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Sample records for acetaminophen-induced liver injury

  1. Acetaminophen-induced acute liver injury in HCV transgenic mice

    The exact etiology of clinical cases of acute liver failure is difficult to ascertain and it is likely that various co-morbidity factors play a role. For example, epidemiological evidence suggests that coexistent hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection increased the risk of acetaminophen-induced acute liver injury, and was associated with an increased risk of progression to acute liver failure. However, little is known about possible mechanisms of enhanced acetaminophen hepatotoxicity in HCV-infected subjects. In this study, we tested a hypothesis that HCV-Tg mice may be more susceptible to acetaminophen hepatotoxicity, and also evaluated the mechanisms of acetaminophen-induced liver damage in wild type and HCV-Tg mice expressing core, E1 and E2 proteins. Male mice were treated with a single dose of acetaminophen (300 or 500 mg/kg in fed animals; or 200 mg/kg in fasted animals; i.g.) and liver and serum endpoints were evaluated at 4 and 24 h after dosing. Our results suggest that in fed mice, liver toxicity in HCV-Tg mice is not markedly exaggerated as compared to the wild-type mice. In fasted mice, greater liver injury was observed in HCV-Tg mice. In fed mice dosed with 300 mg/kg acetaminophen, we observed that liver mitochondria in HCV-Tg mice exhibited signs of dysfunction showing the potential mechanism for increased susceptibility. -- Highlights: ► Acetaminophen-induced liver injury is a significant clinical challenge. ► HCV-infected subjects may be at higher risk for acetaminophen-induced liver injury. ► We used HCV transgenics to test if liver injury due to acetaminophen is exacerbated.

  2. Acetaminophen-induced acute liver injury in HCV transgenic mice

    Uehara, Takeki; Kosyk, Oksana; Jeannot, Emmanuelle; Bradford, Blair U. [Department of Environmental Sciences and Engineering, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Tech, Katherine; Macdonald, Jeffrey M. [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Boorman, Gary A. [Covance, Chantilly, VA 20151 (United States); Chatterjee, Saurabh; Mason, Ronald P. [Laboratory of Toxicology and Pharmacology, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, RTP, NC 27713 (United States); Melnyk, Stepan B. [Department of Pediatrics, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR 72201 (United States); Tryndyak, Volodymyr P.; Pogribny, Igor P. [Division of Biochemical Toxicology, National Center for Toxicological Research, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States); Rusyn, Ivan, E-mail: iir@unc.edu [Department of Environmental Sciences and Engineering, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States)

    2013-01-15

    The exact etiology of clinical cases of acute liver failure is difficult to ascertain and it is likely that various co-morbidity factors play a role. For example, epidemiological evidence suggests that coexistent hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection increased the risk of acetaminophen-induced acute liver injury, and was associated with an increased risk of progression to acute liver failure. However, little is known about possible mechanisms of enhanced acetaminophen hepatotoxicity in HCV-infected subjects. In this study, we tested a hypothesis that HCV-Tg mice may be more susceptible to acetaminophen hepatotoxicity, and also evaluated the mechanisms of acetaminophen-induced liver damage in wild type and HCV-Tg mice expressing core, E1 and E2 proteins. Male mice were treated with a single dose of acetaminophen (300 or 500 mg/kg in fed animals; or 200 mg/kg in fasted animals; i.g.) and liver and serum endpoints were evaluated at 4 and 24 h after dosing. Our results suggest that in fed mice, liver toxicity in HCV-Tg mice is not markedly exaggerated as compared to the wild-type mice. In fasted mice, greater liver injury was observed in HCV-Tg mice. In fed mice dosed with 300 mg/kg acetaminophen, we observed that liver mitochondria in HCV-Tg mice exhibited signs of dysfunction showing the potential mechanism for increased susceptibility. -- Highlights: ► Acetaminophen-induced liver injury is a significant clinical challenge. ► HCV-infected subjects may be at higher risk for acetaminophen-induced liver injury. ► We used HCV transgenics to test if liver injury due to acetaminophen is exacerbated.

  3. Protective effects from Houttuynia cordata aqueous extract against acetaminophen-induced liver injury

    Chen, Wei-Ting; Yang, Chieh-ling; Yin, Mei-chin

    2014-01-01

    Background Protective effects of Houttuynia cordata aqueous extract (HCAE) against acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity in Balb/cA mice were examined. Methods HCAE, at 1 or 2 g/L, was added into the drinking water for 4 weeks. Acute liver injury was induced by acetaminophen treatment intraperitoneally (350 mg/kg body weight). Results Acetaminophen treatment significantly depleted hepatic glutathione (GSH) content, increased hepatic malonyldialdehyde (MDA), reactive oxygen species (ROS) and ox...

  4. BGP-15 inhibits caspase-independent programmed cell death in acetaminophen-induced liver injury

    It has been recently shown that acute acetaminophen toxicity results in endoplasmic reticulum redox stress and an increase in cells with apoptotic phenotype in liver. Since activation of effector caspases was absent, the relevance of caspase-independent mechanisms in acetaminophen-induced programmed cell death was investigated. BGP-15, a drug with known protective actions in conditions involving redox imbalance, has been co-administered with a single sublethal dose of acetaminophen. Proapoptotic events and outcome of the injury were investigated. ER redox alterations and early ER-stress-related signaling events induced by acetaminophen, such as ER glutathione depletion, phosphorylation of eIF2α and JNK and induction of the transcription factor GADD153, were not counteracted by co-treatment with BGP-15. However, BGP-15 prevented AIF mitochondria-to-nucleus translocation and mitochondrial depolarization. BGP-15 co-treatment attenuated the rate of acetaminophen-induced cell death as assessed by apoptotic index and enzyme serum release. These results reaffirm that acute acetaminophen toxicity involves oxidative stress-induced caspase-independent cell death. In addition, pharmacological inhibition of AIF translocation may effectively protect against or at least delay acetaminophen-induced programmed cell death.

  5. Pathogenic Role of NKT and NK Cells in Acetaminophen-Induced Liver Injury is Dependent on the Presence of DMSO

    Masson, Mary Jane; Carpenter, Leah D.; Graf, Mary L.; Pohl, Lance R.

    2008-01-01

    Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) is commonly used in biological studies to dissolve drugs and enzyme inhibitors with low solubility. While DMSO is generally thought of as being relatively inert, it can induce biological effects that are often overlooked. An example highlighting this potential problem is found in the recent report demonstrating a pathogenic role for NKT and NK cells in acetaminophen-induced liver injury (AILI) in C57Bl/6 mice in which DMSO was used to facilitate APAP dissolution. We ...

  6. Inhibitor of apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 protects against acetaminophen-induced liver injury

    Metabolic activation and oxidant stress are key events in the pathophysiology of acetaminophen (APAP) hepatotoxicity. The initial mitochondrial oxidative stress triggered by protein adduct formation is amplified by c-jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK), resulting in mitochondrial dysfunction and ultimately cell necrosis. Apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1) is considered the link between oxidant stress and JNK activation. The objective of the current study was to assess the efficacy and mechanism of action of the small-molecule ASK1 inhibitor GS-459679 in a murine model of APAP hepatotoxicity. APAP (300 mg/kg) caused extensive glutathione depletion, JNK activation and translocation to the mitochondria, oxidant stress and liver injury as indicated by plasma ALT activities and area of necrosis over a 24 h observation period. Pretreatment with 30 mg/kg of GS-459679 almost completely prevented JNK activation, oxidant stress and injury without affecting the metabolic activation of APAP. To evaluate the therapeutic potential of GS-459679, mice were treated with APAP and then with the inhibitor. Given 1.5 h after APAP, GS-459679 was still protective, which was paralleled by reduced JNK activation and p-JNK translocation to mitochondria. However, GS-459679 treatment was not more effective than N-acetylcysteine, and the combination of GS-459679 and N-acetylcysteine exhibited similar efficacy as N-acetylcysteine monotherapy, suggesting that GS-459769 and N-acetylcysteine affect the same pathway. Importantly, inhibition of ASK1 did not impair liver regeneration as indicated by PCNA staining. In conclusion, the ASK1 inhibitor GS-459679 protected against APAP toxicity by attenuating JNK activation and oxidant stress in mice and may have therapeutic potential for APAP overdose patients. - Highlights: • Two ASK1 inhibitors protected against acetaminophen-induced liver injury. • The ASK1 inhibitors protect when used as pre- or post-treatment. • Protection by ASK1 inhibitor is

  7. Inhibitor of apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 protects against acetaminophen-induced liver injury

    Xie, Yuchao; Ramachandran, Anup [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology, and Therapeutics, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States); Breckenridge, David G.; Liles, John T. [Department of Biology, Gilead Sciences, Inc., Foster City, CA (United States); Lebofsky, Margitta [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology, and Therapeutics, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States); Farhood, Anwar [Department of Pathology, St. David' s North Austin Medical Center, Austin, TX 78756 (United States); Jaeschke, Hartmut, E-mail: hjaeschke@kumc.edu [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology, and Therapeutics, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States)

    2015-07-01

    Metabolic activation and oxidant stress are key events in the pathophysiology of acetaminophen (APAP) hepatotoxicity. The initial mitochondrial oxidative stress triggered by protein adduct formation is amplified by c-jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK), resulting in mitochondrial dysfunction and ultimately cell necrosis. Apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1) is considered the link between oxidant stress and JNK activation. The objective of the current study was to assess the efficacy and mechanism of action of the small-molecule ASK1 inhibitor GS-459679 in a murine model of APAP hepatotoxicity. APAP (300 mg/kg) caused extensive glutathione depletion, JNK activation and translocation to the mitochondria, oxidant stress and liver injury as indicated by plasma ALT activities and area of necrosis over a 24 h observation period. Pretreatment with 30 mg/kg of GS-459679 almost completely prevented JNK activation, oxidant stress and injury without affecting the metabolic activation of APAP. To evaluate the therapeutic potential of GS-459679, mice were treated with APAP and then with the inhibitor. Given 1.5 h after APAP, GS-459679 was still protective, which was paralleled by reduced JNK activation and p-JNK translocation to mitochondria. However, GS-459679 treatment was not more effective than N-acetylcysteine, and the combination of GS-459679 and N-acetylcysteine exhibited similar efficacy as N-acetylcysteine monotherapy, suggesting that GS-459769 and N-acetylcysteine affect the same pathway. Importantly, inhibition of ASK1 did not impair liver regeneration as indicated by PCNA staining. In conclusion, the ASK1 inhibitor GS-459679 protected against APAP toxicity by attenuating JNK activation and oxidant stress in mice and may have therapeutic potential for APAP overdose patients. - Highlights: • Two ASK1 inhibitors protected against acetaminophen-induced liver injury. • The ASK1 inhibitors protect when used as pre- or post-treatment. • Protection by ASK1 inhibitor is

  8. Protective Properties of Flavonoid Extract of Coagulated Tofu (Curdled Soy Milk Against Acetaminophen-Induced Liver Injury in Rats

    Ndatsu Yakubu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The total flavonoid contents of the various coagulated tofu and the hepatoprotective potential of all tofu flavonoid extracts were investigated. Tofu was prepared from locally sourced coagulants (steep water, alum, lemon, and lemon peel ash extract. Total flavonoid contents of all coagulated tofu were investigated as established in vitro flavonoid assay. The hepatoprotective activities of tofu flavonoid extracts against acetaminophen-induced hepatic cell toxicity in rats was also investigated in this study. The activity was analyzed by assessing the levels of serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT, aspartate aminotransferase (AST, alkaline phosphatase (ALP and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH. The concentrations of the serum sugar, total protein, albumin, and cholesterol as well as prothrombin time (PT of experimental rats with histopathological analysis were also conducted. The range of the total flavonoid contents of tofu was 4.3-6.4 mg/g. Tofu flavonoid extracts significantly reduced the activities of serum AST, ALT, ALP, and LDH; total cholesterol, and sugar levels, but total protein and albumin concentrations increased compared to acetaminophen-intoxicated rats. Also, the prothrombin time prolongation of serum in acetaminophen intoxicated rats was reduced. Histology of the liver tissue demonstrated that tofu flavonoid extracts inhibited the acetaminophen-induced hepatic cell necrosis, decreased inflammatory cell infiltration and accelerated hepatocellular regeneration. Therefore, all tofus exhibited high total flavonoid contents, and the tofu supplement in human diets is highly recommended as it can be used as a functional food to prevent liver injuries.

  9. Protection against acetaminophen-induced liver injury by allopurinol is dependent on aldehyde oxidase-mediated liver preconditioning

    Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose causes severe and occasionally fatal liver injury. Numerous drugs that attenuate APAP toxicity have been described. However these compounds frequently protect by cytochrome P450 inhibition, thereby preventing the initiating step of toxicity. We have previously shown that pretreatment with allopurinol can effectively protect against APAP toxicity, but the mechanism remains unclear. In the current study, C3HeB/FeJ mice were administered allopurinol 18 h or 1 h prior to an APAP overdose. Administration of allopurinol 18 h prior to APAP overdose resulted in an 88% reduction in liver injury (serum ALT) 6 h after APAP; however, 1 h pretreatment offered no protection. APAP-cysteine adducts and glutathione depletion kinetics were similar with or without allopurinol pretreatment. The phosphorylation and mitochondrial translocation of c-jun-N-terminal-kinase (JNK) have been implicated in the progression of APAP toxicity. In our study we showed equivalent early JNK activation (2 h) however late JNK activation (6 h) was attenuated in allopurinol treated mice, which suggests that later JNK activation is more critical for the toxicity. Additional mice were administered oxypurinol (primary metabolite of allopurinol) 18 h or 1 h pre-APAP, but neither treatment protected. This finding implicated an aldehyde oxidase (AO)-mediated metabolism of allopurinol, so mice were treated with hydralazine to inhibit AO prior to allopurinol/APAP administration, which eliminated the protective effects of allopurinol. We evaluated potential targets of AO-mediated preconditioning and found increased hepatic metallothionein 18 h post-allopurinol. These data show metabolism of allopurinol occurring independent of P450 isoenzymes preconditions the liver and renders the animal less susceptible to an APAP overdose. - Highlights: • 18 h allopurinol pretreatment protects against acetaminophen-induced liver injury. • 1 h allopurinol pretreatment does not protect from APAP

  10. Protection against acetaminophen-induced liver injury by allopurinol is dependent on aldehyde oxidase-mediated liver preconditioning

    Williams, C. David; McGill, Mitchell R.; Lebofsky, Margitta; Bajt, Mary Lynn; Jaeschke, Hartmut, E-mail: hjaeschke@kumc.edu

    2014-02-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose causes severe and occasionally fatal liver injury. Numerous drugs that attenuate APAP toxicity have been described. However these compounds frequently protect by cytochrome P450 inhibition, thereby preventing the initiating step of toxicity. We have previously shown that pretreatment with allopurinol can effectively protect against APAP toxicity, but the mechanism remains unclear. In the current study, C3HeB/FeJ mice were administered allopurinol 18 h or 1 h prior to an APAP overdose. Administration of allopurinol 18 h prior to APAP overdose resulted in an 88% reduction in liver injury (serum ALT) 6 h after APAP; however, 1 h pretreatment offered no protection. APAP-cysteine adducts and glutathione depletion kinetics were similar with or without allopurinol pretreatment. The phosphorylation and mitochondrial translocation of c-jun-N-terminal-kinase (JNK) have been implicated in the progression of APAP toxicity. In our study we showed equivalent early JNK activation (2 h) however late JNK activation (6 h) was attenuated in allopurinol treated mice, which suggests that later JNK activation is more critical for the toxicity. Additional mice were administered oxypurinol (primary metabolite of allopurinol) 18 h or 1 h pre-APAP, but neither treatment protected. This finding implicated an aldehyde oxidase (AO)-mediated metabolism of allopurinol, so mice were treated with hydralazine to inhibit AO prior to allopurinol/APAP administration, which eliminated the protective effects of allopurinol. We evaluated potential targets of AO-mediated preconditioning and found increased hepatic metallothionein 18 h post-allopurinol. These data show metabolism of allopurinol occurring independent of P450 isoenzymes preconditions the liver and renders the animal less susceptible to an APAP overdose. - Highlights: • 18 h allopurinol pretreatment protects against acetaminophen-induced liver injury. • 1 h allopurinol pretreatment does not protect from APAP

  11. Serum acute phase reactants hallmark healthy individuals at risk for acetaminophen-induced liver injury

    Borlak, Jürgen; Chatterji, Bijon; Londhe, Kishor B; Watkins, Paul B

    2013-01-01

    Background Acetaminophen (APAP) is a commonly used analgesic. However, its use is associated with drug-induced liver injury (DILI). It is a prominent cause of acute liver failure, with APAP hepatotoxicity far exceeding other causes of acute liver failure in the United States. In order to improve its safe use this study aimed to identify individuals at risk for DILI prior to drug treatment by searching for non-genetic serum markers in healthy subjects susceptible to APAP-induced liver injury (...

  12. Acetaminophen-induced microvascular injury in the rat liver: protection with misoprostol.

    Lim, S P; Andrews, F J; O'Brien, P E

    1995-12-01

    Studies into the mechanism of acetaminophen (APAP)-induced hepatotoxicity have focused mainly at the hepatocellular level. This study aimed to investigate the effect of acetaminophen on the hepatic microvasculature using a vascular casting technique. Acetaminophen was administered at a dose of 650 mg/kg body weight (intraperitoneally) to fasted male Long Evans rats. Microvascular casting was performed at various points after drug administration. Liver casts from control rats showed good patency with normal hepatic microvasculature. Thirty-six hours after overdose with acetaminophen, liver casts showed rounded centrilobular cavities of various sizes, representing regions in which cast-filled sinusoids were absent with relatively normal microvasculature within periportal regions. Evidence of microvascular injury occurred as early as 5 hours after acetaminophen overdose. This injury consisted of changes to centrilobular sinusoids including areas of incomplete filling and dilated centrilobular sinusoids. Misoprostol (a prostaglandin E1 analog) treatment (6 x 25 micrograms/kg) given before and after acetaminophen administration markedly reduced the extent of microvascular injury with only small focal unfilled areas in the casts and a generally intact microvasculature. In conclusion, this study shows that overdosage with APAP resulted in an extensive, characteristic pattern of hepatic microvascular injury in the centrilobular region. The results also suggest that microvascular injury is an early event in the pathogenesis of acetaminophen hepatotoxicity. Misoprostol was found to protect against injury occurring at the microvascular level. PMID:7489988

  13. Role of the Nalp3 inflammasome in acetaminophen-induced sterile inflammation and liver injury

    Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose is the leading cause of acute liver failure in the US and UK. Recent studies implied that APAP-induced injury is partially mediated by interleukin-1β (IL-1β), which can activate and recruit neutrophils, exacerbating injury. Mature IL-1β is formed by caspase-1, dependent on inflammasome activation. The objective of this invetstigation was to evaluate the role of the Nalp3 inflammasome on release of damage associated molecular patterns (DAMPs), hepatic neutrophil accumulation and liver injury (ALT, necrosis) after APAP overdose. Mice deficient for each component of the Nalp3 inflammasome (caspase-1, ASC and Nalp3) were treated with 300 mg/kg APAP for 24 h; these mice had similar neutrophil recruitment and liver injury as APAP-treated C57Bl/6 wildtype animals. In addition, plasma levels of DAMPs (DNA fragments, keratin-18, hypo- and hyper-acetylated forms of high mobility group box-1 protein) were similarly elevated with no significant difference between wildtype and gene knockout mice. In addition, aspirin treatment, which has been postulated to attenuate cytokine formation and the activation of the Nalp3 inflammasome after APAP, had no effect on release of DAMPs, hepatic neutrophil accumulation or liver injury. Together, these data confirm the release of DAMPs and a sterile inflammatory response after APAP overdose. However, as previously reported minor endogenous formation of IL-1β and the activation of the Nalp3 inflammasome have little impact on APAP hepatotoxicity. It appears that the Nalp3 inflammasome is not a promising therapeutic target to treat APAP overdose.

  14. Anti-thromboxane B2 antibodies protect against acetaminophen-induced liver injury in mice

    Ivan Ćavar

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Prostanoids are lipid compounds that mediate a variety of physiological and pathological functions in almost all body tissues and organs. Thromboxane (TX A2 is a powerful inducer of platelet aggregation and vasoconstriction and it has ulcerogenic activity in the gastrointestinal tract. Overdose or chronic use of a high dose of acetaminophen (N-acetyl-paminophenol, APAP is a major cause of acute liver failure in the Western world. We investigated whether TXA2 plays a role in host response to toxic effect of APAP. CBA/H Zg mice of both sexes were intoxicated with a single lethal or high sublethal dose of APAP, which was administered to animals by oral gavage. The toxicity of APAP was determined by observing the survival of mice during 48 h, by measuring concentration of alanine-aminotransferase (ALT in plasma 20-22 h after APAP administration and by liver histology. The results have shown that anti-thromboxane (TX B2 antibodies (anti-TXB2 and a selective inhibitor of thromboxane (TX synthase, benzylimidazole (BZI, were significantly hepatoprotective, while a selective thromboxane receptor (TPR antagonist, daltroban, was slightly protective in this model of acute liver injury. A stabile metabolite of TXA2, TXB2, and a stabile agonist of TPR, U-46619, had no influence on APAP-induced liver damage. Our findings suggest that TXA2 has a pathogenic role in acute liver toxicity induced with APAP, which was highly abrogated by administration of anti-TXB2. According to our results, this protection is mediated, at least in part, through decreased production of TXB2 by liver fragments ex vivo.

  15. The therapeutic detoxification of chlorogenic acid against acetaminophen-induced liver injury by ameliorating hepatic inflammation.

    Zheng, Zhiyong; Sheng, Yuchen; Lu, Bing; Ji, Lili

    2015-08-01

    Chlorogenic acid (CGA) has been reported to prevent acetaminophen (AP)-induced hepatotoxicity when mice were pre-administered orally with CGA for consecutive 7days before AP intoxication in our previous study. This study investigated the therapeutic detoxification of CGA against AP-induced hepatotoxicity and the engaged mechanism. The mice were orally administered with CGA (10, 20, 40mg/kg) at 1h after given AP (400mg/kg), and another 3h later the mice were killed for the following experiments. Results of serum transaminases analysis and histological evaluation demonstrated the detoxification of CGA against AP-induced hepatotoxicity. CGA reduced AP-induced the increased myeloperoxidase (MPO) enzymatic activity and its expression. CGA reduced AP-induced the increased liver expression of toll-like receptor (TLR)-3/4 and MyD88, and the increased phosphorylation of inhibitor of kappa B (IκB) and p65 subunit of nuclear factor κB (NFκB). CGA reduced AP-induced the increased NFκBp65 expression in nucleus. In addition, CGA reduced AP-induced the increased serum levels and liver mRNA expression of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα), interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), and keratinocyte chemoattractant (KC). Taken together, our results demonstrate the therapeutic detoxification of CGA against AP-induced liver injury, and TLR3/4 and NFκB signaling pathway are involved in such process. PMID:26079055

  16. Application of interleukin-22 mediates protection in experimental acetaminophen-induced acute liver injury.

    Scheiermann, Patrick; Bachmann, Malte; Goren, Itamar; Zwissler, Bernhard; Pfeilschifter, Josef; Mühl, Heiko

    2013-04-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP, paracetamol)-induced hepatotoxicity, although treatable by timely application of N-acetylcysteine, can be fatal. Because it is among the common causes of acute liver failure in intensive care units and in light of its gradually increasing incidence, the need for novel therapeutic strategies aimed at severe intoxication is apparent. Recently, it has been shown that IL-22, a STAT3-activating cytokine, has the capability to mediate liver protection. Herein, the protective potential of IL-22 in murine APAP-induced hepatotoxicity was assessed. Intravenous administration of prophylactic IL-22 significantly reduced serum alanine aminotransferase levels and histopathologic damage in APAP-induced liver injury, a process that coincided with increased hepatocyte proliferation in vivo. Concomitant gene expression analysis revealed hepatic induction of genes prototypically up-regulated by the IL-22/STAT3 axis, among others suppressor of cytokine signaling-3, lipocalin-2, and α1-antichymotrypsin. Notably, in a translational setting of therapeutic treatment 2 hours after APAP, IL-22 supported protection in the context of suboptimal N-acetylcysteine dosing. IL-22 likewise connected to augmented hepatocyte proliferation in this experimental setting. As detected by analysis of inflammatory cytokine production, systemically applied IL-22 did not display acute immunomodulation/stimulation in otherwise untreated or endotoxemic mice. Those latter observations clearly confirm acute tolerability of systemically applied IL-22. Observations presented altogether suggest that therapeutic IL-22 administration is a conceivable tissue-protective regimen aimed at hard-to-treat patients with severe APAP-induced hepatotoxicity. PMID:23375450

  17. Protective effects of (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate against acetaminophen-induced liver injury in rats)

    Yao, Hsien-Tsung; Yang, Yu-Chi; Chang, Chen-Hui; Yang, Hui-Ting; Yin, Mei-chin

    2015-01-01

    (-)-Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) is the most abundant catechin with various biological activities found in tea. In this study, the effects of EGCG on the metabolism and toxicity of acetaminophen in rat liver were investigated. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a controlled diet without or with EGCG (0.54 %, w/w) for 1 week and were then intraperitoneally injected with acetaminophen (1 g/kg body weight) and killed after 12 h. Concentrations of acetaminophen and its conjugates in plasma an...

  18. Role of caspase-1 and interleukin-1β in acetaminophen-induced hepatic inflammation and liver injury

    Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose can result in serious liver injury and potentially death. Toxicity is dependent on metabolism of APAP to a reactive metabolite initiating a cascade of intracellular events resulting in hepatocellular necrosis. This early injury triggers a sterile inflammatory response with formation of cytokines and innate immune cell infiltration in the liver. Recently, IL-1β signaling has been implicated in the potentiation of APAP-induced liver injury. To test if IL-1β formation through caspase-1 is critical for the pathophysiology, C57Bl/6 mice were treated with the pan-caspase inhibitor Z-VD-fmk to block the inflammasome-mediated maturation of IL-1β during APAP overdose (300 mg/kg APAP). This intervention did not affect IL-1β gene transcription but prevented the increase in IL-1β plasma levels. However, APAP-induced liver injury and neutrophil infiltration were not affected. Similarly, liver injury and the hepatic neutrophilic inflammation were not attenuated in IL-1-receptor-1 deficient mice compared to wild-type animals. To evaluate the potential of IL-1β to increase injury, mice were given pharmacological doses of IL-1β after APAP overdose. Despite increased systemic activation of neutrophils and recruitment into the liver, there was no alteration in injury. We conclude that endogenous IL-1β formation after APAP overdose is insufficient to activate and recruit neutrophils into the liver or cause liver injury. Even high pharmacological doses of IL-1β, which induce hepatic neutrophil accumulation and activation, do not enhance APAP-induced liver injury. Thus, IL-1 signaling is irrelevant for APAP hepatotoxicity. The inflammatory cascade is a less important therapeutic target than intracellular signaling pathways to attenuate APAP-induced liver injury.

  19. Identification of novel translational urinary biomarkers for acetaminophen-induced acute liver injury using proteomic profiling in mice

    Swelm, R.P.L. van; Laarakkers, J.M.M.; Kuur, E.C. van der; Morava, E.; Wevers, R A; Augustijn, K.D.; Touw, D.J.; Sandel, M.H.; Masereeuw, R.; Russel, F. G. M.

    2012-01-01

    Drug-induced liver injury (DILI) is the leading cause of acute liver failure. Currently, no adequate predictive biomarkers for DILI are available. This study describes a translational approach using proteomic profiling for the identification of urinary proteins related to acute liver injury induced by acetaminophen (APAP). Mice were given a single intraperitoneal dose of APAP (0-350 mg/kg bw) followed by 24 h urine collection. Doses of >/=275 mg/kg bw APAP resulted in hepatic centrilobular...

  20. Identification of Novel Translational Urinary Biomarkers for Acetaminophen-Induced Acute Liver Injury Using Proteomic Profiling in Mice

    2012-01-01

    Drug-induced liver injury (DILI) is the leading cause of acute liver failure. Currently, no adequate predictive biomarkers for DILI are available. This study describes a translational approach using proteomic profiling for the identification of urinary proteins related to acute liver injury induced by acetaminophen (APAP). Mice were given a single intraperitoneal dose of APAP (0–350 mg/kg bw) followed by 24 h urine collection. Doses of ≥275 mg/kg bw APAP resulted in hepatic centrilobular necr...

  1. Protective Properties of Flavonoid Extract of Coagulated Tofu (Curdled Soy Milk) Against Acetaminophen-Induced Liver Injury in Rats

    Ndatsu Yakubu; Umaru Alhassan Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    The total flavonoid contents of the various coagulated tofu and the hepatoprotective potential of all tofu flavonoid extracts were investigated. Tofu was prepared from locally sourced coagulants (steep water, alum, lemon, and lemon peel ash extract). Total flavonoid contents of all coagulated tofu were investigated as established in vitro flavonoid assay. The hepatoprotective activities of tofu flavonoid extracts against acetaminophen-induced hepatic cell toxicity in rats was also investigate...

  2. Identification of novel translational urinary biomarkers for acetaminophen-induced acute liver injury using proteomic profiling in mice.

    van Swelm, Rachel P L; Laarakkers, Coby M M; van der Kuur, Ellen C; Morava-Kozicz, Eva; Wevers, Ron A; Augustijn, Kevin D; Touw, Daan J; Sandel, Maro H; Masereeuw, Rosalinde; Russel, Frans G M

    2012-01-01

    Drug-induced liver injury (DILI) is the leading cause of acute liver failure. Currently, no adequate predictive biomarkers for DILI are available. This study describes a translational approach using proteomic profiling for the identification of urinary proteins related to acute liver injury induced by acetaminophen (APAP). Mice were given a single intraperitoneal dose of APAP (0-350 mg/kg bw) followed by 24 h urine collection. Doses of ≥275 mg/kg bw APAP resulted in hepatic centrilobular necrosis and significantly elevated plasma alanine aminotransferase (ALT) values (pintoxication the presence of SOD1 and CA3, whereas both proteins were absent in control urine samples. Urinary concentrations of CaM were significantly increased and correlated well with plasma APAP concentrations (r = 0.97; p<0.0001) in human APAP intoxicants, who did not present with elevated plasma ALT levels. In conclusion, using this urinary proteomics approach we demonstrate CA3, SOD1 and, most importantly, CaM as potential human biomarkers for APAP-induced liver injury. PMID:23166697

  3. Glycyrrhizin Protects against Acetaminophen-Induced Acute Liver Injury via Alleviating Tumor Necrosis Factor α-Mediated Apoptosis.

    Yan, Tingting; Wang, Hong; Zhao, Min; Yagai, Tomoki; Chai, Yingying; Krausz, Kristopher W; Xie, Cen; Cheng, Xuefang; Zhang, Jun; Che, Yuan; Li, Feiyan; Wu, Yuzheng; Brocker, Chad N; Gonzalez, Frank J; Wang, Guangji; Hao, Haiping

    2016-05-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose is the leading cause of drug-induced acute liver failure in Western countries. Glycyrrhizin (GL), a potent hepatoprotective constituent extracted from the traditional Chinese medicine liquorice, has potential clinical use in treating APAP-induced liver failure. The present study determined the hepatoprotective effects and underlying mechanisms of action of GL and its active metabolite glycyrrhetinic acid (GA). Various administration routes and pharmacokinetics-pharmacodynamics analyses were used to differentiate the effects of GL and GA on APAP toxicity in mice. Mice deficient in cytochrome P450 2E1 enzyme (CYP2E1) or receptor interacting protein 3 (RIPK3) and their relative wild-type littermates were subjected to histologic and biochemical analyses to determine the potential mechanisms. Hepatocyte death mediated by tumor necrosis factorα(TNFα)/caspase was analyzed by use of human liver-derived LO2 cells. The pharmacokinetics-pharmacodynamics analysis using various administration routes revealed that GL but not GA potently attenuated APAP-induced liver injury. The protective effect of GL was found only with intraperitoneal and intravenous administration and not with gastric administration. CYP2E1-mediated metabolic activation and RIPK3-mediated necroptosis were unrelated to GL's protective effect. However, GL inhibited hepatocyte apoptosis via interference with TNFα-induced apoptotic hepatocyte death. These results demonstrate that GL rapidly attenuates APAP-induced liver injury by directly inhibiting TNFα-induced hepatocyte apoptosis. The protective effect against APAP-induced liver toxicity by GL in mice suggests the therapeutic potential of GL for the treatment of APAP overdose. PMID:26965985

  4. Morin mitigates acetaminophen-induced liver injury by potentiating Nrf2 regulated survival mechanism through molecular intervention in PHLPP2-Akt-Gsk3β axis.

    Rizvi, Fatima; Mathur, Alpana; Kakkar, Poonam

    2015-10-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) is frequently taken to relieve pain. Staggered APAP overdoses have been reported to cause acetaminophen-induced liver injury (AILI). Identification of efficacious therapeutic modalities to address complications imposed by accidental/intentional long-term APAP ingestion is needed. Morin, a plant-derived phytochemical, possesses a multitude of pharmacological properties including hepatoprotective action; however, the underlying mechanisms have been inadequately explored. Our present report demonstrates significant attenuation of APAP-mediated liver injury by morin supplementation in vivo as indicated by reduction in histological and serum markers of hepatotoxicity. Morin not only limited necroinflammation as revealed by reduced HMGB1 release, NALP3 and caspase-1 maturation, but also suppressed oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction. This suggests that morin may have exerted its cytoprotective role by way of early intervention in the pathway leading to perpetuation of AILI. Morin reinforced cellular defenses by suppressing Nrf2 ubiquitination and promoting nuclear Nrf2 retention as well as ARE-Nrf2 binding affinity. The effects were observed to be a result of molecular intervention in the activity of PHLPP2, a phosphatase previously reported by us to subdue cellular Nrf2 responses via Fyn kinase activation. Morin was observed to inhibit APAP-induced increase in PHLPP2 activity ex vivo as well as its association with cellular target Akt1. As a result, morin prevented oxidative stress induced deactivation of Akt (Ser473) leading to suppression in GSK3β and Fyn kinase activation. The study supports the inhibitory action of morin against PHLPP2-regulated Nrf2-suppression and hence indentifies Nrf2-potentiating property of morin that may be exploited in developing novel therapeutic strategy to address AILI. PMID:26286854

  5. Protective role of c-Jun N-terminal kinase 2 in acetaminophen-induced liver injury

    Recent studies in mice suggest that stress-activated c-Jun N-terminal protein kinase 2 (JNK2) plays a pathologic role in acetaminophen (APAP)-induced liver injury (AILI), a major cause of acute liver failure (ALF). In contrast, we present evidence that JNK2 can have a protective role against AILI. When male C57BL/6J wild type (WT) and JNK2-/- mice were treated with 300 mg APAP/kg, 90% of JNK2-/- mice died of ALF compared to 20% of WT mice within 48 h. The high susceptibility of JNK2-/- mice to AILI appears to be due in part to deficiencies in hepatocyte proliferation and repair. Therefore, our findings are consistent with JNK2 signaling playing a protective role in AILI and further suggest that the use of JNK inhibitors as a potential treatment for AILI, as has been recommended by other investigators, should be reconsidered

  6. Protective effect of naringenin against acetaminophen-induced acute liver injury in metallothionein (MT)-null mice.

    Lv, Yingjian; Zhang, Baoxu; Xing, Guozhen; Wang, Fuqiang; Hu, Zhewen

    2013-02-01

    Naringenin is a natural flavonoid aglycone of naringin that has been reported to have a wide range of pharmacological properties, such as antioxidant activity and free radical scavenging capacity. This study was designed to examine the hepatoprotective effect of naringenin against acetaminophen (250 mg kg(-1), sc) in metallothionein (MT)-null mice. 42 SPF MT-knockout mice were used. Naringenin (200, 400, and 800 mg kg(-1), ig) was administered for 4 days before exposure to acetaminophen (250 mg kg(-1), sc). Liver injury was measured by serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), as well as liver malondialdehyde (MDA). The glutathione-to-oxidized glutathione ratio (GSH/GSSG) was also assessed. The evidence of liver injury induced by acetaminophen included not only a significant increase in the levels of serum ALT, AST, LDH and liver MDA, and also a significant decrease in GSH/GSSG. Pretreatment of mice with naringenin at 400 and 800 mg kg(-1) reversed the altered parameters. Such reversal effects were dose-dependent: ALT decreased 78.62% and 98.03%, AST decreased 88.35% and 92.64%, LDH decreased 76.54% and 81.63%, MDA decreased 48.59% and 66.27% at a dose of 400 and 800 mg kg(-1) respectively; GSH/GSSG increased 22.57% and 16.93% at a dose of 400 and 800 mg kg(-1) respectively. Histopathological observation findings were also consistent with these effects. Together, this study suggests that naringenin can potentially reverse the hepatotoxic damage of acetaminophen intoxication in MT-null mice. PMID:23142768

  7. Immune mechanisms in acetaminophen-induced acute liver failure.

    Krenkel, Oliver; Mossanen, Jana C; Tacke, Frank

    2014-12-01

    An overdose of acetaminophen (N-acetyl-p-aminophenol, APAP), also termed paracetamol, can cause severe liver damage, ultimately leading to acute liver failure (ALF) with the need of liver transplantation. APAP is rapidly taken up from the intestine and metabolized in hepatocytes. A small fraction of the metabolized APAP forms cytotoxic mitochondrial protein adducts, leading to hepatocyte necrosis. The course of disease is not only critically influenced by dose of APAP and the initial hepatocyte damage, but also by the inflammatory response following acetaminophen-induced liver injury (AILI). As revealed by mouse models of AILI and corresponding translational studies in ALF patients, necrotic hepatocytes release danger-associated-molecular patterns (DAMPs), which are recognized by resident hepatic macrophages, Kupffer cell (KC), and neutrophils, leading to the activation of these cells. Activated hepatic macrophages release various proinflammatory cytokines, such as TNF-α or IL-1β, as well as chemokines (e.g., CCL2) thereby further enhancing inflammation and increasing the influx of immune cells, like bone-marrow derived monocytes and neutrophils. Monocytes are mainly recruited via their receptor CCR2 and aggravate inflammation. Infiltrating monocytes, however, can mature into monocyte-derived macrophages (MoMF), which are, in cooperation with neutrophils, also involved in the resolution of inflammation. Besides macrophages and neutrophils, distinct lymphocyte populations, especially γδ T cells, are also linked to the inflammatory response following an APAP overdose. Natural killer (NK), natural killer T (NKT) and T cells possibly further perpetuate inflammation in AILI. Understanding the complex interplay of immune cell subsets in experimental models and defining their functional involvement in disease progression is essential to identify novel therapeutic targets for human disease. PMID:25568858

  8. Application of IL-36 receptor antagonist weakens CCL20 expression and impairs recovery in the late phase of murine acetaminophen-induced liver injury.

    Scheiermann, Patrick; Bachmann, Malte; Härdle, Lorena; Pleli, Thomas; Piiper, Albrecht; Zwissler, Bernhard; Pfeilschifter, Josef; Mühl, Heiko

    2015-01-01

    Overdosing of the analgesic acetaminophen (APAP, paracetamol) is a major cause of acute liver injury. Whereas toxicity is initiated by hepatocyte necrosis, course of disease is regulated by mechanisms of innate immunity having the potential to serve in complex manner pathogenic or pro-regenerative functions. Interleukin (IL)-36γ has been identified as novel IL-1-like cytokine produced by and targeting epithelial (-like) tissues. Herein, we investigated IL-36γ in acute liver disease focusing on murine APAP-induced hepatotoxicity. Enhanced expression of hepatic IL-36γ and its prime downstream chemokine target CCL20 was detected upon liver injury. CCL20 expression coincided with the later regeneration phase of intoxication. Primary murine hepatocytes and human Huh7 hepatocellular carcinoma cells indeed displayed enhanced IL-36γ expression when exposed to inflammatory cytokines. Administration of IL-36 receptor antagonist (IL-36Ra) decreased hepatic CCL20 in APAP-treated mice. Unexpectedly, IL-36Ra likewise increased late phase hepatic injury as detected by augmented serum alanine aminotransferase activity and histological necrosis which suggests disturbed tissue recovery upon IL-36 blockage. Finally, we demonstrate induction of IL-36γ in inflamed livers of endotoxemic mice. Observations presented introduce IL-36γ as novel parameter in acute liver injury which may contribute to the decision between unleashed tissue damage and initiation of liver regeneration during late APAP toxicity. PMID:25687687

  9. Acetaminophen-induced Liver Injury in Rats and Mice: Comparison of Protein Adducts, Mitochondrial Dysfunction, and Oxidative Stress in the Mechanism of Toxicity

    McGill, Mitchell R.; Williams, C. David; Xie, Yuchao; Ramachandran, Anup; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2012-01-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose is the most common cause of acute liver failure in the West. In mice, APAP hepatotoxicity can be rapidly induced with a single dose. Because it is both clinically relevant and experimentally convenient, APAP intoxication has become a popular model of liver injury. Early data demonstrated that rats are resistant to APAP toxicity. As a result, mice are the preferred species for mechanistic studies. Furthermore, recent work has shown that the mechanisms of APAP toxi...

  10. Application of IL-36 receptor antagonist weakens CCL20 expression and impairs recovery in the late phase of murine acetaminophen-induced liver injury

    Patrick Scheiermann; Malte Bachmann; Lorena Härdle; Thomas Pleli; Albrecht Piiper; Bernhard Zwissler; Josef Pfeilschifter; Heiko Mühl

    2015-01-01

    Overdosing of the analgesic acetaminophen (APAP, paracetamol) is a major cause of acute liver injury. Whereas toxicity is initiated by hepatocyte necrosis, course of disease is regulated by mechanisms of innate immunity having the potential to serve in complex manner pathogenic or pro-regenerative functions. Interleukin (IL)-36γ has been identified as novel IL-1-like cytokine produced by and targeting epithelial (-like) tissues. Herein, we investigated IL-36γ in acute liver disease focusing o...

  11. Acetaminophen-induced liver injury in rats and mice: Comparison of protein adducts, mitochondrial dysfunction, and oxidative stress in the mechanism of toxicity

    Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose is the most common cause of acute liver failure in the West. In mice, APAP hepatotoxicity can be rapidly induced with a single dose. Because it is both clinically relevant and experimentally convenient, APAP intoxication has become a popular model of liver injury. Early data demonstrated that rats are resistant to APAP toxicity. As a result, mice are the preferred species for mechanistic studies. Furthermore, recent work has shown that the mechanisms of APAP toxicity in humans are similar to mice. Nevertheless, some investigators still use rats. New mechanistic information from the last forty years invites a reevaluation of the differences between these species. Comparison may provide interesting insights and confirm or exclude the rat as an option for APAP studies. To this end, we treated rats and mice with APAP and measured parameters of liver injury, APAP metabolism, oxidative stress, and activation of the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). Consistent with earlier data, we found that rats were highly resistant to APAP toxicity. Although overall APAP metabolism was similar in both species, mitochondrial protein adducts were significantly lower in rats. Accordingly, rats also had less oxidative stress. Finally, while mice showed extensive activation and mitochondrial translocation of JNK, this could not be detected in rat livers. These data support the hypothesis that mitochondrial dysfunction is critical for the development of necrosis after APAP treatment. Because mitochondrial damage also occurs in humans, rats are not a clinically relevant species for studies of APAP hepatotoxicity. Highlights: ► Acetaminophen overdose causes severe liver injury only in mice but not in rats. ► APAP causes hepatic GSH depletion and protein adduct formation in rats and mice. ► Less protein adducts were measured in rat liver mitochondria compared to mouse. ► No oxidant stress, peroxynitrite formation or JNK activation was present in rats. ► The

  12. Acetaminophen-induced liver injury in rats and mice: Comparison of protein adducts, mitochondrial dysfunction, and oxidative stress in the mechanism of toxicity

    McGill, Mitchell R.; Williams, C. David; Xie, Yuchao; Ramachandran, Anup; Jaeschke, Hartmut, E-mail: hjaeschke@kumc.edu

    2012-11-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose is the most common cause of acute liver failure in the West. In mice, APAP hepatotoxicity can be rapidly induced with a single dose. Because it is both clinically relevant and experimentally convenient, APAP intoxication has become a popular model of liver injury. Early data demonstrated that rats are resistant to APAP toxicity. As a result, mice are the preferred species for mechanistic studies. Furthermore, recent work has shown that the mechanisms of APAP toxicity in humans are similar to mice. Nevertheless, some investigators still use rats. New mechanistic information from the last forty years invites a reevaluation of the differences between these species. Comparison may provide interesting insights and confirm or exclude the rat as an option for APAP studies. To this end, we treated rats and mice with APAP and measured parameters of liver injury, APAP metabolism, oxidative stress, and activation of the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). Consistent with earlier data, we found that rats were highly resistant to APAP toxicity. Although overall APAP metabolism was similar in both species, mitochondrial protein adducts were significantly lower in rats. Accordingly, rats also had less oxidative stress. Finally, while mice showed extensive activation and mitochondrial translocation of JNK, this could not be detected in rat livers. These data support the hypothesis that mitochondrial dysfunction is critical for the development of necrosis after APAP treatment. Because mitochondrial damage also occurs in humans, rats are not a clinically relevant species for studies of APAP hepatotoxicity. Highlights: ► Acetaminophen overdose causes severe liver injury only in mice but not in rats. ► APAP causes hepatic GSH depletion and protein adduct formation in rats and mice. ► Less protein adducts were measured in rat liver mitochondria compared to mouse. ► No oxidant stress, peroxynitrite formation or JNK activation was present in rats. ► The

  13. Acetaminophen-induced liver injury in rats and mice: comparison of protein adducts, mitochondrial dysfunction, and oxidative stress in the mechanism of toxicity.

    McGill, Mitchell R; Williams, C David; Xie, Yuchao; Ramachandran, Anup; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2012-11-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose is the most common cause of acute liver failure in the West. In mice, APAP hepatotoxicity can be rapidly induced with a single dose. Because it is both clinically relevant and experimentally convenient, APAP intoxication has become a popular model of liver injury. Early data demonstrated that rats are resistant to APAP toxicity. As a result, mice are the preferred species for mechanistic studies. Furthermore, recent work has shown that the mechanisms of APAP toxicity in humans are similar to mice. Nevertheless, some investigators still use rats. New mechanistic information from the last forty years invites a reevaluation of the differences between these species. Comparison may provide interesting insights and confirm or exclude the rat as an option for APAP studies. To this end, we treated rats and mice with APAP and measured parameters of liver injury, APAP metabolism, oxidative stress, and activation of the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). Consistent with earlier data, we found that rats were highly resistant to APAP toxicity. Although overall APAP metabolism was similar in both species, mitochondrial protein adducts were significantly lower in rats. Accordingly, rats also had less oxidative stress. Finally, while mice showed extensive activation and mitochondrial translocation of JNK, this could not be detected in rat livers. These data support the hypothesis that mitochondrial dysfunction is critical for the development of necrosis after APAP treatment. Because mitochondrial damage also occurs in humans, rats are not a clinically relevant species for studies of APAP hepatotoxicity. PMID:22980195

  14. Gene expression data from acetaminophen-induced toxicity in human hepatic in vitro systems and clinical liver samples

    Robim M. Rodrigues

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This data set is composed of transcriptomics analyses of (i liver samples from patients suffering from acetaminophen-induced acute liver failure (ALF and (ii hepatic cell systems exposed to acetaminophen and their respective controls. The in vitro systems include widely employed cell lines i.e. HepaRG and HepG2 cells as well as a novel stem cell-derived model i.e. human skin-precursors-derived hepatocyte-like cells (hSKP-HPC. Data from primary human hepatocytes was also added to the data set “Open TG-GATEs: a large-scale toxicogenomics database” (Igarashi et al., 2015 [1]. Changes in gene expression due to acetaminophen intoxication as well as comparative information between human in vivo and in vitro samples are provided. The microarray data have been deposited in NCBI׳s Gene Expression Omnibus and are accessible through GEO Series accession number GEO: GSE74000. The provided data is used to evaluate the predictive capacity of each hepatic in vitro system and can be directly compared with large-scale publically available toxicogenomics databases. Further interpretation and discussion of these data feature in the corresponding research article “Toxicogenomics-based prediction of acetaminophen-induced liver injury using human hepatic cell systems” (Rodrigues et al., 2016 [2].

  15. Development of an invasively monitored porcine model of acetaminophen-induced acute liver failure

    Howie Forbes

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The development of effective therapies for acute liver failure (ALF is limited by our knowledge of the pathophysiology of this condition, and the lack of suitable large animal models of acetaminophen toxicity. Our aim was to develop a reproducible invasively-monitored porcine model of acetaminophen-induced ALF. Method 35kg pigs were maintained under general anaesthesia and invasively monitored. Control pigs received a saline infusion, whereas ALF pigs received acetaminophen intravenously for 12 hours to maintain blood concentrations between 200-300 mg/l. Animals surviving 28 hours were euthanased. Results Cytochrome p450 levels in phenobarbital pre-treated animals were significantly higher than non pre-treated animals (300 vs 100 pmol/mg protein. Control pigs (n = 4 survived 28-hour anaesthesia without incident. Of nine pigs that received acetaminophen, four survived 20 hours and two survived 28 hours. Injured animals developed hypotension (mean arterial pressure; 40.8 +/- 5.9 vs 59 +/- 2.0 mmHg, increased cardiac output (7.26 +/- 1.86 vs 3.30 +/- 0.40 l/min and decreased systemic vascular resistance (8.48 +/- 2.75 vs 16.2 +/- 1.76 mPa/s/m3. Dyspnoea developed as liver injury progressed and the increased pulmonary vascular resistance (636 +/- 95 vs 301 +/- 26.9 mPa/s/m3 observed may reflect the development of respiratory distress syndrome. Liver damage was confirmed by deterioration in pH (7.23 +/- 0.05 vs 7.45 +/- 0.02 and prothrombin time (36 +/- 2 vs 8.9 +/- 0.3 seconds compared with controls. Factor V and VII levels were reduced to 9.3 and 15.5% of starting values in injured animals. A marked increase in serum AST (471.5 +/- 210 vs 42 +/- 8.14 coincided with a marked reduction in serum albumin (11.5 +/- 1.71 vs 25 +/- 1 g/dL in injured animals. Animals displayed evidence of renal impairment; mean creatinine levels 280.2 +/- 36.5 vs 131.6 +/- 9.33 μmol/l. Liver histology revealed evidence of severe centrilobular necrosis

  16. Role of nicotinamide (vitamin B3) in acetaminophen-induced changes in rat liver: Nicotinamide effect in acetaminophen-damged liver.

    Mahmoud, Yomna I; Mahmoud, Asmaa A

    2016-06-01

    Acetaminophen is a widely used analgesic and antipyretic agent, which is safe at therapeutic doses. However, overdoses of acetaminophen induce severe oxidative stress, which leads to acute liver failure. Nicotinamide has proven effective in ameliorating many pathological conditions that occur due to oxidative stress. This study verifies the prophylactic and therapeutic effects of nicotinamide against the hepatic pathophysiological and ultrastructural alterations induced by acetaminophen. Wistar rats intoxicated with an acute overdose of acetaminophen (5g/kg b.wt) were given a single dose of nicotinamide (500mg/kg b.wt) either before or after intoxication. Acetaminophen caused significant elevation in the liver functions and lipid peroxidation marker, and decline in the activities of the hepatic antioxidant enzymes. This oxidative injury was associated with hepatic centrilobular necrosis, hemorrage, vacuolar degeneration, lipid accumulation and mitochondrial alterations. Treating intoxicated rats with nicotinamide (500mg/kg) significantly ameliorated acetaminophen-induced biochemical changes and pathological injuries. However, administering the same dose of nicotinamide to healthy animals or prior to acetaminophen-intoxication induced hepatotoxicity. Caution should be taken when administering high doses of NAM because of its possible hepatotoxicity. Considering the wide use of nicotinamide, there is an important need for monitoring nicotinamide tolerance, safety and efficacy in healthy and diseased subjects. PMID:27211843

  17. Spathodea campanulata Extract Attenuates Acetaminophen-Induced Hepatic Injury in Mice

    Phyllis Elsie Dadzeasah

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Spathodea campanulata, well known for its traditional medicinal uses was investigated for hepatoprotective activity against acetaminophen-induced hepatic damage in mice. Six groups of mice were pre-treated with 100, 300 and 625 mg/kg of the aqueous extract of Spathodea campanulata stem bark, N-acetyl cysteine (300 mg/kg; p.o or distilled water for 5 days before they were intoxicated with a single dose of acetaminophen (600 mg/kg; p.o. Alanine aminotransferase, Aspartate aminotransferase and total protein levels were measured in serum, glutathione peroxidase, superoxide dismutase and total cytochrome P450 levels were measured in liver homogenate and liver histology was also observed on liver sections. Total liver cytochrome P450 levels in Spathodea campanulata extract, distilled water, ketoconazole or phenobarbital-treated animals were also measured. Significant hepatoprotection was obtained against liver damage induced by acetaminophen as evident from decreased serum levels of Aspartate transaminase, Alanine transaminase and increased levels of total protein in the combined acetaminophen and extract treated groups and the acetaminophen and N-acetylcysteine-treated groups compared to the acetaminophen only controls. The decrease in serum antioxidant enzymes; glutathione peroxidase and superoxide dismutase levels caused by acetaminophen was significantly reversed by the extract. The results correlated well with the histopathology of liver from treated and control animals. The extract also caused considerable inhibition of total CYP450, the enzymes involved in the activation of acetaminophen. The present results indicate that Spathodea campanulata protects the liver against acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity by enhancing antioxidant protection capacity and interfering with the bio-activation of acetaminophen.

  18. Hepatoprotective Effects of Met-enkephalin on Acetaminophen-Induced Liver Lesions in Male CBA Mice

    Roko Martinić

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Recent histopathological investigations in patients with hepatitis suggested possible involvement of Met-enkephalin and its receptors in the pathophysiology of hepatitis. Consequently, we evaluated the potential hepatoprotective effects of this endogenous opioid pentapeptide in the experimental model of acetaminophen induced hepatotoxicity in male CBA mice. Met-enkephalin exhibited strong hepatoprotective effects in a dose of 7.5 mg/kg, which corresponds to the protective dose reported for several different animal disease models. In this group plasma alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase enzyme activities, as well as liver necrosis score were significantly reduced in comparison to control animals treated with physiological saline (p > 0.01. The specificity of the peptide hepatoprotection was investigated from the standpoint of the receptor and peptide blockade. It was concluded that Met-enkephalin effects on the liver were mediated via δ and ζ opioid receptors. Genotoxic testing of Met-enkephalin confirmed the safety of the peptide.

  19. Safety and efficacy of N-acetylcysteine in children with non-acetaminophen-induced acute liver failure.

    Kortsalioudaki, Christine; Taylor, Rachel M; Cheeseman, Paul; Bansal, Sanjay; Mieli-Vergani, Giorgina; Dhawan, Anil

    2008-01-01

    Acute liver failure (ALF) carries a high mortality in children. N-acetylcysteine (NAC), an antioxidant agent that replenishes mitochondrial and cytosolic glutathione stores, has been used in the treatment of late acetaminophen-induced ALF and non-acetaminophen-induced ALF. In our unit, NAC was introduced as additional treatment for non-acetaminophen-induced ALF in 1995. The aim of this study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of NAC in children with ALF not caused by acetaminophen poisoning. A retrospective review of medical records of 170 children presenting with nonacetaminophen-induced ALF between 1989 and 2004 was undertaken. ALF was defined as either international normalized ratio of prothrombin time (INR) > 2 and abnormal liver function or INR >1.5 with encephalopathy and abnormal liver function. Children were divided into the following groups: Group 1 (1989-1994), standard care (n = 59; 34 [58%] male; median age 2.03 yr, range 0.003-15.8 yr); and Group 2 (1995-2004), standard care and NAC administration (n = 111; 57 [51%] male; median age 3.51 yr, range 0.005-17.4 yr). NAC was administered as a continuous infusion (100 mg/kg/24 hours) until INR dizziness and peripheral edema in 1. One child had an allergic reaction (bronchospasm) and NAC was stopped. A total of 41 (71%) children in Group 1 vs. 85 (77%) in Group 2 required admission to intensive care, P = not significant (ns). The length of intensive care stay was 6 (range, 1-58) days in Group 1 vs. 5 (range, 1-68) days in Group 2, P = ns and length of hospital stay was 25 (range, 1-264) days vs. 19 (range, 1-201) days, P = 0.05. The 10-yr actuarial survival was 50% in Group 1 compared to 75% in Group 2, P = 0.009. Survival with native liver occurred in 13 (22%) in Group 1 vs. 48 (43%) in Group 2, P = 0.005; 15 (25%) in Group 1 died without transplant vs. 21 (19%) in Group 2, P = ns; and LT was performed in 32 (54%) vs. 42 (38%), P = ns. Death after transplantation occurred in 15 (39%) in Group 1 vs. 8

  20. Evaluation of the Hepatoprotective Effects of Lantadene A, a Pentacyclic Triterpenoid of Lantana Plants against Acetaminophen-induced Liver Damage

    Sreenivasan Sasidharan

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to evaluate the hepatoprotective activity of lantadene A against acetaminophen-induced liver toxicity in mice was studied. Activity was measured by monitoring the levels of aspartate aminotransferase (AST, alanine aminotransferase (ALT, alkaline phosphatase (ALP and bilirubin, along with histo-pathological analysis. Silymarin was used as positive control. A bimodal pattern of behavioural toxicity was exhibited by the lantadene A-treated group at the beginning of the treatment. However, treatment with lantadene A and silymarin resulted in an increase in the liver weight compared with the acetaminophen treated group. The results of the acetaminophen-induced liver toxicity experiments showed that mice treated with lantadene A (500 mg/kg showed a significant decrease in the activity of ALT, AST and ALP and the level of bilirubin, which were all elevated in the acetaminophen treated group (p < 0.05. Histological studies supported the biochemical findings and a maximum improvement in the histoarchitecture was seen. The lantadene A-treated group showed remarkable protective effects against histopathological alterations, with comparable results to the silymarin treated group. The current study confirmed the hepatoprotective effects of lantadene A against the model hepatotoxicant acetaminophen, which is likely related to its potent antioxidative activity.

  1. Spathodea campanulata Extract Attenuates Acetaminophen-Induced Hepatic Injury in Mice

    Phyllis Elsie Dadzeasah; Charles Ansah

    2013-01-01

    Spathodea campanulata, well known for its traditional medicinal uses was investigated for hepatoprotective activity against acetaminophen-induced hepatic damage in mice. Six groups of mice were pre-treated with 100, 300 and 625 mg/kg of the aqueous extract of Spathodea campanulata stem bark, N-acetyl cysteine (300 mg/kg; p.o) or distilled water for 5 days before they were intoxicated with a single dose of acetaminophen (600 mg/kg; p.o). Alanine aminotransferase, Aspartate aminotransferase an...

  2. Alleviative effects from boswellic acid on acetaminophen-induced hepatic injury.

    Chen, Lung-Che; Hu, Li-Hong; Yin, Mei-Chin

    2016-06-01

    Protective effects of boswellic acid (BA) against acetaminophen (APAP)-induced hepatotoxicity in Balb/ cA mice were examined. BA, at 0.05 or 0.1%, was supplied for 4 weeks. Acute liver injury was induced by APAP treatment. Results showed that BA intake increased hepatic BA bioavailability. APAP treatment decreased glutathione (GSH) level, increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) and oxidized glutathione (GSSG) production; and lowered activity and protein expression of glutathione reductase (GR) and heme oxygenase (HO)-1 in liver. BA intake at both doses alleviated subsequent APAP-induced oxidative stress by retaining GSH content, decreasing ROS and GSSG formations, reserving activity and expression of GR and HO-1 in liver, and lowering hepatic cytochrome P450 2E1 activity and expression. APAP treatment enhanced hepatic levels of interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-alpha and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1. BA pre-intake diminished APAP-induced release of those inflammatory cytokines and chemokines. APAP upregulated hepatic protein expression of toll-like receptor (TLR)-3, TLR-4, MyD88, nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) p50, NF-κB p65 and JNK. BA pre-intake at both doses suppressed the expression of NF-κB p65 and p-JNK, and only at 0.1% down-regulated hepatic TLR-3, TLR-4 and MyD88 expression. APAP led to obvious foci of inflammatory cell infiltration in liver, determined by H&E stain. BA intake at both doses attenuated hepatic inflammatory infiltration. These findings support that boswellic acid is a potent hepatoprotective agent. PMID:27161000

  3. New therapeutic approach: diphenyl diselenide reduces mitochondrial dysfunction in acetaminophen-induced acute liver failure.

    Nélson R Carvalho

    Full Text Available The acute liver failure (ALF induced by acetaminophen (APAP is closely related to oxidative damage and depletion of hepatic glutathione, consequently changes in cell energy metabolism and mitochondrial dysfunction have been observed after APAP overdose. Diphenyl diselenide [(PhSe2], a simple organoselenium compound with antioxidant properties, previously demonstrated to confer hepatoprotection. However, little is known about the protective mechanism on mitochondria. The main objective of this study was to investigate the effects (PhSe2 to reduce mitochondrial dysfunction and, secondly, compare in the liver homogenate the hepatoprotective effects of the (PhSe2 to the N-acetylcysteine (NAC during APAP-induced ALF to validate our model. Mice were injected intraperitoneal with APAP (600 mg/kg, (PhSe2 (15.6 mg/kg, NAC (1200 mg/kg, APAP+(PhSe2 or APAP+NAC, where the (PhSe2 or NAC treatment were given 1 h following APAP. The liver was collected 4 h after overdose. The plasma alanine and aspartate aminotransferase activities increased after APAP administration. APAP caused a remarkable increase of oxidative stress markers (lipid peroxidation, reactive species and protein carbonylation and decrease of the antioxidant defense in the liver homogenate and mitochondria. APAP caused a marked loss in the mitochondrial membrane potential, the mitochondrial ATPase activity, and the rate of mitochondrial oxygen consumption and increased the mitochondrial swelling. All these effects were significantly prevented by (PhSe2. The effectiveness of (PhSe2 was similar at a lower dose than NAC. In summary, (PhSe2 provided a significant improvement to the mitochondrial redox homeostasis and the mitochondrial bioenergetics dysfunction caused by membrane permeability transition in the hepatotoxicity APAP-induced.

  4. Antioxidant and Hepatoprotective Properties of Tofu (Curdle Soymilk against Acetaminophen-Induced Liver Damage in Rats

    Ndatsu Yakubu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The antioxidant and hepatoprotective properties of tofu using acetaminophen to induce liver damage in albino rats were evaluated. Tofus were prepared using calcium chloride, alum, and steep water as coagulants. The polyphenols of tofu were extracted and their antioxidant properties were determined. The weight gain and feed intake of the rats were measured. The analysis of serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT, alkaline phosphatase (ALP, aspartate aminotransferase (AST, and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH activities and the concentrations of albumin, total protein, cholesterol, and bilirubin were analyzed. The result reveals that the antioxidant property of both soluble and bound polyphenolic extracts was significantly higher in all tofus, but the steep water coagulated tofu was recorded higher. Rats fed with various tofus and acetaminophen had their serum ALP, ALT, AST, and LDH activities; total cholesterol; and bilirubin levels significantly (P<0.05 reduced, and total protein and albumin concentrations increased when compared with basal diet and acetaminophen administered group. Therefore, all tofus curdled with various coagulants could be used to prevent liver damage caused by oxidative stress.

  5. Potential role of caveolin-1 in acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity

    Caveolin-1 (Cav-1) is a membrane scaffolding protein, which functions to regulate intracellular compartmentalization of various signaling molecules. In the present studies, transgenic mice with a targeted disruption of the Cav-1 gene (Cav-1-/-) were used to assess the role of Cav-1 in acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity. Treatment of wild-type mice with acetaminophen (300 mg/kg) resulted in centrilobular hepatic necrosis and increases in serum transaminases. This was correlated with decreased expression of Cav-1 in the liver. Acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity was significantly attenuated in Cav-1-/- mice, an effect that was independent of acetaminophen metabolism. Acetaminophen administration resulted in increased hepatic expression of the oxidative stress marker, lipocalin 24p3, as well as hemeoxygenase-1, but decreased glutathione and superoxide dismutase-1; no differences were noted between the genotypes suggesting that reduced toxicity in Cav-1-/- mice is not due to alterations in antioxidant defense. In wild-type mice, acetaminophen increased mRNA expression of the pro-inflammatory cytokines, interleukin-1β, and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), as well as cyclooxygenase-2, while 15-lipoxygenase (15-LOX), which generates anti-inflammatory lipoxins, decreased. Acetaminophen-induced changes in MCP-1 and 15-LOX expression were greater in Cav-1-/- mice. Although expression of tumor necrosis factor-α, a potent hepatocyte mitogen, was up-regulated in the liver of Cav-1-/- mice after acetaminophen, expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen and survivin, markers of cellular proliferation, were delayed, which may reflect the reduced need for tissue repair. Taken together, these data demonstrate that Cav-1 plays a role in promoting inflammation and toxicity during the pathogenesis of acetaminophen-induced injury.

  6. Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase Phosphatase (Mkp)-1 Protects Mice against Acetaminophen-induced Hepatic Injury

    Wancket, Lyn M.; Meng, Xiaomei; Rogers, Lynette K.; Liu, Yusen

    2012-01-01

    c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) activation promotes hepatocyte death during acetaminophen overdose, a common cause of drug-induced liver failure. While mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) phosphatase (Mkp)-1 is a critical negative regulator of JNK MAPK, little is known about the role of Mkp-1 during hepatotoxicity. In this study, we evaluated the role of Mkp-1 during acute acetaminophen toxicity. Mkp-1+/+ and Mkp-1−/− mice were dosed ip with vehicle or acetaminophen at 300 mg/kg (for mechan...

  7. A Cytochrome P450-Independent Mechanism of Acetaminophen-Induced Injury in Cultured Mouse Hepatocytes.

    Miyakawa, Kazuhisa; Albee, Ryan; Letzig, Lynda G; Lehner, Andreas F; Scott, Michael A; Buchweitz, John P; James, Laura P; Ganey, Patricia E; Roth, Robert A

    2015-08-01

    Mouse hepatic parenchymal cells (HPCs) have become the most frequently used in vitro model to study mechanisms of acetaminophen (APAP)-induced hepatotoxicity. It is universally accepted that APAP hepatocellular injury requires bioactivation by cytochromes P450 (P450s), but this remains unproven in primary mouse HPCs in vitro, especially over the wide range of concentrations that have been employed in published reports. The aim of this work was to test the hypothesis that APAP-induced hepatocellular death in vitro depends solely on P450s. We evaluated APAP cytotoxicity and APAP-protein adducts (a biomarker of metabolic bioactivation by P450) using primary mouse HPCs in the presence and absence of a broad-spectrum inhibitor of P450s, 1-aminobenzotriazole (1-ABT). 1-ABT abolished formation of APAP-protein adducts at all concentrations of APAP (0-14 mM), but eliminated cytotoxicity only at small concentrations (≦5 mM), indicating the presence of a P450-independent mechanism at larger APAP concentrations. P450-independent cell death was delayed in onset relative to toxicity observed at smaller concentrations. p-Aminophenol was detected in primary mouse HPCs exposed to large concentrations of APAP, and a deacetylase inhibitor [bis (4-nitrophenyl) phosphate (BNPP)] significantly reduced cytotoxicity. In conclusion, APAP hepatocellular injury in vitro occurs by at least two mechanisms, a P450-dependent mechanism that operates at concentrations of APAP ≦ 5 mM and a P450-independent mechanism that predominates at larger concentrations and is slower in onset. p-Aminophenol most likely contributes to the latter mechanism. These findings should be considered in interpreting results from APAP cytotoxicity studies in vitro and in selecting APAP concentrations for use in such studies. PMID:26065700

  8. Remarks on Sasidharan et al. “Evaluation of the Hepatoprotective Effects of Lantadene A, a Pentacyclic Triterpenoid of Lantana Plants against Acetaminophen-induced Liver Damage”. Molecules 2012, 17, 13937-13947

    Manu Sharma

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available An article by Sasidharan et al. recently published in the journal Molecules [1] claimed to show the hepatoprotective effects of lantadene A against acetaminophen-induced liver damage in mice. While reading this paper, I came across certain points that need to be clarified and taken up in the interest of science and other scientists working in this area.

  9. Necrostatin-1 protects against reactive oxygen species (ROS-induced hepatotoxicity in acetaminophen-induced acute liver failure

    Kenji Takemoto

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Excessive acetaminophen (APAP use is one of the most common causes of acute liver failure. Various types of cell death in the damaged liver are linked to APAP-induced hepatotoxicity, and, of these, necrotic cell death of hepatocytes has been shown to be involved in disease pathogenesis. Until recently, necrosis was commonly considered to be a random and unregulated form of cell death; however, recent studies have identified a previously unknown form of programmed necrosis called receptor-interacting protein kinase (RIPK-dependent necrosis (or necroptosis, which is controlled by the kinases RIPK1 and RIPK3. Although RIPK-dependent necrosis has been implicated in a variety of disease states, including atherosclerosis, myocardial organ damage, stroke, ischemia–reperfusion injury, pancreatitis, and inflammatory bowel disease. However its involvement in APAP-induced hepatocyte necrosis remains elusive. Here, we showed that RIPK1 phosphorylation, which is a hallmark of RIPK-dependent necrosis, was induced by APAP, and the expression pattern of RIPK1 and RIPK3 in the liver overlapped with that of CYP2E1, whose activity around the central vein area has been demonstrated to be critical for the development of APAP-induced hepatic injury. Moreover, a RIPK1 inhibitor ameliorated APAP-induced hepatotoxicity in an animal model, which was underscored by significant suppression of the release of hepatic enzymes and cytokine expression levels. RIPK1 inhibition decreased reactive oxygen species levels produced in APAP-injured hepatocytes, whereas CYP2E1 expression and the depletion rate of total glutathione were unaffected. Of note, RIPK1 inhibition also conferred resistance to oxidative stress in hepatocytes. These data collectively demonstrated a RIPK-dependent necrotic mechanism operates in the APAP-injured liver and inhibition of this pathway may be beneficial for APAP-induced fulminant hepatic failure.

  10. Predicting outcome on admission and post-admission for acetaminophen-induced acute liver failure using classification and regression tree models.

    Jaime Lynn Speiser

    Full Text Available Assessing prognosis for acetaminophen-induced acute liver failure (APAP-ALF patients often presents significant challenges. King's College (KCC has been validated on hospital admission, but little has been published on later phases of illness. We aimed to improve determinations of prognosis both at the time of and following admission for APAP-ALF using Classification and Regression Tree (CART models.CART models were applied to US ALFSG registry data to predict 21-day death or liver transplant early (on admission and post-admission (days 3-7 for 803 APAP-ALF patients enrolled 01/1998-09/2013. Accuracy in prediction of outcome (AC, sensitivity (SN, specificity (SP, and area under receiver-operating curve (AUROC were compared between 3 models: KCC (INR, creatinine, coma grade, pH, CART analysis using only KCC variables (KCC-CART and a CART model using new variables (NEW-CART.Traditional KCC yielded 69% AC, 90% SP, 27% SN, and 0.58 AUROC on admission, with similar performance post-admission. KCC-CART at admission offered predictive 66% AC, 65% SP, 67% SN, and 0.74 AUROC. Post-admission, KCC-CART had predictive 82% AC, 86% SP, 46% SN and 0.81 AUROC. NEW-CART models using MELD (Model for end stage liver disease, lactate and mechanical ventilation on admission yielded predictive 72% AC, 71% SP, 77% SN and AUROC 0.79. For later stages, NEW-CART (MELD, lactate, coma grade offered predictive AC 86%, SP 91%, SN 46%, AUROC 0.73.CARTs offer simple prognostic models for APAP-ALF patients, which have higher AUROC and SN than KCC, with similar AC and negligibly worse SP. Admission and post-admission predictions were developed.• Prognostication in acetaminophen-induced acute liver failure (APAP-ALF is challenging beyond admission • Little has been published regarding the use of King's College Criteria (KCC beyond admission and KCC has shown limited sensitivity in subsequent studies • Classification and Regression Tree (CART methodology allows the

  11. Effects of Hepatoprotective Compounds from the Leaves of Lumnitzera racemosa on Acetaminophen-Induced Liver Damage in Vitro.

    Darwish, Ahmed Gomaa Gomaa; Samy, Mamdouh Nabil; Sugimoto, Sachiko; Otsuka, Hideaki; Abdel-Salam, Hosni; Matsunami, Katsuyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Phytochemical investigation of the n-BuOH fraction of the mangrove plant Lumnitzera racemosa WILLD. (Combretaceae) led to the isolation of one new flavonoid glycoside; myrcetin 3-O-methyl glucuronate (1), one new phenolic glycoside; lumniracemoside (2) and one new aliphatic alcohol glycoside; n-hexanol 1-O-rutinoside (3), in addition to seven known compounds (4-10). The structures of these compounds were determined by spectroscopic analyses (UV, IR, high resolution-electrospray ionization (HR-ESI)-MS, one- and two-dimensional (1D- and 2D)-NMR). Compound 7 showed the highest hepatoprotective activity against acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity using human HepG2 cells at protection % value of 34.2±3.1%, while compounds 1, 2, 3, 6, and 9 showed weak to moderate hepatoprotective activity (11.6-18.9%). Almost all of these compounds showed stronger 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging activity compared with the standard Trolox. These results suggest the usefulness of this plant extract and the isolated compounds as promising hepatoprotective agents. PMID:27039833

  12. Involvement of mitochondria in acetaminophen-induced apoptosis and hepatic injury Roles of cytochrome c, Bax, Bid, and caspases

    The role of apoptosis in acetaminophen (AAP)-induced hepatic injury was investigated. Six hours after AAP administration to BALB/c mice, a significant loss of hepatic mitochondrial cytochrome c was observed that was similar in extent to the loss observed after in vivo activation of CD95 by antibody treatment. AAP-induced loss of mitochondrial cytochrome c coincided with the appearance in the cytosol of a fragment corresponding to truncated Bid (tBid). At the same time, tBid became detectable in the mitochondrial fraction, and concomitantly, Bax was found translocated to mitochondria. However, AAP failed to activate the execution caspases 3 and 7 as evidenced by a lack of procaspase processing and the absence of an increase in caspase-3-like activity. In contrast, the administration of the pan-inhibitor of caspases, benzyloxycarbonyl-Val-Ala-DL-Asp-fluoromethylketone (but not its analogue benzyloxycarbonyl-Phe-Ala-fluoromethylketone) prevented the development of liver injury by AAP and the appearance of apoptotic parenchymal cells. This correlated with the inhibition of the processing of Bid to tBid. The caspase inhibitor failed to prevent both the redistribution of Bax to the mitochondria and the loss of cytochrome c. In conclusion, apoptosis is an important causal event in the initiation of the hepatic injury inflicted by AAP. However, as suggested by the lack of activation of the main execution caspases, apoptosis is not properly executed and degenerates into necrosis

  13. Croton zehntneri Essential oil prevents acetaminophen-induced acute hepatotoxicity in mice

    Maria Goretti R. Queiroz

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Hepatoprotective activity of Croton zehntneri Pax & Hoffman (Euphorbiaceae leaf essential oil (EOCz was evaluated against single dose of acetaminophen-induced (500 mg/kg, p.o. acute hepatotoxicity in mice. EOCz significantly protected the hepatotoxicity as evident from the activities of serum glutamate pyruvate transaminase (GPT, serum glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase (GOT activities, that were significantly (p<0.01 elevated in the acetaminophen alone treated animals. Histopathological examinations of liver tissue corroborated well with the biochemical changes. Hepatic steatosis, hydropic degeneration and necrosis were observed in the acetaminophen treated group, while these were completely absent in the standard and EOCz treated groups. In conclusion, these data suggest that the Croton zehntneri essential oil can prevent hepatic injuries from acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity in mice.

  14. Effect of Conditioned Medium and Bone Marrow Stem Cell Lysate on the Course of Acetaminophen-Induced Liver Failure.

    Khubutiya, M Sh; Temnov, A A; Vagabov, V A; Sklifas, A N; Rogov, K A; Zhgutov, Yu A

    2015-05-01

    A composition containing culture medium conditioned by mesenchymal stem cells and mesenchymal stem cell lysate improves biochemical parameters, reduces inflammation, and stimulates regenerative processes in the liver. PMID:26033600

  15. Liver autophagy in anorexia nervosa and acute liver injury.

    Kheloufi, Marouane; Boulanger, Chantal M; Durand, François; Rautou, Pierre-Emmanuel

    2014-01-01

    Autophagy, a lysosomal catabolic pathway for long-lived proteins and damaged organelles, is crucial for cell homeostasis, and survival under stressful conditions. During starvation, autophagy is induced in numerous organisms ranging from yeast to mammals, and promotes survival by supplying nutrients and energy. In the early neonatal period, when transplacental nutrients supply is interrupted, starvation-induced autophagy is crucial for neonates' survival. In adult animals, autophagy provides amino acids and participates in glucose metabolism following starvation. In patients with anorexia nervosa, autophagy appears initially protective, allowing cells to copes with nutrient deprivation. However, when starvation is critically prolonged and when body mass index reaches 13 kg/m(2) or lower, acute liver insufficiency occurs with features of autophagic cell death, which can be observed by electron microscopy analysis of liver biopsy samples. In acetaminophen overdose, a classic cause of severe liver injury, autophagy is induced as a protective mechanism. Pharmacological enhancement of autophagy protects against acetaminophen-induced necrosis. Autophagy is also activated as a rescue mechanism in response to Efavirenz-induced mitochondrial dysfunction. However, Efavirenz overdose blocks autophagy leading to liver cell death. In conclusion, in acute liver injury, autophagy appears as a protective mechanism that can be however blocked or overwhelmed. PMID:25250330

  16. Liver Autophagy in Anorexia Nervosa and Acute Liver Injury

    Marouane Kheloufi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy, a lysosomal catabolic pathway for long-lived proteins and damaged organelles, is crucial for cell homeostasis, and survival under stressful conditions. During starvation, autophagy is induced in numerous organisms ranging from yeast to mammals, and promotes survival by supplying nutrients and energy. In the early neonatal period, when transplacental nutrients supply is interrupted, starvation-induced autophagy is crucial for neonates’ survival. In adult animals, autophagy provides amino acids and participates in glucose metabolism following starvation. In patients with anorexia nervosa, autophagy appears initially protective, allowing cells to copes with nutrient deprivation. However, when starvation is critically prolonged and when body mass index reaches 13 kg/m2 or lower, acute liver insufficiency occurs with features of autophagic cell death, which can be observed by electron microscopy analysis of liver biopsy samples. In acetaminophen overdose, a classic cause of severe liver injury, autophagy is induced as a protective mechanism. Pharmacological enhancement of autophagy protects against acetaminophen-induced necrosis. Autophagy is also activated as a rescue mechanism in response to Efavirenz-induced mitochondrial dysfunction. However, Efavirenz overdose blocks autophagy leading to liver cell death. In conclusion, in acute liver injury, autophagy appears as a protective mechanism that can be however blocked or overwhelmed.

  17. Protective Effect of Chlormethiazole, a Sedative, against Acetaminophen-Induced Liver Injury in Mice

    Lee, Han Chu; Jung, Sung Ae; Jung, Hye Kyung; Yi, Sun Young; Kim, Doe Young; Moon, Il Hwan; Park, Sung Su

    1999-01-01

    Objectives The hepatotoxicity of acetaminophen is not a result of the parent compound but is mediated by its reactive metabolite N-acetyl-p-benzoquinone imine. Cytochrome P4502E1 (CYP2E1) is the principal enzyme of this biotransformation, which accounts for approximately 52% of the bioactivation in human microsomes. Recently, chlormethiazole, a sedative drug, is reported to be an efficient inhibitor of CYP2E1 activity in human beings. In this study we wished to evaluate whether chlormethiazol...

  18. Increased plasma levels of microparticles expressing CD39 and CD133 in acute liver injury

    Schmelzle, Moritz; Splith, Katrin; Wiuff Andersen, Lars;

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We have previously demonstrated that CD133 and CD39 are expressed by hematopoietic stem cells (HSC), which are mobilized after liver injury and target sites of injury, limit vascular inflammation, and boost hepatic regeneration. Plasma microparticles (MP) expressing CD39 can block...... endothelial activation. Here, we tested whether CD133 MP might be shed in a CD39-dependent manner in a model of liver injury and could potentially serve as biomarkers of liver failure in the clinic. METHODS: Wild-type and Cd39-null mice were subjected to acetaminophen-induced liver injury. Mice were...... sacrificed and plasma MP were isolated by ultracentrifugation. HSC and CD133 MP levels were analyzed by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Patients were enrolled with acute (n=5) and acute on chronic (n=5) liver injury with matched controls (n=7). Blood was collected at admission and plasma CD133 and CD39...

  19. Protective Effect of Acacia nilotica (L.) against Acetaminophen-Induced Hepatocellular Damage in Wistar Rats

    Kannan, Narayanan; Sakthivel, Kunnathur Murugesan; Guruvayoorappan, Chandrasekaran

    2013-01-01

    The potential biological functions of A. nilotica have long been described in traditional system of medicine. However, the protective effect of A. nilotica on acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity is still unknown. The present study attempted to investigate the protective effect of A. nilotica against acetaminophen-induced hepatic damage in Wistar rats. The biochemical liver functional tests Alanine transaminase (ALT), Aspartate transaminase (AST), Alkaline phosphatase (ALP), total bilirubin, ...

  20. Role of tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 (p55) in hepatocyte proliferation during acetaminophen-induced toxicity in mice

    Hepatocyte proliferation represents an important part of tissue repair. In these studies, TNF receptor 1 (TNFR1) knockout mice were used to analyze the role of TNF-α in hepatocyte proliferation during acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity. Treatment of wild-type (WT) mice with acetaminophen (300 mg/kg) resulted in centrilobular hepatic necrosis. This was associated with proliferation of hepatocytes surrounding the damaged areas, which was evident at 24 h. The cell cycle regulatory proteins, cyclin D1 and cyclin A, were also up regulated in hepatocytes. In contrast, in TNFR1-/- mice, which exhibit exaggerated acetaminophen hepatotoxicity, hepatocyte proliferation, and expression of cyclin D1 and cyclin A, as well as the cyclin dependent kinases, Cdk4 and Cdk2, were reduced. The cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21 was also induced in the liver following acetaminophen administration. This was greater in TNFR1-/- mice compared to WT mice. To investigate mechanisms mediating the reduced hepatic proliferative response of TNFR1-/- mice, we analyzed phosphatidyl inositol-3-kinase (PI-3K) signaling. In both WT and TNFR1-/- mice, acetaminophen caused a rapid increase in total PI-3K within 3 h. Acetaminophen also increased phosphorylated PI-3K, but this was delayed 6-12 h in TNFR1-/- mice. Expression of Akt, a downstream target of PI-3K, was increased in both WT and TNFR1-/- mice in response to acetaminophen. However, the increase was greater in WT mice. Acetaminophen-induced expression of phosphorylated STAT3, a key regulator of cytokine-induced hepatocyte proliferation, was also delayed in TNFR1-/- mice relative to WT. These data suggest that TNF-α signaling through TNFR1 is important in regulating hepatocyte proliferation following acetaminophen-induced tissue injury. Delayed cytokine signaling may account for reduced hepatocyte proliferation and contribute to exaggerated acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity in TNFR1-/- mice

  1. Acetaminophen-induced nephrotoxicity: Pathophysiology, clinical manifestations, and management

    Mazer, Maryann; Perrone, Jeanmarie

    2008-01-01

    Acetaminophen-induced liver necrosis has been studied extensively, but the extrahepatic manifestations of acetaminophen toxicity are currently not described well in the literature. Renal insufficiency occurs in approximately 1–2% of patients with acetaminophen overdose. The pathophysiology of renal toxicity in acetaminophen poisoning has been attributed to cytochrome P-450 mixed function oxidase isoenzymes present in the kidney, although other mechanisms have been elucidated, including the ro...

  2. Leflunomide or A77 1726 protect from acetaminophen-induced cell injury through inhibition of JNK-mediated mitochondrial permeability transition in immortalized human hepatocytes

    Leflunomide, a disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drug, protects against T-cell-mediated liver injury by poorly understood mechanisms. The active metabolite of leflunomide, A77 1726 (teriflunomide) has been shown to inhibit stress-activated protein kinases (JNK pathway), which are key regulators of mitochondria-mediated cell death. Therefore, we hypothesized that leflunomide may protect from drugs that induce the mitochondrial permeability transition (mPT) by blocking the JNK signaling pathway. To this end, we exposed cultured immortalized human hepatocytes (HC-04) to the standard protoxicant drug acetaminophen (APAP), which induces CsA-sensitive mPT-mediated cell death. We determined the effects of leflunomide on the extent of APAP-induced hepatocyte injury and the upstream JNK-mediated mitochondrial signaling pathways. We found that leflunomide or A77 1726 concentration-dependently protected hepatocytes from APAP (1 mM)-induced mitochondrial permeabilization and lethal cell injury. This was not due to proximal inhibition of CYP-catalyzed APAP bioactivation to its thiol-reactive metabolite. Instead, we demonstrate that leflunomide (20 μM) inhibited the APAP-induced early (3 h) activation (phosphorylation) of JNK1/2, thus inhibiting phosphorylation of the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 and preventing P-Bcl-2-mediated induction of the mPT. This greatly attenuated mitochondrial cytochrome c release, which we used as a marker for mitochondrial permeabilization. The specific JNK2 inhibitor SP600125 similarly protected from APAP-induced cell death. In conclusion, these findings are consistent with our hypothesis that leflunomide protects from protoxicant-induced hepatocyte injury by inhibiting JNK signaling and preventing mPT induction

  3. Defensive nature of Sargassum polycystum (Brown alga)against acetaminophen-induced toxic hepatitis in rats: Role of drug metabolizing microsomal enzyme system, tumor necrosis factor-α and fate of liver cell structural integrity

    H Balaji raghavendran; A Sathivel; T Devaki

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To assess the defensive nature of Sargassum polycystum (S. Polycystum) (Brown alga) against acetaminophen (AAP)-induced changes in drug metabolizing microsomal enzyme system, tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α)and fine structural features of the liver during toxic hepatitis in rats.METHODS: Male albino Wistar strain rats used for the study were randomly categorized into 4 groups. Group Ⅰ consisted of normal control rats fed with standard diet.Group Ⅱ rats were administered with acetaminophen (800 mg/kg body weight, intraperitoneally). Group Ⅲ rats were pre-treated with S. Polycystum extract alone.Group Ⅳ rats were orally pre-treated with S. Polycystum extract (200 mg/kg body weight for 21 d) prior to acetaminophen induction (800 mg/kg body weight,intraperitoneally). Serum separated and liver was excised and microsomal fraction was isolated for assaying cytochrome P450, NADPH Cyt P450 reductase and b5.Serum TNF-α was detected using ELISA. Fine structural features of liver were examined by transmission electron microscopy.RESULTS: Rats intoxicated with acetaminophen showed considerable impairment in the activities of drug metabolizing microsomal enzymes, such as cytochrome P450, NADPH Cyt P450 reductase and b5 when compared with the control rats. The rats intoxicated with acetaminophen also significantly triggered serum TNF-α when compared with the control rats. These severe alterations in the drug metabolizing enzymes were appreciably prevented in the rats pretreated with S. Polycystum. The rats pretreated with S. Polycystum showed considerable inhibition in the elevation of TNF-α compared to the rats intoxicated with acetaminophen. The electron microscopic observation showed considerable loss of structural integrity of the endoplasmic reticulum, lipid infiltration and ballooning of mitochondria in the acetaminophen-intoxicated rats,whereas the rats treated with S. Polycystum showed considerable protection against acetaminophen-induced alterations in

  4. HEPATOPROTECTIVE EFFECT OF AQUEOUS AND N-HEXANE EXTRACT OF NIGELLA SATIVA IN PARACETAMOL (ACETAMINOPHEN) INDUCED LIVER DISEASES OF RATS: A HISTOPATHOLOGICAL EVALUATION

    Farida Yesmin; Zaida Rahman; Jesmin Fouzia Dewan; Asadul Mazid Helali; Md Zakirul Islam; Rahman, Nor Iza A; Tengku Fatimah Murniwati Binti Tengku Muda; Mainul Haque

    2013-01-01

    Acute over dose of paracetamol (acetaminophen) causes serious hepatic necrosis. So, this study was conducted to observe the hepatoprotective activity of aqueous and n-hexane extract of Nigella sativa in paracetamol induced hepatotoxicity in rats in Dhaka, Bangladesh from 2008 to 2010. Single dose of paracetamol was administered on day one and rats were sacrificed on day three. Liver damage was evaluated by hepatic histology. Aqueous and n-hexane extract of Nigella sativa was administered oral...

  5. Effects of the Total Saponins from Rosa laevigata Michx Fruit against Acetaminophen-Induced Liver Damage in Mice via Induction of Autophagy and Suppression of Inflammation and Apoptosis

    Deshi Dong

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The effect of the total saponins from Rosa laevigata Michx fruit (RLTS against acetaminophen (APAP-induced liver damage in mice was evaluated in the present paper. The results showed that RLTS markedly improved the levels of liver SOD, CAT, GSH, GSH-Px, MDA, NO and iNOS, and the activities of serum ALT and AST caused by APAP. Further research confirmed that RLTS prevented fragmentation of DNA and mitochondrial ultrastructural alterations based on TdT-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL and transmission electron microscopy (TEM assays. In addition, RLTS decreased the gene or protein expressions of cytochrome P450 (CYP2E1, pro-inflammatory mediators (IL-1β, IL-4, IL-6, TNF-α, iNOS, Bax, HMGB-1 and COX-2, pro-inflammatory transcription factors (NF-κB and AP-1, pro-apoptotic proteins (cytochrome C, p53, caspase-3, caspase-9, p-JNK, p-p38 and p-ERK, and increased the protein expressions of Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL. Moreover, the gene expression of IL-10, and the proteins including LC3, Beclin-1 and Atg5 induced by APAP were even more augmented by the extract. These results demonstrate that RLTS has hepatoprotective effects through antioxidative action, induction of autophagy, and suppression of inflammation and apoptosis, and could be developed as a potential candidate to treat APAP-induced liver damage in the future.

  6. Acetaminophen induced nephrotoxicity in an adolescent girl

    Belde; Mehmet; Demet; Alper; Salih

    2011-01-01

    Acetaminophen induced nephrotoxicity is not a frequent consequence of acetaminophen overdose. The pathophysiology has been attributed to oxidative stress. Here, we report a 16-year-old female patient who developed non-oliguric acute renal failure without hepatotoxicity following ingestion of 14 tablets of 500 mg acetaminophen and recovered spontaneously in a week. (Turk Arch Ped 2011; 46: 343-5)

  7. Chemoprotective effect of insulin-like growth factor I against acetaminophen-induced cell death in Chang liver cells via ERK1/2 activation

    The insulin-like growth factor (IGF) system and type-I IGF receptor (IGF-IR) signaling are involved in protecting against chemotherapeutic drug-induced cell death in human hepatoma cells. Acetaminophen (AAP) hepatotoxicity is the leading cause of liver failure, and the prevention of AAP-induced cell death has been the focus of many studies. We determined whether IGF-I could protect against AAP-induced cell death in Chang liver cells and investigated the protective mechanism. Based on the results of MTS assays, LDH release assays, Hoechst 33342 cell staining, and DNA fragmentation experiments, AAP induced cell death in a dose-dependent manner. According to Western blot analysis, treatment with AAP increased the level of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) fragments in cells compared with that in control cells; however, caspase-3, a critical signaling molecule in apoptosis, was not activated after AAP overdose. Moreover, combined treatment with AAP and IGF-I inhibited PARP cleavage, which was consistent with the ability of IGF-I to restore the level of glutathione (GSH) and cell viability in GSH and MTS assays, respectively. We investigated whether the protective effect of IGF-I against AAP cytotoxicity is related to the extracellular signal-related kinase ERK1/2, which is generally activated by mitogenic and proliferative stimuli such as growth factors. Compared with AAP treatment alone, IGF-I and AAP co-treatment increased ERK1/2 phosphorylation but inhibited PARP cleavage. Thus ERK1/2 activation is instrumental in the protective effect of IGF-I against AAP-induced cell death in Chang liver cells

  8. Plasma glutathione S-transferase and F protein are more sensitive than alanine aminotransferase as markers of paracetamol (acetaminophen)-induced liver damage.

    Beckett, G J; Foster, G R; Hussey, A J; Oliveira, D B; Donovan, J W; Prescott, L F; Proudfoot, A T

    1989-11-01

    Concentrations of glutathione S-transferase (GST; glutathione transferase; EC 2.5.1.18) B1 subunits, F protein, and the activity of alanine aminotransferase (ALT; EC 2.6.1.2) were measured in sequential plasma samples taken from nine patients with self-administered paracetamol (acetaminophen) poisoning. GST exceeded the reference interval in all patients at the time of admission, and F protein was increased in seven. In contrast, abnormal activities of ALT in plasma were found in only one of the nine on admission, a patient admitted 12 h after poisoning. Subsequent to admission nine, eight, and five patients, respectively, had abnormal concentrations of GST, F protein, and ALT. When expressed as multiples of the upper reference limit, the highest values for GST measured in each patient always far exceeded the greatest abnormalities in ALT; this was true for F protein in only five patients. Patients in whom the concentration of GST exceeded 10 micrograms/L on admission subsequently went on to develop moderate or severe liver damage, despite treatment with N-acetylcysteine. F protein and ALT measurements on admission were not as efficient as GST at predicting the clinical outcome of the patients. We conclude that GST and F protein offer clear advantages over ALT for detecting minor degrees of acute liver dysfunction, particularly when only centrilobular damage may be involved. PMID:2582614

  9. Hepatoprotective and antioxidant effects of Azolla microphylla based gold nanoparticles against acetaminophen induced toxicity in a fresh water common carp fish (Cyprinus carpio L.

    Selvaraj Kunjiappan

    2015-04-01

    Conclusion: Azolla microphylla phytochemically synthesized GNaP protects liver against oxidative damage and tissue damaging enzyme activities and could be used as an effective protector against acetaminophen-induced hepatic damage in fresh water common carp fish.

  10. Hepatho-nephroprotective and antioxidant effect of stem bark of Allanblackia gabonensis aqueous extract against acetaminophen-induced liver and kidney disorders in rats

    Theophile Dimo

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Allanblackia gabonensis (Guttiferae is a plant used in traditional medicine to treat some inflammatory diseases. As oxidative stress promotes the development of acetaminophen (APAP-induced hepatotoxicity, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the hepato-nephroprotective and antioxidant effect of aqueous extract of A.gabonensis on APAP-induced liver and kidney damage. Methods: A.gabonensis was given daily per os during 7 days, followed by APAP which was given 2 h after the 6th dose for preventive effect, whereas for curative testing A.gabonensis was administrated 30 min after APAP (2 g/kg. Preventive and curative effects were observed by following biochemical parameters analysis: transaminases, bilirubin, creatinine, nitric oxide, malondialdehyde (MDA, glutathione (GSH, superoxide dismutase (SOD, and catalase (CAT. Results: The aqueous extract of A.gabonensis at the dose of 100 and 200 mg/kg produced significant hepato-nephroprotective activity by reducing the serum effect of MDA while it significantly produced an increase in enzymatic antioxidant activities (SOD and CAT and non enzymatic antioxidant (GSH levels. A.gabonensis also showed a significant decrease in transaminase, bilirubin and creatinine in APAP intoxicicated rats at the doses of 100 and 200 mg/kg. Conclusion: From this study it can be concluded that aqueous extract of A.gabonensis may possess hepato-nephroprotective activities which can be partly attributed to its antioxidant properties. [J Exp Integr Med 2012; 2(4: 337-344

  11. Hepatoprotective and anti-oxidant activities of Glossogyne tenuifolia against acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity in mice.

    Tien, Yu-Hsiu; Chen, Bing-Huei; Wang Hsu, Guoo-Shyng; Lin, Wan-Teng; Huang, Jui-Hua; Lu, Yi-Fa

    2014-01-01

    The present study investigated the anti-oxidative and hepatoprotective effects of Glossogyne tenuifolia (GT) Cassini, against acetaminophen-induced acute liver injury in BALB/c mice. The extracts of GT by various solvents (hot water, 50% ethanol and 95% ethanol) were compared for their 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging activity, reducing power, total phenolic content, and total anti-oxidant capacity. The results showed that hot water (HW) extracts of GT contained high levels of phenolics and exerted an excellent anti-oxidative capacity; thus, these were used in the animal experiment. The male BALB/c mice were randomly divided into control group, acetaminophen (APAP) group, positive control group and two GT groups at low (GT-L) and high (GT-H) dosages. The results showed that mice treated with GT had significantly decreased serum levels of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST). GT-H increased glutathione levels and the ratios of reduced glutathione and oxidized glutathione (GSH/GSSG) in the liver, and inhibited serum and lipid peroxidation. This experiment was the first to determine phenolic compounds, chlorogenic acid and luteolin-7-glucoside in HW extract of GT. In conclusion, HW extract of GT may have potential anti-oxidant capacity and show hepatoprotective capacities in APAP-induced liver damaged mice. PMID:25384447

  12. Mouse population-guided resequencing reveals that variants in CD44 contribute to acetaminophen-induced liver injury in humans

    Harrill, Alison H.; Watkins, Paul B; Su, Stephen; Ross, Pamela K.; Harbourt, David E; Stylianou, Ioannis M; Boorman, Gary A.; Russo, Mark W.; Sackler, Richard S.; Harris, Stephen C.; Smith, Philip C.; Tennant, Raymond; Bogue, Molly; Paigen, Kenneth; Harris, Christopher

    2009-01-01

    Interindividual variability in response to chemicals and drugs is a common regulatory concern. It is assumed that xenobiotic-induced adverse reactions have a strong genetic basis, but many mechanism-based investigations have not been successful in identifying susceptible individuals. While recent advances in pharmacogenetics of adverse drug reactions show promise, the small size of the populations susceptible to important adverse events limits the utility of whole-genome association studies c...

  13. Freshly isolated hepatocyte transplantation in acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity model in rats

    Daniela Rodrigues

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Hepatocyte transplantation is an attractive therapeutic modality for liver disease as an alternative for orthotopic liver transplantation. OBJECTIVE: The aim of the current study was to investigate the feasibility of freshly isolated rat hepatocyte transplantation in acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity model. METHODS: Hepatocytes were isolated from male Wistar rats and transplanted 24 hours after acetaminophen administration in female recipients. Female rats received either 1x10(7 hepatocytes or phosphate buffered saline through the portal vein or into the spleen and were sacrificed after 48 hours. RESULTS: Alanine aminotransferase levels measured within the experiment did not differ between groups at any time point. Molecular analysis and histology showed presence of hepatocytes in liver of transplanted animals injected either through portal vein or spleen. CONCLUSION: These data demonstrate the feasibility and efficacy of hepatocyte transplantation in the liver or spleen in a mild acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity model.

  14. Hepatoprotective activity of Centaurium erythraea on acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity in rats.

    Mroueh, Mohamad; Saab, Yolande; Rizkallah, Raed

    2004-05-01

    The methanol extract of the leaves of Centaurium erythraea L. (Gentianaceae) was evaluated for hepatoprotective activity against acetaminophen-induced liver toxicity in rats. An oral dose of 300 mg/kg/day for 6 days or a single dose of 900 mg/kg for 1 day exhibited a significant protective effect by lowering serum glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase (SGOT), glutamate pyruvate transaminase (SGPT) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). The activity of the extract was supported by histopathological examination of liver sections. PMID:15174008

  15. Protective effect of zinc aspartate against acetaminophen induced hepato-renal toxicity in albino rats

    Zinc is an essential nutrient that is required in humans and animals for many physiological functions, including antioxidant functions. The evidence to date indicates that zinc is an important element that links antioxidant system and tissue damage. Acetaminophen (AP), a widely used analgesic and antipyretic, produces hepatocyte and renal tubular necrosis in human and animals following overdose. In human, AP is one of the most common causes of acute liver failure as a result of accidental or deliberate overdose. Moreover, the initial event in AP toxicity is a toxic metabolic injury with the release of free radicals and subsequent cellular death by necrosis and apoptosis. This study was designed to evaluate the potential protective role of zinc aspartate in case of acetaminophen induced hepato-renal toxicity in rats. A total number of 32 adult male albino rats were divided into 4 equal groups: group I (control group), group II (zinc aspartate treated group), group III (acetaminophen treated group; by a single oral dose of 750 mg/kg body weight) and group IV acetaminophen plus zinc treated group; (zinc aspartate was intraperitoneally given one hour after acetaminophen administration in a dose of 30 mg/kg body weight). Serum levels of: alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, direct bilirubin, blood urea nitrogen, creatinine, uric acid, xanthine oxidase (XO), glutathione (GSH), malonaldehyde (MDA) and nitric oxide (NO) were assessed in all groups. The results of this study showed that treatment with acetaminophen alone (group III) produced a significant increase in serum levels of the liver enzymes and direct bilirubin. Moreover, in the same group there was a significant increase in the blood urea nitrogen and serum creatinine compared to the control group. In addition, there was a significant increase in XO and MDA and a significant decrease in GSH and NO level. Injection of rats with zinc aspartate after acetaminophen treatment could produce a

  16. Effect of Methylsulfonylmethane Pretreatment on Aceta-minophen Induced Hepatotoxicity in Rats

    Shahab Bohlooli; Sadollah Mohammadi; Keyvan Amirshahrokhi; Hafez Mirzanejad-asl; Mohammad Yosefi; Amir Mohammadi-Nei; Mir Mehdi Chinifroush

    2013-01-01

    Objective(s): Methylsulfonylmethane (MSM) is a sulfur-containing compound found in a wide range of human foods including fruits, vegetables, grains and beverages. In this study the effect of MSM pretreatment on acetaminophen induced liver damage was investigated. Materials and Methods: Male Sprague Dawley rats were pretreated with 100 mg/kg MSM for one week. On day seven rats were received acetaminophen (850 mg/kg, intraperitoneal). Twenty-four hours later, blood samples were taken to determi...

  17. Use of Arctium lappa Extract Against Acetaminophen-Induced Hepatotoxicity in Rats

    Attalla Farag El-Kott, PhD; Mashael Mohammed Bin-Meferij, PhD

    2015-01-01

    Background: Severe destructive hepatic injuries can be induced by acetaminophen overdose and may lead to acute hepatic failure. Objective: To investigate the ameliorative effects of Arctium lappa root extract on acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity. Methods: Rats were divided into 4 groups: normal control group, Arctium lappa extract group, acetaminophen-injected group, and acetaminophen treated with Arctium lappa extract group. Results: The treatment with Arctium lappa extract reduc...

  18. Protective Effect of Acacia nilotica (L. against Acetaminophen-Induced Hepatocellular Damage in Wistar Rats

    Narayanan Kannan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The potential biological functions of A. nilotica have long been described in traditional system of medicine. However, the protective effect of A. nilotica on acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity is still unknown. The present study attempted to investigate the protective effect of A. nilotica against acetaminophen-induced hepatic damage in Wistar rats. The biochemical liver functional tests Alanine transaminase (ALT, Aspartate transaminase (AST, Alkaline phosphatase (ALP, total bilirubin, total protein, oxidative stress test (Lipid peroxidation, antioxidant parameter glutathione (GSH, and histopathological changes were examined. Our results show that the pretreatment with A. nilotica (250 mg/kg·bw orally revealed attenuation of serum activities of ALT, AST, ALP, liver weight, and total bilirubin levels that were enhanced by administration of acetaminophen. Further, pretreatment with extract elevated the total protein and GSH level and decreased the level of LPO. Histopathological analysis confirmed the alleviation of liver damage and reduced lesions caused by acetaminophen. The present study undoubtedly provides a proof that hepatoprotective action of A. nilotica extract may rely on its effect on reducing the oxidative stress in acetaminophen-induced hepatic damage in rat model.

  19. Naproxen-induced liver injury

    Sharif Ali; Jason D Pimentel; Chan Ma

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have been reported to induce liver injury. Patterns of the injury usually range from mild elevations of liver enzymes to sometimes severe fulminant hepatic failure. Likewise, naproxen is a propionic acid derivative NSAID that was introduced in 1980 and has been available as an over-the-counter medication since 1994, but has rarely been reported to cause liver injury. METHODS: We treated a 30-year-old woman with jaundice and intractablepruritusthatdevelopedshortlyaftertakingnaproxen. We reviewed the medical history and liver histopathology of the patient as well as all previously published case reports of naproxen-associated liver toxicity in the English language literature. RESULTS: The liver biochemical profile of the patient revealed a mixed cholestasis and hepatitis pattern. Consecutive liver biopsies demonstrated focal lobular inflammation, hepatocyte drop-out, and a progressive loss of the small interlobular bile ducts (ductopenia). The biopsy performed two years after onset of the disease showed partial recovery of a small number of bile ducts; however, 10 years passed before the biochemical profile returned to near normal. CONCLUSIONS:  Naproxen-associated liver toxicity remains a rare entity, but should be considered in any patient presenting with cholestasis shortly after its use. Liver injury is most commonly seen in a mixed pattern characterized by cholestasis and hepatitis. The resulting liver damage may take years to resolve.

  20. Dioscin alleviates dimethylnitrosamine-induced acute liver injury through regulating apoptosis, oxidative stress and inflammation.

    Zhang, Weixin; Yin, Lianhong; Tao, Xufeng; Xu, Lina; Zheng, Lingli; Han, Xu; Xu, Youwei; Wang, Changyuan; Peng, Jinyong

    2016-07-01

    In our previous study, the effects of dioscin against alcohol-, carbon tetrachloride- and acetaminophen-induced liver damage have been found. However, the activity of it against dimethylnitrosamine (DMN)-induced acute liver injury remained unknown. In the present study, dioscin markedly decreased serum ALT and AST levels, significantly increased the levels of SOD, GSH-Px, GSH, and decreased the levels of MDA, iNOS and NO. Mechanism study showed that dioscin significantly decreased the expression levels of IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α, IκBα, p50 and p65 through regulating TLR4/MyD88 pathway to rehabilitate inflammation. In addition, dioscin markedly up-regulated the expression levels of SIRT1, HO-1, NQO1, GST and GCLM through increasing nuclear translocation of Nrf2 against oxidative stress. Furthermore, dioscin significantly decreased the expression levels of FasL, Fas, p53, Bak, Caspase-3/9, and upregulated Bcl-2 level through decreasing IRF9 level against apoptosis. In conclusion, dioscin showed protective effect against DMN-induced acute liver injury via ameliorating apoptosis, oxidative stress and inflammation, which should be developed as a new candidate for the treatment of acute liver injury in the future. PMID:27317992

  1. Satkara (Citrus macroptera) Fruit Protects against Acetaminophen-Induced Hepatorenal Toxicity in Rats.

    Paul, Sudip; Islam, Md Aminul; Tanvir, E M; Ahmed, Romana; Das, Sagarika; Rumpa, Nur-E-Noushin; Hossen, Md Sakib; Parvez, Mashud; Gan, Siew Hua; Khalil, Md Ibrahim

    2016-01-01

    Although Citrus macroptera (Rutaceae), an indigenous fruit in Bangladesh, has long been used in folk medicine, however, there is a lack of information concerning its protective effects against oxidative damage. The protective effects of an ethanol extract of Citrus macroptera (EECM) against acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity and nephrotoxicity were investigated in rats. Rats (treatment groups) were pretreated with EECM at doses of 250, 500, and 1000 mg/kg, respectively, orally for 30 days followed by acetaminophen administration. Silymarin (100 mg/kg) was administered as a standard drug over a similar treatment period. Our findings indicated that oral administration of acetaminophen induced severe hepatic and renal injuries associated with oxidative stress, as observed by 2-fold higher lipid peroxidation (TBARS) compared to control. Pretreatment with EECM prior to acetaminophen administration significantly improved all investigated biochemical parameters, that is, transaminase activities, alkaline phosphatase, lactate dehydrogenase, γ-glutamyl transferase activities and total bilirubin, total cholesterol, triglyceride and creatinine, urea, uric acid, sodium, potassium and chloride ions, and TBARS levels. These findings were confirmed by histopathological examinations. The improvement was prominent in the group that received 1000 mg/kg EECM. These findings suggested that C. macroptera fruit could protect against acetaminophen-induced hepatonephrotoxicity, which might be via the inhibition of lipid peroxidation. PMID:27034701

  2. Satkara (Citrus macroptera) Fruit Protects against Acetaminophen-Induced Hepatorenal Toxicity in Rats

    Paul, Sudip; Islam, Md. Aminul; Tanvir, E. M.; Ahmed, Romana; Das, Sagarika; Rumpa, Nur-E-Noushin; Hossen, Md. Sakib; Parvez, Mashud; Gan, Siew Hua; Khalil, Md. Ibrahim

    2016-01-01

    Although Citrus macroptera (Rutaceae), an indigenous fruit in Bangladesh, has long been used in folk medicine, however, there is a lack of information concerning its protective effects against oxidative damage. The protective effects of an ethanol extract of Citrus macroptera (EECM) against acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity and nephrotoxicity were investigated in rats. Rats (treatment groups) were pretreated with EECM at doses of 250, 500, and 1000 mg/kg, respectively, orally for 30 days followed by acetaminophen administration. Silymarin (100 mg/kg) was administered as a standard drug over a similar treatment period. Our findings indicated that oral administration of acetaminophen induced severe hepatic and renal injuries associated with oxidative stress, as observed by 2-fold higher lipid peroxidation (TBARS) compared to control. Pretreatment with EECM prior to acetaminophen administration significantly improved all investigated biochemical parameters, that is, transaminase activities, alkaline phosphatase, lactate dehydrogenase, γ-glutamyl transferase activities and total bilirubin, total cholesterol, triglyceride and creatinine, urea, uric acid, sodium, potassium and chloride ions, and TBARS levels. These findings were confirmed by histopathological examinations. The improvement was prominent in the group that received 1000 mg/kg EECM. These findings suggested that C. macroptera fruit could protect against acetaminophen-induced hepatonephrotoxicity, which might be via the inhibition of lipid peroxidation. PMID:27034701

  3. Satkara (Citrus macroptera Fruit Protects against Acetaminophen-Induced Hepatorenal Toxicity in Rats

    Sudip Paul

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Although Citrus macroptera (Rutaceae, an indigenous fruit in Bangladesh, has long been used in folk medicine, however, there is a lack of information concerning its protective effects against oxidative damage. The protective effects of an ethanol extract of Citrus macroptera (EECM against acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity and nephrotoxicity were investigated in rats. Rats (treatment groups were pretreated with EECM at doses of 250, 500, and 1000 mg/kg, respectively, orally for 30 days followed by acetaminophen administration. Silymarin (100 mg/kg was administered as a standard drug over a similar treatment period. Our findings indicated that oral administration of acetaminophen induced severe hepatic and renal injuries associated with oxidative stress, as observed by 2-fold higher lipid peroxidation (TBARS compared to control. Pretreatment with EECM prior to acetaminophen administration significantly improved all investigated biochemical parameters, that is, transaminase activities, alkaline phosphatase, lactate dehydrogenase, γ-glutamyl transferase activities and total bilirubin, total cholesterol, triglyceride and creatinine, urea, uric acid, sodium, potassium and chloride ions, and TBARS levels. These findings were confirmed by histopathological examinations. The improvement was prominent in the group that received 1000 mg/kg EECM. These findings suggested that C. macroptera fruit could protect against acetaminophen-induced hepatonephrotoxicity, which might be via the inhibition of lipid peroxidation.

  4. Acetaminophen-Induced Hepatotoxicity: a Comprehensive Update.

    Yoon, Eric; Babar, Arooj; Choudhary, Moaz; Kutner, Matthew; Pyrsopoulos, Nikolaos

    2016-06-28

    Hepatic injury and subsequent hepatic failure due to both intentional and non-intentional overdose of acetaminophen (APAP) has affected patients for decades, and involves the cornerstone metabolic pathways which take place in the microsomes within hepatocytes. APAP hepatotoxicity remains a global issue; in the United States, in particular, it accounts for more than 50% of overdose-related acute liver failure and approximately 20% of the liver transplant cases. The pathophysiology, disease course and management of acute liver failure secondary to APAP toxicity remain to be precisely elucidated, and adverse patient outcomes with increased morbidity and mortality continue to occur. Although APAP hepatotoxicity follows a predictable timeline of hepatic failure, its clinical presentation might vary. N-acetylcysteine (NAC) therapy is considered as the mainstay therapy, but liver transplantation might represent a life-saving procedure for selected patients. Future research focus in this field may benefit from shifting towards obtaining antidotal knowledge at the molecular level, with focus on the underlying molecular signaling pathways. PMID:27350943

  5. Fenofibrate-induced liver injury

    Kazufumi Dohmen; Hiromi Tshibashi; Chun Yang Wen; Shinya Nagaoka; Koji Yano; Seigo Abiru; Toshihito Ueki; Atsumasa Komori; Manabu Daikoku; Hiroshi Yatsuhashi

    2005-01-01

    @@ TO THE EDITOR Fenofibrate is a member of such fibrate class agents as bezafibrate and it work as a ligand of PPARα, and also shows a potent triglyceride-lowering effect. The elevation of aminotransferase levels has been frequently observed after the administration of fenofibrate and this phenomenon is considered to be non-pathological because fenofibrate activates the gene expression of the aminotransferases. Recently, fenofibrate has been used not only for hypercholesterolemia but also for primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC)[1,2]. However, the occurrence of liver injury induced by fenofibrate has not yet been reported written in the English literature. We herein report a rare case of liver injury due to the oral use of this drug.

  6. Preventive and curative effects of Acalypha indica on acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity

    M Mathew

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Effect of ethanol extract of the leaves of Acalypha indica (Euphorbiaceae was investigated against acetaminophen-induced hepatic damage. Acetaminophen (paracetamol at the rate of 1 g/kg produced liver damage in rats as manifested by the significant (P<0.001 rise in serum levels of aspartate aminotransferase (AST, alanine aminotransferase (ALT and alkaline phosphatase (ALP, compared to respective control values. Treatment of rats with acetaminophen led to a marked increase in lipid peroxidation as measured by malondialdehyde (MDA. This was associated with a significant reduction in superoxide dismutase (SOD and glutathione (GSH contents. Pretreatment of animals with the plant extract (100 mg/kg orally once daily for 5 days prevented (P<0.01 the acetaminophen-induced rise in serum transaminases (AST and ALT and ALP. Post treatment with five successive doses of the extract (100 mg/kg restricted the hepatic damage induced by the above said Paracetamol (P<0.001. Histological changes around the hepatic central vein were recovered by administration of the drug. Thus, it is evident that these biochemical and histological alterations resulting from acetaminophen administration were inhibited by pre and post treatment with A. indica leaf extract. One notable study of the study was the spontaneous recovery of liver damage within a week after stopping paracetamol. These results indicate that the crude ethanol extract of A. indica exhibits hepatoprotective action through antioxidant effect and validates the traditional use of the plant in hepatic dysfunction.

  7. Therapeutic modulation of liver ischaemia reperfusion injury

    Sheth, H.

    2011-01-01

    Liver Ischaemia Reperfusion Injury (IRI) leads to production of reactive oxygen species and cytokines, which affects hepatocellular function following liver resection and transplantation. This thesis examines 2 hypotheses: 1) The role of intravenous glycine in amelioration of liver IRI in a in vivo animal model of partial lobar liver IRI. 2) Does prophylactically administered N-acetylcysteine prevent liver IRI in patients undergoing elective liver resection. Materials ...

  8. Hepatoprotective activity of Tribulus terrestris extract against acetaminophen-induced toxicity in a freshwater fish (Oreochromis mossambicus).

    Kavitha, P; Ramesh, R; Bupesh, G; Stalin, A; Subramanian, P

    2011-12-01

    The potential protective role of Tribulus terrestris in acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity in Oreochromis mossambicus was investigated. The effect of oral exposure of acetaminophen (500 mg/kg) in O. mossambicus at 24-h duration was evaluated. The plant extract (250 mg/kg) showed a remarkable hepatoprotective activity against acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity. It was judged from the tissue-damaging level and antioxidant levels in liver, gill, muscle and kidney tissues. Further acetaminophen impact induced a significant rise in the tissue-damaging level, and the antioxidant level was discernible from the enzyme activity modulations such as glutamate oxaloacetic transaminase, glutamate pyruvic transaminase, alkaline phosphatase, acid phosphatase, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, lactate dehydrogenase, superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase, glutathione S-transferase, lipid peroxidase and reduced glutathione. The levels of all these enzymes have significantly (p terrestris extract (250 kg/mg). Histopathological changes of liver, gill and muscle samples were compared with respective controls. The results of the present study specify the hepatoprotective and antioxidant properties of T. terrestris against acetaminophen-induced toxicity in freshwater fish, O. mossambicus. PMID:21975853

  9. Montelukast induced acute hepatocellular liver injury

    Harugeri A

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A 46-year-old male with uncontrolled asthma on inhaled albuterol and formoterol with budesonide was commenced on montelukast. He developed abdominal pain and jaundice 48 days after initiating montelukast therapy. His liver tests showed an increase in serum total bilirubin, conjugated bilirubin, aspartate aminotranferase, alanine aminotranferase, and alkaline phosphatase. The patient was evaluated for possible non-drug related liver injury. Montelukast was discontinued suspecting montelukast induced hepatocellular liver injury. Liver tests began to improve and returned to normal 55 days after drug cessation. Causality of this adverse drug reaction by the Council for International Organizations of Medical Sciences or Roussel Uclaf Causality Assessment Method (CIOMS or RUCAM and Naranjo′s algorithm was ′probable′. Liver tests should be monitored in patients receiving montelukast and any early signs of liver injury should be investigated with a high index of suspicion for drug induced liver injury.

  10. Effect of matrine hydrochloride on liver injury

    CHEN Li-bo; XU Feng; MA Wen-hui

    2008-01-01

    Objective Searching the function that the Injection of the matrine hydrochloride prevents and cures acute chemical liver injury of mice、 immunity liver injury of mice and chronic liver injury of rats. Methods Acute hepatic injury models of mice induced by Chemical poison carbon tetrachloride (CCl4), thioacetamide(TAA), D-galactosamine(D-GalN), immunity hepatic injury model of mice induced by BCG and fat polysaccharide (LPS), chronic liver injury model of rats induced by CCI, were introduced in the experiment. The serum ALT and AST were measured in acute hepatic injury experiments. Serum ALT, AST, AKP, ALB, TP, BiL-T, ereatinine, triglyceride, sialie acid, larninin, hyaluronic acid, type Ⅲ proeollagen and type Ⅳ collagen, hepatic hydroxyproline (HyP) of rats in chronic liver injury animals were determined after Injection of the matrine hydrochloride. Results The Injection of the matrine hydrochloride reduced serum ALT and AST level of acute chemical liver injury of mice induced by CCl4, TAA and D-GaIN. The index of the liver and the spleen of immunity liver injury of mice induced by BCG and LPS were decreased after the injection of matrine hydrochloride treatment. Compared with the model group, the injection may obviously inhibited serum ALT, AST, TP, AKP, TRI, BiL-T, creatinine, triglyceride, sialic acid, laminin , hyaluronic acid , type Ⅲ procollagen and type Ⅳ collagen activity of chronic liver injury of rats induced by CCl4, elevated ALB、A/G, reduced the liver HyP, decreased the index of the liver and the spleen. The liver visual observation, the pathology inspection and the HAI grading result showed the injection may reduce the inflammatory activity in liver tissue, restrain the liver cell damage, reduce the pseudolobuli formation. Conclusions The Injection of matrine hydrochloride had the protective function to acute chemical hepatic injury of mice induced by CCl4、TAA、D-GalN、immunity hepatic injury of mice induced by the BCG and LPS and

  11. Autophagy and Liver Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury

    Raffaele Cursio

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Liver ischemia-reperfusion (I-R injury occurs during liver resection, liver transplantation, and hemorrhagic shock. The main mode of liver cell death after warm and/or cold liver I-R is necrosis, but other modes of cell death, as apoptosis and autophagy, are also involved. Autophagy is an intracellular self-digesting pathway responsible for removal of long-lived proteins, damaged organelles, and malformed proteins during biosynthesis by lysosomes. Autophagy is found in normal and diseased liver. Although depending on the type of ischemia, warm and/or cold, the dynamic process of liver I-R results mainly in adenosine triphosphate depletion and in production of reactive oxygen species (ROS, leads to both, a local ischemic insult and an acute inflammatory-mediated reperfusion injury, and results finally in cell death. This process can induce liver dysfunction and can increase patient morbidity and mortality after liver surgery and hemorrhagic shock. Whether autophagy protects from or promotes liver injury following warm and/or cold I-R remains to be elucidated. The present review aims to summarize the current knowledge in liver I-R injury focusing on both the beneficial and the detrimental effects of liver autophagy following warm and/or cold liver I-R.

  12. The UDP-Glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) 1A Polymorphism c.2042C>G (rs8330) Is Associated with Increased Human Liver Acetaminophen Glucuronidation, Increased UGT1A Exon 5a/5b Splice Variant mRNA Ratio, and Decreased Risk of Unintentional Acetaminophen-Induced Acute Liver FailureS⃞

    Court, Michael H; Freytsis, Marina; Wang, Xueding; Peter, Inga; Guillemette, Chantal; Hazarika, Suwagmani; Duan, Su X.; Greenblatt, David J; Lee, William M.

    2013-01-01

    Acetaminophen is cleared primarily by hepatic glucuronidation. Polymorphisms in genes encoding the acetaminophen UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) enzymes could explain interindividual variability in acetaminophen glucuronidation and variable risk for liver injury after acetaminophen overdose. In this study, human liver bank samples were phenotyped for acetaminophen glucuronidation activity and genotyped for the major acetaminophen-glucuronidating enzymes (UGTs 1A1, 1A6, 1A9, and 2B15). Of th...

  13. Role of Protective Effect of L-Carnitine against Acute Acetaminophen Induced Hepatic Toxicity in Adult Albino Rats

    Zeinab M. Gebaly* and Gamal M. Aboul Hassan

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Acetaminophen, a widely used analgesic and antipyretic is known to cause hepatic injury in humans and experimental animals when administered in high doses. It was reported that toxic effects of acetaminophen are due to oxidative reactions that take place during its metabolism. L-carnitine is a cofactor in the transfer of long-chain fatty acid allowing to the beta-oxidation of fatty acid in the mitochondria. It is a known antioxidant with protective effects against lipid peroxidation. This study aimed to investigate the possible beneficial effect of L-carnitine as an antioxidant agent against acetaminophen induced hepatic toxicity in rats. Material and Methods: Four rat groups (N=7 in each group. Group I is the control, group II received 500 mg/kg/ body weight of L-carnitine for 7 days by oral route, group III received 640/kg/ bw of acetaminophen by oral route, group IV acute acetaminophen group pretreated with L-carnitine for 7 days by gastric tube gavage tube. The liver of all rats were removed for investigation using light and electro microscopic studies. Results: Acetaminophen caused massive centrilobular necrosis and massive degenerative changes. The electron-microscopic study showed few mitochondria, increased fat droplets and scanty smooth endoplasmic reticulum (SER, rough endoplasmic reticulum (RER.These changes were reduced by L-carnitine pretreatment. Conclusion: those results suggest that acetaminophen results damage in the liver as an acute effect and L-carnitine ameliorated the adverse effects of acetaminophen via its antioxidant role

  14. Sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome and liver injury

    TIAN Jian-li; ZHANG Yun; CHEN Bao-yuan

    2010-01-01

    Objective A general review was made of studies involving: (1) the relationship between sleep apnea hypopneasyndrome/sleep apnea style intermittent hypoxia and liver injury and (2) the mechanism that causes the liver injury.Data sources The data used in this review were mainly from Medline and PubMed published in English from 1993 toFebruary 2009. The search term was "sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome".Study selection (1) Clinical and laboratory evidence that sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome and sleep apnea styleintermittent hypoxia leads to liver injury; (2) the mechanism that causes the liver injury.Results The effect of sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome and sleep apnea style intermittent hypoxia on the liver functionis characterized by serum aminotransferase elevation. The liver histological injury includes hepatic steatosis, hepatocyteballooning, lobular inflammation, lobular necrosis, and liver fibrosis. Sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome and sleep apneastyle intermittent hypoxia can cause insulin resistance and oxidative stress.Conclusions Sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome and sleep apnea style intermittent hypoxia can lead to chronic liverinjury, which, in most cases, is shown as nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. Insulin resistance and oxidative stress causedby sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome and sleep apnea style intermittent hypoxia play an important role in the mechanismof chronic liver disease development.

  15. [Strategies for paediatric spleen and liver injuries].

    Zundel, S; Lieber, J; Tsiflikas, I; Henk, A-K; Schmittenbecher, P

    2014-12-01

    Traumatic injuries of the spleen and liver are typically caused by age-related falls or sports and traffic accidents. Today, the non-operative management for isolated injuries is established and evidence-based guidelines are available. The intact abdominal wall and the limited space within the peritoneum produce a compression which is the pathophysiological explanation for the limitation of the haemorrhage. Precondition for the non-operative therapy is the radiology-based classification of the injury (organ injury scale) and a haemodynamically stable patient. Haemodynamic stability is, if necessary maintained with blood transfusion, volume substitutes and the administration of catecholamines. In cases of hilar vascular injury and devascularisation or haemodynamic instability of the patient, despite utilisation of the measures mentioned above, urgent operative therapy needs to be performed. Organ sparing surgery is the therapy of choice for both liver and spleen. The spleen is required for the development of a competent immune system in the growing organism. Liver injuries can be further complicated by injury to the bile system, which might require operative reconstruction. If a patient suffers from multiple injuries and spleen or liver are involved, the decision on the management needs to be taken individually, no guidelines exist but the rate for operative therapy increases. Independent of the dimensions of injury, an experienced paediatric surgeon with his multidisciplinary team, considering the anatomic and age specific characteristics of a child, achieves the best therapeutic results. PMID:25531632

  16. Piperine, an active ingredient of black pepper attenuates acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity in mice

    Evan Prince Sabina; Annie Deborah Harris Souriyan; Deborah Jackline; Mahaboob Khan Rasool

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To explore the hepatoprotective and antioxidant effects of piperine against acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity in mice. Methods: In mice, hepatotoxicity was induced by a single dose of acetaminophen (900 mg/kg b.w. i.p.). Piperine (25 mg/kg b.w. i.p.) and standard drug silymarin (25 mg/kg b.w. i.p.) were given to mice, 30 min after the single injection of acetaminophen. After 4 h, the mice were decapitated. Activities of liver marker enzymes [(aspartate transaminase (AST), alanine transaminase (ALT), and alkaline phosphatase (ALP)] and inflammatory mediator tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) were estimated in serum, while lipid peroxidation and antioxidant status (superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase, glutathione-s-transferase and glutathione) were determined in liver homogenate of control and experimental mice. Results: Acetaminophen induction (900 mg/kg b.w. i.p.) significantly increased the levels of liver marker enzymes, TNF-α, and lipid peroxidation, and caused the depletion of antioxidant status. Piperine and silymarin treatment to acetaminophen challenged mice resulted in decreased liver marker enzymes activity, TNF-α and lipid peroxidation levels with increase in antioxidant status. Conclusions: The results clearly demonstrate that piperine shows promising hepatoprotective effect as comparable to standard drug silymarin.

  17. Montelukast induced acute hepatocellular liver injury

    Harugeri A; Parthasarathi G; Sharma J; D′Souza G; Ramesh M

    2009-01-01

    A 46-year-old male with uncontrolled asthma on inhaled albuterol and formoterol with budesonide was commenced on montelukast. He developed abdominal pain and jaundice 48 days after initiating montelukast therapy. His liver tests showed an increase in serum total bilirubin, conjugated bilirubin, aspartate aminotranferase, alanine aminotranferase, and alkaline phosphatase. The patient was evaluated for possible non-drug related liver injury. Montelukast was discontinued suspecting montelukast i...

  18. Protective Activity of Total Polyphenols from Genista quadriflora Munby and Teucrium polium geyrii Maire in Acetaminophen-Induced Hepatotoxicity in Rats

    Baali, Nacera; Belloum, Zahia; Baali, Samiya; Chabi, Beatrice; Pessemesse, Laurence; Fouret, Gilles; Ameddah, Souad; Benayache, Fadila; Benayache, Samir; Feillet-Coudray, Christine; Cabello, Gérard; Wrutniak-Cabello, Chantal

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress is a major cause of drug-induced hepatic diseases and several studies have demonstrated that diet supplementation with plants rich in antioxidant compounds provides a variety of health benefits in these circumstances. Genista quadriflora Munby (Gq) and Teucrium polium geyrii Maire (Tp) are known to possess antioxidant and numerous biological properties and these endemic plants are often used for dietary or medicinal applications. Herein, we evaluated the beneficial effect of rich-polyphenol fractions of Gq and Tp to prevent Acetaminophen-induced liver injury and investigated the mechanisms involved in this protective action. Rats were orally administered polyphenolic extracts from Gq or Tp (300 mg/kg) or N-acetylcysteine (NAC: 200 mg/kg) once daily for ten days prior to the single oral administration of Acetaminophen (APAP: 1 g/kg). The results show that preventive administration of polyphenolic extracts from Gq or Tp exerts a hepatoprotective influence during APAP treatment by improving transaminases leakage and liver histology and stimulating antioxidant defenses. Besides, suppression of liver CYP2E1, GSTpi and TNF-α mRNA levels, with enhancement of mitochondrial bioenergetics may contribute to the observed hepatoprotection induced by Gq and Tp extracts. The effect of Tp extract is significantly higher (1.5–2 fold) than that of Gq extract and NAC regarding the enhancement of mitochondrial functionality. Overall, this study brings the first evidence that pretreatment with these natural extracts display in vivo protective activity against APAP hepatotoxicity through improving mitochondrial bioenergetics, oxidant status, phase I and II enzymes expression and inflammatory processes probably by virtue of their high total polyphenols content. PMID:27043622

  19. Protective Activity of Total Polyphenols from Genista quadriflora Munby and Teucrium polium geyrii Maire in Acetaminophen-Induced Hepatotoxicity in Rats.

    Baali, Nacera; Belloum, Zahia; Baali, Samiya; Chabi, Beatrice; Pessemesse, Laurence; Fouret, Gilles; Ameddah, Souad; Benayache, Fadila; Benayache, Samir; Feillet-Coudray, Christine; Cabello, Gérard; Wrutniak-Cabello, Chantal

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress is a major cause of drug-induced hepatic diseases and several studies have demonstrated that diet supplementation with plants rich in antioxidant compounds provides a variety of health benefits in these circumstances. Genista quadriflora Munby (Gq) and Teucrium polium geyrii Maire (Tp) are known to possess antioxidant and numerous biological properties and these endemic plants are often used for dietary or medicinal applications. Herein, we evaluated the beneficial effect of rich-polyphenol fractions of Gq and Tp to prevent Acetaminophen-induced liver injury and investigated the mechanisms involved in this protective action. Rats were orally administered polyphenolic extracts from Gq or Tp (300 mg/kg) or N-acetylcysteine (NAC: 200 mg/kg) once daily for ten days prior to the single oral administration of Acetaminophen (APAP: 1 g/kg). The results show that preventive administration of polyphenolic extracts from Gq or Tp exerts a hepatoprotective influence during APAP treatment by improving transaminases leakage and liver histology and stimulating antioxidant defenses. Besides, suppression of liver CYP2E1, GSTpi and TNF-α mRNA levels, with enhancement of mitochondrial bioenergetics may contribute to the observed hepatoprotection induced by Gq and Tp extracts. The effect of Tp extract is significantly higher (1.5-2 fold) than that of Gq extract and NAC regarding the enhancement of mitochondrial functionality. Overall, this study brings the first evidence that pretreatment with these natural extracts display in vivo protective activity against APAP hepatotoxicity through improving mitochondrial bioenergetics, oxidant status, phase I and II enzymes expression and inflammatory processes probably by virtue of their high total polyphenols content. PMID:27043622

  20. Liver injury in invasive aspergillus. Echographic findings

    Aspergillus is the second most common mycoses in immuno compromised patients. The invasive form is associated with a mortality of approximately 100%. We present a case of invasive aspergillus in a heart transplant recipient in whom ultrasound disclosed the presence of liver injury which was later confirmed by necropsy. We review the available literature. (Author) 15 refs

  1. Acetaminophen Induced Hepatotoxicity in Wistar Rats—A Proteomic Approach

    Soundharrajan Ilavenil

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the mechanism of chemical toxicity, which is essential for cross-species and dose extrapolations, is a major challenge for toxicologists. Standard mechanistic studies in animals for examining the toxic and pathological changes associated with the chemical exposure have often been limited to the single end point or pathways. Toxicoproteomics represents a potential aid to the toxicologist to understand the multiple pathways involved in the mechanism of toxicity and also determine the biomarkers that are possible to predictive the toxicological response. We performed an acute toxicity study in Wistar rats with the prototype liver toxin; the acetaminophen (APAP effects on protein profiles in the liver and its correlation with the plasma biochemical markers for liver injury were analyzed. Three separate groups—control, nontoxic (150 mg/kg and toxic dose (1500 mg/kg of APAP—were studied. The proteins extracted from the liver were separated by 2-DE and analyzed by MALDI-TOF. The differential proteins in the gels were analyzed by BIORAD’s PDQuest software and identified by feeding the peptide mass fingerprint data to various public domain programs like Mascot and MS-Fit. The identified proteins in toxicity-induced rats were classified based on their putative protein functions, which are oxidative stress (31%, immunity (14%, neurological related (12% and transporter proteins (2%, whereas in non-toxic dose-induced rats they were  oxidative stress (9%, immunity (6%, neurological (14% and transporter proteins (9%. It is evident that the percentages of oxidative stress and immunity-related proteins were up-regulated in toxicity-induced rats as compared with nontoxic and control rats. Some of the liver drug metabolizing and detoxifying enzymes were depleted under toxic conditions compared with non-toxic rats. Several other proteins were identified as a first step in developing an in-house rodent liver toxicoproteomics database.

  2. Acute liver injury induced by weight-loss herbal supplements

    Gary C Chen, Vivek S Ramanathan, David Law, Pauline Funchain, George C Chen, Samuel French, Boris Shlopov, Viktor Eysselein, David Chung, Sonya Reicher, Binh V Pham

    2010-01-01

    We report three cases of patients with acute liver injury induced by weight-loss herbal supplements. One patient took Hydroxycut while the other two took Herbalife supplements. Liver biopsies for all patients demonstrated findings consistent with drug-induced acute liver injury. To our knowledge, we are the first institute to report acute liver injury from both of these two types of weight-loss herbal supplements together as a case series. The series emphasizes the importance of taking a caut...

  3. Acetaminophen-Induced Acute Pancreatitis. A Case Report

    Hisato Igarashi

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Context Drug-induced acute pancreatitis is rare but should not be overlooked in a patient who presents with idiopathic acute pancreatitis. More than 100 drugs have been implicated in causing the disease: acetaminophen has been associated with acute pancreatitis in cases where there has been an overdose of drugs; however, the frequency is rare. Case report We report the case of a 35-year-old woman who presented with acute pancreatitis and severe metabolic acidosis after overdosing on a drug containing acetaminophen. She improved dramatically after intensive care; however, she showed recurrent episodes after re-overdosing on the same drug. With her self re-challenge test, she was diagnosed as having acetaminophen-induced pancreatitis and metabolic acidosis. A review of the relevant literature is also presented. Conclusions Drug-induced acute pancreatitis is often challenging for clinicians and a detailed mechanism is unknown. It is very important to rule out drug-induced pancreatitis when treating pancreatitis with an unknown etiology.

  4. Neutralization of ADAM8 ameliorates liver injury and accelerates liver repair in carbon tetrachloride-induced acute liver injury.

    Li, San-Qiang; Zhu, Sha; Wan, Xue-Dong; Xu, Zheng-Shun; Ma, Zhao

    2014-04-01

    Although some studies have described the function of ADAM8 (a disintegrin and metalloprotease 8) related with rheumatoid arthritis, cancer and asthma, etc., the concrete role of ADAM8 in acute liver injury is still unknown. So mice respectively received anti-ADAM8 monoclonal antibody (mAb) of 100 μg/100 μl, 200 μg/100 μl or 300 μg/100 μl in PBS or PBS pre-injection. Then acute liver injury was induced in the mice by intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of carbon tetrachloride (CCl₄). Serum AST and ALT level, Haematoxylin-eosin (H&E) staining, the expression level of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), cytochrome P450 1A2 (CYP1A2) and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) were detected in the mice after CCl4 administration. Our results showed that anti-ADAM8 mAb pre-injection could effectively lower AST and ALT levels (P < 0.05 or P < 0.01) and reduce liver injury (P < 0.05 or P <0.01), induce the expression of VEGF, CYP1A2 and PCNA (P <0.05 or P < 0.01) in dose-dependent manner compared with the control mice which received PBS pre-injection. In summary, our study suggested that ADAM8 might promote liver injury by inhibiting the proliferation of hepatocytes, angiogenesis and affecting the metabolism function of liver during acute liver injury induced by CCl₄. Anti-ADAM8 mAb injection might be suitable as a potential method for acute liver injury therapy. PMID:24646716

  5. Liver Manipulation Causes Hepatocyte Injury and Precedes Systemic Inflammation in Patients Undergoing Liver Resection

    van de Poll, Marcel C. G.; Derikx, Joep P. M.; Buurman, Wim A.; Peters, Wilbert H. M.; Hennie M J Roelofs; Stephen J Wigmore; Dejong, Cornelis H C

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Liver failure following liver surgery is caused by an insufficient functioning remnant cell mass. This can be due to insufficient liver volume and can be aggravated by additional cell death during or after surgery. The aim of this study was to elucidate the causes of hepatocellular injury in patients undergoing liver resection.METHODS:Markers of hepatocyte injury (AST, GSTalpha, and L-FABP) and inflammation (IL-6) were measured in plasma of patients undergoing liver resection with ...

  6. Autophagy and ethanol-induced liver injury

    Terrence M Donohue Jr

    2009-01-01

    The majority of ethanol metabolism occurs in the liver. Consequently, this organ sustains the greatest damage from ethanol abuse. Ethanol consumption disturbs the delicate balance of protein homeostasis in the liver, causing intracellular protein accumulation due to a disruption of hepatic protein catabolism.Evidence indicates that ethanol or its metabolism impairs trafficking events in the liver, including the process of macroautophagy, which is the engulfment and degradation of cytoplasmic constituents by the lysosomal system. Autophagy is an essential, ongoing cellular process that is highly regulated by nutrients,endocrine factors and signaling pathways. A great number of the genes and gene products that govern the autophagic response have been characterized and the major metabolic and signaling pathways that activate or suppress autophagy have been identified. This review describes the process of autophagy, its regulation and the possible mechanisms by which ethanol disrupts the process of autophagic degradation. The implications of autophagic suppression are discussed in relation to the pathogenesis of alcohol-induced liver injury.

  7. Analysis of 133 patients with severe blunt liver injury

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the treatment and causes of death aboutsevere blunt liver injury.Methods: The data of 133 patients with severe blunt liver injury (Grade Ⅲ to Grade Ⅴ) were analyzed retrospectively. All the patients except 2 underwent operations. Different types of surgical procedures were adopted according to the severity of liver injury.Results: Operations were the major method to treat hepatic injury. The total mortality rate was 21.0% in this study. The mortality rates of Grade Ⅲ, Grade Ⅳ and Grade Ⅴ of liver injuries were 11.3%, 24.4% and 69.2%, respectively.Conclusions: Packing treatment plays an important role in the treatment of hepatic injury. The mortality rate is related closely to the severity of hepatic injury, multiple trauma, shock and disturbance of blood coagulation.

  8. Acetaminophen induces a caspase-dependent and Bcl-XL sensitive apoptosis in human hepatoma cells and lymphocytes.

    Boulares, A Hamid; Zoltoski, Anna J; Stoica, Bogdan A; Cuvillier, Olivier; Smulson, Mark E

    2002-01-01

    Acetaminophen is a widely used analgesic and antipyretic drug that exhibits toxicity at high doses to the liver and kidneys. This toxicity has been attributed to cytochrome P-450-generated metabolites which covalently modify target proteins. Recently, acetaminophen, in its unmetabolized form, has been shown to affect a variety of cells and tissues, for instance, testicular and lymphoid tissues and lymphocyte cell lines. The effects on cell viability of acetaminophen at a concentration comparable to that achieved in plasma during acetaminophen toxicity have now been examined with a hepatoma cell line SK-Hep1, primary human peripheral blood lymphocytes and human Jurkat T cells. Acetaminophen reduced cell viability in a time-dependent manner. Staining of cells with annexin-V also revealed that acetaminophen induced, after 8 hr of treatment, a loss of the asymmetry of membrane phospholipids, which is an early event associated with apoptosis. Acetaminophen triggered the release of cytochrome c from mitochondria into the cytosol, activation of caspase-3, 8, and 9, cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, and degradation of lamin B1 and DNA. Whereas cleavage of DNA into internucleosomal fragments was apparent in acetaminophen treated SK-Hep1 and primary lymphocytes, DNA was only degraded to 50-kb fragments in treated Jurkat cells. Overexpression of the antiapoptotic protein Bcl-XL prevented these various apoptotic events induced by acetaminophen in Jurkat cells. Caspase-8 activation was a postmictochondrial event and occurred in a Fas-independent manner. These results demonstrate that acetaminophen induces caspases-dependent apoptosis with mitochondria as a primary target. These results also reiterate the potential role of apoptosis in acetaminophen hepatic and extrahepatic toxicity. PMID:12005112

  9. Acute alcohol-induced liver injury

    Gavin Edward Arteel

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Alcohol consumption is customary in most cultures and alcohol abuse is common worldwide. For example, more than 50% of Americans consume alcohol, with an estimated 23.1% of Americans participating in heavy and/or binge drinking at least once a month. A safe and effective therapy for alcoholic liver disease (ALD in humans is still elusive, despite significant advances in our understanding of how the disease is initiated and progresses. It is now clear that acute alcohol binges not only can be acutely toxic to the liver, but also can contribute to the chronicity of ALD. Potential mechanisms by which acute alcohol causes damage include steatosis, dysregulated immunity and inflammation and altered gut permeability. Recent interest in modeling acute alcohol exposure has yielded new insights into potential mechanisms of acute injury, that also may well be relevant for chronic ALD. Recent work by this group on the role of PAI-1 and fibrin metabolism in mediating acute alcohol-induced liver damage serve as an example of possible new targets that may be useful for alcohol abuse, be it acute or chronic.

  10. Acute liver injury induced by weight-loss herbal supplements.

    Chen, Gary C; Ramanathan, Vivek S; Law, David; Funchain, Pauline; Chen, George C; French, Samuel; Shlopov, Boris; Eysselein, Viktor; Chung, David; Reicher, Sonya; Pham, Binh V

    2010-11-27

    We report three cases of patients with acute liver injury induced by weight-loss herbal supplements. One patient took Hydroxycut while the other two took Herbalife supplements. Liver biopsies for all patients demonstrated findings consistent with drug-induced acute liver injury. To our knowledge, we are the first institute to report acute liver injury from both of these two types of weight-loss herbal supplements together as a case series. The series emphasizes the importance of taking a cautious approach when consuming herbal supplements for the purpose of weight loss. PMID:21173910

  11. Alcoholic liver injury:Influence of gender and hormones

    Patricia; K; Eagon

    2010-01-01

    This article discusses several subjects pertinent to a consideration of the role of gender and hormones in alcoholic liver injury (ALI). Beginning with an overview of factors involved in the pathogenesis of ALI, we review changes in sex hormone metabolism resulting from alcohol ingestion, summarize research that points to estrogen as a cofactor in ALI, consider evidence that gut injury is linked to liver injury in the setting of alcohol, and briefly review the limited evidence regarding sex hormones and gut...

  12. Review of liver injury associated with dietary supplements.

    Stickel, Felix; Kessebohm, Kerstin; Weimann, Rosemarie; Seitz, Helmut K

    2011-05-01

    Dietary supplements (DS) are easily available and increasingly used, and adverse hepatic reactions have been reported following their intake. To critically review the literature on liver injury because of DSs, delineating patterns and mechanisms of injury and to increase the awareness towards this cause of acute and chronic liver damage. Studies and case reports on liver injury specifically because of DSs published between 1990 and 2010 were searched in the PubMed and EMBASE data bases using the terms 'dietary/nutritional supplements', 'adverse hepatic reactions', 'liver injury'; 'hepatitis', 'liver failure', 'vitamin A' and 'retinoids', and reviewed for yet unidentified publications. Significant liver injury was reported after intake of Herbalife and Hydroxycut products, tea extracts from Camellia sinensis, products containing usnic acid and high contents of vitamin A, anabolic steroids and others. No uniform pattern of hepatotoxicity has been identified and severity may range from asymptomatic elevations of serum liver enzymes to hepatic failure and death. Exact estimates on how frequent adverse hepatic reactions occur as a result of DSs cannot be provided. Liver injury from DSs mimicking other liver diseases is increasingly recognized. Measures to reduce risk include tighter regulation of their production and distribution and increased awareness of users and professionals of the potential risks. PMID:21457433

  13. MODULATION OF ACETAMINOPHEN-INDUCED HEPATOTOXICITY BY THE XENOBIOTIC RECEPTOR CAR

    We have identified the xenobiotic receptor CAR (constitutive androstane receptor) as a key regulator of acetaminophen metabolism and hepatotoxicity. Known CAR activators as well as high doses of acetaminophen induced expression of three acetaminophen-metabolizing enzymes in wild-type but not in CAR-...

  14. Croton zehntneri Essential oil prevents acetaminophen-induced acute hepatotoxicity in mice

    Maria Goretti R. Queiroz; José Henrique L. Cardoso; Adriana R. Tomé; Roberto C. P. Lima Jr.; Jamile M. Ferreira; Daniel F. Sousa; Felipe C. Lima; Campos, Adriana R.

    2008-01-01

    Hepatoprotective activity of Croton zehntneri Pax & Hoffman (Euphorbiaceae) leaf essential oil (EOCz) was evaluated against single dose of acetaminophen-induced (500 mg/kg, p.o.) acute hepatotoxicity in mice. EOCz significantly protected the hepatotoxicity as evident from the activities of serum glutamate pyruvate transaminase (GPT), serum glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase (GOT) activities, that were significantly (p

  15. Hedgehog signaling and radiation induced liver injury: a delicate balance.

    Kabarriti, Rafi; Guha, Chandan

    2014-07-01

    Radiation-induced liver disease (RILD) is a major limitation of radiation therapy (RT) for the treatment of liver cancer. Emerging data indicate that hedgehog (Hh) signaling plays a central role in liver fibrosis and regeneration after liver injury. Here, we review the potential role of Hh signaling in RILD and propose the temporary use of Hh inhibition during liver RT to radiosensitize HCC tumor cells and inhibit their progression, while blocking the initiation of the radiation-induced fibrotic response in the surrounding normal liver. PMID:26202634

  16. Injury-induced changes of T1 in the liver

    The T1 of rat liver lengthens following any injury to any organ. A hypothesis explaining this holds that a substance (or substances), released from dead or injured cells, reaches liver, engaging it in healing. As a first step in testing this hypothesis, the authors injected rat liver homogenates into rates with previously measured liver T1. Homogenates are dead and injured cells, and their hypothesis predicts that liver T1 in homogenate-injected animals should lengthen. Lengthening of liver T1, measurable with their MR imager presently in clinical use, did result. Homogenates will be fractionated to determine if specific elements elicit the response

  17. Severe liver injury induced by repeated use of hair dye

    HOU Feng-qin; LIN Xiao-hong; YU Yan-yan; WANG Tai-ling; WANG Gui-qiang

    2009-01-01

    @@ Asignificant number of drugs has been proven,or at least suggested,to cause hepatotoxicity.1-3 Liver injury due to herbal medicines,chemicals or natural toxins also occur from household,occupational,or environmental exposure.4,5 However,liver toxicity due to hair dyes now is rarely recognized.Only in 2003,Tokumoto et al6 reported a case of hair dye-induced hepatitis,which presented a comparatively mild liver lesion.Here we described a case had more severe liver injury.

  18. Liver injury associated with ketoconazole: review of the published evidence.

    Greenblatt, H Karl; Greenblatt, David J

    2014-12-01

    The azole antifungal agent ketoconazole has been available since 1981 for the treatment of fungal infections. In 2013, the American Food and Drug Administration and the European Medicines Agency issued warnings or prohibitions against the clinical use of oral ketoconazole due to the risk of liver injury which may lead to liver transplantation or death. From the available published evidence it is difficult to determine the actual incidence or prevalence of liver injury during clinical use of ketoconazole as an antifungal. Hepatic injury, when it occurs, is generally evident as asymptomatic and reversible abnormalities of liver function tests. However, serious liver injury has been reported. Alternatives to ketoconazole (such as itraconazole, fluconazole, voriconazole, and terbinafine) are available, but improved safety with respect to liver injury risk is not clearly established. We are not aware of published reports of significant ketoconazole-associated liver injury in volunteer study participants when ketoconazole has been used as a CYP3A inhibitor in the context of clinical research on drug metabolism. Possible alternatives to ketoconazole as prototype CYP3A inhibitors include ritonavir and potentially itraconazole, but not clarithromycin. PMID:25216238

  19. Liver injury caused by drugs: an update.

    Stirnimann, Guido; Kessebohm, Kerstin; Lauterburg, Bernhard

    2010-01-01

    Although severe idiosyncratic drug-induced liver injury (DILI) is a rare event, it has a large impact on the fate of affected patients and the incriminated drug. Hepatic metabolism of drugs, which occurs in the generation of chemically reactive metabolites in critical amounts, seems to underlie most instances of DILI. Genetic polymorphisms in activating and detoxifying enzymes determine, in part, the extent of cellular stress. A cascade of events, where the pathogenetic relevance of single steps is likely to vary from drug to drug, leads to the disturbance of cellular homeostasis, to mitochondrial dysfunction, to the activation of cell death promoting pathways and the release of drug-modified macromolecules and/or danger signals that initiate an innate and/or adaptive immune response. The patient's response to the initial drug-induced cellular dysfunction determines whether adaptation to the drug-induced cellular stress or DILI in one of its many forms of clinical presentation occurs. Although risk factors for developing DILI have been identified and many pathogenetic mechanisms have been elucidated in model systems, idiosyncratic drug reactions remain unpredictable. PMID:20927685

  20. Role of IRAK-M in alcohol induced liver injury.

    Yipeng Wang

    Full Text Available Increasing evidence suggests that innate immunity plays an important role in alcohol-induced liver injury and most studies have focused on positive regulation of innate immunity. The main objective of this study was to investigate the negative regulator of innate immunity, IL-1/Toll-like receptor (TLR signaling pathways and interleukin receptor-associated kinase-M (IRAK-M in alcoholic liver injury. We established an alcohol-induced liver injury model using wild type and IRAK-M deficient B6 mice and investigated the possible mechanisms. We found that in the absence of IRAK-M, liver damage by alcohol was worse with higher alanine transaminase (ALT, more immune cell infiltration and increased numbers of IFNγ producing cells. We also found enhanced phagocytic activity in CD68(+ cells. Moreover, our results revealed altered gut bacteria after alcohol consumption and this was more striking in the absence of IRAK-M. Our study provides evidence that IRAK-M plays an important role in alcohol-induced liver injury and IRAK-M negatively regulates the innate and possibly the adaptive immune response in the liver reacting to acute insult by alcohol. In the absence of IRAK-M, the hosts developed worse liver injury, enhanced gut permeability and altered gut microbiota.

  1. Liver cold preservation induce lung surfactant changes and acute lung injury in rat liver transplantation

    An Jiang; Chang Liu; Feng Liu; Yu-Long Song; Quan-Yuan Li; Liang Yu; Yi Lv

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the relationship between donor liver cold preservation, lung surfactant (LS) changes and acute lung injury (ALI) after liver transplantation. METHODS: Liver transplantation models were established using male Wistar rats. Donor livers were preserved in University of Wisconsin solution at 4  °C for different lengths of time. The effect of ammonium pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate (PDTC) on ALI was also detected. All samples were harvested after 3 h reperfusion. ...

  2. Carbon tetrachloride-induced liver injury in the rabbit.

    Bernacchi, A. S.; de Castro, C. R.; de Ferreyra, E. C.; Villarruel, M. C.; Fernández, G.; de Fenos, O. M.; Castro, J. A.

    1983-01-01

    CCl4 administration to rabbits leads to early destruction of liver microsomal cytochrome P-450, to depression of glucose 6 phosphatase, to ultrastructurally revealable alterations and to an intense necrosis and fat accumulation in liver. Despite the known resistance of rabbit liver microsomes to lipid peroxidation, CCl4 administration to rabbits promoted lipid peroxidation of their liver microsomal lipids as revealable by the diene hyperconjugation technique, at periods of time from 1 to 12 h. Nevertheless, the intensity of this process is not equivalent to that occurring in rat liver microsomes, since the arachidonic acid content of rabbit liver microsomal lipids does not decrease at either 6 or 24 h after CCl4 administration. Rabbit liver is able to activate CCl4 to reactive metabolites that bind covalently to lipids. Relevance of covalent binding of CCl4 reactive metabolites and CCl4-promoted lipid peroxidation to CCl4-induced rabbit liver injury is analysed. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:6309207

  3. An Update on Drug-induced Liver Injury

    Devarbhavi, Harshad

    2012-01-01

    Idiosyncratic drug-induced liver injury (DILI) is an important cause of morbidity and mortality following drugs taken in therapeutic doses. Hepatotoxicity is a leading cause of attrition in drug development, or withdrawal or restricted use after marketing. No age is exempt although adults and the elderly are at increased risk. DILI spans the entire spectrum ranging from asymptomatic elevation in transaminases to severe disease such as acute hepatitis leading to acute liver failure. The liver ...

  4. Modulation of the Colonic Bacterial Flora Affects Differently Bacterial Translocation and Liver Injury in an Acute Liver Injury Model

    Adawi, Diya; Molin, Göran; Ahrné, Siv; Jeppsson, Bengt

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effects of the administration of different bacterial strains on the extent of liver injury and bacterial translocation in an acute liver injury model. Design: Experimental study. Setting: University hospital, Sweden. Subjects: Sprague–Dawley rats. Interventions: Six different bacterial strains (Bacteroides fragilis ATCC 25285T, Enterococcus faecium No.1, Enterococcus faecium No.2, Escherichia coli F131, Lactobacillus plantarum DSM 6595, and Bifidobacterium lon...

  5. Chitohexaose protects against acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity in mice.

    Barman, P K; Mukherjee, R; Prusty, B K; Suklabaidya, S; Senapati, S; Ravindran, B

    2016-01-01

    Acetaminophen (N-acetyl-para-aminophenol (APAP)) toxicity causes acute liver failure by inducing centrilobular hepatic damage as a consequence of mitochondrial oxidative stress. Sterile inflammation, triggered by hepatic damage, facilitates gut bacterial translocation leading to systemic inflammation; TLR4-mediated activation by LPS has been shown to have a critical role in APAP-mediated hepatotoxicity. In this study, we demonstrate significant protection mediated by chitohexaose (Chtx) in mice challenged with a lethal dose of APAP (400 mg/kg b.w.). Decreased mortality by Chtx was associated with reduced hepatic damage, increased peritoneal migration of neutrophils, decreased mRNA expression of IL-1β as well as inhibition of inflammasome activation in liver. Further, an alternate mouse model of co-administration of a sublethal doses of APAP (200 mg/kg b.w.) and LPS (5 mg/kg b.w.) operating synergistically and mediating complete mortality was developed. Overwhelming inflammation, characterized by increased inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β and so on) in liver as well as in circulation and mortality was demonstrable in this model. Also, Chtx administration mediated significant reversal of mortality in APAP+LPS co-administered mice, which was associated with reduced IL-1β in liver and plasma cytokines in this model. In conclusion, Chtx being a small molecular weight linear carbohydrate offers promise for clinical management of liver failure associated with APAP overdose. PMID:27171266

  6. Mild hypothermia protects liver against ischemia and reperfusion injury

    Cheng-You Wang; Yong Ni; Yan Liu; Zhi-Heng Huang; Min-Jie Zhang; Yong-Qiang Zhan; Hai-Bin Gao

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To determine whether mild hypothermia could protect liver against ischemia and reperfusion injury in pigs. METHODS: Twenty-four healthy pigs were randomly divided into normothermia, mild hypothermia and normal control groups. The experimental procedure consisted of temporary interruption of blood flow to total hepatic lobe for different lengths of time and subsequent reperfusion. Hepatic tissue oxygen pressure (PtiO2) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) values were evaluated, and ultrastructural analysis was carried out for all samples.RESULTS: Serum AST was significantly lower, and hepatic P,O2 values were significantly higher in the mild hypothermia group than in the normothermia group during liver ischemiareperfusion periods (P = 0.032, P = 0.028). Meanwhile, the histopathologic injury of liver induced by ischemiareperfusion was significantly improved in the mild hypothermia group, compared with that in the normothermia group. CONCLUSION: Mild hypothermia can protect the liver from ischemia-reperfusion injury in pigs.

  7. Redox Nanoparticle Therapeutics for Acetaminophen-Induced Hepatotoxicity in Mice

    Boonruamkaew, Phetcharat; Chonpathompikunlert, Pennapa; Nagasaki, Yukio

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the hepatoprotective effect of an antioxidative nanoparticle (RNPN) recently developed against APAP-induced hepatotoxicity in mice. The effects of oral administration of RNPN to APAP-treated mice were assessed for various biochemical liver function parameters: alanine transaminase (ALT) activity, aspartate transaminase (AST) activity, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, prothrombin time, and serum albumin (ALB) level. The treatment effects were asses...

  8. Male Rat Susceptibility for Liver and Kidney Injury

    Sarkawt H. Hamad

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The experimental study of this paper was designed to investigate male rat susceptibility to liver injury. A combination of two experimental animal models (Lead acetate for tissue injury (80 mg / L and castration had been used on twenty male rats, they were divided into two groups sham (n = 10; castrated (n = 10. Results revealed that, liver weight reduced significantly (P < 0.05 in sham group in comparison with castrated rats, but kidney weight changed slightly. Also, serum aminotransferase (AST was significantly higher in sham versus castrated rats. Neither alanine aminotransferase (ALT and alkaline phosphatase (ALP nor malondialdehyde (MDA changed. In conclusion, the absence of male sex hormone would delay tissue injury of male rat organs especially liver organ.

  9. Redox Nanoparticle Therapeutics for Acetaminophen-Induced Hepatotoxicity in Mice

    Boonruamkaew, Phetcharat; Chonpathompikunlert, Pennapa; Nagasaki, Yukio

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the hepatoprotective effect of an antioxidative nanoparticle (RNPN) recently developed against APAP-induced hepatotoxicity in mice. The effects of oral administration of RNPN to APAP-treated mice were assessed for various biochemical liver function parameters: alanine transaminase (ALT) activity, aspartate transaminase (AST) activity, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, prothrombin time, and serum albumin (ALB) level. The treatment effects were assessed in terms of free radical parameters: malondialdehyde (MDA) accumulation, glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity, % inhibition of superoxide anion (O2−∙), and histopathological examination. The N-acetylcysteine (NAC)-treated group exhibited an enhanced prothrombin time relative to the control group, while RNPN did not prolong prothrombin time. The RNPN-treated animals exhibited lower levels of ALT, AST, and ALP, while increased ALB levels were measured in these animals compared to those in the other groups. The RNPN-treated animals furthermore exhibited improved MDA levels, GPx activity, and % inhibition of O2−∙, which relate to oxidative damage. Histological staining of liver tissues from RNPN-treated animals did not reveal any microscopic changes relative to the other groups. The findings of this study suggest that RNPN possesses effective hepatoprotective properties and does not exhibit the notable adverse effects associated with NAC treatment. PMID:27073589

  10. Trimetazidine and liver preservation against ischaemia-reperfusion injury

    Mosbah, Ismail Ben; Abdennebi, Hassen B.; Zaouali, Mohamed A.; Padrissa-Altés, Susagna; Peralta, Carmen; Roselló-Catafau, Joan

    2007-01-01

    Trimetazidine is an anti-ischaemic drug used for angina pectoris treatment. Recently, it has been shown that trimetazidine protects against hepatic ischaemia reperfusion injury. Several hypotheses have been proposed to explain the exact hepatoprotective mechanisms but they still remain unclear. This review assesses the possible mechanisms responsible for the increase of the liver's tolerance against ischaemia-reperfusion injury with special emphasis on: (1) the prevention of oxidative stress ...

  11. Liver injury induced by herbal complementary and alternative medicine.

    Navarro, Victor J; Seeff, Leonard B

    2013-11-01

    Herbal and dietary supplement use is common. Most marketed products consist of complex mixtures. Although they are perceived as safe, instances of hepatotoxicity attributable to these products underscore their potential for injury, but the exact component that is responsible for injury is difficult to discern. The lenient regulatory environment in the United States, which opens the possibility of adulteration and contamination, adds to the challenge of disease attribution. Although many different herbal and dietary supplements have been reported to cause liver injury, in the United States, products used for bodybuilding and weight loss are the most commonly implicated. PMID:24099027

  12. Liver injury-on-a-chip: microfluidic co-cultures with integrated biosensors for monitoring liver cell signaling during injury.

    Zhou, Qing; Patel, Dipali; Kwa, Timothy; Haque, Amranul; Matharu, Zimple; Stybayeva, Gulnaz; Gao, Yandong; Diehl, Anna Mae; Revzin, Alexander

    2015-12-01

    Tissue injury triggers complex communication between cells via secreted signaling molecules such as cytokines and growth factors. Discerning when and where these signals begin and how they propagate over time is very challenging with existing cell culture and analysis tools. The goal of this study was to develop new tools in the form of microfluidic co-cultures with integrated biosensors for local and continuous monitoring of secreted signals. Specifically, we focused on how alcohol injury affects TGF-β signaling between two liver cell types, hepatocytes and stellate cells. Activation of stellate cells happens early during liver injury and is at the center of liver fibrosis. We demonstrated that alcohol injury to microfluidic co-cultures caused significantly higher levels of stellate cell activation compared to conditioned media and transwell injury experiments. This highlighted the advantage of the microfluidic co-culture: placement of two cell types in close proximity to ensure high local concentrations of injury-promoting secreted signals. Next, we developed a microsystem consisting of five chambers, two for co-culturing hepatocytes with stellate cells and three additional chambers containing miniature aptamer-modified electrodes for monitoring secreted TGF-β. Importantly, the walls separating microfluidic chambers were actuatable; they could be raised or lowered to create different configurations of the device. The use of reconfigurable microfluidics and miniature biosensors revealed that alcohol injury causes hepatocytes to secrete TGF-β molecules, which diffuse over to neighboring stellate cells and trigger production of additional TGF-β from stellate cells. Our results lend credence to the emerging view of hepatocytes as active participants of liver injury. Broadly speaking, our microsystem makes it possible to monitor paracrine crosstalk between two cell types communicating via the same signaling molecule (e.g. TGF-β). PMID:26480303

  13. Gastric emptying in rats with acetaminophen-induced hepatitis

    Hessel G.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to study the gastric emptying (GE of liquids in fasted and sucrose-fed rats with toxic hepatitis induced by acetaminophen. The GE of three test meals (saline, glucose and mayonnaise was evaluated in Wistar rats. For each meal, the animals were divided into two groups (N = 24 each. Group I was fed a sucrose diet throughout the experiment (66 h while group II was fasted. Forty-two hours after the start of the experiment, each group was divided into two subgroups (N = 12 each. Subgroup A received a placebo and subgroup B was given acetaminophen (1 g/kg. Twenty-four hours later, the GE of the three test meals was assessed and blood samples were collected to measure the serum levels of alanine aminotransferase (ALT, aspartate aminotransferase (AST and acetaminophen. In group IB, the mean AST and ALT values were 515 and 263 IU/l, respectively, while for group IIB they were 4014 and 2472 IU/l, respectively. The mean serum acetaminophen levels were higher in group IIB (120 µg/ml than in group IB (87 µg/ml. The gastric retention values were significantly higher in group IIB than in group IIA for all three test meals: saline, 51 vs 35%; glucose, 52 vs 38% and mayonnaise, 51 vs 29% (median values. The correlation between gastric retention and AST levels was significant (P<0.05 for group IIB for the three test meals: r = 0.73, 0.67 and 0.68 for saline, glucose and mayonnaise, respectively. We conclude that GE is altered in rats with hepatic lesions induced by acetaminophen, and that these alterations may be related to the liver cell necrosis caused by the drug.

  14. Congenital biliary atresia: liver injury begins at birth

    Makin, Erica; Quaglia, Alberto; Kvist, Nina;

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The timing of onset of liver injury in biliary atresia (BA) is not known, although in approximately 10% of cases, biliary pathologic condition associated with the biliary atresia splenic malformation syndrome must begin well before birth. METHODS: The study involved retrospective case...

  15. Chikusetsusaponin V attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced liver injury in mice.

    Dai, Yan Wen; Zhang, Chang Cheng; Zhao, Hai Xia; Wan, Jing Zhi; Deng, Li Li; Zhou, Zhi Yong; Dun, Yao Yan; Liu, Chao Qi; Yuan, Ding; Wang, Ting

    2016-06-01

    Chikusetsusaponin V (CsV), a saponin from Panax japonicus, has been reported to inhibit inflammatory responses in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced macrophage cells. However, whether CsV could alleviate LPS-induced liver injury in vivo and the potential mechanisms involved remain unclear. In the present study, we investigated the anti-inflammatory effects of CsV on LPS-induced acute liver injury in mice and further explored the potential mechanisms involved. Our results showed that CsV significantly attenuated elevation of alanine transaminase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) levels and improved liver histopathological changes in LPS-induced mice. In addition, CsV decreased serum tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) levels and inhibited mRNA expressions of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), TNF-α and IL-1β in LPS challenged mice. Furthermore, CsV inhibited nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) activation by downregulating phosphorylated NF-κB, IκB-α, ERK, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 levels in the liver tissue, which ultimately decreased nucleus NF-κB protein level. In conclusion, our data suggested that CsV could be a promising drug for preventing LPS challenged liver injury since it attenuated LPS-induced inflammatory responses, partly via inhibiting NF-κB and MAPK signaling pathways. PMID:26981791

  16. Mitochondrial involvement in drug-induced liver injury.

    Pessayre, Dominique; Mansouri, Abdellah; Berson, Alain; Fromenty, Bernard

    2010-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is a major mechanism of liver injury. A parent drug or its reactive metabolite can trigger outer mitochondrial membrane permeabilization or rupture due to mitochondrial permeability transition. The latter can severely deplete ATP and cause liver cell necrosis, or it can instead lead to apoptosis by releasing cytochrome c, which activates caspases in the cytosol. Necrosis and apoptosis can trigger cytolytic hepatitis resulting in lethal fulminant hepatitis in some patients. Other drugs severely inhibit mitochondrial function and trigger extensive microvesicular steatosis, hypoglycaemia, coma, and death. Milder and more prolonged forms of drug-induced mitochondrial dysfunction can also cause macrovacuolar steatosis. Although this is a benign liver lesion in the short-term, it can progress to steatohepatitis and then to cirrhosis. Patient susceptibility to drug-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and liver injury can sometimes be explained by genetic or acquired variations in drug metabolism and/or elimination that increase the concentration of the toxic species (parent drug or metabolite). Susceptibility may also be increased by the presence of another condition, which also impairs mitochondrial function, such as an inborn mitochondrial cytopathy, beta-oxidation defect, certain viral infections, pregnancy, or the obesity-associated metabolic syndrome. Liver injury due to mitochondrial dysfunction can have important consequences for pharmaceutical companies. It has led to the interruption of clinical trials, the recall of several drugs after marketing, or the introduction of severe black box warnings by drug agencies. Pharmaceutical companies should systematically investigate mitochondrial effects during lead selection or preclinical safety studies. PMID:20020267

  17. IL-4 mediates dicloxacillin-induced liver injury in mice.

    Higuchi, Satonori; Kobayashi, Masanori; Yoshikawa, Yukitaka; Tsuneyama, Koichi; Fukami, Tatsuki; Nakajima, Miki; Yokoi, Tsuyoshi

    2011-02-01

    Drug-induced liver injury (DILI) is a major problem in drug development and clinical drug therapy. In most cases, the mechanisms are still unknown. It is difficult to predict DILI in humans due to the lack of experimental animal models. Dicloxacillin, penicillinase-sensitive penicillin, rarely causes cholestatic or mixed liver injury, and there is some evidence for immunoallergic idiosyncratic reaction in human. In this study, we investigated the mechanisms of dicloxacillin-induced liver injury. Plasma ALT and total-bilirubin (T-Bil) levels were significantly increased in dicloxacillin-administered (600 mg/kg, i.p.) mice. Dicloxacillin administration induced Th2 (helper T cells)-mediated factors and increased the plasma interleukin (IL)-4 level. Neutralization of IL-4 suppressed the hepatotoxicity of dicloxacillin, and recombinant mouse IL-4 administration (0.5 or 2.0 μg/mouse, i.p.) exacerbated it. Chemoattractant receptor-homologous molecule expressed on Th2 cells (CRTh2) is a cognate receptor for prostaglandin (PG) D(2), and is suggested to be involved in Th2-dependent allergic inflammation. We investigated the effect of 13,14-Dihydro-15-keto-PGD(2) (DK-PGD(2); 10 μg/mouse, i.p.) administration on dicloxacillin-induced liver injury. DK-PGD(2)/dicloxacillin coadministration resulted in a significant increase of alanine aminotransferases and a remarkable increase of macrophage inflammatory protein 2 expression. In conclusion, to the best of our knowledge, this is the first report to demonstrate that dicloxacillin-induced liver injury is mediated by a Th2-type immune reaction and exacerbated by DK-PGD(2). PMID:21094227

  18. Intestinal microflora in rats with ischemia/reperfusion liver injury

    XING Hui-chun; LI Lan-juan; XU Kai-jin; SHEN Tian; CHEN Yun-bo; SHENG Ji-fang; YU Yun-song; CHEN Ya-gang

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the intestinal microflora status related to ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) liver injury and explore the possible mechanism. Methods: Specific pathogen free grade Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized into three groups: Control group (n=8), sham group (n=6) and I/R group (n=10). Rats in the control group did not receive any treatment, rats in the I/R group were subjected to 20 min of liver ischemia, and rats in the sham group were only subjected to sham operation. Twenty-two hours later, the rats were sacrificed and liver enzymes and malondialdehyde (MDA), superoxide dismutase (SOD), serum endotoxin,intestinal bacterial counts, intestinal mucosal histology, bacterial translocation to mesenteric lymph nodes, liver, spleen, and kidney were studied. Results: Ischemia/reperfusion increased liver enzymes, MDA, decreased SOD, and was associated with plasma endotoxin elevation in the I/R group campared to those in the sham group. Intestinal Bifidobacteria and Lactobacilli decreased and intestinal Enterobacterium and Enterococcus, bacterial translocation to kidney increased in the I/R group compared to the sham group. Intestinal microvilli were lost, disrupted and the interspace between cells became wider in the I/R group.Conclusion: I/R liver injury may lead to disturbance of intestinal microflora and impairment of intestinal mucosal barrier function,which contributes to endotoxemia and bacterial translocation to kidney.

  19. Antituberculous drug-induced liver injury: current perspective.

    Devarbhavi, Harshad

    2011-01-01

    Drug-induced liver injury (DILI) is a minor but significant cause of liver injury across all regions. Antituberculosis drug-induced liver injury (TB DILI) is a leading cause of DILI and drug-induced acute liver failure (DIALF) in India and much of the developing world. Single center registries of DILI continue to highlight the high incidence of DILI and DIALF, much of it due to diagnostic errors and inappropriate prescriptions. The clinical spectrum includes asymptomatic elevation in liver tests to acute hepatitis and acute liver failure. TB DILI can occur across all age groups including children with significant morbidity and mortality. Although TB DILI develops more commonly in males, ALF is noted to be commoner in females with a worse prognosis. Contrasting reports on the role of genetic and environmental factors continue to be published. Since DILI is a diagnosis of exclusion, acute viral hepatitis particularly hepatitis E needs to be excluded in such cases. The presence of jaundice, hypoalbuminemia, ascites, encephalopathy and high prothrombin time are poor prognostic markers. Recent reports of the beneficial role of N-acetylcysteine in DIALF and in preventing TB DILI in elderly individuals needs further investigation. Reintroduction of antitubercular therapy must be balanced with the knowledge of adaptation a common occurrence with antituberculosis drugs. Although monitoring and rechallenge practices vary greatly, the importance of early clinical symptoms cannot be underestimated. Simultaneous rechallenge with combination drugs or sequential treatment have similar incidence of DILI, although increasing reports about the role of pyrazinamide in DILI and on rechallenge warrants its careful use. The combined affliction of HIV or chronic hepatitis B or C and tuberculosis poses multiple challenges including the greatly increased risks of DILI. PMID:22332331

  20. Betaine transport in kidney and liver: use of betaine in liver injury.

    Kempson, Stephen A; Vovor-Dassu, Komi; Day, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    Betaine, also known as trimethylglycine, is an important human nutrient obtained from a variety of foods and also can be synthesized from choline. Betaine is much more abundant in kidney and liver compared to other mammalian organs. The principal role of betaine in the kidney is osmoprotection in cells of the medulla and it enters these cells via the betaine/γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transporter protein (BGT1), which is upregulated by hyperosmotic stress. This process has been studied in great detail. In liver, the main role of betaine is a methyl donor in the methionine cycle. However, recent studies showed that BGT1 is much more abundant in liver compared to kidney medulla. Despite this, the role of BGT1 in liver has received little attention. Entry of betaine into liver cells is a necessary first step for its action at the cellular level. Increased interest in betaine has developed because of a number of therapeutic uses. These include treatment of nonalcoholic fatty liver and hyperhomocysteinemia, a risk factor for atherosclerotic disease. Several important questions need to be addressed to better understand the potential of betaine as a therapeutic agent for other liver diseases, such as alcohol-induced injury. Heavy alcohol consumption is the most common cause for liver-related deaths and altered liver metabolism may contribute to hepatic, vascular, coronary, and cerebral diseases. PMID:24429813

  1. Traditional Chinese Medicine Induced Liver Injury.

    Teschke, Rolf

    2014-06-01

    Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) is popular around the world and encompasses many different practices with particular emphasis on herbal TCM. Using the PubMed database, a literature search was undertaken to assess the extent herbal TCM products exert rare hepatotoxicity. Analysis of reported cases revealed numerous specified herbal TCM products with potential hepatotoxicity. Among these were An Shu Ling, Bai Fang, Bai Xian Pi, Ban Tu Wan, Bo He, Bo Ye Qing Niu Dan, Bofu Tsu Sho San, Boh Gol Zhee, Cang Er Zi, Chai Hu, Chaso, Chi R Yun, Chuan Lian Zi, Ci Wu Jia, Da Chai Hu Tang, Da Huang, Du Huo, Gan Cao, Ge Gen, Ho Shou Wu, Hu Bohe You, Hu Zhang, Huang Qin, Huang Yao Zi, Hwang Geun Cho, Ji Gu Cao, Ji Ji, Ji Xue Cao, Jiguja, Jin Bu Huan, Jue Ming Zi, Kamishoyosan, Kudzu, Lei Gong Teng, Long Dan Xie Gan Tang, Lu Cha, Ma Huang, Mao Guo Tian Jie Cai, Onshido, Polygonum multiflorum, Qian Li Guang, Ren Shen, Sairei To, Shan Chi, Shen Min, Shi Can, Shi Liu Pi, Shou Wu Pian, Tian Hua Fen, White flood, Wu Bei Zi, Xi Shu, Xiao Chai Hu Tang, Yin Chen Hao, Zexie, Zhen Chu Cao, and various unclassified Chinese herbal mixtures. Causality was firmly established for a number of herbal TCM products by a positive reexposure test result, the liver specific scale of CIOMS (Council for International Organizations of Medical Sciences), or both. Otherwise, the quality of case data was mixed, especially regarding analysis of the herb ingredients because of adulteration with synthetic drugs, contamination with heavy metals, and misidentification. In addition, non-herbal TCM elements derived from Agaricus blazei, Agkistrodon, Antelope, Bombyx, Carp, Fish gallbladder, Phellinus, Scolopendra, Scorpio, and Zaocys are also known or potential hepatotoxins. For some patients, the clinical course was severe, with risks for acute liver failure, liver transplantation requirement, and lethality. In conclusion, the use of few herbal TCM products may rarely be associated with hepatotoxicity in some

  2. Alcoholic liver injury: defenestration in noncirrhotic livers--a scanning electron microscopic study

    Horn, T; Christoffersen, P; Henriksen, Jens Henrik Sahl

    1987-01-01

    (fractional area of fenestrae) was observed in acinar Zone 3, both in biopsies with and without Zone 3 fibrosis as judged by light microscopy. A significant reduction of porosity as shown in this study may influence the blood hepatocytic exchange and contribute to the alcohol-induced liver injury....

  3. An Update on Drug-induced Liver Injury.

    Devarbhavi, Harshad

    2012-09-01

    Idiosyncratic drug-induced liver injury (DILI) is an important cause of morbidity and mortality following drugs taken in therapeutic doses. Hepatotoxicity is a leading cause of attrition in drug development, or withdrawal or restricted use after marketing. No age is exempt although adults and the elderly are at increased risk. DILI spans the entire spectrum ranging from asymptomatic elevation in transaminases to severe disease such as acute hepatitis leading to acute liver failure. The liver specific Roussel Uclaf Causality Assessment Method is the most validated and extensively used for determining the likelihood that an implicated drug caused DILI. Asymptomatic elevation in liver tests must be differentiated from adaptation. Drugs producing DILI have a signature pattern although no single pattern is characteristic. Antimicrobial and central nervous system agents including antiepileptic drugs are the leading causes of DILI worldwide. In the absence of a diagnostic test or a biomarker, the diagnosis rests on the evidence of absence of competing causes such as acute viral hepatitis, autoimmune hepatitis and others. Recent studies show that antituberculosis drugs given for active or latent disease are still a major cause of drug-induced liver injury in India and the West respectively. Presence of jaundice signifies a severe disease and entails a worse outcome. The pathogenesis is unclear and is due to a mix of host, drug metabolite and environmental factors. Research has evolved from incriminating candidate genes to genome wide analysis studies. Immediate cessation of the drug is key to prevent or minimize progressive damage. Treatment is largely supportive. N-acetylcysteine is the antidote for paracetamol toxicity. Carnitine has been tried in valproate injury whereas steroids and ursodeoxycholic acid may be used in DILI associated with hypersensitivity or cholestatic features respectively. This article provides an overview of the epidemiology, the patterns of

  4. An Autopsy Study of Liver Injuries in a Tertiary Referral Centre of Eastern Nepal

    Subedi, Nuwadatta; Yadav, B.N.; Jha, Shivendra; Gurung, Sharmila; Pradhan, Amshu

    2013-01-01

    Background: Liver is the largest gland in the body and it frequently gets wounded. The objective of this study was to determine the patterns, types and severities of liver injuries which were caused by mechanical trauma and to study the organs associated with liver injuries. Material and Methods: This was a hospital based, cross sectional study which was conducted on the autopsies showing the evidence of liver injuries in the mortuary of a tertiary hospital in eastern Nepal. All consecutive autopsy cases which were handled within one year’s time (n=46) were included in our study. The cases were studied in detail for liver injuries, which included age, sex, severity, associated injuries, site of the injury, description of the injury, etc. Results: The mean age of the victims was 33.87 years and there was a male: female ratio of 3.6:1. The injuries had resulted from blunt trauma in 41 (89.1%) cases, the most common of which was road traffic accidents, constituting 37(80.4%) cases. Grade III injuries were seen in 14 (30.4%) cases. Laceration of the liver was the most frequent finding that was evident in 34 (73.9%) cases. Right lobe of the liver was injured in 30 (74%) cases. The sole presence of liver injuries among abdomino-pelvic organs was seen in 14 (30.4%) cases. In 40 (87%) cases, liver injuries were associated with other regional injuries. Conclusion: Laceration is the most common liver injury among autopsy cases. Right lobe is mostly affected and grade III injuries are the most common ones. Liver injuries are frequently associated with other abdomino-pelvic organs and multiple regional injuries. PMID:24086875

  5. Hyperhomocysteinemia,endoplasmic reticulum stress,and alcoholic liver injury

    Cheng Ji; Neil Kaplowitz

    2004-01-01

    Deficiencies in vitamins or other factors (B6, B12, folic acid,betaine) and genetic disorders for the metabolism of the non-protein amino acid-homocysteine (Hcy) lead to hyperhomocysteinemia (Hhcy). Hhcy is an integral component of several disorders including cardiovascular disease, neurodegeneration, diabetes and alcoholic liver disease. Hhcy unleashes mediators of inflammation such as NFκB, IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-8, increases production of intracellular superoxide anion causing oxidative stress and reducing intracellular level of nitric oxide (NO), and induces endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress which can explain many processes of Hcy-promoted cell injury such as apoptosis,fat accumulation, and inflammation. Animal models have played an important role in determining the biological effects of Hhcy. ER stress may also be involved in other liver diseases such as α1-antitrypsin (α1-AT) deficiency and hepatitis C and/or B virus infection. Future research should evaluate the possible potentiative effects of alcohol and hepatic virus infection on ER stress-induced liver injury, study potentially beneficial effects of lowering Hcy and preventing ER stress in alcoholic humans,and examine polymorphism of Hcy metabolizing enzymes as potential risk-factors for the development of Hhcy and liver disease.

  6. Role of Galectin-3 in Acetaminophen-Induced Hepatotoxicity and Inflammatory Mediator Production

    Dragomir, Ana-Cristina; Sun, Richard; Mishin, Vladimir; Hall, LeRoy B.; Laskin, Jeffrey D.; Laskin, Debra L.

    2012-01-01

    Galectin-3 (Gal-3) is a β-galactoside-binding lectin implicated in the regulation of macrophage activation and inflammatory mediator production. In the present studies, we analyzed the role of Gal-3 in liver inflammation and injury induced by acetaminophen (APAP). Treatment of wild-type (WT) mice with APAP (300 mg/kg, ip) resulted in centrilobular hepatic necrosis and increases in serum transaminases. This was associated with increased hepatic expression of Gal-3 messenger RNA and protein. Im...

  7. An Autopsy Study of Liver Injuries in a Tertiary Referral Centre of Eastern Nepal

    Subedi, Nuwadatta; Yadav, B.N.; Jha, Shivendra; Gurung, Sharmila; Pradhan, Amshu

    2013-01-01

    Background: Liver is the largest gland in the body and it frequently gets wounded. The objective of this study was to determine the patterns, types and severities of liver injuries which were caused by mechanical trauma and to study the organs associated with liver injuries.

  8. Effect of corn silk extract on acetaminophen induced renal damage in mice

    To evaluate the protective role of Corn Silk extract on Acetaminophen induced nephrotoxicity in albino mice. Study Design: Laboratory based randomized controlled trials. Place and Duration of Study: The study was carried out in experimental research laboratory University of Health Sciences and Anatomy department, Lahore. The study duration was one year from February 2012 to February 2013. Material and Methods: Twenty seven male albino mice, 6-8 weeks old weighing 30 + 5 gm, were used; these animals were randomly divided into three groups having nine mice in each group. Group A served as control and was given 16.6ml/kg normal saline intraperitoneally on first day of experiment and was sacrificed on 10th day of the experiment. Group B was treated with acetaminophen 600 mg/kg dissolved in 16.6 ml of normal saline intraperitoneally on 1st day of experiment and was sacrificed after 48 hours. Group C was given acetaminophen at a dose of 600 mg/kg intraperitoneally on first day of experiment and then corn silk extract was given by oral route at a dose of 400 mg/kg for next 8 days. The animals were sacrificed on 10th day of the experiment, the kidneys were removed; 3mm three tissue pieces were fixed in 10% formaline; processed and stained with H and E for histological study. Results: It was observed on microscopic examination that Corn silk extract reduced deleterious effects of acetaminophen on tubules of kidney as evidenced by reduction of tubular vacuolation and necrosis, absence of protein casts, vascular congestion and inflammation. Conclusion: It is concluded from current results that corn silk extract protects acetaminophen induced nephrotoxicity. (author)

  9. Melatonin protects liver from intestine ischemia reperfusion injury in rats

    Jian-Yi Li; Hong-Zhuan Yin; Xi Gu; Yong Zhou; Wen-Hai Zhang; Yi-Min Qin

    2008-01-01

    AIM:To investigate the protective effect of melatonin on liver after intestinal ischemia-reperfusion injury in rats.METHODS:One hundred and fifty male Wistar rats,weighing 190-210 g,aged 7 wk,were randomly divided into melatonin exposure group,alcohol solvent control group and normal saline control group.Rats in the melatonin exposure group received intraperitoneal (IP) melatonin (20 mg/kg) 30 min before intestinal ischemia-reperfusion (IR),rats in the alcohol solvent control group received the same concentration and volume of alcohol,and rats in the normal saline control group received the same volume of normal saline.Serum samples were collected from each group 0.5,1,6,12,and 24 h after intestinal IR.Levels of serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) were measured with an auto-biochemical analyzer.Serum TNF-a was tested by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA).Malondialdehyde (MDA) in liver was detected by colorimetric assay.Pathological changes in liver and immunohistochemical straining of ICAM-1 were observed under an optical microscope.RESULTS:The levels of ALT measured at various time points after intestinal IR in the melatonin exposure group were significantly lower than those in the other two control groups (P<0.05).The serum AST levels 12 and 24 h after intestinal IR and the ICAM-1 levels (%) 6,12 and 24 h after intestinal IR in the melatonin exposure group were also significantly lower than those in the other two control groups (P<0.05).CONCLUSION:Exotic melatonin can inhibit the activity of ALT,AST and TNF-a decrease the accumulation of MDA,and depress the expression of ICAM-1 in liver after intestinal IR injury,thus improving the liver function.

  10. Liver Injury with Features Mimicking Autoimmune Hepatitis following the Use of Black Cohosh.

    Guzman, Grace; Kallwitz, Eric R; Wojewoda, Christina; Chennuri, Rohini; Berkes, Jamie; Layden, Thomas J; Cotler, Scott J

    2009-01-01

    There are a growing number of cases detailing acute hepatic necrosis in patients taking black cohosh (Cimicifuga racemosa), an over-the-counter herbal supplement for management of menopausal symptoms. Our aim is to illustrate two cases of liver injury following the use of black cohosh characterized by histopathological features mimicking autoimmune hepatitis. Both patients reported black cohosh use for at least six months and had no evidence of another cause of liver disease. Their liver biopsies showed a component of centrilobular necrosis consistent with severe drug-induced liver injury. In addition, the biopsies showed characteristics of autoimmune-like liver injury with an interface hepatitis dominated by plasma cells. Although serum markers for autoimmune hepatitis were not particularly elevated, both patients responded to corticosteroids, supporting an immune-mediated component to the liver injury. Liver injury following the use of black cohosh should be included in the list of differential diagnoses for chronic hepatitis with features mimicking autoimmune hepatitis. PMID:20130783

  11. Nrf2 activation prevents cadmium-induced acute liver injury

    Oxidative stress plays an important role in cadmium-induced liver injury. Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) is a transcription factor that up-regulates cytoprotective genes in response to oxidative stress. To investigate the role of Nrf2 in cadmium-induced hepatotoxicity, Nrf2-null mice, wild-type mice, kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1-knockdown (Keap1-KD) mice with enhanced Nrf2, and Keap1-hepatocyte knockout (Keap1-HKO) mice with maximum Nrf2 activation were treated with cadmium chloride (3.5 mg Cd/kg, i.p.). Blood and liver samples were collected 8 h thereafter. Cadmium increased serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activities, and caused extensive hepatic hemorrhage and necrosis in the Nrf2-null mice. In contrast, Nrf2-enhanced mice had lower serum ALT and LDH activities and less morphological alternations in the livers than wild-type mice. H2DCFDA (2′,7′-dichlorodihydrofluoresein diacetate) staining of primary hepatocytes isolated from the four genotypes of mice indicated that oxidative stress was higher in Nrf2-null cells, and lower in Nrf2-enhanced cells than in wild-type cells. To further investigate the mechanism of the protective effect of Nrf2, mRNA of metallothionein (MT) and other cytoprotective genes were determined. Cadmium markedly induced MT-1 and MT-2 in livers of all four genotypes of mice. In contrast, genes involved in glutathione synthesis and reducing reactive oxygen species, including glutamate-cysteine ligase (Gclc), glutathione peroxidase-2 (Gpx2), and sulfiredoxin-1 (Srxn-1) were only induced in Nrf2-enhanced mice, but not in Nrf2-null mice. In conclusion, the present study shows that Nrf2 activation prevents cadmium-induced oxidative stress and liver injury through induction of genes involved in antioxidant defense rather than genes that scavenge Cd. -- Highlights: ► Cadmium caused extensive hepatic hemorrhage and necrosis in Nrf2-null mice. ► Keap1-KD and Keap1-HKO mice were

  12. Nrf2 activation prevents cadmium-induced acute liver injury

    Wu, Kai C. [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology, and Therapeutics, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States); Liu, Jie J. [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States); Klaassen, Curtis D., E-mail: cklaasse@kumc.edu [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States)

    2012-08-15

    Oxidative stress plays an important role in cadmium-induced liver injury. Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) is a transcription factor that up-regulates cytoprotective genes in response to oxidative stress. To investigate the role of Nrf2 in cadmium-induced hepatotoxicity, Nrf2-null mice, wild-type mice, kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1-knockdown (Keap1-KD) mice with enhanced Nrf2, and Keap1-hepatocyte knockout (Keap1-HKO) mice with maximum Nrf2 activation were treated with cadmium chloride (3.5 mg Cd/kg, i.p.). Blood and liver samples were collected 8 h thereafter. Cadmium increased serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activities, and caused extensive hepatic hemorrhage and necrosis in the Nrf2-null mice. In contrast, Nrf2-enhanced mice had lower serum ALT and LDH activities and less morphological alternations in the livers than wild-type mice. H{sub 2}DCFDA (2′,7′-dichlorodihydrofluoresein diacetate) staining of primary hepatocytes isolated from the four genotypes of mice indicated that oxidative stress was higher in Nrf2-null cells, and lower in Nrf2-enhanced cells than in wild-type cells. To further investigate the mechanism of the protective effect of Nrf2, mRNA of metallothionein (MT) and other cytoprotective genes were determined. Cadmium markedly induced MT-1 and MT-2 in livers of all four genotypes of mice. In contrast, genes involved in glutathione synthesis and reducing reactive oxygen species, including glutamate-cysteine ligase (Gclc), glutathione peroxidase-2 (Gpx2), and sulfiredoxin-1 (Srxn-1) were only induced in Nrf2-enhanced mice, but not in Nrf2-null mice. In conclusion, the present study shows that Nrf2 activation prevents cadmium-induced oxidative stress and liver injury through induction of genes involved in antioxidant defense rather than genes that scavenge Cd. -- Highlights: ► Cadmium caused extensive hepatic hemorrhage and necrosis in Nrf2-null mice. ► Keap1-KD and Keap1-HKO mice

  13. Oral administration of polyamines ameliorates liver ischemia/reperfusion injury and promotes liver regeneration in rats.

    Okumura, Shinya; Teratani, Takumi; Fujimoto, Yasuhiro; Zhao, Xiangdong; Tsuruyama, Tatsuaki; Masano, Yuki; Kasahara, Naoya; Iida, Taku; Yagi, Shintaro; Uemura, Tadahiro; Kaido, Toshimi; Uemoto, Shinji

    2016-09-01

    Polyamines are essential for cell growth and differentiation. They play important roles in protection from liver damage and promotion of liver regeneration. However, little is known about the effect of oral exogenous polyamine administration on liver damage and regeneration. This study investigated the impact of polyamines (spermidine and spermine) on ischemia/reperfusion injury (IRI) and liver regeneration. We used a rat model in which a 70% hepatectomy after 40 minutes of ischemia was performed to mimic the clinical condition of living donor partial liver transplantation (LT). Male Lewis rats were separated into 2 groups: a polyamine group given polyamines before and after operation as treatment and a vehicle group given distilled water as placebo. The levels of serum aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase at 6, 24, and 48 hours after reperfusion were significantly lower in the polyamine group compared with those in the vehicle group. Polyamine treatment reduced the expression of several proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines at 6 hours after reperfusion. Histological analysis showed significantly less necrosis and apoptosis in the polyamine group at 6 hours after reperfusion. Sinusoidal endothelial cells were also well preserved in the polyamine group. In addition, the regeneration of the remnant liver at 24, 48, and 168 hours after reperfusion was significantly accelerated, and the Ki-67 labeling index and the expressions of proliferating cell nuclear antigen and phosphorylated retinoblastoma protein at 24 hours after reperfusion were significantly higher in the polyamine group compared with those in the vehicle group. In conclusion, perioperative oral polyamine administration attenuates liver IRI and promotes liver regeneration. It might be a new therapeutic option to improve the outcomes of partial LT. Liver Transplantation 22 1231-1244 2016 AASLD. PMID:27102080

  14. Intraoperative injuries during liver resection: analysis of 1,005 procedures

    Grat, Michal; Grzegorczyk, Karolina; Lewandowski, Zbigniew; Sujecki, Damian; Szwedowski, Dawid; Boltuc, Adam; Smoter, Piotr; Kornasiewicz, Oskar; Krawczyk, Marek

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Risk of liver resection has been well investigated in many studies. However, the problem of intraoperative injuries is rarely mentioned. The aim of this study was to assess the incidence, the type, and management of intraoperative injuries during liver resection. Methods A total of 1,005 liver resections between 2004 and 2009 were included in this retrospective investigation. We analyzed the incidence of intraoperative injuries, risk factors, and an impact on patients’ clinical outcom...

  15. Clinical significance of eosinophilia in the diagnosis of halothane-induced liver injury.

    Fujiwara,Masachika

    1984-02-01

    Full Text Available Three patients with severe halothane-induced liver injury are described. All patients received halothane anesthesia twice within a short period. High fever and jaundice were noticed soon after the second operation. The prothrombin time was less than 40%, and eosinophilia was greater than 7% prior to these symptoms. Other causes of liver injury were excluded. Diagnostic criteria for halothane-induced liver injury are proposed.

  16. Acute liver failure and acute kidney injury: Definitions, prognosis, and outcome

    Włodzimirow, K.A.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this thesis was to investigate definitions, prognostic indicators and their association with adverse events, mainly mortality for acute liver failure (ALF), acute-on-chronic liver failure (ACLF) and acute kidney injury (AKI).

  17. Exploring an animal model of amodiaquine-induced liver injury in rats and mice.

    Liu, Feng; Cai, Ping; Metushi, Imir; Li, Jinze; Nakayawa, Tetsuya; Vega, Libia; Uetrecht, Jack

    2016-09-01

    Amodiaquine (AQ) is associated with a relatively high incidence of idiosyncratic drug-induced liver injury (IDILI) and agranulocytosis. A previous study reported that a combination of high dose AQ and glutathione (GSH) depletion led to liver injury. However, the characteristics of this toxicity were very different from AQ-induced liver injury in humans. We developed a model of AQ-induced liver injury with characteristics similar to the injury in humans by treating mice with lower doses of AQ for several weeks. In this study we found that not only did GSH depletion not increase AQ covalent binding to hepatic proteins at this lower dose, but also it paradoxically prevented the liver injury. We extended the model to rats and found AQ treatment led to a mild delayed onset liver injury that resolved despite continued treatment with AQ. Immunohistochemistry indicated the presence of Kupffer cell activation, apoptosis and hepatocyte proliferation in the liver. There was also an increase in serum IL-2, IL-5, IL-9, IL-12, MCP-1 and TGFβ, but a decrease in leptin. Coincident with the elevated serum ALT, the number of liver CD4(+) T-cells, IL-17 secreting cells and TH17/Treg cells increased at Week 3 and decreased during continued treatment. Increases in NK1.1+ cells and activated M2 macrophages were also observed during liver injury. These results suggest that the outcome of the liver injury was determined by the balance between effector and regulatory cells. Co-treatment with cyclosporin prevented AQ-induced liver injury, which supports an immune mechanism. Retinoic acid (RA), which has been reported to enhance natural killer (NK) cell activity, exacerbated AQ-induced liver injury. These results suggest that AQ-induced IDILI is immune mediated and the subsequent adaptation appears to represent immune tolerance. PMID:27416278

  18. Oroxylin A accelerates liver regeneration in CCl₄-induced acute liver injury mice.

    Runzhi Zhu

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Based on the previous research that oroxylin A can suppress inflammation, we investigated the hepatoprotective role of oroxylin A against CCl₄-induced liver damage in mice and then studied the possible alteration of the activities of cytokine signaling participating in liver regeneration. Wild type (WT mice were orally administrated with oroxylin A (60 mg/kg for 4 days after CCl₄ injection, the anti-inflammatory effects of oroxylin A were assessed directly by hepatic histology and indirectly by measuring serum levels of aspartate aminotransferase (AST, alanine aminotransferase (ALT and Albumin. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA staining was performed to evaluate the role of oroxylin A in promoting hepatocyte proliferation. Serum IL-1β, TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-1Ra levels were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA and liver HGF, EGF, TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1Ra and IL-1β gene expression was determined by quantitative real-time PCR. The data indicated that the IL-6 and TNF-α mRNA of oroxylin A administered group significantly increased higher than the control within 12 hours after CCl4 treatment. Meanwhile, oroxylin A significantly enhanced the expression of IL-1Ra at the early phase, which indicated that oroxylin A could facilitate the initiating events in liver regeneration by increasing IL-1Ra which acts as an Acute-Phase Protein (APP. In addition, a lethal CCl₄-induced acute liver failure model offers a survival benefit in oroxylin A treated WT mice. However, oroxylin A could not significantly improve the percent survival of IL-1RI⁻/⁻ mice with a lethal CCl₄-induced acute liver failure. CONCLUSIONS: Our study confirmed that oroxylin A could strongly promote liver structural remodeling and functional recovery through IL-1Ra/IL-1RI signaling pathway. All these results support the possibility of oroxylin A being a therapeutic candidate for acute liver injury.

  19. Pathology of flupirtine-induced liver injury: a histological and clinical study of six cases.

    Puls, Florian; Agne, Clemens; Klein, Fritz; Koch, Martin; Rifai, Kinan; Manns, Michael P; Borlak, Jürgen; Kreipe, Hans H

    2011-06-01

    Drug-induced liver injury may cause impairment of liver function and is a leading cause of acute liver failure. Identification of the causative substance in patients receiving several drugs is often difficult in clinical practice. Evaluation of liver biopsies in suspected drug-induced injury is a challenging task that requires close clinico-pathological correlation. Recognizing a characteristic morphological pattern of liver injury may contribute to identification of the causative drug. Flupirtine, a non-opioid analgesic, has been reported to cause liver injury of idiosyncratic type in rare instances. We wished to characterize the histopathological features of flupirtine-induced liver injury, which have not been reported so far. Liver biopsies of five patients with severe liver injury and one explanted liver of a patient with flupirtine-induced acute liver failure that required transplantation were assessed. In addition clinical presentation and course were reviewed and clinical follow up was performed. Extensive perivenular necrosis with associated ceroid pigment-laden macrophages and a mild to moderate lymphocytic infiltrate was a common feature in all cases. Histological extent of liver necrosis corresponded well to serum amino-transferase levels. Accidental reexposure of one patient resulted in a plasma cell rich hepatitis with perivenular necrosis. This study provides evidence that flupirtine can cause substantial liver injury of hepatocellular type. Liver damage is associated with a characteristic morphological picture, the recognition of which will aid in causality assessment of drug-induced liver injury. Clinical and histological features raise the possibility of an immune-mediated toxicity. PMID:21590308

  20. Mechanisms of acetaminophen-induced cell death in primary human hepatocytes

    Xie, Yuchao; McGill, Mitchell R.; Dorko, Kenneth [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology and Therapeutics, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS 66160 (United States); Kumer, Sean C.; Schmitt, Timothy M.; Forster, Jameson [Department of Surgery, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS 66160 (United States); Jaeschke, Hartmut, E-mail: hjaeschke@kumc.edu [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology and Therapeutics, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS 66160 (United States)

    2014-09-15

    Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose is the most prevalent cause of drug-induced liver injury in western countries. Numerous studies have been conducted to investigate the mechanisms of injury after APAP overdose in various animal models; however, the importance of these mechanisms for humans remains unclear. Here we investigated APAP hepatotoxicity using freshly isolated primary human hepatocytes (PHH) from either donor livers or liver resections. PHH were exposed to 5 mM, 10 mM or 20 mM APAP over a period of 48 h and multiple parameters were assessed. APAP dose-dependently induced significant hepatocyte necrosis starting from 24 h, which correlated with the clinical onset of human liver injury after APAP overdose. Interestingly, cellular glutathione was depleted rapidly during the first 3 h. APAP also resulted in early formation of APAP-protein adducts (measured in whole cell lysate and in mitochondria) and mitochondrial dysfunction, indicated by the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential after 12 h. Furthermore, APAP time-dependently triggered c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) activation in the cytosol and translocation of phospho-JNK to the mitochondria. Both co-treatment and post-treatment (3 h) with the JNK inhibitor SP600125 reduced JNK activation and significantly attenuated cell death at 24 h and 48 h after APAP. The clinical antidote N-acetylcysteine offered almost complete protection even if administered 6 h after APAP and a partial protection when given at 15 h. Conclusion: These data highlight important mechanistic events in APAP toxicity in PHH and indicate a critical role of JNK in the progression of injury after APAP in humans. The JNK pathway may represent a therapeutic target in the clinic. - Highlights: • APAP reproducibly causes cell death in freshly isolated primary human hepatocytes. • APAP induces adduct formation, JNK activation and mitochondrial dysfunction in PHH. • Mitochondrial adducts and JNK translocation are delayed in PHH compared to

  1. Mechanisms of acetaminophen-induced cell death in primary human hepatocytes

    Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose is the most prevalent cause of drug-induced liver injury in western countries. Numerous studies have been conducted to investigate the mechanisms of injury after APAP overdose in various animal models; however, the importance of these mechanisms for humans remains unclear. Here we investigated APAP hepatotoxicity using freshly isolated primary human hepatocytes (PHH) from either donor livers or liver resections. PHH were exposed to 5 mM, 10 mM or 20 mM APAP over a period of 48 h and multiple parameters were assessed. APAP dose-dependently induced significant hepatocyte necrosis starting from 24 h, which correlated with the clinical onset of human liver injury after APAP overdose. Interestingly, cellular glutathione was depleted rapidly during the first 3 h. APAP also resulted in early formation of APAP-protein adducts (measured in whole cell lysate and in mitochondria) and mitochondrial dysfunction, indicated by the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential after 12 h. Furthermore, APAP time-dependently triggered c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) activation in the cytosol and translocation of phospho-JNK to the mitochondria. Both co-treatment and post-treatment (3 h) with the JNK inhibitor SP600125 reduced JNK activation and significantly attenuated cell death at 24 h and 48 h after APAP. The clinical antidote N-acetylcysteine offered almost complete protection even if administered 6 h after APAP and a partial protection when given at 15 h. Conclusion: These data highlight important mechanistic events in APAP toxicity in PHH and indicate a critical role of JNK in the progression of injury after APAP in humans. The JNK pathway may represent a therapeutic target in the clinic. - Highlights: • APAP reproducibly causes cell death in freshly isolated primary human hepatocytes. • APAP induces adduct formation, JNK activation and mitochondrial dysfunction in PHH. • Mitochondrial adducts and JNK translocation are delayed in PHH compared to

  2. NRF2 Protection against Liver Injury Produced by Various Hepatotoxicants

    Jie Liu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the role of Nrf2 as a master defense against the hepatotoxicity produced by various chemicals, Nrf2-null, wild-type, Keap1-knock down (Keap1-Kd and Keap1-hepatocyte knockout (Keap1-HKO mice were used as a “graded Nrf2 activation” model. Mice were treated with 14 hepatotoxicants at appropriate doses, and blood and liver samples were collected thereafter (6 h to 7 days depending on the hepatotoxicant. Graded activation of Nrf2 offered a Nrf2-dependent protection against the hepatotoxicity produced by carbon tetrachloride, acetaminophen, microcystin, phalloidin, furosemide, cadmium, and lithocholic acid, as evidenced by serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT activities and by histopathology. Nrf2 activation also offered moderate protection against liver injury produced by ethanol, arsenic, bromobenzene, and allyl alcohol but had no effects on the hepatotoxicity produced by D-galactosamine/endotoxin and the Fas ligand antibody Jo-2. Graded Nrf2 activation reduced the expression of inflammatory genes (MIP-2, mKC, IL-1β, IL-6, and TNFα, oxidative stress genes (Ho-1, Egr1, ER stress genes (Gadd45 and Gadd153, and genes encoding cell death (Noxa, Bax, Bad, and caspase3. Thus, this study demonstrates that Nrf2 prevents the liver from many, but not all, hepatotoxicants. The Nrf2-mediated protection is accompanied by induction of antioxidant genes, suppression of inflammatory responses, and attenuation of oxidative stress.

  3. Acute Hepatocellular Drug-Induced Liver Injury From Bupropion and Doxycycline.

    Tang, Derek M; Koh, Christopher; Twaddell, William S; von Rosenvinge, Erik C; Han, Hyosun

    2015-10-01

    The management and diagnosis of drug-induced liver injury (DILI) is often challenging, particularly when patients are taking multiple medications. We present a 29-year-old African American man who presented with jaundice and malaise after starting bupropion and doxycycline 2 weeks prior. He was found to have acute hepatocellular drug-induced liver injury with autoimmune features, and made a complete recovery with prednisone. Although bupropion and doxycycline are both known to cause liver toxicity, a closer inspection of the signature of liver injury and a review of prior related DILI cases assigns causality more to bupropion than doxycycline. PMID:26504884

  4. Liver injury following blunt abdominal trauma: a new mechanism-driven classification

    Slotta, J. E.; Justinger, C.; Kollmar, O; Kollmar, C.; Schäfer, T.; Schilling, M. K.

    2013-01-01

    Purposes The current classifications for blunt liver trauma focus only on the extent of liver injury. However, these scores are independent from the localization of liver injury and mechanism of trauma. Methods The type of liver injury after blunt abdominal trauma was newly classified as type A when it was along the falciform ligament with involvement of segments IVa/b, III, or II, and type B when there was involvement of segments V–VIII. With the use of a prospectively established database, ...

  5. Role of galectin-3 in acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity and inflammatory mediator production.

    Dragomir, Ana-Cristina; Sun, Richard; Mishin, Vladimir; Hall, LeRoy B; Laskin, Jeffrey D; Laskin, Debra L

    2012-06-01

    Galectin-3 (Gal-3) is a β-galactoside-binding lectin implicated in the regulation of macrophage activation and inflammatory mediator production. In the present studies, we analyzed the role of Gal-3 in liver inflammation and injury induced by acetaminophen (APAP). Treatment of wild-type (WT) mice with APAP (300 mg/kg, ip) resulted in centrilobular hepatic necrosis and increases in serum transaminases. This was associated with increased hepatic expression of Gal-3 messenger RNA and protein. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that Gal-3 was predominantly expressed by mononuclear cells infiltrating into necrotic areas. APAP-induced hepatotoxicity was reduced in Gal-3-deficient mice. This was most pronounced at 48-72 h post-APAP and correlated with decreases in APAP-induced expression of 24p3, a marker of inflammation and oxidative stress. These effects were not due to alterations in APAP metabolism or hepatic glutathione levels. The proinflammatory proteins, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), interleukin (IL)-1β, macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-2, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9, and MIP-3α, as well as the Gal-3 receptor (CD98), were upregulated in livers of WT mice after APAP intoxication. Loss of Gal-3 resulted in a significant reduction in expression of iNOS, MMP-9, MIP-3α, and CD98, with no effects on IL-1β. Whereas APAP-induced increases in MIP-2 were augmented at 6 h in Gal-3(-/-) mice when compared with WT mice, at 48 and 72 h, they were suppressed. Tumor necrosis factor receptor-1 (TNFR1) was also upregulated after APAP, a response dependent on Gal-3. Moreover, exaggerated APAP hepatotoxicity in mice lacking TNFR1 was associated with increased Gal-3 expression. These data demonstrate that Gal-3 is important in promoting inflammation and injury in the liver following APAP intoxication. PMID:22461450

  6. Signaling mechanisms in alcoholic liver injury: Role of transcription factors,kinases and heat shock proteins

    2007-01-01

    Alcoholic liver injury comprises of interactions of various intracellular signaling events in the liver. Innate immune responses in the resident Kupffer cells of the liver, oxidative stress-induced activation of hepatocytes,fibrotic events in liver stellate cells and activation of liver sinusoidal endothelial cells all contribute to alcoholic liver injury. The signaling mechanisms associated with alcoholic liver injury vary based on the cell type involved and the extent of alcohol consumption. In this review we will elucidate the oxidative stress and signaling pathways affected by alcohol in hepatocytes and Kupffer cells in the liver by alcohol. The toll-like receptors and their down-stream signaling events that play an important role in alcohol-induced inflammation will be discussed. Alcohol-induced alterations of various intracellular transcription factors such as NFκB, PPARs and AP-1, as well as MAPK kinases in hepatocytes and macrophages leading to induction of target genes that contribute to liver injury will be reviewed. Finally, we will discuss the significance of heat shock proteins as chaperones and their functional regulation in the liver that could provide new mechanistic insights into the contributions of stress-induced signaling mechanisms in alcoholic liver injury.

  7. Protective effects of C-phycocyanin on alcohol-induced acute liver injury in mice

    Xia, Dong; Liu, Bing; Luan, Xiying; Sun, Junyan; Liu, Nana; Qin, Song; Du, Zhenning

    2016-03-01

    Excessive alcohol consumption leads to liver disease. Extensive evidence suggests that C-phycocyanin (C-PC), a chromophore phycocyanobilin derived from Spirulina platensis, exerts protective effects against chemical-induced organ damage. In this study, we investigated whether C-PC could protect against ethanol-induced acute liver injury. Serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), triglyceride (TG), total cholesterol (CHOL), low-density lipoprotein (LDL), liver homogenate malondialdehyde (MDA), superoxide dismutase (SOD) content were measured, and pathological examination of liver sections were examined. C-PC showed obvious inhibitory effects on serum ALT, AST, TG, CHOL, LDL and MDA, and SOD content significantly increased in the liver. The structure of hepatic lobules was clear, liver sinus returned to normal, and liver cell cords were arranged in neat rows. Cloudiness, swelling, inflammatory cell infiltration and spotty necrosis of liver cells were significantly reduced. Therefore, C-PC can significantly protect against ethanol-induced acute liver injury.

  8. FXR: Big fish or small fry for drug-induced liver injury?

    Ballet, François

    2016-02-01

    By integrating network analysis and molecular modeling, a "system pharmacology" approach identified FXR as a potential off-target protein mediating non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID)-induced liver injury. In vitro assays showed that NSAID are potent FXR antagonists that inhibit FXR transcriptional activity. Given the role of FXR in bile acid homeostasis, liver inflammation and cell proliferation, the data suggest that FXR antagonism could mediate, at least in part, NSAID-induced liver injury. PMID:26797115

  9. Glutathione treatment protects the rat liver against injury after warm ischemia and Kupffer cell activation

    Bilzer, M.; Baron, A; Schauer, R.; Steib, C.; Ebensberger, S.; Gerbes, Alexander L.

    2002-01-01

    Background/Aim: The generation of reactive oxygen species by activated Kupffer cells (KC) may contribute to reperfusion injury of the liver during liver transplantation or resection. The aim of our present studies was to investigate (1) prevention of hepatic reperfusion injury after warm ischemia by administration of the antioxidant glutathione (GSH) and (2) whether GSH confers protection through influences on KC toxicity. Methods: Isolated perfused rat livers were subjected to 1 h of warm is...

  10. Acute Hepatocellular Drug-Induced Liver Injury From Bupropion and Doxycycline

    Derek M Tang; Koh, Christopher; Twaddell, William S.; von Rosenvinge, Erik C; Han, Hyosun

    2015-01-01

    The management and diagnosis of drug-induced liver injury (DILI) is often challenging, particularly when patients are taking multiple medications. We present a 29-year-old African American man who presented with jaundice and malaise after starting bupropion and doxycycline 2 weeks prior. He was found to have acute hepatocellular drug-induced liver injury with autoimmune features, and made a complete recovery with prednisone. Although bupropion and doxycycline are both known to cause liver tox...

  11. Revisiting acute liver injury associated with herbalife products.

    Appelhans, Kristy; Smith, Casey; Bejar, Ezra; Henig, Y Steve

    2011-10-27

    In the November 27, 2010 issue of the World Journal of Hepatology (WJH), three case reports were published which involved patients who had consumed various dietary supplements and conventional foods generally marketed as weight loss products. The reference to Herbalife products as contaminated and generally comparable to all dietary supplements or weight loss products is not scientifically supported. The authors provided an insufficient amount of information regarding patient histories, concomitant medications and other compounds, dechallenge results, and product specifications and usage. This information is necessary to fully assess the association of Herbalife products in the WJH case reports. Therefore, the article does not objectively support a causal relationship between the reported cases of liver injury and Herbalife products or ingredients. PMID:22059112

  12. RUCAM in Drug and Herb Induced Liver Injury: The Update.

    Danan, Gaby; Teschke, Rolf

    2016-01-01

    RUCAM (Roussel Uclaf Causality Assessment Method) or its previous synonym CIOMS (Council for International Organizations of Medical Sciences) is a well established tool in common use to quantitatively assess causality in cases of suspected drug induced liver injury (DILI) and herb induced liver injury (HILI). Historical background and the original work confirm the use of RUCAM as single term for future cases, dismissing now the term CIOMS for reasons of simplicity and clarity. RUCAM represents a structured, standardized, validated, and hepatotoxicity specific diagnostic approach that attributes scores to individual key items, providing final quantitative gradings of causality for each suspect drug/herb in a case report. Experts from Europe and the United States had previously established in consensus meetings the first criteria of RUCAM to meet the requirements of clinicians and practitioners in care for their patients with suspected DILI and HILI. RUCAM was completed by additional criteria and validated, assisting to establish the timely diagnosis with a high degree of certainty. In many countries and for more than two decades, physicians, regulatory agencies, case report authors, and pharmaceutical companies successfully applied RUCAM for suspected DILI and HILI. Their practical experience, emerging new data on DILI and HILI characteristics, and few ambiguous questions in domains such alcohol use and exclusions of non-drug causes led to the present update of RUCAM. The aim was to reduce interobserver and intraobserver variability, to provide accurately defined, objective core elements, and to simplify the handling of the items. We now present the update of the well accepted original RUCAM scale and recommend its use for clinical, regulatory, publication, and expert purposes to validly establish causality in cases of suspected DILI and HILI, facilitating a straightforward application and an internationally harmonized approach of causality assessment as a common

  13. RUCAM in Drug and Herb Induced Liver Injury: The Update

    Gaby Danan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available RUCAM (Roussel Uclaf Causality Assessment Method or its previous synonym CIOMS (Council for International Organizations of Medical Sciences is a well established tool in common use to quantitatively assess causality in cases of suspected drug induced liver injury (DILI and herb induced liver injury (HILI. Historical background and the original work confirm the use of RUCAM as single term for future cases, dismissing now the term CIOMS for reasons of simplicity and clarity. RUCAM represents a structured, standardized, validated, and hepatotoxicity specific diagnostic approach that attributes scores to individual key items, providing final quantitative gradings of causality for each suspect drug/herb in a case report. Experts from Europe and the United States had previously established in consensus meetings the first criteria of RUCAM to meet the requirements of clinicians and practitioners in care for their patients with suspected DILI and HILI. RUCAM was completed by additional criteria and validated, assisting to establish the timely diagnosis with a high degree of certainty. In many countries and for more than two decades, physicians, regulatory agencies, case report authors, and pharmaceutical companies successfully applied RUCAM for suspected DILI and HILI. Their practical experience, emerging new data on DILI and HILI characteristics, and few ambiguous questions in domains such alcohol use and exclusions of non-drug causes led to the present update of RUCAM. The aim was to reduce interobserver and intraobserver variability, to provide accurately defined, objective core elements, and to simplify the handling of the items. We now present the update of the well accepted original RUCAM scale and recommend its use for clinical, regulatory, publication, and expert purposes to validly establish causality in cases of suspected DILI and HILI, facilitating a straightforward application and an internationally harmonized approach of causality

  14. CSF1 Restores Innate Immunity After Liver Injury in Mice and Serum Levels Indicate Outcomes of Patients With Acute Liver Failure

    Stutchfield, Benjamin M.; Antoine, Daniel J.; Mackinnon, Alison C; Gow, Deborah J; Bain, Calum; Hawley, Catherine A.; Hughes, Michael J.; Francis, Benjamin; Wojtacha, Davina; Man, Tak Y.; Dear, James W.; Devey, Luke R.; Mowat, Alan; Pollard, Jeffrey W; Park, B Kevin

    2015-01-01

    Background & Aims: Liver regeneration requires functional liver macrophages, which provide an immune barrier that is compromised after liver injury. The numbers of liver macrophages are controlled by macrophage colony-stimulating factor (CSF1). We examined the prognostic significance of the serum level of CSF1 in patients with acute liver injury and studied its effects in mice. Methods: We measured levels of CSF1 in serum samples collected from 55 patients who underwent partia...

  15. The Molecular Circadian Clock and Alcohol-Induced Liver Injury

    Udoh, Uduak S.; Valcin, Jennifer A.; Gamble, Karen L.; Bailey, Shannon M.

    2015-01-01

    Emerging evidence from both experimental animal studies and clinical human investigations demonstrates strong connections among circadian processes, alcohol use, and alcohol-induced tissue injury. Components of the circadian clock have been shown to influence the pathophysiological effects of alcohol. Conversely, alcohol may alter the expression of circadian clock genes and the rhythmic behavioral and metabolic processes they regulate. Therefore, we propose that alcohol-mediated disruption in circadian rhythms likely underpins many adverse health effects of alcohol that cut across multiple organ systems. In this review, we provide an overview of the circadian clock mechanism and showcase results from new studies in the alcohol field implicating the circadian clock as a key target of alcohol action and toxicity in the liver. We discuss various molecular events through which alcohol may work to negatively impact circadian clock-mediated processes in the liver, and contribute to tissue pathology. Illuminating the mechanistic connections between the circadian clock and alcohol will be critical to the development of new preventative and pharmacological treatments for alcohol use disorders and alcohol-mediated organ diseases. PMID:26473939

  16. The Molecular Circadian Clock and Alcohol-Induced Liver Injury

    Uduak S. Udoh

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Emerging evidence from both experimental animal studies and clinical human investigations demonstrates strong connections among circadian processes, alcohol use, and alcohol-induced tissue injury. Components of the circadian clock have been shown to influence the pathophysiological effects of alcohol. Conversely, alcohol may alter the expression of circadian clock genes and the rhythmic behavioral and metabolic processes they regulate. Therefore, we propose that alcohol-mediated disruption in circadian rhythms likely underpins many adverse health effects of alcohol that cut across multiple organ systems. In this review, we provide an overview of the circadian clock mechanism and showcase results from new studies in the alcohol field implicating the circadian clock as a key target of alcohol action and toxicity in the liver. We discuss various molecular events through which alcohol may work to negatively impact circadian clock-mediated processes in the liver, and contribute to tissue pathology. Illuminating the mechanistic connections between the circadian clock and alcohol will be critical to the development of new preventative and pharmacological treatments for alcohol use disorders and alcohol-mediated organ diseases.

  17. Protective mechanisms of garlic and wolfberry derivatives on acute and chronic liver injury animal models

    Xiao, Jia; 肖佳

    2012-01-01

    Liver is one of the most important organs in the body that maintains the homeostasis of metabolism, immunity, detoxification and hematopoiesis. A large number of acute and chronic intoxications and diseases can influence the normal functions of the liver, leading to irreversible liver damage and even cancer. Currently, applying herbs or herbal derivatives in the prevention and therapy of acute and chronic liver injury receive numerous attentions since they hold great potentials as food supple...

  18. Warm ischemic injury is reflected in the release of injury markers during cold preservation of the human liver.

    Bote G Bruinsma

    Full Text Available Liver transplantation plays a pivotal role in the treatment of patients with end-stage liver disease. Despite excellent outcomes, the field is strained by a severe shortage of viable liver grafts. To meet high demands, attempts are made to increase the use of suboptimal livers by both pretransplant recovery and assessment of donor livers. Here we aim to assess hepatic injury in the measurement of routine markers in the post-ischemic flush effluent of discarded human liver with a wide warm ischemic range.Six human livers discarded for transplantation with variable warm and cold ischemia times were flushed at the end of preservation. The liver grafts were flushed with NaCl or Lactated Ringer's, 2 L through the portal vein and 1 L through the hepatic artery. The vena caval effluent was sampled and analyzed for biochemical markers of injury; lactate dehydrogenase (LDH, alanine transaminase (ALT, and alkaline phosphatase (ALP. Liver tissue biopsies were analyzed for ATP content and histologically (H&E examined.The duration of warm ischemia in the six livers correlated significantly to the concentration of LDH, ALT, and ALP in the effluent from the portal vein flush. No correlation was found with cold ischemia time. Tissue ATP content at the end of preservation correlated very strongly with the concentration of ALP in the arterial effluent (P<0.0007, R2 = 0.96.Biochemical injury markers released during the cold preservation period were reflective of the duration of warm ischemic injury sustained prior to release of the markers, as well as the hepatic energy status. As such, assessment of the flush effluent at the end of cold preservation may be a useful tool in evaluating suboptimal livers prior to transplantation, particularly in situations with undeterminable ischemic durations.

  19. Characterization of chemically induced liver injuries using gene co-expression modules.

    Gregory J Tawa

    Full Text Available Liver injuries due to ingestion or exposure to chemicals and industrial toxicants pose a serious health risk that may be hard to assess due to a lack of non-invasive diagnostic tests. Mapping chemical injuries to organ-specific damage and clinical outcomes via biomarkers or biomarker panels will provide the foundation for highly specific and robust diagnostic tests. Here, we have used DrugMatrix, a toxicogenomics database containing organ-specific gene expression data matched to dose-dependent chemical exposures and adverse clinical pathology assessments in Sprague Dawley rats, to identify groups of co-expressed genes (modules specific to injury endpoints in the liver. We identified 78 such gene co-expression modules associated with 25 diverse injury endpoints categorized from clinical pathology, organ weight changes, and histopathology. Using gene expression data associated with an injury condition, we showed that these modules exhibited different patterns of activation characteristic of each injury. We further showed that specific module genes mapped to 1 known biochemical pathways associated with liver injuries and 2 clinically used diagnostic tests for liver fibrosis. As such, the gene modules have characteristics of both generalized and specific toxic response pathways. Using these results, we proposed three gene signature sets characteristic of liver fibrosis, steatosis, and general liver injury based on genes from the co-expression modules. Out of all 92 identified genes, 18 (20% genes have well-documented relationships with liver disease, whereas the rest are novel and have not previously been associated with liver disease. In conclusion, identifying gene co-expression modules associated with chemically induced liver injuries aids in generating testable hypotheses and has the potential to identify putative biomarkers of adverse health effects.

  20. Hepatic pseudoaneurysm after traumatic liver injury; is CT follow-up warranted?

    Østerballe, Lene; Helgstrand, Frederik; Axelsen, Thomas; Hillingsø, Jens; Svendsen, Lars Bo

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Hepatic pseudoaneurysm (HPA) is a rare complication after liver trauma, yet it is potentially fatal, as it can lead to sudden severe haemorrhage. The risk of developing posttraumatic HPA is one of the arguments for performing follow-up CT of patients with liver injuries. The aim of...... this study was to investigate the occurrence of HPA post liver trauma. METHODS: A retrospective study from 2000-2010 of conservatively treated patients with blunt liver trauma was performed to investigate the incidence and nature of HPA. After the initial CT scan patients were admitted to the...... study shows that HPA is not correlated to the severity of liver injury and it develops in 4% of patients after traumatic liver injury. In order to avoid potentially life-threatening haemorrhage from a post trauma hepatic pseudoaneurysm, it seems appropriate to do follow-up CT as part of the conservative...

  1. Protective effect of salvianolate on lung injury induced by ischemia reperfusion injury of liver in mice

    Zheng-xin WANG

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective To evaluate the protective effect of salvianolate on lung injury induced by hepatic ischemia reperfusion(IR injury in mice and its underlying mechanisms.Methods A hepatic IR model of mice was reproduced,and 24 animals were assigned into 3 groups(8 each: sham operation(SO group,control group and salvianolate(SV group.Just before ischemia induction,animals in SV group received salvianolate injection at a dose of 60 mg/kg via tail vein,while in control group the mice received normal saline with an equal volume,and in SO group the mice received the same operation as in SV group but without producing liver ischemia.Four hours after reperfusion,the serum,liver and lung tissue were collected.The alanine aminotransferase(ALT and aspartate aminotransferase(AST levels in serum were detected and the histological changes in liver and lung were examined.The wet-to-dry weight ratio of pulmonary tissue was measured.The contents of tumor necrosis factor α(TNF-α,interleukin(IL-6,IL-1β and IL-10 in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid(BALF were detected by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay(ELISA,and the relative mRNA levels of TNF-α,IL-6,IL-1β and IL-10 in pulmonary tissue were analyzed by real-time reverse transcription PCR(RT-PCR.The activaty of transcription factor NF-κB was measured with Western blotting analysis.Results No significant pathologic change was found in mice of SO group.Compared with the mice in control group,those in SV group exhibited lower levels of ALT and AST(P < 0.01,lighter histological changes in liver and lung(P < 0.05,lower levels of wet-to-dry weight ratio of lung tissue(P < 0.05,lower expression levels of TNF-α,IL-6,IL-1β and IL-10 in BALF and lung tissue(P < 0.05 or P < 0.01.Further examination demonstrated that the activity of NF-κB in SV group was significantly down-regulated as compared with that in control group.Conclusion Salvianolate can attenuate lung injury induced by hepatic IR in mice,the mechanism may inclade

  2. Blunt liver injury with intact ribs under impacts on the abdomen: a biomechanical investigation.

    Yu Shao

    Full Text Available Abdominal trauma accounts for nearly 20% of all severe traffic injuries and can often result from intentional physical violence, from which blunt liver injury is regarded as the most common result and is associated with a high mortality rate. Liver injury may be caused by a direct impact with a certain velocity and energy on the abdomen, which may result in a lacerated liver by penetration of fractured ribs. However, liver ruptures without rib cage fractures were found in autopsies in a series of cases. All the victims sustained punches on the abdomen by fist. Many studies have been dedicated to determining the mechanism underlying hepatic injury following abdominal trauma, but most have been empirical. The actual process and biomechanism of liver injury induced by blunt impact on the abdomen, especially with intact ribs remained, are still inexhaustive. In order to investigate this, finite element methods and numerical simulation technology were used. A finite element human torso model was developed from high resolution CT data. The model consists of geometrically-detailed liver and rib cage models and simplified models of soft tissues, thoracic and abdominal organs. Then, the torso model was used in simulations in which the right hypochondrium was punched by a fist from the frontal, lateral, and rear directions, and in each direction with several impact velocities. Overall, the results showed that liver rupture was primarily caused by a direct strike of the ribs induced by blunt impact to the abdomen. Among three impact directions, a lateral impact was most likely to cause liver injury with a minimum punch speed of 5 m/s (the momentum was about 2.447 kg.m/s. Liver injuries could occur in isolation and were not accompanied by rib fractures due to different material characteristics and injury tolerance.

  3. Regulation of drug-metabolizing enzymes by local and systemic liver injuries

    Guo, Yan; Hu, Bingfang; Xie, Yang; Billiar, Timothy R.; Sperry, Jason L.; Huang, Min; Xie, Wen

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Drug metabolism and disposition are critical in maintaining the chemical and functional homeostasis of xenobiotics/drugs and endobiotics. The liver plays an essential role in drug metabolism and disposition due to its abundant expression of drug-metabolizing enzymes (DMEs) and transporters. There is growing evidence to suggest that many hepatic and systemic diseases can affect drug metabolism and disposition by regulating the expression and/or activity of DMEs and transporters in the liver. Areas covered This review focuses on the recent progress on the regulation of DMEs by local and systemic liver injuries. Liver ischemia and reperfusion (I/R) and sepsis are used as examples of local and systemic injury, respectively. The reciprocal effect of the expression and activity of DMEs on animals' sensitivity to local and systemic liver injuries is also discussed. Expert opinion Local and systemic liver injuries have a major effect on the expression and activity of DMEs in the liver. Understanding the disease effect on DMEs is clinically important due to the concern of disease-drug interactions. Future studies are necessary to understand the mechanism by which liver injury regulates DMEs. Human studies are also urgently needed in order to determine whether the results in animals can be replicated in human patients. PMID:26751558

  4. DAMPs-activated neutrophil extracellular trap exacerbates sterile inflammatory liver injury

    Huang, Hai; Tohme, Samer; Al-Khafaji, Ahmed B; Tai, Sheng; Loughran, Patricia; Chen, Li; Wang, Shu; Kim, Jiyun; Billiar, Timothy; Wang, Yanming; Tsung, Allan

    2015-01-01

    Innate immunity plays a crucial role in the response to sterile inflammation such as liver ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. The initiation of liver I/R injury results in the release of damage associated molecular patterns (DAMPs), which trigger innate immune and inflammatory cascade via pattern recognition receptors. Neutrophils are recruited to the liver after I/R and contribute to the organ damage, innate immune and inflammatory responses. Formation of neutrophil extracellular trap (NET) has been recently found in response to various stimuli. However, the role of NETs during liver I/R injury remains unknown. We show that NETs form in the sinusoids of ischemic liver lobes in vivo. This was associated with increased NET markers, serum level of myeloperoxidase (MPO)-DNA complexes and tissue level of citrullinated-histone H3 compared to control mice. Treatment with peptidyl-arginine-deiminase (PAD) 4 inhibitor or DNase I significantly protected hepatocytes and reduced inflammation after liver I/R as evidenced by inhibition of NET formation, indicating the pathophysiological role of NETs in liver I/R injury. In vitro, NETs increase hepatocyte death and induce Kupffer cells to release proinflammatory cytokines. DAMPs, such as HMGB1 and histones, released by injured hepatocytes stimulate NET formation through Toll-like receptor (TLR4)- and TLR9-MyD88 signaling pathways. After neutrophil depletion in mice, the adoptive transfer of TLR4 knockout (KO) or TLR9 KO neutrophils confers significant protection from liver I/R injury with significant decrease in NET formation. In addition, we found inhibition of NET formation by PAD4 inhibitor or DNase I reduces HMGB1 and histone-mediated liver I/R injury. Conclusion DAMPs released during liver I/R promotes NET formation through TLRs signaling pathway. Development of NETs subsequently exacerbates organ damage and initiates inflammatory responses during liver I/R. PMID:25855125

  5. Liver Injury from Herbal, Dietary, and Weight Loss Supplements: a Review.

    Zheng, Elizabeth X; Navarro, Victor J

    2015-06-28

    Herbal and dietary supplement usage has increased steadily over the past several years in the United States. Among the non-bodybuilding herbal and dietary supplements, weight loss supplements were among the most common type of HDS implicated in liver injury. While drug induced liver injury is rare, its consequences are significant and on the rise. The purpose of this review is to highlight case reports of weight loss products such as Hydroxycut and OxyElite Pro as one form of HDS that have hepatotoxic potential and to characterize its clinical effects as well as pattern of liver injury. We also propose future strategies in the identification and study of potentially hepatotoxic compounds in an effort to outline a diagnostic approach for identifying any drug induced liver injury. PMID:26357638

  6. Acute liver injury associated with a newer formulation of the herbal weight loss supplement Hydroxycut.

    Araujo, James L; Worman, Howard J

    2015-01-01

    Despite the widespread use of herbal and dietary supplements (HDS), serious cases of hepatotoxicity have been reported. The popular herbal weight loss supplement, Hydroxycut, has previously been implicated in acute liver injury. Since its introduction, Hydroxycut has undergone successive transformations in its formulation; yet, cases of liver injury have remained an ongoing problem. We report a case of a 41-year-old Hispanic man who developed acute hepatocellular liver injury with associated nausea, vomiting, jaundice, fatigue and asterixis attributed to the use of a newer formulation of Hydroxycut, SX-7 Clean Sensory. The patient required hospitalisation and improved with supportive therapy. Despite successive transformations in its formulation, potential liver injury appears to remain an ongoing problem with Hydroxycut. Our case illustrates the importance of obtaining a thorough medication history, including HDS, regardless of new or reformulated product marketing efforts. PMID:25948859

  7. Acute liver injury with severe coagulopathy in marasmus caused by a somatic delusional disorder.

    Stein, Lance L; Jesudian, Arun B

    2011-01-01

    Marasmus is a severe form of protein-calorie malnutrition characterized by the depletion of fat stores, muscle wasting, and the lack of edema. In developed countries, marasmus is often the result of anorexia nervosa. Abnormal transaminases with liver synthetic dysfunction have rarely been reported with anorexia nervosa. To our knowledge, we report the first detailed case of acute liver injury with severe coagulopathy (INR > 1.5) in a patient with marasmus due to self-induced calorie restriction caused by a somatic delusional disorder. This case highlights the severity of liver injury that may occur with significant weight loss from self-induced calorie restriction and the rapid normalization of this injury with treatment. It is important for clinicians to be aware of patterns of acute liver injury in patients with severe protein-calorie malnutrition, regardless of the underlying cause. PMID:25954537

  8. Protective effects of geniposide against Tripterygium glycosides (TG)-induced liver injury and its mechanisms.

    Wang, Junming; Miao, Mingsan; Qu, Lingbo; Cui, Ying; Zhang, Yueyue

    2016-02-01

    Tripterygium glycosides (TG) are commonly used for basic medicine in curing rheumatoid arthritis but with a high incidence of liver injury. Geniposide (GP) has broad and diverse bioactivities, but until now it is still unknown whether GP can protect against TG-induced liver injury. This study, for the first time, observed the possible protection of GP against TG-induced liver injury in mice and its mechanisms underlying. Oral administration of TG (270 mg/kg) induced significant elevation in the levels of serum alanine / aspartate transaminase (ALT/AST), hepatic malondialdehyde (MDA) and pro-inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) (all P tissue repair and regeneration cytokines, was enhanced by GP. Taken together, the current research suggests that GP protects against TG-induced liver injury in mice probably involved during attenuating oxidative stress and inflammation, and promoting tissue repair and regeneration. PMID:26763404

  9. Hemizygosity of transsulfuration genes confers increased vulnerability against acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity in mice

    Hagiya, Yoshifumi; Kamata, Shotaro; Mitsuoka, Saya; Okada, Norihiko; Yoshida, Saori; Yamamoto, Junya; Ohkubo, Rika [Department of Biochemistry, Keio University School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Tokyo 105-8512 (Japan); Abiko, Yumi [Environmental Biology Laboratory, School of Medicine, University of Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8575 (Japan); Yamada, Hidenori [Jobu Hospital for Respiratory Diseases, Maebashi 371-0048 (Japan); Akahoshi, Noriyuki [Department of Immunology, Akita University Graduate School of Medicine, Akita 010-8543 (Japan); Kasahara, Tadashi [Department of Biochemistry, Keio University School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Tokyo 105-8512 (Japan); Kumagai, Yoshito [Environmental Biology Laboratory, School of Medicine, University of Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8575 (Japan); Ishii, Isao, E-mail: isao-ishii@umin.ac.jp [Department of Biochemistry, Keio University School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Tokyo 105-8512 (Japan)

    2015-01-15

    The key mechanism for acetaminophen hepatotoxicity is cytochrome P450 (CYP)-dependent formation of N-acetyl-p-benzoquinone imine, a potent electrophile that forms protein adducts. Previous studies revealed the fundamental role of glutathione, which binds to and detoxifies N-acetyl-p-benzoquinone imine. Glutathione is synthesized from cysteine in the liver, and N-acetylcysteine is used as a sole antidote for acetaminophen poisoning. Here, we evaluated the potential roles of transsulfuration enzymes essential for cysteine biosynthesis, cystathionine β-synthase (CBS) and cystathionine γ-lyase (CTH), in acetaminophen hepatotoxicity using hemizygous (Cbs{sup +/−} or Cth{sup +/−}) and homozygous (Cth{sup −/−}) knockout mice. At 4 h after intraperitoneal acetaminophen injection, serum alanine aminotransferase levels were highly elevated in Cth{sup −/−} mice at 150 mg/kg dose, and also in Cbs{sup +/−} or Cth{sup +/−} mice at 250 mg/kg dose, which was associated with characteristic centrilobular hepatocyte oncosis. Hepatic glutathione was depleted while serum malondialdehyde accumulated in acetaminophen-injected Cth{sup −/−} mice but not wild-type mice, although glutamate–cysteine ligase (composed of catalytic [GCLC] and modifier [GCLM] subunits) became more activated in the livers of Cth{sup −/−} mice with lower K{sub m} values for Cys and Glu. Proteome analysis using fluorescent two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis revealed 47 differentially expressed proteins after injection of 150 mg acetaminophen/kg into Cth{sup −/−} mice; the profiles were similar to 1000 mg acetaminophen/kg-treated wild-type mice. The prevalence of Cbs or Cth hemizygosity is estimated to be 1:200–300 population; therefore, the deletion or polymorphism of either transsulfuration gene may underlie idiosyncratic acetaminophen vulnerability along with the differences in Cyp, Gclc, and Gclm gene activities. - Highlights: • Cbs{sup +/−}, Cth{sup +/−}, and

  10. Hemizygosity of transsulfuration genes confers increased vulnerability against acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity in mice

    The key mechanism for acetaminophen hepatotoxicity is cytochrome P450 (CYP)-dependent formation of N-acetyl-p-benzoquinone imine, a potent electrophile that forms protein adducts. Previous studies revealed the fundamental role of glutathione, which binds to and detoxifies N-acetyl-p-benzoquinone imine. Glutathione is synthesized from cysteine in the liver, and N-acetylcysteine is used as a sole antidote for acetaminophen poisoning. Here, we evaluated the potential roles of transsulfuration enzymes essential for cysteine biosynthesis, cystathionine β-synthase (CBS) and cystathionine γ-lyase (CTH), in acetaminophen hepatotoxicity using hemizygous (Cbs+/− or Cth+/−) and homozygous (Cth−/−) knockout mice. At 4 h after intraperitoneal acetaminophen injection, serum alanine aminotransferase levels were highly elevated in Cth−/− mice at 150 mg/kg dose, and also in Cbs+/− or Cth+/− mice at 250 mg/kg dose, which was associated with characteristic centrilobular hepatocyte oncosis. Hepatic glutathione was depleted while serum malondialdehyde accumulated in acetaminophen-injected Cth−/− mice but not wild-type mice, although glutamate–cysteine ligase (composed of catalytic [GCLC] and modifier [GCLM] subunits) became more activated in the livers of Cth−/− mice with lower Km values for Cys and Glu. Proteome analysis using fluorescent two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis revealed 47 differentially expressed proteins after injection of 150 mg acetaminophen/kg into Cth−/− mice; the profiles were similar to 1000 mg acetaminophen/kg-treated wild-type mice. The prevalence of Cbs or Cth hemizygosity is estimated to be 1:200–300 population; therefore, the deletion or polymorphism of either transsulfuration gene may underlie idiosyncratic acetaminophen vulnerability along with the differences in Cyp, Gclc, and Gclm gene activities. - Highlights: • Cbs+/−, Cth+/−, and especially Cth−/− mice were susceptible to APAP hepatic injury.

  11. Diagnosis and Management of Drug-Induced Liver Injury (DILI) in Patients with Pre-Existing Liver Disease.

    Teschke, Rolf; Danan, Gaby

    2016-08-01

    The relationship between drugs and pre-existing liver disease is complex, particularly when increased liver tests (LTs) or new symptoms emerge in patients with pre-existing liver disease during drug therapy. This requires two strategies to assess whether these changes are due to drug-induced liver injury (DILI) as a new event or due to flares of the underlying liver disease. Lacking a valid diagnostic biomarker, DILI is a diagnosis of exclusion and requires causality assessment by RUCAM, the Roussel Uclaf Causality Assessment Method, to establish an individual causality grading of the suspected drug(s). Flares of pre-existing liver disease can reliably be assessed in some hepatotropic virus infections by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and antibody titers at the beginning and in the clinical course to ascertain flares during the natural course of the disease. Unfortunately, flares cannot be verified in many other liver diseases such as alcoholic liver disease, since specific tests are unavailable. However, such a diagnostic approach using RUCAM applied to suspected DILI cases includes clinical and biological markers of pre-existing liver diseases and would determine whether drugs or underlying liver diseases caused the LT abnormalities or the new symptoms. More importantly, a clear diagnosis is essential to ensure effective disease management by drug cessation or specific treatment of the flare up due to the underlying disease. PMID:27091053

  12. Regulation of drug-induced liver injury by signal transduction pathways: critical role of mitochondria

    Han, Derick; Dara, Lily; Win, Sanda; Than, Tin Aung; Yuan, Liyun; Abbasi, Sadeea Q; Liu, Zhang-Xu; Kaplowitz, Neil

    2013-01-01

    Drugs that cause liver injury often “stress” mitochondria and activate signal transduction pathways important in determining cell survival or death. In most cases, hepatocytes adapt to the drug-induced stress by activating adaptive signaling pathways, such as mitochondrial adaptive responses and erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf-2), a transcription factor that upregulates antioxidant defenses. Due to adaptation, drugs alone rarely cause liver injury, with acetaminophen being the notable excep...

  13. Internal vacuum-assisted closure device in the swine model of severe liver injury

    Everett Christopher B; Thomas Bruce W; Moncure Michael

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Objectives The authors present a novel approach to nonresectional therapy in major hepatic trauma utilizing intraabdominal perihepatic vacuum assisted closure (VAC) therapy in the porcine model of Grade V liver injury. Methods A Grade V injury was created in the right lobe of the liver in a healthy pig. A Pringle maneuver was applied (4.5 minutes total clamp time) and a vacuum assisted closure device was placed over the injured lobe and connected to suction. The device consisted of a...

  14. Fibrin glue eliminates the need for packing after complex liver injuries.

    Feinstein, A. J.; Varela, J. E.; Cohn, S M; Compton, R. P.; McKenney, M. G.

    2001-01-01

    Hemostasis after traumatic liver injury can be extremely difficult to obtain, particularly in coagulopathic patients who have suffered extensive liver damage. We determined the ability of a fibrin glue preparation (FG) to terminate ongoing bleeding using a new, clinically relevant porcine model of complex hepatic injury. Anesthetized swine (n = 6, 18 to 19 kg) received an external blast to the right upper abdomen and were immediately anticoagulated with intravenous heparin (200 u/kg). Uncontr...

  15. A case of amoxicillin-induced hepatocellular liver injury with bile-duct damage

    Kim, Ju Seung; Jang, Young Rock; Lee, Ji Won; Kim, Jin Yong; Jung, Young Kul; Chung, Dong Hae; Kwon, Oh Sang; Kim, Yun Soo; Choi, Duck Joo; Kim, Ju Hyun

    2011-01-01

    Amoxicillin, an antibiotic that is widely prescribed for various infections, is associated with a very low rate of drug-induced liver injury; hepatitis and cholestasis are rare complications. Here we present a case of a 39-year-old woman who was diagnosed with abdominal actinomycosis and received amoxicillin treatment. The patient displayed hepatocellular and bile-duct injury, in addition to elevated levels of liver enzymes. The patient was diagnosed with amoxicillin-induced cholestatic hepat...

  16. Drug-Induced Liver Injury Associated with Noni (Morinda citrifolia) Juice and Phenobarbital

    Mrzljak, Anna; Kosuta, Iva; Skrtic, Anita; Kanizaj, Tajana Filipec; Vrhovac, Radovan

    2013-01-01

    Noni (Morinda citrifolia) juice is a popular herbal dietary supplement globally used for preventive or therapeutic purposes in a variety of ailments, claiming to exhibit hepatoprotective properties as well. Herein we present the case of a 38-year-old woman who developed acute liver injury associated with noni juice consumption on a long-term (9 months) anticonvulsant therapy. Clinical presentation and liver biopsy were consistent with severe, predominantly hepatocellular type of injury. Both ...

  17. The Hepatic Response to Thermal Injury: Is the Liver Important for Postburn Outcomes?

    Jeschke, Marc G.

    2009-01-01

    Thermal injury produces a profound hypermetabolic and hypercatabolic stress response characterized by increased endogenous glucose production via gluconeogenesis and glycogenolysis, lipolysis, and proteolysis. The liver is the central body organ involved in these metabolic responses. It is suggested that the liver, with its metabolic, inflammatory, immune, and acute phase functions, plays a pivotal role in patient survival and recovery by modulating multiple pathways following thermal injury....

  18. Calpain 2-mediated autophagy defect increases susceptibility of fatty livers to ischemia-reperfusion injury.

    Zhao, Q; Guo, Z; Deng, W; Fu, S; Zhang, C; Chen, M; Ju, W; Wang, D; He, X

    2016-01-01

    Hepatic steatosis is associated with significant morbidity and mortality after liver resection and transplantation. This study focuses on the role of autophagy in regulating sensitivity of fatty livers to ischemia and reperfusion (I/R) injury. Quantitative immunohistochemistry conducted on human liver allograft biopsies showed that, the reduction of autophagy markers LC3 and Beclin-1 at 1 h after reperfusion, was correlated with hepatic steatosis and poor survival of liver transplant recipients. In animal studies, western blotting and confocal imaging analysis associated the increase in sensitivity to I/R injury with low autophagy activity in fatty livers. Screening of autophagy-related proteins showed that Atg3 and Atg7 expression levels were marked decreased, whereas calpain 2 expression was upregulated during I/R in fatty livers. Calpain 2 inhibition or knockdown enhanced autophagy and suppressed cell death. Further point mutation experiments revealed that calpain 2 cleaved Atg3 and Atg7 at Atg3Δ92-97 and Atg7Δ344-349, respectively. In vivo and in vitro overexpression of Atg3 or Atg7 enhanced autophagy and suppressed cell death after I/R in fatty livers. Collectively, calpain 2-mediated degradation of Atg3 and Atg7 in fatty livers increases their sensitivity to I/R injury. Increasing autophagy may ameliorate fatty liver damage and represent a valuable method to expand the liver donor pool. PMID:27077802

  19. Microsomal prostaglandin E synthase-1 protects against Fas-induced liver injury.

    Yao, Lu; Chen, Weina; Han, Chang; Wu, Tong

    2016-06-01

    Microsomal prostaglandin E synthase-1 (mPGES-1) is the terminal enzyme for the synthesis of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), a proproliferative and antiapoptotic lipid molecule important for tissue regeneration and injury repair. In this study, we developed transgenic (Tg) mice with targeted expression of mPGES-1 in the liver to assess Fas-induced hepatocyte apoptosis and acute liver injury. Compared with wild-type (WT) mice, the mPGES-1 Tg mice showed less liver hemorrhage, lower serum alanine transaminase (ALT) and aspartate transaminase (AST) levels, less hepatic necrosis/apoptosis, and lower level of caspase cascade activation after intraperitoneal injection of the anti-Fas antibody Jo2. Western blotting analysis revealed increased expression and activation of the serine/threonine kinase Akt and associated antiapoptotic molecules in the liver tissues of Jo2-treated mPGES-1 Tg mice. Pretreatment with the mPGES-1 inhibitor (MF63) or the Akt inhibitor (Akt inhibitor V) restored the susceptibility of the mPGES-1 Tg mice to Fas-induced liver injury. Our findings provide novel evidence that mPGES-1 prevents Fas-induced liver injury through activation of Akt and related signaling and suggest that induction of mPGES-1 or treatment with PGE2 may represent important therapeutic strategy for the prevention and treatment of Fas-associated liver injuries. PMID:27102561

  20. A metabolomic perspective of griseofulvin-induced liver injury in mice.

    Liu, Ke; Yan, Jiong; Sachar, Madhav; Zhang, Xinju; Guan, Ming; Xie, Wen; Ma, Xiaochao

    2015-12-01

    Griseofulvin (GSF) causes hepatic porphyria in mice, which mimics the liver injury associated with erythropoietic protoporphyria (EPP) in humans. The current study investigated the biochemical basis of GSF-induced liver injury in mice using a metabolimic approach. GSF treatment in mice resulted in significant accumulations of protoporphyrin IX (PPIX), N-methyl PPIX, bile acids, and glutathione (GSH) in the liver. Metabolomic analysis also revealed bioactivation pathways of GSF that contributed to the formation of GSF-PPIX, GSF-GSH and GSF-proline adducts. GSF-PPIX is the precursor of N-methyl PPIX. A six-fold increase of N-methyl PPIX was observed in the liver of mice after GSF treatment. N-methyl PPIX strongly inhibits ferrochelatase, the enzyme that converts PPIX to heme, and leads to PPIX accumulation. Excessive PPIX in the liver results in bile duct blockage and disturbs bile acid homeostasis. The accumulation of GSH in the liver was likely due to Nrf2-mediated upregulation of GSH synthesis. In summary, this study provides the biochemical basis of GSF-induced liver injury that can be used to understand the pathophysiology of EPP-associated liver injury in humans. PMID:26343413

  1. Activated farnesoid X receptor attenuates apoptosis and liver injury in autoimmune hepatitis

    LIAN, FAN; Wang, Yu; Xiao, Youjun; WU, XIWEN; Xu, Hanshi; Liang, Liuqin; Yang, Xiuyan

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) is a chronic inflammatory liver disease associated with interface hepatitis, the presence of autoantibodies, regulatory T-cell dysfunction and raised plasma liver enzyme levels. The present study assessed the hepatoprotective and antiapoptotic role of farnesoid X receptor (FXR) in AIH. A mouse model of AIH was induced by treatment with concanavalin A (ConA). The FXR agonist, chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA), was administered to mice exhibiting ConA-induced liver injury ...

  2. Protective effects of ω-3 PUFA on the second liver injury in rats with traumatic brain injury and hemorrhagic shock

    许会彬

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of preconditioning withω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid(ω-3 PUFA)on the second liver injury in rats with traumatic brain injury and hemorrhagic shock(TBIS)and explore the underlying mechanism.Methods Total of 36 male Wistar rats were assigned randomly(random number)into 3 groups(n=12 in each):sham

  3. Oleanolic acid alters bile acid metabolism and produces cholestatic liver injury in mice

    Oleanolic acid (OA) is a triterpenoids that exists widely in plants. OA is effective in protecting against hepatotoxicants. Whereas a low dose of OA is hepatoprotective, higher doses and longer-term use of OA produce liver injury. This study characterized OA-induced liver injury in mice. Adult C57BL/6 mice were given OA at doses of 0, 22.5, 45, 90, and 135 mg/kg, s.c., daily for 5 days, and liver injury was observed at doses of 90 mg/kg and above, as evidenced by increases in serum activities of alanine aminotransferase and alkaline phosphatase, increases in serum total bilirubin, as well as by liver histopathology. OA-induced cholestatic liver injury was further evidenced by marked increases of both unconjugated and conjugated bile acids (BAs) in serum. Gene and protein expression analysis suggested that livers of OA-treated mice had adaptive responses to prevent BA accumulation by suppressing BA biosynthetic enzyme genes (Cyp7a1, 8b1, 27a1, and 7b1); lowering BA uptake transporters (Ntcp and Oatp1b2); and increasing a BA efflux transporter (Ostβ). OA increased the expression of Nrf2 and its target gene, Nqo1, but decreased the expression of AhR, CAR and PPARα along with their target genes, Cyp1a2, Cyp2b10 and Cyp4a10. OA had minimal effects on PXR and Cyp3a11. Taken together, the present study characterized OA-induced liver injury, which is associated with altered BA homeostasis, and alerts its toxicity potential. - Highlights: • Oleanolic acid at higher doses and long-term use may produce liver injury. • Oleanolic acid increased serum ALT, ALP, bilirubin and bile acid concentrations. • OA produced feathery degeneration, inflammation and cell death in the liver. • OA altered bile acid homeostasis, affecting bile acid synthesis and transport

  4. Oleanolic acid alters bile acid metabolism and produces cholestatic liver injury in mice

    Liu, Jie, E-mail: JLiu@kumc.edu [University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS 66160 (United States); Zunyi Medical College, Zunyi 563003 (China); Lu, Yuan-Fu [University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS 66160 (United States); Zunyi Medical College, Zunyi 563003 (China); Zhang, Youcai; Wu, Kai Connie [University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS 66160 (United States); Fan, Fang [Cytopathology, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS 66160 (United States); Klaassen, Curtis D. [University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS 66160 (United States)

    2013-11-01

    Oleanolic acid (OA) is a triterpenoids that exists widely in plants. OA is effective in protecting against hepatotoxicants. Whereas a low dose of OA is hepatoprotective, higher doses and longer-term use of OA produce liver injury. This study characterized OA-induced liver injury in mice. Adult C57BL/6 mice were given OA at doses of 0, 22.5, 45, 90, and 135 mg/kg, s.c., daily for 5 days, and liver injury was observed at doses of 90 mg/kg and above, as evidenced by increases in serum activities of alanine aminotransferase and alkaline phosphatase, increases in serum total bilirubin, as well as by liver histopathology. OA-induced cholestatic liver injury was further evidenced by marked increases of both unconjugated and conjugated bile acids (BAs) in serum. Gene and protein expression analysis suggested that livers of OA-treated mice had adaptive responses to prevent BA accumulation by suppressing BA biosynthetic enzyme genes (Cyp7a1, 8b1, 27a1, and 7b1); lowering BA uptake transporters (Ntcp and Oatp1b2); and increasing a BA efflux transporter (Ostβ). OA increased the expression of Nrf2 and its target gene, Nqo1, but decreased the expression of AhR, CAR and PPARα along with their target genes, Cyp1a2, Cyp2b10 and Cyp4a10. OA had minimal effects on PXR and Cyp3a11. Taken together, the present study characterized OA-induced liver injury, which is associated with altered BA homeostasis, and alerts its toxicity potential. - Highlights: • Oleanolic acid at higher doses and long-term use may produce liver injury. • Oleanolic acid increased serum ALT, ALP, bilirubin and bile acid concentrations. • OA produced feathery degeneration, inflammation and cell death in the liver. • OA altered bile acid homeostasis, affecting bile acid synthesis and transport.

  5. Alterations in the Rat Serum Proteome During Liver Injury from Acetaminophen Exposure

    Merrick, B. Alex; Bruno, Maribel E.; Madenspacher, Jennifer H.; Wetmore, Barbara A.; Foley, Julie; Pieper, Rembert; Zhao, Ming; Makusky, Anthony J.; McGrath, Andrew M.; ZHOU, JEFF X.; Taylor, John; Tomer, Kenneth B.

    2006-01-01

    Changes in the serum proteome were identified during early, fulminant and recovery phases of liver injury from acetaminophen in the rat. Male F344 rats received a single, non-injury dose or a high, injury-producing dose of acetaminophen for evaluation at 6 hr to 120 hr. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis of immunodepleted serum separated about 800 stained proteins per sample from which differentially expressed proteins were identified by mass spectrometry. Serum ALT/AST levels and histopatho...

  6. Redox factor-1 may mediate the repair of multiple organ injuries after liver transplantation

    SUN Zhi-peng; ZHU Yu-bing; Aminbuhe; GONG Ke; ZHU Bin; FAN Qing; LIAN Dong-bo

    2013-01-01

    Background Apurinic apyrimidinic endonuclease/redox effector factor 1 (APE1/Ref-1) is an important enzyme in the repair of reactive oxygen species-induced DNA damage,and its expression/activation can be induced by reactive oxygen species.The aim of this research was to investigate the relationship between multiple-organ injuries and expression of Ref-1 in the early period after liver transplantation.Methods One hundred and fifty adult male Wistar rats were divided randomly into three groups:liver transplantation,sham surgery,and untreated control.After liver transplantation,animals were sacrificed at different time points.Hepatic and renal functions were analyzed by serology.Histology,apoptotic levels,and Ref-1 expression were examined by immunohistochemistry in the liver,kidneys,intestines,and lungs.Results Serum levels of alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase peaked 6 hours after liver transplantation and decreased appreciably after 12 hours in the transplantation group,suggesting that the degree of liver injury in the early period after transplantation peaked at 6 hours and then decreased.Pathological analyses showed that hepatic tissues were more severely injured in the transplantation group than in the sham and untreated groups.A considerable number of infiltrating inflammatory cells was observed around the portal vein in the transplantation group.Injuries to the kidneys,intestines,and lungs were milder after liver transplantation.Apoptotic levels increased after liver transplantation in all four organs examined.Ref-1 expression was higher in the transplantation group in the early period after liver transplantation than in the sham surgery and untreated control groups.Conclusion Ref-1 expression induced by ischemia-reperfusion injury may have a critical role in repairing multiple-organ injuries after liver transplantation.

  7. Carbon tetrachloride-induced liver injury in the rabbit.

    Bernacchi, A. S.; de Castro, C. R.; de Ferreyra, E. C.; Villarruel, M. C.; Fernández, G.; de Fenos, O. M.; Castro, J.A.

    1983-01-01

    CCl4 administration to rabbits leads to early destruction of liver microsomal cytochrome P-450, to depression of glucose 6 phosphatase, to ultrastructurally revealable alterations and to an intense necrosis and fat accumulation in liver. Despite the known resistance of rabbit liver microsomes to lipid peroxidation, CCl4 administration to rabbits promoted lipid peroxidation of their liver microsomal lipids as revealable by the diene hyperconjugation technique, at periods of time from 1 to 12 h...

  8. Broad-spectrum matrix metalloproteinase inhibition curbs inflammation and liver injury but aggravates experimental liver fibrosis in mice.

    Vincent E de Meijer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Liver fibrosis is characterized by excessive synthesis of extracellular matrix proteins, which prevails over their enzymatic degradation, primarily by matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs. The effect of pharmacological MMP inhibition on fibrogenesis, however, is largely unexplored. Inflammation is considered a prerequisite and important co-contributor to fibrosis and is, in part, mediated by tumor necrosis factor (TNF-alpha-converting enzyme (TACE. We hypothesized that treatment with a broad-spectrum MMP and TACE-inhibitor (Marimastat would ameliorate injury and inflammation, leading to decreased fibrogenesis during repeated hepatotoxin-induced liver injury. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Liver fibrosis was induced in mice by repeated carbon tetrachloride (CCl4 administration, during which the mice received either Marimastat or vehicle twice daily. A single dose of CCl4 was administered to investigate acute liver injury in mice pretreated with Marimastat, mice deficient in Mmp9, or mice deficient in both TNF-alpha receptors. Liver injury was quantified by alanine aminotransferase (ALT levels and confirmed by histology. Hepatic collagen was determined as hydroxyproline, and expression of fibrogenesis and fibrolysis-related transcripts was determined by quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction. Marimastat-treated animals demonstrated significantly attenuated liver injury and inflammation but a 25% increase in collagen deposition. Transcripts related to fibrogenesis were significantly less upregulated compared to vehicle-treated animals, while MMP expression and activity analysis revealed efficient pharmacologic MMP-inhibition and decreased fibrolysis following Marimastat treatment. Marimastat pre-treatment significantly attenuated liver injury following acute CCl4-administration, whereas Mmp9 deficient animals demonstrated no protection. Mice deficient in both TNF-alpha receptors exhibited an 80% reduction of serum ALT

  9. Herb-Induced Liver Injury in the Berlin Case-Control Surveillance Study.

    Douros, Antonios; Bronder, Elisabeth; Andersohn, Frank; Klimpel, Andreas; Kreutz, Reinhold; Garbe, Edeltraut; Bolbrinker, Juliane

    2016-01-01

    Herb-induced liver injury (HILI) has recently attracted attention due to increasing reports of hepatotoxicity associated with use of phytotherapeutics. Here, we present data on HILI from the Berlin Case-Control Surveillance Study. The study was initiated in 2000 to investigate the serious toxicity of drugs including herbal medicines. Potential cases of liver injury were ascertained in more than 180 Departments of all 51 Berlin hospitals from October 2002 to December 2011. Drug or herb intake was assessed through a standardized face-to-face interview. Drug or herbal aetiology was assessed based on the updated Council for International Organizations of Medical Sciences scale. In ten of all 198 cases of hepatotoxicity included in the study, herbal aetiology was assessed as probable (once ayurvedic herb) or possible (Valeriana five times, Mentha piperita once, Pelargonium sidoides once, Hypericum perforatum once, Eucalyptus globulus once). Mean age was 56.4 ± 9.7 years, and the predominant pattern of liver injury was hepatocellular. No cases of acute liver failure or death were observed. This case series corroborates known risks for ayurvedic herbs, supports the suspected association between Valeriana use and liver injury, and indicates a hepatotoxic potential for herbs such as Pelargonium sidoides, Hypericum perforatum or Mentha piperita that were rarely associated with liver injury before. However, given that possible causality does not prove clinical significance, further studies in this field are needed. PMID:26784183

  10. Herb-Induced Liver Injury in the Berlin Case-Control Surveillance Study

    Antonios Douros

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Herb-induced liver injury (HILI has recently attracted attention due to increasing reports of hepatotoxicity associated with use of phytotherapeutics. Here, we present data on HILI from the Berlin Case-Control Surveillance Study. The study was initiated in 2000 to investigate the serious toxicity of drugs including herbal medicines. Potential cases of liver injury were ascertained in more than 180 Departments of all 51 Berlin hospitals from October 2002 to December 2011. Drug or herb intake was assessed through a standardized face-to-face interview. Drug or herbal aetiology was assessed based on the updated Council for International Organizations of Medical Sciences scale. In ten of all 198 cases of hepatotoxicity included in the study, herbal aetiology was assessed as probable (once ayurvedic herb or possible (Valeriana five times, Mentha piperita once, Pelargonium sidoides once, Hypericum perforatum once, Eucalyptus globulus once. Mean age was 56.4 ± 9.7 years, and the predominant pattern of liver injury was hepatocellular. No cases of acute liver failure or death were observed. This case series corroborates known risks for ayurvedic herbs, supports the suspected association between Valeriana use and liver injury, and indicates a hepatotoxic potential for herbs such as Pelargonium sidoides, Hypericum perforatum or Mentha piperita that were rarely associated with liver injury before. However, given that possible causality does not prove clinical significance, further studies in this field are needed.

  11. Internal vacuum-assisted closure device in the swine model of severe liver injury

    Everett Christopher B

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objectives The authors present a novel approach to nonresectional therapy in major hepatic trauma utilizing intraabdominal perihepatic vacuum assisted closure (VAC therapy in the porcine model of Grade V liver injury. Methods A Grade V injury was created in the right lobe of the liver in a healthy pig. A Pringle maneuver was applied (4.5 minutes total clamp time and a vacuum assisted closure device was placed over the injured lobe and connected to suction. The device consisted of a perforated plastic bag placed over the liver, followed by a 15 cm by 15cm VAC sponge covered with a nonperforated plastic bag. The abdomen was closed temporarily. Blood loss, cardiopulmonary parameters and bladder pressures were measured over a one-hour period. The device was then removed and the animal was euthanized. Results Feasibility of device placement was demonstrated by maintenance of adequate vacuum suction pressures and seal. VAC placement presented no major technical challenges. Successful control of ongoing liver hemorrhage was achieved with the VAC. Total blood loss was 625 ml (20ml/kg. This corresponds to class II hemorrhagic shock in humans and compares favorably to previously reported estimated blood losses with similar grade liver injuries in the swine model. No post-injury cardiopulmonary compromise or elevated abdominal compartment pressures were encountered, while hepatic parenchymal perfusion was maintained. Conclusion These data demonstrate the feasibility and utility of a perihepatic negative pressure device for the treatment of hemorrhage from severe liver injury in the porcine model.

  12. Freshly isolated hepatocyte transplantation in acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity model in rats Transplante de hepatócitos recém-isolados em um modelo de hepatotoxicidade induzida por acetaminofeno em ratos

    Daniela Rodrigues

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Hepatocyte transplantation is an attractive therapeutic modality for liver disease as an alternative for orthotopic liver transplantation. OBJECTIVE: The aim of the current study was to investigate the feasibility of freshly isolated rat hepatocyte transplantation in acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity model. METHODS: Hepatocytes were isolated from male Wistar rats and transplanted 24 hours after acetaminophen administration in female recipients. Female rats received either 1x10(7 hepatocytes or phosphate buffered saline through the portal vein or into the spleen and were sacrificed after 48 hours. RESULTS: Alanine aminotransferase levels measured within the experiment did not differ between groups at any time point. Molecular analysis and histology showed presence of hepatocytes in liver of transplanted animals injected either through portal vein or spleen. CONCLUSION: These data demonstrate the feasibility and efficacy of hepatocyte transplantation in the liver or spleen in a mild acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity model.CONTEXTO: O transplante de hepatócitos é uma modalidade terapêutica atrativa para doenças hepáticas como alternativa ao transplante hepático ortotópico. OBJETIVO: Investigar a factibilidade do uso de hepatócitos frescos isolados de ratos em um modelo de hepatotoxicidade induzida por paracetamol. MÉTODOS: Hepatócitos foram isolados de ratos Wistar machos e transplantados 24 horas após a administração de paracetamol em receptores fêmeas. As ratas receberam 1x10(7 hepatócitos ou tampão salina fosfato pela veia porta ou no baço e foram sacrificadas após 48 horas. RESULTADOS: Os níveis de alanina aminotransferase medidos durante o experimento não diferiram entre os grupos em nenhum momento. Análises moleculares e histológicas demonstraram a presença de hepatócitos no fígado dos animais transplantados pelo baço ou pela veia porta. CONCLUSÃO: Os dados indicam a factibilidade e eficácia do

  13. Ethanol extracts of Scutellaria baicalensis protect against lipopolysaccharide-induced acute liver injury in mice

    Hai Nguyen Thanh; Hue Pham Thi Minh; Tuan Anh Le; Huong Duong Thi Ly; Tung Nguyen Huu; Loi Vu Duc; Thu Dang Kim; Tung Bui Thanh

    2015-01-01

    To investigated the protective potential of ethanol extracts of Scutellaria baicalensis (S. baicalensis ) against lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced liver injury. Methods: Dried roots of S. baicalensis were extracted with ethanol and concentrated to yield a dry residue. Mice were administered 200 mg/kg of the ethanol extracts orally once daily for one week. Animals were subsequently administered a single dose of LPS (5 mg/kg of body weight, intraperitoneal injection). Both protein and mRNA levels of cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin-1β, and interleukin-6 in liver tissues were evaluated by ELISA assay and quantitative PCR. Cyclooxygenase-2, inducible nitric oxide synthase, and nuclear factor-κB protein levels in liver tissues were analyzed by western blotting. Results: Liver injury induced by LPS significantly increased necrosis factor alpha, interleukin-1β, interleukin-6, cyclooxygenase-2, inducible nitric oxide synthase, and nuclear factor-κB in liver tissues. Treatment with ethanol extracts of S. baicalensis prevented all of these observed changes associated with LPS-induced injury in liver mice. Conclusions: Our study showed that S. baicalensis is potentially protective against LPS-induced liver injury in mice.

  14. Quercetin prevents pyrrolizidine alkaloid clivorine-induced liver injury in mice by elevating body defense capacity.

    Lili Ji

    Full Text Available Quercetin is a plant-derived flavonoid that is widely distributed in nature. The present study is designed to analyze the underlying mechanism in the protection of quercetin against pyrrolizidine alkaloid clivorine-induced acute liver injury in vivo. Serum transaminases, total bilirubin analysis, and liver histological evaluation demonstrated the protection of quercetin against clivorine-induced liver injury. Terminal dUTP nick end-labeling assay demonstrated that quercetin reduced the increased amount of liver apoptotic cells induced by clivorine. Western-blot analysis of caspase-3 showed that quercetin inhibited the cleaved activation of caspase-3 induced by clivorine. Results also showed that quercetin reduced the increase in liver glutathione and lipid peroxidative product malondialdehyde induced by clivorine. Quercetin reduced the enhanced liver immunohistochemical staining for 4-hydroxynonenal induced by clivorine. Results of the Mouse Stress and Toxicity PathwayFinder RT2 Profiler PCR Array demonstrated that the expression of genes related with oxidative or metabolic stress and heat shock was obviously altered after quercetin treatment. Some of the alterations were confirmed by real-time PCR. Our results demonstrated that quercetin prevents clivorine-induced acute liver injury in vivo by inhibiting apoptotic cell death and ameliorating oxidative stress injury. This protection may be caused by the elevation of the body defense capacity induced by quercetin.

  15. Severe starvation-induced hepatocyte autophagy as a cause of acute liver injury in anorexia nervosa: a case report.

    Restellini, S; Spahr, L; Rubbia Brandt, L

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Mild elevation of transaminase may be observed in anorexia nervosa, but acute liver injury is uncommon. A complex programmed cell death in response to starvation, called autophagy, has been described in experimental and human studies. Case Presentation. A 24-year-old woman suffering from anorexia nervosa was hospitalized for severe malnutrition. At admission, there were biological signs of acute liver injury but no electrolytic imbalance. After having ruled out the most common causes of liver injury, the patient was carefully refed. As liver tests remained abnormal, liver biopsy was performed. At histology and electron microscopy, numerous signs suggestive of starvation-induced hepatocyte autophagy were found. Discussion. Severe starvation can be associated with acute liver injury that is slowly reversible with careful enteral nutrition. In this clinical situation, profound hepatic glycogen depletion in association with autophagy appears as the leading cause of liver injury. PMID:25379300

  16. Baicalein pretreatment reduces liver ischemia/reperfusion injury via induction of autophagy in rats.

    Liu, Anding; Huang, Liang; Guo, Enshuang; Li, Renlong; Yang, Jiankun; Li, Anyi; Yang, Yan; Liu, Shenpei; Hu, Jifa; Jiang, Xiaojing; Dirsch, Olaf; Dahmen, Uta; Sun, Jian

    2016-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that baicalein could protect against liver ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury in mice. The exact mechanism of baicalein remains poorly understood. Autophagy plays an important role in protecting against I/R injury. This study was designed to determine whether baicalein could protect against liver I/R injury via induction of autophagy in rats. Baicalein was intraperitoneally injected 1 h before warm ischemia. Pretreatment with baicalein prior to I/R insult significantly blunted I/R-induced elevations of serum aminotransferase levels and significantly improved the histological status of livers. Electron microscopy and expression of the autophagic marker LC3B-II suggested induction of autophagy after baicalein treatment. Moreover, inhibition of the baicalein-induced autophagy using 3-methyladenine (3-MA) worsened liver injury. Furthermore, baicalein treatment increased heme oxygenase (HO)-1 expression, and pharmacological inhibition of HO-1 with tin protoporphyrin IX (SnPP) abolished the baicalein-mediated autophagy and the hepatocellular protection. In primary rat hepatocytes, baicalein-induced autophagy also protected hepatocytes from hypoxia/reoxygenation injury in vitro and the beneficial effect was abrogated by 3-MA or Atg7 siRNA, respectively. Suppression of HO-1 activity by SnPP or HO-1 siRNA prevented the baicalein-mediated autophagy and resulted in increased hepatocellular injury. Collectively, these results suggest that baicalein prevents hepatocellular injury via induction of HO-1-mediated autophagy. PMID:27150843

  17. Kupffer cell-mediated exacerbation of methimazole-induced acute liver injury in rats.

    Akai, Sho; Uematsu, Yasuaki; Tsuneyama, Koichi; Oda, Shingo; Yokoi, Tsuyoshi

    2016-05-01

    Methimazole (MTZ), an anti-thyroid drug, is known to cause liver injury in humans. It has been demonstrated that MTZ-induced liver injury in Balb/c mice is accompanied by T helper (Th) 2 cytokine-mediated immune responses; however, there is little evidence for immune responses associated with MTZ-induced liver injury in rats. To investigate species differences in MTZ-induced liver injury, we administered MTZ with a glutathione biosynthesis inhibitor, L-buthionine-S,R-sulfoximine (BSO), to F344 rats and subsequently observed an increase in plasma alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), which are associated with hepatic lesions. The hepatic mRNA expression of innate immune-related genes significantly increased in BSO- and MTZ-treated rats, but the change in Th2-related genes was not much greater than the change observed in the previous mouse study. Moreover, an increase in Kupffer cells and an induction of the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)/c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) proteins were accompanied by an increase in Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) expression, indicating that Kupffer cell activation occurs through HMGB1-TLR4 signaling. To elucidate the mechanism of liver injury in rats, gadolinium chloride, which inactivates the function of Kupffer cells, was administered before BSO and MTZ administration. The gadolinium chloride treatment significantly suppressed the increased ALT, which was accompanied by decreased hepatic mRNA expression related to innate immune responses and ERK/JNK phosphorylation. In conclusion, Kupffer cell-mediated immune responses are crucial factors for the exacerbation of MTZ-induced liver injury in rats, indicating apparent species differences in the immune-mediated exacerbation of liver injury between mice and rats. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26177832

  18. Liver trauma from penetrating injuries. Miscellanea, personal series, clinical and CT findings

    Penetrating liver wounds are related to many causes and rank second after blunt abdominal and liver trauma. In this report are examined the clinical and radiological findings of personal series of patients with penetrating trauma, especially by firearms and stab and cut wounds. It will also tried to define the diagnostic workup of these traumas, which is especially based on CT signs of liver damage and associated changes and which is of basic importance for following treatment, both surgical or conservative. In the last seven years it was retrospectively reviewed 31 cases of penetrating liver trauma. The patients were 19 men and 12 women, ranging in age 18 to 73 (mean 42), with penetrating liver injuries from firearms (16 patients) and stab (9 cases) wounds; 6 patients had injuries from different cases. Abdominal CT was carried out in emergency with the CT Angiography (CTA) technique in all patients. In the patients with suspected chest and abdomen involvement CT was performed from the mid-chest for accurate assessment of diaphragm and lung bases and to exclude associated pleuropulmonary damage. Penetrating liver wounds were caused by firearms in 70% of cases, by stabbing in 12% and, in the extant 18%, by other cases such as home accidents, road and work traumas, and liver biopsy. In this series, the liver was most frequently involved, especially by firearms wounds; in the 16 cases the most frequent injuries were hemorrhagic tears. It was found bullets in the liver in 6 cases. In one case of home accident the patient wounded himself while slicing bread with a long knife, which cut into the anterior abdominal wall and tore the anterior liver capsule, as seen at CTA. Penetrating wounds to liver and abdomen are less frequent than those to the chest. In the past decade the use of CT has changed the diagnostic and therapeutic approach to such injuries completely, decreasing the resort to explorative laparotomy and hepatorrhaphy. Indeed, CT provides a clear picture of

  19. IRF-1 promotes liver transplant ischemia/reperfusion injury via hepatocyte IL-15/IL-15Rα production

    Yokota, Shinichiro; Yoshida, Osamu; Dou, Lei; Spadaro, Anthony V.; Isse, Kumiko; Ross, Mark A.; Stolz, Donna B.; Kimura, Shoko; Du, Qiang; DEMETRIS, ANTHONY J.; Thomson, Angus W.; Geller, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Ischemia and reperfusion (I/R) injury following liver transplantation (LTx) is an important problem that significantly impacts clinical outcomes. Interferon regulatory factor-1 (IRF-1) is a nuclear transcription factor that plays a critical role in liver injury. Our objective was to determine the immunomodulatory role of IRF-1 during I/R injury following allogeneic LTx. IRF-1 was induced in liver grafts immediately after reperfusion in both human and mouse LTx. IRF-1 contributed significantly...

  20. Modification of radiation-induced latent injury of rat liver by thioctacid and flavobion

    The effect of hepatoprotective drugs (flavobion and thioctacid) and a single whole-body irradiation (5,7 Gy of gamma radiation) on the regeneration of rat liver was examined. Liver regeneration was estimated on the basis of chosen morphological parameters on hour 30 after partial hepatectomy. Rediation-induced latent injury to intact rat liver 30 min bedore partial hepatectomy manifested in remaining regenerating liver by slowing-down of the increase in liver weight, cellularity and inhibition of the mitotic activity and in more frequent chromosome aberrations. Both hepatoprotective agents, especially thioctacid, used i.p. 60 min before irradiation, i. e. 90 min before partial hepatectomy, alleviate the manifestations of latent injury in this low proliferating organ as indicated by an increase in cellularity and mitotic index as compared with unprotected animals. Furthermore, the preparations tested decreased the frequency of radiation-induced chromosome aberrations

  1. Impact of asialoglycoprotein receptor deficiency on the development of liver injury

    Serene ML Lee; Carol A Casey; Benita L McVicker

    2009-01-01

    The asialoglycoprotein (ASGP) receptor is a wellcharacterized hepatic receptor that is recycled via the common cellular process of receptor-mediated endocytosis (RME). The RME process plays an integral part in the proper trafficking and routing of receptors and ligands in the healthy cell. Thus, the missorting or altered transport of proteins during RME is thought to play a role in several diseases associated with hepatocyte and liver dysfunction. Previously,we examined in detail alterations that occur in hepatocellular RME and associated receptor functions as a result of one particular liver injury, alcoholic liver disease (ALD). The studies revealed profound ethanolmediated impairments to the ASGP receptor and the RME process, indicating the importance of this receptor and the maintenance of proper endocytic events in normal tissue. To further clarify these observations,studies were performed utilizing knockout mice (lacking a functional ASGP receptor) to which were administered several liver toxicants. In addition to alcohol, we examined the effects following administration of anti-Fas (CD95) antibody, carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)/galactosamine. The results of these studies demonstrated that the knockout mice sustained enhanced liver injury in response to all of the treatments, as shown by increased indices of liver damage, such as enhancement of serum enzyme levels,histopathological scores, as well as hepatocellular death.Overall, the work completed to date suggests a possible link between hepatic receptors and liver injury. In particular, adequate function and content of the ASGP receptor may provide protection against various toxinmediated liver diseases.

  2. S-nitroso-N-acetylcysteine ameliorates ischemia-reperfusion injury in the steatotic liver

    Wellington Andraus

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Steatosis is currently the most common chronic liver disease and it can aggravate ischemia-reperfusion (IR lesions. We hypothesized that S-nitroso-N-acetylcysteine (SNAC, an NO donor component, can ameliorate cell damage from IR injury. In this paper, we report the effect of SNAC on liver IR in rats with normal livers compared to those with steatotic livers. METHODS: Thirty-four rats were divided into five groups: I (n=8, IR in normal liver; II (n=8, IR in normal liver with SNAC; III (n=9, IR in steatotic liver; IV (n=9, IR in steatotic liver with SNAC; and V (n=10, SHAN. Liver steatosis was achieved by administration of a protein-free diet. A SNAC solution was infused intraperitoneally for one hour, beginning 30 min. after partial (70% liver ischemia. The volume of solution infused was 1 ml/100 g body weight. The animals were sacrificed four hours after reperfusion, and the liver and lung were removed for analysis. We assessed hepatic histology, mitochondrial respiration, oxidative stress (MDA, and pulmonary myeloperoxidase. RESULTS: All groups showed significant alterations compared with the group that received SHAN. The results from the steatotic SNAC group revealed a significant improvement in liver mitochondrial respiration and oxidative stress compared to the steatotic group without SNAC. No difference in myeloperoxidase was observed. Histological analysis revealed no difference between the non-steatotic groups. However, the SNAC groups showed less intraparenchymal hemorrhage than groups without SNAC (p=0.02. CONCLUSION: This study suggests that SNAC effectively protects against IR injury in the steatotic liver but not in the normal liver.

  3. Complications of high grade liver injuries: management and outcomewith focus on bile leaks

    Bala Miklosh

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although liver injury scale does not predict need for surgical intervention, a high-grade complex liver injury should alert the physician to expect an increased risk of hepatic complications following trauma. The aim of the current study was to define hepatic related morbidity in patients sustaining high-grade hepatic injuries that could be safely managed non-operatively. Patients and methods This is a retrospective study of patients with liver injury admitted to Hadassah-Hebrew University Medical Centre over a 10-year period. Grade 3-5 injuries were considered to be high grade. Collected data included the number and types of liver-related complications. Interventions which were required for these complications in patients who survived longer than 24 hours were analysed. Results Of 398 patients with liver trauma, 64 (16% were found to have high-grade liver injuries. Mechanism of injury was blunt trauma in 43 cases, and penetrating in 21. Forty patients (62% required operative treatment. Among survivors 22 patients (47.8% developed liver-related complications which required additional interventional treatment. Bilomas and bile leaks were diagnosed in 16 cases post-injury. The diagnosis of bile leaks was suspected with abdominal CT scan, which revealed intraabdominal collections (n = 6, and ascites (n = 2. Three patients had continuous biliary leak from intraabdominal drains left after laparotomy. Nine patients required ERCP with biliary stent placement, and 2 required percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage. ERCP failed in one case. Four angioembolizations (AE were performed in 3 patients for rebleeding. Surgical treatment was found to be associated with higher complication rate. AE at admission was associated with a significantly higher rate of biliary complications. There were 24 deaths (37%, the majority from uncontrolled haemorrhage (18 patients. There were only 2 hepatic-related mortalities due to liver failure

  4. Liver Injury Assessment by Vetscan VS2 Analyzer and Most Frequently Used ALT/GTP Reagent

    Vatsalya, Vatsalya; Avila, Diana; Frimodig, Jane C.; Barve, Shirish S; McClain, Craig J; Gobejishvili, Leila

    2016-01-01

    Background and aim Liver injury is estimated by serum alanine aminotransferases (ALT) levels in experimental animal models. Laboratories use various techniques to measure ALT levels including assay reagents and chemistry analyzers. VetScan VS2 (VS2) is widely used in veterinary clinics and research laboratories for highly reproducible, convenient and effective testing. Alternatively, ALT liquid reagent is used by laboratories to estimate liver injury in animal studies. The aim of this study was to perform comparative analyses of data obtained from these two assays in two different animal models. Methods In this study, we used two different mouse models and compared the ALT levels measured using VetScan VS2 chemistry analyzer and ALT liquid reagent. Immunohistochemical analysis of hepatic tissue was also performed to document liver pathology. The first model is a high fat diet feeding model that results in a mild hepatic steatosis (fat accumulation in the liver) without elevation of ALT levels. For a severe liver injury model, we employed a hepatotoxin-induced liver injury model (carbon tetrachloride, CCl4), which leads to the development of hepatic fibrosis and very high ALT levels. Results VetScan VS2 and ALT reagent gave different values of ALT for all animal groups. However, linear regression analysis showed a significantly high association between ALT levels obtained by VS2 and ALT liquid reagent in a high-fat feeding model with no liver injury. For the CCl4 induced liver injury model, serum dilution (5 and 10 times) was performed to obtain accurate results with ALT reagent. ALT levels acquired from both techniques showed a close association. Interestingly, this correlation was closer when serum was diluted 5 fold. Conclusion This study demonstrates that both methods give similar results when evaluating liver injury in animal studies. However, the serum dilution factor is critical for severe liver injury assessment when using ALT reagent and requires some

  5. Involvement of immune-related factors in diclofenac-induced acute liver injury in mice

    Drug-induced liver injury (DILI) is a major safety concern in drug development and clinical drug therapy. However, the underlying mechanism of DILI is little known. It is difficult to predict DILI in humans due to the lack of experimental animal models. Diclofenac, a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug rarely causes severe liver injury in human, but there is some evidence for immunoallergic idiosyncratic reactions. In this study, the mechanism of diclofenac-induced liver injury in mice was investigated. First, we established the dosing condition for liver injury in normal mice. Plasma ALT and AST levels were significantly increased in diclofenac-administered (80 mg/kg, i.p.) mice in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Among several interleukins (ILs) and chemokines, mRNA expression of helper T (Th) 17 cell-mediated factors, such as retinoid orphan receptor (ROR)-γt, and signal transducers and activators of transcription factor (STAT) 3 in the liver, and the plasma IL-17 level were significantly increased. Neutralization of IL-17 tended to suppress the hepatotoxicity of diclofenac, suggesting that IL-17 was partly involved. Gadolinium chloride (GdCl3) administration demonstrated that Kupffer cells are not likely to be involved in diclofenac hepatotoxicity. Hepatic expressions of IL-1β mRNA and plasma IL-1β were significantly increased soon after the diclofenac administration. Then, the results of an in vivo neutralization study of IL-1β suggested that IL-1β was involved early in the time of pathogenesis of the diclofenac-induced liver injury. In conclusion, we firstly developed a diclofenac-induced acute liver injury model in normal mice, and the involvement of IL-17 and IL-1β was clarified.

  6. The role of osteopontin in D-galactosamine-induced liver injury in genetically obese mice

    Various epidemiological studies have shown that obesity increases the risk of liver disease, but the precise mechanisms through which this occurs are poorly understood. In the present study, we hypothesized that osteopontin (OPN), an extracellular matrix and proinflammatory cytokine, has an important role in making obese mice more susceptible to inflammatory liver injury. After exposure of genetically obese ob/ob and db/db mice to a single dose of D-galactosamine (GalN), the plasma liver enzyme levels, histology and expression levels of cytokines and OPN were evaluated. The ob/ob and db/db mice, which were more sensitive to GalN-induced inflammatory liver injury compared with wild-type mice, had significantly higher plasma and hepatic OPN expression levels. Increased OPN expression was mainly found in hepatocytes and inflammatory cells and was correlated with markedly up-regulated interleukin (IL)-12 and IL-18 levels. Furthermore, pretreatment with a neutralizing OPN (nOPN) antibody attenuated the GalN-induced inflammatory liver injury in ob/ob and db/db mice, which was accompanied by significantly reduced macrophages recruitment and IL-12 and IL-18 productions. Taken together, these results suggest that up-regulated OPN expression is a contributing factor to increased susceptibility of genetically obese mice to GalN-induced liver injury by promoting inflammation and modulating immune response.

  7. Total Flavonoids from Mimosa Pudica Protects Carbon Tetrachloride -Induced Acute Liver Injury in Mice

    Zhen-qin QIU

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To observe the protective effect of total flavonoids from Mimosa pudica on carbon tetrachloride (CCl4-induced acute liver injury in mice. Methods: CCl4-induced acute liver injury model in mice was established. The activity of ALT and AST, the content of serum albumin (Alb and total antioxidant capacity (T-AOC were determined. The content of malondiadehyde (MDA was measured and the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD was determined. The histopathological changes of liver were observed.Results: Compared with CCl4 modle group, each dose group of total flavonouida from Mimosa pudica couldreduced the activity of ALT and AST in mice obviously (P<0.01, indicating they had remarkably protective effect on CCl4-induced acute liver injury in mice. high and middle dose groups of total flavonouida from Mimosa pudica couldincrease the content of Alb in mice (P<0.01. Each dose group of total flavonouida from Mimosa pudica could enhance the level of T-AOC (P<0.01. each dose group of total flavonouida from Mimosa pudica could lower the content of liver homogenate MDA but enhance the activity of SOD in a dose-depended manner (P<0.01. Conclusion: Total flavones from Mimosa Pudica have obvious protective effect on CCl4-induced acute liver injury in mice.

  8. Oligofructose protects against arsenic-induced liver injury in a model of environment/obesity interaction

    Massey, Veronica L. [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Louisville Health Sciences Center, Louisville, KY 40292 (United States); Stocke, Kendall S. [Department of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, School of Public Health, University of Louisville Health Sciences Center, Louisville, KY 40292 (United States); Schmidt, Robin H.; Tan, Min [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Louisville Health Sciences Center, Louisville, KY 40292 (United States); Ajami, Nadim [Department of Molecular Virology and Microbiology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States); Alkek Center for Metagenomics and Microbiome Research, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States); Neal, Rachel E. [Department of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, School of Public Health, University of Louisville Health Sciences Center, Louisville, KY 40292 (United States); Petrosino, Joseph F. [Department of Molecular Virology and Microbiology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States); Alkek Center for Metagenomics and Microbiome Research, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States); Barve, Shirish [Department of Medicine, University of Louisville Health Sciences Center, Louisville, KY 40292 (United States); Arteel, Gavin E., E-mail: gavin.arteel@louisville.edu [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Louisville Health Sciences Center, Louisville, KY 40292 (United States)

    2015-05-01

    Arsenic (As) tops the ATSDR list of hazardous environmental chemicals and is known to cause liver injury. Although the concentrations of As found in the US water supply are generally too low to directly damage the liver, subhepatotoxic doses of As sensitize the liver to experimental NAFLD. It is now suspected that GI microbiome dysbiosis plays an important role in development of NALFD. Importantly, arsenic has also been shown to alter the microbiome. The purpose of the current study was to test the hypothesis that the prebiotic oligofructose (OFC) protects against enhanced liver injury caused by As in experimental NAFLD. Male C57Bl6/J mice were fed low fat diet (LFD), high fat diet (HFD), or HFD containing oligofructose (OFC) during concomitant exposure to either tap water or As-containing water (4.9 ppm as sodium arsenite) for 10 weeks. HFD significantly increased body mass and caused fatty liver injury, as characterized by an increased liver weight-to-body weight ratio, histologic changes and transaminases. As observed previously, As enhanced HFD-induced liver damage, which was characterized by enhanced inflammation. OFC supplementation protected against the enhanced liver damage caused by As in the presence of HFD. Interestingly, arsenic, HFD and OFC all caused unique changes to the gut flora. These data support previous findings that low concentrations of As enhance liver damage caused by high fat diet. Furthermore, these results indicate that these effects of arsenic may be mediated, at least in part, by GI tract dysbiosis and that prebiotic supplementation may confer significant protective effects. - Highlights: • Arsenic (As) enhances liver damage caused by a high-fat (HFD) diet in mice. • Oligofructose protects against As-enhanced liver damage caused by HFD. • As causes dysbiosis in the GI tract and exacerbates the dysbiosis caused by HFD. • OFC prevents the dysbiosis caused by HFD and As, increasing commensal bacteria.

  9. Oligofructose protects against arsenic-induced liver injury in a model of environment/obesity interaction

    Arsenic (As) tops the ATSDR list of hazardous environmental chemicals and is known to cause liver injury. Although the concentrations of As found in the US water supply are generally too low to directly damage the liver, subhepatotoxic doses of As sensitize the liver to experimental NAFLD. It is now suspected that GI microbiome dysbiosis plays an important role in development of NALFD. Importantly, arsenic has also been shown to alter the microbiome. The purpose of the current study was to test the hypothesis that the prebiotic oligofructose (OFC) protects against enhanced liver injury caused by As in experimental NAFLD. Male C57Bl6/J mice were fed low fat diet (LFD), high fat diet (HFD), or HFD containing oligofructose (OFC) during concomitant exposure to either tap water or As-containing water (4.9 ppm as sodium arsenite) for 10 weeks. HFD significantly increased body mass and caused fatty liver injury, as characterized by an increased liver weight-to-body weight ratio, histologic changes and transaminases. As observed previously, As enhanced HFD-induced liver damage, which was characterized by enhanced inflammation. OFC supplementation protected against the enhanced liver damage caused by As in the presence of HFD. Interestingly, arsenic, HFD and OFC all caused unique changes to the gut flora. These data support previous findings that low concentrations of As enhance liver damage caused by high fat diet. Furthermore, these results indicate that these effects of arsenic may be mediated, at least in part, by GI tract dysbiosis and that prebiotic supplementation may confer significant protective effects. - Highlights: • Arsenic (As) enhances liver damage caused by a high-fat (HFD) diet in mice. • Oligofructose protects against As-enhanced liver damage caused by HFD. • As causes dysbiosis in the GI tract and exacerbates the dysbiosis caused by HFD. • OFC prevents the dysbiosis caused by HFD and As, increasing commensal bacteria

  10. Regulation of drug-induced liver injury by signal transduction pathways: critical role of mitochondria.

    Han, Derick; Dara, Lily; Win, Sanda; Than, Tin Aung; Yuan, Liyun; Abbasi, Sadeea Q; Liu, Zhang-Xu; Kaplowitz, Neil

    2013-04-01

    Drugs that cause liver injury often 'stress' mitochondria and activate signal transduction pathways important in determining cell survival or death. In most cases, hepatocytes adapt to the drug-induced stress by activating adaptive signaling pathways, such as mitochondrial adaptive responses and nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf-2), a transcription factor that upregulates antioxidant defenses. Owing to adaptation, drugs alone rarely cause liver injury, with acetaminophen (APAP) being the notable exception. Drug-induced liver injury (DILI) usually involves other extrinsic factors, such as the adaptive immune system, that cause 'stressed' hepatocytes to become injured, leading to idiosyncratic DILI, the rare and unpredictable adverse drug reaction in the liver. Hepatocyte injury, due to drug and extrinsic insult, causes a second wave of signaling changes associated with adaptation, cell death, and repair. If the stress and injury reach a critical threshold, then death signaling pathways such as c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) become dominant and hepatocytes enter a failsafe mode to undergo self-destruction. DILI can be seen as an active process involving recruitment of death signaling pathways that mediate cell death rather than a passive process due to overwhelming biochemical injury. In this review, we highlight the role of signal transduction pathways, which frequently involve mitochondria, in the development of DILI. PMID:23453390

  11. Evaluation of liver function and electroacupuncture efficacy of animals with alcoholic liver injury by the novel imaging methods

    Zhang, Dong; Song, Xiao-jing; Li, Shun-yue; Wang, Shu-you; Chen, Bing-jun; Bai, Xiao-Dong; Tang, Li-mei

    2016-01-01

    Imaging methods to evaluate hepatic microcirculation (HM) and liver function (LF) by directly monitoring overall liver tissue remain lacking. This study establish imaging methods for LF that combines Laser speckle perfusion imaging (LSPI) and in vivo optical imaging (IVOI) technologies to investigate changes of hepatic microcirculation and reserve function in the animals gavaged with 50% ethanol (15 ml/kg·bw) for a model of acute alcoholic liver injury (ALI), and for evaluation of electroacupuncture (EA) effect. The liver blood perfusion and indocyanine green (ICG) distribution were observe by LSPI and IVOI separately. After EA, the livers were collected to measure the levels of alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), thromboxane A (TXA2), prostacyclin (PGI2) and endothelin (ET). The acquisitions of newly established LSPI of liver and ICG in vivo fluorescence imaging (ICG-IVFI), combining the results of other indexes showed: hepatic microcirculation perfusion (HMP) significantly reduced, ICG metabolism reduced, and ALT/AST increased in animal model with acute ALI. EA can reverse these changes. The use of LSPI of liver and ICG-IVFI, which was novel imaging methods for LF established in this study, could display the LF characteristics of ALI and the EA efficacy. PMID:27443832

  12. Hepatoprotective effect of vitamin C on lithocholic acid-induced cholestatic liver injury in Gulo(-/-) mice.

    Yu, Su Jong; Bae, Seyeon; Kang, Jae Seung; Yoon, Jung-Hwan; Cho, Eun Ju; Lee, Jeong-Hoon; Kim, Yoon Jun; Lee, Wang Jae; Kim, Chung Yong; Lee, Hyo-Suk

    2015-09-01

    Prevention and restoration of hepatic fibrosis from chronic liver injury is essential for the treatment of patients with chronic liver diseases. Vitamin C is known to have hepatoprotective effects, but their underlying mechanisms are unclear, especially those associated with hepatic fibrosis. Here, we analyzed the impact of vitamin C on bile acid induced hepatocyte apoptosis in vitro and lithocholic acid (LCA)-induced liver injury in vitamin C-insufficient Gulo(-/-) mice, which cannot synthesize vitamin C similarly to humans. When Huh-BAT cells were treated with bile acid, apoptosis was induced by endoplasmic reticulum stress-related JNK activation but vitamin C attenuated bile acid-induced hepatocyte apoptosis in vitro. In our in vivo experiments, LCA feeding increased plasma marker of cholestasis and resulted in more extensive liver damage and hepatic fibrosis by more prominent apoptotic cell death and recruiting more intrahepatic inflammatory CD11b(+) cells in the liver of vitamin C-insufficient Gulo(-/-) mice compared to wild type mice which have minimal hepatic fibrosis. However, when vitamin C was supplemented to vitamin C-insufficient Gulo(-/-) mice, hepatic fibrosis was significantly attenuated in the liver of vitamin C-sufficient Gulo(-/-) mice like in wild type mice and this hepatoprotective effect of vitamin C was thought to be associated with both decreased hepatic apoptosis and necrosis. These results suggested that vitamin C had hepatoprotective effect against cholestatic liver injury. PMID:26057690

  13. Steatotic livers are susceptible to normothermic ischemia-reperfusion injury from mitochondrial Complex-I dysfunction

    Chu, Michael JJ; Premkumar, Rakesh; Hickey, Anthony JR; Jiang, Yannan; Delahunt, Brett; Phillips, Anthony RJ; Bartlett, Adam SJR

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To assess the effects of ischemic preconditioning (IPC, 10-min ischemia/10-min reperfusion) on steatotic liver mitochondrial function after normothermic ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI). METHODS: Sixty male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed 8-wk with either control chow or high-fat/high-sucrose diet inducing > 60% mixed steatosis. Three groups (n = 10/group) for each dietary state were tested: (1) the IRI group underwent 60 min partial hepatic ischemia and 4 h reperfusion; (2) the IPC group underwent IPC prior to same standard IRI; and (3) sham underwent the same surgery without IRI or IPC. Hepatic mitochondrial function was analyzed by oxygraphs. Mitochondrial Complex-I, Complex-II enzyme activity, serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT), and histological injury were measured. RESULTS: Steatotic-IRI livers had a greater increase in ALT (2476 ± 166 vs 1457 ± 103 IU/L, P < 0.01) and histological injury following IRI compared to the lean liver group. Steatotic-IRI demonstrated lower Complex-I activity at baseline [78.4 ± 2.5 vs 116.4 ± 6.0 nmol/(min.mg protein), P < 0.001] and following IRI [28.0 ± 6.2 vs 104.3 ± 12.6 nmol/(min.mg protein), P < 0.001]. Steatotic-IRI also demonstrated impaired Complex-I function post-IRI compared to the lean liver IRI group. Complex-II activity was unaffected by hepatic steatosis or IRI. Lean liver mitochondrial function was unchanged following IRI. IPC normalized ALT and histological injury in steatotic livers but had no effect on overall steatotic liver mitochondrial function or individual mitochondrial complex enzyme activities. CONCLUSION: Warm IRI impairs steatotic liver Complex-I activity and function. The protective effects of IPC in steatotic livers may not be mediated through mitochondria.

  14. Newly Identified Mechanisms of Total Parenteral Nutrition Related Liver Injury

    Ajay Kumar Jain; Teckman, Jeffrey H.

    2014-01-01

    Total parenteral nutrition (TPN), a lifesaving therapy, involves providing nutrition by bypassing the gut. Unfortunately it is associated with significant complications including gut atrophy and parenteral nutrition associated liver disease (PNALD). PNALD includes steatosis, cholestasis, disrupted glucose metabolism, disrupted lipid metabolism, cirrhosis, and liver failure. The etiopathogenesis remains poorly defined; however, an altered enterohepatic circulation, disrupting nuclear receptor ...

  15. Expression and significance of SOCS3 in liver tissue of rats with severe acute pancreatitis complicated by liver injury

    Wang, Bin; Zhang, Xiao-Hua; Miao-fan YANG; Xiao-wei WU; Xu, Xiao-Bing; Mei-xia GUO; Min-li LI

    2012-01-01

    Objective  To investigate the expression and mechanism of action of suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 (SOCS3) in liver tissue of rats with experimental severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) concurring with liver injury. Methods  The rat model of SAP was reproduced by retrograde injection of 4% sodium taurocholate into the biliopancreatic duct. Thirty-two male SD rats were randomly assigned into 4 groups (8 each): normal control group (NC), SAP 6h, 12h, and 18h groups. The levels of serum amylase (...

  16. Interaction between nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase in the development of acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity

    Meltem Kolgazi

    2015-03-01

    Results: AG and KET prevented the increase in liver malondialdehyde levels due to APAP toxicity. Decreased liver glutathione in APAP group was prevented by all treatments except NIM. Stimulated liver myeloperoxidase activity in APAP group was attenuated by all treatments except INDO and NIM. Elevation of liver chemiluminescence, nuclear factor (NF- and #61547;B expression and serum alanine transferase level due to APAP overdose were also suppressed by all treatments. Conclusions: NOS and COX pathways interact in the development of hepatotoxicity due to APAP overdose. [J Exp Integr Med 2015; 5(1.000: 16-22

  17. Drug-Induced Liver Injury Associated with Noni (Morinda citrifolia) Juice and Phenobarbital.

    Mrzljak, Anna; Kosuta, Iva; Skrtic, Anita; Kanizaj, Tajana Filipec; Vrhovac, Radovan

    2013-01-01

    Noni (Morinda citrifolia) juice is a popular herbal dietary supplement globally used for preventive or therapeutic purposes in a variety of ailments, claiming to exhibit hepatoprotective properties as well. Herein we present the case of a 38-year-old woman who developed acute liver injury associated with noni juice consumption on a long-term (9 months) anticonvulsant therapy. Clinical presentation and liver biopsy were consistent with severe, predominantly hepatocellular type of injury. Both agents were stopped and corticosteroids were initiated. Five months later the patient had fully recovered. Although in the literature the hepatotoxicity of noni juice remains speculative, sporadic but emerging cases of noni juice-associated liver injury address the need to clarify and investigate potential harmful effects associated with this supplement. PMID:23467452

  18. Liver manipulation causes hepatocyte injury and precedes systemic inflammation in patients undergoing liver resection.

    Poll, M.C. van de; Derikx, J.P.M.; Buurman, W.A.; Peters, W.H.M.; Roelofs, H.M.J.; Wigmore, S.J.; Dejong, C.H.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Liver failure following liver surgery is caused by an insufficient functioning remnant cell mass. This can be due to insufficient liver volume and can be aggravated by additional cell death during or after surgery. The aim of this study was to elucidate the causes of hepatocellular injur

  19. MicroRNA-mediated Th2 bias in methimazole-induced acute liver injury in mice.

    Uematsu, Yasuaki; Akai, Sho; Tochitani, Tomoaki; Oda, Shingo; Yamada, Toru; Yokoi, Tsuyoshi

    2016-09-15

    MicroRNA (miRNA) is a class of small non-coding RNAs containing approximately 20 nucleotides that negatively regulate target gene expression. Little is known about the role of individual miRNAs and their targets in immune- and inflammation-related responses in drug-induced liver injury. In the present study, involvement of miRNAs in the T helper (Th) 2-type immune response was investigated using a methimazole (MTZ)-induced liver injury mouse model. Co-administration of L-buthionine-S,R-sulfoximine and MTZ induced acute hepatocellular necrosis and elevated plasma levels of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) from 4h onward in female Balb/c mice. The hepatic mRNA expression of Th2 promotive factors was significantly increased concomitantly with plasma ALT levels. In contrast, the hepatic mRNA expression of Th2 suppressive factors was significantly decreased during the early phase of liver injury. Comprehensive profiling of hepatic miRNA expression was analyzed before the onset of MTZ-induced liver injury. Using in silico prediction of miRNAs that possibly regulate Th2-related genes and subsequent quantification, we identified up-regulation of expression of miR-29b-1-5p and miR-449a-5p. Among targets of these miRNAs, down-regulation of Th2 suppressive transcription factors, such as SRY-related HMG-box 4 (SOX4) and lymphoid enhancer factor-1 (LEF1), were observed from the early phase of liver injury. In conclusion, negative regulation of the expression of SOX4 by miR-29b-1-5p and that of LEF1 by miR-449a-5p is suggested to play an important role in the development of Th2 bias in MTZ-induced liver injury. PMID:27421576

  20. Amelioration of liver injury by continuously targeted intervention against TNFRp55 in rats with acute-on-chronic liver failure.

    Yumin Xu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Acute-on-chronic liver failure (ACLF is an acute deterioration of established liver disease. Blocking the TNF (tumor necrosis factor/TNFR (tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 pathway may reduce hepatocyte apoptosis/necrosis, and subsequently decrease mortality during development of ACLF. We demonstrated that a long-acting TNF antagonist (soluble TNF receptor: IgG Fc [sTNFR:IgG-Fc] prevented/reduced development of acute liver failure by blocking the TNF/TNFR1 (TNFRp55 pathway. However, it is still unclear if sTNFR:IgG-Fc can inhibit hepatocyte damage during development of ACLF. METHODOLOGY: Chronic liver disease (liver fibrosis/cirrhosis was induced in Wistar rats by repeatedly challenging with human serum albumin (HSA, and confirmed by histopathology. ACLF was induced with D-galactosamine (D-GalN/lipopolysaccharide (LPS i.p. in the rats with chronic liver disease. Serum and liver were collected for biochemical, pathological and molecular biological examinations. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Reduced mortality was observed in sTNFR:IgG-Fc treated ACLF rats, consistent with reduced interleukin (IL-6 levels in serum and liver, as well as reduced hepatic caspase-3 activity, compared to that of mock treated group. Reduced hepatic damage was confirmed with histopathology in the sTNFR:IgG-Fc treated group, which is consistent with reduced Bcl-2 and Bax, at mRNA and protein levels, but increased hepatocyte proliferation (PCNA. This is also supported by the findings that caspase-3 production was up-regulated significantly in ACLF group compared to the mock treated group. Moreover, up-regulated caspase-3 was inhibited following sTNFR:IgG-Fc treatment. Finally, there was up-regulation of hepatic IL-22R in sTNFR:IgG-Fc treated ACLF rats. CONCLUSIONS: sTNFR:IgG-Fc improved survival rate during development of ACLF via ameliorating liver injury with a potential therapeutic value.

  1. Mechanism of exacerbative effect of progesterone on drug-induced liver injury.

    Toyoda, Yasuyuki; Endo, Shinya; Tsuneyama, Koichi; Miyashita, Taishi; Yano, Azusa; Fukami, Tatsuki; Nakajima, Miki; Yokoi, Tsuyoshi

    2012-03-01

    Drug-induced liver injury (DILI) is a major safety concern in drug development and clinical drug therapy. However, the underlying mechanism of DILI is little known. It is generally believed that women exhibit worse outcomes from DILI than men. Recently, we found that pretreatment of mice with estradiol attenuated halothane (HAL)-induced liver injury, whereas pretreatment with progesterone exacerbated it in female mice. To investigate the mechanism of sex difference of DILI, we focused on progesterone in this study. We found the exacerbating effect of progesterone in thioacetamide (TA), α-naphthylisothiocyanate, and dicloxacillin-induced liver injury only in female mice. Higher number of myeloperoxidase-positive mononuclear cells infiltrated into the liver and increased levels of Chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 1 and 2 (CXCL1 and CXCL2) and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 in the liver were observed. Interestingly, CXCL1 was slightly increased by progesterone pretreatment alone. Progesterone pretreatment increased the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) phosphorylation in HAL-induced liver injury. Pretreatment with U0126 (ERK inhibitor) significantly suppressed the exacerbating effect of progesterone and the expression of inflammatory mediators. In addition, pretreatment with gadolinium chloride (GdCl(3): inhibitor of Kupffer cells) significantly suppressed the exacerbating effect of progesterone pretreatment and the expression of inflammatory mediators. Moreover, posttreatment of RU486 (progesterone receptor antagonist) 1 h after the HAL or TA administration ameliorated the HAL- or TA-induced liver injury, respectively, in female mice. In conclusion, progesterone exacerbated the immune-mediated hepatotoxic responses in DILI via Kupffer cells and ERK pathway. The inhibition of progesterone receptor and decrease of the immune response may have important therapeutic implications in DILI. PMID:22157104

  2. Role of bile acids in liver injury and regeneration following acetaminophen overdose.

    Bhushan, Bharat; Borude, Prachi; Edwards, Genea; Walesky, Chad; Cleveland, Joshua; Li, Feng; Ma, Xiaochao; Apte, Udayan

    2013-11-01

    Bile acids play a critical role in liver injury and regeneration, but their role in acetaminophen (APAP)-induced liver injury is not known. We tested the effect of bile acid modulation on APAP hepatotoxicity using C57BL/6 mice, which were fed a normal diet, a 2% cholestyramine (CSA)-containing diet for bile acid depletion, or a 0.2% cholic acid (CA)-containing diet for 1 week before treatment with 400 mg/kg APAP. CSA-mediated bile acid depletion resulted in significantly higher liver injury and delayed regeneration after APAP treatment. In contrast, 0.2% CA supplementation in the diet resulted in a moderate delay in progression of liver injury and significantly higher liver regeneration after APAP treatment. Either CSA-mediated bile acid depletion or CA supplementation did not affect hepatic CYP2E1 levels or glutathione depletion after APAP treatment. CSA-fed mice exhibited significantly higher activation of c-Jun N-terminal protein kinases and a significant decrease in intestinal fibroblast growth factor 15 mRNA after APAP treatment. In contrast, mice fed a 0.2% CA diet had significantly lower c-Jun N-terminal protein kinase activation and 12-fold higher fibroblast growth factor 15 mRNA in the intestines. Liver regeneration after APAP treatment was significantly faster in CA diet-fed mice after APAP administration secondary to rapid cyclin D1 induction. Taken together, these data indicate that bile acids play a critical role in both initiation and recovery of APAP-induced liver injury. PMID:24007882

  3. Liver Injury from Herbal, Dietary, and Weight Loss Supplements: a Review

    Zheng, Elizabeth X.; Navarro, Victor J.

    2015-01-01

    Herbal and dietary supplement usage has increased steadily over the past several years in the United States. Among the non-bodybuilding herbal and dietary supplements, weight loss supplements were among the most common type of HDS implicated in liver injury. While drug induced liver injury is rare, its consequences are significant and on the rise. The purpose of this review is to highlight case reports of weight loss products such as Hydroxycut and OxyElite Pro as one form of HDS that have he...

  4. Protective effect of mycelial polysaccharides from Cordyceps sinensis on immunological liver injury in mice

    Kai-zhong DONG; GAO, YONG-SHENG; Xiao-heng WANG; Ma, Yan-Qing; Su, Lu

    2016-01-01

    Objective  To explore the protective effects of mycelial polysaccharides from Cordyceps sinensis (MPCS) on BCG+LPS-induced liver injury in mice. Methods  The immunological liver injury mice model was reproduced by giving bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Sixty NIH mice were randomly assigned into 6 groups (10 each): normal control group, model group, mycelium polysaccharide in high (100mg/kg), medium (50mg/kg) and low (25mg/kg) dose group, and bifendate (150mg/kg) t...

  5. Edaravone protects endotoxin-induced liver injury by inhibiting apoptosis and reducing proinflammatory cytokines

    Zong, L. [Second Military Medical University, Changhai Hospital, Department of Anesthesiology, Shanghai, China, Department of Anesthesiology, Changhai Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai (China); No. 82 Hospital of People' s Liberation Army, Department of Anesthesiology, Jiangsu, China, Department of Anesthesiology, No. 82 Hospital of People' s Liberation Army, Jiangsu (China); Yu, Q.H. [Second Military Medical University, Changhai Hospital, Department of Gastroenterology, Shanghai, China, Department of Gastroenterology, Changhai Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai (China); Du, Y.X. [No. 82 Hospital of People' s Liberation Army, Department of Anesthesiology, Jiangsu, China, Department of Anesthesiology, No. 82 Hospital of People' s Liberation Army, Jiangsu (China); Deng, X.M. [Second Military Medical University, Changhai Hospital, Department of Anesthesiology, Shanghai, China, Department of Anesthesiology, Changhai Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai (China)

    2014-03-03

    Studies have shown that edaravone may prevent liver injury. This study aimed to investigate the effects of edaravone on the liver injury induced by D-galactosamine (GalN) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in female BALB/c mice. Edaravone was injected into mice 30 min before and 4 h after GalN/LPS injection. The survival rate was determined within the first 24 h. Animals were killed 8 h after GalN/LPS injection, and liver injury was biochemically and histologically assessed. Hepatocyte apoptosis was measured by TUNEL staining; proinflammatory cytokines [tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6)] in the liver were assayed by ELISA; expression of caspase-8 and caspase-3 proteins was detected by Western blot assay; and caspase-3 activity was also determined. Results showed that GalN/LPS induced marked elevations in serum aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT). Edaravone significantly inhibited elevation of serum AST and ALT, accompanied by an improvement in histological findings. Edaravone lowered the levels of TNF-α and IL-6 and reduced the number of TUNEL-positive cells. In addition, 24 h after edaravone treatment, caspase-3 activity and mortality were reduced. Edaravone may effectively ameliorate GalN/LPS-induced liver injury in mice by reducing proinflammatory cytokines and inhibiting apoptosis.

  6. Glycyrrhizin attenuates endotoxin- induced acute liver injury after partial hepatectomy in rats

    B. Tang; Qiao, H.; Meng, F.; Sun, X.

    2007-01-01

    Massive hepatectomy associated with infection induces liver dysfunction, or even multiple organ failure and death. Glycyrrhizin has been shown to exhibit anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether glycyrrhizin could attenuate endotoxin-induced acute liver injury after partial hepatectomy. Male Wistar rats (6 to 8 weeks old, weighing 200-250 g) were randomly assigned to three groups of 24 rats each: sham, saline and glycyrrhizin. Rats...

  7. Hepatoprotective effects of Rubus coreanus miquel concentrates on liver injuries induced by carbon tetrachloride in rats

    Chae, Hyun-Jung; Yim, Jung-Eun; Kim, Kyung-Ah; Chyun, Jong-Hee

    2014-01-01

    As well-being foods pursuing healthy life are becoming popular, interest in Rubus coreanus Miquel (RCM) fruit, a type of Korean blackberry, is increasing due to its medicinal actions including protecting the liver, brightening the eyes, and alleviating diabetes. This study was carried out to evaluate the hepatoprotective effects of RCM concentrates on liver injuries induced by carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) in rats. RCM, produced in June ~ July 2008 at Chunbook, Gochang (South Korea), was finely...

  8. Genetic or Pharmacologic Amplification of Nrf2 Signaling Inhibits Acute Inflammatory Liver Injury in Mice

    Osburn, William O.; YATES, Melinda S.; Dolan, Patrick D.; Liby, Karen T.; Sporn, Michael B.; Taguchi, Keiko; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Kensler, Thomas W.

    2008-01-01

    Oxidative stress-mediated destruction of normal parenchymal cells during hepatic inflammatory responses contributes to the pathogenesis of immune-mediated hepatitis and is implicated in the progression of acute inflammatory liver injury to chronic inflammatory liver disease. The transcription factor NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) regulates the expression of a battery of antioxidative enzymes and Nrf2 signaling can be activated by small-molecule drugs that disrupt Keap1-mediated repression of N...

  9. Therapeutic Implications of Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Liver Injury

    Maria Ausiliatrice Puglisi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs, represent an attractive tool for the establishment of a successful stem-cell-based therapy of liver diseases. A number of different mechanisms contribute to the therapeutic effects exerted by MSCs, since these cells can differentiate into functional hepatic cells and can also produce a series of growth factors and cytokines able to suppress inflammatory responses, reduce hepatocyte apoptosis, regress liver fibrosis, and enhance hepatocyte functionality. To date, the infusion of MSCs or MSC-conditioned medium has shown encouraging results in the treatment of fulminant hepatic failure and in end-stage liver disease in experimental settings. However, some issues under debate hamper the use of MSCs in clinical trials. This paper summarizes the biological relevance of MSCs and the potential benefits and risks that can result from translating the MSC research to the treatment of liver diseases.

  10. Urinary liver-type fatty acid-binding protein predicts adverse outcomes in acute kidney injury

    Ferguson, Michael A.; Vaidya, Vishal S.; Waikar, Sushrut S.; Collings, Fitz B.; Sunderland, Kelsey E.; Gioules, Costas J.; Bonventre, Joseph V.

    2009-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common condition with significant associated morbidity and mortality. The insensitivity and non-specificity of traditional markers of renal dysfunction prevent timely diagnosis, estimation of the severity of renal injury, and the administration of possible therapeutic agents. Here, we determine the prognostic ability of urinary liver-type fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP), and further characterize its sensitivity and specificity as a biomarker of AKI. Initial ...