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Sample records for acetaldehyde

  1. Acetaldehyde and gastric cancer.

    Salaspuro, Mikko

    2011-04-01

    Aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH2) and alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) gene polymorphisms associating with enhanced acetaldehyde exposure and markedly increased cancer risk in alcohol drinkers provide undisputable evidence for acetaldehyde being a local carcinogen not only in esophageal but also in gastric cancer. Accordingly, acetaldehyde associated with alcoholic beverages has recently been classified as a Group 1 carcinogen to humans. Microbes are responsible for the bulk of acetaldehyde production from ethanol both in saliva and Helicobacter pylori-infected and achlorhydric stomach. Acetaldehyde is the most abundant carcinogen in tobacco smoke and it readily dissolves into saliva during smoking. Many foodstuffs and 'non-alcoholic' beverages are important but unrecognized sources of local acetaldehyde exposure. The cumulative cancer risk associated with increasing acetaldehyde exposure suggests the need for worldwide screening of the acetaldehyde levels of alcoholic beverages and as well of the ethanol and acetaldehyde of food produced by fermentation. The generally regarded as safe status of acetaldehyde should be re-evaluated. The as low as reasonably achievable principle should be applied to the acetaldehyde of alcoholic and non-alcoholic beverages and food. Risk groups with ADH-and ALDH2 gene polymorphisms, H. pylori infection or achlorhydric atrophic gastritis, or both, should be screened and educated in this health issue. L-cysteine formulations binding carcinogenic acetaldehyde locally in the stomach provide new means for intervention studies. PMID:21401890

  2. Acetaldehyde adducts with hemoglobin.

    Stevens, V.J.; Fantl, W J; Newman, C B; Sims, R V; Cerami, A.; Peterson, C M

    1981-01-01

    Clinical studies on the minor hemoglobins (hemoglobin A1a-c) have suggested that a novel adduct may form in people abusing alcohol. Such patients were found to have an elevated concentration of minor hemoglobins, but normal or subnormal amounts of glycosylated hemoglobin (hemoglobin A1c) as determined by radioimmunoassay, Acetaldehyde, a reactive metabolite of ethanol, was postulated to form adducts with hemoglobin A that change its chromatographic properties. At physiological concentrations,...

  3. Acetaldehyde in the Alaskan subarctic snow pack

    F. Domine

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Acetaldehyde is a reactive intermediate in hydrocarbon oxidation. It is both emitted and taken up by snowpacks and photochemical and physical processes are probably involved. Understanding the reactivity of acetaldehyde in snow and its processes of physical and chemical exchanges requires the knowledge of its incorporation mechanism in snow crystals. We have performed a season-long study of the evolution of acetaldehyde concentrations in the subarctic snowpack near Fairbanks (65° N, central Alaska, which is subjected to a vigorous metamorphism due to persistent elevated temperature gradients in the snowpack, between 20 and 200°C m−1. The snowpack therefore almost entirely transforms into depth hoar. We have also analyzed acetaldehyde in a manipulated snowpack where temperature gradients were suppressed. Snow crystals there transformed much more slowly and their original shapes remained recognizable for months. The specific surface area of snow layers in both types of snowpacks was also measured. We deduce that acetaldehyde is not adsorbed onto the surface of snow crystals and that most of the acetaldehyde is probably not dissolved in the ice lattice of the snow crystals. We propose that most of the acetaldehyde measured is either trapped or dissolved within organic aerosol particles trapped in snow, or that acetaldehyde is formed by the hydrolysis of organic precursors contained in organic aerosols trapped in the snow, when the snow is melted for analysis. These precursors are probably aldehyde polymers formed within the aerosol particles by acid catalysis, but might also be biological molecules. In a laboratory experiment, acetaldehyde-di-n-hexyl acetal, representing a potential acetaldehyde precursor, was subjected to our analytical procedure and reacted to form acetaldehyde. This confirms our suggestion that acetaldehyde in snow could be produced during the melting of snow for analysis.

  4. Acetaldehyde Adducts in Alcoholic Liver Disease

    Mashiko Setshedi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic alcohol abuse causes liver disease that progresses from simple steatosis through stages of steatohepatitis, fibrosis, cirrhosis, and eventually hepatic failure. In addition, chronic alcoholic liver disease (ALD, with or without cirrhosis, increases risk for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. Acetaldehyde, a major toxic metabolite, is one of the principal culprits mediating fibrogenic and mutagenic effects of alcohol in the liver. Mechanistically, acetaldehyde promotes adduct formation, leading to functional impairments of key proteins, including enzymes, as well as DNA damage, which promotes mutagenesis. Why certain individuals who heavily abuse alcohol, develop HCC (7.2–15% versus cirrhosis (15–20% is not known, but genetics and co-existing viral infection are considered pathogenic factors. Moreover, adverse effects of acetaldehyde on the cardiovascular and hematologic systems leading to ischemia, heart failure, and coagulation disorders, can exacerbate hepatic injury and increase risk for liver failure. Herein, we review the role of acetaldehyde adducts in the pathogenesis of chronic ALD and HCC.

  5. Heterogeneous Interactions of Acetaldehyde and Sulfuric Acid

    Michelsen, R. R.; Ashbourn, S. F. M.; Iraci, L. T.

    2004-01-01

    The uptake of acetaldehyde [CH3CHO] by aqueous sulfuric acid has been studied via Knudsen cell experiments over ranges of temperature (210-250 K) and acid concentration (40-80 wt. %) representative of the upper troposphere. The Henry's law constants for acetaldehyde calculated from these data range from 6 x 10(exp 2) M/atm for 40 wt. % H2SO4 at 228 K to 2 x 10(exp 5) M/atm for 80 wt. % H2SO4 at 212 K. In some instances, acetaldehyde uptake exhibits apparent steady-state loss. The possible sources of this behavior, including polymerization, will be explored. Furthermore, the implications for heterogeneous reactions of aldehydes in sulfate aerosols in the upper troposphere will be discussed.

  6. Threshold photoelectron spectroscopy of acetaldehyde and acrolein

    Highlights: •High-resolution threshold photoelectron spectrum of acetaldehyde. •High-resolution threshold photoelectron spectrum of acrolein. •High-resolution total photoion yield spectrum of acetaldehyde. •High-resolution total photoion yield spectrum of acrolein. •Determination of vertical ionization potentials in acetaldehyde and acrolein. -- Abstract: High-resolution (6 meV and 12 meV) threshold photoelectron (TPE) spectra of acetaldehyde and acrolein (2-propenal) have been recorded over the valence binding energy region 10–20 eV, employing synchrotron radiation and a penetrating-field electron spectrometer. These TPE spectra are presented here for the first time. All of the band structures observed in the TPE spectra replicate those found in their conventional HeI photoelectron (PE) spectra. However, the relative band intensities are found to be dramatically different in the two types of spectra that are attributed to the different dominant operative formation mechanisms. In addition, some band shapes and their vertical ionization potentials are found to differ in the two types of spectra that are associated with the autoionization of Rydberg states in the two molecules

  7. Threshold photoelectron spectroscopy of acetaldehyde and acrolein

    Yencha, Andrew J., E-mail: ayencha@albany.edu [Department of Chemistry, University at Albany, State University of New York, Albany, NY 12222 (United States); Siggel-King, Michele R.F. [Cockcroft Institute, Sci-Tech Daresbury, Warrrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Department of Physics, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 3BX (United Kingdom); King, George C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy and Photon Science Institute, Manchester University, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Malins, Andrew E.R. [Cockcroft Institute, Sci-Tech Daresbury, Warrrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Eypper, Marie [School of Chemistry, University of Southampton, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom)

    2013-04-15

    Highlights: •High-resolution threshold photoelectron spectrum of acetaldehyde. •High-resolution threshold photoelectron spectrum of acrolein. •High-resolution total photoion yield spectrum of acetaldehyde. •High-resolution total photoion yield spectrum of acrolein. •Determination of vertical ionization potentials in acetaldehyde and acrolein. -- Abstract: High-resolution (6 meV and 12 meV) threshold photoelectron (TPE) spectra of acetaldehyde and acrolein (2-propenal) have been recorded over the valence binding energy region 10–20 eV, employing synchrotron radiation and a penetrating-field electron spectrometer. These TPE spectra are presented here for the first time. All of the band structures observed in the TPE spectra replicate those found in their conventional HeI photoelectron (PE) spectra. However, the relative band intensities are found to be dramatically different in the two types of spectra that are attributed to the different dominant operative formation mechanisms. In addition, some band shapes and their vertical ionization potentials are found to differ in the two types of spectra that are associated with the autoionization of Rydberg states in the two molecules.

  8. Ethylene oxide and Acetaldehyde in hot cores

    Occhiogrosso, A; Herbst, E; Viti, S; Ward, M D; Price, S D; Brown, W A

    2014-01-01

    [Abridged] Ethylene oxide and its isomer acetaldehyde are important complex organic molecules because of their potential role in the formation of amino acids. Despite the fact that acetaldehyde is ubiquitous in the interstellar medium, ethylene oxide has not yet been detected in cold sources. We aim to understand the chemistry of the formation and loss of ethylene oxide in hot and cold interstellar objects (i) by including in a revised gas-grain network some recent experimental results on grain surfaces and (ii) by comparison with the chemical behaviour of its isomer, acetaldehyde. We test the code for the case of a hot core. The model allows us to predict the gaseous and solid ethylene oxide abundances during a cooling-down phase prior to star formation and during the subsequent warm-up phase. We can therefore predict at what temperatures ethylene oxide forms on grain surfaces and at what temperature it starts to desorb into the gas phase. The model reproduces the observed gaseous abundances of ethylene oxid...

  9. Acetaldehyde inhibition of protein synthesis in isolated rat pancreatic acini

    Exposure of isolated dispersed pancreatic acini to increasing concentrations of ethanol (5 to 500 mM) or acetaldehyde (0.5 to 100 mM) produced a progressive inhibition of [3H]leucine incorporation into both cellular (those remaining in the cell) and secretory (those released into the medium) proteins. Whereas 500 mM ethanol caused 90-95% inhibition in the synthesis of cellular and secretory proteins, the concentration of acetaldehyde needed to produce a similar inhibition was found to be 50 mM. All subsequent experiments were performed with 12.5 mM acetaldehyde, a concentration that consistently inhibited acinar protein synthesis by about 50%. The acetaldehyde-mediated inhibition of acinar protein synthesis was partially normalized when this metabolite was removed after 30 min during a 90-min incubation period. In the presence of acetaldehyde, the secretion of 3H-pulse-labeled proteins, but not amylase, trypsinogen, or chymotrypsinogen, was greatly depressed. Acetaldehyde also caused a marked reduction in [3H]uridine incorporation into acinar RNA. The entry of [3H]uridine, [3H]leucine, and [3H]aminoisobutyric acid into isolated acini was found to be slightly (15-25%) decreased by acetaldehyde. It is concluded that acetaldehyde exerts a direct toxic effect on isolated dispersed pancreatic acini as evidenced by diminution of both protein and RNA synthesis and decreased secretion of the newly synthesized proteins. This inhibitory effect of acetaldehyde could be partially reversed

  10. Prebiotic synthesis of imidazole-4-acetaldehyde and histidine

    Shen, Chun; Oro, J.; Yang, Lily; Miller, Stanley L.

    1987-01-01

    The prebiotic synthesis of imidazole-4-acetaldehyde and imidazole-4-glycol from erythrose and formamidine has been demonstrated as well as the prebiotic synthesis of imidazole-4-ethanol and imidazole-4-glycol from erythrose, formaldehyde, and ammonia. The maximum yields of imidazole-4-acetaldehyde, imidazole-4-ethanol, and imidazole-4-glycol obtained in these reactions are 1.6, 5.4, and 6.8 percent respectively, based on the erythrose. Imidazole-4-acetaldehyde would have been converted to histidine on the primitive earth by a Strecker synthesis, and several prebiotic reactions would convert imidazole-4-glycol and imidazole-4-ethanol to imidazole-4-acetaldehyde.

  11. 40 CFR 721.10036 - Acetaldehyde based polymer (generic).

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Acetaldehyde based polymer (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10036 Acetaldehyde based polymer (generic). (a) Chemical substance and... based polymer (PMN P-02-406) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant new...

  12. Mechanism of acetaldehyde-induced deactivation of microbial lipases

    Jaeger Karl E

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microbial lipases represent the most important class of biocatalysts used for a wealth of applications in organic synthesis. An often applied reaction is the lipase-catalyzed transesterification of vinyl esters and alcohols resulting in the formation of acetaldehyde which is known to deactivate microbial lipases, presumably by structural changes caused by initial Schiff-base formation at solvent accessible lysine residues. Previous studies showed that several lipases were sensitive toward acetaldehyde deactivation whereas others were insensitive; however, a general explanation of the acetaldehyde-induced inactivation mechanism is missing. Results Based on five microbial lipases from Candida rugosa, Rhizopus oryzae, Pseudomonas fluorescens and Bacillus subtilis we demonstrate that the protonation state of lysine ε-amino groups is decisive for their sensitivity toward acetaldehyde. Analysis of the diverse modification products of Bacillus subtilis lipases in the presence of acetaldehyde revealed several stable products such as α,β-unsaturated polyenals, which result from base and/or amino acid catalyzed aldol condensation of acetaldehyde. Our studies indicate that these products induce the formation of stable Michael-adducts at solvent-accessible amino acids and thus lead to enzyme deactivation. Further, our results indicate Schiff-base formation with acetaldehyde to be involved in crosslinking of lipase molecules. Conclusions Differences in stability observed with various commercially available microbial lipases most probably result from different purification procedures carried out by the respective manufacturers. We observed that the pH of the buffer used prior to lyophilization of the enzyme sample is of utmost importance. The mechanism of acetaldehyde-induced deactivation of microbial lipases involves the generation of α,β-unsaturated polyenals from acetaldehyde which subsequently form stable Michael-adducts with the

  13. Acetaldehyde-induced cytotoxicity involves induction of spermine oxidase at the transcriptional level.

    Uemura, Takeshi; Tanaka, Yuka; Higashi, Kyohei; Miyamori, Daisuke; Takasaka, Tomokazu; Nagano, Tatsuo; Toida, Toshihiko; Yoshimoto, Kanji; Igarashi, Kazuei; Ikegaya, Hiroshi

    2013-08-01

    Ethanol consumption causes serious liver injury including cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Ethanol is metabolized mainly in the liver to acetic acid through acetaldehyde. We investigated the effect of ethanol and acetaldehyde on polyamine metabolism since polyamines are essential factors for normal cellular functions. We found that acetaldehyde induced spermine oxidase (SMO) at the transcriptional level in HepG2 cells. The levels and activities of ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) and spermidine/spermine acetyltransferase (SSAT) were not affected by acetaldehyde. Spermidine content was increased and spermine content was decreased by acetaldehyde treatment. Knockdown of SMO expression using siRNA reduced acetaldehyde toxicity. Acetaldehyde exposure increased free acrolein levels. An increase of acrolein by acetaldehyde was SMO dependent. Our results indicate that cytotoxicity of acetaldehyde involves, at least in part, oxidation of spermine to spermidine by SMO, which is induced by acetaldehyde. PMID:23707493

  14. Eclipsed Acetaldehyde as a Precursor for Producing Vinyl Alcohol

    Saadullah G. Aziz

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The MP2 and DFT/B3LYP methods at 6-311++G(d,p and aug-cc-pdz basis sets have been used to probe the origin of relative stability preference for eclipsed acetaldehyde over its bisected counterpart. A relative energy stability range of 1.02 to 1.20 kcal/mol, in favor of the eclipsed conformer, was found and discussed. An NBO study at these chemistry levels complemented these findings and assigned the eclipsed acetaldehyde preference mainly to the vicinal antiperiplanar hyperconjugative interactions. The tautomeric interconversion between the more stable eclipsed acetaldehyde and vinyl alcohol has been achieved through a four-membered ring transition state (TS. The obtained barrier heights and relative stabilities of eclipsed acetaldehyde and the two conformers of vinyl alchol at these model chemistries have been estimated and discussed.

  15. Photochemical and hot H atom reactions of acetaldehyde

    Photolysis and hot hydrogen atom reactions of acetaldehyde have been studied simultaneously not only with a cadmium but also with a zinc resonance lamp as the light source. Contrary to previous results, new products (acetone, ethanol, 2-propanol, ethyl acetoacetate, and diacetone alcohol) are identified in the photolysis of acetaldehyde. On the other hand, the principal products in decreasing order from the hot atom reaction with acetaldehyde have been established to be hydrogen, biacetyl, methane, carbon monoxide, and ethanol, whereas acetone and ethylene existed as minor products. A study of product quantum yields at 214 nm vs. various [CH3CHO]/[CH2S] ratios are reported. The formation of several unexpected products in these studies strongly suggested that the aldehyde functional group of acetaldehyde has an unsaturated character relative to the addition of both hydrogen atoms and methyl radicals. This latter new observation and accompanying mechanisms are discussed. 2 figures, 6 tables

  16. In vitro inhibition of 10-formyltetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase activity by acetaldehyde

    Mun, Ju-Ae; Doh, Eunjin; Min, Hyesun

    2008-01-01

    Alcoholism has been associated with folate deficiency in humans and laboratory animals. Previous study showed that ethanol feeding reduces the dehydrogenase and hydrolase activity of 10-formyltetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase (FDH) in rat liver. Hepatic ethanol metabolism generates acetaldehyde and acetate. The mechanisms by which ethanol and its metabolites produce toxicity within the liver cells are unknown. We purified FDH from rat liver and investigated the effect of ethanol, acetaldehyde an...

  17. Atmospheric Vinyl Alcohol to Acetaldehyde Tautomerization Revisited.

    Peeters, Jozef; Nguyen, Vinh Son; Müller, Jean-François

    2015-10-15

    The atmospheric oxidation of vinyl alcohol (VA) produced by photoisomerization of acetaldehyde (AA) is thought to be a source of formic acid (FA). Nevertheless, a recent theoretical study predicted a high rate coefficient k1(298 K) of ≈10(-14) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) for the FA-catalyzed tautomerization reaction 1 of VA back into AA, which suggests that FA buffers its own production from VA. However, the unusually high frequency factor implied by that study prompted us to reinvestigate reaction 1 . On the basis of a high-level ab initio potential energy profile, we first established that transition state theory is applicable, and derived a k1(298 K) of only ≈2 × 10(-20) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1), concluding that the reaction is negligible. Instead, we propose and rationalize another important VA sink: its uptake by aqueous aerosol and cloud droplets followed by fast liquid-phase tautomerization to AA; global modeling puts the average lifetime by this sink at a few hours, similar to oxidation by OH. PMID:26722769

  18. Acetone and acetaldehyde determination in tomato juice by isotopic dilution

    Acetone and acetaldehyde content of tomato juice were determined by isotope dilution techniques. The juice is added to 14C labelled compounds, carried along by nitrogen at low pressure. The mixture of 2.4 dinitrophenylhydrazones obtained from volatile compounds is separated by thin layer chromatography on silica gel and then on alumina. A determination of radioactivity and concentration of acetone and acetaldehyde 2,4 dinitrophenylhydrazones obtained after separation and elution allow to calculate the content of these two compounds in the initial product with the same sample. This technique could be used for determination of methanol and ethanol after transformation in 3,5 dinitrobenzoates

  19. Effects of formaldehyde and acetaldehyde inhalation on rat pulmonary mechanics

    Saldiva, P.H.; do Rio Caldeira, M.P.; Massad, E.; Calheiros, D.F.; Cardoso, L.M.; Boehm, G.M.S.; Saldiva, C.D.

    1985-10-01

    Two groups of 12 male Wistar rats received either 243 ppm of acetaldehyde or 5.7 ppm of formaldehyde for 8 h a day, 5 days a week during 5 weeks. These levels represent three times the threshold limit values (TLV) for these substances in Brazilian legislation. The animals were evaluated by pulmonary function tests before and after exposure to the pollutants. The data obtained from these rats were compared with those of 12 controls, housed in identical conditions for the same length of time but breathing normal air. The results showed an increase of the functional residual capacity, residual volume, total lung capacity and respiratory frequency in the rats exposed to acetaldehyde atmosphere. The animals exposed to formaldehyde did not present pulmonary function alterations when compared with the controls. The damage caused by acetaldehyde to the peripheral regions of the lung parenchyma, affecting small airways or altering pulmonary elastic properties, is discussed. It is suggested that the Brazilian TLV for acetaldehyde (78 ppm) is not as safe as that for formaldehyde (1.6 ppm).

  20. [A gas chromatographic method for determining acetaldehyde in cadaver blood].

    Savich, V I; Valladares, Kh A; Gusakov, Iu A; Skachko, Z M

    1990-01-01

    Gas-chromatographic method of acetaldehyde detection in blood of subjects who died of alcoholic intoxication is suggested. Method is simple, does not require additional expenses, can be readily used in medicolegal practice and in difficult cases it may help the expert to make an objective conclusion on the cause of death. PMID:2087747

  1. Plant physiological and environmental controls over the exchange of acetaldehyde between forest canopies and the atmosphere

    K. Jardine

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available We quantified fine scale sources and sinks of gas phase acetaldehyde in two forested ecosystems in the US. During the daytime, the upper canopy behaved as a net source while at lower heights, reduced emission rates or net uptake were observed. At night, uptake generally predominated thoughout the canopies. Net ecosystem emission rates were inversely related to foliar density which influenced the extinction of light and the acetaldehyde compensation point in the canopy. This is supported by branch level studies revealing much higher compensation points in the light than in the dark for poplar (Populus deltoides and holly oak (Quercus ilex implying a higher light/temperature sensitivity for acetaldehyde production relative to consumption. The view of stomata as the major pathway for acetaldehyde exchange is supported by strong linear correlations between branch transpiration rates and acetaldehyde exchange velocities for both species. In addition, natural abundance carbon isotope analysis of gas-phase acetaldehyde during poplar branch fumigation experiments revealed a significant kinetic isotope effect of 5.1±0.3‰, associated with the uptake of acetaldehyde. Similar experiments with dry dead poplar leaves showed no fractionation or uptake of acetaldehyde, confirming that this is only a property of living leaves. We suggest that acetaldehyde belongs to a potentially large list of plant metabolites where stomatal conductance can exert long term control over both emission and uptake rates due to the presence of both source(s and sink(s within the leaf which strongly buffer large changes in concentrations in the substomatal airspace due to changes in stomatal conductance. We conclude that the exchange of acetaldehyde between plant canopies and the atmosphere is fundamentally controlled by ambient acetaldehyde concentrations, stomatal conductance, and the acetaldehyde compensation point.

  2. Terahertz Spectroscopy of Deuterated Acetaldehyde: CH_2DCHO

    Margulès, L.; Motiyenko, R. A.; Coudert, L. H.; Guillemin, J.-C.

    2014-06-01

    This study follows our recent investigations about deuterated methyl-top species of complex organic molecules: methanol, methyl formate, In particular these works led the first ISM detection of HCOOCH_2D and CH_2DOCH_3. Acetaldehyde is not very abundant in the ISM, but this is a very interesting case from the spectroscopic point of view as it is an intermediate case between methyl formate and methanol. In the normal species of acetaldehyde, the barrier to internal rotation which is close to the value in methyl formate: 373 cm-1. However, the value of the Coriolis coupling constant ρ is 0.33 in acetaldehyde which is a much larger value than in methyl formate, 0.08, meaning that the coupling between the torsion and the overall rotation is more important. The sample was not a commercial one and half of its amount is the normal species which leads to a more difficult line assignment. The spectra were recorded in Lille between 75 and 950 GHz with a solid-state submillimeter-wave spectrometer. The starting point of the analysis was the centimeter-wave measurements carried out for the sym and asym- conformers. A comparison between the approach developed for deuterated methyl formate (HCOOCH_2D), based on the water dimer formalism, and that designed recently for deuterated methanola (CH_2DOH) will be presented. This work is supported by the CNES and the Action sur Projets de l'INSU, PCMI. Coudert, L. H.; et al. J. Chem. Phys., 140, (2014) 64307 Coudert, L. H.; et al. ApJ, 779, (2013) 119 Richard, C.; et al. A&A, 552, (2013) A117 Smirnov, I. A.; et al. J. Mol. Spectrosc., 295 (2014) 44 Ilyushin, V.; et al. J. Mol. Spectrosc., 255 (2009) 32 Turner, P. H.; and Cox, A. P. Chem. Phys. Lett., 42, (1976) 84 Turner, P. H.; Cox, A. P.; and Hardy, J. A. J.C.S. Farady Trans., 2, (1981) 1217

  3. Plant physiological and environmental controls over the exchange of acetaldehyde between forest canopies and the atmosphere

    K. Jardine

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available We quantified fine scale sources and sinks of gas phase acetaldehyde in two forested ecosystems in the US. During the daytime, the upper canopy behaved as a net source while at lower heights, reduced emission rates or net uptake were observed. At night, uptake generally predominated throughout the canopies. Net ecosystem emission rates were inversely related to foliar density due to the extinction of light in the canopy and a respective decrease of the acetaldehyde compensation point. This is supported by branch level studies revealing much higher compensation points in the light than in the dark for poplar (Populus deltoides and holly oak (Quercus ilex implying a higher light/temperature sensitivity for acetaldehyde production relative to consumption. The view of stomata as the major pathway for acetaldehyde exchange is supported by strong linear correlations between branch transpiration rates and acetaldehyde exchange velocities for both species. In addition, natural abundance carbon isotope analysis of gas-phase acetaldehyde during poplar branch fumigation experiments revealed a significant kinetic isotope effect of 5.1±0.3‰ associated with the uptake of acetaldehyde. Similar experiments with dry dead poplar leaves showed no fractionation or uptake of acetaldehyde, confirming that this is only a property of living leaves. We suggest that acetaldehyde belongs to a potentially large list of plant metabolites where stomatal resistance can exert long term control over both emission and uptake rates due to the presence of both source(s and sink(s within the leaf which strongly buffer large changes in concentrations in the substomatal airspace due to changes in stomatal resistance. We conclude that the exchange of acetaldehyde between plant canopies and the atmosphere is fundamentally controlled by ambient acetaldehyde concentrations, stomatal resistance, and the compensation point which is a function of light/temperature.

  4. 40 CFR 80.56 - Measurement methods for formaldehyde and acetaldehyde.

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Measurement methods for formaldehyde... Measurement methods for formaldehyde and acetaldehyde. (a) Formaldehyde and acetaldehyde will be measured by....140 of this chapter for formaldehyde analysis. Diluted exhaust sample volumes must be at least 15...

  5. Oxygen vacancy-assisted coupling and enolization of acetaldehyde on CeO2(111).

    Calaza, Florencia C; Xu, Ye; Mullins, David R; Overbury, Steven H

    2012-10-31

    The temperature-dependent adsorption and reaction of acetaldehyde (CH(3)CHO) on a fully oxidized and a highly reduced thin-film CeO(2)(111) surface have been investigated using a combination of reflection-absorption infrared spectroscopy (RAIRS) and periodic density functional theory (DFT+U) calculations. On the fully oxidized surface, acetaldehyde adsorbs weakly through its carbonyl O interacting with a lattice Ce(4+) cation in the η(1)-O configuration. This state desorbs at 210 K without reaction. On the highly reduced surface, new vibrational signatures appear below 220 K. They are identified by RAIRS and DFT as a dimer state formed from the coupling of the carbonyl O and the acyl C of two acetaldehyde molecules. This dimer state remains up to 400 K before decomposing to produce another distinct set of vibrational signatures, which are identified as the enolate form of acetaldehyde (CH(2)CHO¯). Furthermore, the calculated activation barriers for the coupling of acetaldehyde, the decomposition of the dimer state, and the recombinative desorption of enolate and H as acetaldehyde are in good agreement with previously reported TPD results for acetaldehyde adsorbed on reduced CeO(2)(111) [Chen et al. J. Phys. Chem. C 2011, 115, 3385]. The present findings demonstrate that surface oxygen vacancies alter the reactivity of the CeO(2)(111) surface and play a crucial role in stabilizing and activating acetaldehyde for coupling reactions. PMID:23020248

  6. Acetaldehyde alters MAP kinase signalling and epigenetic histone modifications in hepatocytes.

    Shukla, Shivendra D; Lee, Youn Ju; Park, Pil-hoon; Aroor, Annayya R

    2007-01-01

    Although both oxidative and non-oxidative metabolites of ethanol are involved in generating ethanol matabolic stress (Emess), the oxidative metabolite acetaldehyde plays a critical role in the cellular actions of ethanol. We have investigated the effects of acetaldehyde on p42/44 MAP kinase, p46/p54 c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK1/JNK2) and p38 MAP kinase in hepatocytes. Acetaldehyde caused temporal activation of p42/44 MAPK followed by JNK, but the activation of the p42/44 MAPK was not a prerequisite for the JNK activation. Activation ofJNK1 by acetaldehyde was greater than JNK2. Ethanol and acetaldehyde activatedJNK have opposing roles; ethanol-induced JNK activation increased apoptosis whereas that by acetaldehyde decreased apoptosis. Acetaldehyde also caused histone H3 acetylation at Lys9 and phosphorylation of histone H3 at Serl0 and 28, the latter being dependent on p38 MAP kinase. Phosphorylation at Ser28 was higher than at Serl0. Thus acetaldehyde distinctively alters MAP kinase signalling and histone modifications, processes involved in transcriptional activation. PMID:17590997

  7. The hydrogen-storing microporous silica 'Microcluster' reduces acetaldehyde contained in a distilled spirit.

    Kato, Shinya; Miwa, Nobuhiko

    2016-12-01

    Acetaldehyde is a detrimental substance produced in alcoholic liquor aging. We assessed an ability of hydrogen-storing microporous silica 'Microcluster' (MC+) to reduce acetaldehyde, as compared with autoclave-dehydrogenated MC+ (MC-). Acetaldehyde was quantified spectrophotometrically by an enzymatic method. Authentic acetaldehyde was treated by MC+ for 20min, and decreased from 43.4ppm to 10.9ppm, but maintained at 49.3ppm by MC-. On the other hand, acetaldehyde contained in a distilled spirit was decreased from 29.5ppm to 3.1ppm at 20min by MC+, but not decreased by MC-. Addition of MC+ or MC- to distilled water without acetaldehyde showed no seeming effect on the quantification used. Accordingly acetaldehyde in a distilled spirit is reduced to ethanol by hydrogen contained in MC+, but not by the silica moiety of MC+. Hydrogen gas of 1.2mL was released for 20min from MC+ of 0.59g in water, resulting in dissolved hydrogen of 1.09ppm and an oxidation- reduction potential of -687.0mV indicative of a marked reducing ability. Thus, MC+ has an ability to reduce acetaldehyde in a distilled spirit due to dissolved hydrogen released from MC+. PMID:27612695

  8. EFFECT OF SOME TECHNOLOGICAL FACTORS ON THE CONTENT OF ACETALDEHYDE IN BEER

    Gunka Jonkova

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this work was to examine the influence of the temperature, the pitching rate of yeast and wort composition (Free Amino Nitrogen on the content of acetaldehyde in beer. It is known, that higher fermentation temperatures stimulate the formation of acetaldehyde, as well as the higher rate of acetaldehyde reduction, leading to lower concentrations in the final beer. Beer produced with increased pitching rate of yeast (26 and 35 × 10[sup]6[/sup] cells•mL[sup]-1[/sup], contains lower quantities of acetaldehyde as compared to the control beer. Lower content of α-amino nitrogen in result of substitution of 5 to 10�0of the malt with rice, sugar or a combination of both does not lead to considerable differences in the acetaldehyde concentration in beer.

  9. Acetaldehyde and parkinsonism: role of CYP450 2E1

    Giovanni Umberto Corsini

    2013-06-01

    We have indicated that acetaldehyde is able to enhance the parkinsonism induced in mice by 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine, a neurotoxin able to damage the nigrostriatal dopaminergic pathway. Similarly diethyldithiocarbamate, the main metabolite of disulfiram, a drug widely used to control alcoholism, diallylsulfide and phenylisothiocyanate also markedly enhance the toxin-related parkinsonism. All these compounds are substrate/inhibitors of CYP450 2E1 isozyme. The presence of CYP 2E1 has been detected in the dopamine neurons of rodent Substantia Nigra, but a precise function of the enzyme has not been elucidated yet. By treating CYP 2E1 knockout mice with the neurotoxin 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine, the Substantia Nigra induced lesion was significantly reduced when compared with the lesion observed in wild-type animals. Several in vivo and in vitro studies led to the conclusion that CYP 2E1 may enhance the 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine toxicity in mice by increasing free radical production inside the dopaminergic neurons. Acetaldehyde is a good substrate for CYP 2E1 enzyme as the other substrate-inhibitors and by this way may facilitate the susceptibility of dopaminergic neurons to toxic events. The literature suggests that ethanol and/or disulfiram may be responsible for toxic parkinsonism in human and it indicates that basal ganglia are the major targets of disulfiram toxicity. A very recent study reports that there are a decreased methylation of the CYP 2E1 gene and increased expression of CYP 2E1 mRNA in Parkinson’s Disease patient brains. This study suggests that epigenetic variants of this cytochrome contribute to the susceptibility, thus confirming multiples lines of evidence which indicate a link between environmental toxins and Parkinson’s Disease.

  10. The role of acetaldehyde in pregnancy outcome after prenatal alcohol exposure.

    Hard, M L; Einarson, T R; Koren, G

    2001-08-01

    It is not known why some heavy-drinking women give birth to children with alcohol-related birth defects (ARBD) whereas others do not. The objective of this study was to determine whether the frequency of elevated maternal blood acetaldehyde levels among alcoholics is in the range of ARBD among alcoholic women. MEDLINE was searched from 1980 to 2000 using the key words acetaldehyde, pharmacokinetics, and alcoholism for controlled trials reporting blood or breath acetaldehyde levels in alcoholics and nonalcoholics. Separately, using the key words fetal alcohol syndrome, epidemiology, prevalence, incidence, and frequency, articles were identified reporting ARBD incidences among the offspring of heavy drinkers. Of 23 articles reporting acetaldehyde levels in alcoholics, four met the inclusion criteria. Forty-three studies reported on the rate of ARBD in heavy drinkers, and 14 were accepted. Thirty-four percent of heavy drinkers had a child with ARBD, and 43% of chronic alcoholics had high acetaldehyde levels. The similar frequencies of high acetaldehyde levels among alcoholics and the rates of ARBD among alcoholic women provide epidemiologic support to the hypothesis that acetaldehyde may play a major role in the cause of ARBD. PMID:11477328

  11. EFFECT OF SOME TECHNOLOGICAL FACTORS ON THE CONTENT OF ACETALDEHYDE IN BEER

    Gunka Jonkova; Nevjana Petkova

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to examine the influence of the temperature, the pitching rate of yeast and wort composition (Free Amino Nitrogen) on the content of acetaldehyde in beer. It is known, that higher fermentation temperatures stimulate the formation of acetaldehyde, as well as the higher rate of acetaldehyde reduction, leading to lower concentrations in the final beer. Beer produced with increased pitching rate of yeast (26 and 35 × 10[sup]6[/sup] cells•mL[sup]-1[/sup]), contains low...

  12. Acetaldehyde stimulation of net gluconeogenic carbon movement from applied malic acid in tomato fruit pericarp tissue

    Halinska, A.; Frenkel, C. (Rutgers, The State Univ. of New Jersey, New Brunswick (United States))

    1991-03-01

    Applied acetaldehyde is known to lead to sugar accumulation in fruit including tomatoes (Lycopersicon esculentum) presumably due to stimulation of gluconeogenesis. This conjecture was examined using tomato fruit pericarp discs as a test system and applied l-(U-{sup 14}C)malic acid as the source for gluconeogenic carbon mobilization. Results indicate that malic and perhaps other organic acids are carbon sources for gluconeogenesis occurring normally in ripening tomatoes. The process is stimulated by acetaldehyde apparently by attenuating the fructose-2,6-biphosphate levels. The mode of the acetaldehyde regulation of fructose-2,6-biphosphate metabolism awaits clarification.

  13. Comparison of Ethanol and Acetaldehyde Toxicity in Rat Astrocytes in Primary Culture

    Šarc, Lucija; Lipnik-Štangelj, Metoda

    2009-01-01

    This study compared the effects of toxicity of ethanol and its first metabolite acetaldehyde in rat astrocytes through cell viability and cell proliferation. The cells were treated with different concentrations of ethanol in the presence or absence of a catalase inhibitor 2-amino-1,2,4 triazole (AMT) or with different concentrations of acetaldehyde. Cell viability was assessed using the trypan blue test. Cell proliferation was assessed after 24 hours and after seven days of exposure to either...

  14. Implications of acetaldehyde-derived DNA adducts for understanding alcohol-related carcinogenesis.

    Balbo, Silvia; Brooks, Philip J

    2015-01-01

    Among various potential mechanisms that could explain alcohol carcinogenicity, the metabolism of ethanol to acetaldehyde represents an obvious possible mechanism, at least in some tissues. The fundamental principle of genotoxic carcinogenesis is the formation of mutagenic DNA adducts in proliferating cells. If not repaired, these adducts can result in mutations during DNA replication, which are passed on to cells during mitosis. Consistent with a genotoxic mechanism, acetaldehyde does react with DNA to form a variety of different types of DNA adducts. In this chapter we will focus more specifically on N2-ethylidene-deoxyguanosine (N2-ethylidene-dG), the major DNA adduct formed from the reaction of acetaldehyde with DNA and specifically highlight recent data on the measurement of this DNA adduct in the human body after alcohol exposure. Because results are of particular biological relevance for alcohol-related cancer of the upper aerodigestive tract (UADT), we will also discuss the histology and cytology of the UADT, with the goal of placing the adduct data in the relevant cellular context for mechanistic interpretation. Furthermore, we will discuss the sources and concentrations of acetaldehyde and ethanol in different cell types during alcohol consumption in humans. Finally, in the last part of the chapter, we will critically evaluate the concept of carcinogenic levels of acetaldehyde, which has been raised in the literature, and discuss how data from acetaldehyde genotoxicity are and can be utilized in physiologically based models to evaluate exposure risk. PMID:25427902

  15. Seasonal and diurnal variation in formaldehyde and acetaldehyde concentrations along a highway in Eastern Finland

    Viskari, E.-L. [University of Kuopio (Finland). Dept. of Ecology and Environmental Science; Vartiainen, M. [National Public Health Institute, Kuopio (Finland). Environmental Health, Air Research Laboratory; Pasanen, P. [University of Kuopio (Finland). Dept. of Environmental Science

    2000-07-01

    In this study the concentrations of the most important carbonyl compounds, formaldehyde and acetaldehyde, are measured in a highway environment in spring, summer and winter. Measurements were carried out in May, July and January along a two-lane highway, with daily traffic density 27 500 vehicles. Four sampling points were selected: (1) one from east and (2) west sides of the highway, (3) one at the central reservation of the highway and (4) one background site. The formaldehyde and acetaldehyde concentrations measured at both sides of a two-lane highway and at the central reservation suggest that the motor vehicle emissions are the source of these compounds throughout the year. The concentrations were, however, significantly lower at the roadsides than at the central reservation, especially in July. This could indicate rapid dilution of these compounds in the air. It is also possible that the vegetation along the roadside in summer may play a role as a sink or as a biogenic source for these compounds. The concentrations measured along the roadside in this study are comparable to those measured in polluted urban areas. The diurnal variation showed significant decrease of formaldehyde and acetaldehyde concentrations in the night indicating a decrease in primary source, i.e. traffic emissions. The seasonal variation was great as well, concentrations being lower in winter time, indicating lower secondary production of aldehydes. The formaldehyde and acetaldehyde effects on plants remains to be studied, since the formaldehyde and acetaldehyde pose a noteworthy risk to the vegetation exposed. (author)

  16. Chemistry of di-and tetrahydropyrans. Communication 4. Reaction of 4-methylenetetrahydropyran with formaldehyde and acetaldehyde

    The thermal condensation of formaldehyde with 4-methylenetetrahydropyran at 1800C leads to 4-(2'-hydroxyethyl)-5,6-dihydropyran, while an acid-catalyzed condensation leads to 1,3,9-trioxaspiro[5,5]undecane. 2,4-Dimethyl-1,3,9-trioxaspiro[5.5]undecane and 5-hydroxy-1,3-dimethyl-2,8-dioxabicyclo[4.4.0]decane were synthesized by the reaction of 4-methylenetetrahydropyran with acetaldehyde. In the cocondensation of formaldehyde and acetaldehyde with 4-methylenetetrahydropyran under acidic catalysis conditions, not only the expected 2-methyl-1,3,9-trioxaspiro[5.5]undecane, but also 5-hydroxy-1-methyl-2,8-dioxabicyclo[4.4.0]decane is formed in a comparable yield as well as products of a reaction of the olefin with acetaldehyde

  17. Artisanal alcohol production in Mayan Guatemala: Chemical safety evaluation with special regard to acetaldehyde contamination

    There is a lack of knowledge regarding the composition, production, distribution, and consumption of artisanal alcohol, particularly in the developing world. In Nahuala, an indigenous Mayan municipality located in highland Guatemala, heavy alcohol consumption appears to have had a significant negative impact on health, a major role in cases of violence and domestic abuse, and a link to street habitation. Cuxa, an artisanally, as well as commercially produced sugarcane alcohol, is widely consumed by heavy drinkers in this community. Cuxa samples from all distribution points in the community were obtained and chemically analyzed for health-relevant constituents and contaminants including methanol, acetaldehyde, higher alcohols, and metals. From those, only acetaldehyde was confirmed to be present in unusually high levels (up to 126 g/hl of pure alcohol), particularly in samples that were produced clandestinely. Acetaldehyde has been evaluated as 'possibly carcinogenic' and has also been identified as having significant human exposure in a recent risk assessment. This study explores the reasons for the elevated levels of acetaldehyde, through both sampling and analyses of raw and intermediary products of cuxa production, as well as interviews from producers of the clandestine alcohol. For further insight, we experimentally produced this alcohol in our laboratory, based on the directions provided by the producers, as well as materials from the town itself. Based on these data, the origin of the acetaldehyde contamination appears to be due to chemical changes induced during processing, with the major causative factors consisting of poor hygiene, aerobic working conditions, and inadequate yeast strains, compounded by flawed distillation methodology that neglects separation of the first fractions of the distillate. These results indicate a preventable public health concern for consumers, which can be overcome through education about good manufacturing practices, as well

  18. Artisanal alcohol production in Mayan Guatemala: Chemical safety evaluation with special regard to acetaldehyde contamination

    Kanteres, Fotis [Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH), 33 Russell Street, ARF 2035, Toronto, ON, Canada, M5S 2 S1 (Canada); Rehm, Juergen [Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH), 33 Russell Street, ARF 2035, Toronto, ON, Canada, M5S 2 S1 (Canada); Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, 155 College Street, Toronto, ON, Canada, M5T 3 M7 (Canada); Institute for Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy, TU Dresden, Chemnitzer Strasse 46, D-01187 Dresden (Germany); Lachenmeier, Dirk W., E-mail: Lachenmeier@web.de [Chemisches und Veterinaeruntersuchungsamt (CVUA) Karlsruhe, Weissenburger Strasse 3, D-76187 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2009-11-01

    There is a lack of knowledge regarding the composition, production, distribution, and consumption of artisanal alcohol, particularly in the developing world. In Nahuala, an indigenous Mayan municipality located in highland Guatemala, heavy alcohol consumption appears to have had a significant negative impact on health, a major role in cases of violence and domestic abuse, and a link to street habitation. Cuxa, an artisanally, as well as commercially produced sugarcane alcohol, is widely consumed by heavy drinkers in this community. Cuxa samples from all distribution points in the community were obtained and chemically analyzed for health-relevant constituents and contaminants including methanol, acetaldehyde, higher alcohols, and metals. From those, only acetaldehyde was confirmed to be present in unusually high levels (up to 126 g/hl of pure alcohol), particularly in samples that were produced clandestinely. Acetaldehyde has been evaluated as 'possibly carcinogenic' and has also been identified as having significant human exposure in a recent risk assessment. This study explores the reasons for the elevated levels of acetaldehyde, through both sampling and analyses of raw and intermediary products of cuxa production, as well as interviews from producers of the clandestine alcohol. For further insight, we experimentally produced this alcohol in our laboratory, based on the directions provided by the producers, as well as materials from the town itself. Based on these data, the origin of the acetaldehyde contamination appears to be due to chemical changes induced during processing, with the major causative factors consisting of poor hygiene, aerobic working conditions, and inadequate yeast strains, compounded by flawed distillation methodology that neglects separation of the first fractions of the distillate. These results indicate a preventable public health concern for consumers, which can be overcome through education about good manufacturing practices

  19. Generation of acetyl free radicals by radiolysis: comparison of free radicals generated from acetaldehyde and ethylene-glycol

    The optical absorption spectra of the intermediates obtained by pulse radiolysis of N2O-saturated solutions of acetaldehyde or ethylene-glycol and the kinetics of their decays have been investigated. Results suggest that the OH· radical reactions with acetaldehyde or ethylene-glycol produce acetyl and formylmethyl radicals. Besides, these radicals are shown to reduce ferricytochrome c

  20. Involvement of the endogenous opioid system in the psychopharmacological actions of ethanol: the role of acetaldehyde

    Laura Font

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Significant evidence implicates the endogenous opioid system (opioid peptides and receptors in the mechanisms underlying the psychopharmacological effects of ethanol. Ethanol modulates opioidergic signaling and function at different levels, including biosynthesis, release, and degradation of opioid peptides, as well as binding of endogenous ligands to opioid receptors. The role of β-endorphin and µ-opioid receptors (OR have been suggested to be of particular importance in mediating some of the behavioral effects of ethanol, including psychomotor stimulation and sensitization, consumption and conditioned place preference. Ethanol increases the release of β-endorphin from the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (NArc, which can modulate activity of other neurotransmitter systems such as mesolimbic dopamine. The precise mechanism by which ethanol induces a release of β-endorphin, thereby inducing behavioral responses, remains to be elucidated. The present review summarizes accumulative data suggesting that the first metabolite of ethanol, the psychoactive compound acetaldehyde, could participate in such mechanism. Two lines of research involving acetaldehyde are reviewed: 1 implications of the formation of acetaldehyde in brain areas such as the NArc, with high expression of ethanol metabolizing enzymes and presence of cell bodies of endorphinic neurons and 2 the formation of condensation products between DA and acetaldehyde such as salsolinol, which exerts its actions via OR.

  1. Adsorption of Chromium(VI from Aqueous Solutions by Coffee Polyphenol-Formaldehyde/Acetaldehyde Resins

    Khudbudin Mulani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Removal of chromium(VI from wastewater is essential as it is toxic. Thus, removal of chromium(VI was performed using coffee polyphenol-formaldehyde/acetaldehyde resins as adsorbents. Adsorbent resins were prepared by condensation of decaffeinated coffee powder with formaldehyde/acetaldehyde and used for the removal of Cr(VI ions from aqueous solutions. A simple and sensitive solid phase extraction procedure was applied for the determination of chromium at trace levels by spectroscopic method using 1,5-diphenylcarbazide reagent. The adsorption of Cr(VI on the coffee polyphenol-formaldehyde/acetaldehyde resins was monitored by FTIR and EDX analysis. The metal adsorption parameters such as contact time, pH, Cr(VI ion concentration, and adsorbent dose were investigated. For Cr(VI, the maximum adsorption capacity of coffee polyphenol-formaldehyde resins was 98% at pH 2. The experimental results showed that Cr(VI bound strongly with coffee polyphenol-formaldehyde/acetaldehyde resins and utilization of resins could be improved greatly by reuse.

  2. Development of industrial brewing yeast with low acetaldehyde production and improved flavor stability.

    Wang, Jinjing; Shen, Nan; Yin, Hua; Liu, Chunfeng; Li, Yongxian; Li, Qi

    2013-02-01

    Higher acetaldehyde concentration in beer is one of the main concerns of current beer industry in China. Acetaldehyde is always synthesized during beer brewing by the metabolism of yeast. Here, using ethanol as the sole carbon source and 4-methylpyrazole as the selection marker, we constructed a new mutant strain with lower acetaldehyde production and improved ethanol tolerance via traditional mutagenesis strategy. European Brewery Convention tube fermentation tests comparing the fermentation broths of mutant strain and industrial brewing strain showed that the acetaldehyde concentration of mutant strain was 81.67 % lower, whereas its resistant staling value was 1.0-fold higher. Owing to the mutation, the alcohol dehydrogenase activity of the mutant strain decreased to about 30 % of the wild-type strain. In the meantime, the fermentation performance of the newly screened strain has little difference compared with the wild-type strain, and there are no safety problems regarding the industrial usage of the mutant strain. Therefore, we suggest that the newly screened strain could be directly applied to brewing industry. PMID:23296804

  3. Abundances of ethylene oxide and acetaldehyde in hot molecular cloud cores

    Nummelin, A.; Dickens, J. E.; Bergman, P.; Hjalmarson, A.; Irvine, W. M.; Ikeda, M.; Ohishi, M.

    1998-01-01

    We have searched for millimetre-wave line emission from ethylene oxide (c-C2H4O) and its structural isomer acetaldehyde (CH3CHO) in 11 molecular clouds using SEST. Ethylene oxide and acetaldehyde were detected through multiple lines in the hot cores NGC 6334F, G327.3-0.6, G31.41+0.31, and G34.3+0.2. Acetaldehyde was also detected towards G10.47+0.03, G322.2+0.6, and Orion 3'N, and one ethylene oxide line was tentatively detected in G10.47+0.03. Column densities and rotational excitation temperatures were derived using a procedure which fits the observed line intensifies by finding the minimum chi 2-value. The resulting rotational excitation temperatures of ethylene oxide and acetaldehyde are in the range 16-38 K, indicating that these species are excited in the outer, cooler parts of the hot cores or that the excitation is significantly subthermal. For an assumed source size of 20", the deduced column densities are (0.6-1)x10(14) cm-2 for ethylene oxide and (2-5)x10(14) cm-2 for acetaldehyde. The fractional abundances with respect to H2 are X[c-C2H4O]=(2-6)xl0(-10), and X[CH3CHO]=(0.8-3)x10(-9). The ratio X[CH3CHO]/X[c-C2H4O] varies between 2.6 (NGC 6334F) and 8.5 (G327.3-0.6). We also detected and analysed multiple transitions of CH3OH, CH3OCH3, C2H5OH, and HCOOH. The chemical, and possibly evolutionary, states of NGC 6334F, G327.3-0.6, G31.41+0.31, and G34.3+0.2 seem to be very similar.

  4. Formation of 2-propanol in condensed molecular films of acetaldehyde following electron impact ionisation-induced proton transfer*

    Borrmann, Tobias; Swiderek, Petra

    2016-06-01

    Experimental studies on thin condensed layers of acetaldehyde have previously revealed that electron exposure at an energy above the ionisation threshold leads to formation of 2-propanol. However, the mechanism of this reaction remained unclear. Therefore, a computational approach is used to explore the electron-induced reactions of acetaldehyde yielding 2-propanol. Starting from hydrogen-bonded dimers of acetaldehyde we show that the initial ionisation event triggers proton transfer between the two acetaldehyde moieties resulting in a hydrogen-bonded complex of a [OCCH3] radical and a protonated acetaldehyde cation. Given an excess energy of up to 0.75 eV and a favourable arrangement, a methyl radical released upon dissociation of the CC bond within the [OCCH3] radical can migrate to the carbonyl carbon of the protonated acetaldehyde cation. This produces a 2-propanol radical cation and CO. Neutral 2-propanol is then obtained by recombination with a second electron. A mechanism involving ionisation-driven proton transfer is thus proposed as pathway to the formation of 2-propanol during electron exposure of condensed layers of acetaldehyde.

  5. Modeling of experimental treatment of acetaldehyde-laden air and phenol-containing water using corona discharge technique.

    Faungnawakij, Kajornsak; Sano, Noriaki; Charinpanitkul, Tawatchai; Tanthapanichakoon, Wiwut

    2006-03-01

    Acetaldehyde-laden air and phenol-contaminated water were experimentally treated using corona discharge reactions and gas absorption in a single water-film column. Mathematical modeling of the combined treatment was developed in this work. Efficient removal of the gaseous acetaldehyde was achieved while the corona discharge reactions produced short-lived species such as O and O- as well as ozone. Direct contact of the radicals and ions with water was known to produce aqueous OH radical, which contributes to the decomposition of organic contaminants: phenol, absorbed acetaldehyde, and intermediate byproducts in the water. The influence of initial phenol concentration ranging from 15 to 50 mg L(-1) and that of influent acetaldehyde ranging from 0 to 200 ppm were experimentally investigated and used to build the math model. The maximum energetic efficiency of TOC, phenol, and acetaldehyde were obtained at 25.6 x 10(-9) mol carbon J(-1), 25.0 x 10(-9) mol phenol J(-1), and 2.0 x 10(-9) mol acetaldehyde J(-1), respectively. The predictions for the decomposition of acetaldehyde, phenol, and their intermediates were found to be in good agreement with the experimental results. PMID:16568779

  6. Selective catalytic reduction of nitric oxide with acetaldehyde over NaY zeolite catalyst in lean exhaust feed

    Steady-state selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of nitric oxide (NO) was investigated under simulated lean-burn conditions using acetaldehyde (CH3CHO) as the reductant. This work describes the influence of catalyst space velocity and the impact of nitric oxide, acetaldehyde, oxygen, sulfur dioxide, and water on NOx reduction activity over NaY zeolite catalyst. Results indicate that with sufficient catalyst volume 90% NOx conversion can be achieved at temperatures relevant to light-duty diesel exhaust (150-350C). Nitric oxide and acetaldehyde react to form N2, HCN, and CO2. Oxygen is necessary in the exhaust feed stream to oxidize NO to NO2 over the catalyst prior to reduction, and water is required to prevent catalyst deactivation. Under conditions of excess acetaldehyde (C1:N>6:1) and low temperature (x conversion is apparently very high; however, the NOx conversion steadily declines with time due to catalytic oxidation of some of the stored (adsorbed) NO to NO2, which can have a significant impact on steady-state NOx conversion. With 250ppm NO in the exhaust feed stream, maximum NOx conversion at 200C can be achieved with =400ppm of acetaldehyde, with higher acetaldehyde concentrations resulting in production of acetic acid and breakthrough of NO2 causing lower NOx conversion levels. Less acetaldehyde is necessary at lower NO concentrations, while more acetaldehyde is required at higher temperatures. Sulfur in the exhaust feed stream as SO2 can cause slow deactivation of the catalyst by poisoning the adsorption and subsequent reaction of nitric oxide and acetaldehyde, particularly at low temperature

  7. Ambient temperature operated acetaldehyde vapour detection of spray deposited cobalt doped zinc oxide thin film.

    Shalini, S; Balamurugan, D

    2016-03-15

    Undoped and Co-doped ZnO thin films were prepared by a home built spray pyrolysis method. X-ray diffraction results indicate that both undoped and Co-doped ZnO have a polycrystalline nature and a preferential orientation peak in the (002) plane. From a field-emission scanning electron micrographs of annealed films, a uniform distribution of nanoparticles along with nanorods was observed. UV-Visible measurement indicated that all the films are transparent in the visible region. The electrical resistance was also reported. The acetaldehyde sensing behaviour of the prepared undoped and Co-doped ZnO thin films was studied using the chemi-resistive method at ambient temperature (∼30 °C). In the presence of 10 ppm of acetaldehyde vapour, the Co-doped ZnO thin films showed good sensing response of 74% with fast response and recovery time of 3 s and 110 s respectively. PMID:26748067

  8. ALDH2 Genotype Has No Effect on Salivary Acetaldehyde without the Presence of Ethanol in the Systemic Circulation

    Helminen, Andreas; Väkeväinen, Satu; Salaspuro, Mikko

    2013-01-01

    Background Acetaldehyde associated with alcoholic beverages was recently classified as carcinogenic (Group 1) to humans based on uniform epidemiological and biochemical evidence. ALDH2 (aldehyde dehydrogenase 2) deficient alcohol consumers are exposed to high concentrations of salivary acetaldehyde and have an increased risk of upper digestive tract cancer. However, this interaction is not seen among ALDH2 deficient non-drinkers or rare drinkers, regardless of their smoking status or consumpt...

  9. Photodissociation of acetaldehyde as a second example of the roaming mechanism

    Houston, P. L.; Kable, S. H.

    2006-01-01

    Product state distributions of the CO produced in the 308-nm photolysis of acetaldehyde show clear evidence of two dissociation mechanisms. One is attributed to the conventional transition state mechanism predicted by theory, with high rotational and translational energy of the CO and a pronounced v⊥J vector correlation. However, as much as 15% of the reaction flux proceeds via another pathway that produces low CO rotational and translational energy, very high CH4 internal energy, and no corr...

  10. Polyamines stimulate the formation of mutagenic 1,N 2-propanodeoxyguanosine adducts from acetaldehyde

    Theruvathu, Jacob A.; Jaruga, Pawel; Nath, Raghu G.; Dizdaroglu, Miral; Brooks, P. J.

    2005-01-01

    Alcoholic beverage consumption is associated with an increased risk of upper gastrointestinal cancer. Acetaldehyde (AA), the first metabolite of ethanol, is a suspected human carcinogen, but the molecular mechanisms underlying AA carcinogenicity are unclear. In this work, we tested the hypothesis that polyamines could facilitate the formation of mutagenic α-methyl-γ-hydroxy-1,N 2-propano-2′-deoxyguanosine (Cr-PdG) adducts from biologically relevant AA concentrations. We found that Cr-PdG addu...

  11. (3s←n) REMPI of jet-cooled acetaldehyde using two laser beams

    Philis, J. G.; Kosmidis, C.

    2001-05-01

    The 3s←n Rydberg transition of acetaldehyde has been studied by a two-color experiment (545 and 272.5 nm light) by means of a TOF mass spectrometer. The recorded spectra are in close resemblance to the known one-color (2R+1) MPI spectra (364 nm). Nevertheless, the observed mass spectra are different. These differences are discussed in detail. Moreover, two-photon resonances of atomic carbon have been detected, indicating complete dissociation of some neutral fragments.

  12. Determination of free acetaldehyde in blood as the dinitrophenylhydrazone derivative by high-performance liquid chromatography.

    Lucas, D; Ménez, J F; Berthou, F; Pennec, Y; Floch, H H

    1986-10-31

    A simple and sensitive method is proposed for the measurement of acetaldehyde in human blood. Venous blood samples were collected in EDTA Vacutainer tubes, and treated immediately with 0.6 M ice-cold perchloric acid in saline. After centrifugation at 4 degrees C, the supernatants were treated with dinitrophenylhydrazine reagent. After addition of the internal standard (crotonaldehyde dinitrophenylhydrazone) and 3 M sodium acetate, the derivatives were extracted and analysed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) using an Ultrasphere ODS column. The compounds were separated using acetonitrile--water as the mobile phase and detected at 356 nm. A blank determination was carried out for each analysis and subtracted from the results. The specificity of the method was tested by UV and mass spectrometry and the purity of the derivatives by capillary gas chromatography. The recovery of blood acetaldehyde was 98%. Interference from ethanol was minimized by using the tripotassium salt of EDTA as an anticoagulant. The sensitivity of the method can be increased dramatically using microbore HPLC. The level of acetaldehyde was found to be 0.41 +/- 0.13 microM (mean +/- S.D.) for eight fasting controls and 0.91 +/- 0.73 microM for fourteen alcoholics (p less than 0.05). At 30 min after oral administration of ethanol (0.8 g/kg), the ethanol levels were 16.3 +/- 2.8 and 17.7 +/- 2.5 mM and the acetaldehyde levels were 1.67 +/- 0.35 and 3.13 +/- 2.43 microM (p less than 0.05) for the controls and alcoholics, respectively. PMID:3782415

  13. Acetaldehyde Oxime, A Product Formed during the In Vivo Nitrate Reductase Assay of Soybean Leaves.

    Mulvaney, C S; Hageman, R H

    1984-09-01

    Evolution of nitrogen oxides (NO((x)), primarily as nitric oxide) from soybean (Glycine max [L.] Merr.) leaves during purged in vivo nitrate reductase assays had been reported; however, these reports were based on a method that had been used for determination of NO((x)) in air. This method also detects other N compounds. Preliminary work led us to doubt that the evolved N was nitric oxide. Studies were undertaken to identify the N compound evolved from the in vivo assay that had been reported as NO((x)). Material for identification was obtained by cryogenic trapping and fractional distillation, and by chemical trapping procedures. Mass spectrometry, ultraviolet spectroscopy, and (15)N-labeled nitrate were used to identify the compounds evolved and to determine whether these compounds were derived from nitrate. Acetaldehyde oxime was identified as the predominant N compound evolved and this compound is readily detected by the method for NO((x)) determination. Substantial quantities of acetaldehyde oxime (16.2 micromoles per gram fresh weight per hour) were evolved during the in vivo assay. Small amounts of nitrous oxide (0.63 micrograms N per gram fresh weight per hour) were evolved, but this compound is not detected as NO((x)). Acetaldehyde oxime and nitrous oxide were both produced as a result of nitrate ((15)NO(3) (-)) reduction during the assay. PMID:16663781

  14. Acetaldehyde Oxime, A Product Formed during the In Vivo Nitrate Reductase Assay of Soybean Leaves 1

    Mulvaney, Charlene S.; Hageman, Richard H.

    1984-01-01

    Evolution of nitrogen oxides (NO(x), primarily as nitric oxide) from soybean (Glycine max [L.] Merr.) leaves during purged in vivo nitrate reductase assays had been reported; however, these reports were based on a method that had been used for determination of NO(x) in air. This method also detects other N compounds. Preliminary work led us to doubt that the evolved N was nitric oxide. Studies were undertaken to identify the N compound evolved from the in vivo assay that had been reported as NO(x). Material for identification was obtained by cryogenic trapping and fractional distillation, and by chemical trapping procedures. Mass spectrometry, ultraviolet spectroscopy, and 15N-labeled nitrate were used to identify the compounds evolved and to determine whether these compounds were derived from nitrate. Acetaldehyde oxime was identified as the predominant N compound evolved and this compound is readily detected by the method for NO(x) determination. Substantial quantities of acetaldehyde oxime (16.2 micromoles per gram fresh weight per hour) were evolved during the in vivo assay. Small amounts of nitrous oxide (0.63 micrograms N per gram fresh weight per hour) were evolved, but this compound is not detected as NO(x). Acetaldehyde oxime and nitrous oxide were both produced as a result of nitrate (15NO3−) reduction during the assay. PMID:16663781

  15. Risk assessment for the Italian population of acetaldehyde in alcoholic and non-alcoholic beverages.

    Paiano, Viviana; Bianchi, Giancarlo; Davoli, Enrico; Negri, Eva; Fanelli, Roberto; Fattore, Elena

    2014-07-01

    Acetaldehyde is a naturally-occurring carcinogenic compound, present in different food items, especially in alcoholic beverages. The aims of this study were to measure acetaldehyde concentration in different beverages consumed in Italy and to estimate the potential cancer risk. The analytical procedure was based on headspace solid-phase microextraction (SPME) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), using the isotopic dilution method. The margin of exposure (MOE) approach of the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) was used for risk characterisation. The highest concentrations (median, min-max) were detected in grappa samples (499, 23.4-1850mg/l), followed by fruit-based liqueurs and spirits (62.0, 5.23-483mg/l) and wine (68.0, 18.1-477mg/l); the lowest were detected in gin (0.91, 0.78-1.90mg/l). The lowest MOE was estimated for high wine consumers (69). These results suggest that regulatory measures and consumer guidance may be necessary for acetaldehyde in beverages. PMID:24518311

  16. Vertical fluxes and atmospheric cycling of methanol, acetaldehyde, and acetone in a coastal environment

    M. Yang

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available We present here vertical fluxes of methanol, acetaldehyde, and acetone measured directly with eddy covariance (EC during March to July 2012 near the southwest coast of the UK. The performance of the proton-transfer reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS for flux measurement is characterized, with additional considerations given to the homogeneity and stationarity assumptions required by EC. Concentrations and fluxes of these compounds vary significantly with time of day and wind direction. Higher values of acetaldehyde and acetone are usually observed in the daytime and from the direction of a forested park, most likely due to light-driven emissions from terrestrial plants. Methanol concentration and flux do not demonstrate clear diel variability, suggesting sources in addition to plants. We estimate air–sea exchange and photochemical rates of these compounds, which are compared to measured vertical fluxes. For acetaldehyde, the mean (1σ concentration of 0.13 (0.02 ppb at night may be maintained by oceanic emission, while photochemical destruction outpaces production during the day. Air-sea exchange and photochemistry are probably net sinks of methanol and acetone in this region. Their nighttime concentrations of 0.46 (0.20 and 0.39 (0.08 ppb appear to be affected more by terrestrial emissions and long distance transport, respectively.

  17. Evaluating acetaldehyde synthesis from L-14C(U)] threonine by Streptococcus thermophilus and Lactobacillus bulgaricus

    To evaluate the synthesis of acetaldehyde from threonine during growth of yogurt cultures, Streptococcus thermophilus MS1 and Lactobacillus bulgaricus MR1 were grown in defined medium in which 10% of the total threonine was composed of L-[carbon-14(U)]threonine. Acetaldehyde production was monitored by formation of 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazone followed by separation and analysis using high performance liquid chromatography. After growth for 8 h at 420C, approximately 2.0% of the total acetaldehyde (780.4 nmol) produced was from L-[carbon-14]threonine. Threonine aldolase activity was determined in cell-free extracts from S. thermophilus and L. bulgaricus grown in Elliker broth. Increasing incubation temperature from 30 to 420C decreased threonine aldolase activity in cells of the streptococcus harvested after 8 h of incubation. Effect of incubation temperature was more dramatic in cells harvested after 18 h where the activity of cells grown at 480C was 89% lower than that of cells grown at 300C. Cell extracts from S. thermophilus MS1 possessed higher threonine aldolase activity than did those from L. bulgaricus MR1. Increased assay temperature from 30 to 420C increased threonine aldolase activity in S. thermophilus MS1

  18. Sources and sinks of acetone, methanol, and acetaldehyde in North Atlantic marine air

    A. C. Lewis

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of acetone, methanol, acetaldehyde and a range of non-methane hydrocarbons have been made in North Atlantic marine air at the Mace Head observatory. Under maritime conditions the combination of OVOCs (acetone, methanol and acetaldehyde contributed up to 85% of the total mass of measured non methane organics in air and up to 80% of the OH radical organic sink, when compared with the sum of all other organic compounds including non-methane hydrocarbons, DMS and OH-reactive halocarbons (trichloromethane and tetrachloroethylene. The observations showed anomalies in the variance and abundance of acetaldehyde and acetone over that expected for species with a remote terrestrial emission source and OH controlled chemical lifetime. A detailed model incorporating an explicit chemical degradation mechanism indicated in situ formation during air mass transport was on timescales longer than the atmospheric lifetime of precursor hydrocarbons or primary emission. The period over which this process was significant was similar to that of airmass motion on intercontinental scales, and formation via this route may reproduce that of a widespread diffuse source. The model indicates that continued short chain OVOC formation occurs many days from the point of emission, via longer lived intermediates of oxidation such as organic peroxides and long chain alcohols.

  19. Sources and sinks of acetone, methanol, and acetaldehyde in North Atlantic air

    A. C. Lewis

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of acetone, methanol, acetaldehyde and a range of non-methane hydrocarbons have been made in North Atlantic marine air at the Mace Head observatory. Under maritime conditions the combination of OVOCs (acetone, methanol and 5 acetaldehyde contributed up to 85% of the total mass of measured non methane organics in air and up to 80% of the OH radical organic sink, when compared with the sum of all other organic compounds including non-methane hydrocarbons, DMS and OH-reactive halocarbons (trichloromethane and tetrachloroethylene. The observations showed anomalies in the variance and abundance of acetaldehyde and acetone 10 over that expected for species with a remote terrestrial emission source and OH controlled chemical lifetime. A detailed model incorporating an explicit chemical degradation mechanism indicated in situ formation during air mass transport was on timescales longer than the atmospheric lifetime of precursor hydrocarbons or primary emission. The period over which this process was significant was similar to that of airmass mo15 tion on intercontinental scales, and formation via this route may reproduce that of a widespread diffuse source. The model indicates that continued short chain OVOC formation occurs many days from the point of emission, via longer lived intermediates of oxidation such as organic peroxides and long chain alcohols.

  20. Astaxanthin Inhibits Acetaldehyde-Induced Cytotoxicity in SH-SY5Y Cells by Modulating Akt/CREB and p38MAPK/ERK Signaling Pathways

    Tingting Yan; Yan Zhao; Xia Zhang; Xiaotong Lin

    2016-01-01

    Excessive alcohol consumption can lead to brain tissue damage and cognitive dysfunction. Acetaldehyde, the most toxic metabolite of ethanol, mediates the brain tissue damage and cognitive dysfunction induced by chronic excessive alcohol consumption. In this study, the effect of astaxanthin, a marine bioactive compound, on acetaldehyde-induced cytotoxicity was investigated in SH-SY5Y cells. It was found that astaxanthin protected cells from apoptosis by ameliorating the effect of acetaldehyde ...

  1. Short-term salivary acetaldehyde increase due to direct exposure to alcoholic beverages as an additional cancer risk factor beyond ethanol metabolism

    Monakhova Yulia B; Lachenmeier Dirk W

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background An increasing body of evidence now implicates acetaldehyde as a major underlying factor for the carcinogenicity of alcoholic beverages and especially for oesophageal and oral cancer. Acetaldehyde associated with alcohol consumption is regarded as 'carcinogenic to humans' (IARC Group 1), with sufficient evidence available for the oesophagus, head and neck as sites of carcinogenicity. At present, research into the mechanistic aspects of acetaldehyde-related oral cancer has b...

  2. Short-term salivary acetaldehyde increase due to direct exposure to alcoholic beverages as an additional cancer risk factor beyond ethanol metabolism

    Monakhova Yulia B

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An increasing body of evidence now implicates acetaldehyde as a major underlying factor for the carcinogenicity of alcoholic beverages and especially for oesophageal and oral cancer. Acetaldehyde associated with alcohol consumption is regarded as 'carcinogenic to humans' (IARC Group 1, with sufficient evidence available for the oesophagus, head and neck as sites of carcinogenicity. At present, research into the mechanistic aspects of acetaldehyde-related oral cancer has been focused on salivary acetaldehyde that is formed either from ethanol metabolism in the epithelia or from microbial oxidation of ethanol by the oral microflora. This study was conducted to evaluate the role of the acetaldehyde that is found as a component of alcoholic beverages as an additional factor in the aetiology of oral cancer. Methods Salivary acetaldehyde levels were determined in the context of sensory analysis of different alcoholic beverages (beer, cider, wine, sherry, vodka, calvados, grape marc spirit, tequila, cherry spirit, without swallowing, to exclude systemic ethanol metabolism. Results The rinsing of the mouth for 30 seconds with an alcoholic beverage is able to increase salivary acetaldehyde above levels previously judged to be carcinogenic in vitro, with levels up to 1000 μM in cases of beverages with extreme acetaldehyde content. In general, the highest salivary acetaldehyde concentration was found in all cases in the saliva 30 sec after using the beverages (average 353 μM. The average concentration then decreased at the 2-min (156 μM, 5-min (76 μM and 10-min (40 μM sampling points. The salivary acetaldehyde concentration depends primarily on the direct ingestion of acetaldehyde contained in the beverages at the 30-sec sampling, while the influence of the metabolic formation from ethanol becomes the major factor at the 2-min sampling point. Conclusions This study offers a plausible mechanism to explain the increased risk for oral

  3. Adsorption and Photocatalytic Kinetics of Visible-Light Response N-Doped TiO2 Nanocatalyst for Indoor Acetaldehyde Removal under Dark and Light Conditions

    Yu-Hao Lin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the removal nature of the indoor volatile organic compounds under realistic environment conditions would give clear guidance for the development of air purification devices. The study investigated the removal of indoor acetaldehyde using visible-light-responsive N-doped TiO2 (N-TiO2 photocatalyst under visible-light irradiation (light and in the absence of light (dark. The adsorption kinetics of acetaldehyde onto N-TiO2 followed a pseudo-second-order model. The magnitude of acetaldehyde adsorption is proportional to temperature, and the results were fitted to the Langmuir isotherm model. Moreover, the effect of initial acetaldehyde concentration and visible-light intensity on the photooxidation of acetaldehyde was well described by the Langmuir-Hinshelwood model. Results show that the mesoporous N-TiO2 catalyst had a high ability to absorb acetaldehyde in the dark condition, and then acetaldehyde was subsequently photooxidized under visible-light irradiation. The adsorption capacity was found to increase with decreasing temperature. The negative value of ΔG° and the positive value of ΔS° indicate that the adsorption of acetaldehyde onto N-TiO2 was a spontaneous process. Finally, a reaction scheme for removal process of indoor acetaldehyde by N-TiO2 was proposed.

  4. Kinetics of cytochrome P450 2E1-catalyzed oxidation of ethanol to acetic acid via acetaldehyde.

    Bell-Parikh, L C; Guengerich, F P

    1999-08-20

    The P450 2E1-catalyzed oxidation of ethanol to acetaldehyde is characterized by a kinetic deuterium isotope effect that increases K(m) with no effect on k(cat), and rate-limiting product release has been proposed to account for the lack of an isotope effect on k(cat) (Bell, L. C., and Guengerich, F. P. (1997) J. Biol. Chem. 272, 29643-29651). Acetaldehyde is also a substrate for P450 2E1 oxidation to acetic acid, and k(cat)/K(m) for this reaction is at least 1 order of magnitude greater than that for ethanol oxidation to acetaldehyde. Acetic acid accounts for 90% of the products generated from ethanol in a 10-min reaction, and the contribution of this second oxidation has been overlooked in many previous studies. The noncompetitive intermolecular kinetic hydrogen isotope effects on acetaldehyde oxidation to acetic acid ((H)(k(cat)/K(m))/(D)(k(cat)/K(m)) = 4.5, and (D)k(cat) = 1.5) are comparable with the isotope effects typically observed for ethanol oxidation to acetaldehyde, and k(cat) is similar for both reactions, suggesting a possible common catalytic mechanism. Rapid quench kinetic experiments indicate that acetic acid is formed rapidly from added acetaldehyde (approximately 450 min(-1)) with burst kinetics. Pulse-chase experiments reveal that, at a subsaturating concentration of ethanol, approximately 90% of the acetaldehyde intermediate is directly converted to acetic acid without dissociation from the enzyme active site. Competition experiments suggest that P450 2E1 binds acetic acid and acetaldehyde with relatively high K(d) values, which preclude simple tight binding as an explanation for rate-limiting product release. The existence of a rate-determining step between product formation and release is postulated. Also proposed is a conformational change in P450 2E1 occurring during the course of oxidation and the discrimination of P450 2E1 between acetaldehyde and its hydrated form, the gem-diol. This multistep P450 reaction is characterized by kinetic

  5. Biochemical characterization of a bifunctional acetaldehyde-alcohol dehydrogenase purified from a facultative anaerobic bacterium Citrobacter sp. S-77.

    Tsuji, Kohsei; Yoon, Ki-Seok; Ogo, Seiji

    2016-03-01

    Acetaldehyde-alcohol dehydrogenase (ADHE) is a bifunctional enzyme consisting of two domains of an N-terminal acetaldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) and a C-terminal alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH). The enzyme is known to be important in the cellular alcohol metabolism. However, the role of coenzyme A-acylating ADHE responsible for ethanol production from acetyl-CoA remains uncertain. Here, we present the purification and biochemical characterization of an ADHE from Citrobacter sp. S-77 (ADHES77). Interestingly, the ADHES77 was unable to be solubilized from membrane with detergents either 1% Triton X-100 or 1% Sulfobetaine 3-12. However, the enzyme was easily dissociated from membrane by high-salt buffers containing either 1.0 M NaCl or (NH4)2SO4 without detergents. The molecular weight of a native protein was estimated as approximately 400 kDa, consisting of four identical subunits of 96.3 kDa. Based on the specific activity and kinetic analysis, the ADHES77 tended to have catalytic reaction towards acetaldehyde elimination rather than acetaldehyde formation. Our experimental observation suggests that the ADHES77 may play a pivotal role in modulating intracellular acetaldehyde concentration. PMID:26216639

  6. Adsorption and Reaction of Acetaldehyde on Shape-Controlled CeO2 Nanocrystals: Elucidation of Structure-function Relationships

    Mann, Amanda K [ORNL; Wu, Zili [ORNL; Calaza, Florencia [Max Planck Society, Fritz Haber Institute; Overbury, Steven {Steve} H [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    CeO2 cubes with {100} facets, octahedra with {111} facets, and wires with highly defective structures were utilized to probe the structure-dependent reactivity of acetaldehyde. Using temperature-programmed desorption (TPD), temperature-programmed surface reactions (TPSR), and in situ infrared spectroscopy it was found that acetaldehyde desorbs unreacted or undergoes reduction, coupling, or C-C bond scission reactions depending on the surface structure of CeO2. Room temperature FTIR indicates that acetaldehyde binds primarily as 1-acetaldehyde on the octahedra, in a variety of conformations on the cubes, including coupling products and acetate and enolate species, and primarily as coupling products on the wires. The percent consumption of acetaldehyde follows the order of wires > cubes > octahedra. All the nanoshapes produce the coupling product crotonaldehyde; however, the selectivity to produce ethanol follows the order wires cubes >> octahedra. The selectivity and other differences can be attributed to the variation in the basicity of the surfaces, defects densities, coordination numbers of surface atoms, and the reducibility of the nanoshapes.

  7. Millimeter and submillimeter wave spectra of mono-13C-acetaldehydes

    Margulès, L.; Motiyenko, R. A.; Ilyushin, V. V.; Guillemin, J. C.

    2015-07-01

    Context. The acetaldehyde molecule is ubiquitous in the interstellar medium of our galaxy, and due to its dense and complex spectrum, large dipole moment, and several low-lying torsional states, acetaldehyde is considered to be a "weed" molecule for radio astronomy observations. Mono-13C acetaldehydes 13CH3CHO and CH313CHO are likely to be identified in astronomical surveys, such as those available with the very sensitive ALMA telescope. Laboratory measurements and analysis of the millimeter and submillimeter-wave spectra are the prerequisites for the successful radioastronomical search for the new interstellar molecular species, as well as for new isotopologs of already detected interstellar molecules. Aims: In this context, to provide reliable predictions of 13CH3CHO and CH313CHO spectra in millimeter and submillimeter wave ranges, we study rotational spectra of these species in the frequency range from 50 to 945 GHz. Methods: The spectra of mono-13C acetaldehydes were recorded using the spectrometer based on Schottky-diode frequencymultiplication chains in the Lille laboratory. The rotational spectra of 13CH3CHO and CH313CHO molecules were analyzed using the Rho axis method. Results: In the recorded spectra we have assigned 6884 for the 13CH3CHO species and 6458 for CH313CHO species new rotational transitions belonging to the ground, first, and second excited torsional states. These measurements were fitted together with previously published data to the Hamiltonian models that use 91 and 87 parameters to achieve overall weighted rms deviations 0.88 for the 13CH3CHO species and 0.95 for CH313CHO. On the basis of the new spectroscopic results, predictions of transition frequencies in the frequency range up to 1 THz with J ≤ 60 and Ka ≤ 20 are presented for both isotopologs. Full Tables 3-6 are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/579/A46

  8. Sensitive gas chromatographic detection of acetaldehyde and acetone using a reduction gas detector

    O'Hara, Dean; Singh, Hanwant B.

    1988-01-01

    The response of a newly available mercuric oxide Reduction Gas Detector (RGD-2) to subpicomole and larger quantities of acetaldehyde and acetone is tested. The RGD-2 is found to be capable of subpicomole detection for these carbonyls and is more sensitive than an FID (Flame Ionization Detector) by an order of magnitude. Operating parameters can be further optimized to make the RGD-2 some 20-40 times more sensitive than an FID. The detector is linear over a wide range and is easily adapted to a conventional gas chromatograph (GC). Such a GC-RGD-2 system should be suitable for atmospheric carbonyl measurements in clean as well as polluted environments.

  9. Acetaldehyde reinforcement and motor reactivity in newborns with or without a prenatal history of alcohol exposure

    March, Samanta M.; Culleré, Marcela E.; Abate, Paula; Hernández, José I.; Spear, Norman E.; Molina, Juan C.

    2013-01-01

    Animal models have shown that early ontogeny seems to be a period of enhanced affinity to ethanol. Interestingly, the catalase system that transforms ethanol (EtOH) into acetaldehyde (ACD) in the brain, is more active in the perinatal rat compared to adults. ACD has been found to share EtOH's behavioral effects. The general purpose of the present study was to assess ACD motivational and motor effects in newborn rats as a function of prenatal exposure to EtOH. Experiment 1 evaluated if ACD (0....

  10. Acetaldehyde reinforcement and motor reactivity in newborns with or without a prenatal history of alcohol exposure

    Samanta Mabel March; Spear, Norman E.

    2013-01-01

    Animal models have shown that early ontogeny seems to be a period of enhanced affinity to ethanol. Interestingly, the catalase system, that transforms ethanol (EtOH) into acetaldehyde (ACD) in the brain, is more active in the perinatal rat compared to adults. ACD has been found to share EtOH’s behavioral effects. The general purpose of the present study was to assess ACD motivational and motor effects in newborn rats as a function of prenatal exposure to EtOH. Experiment 1 evaluated if ACD (0...

  11. Astrochemistry at work in the L1157-B1 shock: acetaldehyde formation

    Codella, C.; Fontani, F.; Ceccarelli, C.; Podio, L; Viti, S.; Bachiller, R.; Benedettini, M.; Lefloch, B.

    2014-01-01

    The formation of complex organic molecules (COMs) in protostellar environments is a hotly debated topic. In particular, the relative importance of the gas phase processes as compared to a direct formation of COMs on the dust grain surfaces is so far unknown. We report here the first high-resolution images of acetaldehyde (CH$_3$CHO) emission towards the chemically rich protostellar shock L1157-B1, obtained at 2 mm with the IRAM Plateau de Bure interferometer. Six blueshifted CH$_3$CHO lines w...

  12. Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes as a Catalyst for Gas-Phase Oxidation of Ethanol to Acetaldehyde.

    Wang, Jia; Huang, Rui; Feng, Zhenbao; Liu, Hongyang; Su, Dangsheng

    2016-07-21

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were directly used as a sustainable and green catalyst to convert ethanol into acetaldehyde in the presence of molecular oxygen. The C=O groups generated on the nanocarbon surface were demonstrated as active sites for the selective oxidation of ethanol to acetaldehyde. The transformation of disordered carbon debris on the CNT surface to ordered graphitic structures induced by thermal-treatment significantly enhanced the stability of the active C=O groups, and thus the catalytic performance. A high reactivity with approximately 60 % ethanol conversion and 93 % acetaldehyde selectivity was obtained over the optimized CNT catalyst at 270 °C. More importantly, the catalytic performance was quite stable even after 500 h, which is comparable with a supported gold catalyst. The robust catalytic performance displayed the potential application of CNTs in the industrial catalysis field. PMID:27282126

  13. Oxidation of Ethanol to Acetaldehyde over Na-promoted vanadium oxide catalysts

    Sodium-promoted vanadium oxide catalysts supported on MCM-41 and TiO2 (anatase) were investigated for the partial oxidation of ethanol to acetaldehyde. The catalysts were prepared by incipient wetness impregnation with a vanadium oxide content of 6 wt. %. The experimental characterization was performed by X-ray diffraction (XRD), N2 adsorption, temperature programmed reduction (TPR), and diffuse reflectance UV-Vis. Temperature programmed oxidation (TPO) was also used to identify carbon deposits on the spent catalysts. The presence of sodium plays a strong role in the dispersion and reducibility of the vanadium species as detected by TPR analysis and optical absorption spectroscopy. While sodium addition increases the dispersion of the VOx species, its presence also decreases their reducibility. Additionally, TPO of the spent catalysts revealed that an increase in the Na loading decreases the carbon deposition during reaction. In the case of the catalysts supported on MCM-41, these modifications were mirrored by a change in the activity and selectivity to acetaldehyde. Additionally, on the VOx/TiO2 catalysts the catalytic activity decreased with increasing sodium content in the catalyst. A model in which sodium affects dispersion, reducibility and also acidity of the supported-vanadia species is proposed to explain all these observations

  14. Interaction of yeasts with the products resulting from the condensation reaction between (+)-catechin and acetaldehyde.

    Lopez-Toledano, Azahara; Villaño-Valencia, Debora; Mayen, Manuel; Merida, Julieta; Medina, Manuel

    2004-04-21

    The condensation reaction between (+)-catechin and acetaldehyde was studied in model solutions in the presence and absence yeasts in order to evaluate its contribution to color changes in fermented drinks such as white wine. On the basis of the results, the yeasts retain the oligomers produced in the reaction, their retention ability increasing for higher polymerization degrees. As a result, the color of model solutions, measured as the absorbance at 420 nm, was found to decrease after the addition of yeasts. On the other hand, the yeasts exhibited no inhibitory effect on the condensation reaction, which took place at the same rate in their presence and absence. At acidity levels and reactant concentrations similar to those in wine, with acetaldehyde in high concentration as it is present in sherry wines, the reaction was found to occur very slowly. Taking into account that Yeasts are present during most of the winemaking process; consequently, they retain oligomers, and the studied reaction could mainly contribute to the alteration of the color of white wine after bottling. PMID:15080649

  15. The (impossible?) formation of acetaldehyde on the grain surfaces: insights from quantum chemical calculations

    Enrique-Romero, Joan; Ceccarelli, Cecilia; Balucani, Nadia

    2016-01-01

    Complex Organic Molecules (COMs) have been detected in the interstellar medium (ISM). However, it is not clear whether their synthesis occurs on the icy surfaces of interstellar grains or via a series of gas-phase reactions. As a test case of the COMs synthesis in the ISM, we present new quantum chemical calculations on the formation of acetaldehyde (CH3CHO) from the coupling of the HCO and CH3 radicals, both in gas phase and on water ice surfaces. The binding energies of HCO and CH3 on the amorphous water ice were also computed (2333 and 734 K, respectively). Results indicate that, in gas phase, the products could be either CH3CHO, CH4 + CO, or CH3OCH, depending on the relative orientation of the two radicals. However, on the amorphous water ice, only the CH4 + CO product is possible due to the geometrical constraints imposed by the water ice surface. Therefore, acetaldehyde cannot be synthesized by the CH3 + HCO coupling on the icy grains. We discuss the implications of these results and other cases, such a...

  16. The (impossible?) formation of acetaldehyde on the grain surfaces: insights from quantum chemical calculations

    Enrique-Romero, J.; Rimola, A.; Ceccarelli, C.; Balucani, N.

    2016-06-01

    Complex Organic Molecules (COMs) have been detected in the interstellar medium (ISM). However, it is not clear whether their synthesis occurs on the icy surfaces of interstellar grains or via a series of gas-phase reactions. As a test case of the COMs synthesis in the ISM, we present new quantum chemical calculations on the formation of acetaldehyde (CH3CHO) from the coupling of the HCO and CH3 radicals, both in gas phase and on water ice surfaces. The binding energies of HCO and CH3 on the amorphous water ice were also computed (2333 and 734 K, respectively). Results indicate that, in gas phase, the products could be either CH3CHO, CH4 + CO, or CH3OCH, depending on the relative orientation of the two radicals. However, on the amorphous water ice, only the CH4 + CO product is possible due to the geometrical constraints imposed by the water ice surface. Therefore, acetaldehyde cannot be synthesized by the CH3 + HCO coupling on the icy grains. We discuss the implications of these results and other cases, such as ethylene glycol and dimethyl ether, in which similar situations can occur, suggesting that formation of these molecules on the grain surfaces might be unlikely.

  17. Astaxanthin Inhibits Acetaldehyde-Induced Cytotoxicity in SH-SY5Y Cells by Modulating Akt/CREB and p38MAPK/ERK Signaling Pathways.

    Yan, Tingting; Zhao, Yan; Zhang, Xia; Lin, Xiaotong

    2016-03-01

    Excessive alcohol consumption can lead to brain tissue damage and cognitive dysfunction. Acetaldehyde, the most toxic metabolite of ethanol, mediates the brain tissue damage and cognitive dysfunction induced by chronic excessive alcohol consumption. In this study, the effect of astaxanthin, a marine bioactive compound, on acetaldehyde-induced cytotoxicity was investigated in SH-SY5Y cells. It was found that astaxanthin protected cells from apoptosis by ameliorating the effect of acetaldehyde on the expression of Bcl-2 family proteins, preventing the reduction of anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 and the increase of pro-apoptotic protein Bak induced by acetaldehyde. Further analyses showed that astaxanthin treatment inhibited acetaldehyde-induced reduction of the levels of activated Akt and cyclic AMP-responsive element binding protein (CREB). Astaxanthin treatment also prevented acetaldehyde-induced increase of the level of activated p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and decrease of the level of activated extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERKs). Activation of Akt/CREB pathway promotes cell survival and is involved in the upregulation of Bcl-2 gene. P38MAPK plays a critical role in apoptotic events while ERKs mediates the inhibition of apoptosis. Thus, astaxanthin may inhibit acetaldehyde-induced apoptosis through promoting the activation of Akt/CREB and ERKs and blocking the activation of p38MAPK. In addition, astaxanthin treatment suppressed the oxidative stress induced by acetaldehyde and restored the antioxidative capacity of SH-SY5Y cells. Therefore, astaxanthin may protect cells against acetaldehyde-induced cytotoxicity through maintaining redox balance and modulating apoptotic and survival signals. The results suggest that astaxanthin treatment may be beneficial for preventing neurotoxicity associated with acetaldehyde and excessive alcohol consumption. PMID:26978376

  18. Astaxanthin Inhibits Acetaldehyde-Induced Cytotoxicity in SH-SY5Y Cells by Modulating Akt/CREB and p38MAPK/ERK Signaling Pathways

    Tingting Yan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Excessive alcohol consumption can lead to brain tissue damage and cognitive dysfunction. Acetaldehyde, the most toxic metabolite of ethanol, mediates the brain tissue damage and cognitive dysfunction induced by chronic excessive alcohol consumption. In this study, the effect of astaxanthin, a marine bioactive compound, on acetaldehyde-induced cytotoxicity was investigated in SH-SY5Y cells. It was found that astaxanthin protected cells from apoptosis by ameliorating the effect of acetaldehyde on the expression of Bcl-2 family proteins, preventing the reduction of anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 and the increase of pro-apoptotic protein Bak induced by acetaldehyde. Further analyses showed that astaxanthin treatment inhibited acetaldehyde-induced reduction of the levels of activated Akt and cyclic AMP-responsive element binding protein (CREB. Astaxanthin treatment also prevented acetaldehyde-induced increase of the level of activated p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK and decrease of the level of activated extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERKs. Activation of Akt/CREB pathway promotes cell survival and is involved in the upregulation of Bcl-2 gene. P38MAPK plays a critical role in apoptotic events while ERKs mediates the inhibition of apoptosis. Thus, astaxanthin may inhibit acetaldehyde-induced apoptosis through promoting the activation of Akt/CREB and ERKs and blocking the activation of p38MAPK. In addition, astaxanthin treatment suppressed the oxidative stress induced by acetaldehyde and restored the antioxidative capacity of SH-SY5Y cells. Therefore, astaxanthin may protect cells against acetaldehyde-induced cytotoxicity through maintaining redox balance and modulating apoptotic and survival signals. The results suggest that astaxanthin treatment may be beneficial for preventing neurotoxicity associated with acetaldehyde and excessive alcohol consumption.

  19. Thz Spectroscopy of 13C Isotopic Species of a "weed": Acetaldehyde

    Margulès, L.; Motiyenko, R. A.; Guillemin, J.-C.

    2011-06-01

    Our studies of the isotopic species of 13C and D isotopologues of methyl formate (HCOOCH_3), have allowed the detection of more than 600 lines in Orion. This confirms that many observed U-lines are coming from isotopic species of one of the most abundant molecules in space. Since its first detection in 1976 in SgrB2 and in Orion A, acetaldehyde (CH_3CHO) was detected in many other numerous objects. If its deuterated species (CD_3CHO and CH_3CDO) have been previously studied in the millimeterwave range, the data concerning the 13C species are limited to few lines measured in 1957 up to 40 GHz. In this context we decided to study the 13C species of acetaldehyde. Acetaldehyde molecule displays a large amplitude motion: the hindered rotation of the methyl group with respect to the rest of the molecule. The analysis is performed with the Rho Axis Method. Recent versions of the codes include high orders term in order to reproduce the observed frequencies for large quantum numbers values as J-values as high as 70a,b,. Measurements and analysis of the rotational spectra of 13C isotopic species are in progress in Lille with a solid-state submillimetre-wave spectrometer (50-950 GHz), the first results will be presented. This work is supported by the contract ANR-08-BLAN-0054 and by the Programme National de Physico-Chimie du Milieu Interstellaire (PCMI-CNRS). Carvajal, M.; Margulès, L.; Tercero, B.; et al.A&A 500, (2009) 1109 Margulès, L.; Huet, T. R.; Demaison J.; et al.,ApJ 714, (2010) 1120. Ikeda, M.; Ohishi, M.; Nummelin, A.; et al., ApJ, 560, (2001) 792 Kleiner, I.; Lopez, J.-C.; Blanco, S.; et al.J. Mol. Spectrosc. 197, (1999) 275 Elkeurti M.; Coudert, L. H.; Medvedev, I. R.; et al.J. Mol. Spectrosc. 263, (2010) 145 Kilb, R.W.; Lin, C.C.; and Wilson, E.B.J. Chem. Phys. 26, (1957) 1695 Kleiner, I. J. Mol. Spectrosc. 260, (2010) 1 Ilyushin, V.V.; Kryvda, A; and Alekseev, E;J. Mol. Spectrosc. 255, (2009) 32

  20. Experimental and modeling study of the oxidation of acetaldehyde in an atmospheric-pressure pulsed corona discharge

    Klett, C.; Touchard, S.; Vega-Gonzalez, A.; Redolfi, M.; Bonnin, X.; Hassouni, K.; Duten, X.

    2012-08-01

    This paper reports the results obtained for the degradation of acetaldehyde by an atmospheric plasma corona discharge working in a pulsed regime. It was shown that a few hundred ppm of acetaldehyde diluted in a pure N2 gas flow can be removed up to 80% by a discharge fed with an electric power lower than 1 W. Under the same conditions, adding up to 5% of O2 allowed the removal of up to 95% of the initial acetaldehyde. The main identified end products were CO2, CO and methanol. A quasi-homogeneous zero-dimensional chemical model was developed to investigate the respective efficiency of the discharge and post-discharge periods in the global removal of the pollutant. The identified main pathways of acetaldehyde degradation were quenching of N2 metastable states during plasma pulses and oxidation by O and OH radicals during the post-discharge. This latter contribution increased with input power because of ozone accumulation in the gas mixture acting as an additional oxygen reservoir.

  1. Minimising the Effects of Isobaric Product Ions in SIFT-MS Quantification of Acetaldehyde, Dimethyl Sulphide and Carbon Dioxide

    Smith, D.; Chippendale, T. W. E.; Španěl, Patrik

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 4 (2013), s. 550-557. ISSN 1573-4110 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : selected ion flow tube mass spectrometry * SIFT-MS * acetaldehyde Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 1.194, year: 2013

  2. Acetaldehyde as an Intermediate in the Electroreduction of Carbon Monoxide to Ethanol on Oxide-Derived Copper

    Bertheussen, Erlend; Verdaguer Casadevall, Arnau; Ravasio, Davide;

    2016-01-01

    Oxide-derived copper (OD-Cu) electrodes exhibit unprecedented CO reduction performance towards liquid fuels, producing ethanol and acetate with >50 % Faradaic efficiency at −0.3 V (vs. RHE). By using static headspace-gas chromatography for liquid phase analysis, we identify acetaldehyde as a mino...

  3. Kinetic analysis on photocatalytic degradation of gaseous acetaldehyde, ammonia and hydrogen sulfide on nanosized porous TiO2 films

    Iis Sopyan

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The characteristics of the UV illumination-assisted degradation of gaseous acetaldehyde, hydrogen sulfide, and ammonia on highly active nanostructured-anatase and rutile films were investigated. It was found that the anatase film showed a higher photocatalytic activity than the counterpart did, however, the magnitude of difference in the photocatalytic activity of both films decreased in the order ammonia>acetaldehyde>hydrogen sulfide. To elucidate the reasons for the observation, the adsorption characteristics and the kinetics of photocatalytic degradation of the three reactants on both films were analyzed. The adsorption analysis examined using a simple Langmuir isotherm, showed that adsorbability on both films decreased in the order ammonia>acetaldehyde>hydrogen sulfide, which can be explained in terms of the decreasing electron-donor capacity. Acetaldehyde and ammonia adsorbed more strongly and with higher coverage on anatase film (1.2 and 5.6 molecules/nm2, respectively than on rutile (0.6 and 4.7 molecules/nm2, respectively. Conversely, hydrogen sulfide molecules adsorbed more strongly on rutile film (0.7 molecules/nm2 than on anatase (0.4 molecules/nm2. Exposure to UV light illumination brought about the photocatalytic oxidation of the three gases in contact with both TiO2 films, and the decrease in concentration were measured, and their kinetics are analyzed in terms of the Langmuir–Hinshelwood kinetic model. From the kinetic analysis, it was found that the anatase film showed the photocatalytic activities that were factors of ~8 and ~5 higher than the rutile film for the degradation of gaseous ammonia and acetaldehyde, respectively. However, the activity was only a factor of ~1.5 higher for the photodegradation of hydrogen sulfide. These observations are systematically explained by the charge separation efficiency and the adsorption characteristics of each catalyst as well as by the physical and electrochemical properties of each

  4. Quality Characteristics and Quantification of Acetaldehyde and Methanol in Apple Wine Fermentation by Various Pre-Treatments of Mash.

    Won, Seon Yi; Seo, Jae Soon; Kwak, Han Sub; Lee, Youngseung; Kim, Misook; Shim, Hyoung-Seok; Jeong, Yoonhwa

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the effects of adding lactic acid and pectinase, and chaptalization for the quality of apple wine and the production of hazardous compounds (methanol and acetaldehyde). The pH of all of the samples was below 4; therefore, mash seemed to be fermented without any issue. Total acidity was the highest in sample A due to lactic acid addition. Pre-treated groups (samples B, C, and D) showed higher total acidities than that of the control (Ppectinase added sample (sample B) had the lowest alcohol contents. Adding lactic acid produced more alcohol, and chaptalized samples produced more alcohol due to the addition of sugar. Adding pectinase with and without chaptalization was not effective for producing more alcohol. The control sample had significantly higher acetaldehyde content (2.39 mg/L) than the other samples (1.00~2.07 mg/L); therefore, pre-treatments for apple wine fermentation produced a lower amount of acetaldehyde. Among the pre-treated samples, samples C and D showed the lowest acetaldehyde content of 1.00 mg/L and 1.16 mg/L, respectively. On the other hand, a significantly higher amount of methanol was generated for sample A (1.03 mg/L) and sample D (1.22 mg/L) than that of the control (0.82 mg/L) (P<0.05). Adding lactic acid or chaptalization was effective in reducing methanol and acetaldehyde in apple wines. PMID:26770917

  5. Direct measurement of Criegee intermediate (CH2OO) reactions with acetone, acetaldehyde, and hexafluoroacetone.

    Taatjes, Craig A; Welz, Oliver; Eskola, Arkke J; Savee, John D; Osborn, David L; Lee, Edmond P F; Dyke, John M; Mok, Daniel W K; Shallcross, Dudley E; Percival, Carl J

    2012-08-14

    Criegee biradicals, i.e., carbonyl oxides, are critical intermediates in ozonolysis and have been implicated in autoignition chemistry and other hydrocarbon oxidation systems, but until recently the direct measurement of their gas-phase kinetics has not been feasible. Indirect determinations of Criegee intermediate kinetics often rely on the introduction of a scavenger molecule into an ozonolysis system and analysis of the effects of the scavenger on yields of products associated with Criegee intermediate reactions. Carbonyl species, in particular hexafluoroacetone (CF(3)COCF(3)), have often been used as scavengers. In this work, the reactions of the simplest Criegee intermediate, CH(2)OO (formaldehyde oxide), with three carbonyl species have been measured by laser photolysis/tunable synchrotron photoionization mass spectrometry. Diiodomethane photolysis produces CH(2)I radicals, which react with O(2) to yield CH(2)OO + I. The formaldehyde oxide is reacted with a large excess of a carbonyl reactant and both the disappearance of CH(2)OO and the formation of reaction products are monitored. The rate coefficient for CH(2)OO + hexafluoroacetone is k(1) = (3.0 ± 0.3) × 10(-11) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1), supporting the use of hexafluoroacetone as a Criegee-intermediate scavenger. The reactions with acetaldehyde, k(2) = (9.5 ± 0.7) × 10(-13) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1), and with acetone, k(3) = (2.3 ± 0.3) × 10(-13) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1), are substantially slower. Secondary ozonides and products of ozonide isomerization are observed from the reactions of CH(2)OO with acetone and hexafluoroacetone. Their photoionization spectra are interpreted with the aid of quantum-chemical and Franck-Condon-factor calculations. No secondary ozonide was observable in the reaction of CH(2)OO with acetaldehyde, but acetic acid was identified as a product under the conditions used (4 Torr and 293 K). PMID:22481381

  6. Ethanol and acetaldehyde potentiate the clastogenicity of ultraviolet light, methol methanesulfonate, mitomycin C and bleomycin in Chinese hamster ovary cells

    Ethanol itself did not induce any apparent chromosome aberrations in Chinese hamster ovary cells. However, posttreatment with ethanol potentiated the chromosome aberrations induced by ultraviolet light (UV), methyl methanesulfonate (MMS), mitomycin C (MMC) or bleomycin (BLM). Chromatid exchanges were predominantly increased in cultures treated with UV, MMS or MMC and then with ethanol, whereas chromosome breaks and chromatid exchange were the major types of aberrations increased in the cultures treated with BLM and ethanol. Posttreatment with acetaldehyde, the major metabolite of ethanol, also potentiated the chromosome aberrations induced by UV, MMS, MMC or BLM. The main types of aberrations potentiated by posttreatment with acetaldehyde were similar to those by posttreatment with ethanol. (author). 32 refs.; 3 figs.; 2 tabs

  7. Alcohol and acetaldehyde in African fermented milk mursik – A possible etiological factor for high incidence of esophageal cancer in western Kenya

    Nieminen, Mikko T.; Novak-Frazer, Lily; Collins, Rebecca; Dawsey, Sonja P.; Dawsey, Sanford M.; Abnet, Christian C.; White, Russell E.; Freedman, Neal D.; Mwachiro, Michael; Bowyer, Paul; Salaspuro, Mikko; Rautemaa, Riina

    2012-01-01

    Background Esophageal cancer is unusually frequent in western Kenya, despite the low prevalence of classical risk factors such as heavy drinking and tobacco smoking. Among Kenyans consumption of fermented milk is an old tradition. Our hypothesis is that alcohol and acetaldehyde are produced during the fermentation process and that their carcinogenic potential contributes to the high incidence of esophageal cancer. Methods Eight samples of mursik milk starter cultures were collected from different Kalenjin families in the Rift Valley province, Western Kenya. A protocol provided by the families was used for milk fermentation. Ethanol and acetaldehyde levels were measured by gas chromatography. The microbial flora in starter cultures was identified by 16S and 18S sequencing. Results 7/8 starter cultures produced mutagenic (>100 µM) levels of acetaldehyde and 4/8 starter cultures produced >1000 µM of acetaldehyde. The highest alcohol levels (mean 79.4 mM) were detected in the four fermented milks with highest acetaldehyde production. The mean number of microbial species in the starter cultures was 5 (range 2–8). Yeasts were identified in all starter cultures (mean 1.5 species/milk) but their proportion of the total microbial count varied markedly (mean 35%, range 7–90%). A combination of yeast and lactobacilli, especially Candida krusei with Lactobacillus kefiriwith the exclusion of other species, seemed to correlate with higher acetaldehyde and ethanol levels. Conclusions Significant levels of ethanol and acetaldehyde were produced during mursik fermentation. Impact When ingested several times daily the repeated exposure to carcinogenic levels of acetaldehyde may contribute to esophageal carcinogenesis. PMID:23155139

  8. Acetaldehyde as an Intermediate in the Electroreduction of Carbon Monoxide to Ethanol on Oxide-Derived Copper

    Bertheussen, Erlend; Verdaguer Casadevall, Arnau; Ravasio, Davide; H. Montoya, Joseph; Trimarco, Daniel Bøndergaard; Roy, Claudie; Meier, Sebastian; Wendland, Jürgen; Nørskov, Jens K.; E. L. Stephens, Ifan; Chorkendorff, Ib

    2016-01-01

    Oxide-derived copper (OD-Cu) electrodes exhibit unprecedented CO reduction performance towards liquid fuels, producing ethanol and acetate with >50 % Faradaic efficiency at −0.3 V (vs. RHE). By using static headspace-gas chromatography for liquid phase analysis, we identify acetaldehyde as a minor...... solutions using NMR spectroscopy, requiring alternative methods for detection and quantification. Our results represent an important step towards understanding the CO reduction mechanism on OD-Cu electrodes....

  9. Quantitative NMR spectroscopy of binary liquid mixtures (aldehyde + alcohol) Part I: Acetaldehyde + (methanol or ethanol or 1-propanol)

    Highlights: • Formation of hemiacetal/poly(oxymethylene) hemiacetals in liquid binary mixtures. • Acetaldehyde and a low molecular alcohol (methanol or ethanol or 1-propanol). • Quantitative 13C NMR spectroscopy at temperatures between (255 and 295) K. • Hemiacetals are the predominant species. • (Acetaldehyde + methanol (50 + 50)) at 255 K: hemiacetal (polymers) >80% (≈10%). -- Abstract: Aldehydes react with alcohols to hemiacetals and poly(oxymethylene) hemiacetals. The chemical reaction equilibria of such reactions, in particular in the liquid state, can have an essential influence on the thermodynamic properties and related phenomena like, for example, on the vapour + liquid phase equilibrium. Therefore, thermodynamic models that aim to describe quantitatively such phase equilibria have to consider the chemical reaction equilibrium in the coexisting phases. This is well known in the literature for systems such as, for example, formaldehyde and methanol. However, experimental information on the chemical reaction equilibria in mixtures with other aldehydes (than formaldehyde) and alcohols is extremely scarce. Therefore, quantitative NMR spectroscopy was used to investigate the chemical reaction equilibria in binary mixtures of acetaldehyde and a single alcohol (here either methanol, ethanol or 1-propanol) at temperatures between (255 and 295) K. The results reveal that the majority of the constituents of the mixture is present as hemiacetal and the first two poly(oxymethylene) hemiacetals: in an equimolar mixture of (acetaldehyde + methanol or ethanol or 1-propanol), between about 90% at T = 255 K and about 75% at 295 K. The mole-fraction based chemical reaction equilibrium constants for the formation of those species were determined and some derived properties are reported

  10. Cost-effectiveness analysis to assess commercial TiO2 photocatalysts for acetaldehyde degradation in air

    Verbruggen, Sammy W.; Tytgat, Tom; Van Passel, Steven; Martens, Johan A; Lenaerts, Silvia

    2014-01-01

    In the commercialisation of photocatalytic air purifiers, the performance as well as the cost of the catalytic material plays an important role. Where most comparative studies only regard the photocatalytic activity as a decisive parameter, in this study both activity and cost are taken into account. Using a cost-effectiveness analysis, six different commercially available TiO2-based catalysts are evaluated in terms of their activities in photocatalytic degradation of acetaldehyde as a model ...

  11. An improved biosensor for acetaldehyde determination using a bienzymatic strategy at poly(neutral red) modified carbon film electrodes

    Ghica, Mariana Emilia; Pauliukaite, Rasa; Marchand, Nicolas; Devic, Eric; Brett, Christopher M. A.

    2007-01-01

    Improved biosensors for acetaldehyde determination have been developed using a bienzymatic strategy, based on a mediator-modified carbon film electrode and co-immobilisation of NADH oxidase and aldehyde dehydrogenase. Modification of the carbon film electrode with poly(neutral red) mediator resulted in a sensitive, low-cost and reliable NADH detector. Immobilisation of the enzymes was performed using encapsulation in a sol-gel matrix or cross-linking with glutaraldehyde. The bienzymatic biose...

  12. Effect of TBZ, acetaldehyde, citral and Thymus capitatus essential oil on 'Minneola' tangelo fruit decay

    Arras, Giovanni; Piga, Antonio; Agabbio, Mario Carlo Salvatore

    1996-01-01

    Thiabendazole (TBZ), citral, acetaldehyde (AA), and Thymus capitatus essential oil-were tested for their ability to control decay on 'Minneola' tangelo fruit sprayed with a conidial suspension of Penicillium digitatum, either alone, or in combination with a low dose (100 ppm) of TBZ. TBZ at 2000 ppm was used as the standard. Thyme oil, citral and AA, all at 100 ppm (v/v), were applied under reduced pressure (0.6 bar) and heated to complete vaporisation. Control treatments were per...

  13. Evaluating acetaldehyde synthesis from L-/sup 14/C(U)) threonine by Streptococcus thermophilus and Lactobacillus bulgaricus

    Wilkins, D.W.; Schmidt, R.H.; Shireman, R.B.; Smith, K.L.; Jezeski, J.J.

    1986-05-01

    To evaluate the synthesis of acetaldehyde from threonine during growth of yogurt cultures, Streptococcus thermophilus MS1 and Lactobacillus bulgaricus MR1 were grown in defined medium in which 10% of the total threonine was composed of L-(carbon-14(U))threonine. Acetaldehyde production was monitored by formation of 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazone followed by separation and analysis using high performance liquid chromatography. After growth for 8 h at 42/sup 0/C, approximately 2.0% of the total acetaldehyde (780.4 nmol) produced was from L-(carbon-14)threonine. Threonine aldolase activity was determined in cell-free extracts from S. thermophilus and L. bulgaricus grown in Elliker broth. Increasing incubation temperature from 30 to 42/sup 0/C decreased threonine aldolase activity in cells of the streptococcus harvested after 8 h of incubation. Effect of incubation temperature was more dramatic in cells harvested after 18 h where the activity of cells grown at 48/sup 0/C was 89% lower than that of cells grown at 30/sup 0/C. Cell extracts from S. thermophilus MS1 possessed higher threonine aldolase activity than did those from L. bulgaricus MR1. Increased assay temperature from 30 to 42/sup 0/C increased threonine aldolase activity in S. thermophilus MS1.

  14. Insights into photodissociation dynamics of acetaldehyde from ab initio calculations and molecular dynamics simulations

    In the present paper we report a theoretical study on mechanistic photodissociation of acetaldehyde (CH3CHO). Stationary structures for H2 and CO eliminations in the ground state (S0) have been optimized with density functional theory method, which is followed by the intrinsic reaction coordinate and ab initio molecular dynamics calculations to confirm the elimination mechanism. Equilibrium geometries, transition states, and intersection structures for the C-C and C-H dissociations in excited states were determined by the complete-active-space self-consistent field (CASSCF) method. Based on the CASSCF optimized structures, the potential energy profiles for the dissociations were refined by performing the single-point calculations using the multireference configuration interaction method. Upon the low-energy irradiation of CH3CHO (265 nm1 C-C bond fission following intersystem crossing from the S1 state is the predominant channel and the minor channel, the ground-state elimination to CH4+CO after internal conversion (IC) from S1 to S0, could not be excluded. With the photon energy increasing, another pathway of IC, achieved via an S1/S0 intersection point resulting from the S1 C-C bond fission, becomes accessible and increases the yield of CH4+CO.

  15. Atmospheric formaldehyde and acetaldehyde at the campus University of Hiroshima, Japan

    Sonia Naomi Nomi

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Ambient levels of formaldehyde (HCHO and acetaldehyde (CH3CHO were measured at Hiroshima (Japan during spring and summer of 2005. Measurements of O3, NOx, and SO2 were simultaneously conducted, in an attempt to identify temporal profiles and sources for these aldehydes. Atmospheric aldehydes were collected using C18 silica gel cartridges coated with an acidic solution of 2, 4-dinitrophenylhydrazine (2,4-DNPH and analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography with UV/VIS detection adjusted to 360 nm. Summer concentrations were higher than spring levels. FA concentrations during spring period ranged from 0.50 to 1.05 ppb and AA concentrations ranged from 0.17 to 1.31 ppb; during summer their concentrations ranged from 1.55 to 4.12 ppb and 0. 34 to 2.03 ppb. Average FA/AA in spring and summer were 3.09 and 3.72 suggesting biogenic emissions of aldehydes. The levels of FA and AA, their temporal variations, and their concentration ratio (FA/AA indicated that photochemical reactions contributed significantly to the formation of atmospheric aldehydes at the study site.

  16. Conversion of ethanol to acetaldehyde by human placental homogenates and villi in vitro

    The authors have previously reported that placental villi in vitro metabolize acetaldehyde (Ach), and that Ach forms adducts with placental subcellular fractions. In the experiments reported here the authors have investigated the capacity of placental homogenates and villi to generate Ach from ethanol (EtOH). When placental homogenates (0.5 g wet weight) prepared in 50 mM Tris. pH 7.5, were incubated with 20 μM [1-14C]ethanol and an NADP- generating system, Ach was formed at the rate of 0.18 nmol/h/g wet weight of tissue, based on counts trappable with semicarbazide. NAD was as effective as NADP. Omission of cofactor resulted in a 69% decrease in activity. The addition of a human serum ultrafiltrate (25,000 m.w. cut-off) to 20% had no effect on Ach formation, whole serum at 20% reduced reaction by 60%. Sodium azide at 40 mM completely abolished Ach formation, 1,10-phenanthroline at 0.4 mM inhibited approximately 50%. In contrast, no Ach formation was detected when 1.0-g fragments of villous tissue were incubated with 20 μM [1-14C]EtOH. The data suggest that villous tissue is capable of Ach formation by a catalase-like activity, but the capacity of intact villi for EtOH oxidation is low

  17. Recombinant human diamine oxidase activity is not inhibited by ethanol, acetaldehyde, disulfiram, diethyldithiocarbamate or cyanamide.

    Bartko, Johann; Gludovacz, Elisabeth; Petroczi, Karin; Borth, Nicole; Jilma, Bernd; Boehm, Thomas

    2016-08-01

    Human diamine oxidase (hDAO, EC 1.4.3.22) is the key enzyme in the degradation of extracellular histamine. Consumption of alcohol is a known trigger of mast cell degranulation in patients with mast cell activation syndrome. Ethanol may also interfere with enzymatic histamine degradation, but reports on the effects on DAO activity are controversial. There are also conflicting reports whether disulfiram, an FDA-approved agent in the treatment of alcohol dependence, inhibits DAO. We therefore investigated the inhibitory potential of ethanol and disulfiram and their metabolites on recombinant human DAO (rhDAO) in three different assay systems. Relevant concentrations of ethanol, acetaldehyde, and acetate did not inhibit rhDAO activity in an in vitro assay system using horseradish peroxidase (HRP) -mediated luminol oxidation. The aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH; EC 1.2.1.3) inhibitors cyanamide and its dimer dicyanamide also had no effect on DAO activity. In one assay system, the irreversible ALDH inhibitor disulfiram and its main metabolite diethyldithiocarbamate seemed to inhibit DAO activity. However, the decreased product formation was not due to a direct block of DAO activity but resulted from inhibition of peroxidase employed in the coupled system. Our in vitro data do not support a direct blocking effect of ethanol, disulfiram, and their metabolites on DAO activity in vivo. PMID:27401969

  18. Detecting ethanol and acetaldehyde by simple and ultrasensitive fluorimetric methods in compound foods.

    Zachut, M; Shapiro, F; Silanikove, N

    2016-06-15

    There is a need for simple, accurate, and rapid analysis of ethanol (Eth) and acetaldehyde (AA) in a wide variety of beverages and foods. A novel enzymatic assay coupled to formation of fluorescent chromophore is presented. Eth detection was further improved by adding semicarbazide to the reaction mixture, which interacts with AA and prevents its inhibitory effect on Eth oxidation. The limits of detection of Eth (0.5 mg/L) and AA (0.9 mg/L) are comparable with the performance of modern gas chromatography techniques. The repeatability of Eth and AA detection in various foods (9% on average) was lower than that with commercial kits (23%). The high sensitivity of the developed method enables detection of AA in common foods [e.g., bio-yogurt (12.2 mg/L), and the existence of endogenous Eth (1.8 mg/L) and AA (2.0 mg/L) in bacteria-free non-fermented bovine milk], which could not measured so far by enzymatic methods. PMID:26868576

  19. Dissociation of acetaldehyde in intense laser field: Coulomb explosion or field-assisted dissociation?

    Dissociation of acetaldehyde in moderate strong laser field of 1013-1014 W/cm2 was investigated. Singly charged parent ion CH3CHO+ and fragmental ions CH3+, CHO+, C2H4+, O+, CH2CHO+, and H+ were produced by 800 nm laser of 100 fs pulse duration and recorded by time-of-flight mass spectrometer. The CH3+ fragment further dissociated to CH2+, CH+, and C+ ions at higher intensity. Ab initio calculated results show that the singly-, doubly-, and triply charged parent ions are stable. So, the dissociation mechanism was not due to Coulomb explosion of multicharged ion. A field-assisted dissociation (FAD) theory, which assumes that only one bond undergoes dissociation while the rest of the molecular geometry stays unchanged, was employed to treat the dissociation dynamics. Accordingly, the dressed potential energy surfaces of the ground state for the parent and the fragment ions were calculated. Corresponding quasiclassical trajectory calculations show that the bond ruptures take place in the order of C-C, C-O, and C-H, agreeing with the observation. The observed angular dependence and charge distribution of the product ions can also be interpreted by the FAD theory

  20. Dissociation of acetaldehyde in intense laser field: Coulomb explosion or field-assisted dissociation?

    Elshakre, Mohamed E.; Gao, Lirong; Tang, Xiaoping; Wang, Sufan; Shu, Yafei; Kong, Fanao

    2003-09-01

    Dissociation of acetaldehyde in moderate strong laser field of 1013-1014W/cm2 was investigated. Singly charged parent ion CH3CHO+ and fragmental ions CH3+, CHO+, C2H4+, O+, CH2CHO+, and H+ were produced by 800 nm laser of 100 fs pulse duration and recorded by time-of-flight mass spectrometer. The CH3+ fragment further dissociated to CH2+, CH+, and C+ ions at higher intensity. Ab initio calculated results show that the singly-, doubly-, and triply charged parent ions are stable. So, the dissociation mechanism was not due to Coulomb explosion of multicharged ion. A field-assisted dissociation (FAD) theory, which assumes that only one bond undergoes dissociation while the rest of the molecular geometry stays unchanged, was employed to treat the dissociation dynamics. Accordingly, the dressed potential energy surfaces of the ground state for the parent and the fragment ions were calculated. Corresponding quasiclassical trajectory calculations show that the bond ruptures take place in the order of C-C, C-O, and C-H, agreeing with the observation. The observed angular dependence and charge distribution of the product ions can also be interpreted by the FAD theory.

  1. Spectroscopic analysis, AIM, NLO and VCD investigations of acetaldehyde thiosemicarbazone using quantum mechanical simulations

    Moorthy, N.; Prabakar, P. C. Jobe; Ramalingam, S.; Govindarajan, M.; Gnanamuthu, S. Joshua; Pandian, G. V.

    2016-08-01

    The prepared Acetaldehyde thiosemicarbazone (ATSC) have been investigated by both the experimental and theoretical methods; through this work, the essentiality of elucidation of molecular fragments source linear and non-linear optical properties was explored. The stability of the structure and entire calculations have been performed on HF and B3LYP methods with 6-311++G(d,p) level of basis set. The Mulliken charge profile, electronic, optical and hyper polarizability analyses have been carried out in order to evaluate nonlinear optical (NLO) performance of the present compound. The exact optical location of the ATSC was determined by executing UV-Visible calculations on TDSCF method. The existence of the molecular group for the inducement and tuning of NLO properties were thoroughly investigated by performing fundamental vibrational investigation. The optical energy transformation among frontier molecular levels has been described in UV-Visible region. The Gibbs energy coefficient of thermodynamic functions was monitored in different temperature and it was found constant irrespective of temperatures. The appearance of different chemical environment of H and C was monitored from the 1H and 13C NMR spectra. The vibrational optical polarization characteristics with respect to molecular composition in the compound have been studied by VCD spectrum. The bond critical point, Laplacian of electron density, electron kinetic energy density and total electron energy density have calculated and analysed using AIM study.

  2. Non-Saccharomyces and Saccharomyces strains co-fermentation increases acetaldehyde accumulation: effect on anthocyanin-derived pigments in Tannat red wines.

    Medina, Karina; Boido, Eduardo; Fariña, Laura; Dellacassa, Eduardo; Carrau, Francisco

    2016-07-01

    During fermentation, Saccharomyces cerevisiae releases into the medium secondary metabolic products, such as acetaldehyde, able to react with anthocyanins, producing more stable derived pigments. However, very limited reports are found about non-Saccharomyces effects on grape fermentation. In this study, six non-Saccharomyces yeast strains, belonging to the genera Metschnikowia and Hanseniaspora, were screened for their effect on red wine colour and wine-making capacity under pure culture conditions and mixed with Saccharomyces. An artificial red grape must was prepared, containing a phenolic extract of Tannat grapes that allows monitoring changes of key phenol parameters during fermentation, but without skin solids in the medium. When fermented in pure cultures, S. cerevisiae produced higher concentrations of acetaldehyde and vitisin B (acetaldehyde reaction-dependent) compared to M. pulcherrima M00/09G, Hanseniaspora guillermondii T06/09G, H. opuntiae T06/01G, H. vineae T02/05F and H. clermontiae (A10/82Fand C10/54F). However, co-fermentation of H. vineae and H. clermontiae with S. cerevisiae resulted in a significantly higher concentration of acetaldehyde compared with the pure S. cerevisiae control. HPLC-DAD-MS analysis confirmed an increased formation of vitisin B in co-fermentation treatments when compared to pure Saccharomyces fermentation, suggesting the key role of acetaldehyde. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26888345

  3. Preparation of ordered mesoporous Ag/WO3 and its highly efficient degradation of acetaldehyde under visible-light irradiation

    A highly active photocatalyst, silver loaded mesoporous WO3, was successfully synthesized by an ultrasound assisted insertion method. The photodegradation of a common air pollutant acetaldehyde was adopted to evaluate the photocatalytic performance of the as-prepared sample under visible-light irradiation. The photocatalytic activity was about three and six times higher than that of pure mesoporous WO3 and nitrogen-doped TiO2, respectively. The photocatalytic mechanism was investigated to understand the much enhanced photocatalytic activity, which was mainly attributed to the largely improved electron-hole separation in the Ag-WO3 heterojunction.

  4. Pollution Whack-a-Mole: Ambient Acetaldehyde and the Introduction of E-10 Gasoline in the Northeast

    Steiner, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    This paper uses a complicated set of phase-ins and phase-outs of oxygenated motor fuel in the Northeast to determine whether E-10 ethanol-enhanced fuel contributes to acetaldehyde air pollution over the pre-ethanol methyl tertiary-buthyl ether (MTBE) fuel. Oil companies phased out MTBE because of groundwater pollution concerns, and now E-10 is the standard fuel in EPA reformulated gas areas. Using a difference-in-difference setup, I find a small level increase but a large percentage increase ...

  5. Air-sea fluxes of methanol, acetone, acetaldehyde, isoprene and DMS from a Norwegian fjord following a phytoplankton bloom in a mesocosm experiment

    V. Sinha

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The ocean's influence on volatile organic compounds (VOCs in the atmosphere is poorly understood. This work characterises the oceanic emission and/or uptake of methanol, acetone, acetaldehyde, isoprene and dimethyl sulphide (DMS as a function of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR and a suite of biological parameters. The measurements were taken following a phytoplankton bloom, in May/June 2005 with a proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS, from mesocosm enclosures anchored in the Raunefjord, Southern Norway. The net flux of methanol was always into the ocean, and was stronger at night. Isoprene and acetaldehyde were emitted from the ocean, correlating with light (ravcorr, isoprene=0.49; ravcorr, acetaldehyde=0.70 and phytoplankton abundance. DMS was also emitted to the air but did not correlate significantly with light (ravcorr, dms=0.01. Under conditions of high biological activity and a PAR of ~450 μmol photons m−2 s−1, acetone was emitted from the ocean, otherwise it was uptaken. The inter-VOC correlations were highest between the day time emission fluxes of acetone and acetaldehyde (rav=0.96, acetaldehyde and isoprene (rav=0.88 and acetone and isoprene (rav=0.85. The mean fluxes for methanol, acetone, acetaldehyde, isoprene and DMS were −0.26 ng m−2 s−1, 0.21 ng m−2 s−1, 0.23 ng m−2 s−1, 0.12 ng m−2 s−1 and 0.3 ng m−2 s−1, respectively. This work shows that compound specific PAR and biological dependency should be used for estimating the influence of the global ocean on atmospheric VOC budgets.

  6. Reactive processing of formaldehyde and acetaldehyde in aqueous aerosol mimics: surface tension depression and secondary organic products

    Z. Li

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The reactive uptake of carbonyl-containing volatile organic compounds (cVOCs by aqueous atmospheric aerosols is a likely source of particulate organic material. The aqueous-phase secondary organic products of some cVOCs are surface-active. Therefore, cVOC uptake can lead to organic film formation at the gas-aerosol interface and changes in aerosol surface tension. We examined the chemical reactions of two abundant cVOCs, formaldehyde and acetaldehyde, in water and aqueous ammonium sulfate (AS solutions mimicking tropospheric aerosols. Secondary organic products were identified using Aerosol Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry (Aerosol-CIMS, and changes in surface tension were monitored using pendant drop tensiometry. Hemiacetal oligomers and aldol condensation products were identified using Aerosol-CIMS. A hemiacetal sulfate ester was tentatively identified in the formaldehyde-AS system. Acetaldehyde depresses surface tension to 65(±2 dyn cm−1 in pure water and 62(±1 dyn cm−1 in AS solutions. Surface tension depression by formaldehyde in pure water is negligible; in AS solutions, a 9 % reduction in surface tension is observed. Mixtures of these species were also studied in combination with methylglyoxal in order to evaluate the influence of cross-reactions on surface tension depression and product formation in these systems. We find that surface tension depression in the solutions containing mixed cVOCs exceeds that predicted by an additive model based on the single-species isotherms.

  7. Reactive processing of formaldehyde and acetaldehyde in aqueous aerosol mimics: surface tension depression and secondary organic products

    Li, Z.; Schwier, A. N.; Sareen, N.; McNeill, V. F.

    2011-11-01

    The reactive uptake of carbonyl-containing volatile organic compounds (cVOCs) by aqueous atmospheric aerosols is a likely source of particulate organic material. The aqueous-phase secondary organic products of some cVOCs are surface-active. Therefore, cVOC uptake can lead to organic film formation at the gas-aerosol interface and changes in aerosol surface tension. We examined the chemical reactions of two abundant cVOCs, formaldehyde and acetaldehyde, in water and aqueous ammonium sulfate (AS) solutions mimicking tropospheric aerosols. Secondary organic products were identified using Aerosol Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry (Aerosol-CIMS), and changes in surface tension were monitored using pendant drop tensiometry. Hemiacetal oligomers and aldol condensation products were identified using Aerosol-CIMS. Acetaldehyde depresses surface tension to 65(±2) dyn cm-1 in pure water (a 10% surface tension reduction from that of pure water) and 62(±1) dyn cm-1 in AS solutions (a 20.6% reduction from that of a 3.1 M AS solution). Surface tension depression by formaldehyde in pure water is negligible; in AS solutions, a 9% reduction in surface tension is observed. Mixtures of these species were also studied in combination with methylglyoxal in order to evaluate the influence of cross-reactions on surface tension depression and product formation in these systems. We find that surface tension depression in the solutions containing mixed cVOCs exceeds that predicted by an additive model based on the single-species isotherms.

  8. Study on Streptococcus thermophilus isolated from Qula and associated characteristic of acetaldehyde and diacetyl in their fermented milk.

    Zha, Musu; Yu, Jie; Zhang, Yong; Wang, Hongmei; Bai, Na; Qin, Yanting; Liangliang, De; Liu, Wenjun; Zhang, Heping; Bilige, Menghe

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the lactic acid bacterial population of Qula cheese from the Gansu and Sichuan provinces of China were isolated and identified. Eight strains of Streptococcus thermophilus were isolated, of which five strains were selected for further characterization based on their fermentation properties. The changes in a number of parameters, including titration acidity, pH, viable counts, PrtS protease activity and the production of acetaldehyde, diacetyl and organic acid, were monitored during fermentation and the storage of fermented milks produced by the respective strain. All of the strains displaying acidifying capacity and all five fermented milks maintained high viable counts of S. thermophilus from fermentation to storage. Our study found that the changes in the monitored parameters were strain-specific and varied considerably among the five tested strains. Fermented milks produced by strain IMAU80809 had the highest concentration of acetaldehyde and were most favorable in the sensory evaluation. This study confirms that Qula cheese is a good source for isolating novel lactic acid bacterial strains with different fermentation properties, which will be very useful for further development and industrialization of traditionally fermented dairy products. PMID:26018501

  9. Photochemical fabrication of size-controllable gold nanoparticles on chitosan and their application on catalytic decomposition of acetaldehyde

    Yu, Chung-Chin [Department of Environmental Engineering, Vanung University, 1, Van Nung Road, Shuei-Wei Li, Chung-Li City, Taiwan (China); Nano Materials Applications R and D Center, Vanung University, 1, Van Nung Road, Shuei-Wei Li, Chung-Li City, Taiwan (China); Yang, Kuang-Hsuan, E-mail: khy@mail.vnu.edu.tw [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, Vanung University, 1, Van Nung Road, Shuei-Wei Li, Chung-Li City, Taiwan (China); Nano Materials Applications R and D Center, Vanung University, 1, Van Nung Road, Shuei-Wei Li, Chung-Li City, Taiwan (China); Liu, Yu-Chuan [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, Vanung University, 1, Van Nung Road, Shuei-Wei Li, Chung-Li City, Taiwan (China); Nano Materials Applications R and D Center, Vanung University, 1, Van Nung Road, Shuei-Wei Li, Chung-Li City, Taiwan (China); Chen, Bo-Chuen [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, Vanung University, 1, Van Nung Road, Shuei-Wei Li, Chung-Li City, Taiwan (China)

    2010-07-15

    In this work, we report a new pathway to prepare size-controllable gold nanoparticles (NPs) on chitosan (Ch) in aqueous solutions for improving catalytic decomposition of acetaldehyde by pure gold NPs at room temperature. First, Au substrates were cycled in deoxygenated aqueous solutions containing 0.1N NaCl and 1 g/L Ch from -0.28 to +1.22 V vs Ag/AgCl at 500 mV/s for 200 scans. Then the solutions were irradiated with UV lights of different wavelengths to prepare size-controllable Au NPs on Ch. Experimental results indicate that the particle sizes of prepared NPs are increased when UV lights with longer wavelengths were employed. The particle sizes of resulted Au NPs can be controlled from 10 to 50 nm. Moreover, the decomposition of acetaldehydes in wines can be significantly enhanced by ca. 190% of magnitude due to the contribution of the adsorption of Au NPs on Ch.

  10. Reactive processing of formaldehyde and acetaldehyde in aqueous aerosol mimics: Surface tension depression and secondary organic products

    Li, Zhi; Sareen, Neha; McNeill, V Faye

    2011-01-01

    The reactive uptake of carbonyl-containing volatile organic compounds (cVOCs) by aqueous atmospheric aerosols is a likely source of particulate organic material. The aqueous-phase secondary organic products of some cVOCs are surface-active. Therefore, cVOC uptake can lead to organic film formation at the gas-aerosol interface and changes in aerosol surface tension. We examined the chemical reactions of two abundant cVOCs, formaldehyde and acetaldehyde, in water and aqueous ammonium sulfate (AS) solutions mimicking tropospheric aerosols. Secondary organic products were identified using Aerosol Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry (Aerosol-CIMS), and changes in surface tension were monitored using pendant drop tensiometry. Hemiacetal oligomers and aldol condensation products were identified using Aerosol-CIMS. A hemiacetal sulfate ester was tentatively identified in the formaldehyde-AS system. Acetaldehyde depresses surface tension to 65(\\pm2) dyn/cm in pure water and 62(\\pm1) dyn/cm in AS solutions. Surface t...

  11. New insights in understanding plasma-catalysis reaction pathways: study of the catalytic ozonation of an acetaldehyde saturated Ag/TiO2/SiO2 catalyst

    Sauce, Sonia; Vega-González, Arlette; Jia, Zixian; Touchard, Sylvain; Hassouni, Khaled; Kanaev, Andrei; Duten, Xavier

    2015-07-01

    This paper is a preliminary study intended to straighten out the role of reactive oxygen species in the activation mechanisms occurring in a plasma driven catalysis process for acetaldehyde decomposition. For this purpose, the interaction between the surface, the pollutant and one of the main oxidative species generated by non-thermal plasma, namely ozone, was studied. Acetaldehyde catalytic ozonation over a nanostructured Ag/TiO2/SiO2 catalyst is carried out at room temperature and atmospheric pressure, and followed by diffuse reflectance infrared fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS). For this, the catalyst is firstly saturated with acetaldehyde. At the end of the saturation, acetaldehyde and crotonaldehyde, its condensation product, are identified as the major adsorbed species. In a second step, the surface ozonation is carried out and three additional intermediates are identified, namely, acetone, formic acid and acetic acid. Gaseous CO, CO2, methyl formate and methyl acetate are detected at the DRIFTS outlet, evidencing the partial mineralization of the adsorbed species. A global reaction scheme is proposed for explaining the formation of those adsorbed intermediates and gaseous products. This proposed heterogeneous ozone induced chemistry has to be taken into account when associating non-thermal plasma in air to a catalyst. Contribution to the topical issue "The 14th International Symposium on High Pressure Low Temperature Plasma Chemistry (HAKONE XIV)", edited by Nicolas Gherardi, Ronny Brandenburg and Lars Stollenwark

  12. One-Pot Synthesis of (S)-Baclofen via Aldol Condensation of Acetaldehyde with Diphenylprolinol Silyl Ether Mediated Asymmetric Michael Reaction as a Key Step.

    Hayashi, Yujiro; Sakamoto, Daisuke; Okamura, Daichi

    2016-01-01

    An efficient asymmetric total synthesis of (S)-baclofen was accomplished via a one-pot operation from commercially available materials using sequential reactions, such as aldol condensation of acetaldehyde, diphenylprolinol silyl ether mediated asymmetric Michael reaction of nitromethane, Kraus-Pinnick oxidation, and Raney Ni reduction. Highly enantioenriched baclofen was obtained in one pot with a good yield over four reactions. PMID:26636719

  13. Catalytic Upgrading of Biomass-Derived Compounds via C-C Coupling Reactions. Computational and Experimental Studies of Acetaldehyde and Furan Reactions in HZSM-5

    Liu, Cong [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Evans, Tabitha J. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Cheng, Lei [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Nimlos, Mark R. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Mukarakate, Calvin [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Robichaud, David J. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Assary, Rajeev S. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Curtiss, Larry A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2015-10-02

    These catalytic C–C coupling and deoxygenation reactions are essential for upgrading of biomass-derived oxygenates to fuel-range hydrocarbons. Detailed understanding of mechanistic and energetic aspects of these reactions is crucial to enabling and improving the catalytic upgrading of small oxygenates to useful chemicals and fuels. Using periodic density functional theory (DFT) calculations, we have investigated the reactions of furan and acetaldehyde in an HZSM-5 zeolite catalyst, a representative system associated with the catalytic upgrading of pyrolysis vapors. Comprehensive energy profiles were computed for self-reactions (i.e., acetaldehyde coupling and furan coupling) and cross-reactions (i.e., acetaldehyde + furan) of this representative mixture. Major products proposed from the computations are further confirmed using temperature controlled mass spectra measurements. Moreover, the computational results show that furan interacts with acetaldehyde in HZSM-5 via an alkylation mechanism, which is more favorable than the self-reactions, indicating that mixing furans with aldehydes could be a promising approach to maximize effective C–C coupling and dehydration while reducing the catalyst deactivation (e.g., coke formation) from aldehyde condensation.

  14. Reactive processing of formaldehyde and acetaldehyde in aqueous aerosol mimics: surface tension depression and secondary organic products

    Z. Li

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The reactive uptake of carbonyl-containing volatile organic compounds (cVOCs by aqueous atmospheric aerosols is a likely source of particulate organic material. The aqueous-phase secondary organic products of some cVOCs are surface-active. Therefore, cVOC uptake can lead to organic film formation at the gas-aerosol interface and changes in aerosol surface tension. We examined the chemical reactions of two abundant cVOCs, formaldehyde and acetaldehyde, in water and aqueous ammonium sulfate (AS solutions mimicking tropospheric aerosols. Secondary organic products were identified using Aerosol Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry (Aerosol-CIMS, and changes in surface tension were monitored using pendant drop tensiometry. Hemiacetal oligomers and aldol condensation products were identified using Aerosol-CIMS. Acetaldehyde depresses surface tension to 65(±2 dyn cm−1 in pure water (a 10% surface tension reduction from that of pure water and 62(±1 dyn cm−1 in AS solutions (a 20.6% reduction from that of a 3.1 M AS solution. Surface tension depression by formaldehyde in pure water is negligible; in AS solutions, a 9% reduction in surface tension is observed. Mixtures of these species were also studied in combination with methylglyoxal in order to evaluate the influence of cross-reactions on surface tension depression and product formation in these systems. We find that surface tension depression in the solutions containing mixed cVOCs exceeds that predicted by an additive model based on the single-species isotherms.

  15. Formation of the thioester, N,S-diacetylcysteine, from acetaldehyde and N,N'diacetylcystine in aqueous solution with ultraviolet light

    Weber, A.L.

    1981-05-01

    The thioester, N,S-diacetylcysteine, is formed during the illumination of phosphate buffered (pH 7.0) aqueous solutions of acetaldehyde and N,N'-diacetylcystine with ultraviolet light. The yield of N,S-diacetylcysteine relative to N-acetylcysteine and unidentified products progressively increases as ultraviolet light below 239 nm, 253 nm and 281 nm is cut off with optical filters. When ultraviolet light below 320 nm is removed with an optical filter, there is no detectable reaction. Illumination of 0.025 M N,N'-diacetylcystine with 0.5 M and 1.0 M acetaldehyde with filtered ultraviolet light gives, respectively, 20% and 80% yields of N,S-diacetylcysteine. In the reaction with 1.0 M acetyldehyde, N-acetylcysteine forms early in the reaction and later decreases with its conversion to N,S-diacetylcysteine. The prebiotic significance of these reactions is discussed.

  16. Formation of the thioester, N,S-diacetylcysteine, from acetaldehyde and N,N'diacetylcystine in aqueous solution with ultraviolet light

    The thioester, N,S-diacetylcysteine, is formed during the illumination of phosphate buffered (pH 7.0) aqueous solutions of acetaldehyde and N,N'-diacetylcystine with ultraviolet light. The yield of N,S-diacetylcysteine relative to N-acetylcysteine and unidentified products progressively increases as ultraviolet light below 239 nm, 253 nm and 281 nm is cut off with optical filters. When ultraviolet light below 320 nm is removed with an optical filter, there is no detectable reaction. Illumination of 0.025 M N,N'-diacetylcystine with 0.5 M and 1.0 M acetaldehyde with filtered ultraviolet light gives, respectively, 20% and 80% yields of N,S-diacetylcysteine. In the reaction with 1.0 M acetyldehyde, N-acetylcysteine forms early in the reaction and later decreases with its conversion to N,S-diacetylcysteine. The prebiotic significance of these reactions is discussed. (orig.)

  17. Visible-light photodecomposition of acetaldehyde by TiO2-coated gold nanocages: plasmon-mediated hot electron transport via defect states.

    Kodiyath, Rajesh; Manikandan, Maidhily; Liu, Lequan; Ramesh, Gubbala V; Koyasu, Satoshi; Miyauchi, Masahiro; Sakuma, Yoshiki; Tanabe, Toyokazu; Gunji, Takao; Duy Dao, Thang; Ueda, Shigenori; Nagao, Tadaaki; Ye, Jinhua; Abe, Hideki

    2014-12-21

    Skeletal gold nanocages (Au NCs) are synthesized and coated with TiO2 layers (TiO2-Au NCs). The TiO2-Au NCs exhibit enhanced photodecomposition activity toward acetaldehyde under visible light (>400 nm) illumination because hot electrons are generated over the Au NCs by local surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) and efficiently transported across the metal/semiconductor interface via the defect states of TiO2. PMID:25357137

  18. Quantification of acetaldehyde and carbon dioxide in the headspace of malignant and non-malignant lung cells in vitro by SIFT-MS

    Sule-Suso, J.; Pysanenko, Andriy; Španěl, Patrik; Smith, D.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 134, č. 12 (2009), s. 2419-2425. ISSN 0003-2654 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/09/0800; GA ČR GA203/09/0256 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : acetaldehyde * SIFT-MS * carbon dioxide Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.272, year: 2009

  19. Mechanistic insights into the formation of acetaldehyde and diethyl ether from ethanol over supported VO{subx}, MoO{subx}, and WO{subx} catalysts.

    Nair, H.; Gatt, J. E.; Miller, J. T.; Baertsch, C. D. (Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division); (Purdue University)

    2011-04-01

    Catalytic pathways are described for reactions of ethanol to acetaldehyde by oxidative dehydrogenation and of ethanol to diethyl ether by condensation over VO{sub x}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, MoO{sub x}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and WO{sub x}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Isotopic labeling shows that acetaldehyde formation occurs via rate-determining C-H bond cleavage of the CH{sub 2} group in an adsorbed alkoxide followed by removal of surface oxygen in a Mars and van Krevelen redox mechanism (as confirmed by in situ X-ray absorption, diffuse reflectance infra-red Fourier transform spectroscopy and UV-visible spectroscopy); diethyl ether formation occurs in parallel via coupling and condensation of two adjacent ethoxy species. Using a combination of in situ spectroscopic and kinetic analysis, catalyst properties influencing the formation of acetaldehyde and ether from the common adsorbed ethoxy intermediate are elucidated. X-ray absorption analysis during anaerobic ethanol titration is used to preclude the involvement of terminal M{double_bond}O bonds during the reaction. A study of the activity of catalysts with the same MoO{sub x} domain size on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, TiO{sub 2}, and CeO{sub 2} supports and binary oxides of MoO{sub x} and WO{sub x} on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} are used to prove that the active redox oxygen for acetaldehyde formation is the oxygen atom linking the active metal oxide domain to the support oxide. Ether formation ability of the metal oxide is related to the electronegativity of the active metal atom.

  20. Simultaneous removal of ethanol,acetaldehyde and nitrogen oxides over V-Pd/γ-Al2O3-TiO2 catalyst

    Zhe Li; Jing Wang; Kai He; Xia An; Wei Huang; Kechang Xie

    2011-01-01

    V-Pd/γ-Al2O3-TiO2 catalysts with different vanadium contents were prepared by a combined sol-gel and impregnation method.X-ray diffraction(XRD),N2 adsorption-desorption(BET),X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy(XPS)and catalytic removal of ethanol,acetaldehyde and nitrogen oxides at low temperature(<300℃)were used to assess the properties of the catalysts.The results showed that the sample with 1wt% vanadium exhibited an excellent catalytic performance for simultaneous removal of ethanol,acetaldehyde and nitrogen oxides.The conversions of ethanol,acetaldehyde and nitrogen oxides at 250℃ were 100%,74.4% and 98.7%,respectively.V-Pd/γ-Al2O3-TiO2 catalyst with 1 wt% vanadium showed the largest surface area and higher dispersion of vanadium oxide on the catalyst surface,and possessed a larger mole fraction of V4+species and unique PdO species on the surface,which can be attributed to the strong synergistic effect among palladium,vanadium and the carriers.The higher activity of V-Pd/γ-Al2O3-TiO2 catalyst is related to the V4+and Pd2+species on the surface,which might be favorable for the formation of active sites.

  1. On the physical interpretation of torsion-rotation parameters in methanol and acetaldehyde: Comparison of global fit and ab initio results

    Equilibrium structural constants and certain torsion endash rotation interaction parameters have been determined for methanol and acetaldehyde from ab initio calculations using GAUSSIAN 94. The substantial molecular flexing which occurs in going from the bottom to the top of the torsional potential barrier can be quantitatively related to coefficients of torsion endash rotation terms having a (1-cos ampersand hthinsp;3γ) dependence on torsional angle γ. The barrier height, six equilibrium structural constants characterizing the bottom of the potential well, and six torsion endash rotation constants are all compared to experimental parameters obtained from global fits to large microwave and far-infrared data sets for methanol and acetaldehyde. The rather encouraging agreement between the Gaussian and global fit results for methanol seems both to validate the accuracy of ab initio calculations of these parameters, and to demonstrate that the physical origin of these torsion endash rotation interaction terms in methanol lies primarily in structural relaxation with torsion. The less satisfactory agreement between theory and experiment for acetaldehyde requires further study. copyright 1999 American Institute of Physics

  2. Acetaldehyde partial oxidation on the Au(111) model catalyst surface: C-C bond activation and formation of methyl acetate as an oxidative coupling product

    Karatok, Mustafa; Vovk, Evgeny I.; Shah, Asad A.; Turksoy, Abdurrahman; Ozensoy, Emrah

    2015-11-01

    Partial oxidation of acetaldehyde (CH3CHO) on the oxygen pre-covered Au(111) single crystal model catalyst was investigated via Temperature Programmed Desorption (TPD) and Temperature Programmed Reaction Spectroscopy (TPRS) techniques, where ozone (O3) was utilized as the oxygen delivery agent providing atomic oxygen to the reacting surface. We show that for low exposures of O3 and small surface oxygen coverages, two partial oxidation products namely, methyl acetate (CH3COOCH3) and acetic acid (CH3COOH) can be generated without the formation of significant quantities of carbon dioxide. The formation of methyl acetate as the oxidative coupling reaction product implies that oxygen pre-covered Au(111) single crystal model catalyst surface can activate C-C bonds. In addition to the generation of these products; indications of the polymerization of acetaldehyde on the gold surface were also observed as an additional reaction route competing with the partial and total oxidation pathways. The interplay between the partial oxidation, total oxidation and polymerization pathways reveals the complex catalytic chemistry associated with the interaction between the acetaldehyde and atomic oxygen on catalytic gold surfaces.

  3. Concerns regarding 24-h sampling for formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, and acrolein using 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine (DNPH)-coated solid sorbents

    Herrington, Jason S.; Hays, Michael D.

    2012-08-01

    There is high demand for accurate and reliable airborne carbonyl measurement methods due to the human and environmental health impacts of carbonyls and their effects on atmospheric chemistry. Standardized 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine (DNPH)-based sampling methods are frequently applied for measuring gaseous carbonyls in the atmospheric environment. However, there are multiple short-comings associated with these methods that detract from an accurate understanding of carbonyl-related exposure, health effects, and atmospheric chemistry. The purpose of this brief technical communication is to highlight these method challenges and their influence on national ambient monitoring networks, and to provide a logical path forward for accurate carbonyl measurement. This manuscript focuses on three specific carbonyl compounds of high toxicological interest—formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, and acrolein. Further method testing and development, the revision of standardized methods, and the plausibility of introducing novel technology for these carbonyls are considered elements of the path forward. The consolidation of this information is important because it seems clear that carbonyl data produced utilizing DNPH-based methods are being reported without acknowledgment of the method short-comings or how to best address them.

  4. Effect of acid catalysts and accelerated aging on the reaction of methanol with hydroxy-acetaldehyde in bio-oil

    Bhattacharya, P.

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Bio-oil is a promising alternative source of energy produced from fast pyrolysis of biomass. Increasing the viscosity of bio-oil during storage is a major problem that can be controlled by the addition of methanol or other alcohols. This paper reports the results of our investigation of the reactions of short chain alcohols with aldehydes and acids in bio-oil. The reaction of methanol with hydroxyacetaldehyde (HA to form the acetal was catalyzed by the addition of 7 x 10-4 M strong acids such as sulfuric, hydrochloric, p-toluene sulfonic acid, and methanesulfonic acid. HA formed 2,2-dimethoxyethanol (DME, and at 60 oC the equilibrium was reached in less than one hour. Smaller amounts of DME were formed in the absence of strong acid. HA, acetaldehyde, and propanal formed their corresponding acetals when reacted with methanol, ethanol, 1-propanol or 1-butanol. Esters of acetic acid and hydroxyacetic acid were observed from reactions with these same four alcohols. Other acetals and esters were observed by GC/MS analysis of the reaction products. The results from accelerated aging experiments at 90 oC suggest that the presence of methanol slows polymerization by formation of acetals and esters from low molecular weight aldehydes and organic acids.

  5. Formaldehyde and acetaldehyde exposure mitigation in US residences: in-home measurements of ventilation control and source control.

    Hult, E L; Willem, H; Price, P N; Hotchi, T; Russell, M L; Singer, B C

    2015-10-01

    Measurements were taken in new US residences to assess the extent to which ventilation and source control can mitigate formaldehyde exposure. Increasing ventilation consistently lowered indoor formaldehyde concentrations. However, at a reference air exchange rate of 0.35 h(-1), increasing ventilation was up to 60% less effective than would be predicted if the emission rate were constant. This is consistent with formaldehyde emission rates decreasing as air concentrations increase, as observed in chamber studies. In contrast, measurements suggest acetaldehyde emission was independent of ventilation rate. To evaluate the effectiveness of source control, formaldehyde concentrations were measured in Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED)-certified/Indoor airPLUS homes constructed with materials certified to have low emission rates of volatile organic compounds (VOC). At a reference air exchange rate of 0.35 h(-1), and adjusting for home age, temperature and relative humidity, formaldehyde concentrations in homes built with low-VOC materials were 42% lower on average than in reference new homes with conventional building materials. Without adjustment, concentrations were 27% lower in the low-VOC homes. The mean and standard deviation of formaldehyde concentration was 33 μg/m(3) and 22 μg/m(3) for low-VOC homes and 45 μg/m(3) and 30 μg/m(3) for conventional. PMID:25252109

  6. Acetaldehyde as a drug of abuse: insight into AM281 administration on operant-conflict paradigm in rats.

    Fulvio ePlescia

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Increasing evidence focuses on acetaldehyde (ACD as the mediator of the rewarding and motivational properties of ethanol. Indeed, ACD stimulates dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens and it is self-administered under different conditions. Besides the dopaminergic transmission, the endocannabinoid system has been reported to play an important role in ethanol central effects, modulating primary alcohol rewarding effect, drug-seeking and relapse behaviour. Drug motivational properties are highlighted in operant paradigms which include response-contingent punishment, a behavioural equivalent of compulsive drug use despite adverse consequences.The aim of this study was thus to characterize ACD motivational and rewarding properties employing an operant-conflict paradigm in which rats, trained to lever press in order to get ACD solution (0.9%, undergo extinction, reinstatement and conflict sessions, according to a modified Geller-Seifter procedur. Furthermore the role played by CB1 receptor system in modulating ACD-induced effects were investigated through the administration of CB1 receptor antagonist, AM281 (1 mg/kg, i.p. during the extinction-, relapse- and conflict experiments.Our results indicate that ACD is able to induce and maintain an operant behaviour, a high number of responses during extinction, an increase in the lever presses during the reinstatement phase, and a higher emission of punished responses during the conflict experiments, when compared to controls.The administration of AM281 is able to decrease ACD-seeking behaviour during extinction, the number of lever presses during reinstatement and to strongly decrease the punished responses for ACD. Our data strengthen the idea that ACD may be responsible for the central effects of ethanol, and pinpoint at the CB1 system as one of the neural substrates underlying its addictive properties.

  7. Acetaldehyde as a drug of abuse: insight into AM281 administration on operant-conflict paradigm in rats.

    Plescia, Fulvio; Brancato, Anna; Marino, Rosa A M; Cannizzaro, Carla

    2013-01-01

    Increasing evidence focuses on acetaldehyde (ACD) as the mediator of the rewarding and motivational properties of ethanol. Indeed, ACD stimulates dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens and it is self-administered under different conditions. Besides the dopaminergic transmission, the endocannabinoid system has been reported to play an important role in ethanol central effects, modulating primary alcohol rewarding effect, drug-seeking, and relapse behavior. Drug motivational properties are highlighted in operant paradigms which include response-contingent punishment, a behavioral equivalent of compulsive drug use despite adverse consequences. The aim of this study was thus to characterize ACD motivational and rewarding properties employing an operant-conflict paradigm in which rats, trained to lever press in order to get ACD solution (0.9%), undergo extinction, reinstatement and conflict sessions, according to a modified Geller-Seifter procedure. Furthermore, the role played by CB1 receptor system in modulating ACD-induced effects were investigated through the administration of CB1 receptor antagonist, AM281 (1 mg/kg, i.p.) during the extinction-, relapse-, and conflict-experiments. Our results indicate that ACD is able to induce and maintain an operant behavior, a high number of responses during extinction, an increase in the lever presses during the reinstatement phase, and a higher emission of punished responses during the conflict experiments, when compared to controls. The administration of AM281 is able to decrease ACD-seeking behavior during extinction, the number of lever presses during reinstatement and to strongly decrease the punished responses for ACD. Our data strengthen the idea that ACD may be responsible for the central effects of ethanol, and pinpoint at the CB1 system as one of the neural substrates underlying its addictive properties. PMID:23781180

  8. Catalytic liquid-phase oxidation of acetaldehyde to acetic acid over a Pt/CeO2-ZrO2-SnO2/γ-alumina catalyst.

    Choi, Pil-Gyu; Ohno, Takanobu; Masui, Toshiyuki; Imanaka, Nobuhito

    2015-10-01

    Pt/CeO2-ZrO2-SnO2/γ-Al2O3 catalysts were prepared by co-precipitation and wet impregnation methods for catalytic oxidation of acetaldehyde to acetic acid in water. In the present catalysts, Pt and CeO2-ZrO2-SnO2 were successfully dispersed on the γ-Al2O3 support. Dependences of platinum content and reaction time on the selective oxidation of acetaldehyde to acetic acid were investigated to optimize the reaction conditions for obtaining both high acetaldehyde conversion and highest selectivity to acetic acid. Among the catalysts, a Pt(6.4wt.%)/Ce0.68Zr0.17Sn0.15O2.0(16wt.%)/γ-Al2O3 catalyst showed the highest acetaldehyde oxidation activity. On this catalyst, acetaldehyde was completely oxidized after the reaction at 0°C for 8hr, and the selectivity to acetic acid reached to 95% and higher after the reaction for 4hr and longer. PMID:26456607

  9. A Theoretical Investigation of the Plausibility of Reactions Between Ammonia and Carbonyl Species (Formaldehyde, Acetaldehyde, and Acetone) in Interstellar Ice Analogs at Ultracold Temperatures

    Chen, Lina; Woon, David E.

    2011-01-01

    We have reexamined the reaction between formaldehyde and ammonia, which was previously studied by us and other workers in modestly sized cluster calculations. Larger model systems with up to 12H2O were employed, and reactions of two more carbonyl species, acetaldehyde and acetone, were also carried out. Calculations were performed at the B3LYP/6-31+G** level with bulk solvent effects treated with a polarizable continuum model; limited MP2/6-31+G** calculations were also performed. We found that while the barrier for the concerted proton relay mechanism described in previous work remains modest, it is still prohibitively high for the reaction to occur under the ultracold conditions that prevail in dense interstellar clouds. However, a new pathway emerged in more realistic clusters that involves at least one barrierless step for two of the carbonyl species considered here: ammonia reacts with formaldehyde and acetaldehyde to form a partial charge transfer species in small clusters (4H2O) and a protonated hydroxyamino intermediate species in large clusters (9H2O, 12H2O); modest barriers that decrease sharply with cluster size are found for the analogous processes for the acetone-NH3 reaction. Furthermore, if a second ammonia replaces one of the water molecules in calculations in the 9H2O clusters, deprotonation can occur to yield the same neutral hydroxyamino species that is formed via the original concerted proton relay mechanism. In at least one position, deprotonation is barrierless when zero-point energy is included. In addition to describing the structures and energetics of the reactions between formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, and acetone with ammonia, we report spectroscopic predictions of the observable vibrational features that are expected to be present in ice mixtures of different composition.

  10. Effect of indole-3-carbinol on ethanol-induced liver injury and acetaldehyde-stimulated hepatic stellate cells activation using precision-cut rat liver slices.

    Guo, Yu; Wu, Xiao-Qian; Zhang, Chun; Liao, Zhang-Xiu; Wu, Yong; Xia, Zheng-Yuan; Wang, Hui

    2010-12-01

    1. Indole-3-carbinol (I3C), a major indole compound found in high levels in cruciferous vegetables, shows a broad spectrum of biological activities. However, few studies have reported the effect of I3C on alcoholic liver injury. In the present study, we investigated the protective effect of I3C on acute ethanol-induced hepatotoxicity and acetaldehyde-stimulated hepatic stellate cells (HSC) activation using precision-cut liver slices (PCLS). 2. Rat PCLS were incubated with 50 mmol/L ethanol or 350 μmol/L acetaldehyde, and different concentrations (100-400 μmol/L) of I3C were added into the culture system of these two liver injury models, respectively. Hepatotoxicity was assessed by measuring enzyme leakage and malondialdehyde (MDA) content in tissue. Activities of alcoholic enzymes were also determined. α-Smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), transforming growth factor (TGF-β(1) ) and hydroxyproline (HYP) were used as indices to evaluate the activation of HSC. In addition, matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1) and the tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP-1) were observed to estimate collagen degradation. 3. I3C significantly reduced the enzyme leakage in ethanol-treated slices. In I3C groups, cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2E1 activities were inhibited by 40.9-51.8%, whereas alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) activity was enhanced 1.6-fold compared with the ethanol-treated group. I3C also showed an inhibitory effect against HSC activation and collagen production stimulated by acetaldehyde. After being incubated with I3C (400 μmol/L), the expression of MMP-1 was markedly enhanced, whereas TIMP-1 was decreased. 4. These results showed that I3C protected PCLS against alcoholic liver injury, which might be associated with the regulation of ethanol metabolic enzymes, attenuation of oxidative injury and acceleration of collagen degradation. PMID:20880187

  11. Quantitative analysis of the lactic acid and acetaldehyde produced by Streptococcus thermophilus and Lactobacillus bulgaricus strains isolated from traditional Turkish yogurts using HPLC.

    Gezginc, Y; Topcal, F; Comertpay, S; Akyol, I

    2015-03-01

    The present study was conducted to evaluate the lactic acid- and acetaldehyde-producing abilities of lactic acid bacterial species isolated from traditionally manufactured Turkish yogurts using HPLC. The lactic acid bacterial species purified from the yogurts were the 2 most widely used species in industrial yogurt production: Streptococcus thermophilus and Lactobacillus bulgaricus. These bacteria have the ability to ferment hexose sugars homofermentatively to generate lactic acid and some carbonyl compounds, such as acetaldehyde through pyruvate metabolism. The levels of the compounds produced during fermentation influence the texture and the flavor of the yogurt and are themselves influenced by the chemical composition of the milk, processing conditions, and the metabolic activity of the starter culture. In the study, morphological, biochemical, and molecular characteristics were employed to identify the bacteria obtained from homemade yogurts produced in different regions of Turkey. A collection of 91 Strep. thermophilus and 35 L. bulgaricus strains were investigated for their lactic acid- and acetaldehyde-formation capabilities in various media such as cow milk, LM17 agar, and aerobic-anaerobic SM17 agar or de Man, Rogosa, and Sharpe agar. The amounts of the metabolites generated by each strain in all conditions were quantified by HPLC. The levels were found to vary depending on the species, the strain, and the growth conditions used. Whereas lactic acid production ranged between 0 and 77.9 mg/kg for Strep. thermophilus strains, it ranged from 0 to 103.5 mg/kg for L. bulgaricus. Correspondingly, the ability to generate acetaldehyde ranged from 0 to 105.9 mg/kg in Strep. thermophilus and from 0 to 126.9 mg/kg in L. bulgaricus. Our study constitutes the first attempt to determine characteristics of the wild strains isolated from traditional Turkish yogurts, and the approach presented here, which reveals the differences in metabolite production abilities of the

  12. Involvement of acetaldehyde in seed deterioration of some recalcitrant woody species through the acceleration of aerobic respiration.

    Akimoto, Toshiyuki; Cho, Shinya; Yoshida, Hiroshi; Furuta, Hiroaki; Esashi, Yohji

    2004-02-01

    The rate of acetaldehyde (Ald) evolution in the deterioration of recalcitrant woody seeds was investigated. Four plant species, Ligustrum japonicum, Quercus serrata, Quercus myrsinaefolia and Camellia japonica, were used for the experiments. Similar to orthodox seeds, all of the recalcitrant seeds used contained Ald in addition to methanol and ethanol, although the amount of Ald in Camellia, a typical oil seed, was very small. These volatiles were accumulated in a container in which Ligustrum and Q. serrata seeds were stored for a short period. Moreover, all of the seeds that had been previously exposed to Ald for only 6 d at 3 or 13 degrees C lost their vigor rapidly in proportion to the concentration of Ald. The occasional removal by decompression of Ald accumulated in the container prolonged the life span of Q. serrata seeds from 4 to 6 months. These findings suggest that a short life span of the hydrated recalcitrant seeds may involve Ald synthesis as in the orthodox seeds. However, the action mechanism of Ald in Ligustrum and Quercus seeds in which storage substances were polysaccharides seems to differ slightly from that in orthodox seeds, because their aerobic respiration was significantly stimulated by exposure to exogenously applied Ald. It was, therefore, thought that the rapid deterioration of some recalcitrant seeds in woody species may result from a decline in vigor, not only due to the denaturation of functional proteins by Ald as in the orthodox seeds but also due to the rapid consumption of direct substrates for the Ald-stimulated aerobic respiration and related co-enzymes within seeds. In contrast, in the oil-bearing Camellia seeds, Ald was slightly produced and their aerobic respiration was not enhanced by Ald, although they were very sensitive to Ald. Desiccation storage of Camellia seeds caused the deterioration of their outer part, which was accelerated by exogenously applied Ald, which suggests that in Camellia Ald acts only to denature the

  13. Flux measurement of methanol, acetaldehyde and other oxygenated VOCs from crop harvesting using proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry and surface layer gradient method

    PTR-MS technique was used to measure fluxes of various VOC's including oxygenates using surface layer gradient method. The VOC concentrations and temperature were measured at heights of about 0.5 m and 3.9 m above ground at field site in St. Johann in Tirol during and after grass cutting (24th and 25th of May 2000) in order to calculate fluxes. The sensible heat flux was obtained by a sonic anemometer with turbulence data analyzer. The major crop in this part of Austria are perennial grasses used for livestock farming. We observed VOC emission fluxes including methanol and acetaldehyde as the major volatile, C5 and C6 leaf wound compounds with lesser amounts and traces of acetone and butanone. This composition of VOC's is very similar to that released from slashed pasture grass. At the same time, VOC fluxes were measured with PTR-MS and eddy covariance method. Comparing the flux data of methanol and acetaldehyde of both days have shown very similar results. (author)

  14. Fructophilic characteristics of Fructobacillus spp. may be due to the absence of an alcohol/acetaldehyde dehydrogenase gene (adhE).

    Endo, Akihito; Tanaka, Naoto; Oikawa, Yo; Okada, Sanae; Dicks, Leon

    2014-04-01

    Fructophilic strains of Leuconostoc spp. have recently been reclassified to a new genus, i.e., Fructobacillus. Members of the genus are differentiated from Leuconostoc spp. by their preference for fructose on growth, requirement of an electron acceptor for glucose metabolism, and the inability to produce ethanol from the fermentation of glucose. In the present study, enzyme activities and genes involved in ethanol production were studied, since this is the key pathway for NAD(+)/NADH cycling in heterofermentative lactic acid bacteria. Fructobacillus spp. has a weak alcohol dehydrogenase activity and has no acetaldehyde dehydrogenase activity, whereas both enzymes are active in Leuconostoc mesenteroides. The bifunctional alcohol/acetaldehyde dehydrogenase gene, adhE, was described in Leuconostoc spp., but not in Fructobacillus spp. These results suggested that, due to the deficiency of the adhE gene, the normal pathway for ethanol production is absent in Fructobacillus spp. This leads to a shortage of NAD(+), and the requirement for an electron acceptor in glucose metabolism. Fructophilic characteristics, as observed for Fructobacillus spp., are thus due to the absence of the adhE gene, and a phenotype that most likely evolved as a result of regressive evolution. PMID:24352296

  15. Spectroscopy of the ground, first and second excited torsional states of acetaldehyde from 0.05 to 1.6 THz

    Smirnov, I. A.; Alekseev, E. A.; Ilyushin, V. V.; Margulés, L.; Motiyenko, R. A.; Drouin, B. J.

    2014-01-01

    We present a new global study of the millimeter wave, submillimeter wave and THz spectra of the lowest three torsional states of acetaldehyde (CH3CHO). New measurements have been carried out between 0.05 and 1.62 THz using three different spectrometers in IRA NASU (Ukraine), PhLAM Lille (France), and JPL (USA). The new data involving torsion-rotation transitions with J up to 66 and Ka up to 22 were combined with previously published measurements and fitted using the rho-axis-method torsion-rotation Hamiltonian. The final fit used 109 parameters to give an overall weighted root-mean-square deviation of 0.69 for the dataset consisting of 8748, 6959, and 4524 transitions belonging, respectively, to the ground, first, and second excited torsional states and 1481 Δvt ≠ 0 FIR transitions belonging to the torsional vt = 0 → 1 and 1 → 2 bands of the molecule. This investigation presents more than a twofold expansion in the J quantum number and almost fourfold expansion in the frequency range coverage for the acetaldehyde rotational spectrum.

  16. Symthesis of Methyl Hexyl Acetaldehyde by Darzems Reactiom%Darzens 反应合成甲基己基乙醛

    陈文抗

    2014-01-01

    The solvent method for synthesizing methyl hexyl acetaldehyde,under the anhydrous and alkali catalysis,methyl nonyl ketone and α - halogenated acid ester via Darzens reaction to generate α,β - epoxy acid ester,saponification, acidification,heating and decarboxylation. The optimum process conditions acquired:petroleum ether as solvent,reaction temperature for 10 ~ 15℃ for condensation,condensation rate of reached 75% ;25% NaOH solution for saponification;2% sulfuric acidhyl sulfoxide for decarboxylation,the methyl hexyl acetaldehyde must rate reached 61% .%溶剂法缩合制甲基己基乙醛,以甲基壬酮与α-卤代酸酯在无水碱催化下,通过 Darzens 反应生成α,β-环氧酸酯,经皂化、酸化、加热脱羧而得,并对该工艺进行优化,缩合反应以石油醚为溶剂,反应温度为10~15℃,缩合收率达到75%;水解反应:用25%的 NaOH 溶液;脱羧反应:用2%的硫酸,使甲基己基乙醛总收率达到61%。

  17. Effect of the allelic variants of aldehyde dehydrogenase ALDH2*2 and alcohol dehydrogenase ADH1B*2 on blood acetaldehyde concentrations

    Peng Giia-Sheun

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Alcoholism is a complex behavioural disorder. Molecular genetics studies have identified numerous candidate genes associated with alcoholism. It is crucial to verify the disease susceptibility genes by correlating the pinpointed allelic variations to the causal phenotypes. Alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH are the principal enzymes responsible for ethanol metabolism in humans. Both ADH and ALDH exhibit functional polymorphisms among racial populations; these polymorphisms have been shown to be the important genetic determinants in ethanol metabolism and alcoholism. Here, we briefly review recent advances in genomic studies of human ADH/ALDH families and alcoholism, with an emphasis on the pharmacogenetic consequences of venous blood acetaldehyde in the different ALDH2 genotypes following the intake of various doses of ethanol. This paper illustrates a paradigmatic example of phenotypic verifications in a protective disease gene for substance abuse.

  18. Uptake and Reactions of Formaldehyde, Acetaldehyde, Acetone, Propanal and Ethanol in Sulfuric Acid solutions at 200-240 K: Implications for upper tropospheric aerosol composition

    Iraci, L. T.; Williams, M. B.; Axson, J.; Michelsen, R.

    2007-12-01

    The production of light absorbing, organic material in aerosol that is normally considered to be transparent in the UV and visible wavelength regions has significant implications for biogeochemical cycling and climate modelling. Production mechanisms likely involve carbonyl compounds such as formaldehyde, acetone, acetaldehyde and propanal that are present in significant quantities in the upper troposphere (UT). In this study, we have performed experiments focusing on a class of acid catalyzed carbonyl reactions, the formation of acetals. R2C=O + 2R'OH --> R2C(OR')2 + H2O Using a Knudsen cell apparatus, we have measured the rate of uptake of formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, acetone, propanal, and ethanol into sulfuric acid solutions ranging between 40-70 wt% of acid, containing 0-0.1 M of ethanol, acetone or formaldehyde at temperatures of 220-250 K. For all reactant pairs, the aldol condensation path, including self reaction, should be insignificant at the acidities studied. Evidence for reaction between organics was observed for all pairs, except those involving propanal which were likely limited by the very low solubility. We attribute enhanced uptake to the formation of acetals, such as 1,1-diethoxyethane and 2,2- diethoxypropane, among others. Enhanced uptake was observed to proceed on timescales > 1 hour and sometimes shows complex dependence on acidity that is likely related to speciation of the individual carbonyls in acidic solution. The acetal products do not absorb in the visible but are less volatile than parent molecules, allowing for accumulation in sulfuric acid particles, and enhanced uptake. Cross reactions of carbonyls with alcohols in sulfuric acid medium have not been previously measured, yet methanol and ethanol show high solubility and are present at significant concentrations in the UT. Thus even at slow reaction rates, the acetal reaction has ample starting material and proceeds under conditions common to the UT. We will present results for the

  19. Mechanistic insights into the formation of acetaldehyde and diethyl ether from ethanol over support VO{sub x}, MoO{sub x}, and WO{sub x} catalysts.

    Nair, H.; Gatt, J. E.; Miller, J. T.; Baertsch, C. D. (Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division); (Purdue Univ.)

    2011-04-01

    Catalytic pathways are described for reactions of ethanol to acetaldehyde by oxidative dehydrogenation and of ethanol to diethyl ether by condensation over VO{sub x}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, MoO{sub x}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and WO{sub x}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Isotopic labeling shows that acetaldehyde formation occurs via rate-determining C-H bond cleavage of the CH{sub 2} group in an adsorbed alkoxide followed by removal of surface oxygen in a Mars and van Krevelen redox mechanism (as confirmed by in situ X-ray absorption, diffuse reflectance infra-red Fourier transform spectroscopy and UV-visible spectroscopy); diethyl ether formation occurs in parallel via coupling and condensation of two adjacent ethoxy species. Using a combination of in situ spectroscopic and kinetic analysis, catalyst properties influencing the formation of acetaldehyde and ether from the common adsorbed ethoxy intermediate are elucidated. X-ray absorption analysis during anaerobic ethanol titration is used to preclude the involvement of terminal MO bonds during the reaction. A study of the activity of catalysts with the same MoO{sub x} domain size on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, TiO{sub 2}, and CeO{sub 2} supports and binary oxides of MoO{sub x} and WO{sub x} on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} are used to prove that the active redox oxygen for acetaldehyde formation is the oxygen atom linking the active metal oxide domain to the support oxide. Ether formation ability of the metal oxide is related to the electronegativity of the active metal atom.

  20. Ethanol-induced oxidative stress and acetaldehyde formation in rat mammary tissue: Potential factors involved in alcohol drinking promotion of breast cancer

    Recent studies from our laboratory provided evidence that part of the carcinogenic effects of ethanol consumption might be related to its in situ metabolism at cytosolic and microsomal levels, to the mutagen acetaldehyde and to hydroxyl and 1-hydroxyethyl radicals. In this work, we report on our experiments where Sprague-Dawley female rats were exposed to the standard Lieber and De Carli diet for 28 days. We observed: the induction of the (xanthineoxidoreductase mediated) cytosolic and microsomal (lipoxygenase mediated) pathways of ethanol metabolism; promotion of oxidative stress as shown by increased formation of lipid hydroperoxides; delay in the t-butylhydroperoxide induced chemiluminiscence, and a significant decrease in protein sulfhydryls. In addition, the epithelial cells showed ultrastructural alterations consisting of markedly irregular nuclei, with frequent invaginations at the level of the nuclear envelope, condensation of chromatin around the inner nuclear membrane, and marked dilatation of the nuclear pores showing filamentous material exiting to the cytoplasm. In conclusion, the presence in mammary epithelial cells of cytosolic and microsomal pathways of ethanol bioactivation to carcinogenic and to tumorigenic metabolites might play a role in alcohol promotion of breast cancer

  1. Hydrogen bonding interaction of small acetaldehyde clusters studied with core-electron excitation spectroscopy in the oxygen K-edge region

    In order to examine inner-shell electron excitation spectra of molecular clusters with strong multipole interactions, excitation spectra and time-of-flight (TOF) fragment-mass spectra of small acetaldehyde (AA) clusters have been studied under the beam conditions. The TOF spectra at the oxygen K-edge region showed an intense growth of the protonated clusters, MnH+ (M=CH3CHO) in the cluster beams. 'cluster-specific' excitation spectra could be generated by monitoring partial-ion-yields of the protonated clusters. The most intense band of O1s→π*CO was found to shift to a higher energy by 0.15 eV relative to the monomer band upon clusterization. X-ray absorption spectra (XAS) were also calculated for the representative dimer configurations using a computer modelling program based on the density functional theory. The XAS prediction for the most stable (non-planar) configuration was found to give a close comparison with the cluster-band shift observed. The band shift was interpreted as being due to the HOMO-LUMO interaction within the complex where a contribution of vibrationally blue-shifting hydrogen bonding could be identified.

  2. Liquid-Phase Aldol Condesation of Acetaldehyde and Its Kinetics%乙醛液相羟醛缩合反应工艺和动力学

    伍艳辉; 任伟丽; 梁泽磊; 刘仲能; 吴高胜

    2013-01-01

    考察了KOH,NaOH,Na2CO3,NaOH和Na2CO3混合碱,三乙胺及阴离子交换树脂在乙醛缩合反应过程中的催化性能,以及反应体系的pH值和温度对反应的影响.结果表明,以Na2CO3为催化剂有利于维持反应体系pH稳定,当反应体系pH值为11~12,反应温度35℃时,反应转化率和选择性较高.在不同温度和pH值时进行动力学研究,得到pH值分别为10.4,11.0和11.4的动力学方程和相应的参数,其中pH值为11.4时,反应活化能最小.%The catalytic performance of different catalysts, KOH, NaOH, Na2CO3, mixed alkalis of NaOH and Na2CO3, triethylamine, and anionic exchange resin, in aldol condensation of acetaldehyde, were examined. The effects of solution pH level and reaction temperature on the reaction extent were investigated. The results indicate that a relatively constant pH level could be maintained with Na2CO3 as the catalyst. The reaction has a high conversion and a high selectivity at the reaction temperature of 35 ℃ and the pH range of 11-12. Kinetic studies were then carried out with Na2CO3 as the catalyst at different reaction temperatures and pH levels. The kinetic equations and the corresponding parameters were finally obtained for pH level of 10.4, 11.0, and 11.4, respectively. The activation energy at pH value of 11.4 is the lowest.

  3. Kinetics of the unimolecular reaction of CH2OO and the bimolecular reactions with the water monomer, acetaldehyde and acetone under atmospheric conditions.

    Berndt, Torsten; Kaethner, Ralf; Voigtländer, Jens; Stratmann, Frank; Pfeifle, Mark; Reichle, Patrick; Sipilä, Mikko; Kulmala, Markku; Olzmann, Matthias

    2015-08-14

    Stabilized Criegee Intermediates (sCIs) have been identified as oxidants of atmospheric trace gases such as SO2, NO2, carboxylic acids or carbonyls. The atmospheric sCI concentrations, and accordingly their importance for trace gas oxidation, are controlled by the rate of the most important loss processes, very likely the unimolecular reactions and the reaction with water vapour (monomer and dimer) ubiquitously present at high concentrations in the troposphere. In this study, the rate coefficients of the unimolecular reaction of the simplest sCI, formaldehyde oxide, CH2OO, and its bimolecular reaction with the water monomer have been experimentally determined at T = (297 ± 1) K and at atmospheric pressure by using a free-jet flow system. CH2OO was produced by the reaction of ozone with C2H4, and CH2OO concentrations were probed indirectly by detecting H2SO4 after titration with SO2. Time-resolved experiments yield a rate coefficient of the unimolecular reaction of k(uni) = (0.19 ± 0.07) s(-1), a value that is supported by quantum-chemical and statistical rate theory calculations as well as by additional measurements performed under CH2OO steady-state conditions. A rate coefficient of k(CH2OO+H2O) = (3.2 ± 1.2) × 10(-16) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) has been determined for sufficiently low H2O concentrations (<10(15) molecule cm(-3)) that allow separation from the CH2OO reaction with the water dimer. In order to evaluate the accuracy of the experimental approach, the rate coefficients of the reactions with acetaldehyde and acetone were reinvestigated. The obtained rate coefficients k(CH2OO+acetald) = (1.7 ± 0.5) × 10(-12) and k(CH2OO+acetone) = (3.4 ± 0.9) × 10(-13) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) are in good agreement with literature data. PMID:26159709

  4. Solvent Effects on Nuclear Magnetic Resonance 2J(C,Hf and 1J(C,Hf Spin–Spin Coupling Constants in Acetaldehyde

    Angel Esteban

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: The known solvent dependence of 1J(Cc,Hf and 2J(C1,Hf couplings in acetaldehyde is studied from a theoretical viewpoint based on the density functional theory approach where the dielectric solvent effect is taken into account with the polarizable continuum model. The four terms of scalar couplings, Fermi contact, paramagnetic spin orbital, diamagnetic spin orbital and spin dipolar, are calculated but the solvent effect analysis is restricted to the first term since for both couplings it is by far the dominant contribution. Experimental trends of Δ1J(Cc,Hf and Δ2J(C1,Hf Vs ε (the solvent dielectric constant are correctly reproduced although they are somewhat underestimated. Specific interactions between solute and solvent molecules are studied for dimethylsulfoxide, DMSO, solutions considering two different one-to-one molecular complexes between acetaldehyde and DMSO. They are determined by interactions of type C=O---H---C and S=O---H---C, and the effects of such interactions on 1J(Cc,Hf and 2J(C1,Hf couplings are analyzed. Even though only in a semiquantitative way, it is shown that the effect of such interactions on the solvent effects, of Δ1J(Cc,Hf and Δ2J(C1,Hf, tend to improve the agreement between calculated and experimental values. These results seem to indicate that a continuum dielectric model has not enough flexibility for describing quantitatively solvent effects on spin-spin couplings. Apparently, even for relatively weak hydrogen bonding, the contribution from “direct” interactions is of the same order of magnitude as the “dielectric” effect.

  5. GC Determination of Acetaldehyde, Acrolein and Acrylonitrile in Water with Purge and Trap Technique%吹扫捕集-气相色谱法测定水中乙醛、丙烯醛、丙烯腈

    陆文娟; 王晋宇; 陈玲瑚; 赵辰

    2011-01-01

    Purge and trap technique was applied in the GC determination of acetaldehyde, acrolein and acrylonitrile in water. The analytes were purged, trapped and thermodesorbed using the Trap Vocarb 3000, and determined by CR2 with flame ionization detector (FID). Linear relationships between values of peak area and mass concentration of acetaldehyde, acrolein and acrylonitrile obtained were same in the range of 0. 020--0.20 mg·L^-1 , with detection limits (3S/N) of 0. 005, 0. 010, 0. 001mg·L^-1 respectively. Tests for recovery and precision were made by standard addition method, values of recovery found were in the range of 90. 0%-110.0% and values of RSD's (n=7) were less than 50%.%提出了吹扫捕集-气相色谱法测定水中乙醛、丙烯醛和丙烯腈的分析方法。样品用Trap Vocarb 3000捕集阱吹扫、捕集及热解析后,用气相色谱法氢火焰离子化检测器分析。3种化合物的质量浓度在0.020~0.20mg·L^-1的相同范围内与其峰面积呈线性关系,方法的检出限(3S/N)分别为0.005,0.010,0.001mg·L^-。标准加入回收率在90.0%~110.0%之间,相对标准偏差(n=7)均小于5%。

  6. Overview of VOC emissions and chemistry from PTR-TOF-MS measurements during the SusKat-ABC campaign: high acetaldehyde, isoprene and isocyanic acid in wintertime air of the Kathmandu Valley

    Sarkar, Chinmoy; Sinha, Vinayak; Kumar, Vinod; Rupakheti, Maheswar; Panday, Arnico; Mahata, Khadak S.; Rupakheti, Dipesh; Kathayat, Bhogendra; Lawrence, Mark G.

    2016-03-01

    The Kathmandu Valley in Nepal suffers from severe wintertime air pollution. Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are key constituents of air pollution, though their specific role in the valley is poorly understood due to insufficient data. During the SusKat-ABC (Sustainable Atmosphere for the Kathmandu Valley-Atmospheric Brown Clouds) field campaign conducted in Nepal in the winter of 2012-2013, a comprehensive study was carried out to characterise the chemical composition of ambient Kathmandu air, including the determination of speciated VOCs, by deploying a proton transfer reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometer (PTR-TOF-MS) - the first such deployment in South Asia. In the study, 71 ion peaks (for which measured ambient concentrations exceeded the 2σ detection limit) were detected in the PTR-TOF-MS mass scan data, highlighting the chemical complexity of ambient air in the valley. Of the 71 species, 37 were found to have campaign average concentrations greater than 200 ppt and were identified based on their spectral characteristics, ambient diel profiles and correlation with specific emission tracers as a result of the high mass resolution (m / Δm > 4200) and temporal resolution (1 min) of the PTR-TOF-MS. The concentration ranking in the average VOC mixing ratios during our wintertime deployment was acetaldehyde (8.8 ppb) > methanol (7.4 ppb) > acetone + propanal (4.2 ppb) > benzene (2.7 ppb) > toluene (1.5 ppb) > isoprene (1.1 ppb) > acetonitrile (1.1 ppb) > C8-aromatics ( ˜ 1 ppb) > furan ( ˜ 0.5 ppb) > C9-aromatics (0.4 ppb). Distinct diel profiles were observed for the nominal isobaric compounds isoprene (m / z = 69.070) and furan (m / z = 69.033). Comparison with wintertime measurements from several locations elsewhere in the world showed mixing ratios of acetaldehyde ( ˜ 9 ppb), acetonitrile ( ˜ 1 ppb) and isoprene ( ˜ 1 ppb) to be among the highest reported to date. Two "new" ambient compounds, namely formamide (m / z = 46.029) and acetamide (m / z

  7. Impact of engineered Streptococcus thermophilus trains overexpressing glyA gene on folic acid and acetaldehyde production in fermented milk Impacto de linhagens de Streptococcus thermophilus com aumento da expressão do gene glyA na produção de ácido folico e acetaldeído em leite fermentado

    Ana Carolina Sampaio Dória Chaves

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available The typical yogurt flavor is caused by acetaldehyde produced through many different pathways by the yogurt starter bacteria L. bulgaricus and S. thermophilus. The attention was focused on one specific reaction for acetaldehyde and folic acid formation catalyzed by serine hydroxymethyltransferase (SHMT, encoded by the glyA gene. In S. thermophilus, this enzyme SHMT also plays the typical role of the enzyme threonine aldolase (TA that is the interconvertion of threonine into glycine and acetaldehyde. The behavior of engineered S. thermophilus strains in milk fermentation is described, folic acid and acetaldehyde production were measured and pH and counts were followed. The engineered S. thermophilus strains StA2305 and StB2305, have the glyA gene (encoding the enzyme serine hydroxymethyltransferase overexpressed. These engineered strains showed normal growth in milk when it was supplemented with Casitione. When they were used in milk fermentation it was observed an increase in folic acid and in acetaldehyde production by StA2305 and for StB2305 it was noticed a significative increase in folic acid formation.O acetaldeído, responsável pelo sabor e aroma característicos de iogurte, é produzido por diferentes vias metabólicas pelas bactérias lácticas: Streptococcus thermophilus (S. thermophilus e Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus (L. bulgaricus. Neste trabalho, a atenção foi focada especificamente na reação para a formação de acetaldeído e de ácido fólico, catalisada pela enzima serina hidroximetil transferase (SHMT, codificada pelo gene glyA. A enzima SHMT catalisa diversas reações e, no caso da bactéria S. thermophilus, ela exerce também a atividade característica da enzima treonina aldolase (TA, definida como a interconversão do aminoácido treonina em glicina e acetaldeído. Foram construídas linhagens de S. thermophilus (StA2305 e StB2305 com super expressão do gene glyA. Estas linhagens modificadas apresentaram

  8. Acetaldehyde dehydrogenase 2 activation inhibits myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury in senescent rats%激活乙醛脱氢酶2抑制老年大鼠心肌缺血再灌注损伤

    邢媛; 殷玥; 石曌玲; 李晨; 王博文; 王衍帅; 高峰; 马恒

    2013-01-01

    Objective Aging heart shows significantly reduced tolerance to myocardial ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury, so senescent heart is prone to be damaged by the injury. This study was designed to investigate the protective effect of acetaldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) agonist Alda-1 in aging rats after myocardial I/R injury. Methods A total of 40 aging male Sprague Dawley (SD) rats (at an age of 20 to 22 months) were randomized into I/R group (I/R) and Alda-1 group (I/R + Alda). Another 40 adult rats at an age of 3 to 4 months served as adult control. Rat acute myocardial I/R model was established by ligation of left anterior descending artery for 30min followed by reperfusion for 4h. Alda-l(16mg/kg) and normal saline at the same volume were intravenously infused at a flow rate of 2ml/(kg · h) into the left ventricle of corresponding rats in 5min before reperfusion. The left ventricular pressure was monitored at the same time. At the end of 4 hours reperfusion, ALDH2 activity, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, and protein carbonylation in the myocardial tissue were measured. Serum level of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) was tested. Results A significant decrease in ALDH2 activity was observed in the aging hearts, but this effect was blocked by Alda-1. Compared with the adult hearts, myocardial I/R injury was significantly aggravated in aging hearts, which were evidenced by reduced ± LVdP/dtmax and increased serum level of LDH (P < 0.05). ALDH2 activator infusion during reperfusion effectively suppressed the above mentioned ischemic injury in the aging hearts (P < 0.05). Furthermore, protein carbonylation and ROS production in the myocardium were increased in the aging hearts compared with the adult hearts (P < 0.05), which was attenuated by Alda-1 treatment. Conclusion Activating myocardial ALDH2 significantly improves the resistance ability to myocardial I/R injury in aging heart. ALDH2-induced cardiac protection may be through suppressing myocardial I

  9. Effect of caffeine on signaling transduction of TGF-β1 and CTGF in hepatic stellate cell-T6 stimulated by acetaldehyde%咖啡因对乙醛诱导的HSC-T6中TGF-β1,CTGF信号转导通路的影响

    管文婕; 吕雄文; 杨万枝; 李俊

    2012-01-01

    Objective To explore the effect of caffeine on proliferation in hepatic stellate cell stimulated by acetaldehyde and its signaling pathway of TGF-β and CTGF. Methods Trials are divided into normal group( regular training ), model group, adenosine receptor group,which were given caffeine( 4 mmol · L-1 ),adenosine A2A receptor antagonist ZM241385( 1 μmol · L-1 ),adenosine A2A receptor agonists CGS21680( 1 μmol · L-1 ),caffeine + CGS21680,ZM241385 + CGS21680 and HSC-T6 respectively,stimulated by acetaldehyde after 1 h,before continueing to cultivate 48 h. The protein expression of a-SMA was analyzed by immunocytochemistry methods. The mR-NA expressions of TGF-β1 and CTGF were measured by RT-PCR. The protein expression of CTGF was analyzed by western blot methods. Results Caffeine or ZM241385 treatment inhibited the increase expressions of TGF-β1, CTGF, α-SMA in the HSC-T6,likewise,as with CGS21680 plus caffeine or ZM241385 groups, caffeine or ZM241385 prevented the adenosine A2A receptor agonist from stimulating an increase in hepatic stellate cell. Conclusion Caffeine can suppress the activation of α-SMA in HSC-T6 stimulated by acetaldehyde. Caffeine treatment inhibited the increase expressions of TGF-βl and CTGF in the HSC-T6,the mechanisms of which may be related to the expression of adenosine A2A receptor.%目的 探讨咖啡因(caffeine)对乙醛诱导的大鼠肝星状细胞系(Hepatic Stellate Cell-T6,HSC-T6)中转化生长因子-β1(Transforming Growth Factor-β1,TGF-β1),结缔组织生长因子(Connective Tissue Growth Factor,CTGF)信号转导通路的影响.方法 实验设正常组(常规培养),模型组及腺苷受体(Adenosine Receptor,AR)调节剂干预组.分别给予caffeine(4 mmol·L-1)[1-2],腺苷A2A受体拮抗剂ZM241385(1 μmol·L-1)[3],腺苷A2A受体激动剂CGS21680(1 μmol·L-1)[3],caffeine+CGS21680,ZM241385+CGS21680 与HSC-T6共同培养,1 h后加入终浓度200 μmol·L-1的乙醛刺激(每12 h补充1次),继续培养48 h.采

  10. Candida yeasts and carcinogenic acetaldehyde in upper digestive tract carcinogenesis

    Nieminen, Mikko

    2014-01-01

    Cancers of the upper digestive tract (oral, pharyngeal, laryngeal, oesophageal and stomach) are among the ten most common cancers worldwide and are associated with high mortality and morbidity. Despite improved treatment strategies, the prognosis of these cancers remains poor. The main aetiological factors for the upper digestive tract cancers are alcohol consumption and smoking. Dietary and genetic factors can also contribute to an increased risk. Alcohol consumption, smoking and poor oral h...

  11. Azo dyes photobleaching and operando FTIR study of acetaldehyde photoinduced decomposition on bismuth doped titania

    Henych, Jiří; Štengl, Václav; Mattsson, A.; Österlund, L.

    Thessaloniki: Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 2014, 41 PC-2-4. [European Meeting on Solar Chemistry and Photocatalysis: Environmental Applications (SPEA) /8./. Thessaloniki (GR), 25.6.2014-28.6.2014] Institutional support: RVO:61388980 Keywords : bismuth doped titania * photocatalytic Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry

  12. Relative tropospheric photolysis rates of acetaldehyde and formaldehyde measured at the European Photoreactor Facility

    Nilsson, Elna Johanna Kristina; Bache-Andreassen, Lihn; Johnson, Matthew Stanley;

    2009-01-01

    The photolysis rates of HCHO, DCDO, CH3CHO, and CH3CDO are studied by long-path FTIR spectroscopy in natural tropospheric conditions at the European Photoreactor Facility (EUPHORE) in Valencia, Spain. Average relative photolysis rates jHCHO/jDCDO ) 3.15 ( 0.08 and jCH3CHO/jCH3CDO ) 1.26 ( 0.03 are...

  13. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Mono-13C acetaldehydes mm/submm wave spectra (Margules+,

    Margules, L.; Motiyenko, R. A.; Ilyushin, V. V.; Guillemin, J.-C.

    2015-06-01

    This paper is a continuation of a series of studies conducted in PhLAM Lille (France) that are devoted to the investigations of the spectra of different isotopic species of astrophysical molecules. We present a new study of the 13CH3CHO and CH313CHO spectra with measurements and analysis extended up to 945GHz. (6 data files).

  14. Roaming is the dominant mechanism for molecular products in acetaldehyde photodissociation

    Heazlewood, Brianna R.; Jordan, Meredith J. T.; Kable, Scott H.; Selby, Talitha M.; Osborn, David L.; Shepler, Benjamin C.; Braams, Bastiaan J.; Joel M. Bowman

    2008-01-01

    Reaction pathways that bypass the conventional saddle-point transition state (TS) are of considerable interest and importance. An example of such a pathway, termed “roaming,” has been described in the photodissociation of H2CO. In a combined experimental and theoretical study, we show that roaming pathways are important in the 308-nm photodissociation of CH3CHO to CH4 + CO. The CH4 product is found to have extreme vibrational excitation, with the vibrational distribution peaked at ≈95% of the...

  15. Azo dyes photobleaching and operando FTIR study of acetaldehyde photoinduced decomposition on bismuth doped titania

    Henych, Jiří; Štengl, Václav; Mattsson, A.; Österlund, L.

    Thessaloniki : Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 2014. s. 101. [European Meeting on Solar Chemistry and Photocatalysis: Environmental Applications (SPEA) /8./. 25.6.2014-28.6.2014, Thessaloniki] Institutional support: RVO:61388980 Keywords : bismuth doped titania Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry

  16. Quantification by SIFT-MS of acetaldehyde released by lung cells in a 3D model

    Rutter, A. V.; Chippendale, T. W. E.; Yang, Y.; Španěl, Patrik; Smith, D.; Sule-Suso, J.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 138, č. 1 (2013), s. 91-95. ISSN 0003-2654 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : tube mass spectrometry * volatile organic compounds * in-vitro Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.906, year: 2013

  17. Ethanol-derived acetaldehyde: pleasure and pain of alcohol mechanism of action.

    Marco Diana

    2013-07-01

    In the present paper we review the role of EtOH-derived ACD in the reinforcing effects of EtOH and the possibility that ACD may serve as a therapeutically targetable biomarker in the search for novel treatments in alcohol abuse and alcoholism.

  18. Water and acetaldehyde in HH212: The first hot corino in Orion

    Codella, C; Cabrit, S; Podio, L; Bachiller, R; Fontani, F; Gusdorf, A; Lefloch, B; Leurini, S; Tafalla, M

    2016-01-01

    Aims: Using the unprecedented combination of high resolution and sensitivity offered by ALMA, we aim to investigate whether and how hot corinos, circumstellar disks, and ejected gas are related in young solar-mass protostars. Methods: We observed CH$_3$CHO and deuterated water (HDO) high-excitation ($E_{\\rm u}$ up to 335 K) lines towards the Sun-like protostar HH212--MM1. Results: For the first time, we have obtained images of CH$_3$CHO and HDO emission in the inner $\\simeq$ 100 AU of HH212. The multifrequency line analysis allows us to contrain the density ($\\geq$ 10$^{7}$ cm$^{-3}$), temperature ($\\simeq$ 100 K), and CH$_3$CHO abundance ($\\simeq$ 0.2--2 $\\times$ 10$^{-9}$) of the emitting region. The HDO profile is asymmetric at low velocities ($\\leq$ 2 km s$^{-1}$ from $V_{\\rm sys}$). If the HDO line is optically thick, this points to an extremely small ($\\sim$ 20--40 AU) and dense ($\\ge$ 10$^{9}$ cm$^{-3}$) emitting region. Conclusions: We report the first detection of a hot corino in Orion. The HDO asymm...

  19. Water and acetaldehyde in HH212: The first hot corino in Orion

    Codella, C.; Ceccarelli, C.; Cabrit, S.; Gueth, F.; Podio, L.; Bachiller, R.; Fontani, F.; Gusdorf, A.; Lefloch, B.; Leurini, S.; Tafalla, M.

    2016-02-01

    Aims: Using the unprecedented combination of high resolution and sensitivity offered by ALMA, we aim to investigate whether and how hot corinos, circumstellar disks, and ejected gas are related in young solar-mass protostars. Methods: We observed CH3CHO and deuterated water (HDO) high-excitation (Eu up to 335 K) lines towards the Sun-like protostar HH212-MM1. Results: For the first time, we have obtained images of CH3CHO and HDO emission in the inner ≃100 AU of HH212. The multifrequency line analysis allows us to contrain the density (≥107 cm-3), temperature (≃100 K), and CH3CHO abundance (≃0.2-2 × 10-9) of the emitting region. The HDO profile is asymmetric at low velocities (≤2 km s-1 from Vsys). If the HDO line is optically thick, this points to an extremely small (~20-40 AU) and dense (≥109 cm-3) emitting region. Conclusions: We report the first detection of a hot corino in Orion. The HDO asymmetric profile indicates a contribution of outflowing gas from the compact central region, possibly associated with a dense disk wind.

  20. Genetic determinants of both ethanol and acetaldehyde metabolism influence alcohol hypersensitivity and drinking behaviour among Scandinavians

    Linneberg, A; Gonzalez-Quintela, A; Vidal, C;

    2010-01-01

    Although hypersensitivity reactions following intake of alcoholic drinks are common in Caucasians, the underlying mechanisms and clinical significance are not known. In contrast, in Asians, alcohol-induced asthma and flushing have been shown to be because of a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP...

  1. Real-time trace gas sensing of ethylene, propanal and acetaldehyde from human skin in vivo.

    Moeskops, B.W.M.; Steeghs, M.M.L.; Swam, K. van; Cristescu, S.M.; Scheepers, P.T.J.; Harren, F.J.M.

    2006-01-01

    Trace gases emitted by human skin in vivo are monitored non-invasively and in real time using laser-based photoacoustic detection and proton-transfer reaction mass spectrometry. A small quartz cuvette is placed on the skin to create a headspace from which a carrier gas transports the skin emissions

  2. Quantification of Acetaldehyde Released by Lung Cancer Cells in vintro Using Selected Ion Flow Tube Mass Spectrometry

    Smith, D.; Wang, T.; Sule-Suso, J.; Španěl, Patrik; El Haj, A.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 17, - (2003), s. 845-850. ISSN 0951-4198 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/03/0827; GA ČR GA203/02/0737 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4040901 Keywords : stage ranal-failure * trace gas-analysis * quantitative-analysis Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.789, year: 2003

  3. Oscillatory Ignitions and Cool Flames Accompanying the Non-Isothermal Oxidation of Acetaldehyde in a Well Stirred, Flow Reactor

    Gray, P.; Griffiths, J. F.; Hasko, S. M.; Lignola, P.-G.

    1981-02-01

    At the various boundaries between the five regions, sharp jumps occur from one kind of behaviour to another. At three segments of the boundary, there is hysteresis, the jumps occurring at different temperatures during heating (I --> II, III or IV) and cooling (II, III or IV --> I) traverses. There are thus regions of bistability, where identical external conditions - vessel temperatures, reactant pressures and flow rates - can give rise to alternative states inside the reactor. The two non-oscillatory, stationary states have different characters: I is a stable node and V is a stable focus. In region I, the reaction rate increases with temperature; but in region V, both reaction rate and extent of self-heating show a near-zero or negative temperature-coefficient.

  4. In Situ FTIR Spectroscopy Study of the Photodegradation of Acetaldehyde and azo Dye Photobleaching on Bismuth-Modified TiO2

    Henych, Jiří; Štengl, Václav; Mattsson, A.; Österlund, L.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 91, č. 1 (2015), s. 48-58. ISSN 0031-8655 Institutional support: RVO:61388980 Keywords : TITANIUM-DIOXIDE PHOTOCATALYSTS * RAY PHOTOELECTRON-SPECTROSCOPY * DOPED TIO2 * SURFACE * ADSORPTION Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 2.266, year: 2014

  5. Technical Note: Concerns regarding 24-h sampling for formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, and acrolein using 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine (DNPH)-coated solid sorbents

    A wide variety of natural and anthropogenic sources emit airborne carbonyls such as aldehydes (RCHO) and ketones (R1COR2). Vegetation, food, forest fires, fossil fuel combustion, disinfectants, fumigants, preservatives, and resins are a few examples of primary carbonyl sources. T...

  6. Study on Aldol Condensation of Acetaldehyde and Formaldehyde%甲醛、乙醛气相缩合生成丙烯醛的研究

    杨菊群

    2008-01-01

    对SiO2及其用碱土金属、稀土金属修饰的混合氧化物催化剂进行了表征,并研究了其对甲醛、乙醛缩合生成丙烯醛的催化性能,详细考察了甲醛、乙醛的摩尔比;反应温度;投料速度对乙醛的转化率和生成丙烯醛的选择性等的影响.

  7. The thiocarbamate disulphide drug, disulfiram induces osteopenia in rats by inhibition of osteoblast function due to suppression of acetaldehyde dehydrogenase activity.

    Mittal, Monika; Khan, Kainat; Pal, Subhashis; Porwal, Konica; China, Shyamsundar Pal; Barbhuyan, Tarun K; Baghel, Khemraj S; Rawat, Tara; Sanyal, Sabyasachi; Bhadauria, Smrati; Sharma, Vishnu L; Chattopadhyay, Naibedya

    2014-05-01

    Dithiocarbamates (DTC), a sulfhydryl group containing compounds, are extensively used by humans that include metam and thiram due to their pesticide properties, and disulfiram (DSF) as an alcohol deterrent. We screened these DTC in an osteoblast viability assay. DSF exhibited the highest cytotoxicity (IC50 488nM). Loss in osteoblast viability and proliferation was due to induction of apoptosis via G1 arrest. DSF treatment to osteoblasts reduced glutathione (GSH) levels and exogenous addition of GSH prevented DSF-induced reactive oxygen species generation and osteoblast apoptosis. DSF also inhibited osteoblast differentiation in vitro and in vivo, and the effect was associated with inhibition of aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) activity. Out of various ALDH isozymes, osteoblasts expressed only ALDH2 and DSF downregulated its transcript as well as activity. Alda-1, a specific activator of ALDH2, stimulated osteoblast differentiation. Subcutaneous injection of DSF over the calvarium of new born rats reduced the differentiation phenotype of calvarial osteoblasts but increased the mRNA levels of Runx-2 and osteocalcin. DSF treatment at a human-equivalent dose of 30 mg/kg p.o. to adult Sprague Dawley rats caused trabecular osteopenia and suppressed the formation of mineralized nodule by bone marrow stromal cells. Moreover, DSF diminished bone regeneration at the fracture site. In growing rats, DSF diminished growth plate height, primary and secondary spongiosa, mineralized osteoid and trabecular strength. Substantial decreased bone formation was also observed in the cortical site of these rats. We conclude that DSF has a strong osteopenia inducing effect by impairing osteoblast survival and differentiation due to the inhibition of ALDH2 function. PMID:24496638

  8. Effect of the allelic variants of aldehyde dehydrogenase ALDH2*2 and alcohol dehydrogenase ADH1B*2 on blood acetaldehyde concentrations

    Peng Giia-Sheun; Yin Shih-Jiun

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Alcoholism is a complex behavioural disorder. Molecular genetics studies have identified numerous candidate genes associated with alcoholism. It is crucial to verify the disease susceptibility genes by correlating the pinpointed allelic variations to the causal phenotypes. Alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) are the principal enzymes responsible for ethanol metabolism in humans. Both ADH and ALDH exhibit functional polymorphisms among racial populations; the...

  9. 乙醇脱氢制备乙醛适宜温度的选择%Discussion on Optimum Temperature for Dehydrogenation of Ethanol to Acetaldehyde

    丁爱军; 王金龙

    2011-01-01

    从化学热力学角度探讨乙醇直接脱氢和氧化脱氢的反应属性,认为直接脱氢的反应温度应高于322.5℃.说明决定反应温度的相关要素,对化学教学中相应的反应温度提出建议.

  10. Kinetics and Isotope Patterns of Ethanol and Acetaldehyde Emissions from Yeast Fermentations of Glucose and Glucose-6,6-d2 Using Selected Ion Flow Tube Mass Spectrometry: A Case Study

    Smith, D.; Wang, T.; Španěl, Patrik

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 16, č. 1 (2002), s. 69-76. ISSN 0951-4198 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/00/0632 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4040901 Keywords : selected ion flow tube mass spectrometry * stable isotope * yeast fermentation Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.372, year: 2002

  11. Reaction of the oximes of aliphatic aldehydes and ketones with alkoxyethenes

    In the reaction of acetone oxime with alkyl vinyl ethers in the presence of zinc chloride variable amounts of acetone 0,0'-(2-propylidene)dioxime, acetaldehyde dialkyl acetal, acetaldehyde 0-(1-alkoxyethyl)oxide, and acetone 0-(1-alkoxy-1-methylethyl)oxime, depending on the reaction conditions, are formed in addition to acetone 0-(1-alkoxyethyl)oxime (the initial addition product). In the reaction of acetaldehyde oxime with alkyl vinyl ethers in the presence of zinc chloride acetaldehyde oxime with alkyl vinyl ethers in the presence of zinc chloride acetaldehyde dialkyl acetal was isolated in addition to acetaldehyde 0-(1-alkoxyethyl)oxime. A mechanism for the formation of the obtained compounds is proposed

  12. Sequence Classification: 390200 [

    Full Text Available Non-TMB Non-TMH Non-TMB Non-TMB Non-TMB Non-TMB >gi|31794711|ref|NP_857204.1| PROBABLE ACETA...LDEHYDE DEHYDROGENASE (ACETALDEHYDE DEHYDROGENASE || http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/protein/31794711 ...

  13. Sequence Classification: 399976 [

    Full Text Available Non-TMB Non-TMH Non-TMB Non-TMB Non-TMB Non-TMB >gi|15610671|ref|NP_218052.1| PROBABLE ACETA...LDEHYDE DEHYDROGENASE (ACETALDEHYDE DEHYDROGENASE || http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/protein/15610671 ...

  14. Aerobic oxidation of aqueous ethanol using heterogeneous gold catalysts: Efficient routes to acetic acid and ethyl acetate

    Jørgensen, Betina; Christiansen, Sofie Egholm; Thomsen, M.L.D.;

    2007-01-01

    oxygen-assisted) dehydrogenation of ethanol to produce acetaldehyde. It also is concluded that most of the CO2 formed as a byproduct in the reaction results from the absorbed intermediate in the dehydrogenation of ethanol to produce acetaldehyde. By varying the amount of water in the reaction mixture...

  15. Transport of trace contaminants through porous media

    Madey, R.

    1975-01-01

    Research accomplishments in the following areas are discussed: (1) the calibration of the gas chromatograph for acetaldehyde and ethanol; (2) the development of data reduction and analysis methods; (3) the generation and analysis of experimental data for the transport of 100 ppm acetaldehyde through a cylindrical bed packed with activated carbon granules; (4) the generation and analysis of experimental data for the transport of 100 ppm ethanol through a cylindrical bed packed with activated carbon granules; and (5) a comparison of the volume adsorption capacity of activated carbon for 100 ppm concentrations of acetaldehyde, ethanol, and acetone. Activities in progress and planned activities are reviewed.

  16. Kinetics of acetic acid synthesis from ethanol over a Cu/SiO2 catalyst

    Voss, Bodil; Schjødt, Niels Christian; Grunwaldt, Jan-Dierk;

    2011-01-01

    The dehydrogenation of ethanol via acetaldehyde for the synthesis of acetic acid over a Cu based catalyst in a new process is reported. Specifically, we have studied a Cu on SiO2 catalyst which has shown very high selectivity to acetic acid via acetaldehyde compared to competing condensation routes....... The dehydrogenation experiments were carried out in a flow through lab scale tubular reactor. Based on 71 data sets a power law kinetic expression has been derived for the description of the dehydrogenation of acetaldehyde to acetic acid. The apparent reaction order was 0.89 with respect to water and...

  17. Electrocatalytic Activity of Pt/C Electrodes for Ethanol Oxidation in Vapor Phase

    LIANG Hong; YE Dai-qi; LIN Wei-ming

    2005-01-01

    High performance platinized-carbon electrodes have been developed for the electrocatalytic oxidation of ethanol to acetaldehyde in electrogenerative processes. A load current density of the electrode can be achieved as high as 600 mA per square centimeter for oxygen reducing in 3 mol/L sulfuric acid with a good stability. With these electrodes and sulfuric acid as an electrolyte in fuel cells, ethanol vapor carried by nitrogen gas can be oxidized selectively to acetaldehyde. Selectivity of acetaldehyde depends on the potential of the cell and the feed rate of ethanol vapor and it can be more than 80% under optimized conditions. The initial product of ethanol oxidized on a platinized-carbon electrode is acetaldehyde and the ethanol oxidation mechanism is discussed.

  18. 21 CFR 172.712 - 1,3-Butylene glycol.

    2010-04-01

    ...: (a) It is prepared by the aldol condensation of acetaldehyde followed by catalytic hydrogenation. (b... reference in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies are available from the Office...

  19. The mechanism for the rhodium-catalyzed decarbonylation of aldehydes: A combined experimental and theoretical study

    Fristrup, Peter; Kreis, Michael; Palmelund, Anders; Norrby, Per-Ola; Madsen, Robert

    2008-01-01

    The mechanism for the rhodium-catalyzed decarbonylation of aldehydes was investigated by experimental techniques (Hammett studies and kinetic isotope effects) and extended by a computational study (DFT calculations). For both benzaldehyde and phenyl acetaldehyde derivatives, linear Hammett plots...

  20. Production of methanol from heat-stressed pepper and corn leaf disks

    Anderson, J.A. (Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater, OK (United States). Dept. of Horticulture and Landscape Architecture)

    1994-05-01

    Early Calwonder'' pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) and Jubilee'' corn (Zea mays L.) leaf disks exposed to high temperature stress produced ethylene, ethane, methanol, acetaldehyde, and ethanol based on comparison of retention times during gas chromatography to authentic standards. Methanol, ethanol, and acetaldehyde were also identified by mass spectroscopy. Corn leaf disks produced lower levels of ethylene, ethane, and methanol, but more acetaldehyde and ethanol than pepper. Production of ethane, a by-product of lipid peroxidation, coincided with an increase in electrolyte leakage (EL) in pepper but not in corn. Compared with controls, pepper leaf disks infiltrated with linolenic acid evolved significantly greater amounts of ethane, acetaldehyde, and methanol and similar levels of ethanol. EL and volatile hydrocarbon production were not affected by fatty acid infiltration in corn. Infiltration of pepper leaves with buffers increasing in pH from 5.5 to 9.5 increased methanol production.

  1. Ethanol-induced oxidative stress: basic knowledge

    Comporti, Mario; Signorini, Cinzia; Leoncini, Silvia; Gardi, Concetta; Ciccoli, Lucia; Giardini, Anna; Vecchio, Daniela; Arezzini, Beatrice

    2009-01-01

    After a general introduction, the main pathways of ethanol metabolism (alcohol dehydrogenase, catalase, coupling of catalase with NADPH oxidase and microsomal ethanol-oxidizing system) are shortly reviewed. The cytochrome P450 isoform (CYP2E1) specifically involved in ethanol oxidation is discussed. The acetaldehyde metabolism and the shift of the NAD/NADH ratio in the cellular environment (reductive stress) are stressed. The toxic effects of acetaldehyde are mentioned. The ethanol-induced ox...

  2. The Products of the Thermal Decomposition of CH3CHO

    Vasiliou, AnGayle

    2011-01-01

    We have used a heated 2 cm x 1 mm SiC microtubular (mu tubular) reactor to decompose acetaldehyde: CH3CHO + DELTA --> products. Thermal decomposition is followed at pressures of 75 - 150 Torr and at temperatures up to 1700 K, conditions that correspond to residence times of roughly 50 - 100 mu sec in the mu tubular reactor. The acetaldehyde decomposition products are identified by two independent techniques: VUV photoionization mass spectroscopy (PIMS) and infrared (IR) absorption spectroscop...

  3. Effects of 20 Selected Fruits on Ethanol Metabolism: Potential Health Benefits and Harmful Impacts

    Zhang, Yu-Jie; Wang, Fang; Zhou, Yue; Li, Ya; Zhou, Tong; Zheng, Jie; Zhang, Jiao-jiao; Li, Sha; Xu, Dong-Ping; Li, Hua-Bin

    2016-01-01

    The consumption of alcohol is often accompanied by other foods, such as fruits and vegetables. This study is aimed to investigate the effects of 20 selected fruits on ethanol metabolism to find out their potential health benefits and harmful impacts. The effects of the fruits on ethanol metabolism were characterized by the concentrations of ethanol and acetaldehyde in blood, as well as activities of alcohol dehydrogenase and acetaldehyde dehydrogenase in liver of mice. Furthermore, potential ...

  4. Genetic Changes To Optimize Carbon Partitioning between Ethanol and Biosynthesis in Ethanologenic Escherichia coli†

    Underwood, S. A.; Zhou, S; Causey, T. B.; Yomano, L. P.; Shanmugam, K T; Ingram, L O

    2002-01-01

    The production of ethanol from xylose by ethanologenic Escherichia coli strain KO11 was improved by adding various medium supplements (acetate, pyruvate, and acetaldehyde) that prolonged the growth phase by increasing cell yield and volumetric productivity (approximately twofold). Although added pyruvate and acetaldehyde were rapidly metabolized, the benefit of these additives continued throughout fermentation. Both additives increased the levels of extracellular acetate through different mec...

  5. Quantitative DEMS study of ethanol oxidation: effect of surface structure and Sn surface modification.

    Mostafa, Ehab; Abd-El-Latif, Abd-El-Aziz A; Ilsley, Richard; Attard, Gary; Baltruschat, Helmut

    2012-12-14

    Using the dual thin layer flow through cell, a semi-quantitative analysis of the volatile products during the electrooxidation of adsorbed and bulk solution of 0.01 M ethanol at polycrystalline platinum, smooth, roughened and Sn modified Pt(11,1,1), Pt(311) electrodes has been done by on-line differential electrochemical mass spectroscopy (DEMS). In addition to the current efficiency of CO(2), that of acetaldehyde was determined as a function of the flow rate. At polycrystalline platinum, ethanol oxidation produces only acetaldehyde; the amount of acetaldehyde further oxidized to acetic acid is negligible due to convection conditions. For comparison and for calibration purposes, i-propanol oxidation was examined for which acetone is the only oxidation product. At Pt(11,1,1), the main oxidation product is acetaldehyde. At Pt(311), in addition to acetaldehyde, acetic acid was also formed. Surface modification with Sn did not increase the reactivity of Pt(11,1,1) instead it led to inhibition of the ethanol oxidation. In the case of Pt(311), the onset potential of oxidation was shifted negatively by 0.2 V in the presence of Sn. The results of the potentiostatic measurements showed that this shift is not associated with the production of CO(2); rather acetic acid and acetaldehyde are the main oxidation products. PMID:23108295

  6. Hypothesis of demodicidosis rosacea flushing etiopathogenesis.

    Robledo, Mary Ann; Orduz, Mariana

    2015-04-01

    Most of the patients with erythematotelangiectatic rosacea are characterized by flushing, oedema and telangiectasia. The etiopathogenesis of the flushing in rosacea patients is unknown. Clinically the flushing in rosacea is similar to the "Asian flushing syndrome". Most Asians have an overactive alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) that tends to break down alcohol into acetaldehyde faster. People with "Asians flushing syndrome" have a genetic disorder with the Aldehyde Dehydrogenase 2(∗)2 (ALDH2(∗)2) allele. This is the reason why they do not metabolize very well the acetaldehyde that comes from the alcohol, which means that acetaldehyde takes much longer to clear from their blood. ALDH2 enzyme is primarily responsible for oxidation of acetaldehyde derived from ethanol metabolism, as well as oxidation of various other endogenous and exogenous aldehydes. Acetaldehyde produces the vasodilatation in the "Asian flushing syndrome". The antibodies against the GroEl chaperonin protein, a 62-kDa heat shock protein were found in the Bacillus oleronius isolated from Demodex mites, in rosacea patients. The GroEl chaperonin protein is a protein that plays a key role in normal folding of ALDH2. If the GroEl chaperonin antibodies found in patients with rosacea, cross react with the human GroEl chaperonin protein, they will not fold normally the ALDH2, and then the enzyme will not metabolize the acetaldehyde. Many of the patients with rosacea have a concomitant infection with Helicobacter pylori in their stomach. The H.pylori produces high amounts of acetaldehyde, which comes from their metabolism of ethanol or carbohydrates. As a result, high amounts of acetaldehyde will circulate for longer time in the blood, until the liver CYP2E1(p450) enzyme system finally metabilizes the acetaldehyde, during that period of time the patients will experience a flushing as well as the people with the "Asian flushing syndrome" suffer when they drink ethanol. To prove the hypothesis it is necessary

  7. Fancd2 counteracts the toxic effects of naturally produced aldehydes in mice.

    Langevin, Frédéric; Crossan, Gerry P; Rosado, Ivan V; Arends, Mark J; Patel, Ketan J

    2011-07-01

    Reactive aldehydes are common carcinogens. They are also by-products of several metabolic pathways and, without enzymatic catabolism, may accumulate and cause DNA damage. Ethanol, which is metabolised to acetaldehyde, is both carcinogenic and teratogenic in humans. Here we find that the Fanconi anaemia DNA repair pathway counteracts acetaldehyde-induced genotoxicity in mice. Our results show that the acetaldehyde-catabolising enzyme Aldh2 is essential for the development of Fancd2(-/-) embryos. Nevertheless, acetaldehyde-catabolism-competent mothers (Aldh2(+/-)) can support the development of double-mutant (Aldh2(-/-)Fancd2(-/-)) mice. However, these embryos are unusually sensitive to ethanol exposure in utero, and ethanol consumption by postnatal double-deficient mice rapidly precipitates bone marrow failure. Lastly, Aldh2(-/-)Fancd2(-/-) mice spontaneously develop acute leukaemia. Acetaldehyde-mediated DNA damage may critically contribute to the genesis of fetal alcohol syndrome in fetuses, as well as to abnormal development, haematopoietic failure and cancer predisposition in Fanconi anaemia patients. PMID:21734703

  8. Evidence for the formation of an enamine species during aldol and Michael-type addition reactions promiscuously catalyzed by 4-oxalocrotonate tautomerase.

    Poddar, Harshwardhan; Rahimi, Mehran; Geertsema, Edzard M; Thunnissen, Andy-Mark W H; Poelarends, Gerrit J

    2015-03-23

    The enzyme 4-oxalocrotonate tautomerase (4-OT), which has a catalytic N-terminal proline residue (Pro1), can promiscuously catalyze various carbon-carbon bond-forming reactions, including aldol condensation of acetaldehyde with benzaldehyde to yield cinnamaldehyde, and Michael-type addition of acetaldehyde to a wide variety of nitroalkenes to yield valuable γ-nitroaldehydes. To gain insight into how 4-OT catalyzes these unnatural reactions, we carried out exchange studies in D2 O, and X-ray crystallography studies. The former established that H-D exchange within acetaldehyde is catalyzed by 4-OT and that the Pro1 residue is crucial for this activity. The latter showed that Pro1 of 4-OT had reacted with acetaldehyde to give an enamine species. These results provide evidence of the mechanism of the 4-OT-catalyzed aldol and Michael-type addition reactions in which acetaldehyde is activated for nucleophilic addition by Pro1-dependent formation of an enamine intermediate. PMID:25728471

  9. Alternate fuels and chemicals from synthesis gas: Vinyl acetate monomer. Final report

    Richard D. Colberg; Nick A. Collins; Edwin F. Holcombe; Gerald C. Tustin; Joseph R. Zoeller

    1999-01-01

    There has been a long-standing desire on the part of industry and the U.S. Department of Energy to replace the existing ethylene-based vinyl acetate monomer (VAM) process with an entirely synthesis gas-based process. Although there are a large number of process options for the conversion of synthesis gas to VAM, Eastman Chemical Company undertook an analytical approach, based on known chemical and economic principles, to reduce the potential candidate processes to a select group of eight processes. The critical technologies that would be required for these routes were: (1) the esterification of acetaldehyde (AcH) with ketene to generate VAM, (2) the hydrogenation of ketene to acetaldehyde, (3) the hydrogenation of acetic acid to acetaldehyde, and (4) the reductive carbonylation of methanol to acetaldehyde. This report describes the selection process for the candidate processes, the successful development of the key technologies, and the economic assessments for the preferred routes. In addition, improvements in the conversion of acetic anhydride and acetaldehyde to VAM are discussed. The conclusion from this study is that, with the technology developed in this study, VAM may be produced from synthesis gas, but the cost of production is about 15% higher than the conventional oxidative acetoxylation of ethylene, primarily due to higher capital associated with the synthesis gas-based processes.

  10. Conversion of Biomass-Derived Small Oxygenates over HZSM-5 and its Deactivation Mechanism

    Ramasamy, Karthikeyan K.; Gerber, Mark A.; Flake, Matthew D.; Zhang, He; Wang, Yong

    2014-02-28

    HZSM-5 catalyst deactivation was studied using aqueous feed mixtures containing ethanol, ethanol+ acetic acid, ethanol+ethyl acetate, or ethanol+acetaldehyde in a fixed bed reactor at 360°C and 300psig. Compared to ethanol alone experiment, addition of other oxygenates reduced catalyst life in the order of: ethyl acetateacetaldehyde. Based on the liquid product and the spent catalyst analyses from the individual ethanol, acetaldehyde, acetic acid, and ethyl acetate feed, the presence of acetaldehyde appears to produce high molecular weight aromatic compounds which deactivate the catalyst through a pore-blocking mechanism. Acetic acid deactivates the catalyst through an active site poisoning mechanism or strong adsorption of acetate intermediates on the active sites (hydroxyl groups). Ethanol deactivates the catalyst primarily through its pore-blocking mechanism, but the rate of ethanol deactivation is orders of magnitude slower than that of acetaldehyde. Ethyl acetate hydrolyzes to form acetic acid and ethanol which deactivate the catalyst through its respective mechanisms. In addition, each functional group of oxygenates requires different active sites/catalysts and different operating conditions due to competitive adsorptions on active sites for their conversion to the desired products. Therefore, it is necessary to pre-treat the mixture of oxygenates to produce a feed stream containing the same or similar functional group compounds before converting the feed stream to hydrocarbon compounds over HZSM-5 catalyst.

  11. Analysis of reactive aldehydes formed from the irradiated skin lipid, triolein

    One of the major skin lipids, triolein, was irradiated by 300 nm uv light under conditions approximately those at the skin surface exposed to sunlight for different periods of time. Irradiated samples were analyzed for acrolein, formaldehyde, and acetaldehyde by gas chromatography. Acrolein formed was derivatized to more stable 1-methyl-2-pyrazoline with N-methylhydrazine and analyzed by a nitrogen-phosphorus specific detector. Formaldehyde and acetaldehyde formed were reacted with cysteamine to give thiazolidine and 2-methylthiazolidine, respectively and analyzed by a flame photometric sulfur specific detector. The maximum amount of acrolein (1.05 nmol/mg triolein) was formed after 6 hr irradiation. The maximum quantities of formaldehyde (6 nmol/mg triolein) and acetaldehyde (2.71 nmol/mg triolein) were formed after 12 hr irradiation. Both formaldehyde and acrolein have been known to cause skin irritation in the levels of 1 ppM

  12. Cellulosic ethanol production via consolidated bioprocessing at 75 °C by engineered Caldicellulosiruptor bescii

    Chung, Daehwan; Cha, Minseok; Snyder, Elise N.; Elkins, James G.; Guss, Adam M.; Westpheling, Janet

    2015-01-01

    Background The C. bescii genome does not encode an acetaldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenase or an acetaldehyde dehydrogenase and no ethanol production is detected in this strain. The recent introduction of an NADH-dependent AdhE from C. thermocellum (Fig. 1a) in an ldh mutant of this strain resulted in production of ethanol from un-pretreated switchgrass, but the thermolability of the C. thermocellum AdhE at the optimum growth temperature of C. bescii (78 °C) meant that ethanol was not produced abo...

  13. Dynamic modeling of a three-stage low-temperature ethanol reformer for fuel cell application

    Garcia, Vanesa M.; Serra, Maria [Institut de Robotica i Informatica Industrial (CSIC-UPC), Llorens i Artigas 4-6, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Lopez, Eduardo; Llorca, Jordi [Institut de Tecniques Energetiques, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Diagonal 647, ed. ETSEIB, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2009-07-01

    A low-temperature ethanol reformer based on a cobalt catalyst for the production of hydrogen has been designed aiming the feed of a fuel cell for an autonomous low-scale power production unit. The reformer comprises three stages: ethanol dehydrogenation to acetaldehyde and hydrogen over SnO{sub 2} followed by acetaldehyde steam reforming over Co(Fe)/ZnO catalyst and water gas shift reaction. Kinetic data have been obtained under different experimental conditions and a dynamic model has been developed for a tubular reformer loaded with catalytic monoliths for the production of the hydrogen required to feed a 1 kW PEMFC. (author)

  14. Computational fluid dynamics simulation of ethanol steam reforming in catalytic wall microchannels

    Uriz, I.; Arzamendi, G.; López, E.; Llorca Piqué, Jordi; Gandía, L.M.

    2011-01-01

    A three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation study of the ethanol steam reforming (ESR) in microreactors with square channels has been carried out. A phenomenological kinetic model describing the ESR on a Co3O4–ZnO catalyst has been established and implemented in the CFD codes. This model includes the ethanol dehydrogenation to acetaldehyde, ethanol decomposition to CO and CH4, acetaldehyde steam reforming to H2 and CO2 and water–gas shift as the reactions des...

  15. Isolated tumoral pyruvate dehydrogenase can synthesize acetoin which inhibits pyruvate oxidation as well as other aldehydes.

    Baggetto, L G; Lehninger, A L

    1987-05-29

    Oxidation of 1 mM pyruvate by Ehrlich and AS30-D tumor mitochondria is inhibited by acetoin, an unusual and important metabolite of pyruvate utilization by cancer cells, by acetaldehyde, methylglyoxal and excess pyruvate. The respiratory inhibition is reversed by other substrates added to pyruvate and also by 0.5 mM ATP. Kinetic properties of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex isolated from these tumor mitochondria have been studied. This complex appears to be able to synthesize acetoin from acetaldehyde plus pyruvate and is competitively inhibited by acetoin. The role of a new regulatory pattern for tumoral pyruvate dehydrogenase is presented. PMID:3593337

  16. Dynamic Aspects of Alcoholic Fermentation of Rice Seedlings in Response to Anaerobiosis and to Complete Submergence: Relationship to Submergence Tolerance

    BOAMFA, E. I.; RAM, P. C.; Jackson, M B; Reuss, J.; Harren, F.J.M.

    2003-01-01

    Rice plants are severely damaged by complete submergence. This is a problem in rice farming and could be the result, in part, of tissue anoxia imposed by a reduced availability of oxygen. To investigate this possibility we monitored alcoholic fermentation products as markers for tissue anaerobiosis using sensitive laser‐based spectroscopy able to sense ethanol and acetaldehyde down to 3 nl l–1 and 0·1 nl l–1, respectively. Acetaldehyde emission began within 0·5 h of imposing an oxygen‐free ga...

  17. Aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) and glutathione S-transferase M1 (GSTM1) polymorphisms in relation to oral cancer risk among Malaysians

    Karen-Ng, L. P.; Ghani, W. M. N.; Vimmitra, A.; Yuen, K. M.; Tan, H S; Lim, S. J.; Abraham, M. T.; Rahman, Z. A. A.; Tay, K. K.; Mustafa, W. M. W.; Jalil, N; Norlida, A.; Cheong, S. C.; Zain, R. B.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: ALDH2 is an enzyme involved in major oxidative pathway of alcohol metabolism while GSTM1 is a drug-metabolizing enzyme of acetaldehyde. It has been reported that the mutant ALDH2 allele and the absence of GSTM1 contributes to increased oral cancer risk due to reduced acetaldehyde metabolism. This study aims to determine ALDH2 and GSTM1 polymorphisms and its association with oral cancer risk. Method: An unmatched case-control study was conducted using 163 oral cancer patients and...

  18. 46 CFR 154.1720 - Indirect refrigeration.

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Indirect refrigeration. 154.1720 Section 154.1720... § 154.1720 Indirect refrigeration. A refrigeration system that is used to cool acetaldehyde, ethylene oxide, or methyl bromide, must be an indirect refrigeration system that does not use vapor compression....

  19. Methanol as fuel: evaluation of atmosphere contamination

    With the beginning of methanol use as automotive fuel in Sao Paulo city, 1990, were realized special measurements of methanol, formaldehyde, ethanol and acetaldehyde in atmosphere. Other indicators of air quality as carbon and ozone monoxide were also observed in this study. (C.M.)

  20. Gas-Phase Oxidation of Aqueous Ethanol by Nanoparticle Vanadia/Anatase Catalysts

    Jørgensen, Betina; Kristensen, Steffen Buus; Kunov-Kruse, Andreas Jonas;

    2009-01-01

    The gas-phase oxidation of aqueous ethanol with dioxygen has been examined with a new nanoparticle V2O5/TiO2 catalyst. Product selectivity could to a large extent be controlled by small alterations of reaction parameters, allowing production of acetaldehyde at a selectivity higher than 90%, near ...

  1. (S)-1-[(S)-4-Benzyl-2-thioxothia­zolidin-3-yl]-3-hydroxy­butan-1-one

    Jian-hong Yang; Cui-fen Lu; Zu-xing Chen; Gui-chun Yang

    2007-01-01

    The title compound, C14H17NO2S2, was synthesized by asymmetric aldol condensation of N-acylthiazolidinethione with acetaldehyde. In the molecule, the thiazolidine five-membered ring assumes an envelope conformation. Intermolecular C—H...O and intramolecular O—H...O and C—H...S hydrogen bonding helps to stabilize the structure.

  2. (S-1-[(S-4-Benzyl-2-thioxothiazolidin-3-yl]-3-hydroxybutan-1-one

    Jian-hong Yang

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The title compound, C14H17NO2S2, was synthesized by asymmetric aldol condensation of N-acylthiazolidinethione with acetaldehyde. In the molecule, the thiazolidine five-membered ring assumes an envelope conformation. Intermolecular C—H...O and intramolecular O—H...O and C—H...S hydrogen bonding helps to stabilize the structure.

  3. Asymmetric catalytic synthesis of the proposed structure of trocheliophorolide B

    Trost, Barry M.; Quintard, Adrien

    2012-01-01

    A concise catalytic asymmetric synthesis of the proposed structure of Trocheliophorolide B is reported. The synthetic sequence notably features an asymmetric acetaldehyde alkynylation, Ru-catalyzed alder-ene reaction and Zn-ProPhenol ynone aldol condensation. Comparison with the reported data suggests a miss-assignment of the natural product structure.

  4. Evidence for the Formation of an Enamine Species during Aldol and Michael-type Addition Reactions Promiscuously Catalyzed by 4-Oxalocrotonate Tautomerase

    Poddar, Harshwardhan; Rahimi, Mehran; Geertsema, Edzard; Thunnissen, Andy; Poelarends, Gerrit

    2015-01-01

    The enzyme 4-oxalocrotonate tautomerase (4-OT), which has a catalytic N-terminal proline residue (Pro1), can promiscuously catalyze various carbon–carbon bond-forming reactions, including aldol condensation of acetaldehyde with benzaldehyde to yield cinnamaldehyde, and Michael-type addition of aceta

  5. One-pot synthesis of quinaldine derivatives by using microwave irradiation without any solvent - A green chemistry approach

    Javad Safari; Sayed Hossein Banitaba; Sepehr Sadegh Samiei

    2009-07-01

    A convenient and efficient procedure for synthesis of quinaldine derivatives has been developed by a simple one-pot reaction of aniline derivatives and acetaldehyde on the surface of neutral alumina impregnated with hydrochloric acid under microwave irradiation without any solvent according to green chemistry.

  6. 77 FR 20817 - Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS); Announcement of Availability of Literature Searches...

    2012-04-06

    ... AGENCY Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS); Announcement of Availability of Literature Searches for... literature searches for IRIS assessments; request for information. SUMMARY: The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is announcing the availability of literature searches for acetaldehyde (75-07-0) and...

  7. 40 CFR 60.707 - Chemicals affected by subpart RRR.

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Chemicals affected by subpart RRR. 60.707 Section 60.707 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS....707 Chemicals affected by subpart RRR. Chemical CAS No. 1 Acetaldehyde 75-07-0 Acetic acid...

  8. Emissions and photochemistry of oxygenated VOCs in urban plumes in the Northeastern United States

    R. Sommariva

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Photochemical processes inside urban plumes in the Northeast of the United States have been studied using a highly detailed chemical model, based upon the Master Chemical Mechanism (MCM. The model results have been compared to measurements of oxygenated VOCs (acetone, methyl ethyl ketone, acetaldehyde, acetic acid and methanol obtained during several flights of the NOAA WP-3D aircraft, which sampled plumes from the New York City area during the ICARTT campaign in 2004. The agreement between the model and the measurements was within 40–60% for all species, except acetic acid.

    The model results have been used to study the formation and photochemical evolution of acetone, methyl ethyl ketone and acetaldehyde. Under the conditions encountered during the ICARTT campaign, acetone is produced from the oxidation of propane (24–28% and i-propanol (<15% and from a number of products of i-pentane oxidation. Methyl ethyl ketone (MEK is mostly produced from the oxidation of n-butane (20–30% and 3-methylpentane (<40%. Acetaldehyde is formed from several precursors, mostly small alkenes, >C5 alkanes, propanal and MEK. Ethane and ethanol oxidation account, respectively, for 6–23% and 5–25% of acetaldehyde photochemical formation. The results highlight the importance of long-chain alkanes for the photochemical production of ketones and the role of hydroperoxides in sustaining their formation far from the emission sources.

  9. Emissions and photochemistry of oxygenated VOCs in urban plumes in the Northeastern United States

    R. Sommariva

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Photochemical processes inside urban plumes in the Northeast of the United States have been studied using a highly detailed chemical model, based upon the Master Chemical Mechanism (MCM. The model results have been compared to measurements of oxygenated VOCs (acetone, methyl ethyl ketone, acetaldehyde, acetic acid and methanol obtained during several flights of the NOAA WP-3D aircraft, which sampled plumes from the New York City area during the ICARTT campaign in 2004. The agreement between the model and the measurements was within 40–60 % for all species, except acetic acid.

    The model results have been used to study the formation and photochemical evolution of acetone, methyl ethyl ketone and acetaldehyde. Under the conditions encountered during the ICARTT campaign, acetone is produced from the oxidation of propane (24–28 % and i-propanol (<15 % and from a number of products of i-pentane oxidation. Methyl ethyl ketone (MEK is mostly produced from the oxidation of n-butane (20–30 % and 3-methylpentane (<40 %. Acetaldehyde is formed from several precursors, mostly small alkenes, >C5 alkanes, propanal and MEK. Ethane and ethanol oxidation account, respectively, for 6–23 % and 5–25 % of acetaldehyde photochemical formation. The results highlight the importance of alkanes for the photochemical production of ketones and the role of hydroperoxides in sustaining their formation far from the emission sources.

  10. Principal component analysis of UV-VIS-NIR transmission spectra of Moldavian matured wine distillates

    Khodasevich, Mikhail A.; Trofimova, Darya V.; Nezalzova, Elena I.

    2011-02-01

    Principal component analysis of UV-VIS-NIR transmission spectra of matured wine distillates (1-40 years aged) produced by three Moldavian manufacturers allows to characterize with sufficient certainty the eleven chemical parameters of considered alcoholic beverages: contents of acetaldehyde, ethyl acetate, furfural, vanillin, syringic aldehyde and acid, etc.

  11. Reaction of tobacco smoke aldehydes with human hemoglobin.

    Hoberman, H D; San George, R C

    1988-01-01

    Formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, propionaldehyde, butyraldehyde, isobutyraldehyde, and acrolein, all of which are constituents of tobacco smoke, were reacted in 5 mM concentration with the purified major fraction of normal adult human hemoglobin (hemoglobin Ao) in 1 mM concentration. A cigarette smoke condensate, diluted to contain 5 mM total aldehydes, was also reacted with 1 mM hemoglobin Ao. Cationic exchange high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) showed that the products formed from simple aliphatic aldehydes, with the exception of formaldehyde, were analogues of those formed from acetaldehyde, earlier shown by us to be imidazolidinone derivatives, that is, cyclic addition products of the N-terminal aminoamide function of alpha and beta chains. Formaldehyde and acrolein produced a heterogeneous mixture of derivatives including cross-linked hemoglobin dimers. The greater proportion of modified hemoglobins produced by condensate aldehydes resembled those formed from acetaldehyde, the most abundant aldehyde in the condensate. A smaller fraction consisted of cross-linked hemoglobin dimers, presumably due to the action of formaldehyde. Mass spectrometric and HPLC analyses of the 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazones precipitated from the condensate documented the presence of formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, propionaldehyde, butyraldehyde, furfural, and methylfurfural. The toxicity of aldehydes is briefly discussed in the context of the findings of this study. PMID:3236330

  12. 40 CFR Table 7 to Subpart Vvvvvv... - Partially Soluble HAP

    2010-07-01

    ...-Dichlorobenzene 106467 11. 2-Nitropropane 79469 12. 4-Methyl-2-pentanone (MIBK) 108101 13. Acetaldehyde 75070 14...-Trichloroethane (methyl chloroform) 71556 2. 1,1,2,2-Tetrachloroethane 79345 3. 1,1,2-Trichloroethane 79005 4. 1,1-Dichloroethylene (vinylidene chloride) 75354 5. 1,2-Dibromoethane 106934 6. 1,2-Dichloroethane......

  13. 75 FR 8575 - Testing of Certain High Production Volume Chemicals; Third Group of Chemicals

    2010-02-25

    ...). Method B (ASTM E 1147-92(2005)--liquid chromatography) (Ref. 20). Method C (40 CFR 799.6756--generator... Method B: ASTM E or C. 1147-92(2005) log Kow range > 4- (liquid 6: Method B or C. chromatography). log... substances, benzene, 1,2-dimethyl-3-nitro-acetaldehyde (CAS No. 83-41-0); tar oils, coal (CAS No....

  14. Guide On Analysis Of Dangerous And Harmful Object

    This book lists the dangerous and harmful object, which are Acetaldehyde, Acetic acid, Acetone, Acrolein, Aldrin Ammonia, Arsenic, Asphalt, Barium, Benzene, Benzyl chloride, Butane, Butylamine, Butyl mercaptan, Cadmium, Cadmium chloride, Cadmium nitrate, Cadmium sulfate, Calcium, Calcium carbonate, Calcium chloride, Calcium cyanamide, Calcium oxide, Captan, Carbon black, Carbon dioxide, Carbon disulfide, Catechol, Chlordane, Chlorine, Chlorine dioxide, Chlorine trifluoride and Chloroacetic acid.

  15. Sequence Classification: 891284 [

    Full Text Available TMB Non-TMH Non-TMB TMB Non-TMB TMB >gi|6321524|ref|NP_011601.1| Minor isoform of pyruvate decar ... ruvate to acetaldehyde, regulation is glucose- and ethanol -dependent, involved in amino acid catabolism; Pdc6 ...

  16. Experimental research on photocatalytic oxidation air purification technology applied to aircraft cabins

    Sun, Yuexia; Fang, Lei; Wyon, David P.;

    2005-01-01

    by oxida-tion in the PCO units tested. However, some intermediate products, such as Formaldehyde and Acetaldehyde, were detected. Physiological measurements did not show any significant effects of the two PCO units. Both positive and negative effects of using PCO units on subjec-tive assessments were...

  17. 21 CFR 184.1005 - Acetic acid.

    2010-04-01

    ... carbohydrates or by organic synthesis. The principal synthetic methods currently employed are oxidation of acetaldehyde derived from ethylene, liquid phase oxidation of butane, and reaction of carbon monoxide with..._regulations/ibr_locations.html. (c) The ingredient is used as a curing and pickling agent as defined in §...

  18. Evaluation of vinyl laurate in a battery of in vitro and in vivo tests for genotoxicity.

    van Acker, Frédérique; Messinger, Horst; Bär, Albert

    2015-06-01

    Vinyl laurate is a potential residual monomer in chewing gum base formulated with polyvinyl acetate vinyl laurate copolymer (PVAcVL). The genotoxic potential of vinyl laurate was examined in a battery of in vitro and in vivo genotoxicity tests. Vinyl laurate was not mutagenic in Ames tests. In addition, it was not mutagenic in the HPRT mutation assay in L5178Y cells. An in vitro mammalian chromosome aberration assay performed in CHO cells was equivocal. Vinyl laurate and/or its metabolites were not clastogenic in the mouse bone marrow micronucleus test. Kinetic data indicate that VL is metabolised to acetaldehyde and lauric acid. Both metabolites are well known and have been studied previously. Model calculations show, that any exposure to acetaldehyde from the consumption of PVAcVL containing chewing gum will remain far below levels of acetaldehyde exposure from food in which acetaldehyde occurs naturally. Direct exposure to VL will primarily be at the site of entry. The lack of toxicity in a 90-day repeated dose toxicity test, performed with VL doses up to approximately 3000 times higher than the maximal VL intake from the consumption of a typical piece of chewing gum, demonstrates a high safety margin. PMID:25445001

  19. Regulated and unregulated emissions from an internal combustion engine operating on ethanol-containing fuels

    Poulopoulos, S. G.; Samaras, D. P.; Philippopoulos, C. J.

    In the present work, the effect of ethanol addition to gasoline on regulated and unregulated emissions is studied. A 4-cylinder OPEL 1.6 L internal combustion engine equipped with a hydraulic brake dynamometer was used in all the experiments. For exhaust emissions treatment a typical three-way catalyst was used. Among the various compounds detected in exhaust emissions, the following ones were monitored at engine and catalyst outlet: methane, hexane, ethylene, acetaldehyde, acetone, benzene, 1,3-butadiene, toluene, acetic acid and ethanol. Addition of ethanol in the fuel up to 10% w/w had as a result an increase in the Reid vapour pressure of the fuel, which indicates indirectly increased evaporative emissions, while carbon monoxide tailpipe emissions were decreased. For ethanol-containing fuels, acetaldehyde emissions were appreciably increased (up to 100%), especially for fuel containing 3% w/w ethanol. In contrast, aromatics emissions were decreased by ethanol addition to gasoline. Methane and ethanol were the most resistant compounds to oxidation while ethylene was the most degradable compound over the catalyst. Ethylene, methane and acetaldehyde were the main compounds present at engine exhaust while methane, acetaldehyde and ethanol were the main compounds in tailpipe emissions for ethanol fuels after the catalyst operation.

  20. Mass balance evaluation of alcohol emission from cattle feed

    Silage on dairy farms has been recognized as an important source of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) to the atmosphere, and therefore a contributor to tropospheric ozone. Considering reactivity and likely emission rates, ethanol, 1-propanol, and acetaldehyde probably make the largest contribution t...

  1. Interaction between ADH1C Arg272Gln and alcohol intake in relation to breast cancer risk suggests that ethanol is the causal factor in alcohol related breast cancer

    Benzon Larsen, Signe; Vogel, Ulla Birgitte; Christensen, Jane;

    2010-01-01

    Alcohol is a risk factor for breast cancer. We wanted to determine if ADH polymorphisms which modify the rate of ethanol oxidation to acetaldehyde, were associated with breast cancer risk. We matched 809 postmenopausal breast cancer cases with 809 controls, nested within the prospective Diet...

  2. Contribution of carbonyl photochemistry to aging of atmospheric secondary organic aerosol

    Mang, Stephen A.; Henricksen, Dana K.; Bateman, Adam P.;

    2008-01-01

    in situ by infrared cavity ring-down spectroscopy. A number of additional gas-phase products of SOA photodegradation were observed by gas chromatography, including methane, ethene, acetaldehyde, acetone, methanol, and I-butene. The absorption spectrum of SOA material collected onto CaF, windows was...

  3. Atmospheric ethanol in London and the potential impacts of future fuel formulations.

    Dunmore, Rachel E; Whalley, Lisa K; Sherwen, Tomás; Evans, Mathew J; Heard, Dwayne E; Hopkins, James R; Lee, James D; Lewis, Alastair C; Lidster, Richard T; Rickard, Andrew R; Hamilton, Jacqueline F

    2016-07-18

    There is growing global consumption of non-fossil fuels such as ethanol made from renewable biomass. Previous studies have shown that one of the main air quality disadvantages of using ethanol blended fuels is a significant increase in the production of acetaldehyde, an unregulated and toxic pollutant. Most studies on the impacts of ethanol blended gasoline have been carried out in the US and Brazil, with much less focus on the UK and Europe. We report time resolved measurements of ethanol in London during the winter and summer of 2012. In both seasons the mean mixing ratio of ethanol was around 5 ppb, with maximum values over 30 ppb, making ethanol currently the most abundant VOC in London air. We identify a road transport related source, with 'rush-hour' peaks observed. Ethanol is strongly correlated with other road transport-related emissions, such as small aromatics and light alkanes, and has no relationship to summer biogenic emissions. To determine the impact of road transport-related ethanol emission on secondary species (i.e. acetaldehyde and ozone), we use both a chemically detailed box model (incorporating the Master Chemical Mechanism, MCM) and a global and nested regional scale chemical transport model (GEOS-Chem), on various processing time scales. Using the MCM model, only 16% of the modelled acetaldehyde was formed from ethanol oxidation. However, the model significantly underpredicts the total levels of acetaldehyde, indicating a missing primary emission source, that appears to be traffic-related. Further support for a primary emission source comes from the regional scale model simulations, where the observed concentrations of ethanol and acetaldehyde can only be reconciled with the inclusion of large primary emissions. Although only constrained by one set of observations, the regional modelling suggests a European ethanol source similar in magnitude to that of ethane (∼60 Gg per year) and greater than that of acetaldehyde (∼10 Gg per year). The

  4. Flooding effects on plant physiology and VOC emissions from Amazonian tree species from two different flooding environments: Varzea and Igapo

    Bracho Nunez, A.; Knothe, N.; Liberato, M. A. R.; Schebeske, G.; Ciccioli, P.; Piedade, M. T. F.; Kesselmeier, J.

    2009-04-01

    A land area of 300.000 km² in the Amazon basin is subjected to a continuous flooding pulse, being flooded for 210 days a-1 on an average (Junk et al. 1993). To survive the flooding period vegetation has developed several morphological, anatomical and physiological strategies to mitigate the produced stress due to root anoxia. One of the strategies is fermentation of sucrose in the roots to comply with the energy demand under anoxia. The resulting toxic metabolite ethanol is transported through the transpiration stream to the leaves and can be directly emitted into the atmosphere or converted to acetaldehyde and/or acetate, still volatile enough to be partly released. We investigated short-term and long-term flooding effects on physiology and VOC emission by plant species from várzea and igapó and observed ethanol and acetaldehyde emissions from the várzea species Vatairea guianensis after one day of flooding, which decreased considerably within the next three days. The same species from igapó showed no acetaldehyde emission and much lower emission rates of ethanol, than the várzea species. In contrast Hevea spruceana from both várzea and igapó showed no ethanol or acetaldehyde emissions. After long term flooding (2 months) we did not find any emissions of acetaldehyde or ethanol from all plant species investigated. However, isoprene and monoterpene emissions were clearly affected, showing a significant decrease. Carbon dioxide assimilation was not affected by short term flooding, but declined after two months root anoxia in the case of Hevea spruceana.

  5. Synthesis of nanoporous carbohydrate metal-organic framework and encapsulation of selected organic compounds

    Al-Ghamdi, Saleh

    Cyclodextrin metal organic frameworks (CDMOFs) with different types of cyclodextrins (CDs) (i.e., Alpha, Beta and Gamma-CD) and coordination potassium ion sources (KOH) CDMOF-a and (C7H5KO2) CDMOF-b were synthesized and fully characterized. The physical and thermal properties of the successfully produced CDMOFs were evaluated using N2 gas sorption, thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The N2 gas sorption isotherm revealed high uptake into the micropores (330 cm3.g -1 for Gamma-CDMOF-a) to macropore (125 cm3.g -1 for Gamma-CDMOF-b) structures with isotherm types I and II for Gamma-CDMOFs and Alpha-CDMOFs, respectively. The Langmuir specific surface area (SSA) of Gamma-CDMOF-a (1376 m2.g-1) was significantly higher than the SSA of Alpha-CDMOF-a (289 m2.g -1) and Beta-CDMOF-a (54 m2.g-1). The TGA of dehydrated CDMOF crystals showed the structures were thermally stable up to 300 °C. The XRD of the Gamma-CDMOFs and Alpha-CDMOFs showed a highly face-centered-cubic symmetrical structure. An Aldol condensation reaction occurred during the encapsulation of acetaldehyde, hexanal, trans-2-hexenal, and ethanol into Gamma-CDMOF-a, with a SSA of 1416 m2.g -1. However, Gamma-CDMOF-b with a SSA of 499 m2.g -1 was successfully used to encapsulate acetaldehyde. The maximum release of acetaldehyde from CDMOF-b was 53 mug of acetaldehyde per g of CDMOF, which is greater than previously reported acetaldehyde encapsulation on Beta-CD inclusion complexes.

  6. Red ginseng relieves the effects of alcohol consumption and hangover symptoms in healthy men: a randomized crossover study.

    Lee, Mi-Hyang; Kwak, Jung Hyun; Jeon, Gayoung; Lee, Jong-Won; Seo, Jang-Ho; Lee, Hoon-Sang; Lee, Jong Ho

    2014-03-01

    Heavy drinking causes hangover symptoms, because the action of alcohol dehydrogenase forms acetaldehyde, which is metabolized by acetaldehyde dehydrogenase into acetate. Red ginseng shows positive effects on alcohol metabolism in animal studies. We investigated the effects of red ginseng on relieving alcohol and hangover symptoms in 25 healthy men in a randomized crossover study. At each visit (0, 1, and 2 weeks), the subjects drank 100 mL whiskey (40% alcohol) and either 100 mL water or 100 mL of a 0.321 mg mL(-1) red ginseng anti-hangover drink (RGD). We took blood samples periodically until 240 min after alcohol consumption, and we investigated the blood profiles, alcohol levels, and acetaldehyde levels. We also measured anthropometric parameters, expiratory air-alcohol levels, and hangover symptoms. The plasma alcohol concentrations within the RGD group were significantly lower than those within the placebo group after 30 min (p = 0.002), 45 min (p = 0.016), and 60 min (p = 0.009); the areas under the response curves revealed a positive effect of RGD (p = 0.051). Furthermore, the expiratory alcohol concentration was significantly lower after 30 min (p = 0.005) and 60 min (p = 0.065), and the areas under the response curves (p = 0.058) likewise revealed a positive effect of RGD. The plasma acetaldehyde level was significantly elevated at 120 min (p = 0.020), but the areas under the response curves showed a similar trend (p = 0.054). While the plasma acetaldehyde concentration slightly increased, the RGD showed positive effects on hangover symptoms. Considering the reduction of plasma alcohol levels, expiratory concentrations, and hangover severity, we conclude that red ginseng relieves the symptoms of alcohol hangover. PMID:24458173

  7. Ambient concentrations of aldehydes in relation to Beijing Olympic air pollution control measures

    J. C. Gong

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Aldehydes are ubiquitous constituents of the atmosphere. Their concentrations are elevated in polluted urban atmospheres. The present study was carried out to characterize three aldehydes of most health concern (formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, and acrolein in a central Beijing site in the summer and early fall of 2008 (from June to October. Measurements were made before, during, and after the Beijing Olympics to examine whether the air pollution control measures implemented to improve Beijing's air quality during the Olympics had any impact on concentrations of the three aldehydes. Average concentrations of formaldehyde, acetaldehyde and acrolein were 29.34 ± 15.12 μg/m3, 27.09 ± 15.74 μg/m3 and 2.32 ± 0.95 μg/m3, respectively, for the entire period of measurements, all being the highest among the levels measured in cities around the world in photochemical smog seasons. Among the three measured aldehydes, only acetaldehyde had a substantially reduced mean concentration during the Olympic air pollution control period compared to the pre-Olympic period. Formaldehyde and acrolein followed the changing pattern of temperature and were each significantly correlated with ozone (a secondary product of photochemical reactions. In contrast, acetaldehyde was significantly correlated with several pollutants emitted mainly from local emission sources (e.g., NO2, CO, and PM2.5. These findings suggest that local direct emissions had a larger impact on acetaldehyde than formaldehyde and acrolein.

  8. Glass fibers and vapor phase components of cigarette smoke as cofactors in experimental respiratory tract carcinogenesis

    Feron, V.J.; Kuper, C.F.; Spit, B.J.; Reuzel, P.G.; Woutersen, R.A.

    1985-01-01

    Syrian golden hamsters were given intratracheal instillations of glass fibers with or without BP suspended in saline, once a fortnight for 52 weeks; the experiment was terminated at week 85. No tumors of the respiratory tract were observed in hamsters treated with glass fibers alone. There was no indication that glass fibers enhanced the development of respiratory tract tumors induced by BP. In another study Syrian golden hamsters were exposed to fresh air or to a mixture of 4 major vapor phase components of cigarette smoke, viz. isoprene (800----700 ppm), methyl chloride (1000----900 ppm), methyl nitrite (200----190 ppm) and acetaldehyde (1400----1200 ppm) for a period of at most 23 months. Some of the animals were also given repeated intratracheal instillations of BP or norharman in saline. Laryngeal tumors were found in 7/31 male and 6/32 female hamsters exposed only to the vapor mixture, whereas no laryngeal tumors occurred in controls. The tumor response of the larynx most probably has to be ascribed entirely to the action of acetaldehyde. Simultaneous treatment with norharman or BP did not affect the tumor response of the larynx. Acetaldehyde may occur in the vapor phase of cigarette smoke at levels up to 2000 ppm. Chronic inhalation exposure of rats to acetaldehyde at levels of 0 (controls), 750, 1500 or 3000----1000 ppm resulted in a high incidence of nasal carcinomas, both squamous cell carcinomas of the respiratory epithelium and adenocarcinomas of the olfactory epithelium. It was discussed that acetaldehyde may significantly contribute to the induction of bronchogenic cancer by cigarette smoke in man.

  9. Evaluation of a Combined Ultraviolet Photocatalytic Oxidation(UVPCO)/Chemisorbent Air Cleaner for Indoor Air Applications

    Hodgson, Alfred T.; Destaillats, Hugo; Hotchi, Toshifumi; Fisk,William J.

    2007-02-01

    We previously reported that gas-phase byproducts of incomplete oxidation were generated when a prototype ultraviolet photocatalytic oxidation (UVPCO) air cleaner was operated in the laboratory with indoor-relevant mixtures of VOCs at realistic concentrations. Under these conditions, there was net production of formaldehyde and acetaldehyde, two important indoor air toxicants. Here, we further explore the issue of byproduct generation. Using the same UVPCO air cleaner, we conducted experiments to identify common VOCs that lead to the production of formaldehyde and acetaldehyde and to quantify their production rates. We sought to reduce the production of formaldehyde and acetaldehyde to acceptable levels by employing different chemisorbent scrubbers downstream of the UVPCO device. Additionally, we made preliminary measurements to estimate the capacity and expected lifetime of the chemisorbent media. For most experiments, the system was operated at 680-780 m{sup 3}/h (400-460 cfm). A set of experiments was conducted with common VOCs introduced into the UVPCO device individually and in mixture. Compound conversion efficiencies and the production of formaldehyde and acetaldehyde were determined by comparison of compound concentrations upstream and downstream of the reactor. There was general agreement between compound conversions efficiencies determined individually and in the mixture. This suggests that competition among compounds for active sites on the photocatalyst surface will not limit the performance of the UVPCO device when the total VOC concentration is low. A possible exception was the very volatile alcohols, for which there were some indications of competitive adsorption. The results also showed that formaldehyde was produced from many commonly encountered VOCs, while acetaldehyde was generated by specific VOCs, particularly ethanol. The implication is that formaldehyde concentrations are likely to increase when an effective UVPCO air cleaner is used in

  10. Preparation and evaluation of transdermal drug delivery system of etoricoxib using modified chitosan

    Wahid A

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present investigation chitosan has been chemically modified by treating with two different aldehydes like acetaldehyde and propionaldehyde to form Schiff′s bases. Schiff′s bases of chitosan with acetaldehyde and propionaldehyde were named as polymer A and polymer B, respectively. Fourier Transform Infra Red (FTIR spectral data have confirmed the reaction carried out on chitosan. Drug free polymeric films of chitosan, chemically modified chitosan and chitosan/hydroxypropylmethylcellulose blend were prepared and evaluated for various physicochemical characters. Further, the films were incorporated with anti-inflammatory drug, etoricoxib using glycerol as plasticizer. The drug loaded films were cross-linked with sodium citrate and studied for permeation characteristics across dialysis membrane and rat skin. All the films were evaluated for bursting strength, swelling index, moisture uptake, thickness uniformity, drug content uniformity, tensile strength, percent elongation at break, percent flatness, water vapour transmission rate and in vitro drug permeation study.

  11. Biosynthesis of l-phenylacetyl carbinol from locally isolated yeasts

    In the present study, 250 yeast strains were isolated from samples of different natural sources as cane-molasses, decaying vegetables and bagasse using glucose enriched medium. Among these, 106 strains showed no growth in acetaldehyde (1 g/l) supplemented yeast extract-peptone dextrose plates during qualitative screening. In the course of quantitative screening, 64 acetaldehyde tolerants gave almost negligible L-PAC production (=0.5 g/l) using glucose-peptone medium in shake flasks. A comparatively better L-PAC production was observed with the rest of strains. The isolate Saccharomyces cerevisiae GCU-36 exhibited higher L-PAC production (2.58 g/l). However, lower sugar consumption and subsequent biomass formation was noted. Therefore, yeast GCU-36 was selected as a hyper producer of L-PAC in batch culture. (author)

  12. Torsional symmetry dependence of S1 dynamics in molecules that under methyl internal rotation

    the single-rovibronic-level fluorescence of intermediate-case molecules that undergo methyl internal rotation is strongly influenced by the torsional symmetry of the lowest excited singlet state (S1). The most dramatic example of such symmetry dependence comes from the recent finding that the intensities of the e-e transitions in the high-resolution S1 left-arrow S0 fluorescence excitation spectra of jet-cooled acetaldehyde become very weak relative to the a-a transitions at higher beam temperatures. In this study, they rationalize this remarkable torsional symmetry dependence of electronic relaxation in acetaldehyde on the basis of internal-overall rotation coupling that leads to symmetry-selective increase in the density of states for singlet-triplet coupling. Related observations by others on aliphatic carbonyls and diazabenzenes are also discussed within the context of the coupling between the internal and overall rotation

  13. Effect of oxidoreduction potential on aroma biosynthesis by lactic acid bacteria in nonfat yogurt.

    Martin, F; Cachon, R; Pernin, K; De Coninck, J; Gervais, P; Guichard, E; Cayot, N

    2011-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of oxidoreduction potential (Eh) on the biosynthesis of aroma compounds by lactic acid bacteria in non-fat yogurt. The study was done with yogurts fermented by Lactobacillus bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophilus. The Eh was modified by the application of different gaseous conditions (air, nitrogen, and nitrogen/hydrogen). Acetaldehyde, dimethyl sulfide, diacetyl, and pentane-2,3-dione, as the major endogenous odorant compounds of yogurt, were chosen as tracers for the biosynthesis of aroma compounds by lactic acid bacteria. Oxidative conditions favored the production of acetaldehyde, dimethyl sulfide, and diketones (diacetyl and pentane-2,3-dione). The Eh of the medium influences aroma production in yogurt by modifying the metabolic pathways of Lb. bulgaricus and Strep. thermophilus. The use of Eh as a control parameter during yogurt production could permit the control of aroma formation. PMID:21257030

  14. Study of the electrooxidation of ethanol on hydrophobic electrodes by DEMS and HPLC

    The electrochemical oxidation of ethanol in alkaline solution has been studied on Cu-PVC electrode and Ni/Cu-PVC composite electrodes modified by ruthenium nanoparticles. The techniques used were cyclic voltammetry (CV), steady-state potentiostatic method, on line differential electrochemical mass spectrometry (DEMS), and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The chemical products: acetaldehyde and acetic acid were detected measuring the proper mass charge (m/z) ratios. These products were also confirmed by HPLC. The surface modification of composite electrodes by ruthenium nanoparticles promotes the formation of acetaldehyde. As shown by DEMS, the surface modification shifts the onset potential for oxygen evolution reaction on the Cu-PVC composite electrode towards more anodic values

  15. A theoretical study for one-dimensional modeling for VOC in a catalytic converter

    Chauhan, S.; Sharma, L.; Srivastava, V. K.

    2010-07-01

    Modeling for catalytic oxidation of a volatile organic compound, acetaldehyde for the purpose of controlling tail-pipe emissions from vehicular exhaust was carried out. The model developed was one-dimensional unsteady state model, using mass and energy balance equations to predict results for acetaldehyde conversion in an adiabatic monolith operating under warm-up conditions. The equations consisted of a set of partial differential equations that are coupled and solved using Backward Implicit Scheme. Analysis of the behavior of the converter during warm up period was carried out and it was observed that the warm up was faster for a fresh catalyst and this warm up period could be reduced by introducing hot incoming exhaust gas at higher temperature.

  16. Recent observations of organic molecules in nearby cold, dark interstellar clouds

    Suzuki, H.; Ohishi, M.; Morimoto, M.; Kaifu, N.; Friberg, P.

    1985-01-01

    Recent investigations of the organic chemistry of relatively nearby cold, dark interstellar clouds are reported. Specifically, the presence of interstellar tricarbon monoxide (C3O) in Taurus Molecular Cloud 1 (TMC-1) is confirmed. The first detection in such regions of acetaldehyde (CH3CHO), the most complex oxygen-containing organic molecule yet found in dark clouds is reported, as well as the first astronomical detection of several molecular rotational transitions, including the J = 18-17 and 14-13 transitions of cyanodiacetylene (HC5N), the 1(01)-0(00) transition of acetaldehyde, and the J = 5-4 transition of C3O. A significant upper limit is set on the abundance of cyanocarbene (HCCN) as a result of the first reported interstellar search for this molecule.

  17. Dynamic modeling and controllability analysis of an ethanol reformer for fuel cell application

    Garcia, Vanesa M.; Serra, Maria; Riera, Jordi [Institut de Robotica i Informatica Industrial (CSIC-UPC), Llorens i Artigas 4-6, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Lopez, Eduardo [Institut de Tecniques Energetiques, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Diagonal 647, ed. ETSEIB, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Planta Piloto de Ingenieria Quimica (CONICET-UNS), Camino de la Carrindanga km7, 8000 Bahia Blanca (Argentina); Llorca, Jordi [Institut de Tecniques Energetiques, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Diagonal 647, ed. ETSEIB, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2010-09-15

    This work presents a controllability analysis of a low temperature ethanol reformer based on a cobalt catalyst for fuel cell application. The study is based on a non-linear dynamic model of a reformer which operates in three separate stages: ethanol dehydrogenation to acetaldehyde and hydrogen, acetaldehyde steam reforming, and water-gas-shift reaction. The controllability analysis is focused on the rapid dynamics due to mass balances and is based on a linearization of the complex non-linear model of the reformer. RGA, CN and MRI analysis tools are applied to the linear model suggesting that a good performance can be obtained with decentralized control for frequencies up to 0.1 rad s{sup -1}. (author)

  18. Evaluation of volatile compounds and free fatty acids in set types yogurts made of ewes', goats' milk and their mixture using two different commercial starter cultures during refrigerated storage.

    Güler, Zehra; Gürsoy-Balcı, Alev Canan

    2011-08-01

    Six different types of yogurt were manufactured from Damascus goat milk, Awassi ewe milk and a mixture of equal portions of the 2 species of milk using 2 types of commercial yogurt cultures (CH-1 and YF-3331). Yogurts were chemically analysed at 1, 7, 14 and 21days of storage. Results showed that cultures significantly affected acetaldehyde (Pmilk significantly influenced acetaldehyde (Pmilk yogurt made with culture YF-3331, and increased during storage, while the levels of medium-chain free fatty acids, except for decanoic acid, were unchanged and the amount of long-chain free fatty acids decreased during storage. Cultures used and types of milk had no effect on long-chain free fatty acids in yogurts. PMID:25214097

  19. A coniferyl aldehyde dehydrogenase gene from Pseudomonas sp. strain HR199 enhances the conversion of coniferyl aldehyde by Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Adeboye, Peter Temitope; Olsson, Lisbeth; Bettiga, Maurizio

    2016-07-01

    The conversion of coniferyl aldehyde to cinnamic acids by Saccharomyces cerevisiae under aerobic growth conditions was previously observed. Bacteria such as Pseudomonas have been shown to harbor specialized enzymes for converting coniferyl aldehyde but no comparable enzymes have been identified in S. cerevisiae. CALDH from Pseudomonas was expressed in S. cerevisiae. An acetaldehyde dehydrogenase (Ald5) was also hypothesized to be actively involved in the conversion of coniferyl aldehyde under aerobic growth conditions in S. cerevisiae. In a second S. cerevisiae strain, the acetaldehyde dehydrogenase (ALD5) was deleted. A prototrophic control strain was also engineered. The engineered S. cerevisiae strains were cultivated in the presence of 1.1mM coniferyl aldehyde under aerobic condition in bioreactors. The results confirmed that expression of CALDH increased endogenous conversion of coniferyl aldehyde in S. cerevisiae and ALD5 is actively involved with the conversion of coniferyl aldehyde in S. cerevisiae. PMID:27070284

  20. Development of hierarchically porous cobalt oxide for enhanced photo-oxidation of indoor pollutants

    Porous cobalt oxide was successfully prepared by precipitation of cobalt hydroxide followed by low temperature thermal decomposition. The morphologies of the resultant oxides remained as the corresponding hydroxides, although the morphology of cobalt hydroxides was greatly influenced by the precursor salts. The cobalt oxides with average crystal size less than 20 nm were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscope, BET surface area, and XPS analysis. The photocatalytic activities of the various cobalt oxides morphologies were investigated by comparing the photo-degradation of acetaldehyde under simulated solar illumination. Relative to their low order structures and reference titania samples, the hierarchical nanostructures of cobalt oxide showed excellent abilities to rapidly degrade acetaldehyde, a model air pollutant. This was attributed to the unique nature of these hierarchical cobalt oxide nanoassemblies, which contained many catalytically active reaction sites and open pores

  1. Preparation and Evaluation of Transdermal Drug Delivery System of Etoricoxib Using Modified Chitosan

    Wahid, A.; Sridhar, B. K.; Shivakumar, S.

    2008-01-01

    In the present investigation chitosan has been chemically modified by treating with two different aldehydes like acetaldehyde and propionaldehyde to form Schiff’s bases. Schiff’s bases of chitosan with acetaldehyde and propionaldehyde were named as polymer A and polymer B, respectively. Fourier Transform Infra Red (FTIR) spectral data have confirmed the reaction carried out on chitosan. Drug free polymeric films of chitosan, chemically modified chitosan and chitosan/hydroxypropylmethylcellulose blend were prepared and evaluated for various physicochemical characters. Further, the films were incorporated with anti-inflammatory drug, etoricoxib using glycerol as plasticizer. The drug loaded films were cross-linked with sodium citrate and studied for permeation characteristics across dialysis membrane and rat skin. All the films were evaluated for bursting strength, swelling index, moisture uptake, thickness uniformity, drug content uniformity, tensile strength, percent elongation at break, percent flatness, water vapour transmission rate and in vitro drug permeation study. PMID:20046770

  2. Infrared Absorption Spectroscopy and Chemical Kinetics of Free Radicals, Final Technical Report

    Curl, Robert F.; Glass, Graham P.

    2004-11-01

    This research was directed at the detection, monitoring, and study of the chemical kinetic behavior by infrared absorption spectroscopy of small free radical species thought to be important intermediates in combustion. Work on the reaction of OH with acetaldehyde has been completed and published and work on the reaction of O({sup 1}D) with CH{sub 4} has been completed and submitted for publication. In the course of our investigation of branching ratios of the reactions of O({sup 1}D) with acetaldehyde and methane, we discovered that hot atom chemistry effects are not negligible at the gas pressures (13 Torr) initially used. Branching ratios of the reaction of O({sup 1}D) with CH{sub 4} have been measured at a tenfold higher He flow and fivefold higher pressure.

  3. Prebiotic synthesis of histidine

    Shen, C.; Yang, L.; Miller, S. L.; Oro, J.

    1990-01-01

    The prebiotic formation of histidine (His) has been accomplished experimentally by the reaction of erythrose with formamidine followed by a Strecker synthesis. In the first step of this reaction sequence, the formation of imidazole-4-acetaldehyde took place by the condensation of erythrose and formamidine, two compounds that are known to be formed under prebiotic conditions. In a second step, the imidazole-4-acetaldehyde was converted to His, without isolation of the reaction products by adding HCN and ammonia to the reaction mixture. LC, HPLC, thermospray liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, and tandem mass spectrometry were used to identify the product, which was obtained in a yield of 3.5% based on the ratio of His/erythrose. This is a new chemical synthesis of one of the basic amino acids which had not been synthesized prebiotically until now.

  4. Cloning and characterization of a locus encoding an indolepyruvate decarboxylase involved in indole-3-acetic acid synthesis in Erwinia herbicola.

    Brandl, M. T.; Lindow, S E

    1996-01-01

    Erwinia herbicola 299R synthesizes indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) primarily by the indole-3-pyruvic acid pathway. A gene involved in the biosynthesis of IAA was cloned from strain 299R. This gene (ipdC) conferred the synthesis of indole-3-acetaldehyde and tryptophol upon Escherichia coli DH5 alpha in cultures supplemented with L-tryptophan. The deduced amino acid sequence of the gene product has high similarity to that of the indolepyruvate decarboxylase of Enterobacter cloacae. Regions within py...

  5. Analysis of alcohol dehydrogenase inhibitors from Desmodium styracifolium using centrifugal ultrafiltration coupled with HPLC-MS

    Liu Liangliang; Chen Miao; Chen Xiaoqing

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) inhibitors play an important role in the treatment of human methanol or ethylene glycol poisoning and the suppression of acetaldehyde accumulation in alcoholics. In this study, centrifugal ultrafiltration coupled with high performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS) was utilized to screen and identify ADH inhibitors from ethyl acetate extract of Desmosium styracifolium (Osb.) Merr. The experiment conditions of c...

  6. Disulfiram Attenuates Drug-Primed Reinstatement of Cocaine Seeking via Inhibition of Dopamine β-Hydroxylase

    Schroeder, Jason P; Cooper, Debra A.; Schank, Jesse R.; Lyle, Megan A.; Gaval-Cruz, Meriem; Ogbonmwan, Yvonne E.; Pozdeyev, Nikita; Freeman, Kimberly G; Iuvone, P. Michael; Edwards, Gaylen L.; Holmes, Philip V.; Weinshenker, David

    2010-01-01

    The antialcoholism medication disulfiram (Antabuse) inhibits aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH), which results in the accumulation of acetaldehyde upon ethanol ingestion and produces the aversive ‘Antabuse reaction' that deters alcohol consumption. Disulfiram has also been shown to deter cocaine use, even in the absence of an interaction with alcohol, indicating the existence of an ALDH-independent therapeutic mechanism. We hypothesized that disulfiram's inhibition of dopamine β-hydroxylase (DBH),...

  7. Salsolinol Facilitates Glutamatergic Transmission to Dopamine Neurons in the Posterior Ventral Tegmental Area of Rats

    Xie, Guiqin; Ye, Jiang-Hong

    2012-01-01

    Although in vivo evidence indicates that salsolinol, the condensation product of acetaldehyde and dopamine, has properties that may contribute to alcohol abuse, the underlying mechanisms have not been fully elucidated. We have reported previously that salsolinol stimulates dopamine neurons in the posterior ventral tegmental area (p-VTA) partly by reducing inhibitory GABAergic transmission, and that ethanol increases glutamatergic transmission to VTA-dopamine neurons via the activation of dopa...

  8. First-pass gastric mucosal metabolism of ethanol is negligible in the rat.

    SMITH, T; DeMaster, E G; Furne, J K; Springfield, J; Levitt, M D

    1992-01-01

    Ethanol metabolism by gastric alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) is thought to be an important determinant of peripheral ethanol time-concentration curves (AUCs) in rats and humans. We quantitated this metabolism in rats by measuring the gastric absorption of oral ethanol (0.25 g/kg) and the gastric venous-arterial (V-A) difference of ethanol versus ethanol metabolites (acetate, acetaldehyde, and bicarbonate). Over 1 h, approximately 20% of the ethanol was absorbed from the stomach and 70% was empti...

  9. Nucleic acid molecules conferring enhanced ethanol tolerance and microorganisms having enhanced tolerance to ethanol

    Brown, Steven; Guss, Adam; Yang, Shihui; Karpinets, Tatiana; Lynd, Lee; Shao, Xiongjun

    2014-01-14

    The present invention provides isolated nucleic acid molecules which encode a mutant acetaldehyde-CoA/alcohol dehydrogenase or mutant alcohol dehydrogenase and confer enhanced tolerance to ethanol. The invention also provides related expression vectors, genetically engineered microorganisms having enhanced tolerance to ethanol, as well as methods of making and using such genetically modified microorganisms for production of biofuels based on fermentation of biomass materials.

  10. Monomolecular hydrogen elimination in C2H5OH vapor produced by CO2 IR laser pulses

    The authors examine the scope for the formation of acetaldehyde as a result of ethanol vapor photolysis by infrared multiphoton excitation and consequent isomerization via a series of probable reaction channels. The infrared source is a carbon dioxide laser. To estimate the relative probabilities of the channels they perform quantum-chemical calculations by the MINDO/3 method and vary all the independent degrees of freedom