping-Vapor Permeation Process for Recovery and Dehydration of 1-Butanol and Acetone/Butanol/Ethanol from Dilute Aqueous Solutions. Part 1. Process Simulations

    BACKGROUND: Fermentative production of butanol is limited to low concentrations, typically less than 2 wt% solvent, due to product inhibition. The result is high separation energy demand by conventional distillation approaches, despite favorable vapor-liquid equilibrium and parti...

  19. An acetone bio-sniffer (gas phase biosensor) enabling assessment of lipid metabolism from exhaled breath.

    Ye, Ming; Chien, Po-Jen; Toma, Koji; Arakawa, Takahiro; Mitsubayashi, Kohji

    2015-11-15

    Several volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are released from human breath or skin. Like chemical substances in blood or urine, some of these vapors can provide valuable information regarding the state of the human body. A highly sensitive acetone biochemical gas sensor (bio-sniffer) was developed and used to measure exhaled breath acetone concentration, and assess lipid metabolism based on breath acetone analysis. A fiber-optic biochemical gas sensing system was constructed by attaching a flow-cell with nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH)-dependent secondary alcohol dehydrogenase (S-ADH) immobilized membrane onto a fiber-optic NADH measurement system. The NADH measurement system utilizes an ultraviolet-light emitting diode with peak emission of 335 nm as an excitation light source. NADH is consumed by the enzymatic reaction of S-ADH, and the consumption is proportional to the concentration of acetone vapor. Phosphate buffer which contained NADH was circulated into the flow-cell to rinse products and the excessive substrates from the optode. The change of fluorescent emitted from NADH is analyzed by the PMT. Hence, fluorescence intensity decreased as the acetone concentration increased. The relationship between fluorescence intensity and acetone concentration was identified from 20 ppb to 5300 ppb. This interval included the concentration of acetone vapor in the breath of healthy people and those suffering from disorders of carbohydrate metabolism. Finally, the acetone bio-sniffer was used to measure breath acetone during an exercise stress test on an ergometer after a period of fasting. The concentration of acetone in breath was shown to significantly increase after exercise. This biosensor allows rapid, highly sensitive and selective measurement of lipid metabolism. PMID:26079672

  20. Au-modified three-dimensional In2O3 inverse opals: synthesis and improved performance for acetone sensing toward diagnosis of diabetes

    Xing, Ruiqing; Li, Qingling; Xia, Lei; Song, Jian; Xu, Lin; Zhang, Jiahuan; Xie, Yi; Song, Hongwei

    2015-07-01

    Analyzing the volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in exhaled breath effectively is crucial to medical treatment, which can provide a fast and noninvasive way to diagnose disease. Well-designed materials with controlled structures have great influence on the sensing performance. In this work, the ordered three dimensional inverse opal (3DIO) macroporous In2O3 films with additional via-hole architectures were fabricated and different amounts of gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) were loaded on the In2O3 films aiming at enhancing their electrical responses. The gas sensing to acetone toward diabetes diagnosis in exhaled breath was performed with different Au/In2O3 electrodes. Representatively, the best 3DIO Au/In2O3 sensor can detect acetone effectively at 340 °C with response of 42.4 to 5 ppm, the actual detection limit is as low as 20 ppb, and it holds a dynamic response of 11 s and a good selectivity. Moreover, clinical tests proved that the as-prepared 3DIO Au/In2O3 IO sensor could distinguish acetone biomarkers in human breath clearly. The excellent gas sensing properties of the Au/In2O3 electrodes were attributed to the ``spillover effects'' between Au and In2O3 and the special 3DIO structure. This work indicates that 3DIO Au/In2O3 composite is a promising electrode material for actual application in the monitoring and detection of diabetes through exhaled breath.Analyzing the volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in exhaled breath effectively is crucial to medical treatment, which can provide a fast and noninvasive way to diagnose disease. Well-designed materials with controlled structures have great influence on the sensing performance. In this work, the ordered three dimensional inverse opal (3DIO) macroporous In2O3 films with additional via-hole architectures were fabricated and different amounts of gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) were loaded on the In2O3 films aiming at enhancing their electrical responses. The gas sensing to acetone toward diabetes diagnosis in exhaled

  1. Open-system nanocasting synthesis of nanoscale α-Fe2O3 porous structure with enhanced acetone-sensing properties

    Highlights: • Nanoscale α-Fe2O3 porous structure was fabricated by an open-system nanocasting way. • Nanoscale α-Fe2O3 exhibits enhanced acetone-sensing property than the mesoporous one. • High surface area, small diameter and wide porous distribution are sensing reasons. - Abstract: Nanoscale α-Fe2O3 with porous structure was synthesized via an open-system nanocasting method. Characterization of the crystal structures, morphologies, surface areas, and pore size distributions of the as-synthesized α-Fe2O3 by wide-angle and small-angle X-ray powder diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and nitrogen physisorption analysis demonstrated that the nanoscale α-Fe2O3 synthesized in open system had a less crystallinity with average diameter of ∼6.0 nm, higher BET specific surface area of 205.4 m2 g−1, and wider pore size distribution from ∼2.2 nm to 15.7 nm compared with that of the mesoporous α-Fe2O3 synthesized in closed system. The gas-sensing measurement results revealed that the nanoscale α-Fe2O3 based gas sensor had a much better response to acetone than that of the device prepared from the mesoporous α-Fe2O3. A possible gas-sensing mechanism based on the α-Fe2O3 samples synthesized with different nanocasting systems was discussed in detail. Wide porous distribution of the nanoscale α-Fe2O3, as well as small particle size and high surface area are effective for gas molecules diffusion and formation of sufficient electron depletion area and result the enhanced sensor response, which suggests that it has great potential for practical applications in diabetes diagnosis

  2. REMOTE SENSING OF WATER VAPOR CONTENT USING GROUND-BASED GPS DATA

    2000-01-01

    Spatial and temporal resolution of water vapor content is useful in improving the accuracy of short-term weather prediction.Dense and continuously tracking regional GPS arrays will play an important role in remote sensing atmospheric water vapor content.In this study,a piecewise linear solution method was proposed to estimate the precipitable water vapor (PWV) content from ground-based GPS observations in Hong Kong.To evaluate the solution accuracy of the water vapor content sensed by GPS,the upper air sounding data (radiosonde) that are collected locally was used to calculate the precipitable water vapor during the same period.One-month results of PWV from both ground-based GPS sensing technique and radiosonde method are in agreement within 1~2 mm.This encouraging result will motivate the GPS meteorology application based on the establishment of a dense GPS array in Hong Kong.

  3. Open-system nanocasting synthesis of nanoscale α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} porous structure with enhanced acetone-sensing properties

    Sun, Xiaohong, E-mail: sunxh@tju.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Key Lab of Advanced Ceramics and Machining Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Ji, Huiming; Li, Xiaolei; Cai, Shu [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Key Lab of Advanced Ceramics and Machining Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Zheng, Chunming, E-mail: zhengchunming@tjpu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Hollow-fiber Membrane Materials and Membrane Processes, School of Environmental and Chemical Engineering, Tianjin Polytechnic University, Tianjin 300387 (China)

    2014-07-05

    Highlights: • Nanoscale α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} porous structure was fabricated by an open-system nanocasting way. • Nanoscale α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} exhibits enhanced acetone-sensing property than the mesoporous one. • High surface area, small diameter and wide porous distribution are sensing reasons. - Abstract: Nanoscale α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} with porous structure was synthesized via an open-system nanocasting method. Characterization of the crystal structures, morphologies, surface areas, and pore size distributions of the as-synthesized α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} by wide-angle and small-angle X-ray powder diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and nitrogen physisorption analysis demonstrated that the nanoscale α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} synthesized in open system had a less crystallinity with average diameter of ∼6.0 nm, higher BET specific surface area of 205.4 m{sup 2} g{sup −1}, and wider pore size distribution from ∼2.2 nm to 15.7 nm compared with that of the mesoporous α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} synthesized in closed system. The gas-sensing measurement results revealed that the nanoscale α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} based gas sensor had a much better response to acetone than that of the device prepared from the mesoporous α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}. A possible gas-sensing mechanism based on the α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} samples synthesized with different nanocasting systems was discussed in detail. Wide porous distribution of the nanoscale α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, as well as small particle size and high surface area are effective for gas molecules diffusion and formation of sufficient electron depletion area and result the enhanced sensor response, which suggests that it has great potential for practical applications in diabetes diagnosis.

  4. Compressive sensing for neutrospheric water vapor tomography using GNSS and InSAR observations

    Heublein, Marion; Zhu, Xiao Xiang; Alshawaf, Fadwa; Mayer, Michael; Bamler, Richard; Hinz, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the innovative Compressive Sensing (CS) concept for tomographic reconstruction of 3D neutrospheric water vapor fields using data from Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) and Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR). The Precipitable Water Vapor (PWV) input data are derived from simulations of the Weather Research and Forecasting modeling system. We apply a Compressive Sensing based approach for tomographic inversion. Using the Cosine transform, a sparse repr...

  5. Hybrid Vapor Stripping-Vapor Permeation Process for Recovery and Dehydration of 1-Butanol and Acetone/Butanol/Ethanol from Dilute Aqueous Solutions. Part 2. Experimental Validation with Simple Mixtures and Actual Fermentation Broth

    BACKGROUND: In Part1 of this work, a process integrating vapor stripping, vapor compression, and a vapor permeation membrane separation step, Membrane Assisted Vapor Stripping (MAVS), was predicted to produce energy savings compared to traditional distillation systems for separat...

  6. Remote sensing of water vapor in the near IR from EOS/MODIS

    Kaufman, Yoram J.; Gao, Bo-Cai

    1992-01-01

    Consideration is given to the selection of spectral channels in the near-infrared IR which are to be employed for the derivation of total column water vapor using the MODIS instrument on the NASA's Earth Observing System. Data obtained show that the three near-IR water vapor channels on the MODIS instrument enable remote sensing of the total column water vapor with an absolute accuracy of +/- 13 percent. An absolute accuracy of +/-7 percent can be obtained if additional MODIS channels are used to decrease the effect of uncertainty in the spectral reflectance of the surface, subpixel clouds, haze, and temperature profile on the derived water vapor.

  7. Remote Sensing of Water Vapor and Thin Cirrus Clouds using MODIS Near-IR Channels

    Gao, Bo-Cai; Kaufman, Yoram J.

    2001-01-01

    The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), a major facility instrument on board the Terra Spacecraft, was successfully launched into space in December of 1999. MODIS has several near-IR channels within and around the 0.94 micrometer water vapor bands for remote sensing of integrated atmospheric water vapor over land and above clouds. MODIS also has a special near-IR channel centered at 1.375-micron with a width of 30 nm for remote sensing of cirrus clouds. In this paper, we describe briefly the physical principles on remote sensing of water vapor and cirrus clouds using these channels. We also present sample water vapor images and cirrus cloud images obtained from MODIS data.

  8. Possible near-IR channels for remote sensing precipitable water vapor from geostationary satellite platforms

    Gao, B.-C.; Goetz, A. F. H.; Westwater, Ed R.; Conel, J. E.; Green, R. O.

    1993-01-01

    Remote sensing of troposheric water vapor profiles from current geostationary weather satellites is made using a few broadband infrared (IR) channels in the 6-13 micron region. Uncertainties greater than 20% exist in derived water vapor values just above the surface from the IR emission measurements. In this paper, we propose three near-IR channels, one within the 0.94-micron water vapor band absorption region, and the other two in nearby atmospheric windows, for remote sensing of precipitable water vapor over land areas, excluding lakes and rivers, during daytime from future geostationary satellite platforms. The physical principles are as follows. The reflectance of most surface targets varies approximately linearly with wavelength near 1 micron. The solar radiation on the sun-surface-sensor ray path is attenuated by atmospheric water vapor. The ratio of the radiance from the absorption channel with the radiances from the two window channels removes the surface reflectance effects and yields approximately the mean atmospheric water vapor transmittance of the absorption channel. The integrated water vapor amount from ground to space can be obtained with a precision of better than 5% from the mean transmittance. Because surface reflectances vary slowly with time, temporal variation of precipitable water vapor can be determined reliably. High spatial resolution, precipitable water vapor images are derived from spectral data collected by the Airborne Visable-Infrared Imaging Spectrometer, which measures solar radiation reflected by the surface in the 0.4-2.5 micron region in 10-nm channels and has a ground instantaneous field of view of 20 m from its platform on an ER-2 aircraft at 20 km. The proposed near-IR reflectance technique would complement the IR emission techniques for remote sensing of water vapor profiles from geostationary satellite platforms, especially in the boundary layer where most of the water vapor is located.

  9. Temperature and saturation dependence in the vapor sensing of butterfly wing scales

    Kertész, K., E-mail: kertesz.krisztian@ttk.mta.hu [Institute of Technical Physics and Materials Science, Research Centre for Natural Sciences, 1525 Budapest, PO Box 49 (Hungary); Piszter, G. [Institute of Technical Physics and Materials Science, Research Centre for Natural Sciences, 1525 Budapest, PO Box 49 (Hungary); Jakab, E. [Institute of Materials and Environmental Chemistry, Research Centre for Natural Sciences, H-1525 Budapest, P O Box 17 (Hungary); Bálint, Zs. [Hungarian Natural History Museum, H-1088, Budapest, Baross utca 13 (Hungary); Vértesy, Z.; Biró, L.P. [Institute of Technical Physics and Materials Science, Research Centre for Natural Sciences, 1525 Budapest, PO Box 49 (Hungary)

    2014-06-01

    The sensing of gasses/vapors in the ambient air is the focus of attention due to the need to monitor our everyday environment. Photonic crystals are sensing materials of the future because of their strong light-manipulating properties. Natural photonic structures are well-suited materials for testing detection principles because they are significantly cheaper than artificial photonic structures and are available in larger sizes. Additionally, natural photonic structures may provide new ideas for developing novel artificial photonic nanoarchitectures with improved properties. In the present paper, we discuss the effects arising from the sensor temperature and the vapor concentration in air during measurements with a photonic crystal-type optical gas sensor. Our results shed light on the sources of discrepancy between simulated and experimental sensing behaviors of photonic crystal-type structures. Through capillary condensation, the vapors will condensate to a liquid state inside the nanocavities. Due to the temperature and radius of curvature dependence of capillary condensation, the measured signals are affected by the sensor temperature as well as by the presence of a nanocavity size distribution. The sensing materials used are natural photonic nanoarchitectures present in the wing scales of blue butterflies. - Highlights: • We report optical gas sensing on blue butterfly wing scale nanostructures. • The sample temperature decrease effects a reversible break-down in the measured spectra. • The break-down is connected with the vapor condensation in the scales and wing surface. • Capillary condensation occurs in the wing scales.

  10. Temperature and saturation dependence in the vapor sensing of butterfly wing scales

    The sensing of gasses/vapors in the ambient air is the focus of attention due to the need to monitor our everyday environment. Photonic crystals are sensing materials of the future because of their strong light-manipulating properties. Natural photonic structures are well-suited materials for testing detection principles because they are significantly cheaper than artificial photonic structures and are available in larger sizes. Additionally, natural photonic structures may provide new ideas for developing novel artificial photonic nanoarchitectures with improved properties. In the present paper, we discuss the effects arising from the sensor temperature and the vapor concentration in air during measurements with a photonic crystal-type optical gas sensor. Our results shed light on the sources of discrepancy between simulated and experimental sensing behaviors of photonic crystal-type structures. Through capillary condensation, the vapors will condensate to a liquid state inside the nanocavities. Due to the temperature and radius of curvature dependence of capillary condensation, the measured signals are affected by the sensor temperature as well as by the presence of a nanocavity size distribution. The sensing materials used are natural photonic nanoarchitectures present in the wing scales of blue butterflies. - Highlights: • We report optical gas sensing on blue butterfly wing scale nanostructures. • The sample temperature decrease effects a reversible break-down in the measured spectra. • The break-down is connected with the vapor condensation in the scales and wing surface. • Capillary condensation occurs in the wing scales

  11. Highly enhanced vapor sensing of multiwalled carbon nanotube network sensors by n-butylamine functionalization

    P. Slobodian; Riha, P.; Cavallo, P.; Barbero, C. A.; R. Benlikaya; Cvelbar, U.; Petras, D.; Saha, P.

    2014-01-01

    The sensing of volatile organic compounds by multiwall carbon nanotube networks of randomly entangled pristine nanotubes or the nanotubes functionalized by n-butylamine, which were deposited on polyurethane supporting electrospinned nonwoven membrane, has been investigated. The results show that the sensing of volatile organic compounds by functionalized nanotubes considerably increases with respect to pristine nanotubes. The increase is highly dependent on used vapor polarity. For the cas...

  12. Remote sensing evidence for regolith water vapor sources on Mars

    Huguenin, R. L.; Clifford, S. M.

    1982-01-01

    McCord et al. (1977) have presented earth-based photometric imaging data of an event associated with the 1973 dust storm on Mars. The initial dust cloud in Solis Lacus and two regions to the north and south appeared anomalously bright at blue wavelengths. Water frosts, hazes, and/or clouds were identified, and it was suggested that the water responsible for these findings may have originated from Solis Lacus. More recently, a more intensive review of the observational record of Mars was undertaken. Earth-based telescope observations and data from the Mariner and Viking missions have revealed that Solis Lacus has been a center of repeated activity. Persistent activity in the vicinity of Noachis-Hellespontus and in the border regions of Syrtis Major was also discovered. A review of the observations is provided and possible interpretations are discussed. The obtained results appear to support the original proposal that Solis Lacus may be a source of water vapor. Noachis-Hellespontus seems to be a similar vapor source

  13. Effect of loading types on performance characteristics of a trickle-bed bioreactor and biofilter during styrene/acetone vapor biofiltration.

    Halecky, Martin; Paca, Jan; Kozliak, Evguenii; Jones, Kim

    2016-07-01

    A 2:1 (w/w) mixture of styrene (STY) and acetone (AC) was subjected to lab-scale biofiltration under varied loading in both a trickle bed reactor (TBR) and biofilter (BF) to investigate substrate interactions and determine the limits of biofiltration efficiency of typical binary air pollutant mixtures containing both hydrophobic and polar components. A comparison of the STY/AC mixture degradation in the TBR and BF revealed higher pollutant removal efficiencies and degradation rates in the TBR, with the pollutant concentrations increasing up to the overloading limit. The maximum styrene degradation rates were 12 and 8 gc m(-3) h(-1) for the TBR and BF, respectively. However, the order of performance switched in favor of the BF when the loading was conducted by increasing air flow rate while keeping the inlet styrene concentration (Cin) constant in contrast to loading by increasing Cin. This switch may be due to a drastic difference in the effective surface area between these two reactors, so the biofilter becomes the reactor of choice when the rate-limiting step switches from biochemical processes to mass transfer by changing the loading mode. The presence of acetone in the mixture decreased the efficiency of styrene degradation and its degradation rate at high loadings. When the overloading was lifted by lowering the pollutant inlet concentrations, short-term back-stripping of both substrates in both reactors into the outlet air was observed, with a subsequent gradual recovery taking several hours and days in the BF and TBR, respectively. Removal of excess biomass from the TBR significantly improved the reactor performance. Identification of the cultivable strains, which was performed on Day 763 of continuous operation, showed the presence of 7 G(-) bacteria, 2 G(+) bacteria and 4 fungi. Flies and larvae of Lycoriella nigripes survived half a year of the biofilter operation by feeding on the biofilm resulting in the maintenance of a nearly constant pressure drop

  14. Laser remote sensing of water vapor: Raman lidar development

    The goal of this research is the development of a critical design for a Raman lidar system optimized to match ARM Program needs for profiling atmospheric water vapor at CART sites. This work has emphasized the development of enhanced daytime capabilities using Raman lidar techniques. This abstract touches briefly on the main components of the research program, summarizing results of the efforts. A detailed Raman lidar instrument model has been developed to predict the daytime and nighttime performance capabilities of Raman lidar systems. The model simulates key characteristics of the lidar system, using realistic atmospheric profiles, modeled background sky radiance, and lidar system parameters based on current instrument capabilities. The model is used to guide development of lidar systems based on both the solar-blind concept and the narrowband, narrow field-of-view concept for daytime optimization

  15. Rapid and selective detection of acetone using hierarchical ZnO gas sensor for hazardous odor markers application

    Highlights: • ZnO spheres fabricated via solvothermal method are with (0 0 2) polar facet exposed. • Response time of ZnO sensor for detecting 100 ppm acetone is as short as 3 s. • Ra/Rg toward 100 ppm acetone is 33 when operated at 230 °C. • ZnO sensor exhibits good selectivity against other toxic gases and water vapor. • Porous structure and exposure of polar facet contribute to good sensing properties. - Abstract: Hierarchical nanostructured ZnO dandelion-like spheres were synthesized via solvothermal reaction at 200 °C for 4 h. The products were pure hexagonal ZnO with large exposure of (0 0 2) polar facet. Side-heating gas sensor based on hierarchical ZnO spheres was prepared to evaluate the acetone gas sensing properties. The detection limit to acetone for the ZnO sensor is 0.25 ppm. The response (Ra/Rg) toward 100 ppm acetone was 33 operated at 230 °C and the response time was as short as 3 s. The sensor exhibited remarkable acetone selectivity with negligible response toward other hazardous gases and water vapor. The high proportion of electron depletion region and oxygen vacancies contributed to high gas response sensitivity. The hollow and porous structure of dandelion-like ZnO spheres facilitated the diffusion of gas molecules, leading to a rapid response speed. The largely exposed (0 0 2) polar facets could adsorb acetone gas molecules easily and efficiently, resulting in a rapid response speed and good selectivity of hierarchical ZnO spheres gas sensor at low operating temperature

  16. Rapid and selective detection of acetone using hierarchical ZnO gas sensor for hazardous odor markers application

    Jia, Qianqian; Ji, Huiming, E-mail: jihuiming@tju.edu.cn; Zhang, Ying; Chen, Yalu; Sun, Xiaohong, E-mail: sunxh@tju.edu.cn; Jin, Zhengguo

    2014-07-15

    Highlights: • ZnO spheres fabricated via solvothermal method are with (0 0 2) polar facet exposed. • Response time of ZnO sensor for detecting 100 ppm acetone is as short as 3 s. • R{sub a}/R{sub g} toward 100 ppm acetone is 33 when operated at 230 °C. • ZnO sensor exhibits good selectivity against other toxic gases and water vapor. • Porous structure and exposure of polar facet contribute to good sensing properties. - Abstract: Hierarchical nanostructured ZnO dandelion-like spheres were synthesized via solvothermal reaction at 200 °C for 4 h. The products were pure hexagonal ZnO with large exposure of (0 0 2) polar facet. Side-heating gas sensor based on hierarchical ZnO spheres was prepared to evaluate the acetone gas sensing properties. The detection limit to acetone for the ZnO sensor is 0.25 ppm. The response (R{sub a}/R{sub g}) toward 100 ppm acetone was 33 operated at 230 °C and the response time was as short as 3 s. The sensor exhibited remarkable acetone selectivity with negligible response toward other hazardous gases and water vapor. The high proportion of electron depletion region and oxygen vacancies contributed to high gas response sensitivity. The hollow and porous structure of dandelion-like ZnO spheres facilitated the diffusion of gas molecules, leading to a rapid response speed. The largely exposed (0 0 2) polar facets could adsorb acetone gas molecules easily and efficiently, resulting in a rapid response speed and good selectivity of hierarchical ZnO spheres gas sensor at low operating temperature.

  17. Highly Enhanced Vapor Sensing of Multiwalled Carbon Nanotube Network Sensors by n-Butylamine Functionalization

    P. Slobodian

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The sensing of volatile organic compounds by multiwall carbon nanotube networks of randomly entangled pristine nanotubes or the nanotubes functionalized by n-butylamine, which were deposited on polyurethane supporting electrospinned nonwoven membrane, has been investigated. The results show that the sensing of volatile organic compounds by functionalized nanotubes considerably increases with respect to pristine nanotubes. The increase is highly dependent on used vapor polarity. For the case of highly polar methanol, the functionalized MWCNT network exhibits even more than eightfold higher sensitivity in comparison to the network prepared from pristine nanotubes.

  18. Water vapor mapping by fusing InSAR and GNSS remote sensing data and atmospheric simulations

    Alshawaf, F.; B. Fersch; Hinz, S.; H. Kunstmann; M. Mayer; Meyer, F. J.

    2016-01-01

    Data fusion aims at integrating multiple data sources that can be redundant or complementary to produce complete, accurate information of the parameter of interest. In this work, data fusion of precipitable water vapor (PWV) estimated from remote sensing observations and data from the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) modeling system are applied to provide complete grids of PWV with high quality. Our goal is to correctly infer PWV at spatially continuous, highly resolved grids from heter...

  19. Water vapor mapping by fusing InSAR and GNSS remote sensing data and atmospheric simulations

    Alshawaf, F.; B. Fersch; Hinz, S.; H. Kunstmann; M. Mayer; Meyer, F. J.

    2015-01-01

    Data fusion aims at integrating multiple data sources that can be redundant or complementary to produce complete, accurate information of the parameter of interest. In this work, data fusion of precipitable water vapor (PWV) estimated from remote sensing observations and data from the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) modeling system is applied to provide complete, accurate grids of PWV. Our goal is to infer spatially continuous, prec...

  20. Water vapor mapping by fusing InSAR and GNSS remote sensing data and atmospheric simulations

    Alshawaf, F.; B. Fersch; Hinz, S.; H. Kunstmann; M. Mayer; Meyer, F. J.

    2015-01-01

    Data fusion aims at integrating multiple data sources that can be redundant or complementary to produce complete, accurate information of the parameter of interest. In this work, data fusion of precipitable water vapor (PWV) estimated from remote sensing observations and data from the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) modeling system is applied to provide complete, accurate grids of PWV. Our goal is to infer spatially continuous, precise grids of PWV from heterogeneous data sets. This is...

  1. Alcohol vapor sensing by cadmium-doped zinc oxide thick films based chemical sensor

    Zargar, R. A.; Arora, M.; Chackrabarti, S.; Ahmad, S.; Kumar, J.; Hafiz, A. K.

    2016-04-01

    Cadmium-doped zinc oxide nanoparticles were derived by simple chemical co-precipitation route using zinc acetate dihydrate and cadmium acetate dihydrate as precursor materials. The thick films were casted from chemical co-precipitation route prepared nanoparticles by economic facile screen printing method. The structural, morphological, optical and electrical properties of the film were characterized relevant to alcohol vapor sensing application by powder XRD, SEM, UV-VIS and DC conductivity techniques. The response and sensitivity of alcohol (ethanol) vapor sensor are obtained from the recovery curves at optimum working temperature range from 20∘C to 50∘C. The result shows that maximum sensitivity of the sensor is observed at 25∘C operating temperature. On varying alcohol vapor concentration, minor variation in resistance has been observed. The sensing mechanism of sensor has been described in terms of physical adsorption and chemical absorption of alcohol vapors on cadmium-doped zinc oxide film surface and inside film lattice network through weak hydrogen bonding, respectively.

  2. ROCKETMAS: A sounding-rocket-based remote sensing measurement of mesospheric water vapor and ozone

    Croskey, C. L.; Olivero, J. J.; Puliafito, S. E.; Mitchell, J. D.

    1994-01-01

    The ROCKETMAS rocketborne technique, based on the shuttle-borne millimeter wave atmospheric sounder (MAS), to obtain water vapor and ozone measurements with vertical resolution, is described. The concentrations of mesospheric water vapor and ozone are not well known, yet both contribute significantly to the chemical and radiative structure of that region. In situ measurements of water vapor are difficult to make because water that was absorbed on the instrument surfaces outgasses in space and contaminates the local environment of the payload. However, a remote sensing technique that uses a long pathlength through the atmosphere greatly reduces the effect of such local contamination. The 183.3 GHz line of water vapor and 184.4 GHz line of ozone are good choices for spaceborne radiometer measurements because one front-end mixer assembly can be used to simultaneously observe both gases. The design of a sounding rocket based millimeter wave radiometer for measuring water vapor and ozone with a height resolution not possible by either ground based or limb sounding techniques is described.

  3. Vapor Phase Sensing Using Metal Nanorod Thin Films Grown by Cryogenic Oblique Angle Deposition

    Piyush Shah

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate the chemical sensing capability of silver nanostructured films grown by cryogenic oblique angle deposition (OAD. For comparison, the films are grown side by side at cryogenic (~100 K and at room temperature (~300 K by e-beam evaporation. Based on the observed structural differences, it was hypothesized that the cryogenic OAD silver films should show an increased surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS sensitivity. COMSOL simulation results are presented to validate this hypothesis. Experimental SERS results of 4-aminobenzenethiol (4-ABT Raman test probe molecules in vapor phase show good agreement with the simulation and indicate promising SERS applications for these nanostructured thin films.

  4. GPS meteorology - Remote sensing of atmospheric water vapor using the Global Positioning System

    Bevis, Michael; Businger, Steven; Herring, Thomas A.; Rocken, Christian; Anthes, Richard A.; Ware, Randolph H.

    1992-01-01

    We present a new approach to remote sensing of water vapor based on the Global Positioning System (GPS). Geodesists and geophysicists have devised methods for estimating the extent to which signals propagating from GPS satellites to ground-based GPS receivers are delayed by atmospheric water vapor. This delay is parameterized in terms of a time-varying zenith wet delay (ZWD) which is retrieved by stochastic filtering of the GPS data. Given surface temperature and pressure readings at the GPS receiver, the retrieved ZWD can be transformed with very little additional uncertainty into an estimate of the integrated water vapor (IWV) overlying that receiver. Networks of continuously operating GPS receivers are being constructed by geodesists, geophysicists, and government and military agencies, in order to implement a wide range of positioning capabilities. These emerging GPS networks offer the possibility of observing the horizontal distribution of IWV or, equivalently, precipitate water with unprecedented coverage and a temporal resolution of the order of 10 min. These measurements could be utilized in operational weather forecasting and in fundamental research into atmospheric storm systems, the hydrologic cycle, atmospheric chemistry, and global climate change.

  5. Room temperature ammonia vapor sensing properties of transparent single walled carbon nanotube thin film

    Shobin, L. R.; Manivannan, S.

    2014-10-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) networks are identified as potential substitute and surpass the conventional indium doped tin oxide (ITO) in transparent conducting electrodes, thin-film transistors, solar cells, and chemical sensors. Among them, CNT based gas sensors gained more interest because of its need in environmental monitoring, industrial control, and detection of gases in warfare or for averting security threats. The unique properties of CNT networks such as high surface area, low density, high thermal conductivity and chemical sensitivity making them as a potential candidate for gas sensing applications. Commercial unsorted single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) were purified by thermal oxidation and acid treatment processes and dispersed in organic solvent N-methyl pyrolidone using sonication process in the absence of polymer or surfactant. Optically transparent SWCNT networks are realized on glass substrate by coating the dispersed SWCNT with the help of dynamic spray coating process at 200ºC. The SWCNT random network was characterized by scanning electron microscopy and UV-vis-NIR spectroscopy. Gas sensing property of transparent film towards ammonia vapor is studied at room temperature by measuring the resistance change with respect to the concentration in the range 0-1000 ppm. The sensor response is increased logarithmically in the concentration range 0 to 1000 ppm with the detection limit 0.007 ppm. The random networks are able to detect ammonia vapor selectively because of the high electron donating nature of ammonia molecule to the SWCNT. The sensor is reversible and selective to ammonia vapor with response time 70 seconds and recovery time 423 seconds for 62.5 ppm with 90% optical transparency at 550 nm.

  6. Rubrene endoperoxide acetone monosolvate

    Kiyoaki Shinashi

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The title acetone solvate, C42H28O2·C3H6O [systematic name: 1,3,10,12-tetraphenyl-19,20-dioxapentacyclo[10.6.2.02,11.04,9.013,18]icosa-2(11,3,5,7,9,13,15,17-octaene acetone monosolvate], is a photooxygenation product of rubrene (systematic name: 5,6,11,12-tetraphenyltetracene. The molecule bends at the bridgehead atoms, which are linked by the O—O transannular bond, with a dihedral angle of 49.21 (6° between the benzene ring and the naphthalene ring system of the tetracene unit. In the crystal, the rubrene molecules are linked by C—H...O hydrogen bonds into a column along the c axis. The acetone solvent molecules form a dimer around a crystallographic inversion centre through a carbonyl–carbonyl dipolar interaction. A C—H...O hydrogen bond between the rubrene and acetone molecules is also observed.

  7. RESEARCH ON THE LOCAL CORRECTION MODEL OF ATMOSPHERIC DRY DELAY IN GPS REMOTE SENSING WATER VAPOR

    GU Xiao-ping; WANG Chang-yao; WANG Wen; JIANG Guo-hua

    2005-01-01

    The precision of atmospheric dry delay model is closely correlated with the accuracy of GPS water vapor in the process of GPS (Global Position System) remote sensing. Radiosonde data (from 1996 to 2001) at Qingyuan are used to calculate the exact values of the atmospheric dry delay. Base on these calculations and the surface meteorological parameters, the local year and month correction models of dry delay at the zenith angle of 0° are established by statistical methods. The analysis result shows that the local model works better and is slight more sensitive to altitude angle than universal models and that it is not necessary to build models for each month due to the slight difference between year model and month model. Furthermore, when the altitude angle is less than 75°, the difference between curve path and straight path increases rapidly with altitude angle's decrease.

  8. Water vapor mapping by fusing InSAR and GNSS remote sensing data and atmospheric simulations

    F. Alshawaf

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Data fusion aims at integrating multiple data sources that can be redundant or complementary to produce complete, accurate information of the parameter of interest. In this work, data fusion of precipitable water vapor (PWV estimated from remote sensing observations and data from the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF modeling system is applied to provide complete, accurate grids of PWV. Our goal is to infer spatially continuous, precise grids of PWV from heterogeneous data sets. This is done by a geostatistical data fusion approach based on the method of fixed-rank kriging. The first data set contains absolute maps of atmospheric water vapor produced by combining observations from Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS and Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR. These PWV maps have a high spatial density and an accuracy of submillimeter; however, data are missing in regions of low coherence (e.g., forests and vegetated areas. The PWV maps simulated by the WRF model represent the second data set. The model maps are available for wide areas, but they have a coarse spatial resolution and a yet limited accuracy. The PWV maps inferred by the data fusion at any spatial resolution are more accurate than those inferred from single data sets. In addition, using the fixed-rank kriging method, the computational burden is significantly lower than that for ordinary kriging.

  9. Dynamics of chemical vapor sensing with MoS2 using 1T/2H phase contacts/channel

    Friedman, Adam L.; Perkins, F. Keith; Hanbicki, Aubrey T.; Culbertson, James C.; Campbell, Paul M.

    2016-06-01

    Ultra-thin transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) films show remarkable potential for use in chemical vapor sensing devices. Electronic devices fabricated from TMD films are inexpensive, inherently flexible, low-power, amenable to industrial-scale processing because of emergent growth techniques, and have shown high sensitivity and selectivity to electron donor analyte molecules important for explosives and nerve gas detection. However, for devices reported to date, the conductance response to chemical vapors is dominated by Schottky contacts, to the detriment of the sensitivity, selectivity, recovery, and obscuring their intrinsic behavior. Here, we use contact engineering to transition the contacts in a MoS2 FET-based chemical vapor sensor to the 1T conducting phase, while leaving the channel in the 2H semiconducting state, and thus providing Ohmic contacts to the film. We demonstrate that the resultant sensors have much improved electrical characteristics, are more selective, and recover fully after chemical vapor exposure--all major enhancements to previously MoS2 sensor devices. We identify labile nitrogen-containing electron donors as the primary species that generate a response in MoS2, and we study the dynamics of the sensing reactions, identifying two possible qualitative models for the chemical sensing reaction.

  10. Two-way shift of wavelength in holographic sensing of organic vapor in nanozeolites dispersed acrylamide photopolymer.

    Mao, Dongyao; Geng, Yaohui; Liu, Hongpeng; Zhou, Ke; Xian, Lihong; Yu, Dan

    2016-08-10

    Holographic sensing of alcohol organic vapor is characterized in detail at transmission and reflection geometries in Y nanozeolites dispersed acrylamide photopolymer. The two-way shift of the diffraction spectrum and its temporal evolution with various vapor concentrations are measured. Obvious blueshifts of diffraction spectrum peaks are observed and analyzed in two recording geometries. The competition mechanism between decreasing the average refractive index and swelling the grating fringe space is proposed for exploring the wavelength shift mechanism. In the reflection grating, as organic vapor increases, the redshift after the blueshift of the wavelength peaks are observed clearly. We further demonstrate the significance of this competition mechanism. In the low concentration region, at transmission <700  ppm and reflection <400  ppm in nanozeolites dispersed polymer, the blueshift of the wavelength is a significant factor in identifying an organic vapor with a low refractive index. These experimental results provide a probability for improving the applicability of a holographic sensor. This work can accelerate the development of the holographic sensing strategy and provide a novel identification method for organic vapor. PMID:27534461

  11. Water vapor mapping by fusing InSAR and GNSS remote sensing data and atmospheric simulations

    Alshawaf, F.; Fersch, B.; Hinz, S.; Kunstmann, H.; Mayer, M.; Meyer, F. J.

    2015-12-01

    Data fusion aims at integrating multiple data sources that can be redundant or complementary to produce complete, accurate information of the parameter of interest. In this work, data fusion of precipitable water vapor (PWV) estimated from remote sensing observations and data from the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) modeling system are applied to provide complete grids of PWV with high quality. Our goal is to correctly infer PWV at spatially continuous, highly resolved grids from heterogeneous data sets. This is done by a geostatistical data fusion approach based on the method of fixed-rank kriging. The first data set contains absolute maps of atmospheric PWV produced by combining observations from the Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) and Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR). These PWV maps have a high spatial density and a millimeter accuracy; however, the data are missing in regions of low coherence (e.g., forests and vegetated areas). The PWV maps simulated by the WRF model represent the second data set. The model maps are available for wide areas, but they have a coarse spatial resolution and a still limited accuracy. The PWV maps inferred by the data fusion at any spatial resolution show better qualities than those inferred from single data sets. In addition, by using the fixed-rank kriging method, the computational burden is significantly lower than that for ordinary kriging.

  12. Phage inactivation by triplet acetone

    The exposure of lambda phage to triplet acetone is studied. The triplet acetone is obtained from aerobic oxidation of isobutanal catalysed by peroxidase. A decrease of lambda phage ability to infect Escherichia coli is reported, perhaps, partially due to the possible production of lesions in the phage genome. (M.A.C.)

  13. Remote sensing of cloud, aerosol and water vapor properties from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS)

    King, M. D.

    1992-01-01

    The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) is an Earth-viewing sensor being developed as a facility instrument for the Earth Observing System (EOS) to be launched in the late 1990s. MODIS consists of two separate instruments that scan a swath width sufficient to provide nearly complete global coverage every two days from a polar-orbiting, Sun-synchronous, platform at an altitude of 705 km. Of primary interest for studies of atmospheric physics is the MODIS-N (nadir) instrument which will provide images in 36 spectral bands between 0.415 and 14.235 micrometers with spatial resoulutions of 250 m (2 bands), 500 m (5 bands) and 1000 m (29 bands). These bands have been carefully selected to enable advanced studies of land, ocean and atmosperhic processes. The intent of this lecture is to describe the current status of MODIS-N and its companion instrument MODIS-T (tilt), a tiltable cross-track scanning radiometer with 32 uniformly spaced channels between 0.410 and 0.875 micrometers, and to describe the physical principles behind the development of MODIS for the remote sensing of atmospheric properties. Primary emphasis will be placed on the main atmospheric applications of determining the optical, microphysical and physical properties of clouds and aerosol particles form spectral-reflection and thermal-emission measurements. In addition to cloud and aerosol properties, MODIS-N will be utilized for the determination of the total precipitable water vapor over land and atmospheric stability. The physical principles behind the determination of each of these atmospheric products will be described herein.

  14. Comparison of Water Vapor Measurements from Ground-based and Space-based GPS Atmospheric Remote Sensing Techniques

    Colon-Pagan, Ian; Kuo, Ying-Hwa

    2008-10-01

    In this study, we compare precipitable water vapor (PWV) values from ground-based GPS water vapor sensing and COSMIC radio occultation (RO) measurements over the Caribbean Sea, Gulf of Mexico, and United States regions as well as global analyses from NCEP and ECMWF models. The results show good overall agreement; however, the PWV values estimated by ground-based GPS receivers tend to have a slight dry bias for low PWV values and a slight wet bias for higher PWV values, when compared with GPS RO measurements and global analyses. An application of a student T-test indicates that there is a significant difference between both ground- and space-based GPS measured datasets. The dry bias associated with space-based GPS is attributed to the missing low altitude data, where the concentration of water vapor is large. The close agreements between space-based and global analyses are due to the fact that these global analyses assimilate space-based GPS RO data from COSMIC, and the retrieval of water vapor profiles from space-based technique requires the use of global analyses as the first guess. This work is supported by UCAR SOARS and a grant from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Educational Partnership Program under the cooperative agreement NA06OAR4810187.

  15. Ethanol Vapor Sensing Properties of Triangular Silver Nanostructures Based on Localized Surface Plasmon Resonance

    Ping Gao; Jun Yao; Weimin Wang; Huan Yang; Wenying Ma

    2011-01-01

    A sensitive volatile organic vapor sensor based on the LSPR properties of silver triangular nanoprisms is proposed in this paper. The triangular nanoprisms were fabricated by a nanosphere lithography (NSL) method. They have sharp vertices and edges, and are arranged in an ideal hexangular array. These characteristics ensure that they exhibit an excellent LSPR spectrum and a high sensitivity to the exterior environment changes. The LSPR spectra responding to ethanol vapor and four other volati...

  16. Fabrication of a SnO2-Based Acetone Gas Sensor Enhanced by Molecular Imprinting

    Wenhu Tan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This work presents a new route to design a highly sensitive SnO2–based sensor for acetone gas enhanced by the molecular imprinting technique. Unassisted and acetone-assisted thermal synthesis methods are used to synthesis SnO2 nanomaterials. The prepared SnO2 nanomaterials have been characterized by X-ray powder diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and N2 adsorption−desorption. Four types of SnO2 films were obtained by mixing pure deionized water and liquid acetone with the two types of as-prepared powders, respectively. The acetone gas sensing properties of sensors coated by these films were evaluated. Testing results reveal that the sensor coated by the film fabricated by mixing liquid acetone with the SnO2 nanomaterial synthesized by the acetone-assisted thermal method exhibits the best acetone gas sensing performance. The sensor is optimized for the smooth adsorption and desorption of acetone gas thanks to the participation of acetone both in the procedure of synthesis of the SnO2 nanomaterial and the device fabrication, which results in a distinct response–recovery behavior.

  17. ZnO–PDMS Nanohybrids: A Novel Optical Sensing Platform for Ethanol Vapor Detection at Room Temperature

    Klini, Argyro

    2015-01-08

    © 2014 American Chemical Society. A new optical gas sensor platform based on highly luminescent ZnO-polymer nanohybrids is demonstrated. The nanohybrids consist of ZnO nanoparticles, typically 125 (±25) nm in size, dispersed in an inert cross-linked polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) matrix. Upon exposure to ethanol-enriched air at room temperature, the nanocomposites exhibit a clear increase in their photoluminescence (PL) emission, which shows a nearly Langmuir dependence on the alcohol vapor pressure. The response time is on the order of 50 s, particularly at low ethanol concentrations. The limit of ethanol vapor detection (LOD) is as low as 0.4 Torr, while the sensor remains unaffected by the presence of water vapor, demonstrating the potential of the ZnO-PDMS system as an optical gas sensing device. The interaction of the ZnO nanoparticles with molecular oxygen plays an essential role on the overall performance of the sensor, as shown in comparative experiments performed in the presence and absence of atmospheric air. Notably, O2 was found to be quite effective in accelerating the sensor recovery process compared to N2 or vacuum.

  18. Aircraft millimeter-wave passive sensing of cloud liquid water and water vapor during VOCALS-REx

    Zuidema, P.; Leon, D.; Pazmany, A.; Cadeddu, M.

    2012-01-01

    Routine liquid water path measurements and water vapor path are valuable for process studies of the cloudy marine boundary layer and for the assessment of large-scale models. The VOCALS Regional Experiment respected this goal by including a small, inexpensive, upward-pointing millimeter-wavelength passive radiometer on the fourteen research flights of the NCAR C-130 plane, the G-band (183 GHz) Vapor Radiometer (GVR). The radiometer permitted above-cloud retrievals of the free-tropospheric water vapor path (WVP). Retrieved free-tropospheric (above-cloud) water vapor paths possessed a strong longitudinal gradient, with off-shore values of one to two mm and near-coastal values reaching ten mm. The VOCALS-REx free troposphere was drier than that of previous years. Cloud liquid water paths (LWPs) were retrieved from the sub-cloud and cloudbase aircraft legs through a combination of the GVR, remotely-sensed cloud boundary information, and in-situ thermodynamic data. The absolute (between-leg) and relative (within-leg) accuracy of the LWP retrievals at 1 Hz (~100 m) resolution was estimated at 20 g m-2 and 3 g m-2 respectively for well-mixed conditions, and 25 g m-2 absolute uncertainty for decoupled conditions where the input WVP specification was more uncertain. Retrieved liquid water paths matched adiabatic values derived from coincident cloud thickness measurements exceedingly well. A significant contribution of the GVR dataset was the extended information on the thin clouds, with 62 % (28 %) of the retrieved LWPs adiabatic LWPs at 40 %, but lower than the lidar-determined cloud cover of 85 %, further testifying to the frequent occurrence of thin clouds.

  19. Correction of water vapor absorption for aerosol remote sensing with ceilometers

    M. Wiegner

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In recent years attention was increasingly paid to backscatter profiles of ceilometers as a new source of aerosol information. Several case studies have shown that – although originally intended for cloud detection only – ceilometers can provide the planetary boundary layer height and even quantitative information such as the aerosol backscatter coefficient βp, provided that the signals have been calibrated. It is expected that the retrieval of aerosol parameters will become widespread as the number of ceilometers is steadily increasing, and continuous and unattended operation is provided. In this context however one should be aware of the fact that the majority of ceilometers emit wavelengths that are influenced by atmospheric water vapor. As a consequence, profiles of aerosol parameters can only be retrieved if water vapor absorption is taken into account. In this paper we describe the influence of water vapor absorption on ceilometer signals at wavelengths in the range around λ = 910 nm. Spectrally high resolved absorption coefficients are calculated from HITRAN on the basis of realistic emission spectra of ceilometers. These results are used as reference to develop a methodology ("WAPL" for routine and near real time corrections of the water vapor influence. Comparison of WAPL with the reference demonstrates its very high accuracy. Extensive studies with simulations based on measurements reveal that the error when water vapor absorption is ignored in the βp retrieval can be in the order of 20 % for mid-latitudes and more than 50 % for the tropics. It is concluded that the emission spectrum of the laser source should be provided by the manufacturer to increase the accuracy of WAPL, and that 910 nm is better suited than 905 nm. With WAPL systematic errors can be avoided, that would exceed the inherent random errors of the Klett solutions by far.

  20. Mid-infrared absorption cross sections for acetone (propanone)

    Infrared absorption cross sections for acetone (propanone) have been determined in the 830-1950 cm-1 spectral region from spectra recorded using a high-resolution FTIR spectrometer (Bruker IFS 125HR) and a multipass cell with a maximum optical path length of 19.3 m. The spectra of mixtures of acetone with dry synthetic air were recorded at 0.015 cm-1 resolution (calculated as 0.9/MOPD using the Bruker definition of resolution) at a number of temperatures between 194 and 251 K and pressures appropriate for atmospheric conditions. Intensities were calibrated using three acetone spectra (recorded at 278, 293 and 323 K) taken from the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) IR database. The new absorption cross sections have been combined with previous high spectral resolution results to create a more complete set of acetone absorption cross sections appropriate for atmospheric remote sensing. These cross sections will provide an accurate basis for upper tropospheric/lower stratospheric retrievals of acetone in the mid-infrared spectral region from ACE and MIPAS satellite data.

  1. Ground-based microwave remote sensing of water vapor in the mesosphere and stratosphere

    Croskey, Charles L.; Olivero, John J.; Martone, Joseph P.

    1991-01-01

    A ground-based, portable microwave radiometer that will be used to measure water vapor in the 30-80-km altitude region, and is to operate 24 hr a day, is described. The thermally excited 22.235-GHz rotational-transition line of water vapor is employed. The emission from this region produces a signal with an apparent brightness temperature of the order 0.1 to 0.5 K. A steerable reflector is used to provide optimal viewing angles, depending on the geographic location and season. Periodic tipping curve scans by this reflector permit determination of the amount of tropospheric correction that is applied to the data. All local oscillators in the receiver are crystal-controlled so that narrow-band spectral analysis of the received line shape can be performed.

  2. Upper Bound for Neutron Emission from Sonoluminescing Bubbles in Deuterated Acetone

    An experimental search for nuclear fusion inside imploding bubbles of degassed deuterated acetone at 0 degree sign C driven by a 15 atm sound field and seeded with a neutron generator reveals an upper bound that is a factor of 10 000 less than the signal reported by Taleyarkhan et al. The strength of our upper bound is limited by the weakness of sonoluminescence, which we ascribe to the relatively high vapor pressure of acetone

  3. Quantification of acetone emission from pine plants

    SHAO; Min; (邵敏); Jürgen; Wildt

    2002-01-01

    Acetone emission from pine plants (pinus sylvestris) is measured by continuously stirred tank reactor. Under a constant light intensity, acetone emission rates increase exponentially with leaf temperature. When leaf temperature is kept constant, acetone emission increases with light intensity. And acetone emission in darkness is also detected. Acetone emitted from pine is quickly labeled by 13C when the plants are exposed to air with 630 mg/m3 13CO2. However, no more than 20% of acetone is 13C labeled. Acetone emission from pine may be due to both leaf temperature- controlled process and light intensity-controlled process. Based on these understandings, an algorithm is used to describe the short term acetone emission rates from pine.

  4. Catalyst-Free Vapor-Phase Method for Direct Integration of Gas Sensing Nanostructures with Polymeric Transducing Platforms

    Stella Vallejos

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Tungsten oxide nanoneedles (NNs are grown and integrated directly with polymeric transducing platforms for gas sensors via aerosol-assisted chemical vapor deposition (AACVD method. Material analysis shows the feasibility to grow highly crystalline nanomaterials in the form of NNs with aspect ratios between 80 and 200 and with high concentration of oxygen vacancies at the surface, whereas gas testing demonstrates moderate sensing responses to hydrogen at concentrations between 10 ppm and 50 ppm, which are comparable with results for tungsten oxide NNs grown on silicon transducing platforms. This method is demonstrated to be an attractive route to fabricate next generation of gas sensors devices, provided with flexibility and functionality, with great potential in a cost effective production for large-scale applications.

  5. Airborne remote sensing of tropospheric water vapor using a near infrared DIAL system

    Ehret, G.; Kiemle, C.; Renger, W.; Simmet, G.

    1992-01-01

    Summarized here are the results of airborne water vapor measurements in the lower middle and upper troposphere using the Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) technique in the near infrared. The measurements were performed in July 1990 in Southern Bavaria between Allersberg and Straubing from 20 to 23 UTC taking advantage of night time conditions. The tropospheric H2O profiles were range investigated both horizontally and vertically. With the DIAL system that was used, water vapor measurements in the upper troposphere have been carried out for the first time. To calibrate the H2O-retrievals, effective absorption cross sections of selected H2O lines in terms of altitude around 724 nm were calculated using line parameter data from the literature (B. E. Grossmann et al). The frequency of the on-line measurements was adjusted by the spectra of a Polyacenic Semiconductor (PAS) cell filled with H2O. We found that the calibration error ranged between 0.005 and 0.015 cm(exp -1). The systematic errors of the H2O as a function of altitude were estimated below 7 km and 12 percent accuracy in the upper troposphere. The vertical H2O profile agrees well with in situ measurements in the investigated range between the top of the planetary boundary layer (PBL) up to near the tropopause. Horizontal and vertical H2O profiles are calculated by means of averaging single lidar returns. Typical horizontal resolutions range from 4 km in the lower to 11 km in the upper troposphere with vertical resolutions varying from 0.3 km up to 1 km, respectively, in order to satisfy a 5 - 10 percent accuracy in the statistical error. The measurement sensibility of the water vapor mixing ration in the upper troposphere is 0.01 g/kg.

  6. Sorption and Diffusion of Water Vapor and Carbon Dioxide in Sulfonated Polyaniline as Chemical Sensing Materials.

    Liang, Qiuhua; Jiang, Junke; Ye, Huaiyu; Yang, Ning; Cai, Miao; Xiao, Jing; Chen, Xianping

    2016-01-01

    A hybrid quantum mechanics (QM)/molecular dynamics (MD) simulation is performed to investigate the effect of an ionizable group (-SO₃(-)Na⁺) on polyaniline as gas sensing materials. Polymers considered for this work include emeraldine base of polyaniline (EB-PANI) and its derivatives (Na-SPANI (I), (II) and (III)) whose rings are partly monosubstituted by -SO₃(-)Na⁺. The hybrid simulation results show that the adsorption energy, Mulliken charge and band gap of analytes (CO₂ and H₂O) in polyaniline are relatively sensitive to the position and the amounts of -SO₃(-)Na⁺, and these parameters would affect the sensitivity of Na-SPANI/EB-PANI towards CO₂. The sensitivity of Na-SPANI (III)/EB-PANI towards CO₂ can be greatly improved by two orders of magnitude, which is in agreement with the experimental study. In addition, we also demonstrate that introducing -SO₃(-)Na⁺ groups at the rings can notably affect the gas transport properties of polyaniline. Comparative studies indicate that the effect of ionizable group on polyaniline as gas sensing materials for the polar gas molecule (H₂O) is more significant than that for the nonpolar gas molecule (CO₂). These findings contribute in the functionalization-induced variations of the material properties of polyaniline for CO₂ sensing and the design of new polyaniline with desired sensing properties. PMID:27128921

  7. Sorption and Diffusion of Water Vapor and Carbon Dioxide in Sulfonated Polyaniline as Chemical Sensing Materials

    Qiuhua Liang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available A hybrid quantum mechanics (QM/molecular dynamics (MD simulation is performed to investigate the effect of an ionizable group (–SO3−Na+ on polyaniline as gas sensing materials. Polymers considered for this work include emeraldine base of polyaniline (EB-PANI and its derivatives (Na-SPANI (I, (II and (III whose rings are partly monosubstituted by –SO3−Na+. The hybrid simulation results show that the adsorption energy, Mulliken charge and band gap of analytes (CO2 and H2O in polyaniline are relatively sensitive to the position and the amounts of –SO3−Na+, and these parameters would affect the sensitivity of Na-SPANI/EB-PANI towards CO2. The sensitivity of Na-SPANI (III/EB-PANI towards CO2 can be greatly improved by two orders of magnitude, which is in agreement with the experimental study. In addition, we also demonstrate that introducing –SO3−Na+ groups at the rings can notably affect the gas transport properties of polyaniline. Comparative studies indicate that the effect of ionizable group on polyaniline as gas sensing materials for the polar gas molecule (H2O is more significant than that for the nonpolar gas molecule (CO2. These findings contribute in the functionalization-induced variations of the material properties of polyaniline for CO2 sensing and the design of new polyaniline with desired sensing properties.

  8. [Sensing characteristics of a real-time monitor using a photoionization detector on organic solvent vapors].

    Hori, Hajime; Ishematsu, Sumiyo; Fueta, Yukiko; Hinoue, Mitsuo; Ishidao, Toru

    2012-12-01

    Measurements of organic solvents in the work environment are carried out by either direct sampling using plastic bags/gas chromatography, solid sorbent adsorption using charcoal tubes/gas chromatography, or by a direct reading method using detector tubes. However, these methods cannot always measure the work environment accurately because the concentration of hazardous materials changes from time to time, and from space to space. In this study, the sensor characteristics of a real time monitor using a photoionization detector that can monitor vapor concentration continuously were investigated for 52 organic solvent vapors that are required to be measured in the work environment by the Ordinance of Organic Solvent Poisoning Prevention in Japan. The sensitivity of the monitor was high for the solvents with low ionization potential. However, the sensitivity for the solvents with high ionization potential was low, and the sensor could not detected 7 solvents. Calibration of the sensor using a standard gas was desirable before being used for measurement because the sensitivity of the sensor was variable. PMID:23270260

  9. Optimizing detection of RDX vapors using designed experiments for remote sensing

    Ewing, Robert G.; Heredia-Langner, Alejandro; Warner, Marvin G.

    2014-03-24

    Abstract: This paper presents results of experiments performed to study the effect of four factors on the detection of RDX vapors from desorption into an atmospheric flow tube mass spectrometer (AFT-MS). The experiments initially included four independent factors: gas flow rate, desorption current, solvent evaporation time and RDX mass. The values of three detection responses, peak height, peak width, and peak area were recorded but only the peak height response was analyzed. Results from the first block of experiments indicated that solvent evaporation time was not statistically significant. A second round of experiments was performed using flow rate, current, and RDX mass as factors and the results were used to create a model to predict conditions resulting in maximum peak height. Those conditions were confirmed experimentally and used to obtain data for a calibration model. The calibration model represented RDX amounts ranging from 1 to 25 pg desorbed into an air flow of 7 L/min. Air samples from a shipping container that held 2 closed explosive storage magazines were collected on metal filaments for varying amounts for time ranging from 5 to 90 minutes. RDX was detected from all of the filaments sampled by desorption into the AFT-MS. From the calibration model, RDX vapor concentrations within the shipping container were calculated to be in the range of 1 to 50 parts-per-quadrillion from data collected on 2 separate days.

  10. Experimental evaluation of ground-based microwave radiometric sensing of atmospheric temperature and water vapor profiles

    Profiles of atmospheric temperature and water vapor derived from ground-based microwave radiometric measurements are compared with concurrent rawinsonde profiles including both clear and cloudy cases. Accuracies of the temperature profiles including the cloudy cases are quite close to predicted accuracies. Mean virtual temperatures between commonly used pressure levels are also compared and resulting rms accuracies are 1.1, 1.6, 2.0 and 2.80C for the 1000--850, 850--700, 700--500 and 500--300 mb layers, respectively. The microwave technique is potentially useful in applications requiring high time resolution or in data-sparse regions of the oceans that might be covered by an ocean data buoy system

  11. Mid-IR laser absorption diagnostics for hydrocarbon vapor sensing in harsh environments

    Klingbeil, Adam Edgar

    unburned fuel, engine performance can be characterized and future engine designs can be improved to utilize all of the fuel supplied to the engine. Simultaneous measurement of absorption at two wavelengths is used as a basis for hydrocarbon detection in severe environments. A novel wavelength-tunable mid-IR laser is modified to rapidly switch between two wavelengths, improving the versatility of this laser system. The two-wavelength technique is then exploited to measure vapor concentration while rejecting interferences such as scattering from liquid droplets and absorption from other species. This two-wavelength laser is also used to simultaneously determine temperature and vapor concentration. These techniques, in combination with the library of temperature-dependent hydrocarbon spectra, lay the groundwork necessary to develop fuel diagnostics for laboratory experiments and tests in pulse detonation engines and internal combustion engines. The temperature-dependent spectroscopy of gasoline is examined to develop a sensor for fuel/air ratio in an internal combustion engine. A wavelength was selected for good sensitivity to gasoline concentration. A spectroscopic model is developed that uses the relative concentrations of five structural classes to predict the absorption spectrum of gasoline samples with varying composition. The model is tested on 21 samples of gasoline for temperatures ranging from 300 to 1200 K, showing good agreement between model and measurements over the entire temperature range. Finally, a two-wavelength diagnostic was developed to measure the post-evaporation temperature and n-dodecane concentration in an aerosol-laden shock tube. The experimental data validate a model which calculates the effects of shock-wave compression on a two-phase mixture. The measured post-shock temperature and vapor concentration compare favorably for gas-phase and aerosol experiments. The agreement between the two fuel-loading techniques verifies that this aerosol shock

  12. Improved Remote Sensing Retrieval of Land Surface Temperature in the Thermal Infrared (TIR) Using Visible/Short Wave Infrared (VSWIR) Imaging Spectrometer Estimated Water Vapor

    Grigsby, S.; Hulley, G. C.; Roberts, D. A.; Scheele, C. J.; Ustin, S.; Alsina, M. M.

    2014-12-01

    Land surface temperature (LST) is an important parameter in many ecological studies, where processes such as evapotranspiration have impacts at temperature gradients less than 1 K. Current errors in standard MODIS and ASTER LST products are greater than 1 K, and for ASTER can be greater than 2 K in humid conditions due to incomplete atmospheric correction of atmospheric water vapor. Estimates of water vapor, either derived from visible-to-shortwave-infrared (VSWIR) remote sensing data or taken from weather simulation data such as NCEP, can be combined with coincident Thermal-Infrared (TIR) remote sensing data to yield improved accuracy in LST measurements. This study compares LST retrieval accuracies derived using the standard JPL MASTER Temperature Emissivity Separation (TES) algorithm, and the Water Vapor Scaling (WVS) atmospheric correction method proposed for the Hyperspectral Infrared Imager, or HyspIRI, mission with ground observations. The 2011 ER-2 Delano/Lost Hills flights acquired TIR data from the MODIS/ASTER Simulator (MASTER) and VSWIR data from Airborne Visible InfraRed Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) instruments flown concurrently. The TES and WVS retrieval methods are run with and without high spatial resolution AVIRIS-derived water vapor maps to assess the improvement using VSWIR water vapor estimates. We find improvement using VSWIR derived water vapor maps in both cases, with the WVS method being most accurate overall. For closed canopy agricultural vegetation we observed canopy temperature retrieval RMSEs of 0.49 K and 0.70 K using the WVS method on MASTER data with and without AVIRIS derived water vapor, respectively.

  13. Remote Sensing of Cloud, Aerosol, and Water Vapor Properties from MODIS

    King, Michael D.

    2001-01-01

    MODIS is an earth-viewing cross-track scanning spectroradiometer launched on the Terra satellite in December 1999. MODIS scans a swath width sufficient to provide nearly complete global coverage every two days from a polar-orbiting, sun-synchronous, platform at an altitude of 705 km, and provides images in 36 spectral bands from 0.415 to 14.235 microns with spatial resolutions of 250 m (2 bands), 500 m (5 bands) and 1000 m (29 bands). These bands have been carefully selected to enable advanced studies of land, ocean, and atmospheric processes. In this presentation I will review the comprehensive set of remote sensing algorithms that have been developed for the remote sensing of atmospheric properties using MODIS data, placing primary emphasis on the principal atmospheric applications of: (1) developing a cloud mask for distinguishing clear sky from clouds, (2) retrieving global cloud radiative and microphysical properties, including cloud top pressure and temperature, effective emissivity, cloud optical thickness, thermodynamic phase, and effective radius, (3) monitoring tropospheric aerosol optical thickness over the land and ocean and aerosol size distribution over the ocean, (4) determining atmospheric profiles of moisture and temperature, and (5) estimating column water amount. The physical principles behind the determination of each of these atmospheric products will be described, together with an example of their application using MODIS observations. All products are archived into two categories: pixel-level retrievals (referred to as Level-2 products) and global gridded products at a latitude and longitude resolution of 1 deg (Level-3 products). An overview of the MODIS atmosphere algorithms and products, status, validation activities, and early level-2 and -3 results will be presented. Finally, I will present some highlights from the land and ocean algorithms developed for processing global MODIS observations, including: (1) surface reflectance, (2

  14. Pd- and Ca-doped iron oxide for ethanol vapor sensing

    Iron oxide thin films doped with Ca and Pd, prepared by a liquid-phase deposition method (LPD) from aqueous solution, have been investigated as potential ethanol gas sensors. SEM and XRD analyses were used to characterize Fe2O3 LPD films. Hematite (α-Fe2O3), having an average crystallite size in the range between 20 and 30 nm, was the only crystalline phase detected on all undoped and doped films. The electrical response towards ethanol (100-500 ppm) has been studied in the temperature range of 300-500 deg. C. Both Ca and Pd promoters have shown a positive effect on the sensitivity of Fe2O3 films at the lower temperature investigated, whereas at higher temperature the undoped Fe2O3 film has shown better performances. The sensing properties of undoped and doped Fe2O3 thin films towards different interfering gases like NO2, CO and NH3 have been also investigated, showing that the selectivity to ethanol benefits of the Ca addition

  15. Low-gravity sensing of liquid/vapor interface and transient liquid flow

    Jacobson, Saul A.; Korba, James M.; Lynnworth, Lawrence C.; Nguyen, Toan H.; Orton, George F.

    1987-03-01

    The work reported here deals mainly with tests on internally vaned cylindrical shell acrylic containers capped by hemispherical acrylic or aluminum end domes. Three different ultrasonic sensor techniques and one nucleonic technique presently are evaluated as possible solutions to the low-gravity liquid gauging problem. The ultrasonic techniques are as follows: use of a torsional wave sensor in which transit time is proportional to the integral of wetted distance x liquid density; integration of the flow rate output signal of a fast-response ultrasonic flowmeter; and use of multiplexed externally mounted 'point-sensor' transducers that sense transit times to liquid-gas interfaces. Using two commercial flowmeters and a thickness gauge modified for this particular project, bench tests were conducted at 1 g on liquids such as water, freon, and solvent 140, including both steady flow and pulsating flow with 40, 80, and 120 ms flow pulses. Subsequently, flight tests were conducted in the NASA KC-135 aircraft in which nearly 0-g conditions are obtainable for up to about 5 s in each of a number of repetitive parabolic flight trajectories. In some of these brief low-gravity flight tests freon was replaced with a higher-viscosity fuel to reduce sloshing and thereby obtain settled surfaces more quickly.

  16. Unencapsulated Air-stable Organic Field Effect Transistor by All Solution Processes for Low Power Vapor Sensing

    Feng, Linrun; Tang, Wei; Zhao, Jiaqing; Yang, Ruozhang; Hu, Wei; Li, Qiaofeng; Wang, Ruolin; Guo, Xiaojun

    2016-02-01

    With its excellent mechanical flexibility, low-cost and low-temperature processing, the solution processed organic field-effect transistor (OFET) is a promising platform technology for developing ubiquitous sensor applications in digital health, environment monitoring and Internet of Things. However, a contradiction between achieving low voltage operation and having stable performance severely hinder the technology to become commercially viable. This work shows that, by reducing the sub-gap density of states (DOS) at the channel for low operation voltage and using a proper low-k non-polar polymer dielectric layer, such an issue can be addressed. Stable electrical properties after either being placed for weeks or continuously prolonged bias stressing for hours in ambient air are achieved for all solution processed unencapsulated OFETs with the channel being exposed to the ambient air for analyte detection. The fabricated device presents a steep subthreshold swing less than 100 mV/decade, and an ON/OFF ratio of 106 at a voltage swing of 3 V. The low voltage and stable operation allows the sensor made of the OFET to be incorporated into a battery-powered electronic system for continuously reliable sensing of ammonia vapor in ambient air with very small power consumption of about 50 nW.

  17. Conditioned Place Preference to Acetone Inhalation and the Effects on Locomotor Behavior and 18FDG Uptake

    Pai, J.C.; Dewey, S.L.; Schiffer, W.; Lee, D.

    2006-01-01

    Acetone is a component in many inhalants that have been widely abused. While other solvents have addictive potential, such as toluene, it is unclear whether acetone alone contains addictive properties. The locomotor, relative glucose metabolism and abusive effects of acetone inhalation were studied in animals using the conditioned place preference (CPP) paradigm and [18F]2-fluorodeoxy-D-glucose (18FDG) imaging. The CPP apparatus contains two distinct conditioning chambers and a middle adaptation chamber, each lined with photocells to monitor locomotor activity. Adolescent Sprague-Dawley rats (n=16; 90-110 g) were paired with acetone in least preferred conditioning chamber, determined on the pretest day. The animals were exposed to a 10,000 ppm dose for an hour, alternating days with air. A CPP test was conducted after the 3rd, 6th and 12th pairing. In these same animals, the relative glucose metabolism effects were determined using positron emission tomography (PET) imaging with 18FDG. Following the 3rd pairing, there was a significant aversion to the acetone paired chamber (190.9 ± 13.7 sec and 241.7 ± 16.9 sec, acetone and air, respectively). After the 6th pairing, there was no significant preference observed with equal time spent in each chamber (222 ± 21 sec and 207 ± 20 sec, acetone and air-paired, respectively). A similar trend was observed after the 12th pairing (213 ± 21 sec and 221 ± 22 sec, acetone and air-paired, respectively). Locomotor analysis indicated a significant decrease (p<0.05) from air pairings to acetone pairings on the first and sixth pairings. The observed locomotor activity was characteristic of central nervous system (CNS) depressants, without showing clear abusive effects in this CPP model. In these studies, acetone vapors were not as reinforcing as other solvents, shown by overall lack of preference for the acetone paired side of the chamber. PET imaging indicated a regionally specific distribution of 18FDG uptake following

  18. A Micro-Preconcentrator Combined Olfactory Sensing System with a Micromechanical Cantilever Sensor for Detecting 2,4-Dinitrotoluene Gas Vapor

    Myung-Sic Chae

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Preventing unexpected explosive attacks and tracing explosion-related molecules require the development of highly sensitive gas-vapor detection systems. For that purpose, a micromechanical cantilever-based olfactory sensing system including a sample preconcentrator was developed to detect 2,4-dinitrotoluene (2,4-DNT, which is a well-known by-product of the explosive molecule trinitrotoluene (TNT and exists in concentrations on the order of parts per billion in the atmosphere at room temperature. A peptide receptor (His-Pro-Asn-Phe-Ser-Lys-Tyr-Ile-Leu-His-Gln-Arg that has high binding affinity for 2,4-DNT was immobilized on the surface of the cantilever sensors to detect 2,4-DNT vapor for highly selective detection. A micro-preconcentrator (µPC was developed using Tenax-TA adsorbent to produce higher concentrations of 2,4-DNT molecules. The preconcentration was achieved via adsorption and thermal desorption phenomena occurring between target molecules and the adsorbent. The µPC directly integrated with a cantilever sensor and enhanced the sensitivity of the cantilever sensor as a pretreatment tool for the target vapor. The response was rapidly saturated within 5 min and sustained for more than 10 min when the concentrated vapor was introduced. By calculating preconcentration factor values, we verified that the cantilever sensor provides up to an eightfold improvement in sensing performance.

  19. An Acetone Microsensor with a Ring Oscillator Circuit Fabricated Using the Commercial 0.18 μm CMOS Process

    Ming-Zhi Yang

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the fabrication and characterization of an acetone microsensor with a ring oscillator circuit using the commercial 0.18 μm complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS process. The acetone microsensor contains a sensitive material, interdigitated electrodes and a polysilicon heater. The sensitive material is α-Fe2O3 synthesized by the hydrothermal method. The sensor requires a post-process to remove the sacrificial oxide layer between the interdigitated electrodes and to coat the α-Fe2O3 on the electrodes. When the sensitive material adsorbs acetone vapor, the sensor produces a change in capacitance. The ring oscillator circuit converts the capacitance of the sensor into the oscillation frequency output. The experimental results show that the output frequency of the acetone sensor changes from 128 to 100 MHz as the acetone concentration increases 1 to 70 ppm.

  20. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic model for acetone.

    Kumagai, S.; Matsunaga, I

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--This study aimed to develop a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model for acetone and to predict the kinetic behaviour of acetone in the human body with that model. METHODS--The model consists of eight tissue groups in which acetone can be distributed: the mucous layer of the inhaled air tract, the mucous layer of the exhaled air tract, a compartment for gas exchange (alveolus of the lung), a group of blood vessel rich tissues including the brain and heart, a group of tissues i...

  1. Investigation of efficiency of air cleaning from acetone using a segmental construction biofilter

    Denas Bacevičius

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Volatile organic compounds, e. g. acetone, have a direct impact on climate change, decrease of ozone in the air, and on the growth of greenhouse effect. One of the most popular air purifying methods from VOC is a biological air cleaning. Experimental investigations were conducted to determine the efficiency of the new structure of biofilter with polypropylene plates segments. During the investigations the efficiency of segmental construction biofilter of air purification at different initial concentrations of pollutants was determined. Different concentrations of pollutants were estimated during the acetone dilution with water. During the tests the efficiency of biofilter air purification from acetone vapor and its change under different concentrations of vapors was set. Based on test results, the maximum efficiency of biofilter air purification was up to 93%. Studies have shown that increasing the allowable pollutant concentration, the efficiency of air purification unit decreases. Increasing the concentration of supplied acetone vapor into the biofilter from 232 to 701 mg/m3, cleaning efficiency decreased from 92.8 to 82.3%. Since microorganisms fail to oxidize organic compounds, the filter works better at lower initial concentrations of pollutants.

  2. Effect of grain-size on the ethanol vapor sensing properties of room-temperature sputtered ZnO thin films

    We have investigated the gas sensing properties of ZnO thin films (100 to 200 nm thickness) deposited by room-temperature radio frequency magnetron sputtering. The sensitivity of the films to ethanol vapor was measured in the 10 to 50 ppm concentration range at operating temperatures between 200 and 400 °C. A synergetic effect of decreasing grain size and increasing operating temperature was observed towards the improvement of the sensitivity, reaching a value of 54 and a limit of detection as low as 0.61 ppm. The decrease in the grain size resulted in prolonged response time but faster recovery. In any case, both response time and recovery time are < 400 s. The results demonstrate that room-temperature magnetron sputtering is a viable approach to enhance the performances of ZnO films in sensors for ethanol vapor. (author)

  3. Composition measurement of bicomponent droplets using laser-induced fluorescence of acetone

    Maqua, C.; Depredurand, V.; Castanet, G.; Wolff, M.; Lemoine, F.

    2007-12-01

    Commercial fuels are complex mixtures, the evaporation of which remains particularly difficult to model. Experimental characterization of the differential vaporization of the components is a problem that is seldom addressed. In this paper, the evaporation of binary droplets made of ethyl-alcohol and acetone is investigated using a technique of measurement of the droplet composition developed in purpose. This technique exploits the laser induced fluorescence of acetone which acts as a fluorescent tracer as well as the more volatile component of the fuel associated with an accurate measurement of the droplet diameter by forward scattering interferometry. A model of the fluorescence intensity of the binary mixture, taking into account the absorption of the acetone molecules, is proposed and validated. The sensitivity of the technique is discussed. Finally, the reliability of the technique is demonstrated on binary combusting droplets in linear stream.

  4. Breath acetone monitoring by portable Si:WO{sub 3} gas sensors

    Righettoni, Marco; Tricoli, Antonio; Gass, Samuel [Particle Technology Laboratory, Department of Mechanical and Process Engineering ETH Zurich, CH-8092 Zurich (Switzerland); Schmid, Alex; Amann, Anton [Univ.-Clinic for Anesthesia, Innsbruck Medical University, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Breath Research Institute of the Austrian Academy of Sciences, A-6850 Dornbirn (Austria); Pratsinis, Sotiris E., E-mail: sotiris.pratsinis@ptl.mavt.ethz.ch [Particle Technology Laboratory, Department of Mechanical and Process Engineering ETH Zurich, CH-8092 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2012-08-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Portable sensors were developed and tested for monitoring acetone in the human breath. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Acetone concentrations down to 20 ppb were measured with short response times (<30 s). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The present sensors were highly selective to acetone over ethanol and water. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sensors were applied to human breath: good agreement with highly sensitive PTR-MS. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Tests with people at rest and during physical activity showed the sensor robustness. - Abstract: Breath analysis has the potential for early stage detection and monitoring of illnesses to drastically reduce the corresponding medical diagnostic costs and improve the quality of life of patients suffering from chronic illnesses. In particular, the detection of acetone in the human breath is promising for non-invasive diagnosis and painless monitoring of diabetes (no finger pricking). Here, a portable acetone sensor consisting of flame-deposited and in situ annealed, Si-doped epsilon-WO{sub 3} nanostructured films was developed. The chamber volume was miniaturized while reaction-limited and transport-limited gas flow rates were identified and sensing temperatures were optimized resulting in a low detection limit of acetone ({approx}20 ppb) with short response (10-15 s) and recovery times (35-70 s). Furthermore, the sensor signal (response) was robust against variations of the exhaled breath flow rate facilitating application of these sensors at realistic relative humidities (80-90%) as in the human breath. The acetone content in the breath of test persons was monitored continuously and compared to that of state-of-the-art proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS). Such portable devices can accurately track breath acetone concentration to become an alternative to more elaborate breath analysis techniques.

  5. Atmospheric heteroseneous reaction of acetone: Adsorption and desorption kinetics and mechanisms on SiO2 particles

    JIE ChongYu; CHEN ZhongMing; WANG HongLi; HUA Wei; WANG CaiXia; LI Shuang

    2008-01-01

    Acetone plays an important role in photooxidation processes in the atmosphere. Up to date, little is known regarding the heterogeneous fate of acetone. In this study, the adsorption and desorption processes of acetone on SiO2 particles, which are the major constituent of mineral dust in the atmos-phere, have been investigated for the first time under the simulated atmospheric conditions, using in situ transmission Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. It is found that acetone molecules are ad-sorbed on the surfaces of SiO2 particles by van der Waals forces and hydrogen bonding forces in a nonreactive and reversible state. The rates of initial adsorption and initial desorption, initial uptake coefficients and adsorption concentrations at equilibrium have been determined at different relative humidity. The presence of water vapor cannot result in the formation of new substances, but can de-crease the adsorption ability by consuming or overlapping the isolated OH groups on the surfaces of SiO2 particles. In the desorption process, a considerable amount of acetone molecules will remain on SiO2 particles in dry air, whereas acetone molecules are almost completely desorbed at a high relative humidity. In order to evaluate the role of heterogeneous reactions of acetone and other carbonyl compounds in the atmosphere, a new model fitting the atmospheric conditions is needed.

  6. Acetone/hexane recrystallization of HNAB

    Quinlin, W.T.; Evans, V.H.

    1977-08-01

    In the manufacturing process for hexanitroazobenzene (HNAB), the final step prior to heat treatment is a recrystallization of HNAB from an acetonitrile/tetrachlorethane mixture. The possibility that the above solvents might become unavailable at some future date and the toxicities of these solvents indicate a need for a new solvent system. Initial work using acetone/hexane in place of acetonitrite/tetrachloroethane indicated its feasibility (D. M. O'Keefe, Sandia Laboratories, Private Communication). The objective of the present work was to confirm the feasibility of the use of acetone/hexane system and then to scale-up the recrystallization to the size and type of equipment used in the manufacturing process. A 7.2 kg batch of HNAB was produced with the final recrystallization from the acetone/hexane system. The analysis of the HNAB-II compared favorably with that from the production process. A 50 g sample was furnished to Sandia Laboratory.

  7. Atmospheric remote sensing of water vapor, HCl and CH4 using a continuously tunable Co:MgF2 laser

    Menyuk, Norman; Killinger, Dennis K.

    1987-01-01

    A differential-absorption lidar system has been developed which uses a continuously tunable (1.5-2.3 micron) cobalt-doped magnesium fluoride laser as the radiation source. Preliminary atmospheric measurements of water vapor, HCl, and CH4 have been made with this system, including both path-averaged and ranged-resolved DIAL measurements at ranges up to 6 and 3 km, respectively.

  8. Breath acetone monitoring by portable Si:WO3 gas sensors

    Highlights: ► Portable sensors were developed and tested for monitoring acetone in the human breath. ► Acetone concentrations down to 20 ppb were measured with short response times (3 nanostructured films was developed. The chamber volume was miniaturized while reaction-limited and transport-limited gas flow rates were identified and sensing temperatures were optimized resulting in a low detection limit of acetone (∼20 ppb) with short response (10–15 s) and recovery times (35–70 s). Furthermore, the sensor signal (response) was robust against variations of the exhaled breath flow rate facilitating application of these sensors at realistic relative humidities (80–90%) as in the human breath. The acetone content in the breath of test persons was monitored continuously and compared to that of state-of-the-art proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS). Such portable devices can accurately track breath acetone concentration to become an alternative to more elaborate breath analysis techniques.

  9. Enhanced chemiluminescent detection scheme for trace vapor sensing in pneumatically-tuned hollow core photonic bandgap fibers.

    Stolyarov, Alexander M; Gumennik, Alexander; McDaniel, William; Shapira, Ofer; Schell, Brent; Sorin, Fabien; Kuriki, Ken; Benoit, Gilles; Rose, Aimee; Joannopoulos, John D; Fink, Yoel

    2012-05-21

    We demonstrate an in-fiber gas phase chemical detection architecture in which a chemiluminescent (CL) reaction is spatially and spectrally matched to the core modes of hollow photonic bandgap (PBG) fibers in order to enhance detection efficiency. A peroxide-sensitive CL material is annularly shaped and centered within the fiber's hollow core, thereby increasing the overlap between the emission intensity and the intensity distribution of the low-loss fiber modes. This configuration improves the sensitivity by 0.9 dB/cm compared to coating the material directly on the inner fiber surface, where coupling to both higher loss core modes and cladding modes is enhanced. By integrating the former configuration with a custom-built optofluidic system designed for concomitant controlled vapor delivery and emission measurement, we achieve a limit-of-detection of 100 parts per billion (ppb) for hydrogen peroxide vapor. The PBG fibers are produced by a new fabrication method whereby external gas pressure is used as a control knob to actively tune the transmission bandgaps through the entire visible range during the thermal drawing process. PMID:22714227

  10. GPS meteorology in a low-latitude region: Remote sensing of atmospheric water vapor over the Malaysian Peninsula

    Musa, T. A.; Amir, S.; Othman, R.; Ses, S.; Omar, K.; Abdullah, K.; Lim, S.; Rizos, C.

    2011-10-01

    This paper presents an accuracy assessment of IWV data obtained from one year of GPS measurements in Peninsular Malaysia and the correlation between this GPS-derived IWV and radiosonde-derived IWV. Four GPS stations in close proximity to existing radiosonde stations are assessed; the root mean square errors of the GPS-derived IWVs are 3.447 kg/m2, 3.786 kg/m2, 4.122 kg/m2 and 4.253 kg/m2 and their linear correlation coefficients are 0.877, 0.797, 0.851 and 0.849, respectively. Such strong correlations indicate that GPS data has the potential to be used for water vapor observation in Peninsular Malaysia for locations with few weather stations.

  11. Sheet Resistance and Gas-Sensing Properties of Tin Oxide Thin Films by Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition

    刘彭义; 陈俊芳; 孙汪典

    2004-01-01

    Tin oxide (SnO2) thin films are prepared at different temperatures by plasmaenhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). The structural characterizations of the films are investigated by various analysis techniques. X-ray diffraction patterns (XRD) show that the phase of SnO2 films are different at different deposition temperatures. The sheet resistance of the films decreases with increase of deposition temperature. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) shows that the SnO2 thin film is non-stoichiometric. The sheet resistance increases with increase in oxygen flow. Sb-doped SnO2 thin films are more sensitive to alcohol than carbon monoxide, and its maximum sensitivity is about 220%.

  12. Acetone-butanol fermentation in Egypt

    Tantawi, M.

    1984-10-01

    Acetone and butanol can be produced by anaerobic fermentation of molasses with microorganisms such as Clostridium saccharobutylicum and Clostridium acetobutylicum. There are many steps in the process and the main problem is that the yields are quite susceptible to contamination. At the present time the process is uneconomical due to the cost of molasses, the considerable steam consumption for the sterilizing process and the expense of the disposal of the slops.

  13. Nonlinear diffusion in Acetone-Benzene Solution

    Obukhovsky, Vjacheslav V

    2010-01-01

    The nonlinear diffusion in multicomponent liquids under chemical reactions influence has been studied. The theory is applied to the analysis of mass transfer in a solution of acetone-benzene. It has been shown, that the creation of molecular complexes should be taken into account for the explanation of the experimental data on concentration dependence of diffusion coefficients. The matrix of mutual diffusivities has been found and effective parameters of the system have been computed.

  14. Synthesis of complex compounds in the system [ReOG5]2--thiosemicarbazone acetone-Hg-acetone

    Present article is devoted to synthesis of complex compounds in the system [ReOG5]2--thiosemicarbazone acetone-Hg-acetone. The literature data on complex compounds of various metals with thiosemicarbazone was summarized. The synthesis of complex compounds in the system [ReOG5]2--thiosemicarbazone acetone-Hg-acetone was conducted. The complex compounds of rhenium with methyl ident thiosemicarbazone were synthesized.

  15. Plasma treatment as a way of increasing the selectivity of carbon nanotube networks for organic vapor sensing elements

    Olejník, R.; Slobodian, P.; Cvelbar, U.; Říha, Pavel; Sáha, P.

    Vol. 543. Zurich : Trans Tech Publications, 2013, s. 410-413. ISSN 1662-9795. [2nd International Conference on Materials and Applications for Sensors and Transducers , IC-MAST. Budapest (HU), 24.05.2012-28.05.2012] Grant ostatní: UTB Zlín(CZ) IGA/FT/2012/022; GA MŠk(CZ) ED2.1.00/03.0111 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20600510 Institutional support: RVO:67985874 Keywords : carbon nanotube networks * plasma * sensing element * interdigitated electrode Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics

  16. Performance Assessment of GPS-Sensed Precipitable Water Vapor using IGS Ultra-Rapid Orbits: A Preliminary Study in Thailand

    Yoon-Soo Choi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Precipitable Water Vapor (PWV is a significant variable used for climate change studies. Currently PWV can be derived from the Global Positioning System (GPS observation in addition to the specific instruments such as Radiosondes (RS, Microwave Radiometers (MWR and Meteorological Satellites. To accurately derive PWV from GPS data, long periods of observation time in conjunction with final orbit data have to be applied in the data processing steps. This final orbit data can be acquired from the International GNSS Service (IGS with 13 days latency, which is not practical in climate change studies or meteorological forecasting. Alternatively, real-time ultra-rapid orbits are more suitable for this application but with lower orbit accuracy. It is therefore interesting to evaluate the impact of using different orbits in the estimation of PWV. In this study, data from permanent GPS base stations in Thailand were processed using Bernese 5.0 software to derive near real-time PWV values. Ultra-rapid orbit data have been introduced in the data processing step with different time windows and compared to that using final orbit data with the 24-hr time window. The results have shown that 1.0 mm and 2.9 mm biases can be achieved using 24-hr and 12-hr time windows, respectively. These results therefore address the potential use of ultra-rapid orbits for a near real-time estimation of PWV.

  17. Development of Solid State Laser Materials for Application in Lasers for Atmospheric Ozone and Water Vapor Sensing

    Noginov, Makhail A.; Loutts, G. B.

    2002-01-01

    We have grown neodymium doped mixed apatite crystals, (Sr(x)Ba(l-x)5(PO4)3F, Sr5(P(1-x)V(x)O4)3F, and Ba5(P(1-x)V(x)O4)3F, and spectroscopically studied them as potential gain media for a laser source for atmospheric water sensing operating at 944.11 nm0. We conclude that an appropriate apatite host material for a 944.11 nm laser should be a mixture of Sr5(PO4)3F with a small fraction of Ba5(PO4)3F. The precise wavelength tuning around 944.11 nm can be accomplished by varying the host composition, temperature, and threshold population inversion. In apatite crystals of mixed composition, the Amplified Spontaneous Emission (ASE) loss at 1.06 microns is predicted to be significantly smaller than that in the end members.

  18. Acetone-butanol Fermentation of Marine Macroalgae

    Huesemann, Michael H.; Kuo, Li-Jung; Urquhart, Lindsay A.; Gill, Gary A.; Roesijadi, Guritno

    2012-03-01

    Mannitol and laminarin, which are present at high concentrations in the brown macroalga Saccharina spp., a type of kelp, are potential biochemical feedstocks for butanol production. To test their bioconversion potential, aqueous extracts of the kelp Saccharina spp., mannitol, and glucose (a product of laminarin hydrolysis) were subjected to acetone-butanol fermentation by Clostridium acetobutylicum (ATCC 824). Both mannitol and glucose were readily fermented. Mixed substrate fermentations with glucose and mannitol resulted in diauxic growth of C. acetobutylicum with glucose depletion preceding mannitol utilization. Fermentation of kelp extract exhibited triauxic growth, with an order of utilization of free glucose, mannitol, and bound glucose, presumably laminarin. The lag in laminarin utilization reflected the need for enzymatic hydrolysis of this polysaccharide into fermentable sugars. The butanol and total solvent yields were 0.12 g/g and 0.16 g/g, respectively, indicating that significant improvements are still needed to make industrial-scale acetone-butanol fermentations of seaweed economically feasible.

  19. Apparatus and method for monitoring breath acetone and diabetic diagnostics

    Duan, Yixiang (Los Alamos, NM); Cao, Wenqing (Los Alamos, NM)

    2008-08-26

    An apparatus and method for monitoring diabetes through breath acetone detection and quantitation employs a microplasma source in combination with a spectrometer. The microplasma source provides sufficient energy to produce excited acetone fragments from the breath gas that emit light. The emitted light is sent to the spectrometer, which generates an emission spectrum that is used to detect and quantify acetone in the breath gas.

  20. Synthesis and characterization of carbon nanofilms for chemical sensing

    Kumar, Vivek

    Carbon nanofilms obtained by high temperature graphitization of diamond surface in inert atmospheres or vacuum are modified by treatment in plasma of different precursor gases. At temperatures above 1000 °C, a stable conductive film of thickness between 10 - 100 nm and specific resistivity 10-3-10-4 Ωm, depending upon the heating conditions and the growth atmosphere, is formed on diamond surface. A gray, thin film of high surface resistivity is obtained in high vacuum, while at low vacuum (below 10-4 mbar), a thick black film of low surface resistivity forms. It is observed that the exposure to plasma reduces the surface conductance of carbon nanofilms as result of a partial removal of carbon and the plasma-stimulated amorphization. The rate of the reduction of conductance and hence the etching ability of plasma depends on the type of precursor gas. Hydrogen reveals the strongest etching ability, followed by oxygen and argon, whereas SF6 is ineffective. The carbon nanofilms show significant sensitivity of their electrical conductance to temperature and exposure to the vapors of common organic compounds. The oxygen plasma treated films exhibit selective response to acetone and water vapors. The fast response and recovery of the conductance are the features of the carbon nanofilms. The plasma-treated carbon nanofilm on graphitized diamond surface is discussed as a promising sensing material for development of all-carbon chemical sensors, which may be suitable for biological and medical applications. An alternative approach of fabrication of temperature and chemical sensitive carbon nanofilms on insulating substrates is proposed. The films are obtained by direct deposition of sputtered carbon on highly polished quartz substrates followed by subsequent annealing at temperatures above 400 °C. It is observed that the as-deposited films are essentially amorphous, while the heating induces irreversible structural ordering and gradual conversion of amorphous carbon in

  1. Pervaporation of model acetone-butanol-ethanol fermentation product solutions using polytetrafluoroethylene membranes

    Vrana, D.L.; Meagher, M.M.; Hutkins, R.W.; Duffield, B. (Univ. of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE (United States))

    1993-10-01

    A pervaporation apparatus was designed and tested in an effort to develop an integrated fermentation and product recovery process for acetone-butanol-ethanol(ABE) fermentation. A crossflow membrane module able to accommodate flat sheet hydrophobic membranes was used for the experiments. Permeate vapors were collected under vacuum and condensed in a dry ice/ethanol cold trap. The apparatus containing polytetrafluoroethylene membranes was tested using butanol-water and model solutions of ABE products. Parameters such as product concentration, component effect, temperature, and permeate side pressure were examined. 25 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  2. Inhalation developmental toxicology studies: Teratology study of acetone in mice and rats: Final report

    Mast, T.J.; Evanoff, J.J.; Rommereim, R.L.; Stoney, K.H.; Weigel, R.J.; Westerberg, R.B.

    1988-11-01

    Acetone, an aliphatic ketone, is a ubiquitous industrial solvent and chemical intermediate; consequently, the opportunity for human exposure is high. The potential for acetone to cause developmental toxicity was assessed in Sprague-Dawley rats exposed to 0, 440, 2200, or 11000 ppm, and in Swiss (CD-1) mice exposed to 0, 440, 2200, and 6600 ppm acetone vapors, 6 h/day, 7 days/week. Each of the four treatment groups consisted of 10 virgin females (for comparison), and approx.32 positively mated rats or mice. Positively mated mice were exposed on days 6-17 of gestation (dg), and rats on 6-19 dg. The day of plug or sperm detection was designated as 0 dg. Body weights were obtained throughout the study period, and uterine and fetal body weights were obtained at sacrifice (rats, 20 dg; mice, 18 dg). Implants were enumerated and their status recorded. Live fetuses were sexed and examined for gross, visceral, skeletal, and soft-tissue craniofacial defects. 46 refs., 6 figs., 27 tabs.

  3. The efficacy of acetone in the sterilisation of ophthalmic instruments

    Agrawal Vinay

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available Acetone has been considered a quick, effective and less expensive chemical sterilising agent and continues to be used by ophthalmic surgeons, at least in developing countries. Its utility however has been questioned recently. This study was designed to assess the efficacy of acetone against Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Bacillus subtilis and Aspergillus flavus present on ophthalmic surgical instruments (forceps, sutures. The instruments were contaminated by immersion in standard suspensions of the organisms and thereafter were either unwashed (group-I, washed and dried (group-II or only washed (group-III before immersion in acetone. The exposure to acetone was kept at 3, 10 and 20 minutes in each group. The results showed that acetone could eliminate Pseudomonas (vegetative bacteria after 10 minutes exposure in unwashed group and 3 minutes exposure in washed groups. It was ineffective against spore bearing bacteria (B. subtilis and fungus (Aspergillus flavus even after 20 minutes of exposure

  4. Effect of Cobalt Particle Size on Acetone Steam Reforming

    Sun, Junming; Zhang, He; Yu, Ning; Davidson, Stephen D.; Wang, Yong

    2015-06-11

    Carbon-supported cobalt nanoparticles with different particle sizes were synthesized and characterized by complementary characterization techniques such as X-ray diffraction, N-2 sorption, acetone temperature-programmed desorption, transmission electron microscopy, and CO chemisorption. Using acetone steam reforming reaction as a probe reaction, we revealed a volcano-shape curve of the intrinsic activity (turnover frequency of acetone) and the CO2 selectivity as a function of the cobalt particle size with the highest activity and selectivity observed at a particle size of approximately 12.8nm. Our results indicate that the overall performance of acetone steam reforming is related to a combination of particle-size-dependent acetone decomposition, water dissociation, and the oxidation state of the cobalt nanoparticles.

  5. A comparative study on two explosive acetone peroxides

    Egorshev, V. Yu.; Sinditskii, V.P., E-mail: vps@rctu.ru; Smirnov, S.P.

    2013-12-20

    Highlights: • The most accurate heats of DADP and TATP sublimation were evaluated from experimental vapor pressures in a widened temperature range. • DADP is more volatile while more thermally stable peroxide than TATP. • DADP reveals lesser sensitivity to drop-weight impact, flame temperature, burning rate, and initiating efficiency as compared with TATP. - Abstract: Two explosive cyclic acetone peroxides, diacetone diperoxide (DADP) and triacetone triperoxide (TATP) have been studied in respect of thermal decomposition, burning behavior, impact sensitivity, and initiating efficiency. Using the glass Bourdon gauge technique, the vapor pressures of TATP and DADP were determined over the temperature range 75–144 °C and 67–120 °C, respectively. The kinetic parameters of decomposition of the peroxides in the gas phase have been obtained in the temperature interval of 140–200 °C. The decomposition of both DADP and TATP followed the first-order reaction to high degrees of decay with close activation energies of 159.2 kJ/mol (38.0 kcal/mol) and 165.8 kJ/mol (39.6 kcal/mol), respectively. The decomposition rate constants of DADP were found to be approximately 2 times less than those of TATP. The linear burning rate of DADP measured in a constant-pressure window bomb appeared to be approximately 5 times less than that of TATP. Temperature profiles in the combustion wave were measured at subatmospheric pressures with the help of thin tungsten-rhenium thermocouples. The leading reaction on combustion of both volatile peroxides was assumed to occur in the gas phase. Kinetic parameters of the leading reaction derived from the combustion data showed a good agreement with kinetic parameters of low-temperature thermal decomposition extrapolated to the high-temperature flame zone. In the drop-weight impact test, DADP appeared to be notably less sensitive peroxide than TATP. No deflagration-to-detonation transition was observed when RDX was attempted to explode by

  6. A comparative study on two explosive acetone peroxides

    Highlights: • The most accurate heats of DADP and TATP sublimation were evaluated from experimental vapor pressures in a widened temperature range. • DADP is more volatile while more thermally stable peroxide than TATP. • DADP reveals lesser sensitivity to drop-weight impact, flame temperature, burning rate, and initiating efficiency as compared with TATP. - Abstract: Two explosive cyclic acetone peroxides, diacetone diperoxide (DADP) and triacetone triperoxide (TATP) have been studied in respect of thermal decomposition, burning behavior, impact sensitivity, and initiating efficiency. Using the glass Bourdon gauge technique, the vapor pressures of TATP and DADP were determined over the temperature range 75–144 °C and 67–120 °C, respectively. The kinetic parameters of decomposition of the peroxides in the gas phase have been obtained in the temperature interval of 140–200 °C. The decomposition of both DADP and TATP followed the first-order reaction to high degrees of decay with close activation energies of 159.2 kJ/mol (38.0 kcal/mol) and 165.8 kJ/mol (39.6 kcal/mol), respectively. The decomposition rate constants of DADP were found to be approximately 2 times less than those of TATP. The linear burning rate of DADP measured in a constant-pressure window bomb appeared to be approximately 5 times less than that of TATP. Temperature profiles in the combustion wave were measured at subatmospheric pressures with the help of thin tungsten-rhenium thermocouples. The leading reaction on combustion of both volatile peroxides was assumed to occur in the gas phase. Kinetic parameters of the leading reaction derived from the combustion data showed a good agreement with kinetic parameters of low-temperature thermal decomposition extrapolated to the high-temperature flame zone. In the drop-weight impact test, DADP appeared to be notably less sensitive peroxide than TATP. No deflagration-to-detonation transition was observed when RDX was attempted to explode by

  7. Nanostructure Engineered Chemical Sensors for Hazardous Gas and Vapor Detection

    Li, Jing; Lu, Yijiang

    2005-01-01

    A nanosensor technology has been developed using nanostructures, such as single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and metal oxides nanowires or nanobelts, on a pair of interdigitated electrodes (IDE) processed with a silicon based microfabrication and micromachining technique. The IDE fingers were fabricated using thin film metallization techniques. Both in-situ growth of nanostructure materials and casting of the nanostructure dispersions were used to make chemical sensing devices. These sensors have been exposed to hazardous gases and vapors, such as acetone, benzene, chlorine, and ammonia in the concentration range of ppm to ppb at room temperature. The electronic molecular sensing in our sensor platform can be understood by electron modulation between the nanostructure engineered device and gas molecules. As a result of the electron modulation, the conductance of nanodevice will change. Due to the large surface area, low surface energy barrier and high thermal and mechanical stability, nanostructured chemical sensors potentially can offer higher sensitivity, lower power consumption and better robustness than the state-of-the-art systems, which make them more attractive for defense and space applications. Combined with MEMS technology, light weight and compact size sensors can be made in wafer scale with low cost.

  8. Viscosities and refractive indices of binary systems acetone+1-propanol, acetone+1,2-propanediol and acetone+1,3-propanediol

    Živković Emila M.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Viscosities and refractive indices of three binary systems, acetone+1-propanol, acetone+1,2-propanediol and acetone+1,3-propanediol, were measured at eight temperatures (288.15, 293.15, 298.15, 303.15, 308.15, 313.15, 318.15, 323.15K and at atmospheric pressure. From these data viscosity deviations and deviations in refractive index were calculated and fitted to the Redlich-Kister equation. The viscosity modelling was done by two types of models: predictive UNIFAC-VISCO and ASOG VISCO and correlative Teja-Rice and McAlister equations. The refractive indices of binary mixtures were predicted by various mixing rules and compared with experimental data. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 172063

  9. Synthesis and Analysis of Resorcinol-Acetone Copolymer

    Gen-ichi Konishi; Ataru Kobayashi

    2009-01-01

    Synthesis and characterization of resorcinol-acetone copolymer is described. The polymer was prepared by trifluoroacetic acid-catalyzed polymerization of resorcinol with acetone. According to the 1H-NMR, 13C-NMR, and MALDI-TOF Mass spectra data, the obtained polymer had three types of repeating units: isopropylidene bridged-resorcinol, chromane ring, and spiro-shaped double chromane ring, indicating that polymerization proceeded via simultaneous addition-condensation and cyclization of resorc...

  10. Breath acetone concentration; biological variability and the influence of diet

    Previous measurements of acetone concentrations in the exhaled breath of healthy individuals and the small amount of comparable data for individuals suffering from diabetes are briefly reviewed as a prelude to the presentation of new data on the sporadic and wide variations of breath acetone that occur in ostensibly healthy individuals. Data are also presented which show that following a ketogenic diet taken by eight healthy individuals their breath acetone concentrations increased up to five times over the subsequent 6 h. Similarly, the breath acetone increased six and nine times when a low carbohydrate diet was taken by two volunteers and remained high for the several days for which the diet was continued. These new data, together with the previous data, clearly indicate that diet and natural intra-individual biological and diurnal variability result in wide variations in breath acetone concentration. This places an uncertainty in the use of breath acetone alone to monitor blood glucose and glycaemic control, except and unless the individual acts as their own control and is cognizant of the need for dietary control. (note)

  11. Activation of Acetone and Other Simple Ketones in Anaerobic Bacteria.

    Heider, Johann; Schühle, Karola; Frey, Jasmin; Schink, Bernhard

    2016-01-01

    Acetone and other ketones are activated for subsequent degradation through carboxylation by many nitrate-reducing, phototrophic, and obligately aerobic bacteria. Acetone carboxylation leads to acetoacetate, which is subsequently activated to a thioester and degraded via thiolysis. Two different types of acetone carboxylases have been described, which require either 2 or 4 ATP equivalents as an energy supply for the carboxylation reaction. Both enzymes appear to combine acetone enolphosphate with carbonic phosphate to form acetoacetate. A similar but more complex enzyme is known to carboxylate the aromatic ketone acetophenone, a metabolic intermediate in anaerobic ethylbenzene metabolism in denitrifying bacteria, with simultaneous hydrolysis of 2 ATP to 2 ADP. Obligately anaerobic sulfate-reducing bacteria activate acetone to a four-carbon compound as well, but via a different process than bicarbonate- or CO2-dependent carboxylation. The present evidence indicates that either carbon monoxide or a formyl residue is used as a cosubstrate, and that the overall ATP expenditure of this pathway is substantially lower than in the known acetone carboxylase reactions. PMID:26958851

  12. Extraction of defatted rice bran with subcritical aqueous acetone.

    Chiou, Tai-Ying; Neoh, Tze Loon; Kobayashi, Takashi; Adachi, Shuji

    2012-01-01

    Defatted rice bran extracts were obtained by subcritical treatment using aqueous acetone as extractant. Treatment with 40% (v/v) acetone at 230 °C for 5 min yielded an extract with the highest 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging activity (0.274 mmol of ascorbic acid/g of bran), total carbohydrate (0.188 g/g of bran), protein (0.512 g/g of bran), and total phenolic contents (88.2 mg of gallic acid/g of bran). The effect of treatment temperature (70-230 °C) was investigated using 40% (v/v) acetone, and the extract under 230 °C treatment showed the highest levels of all the determinations described above. The extracts obtained with various concentrations of aqueous acetone were subjected to UV absorption spectra and HPLC analysis, and the results showed changes in composition and polarity. Antioxidative activity evaluated against oxidation of bulk linoleic acid of the extract obtained with 80% (v/v) acetone was higher than that not only of the extract from subcritical water treatment but also of that obtained 40% (v/v) acetone treatment. PMID:22878207

  13. Optical Properties of Sol-Gel Nb2O5 Films with Tunable Porosity for Sensing Applications

    Rosen Georgiev

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Thin Nb2O5 films with tunable porosity are deposited by the sol-gel and evaporation induced self-assembly methods using organic template Pluronic PE6100 with different molar fractions with respect to NbCl5 used as a precursor for synthesis of Nb sol. Surface morphology and structure of the films are studied by Transmission Electron Microscopy and Selected Area Electron Diffraction. The optical characterization of the films is carried out through reflectance spectra measurements of the films deposited on silicon substrates and theoretical modeling in order to obtain refractive index, extinction coefficient, and thickness of the films. The overall porosity of the films and the amount of adsorbed acetone vapors in the pores are quantified by means of Bruggeman effective medium approximation using already determined optical constants. The sensing properties of the samples are studied by measuring both the reflectance spectra and room-temperature photoluminescence spectra prior to and after exposure to acetone vapors and liquid, respectively. The potential of using the studied mesoporous Nb2O5 films for chemooptical sensing is demonstrated and discussed.

  14. Remote sensing of water vapor convergence, deep convection, and precipitation over the tropical Pacific Ocean during the 1982-1983 El Nino

    Ardanuy, Philip E.; Cuddapah, Prabhakara; Kyle, H. Lee

    1987-01-01

    Using data collected by SMMR on board the Nimbus 7 satellite, estimates of atmospheric water vapor were obtained over the tropical Pacific Ocean during the 1982-1983 El Nino. A parameterization that physically relates the synoptic and convective scales was employed, making it possible to explicitly resolve convective elements and rain cells for poorly resolvable measurements. The derived water vapor flux convergences were analyzed during the El Nino episode to map the inferred deep convection and estimated rainfall over regions impacted by the event, and the inferred monthly rainfall amounts were compared with observations for 14 island and coastal stations in the Pacific Ocean.

  15. A MEMS based acetone sensor incorporating ZnO nanowires synthesized by wet oxidation of Zn film

    In this work, we report a simple and efficient method for synthesis of ZnO nanowires by thermal oxidation of Zn film and their integration with MEMS technologies to fabricate a sensor for acetone vapour detection. ZnO nanowires were prepared by thermal oxidation of sputter deposited Zn film. The nanostructured ZnO was characterized by x-ray diffraction, a scanning electron microscope and room temperature photoluminescence measurements. The ZnO nanowires synthesis process was integrated with MEMS technologies to obtain a sensor for volatile organic compounds, incorporating an on-chip Ni microheater and an interdigited electrode structure. To reduce the heat loss from the on-chip microheater, the sensor was made on a thin silicon diaphragm obtained via a modified reactive ion etching process. This resulted in considerable power saving during sensor operation. For this, a three-mask process was used. The performance of the microheater was simulated on COMSOL and validated experimentally. The sensor has been tested for acetone vapour sensing and the operating parameters were optimized. The sensor has the ability to detect acetone vapour at 5 parts per million (ppm) concentrations when operated at 100 °C. The sensor consumed only 36 mW power and showed a high-sensitivity value of 26.3% for 100 ppm of acetone vapour. (paper)

  16. A MEMS based acetone sensor incorporating ZnO nanowires synthesized by wet oxidation of Zn film

    Behera, Bhagaban; Chandra, Sudhir

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we report a simple and efficient method for synthesis of ZnO nanowires by thermal oxidation of Zn film and their integration with MEMS technologies to fabricate a sensor for acetone vapour detection. ZnO nanowires were prepared by thermal oxidation of sputter deposited Zn film. The nanostructured ZnO was characterized by x-ray diffraction, a scanning electron microscope and room temperature photoluminescence measurements. The ZnO nanowires synthesis process was integrated with MEMS technologies to obtain a sensor for volatile organic compounds, incorporating an on-chip Ni microheater and an interdigited electrode structure. To reduce the heat loss from the on-chip microheater, the sensor was made on a thin silicon diaphragm obtained via a modified reactive ion etching process. This resulted in considerable power saving during sensor operation. For this, a three-mask process was used. The performance of the microheater was simulated on COMSOL and validated experimentally. The sensor has been tested for acetone vapour sensing and the operating parameters were optimized. The sensor has the ability to detect acetone vapour at 5 parts per million (ppm) concentrations when operated at 100 °C. The sensor consumed only 36 mW power and showed a high-sensitivity value of 26.3% for 100 ppm of acetone vapour.

  17. Retrieval techniques and information content analysis to improve remote sensing of atmospheric water vapor, liquid water and temperature from ground-based microwave radiometer measurements

    Sahoo, Swaroop

    Observation of profiles of temperature, humidity and winds with sufficient accuracy and fine vertical and temporal resolution are needed to improve mesoscale weather prediction, track conditions in the lower to mid-troposphere, predict winds for renewable energy, inform the public of severe weather and improve transportation safety. In comparing these thermodynamic variables, the absolute atmospheric temperature varies only by 15%; in contrast, total water vapor may change by up to 50% over several hours. In addition, numerical weather prediction (NWP) models are initialized using water vapor profile information, so improvements in their accuracy and resolution tend to improve the accuracy of NWP. Current water vapor profile observation systems are expensive and have insufficient spatial coverage to observe humidity in the lower to mid-troposphere. To address this important scientific need, the principal objective of this dissertation is to improve the accuracy, vertical resolution and revisit time of tropospheric water vapor profiles retrieved from microwave and millimeter-wave brightness temperature measurements. This dissertation advances the state of knowledge of retrieval of atmospheric water vapor from microwave brightness temperature measurements. It focuses on optimizing two information sources of interest for water vapor profile retrieval, i.e. independent measurements and background data set size. From a theoretical perspective, it determines sets of frequencies in the ranges of 20-23, 85-90 and 165-200 GHz that are optimal for water vapor retrieval from each of ground-based and airborne radiometers. The maximum number of degrees of freedom for the selected frequencies for ground-based radiometers is 5-6, while the optimum vertical resolution is 0.5 to 1.5 km. On the other hand, the maximum number of degrees of freedom for airborne radiometers is 8-9, while the optimum vertical resolution is 0.2 to 0.5 km. From an experimental perspective, brightness

  18. Non-Isothermal Desolvation Kinetics of Erythromycin A Acetone Solvate

    2007-01-01

    The desolvation of erythromycin acetone solvate was investigated under non-isothermal conditions by a thermogravimetric analyzer. This paper emphasized the kinetic analysis of non-isothermal TG-DTA data by Achar method and Coats-Redfern method to fit various solid-state reaction models, and to achieve kinetic parameters of desolvation. The mechanism of thermal desolvation was evaluated using the kinetic compensation effect. The results show that kinetics of desolvation of erythromycin acetone solvate was compatible with the mechanism of a two-dimensional diffusion controlled and was best expressed by Valensi equation. Corresponding to the integral method and the differential method, the activation energy of desolvation of erythromycin acetone solvate was estimated to be 51.26-57.11 kJ/mol, and the pre-exponential factor was 8.077 × 106 s-1-4.326 × 107 s-1,respectively.

  19. Synthesis and Analysis of Resorcinol-Acetone Copolymer

    Gen-ichi Konishi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Synthesis and characterization of resorcinol-acetone copolymer is described. The polymer was prepared by trifluoroacetic acid-catalyzed polymerization of resorcinol with acetone. According to the 1H-NMR, 13C-NMR, and MALDI-TOF Mass spectra data, the obtained polymer had three types of repeating units: isopropylidene bridged-resorcinol, chromane ring, and spiro-shaped double chromane ring, indicating that polymerization proceeded via simultaneous addition-condensation and cyclization of resorcinol with acetone. The obtained polymer can be useful not only for the development of plastic materials such as thermosets, adhesives, and coatings but also for the synthesis of biomaterials such as antimicrobial agents, pesticides, and medicines.

  20. Isopropanol and acetone induces vinyl chloride degradation in Rhodococcus rhodochrous.

    Kuntz, Robin L; Brown, Lewis R; Zappi, Mark E; French, W Todd

    2003-11-01

    In situ bioremediation of vinyl chloride (VC)-contaminated waste sites requires a microorganism capable of degrading VC. While propane will induce an oxygenase to accomplish this goal, its use as a primary substrate in bioremediation is complicated by its flammability and low water solubility. This study demonstrates that two degradation products of propane, isoproponal and acetone, can induce the enzymes in Rhodococcus rhodochrous that degrade VC. Additionally, a reasonable number of cells for bioremediation can be grown on conventional solid bacteriological media (nutrient agar, tryptic soy agar, plate count agar) in an average microbiological laboratory and then induced to produce the necessary enzymes by incubation of a resting cell suspension with isopropanol or acetone. Since acetone is more volatile than isopropanol and has other undesirable characteristics, isopropanol is the inducer of choice. It offers a non-toxic, water-soluble, relatively inexpensive alternative to propane for in situ bioremediation of waste sites contaminated with VC. PMID:14605909

  1. Acetone and acetaldehyde determination in tomato juice by isotopic dilution

    Acetone and acetaldehyde content of tomato juice were determined by isotope dilution techniques. The juice is added to 14C labelled compounds, carried along by nitrogen at low pressure. The mixture of 2.4 dinitrophenylhydrazones obtained from volatile compounds is separated by thin layer chromatography on silica gel and then on alumina. A determination of radioactivity and concentration of acetone and acetaldehyde 2,4 dinitrophenylhydrazones obtained after separation and elution allow to calculate the content of these two compounds in the initial product with the same sample. This technique could be used for determination of methanol and ethanol after transformation in 3,5 dinitrobenzoates

  2. Numerical Modeling and Experimental Validation by Calorimetric Detection of Energetic Materials Using Thermal Bimorph Microcantilever Array: A Case Study on Sensing Vapors of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs)

    Seok-Won Kang; Joe Fragala; Debjyoti Banerjee

    2015-01-01

    Bi-layer (Au-Si3N4) microcantilevers fabricated in an array were used to detect vapors of energetic materials such as explosives under ambient conditions. The changes in the bending response of each thermal bimorph (i.e., microcantilever) with changes in actuation currents were experimentally monitored by measuring the angle of the reflected ray from a laser source used to illuminate the gold nanocoating on the surface of silicon nitride microcantilevers in the absence and presence of a desig...

  3. Measure and exploitation of multisensor and multiwavelength synergy for remote sensing: 2. Application to the retrieval of atmospheric temperature and water vapor from MetOp

    Aires, F.; Paul, M; Prigent, C; Rommen, B.; Bouvet, M

    2011-01-01

    In the companion paper, classical information content (IC) analysis was used to measure the potential synergy between the microwave (MW) and infrared (IR) observations from Atmospheric Microwave Sounding Unit-A, Microwave Humidity Sounder, and Improved Atmospheric Sounding in the Infrared instruments, used to retrieve the atmospheric profiles of temperature and water vapor over ocean, under clear-sky conditions. Some limitations of IC were pointed out that questioned the reliability of this t...

  4. Investigation into the vapor sensing behavior and mechanism of a reactive hydroxyl-terminated polybutadiene liquid rubber/carbon black conductive film

    Luo, Yanling; Li, Yanlei; Li, Zhanqing

    2006-12-01

    An electrically conductive composite of polyurethane pre-polymers was prepared by an intramolecular hydrogen transfer reaction using a reactive hydroxyl-terminated polybutadiene (HTPB) liquid rubber oligopolymer as a reactant, toluene diisocyanate (TDI) as a curing agent and carbon black (CB) as a conductive filler. The influence of the component ratios, types of carbon black particles, curing temperatures and chain-extending agents such as glycerine and triethanolamine on the responsiveness and reversibility of HTPB/TDI/CB composite films was investigated. The structural characterization of the curing materials was conducted on a FT-IR spectrometer. The experimental results indicated that a higher response behavior of HTPB/TDI/CB composite films occurred in non-polar solvent vapors than with polar solvent vapors. The response intensity of the composite films enhanced with increased TDI content and the introduction of chain-extending agents. The responsivity of the films to benzene vapor reached 106 times the original value, but the responsive time and recovery time were prolonged at higher curing temperatures. The response mechanism for the films was elucidated based on the relationship between soft chain segments and hard chain segments.

  5. Improved Gas-Sensing Properties of Graphene-CoFe2O4 Composite Prepared via Homogeneous Precipitation

    1,2F. Liu

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Before studying the gas-sensing properties of graphene-CoFe2O4 composite, graphene-CoFe2O4 composite with different mixing ratio are prepared via homogeneous precipitation method with urea as precipitator and characterized by X-ray diffraction using CuKα. The experimental results reveal that the average grain size of CoFe2O4 with spinel-type structure is about 60 nm. The sensitive properties of pure CoFe2O4, 1%G-CoFe2O4, 2%G-CoFe2O4 and 5%G-CoFe2O4 are similar to the p-type semiconductor, and the sensor based on 5%G-CoFe2O4 shows the high sensitivity to ammonia, acetone vapor, formaldehyde vapor and acetaldehyde vapor with the temperature range from 80 to 300oC. Especially, the sensor based on 5%G-CoFe2O4 shows the sensitivity as high as 3 to 1000 ppm formaldehyde vapor when the operating temperature of sensor is 180oC. Thus, graphene-CoFe2O4 composite may be applied to measure the formaldehyde vapor at low temperature if the selectivity and response are improved further.

  6. [Detection and determination of acetone using semiconductor sensors].

    Reichel, J; Seyffarth, T; Guth, U; Möbius, H H; Göckeritz, D

    1989-10-01

    Investigations to examine not only the factors of influence on evaluation of acetone by self-prepared semiconductor gas sensors, but also to prove analytical properties, were carried out using different tools. A sensor temperature of 600 degrees C and a carrier gas flow-rate of 5 l/h were found to be suitable conditions for the measurement of flow-injection apparatus. The determination of 1 microliter-samples of aqueous solutions containing 1-700 g of acetone/l yielded deviations of 4 to 33%. Using a head space method, the working temperature of 370 degrees C led to a maximum sensor response, the detection limit ranged from 37.5 to 50 mg of acetone/l. After quantifying 5 microliters-sample solutions of 40-600 mg/l, results with an accuracy of 1 to 36% were obtained. The method showed the possibility of distinguishing concentrations of acetone below and above 40 mg/l according to physiological and pathological urinary values. The tests carried out on 100 human urine samples provide a good agreement with the Legal reference method for samples containing physiological or strong pathological amounts of ketone bodies, but not for those including traces and small amounts. False-positive results might be caused by a possible presence of ethanol in urine. PMID:2616614

  7. Photocatalytic degradation of acetone and butane on mesoporous titania layers

    Štengl, Václav; Houšková, Vendula; Bakardjieva, Snejana; Murafa, Nataliya

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 34, č. 9 (2010), s. 1999-2005. ISSN 1144-0546 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/08/0334 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40320502 Keywords : thin-films * gaseous acetone * oxidation * TIO2 Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 2.631, year: 2010

  8. Breath acetone concentration; biological variability and the influence of diet

    Španěl, Patrik; Dryahina, Kseniya; Rejšková, A.; Chippendale, T. W. E.; Smith, D.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 32, č. 8 (2011), N23-N31. ISSN 0967-3334 R&D Projects: GA ČR GP203/09/P172 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : acetone * breath * ketogenic diet Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 1.677, year: 2011

  9. Increase of acetone emitted by urine in relation to ovulation

    Smith, D.; Ismail, K. M. K.; Diskin, A. M.; Chapman, G.; Magnay, J. L.; Španěl, Patrik; O´Brien, S.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 85, č. 8 (2006), s. 1008-1011. ISSN 0001-6349 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : SIFT-MS * ovulation * acetone * spectrometry * trace gases Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 1.327, year: 2006

  10. Water vapor isotopes measurements at Mauna Loa, Hawaii: Comparison of laser spectroscopy and remote sensing with traditional methods, and the need for ongoing monitoring

    Galewsky, J.; Noone, D.; Sharp, Z.; Worden, J.

    2009-04-01

    The isotopic composition of water vapor (2H/1H and 18O/16 ratios) provides unique information on the transport pathways that link water sources to regional sinks, and thus proves useful in understanding large scale atmospheric humidity budgets. Recent advances in measurement technology allow the monitoring of water vapor isotope composition in ways which has can revolutionize investigations of atmospheric hydrology. Traditional measurement of isotopic composition requires trapping of samples with either large volume vacuum flasks or by trapping liquid samples with cryogens for later analyses using mass spectrometry, and are laborious and seldom span more than just short dedicated observational periods. On the other hand, laser absorption spectroscopy can provide almost continuous and autonomous in situ measurements of isotope abundances with precision almost that of traditional mass spectrometry, and observations from spacecraft can make almost daily maps of the global isotope distributions. In October of 2008 three laser based spectrometers were deployed at the Mauna Loa Laboratory in Hawaii to make continuous measurement of the 2H and 18O abundance of free tropospheric water vapor. These results are compared with traditional measurements and with measurements from two satellite platforms. While providing field validation of the new methodologies, the data show variability which captures the transport processes in the region. The data are used to characterize the role of large scale mixing of dry air, the influence of the boundary layer and the importance of moist convection in controlling the low humidity of subtropical air near Hawaii. Although the record is short, it demonstrates the usefulness of using robust isotope measurements to understand the budgets of the most important greenhouse gas. This work motivates establishing a continuous record of isotopes measurement at baseline sites, like Mauna Loa, such that the changes in water cycle can be understood and

  11. Raman lidar measurements of water vapor and aerosols during the atmospheric radiation measurement (ARM) remote clouds sensing (RCS) intensive observation period (IOP)

    Melfi, S.H.; Starr, D.O`C.; Whiteman, D. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (United States)] [and others

    1996-04-01

    The first Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) remote Cloud Study (RCS) Intensive Operations Period (IOP) was held during April 1994 at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. This experiment was conducted to evaluate and calibrate state-of-the-art, ground based remote sensing instruments and to use the data acquired by these instruments to validate retrieval algorithms developed under the ARM program.

  12. Numerical Modeling and Experimental Validation by Calorimetric Detection of Energetic Materials Using Thermal Bimorph Microcantilever Array: A Case Study on Sensing Vapors of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs).

    Kang, Seok-Won; Fragala, Joe; Banerjee, Debjyoti

    2015-01-01

    Bi-layer (Au-Si₃N₄) microcantilevers fabricated in an array were used to detect vapors of energetic materials such as explosives under ambient conditions. The changes in the bending response of each thermal bimorph (i.e., microcantilever) with changes in actuation currents were experimentally monitored by measuring the angle of the reflected ray from a laser source used to illuminate the gold nanocoating on the surface of silicon nitride microcantilevers in the absence and presence of a designated combustible species. Experiments were performed to determine the signature response of this nano-calorimeter platform for each explosive material considered for this study. Numerical modeling was performed to predict the bending response of the microcantilevers for various explosive materials, species concentrations, and actuation currents. The experimental validation of the numerical predictions demonstrated that in the presence of different explosive or combustible materials, the microcantilevers exhibited unique trends in their bending responses with increasing values of the actuation current. PMID:26334276

  13. Acetone Formation in the Vibrio Family: a New Pathway for Bacterial Leucine Catabolism

    Nemecek-Marshall, Michele; Wojciechowski, Cheryl; William P. Wagner; Fall, Ray

    1999-01-01

    There is current interest in biological sources of acetone, a volatile organic compound that impacts atmospheric chemistry. Here, we determined that leucine-dependent acetone formation is widespread in the Vibrionaceae. Sixteen Vibrio isolates, two Listonella species, and two Photobacterium angustum isolates produced acetone in the presence of l-leucine. Shewanella isolates produced much less acetone. Growth of Vibrio splendidus and P. angustum in a fermentor with controlled aeration revealed...

  14. Flame-made Nb-doped TiO2 ethanol and acetone sensors.

    Phanichphant, Sukon; Liewhiran, Chaikarn; Wetchakun, Khatcharin; Wisitsoraat, Anurat; Tuantranont, Adisorn

    2011-01-01

    Undoped TiO(2) and TiO(2) nanoparticles doped with 1-5 at.% Nb were successfully produced in a single step by flame spray pyrolysis (FSP). The phase and crystallite size were analyzed by XRD. The BET surface area (SSA(BET)) of the nanoparticles was measured by nitrogen adsorption. The trend of SSA(BET) on the doping samples increased and the BET equivalent particle diameter (d(BET)) (rutile) increased with the higher Nb-doping concentrations while d(BET) (anatase) remained the same. The morphology and accurate size of the primary particles were further investigated by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The crystallite sizes of undoped and Nb-doped TiO(2) spherical were in the range of 10-20 nm. The sensing films were prepared by spin coating technique. The mixing sample was spin-coated onto the Al(2)O(3) substrates interdigitated with Au electrodes. The gas sensing of acetone (25-400 ppm) was studied at operating temperatures ranging from 300-400 °C in dry air, while the gas sensing of ethanol (50-1,000 ppm) was studied at operating temperatures ranging from 250-400 °C in dry air. PMID:22346586

  15. Flame-Made Nb-Doped TiO2 Ethanol and Acetone Sensors

    Adisorn Tuantranont

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Undoped TiO2 and TiO2 nanoparticles doped with 1–5 at.% Nb were successfully produced in a single step by flame spray pyrolysis (FSP. The phase and crystallite size were analyzed by XRD. The BET surface area (SSABET of the nanoparticles was measured by nitrogen adsorption. The trend of SSABET on the doping samples increased and the BET equivalent particle diameter (dBET (rutile increased with the higher Nb-doping concentrations while dBET (anatase remained the same. The morphology and accurate size of the primary particles were further investigated by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM. The crystallite sizes of undoped and Nb-doped TiO2 spherical were in the range of 10–20 nm. The sensing films were prepared by spin coating technique. The mixing sample was spin-coated onto the Al2O3 substrates interdigitated with Au electrodes. The gas sensing of acetone (25–400 ppm was studied at operating temperatures ranging from 300–400 °C in dry air, while the gas sensing of ethanol (50–1,000 ppm was studied at operating temperatures ranging from 250–400 °C in dry air.

  16. Multiphoton ionization of acetone-water clusters at 355 nm

    WANG Reng; KONG Xiang-he; ZHANG Shu-dong; ZHANG Xia; FAN Xing-yan; ZHAO Shu-yan

    2006-01-01

    @@ The multiphoton ionization of acetone-water clusters were detected at 355 nm laser wavelength by using the time of flight mass spectrometer(TOF-MS).The experiments show that all products are protonated.Three main products such as (CH3COCH3)n-(H2O)n-2H+,(CH3COCH3)n-(H2O)n-1H+ and (CH3COCH3)n-(H2O)nH+ are concluded from the results.In order to study the equilibrium structures of the (CH3COCH3)n-(H2O)n-2H+,the ab-initio calculation is used on them.The experiment is even done when the volume rate of acetone to water is 1:2.

  17. Effect of using acetone and distilled water on the performance of open loop pulsating heat pipe (OLPHP) with different filling ratios

    Rahman, Md. Lutfor; Afrose, Tonima; Tahmina, Halima Khatun; Rinky, Rumana Parvin; Ali, Mohammad

    2016-07-01

    Pulsating heat pipe (PHP) is a new innovation in the modern era of miniaturizes thermal management system for its higher heating and cooling capacity. The objective of this experiment is to observe the performance of open loop pulsating heat pipe using two fluids at different filling ratios. This OLPHP is a copper capillary tube of 2.5mm outer diameter and 2mm inner diameter. It consists of 8 loops where the evaporative section is 50mm, adiabatic section is 120mm and condensation section is 80mm. The experiment is conducted with distilled water and acetone at 40%, 50%, 60%, and 70% filling ratios where 0° (vertical) is considered as definite angle of inclination. Distilled water and acetone are selected as working fluids considering their different latent heat of vaporization and surface tension. It is found that acetone shows lower thermal resistance than water at all heat inputs. Best performance of acetone is attained at 70% filling ratio. Water displays better heat transfer capability at 50% filling ratio.

  18. Aldol Condensation of Citral with Acetone on Basic Solid Catalysts

    Noda, C.; G. P. ALT; WERNECK R. M.; C. A. HENRIQUES; Monteiro, J. L. F.

    1998-01-01

    The catalytic performance of solids with basic properties, such as CaO, MgO and hydrotalcites, was evaluated in the aldol condensation of citral and acetone, the first step in the synthesis of ionones from citral. The best results were obtained with CaO and hydrotalcite with high conversions (98%) and selectivities (close to 70% for the main product) observed for both of the catalyst. Such pseudoionone yields were greater than those reported in the literature for the homogeneous reaction.

  19. Effect of Coadsorbed Water on the Photodecomposition of Acetone on TiO2(110)

    Henderson, Michael A.

    2008-06-10

    The influence of coadsorbed water on the photodecomposition of acetone on TiO2 was examined using temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and the rutile TiO2(110) surface as a model photocatalyst. Of the two major influences ascribed to water in the heterogeneous photocatalysis literature (promotion via OH radical supply and inhibition due to site blocking), only the negative influence of water was observed. As long as the total water and acetone coverage was maintained well below the first layer saturation coverage (‘1 ML’), little inhibition of acetone photodecomposition was observed. However, as the total water+acetone coverage exceeded 1 ML, acetone was preferentially displaced from the first layer to physisorbed states by water and the extent of acetone photodecomposition attenuated. The displacement originated from water compressing acetone into high coverage regions where increased acetone-acetone repulsions caused displacement from the first layer. The immediate product of acetone photodecomposition was adsorbed acetate, which occupies twice as many surface sites per molecule as compared to acetone. Since the acetate intermediate was more stable on the TiO2(110) surface than either water or acetone (as gauged by TPD) and since its photodecomposition rate was less than that of acetone, additional surface sites were not opened up during acetone photodecomposition for previously displaced acetone molecules to re-enter the first layer. Results in this study suggest that increased molecular-level repulsions between organic molecules brought about by increased water coverage are as influential in the inhibiting effect of water on photooxidation rates as are water-organic repulsions.

  20. Analysis of organic vapors with laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Nozari, Hadi; Rezaei, Fatemeh; Tavassoli, Seyed Hassan

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is utilized in the study of acetone, ethanol, methanol, cyclohexane, and nonane vapors. Carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, and nitrogen atomic emission spectra have been recorded following laser-induced breakdown of the organic vapors that are mixed with air inside a quartz chamber at atmospheric pressure. The plasma is generated with focused, Q-switched Nd:YAG radiation at the wavelength of 1064 nm. The effects of ignition and vapor pressure are discussed in view of the appearance of the emission spectra. The recorded spectra are proportional to the vapor pressure in air. The hydrogen and oxygen contributions diminish gradually with consecutive laser-plasma events without gas flow. The results show that LIBS can be used to characterize organic vapor.

  1. Analysis of organic vapors with laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Nozari, Hadi; Tavassoli, Seyed Hassan [Laser and Plasma Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, G. C, 1983963113 Evin, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rezaei, Fatemeh, E-mail: fatemehrezaei@kntu.ac.ir [Department of Physics, K. N. Toosi University of Technology, 15875-4416 Shariati, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-09-15

    In this paper, laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is utilized in the study of acetone, ethanol, methanol, cyclohexane, and nonane vapors. Carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, and nitrogen atomic emission spectra have been recorded following laser-induced breakdown of the organic vapors that are mixed with air inside a quartz chamber at atmospheric pressure. The plasma is generated with focused, Q-switched Nd:YAG radiation at the wavelength of 1064 nm. The effects of ignition and vapor pressure are discussed in view of the appearance of the emission spectra. The recorded spectra are proportional to the vapor pressure in air. The hydrogen and oxygen contributions diminish gradually with consecutive laser-plasma events without gas flow. The results show that LIBS can be used to characterize organic vapor.

  2. Analysis of organic vapors with laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    In this paper, laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is utilized in the study of acetone, ethanol, methanol, cyclohexane, and nonane vapors. Carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, and nitrogen atomic emission spectra have been recorded following laser-induced breakdown of the organic vapors that are mixed with air inside a quartz chamber at atmospheric pressure. The plasma is generated with focused, Q-switched Nd:YAG radiation at the wavelength of 1064 nm. The effects of ignition and vapor pressure are discussed in view of the appearance of the emission spectra. The recorded spectra are proportional to the vapor pressure in air. The hydrogen and oxygen contributions diminish gradually with consecutive laser-plasma events without gas flow. The results show that LIBS can be used to characterize organic vapor

  3. Numerical Modeling and Experimental Validation by Calorimetric Detection of Energetic Materials Using Thermal Bimorph Microcantilever Array: A Case Study on Sensing Vapors of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs

    Seok-Won Kang

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Bi-layer (Au-Si3N4 microcantilevers fabricated in an array were used to detect vapors of energetic materials such as explosives under ambient conditions. The changes in the bending response of each thermal bimorph (i.e., microcantilever with changes in actuation currents were experimentally monitored by measuring the angle of the reflected ray from a laser source used to illuminate the gold nanocoating on the surface of silicon nitride microcantilevers in the absence and presence of a designated combustible species. Experiments were performed to determine the signature response of this nano-calorimeter platform for each explosive material considered for this study. Numerical modeling was performed to predict the bending response of the microcantilevers for various explosive materials, species concentrations, and actuation currents. The experimental validation of the numerical predictions demonstrated that in the presence of different explosive or combustible materials, the microcantilevers exhibited unique trends in their bending responses with increasing values of the actuation current.

  4. Mathematical modeling of blood-gas kinetics for the volatile organic compounds isoprene and acetone

    Breath gas analysis is based on the compelling concept that the exhaled breath levels of endogenously produced volatile organic compounds (VOCs) can provide a direct, non-invasive window to the blood and hence, by inference, to the body. In this sense, breath VOCs are regarded as a comprehensive repository of valuable physiological and clinical information, that might be exploited in such diverse areas as diagnostics, therapeutic monitoring or general dynamic assessments of metabolic function, pharmacodynamics (e.g., in drug testing) and environmental exposure (e.g., in occupational health). Despite this enormous potential, the lack of standardized breath sampling regimes as well as the poor mechanistic understanding of VOC exhalation kinetics could cast a cloud over the widespread use of breath gas analysis in the biomedical sciences. In this context, a primary goal of the present thesis is to provide a better quantitative insight into the breath behavior of two prototypic VOCs, isoprene and acetone. A compartmental modeling framework is developed and validated by virtue of real-time breath measurements of these trace gases during distinct physiological states. In particular, the influence of various hemodynamic and ventilatory parameters on VOC concentrations in exhaled breath is investigated. This approach also complements previous steady state investigations in toxicology. From a phenomenological point of view, both acetone and isoprene concentrations in end-tidal breath are demonstrated to exhibit a reproducible non-steady state behavior during moderate workload challenges on a stationary bicycle. However, these dynamics depart drastically from what is expected on the basis of classical pulmonary inert gas elimination theory. More specifically, the start of exercise is accompanied by an abrupt increase in breath isoprene levels, usually by a factor of 3 to 4 compared with the steady state value during rest. This phase is followed by a gradual decline and the

  5. Acetone formation in the Vibrio family: a new pathway for bacterial leucine catabolism.

    Nemecek-Marshall, M; Wojciechowski, C; Wagner, W P; Fall, R

    1999-12-01

    There is current interest in biological sources of acetone, a volatile organic compound that impacts atmospheric chemistry. Here, we determined that leucine-dependent acetone formation is widespread in the Vibrionaceae. Sixteen Vibrio isolates, two Listonella species, and two Photobacterium angustum isolates produced acetone in the presence of L-leucine. Shewanella isolates produced much less acetone. Growth of Vibrio splendidus and P. angustum in a fermentor with controlled aeration revealed that acetone was produced after a lag in late logarithmic or stationary phase of growth, depending on the medium, and was not derived from acetoacetate by nonenzymatic decarboxylation in the medium. L-Leucine, but not D-leucine, was converted to acetone with a stoichiometry of approximately 0.61 mol of acetone per mol of L-leucine. Testing various potential leucine catabolites as precursors of acetone showed that only alpha-ketoisocaproate was efficiently converted by whole cells to acetone. Acetone production was blocked by a nitrogen atmosphere but not by electron transport inhibitors, suggesting that an oxygen-dependent reaction is required for leucine catabolism. Metabolic labeling with deuterated (isopropyl-d(7))-L-leucine revealed that the isopropyl carbons give rise to acetone with full retention of deuterium in each methyl group. These results suggest the operation of a new catabolic pathway for leucine in vibrios that is distinct from the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A pathway seen in pseudomonads. PMID:10601206

  6. Measure and exploitation of multisensor and multiwavelength synergy for remote sensing: 2. Application to the retrieval of atmospheric temperature and water vapor from MetOp

    Aires, Filipe; Paul, Maxime; Prigent, Catherine; Rommen, BjöRn; Bouvet, Marc

    2011-01-01

    In the companion paper, classical information content (IC) analysis was used to measure the potential synergy between the microwave (MW) and infrared (IR) observations from Atmospheric Microwave Sounding Unit-A, Microwave Humidity Sounder, and Improved Atmospheric Sounding in the Infrared instruments, used to retrieve the atmospheric profiles of temperature and water vapor over ocean, under clear-sky conditions. Some limitations of IC were pointed out that questioned the reliability of this technique for synergy characterization. The goal of this second paper is to develop a methodology to measure realistic potential synergies and to construct retrieval methods able to exploit them. Three retrieval methods are considered: the k nearest neighbors, the linear regression, and the neural networks (NN). These statistical retrieval schemes are tested on an application involving IR and MW synergy. Only clear-sky, near-nadir radiances over ocean are considered. The IR/MW synergy is expected to be stronger in cloudy cases, but it will be shown that it can also be observed in clear situations. The inversion algorithms are calibrated and tested with simulated observations, without any loss of generality, using similar theoretical assumption (same radiative transfer model, observational noise, and a priori information) in order to truly compare the IC and the direct statistical retrieval approaches. Multivariate and nonlinear methods such as the NN approach show that there is a strong potential for synergy. Synergy measurement tools such as the method proposed in this study should be considered in the future for the definition of new missions: The instrument characteristics should be determined not independently, sensor by sensor, but taking into account all the instruments together as a whole observing system.

  7. Template-free synthesis of hierarchical ZnFe2O4 yolk-shell microspheres for high-sensitivity acetone sensors

    Zhou, Xin; Wang, Boqun; Sun, Hongbin; Wang, Chen; Sun, Peng; Li, Xiaowei; Hu, Xiaolong; Lu, Geyu

    2016-03-01

    Metal oxides with hierarchical microstructures have attracted tremendous attention with respect to their enhanced gas sensing properties. Herein, we reported the facile synthesis of hierarchical ZnFe2O4 yolk-shell microspheres via a template-free solvothermal strategy and the subsequent annealing and chemical etching process. Electron microscopy images undoubtedly demonstrated that the novel ZnFe2O4 architecture was constructed of a large number of nanosheet subunits with a thickness around 20 nm. As a proof-of-concept demonstration of the function, when evaluated as gas sensing materials, the as-prepared ZnFe2O4 yolk-shell microspheres manifested an extremely high response and a low detection limit to acetone at the operating temperature of 200 °C. Significantly, the response to 20 ppm acetone was retained well even after 200 cycles and continuous measurement for 30 days, indicating superior cyclability and long-term stability.Metal oxides with hierarchical microstructures have attracted tremendous attention with respect to their enhanced gas sensing properties. Herein, we reported the facile synthesis of hierarchical ZnFe2O4 yolk-shell microspheres via a template-free solvothermal strategy and the subsequent annealing and chemical etching process. Electron microscopy images undoubtedly demonstrated that the novel ZnFe2O4 architecture was constructed of a large number of nanosheet subunits with a thickness around 20 nm. As a proof-of-concept demonstration of the function, when evaluated as gas sensing materials, the as-prepared ZnFe2O4 yolk-shell microspheres manifested an extremely high response and a low detection limit to acetone at the operating temperature of 200 °C. Significantly, the response to 20 ppm acetone was retained well even after 200 cycles and continuous measurement for 30 days, indicating superior cyclability and long-term stability. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr06308f

  8. On the relationship between acetone and carbon monoxide in different air masses

    M. de Reus

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon monoxide and acetone measurements are presented for five aircraft measurement campaigns at mid-latitudes, polar and tropical regions in the northern hemisphere. Throughout all campaigns, free tropospheric air masses, which were influenced by anthropogenic emissions, showed a similar linear relation between acetone and CO, with a slope of 21-25 pptv acetone/ppbv CO. Measurements in the anthropogenically influenced marine boundary layer revealed a slope of 13-16 pptv acetone/ppbv CO. The different slopes observed in the marine boundary layer and the free troposphere indicate that acetone is emitted by the ocean in relatively clean air masses and taken up by the ocean in polluted air masses. In the lowermost stratosphere, a good correlation between acetone and CO was observed as well, however, with a much smaller slope (~5 pptv acetone/ppbv CO compared to the troposphere. This is caused by the longer photochemical lifetime of CO compared to acetone in the lower stratosphere, due to the increasing photolytic loss of acetone and the decreasing OH concentration with altitude. No significant correlation between acetone and CO was observed over the tropical rain forest due to the large direct and indirect biogenic emissions of acetone. The common slopes of the linear acetone-CO relation in various layers of the atmosphere, during five field experiments, makes them useful for model calculations. Often a single observation of the acetone-CO correlation, determined from stratospheric measurements, has been used in box model applications. This study shows that different slopes have to be considered for marine boundary layer, free tropospheric and stratospheric air masses, and that the acetone-CO relation cannot be used for air masses which are strongly influenced by biogenic emissions.

  9. Enhancing acetone biosynthesis and acetone-butanol-ethanol fermentation performance by co-culturing Clostridium acetobutylicum/Saccharomyces cerevisiae integrated with exogenous acetate addition.

    Luo, Hongzhen; Ge, Laibing; Zhang, Jingshu; Ding, Jian; Chen, Rui; Shi, Zhongping

    2016-01-01

    Acetone is the major by-product in ABE fermentations, most researches focused on increasing butanol/acetone ratio by decreasing acetone biosynthesis. However, economics of ABE fermentation industry strongly relies on evaluating acetone as a valuable platform chemical. Therefore, a novel ABE fermentation strategy focusing on bio-acetone production by co-culturing Clostridium acetobutylicum/Saccharomyces cerevisiae with exogenous acetate addition was proposed. Experimental and theoretical analysis revealed the strategy could, enhance C. acetobutylicum survival oriented amino acids assimilation in the cells; control NADH regeneration rate at moderately lower level to enhance acetone synthesis but without sacrificing butanol production; enhance the utilization ability of C. acetobutylicum on glucose and direct most of extra consumed glucose into acetone/butanol synthesis routes. By implementing the strategy using synthetic or acetate fermentative supernatant, acetone concentrations increased to 8.27-8.55g/L from 5.86g/L of the control, while butanol concentrations also elevated to the higher levels of 13.91-14.23g/L from 11.63g/L simultaneously. PMID:26476171

  10. Influence of the thickness on the morphology and sensing ability of thermally-deposited tellurium films

    Hristova-Vasileva, T.; Bineva, I.; Dinescu, A.; Nesheva, D.; Arsova, D.; Pejova, B.

    2016-03-01

    Tellurium films with nominal thicknesses of 30, 90 and 300 nm were prepared by thermal evaporation in vacuum at a low deposition rate of 0.3 nm/s. The morphology evolution with the increase of the film thickness was observed by scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. Nanorods with a width of about 40 nm were observed on the thinnest films surface. On the 90 nm thick films, the formations grew in priority in the z-direction to nanoblades with the same width, but a length of about 100 nm. The further increase of the thickness led to an increase of the 2D nanoobjects' width and length and formation of a stacked nanosheet structure. The surface root-mean-square roughness (Sq) increased with the thickness of the films. Preliminary investigations of the sensing ability of the as-deposited tellurium films with different thicknesses towards water (H2O), ethanol (C2H5OH), acetone (C3H5OH), and ammonia (NH3) vapors were performed by measuring the vapor-induced changes in the film dark current. The films showed appreciable response only to ammonia vapors; their sensitivity was almost equal for the 30 and 90 nm thick films, and decreased significantly for the film tkness of 300 nm.

  11. Surface Tension and Viscosity of SCN and SCN-acetone Alloys at Melting Points and Higher Temperatures Using Surface Light Scattering Spectrometer

    Tin, Padetha; deGroh, Henry C., III.

    2003-01-01

    Succinonitrile has been and is being used extensively in NASA's Microgravity Materials Science and Fluid Physics programs and as well as in several ground-based and microgravity studies including the Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment (IDGE). Succinonitrile (SCN) is useful as a model for the study of metal solidification, although it is an organic material, it has a BCC crystal structure and solidifies dendriticly like a metal. It is also transparent and has a low melting point (58.08 C). Previous measurements of succinonitrile (SCN) and alloys of succinonitrile and acetone surface tensions are extremely limited. Using the Surface Light Scattering technique we have determined non invasively, the surface tension and viscosity of SCN and SCN-Acetone Alloys at different temperatures. This relatively new and unique technique has several advantages over the classical methods such as, it is non invasive, has good accuracy and measures the surface tension and viscosity simultaneously. The accuracy of interfacial energy values obtained from this technique is better than 2% and viscosity about 10 %. Succinonitrile and succinonitrile-acetone alloys are well-established model materials with several essential physical properties accurately known - except the liquid/vapor surface tension at different elevated temperatures. We will be presenting the experimentally determined liquid/vapor surface energy and liquid viscosity of succinonitrile and succinonitrile-acetone alloys in the temperature range from their melting point to around 100 C using this non-invasive technique. We will also discuss about the measurement technique and new developments of the Surface Light Scattering Spectrometer.

  12. Aldol Condensation of Citral with Acetone on Basic Solid Catalysts

    C. NODA

    1998-06-01

    Full Text Available The catalytic performance of solids with basic properties, such as CaO, MgO and hydrotalcites, was evaluated in the aldol condensation of citral and acetone, the first step in the synthesis of ionones from citral. The best results were obtained with CaO and hydrotalcite with high conversions (98% and selectivities (close to 70% for the main product observed for both of the catalyst. Such pseudoionone yields were greater than those reported in the literature for the homogeneous reaction.

  13. N,N′-Diphenyl­thio­urea acetone monosolvate

    Okuniewski, Andrzej; Chojnacki, Jaroslaw; Becker, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    In the title compound, C13H12N2S·C3H6O, the phenyl rings of the thio­urea mol­ecule are in syn and anti positions in relation to the C=S bond. Two mol­ecules are connected by N—H⋯S=C hydrogen bonds into a centrosymmetric dimer. An additional N—H⋯O=C hydrogen bond to the acetone solvent mol­ecule and some weak C—H⋯π inter­actions reinforce the crystal structure.

  14. Solubility of paroxetine hydrochloride hemi-hydrate in (water + acetone)

    Ren Guobin [School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China)]. E-mail: renguobin2557@sohu.com; Wang Jingkang [School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Li Guizhi [School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China)

    2005-08-15

    Using a laser monitoring observation technique, the solubilities of paroxetine hydrochloride hemi-hydrate in (water + acetone) were determined by the synthetic method from (294.45 to 323.20) K, respectively. Results of these measurements were correlated by the three variants of the combined nearly ideal binary solvent/Redlich-Kister (CNIBS/R-K) model. For the seven group data studied, three variants of the (CNIBS/R-K) equation were found to provide accurate mathematical representations of the experimental data and variant 2 is the best of the three variants.

  15. Optimization of an External Cavity Quantum Cascade Laser for Chemical Sensing Applications

    Phillips, Mark C.; Bernacki, Bruce E.; Taubman, Matthew S.; Cannon, Bret D.; Schiffern, John T.; Myers, Tanya L.

    2010-03-01

    We describe and characterize an external cavity quantum cascade laser designed for detection of multiple airborne chemicals, and used with a compact astigmatic Herriott cell for sensing of acetone and hydrogen peroxide.

  16. Uncertainties in Biogenic Sources and Sinks and Their Relevance for the Global Acetone Budget

    Brewer, J.; Fischer, E. V.; Ravishankara, A. R.; Bishop, M.

    2015-12-01

    Acetone is one of the most abundant carbonyl compounds in the atmosphere, and a major source of HOx radicals in the upper troposphere. Thus, understanding the global budget of acetone is essential to understanding global oxidation capacity. Significant uncertainties remain regarding the flux of acetone out of and into the biosphere. Crucially unconstrained processes include dry deposition, fluxes of acetone into and out of the ocean, direct emissions of acetone from the terrestrial biosphere, and direct emissions of secondary sources of acetone such as the oxidation of monoterpenes from the terrestrial biosphere. We have performed an elementary effects sensitivity analysis of the GEOS-Chem global 3-D CTM (version 10-01, www.geos-chem.org) for the global atmospheric distribution of acetone using the Morris method. This method provides a ranking of both the comparative direct importance, as well as non-linear effects and interactions of the tested input factor uncertainties, at a relatively low computational cost. The sensitivity analysis was bounded using literature minima and maxima for five sources of uncertainty related to specific biogenic sources and sinks. Preliminary results suggest that the uncertainties with the largest impact on acetone concentration are the uncertainties in direct acetone emissions from the terrestrial biosphere and uncertainties in the concentration of acetone in the ocean mixed layer.

  17. Mutual diffusion of binary liquid mixtures containing methanol, ethanol, acetone, benzene, cyclohexane, toluene, and carbon tetrachloride

    Guevara-Carrion, Gabriela; Janzen, Tatjana; Muñoz-Muñoz, Y. Mauricio; Vrabec, Jadran

    2016-03-01

    Mutual diffusion coefficients of all 20 binary liquid mixtures that can be formed out of methanol, ethanol, acetone, benzene, cyclohexane, toluene, and carbon tetrachloride without a miscibility gap are studied at ambient conditions of temperature and pressure in the entire composition range. The considered mixtures show a varying mixing behavior from almost ideal to strongly non-ideal. Predictive molecular dynamics simulations employing the Green-Kubo formalism are carried out. Radial distribution functions are analyzed to gain an understanding of the liquid structure influencing the diffusion processes. It is shown that cluster formation in mixtures containing one alcoholic component has a significant impact on the diffusion process. The estimation of the thermodynamic factor from experimental vapor-liquid equilibrium data is investigated, considering three excess Gibbs energy models, i.e., Wilson, NRTL, and UNIQUAC. It is found that the Wilson model yields the thermodynamic factor that best suits the simulation results for the prediction of the Fick diffusion coefficient. Four semi-empirical methods for the prediction of the self-diffusion coefficients and nine predictive equations for the Fick diffusion coefficient are assessed and it is found that methods based on local composition models are more reliable. Finally, the shear viscosity and thermal conductivity are predicted and in most cases favorably compared with experimental literature values.

  18. Saving Energy and Reducing Emission When Recycling Acetone during the Production of Soy Phospholipid

    Liu Daicheng; Wang Yan; Tao Yinhua

    2008-01-01

    Acetone, which is volatile, flammable, toxic, expen-sive and causing serious air pollution, is often used as extracting solvent in the production of powdery soy phospholipid. Recycling and reusing acetone is the key of reducing the cost of production. Therefore, saving energy and reducing emission when recycling acetone are the most important technologies during the production of phospholipid. On the basis of the productivity of powdery phospholipid being 2.4 t every day, 43.2 t acetone is reused every 8 h and the total volume of acetone gas emitted is 450.75 m3 (about 901.5 kg). According to the current price of acetone, the lost money is about 7212 yuan RMB.

  19. Vapor extractor

    Bronder, G.A.; Bronder, L.R.

    1924-10-21

    A vapor extractor is described comprising a conveyer having compartments open at their top and bottom sides for a material to be conveyed, a plate forming a support for the conveyer and its compartments, means to move the conveyer over the plate with the material in the compartments, the movements of the conveyer forming ridges in the material that project above the walls of the compartments and means to remove the peaks of the ridges and thereby distribute the material composing the ridges into the bottom portion of the conveyer.

  20. Solvent vapor annealing of an insoluble molecular semiconductor

    Amassian, Aram

    2010-01-01

    Solvent vapor annealing has been proposed as a low-cost, highly versatile, and room-temperature alternative to thermal annealing of organic semiconductors and devices. In this article, we investigate the solvent vapor annealing process of a model insoluble molecular semiconductor thin film - pentacene on SiO 2 exposed to acetone vapor - using a combination of optical reflectance and two-dimensional grazing incidence X-ray diffraction measurements performed in situ, during processing. These measurements provide valuable and new insight into the solvent vapor annealing process; they demonstrate that solvent molecules interact mainly with the surface of the film to induce a solid-solid transition without noticeable swelling, dissolving or melting of the molecular material. © 2010 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  1. Influence of acetone on nanostructure and electrochemical properties of interfacial synthesized polyaniline nanofibers

    Jianyun Zhao; Zongyi Qin; Tao Li; Zhuozhan Li; Zhe Zhou; Meifang Zhu

    2015-01-01

    The growth of polyaniline (PANI) nanofibers through interfacial polymerization can be well controlled by adding a small amount of acetone in the water/chloroform system. It was found that the polymerization rate became slower in the presence of acetone, yielding PANI nanofibers with larger aspect ratios. The influences of the acetone addition on the morphology, microstructure and properties of as-prepared PANI nanofibers were studied by scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM), ultraviolet–visib...

  2. Thermal and Ablative Properties of Ipns and Composites of High Ortho Resole Resin and Difurfurylidene Acetone

    Najim, Tariq S.; Amel M. NAJI; Mahmood M. BARBOOTI

    2008-01-01

    High ortho resole resin was prepared by condensation of phenol with excess of formaldehyde in the presence of magnesium oxide as catalyst. Reaction of furfuraldehyde with acetone in basic medium led to difurfurylidene acetone (DFA). Their interpenetrating polymer network (IPNS) were obtained by the reaction of predetermined quantities of difurfurylidene acetone and high ortho resole using p-toluene sulphonic acid (PTSA) as curing agent. The thermal behavior of the resins was studied using the...

  3. System-level modeling of acetone-butanol-ethanol fermentation.

    Liao, Chen; Seo, Seung-Oh; Lu, Ting

    2016-05-01

    Acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation is a metabolic process of clostridia that produces bio-based solvents including butanol. It is enabled by an underlying metabolic reaction network and modulated by cellular gene regulation and environmental cues. Mathematical modeling has served as a valuable strategy to facilitate the understanding, characterization and optimization of this process. In this review, we highlight recent advances in system-level, quantitative modeling of ABE fermentation. We begin with an overview of integrative processes underlying the fermentation. Next we survey modeling efforts including early simple models, models with a systematic metabolic description, and those incorporating metabolism through simple gene regulation. Particular focus is given to a recent system-level model that integrates the metabolic reactions, gene regulation and environmental cues. We conclude by discussing the remaining challenges and future directions towards predictive understanding of ABE fermentation. PMID:27020410

  4. Recent trends in acetone, butanol, and ethanol (ABE production

    Keikhosro Karim

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Among the renewable fuels considered as a suitable substitute to petroleum-based gasoline, butanol has attracted a great deal of attention due to its unique properties. Acetone, butanol, and ethanol (ABE can be produced biologically from different substrates, including sugars, starch, lignocelluloses, and algae. This process was among the very first biofuel production processes which was commercialized during the First World War. The present review paper discusses the different aspects of the ABE process and the recent progresses made. Moreover, the microorganisms and the biochemistry of the ABE fermentation as well as the feedstocks used are reviewed. Finally, the challenges faced such as low products concentration and products` inhibitory effects on the fermentation are explained and different possible solutions are presented and reviewed.

  5. Evaluating the Potential Importance of Monoterpene Degradation for Global Acetone Production

    Kelp, M. M.; Brewer, J.; Keller, C. A.; Fischer, E. V.

    2015-12-01

    Acetone is one of the most abundant volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the atmosphere, but estimates of the global source of acetone vary widely. A better understanding of acetone sources is essential because acetone serves as a source of HOx in the upper troposphere and as a precursor to the NOx reservoir species peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN). Although there are primary anthropogenic and pyrogenic sources of acetone, the dominant acetone sources are thought to be from direct biogenic emissions and photochemical production, particularly from the oxidation of iso-alkanes. Recent work suggests that the photochemical degradation of monoterpenes may also represent a significant contribution to global acetone production. We investigate that hypothesis using the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model. In this work, we calculate the emissions of eight terpene species (α-pinene, β-pinene, limonene, Δ3-carene, myrcene, sabinene, trans-β-ocimene, and an 'other monoterpenes' category which contains 34 other trace species) and couple these with upper and lower bound literature yields from species-specific chamber studies. We compare the simulated acetone distributions against in situ acetone measurements from a global suite of NASA aircraft campaigns. When simulating an upper bound on yields, the model-to-measurement comparison improves for North America at both the surface and in the upper troposphere. The inclusion of acetone production from monoterpene degradation also improves the ability of the model to reproduce observations of acetone in East Asian outflow. However, in general the addition of monoterpenes degrades the model comparison for the Southern Hemisphere.

  6. The preparation of ZnO based gas-sensing thin films by ink-jet printing method

    An ink-jet printing technique was applied to prepare ZnO based gas-sensing thin films. ZnO inks with appropriate viscosity and surface tension were prepared by sol-gel techniques, and printed onto substrates using a commercial printer. After the drying and heating treatment processes, continuous ZnO films were formed and studied by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and by a home-made gas sensitivity measuring system. It was found that the morphology and electrical properties of the films changed significantly with the thickness of the films, which can be adjusted simply by printing on the film with increasing frequency. Highest resistance and sensitivity to acetone vapor were obtained when the film was prepared by printing only once on it. Different dopants with certain concentrations could be added into the films by printing with different dopant inks and printing frequency. All Pd, Ag, and ZrO2 dopants increased both the resistivity and the sensitivity of the films (180 ppm acetone). This work showed that the ink-jet printing technique was a convenient and low cost method to prepare films with controlled film thickness and dopant concentration

  7. Seasonal variability of upper tropospheric acetone using ACE-FTS observations and LMDz-INCA model simulations

    Dufour, Gaëlle; Harrison, Jeremy; Szopa, Sophie; Bernath, Peter

    2014-05-01

    The vertically-resolved distributions of oxygenated organic compounds (oVOCs) are mainly inferred from surface and airborne measurements with limited spatial and temporal coverage. This results in a limited understanding of the atmospheric budget of these compounds and of their impact on the upper tropospheric chemistry. In the last decade, satellite observations which complement in-situ measurements have become available, providing global distributions of several oVOCs. For example, Scisat-1, also known as the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE) has measured several oVOCs including methanol and formaldehyde. ACE is a Canadian-led satellite mission for remote sensing of the Earth's atmosphere that has been in operation since 2004. The primary instrument on board is a Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) featuring broad spectral coverage in the infrared (750-4400 cm-1) with high spectral resolution (0.02 cm-1). The FTS instrument can measure down to 5 km altitude with a high signal-to-noise ratio using solar occultation. The ACE-FTS has the ability to measure seasonal and height-resolved distributions of minor tropospheric constituents on a near-global scale and provides the opportunity to evaluate our understanding of important atmospheric oxygenated organic species. ACE-FTS acetone retrievals will be presented. The spatial distribution and seasonal variability of acetone will be described and compared to LMDz-INCA model simulations.

  8. Antibacterial Activities and Mechanism of Action of Acetone Extracts from Rabdosia rubescens

    Li Ping Cheng

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The antibacterial activities and mechanism of action of acetone extracts from R. rubescens were reported in this paper. The results showed that 80% acetone extracts had both the highest contents of total phenolics and flavonoids. Acetone extracts showed better antibacterial activities against Gram-positive bacterial strains and there were no inhibitory effects found on tested Gram-negative bacteria. In addition, 80% acetone extracts from R. rubescens had relatively higher antibacterial activities with the lowest values of MIC and MBC at 2.5 mg/mL and 5 mg/mL against B. subtilis. The antibacterial mechanism of 80% acetone extracts against Bacillus subtilis might be described as disrupting cell wall, increasing cell membrane permeability, and finally leading to the leakage of cell constituents

  9. Formation of halogenated acetones in the lower troposphere

    Sattler, Tobias; Wittmer, Julian; Krause, Torsten; Schöler, Heinz Friedrich; Kamilli, Katharina; Held, Andreas; Zetzsch, Cornelius; Ofner, Johannes; Atlas, Elliot

    2015-04-01

    Western Australia is a semi-/arid region that is heavily influenced by climate change and agricultural land use. The area is known for its saline lakes with a wide range of hydrogeochemical parameters and consists of ephemeral saline and saline groundwater fed lakes with a pH range from 2.5 to 7.1. In 2012 a novel PTFE-chamber was setup directly on the lakes. The 1.5 m³ cubic chamber was made of UV transparent PTFE foil to permit photochemistry while preventing dilution of the air due to lateral wind transport. This experimental setup allows linking measured data directly to the chemistry of and above the salt lakes. Air samples were taken using stainless steel canisters and measured by GC-MS/ECD. Sediment, crust and water samples were taken for investigation of potential VOC and VOX emissions in the laboratory using GC-MS. Several lakes were investigated and canister samples were taken over the day to see diurnal variations. The first samples were collected at 6 a.m. and from this time every 2 hours a canister was filled with chamber air. Concentrations of chloroacetone up to 15 ppb and of bromoacetone up to 40 ppb in the air samples were detected. The concentrations vary over the day and display their highest values around noon. Soil and water samples showed a variety of highly volatile and semi-volatile VOC/VOX but no halogenated acetones. An abiotic formation of these VOC/VOX seems conclusive due to iron-catalysed reactions below the salt crust [1]. The salt crust is the interface through which VOC/VOX pass from soil/groundwater to the atmosphere where they were photochemically altered. This explains the finding of halo acetones only in the air samples and not in water and soil samples measured in the laboratory. The main forming pathway for these haloacetones is the direct halogenation due to atomic chlorine and bromine above the salt lakes [2]. A minor pathway is the atmospheric degradation of chloropropane and bromopropane [3]. These halopropanes were found

  10. Photochromism and polarization spectroscopy of p-methyl(thiobenzoyl)acetone

    Gorski, Alexander [Institute of Physical Chemistry, Polish Academy of Sciences, Kasprzaka 44, 01-224 Warsaw (Poland); Posokhov, Yevgen [Institute of Physical Chemistry, Polish Academy of Sciences, Kasprzaka 44, 01-224 Warsaw (Poland); Hansen, Bjarke K.V. [Department of Life Sciences and Chemistry, Roskilde University, P.O. Box 260, DK-4000, Roskilde (Denmark); Spanget-Larsen, Jens [Department of Life Sciences and Chemistry, Roskilde University, P.O. Box 260, DK-4000, Roskilde (Denmark); Jasny, Jan [Institute of Physical Chemistry, Polish Academy of Sciences, Kasprzaka 44, 01-224 Warsaw (Poland); Duus, Fritz [Department of Life Sciences and Chemistry, Roskilde University, P.O. Box 260, DK-4000, Roskilde (Denmark); Hansen, Poul Erik [Department of Life Sciences and Chemistry, Roskilde University, P.O. Box 260, DK-4000, Roskilde (Denmark); Waluk, Jacek [Institute of Physical Chemistry, Polish Academy of Sciences, Kasprzaka 44, 01-224 Warsaw (Poland)], E-mail: waluk@ichf.edu.pl

    2006-09-29

    Photochromism of p-methyl(thiobenzoyl)acetone (1) has been studied in argon and xenon cryogenic matrices. Application of linearly polarized light to induce the phototransformation resulted in partial alignment of both the initial structure and the photochromic product. Different orientations were achieved by using irradiation wavelengths corresponding to differently polarized electronic transitions. This was followed by measurements of linear dichroism (LD) in the IR region. The analysis of the IR spectra, combined with the results of DFT B3LYP/cc-pVDZ calculations enabled determining the structures of the most stable ground state species and of the photoproduct. Similarly to the recently reported cases of thioacetylacetone and monothiodibenzoylmethane, the initial structure of 1 corresponds to an intramolecularly hydrogen-bonded enol form, and the photochromic species to an 'open', nonchelated enethiolic form. Vibrational assignments have been made for both species, greatly helped by the analysis of the LD spectra. It is concluded that DFT calculations for 1 quite reliably predict not only vibrational frequencies and intensities, but also transition moment directions, in both IR and electronic spectra.

  11. Photochromism and polarization spectroscopy of p-methyl(thiobenzoyl)acetone

    Photochromism of p-methyl(thiobenzoyl)acetone (1) has been studied in argon and xenon cryogenic matrices. Application of linearly polarized light to induce the phototransformation resulted in partial alignment of both the initial structure and the photochromic product. Different orientations were achieved by using irradiation wavelengths corresponding to differently polarized electronic transitions. This was followed by measurements of linear dichroism (LD) in the IR region. The analysis of the IR spectra, combined with the results of DFT B3LYP/cc-pVDZ calculations enabled determining the structures of the most stable ground state species and of the photoproduct. Similarly to the recently reported cases of thioacetylacetone and monothiodibenzoylmethane, the initial structure of 1 corresponds to an intramolecularly hydrogen-bonded enol form, and the photochromic species to an 'open', nonchelated enethiolic form. Vibrational assignments have been made for both species, greatly helped by the analysis of the LD spectra. It is concluded that DFT calculations for 1 quite reliably predict not only vibrational frequencies and intensities, but also transition moment directions, in both IR and electronic spectra

  12. Research of remote sensing technology of atmospheric water vapor by using ground-based GPS and application system of meteorological operations%地基GPS水汽监测技术及气象业务化应用系统的研究

    李国平

    2011-01-01

    本研究建立了川渝地区地基GPS(global positioning system,全球定位系统)遥感水汽的本地化计算模型,开发出GPS遥感水汽的计算软件包,开展了局域地基GPS观测网遥感大气水汽的试验及业务应用,反演出30 min间隔的高时间分辨率GPS可降水量序列。评估了反演精度,研究了GPS水汽产品在气象业务应用的可行性。研发了可搭建在MICAPS(meteorological information comprehensive analysis and process system)平台上的地基G%This study established local computing model of remote sensing water vapor by using ground-based GPS(global positioning system) in the region of Sichuan-Chongqing,and developed computing software packages of GPS remote sensing water vapor.Then the experiment and operational application of remote sensing water vapor by using ground-based GPS in this local network was done,by which the high time resolution GPS precipitable water vapor(PWV) sequence of 30 min intervals was derived.This paper also gives the assessment of the retrieval accuracy,as well as the feasibility of meteorological operations application of GPS water vapor products.The major results of this study include developing the operations application system of remote sensing atmospheric water vapor by using ground-based GPS,which can be build on the MICAPS(meteorological information comprehensive analysis and process system) as an operational application system,and realizing the real-time transmission,data solution,deriving of PWV by a local ground-based GPS network and visualization of GPS water vapor products.This meteorological operations system played a unique role in the heavy rain,blizzard and other severe weather forecast in its trial-run.Systematical study of the temporal variation,horizontal distribution of GPS-PWV was done by our research group.Furthermore,the relationship between PWV derived by GPS among surface air temperature,pressure,specific humidity,solar radiation

  13. Derivatization reaction-based surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) for detection of trace acetone.

    Zheng, Ying; Chen, Zhuo; Zheng, Chengbin; Lee, Yong-Ill; Hou, Xiandeng; Wu, Li; Tian, Yunfei

    2016-08-01

    A facile method was developed for determination of trace volatile acetone by coupling a derivatization reaction to surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). With iodide modified Ag nanoparticles (Ag IMNPs) as the SERS substrate, acetone without obvious Raman signal could be converted to SERS-sensitive species via a chemical derivatization reaction with 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine (2,4-DNPH). In addition, acetone can be effectively separated from liquid phase with a purge-sampling device and then any serious interference from sample matrices can be significantly reduced. The optimal conditions for the derivatization reaction and the SERS analysis were investigated in detail, and the selectivity and reproducibility of this method were also evaluated. Under the optimal conditions, the limit of detection (LOD) for acetone was 5mgL(-1) or 0.09mM (3σ). The relative standard deviation (RSD) for 80mgL(-1) acetone (n=9) was 1.7%. This method was successfully used for the determination of acetone in artificial urine and human urine samples with spiked recoveries ranging from 92% to 110%. The present method is convenient, sensitive, selective, reliable and suitable for analysis of trace acetone, and it could have a promising clinical application in early diabetes diagnosis. PMID:27216660

  14. Protein precipitation of diluted samples in SDS-containing buffer with acetone leads to higher protein recovery and reproducibility in comparison with TCA/acetone approach.

    Santa, Cátia; Anjo, Sandra I; Manadas, Bruno

    2016-07-01

    Proteomic approaches are extremely valuable in many fields of research, where mass spectrometry methods have gained an increasing interest, especially because of the ability to perform quantitative analysis. Nonetheless, sample preparation prior to mass spectrometry analysis is of the utmost importance. In this work, two protein precipitation approaches, widely used for cleaning and concentrating protein samples, were tested and compared in very diluted samples solubilized in a strong buffer (containing SDS). The amount of protein recovered after acetone and TCA/acetone precipitation was assessed, as well as the protein identification and relative quantification by SWATH-MS yields were compared with the results from the same sample without precipitation. From this study, it was possible to conclude that in the case of diluted samples in denaturing buffers, the use of cold acetone as precipitation protocol is more favourable than the use of TCA/acetone in terms of reproducibility in protein recovery and number of identified and quantified proteins. Furthermore, the reproducibility in relative quantification of the proteins is even higher in samples precipitated with acetone compared with the original sample. PMID:27094026

  15. Evaluation of formalin-acetone sedimentation in the concentration of stool for intestinal parasites.

    Parija, S C; Bhattacharya, S; Padhan, P; Shivaprakash, M R

    2003-07-01

    Formalin-acetone sedimentation was compared with the formalin-ether method for the concentration of stool for intestinal parasites. Of 80 stool specimens, 45 (56.25%) were positive for parasites by the formalin-acetone method. The figures for the two methods were formalin-ether 35 (43.75%) and for the direct lacto-phenol cotton blue wet mount method 17 (21.25%). There was no statistically significant difference in the parasite recovery rate between the two methods. Acetone is more stable, safer, and a cheaper fat solvent and promises to be a useful alternative to ether. PMID:12870605

  16. Tank vapor characterization project. Headspace vapor characterization of Hanford waste Tank SX-101: Results from samples collected on 07/21/95

    Results described in this report were obtained to characterize the vapors present in the tank headspace and to support safety evaluations and tank-farm operations. They include air concentrations of inorganic and organic analytes and grouped compounds from samples. The vapor concentrations are based either on whole-volume samples or on sorbent traps exposed to sample flow. No immediate notifications were needed because analytical results indicated no specific analytes exceeded notification levels. Summary of results: NH3, 3.8 ppmv; NO2, 0.10 ppmv; NO, 0.13 ppm; H2O, 11.8 mg/L; CO2, 338 ppmv; CO, 3; methanol, 0.060 ppmv; acetone, 0.033 ppmv; trichlorofluoromethane, 0.023 ppmv; and acetone, 0.034 ppmv

  17. Recent Progresses in Atmospheric Remote Sensing Research in China-- Chinese National Report on Atmospheric Remote Sensing Research in China during 1999-2003

    邱金桓; 陈洪滨

    2004-01-01

    Progresses of atmospheric remote sensing research in China during 1999-2003 are summarily introduced.This research includes: (1) microwave remote sensing of the atmosphere; (2) Lidar remote sensing; (3)remote sensing of aerosol optical properties; and (4) other research related to atmospheric remote sensing,including GPS remote sensing of precipitable water vapor and radiation model development.

  18. Damages induced in lambda phage DNA by enzyme-generated triplet acetone

    Exposure of lambda phage to triplet acetone, generated during the aerobic oxidation of isobutanal by peroxidase, leads to genome lesions. The majority of these lesions are detected as DNA single-strand breaks only in alkaline conditions, so true breaks were not observed. Also, no sites sensitive to UV-endonuclease from Micrococcus luteus were found in DNA from treated phage. The participation of triplet acetone in the generation of such DNA damage is discussed. (Author)

  19. Spice paprika oleoresin extraction under different conditions involving acetone and ethanol

    Rafajlovska, Vesna; Slaveska-Raicki, Renata; Koleva Gudeva, Liljana; Klopceska, Jana

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes the oleoresin extraction from the spice paprika under different extraction conditions that involves acetone and ethanol as an extracting solvent in percolatory system. Moreover, the influence of paprika particle size, solvent flow rate and the temperature on the extraction procedure was also studied. It was revealed that better extraction efficiency was achieved with 2 ml/min solvent flow rate. The particle size is more important when acetone for paprika oleoresin extract...

  20. Effects of cyclohexane/acetone ratio on bixin extraction yield by accelerated solvent extraction method

    Rahmalia, Winda; Fabre, Jean-François; Mouloungui, Zephirin

    2015-01-01

    In this study, accelerated solvent extraction (ASE) was applied to the quantitative extraction of bixin. The effects of cyclohexane/ acetone ratios on bixin extraction yield were evaluated. Acetone was used in the process of pigment extraction and also played a major role in its analysis by UV-Vis spectrophotometry. Pure cis-bixin isolated by flash chromatography and characterized by Fourier Transform Infra Red spectrometry was used as a bixin standard for qualitative and quantitative analysi...

  1. Preparation and properties of low boiling point of alcohol and acetone-based magnetic fluid

    Fujita, T.; Miyazaki, T.; Nishiyama, H.; Jeyadevan, B.

    1999-07-01

    Ultra-fine magnetic particles are difficult to be dispersed in low boiling point solvents such as alcohol (C 1-C 4) and acetone. In this paper, we report the preparation methods of several alcohol and acetone-based magnetic fluids. The stability of magnetic fluid depended on the HLB (hydrophile-lipophile balance) of the solvent and alkyl chain lengths of organic layers. The fluid was most stable only when the HLB value of surfactant and the solvents are similar.

  2. Physiology and biochemistry of the anaerobic biodegradation of isopropanol and acetone

    Dullius, Carlos Henrique

    2011-01-01

    Diese Arbeit konzentrierte sich auf die Physiologie und Biochemie des anaeroben Abbaus von Isopropanol und Aceton, sowie auf die Aufklärung von Reaktionsmechanismen, welche am Acetonabbau in anaeroben Bakterien beteiligt sind. Untersucht wurden diese physiologischen und biochemischen Aspekte in syntrophen, methanogenen Anreicherungen, sulfatreduzierenden Bakterien und nitratreduzierenden Stämmen, welche dafür angereichert und isoliert wurden.Die Abbaureaktionen von Isopropanol und Aceton wur...

  3. Industrial production of acetone and butanol by fermentation—100 years later

    Sauer, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Microbial production of acetone and butanol was one of the first large-scale industrial fermentation processes of global importance. During the first part of the 20th century, it was indeed the second largest fermentation process, superseded in importance only by the ethanol fermentation. After a rapid decline after the 1950s, acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation has recently gained renewed interest in the context of biorefinery approaches for the production of fuels and chemicals from ...

  4. Ionization energy of acetone by vacuum ultraviolet mass-analyzed threshold ionization spectrometry

    Mass-analyzed threshold ionization (MATI) time-of-flight mass spectrometer using coherent vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) laser generated by four-wave difference frequency mixing (FWDFM) in Kr has been constructed and utilized to obtain the accurate ionization energy of acetone. From the MATI onsets measured from various applied pulsed fields, the ionization energy to the ionic ground state of acetone has been determined to be 9.7074 ± 0.0019 eV.

  5. NMR study of inorganic mesophase in water-acetone solutions of uranyl fluoride

    By the method of PMR spectroscopy a macroscopic ordering, dependence of orientation de.gree of acetone molecules on temperature and composition of the uranuyl fluoride-water- acetone system is investigated. It is shown that physical processes determining the formation of a mesophase in the investigated system are analogous to the processes in organic liquid crystals. It is pointed out that the matrix of the given liquid crystal is a dimeric complex of uranyl fluoride

  6. Solvatation and ion association in calcium nitrate solutions in acetone on sound data

    Present article is devoted to solvatation and ion association in calcium nitrate solutions in acetone on sound data. The results of measurement of the rate of distribution and peak value of coefficient of adsorption of supersonic waves in the calcium nitrate solutions in acetone were considered. Measurements were carried out on impulse ultrasonic unit in the frequency range 9.7-106.7 MHz and at temperature range 289-313 K.

  7. A study of global atmospheric budget and distribution of acetone using global atmospheric model STOCHEM-CRI

    Khan, M. A. H.; Cooke, M. C.; Utembe, S. R.; Archibald, A. T.; Maxwell, P.; Morris, W. C.; Xiao, P.; Derwent, R. G.; Jenkin, M. E.; Percival, C. J.; Walsh, R. C.; Young, T. D. S.; Simmonds, P. G.; Nickless, G.; O'Doherty, S.; Shallcross, D. E.

    2015-07-01

    The impact of including a more detailed VOC oxidation scheme (CRI v2-R5) with a multi-generational approach for simulating tropospheric acetone is investigated using a 3-D global model, STOCHEM-CRI. The CRI v2-R5 mechanism contains photochemical production of acetone from monoterpenes which account for 64% (46.8 Tg/yr) of the global acetone sources in STOCHEM-CRI. Both photolysis and oxidation by OH in the troposphere contributes equally (42%, each) and dry deposition contributes 16% of the atmospheric sinks of acetone. The tropospheric life-time and the global burden of acetone are found to be 18 days and 3.5 Tg, respectively, these values being close to those reported in the study of Jacob et al. (2002). A dataset of aircraft campaign measurements are used to evaluate the inclusion of acetone formation from monoterpenes in the CRI v2-R5 mechanism used in STOCHEM-CRI. The overall comparison between measurements and models show that the parameterised approach in STOCHEM-NAM (no acetone formation from monoterpenes) underpredicts the mixing ratios of acetone in the atmosphere. However, using a detailed monoterpene oxidation mechanism forming acetone has brought the STOCHEM-CRI into closer agreement with measurements with an improvement in the vertical simulation of acetone. The annual mean surface distribution of acetone simulated by the STOCHEM-CRI shows a peak over forested regions where there are large biogenic emissions and high levels of photochemical activity. Year-long observations of acetone and methanol at the Mace Head research station in Ireland are compared with the simulated acetone and methanol produced by the STOCHEM-CRI and found to produce good overall agreement between model and measurements. The seasonal variation of model and measured acetone levels at Mace Head, California, New Hampshire and Minnesota show peaks in summer and dips in winter, suggesting that photochemical production may have the strongest effect on its seasonal trend.

  8. Selective gas sensing for photonic crystal lasers

    Smith, Cameron; Christiansen, Mads Brøkner; Buss, Thomas; Kristensen, Anders; Lind, Johan Ulrik; Nielsen, Claus Højgård; Larsen, Niels Bent

    2011-01-01

    We facilitate photonic crystal lasers to sense gases via an additional swelling polymer film. We describe the transduction transfer function and experimentally demonstrate an enhanced ethanol vapor sensitivity over 15 dB with low humidity crosstalk....

  9. Remote sensing for gas plume monitoring using state-of-the-art infrared hyperspectral imaging

    Hinnrichs, Michele

    1999-02-01

    Under contract to the US Air Force and Navy, Pacific Advanced Technology has developed a very sensitive hyperspectral imaging infrared camera that can perform remote imaging spectro-radiometry. One of the most exciting applications for this technology is in the remote monitoring of gas plume emissions. Pacific Advanced Technology (PAT) currently has the technology available to detect and identify chemical species in gas plumes using a small light weight infrared camera the size of a camcorder. Using this technology as a remote sensor can give advanced warning of hazardous chemical vapors undetectable by the human eye as well as monitor the species concentrations in a gas plume from smoke stack and fugitive leaks. Some of the gas plumes that have been measured and species detected using an IMSS imaging spectrometer are refinery smoke stacks plumes with emission of CO2, CO, SO2, NOx. Low concentration vapor unseen by the human eye that has been imaged and measured is acetone vapor evaporating at room temperature. The PAT hyperspectral imaging sensor is called 'Image Multi-spectral Sensing or IMSS.' The IMSS instrument uses defractive optic technology and exploits the chromatic aberrations of such lenses. Using diffractive optics for both imaging and dispersion allows for a very low cost light weight robust imaging spectrometer. PAT has developed imaging spectrometers that span the spectral range from the visible, midwave infrared (3 to 5 microns) and longwave infrared (8 to 12 microns) with this technology. This paper will present the imaging spectral data that we have collected on various targets with our hyperspectral imaging instruments as will also describe the IMSS approach to imaging spectroscopy.

  10. Investigation and subsurface remediation program for acetone in gulf coast sediments

    Failure of a subsurface pipeline and a rail car loading header caused a release of acetone to the shallow subsurface sediments at a Texas Gulf Coast chemical plant. A channel sand deposit was mapped beneath the release location consisting of fine grained sand below 10 feet of clay. The channel geometry and acetone distribution in the subsurface were delineated by a series of boreholes for the installation of monitor wells. The channel sand is approximately 30 feet thick and 150 feet wide. Aquifer test analyses show the transmissivity of the sand deposit to be about 400 ft2 /day. The acetone concentration in the ground water exceeded 100,000 mg/L with the greatest concentrations stratified at the top of the saturated zone. A ground water remediation program has been underway for more than three years. It was found that a single well, screened through the entire thickness of the sand deposit and pumped at eight gpm could effectively capture the contaminant plume, however the average concentration of acetone in the discharge fluid was only 800 mg/L. Alternate pumping schemes have been tried to evolve a more efficient recovery operation. Additionally, a top filling pneumatic pump was installed to take advantage of the higher concentrations of acetone found at the top of the saturated zone. Attempts were made to determine if a particular pumping scheme was more efficient for the ground water remediation. Both intermittent and continuous pumping were tried. Samples were collected to determine the concentrations of the discharge water and the total mass of recovered acetone. It was found that intermittent pumping of the recovery wells did not recover as much acetone as continuous pumping

  11. Selective gas sensing for photonic crystal lasers

    Smith, Cameron; Christiansen, Mads Brøkner; Buss, Thomas;

    2011-01-01

    We facilitate photonic crystal lasers to sense gases via an additional swelling polymer film. We describe the transduction transfer function and experimentally demonstrate an enhanced ethanol vapor sensitivity over 15 dB with low humidity crosstalk.......We facilitate photonic crystal lasers to sense gases via an additional swelling polymer film. We describe the transduction transfer function and experimentally demonstrate an enhanced ethanol vapor sensitivity over 15 dB with low humidity crosstalk....

  12. Study of the exhaled acetone in type 1 diabetes using quantum cascade laser spectroscopy.

    Reyes-Reyes, Adonis; Horsten, Roland C; Urbach, H Paul; Bhattacharya, Nandini

    2015-01-01

    The acetone concentration exhaled in the breath of three type 1 diabetes patients (two minors and one adult) and one healthy volunteer is studied using a quantum cascade laser-based spectroscopic system. Using the acetone signature between 1150 and 1250 cm(-1) and a multiline fitting method, the concentration variations on the order of parts per billion by volume were measured. Blood glucose and ketone concentrations in blood measurements were performed simultaneously to study their relation with acetone in exhaled breath. We focus on personalized studies to better understand the role of acetone in diabetes. For each volunteer, we performed a series of measurements over a period of time, including overnight fastings of 11 ± 1 h and during ketosis-hyperglycemia events for the minors. Our results highlight the importance of performing personalized studies because the response of the minors to the presence of ketosis was consistent but unique for each individual. Also, our results emphasize the need for performing more studies with T1D minors, because the acetone concentration in the breath of the minors differs, with respect to those reported in the literature, which are based on adults. PMID:25506743

  13. Electron impact investigation of the 3p-Rydberg transitions of acetone

    High resolution (15 meV), gas phase, electron impact energy loss spectra of acetone, and acetone-d6 measured as a function of incident energy and scattering angle have been used to study the anomalously weak 7.4 eV 3p-Rydberg transition in acetone. Assignments made on the basis of isotope shifts and differential electron scattering cross sections show that the weak transition observed optically and in the high energy electron impact spectrum is a forbidden transition to the out-of-plane 3p-Rydberg orbital. The band system is built on a vibronically allowed false origin enabled by the ν23 (CO bend) vibration. The analogous transition in the less symmetric molecule methyl ethyl ketone was observed to be optically allowed. All observed bands could be assigned to the one electronic transition to the out-of-plane 3p-Rydberg orbital. The other two 3p-Rydberg transitions do not appear to be active in acetone or methyl ethyl ketone. An unusual feature of this investigation was the experimental investigation of the relative differential scattering cross sections of both true and false vibronic origins within a single electronic transition. The high energy resolution allowed isotopic substitution, a traditional technique of optical spectroscopy, to be used to establish assignments in an electron impact experiment

  14. Thermodynamic Properties of the Azeotropic Mixture of Acetone, Cyclohexane and Methanol

    WANG Xiu-Rong; NAN Zhao-Dong; TAN Zhi-Cheng

    2006-01-01

    Molar heat capacities of the pure samples of acetone, methanol and the azeotropic mixture composed of acetone,cyclohexane and methanol were measured by an adiabatic calorimeter from 78 to 320 K. The solid-solid and solid-liquid phase transitions of the pure samples and the mixture were determined based on the curve of the heat capacity with respect to temperature. The phase transitions took place at (126.16±0.68) and (178.96±1.47) K for the sample of acetone, (157.79±0.95) and (175.93±0.95) K for methanol, which were corresponding to the solid-solid and the solid-liquid phase transitions of the acetone and the methanol, respectively. And the phase transitions occurred in the temperature ranges of 120 to 190 K and 278 to 280 K corresponding to the solid-solid and the solid-liquid phase transitions of mixture of acetone, cyclohexane and methanol, respectively. The thermodynamic functions and the excess thermodynamic functions of the mixture relative to standard temperature of 298.15 K were derived based on the relationships of the thermodynamic functions and the function of the measured heat capacity with respect to temperature.

  15. Biofiltration of mixtures of gas-phase styrene and acetone with the fungus Sporothrix variecibatus

    The biodegradation performance of a biofilter, inoculated with the fungus Sporothrix variecibatus, to treat gas-phase styrene and acetone mixtures under steady-state and transient conditions was evaluated. Experiments were carried out by varying the gas-flow rates (0.05-0.4 m3 h-1), leading to empty bed residence times as low as 17.1 s, and by changing the concentrations of gas-phase styrene (0.01-6.3 g m-3) and acetone (0.01-8.9 g m-3). The total elimination capacities were as high as 360 g m-3 h-1, with nearly 97.5% removal of styrene and 75.6% for acetone. The biodegradation of acetone was inhibited by the presence of styrene, while styrene removal was affected only slightly by the presence of acetone. During transient-state experiments, increasing the overall pollutant load by almost 3-fold, i.e., from 220 to 600 g m-3 h-1, resulted in a sudden drop of removal efficiency (>90-70%), but still high elimination capacities were maintained. Periodic microscopic observations revealed that the originally inoculated Sporothrix sp. remained present in the reactor and actively dominant in the biofilm.

  16. Efficient acetone-butanol-ethanol production by Clostridium beijerinckii from sugar beet pulp.

    Bellido, Carolina; Infante, Celia; Coca, Mónica; González-Benito, Gerardo; Lucas, Susana; García-Cubero, María Teresa

    2015-08-01

    Sugar beet pulp (SBP) has been investigated as a promising feedstock for ABE fermentation by Clostridium beijerinckii. Although lignin content in SBP is low, a pretreatment is needed to enhance enzymatic hydrolysis and fermentation yields. Autohydrolysis at pH 4 has been selected as the best pretreatment for SBP in terms of sugars release and acetone and butanol production. The best overall sugars release yields from raw SBP ranged from 66.2% to 70.6% for this pretreatment. The highest ABE yield achieved was 0.4g/g (5.1g/L of acetone and 6.6g/L butanol) and 143.2g ABE/kg SBP (62.3g acetone and 80.9g butanol) were obtained when pretreated SBP was enzymatically hydrolyzed at 7.5% (w/w) solid loading. Higher solid loadings (10%) offered higher acetone and butanol titers (5.8g/L of acetone and 7.8g/L butanol). All the experiments were carried out under not-controlling pH conditions reaching about 5.3 in the final samples. PMID:25965949

  17. Transient permeation of organic vapors through elastomeric membranes

    Curry, J. E.

    1973-01-01

    The permeation of benzene and acetone vapors through sulfur-cured natural rubber was studied by the time-lag method. The zero concentration diffusion coefficient, was obtained by the early-time method. The Frisch time lag equation was utilized to estimate both the solubility coefficient and the additional parameter required to define the concentration-dependence of the diffusion coefficient. This form of concentration dependence was manifested by the corresponding permeability coefficient values. At low entering penetrant pressure where the transport coefficients are constant, indirect evidence was obtained that zero diffusion coefficient is the mechanically correct diffusion coefficient. The solubility coefficient values calculated for benzene vapor in natural rubber are in reasonable agreement with published equilibrium sorption data for a similar rubber compound. At higher entering penetrant pressures, average diffusion coefficients obtained at steady state tended to be larger than the corresponding average diffusion coefficients derived from the time-lags.

  18. Highly sensitive room temperature organic vapor sensor based on polybenzoxazine-derived carbon aerogel thin film composite

    Thubsuang, Uthen [Materials Science and Engineering, School of Engineering and Resources, Walailak University, Nakhon Si Thammarat 80160 (Thailand); Sukanan, Darunee [The Petroleum and Petrochemical College and the Center of Excellence on Petrochemical and Materials Technology, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand); Sahasithiwat, Somboon [National Metal and Materials Technology Center, Thailand Science Park (TSP), Khlong Luang, Pathum Thani 12120 (Thailand); Wongkasemjit, Sujitra [The Petroleum and Petrochemical College and the Center of Excellence on Petrochemical and Materials Technology, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand); Chaisuwan, Thanyalak, E-mail: thanyalak.c@chula.ac.th [The Petroleum and Petrochemical College and the Center of Excellence on Petrochemical and Materials Technology, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand)

    2015-10-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Activated carbon aerogel with high surface area can be prepared from polybenzoxazine. • Activated carbon aerogel enhances the adsorption capacity of gas sensor. • Organic vapors with very low concentration can be detected by the as-prepared sensor. • The as-prepared sensor shows impressive short exposure and recovery time. • The response to different organic vapors can be tailored by changing polymer matrix. - Abstract: Gas sensing composites were fabricated using polybenzoxazine-based activated carbon aerogel as a conductive filler. The activated carbon aerogel is a nano-porous material, which has high pore volume of 0.57 cm{sup 3}/g and surface area of 917 m{sup 2}/g. The activated carbon aerogel/polybutadiene composite displayed good response of 11.2 and 6.7 to toluene and n-hexane, respectively, compared to those of graphite/polybutadiene composite. The activated carbon aerogel/polybutadiene composite also showed high sensitivity of 3.09 × 10{sup 2} ppm{sup −1} to toluene. However, the sensitivity of activated carbon aerogel/polybutadiene composite drastically decreased to 1.99 ppm{sup −1} and zero when exposed to acetone and water, respectively. Contrarily, when polyvinyl alcohol was used as a matrix, the sensitivity was about 4.19 ppm{sup −1} to water. While the composite was found to be not sensitive to toluene. The activated carbon aerogel/polybutadiene composite also showed good recovery as the electrical resistance came back to the original value within minutes when exposed to nitrogen gas.

  19. Highly sensitive room temperature organic vapor sensor based on polybenzoxazine-derived carbon aerogel thin film composite

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Activated carbon aerogel with high surface area can be prepared from polybenzoxazine. • Activated carbon aerogel enhances the adsorption capacity of gas sensor. • Organic vapors with very low concentration can be detected by the as-prepared sensor. • The as-prepared sensor shows impressive short exposure and recovery time. • The response to different organic vapors can be tailored by changing polymer matrix. - Abstract: Gas sensing composites were fabricated using polybenzoxazine-based activated carbon aerogel as a conductive filler. The activated carbon aerogel is a nano-porous material, which has high pore volume of 0.57 cm3/g and surface area of 917 m2/g. The activated carbon aerogel/polybutadiene composite displayed good response of 11.2 and 6.7 to toluene and n-hexane, respectively, compared to those of graphite/polybutadiene composite. The activated carbon aerogel/polybutadiene composite also showed high sensitivity of 3.09 × 102 ppm−1 to toluene. However, the sensitivity of activated carbon aerogel/polybutadiene composite drastically decreased to 1.99 ppm−1 and zero when exposed to acetone and water, respectively. Contrarily, when polyvinyl alcohol was used as a matrix, the sensitivity was about 4.19 ppm−1 to water. While the composite was found to be not sensitive to toluene. The activated carbon aerogel/polybutadiene composite also showed good recovery as the electrical resistance came back to the original value within minutes when exposed to nitrogen gas

  20. Mid-Infrared Vibrational Spectra of Discrete Acetone-Ligated Cerium Hydroxide Cations

    Groenewold, G. S.; Gianotto, Anita K.; Cossel, Kevin C.; Van Stipdonk, Michael J.; Oomens, Jos; Polfer, Nick; Moore, D.T.; De Jong, Wibe A.; McIIwain, Michael E.

    2007-02-15

    Cerium (III) hydroxy reactive sites are responsible for several important heterogeneous catalysis processes, and understanding the reaction chemistry of substrate molecules like CO, H2O, and CH3OH as they occur in heterogeneous media is a challenging task. We report here the first infrared spectra of model gas-phase cerium complexes and use the results as a benchmark to assist evaluation of the accuracy of ab initio calculations. Complexes containing [CeOH]2+ ligated by three- and four-acetone molecules were generated by electrospray ionization and characterized using wavelength-selective infrared multiple photon dissociation (IRMPD). The C=O stretching frequency for the [CeOH(acetone)4]2+ species appeared at 1650 cm-1 and was red-shifted by 90 cm-1 compared to unligated acetone. The magnitude of this shift for the carbonyl frequency was even greater for the [CeOH(acetone)3]2+ complex: the IRMPD peak consisted of two dissociation channels, an initial elimination of acetone at 1635 cm-1, and elimination of acetone accompanied by a serial charge separation producing [CeO(acetone)]+ at 1599 cm-1, with the overall frequency centered at 1616 cm-1. The increasing red shift observed as the number of acetone ligands decreases from four to three is consistent with transfer of more electron density per ligand in the less coordinated complexes. The lower frequency measured for the elimination/charge separation process is likely due to anharmonicity resulting from population of higher vibrational states. The C-C stretching frequency in the complexes is also influenced by coordination to the metal: it is blue-shifted compared to bare acetone, indicating a slight strengthening of the C-C bond in the complex, with the intensity of the absorption decreasing with decreasing ligation. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations using three different functionals (LDA, B3LYP, and PBE0) are used to predict the infrared spectra of the complexes. Calculated frequencies for the carbonyl

  1. Determination of Eu3+ aquacomplexes stability constants in acetone using energy degradation of electron excitation

    Mean deactivation rate of rare-earth element (REE) ions in their excited states, which is single-valued function of their complexation, is employed as an indicator of the complexation in the respective solutions. The first four stability constants of the aquacomplexes Eu3+ in acetone at 293 deg K were found by means of such procedure: β1 = (1.27+-0.2) x 103, β2 = (5.6+-0.65) x 104, β3 = (4.41+-0.75) x 105, β4 = (5.92+-0.86)x 105. Upon increase of water concentration in europium nitrate acetone solution, at first three water molecules are inserted into the REE ion coordination sphere, then NO33- anions are replaced by water. This is confirmed by the rate of nonradiative energy transfer between Eu3+ and Nd3+ in acetone depending on water concentration

  2. Infrared absorption cross sections for acetone (propanone) in the 3 μm region

    Infrared absorption cross sections for acetone (propanone), CH3C(O)CH3, have been determined in the 3 μm spectral region from spectra recorded using a high-resolution FTIR spectrometer (Bruker IFS 125 HR) and a multipass cell with a maximum optical path length of 19.3 m. The spectra of mixtures of acetone with dry synthetic air were recorded at 0.015 cm-1 resolution (calculated as 0.9/MOPD using the Bruker definition of resolution) at a number of temperatures and pressures (50-760 Torr and 195-296 K) appropriate for atmospheric conditions. Intensities were calibrated using three acetone spectra (recorded at 278, 293 and 323 K) taken from the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) IR database.

  3. Stratospheric water vapor feedback

    Dessler, A. E.; Schoeberl, M. R.; Wang, T.; Davis, S M; K. H. Rosenlof

    2013-01-01

    We show observational evidence for a stratospheric water vapor feedback—a warmer climate increases stratospheric water vapor, and because stratospheric water vapor is itself a greenhouse gas, this leads to further warming. An estimate of its magnitude from a climate model yields a value of +0.3 W/(m2⋅K), suggesting that this feedback plays an important role in our climate system.

  4. Bis(1,10-phenanthroline)lithium perchlorate: crystal structure and dissociation of complex in acetone

    Composition of solid phase formed in acetone at concentration ratios of 1,10-phenanthroline (phen) and LiClO4 near 2:1 is established. Molecular structure of bis(1,10-phenanthroline)lithium perchlorate is determined by X-ray structural analysis: space group Pnna, a=7.191(2), b=39.929(9), c=14.494(3) A, Z=8, Dx=1.490 g/cm3. Data of IR spectroscopy in acetone denotes dissociation of the Li(phen)2ClO4 complex for the 1:1 composition complex and molecule phen in the solution equilibrium with the solid phase

  5. Radiation-induced synthesis of low molecular weight of PTFE and their crosslinking in acetone medium

    Polytetrafluoroethylene was obtained by radiation-induced polymerization of tetrafluoroethylene in acetone at 195 K. An average diameter of the products was very small compared with the commercial one; it was about 0.2 μm. The yield was reached to 100% with a dose of 4 kGy. The crystallinity of the products is decreasing with increasing dose. The crystallinity becomes low, for higher irradiation doses. It was found that PTFE obtained by irradiation of TFE in acetone at 195 K has Y-type crosslinking structure. This was demonstrated by means of 19F MAS NMR

  6. Radiation induced synthesis of low molecular weight of PTFE and their crosslinking in acetone medium

    Polytetrafluoroethylene was obtained by radiation induced polymerization of tetrafluoroethylene in acetone at 195 K. An average diameter of the products was very small compared with commercial one; it was about 0.3 micro-meters. The yield was reached to 100% with a dose of 4 kGy. The crystallinity of the products is decreasing with increasing dose. The products become amorphous, for higher irradiation doses. It was found that PTFE obtained by irradiation of TFE in acetone at 195 K has branching structure. This was demonstrated by means of 19F MAS NMR. (Author)

  7. Petroleum Vapor - Field Technical

    The screening approach being developed by EPA OUST to evaluate petroleum vapor intrusion (PVI) requires information that has not be routinely collected in the past at vapor intrusion sites. What is the best way to collect this data? What are the relevant data quality issues and ...

  8. Water vapor pressure calculation.

    Hall, J R; Brouillard, R G

    1985-06-01

    Accurate calculation of water vapor pressure for systems saturated with water vapor can be performed using the Goff-Gratch equation. A form of the equation that can be adapted for computer programming and for use in electronic databases is provided. PMID:4008425

  9. Intercalation of polyoxomolybdate in polyaniline matrix: Enhancement in AC impedance and gas sensing properties

    The electrochemically prepared polyaniline-12-molybdophosphoric acid (P12MPA) thin films in conducting emeraldine salt form of polyaniline (PAni) matrix is verified by the presence of redox peaks in the UV-vis spectra for different dopant concentrations. The optical band gap energy in these films is dopant concentration dependant and tunable. From the FTIR spectra, it is evidenced that, the characteristic peaks of PAni is present in P12MPA thus there is only conformational change due to the inclusion of molybdophosphoric acid (12MPA) in the polymer matrix. The amorphous nature of the film is proved from the XRD. XPS peaks of PAni and P12MPA thin films have shown the evidence for the presence of quinoid imine, benzenoid amine and the polaronic nitrogen and the oxidation level is quantitatively analysed. P12MPA has the oxidation level of around 51% which matches with that of protonated emeraldine form. Due to the inclusion of 12MPA, in addition to para coupling of the monomer, ortho coupling also takes place. Impedance analysis shows the role of temperature in crosslinking of polymer chain and dopant anions. The high response of P12MPA (64.8%) towards acetone vapor provides evidence for improved sensing behaviour of the doped polymer.

  10. Improvement of the cold flow characteristics of biodiesel containing dissolved polymer wastes using acetone

    Pouya Mohammadi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Due to the fast fossil fuel depletion and at the same time global warming phenomenon anticipated for the next coming years, the necessity of developing alternative fuels e.g. biofuels (i.e. bioethanol, biodiesel, biogas and etc. has turned into an important concern. Recently, the application of the bio-solvency properties of biodiesel for recycling waste polymers has been highlighted. However, the impact of polymer dissolution on cold flow characteristics of biodiesel was never investigated. The present study was set to explore the impact of different solvents in stabilizing biodiesel-polymer solution. Among them, acetone was proved to be the best fuel stabilizer. Subsequently, cold flow characteristic i.e. cloud point, of the biodiesel-polymer-acetone fuel was found to have improved (decreased due to the inclusion of acetone. Finally, flash point analysis of the fuel blends containing acetone was done to ensured high safety of the fuel blend by dramatically increasing the flash point values of biodiesel-polymer fuel blends.

  11. Screening of Methanol and Acetone Extracts of Fourteen Indian Medicinal Plants for Antimicrobial Activity

    VAGHASIYA, Yogeshkumar; Chanda, Sumitra V.

    2007-01-01

    The methanol and acetone extracts of 14 plants belonging to different families were evaluated for antimicrobial activity against five Gram-positive bacteria: Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Bacillus cereus, Bacillus subtilis, Micrococcus flavus; seven Gram-negative bacteria: Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Proteus mirabilis, Proteus vulgaris, Salmonella typhimurium, Citrobacter freundii; and three fungi: Candida tropicalis, Cryptococcus lut...

  12. Colorimetric determination of uranium using ammonium thiocyanate in a medium of ethyl acetate, acetone and water

    The method consists of colorimetrically analyzing uranium using ammonium sulfo-cyanide in the solvent phase. The optimum conditions for extracting uranium by ethyl acetate have been studied. A precise colorimetric method was established which depends on the extracted phase and on the behavior of the ethyl acetate-acetone medium. (author)

  13. Design of a solvent extraction process for PAH-contaminated sediments : The WAU-acetone process

    Rulkens, W.H.; Bruning, H.; Hasselt, H.J. van; Rienks, J.; Veen, H.J. van; Terlingen, J.P.M.

    1998-01-01

    Solvent extraction is one of the possibilities to clean-up polluted sediments. It is especially attractive when the sediment mainly consists of clay particles polluted with contaminants which are not, or not easily, biodegradable. Using acetone as extracting agent the extraction process has been inv

  14. Silicalite-1 Crystals Etched with Hydrofluoric Acid Dissolved in Water or Acetone

    Brabec, Libor; Kočiřík, Milan

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 114, č. 32 (2010), s. 13685-13694. ISSN 1932-7447 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA400400909 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : silicalite-1 crystals * acetone * hydrofluorid acid Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 4.520, year: 2010

  15. Acetone, ammonia and hydrogen cyanide in exhaled breath of several volunteers aged 4–83 years

    Španěl, Patrik; Dryahina, Kseniya; Smith, D.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 1, - (2007), 011001. ISSN 1752-7155 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/06/0776 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : acetone * ammonia * hydrogen cyanide Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry

  16. Peculiar behavior of MWW materials in aldol condensation of furfural and acetone

    Kikhtyanin, O.; Eliášová, Pavla; Jindrová, T.; Kubička, D.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 43, č. 27 (2014), s. 10628-10641. ISSN 1477-9226 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP106/12/G015 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : acetone * aldehydes * batch reactors Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 4.197, year: 2014

  17. Toxicity study of di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (DEHP) in combination with acetone in rats

    Dalgaard, M.; Østergaard, G.; Lam, Henrik Rye;

    2000-01-01

    measured parameters. In the 4-week study DEHP, at the highest dose level, resulted in severe general toxicity. The group exposed to DEHP in combination with acetone was more affected. Male fertility was decreased. Body weight was decreased, and the relative weight of the liver, kidney, heart, brain and...

  18. Stable gold nanoparticles obtained in pure acetone by laser ablation with different wavelengths

    We prepared gold nanoparticles (NPs) by ps laser ablation in pure acetone and water with 532 and 1,064 nm wavelengths. The NPs obtained in pure acetone are stable for years and, depending on the fabrication conditions, they can be very small, quasi monodisperse and fluorescent. These properties are not lost when they are transferred from acetone to water. Post-irradiation tests of the colloids with 532 nm pulses, before and after phase transfer to water, and surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS), either on liquid and on dried samples, suggest that the stabilization mechanism in acetone is related to the light-induced formation on the gold surface of enolate which, in some cases, can undergo degradation with formation of amorphous carbon. Micro-SERS tests were also used to demonstrate that functionalization of the particles with 1,10-phenanthroline or adenine is possible after transfer to the water phase, which opens the way to the use of such structures for biological and medical applications, such as biocompatible fluorescent or Raman markers.

  19. Stable gold nanoparticles obtained in pure acetone by laser ablation with different wavelengths

    Giorgetti, Emilia, E-mail: emilia.giorgetti@fi.isc.cnr.it [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, INSTM and Istituto dei Sistemi Complessi (Italy); Muniz-Miranda, Maurizio [Universita di Firenze, Dipartimento di Chimica ' Ugo Schiff' (Italy); Marsili, Paolo; Scarpellini, David [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Istituto dei Sistemi Complessi (Italy); Giammanco, Francesco [University of Pisa, Department of Physics ' E. Fermi' (Italy)

    2012-01-15

    We prepared gold nanoparticles (NPs) by ps laser ablation in pure acetone and water with 532 and 1,064 nm wavelengths. The NPs obtained in pure acetone are stable for years and, depending on the fabrication conditions, they can be very small, quasi monodisperse and fluorescent. These properties are not lost when they are transferred from acetone to water. Post-irradiation tests of the colloids with 532 nm pulses, before and after phase transfer to water, and surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS), either on liquid and on dried samples, suggest that the stabilization mechanism in acetone is related to the light-induced formation on the gold surface of enolate which, in some cases, can undergo degradation with formation of amorphous carbon. Micro-SERS tests were also used to demonstrate that functionalization of the particles with 1,10-phenanthroline or adenine is possible after transfer to the water phase, which opens the way to the use of such structures for biological and medical applications, such as biocompatible fluorescent or Raman markers.

  20. Synthesis and Characterization of New Material——La/Zr/MMT Employed in Acetone Oxidation

    FAN,Li-Ping; CHEN,Min; ZHANG,Yi-Gai; ZHOU,Ren-Xian; ZHENG,Xiao-Ming

    2007-01-01

    A new material of zirconium pillared montmorillonite added with lanthanum (denoted as La/Zr/MMT) was prepared for acetone oxidation. Surface properties of the catalysts were investigated by means of XRD, TEM,TG-DTA and BET methods. The XRD result indicated that the interlayer space of the montmorillonite was enlarged from 1.57 to 4.85 nm after the treatment with zirconium pillaring and the addition of lanthanum. N2 adsorption-desorption result showed that by the process of zirconium pillaring, the specific surface area of the sample was increased to 128.0 m2/g, which was two times almost as large as pure montmorillonite. Simultaneously, the thermal stability was also enhanced. The activity of the new material on the total oxidation of acetone was investigated, and the results indicated that the catalytic activity of the montmorillonite was greatly improved. Over the sample of La/Zr/MMT, the T98 of acetone was obtained at 350℃, while it needs 400℃ over the pure montmorillonite. After 0.1% Pd was supported on the sample of La/Zr/MMT, the T98 decreased from 350 to 280 ℃, indicating the montmorillonite is a promising material for the control of some types of the volatile organic compounds such as acetone.

  1. Thermal and Ablative Properties of Ipns and Composites of High Ortho Resole Resin and Difurfurylidene Acetone

    Tariq S. NAJIM

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available High ortho resole resin was prepared by condensation of phenol with excess of formaldehyde in the presence of magnesium oxide as catalyst. Reaction of furfuraldehyde with acetone in basic medium led to difurfurylidene acetone (DFA. Their interpenetrating polymer network (IPNS were obtained by the reaction of predetermined quantities of difurfurylidene acetone and high ortho resole using p-toluene sulphonic acid (PTSA as curing agent. The thermal behavior of the resins was studied using thermogravimetry (TG under ambient and nitrogen atmospheres over a temperature range of (25-1000 Cº. It was observed that the IPN of 20% DFA – 80% resole has higher thermal stability than that of resole alone and the decomposition temperature was higher by 80 Cº. This behavior was attributed to highly cross linked structure and thermally stable backbone of ploy difurfurylidene acetone due to formation of ladder structure.Impregnation of chopped fiber glass type (E with the polymeric solutions was used to prepare their composites, and the ablative properties were investigated according to ASTM E-285 –80. It was observed that the IPN of (DFA- resol perform better than the resole composite alone.

  2. High dilutions of acetone affect the Avena sativa growth in vitro

    Kely Karina Belato

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Acetone is an organic solvent with molecular structure CH3(COCH3, its endogenous production in the animal body is called ketosis. The production of this compound increases with the fat. Acetone influences the lipid membrane, altering its fluidity and lipid composition [1], causing cell damage and leakage and can cause cell death. The use of herbicides in organic farming is not accepted by the Brazilian legislation [2]. So the weed control becomes a problem for organic farmers. The aim of this study is to evaluate the herbicide potential of high dilutions of acetone on Avena sativa L. Materials and Methods: The preliminary tests were conducted at the Laboratory of Plant Physiology and Homeopathy, State University of Maringá (UEM. The seeds of Avena sativa are placed in Petri dishes. Fitty seeds were germinated and grown in Petri dishes containing 15ml of high dilution of acetone and maintained at 25°C ± 2 and 12h photoperiod. Acetone dilutions (6, 12, 18, 24 and 30cH were obtained according to the Brazilian Homeopathic Pharmacopoeia [3]. Were evaluated the shoot length (cm, total length (cm, fresh root (mg and total dry mass (mg. The plants growth was measured after 7 days. The control consisted of distilled water. The experiment evaluated 4 replicates of each treatment and the data were analyzed by ANOVA and means were compared by Scott-Knott test (P ≤ 0.05. Results and Discussion: Dilutions 6, 24 and 30 cH inhibited the growth of the shoot and total seedling of A. sativa. The root fresh weight was significantly reduced by 4 dilutions (6,12,24 and 30x, with no difference of 24x compared to the control. The total dry mass of plants of A. sativa was reduced in all the dilutions studied, showing an inhibitory effect on growth of seedlings subjected to treatment. Somehow, acetone diluited inhibited the growth and accumulation of biomass of these seedlings, suggesting an imbalance in metabolism

  3. Hydrogen bond dynamics and vibrational spectral diffusion in aqueous solution of acetone: A first principles molecular dynamics study

    Bhabani S Mallik; Amalendu Chandra

    2012-01-01

    We present an ab initio molecular dynamics study of vibrational spectral diffusion and hydrogen bond dynamics in aqueous solution of acetone at room temperature. It is found that the frequencies of OD bonds in the acetone hydration shell have a higher stretch frequency than those in the bulk water. Also, on average, the frequencies of hydration shell OD modes are found to increase with increase in the acetone-water hydrogen bond distance. The vibrational spectral diffusion of the hydration shell water molecules reveals three time scales: A short-time relaxation (∼80 fs) corresponding to the dynamics of intact acetone-water hydrogen bonds, a slower relaxation (∼1.3 ps) corresponding to the lifetime of acetone-water hydrogen bonds and another longer time constant (∼12 ps) corresponding to the escape dynamics of water from the solute hydration shell. The present first principles results are compared with those of available experiments and classical simulations.

  4. A carbon nanotube-based sensing element

    YANG Xing; ZHOU Zhao-ying; WU Ying; ZHANG Jin; ZHANG Ying-ying

    2007-01-01

    A carbon nanotube-based(CNT) sensing element is presented, which consists of substrate, insulating layer, electrodes,carbon nanotube and measuring circuit. The sensing components are a single or array of CNTs, which are located on the two electrodes. The CNT-based sensing element is fabricated by CVD (chemical vapor deposition)-direct-growth on microelectrodes. The sensing model and measurement method of electromechanical property are also presented. Finally, the voltage-current characteristics are measured, which show that the CNT-based sensing element has good electrical properties.

  5. ZnO:Al Thin Film Gas Sensor for Detection of Ethanol Vapor

    Min Hsiung Hon

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available The ZnO:Al thin films were prepared by RF magnetron sputtering on Si substrateusing Pt as interdigitated electrodes. The structure was characterized by XRD and SEManalyses, and the ethanol vapor gas sensing as well as electrical properties have beeninvestigated and discussed. The gas sensing results show that the sensitivity for detecting400 ppm ethanol vapor was ~20 at an operating temperature of 250°C. The high sensitivity,fast recovery, and reliability suggest that ZnO:Al thin film prepared by RF magnetronsputtering can be used for ethanol vapor gas sensing.

  6. Effects of copolymer composition, film thickness, and solvent vapor annealing time on dewetting of ultrathin block copolymer films.

    Huang, Changchun; Wen, Gangyao; Li, Jingdan; Wu, Tao; Wang, Lina; Xue, Feifei; Li, Hongfei; Shi, Tongfei

    2016-09-15

    Effects of copolymer composition, film thickness, and solvent vapor annealing time on dewetting of spin-coated polystyrene-block-poly(methyl methacrylate) (PS-b-PMMA) films (annealed for different times were performed using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and contact angle measurement. With the annealing of acetone vapor, dewetting of the films with different thicknesses occur via the spinodal dewetting and the nucleation and growth mechanisms, respectively. The PS-b-PMMA films rupture into droplets which first coalesce into large ones to reduce the surface free energy. Then the large droplets rupture into small ones to increase the contact area between PMMA blocks and acetone molecules resulting from ultimate migration of PMMA blocks to droplet surface, which is a novel dewetting process observed in spin-coated films for the first time. PMID:27309943

  7. Second Vapor-Level Sensor For Vapor Degreaser

    Painter, Nance M.; Burley, Richard K.

    1990-01-01

    Second vapor-level sensor installed at lower level in vapor degreaser makes possible to maintain top of vapor at that lower level. Evaporation reduced during idle periods. Provides substantial benefit, without major capital cost of building new vapor degreaser with greater freeboard height.

  8. Acetone in Orion BN/KL - High-resolution maps of a special oxygen-bearing molecule

    Peng, T -C; Brouillet, N; Baudry, A; Favre, C; Remijan, A; Wootten, A; Wilson, T L; Combes, F; Wlodarczak, G

    2013-01-01

    As one of the prime targets of interstellar chemistry study, Orion BN/KL clearly shows different molecular distributions between large nitrogen- (e.g., C2H5CN) and oxygen-bearing (e.g., HCOOCH3) molecules. However, acetone (CH3)2CO, a special complex O-bearing molecule, has been shown to have a very different distribution from other typical O-bearing molecules in the BN/KL region. We searched for acetone within our IRAM Plateau de Bure Interferometer 3 mm and 1.3 mm data sets. Twenty-two acetone lines were searched within these data sets. The angular resolution ranged from 1.8 X 0.8 to 6.0 X 2.3 arcsec^2, and the spectral resolution ranged from 0.4 to 1.9 km s-1. Nine of the acetone lines appear free of contamination. Three main acetone peaks (Ace-1, 2, and 3) are identified in Orion BN/KL. The new acetone source Ace-3 and the extended emission in the north of the hot core region have been found for the first time. An excitation temperature of about 150 K is determined toward Ace-1 and Ace-2, and the acetone ...

  9. R-22 vapor explosions

    Previous experimental and theoretical studies of R-22 vapor explosions are reviewed. Results from two experimental investigations of vapor explosions in a medium scale R-22/water system are reported. Measurements following the drop of an unrestrained mass of R-22 into a water tank demonstrated the existence of two types of interaction behavior. Release of a constrained mass of R-22 beneath the surface of a water tank improved the visual resolution of the system thus allowing identification of two interaction mechansims: at low water temperatures, R-22/water contact would produce immediate violent boiling; at high water temperatures a vapor film formed around its R-22 as it was released, explosions were generated by a surface wave which initiated at a single location and propagated along the vapor film as a shock wave. A new vapor explosion model is proposed, it suggests explosions are the result of a sequence of three independent steps: an initial mixing phase, a trigger and growth phase, and a mature phase where a propagating shock wave accelerates the two liquids into a collapsing vapor layer causing a high velocity impact which finely fragments and intermixes the two liquids

  10. Small-angle X-ray scattering study of the structural evolution of the drying of teos-derived sonogels with the liquid phase exchanged by acetone

    Full text: The structural evolution on the drying of wet sonogels of silica with the liquid phase exchanged by acetone, obtained from tetraethoxisilane sonohydrolysis, was studied 'in situ' by small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). The SAXS measurements were carried out using synchrotron radiation with a wavelength λ = 0.1608 nm and a pin-hole geometry collimated beam. The periods associated to the structural evolution as determined by SAXS are in agreement with those classical ones established on basis of the features of the evaporation rate of the liquid phase in the obtaining of xerogels. The SAXS data were analyzed on basis of the fractal characteristics of the sonogels. The wet gel can be described as formed by primary particles (microclusters), with characteristic length a ∼ 0.67 nm and surface which is fractal, linking together to form mass fractal structures with mass fractal dimension D = 2.24 in a length scale ξ ∼ 6.7 nm. As the network collapses while the liquid/vapor meniscus is kept out of the gel volume, the mass fractal structure becomes more compacted by increasing D and decreasing ξ, with smoothing of the fractal surface of the microclusters. The time evolution of the density of the wet gels was evaluated exclusively from the SAXS parameters ξ, D and a. The final dried acetone-exchanged gel presents Porod's inhomogeneity length of about 2.8 nm and apparently exhibits an interesting singularity D → 3, as determined by the mass fractal modeling used to t the SAXS intensity data for the obtaining of the parameters ξ and D. (author)

  11. Graphene oxide foams and their excellent adsorption ability for acetone gas

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • GO and RGO foams were prepared using a simple and green method, unidirectional freeze-drying. • The porous structure of the foams can be adjusted by changing GO concentrations. • GO and RGO foams show good adsorption efficiency for acetone gas. - Abstract: Graphene oxide (GO) and reduced graphene oxide (RGO) foams were prepared using a unidirectional freeze-drying method. These porous carbon materials were characterized by thermal gravimetric analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The adsorption behavior of the two kinds of foams for acetone was studied. The result showed that the saturated adsorption efficiency of the GO foams was over 100%, and was higher than that of RGO foams and other carbon materials

  12. Roles of Acetone and Diacetone Alcohol in Coordination and Dissociation Reactions of Uranyl Complexes

    Rios, Daniel; Schoendorff, George E.; Van Stipdonk, Michael J.; Gordon, Mark S.; Windus, Theresa L.; Gibson, John K.; De Jong, Wibe A.

    2012-12-03

    Combined collision-induced dissociation mass-spectrometry experiments and DFT calculations were employed to elucidate the molecular structure of "hypercoordinated" species and the energetics of water-elimination reactions of uranyl acetone complexes observed in earlier work (Rios, D.; Rutkowski, P. X.; Van Stipdonk, M. J.; Gibson, J. K. Inorg. Chem. 2011, 50, 4781). It is shown that the "hypercoordinated" species contain diacetone alcohol ligands bonded in either bidentate or monodentate fashion, which are indistinguishable from (acetone)2 in mass spectrometry. Calculations confirm that four diacetone ligands can form stable complexes, but that the effective number of atoms coordinating with uranium in the equatorial plane does not exceed five. Diacetone alcohol ligands are shown to form mesityl oxide ligands and alkoxide species through the elimination of water, providing an explanation for the observed water-elimination reactions.

  13. DSC and curing kinetics study of epoxy grouting diluted with furfural -acetone slurry

    Yin, H.; Sun, D. W.; Li, B.; Liu, Y. T.; Ran, Q. P.; Liu, J. P.

    2016-07-01

    The use of furfural-acetone slurry as active diluents of Bisphenol-A epoxy resin (DGEBA) groutings has been studied by dynamic and non-isothermal DSC for the first time. Curing kinetics study was investigated by non-isothermal differential scanning calorimetries at different heating rates. Activation enery (Ea) was calculated based on Kissinger and Ozawa Methods, and the results showed that Ea increased from 58.87 to 71.13KJ/mol after the diluents were added. The furfural-acetone epoxy matrix could cure completely at the theoretical curing temperature of 365.8K and the curing time of 139mins, which were determined by the kinetic model parameters.

  14. Kinetic Model of Resin-Catalyzed Decomposition of Acetone Cyanohydrin in Organic Solvent

    章亭洲; 杨立荣; 朱自强; 吴坚平

    2003-01-01

    Decomposition of acetone cyanohydrin is the first-step reaction for preparing (S)-α-cyano-3-phenoxybenzyl alcohol (CPBA) by the one-pot method in organic media. Considering the compatibility of biocatalysts with chemical catalysts and the successive operation in the bioreactor, anion exchange resin (D301) was used as catalyst for this reaction. External diffusion limitation was excluded by raising rotational speed to higher than 190r·min-1 in both solvents. Internal diffusion limitation was verified to be insignificant in this reaction system. The effect of acetone cyanohydrin concentration on the reaction was also investigated. An intrinsic kinetic model was proposed when the mass transfer limitation was excluded, and the average deviation of the model is 10.5%.

  15. Graphene oxide foams and their excellent adsorption ability for acetone gas

    He, Yongqiang [Department of Applied Chemistry, Yuncheng University, Yuncheng 044000 (China); School of Science, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Zhang, Nana; Wu, Fei; Xu, Fangqiang; Liu, Yu [School of Science, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Gao, Jianping, E-mail: jianpingg@eyou.com [School of Science, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China)

    2013-09-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • GO and RGO foams were prepared using a simple and green method, unidirectional freeze-drying. • The porous structure of the foams can be adjusted by changing GO concentrations. • GO and RGO foams show good adsorption efficiency for acetone gas. - Abstract: Graphene oxide (GO) and reduced graphene oxide (RGO) foams were prepared using a unidirectional freeze-drying method. These porous carbon materials were characterized by thermal gravimetric analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The adsorption behavior of the two kinds of foams for acetone was studied. The result showed that the saturated adsorption efficiency of the GO foams was over 100%, and was higher than that of RGO foams and other carbon materials.

  16. Investigation of efficiency of air cleaning from acetone using a segmental construction biofilter

    Denas Bacevičius; Alvydas Zagorskis

    2015-01-01

    Volatile organic compounds, e. g. acetone, have a direct impact on climate change, decrease of ozone in the air, and on the growth of greenhouse effect. One of the most popular air purifying methods from VOC is a biological air cleaning. Experimental investigations were conducted to determine the efficiency of the new structure of biofilter with polypropylene plates segments. During the investigations the efficiency of segmental construction biofilter of air purification at different initial ...

  17. Experimental investigation of the Soret effect in acetone/water and dimethylsulfoxide/water mixtures

    Ning, H.; Wiegand, S.

    2006-01-01

    The thermal diffusion behavior of acetone/water and dimethylsulfoxide(DMSO)/water mixtures has been experimentally investigated by a transient holographic grating technique named thermal diffusion forced Rayleigh scattering (TDFRS). For both systems a sign change of the Soret coefficient S(T) with varying water content has been predicted by simulations [C. Nieto Draghi et al., J. Chem. Phys. 122, 114503 (2005)]. The sign change of S(T) is confirmed by the experiment. Except for equimolar conc...

  18. Acetone and Butanol Production by Clostridium acetobutylicum in a Synthetic Medium

    Monot, Frédéric; Martin, Jean-René; Petitdemange, Henri; Gay, Robert

    1982-01-01

    The effect of the component concentrations of a synthetic medium on acetone and butanol fermentation by Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 was investigated. Cell growth was dependent on the presence of Mg, Fe, and K in the medium. Mg and Mn had deleterious effects when in excess. Ammonium acetate in excess caused acid fermentation. The metabolism was composed of two phases: an acid phase and a solvent one. Low concentrations of glucose allowed the first phase only. The theoretical ratio of t...

  19. Acetone, Isopropanol, and Butanol Production by Clostridium beijerinckii (syn. Clostridium butylicum) and Clostridium aurantibutyricum

    George, H. A.; Johnson, J. L.; Moore, W. E. C.; Holdeman, L V; Chen, J S

    1983-01-01

    Thirty-four strains representing 15 species of anaerobic bacteria were screened for acetone, isopropanol, and n-butanol (solvent) production. Under our culture conditions, several strains of Clostridium beijerinckii and C. aurantibutyricum produced at least 40 mM n-butanol (C. acetobutylicum strains produced up to 41 mM n-butanol under similar conditions). Both solvent-producing and non-solvent-producing strains of C. beijerinckii have high DNA homology with a reference strain of C. beijerinc...

  20. Studies on Acetone Powder and Purified Rhus Laccase Immobilized on Zirconium Chloride for Oxidation of Phenols

    Rong Lu; Tetsuo Miyakoshi

    2012-01-01

    Rhus laccase was isolated and purified from acetone powder obtained from the exudates of Chinese lacquer trees (Rhus vernicifera) from the Jianshi region, Hubei province of China. There are two blue bands appearing on CM-sephadex C-50 chromatography column, and each band corresponding to Rhus laccase 1 and 2, the former being the major constituent, and each had an average molecular weight of approximately 110 kDa. The purified and crude Rhus laccases were immobilized on zirconium chloride in ...

  1. The potential of aqueous and acetone extracts of galls of Quercus infectoria as antibacterial agents

    Basri Dayang

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the antibacterial potential of aqueous and acetone extracts of galls of Quercus infectoria by determination of Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC and Minimum Bactericidal Concentration (MBC values. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The extracts from the galls of Q. infectoria at 10 mg/ml were screened against three Gram-positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923, Staphylococcus epidermidis and Bacillus subtilis and three Gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli NCTC 12079 serotype O157:H7, Salmonella typhimurium NCTC 74 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 27853. The MIC of the extracts were then determined using the twofold serial microdilution technique at a concentration ranging from 5 mg/ml to 0.0024 mg/ml. The MBC values were finally obtained from the MIC microtiter wells which showed no turbidity after 24 hrs of incubation by subculturing method. RESULTS: Out of the six bacterial species tested, S. aureus was the most susceptible. On the other hand, the extracts showed weak inhibitory effect against S. epidermidis, B. subtilis, S. typhimurium and P. aeruginosa while there was no inhibition zone observed for E. coli O157. The MIC values of the extracts ranged from 0.0781 mg/ml to 1.25 mg/ml whereas the MBC values ranged from 0.3125 mg/ml to 2.50 mg/ml. The MBC values of aqueous extract against S. aureus and S. typhimurium were higher than their MIC values. The MBC value of acetone extract against S. aureus was also higher than its MIC value. Interestingly, however, the MIC and MBC values of acetone extract against S. typhimurium were the same (1.25 mg/ml. CONCLUSION: The aqueous and acetone extracts displayed similarities in their antimicrobial activity on the bacterial species and as such, the galls of Quercus infectoria are potentially good source of antimicrobial agents.

  2. Marking planes of surgical excision on breast biopsy specimens: use of artists' pigments suspended in acetone.

    Paterson, D. A.; Davies, J. D.

    1988-01-01

    The performance of carbon and metallic inks, silver nitrate solution, and artists' pigments mounted in acetone was compared for marking the surface of surgical biopsy specimens. Using India ink is an unsatisfactory procedure because of slow drying, messiness, and spreading of the ink. It is concluded that use of artists' pigments has many advantages over other reagents, because of their rapid drying, resistance to tissue processing, and the ability to mark simultaneously many different planes...

  3. Bayesian population analysis of a washin-washout physiologically based pharmacokinetic model for acetone

    The aim of this study was to derive improved estimates of population variability and uncertainty of physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model parameters, especially of those related to the washin-washout behavior of polar volatile substances. This was done by optimizing a previously published washin-washout PBPK model for acetone in a Bayesian framework using Markov chain Monte Carlo simulation. The sensitivity of the model parameters was investigated by creating four different prior sets, where the uncertainty surrounding the population variability of the physiological model parameters was given values corresponding to coefficients of variation of 1%, 25%, 50%, and 100%, respectively. The PBPK model was calibrated to toxicokinetic data from 2 previous studies where 18 volunteers were exposed to 250-550 ppm of acetone at various levels of workload. The updated PBPK model provided a good description of the concentrations in arterial, venous, and exhaled air. The precision of most of the model parameter estimates was improved. New information was particularly gained on the population distribution of the parameters governing the washin-washout effect. The results presented herein provide a good starting point to estimate the target dose of acetone in the working and general populations for risk assessment purposes.

  4. Pyrolysis of furfural-acetone resin as matrix precursor for new carbon materials

    2008-01-01

    In order to increase the understanding of the pyrolysis mechanism,Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and thermogravimetry-mass spectrometric coupling technique (TG-MS) were used to study the pyrolysis behavior of furfural-acetone resin used for new carbon materials.The curing and carbonization mechanisms of furfural-acetone resin were mainly investigated;structural changes and volatile products evolved during pyrolysis were analyzed.The results indicate that,during pyrolysis of furfural-acetone resin adding 7% (mass fraction) phosphorous acid as curing agent,the rupture of C-O bond in the five-membered heterocycle firstly takes place to release oxygen atoms and then does the C--H bond,which enable the molecular chain to cross-link and condense,then lead to the formation of three dimensional networking structure.With the increase of pyrolyzing temperature,the scission of methyl and the opening of furan ring are generated.As a result,the recomposition of molecular chain structure isgenerated and a hexatomic fused ring containing double bonds is built.The main volatile products during pyrolysis of furfuralacetone resin are H2O,and a small mount of CO,CO2 and CH4.At elevated temperatures,dehydrogenation takes place and hydrogen gas is evolved.

  5. Multinuclear NMR spectroscopy for differentiation of molecular configurations and solvent properties between acetone and dimethyl sulfoxide

    Wen, Yuan-Chun; Kuo, Hsiao-Ching; Jia, Hsi-Wei

    2016-04-01

    The differences in molecular configuration and solvent properties between acetone and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) were investigated using the developed technique of 1H, 13C, 17O, and 1H self-diffusion liquid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Acetone and DMSO samples in the forms of pure solution, ionic salt-added solution were used to deduce their active sites, relative dipole moments, dielectric constants, and charge separations. The NMR results suggest that acetone is a trigonal planar molecule with a polarized carbonyl double bond, whereas DMSO is a trigonal pyramidal-like molecule with a highly polarized S-O single bond. Both molecules use their oxygen atoms as the active sites to interact other molecules. These different molecular models explain the differences their physical and chemical properties between the two molecules and explain why DMSO is classified as an aprotic but highly dipolar solvent. The results are also in agreement with data obtained using X-ray diffraction, neutron diffraction, and theoretical calculations.

  6. Metal-Exchanged β Zeolites as Catalysts for the Conversion of Acetone to Hydrocarbons

    Aurora J. Cruz-Cabeza

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Various metal-β zeolites have been synthesized under similar ion-exchange conditions. During the exchange process, the nature and acid strength of the used cations modified the composition and textural properties as well as the Brönsted and Lewis acidity of the final materials. Zeolites exchanged with divalent cations showed a clear decrease of their surface Brönsted acidity and an increase of their Lewis acidity. All materials were active as catalysts for the transformation of acetone into hydrocarbons. Although the protonic zeolite was the most active in the acetone conversion (96.8% conversion, the metal-exchanged zeolites showed varied selectivities towards different products of the reaction. In particular, we found the Cu-β to have a considerable selectivity towards the production of isobutene from acetone (over 31% yield compared to 7.5% of the protonic zeolite. We propose different reactions mechanisms in order to explain the final product distributions.

  7. Vertical fluxes and atmospheric cycling of methanol, acetaldehyde, and acetone in a coastal environment

    M. Yang

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available We present here vertical fluxes of methanol, acetaldehyde, and acetone measured directly with eddy covariance (EC during March to July 2012 near the southwest coast of the UK. The performance of the proton-transfer reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS for flux measurement is characterized, with additional considerations given to the homogeneity and stationarity assumptions required by EC. Concentrations and fluxes of these compounds vary significantly with time of day and wind direction. Higher values of acetaldehyde and acetone are usually observed in the daytime and from the direction of a forested park, most likely due to light-driven emissions from terrestrial plants. Methanol concentration and flux do not demonstrate clear diel variability, suggesting sources in addition to plants. We estimate air–sea exchange and photochemical rates of these compounds, which are compared to measured vertical fluxes. For acetaldehyde, the mean (1σ concentration of 0.13 (0.02 ppb at night may be maintained by oceanic emission, while photochemical destruction outpaces production during the day. Air-sea exchange and photochemistry are probably net sinks of methanol and acetone in this region. Their nighttime concentrations of 0.46 (0.20 and 0.39 (0.08 ppb appear to be affected more by terrestrial emissions and long distance transport, respectively.

  8. Hydrate phase equilibria of furan, acetone, 1,4-dioxane, TBAC and TBAF

    Highlights: • Experimental hydrate dissociation conditions are reported for CO2/methane + some water soluble/insoluble hydrate formers. • An isochoric pressure-search method was used to generate the experimental data. • The data are compared with the corresponding literature data in the presence of pure water. • The hydrate promotion effects of acetone, 1,4-dioxane, furan, TBAC and TBAF are discussed. -- Abstract: In this communication, we first report experimental hydrate dissociation pressures for the methane/carbon dioxide + furan/acetone/1,4-dioxane + water and the methane + tetra n-butyl ammonium chloride (TBAC) + water as well as the carbon dioxide + tetra n-butyl ammonium floride (TBAF) + water systems in the temperature ranges of (269.9 to 303.3) K. An isochoric pressure-search method was used to generate the experimental data. The hydrate dissociation data are compared with the corresponding literature data, if exists, and the literature data in the presence of pure water and acceptable agreement is observed. A discussion is made on hydrate promotion effects of acetone, 1,4-dioxane, furan, TBAC and TBAF

  9. Sources and sinks of acetone, methanol, and acetaldehyde in North Atlantic marine air

    A. C. Lewis

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of acetone, methanol, acetaldehyde and a range of non-methane hydrocarbons have been made in North Atlantic marine air at the Mace Head observatory. Under maritime conditions the combination of OVOCs (acetone, methanol and acetaldehyde contributed up to 85% of the total mass of measured non methane organics in air and up to 80% of the OH radical organic sink, when compared with the sum of all other organic compounds including non-methane hydrocarbons, DMS and OH-reactive halocarbons (trichloromethane and tetrachloroethylene. The observations showed anomalies in the variance and abundance of acetaldehyde and acetone over that expected for species with a remote terrestrial emission source and OH controlled chemical lifetime. A detailed model incorporating an explicit chemical degradation mechanism indicated in situ formation during air mass transport was on timescales longer than the atmospheric lifetime of precursor hydrocarbons or primary emission. The period over which this process was significant was similar to that of airmass motion on intercontinental scales, and formation via this route may reproduce that of a widespread diffuse source. The model indicates that continued short chain OVOC formation occurs many days from the point of emission, via longer lived intermediates of oxidation such as organic peroxides and long chain alcohols.

  10. Sources and sinks of acetone, methanol, and acetaldehyde in North Atlantic air

    A. C. Lewis

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of acetone, methanol, acetaldehyde and a range of non-methane hydrocarbons have been made in North Atlantic marine air at the Mace Head observatory. Under maritime conditions the combination of OVOCs (acetone, methanol and 5 acetaldehyde contributed up to 85% of the total mass of measured non methane organics in air and up to 80% of the OH radical organic sink, when compared with the sum of all other organic compounds including non-methane hydrocarbons, DMS and OH-reactive halocarbons (trichloromethane and tetrachloroethylene. The observations showed anomalies in the variance and abundance of acetaldehyde and acetone 10 over that expected for species with a remote terrestrial emission source and OH controlled chemical lifetime. A detailed model incorporating an explicit chemical degradation mechanism indicated in situ formation during air mass transport was on timescales longer than the atmospheric lifetime of precursor hydrocarbons or primary emission. The period over which this process was significant was similar to that of airmass mo15 tion on intercontinental scales, and formation via this route may reproduce that of a widespread diffuse source. The model indicates that continued short chain OVOC formation occurs many days from the point of emission, via longer lived intermediates of oxidation such as organic peroxides and long chain alcohols.