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Sample records for accurate protein identification

  1. Towards an accurate bioimpedance identification

    Sanchez, B.; Louarroudi, E.; Bragos, R.; Pintelon, R.

    2013-04-01

    This paper describes the local polynomial method (LPM) for estimating the time-invariant bioimpedance frequency response function (FRF) considering both the output-error (OE) and the errors-in-variables (EIV) identification framework and compare it with the traditional cross— and autocorrelation spectral analysis techniques. The bioimpedance FRF is measured with the multisine electrical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) technique. To show the overwhelming accuracy of the LPM approach, both the LPM and the classical cross— and autocorrelation spectral analysis technique are evaluated through the same experimental data coming from a nonsteady-state measurement of time-varying in vivo myocardial tissue. The estimated error sources at the measurement frequencies due to noise, σnZ, and the stochastic nonlinear distortions, σZNL, have been converted to Ω and plotted over the bioimpedance spectrum for each framework. Ultimately, the impedance spectra have been fitted to a Cole impedance model using both an unweighted and a weighted complex nonlinear least square (CNLS) algorithm. A table is provided with the relative standard errors on the estimated parameters to reveal the importance of which system identification frameworks should be used.

  2. Towards an accurate bioimpedance identification

    This paper describes the local polynomial method (LPM) for estimating the time-invariant bioimpedance frequency response function (FRF) considering both the output-error (OE) and the errors-in-variables (EIV) identification framework and compare it with the traditional cross— and autocorrelation spectral analysis techniques. The bioimpedance FRF is measured with the multisine electrical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) technique. To show the overwhelming accuracy of the LPM approach, both the LPM and the classical cross— and autocorrelation spectral analysis technique are evaluated through the same experimental data coming from a nonsteady-state measurement of time-varying in vivo myocardial tissue. The estimated error sources at the measurement frequencies due to noise, σnZ, and the stochastic nonlinear distortions, σZNL, have been converted to Ω and plotted over the bioimpedance spectrum for each framework. Ultimately, the impedance spectra have been fitted to a Cole impedance model using both an unweighted and a weighted complex nonlinear least square (CNLS) algorithm. A table is provided with the relative standard errors on the estimated parameters to reveal the importance of which system identification frameworks should be used.

  3. Accurate in silico identification of species-specific acetylation sites by integrating protein sequence-derived and functional features

    Li, Yuan; Wang, Mingjun; Wang, Huilin; Tan, Hao; Zhang, Ziding; Webb, Geoffrey I.; Song, Jiangning

    2014-07-01

    Lysine acetylation is a reversible post-translational modification, playing an important role in cytokine signaling, transcriptional regulation, and apoptosis. To fully understand acetylation mechanisms, identification of substrates and specific acetylation sites is crucial. Experimental identification is often time-consuming and expensive. Alternative bioinformatics methods are cost-effective and can be used in a high-throughput manner to generate relatively precise predictions. Here we develop a method termed as SSPKA for species-specific lysine acetylation prediction, using random forest classifiers that combine sequence-derived and functional features with two-step feature selection. Feature importance analysis indicates functional features, applied for lysine acetylation site prediction for the first time, significantly improve the predictive performance. We apply the SSPKA model to screen the entire human proteome and identify many high-confidence putative substrates that are not previously identified. The results along with the implemented Java tool, serve as useful resources to elucidate the mechanism of lysine acetylation and facilitate hypothesis-driven experimental design and validation.

  4. Fast and Accurate Identification of Cross-Linked Peptides for the Structural Analysis of Large Protein Complexes and Elucidation of Interaction Networks. / Tahir, Salman; Bukowski-Wills, Jimi-Carlo; Rasmussen, Morten; Rappsilber, Juri

    Rasmussen, Morten

    Fast and Accurate Identification of Cross-Linked Peptides for the structural analysis of large protein complexes and to elucidate interaction networks. Salman Tahir Jimi-Carlo Bukowski-Wills; Morten Rasmussen; Juri RappsilberWellcome Trust Centre for Cell Biology, Edinburgh , United Kingdom   Novel...

  5. Accurate pose estimation for forensic identification

    Merckx, Gert; Hermans, Jeroen; Vandermeulen, Dirk

    2010-04-01

    In forensic authentication, one aims to identify the perpetrator among a series of suspects or distractors. A fundamental problem in any recognition system that aims for identification of subjects in a natural scene is the lack of constrains on viewing and imaging conditions. In forensic applications, identification proves even more challenging, since most surveillance footage is of abysmal quality. In this context, robust methods for pose estimation are paramount. In this paper we will therefore present a new pose estimation strategy for very low quality footage. Our approach uses 3D-2D registration of a textured 3D face model with the surveillance image to obtain accurate far field pose alignment. Starting from an inaccurate initial estimate, the technique uses novel similarity measures based on the monogenic signal to guide a pose optimization process. We will illustrate the descriptive strength of the introduced similarity measures by using them directly as a recognition metric. Through validation, using both real and synthetic surveillance footage, our pose estimation method is shown to be accurate, and robust to lighting changes and image degradation.

  6. Accurate Identification of Cancerlectins through Hybrid Machine Learning Technology

    Ju, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Cancerlectins are cancer-related proteins that function as lectins. They have been identified through computational identification techniques, but these techniques have sometimes failed to identify proteins because of sequence diversity among the cancerlectins. Advanced machine learning identification methods, such as support vector machine and basic sequence features (n-gram), have also been used to identify cancerlectins. In this study, various protein fingerprint features and advanced classifiers, including ensemble learning techniques, were utilized to identify this group of proteins. We improved the prediction accuracy of the original feature extraction methods and classification algorithms by more than 10% on average. Our work provides a basis for the computational identification of cancerlectins and reveals the power of hybrid machine learning techniques in computational proteomics. PMID:27478823

  7. Combinatorial Approaches to Accurate Identification of Orthologous Genes

    Shi, Guanqun

    2011-01-01

    The accurate identification of orthologous genes across different species is a critical and challenging problem in comparative genomics and has a wide spectrum of biological applications including gene function inference, evolutionary studies and systems biology. During the past several years, many methods have been proposed for ortholog assignment based on sequence similarity, phylogenetic approaches, synteny information, and genome rearrangement. Although these methods share many commonly a...

  8. DOMAC: an accurate, hybrid protein domain prediction server

    Cheng, Jianlin

    2007-01-01

    Protein domain prediction is important for protein structure prediction, structure determination, function annotation, mutagenesis analysis and protein engineering. Here we describe an accurate protein domain prediction server (DOMAC) combining both template-based and ab initio methods. The preliminary version of the server was ranked among the top domain prediction servers in the seventh edition of Critical Assessment of Techniques for Protein Structure Prediction (CASP7), 2006. DOMAC server...

  9. Accurate Peptide Fragment Mass Analysis: Multiplexed Peptide Identification and Quantification

    Weisbrod, Chad R.; Eng, Jimmy K.; Hoopmann, Michael R.; Baker, Tahmina; Bruce, James E.

    2012-01-01

    FT All Reaction Monitoring (FT-ARM) is a novel approach for the identification and quantification of peptides that relies upon the selectivity of high mass accuracy data and the specificity of peptide fragmentation patterns. An FT-ARM experiment involves continuous, data-independent, high mass accuracy MS/MS acquisition spanning a defined m/z range. Custom software was developed to search peptides against the multiplexed fragmentation spectra by comparing theoretical or empirical fragment ion...

  10. Accurate Identification of Fear Facial Expressions Predicts Prosocial Behavior

    Marsh, Abigail A.; Kozak, Megan N.; Ambady, Nalini

    2007-01-01

    The fear facial expression is a distress cue that is associated with the provision of help and prosocial behavior. Prior psychiatric studies have found deficits in the recognition of this expression by individuals with antisocial tendencies. However, no prior study has shown accuracy for recognition of fear to predict actual prosocial or antisocial behavior in an experimental setting. In 3 studies, the authors tested the prediction that individuals who recognize fear more accurately will beha...

  11. PILER-CR: Fast and accurate identification of CRISPR repeats

    Edgar Robert C

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sequencing of prokaryotic genomes has recently revealed the presence of CRISPR elements: short, highly conserved repeats separated by unique sequences of similar length. The distinctive sequence signature of CRISPR repeats can be found using general-purpose repeat- or pattern-finding software tools. However, the output of such tools is not always ideal for studying these repeats, and significant effort is sometimes needed to build additional tools and perform manual analysis of the output. Results We present PILER-CR, a program specifically designed for the identification and analysis of CRISPR repeats. The program executes rapidly, completing a 5 Mb genome in around 5 seconds on a current desktop computer. We validate the algorithm by manual curation and by comparison with published surveys of these repeats, finding that PILER-CR has both high sensitivity and high specificity. We also present a catalogue of putative CRISPR repeats identified in a comprehensive analysis of 346 prokaryotic genomes. Conclusion PILER-CR is a useful tool for rapid identification and classification of CRISPR repeats. The software is donated to the public domain. Source code and a Linux binary are freely available at http://www.drive5.com/pilercr.

  12. Accurate analysis of EBSD data for phase identification

    Palizdar, Y; Cochrane, R C; Brydson, R; Leary, R; Scott, A J, E-mail: preyp@leeds.ac.u [Institute for Materials Research, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT UK (United Kingdom)

    2010-07-01

    This paper aims to investigate the reliability of software default settings in the analysis of EBSD results. To study the effect of software settings on the EBSD results, the presence of different phases in high Al steel has been investigated by EBSD. The results show the importance of appropriate automated analysis parameters for valid and reliable phase discrimination. Specifically, the importance of the minimum number of indexed bands and the maximum solution error have been investigated with values of 7-9 and 1.0-1.5{sup 0} respectively, found to be needed for accurate analysis.

  13. An Overview of Practical Applications of Protein Disorder Prediction and Drive for Faster, More Accurate Predictions

    Xin Deng

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Protein disordered regions are segments of a protein chain that do not adopt a stable structure. Thus far, a variety of protein disorder prediction methods have been developed and have been widely used, not only in traditional bioinformatics domains, including protein structure prediction, protein structure determination and function annotation, but also in many other biomedical fields. The relationship between intrinsically-disordered proteins and some human diseases has played a significant role in disorder prediction in disease identification and epidemiological investigations. Disordered proteins can also serve as potential targets for drug discovery with an emphasis on the disordered-to-ordered transition in the disordered binding regions, and this has led to substantial research in drug discovery or design based on protein disordered region prediction. Furthermore, protein disorder prediction has also been applied to healthcare by predicting the disease risk of mutations in patients and studying the mechanistic basis of diseases. As the applications of disorder prediction increase, so too does the need to make quick and accurate predictions. To fill this need, we also present a new approach to predict protein residue disorder using wide sequence windows that is applicable on the genomic scale.

  14. Optical identifications of radio sources with accurate positions using the UKST IIIa-J plates

    Three radio identification programmes are described which are drawn from radio samples with accurate radio positions (< 2'' arc rms). Optical identifications are being made on the basis of radio-optical positional coincidence alone, without regard to colour or morphology, using the UKST IIIa-J sky survey to a limiting magnitude of 22.5. Some preliminary results are presented. (Auth.)

  15. Highly Accurate Prediction of Protein-Protein Interactions via Incorporating Evolutionary Information and Physicochemical Characteristics.

    Li, Zheng-Wei; You, Zhu-Hong; Chen, Xing; Gui, Jie; Nie, Ru

    2016-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions (PPIs) occur at almost all levels of cell functions and play crucial roles in various cellular processes. Thus, identification of PPIs is critical for deciphering the molecular mechanisms and further providing insight into biological processes. Although a variety of high-throughput experimental techniques have been developed to identify PPIs, existing PPI pairs by experimental approaches only cover a small fraction of the whole PPI networks, and further, those approaches hold inherent disadvantages, such as being time-consuming, expensive, and having high false positive rate. Therefore, it is urgent and imperative to develop automatic in silico approaches to predict PPIs efficiently and accurately. In this article, we propose a novel mixture of physicochemical and evolutionary-based feature extraction method for predicting PPIs using our newly developed discriminative vector machine (DVM) classifier. The improvements of the proposed method mainly consist in introducing an effective feature extraction method that can capture discriminative features from the evolutionary-based information and physicochemical characteristics, and then a powerful and robust DVM classifier is employed. To the best of our knowledge, it is the first time that DVM model is applied to the field of bioinformatics. When applying the proposed method to the Yeast and Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) datasets, we obtain excellent prediction accuracies of 94.35% and 90.61%, respectively. The computational results indicate that our method is effective and robust for predicting PPIs, and can be taken as a useful supplementary tool to the traditional experimental methods for future proteomics research. PMID:27571061

  16. Protein Structure Idealization: How accurately is it possible to model protein structures with dihedral angles?

    Cui, Xuefeng; Li, Shuai Cheng; Bu, Dongbo; Alipanahi, Babak; Li, Ming

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies show that the same type of bond lengths and angles fit Gaussian distributions well with small standard deviations on high resolution protein structure data. The mean values of these Gaussian distributions have been widely used as ideal bond lengths and angles in bioinformatics. However, we are not aware of any research done to evaluate how accurately we can model protein structures with dihedral angles and ideal bond lengths and angles. Here, we introduce the protein structur...

  17. Neural Network Based Accurate Biometric Recognition and Identification of Human Iris Patterns

    M. Gopikrishnan; T.Santhanam

    2010-01-01

    Problem statement: A biometric system provides automatic identification of an individual based on a unique feature or characteristic possessed by the individual. Iris recognition is regarded as the most reliable and accurate biometric identification system available. Approach: Most commercial iris recognition systems use patented algorithms developed by Daugman and these algorithms are able to produce perfect recognition rates. However, published results have usually been produced under favor...

  18. Identification of Microorganisms by High Resolution Tandem Mass Spectrometry with Accurate Statistical Significance

    Alves, Gelio; Wang, Guanghui; Ogurtsov, Aleksey Y.; Drake, Steven K.; Gucek, Marjan; Suffredini, Anthony F.; Sacks, David B.; Yu, Yi-Kuo

    2016-02-01

    Correct and rapid identification of microorganisms is the key to the success of many important applications in health and safety, including, but not limited to, infection treatment, food safety, and biodefense. With the advance of mass spectrometry (MS) technology, the speed of identification can be greatly improved. However, the increasing number of microbes sequenced is challenging correct microbial identification because of the large number of choices present. To properly disentangle candidate microbes, one needs to go beyond apparent morphology or simple `fingerprinting'; to correctly prioritize the candidate microbes, one needs to have accurate statistical significance in microbial identification. We meet these challenges by using peptidome profiles of microbes to better separate them and by designing an analysis method that yields accurate statistical significance. Here, we present an analysis pipeline that uses tandem MS (MS/MS) spectra for microbial identification or classification. We have demonstrated, using MS/MS data of 81 samples, each composed of a single known microorganism, that the proposed pipeline can correctly identify microorganisms at least at the genus and species levels. We have also shown that the proposed pipeline computes accurate statistical significances, i.e., E-values for identified peptides and unified E-values for identified microorganisms. The proposed analysis pipeline has been implemented in MiCId, a freely available software for Microorganism Classification and Identification. MiCId is available for download at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/CBBresearch/Yu/downloads.html.

  19. The SPECIES and ORGANISMS Resources for Fast and Accurate Identification of Taxonomic Names in Text

    Pafilis, Evangelos; Pletscher-Frankild, Sune; Fanini, Lucia;

    2013-01-01

    The exponential growth of the biomedical literature is making the need for efficient, accurate text-mining tools increasingly clear. The identification of named biological entities in text is a central and difficult task. We have developed an efficient algorithm and implementation of a dictionary......-based approach to named entity recognition, which we here use to identify names of species and other taxa in text. The tool, SPECIES, is more than an order of magnitude faster and as accurate as existing tools. The precision and recall was assessed both on an existing gold-standard corpus and on a new corpus of...

  20. Mining tandem mass spectral data to develop a more accurate mass error model for peptide identification.

    Fu, Yan; Gao, Wen; He, Simin; Sun, Ruixiang; Zhou, Hu; Zeng, Rong

    2007-01-01

    The assumption on the mass error distribution of fragment ions plays a crucial role in peptide identification by tandem mass spectra. Previous mass error models are the simplistic uniform or normal distribution with empirically set parameter values. In this paper, we propose a more accurate mass error model, namely conditional normal model, and an iterative parameter learning algorithm. The new model is based on two important observations on the mass error distribution, i.e. the linearity between the mean of mass error and the ion mass, and the log-log linearity between the standard deviation of mass error and the peak intensity. To our knowledge, the latter quantitative relationship has never been reported before. Experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach in accurately quantifying the mass error distribution and the ability of the new model to improve the accuracy of peptide identification. PMID:17990507

  1. A Statistical Method for Assessing Peptide Identification Confidence in Accurate Mass and Time Tag Proteomics

    Stanley, Jeffrey R.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Slysz, Gordon W.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Karpievitch, Yuliya V.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Smith, Richard D.; Dabney, Alan R.

    2011-07-15

    High-throughput proteomics is rapidly evolving to require high mass measurement accuracy for a variety of different applications. Increased mass measurement accuracy in bottom-up proteomics specifically allows for an improved ability to distinguish and characterize detected MS features, which may in turn be identified by, e.g., matching to entries in a database for both precursor and fragmentation mass identification methods. Many tools exist with which to score the identification of peptides from LC-MS/MS measurements or to assess matches to an accurate mass and time (AMT) tag database, but these two calculations remain distinctly unrelated. Here we present a statistical method, Statistical Tools for AMT tag Confidence (STAC), which extends our previous work incorporating prior probabilities of correct sequence identification from LC-MS/MS, as well as the quality with which LC-MS features match AMT tags, to evaluate peptide identification confidence. Compared to existing tools, we are able to obtain significantly more high-confidence peptide identifications at a given false discovery rate and additionally assign confidence estimates to individual peptide identifications. Freely available software implementations of STAC are available in both command line and as a Windows graphical application.

  2. Post-Electrophoretic Identification of Oxidized Proteins

    Conrad Craig

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The oxidative modification of proteins has been shown to play a major role in a number of human diseases. However, the ability to identify specific proteins that are most susceptible to oxidative modifications is difficult. Separation of proteins using polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE offers the analytical potential for the recovery, amino acid sequencing, and identification of thousands of individual proteins from cells and tissues. We have developed a method to allow underivatized proteins to be electroblotted onto PVDF membranes before derivatization and staining. Since both the protein and oxidation proteins are quantifiable, the specific oxidation index of each protein can be determined. The optimal sequence and conditions for the staining process are (a electrophoresis, (b electroblotting onto PVDF membranes, (c derivatization of carbonyls with 2,4-DNP, (d immunostaining with anti DNP antibody, and (e protein staining with colloidal gold.

  3. Protein kinase substrate identification on functional protein arrays

    Zhou Fang

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Over the last decade, kinases have emerged as attractive therapeutic targets for a number of different diseases, and numerous high throughput screening efforts in the pharmaceutical community are directed towards discovery of compounds that regulate kinase function. The emerging utility of systems biology approaches has necessitated the development of multiplex tools suitable for proteomic-scale experiments to replace lower throughput technologies such as mass spectroscopy for the study of protein phosphorylation. Recently, a new approach for identifying substrates of protein kinases has applied the miniaturized format of functional protein arrays to characterize phosphorylation for thousands of candidate protein substrates in a single experiment. This method involves the addition of protein kinases in solution to arrays of immobilized proteins to identify substrates using highly sensitive radioactive detection and hit identification algorithms. Results To date, the factors required for optimal performance of protein array-based kinase substrate identification have not been described. In the current study, we have carried out a detailed characterization of the protein array-based method for kinase substrate identification, including an examination of the effects of time, buffer compositions, and protein concentration on the results. The protein array approach was compared to standard solution-based assays for assessing substrate phosphorylation, and a correlation of greater than 80% was observed. The results presented here demonstrate how novel substrates for protein kinases can be quickly identified from arrays containing thousands of human proteins to provide new clues to protein kinase function. In addition, a pooling-deconvolution strategy was developed and applied that enhances characterization of specific kinase-substrate relationships and decreases reagent consumption. Conclusion Functional protein microarrays are an

  4. Energy functions for protein design I: Efficient and accurate continuum electrostatics and solvation

    Pokala, Navin; Handel, Tracy M.

    2004-01-01

    Electrostatics and solvation energies are important for defining protein stability, structural specificity, and molecular recognition. Because these energies are difficult to compute quickly and accurately, they are often ignored or modeled very crudely in computational protein design. To address this problem, we have developed a simple, fast, and accurate approximation for calculating Born radii in the context of protein design calculations. When these approximate Born radii are used with th...

  5. Identification of extracellularly phosphorylated membrane proteins.

    Burghoff, Sandra; Willberg, Wibke; Schrader, Jürgen

    2015-10-01

    Ecto-protein kinases phosphorylate extracellular membrane proteins and exhibit similarities to casein kinases and protein kinases A and C. However, the identification of their protein substrates still remains a challenge because a clear separation from intracellular phosphoproteins is difficult. Here, we describe a straightforward method for the identification of extracellularly phosphorylated membrane proteins in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and K562 cells which used the protease bromelain to selectively remove ectoproteins from intact cells and combined this with the subsequent analysis using IMAC and LC-MS/MS. A "false-positive" strategy in which cells without protease treatment served as controls was applied. Using this approach we identified novel phosphorylation sites on five ectophosphoproteins (NOTCH1, otopetrin 1, regulator of G-protein signalling 13 (RGS13), protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor type D isoform 3 (PTPRD), usherin isoform B (USH2A)). Use of bromelain appears to be a reliable technique for the further identification of phosphorylated surface-exposed peptides when extracellular adenosine-5'-triphosphate is elevated during purinergic signalling. PMID:26152529

  6. Final Progress Report: Isotope Identification Algorithm for Rapid and Accurate Determination of Radioisotopes Feasibility Study

    Rawool-Sullivan, Mohini [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bounds, John Alan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Brumby, Steven P. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Prasad, Lakshman [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sullivan, John P. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-04-30

    This is the final report of the project titled, 'Isotope Identification Algorithm for Rapid and Accurate Determination of Radioisotopes,' PMIS project number LA10-HUMANID-PD03. The goal of the work was to demonstrate principles of emulating a human analysis approach towards the data collected using radiation isotope identification devices (RIIDs). It summarizes work performed over the FY10 time period. The goal of the work was to demonstrate principles of emulating a human analysis approach towards the data collected using radiation isotope identification devices (RIIDs). Human analysts begin analyzing a spectrum based on features in the spectrum - lines and shapes that are present in a given spectrum. The proposed work was to carry out a feasibility study that will pick out all gamma ray peaks and other features such as Compton edges, bremsstrahlung, presence/absence of shielding and presence of neutrons and escape peaks. Ultimately success of this feasibility study will allow us to collectively explain identified features and form a realistic scenario that produced a given spectrum in the future. We wanted to develop and demonstrate machine learning algorithms that will qualitatively enhance the automated identification capabilities of portable radiological sensors that are currently being used in the field.

  7. Novel methods for accurate identification, isolation, and genomic analysis of symptomatic microenvironments in atherosclerotic arteries.

    Slevin, Mark; Baldellou, Maribel; Hill, Elspeth; Alexander, Yvonne; McDowell, Garry; Murgatroyd, Christopher; Carroll, Michael; Degens, Hans; Krupinski, Jerzy; Rovira, Norma; Chowdhury, Mohammad; Serracino-Inglott, Ferdinand; Badimon, Lina

    2014-01-01

    A challenge facing surgeons is identification and selection of patients for carotid endarterectomy or coronary artery bypass/surgical intervention. While some patients with atherosclerosis develop unstable plaques liable to undergo thrombosis, others form more stable plaques and are asymptomatic. Identification of the cellular signaling mechanisms associated with production of the inflammatory, hemorrhagic lesions of mature heterogenic plaques will help significantly in our understanding of the differences in microenvironment associated with development of regions susceptible to rupture and thrombosis and may help to predict the risk of plaque rupture and guide surgical intervention to patients who will most benefit. Here, we demonstrate detailed and novel methodologies for successful and, more importantly, accurate and reproducible extraction, sampling, and analysis of micro-regions in stable and unstable coronary/carotid arteries. This information can be applied to samples from other origins and so should be useful for scientists working with micro-isolation techniques in all fields of biomedical science. PMID:24510873

  8. Rapid and accurate identification of poliovirus strains used for vaccine production.

    Nijst, Olaf E M; Mouthaan, Justin J; Mekkes, Dirk R; Jusic, Edin; van der Avoort, Harrie G A M; Metz, Bernard

    2013-04-01

    In the context of eradication of poliomyelitis the World Health Organization stimulates the development of inactivated polio vaccines based on attenuated virus strains. In addition to vaccine development, tests have to be designed to assess the vaccine quality. An important test is the identification test for poliovirus strains that are used for the vaccine production. A rapid and accurate PCR method with fluorescent probes has been developed to identify unequivocally the vaccine-specific poliovirus strains, such as Mahoney, MEF-1, Saukett H, Sabin type 1, Sabin type 2 and Sabin type 3. PMID:23434540

  9. A Novel PCR-Based Approach for Accurate Identification of Vibrio parahaemolyticus.

    Li, Ruichao; Chiou, Jiachi; Chan, Edward Wai-Chi; Chen, Sheng

    2016-01-01

    A PCR-based assay was developed for more accurate identification of Vibrio parahaemolyticus through targeting the bla CARB-17 like element, an intrinsic β-lactamase gene that may also be regarded as a novel species-specific genetic marker of this organism. Homologous analysis showed that bla CARB-17 like genes were more conservative than the tlh, toxR and atpA genes, the genetic markers commonly used as detection targets in identification of V. parahaemolyticus. Our data showed that this bla CARB-17-specific PCR-based detection approach consistently achieved 100% specificity, whereas PCR targeting the tlh and atpA genes occasionally produced false positive results. Furthermore, a positive result of this test is consistently associated with an intrinsic ampicillin resistance phenotype of the test organism, presumably conferred by the products of bla CARB-17 like genes. We envision that combined analysis of the unique genetic and phenotypic characteristics conferred by bla CARB-17 shall further enhance the detection specificity of this novel yet easy-to-use detection approach to a level superior to the conventional methods used in V. parahaemolyticus detection and identification. PMID:26858713

  10. Mechanism for accurate, protein-assisted DNA annealing by Deinococcus radiodurans DdrB.

    Sugiman-Marangos, Seiji N; Weiss, Yoni M; Junop, Murray S

    2016-04-19

    Accurate pairing of DNA strands is essential for repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). How cells achieve accurate annealing when large regions of single-strand DNA are unpaired has remained unclear despite many efforts focused on understanding proteins, which mediate this process. Here we report the crystal structure of a single-strand annealing protein [DdrB (DNA damage response B)] in complex with a partially annealed DNA intermediate to 2.2 Å. This structure and supporting biochemical data reveal a mechanism for accurate annealing involving DdrB-mediated proofreading of strand complementarity. DdrB promotes high-fidelity annealing by constraining specific bases from unauthorized association and only releases annealed duplex when bound strands are fully complementary. To our knowledge, this mechanism provides the first understanding for how cells achieve accurate, protein-assisted strand annealing under biological conditions that would otherwise favor misannealing. PMID:27044084

  11. Neural Network Based Accurate Biometric Recognition and Identification of Human Iris Patterns

    M. Gopikrishnan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: A biometric system provides automatic identification of an individual based on a unique feature or characteristic possessed by the individual. Iris recognition is regarded as the most reliable and accurate biometric identification system available. Approach: Most commercial iris recognition systems use patented algorithms developed by Daugman and these algorithms are able to produce perfect recognition rates. However, published results have usually been produced under favorable conditions and there have been no independent trials of the technology. Results: In this study after providing brief picture on development of various techniques for iris recognition, hamming distance coupled with neural network based iris recognition techniques were discussed. Perfect recognition on a set of 150 eye images has been achieved through this approach. Further, Tests on another set of 801 images resulted in false accept and false reject rates of 0.0005 and 0.187% respectively, providing the reliability and accuracy of the biometric technology. Conclusion/Recommendations: This study provided results of iris recognition performed applying Hamming distance, Feed forward back propagation, Cascade forward back propagation, Elman forward back propagation and perceptron. It has been established that the method suggested applying perceptron provides the best accuracy in respect of iris recognition with no major additional computational complexity.

  12. Analysis of hydraulic fracturing flowback and produced waters using accurate mass: identification of ethoxylated surfactants.

    Thurman, E Michael; Ferrer, Imma; Blotevogel, Jens; Borch, Thomas

    2014-10-01

    Two series of ethylene oxide (EO) surfactants, polyethylene glycols (PEGs from EO3 to EO33) and linear alkyl ethoxylates (LAEs C-9 to C-15 with EO3-EO28), were identified in hydraulic fracturing flowback and produced water using a new application of the Kendrick mass defect and liquid chromatography/quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The Kendrick mass defect differentiates the proton, ammonium, and sodium adducts in both singly and doubly charged forms. A structural model of adduct formation is presented, and binding constants are calculated, which is based on a spherical cagelike conformation, where the central cation (NH4(+) or Na(+)) is coordinated with ether oxygens. A major purpose of the study was the identification of the ethylene oxide (EO) surfactants and the construction of a database with accurate masses and retention times in order to unravel the mass spectral complexity of surfactant mixtures used in hydraulic fracturing fluids. For example, over 500 accurate mass assignments are made in a few seconds of computer time, which then is used as a fingerprint chromatogram of the water samples. This technique is applied to a series of flowback and produced water samples to illustrate the usefulness of ethoxylate "fingerprinting", in a first application to monitor water quality that results from fluids used in hydraulic fracturing. PMID:25164376

  13. CASD-NMR 2: robust and accurate unsupervised analysis of raw NOESY spectra and protein structure determination with UNIO

    UNIO is a comprehensive software suite for protein NMR structure determination that enables full automation of all NMR data analysis steps involved—including signal identification in NMR spectra, sequence-specific backbone and side-chain resonance assignment, NOE assignment and structure calculation. Within the framework of the second round of the community-wide stringent blind NMR structure determination challenge (CASD-NMR 2), we participated in two categories of CASD-NMR 2, namely using either raw NMR spectra or unrefined NOE peak lists as input. A total of 15 resulting NMR structure bundles were submitted for 9 out of 10 blind protein targets. All submitted UNIO structures accurately coincided with the corresponding blind targets as documented by an average backbone root mean-square deviation to the reference proteins of only 1.2 Å. Also, the precision of the UNIO structure bundles was virtually identical to the ensemble of reference structures. By assessing the quality of all UNIO structures submitted to the two categories, we find throughout that only the UNIO–ATNOS/CANDID approach using raw NMR spectra consistently yielded structure bundles of high quality for direct deposition in the Protein Data Bank. In conclusion, the results obtained in CASD-NMR 2 are another vital proof for robust, accurate and unsupervised NMR data analysis by UNIO for real-world applications

  14. CASD-NMR 2: robust and accurate unsupervised analysis of raw NOESY spectra and protein structure determination with UNIO

    Guerry, Paul; Duong, Viet Dung; Herrmann, Torsten, E-mail: torsten.herrmann@ens-lyon.fr [Université de Lyon (UMR 5280 CNRS, Ecole Normale Supérieure de Lyon, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1), Institut des Sciences Analytiques, Centre de RMN à très Hauts Champs (France)

    2015-08-15

    UNIO is a comprehensive software suite for protein NMR structure determination that enables full automation of all NMR data analysis steps involved—including signal identification in NMR spectra, sequence-specific backbone and side-chain resonance assignment, NOE assignment and structure calculation. Within the framework of the second round of the community-wide stringent blind NMR structure determination challenge (CASD-NMR 2), we participated in two categories of CASD-NMR 2, namely using either raw NMR spectra or unrefined NOE peak lists as input. A total of 15 resulting NMR structure bundles were submitted for 9 out of 10 blind protein targets. All submitted UNIO structures accurately coincided with the corresponding blind targets as documented by an average backbone root mean-square deviation to the reference proteins of only 1.2 Å. Also, the precision of the UNIO structure bundles was virtually identical to the ensemble of reference structures. By assessing the quality of all UNIO structures submitted to the two categories, we find throughout that only the UNIO–ATNOS/CANDID approach using raw NMR spectra consistently yielded structure bundles of high quality for direct deposition in the Protein Data Bank. In conclusion, the results obtained in CASD-NMR 2 are another vital proof for robust, accurate and unsupervised NMR data analysis by UNIO for real-world applications.

  15. Automated Selected Reaction Monitoring Software for Accurate Label-Free Protein Quantification

    Teleman, Johan; Karlsson, Christofer; Waldemarson, Sofia; Hansson, Karin; James, Peter; Malmström, Johan; Levander, Fredrik

    2012-01-01

    Selected reaction monitoring (SRM) is a mass spectrometry method with documented ability to quantify proteins accurately and reproducibly using labeled reference peptides. However, the use of labeled reference peptides becomes impractical if large numbers of peptides are targeted and when high flexibility is desired when selecting peptides. We have developed a label-free quantitative SRM workflow that relies on a new automated algorithm, Anubis, for accurate peak detection. Anubis efficiently...

  16. A scalable and accurate method for classifying protein-ligand binding geometries using a MapReduce approach.

    Estrada, T; Zhang, B; Cicotti, P; Armen, R S; Taufer, M

    2012-07-01

    We present a scalable and accurate method for classifying protein-ligand binding geometries in molecular docking. Our method is a three-step process: the first step encodes the geometry of a three-dimensional (3D) ligand conformation into a single 3D point in the space; the second step builds an octree by assigning an octant identifier to every single point in the space under consideration; and the third step performs an octree-based clustering on the reduced conformation space and identifies the most dense octant. We adapt our method for MapReduce and implement it in Hadoop. The load-balancing, fault-tolerance, and scalability in MapReduce allow screening of very large conformation spaces not approachable with traditional clustering methods. We analyze results for docking trials for 23 protein-ligand complexes for HIV protease, 21 protein-ligand complexes for Trypsin, and 12 protein-ligand complexes for P38alpha kinase. We also analyze cross docking trials for 24 ligands, each docking into 24 protein conformations of the HIV protease, and receptor ensemble docking trials for 24 ligands, each docking in a pool of HIV protease receptors. Our method demonstrates significant improvement over energy-only scoring for the accurate identification of native ligand geometries in all these docking assessments. The advantages of our clustering approach make it attractive for complex applications in real-world drug design efforts. We demonstrate that our method is particularly useful for clustering docking results using a minimal ensemble of representative protein conformational states (receptor ensemble docking), which is now a common strategy to address protein flexibility in molecular docking. PMID:22658682

  17. An accurate and efficient identification of children with psychosocial problems by means of computerized adaptive testing

    Reijneveld Symen A

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Questionnaires used by health services to identify children with psychosocial problems are often rather short. The psychometric properties of such short questionnaires are mostly less than needed for an accurate distinction between children with and without problems. We aimed to assess whether a short Computerized Adaptive Test (CAT can overcome the weaknesses of short written questionnaires when identifying children with psychosocial problems. Method We used a Dutch national data set obtained from parents of children invited for a routine health examination by Preventive Child Healthcare with 205 items on behavioral and emotional problems (n = 2,041, response 84%. In a random subsample we determined which items met the requirements of an Item Response Theory (IRT model to a sufficient degree. Using those items, item parameters necessary for a CAT were calculated and a cut-off point was defined. In the remaining subsample we determined the validity and efficiency of a Computerized Adaptive Test using simulation techniques, with current treatment status and a clinical score on the Total Problem Scale (TPS of the Child Behavior Checklist as criteria. Results Out of 205 items available 190 sufficiently met the criteria of the underlying IRT model. For 90% of the children a score above or below cut-off point could be determined with 95% accuracy. The mean number of items needed to achieve this was 12. Sensitivity and specificity with the TPS as a criterion were 0.89 and 0.91, respectively. Conclusion An IRT-based CAT is a very promising option for the identification of psychosocial problems in children, as it can lead to an efficient, yet high-quality identification. The results of our simulation study need to be replicated in a real-life administration of this CAT.

  18. Applications of graph theory in protein structure identification

    Zhang Shenggui; Yan Yan; Wu Fang-Xiang

    2011-01-01

    Abstract There is a growing interest in the identification of proteins on the proteome wide scale. Among different kinds of protein structure identification methods, graph-theoretic methods are very sharp ones. Due to their lower costs, higher effectiveness and many other advantages, they have drawn more and more researchers’ attention nowadays. Specifically, graph-theoretic methods have been widely used in homology identification, side-chain cluster identification, peptide sequencing and so ...

  19. Identification of ligands for bacterial sensor proteins.

    Fernández, Matilde; Morel, Bertrand; Corral-Lugo, Andrés; Rico-Jiménez, Miriam; Martín-Mora, David; López-Farfán, Diana; Reyes-Darias, José Antonio; Matilla, Miguel A; Ortega, Álvaro; Krell, Tino

    2016-02-01

    Bacteria have evolved a variety of different signal transduction mechanisms. However, the cognate signal molecule for the very large amount of corresponding sensor proteins is unknown and their functional annotation represents a major bottleneck in the field of signal transduction. The knowledge of the signal molecule is an essential prerequisite to understand the signalling mechanisms. Recently, the identification of signal molecules by the high-throughput protein screening of commercially available ligand collections using differential scanning fluorimetry has shown promise to resolve this bottleneck. Based on the analysis of a significant number of different ligand binding domains (LBDs) in our laboratory, we identified two issues that need to be taken into account in the experimental design. Since a number of LBDs require the dimeric state for ligand recognition, it has to be assured that the protein analysed is indeed in the dimeric form. A number of other examples demonstrate that purified LBDs can contain bound ligand which prevents further binding. In such cases, the apo-form can be generated by denaturation and subsequent refolding. We are convinced that this approach will accelerate the functional annotation of sensor proteins which will help to understand regulatory circuits in bacteria. PMID:26511375

  20. Calculation of accurate small angle X-ray scattering curves from coarse-grained protein models

    Stovgaard Kasper

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genome sequencing projects have expanded the gap between the amount of known protein sequences and structures. The limitations of current high resolution structure determination methods make it unlikely that this gap will disappear in the near future. Small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS is an established low resolution method for routinely determining the structure of proteins in solution. The purpose of this study is to develop a method for the efficient calculation of accurate SAXS curves from coarse-grained protein models. Such a method can for example be used to construct a likelihood function, which is paramount for structure determination based on statistical inference. Results We present a method for the efficient calculation of accurate SAXS curves based on the Debye formula and a set of scattering form factors for dummy atom representations of amino acids. Such a method avoids the computationally costly iteration over all atoms. We estimated the form factors using generated data from a set of high quality protein structures. No ad hoc scaling or correction factors are applied in the calculation of the curves. Two coarse-grained representations of protein structure were investigated; two scattering bodies per amino acid led to significantly better results than a single scattering body. Conclusion We show that the obtained point estimates allow the calculation of accurate SAXS curves from coarse-grained protein models. The resulting curves are on par with the current state-of-the-art program CRYSOL, which requires full atomic detail. Our method was also comparable to CRYSOL in recognizing native structures among native-like decoys. As a proof-of-concept, we combined the coarse-grained Debye calculation with a previously described probabilistic model of protein structure, TorusDBN. This resulted in a significant improvement in the decoy recognition performance. In conclusion, the presented method shows great promise for

  1. Accurate identification and compensation of geometric errors of 5-axis CNC machine tools using double ball bar

    Lasemi, Ali; Xue, Deyi; Gu, Peihua

    2016-05-01

    Five-axis CNC machine tools are widely used in manufacturing of parts with free-form surfaces. Geometric errors of machine tools have significant effects on the quality of manufactured parts. This research focuses on development of a new method to accurately identify geometric errors of 5-axis CNC machines, especially the errors due to rotary axes, using the magnetic double ball bar. A theoretical model for identification of geometric errors is provided. In this model, both position-independent errors and position-dependent errors are considered as the error sources. This model is simplified by identification and removal of the correlated and insignificant error sources of the machine. Insignificant error sources are identified using the sensitivity analysis technique. Simulation results reveal that the simplified error identification model can result in more accurate estimations of the error parameters. Experiments on a 5-axis CNC machine tool also demonstrate significant reduction in the volumetric error after error compensation.

  2. Highly ordered protein nanorings designed by accurate control of glutathione S-transferase self-assembly.

    Bai, Yushi; Luo, Quan; Zhang, Wei; Miao, Lu; Xu, Jiayun; Li, Hongbin; Liu, Junqiu

    2013-07-31

    Protein self-assembly into exquisite, complex, yet highly ordered architectures represents the supreme wisdom of nature. However, precise manipulation of protein self-assembly behavior in vitro is a great challenge. Here we report that by taking advantage of the cooperation of metal-ion-chelating interactions and nonspecific protein-protein interactions, we achieved accurate control of the orientation of proteins and their self-assembly into protein nanorings. As a building block, we utilized the C2-symmetric protein sjGST-2His, a variant of glutathione S-transferase from Schistosoma japonicum having two properly oriented His metal-chelating sites on the surface. Through synergic metal-coordination and non-covalent interactions, sjGST-2His self-assembled in a fixed bending manner to form highly ordered protein nanorings. The diameters of the nanorings can be regulated by tuning the strength of the non-covalent interaction network between sjGST-2His interfaces through variation of the ionic strength of the solution. This work provides a de novo design strategy that can be applied in the construction of novel protein superstructures. PMID:23865524

  3. Applications of graph theory in protein structure identification.

    Yan, Yan; Zhang, Shenggui; Wu, Fang-Xiang

    2011-01-01

    There is a growing interest in the identification of proteins on the proteome wide scale. Among different kinds of protein structure identification methods, graph-theoretic methods are very sharp ones. Due to their lower costs, higher effectiveness and many other advantages, they have drawn more and more researchers' attention nowadays. Specifically, graph-theoretic methods have been widely used in homology identification, side-chain cluster identification, peptide sequencing and so on. This paper reviews several methods in solving protein structure identification problems using graph theory. We mainly introduce classical methods and mathematical models including homology modeling based on clique finding, identification of side-chain clusters in protein structures upon graph spectrum, and de novo peptide sequencing via tandem mass spectrometry using the spectrum graph model. In addition, concluding remarks and future priorities of each method are given. PMID:22165974

  4. PconsD: ultra rapid, accurate model quality assessment for protein structure prediction

    Skwark, M. J.; Elofsson, A.

    2013-01-01

    Clustering methods are often needed for accurately assessing the quality of modeled protein structures. Recent blind evaluation of quality assessment methods in CASP10 showed that there is very little difference between many different methods as far as ranking models and selecting best model are concerned. When comparing many models the computational cost of the model comparison can become significant. Here, we present PconsD, a very fast, stream-computing method for distance-driven model qua...

  5. Fast and accurate protein substructure searching with simulated annealing and GPUs

    Stivala Alex D

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Searching a database of protein structures for matches to a query structure, or occurrences of a structural motif, is an important task in structural biology and bioinformatics. While there are many existing methods for structural similarity searching, faster and more accurate approaches are still required, and few current methods are capable of substructure (motif searching. Results We developed an improved heuristic for tableau-based protein structure and substructure searching using simulated annealing, that is as fast or faster and comparable in accuracy, with some widely used existing methods. Furthermore, we created a parallel implementation on a modern graphics processing unit (GPU. Conclusions The GPU implementation achieves up to 34 times speedup over the CPU implementation of tableau-based structure search with simulated annealing, making it one of the fastest available methods. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first application of a GPU to the protein structural search problem.

  6. Accurate refinement of docked protein complexes using evolutionary information and deep learning.

    Akbal-Delibas, Bahar; Farhoodi, Roshanak; Pomplun, Marc; Haspel, Nurit

    2016-06-01

    One of the major challenges for protein docking methods is to accurately discriminate native-like structures from false positives. Docking methods are often inaccurate and the results have to be refined and re-ranked to obtain native-like complexes and remove outliers. In a previous work, we introduced AccuRefiner, a machine learning based tool for refining protein-protein complexes. Given a docked complex, the refinement tool produces a small set of refined versions of the input complex, with lower root-mean-square-deviation (RMSD) of atomic positions with respect to the native structure. The method employs a unique ranking tool that accurately predicts the RMSD of docked complexes with respect to the native structure. In this work, we use a deep learning network with a similar set of features and five layers. We show that a properly trained deep learning network can accurately predict the RMSD of a docked complex with 1.40 Å error margin on average, by approximating the complex relationship between a wide set of scoring function terms and the RMSD of a docked structure. The network was trained on 35000 unbound docking complexes generated by RosettaDock. We tested our method on 25 different putative docked complexes produced also by RosettaDock for five proteins that were not included in the training data. The results demonstrate that the high accuracy of the ranking tool enables AccuRefiner to consistently choose the refinement candidates with lower RMSD values compared to the coarsely docked input structures. PMID:26846813

  7. Hash: a program to accurately predict protein H{sup {alpha}} shifts from neighboring backbone shifts

    Zeng Jianyang, E-mail: zengjy@gmail.com [Tsinghua University, Institute for Interdisciplinary Information Sciences (China); Zhou Pei [Duke University Medical Center, Department of Biochemistry (United States); Donald, Bruce Randall [Duke University, Department of Computer Science (United States)

    2013-01-15

    Chemical shifts provide not only peak identities for analyzing nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) data, but also an important source of conformational information for studying protein structures. Current structural studies requiring H{sup {alpha}} chemical shifts suffer from the following limitations. (1) For large proteins, the H{sup {alpha}} chemical shifts can be difficult to assign using conventional NMR triple-resonance experiments, mainly due to the fast transverse relaxation rate of C{sup {alpha}} that restricts the signal sensitivity. (2) Previous chemical shift prediction approaches either require homologous models with high sequence similarity or rely heavily on accurate backbone and side-chain structural coordinates. When neither sequence homologues nor structural coordinates are available, we must resort to other information to predict H{sup {alpha}} chemical shifts. Predicting accurate H{sup {alpha}} chemical shifts using other obtainable information, such as the chemical shifts of nearby backbone atoms (i.e., adjacent atoms in the sequence), can remedy the above dilemmas, and hence advance NMR-based structural studies of proteins. By specifically exploiting the dependencies on chemical shifts of nearby backbone atoms, we propose a novel machine learning algorithm, called Hash, to predict H{sup {alpha}} chemical shifts. Hash combines a new fragment-based chemical shift search approach with a non-parametric regression model, called the generalized additive model, to effectively solve the prediction problem. We demonstrate that the chemical shifts of nearby backbone atoms provide a reliable source of information for predicting accurate H{sup {alpha}} chemical shifts. Our testing results on different possible combinations of input data indicate that Hash has a wide rage of potential NMR applications in structural and biological studies of proteins.

  8. Biochip System for Rapid and Accurate Identification of Mycobacterial Species from Isolates and Sputum▿

    Zhu, Lingxiang; Jiang, Guanglu; Wang, Shengfen; Wang, Can; Li, Qiang; Yu, Hao; Zhou, Yang; Zhao, Bing; Huang, Hairong; Xing, Wanli; Mitchelson, Keith; Cheng, Jing; Zhao, Yanlin; Guo, Yong

    2010-01-01

    The accurate detection of mycobacterial species from isolates and clinical samples is important for pathogenic diagnosis and treatment and for disease control. There is an urgent need for the development of a rapid, simple, and accurate detection method. We established a biochip assay system, including a biochip, sample preparation apparatus, hybridization instrument, chip washing machine, and laser confocal scanner equipped with interpretation software for automatic diagnosis. The biochip si...

  9. Seed Storage Proteins as a System for Teaching Protein Identification by Mass Spectrometry in Biochemistry Laboratory

    Wilson, Karl A.; Tan-Wilson, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS) has become an important tool in studying biological systems. One application is the identification of proteins and peptides by the matching of peptide and peptide fragment masses to the sequences of proteins in protein sequence databases. Often prior protein separation of complex protein mixtures by 2D-PAGE is needed,…

  10. Accurate mass filtering of ion chromatograms for metabolite identification using a unit mass resolution liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry system.

    Gu, Ming; Wang, Yongdong; Zhao, Xian-Guo; Gu, Zhe-Ming

    2006-01-01

    Acceleration of liquid chromatography/mass spectrometric (LC/MS) analysis for metabolite identification critically relies on effective data processing since the rate of data acquisition is much faster than the rate of data mining. The rapid and accurate identification of metabolite peaks from complex LC/MS data is a key component to speeding up the process. Current approaches routinely use selected ion chromatograms that can suffer severely from matrix effects. This paper describes a new method to automatically extract and filter metabolite-related information from LC/MS data obtained at unit mass resolution in the presence of complex biological matrices. This approach is illustrated by LC/MS analysis of the metabolites of verapamil from a rat microsome incubation spiked with biological matrix (bile). MS data were acquired in profile mode on a unit mass resolution triple-quadrupole instrument, externally calibrated using a unique procedure that corrects for both mass axis and mass spectral peak shape to facilitate metabolite identification with high mass accuracy. Through the double-filtering effects of accurate mass and isotope profile, conventional extracted ion chromatograms corresponding to the parent drug (verapamil at m/z 455), demethylated verapamil (m/z 441), and dealkylated verapamil (m/z 291), that contained substantial false-positive peaks, were simplified into chromatograms that are substantially free from matrix interferences. These filtered chromatograms approach what would have been obtained by using a radioactivity detector to detect radio-labeled metabolites of interest. PMID:16463359

  11. Rapid and accurate prediction and scoring of water molecules in protein binding sites.

    Gregory A Ross

    Full Text Available Water plays a critical role in ligand-protein interactions. However, it is still challenging to predict accurately not only where water molecules prefer to bind, but also which of those water molecules might be displaceable. The latter is often seen as a route to optimizing affinity of potential drug candidates. Using a protocol we call WaterDock, we show that the freely available AutoDock Vina tool can be used to predict accurately the binding sites of water molecules. WaterDock was validated using data from X-ray crystallography, neutron diffraction and molecular dynamics simulations and correctly predicted 97% of the water molecules in the test set. In addition, we combined data-mining, heuristic and machine learning techniques to develop probabilistic water molecule classifiers. When applied to WaterDock predictions in the Astex Diverse Set of protein ligand complexes, we could identify whether a water molecule was conserved or displaced to an accuracy of 75%. A second model predicted whether water molecules were displaced by polar groups or by non-polar groups to an accuracy of 80%. These results should prove useful for anyone wishing to undertake rational design of new compounds where the displacement of water molecules is being considered as a route to improved affinity.

  12. HMM-FRAME: accurate protein domain classification for metagenomic sequences containing frameshift errors

    Sun Yanni

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein domain classification is an important step in metagenomic annotation. The state-of-the-art method for protein domain classification is profile HMM-based alignment. However, the relatively high rates of insertions and deletions in homopolymer regions of pyrosequencing reads create frameshifts, causing conventional profile HMM alignment tools to generate alignments with marginal scores. This makes error-containing gene fragments unclassifiable with conventional tools. Thus, there is a need for an accurate domain classification tool that can detect and correct sequencing errors. Results We introduce HMM-FRAME, a protein domain classification tool based on an augmented Viterbi algorithm that can incorporate error models from different sequencing platforms. HMM-FRAME corrects sequencing errors and classifies putative gene fragments into domain families. It achieved high error detection sensitivity and specificity in a data set with annotated errors. We applied HMM-FRAME in Targeted Metagenomics and a published metagenomic data set. The results showed that our tool can correct frameshifts in error-containing sequences, generate much longer alignments with significantly smaller E-values, and classify more sequences into their native families. Conclusions HMM-FRAME provides a complementary protein domain classification tool to conventional profile HMM-based methods for data sets containing frameshifts. Its current implementation is best used for small-scale metagenomic data sets. The source code of HMM-FRAME can be downloaded at http://www.cse.msu.edu/~zhangy72/hmmframe/ and at https://sourceforge.net/projects/hmm-frame/.

  13. An accurate and efficient identification of children with psychosocial problems by means of computerized adaptive testing

    Vogels, Antonius G. C.; Jacobusse, Gert W.; Reijneveld, Symen A.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Questionnaires used by health services to identify children with psychosocial problems are often rather short. The psychometric properties of such short questionnaires are mostly less than needed for an accurate distinction between children with and without problems. We aimed to assess w

  14. Bacteremia with Streptococcus bovis and Streptococcus salivarius: clinical correlates of more accurate identification of isolates.

    Ruoff, K L; Miller, S I; Garner, C V; Ferraro, M J; Calderwood, S B

    1989-01-01

    Two biotypes of Streptococcus bovis can be identified by laboratory testing and can be distinguished from the phenotypically similar organism Streptococcus salivarius. We assessed the clinical relevance of careful identification of these organisms in 68 patients with streptococcal bacteremia caused by these similar species. S. bovis was more likely to be clinically significant when isolated from blood (89%) than was S. salivarius (23%). There was a striking association between S. bovis I bacteremia and underlying endocarditis (94%) compared with that of S. bovis II bacteremia (18%). Bacteremia with S. bovis I was also highly correlated with an underlying colonic neoplasm (71% of patients overall, 100% of those with thorough colonic examinations) compared with bacteremia due to S. bovis II or S. salivarius (17% overall, 25% of patients with thorough colonic examinations). We conclude that careful identification of streptococcal bacteremic isolates as S. bovis biotype I provides clinically important information and should be more widely applied. PMID:2915024

  15. Evaluating Peptide Mass Fingerprinting-based Protein Identification

    Senthilkumar Damodaran; Troy D. Wood; Priyadharsini Nagarajan; Richard A. Rabin

    2007-01-01

    Identification of proteins by mass spectrometry (MS) is an essential step in pro- teomic studies and is typically accomplished by either peptide mass fingerprinting (PMF) or amino acid sequencing of the peptide. Although sequence information from MS/MS analysis can be used to validate PMF-based protein identification, it may not be practical when analyzing a large number of proteins and when high- throughput MS/MS instrumentation is not readily available. At present, a vast majority of proteomic studies employ PMF. However, there are huge disparities in criteria used to identify proteins using PMF. Therefore, to reduce incorrect protein identification using PMF, and also to increase confidence in PMF-based protein identification without accompanying MS/MS analysis, definitive guiding principles are essential. To this end, we propose a value-based scoring system that provides guidance on evaluating when PMF-based protein identification can be deemed sufficient without accompanying amino acid sequence data from MS/MS analysis.

  16. Retrival experience as an accurate indicator of person identification in line-ups

    María José Contreras

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Responses in eyewitness identification of a person in a line-up may be based on two types of recovery experiences, remember and know experiences. Remember responses involve eyewitness identification of the target person as an episodic memory task, because it implies retrieving information about the target person in the place and at the time of the event. Know responses, in contrast, engage recognition based on familiarity or perceptual facilitation, that is, as a semantic memory task. To explore the relation between retrieval experiences and recognition accuracy, 86 participants took part in a recognition task with two conditions: one with an interpolated target absent line-up and the other only with the target present line-up. Accuracy of recognition and retrieval experience was measured. The results showed that, having previously participated in a target-absent line-up, increased omissions, while the number of hits decreased. Furthermore, participants’ know responses were associated to false recognition, whilst remember responses were associated to hits in recognition. Thus, asking eyewitnesses to inform about the kind of retrieval experience in which they based their recognition responses, may serve as a reliable indicator of accuracy in recognition. Future studies are needed to investigate whether this is also the case in natural settings.

  17. Application of the antibiotic batumin for accurate and rapid identification of staphylococcal small colony variants

    Churkina Larisa N

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Staphylococcus aureus is a major human pathogen causing significant morbidity and mortality. The S. aureus colonies in osteomyelitis, in patients with cystic fibrosis and patients with endoprosthesis rejection frequently have an atypical morphology, i.e. staphylococcal small-colony variants, which form a naturally occurring subpopulation of clinically important staphylococci. Identification of these small colony variants is difficult, because of the loss of typical phenotypic characteristics of these variants. We wanted to improve and simplify the diagnosis of staphylococcal infection using a diagnostic preparation, consisting of 5 μg batumin paper disks. Batumin possesses a unique selective activity against all studied Staphylococcus spp., whereas all other species tested thus far are batumin resistant. We assessed the efficacy of the batumin diagnostic preparation to identify staphylococcal small colony variants, isolated from osteomyelitis patients. Findings With the batumin diagnostic preparation, all 30 tested staphylococcal small-colony variants had a growth inhibition zone around the disk of minimum 25 mm, accordant with the inhibition zones of the parent strains, isolated from the same patients. Conclusions The batumin diagnostic preparation correctly identified the small-colony variants of S. aureus, S. haemolyticus and S. epidermidis as belonging to the genus Staphylococcus, which differ profoundly from parental strains and are difficult to identify with standard methods. Identification of staphylococcal small-colony variants with the batumin diagnostic preparation is technically simple and can facilitate practical laboratory work.

  18. Identification of prokaryotic small proteins using a comparative genomic approach

    Samayoa, Josue; Yildiz, Fitnat H.; Karplus, Kevin

    2011-01-01

    Motivation: Accurate prediction of genes encoding small proteins (on the order of 50 amino acids or less) remains an elusive open problem in bioinformatics. Some of the best methods for gene prediction use either sequence composition analysis or sequence similarity to a known protein coding sequence. These methods often fail for small proteins, however, either due to a lack of experimentally verified small protein coding genes or due to the limited statistical significance of statistics on sm...

  19. Rapid identification of DNA-binding proteins by mass spectrometry

    Nordhoff, E; Krogsdam, A M; Jorgensen, H F;

    1999-01-01

    We report a protocol for the rapid identification of DNA-binding proteins. Immobilized DNA probes harboring a specific sequence motif are incubated with cell or nuclear extract. Proteins are analyzed directly off the solid support by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass...

  20. A transition radiation detector for RHIC featuring accurate tracking and dE/dx particle identification

    O`Brien, E.; Lissauer, D.; McCorkle, S.; Polychronakos, V.; Takai, H. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Chi, C.Y.; Nagamiya, S.; Sippach, W.; Toy, M.; Wang, D.; Wang, Y.F.; Wiggins, C.; Willis, W. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States); Cherniatin, V.; Dolgoshein, B. [Moscow Institute of Physics and Engineering, (Russian Federation); Bennett, M.; Chikanian, A.; Kumar, S.; Mitchell, J.T.; Pope, K. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States)

    1991-12-31

    We describe the results of a test ran involving a Transition Radiation Detector that can both distinguish electrons from pions which momenta greater titan 0.7 GeV/c and simultaneously track particles passing through the detector. The particle identification is accomplished through a combination of the detection of Transition Radiation from the electron and the differences in electron and pion energy loss (dE/dx) in the detector. The dE/dx particle separation is most, efficient below 2 GeV/c while particle ID utilizing Transition Radiation effective above 1.5 GeV/c. Combined, the electron-pion separation is-better than 5 {times} 10{sup 2}. The single-wire, track-position resolution for the TRD is {approximately}230 {mu}m.

  1. Accurate prediction of helix interactions and residue contacts in membrane proteins.

    Hönigschmid, Peter; Frishman, Dmitrij

    2016-04-01

    Accurate prediction of intra-molecular interactions from amino acid sequence is an important pre-requisite for obtaining high-quality protein models. Over the recent years, remarkable progress in this area has been achieved through the application of novel co-variation algorithms, which eliminate transitive evolutionary connections between residues. In this work we present a new contact prediction method for α-helical transmembrane proteins, MemConP, in which evolutionary couplings are combined with a machine learning approach. MemConP achieves a substantially improved accuracy (precision: 56.0%, recall: 17.5%, MCC: 0.288) compared to the use of either machine learning or co-evolution methods alone. The method also achieves 91.4% precision, 42.1% recall and a MCC of 0.490 in predicting helix-helix interactions based on predicted contacts. The approach was trained and rigorously benchmarked by cross-validation and independent testing on up-to-date non-redundant datasets of 90 and 30 experimental three dimensional structures, respectively. MemConP is a standalone tool that can be downloaded together with the associated training data from http://webclu.bio.wzw.tum.de/MemConP. PMID:26851352

  2. Dealing with the identification of protein species in ancient amphorae.

    Dallongeville, Sophie; Garnier, Nicolas; Casasola, Dario Bernal; Bonifay, Michel; Rolando, Christian; Tokarski, Caroline

    2011-03-01

    This manuscript deals with the identification of protein residues in amphorae, including particularly identification of protein species. The work described was performed on fishes, the anchovy (Engraulis encrasicolus) and bonito (Sarda sarda) species frequently found in the Mediterranean area. Based on proteomic techniques, the analytical strategy was adapted to analysis of protein residues from tiny ceramic fragments. The major difficulty was to extract proteins and limit their hydrolysis during the sample preparation; consequently, multiple soft extraction techniques were evaluated. The most valuable results were obtained using a solution containing high amounts of denaturing agents, urea and thiourea, reducing agent, dithiothreitol, and detergent, 3-[(3-cholamidopropyl)dimethylammonio]-1-propanesulfonate. The analysis using nano liquid chromatography-nano electrospray ionization double quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry resulted in the identification of up to 200 proteins for the anchovy and bonito species, among which 73 peptides were found to be fish-specific. Because bonito and anchovy species are not documented and fully sequenced in genomic databases, the preliminary protein identification was realized via sequence homology to other fish sequenced species. Amino acid substitutions of peptides were assigned on the basis of the interpretation of tandem mass spectrometry spectra using de novo sequencing; these peptides, not reported up to now in databases, constitute species-specific markers. The method developed was finally applied to an archaeological sample replica impregnated with a mixture of fish tissue from both species; this experiment successfully led to the identification of 17 fish proteins, including 33 fish-specific peptides. This work shows that the analytical method developed has great potential for the identification of protein species in complex archaeological samples. PMID:20890751

  3. Development of Improved Methods for Protein Separation and Identification

    Iskra Sainova; Ilina Valkova; Velichka Pavlova; Elena Nikolova

    2013-01-01

    For identification of proteins, able to connect specifically or non-specifically with peptide SCGN, protein material from RIN-5F rat insulinoma malignant cells and E. coli bacteria strains, both with inserted by transfection with recombinant vectors rat gene SCGN, was isolated. Subsequently, SCGN peptide was isolated, precipitated and incubated with lysates from rat pancreas and brain, known as anatomic organs with highest expression of SCGN gene. For determination of proteins with highest af...

  4. Rapid and Accurate Identification of Animal Species in Natural Leather Goods by Liquid Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry

    Izuchi, Yukari; Takashima, Tsuneo; Hatano, Naoya

    2016-01-01

    The demand for leather goods has grown globally in recent years. Industry revenue is forecast to reach $91.2 billion by 2018. There is an ongoing labelling problem in the leather items market, in that it is currently impossible to identify the species that a given piece of leather is derived from. To address this issue, we developed a rapid and simple method for the specific identification of leather derived from cattle, horses, pigs, sheep, goats, and deer by analysing peptides produced by the trypsin-digestion of proteins contained in leather goods using liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. We determined species-specific amino acid sequences by liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry analysis using the Mascot software program and demonstrated that collagen α-1(I), collagen α-2(I), and collagen α-1(III) from the dermal layer of the skin are particularly useful in species identification. PMID:27313979

  5. A novel approach for latent print identification using accurate overlays to prioritize reference prints.

    Gantz, Daniel T; Gantz, Donald T; Walch, Mark A; Roberts, Maria Antonia; Buscaglia, JoAnn

    2014-12-01

    A novel approach to automated fingerprint matching and scoring that produces accurate locally and nonlinearly adjusted overlays of a latent print onto each reference print in a corpus is described. The technology, which addresses challenges inherent to latent prints, provides the latent print examiner with a prioritized ranking of candidate reference prints based on the overlays of the latent onto each candidate print. In addition to supporting current latent print comparison practices, this approach can make it possible to return a greater number of AFIS candidate prints because the ranked overlays provide a substantial starting point for latent-to-reference print comparison. To provide the image information required to create an accurate overlay of a latent print onto a reference print, "Ridge-Specific Markers" (RSMs), which correspond to short continuous segments of a ridge or furrow, are introduced. RSMs are reliably associated with any specific local section of a ridge or a furrow using the geometric information available from the image. Latent prints are commonly fragmentary, with reduced clarity and limited minutiae (i.e., ridge endings and bifurcations). Even in the absence of traditional minutiae, latent prints contain very important information in their ridges that permit automated matching using RSMs. No print orientation or information beyond the RSMs is required to generate the overlays. This automated process is applied to the 88 good quality latent prints in the NIST Special Database (SD) 27. Nonlinear overlays of each latent were produced onto all of the 88 reference prints in the NIST SD27. With fully automated processing, the true mate reference prints were ranked in the first candidate position for 80.7% of the latents tested, and 89.8% of the true mate reference prints ranked in the top ten positions. After manual post-processing of those latents for which the true mate reference print was not ranked first, these frequencies increased to 90

  6. Accurate microRNA target prediction correlates with protein repression levels

    Simossis Victor A

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background MicroRNAs are small endogenously expressed non-coding RNA molecules that regulate target gene expression through translation repression or messenger RNA degradation. MicroRNA regulation is performed through pairing of the microRNA to sites in the messenger RNA of protein coding genes. Since experimental identification of miRNA target genes poses difficulties, computational microRNA target prediction is one of the key means in deciphering the role of microRNAs in development and disease. Results DIANA-microT 3.0 is an algorithm for microRNA target prediction which is based on several parameters calculated individually for each microRNA and combines conserved and non-conserved microRNA recognition elements into a final prediction score, which correlates with protein production fold change. Specifically, for each predicted interaction the program reports a signal to noise ratio and a precision score which can be used as an indication of the false positive rate of the prediction. Conclusion Recently, several computational target prediction programs were benchmarked based on a set of microRNA target genes identified by the pSILAC method. In this assessment DIANA-microT 3.0 was found to achieve the highest precision among the most widely used microRNA target prediction programs reaching approximately 66%. The DIANA-microT 3.0 prediction results are available online in a user friendly web server at http://www.microrna.gr/microT

  7. Proteomics: Protein Identification Using Online Databases

    Eurich, Chris; Fields, Peter A.; Rice, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Proteomics is an emerging area of systems biology that allows simultaneous study of thousands of proteins expressed in cells, tissues, or whole organisms. We have developed this activity to enable high school or college students to explore proteomic databases using mass spectrometry data files generated from yeast proteins in a college laboratory…

  8. Protein identification by peptide mass fingerprinting

    Hjernø, Karin

    2007-01-01

      Peptide mass fingerprinting is an effective way of identifying, e.g., gel-separated proteins, by matching experimentally obtained peptide mass data against large databases. However, several factors are known to influence the quality of the resulting matches, such as proteins contaminating the...

  9. Identification of Ina proteins from Fusarium acuminatum

    Scheel, Jan Frederik; Kunert, Anna Theresa; Pöschl, Ulrich; Fröhlich-Nowoisky, Janine

    2015-04-01

    Freezing of water above -36° C is based on ice nucleation activity (INA) mediated by ice nucleators (IN) which can be of various origins. Beside mineral IN, biological particles are a potentially important source of atmospheric IN. The best-known biological IN are common plant-associated bacteria. The IN activity of these bacteria is induced by a surface protein on the outer cell membrane, which is fully characterized. In contrast, much less is known about the nature of fungal IN. The fungal genus Fusarium is widely spread throughout the earth. It belongs to the Ascomycota and is one of the most severe fungal pathogens. It can affect a variety of organisms from plants to animals including humans. INA of Fusarium was already described about 30 years ago and INA of Fusarium as well as other fungal genera is assumed to be mediated by proteins or at least to contain a proteinaceous compound. Although many efforts were made the precise INA machinery of Fusarium and other fungal species including the proteins and their corresponding genes remain unidentified. In this study preparations from living fungal samples of F. acuminatum were fractionated by liquid chromatography and IN active fractions were identified by freezing assays. SDS-page and de novo sequencing by mass spectrometry were used to identify the primary structure of the protein. Preliminary results show that the INA protein of F. acuminatum is contained in the early size exclusion chromatography fractions indicating a high molecular size. Moreover we could identify a single protein band from IN active fractions at 130-145 kDa corresponding to sizes of IN proteins from bacterial species. To our knowledge this is for the first time an isolation of a single protein from in vivo samples, which can be assigned as IN active from Fusarium.

  10. Identification of Osteocyte-Selective Proteins

    Guo, Dayong; Keightley, Andrew; Guthrie, Jill; Veno, Patricia A.; Harris, Stephen E.; Bonewald, Lynda F.

    2010-01-01

    Since little is known regarding osteocytes, cells embedded within the mineralized bone matrix, a proteomics approach was used to discover proteins more highly expressed in osteocytes than in osteoblasts to determine osteocyte specific function. Two proteomic profiles obtained by two different proteomic approaches using total cell lysates from the osteocyte cell line MLO-Y4 and the osteoblast cell line MC3T3 revealed unique differences. Three protein clusters, one related to glycolysis, (Phosp...

  11. Identification of kinetically hot residues in proteins.

    M. C. Demirel; Atilgan, A. R.; Jernigan, R. L.; Erman, B; Bahar, I

    1998-01-01

    A number of recent studies called attention to the presence of kinetically important residues underlying the formation and stabilization of folding nuclei in proteins, and to the possible existence of a correlation between conserved residues and those participating in the folding nuclei. Here, we use the Gaussian network model (GNM), which recently proved useful in describing the dynamic characteristics of proteins for identifying the kinetically hot residues in folded structures. These are t...

  12. BioID Identification of Lamin-Associated Proteins.

    Mehus, Aaron A; Anderson, Ruthellen H; Roux, Kyle J

    2016-01-01

    A- and B-type lamins support the nuclear envelope, contribute to heterochromatin organization, and regulate a myriad of nuclear processes. The mechanisms by which lamins function in different cell types and the mechanisms by which lamin mutations cause over a dozen human diseases (laminopathies) remain unclear. The identification of proteins associated with lamins is likely to provide fundamental insight into these mechanisms. BioID (proximity-dependent biotin identification) is a unique and powerful method for identifying protein-protein and proximity-based interactions in living cells. BioID utilizes a mutant biotin ligase from bacteria that is fused to a protein of interest (bait). When expressed in living cells and stimulated with excess biotin, this BioID-fusion protein promiscuously biotinylates directly interacting and vicinal endogenous proteins. Following biotin-affinity capture, the biotinylated proteins can be identified using mass spectrometry. BioID thus enables screening for physiologically relevant protein associations that occur over time in living cells. BioID is applicable to insoluble proteins such as lamins that are often refractory to study by other methods and can identify weak and/or transient interactions. We discuss the use of BioID to elucidate novel lamin-interacting proteins and its applications in a broad range of biological systems, and provide detailed protocols to guide new applications. PMID:26778550

  13. Identification and quantitation of signal molecule-dependent protein phosphorylation

    Groen, Arnoud J.

    2013-09-03

    Phosphoproteomics is a fast-growing field that aims at characterizing phosphorylated proteins in a cell or a tissue at a given time. Phosphorylation of proteins is an important regulatory mechanism in many cellular processes. Gel-free phosphoproteome technique involving enrichment of phosphopeptide coupled with mass spectrometry has proven to be invaluable to detect and characterize phosphorylated proteins. In this chapter, a gel-free quantitative approach involving 15N metabolic labelling in combination with phosphopeptide enrichment by titanium dioxide (TiO2) and their identification by MS is described. This workflow can be used to gain insights into the role of signalling molecules such as cyclic nucleotides on regulatory networks through the identification and quantification of responsive phospho(proteins). © Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013.

  14. Identification of stromal proteins overexpressed in nodular sclerosis Hodgkin lymphoma

    de Leval Laurence

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Hodgkin lymphoma (HL represents a category of lymphoid neoplasms with unique features, notably the usual scarcity of tumour cells in involved tissues. The most common subtype of classical HL, nodular sclerosis HL, characteristically comprises abundant fibrous tissue stroma. Little information is available about the protein composition of the stromal environment from HL. Moreover, the identification of valid protein targets, specifically and abundantly expressed in HL, would be of utmost importance for targeted therapies and imaging, yet the biomarkers must necessarily be accessible from the bloodstream. To characterize HL stroma and to identify potentially accessible proteins, we used a chemical proteomic approach, consisting in the labelling of accessible proteins and their subsequent purification and identification by mass spectrometry. We performed an analysis of potentially accessible proteins in lymph node biopsies from HL and reactive lymphoid tissues, and in total, more than 1400 proteins were identified in 7 samples. We have identified several extracellular matrix proteins overexpressed in HL, such as versican, fibulin-1, periostin, and other proteins such as S100-A8. These proteins were validated by immunohistochemistry on a larger series of biopsy samples, and bear the potential to become targets for antibody-based anti-cancer therapies.

  15. Identification of a putative protein profile associating with tamoxifen therapy resistance in breast cancer

    Umar, Arzu; Kang, Hyuk; Timmermans, A. M.; Look, Maxime P.; Meijer-van Gelder, M. E.; den Bakker, Michael A.; Jaitly, Navdeep; Martens, John W.; Luider, Theo M.; Foekens, John A.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana

    2009-06-01

    Tamoxifen-resistance is a major cause of death in patients with recurrent breast cancer. Current clinical factors can correctly predict therapy response in only half of the treated patients. Identification of proteins that associate with tamoxifen-resistance is a first step towards better response prediction and tailored treatment of patients. In the present study we intended to identify putative protein biomarkers indicative of tamoxifen therapy-resistance in breast cancer, using nanoLC coupled with FTICR MS. Comparative proteome analysis was performed on ~5,500 pooled tumor cells (corresponding to ~550 ng protein lysate/analysis) obtained through laser capture microdissection (LCM) from two independently processed data sets (n=24 and n=27) containing both tamoxifen therapy-sensitive and therapy-resistant tumors. Peptides and proteins were identified by matching mass and elution time of newly acquired LC-MS features to information in previously generated accurate mass and time tag (AMT) reference databases.

  16. Identification of essential proteins based on edge clustering coefficient.

    Wang, Jianxin; Li, Min; Wang, Huan; Pan, Yi

    2012-01-01

    Identification of essential proteins is key to understanding the minimal requirements for cellular life and important for drug design. The rapid increase of available protein-protein interaction (PPI) data has made it possible to detect protein essentiality on network level. A series of centrality measures have been proposed to discover essential proteins based on network topology. However, most of them tended to focus only on the location of single protein, but ignored the relevance between interactions and protein essentiality. In this paper, a new centrality measure for identifying essential proteins based on edge clustering coefficient, named as NC, is proposed. Different from previous centrality measures, NC considers both the centrality of a node and the relationship between it and its neighbors. For each interaction in the network, we calculate its edge clustering coefficient. A node’s essentiality is determined by the sum of the edge clustering coefficients of interactions connecting it and its neighbors. The new centrality measure NC takes into account the modular nature of protein essentiality. NC is applied to three different types of yeast protein-protein interaction networks, which are obtained from the DIP database, the MIPS database and the BioGRID database, respectively. The experimental results on the three different networks show that the number of essential proteins discovered by NC universally exceeds that discovered by the six other centrality measures: DC, BC, CC, SC, EC, and IC. Moreover, the essential proteins discovered by NC show significant cluster effect. PMID:22084147

  17. Identification of SUMO target proteins by quantitative proteomics

    Andersen, Jens S; Matic, Ivan; Vertegaal, Alfred C O

    2009-01-01

    , the methodological details of the application of stable isotope labeling of amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) for the identification of target proteins for SUMOs are described. In addition to steady state sumoylation, the sumoylated proteome undergoes dynamic rearrangements in response to a diverse...

  18. DrugScorePPI webserver: fast and accurate in silico alanine scanning for scoring protein–protein interactions

    Krüger, Dennis M; Gohlke, Holger

    2010-01-01

    Protein–protein complexes play key roles in all cellular signal transduction processes. We have developed a fast and accurate computational approach to predict changes in the binding free energy upon alanine mutations in protein–protein interfaces. The approach is based on a knowledge-based scoring function, DrugScorePPI, for which pair potentials were derived from 851 complex structures and adapted against 309 experimental alanine scanning results. Based on this approach, we developed the Dr...

  19. Bioinformatics pipeline for functional identification and characterization of proteins

    Skarzyńska, Agnieszka; Pawełkowicz, Magdalena; Krzywkowski, Tomasz; Świerkula, Katarzyna; PlÄ der, Wojciech; Przybecki, Zbigniew

    2015-09-01

    The new sequencing methods, called Next Generation Sequencing gives an opportunity to possess a vast amount of data in short time. This data requires structural and functional annotation. Functional identification and characterization of predicted proteins could be done by in silico approches, thanks to a numerous computational tools available nowadays. However, there is a need to confirm the results of proteins function prediction using different programs and comparing the results or confirm experimentally. Here we present a bioinformatics pipeline for structural and functional annotation of proteins.

  20. Identification of chikungunya virus interacting proteins in mammalian cells

    Mandar S Paingankar; Vidya A Arankalle

    2014-06-01

    Identification and characterization of virus host interactions is an essential step for the development of novel antiviral strategies. Very few studies have been targeted towards identification of chikungunya virus (CHIKV) interacting host proteins. In current study, virus overlay protein binding assay (VOPBA) and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight analysis (MALDI TOF/TOF) were employed for the identification of CHIKV binding proteins in mammalian cells. HSP70 and actin were identified as virus binding proteins in HEK-293T and Vero-E6 cells, whereas STAT-2 was identified as an additional protein in Vero-E6 cells. Pre-incubation with anti-HSP70 antibody and miRNA silencing of HSP70 significantly reduced the CHIKV production in HEK-293T and Vero-E6 cells at early time points. These results suggest that CHIKV exploits the housekeeping molecules such as actin, HSP70 and STAT-2 to establish infection in the mammalian cells.

  1. Identification of surface proteins in Enterococcus faecalis V583

    Eijsink Vincent GH

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Surface proteins are a key to a deeper understanding of the behaviour of Gram-positive bacteria interacting with the human gastro-intestinal tract. Such proteins contribute to cell wall synthesis and maintenance and are important for interactions between the bacterial cell and the human host. Since they are exposed and may play roles in pathogenicity, surface proteins are interesting targets for drug design. Results Using methods based on proteolytic "shaving" of bacterial cells and subsequent mass spectrometry-based protein identification, we have identified surface-located proteins in Enterococcus faecalis V583. In total 69 unique proteins were identified, few of which have been identified and characterized previously. 33 of these proteins are predicted to be cytoplasmic, whereas the other 36 are predicted to have surface locations (31 or to be secreted (5. Lipid-anchored proteins were the most dominant among the identified surface proteins. The seemingly most abundant surface proteins included a membrane protein with a potentially shedded extracellular sulfatase domain that could act on the sulfate groups in mucin and a lipid-anchored fumarate reductase that could contribute to generation of reactive oxygen species. Conclusions The present proteome analysis gives an experimental impression of the protein landscape on the cell surface of the pathogenic bacterium E. faecalis. The 36 identified secreted (5 and surface (31 proteins included several proteins involved in cell wall synthesis, pheromone-regulated processes, and transport of solutes, as well as proteins with unknown function. These proteins stand out as interesting targets for further investigation of the interaction between E. faecalis and its environment.

  2. Identification and Validation of ISG15 Target Proteins.

    Durfee, Larissa A; Huibregtse, Jon M

    2010-01-01

    ISG15 is an interferon-induced ubiquitin-like protein (Ubl) that has antiviral properties. The core E1, E2 and E3 enzymes for conjugation of human ISG15 are Ube1L, UbcH8 and Herc5, all of which are induced at the transcriptional level by Type 1 interferon signaling. Several proteomics studies have, together, identified over 300 cellular proteins as ISG15 targets. These targets include a broad range of constitutively expressed proteins and approximately 15 interferon-induced proteins. This chapter provides an overview of the target identification process and the validation of these targets. We also discuss the limited number of examples where the biochemical effect of ISG15 conjugation on target proteins has been characterized. PMID:21222286

  3. Accurate and rapid identification of the Burkholderia pseudomallei near-neighbour, Burkholderia ubonensis, using real-time PCR.

    Erin P Price

    Full Text Available Burkholderia ubonensis is an environmental bacterium belonging to the Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc, a group of genetically related organisms that are associated with opportunistic but generally nonfatal infections in healthy individuals. In contrast, the near-neighbour species Burkholderia pseudomallei causes melioidosis, a disease that can be fatal in up to 95% of cases if left untreated. B. ubonensis is frequently misidentified as B. pseudomallei from soil samples using selective culturing on Ashdown's medium, reflecting both the shared environmental niche and morphological similarities of these species. Additionally, B. ubonensis shows potential as an important biocontrol agent in B. pseudomallei-endemic regions as certain strains possess antagonistic properties towards B. pseudomallei. Current methods for characterising B. ubonensis are laborious, time-consuming and costly, and as such this bacterium remains poorly studied. The aim of our study was to develop a rapid and inexpensive real-time PCR-based assay specific for B. ubonensis. We demonstrate that a novel B. ubonensis-specific assay, Bu550, accurately differentiates B. ubonensis from B. pseudomallei and other species that grow on selective Ashdown's agar. We anticipate that Bu550 will catalyse research on B. ubonensis by enabling rapid identification of this organism from Ashdown's-positive colonies that are not B. pseudomallei.

  4. Identification of Essential Proteins Based on a New Combination of Local Interaction Density and Protein Complexes.

    Jiawei Luo

    Full Text Available Computational approaches aided by computer science have been used to predict essential proteins and are faster than expensive, time-consuming, laborious experimental approaches. However, the performance of such approaches is still poor, making practical applications of computational approaches difficult in some fields. Hence, the development of more suitable and efficient computing methods is necessary for identification of essential proteins.In this paper, we propose a new method for predicting essential proteins in a protein interaction network, local interaction density combined with protein complexes (LIDC, based on statistical analyses of essential proteins and protein complexes. First, we introduce a new local topological centrality, local interaction density (LID, of the yeast PPI network; second, we discuss a new integration strategy for multiple bioinformatics. The LIDC method was then developed through a combination of LID and protein complex information based on our new integration strategy. The purpose of LIDC is discovery of important features of essential proteins with their neighbors in real protein complexes, thereby improving the efficiency of identification.Experimental results based on three different PPI(protein-protein interaction networks of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Escherichia coli showed that LIDC outperformed classical topological centrality measures and some recent combinational methods. Moreover, when predicting MIPS datasets, the better improvement of performance obtained by LIDC is over all nine reference methods (i.e., DC, BC, NC, LID, PeC, CoEWC, WDC, ION, and UC.LIDC is more effective for the prediction of essential proteins than other recently developed methods.

  5. Accurate prediction of interfacial residues in two-domain proteins using evolutionary information: implications for three-dimensional modeling.

    Bhaskara, Ramachandra M; Padhi, Amrita; Srinivasan, Narayanaswamy

    2014-07-01

    With the preponderance of multidomain proteins in eukaryotic genomes, it is essential to recognize the constituent domains and their functions. Often function involves communications across the domain interfaces, and the knowledge of the interacting sites is essential to our understanding of the structure-function relationship. Using evolutionary information extracted from homologous domains in at least two diverse domain architectures (single and multidomain), we predict the interface residues corresponding to domains from the two-domain proteins. We also use information from the three-dimensional structures of individual domains of two-domain proteins to train naïve Bayes classifier model to predict the interfacial residues. Our predictions are highly accurate (∼85%) and specific (∼95%) to the domain-domain interfaces. This method is specific to multidomain proteins which contain domains in at least more than one protein architectural context. Using predicted residues to constrain domain-domain interaction, rigid-body docking was able to provide us with accurate full-length protein structures with correct orientation of domains. We believe that these results can be of considerable interest toward rational protein and interaction design, apart from providing us with valuable information on the nature of interactions. PMID:24375512

  6. Accurate prediction of cellular co-translational folding indicates proteins can switch from post- to co-translational folding

    Nissley, Daniel A.; Sharma, Ajeet K.; Ahmed, Nabeel; Friedrich, Ulrike A.; Kramer, Günter; Bukau, Bernd; O'Brien, Edward P.

    2016-02-01

    The rates at which domains fold and codons are translated are important factors in determining whether a nascent protein will co-translationally fold and function or misfold and malfunction. Here we develop a chemical kinetic model that calculates a protein domain's co-translational folding curve during synthesis using only the domain's bulk folding and unfolding rates and codon translation rates. We show that this model accurately predicts the course of co-translational folding measured in vivo for four different protein molecules. We then make predictions for a number of different proteins in yeast and find that synonymous codon substitutions, which change translation-elongation rates, can switch some protein domains from folding post-translationally to folding co-translationally--a result consistent with previous experimental studies. Our approach explains essential features of co-translational folding curves and predicts how varying the translation rate at different codon positions along a transcript's coding sequence affects this self-assembly process.

  7. Identification of protein superfamily from structure- based sequence motif

    2002-01-01

    The structure-based sequence motif of the distant proteins in evolution, protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTP) Ⅰ and Ⅱ superfamilies, as an example, has been defined by the structural comparison, structure-based sequence alignment and analyses on substitution patterns of residues in common sequence conserved regions. And the phosphatases Ⅰ and Ⅱ can be correctly identified together by the structure-based PTP sequence motif from SWISS-PROT and TrEBML databases. The results show that the correct rates of identification are over 98%. This is the first time to identify PTP Ⅰ and Ⅱ together by this motif.

  8. Machine Learning Identification of Protein Properties Useful for Specific Applications

    Khamis, Abdullah

    2016-03-31

    Proteins play critical roles in cellular processes of living organisms. It is therefore important to identify and characterize their key properties associated with their functions. Correlating protein’s structural, sequence and physicochemical properties of its amino acids (aa) with protein functions could identify some of the critical factors governing the specific functionality. We point out that not all functions of even well studied proteins are known. This, complemented by the huge increase in the number of newly discovered and predicted proteins, makes challenging the experimental characterization of the whole spectrum of possible protein functions for all proteins of interest. Consequently, the use of computational methods has become more attractive. Here we address two questions. The first one is how to use protein aa sequence and physicochemical properties to characterize a family of proteins. The second one focuses on how to use transcription factor (TF) protein’s domains to enhance accuracy of predicting TF DNA binding sites (TFBSs). To address the first question, we developed a novel method using computational representation of proteins based on characteristics of different protein regions (N-terminal, M-region and C-terminal) and combined these with the properties of protein aa sequences. We show that this description provides important biological insight about characterization of the protein functional groups. Using feature selection techniques, we identified key properties of proteins that allow for very accurate characterization of different protein families. We demonstrated efficiency of our method in application to a number of antimicrobial peptide families. To address the second question we developed another novel method that uses a combination of aa properties of DNA binding domains of TFs and their TFBS properties to develop machine learning models for predicting TFBSs. Feature selection is used to identify the most relevant characteristics

  9. VORFFIP-driven dock: V-D2OCK, a fast and accurate protein docking strategy.

    Joan Segura

    Full Text Available The experimental determination of the structure of protein complexes cannot keep pace with the generation of interactomic data, hence resulting in an ever-expanding gap. As the structural details of protein complexes are central to a full understanding of the function and dynamics of the cell machinery, alternative strategies are needed to circumvent the bottleneck in structure determination. Computational protein docking is a valid and valuable approach to model the structure of protein complexes. In this work, we describe a novel computational strategy to predict the structure of protein complexes based on data-driven docking: VORFFIP-driven dock (V-D2OCK. This new approach makes use of our newly described method to predict functional sites in protein structures, VORFFIP, to define the region to be sampled during docking and structural clustering to reduce the number of models to be examined by users. V-D2OCK has been benchmarked using a validated and diverse set of protein complexes and compared to a state-of-art docking method. The speed and accuracy compared to contemporary tools justifies the potential use of VD2OCK for high-throughput, genome-wide, protein docking. Finally, we have developed a web interface that allows users to browser and visualize V-D2OCK predictions from the convenience of their web-browsers.

  10. Identification of Tobacco Topping Responsive Proteins in Roots

    Hongxiang eGuo

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Tobacco plant has many responses to topping, such as the increase in ability of nicotine synthesis and secondary growth of roots. Some topping responsive miRNAs and genes had been identified in our previous work, but it is not enough to elaborate mechanism of tobacco response to topping. Here, topping responsive proteins were screened from tobacco roots with two-dimensional electrophoresis. Of these proteins, calretulin (CRT and Auxin-responsive protein IAA9 were related to the secondary growth of roots, LRR disease resistance, heat shock protein 70 and farnesyl pyrophosphate synthase 1(FPPS)were involved in wounding stress response, and F-box protein played an important role in promoting the ability of nicotine synthesis after topping. In addition, there were five tobacco bHLH proteins (NtbHLH, NtMYC1a, NtMYC1b, NtMYC2a and NtMYC2b related to nicotine synthesis. It was suggested that NtMYC2 might be the main positive transcription factor and NtbHLH protein is a negative regulator in the JA-mediating activation of nicotine synthesis after topping. Tobacco topping activates some comprehensive biology processes involving IAA and JA signaling pathway, and the identification of these proteins will be helpful to understand the process of topping response.

  11. Identification of novel CBP interacting proteins in embryonic orofacial tissue

    cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB)-binding protein (CBP) plays an important role as a general co-integrator of multiple signaling pathways and interacts with a large number of transcription factors and co-factors, through its numerous protein-binding domains. To identify nuclear factors associated with CBP in developing orofacial tissue, a yeast two-hybrid screen of a cDNA library derived from orofacial tissue from gestational day 11 to 13 mouse embryos was conducted. Using the carboxy terminus (amino acid residues 1676-2441) of CBP as bait, several novel proteins that bind CBP were identified, including an Msx-interacting-zinc finger protein, CDC42 interaction protein 4/thyroid hormone receptor interactor 10, SH3-domain GRB2-like 1, CCR4-NOT transcription complex subunit 3, adaptor protein complex AP-1 β1 subunit, eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2B subunit 1 (α), and cyclin G-associated kinase. Results of the yeast two-hybrid screen were confirmed by glutathione S-transferase pull-down assays. The identification of these proteins as novel CBP-binding partners allows exploration of new mechanisms by which CBP regulates and integrates diverse cell signaling pathways

  12. Are current atomistic force fields accurate enough to study proteins in crowded environments?

    Drazen Petrov

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The high concentration of macromolecules in the crowded cellular interior influences different thermodynamic and kinetic properties of proteins, including their structural stabilities, intermolecular binding affinities and enzymatic rates. Moreover, various structural biology methods, such as NMR or different spectroscopies, typically involve samples with relatively high protein concentration. Due to large sampling requirements, however, the accuracy of classical molecular dynamics (MD simulations in capturing protein behavior at high concentration still remains largely untested. Here, we use explicit-solvent MD simulations and a total of 6.4 µs of simulated time to study wild-type (folded and oxidatively damaged (unfolded forms of villin headpiece at 6 mM and 9.2 mM protein concentration. We first perform an exhaustive set of simulations with multiple protein molecules in the simulation box using GROMOS 45a3 and 54a7 force fields together with different types of electrostatics treatment and solution ionic strengths. Surprisingly, the two villin headpiece variants exhibit similar aggregation behavior, despite the fact that their estimated aggregation propensities markedly differ. Importantly, regardless of the simulation protocol applied, wild-type villin headpiece consistently aggregates even under conditions at which it is experimentally known to be soluble. We demonstrate that aggregation is accompanied by a large decrease in the total potential energy, with not only hydrophobic, but also polar residues and backbone contributing substantially. The same effect is directly observed for two other major atomistic force fields (AMBER99SB-ILDN and CHARMM22-CMAP as well as indirectly shown for additional two (AMBER94, OPLS-AAL, and is possibly due to a general overestimation of the potential energy of protein-protein interactions at the expense of water-water and water-protein interactions. Overall, our results suggest that current MD force fields

  13. Identification of repetitive units in protein structures with ReUPred.

    Hirsh, Layla; Piovesan, Damiano; Paladin, Lisanna; Tosatto, Silvio C E

    2016-06-01

    Over the last decade, numerous studies have demonstrated the fundamental importance of tandem repeat (TR) proteins in many biological processes. A plethora of new repeat structures have also been solved. The recently published RepeatsDB provides information on TR proteins. However, a detailed structural characterization of repetitive elements is largely missing, as repeat unit annotation is manually curated and currently covers only 3 % of the bona fide TR proteins. Repeat Protein Unit Predictor (ReUPred) is a novel method for the fast automatic prediction of repeat units and repeat classification using an extensive Structure Repeat Unit Library (SRUL) derived from RepeatsDB. ReUPred uses an iterative structural search against the SRUL to find repetitive units. On a test set of solenoid proteins, ReUPred is able to correctly detect 92 % of the proteins. Unlike previous methods, it is also able to correctly classify solenoid repeats in 89 % of cases. It also outperforms two recent state-of-the-art methods for the repeat unit identification problem. The accurate prediction of repeat units increases the number of annotated repeat units by an order of magnitude compared to the sequence-based Pfam classification. ReUPred is implemented in Python for Linux and freely available from the URL: http://protein.bio.unipd.it/reupred/ . PMID:26898549

  14. Calculation of accurate small angle X-ray scattering curves from coarse-grained protein models

    Stovgaard Kasper; Andreetta Christian; Ferkinghoff-Borg Jesper; Hamelryck Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Genome sequencing projects have expanded the gap between the amount of known protein sequences and structures. The limitations of current high resolution structure determination methods make it unlikely that this gap will disappear in the near future. Small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) is an established low resolution method for routinely determining the structure of proteins in solution. The purpose of this study is to develop a method for the efficient calculation of ac...

  15. Fast and Accurate Multivariate Gaussian Modeling of Protein Families: Predicting Residue Contacts and Protein-Interaction Partners

    Carlo Baldassi; Marco Zamparo; Christoph Feinauer; Andrea Procaccini; Riccardo Zecchina; Martin Weigt; Andrea Pagnani

    2014-01-01

    International audience In the course of evolution, proteins show a remarkable conservation of their three-dimensional structure and their biological function, leading to strong evolutionary constraints on the sequence variability between homologous proteins. Our method aims at extracting such constraints from rapidly accumulating sequence data, and thereby at inferring protein structure and function from sequence information alone. Recently, global statistical inference methods (e.g. direc...

  16. Mass spectrometry allows direct identification of proteins in large genomes

    Küster, B; Mortensen, Peter V.; Andersen, Jens S.;

    2001-01-01

    Proteome projects seek to provide systematic functional analysis of the genes uncovered by genome sequencing initiatives. Mass spectrometric protein identification is a key requirement in these studies but to date, database searching tools rely on the availability of protein sequences derived from...... full length cDNA, expressed sequence tags or predicted open reading frames (ORFs) from genomic sequences. We demonstrate here that proteins can be identified directly in large genomic databases using peptide sequence tags obtained by tandem mass spectrometry. On the background of vast amounts of...... noncoding DNA sequence, identified peptides localize coding sequences (exons) in a confined region of the genome, which contains the cognate gene. The approach does not require prior information about putative ORFs as predicted by computerized gene finding algorithms. The method scales to the complete human...

  17. Identification of potential protein markers of noble rot infected grapes.

    Lorenzini, Marilinda; Millioni, Renato; Franchin, Cinzia; Zapparoli, Giacomo; Arrigoni, Giorgio; Simonato, Barbara

    2015-07-15

    The evaluation of Botrytis cinerea as noble rot on withered grapes is of great importance to predict the wine sensory/organoleptic properties and to manage the winemaking process of Amarone, a passito dry red wine. This report describes the first proteomic analysis of grapes infected by noble rot under withering conditions to identify possible markers of fungal infection. 2-D gel electrophoresis revealed that protein profiles of infected and not infected grape samples are significantly different in terms of number of spots and relative abundance. Protein identification by MS analysis allowed to identify only in infected berries proteins of B. cinerea that represent potential markers of the presence of the fungus in the withered grapes. PMID:25722151

  18. Identification of Candidate Genes related to Bovine Marbling using Protein-Protein Interaction Networks

    Lim, Dajeong; Kim, Nam-Kuk; Park, Hye-Sun; Lee, Seung-Hwan; Cho, Yong-Min; Oh, Sung Jong; Kim, Tae-Hun; Kim, Heebal

    2011-01-01

    Complex traits are determined by the combined effects of many loci and are affected by gene networks or biological pathways. Systems biology approaches have an important role in the identification of candidate genes related to complex diseases or traits at the system level. The present study systemically analyzed genes associated with bovine marbling score and identified their relationships. The candidate nodes were obtained using MedScan text-mining tools and linked by protein-protein intera...

  19. Rapid and accurate processing method for amide proton exchange rate measurement in proteins

    Koskela, Harri [University of Helsinki, Finnish Institute for Verification of the Chemical Weapons Convention (VERIFIN) (Finland)], E-mail: Harri.T.Koskela@helsinki.fi; Heikkinen, Outi; Kilpelaeinen, Ilkka; Heikkinen, Sami [University of Helsinki, Laboratory of Organic Chemistry (Finland)

    2007-04-15

    Exchange between protein backbone amide hydrogen and water gives relevant information about solvent accessibility and protein secondary structure stability. NMR spectroscopy provides a convenient tool to study these dynamic processes with saturation transfer experiments. Processing of this type of NMR spectra has traditionally required peak integration followed by exponential fitting, which can be tedious with large data sets. We propose here a computer-aided method that applies inverse Laplace transform in the exchange rate measurement. With this approach, the determination of exchange rates can be automated, and reliable results can be acquired rapidly without a need for manual processing.

  20. Rapid and accurate processing method for amide proton exchange rate measurement in proteins

    Exchange between protein backbone amide hydrogen and water gives relevant information about solvent accessibility and protein secondary structure stability. NMR spectroscopy provides a convenient tool to study these dynamic processes with saturation transfer experiments. Processing of this type of NMR spectra has traditionally required peak integration followed by exponential fitting, which can be tedious with large data sets. We propose here a computer-aided method that applies inverse Laplace transform in the exchange rate measurement. With this approach, the determination of exchange rates can be automated, and reliable results can be acquired rapidly without a need for manual processing

  1. Identification of major immunogenic proteins of Mycoplasma synoviae isolates.

    Bercic, Rebeka Lucijana; Slavec, Brigita; Lavric, Miha; Narat, Mojca; Bidovec, Andrej; Dovc, Peter; Bencina, Dusan

    2008-02-01

    Mycoplasma synoviae isolates differ in patterns of immunogenic proteins, but most of them have not been identified yet. The main aim of this study was their identification in two closely related M. synoviae isolates, ULB 02/P4 and ULB 02/OV6, recovered recently from chickens in Slovenia. N-terminal sequencing identified 17 M. synoviae proteins. Amongst them were 14 major, highly expressed but previously unidentified proteins, including enzymes, chaperones and putative lipoproteins. ULB 02/P4 proteins with increasing molecular weight (M(w)) in the region above the lipoprotein MSPB (approximately 40 kDa) were elongation factor EF-Tu, enolase, NADH oxidase, haemagglutinin MSPA, ATP synthase beta chain, trigger factor, pyruvate kinase and chaperone DnaK. Enolase (approximately 47 kDa) seemed to be immunogenic for chickens infected with M. synoviae, whereas EF-Tu, which might cross-react with antibodies to the P1 adhesin of Mycoplasma pneumoniae, was not. ULB 02/OV6 synthesized several immunogenic proteins and those with M(w) of approximately 70, 78, 82, 90, 110 and 160 kDa, cross-reacted with antibodies to Mycoplasma gallisepticum. They remain to be identified, because besides putative lipoproteins, protein bands of 78, 82, 85 and 110 kDa contained also dehydrogenase PdhD, elongation factor EF-G, enzyme PtsG and putative neuraminidase, respectively. PMID:17720337

  2. Development of Improved Methods for Protein Separation and Identification

    Iskra Sainova

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available For identification of proteins, able to connect specifically or non-specifically with peptide SCGN, protein material from RIN-5F rat insulinoma malignant cells and E. coli bacteria strains, both with inserted by transfection with recombinant vectors rat gene SCGN, was isolated. Subsequently, SCGN peptide was isolated, precipitated and incubated with lysates from rat pancreas and brain, known as anatomic organs with highest expression of SCGN gene. For determination of proteins with highest affinity to this target peptide, from both organs, it was separately mixed with both lysates, and the mixtures were subjected on separation on CNBr-Sepharose and GST-Agarose columns, respectively. GST-Agarose technique indicated some advantages in comparison with CNBr-Sepharose, connected mainly with higher yields of different protein types because of the escaped protein degradation influence of CNBr. The results supported the suggested in our previous studies abilities of protein SCGN to connect with cytoskeleton elements, in confirmation with some literature findings. On this base, a mechanism for indirect influence of this peptide on the control of cell growth and proliferation, has been proposed. Future studies are necessary in this direction

  3. Accurate design of megadalton-scale two-component icosahedral protein complexes.

    Bale, Jacob B; Gonen, Shane; Liu, Yuxi; Sheffler, William; Ellis, Daniel; Thomas, Chantz; Cascio, Duilio; Yeates, Todd O; Gonen, Tamir; King, Neil P; Baker, David

    2016-07-22

    Nature provides many examples of self- and co-assembling protein-based molecular machines, including icosahedral protein cages that serve as scaffolds, enzymes, and compartments for essential biochemical reactions and icosahedral virus capsids, which encapsidate and protect viral genomes and mediate entry into host cells. Inspired by these natural materials, we report the computational design and experimental characterization of co-assembling, two-component, 120-subunit icosahedral protein nanostructures with molecular weights (1.8 to 2.8 megadaltons) and dimensions (24 to 40 nanometers in diameter) comparable to those of small viral capsids. Electron microscopy, small-angle x-ray scattering, and x-ray crystallography show that 10 designs spanning three distinct icosahedral architectures form materials closely matching the design models. In vitro assembly of icosahedral complexes from independently purified components occurs rapidly, at rates comparable to those of viral capsids, and enables controlled packaging of molecular cargo through charge complementarity. The ability to design megadalton-scale materials with atomic-level accuracy and controllable assembly opens the door to a new generation of genetically programmable protein-based molecular machines. PMID:27463675

  4. Method optimization for proteomic analysis of soybean leaf: improvements in identification of new and low-abundance proteins

    Rosilene Oliveira Mesquita

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The most critical step in any proteomic study is protein extraction and sample preparation. Better solubilization increases the separation and resolution of gels, allowing identification of a higher number of proteins and more accurate quantitation of differences in gene expression. Despite the existence of published results for the optimization of proteomic analyses of soybean seeds, no comparable data are available for proteomic studies of soybean leaf tissue. In this work we have tested the effects of modification of a TCA-acetone method on the resolution of 2-DE gels of leaves and roots of soybean. Better focusing was obtained when both mercaptoethanol and dithiothreitol were used in the extraction buffer simultaneously. Increasing the number of washes of TCA precipitated protein with acetone, using a final wash with 80% ethanol and using sonication to ressuspend the pellet increased the number of detected proteins as well the resolution of the 2-DE gels. Using this approach we have constructed a soybean protein map. The major group of identified proteins corresponded to genes of unknown function. The second and third most abundant groups of proteins were composed of photosynthesis and metabolism related genes. The resulting protocol improved protein solubility and gel resolution allowing the identification of 122 soybean leaf proteins, 72 of which were not detected in other published soybean leaf 2-DE gel datasets, including a transcription factor and several signaling proteins.

  5. Identification of protein binding in pictorial art Cuban

    In this paper were implemented microanalysis methodologies by histochemical analysis, and infrared spectroscopy to determine the nature of the binder in paintings and Gas Chromatography (GC) coupled to Mass Spectrometry (MS) for identification of protein binders of common use in tempera technique with the aim of having these methods as part of the identification of artistic materials in Cuban cultural heritage carried out by Archaeometry Laboratory of Havana city's Historian Cabinet. The methodologies implemented were evaluated using model samples of traditional painting techniques with variable protein binder: yolk, egg white, casein, nut oil and animal glue; ageing for 5 years. The models samples were correctly identified. It was determined the interference of pigments with the presence of nitrogen by histochemical analysis with Amido Black dye. IR spectroscopy technique allowed to differentiate between oily and mixed (oil plus protein) techniques and tempera with yolk. Oily technique was identified in wall paintings of the New San Francisco church (XIX century) and the Obrapia House (XVII century) and the technique of tempera with animal glue in the polychrome of the XVIII century which represents St. John the Evangelist belonging to the San Juan de Letran church

  6. LOCUSTRA: accurate prediction of local protein structure using a two-layer support vector machine approach.

    Zimmermann, Olav; Hansmann, Ulrich H E

    2008-09-01

    Constraint generation for 3d structure prediction and structure-based database searches benefit from fine-grained prediction of local structure. In this work, we present LOCUSTRA, a novel scheme for the multiclass prediction of local structure that uses two layers of support vector machines (SVM). Using a 16-letter structural alphabet from de Brevern et al. (Proteins: Struct., Funct., Bioinf. 2000, 41, 271-287), we assess its prediction ability for an independent test set of 222 proteins and compare our method to three-class secondary structure prediction and direct prediction of dihedral angles. The prediction accuracy is Q16=61.0% for the 16 classes of the structural alphabet and Q3=79.2% for a simple mapping to the three secondary classes helix, sheet, and coil. We achieve a mean phi(psi) error of 24.74 degrees (38.35 degrees) and a median RMSDA (root-mean-square deviation of the (dihedral) angles) per protein chain of 52.1 degrees. These results compare favorably with related approaches. The LOCUSTRA web server is freely available to researchers at http://www.fz-juelich.de/nic/cbb/service/service.php. PMID:18763837

  7. Identification of transcriptional signals in Encephalitozoon cuniculi widespread among Microsporidia phylum: support for accurate structural genome annotation

    Wincker Patrick

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microsporidia are obligate intracellular eukaryotic parasites with genomes ranging in size from 2.3 Mbp to more than 20 Mbp. The extremely small (2.9 Mbp and highly compact (~1 gene/kb genome of the human parasite Encephalitozoon cuniculi has been fully sequenced. The aim of this study was to characterize noncoding motifs that could be involved in regulation of gene expression in E. cuniculi and to show whether these motifs are conserved among the phylum Microsporidia. Results To identify such signals, 5' and 3'RACE-PCR experiments were performed on different E. cuniculi mRNAs. This analysis confirmed that transcription overrun occurs in E. cuniculi and may result from stochastic recognition of the AAUAAA polyadenylation signal. Such experiments also showed highly reduced 5'UTR's (E. cuniculi genes presented a CCC-like motif immediately upstream from the coding start. To characterize other signals involved in differential transcriptional regulation, we then focused our attention on the gene family coding for ribosomal proteins. An AAATTT-like signal was identified upstream from the CCC-like motif. In rare cases the cytosine triplet was shown to be substituted by a GGG-like motif. Comparative genomic studies confirmed that these different signals are also located upstream from genes encoding ribosomal proteins in other microsporidian species including Antonospora locustae, Enterocytozoon bieneusi, Anncaliia algerae (syn. Brachiola algerae and Nosema ceranae. Based on these results a systematic analysis of the ~2000 E. cuniculi coding DNA sequences was then performed and brings to highlight that 364 translation initiation codons (18.29% of total CDSs had been badly predicted. Conclusion We identified various signals involved in the maturation of E. cuniculi mRNAs. Presence of such signals, in phylogenetically distant microsporidian species, suggests that a common regulatory mechanism exists among the microsporidia. Furthermore

  8. Identification of Inhibitors of Biological Interactions Involving Intrinsically Disordered Proteins

    Daniela Marasco

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Protein–protein interactions involving disordered partners have unique features and represent prominent targets in drug discovery processes. Intrinsically Disordered Proteins (IDPs are involved in cellular regulation, signaling and control: they bind to multiple partners and these high-specificity/low-affinity interactions play crucial roles in many human diseases. Disordered regions, terminal tails and flexible linkers are particularly abundant in DNA-binding proteins and play crucial roles in the affinity and specificity of DNA recognizing processes. Protein complexes involving IDPs are short-lived and typically involve short amino acid stretches bearing few “hot spots”, thus the identification of molecules able to modulate them can produce important lead compounds: in this scenario peptides and/or peptidomimetics, deriving from structure-based, combinatorial or protein dissection approaches, can play a key role as hit compounds. Here, we propose a panoramic review of the structural features of IDPs and how they regulate molecular recognition mechanisms focusing attention on recently reported drug-design strategies in the field of IDPs.

  9. Identification of Proteins that Modify Cataract of the Eye Lens

    Hoehenwarter, Wolfgang; Tang, Yajun; Ackermann, Renate; Pleissner, Klaus-Peter; Schmid, Monika; Stein, Robert; Zimny-Arndt, Ursula; Kumar, Nalin M.; Jungblut, Peter R.

    2010-01-01

    The occurrence of a nuclear cataract in the eye lens due to disruption of theα3Cx46 connexin gene, Gja3, is dependent on strain background in a mouse model, implicating factors that modify the pathology. The differences upon cataractogenesis in the urea soluble proteins of the lens of two mouse strains, C57BL/6J and 129/SvJ, were analyzed by a comparative proteomics approach. Determination of the complete proteome of an organ offers the opportunity to characterize at a molecular level, differences in gene expression and post-translational modifications occurring during pathology and between individuals. The abundance of 63 protein species was altered between the strains. A unique aspect of this study is the identification of chaperonin subunit 6A, mortalin, ERp29 and syntaxin binding protein 6 in the eye lens. DNA polymorphisms resulting in non-conservative amino acid changes that led to altered physicochemical properties of the proteins were detected for mortalin, chaperonin subunit 6A, annexin A1 and possibly gamma N crystallin. The results show HSP27/25 and/or ERp29 are the likely major modifying factors for cataractogenesis. Extension of the results suggests that small heat shock proteins have a major role for influencing cataract formation in humans. PMID:19003866

  10. Urinary Excretion of Liver Type Fatty Acid Binding Protein Accurately Reflects the Degree of Tubulointerstitial Damage

    Yokoyama, Takeshi; Kamijo-Ikemori, Atsuko; Sugaya, Takeshi; Hoshino, Seiko; Yasuda, Takashi; Kimura, Kenjiro

    2009-01-01

    To investigate the relationship between liver-type fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP), a biomarker of chronic kidney disease, in the kidney and the degree of tubulointerstitial damage, folic acid (FA)-induced nephropathy was studied in a mouse model system. As renal L-FABP is not expressed in wild-type mice, human L-FABP (hL-FABP) transgenic mice were used in this study. hL-FABP is expressed in the renal proximal tubules of the transgenic mice that were injected intraperitoneally with FA in ...

  11. Identification and characterization of N-glycosylated proteins using proteomics

    Selby, David S; Larsen, Martin R; Calvano, Cosima Damiana; Jensen, Ole Nørregaard

    2008-01-01

    complex task and is currently achieved by mass spectrometry-based methods that enable identification of glycoproteins and localization, classification, and analysis of individual glycan structures on proteins. In this chapter we briefly introduce a range of analytical technologies for recovery and...... analysis of glycoproteins and glycopeptides. Combinations of affinity-enrichment techniques, chemical and biochemical protocols, and advanced mass spectrometry facilitate detailed glycoprotein analysis in proteomics, from fundamental biological studies to biomarker discovery in biomedicine.......Glycoproteins constitute a large fraction of the proteome. The fundamental role of protein glycosylation in cellular development, growth, and differentiation, tissue development, and in host-pathogen interactions is by now widely accepted. Proteome-wide characterization of glycoproteins is a...

  12. Identification and evaluation of new reference genes in Gossypium hirsutum for accurate normalization of real-time quantitative RT-PCR data

    Alves-Ferreira Marcio; Grossi-de-Sa Maria; Brilhante Osmundo; Nardeli Sarah M; Artico Sinara

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Normalizing through reference genes, or housekeeping genes, can make more accurate and reliable results from reverse transcription real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Recent studies have shown that no single housekeeping gene is universal for all experiments. Thus, suitable reference genes should be the first step of any qPCR analysis. Only a few studies on the identification of housekeeping gene have been carried on plants. Therefore qPCR studies on i...

  13. Phytochip: Development of a DNA-microarray for rapid and accurate identification of Pseudo-nitzschia spp and other harmful algal species

    Noyer, Charlotte; Abot, Anne; Trouilh, Lidwine; Leberre, Veronique Anton; Dreanno, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Detection of harmful algal blooms has become a challenging concern because of to the direct impacts on public health and economy. The identification of toxic dinoflagellates and diatoms in monitoring programs requires an extensive taxonomic expertise and is time consuming. Advances in molecular biology have allowed the development of new approaches, more rapid, accurate and cost-effective for detecting these microorganisms. In this context, we developed a new DNA microarray (called, Phytochip...

  14. HEASARC Astronomical Archive: GLIESE2MAS - Gliese Catalog Stars with Accurate Coordinates and 2MASS Cross-Identifications

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This table contains precise epoch 2000 coordinates and cross-identifications to sources in the 2MASS Point Source Catalog for nearly all stars in the Gliese,...

  15. Improved Identification and Relative Quantification of Sites of Peptide and Protein Oxidation for Hydroxyl Radical Footprinting

    Li, Xiaoyan; Li, Zixuan; Xie, Boer; Sharp, Joshua S.

    2013-11-01

    Protein oxidation is typically associated with oxidative stress and aging and affects protein function in normal and pathological processes. Additionally, deliberate oxidative labeling is used to probe protein structure and protein-ligand interactions in hydroxyl radical protein footprinting (HRPF). Oxidation often occurs at multiple sites, leading to mixtures of oxidation isomers that differ only by the site of modification. We utilized sets of synthetic, isomeric "oxidized" peptides to test and compare the ability of electron-transfer dissociation (ETD) and collision-induced dissociation (CID), as well as nano-ultra high performance liquid chromatography (nanoUPLC) separation, to quantitate oxidation isomers with one oxidation at multiple adjacent sites in mixtures of peptides. Tandem mass spectrometry by ETD generates fragment ion ratios that accurately report on relative oxidative modification extent on specific sites, regardless of the charge state of the precursor ion. Conversely, CID was found to generate quantitative MS/MS product ions only at the higher precursor charge state. Oxidized isomers having multiple sites of oxidation in each of two peptide sequences in HRPF product of protein Robo-1 Ig1-2, a protein involved in nervous system axon guidance, were also identified and the oxidation extent at each residue was quantified by ETD without prior liquid chromatography (LC) separation. ETD has proven to be a reliable technique for simultaneous identification and relative quantification of a variety of functionally different oxidation isomers, and is a valuable tool for the study of oxidative stress, as well as for improving spatial resolution for HRPF studies.

  16. Seasonal variation in accurate identification of Escherichia coli within a constructed wetland receiving tertiary-treated municipal effluent

    The reuse of municipal wastewater has been escalating worldwide as a means to extend increasingly limited water supplies. With the growth in use of recycled water, accurate monitoring of water quality parameters, including Escherichia coli (E. coli), increases in importance. Chromogenic media, becau...

  17. DNA binding protein identification by combining pseudo amino acid composition and profile-based protein representation

    Liu, Bin; Wang, Shanyi; Wang, Xiaolong

    2015-10-01

    DNA-binding proteins play an important role in most cellular processes. Therefore, it is necessary to develop an efficient predictor for identifying DNA-binding proteins only based on the sequence information of proteins. The bottleneck for constructing a useful predictor is to find suitable features capturing the characteristics of DNA binding proteins. We applied PseAAC to DNA binding protein identification, and PseAAC was further improved by incorporating the evolutionary information by using profile-based protein representation. Finally, Combined with Support Vector Machines (SVMs), a predictor called iDNAPro-PseAAC was proposed. Experimental results on an updated benchmark dataset showed that iDNAPro-PseAAC outperformed some state-of-the-art approaches, and it can achieve stable performance on an independent dataset. By using an ensemble learning approach to incorporate more negative samples (non-DNA binding proteins) in the training process, the performance of iDNAPro-PseAAC was further improved. The web server of iDNAPro-PseAAC is available at http://bioinformatics.hitsz.edu.cn/iDNAPro-PseAAC/.

  18. Template-based identification of protein-protein interfaces using eFindSitePPI.

    Maheshwari, Surabhi; Brylinski, Michal

    2016-01-15

    Protein-protein interactions orchestrate virtually all cellular processes, therefore, their exhaustive exploration is essential for the comprehensive understanding of cellular networks. A reliable identification of interfacial residues is vital not only to infer the function of individual proteins and their assembly into biological complexes, but also to elucidate the molecular and physicochemical basis of interactions between proteins. With the exponential growth of protein sequence data, computational approaches for detecting protein interface sites have drawn an increased interest. In this communication, we discuss the major features of eFindSite(PPI), a recently developed template-based method for interface residue prediction available at http://brylinski.cct.lsu.edu/efindsiteppi. We describe the requirements and installation procedures for the stand-alone version, and explain the content and format of output data. Furthermore, the functionality of the eFindSite(PPI) web application that is designed to provide a simple and convenient access for the scientific community is presented with illustrative examples. Finally, we discuss common problems encountered in predicting protein interfaces and set forth directions for the future development of eFindSite(PPI). PMID:26235816

  19. Identification of hot-spot residues in protein-protein interactions by computational docking

    Fernández-Recio Juan

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The study of protein-protein interactions is becoming increasingly important for biotechnological and therapeutic reasons. We can define two major areas therein: the structural prediction of protein-protein binding mode, and the identification of the relevant residues for the interaction (so called 'hot-spots'. These hot-spot residues have high interest since they are considered one of the possible ways of disrupting a protein-protein interaction. Unfortunately, large-scale experimental measurement of residue contribution to the binding energy, based on alanine-scanning experiments, is costly and thus data is fairly limited. Recent computational approaches for hot-spot prediction have been reported, but they usually require the structure of the complex. Results We have applied here normalized interface propensity (NIP values derived from rigid-body docking with electrostatics and desolvation scoring for the prediction of interaction hot-spots. This parameter identifies hot-spot residues on interacting proteins with predictive rates that are comparable to other existing methods (up to 80% positive predictive value, and the advantage of not requiring any prior structural knowledge of the complex. Conclusion The NIP values derived from rigid-body docking can reliably identify a number of hot-spot residues whose contribution to the interaction arises from electrostatics and desolvation effects. Our method can propose residues to guide experiments in complexes of biological or therapeutic interest, even in cases with no available 3D structure of the complex.

  20. Rapid and Accurate Identification by Real-Time PCR of Biotoxin-Producing Dinoflagellates from the Family Gymnodiniaceae

    Kirsty F. Smith

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The identification of toxin-producing dinoflagellates for monitoring programmes and bio-compound discovery requires considerable taxonomic expertise. It can also be difficult to morphologically differentiate toxic and non-toxic species or strains. Various molecular methods have been used for dinoflagellate identification and detection, and this study describes the development of eight real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR assays targeting the large subunit ribosomal RNA (LSU rRNA gene of species from the genera Gymnodinium, Karenia, Karlodinium, and Takayama. Assays proved to be highly specific and sensitive, and the assay for G. catenatum was further developed for quantification in response to a bloom in Manukau Harbour, New Zealand. The assay estimated cell densities from environmental samples as low as 0.07 cells per PCR reaction, which equated to three cells per litre. This assay not only enabled conclusive species identification but also detected the presence of cells below the limit of detection for light microscopy. This study demonstrates the usefulness of real-time PCR as a sensitive and rapid molecular technique for the detection and quantification of micro-algae from environmental samples.

  1. Identification of local conformational similarity in structurally variable regions of homologous proteins using protein blocks.

    Agarwal, Garima; Mahajan, Swapnil; Srinivasan, Narayanaswamy; de Brevern, Alexandre G

    2011-01-01

    Structure comparison tools can be used to align related protein structures to identify structurally conserved and variable regions and to infer functional and evolutionary relationships. While the conserved regions often superimpose well, the variable regions appear non superimposable. Differences in homologous protein structures are thought to be due to evolutionary plasticity to accommodate diverged sequences during evolution. One of the kinds of differences between 3-D structures of homologous proteins is rigid body displacement. A glaring example is not well superimposed equivalent regions of homologous proteins corresponding to α-helical conformation with different spatial orientations. In a rigid body superimposition, these regions would appear variable although they may contain local similarity. Also, due to high spatial deviation in the variable region, one-to-one correspondence at the residue level cannot be determined accurately. Another kind of difference is conformational variability and the most common example is topologically equivalent loops of two homologues but with different conformations. In the current study, we present a refined view of the "structurally variable" regions which may contain local similarity obscured in global alignment of homologous protein structures. As structural alphabet is able to describe local structures of proteins precisely through Protein Blocks approach, conformational similarity has been identified in a substantial number of 'variable' regions in a large data set of protein structural alignments; optimal residue-residue equivalences could be achieved on the basis of Protein Blocks which led to improved local alignments. Also, through an example, we have demonstrated how the additional information on local backbone structures through protein blocks can aid in comparative modeling of a loop region. In addition, understanding on sequence-structure relationships can be enhanced through our approach. This has been

  2. P161-M De Novo Peptide Sequence Database for Protein Identification

    Kanazawa, M.; Egawa, S.; Anyoji, H.; Hoshino, Y; Nagashima, U.

    2007-01-01

    Several protein identification methods using mass spectrum are utilized for proteomic analysis, and almost all methods rely on protein sequence databases for the characteristic of their algorithms. Basic algorithm of these methods is to compare molecular weight (MW) of peptide as digested protein or dissociated peptide fragment with calculated weight by database stored sequences and to identify which peptide or protein is measured.

  3. Rapid and accurate identification of Streptococcus equi subspecies by MALDI-TOF MS

    Kudirkiene, Egle; Welker, Martin; Knudsen, Nanna Reumert;

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus equi includes very important animal and human pathogens. S. equi subsp. equi (SEE) is a highly pathogenic equine specific subspecies, while S. equi subsp. zooepidemicus (SEZ) and S. equi subsp. ruminatorum are opportunistic pathogens of various animal species and humans. Due to great...... phenotypic and sequence similarity between three subspecies their discrimination remains difficult. In this study, we aimed to design and validate a novel, Superspectra based, MALDI-TOF MS approach for reliable, rapid and cost-effective identification of SEE and SEZ, the most frequent S. equi subspecies in...

  4. Accurate mass screening and identification of emerging contaminants in environmental samples by liquid chromatography-hybrid linear ion trap Orbitrap mass spectrometry.

    Hogenboom, A C; van Leerdam, J A; de Voogt, P

    2009-01-16

    The European Reach legislation will possibly drive producers to develop newly designed chemicals that will be less persistent, bioaccumulative or toxic. If this innovation leads to an increased use of more hydrophilic chemicals it may result in higher mobilities of chemicals in the aqueous environment. As a result, the drinking water companies may face stronger demands on removal processes as the hydrophilic compounds inherently are more difficult to remove. Monitoring efforts will also experience a shift in focus to more water-soluble compounds. Screening source waters on the presence of (emerging) contaminants is an essential step in the control of the water cycle from source to tap water. In this article, some of our experiences are presented with the hybrid linear ion trap (LTQ) FT Orbitrap mass spectrometer, in the area of chemical water analysis. A two-pronged strategy in mass spectrometric research was employed: (i) exploring effluent, surface, ground- and drinking-water samples searching for accurate masses corresponding to target compounds (and their product ions) known from, e.g. priority lists or the scientific literature and (ii) full-scan screening of water samples in search of 'unknown' or unexpected masses, followed by MS(n) experiments to elucidate the structure of the unknowns. Applications of both approaches to emerging water contaminants are presented and discussed. Results are presented for target analysis search for pharmaceuticals, benzotriazoles, illicit drugs and for the identification of unknown compounds in a groundwater sample and in a polar extract of a landfill soil sample (a toxicity identification evaluation bioassay sample). The applications of accurate mass screening and identification described in this article demonstrate that the LC-LTQ FT Orbitrap MS is well equipped to meet the challenges posed by newly emerging polar contaminants. PMID:18771771

  5. Rapid metabolite discovery, identification, and accurate comparison of the stereoselective metabolism of metalaxyl in rat hepatic microsomes.

    Wang, Xinru; Qiu, Jing; Xu, Peng; Zhang, Ping; Wang, Yao; Zhou, Zhiqiang; Zhu, Wentao

    2015-01-28

    Metabolite identification and quantitation impose great challenges on risk assessment of agrochemicals, as many metabolite standards are generally unavailable. In this study, metalaxyl metabolites were identified by time-of-flight mass spectrometry and semiquantified by triple quadrupole tandem mass spectrometry with self-prepared (13)C-labeled metalaxyl metabolites as internal standards. Such methodology was employed to characterize the stereoselective metabolism of metalaxyl in rat hepatic microsomes successfully. Metabolites derived from hydroxylation, demethylation, and didemethylation were identified and semiquantified. The results indicated that (+)-S-metalaxyl eliminated preferentially as the enantiomer fraction was 0.32 after 60 min incubation. The amounts of hydroxymetalaxyl and demethylmetalaxyl derived from (-)-R-metalaxyl were 1.76 and 1.82 times higher than that of (+)-S-metalaxyl, whereas didemethylmetalaxyl derived from (+)-S-metalaxyl was 1.44 times larger than that from (-)-R-metalaxyl. This study highlights a new quantitation approach for stereoselective metabolism of chiral agrochemicals and provides more knowledge on metalaxyl risk assessment. PMID:25581548

  6. Identification of a novel resi-dent centrosomal protein

    2001-01-01

    One human autoimmune serum was identified to react withcentrosomes by immunofluorescence. We applied the affinity purification of membrane-bound antibody technique and demonstrated that the antibodies present in this antiserum reacted with a 31/29 ku centrosomal antigen. Immunofluorescence showed that this antigen is located at centrosome in a cell-cycle independent manner, and thereby it belongs to the family of centrosomal residents. We then uti- lized this autoimmune serum and antibodies against centrin and gamma-tubulin to investigate changes of centrosome cycle kinetics during premature chromosome condensation (PCC) artificially induced in V79-8 cells. We show here that centrosomal proteins continue to express when cells are syn-chronized at G1/S boundary and S phase by Hydroxyurea (HU). During this time, the addition of caffeine causes cells with unreplicated genome to go into mitosis, and induces the separation of the replicated centrosomes. These results sug-gest that the coordination of DNA synthesis and centrosome replication in the normal cell cycle can be uncoupled. Cells ensure that centrosome duplicates once, and only once dur-ing each DNA synthesis cycle through the tight and subtle coordination of cell cycle engine molecules, and thereby the assembly of bipolar spindle and the accurate transmission of genetic information.

  7. Identification and validation of reference genes for accurate normalization of real-time quantitative PCR data in kiwifruit.

    Ferradás, Yolanda; Rey, Laura; Martínez, Óscar; Rey, Manuel; González, M Victoria

    2016-05-01

    Identification and validation of reference genes are required for the normalization of qPCR data. We studied the expression stability produced by eight primer pairs amplifying four common genes used as references for normalization. Samples representing different tissues, organs and developmental stages in kiwifruit (Actinidia chinensis var. deliciosa (A. Chev.) A. Chev.) were used. A total of 117 kiwifruit samples were divided into five sample sets (mature leaves, axillary buds, stigmatic arms, fruit flesh and seeds). All samples were also analysed as a single set. The expression stability of the candidate primer pairs was tested using three algorithms (geNorm, NormFinder and BestKeeper). The minimum number of reference genes necessary for normalization was also determined. A unique primer pair was selected for amplifying the 18S rRNA gene. The primer pair selected for amplifying the ACTIN gene was different depending on the sample set. 18S 2 and ACT 2 were the candidate primer pairs selected for normalization in the three sample sets (mature leaves, fruit flesh and stigmatic arms). 18S 2 and ACT 3 were the primer pairs selected for normalization in axillary buds. No primer pair could be selected for use as the reference for the seed sample set. The analysis of all samples in a single set did not produce the selection of any stably expressing primer pair. Considering data previously reported in the literature, we validated the selected primer pairs amplifying the FLOWERING LOCUS T gene for use in the normalization of gene expression in kiwifruit. PMID:26897117

  8. Accurate high-throughput identification of parallel G-quadruplex topology by a new tetraaryl-substituted imidazole.

    Hu, Ming-Hao; Chen, Shuo-Bin; Wang, Yu-Qing; Zeng, You-Mei; Ou, Tian-Miao; Li, Ding; Gu, Lian-Quan; Huang, Zhi-Shu; Tan, Jia-Heng

    2016-09-15

    G-quadruplex nucleic acids are four-stranded DNA or RNA secondary structures that are formed in guanine-rich sequences. These structures exhibit extensive structural polymorphism and play a pivotal role in the control of a variety of cellular processes. To date, diverse approaches for high-throughput identification of G-quadruplex structures have been successfully developed, but high-throughput methods for further characterization of their topologies are still lacking. In this study, we report a new tetra-arylimidazole probe psIZCM-1, which was found to display significant and distinctive changes in both the absorption and the fluorescence spectra in the presence of parallel G-quadruplexes but show insignificant changes upon interactions with anti-parallel G-quadruplexes or other non-quadruplex oligonucleotides. In view of this dual-output feature, we used psIZCM-1 to identify the parallel G-quadruplexes from a large set of 314 oligonucleotides (including 300 G-quadruplex-forming oligonucleotides and 14 non-quadruplex oligonucleotides) via a microplate reader and accordingly established a high-throughput method for the characterization of parallel G-quadruplex topologies. The accuracy of this method was greater than 95%, which was much higher than that of the commercial probe NMM. To make the approach more practical, we further combined psIZCM-1 with another G-quadruplex probe IZCM-7 to realize the high-throughput classification of parallel, anti-parallel G-quadruplexes and non-quadruplex structures. PMID:27104587

  9. Generalized method for probability-based peptide and protein identification from tandem mass spectrometry data and sequence database searching.

    Ramos-Fernández, Antonio; Paradela, Alberto; Navajas, Rosana; Albar, Juan Pablo

    2008-09-01

    Tandem mass spectrometry-based proteomics is currently in great demand of computational methods that facilitate the elimination of likely false positives in peptide and protein identification. In the last few years, a number of new peptide identification programs have been described, but scores or other significance measures reported by these programs cannot always be directly translated into an easy to interpret error rate measurement such as the false discovery rate. In this work we used generalized lambda distributions to model frequency distributions of database search scores computed by MASCOT, X!TANDEM with k-score plug-in, OMSSA, and InsPecT. From these distributions, we could successfully estimate p values and false discovery rates with high accuracy. From the set of peptide assignments reported by any of these engines, we also defined a generic protein scoring scheme that enabled accurate estimation of protein-level p values by simulation of random score distributions that was also found to yield good estimates of protein-level false discovery rate. The performance of these methods was evaluated by searching four freely available data sets ranging from 40,000 to 285,000 MS/MS spectra. PMID:18515861

  10. Identification of Candidate Genes related to Bovine Marbling using Protein-Protein Interaction Networks

    Dajeong Lim, Nam-Kuk Kim, Hye-Sun Park, Seung-Hwan Lee, Yong-Min Cho, Sung Jong Oh, Tae-Hun Kim, Heebal Kim

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Complex traits are determined by the combined effects of many loci and are affected by gene networks or biological pathways. Systems biology approaches have an important role in the identification of candidate genes related to complex diseases or traits at the system level. The present study systemically analyzed genes associated with bovine marbling score and identified their relationships. The candidate nodes were obtained using MedScan text-mining tools and linked by protein-protein interaction (PPI from the Human Protein Reference Database (HPRD. To determine key node of marbling, the degree and betweenness centrality (BC were used. The hub nodes and biological pathways of our network are consistent with the previous reports about marbling traits, and also suggest unknown candidate genes associated with intramuscular fat. Five nodes were identified as hub genes, which was consistent with the network analysis using quantitative reverse-transcription PCR (qRT-PCR. Key nodes of the PPI network have positive roles (PPARγ, C/EBPα, and RUNX1T1 and negative roles (RXRA, CAMK2A in the development of intramuscular fat by several adipogenesis-related pathways. This study provides genetic information for identifying candidate genes for the marbling trait in bovine.

  11. Identification of peptide and protein doping related drug compounds confiscated in Denmark between 2007-2013

    Andersen Hartvig Rune

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available We present an overview of protein and peptide compounds confiscated in Denmark from late 2007 till late 2013 together with a description of a newly developed HRAM-LC-MS method used for identification. As examples of identification, we present data for the peptides AOD-9604, [D-Ala2, Gln8, Ala15, Leu27]sermorelin and the protein follistatin. It was found that a method with minimum sample preparation could be implemented for all of the confiscated peptides and the protein somatropin. However, for the protein follistatin it was necessary to include trypsin digestion in the sample preparation, which considerably increases the overall analysis time.

  12. Identification of proteins in the postsynaptic density fraction by mass spectrometry

    Walikonis, R S; Jensen, Ole Nørregaard; Mann, M;

    2000-01-01

    previously known to be constituents of the PSD fraction and 24 that had previously been associated with the PSD by other methods. The newly identified proteins include the heavy chain of myosin-Va (dilute myosin), a motor protein thought to be involved in vesicle trafficking, and the mammalian homolog of the......Our understanding of the organization of postsynaptic signaling systems at excitatory synapses has been aided by the identification of proteins in the postsynaptic density (PSD) fraction, a subcellular fraction enriched in structures with the morphology of PSDs. In this study, we have completed the...... identification of most major proteins in the PSD fraction with the use of an analytical method based on mass spectrometry coupled with searching of the protein sequence databases. At least one protein in each of 26 prominent protein bands from the PSD fraction has now been identified. We found 7 proteins not...

  13. Hide and seek: Identification and confirmation of small molecule protein targets.

    Ursu, Andrei; Waldmann, Herbert

    2015-08-15

    Target identification and confirmation for small molecules is often the rate limiting step in drug discovery. A robust method to identify proteins addressed by small molecules is affinity chromatography using chemical probes. These usually consist of the compound of interest equipped with a linker molecule and a proper tag. Recently, methods emerged that allow the identification of protein targets without prior functionalization of the small molecule of interest. The digest offers an update on the newest developments in the area of target identification with special focus on confirmation techniques. PMID:26115575

  14. Identification and characterization of the surface proteins of Clostridium difficile

    Dailey, D.C.

    1988-01-01

    Several clostridial proteins were detected on the clostridial cell surface by sensitive radioiodination techniques. Two major proteins and six minor proteins comprised the radioiodinated proteins on the clostridial cell surface. Cellular fractionation of surface radiolabeled C. difficile determined that the radioiodinated proteins were found in the cell wall fraction of C. difficile and surprisingly were also present in the clostridial membrane. Furthermore, an interesting phenomenon of disulfide-crosslinking of the cell surface proteins of C. difficile was observed. Disulfide-linked protein complexes were found in both the membrane and cell wall fractions. In addition, the cell surface proteins of C. difficile were found to be released into the culture medium. In attempts to further characterize the clostridial proteins recombinant DNA techniques were employed. In addition, the role of the clostridial cell surface proteins in the interactions of C. difficile with human PMNs was also investigated.

  15. Identification and characterization of secreted proteins in Eimeria tenella

    Ramlee, Intan Azlinda; Firdaus-Raih, Mohd; Wan, Kiew-Lian

    2015-09-01

    Eimeria tenella is a protozoan parasite that causes coccidiosis, an economically important disease in the poultry industry. The characterization of proteins that are secreted by parasites have been shown to play important roles in parasite invasion and are considered to be potential control agents. In this study, 775 proteins potentially secreted by E. tenella were identified. These proteins were further filtered to remove mitochondrial proteins. Out of 763 putative secreted proteins, 259 proteins possess transmembrane domains while another 150 proteins have GPI (Glycosylphosphatidylinositol) anchors. Homology search revealed that 315 and 448 proteins have matches with known and hypothetical proteins in the database, respectively. Within this data set, previously characterized secretory proteins such as micronemes, rhoptry kinases and dense granules were detected.

  16. Identification and characterization of the surface proteins of Clostridium difficile

    Several clostridial proteins were detected on the clostridial cell surface by sensitive radioiodination techniques. Two major proteins and six minor proteins comprised the radioiodinated proteins on the clostridial cell surface. Cellular fractionation of surface radiolabeled C. difficile determined that the radioiodinated proteins were found in the cell wall fraction of C. difficile and surprisingly were also present in the clostridial membrane. Furthermore, an interesting phenomenon of disulfide-crosslinking of the cell surface proteins of C. difficile was observed. Disulfide-linked protein complexes were found in both the membrane and cell wall fractions. In addition, the cell surface proteins of C. difficile were found to be released into the culture medium. In attempts to further characterize the clostridial proteins recombinant DNA techniques were employed. In addition, the role of the clostridial cell surface proteins in the interactions of C. difficile with human PMNs was also investigated

  17. Proteomics - a novel approach to the identification and characterisation of plasmodesmatal proteins

    The development of proteomic methods, such as 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE), has established a high resolution means of identifying and characterising proteins from a given protein mixture. The biochemical composition of plasmodesmata, the intercellular channels between plant cells, is poorly described despite extensive attempts to identify protemaceous plasmodesmatal components. These attempts have been confounded by the large number of proteins in the cell wall. We have exploited the anatomy of the alga Chara corallina to separate tissues with (nodal cells) and tissues without (internodal cells) plasmodesmata. Proteins specific to the cytoplasmic and wall protein extracts of nodal and internodal tissue were identified by comparison of 2-DE gels of these extracts. In particular, a 95 kDa protein was identified as specific to the nodal cells in both 1-dimensional and 2-dimensional comparisons of cytoplasmic nodal and internodal protein extracts. This protein was analysed by electron spray ionization time of flight tandem mass spectroscopy (ESI-TOF MS/MS) and the sequence obtained showed similarity to plant lipoxygenases. Further proteins of interest were identified in 2-DE resolution of extracts from the nodal cytoplasm, including two 49 kDa proteins and two 46 kDa proteins, and from the nodal cell walls, including a cluster of proteins around 30 kDa. Thus, a proteomic strategy for the identification and characterisation of proteins specific to different cell types in Chara corallina has been developed, with potential application to the identification and characterisation of plasmodesmatal proteins

  18. Identification of phosphorylation sites in protein kinase A substrates using artificial neural networks and mass spectrometry

    Hjerrild, Majbrit; Stensballe, Allan; Rasmussen, Thomas E;

    2011-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation plays a key role in cell regulation and identification of phosphorylation sites is important for understanding their functional significance. Here, we present an artificial neural network algorithm: NetPhosK (http://www.cbs.dtu.dk/services/NetPhosK/) that predicts protein...

  19. IDENTIFICATION OF IMMUNOGENS OF 'MYCOPLASMA PNEUMONIAE' BY PROTEIN BLOTTING

    Proteins of Mycoplasma pneumoniae were separated by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and transferred to a nitrocellulose sheet by blotting. Sera obtained from infected hamsters and immunized rabbits were then incubated with the nitrocellulose strips. Proteins which are capa...

  20. Identification of lectin-binding proteins in Chlamydia species.

    Swanson, A F; Kuo, C. C.

    1990-01-01

    Lectin-binding proteins of chlamydiae were detected by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and immunoblotting. All three Chlamydia species tested expressed two proteins when whole-elementary-body lysates were reacted with the biotinylated lectin Dolichos biflorus agglutinin. The protein with a molecular mass of 18 kilodaltons (kDa) responded strongly compared with a higher-molecular-mass protein that varied from 27 to 32 kDa with each chlamydia strain tested. Among six l...

  1. Identification and Immunogenicity of Group A Streptococcus Culture Supernatant Proteins

    Lei, Benfang; Mackie, Stacy; Lukomski, Slawomir; Musser, James M.

    2000-01-01

    Extracellular proteins made by group A Streptococcus (GAS) play critical roles in the pathogenesis of human infections caused by this bacterium. Although many extracellular GAS proteins have been identified and characterized, there has been no systematic analysis of culture supernatant proteins. Proteins present in the culture supernatant of strains of serotype M1 (MGAS 5005) and M3 (MGAS 315) mutants lacking production of the major extracellular cysteine protease were separated by two-dimens...

  2. Towards an accurate bioimpedance identification

    Sánchez Terrones, Benjamín; Louarroudi, E.; Bragós Bardia, Ramon; Pintelon, Rik

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the local polynomial method (LPM) for estimating the time- invariant bioimpedance frequency response function (FRF) considering both the output-error (OE) and the errors-in-variables (EIV) identi cation framework and compare it with the traditional cross and autocorrelation spectral analysis techniques. The bioimpedance FRF is measured with the multisine electrical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) technique. To show the overwhelming accuracy of the LPM approach, both t...

  3. PSSP-RFE: accurate prediction of protein structural class by recursive feature extraction from PSI-BLAST profile, physical-chemical property and functional annotations.

    Liqi Li

    Full Text Available Protein structure prediction is critical to functional annotation of the massively accumulated biological sequences, which prompts an imperative need for the development of high-throughput technologies. As a first and key step in protein structure prediction, protein structural class prediction becomes an increasingly challenging task. Amongst most homological-based approaches, the accuracies of protein structural class prediction are sufficiently high for high similarity datasets, but still far from being satisfactory for low similarity datasets, i.e., below 40% in pairwise sequence similarity. Therefore, we present a novel method for accurate and reliable protein structural class prediction for both high and low similarity datasets. This method is based on Support Vector Machine (SVM in conjunction with integrated features from position-specific score matrix (PSSM, PROFEAT and Gene Ontology (GO. A feature selection approach, SVM-RFE, is also used to rank the integrated feature vectors through recursively removing the feature with the lowest ranking score. The definitive top features selected by SVM-RFE are input into the SVM engines to predict the structural class of a query protein. To validate our method, jackknife tests were applied to seven widely used benchmark datasets, reaching overall accuracies between 84.61% and 99.79%, which are significantly higher than those achieved by state-of-the-art tools. These results suggest that our method could serve as an accurate and cost-effective alternative to existing methods in protein structural classification, especially for low similarity datasets.

  4. Identification of Renibacterium salmoninarum surface proteins by radioiodination.

    Fredriksen, A; Bakken, V

    1994-09-01

    Surface exposed proteins of Renibacterium salmoninarum were identified by radiolabelling whole bacterial cells with 125I, followed by SDS-PAGE and autoradiography. The most prominent bands had molecular masses of approximately 57 kDa and 22 kDa; in addition, some less intensively labelled bands were detected. Polyclonal sera raised against the 22 kDa protein did not react with the 57 kDa protein. N-terminal amino acid sequence analysis of the purified 22 kDa protein showed no similarity with the sequence of the 57 kDa protein. PMID:7926685

  5. Identification of Posttranslational Modification-Dependent Protein Interactions Using Yeast Surface Displayed Human Proteome Libraries

    Bidlingmaier, Scott; Liu, Bin

    2016-01-01

    The identification of proteins that interact specifically with posttranslational modifications such as phosphorylation is often necessary to understand cellular signaling pathways. Numerous methods for identifying proteins that interact with posttranslational modifications have been utilized, including affinity-based purification and analysis, protein microarrays, phage display, and tethered catalysis. Although these techniques have been used successfully, each has limitations. Recently, yeast surface-displayed human proteome libraries have been utilized to identify protein fragments with affinity for various target molecules, including phosphorylated peptides. When coupled with fluorescently activated cell sorting and high throughput methods for the analysis of selection outputs, yeast surface-displayed human proteome libraries can rapidly and efficiently identify protein fragments with affinity for any soluble ligand that can be fluorescently detected, including posttranslational modifications. In this review we compare the use of yeast surface display libraries to other methods for the identification of interactions between proteins and posttranslational modifications and discuss future applications of the technology. PMID:26060076

  6. Development of a strategy for the identification of surface proteins in the pathogenic microsporidian Nosema bombycis.

    Zhao, Weixi; Hao, Youjin; Wang, Linglin; Zhou, Zeyang; Li, Zhi

    2015-06-01

    Parasite-host interactions mediated by cell surface proteins have been implicated as a critical step in infections caused by the microsporidian Nosema bombycis. Such cell surface proteins are considered as promising diagnostic markers and targets for drug development. However, little research has specifically addressed surface proteome identification in microsporidia due to technical barriers. Here, a combined strategy was developed to separate and identify the surface proteins of N. bombycis. Briefly, following (1) biotinylation of the spore surface, (2) extraction of total proteins with an optimized method and (3) streptavidin affinity purification of biotinylated proteins, 22 proteins were identified based on LC-MS/MS analysis. Among them, 5 proteins were confirmed to be localized on the surface of N. bombycis. A total of 8 proteins were identified as hypothetical extracellular proteins, whereas 7 other hypothetical proteins had no available function annotation. Furthermore, a protein with a molecular weight of 18·5 kDa was localized on the spore surface by western blotting and immunofluorescence analysis, even though it was predicted to be a nuclear protein by bioinformatics. Collectively, our work provides an effective strategy for isolating microsporidian surface protein components for both drug target identification and further diagnostic research on microsporidian disease control. PMID:25811320

  7. Comprehensive Identification of Immunodominant Proteins of Brucella abortus and Brucella melitensis Using Antibodies in the Sera from Naturally Infected Hosts

    Wareth, Gamal; Eravci, Murat; Weise, Christoph; Roesler, Uwe; Melzer, Falk; Sprague, Lisa D.; Neubauer, Heinrich; Murugaiyan, Jayaseelan

    2016-01-01

    Brucellosis is a debilitating zoonotic disease that affects humans and animals. The diagnosis of brucellosis is challenging, as accurate species level identification is not possible with any of the currently available serology-based diagnostic methods. The present study aimed at identifying Brucella (B.) species-specific proteins from the closely related species B. abortus and B. melitensis using sera collected from naturally infected host species. Unlike earlier reported investigations with either laboratory-grown species or vaccine strains, in the present study, field strains were utilized for analysis. The label-free quantitative proteomic analysis of the naturally isolated strains of these two closely related species revealed 402 differentially expressed proteins, among which 63 and 103 proteins were found exclusively in the whole cell extracts of B. abortus and B. melitensis field strains, respectively. The sera from four different naturally infected host species, i.e., cattle, buffalo, sheep, and goat were applied to identify the immune-binding protein spots present in the whole protein extracts from the isolated B. abortus and B. melitensis field strains and resolved on two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Comprehensive analysis revealed that 25 proteins of B. abortus and 20 proteins of B. melitensis were distinctly immunoreactive. Dihydrodipicolinate synthase, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and lactate/malate dehydrogenase from B. abortus, amino acid ABC transporter substrate-binding protein from B. melitensis and fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase from both species were reactive with the sera of all the tested naturally infected host species. The identified proteins could be used for the design of serological assays capable of detecting pan-Brucella, B. abortus- and B. melitensis-specific antibodies. PMID:27144565

  8. Comprehensive Identification of Immunodominant Proteins of Brucella abortus and Brucella melitensis Using Antibodies in the Sera from Naturally Infected Hosts

    Gamal Wareth

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Brucellosis is a debilitating zoonotic disease that affects humans and animals. The diagnosis of brucellosis is challenging, as accurate species level identification is not possible with any of the currently available serology-based diagnostic methods. The present study aimed at identifying Brucella (B. species-specific proteins from the closely related species B. abortus and B. melitensis using sera collected from naturally infected host species. Unlike earlier reported investigations with either laboratory-grown species or vaccine strains, in the present study, field strains were utilized for analysis. The label-free quantitative proteomic analysis of the naturally isolated strains of these two closely related species revealed 402 differentially expressed proteins, among which 63 and 103 proteins were found exclusively in the whole cell extracts of B. abortus and B. melitensis field strains, respectively. The sera from four different naturally infected host species, i.e., cattle, buffalo, sheep, and goat were applied to identify the immune-binding protein spots present in the whole protein extracts from the isolated B. abortus and B. melitensis field strains and resolved on two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Comprehensive analysis revealed that 25 proteins of B. abortus and 20 proteins of B. melitensis were distinctly immunoreactive. Dihydrodipicolinate synthase, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and lactate/malate dehydrogenase from B. abortus, amino acid ABC transporter substrate-binding protein from B. melitensis and fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase from both species were reactive with the sera of all the tested naturally infected host species. The identified proteins could be used for the design of serological assays capable of detecting pan-Brucella, B. abortus- and B. melitensis-specific antibodies.

  9. Comprehensive Identification of Immunodominant Proteins of Brucella abortus and Brucella melitensis Using Antibodies in the Sera from Naturally Infected Hosts.

    Wareth, Gamal; Eravci, Murat; Weise, Christoph; Roesler, Uwe; Melzer, Falk; Sprague, Lisa D; Neubauer, Heinrich; Murugaiyan, Jayaseelan

    2016-01-01

    Brucellosis is a debilitating zoonotic disease that affects humans and animals. The diagnosis of brucellosis is challenging, as accurate species level identification is not possible with any of the currently available serology-based diagnostic methods. The present study aimed at identifying Brucella (B.) species-specific proteins from the closely related species B. abortus and B. melitensis using sera collected from naturally infected host species. Unlike earlier reported investigations with either laboratory-grown species or vaccine strains, in the present study, field strains were utilized for analysis. The label-free quantitative proteomic analysis of the naturally isolated strains of these two closely related species revealed 402 differentially expressed proteins, among which 63 and 103 proteins were found exclusively in the whole cell extracts of B. abortus and B. melitensis field strains, respectively. The sera from four different naturally infected host species, i.e., cattle, buffalo, sheep, and goat were applied to identify the immune-binding protein spots present in the whole protein extracts from the isolated B. abortus and B. melitensis field strains and resolved on two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Comprehensive analysis revealed that 25 proteins of B. abortus and 20 proteins of B. melitensis were distinctly immunoreactive. Dihydrodipicolinate synthase, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and lactate/malate dehydrogenase from B. abortus, amino acid ABC transporter substrate-binding protein from B. melitensis and fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase from both species were reactive with the sera of all the tested naturally infected host species. The identified proteins could be used for the design of serological assays capable of detecting pan-Brucella, B. abortus- and B. melitensis-specific antibodies. PMID:27144565

  10. Computational Identification of Post Translational Modification Regulated RNA Binding Protein Motifs.

    Andrew S Brown

    Full Text Available RNA and its associated RNA binding proteins (RBPs mitigate a diverse array of cellular functions and phenotypes. The interactions between RNA and RBPs are implicated in many roles of biochemical processing by the cell such as localization, protein translation, and RNA stability. Recent discoveries of novel mechanisms that are of significant evolutionary advantage between RBPs and RNA include the interaction of the RBP with the 3' and 5' untranslated region (UTR of target mRNA. These mechanisms are shown to function through interaction of a trans-factor (RBP and a cis-regulatory element (3' or 5' UTR by the binding of a RBP to a regulatory-consensus nucleic acid motif region that is conserved throughout evolution. Through signal transduction, regulatory RBPs are able to temporarily dissociate from their target sites on mRNAs and induce translation, typically through a post-translational modification (PTM. These small, regulatory motifs located in the UTR of mRNAs are subject to a loss-of-function due to single polymorphisms or other mutations that disrupt the motif and inhibit the ability to associate into the complex with RBPs. The identification of a consensus motif for a given RBP is difficult, time consuming, and requires a significant degree of experimentation to identify each motif-containing gene on a genomic scale. We have developed a computational algorithm to analyze high-throughput genomic arrays that contain differential binding induced by a PTM for a RBP of interest-RBP-PTM Target Scan (RPTS. We demonstrate the ability of this application to accurately predict a PTM-specific binding motif to an RBP that has no antibody capable of distinguishing the PTM of interest, negating the use of in-vitro exonuclease digestion techniques.

  11. Modification of resolution in capillary electrophoresis for protein profiling in identification of genetic modification in foods

    Latoszek, A.; Cifuentes, Alejandro

    2011-01-01

    The capillary electrophoresis with UV detection was employed for protein profiling in extracts from maize and soybeans. Modifications of back-ground electrolyte and coating the capillary wall with polybrene was employed in order to decrease the protein adsorption on the capillary walls. The obtained protein profiles were compared for transgenic and non-transgenic variants, showing in some cases significant changes that might be employed for identification of genetic modifications ...

  12. Identification of urinary protein biomarkers for tobacco smoking.

    Haniff, Aj Nabill; Gam, Lay-Harn

    2016-03-01

    Smoking, passive smoking, and nonsmoking are conditions that give different degrees of stress to the body. In this study, a proteomic technique was used to analyze differentially urinary protein expression between these three groups of subjects. Urinary proteins were precipitated using ammonium sulfate followed by separation according to molecular weights using SDS-PAGE. The gel was stained by Coommassie blue, and the image of the gel was captured for the comparison study. The protein bands that were consistently detected but expressed at different intensity between the smokers and nonsmokers were targeted for further analysis. Three targeted protein bands were excised from the gel, consisting of a unique protein band of smokers and a pair of differentially expressed protein bands from smokers and nonsmokers. The proteins were digested in gel by trypsin. The tryptic peptides were analyzed with ultra performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Protein identity was determined by the product ion spectrum in the MS/MS scan. Four unique proteins from the smokers, namely, pancreatic alpha amylase, proepidermal growth factor, protein 4.1, and prostatic acid phosphatase, were found to be potential urinary biomarkers to indicate smoking status of a person. PMID:25640279

  13. A nested mixture model for protein identification using mass spectrometry

    Li, Qunhua; Stephens, Matthew; 10.1214/09-AOAS316

    2010-01-01

    Mass spectrometry provides a high-throughput way to identify proteins in biological samples. In a typical experiment, proteins in a sample are first broken into their constituent peptides. The resulting mixture of peptides is then subjected to mass spectrometry, which generates thousands of spectra, each characteristic of its generating peptide. Here we consider the problem of inferring, from these spectra, which proteins and peptides are present in the sample. We develop a statistical approach to the problem, based on a nested mixture model. In contrast to commonly used two-stage approaches, this model provides a one-stage solution that simultaneously identifies which proteins are present, and which peptides are correctly identified. In this way our model incorporates the evidence feedback between proteins and their constituent peptides. Using simulated data and a yeast data set, we compare and contrast our method with existing widely used approaches (PeptideProphet/ProteinProphet) and with a recently publis...

  14. Identification of an epitope of SARS-coronavirus nucleocapsid protein

    YING LIN; JIN WANG; HONG XIA WANG; HUA LIANG JIANG; JIAN HUA SHEN; YOU HUA XIE; YUAN WANG; GANG PEI; BEI FEN SHEN; JIA RUI WU; BING SUN; XU SHEN; RUI FU YANG; YI XUE LI; YONG YONG JI; YOU YU HE; MUDE SHI; WEI LU; TIE LIU SHI

    2003-01-01

    The nucleocapsid (N) protein of severe acute respiratory syndrome-coronavirus (SARS-CoV) is a majorvirion structural protein. In this study, two epitopes (N1 and N2) of the N protein of SARS-CoV werepredicted by bioinformatics analysis. After immunization with two peptides, the peptides-specific antibodieswere isolated from the immunized rabbits. The further experiments demonstrated that N1 peptide-inducedpolyclonal antibodies had a high affinity to bind to E. coli expressed N protein of SARS-CoV. Furthermore, itwas confirmed that N1 peptide-specific IgG antibodies were detectable in the sera of severe acute respiratorysyndrome (SARS) patients. The results indicated that an epitope of the N protein has been identified andN protein specific Abs were produced by peptide immunization, which will be useful for the study of SARS-CoV.

  15. Identification of new centrosome proteins by autoimmune patient sera

    XIA Liang; LI Yan; YANG Dong; WANG LiMin; HE Fang; ZHOU ChunYuan; LI YongZhe; ZENG ChangQing; He DaCheng

    2007-01-01

    Compared to other subcellular organelles, centrosome proteome can hardly be studied, due to the difficulties in separation and purification of centrosome. Auto-antisera from 6 autoimmune patients, which recognized centrosome specifically in immunofluorescence, were used to identify the corresponding centrosomal proteins. The sera were first tested by Western blot on whole cell lysate, and all bound antibodies were then eluted from each single band in Western blot membrane to assure which antibody was responsible for the centrosome specific immunofluorescence staining. The corresponding proteins were obtained by immunoprecipitation and identified by mass spectrometry. Six centrosomal proteins, including 2 known centrosomal proteins and 4 proteins with unknown localization or reportedly non-centrosomal localization, were identified. These proteins apparently involve in cell cycle regulation, signal transduction pathways, molecular chaperons, and metabolism enzymes, which may reflect the expected functional diversity of centrosome.

  16. Identification of Major Outer Surface Proteins of Streptococcus agalactiae

    Hughes, Martin J. G.; Moore, Joanne C.; Lane, Jonathan D.; Wilson, Rebecca; Pribul, Philippa K.; Younes, Zabin N.; Dobson, Richard J; Everest, Paul; Reason, Andrew J.; Redfern, Joanne M.; Greer, Fiona M.; Paxton, Thanai; Panico, Maria; Morris, Howard R; Feldman, Robert G.

    2002-01-01

    To identify the major outer surface proteins of Streptococcus agalactiae (group B streptococcus), a proteomic analysis was undertaken. An extract of the outer surface proteins was separated by two-dimensional electrophoresis. The visualized spots were identified through a combination of peptide sequencing and reverse genetic methodologies. Of the 30 major spots identified as S. agalactiae specific, 27 have been identified. Six of these proteins, previously unidentified in S. agalactiae, were ...

  17. Identification of three novel Toxoplasma gondii rhoptry proteins

    Camejo, Ana; Gold, Daniel A.; Lu, Diana; McFetridge, Kiva; Julien, Lindsay; Yang, Ninghan; Jensen, Kirk D. C.; Jeroen P J Saeij

    2013-01-01

    The rhoptries are key secretory organelles from apicomplexan parasites that contain proteins involved in invasion and modulation of the host cell. Some rhoptry proteins are restricted to the posterior bulb (ROPs) and others to the anterior neck (RONs). As many rhoptry proteins have been shown to be key players in Toxoplasma invasion and virulence, it is important to identify, understand and characterize the biological function of the components of the rhoptries. In this report, we identified ...

  18. Identification of proteins in fluid collected from nerve regeneration chambers

    Ye Yilin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We examined whether there are novel neurotrophic factors (NTFs in nerve regeneration conditioned fluid (NRCF. Nerve regeneration chamber models were established in the sciatic nerves of 25 New Zealand rabbits, and NRCF was extracted from the chambers l week postoperatively. Proteins in NRCF were separated by native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE, and Western blot and ELISA were used to identify the proteins. A novel NTF was identified in a protein fraction corresponding to 220 kDa.

  19. An effective approach for identification of in vivo protein-DNA binding sites from paired-end ChIP-Seq data

    Wilson Zoe A

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background ChIP-Seq, which combines chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP with high-throughput massively parallel sequencing, is increasingly being used for identification of protein-DNA interactions in vivo in the genome. However, to maximize the effectiveness of data analysis of such sequences requires the development of new algorithms that are able to accurately predict DNA-protein binding sites. Results Here, we present SIPeS (Site Identification from Paired-end Sequencing, a novel algorithm for precise identification of binding sites from short reads generated by paired-end solexa ChIP-Seq technology. In this paper we used ChIP-Seq data from the Arabidopsis basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor ABORTED MICROSPORES (AMS, which is expressed within the anther during pollen development, the results show that SIPeS has better resolution for binding site identification compared to two existing ChIP-Seq peak detection algorithms, Cisgenome and MACS. Conclusions When compared to Cisgenome and MACS, SIPeS shows better resolution for binding site discovery. Moreover, SIPeS is designed to calculate the mappable genome length accurately with the fragment length based on the paired-end reads. Dynamic baselines are also employed to effectively discriminate closely adjacent binding sites, for effective binding sites discovery, which is of particular value when working with high-density genomes.

  20. Optimization of Data-Dependent Parameters for LC-MS/MS Protein Identification

    Orlando, R; Johnson, D

    2011-01-01

    A typical bottom-up protein identification workflow involves proteolytic digestion followed by identification of the resulting peptides by LC-MS/MS using data-dependent acquisition (DDA). Recent developments in chromatography, such as uHPLC and superficially porous Fused-core particles, offer significantly improved peptide resolutions. The narrow peak widths, often only several seconds, can permit a 15 minute LC run to have a similar peak capacity as a 60 minute run using a traditional HPLC a...

  1. Proteomics of Soil and Sediment: Protein Identification by De Novo Sequencing of Mass Spectra Complements Traditional Database Searching

    Miller, S.; Rizzo, A. I.; Waldbauer, J.

    2015-12-01

    Proteomics has the potential to elucidate the metabolic pathways and taxa responsible for in situ biogeochemical transformations. However, low rates of protein identification from high resolution mass spectra have been a barrier to the development of proteomics in complex environmental samples. Much of the difficulty lies in the computational challenge of linking mass spectra to their corresponding proteins. Traditional database search methods for matching peptide sequences to mass spectra are often inadequate due to the complexity of environmental proteomes and the large database search space, as we demonstrate with soil and sediment proteomes generated via a range of extraction methods. One alternative to traditional database searching is de novo sequencing, which identifies peptide sequences without the need for a database. BLAST can then be used to match de novo sequences to similar genetic sequences. Assigning confidence to putative identifications has been one hurdle for the implementation of de novo sequencing. We found that accurate de novo sequences can be screened by quality score and length. Screening criteria are verified by comparing the results of de novo sequencing and traditional database searching for well-characterized proteomes from simple biological systems. The BLAST hits of screened sequences are interrogated for taxonomic and functional information. We applied de novo sequencing to organic topsoil and marine sediment proteomes. Peak-rich proteomes, which can result from various extraction techniques, yield thousands of high-confidence protein identifications, an improvement over previous proteomic studies of soil and sediment. User-friendly software tools for de novo metaproteomics analysis have been developed. This "De Novo Analysis" Pipeline is also a faster method of data analysis than constructing a tailored sequence database for traditional database searching.

  2. Identification of Treponema pallidum penicillin-binding proteins.

    Cunningham, T M; Miller, J N; Lovett, M A

    1987-01-01

    Penicillin-binding proteins of 180, 89, 80, 68, 61, 41, and 38 kilodaltons were identified in Treponema pallidum (Nichols) by their covalent binding of [35S]benzylpenicillin. Penicillin-binding proteins are localized in the plasma membranes of many bacterial species and may serve as useful markers for determining plasma membrane intactness in T. pallidum fractionation studies.

  3. Identification of new Palmitoylated Proteins in Toxoplasma gondii

    Caballero, Marina C.; Alonso, Andrés M.; Deng, Bin; Attias, Marcia; de Souza, Wanderley; Corvi, María M.

    2016-01-01

    Protein palmitoylation has been shown to be an important post-translational modification in eukaryotic cells. This modification alters the localization and/or the function of the targeted protein. In the recent years protein palmitoylation has risen in importance in apicomplexan parasites as well. In Toxoplasma gondii, some proteins have been reported to be modified by palmitate. With the development of new techniques that allow the isolation of palmitoylated proteins, this significant post-translational modification has begun to be studied in more detail in T. gondii. Here we describe the palmitoylome of the tachyzoite stage of T. gondii using a combination of the acyl-biotin exchange chemistry method and mass spectrometry analysis. We identified 401 proteins found in multiple cellular compartments, with a wide range of functions that vary from metabolic processes, gliding and host-cell invasion to even regulation of transcription and translation. Besides, we found that more rhoptry proteins than the ones already described for Toxoplasma are palmitoylated, suggesting an important role for this modification in the invasion mechanism of the host-cell. This study documents that protein palmitoylation is a common modification in T. gondii that could have an impact on different cellular processes. PMID:26825284

  4. Identification of SNARE proteins in fish-Tilapia Oreochromis niloticus

    HUANG Xiaohang; LAM Patrick P L; LIN Xuezheng; LIU Chenlin; BIAN Ji; GAISANO Herbert

    2007-01-01

    SNARE proteins are a group of membrane-associated proteins involved in exocytosis, secretion and membrane trafficking events in eukaryotic cells. Research on SNARE protein biology has become a more attractive field in recent years, which is applied to marine biology specifically to the fish Tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus). Plasma membrane fractions of different tissues of Tilapia, including brain, liver-pancreas, intestine, skin and muscle, were extracted, and immuno-decorated with isoform-specific antibodies to the SNARE families and associated proteins. The presence of Syntaxins -1A, 2 and 3, SNAP-23 and SNAP-25, VAMP-2, Munc-18-1 and Munc-13 in the brain was identified, which were differentially distributed in the other organ tissues of the fish Tilapia. The distinct distribution of SNARE and associated proteins will serve as the basis for further investigation into their special secretory function in these tissues of the fish.

  5. Serum protein identification and quantification of the corona of 5, 15 and 80 nm gold nanoparticles

    When nanoparticles (NP) enter the body they come into contact with body fluids containing proteins which can adsorb to their surface. These proteins may influence the NP interactions with the biological vicinity, eventually determining their biological fate inside the body. Adsorption of the most abundantly binding proteins was studied after an in vitro 24 hr incubation of monodisperse, negatively charged 5, 15 and 80 nm gold spheres (AuNP) in mouse serum by a two-step analysis: proteomic protein identification and quantitative protein biochemistry. The adsorbed proteins were separated from non-adsorbed proteins by centrifugation and gel electrophoresis and identified using a MALDI-TOF-MS-Proteomics-Analyzer. Quantitative analysis of proteins in gel bands by protein densitometry, required the focus on predominantly binding serum proteins. Numerous proteins adsorbed to the AuNP depending on their size, e.g. apolipoproteins or complement C3. The qualitative and quantitative amount of adsorbed proteins differed between 5, 15 and 80 nm AuNP. Band intensities of adsorbed proteins decreased with increasing AuNP sizes based not only on their mass but also on their surface area. Summarizing, the AuNP surface is covered with serum proteins containing transport and immune related proteins among others. Hence, protein binding depends on the size, surface area and curvature of the AuNP. (paper)

  6. Method for identification of rigid domains and hinge residues in proteins based on exhaustive enumeration.

    Sim, Jaehyun; Sim, Jun; Park, Eunsung; Lee, Julian

    2015-06-01

    Many proteins undergo large-scale motions where relatively rigid domains move against each other. The identification of rigid domains, as well as the hinge residues important for their relative movements, is important for various applications including flexible docking simulations. In this work, we develop a method for protein rigid domain identification based on an exhaustive enumeration of maximal rigid domains, the rigid domains not fully contained within other domains. The computation is performed by mapping the problem to that of finding maximal cliques in a graph. A minimal set of rigid domains are then selected, which cover most of the protein with minimal overlap. In contrast to the results of existing methods that partition a protein into non-overlapping domains using approximate algorithms, the rigid domains obtained from exact enumeration naturally contain overlapping regions, which correspond to the hinges of the inter-domain bending motion. The performance of the algorithm is demonstrated on several proteins. PMID:25820699

  7. Mass spectrometric identification of proteins and characterization of their post-translational modifications in proteome analysis

    Roepstorff, P; Larsen, Martin Røssel

    2001-01-01

    more than 425.000 protein sequences. However, the cellular functions are determined by the set of proteins expressed in the cell--the proteome. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, mass spectrometry and bioinformatics have become important tools in correlating the proteome with the genome. The current...... dominant strategies for identification of proteins from gels based on peptide mass spectrometric fingerprinting and partial sequencing by mass spectrometry are described. After identification of the proteins the next challenge in proteome analysis is characterization of their post-translational...... modifications. The general problems associated with characterization of these directly from gel separated proteins are described and the current state of art for the determination of phosphorylation, glycosylation and proteolytic processing is illustrated....

  8. An automated stochastic approach to the identification of the protein specificity determinants and functional subfamilies

    Rakhmaninova Aleksandra B

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent progress in sequencing and 3 D structure determination techniques stimulated development of approaches aimed at more precise annotation of proteins, that is, prediction of exact specificity to a ligand or, more broadly, to a binding partner of any kind. Results We present a method, SDPclust, for identification of protein functional subfamilies coupled with prediction of specificity-determining positions (SDPs. SDPclust predicts specificity in a phylogeny-independent stochastic manner, which allows for the correct identification of the specificity for proteins that are separated on a phylogenetic tree, but still bind the same ligand. SDPclust is implemented as a Web-server http://bioinf.fbb.msu.ru/SDPfoxWeb/ and a stand-alone Java application available from the website. Conclusions SDPclust performs a simultaneous identification of specificity determinants and specificity groups in a statistically robust and phylogeny-independent manner.

  9. Identification of Uropathogenic Escherichia coli Surface Proteins by Shotgun Proteomics

    Walters, Matthew S.; Mobley, Harry L. T.

    2009-01-01

    Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) cause the majority of uncomplicated urinary tract infections in humans. In the process of identifying candidate antigens for a vaccine, two methods for the identification of the UPEC surface proteome during growth in human urine were investigated. The first approach utilized a protease to ‘shave’ surface-exposed peptides from the bacterial cell surface and identify them by mass spectrometry. Although this approach has been successfully applied to a Gram-p...

  10. Identification and Characterization of Proteins Associated with Plant Tolerance to Heat Stress

    Bingru Huang; Chenping Xu

    2008-01-01

    Heat stress is a major abiotic stress limiting plant growth and productivity in many areas of the world. Understanding mechanisms of plant adaptation to heat stress would facilitate the development of heat-tolerant cultivars for improving productivity in warm climatic regions. Protein metabolism involving protein synthesis and degradation is one of the most sensitive processes to heat stress. Changes in the level and expression pattern of some proteins may play an important role in plant adaptation to heat stress. The identification of stress-responsive proteins and pathways has been facilitated by an increasing number of tools and resources, including two-dimensional electrophoresis and mass spectrometry, and the rapidly expanding nucleotide and amino acid sequence databases. Heat stress may induce or enhance protein expression or cause protein degradation. The induction of heat-responsive proteins, particularly heat shock proteins (HSPs), plays a key role in plant tolerance to heat stress. Protein degradation involving various proteases is also important in regulating plant responses to heat stress. This review provides an overview of recent research on proteomic profiling for the identification of heat-responsive proteins associated with heat tolerance, heat induction and characteristics of HSPs, and protein degradation in relation to plant responses to heat stress.

  11. Identification of novel amelogenin-binding proteins by proteomics analysis.

    Takao Fukuda

    Full Text Available Emdogain (enamel matrix derivative, EMD is well recognized in periodontology. It is used in periodontal surgery to regenerate cementum, periodontal ligament, and alveolar bone. However, the precise molecular mechanisms underlying periodontal regeneration are still unclear. In this study, we investigated the proteins bound to amelogenin, which are suggested to play a pivotal role in promoting periodontal tissue regeneration. To identify new molecules that interact with amelogenin and are involved in osteoblast activation, we employed coupling affinity chromatography with proteomic analysis in fractionated SaOS-2 osteoblastic cell lysate. In SaOS-2 cells, many of the amelogenin-interacting proteins in the cytoplasm were mainly cytoskeletal proteins and several chaperone molecules of heat shock protein 70 (HSP70 family. On the other hand, the proteomic profiles of amelogenin-interacting proteins in the membrane fraction of the cell extracts were quite different from those of the cytosolic-fraction. They were mainly endoplasmic reticulum (ER-associated proteins, with lesser quantities of mitochondrial proteins and nucleoprotein. Among the identified amelogenin-interacting proteins, we validated the biological interaction of amelogenin with glucose-regulated protein 78 (Grp78/Bip, which was identified in both cytosolic and membrane-enriched fractions. Confocal co-localization experiment strongly suggested that Grp78/Bip could be an amelogenin receptor candidate. Further biological evaluations were examined by Grp78/Bip knockdown analysis with and without amelogenin. Within the limits of the present study, the interaction of amelogenin with Grp78/Bip contributed to cell proliferation, rather than correlate with the osteogenic differentiation in SaOS-2 cells. Although the biological significance of other interactions are not yet explored, these findings suggest that the differential effects of amelogenin-derived osteoblast activation could be of

  12. Identification of outer membrane proteins of Bartonella bacilliformis.

    Minnick, M F

    1994-01-01

    Purification of the outer membrane of Bartonella bacilliformis by sucrose step gradient centrifugation and analysis by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) suggest that 14 proteins, ranging from 11.2 to 75.3 kDa, are located in the outer membrane of the pathogen. On the basis of M(r)s, eleven of these proteins have counterparts which are labeled by extrinsic radioiodination of intact bartonellae, and two of the proteins are visibly sensitive to extrinsic protei...

  13. Simple method for identification of plasmid-coded proteins

    Proteins encoded by plasmid DNA are specifically labeled in uv-irradiated cells of Escherichia coli carrying recA and uvrA mutations because extensive degradation of the chromosome DNA occurs concurrently with amplification of plasmid DNA

  14. Proteomic identification of S-nitrosylated proteins in Arabidopsis

    Lindermayr, C.; Saalbach, G.; Durner, J.

    2005-01-01

    one of the dominant regulation mechanisms for many animal proteins. For plants, the principle of S-nitrosylation remained to be elucidated. We generated S-nitrosothiols by treating extracts from Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) cell suspension cultures with the NO-donor S......Although nitric oxide (NO) has grown into a key signaling molecule in plants during the last few years, less is known about how NO regulates different events in plants. Analyses of NO-dependent processes in animal systems have demonstrated protein S-nitrosylation of cysteine (Cys) residues to be......-nitrosoglutathione. Furthermore, Arabidopsis plants were treated with gaseous NO to analyze whether S-nitrosylation can occur in the specific redox environment of a plant cell in vivo. S-Nitrosylated proteins were detected by a biotin switch method, converting S-nitrosylated Cys to biotinylated Cys. Biotin-labeled proteins were...

  15. Identification and characterization of Vibrio cholerae surface proteins by radioiodination

    Whole cells and isolated outer membrane from Vibrio cholerae (Classical, Inaba) were radiolabeled with Iodogen or Iodo-beads as catalyst. Radiolabeling of whole cells was shown to be surface specific by sodium dodecyl sulfate-urea polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of whole cells and cell fractions. Surface-labeled whole cells regularly showed 16 distinguishable protein species, of which nine were found in radiolabeled outer membrane preparations obtained by a lithium chloride- lithium acetate procedure. Eight of these proteins were found in outer membranes prepared by sucrose density gradient centrifugation and Triton X-100 extraction of radiolabeled whole cells. The mobility of several proteins was shown to be affected by temperature, and the major protein species exposed on the cell surface was shown to consist of at least two different peptides

  16. aPPRove: An HMM-Based Method for Accurate Prediction of RNA-Pentatricopeptide Repeat Protein Binding Events

    Harrison, Thomas; Ruiz, Jaime; Sloan, Daniel B.; Ben-Hur, Asa; Boucher, Christina

    2016-01-01

    Pentatricopeptide repeat containing proteins (PPRs) bind to RNA transcripts originating from mitochondria and plastids. There are two classes of PPR proteins. The P class contains tandem P-type motif sequences, and the PLS class contains alternating P, L and S type sequences. In this paper, we describe a novel tool that predicts PPR-RNA interaction; specifically, our method, which we call aPPRove, determines where and how a PLS-class PPR protein will bind to RNA when given a PPR and one or more RNA transcripts by using a combinatorial binding code for site specificity proposed by Barkan et al. Our results demonstrate that aPPRove successfully locates how and where a PPR protein belonging to the PLS class can bind to RNA. For each binding event it outputs the binding site, the amino-acid-nucleotide interaction, and its statistical significance. Furthermore, we show that our method can be used to predict binding events for PLS-class proteins using a known edit site and the statistical significance of aligning the PPR protein to that site. In particular, we use our method to make a conjecture regarding an interaction between CLB19 and the second intronic region of ycf3. The aPPRove web server can be found at www.cs.colostate.edu/~approve. PMID:27560805

  17. Uromodulin Exclusion List Improves Urinary Exosomal Protein Identification

    Hiemstra, Thomas F.; Charles, Philip D.; Hester, Svenja S.; Karet, Fiona E.; Lilley, Kathryn S

    2011-01-01

    Advances in mass spectrometry (MS) have encouraged interest in its deployment in urine biomarker studies, but success has been limited. Urine exosomes have been proposed as an ideal source of biomarkers for renal disease. However, the abundant urinary protein, uromodulin, cofractionates with exosomes during isolation and represents a practical contaminant that limits MS sensitivity. Uromodulin depletion has been attempted but is labor- and time-intensive and may remove important protein bioma...

  18. Identification of Drought-Responsive Universal Stress Proteins in Viridiplantae

    Isokpehi, Raphael D.; Simmons, Shaneka S.; Cohly, Hari H. P.; Ekunwe, Stephen I.N.; Begonia, Gregorio B.; Ayensu, Wellington K.

    2011-01-01

    Genes encoding proteins that contain the universal stress protein (USP) domain are known to provide bacteria, archaea, fungi, protozoa, and plants with the ability to respond to a plethora of environmental stresses. Specifically in plants, drought tolerance is a desirable phenotype. However, limited focused and organized functional genomic datasets exist on drought-responsive plant USP genes to facilitate their characterization. The overall objective of the investigation was to identify diver...

  19. Identification and characterization of the pseudorabies virus UL43 protein

    Among the least characterized herpesvirus membrane proteins are the homologs of UL43 of herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1). To identify and characterize the UL43 protein of pseudorabies virus (PrV), part of the open reading frame was expressed in Escherichia coli and used for immunization of a rabbit. The antiserum recognized in Western blots a 34-kDa protein in lysates of PrV infected cells and purified virions, demonstrating that the UL43 protein is a virion component. In indirect immunofluorescence analysis, the antiserum labeled vesicular structures in PrV infected cells which also contained glycoprotein B. To functionally analyze UL43, a deletion mutant was constructed lacking amino acids 23-332 of the 373aa protein. This mutant was only slightly impaired in replication as assayed by one-step growth kinetics, measurement of plaque sizes, and electron microscopy. Interestingly, the PrV UL43 protein was able to inhibit fusion induced by PrV glycoproteins in a transient expression-fusion assay to a similar extent as gM. Double mutant viruses lacking, in addition to UL43, the multiply membrane spanning glycoproteins K or M did not show a phenotype beyond that observed in the gK and gM single deletion mutants

  20. Biomarkers for ragwort poisoning in horses: identification of protein targets

    Beynon Robert J

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ingestion of the poisonous weed ragwort (Senecio jacobea by horses leads to irreversible liver damage. The principal toxins of ragwort are the pyrrolizidine alkaloids that are rapidly metabolised to highly reactive and cytotoxic pyrroles, which can escape into the circulation and bind to proteins. In this study a non-invasive in vitro model system has been developed to investigate whether pyrrole toxins induce specific modifications of equine blood proteins that are detectable by proteomic methods. Results One dimensional gel electrophoresis revealed a significant alteration in the equine plasma protein profile following pyrrole exposure and the formation of a high molecular weight protein aggregate. Using mass spectrometry and confirmation by western blotting the major components of this aggregate were identified as fibrinogen, serum albumin and transferrin. Conclusion These findings demonstrate that pyrrolic metabolites can modify equine plasma proteins. The high molecular weight aggregate may result from extensive inter- and intra-molecular cross-linking of fibrinogen with the pyrrole. This model has the potential to form the basis of a novel proteomic strategy aimed at identifying surrogate protein biomarkers of ragwort exposure in horses and other livestock.

  1. High sensitivity identification of membrane proteins by MALDI TOF-MASS spectrometry using polystyrene beads.

    Bensalem, Noura; Masscheleyn, Sandrine; Mozo, Julien; Vallée, Benoit; Brouillard, Franck; Trudel, Stéphanie; Ricquier, Daniel; Edelman, Aleksander; Guerrera, Ida Chiara; Miroux, Bruno

    2007-04-01

    Membrane proteins play a large variety of functions in life and represent 30% of all genomes sequenced. Due to their hydrophobic nature, they are tightly bound to their biological membrane, and detergents are always required to extract and isolate them before identification by mass spectrometry (MS). The latter, however remains difficult. Peptide mass fingerprinting methods using techniques such as MALDI-TOF MS, for example, have become an important analytical tool in the identification of proteins. However, PMF of membrane proteins is a real challenge for at least three reasons. First, membrane proteins are naturally present at low levels; second, most of the detergents strongly inhibit proteases and have deleterious effects on MALDI spectra; and third, despite the presence of detergent, membrane proteins are unstable and often aggregate. We took the mitochondrial uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) as a model and showed that differential acetonitrile extraction of tryptic peptides combined with the use of polystirene Bio-Beads triggered high resolution of the MALDI-TOF identification of mitochondrial membrane proteins solubilized either with Triton-X100 or CHAPS detergents. PMID:17355127

  2. Identification of cancer protein biomarkers using proteomic techniques

    Mor, Gil G; Ward, David C; Bray-Ward, Patricia

    2015-03-10

    The claimed invention describes methods to diagnose or aid in the diagnosis of cancer. The claimed methods are based on the identification of biomarkers which are particularly well suited to discriminate between cancer subjects and healthy subjects. These biomarkers were identified using a unique and novel screening method described herein. The biomarkers identified herein can also be used in the prognosis and monitoring of cancer. The invention comprises the use of leptin, prolactin, OPN and IGF-II for diagnosing, prognosis and monitoring of ovarian cancer.

  3. Identification of cancer protein biomarkers using proteomic techniques

    Mor, Gil G. (Cheshire, CT); Ward, David C. (Las Vegas, NV); Bray-Ward, Patricia (Las Vegas, NV)

    2010-02-23

    The claimed invention describes methods to diagnose or aid in the diagnosis of cancer. The claimed methods are based on the identification of biomarkers which are particularly well suited to discriminate between cancer subjects and healthy subjects. These biomarkers were identified using a unique and novel screening method described herein. The biomarkers identified herein can also be used in the prognosis and monitoring of cancer. The invention comprises the use of leptin, prolactin, OPN and IGF-II for diagnosing, prognosis and monitoring of ovarian cancer.

  4. Identification of Actin-Binding Proteins from Maize Pollen

    Staiger, C.J.

    2004-01-13

    Specific Aims--The goal of this project was to gain an understanding of how actin filament organization and dynamics are controlled in flowering plants. Specifically, we proposed to identify unique proteins with novel functions by investigating biochemical strategies for the isolation and characterization of actin-binding proteins (ABPs). In particular, our hunt was designed to identify capping proteins and nucleation factors. The specific aims included: (1) to use F-actin affinity chromatography (FAAC) as a general strategy to isolate pollen ABPs (2) to produce polyclonal antisera and perform subcellular localization in pollen tubes (3) to isolate cDNA clones for the most promising ABPs (4) to further purify and characterize ABP interactions with actin in vitro. Summary of Progress By employing affinity chromatography on F-actin or DNase I columns, we have identified at least two novel ABPs from pollen, PrABP80 (gelsolin-like) and ZmABP30, We have also cloned and expressed recombinant protein, as well as generated polyclonal antisera, for 6 interesting ABPs from Arabidopsis (fimbrin AtFIM1, capping protein a/b (AtCP), adenylyl cyclase-associated protein (AtCAP), AtCapG & AtVLN1). We performed quantitative analyses of the biochemical properties for two of these previously uncharacterized ABPs (fimbrin and capping protein). Our studies provide the first evidence for fimbrin activity in plants, demonstrate the existence of barbed-end capping factors and a gelsolin-like severing activity, and provide the quantitative data necessary to establish and test models of F-actin organization and dynamics in plant cells.

  5. Identification of Anaplasma marginale type IV secretion system effector proteins.

    Svetlana Lockwood

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Anaplasma marginale, an obligate intracellular alphaproteobacterium in the order Rickettsiales, is a tick-borne pathogen and the leading cause of anaplasmosis in cattle worldwide. Complete genome sequencing of A. marginale revealed that it has a type IV secretion system (T4SS. The T4SS is one of seven known types of secretion systems utilized by bacteria, with the type III and IV secretion systems particularly prevalent among pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria. The T4SS is predicted to play an important role in the invasion and pathogenesis of A. marginale by translocating effector proteins across its membrane into eukaryotic target cells. However, T4SS effector proteins have not been identified and tested in the laboratory until now. RESULTS: By combining computational methods with phylogenetic analysis and sequence identity searches, we identified a subset of potential T4SS effectors in A. marginale strain St. Maries and chose six for laboratory testing. Four (AM185, AM470, AM705 [AnkA], and AM1141 of these six proteins were translocated in a T4SS-dependent manner using Legionella pneumophila as a reporter system. CONCLUSIONS: The algorithm employed to find T4SS effector proteins in A. marginale identified four such proteins that were verified by laboratory testing. L. pneumophila was shown to work as a model system for A. marginale and thus can be used as a screening tool for A. marginale effector proteins. The first T4SS effector proteins for A. marginale have been identified in this work.

  6. Proteomic identification of secreted proteins of Propionibacterium acnes

    Holland Carsten

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The anaerobic Gram-positive bacterium Propionibacterium acnes is a human skin commensal that resides preferentially within sebaceous follicles; however, it also exhibits many traits of an opportunistic pathogen, playing roles in a variety of inflammatory diseases such as acne vulgaris. To date, the underlying disease-causing mechanisms remain ill-defined and knowledge of P. acnes virulence factors remains scarce. Here, we identified proteins secreted during anaerobic cultivation of a range of skin and clinical P. acnes isolates, spanning the four known phylogenetic groups. Results Culture supernatant proteins of P. acnes were separated by two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE and all Coomassie-stained spots were subsequently identified by MALDI mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS. A set of 20 proteins was secreted in the mid-exponential growth phase by the majority of strains tested. Functional annotation revealed that many of these common proteins possess degrading activities, including glycoside hydrolases with similarities to endoglycoceramidase, β-N-acetylglucosaminidase and muramidase; esterases such as lysophospholipase and triacylglycerol lipase; and several proteases. Other secreted factors included Christie-Atkins-Munch-Petersen (CAMP factors, glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH, and several hypothetical proteins, a few of which are unique to P. acnes. Strain-specific differences were apparent, mostly in the secretion of putative adhesins, whose genes exhibit variable phase variation-like sequence signatures. Conclusions Our proteomic investigations have revealed that the P. acnes secretome harbors several proteins likely to play a role in host-tissue degradation and inflammation. Despite a large overlap between the secretomes of all four P. acnes phylotypes, distinct differences between predicted host-tissue interacting proteins were identified, providing potential insight into the differential virulence

  7. Identification of three novel Toxoplasma gondii rhoptry proteins

    Camejo, Ana; Gold, Daniel A.; Lu, Diana; McFetridge, Kiva; Julien, Lindsay; Yang, Ninghan; Jensen, Kirk D. C.; Saeij, Jeroen P.J

    2013-01-01

    The rhoptries are key secretory organelles from apicomplexan parasites that contain proteins involved in invasion and modulation of the host cell. Some rhoptry proteins are restricted to the posterior bulb (ROPs) and others to the anterior neck (RONs). As many rhoptry proteins have been shown to be key players in Toxoplasma invasion and virulence, it is important to identify, understand and characterize the biological function of the components of the rhoptries. In this report, we identified putative novel rhoptry candidate genes by identifying Toxoplasma genes with similar cyclical expression profiles as known rhoptry protein encoding genes across its cell cycle. Using this approach we identified two new rhoptry bulb (ROP47 and ROP48) and one new rhoptry neck protein (RON12). ROP47 is secreted and traffics to the host cell nucleus, RON12 was not detected at the moving junction during invasion. Deletion of ROP47 or ROP48 in a type II strain did not show major influence in in vitro growth or virulence in mice. PMID:24070999

  8. Systematic identification of proteins that elicit drug side effects

    Kuhn, Michael; Al Banchaabouchi, Mumna; Campillos, Monica;

    2013-01-01

    Side effect similarities of drugs have recently been employed to predict new drug targets, and networks of side effects and targets have been used to better understand the mechanism of action of drugs. Here, we report a large-scale analysis to systematically predict and characterize proteins that...... responsible for hyperesthesia in mice, which, in turn, can be prevented by a drug that selectively inhibits HTR7. Taken together, we show that a large fraction of complex drug side effects are mediated by individual proteins and create a reference for such relations.......Side effect similarities of drugs have recently been employed to predict new drug targets, and networks of side effects and targets have been used to better understand the mechanism of action of drugs. Here, we report a large-scale analysis to systematically predict and characterize proteins that...... cause drug side effects. We integrated phenotypic data obtained during clinical trials with known drug-target relations to identify overrepresented protein-side effect combinations. Using independent data, we confirm that most of these overrepresentations point to proteins which, when perturbed, cause...

  9. The need for improved identification and accurate classification of stages 3-5 Chronic Kidney Disease in primary care: retrospective cohort study.

    Poorva Jain

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Around ten percent of the population have been reported as having Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD, which is associated with increased cardiovascular mortality. Few previous studies have ascertained the chronicity of CKD. In the UK, a payment for performance (P4P initiative incentivizes CKD (stages 3-5 recognition and management in primary care, but the impact of this has not been assessed. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Using data from 426 primary care practices (population 2,707,130, the age standardised prevalence of stages 3-5 CKD was identified using two consecutive estimated Glomerular Filtration Rates (eGFRs seven days apart. Additionally the accuracy of practice CKD registers and the relationship between accurate identification of CKD and the achievement of P4P indicators was determined. Between 2005 and 2009, the prevalence of stages 3-5 CKD increased from 0.3% to 3.9%. In 2009, 30,440 patients (1.1% unadjusted fulfilled biochemical criteria for CKD but were not on a practice CKD register (uncoded CKD and 60,705 patients (2.2% unadjusted were included on a practice CKD register but did not fulfil biochemical criteria (miscoded CKD. For patients with confirmed CKD, inclusion in a practice register was associated with increasing age, male sex, diabetes, hypertension, cardiovascular disease and increasing CKD stage (p<0.0001. Uncoded CKD patients compared to miscoded patients were less likely to achieve performance indicators for blood pressure (OR 0.84, 95% CI 0.82-0.86 p<0.001 or recorded albumin-creatinine ratio (OR 0.73, 0.70-0.76, p<0.001. CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of stages 3-5 CKD, using two laboratory reported eGFRs, was lower than estimates from previous studies. Clinically significant discrepancies were identified between biochemically defined CKD and appearance on practice registers, with misclassification associated with sub-optimal care for some people with CKD.

  10. Phytochip: development of a DNA-microarray for rapid and accurate identification of Pseudo-nitzschia spp and other harmful algal species.

    Noyer, Charlotte; Abot, Anne; Trouilh, Lidwine; Leberre, Véronique Anton; Dreanno, Catherine

    2015-05-01

    Detection of harmful algal blooms has become a challenging concern because of the direct impacts on public health and economy. The identification of toxic dinoflagellates and diatoms in monitoring programs requires an extensive taxonomic expertise and is time consuming. Advances in molecular biology have allowed the development of new approaches, more rapid, accurate and cost-effective for detecting these microorganisms. In this context, we developed a new DNA microarray (called, Phytochip) for the simultaneous detection of multiple HAB species with a particular emphasis on Pseudo-nitzschia species. Oligonucleotide probes were designed along the rRNA operon. After DNA extraction, the target rDNA genes were amplified and labeled using an asymmetric PCR; then, the amplicons were hybridized to the oligonucleotide probes present on the chips. The total assay from seawater sampling to data acquisition can be performed within a working day. Specificity and sensitivity were assessed by using monoclonal cultures, mixtures of species and field samples spiked with a known amount of cultured cells. The Phytochip with its 81 validated oligonucleotide probes was able to detect 12 species of Pseudo-nitzschia and 11 species of dinoflagellates among which were 3 species of Karenia and 3 species of Alexandrium. The Phytochip was applied to environmental samples already characterized by light microscopy and cloned into DNA libraries. The hybridizations on the Phytochip were in good agreement with the sequences retrieved from the clone libraries and the microscopic observations. The Phytochip enables a reliable multiplex detection of phytoplankton and can assist a water quality monitoring program as well as more general ecological research. PMID:25765159

  11. Identification of outer membrane proteins of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Song, Houhui; Sandie, Reatha; Wang, Ying; Andrade-Navarro, Miguel A; Niederweis, Michael

    2008-11-01

    The cell wall of mycobacteria includes an unusual outer membrane of extremely low permeability. While Escherichia coli uses more than 60 proteins to functionalize its outer membrane, only two mycobacterial outer membrane proteins (OMPs) are known. The porin MspA of Mycobacterium smegmatis provided the proof of principle that integral mycobacterial OMPs share the beta-barrel structure, the absence of hydrophobic alpha-helices and the presence of a signal peptide with OMPs of gram-negative bacteria. These properties were exploited in a multi-step bioinformatic approach to predict OMPs of M. tuberculosis. A secondary structure analysis was performed for 587 proteins of M. tuberculosis predicted to be exported. Scores were calculated for the beta-strand content and the amphiphilicity of the beta-strands. Reference OMPs of gram-negative bacteria defined threshold values for these parameters that were met by 144 proteins of unknown function of M. tuberculosis. Two of them were verified as OMPs by a novel two-step experimental approach. Rv1698 and Rv1973 were detected only in the total membrane fraction of M. bovis BCG in Western blot experiments, while proteinase K digestion of whole cells showed the surface accessibility of these proteins. These findings established that Rv1698 and Rv1973 are indeed localized in the outer membrane and tripled the number of known OMPs of M. tuberculosis. Significantly, these results provide evidence for the usefulness of the bioinformatic approach to predict mycobacterial OMPs and indicate that M. tuberculosis likely has many OMPs with beta-barrel structure. Our findings pave the way to identify the set of proteins which functionalize the outer membrane of M. tuberculosis. PMID:18439872

  12. Identification of Dominant Immunogenic Bacteria and Bacterial Proteins in Periodontitis

    Agerbæk, Mette Rylev; Haubek, Dorte; Birkelund, Svend;

    Marginal periodontitis is considered an infectious disease that triggers host inflammatory responses resulting in destruction of the periodontium. A complex biofilm of bacteria is associated with periodontitis. Some species have been identified as putative pathogens such as Porphyromonas gingivalis...... (P.g) and Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans (A.a), but the identity of dominate immunogens of these bacteria is poorly elucidated. The aim of the study was to identify dominant immunogenic proteins of P.g and A.a in patients suffering from chronic and aggressive periodontitis by proteomic analysis...... will be able to identify immunodominant proteins and potentially important virulence factors of putative periodontal pathogens....

  13. Identification of Two RNA-binding Proteins Associated with Human Telomerase RNA

    Le, Siyuan; Sternglanz, Rolf; Greider, Carol W

    2000-01-01

    Telomerase plays a crucial role in telomere maintenance in vivo. To understand telomerase regulation, we have been characterizing components of the enzyme. To date several components of the mammalian telomerase holoenzyme have been identified: the essential RNA component (human telomerase RNA [hTR]), the catalytic subunit human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT), and telomerase-associated protein 1. Here we describe the identification of two new proteins that interact with hTR: hStau an...

  14. Ultrasensitive isolation, identification and quantification of DNA–protein adducts by ELISA-based RADAR assay

    Kiianitsa, Kostantin; Maizels, Nancy

    2014-01-01

    Enzymes that form transient DNA–protein covalent complexes are targets for several potent classes of drugs used to treat infectious disease and cancer, making it important to establish robust and rapid procedures for analysis of these complexes. We report a method for isolation of DNA–protein adducts and their identification and quantification, using techniques compatible with high-throughput screening. This method is based on the RADAR assay for DNA adducts that we previously developed (Kiia...

  15. Identification and Characterization of a Highly Conserved Crenarchaeal Protein Lysine Methyltransferase with Broad Substrate Specificity

    Chu, Yindi; Zhang, Zhenfeng; Wang, Qian; Luo, Yuanming; Huang, Li

    2012-01-01

    Protein lysine methylation occurs extensively in the Crenarchaeota, a major kingdom in the Archaea. However, the enzymes responsible for this type of posttranslational modification have not been found. Here we report the identification and characterization of the first crenarchaeal protein lysine methyltransferase, designated aKMT, from the hyperthermophilic crenarchaeon Sulfolobus islandicus. The enzyme was capable of transferring methyl groups to selected lysine residues in a substrate prot...

  16. Identification and evaluation of new reference genes in Gossypium hirsutum for accurate normalization of real-time quantitative RT-PCR data

    Alves-Ferreira Marcio

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Normalizing through reference genes, or housekeeping genes, can make more accurate and reliable results from reverse transcription real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR. Recent studies have shown that no single housekeeping gene is universal for all experiments. Thus, suitable reference genes should be the first step of any qPCR analysis. Only a few studies on the identification of housekeeping gene have been carried on plants. Therefore qPCR studies on important crops such as cotton has been hampered by the lack of suitable reference genes. Results By the use of two distinct algorithms, implemented by geNorm and NormFinder, we have assessed the gene expression of nine candidate reference genes in cotton: GhACT4, GhEF1α5, GhFBX6, GhPP2A1, GhMZA, GhPTB, GhGAPC2, GhβTUB3 and GhUBQ14. The candidate reference genes were evaluated in 23 experimental samples consisting of six distinct plant organs, eight stages of flower development, four stages of fruit development and in flower verticils. The expression of GhPP2A1 and GhUBQ14 genes were the most stable across all samples and also when distinct plants organs are examined. GhACT4 and GhUBQ14 present more stable expression during flower development, GhACT4 and GhFBX6 in the floral verticils and GhMZA and GhPTB during fruit development. Our analysis provided the most suitable combination of reference genes for each experimental set tested as internal control for reliable qPCR data normalization. In addition, to illustrate the use of cotton reference genes we checked the expression of two cotton MADS-box genes in distinct plant and floral organs and also during flower development. Conclusion We have tested the expression stabilities of nine candidate genes in a set of 23 tissue samples from cotton plants divided into five different experimental sets. As a result of this evaluation, we recommend the use of GhUBQ14 and GhPP2A1 housekeeping genes as superior references

  17. Identification of Enhancer Binding Proteins Important for Myxococcus xanthus Development▿

    Giglio, Krista M.; Eisenstatt, Jessica; Garza, Anthony G.

    2009-01-01

    Enhancer binding proteins (EBPs) control the temporal expression of fruiting body development-associated genes in Myxococcus xanthus. Eleven previously uncharacterized EBP genes were inactivated. Six EBP gene mutations produced minor but reproducible defects in fruiting body development. One EBP gene mutation that affected A-motility produced strong developmental defects.

  18. Biomarkers of Aspergillus spores: Strain typing and protein identification

    Šulc, Miroslav; Pešlová, Kateřina; Žabka, Martin; Hajdúch, M.; Havlíček, Vladimír

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 280, 1-3 (2009), s. 162-168. ISSN 1387-3806 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC07017; GA ČR GP203/05/P575 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : aspergillus * spore * protein Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 2.117, year: 2009

  19. The identification of matrix Gla protein in cartilage.

    Hale, J E; Fraser, J D; Price, P A

    1988-04-25

    The vitamin K-dependent bone protein matrix gamma-carboxyglutamic acid (Gla) protein (MGP) has been identified by radioimmunoassay in the guanidine extract of rat cartilage. MGP was present in all cartilages tested at levels comparable to the MGP level in bone. Western blot analysis indicated that the molecular weight of cartilage MGP is the same as bone MGP, and Northern blot analysis revealed that MGP mRNA from cartilage is the same size as the MGP mRNA from bone. The structurally related vitamin K-dependent protein bone Gla protein could not be detected in cartilage by radioimmunoassay or by Northern blot analysis. The discovery that MGP is synthesized by growth plate cartilage could provide an explanation for the excessive growth plate mineralization disorder seen in rats treated with the vitamin K antagonist warfarin and the punctate mineralization of the growth plate seen in infants whose mothers received warfarin in the first trimester of pregnancy (the fetal warfarin syndrome). Both disorders appear to be caused by the inactivation of a vitamin K-dependent mineralization inhibitor in cartilage, an inhibitor which we suggest is MGP. PMID:3258600

  20. Proteomic identification of gluten proteins in relation to celiac disease

    Šalplachta, Jiří

    Jena: ESF, 2008. s. 48. [Central and Eastern European Proteomic Conference /2./. 12.10.2008-15.10.2008, Jena] R&D Projects: GA MZe 1B53002 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40310501 Keywords : proteomics * gluten * celiac-related proteins Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation

  1. Screening and identification of proteins interacting with nucleostemin

    Hai-Xia Yang; Geng-Lin Jin; Ling Meng; Jian-Zhi Zhang; Wen-Bin Liu; Cheng-Chao Shou

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To identify the proteins interacting with nucleostemin (NS), thereby gaining an insight into the function of NS.METHODS: Yeast two-hybrid assay was performed to screen a human placenta cDNA library with the full length of NS as a bait. X-Gal assay and β-galactosidase filter assay were subsequently conducted to check the positive clones and the gene was identified by DNA sequencing.To further confirm the interaction of two proteins, the DNA fragment coding NS and the DNA fragment isolated from the positive clone were inserted into the mammalian expression vector pcDNA3 and pcDNA3-myc, respectively.Then, two plasmids were cotransfected into the COS-7 cells by DEAE-dextron. The total protein from the cotransfected cells was extracted and coimmunoprecipitation and Western blot were performed with suitable antibodies sequentially.RESULTS: Two positive clones that interacted with NS were obtained from human placenta cDNA library. One was an alpha isoform of human protein phosphatase 2 regulatory subunit B (B56) (PPP2R5A) and the other was a novel gene being highly homologous to the gene associated with spondylo paralysis. The co-immunoprecipitation also showed that NS specifically interacted with PPP2R5A.CONCLUSION: NS and PPP2R5A interact in yeast and mammalian cells, respectively, which is helpful for addressing the function of NS in cancer development and progression.

  2. PSI/TM-Coffee: a web server for fast and accurate multiple sequence alignments of regular and transmembrane proteins using homology extension on reduced databases.

    Floden, Evan W; Tommaso, Paolo D; Chatzou, Maria; Magis, Cedrik; Notredame, Cedric; Chang, Jia-Ming

    2016-07-01

    The PSI/TM-Coffee web server performs multiple sequence alignment (MSA) of proteins by combining homology extension with a consistency based alignment approach. Homology extension is performed with Position Specific Iterative (PSI) BLAST searches against a choice of redundant and non-redundant databases. The main novelty of this server is to allow databases of reduced complexity to rapidly perform homology extension. This server also gives the possibility to use transmembrane proteins (TMPs) reference databases to allow even faster homology extension on this important category of proteins. Aside from an MSA, the server also outputs topological prediction of TMPs using the HMMTOP algorithm. Previous benchmarking of the method has shown this approach outperforms the most accurate alignment methods such as MSAProbs, Kalign, PROMALS, MAFFT, ProbCons and PRALINE™. The web server is available at http://tcoffee.crg.cat/tmcoffee. PMID:27106060

  3. Web and database software for identification of intact proteins using "top down" mass spectrometry.

    Taylor, Gregory K; Kim, Yong-Bin; Forbes, Andrew J; Meng, Fanyu; McCarthy, Ryan; Kelleher, Neil L

    2003-08-15

    For the identification and characterization of proteins harboring posttranslational modifications (PTMs), a "top down" strategy using mass spectrometry has been forwarded recently but languishes without tailored software widely available. We describe a Web-based software and database suite called ProSight PTM constructed for large-scale proteome projects involving direct fragmentation of intact protein ions. Four main components of ProSight PTM are a database retrieval algorithm (Retriever), MySQL protein databases, a file/data manager, and a project tracker. Retriever performs probability-based identifications from absolute fragment ion masses, automatically compiled sequence tags, or a combination of the two, with graphical rendering and browsing of the results. The database structure allows known and putative protein forms to be searched, with prior or predicted PTM knowledge used during each search. Initial functionality is illustrated with a 36-kDa yeast protein identified from a processed cell extract after automated data acquisition using a quadrupole-FT hybrid mass spectrometer. A +142-Da delta(m) on glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase was automatically localized between Asp90 and Asp192, consistent with its two cystine residues (149 and 153) alkylated by acrylamide (+71 Da each) during the gel-based sample preparation. ProSight PTM is the first search engine and Web environment for identification of intact proteins (https://prosightptm.scs.uiuc.edu/). PMID:14632120

  4. Identification of antigenic proteins of the nosocomial pathogen Klebsiella pneumoniae.

    Sebastian Hoppe

    Full Text Available The continuous expansion of nosocomial infections around the globe has become a precarious situation. Key challenges include mounting dissemination of multiple resistances to antibiotics, the easy transmission and the growing mortality rates of hospital-acquired bacterial diseases. Thus, new ways to rapidly detect these infections are vital. Consequently, researchers around the globe pursue innovative approaches for point-of-care devices. In many cases the specific interaction of an antigen and a corresponding antibody is pivotal. However, the knowledge about suitable antigens is lacking. The aim of this study was to identify novel antigens as specific diagnostic markers. Additionally, these proteins might be aptly used for the generation of vaccines to improve current treatment options. Hence, a cDNA-based expression library was constructed and screened via microarrays to detect novel antigens of Klebsiella pneumoniae, a prominent agent of nosocomial infections well-known for its extensive antibiotics resistance, especially by extended-spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBL. After screening 1536 clones, 14 previously unknown immunogenic proteins were identified. Subsequently, each protein was expressed in full-length and its immunodominant character examined by ELISA and microarray analyses. Consequently, six proteins were selected for epitope mapping and three thereof possessed linear epitopes. After specificity analysis, homology survey and 3d structural modelling, one epitope sequence GAVVALSTTFA of KPN_00363, an ion channel protein, was identified harboring specificity for K. pneumoniae. The remaining epitopes showed ambiguous results regarding the specificity for K. pneumoniae. The approach adopted herein has been successfully utilized to discover novel antigens of Campylobacter jejuni and Salmonella enterica antigens before. Now, we have transferred this knowledge to the key nosocomial agent, K. pneumoniae. By identifying several novel antigens

  5. Identification of the N gene protein of bacteriophage lambda

    The N gene protein, pN, of bacteriophage lambda stimulates early gene transcription by allowing mRNA chain elongation to proceed into genes distal to transcription termination sites normally recognized by the Escherichia coli transcription termination protein rho. pN has previously eluded detection on sodium dodecyl sulfate/polyacrylamide gels because of its small size, its instability, and the difficulty of distinguising pN itself both from host proteins and from other early lambda proteins whose synthesis depends on pN action. These problems have now been overcome and we find that the major form of pN present in crude cell extracts of infected cells has an apparent molecular weight of 13,500. Lambda bio256, a deletion-substitution mutant terminating in N, codes for a shorter pN of molecular weight 12,500. A nonsense fragment of 10,500 molecular weight coded by lambda N/sub am7/ has also been identified. These conclusions are based on examination of the electrophoretic profiles of the proteins synthesized after infection of UV-irradiated E. coli by various lambda N- temperature-sensitive, nonsense, and deletion-substitution mutants. It has also been possible to distinguish pN itself from other early lambda polypeptides by infecting ron- cells with either lambda N/sub mar/ phage allowing pN synthesis but not pN action or lambda N/sub am/ phage defective in pN synthesis and pN action. Our results together with previous data are discussed with respect to the possible existence of multiple molecular weight forms of pN and the location of the coding sequences in the N gene region

  6. A novel protein complex identification algorithm based on Connected Affinity Clique Extension (CACE).

    Li, Peng; He, Tingting; Hu, Xiaohua; Zhao, Junmin; Shen, Xianjun; Zhang, Ming; Wang, Yan

    2014-06-01

    A novel algorithm based on Connected Affinity Clique Extension (CACE) for mining overlapping functional modules in protein interaction network is proposed in this paper. In this approach, the value of protein connected affinity which is inferred from protein complexes is interpreted as the reliability and possibility of interaction. The protein interaction network is constructed as a weighted graph, and the weight is dependent on the connected affinity coefficient. The experimental results of our CACE in two test data sets show that the CACE can detect the functional modules much more effectively and accurately when compared with other state-of-art algorithms CPM and IPC-MCE. PMID:24803142

  7. Mass Spectrometric Identification of the Arginine and Lysine deficient Proline Rich Glutamine Rich Wheat Storage Proteins

    Tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) of enzymatic digest has made possible identification of a wide variety of proteins and complex samples prepared by such techniques as RP-HPLC or 2-D gel electrophoresis. Success requires peptide fragmentation to be indicative of the peptide amino acid sequence. The f...

  8. Identification of a 5-protein biomarker molecular signature for predicting Alzheimer's disease.

    Martín Gómez Ravetti

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Alzheimer's disease (AD is a progressive brain disease with a huge cost to human lives. The impact of the disease is also a growing concern for the governments of developing countries, in particular due to the increasingly high number of elderly citizens at risk. Alzheimer's is the most common form of dementia, a common term for memory loss and other cognitive impairments. There is no current cure for AD, but there are drug and non-drug based approaches for its treatment. In general the drug-treatments are directed at slowing the progression of symptoms. They have proved to be effective in a large group of patients but success is directly correlated with identifying the disease carriers at its early stages. This justifies the need for timely and accurate forms of diagnosis via molecular means. We report here a 5-protein biomarker molecular signature that achieves, on average, a 96% total accuracy in predicting clinical AD. The signature is composed of the abundances of IL-1alpha, IL-3, EGF, TNF-alpha and G-CSF. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Our results are based on a recent molecular dataset that has attracted worldwide attention. Our paper illustrates that improved results can be obtained with the abundance of only five proteins. Our methodology consisted of the application of an integrative data analysis method. This four step process included: a abundance quantization, b feature selection, c literature analysis, d selection of a classifier algorithm which is independent of the feature selection process. These steps were performed without using any sample of the test datasets. For the first two steps, we used the application of Fayyad and Irani's discretization algorithm for selection and quantization, which in turn creates an instance of the (alpha-beta-k-Feature Set problem; a numerical solution of this problem led to the selection of only 10 proteins. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: the previous study has provided an extremely

  9. Accurate measurements of 13C-13C distances in uniformly 13C-labeled proteins using multi-dimensional four-oscillating field solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    Application of sets of 13C-13C internuclear distance restraints constitutes a typical key element in determining the structure of peptides and proteins by magic-angle-spinning solid-state NMR spectroscopy. Accurate measurements of the structurally highly important 13C-13C distances in uniformly 13C-labeled peptides and proteins, however, pose a big challenge due to the problem of dipolar truncation. Here, we present novel two-dimensional (2D) solid-state NMR experiments capable of extracting distances between carbonyl (13C′) and aliphatic (13Caliphatic) spins with high accuracy. The method is based on an improved version of the four-oscillating field (FOLD) technique [L. A. Straasø, M. Bjerring, N. Khaneja, and N. C. Nielsen, J. Chem. Phys. 130, 225103 (2009)] which circumvents the problem of dipolar truncation, thereby offering a base for accurate extraction of internuclear distances in many-spin systems. The ability to extract reliable accurate distances is demonstrated using one- and two-dimensional variants of the FOLD experiment on uniformly 13C,15N-labeled-L-isoleucine. In a more challenging biological application, FOLD 2D experiments are used to determine a large number of 13C′-13Caliphatic distances in amyloid fibrils formed by the SNNFGAILSS fibrillating core of the human islet amyloid polypeptide with uniform 13C,15N-labeling on the FGAIL fragment

  10. Multiplex PCR Assay for Direct Identification of Group B Streptococcal Alpha-Protein-Like Protein Genes

    Creti, Roberta; Fabretti, Francesca; Orefici, Graziella; von Hunolstein, Christina

    2004-01-01

    We developed a group B streptococcus multiplex PCR assay which allows, by direct analysis of the amplicon size, determination of the surface protein antigen genes of alpha-C protein, epsilon protein, Rib, Alp2, Alp3, and Alp4. The multiplex PCR assay offers a rapid and simple method of subtyping Streptococcus agalactiae based on surface protein genes.

  11. Serum copeptin and cortisol do not accurately predict sickle cell anaemia vaso-occlusive crisis as C-reactive protein.

    Kehinde Sola Akinlade

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study assessed the diagnostic performance and prognostic properties of C-reactive protein (CRP, copeptin and cortisol in individuals with sickle cell anaemia (SCA. DESIGN: Prospective case-control study. METHODS: Sixty consecutive SCA subjects (18-40 years comprising 30 subjects in the steady state and 30 subjects in vaso-occlusive crisis (VOC were recruited into this study. Thirty (30 apparently healthy individuals with HbAA genotype served as controls. ELISA was used for the determination of serum levels of copeptin, CRP and cortisol. Data obtained were statistically analyzed using the Student's t-test and Mann Whitney U as appropriate and P<0.05 was considered significant. RESULTS: SCA subjects in VOC had significantly lower copeptin level and significantly higher CRP level compared with controls. However, serum levels of copeptin, cortisol and CRP were significantly higher in SCA subjects in VOC compared with SCA subjects in steady state. Furthermore, CRP had the widest Area under the ROC curve (AUROC than copeptin and cortisol. No significant difference was observed in the levels of copeptin, CRP and cortisol when SCA subjects in VOC who were hospitalized for less ≤ 5 days were compared with subjects who had longer stays. CONCLUSION: It could be concluded that C-reactive protein has a superior diagnostic performance for vaso-occlusive crisis in individuals with sickle cell anaemia and that C-reactive protein, cortisol and copeptin are not good prognostic markers in SCA subjects in vaso-occlusive crisis.

  12. Identification of Genes Coding for Exported Proteins of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans

    Mintz, Keith P.; Fives-Taylor, Paula M.

    1999-01-01

    Random fusions of genomic DNA fragments to a partial gene encoding a signal sequence-deficient bacterial alkaline phosphatase were utilized to screen for exported proteins of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans in Escherichia coli. Twenty-four PhoA+ clones were isolated and sequenced. Membrane localization signals in the form of signal sequences were deduced from most of these sequences. Several of the deduced amino acid sequences were found to be homologous to known exported or membrane-ass...

  13. Identification of a cell membrane protein that binds alveolar surfactant.

    Strayer, D. S.

    1991-01-01

    Alveolar surfactants are complex mixtures of proteins and phospholipids produced by type II alveolar cells and responsible for lowering pulmonary surface tension. The process by which surfactant is produced and exported and by which its production by pulmonary cells is regulated are not well understood. This study was designed to identify a cellular receptor for surfactant constituents. To do so, monoclonal anti-idiotypic antibodies directed against antibodies to porcine and rabbit surfactant...

  14. Identification of albumin-binding proteins in capillary endothelial cells

    1988-01-01

    Isolated fat tissue microvessels and lung, whose capillary endothelia express in situ specific binding sites for albumin, were homogenized and subjected to SDS-gel electrophoresis and electroblotting. The nitrocellulose strips were incubated with either albumin-gold (Alb-Au) and directly visualized, or with [125I]albumin (monomeric or polymeric) and autoradiographed. The extracts of both microvascular endothelium and the lung express albumin-binding proteins (ABPs) represented by two pairs of...

  15. Characterization of quinone derived protein adducts and their selective identification using redox cycling based chemiluminescence assay.

    Elgawish, Mohamed Saleh; Kishikawa, Naoya; Ohyama, Kaname; Kuroda, Naotaka

    2015-07-17

    The cytotoxic mechanism of many quinones has been correlated to covalent modification of cellular proteins. However, the identification of relevant proteins targets is essential but challenging goals. To better understand the quinones cytotoxic mechanism, human serum albumin (HSA) was incubated in vitro with different concentration of menadione (MQ). In this respect, the initial nucleophilic addition of proteins to quinone converts the conjugates to redox-cycling quinoproteins with altered conformation and secondary structure and extended life span than the short lived, free quinones. The conjugation of MQ with nucleophilic sites likewise, free cysteine as well as ɛ-amino group of lysine residue of HSA has been found to be in concentration dependent manner. The conventional methods for modified proteins identification in complex mixtures are complicated and time consuming. Herein, we describe a highly selective, sensitive, simple, and fast strategy for quinoproteins identification. The suggested strategy exploited the unique redox-cycling capability of quinoproteins in presence of a reductant, dithiothreitol (DTT), to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) that gave sufficient chemiluminescence (CL) when mixed with luminol. The CL approach is highly selective and sensitive to detect the quinoproteins in ten-fold molar excess of native proteins without adduct enrichment. The approach was also coupled with gel filtration chromatography (GFC) and used to identify adducts in complex mixture of proteins in vitro as well as in rat plasma after MQ administration. Albumin was identified as the main protein in human and rat plasma forming adduct with MQ. Overall, the identification of quinoproteins will encourage further studies of toxicological impact of quinones on human health. PMID:26044383

  16. Ultrasensitive isolation, identification and quantification of DNA-protein adducts by ELISA-based RADAR assay.

    Kiianitsa, Kostantin; Maizels, Nancy

    2014-07-01

    Enzymes that form transient DNA-protein covalent complexes are targets for several potent classes of drugs used to treat infectious disease and cancer, making it important to establish robust and rapid procedures for analysis of these complexes. We report a method for isolation of DNA-protein adducts and their identification and quantification, using techniques compatible with high-throughput screening. This method is based on the RADAR assay for DNA adducts that we previously developed (Kiianitsa and Maizels (2013) A rapid and sensitive assay for DNA-protein covalent complexes in living cells. Nucleic Acids Res., 41:e104), but incorporates three key new steps of broad applicability. (i) Silica-assisted ethanol/isopropanol precipitation ensures reproducible and efficient recovery of DNA and DNA-protein adducts at low centrifugal forces, enabling cell culture and DNA precipitation to be carried out in a single microtiter plate. (ii) Rigorous purification of DNA-protein adducts by a procedure that eliminates free proteins and free nucleic acids, generating samples suitable for detection of novel protein adducts (e.g. by mass spectroscopy). (iii) Identification and quantification of DNA-protein adducts by direct ELISA assay. The ELISA-based RADAR assay can detect Top1-DNA and Top2a-DNA adducts in human cells, and gyrase-DNA adducts in Escherichia coli. This approach will be useful for discovery and characterization of new drugs to treat infectious disease and cancer, and for development of companion diagnostics assays for individualized medicine. PMID:24914050

  17. Identification of proteins bound to a thioaptamer probe on a proteomics array

    A rapid method to screen and identify unknown bound proteins to specific nucleic acid probes anchored on ProteinChip array surfaces from crude biological samples has been developed in this paper. It was demonstrated with screening specific binding proteins from LPS-stimulated mouse 70Z/3 pre-B cell nuclear extracts by direct coupling of thioaptamer XBY-S2 to the pre-activated ProteinChip array surfaces. With pre-fractionation of crude nuclear extracts by ion exchange method, specific 'on-chip' captured proteins have been obtained that were pure enough to do 'on-chip' digestion and the subsequent identification of the 'on-chip' bound proteins by microsequencing of the trypsin digested peptide fragments through tandem MS. Five mouse heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNPs) A1, A2/B1, A3, A/B, and D0 were identified. To verify those bound hnRNPs, a novel thioaptamer/antibody sandwich assay provides highly sensitive and selective identification of proteins on ProteinChip arrays

  18. Latest methods of fluorescence-based protein crystal identification

    Fluorescence, whether intrinsic or by using trace fluorescent labeling, can be a powerful aid in macromolecule crystallization. Its use in screening for crystals is discussed here. Successful protein crystallization screening experiments are dependent upon the experimenter being able to identify positive outcomes. The introduction of fluorescence techniques has brought a powerful and versatile tool to the aid of the crystal grower. Trace fluorescent labeling, in which a fluorescent probe is covalently bound to a subpopulation (<0.5%) of the protein, enables the use of visible fluorescence. Alternatively, one can avoid covalent modification and use UV fluorescence, exploiting the intrinsic fluorescent amino acids present in most proteins. By the use of these techniques, crystals that had previously been obscured in the crystallization drop can readily be identified and distinguished from amorphous precipitate or salt crystals. Additionally, lead conditions that may not have been obvious as such under white-light illumination can be identified. In all cases review of the screening plate is considerably accelerated, as the eye can quickly note objects of increased intensity

  19. Identification of Thylakoid Membrane Protein Complexes by Using a BN-Chip/MS Approach

    Longquan Fan; Yinghong Pan

    2012-01-01

    Thylakoid membrane protein complexes of wheat (Triticum aestivum Linn.)play crucial roles in growth and crop production.Knowledge of the composition and structure of protein complexes,as well as protein interactions,will result in a much deeper understanding of metabolic pathways and cellular processes than protein identities alone,especially if the complexes can be separated in the native forms.Whereas the analysis of membrane protein complexes is a significant challenge due to their hydrophobic properties and relatively low abundance.A rapid and efficient method of identifying membrane protein complexes will greatly facilitate the investigation of agriculture.The present work developed an BN-Chip/MS approach for exhaustive separation and identification of protein complexes,by combining using blue-native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (BN-PAGE) and chip-based high-performance liquid chromatography quadruple time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-Chip/ESI-QT-OF-MS,Chip/MS).By using this approach,seventy-five nonredundant proteins of wheat thylakoid membrane complexes were identified from digested 13 bands of BN-gel.When the protocol of BN separation was not used,only 37 nonredundant proteins had been identified and among of them 9 proteins were uniquely identi? ed.This BN-Chip/MS approach is rapid and efficient for identifying protein complexes in wheat thylakoid membranes,and also providing reliable foundations for further functional research of wheat chloroplast and for identifying protein complexes of other species.

  20. Identification of Novel Immunogenic Proteins of Neisseria gonorrhoeae by Phage Display.

    Connor, Daniel O; Zantow, Jonas; Hust, Michael; Bier, Frank F; von Nickisch-Rosenegk, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae is one of the most prevalent sexually transmitted diseases worldwide with more than 100 million new infections per year. A lack of intense research over the last decades and increasing resistances to the recommended antibiotics call for a better understanding of gonococcal infection, fast diagnostics and therapeutic measures against N. gonorrhoeae. Therefore, the aim of this work was to identify novel immunogenic proteins as a first step to advance those unresolved problems. For the identification of immunogenic proteins, pHORF oligopeptide phage display libraries of the entire N. gonorrhoeae genome were constructed. Several immunogenic oligopeptides were identified using polyclonal rabbit antibodies against N. gonorrhoeae. Corresponding full-length proteins of the identified oligopeptides were expressed and their immunogenic character was verified by ELISA. The immunogenic character of six proteins was identified for the first time. Additional 13 proteins were verified as immunogenic proteins in N. gonorrhoeae. PMID:26859666

  1. Identification of Novel Immunogenic Proteins of Neisseria gonorrhoeae by Phage Display.

    Daniel O Connor

    Full Text Available Neisseria gonorrhoeae is one of the most prevalent sexually transmitted diseases worldwide with more than 100 million new infections per year. A lack of intense research over the last decades and increasing resistances to the recommended antibiotics call for a better understanding of gonococcal infection, fast diagnostics and therapeutic measures against N. gonorrhoeae. Therefore, the aim of this work was to identify novel immunogenic proteins as a first step to advance those unresolved problems. For the identification of immunogenic proteins, pHORF oligopeptide phage display libraries of the entire N. gonorrhoeae genome were constructed. Several immunogenic oligopeptides were identified using polyclonal rabbit antibodies against N. gonorrhoeae. Corresponding full-length proteins of the identified oligopeptides were expressed and their immunogenic character was verified by ELISA. The immunogenic character of six proteins was identified for the first time. Additional 13 proteins were verified as immunogenic proteins in N. gonorrhoeae.

  2. Novel identification of expressed genes and functional classification of hypothetical proteins from Neisseria meningitidis serogroup A.

    Bernardini, Giulia; Arena, Simona; Braconi, Daniela; Scaloni, Andrea; Santucci, Annalisa

    2007-09-01

    To implement the 2-DE database of serogroup A Neisseria meningitidis (MenA) and improve its potential of investigation in bacterial biology, cell extracts were separated by tricine-SDS-PAGE and 131 novel proteins were identified by microLC-ESI-IT-MS/MS. These identifications extended to 404, the number of MenA gene expression products characterized at the proteome level, approximately covering 20% of the total ORFs predicted from genome sequence. This technical approach was particularly useful in ascertaining expression of ribosomal as well as hypothetical proteins. Particular attention was paid to functional characterization of hypothetical proteins by means of software analyses and database searches. PMID:17849410

  3. Identification of phosphorylation sites in protein kinase A substrates using artificial neural networks and mass spectrometry

    Hjerrild, M.; Stensballe, A.; Rasmussen, T.E.; Kofoed, C.B.; Blom, Nikolaj; Sicheritz-Pontén, Thomas; Larsen, M.R.; Brunak, Søren; Jensen, O.N.; Gammeltoft, S.

    2004-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation plays a key role in cell regulation and identification of phosphorylation sites is important for understanding their functional significance. Here, we present an artificial neural network algorithm: NetPhosK (http://www.cbs.dtu.dk/services/NetPhosK/) that predicts protein...... kinase A (PKA) phosphorylation sites. The neural network was trained with a positive set of 258 experimentally verified PKA phosphorylation sites. The predictions by NetPhosK were! validated using four novel PKA substrates: Necdin, RFX5, En-2, and Wee 1. The four proteins were phosphorylated by PKA in...

  4. Advances in identification and validation of protein targets of natural products without chemical modification.

    Chang, J; Kim, Y; Kwon, H J

    2016-05-01

    Covering: up to February 2016Identification of the target proteins of natural products is pivotal to understanding the mechanisms of action to develop natural products for use as molecular probes and potential therapeutic drugs. Affinity chromatography of immobilized natural products has been conventionally used to identify target proteins, and has yielded good results. However, this method has limitations, in that labeling or tagging for immobilization and affinity purification often result in reduced or altered activity of the natural product. New strategies have recently been developed and applied to identify the target proteins of natural products and synthetic small molecules without chemical modification of the natural product. These direct and indirect methods for target identification of label-free natural products include drug affinity responsive target stability (DARTS), stability of proteins from rates of oxidation (SPROX), cellular thermal shift assay (CETSA), thermal proteome profiling (TPP), and bioinformatics-based analysis of connectivity. This review focuses on and reports case studies of the latest advances in target protein identification methods for label-free natural products. The integration of newly developed technologies will provide new insights and highlight the value of natural products for use as biological probes and new drug candidates. PMID:26964663

  5. Enterovirus 71 viral capsid protein linear epitopes: Identification and characterization

    Gao Fan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To characterize the human humoral immune response against enterovirus 71 (EV71 infection and map human epitopes on the viral capsid proteins. Methods A series of 256 peptides spanning the capsid proteins (VP1, VP2, VP3 of BJ08 strain (genomic C4 were synthesized. An indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA was carried out to detect anti-EV71 IgM and IgG in sera of infected children in acute or recovery phase. The partially overlapped peptides contained 12 amino acids and were coated in the plate as antigen (0.1 μg/μl. Sera from rabbits immunized with inactivated BJ08 virus were also used to screen the peptide panel. Results A total of 10 human anti-EV71 IgM epitopes (vp1-14 in VP1; vp2-6, 21, 40 and 50 in VP2 and vp3-10, 12, 15, 24 and 75 in VP3 were identified in acute phase sera. In contrast, only one anti-EV71 IgG epitope in VP1 (vp1-15 was identified in sera of recovery stage. Four rabbit anti-EV71 IgG epitopes (vp1-14, 31, 54 and 71 were identified and mapped to VP1. Conclusion These data suggested that human IgM epitopes were mainly mapped to VP2 and VP3 with multi-epitope responses occurred at acute infection, while the only IgG epitope located on protein VP1 was activated in recovery phase sera. The dynamic changes of humoral immune response at different stages of infection may have public health significance in evaluation of EV71 vaccine immunogenicity and the clinical application of diagnostic reagents.

  6. Mass spectrometry based approach for identification and characterisation of fluorescent proteins from marine organisms

    Wojdyla, Katarzyna; Rogowska-Wrzesinska, Adelina; Wrzesinski, Krzysztof;

    2011-01-01

    We present here a new analytical strategy for identification and characterisation of fluorescent proteins from marine organisms. By applying basic proteomics tools it is possible to screen large sample collections for fluorescent proteins of desired characteristics prior to gene cloning. Our...... methodology which includes isolation, spectral characterisation, stability testing, gel-based separation and mass spectrometric identification was optimised on samples collected during the Danish Galathea 3 expedition. Four corals of the Fungia, Sarcophyton and Acropora species emitting green fluorescence...... were tested. Each of the fluorescent extracts behaves differently under denaturing conditions but complete fluorescence loss was not observed. Optimised electrophoretic conditions yielded effective separation of active fluorescent proteins in both 1DE and 2DE. Mass spectrometric analysis of the...

  7. Mass spectrometry based approach for identification and characterisation of fluorescent proteins from marine organisms

    Wojdyla, Katarzyna Iwona; Rogowska-Wrzesinska, Adelina; Wrzesinski, Krzysztof;

    2011-01-01

    We present here a new analytical strategy for identification and characterisation of fluorescent proteins from marine organisms. By applying basic proteomics tools it is possible to screen large sample collections for fluorescent proteins of desired characteristics prior to gene cloning. Our...... methodology which includes isolation, spectral characterisation, stability testing, gel-based separation and mass spectrometric identification was optimised on samples collected during the Danish Galathea 3 expedition. Four corals of the Fungia, Sarcophyton and Acropora species emitting green fluorescence...... were tested. Each of the fluorescent extracts behaves differently under denaturing conditions but complete fluorescence loss was not observed. Optimised electrophoretic conditions yielded effective separation of active fluorescent proteins in both 1DE and 2DE. Mass spectrometric analysis...

  8. Identification of chemosensory proteins for trichloroethylene in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Shitashiro, Maiko; Tanaka, Hirohide; Hong, Chang Soo; Kuroda, Akio; Takiguchi, Noboru; Ohtake, Hisao; Kato, Junichi

    2005-01-01

    The involvement of the chemotaxis gene cluster 1 (cheYZABW) and cheR in repellent responses of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to trichloroethylene (TCE) is described and three methyl-accepting chemotaxis proteins (MCPs) for TCE are identified. TCE chemotaxis assays of a number of deletion-insertion mutants of P. aeruginosa PAO1 revealed that the chemotaxis gene cluster 1 and cheR are required for negative chemotaxis to TCE. Mutant strains which contained deletions in pctA, pctB and pctC showed decrea...

  9. Identification of Novel O-Linked Glycosylated Toxoplasma Proteins by Vicia villosa Lectin Chromatography.

    Kevin Wang

    Full Text Available Toxoplasma gondii maintains its intracellular life cycle using an extraordinary arsenal of parasite-specific organelles including the inner membrane complex (IMC, rhoptries, micronemes, and dense granules. While these unique compartments play critical roles in pathogenesis, many of their protein constituents have yet to be identified. We exploited the Vicia villosa lectin (VVL to identify new glycosylated proteins that are present in these organelles. Purification of VVL-binding proteins by lectin affinity chromatography yielded a number of novel proteins that were subjected to further study, resulting in the identification of proteins from the dense granules, micronemes, rhoptries and IMC. We then chose to focus on three proteins identified by this approach, the SAG1 repeat containing protein SRS44, the rhoptry neck protein RON11 as well as a novel IMC protein we named IMC25. To assess function, we disrupted their genes by homologous recombination or CRISPR/Cas9. The knockouts were all successful, demonstrating that these proteins are not essential for invasion or intracellular survival. We also show that IMC25 undergoes substantial proteolytic processing that separates the C-terminal domain from the predicted glycosylation site. Together, we have demonstrated that lectin affinity chromatography is an efficient method of identifying new glycosylated parasite-specific proteins.

  10. Identification of Novel O-Linked Glycosylated Toxoplasma Proteins by Vicia villosa Lectin Chromatography.

    Wang, Kevin; Peng, Eric D; Huang, Amy S; Xia, Dong; Vermont, Sarah J; Lentini, Gaelle; Lebrun, Maryse; Wastling, Jonathan M; Bradley, Peter J

    2016-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii maintains its intracellular life cycle using an extraordinary arsenal of parasite-specific organelles including the inner membrane complex (IMC), rhoptries, micronemes, and dense granules. While these unique compartments play critical roles in pathogenesis, many of their protein constituents have yet to be identified. We exploited the Vicia villosa lectin (VVL) to identify new glycosylated proteins that are present in these organelles. Purification of VVL-binding proteins by lectin affinity chromatography yielded a number of novel proteins that were subjected to further study, resulting in the identification of proteins from the dense granules, micronemes, rhoptries and IMC. We then chose to focus on three proteins identified by this approach, the SAG1 repeat containing protein SRS44, the rhoptry neck protein RON11 as well as a novel IMC protein we named IMC25. To assess function, we disrupted their genes by homologous recombination or CRISPR/Cas9. The knockouts were all successful, demonstrating that these proteins are not essential for invasion or intracellular survival. We also show that IMC25 undergoes substantial proteolytic processing that separates the C-terminal domain from the predicted glycosylation site. Together, we have demonstrated that lectin affinity chromatography is an efficient method of identifying new glycosylated parasite-specific proteins. PMID:26950937

  11. Identification of two integral membrane proteins of Plasmodium falciparum

    Smythe, J.A.; Coppel, R.L.; Brown, G.V.; Ramasamy, R.; Kemp, D.J.; Anders, R.F. (Walter and Eliza Hall Institute of Medical Research, Melbourne (Australia))

    1988-07-01

    The authors describe the isolation and cloning of two integral membrane protein antigens of Plasmodium falciparum. The antigens were isolated by Triton X-114 temperature-dependent phase separation, electrophoretically transferred to nitrocellulose, and used to affinity-purify monospecific human antibodies. These antibodies were used to isolate the corresponding cDNA clones from a phage {lambda}gt11-Amp3 cDNA expression library. Clone Ag512 corresponds to a M{sub r} 55,000 merozoite rhoptry antigen, and clone Ag513 corresponds to a M{sub r} 45,000 merozoite surface antigen. Both proteins can be biosynthetically labeled with ({sup 3}H)glucosamine and ({sup 3}H)myristic acid, suggesting that they may be anchored in membranes via a glycosylphosphatidylinositol moiety. Similarities in the C-terminal sequences of the M{sub r} 45,000 merozoite surface antigen and the Trypanosoma brucei variant surface glycoproteins provides further evidence that this antigen has a glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchor.

  12. Small acid soluble proteins for rapid spore identification.

    Branda, Steven S.; Lane, Todd W.; VanderNoot, Victoria A.; Jokerst, Amanda S.

    2006-12-01

    This one year LDRD addressed the problem of rapid characterization of bacterial spores such as those from the genus Bacillus, the group that contains pathogenic spores such as B. anthracis. In this effort we addressed the feasibility of using a proteomics based approach to spore characterization using a subset of conserved spore proteins known as the small acid soluble proteins or SASPs. We proposed developing techniques that built on our previous expertise in microseparations to rapidly characterize or identify spores. An alternative SASP extraction method was developed that was amenable to both the subsequent fluorescent labeling required for laser-induced fluorescence detection and the low ionic strength requirements for isoelectric focusing. For the microseparations, both capillary isoelectric focusing and chip gel electrophoresis were employed. A variety of methods were evaluated to improve the molecular weight resolution for the SASPs, which are in a molecular weight range that is not well resolved by the current methods. Isoelectric focusing was optimized and employed to resolve the SASPs using UV absorbance detection. Proteomic signatures of native wild type Bacillus spores and clones genetically engineered to produce altered SASP patterns were assessed by slab gel electrophoresis, capillary isoelectric focusing with absorbance detection as well as microchip based gel electrophoresis employing sensitive laser-induced fluorescence detection.

  13. Rapid and accurate identification of isolates of Candida species by melting peak and melting curve analysis of the internally transcribed spacer region 2 fragment (ITS2-MCA)

    Decat, E.; van Mechelen, E.; Saerens, B.; Vermeulen, S.J.T.; Boekhout, T.; de Blaiser, S.; Vaneechoutte, M.; Deschaght, P.

    2013-01-01

    Rapid identification of clinically important yeasts can facilitate the initiation of anti-fungal therapy, since susceptibility is largely species-dependent. We evaluated melting peak and melting curve analysis of the internally transcribed spacer region 2 fragment (ITS2-MCA) as an identification too

  14. Surface protein composition of Aeromonas hydrophila strains virulent for fish: identification of a surface array protein

    The surface protein composition of members of a serogroup of Aeromonas hydrophila was examined. Immunoblotting with antiserum raised against formalinized whole cells of A. hydrophila TF7 showed a 52K S-layer protein to be the major surface protein antigen, and impermeant Sulfo-NHS-Biotin cell surface labeling showed that the 52K S-layer protein was the only protein accessible to the Sulfo-NHS-Biotin label and effectively masked underlying outer membrane (OM) proteins. In its native surface conformation the 52K S-layer protein was only weakly reactive with a lactoperoxidase 125I surface iodination procedure. A UV-induced rough lipopolysaccharide (LPS) mutant of TF7 was found to produce an intact S layer, but a deep rough LPS mutant was unable to maintain an array on the cell surface and excreted the S-layer protein into the growth medium, indicating that a minimum LPS oligosaccharide size required for A. hydrophila S-layer anchoring. The native S layer was permeable to 125I in the lactoperoxidase radiolabeling procedure, and two major OM proteins of molecular weights 30,000 and 48,000 were iodinated. The 48K species was a peptidoglycan-associated, transmembrane protein which exhibited heat-modifiable SDS solubilization behavior characteristic of a porin protein. A 50K major peptidoglycan-associated OM protein which was not radiolabeled exhibited similar SDS heat modification characteristics and possibly represents a second porin protein

  15. Identification of Arsenic Direct-Binding Proteins in Acute Promyelocytic Leukaemia Cells

    Tao Zhang

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The identification of arsenic direct-binding proteins is essential for determining the mechanism by which arsenic trioxide achieves its chemotherapeutic effects. At least two cysteines close together in the amino acid sequence are crucial to the binding of arsenic and essential to the identification of arsenic-binding proteins. In the present study, arsenic binding proteins were pulled down with streptavidin and identified using a liquid chromatograph-mass spectrometer (LC-MS/MS. More than 40 arsenic-binding proteins were separated, and redox-related proteins, glutathione S-transferase P1 (GSTP1, heat shock 70 kDa protein 9 (HSPA9 and pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM2, were further studied using binding assays in vitro. Notably, PKM2 has a high affinity for arsenic. In contrast to PKM2, GSTP1and HSPA9 did not combine with arsenic directly in vitro. These observations suggest that arsenic-mediated acute promyelocytic leukaemia (APL suppressive effects involve PKM2. In summary, we identified several arsenic binding proteins in APL cells and investigated the therapeutic mechanisms of arsenic trioxide for APL. Further investigation into specific signal pathways by which PKM2 mediates APL developments may lead to a better understanding of arsenic effects on APL.

  16. Ion soft-landing into liquids: Protein identification, separation, and purification with retention of biological activity.

    Gologan, Bogdan; Takáts, Zoltán; Alvarez, Jormarie; Wiseman, Justin M; Talaty, Nari; Ouyang, Zheng; Cooks, R Graham

    2004-12-01

    Protein ions, after mass spectrometric separation, can be soft-landed into liquid surfaces with preservation of their native structures. Retention of biological activity is strongly favored in glycerol-based surfaces but not in self-assembled monolayer solid surfaces. Soft-landing efficiency for multiply-charged hexokinase ions was found to be some four times higher for a glycerol/fructose liquid surface than for a fluorinated self-assembled monolayer surface. Soft-landing into liquid surfaces is also shown to allow (1) protein purification, (2) on-surface identification of the soft-landed material using MALDI, and (3) protein identification by in-surface tryptic digestion. Pure lysozyme was successfully isolated from different mixtures including an oxidized, partially decomposed batch of the protein and a partial tryptic digest. Liquid glycerol/carbohydrate mixtures could be used directly to record MALDI spectra on the soft-landed compounds provided they were fortified in advance with traditional MALDI matrices such as p-nitroaniline and alpha-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid. Various proteins were soft-landed and detected on-target using these types of liquid surface. Soft-landing of multiply-charged lysozyme ions onto fluorinated self-assembled monolayer surfaces was found to occur with a limited amount of neutralization, and trapped multiply-charged ions could be desorbed from the surface by laser desorption. Initial data is shown for a new approach to protein identification that combines top-down and bottom-up approaches by utilizing protein ion soft-landing from a protein mixture, followed by tryptic digestion of the landed material and detection of characteristic tryptic fragments by MALDI. PMID:15589764

  17. Gene identification and protein classification in microbial metagenomic sequence data via incremental clustering

    Li Weizhong

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The identification and study of proteins from metagenomic datasets can shed light on the roles and interactions of the source organisms in their communities. However, metagenomic datasets are characterized by the presence of organisms with varying GC composition, codon usage biases etc., and consequently gene identification is challenging. The vast amount of sequence data also requires faster protein family classification tools. Results We present a computational improvement to a sequence clustering approach that we developed previously to identify and classify protein coding genes in large microbial metagenomic datasets. The clustering approach can be used to identify protein coding genes in prokaryotes, viruses, and intron-less eukaryotes. The computational improvement is based on an incremental clustering method that does not require the expensive all-against-all compute that was required by the original approach, while still preserving the remote homology detection capabilities. We present evaluations of the clustering approach in protein-coding gene identification and classification, and also present the results of updating the protein clusters from our previous work with recent genomic and metagenomic sequences. The clustering results are available via CAMERA, (http://camera.calit2.net. Conclusion The clustering paradigm is shown to be a very useful tool in the analysis of microbial metagenomic data. The incremental clustering method is shown to be much faster than the original approach in identifying genes, grouping sequences into existing protein families, and also identifying novel families that have multiple members in a metagenomic dataset. These clusters provide a basis for further studies of protein families.

  18. Novel Accurate Bacterial Discrimination by MALDI-Time-of-Flight MS Based on Ribosomal Proteins Coding in S10-spc-alpha Operon at Strain Level S10-GERMS

    Tamura, Hiroto; Hotta, Yudai; Sato, Hiroaki

    2013-08-01

    Matrix-assisted laser-desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) is one of the most widely used mass-based approaches for bacterial identification and classification because of the simple sample preparation and extremely rapid analysis within a few minutes. To establish the accurate MALDI-TOF MS bacterial discrimination method at strain level, the ribosomal subunit proteins coded in the S 10-spc-alpha operon, which encodes half of the ribosomal subunit protein and is highly conserved in eubacterial genomes, were selected as reliable biomarkers. This method, named the S10-GERMS method, revealed that the strains of genus Pseudomonas were successfully identified and discriminated at species and strain levels, respectively; therefore, the S10-GERMS method was further applied to discriminate the pathovar of P. syringae. The eight selected biomarkers (L24, L30, S10, S12, S14, S16, S17, and S19) suggested the rapid discrimination of P. syringae at the strain (pathovar) level. The S10-GERMS method appears to be a powerful tool for rapid and reliable bacterial discrimination and successful phylogenetic characterization. In this article, an overview of the utilization of results from the S10-GERMS method is presented, highlighting the characterization of the Lactobacillus casei group and discrimination of the bacteria of genera Bacillus and Sphingopyxis despite only two and one base difference in the 16S rRNA gene sequence, respectively.

  19. Identification of bitter peptides in whey protein hydrolysate.

    Liu, Xiaowei; Jiang, Deshou; Peterson, Devin G

    2014-06-25

    Bitterness of whey protein hydrolysates (WPH) can negatively affect product quality and limit utilization in food and pharmaceutical applications. Four main bitter peptides were identified in a commercial WPH by means of sensory-guided fractionation techniques that included ultrafiltration and offline two-dimensional reverse phase chromatography. LC-TOF-MS/MS analysis revealed the amino acid sequences of the bitter peptides were YGLF, IPAVF, LLF, and YPFPGPIPN that originated from α-lactalbumin, β-lactoglobulin, serum albumin, and β-casein, respectively. Quantitative LC-MS/MS analysis reported the concentrations of YGLF, IPAVF, LLF, and YPFPGPIPN to be 0.66, 0.58, 1.33, and 2.64 g/kg powder, respectively. Taste recombination analysis of an aqueous model consisting of all four peptides was reported to explain 88% of the bitterness intensity of the 10% WPH solution. PMID:23998904

  20. PILOT_PROTEIN: identification of unmodified and modified proteins via high-resolution mass spectrometry and mixed-integer linear optimization.

    Baliban, Richard C; Dimaggio, Peter A; Plazas-Mayorca, Mariana D; Garcia, Benjamin A; Floudas, Christodoulos A

    2012-09-01

    A novel protein identification framework, PILOT_PROTEIN, has been developed to construct a comprehensive list of all unmodified proteins that are present in a living sample. It uses the peptide identification results from the PILOT_SEQUEL algorithm to initially determine all unmodified proteins within the sample. Using a rigorous biclustering approach that groups incorrect peptide sequences with other homologous sequences, the number of false positives reported is minimized. A sequence tag procedure is then incorporated along with the untargeted PTM identification algorithm, PILOT_PTM, to determine a list of all modification types and sites for each protein. The unmodified protein identification algorithm, PILOT_PROTEIN, is compared to the methods SEQUEST, InsPecT, X!Tandem, VEMS, and ProteinProspector using both prepared protein samples and a more complex chromatin digest. The algorithm demonstrates superior protein identification accuracy with a lower false positive rate. All materials are freely available to the scientific community at http://pumpd.princeton.edu. PMID:22788846

  1. New technologies in proteomics: automated excision and digestion of fluorescently stained protein gel spots and identification of proteins by MALDI-QTOF mass spectrometry

    This presentation is an overview of the techniques and systems we use for large-scale proteomics in plants. This includes a variety of 2D gel electrophoresis methods, and automation of spot-cutting, in-gel digestion, nanoLC-MS/MS tandem mass spectrometry and SEQUEST based protein identification. Examples and applications of several new technologies will also be shown, including the use of a robotic spot cutter in conjunction with high sensitivity fluorescent protein staining and the identification of proteins by redundant peptide identification in a high-throughput fashion using a hybrid MALDI-Qtof mass spectrometer

  2. An approach to large scale identification of non-obvious structural similarities between proteins

    Cherkasov Artem

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A new sequence independent bioinformatics approach allowing genome-wide search for proteins with similar three dimensional structures has been developed. By utilizing the numerical output of the sequence threading it establishes putative non-obvious structural similarities between proteins. When applied to the testing set of proteins with known three dimensional structures the developed approach was able to recognize structurally similar proteins with high accuracy. Results The method has been developed to identify pathogenic proteins with low sequence identity and high structural similarity to host analogues. Such protein structure relationships would be hypothesized to arise through convergent evolution or through ancient horizontal gene transfer events, now undetectable using current sequence alignment techniques. The pathogen proteins, which could mimic or interfere with host activities, would represent candidate virulence factors. The developed approach utilizes the numerical outputs from the sequence-structure threading. It identifies the potential structural similarity between a pair of proteins by correlating the threading scores of the corresponding two primary sequences against the library of the standard folds. This approach allowed up to 64% sensitivity and 99.9% specificity in distinguishing protein pairs with high structural similarity. Conclusion Preliminary results obtained by comparison of the genomes of Homo sapiens and several strains of Chlamydia trachomatis have demonstrated the potential usefulness of the method in the identification of bacterial proteins with known or potential roles in virulence.

  3. Protein structural classification and family identification by multifractal analysis and wavelet spectrum

    Family identification is helpful for predicting protein functions. It has been known from the literature that longer sequences of base pairs or amino acids are required to study patterns in biological sequences. Since most protein sequences are relatively short, we randomly concatenate or link the protein sequences from the same family or superfamily together to form longer protein sequences. The 6-letter model, 12-letter model, 20-letter model, the revised Schneider and Wrede scale hydrophobicity, solvent accessibility and stochastic standard state accessibility are used to convert linked protein sequences into numerical sequences. Then multifractal analyses and wavelet analysis are performed on these numerical sequences. The parameters from these analyses can be used to construct parameter spaces where each linked protein is represented by a point. The four classes of proteins, namely the α, β, α + β and α/β classes, are then distinguished in these parameter spaces. The Fisher linear discriminant algorithm is used to assess the discriminant accuracy. Numerical results indicate that the discriminant accuracies are satisfactory in separating these classes. We find that the linked proteins from the same family or superfamily tend to group together and can be separated from other linked proteins. The methods are helpful for identifying the family of an unknown protein. (general)

  4. Identification of proteins targeted by the thioredoxin superfamily in Plasmodium falciparum.

    Nicole Sturm

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The malarial parasite Plasmodium falciparum possesses a functional thioredoxin and glutathione system comprising the dithiol-containing redox proteins thioredoxin (Trx and glutaredoxin (Grx, as well as plasmoredoxin (Plrx, which is exclusively found in Plasmodium species. All three proteins belong to the thioredoxin superfamily and share a conserved Cys-X-X-Cys motif at the active site. Only a few of their target proteins, which are likely to be involved in redox reactions, are currently known. The aim of the present study was to extend our knowledge of the Trx-, Grx-, and Plrx-interactome in Plasmodium. Based on the reaction mechanism, we generated active site mutants of Trx and Grx lacking the resolving cysteine residue. These mutants were bound to affinity columns to trap target proteins from P. falciparum cell extracts after formation of intermolecular disulfide bonds. Covalently linked proteins were eluted with dithiothreitol and analyzed by mass spectrometry. For Trx and Grx, we were able to isolate 17 putatively redox-regulated proteins each. Furthermore, the approach was successfully established for Plrx, leading to the identification of 21 potential target proteins. In addition to confirming known interaction partners, we captured potential target proteins involved in various processes including protein biosynthesis, energy metabolism, and signal transduction. The identification of three enzymes involved in S-adenosylmethionine (SAM metabolism furthermore suggests that redox control is required to balance the metabolic fluxes of SAM between methyl-group transfer reactions and polyamine synthesis. To substantiate our data, the binding of the redoxins to S-adenosyl-L-homocysteine hydrolase and ornithine aminotransferase (OAT were verified using BIAcore surface plasmon resonance. In enzymatic assays, Trx was furthermore shown to enhance the activity of OAT. Our approach led to the discovery of several putatively redox-regulated proteins

  5. Identification and characterization of proteins involved in nuclear organization using Drosophila GFP protein trap lines.

    Margaret Rohrbaugh

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Strains from a collection of Drosophila GFP protein trap lines express GFP in the normal tissues where the endogenous protein is present. This collection can be used to screen for proteins distributed in the nucleus in a non-uniform pattern. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We analyzed four lines that show peripheral or punctate nuclear staining. One of these lines affects an uncharacterized gene named CG11138. The CG11138 protein shows a punctate distribution in the nuclear periphery similar to that of Drosophila insulator proteins but does not co-localize with known insulators. Interestingly, mutations in Lamin proteins result in alterations in CG11138 localization, suggesting that this protein may be a novel component of the nuclear lamina. A second line affects the Decondensation factor 31 (Df31 gene, which encodes a protein with a unique nuclear distribution that appears to segment the nucleus into four different compartments. The X-chromosome of males is confined to one of these compartments. We also find that Drosophila Nucleoplasmin (dNlp is present in regions of active transcription. Heat shock leads to loss of dNlp from previously transcribed regions of polytene chromosome without redistribution to the heat shock genes. Analysis of Stonewall (Stwl, a protein previously found to be necessary for the maintenance of germline stem cells, shows that Stwl is present in a punctate pattern in the nucleus that partially overlaps with that of known insulator proteins. Finally we show that Stwl, dNlp, and Df31 form part of a highly interactive network. The properties of other components of this network may help understand the role of these proteins in nuclear biology. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results establish screening of GFP protein trap alleles as a strategy to identify factors with novel cellular functions. Information gained from the analysis of CG11138 Stwl, dNlp, and Df31 sets the stage for future studies of these

  6. Accurate small and wide angle x-ray scattering profiles from atomic models of proteins and nucleic acids

    Nguyen, Hung T.; Pabit, Suzette A.; Meisburger, Steve P.; Pollack, Lois; Case, David A.

    2014-12-01

    A new method is introduced to compute X-ray solution scattering profiles from atomic models of macromolecules. The three-dimensional version of the Reference Interaction Site Model (RISM) from liquid-state statistical mechanics is employed to compute the solvent distribution around the solute, including both water and ions. X-ray scattering profiles are computed from this distribution together with the solute geometry. We describe an efficient procedure for performing this calculation employing a Lebedev grid for the angular averaging. The intensity profiles (which involve no adjustable parameters) match experiment and molecular dynamics simulations up to wide angle for two proteins (lysozyme and myoglobin) in water, as well as the small-angle profiles for a dozen biomolecules taken from the BioIsis.net database. The RISM model is especially well-suited for studies of nucleic acids in salt solution. Use of fiber-diffraction models for the structure of duplex DNA in solution yields close agreement with the observed scattering profiles in both the small and wide angle scattering (SAXS and WAXS) regimes. In addition, computed profiles of anomalous SAXS signals (for Rb+ and Sr2+) emphasize the ionic contribution to scattering and are in reasonable agreement with experiment. In cases where an absolute calibration of the experimental data at q = 0 is available, one can extract a count of the excess number of waters and ions; computed values depend on the closure that is assumed in the solution of the Ornstein-Zernike equations, with results from the Kovalenko-Hirata closure being closest to experiment for the cases studied here.

  7. MALDI-TOF MS is more accurate than VITEK II ANC card and API Rapid ID 32 A system for the identification of Clostridium species.

    Kim, Young Jin; Kim, Si Hyun; Park, Hyun-Jung; Park, Hae-Geun; Park, Dongchul; Song, Sae Am; Lee, Hee Joo; Yong, Dongeun; Choi, Jun Yong; Kook, Joong-Ki; Kim, Hye Ran; Shin, Jeong Hwan

    2016-08-01

    All 50 Clostridium difficile strains were definitely identified by Vitek2 system, Rapid ID 32A system, and MALDI-TOF. For 18 non-difficile Clostridium strains, the identification results were correct in 0, 2, and 17 strains by Vitek2, Rapid ID 32A, and MALDI-TOF, respectively. MALDI-TOF could be used as the primary tool for identification of Clostridium species. PMID:27296834

  8. Human neutrophil calmodulin-binding proteins: identification of the calmodulin-dependent protein phosphatase

    The molecular events in linking neutrophil activation and ligand binding to specific membrane receptors are mediated in part by an increase in intracellular Ca2+. One mechanism by which Ca2+ may trigger neutrophil activation is through Ca2+/calmodulin (CaM)-regulated proteins and enzymes. To determine which Ca2+/CaM-regulated enzymes may be present in the neutrophil, they have used Western blotting techniques and 125I-CaM to identify neutrophil CaM-binding proteins. Eleven proteins with molecular weights ranging from 230K to 13.5K bound 125I-CaM in a Ca2+-dependent manner. One predominant region of 125I-Cam binding was to a 59K protein; a protein with an identical mobility was labeled by an antisera against brain CaM-dependent phosphatase. Ca2+-dependent phosphatase activity, which was inhibited by the CaM antagonist trifluoperazine, was detected in a neutrophil extract; a radioimmunoassay for the phosphatase indicated that it was present in the extract at approximately 0.2 μg/mg protein. Most of the CaM-binding proteins, including the 59K protein, were rapidly degraded upon lysis of the neutrophil. There was a close correlation between the degradation of the 59K protein and the loss of Ca2+-dependent phosphatase activity in the neutrophil extract. Thus, human neutrophils contain numerous CaM-binding proteins which are presumably Ca2+/calmodulin-regulated enzymes and proteins; the 59K protein is a CaM-dependent phosphatase

  9. Subproteomics: identification of plasma membrane proteins from the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Navarre, Catherine; Degand, Hervé; Bennett, Keiryn L; Crawford, Janne S; Mørtz, Ejvind; Boutry, Marc

    2002-12-01

    As a consequence of their poor solubility during isoelectric focusing, integral membrane proteins are generally absent from two-dimensional gel proteome maps. In order to analyze the yeast plasma membrane proteome, a plasma membrane purification protocol was optimized in order to reduce contaminating membranes and cytosolic proteins. Specifically, the new fractionation scheme largely depleted the plasma membrane fraction of cytosolic proteins by deoxycholate stripping and ribosomal proteins by sucrose gradient flotation. The plasma membrane complement was resolved by two-dimensional electrophoresis using the cationic detergent cetyl trimethyl ammonium bromide in the first, and sodium dodecyl sulfate in the second dimension, and fifty spots were identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight mass spectometry. In spite of the presence of still contaminating ribosomal proteins, major proteins corresponded to known plasma membrane residents, the ABC transporters Pdr5p and Snq2p, the P-type H(+)-ATPase Pma1p, the glucose transporter Hxt7p, the seven transmembrane-span Mrh1p, the low affinity Fe(++) transporter Fet4p, the twelve-span Ptr2p, and the plasma membrane anchored casein kinase Yck2p. The four transmembrane-span proteins Sur7p and Nce102p were also present in the isolated plasma membranes, as well as the unknown protein Ygr266wp that probably contains a single transmembrane span. Thus, combining subcellular fractionation with adapted two-dimensional electrophoresis resulted in the identification of intrinsic plasma membrane proteins. PMID:12469340

  10. Identification of Differentially Abundant Proteins of Edwardsiella ictaluri during Iron Restriction.

    Pradeep R Dumpala

    Full Text Available Edwardsiella ictaluri is a Gram-negative facultative anaerobe intracellular bacterium that causes enteric septicemia in channel catfish. Iron is an essential inorganic nutrient of bacteria and is crucial for bacterial invasion. Reduced availability of iron by the host may cause significant stress for bacterial pathogens and is considered a signal that leads to significant alteration in virulence gene expression. However, the precise effect of iron-restriction on E. ictaluri protein abundance is unknown. The purpose of this study was to identify differentially abundant proteins of E. ictaluri during in vitro iron-restricted conditions. We applied two-dimensional difference in gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE for determining differentially abundant proteins and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI TOF/TOF MS for protein identification. Gene ontology and pathway-based functional modeling of differentially abundant proteins was also conducted. A total of 50 unique differentially abundant proteins at a minimum of 2-fold (p ≤ 0.05 difference in abundance due to iron-restriction were detected. The numbers of up- and down-regulated proteins were 37 and 13, respectively. We noted several proteins, including EsrB, LamB, MalM, MalE, FdaA, and TonB-dependent heme/hemoglobin receptor family proteins responded to iron restriction in E. ictaluri.