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Sample records for acetone peroxide formation

  1. Thermochemistry of cyclic acetone peroxides

    Sinditskii, V.P., E-mail: vps@rctu.ru [Mendeleev University of Chemical Technology, 9 Miusskaya Square, 125047 Moscow (Russian Federation); Kolesov, V.I.; Egorshev, V.Yu.; Patrikeev, D.I. [Mendeleev University of Chemical Technology, 9 Miusskaya Square, 125047 Moscow (Russian Federation); Dorofeeva, O.V. [Department of Chemistry, Lomonosov Moscow State University, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2014-06-01

    Highlights: • Old data on DADP and TATP enthalpies of formation have been revised. • Combining Gaussian-4 (G4) theory with an isodesmic reaction scheme allowed calculated enthalpies of formation of TATP and DADP. • Oxygen bomb calorimetry measurements allowed experimental enthalpies of formation of the peroxides. • Both experimental and calculated values show a satisfactory agreement between each other. • The newly obtained enthalpies reasonably account for the observed derivative parameters: heats of decomposition, combustion, and explosion. - Abstract: Two potentially initiating explosive peroxides, diacetonediperoxide (DADP) and triacetonetriperoxide (TATP), were studied in respect to their thermochemical properties. To get the internally self-consistent estimations of gas-phase enthalpy of formation of DADP and TATP, their values were calculated by combining Gaussian-4 (G4) theory with an isodesmic reaction scheme. The energies of combustion (Δ{sub c}U) were measured and the standard enthalpies of formation (Δ{sub f}H{sub 298}{sup °}) of DADP and TATP were derived using the standard enthalpies of formation of the combustion products. The heat of explosion was measured for small low-pressed charges of the peroxides. The obtained enthalpies of formation of DADP and TATP were found to agree well with quantum chemical calculations and reasonably account for the observed derivative parameters: heats of decomposition, combustion, and detonation.

  2. Thermochemistry of cyclic acetone peroxides

    Highlights: • Old data on DADP and TATP enthalpies of formation have been revised. • Combining Gaussian-4 (G4) theory with an isodesmic reaction scheme allowed calculated enthalpies of formation of TATP and DADP. • Oxygen bomb calorimetry measurements allowed experimental enthalpies of formation of the peroxides. • Both experimental and calculated values show a satisfactory agreement between each other. • The newly obtained enthalpies reasonably account for the observed derivative parameters: heats of decomposition, combustion, and explosion. - Abstract: Two potentially initiating explosive peroxides, diacetonediperoxide (DADP) and triacetonetriperoxide (TATP), were studied in respect to their thermochemical properties. To get the internally self-consistent estimations of gas-phase enthalpy of formation of DADP and TATP, their values were calculated by combining Gaussian-4 (G4) theory with an isodesmic reaction scheme. The energies of combustion (ΔcU) were measured and the standard enthalpies of formation (ΔfH298°) of DADP and TATP were derived using the standard enthalpies of formation of the combustion products. The heat of explosion was measured for small low-pressed charges of the peroxides. The obtained enthalpies of formation of DADP and TATP were found to agree well with quantum chemical calculations and reasonably account for the observed derivative parameters: heats of decomposition, combustion, and detonation

  3. Reaction Kinetics of Acetone Peroxide Formation and Structure Investigations Using Raman Spectroscopy and X-ray Diffraction

    Jensen, Lars; Mortensen, Peter Mølgaard; Trane, Rasmus;

    2009-01-01

    Triacetone triperoxide (TATP) has been prepared in order to study the effect of pH and temperature on the reaction kinetics. Raman spectra of liquid mixtures of acetone and hydrogen peroxide were recorded versus time throughout the experiments. The spectral data of the liquid phases indicate that...

  4. A comparative study on two explosive acetone peroxides

    Egorshev, V. Yu.; Sinditskii, V.P., E-mail: vps@rctu.ru; Smirnov, S.P.

    2013-12-20

    Highlights: • The most accurate heats of DADP and TATP sublimation were evaluated from experimental vapor pressures in a widened temperature range. • DADP is more volatile while more thermally stable peroxide than TATP. • DADP reveals lesser sensitivity to drop-weight impact, flame temperature, burning rate, and initiating efficiency as compared with TATP. - Abstract: Two explosive cyclic acetone peroxides, diacetone diperoxide (DADP) and triacetone triperoxide (TATP) have been studied in respect of thermal decomposition, burning behavior, impact sensitivity, and initiating efficiency. Using the glass Bourdon gauge technique, the vapor pressures of TATP and DADP were determined over the temperature range 75–144 °C and 67–120 °C, respectively. The kinetic parameters of decomposition of the peroxides in the gas phase have been obtained in the temperature interval of 140–200 °C. The decomposition of both DADP and TATP followed the first-order reaction to high degrees of decay with close activation energies of 159.2 kJ/mol (38.0 kcal/mol) and 165.8 kJ/mol (39.6 kcal/mol), respectively. The decomposition rate constants of DADP were found to be approximately 2 times less than those of TATP. The linear burning rate of DADP measured in a constant-pressure window bomb appeared to be approximately 5 times less than that of TATP. Temperature profiles in the combustion wave were measured at subatmospheric pressures with the help of thin tungsten-rhenium thermocouples. The leading reaction on combustion of both volatile peroxides was assumed to occur in the gas phase. Kinetic parameters of the leading reaction derived from the combustion data showed a good agreement with kinetic parameters of low-temperature thermal decomposition extrapolated to the high-temperature flame zone. In the drop-weight impact test, DADP appeared to be notably less sensitive peroxide than TATP. No deflagration-to-detonation transition was observed when RDX was attempted to explode by

  5. A comparative study on two explosive acetone peroxides

    Highlights: • The most accurate heats of DADP and TATP sublimation were evaluated from experimental vapor pressures in a widened temperature range. • DADP is more volatile while more thermally stable peroxide than TATP. • DADP reveals lesser sensitivity to drop-weight impact, flame temperature, burning rate, and initiating efficiency as compared with TATP. - Abstract: Two explosive cyclic acetone peroxides, diacetone diperoxide (DADP) and triacetone triperoxide (TATP) have been studied in respect of thermal decomposition, burning behavior, impact sensitivity, and initiating efficiency. Using the glass Bourdon gauge technique, the vapor pressures of TATP and DADP were determined over the temperature range 75–144 °C and 67–120 °C, respectively. The kinetic parameters of decomposition of the peroxides in the gas phase have been obtained in the temperature interval of 140–200 °C. The decomposition of both DADP and TATP followed the first-order reaction to high degrees of decay with close activation energies of 159.2 kJ/mol (38.0 kcal/mol) and 165.8 kJ/mol (39.6 kcal/mol), respectively. The decomposition rate constants of DADP were found to be approximately 2 times less than those of TATP. The linear burning rate of DADP measured in a constant-pressure window bomb appeared to be approximately 5 times less than that of TATP. Temperature profiles in the combustion wave were measured at subatmospheric pressures with the help of thin tungsten-rhenium thermocouples. The leading reaction on combustion of both volatile peroxides was assumed to occur in the gas phase. Kinetic parameters of the leading reaction derived from the combustion data showed a good agreement with kinetic parameters of low-temperature thermal decomposition extrapolated to the high-temperature flame zone. In the drop-weight impact test, DADP appeared to be notably less sensitive peroxide than TATP. No deflagration-to-detonation transition was observed when RDX was attempted to explode by

  6. Acetone Formation in the Vibrio Family: a New Pathway for Bacterial Leucine Catabolism

    Nemecek-Marshall, Michele; Wojciechowski, Cheryl; William P. Wagner; Fall, Ray

    1999-01-01

    There is current interest in biological sources of acetone, a volatile organic compound that impacts atmospheric chemistry. Here, we determined that leucine-dependent acetone formation is widespread in the Vibrionaceae. Sixteen Vibrio isolates, two Listonella species, and two Photobacterium angustum isolates produced acetone in the presence of l-leucine. Shewanella isolates produced much less acetone. Growth of Vibrio splendidus and P. angustum in a fermentor with controlled aeration revealed...

  7. Acetone formation in the Vibrio family: a new pathway for bacterial leucine catabolism.

    Nemecek-Marshall, M; Wojciechowski, C; Wagner, W P; Fall, R

    1999-12-01

    There is current interest in biological sources of acetone, a volatile organic compound that impacts atmospheric chemistry. Here, we determined that leucine-dependent acetone formation is widespread in the Vibrionaceae. Sixteen Vibrio isolates, two Listonella species, and two Photobacterium angustum isolates produced acetone in the presence of L-leucine. Shewanella isolates produced much less acetone. Growth of Vibrio splendidus and P. angustum in a fermentor with controlled aeration revealed that acetone was produced after a lag in late logarithmic or stationary phase of growth, depending on the medium, and was not derived from acetoacetate by nonenzymatic decarboxylation in the medium. L-Leucine, but not D-leucine, was converted to acetone with a stoichiometry of approximately 0.61 mol of acetone per mol of L-leucine. Testing various potential leucine catabolites as precursors of acetone showed that only alpha-ketoisocaproate was efficiently converted by whole cells to acetone. Acetone production was blocked by a nitrogen atmosphere but not by electron transport inhibitors, suggesting that an oxygen-dependent reaction is required for leucine catabolism. Metabolic labeling with deuterated (isopropyl-d(7))-L-leucine revealed that the isopropyl carbons give rise to acetone with full retention of deuterium in each methyl group. These results suggest the operation of a new catabolic pathway for leucine in vibrios that is distinct from the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A pathway seen in pseudomonads. PMID:10601206

  8. Formation of halogenated acetones in the lower troposphere

    Sattler, Tobias; Wittmer, Julian; Krause, Torsten; Schöler, Heinz Friedrich; Kamilli, Katharina; Held, Andreas; Zetzsch, Cornelius; Ofner, Johannes; Atlas, Elliot

    2015-04-01

    Western Australia is a semi-/arid region that is heavily influenced by climate change and agricultural land use. The area is known for its saline lakes with a wide range of hydrogeochemical parameters and consists of ephemeral saline and saline groundwater fed lakes with a pH range from 2.5 to 7.1. In 2012 a novel PTFE-chamber was setup directly on the lakes. The 1.5 m³ cubic chamber was made of UV transparent PTFE foil to permit photochemistry while preventing dilution of the air due to lateral wind transport. This experimental setup allows linking measured data directly to the chemistry of and above the salt lakes. Air samples were taken using stainless steel canisters and measured by GC-MS/ECD. Sediment, crust and water samples were taken for investigation of potential VOC and VOX emissions in the laboratory using GC-MS. Several lakes were investigated and canister samples were taken over the day to see diurnal variations. The first samples were collected at 6 a.m. and from this time every 2 hours a canister was filled with chamber air. Concentrations of chloroacetone up to 15 ppb and of bromoacetone up to 40 ppb in the air samples were detected. The concentrations vary over the day and display their highest values around noon. Soil and water samples showed a variety of highly volatile and semi-volatile VOC/VOX but no halogenated acetones. An abiotic formation of these VOC/VOX seems conclusive due to iron-catalysed reactions below the salt crust [1]. The salt crust is the interface through which VOC/VOX pass from soil/groundwater to the atmosphere where they were photochemically altered. This explains the finding of halo acetones only in the air samples and not in water and soil samples measured in the laboratory. The main forming pathway for these haloacetones is the direct halogenation due to atomic chlorine and bromine above the salt lakes [2]. A minor pathway is the atmospheric degradation of chloropropane and bromopropane [3]. These halopropanes were found

  9. Improvement of adventitious root formation in flax using hydrogen peroxide.

    Takáč, Tomáš; Obert, Bohuš; Rolčík, Jakub; Šamaj, Jozef

    2016-09-25

    Flax (Linum usitatissimum L.) is an important crop for the production of oil and fiber. In vitro manipulations of flax are used for genetic improvement and breeding while improvements in adventitious root formation are important for biotechnological programs focused on regeneration and vegetative propagation of genetically valuable plant material. Additionally, flax hypocotyl segments possess outstanding morphogenetic capacity, thus providing a useful model for the investigation of flax developmental processes. Here, we investigated the crosstalk between hydrogen peroxide and auxin with respect to reprogramming flax hypocotyl cells for root morphogenetic development. Exogenous auxin induced the robust formation of adventitious roots from flax hypocotyl segments while the addition of hydrogen peroxide further enhanced this process. The levels of endogenous auxin (indole-3-acetic acid; IAA) were positively correlated with increased root formation in response to exogenous auxin (1-Naphthaleneacetic acid; NAA). Histochemical staining of the hypocotyl segments revealed that hydrogen peroxide and peroxidase, but not superoxide, were positively correlated with root formation. Measurements of antioxidant enzyme activities showed that endogenous levels of hydrogen peroxide were controlled by peroxidases during root formation from hypocotyl segments. In conclusion, hydrogen peroxide positively affected flax adventitious root formation by regulating the endogenous auxin levels. Consequently, this agent can be applied to increase flax regeneration capacity for biotechnological purposes such as improved plant rooting. PMID:26921706

  10. Formation of hydrogen peroxide through ozonolysis of alkenes

    Bechara, J.; Becker, K.H. (Wuppertal Univ. (Gesamthochschule) (DE)); Brockmann, K.J.

    1991-07-01

    The gas phase reactions of ozone with several alkenes (including isoprene and some terpenes) are investigated for the formation of hydrogen peroxide (H202) under atmospheric conditions by means of a TDLAS. All alkenes produced hydrogen peroxide with a molar yield in the part per thousand range. Water vapour induced a significant increase (factor 3 to 14) in H202 yield, due to the reaction of water vapour with the Criegee biradical, the main intermediate in alkene ozonolysis. Reaction rate are reported, with respect to sulfur dioxide, for ethene, tetramethylethene and limonene. Forest air application is discussed.

  11. An in vitro study to evaluate the effect of two ethanol-based and two acetone-based dental bonding agents on the bond strength of composite to enamel treated with 10% carbamide peroxide

    Deepa Basavaraj Benni

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Carbamide peroxide bleaching has been implicated in adversely affecting the bond strength of composite to enamel. The objective of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of ethanol-based (Clearfil S 3 bond, Kuraray, Adper Single bond 2, 3M ESPE dental products and acetone-based (Prime and Bond NT, Dentsply, One Step, Bisco bonding agents on the shear bond strength of composite to enamel treated with 10% carbamide peroxide bleaching agent. Materials and Methods: A total of 120 extracted human noncarious permanent incisors were randomly divided into two groups (control and experimental. Experimental group specimens were subjected to a bleaching regimen with a 10% carbamide peroxide bleaching system (Opalescence; Ultradent Products Inc, South Jordan, USA. Composite resin cylinders were bonded to the specimens using four bonding agents and shear bond strength was determined with universal testing machine. Results: There was no statistically significant difference in the shear bond strength between control and experimental groups with both ethanol-based (Clearfil S 3 Bond and Adper Single Bond 2 and acetone-based bonding agent (Prime and Bond NT and One Step. Interpretation and Conclusion: The adverse effect of bleaching on bonding composite to enamel can be reduced or eliminated by using either ethanol- or acetone-based bonding agent. Clinical Significances: Immediate bonding following bleaching procedure can be done using ethanol- or acetone-based bonding agent without compromising bond strength.

  12. Peroxide formation and kinetics of sodium dissolution in alcohols

    Suitable techniques for sodium removal and decontamination of sodium wetted components of Liquid Metal Fast Reactors (LMFRs) are necessary both for repair, reuse and decommissioning of such components. Among the methods followed for sodium removal, alcohol dissolution is usually employed for small components like bellow sealed valves, gripping tools to handle core components and sodium sampling devices (primary and secondary). One of the concerns in the alcohol dissolution method is the possible role of peroxide formation in the ethoxy group during storage and handling leading to explosion. This paper describes the study of peroxide formation in ethyl carbitol and butyl cellosolve as well as some of the results of dissolution kinetic studies carried out in our laboratory using different alcohols. The peroxide formation of ethyl carbitol and butyl cellosolve were studied by iodometric technique. It has been found that the peroxide formation is less in sodium containing alcohol than in pure one. Ethyl carbitol, butyl cellosolve and Jaysol-SS (mixture of ethyl alcohol, methyl alcohol, isopropyl alcohol and methyl isobutyl ketone) were used in dissolution kinetics studies. The effects due to area and orientation of the fresh sodium surface have also been investigated. The reaction rates were studied in the temperature range of 303-343 K. The rate of dissolution was estimated by measuring the sodium content of alcohol at periodic intervals. It is found that the reaction rate varies in the order of ethyl alcohol-water mixture > Jaysol-SS > butyl cellosolve > ethyl carbitol. While cleaning sodium using alcohol, the concentration of alcohol is held essentially constant throughout the process. The rate of reaction depends only on the amount of sodium and follows pseudo-first order kinetics. Increase in surface area has a marked impact on the dissolution rate at lower temperatures while at higher temperatures, the temperature factor overrides the effect due to surface area

  13. Acetone poisoning

    ... JavaScript. Acetone is a chemical used in many household products. This article discusses poisoning from swallowing acetone-based ... A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Household Products Browse the Encyclopedia A.D.A.M., Inc. ...

  14. The Formation of 2,2,4-Trimethyl-2,3-dihydro-1H-1,5-Benzodiazepine from 1,2-Diaminobenzene in the Presence of Acetone

    Felix Odame

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In an attempt to synthesize a 2-substituted benzimidazole from the reaction of o-phenylenediamine and isophthalic acid in the presence of acetone and ethanol under microwave irradiation, a salt of the isophthalate ion and 2,2,4-trimethyl-2,3-dihydro-1H-1,5-benzodiazepin-5-ium ion was obtained. The condensation of two moles of acetone with the amine groups resulted in the formation of the benzodiazepine which crystallized as an iminium cation forming a salt with the isophthalate anion. The formation of benzodiazepine was also confirmed by performing the reaction of o-phenylenediamine with excess acetone in ethanol under conventional heating conditions. The compounds were characterized by NMR, FTIR, HRMS and microanalysis as well as X-ray crystallography. The reaction mechanism leading to the formation of benzodiazepine is also discussed.

  15. Plutonium(IV) peroxide formation in nitric medium and kinetics Pu(VI) reduction by hydrogen peroxide

    Reduction of plutonium (VI) to Pu(IV) with hydrogen peroxide is a step in industrial processes used to purify plutonium nitrate solutions. This operation must be carefully controlled, in order to avoid any formation of the Pu(IV) peroxide green precipitate and to obtain exclusively Pu(IV). This led us to study the acidity and Pu and H2O2 concentrations influences on the precipitate appearance and to perform a Pu(VI) reduction kinetic study on a wide range of acidities ([HNO3]: 0.5 to 8 M), plutonium concentrations ([Pu(VI)]: 0.1 to 0.8 M) and [H2O2]/[Pu(VI)] ratio (from 1 to 8). Thus, the domain of Pu(IV) peroxide formation and the reactional paths were established. With the exception of 0.5 M nitric acid medium, the kinetic curves show two distinct regims: the first one corresponds to an induction period where the Pu(VI) concentration doesn't change, the second corresponds to a linear decrease of Pu(VI). An increase of the temperature greatly accelerates the Pu(VI) reduction rate while [H2O2]/[Pu(VI)] has almost no influence. The Pu(VI) total reduction time decreases when initial concentration of plutonium increases. By increasing nitric acid concentration from 0.5 M to 6 M, the total Pu(VI) reduction time decreases. This time increases when [HNO3] varies from 6 M to 8 M. (orig.)

  16. Formation of complexes of hydrogen peroxide molecules with DNA

    A possibility for hydrogen peroxide molecules to form stable complexes with atomic groups in the DNA backbone under the irradiation of the cell medium with high-energy ions has been studied. The energy of complexes is estimated, by taking the electrostatic and van der Waals interactions into account in the framework of the atom-atom potential function method. The interaction with metal counterions, which neutralize the surface charge of a macromolecule under natural conditions, is also taken into consideration. Stable configurations are determined for various complexes consisting of the atoms belonging to a DNA phosphate group, H2O2 and H2O molecules, and a Na+ metal ion. The complexes of hydrogen peroxide molecules with DNA phosphate groups and a counterions are shown to be not less stable than their complexes with water molecules. The attachment of an H2O2 molecule to a phosphate group of the double helix backbone can block the processes of DNA biological functioning and can deactivate the genetic mechanism of a cell

  17. Oxygen-consuming chlor alkali cell configured to minimize peroxide formation

    Chlistunoff, Jerzy B.; Lipp, Ludwig; Gottesfeld, Shimshon

    2006-08-01

    Oxygen-consuming zero gap chlor-alkali cell was configured to minimize peroxide formation. The cell included an ion-exchange membrane that divided the cell into an anode chamber including an anode and a cathode chamber including an oxygen gas diffusion cathode. The cathode included a single-piece of electrically conducting graphitized carbon cloth. Catalyst and polytetrafluoroethylene were attached to only one side of the cloth. When the cathode was positioned against the cation exchange membrane with the catalyst side away from the membrane, electrolysis of sodium chloride to chlorine and caustic (sodium hydroxide) proceeded with minimal peroxide formation.

  18. Kinetics and mechanism of the furan peroxide formation in the reaction of furfural with hydrogen peroxide in the presence and absence of sodium molybdate

    Kinetics of the initial stage of the reaction of furfural with hydrogen peroxide are studied in the presence of Na2MoO4 in water and without catalytic additions in n-butanol. Organic peroxide having in its disposal Mo(6), which is the only product on the initial stage of the reaction, is formed since the first minutes of oxidation of furfural by hydrogen peroxide with the presence of Na2MoO4. The mechanisms of conversion of furfural in the Na2MoO4 - H2O system and its oxidation by peroxide without sodium molybdate are discussed. Schemes of formation of furfural complexes based on the results of kinetic studies are suggested. Comparison of obtained data demonstrates that presence of the sodium molybdates in the reaction medium trends to change of reaction procedure in the hydrogen peroxide

  19. Studies of lipid peroxide formation in irradiated synthetic diets and the effects of storage after irradiation

    The effect of irradiation doses of γ-rays or electrons within the range 100 to 2000 krad has been studied on lipid peroxide formation in artificial food mixtures containing lard, corn oil or herring oil mixed with starch, casein or other proteins. (author)

  20. Formation of negative hydrogen ions in 7-keV OH+ + Ar and OH+ + acetone collisions: a general process for H-bearing molecular species

    Juhász, Zoltán; Rangama, Jimmy; Bene, Erika; Sorgunlu-Frankland, Burcu; Frémont, François; Chesnel, Jean-Yves

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate that the formation of negative hydrogen ions (H-) occurs in a wide class of atomic and molecular collisions. In our experiments, H- emission from hydroxyl cations and acetone molecules was observed in keV-energy collisions. We show that hydride (H-) anions are formed via direct collisional fragmentation of molecules, followed by electron grabbing by fast hydrogen fragments. Such general mechanism in hydrogen-containing molecules may significantly influence reaction networks in planetary atmospheres and astrophysical media and new reaction pathways may have to be added in radiolysis studies.

  1. Hydrogen peroxide and hydroxyl radical formation by methylene blue in the presence of ascorbic acid

    Using ESR we have demonstrated the formation of the ascorbate free radical from sodium ascorbate, methylene blue and light. In oxygen uptake experiments we have observed the production of hydrogen peroxide while spin trapping experiments have revealed the iron catalyzed production of the hydroxyl free radical in this system. The presence of this highly reactive radical suggests that it could be the radical that initiates free radical damage in this photodynamic system. (orig.)

  2. Roles of RPS41 in Biofilm Formation, Virulence, and Hydrogen Peroxide Sensitivity in Candida albicans.

    Lu, Hui; Xiong, Juan; Shang, Qinghua; Jiang, Yuanying; Cao, Yingying

    2016-06-01

    In eukaryotes, loss of cytoplasmic ribosomal proteins (RPs) results in a reduced growth rate and other phenotypic defects. The ability to transition from a unicellular budding yeast to a filamentous form is very important for biofilm formation and virulence in Candida albicans. Our recent study found that loss of the RPS41 (C2_10620W_A) gene but not its paralog RPS42 (C1_01640W_A) resulted in altered growth and filamentation changes in C. albicans, so we hypothesized that the RPS41 gene should play important roles in virulence and biofilm formation in this pathogen. We found that both virulence and the ability to form biofilms were defective due to deletion of the RPS41 gene. We also found that loss of the RPS41 gene increased sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide, and that hydrogen peroxide induced the expression of the RPS41 gene in a wild-type strain. These results suggested that the RPS41 gene plays important roles in C. albicans biofilm formation, virulence, and susceptibility to hydrogen peroxide. PMID:26952720

  3. Hydrogen peroxide formation and decay in γ-irradiated clay water

    The mechanism of the radiolytic formation and disappearance of hydrogen peroxide in aerated clay water was studied. The yield of H2O2 formation in clay water in an air atmosphere is equal to 0.25 μmol J-1. When initially present in the solution, hydrogen peroxide disappears with a yield dependent upon the concentration and the dose rate. In both cases a steady state is reached dependent on the dose rate. In order to define more precisely the role of OH free radicals in this process, the reaction of these free radicals in clay water was studied by pulse radiolysis. As expected, OH is scavenged by different solutes, therefore, it cannot react with hydrogen peroxide. A kinetic scheme based upon these results is proposed. Using a minimal equation set (nine equations), it is possible to simulate the [H2O2] evolution with a very good accuracy, for doses going up to 20,000 Gy. It is also demonstrated that the reaction of H2 with OH does not occur in such conditions, which is consistent with the accumulation of dihydrogen during the radiolysis of ground water. (author)

  4. Effects of antioxidants on lipid peroxide formation in irradiated synthetic diets

    The effects of the antioxidants, vitamin E, propyl gallate, 2-t-butyl-4-methoxy phenol (BHA), 2,6-di-t-butyl-4-methoxy phenol (BHT), nor-dihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA) and diphenyl-p-phenylene diamine (DPPD) in concentrations ranging between 0.001 per cent and 0.1 per cent have been tested on lipid peroxide formation in synthetic diet mixtures containing herring oil (10 per cent) mixed with starch (90 per cent) irradiated with γ-ray doses of 100 to 2000 krad. On a weight basis NDGA, DPPD, BHA and BHT were most effective and vitamin E and propyl gallate were least effective. An antioxidant concentration of 0.01 per cent normally protected against peroxide formation after a dose of 500 krad but if the dose was increased to 1000 or 2000 krad, much higher doses of antioxidant, up to 0.1 per cent, were required to give protection. Antioxidants prevented peroxide developing during post-irradiation storage even when added after irradiation. Antioxidants were partially or completely destroyed by irradiation with doses of 100 krad or more. The percentage of total antioxidant destroyed depended on the concentration; much greater destruction occurred in dilute solutions than in concentrated solutions. Vitamin E and propyl gallate were most sensitive whereas NDGA was relatively resistant. Antioxidant destruction was much enhanced if irradiation was carried out in presence of herring oil. Free radicals formed in unsaturated fatty acids of the herring oil are believed to be responsible. Lecithin and citric acid, which have been described as antioxidant synergists when added with vitamin E, caused a limited enhancement of its antioxidant action against radiation-induced peroxidation. (author)

  5. Photochemical formation of hydrogen peroxide in surface and ground waters exposed to sunlight

    Cooper, W.J. (Florida International Univ., Miami); Zika, R.G.

    1983-05-13

    A rapid increase in the concentration of hydrogen peroxide was observed when samples of natural surface and ground water from various locations in the United States were exposed to sunlight. The hydrogen peroxide is photochemically generated from organic constitutents present in the water; humic materials are believed to be the primary agent producing the peroxide. Studies with superoxide dismutase suggest that the superoxide anion is the precursor of the peroxide.

  6. Formation, Isolation and Characterization of a New Ruthenium Complex in Reaction of Acetone Masked Terminal Alkynone with Transfer Hydrogenation Catalyst

    郭敏捷; 李到; 孙延辉; 成江; 张兆国

    2004-01-01

    Reaction of [1S,2S-(Ts-diphen)Ru(Ⅱ)(p-cymene)] (1S,2S-Ts-diphen= 1S,2S-N-tosyl-1,2-diphenylethylenediamine) and 2-hydroxy-2-methyl-non-3-yn-5-one under transfer hydrogenation condition gave a ruthenium complex bearing a 2,5-dihydrofuran moiety. The complex was characterized and a possible mechanism for the formation of the complex was proposed.

  7. Effect of catechins and tannins on hydroxyl radical formation in depleted uranium-hydrogen peroxide systems

    The effects of catechins and tannins on the uranyl ion (UO2+2)-hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) system were examined using the spin-trapping method. Epigallocatechin (EGC), having low ·OH-scavenging ability, significantly enhanced and accelerated the hydroxyl radical (·OH) formation in the UO2+2-H2O2 solution. Epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), having high ·OH-scavenging ability, fairly enhanced and accelerated hydroxyl radical (·OH) formation in the UO2+2-H2O2 solution. These results indicate that the enhancement and acceleration of ·OH formation are caused by the reduction of UO2+2 to UO2+ by EGC and EGCG. The effects of tannins on ·OH formation in the UO2+2-H2O2 solution varied with tannins. Mimosa (MMT) and quebracho (QBT) tannins enhanced and accelerated ·OH formation, while chestnut (CNT), mylobaran (MBT) and Chinese gallo- (CGT) tannins heavily depressed it. In the solution containing persimmon (PST) and gambir (GBT) tannins, the depression of ·OH formation caused by the strong coupling with UO2+2 ion should be added to the enhancement caused by the reduction of UO2+2 to UO2+. MBT indicated the highest ability to scavenge ·OH in the UV-irradiated H2O2 solution, and MMT, the lowest. In summary, MMT and QBT, classified as condensed tannins, have very high abilities to reduce UO2+2 to UO2+, similarly to catechins such as EGC and EGCG, while MBT, a hydrolysable tannin, has higher abilities to scavenge ·OH. (author)

  8. Using fluorescence-activated flow cytometry to determine reactive oxygen species formation and membrane lipid peroxidation in viable boar spermatozoa.

    Guthrie, H David; Welch, Glenn R

    2010-01-01

    Fluorescence-activated flow cytometry analyses were developed for determination of reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation and membrane lipid peroxidation in live spermatozoa loaded with, respectively, hydroethidine (HE) or the lipophilic probe 4,4-difluoro-5-(4-phenyl-1,3-butadienyl)-4-bora-3a,4a-diaza-s-indacene-3-undecanoic acid, C(11)BODIPY(581/591) (BODIPY). ROS was detected by red fluorescence emission from oxidization of HE and membrane lipid peroxidation was detected by green fluorescence emission from oxidation of BODIPY in individual live sperm. Of the reactive oxygen species generators tested, BODIPY oxidation was specific for FeSo4/ascorbate (FeAc), because menadione and H(2)O(2) had little or no effect. The oxidization of hydroethidine to ethidium was specific for menadione and H(2)O(2); FeAc had no effect. The incidence of basal or spontaneous ROS formation and membrane lipid peroxidation were low in boar sperm (semen or after low temperature storage; however the sperm were quite susceptible to treatment-induced ROS formation and membrane lipid peroxidation. PMID:20072917

  9. Characterizing the chemical pathways for water formation -- A deep search for hydrogen peroxide

    Parise, B; Menten, K

    2014-01-01

    In 2011, hydrogen peroxide (HOOH) was observed for the first time outside the solar system (Bergman et al., A&A, 2011, 531, L8). This detection appeared a posteriori quite natural, as HOOH is an intermediate product in the formation of water on the surface of dust grains. Following up on this detection, we present a search for HOOH in a diverse sample of sources in different environments, including low-mass protostars and regions with very high column densities, such as Infrared Dark Clouds (IRDCs). We do not detect the molecule in any other source than Oph A, and derive 3$\\sigma$ upper limits for the abundance of HOOH relative to H$_2$ lower than in Oph A for most sources. This result sheds a different light on our understanding of the detection of HOOH in Oph A, and shifts the puzzle to why this source seems to be special. Therefore we rediscuss the detection of HOOH in Oph A, as well as the implications of the low abundance of HOOH, and its similarity with the case of O$_2$. Our chemical models show th...

  10. Critical assessment of the formation of hydrogen peroxide in dough by fermenting yeast cells.

    Rezaei, Mohammad N; Dornez, Emmie; Verstrepen, Kevin J; Courtin, Christophe M

    2015-02-01

    Fermentation of bread dough leads to strengthening of the dough matrix. This effect has previously been ascribed to the action of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) produced by yeast in dough. In this study, we re-evaluate the production of H2O2 by yeast in dough and aqueous fermentation broth. Results show that the previously reported high levels of H2O2 in fermenting dough were most probably due to the lack of specificity of the potassium dichromate/acetic acid-based method used. Using the chemiluminescent HyPerBlu assay, no yeast H2O2 production could be detected in fermented dough or broth. Even though the formation of low levels of H2O2 cannot be ruled out due to the presence of catalase in flour and the fast reaction of H2O2 with gluten proteins, our results suggest that the changes in dough matrix rheological properties upon fermentation are not due to production of H2O2 by yeast. PMID:25172698

  11. Photoirradiation of Retinyl Palmitate in Ethanol with Ultraviolet Light - Formation of Photodecomposition Products, Reactive Oxygen Species, and Lipid Peroxides

    Peter P. Fu

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available We have previously reported that photoirradiation of retinyl palmitate (RP, a storage and ester form of vitamin A (retinol, with UVA light resulted in the formation of photodecomposition products, generation of reactive oxygen species, and induction of lipid peroxidation. In this paper, we report our results following the photoirradiation of RP in ethanol by an UV lamp with approximately equal UVA and UVB light. The photodecomposition products were separated by reversed-phase HPLC and characterized spectroscopically by comparison with authentic standards. The identified products include: 4-keto-RP, 11-ethoxy-12-hydroxy-RP, 13-ethoxy-14-hydroxy-RP, anhydroretinol (AR, and trans- and cis-15-ethoxy-AR. Photoirradiation of RP in the presence of a lipid, methyl linoleate, resulted in induction of lipid peroxidation. Lipid peroxidation was inhibited when sodium azide was present during photoirradiation which suggests free radicals were formed. Our results demonstrate that, similar to irradiation with UVA light, RP can act as a photosensitizer leading to free radical formation and induction of lipid peroxidation following irradiation with UVB light.

  12. Sources and sinks of acetone, methanol, and acetaldehyde in North Atlantic marine air

    A. C. Lewis

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of acetone, methanol, acetaldehyde and a range of non-methane hydrocarbons have been made in North Atlantic marine air at the Mace Head observatory. Under maritime conditions the combination of OVOCs (acetone, methanol and acetaldehyde contributed up to 85% of the total mass of measured non methane organics in air and up to 80% of the OH radical organic sink, when compared with the sum of all other organic compounds including non-methane hydrocarbons, DMS and OH-reactive halocarbons (trichloromethane and tetrachloroethylene. The observations showed anomalies in the variance and abundance of acetaldehyde and acetone over that expected for species with a remote terrestrial emission source and OH controlled chemical lifetime. A detailed model incorporating an explicit chemical degradation mechanism indicated in situ formation during air mass transport was on timescales longer than the atmospheric lifetime of precursor hydrocarbons or primary emission. The period over which this process was significant was similar to that of airmass motion on intercontinental scales, and formation via this route may reproduce that of a widespread diffuse source. The model indicates that continued short chain OVOC formation occurs many days from the point of emission, via longer lived intermediates of oxidation such as organic peroxides and long chain alcohols.

  13. Sources and sinks of acetone, methanol, and acetaldehyde in North Atlantic air

    A. C. Lewis

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of acetone, methanol, acetaldehyde and a range of non-methane hydrocarbons have been made in North Atlantic marine air at the Mace Head observatory. Under maritime conditions the combination of OVOCs (acetone, methanol and 5 acetaldehyde contributed up to 85% of the total mass of measured non methane organics in air and up to 80% of the OH radical organic sink, when compared with the sum of all other organic compounds including non-methane hydrocarbons, DMS and OH-reactive halocarbons (trichloromethane and tetrachloroethylene. The observations showed anomalies in the variance and abundance of acetaldehyde and acetone 10 over that expected for species with a remote terrestrial emission source and OH controlled chemical lifetime. A detailed model incorporating an explicit chemical degradation mechanism indicated in situ formation during air mass transport was on timescales longer than the atmospheric lifetime of precursor hydrocarbons or primary emission. The period over which this process was significant was similar to that of airmass mo15 tion on intercontinental scales, and formation via this route may reproduce that of a widespread diffuse source. The model indicates that continued short chain OVOC formation occurs many days from the point of emission, via longer lived intermediates of oxidation such as organic peroxides and long chain alcohols.

  14. Rubrene endoperoxide acetone monosolvate

    Kiyoaki Shinashi

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The title acetone solvate, C42H28O2·C3H6O [systematic name: 1,3,10,12-tetraphenyl-19,20-dioxapentacyclo[10.6.2.02,11.04,9.013,18]icosa-2(11,3,5,7,9,13,15,17-octaene acetone monosolvate], is a photooxygenation product of rubrene (systematic name: 5,6,11,12-tetraphenyltetracene. The molecule bends at the bridgehead atoms, which are linked by the O—O transannular bond, with a dihedral angle of 49.21 (6° between the benzene ring and the naphthalene ring system of the tetracene unit. In the crystal, the rubrene molecules are linked by C—H...O hydrogen bonds into a column along the c axis. The acetone solvent molecules form a dimer around a crystallographic inversion centre through a carbonyl–carbonyl dipolar interaction. A C—H...O hydrogen bond between the rubrene and acetone molecules is also observed.

  15. Formation of gas-phase peroxides in a rural atmosphere: An interpretation of the recent SOS/SERON field results

    Lee, J.H.; Tang, I.N. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Weinstein-Lloyd, J.B. [State Univ. of New York, Old Westbury, NY (United States). Chemistry/Physics Dept.

    1993-09-01

    Hydrogen perioxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) and certain organic peroxides such as hydroxymethyl-hydroperoxide (HMHP), are gas-phase oxidants present in the atmosphere at ppbv concentration levels. These oxidants play an important role in atmospheric chemistry. In addition, precipitation containing H{sub 2}O{sub 2} is toxic to trees, and it has also been suggested that organic peroxides formed presumably by ozone reactions with biogenic alkenes are responsible for leaf disorders. Recently, we have developed a nonenzymatic method or aqueous-phase H{sub 2}O{sub 2} measurement, using Fenton reagent and fluorescent hydroxy- benzoic acid. The new method, in conjunction with the well-known method of p-hydroxyphenylacetic acid and horseradish peroxidase for total peroxides, and together with an improved gas scrubber to mitigate sampling line problems, has been successfully deployed in recent SOS/SERON field measurements in rural Georgia. For the first time, continuously measured and speciated gas-phase peroxide data have become available, making it possible to examine some aspects of the ozone chemistry leading to the formation of these oxidants. It is observed that daily H{sub 2}O{sub 2} maximum frequently occurs at a different time than does HMHP, and that H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentration, but not HMHP, tends to correlate with solar fluxes measured at the same location. These findings seem to indicate that the formation mechanisms for H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and organic peroxides are basically different. It is likely that H{sub 2}O{sub 2} is formed from radical-radical recombination, while HMHP is formed by ozone-alkene reactions. Since the gas-phase ozone-alkene reactions are usually too slow to account for the diurnal concentration variations observed for HMHP, heterogeneous processes involving ozone and alkenes are also a possibility.

  16. Protective Effect of Cinnamomum tejpata on Lipid Peroxide Formation in Isolated Rat Liver Homogenate

    Vandana Gupta

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Restrictions on the use of synthetic antioxidants are being imposed because of their toxic properties.The present study is the continuation of a program aimed at investigation on antioxidant activity of extractsfrom medicinal plants and to identify alternative natural and safe sources of food antioxidant especially fromplant origin. Free radicals are involved in more than 50 diseases. Day to day researchers are adding morenumber of diseases to the list. In this report the anti-peroxidative effect of alcoholic extract of Cinnamomumtejpata has been studied in rat liver homogenate. Ferrous sulphate has been used as inducer to induce lipid peroxidation. On the basis of results, it could be concluded that TBARS production in normal condition group isvery slow and in FeSO4 treated groups, it is very high. Initiation of lipid peroxidation by ferrous sulphate takesplace either through ferryl- perferryl com plex or through OH Radical from Fenton’s reaction. Effect of differentconcentrations of ferrous sulphate for induction of lipid peroxidation in rat liver homogenate was studied. Dosedependent increase in lipid peroxidation was found. Results revealed that at lower doses the rate of formationof TBARS is slow , which increased with dose. Significant and moderate results were found from 0.40 mM to0.80 mM of ferrous sulphate.

  17. Selective formation of hydrogen peroxide by oxygen reduction on TiO2 nanotubes in alkaline media

    Graphical abstract: Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is widely used in the chemical industry and environmental protection. The oxygen reduction in alkaline solution using TiO2 nanotube array catalyst showed a unique electrochemical behavior of two well-separated 2-electron O2 reduction peaks and formation of H2O2. TiO2 nanotube array electrodes are of interest in a wide range of applications and the possibility to fine-tune reactivity to avoid or to promote peroxide formation will be of considerable use and benefits. - Abstract: The oxygen electrochemical reduction at nitrogen treated TiO2 nanotubes electrode shows distinctive and well-separated 2-electrons reduction peaks. The oxygen reduction was investigated in alkaline solution at titanium oxide nanotube (TON) arrays fabricated by anodizing of titanium foil in hydrogen fluoride solution followed by annealing at 450 °C in nitrogen (TON-N2) atmosphere. The morphology of the arrays was characterized by SEM and the electrochemical behavior was studied by cyclic voltammetry in potassium ferrocyanide and alkaline solutions. The treated TON arrays showed a significant enhancement in conductivity and in the activity for reduction of O2 in alkaline media in comparison to the data of plain TiO2. TON arrays annealed in N2 showed a unique electrochemical behavior of two well-resolved 2-electrons O2 reduction peaks in contrast to TON arrays annealed air, which only showed a single reduction peak at more negative potential. At TON-N2 arrays, hydrogen peroxide was detected as the main product during the first reduction. The switch in mechanism is proposed to be due to the presence of oxygen vacancies at the surface of titania nanotube arrays. The finding is of a high importance for the selective production of hydrogen peroxide by electrochemical reduction of oxygen in alkaline media using TiO2 nanotubes electrode

  18. Formation of water-soluble soybean polysaccharides from spent flakes by hydrogen peroxide treatment

    Pierce, Brian; Wichmann, Jesper; Tran, Tam H.; Cheetamun, Roshan; Bacic, Antony; Meyer, Anne S.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we propose a novel chemical process for the generation of water-soluble polysaccharides from soy spent flake, a by-product of the soy food industry. This process entails treatment of spent flake with hydrogen peroxide at an elevated temperature, resulting in the release of more than...

  19. HYDROGEN PEROXIDE FORMATION FROM THE PHOTOOXIDATION OF FORMALDEHYDE AND ITS PRESENCE IN RAINWATER

    The photooxidation of formaldehyde with sunlamps (E(max) = 3100 A) produces hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) at varying concentrations depending upon the amount of water vapor present. It is postulated that the variable production of H2O2 is a result of condensation on the reactor surfac...

  20. Formation of water-soluble soybean polysaccharides from spent flakes by hydrogen peroxide treatment.

    Pierce, Brian C; Wichmann, Jesper; Tran, Tam H; Cheetamun, Roshan; Bacic, Antony; Meyer, Anne S

    2016-06-25

    In this paper we propose a novel chemical process for the generation of water-soluble polysaccharides from soy spent flake, a by-product of the soy food industry. This process entails treatment of spent flake with hydrogen peroxide at an elevated temperature, resulting in the release of more than 70% of the original insoluble material as high molar mass soluble polysaccharides. A design of experiment was used to quantify the effects of pH, reaction time, and hydrogen peroxide concentration on the reaction yield, average molar mass, and free monosaccharides generated. The resulting product is low in protein, fat, and minerals and contains predominantly water-soluble polysaccharides of high molar mass, including arabinan, type I arabinogalactan, homogalacturonan, xyloglucan, rhamnogalacturonan, and (glucurono)arabinoxylan. This treatment provides a straightforward approach for generation of soluble soy polysaccharides and opens a new range of opportunities for this abundant and underutilized material in future research and industrial applications. PMID:27083842

  1. Protective Effect of Cinnamomum tejpata on Lipid Peroxide Formation in Isolated Rat Liver Homogenate

    Vandana Gupta; Mukta Sharma

    2010-01-01

    Restrictions on the use of synthetic antioxidants are being imposed because of their toxic properties.The present study is the continuation of a program aimed at investigation on antioxidant activity of extractsfrom medicinal plants and to identify alternative natural and safe sources of food antioxidant especially fromplant origin. Free radicals are involved in more than 50 diseases. Day to day researchers are adding morenumber of diseases to the list. In this report the anti-peroxidative ef...

  2. Commercial-scale demonstration of the Liquid Phase Methanol (LPMEOH{trademark}) Process. Peroxide formation of dimethyl ether in methanol mixtures

    Waller, F.J.

    1997-11-01

    Organic peroxides could form when dimethyl ether in methanol is stored for three to six months at a time. The objective of this work was to determine the level of peroxide formation from dimethyl ether in reagent grade methanol and raw methanol at room temperature under 3 atmospheres (45 psig) of air. Raw methanol is methanol made from syngas by the LPMEOH Process without distillation. Aliphatic ethers tend to react slowly with oxygen from the air to form unstable peroxides. However, there are no reports on peroxide formation from dimethyl ether. After 172 days of testing, dimethyl ether in either reagent methanol or raw methanol at room temperature and under 60--70 psig pressure of air does not form detectable peroxides. Lack of detectable peroxides suggests that dimethyl ether or dimethyl ether and methanol may be stored at ambient conditions. Since the compositions of {approximately} 1.3 mol% or {approximately} 4.5 mol% dimethyl ether in methanol do not form peroxides, these compositions can be considered for diesel fuel or an atmospheric turbine fuel, respectively.

  3. Formation of fumonisin B(1)-glucose reaction product, in vitro cytotoxicity, and lipid peroxidation on kidney cells.

    Meca, Giuseppe; Fernández-Franzón, Mónica; Ritieni, Alberto; Font, Guillermina; Ruiz, María José; Mañes, Jordi

    2010-01-27

    Fumonisin B(1) (FB(1)) content in corn products decreases during the heating process in foods containing reducing sugars, mainly because of the formation of N-(carboxymethyl)fumonisin B(1). In this study, a rapid method has been developed for the determination of both compounds in corn products using a high-speed blender, Ultra-Turrax, for solvent extraction and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. The kinetics of FB(1) degradation and the formation of the Maillard adduct were studied in a model system constituted by corn bread spiked with FB(1) and heated at 160, 180, and 200 degrees C for 3, 6, 10, 15, and 20 min. FB(1) decreased from 0.96 to 0.3 mg/kg and N-(carboxymethyl)fumonisin B(1) increased to 0.1 mg/kg. Cytotoxicity and lipid peroxidation were studied in monkey kidney cells (Vero cells). After 24 h exposure, FB(1) revealed an IC(50) (median inhibitory concentration) of 55 +/- 7 microM with neutral red uptake, but no IC(50) was obtained after N-(carboxymethyl)fumonisin B(1) exposure at the studied concentrations. Lipid peroxidation was assessed using the thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS) method for 90 min and 24 and 48 h. FB(1) significantly increased the production of malondialdehyde in Vero cells exposed to 1 microM FB(1) after 24 h, while malondialdehyde increased after 5 microM N-(carboxymethyl)fumonisin B(1) exposure. These findings showed that the transformation products exhibit lower cytotoxicity than fumonisin B(1) and lipid peroxidation may be involved in the cytotoxicity induced by both toxins. PMID:20041644

  4. The E-loop Is Involved in Hydrogen Peroxide Formation by the NADPH Oxidase Nox4*

    Takac, Ina; Schröder, Katrin; Zhang, Leilei; Lardy, Bernard; Anilkumar, Narayana; Lambeth, J. David; Shah, Ajay M.; Morel, Francoise; Brandes, Ralf P.

    2011-01-01

    In contrast to the NADPH oxidases Nox1 and Nox2, which generate superoxide (O2˙̄), Nox4 produces hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). We constructed chimeric proteins and mutants to address the protein region that specifies which reactive oxygen species is produced. Reactive oxygen species were measured with luminol/horseradish peroxidase and Amplex Red for H2O2 versus L-012 and cytochrome c for O2˙̄. The third extracytosolic loop (E-loop) of Nox4 is 28 amino acids longer than that of Nox1 or Nox2. Dele...

  5. Phage inactivation by triplet acetone

    The exposure of lambda phage to triplet acetone is studied. The triplet acetone is obtained from aerobic oxidation of isobutanal catalysed by peroxidase. A decrease of lambda phage ability to infect Escherichia coli is reported, perhaps, partially due to the possible production of lesions in the phage genome. (M.A.C.)

  6. Effects of ozone and ozone/peroxide pretreatments on disinfection byproduct formation during subsequent chlorination and chloramination.

    Yang, Xin; Peng, Jinfeng; Chen, Baiyang; Guo, Wanhong; Liang, Yongmei; Liu, Wei; Liu, Lu

    2012-11-15

    Ozone (O3) and ozone/hydrogen peroxide (O3/H2O2) can be used in water treatment facilities to remove many organic micropollutants with taste, odor, and color implications. The effects of O3 and O3/H2O2 on the formation of disinfection byproducts (DBPs) in subsequent chlorination and chloramination processes, however, are not well determined. In this study, we compared the yields of a series of regulated and emerging DBPs during sequenced O3-Cl2, O3/H2O2-Cl2, O3-NH2Cl, and O3/H2O2-NH2Cl oxidation of 11 samples, each with different hydrophobicity, bromide concentration, soluble microbial products, and humic substances. For most water, pretreatment with O3 and O3/H2O2 increased the formation of chloral hydrate (CH), trichloronitromethane (TCNM) and haloketones (HKs) but lowered the yields of haloacetonitriles (HANs) during chlorination processes. Compared with O3 alone, O3/H2O2 in combination generated more CH and HKs during chlorination, and their extents of formation appeared to depend on the O3 doses. In terms of chloramination, both O3 and O3/H2O2 reduced THM, HAA, and HAN formation significantly without increasing CH, TCNM, or HKs. These results suggest that O3 or O3/H2O2 pretreatments may provide some benefits for the chloramination process in controlling regulated and emerging DBPs in waters without high bromide content. PMID:23009791

  7. Hydrogen peroxide formation photoinduced by near-UV radiation in aqueous solutions of adenine derivatives at 77 K

    Lozinova, T. A.; Lobanov, A. V.; Lander, A. V.

    2015-08-01

    An estimate of the content of free radicals in aqueous solutions of adenosine (Ado), adenosine-5'-diphosphate (ADP) and guanosine-5'-monophosphate (GMP) irradiated with near-UV radiation at 77 K is obtained by interpreting EPR spectra. It is established that in the presence of NaCl (0.1 M), the total number of peroxyl radicals O{2/-·} and HO{2/·} in samples of the studied compounds was 15-45% of the total quantity of produced free radicals and was affected by the conditions of exposure. The estimates are compared with the results from hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) determination in the same samples after thawing. Although the number of peroxyl radicals in the samples of adenine derivatives (A) and GMP are comparable, the formation of H2O2 is observed only in the case of A derivatives, but not in GMP. Possible reasons for these differences are discussed.

  8. Endogenous hydrogen peroxide increases biofilm formation by inducing exopolysaccharide production in Acinetobacter oleivorans DR1.

    Jang, In-Ae; Kim, Jisun; Park, Woojun

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we investigated differentially expressed proteins in Acinetobacter oleivorans cells during planktonic and biofilm growth by using 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis combined with matrix-assisted laser desorption time-of-flight mass spectrometry. We focused on the role of oxidative stress resistance during biofilm formation using mutants defective in alkyl hydroperoxide reductase (AhpC) because its production in aged biofilms was enhanced compared to that in planktonic cells. Results obtained using an ahpC promoter-gfp reporter vector showed that aged biofilms expressed higher ahpC levels than planktonic cells at 48 h. However, at 24 h, ahpC expression was higher in planktonic cells than in biofilms. Deletion of ahpC led to a severe growth defect in rich media that was not observed in minimal media and promoted early biofilm formation through increased production of exopolysaccharide (EPS) and EPS gene expression. Increased endogenous H2O2 production in the ahpC mutant in rich media enhanced biofilm formation, and this enhancement was not observed in the presence of antioxidants. Exogenous addition of H2O2 promoted biofilm formation in wild type cells, which suggested that biofilm development is linked to defense against H2O2. Collectively, our data showed that EPS production caused by H2O2 stress enhances biofilm formation in A. oleivorans. PMID:26884212

  9. Homolytic Cleavage of Both Heme-Bound Hydrogen Peroxide and Hydrogen Sulfide Leads to the Formation of Sulfheme.

    Arbelo-Lopez, Hector D; Simakov, Nikolay A; Smith, Jeremy C; Lopez-Garriga, Juan; Wymore, Troy

    2016-08-01

    Many heme-containing proteins with a histidine in the distal E7 (HisE7) position can form sulfheme in the presence of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) and a reactive oxygen species such as hydrogen peroxide. For reasons unknown, sulfheme derivatives are formed specifically on solvent-excluded heme pyrrole B. Sulfhemes severely decrease the oxygen-binding affinity in hemoglobin (Hb) and myoglobin (Mb). Here, use of hybrid quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical methods has permitted characterization of the entire process of sulfheme formation in the HisE7 mutant of hemoglobin I (HbI) from Lucina pectinata. This process includes a mechanism for H2S to enter the solvent-excluded active site through a hydrophobic channel to ultimately form a hydrogen bond with H2O2 bound to Fe(III). Proton transfer from H2O2 to His64 to form compound (Cpd) 0, followed by hydrogen transfer from H2S to the Fe(III)-H2O2 complex, results in homolytic cleavage of the O-O and S-H bonds to form a reactive thiyl radical (HS(•)), ferryl heme Cpd II, and a water molecule. Subsequently, the addition of HS(•) to Cpd II, followed by three proton transfer reactions, results in the formation of a three-membered ring ferric sulfheme that avoids migration of the radical to the protein matrix, in contrast to that in other peroxidative reactions. The transformation of this three-membered episulfide ring structure to the five-membered thiochlorin ring structure occurs through a significant potential energy barrier, although both structures are nearly isoenergetic. Both three- and five-membered ring structures reveal longer NB-Fe(III) bonds compared with other pyrrole nitrogen-Fe(III) bonds, which would lead to decreased oxygen binding. Overall, these results are in agreement with a wide range of experimental data and provide fertile ground for further investigations of sulfheme formation in other heme proteins and additional effects of H2S on cell signaling and reactivity. PMID:27357070

  10. Formation of hydrogen peroxide and nitric oxide in rat skeletal muscle cells during contractions

    Silveira, Leonardo R.; Pereira-Da-Silva, Lucia; Juel, Carsten;

    2003-01-01

    We examined intra- and extracellular H(2)O(2) and NO formation during contractions in primary rat skeletal muscle cell culture. The fluorescent probes DCFH-DA/DCFH (2,7-dichlorofluorescein-diacetate/2,7-dichlorofluorescein) and DAF-2-DA/DAF-2 (4,5-diaminofluorescein-diacetate/4,5-diaminofluoresce...

  11. Formation of novel non-cyclooxygenase-derived prostanoids (F2-isoprostanes) in carbon tetrachloride hepatotoxicity. An animal model of lipid peroxidation.

    Morrow, J D; Awad, J A; Kato, T; Takahashi, K; Badr, K F; Roberts, L J; Burk, R F

    1992-01-01

    These studies examine the in vivo formation of a unique series of PGF2-like compounds (F2-isoprostanes) derived from free radical-catalyzed nonenzymatic peroxidation of arachidonic acid. We have previously shown that levels of these compounds increase up to 50-fold in rats administered CCl4. To understand further the formation of these compounds in vivo, we carried out a series of experiments assessing factors influencing their generation. After CCl4 (2 ml/kg) was administered to rats, plasma...

  12. Endogenous hydrogen peroxide increases biofilm formation by inducing exopolysaccharide production in Acinetobacter oleivorans DR1

    In-Ae Jang; Jisun Kim; Woojun Park

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we investigated differentially expressed proteins in Acinetobacter oleivorans cells during planktonic and biofilm growth by using 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis combined with matrix-assisted laser desorption time-of-flight mass spectrometry. We focused on the role of oxidative stress resistance during biofilm formation using mutants defective in alkyl hydroperoxide reductase (AhpC) because its production in aged biofilms was enhanced compared to that in planktonic cells. Res...

  13. Electrocatalysis of heat-treated cobalt-porphyrin/carbon for hydrogen peroxide formation

    The electrocatalysis of heat-treated Co-TPP/carbon for O2 reduction and H2O2 formation using a fuel cell reactor with an H2SO4 aqueous electrolyte was studied (TPP: 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(phenyl)-21H,23H-porphyrin). Carbon supports, including vapor grown carbon fiber (VGCF), activated carbon (AC), carbon black XC-72 (XC72), and carbon black Black-Pearl-2000/3500 (BP2000/3500), strongly affected the electrocatalysis of the Co-TPP/carbon. The Co-TPP/VGCF heat-treated at 1023 K, abbreviated as Co-TPP/VGCF(1073), showed a good electrocatalytic activity for H2O2 formation (1.0 mol dm−3 with 40% current efficiency (CE)); however, other carbon supports were unfavorable. Electrocatalytic activities were Co-TPP/VGCF(1073) >> Co-TPP/XC72(1073) > Co-TPP/AC(1073) > Co-TPP/BP2000(1073). Their electrocatalysis were studied by rotating ring-disk electrode voltammetry and kinetic studies of the decomposition of H2O2 and the electroreduction of H2O2 to water. These studies indicated that the electrocatalytic activities for the successive reduction of H2O2 to water determined the final H2O2 concentrations and CEs. An active site of heat-treated Co-TPP/VGCF was characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and X-ray absorption near-edge fine structure spectroscopy. Partial pyrolysis of Co-TPP on the carbon surface was essential to generate the active site for the H2O2 formation. A model of the Co active site, CoN2–carbon, was proposed

  14. Atmospheric new particle formation and the potential role of organic peroxides

    Trawny, Katrin; Bonn, Boris; Jacobi, Stefan

    2010-05-01

    New particle formation in the atmosphere belongs to the currently most discussed aspects of atmospheric aerosols with significant implications for cloud formation and microphysics, once these particles have grown beyond about 50 nm in particle diameter. If these particles act as cloud condensation or ice nuclei they can affect the radiation budget at the Earths surface and cause climate couplings important to understand when aiming to predict climate change scenarios. One aspect widely discussed is the potential contribution of organic trace gases from anthropogenic and biogenic sources. In this study we analysed datasets from a Central European measurement station in Germany in a spruce forest approximately 800 m above sea level and a distance of about 20 km to Frankfurt (southeast). Continuous particle size distribution measurements were classified in nucleation-event or not and unidentified and intercompared to meteorological and basic trace gas observations. Additionally meteorological backtrajektories calculated by the German Weather Service for the station every 12 hours have been considered. These led to the following conclusions: Nucleation was most likely if (A) the air has not get significantly into touch with the surface within the last days, or if (B) at least human impact was minor and the air faced forest surfaces mainly (northwest). As observed already in Hyytiälä (Finland) nucleation appeared, when the relative humidity and ambient water vapour mixing ratio were low, ozone was high and the condensation sink was small. A further important point was the amount of global radiation measured at the Taunus Observatory (Mt. Kleiner Feldberg). The higher the radiation, the more likely a nucleation event and the more intense. Temperature impacted on the intensity of nucleation, i.e. the higher the temperature the more intense the event, but did not directly affect the occurrence of an event or not, if a threshold value of ca. -6 °C was exceeded. This

  15. ON THE FORMATION OF INTERSTELLAR WATER ICE: CONSTRAINTS FROM A SEARCH FOR HYDROGEN PEROXIDE ICE IN MOLECULAR CLOUDS

    Recent surface chemistry experiments have shown that the hydrogenation of molecular oxygen on interstellar dust grains is a plausible formation mechanism, via hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), for the production of water (H2O) ice mantles in the dense interstellar medium. Theoretical chemistry models also predict the formation of a significant abundance of H2O2 ice in grain mantles by this route. At their upper limits, the predicted and experimental abundances are sufficiently high that H2O2 should be detectable in molecular cloud ice spectra. To investigate this further, laboratory spectra have been obtained for H2O2/H2O ice films between 2.5 and 200 μm, from 10 to 180 K, containing 3%, 30%, and 97% H2O2 ice. Integrated absorbances for all the absorption features in low-temperature H2O2 ice have been derived from these spectra. For identifying H2O2 ice, the key results are the presence of unique features near 3.5, 7.0, and 11.3 μm. Comparing the laboratory spectra with the spectra of a group of 24 protostars and field stars, all of which have strong H2O ice absorption bands, no absorption features are found that can definitely be identified with H2O2 ice. In the absence of definite H2O2 features, the H2O2 abundance is constrained by its possible contribution to the weak absorption feature near 3.47 μm found on the long-wavelength wing of the 3 μm H2O ice band. This gives an average upper limit for H2O2, as a percentage of H2O, of 9% ± 4%. This is a strong constraint on parameters for surface chemistry experiments and dense cloud chemistry models.

  16. On the Formation of Interstellar Water Ice: Constraints from a Search for Hydrogen Peroxide Ice in Molecular Clouds

    Smith, R. G.; Charnely, S. B.; Pendleton, Y. J.; Wright, C. M.; Maldoni, M. M.; Robinson, G.

    2011-01-01

    Recent surface chemistry experiments have shown that the hydrogenation of molecular oxygen on interstellar dust grains is a plausible formation mechanism, via hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), for the production of water (H2O) ice mantles in the dense interstellar medium. Theoretical chemistry models also predict the formation of a significant abundance of H2O2 ice in grain mantles by this route. At their upper limits, the predicted and experimental abundances are sufficiently high that H2O2 should be detectable in molecular cloud ice spectra. To investigate this further, laboratory spectra have been obtained for H2O2/H2O ice films between 2.5 and 200 micron, from 10 to 180 K, containing 3%, 30%, and 97% H2O2 ice. Integrated absorbances for all the absorption features in low-temperature H2O2 ice have been derived from these spectra. For identifying H2O2 ice, the key results are the presence of unique features near 3.5, 7.0, and 11.3 micron. Comparing the laboratory spectra with the spectra of a group of 24 protostars and field stars, all of which have strong H2O ice absorption bands, no absorption features are found that can definitely be identified with H2O2 ice. In the absence of definite H2O2 features, the H2O2 abundance is constrained by its possible contribution to the weak absorption feature near 3.47 micron found on the long-wavelength wing of the 3 micron H2O ice band. This gives an average upper limit for H2O2, as a percentage of H2O, of 9% +/- 4%. This is a strong constraint on parameters for surface chemistry experiments and dense cloud chemistry models.

  17. The relative importance of competing pathways for the formation of high-molecular-weight peroxides in the ozonolysis of organic aerosol particles

    M. Mochida

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available High-molecular-weight (HMW organic compounds are an important component of atmospheric particles, although their origins, possibly including in situ formation pathways, remain incompletely understood. This study investigates the formation of HMW organic peroxides through reactions involving stabilized Criegee intermediates (SCI's. The model system is methyl oleate (MO mixed with dioctyl adipate (DOA and myristic acid (MA in submicron aerosol particles, and Criegee intermediates are formed by the ozonolysis of the double bond in methyl oleate. An aerosol flow tube coupled to a quadrupole aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS is employed to determine the relative importance of different HMW organic peroxides following the ozonolysis of different mixing mole fractions of MO in DOA and MA. Possible peroxide products include secondary ozonides (SOZ's, α-acyloxyalkyl hydroperoxides and α-acyloxyalkyl alkyl peroxides (αAAHP-type compounds, diperoxides, and monoperoxide oligomers. Of these, the AMS data identify two SOZ's as major HMW products in the ozonolysis of pure methyl oleate as well as in an inert matrix of DOA to as low as 0.04 mole fraction MO. In comparison, in mixed particles of MO and MA, αAAHP-type compounds form in high yields for MO mole fractions of 0.5 or less, suggesting that SCI's efficiently attack the carboxylic acid group of myristic acid. The reactions of SCI's with carboxylic acid groups to form αAAHP-type compounds therefore compete with those of SCI's with aldehydes to form SOZ's, provided that both types of functionalities are present at significant concentrations. The results therefore suggest that SCI's in atmospheric particles contribute to the transformation of carboxylic acids and other protic groups into HMW organic peroxides.

  18. Quantification of acetone emission from pine plants

    SHAO; Min; (邵敏); Jürgen; Wildt

    2002-01-01

    Acetone emission from pine plants (pinus sylvestris) is measured by continuously stirred tank reactor. Under a constant light intensity, acetone emission rates increase exponentially with leaf temperature. When leaf temperature is kept constant, acetone emission increases with light intensity. And acetone emission in darkness is also detected. Acetone emitted from pine is quickly labeled by 13C when the plants are exposed to air with 630 mg/m3 13CO2. However, no more than 20% of acetone is 13C labeled. Acetone emission from pine may be due to both leaf temperature- controlled process and light intensity-controlled process. Based on these understandings, an algorithm is used to describe the short term acetone emission rates from pine.

  19. Study using 18-oxygen, of the formation process of hydrogen peroxide during gamma irradiation of starch powder

    The isotopic content (18O) of hydrogen peroxide, formed during gamma irradiation of starch powder in presence of labelled or not labelled water and oxygen, is determined. The results lead to proof of a dismutation mechanism between peroxyl radicals (or superoxyl radicals)

  20. A study of global atmospheric budget and distribution of acetone using global atmospheric model STOCHEM-CRI

    Khan, M. A. H.; Cooke, M. C.; Utembe, S. R.; Archibald, A. T.; Maxwell, P.; Morris, W. C.; Xiao, P.; Derwent, R. G.; Jenkin, M. E.; Percival, C. J.; Walsh, R. C.; Young, T. D. S.; Simmonds, P. G.; Nickless, G.; O'Doherty, S.; Shallcross, D. E.

    2015-07-01

    The impact of including a more detailed VOC oxidation scheme (CRI v2-R5) with a multi-generational approach for simulating tropospheric acetone is investigated using a 3-D global model, STOCHEM-CRI. The CRI v2-R5 mechanism contains photochemical production of acetone from monoterpenes which account for 64% (46.8 Tg/yr) of the global acetone sources in STOCHEM-CRI. Both photolysis and oxidation by OH in the troposphere contributes equally (42%, each) and dry deposition contributes 16% of the atmospheric sinks of acetone. The tropospheric life-time and the global burden of acetone are found to be 18 days and 3.5 Tg, respectively, these values being close to those reported in the study of Jacob et al. (2002). A dataset of aircraft campaign measurements are used to evaluate the inclusion of acetone formation from monoterpenes in the CRI v2-R5 mechanism used in STOCHEM-CRI. The overall comparison between measurements and models show that the parameterised approach in STOCHEM-NAM (no acetone formation from monoterpenes) underpredicts the mixing ratios of acetone in the atmosphere. However, using a detailed monoterpene oxidation mechanism forming acetone has brought the STOCHEM-CRI into closer agreement with measurements with an improvement in the vertical simulation of acetone. The annual mean surface distribution of acetone simulated by the STOCHEM-CRI shows a peak over forested regions where there are large biogenic emissions and high levels of photochemical activity. Year-long observations of acetone and methanol at the Mace Head research station in Ireland are compared with the simulated acetone and methanol produced by the STOCHEM-CRI and found to produce good overall agreement between model and measurements. The seasonal variation of model and measured acetone levels at Mace Head, California, New Hampshire and Minnesota show peaks in summer and dips in winter, suggesting that photochemical production may have the strongest effect on its seasonal trend.

  1. Investigation of the formation of benzoyl peroxide, benzoic anhydride, and other potential aerosol products from gas-phase reactions of benzoylperoxy radicals

    Strollo, Christen M.; Ziemann, Paul J.

    2016-04-01

    The secondary organic aerosol (SOA) products of the reaction of benzaldehyde with Cl atoms and with OH radicals in air in the absence of NOx were investigated in an environmental chamber in order to better understand the possible role of organic peroxy radical self-reactions in SOA formation. SOA products and authentic standards were analyzed using mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography, and results show that the yields of benzoyl peroxide (C6H5C(O)OO(O)CC6H5) and benzoic anhydride (C6H5C(O)O(O)CC6H5), two potential products from the gas-phase self-reaction of benzoylperoxy radicals (C6H5C(O)OO·), were less than 0.1%. This is in contrast to results of recent studies that have shown that the gas-phase self-reactions of β-nitrooxyperoxy radicals formed from reactions of isoprene with NO3 radicals form dialkyl peroxides that contribute significantly to gas-phase and SOA products. Such reactions have also been proposed to explain the gas-phase formation of extremely low volatility dimers from autooxidation of terpenes. The results obtained here indicate that, at least for benzoylperoxy radicals, the self-reactions form only benzoyloxy radicals. Analyses of SOA composition and volatility were inconclusive, but it appears that the SOA may consist primarily of oligomers formed through heterogeneous/multiphase reactions possibly involving some combination of phenol, benzaldehyde, benzoic acid, and peroxybenzoic acid.

  2. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic model for acetone.

    Kumagai, S.; Matsunaga, I

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--This study aimed to develop a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model for acetone and to predict the kinetic behaviour of acetone in the human body with that model. METHODS--The model consists of eight tissue groups in which acetone can be distributed: the mucous layer of the inhaled air tract, the mucous layer of the exhaled air tract, a compartment for gas exchange (alveolus of the lung), a group of blood vessel rich tissues including the brain and heart, a group of tissues i...

  3. NMR study of inorganic mesophase in water-acetone solutions of uranyl fluoride

    By the method of PMR spectroscopy a macroscopic ordering, dependence of orientation de.gree of acetone molecules on temperature and composition of the uranuyl fluoride-water- acetone system is investigated. It is shown that physical processes determining the formation of a mesophase in the investigated system are analogous to the processes in organic liquid crystals. It is pointed out that the matrix of the given liquid crystal is a dimeric complex of uranyl fluoride

  4. Formation of the 5,6-epoxy derivatives of 7-liydroxy-cholesteryl 3β-acetates during peroxidation of cholesteryl acetate.

    Lercker, G.

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available The thermal peroxidation of cholesteryl acetate (CA generates many compounds, most of which have been identified in previous studies. The trimethylsilyl (TMS derivatives of the thermodegradation products of the single hydroperoxides of CA (7α- and 7β- gave GCMS spectra that were almost identical to those of the thermal peroxidation of CA, except for four compounds that were only detected as TMS derivatives. These substances were identified by comparing their mass spectra and their GC retention time against those of the four synthesized isomers of the epoxy-hydroxy derivatives of CA. The presence of a considerable amount of epoxy-hydroxy derivates of CA, especially at low-temperature degradations, provides an explanation for the formation of other substances that have been previously identified.

    La peroxidación térmica del colesteril acetato (OA produce varios compuestos, la mayoría de los cuales fueron ya identificados en estudios precedentes. Los trimetilsilil (TMS derivados de los productos de la termodegradación de los hidroperóxidos simples del CA (7α- y 7β- producen espectros GC-MS que son siempre idénticos a aquellos de la peroxidación de CA, a excepción de los cuatro compuestos que son únicamente detectados como derivados TMS. Estas substancias fueron identificadas comparando los espectros de masa y los tiempos de retención GC con los cuatro isómeros de los derivados epoxi-hidroxi del CA. La presencia de una considerable cantidad de derivados epoxi- hidroxi del CA, especialmente a bajas temperaturas de degradación, proveen una explicación de la formación de otras substancias que fueron Identificadas precedentemente.

  5. Formation of hydrogen peroxide and water from the reaction of cold hydrogen atoms with solid oxygen at 10K

    Miyauchi, N; Chigai, T; Nagaoka, A; Watanabe, N; Kouchi, A

    2008-01-01

    The reactions of cold H atoms with solid O2 molecules were investigated at 10 K. The formation of H2O2 and H2O has been confirmed by in-situ infrared spectroscopy. We found that the reaction proceeds very efficiently and obtained the effective reaction rates. This is the first clear experimental evidence of the formation of water molecules under conditions mimicking those found in cold interstellar molecular clouds. Based on the experimental results, we discuss the reaction mechanism and astrophysical implications.

  6. Radical formation in the [MeReO3]-catalyzed aqueous peroxidative oxidation of alkanes: a theoretical mechanistic study.

    Kuznetsov, Maxim L; Pombeiro, Armando J L

    2009-01-01

    Plausible mechanisms of radical formation in the catalytic system [MeReO(3)]/H(2)O(2)/H(2)O-CH(3)CN for the oxidation of alkanes to alcohols and ketones, via radical pathways, are investigated extensively at the density functional theory level. The most favorable route is based on the monoperoxo complex [MeReO(2)(O(2))(H(2)O)] and includes the formation of an H(2)O(2) adduct, water-assisted H-transfer from H(2)O(2) to the peroxo ligand, and generation of HOO(*). The thus formed reduced Re(VI) complex [MeReO(2)(OOH)(H(2)O)] reacts with H(2)O(2), resulting, upon water-assisted H-transfer and O-OH bond homolysis, in the regeneration of the oxo-Re(VII) catalyst and formation of the HO(*) radical that reacts further with the alkane. Water plays a crucial role by (i) stabilizing transition states for the proton migrations and providing easy intramolecular H-transfers in the absence of any N,O-ligands and (ii) saturating the Re coordination sphere what leads to a decrease of the activation barrier for the formation of HOO(*). The activation energy of the radical formation calculated for [MeReO(3)] (17.7 kcal/mol) is compatible with that determined experimentally [Shul'pin et al. J. Chem. Soc., Perkin Trans. 2 2001, 1351 .] for oxo-V-based catalytic systems (17 +/- 2 kcal/mol), and the overall type of mechanism proposed for such V catalysts is also effective for [MeReO(3)]. PMID:19049432

  7. Biochemical changes in barberries during adventitious root formation: the role of indole-3-butyric acid and hydrogen peroxide

    Ali Tehranifar

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Peroxidase, polyphenol oxidase (PPO, phenolic compounds and total sugars (TS were investigated during root formation in cuttings of Berberis vulgaris var. asperma (BVA and Berberis thunbergii var. atropurpurea (BTA treated with indole-3-butyric acid (IBA and IBA+H2O2. Rooting was observed on BTA cuttings but not on BVA cuttings. The BTA cuttings treated with IBA and IBA+H2O2 showed higher rooting percentages, number of roots, and root length over the control. Those treated with IBA+H2O2 recorded the lowest peroxidase activity after planting. BTA cuttings treated with IBA+H2O2 showed the highest peroxidase activity at 50 d after planting; BVA cuttings under different treatments showed no significant difference for peroxidase activity at planting time or up to 80 d after planting. PPO activity for the BTA cuttings in the control treatment was lower than for other treatments during root formation. The cuttings in the IBA and IBA+H2O2 treatments showed increased PPO activity from 0 to 50 d after planting and a slight decrease in PPO activity from 60 to 80 d after planting. PPO activity for the BVA cuttings was significantly lower than for BTA during root formation. The BTA cuttings treated with IBA and IBA+H2O2 showed the highest phenolic compound content during root formation. The BVA cuttings displayed higher TS than BTA during the initial stage of root formation. A comparison of the anatomical structure of easy-to-root and difficult-to-root cuttings indicated that physical inhibitors did not affect the rooting capacity of BVA.

  8. N,N'-Dimethylthiourea dioxide formation from N,N'-dimethylthiourea reflects hydrogen peroxide concentrations in simple biological systems

    The authors hypothesized that measurement of a specific product from reaction of N,N'-dimethylthiourea (Me2TU) and H2O2 would provide a good indication of the H2O2 scavenging and protection seen after addition of Me2TU to biological systems. They found that addition of H2O2 to Me2TU yielded a single stable product, Me2TU dioxide. Me2TU dioxide formation correlated with Me2TU consumption as a function of added H2O2 concentration and was prevented by simultaneous addition of catalase (but not boiled catalase), superoxide dismutase, dimethyl sulfoxide, mannitol, or sodium benzoate. Me2TU dioxide formation, Me2TU consumption, and H2O2 concentration increases occurred in mixtures containing phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and normal human neutrophils but not in mixtures containing PMA and neutrophils from patients with chronic granulomatous disease or in mixtures containing PMA and normal neutrophils and catalase. Me2TU dioxide formation also occurred in isolated rat lungs perfused with Me2TU and H2O2 but not in lungs perfused with Me2TU and elastase, histamine, or oleic acid. In contrast, Me2TU dioxide formation did not occur after exposure of Me2TU to 60Co-generated hydroxyl radical or hypochlorous acid in the presence of catalase. The results indicate that reaction of Me2TU with H2O2 selectively forms Me2TU may be useful for assessing the presence and significance of H2O2 in biological systems

  9. Acetone/hexane recrystallization of HNAB

    Quinlin, W.T.; Evans, V.H.

    1977-08-01

    In the manufacturing process for hexanitroazobenzene (HNAB), the final step prior to heat treatment is a recrystallization of HNAB from an acetonitrile/tetrachlorethane mixture. The possibility that the above solvents might become unavailable at some future date and the toxicities of these solvents indicate a need for a new solvent system. Initial work using acetone/hexane in place of acetonitrite/tetrachloroethane indicated its feasibility (D. M. O'Keefe, Sandia Laboratories, Private Communication). The objective of the present work was to confirm the feasibility of the use of acetone/hexane system and then to scale-up the recrystallization to the size and type of equipment used in the manufacturing process. A 7.2 kg batch of HNAB was produced with the final recrystallization from the acetone/hexane system. The analysis of the HNAB-II compared favorably with that from the production process. A 50 g sample was furnished to Sandia Laboratory.

  10. Formation of hydrogen peroxide and degradation of phenol in synergistic system of pulsed corona discharge combined with TiO2 photocatalysis.

    Wang, Huijuan; Li, Jie; Quan, Xie; Wu, Yan; Li, Guofeng; Wang, Fangzheng

    2007-03-01

    In the present work, a synergistic system of pulsed corona discharge combined with TiO(2) photocatalysis has been developed to investigate the degradation rate of phenol solutions by varying experimental conditions of gas bubbling varieties (air, O(2), and Ar), solution pH values, and radical scavenger additives. The hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) concentration, which indicated the amount of hydroxyl radicals (OH) in the reaction system under different conditions of gas bubbling varieties and scavenger species, was also reviewed. The obtained results revealed that degradation efficiency of phenol could be increased by the addition of TiO(2) in pulsed discharge system. The gas of Ar and O(2) bubbled into the reaction system was found to be favorable for phenol degradation and H(2)O(2) formation. Both in air bubbling and in O(2) bubbling reaction system, the higher degradation rate of phenol occurred in the case of acidic solution. The addition of sodium carbonate or n-butanol in the solution displayed a negative effect for phenol removal, while the H(2)O(2) concentration showed different changing trend by adding different radical scavengers. The most effective degradation of the three main intermediates of catechol, 1,4-hydroquinone, and 1,4-benzoquinone formed during phenol decomposition existed in the synergistic system of pulsed corona discharge and TiO(2) photocatalysis bubbled with O(2). PMID:16920259

  11. Atmospheric hydrogen peroxide and organic hydroperoxides during PRIDE-PRD'06, China: their concentration, formation mechanism and contribution to secondary aerosols

    W. Hua

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 and organic hydroperoxides were measured from 18 to 30 July in 2006 during the PRIDE-PRD'06 campaign at Backgarden, a rural site located 48 km north of Guangzhou, a mega-city in southern China. A ground-based instrument was used as a scrubbing coil collector to sample ambient air, followed by on-site analysis by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC coupled with post-column derivatization and fluorescence detection. The H2O2 mixing ratio over the 13 days ranged from below the detection limit to a maximum of 4.6 ppbv, with a mean (and standard deviation of (1.26±1.24 ppbv during the daytime (08:00–20:00 LT. Methyl hydroperoxide (MHP, with a maximum of 0.8 ppbv and a mean (and standard deviation of (0.28±0.10 ppbv during the daytime, was the dominant organic hydroperoxide. Other organic peroxides, including bis-hydroxymethyl hydroperoxide (BHMP, peroxyacetic acid (PAA, hydroxymethyl hydroperoxide (HMHP, 1-hydroxy-ethyl hydroperoxide (1-HEHP and ethyl hydroperoxide (EHP, were detected occasionally. The concentration of H2O2 exhibited a pronounced diurnal variation on sunny days, with a peak mixing ratio in the afternoon (12:00–18:00 LT, but lacked an explicit diurnal cycle on cloudy days. Sometimes a second peak mixing ratio of H2O2 was observed during the evening, suggesting that H2O2 was produced by the ozonolysis of alkenes. The diurnal variation profile of MHP was, in general, consistent with that of H2O2. The estimation indicated that in the morning the H2O2 detected was formed mostly through local photochemical activity, with the rest probably attributable to vertical transport. It is notable that relatively high levels of H2O2 and MHP were found in polluted air. The unexpectedly high level of HO2 radicals

  12. Atmospheric hydrogen peroxide and organic hydroperoxides during PRIDE-PRD'06, China: their concentration, formation mechanism and contribution to secondary aerosols

    W. Hua

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 and organic hydroperoxides were measured from 18 to 30 July in 2006 during the PRIDE-PRD'06 campaign at Backgarden, a rural site located 48 km north of Guangzhou, a mega-city in southern China. A ground-based instrument was used as a scrubbing coil collector to sample ambient air, followed by on-site analysis by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC coupled with post-column derivatization and fluorescence detection. The H2O2 mixing ratio over the 13 days ranged from below the detection limit to a maximum of 4.6 ppbv, with a mean (and standard deviation of (1.26±1.24 ppbv during the daytime (08:00–20:00 LT. Methyl hydroperoxide (MHP, with a maximum of 0.8 ppbv and a mean (and standard deviation of (0.28±0.10 ppbv during the daytime, was the dominant organic hydroperoxide. Other organic peroxides, including bis-hydroxymethyl hydroperoxide (BHMP, peroxyacetic acid (PAA, hydroxymethyl hydroperoxide (HMHP, 1-hydroxy-ethyl hydroperoxide (1-HEHP and ethyl hydroperoxide (EHP, were detected occasionally. The concentration of H2O2 exhibited a pronounced diurnal variation on sunny days, with a peak mixing ratio in the afternoon (12:00–18:00 LT, but lacked an explicit diurnal cycle on cloudy days. Sometimes a second peak mixing ratio of H2O2 was observed during the evening, suggesting that H2O2 was produced by the ozonolysis of alkenes. The diurnal variation profile of MHP was, in general, consistent with that of H2O2. The estimation indicated that in the morning the H2O2 detected was formed mostly through local photochemical activity, with the rest probably attributable to vertical transport. It is notable that relatively high levels of H2O2 and MHP were found in polluted air. The unexpectedly high level of HO2 radicals

  13. Atmospheric Pressure Humid Argon DBD Plasma for the Application of Sterilization - Measurement and Simulation of Hydrogen, Oxygen, and Hydrogen Peroxide Formation

    Kirkpatrick, Mike; Dodet, Bénédicte; Odic, Emmanuel

    2007-01-01

    Hydrogen, oxygen, and hydrogen peroxide have been measured downstream of an atmospheric pressure humid argon dielectric barrier discharge. The yield of the three species was studied as a function of the discharge power and gas flow rate. Hydrogen peroxide was measured after dissolution into water downstream of the discharge, while hydrogen and oxygen were measured in the gas phase. The production rates of both hydrogen and oxygen were found to be at least one order of magnitude greater than t...

  14. Nonlinear diffusion in Acetone-Benzene Solution

    Obukhovsky, Vjacheslav V

    2010-01-01

    The nonlinear diffusion in multicomponent liquids under chemical reactions influence has been studied. The theory is applied to the analysis of mass transfer in a solution of acetone-benzene. It has been shown, that the creation of molecular complexes should be taken into account for the explanation of the experimental data on concentration dependence of diffusion coefficients. The matrix of mutual diffusivities has been found and effective parameters of the system have been computed.

  15. Acetone-butanol fermentation in Egypt

    Tantawi, M.

    1984-10-01

    Acetone and butanol can be produced by anaerobic fermentation of molasses with microorganisms such as Clostridium saccharobutylicum and Clostridium acetobutylicum. There are many steps in the process and the main problem is that the yields are quite susceptible to contamination. At the present time the process is uneconomical due to the cost of molasses, the considerable steam consumption for the sterilizing process and the expense of the disposal of the slops.

  16. Concentration of Hydrogen Peroxide

    Parrish, Clyde F. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    Methods for concentrating hydrogen peroxide solutions have been described. The methods utilize a polymeric membrane separating a hydrogen peroxide solution from a sweep gas or permeate. The membrane is selective to the permeability of water over the permeability of hydrogen peroxide, thereby facilitating the concentration of the hydrogen peroxide solution through the transport of water through the membrane to the permeate. By utilizing methods in accordance with the invention, hydrogen peroxide solutions of up to 85% by volume or higher may be generated at a point of use without storing substantial quantities of the highly concentrated solutions and without requiring temperatures that would produce explosive mixtures of hydrogen peroxide vapors.

  17. Synthesis of complex compounds in the system [ReOG5]2--thiosemicarbazone acetone-Hg-acetone

    Present article is devoted to synthesis of complex compounds in the system [ReOG5]2--thiosemicarbazone acetone-Hg-acetone. The literature data on complex compounds of various metals with thiosemicarbazone was summarized. The synthesis of complex compounds in the system [ReOG5]2--thiosemicarbazone acetone-Hg-acetone was conducted. The complex compounds of rhenium with methyl ident thiosemicarbazone were synthesized.

  18. Ultrasonic radiation induced lipid peroxidation in liposomal membrane

    Jana, A.K.; Agarwal, S.; Chatterjee, S.N.

    1986-12-01

    Ultrasonic radiation produced a dose dependent linear increase in lipid peroxidation (MDA formation) in the liposomal membrane. The yield of MDA was significantly inhibited by butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT), the antioxidant, sodium formate,the OH/sup ./ radical scavenger, and EDTA, the metal ion chelator. Ascorbic acid at low concentration increased the ultrasonic induced MDA formation while high concentrations inhibited lipid peroxidation. A mechanism of ultrasound induced lipid peroxidation is suggested.

  19. Synthesis and phototoxicity of isomeric 7,9-diglutathione pyrrole adducts: Formation of reactive oxygen species and induction of lipid peroxidation

    Liang Ma

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PAs are hepatotoxic, genotoxic, and carcinogenic in experimental animals. Because of their widespread distribution in the world, PA-containing plants are probably the most common poisonous plants affecting livestock, wildlife, and humans. Upon metabolism, PAs generate reactive dehydro-PAs and other pyrrolic metabolites that lead to toxicity. Dehydro-PAs are known to react with glutathione (GSH to form 7-GSH-(+/−-6,7-dihydro-7-hydroxy-1-hydroxymethyl-5H-pyrrolizine (7-GS-DHP in vivo and in vitro and 7,9-diGS-DHP in vitro. To date, the phototoxicity of GS-DHP adducts has not been well studied. In this study, we synthesized 7-GS-DHP, a tentatively assigned 9-GS-DHP, and two enantiomeric 7,9-diGS-DHP adducts by reaction of dehydromonocrotaline with GSH. The two 7,9-diGS-DHPs were separated by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC and their structures were characterized by 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR and 1H–1H correlation spectroscopy (COSY NMR spectral analysis. Photoirradiation of 7-GS-DHP, 9-GS-DHP, and the two 7,9-diGS-DHPs as well as dehydromonocrotaline, dehydroheliotrine, and the 7-R enantiomer of DHP (DHR, by UVA light at 0 J/cm2, 14 J/cm2, and 35 J/cm2 in the presence of a lipid, methyl linoleate, all resulted in lipid peroxidation in a light dose-responsive manner. The levels of lipid peroxidation induced by the two isomeric 7,9-diGS-DHPs were significantly higher than that by 7-GS-DHP and 9-GS-DHP. When 7,9-diGS-DHP was irradiated in the presence of sodium azide (NaN3, the level of lipid peroxidation decreased; lipid peroxidation was enhanced when methanol was replaced by deuterated methanol. These results suggest that singlet oxygen is a product induced by the irradiation of 7,9-diGS-DHP. When irradiated in the presence of superoxide dismutase (SOD, the level of lipid peroxidation decreased, indicating that lipid peroxidation is also mediated by superoxide. These results indicate that lipid

  20. Investigation of toxic effects of imidazolium ionic liquids, [bmim][BF4] and [omim][BF4], on marine mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis with or without the presence of conventional solvents, such as acetone

    Highlights: • The toxic effects of [bmim][BF4] and [omim][BF4] on mussels were investigated. • Both ILs could induce lethal and nonlethal effects on Mytilus galloprovincialis. • Different extent of IL-mediated adverse effects was observed in mussel hemocytes. • The alkyl chain length and lipophilicity of ILs are crucial for their toxicity. • Acetone influences the oxidative and genotoxic effects of [omim][BF4]. - Abstract: This study investigated the cytotoxic, oxidative and genotoxic effects of two commonly used imidazolium ionic liquids (ILs), [bmim][BF4] (1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium) and [omim][BF4] (1-methyl-3-octylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate), on the marine mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis, as well as whether acetone could mediate their toxic profile. In this context, mussels were firstly exposed to different concentrations of [bmim][BF4] or [omim][BF4], with or without the presence of acetone (at a final concentration of 0.06% v/v), for a period of 96 h, in order to determine the concentration that causes 50% mussel mortality (LC50 values) in each case. Thereafter, mussels were exposed to sub- and non-lethal concentrations of ILs for investigating their ability to cause lysosomal membrane impairment (with the use of neutral red retention assay/NRRT), superoxide anion and lipid peroxidation byproduct (malondialdehyde/MDA) formation, as well as DNA damage and formation of nuclear abnormalities in hemocytes. The results showed that [omim][BF4] was more toxic than [bmim][BF4] in all cases, while the presence of acetone resulted in a slight attenuation of its toxicity. The different toxic behavior of ILs was further revealed by the significantly lower levels of NRRT values observed in [omim][BF4]-treated mussels, compared to those occurring in [bmim][BF4] in all cases. Similarly, [bmim][BF4]-mediated oxidative and genotoxic effects were observed only in the highest concentration tested (10 mg L−1), while [omim][BF4]-mediated effects were enhanced at

  1. Atmospheric heteroseneous reaction of acetone: Adsorption and desorption kinetics and mechanisms on SiO2 particles

    JIE ChongYu; CHEN ZhongMing; WANG HongLi; HUA Wei; WANG CaiXia; LI Shuang

    2008-01-01

    Acetone plays an important role in photooxidation processes in the atmosphere. Up to date, little is known regarding the heterogeneous fate of acetone. In this study, the adsorption and desorption processes of acetone on SiO2 particles, which are the major constituent of mineral dust in the atmos-phere, have been investigated for the first time under the simulated atmospheric conditions, using in situ transmission Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. It is found that acetone molecules are ad-sorbed on the surfaces of SiO2 particles by van der Waals forces and hydrogen bonding forces in a nonreactive and reversible state. The rates of initial adsorption and initial desorption, initial uptake coefficients and adsorption concentrations at equilibrium have been determined at different relative humidity. The presence of water vapor cannot result in the formation of new substances, but can de-crease the adsorption ability by consuming or overlapping the isolated OH groups on the surfaces of SiO2 particles. In the desorption process, a considerable amount of acetone molecules will remain on SiO2 particles in dry air, whereas acetone molecules are almost completely desorbed at a high relative humidity. In order to evaluate the role of heterogeneous reactions of acetone and other carbonyl compounds in the atmosphere, a new model fitting the atmospheric conditions is needed.

  2. Acetone-butanol Fermentation of Marine Macroalgae

    Huesemann, Michael H.; Kuo, Li-Jung; Urquhart, Lindsay A.; Gill, Gary A.; Roesijadi, Guritno

    2012-03-01

    Mannitol and laminarin, which are present at high concentrations in the brown macroalga Saccharina spp., a type of kelp, are potential biochemical feedstocks for butanol production. To test their bioconversion potential, aqueous extracts of the kelp Saccharina spp., mannitol, and glucose (a product of laminarin hydrolysis) were subjected to acetone-butanol fermentation by Clostridium acetobutylicum (ATCC 824). Both mannitol and glucose were readily fermented. Mixed substrate fermentations with glucose and mannitol resulted in diauxic growth of C. acetobutylicum with glucose depletion preceding mannitol utilization. Fermentation of kelp extract exhibited triauxic growth, with an order of utilization of free glucose, mannitol, and bound glucose, presumably laminarin. The lag in laminarin utilization reflected the need for enzymatic hydrolysis of this polysaccharide into fermentable sugars. The butanol and total solvent yields were 0.12 g/g and 0.16 g/g, respectively, indicating that significant improvements are still needed to make industrial-scale acetone-butanol fermentations of seaweed economically feasible.

  3. Uses of peroxide on the formation of chlorinated phenolics by gas chromatography technique in nonwood pulps to reduce toxicity in paper manufacturing

    Prakash, Divya; Kumar, S.; Tomar, Neeraj

    2016-05-01

    ECF technology has been established itself as the most preferred process worldwide. Peroxide addition minimizes the effluent color. The study deals with the bleaching of Bamboo and Jute Cady pulps with chlorine and peroxide treatment and identification of various chlorophenolics compounds. The results show that quantity of the total chlorophenolic compounds formed decreases up to 54% in total chlorophenolic compound in the CEH effluent and the COD and color values are reduced by 35% and 33% respectively as E stage is changed to Ep stage in Bamboo pulp. And there is a reduction of 52% in total chlorophenolic compound in the CEH effluent when E stage is changed to Ep. and the COD and color values are reduced by 30% and 33% respectively as E stage is changed to Ep stage in Jute Cady pulp

  4. The effect of lipid peroxidation products on reactive oxygen species formation and nitric oxide production in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophages

    Ambrožová, Gabriela; Pekarová, Michaela; Lojek, Antonín

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 25, č. 1 (2011), s. 145-152. ISSN 0887-2333 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) OC08058; GA ČR(CZ) GA524/08/1753 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : lipid peroxidation products * reactive oxygen species * nitric oxide Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 2.775, year: 2011

  5. Stable gold nanoparticles obtained in pure acetone by laser ablation with different wavelengths

    We prepared gold nanoparticles (NPs) by ps laser ablation in pure acetone and water with 532 and 1,064 nm wavelengths. The NPs obtained in pure acetone are stable for years and, depending on the fabrication conditions, they can be very small, quasi monodisperse and fluorescent. These properties are not lost when they are transferred from acetone to water. Post-irradiation tests of the colloids with 532 nm pulses, before and after phase transfer to water, and surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS), either on liquid and on dried samples, suggest that the stabilization mechanism in acetone is related to the light-induced formation on the gold surface of enolate which, in some cases, can undergo degradation with formation of amorphous carbon. Micro-SERS tests were also used to demonstrate that functionalization of the particles with 1,10-phenanthroline or adenine is possible after transfer to the water phase, which opens the way to the use of such structures for biological and medical applications, such as biocompatible fluorescent or Raman markers.

  6. Stable gold nanoparticles obtained in pure acetone by laser ablation with different wavelengths

    Giorgetti, Emilia, E-mail: emilia.giorgetti@fi.isc.cnr.it [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, INSTM and Istituto dei Sistemi Complessi (Italy); Muniz-Miranda, Maurizio [Universita di Firenze, Dipartimento di Chimica ' Ugo Schiff' (Italy); Marsili, Paolo; Scarpellini, David [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Istituto dei Sistemi Complessi (Italy); Giammanco, Francesco [University of Pisa, Department of Physics ' E. Fermi' (Italy)

    2012-01-15

    We prepared gold nanoparticles (NPs) by ps laser ablation in pure acetone and water with 532 and 1,064 nm wavelengths. The NPs obtained in pure acetone are stable for years and, depending on the fabrication conditions, they can be very small, quasi monodisperse and fluorescent. These properties are not lost when they are transferred from acetone to water. Post-irradiation tests of the colloids with 532 nm pulses, before and after phase transfer to water, and surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS), either on liquid and on dried samples, suggest that the stabilization mechanism in acetone is related to the light-induced formation on the gold surface of enolate which, in some cases, can undergo degradation with formation of amorphous carbon. Micro-SERS tests were also used to demonstrate that functionalization of the particles with 1,10-phenanthroline or adenine is possible after transfer to the water phase, which opens the way to the use of such structures for biological and medical applications, such as biocompatible fluorescent or Raman markers.

  7. Production of uranium peroxide

    The process of recovering uranium values as uranium peroxide from an aqueous uranyl solution containing dissolved vanadium and sodium impurities, characterized by treating the uranyl solution with hydrogen peroxide in an amount sufficient to have an excess of at least 0.5 parts H2O2 per part vanadium (V2O5) above the stoichio-metric amount required to form the uranium peroxide, the hydrogen peroxide treatment being carried out in three sequential phases consisting of: 1) a precipitation phase in which the hydrogen peroxide is added to the uranyl solution to precipitate the uranium peroxide and the pH of the reaction media maintained in the range of 3.0 to 7.0 for a period of 5 to 180 60 minutes after the hydrogen peroxide addition; 2) a digestion phase in which the pH of the reaction medium is maintained in the range of 3.0 to 7.0 for a period of 5 to 180 minutes and 3) a final phase in which the pH of the reaction media is maintained in the range of 4.0 to 7.0 for a period of 1 to 60 minutes during which time the uranium peroxide is separated from the reaction solution containing the dissolved vanadium and sodium impurities, the excess hydrogen peroxide aforesaid being maintained until the uranium peroxide is separated from the reaction mixture

  8. Apparatus and method for monitoring breath acetone and diabetic diagnostics

    Duan, Yixiang (Los Alamos, NM); Cao, Wenqing (Los Alamos, NM)

    2008-08-26

    An apparatus and method for monitoring diabetes through breath acetone detection and quantitation employs a microplasma source in combination with a spectrometer. The microplasma source provides sufficient energy to produce excited acetone fragments from the breath gas that emit light. The emitted light is sent to the spectrometer, which generates an emission spectrum that is used to detect and quantify acetone in the breath gas.

  9. Production of uranium peroxide

    The invention provides a process for recovering uranium values as uranium peroxide from an aqueous uranyl solution containing dissolved vanadium and sodium impurities. It consists of treating the uranyl solution with hydrogen peroxide in an amount equal to at least 0.5 part H2O2 per part of vanadium (V2O5) in solution in excess of the stoichiometric (1.26 parts/part U3O8) amount required to form the uranium peroxide. The hydrogen peroxide treatment is carried out in three phases. (auth)

  10. Atmospheric hydrogen peroxide and organic hydroperoxides during PRIDE-PRD'06, China: their concentration, formation mechanism and contribution to secondary aerosols

    Hua, W.; Z. M. Chen; Zhang, Y.; Hu, M; Jie, C. Y.; Kondo, Y.; Hofzumahaus, A.; Takegawa, N.; Lu, K.; Miyazaki, Y.; K. Kita; Wang, H L

    2008-01-01

    Atmospheric hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and organic hydroperoxides were measured from 18 to 30 July in 2006 during the PRIDE-PRD'06 campaign at Backgarden, a rural site located 48 km north of Guangzhou, a mega-city in southern China. A ground-based instrument was used as a scrubbing coil collector to sample ambient air, followed by on-site analysis by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) coupled with post-column derivatization and fluorescence detection. The H2O2 mixing ratio over the 1...

  11. Atmospheric hydrogen peroxide and organic hydroperoxides during PRIDE-PRD'06, China: their concentration, formation mechanism and contribution to secondary aerosols

    Hua, W.; Z. M. Chen; Jie, C. Y.; Kondo, Y.; Hofzumahaus, A.; Takegawa, N.; K. D. Lu; Miyazaki, Y.; K. Kita; Wang, H L; Zhang, Y H; Hu, M

    2008-01-01

    Atmospheric hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and organic hydroperoxides were measured from 18 to 30 July in 2006 during the PRIDE-PRD'06 campaign at Backgarden, a rural site located 48 km north of Guangzhou, a mega-city in southern China. A ground-based instrument was used as a scrubbing coil collector to sample ambient air, followed by on-site analysis by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) coupled with post-column derivatization and fluor...

  12. Alkali-metal ion coordination in uranyl(VI) poly-peroxo complexes in solution, inorganic analogues to crown-ethers. Part 2. Complex formation in the tetramethyl ammonium-, Li(+)-, Na(+)- and K(+)-uranyl(VI)-peroxide-carbonate systems.

    Zanonato, Pier Luigi; Szabó, Zoltán; Vallet, Valerie; Di Bernardo, Plinio; Grenthe, Ingmar

    2015-10-01

    The constitution and equilibrium constants of ternary uranyl(vi) peroxide carbonate complexes [(UO2)p(O2)q(CO3)r](2(p-q-r)) have been determined at 0 °C in 0.50 M MNO3, M = Li, K, and TMA (tetramethyl ammonium), ionic media using potentiometric and spectrophotometric data; (17)O NMR data were used to determine the number of complexes present. The formation of cyclic oligomers, "[(UO2)(O2)(CO3)]n", n = 4, 5, 6, with different stoichiometries depending on the ionic medium used, suggests that Li(+), Na(+), K(+) and TMA ions act as templates for the formation of uranyl peroxide rings where the uranyl-units are linked by μ-η(2)-η(2) bridged peroxide-ions. The templating effect is due to the coordination of the M(+)-ions to the uranyl oxygen atoms, where the coordination of Li(+) results in the formation of Li[(UO2)(O2)(CO3)]4(7-), Na(+) and K(+) in the formation of Na/K[(UO2)(O2)(CO3)]5(9-) complexes, while the large tetramethyl ammonium ion promotes the formation of two oligomers, TMA[(UO2)(O2)(CO3)]5(9-) and TMA[(UO2)(O2)(CO3)]6(11-). The NMR spectra demonstrate that the coordination of Na(+) in the five- and six-membered oligomers is significantly stronger than that of TMA(+); these observations suggest that the templating effect is similar to the one observed in the synthesis of crown-ethers. The NMR experiments also demonstrate that the exchange between TMA[(UO2)(O2)(CO3)]5(9-) and TMA[(UO2)(O2)(CO3)]6(11-) is slow on the (17)O chemical shift time-scale, while the exchange between TMA[(UO2)(O2)(CO3)]6(11-) and Na[(UO2)(O2)(CO3)]6(11-) is fast. There was no indication of the presence of large clusters of the type identified by Burns and Nyman (M. Nyman and P. C. Burns, Chem. Soc. Rev., 2012, 41, 7314-7367) and possible reasons for this and the implications for the synthesis of large clusters are briefly discussed. PMID:26331776

  13. Thermal and Ablative Properties of Ipns and Composites of High Ortho Resole Resin and Difurfurylidene Acetone

    Tariq S. NAJIM

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available High ortho resole resin was prepared by condensation of phenol with excess of formaldehyde in the presence of magnesium oxide as catalyst. Reaction of furfuraldehyde with acetone in basic medium led to difurfurylidene acetone (DFA. Their interpenetrating polymer network (IPNS were obtained by the reaction of predetermined quantities of difurfurylidene acetone and high ortho resole using p-toluene sulphonic acid (PTSA as curing agent. The thermal behavior of the resins was studied using thermogravimetry (TG under ambient and nitrogen atmospheres over a temperature range of (25-1000 Cº. It was observed that the IPN of 20% DFA – 80% resole has higher thermal stability than that of resole alone and the decomposition temperature was higher by 80 Cº. This behavior was attributed to highly cross linked structure and thermally stable backbone of ploy difurfurylidene acetone due to formation of ladder structure.Impregnation of chopped fiber glass type (E with the polymeric solutions was used to prepare their composites, and the ablative properties were investigated according to ASTM E-285 –80. It was observed that the IPN of (DFA- resol perform better than the resole composite alone.

  14. Effect of Cobalt Particle Size on Acetone Steam Reforming

    Sun, Junming; Zhang, He; Yu, Ning; Davidson, Stephen D.; Wang, Yong

    2015-06-11

    Carbon-supported cobalt nanoparticles with different particle sizes were synthesized and characterized by complementary characterization techniques such as X-ray diffraction, N-2 sorption, acetone temperature-programmed desorption, transmission electron microscopy, and CO chemisorption. Using acetone steam reforming reaction as a probe reaction, we revealed a volcano-shape curve of the intrinsic activity (turnover frequency of acetone) and the CO2 selectivity as a function of the cobalt particle size with the highest activity and selectivity observed at a particle size of approximately 12.8nm. Our results indicate that the overall performance of acetone steam reforming is related to a combination of particle-size-dependent acetone decomposition, water dissociation, and the oxidation state of the cobalt nanoparticles.

  15. The efficacy of acetone in the sterilisation of ophthalmic instruments

    Agrawal Vinay

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available Acetone has been considered a quick, effective and less expensive chemical sterilising agent and continues to be used by ophthalmic surgeons, at least in developing countries. Its utility however has been questioned recently. This study was designed to assess the efficacy of acetone against Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Bacillus subtilis and Aspergillus flavus present on ophthalmic surgical instruments (forceps, sutures. The instruments were contaminated by immersion in standard suspensions of the organisms and thereafter were either unwashed (group-I, washed and dried (group-II or only washed (group-III before immersion in acetone. The exposure to acetone was kept at 3, 10 and 20 minutes in each group. The results showed that acetone could eliminate Pseudomonas (vegetative bacteria after 10 minutes exposure in unwashed group and 3 minutes exposure in washed groups. It was ineffective against spore bearing bacteria (B. subtilis and fungus (Aspergillus flavus even after 20 minutes of exposure

  16. The identification of chlorinated acetones in analyses of aged triacetone triperoxide (TATP).

    Fitzgerald, Mark; Bilusich, Daniel

    2012-09-01

    The organic peroxide explosive triacetone triperoxide (TATP) is regularly encountered by law enforcement agents in various stages of its production, storage, or usage. In a previous study, it has been demonstrated that isolated, rigorously purified, TATP may degrade to form a series of chlorinated acetones when directly treated with excess concentrated hydrochloric acid. The current study extends this work to examine whether this phenomenon may be measured during the more feasible scenario of aging of rudimentarily purified TATP contaminated with trace reaction mixture. It was demonstrated that solid-phase microextraction gas chromatography/mass spectrometry analyses of aged TATP that was synthesized utilizing hydrochloric acid catalyst may identify the presence of the degradation products chloroacetone and 1,1-dichloroacetone. Upon aging of TATP synthesized utilizing either sulfuric or nitric acid catalyst, no acid specific degradation products could be identified. These findings may be exploited by forensic chemists in the analyses of TATP samples. PMID:22881036

  17. Acetone Extract of Almond Hulls Provides Protection against Oxidative Damage and Membrane Protein Degradation.

    Meshkini, Azadeh

    2016-06-01

    Several studies have revealed that among foods, the consumption of edible nuts has beneficial effects on health which are attributed to their high content of potent antioxidants. Among nuts, the whole seed of the almond (Prunus dulcis) has been demonstrated to possess potent free radical scavenging activity, which is related to the presence of phenolic compounds. The aim of the current study is to evaluate the polyphenol content and the antioxidant ability of almond hull, which is an agriculture solid waste. The present results revealed that among different extraction methods, the acetone extract of almond hulls has a high content of phenolic and flavonoid compounds and a high antioxidant ability, which were determined by using the phosphomolybdenum method and by measuring the potency of the antioxidant, respectively. Moreover, the experimental data disclosed that the acetone extract of almond hulls provides protection against the oxidative damage and the membrane protein degradation that are caused in human erythrocytes by hydrogen peroxide. These phenomena may likely be due to the recruitment of antioxidants by cell membranes and/or translocation to cytosol. Overall, almond hull extract could be considered as a natural source of antioxidants, and its consumption could have a positive effect on human health. PMID:27342887

  18. LIPID PEROXIDATION IN PREECLAMPSIA

    T. Sharmila Krishna; D. Raja Rajeswari; E. Venkat Rao; Sk. Deepthi; Naidu, J.N.

    2015-01-01

    Hypertension in pregnancy is a leading cause of both maternal and fetal mortality and morbidity. Preeclampsia is characterised by hypertension and proteinuria. Lipid peroxidation is an important factor in the pathophysiology of Preeclampsia. The present study was undertaken to determine Serum Malondialdehyde (MDA) levels , a product of lipid peroxidation , in clinically diagnosed Preeclamptic women(n=30) and the values were compared with that of Normotensive pregnant women (n=30) aged between...

  19. Protein peroxides - key intermediates in oxidative damage?

    Proteins comprise a major target for reactive radicals and other oxidants in biological systems as a result of their abundance and high rate constants for reaction. Kinetic data suggest that proteins consume > 75% of the hydroxyl radicals generated by gamma radiation. Hydrogen atom abstraction from protein side-chains or the backbone gives rise to carbon-centred radicals, which react at diffusion-controlled rates to give peroxyl radicals. Current data suggests that the major decay route for these peroxyl radicals is via hydrogen atom- or electron-abstraction from neighbouring residues with resultant formation of a further protein radical (thereby initiating chain reactions) and a protein peroxide. These peroxides are major products of protein oxidation induced by a range of species including hydroxyl, alkoxyl and peroxyl radicals, metal ion-catalysed systems, peroxynitrite, activated white cells and singlet oxygen. The yield of these materials, based on the amount of initial oxidant, can be as high as 95%, though this depends on the species involved and the conditions used. These species can be formed in an essentially random manner on both side-chains and the backbone (e.g with hydroxyl radicals) or with great specificity (e.g. with singlet oxygen, where His, Trp and Tyr are the major targets). Some of these peroxides have been characterised. Protein peroxides have half-lives of minutes to days at 4 deg C but can decay rapidly at 37 deg C, or on exposure to UV light or metal ions. Peroxide decomposition can give further radicals, identified by EPR spin trapping, via cleavage of the peroxide bond. Evidence has been obtained for reaction of these protein peroxides, via both radical and non-radical pathways, with other cellular targets including other proteins (e.g. to give enzymatic inactivation), with lipids (thereby initiating peroxidation) and with DNA (to give 8-oxodG, strand breaks and DNA-protein cross-links)

  20. Formation and self-assembly growth of palladium nanospheres into flowerlike microstructures using hydrogen peroxide as a sole reducing and shape-controlling agent

    Amornkitbamrung, Lunjakorn; Pienpinijtham, Prompong; Thammacharoen, Chuchaat; Ekgasit, Sanong, E-mail: sanong.e@chula.ac.th [Chulalongkorn University, Sensor Research Unit, Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science (Thailand)

    2015-11-15

    A novel and facile green synthetic method for creating flowerlike palladium microstructures (FPdµSTs) using hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) as a sole reducing and shape-controlling agent was developed. FPdµSTs with particle size in the range of 1–5 μm were successfully synthesized. Morphology (size and shape) and complexity of the FPdµSTs could be tuned through the synthetic conditions (i.e., concentrations of H{sub 2}PdCl{sub 4} and H{sub 2}O{sub 2}). H{sub 2}O{sub 2} played an important role in creating palladium microstructures by reduction of H{sub 2}PdCl{sub 4} under acidic condition. The time-dependent investigation on the particle growth suggested that the FPdµSTs evolved from spherical palladium nanoparticles with a particle size of 3 nm. The small particles, which were formed at the early stage of the reaction, aggregated and grew into complex flowerlike microstructures.

  1. BaFe{sub 12}O{sub 19} powder with high magnetization prepared by acetone-aided coprecipitation

    Yu, Hsuan-Fu, E-mail: hfyu@mail.tku.edu.tw

    2013-09-15

    BaFe{sub 12}O{sub 19} particles with high magnetization were produced using an acetone-aided coprecipitation process. An aqueous solution of iron and barium nitrates, in an Fe{sup 3+}/Ba{sup 2+} molar ratio of 12, was added in a stirred precipitation liquid medium composed of H{sub 2}O, CH{sub 3}(CO)CH{sub 3} and NH{sub 4}OH. After reacting metallic ions with ammonia, the precipitates were formed, centrifugally filtered, freeze dried and calcined. Effects of amount of the acetone in the precipitation liquid medium on the formation of crystalline BaFe{sub 12}O{sub 19} were investigated. The presence of acetone in the precipitation liquid medium can greatly promote formation of the crystalline BaFe{sub 12}O{sub 19} at temperature as low as 650 °C and can enhance magnetization of the derived particles. On the other hand, raising the calcination temperature can effectively accelerate development of crystallite morphology and magnetic characters of the barium hexaferrites. While the barium hexaferrite powder obtained without acetone additions and calcined at 1000 °C had magnetization (measured at 50 kOe; M(50 kOe)) of 63.5 emu/g, remanence magnetization (Mr) of 31.3 emu/g and coercivity (Hc) of 4.7 kOe, the single magnetic domain size BaFe{sub 12}O{sub 19} powder with M(50 kOe) of 70.6 emu/g, Mr of 34.4 emu/g and Hc of 3.7 kOe was produced at 1000 °C, using a precipitation liquid medium of 64 vol% acetone. - Highlights: • BaFe{sub 12}O{sub 19} with high magnetic characters was produced by an acetone-aided coprecipitation. • The effects of acetone addition in the precipitation on the formation of BaFe{sub 12}O{sub 19} were studied. • Acetone presence in the precipitation liquid medium promoted BaFe{sub 12}O{sub 19} formation at ≥650 °C. • BaFe{sub 12}O{sub 19} with M(50 kOe) of 70.6 emu/g, Mr of 34.4 emu/g and Hc of 3.7 kOe was obtained.

  2. Viscosities and refractive indices of binary systems acetone+1-propanol, acetone+1,2-propanediol and acetone+1,3-propanediol

    Živković Emila M.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Viscosities and refractive indices of three binary systems, acetone+1-propanol, acetone+1,2-propanediol and acetone+1,3-propanediol, were measured at eight temperatures (288.15, 293.15, 298.15, 303.15, 308.15, 313.15, 318.15, 323.15K and at atmospheric pressure. From these data viscosity deviations and deviations in refractive index were calculated and fitted to the Redlich-Kister equation. The viscosity modelling was done by two types of models: predictive UNIFAC-VISCO and ASOG VISCO and correlative Teja-Rice and McAlister equations. The refractive indices of binary mixtures were predicted by various mixing rules and compared with experimental data. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 172063

  3. Oxygenated compounds in aged biomass burning plumes over the Eastern Mediterranean: evidence for strong secondary production of methanol and acetone

    R. Holzinger

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Airborne measurements of acetone, methanol, PAN, acetonitrile (by Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometry, and CO (by Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy have been performed during the Mediterranean Intensive Oxidants Study (MINOS, August 2001. In the course of the campaign 10 biomass burning plumes, identified by strongly elevated acetonitrile mixing ratios, were found. The characteristic biomass burning signatures obtained from these plumes reveal secondary production of acetone and methanol, while CO photochemically declines in the plumes. Mean excess mixing ratios – normalized to CO – of 1.8%, 0.20%, 3.8%, and 0.65% for acetone, acetonitrile, methanol, and PAN, respectively, were found in the plumes. By scaling to an assumed global annual source of 663–807 Tg CO, biomass burning emissions of 25–31 and 29–35 Tg/yr for acetone and methanol are estimated, respectively. Our measurements suggest that the present biomass burning contributions of acetone and methanol are significantly underestimated due to the neglect of secondary formation. Median acetonitrile mixing ratios throughout the troposphere were around 150 pmol/mol; this is in accord with current biomass burning inventories and an atmospheric lifetime of ~6 months.

  4. Oxygenated compounds in aged biomass burning plumes over the Eastern Mediterranean: evidence for strong secondary production of methanol and acetone

    R. Holzinger

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Airborne measurements of acetone, methanol, PAN, acetonitrile (by Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometry, and CO (by Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy have been performed during the Mediterranean Intensive Oxidants Study (MINOS August 2001. We have identified ten biomass burning plumes from strongly elevated acetonitrile mixing ratios. The characteristic biomass burning signatures obtained from these plumes reveal secondary production of acetone and methanol, while CO photochemically declines in the plumes. Mean excess mixing ratios - normalized to CO - of 1.8%, 0.20%, 3.8%, and 0.65% for acetone, acetonitrile, methanol, and PAN, respectively, were found. By scaling to an assumed global annual source of 663-807Tg CO, biomass burning emissions of 25-31 and 29-35 Tg/yr for acetone and methanol are estimated, respectively. Our measurements suggest that the present biomass burning contributions of acetone and methanol are significantly underestimated due to the neglect of secondary formation within the plume. Median acetonitrile mixing ratios throughout the troposphere were around 150pmol/mol, in accord with current biomass burning inventories and an atmospheric lifetime of ~6 months.

  5. Synthesis and Analysis of Resorcinol-Acetone Copolymer

    Gen-ichi Konishi; Ataru Kobayashi

    2009-01-01

    Synthesis and characterization of resorcinol-acetone copolymer is described. The polymer was prepared by trifluoroacetic acid-catalyzed polymerization of resorcinol with acetone. According to the 1H-NMR, 13C-NMR, and MALDI-TOF Mass spectra data, the obtained polymer had three types of repeating units: isopropylidene bridged-resorcinol, chromane ring, and spiro-shaped double chromane ring, indicating that polymerization proceeded via simultaneous addition-condensation and cyclization of resorc...

  6. Nitric oxide-based protein modification: formation and site-specificity of protein S-nitrosylation: Could protein S-nitrosylation be the unifying oxidative modification to explain the cellular signaling activity of superoxide and hydrogen peroxide?

    Clement, Marie-Veronique

    2014-10-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) function as signaling molecules in physiological settings by acting as second messengers in response to external stimuli such as growth factors, cytokines and hormones. The nature of the ROS involved in cell signaling as well as the underlying mechanisms by which ROS modify protein function to influence cellular processes have been unfolding over the past decade. ROS and RNS influence various cellular processes by altering the function of critical proteins via reversible oxidation of "reactive cysteine" residues. Protein S-nitrosylation is a mechanism of nitric oxide-based signaling, however, while the presence of NO is sufficient and may be a prerequisite for the formation of cysteine-SNO, we reasoned that if protein-SNO formation is a critical cystein modification for redox driven signal transduction, an increase in intracellular ROS such as H2O2 and O2(-), shown to be independently involved in cell signaling, might both promote the formation of protein-SNO. In this respect, the present study shows that an increase in protein-SNO was detected not only upon an increase in the intracellular level of nitric oxide (NO), but also following exposure to low concentration of exogenous hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) or upon inhibition of the Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase that results in increased intracellular O2(-). PMID:26461291

  7. [Hydrogen peroxide in artificial photosynthesizing systems].

    Lobanov, A V; Komissarov, G G

    2014-01-01

    From the point of view of the concepts of hydrogen peroxide as a source of photosynthetic oxygen (hydrogen) coordination and photochemical properties of chlorophyll and its aggregates towards hydrogen peroxide were considered. The binding energy of H2O and H2O2 with chlorophyll and chlorophyllide depending on their form (monomers, dimers and trimers) was estimated by quantum chemical calculations. It is shown that at an increase of the degree of the pigment aggregation binding energy of H2O2 was more than the energy of H2O. Analysis of experimental results of the photochemical decomposition of hydrogen peroxide using chlorophyll was carried out. Estimates of the thermodynamic parameters (deltaG degrees and deltaH degrees) of the formation of organic compounds from CO2 with water and hydrogen peroxide were compared. The interaction of CO2 with H2O2 requires much less energy consumption than with water for all considered cases. The formation of organic products (formaldehyde, alcohols, carboxylic and carbonylic compounds) and simultaneous production of O2 under the influence of visible light in the systems of inorganic carbon--hydrogen peroxide--chlorophyll (phthalocyanine) is detected by GC/MS method, FTIR spectroscopy, and chemical analysis. PMID:25702472

  8. Phytic Acid Inhibits Lipid Peroxidation In Vitro

    Alicja Zajdel

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Phytic acid (PA has been recognized as a potent antioxidant and inhibitor of iron-catalyzed hydroxyl radical formation under in vitro and in vivo conditions. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate, with the use of HPLC/MS/MS, whether PA is capable of inhibiting linoleic acid autoxidation and Fe(II/ascorbate-induced peroxidation, as well as Fe(II/ascorbate-induced lipid peroxidation in human colonic epithelial cells. PA at 100 μM and 500 μM effectively inhibited the decay of linoleic acid, both in the absence and presence of Fe(II/ascorbate. The observed inhibitory effect of PA on Fe(II/ascorbate-induced lipid peroxidation was lower (10–20% compared to that of autoxidation. PA did not change linoleic acid hydroperoxides concentration levels after 24 hours of Fe(II/ascorbate-induced peroxidation. In the absence of Fe(II/ascorbate, PA at 100 μM and 500 μM significantly suppressed decomposition of linoleic acid hydroperoxides. Moreover, PA at the tested nontoxic concentrations (100 μM and 500 μM significantly decreased 4-hydroxyalkenal levels in Caco-2 cells which structurally and functionally resemble the small intestinal epithelium. It is concluded that PA inhibits linoleic acid oxidation and reduces the formation of 4-hydroxyalkenals. Acting as an antioxidant it may help to prevent intestinal diseases induced by oxygen radicals and lipid peroxidation products.

  9. Activation of Acetone and Other Simple Ketones in Anaerobic Bacteria.

    Heider, Johann; Schühle, Karola; Frey, Jasmin; Schink, Bernhard

    2016-01-01

    Acetone and other ketones are activated for subsequent degradation through carboxylation by many nitrate-reducing, phototrophic, and obligately aerobic bacteria. Acetone carboxylation leads to acetoacetate, which is subsequently activated to a thioester and degraded via thiolysis. Two different types of acetone carboxylases have been described, which require either 2 or 4 ATP equivalents as an energy supply for the carboxylation reaction. Both enzymes appear to combine acetone enolphosphate with carbonic phosphate to form acetoacetate. A similar but more complex enzyme is known to carboxylate the aromatic ketone acetophenone, a metabolic intermediate in anaerobic ethylbenzene metabolism in denitrifying bacteria, with simultaneous hydrolysis of 2 ATP to 2 ADP. Obligately anaerobic sulfate-reducing bacteria activate acetone to a four-carbon compound as well, but via a different process than bicarbonate- or CO2-dependent carboxylation. The present evidence indicates that either carbon monoxide or a formyl residue is used as a cosubstrate, and that the overall ATP expenditure of this pathway is substantially lower than in the known acetone carboxylase reactions. PMID:26958851

  10. Breath acetone concentration; biological variability and the influence of diet

    Previous measurements of acetone concentrations in the exhaled breath of healthy individuals and the small amount of comparable data for individuals suffering from diabetes are briefly reviewed as a prelude to the presentation of new data on the sporadic and wide variations of breath acetone that occur in ostensibly healthy individuals. Data are also presented which show that following a ketogenic diet taken by eight healthy individuals their breath acetone concentrations increased up to five times over the subsequent 6 h. Similarly, the breath acetone increased six and nine times when a low carbohydrate diet was taken by two volunteers and remained high for the several days for which the diet was continued. These new data, together with the previous data, clearly indicate that diet and natural intra-individual biological and diurnal variability result in wide variations in breath acetone concentration. This places an uncertainty in the use of breath acetone alone to monitor blood glucose and glycaemic control, except and unless the individual acts as their own control and is cognizant of the need for dietary control. (note)

  11. Extraction of defatted rice bran with subcritical aqueous acetone.

    Chiou, Tai-Ying; Neoh, Tze Loon; Kobayashi, Takashi; Adachi, Shuji

    2012-01-01

    Defatted rice bran extracts were obtained by subcritical treatment using aqueous acetone as extractant. Treatment with 40% (v/v) acetone at 230 °C for 5 min yielded an extract with the highest 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging activity (0.274 mmol of ascorbic acid/g of bran), total carbohydrate (0.188 g/g of bran), protein (0.512 g/g of bran), and total phenolic contents (88.2 mg of gallic acid/g of bran). The effect of treatment temperature (70-230 °C) was investigated using 40% (v/v) acetone, and the extract under 230 °C treatment showed the highest levels of all the determinations described above. The extracts obtained with various concentrations of aqueous acetone were subjected to UV absorption spectra and HPLC analysis, and the results showed changes in composition and polarity. Antioxidative activity evaluated against oxidation of bulk linoleic acid of the extract obtained with 80% (v/v) acetone was higher than that not only of the extract from subcritical water treatment but also of that obtained 40% (v/v) acetone treatment. PMID:22878207

  12. Phytic Acid Inhibits Lipid Peroxidation In Vitro

    Alicja Zajdel; Adam Wilczok; Ludmiła Węglarz; Zofia Dzierżewicz

    2013-01-01

    Phytic acid (PA) has been recognized as a potent antioxidant and inhibitor of iron-catalyzed hydroxyl radical formation under in vitro and in vivo conditions. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate, with the use of HPLC/MS/MS, whether PA is capable of inhibiting linoleic acid autoxidation and Fe(II)/ascorbate-induced peroxidation, as well as Fe(II)/ascorbate-induced lipid peroxidation in human colonic epithelial cells. PA at 100 μM and 500 μM effectively inhibited the deca...

  13. Pyrolysis of furfural-acetone resin as matrix precursor for new carbon materials

    2008-01-01

    In order to increase the understanding of the pyrolysis mechanism,Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and thermogravimetry-mass spectrometric coupling technique (TG-MS) were used to study the pyrolysis behavior of furfural-acetone resin used for new carbon materials.The curing and carbonization mechanisms of furfural-acetone resin were mainly investigated;structural changes and volatile products evolved during pyrolysis were analyzed.The results indicate that,during pyrolysis of furfural-acetone resin adding 7% (mass fraction) phosphorous acid as curing agent,the rupture of C-O bond in the five-membered heterocycle firstly takes place to release oxygen atoms and then does the C--H bond,which enable the molecular chain to cross-link and condense,then lead to the formation of three dimensional networking structure.With the increase of pyrolyzing temperature,the scission of methyl and the opening of furan ring are generated.As a result,the recomposition of molecular chain structure isgenerated and a hexatomic fused ring containing double bonds is built.The main volatile products during pyrolysis of furfuralacetone resin are H2O,and a small mount of CO,CO2 and CH4.At elevated temperatures,dehydrogenation takes place and hydrogen gas is evolved.

  14. Quantum chemistry research structure and electronic properties of peroxides

    Grytselyak, Tymofiy; Shchodryi, Volodymyr; Dutka, Volodymyr; Kovalskyi, Yaroslav

    2013-01-01

    We have calculated the optimal structure, electronic properties and heat of formation (?fH? ) peroxide compounds with the help of semiempirical quantum chemical methods. Theoretically calculated values well coincide with the values found from thermochemical experiments.

  15. Influence of Nafion film on oxygen reduction reaction and hydrogen peroxide formation on Pt electrode for proton exchange membrane fuel cell

    The influence of Nafion film on ORR kinetics and H2O2 formation on a Pt electrode was investigated using RRDE in 0.1 M HClO4. It was found that the Nafion-coated Pt system showed lower apparent ORR activity and more H2O2 production than the bare Pt electrode system. From the temperature sensitivity, it was revealed that the apparent activation energies of ORR in the Nafion-coated Pt system were lower than the bare Pt electrode system, and the H2O2 formation was suppressed with the increase of the temperature. In order to analyze the results furthermore, other systems (0.1/1.0 M, HClO4/CF3SO3H) with the bare Pt electrodes were also examined as references. It was exhibited that the ORR kinetic current, the H2O2 formation, and the apparent activation energies of 1.0 M CF3SO3H system were close to those of the Nafion-coated Pt system. We concluded that the orientation of anion species of Nafion and CF3SO3H to the Pt surface via water molecules, as well as a fluorocarbon polymer network of Nafion, might block O2 adsorption, resulting in the smaller effective surface area of the Pt electrode for ORR, the smaller ORR kinetic current, and the more H2O2 production.

  16. Electrochemical Hydrogen Peroxide Generator

    Tennakoon, Charles L. K.; Singh, Waheguru; Anderson, Kelvin C.

    2010-01-01

    Two-electron reduction of oxygen to produce hydrogen peroxide is a much researched topic. Most of the work has been done in the production of hydrogen peroxide in basic media, in order to address the needs of the pulp and paper industry. However, peroxides under alkaline conditions show poor stabilities and are not useful in disinfection applications. There is a need to design electrocatalysts that are stable and provide good current and energy efficiencies to produce hydrogen peroxide under acidic conditions. The innovation focuses on the in situ generation of hydrogen peroxide using an electrochemical cell having a gas diffusion electrode as the cathode (electrode connected to the negative pole of the power supply) and a platinized titanium anode. The cathode and anode compartments are separated by a readily available cation-exchange membrane (Nafion 117). The anode compartment is fed with deionized water. Generation of oxygen is the anode reaction. Protons from the anode compartment are transferred across the cation-exchange membrane to the cathode compartment by electrostatic attraction towards the negatively charged electrode. The cathode compartment is fed with oxygen. Here, hydrogen peroxide is generated by the reduction of oxygen. Water may also be generated in the cathode. A small amount of water is also transported across the membrane along with hydrated protons transported across the membrane. Generally, each proton is hydrated with 3-5 molecules. The process is unique because hydrogen peroxide is formed as a high-purity aqueous solution. Since there are no hazardous chemicals or liquids used in the process, the disinfection product can be applied directly to water, before entering a water filtration unit to disinfect the incoming water and to prevent the build up of heterotrophic bacteria, for example, in carbon based filters. The competitive advantages of this process are: 1. No consumable chemicals are needed in the process. The only raw materials

  17. Mid-infrared absorption cross sections for acetone (propanone)

    Infrared absorption cross sections for acetone (propanone) have been determined in the 830-1950 cm-1 spectral region from spectra recorded using a high-resolution FTIR spectrometer (Bruker IFS 125HR) and a multipass cell with a maximum optical path length of 19.3 m. The spectra of mixtures of acetone with dry synthetic air were recorded at 0.015 cm-1 resolution (calculated as 0.9/MOPD using the Bruker definition of resolution) at a number of temperatures between 194 and 251 K and pressures appropriate for atmospheric conditions. Intensities were calibrated using three acetone spectra (recorded at 278, 293 and 323 K) taken from the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) IR database. The new absorption cross sections have been combined with previous high spectral resolution results to create a more complete set of acetone absorption cross sections appropriate for atmospheric remote sensing. These cross sections will provide an accurate basis for upper tropospheric/lower stratospheric retrievals of acetone in the mid-infrared spectral region from ACE and MIPAS satellite data.

  18. Transient formation of the oxo-iron(IV) porphyrin radical cation during the reaction of iron(III) tetrakis-5,10,15,20-(N-methyl-4-pyridyl)porphyrin with hydrogen peroxide in aqueous solution.

    Saha, Tapan Kumar; Karmaker, Subarna; Tamagake, Keietsu

    2003-01-01

    The reaction of iron(III) tetrakis-5,10,15,20-(N-methyl-4-pyridyl)porphyrin (Fe(III)TMPyP) with hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) and the catalytic activity of the reaction intermediates on the luminescent peroxidation of luminol in aqueous solution were studied by using a double-mixing stopped-flow system. The observed luminescence intensities showed biphasic decay depending on the conditions. The initial flashlight decayed within flashlight appeared during the formation of the oxo-iron(IV) porphyrin, TMPyPFe(IV) = O, which is responsible for the sustained emission. The absorption spectra 0.0-0.5 s did not reproduce well by a simple combination of the two spectra of Fe(III)TMPyP and TMPyPFe(IV) = O, indicating that transient species was formed at the initial stage. Addition of uric acid (UA) caused a significant delay in the initiation of the luminol emission as well as in the formation of the TMPyPFe(IV) = O. Both of them were completely diminished in the presence of UA equimolar with H(2)O(2), while mannitol had no effect at all. The delay of the light emission as well as the appearance of TMPyPFe(IV) = O was directly proportional to the [UA](0) but other kinetic profiles were not changed significantly. Based on these observations and the kinetic analysis, we confirmed the involvement of the oxo-iron(IV) porphyrin radical cation, (TMPyP)(.+)Fe(IV) = O, as an obligatory intermediate in the rate-determining step of the overall reaction, Fe(III)TMPyP + H(2)O(2) --> TMPyPFe(IV) = O, with a rate constant of k = 4.3 x 10(4)/mol/L/s. The rate constants for the reaction between the (TMPyP)(.+)Fe(IV) = O and luminol, and between the TMPyPFe(IV) = O and luminol were estimated to be 3.6 x 10(6)/mol/L/s and 1.31 x 10(4)/mol/L/s, respectively. PMID:12701092

  19. Effect of Gold Dispersion on the Photocatalytic Activity of Mesoporous Titania for the Vapor-Phase Oxidation of Acetone

    S. V. Awate

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesostructured titanium dioxide photocatalyst, having uniform crystallite size (6–12 nm and average pore diameter of ∼4.2 nm, was synthesized by using a low-temperature nonsurfactant hydrothermal route, employing tartaric acid as a templating agent. Gold additions from 0.5 to 2 wt% were incorporated, either during the hydrothermal process or by postsynthesis wet impregnation. Compared to the impregnation-prepared samples, the samples synthesized hydrothermally contained smaller-size (≤1 nm gold clusters occluded in the pores of the host matrix. Whereas CO2 and H2O were the main reaction products in UV-assisted vapor-phase oxidation of acetone using these catalysts, C2H6 and HCO2CH3 were also produced for higher acetone concentrations in air. The conversion of acetone was found to increase with decrease in the size of both TiO2 and gold particles. In situ IR spectroscopy revealed that titania and gold particles serve as independent adsorption and reaction sites for acetone and oxygen molecules. Acetone molecules adsorb exclusively at TiO2 surface, giving rise to a strongly adsorbed (condensed state as well as to the formation of formate- and methyl formate-type surface species. Hydroxyl groups at titania surface participate directly in these adsorption steps. Nanosize gold particles, on the other hand, were primarily responsible for the adsorption and activation of oxygen molecules. Mechanistic aspects of the photochemical processes are discussed on the basis of these observations.

  20. Non-Isothermal Desolvation Kinetics of Erythromycin A Acetone Solvate

    2007-01-01

    The desolvation of erythromycin acetone solvate was investigated under non-isothermal conditions by a thermogravimetric analyzer. This paper emphasized the kinetic analysis of non-isothermal TG-DTA data by Achar method and Coats-Redfern method to fit various solid-state reaction models, and to achieve kinetic parameters of desolvation. The mechanism of thermal desolvation was evaluated using the kinetic compensation effect. The results show that kinetics of desolvation of erythromycin acetone solvate was compatible with the mechanism of a two-dimensional diffusion controlled and was best expressed by Valensi equation. Corresponding to the integral method and the differential method, the activation energy of desolvation of erythromycin acetone solvate was estimated to be 51.26-57.11 kJ/mol, and the pre-exponential factor was 8.077 × 106 s-1-4.326 × 107 s-1,respectively.

  1. Isopropanol and acetone induces vinyl chloride degradation in Rhodococcus rhodochrous.

    Kuntz, Robin L; Brown, Lewis R; Zappi, Mark E; French, W Todd

    2003-11-01

    In situ bioremediation of vinyl chloride (VC)-contaminated waste sites requires a microorganism capable of degrading VC. While propane will induce an oxygenase to accomplish this goal, its use as a primary substrate in bioremediation is complicated by its flammability and low water solubility. This study demonstrates that two degradation products of propane, isoproponal and acetone, can induce the enzymes in Rhodococcus rhodochrous that degrade VC. Additionally, a reasonable number of cells for bioremediation can be grown on conventional solid bacteriological media (nutrient agar, tryptic soy agar, plate count agar) in an average microbiological laboratory and then induced to produce the necessary enzymes by incubation of a resting cell suspension with isopropanol or acetone. Since acetone is more volatile than isopropanol and has other undesirable characteristics, isopropanol is the inducer of choice. It offers a non-toxic, water-soluble, relatively inexpensive alternative to propane for in situ bioremediation of waste sites contaminated with VC. PMID:14605909

  2. Synthesis and Analysis of Resorcinol-Acetone Copolymer

    Gen-ichi Konishi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Synthesis and characterization of resorcinol-acetone copolymer is described. The polymer was prepared by trifluoroacetic acid-catalyzed polymerization of resorcinol with acetone. According to the 1H-NMR, 13C-NMR, and MALDI-TOF Mass spectra data, the obtained polymer had three types of repeating units: isopropylidene bridged-resorcinol, chromane ring, and spiro-shaped double chromane ring, indicating that polymerization proceeded via simultaneous addition-condensation and cyclization of resorcinol with acetone. The obtained polymer can be useful not only for the development of plastic materials such as thermosets, adhesives, and coatings but also for the synthesis of biomaterials such as antimicrobial agents, pesticides, and medicines.

  3. Acetone and acetaldehyde determination in tomato juice by isotopic dilution

    Acetone and acetaldehyde content of tomato juice were determined by isotope dilution techniques. The juice is added to 14C labelled compounds, carried along by nitrogen at low pressure. The mixture of 2.4 dinitrophenylhydrazones obtained from volatile compounds is separated by thin layer chromatography on silica gel and then on alumina. A determination of radioactivity and concentration of acetone and acetaldehyde 2,4 dinitrophenylhydrazones obtained after separation and elution allow to calculate the content of these two compounds in the initial product with the same sample. This technique could be used for determination of methanol and ethanol after transformation in 3,5 dinitrobenzoates

  4. Acid phosphatase and lipid peroxidation in human cataractous lens epithelium

    Vasavada Abhay

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available The anterior lens epithelial cells undergo a variety of degenerative and proliferative changes during cataract formation. Acid phosphatase is primarily responsible for tissue regeneration and tissue repair. The lipid hydroperoxides that are obtained by lipid peroxidation of polysaturated or unsaturated fatty acids bring about deterioration of biological membranes at cellular and tissue levels. Acid phosphatase and lipid peroxidation activities were studied on the lens epithelial cells of nuclear cataract, posterior subcapsular cataract, mature cataract, and mixed cataract. Of these, mature cataractous lens epithelium showed maximum activity for acid phosphatase (516.83 moles of p-nitrophenol released/g lens epithelium and maximum levels of lipid peroxidation (86.29 O.D./min/g lens epithelium. In contrast, mixed cataractous lens epithelium showed minimum activity of acid phosphatase (222.61 moles of p-nitrophenol released/g lens epithelium and minimum levels of lipid peroxidation (54.23 O.D./min/g lens epithelium. From our study, we correlated the maximum activity of acid phosphatase in mature cataractous lens epithelium with the increased areas of superimposed cells associated with the formation of mature cataract. Likewise, the maximum levels of lipid peroxidation in mature cataractous lens epithelium was correlated with increased permeability of the plasma membrane. Conversely, the minimum levels of lipid peroxidation in mixed cataractous lens epithelium makes us presume that factors other than lipid peroxidation may also account for the formation of mixed type of cataract.

  5. Key Roles of Lewis Acid-Base Pairs on ZnxZryOz in Direct Ethanol/Acetone to Isobutene Conversion.

    Sun, Junming; Baylon, Rebecca A L; Liu, Changjun; Mei, Donghai; Martin, Kevin J; Venkitasubramanian, Padmesh; Wang, Yong

    2016-01-20

    The effects of surface acidity on the cascade ethanol-to-isobutene conversion were studied using ZnxZryOz catalysts. The ethanol-to-isobutene reaction was found to be limited by the secondary reaction of the key intermediate, acetone, namely the acetone-to-isobutene reaction. Although the catalysts with coexisting Brønsted acidity could catalyze the rate-limiting acetone-to-isobutene reaction, the presence of Brønsted acidity is also detrimental. First, secondary isobutene isomerization is favored, producing a mixture of butene isomers. Second, undesired polymerization and coke formation prevail, leading to rapid catalyst deactivation. Most importantly, both steady-state and kinetic reaction studies as well as FTIR analysis of adsorbed acetone-d6 and D2O unambiguously showed that a highly active and selective nature of balanced Lewis acid-base pairs was masked by the coexisting Brønsted acidity in the aldolization and self-deoxygenation of acetone to isobutene. As a result, ZnxZryOz catalysts with only Lewis acid-base pairs were discovered, on which nearly a theoretical selectivity to isobutene (∼ 88.9%) was successfully achieved, which has never been reported before. Moreover, the absence of Brønsted acidity in such ZnxZryOz catalysts also eliminates the side isobutene isomerization and undesired polymerization/coke reactions, resulting in the production of high purity isobutene with significantly improved catalyst stability (catalyst for C-C coupling via aldolization reaction. PMID:26624526

  6. Investigation of toxic effects of imidazolium ionic liquids, [bmim][BF{sub 4}] and [omim][BF{sub 4}], on marine mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis with or without the presence of conventional solvents, such as acetone

    Tsarpali, Vasiliki; Belavgeni, Alexia; Dailianis, Stefanos, E-mail: sdailianis@upatras.gr

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • The toxic effects of [bmim][BF{sub 4}] and [omim][BF{sub 4}] on mussels were investigated. • Both ILs could induce lethal and nonlethal effects on Mytilus galloprovincialis. • Different extent of IL-mediated adverse effects was observed in mussel hemocytes. • The alkyl chain length and lipophilicity of ILs are crucial for their toxicity. • Acetone influences the oxidative and genotoxic effects of [omim][BF{sub 4}]. - Abstract: This study investigated the cytotoxic, oxidative and genotoxic effects of two commonly used imidazolium ionic liquids (ILs), [bmim][BF{sub 4}] (1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium) and [omim][BF{sub 4}] (1-methyl-3-octylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate), on the marine mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis, as well as whether acetone could mediate their toxic profile. In this context, mussels were firstly exposed to different concentrations of [bmim][BF{sub 4}] or [omim][BF{sub 4}], with or without the presence of acetone (at a final concentration of 0.06% v/v), for a period of 96 h, in order to determine the concentration that causes 50% mussel mortality (LC{sub 50} values) in each case. Thereafter, mussels were exposed to sub- and non-lethal concentrations of ILs for investigating their ability to cause lysosomal membrane impairment (with the use of neutral red retention assay/NRRT), superoxide anion and lipid peroxidation byproduct (malondialdehyde/MDA) formation, as well as DNA damage and formation of nuclear abnormalities in hemocytes. The results showed that [omim][BF{sub 4}] was more toxic than [bmim][BF{sub 4}] in all cases, while the presence of acetone resulted in a slight attenuation of its toxicity. The different toxic behavior of ILs was further revealed by the significantly lower levels of NRRT values observed in [omim][BF{sub 4}]-treated mussels, compared to those occurring in [bmim][BF{sub 4}] in all cases. Similarly, [bmim][BF{sub 4}]-mediated oxidative and genotoxic effects were observed only in the highest

  7. Investigation of hybrid plasma-catalytic removal of acetone over CuO/γ-Al2O3 catalysts using response surface method.

    Zhu, Xinbo; Tu, Xin; Mei, Danhua; Zheng, Chenghang; Zhou, Jinsong; Gao, Xiang; Luo, Zhongyang; Ni, Mingjiang; Cen, Kefa

    2016-07-01

    In this work, plasma-catalytic removal of low concentrations of acetone over CuO/γ-Al2O3 catalysts was carried out in a cylindrical dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) reactor. The combination of plasma and the CuO/γ-Al2O3 catalysts significantly enhanced the removal efficiency of acetone compared to the plasma process using the pure γ-Al2O3 support, with the 5.0 wt% CuO/γ-Al2O3 catalyst exhibiting the best acetone removal efficiency of 67.9%. Catalyst characterization was carried out to understand the effect the catalyst properties had on the activity of the CuO/γ-Al2O3 catalysts in the plasma-catalytic reaction. The results indicated that the formation of surface oxygen species on the surface of the catalysts was crucial for the oxidation of acetone in the plasma-catalytic reaction. The effects that various operating parameters (discharge power, flow rate and initial concentration of acetone) and the interactions between these parameters had on the performance of the plasma-catalytic removal of acetone over the 5.0 wt% CuO/γ-Al2O3 catalyst were investigated using central composite design (CCD). The significance of the independent variables and their interactions were evaluated by means of the Analysis of Variance (ANOVA). The results showed that the gas flow rate was the most significant factor affecting the removal efficiency of acetone, whilst the initial concentration of acetone played the most important role in determining the energy efficiency of the plasma-catalytic process. PMID:27093635

  8. LIPID PEROXIDATION IN PREECLAMPSIA

    T.Sharmila Krishna

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Hypertension in pregnancy is a leading cause of both maternal and fetal mortality and morbidity. Preeclampsia is characterised by hypertension and proteinuria. Lipid peroxidation is an important factor in the pathophysiology of Preeclampsia. The present study was undertaken to determine Serum Malondialdehyde (MDA levels , a product of lipid peroxidation , in clinically diagnosed Preeclamptic women(n=30 and the values were compared with that of Normotensive pregnant women (n=30 aged between 18-30yrs. All of them were in their third trimester and were primigravida. Serum MDA was estimated by TBARS (thiobarbituric acid reactive substances method. We observed that Serum MDA levels were significantly increased in Preeclamptic women (p <0.000 as compared to that of Normotensive pregnant women . Increased levels of lipid peroxiation product - MDA may contribute to the pathophysiology of Preeclampsia.

  9. Measurements of acetone and other gas phase product yields from the OH-initiated oxidation of terpenes by proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS)

    The atmospheric oxidation of several terpenes appears to be a potentially relevant source of acetone in the atmosphere. Proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry was used as an on-line analytical method in a chamber study to measure acetone and other gas phase products from the oxidation of α- and β-pinene initiated by OH radicals in air and in the presence of NOx. Acetone may be formed promptly, following attack by the OH radical on the terpene, via a series of highly unstable radical intermediates. It can also be formed by slower processes, via degradation of stable non-radical intermediates such as pinonaldehyde and nopinone. Primary acetone and pinonaldehyde molar yields of 11±2% (one σ) and 34±9% (one σ), respectively, were found from the reaction between α-pinene and the OH radical. After all α-pinene had been consumed, an additional formation of acetone due to the degradation of stable non-radical intermediates was observed. The total amount of acetone formed was 15±2% (one σ) of the reacted α-pinene. An upper limit of 12±3% (one σ) for the acetone molar yield from the oxidation of pinonaldehyde was established. From the reaction between β-pinene and the OH radicals, primary acetone and nopinone molar yields of 13±2% (one σ) and 25±3% (one σ), respectively, were observed. Additional amounts of acetone were formed by the further degradation of the primary product, such as the most abundant product nopinone. The total amount of acetone formed was 16±2% (one σ) of the reacted β-pinene. An upper limit of 12±2% (one σ) for the acetone molar yield from the oxidation of nopinone was established. The observed product yields from α- and β-pinene are in good agreement with other studies using mass-spectrometric and gas chromatographic analytical techniques, but differ significantly from previous studies using spectroscopic methods. Possible reasons for the discrepancies are discussed. (author)

  10. Protein oxidation and peroxidation.

    Davies, Michael J

    2016-04-01

    Proteins are major targets for radicals and two-electron oxidants in biological systems due to their abundance and high rate constants for reaction. With highly reactive radicals damage occurs at multiple side-chain and backbone sites. Less reactive species show greater selectivity with regard to the residues targeted and their spatial location. Modification can result in increased side-chain hydrophilicity, side-chain and backbone fragmentation, aggregation via covalent cross-linking or hydrophobic interactions, protein unfolding and altered conformation, altered interactions with biological partners and modified turnover. In the presence of O2, high yields of peroxyl radicals and peroxides (protein peroxidation) are formed; the latter account for up to 70% of the initial oxidant flux. Protein peroxides can oxidize both proteins and other targets. One-electron reduction results in additional radicals and chain reactions with alcohols and carbonyls as major products; the latter are commonly used markers of protein damage. Direct oxidation of cysteine (and less commonly) methionine residues is a major reaction; this is typically faster than with H2O2, and results in altered protein activity and function. Unlike H2O2, which is rapidly removed by protective enzymes, protein peroxides are only slowly removed, and catabolism is a major fate. Although turnover of modified proteins by proteasomal and lysosomal enzymes, and other proteases (e.g. mitochondrial Lon), can be efficient, protein hydroperoxides inhibit these pathways and this may contribute to the accumulation of modified proteins in cells. Available evidence supports an association between protein oxidation and multiple human pathologies, but whether this link is causal remains to be established. PMID:27026395

  11. [Detection and determination of acetone using semiconductor sensors].

    Reichel, J; Seyffarth, T; Guth, U; Möbius, H H; Göckeritz, D

    1989-10-01

    Investigations to examine not only the factors of influence on evaluation of acetone by self-prepared semiconductor gas sensors, but also to prove analytical properties, were carried out using different tools. A sensor temperature of 600 degrees C and a carrier gas flow-rate of 5 l/h were found to be suitable conditions for the measurement of flow-injection apparatus. The determination of 1 microliter-samples of aqueous solutions containing 1-700 g of acetone/l yielded deviations of 4 to 33%. Using a head space method, the working temperature of 370 degrees C led to a maximum sensor response, the detection limit ranged from 37.5 to 50 mg of acetone/l. After quantifying 5 microliters-sample solutions of 40-600 mg/l, results with an accuracy of 1 to 36% were obtained. The method showed the possibility of distinguishing concentrations of acetone below and above 40 mg/l according to physiological and pathological urinary values. The tests carried out on 100 human urine samples provide a good agreement with the Legal reference method for samples containing physiological or strong pathological amounts of ketone bodies, but not for those including traces and small amounts. False-positive results might be caused by a possible presence of ethanol in urine. PMID:2616614

  12. Photocatalytic degradation of acetone and butane on mesoporous titania layers

    Štengl, Václav; Houšková, Vendula; Bakardjieva, Snejana; Murafa, Nataliya

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 34, č. 9 (2010), s. 1999-2005. ISSN 1144-0546 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/08/0334 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40320502 Keywords : thin-films * gaseous acetone * oxidation * TIO2 Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 2.631, year: 2010

  13. Breath acetone concentration; biological variability and the influence of diet

    Španěl, Patrik; Dryahina, Kseniya; Rejšková, A.; Chippendale, T. W. E.; Smith, D.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 32, č. 8 (2011), N23-N31. ISSN 0967-3334 R&D Projects: GA ČR GP203/09/P172 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : acetone * breath * ketogenic diet Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 1.677, year: 2011

  14. Increase of acetone emitted by urine in relation to ovulation

    Smith, D.; Ismail, K. M. K.; Diskin, A. M.; Chapman, G.; Magnay, J. L.; Španěl, Patrik; O´Brien, S.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 85, č. 8 (2006), s. 1008-1011. ISSN 0001-6349 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : SIFT-MS * ovulation * acetone * spectrometry * trace gases Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 1.327, year: 2006

  15. Lipid peroxidation in ethanol poisoning: a critical reconsideration.

    Dianzani, M U

    1985-01-01

    Evidence for the existence of increased lipid peroxidation in the liver after ethanol administration to rats is discussed. A criticism of the methods used to measure lipid peroxidation is also given. Most authors who are in favour of the presence of lipid peroxidation after ethanol have used the detection of thiobarbituric acid (TBA)-reacting substances as a measure of lipid peroxidation. This test is not entirely satisfactory, because: (1) it is not specific; (2) it mostly measures malonaldehyde, a substance of low toxicity, following a 1-2 hr incubation time; (3) several aldehydes produced during lipid peroxidation do not react with TBA. However, it is now clear that the aldehydes produced during lipid peroxidation are actively metabolized by homogenates, so differences in catabolism may influence the result of a TBA test. Measurement of the diene conjugation band, the other test usually used to detect lipid peroxidation, produces information only on the presence of dienes at a given moment, but does not give any information on the production or decomposition rates of such dienes. Thus differences in production or decomposition kinetics may mask the results. Notwithstanding these criticisms, most of the evidence at present is in favour of some involvement of lipid peroxidation in ethanol intoxication. One hypothesis is that of the direct impact of ethanol-derived free radicals. Another is that ethanol provokes the formation of oxygen free radical species, which can start lipid peroxidation either directly, or by exhausting anti-oxidant substances in the cell so as to change the balance in favour of increased peroxidation. Finally, a third hypothesis is that acetaldehyde, the main product of ethanol oxidation, is able to stimulate lipid peroxidation, possibly through the formation of free radicals, or depletion of levels of antioxidant substances. Experiments consisting of measuring total glutathione (GSH and GSSG) during lipid peroxidation stimulated by ethanol

  16. Removal of Fermentation Inhibitors from Alkaline Peroxide Pretreated and Enzymatically Hydrolyzed Wheat Straw: Production of Butanol from Hydrolysate Using Clostridium beijerinckii in Batch Reactors

    In these studies, alkaline peroxide pretreatment of wheat straw was investigated. Pretreated wheat straw was hydrolyzed using celluloytic and xylanolytic enzymes, and the hydrolysate was used to produce butanol using Clostridium beijerinckii P260. The culture produced less than 2.59 gL**-1 acetone...

  17. Hydrogen peroxide production in capillary underwater discharges

    De Baerdemaeker, F.; Šimek, Milan; Leys, C.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 40, č. 9 (2007), s. 2801-2809. ISSN 0022-3727 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA1043403 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : water breakdown * capillary * AC discharge * conductive liquid * hydrogen peroxide formation * initial rate * energy yield Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 2.200, year: 2007

  18. Hydrogen peroxide production in capillary underwater discharges

    De Baerdemaeker, F.; Šimek, Milan; Člupek, Martin; Lukeš, Petr; Leys, C.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 56, suppl. B (2006), s. 1132-1139. ISSN 0011-4626. [Symposium on Plasma Physics and Technology/22nd./. Praha, 26.6.2006-29.6.2006] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA1043403 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : water * capillary * AC discharge * hydrogen peroxide formation * initial rate Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 0.568, year: 2006

  19. The charging of neutral dimethylamine and dimethylamine-sulfuric acid clusters using protonated acetone

    Ruusuvuori, K.; Hietala, P.; Kupiainen-Määttä, O.; Jokinen, T.; Junninen, H.; Sipilä, M.; Kurtén, T.; Vehkamäki, H.

    2015-06-01

    Sulfuric acid is generally considered one of the most important substances taking part in atmospheric particle formation. However, in typical atmospheric conditions in the lower troposphere, sulfuric acid and water alone are unable to form particles. It has been suggested that strong bases may stabilize sulfuric acid clusters so that particle formation may occur. More to the point, amines - strong organic bases - have become the subject of interest as possible cause for such stabilization. To probe whether amines play a role in atmospheric nucleation, we need to be able to measure accurately the gas-phase amine vapour concentration. Such measurements often include charging the neutral molecules and molecular clusters in the sample. Since amines are bases, the charging process should introduce a positive charge. This can be achieved by, for example, using chemical ionization with a positively charged reagent with a suitable proton affinity. In our study, we have used quantum chemical methods combined with a cluster dynamics code to study the use of acetone as a reagent ion in chemical ionization and compared the results with measurements performed with a chemical ionization atmospheric pressure interface time-of-flight mass spectrometer (CI-APi-TOF). The computational results indicate that protonated acetone is an effective reagent in chemical ionization. However, in the experiments the reagent ions were not depleted at the predicted dimethylamine concentrations, indicating that either the modelling scheme or the experimental results - or both - contain unidentified sources of error.

  20. Carbonate leaching of uranium and hydrogen peroxide stabilizer therefor

    In the carbonate leaching process for the solution mining of subterranean uranium containing formations in which an injection well is drilled and completed within the uranium formation; alkaline carbonate uranium leaching solution and sufficient hydrogen peroxide are injected through the injection wells into the formation whereby uranium values are produced from production wells, characterized by providing in the leaching solution a mixture of 1-hydroxyethylidene-1,1-diphosphonic acid and an alkali metal pyrophosphate in a weight ratio of from 1 to 10 to 10 to 1, the amount of said mixture being sufficient to inhibit decomposition of the hydrogen peroxide in said leaching solution

  1. Organic peroxides' gas-particle partitioning and rapid heterogeneous decomposition on secondary organic aerosol

    Li, Huan; Chen, Zhongming; Huang, Liubin; Huang, Dao

    2016-02-01

    Organic peroxides, important species in the atmosphere, promote secondary organic aerosol (SOA) aging, affect HOx radicals cycling, and cause adverse health effects. However, the formation, gas-particle partitioning, and evolution of organic peroxides are complicated and still unclear. In this study, we investigated in the laboratory the production and gas-particle partitioning of peroxides from the ozonolysis of α-pinene, which is one of the major biogenic volatile organic compounds in the atmosphere and an important precursor for SOA at a global scale. We have determined the molar yields of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), hydromethyl hydroperoxide (HMHP), peroxyformic acid (PFA), peroxyacetic acid (PAA), and total peroxides (TPOs, including unknown peroxides) and the fraction of peroxides in α-pinene/O3 SOA. Comparing the gas-phase peroxides with the particle-phase peroxides, we find that gas-particle partitioning coefficients of PFA and PAA are 104 times higher than the values from the theoretical prediction, indicating that organic peroxides play a more important role in SOA formation than previously expected. Here, the partitioning coefficients of TPO were determined to be as high as (2-3) × 10-4 m3 µg-1. Even so, more than 80 % of the peroxides formed in the reaction remain in the gas phase. Water changes the distribution of gaseous peroxides, while it does not affect the total amount of peroxides in either the gas or the particle phase. Approx. 18 % of gaseous peroxides undergo rapid heterogeneous decomposition on SOA particles in the presence of water vapor, resulting in the additional production of H2O2. This process can partially explain the unexpectedly high H2O2 yields under wet conditions. Transformation of organic peroxides to H2O2 also preserves OH in the atmosphere, helping to improve the understanding of OH cycling.

  2. Multiphoton ionization of acetone-water clusters at 355 nm

    WANG Reng; KONG Xiang-he; ZHANG Shu-dong; ZHANG Xia; FAN Xing-yan; ZHAO Shu-yan

    2006-01-01

    @@ The multiphoton ionization of acetone-water clusters were detected at 355 nm laser wavelength by using the time of flight mass spectrometer(TOF-MS).The experiments show that all products are protonated.Three main products such as (CH3COCH3)n-(H2O)n-2H+,(CH3COCH3)n-(H2O)n-1H+ and (CH3COCH3)n-(H2O)nH+ are concluded from the results.In order to study the equilibrium structures of the (CH3COCH3)n-(H2O)n-2H+,the ab-initio calculation is used on them.The experiment is even done when the volume rate of acetone to water is 1:2.

  3. Aldol Condensation of Citral with Acetone on Basic Solid Catalysts

    Noda, C.; G. P. ALT; WERNECK R. M.; C. A. HENRIQUES; Monteiro, J. L. F.

    1998-01-01

    The catalytic performance of solids with basic properties, such as CaO, MgO and hydrotalcites, was evaluated in the aldol condensation of citral and acetone, the first step in the synthesis of ionones from citral. The best results were obtained with CaO and hydrotalcite with high conversions (98%) and selectivities (close to 70% for the main product) observed for both of the catalyst. Such pseudoionone yields were greater than those reported in the literature for the homogeneous reaction.

  4. Photo-catalytic oxidation of acetone on a TiO2 powder: An in situ FTIR investigation

    Szanyi, Janos; Kwak, Ja Hun

    2015-09-01

    In situ transmission infrared spectroscopy was used to investigate the photo-oxidation of acetone on a commercial, oxidized TiO2 (P25) powder catalyst under UV irradiation at ambient temperature, in the absence and presence of gas phase O2. The photochemistry of a number of organic molecules (1-butanone, methanol and acetic acid,) under the same conditions was also studied in order to identify reaction intermediates and products formed in the photo-oxidation of acetone. Under anaerobic conditions (in the absence of gas phase oxygen) limited extent of photo-oxidation of acetone took place on the oxidized TiO2 sample. In the presence of O2 in the gas phase, however, acetone was completely converted to acetates and formates, and ultimately CO2. The initial step in the sequence of photo-induced reactions is the ejection of a methyl radical, resulting in the formation of surface acetates (from the acetyl group) and formates (from the methyl radicals). Acetate ions are also converted to formates, that, in turn, photo-oxidized to CO2. Under the experimental conditions applied the accumulation of carbonates and bicarbonates were observed on the TiO2 surface as the photo-oxidation of acetone proceeded (this was also observed during the course of photo-oxidation of all the other organics studied here). When the initial radical ejection step produced hydrocarbons containing more than one C atoms (as in the case in 2-butanone and mesytil oxide), the formation of aldehydes on the catalyst surface was also observed as a result of secondary reactions. This work was supported by the US Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the US Department of Energy. JHK also acknowledges the support of this work by the 2014 Research Fund of UNIST (Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology, Ulsan, Korea). The authors thank M

  5. Effect of Coadsorbed Water on the Photodecomposition of Acetone on TiO2(110)

    Henderson, Michael A.

    2008-06-10

    The influence of coadsorbed water on the photodecomposition of acetone on TiO2 was examined using temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and the rutile TiO2(110) surface as a model photocatalyst. Of the two major influences ascribed to water in the heterogeneous photocatalysis literature (promotion via OH radical supply and inhibition due to site blocking), only the negative influence of water was observed. As long as the total water and acetone coverage was maintained well below the first layer saturation coverage (‘1 ML’), little inhibition of acetone photodecomposition was observed. However, as the total water+acetone coverage exceeded 1 ML, acetone was preferentially displaced from the first layer to physisorbed states by water and the extent of acetone photodecomposition attenuated. The displacement originated from water compressing acetone into high coverage regions where increased acetone-acetone repulsions caused displacement from the first layer. The immediate product of acetone photodecomposition was adsorbed acetate, which occupies twice as many surface sites per molecule as compared to acetone. Since the acetate intermediate was more stable on the TiO2(110) surface than either water or acetone (as gauged by TPD) and since its photodecomposition rate was less than that of acetone, additional surface sites were not opened up during acetone photodecomposition for previously displaced acetone molecules to re-enter the first layer. Results in this study suggest that increased molecular-level repulsions between organic molecules brought about by increased water coverage are as influential in the inhibiting effect of water on photooxidation rates as are water-organic repulsions.

  6. Acetone mediated electrophoretic deposition of nanocrystalline SDC on NiO-SDC ceramics

    Bhosale, A.G. [Smt. Kusumtai Rajarambapu Patil Kanya Mahavidyalaya, Islampur 415409, Maharashtra (India); Department of Physics, Shivaji University, Kolhapur 416 004, Maharashtra (India); Joshi, Rajeev [Department of Physics, Shivaji University, Kolhapur 416 004, Maharashtra (India); Department of Technology, D.Y Patil University, Kolhapur 416006, Maharashtra (India); Subhedar, K.M. [Department of Electrical Engineering, The Technion - Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa 32000 (Israel); Mishra, R. [Chemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085, Maharashtra (India); Pawar, S.H., E-mail: pawar_s_h@yahoo.co [Department of Physics, Shivaji University, Kolhapur 416 004, Maharashtra (India); Department of Technology, D.Y Patil University, Kolhapur 416006, Maharashtra (India)

    2010-07-30

    Films of Ce{sub 0.8}Sm{sub 0.2}O{sub 1.9} (SDC) were electrophoretically deposited on non-conducting NiO-SDC ceramics using the suspension of nanocrystalline SDC in acetone. The effect of iodine addition on suspension stability was investigated by measuring the zeta potential of SDC particle and pH of the suspension. The highest zeta potential was 42.1 mV with the addition of 2 mg iodine at pH 5.7 indicating formation of relatively stable suspension. The particle size distribution reveals the agglomerate size of SDC in acetone with iodine addition was of the order of 222 nm. The surface morphology and sintering effect on grain growth of the deposited films were investigated by scanning electron microscope (SEM). The structural investigation of the sintered film was done by X-ray diffraction (XRD) technique and it revealed phase pure SDC with cubic structure. Impedance study of sintered SDC/NiO-SDC hetero-structure showed decrease in total resistance with increase in temperature.

  7. Antimicrobial activity of Aqueous, Ethanol and Acetone extracts of Sesbania grandiflora leaves and its phytochemical characterization

    K. Padmalochana

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Plants are being highly explored as a major source of medicinal compounds due to the presence of various phytochemical groups. Leaves of Sesbania grandiflora was consumed in traditional medicinal system of Ayurveda for numerous harmful syndromes and infections. This present study was explored the various phytochemicals present in the plant leaves of S. grandiflora. The qualitative analysis of various phytochemicals was exploited using different solvent systems. The aqueous, 80% ethanol and 70% acetone extraction was carried out in this study. Ethanolic extract shown presence of high amount of Alkaloids, Tannins, Saponins, Glycosides and steroids were confirmed by formation of colour intensity during chemical reactions. All the three extracts were tested for antimicrobial activity against pathogenic micro-organisms especially methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus and dermatophytes Candida sp using Agar well diffusion method. Among these three extracts ethanol extracts shows good antibacterial activity compared with aqueous and acetone extracts. Because of the presence of alkaloids, flavonoids, tannins and steroids ethanol extract shows high antibacterial activity. So these active compounds can be used in the field of medicine as therapeutic agent.

  8. ALKALINE PEROXIDE MECHANICAL PULPING OF FAST GROWTH PAULOWNIA WOOD

    Ahmad Jahan Latibari,

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Alkaline peroxide mechanical pulping of paulownia wood harvested from exotic tree plantations in northern Iran was investigated. The fiber length, width, and cell wall thickness of this wood were measured as 0.82 mm, 40.3 μm, and 7.1 μm, respectively. The chemical composition including cellulose, lignin, and extractives soluble in ethanol-acetone, 1% NaOH, hot and cold water was determined as 49.5%, 25%, 12.1%, 26.9%, 11.4%, and 8.1% respectively. The ash content of this wood was 0.45%. Pre-washed chips were chemically treated at 70°C for 120 minutes with different combinations of three dosages (1.5, 3, and 4.5% of hydrogen peroxide and three dosages (1.5, 3, and 4.5% of sodium hydroxide prior to defibration. Other chemicals including DTPA, sodium silicate, and MgSO4 were constant at 0.5%, 3%, and 0.5%, respectively. The results showed that using a 1.5% hydrogen peroxide and 4.5% sodium hydroxide charge, the brightness of APMP pulp reached 68.7% ISO and higher chemical dosages did not improve the brightness; however, to produce APMP pulp with higher strength, a sodium hydroxide charge of 4.5% was needed. The tensile strength, tear strength, burst strength indices, and bulk density of the APMP pulp produced from 1.5% hydrogen peroxide and 4.5% sodium hydroxide were measured as 15.5Nm/g, 6.54mN.m2/g, 0.56kPa.m2/g, and 3.47cm3/g, respectively. The resulting pulp was bulky and is suitable for use in the middle layer of boxboard to provide the desired stiffness with a lower basis weight.

  9. Organic peroxides gas-particle partitioning and rapid heterogeneous decomposition on secondary organic aerosol

    Li, H.; Chen, Z. M.; Huang, L. B.; Huang, D.

    2015-10-01

    Organic peroxides, important species in the atmosphere, will promote secondary organic aerosols (SOA) aging, affect HOx radicals cycling, and cause adverse health effects. However, the formation, gas-particle partitioning, and evolution of organic peroxides are extremely complicated and still unclear. In this study, we investigate in the laboratory the production and gas-particle partitioning of peroxides from the ozonolysis of α-pinene, which is one of the major biogenic volatile organic compounds in the atmosphere and is an important precursor for SOA at a global scale. We have determined the molar yields of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), hydroxymethyl hydroperoxide (HMHP), peroxyformic acid (PFA), peroxyacetic acid (PAA) and total peroxides (TPO, including unknown peroxides) and the fraction of peroxides in SOA. Comparing the gas-phase and particle-phase peroxides, we find that gas-particle partitioning coefficients of PFA and PAA are 104 times higher than theoretical prediction, indicating that organic peroxides play a more important role in the SOA formation than expected previously. Here, we give the partitioning coefficients of TPO as (2-3) × 10-4 m3μg-1. Even so, more than 80 % of the peroxides formed in the reaction remain in the gas phase. Water does not affect the total amount of peroxides in either the gas or particle phase, but can change the distribution of gaseous peroxides. About 18 % gaseous peroxides undergo rapid heterogeneous decomposition on SOA particles in the presence of water vapor, resulting in the additional production of H2O2. This process can partially interpret the unexpected high H2O2 yield under wet conditions. Transformation of organic peroxides to H2O2 also saves OH in the atmosphere, helping to improve the understanding of OH cycling.

  10. On the relationship between acetone and carbon monoxide in different air masses

    M. de Reus

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon monoxide and acetone measurements are presented for five aircraft measurement campaigns at mid-latitudes, polar and tropical regions in the northern hemisphere. Throughout all campaigns, free tropospheric air masses, which were influenced by anthropogenic emissions, showed a similar linear relation between acetone and CO, with a slope of 21-25 pptv acetone/ppbv CO. Measurements in the anthropogenically influenced marine boundary layer revealed a slope of 13-16 pptv acetone/ppbv CO. The different slopes observed in the marine boundary layer and the free troposphere indicate that acetone is emitted by the ocean in relatively clean air masses and taken up by the ocean in polluted air masses. In the lowermost stratosphere, a good correlation between acetone and CO was observed as well, however, with a much smaller slope (~5 pptv acetone/ppbv CO compared to the troposphere. This is caused by the longer photochemical lifetime of CO compared to acetone in the lower stratosphere, due to the increasing photolytic loss of acetone and the decreasing OH concentration with altitude. No significant correlation between acetone and CO was observed over the tropical rain forest due to the large direct and indirect biogenic emissions of acetone. The common slopes of the linear acetone-CO relation in various layers of the atmosphere, during five field experiments, makes them useful for model calculations. Often a single observation of the acetone-CO correlation, determined from stratospheric measurements, has been used in box model applications. This study shows that different slopes have to be considered for marine boundary layer, free tropospheric and stratospheric air masses, and that the acetone-CO relation cannot be used for air masses which are strongly influenced by biogenic emissions.

  11. Enhancing acetone biosynthesis and acetone-butanol-ethanol fermentation performance by co-culturing Clostridium acetobutylicum/Saccharomyces cerevisiae integrated with exogenous acetate addition.

    Luo, Hongzhen; Ge, Laibing; Zhang, Jingshu; Ding, Jian; Chen, Rui; Shi, Zhongping

    2016-01-01

    Acetone is the major by-product in ABE fermentations, most researches focused on increasing butanol/acetone ratio by decreasing acetone biosynthesis. However, economics of ABE fermentation industry strongly relies on evaluating acetone as a valuable platform chemical. Therefore, a novel ABE fermentation strategy focusing on bio-acetone production by co-culturing Clostridium acetobutylicum/Saccharomyces cerevisiae with exogenous acetate addition was proposed. Experimental and theoretical analysis revealed the strategy could, enhance C. acetobutylicum survival oriented amino acids assimilation in the cells; control NADH regeneration rate at moderately lower level to enhance acetone synthesis but without sacrificing butanol production; enhance the utilization ability of C. acetobutylicum on glucose and direct most of extra consumed glucose into acetone/butanol synthesis routes. By implementing the strategy using synthetic or acetate fermentative supernatant, acetone concentrations increased to 8.27-8.55g/L from 5.86g/L of the control, while butanol concentrations also elevated to the higher levels of 13.91-14.23g/L from 11.63g/L simultaneously. PMID:26476171

  12. Aldol Condensation of Citral with Acetone on Basic Solid Catalysts

    C. NODA

    1998-06-01

    Full Text Available The catalytic performance of solids with basic properties, such as CaO, MgO and hydrotalcites, was evaluated in the aldol condensation of citral and acetone, the first step in the synthesis of ionones from citral. The best results were obtained with CaO and hydrotalcite with high conversions (98% and selectivities (close to 70% for the main product observed for both of the catalyst. Such pseudoionone yields were greater than those reported in the literature for the homogeneous reaction.

  13. Solubility of paroxetine hydrochloride hemi-hydrate in (water + acetone)

    Ren Guobin [School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China)]. E-mail: renguobin2557@sohu.com; Wang Jingkang [School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Li Guizhi [School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China)

    2005-08-15

    Using a laser monitoring observation technique, the solubilities of paroxetine hydrochloride hemi-hydrate in (water + acetone) were determined by the synthetic method from (294.45 to 323.20) K, respectively. Results of these measurements were correlated by the three variants of the combined nearly ideal binary solvent/Redlich-Kister (CNIBS/R-K) model. For the seven group data studied, three variants of the (CNIBS/R-K) equation were found to provide accurate mathematical representations of the experimental data and variant 2 is the best of the three variants.

  14. N,N′-Diphenyl­thio­urea acetone monosolvate

    Okuniewski, Andrzej; Chojnacki, Jaroslaw; Becker, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    In the title compound, C13H12N2S·C3H6O, the phenyl rings of the thio­urea mol­ecule are in syn and anti positions in relation to the C=S bond. Two mol­ecules are connected by N—H⋯S=C hydrogen bonds into a centrosymmetric dimer. An additional N—H⋯O=C hydrogen bond to the acetone solvent mol­ecule and some weak C—H⋯π inter­actions reinforce the crystal structure.

  15. Uncertainties in Biogenic Sources and Sinks and Their Relevance for the Global Acetone Budget

    Brewer, J.; Fischer, E. V.; Ravishankara, A. R.; Bishop, M.

    2015-12-01

    Acetone is one of the most abundant carbonyl compounds in the atmosphere, and a major source of HOx radicals in the upper troposphere. Thus, understanding the global budget of acetone is essential to understanding global oxidation capacity. Significant uncertainties remain regarding the flux of acetone out of and into the biosphere. Crucially unconstrained processes include dry deposition, fluxes of acetone into and out of the ocean, direct emissions of acetone from the terrestrial biosphere, and direct emissions of secondary sources of acetone such as the oxidation of monoterpenes from the terrestrial biosphere. We have performed an elementary effects sensitivity analysis of the GEOS-Chem global 3-D CTM (version 10-01, www.geos-chem.org) for the global atmospheric distribution of acetone using the Morris method. This method provides a ranking of both the comparative direct importance, as well as non-linear effects and interactions of the tested input factor uncertainties, at a relatively low computational cost. The sensitivity analysis was bounded using literature minima and maxima for five sources of uncertainty related to specific biogenic sources and sinks. Preliminary results suggest that the uncertainties with the largest impact on acetone concentration are the uncertainties in direct acetone emissions from the terrestrial biosphere and uncertainties in the concentration of acetone in the ocean mixed layer.

  16. The Acetone Extract of Sclerocarya birrea (Anacardiaceae Possesses Antiproliferative and Apoptotic Potential against Human Breast Cancer Cell Lines (MCF-7

    Nicoline Fri Tanih

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Interesting antimicrobial data from the stem bark of Sclerocarya birrea, which support its use in traditional medicine for the treatment of many diseases, have been delineated. The current study was aimed to further study some pharmacological and toxicological properties of the plant to scientifically justify its use. Anticancer activity of water and acetone extracts of S. birrea was evaluated on three different cell lines, HT-29, HeLa, and MCF-7 using the cell titre blue viability assay in 96-well plates. Apoptosis was evaluated using the acridine orange and propidium iodide staining method, while morphological structure of treated cells was examined using SEM. The acetone extract exhibited remarkable antiproliferative activities on MCF-7 cell lines at dose- and time-dependent manners (24 h and 48 h of incubation. The extract also exerted apoptotic programmed cell death in MCF-7 cells with significant effect on the DNA. Morphological examination also displayed apoptotic characteristics in the treated cells, including clumping, condensation, and culminating to budding of the cells to produce membrane-bound fragmentation, as well as formation of apoptotic bodies. The acetone extract of S. birrea possesses antiproliferative and apoptotic potential against MCF-7-treated cells and could be further exploited as a potential lead in anticancer therapy.

  17. Method of precipitating uranium peroxide

    The uranium dissolved as uranyl tricarbonate ion in an aqueous alkaline solution is precipitated out as uranium peroxide. The precipitation is carried out by acidifying a portion of the aqueous alkaline solution with excess sulfuric acid to convert the uranyl tricarbonate ion to the uranyl ion and carbon dioxide. This is followed by the addition of hydrogen peroxide to the acidified solution to convert the uranyl ion to uranium peroxide precipitate, producing additional acid. Concurrently, a different portion of the aqueous alkaline uranyl tricarbonate solution is added to the precipitating solution to elevate the pH to an acidic range which is optimum for effective reaction to uranium peroxide and for its precipitation

  18. Key Roles of Lewis Acid-base Pairs on ZnxZryOz in Direct Ethanol/Acetone to Isobutene Conversion

    Sun, Junming; Baylon, Rebecca A.; Liu, Changjun; Mei, Donghai; Martin, Kevin J.; Venkitasubramanian, Padmesh; Wang, Yong

    2016-01-20

    The effects of surface acidity on the cascade ethanol-to-isobutene conversion were studied using ZnxZryOz catalysts. The ethanol-to-isobutene reaction was found to be limited by the secondary reaction of the key intermediate, acetone, namely the acetone-to-isobutene reaction. Although the catalysts with coexisting Brønsted acidity could catalyze the rate-limiting acetone-to-isobutene reaction, the presence of Brønsted acidity is also detrimental. First, secondary isobutene isomerization is favored, producing a mixture of butene isomers. Second, undesired polymerization and coke formation prevail, leading to rapid catalyst deactivation. Most importantly, both steady-state and kinetic reaction studies as well as FTIR analysis of adsorbed acetone-d6 and D2O unambiguously showed that a highly active and selective nature of balanced Lewis acid-base pairs was masked by the coexisting Brønsted acidity in the aldolization and self-deoxygenation of acetone to isobutene. As a result, ZnxZryOz catalysts with only Lewis acid-base pairs were discovered, on which nearly a theoretical selectivity to isobutene (~88.9%) was successfully achieved, which has never been reported before. Moreover, the absence of Brønsted acidity in such ZnxZryOz catalysts also eliminates the side isobutene isomerization and undesired polymerization/coke reactions, resulting in the production of high purity isobutene with significantly improved catalyst stability (< 2% activity loss after 200 h time-on-stream). This work not only demonstrates a balanced Lewis acid-base pair for the highly active and selective cascade ethanol-to-isobutene reaction, but also sheds light on the rational design of selective and robust acid-base catalyst for C-C coupling via aldolization reaction.

  19. Formation of a robust and stable film comprising ionic liquid and polyoxometalate on glassy carbon electrode modified with multiwalled carbon nanotubes: Toward sensitive and fast detection of hydrogen peroxide and iodate

    A robust and stable film comprising n-octylpyridinum hexafluorophosphate ([C8Py][PF6]) and 1:12 phosphomolybdic acid (PMo12) was prepared on glassy carbon electrodes modified with multiwall carbon nanotubes (GCE/MWCNTs) by dip-coating. The cyclic voltammograms of the GCE/MWCNTs/[C8Py][PF6]-PMo12 showed three well-defined pairs of redox peaks due to the PMo12 system. The surface coverage for the immobilized PMo12 and the average values of the electron transfer rate constant for three pairs of redox peaks were evaluated. The GCE/MWCNTs/[C8Py][PF6]-PMo12 showed great electrocatalytic activity towards the reduction of H2O2 and iodate. The kinetic parameters of the catalytic reduction of hydrogen peroxide and iodate at the electrode surface and analytical features of the sensor for amperometric determination of hydrogen peroxide and iodate were evaluated.

  20. Photoinduced charge transfer and acetone sensitivity of single-walled carbon nanotube-titanium dioxide hybrids.

    Ding, Mengning; Sorescu, Dan C; Star, Alexander

    2013-06-19

    The unique physical and chemical properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) make them ideal building blocks for the construction of hybrid nanostructures. In addition to increasing the material complexity and functionality, SWNTs can probe the interfacial processes in the hybrid system. In this work, SWNT-TiO2 core/shell hybrid nanostructures were found to exhibit unique electrical behavior in response to UV illumination and acetone vapors. By experimental and theoretical studies of UV and acetone sensitivities of different SWNT-TiO2 hybrid systems, we established a fundamental understanding on the interfacial charge transfer between photoexcited TiO2 and SWNTs as well as the mechanism of acetone sensing. We further demonstrated a practical application of photoinduced acetone sensitivity by fabricating a microsized room temperature acetone sensor that showed fast, linear, and reversible detection of acetone vapors with concentrations in few parts per million range. PMID:23734594

  1. Saving Energy and Reducing Emission When Recycling Acetone during the Production of Soy Phospholipid

    Liu Daicheng; Wang Yan; Tao Yinhua

    2008-01-01

    Acetone, which is volatile, flammable, toxic, expen-sive and causing serious air pollution, is often used as extracting solvent in the production of powdery soy phospholipid. Recycling and reusing acetone is the key of reducing the cost of production. Therefore, saving energy and reducing emission when recycling acetone are the most important technologies during the production of phospholipid. On the basis of the productivity of powdery phospholipid being 2.4 t every day, 43.2 t acetone is reused every 8 h and the total volume of acetone gas emitted is 450.75 m3 (about 901.5 kg). According to the current price of acetone, the lost money is about 7212 yuan RMB.

  2. Investigating the Stability of Benzoyl Peroxide in Over-the-Counter Acne Medications

    Kittredge, Marina Canepa; Kittredge, Kevin W.; Sokol, Melissa S.; Sarquis, Arlyne M.; Sennet, Laura M.

    2008-01-01

    One of the most commonly used ingredients in over-the-counter acne treatments in cream, gel, and wash form is benzoyl peroxide. It is an anti-bacterial agent that kills the bacterium ("Propionibacterium acne") involved in the formation of acne. The formulation of these products is extremely difficult owing to the instability of benzoyl peroxide.…

  3. Influence of acetone on nanostructure and electrochemical properties of interfacial synthesized polyaniline nanofibers

    Jianyun Zhao; Zongyi Qin; Tao Li; Zhuozhan Li; Zhe Zhou; Meifang Zhu

    2015-01-01

    The growth of polyaniline (PANI) nanofibers through interfacial polymerization can be well controlled by adding a small amount of acetone in the water/chloroform system. It was found that the polymerization rate became slower in the presence of acetone, yielding PANI nanofibers with larger aspect ratios. The influences of the acetone addition on the morphology, microstructure and properties of as-prepared PANI nanofibers were studied by scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM), ultraviolet–visib...

  4. Thermal and Ablative Properties of Ipns and Composites of High Ortho Resole Resin and Difurfurylidene Acetone

    Najim, Tariq S.; Amel M. NAJI; Mahmood M. BARBOOTI

    2008-01-01

    High ortho resole resin was prepared by condensation of phenol with excess of formaldehyde in the presence of magnesium oxide as catalyst. Reaction of furfuraldehyde with acetone in basic medium led to difurfurylidene acetone (DFA). Their interpenetrating polymer network (IPNS) were obtained by the reaction of predetermined quantities of difurfurylidene acetone and high ortho resole using p-toluene sulphonic acid (PTSA) as curing agent. The thermal behavior of the resins was studied using the...

  5. Fabrication of a SnO2-Based Acetone Gas Sensor Enhanced by Molecular Imprinting

    Wenhu Tan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This work presents a new route to design a highly sensitive SnO2–based sensor for acetone gas enhanced by the molecular imprinting technique. Unassisted and acetone-assisted thermal synthesis methods are used to synthesis SnO2 nanomaterials. The prepared SnO2 nanomaterials have been characterized by X-ray powder diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and N2 adsorption−desorption. Four types of SnO2 films were obtained by mixing pure deionized water and liquid acetone with the two types of as-prepared powders, respectively. The acetone gas sensing properties of sensors coated by these films were evaluated. Testing results reveal that the sensor coated by the film fabricated by mixing liquid acetone with the SnO2 nanomaterial synthesized by the acetone-assisted thermal method exhibits the best acetone gas sensing performance. The sensor is optimized for the smooth adsorption and desorption of acetone gas thanks to the participation of acetone both in the procedure of synthesis of the SnO2 nanomaterial and the device fabrication, which results in a distinct response–recovery behavior.

  6. Lipid Peroxidation and Antioxidant Status in Preeclampsia

    Rokeya Begum

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Preeclampsia is the most common and major medical complication of pregnancy with a high incidence of maternal and foetal morbidity and mortality. During pregnancy abnormally increased lipid peroxidation and free radical formation as well as significantly decreased antioxidants production in maternal blood may lead to pathogenesis of preeclampsia. So, we designed this study as little information is known about lipid peroxidation and antioxidant level in preeclampsia. Objectives: To assess the serum malondialdehyde (MDA level as a lipid peroxidation product and vitamin E (antioxidant level in women with preeclampsia as well as in normal pregnancy and to compare the values. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted on 60 women aged from 25 to 35 years in the department of Biochemistry, Budi Kemuliaan Maternity Hospital (BKMH in Jakarta during the period April to July 2004. Twenty were normal pregnant women and 20 were preeclamptic patients. For comparison age matched 20 apparently healthy nonpregnant women were included in the study. The study subjects were selected from outpatient department (OPD of Obstetrics and Gynaecology of BKMH in Jakarta. Serum MDA (lipid peroxidation product level was measured by thiobarbituric acid reactive substances assay (TBRAS method and vitamin E was estimated spectroflurometrically. Data were analyzed by unpaired Student’s t test between the groups by using SPSS version 12. Results: The mean serum MDA levels were significantly higher in normal pregnancy and also in preeclampsia than that of nonpregnant control group women (p<0.001. Again the serum MDA levels were significantly higher in preeclampsia than that of normal pregnant women (p<0.001. The serum vitamin E levels were significantly lower in preeclampsia and also in normal pregnancy than that of nonpregnant control women (p<0.001. Moreover, the serum vitamin E levels were significantly lower in preeclampsia compared to that of normal

  7. Direct measurement of Criegee intermediate (CH2OO) reactions with acetone, acetaldehyde, and hexafluoroacetone.

    Taatjes, Craig A; Welz, Oliver; Eskola, Arkke J; Savee, John D; Osborn, David L; Lee, Edmond P F; Dyke, John M; Mok, Daniel W K; Shallcross, Dudley E; Percival, Carl J

    2012-08-14

    Criegee biradicals, i.e., carbonyl oxides, are critical intermediates in ozonolysis and have been implicated in autoignition chemistry and other hydrocarbon oxidation systems, but until recently the direct measurement of their gas-phase kinetics has not been feasible. Indirect determinations of Criegee intermediate kinetics often rely on the introduction of a scavenger molecule into an ozonolysis system and analysis of the effects of the scavenger on yields of products associated with Criegee intermediate reactions. Carbonyl species, in particular hexafluoroacetone (CF(3)COCF(3)), have often been used as scavengers. In this work, the reactions of the simplest Criegee intermediate, CH(2)OO (formaldehyde oxide), with three carbonyl species have been measured by laser photolysis/tunable synchrotron photoionization mass spectrometry. Diiodomethane photolysis produces CH(2)I radicals, which react with O(2) to yield CH(2)OO + I. The formaldehyde oxide is reacted with a large excess of a carbonyl reactant and both the disappearance of CH(2)OO and the formation of reaction products are monitored. The rate coefficient for CH(2)OO + hexafluoroacetone is k(1) = (3.0 ± 0.3) × 10(-11) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1), supporting the use of hexafluoroacetone as a Criegee-intermediate scavenger. The reactions with acetaldehyde, k(2) = (9.5 ± 0.7) × 10(-13) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1), and with acetone, k(3) = (2.3 ± 0.3) × 10(-13) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1), are substantially slower. Secondary ozonides and products of ozonide isomerization are observed from the reactions of CH(2)OO with acetone and hexafluoroacetone. Their photoionization spectra are interpreted with the aid of quantum-chemical and Franck-Condon-factor calculations. No secondary ozonide was observable in the reaction of CH(2)OO with acetaldehyde, but acetic acid was identified as a product under the conditions used (4 Torr and 293 K). PMID:22481381

  8. Recent trends in acetone, butanol, and ethanol (ABE production

    Keikhosro Karim

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Among the renewable fuels considered as a suitable substitute to petroleum-based gasoline, butanol has attracted a great deal of attention due to its unique properties. Acetone, butanol, and ethanol (ABE can be produced biologically from different substrates, including sugars, starch, lignocelluloses, and algae. This process was among the very first biofuel production processes which was commercialized during the First World War. The present review paper discusses the different aspects of the ABE process and the recent progresses made. Moreover, the microorganisms and the biochemistry of the ABE fermentation as well as the feedstocks used are reviewed. Finally, the challenges faced such as low products concentration and products` inhibitory effects on the fermentation are explained and different possible solutions are presented and reviewed.

  9. System-level modeling of acetone-butanol-ethanol fermentation.

    Liao, Chen; Seo, Seung-Oh; Lu, Ting

    2016-05-01

    Acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation is a metabolic process of clostridia that produces bio-based solvents including butanol. It is enabled by an underlying metabolic reaction network and modulated by cellular gene regulation and environmental cues. Mathematical modeling has served as a valuable strategy to facilitate the understanding, characterization and optimization of this process. In this review, we highlight recent advances in system-level, quantitative modeling of ABE fermentation. We begin with an overview of integrative processes underlying the fermentation. Next we survey modeling efforts including early simple models, models with a systematic metabolic description, and those incorporating metabolism through simple gene regulation. Particular focus is given to a recent system-level model that integrates the metabolic reactions, gene regulation and environmental cues. We conclude by discussing the remaining challenges and future directions towards predictive understanding of ABE fermentation. PMID:27020410

  10. An analysis of human response to the irritancy of acetone vapors.

    Arts, J H E; Mojet, J; van Gemert, L J; Emmen, H H; Lammers, J H C M; Marquart, J; Woutersen, R A; Feron, V J

    2002-01-01

    Studies on the irritative effects of acetone vapor in humans and experimental animals have revealed large differences in the lowest acetone concentration found to be irritative to the respiratory tract and eyes. This has brought on much confusion in the process of setting occupational exposure limits for acetone. A literature survey was carried out focusing on the differences in results between studies using subjective (neuro)behavioral methods (questionnaires) and studies using objective measurements to detect odor and irritation thresholds. A critical review of published studies revealed that the odor detection threshold of acetone ranges from about 20 to about 400 ppm. Loss of sensitivity due to adaptation and/or habituation to acetone odor may occur, as was shown in studies comparing workers previously exposed to acetone with previously unexposed subjects. It further appeared that the sensory irritation threshold of acetone lies between 10,000 and 40,000 ppm. Thus, the threshold for sensory irritation is much higher than the odor detection limit, a conclusion that is supported by observations in anosmics, showing a ten times higher irritation threshold level than the odor threshold found in normosmics. The two-times higher sensory irritation threshold observed in acetone-exposed workers compared with previously nonexposed controls can apart from adaptation be ascribed to habituation. An evaluation of studies on subjectively reported irritation at acetone concentrations < 1000 ppm shows that perception of odor intensity, information bias, and exposure history (i.e., habituation) are confounding factors in the reporting of irritation thresholds and health symptoms. In conclusion, subjective measures alone are inappropriate for establishing sensory irritation effects and sensory irritation threshold levels of odorants such as acetone. Clearly, the sensory irritation threshold of acetone should be based on objective measurements. PMID:11852913

  11. Evaluating the Potential Importance of Monoterpene Degradation for Global Acetone Production

    Kelp, M. M.; Brewer, J.; Keller, C. A.; Fischer, E. V.

    2015-12-01

    Acetone is one of the most abundant volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the atmosphere, but estimates of the global source of acetone vary widely. A better understanding of acetone sources is essential because acetone serves as a source of HOx in the upper troposphere and as a precursor to the NOx reservoir species peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN). Although there are primary anthropogenic and pyrogenic sources of acetone, the dominant acetone sources are thought to be from direct biogenic emissions and photochemical production, particularly from the oxidation of iso-alkanes. Recent work suggests that the photochemical degradation of monoterpenes may also represent a significant contribution to global acetone production. We investigate that hypothesis using the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model. In this work, we calculate the emissions of eight terpene species (α-pinene, β-pinene, limonene, Δ3-carene, myrcene, sabinene, trans-β-ocimene, and an 'other monoterpenes' category which contains 34 other trace species) and couple these with upper and lower bound literature yields from species-specific chamber studies. We compare the simulated acetone distributions against in situ acetone measurements from a global suite of NASA aircraft campaigns. When simulating an upper bound on yields, the model-to-measurement comparison improves for North America at both the surface and in the upper troposphere. The inclusion of acetone production from monoterpene degradation also improves the ability of the model to reproduce observations of acetone in East Asian outflow. However, in general the addition of monoterpenes degrades the model comparison for the Southern Hemisphere.

  12. High acetone-butanol-ethanol production in pH-stat co-feeding of acetate and glucose.

    Gao, Ming; Tashiro, Yukihiro; Wang, Qunhui; Sakai, Kenji; Sonomoto, Kenji

    2016-08-01

    We previously reported the metabolic analysis of butanol and acetone production from exogenous acetate by (13)C tracer experiments (Gao et al., RSC Adv., 5, 8486-8495, 2015). To clarify the influence of acetate on acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) production, we first performed an enzyme assay in Clostridium saccharoperbutylacetonicum N1-4. Acetate addition was found to drastically increase the activities of key enzymes involved in the acetate uptake (phosphate acetyltransferase and CoA transferase), acetone formation (acetoacetate decarboxylase), and butanol formation (butanol dehydrogenase) pathways. Subsequently, supplementation of acetate during acidogenesis and early solventogenesis resulted in a significant increase in ABE production. To establish an efficient ABE production system using acetate as a co-substrate, several shot strategies were investigated in batch culture. Batch cultures with two substrate shots without pH control produced 14.20 g/L butanol and 23.27 g/L ABE with a maximum specific butanol production rate of 0.26 g/(g h). Furthermore, pH-controlled (at pH 5.5) batch cultures with two substrate shots resulted in not only improved acetate consumption but also a further increase in ABE production. Finally, we obtained 15.13 g/L butanol and 24.37 g/L ABE at the high specific butanol production rate of 0.34 g/(g h) using pH-stat co-feeding method. Thus, in this study, we established a high ABE production system using glucose and acetate as co-substrates in a pH-stat co-feeding system with C. saccharoperbutylacetonicum N1-4. PMID:26928043

  13. Lipid peroxidation of fish oils

    Godwin, Angela; Prabhu, H. Ramachandra

    2006-01-01

    Fish and fish oils are the richest sources of ω-3 fatty acids. However, they are susceptible to lipid peroxidation due to their high degree of unsaturation. In the present study, the level of thiobarbituric acid reactive material in various fish oils available in the market with and without added Vitamin E was determined. The peroxide levels in fish oil heated to food frying temperature of 180°C and the effect of addition of vitamin E has also been studied. The results indicate that the perox...

  14. Progress toward hydrogen peroxide micropulsion

    Whitehead, J C; Dittman, M D; Ledebuhr, A G

    1999-07-08

    A new self-pressurizing propulsion system has liquid thrusters and gas jet attitude control without heavy gas storage vessels. A pump boosts the pressure of a small fraction of the hydrogen peroxide, so that reacted propellant can controllably pressurize its own source tank. The warm decomposition gas also powers the pump and is supplied to the attitude control jets. The system has been incorporated into a prototype microsatellite for terrestrial maneuvering tests. Additional progress includes preliminary testing of a bipropellant thruster, and storage of unstabilized hydrogen peroxide in small sealed tanks.

  15. Antibacterial Activities and Mechanism of Action of Acetone Extracts from Rabdosia rubescens

    Li Ping Cheng

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The antibacterial activities and mechanism of action of acetone extracts from R. rubescens were reported in this paper. The results showed that 80% acetone extracts had both the highest contents of total phenolics and flavonoids. Acetone extracts showed better antibacterial activities against Gram-positive bacterial strains and there were no inhibitory effects found on tested Gram-negative bacteria. In addition, 80% acetone extracts from R. rubescens had relatively higher antibacterial activities with the lowest values of MIC and MBC at 2.5 mg/mL and 5 mg/mL against B. subtilis. The antibacterial mechanism of 80% acetone extracts against Bacillus subtilis might be described as disrupting cell wall, increasing cell membrane permeability, and finally leading to the leakage of cell constituents

  16. Aluminum induces lipid peroxidation and aggregation of human blood platelets

    Neiva T.J.C.

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Aluminum (Al3+ intoxication is thought to play a major role in the development of Alzheimer's disease and in certain pathologic manifestations arising from long-term hemodialysis. Although the metal does not present redox capacity, it can stimulate tissue lipid peroxidation in animal models. Furthermore, in vitro studies have revealed that the fluoroaluminate complex induces diacylglycerol formation, 43-kDa protein phosphorylation and aggregation. Based on these observations, we postulated that Al3+-induced blood platelet aggregation was mediated by lipid peroxidation. Using chemiluminescence (CL of luminol as an index of total lipid peroxidation capacity, we established a correlation between lipid peroxidation capacity and platelet aggregation. Al3+ (20-100 µM stimulated CL production by human blood platelets as well as their aggregation. Incubation of the platelets with the antioxidants nor-dihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA (100 µM and n-propyl gallate (NPG (100 µM, inhibitors of the lipoxygenase pathway, completely prevented CL and platelet aggregation. Acetyl salicylic acid (ASA (100 µM, an inhibitor of the cyclooxygenase pathway, was a weaker inhibitor of both events. These findings suggest that Al3+ stimulates lipid peroxidation and the lipoxygenase pathway in human blood platelets thereby causing their aggregation

  17. Algerian mint species: high performance thin layer chromatography quantitative determination of rosmarinic acid and in vitro inhibitory effects on linoleic acid peroxidation

    Brahmi Fatiha; Madani Khodir; Stévigny Caroline; Chibane Mohamed; Duez Pierre

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the quantitative paremeters of rosmarinic acid in Algerian mints, Mentha spicata L. (M. spicata), Mentha pulegium L. and Mentha rotundifolia (L.) Huds by high performance thin layer chromatography (HPTLC)-densitometric method and screen the effects of these plant extracts on linoleic acid peroxidation. Methods: The analyses were performed on HPTLC silica gel 60 F254 plates with chloroform: acetone: formic acid (75:16.5:8.5, v/v) as the mobile phase....

  18. An acetone bio-sniffer (gas phase biosensor) enabling assessment of lipid metabolism from exhaled breath.

    Ye, Ming; Chien, Po-Jen; Toma, Koji; Arakawa, Takahiro; Mitsubayashi, Kohji

    2015-11-15

    Several volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are released from human breath or skin. Like chemical substances in blood or urine, some of these vapors can provide valuable information regarding the state of the human body. A highly sensitive acetone biochemical gas sensor (bio-sniffer) was developed and used to measure exhaled breath acetone concentration, and assess lipid metabolism based on breath acetone analysis. A fiber-optic biochemical gas sensing system was constructed by attaching a flow-cell with nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH)-dependent secondary alcohol dehydrogenase (S-ADH) immobilized membrane onto a fiber-optic NADH measurement system. The NADH measurement system utilizes an ultraviolet-light emitting diode with peak emission of 335 nm as an excitation light source. NADH is consumed by the enzymatic reaction of S-ADH, and the consumption is proportional to the concentration of acetone vapor. Phosphate buffer which contained NADH was circulated into the flow-cell to rinse products and the excessive substrates from the optode. The change of fluorescent emitted from NADH is analyzed by the PMT. Hence, fluorescence intensity decreased as the acetone concentration increased. The relationship between fluorescence intensity and acetone concentration was identified from 20 ppb to 5300 ppb. This interval included the concentration of acetone vapor in the breath of healthy people and those suffering from disorders of carbohydrate metabolism. Finally, the acetone bio-sniffer was used to measure breath acetone during an exercise stress test on an ergometer after a period of fasting. The concentration of acetone in breath was shown to significantly increase after exercise. This biosensor allows rapid, highly sensitive and selective measurement of lipid metabolism. PMID:26079672

  19. Conditioned Place Preference to Acetone Inhalation and the Effects on Locomotor Behavior and 18FDG Uptake

    Pai, J.C.; Dewey, S.L.; Schiffer, W.; Lee, D.

    2006-01-01

    Acetone is a component in many inhalants that have been widely abused. While other solvents have addictive potential, such as toluene, it is unclear whether acetone alone contains addictive properties. The locomotor, relative glucose metabolism and abusive effects of acetone inhalation were studied in animals using the conditioned place preference (CPP) paradigm and [18F]2-fluorodeoxy-D-glucose (18FDG) imaging. The CPP apparatus contains two distinct conditioning chambers and a middle adaptation chamber, each lined with photocells to monitor locomotor activity. Adolescent Sprague-Dawley rats (n=16; 90-110 g) were paired with acetone in least preferred conditioning chamber, determined on the pretest day. The animals were exposed to a 10,000 ppm dose for an hour, alternating days with air. A CPP test was conducted after the 3rd, 6th and 12th pairing. In these same animals, the relative glucose metabolism effects were determined using positron emission tomography (PET) imaging with 18FDG. Following the 3rd pairing, there was a significant aversion to the acetone paired chamber (190.9 ± 13.7 sec and 241.7 ± 16.9 sec, acetone and air, respectively). After the 6th pairing, there was no significant preference observed with equal time spent in each chamber (222 ± 21 sec and 207 ± 20 sec, acetone and air-paired, respectively). A similar trend was observed after the 12th pairing (213 ± 21 sec and 221 ± 22 sec, acetone and air-paired, respectively). Locomotor analysis indicated a significant decrease (p<0.05) from air pairings to acetone pairings on the first and sixth pairings. The observed locomotor activity was characteristic of central nervous system (CNS) depressants, without showing clear abusive effects in this CPP model. In these studies, acetone vapors were not as reinforcing as other solvents, shown by overall lack of preference for the acetone paired side of the chamber. PET imaging indicated a regionally specific distribution of 18FDG uptake following

  20. Photochromism and polarization spectroscopy of p-methyl(thiobenzoyl)acetone

    Gorski, Alexander [Institute of Physical Chemistry, Polish Academy of Sciences, Kasprzaka 44, 01-224 Warsaw (Poland); Posokhov, Yevgen [Institute of Physical Chemistry, Polish Academy of Sciences, Kasprzaka 44, 01-224 Warsaw (Poland); Hansen, Bjarke K.V. [Department of Life Sciences and Chemistry, Roskilde University, P.O. Box 260, DK-4000, Roskilde (Denmark); Spanget-Larsen, Jens [Department of Life Sciences and Chemistry, Roskilde University, P.O. Box 260, DK-4000, Roskilde (Denmark); Jasny, Jan [Institute of Physical Chemistry, Polish Academy of Sciences, Kasprzaka 44, 01-224 Warsaw (Poland); Duus, Fritz [Department of Life Sciences and Chemistry, Roskilde University, P.O. Box 260, DK-4000, Roskilde (Denmark); Hansen, Poul Erik [Department of Life Sciences and Chemistry, Roskilde University, P.O. Box 260, DK-4000, Roskilde (Denmark); Waluk, Jacek [Institute of Physical Chemistry, Polish Academy of Sciences, Kasprzaka 44, 01-224 Warsaw (Poland)], E-mail: waluk@ichf.edu.pl

    2006-09-29

    Photochromism of p-methyl(thiobenzoyl)acetone (1) has been studied in argon and xenon cryogenic matrices. Application of linearly polarized light to induce the phototransformation resulted in partial alignment of both the initial structure and the photochromic product. Different orientations were achieved by using irradiation wavelengths corresponding to differently polarized electronic transitions. This was followed by measurements of linear dichroism (LD) in the IR region. The analysis of the IR spectra, combined with the results of DFT B3LYP/cc-pVDZ calculations enabled determining the structures of the most stable ground state species and of the photoproduct. Similarly to the recently reported cases of thioacetylacetone and monothiodibenzoylmethane, the initial structure of 1 corresponds to an intramolecularly hydrogen-bonded enol form, and the photochromic species to an 'open', nonchelated enethiolic form. Vibrational assignments have been made for both species, greatly helped by the analysis of the LD spectra. It is concluded that DFT calculations for 1 quite reliably predict not only vibrational frequencies and intensities, but also transition moment directions, in both IR and electronic spectra.

  1. Photochromism and polarization spectroscopy of p-methyl(thiobenzoyl)acetone

    Photochromism of p-methyl(thiobenzoyl)acetone (1) has been studied in argon and xenon cryogenic matrices. Application of linearly polarized light to induce the phototransformation resulted in partial alignment of both the initial structure and the photochromic product. Different orientations were achieved by using irradiation wavelengths corresponding to differently polarized electronic transitions. This was followed by measurements of linear dichroism (LD) in the IR region. The analysis of the IR spectra, combined with the results of DFT B3LYP/cc-pVDZ calculations enabled determining the structures of the most stable ground state species and of the photoproduct. Similarly to the recently reported cases of thioacetylacetone and monothiodibenzoylmethane, the initial structure of 1 corresponds to an intramolecularly hydrogen-bonded enol form, and the photochromic species to an 'open', nonchelated enethiolic form. Vibrational assignments have been made for both species, greatly helped by the analysis of the LD spectra. It is concluded that DFT calculations for 1 quite reliably predict not only vibrational frequencies and intensities, but also transition moment directions, in both IR and electronic spectra

  2. 21 CFR 184.1366 - Hydrogen peroxide.

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Hydrogen peroxide. 184.1366 Section 184.1366 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1366 Hydrogen peroxide. (a) Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2, CAS Reg. No. 7722-84-1) is also referred to as hydrogen dioxide. It is made by the electrolytic oxidation...

  3. 21 CFR 582.1366 - Hydrogen peroxide.

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hydrogen peroxide. 582.1366 Section 582.1366 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1366 Hydrogen peroxide. (a) Product. Hydrogen peroxide. (b) (c) Limitations,...

  4. Derivatization reaction-based surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) for detection of trace acetone.

    Zheng, Ying; Chen, Zhuo; Zheng, Chengbin; Lee, Yong-Ill; Hou, Xiandeng; Wu, Li; Tian, Yunfei

    2016-08-01

    A facile method was developed for determination of trace volatile acetone by coupling a derivatization reaction to surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). With iodide modified Ag nanoparticles (Ag IMNPs) as the SERS substrate, acetone without obvious Raman signal could be converted to SERS-sensitive species via a chemical derivatization reaction with 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine (2,4-DNPH). In addition, acetone can be effectively separated from liquid phase with a purge-sampling device and then any serious interference from sample matrices can be significantly reduced. The optimal conditions for the derivatization reaction and the SERS analysis were investigated in detail, and the selectivity and reproducibility of this method were also evaluated. Under the optimal conditions, the limit of detection (LOD) for acetone was 5mgL(-1) or 0.09mM (3σ). The relative standard deviation (RSD) for 80mgL(-1) acetone (n=9) was 1.7%. This method was successfully used for the determination of acetone in artificial urine and human urine samples with spiked recoveries ranging from 92% to 110%. The present method is convenient, sensitive, selective, reliable and suitable for analysis of trace acetone, and it could have a promising clinical application in early diabetes diagnosis. PMID:27216660

  5. Protein precipitation of diluted samples in SDS-containing buffer with acetone leads to higher protein recovery and reproducibility in comparison with TCA/acetone approach.

    Santa, Cátia; Anjo, Sandra I; Manadas, Bruno

    2016-07-01

    Proteomic approaches are extremely valuable in many fields of research, where mass spectrometry methods have gained an increasing interest, especially because of the ability to perform quantitative analysis. Nonetheless, sample preparation prior to mass spectrometry analysis is of the utmost importance. In this work, two protein precipitation approaches, widely used for cleaning and concentrating protein samples, were tested and compared in very diluted samples solubilized in a strong buffer (containing SDS). The amount of protein recovered after acetone and TCA/acetone precipitation was assessed, as well as the protein identification and relative quantification by SWATH-MS yields were compared with the results from the same sample without precipitation. From this study, it was possible to conclude that in the case of diluted samples in denaturing buffers, the use of cold acetone as precipitation protocol is more favourable than the use of TCA/acetone in terms of reproducibility in protein recovery and number of identified and quantified proteins. Furthermore, the reproducibility in relative quantification of the proteins is even higher in samples precipitated with acetone compared with the original sample. PMID:27094026

  6. Evaluation of formalin-acetone sedimentation in the concentration of stool for intestinal parasites.

    Parija, S C; Bhattacharya, S; Padhan, P; Shivaprakash, M R

    2003-07-01

    Formalin-acetone sedimentation was compared with the formalin-ether method for the concentration of stool for intestinal parasites. Of 80 stool specimens, 45 (56.25%) were positive for parasites by the formalin-acetone method. The figures for the two methods were formalin-ether 35 (43.75%) and for the direct lacto-phenol cotton blue wet mount method 17 (21.25%). There was no statistically significant difference in the parasite recovery rate between the two methods. Acetone is more stable, safer, and a cheaper fat solvent and promises to be a useful alternative to ether. PMID:12870605

  7. Inorganic precursor peroxides for antifouling coatings

    Olsen, S.M.; Pedersen, L.T.; Hermann, M.H.;

    2009-01-01

    antifouling properties, it is also a vital ingredient for the antifouling coating to obtain its polishing and leaching mechanism. In this paper, peroxides of strontium, calcium, magnesium, and zinc are tested as pigments in antifouling coatings. The peroxides react with seawater to create hydrogen peroxide...... shown that it is possible to identify particulates that, when applied as pigments in antifouling coatings, will provide polishing and leaching rates comparable to those of Cu2O-based coatings. Furthermore, the combination of polishing and hydrogen peroxide leaching by a coating based on zinc peroxide in...... and highly seawater-soluble ions of the metal. The goals have been to establish the antifouling potency of an antifouling coating that releases hydrogen peroxide as biocide, and to investigate the potential use of peroxides as water-soluble polishing and leaching pigments. The investigations have...

  8. Green synthesis of silver nanoparticles as antibacterial agent using Rhodomyrtus tomentosa acetone extract

    Voravuthikunchai, Supayang P.; Chorachoo, Julalak; Jaiswal, Lily; Shankar, Shiv

    2013-12-01

    The capability of Rhodomyrtus tomentosa acetone extract (RAE) for the production of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) has been explored for the first time. Silver nanoparticles with a surface plasmon resonance band centered at 420-430 nm were synthesized by reacting RAE with AgNO3. Reaction time, temperature, concentration of AgNO3 and RAE could accelerate the reduction rate of Ag+ and affect AgNPs size. The nanoparticles were found to be 10-30 nm in size and spherical in shape. XRD data demonstrated crystalline nature of AgNPs dominated by (200) facets. FTIR results showed decrease in intensity of peaks at 3394, 1716 and 1618 cm-1 indicating the involvement of O-H, carbonyl group and C=C stretching with the formation of AgNPs with RAE, respectively. The C-O-C and C-N stretching suggested the presence of many phytochemicals on the surface of the nanoparticles. High negative zeta potential values confirmed the stability of AgNPs in water. In vitro antibacterial activity of AgNPs was tested against Staphylococcus aureus using broth microdilution method. AgNPs capped with RAE demonstrated profound antibacterial activity against the organisms with minimum inhibitory concentration and minimum bactericidal concentration in the range between 3.1-6.2 and 6.2-50 μgmL-1, respectively. The synthesized nanoparticles could be applied as an effective antimicrobial agent against staphylococcal infections.

  9. Mutual diffusion of binary liquid mixtures containing methanol, ethanol, acetone, benzene, cyclohexane, toluene, and carbon tetrachloride

    Guevara-Carrion, Gabriela; Janzen, Tatjana; Muñoz-Muñoz, Y. Mauricio; Vrabec, Jadran

    2016-03-01

    Mutual diffusion coefficients of all 20 binary liquid mixtures that can be formed out of methanol, ethanol, acetone, benzene, cyclohexane, toluene, and carbon tetrachloride without a miscibility gap are studied at ambient conditions of temperature and pressure in the entire composition range. The considered mixtures show a varying mixing behavior from almost ideal to strongly non-ideal. Predictive molecular dynamics simulations employing the Green-Kubo formalism are carried out. Radial distribution functions are analyzed to gain an understanding of the liquid structure influencing the diffusion processes. It is shown that cluster formation in mixtures containing one alcoholic component has a significant impact on the diffusion process. The estimation of the thermodynamic factor from experimental vapor-liquid equilibrium data is investigated, considering three excess Gibbs energy models, i.e., Wilson, NRTL, and UNIQUAC. It is found that the Wilson model yields the thermodynamic factor that best suits the simulation results for the prediction of the Fick diffusion coefficient. Four semi-empirical methods for the prediction of the self-diffusion coefficients and nine predictive equations for the Fick diffusion coefficient are assessed and it is found that methods based on local composition models are more reliable. Finally, the shear viscosity and thermal conductivity are predicted and in most cases favorably compared with experimental literature values.

  10. Determination of amino acid and protein peroxides by the xylenol orange-Fe(III) complex

    Oxidative stress imposed on living organisms is believed to lead to the depletion of their antioxidant defences, followed by chemical changes in the cell constituents. These may ultimately develop into pathological conditions such as cancer or cardiovascular disease. An assay of peroxides which could be applied to tissues or simple tissue extracts would prove extremely useful in the studies of the phenomenon of oxidative stress. With this purpose, the authors have tested the ability of two peroxide assay techniques to measure the formation of amino acid and protein peroxides in aqueous solutions irradiated with gamma rays, using a modification of the method based on the oxidation of Fe(II)) by peroxides and complexing of the Fe(III) produced by xylenol orange. The molar extinction coefficients of the peroxides tested were determined by comparison with the well-tested iodometric assay. This work was extended to the detection of all organic peroxides in human blood plasma or serum subjected to oxidative stress, where the iodometric assay proved difficult to apply and unreliable because of the binding of iodine to the blood components. Preliminary results suggest that exposure of serum to gamma radiation leads to immediate peroxidation of the proteins, with a delay before generation of lipid peroxides

  11. Ultraviolet- and sunlight-induced lipid peroxidation in liposomal membrane

    Ultraviolet radiation and sunlight caused lipid peroxidation in the liposomal membrane (as detected by measurement of the oxidation index, A233/A215, and the amount of malondialdehyde formed) and made the membrane leaky (as revealed by the release of the trapped chromate anions). The oxidation index and the formation of malondialdehyde increased linearly with increasing dose of radiation and depended significantly on the dose rate. The effects were smaller in liposomes derived from Vibrio cholerae phospholipid than in those derived from egg lecithin. The effects of the radiation dose and dose rate on hemolysis and peroxidation (MDA formation) of the erythrocyte membrane followed a similar pattern. A direct correlation between the percentage leakage of chromate (Y) and the oxidation index (X) of the liposomal system was obtained as Y = 236.5 x X

  12. Preparation and properties of low boiling point of alcohol and acetone-based magnetic fluid

    Fujita, T.; Miyazaki, T.; Nishiyama, H.; Jeyadevan, B.

    1999-07-01

    Ultra-fine magnetic particles are difficult to be dispersed in low boiling point solvents such as alcohol (C 1-C 4) and acetone. In this paper, we report the preparation methods of several alcohol and acetone-based magnetic fluids. The stability of magnetic fluid depended on the HLB (hydrophile-lipophile balance) of the solvent and alkyl chain lengths of organic layers. The fluid was most stable only when the HLB value of surfactant and the solvents are similar.

  13. Physiology and biochemistry of the anaerobic biodegradation of isopropanol and acetone

    Dullius, Carlos Henrique

    2011-01-01

    Diese Arbeit konzentrierte sich auf die Physiologie und Biochemie des anaeroben Abbaus von Isopropanol und Aceton, sowie auf die Aufklärung von Reaktionsmechanismen, welche am Acetonabbau in anaeroben Bakterien beteiligt sind. Untersucht wurden diese physiologischen und biochemischen Aspekte in syntrophen, methanogenen Anreicherungen, sulfatreduzierenden Bakterien und nitratreduzierenden Stämmen, welche dafür angereichert und isoliert wurden.Die Abbaureaktionen von Isopropanol und Aceton wur...

  14. Industrial production of acetone and butanol by fermentation—100 years later

    Sauer, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Microbial production of acetone and butanol was one of the first large-scale industrial fermentation processes of global importance. During the first part of the 20th century, it was indeed the second largest fermentation process, superseded in importance only by the ethanol fermentation. After a rapid decline after the 1950s, acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation has recently gained renewed interest in the context of biorefinery approaches for the production of fuels and chemicals from ...

  15. Spice paprika oleoresin extraction under different conditions involving acetone and ethanol

    Rafajlovska, Vesna; Slaveska-Raicki, Renata; Koleva Gudeva, Liljana; Klopceska, Jana

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes the oleoresin extraction from the spice paprika under different extraction conditions that involves acetone and ethanol as an extracting solvent in percolatory system. Moreover, the influence of paprika particle size, solvent flow rate and the temperature on the extraction procedure was also studied. It was revealed that better extraction efficiency was achieved with 2 ml/min solvent flow rate. The particle size is more important when acetone for paprika oleoresin extract...

  16. Effects of cyclohexane/acetone ratio on bixin extraction yield by accelerated solvent extraction method

    Rahmalia, Winda; Fabre, Jean-François; Mouloungui, Zephirin

    2015-01-01

    In this study, accelerated solvent extraction (ASE) was applied to the quantitative extraction of bixin. The effects of cyclohexane/ acetone ratios on bixin extraction yield were evaluated. Acetone was used in the process of pigment extraction and also played a major role in its analysis by UV-Vis spectrophotometry. Pure cis-bixin isolated by flash chromatography and characterized by Fourier Transform Infra Red spectrometry was used as a bixin standard for qualitative and quantitative analysi...

  17. Upper Bound for Neutron Emission from Sonoluminescing Bubbles in Deuterated Acetone

    An experimental search for nuclear fusion inside imploding bubbles of degassed deuterated acetone at 0 degree sign C driven by a 15 atm sound field and seeded with a neutron generator reveals an upper bound that is a factor of 10 000 less than the signal reported by Taleyarkhan et al. The strength of our upper bound is limited by the weakness of sonoluminescence, which we ascribe to the relatively high vapor pressure of acetone

  18. Breath acetone monitoring by portable Si:WO{sub 3} gas sensors

    Righettoni, Marco; Tricoli, Antonio; Gass, Samuel [Particle Technology Laboratory, Department of Mechanical and Process Engineering ETH Zurich, CH-8092 Zurich (Switzerland); Schmid, Alex; Amann, Anton [Univ.-Clinic for Anesthesia, Innsbruck Medical University, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Breath Research Institute of the Austrian Academy of Sciences, A-6850 Dornbirn (Austria); Pratsinis, Sotiris E., E-mail: sotiris.pratsinis@ptl.mavt.ethz.ch [Particle Technology Laboratory, Department of Mechanical and Process Engineering ETH Zurich, CH-8092 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2012-08-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Portable sensors were developed and tested for monitoring acetone in the human breath. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Acetone concentrations down to 20 ppb were measured with short response times (<30 s). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The present sensors were highly selective to acetone over ethanol and water. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sensors were applied to human breath: good agreement with highly sensitive PTR-MS. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Tests with people at rest and during physical activity showed the sensor robustness. - Abstract: Breath analysis has the potential for early stage detection and monitoring of illnesses to drastically reduce the corresponding medical diagnostic costs and improve the quality of life of patients suffering from chronic illnesses. In particular, the detection of acetone in the human breath is promising for non-invasive diagnosis and painless monitoring of diabetes (no finger pricking). Here, a portable acetone sensor consisting of flame-deposited and in situ annealed, Si-doped epsilon-WO{sub 3} nanostructured films was developed. The chamber volume was miniaturized while reaction-limited and transport-limited gas flow rates were identified and sensing temperatures were optimized resulting in a low detection limit of acetone ({approx}20 ppb) with short response (10-15 s) and recovery times (35-70 s). Furthermore, the sensor signal (response) was robust against variations of the exhaled breath flow rate facilitating application of these sensors at realistic relative humidities (80-90%) as in the human breath. The acetone content in the breath of test persons was monitored continuously and compared to that of state-of-the-art proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS). Such portable devices can accurately track breath acetone concentration to become an alternative to more elaborate breath analysis techniques.

  19. Ionization energy of acetone by vacuum ultraviolet mass-analyzed threshold ionization spectrometry

    Mass-analyzed threshold ionization (MATI) time-of-flight mass spectrometer using coherent vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) laser generated by four-wave difference frequency mixing (FWDFM) in Kr has been constructed and utilized to obtain the accurate ionization energy of acetone. From the MATI onsets measured from various applied pulsed fields, the ionization energy to the ionic ground state of acetone has been determined to be 9.7074 ± 0.0019 eV.

  20. Damages induced in lambda phage DNA by enzyme-generated triplet acetone

    Exposure of lambda phage to triplet acetone, generated during the aerobic oxidation of isobutanal by peroxidase, leads to genome lesions. The majority of these lesions are detected as DNA single-strand breaks only in alkaline conditions, so true breaks were not observed. Also, no sites sensitive to UV-endonuclease from Micrococcus luteus were found in DNA from treated phage. The participation of triplet acetone in the generation of such DNA damage is discussed. (Author)

  1. Solvatation and ion association in calcium nitrate solutions in acetone on sound data

    Present article is devoted to solvatation and ion association in calcium nitrate solutions in acetone on sound data. The results of measurement of the rate of distribution and peak value of coefficient of adsorption of supersonic waves in the calcium nitrate solutions in acetone were considered. Measurements were carried out on impulse ultrasonic unit in the frequency range 9.7-106.7 MHz and at temperature range 289-313 K.

  2. Cathodic carbon peroxidation process. Surface modifications through oxygen bonding

    Simonet, Jacques

    2013-01-01

    The reduction of oxygen of the air at carbon electrodes in organic aprotic polar solvents in the presence of organic electrophiles such as alkyl iodides may reveal the formation of films of surface-attached alkyl peroxides. Electrochemical charge of carbons (glassy carbon, graphite, industrial coke) in the presence of tetraalkylammonium salt TAAX permits the building of poly-nucleophilic materials that may spontaneously react with air during the work up. This way, a TAA+ hydroperoxydate layer...

  3. Aluminum induces lipid peroxidation and aggregation of human blood platelets

    T.J.C. Neiva; D.M. Fries; Monteiro, H. P.; E.A. D'Amico; D.A.F. Chamone

    1997-01-01

    Aluminum (Al3+) intoxication is thought to play a major role in the development of Alzheimer's disease and in certain pathologic manifestations arising from long-term hemodialysis. Although the metal does not present redox capacity, it can stimulate tissue lipid peroxidation in animal models. Furthermore, in vitro studies have revealed that the fluoroaluminate complex induces diacylglycerol formation, 43-kDa protein phosphorylation and aggregation. Based on these observations, we postulated t...

  4. Sol - Gel synthesis and characterization of magnesium peroxide nanoparticles

    Jaison, J.; Ashok raja, C.; Balakumar, S.; Chan, Y. S.

    2015-04-01

    Magnesium peroxide is an excellent source of oxygen in agriculture applications, for instance it is used in waste management as a material for soil bioremediation to remove contaminants from polluted underground water, biological wastes treatment to break down hydrocarbon, etc. In the present study, sol-gel synthesis of magnesium peroxide (MgO2) nanoparticles is reported. Magnesium peroxide is odourless; fine peroxide which releases oxygen when reacts with water. During the sol-gel synthesis, the magnesium malonate intermediate is formed which was then calcinated to obtain MgO2 nanoparticles. The synthesized nanoparticles were characterized using Thermo gravimetric -Differential Thermal Analysis (TG- DTA), X-Ray Diffraction studies (XRD) and High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscope (HRTEM). Our study provides a clear insight that the formation of magnesium malonate during the synthesis was due to the reaction between magnesium acetate, oxalic acid and ethanol. In our study, we can conclude that the calcination temperature has a strong influence on particle size, morphology, monodispersity and the chemistry of the particles.

  5. Determination of hydrogen peroxide concentration in THOR coolant during reactor operation

    The concentrations of hydrogen peroxide formed in the coolant due to radiolysis were studied during THOR operation at 1 MW. The relation between doses and hydrogen peroxide formation in a neutron-gamma mixed field was investigated. The initial concentration was 2.3x10-5 g/ml at the beginning of reactor operation, and then it increased rather rapidly at the first 9 hs. The increasing rate slowed down till the end of 30 hs of operation. The maximum concentration of hydrogen peroxide was found to be 4.7x10-5 g/ml, and its decrease followed the exponential curve. (author)

  6. Magnetic carbon xerogels for the catalytic wet peroxide oxidation of 4-nitrophenol solutions

    Ribeiro, R; Silva, Adrián; Faria, Joaquim; Gomes, Helder

    2015-01-01

    Catalytic wet peroxide oxidation (CWPO) is a well-known advanced oxidation process for the removal of organic pollutants from industrial process waters and wastewater. Specifically, CWPO employs hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) as oxidation source and a suitable catalyst to promote its decomposition via formation of hydroxyl radicals (HO•), which exhibit high oxidizing potential and serve as effective species in the destruction of a huge range of organic pollutants

  7. Pork fat peroxidation by gamma-irradiation

    In this paper, pork fat peroxidation by γ-irradiation and the possible effects of oxygen, UV-irradiation and storage after the γ-irradiation have been investigated. It has been found that the level of peroxides in irradiated pork increases linearly with the increasing absorbed dose. The chemical yield of peroxides formed in the irradiated fat is about 4.2 and independent on the sample temperature or absorbed dose rate, but dependent on storage time of sample before γ-irradiation. The irradiated pork exhibits some unusual features as following: 1) the peroxide content in irradiated pork is higher than that in unirradiated one; 2) the peroxide content in irradiated pork increases gradually on storage and is essentially constant in unirradiated one, which is very useful for the detection of irradiated pork; 3) the further peroxidation in irradiated pork is much more susceptible to UV radiation than that in unirradiated pork

  8. Investigation and subsurface remediation program for acetone in gulf coast sediments

    Failure of a subsurface pipeline and a rail car loading header caused a release of acetone to the shallow subsurface sediments at a Texas Gulf Coast chemical plant. A channel sand deposit was mapped beneath the release location consisting of fine grained sand below 10 feet of clay. The channel geometry and acetone distribution in the subsurface were delineated by a series of boreholes for the installation of monitor wells. The channel sand is approximately 30 feet thick and 150 feet wide. Aquifer test analyses show the transmissivity of the sand deposit to be about 400 ft2 /day. The acetone concentration in the ground water exceeded 100,000 mg/L with the greatest concentrations stratified at the top of the saturated zone. A ground water remediation program has been underway for more than three years. It was found that a single well, screened through the entire thickness of the sand deposit and pumped at eight gpm could effectively capture the contaminant plume, however the average concentration of acetone in the discharge fluid was only 800 mg/L. Alternate pumping schemes have been tried to evolve a more efficient recovery operation. Additionally, a top filling pneumatic pump was installed to take advantage of the higher concentrations of acetone found at the top of the saturated zone. Attempts were made to determine if a particular pumping scheme was more efficient for the ground water remediation. Both intermittent and continuous pumping were tried. Samples were collected to determine the concentrations of the discharge water and the total mass of recovered acetone. It was found that intermittent pumping of the recovery wells did not recover as much acetone as continuous pumping

  9. Anion exchange behavior of Ti, Zr, Hf, Nb and Ta as homologues of Rf and Db in mixed HF-acetone solutions

    We studied in detail the sorption behavior of Ti, Zr, Hf, Nb and Ta on AG 1 anion exchange resin in HF-acetone mixed solutions as a function of organic cosolvent and acid concentrations. Anion exchange behavior was found to be strongly acetone concentration dependent. The distribution coefficients of Ti, Zr, Hf and Nb increased and those of Ta decreased with increasing content of acetone in HF solutions. With increasing HF concentration, anion exchange equilibrium analysis indicated the formation of fluoride complexes of group-4 elements with charge -3 and Ta with charge -2. For Nb the slope of -2 increased up to -5. Optimal conditions for separation of the elements using AIX chromatography were found. Group-4 elements formed MF73- (M = Ti, Zr, Hf) complexes whose sorption decreased Ti > Hf > Zr in reverse order of complex stability. This fact is of particular interest for studying ion exchange behavior of Rf compared to Ti. The advantages of studying chemical properties of Rf and Db in aqueous HF solutions mixed with organic solvents are briefly discussed

  10. Compositional Factors that Influence Lipid Peroxidation in Beef Juice and Standard Sausages.

    Yi, Gu; Haug, Anna; Nordvi, Berit; Saarem, Kristin; Oostindjer, Marije; Langsrud, Øyvind; Egelandsdal, Bjørg

    2015-12-01

    In order to identify how different additives influenced lipid peroxidation formation, a sausage only using beef juice as pigment source and a standard beef-pork meat sausage were studied. The effects of different additives, including fish oil, myoglobin, nitrite, clove extract, and calcium sources on oxidation and sensory properties were examined. Both sausage systems were stored in 3 different manners prior to testing: (1) frozen immediately at -80 °C; (2) chilled stored for 2.5 weeks followed by fluorescent light illumination at 4 °C for another 2 wk; (3) frozen at -20 °C for 5 mo. The frozen group 3 showed the highest peroxide formation and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) for both sausage systems. Unpolar peroxides dominated in both systems. The clove extract could offset the peroxide formation from myoglobin/beef juice and/or fish oil, but the addition of clove flavor was recognized by the sensory panelists. Calcium addition reduced lipid peroxide formation. Added nitrite and fish oil seemed to interact to stimulate nitroso-myoglobin formation. Nitrite was identified to interact with clove addition and thereby, relatively speaking, increased TBARS. The 2 sausage systems generally ranked the additives similarly as pro- and antioxidants. PMID:26579877

  11. Membrane lipid peroxidation by UV-A: Mechanism and implications

    Bose, B.; Agarwal, S.; Chatterjee, S.N. (Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, Calcutta (India))

    1990-10-01

    UV-A produced a dose-dependent linear increase of lipid peroxidation in liposomal membrane, as detected by the assay of (i) conjugated dienes, (ii) lipid hydroperoxides, (iii) malondialdehydes (MDA), and (iv) the fluorescent adducts formed by the reaction of MDA with glycine and also a linear dose-dependent increase of ({sup 14}C)glucose efflux from the liposomes. UV-A-induced MDA production could not be inhibited by any significant degree by sodium formate, dimethyl sulfoxide, EDTA, or superoxide dismutase but was very significantly inhibited by butylated hydroxytoluene, alpha-tocopherol, sodium azide, L-histidine, dimethylfuran, and beta-carotene. MDA formation increased with an increase in the D{sub 2}O content in water, leading to a maximal amount of nearly 50% enhancement of lipid peroxidation in 100% D{sub 2}O vis-a-vis water used as dispersion medium. The experimental findings indicate the involvement of singlet oxygen as the initiator of the UV-A-induced lipid peroxidation.

  12. Membrane lipid peroxidation by UV-A: Mechanism and implications

    UV-A produced a dose-dependent linear increase of lipid peroxidation in liposomal membrane, as detected by the assay of (i) conjugated dienes, (ii) lipid hydroperoxides, (iii) malondialdehydes (MDA), and (iv) the fluorescent adducts formed by the reaction of MDA with glycine and also a linear dose-dependent increase of [14C]glucose efflux from the liposomes. UV-A-induced MDA production could not be inhibited by any significant degree by sodium formate, dimethyl sulfoxide, EDTA, or superoxide dismutase but was very significantly inhibited by butylated hydroxytoluene, alpha-tocopherol, sodium azide, L-histidine, dimethylfuran, and beta-carotene. MDA formation increased with an increase in the D2O content in water, leading to a maximal amount of nearly 50% enhancement of lipid peroxidation in 100% D2O vis-a-vis water used as dispersion medium. The experimental findings indicate the involvement of singlet oxygen as the initiator of the UV-A-induced lipid peroxidation

  13. Molecular simulations of the effects of phospholipid and cholesterol peroxidation on lipid membrane properties.

    Neto, Antenor J P; Cordeiro, Rodrigo M

    2016-09-01

    Non-enzymatic lipid peroxidation may change biomembrane structure and function. Here, we employed molecular dynamics simulations to study the effects of either phospholipid or cholesterol peroxidation individually, as well as the combined peroxidation of both components. When lipids were peroxidized, the generated OOH groups migrated to the membrane surface and engaged in H-bonds with each other and the phospholipid carbonyl ester groups. It caused the sn-2 acyl chains of phospholipid hydroperoxides to bend and the whole sterol backbone of cholesterol hydroperoxides to tilt. When phospholipids were kept intact, peroxidation of the sterol backbone led to a partial degradation of its condensing and ordering properties, independently of the position and isomerism of the OOH substitution. However, even in massively peroxidized membranes in which all phospholipids and cholesterol were peroxidized, the condensing and ordering properties of the sterol backbone were still significant. The possible implications for the formation of membrane lateral domains were discussed. Cholesterol peroxyl radicals were also investigated and we found that the OO groups did not migrate to the headgroups region. PMID:27349733

  14. Electron impact investigation of the 3p-Rydberg transitions of acetone

    High resolution (15 meV), gas phase, electron impact energy loss spectra of acetone, and acetone-d6 measured as a function of incident energy and scattering angle have been used to study the anomalously weak 7.4 eV 3p-Rydberg transition in acetone. Assignments made on the basis of isotope shifts and differential electron scattering cross sections show that the weak transition observed optically and in the high energy electron impact spectrum is a forbidden transition to the out-of-plane 3p-Rydberg orbital. The band system is built on a vibronically allowed false origin enabled by the ν23 (CO bend) vibration. The analogous transition in the less symmetric molecule methyl ethyl ketone was observed to be optically allowed. All observed bands could be assigned to the one electronic transition to the out-of-plane 3p-Rydberg orbital. The other two 3p-Rydberg transitions do not appear to be active in acetone or methyl ethyl ketone. An unusual feature of this investigation was the experimental investigation of the relative differential scattering cross sections of both true and false vibronic origins within a single electronic transition. The high energy resolution allowed isotopic substitution, a traditional technique of optical spectroscopy, to be used to establish assignments in an electron impact experiment

  15. Breath acetone monitoring by portable Si:WO3 gas sensors

    Highlights: ► Portable sensors were developed and tested for monitoring acetone in the human breath. ► Acetone concentrations down to 20 ppb were measured with short response times (3 nanostructured films was developed. The chamber volume was miniaturized while reaction-limited and transport-limited gas flow rates were identified and sensing temperatures were optimized resulting in a low detection limit of acetone (∼20 ppb) with short response (10–15 s) and recovery times (35–70 s). Furthermore, the sensor signal (response) was robust against variations of the exhaled breath flow rate facilitating application of these sensors at realistic relative humidities (80–90%) as in the human breath. The acetone content in the breath of test persons was monitored continuously and compared to that of state-of-the-art proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS). Such portable devices can accurately track breath acetone concentration to become an alternative to more elaborate breath analysis techniques.

  16. Study of the exhaled acetone in type 1 diabetes using quantum cascade laser spectroscopy.

    Reyes-Reyes, Adonis; Horsten, Roland C; Urbach, H Paul; Bhattacharya, Nandini

    2015-01-01

    The acetone concentration exhaled in the breath of three type 1 diabetes patients (two minors and one adult) and one healthy volunteer is studied using a quantum cascade laser-based spectroscopic system. Using the acetone signature between 1150 and 1250 cm(-1) and a multiline fitting method, the concentration variations on the order of parts per billion by volume were measured. Blood glucose and ketone concentrations in blood measurements were performed simultaneously to study their relation with acetone in exhaled breath. We focus on personalized studies to better understand the role of acetone in diabetes. For each volunteer, we performed a series of measurements over a period of time, including overnight fastings of 11 ± 1 h and during ketosis-hyperglycemia events for the minors. Our results highlight the importance of performing personalized studies because the response of the minors to the presence of ketosis was consistent but unique for each individual. Also, our results emphasize the need for performing more studies with T1D minors, because the acetone concentration in the breath of the minors differs, with respect to those reported in the literature, which are based on adults. PMID:25506743

  17. Efficient acetone-butanol-ethanol production by Clostridium beijerinckii from sugar beet pulp.

    Bellido, Carolina; Infante, Celia; Coca, Mónica; González-Benito, Gerardo; Lucas, Susana; García-Cubero, María Teresa

    2015-08-01

    Sugar beet pulp (SBP) has been investigated as a promising feedstock for ABE fermentation by Clostridium beijerinckii. Although lignin content in SBP is low, a pretreatment is needed to enhance enzymatic hydrolysis and fermentation yields. Autohydrolysis at pH 4 has been selected as the best pretreatment for SBP in terms of sugars release and acetone and butanol production. The best overall sugars release yields from raw SBP ranged from 66.2% to 70.6% for this pretreatment. The highest ABE yield achieved was 0.4g/g (5.1g/L of acetone and 6.6g/L butanol) and 143.2g ABE/kg SBP (62.3g acetone and 80.9g butanol) were obtained when pretreated SBP was enzymatically hydrolyzed at 7.5% (w/w) solid loading. Higher solid loadings (10%) offered higher acetone and butanol titers (5.8g/L of acetone and 7.8g/L butanol). All the experiments were carried out under not-controlling pH conditions reaching about 5.3 in the final samples. PMID:25965949

  18. Thermodynamic Properties of the Azeotropic Mixture of Acetone, Cyclohexane and Methanol

    WANG Xiu-Rong; NAN Zhao-Dong; TAN Zhi-Cheng

    2006-01-01

    Molar heat capacities of the pure samples of acetone, methanol and the azeotropic mixture composed of acetone,cyclohexane and methanol were measured by an adiabatic calorimeter from 78 to 320 K. The solid-solid and solid-liquid phase transitions of the pure samples and the mixture were determined based on the curve of the heat capacity with respect to temperature. The phase transitions took place at (126.16±0.68) and (178.96±1.47) K for the sample of acetone, (157.79±0.95) and (175.93±0.95) K for methanol, which were corresponding to the solid-solid and the solid-liquid phase transitions of the acetone and the methanol, respectively. And the phase transitions occurred in the temperature ranges of 120 to 190 K and 278 to 280 K corresponding to the solid-solid and the solid-liquid phase transitions of mixture of acetone, cyclohexane and methanol, respectively. The thermodynamic functions and the excess thermodynamic functions of the mixture relative to standard temperature of 298.15 K were derived based on the relationships of the thermodynamic functions and the function of the measured heat capacity with respect to temperature.

  19. Biofiltration of mixtures of gas-phase styrene and acetone with the fungus Sporothrix variecibatus

    The biodegradation performance of a biofilter, inoculated with the fungus Sporothrix variecibatus, to treat gas-phase styrene and acetone mixtures under steady-state and transient conditions was evaluated. Experiments were carried out by varying the gas-flow rates (0.05-0.4 m3 h-1), leading to empty bed residence times as low as 17.1 s, and by changing the concentrations of gas-phase styrene (0.01-6.3 g m-3) and acetone (0.01-8.9 g m-3). The total elimination capacities were as high as 360 g m-3 h-1, with nearly 97.5% removal of styrene and 75.6% for acetone. The biodegradation of acetone was inhibited by the presence of styrene, while styrene removal was affected only slightly by the presence of acetone. During transient-state experiments, increasing the overall pollutant load by almost 3-fold, i.e., from 220 to 600 g m-3 h-1, resulted in a sudden drop of removal efficiency (>90-70%), but still high elimination capacities were maintained. Periodic microscopic observations revealed that the originally inoculated Sporothrix sp. remained present in the reactor and actively dominant in the biofilm.

  20. Laser-based assessment of lipid peroxidation in humans

    Giubileo, Gianfranco

    1998-07-01

    Infrared absorption spectroscopy can be performed at very high resolution by tunable diode laser (TDL) based optical systems for any gas with well resolved absorption spectra. In a double beam setup atmospheric trace gas concentration can be measured down to ppb levels. The analysis of trace gases may have useful applications in detecting chemicals in the human breath for non invasive medical diagnostic. The capability of TDL based breath analysis was well demonstrated by monitoring ammonia and methane. In the human body the formation of free radicals does induce oxidative degradation of polyunsaturated fatty acids (lipid peroxidation) which is a damage for cells and organs in the organism. Specific volatile hydrocarbons generated as end product by lipid peroxidation (LP) can be found inside circulating blood and expired breath. TDL based analysis of those specific hydrocarbons (ethane and pentane) in the expired breath can allow a non invasive assessment of the LP extent.

  1. Does acetone react with HO2 in the upper-troposphere?

    J. Lelieveld

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Recent theoretical calculations showed that reaction with HO2 could be an important sink for acetone (CH3C(OCH3 and source of acetic acid (CH3C(OOH in cold parts of the atmosphere (e.g. the tropopause region. This work details studies of HO2 + CH3C(OCH3 (CH32C(OHOO (R1 in laboratory-based and theoretical chemistry experiments; the atmospheric significance of Reaction (R1 was assessed in a global 3-D chemical model. Pulsed laser-kinetic experiments were conducted, for the first time, at the low-temperatures representative of the tropopause. Reaction with NO converted HO2 to OH for detection by laser induced fluorescence. Reduced yields of OH at T 2 by CH3C(OCH3 with a forward rate coefficient greater than 2 × 10−12 cm3 molecule−1 s−1. No evidence for Reaction (R1 was observed at T > 230 K, probably due to rapid thermal dissociation back to HO2 + CH3C(OCH3. Numerical simulations of the data indicate that these experiments were sensitive to only (R1a HO2-CH3C(OCH3 complex formation, the first step in (R1. Rearrangement (R1b of the complex to form peroxy radicals, and hence the atmospheric significance of (R1 has yet to be rigorously verified by experiment. Results from new quantum chemical calculations indicate that K1 is characterised by large uncertainties of at least an order of magnitude at T 3C(OCH3 near the tropopause, it cannot explain observations of CH3C(OOH throughout the troposphere.

  2. Hydrogen peroxide as a greenhouse soil amendment

    There are anecdotal reports that hydrogen peroxide provides growth benefits beyond controlling plant infection and plant stress. The objective of this research was to determine the effect of soil applications of hydrogen peroxide solutions on plant growth and flowering. Nasturtium (Tropaeolum maju...

  3. Molecular Association and Structure of Hydrogen Peroxide.

    Giguere, Paul A.

    1983-01-01

    The statement is sometimes made in textbooks that liquid hydrogen peroxide is more strongly associated than water, evidenced by its higher boiling point and greater heat of vaporization. Discusses these and an additional factor (the nearly double molecular mass of the peroxide), focusing on hydrogen bonds and structure of the molecule. (JN)

  4. 7 CFR 58.431 - Hydrogen peroxide.

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Hydrogen peroxide. 58.431 Section 58.431 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... Material § 58.431 Hydrogen peroxide. The solution shall comply with the specification of the...

  5. 21 CFR 529.1150 - Hydrogen peroxide.

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hydrogen peroxide. 529.1150 Section 529.1150 Food... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS CERTAIN OTHER DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 529.1150 Hydrogen peroxide. (a) Specifications. Each milliliter of solution contains 396.1 milligrams (mg) hydrogen...

  6. Simple, field portable colorimetric detection device for organic peroxides and hydrogen peroxide

    Pagoria, Philip F.; Mitchell, Alexander R.; Whipple, Richard E.; Carman, M. Leslie; Reynolds, John G.; Nunes, Peter; Shields, Sharon J.

    2010-11-09

    A simple and effective system for the colorimetric determination of organic peroxides and hydrogen peroxide. A peroxide pen utilizing a swipe material attached to a polyethylene tube contains two crushable vials. The two crushable vials contain a colorimetric reagent separated into dry ingredients and liquid ingredients. After swiping a suspected substance or surface the vials are broken, the reagent is mixed thoroughly and the reagent is allowed to wick into the swipe material. The presence of organic peroxides or hydrogen peroxide is confirmed by a deep blue color.

  7. Safe, in situ methodologies for the destruction of triacetone triperoxide and other explosive peroxides

    Clausen, III, Christian (Inventor); Geiger, Cherie L. (Inventor); Sigman, Michael (Inventor); Fidler, Rebecca (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    Triacetone triperoxide (TATP) and other explosives of the peroxide family are safely degraded in situ. Nano and micron size metal particles in an elemental state include pure iron and magnesium or iron and magnesium particles that are mechanically alloyed with palladium and nickel. The metal particles are used in both the elemental state and in emulsions that are made from water, a hydrophobic solvent, such as corn oil, and a food-grade nonionic surfactant. The neat metals and emulsified zero valent metals (EZVM) safely degrade TATP with the major degradation product being acetone. The EZVM system absorbs and dissolves the TATP into the emulsion droplets where TATP degradation occurs. EZVM systems are ideal for degrading dry TATP crystals that may be present on a carpet or door entrance. Both the neat metal system and the emulsion system (EZVM) degrade TATP in an aqueous slurry.

  8. Vapor Hydrogen Peroxide Sterilization Certification

    Chen, Fei; Chung, Shirley; Barengoltz, Jack

    For interplanetary missions landing on a planet of potential biological interest, United States NASA planetary protection currently requires that the flight system must be assembled, tested and ultimately launched with the intent of minimizing the bioload taken to and deposited on the planet. Currently the only NASA approved microbial reduction method is dry heat sterilization process. However, with utilization of such elements as highly sophisticated electronics and sensors in modern spacecraft, this process presents significant materials challenges and is thus an undesirable bioburden reduction method to design engineers. The objective of this work is to introduce vapor hydrogen peroxide (VHP) as an alternative to dry heat microbial reduction to meet planetary protection requirements. The VHP sterilization technology is widely used by the medical industry, but high doses of VHP may degrade the performance of flight hardware, or compromise material compatibility. The goal of our study is determine the minimum VHP process conditions for PP acceptable microbial reduction levels. A series of experiments were conducted using Geobacillus stearothermophilus to determine VHP process parameters that provided significant reductions in spore viability while allowing survival of sufficient spores for statistically significant enumeration. In addition to the obvious process parameters -hydrogen peroxide concentration, number of pulses, and exposure duration -the investigation also considered the possible effect of environmental pa-rameters. Temperature, relative humidity, and material substrate effects on lethality were also studied. Based on the results, a most conservative D value was recommended. This recom-mended D value was also validated using VHP "hardy" strains that were isolated from clean-rooms and environmental populations collected from spacecraft relevant areas. The efficiency of VHP at ambient condition as well as VHP material compatibility will also be

  9. Determination of Eu3+ aquacomplexes stability constants in acetone using energy degradation of electron excitation

    Mean deactivation rate of rare-earth element (REE) ions in their excited states, which is single-valued function of their complexation, is employed as an indicator of the complexation in the respective solutions. The first four stability constants of the aquacomplexes Eu3+ in acetone at 293 deg K were found by means of such procedure: β1 = (1.27+-0.2) x 103, β2 = (5.6+-0.65) x 104, β3 = (4.41+-0.75) x 105, β4 = (5.92+-0.86)x 105. Upon increase of water concentration in europium nitrate acetone solution, at first three water molecules are inserted into the REE ion coordination sphere, then NO33- anions are replaced by water. This is confirmed by the rate of nonradiative energy transfer between Eu3+ and Nd3+ in acetone depending on water concentration

  10. Infrared absorption cross sections for acetone (propanone) in the 3 μm region

    Infrared absorption cross sections for acetone (propanone), CH3C(O)CH3, have been determined in the 3 μm spectral region from spectra recorded using a high-resolution FTIR spectrometer (Bruker IFS 125 HR) and a multipass cell with a maximum optical path length of 19.3 m. The spectra of mixtures of acetone with dry synthetic air were recorded at 0.015 cm-1 resolution (calculated as 0.9/MOPD using the Bruker definition of resolution) at a number of temperatures and pressures (50-760 Torr and 195-296 K) appropriate for atmospheric conditions. Intensities were calibrated using three acetone spectra (recorded at 278, 293 and 323 K) taken from the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) IR database.

  11. Mid-Infrared Vibrational Spectra of Discrete Acetone-Ligated Cerium Hydroxide Cations

    Groenewold, G. S.; Gianotto, Anita K.; Cossel, Kevin C.; Van Stipdonk, Michael J.; Oomens, Jos; Polfer, Nick; Moore, D.T.; De Jong, Wibe A.; McIIwain, Michael E.

    2007-02-15

    Cerium (III) hydroxy reactive sites are responsible for several important heterogeneous catalysis processes, and understanding the reaction chemistry of substrate molecules like CO, H2O, and CH3OH as they occur in heterogeneous media is a challenging task. We report here the first infrared spectra of model gas-phase cerium complexes and use the results as a benchmark to assist evaluation of the accuracy of ab initio calculations. Complexes containing [CeOH]2+ ligated by three- and four-acetone molecules were generated by electrospray ionization and characterized using wavelength-selective infrared multiple photon dissociation (IRMPD). The C=O stretching frequency for the [CeOH(acetone)4]2+ species appeared at 1650 cm-1 and was red-shifted by 90 cm-1 compared to unligated acetone. The magnitude of this shift for the carbonyl frequency was even greater for the [CeOH(acetone)3]2+ complex: the IRMPD peak consisted of two dissociation channels, an initial elimination of acetone at 1635 cm-1, and elimination of acetone accompanied by a serial charge separation producing [CeO(acetone)]+ at 1599 cm-1, with the overall frequency centered at 1616 cm-1. The increasing red shift observed as the number of acetone ligands decreases from four to three is consistent with transfer of more electron density per ligand in the less coordinated complexes. The lower frequency measured for the elimination/charge separation process is likely due to anharmonicity resulting from population of higher vibrational states. The C-C stretching frequency in the complexes is also influenced by coordination to the metal: it is blue-shifted compared to bare acetone, indicating a slight strengthening of the C-C bond in the complex, with the intensity of the absorption decreasing with decreasing ligation. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations using three different functionals (LDA, B3LYP, and PBE0) are used to predict the infrared spectra of the complexes. Calculated frequencies for the carbonyl

  12. Composition measurement of bicomponent droplets using laser-induced fluorescence of acetone

    Maqua, C.; Depredurand, V.; Castanet, G.; Wolff, M.; Lemoine, F.

    2007-12-01

    Commercial fuels are complex mixtures, the evaporation of which remains particularly difficult to model. Experimental characterization of the differential vaporization of the components is a problem that is seldom addressed. In this paper, the evaporation of binary droplets made of ethyl-alcohol and acetone is investigated using a technique of measurement of the droplet composition developed in purpose. This technique exploits the laser induced fluorescence of acetone which acts as a fluorescent tracer as well as the more volatile component of the fuel associated with an accurate measurement of the droplet diameter by forward scattering interferometry. A model of the fluorescence intensity of the binary mixture, taking into account the absorption of the acetone molecules, is proposed and validated. The sensitivity of the technique is discussed. Finally, the reliability of the technique is demonstrated on binary combusting droplets in linear stream.

  13. Bis(1,10-phenanthroline)lithium perchlorate: crystal structure and dissociation of complex in acetone

    Composition of solid phase formed in acetone at concentration ratios of 1,10-phenanthroline (phen) and LiClO4 near 2:1 is established. Molecular structure of bis(1,10-phenanthroline)lithium perchlorate is determined by X-ray structural analysis: space group Pnna, a=7.191(2), b=39.929(9), c=14.494(3) A, Z=8, Dx=1.490 g/cm3. Data of IR spectroscopy in acetone denotes dissociation of the Li(phen)2ClO4 complex for the 1:1 composition complex and molecule phen in the solution equilibrium with the solid phase

  14. Radiation-induced synthesis of low molecular weight of PTFE and their crosslinking in acetone medium

    Polytetrafluoroethylene was obtained by radiation-induced polymerization of tetrafluoroethylene in acetone at 195 K. An average diameter of the products was very small compared with the commercial one; it was about 0.2 μm. The yield was reached to 100% with a dose of 4 kGy. The crystallinity of the products is decreasing with increasing dose. The crystallinity becomes low, for higher irradiation doses. It was found that PTFE obtained by irradiation of TFE in acetone at 195 K has Y-type crosslinking structure. This was demonstrated by means of 19F MAS NMR

  15. Radiation induced synthesis of low molecular weight of PTFE and their crosslinking in acetone medium

    Polytetrafluoroethylene was obtained by radiation induced polymerization of tetrafluoroethylene in acetone at 195 K. An average diameter of the products was very small compared with commercial one; it was about 0.3 micro-meters. The yield was reached to 100% with a dose of 4 kGy. The crystallinity of the products is decreasing with increasing dose. The products become amorphous, for higher irradiation doses. It was found that PTFE obtained by irradiation of TFE in acetone at 195 K has branching structure. This was demonstrated by means of 19F MAS NMR. (Author)

  16. Stable magnesium peroxide at high pressure.

    Lobanov, Sergey S; Zhu, Qiang; Holtgrewe, Nicholas; Prescher, Clemens; Prakapenka, Vitali B; Oganov, Artem R; Goncharov, Alexander F

    2015-01-01

    Rocky planets are thought to comprise compounds of Mg and O as these are among the most abundant elements, but knowledge of their stable phases may be incomplete. MgO is known to be remarkably stable to very high pressure and chemically inert under reduced condition of the Earth's lower mantle. However, in exoplanets oxygen may be a more abundant constituent. Here, using synchrotron x-ray diffraction in laser-heated diamond anvil cells, we show that MgO and oxygen react at pressures above 96 GPa and T = 2150 K with the formation of I4/mcm MgO2. Raman spectroscopy detects the presence of a peroxide ion (O2(2-)) in the synthesized material as well as in the recovered specimen. Likewise, energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy confirms that the recovered sample has higher oxygen content than pure MgO. Our finding suggests that MgO2 may be present together or instead of MgO in rocky mantles and rocky planetary cores under highly oxidized conditions. PMID:26323635

  17. Adsorption and solar light decomposition of acetone on anatase TiO2 and niobium doped TiO2 thin films.

    Mattsson, Andreas; Leideborg, Michael; Larsson, Karin; Westin, Gunnar; Osterlund, Lars

    2006-01-26

    Adsorption and solar light decomposition of acetone was studied on nanostructured anatase TiO2 and Nb-doped TiO2 films made by sol-gel methods (10 and 20 mol % NbO2.5). A detailed characterization of the film materials show that films contain only nanoparticles with the anatase modification with pentavalent Nb oxide dissolved into the anatase structure, which is interpreted as formation of substituted Nb=O clusters in the anatase lattice. The Nb-doped films displayed a slight yellow color and an enhanced the visible light absorption with a red-shift of the optical absorption edge from 394 nm for the pure TiO2 film to 411 nm for 20 mol % NbO2.5. In-situ Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) transmission spectroscopy shows that acetone adsorbs associatively with eta1-coordination to the surface cations on all films. On Nb-doped TiO2 films, the carbonyl bonding to the surface is stabilized, which is evidenced by a lowering of the nu(C=O) frequency by about 20 cm(-1) to 1672 cm(-1). Upon solar light illumination acetone is readily decomposed on TiO2, and stable surface coordinated intermediates are formed. The decomposition rate is an order of magnitude smaller on the Nb-doped films despite an enhanced visible light absorption in these materials. The quantum yield is determined to be 0.053, 0.004 and 0.002 for the pure, 10% Nb:TiO2, and 20%Nb:TiO2, respectively. Using an interplay between FTIR and DFT calculations we show that the key surface intermediates are bidentate bridged formate and carbonate, and H-bonded bicarbonate, respectively, whose concentration on the surface can be correlated with their heats of formation and bond strength to coordinatively unsaturated surface Ti and Nb atoms at the surface. The oxidation rate of these intermediates is substantially slower than the initial acetone decomposition rate, and limits the total oxidation rate at t>7 min on TiO2, while no decrease of the rate is observed on the Nb-doped films. The rate of degradation of key surface

  18. Lipid peroxides level in the Indonesian elderly

    Purwantyastuti Purwantyastuti

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available A cross-sectional study was done to see the possible association of plasma lipid peroxides in the elderly with age and other factors. Plasma lipid peroxides is a product of free radical reactions which according to the latest theory of aging is the cause of aging process. Lipid peroxides were also found high in coronary heart disease. Four hundred forty relatively healthy elderly, age 55-85 years, were randomly chosen from free living elderly under guidance of health care centers (PUSKESMAS in Jakarta. Anamnesis and physical examination were done in the morning in the health centers. Blood samples were taken in fasting conditions, plasma lipids and lipid peroxides were measured according to standard methods. There was an age difference of lipid peroxides level in the elderly, which increased with age up to 70 years old. Elderly 70 years old and over had low plasma lipid peroxides. The level was not related to high plasma lipids. Higher level was found when more chronic degenerative diseases were found. (Med J Indones 2005; 14: 71-7Keywords: lipid peroxides, aging

  19. Peculiar behavior of MWW materials in aldol condensation of furfural and acetone

    Kikhtyanin, O.; Eliášová, Pavla; Jindrová, T.; Kubička, D.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 43, č. 27 (2014), s. 10628-10641. ISSN 1477-9226 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP106/12/G015 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : acetone * aldehydes * batch reactors Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 4.197, year: 2014

  20. Toxicity study of di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (DEHP) in combination with acetone in rats

    Dalgaard, M.; Østergaard, G.; Lam, Henrik Rye;

    2000-01-01

    measured parameters. In the 4-week study DEHP, at the highest dose level, resulted in severe general toxicity. The group exposed to DEHP in combination with acetone was more affected. Male fertility was decreased. Body weight was decreased, and the relative weight of the liver, kidney, heart, brain and...

  1. Colorimetric determination of uranium using ammonium thiocyanate in a medium of ethyl acetate, acetone and water

    The method consists of colorimetrically analyzing uranium using ammonium sulfo-cyanide in the solvent phase. The optimum conditions for extracting uranium by ethyl acetate have been studied. A precise colorimetric method was established which depends on the extracted phase and on the behavior of the ethyl acetate-acetone medium. (author)

  2. Design of a solvent extraction process for PAH-contaminated sediments : The WAU-acetone process

    Rulkens, W.H.; Bruning, H.; Hasselt, H.J. van; Rienks, J.; Veen, H.J. van; Terlingen, J.P.M.

    1998-01-01

    Solvent extraction is one of the possibilities to clean-up polluted sediments. It is especially attractive when the sediment mainly consists of clay particles polluted with contaminants which are not, or not easily, biodegradable. Using acetone as extracting agent the extraction process has been inv

  3. Silicalite-1 Crystals Etched with Hydrofluoric Acid Dissolved in Water or Acetone

    Brabec, Libor; Kočiřík, Milan

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 114, č. 32 (2010), s. 13685-13694. ISSN 1932-7447 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA400400909 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : silicalite-1 crystals * acetone * hydrofluorid acid Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 4.520, year: 2010

  4. Acetone, ammonia and hydrogen cyanide in exhaled breath of several volunteers aged 4–83 years

    Španěl, Patrik; Dryahina, Kseniya; Smith, D.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 1, - (2007), 011001. ISSN 1752-7155 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/06/0776 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : acetone * ammonia * hydrogen cyanide Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry

  5. Synthesis and Characterization of New Material——La/Zr/MMT Employed in Acetone Oxidation

    FAN,Li-Ping; CHEN,Min; ZHANG,Yi-Gai; ZHOU,Ren-Xian; ZHENG,Xiao-Ming

    2007-01-01

    A new material of zirconium pillared montmorillonite added with lanthanum (denoted as La/Zr/MMT) was prepared for acetone oxidation. Surface properties of the catalysts were investigated by means of XRD, TEM,TG-DTA and BET methods. The XRD result indicated that the interlayer space of the montmorillonite was enlarged from 1.57 to 4.85 nm after the treatment with zirconium pillaring and the addition of lanthanum. N2 adsorption-desorption result showed that by the process of zirconium pillaring, the specific surface area of the sample was increased to 128.0 m2/g, which was two times almost as large as pure montmorillonite. Simultaneously, the thermal stability was also enhanced. The activity of the new material on the total oxidation of acetone was investigated, and the results indicated that the catalytic activity of the montmorillonite was greatly improved. Over the sample of La/Zr/MMT, the T98 of acetone was obtained at 350℃, while it needs 400℃ over the pure montmorillonite. After 0.1% Pd was supported on the sample of La/Zr/MMT, the T98 decreased from 350 to 280 ℃, indicating the montmorillonite is a promising material for the control of some types of the volatile organic compounds such as acetone.

  6. Acetone vapor sensing using a vertical cavity surface emitting laser diode coated with polystyrene

    Ansbæk, Thor; Nielsen, Claus Højgaard; Larsen, Niels Bent;

    2009-01-01

    We report theoretical and experimental on a new vapor sensor, using a single-mode vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) coated with a polymer sensor coating, which can detect acetone vapor at a volume fraction of 2.5%. The sensor provides the advantage of standard packaging, small form...

  7. Improvement of the cold flow characteristics of biodiesel containing dissolved polymer wastes using acetone

    Pouya Mohammadi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Due to the fast fossil fuel depletion and at the same time global warming phenomenon anticipated for the next coming years, the necessity of developing alternative fuels e.g. biofuels (i.e. bioethanol, biodiesel, biogas and etc. has turned into an important concern. Recently, the application of the bio-solvency properties of biodiesel for recycling waste polymers has been highlighted. However, the impact of polymer dissolution on cold flow characteristics of biodiesel was never investigated. The present study was set to explore the impact of different solvents in stabilizing biodiesel-polymer solution. Among them, acetone was proved to be the best fuel stabilizer. Subsequently, cold flow characteristic i.e. cloud point, of the biodiesel-polymer-acetone fuel was found to have improved (decreased due to the inclusion of acetone. Finally, flash point analysis of the fuel blends containing acetone was done to ensured high safety of the fuel blend by dramatically increasing the flash point values of biodiesel-polymer fuel blends.

  8. Screening of Methanol and Acetone Extracts of Fourteen Indian Medicinal Plants for Antimicrobial Activity

    VAGHASIYA, Yogeshkumar; Chanda, Sumitra V.

    2007-01-01

    The methanol and acetone extracts of 14 plants belonging to different families were evaluated for antimicrobial activity against five Gram-positive bacteria: Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Bacillus cereus, Bacillus subtilis, Micrococcus flavus; seven Gram-negative bacteria: Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Proteus mirabilis, Proteus vulgaris, Salmonella typhimurium, Citrobacter freundii; and three fungi: Candida tropicalis, Cryptococcus lut...

  9. Investigation of efficiency of air cleaning from acetone using a segmental construction biofilter

    Denas Bacevičius

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Volatile organic compounds, e. g. acetone, have a direct impact on climate change, decrease of ozone in the air, and on the growth of greenhouse effect. One of the most popular air purifying methods from VOC is a biological air cleaning. Experimental investigations were conducted to determine the efficiency of the new structure of biofilter with polypropylene plates segments. During the investigations the efficiency of segmental construction biofilter of air purification at different initial concentrations of pollutants was determined. Different concentrations of pollutants were estimated during the acetone dilution with water. During the tests the efficiency of biofilter air purification from acetone vapor and its change under different concentrations of vapors was set. Based on test results, the maximum efficiency of biofilter air purification was up to 93%. Studies have shown that increasing the allowable pollutant concentration, the efficiency of air purification unit decreases. Increasing the concentration of supplied acetone vapor into the biofilter from 232 to 701 mg/m3, cleaning efficiency decreased from 92.8 to 82.3%. Since microorganisms fail to oxidize organic compounds, the filter works better at lower initial concentrations of pollutants.

  10. High dilutions of acetone affect the Avena sativa growth in vitro

    Kely Karina Belato

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Acetone is an organic solvent with molecular structure CH3(COCH3, its endogenous production in the animal body is called ketosis. The production of this compound increases with the fat. Acetone influences the lipid membrane, altering its fluidity and lipid composition [1], causing cell damage and leakage and can cause cell death. The use of herbicides in organic farming is not accepted by the Brazilian legislation [2]. So the weed control becomes a problem for organic farmers. The aim of this study is to evaluate the herbicide potential of high dilutions of acetone on Avena sativa L. Materials and Methods: The preliminary tests were conducted at the Laboratory of Plant Physiology and Homeopathy, State University of Maringá (UEM. The seeds of Avena sativa are placed in Petri dishes. Fitty seeds were germinated and grown in Petri dishes containing 15ml of high dilution of acetone and maintained at 25°C ± 2 and 12h photoperiod. Acetone dilutions (6, 12, 18, 24 and 30cH were obtained according to the Brazilian Homeopathic Pharmacopoeia [3]. Were evaluated the shoot length (cm, total length (cm, fresh root (mg and total dry mass (mg. The plants growth was measured after 7 days. The control consisted of distilled water. The experiment evaluated 4 replicates of each treatment and the data were analyzed by ANOVA and means were compared by Scott-Knott test (P ≤ 0.05. Results and Discussion: Dilutions 6, 24 and 30 cH inhibited the growth of the shoot and total seedling of A. sativa. The root fresh weight was significantly reduced by 4 dilutions (6,12,24 and 30x, with no difference of 24x compared to the control. The total dry mass of plants of A. sativa was reduced in all the dilutions studied, showing an inhibitory effect on growth of seedlings subjected to treatment. Somehow, acetone diluited inhibited the growth and accumulation of biomass of these seedlings, suggesting an imbalance in metabolism

  11. Thermal stabilities of various rubber vulcanization cured by sulfur, peroxide and gamma radiation

    Sulfur and peroxide-cured rubber vulcanizates of NR and EPDM were obtained by blending the elastomers with fillers, antioxidants and appropriate accelerators, followed by vulcanization at 150 - 160 degree C. Blends of the same elastomers with appropriate co-agents and additives were also cured by gamma radiation at 150 and 200 kGy. A comparison of the thermal stabilities of these vulcanizates prepared by different curing techniques has been made by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), assessed on the basis of comparison of DTG peak maxima, temperature for loss of 50% mass and actual thermal curves. The comparison reveals that the sulfur-cured vulcanizates are less thermally stable than their peroxide-cured counterparts. This may be attributed to the presence of a stronger C-C bond in case of peroxide-cured vulcanizates compared to weaker C-S sub x-C bond in case of sulfur-cured vulcanizates. However, compared to peroxide-cured vulcanizates, radiation-cured formulations demonstrated much improved thermal stability. This may originate from the existence of more uniformly distributed crosslinks and the enhanced rate of crosslink formation in the radiation process as compared to peroxide curing. In all the formulations whether sulfur, peroxide or radiation-cured, the natural rubber vulcanizates were found to be thermally much inferior to the synthetic contender, EPDM. Influence of variation of the amount of co-agent and other additives on the thermal stabilities of formulations of radiation cured NR and EPDM vulcanizates was also investigated

  12. An Acetone Microsensor with a Ring Oscillator Circuit Fabricated Using the Commercial 0.18 μm CMOS Process

    Ming-Zhi Yang

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the fabrication and characterization of an acetone microsensor with a ring oscillator circuit using the commercial 0.18 μm complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS process. The acetone microsensor contains a sensitive material, interdigitated electrodes and a polysilicon heater. The sensitive material is α-Fe2O3 synthesized by the hydrothermal method. The sensor requires a post-process to remove the sacrificial oxide layer between the interdigitated electrodes and to coat the α-Fe2O3 on the electrodes. When the sensitive material adsorbs acetone vapor, the sensor produces a change in capacitance. The ring oscillator circuit converts the capacitance of the sensor into the oscillation frequency output. The experimental results show that the output frequency of the acetone sensor changes from 128 to 100 MHz as the acetone concentration increases 1 to 70 ppm.

  13. Hydrogen bond dynamics and vibrational spectral diffusion in aqueous solution of acetone: A first principles molecular dynamics study

    Bhabani S Mallik; Amalendu Chandra

    2012-01-01

    We present an ab initio molecular dynamics study of vibrational spectral diffusion and hydrogen bond dynamics in aqueous solution of acetone at room temperature. It is found that the frequencies of OD bonds in the acetone hydration shell have a higher stretch frequency than those in the bulk water. Also, on average, the frequencies of hydration shell OD modes are found to increase with increase in the acetone-water hydrogen bond distance. The vibrational spectral diffusion of the hydration shell water molecules reveals three time scales: A short-time relaxation (∼80 fs) corresponding to the dynamics of intact acetone-water hydrogen bonds, a slower relaxation (∼1.3 ps) corresponding to the lifetime of acetone-water hydrogen bonds and another longer time constant (∼12 ps) corresponding to the escape dynamics of water from the solute hydration shell. The present first principles results are compared with those of available experiments and classical simulations.

  14. Mechanisms of wet oxidation by hydrogen peroxide

    A research programme is currently under way at BNL and MEL to investigate the possible use of Hydrogen Peroxide with metal ion catalysts as a wet oxidation treatment system for CEGB organic radioactive wastes. The published literature relating to the kinetics and mechanism of oxidation and decomposition reactions of hydrogen peroxide is reviewed and the links with practical waste management by wet oxidation are examined. Alternative wet oxidation systems are described and the similarities to the CEGB research effort are noted. (author)

  15. HOME BLEACHING TECHNIQUE USING CARBAMIDE PEROXIDE

    Rahmi Alma Farah Adang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available There are two basic kinds of tooth whitening agents. The first is over the counter materials and the other is material used by the dentist or under dentist control. Home bleaching is a technique using 10% carbamide peroxide on a tray applied by patient under dentist supervision. This paper is a review of the effect of 10% carbamide peroxide home bleaching technique. It is revealed that this method is simple, safe, economic, and has short chairside time.

  16. Electrolytic process for producing hydrogen peroxide

    An electrolytic process for producing hydrogen peroxide in an aqueous alkaline solution includes simultaneously passing an aqueous alkaline electrolyte and oxygen through a fluid permeable conductive cathode comprising reticulated vitreous carbon foam, separating the fluid permeable conductive cathode from an anode by a barrier and connecting the fluid permeable conductive electrode and the anode with an external power source to cause generation of hydrogen peroxide ion within the aqueous alkaline solution

  17. Lipid Peroxidation and Antioxidant Status in Preeclampsia

    S.V. Kashinakunti; Sunitha H; K. Gurupadappa; D.S. Shankarprasad; G.Suryaprakash; J.B Ingin

    2010-01-01

    The current theory suggests that in preeclampsia there is an increase in the lipid peroxidation products and leads to decrease in the serum antioxidants except uric acid, contributing to the pathogenesis of preeclampsia. In this context, this study was undertaken to determine the changes in blood levels of lipid peroxide and antioxidant levels in women with preeclampsia.Method: Case control study consisting of 30 preeclamptic and 30 healthy pregnant women. Fasting venous blood samples wer...

  18. Hydrogen peroxide as a sustainable energy carrier: Electrocatalytic production of hydrogen peroxide and the fuel cell

    This review describes homogeneous and heterogeneous catalytic reduction of dioxygen with metal complexes focusing on the catalytic two-electron reduction of dioxygen to produce hydrogen peroxide. Whether two-electron reduction of dioxygen to produce hydrogen peroxide or four-electron O2-reduction to produce water occurs depends on the types of metals and ligands that are utilized. Those factors controlling the two processes are discussed in terms of metal–oxygen intermediates involved in the catalysis. Metal complexes acting as catalysts for selective two-electron reduction of oxygen can be utilized as metal complex-modified electrodes in the electrocatalytic reduction to produce hydrogen peroxide. Hydrogen peroxide thus produced can be used as a fuel in a hydrogen peroxide fuel cell. A hydrogen peroxide fuel cell can be operated with a one-compartment structure without a membrane, which is certainly more promising for the development of low-cost fuel cells as compared with two compartment hydrogen fuel cells that require membranes. Hydrogen peroxide is regarded as an environmentally benign energy carrier because it can be produced by the electrocatalytic two-electron reduction of O2, which is abundant in air, using solar cells; the hydrogen peroxide thus produced could then be readily stored and then used as needed to generate electricity through the use of hydrogen peroxide fuel cells.

  19. Electrochemical peroxidation of PCBs and VOCs in superfund site water and sediments

    Scrudato, R.J.; Chiarenzelli, J.R. [SUNY, Oswego, NY (United States)

    1996-12-31

    An electrochemical peroxidation (ECP) process has been developed and used to degrade polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) and volatile organic compounds (VOC)-contaminated water, sludge, and sediments at a New York State Federal and State Superfund Site. The process involves passing an oscillating low-amperage (<10 amps) current through steel electrodes immersed in an acidified water or sediment slurry into which hydrogen peroxide (<1,000 ppm) is added. The generated free radicals attack organic compounds, including organo-metallic complexes and refractory compounds including PCBs. PCB degradation ranged from about 30% to 80% in experiments involving Federal Superfund Site sediments; total PCBs were reduced by {approximately}97% to 68%, respectively, in water and slurry collected from a State Superfund subsurface storage tank. VOC bench-scale experiments involved chloroethane, 1,1-dichloroethane, dichloromethane, 1,1,1-trichloroethane, and acetone and after a 3-min ECP treatment, degradation ranged from >94% to about 99.9%. Results indicate the ECP is a viable process to degrade organic contaminants in water and sediment suspensions. Because the treated water suspensions are acidified, select trace metal sorbed to the particulates is solubilized and therefore can be segregated from the particulates, offering a process that simultaneously degrades organic contaminants and separates trace metals. 19 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  20. One electron reduction of 1,2 dihydroxy 9,10 anthraquinone and its transition metal complexes in aqueous-isopropanol-acetone mixed solvent: a steady state-state and pulse radiolysis study

    One electron reduction of 1,2 dihydroxy 9,10 anthraquinone and its Cu(II) and Ni(II) and Fe(III) complexes have been studied in aqueous-isopropanol-acetone solvent. Results indicate that the reducing ketyl radical generated reacts with the ligand forming semiquinones which undergoes a disproportionation reaction. Formation and decay rates of semiquinones was calculated using pulse radiolysis. (author)

  1. Troilite oxidation by hydrogen peroxide

    The kinetics and mechanism of troilite oxidation by H2O2 was studied at temperatures of 25 and 45 deg. C. Solutions within the range 0.1-0.85 mol L-1 H2O2 in HClO4 (0.01-0.1 mol L-1) were used as dissolution media. The experimental amount of dissolved iron was plotted versus t(n), with n ranging from 0.25 to 1.55. The theoretical interpretation of this dependence suggests that the troilite oxidation involves several processes: acidic troilite dissolution, FeS + 2H+ ↔ /SH2/ + /Fe2+/, where /SH2/ and /Fe2+/ are H2S and Fe2+ at troilite/sulfur rich layer (SRL) interface; /Fe2+/ migration into solution across SRL, and its rapid oxidation by hydrogen peroxide into ferric iron, 2Fe2+ + H2O2 + 2H+ 2Fe3+ + 2H2O; oxidation of /SH2/ sites to elemental sulfur, a process that contributes to sulfur enrichment of troilite surface, /SH2/ + 2Fe3+ S + 2Fe2+ + 2H+; oxidation of elemental sulfur to sulfate, a sulfur-consuming process, S + 3H2O2 = SO42- + 2H2O + 2H+. Both experimental results and theoretical considerations illustrate the importance of temperature, pH, and [H2O2] for the kinetics and mechanisms of troilite oxidation. The amounts of dissolved iron strongly increase with temperature and [H+], whereas an increase of H2O2 concentration seems to reduce the troilite oxidation. The reaction orders with respect to [H+] are variable, pointing out notable modifications of reaction mechanism with experimental conditions. The estimated value Ea 25.4 ± 0.9 kJ mol-1 ([H2O2] = 0.4 mol L-1 and pH 1) points to dissolution kinetics controlled by a mix regime of surface reaction and diffusion. (authors)

  2. Introduction of Hydrogen Peroxide as an Oxidant in Flow Injection Analysis: Speciation of Cr(III) and Cr(VI)

    Andersen, Jens Enevold Thaulov

    1998-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide was used as an oxidant in Flow Injection Analysis (FIA). The formation of gaseous components during the analysis was suppressed by maintaining a concentration lower than 0.15% of hydrogen peroxide in 0.1 M NaOH. By this method Cr(III) was oxidised on-line to Cr(VI) which was...... concentrations above 6 mg/L which is suitable for on-line monitoring of e.g. waste waters....

  3. Troilite oxidation by hydrogen peroxide

    Chirita, Paul [Department of Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry, University of Craiova, Calea Bucuresti BB 107, Craiova 200512 (Romania); Descostes, Michael [CEA, DEN/DANS/DPC/SECR/Laboratory of Radionuclides Migration Measurements and Modelling, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2006-07-01

    The kinetics and mechanism of troilite oxidation by H{sub 2}O{sub 2} was studied at temperatures of 25 and 45 deg. C. Solutions within the range 0.1-0.85 mol L{sup -1} H{sub 2}O{sub 2} in HClO{sub 4} (0.01-0.1 mol L{sup -1}) were used as dissolution media. The experimental amount of dissolved iron was plotted versus t(n), with n ranging from 0.25 to 1.55. The theoretical interpretation of this dependence suggests that the troilite oxidation involves several processes: acidic troilite dissolution, FeS + 2H{sup +} {r_reversible} /SH{sub 2}/ + /Fe{sup 2+}/, where /SH{sub 2}/ and /Fe{sup 2+}/ are H{sub 2}S and Fe{sup 2+} at troilite/sulfur rich layer (SRL) interface; /Fe{sup 2+}/ migration into solution across SRL, and its rapid oxidation by hydrogen peroxide into ferric iron, 2Fe{sup 2+} + H{sub 2}O{sub 2} + 2H{sup +} 2Fe{sup 3+} + 2H{sub 2}O; oxidation of /SH{sub 2}/ sites to elemental sulfur, a process that contributes to sulfur enrichment of troilite surface, /SH{sub 2}/ + 2Fe{sup 3+} S + 2Fe{sup 2+} + 2H{sup +}; oxidation of elemental sulfur to sulfate, a sulfur-consuming process, S + 3H{sub 2}O{sub 2} = SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} + 2H{sub 2}O + 2H{sup +}. Both experimental results and theoretical considerations illustrate the importance of temperature, pH, and [H{sub 2}O{sub 2}] for the kinetics and mechanisms of troilite oxidation. The amounts of dissolved iron strongly increase with temperature and [H{sup +}], whereas an increase of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentration seems to reduce the troilite oxidation. The reaction orders with respect to [H{sup +}] are variable, pointing out notable modifications of reaction mechanism with experimental conditions. The estimated value E{sub a} 25.4 {+-} 0.9 kJ mol{sup -1} ([H{sub 2}O{sub 2}] = 0.4 mol L{sup -1} and pH 1) points to dissolution kinetics controlled by a mix regime of surface reaction and diffusion. (authors)

  4. Effect of Silane Solvent on Microtensile Bond Strength of Hy-drogen Peroxide-Treated Fiber Post and Composite Core

    Sh. Kasraei

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this in vitrostudy was to evaluate the effect of the type of solvent in silane solution on microtensile bond strength of fiber posts to composite resin cores af-ter application of 24% hydrogen peroxide.Materials and Methods: Eighteen white fiber posts, immersed in 24% hydrogen peroxide were divided into three groups (n=6. In the group A post surfaces were silanized with an ethanol based solution, in group B with an acetone based solution, in the group C with and un-diluted methacryloxytrimethoxysilane (as the control group. The cores were built up using flowable composite. Microtensile bond strength test and evaluations using stereomi-croscope were performed on the samples and the data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey HSD tests.Results: A significant difference was observed between the amounts of microtensile bond strength of fiber poststo composite cores in the groups A and B, and the ones in group C (P0.05.Conclusion: The type of solvent in silane solution has no effect on microtensile bond strength between fiber post andcomposite resin core after application of 24% Hydrogen Peroxide.

  5. Acetone in Orion BN/KL - High-resolution maps of a special oxygen-bearing molecule

    Peng, T -C; Brouillet, N; Baudry, A; Favre, C; Remijan, A; Wootten, A; Wilson, T L; Combes, F; Wlodarczak, G

    2013-01-01

    As one of the prime targets of interstellar chemistry study, Orion BN/KL clearly shows different molecular distributions between large nitrogen- (e.g., C2H5CN) and oxygen-bearing (e.g., HCOOCH3) molecules. However, acetone (CH3)2CO, a special complex O-bearing molecule, has been shown to have a very different distribution from other typical O-bearing molecules in the BN/KL region. We searched for acetone within our IRAM Plateau de Bure Interferometer 3 mm and 1.3 mm data sets. Twenty-two acetone lines were searched within these data sets. The angular resolution ranged from 1.8 X 0.8 to 6.0 X 2.3 arcsec^2, and the spectral resolution ranged from 0.4 to 1.9 km s-1. Nine of the acetone lines appear free of contamination. Three main acetone peaks (Ace-1, 2, and 3) are identified in Orion BN/KL. The new acetone source Ace-3 and the extended emission in the north of the hot core region have been found for the first time. An excitation temperature of about 150 K is determined toward Ace-1 and Ace-2, and the acetone ...

  6. Kinetic Model of Resin-Catalyzed Decomposition of Acetone Cyanohydrin in Organic Solvent

    章亭洲; 杨立荣; 朱自强; 吴坚平

    2003-01-01

    Decomposition of acetone cyanohydrin is the first-step reaction for preparing (S)-α-cyano-3-phenoxybenzyl alcohol (CPBA) by the one-pot method in organic media. Considering the compatibility of biocatalysts with chemical catalysts and the successive operation in the bioreactor, anion exchange resin (D301) was used as catalyst for this reaction. External diffusion limitation was excluded by raising rotational speed to higher than 190r·min-1 in both solvents. Internal diffusion limitation was verified to be insignificant in this reaction system. The effect of acetone cyanohydrin concentration on the reaction was also investigated. An intrinsic kinetic model was proposed when the mass transfer limitation was excluded, and the average deviation of the model is 10.5%.

  7. Graphene oxide foams and their excellent adsorption ability for acetone gas

    He, Yongqiang [Department of Applied Chemistry, Yuncheng University, Yuncheng 044000 (China); School of Science, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Zhang, Nana; Wu, Fei; Xu, Fangqiang; Liu, Yu [School of Science, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Gao, Jianping, E-mail: jianpingg@eyou.com [School of Science, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China)

    2013-09-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • GO and RGO foams were prepared using a simple and green method, unidirectional freeze-drying. • The porous structure of the foams can be adjusted by changing GO concentrations. • GO and RGO foams show good adsorption efficiency for acetone gas. - Abstract: Graphene oxide (GO) and reduced graphene oxide (RGO) foams were prepared using a unidirectional freeze-drying method. These porous carbon materials were characterized by thermal gravimetric analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The adsorption behavior of the two kinds of foams for acetone was studied. The result showed that the saturated adsorption efficiency of the GO foams was over 100%, and was higher than that of RGO foams and other carbon materials.

  8. Roles of Acetone and Diacetone Alcohol in Coordination and Dissociation Reactions of Uranyl Complexes

    Rios, Daniel; Schoendorff, George E.; Van Stipdonk, Michael J.; Gordon, Mark S.; Windus, Theresa L.; Gibson, John K.; De Jong, Wibe A.

    2012-12-03

    Combined collision-induced dissociation mass-spectrometry experiments and DFT calculations were employed to elucidate the molecular structure of "hypercoordinated" species and the energetics of water-elimination reactions of uranyl acetone complexes observed in earlier work (Rios, D.; Rutkowski, P. X.; Van Stipdonk, M. J.; Gibson, J. K. Inorg. Chem. 2011, 50, 4781). It is shown that the "hypercoordinated" species contain diacetone alcohol ligands bonded in either bidentate or monodentate fashion, which are indistinguishable from (acetone)2 in mass spectrometry. Calculations confirm that four diacetone ligands can form stable complexes, but that the effective number of atoms coordinating with uranium in the equatorial plane does not exceed five. Diacetone alcohol ligands are shown to form mesityl oxide ligands and alkoxide species through the elimination of water, providing an explanation for the observed water-elimination reactions.

  9. DSC and curing kinetics study of epoxy grouting diluted with furfural -acetone slurry

    Yin, H.; Sun, D. W.; Li, B.; Liu, Y. T.; Ran, Q. P.; Liu, J. P.

    2016-07-01

    The use of furfural-acetone slurry as active diluents of Bisphenol-A epoxy resin (DGEBA) groutings has been studied by dynamic and non-isothermal DSC for the first time. Curing kinetics study was investigated by non-isothermal differential scanning calorimetries at different heating rates. Activation enery (Ea) was calculated based on Kissinger and Ozawa Methods, and the results showed that Ea increased from 58.87 to 71.13KJ/mol after the diluents were added. The furfural-acetone epoxy matrix could cure completely at the theoretical curing temperature of 365.8K and the curing time of 139mins, which were determined by the kinetic model parameters.

  10. Graphene oxide foams and their excellent adsorption ability for acetone gas

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • GO and RGO foams were prepared using a simple and green method, unidirectional freeze-drying. • The porous structure of the foams can be adjusted by changing GO concentrations. • GO and RGO foams show good adsorption efficiency for acetone gas. - Abstract: Graphene oxide (GO) and reduced graphene oxide (RGO) foams were prepared using a unidirectional freeze-drying method. These porous carbon materials were characterized by thermal gravimetric analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The adsorption behavior of the two kinds of foams for acetone was studied. The result showed that the saturated adsorption efficiency of the GO foams was over 100%, and was higher than that of RGO foams and other carbon materials

  11. The results of the lipids peroxidation products on the DNA bases as biological markers of the oxidative stress

    Different ways of DNA damages have been studied, among these ones the direct way of DNA damages formation by the reactive oxygen species (R.O.S.). This way leads to the formation of oxidative DNA damages. In 1990, works have suggested an indirect way of DNA damages formation, the lipids peroxidation. Instead of oxidizing directly DNA, the R.O.S. oxide the lipids present in the cells and their membranes; The products coming from this degradation are able to provoke DNA damages. This way has not been studied very much. The work of this thesis is axed on this DNA theme and lipids peroxidation. In the first chapter, we begin by presenting DNA and the direct way of oxidative damages formation by the R.O.S.Then, we speak about the cell lipids suffering oxidation reactions and the different ways of lipids oxidation. Then, we present how the lipid peroxidation is a source of damages for DNA. (N.C.)

  12. Enzymatic generation of hydrogen peroxide shows promising antifouling effect

    Kristensen, J.B.; Olsen, Stefan Møller; Laursen, B.S.; Kragh, K.M.; Poulsen, C.H.; Besenbacher, F.; Meyer, R.L.

    2010-01-01

    The antifouling (AF) potential of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) produced enzymatically in a coating containing starch, glucoamylase, and hexose oxidase was evaluated in a series of laboratory tests and in-sea field trials. Dissolved H2O2 inhibited bacterial biofilm formation by eight of nine marine...... Proteobacteria, tested in microtiter plates. However, enzymatically produced H2O2 released from a coating did not impede biofilm formation by bacteria in natural seawater tested in a biofilm reactor. A field trial revealed a noticeable effect of the enzyme system: after immersion in the North Sea for 97 days......, the reference coating without enzymes had 35-40 barnacles, 10% area coverage by diatoms and 15% area coverage by tunicates. The enzyme containing coating had only 6-12 barnacles, 10% area coverage by diatoms and no tunicates. The enzyme system had a performance similar to a copper-based commercial...

  13. Acetone and Butanol Production by Clostridium acetobutylicum in a Synthetic Medium

    Monot, Frédéric; Martin, Jean-René; Petitdemange, Henri; Gay, Robert

    1982-01-01

    The effect of the component concentrations of a synthetic medium on acetone and butanol fermentation by Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 was investigated. Cell growth was dependent on the presence of Mg, Fe, and K in the medium. Mg and Mn had deleterious effects when in excess. Ammonium acetate in excess caused acid fermentation. The metabolism was composed of two phases: an acid phase and a solvent one. Low concentrations of glucose allowed the first phase only. The theoretical ratio of t...

  14. Acetone, Isopropanol, and Butanol Production by Clostridium beijerinckii (syn. Clostridium butylicum) and Clostridium aurantibutyricum

    George, H. A.; Johnson, J. L.; Moore, W. E. C.; Holdeman, L V; Chen, J S

    1983-01-01

    Thirty-four strains representing 15 species of anaerobic bacteria were screened for acetone, isopropanol, and n-butanol (solvent) production. Under our culture conditions, several strains of Clostridium beijerinckii and C. aurantibutyricum produced at least 40 mM n-butanol (C. acetobutylicum strains produced up to 41 mM n-butanol under similar conditions). Both solvent-producing and non-solvent-producing strains of C. beijerinckii have high DNA homology with a reference strain of C. beijerinc...

  15. Studies on Acetone Powder and Purified Rhus Laccase Immobilized on Zirconium Chloride for Oxidation of Phenols

    Rong Lu; Tetsuo Miyakoshi

    2012-01-01

    Rhus laccase was isolated and purified from acetone powder obtained from the exudates of Chinese lacquer trees (Rhus vernicifera) from the Jianshi region, Hubei province of China. There are two blue bands appearing on CM-sephadex C-50 chromatography column, and each band corresponding to Rhus laccase 1 and 2, the former being the major constituent, and each had an average molecular weight of approximately 110 kDa. The purified and crude Rhus laccases were immobilized on zirconium chloride in ...

  16. Experimental investigation of the Soret effect in acetone/water and dimethylsulfoxide/water mixtures

    Ning, H.; Wiegand, S.

    2006-01-01

    The thermal diffusion behavior of acetone/water and dimethylsulfoxide(DMSO)/water mixtures has been experimentally investigated by a transient holographic grating technique named thermal diffusion forced Rayleigh scattering (TDFRS). For both systems a sign change of the Soret coefficient S(T) with varying water content has been predicted by simulations [C. Nieto Draghi et al., J. Chem. Phys. 122, 114503 (2005)]. The sign change of S(T) is confirmed by the experiment. Except for equimolar conc...

  17. The potential of aqueous and acetone extracts of galls of Quercus infectoria as antibacterial agents

    Basri Dayang

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the antibacterial potential of aqueous and acetone extracts of galls of Quercus infectoria by determination of Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC and Minimum Bactericidal Concentration (MBC values. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The extracts from the galls of Q. infectoria at 10 mg/ml were screened against three Gram-positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923, Staphylococcus epidermidis and Bacillus subtilis and three Gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli NCTC 12079 serotype O157:H7, Salmonella typhimurium NCTC 74 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 27853. The MIC of the extracts were then determined using the twofold serial microdilution technique at a concentration ranging from 5 mg/ml to 0.0024 mg/ml. The MBC values were finally obtained from the MIC microtiter wells which showed no turbidity after 24 hrs of incubation by subculturing method. RESULTS: Out of the six bacterial species tested, S. aureus was the most susceptible. On the other hand, the extracts showed weak inhibitory effect against S. epidermidis, B. subtilis, S. typhimurium and P. aeruginosa while there was no inhibition zone observed for E. coli O157. The MIC values of the extracts ranged from 0.0781 mg/ml to 1.25 mg/ml whereas the MBC values ranged from 0.3125 mg/ml to 2.50 mg/ml. The MBC values of aqueous extract against S. aureus and S. typhimurium were higher than their MIC values. The MBC value of acetone extract against S. aureus was also higher than its MIC value. Interestingly, however, the MIC and MBC values of acetone extract against S. typhimurium were the same (1.25 mg/ml. CONCLUSION: The aqueous and acetone extracts displayed similarities in their antimicrobial activity on the bacterial species and as such, the galls of Quercus infectoria are potentially good source of antimicrobial agents.

  18. Investigation of efficiency of air cleaning from acetone using a segmental construction biofilter

    Denas Bacevičius; Alvydas Zagorskis

    2015-01-01

    Volatile organic compounds, e. g. acetone, have a direct impact on climate change, decrease of ozone in the air, and on the growth of greenhouse effect. One of the most popular air purifying methods from VOC is a biological air cleaning. Experimental investigations were conducted to determine the efficiency of the new structure of biofilter with polypropylene plates segments. During the investigations the efficiency of segmental construction biofilter of air purification at different initial ...

  19. Marking planes of surgical excision on breast biopsy specimens: use of artists' pigments suspended in acetone.

    Paterson, D. A.; Davies, J. D.

    1988-01-01

    The performance of carbon and metallic inks, silver nitrate solution, and artists' pigments mounted in acetone was compared for marking the surface of surgical biopsy specimens. Using India ink is an unsatisfactory procedure because of slow drying, messiness, and spreading of the ink. It is concluded that use of artists' pigments has many advantages over other reagents, because of their rapid drying, resistance to tissue processing, and the ability to mark simultaneously many different planes...

  20. Effectiveness and kinetics of hydrogen peroxide and nitrate-enhanced biodegradation of hydrocarbons

    Techniques are rapidly developing for insitu biodegradation processes of contaminations in lower water bearing formations. It is well known that underground biodegradation is limited by the lack of electron acceptors and nutrients. Hydrogen peroxide and nitrate are the most commonly applied electron acceptors to enhance in situ bioremediation of contaminated soils. This paper has two purposes. The first is to compare the effects and rates of degradation processes with hydrogen peroxide and nitrates as electron acceptors despite of differences in type of metabolism. The second is to develop a bioreactor system that allows consideration of the effects of mass transportation and evaluation of the overall kinetics for biodegradation processes in soils

  1. What are the sources of hydrogen peroxide production by heart mitochondria?

    Grivennikova, Vera G.; Kareyeva, Alexandra V.; Vinogradov, Andrei D.

    2010-01-01

    Coupled rat heart mitochondria produce externally hydrogen peroxide at the rates which correspond to about 0.8 and 0.3 per cent of the total oxygen consumption at State 4 with succinate and glutamate plus malate as the respiratory substrates, respectively. Stimulation of the respiratory activities by ADP (State 4–State 3 transition) decreases the succinate- and glutamate plus malate-supported H2O2 production 8- and 1.3-times, respectively. NH4+ strongly stimulates hydrogen peroxide formation ...

  2. Multinuclear NMR spectroscopy for differentiation of molecular configurations and solvent properties between acetone and dimethyl sulfoxide

    Wen, Yuan-Chun; Kuo, Hsiao-Ching; Jia, Hsi-Wei

    2016-04-01

    The differences in molecular configuration and solvent properties between acetone and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) were investigated using the developed technique of 1H, 13C, 17O, and 1H self-diffusion liquid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Acetone and DMSO samples in the forms of pure solution, ionic salt-added solution were used to deduce their active sites, relative dipole moments, dielectric constants, and charge separations. The NMR results suggest that acetone is a trigonal planar molecule with a polarized carbonyl double bond, whereas DMSO is a trigonal pyramidal-like molecule with a highly polarized S-O single bond. Both molecules use their oxygen atoms as the active sites to interact other molecules. These different molecular models explain the differences their physical and chemical properties between the two molecules and explain why DMSO is classified as an aprotic but highly dipolar solvent. The results are also in agreement with data obtained using X-ray diffraction, neutron diffraction, and theoretical calculations.

  3. Inhalation developmental toxicology studies: Teratology study of acetone in mice and rats: Final report

    Mast, T.J.; Evanoff, J.J.; Rommereim, R.L.; Stoney, K.H.; Weigel, R.J.; Westerberg, R.B.

    1988-11-01

    Acetone, an aliphatic ketone, is a ubiquitous industrial solvent and chemical intermediate; consequently, the opportunity for human exposure is high. The potential for acetone to cause developmental toxicity was assessed in Sprague-Dawley rats exposed to 0, 440, 2200, or 11000 ppm, and in Swiss (CD-1) mice exposed to 0, 440, 2200, and 6600 ppm acetone vapors, 6 h/day, 7 days/week. Each of the four treatment groups consisted of 10 virgin females (for comparison), and approx.32 positively mated rats or mice. Positively mated mice were exposed on days 6-17 of gestation (dg), and rats on 6-19 dg. The day of plug or sperm detection was designated as 0 dg. Body weights were obtained throughout the study period, and uterine and fetal body weights were obtained at sacrifice (rats, 20 dg; mice, 18 dg). Implants were enumerated and their status recorded. Live fetuses were sexed and examined for gross, visceral, skeletal, and soft-tissue craniofacial defects. 46 refs., 6 figs., 27 tabs.

  4. Bayesian population analysis of a washin-washout physiologically based pharmacokinetic model for acetone

    The aim of this study was to derive improved estimates of population variability and uncertainty of physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model parameters, especially of those related to the washin-washout behavior of polar volatile substances. This was done by optimizing a previously published washin-washout PBPK model for acetone in a Bayesian framework using Markov chain Monte Carlo simulation. The sensitivity of the model parameters was investigated by creating four different prior sets, where the uncertainty surrounding the population variability of the physiological model parameters was given values corresponding to coefficients of variation of 1%, 25%, 50%, and 100%, respectively. The PBPK model was calibrated to toxicokinetic data from 2 previous studies where 18 volunteers were exposed to 250-550 ppm of acetone at various levels of workload. The updated PBPK model provided a good description of the concentrations in arterial, venous, and exhaled air. The precision of most of the model parameter estimates was improved. New information was particularly gained on the population distribution of the parameters governing the washin-washout effect. The results presented herein provide a good starting point to estimate the target dose of acetone in the working and general populations for risk assessment purposes.

  5. Hydrate phase equilibria of furan, acetone, 1,4-dioxane, TBAC and TBAF

    Highlights: • Experimental hydrate dissociation conditions are reported for CO2/methane + some water soluble/insoluble hydrate formers. • An isochoric pressure-search method was used to generate the experimental data. • The data are compared with the corresponding literature data in the presence of pure water. • The hydrate promotion effects of acetone, 1,4-dioxane, furan, TBAC and TBAF are discussed. -- Abstract: In this communication, we first report experimental hydrate dissociation pressures for the methane/carbon dioxide + furan/acetone/1,4-dioxane + water and the methane + tetra n-butyl ammonium chloride (TBAC) + water as well as the carbon dioxide + tetra n-butyl ammonium floride (TBAF) + water systems in the temperature ranges of (269.9 to 303.3) K. An isochoric pressure-search method was used to generate the experimental data. The hydrate dissociation data are compared with the corresponding literature data, if exists, and the literature data in the presence of pure water and acceptable agreement is observed. A discussion is made on hydrate promotion effects of acetone, 1,4-dioxane, furan, TBAC and TBAF

  6. Vertical fluxes and atmospheric cycling of methanol, acetaldehyde, and acetone in a coastal environment

    M. Yang

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available We present here vertical fluxes of methanol, acetaldehyde, and acetone measured directly with eddy covariance (EC during March to July 2012 near the southwest coast of the UK. The performance of the proton-transfer reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS for flux measurement is characterized, with additional considerations given to the homogeneity and stationarity assumptions required by EC. Concentrations and fluxes of these compounds vary significantly with time of day and wind direction. Higher values of acetaldehyde and acetone are usually observed in the daytime and from the direction of a forested park, most likely due to light-driven emissions from terrestrial plants. Methanol concentration and flux do not demonstrate clear diel variability, suggesting sources in addition to plants. We estimate air–sea exchange and photochemical rates of these compounds, which are compared to measured vertical fluxes. For acetaldehyde, the mean (1σ concentration of 0.13 (0.02 ppb at night may be maintained by oceanic emission, while photochemical destruction outpaces production during the day. Air-sea exchange and photochemistry are probably net sinks of methanol and acetone in this region. Their nighttime concentrations of 0.46 (0.20 and 0.39 (0.08 ppb appear to be affected more by terrestrial emissions and long distance transport, respectively.

  7. Metal-Exchanged β Zeolites as Catalysts for the Conversion of Acetone to Hydrocarbons

    Aurora J. Cruz-Cabeza

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Various metal-β zeolites have been synthesized under similar ion-exchange conditions. During the exchange process, the nature and acid strength of the used cations modified the composition and textural properties as well as the Brönsted and Lewis acidity of the final materials. Zeolites exchanged with divalent cations showed a clear decrease of their surface Brönsted acidity and an increase of their Lewis acidity. All materials were active as catalysts for the transformation of acetone into hydrocarbons. Although the protonic zeolite was the most active in the acetone conversion (96.8% conversion, the metal-exchanged zeolites showed varied selectivities towards different products of the reaction. In particular, we found the Cu-β to have a considerable selectivity towards the production of isobutene from acetone (over 31% yield compared to 7.5% of the protonic zeolite. We propose different reactions mechanisms in order to explain the final product distributions.

  8. Plasticization and crosslinking effects of acetone-formaldehyde and tannin resins on wheat protein-based natural polymers.

    Zhang, Xiaoqing; Do, My Dieu

    2009-07-01

    Efficient plasticization and sufficient crosslinking were achieved by using an acetone-formaldehyde (AF) resin as an additive in the thermal processing of wheat protein-based natural polymers. The mobile AF resin and its strong intermolecular interactions with a wheat protein matrix produced sufficient flexibility for the plastics, while the covalent bonds formed between AF and the protein chains also caused the water-soluble resin to be retained in the materials under wet conditions. The mechanical properties of the materials were also enhanced as an additional benefit due to the formation of crosslinked networks through the polymer matrix. Tensile strength was further enhanced when using AF in conjunction with tannin resin (AFTR) in the systems as rigid aromatic structures were formed in the crosslinking segments. Different components in wheat proteins (WPs) or wheat gluten (WG) (e.g., proteins, residual starch and lipids) displayed different capabilities in interaction and reaction with the AFTR additives, and thus resulted in different performances when the ratio of these components varied in the materials. The application of the AFTR additives provides a feasible methodology to thermally process wheat protein-based natural polymers with improved mechanical performance and water-resistant properties. PMID:19447383

  9. Synthesis of defect-rich, (001) faceted-ZnO nanorod on a FTO substrate as efficient photocatalysts for dehydrogenation of isopropanol to acetone

    Tan, Sin Tee; Umar, Akrajas Ali; Salleh, Muhamad Mat

    2016-06-01

    Highly oriented ZnO nanorod was successfully synthesised on Ag nanoseed coated FTO substrate via a microwave hydrolysis approach. It was found that the morphology and the optical properties of the ZnO nanorod are strongly influenced by the power of the microwave irradiation used during the growth process. The aspect ratio of the nanorods changed from high to low with the increasing of microwave power. It was also found that the optical band gap of the ZnO nanorod red shifted with the increasing of the microwave power, reflecting an excellent tune ability of the optical properties of ZnO nanorods. The photocatalytic activity of these unique nanorod was evaluated by a dehydrogenation process of isopropanol to acetone in the presence of ZnO nanorod. It was found that the ZnO nanorod exhibited an excellent catalytic performance by showing an ability to accelerate the production of 0.031 mol L-1 of acetone within only 35 min or 0.9 mmol L-1 min-1 from isopropyl alcohol dehydrogenation. It was almost no conversion from isopropyl alcohol when ZnO nanorods was absence during the reaction. In this report, a detailed mechanism of ZnO nanorod formation and the relationship between morphology and optical energy band gap are described.

  10. Facile synthesis of ZnO/Zn2TiO4 core/shell nanowires for photocatalytic oxidation of acetone.

    Wan, Liyuan; Li, Xinyong; Qu, Zhenping; Shi, Yong; Li, Hong; Zhao, Qidong; Chen, Guohua

    2010-12-15

    ZnO/Zn(2)TiO(4) core/shell nanowires were synthesized for the first time based on a solid-solid reaction of ZnO nanowires with a conformal shell of TiO(2), which was deposited by a sol-gel method. The as-prepared samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis, transmission electron microscope (TEM) and environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM). The surface photovoltage (SPV) spectra indicated that the as-synthesized ZnO/Zn(2)TiO(4) core/shell nanowires exhibited more excellent photovoltaic activity than single ZnO nanowires. The enhanced photocatalytic activity of the ZnO/Zn(2)TiO(4) core/shell nanowires was demonstrated by the degradation of acetone under UV light irradiation. As monitored by the in situ FTIR, a sequence of chemical steps could be extracted during the photocatalytic oxidation of gaseous acetone, which was firstly degraded into formate, and subsequently converted into CO and CO(2). CO(2) was partially converted to carbonate further. PMID:20810213

  11. Facile synthesis of ZnO/Zn2TiO4 core/shell nanowires for photocatalytic oxidation of acetone

    ZnO/Zn2TiO4 core/shell nanowires were synthesized for the first time based on a solid-solid reaction of ZnO nanowires with a conformal shell of TiO2, which was deposited by a sol-gel method. The as-prepared samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis, transmission electron microscope (TEM) and environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM). The surface photovoltage (SPV) spectra indicated that the as-synthesized ZnO/Zn2TiO4 core/shell nanowires exhibited more excellent photovoltaic activity than single ZnO nanowires. The enhanced photocatalytic activity of the ZnO/Zn2TiO4 core/shell nanowires was demonstrated by the degradation of acetone under UV light irradiation. As monitored by the in situ FTIR, a sequence of chemical steps could be extracted during the photocatalytic oxidation of gaseous acetone, which was firstly degraded into formate, and subsequently converted into CO and CO2. CO2 was partially converted to carbonate further.

  12. Reactive Oxygen Species, Lipid Peroxidation and Antioxidative Defense Mechanism

    Hossam S. EL-BELTAGI

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Lipid peroxidation can be defined as the oxidative deterioration of lipids containing any number of carbon-carbon double bonds. Lipid peroxidation is a well-established mechanism of cellular injury in both plants and animals, and is used as an indicator of oxidative stress in cells and tissues. Lipid peroxides are unstable and decompose to form a complex series of compounds including reactive carbonyl compounds. The oxidation of linoleates and cholesterol is discussed in some detail. Analytical methods for studying lipid peroxidation were mentioned. Various kinds of antioxidants with different functions inhibit lipid peroxidation and the deleterious effects caused by the lipid peroxidation products.

  13. Reactivity of lignin and lignin models towards UV-assisted peroxide

    The comparative reactivities of a series of guaiacyl and syringyl lignin model compounds and their methylated analogues towards alkaline peroxide and UV-alkaline peroxide were investigated. The overall reaction was followed by monitoring the reduction of the substrate as a function of time, and in every case, the reaction showed pseudo-first-order kinetics. The reaction rates of most lignin models having identical sidechains with alkaline peroxide and with UV-alkaline peroxide were in the order syringyl guaiacyl 3,4,5-trimethoxyphenyl veratryl. Thus phenols react faster than their methyl ethers, and an extra ortho methoxyl group promotes the reaction. Lignin models possessing electron-donating sidechains had generally higher reaction rates than those with electron-withdrawing sidechains. The reaction rates of the series of benzoic acids were 2-4 times higher at pH 11 than at pH 5. UV-peroxide degradation of a eucalypt kraft lignin was faster than that of a pine kraft lignin, and degradation was 1.4-1.6 times faster at pH 11 than at pH 5. The data are consistent with the formation of higher amounts of reactive radicals under alkaline conditions, and aromatic rings with greater electronegativities promoting reactions with the radicals

  14. Role of lipid peroxidation and oxidative stress in 3-methylindole pneumotoxicity

    The cytochrome P-450-catalyzed metabolism of 3-methylindole (3-MI) results in acute lung injury in ruminants and horses. Experiments were conducted to determine the role of lipid peroxidation and oxidative stress in 3-MI pneumotoxicity in goats. Goats were given methylethylketone peroxide (MEKP), a potent peroxidant, 3-MI, indole, or cremophor-EL vehicle. The levels of shortchain hydrocarbons in expired air were measured for 6 hours post-dosing by gas chromatography. Exhaled hydrocarbons increased 20 to 30 fold within 1 hour in goats given MEKP. No significant changes were seen in goats given 3-Mi, indole or cremophor-EL. Levels of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances, an indicator of lipid peroxidation, were significantly increased in lung tissue from goats given MEKP. In goats given 3-MI, indole or cremophor-EL, the levels were not significantly different from each other. Goats were killed at 6 hours post-dosing and examined post mortem. Bronchiolar epithelial necrosis was seen in goats given 3-MI but there were not lung lesions in other groups. The role of oxygen radicals in 3-MI pneumotoxicity was examined in a goat lung explant system using 51Cr release as an indicator of cytotoxicity. The results of these studies provide no evidence to support the view that 3-MI pneumotoxicity involves lipid peroxidation or oxidative stress as a result of formation of oxygen or xenobiotic radicals

  15. Role of peroxidation and heme catalysis in coloration of raw meat

    Alexander G. Shleikin

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available It is known, that lipid peroxidation is one of the main factors limiting the ąuality and acceptability of meat and other animal tissues. The current data conceming connection of heme and peroxidation were summarized and analysed here. The muscle food compounds that are most influenced by oxidative processes include unsaturated fatty acids of lipids, amino acids of proteins and heme groups of pigments. Heme proteins and particularly myoglobin are abundant in muscle tissues. Meat colour is primarily influenced by the concentration and chemical State of heme pigments, myoglobin and hemoglobin. Oxygenated myoglobin oxidized to the brown metmyoglobin form and its accumulation is highly correlated with progress of lipid peroxidation. Heme proteins such as hemoglobin or myoglobin accelerate the decomposition of hydroperoxides to free radicals. Metmyoglobin possesses «pseudoperoxidase» activity and catalyzes the oxidation of various compounds following the reaction with hydrogen peroxide. The reaction between hydrogen peroxide and metmyoglobin results in the formation of two active hypervalent myoglobin species, perferrylmyoglobin (*MbFelv=0 and ferrylmyoglobin (MbFelv=0, which participate in lipid oxidation catalysis. Both MbFeIV=0 and *MbFelv=0 are deactivated in the presence of reducing agents, whose naturę determines the overall effect of the pseudoperoxidase cycle. Hypothesis can be put forward that loss of cellular antioxidants might precede the rise of peroxidase-like activity, thus being a sign of incipient discoloration of meats and muscle components of foods.  

  16. Co-production of acetone and ethanol with molar ratio control enables production of improved gasoline or jet fuel blends.

    Baer, Zachary C; Bormann, Sebastian; Sreekumar, Sanil; Grippo, Adam; Toste, F Dean; Blanch, Harvey W; Clark, Douglas S

    2016-10-01

    The fermentation of simple sugars to ethanol has been the most successful biofuel process to displace fossil fuel consumption worldwide thus far. However, the physical properties of ethanol and automotive components limit its application in most cases to 10-15 vol% blends with conventional gasoline. Fermentative co-production of ethanol and acetone coupled with a catalytic alkylation reaction could enable the production of gasoline blendstocks enriched in higher-chain oxygenates. Here we demonstrate a synthetic pathway for the production of acetone through the mevalonate precursor hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA. Expression of this pathway in various strains of Escherichia coli resulted in the co-production of acetone and ethanol. Metabolic engineering and control of the environmental conditions for microbial growth resulted in controllable acetone and ethanol production with ethanol:acetone molar ratios ranging from 0.7:1 to 10.0:1. Specifically, use of gluconic acid as a substrate increased production of acetone and balanced the redox state of the system, predictively reducing the molar ethanol:acetone ratio. Increases in ethanol production and the molar ethanol:acetone ratio were achieved by co-expression of the aldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenase (AdhE) from E. coli MG1655 and by co-expression of pyruvate decarboxylase (Pdc) and alcohol dehydrogenase (AdhB) from Z. mobilis. Controlling the fermentation aeration rate and pH in a bioreactor raised the acetone titer to 5.1 g L(-1) , similar to that obtained with wild-type Clostridium acetobutylicum. Optimizing the metabolic pathway, the selection of host strain, and the physiological conditions employed for host growth together improved acetone titers over 35-fold (0.14-5.1 g/L). Finally, chemical catalysis was used to upgrade the co-produced ethanol and acetone at both low and high molar ratios to higher-chain oxygenates for gasoline and jet fuel applications. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 2079-2087. © 2016 Wiley

  17. Algerian mint species: high performance thin layer chromatography quantitative determination of rosmarinic acid and in vitro inhibitory effects on linoleic acid peroxidation

    Brahmi Fatiha

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the quantitative paremeters of rosmarinic acid in Algerian mints, Mentha spicata L. (M. spicata, Mentha pulegium L. and Mentha rotundifolia (L. Huds by high performance thin layer chromatography (HPTLC-densitometric method and screen the effects of these plant extracts on linoleic acid peroxidation. Methods: The analyses were performed on HPTLC silica gel 60 F254 plates with chloroform: acetone: formic acid (75:16.5:8.5, v/v as the mobile phase. Rosmarinic acid was determined in UV at 365 nm and fluorescence at λexc 325 nm with a 550 nm filter, respectively. The effects of plants extracts on linoleic acid peroxidation were measured by an indirect in vitro colorimetric method. Results: Chromatographic resolution permitted reliable quantification in both measurement modes and calibration curves were linear in a range of 150-1 000 ng/spot. M. spicata was found to contain significantly higher concentrations of rosmarinic acid. The densitometric quantification allowed the analysis of many samples in a short time with reasonable precision (total precision for Mentha spp extracts, 5.1% and 5.8% for UV and fluorescence detection, respectively. The HPTLC data, allied to assays of linoleic acid peroxidation prevention, suggested the potential of M. spicata (52% Trolox® equivalents as a natural source for inhibitors of lipid peroxidation. Conclusions: Densitometry can be used for routine determination and quality control of rosmarinic acid in herbal and formulations containing Mentha species.

  18. Algerian mint species:high performance thin layer chromatography quantitative determination of rosmarinic acid and in vitro inhibitory effects on linoleic acid peroxidation

    Brahmi Fatiha; Madani Khodir; Stvigny Caroline; Chibane Mohamed; Duez Pierre

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the quantitative paremeters of rosmarinic acid in Algerian mints,Mentha spicata L. (M. spicata), Mentha pulegium L. and Mentha rotundifolia (L.) Huds by high performance thin layer chromatography (HPTLC)-densitometric method and screen the effects of these plant extracts on linoleic acid peroxidation.Methods:The analyses were performed on HPTLC silica gel 60 F254 plates with chloroform:acetone: formic acid (75:16.5:8.5, v/v) as the mobile phase. Rosmarinic acid was determined in UV at 365 nm and fluorescence at λexc 325 nm with a 550 nm filter, respectively. The effects of plants extracts on linoleic acid peroxidation were measured by an indirect in vitro colorimetric method.Results:Chromatographic resolution permitted reliable quantification in both measurement modes and calibration curves were linear in a range of 150-1000 ng/spot. M. spicata was found to contain significantly higher concentrations of rosmarinic acid. The densitometric quantification allowed the analysis of many samples in a short time with reasonable precision (total precision for Mentha spp extracts, 5.1% and 5.8% for UV and fluorescence detection, respectively). The HPTLC data, allied to assays of linoleic acid peroxidation prevention, suggested the potential of M. spicata (52% Trolox®equivalents) as a natural source for inhibitors of lipid peroxidation.Conclusions:Densitometry can be used for routine determination and quality control of rosmarinic acid in herbal and formulations containing Mentha species.

  19. Quantitative phosphoproteomics using acetone-based peptide labeling: Method evaluation and application to a cardiac ischemia/reperfusion model

    Wijeratne, Aruna B.; Manning, Janet R.; Schultz, Jo El J.; Greis, Kenneth D.

    2013-01-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS) techniques to globally profile protein phosphorylation in cellular systems that are relevant to physiological or pathological changes have been of significant interest in biological research. In this report, an MS-based strategy utilizing an inexpensive acetone-based peptide labeling technique known as reductive alkylation by acetone (RABA) for quantitative phosphoproteomics was explored to evaluate its capacity. Since the chemistry for RABA-labeling for phosphorylation...

  20. The isolated perfused bovine udder as an in vitro model of percutaneous drug absorption. Skin viability and percutaneous absorption of dexamethasone, benzoyl peroxide, and etofenamate.

    Kietzmann, M; Löscher, W; Arens, D; Maass, P; Lubach, D

    1993-10-01

    Using udders from slaughtered cows as a new in vitro model of percutaneous drug absorption, the tissue viability and the percutaneous absorption of dexamethasone, benzoyl peroxide, and etofenamate were studied. The organ was perfused with gassed tyrode solution for up to 6 hr. As shown by measurement of glucose consumption, lactate production, lactate dehydrogenase activity, and pH in the perfusate, the tissue was viable over a 6-hr period. This was confirmed by a histological examination. Determination of the udder skin-fold thickness demonstrated that no edema developed within the perfusion period. A maximum skin penetration of dexamethasone was found after administration of dexamethasone dissolved in acetone with dimethyl sulfoxide, followed by ointment with salicylic acid, ointment without salicylic acid, and acetone solution. Experiments with benzoyl peroxide and etofenamate demonstrated that the perfused udder skin was capable of metabolizing drugs in vitro. In conclusion, the isolated perfused bovine udder is a new in vitro model, which maintains bovine udder skin with an isolated vasculature in a viable state. Using this in vitro model, we note it is possible to compare the dermal penetration, metabolism, and absorption of substances after topical administration of different drug formulations. PMID:8298184

  1. Lipid Peroxidation and Antioxidant Status in Preeclampsia

    S.V. Kashinakunti

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The current theory suggests that in preeclampsia there is an increase in the lipid peroxidation products and leads to decrease in the serum antioxidants except uric acid, contributing to the pathogenesis of preeclampsia. In this context, this study was undertaken to determine the changes in blood levels of lipid peroxide and antioxidant levels in women with preeclampsia.Method: Case control study consisting of 30 preeclamptic and 30 healthy pregnant women. Fasting venous blood samples were collected during antepartum period and serum levels of malondialdehyde, ascorbic acid (Vitamin C and uric acid were measured. In the preeclamptic group malondialdehyde (MDA, a lipid peroxidation product was significantly increased, while serum antioxidant ascorbic acid was significantly decreased (P< 0.001, where as uric acid level increased significantly (P<0.001. The findings of the present study are consistent with previous studies, suggesting that lipid peroxidation is an important factor in the pathogenesis of preeclampsia. In preeclampsia serum antioxidants are excessively utilized to counteract the cellular changes mediated by free radicals

  2. Vanadium(5) peroxocomplexes in catalysis of hydrogen peroxide transformations in trifluoroacetic acid

    It is found that vanadium(5) complexes in trifluoroacetic acid catalyze effectively hydrogen peroxide decomposition with formation of considerable amounts of ozone (up to 15 %). It is also found that vanadium compounds in the course of interaction with peroxytrifluoroacetic acid catalyze not only its decomposition but also decarboxylation. It is ascertained by kinetic methods that in the system V(5)-H2O2-CF3COOH a series of vanadium(5) active complexes, responsible for oxidation of all the compounds studied and ozone evolution, are formed. It is shown that in the formation of the compounds both hydrogen peroxide and peroxytrifluoroacetic acid take part. All the regularities found are explained in the framework of the model, involving intrasphere regrouping of two peroxoligands into grouping (O32-). A mathematical model, which gives an adequate description of substrate oxidation and ozone formation, is plotted

  3. Crocidolite-induced lipid peroxidation. II. Role of antioxidants

    Gulumian, M.; Kilroe-Smith, T.A.

    1987-12-01

    Asbestos fibers in vitro produce lipid peroxidation in rat lung microsomes. Butylated hydroxytoluene prevented this peroxidation. Ascorbate in low concentrations enhanced peroxidation of lipids but inhibited it at concentrations above 4 mmole/liter so that it partially protected membrane lipids from peroxidation produced by asbestos fibers. Reduced glutathione added to microsomes gave increased peroxidation at increased concentrations up to 20 mmol/liter. At 40 mmol/liter peroxidation was prevented. Glutathione had no obvious effect on the level of peroxidation produced by asbestos fibers. The 105,000g supernatant cell fraction added either with or without glutathione gave a decrease in the amount of lipid peroxidation produced by asbestos fibers. The protective action of these reducing agents suggests a possible use as prophylactic agents against the harmful effects of inhaled asbestos.

  4. Microsomal lipid peroxidation as a mechanism of cellular damage. [Dissertation

    Kornbrust, D.J.

    1979-01-01

    The NADPH/iron-dependent peroxidation of lipids in rat liver microsomes was found to be dependent on the presence of free ferrous ion and maintains iron in the reduced Fe/sup 2 +/ state. Chelation of iron by EDTA inhibited peroxidation. Addition of iron, after preincubation of microsomes in the absence of iron, did not enhance the rate of peroxidation suggesting that iron acts by initiating peroxidative decomposition of membrane lipids rather than by catalyzing the breakdown of pre-formed hydroperoxides. Liposomes also underwent peroxidation in the presence of ferrous iron at a rate comparable to intact microsomes and was stimulated by ascorbate. Carbon tetrachloride initiated lipid peroxidation in the absence of free metal ions. Rates of in vitro lipid peroxidation of microsomes and homogenates were found to vary widely between different tissues and species. The effects of paraquat on lipid peroxidation was also studied. (DC)

  5. Structural diversity and chemical synthesis of peroxide and peroxide-derived polyketide metabolites from marine sponges.

    Norris, Matthew D; Perkins, Michael V

    2016-07-28

    Covering: up to early 2016Marine sponges are widely known as a rich source of natural products, especially of polyketide origin, with a wealth of chemical diversity. Within this vast collection, peroxide and peroxide-derived secondary metabolites have attracted significant interest in the fields of natural product isolation and chemical synthesis for their structural distinction and promising in vitro antimicrobial and anticancer properties. In this review, peroxide and peroxide-derived polyketide metabolites isolated from marine sponges in the past 35 years are summarised. Efforts toward their synthesis are detailed with a focus on methods that utilise or attempt to elucidate the complex biosynthetic interrelationships of these compounds beyond enzymatic polyketide synthesis. Recent isolations, advances in synthetic methodology and theories of biogenesis are highlighted and critically evaluated. PMID:27163115

  6. Bactericidal and cytotoxic effects of hypothiocyanite-hydrogen peroxide mixtures.

    Carlsson, J.; Edlund, M B; Hänström, L.

    1984-01-01

    Lactoperoxidase catalyzes the oxidation of thiocyanate by hydrogen peroxide into hypothiocyanite, a reaction which can protect bacterial and mammalian cells from killing by hydrogen peroxide. The present study demonstrates, however, that lactoperoxidase in the presence of thiocyanate can actually potentiate the bactericidal and cytotoxic effects of hydrogen peroxide under specific conditions, such as when hydrogen peroxide is present in the reaction mixtures in excess of thiocyanate. The toxi...

  7. Hydrogen peroxide excretion by oral streptococci and effect of lactoperoxidase-thiocyanate-hydrogen peroxide.

    Carlsson, J.; Y. Iwami; Yamada, T.

    1983-01-01

    Approved type strains of Streptococcus sanguis, S. mitis, S. mutans, and S. salivarius were grown under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. The rate of hydrogen peroxide excretion, oxygen uptake, and acid production from glucose by washed-cell suspensions of these strains were studied, and the levels of enzymes in cell-free extracts which reduced oxygen, hydrogen peroxide, or hypothiocyanite (OSCN-) in the presence of NADH or NADPH were assayed. The effects of lactoperoxidase-thiocyanate-hydrog...

  8. Interpretation of PAN, acetone and acetylene measurements from the MIPAS-E

    Moore, D. P.; Remedios, J. J.; Parker, R. J.

    2009-04-01

    Emissions of anthropogenic pollution, from biomass burning events in particular, result in the injection of a wide range of carbon compounds into the atmosphere. Carbon monoxide (CO), methane (CH4) and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are released in significant amounts, affecting both the oxidation capacity of the troposphere and ozone production. Upper troposphere (UT) measurements of PAN, acetone and acetylene have, in the past, been generally limited to sporadic in situ sampling during specialised campaign periods. The recent rapid progress in both the detection and retrieval of many VOC species from spaceborne instrumentation has been large. It has recently been established that the observation of the global distribution of VOCs in the UT can be made by measurements provided by instruments such as the Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding onboard ENVISAT (MIPAS-E) or the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE) onboard SCISAT-1. In this work, we discuss the ability of MIPAS-E to provide new global measurements of acetone in the UT. We also describe both the distribution and seasonality observed in UT PAN volume mixing ratios (vmrs). From the MIPAS-E acetylene measurements, we analyse the extent and magnitude of the chemical isolation observed over the Middle East during August 2003. We show that this enhancement is due to fast westward transport from Asia via the Easterly Jet associated with the Asian monsoon anticyclone. A full error analysis is carried out for each of the three gases we analyse. Previous work has shown that characteristic infrared signatures of PAN, acetone and acetylene can be detected in MIPAS-E thermal emission spectra, with the 787-790 cm-1, 1216-1218 cm-1 and 776.0-776.15 cm-1 spectral ranges respectively being particularly sensitive to changes in each of the gases. We invert the measured MIPAS-E spectra into vmrs using an independent offline-retrieval scheme based on the optimal estimation approach which was

  9. Impact of hydrogen peroxide as a soil amendment on nasturtiums

    Hydrogen peroxide, H2O2, is a highly reactive oxidizing agent naturally occurring in plants and animals. Plants produce hydrogen peroxide to destroy either their infected plant cells or the pathogens within their cells. Hydrogen peroxide also acts as a stress signal to plants. It is approved for c...

  10. Ionizing radiation and lipid peroxidation in human body

    Lipids are organic compounds constituting the living cells. Lipid molecules can be disassembled through peroxidative pathways and hydrocarbons can be bred as end-product of lipid peroxidation in vivo. Lipid peroxidation can be started by an indirect effect of ionizing radiation. So a radioinduced cellular damage in human body can be detected by monitoring the production of specific hydrocarbons

  11. The effect of hydrogen peroxide on uranium oxide films on 316L stainless steel

    Highlights: • The first report of the presence of both UO2 and polymeric UO22+ in the same electrodeposited U oxide sample. • The action of H2O2 on electrodeposited U oxides is described using corrosion based concepts. • Electrodeposited U oxide freely dissolves at hydrogen peroxide concentrations <100 μmol dm−3. • At [H2O2] > 0.1 mmol dm−3 dissolution is inhibited by formation of a studtite passivation layer. • At [H2O2] ⩾ 1 mol dm−3 studtite formation competes with uranyl–peroxide complex formation. - Abstract: For the first time the effect of hydrogen peroxide on the dissolution of electrodeposited uranium oxide films on 316L stainless steel planchets (acting as simulant uranium-contaminated metal surfaces) has been studied. Analysis of the H2O2-mediated film dissolution processes via open circuit potentiometry, alpha counting and SEM/EDX imaging has shown that in near-neutral solutions of pH 6.1 and at [H2O2] ⩽ 100 μmol dm−3 the electrodeposited uranium oxide layer is freely dissolving, the associated rate of film dissolution being significantly increased over leaching of similar films in pH 6.1 peroxide-free water. At H2O2 concentrations between 1 mmol dm−3 and 0.1 mol dm−3, formation of an insoluble studtite product layer occurs at the surface of the uranium oxide film. In analogy to corrosion processes on common metal substrates such as steel, the studtite layer effectively passivates the underlying uranium oxide layer against subsequent dissolution. Finally, at [H2O2] > 0.1 mol dm−3 the uranium oxide film, again in analogy to common corrosion processes, behaves as if in a transpassive state and begins to dissolve. This transition from passive to transpassive behaviour in the effect of peroxide concentration on UO2 films has not hitherto been observed or explored, either in terms of corrosion processes or otherwise. Through consideration of thermodynamic solubility product and complex formation constant data, we attribute the

  12. 3,5-Bis(2,4-dinitrophenyl-4-nitro-1H-pyrazole acetone monosolvate

    Logesh Mathivathanan

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The title structure, C15H7N7O10·C3H6O, was prepared by pentanitration of 3,5-diphenyl-1H-pyrazole. The proton attached to a pyrazole N atom forms a hydrogen bond with the O atom of the acetone solvent molecule, owing to the NO2 enhanced acidity of the proton. The NO2 group on the phenyl C atom is twisted by 33.9 (2° from coplanarity with the ring in order to avoid a short intramolecular O...O contact with an O atom of an adjacent pyrazole-bonded NO2 group.

  13. Bioreactors and in situ product recovery techniques for acetone-butanol-ethanol fermentation.

    Li, Si-Yu; Chiang, Chung-Jen; Tseng, I-Ting; He, Chi-Ruei; Chao, Yun-Peng

    2016-07-01

    The microbial fermentation process is one of the sustainable and environment-friendly ways to produce 1-butanol and other bio-based chemicals. The success of the fermentation process greatly relies on the choice of bioreactors and the separation methods. In this review, the history and the performance of bioreactors for the acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation is discussed. The subject is then focused on in situ product recovery (ISPR) techniques, particularly for the integrated extraction-gas stripping. The usefulness of this promising hybrid ISPR device is acknowledged by its incorporation with batch, fed-batch and continuous processes to improve the performance of ABE fermentation. PMID:27190167

  14. Multi-species time-history measurements during high-temperature acetone and 2-butanone pyrolysis

    Lam, Kingyiu

    2013-01-01

    High-temperature acetone and 2-butanone pyrolysis studies were conducted behind reflected shock waves using five species time-history measurements (ketone, CO, CH3, CH4 and C2H4). Experimental conditions covered temperatures of 1100-1600 Kat 1.6 atm, for mixtures of 0.25-1.5% ketone in argon. During acetone pyrolysis, the CO concentration time-history was found to be strongly sensitive to the acetone dissociation rate constant κ1 (CH3COCH3 → CH3 + CH3CO), and this could be directly determined from the CO time-histories, yielding κ1(1.6 atm) = 2.46 × 1014 exp(-69.3 [kcal/mol]/RT) s-1 with an uncertainty of ±25%. This rate constant is in good agreement with previous shock tube studies from Sato and Hidaka (2000) [3] and Saxena et al. (2009) [4] (within 30%) at temperatures above 1450 K, but is at least three times faster than the evaluation from Sato and Hidaka at temperatures below 1250 K. Using this revised κ1 value with the recent mechanism of Pichon et al. (2009) [5], the simulated profiles during acetone pyrolysis show excellent agreement with all five species time-history measurements. Similarly, the overall 2-butanone decomposition rate constant κtot was inferred from measured 2-butanone time-histories, yielding κ tot(1.5 atm) = 6.08 × 1013 exp(-63.1 [kcal/mol]/RT) s -1 with an uncertainty of ±35%. This rate constant is approximately 30% faster than that proposed by Serinyel et al. (2010) [11] at 1119 K, and approximately 100% faster at 1412 K. Using the measured 2-butanone and CO time-histories and an O-atom balance analysis, a missing removal pathway for methyl ketene was identified. The rate constant for the decomposition of methyl ketene was assumed to be the same as the value for the ketene decomposition reaction. Using the revised κtot value and adding the methyl ketene decomposition reaction to the Serinyel et al. mechanism, the simulated profiles during 2-butanone pyrolysis show good agreement with the measurements for all five species.

  15. Sensitive gas chromatographic detection of acetaldehyde and acetone using a reduction gas detector

    O'Hara, Dean; Singh, Hanwant B.

    1988-01-01

    The response of a newly available mercuric oxide Reduction Gas Detector (RGD-2) to subpicomole and larger quantities of acetaldehyde and acetone is tested. The RGD-2 is found to be capable of subpicomole detection for these carbonyls and is more sensitive than an FID (Flame Ionization Detector) by an order of magnitude. Operating parameters can be further optimized to make the RGD-2 some 20-40 times more sensitive than an FID. The detector is linear over a wide range and is easily adapted to a conventional gas chromatograph (GC). Such a GC-RGD-2 system should be suitable for atmospheric carbonyl measurements in clean as well as polluted environments.

  16. Pervaporation of model acetone-butanol-ethanol fermentation product solutions using polytetrafluoroethylene membranes

    Vrana, D.L.; Meagher, M.M.; Hutkins, R.W.; Duffield, B. (Univ. of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE (United States))

    1993-10-01

    A pervaporation apparatus was designed and tested in an effort to develop an integrated fermentation and product recovery process for acetone-butanol-ethanol(ABE) fermentation. A crossflow membrane module able to accommodate flat sheet hydrophobic membranes was used for the experiments. Permeate vapors were collected under vacuum and condensed in a dry ice/ethanol cold trap. The apparatus containing polytetrafluoroethylene membranes was tested using butanol-water and model solutions of ABE products. Parameters such as product concentration, component effect, temperature, and permeate side pressure were examined. 25 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  17. Coordination compounds of titanium(4), zirconium and hafnium(4) with acetone thiosemicarbazone

    Adducts of titanium, zirconium and hafnium tetrachlorides with acetone thiosemicarbazone of 1:1 composition are synthesized from ethyl acetate solutions. It is shown on the base of studying infrared spectra that the ligand is coordinated to titanium, zirconium and hafnium bidentately via atoms of sulphur and azomething nitrogen. Heats of ligands and adducts dissolution in 4N- muriatic acid at 298 K are determined by calorimetry. Heats of gaseous ligand addition to the mole of tetrachloride calculated according to Haber cycle on the base of the conducted measurements are localized in the series Ti > Hf > Zr

  18. OPTIMIZATION OF PRODUCTION OF 5-HYDROXYMETHYLFURFURAL FROM GLUCOSE IN A WATER: ACETONE BIPHASIC SYSTEM

    A. D. M. Mendonça

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract5-Hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF is considered to be an important building block for biorefineries and has a high potential for the production of chemicals and fuels. Production of HMF from glucose was studied using phosphoric acid as catalyst, in a water:acetone system with volume ratio of 1:2 and NaCl. An experimental design was applied to examine the influence of temperature, time and concentration of catalyst on the HMF yield. HMF yields of more than 50 % were obtained when using 200 ºC, 8.4 min and 0.8% of catalyst. The temperature is the main factor influencing the HMF yield.

  19. Uptake and Reactions of Formaldehyde, Acetaldehyde, Acetone, Propanal and Ethanol in Sulfuric Acid solutions at 200-240 K: Implications for upper tropospheric aerosol composition

    Iraci, L. T.; Williams, M. B.; Axson, J.; Michelsen, R.

    2007-12-01

    The production of light absorbing, organic material in aerosol that is normally considered to be transparent in the UV and visible wavelength regions has significant implications for biogeochemical cycling and climate modelling. Production mechanisms likely involve carbonyl compounds such as formaldehyde, acetone, acetaldehyde and propanal that are present in significant quantities in the upper troposphere (UT). In this study, we have performed experiments focusing on a class of acid catalyzed carbonyl reactions, the formation of acetals. R2C=O + 2R'OH --> R2C(OR')2 + H2O Using a Knudsen cell apparatus, we have measured the rate of uptake of formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, acetone, propanal, and ethanol into sulfuric acid solutions ranging between 40-70 wt% of acid, containing 0-0.1 M of ethanol, acetone or formaldehyde at temperatures of 220-250 K. For all reactant pairs, the aldol condensation path, including self reaction, should be insignificant at the acidities studied. Evidence for reaction between organics was observed for all pairs, except those involving propanal which were likely limited by the very low solubility. We attribute enhanced uptake to the formation of acetals, such as 1,1-diethoxyethane and 2,2- diethoxypropane, among others. Enhanced uptake was observed to proceed on timescales > 1 hour and sometimes shows complex dependence on acidity that is likely related to speciation of the individual carbonyls in acidic solution. The acetal products do not absorb in the visible but are less volatile than parent molecules, allowing for accumulation in sulfuric acid particles, and enhanced uptake. Cross reactions of carbonyls with alcohols in sulfuric acid medium have not been previously measured, yet methanol and ethanol show high solubility and are present at significant concentrations in the UT. Thus even at slow reaction rates, the acetal reaction has ample starting material and proceeds under conditions common to the UT. We will present results for the

  20. Polyester Sulphonic Acid Interstitial Nanocomposite Platform for Peroxide Biosensor

    Emmanuel I. Iwuoha

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available A novel enzyme immobilization platform was prepared on a platinum disk working electrode by polymerizing aniline inside the interstitial pores of polyester sulphonic acid sodium salt (PESA. Scanning electron microscopy study showed the formation of homogeneous sulphonated polyaniline (PANI nanotubes (~90 nm and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA confirmed that the nanotubes were stable up to 230 °C. The PANI:PESA nanocomposite showed a quasi-reversible redox behaviour in phosphate buffer saline. Horseradish peroxidase (HRP was immobilized on to this modified electrode for hydrogen peroxide detection. The biosensor gave a sensitivity of 1.33 μA (μM-1 and a detection limit of 0.185 μM for H2O2. Stability experiments showed that the biosensor retained more than 64% of its initial sensitivity over four days of storage at 4 °C.

  1. Rapid and selective detection of acetone using hierarchical ZnO gas sensor for hazardous odor markers application

    Highlights: • ZnO spheres fabricated via solvothermal method are with (0 0 2) polar facet exposed. • Response time of ZnO sensor for detecting 100 ppm acetone is as short as 3 s. • Ra/Rg toward 100 ppm acetone is 33 when operated at 230 °C. • ZnO sensor exhibits good selectivity against other toxic gases and water vapor. • Porous structure and exposure of polar facet contribute to good sensing properties. - Abstract: Hierarchical nanostructured ZnO dandelion-like spheres were synthesized via solvothermal reaction at 200 °C for 4 h. The products were pure hexagonal ZnO with large exposure of (0 0 2) polar facet. Side-heating gas sensor based on hierarchical ZnO spheres was prepared to evaluate the acetone gas sensing properties. The detection limit to acetone for the ZnO sensor is 0.25 ppm. The response (Ra/Rg) toward 100 ppm acetone was 33 operated at 230 °C and the response time was as short as 3 s. The sensor exhibited remarkable acetone selectivity with negligible response toward other hazardous gases and water vapor. The high proportion of electron depletion region and oxygen vacancies contributed to high gas response sensitivity. The hollow and porous structure of dandelion-like ZnO spheres facilitated the diffusion of gas molecules, leading to a rapid response speed. The largely exposed (0 0 2) polar facets could adsorb acetone gas molecules easily and efficiently, resulting in a rapid response speed and good selectivity of hierarchical ZnO spheres gas sensor at low operating temperature

  2. Rapid and selective detection of acetone using hierarchical ZnO gas sensor for hazardous odor markers application

    Jia, Qianqian; Ji, Huiming, E-mail: jihuiming@tju.edu.cn; Zhang, Ying; Chen, Yalu; Sun, Xiaohong, E-mail: sunxh@tju.edu.cn; Jin, Zhengguo

    2014-07-15

    Highlights: • ZnO spheres fabricated via solvothermal method are with (0 0 2) polar facet exposed. • Response time of ZnO sensor for detecting 100 ppm acetone is as short as 3 s. • R{sub a}/R{sub g} toward 100 ppm acetone is 33 when operated at 230 °C. • ZnO sensor exhibits good selectivity against other toxic gases and water vapor. • Porous structure and exposure of polar facet contribute to good sensing properties. - Abstract: Hierarchical nanostructured ZnO dandelion-like spheres were synthesized via solvothermal reaction at 200 °C for 4 h. The products were pure hexagonal ZnO with large exposure of (0 0 2) polar facet. Side-heating gas sensor based on hierarchical ZnO spheres was prepared to evaluate the acetone gas sensing properties. The detection limit to acetone for the ZnO sensor is 0.25 ppm. The response (R{sub a}/R{sub g}) toward 100 ppm acetone was 33 operated at 230 °C and the response time was as short as 3 s. The sensor exhibited remarkable acetone selectivity with negligible response toward other hazardous gases and water vapor. The high proportion of electron depletion region and oxygen vacancies contributed to high gas response sensitivity. The hollow and porous structure of dandelion-like ZnO spheres facilitated the diffusion of gas molecules, leading to a rapid response speed. The largely exposed (0 0 2) polar facets could adsorb acetone gas molecules easily and efficiently, resulting in a rapid response speed and good selectivity of hierarchical ZnO spheres gas sensor at low operating temperature.

  3. Induction of antioxidant enzyme activity and lipid peroxidation level in ion-beam-bombarded rice seeds

    Highlights: ► Ion beam bombarded rice seeds in vacuum. ► Studied seed survival from the ion bombardment. ► Determined various antioxidant enzyme activities and lipid peroxidation level. ► Discussed vacuum, ion species and ion energy effects. ► Attributed the changes to free radical formation due to ion bombardment. -- Abstract: Low-energy ion beam bombardment has been used to mutate a wide variety of plant species. To explore the indirect effects of low-energy ion beam on biological damage due to the free radical production in plant cells, the increase in antioxidant enzyme activities and lipid peroxidation level was investigated in ion-bombarded rice seeds. Local rice seeds were bombarded with nitrogen or argon ion beams at energies of 29–60 keV and ion fluences of 1 × 1016 ions cm−2. The activities of the antioxidant enzymes; superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), ascorbate peroxidase (APX), dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR), glutathione reductase (GR), glutathione S-transferase (GST) and lipid peroxidation level were assayed in the germinated rice seeds after ion bombardment. The results showed most of the enzyme activities and lipid peroxidation levels in both the argon and nitrogen bombarded samples were higher than those in the natural control. N-ion bombardment could induce higher levels of antioxidant enzyme activities in the rice samples than the Ar-ion bombardment. Additional effects due to the vacuum condition were found to affect activities of some antioxidant enzymes and lipid peroxidation level. This study demonstrates that ion beam bombardment and vacuum condition could induce the antioxidant enzyme activity and lipid peroxidation level which might be due to free radical production in the bombarded rice seeds

  4. Synthesis and Photoirradiation of Isomeric Ethylchrysenes by UVA Light Leading to Lipid Peroxidation

    Peter P. Fu

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs are widespread genotoxic environmental pollutants. We have recently demonstrated that photoirradiation of PAHs leads to cytotoxicity, DNA damage, and induction of lipid peroxidation. In this paper we report the synthesis of all the six isomeric ethylchrysenes and the study of light-induced lipid peroxidation by these ethylchrysenes. 5-Ethylchrysene was synthesized by reaction of 5-keto-5,6,6a,7,8,9,10,10a-octahydrochrysene with CH3CH2MgBr followed by dehydration catalyzed by p-toluenesulfonic acid and dehydrogenation with DDQ in benzene. 1- and 4-Ethylchrysenes were similarly prepared by reaction of 1-keto-1,2,3,4,5,6-hexahydrochrysene and 4-keto-1,2,3,4-tetrahydrochrysenes, respectively with CH3CH2MgBr followed by dehydration and dehydrogenation. Direct acetylation of chrysene followed by Wolff-Kishner or Clemmensen reduction resulted in the formation of 2-, 3-, and 6-ethylchrysenes in 4%, 16%, and 43% yields, respectively. Photoirradiation of these compounds with 7 and 21 J/cm2 UVA light in the presence of methyl linoleate all resulted in lipid peroxidation. For comparison, photoirradiation of 4-methylchrysene and 5-methylchrysene was similarly conducted. For irradiation at a UVA light dose of 21 J/cm2, the level of induced lipid peroxidation is in the order 4-methylchrysene = 5-methylchrysene = 5-ethylchrysene = 4-ethylchrysene = chrysene > 1-ethylchrysene = 2-ethylchrysene > 3-ethylchrysene > 6-ethylchrysene. Compared with chrysene, these results indicate that the ethyl group at C4 or C5 position either slightly enhances or has no effect on the light-induced lipid peroxidation, while at C1-, C2-, C3-, or C6 position reduces light-induced lipid peroxidation.

  5. Induction of antioxidant enzyme activity and lipid peroxidation level in ion-beam-bombarded rice seeds

    Semsang, Nuananong, E-mail: nsemsang@gmail.com [Molecular Biology Laboratory, Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Yu, LiangDeng [Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Thailand Center of Excellence in Physics, Commission on Higher Education, 328 Si Ayutthaya Road, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand)

    2013-07-15

    Highlights: ► Ion beam bombarded rice seeds in vacuum. ► Studied seed survival from the ion bombardment. ► Determined various antioxidant enzyme activities and lipid peroxidation level. ► Discussed vacuum, ion species and ion energy effects. ► Attributed the changes to free radical formation due to ion bombardment. -- Abstract: Low-energy ion beam bombardment has been used to mutate a wide variety of plant species. To explore the indirect effects of low-energy ion beam on biological damage due to the free radical production in plant cells, the increase in antioxidant enzyme activities and lipid peroxidation level was investigated in ion-bombarded rice seeds. Local rice seeds were bombarded with nitrogen or argon ion beams at energies of 29–60 keV and ion fluences of 1 × 10{sup 16} ions cm{sup −2}. The activities of the antioxidant enzymes; superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), ascorbate peroxidase (APX), dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR), glutathione reductase (GR), glutathione S-transferase (GST) and lipid peroxidation level were assayed in the germinated rice seeds after ion bombardment. The results showed most of the enzyme activities and lipid peroxidation levels in both the argon and nitrogen bombarded samples were higher than those in the natural control. N-ion bombardment could induce higher levels of antioxidant enzyme activities in the rice samples than the Ar-ion bombardment. Additional effects due to the vacuum condition were found to affect activities of some antioxidant enzymes and lipid peroxidation level. This study demonstrates that ion beam bombardment and vacuum condition could induce the antioxidant enzyme activity and lipid peroxidation level which might be due to free radical production in the bombarded rice seeds.

  6. Grafting to Polymethylmethacrylate by the Radiation-Peroxidation Method

    Studies of the radiation-peroxidation of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) are discussed in relation to the subsequent grafting of vinyl pyrrolidone to the peroxidized polymer. The peroxidation has been investigated as a function of dose, PMMA molecular weight, and irradiation temperature. It is shown that low molecular weight PMMA is more effectively peroxidized and grafted at doses of a few megarads than a relatively high molecular weight polymer. It is also observed that increasing the temperature to about the glass sansition also increases peroxidation and grafting. The results are explained in terms to the effects of temperature and molecular weight on the mobility of polymer and fragment radicals. (author)

  7. Lipid Peroxidation in Psychiatric Illness: Overview of Clinical Evidence

    Yash B. Joshi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The brain is known to be sensitive to oxidative stress and lipid peroxidation. While lipid peroxidation has been shown to contribute to many disease processes, its role in psychiatric illness has not been investigated until recently. In this paper, we provide an overview of lipid peroxidation in the central nervous system as well as clinical data supporting a link between lipid peroxidation and disorders such as schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and major depressive disorder. These data support further investigation of lipid peroxidation in the effort to uncover therapeutic targets and biomarkers of psychiatric disease.

  8. Functionalized Palladium Nanoparticles for Hydrogen Peroxide Biosensor

    H. Baccar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a comparison between two biosensors for hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 detection. The first biosensor was developed by the immobilization of Horseradish Peroxidase (HRP enzyme on thiol-modified gold electrode. The second biosensor was developed by the immobilization of cysteamine functionalizing palladium nanoparticles on modified gold surface. The amino groups can be activated with glutaraldehyde for horseradish peroxidase immobilization. The detection of hydrogen peroxide was successfully observed in PBS for both biosensors using the cyclic voltammetry and the chronoamperometry techniques. The results show that the limit detection depends on the large surface-to-volume ratio attained with palladium nanoparticles. The second biosensor presents a better detection limit of 7.5 μM in comparison with the first one which is equal to 75 μM.

  9. Lignin Hydrolysis and Phosphorylation Mechanism during Phosphoric Acid–Acetone Pretreatment: A DFT Study

    Wu Qin

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The study focused on the structural sensitivity of lignin during the phosphoric acid–acetone pretreatment process and the resulting hydrolysis and phosphorylation reaction mechanisms using density functional theory calculations. The chemical stabilities of the seven most common linkages (β-O-4, β-β, 4-O-5, β-1, 5-5, α-O-4, and β-5 of lignin in H3PO4, CH3COCH3, and H2O solutions were detected, which shows that α-O-4 linkage and β-O-4 linkage tend to break during the phosphoric acid–acetone pretreatment process. Then α-O-4 phosphorylation and β-O-4 phosphorylation follow a two-step reaction mechanism in the acid treatment step, respectively. However, since phosphorylation of α-O-4 is more energetically accessible than phosphorylation of β-O-4 in phosphoric acid, the phosphorylation of α-O-4 could be controllably realized under certain operational conditions, which could tune the electron and hole transfer on the right side of β-O-4 in the H2PO4− functionalized lignin. The results provide a fundamental understanding for process-controlled modification of lignin and the potential novel applications in lignin-based imprinted polymers, sensors, and molecular devices.

  10. Conversion of Alcohols to Bromides by Trimethylsilane and lithium Bromide in Acetone

    Wei Feng; Zhang Xiao-xia; Zhang Qing; Wang Ji-yu; Chen Dai-mo

    2004-01-01

    Conversion of alcohols to alkyl bromides is one of the most frequently used functional group transformation reactions. Phosphorus tribromide is one of the most popular classical reagents.Triphenylphosphine has been used in combination with bromine,carbon tetrabromide,N-halo imides and other bromide compounds as a mild reagents for the preparation of alkyl bromides.More reacently, halotrimethylsilanes were found to be useful for halogenation of alcohols. George A.Olah successfully converted alcohols to bromides with chlorotrimethylsilane/lithium bromide in acetonitrile. But in our research, we found that we got no bromides but methylation products when we planed to convered our substances to bromides according to Gerge's method. We did some experiments, and we found that when the substituent group in the 2-N was donor group,we got the methylation products,but when it was acceptor group,the bromide could be got.(Scheme 1).Then we did some experiments with several other solvents, we found excitedly that when the solvent was acetone ,the bromides could be got even the substituent group was donor.(Scheme 2).When we changed the substances to normal alcohols ,such as ethyl alcohol,benzyl alcohol,isopropyl alcohol and 3,4-dimethoxy benzyl alcohol,we also got the bromides.In conclusion, we found a simple method to convert alcohols to bromides with trimethylsilane/li thium bromide in acetone,which was better than Geroge's method.

  11. Theoretical study on the mechanism of cycloaddition between dimethyl methylene carbene and acetone

    LU Xiuhui; WU Weirong; YU Haibin; XU Yuehua

    2005-01-01

    The mechanism of the cycloaddition reaction of singlet dimethyl methylene carbene and acetone has been studied by using second-order Moller-Plesset perturbation and density functional theory. The geometrical parameters, harmonic vibrational frequencies and energy of stationary points on the potential energy surface are calculated by MP2/6-31G* and B3LYP/6-31G* methods. The results show that path b of the cycloaddition reaction (1) would be the major reactive channel of the cycloaddition reaction between singlet dimethyl methylene carbene and acetone, which proceeds in two steps: i) The two reactants form an energy-rich intermediate (INT1b), which is an exothermic reaction of 23.3 kJ/mol with no energy barrier. ii) The intermediate INT1b isomerizes to a three-membered ring product (P1) via transition state TS1b with energy barrier of 22.2 kJ/mol. The reaction rate of this reaction and its competitive reactions do greatly differ, with excellent selectivity. In view of dynamics and thermodynamics, this reaction is suitable for occurring at 1 atm and temperature range of 300―800 K, in which the reaction will have not only the larger spontaneous tendency and equilibrium constant but also the faster reaction rate.

  12. Central nervous system activity of an aqueous acetonic extract of Ficus carica L. in mice

    Mittal M Bhanushali

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Ficus carica Linn. is reported to possess variety of activities, but its potential in CNS disorders is still to be explored. Objective: The present study was carried out to evaluate the CNS depressant activity of aqueous acetonic extract of Ficus carica Linn on different models in mice. Materials and Methods: The aerial parts of the plant Ficus carica L. were extracted with aqueous acetone and the solvent was removed by rotary vacuum evaporator under reduced pressure. A crude extract was given orally and its effects were tested on ketamine-induced sleeping time, muscle-coordination, anxiety (elevated-plus maze and Staircase test, convulsions [maximal electroshock (MES and pentylenetetrazole (PTZ-induced seizures], and nociception. In addition, we determined the levels of neurotransmitters, norepinephrine (NE and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT. Results: Results from the experimental models tested showed: (1 a delay on onset and prolongation of sleep of ketamine-induced sleeping time; (2 significant muscle relaxant activity; (3 a significant attenuation in the anxiety-response (4 a delay in the onset of seizures and reduction in duration of seizures and mortality induced by MES and PTZ; (5 a reduction in the licking time in nociception test and (6 increased levels of NE and 5-HT. Conclusion: This suggests that Ficus carica L. exerts its CNS depressive effect by modulating the neurotransmitters NE and 5-HT in the brain.

  13. Industrial production of acetone and butanol by fermentation-100 years later.

    Sauer, Michael

    2016-07-01

    Microbial production of acetone and butanol was one of the first large-scale industrial fermentation processes of global importance. During the first part of the 20th century, it was indeed the second largest fermentation process, superseded in importance only by the ethanol fermentation. After a rapid decline after the 1950s, acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation has recently gained renewed interest in the context of biorefinery approaches for the production of fuels and chemicals from renewable resources. The availability of new methods and knowledge opens many new doors for industrial microbiology, and a comprehensive view on this process is worthwhile due to the new interest. This thematic issue of FEMS Microbiology Letters, dedicated to the 100th anniversary of the first industrial exploitation of Chaim Weizmann's ABE fermentation process, covers the main aspects of old and new developments, thereby outlining a model development in biotechnology. All major aspects of industrial microbiology are exemplified by this single process. This includes new technologies, such as the latest developments in metabolic engineering, the exploitation of biodiversity and discoveries of new regulatory systems such as for microbial stress tolerance, as well as technological aspects, such as bio- and down-stream processing. PMID:27199350

  14. Biofiltration of a mixture of ethylene, ammonia, n-butanol, and acetone gases.

    Lee, Sang-Hun; Li, Congna; Heber, Albert J; Ni, Jiqin; Huang, Hong

    2013-01-01

    This study describes cleaning of a waste gas stream using bench scale biofilters (BFs) or biotrickling filters (BTFs). The gas stream contained a mixture of acetone, n-butanol, methane, ethylene, and ammonia, and was diverted uniformly to six biofilters and four biotrickling filters. The biofilters were packed with either perlite (BF-P), polyurethane foam (BF-F), or a mixture of compost, wood chips, and straw (BF-C), whereas the biotrickling filters contained either perlite (BTF-P) or polyurethane foam (BTF-F). Experimental results showed that both BFs and BTFs packed with various media were able to achieve complete removal of highly soluble compounds such as acetone, n-butanol, and ammonia of which the dimensionless Henry's constants (H) are less than 0.01. Methane was not removed due to its extreme insolubility (H>30). However, the ethylene (H ≈ 9) removal efficiencies depended on trickle water flow rates, media surface areas, and ammonia gas levels. PMID:23138059

  15. Measurement of endogenous acetone and isoprene in exhaled breath during sleep

    This explorative study aims at characterizing the breath behavior of two prototypic volatile organic compounds, acetone and isoprene, during normal human sleep and to possibly relate changes in the respective concentration time courses to the underlying sleep architecture. For this purpose, six normal healthy volunteers (two females, four males, age 20–29 years) were monitored over two consecutive nights (the first one being an adaption night) by combining real-time proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry measurements from end-tidal exhalation segments with laboratory-based polysomnographic data. Breath acetone concentrations increased overnight in all measurements, with an average relative change by a factor of up to 4 (median 2.5). Nighttime concentration maxima were usually recorded 2–3 h before lights on. For breath isoprene, a nocturnal increase in baseline concentrations of about 74% was observed, with individual changes ranging from 36–110%. Isoprene profiles exhibited pronounced concentration peaks, which were highly specific for leg movements as scored by tibial electromyography. Furthermore, relative to a linear trend, baseline isoprene concentrations decreased during the transition from the NREM to the REM phase of a complete sleep cycle. (paper)

  16. Acetone cataluminescence as an indicator for evaluation of heterogeneous base catalysts in biodiesel production.

    Zhang, Lijuan; Chen, Yingchun; He, Nan; Lu, Chao

    2014-01-01

    Rapid and effective evaluation techniques for heterogeneous base catalysts in biodiesel production are highly desirable with increased global demand for biofuels. In this work, we have discovered direct connections between the number of medium-strength basic sites of heterogeneous base catalysts in biodiesel production and cataluminescence intensity in acetone aldol condensation reactions. Accordingly, acetone cataluminescence has been employed as an indicator for rapid evaluation of heterogeneous base catalysts in biodiesel production. Its practical feasibility has been first established using commercially available heterogeneous base catalysts in biodiesel production (including MgO, Al2O3, TiO2, and ZnO), indicating a good matching between the proposed cataluminescence screening method and routine temperature-programmed desorption measurements. Subsequently, the proposed cataluminescence method can be used to effectively distinguish a set of layered double hydroxides and layered double oxide with fewer differences of basic sites, and the relative standard deviation (RSD) of the proposed method is 2.90%. The developed cataluminescence platform is able to take advantage of low cost, simple configuration, fast response, long-term stability, and easy operation. This work has a great potential in distinguishing weak/strong basic sites and even acidic sites of each catalyst system by tuning molecular probes. PMID:24325398

  17. Micronization of Griseofulvin by Ress in Supercritical CO2 with Cosolvent Acetone

    胡国勤; 陈鸿雁; 蔡建国; 邓修

    2003-01-01

    Griseofulvin (GF) is an antifungal drug whose pharmaceutical activity can be improved by reducing particle size. In this study the rapid expansion of supercritical solution (RESS) was employed to micronize GF.Carbon dioxide with cosolvent acetone was chosen as a supercritical mixed solvent. The solubility of GF in super-critical CO2 with cosolvent acetone was measured using a dynamic apparatus at pressures between 12 and 32 MPa,temperatures at 313, 323 and 333 K and cosolvent concentration at 1.5, 3.0, 4.5 and 6.0% (by mole). The effect of pre-expansion pressure, extraction temperature, spraying distance, nozzle size and concentration of cosolvent on the precipitated particles was investigated. The results show that the mean particle size of griseofulvin precipitated by RESS was less than 1.2μm. An increase in pre-expansion pressure, extraction temperature, spraying distance and concentration of cosolvent resulted in a decrease in particle size under the operating condition studied. With the decrease of nozzle diameter the particle size reduces. The crystallinity and melting point of the original material and the processed particle by RESS were tested by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC).No evident modification in the crystal habit was found under the experimental conditions tested. The morphology of particles precipitated was analyzed bY scanning electron microscopy (SEM).

  18. New hydrogen peroxide bioburden reduction specification

    Kminek, Gerhard; Conley, Catharine

    2012-07-01

    The presentation will detail approved Planetary Protection specifications for the process of Vapor Hydrogen Peroxide (VHP) bioburden reduction for spacecraft components and subsystems. Outlined will be the research and studies on which the specifications were based. The research, funded by ESA and NASA/JPL, was conducted over a period of two years and was followed by limited material compatibility studies to assess the feasibility of this bioburden reduction modality for spacecraft.

  19. Hydrogen Peroxide Propulsion for Smaller Satellites

    Whitehead, John

    1998-01-01

    As satellite designs shrink, providing maneuvering and control capability falls outside the realm of available propulsion technology. While cold gas has been used on the smallest satellites, hydrogen peroxide propellant is suggested as the next step in performance and cost before hydrazine. Minimal toxicity and a small scale enable bench top propellant preparation and development testing. Progress toward low-cost thrusters and self-pressurizing tank systems is described.

  20. Acetone Gas Sensing Properties of a Multiple-Networked Fe2O3-Functionalized CuO Nanorod Sensor

    Sunghoon Park

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Fe2O3-decorated CuO nanorods were prepared by Cu thermal oxidation followed by Fe2O3 decoration via a solvothermal route. The acetone gas sensing properties of multiple-networked pristine and Fe2O3-decorated CuO nanorod sensors were examined. The optimal operating temperature of the sensors was found to be 240°C. The pristine and Fe2O3-decorated CuO nanorod sensors showed responses of 586 and 1,090%, respectively, to 1,000 ppm of acetone at 240°C. The Fe2O3-decorated CuO nanorod sensor also showed faster response and recovery than the latter sensor. The acetone gas sensing mechanism of the Fe2O3-decorated CuO nanorod sensor is discussed in detail. The origin of the enhanced sensing performance of the multiple-networked Fe2O3-decorated CuO nanorod sensor to acetone gas was explained by modulation of the potential barrier at the Fe2O3-CuO interface, highly catalytic activity of Fe2O3 for acetone oxidation, and the creation of active adsorption sites by Fe2O3 nanoparticles.

  1. An acetone breath analyzer using cavity ringdown spectroscopy: an initial test with human subjects under various situations

    Wang, Chuji; Surampudi, Anand B.

    2008-10-01

    We have developed a portable breath acetone analyzer using cavity ringdown spectroscopy (CRDS). The instrument was initially tested by measuring the absorbance of breath gases at a single wavelength (266 nm) from 32 human subjects under various conditions. A background subtraction method, implemented to obtain absorbance differences, from which an upper limit of breath acetone concentration was obtained, is described. The upper limits of breath acetone concentration in the four Type 1 diabetes (T1D) subjects, tested after a 14 h overnight fast, range from 0.80 to 3.97 parts per million by volume (ppmv), higher than the mean acetone concentration (0.49 ppmv) in non-diabetic healthy breath reported in the literature. The preliminary results show that the instrument can tell distinctive differences between the breath from individuals who are healthy and those with T1D. On-line monitoring of breath gases in healthy people post-exercise, post-meals and post-alcohol-consumption was also conducted. This exploratory study demonstrates the first CRDS-based acetone breath analyzer and its potential application for point-of-care, non-invasive, diabetic monitoring.

  2. An acetone breath analyzer using cavity ringdown spectroscopy: an initial test with human subjects under various situations

    We have developed a portable breath acetone analyzer using cavity ringdown spectroscopy (CRDS). The instrument was initially tested by measuring the absorbance of breath gases at a single wavelength (266 nm) from 32 human subjects under various conditions. A background subtraction method, implemented to obtain absorbance differences, from which an upper limit of breath acetone concentration was obtained, is described. The upper limits of breath acetone concentration in the four Type 1 diabetes (T1D) subjects, tested after a 14 h overnight fast, range from 0.80 to 3.97 parts per million by volume (ppmv), higher than the mean acetone concentration (0.49 ppmv) in non-diabetic healthy breath reported in the literature. The preliminary results show that the instrument can tell distinctive differences between the breath from individuals who are healthy and those with T1D. On-line monitoring of breath gases in healthy people post-exercise, post-meals and post-alcohol-consumption was also conducted. This exploratory study demonstrates the first CRDS-based acetone breath analyzer and its potential application for point-of-care, non-invasive, diabetic monitoring

  3. Mathematical modeling of blood-gas kinetics for the volatile organic compounds isoprene and acetone

    Breath gas analysis is based on the compelling concept that the exhaled breath levels of endogenously produced volatile organic compounds (VOCs) can provide a direct, non-invasive window to the blood and hence, by inference, to the body. In this sense, breath VOCs are regarded as a comprehensive repository of valuable physiological and clinical information, that might be exploited in such diverse areas as diagnostics, therapeutic monitoring or general dynamic assessments of metabolic function, pharmacodynamics (e.g., in drug testing) and environmental exposure (e.g., in occupational health). Despite this enormous potential, the lack of standardized breath sampling regimes as well as the poor mechanistic understanding of VOC exhalation kinetics could cast a cloud over the widespread use of breath gas analysis in the biomedical sciences. In this context, a primary goal of the present thesis is to provide a better quantitative insight into the breath behavior of two prototypic VOCs, isoprene and acetone. A compartmental modeling framework is developed and validated by virtue of real-time breath measurements of these trace gases during distinct physiological states. In particular, the influence of various hemodynamic and ventilatory parameters on VOC concentrations in exhaled breath is investigated. This approach also complements previous steady state investigations in toxicology. From a phenomenological point of view, both acetone and isoprene concentrations in end-tidal breath are demonstrated to exhibit a reproducible non-steady state behavior during moderate workload challenges on a stationary bicycle. However, these dynamics depart drastically from what is expected on the basis of classical pulmonary inert gas elimination theory. More specifically, the start of exercise is accompanied by an abrupt increase in breath isoprene levels, usually by a factor of 3 to 4 compared with the steady state value during rest. This phase is followed by a gradual decline and the

  4. Experimental investigation of hydrogen peroxide RF plasmas

    Barni, R.; Decina, A.; Zanini, S.; D'Orazio, A.; Riccardi, C.

    2016-04-01

    This work reports a detailed experimental study of the plasma properties in low pressure RF discharges in hydrogen peroxide and a comparison with argon under the same operating conditions. H2O2 plasmas have been proposed for sterilization purposes. Electrical properties of the discharge were shown to be similar, as for the RF and DC voltages of the driving electrode. Bulk plasma volume remains stable, concentrated in an almost cylindrical region between the two facing electrodes. It was found that the electron temperature is almost uniform across the plasma and independent of the power level. This is higher than in argon discharges: T e  =  4.6  ±  0.9 eV versus T e  =  3.3  ±  1.1 eV. The plasma density increases almost linearly with the power level and a substantial negative ion component has been ruled out in hydrogen peroxide. Dissociation in the plasma gas phase was revealed by atomic hydrogen and hydroxyl radical emission in the discharge spectra. Emission from hydroxyl and atomic oxygen demonstrates that oxidizing radicals are produced by hydrogen peroxide discharges, revealing its usefulness for plasma processing other than sterilization, for instance to increase polymer film surface energy. On the other hand, argon could be considered as a candidate for the sterilization purposes due to the intense production of UV radiation.

  5. STUDY OF AZOSPIRILLUM LECTINS INFLUENCE ON HYDROGEN PEROXIDE PRODUCTION IN WHEAT-ROOTS

    Alen’kina S.A.

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available It was found that two cell-surface lectins isolated from the nitrogen-fixing soil bacterium Azospirillum brasilense Sp7 and from its mutant defective in lectin activity, A. brasilense Sp7.2.3 can stimulate rapid formation of hydrogen peroxide, associated with an increase in the activities of oxalate oxidase and peroxidase in the roots of wheat seedlings. The most advantageous and most rapidly induced pathway of hydrogen peroxide formation was the oxidation of oxalic acid by oxalate oxidase because in this case, a 10-min treatment of the roots with the lectins at 10 µg ml-1 was sufficient. The data from this study attest that the Azospirillum lectins can act as inducers of adaptation processes in the roots of wheat seedlings.

  6. Understanding the mechanism of DNA deactivation in ion therapy of cancer cells: hydrogen peroxide action*

    Piatnytskyi, Dmytro V.; Zdorevskyi, Oleksiy O.; Perepelytsya, Sergiy M.; Volkov, Sergey N.

    2015-11-01

    Changes in the medium of biological cells under ion beam irradiation has been considered as a possible cause of cell function disruption in the living body. The interaction of hydrogen peroxide, a long-lived molecular product of water radiolysis, with active sites of DNA macromolecule was studied, and the formation of stable DNA-peroxide complexes was considered. The phosphate groups of the macromolecule backbone were picked out among the atomic groups of DNA double helix as a probable target for interaction with hydrogen peroxide molecules. Complexes consisting of combinations including: the DNA phosphate group, H2O2 and H2O molecules, and Na+ counterion, were considered. The counterions have been taken into consideration insofar as under the natural conditions they neutralise DNA sugar-phosphate backbone. The energy of the complexes have been determined by considering the electrostatic and the Van der Waals interactions within the framework of atom-atom potential functions. As a result, the stability of various configurations of molecular complexes was estimated. It was shown that DNA phosphate groups and counterions can form stable complexes with hydrogen peroxide molecules, which are as stable as the complexes with water molecules. It has been demonstrated that the formation of stable complexes of H2O2-Na+-PO4- may be detected experimentally by observing specific vibrations in the low-frequency Raman spectra. The interaction of H2O2 molecule with phosphate group of the double helix backbone can disrupt DNA biological function and induce the deactivation of the cell genetic apparatus. Thus, the production of hydrogen peroxide molecules in the nucleus of living cells can be considered as an additional mechanism by which high-energy ion beams destroy tumour cells during ion beam therapy. Contribution to the Topical Issue "COST Action Nano-IBCT: Nano-scale Processes Behind Ion-Beam Cancer Therapy", edited by Andrey Solov'yov, Nigel Mason, Gustavo García, Eugene

  7. Understanding the mechanism of DNA deactivation in ion therapy of cancer cells: hydrogen peroxide action

    Changes in the medium of biological cells under ion beam irradiation has been considered as a possible cause of cell function disruption in the living body. The interaction of hydrogen peroxide, a long lived molecular product of water radiolysis, with active sites of DNA macromolecule was studied, and the formation of stable DNA-peroxide complexes was considered. The phosphate groups of the macromolecule backbone were picked out among the atomic groups of DNA double helix as a probable target for interaction with hydrogen peroxide molecules. Complexes consisting of combinations including: the DNA phosphate group, H2O2 and H2O molecules, and Na+ counter-ion, were considered. The counter-ions have been taken into consideration in so far as under the natural conditions they neutralise DNA sugar-phosphate backbone. The energy of the complexes have been determined by considering the electrostatic and the Van der Waals interactions within the framework of atom-atom potential functions. As a result, the stability of various configurations of molecular complexes was estimated. It was shown that DNA phosphate groups and counter-ions can form stable complexes with hydrogen peroxide molecules, which are as stable as the complexes with water molecules. It has been demonstrated that the formation of stable complexes of H2O2- Na+-PO4- may be detected experimentally by observing specific vibrations in the low-frequency Raman spectra. The interaction of H2O2 molecule with phosphate group of the double helix backbone can disrupt DNA biological function and induce the deactivation of the cell genetic apparatus. Thus, the production of hydrogen peroxide molecules in the nucleus of living cells can be considered as an additional mechanism by which high-energy ion beams destroy tumour cells during ion beam therapy. (authors)

  8. Interaction of red pepper (Capsicum annum, Tepin) polyphenols with Fe(II)-induced lipid peroxidation in brain and liver

    Polyphenols exhibit a wide range of biological effects because of their antioxidant properties. Several types of polyphenols (phenolic acids, hydrolyzable tannins, and flavonoids) show anticarcinogenic and antimutagenic effects. Comparative studies were carried on the protective ability of free and bound polyphenol extracts of red Capsicum annuum Tepin (CAT) on brain and liver - In vitro. Free polyphenols of red Capsicum annuum Tepin (CAT) were extracted with 80% acetone, while the bound polyphenols were extracted with ethyl acetate from acid and alkaline hydrolysis of the pepper residue from free polyphenols extract. The phenol content, Fe (II) chelating ability, OH radical scavenging ability and protective ability of the extract against Fe (II)-induced lipid peroxidation in brain and liver was subsequently determined. The results of the study revealed that the free polyphenols (218.2mg/100g) content of the pepper were significantly higher than the bound polyphenols (42.5mg/100g). Furthermore, the free polyphenol extract had a significantly higher (2+ induced lipid peroxidation, and this is probably due to the higher Fe (II) chelating ability and OH radical scavenging ability of the free polyphenols from the pepper. (author)

  9. Polymer Supported Heterogenous Catalysts for Direct Synthesis of Hydrogen Peroxide in Absence of Selectivity Enhancers

    Sterchele, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    The research program developed during the Ph.D. School is focused on the study of metal catalysts supported on cross-linked functional polymers (CFPs) for the direct synthesis of hydrogen peroxide. In the last twenty years this compound has become a commodity with a constant increasing demand because of its strong oxidant properties and the formation of water as the reduction byproduct. In particular, H2O2 is widely employed as environmentally-friendly bleaching and cleaning agent. The...

  10. Reactions of peroxide radicals with a surface of heterogeneous catalysts in homolytic and heterolytic processes

    The interrelation between homolytic and heterolytic stages is found for olefin epoxidation by hydroperoxides and cumene hydroperoxide decomposition in the presence of a heterogeneous catalyst-molybdenum selenide. Peroxide radicals that are formed in homolytic decomposition of hydroperoxide react with the catalyst surface resulting in molybdenum oxidation to the highest valency state and in the formation of new reaction sites on which heterolytic reactions occur. 7 refs.; 4 figs

  11. [Lipid peroxidation and its interrelation with the personality characteristics of surgical patients].

    Man'kov, Iu U; Sharapov, G N; Khyshov, V B; Pal'chikov, V P; Alekseenko, G M

    1991-04-01

    The article deals with the exam results of 42 pre- and postoperative surgical patients. The reactivity of peroxide oxidation of lipids plays an important role in regulation of adaptive process of surgical patients. The authors emphasize the role of anxiety state as one of the most intimate and obligate mechanisms of psychologic stress. The anxiety rising process influences upon the formation of typical psychophysiological correlations that lead to the intensification of lipid oxidation. PMID:1887607

  12. Improved sensing response of photo activated ZnO thin film for hydrogen peroxide detection.

    Parthasarathy, S; Nandhini, V; Jeyaprakash, B G

    2016-11-15

    The nanostructured ZnO thin films were deposited using spray pyrolysis technique. Formation of polycrystalinity with hexagonal wurtzite structure was observed from the structural study. Highly dense spherical shaped nanoparticles with fine crystallites were observed from the surface morphological studies. The light induced hydrogen peroxide vapour sensing was done using chemi-resistive method and its effect on the sensing response was studied and reported. PMID:27491004

  13. Vitamin C conjugates of genotoxic lipid peroxidation products: Structural characterization and detection in human plasma

    Sowell, John; Frei, Balz; Stevens, Jan F.

    2004-01-01

    α,β-Unsaturated aldehydes such as 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE) and other electrophilic lipid peroxidation (LPO) products may contribute to the pathogenesis of cancer, cardiovascular diseases, and other age-related diseases by cytotoxic, genotoxic, and proinflammatory mechanisms. The notion that vitamin C (ascorbic acid) acts as a biological antioxidant has been challenged recently by an in vitro study showing that ascorbic acid promotes, rather than inhibits, the formation of genotoxic LPO produ...

  14. A QSPR study on the solvent-induced frequency shifts of acetone and dimethyl sulfoxide in organic solvents.

    Ou, Yu Heng; Chang, Chia Ming; Chen, Ying Shao

    2016-06-01

    In this study, solvent-induced frequency shifts (SIFS) in the infrared spectrum of acetone and dimethyl sulfoxide in organic solvents were investigated by using four types of quantum-chemical reactivity descriptors. The results showed that the SIFS of acetone is mainly affected by the electron-acceptance chemical potential and the maximum nucleophilic condensed local softness of organic solvents, which represent the electron flow and the polarization between acetone and solvent molecules. On the other hand, the SIFS of dimethyl sulfoxide changes with the maximum positive charge of hydrogen atom and the inverse of apolar surface area of solvent molecules, showing that the electrostatic and hydrophilic interactions are main mechanisms between dimethyl sulfoxide and solvent molecules. The introduction of the four-element theory model-based quantitative structure-property relationship approach improved the assessing quality and provided a basis for interpreting the solute-solvent interactions. PMID:26994584

  15. Effect of inorganic phosphate concentration on the nature of inner mitochondrial membrane alterations mediated by Ca2+ ions. A proposed model for phosphate-stimulated lipid peroxidation.

    Kowaltowski, A J; Castilho, R F; Grijalba, M T; Bechara, E J; Vercesi, A E

    1996-02-01

    Addition of high concentrations (>1 mm) of inorganic phosphate (Pi) or arsenate to Ca2+-loaded mitochondria was followed by increased rates of H2O2 production, membrane lipid peroxidation, and swelling. Mitochondrial swelling was only partially prevented either by butylhydroxytoluene, an inhibitor of lipid peroxidation, or cyclosporin A, an inhibitor of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore. This swelling was totally prevented by the simultaneous presence of these compounds. At lower Pi concentrations (1 mm), mitochondrial swelling is reversible and prevented by cyclosporin A, but not by butylhydroxytoluene. In any case (low or high phosphate concentration) exogenous catalase prevented mitochondrial swelling, suggesting that reactive oxygen species (ROS) participate in these mechanisms. Altogether, the data suggest that, at low Pi concentrations, membrane permeabilization is reversible and mediated by opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore, whereas at high Pi concentrations, membrane permeabilization is irreversible because lipid peroxidation also takes place. Under these conditions, lipid peroxidation is strongly inhibited by sorbate, a putative quencher of triplet carbonyl species. This suggests that high Pi or arsenate concentrations stimulate propagation of the peroxidative reactions initiated by mitochondrial-generated ROS because these anions are able to catalyze Cn-aldehyde tautomerization producing enols, which can be oxidized by hemeproteins to yield the lower Cn - 1-aldehyde in the triplet state. This proposition was also supported by experiments using a model system consisting of phosphatidylcholine/dicethylphosphate liposomes and the triplet acetone-generating system isobutanal/horseradish peroxidase, where phosphate and Ca2+ cooperate to increase the yield of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances. PMID:8621682

  16. Embryotoxic effects of eight organic peroxides and hydrogen peroxide on three-day chicken embryos

    Korhonen, A.; Hemminki, K.; Vainio, H.

    1984-02-01

    Nine peroxides used in rubber processing were tested for embryotoxicity in 3-day chicken embryos using the air chamber method. The potencies were expressed by the ED/sub 50/ for the total embryotoxic effect of the chemicals, including deaths and malformations, up to Day 14 of the incubation. The range of the ED/sub 50/'s was from 0.13 to 2.7 ..mu..moles per egg and the order of the potencies was as follows: cyclohexanoneperoxide > cumolhydroperoxide > ethylmethylketoneperoxide > dibenzoylperoxide > acetylacetoneperoxide > perbenzoic acid-tert-butylester > dicumylperoxide > dialauroylperoxide > hydrogen peroxide. All nine peroxides caused malformations at a moderate frequency. The maximum percentage of malformed embryos of the treated varied from the 16% of perbenzoic acid-tert-butylester to the 56% of dicumylperoxide. The high percentage caused by the latter could, however, result from slow diffusion of high lethal doses from the air chamber to the embryo.

  17. The mechanism of catalytic methylation of 2-phenylpyridine using di-tert-butyl peroxide.

    Sharma, Akhilesh K; Roy, Dipankar; Sunoj, Raghavan B

    2014-07-14

    The mechanism of palladium chloride-catalyzed direct methylation of arenes with peroxides is elucidated by using the energetics computed at the M06 density functional theory. The introduction of a methyl group by tert-butyl peroxides at the ortho-position of a prototypical 2-phenyl pyridine, a commonly used substrate in directed C-H functionalization reactions, is examined in detail by identifying the key intermediates and transition states involved in the reaction sequence. Different possibilities that differ in terms of the site of catalyst coordination with the substrate and the ensuing mechanism are presented. The important mechanistic events involved are (a) an oxidative or a homolytic cleavage of the peroxide O-O bond, (b) C-H bond activation, (c) C-C bond activation, and (d) reductive elimination involving methyl transfer to the aromatic ring. We have examined both radical and non-radical pathways. In the non-radical pathway, the lowest energy pathway involves C-H bond activation prior to the coordination of the peroxide to palladium, which is subsequently followed by the O-O bond cleavage of the peroxide and the C-C bond activation. Reductive elimination in the resulting intermediate leads to the vital C-C bond formation between methyl and aryl carbon atoms. In the non-radical pathway, the C-C bond activation is higher in energy and has been identified as the rate-limiting step of this reaction. In the radical pathway, however, the activation barrier for the C-C bond cleavage is lower than for the peroxide O-O bond cleavage. A combination of a radical pathway up to the formation of a palladium methyl intermediate and a subsequent non-radical pathway has been identified as the most favored pathway for the title reaction. The predicted mechanism is in good agreement with the experimental observations on PdCl2 catalyzed methylation of 2-phenyl pyridine using tert-butyl peroxide. PMID:24875675

  18. Lipid peroxidation and cell death mechanisms in pulmonary epithelial cells induced by peroxynitrite and nitric oxide

    Ho, Yuan-Soon [School of Medical Technology, Taipei Medical University, Taipei (Taiwan); Liou, Hung-Bin; Lin, Yu-Ping; Guo, How-Ran; Ho, Sheng-Yow; Lee, Ching-Chang; Wang, Ying-Jan [Department of Environmental and Occupational Health, National Cheng Kung University Medical College, 138 Sheng-Li Road, Tainan (Taiwan); Lin, Jen-Kun; Pan, Min-Hsiung [Institute of Biochemistry, National Taiwan University, Medical College, Taipei (Taiwan); Jeng, Jiiang-Huei [School of Dentistry, National Taiwan University and Hospital, Medical College, Taipei (Taiwan)

    2002-08-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is an environmental pollutant found in smog and cigarette smoke. Recently, NO has been discovered to act as a molecular messenger, mediating various physiological functions. However, when an excess of NO is present, cytotoxic and mutagenic effects can also be induced. The reaction of NO with superoxide results in the formation of peroxynitrite (ONOO{sup -}), which decomposes into the hydroxyl radical and nitrogen dioxide. Both of them are potent oxidant species that may initiate and propagate lipid peroxidation. In the present study, we examined the effects of NO and ONOO{sup -} on the induction of lipid peroxidation and cell death mechanisms in rats and in A549 pulmonary epithelial cells. The results showed that ONOO{sup -} is able to induce lipid peroxidation in pulmonary epithelial cells in a dose-dependent manner. 8-Epi-prostaglandin F{sub 2{alpha}} can serve as a good biomarker of lipid peroxidation both in vitro and in vivo. Postmitotic apoptosis was found in A549 cells exposed to NO, whereas ONOO{sup -} induced cell death more characteristic of necrosis than apoptosis. Apoptosis that occurred in cells may be related to the dysfunction of mitochondria, the release of cytochrome c into cytosol, and the activation of caspase-9. The relationship between caspase activation and the cleavage of other death substrates during postmitotic apoptosis in A549 cells needs further investigation. (orig.)

  19. Direct electron transfer biosensor for hydrogen peroxide carrying nanocomplex composed of horseradish peroxidase and Au-nanoparticle – Characterization and application to bienzyme systems

    Yusuke Okawa

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A reagentless electrochemical biosensor for hydrogen peroxide was fabricated. The sensor carries a monolayer of nanocomplex composed of horseradish peroxidase and Au-nanoparticle, and responds to hydrogen peroxide through the highly efficient direct electron transfer at a mild electrode potential without any soluble mediator. Formation of the nanocomplex was studied with visible spectroscopy and size exclusion chromatography. The sensor performance was analyzed based on a hydrodynamic electrochemical technique and enzyme kinetics. The sensor was applied to fabrication of sensors for glucose and uric acid through further modification of the nanocomplex-carrying electrode with the corresponding hydrogen peroxide-generating oxidases, glucose oxidase and urate oxidase, respectively.

  20. Influence of Ce doping on microstructure of ZnO nanoparticles and their acetone sensing properties

    Li, F.M.; Li, X.B. [College of Physics and Electronic Engineering, Key Laboratory of Atomic and Molecular Physics & Functional Materials of Gansu Province, Northwest Normal University, Lanzhou, Gansu 730070 (China); National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures & Eco-Materials and Renewable Energy Research Center (ERERC) at Department of Physics, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Ma, S.Y., E-mail: lifaming1108074@sina.com [College of Physics and Electronic Engineering, Key Laboratory of Atomic and Molecular Physics & Functional Materials of Gansu Province, Northwest Normal University, Lanzhou, Gansu 730070 (China); Chen, L.; Li, W.Q.; Zhu, C.T.; Xu, X.L. [College of Physics and Electronic Engineering, Key Laboratory of Atomic and Molecular Physics & Functional Materials of Gansu Province, Northwest Normal University, Lanzhou, Gansu 730070 (China); Chen, Y. [Northwest University for Nationality, Lanzhou, Gansu 730030 (China); Li, Y.F.; Lawson, G. [Atech Systems, 6110 W. Highway 290, Austin, TX 78735 (United States)

    2015-11-15

    Electrospinning technology was generally used to synthesis nanofiber, here we use it to fabricate pure ZnO nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) and Ce-doped (0.1 wt%, 0.8 wt%, 1.5 wt%) ZnO nanoparticles (ZnO:Ce NPs) via decrease the molecular weight of PVP in precursor liquid. Their microstructures were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, Brunauer-Emmet-Teller and photoluminescence spectra. The results clearly indicated that the 0.8 wt% ZnO:Ce NPs shows smaller average grain size (70 nm) and a higher specific surface area (21.5 m{sup 2}/g). The testing on gas sensing performance revealed that the 0.8 wt% ZnO:Ce NPs based sensor shows the highest response values and a well selectivity to acetone. The response and recovery time of ZnO NPs based sensors to 100 ppm acetone was about 13 and 7 s while these are about 10 and 9 s in ZnO:Ce NPs based sensors, respectively. These results demonstrated that the 0.8 wt% ZnO:Ce NPs based sensor can rapidly be detect and distinguish accurately acetone in ambient air. Moreover, the sensor shows good long-term stability and reproducibility of response. The sensing mechanism was also discussed and the results indicated that the gas diffusing channels and the electron depleted layer of the ZnO NPs based sensor was increased markedly after Ce-doped, which results in the response of the ZnO:Ce NPs based sensor increased. - Highlights: • The loose mesostructured provide more channel for gas diffusion. • Smaller average grain size (70 nm) and higher specific surface area (21.5 m{sup 2}/g). • The response and recovery time of ZnO:Ce NPs based sensor was about 10 and 9 s. • Suitable Ce-doped could improve the response of the ZnO NPs base sensors.

  1. Chemo-enzymatic epoxidation of olefins by carboxylic acid esters and hydrogen peroxide

    Ruesch gen. Klaas, M.; Warwel, S. [Inst. for Biochemistry and Technology of Lipids, H.P. Kaufmanm-Inst., Federal Centre for Cereal, Potato and Lipid Research, Muenster (Germany)

    1998-12-31

    Ethylen and, recently, butadiene can be epoxidized directly with oxygen and for the epoxidation of propylene, the use of heterogeneous transition metals and organic peroxides (Halcon-Process) is the major player. But, beside from those notable exceptions, all other epoxidations, including large ones like the epoxidation of plant oils as PVC-stabilizers (about 200.000 t/year), are carried out with peroxy acids. Because mcpba is far to expensive for most applications, short chain peracids like peracetic acid are used. Being much less stable than mcpba and thus risky handled in large amounts and high concentrations, these peroxy acids were preferably prepared in-situ. However, conventional in-situ formation of peracids has the serious drawback, that a strong acid is necessary to catalyze peroxy acid formation from the carboxylic acid and hydrogen peroxide. The presence of a strong acid in the reaction mixture often results in decreased selectivity because of the formation of undesired by-products by opening of the oxirane ring. Therefore, we propose a new method for epoxidation based on the in-situ preparation of percarboxylic acids from carboxylic acid esters and hydrogen peroxide catalyzed by a commercial, immobilized lipase. (orig.)

  2. Breath acetone concentration decreases with blood glucose concentration in type I diabetes mellitus patients during hypoglycaemic clamps

    Turner, Claire; Walton, Christopher; Hoashi, Shu; Evans, Mark

    2009-01-01

    Conventional wisdom is that breath acetone may be markedly elevated in type 1 diabetes, but that this only occurs during poor blood glucose control and/or intercurrent illness. In contrast, little is known about breath acetone at more representative everyday blood glucose levels in diabetes. We used selected ion flow tube mass spectrometry (SIFT-MS) to monitor the breath of 8 patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus during “insulin clamp” studies in which insulin and glucose were infused into p...

  3. X-ray diffraction analysis and study of thermal stability of benzo acetonates of some transition group metals

    Crystals of benzoyl acetonates of Mn (II), Cd (II) and Fe (III) have been prepared. Their structures have been determined by X-ray powder diffraction. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) of these benzoyl acetonate indicate that they are stable up to 90 deg. C,220 deg. C, 65 deg. C, and 190 deg. C respectively. It is found that the thermal stability of the transition meals chelates follows the order Cd/sup 2+/ < Mn/sup 2+/ < Fe/sup 3+/< Ni/sup 2+/. The chelate of Cd(II) (last member of the second transition series) has the lowest temperature of decomposition of all the compounds studied. (author)

  4. Acetone Gas Sensing Properties of a Multiple-Networked Fe2O3-Functionalized CuO Nanorod Sensor

    Sunghoon Park; Hyejoon Kheel; Gun-Joo Sun; Taegyung Ko; Wan In Lee; Chongmu Lee

    2015-01-01

    Fe2O3-decorated CuO nanorods were prepared by Cu thermal oxidation followed by Fe2O3 decoration via a solvothermal route. The acetone gas sensing properties of multiple-networked pristine and Fe2O3-decorated CuO nanorod sensors were examined. The optimal operating temperature of the sensors was found to be 240°C. The pristine and Fe2O3-decorated CuO nanorod sensors showed responses of 586 and 1,090%, respectively, to 1,000 ppm of acetone at 240°C. The Fe2O3-decorated CuO nanorod sensor also s...

  5. Open-system nanocasting synthesis of nanoscale α-Fe2O3 porous structure with enhanced acetone-sensing properties

    Highlights: • Nanoscale α-Fe2O3 porous structure was fabricated by an open-system nanocasting way. • Nanoscale α-Fe2O3 exhibits enhanced acetone-sensing property than the mesoporous one. • High surface area, small diameter and wide porous distribution are sensing reasons. - Abstract: Nanoscale α-Fe2O3 with porous structure was synthesized via an open-system nanocasting method. Characterization of the crystal structures, morphologies, surface areas, and pore size distributions of the as-synthesized α-Fe2O3 by wide-angle and small-angle X-ray powder diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and nitrogen physisorption analysis demonstrated that the nanoscale α-Fe2O3 synthesized in open system had a less crystallinity with average diameter of ∼6.0 nm, higher BET specific surface area of 205.4 m2 g−1, and wider pore size distribution from ∼2.2 nm to 15.7 nm compared with that of the mesoporous α-Fe2O3 synthesized in closed system. The gas-sensing measurement results revealed that the nanoscale α-Fe2O3 based gas sensor had a much better response to acetone than that of the device prepared from the mesoporous α-Fe2O3. A possible gas-sensing mechanism based on the α-Fe2O3 samples synthesized with different nanocasting systems was discussed in detail. Wide porous distribution of the nanoscale α-Fe2O3, as well as small particle size and high surface area are effective for gas molecules diffusion and formation of sufficient electron depletion area and result the enhanced sensor response, which suggests that it has great potential for practical applications in diabetes diagnosis

  6. Evaluation of the antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects of the acetone extract from Anacardium occidentale L

    Frederico Argollo Vanderlinde

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The stem bark of Anacardium occidentale L. (Anacardiaceae, commonly called cashew, is used in Brazilian traditional medicine for the treatment of gastric and inflammatory disorders. The present study was carried out to investigate the in vivo anti-inflammatory activities of the acetone extract (AE of the stem bark of A. occidentale. We evaluated the pharmacological activities of this plant material through the analgesic, antiedematogenic and chemotaxic inhibitory effects produced by the AE. The oral administration (p.o. of mice with the AE (0.1, 0.3 and 1.0 g/kg or positive control indomethacin (10 mg/kg inhibited acetic acid-induced writhing by 18.9, 35.9, 62.9 and 68.9%, respectively (ID50% = 530 mg/kg. The highest dose of the AE was able to inhibit croton oil-induced ear edema formation by 56.8% (indomethacin at 10 mg/kg, p.o. - 57.6% inhibition. When submitted to the carrageenan-induced peritonitis test, the AE (0.1, 0.3 and 1.0 g/kg, p.o. impaired leukocyte migration into the peritoneal cavity by 24.8, 40.5 and 49.6%, respectively. The positive control, dexamethasone (2 mg/kg, s.c., inhibited leukocyte migration by 66.9%. These results indicate the presence of anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive principles in the acetone extract of Anacardium occidentale, and reinforce the plant's potential therapeutic use against pain and inflammatory diseases.As cascas do caule do Anacardium occidentale L. (Anacardiaceae, conhecido como cajueiro, são popularmente utilizadas no Brasil para o tratamento de doenças gástricas e inflamatórias. Este estudo teve como objetivo a avaliação farmacológica in vivo da atividade antiinflamatória do extrato acetônico (AE obtido das cascas do A. occidentale, investigando os efeitos analgésico, antiedematogênico e inibitório sobre a quimiotaxia deste material botânico. A administração oral (p.o. em camundongos com o AE (0,1; 0,3 e 1 g/kg ou o controle positivo indometacina (10 mg/kg inibiu as contor

  7. Investigating Solvent Purity Utilizing Comprehensive Gas Chromatography: A Study of Acetones

    Wahl, Jon H.; Bolz, Cinnamon DH; Wahl, Karen L.

    2010-04-01

    Broad spectrum chemical analysis of trace level components is a continuing challenge for any analytical chemist. This challenge is further confounded when chemical impurities may be present in common organic solvents or when chemical artifacts may be formed, produced and introduced during an analytical procedure. Minimizing and understanding these chemical artifacts, is critical for trace level detection and is crucial for unambiguous analytical results. Comprehensive gas chromatography is an excellent analytical tool to help address these complex mixture challenges. This work examines the impurities present in various acetone sources utilizing comprehensive gas chromatography. This work highlights the extreme variability possible in solvent sources and hence the importance of understanding the impurities that may confound an analytical method or result.

  8. Studies on acetone powder and purified rhus laccase immobilized on zirconium chloride for oxidation of phenols.

    Lu, Rong; Miyakoshi, Tetsuo

    2012-01-01

    Rhus laccase was isolated and purified from acetone powder obtained from the exudates of Chinese lacquer trees (Rhus vernicifera) from the Jianshi region, Hubei province of China. There are two blue bands appearing on CM-sephadex C-50 chromatography column, and each band corresponding to Rhus laccase 1 and 2, the former being the major constituent, and each had an average molecular weight of approximately 110 kDa. The purified and crude Rhus laccases were immobilized on zirconium chloride in ammonium chloride solution, and the kinetic properties of free and immobilized Rhus laccase, such as activity, molecular weight, optimum pH, and thermostability, were examined. In addition, the behaviors on catalytic oxidation of phenols also were conducted. PMID:22545205

  9. 1,3-Di-1-adamantylimidazolium (phthalocyaninatolithium(I acetone hemisolvate monohydrate

    David A Grossie

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The asymmetric unit of the title compound, (C23H33N2[Li(C32H16N8]·0.5C3H6O·H2O, consists of two symmetry-unrelated lithium phthalocyanine (LiPc− half-anions, centered at (1,0,0 and (0,{script{1over 2}},0, respectively, the bis(adamantylimidazolium cation (BAI+, occupying a general site, an acetone molecule, disordered about the inversion centre at (0, {script{1over 2}}, {script{1over 2}} and a water molecule at a general site. The LiPc− anions pack in a stepped pattern enclosing the bis(adamantylimidazolium cation. Attractions between the anion and cation are mediated by a water molecule which forms O—H...N hydrogen bonds. In addition, two C—H...O interactions are seen.

  10. Pressure swing adsorption modeling of acetone and toluene on activated carbon

    唐琳; 李立清; 邢俊东; 刘峥; 姚小龙

    2013-01-01

    A five steps pressure swing adsorption process was designed for acetone and toluene mixtures separation and recovery. Dynamic distributions of gas phase content and temperature were investigated. Based on the theory of Soret and Dufour, a non-isothermal mathematical model was developed to simulate the PSA process. Effects of heat and mass transfer coefficients were studied. The coupled Soret and Dufour effects were also evaluated. It is found that the heat transfer coefficient has little effect on mass transfer in adsorption stage. However, it has some impacts in desorption stage. The maximum value of C/C0 increases by about 25% as heat transfer coefficient decreases. The temperature variation is less than 0.05 K with the change of mass transfer coefficient, so that the effect of mass transfer coefficient on heat transfer can be ignored. It is also concluded that the Soret and Dufour coupled effects are not obvious in pressure swing adsorption compared with fixed-bed adsorption.

  11. ACETONE REMOVAL AND BIOELECTRICITY GENERATION IN DUAL CHAMBER MICROBIAL FUEL CELL

    Mostafa Rahimnejad

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Synthetic waste water contain organic compound can be oxidized in an anaerobic conditions in microbial fuel cell while biodegradation of Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD takes place under anaerobic condition in anode compartment. The microorganisms for biological treatment of the organic matter were obtained from a UASFB bioreactor. In the treatment of waste water, ones COD was removed the current and power was generated and record. Also polarization curve was obtained. In cathode compartment ferocynide and potassium permanganate with several concentration were add for enhancement of proton oxidation. The performance of MFC for maximum current and power generation were obtained with 300 µM L-1 potassium permanganate as oxidizers agent. Maximum generated power and current densities were 22 mW/m2 and 70 mA/m2, respectively. Active microorganisms used acetone as electron donors and COD removal was 69% at the end of process.

  12. Bromido({2-[2-(diphenylphosphanylbenzylidene]hydrazin-1-ylidene}(4-methoxyanilinomethanethiolatopalladium(II acetone monosolvate

    Khalisah Asilah Mokthar

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In the title compound, [PdBr(C27H23N3OPS]·C3H6O, the coordination geometry about the PdII atom is distorted square-planar, arising from the attached Br, S, P and N atoms (N and Br are trans, the maximum deviation from the plane being 0.2053 (4 Å for the N atom. The three benzene rings attached to the P atom make dihedral angles of 69.78 (7, 87.05 (7 and 77.50 (7° with each other. An intramolecular C—H...N hydrogen bond forms an S(6 ring motif. In the crystal, the complex molecules form infinite chains along the a-axis direction through C—H...Br interactions, and a C—H...O interaction links the main molecule with the acetone solvent molecule.

  13. High Efficiency Pulse Acetone Liquid Raman Laser Using DCM Fluorescent Dye as the Enhancement Medium

    CHENG Andrew Yuk-Sun; YANG Jing-Guo; CHAN Mau-Hing

    2006-01-01

    Pumped by a frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser, 10-Hz repetition rate, 320-mJ pump energy, and 5.1-ns pulse width, a liquid Raman laser using acetone as the Raman shifting medium has been established. The residual pump laser pulse and the generated Stokes pulse are directed to a DCM dye cell for energy enhancement of the Stokes pulse. The Raman laser system is capable to produce a laser pulse at wavelength 630 nm, with single pulse energy of 120 mJ, peak power of 70 MW and an average power of 1200 mW. The energy conversion efficiency is 37.5%, or equivalently a quantum efficiency of 44.5%.

  14. Zinc isotope separation in acetone by displacement chromatography using benzo-15-crown-5 resin

    Zinc isotope separation was studied by column chromatographies using resorcinol-formaldehyde-resin grafted with benzo-15-crown-5 in the porous silica beads. Chromatography was performed in a break-through manner by feeding the acetone solution of zinc chloride into the columns. Zinc isotopic abundance ratios of 66Zn/64Zn and 68Zn/64Zn were measured by ICP-MS. It has been found that the heavier isotopes are preferentially enriched at the front boundary region. This result proves 64Zn depleted zinc can be obtained by collecting the effluents of front boundary region. The separation coefficient (ε) observed by five meters migration treatment is 0.81 x 10-3 for the isotopic pair of 68Zn/64Zn at 25 deg C and higher separation coefficient was obtained from more concentrated zinc chloride solution. (author)

  15. Removal of fermentation inhibitors from alkaline peroxide pretreated and enzymatically hydrolyzed wheat straw: Production of butanol from hydrolysate using Clostridium beijerinckii in batch reactors

    In these studies, alkaline peroxide pretreatment of wheat straw was investigated. Pretreated wheat straw was hydrolyzed using cellulolytic and xylanolytic enzymes, and the hydrolysate was used to produce butanol using Clostridium beijerinckii P260. The culture produced less than 2.59 g L-1 acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) from alkaline peroxide wheat straw hydrolysate (APWSH) that had not been treated to reduce salt concentration (a neutralization product). However, fermentation was successful after inhibitors (salts) were removed from the hydrolysate by electrodialysis. A control glucose fermentation resulted in the production of 21.37 g L-1 ABE, while salt removed APWSH resulted in the production of 22.17 g L-1 ABE. In the two fermentations, reactor productivities were 0.30 and 0.55 g L-1 h-1, respectively. A comparison of use of different substrates (corn fiber, wheat straw) and different pretreatment techniques (dilute sulfuric acid, alkaline peroxide) suggests that generation of inhibitors is substrate and pretreatment specific

  16. Properties of a-C:H:O plasma polymer films deposited from acetone vapors

    Drabik, M., E-mail: martin.drabik@gmail.com [Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Lerchenfeldstrasse 5, 9014 St. Gallen (Switzerland); Celma, C. [Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Lerchenfeldstrasse 5, 9014 St. Gallen (Switzerland); Kousal, J.; Biederman, H. [Charles University in Prague, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Department of Macromolecular Physics, V Holešovičkách 2, 180 00 Prague 8 (Czech Republic); Hegemann, D. [Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Lerchenfeldstrasse 5, 9014 St. Gallen (Switzerland)

    2014-12-31

    To gain insight into the deposition and stability of oxygen-containing plasma polymer films, the properties of amorphous oxygenated hydrocarbon (a-C:H:O) plasma polymer coatings deposited from acetone vapors under various experimental conditions are investigated. Apart from the discharge power, the influence of the reactive carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) gas on the structure of the resulting films is studied. It is found by characterization using X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy and Fourier-Transform Infrared Spectroscopy that the experimental conditions particularly influence the amount of oxygen in the deposited a-C:H:O plasma polymer films. The O/C elemental ratio increases with increasing amount of CO{sub 2} in the working gas mixture (up to 0.2 for 24 sccm of CO{sub 2} at 30 W) and decreases with increasing RF discharge power (down to 0.17 for 50 W). Furthermore, the nature of bonds between the oxygen and carbon atoms has been examined. Only low amounts of double and triple bonded carbon are observed. This has a particular influence on the aging of the plasma polymer films which is studied both in ambient air and in distilled water for up to 4 months. Overall, stable a-C:H:O plasma polymer films are deposited comprising low amounts (up to about 5%) of ester/carboxyl groups. - Highlights: • Hydrocarbon plasma polymer films with variable oxygen content can be prepared. • Stable oxygenated hydrocarbon plasma polymers contain max 5% of ester/carboxyl groups. • Acetone-derived plasma polymer films can be used as permanent hydrophilic surfaces.

  17. Does acetone react with HO2 in the upper-troposphere?

    J. Lelieveld

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Recent theoretical calculations showed that reaction of HO2 with acetone (CH3C(OCH3 could be a potentially important sink for acetone and source for acetic acid in cold parts of the atmosphere (e.g. the tropopause region. The reaction HO2+CH3C(OCH3⇌(CH32C(OHOO (R1, R-1 was therefore studied experimentally at low-temperatures for the first time. HO2 was generated by pulsed laser photolysis, and converted by reaction with NO to OH for detection by laser induced fluorescence. Reduced yields of OH at T32C(OHOO at such temperatures. In contrast, no evidence for (R1 was observed at T>230 K, probably due to rapid thermal dissociation of the peroxy radical product back to reactants (R-1. The experimental data indicate that the rate coefficient for the forward reaction, k1(207 K, is larger than 1.6×10-12 cm3 molecule−1 s−1, in line with recent quantum mechanical calculations. In contrast, an upper limit for the equilibrium constant K1(T=k1(T/k-1(T of 7.8×1028exp(50.6 kJ mol-1/RT was obtained, considerably smaller than calculated from theory. Incorporation of these results into a global 3-D chemical model demonstrated that (R1 is neither a significant loss process for CH3C(OCH3 nor a significant source of acetic acid in the atmosphere.

  18. Properties of a-C:H:O plasma polymer films deposited from acetone vapors

    To gain insight into the deposition and stability of oxygen-containing plasma polymer films, the properties of amorphous oxygenated hydrocarbon (a-C:H:O) plasma polymer coatings deposited from acetone vapors under various experimental conditions are investigated. Apart from the discharge power, the influence of the reactive carbon dioxide (CO2) gas on the structure of the resulting films is studied. It is found by characterization using X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy and Fourier-Transform Infrared Spectroscopy that the experimental conditions particularly influence the amount of oxygen in the deposited a-C:H:O plasma polymer films. The O/C elemental ratio increases with increasing amount of CO2 in the working gas mixture (up to 0.2 for 24 sccm of CO2 at 30 W) and decreases with increasing RF discharge power (down to 0.17 for 50 W). Furthermore, the nature of bonds between the oxygen and carbon atoms has been examined. Only low amounts of double and triple bonded carbon are observed. This has a particular influence on the aging of the plasma polymer films which is studied both in ambient air and in distilled water for up to 4 months. Overall, stable a-C:H:O plasma polymer films are deposited comprising low amounts (up to about 5%) of ester/carboxyl groups. - Highlights: • Hydrocarbon plasma polymer films with variable oxygen content can be prepared. • Stable oxygenated hydrocarbon plasma polymers contain max 5% of ester/carboxyl groups. • Acetone-derived plasma polymer films can be used as permanent hydrophilic surfaces

  19. Hydrogen peroxide decomposition kinetics in aquaculture water

    Arvin, Erik; Pedersen, Lars-Flemming

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (HP) is used in aquaculture systems where preventive or curative water treatments occasionally are required. Use of chemical agents can be challenging in recirculating aquaculture systems (RAS) due to extended water retention time and because the agents must not damage the fish...... reared or the nitrifying bacteria in the biofilters at concentrations required to eliminating pathogens. This calls for quantitative insight into the fate of the disinfectant residuals during water treatment. This paper presents a kinetic model that describes the HP decomposition in aquaculture water...... application in RAS by addressing disinfection demand and identify efficient and safe water treatment routines....

  20. The effect of hydrogen peroxide on uranium oxide films on 316L stainless steel

    Wilbraham, Richard J.; Boxall, Colin; Goddard, David T.; Taylor, Robin J.; Woodbury, Simon E.

    2015-09-01

    For the first time the effect of hydrogen peroxide on the dissolution of electrodeposited uranium oxide films on 316L stainless steel planchets (acting as simulant uranium-contaminated metal surfaces) has been studied. Analysis of the H2O2-mediated film dissolution processes via open circuit potentiometry, alpha counting and SEM/EDX imaging has shown that in near-neutral solutions of pH 6.1 and at [H2O2] ⩽ 100 μmol dm-3 the electrodeposited uranium oxide layer is freely dissolving, the associated rate of film dissolution being significantly increased over leaching of similar films in pH 6.1 peroxide-free water. At H2O2 concentrations between 1 mmol dm-3 and 0.1 mol dm-3, formation of an insoluble studtite product layer occurs at the surface of the uranium oxide film. In analogy to corrosion processes on common metal substrates such as steel, the studtite layer effectively passivates the underlying uranium oxide layer against subsequent dissolution. Finally, at [H2O2] > 0.1 mol dm-3 the uranium oxide film, again in analogy to common corrosion processes, behaves as if in a transpassive state and begins to dissolve. This transition from passive to transpassive behaviour in the effect of peroxide concentration on UO2 films has not hitherto been observed or explored, either in terms of corrosion processes or otherwise. Through consideration of thermodynamic solubility product and complex formation constant data, we attribute the transition to the formation of soluble uranyl-peroxide complexes under mildly alkaline, high [H2O2] conditions - a conclusion that has implications for the design of both acid minimal, metal ion oxidant-free decontamination strategies with low secondary waste arisings, and single step processes for spent nuclear fuel dissolution such as the Carbonate-based Oxidative Leaching (COL) process.

  1. Measurement of atmospheric hydrogen peroxide and organic peroxides in Beijing before and during the 2008 Olympic Games: Chemical and physical factors influencing their concentrations

    He, S. Z.; Chen, Z. M.; Zhang, X.; Zhao, Y.; Huang, D. M.; Zhao, J. N.; Zhu, T.; Hu, M.; Zeng, L. M.

    2010-09-01

    For the 2008 Beijing Olympic Games full-scale control (FSC) of atmospheric pollution was implemented to improve the air quality from 20 July to 20 September 2008, resulting in a significant decrease in the emission of pollutants in urban Beijing, especially vehicular emissions. The combination of reduced emissions and weather condition changes provided us with a unique opportunity to investigate urban atmospheric chemistry. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and organic peroxides play significant roles in atmospheric processes, such as the cycling of HOx radicals and the formation of secondary sulfate aerosols and secondary organic aerosols. We measured atmospheric H2O2 and organic peroxides in urban Beijing, at the Peking University campus, from 12 July to 30 September, before and during the FSC. The major peroxides observed were H2O2, methyl hydroperoxide (MHP), and peroxyacetic acid (PAA), having maximal mixing ratios of 2.34, 0.95, and 0.17 ppbv (parts per billion by volume), respectively. Other organic peroxides were detected occasionally, such as bis-hydroxymethyl hydroperoxide, hydroxymethyl hydroperoxide, ethyl hydroperoxide, and 1-hydroxyethyl hydroperoxide. On sunny days the concentrations of H2O2, MHP, and PAA exhibited pronounced diurnal variations, with a peak in the afternoon (1500-1900) and, occasionally, a second peak in the evening (2000-0200). The night peaks can be attributed to local night production from the ozonolysis of alkenes, coupled with the reaction between NO3 radicals and organic compounds. Sunny-day weather dominated during 16-26 July, and we found that the concentrations of H2O2, MHP, and PAA increased strikingly on 22-26 July, compared with the concentrations during 16-19 July. This effect was mainly attributed to the NOx (NO and NO2) decline because of the FSC, due to (i) the suppressing effect of NO and NO2 on the production of peroxides and (ii) the indirect effect of reduced NOx on the concentration of peroxides via O3 production in the

  2. Antioxidant effect of bisphosphonates and simvastatin on chondrocyte lipid peroxidation

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of bisphosphonates (BPs) and simvastatin on chondrocyte lipid peroxidation. For this purpose, a flow cytometrical method using C11-BODIPY581/591 was developed to detect hydroperoxide-induced lipid peroxidation in chondrocytes. Tertiary butylhydroperoxide (t-BHP) induced a time and concentration dependent increase in chondrocyte lipid peroxidation. Addition of a Fe2+/EDTA complex to t-BHP or hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) clearly enhanced lipid peroxidation. The lipophilic simvastatin demonstrated a small inhibition in the chondrocyte lipid peroxidation. None of three tested BPs (clodronate, pamidronate, and risedronate) had an effect on chondrocyte lipid peroxidation induced by t-BHP. However, when Fe2+/EDTA complex was added to t-BHP or H2O2, BPs inhibited the lipid peroxidation process varying from 25% to 58%. This study demonstrates that BPs have antioxidant properties as iron chelators, thereby inhibiting the chondrocyte lipid peroxidation. These findings add evidence to the therapeutic potential of bisphosphonates and statins in rheumatoid arthritis

  3. Lipid Peroxidation and Lipid Metabolism in Postmenopausal Women

    , Banu ÖNVURAL

    1998-01-01

    The aims of this study were to determine the degree of lipid peroxidation in the sera of postmenopausal women and compare this with the lipid peroxidation of a premenopausal group, and to see if there was any correlation between lipid parameters and lipid peroxidation within the groups. We assayed the lipid profiles and malondialdehyde (MDA), a marker for lipid peroxidation, in a postmenopausal group (n=57, mean age=49.4±6.6), an age-matched male group (n=21, mean age=48.5±6.7) an...

  4. Hydrogen peroxide leaching of uranium in carbonate solutions

    The kinetics of UO2 dissolution in ammoniacal carbonate solutions were investigated with hydrogen peroxide as an oxidant. The effects of hydrogen peroxide concentration, total carbonate concentration and pH were studied. For similar conditions, the rate of dissolution was considerably faster with hydrogen peroxide than with oxygen. The reaction was found to be of 0.5 order with respect to both hydrogen peroxide and total carbonate concentrations. At pH values below approximately 10, the rate was relatively insensitive to pH. These results are consistent with an electrochemical surface reaction similar to that developed for the oxygen-leaching system. Electrochemical interpretation adequately explain the enhanced rate of dissolution observed for hydrogen peroxide leaching. The decomposition of hydrogen peroxide in alkaline solutions is discussed. Surface-electrode potentials are used to explain the catalytic activity of various solids. Hydrogen peroxide was found to decompose rapidly in the presence of freshly precipitated ferric hydroxide. The effect of pH on the rate of hydrogen peroxide decomposition was investigated in the pH range 4.3 to 11.2. Problems associated with the use of hydrogen peroxide in the in-situ leaching of uranium are considered. (author)

  5. Use of Hydrogen Peroxide to Disinfect Hydroponic Plant Growth Systems

    Barta, Daniel J.; Henderson, Keith

    2000-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide was studied as an alternative to conventional bleach and rinsing methods to disinfect hydroponic plant growth systems. A concentration of 0.5% hydrogen peroxide was found to be effective. Residual hydrogen peroxide can be removed from the system by repeated rinsing or by flowing the solution through a platinum on aluminum catalyst. Microbial populations were reduced to near zero immediately after treatment but returned to pre-disinfection levels 2 days after treatment. Treating nutrient solution with hydrogen peroxide and planting directly into trays being watered with the nutrient solution without replenishment, was found to be detrimental to lettuce germination and growth.

  6. Temperature response and durability characterization of an optical fiber sensor for the detection of hydrogen peroxide

    Hydrogen peroxide is a precursor to damage mechanisms in numerous applications; its monitoring is important and challenging. The effect of temperature on the performance and durability of a recently developed optical fiber sensors sensitive to the presence of hydrogen peroxide in low concentrations is investigated. The sensors are fabricated by immobilizing Prussian blue within a multilayer of electrostatically self-assembled polyelectrolytes. The sensing principle of this optical electrode relies on the change in the intensity of the reflected light when Prussian white is oxidized back to the blue state due to the presence of hydrogen peroxide. The amplitude of the intensity of the reflected light is found to vary with temperature in a quadratic fashion, but the characteristic response time which correlates with concentration remains constant. Thus the sensing device retains its abilities to determine and quantify the concentration of hydrogen peroxide in a liquid solution. Additionally, the degradation of these fiber sensors when subjected to high temperature is examined. Four optical fiber sensing devices were subjected to different testing conditions and a characterization protocol that included: measurement of the intensity of the cyanide stretch (2150 cm−1) via Raman micro spectroscopy; imaging with scanning electron microscopy; and measurement of the presence of iron ions using energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The results show a gradual degradation of the sensing device as a result of progressive desorption of the polyelectrolyte multilayer structure that leads to leaching of the Prussian reagent. This degradation mechanism does not compromise the functionality of the device which is found sufficiently robust for multiple tests at high temperature. The simplicity of this sensing system combined with its relative robustness and reusability make it a good a good candidate for minimally intrusive and localized monitoring of hydrogen peroxide formation in

  7. Quantification of peroxide ion passage in dentin, enamel, and cementum after internal bleaching with hydrogen peroxide.

    Palo, R M; Bonetti-Filho, I; Valera, M C; Camargo, C H R; Camargo, Sea; Moura-Netto, C; Pameijer, C

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the amount of peroxide passage from the pulp chamber to the external enamel surface during the internal bleaching technique. Fifty bovine teeth were sectioned transversally 5 mm below the cemento-enamel junction (CEJ), and the remaining part of the root was sealed with a 2-mm layer of glass ionomer cement. The external surface of the samples was coated with nail varnish, with the exception of standardized circular areas (6-mm diameter) located on the enamel, exposed dentin, or cementum surface of the tooth. The teeth were divided into three experimental groups according to exposed areas close to the CEJ and into two control groups (n=10/group), as follows: GE, enamel exposure area; GC, cementum exposed area; GD, dentin exposed area; Negative control, no presence of internal bleaching agent and uncoated surface; and Positive control, pulp chamber filled with bleaching agent and external surface totally coated with nail varnish. The pulp chamber was filled with 35% hydrogen peroxide (Opalescence Endo, Ultradent). Each sample was placed inside of individual flasks with 1000 μL of acetate buffer solution, 2 M (pH 4.5). After seven days, the buffer solution was transferred to a glass tube, in which 100 μL of leuco-crystal violet and 50 μL of horseradish peroxidase were added, producing a blue solution. The optical density of the blue solution was determined by spectrophotometer and converted into microgram equivalents of hydrogen peroxide. Data were submitted to Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn-Bonferroni tests (α=0.05). All experimental groups presented passage of peroxide to the external surface that was statistically different from that observed in the control groups. It was verified that the passage of peroxide was higher in GD than in GE (ppermeable than were the dentin and enamel surfaces. PMID:22621165

  8. Precipitation of uranium concentrates by hydrogen peroxide

    An experimental study on the (UO4.xH2) uranyl peroxide precipitation from a uranium process strip solution is presented. The runs were performed in a batch reactor, in laboratory scale. The main objective was to assess the possibility of the peroxide route as an alternative to a conventional ammonium diuranate process. The chemical composition of process solution was obtained. The experiments were conducted according to a factorial design, aiming to evaluate the effects of initial pH, precipitation pH and H2O2/UO22+ ratio upon the process. The responses were measured in terms of the efficiency of U precipitation, the content of U in the precipitates and the distribution of impurities in the precipitates. The results indicated that the process works is satisfactory on the studied conditions and depending on conditions, it is possible to achieve levels of U precipitation efficiency greater than 99.9% in reaction times of 2 hours. The precipitates reach grades around 99% U3O8 after calcination (9000C) and impurities fall below the limit for penalties established by the ASTM and the Allied Chemical Standards. The precipitates are composed of large aggregates of crystals of 1-4 μm, are fast settling and filtering, and are free-flowing when dry. (Author)

  9. A MEMS based acetone sensor incorporating ZnO nanowires synthesized by wet oxidation of Zn film

    In this work, we report a simple and efficient method for synthesis of ZnO nanowires by thermal oxidation of Zn film and their integration with MEMS technologies to fabricate a sensor for acetone vapour detection. ZnO nanowires were prepared by thermal oxidation of sputter deposited Zn film. The nanostructured ZnO was characterized by x-ray diffraction, a scanning electron microscope and room temperature photoluminescence measurements. The ZnO nanowires synthesis process was integrated with MEMS technologies to obtain a sensor for volatile organic compounds, incorporating an on-chip Ni microheater and an interdigited electrode structure. To reduce the heat loss from the on-chip microheater, the sensor was made on a thin silicon diaphragm obtained via a modified reactive ion etching process. This resulted in considerable power saving during sensor operation. For this, a three-mask process was used. The performance of the microheater was simulated on COMSOL and validated experimentally. The sensor has been tested for acetone vapour sensing and the operating parameters were optimized. The sensor has the ability to detect acetone vapour at 5 parts per million (ppm) concentrations when operated at 100 °C. The sensor consumed only 36 mW power and showed a high-sensitivity value of 26.3% for 100 ppm of acetone vapour. (paper)

  10. Modification of an acetone-sodium dodecyl sulfate disruption method for cellular protein extraction from neuropathogenic Clostridium botulinum

    An acetone-sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) disruption method was used for the extraction of cellular proteins from neurotoxigenic Clostridium botulinum. The amount of protein extracted per gram of dry weight and the protein profile as revealed by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) was comparabl...

  11. Acetone-water complexes at MRCI level using localized orbitals: n ->pi* and pi ->pi* electronic transitions

    Hoyau, S.; Ben Amor, N.; Borini, Stefano; Evangelisti, S.; Maynau, D.

    The n -> pi* and pi -> pi* vertical electronic transitions of acetone with two and four H2O which correspond to a first solvation shell are considered. By using localized orbitals, and thanks to the MRCI approach which permits to know the wave function, the role of the various solvent molecules is...

  12. A MEMS based acetone sensor incorporating ZnO nanowires synthesized by wet oxidation of Zn film

    Behera, Bhagaban; Chandra, Sudhir

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we report a simple and efficient method for synthesis of ZnO nanowires by thermal oxidation of Zn film and their integration with MEMS technologies to fabricate a sensor for acetone vapour detection. ZnO nanowires were prepared by thermal oxidation of sputter deposited Zn film. The nanostructured ZnO was characterized by x-ray diffraction, a scanning electron microscope and room temperature photoluminescence measurements. The ZnO nanowires synthesis process was integrated with MEMS technologies to obtain a sensor for volatile organic compounds, incorporating an on-chip Ni microheater and an interdigited electrode structure. To reduce the heat loss from the on-chip microheater, the sensor was made on a thin silicon diaphragm obtained via a modified reactive ion etching process. This resulted in considerable power saving during sensor operation. For this, a three-mask process was used. The performance of the microheater was simulated on COMSOL and validated experimentally. The sensor has been tested for acetone vapour sensing and the operating parameters were optimized. The sensor has the ability to detect acetone vapour at 5 parts per million (ppm) concentrations when operated at 100 °C. The sensor consumed only 36 mW power and showed a high-sensitivity value of 26.3% for 100 ppm of acetone vapour.

  13. Microbial production of a biofuel (acetone-butanol-ethanol) in a continuous bioreactor: impact of bleed and simultaneous product removal

    Acetone butanol ethanol (ABE) was produced in an integrated continuous fermentation and product recovery system using a microbial strain Clostridium beijerinckii BA101 for ABE production and fermentation gases (CO2 and H2) for product removal by gas stripping. This represents a continuation of our ...

  14. In situ hydrogen, acetone, butanol, ethanol and microdiesel production by Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 from oleaginous fungal biomass.

    Hassan, Elhagag Ahmed; Abd-Alla, Mohamed Hemida; Bagy, Magdy Mohamed Khalil; Morsy, Fatthy Mohamed

    2015-08-01

    An in situ batch fermentation technique was employed for biohydrogen, acetone, butanol, ethanol and microdiesel production from oleaginous fungal biomass using the anaerobic fermentative bacterium Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824. Oleaginous fungal Cunninghamella echinulata biomass which has ability to accumulate up to 71% cellular lipid was used as the substrate carbon source. The maximum cumulative hydrogen by C. acetobutylicum ATCC 824 from crude C. echinulata biomass was 260 ml H2 l(-1), hydrogen production efficiency was 0.32 mol H2 mole(-1) glucose and the hydrogen production rate was 5.2 ml H2 h(-1). Subsequently, the produced acids (acetic and butyric acids) during acidogenesis phase are re-utilized by ABE-producing clostridia and converted into acetone, butanol, and ethanol. The total ABE produced by C. acetobutylicum ATCC 824 during batch fermentation was 3.6 g l(-1) from crude fungal biomass including acetone (1.05 g l(-1)), butanol (2.19 g l(-1)) and ethanol (0.36 g l(-1)). C. acetobutylicum ATCC 824 has ability to produce lipolytic enzymes with a specific activity 5.59 U/mg protein to hydrolyze ester containing substrates. The lipolytic potential of C. acetobutylicum ATCC 824 was used as a biocatalyst for a lipase transesterification process using the produced ethanol from ABE fermentation for microdiesel production. The fatty acid ethyl esters (microdiesel) generated from the lipase transesterification of crude C. echinulata dry mass was analyzed by GC/MS as 15.4% of total FAEEs. The gross energy content of biohydrogen, acetone, butanol, ethanol and biodiesel generated through C. acetobutylicum fermentation from crude C. echinulata dry mass was 3113.14 kJ mol(-1). These results suggest a possibility of integrating biohydrogen, acetone, butanol and ethanol production technology by C. acetobutylicum with microdiesel production from crude C. echinulata dry mass and therefore improve the feasibility and commercialization of bioenergy production. PMID

  15. A path integral molecular dynamics study of the hyperfine coupling constants of the muoniated and hydrogenated acetone radicals

    Oba, Yuki; Kawatsu, Tsutomu; Tachikawa, Masanori

    2016-08-01

    The on-the-fly ab initio density functional path integral molecular dynamics (PIMD) simulations, which can account for both the nuclear quantum effect and thermal effect, were carried out to evaluate the structures and "reduced" isotropic hyperfine coupling constants (HFCCs) for muoniated and hydrogenated acetone radicals (2-muoxy-2-propyl and 2-hydoxy-2-propyl) in vacuo. The reduced HFCC value from a simple geometry optimization calculation without both the nuclear quantum effect and thermal effect is -8.18 MHz, and that by standard ab initio molecular dynamics simulation with only the thermal effect and without the nuclear quantum effect is 0.33 MHz at 300 K, where these two methods cannot distinguish the difference between muoniated and hydrogenated acetone radicals. In contrast, the reduced HFCC value of the muoniated acetone radical by our PIMD simulation is 32.1 MHz, which is about 8 times larger than that for the hydrogenated radical of 3.97 MHz with the same level of calculation. We have found that the HFCC values are highly correlated with the local molecular structures; especially, the Mu—O bond length in the muoniated acetone radical is elongated due to the large nuclear quantum effect of the muon, which makes the expectation value of the HFCC larger. Although our PIMD result calculated in vacuo is about 4 times larger than the measured experimental value in aqueous solvent, the ratio of these HFCC values between muoniated and hydrogenated acetone radicals in vacuo is in reasonable agreement with the ratio of the experimental values in aqueous solvent (8.56 MHz and 0.9 MHz); the explicit presence of solvent molecules has a major effect on decreasing the reduced muon HFCC of in vacuo calculations for the quantitative reproduction.

  16. Weakening of erythrocyte aggregation and peroxidation of their membrane lipids under UV-radiation

    A study was made on formation of man crythrocyte piles, induced by dextron and discocyte transformation into spherocytes under the effect of lipid peroxide photoxidation, caused by UV-radiation (integral radiation of SVD-120A mercury lamp), and exogenous product of lipid oxidation-malonic dialdehyde (MDA). The transformation of diskshaped erythrocytes into spherical ones was registered by the decrease of ump of intensity of diffusely reflected light, observed when mixing of erythrocytal suspension was stoped; the formation of erythrocytal piles was registered by the rate of successive decrease of reflected light intensity. Peroxide photooxidation of membrane lipids and their autooxidation, developed in dark after UV-radiation, didn't effect directly on erythrocyte pile formation. Pile formation decreases sufficiently during continuous erythrocyte incubation at 37 deg C after irradiation in result of diskocyte transformation into spherocytes. Exogenous MDA suppresses noticeably (as well as glutaric aldehyde) the formation of erythrocyte piles in their suspension (haemotocryte factor-45%) only at comparatively high concentration (approximately 8x10-4 M) which is not reached during UV-radiation

  17. Effect of exogenous hydrogen peroxide on biophoton emission from radish root cells.

    Rastogi, Anshu; Pospísil, Pavel

    2010-01-01

    Biophotons spontaneously emitted from radish root cells were detected using highly sensitive photomultiplier tube. Freshly isolated radish root cells exhibited spontaneous photon emission of about 4 counts s(-1). Addition of hydrogen peroxide to the cells caused significant enhancement in biophoton emission to about 500 counts s(-1). Removal of molecular oxygen using glucose/glucose oxidase system and scavengering of reactive oxygen species by reducing agents such are sodium ascorbate and cysteine completely diminished biophoton emission. Spectral analysis of the hydrogen peroxide-induced biophoton emission indicates that biophotons are emitted mainly in green-red region of the spectra. The data provided by electron paramagnetic resonance spin-trapping technique showed that formation of singlet oxygen observed after addition of H2O2 correlates with enhancement in biophoton emission. These observations provide direct evidence that singlet oxygen is involved in biophoton emission from radish root cells. PMID:20106674

  18. Insights into acetone photochemistry on rutile TiO₂(110). 2. new photodesorption channel with CH₃ ejection along the surface normal

    Petrik, Nikolay G. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Henderson, Michael A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Kimmel, Gregory A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-06-04

    Angle-resolved photon stimulated desorption (PSD) combined with infrared reflection-adsorption spectroscopy and temperature programmed desorption reveal two distinct channels in the photochemistry of acetone on rutile TiO₂(110) surface. During UV irradiation of co-adsorbed oxygen and acetone molecules, methyl radicals (CH₃) are ejected in two different directions: i) normal to the surface and ii) off-normal at ~±66° to the surface normal in the azimuth (i.e. perpendicular to the rows of bridging oxygen and Ti atoms). Both components are relatively narrow and non-cosine, indicating non-thermal evolution of CH₃ radicals. The direction of the “off-normal” PSD component is consistent with orientation of the C–CH₃ bonds in the n²-acetone diolate—a photoactive form of acetone chemisorption on the oxidized TiO₂(110) surface proposed earlier from experimental and theoretical studies. The direction of the “normal” PSD component requires an orientation of a C–CH₃ bond which is not consistent with the n²-acetone diolate structure. The angular distribution of the CH₃ PSD depends on the acetone coverage. The “off-normal” PSD component dominates at lower acetone coverage (< 0.2 ML), but does not increase at higher coverages in accord with the acetone diolate peak intensity in the infrared reflection-absorption spectra. The “normal” PSD component grows with the acetone coverage up to 0.6 ML. The newly discovered “normal” PSD channel is tentatively assigned to a photo-produced n²- acetone enolate as a potential precursor based on the H/D exchange experiments

  19. Hydrogen peroxide mediates higher order chromatin degradation.

    Bai, H; Konat, G W

    2003-01-01

    Although a large body of evidence supports a causative link between oxidative stress and neurodegeneration, the mechanisms are still elusive. We have recently demonstrated that hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), the major mediator of oxidative stress triggers higher order chromatin degradation (HOCD), i.e. excision of chromatin loops at the matrix attachment regions (MARs). The present study was designed to determine the specificity of H(2)O(2) in respect to HOCD induction. Rat glioma C6 cells were exposed to H(2)O(2) and other oxidants, and the fragmentation of genomic DNA was assessed by field inversion gel electrophoresis (FIGE). S1 digestion before FIGE was used to detect single strand fragmentation. The exposure of C6 cells to H(2)O(2) induced a rapid and extensive HOCD. Thus, within 30 min, total chromatin was single strandedly digested into 50 kb fragments. Evident HOCD was elicited by H(2)O(2) at concentrations as low as 5 micro M. HOCD was mostly reversible during 4-8h following the removal of H(2)O(2) from the medium indicating an efficient relegation of the chromatin fragments. No HOCD was induced by H(2)O(2) in isolated nuclei indicating that HOCD-endonuclease is activated indirectly by cytoplasmic signal pathways triggered by H(2)O(2). The exposure of cells to a synthetic peroxide, i.e. tert-butyrylhydroperoxide (tBH) also induced HOCD, but to a lesser extent than H(2)O(2). Contrary to the peroxides, the exposure of cells to equitoxic concentration of hypochlorite and spermine NONOate, a nitric oxide generator, failed to induce rapid HOCD. These results indicate that rapid HOCD is not a result of oxidative stress per se, but is rather triggered by signaling cascades initiated specifically by H(2)O(2). Furthermore, the rapid and extensive HOCD was observed in several rat and human cell lines challenged with H(2)O(2), indicating that the process is not restricted to glial cells, but rather represents a general response of cells to H(2)O(2). PMID:12421592

  20. Differentiation among peroxide explosives with an optoelectronic nose.

    Li, Zheng; Bassett, Will P; Askim, Jon R; Suslick, Kenneth S

    2015-10-25

    Forensic identification of batches of homemade explosives (HME) poses a difficult analytical challenge. Differentiation among peroxide explosives is reported herein using a colorimetric sensor array and handheld scanner with a field-appropriate sampling protocol. Clear discrimination was demonstrated among twelve peroxide samples prepared from different reagents, with a classification accuracy >98%. PMID:26340082

  1. Experimental study of the inverse diffusion flame using high repetition rate OH/acetone PLIF and PIV

    Elbaz, Ayman M.

    2015-10-29

    Most previous work on inverse diffusion flames (IDFs) has focused on laminar IDF emissions and the soot formation characteristics. Here, we investigate the characteristics and structure of methane IDFs using high speed planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) images of OH, particle image velocimetry (PIV), and acetone PLIF imaging for non-reacting cases. First, the flame appearance was investigated with fixed methane loading (mass flux) but with varying airflow rates, yielding a central air jet Reynolds number (Re) of 1,000 to 6,000 (when blow-off occurs). Next, it was investigated a fixed central air jet Re of 4500, but with varied methane mass flux such that the global equivalence ratio spanned 0.5 to 4. It was observed that at Re smaller than 2000, the inner air jet promotes the establishment of an inverse diffusion flame surrounded by a normal diffusion flame. However, when the Re was increased to 2500, two distinct zones became apparent in the flame, a lower entrainment zone and an upper mixing and combustion zone. 10 kHz OH-PLIF images, and 2D PIV allow the identification of the fate and spatial flame structure. Many flame features were identified and further analyzed using simple but effective image processing methods, where three types of structure in all the flames investigated here: flame holes or breaks; closures; and growing kernels. Insights about the rate of evolution of these features, the dynamics of local extinction, and the sequence of events that lead to re-ignition are reported here. In the lower entrainment zone, the occurrence of the flame break events is counterbalanced by closure events, and the edge propagation appears to control the rate at which the flame holes and closures propagate. The rate of propagation of holes was found to be statistically faster than the rate of closure. As the flames approach blow-off, flame kernels become the main mechanism for flame re-ignition further downstream. The simultaneous OH-PLIF/Stereo PIV

  2. Hydrogen Peroxide Storage in Small Sealed Tanks

    Whitehead, J.

    1999-10-20

    Unstabilized hydrogen peroxide of 85% concentration has been prepared in laboratory quantities for testing material compatibility and long term storage on a small scale. Vessels made of candidate tank and liner materials ranged in volume from 1 cc to 2540 cc. Numerous metals and plastics were tried at the smallest scales, while promising ones were used to fabricate larger vessels and liners. An aluminum alloy (6061-T6) performed poorly, including increasing homogeneous decay due to alloying elements entering solution. The decay rate in this high strength aluminum was greatly reduced by anodizing. Better results were obtained with polymers, particularly polyvinylidene fluoride. Data reported herein include ullage pressures as a function of time with changing decay rates, and contamination analysis results.

  3. Determination of active oxygen content in rare earth peroxides

    The content of active oxygen in rare earth peroxides have been determined after the dissolution of the samples with hydrocloridic acid in the presence of potassium iodide. The free generated iodine is titrated with sodium thiosulfate using starch as indicator. The oxidation of iodide to the free iodine indicates the presence of a higher valence state rare earth oxide, until now specifically recognized for the oxides of cerium (Ce O2), praseodymium (Pr6 O11) and terbium (TB4 O7). recently the authors synthesized a new series of rare earth compounds, the peroxides. These new compounds were prepared by precipitating the rare earth elements complexed with carbonate ion by addition of hydrogen peroxide. the authors demonstrated that all rare earth elements, once solubilized by complexing with carbonate ion, are quantitatively precipitated as peroxide by addition of hydrogen peroxide. (author)

  4. Estimation of Lipid Peroxidation Induced by Hydrogen Peroxide in Cultured Human Lymphocytes

    Siddique, Yasir Hasan; Ara, Gulshan; Afzal, Mohammad

    2011-01-01

    Malondialdehyde (MDA) is used for the estimation of damage by reactive oxygen species. MDA is a major reactive aldehyde resulting from the peroxidation of biological membranes. The most common method used to assess MDA production is the thiobarbituric acid (TBARS) assay. However, the value of this method is curbed by low specificity and has been criticized for its use in human studies. In the present study we have used an alternative method for the estimation of MDA production i.e. reaction o...

  5. PEROXIDE DESTRUCTION TESTING FOR THE 200 AREA EFFLUENT TREATMENT FACILITY

    HALGREN DL

    2010-03-12

    The hydrogen peroxide decomposer columns at the 200 Area Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) have been taken out of service due to ongoing problems with particulate fines and poor destruction performance from the granular activated carbon (GAC) used in the columns. An alternative search was initiated and led to bench scale testing and then pilot scale testing. Based on the bench scale testing three manganese dioxide based catalysts were evaluated in the peroxide destruction pilot column installed at the 300 Area Treated Effluent Disposal Facility. The ten inch diameter, nine foot tall, clear polyvinyl chloride (PVC) column allowed for the same six foot catalyst bed depth as is in the existing ETF system. The flow rate to the column was controlled to evaluate the performance at the same superficial velocity (gpm/ft{sup 2}) as the full scale design flow and normal process flow. Each catalyst was evaluated on peroxide destruction performance and particulate fines capacity and carryover. Peroxide destruction was measured by hydrogen peroxide concentration analysis of samples taken before and after the column. The presence of fines in the column headspace and the discharge from carryover was generally assessed by visual observation. All three catalysts met the peroxide destruction criteria by achieving hydrogen peroxide discharge concentrations of less than 0.5 mg/L at the design flow with inlet peroxide concentrations greater than 100 mg/L. The Sud-Chemie T-2525 catalyst was markedly better in the minimization of fines and particle carryover. It is anticipated the T-2525 can be installed as a direct replacement for the GAC in the peroxide decomposer columns. Based on the results of the peroxide method development work the recommendation is to purchase the T-2525 catalyst and initially load one of the ETF decomposer columns for full scale testing.

  6. PEROXIDE DESTRUCTION TESTING FOR THE 200 AREA EFFLUENT TREATMENT FACILITY

    The hydrogen peroxide decomposer columns at the 200 Area Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) have been taken out of service due to ongoing problems with particulate fines and poor destruction performance from the granular activated carbon (GAC) used in the columns. An alternative search was initiated and led to bench scale testing and then pilot scale testing. Based on the bench scale testing three manganese dioxide based catalysts were evaluated in the peroxide destruction pilot column installed at the 300 Area Treated Effluent Disposal Facility. The ten inch diameter, nine foot tall, clear polyvinyl chloride (PVC) column allowed for the same six foot catalyst bed depth as is in the existing ETF system. The flow rate to the column was controlled to evaluate the performance at the same superficial velocity (gpm/ft2) as the full scale design flow and normal process flow. Each catalyst was evaluated on peroxide destruction performance and particulate fines capacity and carryover. Peroxide destruction was measured by hydrogen peroxide concentration analysis of samples taken before and after the column. The presence of fines in the column headspace and the discharge from carryover was generally assessed by visual observation. All three catalysts met the peroxide destruction criteria by achieving hydrogen peroxide discharge concentrations of less than 0.5 mg/L at the design flow with inlet peroxide concentrations greater than 100 mg/L. The Sud-Chemie T-2525 catalyst was markedly better in the minimization of fines and particle carryover. It is anticipated the T-2525 can be installed as a direct replacement for the GAC in the peroxide decomposer columns. Based on the results of the peroxide method development work the recommendation is to purchase the T-2525 catalyst and initially load one of the ETF decomposer columns for full scale testing.

  7. At-home vital bleaching: a comparison of hydrogen peroxide and carbamide peroxide treatments.

    Berga-Caballero, Amparo; Forner-Navarro, Leopoldo; Amengual-Lorenzo, José

    2006-01-01

    Tray bleaching of vital teeth performed at home by the patient under the dentist s supervision, whether alone or in combination with any of the in-office techniques, provides an interesting alternative to other methods employed in this type of dental treatment. This bleaching procedure applies low-concentration peroxides to the enamel by means of a custom-made mouth tray specifically designed for this purpose. The aim of this study is to examine and compare two commercially-available bleaching products, at equivalent concentrations, for use in this technique: VivaStyle (Vivadent) and FKD (Kin); the former is a 10% carbamide peroxide and the latter a 3.5% hydrogen peroxide formulation. It examines the parameters that must be monitored during the application of this type of procedure and presents 6 cases (3 treated with one of the above-mentioned products and the other 3 with the other), establishing the bleaching power of the products and the appearance and intensity of post-operatory hypersensitivity. The results obtained show that both products are effective for the purpose for which they were designed. In general, dental hypersensitivity was minimal. PMID:16388304

  8. Acetone-butanol-ethanol production in a novel continuous flow system.

    Elbeshbishy, Elsayed; Dhar, Bipro Ranjan; Hafez, Hisham; Lee, Hyung-Sool

    2015-08-01

    This study investigates the potential of using a novel integrated biohydrogen reactor clarifier system (IBRCS) for acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) production using a mixed culture at different organic loading rates (OLRs). The results of this study showed that using a setting tank after the fermenter and recycle the settled biomass to the fermenter is a practical option to achieve high biomass concentration in the fermenter and thus sustainable ABE fermentation in continuous mode. The average ABE concentrations of 2.3, 7.0, and 14.6gABE/L which were corresponding to ABE production rates of 0.4, 1.4, and 2.8gABE/Lreactorh were achieved at OLRs of 21, 64, and 128gCOD/Lreactord, respectively. The main volatile fatty acids components in the effluent were acetic, propionic, and butyric acids. Acetic acid was the predominant component in the OLR-1, while butyric acid was the predominant acid in OLRs 2 and 3. PMID:25965257

  9. Acetone and butanol production by Clostridium acetobutylicum in a synthetic medium

    Monot, F.; Martin, J.R.; Petitdemange, H.; Gay, R.

    1982-12-01

    The effect of the component concentrations of a synthetic medium on acetone and butanol fermentation by Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 was investigated. Cell growth was dependent on the presence of Mg, Fe, and K in the medium. Mg and Mn had deleterious effects when in excess. Ammonium acetate in excess caused acid fermentation. The metabolism was composed of two phases: an acid phase and a solvent one. Low concentrations of glucose allowed the first phase only. The theoretical ratio of the conversion of glucose to solvents, which was 28 to 33%, was obtained with the following medium: MgSO/sub 4/, 50 to 200 mg/liter; MnSO/sub 4/, 0 to 20 mg/liter; KCl, 0.015 to 8 g/liter (an equivalent concentration of K+ was supplied in the form of KH/sub 2/PO/sub 4/ and K/sub 2/HPO/sub 4/); FeSO/sub 4/, 1 to 50 mg/liter; ammonium acetate, 1.1 to 2.2 g/liter; para-aminobenzoic acid, 1 mg/liter; biotin, 0.01 mg/liter; glucose, 20 to 60 g/liter. (Refs. 24).

  10. Initial dynamics of the Norrish Type I reaction in acetone: probing wave packet motion.

    Brogaard, Rasmus Y; Sølling, Theis I; Møller, Klaus B

    2011-02-10

    The Norrish Type I reaction in the S(1) (nπ*) state of acetone is a prototype case of ketone photochemistry. On the basis of results from time-resolved mass spectrometry (TRMS) and photoelectron spectroscopy (TRPES) experiments, it was recently suggested that after excitation the wave packet travels toward the S(1) minimum in less than 30 fs and stays there for more than 100 picoseconds [Chem. Phys. Lett.2008, 461, 193]. In this work we present simulated TRMS and TRPES signals based on ab initio multiple spawning simulations of the dynamics during the first 200 fs after excitation, getting quite good agreement with the experimental signals. We can explain the ultrafast decay of the experimental signals in the following manner: the wave packet simply travels, mainly along the deplanarization coordinate, out of the detection window of the ionizing probe. This window is so narrow that subsequent revival of the signal due to the coherent deplanarization vibration is not observed, meaning that from the point of view of the experiment the wave packets travels directly to the S(1) minimum. This result stresses the importance of pursuing a closer link to the experimental signal when using molecular dynamics simulations in interpreting experimental results. PMID:21229990

  11. Flame-made Nb-doped TiO2 ethanol and acetone sensors.

    Phanichphant, Sukon; Liewhiran, Chaikarn; Wetchakun, Khatcharin; Wisitsoraat, Anurat; Tuantranont, Adisorn

    2011-01-01

    Undoped TiO(2) and TiO(2) nanoparticles doped with 1-5 at.% Nb were successfully produced in a single step by flame spray pyrolysis (FSP). The phase and crystallite size were analyzed by XRD. The BET surface area (SSA(BET)) of the nanoparticles was measured by nitrogen adsorption. The trend of SSA(BET) on the doping samples increased and the BET equivalent particle diameter (d(BET)) (rutile) increased with the higher Nb-doping concentrations while d(BET) (anatase) remained the same. The morphology and accurate size of the primary particles were further investigated by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The crystallite sizes of undoped and Nb-doped TiO(2) spherical were in the range of 10-20 nm. The sensing films were prepared by spin coating technique. The mixing sample was spin-coated onto the Al(2)O(3) substrates interdigitated with Au electrodes. The gas sensing of acetone (25-400 ppm) was studied at operating temperatures ranging from 300-400 °C in dry air, while the gas sensing of ethanol (50-1,000 ppm) was studied at operating temperatures ranging from 250-400 °C in dry air. PMID:22346586

  12. Flame-Made Nb-Doped TiO2 Ethanol and Acetone Sensors

    Adisorn Tuantranont

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Undoped TiO2 and TiO2 nanoparticles doped with 1–5 at.% Nb were successfully produced in a single step by flame spray pyrolysis (FSP. The phase and crystallite size were analyzed by XRD. The BET surface area (SSABET of the nanoparticles was measured by nitrogen adsorption. The trend of SSABET on the doping samples increased and the BET equivalent particle diameter (dBET (rutile increased with the higher Nb-doping concentrations while dBET (anatase remained the same. The morphology and accurate size of the primary particles were further investigated by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM. The crystallite sizes of undoped and Nb-doped TiO2 spherical were in the range of 10–20 nm. The sensing films were prepared by spin coating technique. The mixing sample was spin-coated onto the Al2O3 substrates interdigitated with Au electrodes. The gas sensing of acetone (25–400 ppm was studied at operating temperatures ranging from 300–400 °C in dry air, while the gas sensing of ethanol (50–1,000 ppm was studied at operating temperatures ranging from 250–400 °C in dry air.

  13. Acetone-butanol-ethanol production from Kraft paper mill sludge by simultaneous saccharification and fermentation.

    Guan, Wenjian; Shi, Suan; Tu, Maobing; Lee, Yoon Y

    2016-01-01

    Paper mill sludge (PS), a solid waste from pulp and paper industry, was investigated as a feedstock for acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) production by simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF). ABE fermentation of paper sludge by Clostridium acetobutylicum required partial removal of ash in PS to enhance its enzymatic digestibility. Enzymatic hydrolysis was found to be a rate-limiting step in the SSF. A total of 16.4-18.0g/L of ABE solvents were produced in the SSF of de-ashed PS with solid loading of 6.3-7.4% and enzyme loading of 10-15FPU/g-glucan, and the final solvent yield reached 0.27g/g sugars. No pretreatment and pH control were needed in ABE fermentation of paper sludge, which makes it an attractive feedstock for butanol production. The results suggested utilization of paper sludge should not only consider the benefits of buffering effect of CaCO3 in fermentation, but also take into account its inhibitory effect on enzymatic hydrolysis. PMID:26562687

  14. Anthelmintic activity of acetone extracts from South African plants used on egg hatching of Haemonchus contortus.

    Fouche, Gerda; Sakong, Bellonah M; Adenubi, Olubukola T; Pauw, Elizabeth; Leboho, Tlabo; Wellington, Kevin W; Eloff, Jacobus N

    2016-01-01

    The nematode, Haemonchus contortus, is responsible for major economic losses in the livestock industry. The management of parasites such as H. contortus has been through the use of synthetic parasiticides. This has resulted in the presence of residues in meat and milk, which affects food safety. The development of resistance to available anthelmintics coupled with their high cost has further complicated matters. This has led to the investigation of alternative methods to manage nematodes, including the use of plants and plant extracts as a potential source of novel anthelmintics. Acetone extracts were prepared from 15 South African plant species and their anthelmintic activity determined using the egg hatch assay (EHA). The leaf extract of Cleome gynandra had the best inhibitory activity (68% ± 3%) at a concentration of 2.5 mg/mL, followed by the stem extract of Maerua angolensis (65% ± 5%). The extracts had a relatively low toxicity on Vero cells determined by the MTT (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5- diphenyltetrazolium bromide) cellular assay. PMID:27543148

  15. Antibacterial and antifungal activities of acetonic extract from Paullinia cupana Mart. seeds.

    Basile, Adriana; Rigano, Daniela; Conte, Barbara; Bruno, Maurizio; Rosselli, Sergio; Sorbo, Sergio

    2013-01-01

    The antibacterial and antifungal activities of the acetone extract from Paullinia cupana var. sorbilis Mart. (Sapindaceae) seeds, commonly called guarana, were assessed against selected bacterial and fungal strains. We tested the extract against both standard American Type Culture Collection (ATCC) and clinically isolated (CI) bacterial strains and three fungal strains. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) values for bacteria and MIC and minimum fungicidal concentration for fungi were determined. The extract showed an activity against the nine bacterial strains tested, both CI and ATCC strains (MIC comprised between 32 and 128 μm/mL and MBC between 128 and 512 μm/mL), showing a significant antibacterial effect against both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. Also, the tested fungi were sensitive to the extract (MIC between 125 and 250 μm/mL). The contemporaneous presence of different bioactivities in the extract from guarana suggests this plant as a source of bioactive substances. PMID:23672664

  16. Integrated, systems metabolic picture of acetone-butanol-ethanol fermentation by Clostridium acetobutylicum.

    Liao, Chen; Seo, Seung-Oh; Celik, Venhar; Liu, Huaiwei; Kong, Wentao; Wang, Yi; Blaschek, Hans; Jin, Yong-Su; Lu, Ting

    2015-07-01

    Microbial metabolism involves complex, system-level processes implemented via the orchestration of metabolic reactions, gene regulation, and environmental cues. One canonical example of such processes is acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation by Clostridium acetobutylicum, during which cells convert carbon sources to organic acids that are later reassimilated to produce solvents as a strategy for cellular survival. The complexity and systems nature of the process have been largely underappreciated, rendering challenges in understanding and optimizing solvent production. Here, we present a system-level computational framework for ABE fermentation that combines metabolic reactions, gene regulation, and environmental cues. We developed the framework by decomposing the entire system into three modules, building each module separately, and then assembling them back into an integrated system. During the model construction, a bottom-up approach was used to link molecular events at the single-cell level into the events at the population level. The integrated model was able to successfully reproduce ABE fermentations of the WT C. acetobutylicum (ATCC 824), as well as its mutants, using data obtained from our own experiments and from literature. Furthermore, the model confers successful predictions of the fermentations with various network perturbations across metabolic, genetic, and environmental aspects. From foundation to applications, the framework advances our understanding of complex clostridial metabolism and physiology and also facilitates the development of systems engineering strategies for the production of advanced biofuels. PMID:26100881

  17. Lipase-catalyzed synthesis of ascorbyl oleate in acetone: optimization of reaction conditions and lipase reusability.

    Stojanović, Marija; Velićković, Dušan; Dimitrijević, Aleksandra; Milosavić, Nenad; Knežević-Jugović, Zorica; Bezbradica, Dejan

    2013-01-01

    Lipase-catalyzed ascorbyl oleate synthesis is eco-friendly and selective way of production of liposoluble biocompatible antioxidants, but still not present on an industrial level due to the high biocatalyst costs. In this study, response surface methodology was applied in order to estimate influence of individual experimental factors, identify interactions among them, and to determine optimum conditions for enzymatic synthesis of ascorbyl oleate in acetone, in terms of limiting substrate conversion, product yield, and yield per mass of consumed enzyme. As a biocatalyst, commercial immobilized preparation of lipase B from Candida antarctica, Novozym 435, was used. In order to develop cost-effective process, at reaction conditions at which maximum amount of product per mass of biocatalyst was produced (60°C, 0.018 % (v/v) of water, 0.135 M of vitamin C, substrates molar ratio 1:8, and 0.2 % (w/v) of lipase), possibilities for further increase of ester yield were investigated. Addition of molecular sieves at 4(th) hour of reaction enabled increase of yield from 16.7 mmol g⁻¹ to 19.3 mmol g⁻¹. Operational stability study revealed that after ten reaction cycles enzyme retained 48 % of its initial activity. Optimized synthesis with well-timed molecular sieves addition and repeated use of lipase provided production of 153 mmol per gram of enzyme. Further improvement of productivity was achieved using procedure for the enzyme reactivation. PMID:23985489

  18. Optimization of wastewater microalgae saccharification using dilute acid hydrolysis for acetone, butanol, and ethanol fermentation

    Castro, Yessica; Ellis, Joshua T.; Miller, Charles D.; Sims, Ronald C.

    2015-02-01

    Exploring and developing sustainable and efficient technologies for biofuel production are crucial for averting global consequences associated with fuel shortages and climate change. Optimization of sugar liberation from wastewater algae through acid hydrolysis was determined for subsequent fermentation to acetone, butanol, and ethanol (ABE) by Clostridium saccharoperbutylacetonicum N1-4. Acid concentration, retention time, and temperature were evaluated to determine optimal hydrolysis conditions by assessing the sugar and ABE yield as well as the associated costs. Sulfuric acid concentrations ranging from 0-1.5 M, retention times of 40-120 min, and temperatures from 23°C- 90°C were combined to form a full factorial experiment. Acid hydrolysis pretreatment of 10% dried wastewater microalgae using 1.0 M sulfuric acid for 120 min at 80-90°C was found to be the optimal parameters, with a sugar yield of 166.1 g for kg of dry algae, concentrations of 5.23 g/L of total ABE, and 3.74 g/L of butanol at a rate of USD $12.83 per kg of butanol.

  19. Zinc isotope separation in acetone by displacement chromatography using benzo-15-crown-5 resin

    Zinc is considered as a useful material for cooling water treatment in light water plants. Injection of 64Zn depleted Zinc is expected to further reduce the radiation in the reactor water system. For such a purpose of Zinc isotope separation, chemical exchange method has been studied. Breakthrough methods of chromatography experiments were performed. 0.5 mol/dm3 ZnCl2 dissolved in acetone solution was fed to glass columns packed with benzo-15-crown-5 resin at 35 degree C. The effluent was collected in fractions of which zinc concentration was determined by atomic adsorption spectrometer and isotope ratio was measured by ICP-MS. Observed enrichment ratios defined as, (iZn/64Zn)sample/ (iZn/64Zn)original, where i=66,68, are plotted in Figure. From the results of experiment, it was confirmed that heavier zinc is preferentially enriched in the eluted samples of front band regions. The separation coefficient (ε) for 66Zn/64Zn and 68Zn/64Zn of five meters migration was obtained as 5.2 x 10-4 and 8.1 x 10-4, respectively. The error is estimated to be 20% of the values.

  20. Effect of different format-solvent rosemary extracts (Rosmarinus officinalis) on frozen chicken nuggets quality.

    Rocío Teruel, M; Garrido, M Dolores; Espinosa, Miriam C; Linares, M Belén

    2015-04-01

    Three kinds of Rosmarinus officinalis extract (powder-acetone, liquid-methanol, liquid-acetone) were used to examine the effects of format-solvent on the active compounds extracted (total phenolic, carnosol and carnosic acid content) and antioxidant activity (FRAP, ABTS). The results showed that both, as the format but also the solvent used, had significant effect on the parameters analyzed (p extract followed by the liquid methanol and liquid acetone extracts (p extracts on the physical-chemical and sensory quality of frozen chicken nuggets was evaluated. At the dose proposed by the European Union Directive 2010/69/EU for the carnosic and carnosol compounds [150 ppm (mg/kg fat basic)], the format-solvent combination of the rosemary extracts used did not modify the chicken nuggets quality characteristics (pH, colour, sensory quality) and still underlines the effectiveness of these extracts. PMID:25442521

  1. Organic peroxide production in the Cl2-ethane-air photoreaction system

    QI; Bin

    2001-01-01

    [1]Hewitt, C. N., Gregoryl, L. K., Formation and occurrence of organic hydroperoxides in the troposphere: laboratory and field observation, J. Atmos. Chem., 1991, 12: 181.[2]Jackson, A. V., Hewiit, C. N., Atmospheric hydrogen and organic hydroperoxides: A review, Critic Reviews in Environ-metal Science and Technology, 1999, 29(2): 175.[3]Hanst, P. L., Bruce, W. G. Jr., Atmospheric oxidation of hydrocarbons: formation of hydroperoxides and peroxyacides, Atmos. Environ., 1983, 17: 2259.[4]Atkinson, R., Gas-phase tropospheric chemistry of volatile organic compounds: 1, Alkanes and alkenes, J. Phys. Chem. Ref. Data, 1997, 26(2): 217.[5]Qi Bin, Shao Kesheng, Tang Xiaoyan, Determination of hydrogen peroxide and hydrophilic organic peroxides with hemin as a peroxidase substitute in an HPLC system, Anal. Chem. (in Chinese), 1998, 26(9): 1041.[6]Marklund, S., The simultaneous determination of bis(hydroxymethy)-peroxide (BMHP), hydroxymethylhydroperoxide (HMHP) and H2O2 with titanium, (Ⅳ). Equilibria between the peroxides and the stabilities of HMHP and BMHP at physi-ological condition, Acta Chemica Scandinavica, 1971, 25: 3517.[7]Vaghjiani, G. L., Ravishankara, A. R., Kinetics and mechanism of OH reaction with CH3OOH, J. Phys. Chem., 1989, 93: 1948.[8]Niki, H., Maker, P. D., Savage, C. M. et al., Fourier transform infrared studies of the self-reaction of CH3CH2O2 radicals, J. Phys. Chem., 1982, 86: 3825.[9]Nangia, P. S., Benson, S. W., The kinetics of the interaction of peroxy radicals, primary and secondary alkyl peroxy, Int. J. Chem. Kinet., 1989, 12: 43.[10]Becker, K. H., Klaus, J. B., Bechara, J., Production of hydrogen peroxide in forest air by reaction of ozone with terpenes, Nature, 1990, 346: 256.[11]Niki, H., Maker, P. D., Savage, C. M. et al., Further IR spectroscopic evidence for the formation of CH2(OH)OOH in the gas-phase reaction of HO2 with CH2O, Chem. Phys. Lett., 1980 , 75: 533.[12]Burrows, J. P., Moortgat

  2. Synthesis of five- and six-membered cyclic organic peroxides: Key transformations into peroxide ring-retaining products.

    Terent'ev, Alexander O; Borisov, Dmitry A; Vil', Vera A; Dembitsky, Valery M

    2014-01-01

    The present review describes the current status of synthetic five and six-membered cyclic peroxides such as 1,2-dioxolanes, 1,2,4-trioxolanes (ozonides), 1,2-dioxanes, 1,2-dioxenes, 1,2,4-trioxanes, and 1,2,4,5-tetraoxanes. The literature from 2000 onwards is surveyed to provide an update on synthesis of cyclic peroxides. The indicated period of time is, on the whole, characterized by the development of new efficient and scale-up methods for the preparation of these cyclic compounds. It was shown that cyclic peroxides remain unchanged throughout the course of a wide range of fundamental organic reactions. Due to these properties, the molecular structures can be greatly modified to give peroxide ring-retaining products. The chemistry of cyclic peroxides has attracted considerable attention, because these compounds are used in medicine for the design of antimalarial, antihelminthic, and antitumor agents. PMID:24454562

  3. Efficiency of hydrogen peroxide production by ac capillary discharge in water solution

    Efficiency of hydrogen peroxide production by an ac driven underwater capillary discharge was investigated quantitatively. The concentration of formed hydrogen peroxide was measured by a colorimetric method using a specific reaction between H2O2 and a titanium reagent. The amount of formed H2O2 increases linearly during the first hour of the discharge duration. The initial rate and corresponding total energy yield of H2O2 formation by the capillary discharge were determined for initial electrical conductivity of aqueous solution in the range of 100-500 μS cm-1 and average applied power in the range 30-90 W. It comes out that the total energy yield of H2O2 formation, derived from the initial rate of H2O2 formation and the average applied power, increases linearly with average applied power and that solution conductivity has only a negligible effect on the energy yield. A maximum total energy yield of H2O2 formation of 0.9 g kWh-1 was obtained for a 500 μS cm-1 aqueous solution

  4. Synthesis and evaluation of inhaled [11C]butane and intravenously injected [11C]acetone as potential radiotracers for studying inhalant abuse

    The phenomenon of inhalant abuse is a growing problem in the US and many countries around the world. Yet, relatively little is known about the pharmacokinetic properties of inhalants that underlie their abuse potential. While the synthesis of 11C-labeled toluene, acetone and butane has been proposed in the literature, none of these compounds has been developed as radiotracers for PET studies. In the present report we extend our previous studies with [11C]toluene to include [11C]acetone and [11C]butane with the goal of comparing the pharmacokinetic profiles of these three volatile abused substances. Both [11C]toluene and [11C]acetone were administered intravenously and [11C]butane was administered via inhalation to anesthesized baboons. Rapid and efficient uptake of radiolabeled toluene and acetone into the brain was followed by fast clearance in the case of toluene and slower kinetics in the case of acetone. [11C]Butane was detected in the blood and brain following inhalation, but the levels of radioactivity in both tissues dropped to half of the maximal values over the period of less than a minute. To our knowledge, this is the first reported study of the in vivo brain pharmacokinetics of labeled acetone and butane in nonhuman primates. These data provide insight into the pharmacokinetic features possibly associated with the abuse liability of toluene, acetone and butane

  5. Reaction of CO with Ta(eta5-C5Me5)Me4. Intramolecular reductive coupling of carbon monoxide via an eta2-acetone intermediate

    Ta(eta5-C5Me5)Me4 (1) reacts rapidly with 1 mol of CO at 250C to give (in 80% yield) an eta2-acetone complex, monomeric (2). Its IR spectrum shows a peak at 1200/cm which may be described as an oxytantallacyclopropane complex. Since its 1H and 13C NMR spectra show only three types of methyl groups, and since the peak for the acetone methyl group broadens significantly at -800C in toluene-d8 in the 270-MHz 1H NMR spectrum, it is suggested that the molecule has a ground state pseudo-tetragonal-pyramidal geometry which rearranges rapidly under most conditions. Acetone is produced when 2 is treated with oxygen, but bound acetone does not exchange readily with free acetone-d6. Eta2-acetone is reduced to 2-propanol when 2 is treated with water; 2 mol of methane are also formed. The reaction of 1 with enriched 13CO gave Ta(eta5-C5Me5)(0 = 13CMe2)Me2 (2-13C). The peak suspected as upsilon/sub C-O/ at 1200/cm in 2 shifts to 1180/cm in 2-13C. No intermediate was detected between 1 and 2 in low temperature 13C NMR experiments

  6. Biofiltration of a styrene/acetone vapor mixture in two reactor types under conditions of styrene overloading

    Lubos Zapotocky

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This aim of study was to compare the performance of a biofilter (BF and trickle bed reactor (TBR under increased styrene loading with a constant acetone load, 2 gc/m3/h. At styrene loading rates up to 30 gc/m3/h, the BF showed higher styrene removal than TBR. However, the BF efficiency started to drop beyond this threshold loading and could never reach steady state, whereas the TBR continued to yield a 50% styrene removal. The acetone removal remained constant (93-98% in both the reactors at any styrene loading. Once the overloading was lifted, the BF recovered within 26 min, whereas the TBR efficiency bounced back only to 95%, gradually returning to complete removal only in 10 h.

  7. Synthesis and evaluation of sulphonated acetone-formaldehyde resin applied as dispersant of coal-water slurry

    The water-soluble sulphonated acetone-formaldehyde (SAF) resin was synthesized by a reaction among acetone, formaldehyde and sodium sulfite. It is applied as a dispersant of a coal-water slurry, and the influence of the synthesis processing parameter on the inherent viscosity and the dispersing ability of the SAF resin was investigated. The composite SAF resin was regarded as an aliphatic high polymer containing block hydrophilic and hydrophobic structures in the molecular chain, which show little surface activity. The dispersing ability of the SAF resin dispersant in a coal-water slurry was evaluated, and the effect of the SAF mass concentration on the rheological property of the slurries was determined. The results showed that the SAF resin has potential to be developed as a new type of dispersant of a coal-water slurry

  8. Effect of Ascorbic Acid on Lipid Peroxidation Induced by Ceftazidime

    Devbhuti P*,1

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Lipid peroxidation is the oxidative deterioration of polyunsaturated lipids which is a free radical related process and responsible for thedevelopment of many diseases and disorders like diabetes mellitus, hypertension, cancer etc. End products of lipid peroxidation aremalondialdehyde (MDA, 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (4-HNE, etc. which are the ultimate mediator of toxicity. Antioxidants have the capability toinhibit lipid peroxidation. Keeping in mind this fact, the present in vitro study was carried out to evaluate lipid peroxidation induction potential of ceftazidime, a cephalosporin antibiotic and its suppression with ascorbic acid considering some laboratory markers of lipid peroxidation like MDA, 4-HNE and reduced glutathione (GSH. Goat liver was used as the lipid source. After treatment of the liver homogenate with drug and/or antioxidant the levels of 4-HNE, MDA and GSH were estimated in different samples at different hours of incubation. The results showed that the drug ceftazidime could significantly induce lipid peroxidation and the antioxidant ascorbic acid has the capability to inhibit ceftazidime-inducedlipid peroxidation.

  9. Comparative toxicity profiles of Plumbago zeylanica L. root petroleum ether, acetone and hydroalcoholic extracts in Wistar rats

    Kumar, Dushyant; Patil, Paragouda A.; Roy, Subarna; Kholkute, Sanjiv D; Harsha V Hegde; Nair, Vinod

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The root of Plumbago zeylanica Linn. is used in traditional medicine for the treatment of chronic inflammatory diseases and various disorders. The toxicity of this plant has not yet been extensively evaluated. Aim: To evaluate and compare the toxicity of P. zeylanica root petroleum ether (PZPE), acetone (PZAC), and the hydroalcoholic (PZHY) extracts. Materials and Methods: The acute and sub-acute toxicities of extracts were evaluated according to OECD guidelines 425 and 407, res...

  10. Quantitative phosphoproteomics using acetone-based peptide labeling: method evaluation and application to a cardiac ischemia/reperfusion model.

    Wijeratne, Aruna B; Manning, Janet R; Schultz, Jo El J; Greis, Kenneth D

    2013-10-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS) techniques to globally profile protein phosphorylation in cellular systems that are relevant to physiological or pathological changes have been of significant interest in biological research. An MS-based strategy utilizing an inexpensive acetone-based peptide-labeling technique known as reductive alkylation by acetone (RABA) for quantitative phosphoproteomics was explored to evaluate its capacity. Because the chemistry for RABA labeling for phosphorylation profiling had not been previously reported, it was first validated using a standard phosphoprotein and identical phosphoproteomes from cardiac tissue extracts. A workflow was then utilized to compare cardiac tissue phosphoproteomes from mouse hearts not expressing FGF2 versus hearts expressing low-molecular-weight fibroblast growth factor-2 (LMW FGF2) to relate low-molecular-weight fibroblast growth factor-2 (LMW FGF2)-mediated cardioprotective phenomena induced by ischemia/reperfusion injury of hearts, with downstream phosphorylation changes in LMW FGF2 signaling cascades. Statistically significant phosphorylation changes were identified at 14 different sites on 10 distinct proteins, including some with mechanisms already established for LMW FGF2-mediated cardioprotective signaling (e.g., connexin-43), some with new details linking LMW FGF2 to the cardioprotective mechanisms (e.g., cardiac myosin binding protein C or cMyBPC), and also several new downstream effectors not previously recognized for cardio-protective signaling by LMW FGF2. Additionally, one of the phosphopeptides, cMyBPC/pSer-282, identified was further verified with site-specific quantification using an SRM (selected reaction monitoring)-based approach that also relies on isotope labeling of a synthetic phosphopeptide with deuterated acetone as an internal standard. Overall, this study confirms that the inexpensive acetone-based peptide labeling can be used in both exploratory and targeted quantification phosphoproteomic

  11. Studies on the Toxicity of Acetone, Acrolein and Carbon Dioxide on Stored-Product Insects and Wheat Seed

    Ali Asghar Pourmirza; Mehdie Tajbakhsh

    2008-01-01

    In laboratory experiments toxicity of acetone, acrolein and carbon dioxide were investigated against 4 species of stored-product insects. In all experiments, acrolein was the most toxic compound to the tested insects. In empty-space trials, estimated LD50 values of acrolein for adults of Tribolium castaneum (Herbst) (Tenebrionidae), Rhizopertha dominica (F.) (Bostrychidae), Sitophilus oryzae L. (Curculionidae) and Oryzaephilus surinamensis L. (Silvanidae) were 7.26, 6.09, 6.37 and 5.65...

  12. Effects of lindane and acetone on the development of larvae of the southern king crab (lithodes antarcticus Jaquinot)

    Lombardo, R.J. (Univ. of Buenos Aires (Argentina)); Ferrari, L. (National Univ. of Lugan, Buenos Aires (Argentina)); Vinuesa, J.H. (Centro Austral de investigaciones Cientificas, Ushuaia (Argentina))

    1991-02-01

    Lithodes antarcticus (southern king crab) is a commercially important species. The present study attempts to describe the effects of an organochlorine pesticide and the most commonly used solvent (acetone) on the early development of this species. The aims of this study were: to determine the effects of lindane on survival, development and moulting during the early larval stages of L. antarcticus, and to determine an incipient lethal level, corresponding to a threshold concentration, at which acute toxicity ceases.

  13. Bleaching of chlorophylls by UV irradiation in vitro: the effects on chlorophyll organization in acetone and n-hexane

    JELENA ZVEZDANOVIC; DEJAN MARKOVIC

    2008-01-01

    The stability of chlorophylls toward UV irradiation was studied by Vis spectrophotometry in extracts containing mixtures of photosynthetic pigments in acetone and n-hexane. The chlorophylls underwent destruction (bleaching) obeying first-order kinetics. The bleaching was governed by three major factors: the energy input of the UV photons, the concentration of the chlorophylls and the polarity of the solvent, implying different molecular organizations of the chlorophylls in the two solvents.

  14. The potential of aqueous and acetone extracts of galls of Quercus infectoria as antibacterial agents

    Basri Dayang; Fan S

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the antibacterial potential of aqueous and acetone extracts of galls of Quercus infectoria by determination of Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) and Minimum Bactericidal Concentration (MBC) values. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The extracts from the galls of Q. infectoria at 10 mg/ml were screened against three Gram-positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923, Staphylococcus epidermidis and Bacillus subtilis) and three Gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli NCT...

  15. Impact of Hot-Water Extraction on Acetone-Water Oxygen Delignification of Paulownia Spp. and Lignin Recovery

    Chen Gong; Biljana M. Bujanovic

    2014-01-01

    A hardwood-based biorefinery process starting with hot-water extraction (HWE) is recommended in order to remove most of the hemicelluloses/xylans before further processing. HWE may be followed by delignification in acetone/water in the presence of oxygen (AWO) for the production of cellulose and lignin. In this study, the HWE-AWO sequence was evaluated for its effectiveness at removing lignin from the fast-growing species Paulownia tomentosa (PT) and Paulownia elongata (PE), in comparison wit...

  16. CINETIQUE ET MECANISME DE DEGRADATION ATMOSPHERIQUE DE TROIS COMPOSES ORGANIQUES VOLATILS : L'ACETONE, LE PHENOL ET LE CATECHOL

    TURPIN, Estelle

    2004-01-01

    M. P. Devolder Président de jury Mme C. Fittschen Directrice de thèse M. A. Mellouki Rapporteur M. E. Villenave Rapporteur M. E. Hénon Examinateur M. A. Tomas Examinateur In this thesis, atmospheric degradation of three VOC (volatile organic compound), acetone, phenol and catechol, has been studied. These compounds are renowned to be some of main compounds in the atmosphere because the relative importance of their primary emissions (biogenic, gas fumes, ...) and secondary emissions (VOCs o...

  17. The effect of hydrogen peroxide on uranium oxide films on 316L stainless steel

    Wilbraham, Richard J., E-mail: r.wilbraham@lancaster.ac.uk [The Lloyd’s Register Foundation Centre for Nuclear Engineering, Engineering Department, Lancaster University, Bailrigg, Lancashire LA1 4YR (United Kingdom); Boxall, Colin, E-mail: c.boxall@lancaster.ac.uk [The Lloyd’s Register Foundation Centre for Nuclear Engineering, Engineering Department, Lancaster University, Bailrigg, Lancashire LA1 4YR (United Kingdom); Goddard, David T., E-mail: dave.t.goddard@nnl.co.uk [National Nuclear Laboratory, Preston Laboratory, Springfields, Preston, Lancashire PR4 0XJ (United Kingdom); Taylor, Robin J., E-mail: robin.j.taylor@nnl.co.uk [National Nuclear Laboratory, Central Laboratory, Seascale, Cumbria CA20 1PG (United Kingdom); Woodbury, Simon E., E-mail: simon.woodbury@nnl.co.uk [National Nuclear Laboratory, Central Laboratory, Seascale, Cumbria CA20 1PG (United Kingdom)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • The first report of the presence of both UO{sub 2} and polymeric UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} in the same electrodeposited U oxide sample. • The action of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} on electrodeposited U oxides is described using corrosion based concepts. • Electrodeposited U oxide freely dissolves at hydrogen peroxide concentrations <100 μmol dm{sup −3}. • At [H{sub 2}O{sub 2}] > 0.1 mmol dm{sup −3} dissolution is inhibited by formation of a studtite passivation layer. • At [H{sub 2}O{sub 2}] ⩾ 1 mol dm{sup −3} studtite formation competes with uranyl–peroxide complex formation. - Abstract: For the first time the effect of hydrogen peroxide on the dissolution of electrodeposited uranium oxide films on 316L stainless steel planchets (acting as simulant uranium-contaminated metal surfaces) has been studied. Analysis of the H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-mediated film dissolution processes via open circuit potentiometry, alpha counting and SEM/EDX imaging has shown that in near-neutral solutions of pH 6.1 and at [H{sub 2}O{sub 2}] ⩽ 100 μmol dm{sup −3} the electrodeposited uranium oxide layer is freely dissolving, the associated rate of film dissolution being significantly increased over leaching of similar films in pH 6.1 peroxide-free water. At H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentrations between 1 mmol dm{sup −3} and 0.1 mol dm{sup −3}, formation of an insoluble studtite product layer occurs at the surface of the uranium oxide film. In analogy to corrosion processes on common metal substrates such as steel, the studtite layer effectively passivates the underlying uranium oxide layer against subsequent dissolution. Finally, at [H{sub 2}O{sub 2}] > 0.1 mol dm{sup −3} the uranium oxide film, again in analogy to common corrosion processes, behaves as if in a transpassive state and begins to dissolve. This transition from passive to transpassive behaviour in the effect of peroxide concentration on UO{sub 2} films has not hitherto been observed or explored, either in terms

  18. Evaluation of the antioxidant, antibacterial, and antiproliferative activities of the acetone extract of the roots of Senna italica (Fabaceae).

    Masoko, P; Gololo, S S; Mokgotho, M P; Eloff, J N; Howard, R I; Mampuru, L J

    2010-01-01

    Senna italica, a member of the Fabaceae family (subfamily Caesalpinaceae), is widely used traditionally to treat a number of disease conditions, such as sexually transmitted diseases and some forms of intestinal complications. The roots of Senna italica were collected from Zebediela subregion, Limpopo province (S.A), powdered and extracted with acetone by cold/shaking extraction method. The phytochemical composition of the extract was determined by thin layer chromatography (TLC). The chromatograms were visualised with vanillin-sulphuric acid and p-anisaldehyde reagents. The total phenolic content of the extract was determined by Folin-Ciocalteu method and expressed as TAE/g dry weight. The extract was assayed for the in vitro anticancer activity using Jurkat T cells, antioxidant activity using DPPH assay and antibacterial activity by bioautographic method and the microtitre plate method. The acetone extract of the roots of Senna italica inhibited the growth of Jurkat T cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The extract also had free radical scavenging activity as well as reasonable antibacterial activity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Enterococcus faecalis, Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus with MICs ranging from 0,08 to 0.16 mg/ml in the same order as ampicillin the positive control. The biological activities observed in the acetone extract validated the ethnomedicinal use of Senna italica. PMID:21304625

  19. Gas sensing behaviour of Cr2O3 and W6+: Cr2O3 nanoparticles towards acetone

    Kohli, Nipin; Hastir, Anita; Singh, Ravi Chand

    2016-05-01

    This paper reports the acetone gas sensing properties of Cr2O3 and 2% W6+ doped Cr2O3 nanoparticles. The simple cost-effective hydrolysis assisted co-precipitation method was adopted. Synthesized samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) techniques. XRD revealed that synthesized nanoparticles have corundum structure. The lattice parameters have been calculated by Rietveld refinement; and strain and crystallite size have been calculated by using the Williamson-Hall plots. For acetone gas sensing properties, the nanoparticles were applied as thick film onto alumina substrate and tested at different operating temperatures. The results showed that the optimum operating temperature of both the gas sensors is 250°C. At optimum operating temperature, the response of Cr2O3 and 2% W6+ doped Cr2O3 gas sensor towards 100 ppm acetone was found to be 25.5 and 35.6 respectively. The investigations revealed that the addition of W6+ as a dopant enhanced the sensing response of Cr2O3 nanoparticles appreciably.

  20. Hepatoprotective Effect of Aqueous Acetone Extract of Sida alba L. (Malvaceae Against Alcohol Induced Liver Damage in albinos Wistar Rats

    K. Konaté

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The present study was conducted to evaluate the hepatoprotective effects of aqueous acetone extract of Sida alba. (Malvaceae an herbal plant used in Burkina Faso to treat traditionally hepatics affections in albinos Wistar rats. Animals were treated by gavage during 28 days with different doses of aqueous acetone extracts of Sida alba. (75, 100, 150 mg/kg suspended in 35% ethanol. Control groups received alcohol 35% and water. In vivo administration of 35% ethano l for 28 days results an activity of liver marker enzymes (AST, ALT, ALP, glucose, triglycerides, total cholesterol, total bilirubin and direct bilirubin in serum as compared with rats which received water (control water. However, administrations of 35% ethanol along with aqueous acetone extract decreased the activities of liver markers enzyme in serum comparatively to the control water group (p0.05 and p<0.05. This study revealed that Sida alba presents a hepatoprotective potential and this plant could be traditionally exploited in the treatment of affection hepatics.

  1. Inactivation of rabies virus by hydrogen peroxide.

    Abd-Elghaffar, Asmaa A; Ali, Amal E; Boseila, Abeer A; Amin, Magdy A

    2016-02-01

    Development of safe and protective vaccines against infectious pathogens remains a challenge. Inactivation of rabies virus is a critical step in the production of vaccines and other research reagents. Beta-propiolactone (βPL); the currently used inactivating agent for rabies virus is expensive and proved to be carcinogenic in animals. This study aimed to investigate the ability of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) to irreversibly inactivate rabies virus without affecting its antigenicity and immunogenicity in pursuit of finding safe, effective and inexpensive alternative inactivating agents. H2O2 3% rapidly inactivated a Vero cell adapted fixed rabies virus strain designated as FRV/K within 2h of exposure without affecting its antigenicity or immunogenicity. No residual infectious virus was detected and the H2O2-inactivated vaccine proved to be safe and effective when compared with the same virus harvest inactivated with the classical inactivating agent βPL. Mice immunized with H2O2-inactivated rabies virus produced sufficient level of antibodies and were protected when challenged with lethal CVS virus. These findings reinforce the idea that H2O2 can replace βPL as inactivating agent for rabies virus to reduce time and cost of inactivation process. PMID:26731189

  2. Open-system nanocasting synthesis of nanoscale α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} porous structure with enhanced acetone-sensing properties

    Sun, Xiaohong, E-mail: sunxh@tju.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Key Lab of Advanced Ceramics and Machining Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Ji, Huiming; Li, Xiaolei; Cai, Shu [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Key Lab of Advanced Ceramics and Machining Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Zheng, Chunming, E-mail: zhengchunming@tjpu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Hollow-fiber Membrane Materials and Membrane Processes, School of Environmental and Chemical Engineering, Tianjin Polytechnic University, Tianjin 300387 (China)

    2014-07-05

    Highlights: • Nanoscale α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} porous structure was fabricated by an open-system nanocasting way. • Nanoscale α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} exhibits enhanced acetone-sensing property than the mesoporous one. • High surface area, small diameter and wide porous distribution are sensing reasons. - Abstract: Nanoscale α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} with porous structure was synthesized via an open-system nanocasting method. Characterization of the crystal structures, morphologies, surface areas, and pore size distributions of the as-synthesized α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} by wide-angle and small-angle X-ray powder diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and nitrogen physisorption analysis demonstrated that the nanoscale α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} synthesized in open system had a less crystallinity with average diameter of ∼6.0 nm, higher BET specific surface area of 205.4 m{sup 2} g{sup −1}, and wider pore size distribution from ∼2.2 nm to 15.7 nm compared with that of the mesoporous α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} synthesized in closed system. The gas-sensing measurement results revealed that the nanoscale α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} based gas sensor had a much better response to acetone than that of the device prepared from the mesoporous α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}. A possible gas-sensing mechanism based on the α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} samples synthesized with different nanocasting systems was discussed in detail. Wide porous distribution of the nanoscale α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, as well as small particle size and high surface area are effective for gas molecules diffusion and formation of sufficient electron depletion area and result the enhanced sensor response, which suggests that it has great potential for practical applications in diabetes diagnosis.

  3. Spatial and temporal variations and factors controlling the concentrations of hydrogen peroxide and organic peroxides in rivers

    Mostofa, Khan M. G.; Sakugawa, Hiroshi

    2009-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and organic peroxides (ROOH) were examined in water samples collected from the upstream and downstream sites of two Japanese rivers (the Kurose and the Ohta). H2O2 concentrations during monthly measurements varied between 6 and 213nM in the Kurose River and 33 and 188nM in the Ohta River. ROOH varied between 0 and 73nM in the Kurose River and 1 and 80nM in the Ohta. Concentrations of peroxides were higher during the summer months than in winter. H2O2 concentrations co...

  4. Effects of acetone-soaking treatment on the performance of polymer solar cells based on P3HT/PCBM bulk heterojunction

    The improvement of the acetone-soaking treatment to the performance of polymer solar cells based on the P3HT/PCBM bulk heterojunction is reported. Undergoing acetone-soaking, the PCBM does not distribute uniformly in the vertical direction, a PCBM enrichment layer forms on the top of the active layer, which is beneficial to the collection of the carriers and blocking the inverting diffusion carriers. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis reveals that the PCBM weight ratio on the top of the active layer increases by 20% after the acetone-soaking treatment. Due to the nonuniform distribution of PCBM, the short-circuit current density, the open-circuit voltage, and the fill factor are enhanced significantly. Finally, the power conversion efficiency of the acetone-soaking device increases by 31% compared with the control device. (interdisciplinary physics and related areas of science and technology)

  5. The distribution of acid, water, methanol, ethanol and acetone between mixed aqueous-organic nitric acid solutions of trilaurylammoniumnitrate in cyclohexane

    The distribution of acid, water, methanol, ethanol and acetone between mixed aqueous-organic nitric acid solutions and solutions of trilaurylammoniumnitrate in cyclohexane has been investigated. The distribution of acid rises with increasing concentrations of nitric acid, methanol, ethanol and acetone in the mixed aqueous-organic phase. The effect of the organic additives in increasing the distribution of the acid is methanol< ethanol< acetone. The concentration of nitric acid in the organic phase can be calculated by a formula similar to that describing the extraction from pure aqueous solutions. The distribution curves of water, methanol and ethanol resemble each other, all of them showing a minimum, when the distribution ratio is plotted versus the nitric acid concentration in the mixed aqueous-organic phase. The acetone distribution decreases steadily with increasing nitric acid concentration. The shape of the curves is briefly discussed. (T.G.)

  6. Zinc carnosine protects against hydrogen peroxide-induced DNA damage in WIL2-NS lymphoblastoid cell line independent of poly (ADP-Ribose) polymerase expression.

    Ooi, Theng Choon; Mohammad, Nur Hafiza; Sharif, Razinah

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the ability of zinc carnosine to protect the human lymphoblastoid (WIL2-NS) cell line from hydrogen peroxide-induced DNA damage. Cells were cultured with medium containing zinc carnosine at the concentrations of 0.4, 4, 16 and 32 μM for 9 days prior to treatment with 30 μM of hydrogen peroxide (30 min). Zinc carnosine at the concentration 16 μM was optimal in protecting cells from hydrogen peroxide-induced cytotoxicity and gave the lowest percentage of apoptotic and necrotic cells. Results showed that zinc carnosine was able to induce glutathione production and protect cells from hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress at all concentration and the highest protection was observed at 32-μM zinc carnosine culture. Cytokinesis-block micronucleus cytome assay showed that cells cultured with 4-32 μM of zinc carnosine showed significant reduction in micronuclei formation, nucleoplasmic bridges and nuclear bud frequencies (p carnosines possess antioxidant properties and are able to reduce hydrogen peroxide-induced DNA damage in vitro independent of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase. Further studies are warranted to understand the mechanism of protection of zinc carnosine against hydrogen peroxide-induced damage. PMID:25326781

  7. Apparatus for the continuous precipitation of uranium peroxide

    A process and apparatus are described for the production of pourable, directly compactable uranium dioxide powder by continuous precipitation of uranium peroxide from a stirred uranyl nitrate solution at a pH of 1-2.5 with hydrogen peroxide, calcining of the peroxide at 5000-8000C. And subsequent reduction at 5500-7500C. Precipitation solution contains 70-150 g/l of uranium and 0.80 g/l of ammonium nitrate and is treated with 15-20% aqueous hydrogen peroxide solution in the ratio of U:H2O2 from 1:1.5 to 1:3 and there is led through the solution a mixture of ammoni and air having an air-ammonia volume ratio of 1:0.3-0.6

  8. Quantifying intracellular hydrogen peroxide perturbations in terms of concentration

    Beijing K. Huang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Molecular level, mechanistic understanding of the roles of reactive oxygen species (ROS in a variety of pathological conditions is hindered by the difficulties associated with determining the concentration of various ROS species. Here, we present an approach that converts fold-change in the signal from an intracellular sensor of hydrogen peroxide into changes in absolute concentration. The method uses extracellular additions of peroxide and an improved biochemical measurement of the gradient between extracellular and intracellular peroxide concentrations to calibrate the intracellular sensor. By measuring peroxiredoxin activity, we found that this gradient is 650-fold rather than the 7–10-fold that is widely cited. The resulting calibration is important for understanding the mass-action kinetics of complex networks of redox reactions, and it enables meaningful characterization and comparison of outputs from endogenous peroxide generating tools and therapeutics across studies.

  9. High Test Peroxide High Sealing Conical Seal Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — High Test Peroxide (HTP) Highly Compatible High Sealing Conical Seals are necessary for ground test operations and space based applications. Current conical seals...

  10. Atmospheric hydrogen peroxide and methyl hydroperoxide in Yanbian, China

    Kim, Y.; Ji, B.; Lee, M.; Kim, K.; Lee, G.

    2003-04-01

    Hydrogen peroxide and organic peroxides are photochemical byproducts. They are referred as the indicator of oxidizing capacity of the atmosphere. Further, they are related with the production and removal of ozone in photochemistry. To better understand the photochemical processes in the troposphere, it is essential to know the correct concentration of hydroperoxides. Hydrogen peroxide and methyl Hydroperoxide were measured from 24 Aug to 3 Sep in Yanbian, China. Measurements were made for continuously during the whole course of the experiments. After collected in aqueous solution using continuous scrubbing coil, hydroperoxides were separated by HPLC, and then quantified by fluorescence produced using postcolumn enzyme derivatization. Collection and analysis were done automatically Average concentration of hydrogen peroxide and methyl hydroperoxide were 0.9ppbc and 1.6 ppb, respectively. In general, hydroperoxides showed typical diurnal variations with the maximum concentration during day. It was the first study of air pollution conducted in Yanbian, China. Detailed results will be presented in the meeting.

  11. Efficient Electrochemical Hydrogen Peroxide Generation in Water Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — An electrochemical cell is proposed for the efficient generation of 3% hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in pure water using only power, oxygen and water. H2O2 is an...

  12. A Novel Fluorescent Reagent for Analysis of Hydrogen Peroxide

    董素英; 苏美红; 聂丽华; 马会民

    2003-01-01

    8-(4,6-Dichloro-1,3,5-trazinoxy)quinoline(DTQ) was evaluated as a new fluorescent reagent for determining hydrogen peroxide.It was found that the fluorescence intensity of DTQ in alkaline medium could be dramatically enhanced upon addition of H2O2.Based on this effect,a simple and selective method for the spectrofluorimetric determination of hydrogen peroxide was estabhlished.The relative standard deviation of the method was found to be 1.1?for 9 replicate determinations of a 4.6×10-6mol/L hydrogen peroxide solution.The linear range was 2.3×10-7-2.3×10-5mol/L with a detection limit of 2.2×10-8mol/L(S/N=3).The ,method was attempted to determine hydrogen peroxide in synthetic human serum samples with satisfactory results.

  13. Hydrogen peroxide- metals- chelating agents; interactions and analytical techniques

    Rämö, J.

    2003-01-01

    Abstract Information about interactions among metals, hydrogen peroxide and chelating agents is needed to develop environmental technology and the operating efficiency of modern elemental chlorine free and total chlorine free bleaching processes. The work presented here focused on the properties of metal chelates and corrosion of titanium in an alkaline hydrogen peroxide solution. A comparative study between three rapid analysis methods, ICP-AES, XRF and ISE, was performed in pulp matrix a...

  14. Selective electrochemical generation of hydrogen peroxide from water oxidation

    Viswanathan, Venkatasubramanian; Hansen, Heine A.; Nørskov, Jens K.

    2015-01-01

    Water is a life-giving source, fundamental to human existence, yet, over a billion people lack access to clean drinking water. Present techniques for water treatment such as piped, treated water rely on time and resource intensive centralized solutions. In this work, we propose a decentralized device concept that can utilize sunlight to split water into hydrogen and hydrogen peroxide. The hydrogen peroxide can oxidize organics while the hydrogen bubbles out. In enabling this device, we requir...

  15. Graphene-based materials in catalytic wet peroxide oxidation

    Gomes, Helder; Ribeiro, Rui; Pastrana-Martínez, Luisa; Figueiredo, José; Faria, Joaquim; Silva, Adrián

    2014-01-01

    In catalytic wet peroxide oxidation (CWPO),an advanced oxidation process, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is decomposed catalytically giving rise to hydroxyl radicals (HO•).These radicals, exhibiting high oxidizing potential, serve as effective and non selective species for the degradation of several organic pollutants in liquid phase. Since the report of Lücking et al. [1], carbon materials have been explored as catalysts for CWPO[2]. Recent reports address process intensification issues, br...

  16. Natural manganese deposits as catalyst for decomposing hydrogen peroxide

    Knol, A.H.; K. Lekkerkerker-Teunissen; Van Dijk, J. C.

    2015-01-01

    Drinking water companies more and more implement Advanced Oxidation Processes (AOP) in their treatment schemes to increase the barrier against organic micropollutants (OMPs). It is necessary to decompose the excessive hydrogen peroxide after applying AOP to avoid negative effects in the following, often biological, treatment steps. A drinking water company in the western part of the Netherlands investigated decomposition of about 5.75 mg L−1 hydrogen peroxide in pre-...

  17. 49 CFR 173.225 - Packaging requirements and other provisions for organic peroxides.

    2010-10-01

    ... require temperature control are subject to the provisions of § 173.21(f). When an IBC or bulk packaging is... that is not identified by technical name in the Organic Peroxides Table, Organic Peroxide IBC Table, or...) Organic Peroxide IBC Table. The following Organic Peroxide IBC Table specifies, by technical name,...

  18. Phytochemical properties, total antioxidant status of acetone and methanol extract of Terminalia arjuna Roxb. bark and its hypoglycemic effect on Type-II diabetic albino rats.

    Chandan Kumar

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, acetone and methanol extract of T. arjuna Roxb. bark was evaluated for its phytochemical properties and antioxidant status by FRAP method. The result indicated that tannin, alkaloid, triterpenoid, flavonoid, phytosteroids and saponin are present in both the acetone and methanol extract. Total antioxidant status was found to be significantly (P˂0.01 higher in acetone extract (212.5±11.55 µM as compared to methanol extract (35.50±4.70 µM. This indicates higher antioxidative property of T. arjuna bark acetone extract in comparison to methanol extract and selected for in vivo study. In vivo study, showed protective effect of acetone extract of T. arjuna bark towards blood glucose, oral glucose tolerance (OGTT and insulin tolarence test in STZ treated rats. Feeding 500 mg/kg bw arjuna bark extract to rats showed significantly (P<0.05 lower parameters as compared to rats of diabetic control rats and 250 mg/kg bw arjuna bark fed rats and was non-significant with glimepiride fed rats. Feeding 500 mg/kg bw extract showed significantly (P<0.05 higher anti-hyperglycemic and anti-diabetic effects as compared to 250 mg/kg bw extract. It is concluded that the acetone extract of Terminalia arjuna bark exhibit antioxidant power and hypoglycemic properties.

  19. Peroxide test strips detect added hydrogen peroxide in raw milk at levels affecting bacterial load.

    Martin, Nicole H; Friedlander, Adam; Mok, Allen; Kent, David; Wiedmann, Martin; Boor, Kathryn J

    2014-10-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) has a long-established history of use as a preservative in milk worldwide. The use of H2O2 to activate the inherent lactoperoxidase enzyme system has dramatically improved the quality of raw dairy products in areas in which cooling is not widely available. In the United States, however, where refrigeration is widely available, the addition of H2O2 to milk is not permitted, with the exception of certain applications prior to cheesemaking and during the preparation of modified whey. Due to the relatively quick deterioration of H2O2 in fluid milk, the detection of raw milk adulterated with the compound can be challenging. In this study we evaluated (i) total aerobic bacterial counts and (ii) ability of peroxide test strips to detect H2O2 in raw milk with various concentrations (0, 100, 300, 500, 700, and 900 ppm) of added H2O2, incubated at both 6 and 21°C for 0, 24, and 48 h. Results showed that at both 6 and 21°C the H2O2 concentration and time had a significant effect on bacterial loads in raw milk. Additionally, commercially available test strips were able to detect H2O2 in raw milk, with predicted probability of >90%, immediately after addition and after 24 and 48 h for the higher concentrations used, offering a viable method for detecting raw milk adulteration with H2O2. PMID:25285503

  20. Localised hydrogen peroxide sensing for reproductive health

    Purdey, Malcolm S.; Schartner, Erik P.; Sutton-McDowall, Melanie L.; Ritter, Lesley J.; Thompson, Jeremy G.; Monro, Tanya M.; Abell, Andrew D.

    2015-05-01

    The production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is known to affect the developmental competence of embryos. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) an important reactive oxygen species, is also known to causes DNA damage and defective sperm function. Current techniques require incubating a developing embryo with an organic fluorophore which is potentially hazardous for the embryo. What we need is a localised ROS sensor which does not require fluorophores in solution and hence will allow continuous monitoring of H2O2 production without adversely affect the development of the embryo. Here we report studies on such a fibre-based sensor for the detection of H2O2 that uses a surface-bound aryl boronate fluorophore carboxyperoxyfluor-1(CPF1). Optical fibres present a unique platform due to desirable characteristics as dip sensors in biological solutions. Attempts to functionalise the fibre tips using polyelectrolyte layers and (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane (APTES) coatings resulted in a limited signal and poor fluorescent response to H2O2 due to a low tip surface density of the fluorophore. To increase the surface density, CPF1 was integrated into a polymer matrix formed on the fibre tip by a UV-catalysed polymerisation process of acrylamide onto a methacrylate silane layer. The polyacrylamide containing CPF1 gave a much higher surface density than previous surface attachment methods and the sensor was found to effectively detect H2O2. Using this method, biologically relevant concentrations of H2O2 were detected, enabling remote sensing studies into ROS releases from embryos throughout early development.

  1. Peroxide effects of iodide excess on mitochondria in Fischer rat thyroid cell line in the early period

    李敏

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the peroxide effects of iodide excess on mitochondria in Fischer rat thyroid cell line(FRTL)in the early period.Methods After treatment with 0.0 mmol/L(control group)or 0.1 mmol/L potassium iodide(KI)for 2,4 and 24 h,respectively,changes of mitochondrial superoxide formation were assayed by flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy using mitochondria-targeted hydroethidine(Mito SOX).

  2. Hydrogen Peroxide Linked to Lysine Oxidase Activity Facilitates Biofilm Differentiation and Dispersal in Several Gram-Negative Bacteria▿

    Mai-Prochnow, Anne; Lucas-Elio, Patricia; Egan, Suhelen; Thomas, Torsten; Webb, Jeremy S.; Sanchez-Amat, Antonio; Kjelleberg, Staffan

    2008-01-01

    The marine bacterium Pseudoalteromonas tunicata produces an antibacterial and autolytic protein, AlpP, which causes death of a subpopulation of cells during biofilm formation and mediates differentiation, dispersal, and phenotypic variation among dispersal cells. The AlpP homologue (LodA) in the marine bacterium Marinomonas mediterranea was recently identified as a lysine oxidase which mediates cell death through the production of hydrogen peroxide. Here we show that AlpP in P. tunicata also ...

  3. Adsorption of some metal complexes derived from acetyl acetone on activated carbon and purolite S-930

    Salam A.H. Al-Ameri

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A new Schiff base (HL derived from condensation of p-anisidine and acetyl acetone has been prepared and used as a chelating ligand to prepare Cr(III, Mn(II, Co(II, Ni(II and Cu(II complexes. The study of the nature of these complexes formed in ethanol solution following the mole ratio method (2:1, L:M gave results which were compared successfully with these obtained from isolated solid state studies. These studies revealed that the complexes having square planner geometry of the type (ML2, M = Co(II, Ni(II and Cu(II, and octahedral geometry of the type [CrIIIL2(H2O2]Cl and [MNIIL2(H2O2]. The adsorption studies of three complexes Cr(III, Mn(II, and Co(II on activated carbon, H and Na-forms of purolite S-930 resin show high adsorption percentage for Cr(III on purolite S-930 due to ion exchange interaction compared with high adsorption of neutral Mn(II, Co(II complexes on activated charcoal. Linear plot of log Qe versus log Ce showed that the adsorption isotherm of these three complexes on activated carbon, H and Na-forms of purolite S-930 surface obeys Freundlich isotherm and was similar to S-curve type according to Giles classification which investigates heterogeneous adsorption. The regression values indicate that the adsorption data for these complexes fitted well within the Freundlich isothermal plots for the concentration studied. The accuracy and precision of the concentration measurements of these complexes were determined by preparing standard laboratory samples, the results show relative error ranging from ±1.08 to 5.31, ±1.04 to 4.82 and ±0.28 to 3.09 and the relative standard deviation did not exceed ±6.23, ±2.77 and ±4.38% for A1, A2 and A3 complexes, respectively.

  4. Changes of hydrogen peroxide and radical-scavenging activity of raspberry during osmotic, convective, and freeze-drying.

    Novaković, Miroslav M; Stevanović, Snežana M; Gorjanović, Stanislava Ž; Jovanovic, Predrag M; Tešević, Vele V; Janković, Miodrag A; Sužnjević, Desanka Ž

    2011-05-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the influence of different drying treatments on antioxidant (AO) activity and phenolic content of raspberry (Rubus idaeus), cultivar Willamette. Whole raspberry fruits were dried convectively (air-drying), osmotically, and freeze-dried. Acetone-water extracts of fresh and dried raspberries were assessed for total phenolic content by standard Folin-Ciocalteau method. Two AO assays were applied, a recently developed direct current (DC) polarographic assay based on decrease of anodic oxidation current of hydrogen peroxide and widely used radical scavenge against the 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH). Strong correlation has been obtained between both AO assays and total phenolic content. In addition, some individual phenolic compounds present in raspberry have been assessed using DPPH and DC polarographic assay. Comparison and evaluation of drying methods has been based on preservation of AO activity and total phenolic content. Obtained results confirmed superiority of freeze-drying; convective drying caused slight changes while osmotic dehydration showed a significant decrease of phenolic compounds and AO activity. PMID:22417351

  5. A Three-Step Acne System Containing Solubilized Benzoyl Peroxide versus Benzoyl Peroxide/Clindamycin in Pediatric Patients with Acne

    Eichenfield, Lawrence F.; Thiboutot, Diane; Shalita, Alan; Swinyer, Leonard; Tanghetti, Emil; Tschen, Eduardo; Parr, Lisa

    2009-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the clinical benefit in adolescents of a three-step acne system containing solubilized benzoyl peroxide. Design. Patients in this multicenter, investigator-blind trial were randomly assigned to receive 10 weeks of treatment with either the three-step acne system for normal-to-oily skin (proprietary 2% salicylic acid cleanser twice daily + proprietary 2% salicylic acid toner once daily + solubilized 5% benzoyl peroxide gel twice daily) or with control cleanser + 5% benzo...

  6. Alkaline peroxide processing of low-enriched uranium targets for 99Mo production -- Decomposition of hydrogen peroxide

    The recent progress on the alkaline peroxide processing of low-enriched uranium targets for the production of 99Mo, a parent nuclide of the widely used medical isotope 99mTc, is reported. Kinetic studies were undertaken to investigate the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide in alkaline solution in contact with a uranium metal surface. It was found that the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide essentially follows the kinetic trend of uranium dissolution and can be classified into two regimes, depending on the hydroxide concentration. In the low-base regime (0.2 M), the rate of peroxide decomposition is independent of alkali concentration. When the acid/base equilibrium between H2O2 and O2H- is taken into account, the overall rate of hydrogen peroxide disappearance can be described as a 0.25th order reaction with respect to hydrogen peroxide concentration over NaOH concentrations ranging from 0.01 to 5 M. Empirical kinetics models are proposed and discussed

  7. Seasonal variations of acetone in the upper troposphere-lower stratosphere of the northern midlatitudes as observed by ACE-FTS

    Dufour, G.; Szopa, S.; Harrison, J. J.; Boone, C. D.; Bernath, P. F.

    2016-05-01

    This study reports on the climatological acetone distribution and seasonal variations in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere of the northern midlatitudes, derived from observations by the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment Fourier Transform Spectrometer (ACE-FTS) onboard SCISAT. The acetone profiles retrieved from 5 to ∼20 km cover the period from January 2004 to September 2010. The 1σ statistical fitting errors are typically ∼5-20% within the upper troposphere (UT), increasing in the lower stratosphere (LS) with decreasing acetone. The systematic errors range between 15% and 20%. The largest UT acetone mixing ratios (∼1200 ppt on average in July over Siberia) are observed in summer in the northern mid- and high latitudes. Mixing ratios are larger over continental regions than over the ocean. Comparisons with airborne measurements available in the literature point toward a possible underestimation in acetone retrieved from ACE-FTS. The largest differences occur primarily in winter and for the background values. This underestimation is attributed to the complexity of the spectral region used for the retrieval. The annual cycle of acetone for the 30-70°N midlatitude band shows a maximum during summer, reflecting the annual cycle of the primary terrestrial biogenic source of acetone. By comparison with ACE-FTS, the LMDz-INCA global climate-chemistry model systematically overestimates acetone mixing ratios lower than 400 ppt. This overestimation is thus generalized for the lower stratosphere, the Tropics and beyond 70°N for the upper troposphere. In contrast, in the upper troposphere of the 30-70°N region, where the acetone levels are the highest (>450 ppt on average), the model-observation differences are in the range of the observation uncertainty. However, in this region, the model fails to capture the annual cycle of acetone, culminating in July. A seasonal cycle can only be obtained by considering high biogenic emissions but this cycle is shifted

  8. Effect of biosubstances on the depleted uranium-hydrogen peroxide system

    Recently the chemical toxicity of depleted uranium is in the center of wide interest, because of its military use. Hamilton et al. reported the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the uranium-hydrogen peroxide system. Miller et al. reported the DNA damage by depleted uranium, suggesting a little affect of alpha-decay. The effort should be, therefore, concentrated on the study of ROS formation by DU under various conditions. In the present study, the characteristics and the mechanism of hydroxyl radical formation in the depleted uranium (DU)-hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) system and the effects of anti-oxidants on the system were studied. Hydroxyl radical were produced both in UO22+ - H2O2 and UO2+ - H2O2 systems. Kinetic study of these systems indicated that the hydroxyl radical formation in the UO22+ - H2O2 system could be described as a stepwise reaction process including the reduction of UO22+ to UO2+ by H2O2 and the Fenton-type reaction of UO2+ with H2O2. Glucose and glucosamine, acting as ordinal radical scavengers in the UV-irradiated H2O2 system, indicated quite different behaviors each other in the UO22+ - H2O2 system. Amino acids and peptides little bit depressed the hydroxyl radical formation both in the UV-irradiated H2O2 and the UO22+ - H2O2 systems. These results indicated that the behavior of biosubstances in the UO22+ - H2O2 system could be explained by the direct elimination of hydroxyl radical and the coupling of UO22+ ion with these compounds. Both effects are possible to raise the chemical toxicity of depleted uranium.

  9. Different Modes of Hydrogen Peroxide Action During Seed Germination

    Wojtyla, Łukasz; Lechowska, Katarzyna; Kubala, Szymon; Garnczarska, Małgorzata

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide was initially recognized as a toxic molecule that causes damage at different levels of cell organization and thus losses in cell viability. From the 1990s, the role of hydrogen peroxide as a signaling molecule in plants has also been discussed. The beneficial role of H2O2 as a central hub integrating signaling network in response to biotic and abiotic stress and during developmental processes is now well established. Seed germination is the most pivotal phase of the plant life cycle, affecting plant growth and productivity. The function of hydrogen peroxide in seed germination and seed aging has been illustrated in numerous studies; however, the exact role of this molecule remains unknown. This review evaluates evidence that shows that H2O2 functions as a signaling molecule in seed physiology in accordance with the known biology and biochemistry of H2O2. The importance of crosstalk between hydrogen peroxide and a number of signaling molecules, including plant phytohormones such as abscisic acid, gibberellins, and ethylene, and reactive molecules such as nitric oxide and hydrogen sulfide acting on cell communication and signaling during seed germination, is highlighted. The current study also focuses on the detrimental effects of H2O2 on seed biology, i.e., seed aging that leads to a loss of germination efficiency. The dual nature of hydrogen peroxide as a toxic molecule on one hand and as a signal molecule on the other is made possible through the precise spatial and temporal control of its production and degradation. Levels of hydrogen peroxide in germinating seeds and young seedlings can be modulated via pre-sowing seed priming/conditioning. This rather simple method is shown to be a valuable tool for improving seed quality and for enhancing seed stress tolerance during post-priming germination. In this review, we outline how seed priming/conditioning affects the integrative role of hydrogen peroxide in seed germination and aging. PMID:26870076

  10. Lipid Peroxidation: Pathophysiology and Pharmacological Implications in the Eye

    Ya Fatou eNjie-Mbye

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Oxygen-derived free radicals such as hydroxyl and hydroperoxyl species have been shown to oxidize phospholipids and other membrane lipid components leading to lipid peroxidation. In the eye, lipid peroxidation has been reported to play an important role in degenerative ocular diseases (age-related macular degeneration, cataract, glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy. Indeed, ocular tissues are prone to damage from reactive oxygen species due to stress from constant exposure of the eye to sunlight, atmospheric oxygen and environmental chemicals. Furthermore, free radical catalyzed peroxidation of long chain polyunsaturated acids (LCPUFAs such as arachidonic acid and docosahexaenoic acid leads to generation of LCPUFA metabolites including isoprostanes and neuroprostanes that may further exert pharmacological/toxicological actions in ocular tissues. Evidence from literature supports the presence of endogenous defense mechanisms against reactive oxygen species in the eye, thereby presenting new avenues for the prevention and treatment of ocular degeneration. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 and synthetic peroxides can exert pharmacological and toxicological effects on tissues of the anterior uvea of several mammalian species. There is evidence suggesting that the retina, especially retinal ganglion cells can exhibit unique characteristics of antioxidant defense mechanisms. In the posterior segment of the eye, H2O2 and synthetic peroxides produce an inhibitory action on glutamate release (using [3H]-D-aspartate as a marker, in vitro and on the endogenous glutamate and glycine concentrations in vivo. In addition to peroxides, isoprostanes can elicit both excitatory and inhibitory effects on norepinephrine (NE release from sympathetic nerves in isolated mammalian iris ciliary bodies. Whereas isoprostanes attenuate dopamine release from mammalian neural retina, in vitro, these novel arachidonic acid metabolites exhibit a biphasic regulatory effect on glutamate release

  11. Hydrogen peroxide potentiates organophosphate toxicosis in chicks

    Banan K. Al-Baggou

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The purpose of the present study was to examine the effect of hydrogen peroxide(H2O2 on the acute toxicity of organophosphate insecticides dichlorvos and diazinon and their inhibitoryactions on plasma, brain and liver cholinesterase activities. Material and Methods: H2O2 was given indrinking water (0.5% v/v for 2 weeks in unsexed day old chicks, a regimen known to induce oxidativestress in this species. A control group received drinking tap water. All experiments were conducted onthe chicks at the age of 15 days after exposure to H2O2. The acute (24 h oral LD50 values of dichlorvosand diazinon in the insecticidal preparations as determined by the up-and-down method in the controlchicks were 9.4 and 15.6 mg/kg, respectively. Results: The poisoned chicks manifested signs ofcholinergic toxicosis within one hour after the dosing including salivation, lacrimation, gasping, frequentdefecation, drooping of wings, tremors, convulsions and recumbency. The acute (24 h oral LD50 valuesof dichlorvos and diazinon in chicks provided with H2O2 were reduced to 3.5 and 6.5 mg/kg, by 63 and58%, respectively when compared to respective control LD50 values. The intoxicated chicks also showedcholinergic signs of toxicosis as described above. Plasma, brain and liver cholinesterase activities of thechicks exposed to H2O2 were significantly lower than their respective control (H2O values by 25, 28 and27%, respectively. Oral dosing of chicks with dichlorvos at 3 mg/kg significantly inhibited cholinesteraseactivities in the plasma, brain and liver of both control (42-67% and H2O2-treated (15-59% chicks.Diazinon at 5 mg/kg, orally also inhibited cholinesterase activities in the plasma, brain and liver of bothcontrol (36-66% and H2O2-treated (15-30% chicks. In the H2O2 groups, dichlorvos inhibition of livercholinesterase activity and diazinon inhibition of liver and brain cholinesterase activities weresignificantly lesser than those of the respective values of

  12. Physiological response to lipid peroxidation in ischemia and reperfusion during carotid endarterectomy

    Cordeddu Lina

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In this study we aimed to assess lipid peroxidation during carotid endarterectomy by the formation of PUFA hydroperoxides (PUFAHP and isoprostanes (IP and concomitant peroxisomal beta-oxidation as a physiological mechanism to limit their concentration. Two markers of peroxisomal beta oxidation have been evaluated, formation of 2,3 dinor from IP and conjugated esadecadienoic acid (CD 16:2 from peroxisomal beta-oxidation of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA, an unusual fatty acid present in small concentration in our diet and preferentially beta-oxidised in peroxisomes. The study was conducted on 30 patients undergoing carotid endarterectomy. Blood samplings were performed before, during endarterectomy in the "ischemic phase", and 30 seconds, 30 minutes and 2 hours after reperfusion. Results The results showed that PUFAHP increased significantly after 30 min of reperfusion in patients with controlateral stenosis > 50%, and steeply decreased after 2 hour of reperfusion. Interestingly, IP increased in a similar fashion of PUFAHP but never significantly. Both ratios CD16:2/CLA and DIN/IP also increased significantly after 30 min of reperfusion to decrease thereafter. Conclusions Our data show that lipid peroxidation takes place only in patients with high controlateral stenosis and within 2 hours occurs a physiological response aimed to decrease IP and PUFAHP by increasing their catabolism in peroxisomes.

  13. Partial oxidation of n-hexadecane through decomposition of hydrogen peroxide in supercritical water

    Alshammari, Y.M.

    2015-01-01

    © 2014 The Institution of Chemical Engineers. This work reports the experimental analysis of partial oxidation of n-hexadecane under supercritical water conditions. A novel reactor flow system was developed which allows for total decomposition of hydrogen peroxide in a separate reactor followed partial oxidation of n-hexadecane in a gasification reactor instead of having both reactions in one reactor. The kinetics of hydrothermal decomposition of hydrogen peroxide was studied in order to confirm its full conversion into water and oxygen under the desired partial oxidation conditions, and the kinetic data were found in a good agreement with previously reported literature. The gas yield and gasification efficiency were investigated under different operating parameters. Furthermore, the profile of C-C/C=C ratio was studied which showed the favourable conditions for maximising yields of n-alkanes via hydrogenation of their corresponding 1-alkenes. Enhanced hydrogenation of 1-alkenes was observed at higher O/C ratios and higher residence times, shown by the increase in the C-C/C=C ratio to more than unity, while increasing the temperature has shown much less effect on the C-C/C=C ratio at the current experimental conditions. In addition, GC-MS analysis of liquid samples revealed the formation of heavy oxygenated compounds which may suggest a new addition reaction to account for their formation under the current experimental conditions. Results show new promising routes for hydrogen production with in situ hydrogenation of heavy hydrocarbons in a supercritical water reactor.

  14. Addition of H_2O and O_2 to Acetone and Dimethylsulfoxide Ligated Uranyl(V) Dioxocations

    Leavitt, Christopher M.; Bryantsev, Vyacheslav S.; de Jong, Wibe A.; Diallo, Mamadou S.; GODDARD, William A.; Groenewald, Gary S.; van Stipdonk, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    Gas-phase complexes of the formula [UO_2(lig)]^+ (lig = acetone (aco) or dimethylsulfoxide (dmso)) were generated by electrospray ionization (ESI) and studied by tandem ion-trap mass spectrometry to determine the general effect of ligand charge donation on the reactivity of UO_2^+ with respect to water and dioxygen. The original hypothesis that addition of O_2 is enhanced by strong σ-donor ligands bound to UO_2^+ is supported by results from competitive collision-induced dissociation (CID) ex...

  15. Antioxidant effect of water and acetone extracts ofFucus vesiculosuson oxidative stability of skin care emulsions

    Poyato, Candelaria; Thomsen, Birgitte Raagaard; Hermund, Ditte Baun;

    2016-01-01

    A water and an acetone extract of the Icelandic brown algae Fucus vesiculosus were evaluated as potential natural sources of antioxidant compounds in skin care emulsions. To assess their efficacy in inhibiting lipid oxidation caused by photo- or thermoxidation, they were stored in darkness and room...... temperature as control conditions, and compared to samples stored under accelerated conditions (light and room temperature, or darkness and 40°C). The presence of extracts in the skin care emulsions induced remarkable colour changes when the emulsions were exposed to light, and more extensively under high...... thermooxidation, only the water extract showed antioxidant activity against photooxidation....

  16. The charging of neutral dimethylamine and dimethylamine-sulphuric acid clusters using protonated acetone

    Ruusuvuori, K.; P. Hietala; O. Kupiainen-Määttä; Jokinen, T; Junninen, H.; Sipilä, M.; Kurtén, T.; Vehkamäki, H.

    2014-01-01

    Sulphuric acid is generally considered one of the most important substances taking part in atmospheric particle formation. However, in typical atmospheric conditions in the lower troposphere sulphuric acid and water alone are unable to form particles. It has been suggested that strong bases may stabilize sulphuric acid clusters so that particle formation may occur. More to the point, amines – strong organic bases – have become the subject of interest as pos...

  17. The charging of neutral dimethylamine and dimethylamine–sulfuric acid clusters using protonated acetone

    Ruusuvuori, K.; P. Hietala; O. Kupiainen-Määttä; Jokinen, T; Junninen, H.; Sipilä, M.; Kurtén, T.; Vehkamäki, H.

    2015-01-01

    Sulfuric acid is generally considered one of the most important substances taking part in atmospheric particle formation. However, in typical atmospheric conditions in the lower troposphere, sulfuric acid and water alone are unable to form particles. It has been suggested that strong bases may stabilize sulfuric acid clusters so that particle formation may occur. More to the point, amines – strong organic bases – have become the subject of interest as possible cause for such...

  18. The results of the lipids peroxidation products on the DNA bases as biological markers of the oxidative stress; Les adduits des produits de la peroxydation lipidique sur les bases de l'ADN comme biomarqueurs du stress oxydant

    Falletti, O

    2007-10-15

    Different ways of DNA damages have been studied, among these ones the direct way of DNA damages formation by the reactive oxygen species (R.O.S.). This way leads to the formation of oxidative DNA damages. In 1990, works have suggested an indirect way of DNA damages formation, the lipids peroxidation. Instead of oxidizing directly DNA, the R.O.S. oxide the lipids present in the cells and their membranes; The products coming from this degradation are able to provoke DNA damages. This way has not been studied very much. The work of this thesis is axed on this DNA theme and lipids peroxidation. In the first chapter, we begin by presenting DNA and the direct way of oxidative damages formation by the R.O.S.Then, we speak about the cell lipids suffering oxidation reactions and the different ways of lipids oxidation. Then, we present how the lipid peroxidation is a source of damages for DNA. (N.C.)

  19. Lipid peroxidation and antioxidant enzymes in male infertility.

    Dandekar S

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND AIM: Mammalian spermatozoa are rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids and are very susceptible to attack by reactive oxygen species (ROS and membrane lipid peroxide ion. Normally a balance is maintained between the amount of ROS produced and that scavenged. Cellular damage arises when this equilibrium is disturbed. A shift in the levels of ROS towards pro-oxidants in semen and vaginal secretions can induce an oxidative stress on spermatozoa. The aim was to study lipid peroxidation and antioxidant enzymes such as catalase, glutathione peroxidase and superoxide dismutase (SOD and to correlate the same, with the ′water test′, in male infertility. SETTINGS: Experimental study. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: Ejaculates from a total of 83 infertile and fertile healthy individuals were obtained. Lipid peroxidation and antioxidant enzyme levels were studied and correlated with water test. RESULTS: The results indicate that (i the antioxidant enzyme catalase showed no significant changes in the various pathological samples, (ii antioxidant enzymes SOD and glutathione peroxidase correlate positively with asthenozoospermic samples and (iii the degree of lipid peroxidation also correlates positively with the poorly swollen sperm tails. The increase in SOD and glutathione peroxidase values, in the pathological cases represents an attempt made to overcome the reactive oxygen species. CONCLUSION: Water test could be used as a preliminary marker test for sperm tail damage by reactive oxygen species, since it correlates very well with lipid peroxidation and antioxidant enzymes.

  20. Erythrocyte susceptibility to lipid peroxidation in patients with coronary atherosclerosis.

    Dincer,Yildiz

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available In recent years it has been reported that free oxygen radicals play an important role in the pathogenesis of degenerative diseases and that antioxidant vitamins such as vitamins E or C prevent their harmful effects. In this study, we evaluated the following: Erythrocyte susceptibility to lipid peroxidation; the role of erythrocyte glutathione (GSH as an antioxidant; plasma lipid fractions; and the relationship between plasma lipid peroxides and antioxidant vitamin levels. Thiobarbituric acid-reactive substance (TBARS levels were measured to determine the levels of plasma lipid peroxides and the susceptibility to lipid peroxidation when erythrocytes were stressed by hydrogen peroxide for 2 h in vitro. Erythrocyte TBARS production was significantly higher in patients with coronary atherosclerosis than in the controls. On the other hand, the levels of plasma high-density lipoproteins, vitamin C, vitamin E and erythrocyte GSH were significantly lower, and the levels of plasma total cholesterol, triglycerides, low-density lipoproteins and TBARS were significantly higher in the patients with coronary atherosclerosis than in the controls. In conclusion, our results indicate that erythrocytes from patients with coronary atherosclerosis are more susceptible to oxidation than those of controls and that these patients have lowered antioxidant capacity as revealed by decreased plasma levels of vitamins C and E.

  1. Probing skin interaction with hydrogen peroxide using diffuse reflectance spectroscopy

    Zonios, George; Dimou, Aikaterini; Galaris, Dimitrios

    2008-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide is an important oxidizing agent in biological systems. In dermatology, it is frequently used as topical antiseptic, it has a haemostatic function, it can cause skin blanching, and it can facilitate skin tanning. In this work, we investigated skin interaction with hydrogen peroxide, non-invasively, using diffuse reflectance spectroscopy. We observed transient changes in the oxyhaemoglobin and deoxyhaemoglobin concentrations as a result of topical application of dilute H2O2 solutions to the skin, with changes in deoxyhaemoglobin concentration being more pronounced. Furthermore, we did not observe any appreciable changes in melanin absorption properties as well as in the skin scattering properties. We also found no evidence for production of oxidized haemoglobin forms. Our observations are consistent with an at least partial decomposition of hydrogen peroxide within the stratum corneum and epidermis, with the resulting oxygen and/or remaining hydrogen peroxide inducing vasoconstriction to dermal blood vessels and increasing haemoglobin oxygen saturation. An assessment of the effects of topical application of hydrogen peroxide to the skin may serve as the basis for the development of non-invasive techniques to measure skin antioxidant capacity and also may shed light onto skin related disorders such as vitiligo.

  2. Probing skin interaction with hydrogen peroxide using diffuse reflectance spectroscopy

    Hydrogen peroxide is an important oxidizing agent in biological systems. In dermatology, it is frequently used as topical antiseptic, it has a haemostatic function, it can cause skin blanching, and it can facilitate skin tanning. In this work, we investigated skin interaction with hydrogen peroxide, non-invasively, using diffuse reflectance spectroscopy. We observed transient changes in the oxyhaemoglobin and deoxyhaemoglobin concentrations as a result of topical application of dilute H2O2 solutions to the skin, with changes in deoxyhaemoglobin concentration being more pronounced. Furthermore, we did not observe any appreciable changes in melanin absorption properties as well as in the skin scattering properties. We also found no evidence for production of oxidized haemoglobin forms. Our observations are consistent with an at least partial decomposition of hydrogen peroxide within the stratum corneum and epidermis, with the resulting oxygen and/or remaining hydrogen peroxide inducing vasoconstriction to dermal blood vessels and increasing haemoglobin oxygen saturation. An assessment of the effects of topical application of hydrogen peroxide to the skin may serve as the basis for the development of non-invasive techniques to measure skin antioxidant capacity and also may shed light onto skin related disorders such as vitiligo

  3. Probing skin interaction with hydrogen peroxide using diffuse reflectance spectroscopy

    Zonios, George [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Ioannina, 45110 Ioannina (Greece); Dimou, Aikaterini [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Ioannina, 45110 Ioannina (Greece); Galaris, Dimitrios [Laboratory of Biological Chemistry, School of Medicine, University of Ioannina, 45110 Ioannina (Greece)

    2008-01-07

    Hydrogen peroxide is an important oxidizing agent in biological systems. In dermatology, it is frequently used as topical antiseptic, it has a haemostatic function, it can cause skin blanching, and it can facilitate skin tanning. In this work, we investigated skin interaction with hydrogen peroxide, non-invasively, using diffuse reflectance spectroscopy. We observed transient changes in the oxyhaemoglobin and deoxyhaemoglobin concentrations as a result of topical application of dilute H{sub 2}O{sub 2} solutions to the skin, with changes in deoxyhaemoglobin concentration being more pronounced. Furthermore, we did not observe any appreciable changes in melanin absorption properties as well as in the skin scattering properties. We also found no evidence for production of oxidized haemoglobin forms. Our observations are consistent with an at least partial decomposition of hydrogen peroxide within the stratum corneum and epidermis, with the resulting oxygen and/or remaining hydrogen peroxide inducing vasoconstriction to dermal blood vessels and increasing haemoglobin oxygen saturation. An assessment of the effects of topical application of hydrogen peroxide to the skin may serve as the basis for the development of non-invasive techniques to measure skin antioxidant capacity and also may shed light onto skin related disorders such as vitiligo.

  4. Acrolein, A Reactive Product of Lipid Peroxidation, Induces Oxidative Modification of Cytochrome c

    Kang, Jung Hoon [Cheongju Univ., Cheongju (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-11-15

    Acrolein (ACR) is a well-known carbonyl toxin produced by lipid peroxidation of polyunsaturated fatty acids, which is involved in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). In Alzheimer's brain, ACR was found to be elevated in hippocampus and temporal cortex where oxidative stress is high. In this study, we evaluated oxidative modification of cytochrome c occurring after incubation with ACR. When cytochrome c was incubated with ACR, protein aggregation increased in a dose-dependent manner. The formation of carbonyl compounds and the release of iron were obtained in ACR-treated cytochrome c. Reactive oxygen species scavengers and iron specific chelator inhibited the ACR-mediated cytochrome c modification and carbonyl compound formation. Our data demonstrate that oxidative damage of cytochrome c by ACR might induce disruption of cyotochrome c structure and iron mishandling as a contributing factor to the pathology of AD.

  5. Acrolein, A Reactive Product of Lipid Peroxidation, Induces Oxidative Modification of Cytochrome c

    Acrolein (ACR) is a well-known carbonyl toxin produced by lipid peroxidation of polyunsaturated fatty acids, which is involved in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). In Alzheimer's brain, ACR was found to be elevated in hippocampus and temporal cortex where oxidative stress is high. In this study, we evaluated oxidative modification of cytochrome c occurring after incubation with ACR. When cytochrome c was incubated with ACR, protein aggregation increased in a dose-dependent manner. The formation of carbonyl compounds and the release of iron were obtained in ACR-treated cytochrome c. Reactive oxygen species scavengers and iron specific chelator inhibited the ACR-mediated cytochrome c modification and carbonyl compound formation. Our data demonstrate that oxidative damage of cytochrome c by ACR might induce disruption of cyotochrome c structure and iron mishandling as a contributing factor to the pathology of AD

  6. Reaction of chromium(VI) with glutathione or with hydrogen peroxide: identification of reactive intermediates and their role in chromium(VI)-induced DNA damage.

    Aiyar, J; Berkovits, H J; Floyd, R A; Wetterhahn, K E

    1991-01-01

    The types of reactive intermediates generated upon reduction of chromium(VI) by glutathione or hydrogen peroxide and the resulting DNA damage have been determined. In vitro, reaction of chromium(VI) with glutathione led to formation of two chromium(V) complexes and the glutathione thiyl radical. When chromium(VI) was reacted with DNA in the presence of glutathione, chromium-DNA adducts were obtained, with no DNA strand breakage. The level of chromium-DNA adduct formation correlated with chrom...

  7. Proton transfer and unimolecular decay in the low-energy-reaction dynamics of H3O+ with acetone

    The title reaction has been studied at collision energies of 0.83 and 2.41 eV. Direct reaction dynamics have been observed at both energies and an increasingly high fraction of the total energy appears in product translation as the collision energy increases. This result is consistent with the concept of induced repulsive energy release, which becomes more effective as trajectories sample the corner of the potential energy surface. At the higher collision energy, the protonated acetone cation undergoes two unimolecular decay channels: C-C bond cleavage to CH3CO+ and CH4, and C-O bond cleavagto C3H5+ (presumably to allyl cation) and H2O. The CH3CO+ channel, endothermic relative to ground state protonated acetone cations by 0.74 eV, appears to liberate 0.4 eV in relative product translation while the C3H5+ channel, endothermic by 2.17 eV, liberates only 0.07 eV in relative translation. These results are discussed in terms of the location on the reaction coordinate and magnitudes of potential energy barriers to 1,3-hydrogen atoms shifts which must precede the bond cleavage processes

  8. Crystal structure of bis[μ-bis(diphenylphosphanylmethane-κ2P:P′]digold(I dichloride acetone monosolvate monohydrate

    Chien Ing Yeo

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In the title complex salt, [Au2{(C6H52PCH2P(C6H52}]Cl2·(CH32C=O·H2O, the dication forms an eight-membered {—PCPAu}2 ring with a transannular aurophilic interaction [Au...Au = 2.9743 (2 Å]. The ring approximates a flattened boat conformation, with the two methylene C atoms lying ca 0.58–0.59 Å above the least-squares plane defined by the Au2P4 atoms (r.m.s. deviation = 0.0849 Å. One Cl− anion functions as a weak bridge between the AuI atoms [Au...Cl = 2.9492 (13 and 2.9776 (12 Å]. The second Cl− anion forms two (waterO—H...Cl hydrogen bonds about a centre of inversion, forming a centrosymmetric eight-membered {...HOH...Cl}2 supramolecular square. Globally, the dications and loosely associated Cl− anions assemble into layers lying parallel to the ac plane, being connected by C—H...Cl,π(phenyl interactions. The supramolecular squares and solvent acetone molecules are sandwiched in the inter-layer region, being connected to the layers on either side by C—H...Cl,O(acetone interactions.

  9. Seasonal variability of upper tropospheric acetone using ACE-FTS observations and LMDz-INCA model simulations

    Dufour, Gaëlle; Harrison, Jeremy; Szopa, Sophie; Bernath, Peter

    2014-05-01

    The vertically-resolved distributions of oxygenated organic compounds (oVOCs) are mainly inferred from surface and airborne measurements with limited spatial and temporal coverage. This results in a limited understanding of the atmospheric budget of these compounds and of their impact on the upper tropospheric chemistry. In the last decade, satellite observations which complement in-situ measurements have become available, providing global distributions of several oVOCs. For example, Scisat-1, also known as the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE) has measured several oVOCs including methanol and formaldehyde. ACE is a Canadian-led satellite mission for remote sensing of the Earth's atmosphere that has been in operation since 2004. The primary instrument on board is a Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) featuring broad spectral coverage in the infrared (750-4400 cm-1) with high spectral resolution (0.02 cm-1). The FTS instrument can measure down to 5 km altitude with a high signal-to-noise ratio using solar occultation. The ACE-FTS has the ability to measure seasonal and height-resolved distributions of minor tropospheric constituents on a near-global scale and provides the opportunity to evaluate our understanding of important atmospheric oxygenated organic species. ACE-FTS acetone retrievals will be presented. The spatial distribution and seasonal variability of acetone will be described and compared to LMDz-INCA model simulations.

  10. Preparation and acetone sensitive characteristics of nano-LaFeO3 semiconductor thin films by polymerization complex method

    Perovskite structure nano-LaFeO3 thin films were prepared by polymerization complex method using La(NO3)3.6H2O, FeCl3.6H2O as raw materials, citric acid (CA) as chelating agent and ethylene glycol (EG) as cross-linking agent. Nano-LaFeO3 thin films were fabricated on Al2O3 substrates by dip-coating, drying, pre-heating and sintering. The precursor and thin films were characterized by IR, AFM, XRD and SEM. The results revealed that the homogeneous LaFeO3 thin films with the grain size of about 37 nm and the thickness of approximately 2 μm were successfully synthesized at the sintering temperature of 650 deg. C. The nano-LaFeO3 semiconductor thin films have higher sensitive to acetone gas with lower concentration, which exposed to 80 ppm acetone gas show that sensitivity are 204, and response time are within 15 s at the testing temperature of 400 deg. C

  11. Reproducing Phenomenology of Peroxidation Kinetics via Model Optimization

    Ruslanov, Anatole D.; Bashylau, Anton V.

    2010-06-01

    We studied mathematical modeling of lipid peroxidation using a biochemical model system of iron (II)-ascorbate-dependent lipid peroxidation of rat hepatocyte mitochondrial fractions. We found that antioxidants extracted from plants demonstrate a high intensity of peroxidation inhibition. We simplified the system of differential equations that describes the kinetics of the mathematical model to a first order equation, which can be solved analytically. Moreover, we endeavor to algorithmically and heuristically recreate the processes and construct an environment that closely resembles the corresponding natural system. Our results demonstrate that it is possible to theoretically predict both the kinetics of oxidation and the intensity of inhibition without resorting to analytical and biochemical research, which is important for cost-effective discovery and development of medical agents with antioxidant action from the medicinal plants.

  12. Electrochemical behaviour of platinum in hydrogen peroxide solution (1963)

    The relative stability of hydrogen peroxide in aqueous solution at 25 deg. C, allows its amperometric determination from the theory, using either its cathodic reduction or its anodic oxidation. The cathodic reduction yields a wave on a platinum electrode only when some oxygen is present in the solution. It cannot, therefore, be used for electrochemical determination. On the other hand, the anodic oxidation on platinum produces a wave which might be used. However, a passivation of platinum occurs at the same time. This passivation process is studied by means of potentio-kinetic, potentio-static, intensio-static curves and of pH measurements in the vicinity of the anode. A mechanism for passivation is presented, which takes into account the role of hydrogen peroxide as a reducing agent. This passivation rules out any analytical application of the oxidation reaction of hydrogen peroxide. (author)

  13. Modeling the oxidation of phenolic compounds by hydrogen peroxide photolysis.

    Zhang, Tianqi; Cheng, Long; Ma, Lin; Meng, Fanchao; Arnold, Robert G; Sáez, A Eduardo

    2016-10-01

    Hydrogen peroxide UV photolysis is among the most widely used advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) for the destruction of trace organics in waters destined for reuse. Previous kinetic models of hydrogen peroxide photolysis focus on the dynamics of hydroxyl radical production and consumption, as well as the reaction of the target organic with hydroxyl radicals. However, the rate of target destruction may also be affected by radical scavenging by reaction products. In this work, we build a predictive kinetic model for the destruction of p-cresol by hydrogen peroxide photolysis based on a complete reaction mechanism that includes reactions of intermediates with hydroxyl radicals. The results show that development of a predictive kinetic model to evaluate process performance requires consideration of the complete reaction mechanism, including reactions of intermediates with hydroxyl radicals. PMID:27448315

  14. Synthesis of unstable cyclic peroxides for chemiluminescence studies

    Bartoloni, Fernando H.; Oliveira, Marcelo A. de; Augusto, Felipe A.; Ciscato, Luiz Francisco M.L.; Bastos, Erick L.; Baader, Wilhelm J., E-mail: wjbaader@iq.usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica. Dept. de Quimica Fundamental

    2012-11-15

    Cyclic four-membered ring peroxides are important high-energy intermediates in a variety of chemi and bioluminescence transformations. Specifically, a-peroxy lactones (1,2-dioxetanones) have been considered as model systems for efficient firefly bioluminescence. However, the preparation of such highly unstable compounds is extremely difficult and, therefore, only few research groups have been able to study the properties of these substances. In this study, the synthesis, purification and characterization of three 1,2-dioxetanones are reported and a detailed procedure for the known synthesis of diphenoyl peroxide, another important model compound for the chemical generation of electronically excited states, is provided. For most of these peroxides, the complete spectroscopic characterization is reported here for the first time. (author)

  15. An Optimized Trichloroacetic Acid/Acetone Precipitation Method for Two-Dimensional Gel Electrophoresis Analysis of Qinchuan Cattle Longissimus Dorsi Muscle Containing High Proportion of Marbling.

    Ruijie Hao

    Full Text Available Longissimus dorsi muscle (LD proteomics provides a novel opportunity to reveal the molecular mechanism behind intramuscular fat deposition. Unfortunately, the vast amounts of lipids and nucleic acids in this tissue hampered LD proteomics analysis. Trichloroacetic acid (TCA/acetone precipitation is a widely used method to remove contaminants from protein samples. However, the high speed centrifugation employed in this method produces hard precipitates, which restrict contaminant elimination and protein re-dissolution. To address the problem, the centrifugation precipitates were first grinded with a glass tissue grinder and then washed with 90% acetone (TCA/acetone-G-W in the present study. According to our result, the treatment for solid precipitate facilitated non-protein contaminant removal and protein re-dissolution, ultimately improving two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE analysis. Additionally, we also evaluated the effect of sample drying on 2-DE profile as well as protein yield. It was found that 30 min air-drying did not result in significant protein loss, but reduced horizontal streaking and smearing on 2-DE gel compared to 10 min. In summary, we developed an optimized TCA/acetone precipitation method for protein extraction of LD, in which the modifications improved the effectiveness of TCA/acetone method.

  16. MOLYBDENUM CATALYZED ACID PEROXIDE BLEACHING OF EUCALYPTUS KRAFT PULP

    Marcos S. Rabelo; Jorge L. Colodette; Vera M. Sacon; Marcelo R. Silva; Marco A. B. Azevedo

    2008-01-01

    Molybdenum catalyzed peroxide bleaching (PMo Stage) consists of pulp treatment with hydrogen peroxide under acidic conditions in the presence of a molybdenum catalyst. Molybdenum is applied in catalytic doses (50-200 mg/kg pulp) and may originate from various sources, including (NH4)6Mo7O24.4H2O, Na2MoO4.2H2O, siliconmolybdate, etc. This work is aimed at optimizing the PMo stage and evaluating its industrial application in the OAZDP sequence. Optimum PMo stage conditions for bleaching eucalyp...

  17. Hydrogen Peroxide Gas Generator Cycle with a Reciprocating Pump

    Whitehead, J C

    2002-06-11

    A four-chamber piston pump is powered by decomposed 85% hydrogen peroxide. The performance envelope of the evolving 400 gram pump has been expanded to 172 cc/s water flow at discharge pressures near 5 MPa. A gas generator cycle system using the pump has been tested under similar conditions of pressure and flow. The powerhead gas is derived from a small fraction of the pumped hydrogen peroxide, and the system starts from tank pressures as low as 0.2 MPa. The effects of steam condensation on performance have been evaluated.

  18. The mechanism of hydrogen peroxide-induced aerobic oxidation of alkanes in catalysis by a vanadium complex and pyrazine-2-carboxylic acid

    It was established that effective oxy generation of alkanes by oxygen of the air in acetonitrile was catalyzed by vanadate anion in the presence of pyrazine-2-carboxylic acid (PCA) and hydrogen peroxide. Alkyl hydroxy peroxide smoothly decomposing during the process with formation of conforming ketone (aldehyde) and alcohol is a primary product of the reaction. It is shown that hydroxyl radicals come into being by reaction of complex between vanadium oxo compound derivative and hydrogen peroxide in the system; decomposition of vanadium monoperoxocomplex with PCA is a limiting stage of the process, and V(4) derivative and hydro peroxyl radicals are defined as products of its decomposition. Adequate agreement of suggested kinetic model of the process with all totality of the experimental data was obtained. The constants of suggested equilibria and the constant of the rate of decomposition of vanadium monoperoxocomplex with PCA are estimated

  19. Electron paramagnetic resonance study of lipid and protein membrane components of erythrocytes oxidized with hydrogen peroxide

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy of spin labels was used to monitor membrane dynamic changes in erythrocytes subjected to oxidative stress with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). The lipid spin label, 5-doxyl stearic acid, responded to dramatic reductions in membrane fluidity, which was correlated with increases in the protein content of the membrane. Membrane rigidity, associated with the binding of hemoglobin (Hb) to the erythrocyte membrane, was also indicated by a spin-labeled maleimide, 5-MSL, covalently bound to the sulfhydryl groups of membrane proteins. At 2% hematocrit, these alterations in membrane occurred at very low concentrations of H2O2 (50 µM) after only 5 min of incubation at 37°C in azide phosphate buffer, pH 7.4. Lipid peroxidation, suggested by oxidative hemolysis and malondialdehyde formation, started at 300 µM H2O2 (for incubation of 3 h), which is a concentration about six times higher than those detected with the probes. Ascorbic acid and α-tocopherol protected the membrane against lipoperoxidation, but did not prevent the binding of proteins to the erythrocyte membrane. Moreover, the antioxidant (+)-catechin, which also failed to prevent the cross-linking of cytoskeletal proteins with Hb, was very effective in protecting erythrocyte ghosts from lipid peroxidation induced by the Fenton reaction. This study also showed that EPR spectroscopy can be useful to assess the molecular dynamics of red blood cell membranes in both the lipid and protein domains and examine oxidation processes in a system that is so vulnerable to oxidation

  20. Serum Iron, Haemoglobin and Serum Lipid Peroxidation in Neonates with Respiratory Disorders

    Sushama P. Dhonde

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Respiratory disorders are the most common cause for higher morbidity and mortality rate in India. Higher oxygen concentration of extrauterine existence causes increased erythrocyte lysis lead to release of iron in neonates. Iron is known to catalyze the formation of Reactive oxygen species. Involvement of hemoglobin and iron in oxygen-mediated reactions stimulate us to study the role of these in neonates.Objectives :iTo estimate the concentration of Haemoglobin, serum iron, serum lipid peroxidation in neonates with respiratory disorders; and compare those with that of healthy controls. iiTo study the role of these parameters in neonates with respiratory disorders.Materials and Methods: Present study includes 50 neonates suffering from respiratory disorders and 50 healthy neonates as controls. Samples collected from these were used for the estimation of haemoglobin, serum iron, and serum lipid peroxidation.Observations: Significantly (p<0.001 increased levels of serum iron and lipid peroxidation were observed in neonates with respiratory disorders when compared those with control values. These levels were found significantly (p<0.001 higher in preterm than full-term neonates. Concentration of haemoglobin showed no significant difference in both groups.Conclusion: Exacerbation of oxidative stress in neonates with respiratory disorders may be due to hypoxia induced free radical generation, higher oxidative tendency of HbF and elevated iron. Premature neonates are probably unprepared for extra uterine life in an oxygen rich environment and due to this they are more prone to oxidative insult. Thus this study reveals the pro-oxidant role of HbF and iron, which enhances the oxidative stress in respiratory disorder.