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Sample records for accurate phylogenetic breakpoint

  1. Detecting phylogenetic breakpoints and discordance from genome-wide alignments for species tree reconstruction.

    Ané, Cécile

    2011-01-01

    With the easy acquisition of sequence data, it is now possible to obtain and align whole genomes across multiple related species or populations. In this work, I assess the performance of a statistical method to reconstruct the whole distribution of phylogenetic trees along the genome, estimate the proportion of the genome for which a given clade is true, and infer a concordance tree that summarizes the dominant vertical inheritance pattern. There are two main issues when dealing with whole-genome alignments, as opposed to multiple genes: the size of the data and the detection of recombination breakpoints. These breakpoints partition the genomic alignment into phylogenetically homogeneous loci, where sites within a given locus all share the same phylogenetic tree topology. To delimitate these loci, I describe here a method based on the minimum description length (MDL) principle, implemented with dynamic programming for computational efficiency. Simulations show that combining MDL partitioning with Bayesian concordance analysis provides an efficient and robust way to estimate both the vertical inheritance signal and the horizontal phylogenetic signal. The method performed well both in the presence of incomplete lineage sorting and in the presence of horizontal gene transfer. A high level of systematic bias was found here, highlighting the need for good individual tree building methods, which form the basis for more elaborate gene tree/species tree reconciliation methods. PMID:21362638

  2. Chromosomal instability in Afrotheria: fragile sites, evolutionary breakpoints and phylogenetic inference from genome sequence assemblies

    Ruiz-Herrera Aurora

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Extant placental mammals are divided into four major clades (Laurasiatheria, Supraprimates, Xenarthra and Afrotheria. Given that Afrotheria is generally thought to root the eutherian tree in phylogenetic analysis of large nuclear gene data sets, the study of the organization of the genomes of afrotherian species provides new insights into the dynamics of mammalian chromosomal evolution. Here we test if there are chromosomal bands with a high tendency to break and reorganize in Afrotheria, and by analyzing the expression of aphidicolin-induced common fragile sites in three afrotherian species, whether these are coincidental with recognized evolutionary breakpoints. Results We described 29 fragile sites in the aardvark (OAF genome, 27 in the golden mole (CAS, and 35 in the elephant-shrew (EED genome. We show that fragile sites are conserved among afrotherian species and these are correlated with evolutionary breakpoints when compared to the human (HSA genome. Inddition, by computationally scanning the newly released opossum (Monodelphis domestica and chicken sequence assemblies for use as outgroups to Placentalia, we validate the HSA 3/21/5 chromosomal synteny as a rare genomic change that defines the monophyly of this ancient African clade of mammals. On the other hand, support for HSA 1/19p, which is also thought to underpin Afrotheria, is currently ambiguous. Conclusion We provide evidence that (i the evolutionary breakpoints that characterise human syntenies detected in the basal Afrotheria correspond at the chromosomal band level with fragile sites, (ii that HSA 3p/21 was in the amniote ancestor (i.e., common to turtles, lepidosaurs, crocodilians, birds and mammals and was subsequently disrupted in the lineage leading to marsupials. Its expansion to include HSA 5 in Afrotheria is unique and (iii that its fragmentation to HSA 3p/21 + HSA 5/21 in elephant and manatee was due to a fission within HSA 21 that is probably shared

  3. Chromosomal instability in Afrotheria: fragile sites, evolutionary breakpoints and phylogenetic inference from genome sequence assemblies

    Ruiz-Herrera Aurora; Robinson Terence J

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Extant placental mammals are divided into four major clades (Laurasiatheria, Supraprimates, Xenarthra and Afrotheria). Given that Afrotheria is generally thought to root the eutherian tree in phylogenetic analysis of large nuclear gene data sets, the study of the organization of the genomes of afrotherian species provides new insights into the dynamics of mammalian chromosomal evolution. Here we test if there are chromosomal bands with a high tendency to break and reorgani...

  4. Accurate phylogenetic classification of DNA fragments based onsequence composition

    McHardy, Alice C.; Garcia Martin, Hector; Tsirigos, Aristotelis; Hugenholtz, Philip; Rigoutsos, Isidore

    2006-05-01

    Metagenome studies have retrieved vast amounts of sequenceout of a variety of environments, leading to novel discoveries and greatinsights into the uncultured microbial world. Except for very simplecommunities, diversity makes sequence assembly and analysis a verychallenging problem. To understand the structure a 5 nd function ofmicrobial communities, a taxonomic characterization of the obtainedsequence fragments is highly desirable, yet currently limited mostly tothose sequences that contain phylogenetic marker genes. We show that forclades at the rank of domain down to genus, sequence composition allowsthe very accurate phylogenetic 10 characterization of genomic sequence.We developed a composition-based classifier, PhyloPythia, for de novophylogenetic sequence characterization and have trained it on adata setof 340 genomes. By extensive evaluation experiments we show that themethodis accurate across all taxonomic ranks considered, even forsequences that originate fromnovel organisms and are as short as 1kb.Application to two metagenome datasets 15 obtained from samples ofphosphorus-removing sludge showed that the method allows the accurateclassification at genus level of most sequence fragments from thedominant populations, while at the same time correctly characterizingeven larger parts of the samples at higher taxonomic levels.

  5. Accurate Reconstruction of Insertion-Deletion Histories by Statistical Phylogenetics

    Westesson, O; Lunter, G.; Paten, B; Holmes, I

    2012-01-01

    The Multiple Sequence Alignment (MSA) is a computational abstraction that represents a partial summary either of indel history, or of structural similarity. Taking the former view (indel history), it is possible to use formal automata theory to generalize the phylogenetic likelihood framework for finite substitution models (Dayhoff's probability matrices and Felsenstein's pruning algorithm) to arbitrary-length sequences. In this paper, we report results of a simulation-based benchmark of seve...

  6. Accurate reconstruction of insertion-deletion histories by statistical phylogenetics.

    Oscar Westesson

    Full Text Available The Multiple Sequence Alignment (MSA is a computational abstraction that represents a partial summary either of indel history, or of structural similarity. Taking the former view (indel history, it is possible to use formal automata theory to generalize the phylogenetic likelihood framework for finite substitution models (Dayhoff's probability matrices and Felsenstein's pruning algorithm to arbitrary-length sequences. In this paper, we report results of a simulation-based benchmark of several methods for reconstruction of indel history. The methods tested include a relatively new algorithm for statistical marginalization of MSAs that sums over a stochastically-sampled ensemble of the most probable evolutionary histories. For mammalian evolutionary parameters on several different trees, the single most likely history sampled by our algorithm appears less biased than histories reconstructed by other MSA methods. The algorithm can also be used for alignment-free inference, where the MSA is explicitly summed out of the analysis. As an illustration of our method, we discuss reconstruction of the evolutionary histories of human protein-coding genes.

  7. Phylogenetics.

    Sleator, Roy D

    2011-04-01

    The recent rapid expansion in the DNA and protein databases, arising from large-scale genomic and metagenomic sequence projects, has forced significant development in the field of phylogenetics: the study of the evolutionary relatedness of the planet's inhabitants. Advances in phylogenetic analysis have greatly transformed our view of the landscape of evolutionary biology, transcending the view of the tree of life that has shaped evolutionary theory since Darwinian times. Indeed, modern phylogenetic analysis no longer focuses on the restricted Darwinian-Mendelian model of vertical gene transfer, but must also consider the significant degree of lateral gene transfer, which connects and shapes almost all living things. Herein, I review the major tree-building methods, their strengths, weaknesses and future prospects. PMID:21249334

  8. Breakpoint Distance and PQ-Trees

    Jiang, Haitao; Chauve, Cedric; Zhu, Binhai

    The PQ-tree is a fundamental data structure that can encode large sets of permutations. It has recently been used in comparative genomics to model ancestral genomes with some uncertainty: given a phylogeny for some species, extant genomes are represented by permutations on the leaves of the tree, and each internal node in the phylogenetic tree represents an extinct ancestral genome, represented by a PQ-tree. An open problem related to this approach is then to quantify the evolution between genomes represented by PQ-trees. In this paper we present results for two problems of PQ-tree comparison motivated by this application. First, we show that the problem of comparing two PQ-trees by computing the minimum breakpoint distance among all pairs of permutations generated respectively by the two considered PQ-trees is NP-complete for unsigned permutations. Next, we consider a generalization of the classical Breakpoint Median problem, where an ancestral genome is represented by a PQ-tree and p permutations are given, with p ≥ 1, and we want to compute a permutation generated by the PQ-tree that minimizes the sum of the breakpoint distances to the p permutations. We show that this problem is Fixed-Parameter Tractable with respect to the breakpoint distance value. This last result applies both on signed and unsigned permutations, and to uni-chromosomal and multi-chromosomal permutations.

  9. DNA Probe Pooling for Rapid Delineation of Chromosomal Breakpoints

    Lu, Chun-Mei; Kwan, Johnson; Baumgartner, Adolf; Weier, Jingly F.; Wang, Mei; Escudero, Tomas; Munne' , Santiago; Zitzelsberger, Horst F.; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich

    2009-01-30

    Structural chromosome aberrations are hallmarks of many human genetic diseases. The precise mapping of translocation breakpoints in tumors is important for identification of genes with altered levels of expression, prediction of tumor progression, therapy response, or length of disease-free survival as well as the preparation of probes for detection of tumor cells in peripheral blood. Similarly, in vitro fertilization (IVF) and preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) for carriers of balanced, reciprocal translocations benefit from accurate breakpoint maps in the preparation of patient-specific DNA probes followed by a selection of normal or balanced oocytes or embryos. We expedited the process of breakpoint mapping and preparation of case-specific probes by utilizing physically mapped bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones. Historically, breakpoint mapping is based on the definition of the smallest interval between proximal and distal probes. Thus, many of the DNA probes prepared for multi-clone and multi-color mapping experiments do not generate additional information. Our pooling protocol described here with examples from thyroid cancer research and PGD accelerates the delineation of translocation breakpoints without sacrificing resolution. The turnaround time from clone selection to mapping results using tumor or IVF patient samples can be as short as three to four days.

  10. Assignment of Calibration Information to Deeper Phylogenetic Nodes is More Effective in Obtaining Precise and Accurate Divergence Time Estimates.

    Mello, Beatriz; Schrago, Carlos G

    2014-01-01

    Divergence time estimation has become an essential tool for understanding macroevolutionary events. Molecular dating aims to obtain reliable inferences, which, within a statistical framework, means jointly increasing the accuracy and precision of estimates. Bayesian dating methods exhibit the propriety of a linear relationship between uncertainty and estimated divergence dates. This relationship occurs even if the number of sites approaches infinity and places a limit on the maximum precision of node ages. However, how the placement of calibration information may affect the precision of divergence time estimates remains an open question. In this study, relying on simulated and empirical data, we investigated how the location of calibration within a phylogeny affects the accuracy and precision of time estimates. We found that calibration priors set at median and deep phylogenetic nodes were associated with higher precision values compared to analyses involving calibration at the shallowest node. The results were independent of the tree symmetry. An empirical mammalian dataset produced results that were consistent with those generated by the simulated sequences. Assigning time information to the deeper nodes of a tree is crucial to guarantee the accuracy and precision of divergence times. This finding highlights the importance of the appropriate choice of outgroups in molecular dating. PMID:24855333

  11. Setting and Revising Antibacterial Susceptibility Breakpoints

    Turnidge, John; PATERSON, DAVID L.

    2007-01-01

    Clinical microbiology laboratories need to communicate results of antibacterial susceptibility testing to prescribers. Sophisticated prescribers who are knowledgeable of the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of antibacterials may desire no more information than the MIC of the drug in question. However, most prescribers require interpretation of antibacterial susceptibility testing results. Breakpoints can assist in determining if an antibacterial is potentially useful in the treatment of ...

  12. Susceptibility testing with the sensititer breakpoint broth microdilution system.

    Doern, G V; Dascal, A; Keville, M

    1985-05-01

    The antimicrobial susceptibility profiles of a total of 318 aerobic and facultatively anaerobic bacteria (255 gram-negative bacilli and 63 gram-positive cocci) were determined, using a new commercially available breakpoint broth microdilution procedure (Sensititer Breakpoint System (SBS), Gibco Diagnostics, Inc., Madison, WI) that categorizes test results in the form of susceptibility categories: susceptible, intermediate, and resistant. Results obtained with the SBS were compared with those achieved with a standardized disk diffusion procedure. Among a total of 4,414 organism-antimicrobic comparisons, concordance between the results of the SBS and the disk diffusion procedure was observed in 3,888 cases (88.1%). Four hundred twenty-three (9.6%) minor discrepancies, 45 (1.0%) major discrepancies, and 58 (1.3%) very major discrepancies were noted. Arbitration of major and very major discrepancies with a full-range minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) procedure confirmed the results of the SBS in 53.4% of cases. A single organism-antimicrobial combination, the nonenterococcal streptococci tested against the aminoglycosides, yielded a significant number of very major errors which were arbitrated in favor of the disk diffusion result. These errors were probably due to poor growth of the test organism in the broth medium used for performing the SBS test (i.e., cation-supplemented Mueller-Hinton broth). With this exception, the SBS was found to be at least as accurate as the standardized disk diffusion procedure. PMID:3922668

  13. A Fast and Exact Algorithm for the Exemplar Breakpoint Distance.

    Shao, Mingfu; Moret, Bernard M E

    2016-05-01

    A fundamental problem in comparative genomics is to compute the distance between two genomes. For two genomes without duplicate genes, we can easily compute a variety of distance measures in linear time, but the problem is NP-hard under most models when genomes contain duplicate genes. Sankoff proposed the use of exemplars to tackle the problem of duplicate genes and gene families: each gene family is represented by a single gene (the exemplar for that family), chosen so as to optimize some metric. Unfortunately, choosing exemplars is itself an NP-hard problem. In this article, we propose a very fast and exact algorithm to compute the exemplar breakpoint distance, based on new insights in the underlying structure of genome rearrangements and exemplars. We evaluate the performance of our algorithm on simulation data and compare its performance to the best effort to date (a divide-and-conquer approach), showing that our algorithm runs much faster and scales much better. We also devise a new algorithm for the intermediate breakpoint distance problem, which can then be applied to assign orthologs. We compare our algorithm with the state-of-the-art method MSOAR by assigning orthologs among five well annotated mammalian genomes, showing that our algorithm runs much faster and is slightly more accurate than MSOAR. PMID:26953781

  14. Increasing the data size to accurately reconstruct the phylogenetic relationships between nine subgroups of the Drosophila melanogaster species group (Drosophilidae, Diptera).

    Yang, Yong; Hou, Zhuo-Cheng; Qian, Yuan-Huai; Kang, Han; Zeng, Qing-Tao

    2012-01-01

    Previous phylogenetic analyses of the melanogaster species group have led to conflicting hypotheses concerning their relationship; therefore the addition of new sequence data is necessary to discover the phylogeny of this species group. Here we present new data derived from 17 genes and representing 48 species to reconstruct the phylogeny of the melanogaster group. A variety of statistical tests, as well as maximum likelihood mapping analysis, were performed to estimate data quality, suggesting that all genes had a high degree of contribution to resolve the phylogeny. Individual locus was analyzed using maximum likelihood (ML), and the concatenated dataset (12,988 bp) were analyzed using partitioned maximum likelihood (ML) and Bayesian analyses. Separated analysis produced various phylogenetic relationships, however, phylogenetic topologies from ML and Bayesian analysis based on concatenated dataset, at the subgroup level, were completely identical to each other with high levels of support. Our results recovered three major clades: the ananassae subgroup, followed by the montium subgroup, the melanogaster subgroup and the oriental subgroups form the third monophyletic clade, in which melanogaster (takahashii, suzukii) forms one subclade and ficusphila [eugracilis (elegans, rhopaloa)] forms another. However, more data are necessary to determine the phylogenetic position of Drosophila lucipennis which proved difficult to place. PMID:21985965

  15. Kalman Filter Track Fits and Track Breakpoint Analysis

    Astier, Pierre; Cardini, Alessandro; Cousins, Robert D.; Letessier-Selvon, Antoine; Popov, Boris A.; Vinogradova, Tatiana

    1999-01-01

    We give an overview of track fitting using the Kalman filter method in the NOMAD detector at CERN, and emphasize how the wealth of by-product information can be used to analyze track breakpoints (discontinuities in track parameters caused by scattering, decay, etc.). After reviewing how this information has been previously exploited by others, we describe extensions which add power to breakpoint detection and characterization. We show how complete fits to the entire track, with breakpoint par...

  16. Carbapenem susceptibility breakpoints, clinical implications with the moving target.

    O'Donnell, J Nicholas; Miglis, Cristina M; Lee, Jane Y; Tuvell, Merika; Lertharakul, Tina; Scheetz, Marc H

    2016-01-01

    Carbapenems are primary agents used to treat a variety of Gram-negative multi-drug resistant infections. In parallel with increasing use, increasing resistance to carbapenem agents has manifested as increased minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs). To attempt to improve clinical outcomes with carbapenems, the Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute and the Food Drug Administration decreased susceptibility breakpoints. The European equivalent expert committee, the European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing, also utilizes lower MIC susceptibility breakpoints. This review focuses on the rationale for recent breakpoint changes and the associated clinical outcomes for patients treated with carbapenems for infections with varying MICs proximal to the breakpoint. Supporting pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics that underpin the breakpoints are also reviewed. PMID:26918486

  17. Cytogenetic effects of radiotherapy. Breakpoint distribution in induced chromosome aberrations

    A total of 660 breakpoints were identified in the chromosome aberrations detected in lymphocytes from cancer patients after radiotherapy. The results show that chromosomes 1, 3, and 7 were significantly more affected than other chromosomes by ionizing radiation in vivo. Chromosome arms 1p, 1q, 7q, and 11p were also significantly more affected. Some bands also showed a special sensitivity to radiation, and band 1q32 was the most affected. This band is proposed as a hot point for the clastogenic effect of ionizing radiation. A significant clustering of breakpoints in G bands was also found, especially at the telomeres, as previously described by other authors. Clustering of breakpoints was also observed in bands where fragile sites, protooncogenes, breakpoints involved in chromosomal cancer rearrangements, and breakpoints involved in chromosomal evolution of the Hominoidea are located

  18. Kalman filter track fits and track breakpoint analysis

    Astier, Pierre; Cardini, Alessandro; Cousins, Robert D. E-mail: cousins@physics.ucla.edu; Letessier-Selvon, Antoine; Popov, Boris A.; Vinogradova, Tatiana

    2000-08-01

    We give an overview of track fitting using the Kalman filter method in the NOMAD detector at CERN, and emphasize how the wealth of by-product information can be used to analyze track breakpoints (discontinuities in track parameters caused by scattering, decay, etc.). After reviewing how this information has been previously exploited by others, we describe extensions which add power to breakpoint detection and characterization. We show how complete fits to the entire track, with breakpoint parameters added, can be easily obtained from the information from unbroken fits. Tests inspired by the Fisher F-test can then be used to judge breakpoints. Signed quantities (such as change in momentum at the breakpoint) can supplement unsigned quantities such as the various chisquares. We illustrate the method with electrons from real data, and with Monte Carlo simulations of pion decays.

  19. Kalman filter track fits and track breakpoint analysis

    We give an overview of track fitting using the Kalman filter method in the NOMAD detector at CERN, and emphasize how the wealth of by-product information can be used to analyze track breakpoints (discontinuities in track parameters caused by scattering, decay, etc.). After reviewing how this information has been previously exploited by others, we describe extensions which add power to breakpoint detection and characterization. We show how complete fits to the entire track, with breakpoint parameters added, can be easily obtained from the information from unbroken fits. Tests inspired by the Fisher F-test can then be used to judge breakpoints. Signed quantities (such as change in momentum at the breakpoint) can supplement unsigned quantities such as the various chisquares. We illustrate the method with electrons from real data, and with Monte Carlo simulations of pion decays

  20. Kalman Filter Track Fits and Track Breakpoint Analysis

    Astier, Pierre; Cousins, R D; Letessier-Selvon, A A; Popov, B A; Vinogradova, T G; Astier, Pierre; Cardini, Alessandro; Cousins, Robert D.; Letessier-Selvon, Antoine; Popov, Boris A.; Vinogradova, Tatiana

    2000-01-01

    We give an overview of track fitting using the Kalman filter method in the NOMAD detector at CERN, and emphasize how the wealth of by-product information can be used to analyze track breakpoints (discontinuities in track parameters caused by scattering, decay, etc.). After reviewing how this information has been previously exploited by others, we describe extensions which add power to breakpoint detection and characterization. We show how complete fits to the entire track, with breakpoint parameters added, can be easily obtained from the information from unbroken fits. Tests inspired by the Fisher F-test can then be used to judge breakpoints. Signed quantities (such as change in momentum at the breakpoint) can supplement unsigned quantities such as the various chisquares. We illustrate the method with electrons from real data, and with Monte Carlo simulations of pion decays.

  1. Development of Doxycycline MIC and Disk Diffusion Interpretive Breakpoints and Revision of Tetracycline Breakpoints for Streptococcus pneumoniae

    Dallas, Steven D.; McGee, Lesley; Limbago, Brandi; Patel, Jean B; McElmeel, M. Leticia; Fulcher, Letitia C.; Lonsway, David R.; Jorgensen, James H.

    2013-01-01

    A study was performed to derive susceptibility testing interpretive breakpoints for doxycycline with Streptococcus pneumoniae and to reassess breakpoints for tetracycline using the requirements defined in Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) document M23-A3. Tetracycline and doxycycline MICs and disk diffusion zone sizes were determined on 189 isolates selected from the 2009-2010 CDC Active Bacterial Core surveillance strain collection according to the testing methods described ...

  2. Unit roots and structural breakpoints in China's macroeconomic and financial time series

    LIANG Qi; TENG Jianzhou

    2006-01-01

    This paper applies unit-root tests to 10 Chinese macroeconomic and financial time series that allow for the possibility of up to two endogenous structural breaks.We found that 6 of the series,i.e.,GDP,GDP per capita,employment,bank credit,deposit liabilities and investment,can be more accurately characterized as a segmented trend stationarity process around one or two structural breakpoints as opposed to a stochastic unit root process.Our findings have important implications for policy-makers to formulate long-term growth strategy and short-run stabilization policies,as well as causality analysis among the series.

  3. Rapid mapping of chromosomal breakpoints: from blood to BAC in 20 days.

    Mei Wang

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Structural chromosome aberrations and associated segmental or chromosomal aneusomies are major causes of reproductive failure in humans. Despite the fact that carriers of reciprocal balanced translocation often have no other clinical symptoms or disease, impaired chromosome homologue pairing in meiosis and karyokinesis errors lead to over-representation of translocations carriers in the infertile population and in recurrent pregnancy loss patients. At present, clinicians have no means to select healthy germ cells or balanced zygotes in vivo, but in vitro fertilization (IVF followed by preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD offers translocation carriers a chance to select balanced or normal embryos for transfer. Although a combination of telomeric and centromeric probes can differentiate embryos that are unbalanced from normal or unbalanced ones, a seemingly random position of breakpoints in these IVF-patients poses a serious obstacle to differentiating between normal and balanced embryos, which for most translocation couples, is desirable. Using a carrier with reciprocal translocation t(4;13 as an example, we describe our state-of-the-art approach to the preparation of patient-specific DNA probes that span or 'extent' the breakpoints. With the techniques and resources described here, most breakpoints can be accurately mapped in a matter of days using carrier lymphocytes, and a few extra days are allowed for PGD-probe optimization. The optimized probes will then be suitable for interphase cell analysis, a prerequisite for PGD since blastomeres are biopsied from normally growing day 3--embryos regardless of their position in the mitotic cell cycle. Furthermore, routine application of these rapid methods should make PGD even more affordable for translocation carriers enrolled in IVF programs.

  4. Rapid mapping of chromosomal breakpoints: from blood to BAC in 20 days.

    Lu, Chun-Mei; Kwan, Johnson; Weier, Jingly F.; Baumgartner, Aldof; Wang, Mei; Escudero, Tomas; Munne, Santiago; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich

    2009-02-25

    Structural chromosome aberrations and associated segmental or chromosomal aneusomies are major causes of reproductive failure in humans. Despite the fact that carriers of reciprocal balanced translocation often have no other clinical symptoms or disease, impaired chromosome homologue pairing in meiosis and karyokinesis errors lead to over-representation of translocations carriers in the infertile population and in recurrent pregnancy loss patients. At present, clinicians have no means to select healthy germ cells or balanced zygotes in vivo, but in vitro fertilization (IVF) followed by preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) offers translocation carriers a chance to select balanced or normal embryos for transfer. Although a combination of telomeric and centromeric probes can differentiate embryos that are unbalanced from normal or unbalanced ones, a seemingly random position of breakpoints in these IVF-patients poses a serious obstacle to differentiating between normal and balanced embryos, which for most translocation couples, is desirable. Using a carrier with reciprocal translocation t(4;13) as an example, we describe our state-of-the-art approach to the preparation of patient-specific DNA probes that span or 'extent' the breakpoints. With the techniques and resources described here, most breakpoints can be accurately mapped in a matter of days using carrier lymphocytes, and a few extra days are allowed for PGD-probe optimization. The optimized probes will then be suitable for interphase cell analysis, a prerequisite for PGD since blastomeres are biopsied from normally growing day 3 - embryos regardless of their position in the mitotic cell cycle. Furthermore, routine application of these rapid methods should make PGD even more affordable for translocation carriers enrolled in IVF programs.

  5. Fast detection of deletion breakpoints using quantitative PCR

    Gulshara Abildinova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The routine detection of large and medium copy number variants (CNVs is well established. Hemizygotic deletions or duplications in the large Duchenne muscular dystrophy DMD gene responsible for Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophies are routinely identified using multiple ligation probe amplification and array-based comparative genomic hybridization. These methods only map deleted or duplicated exons, without providing the exact location of breakpoints. Commonly used methods for the detection of CNV breakpoints include long-range PCR and primer walking, their success being limited by the deletion size, GC content and presence of DNA repeats. Here, we present a strategy for detecting the breakpoints of medium and large CNVs regardless of their size. The hemizygous deletion of exons 45-50 in the DMD gene and the large autosomal heterozygous PARK2 deletion were used to demonstrate the workflow that relies on real-time quantitative PCR to narrow down the deletion region and Sanger sequencing for breakpoint confirmation. The strategy is fast, reliable and cost-efficient, making it amenable to widespread use in genetic laboratories.

  6. On the Complexity of Rearrangement Problems under the Breakpoint Distance

    Kovac, Jakub

    2011-01-01

    Tannier et al. introduced a generalization of breakpoint distance for multichromosomal genomes. They showed that the median problem under the breakpoint distance is solvable in polynomial time in the multichromosomal circular and mixed models. This is intriguing, since in all other rearrangement models (DCJ, reversal, unichromosomal or multilinear breakpoint models), the problem is NP-hard. The complexity of the small or even the large phylogeny problem under the breakpoint distance remained an open problem. We improve the algorithm for the median problem and show that it is equivalent to the problem of finding maximum cardinality non-bipartite matching (under linear reduction). On the other hand, we prove that the more general small phylogeny problem is NP-hard. Surprisingly, we show that it is already NP-hard (or even APX-hard) for 4 species (a quartet phylogeny). In other words, while finding an ancestor for 3 species is easy, already finding two ancestors for 4 species is hard. We also show that, in the u...

  7. Fast detection of deletion breakpoints using quantitative PCR.

    Abildinova, Gulshara; Abdrakhmanova, Zhanara; Tuchinsky, Helena; Nesher, Elimelech; Pinhasov, Albert; Raskin, Leon

    2016-06-16

    The routine detection of large and medium copy number variants (CNVs) is well established. Hemizygotic deletions or duplications in the large Duchenne muscular dystrophy DMD gene responsible for Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophies are routinely identified using multiple ligation probe amplification and array-based comparative genomic hybridization. These methods only map deleted or duplicated exons, without providing the exact location of breakpoints. Commonly used methods for the detection of CNV breakpoints include long-range PCR and primer walking, their success being limited by the deletion size, GC content and presence of DNA repeats. Here, we present a strategy for detecting the breakpoints of medium and large CNVs regardless of their size. The hemizygous deletion of exons 45-50 in the DMD gene and the large autosomal heterozygous PARK2 deletion were used to demonstrate the workflow that relies on real-time quantitative PCR to narrow down the deletion region and Sanger sequencing for breakpoint confirmation. The strategy is fast, reliable and cost-efficient, making it amenable to widespread use in genetic laboratories. PMID:27333265

  8. Evaluation of Oxacillin and Cefoxitin Disk and MIC Breakpoints for Prediction of Methicillin Resistance in Human and Veterinary Isolates of Staphylococcus intermedius Group.

    Wu, M T; Burnham, C-A D; Westblade, L F; Dien Bard, J; Lawhon, S D; Wallace, M A; Stanley, T; Burd, E; Hindler, J; Humphries, R M

    2016-03-01

    Staphylococcus pseudintermedius is a coagulase-positive species that colonizes the nares and anal mucosa of healthy dogs and cats. Human infections with S. pseudintermedius range in severity from bite wounds and rhinosinusitis to endocarditis; historically, these infections were thought to be uncommon, but new laboratory methods suggest that their true incidence is underreported. Oxacillin and cefoxitin disk and MIC tests were evaluated for the detection of mecA- or mecC-mediated methicillin resistance in 115 human and animal isolates of the Staphylococcus intermedius group (SIG), including 111 Staphylococcus pseudintermediusand 4 Staphylococcus delphini isolates, 37 of which were mecA positive. The disk and MIC breakpoints evaluated included the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) M100-S25 Staphylococcus aureus/Staphylococcus lugdunensis oxacillin MIC breakpoints and cefoxitin disk and MIC breakpoints, the CLSI M100-S25 coagulase-negative Staphylococcus (CoNS) oxacillin MIC breakpoint and cefoxitin disk breakpoint, the CLSI VET01-S2 S. pseudintermedius oxacillin MIC and disk breakpoints, and the European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST) S. pseudintermedius cefoxitin disk breakpoint. The oxacillin results interpreted by the VET01-S2 (disk and MIC) and M100-S25 CoNS (MIC) breakpoints agreed with the results of mecA/mecC PCR for all isolates, with the exception of one false-resistant result (1.3% of mecA/mecC PCR-negative isolates). In contrast, cefoxitin tests performed poorly, ranging from 3 to 89% false susceptibility (very major errors) and 0 to 48% false resistance (major errors). BD Phoenix, bioMérieux Vitek 2, and Beckman Coulter MicroScan commercial automated susceptibility test panel oxacillin MIC results were also evaluated and demonstrated >95% categorical agreement with mecA/mecC PCR results if interpreted by using the M100-S25 CoNS breakpoint. The Alere penicillin-binding protein 2a test accurately detected all

  9. Breakpoint characterization of the der(19)t(11;19)(q13;p13) in the ovarian cancer cell line SKOV-3.

    Onkes, Wiebke; Fredrik, Regina; Micci, Francesca; Schönbeck, Benjamin J; Martin-Subero, Jose I; Ullmann, Reinhard; Hilpert, Felix; Bräutigam, Karen; Janssen, Ottmar; Maass, Nicolai; Siebert, Reiner; Heim, Sverre; Arnold, Norbert; Weimer, Jörg

    2013-05-01

    About 20% of ovarian carcinomas show alterations of 19p13 and/or 19q13 in the form of added extra material whose origin often is from chromosome 11. Based on earlier spectral karyotype analysis of the ovarian cancer cell line SKOV-3, which shows an unbalanced translocation der(19)t(11;19), the aim of this study was to determine the precise breakpoints of that derivative chromosome. After rough delimitation of the breakpoints of microdissected derivative chromosomes by array analysis, we designed a matrix of primers spanning 11q13.2 and 19p13.2 detecting multiple amplicons on genomic and cDNA. Sequencing the amplicons, accurate localization of both breakpoints on both chromosomes was possible and we found that exon 14 of HOOK2 from chromosome 19 and exon 2 of ACTN3 from chromosome 11 were fused in the derivative chromosome. The breakpoint in the HOOK2 gene was in an intrinsic triplet of nucleic acids leading to a shift in the ACTN3 reading frame in the derivative chromosome. This frameshift alteration should give rise to an early stop codon causing a loss of function of ACTN3. Signals in two-dimensional Western blotting exactly match to calculated molecular mass and the isoelectric point of the fusion protein. PMID:23362175

  10. Continuous Piecewise Linear δ-Approximations for MINLP Problems. I. Minimal Breakpoint Systems for Univariate Functions

    Steffen Rebennack; Josef Kallrath

    2012-01-01

    For univariate functions, we compute optimal breakpoint systems subject to the condition that the piecewise linear approximation (or, under- and overestimator) never deviates more than a given δ-tolerance from the original function, over a given finite interval. The linear approximators, under- and overestimators involve shift variables at the breakpoints leading to a small number of breakpoints while still ensuring continuity over the full interval. We develop two mixed integer non-linear pr...

  11. Investigation of the breakpoint region in stacks with a finite number of intrinsic Josephson junctions

    Shukrinov, Yu M.; Mahfouzi, F.; Pedersen, Niels Falsig

    2007-01-01

    We study the breakpoint region on the outermost branch of current-voltage characteristics of the stacks with di_erent number of intrinsic Josephson junctions. E_ect of the boundary conditions on the breakpoint region is demonstrated. At periodic boundary conditions the breakpoint region is absent...... for stacks with even number of junctions. For stacks with odd number of junctions and for stacks with nonperiodic boundary conditions the breakpoint current is increased with number of junctions and saturated at the value corresponding to the periodic boundary conditions. The region of saturation and...

  12. Antimicrobial breakpoint estimation accounting for variability in pharmacokinetics

    Nekka Fahima

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic (PK/PD indices are increasingly being used in the microbiological field to assess the efficacy of a dosing regimen. In contrast to methods using MIC, PK/PD-based methods reflect in vivo conditions and are more predictive of efficacy. Unfortunately, they entail the use of one PK-derived value such as AUC or Cmax and may thus lead to biased efficiency information when the variability is large. The aim of the present work was to evaluate the efficacy of a treatment by adjusting classical breakpoint estimation methods to the situation of variable PK profiles. Methods and results We propose a logical generalisation of the usual AUC methods by introducing the concept of "efficiency" for a PK profile, which involves the efficacy function as a weight. We formulated these methods for both classes of concentration- and time-dependent antibiotics. Using drug models and in silico approaches, we provide a theoretical basis for characterizing the efficiency of a PK profile under in vivo conditions. We also used the particular case of variable drug intake to assess the effect of the variable PK profiles generated and to analyse the implications for breakpoint estimation. Conclusion Compared to traditional methods, our weighted AUC approach gives a more powerful PK/PD link and reveals, through examples, interesting issues about the uniqueness of therapeutic outcome indices and antibiotic resistance problems.

  13. European gene mapping project (EUROGEM) : Breakpoint panels for human chromosomes based on the CEPH reference families

    Attwood, J; Bryant, SP; Bains, R; Povey, R; Povey, S; Rebello, M; Kapsetaki, M; Moschonas, NK; Grzeschik, KH; Otto, M; Dixon, M; Sudworth, HE; Kooy, RF; Wright, A; Teague, P; Terrenato, L; Vergnaud, G; Monfouilloux, S; Weissenbach, J; Alibert, O; Dib, C; Faure, S; Bakker, E; Pearson, NM; Vossen, RHAM; Gal, A; MuellerMyhsok, B; Cann, HM; Spurr, NK

    1996-01-01

    Meiotic breakpoint panels for human chromosomes 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 13, 14, 15, 17; 18, 20 and X were constructed from genotypes from the CEPH reference families. Each recombinant chromosome included has a breakpoint well-supported with reference to defined quantitative criteria. The panels

  14. Impact of New Antifungal Breakpoints on Antifungal Resistance in Candida Species

    Fothergill, Annette W.; Sutton, Deanna A.; McCarthy, Dora I.; Wiederhold, Nathan P.

    2014-01-01

    We reviewed our antifungal susceptibility data for micafungin, anidulafungin, fluconazole, and voriconazole against Candida species and compared resistance rates determined by the previous and recently revised CLSI antifungal breakpoints. With the new breakpoints, resistance was significantly increased for micafungin (from 0.8% to 7.6%), anidulafungin (from 0.9% to 7.3%), and voriconazole (from 6.1% to 18.4%) against Candida glabrata. Resistance was also increased for fluconazole against Cand...

  15. Determination of IVC breakpoint for Josephson junction stack. Periodic and nonperiodic (with γ = 0) boundary conditions

    Serdyukova, S. I.

    2013-05-01

    We prove that in the case of periodic and nonperiodic (with γ = 0) boundary conditions, the calculation of the current-voltage characteristic for a stack of n intrinsic Josephson junctions reduces to solving a unique equation. The current-voltage characteristic V( I) has the shape of a hysteresis loop. On the back branch of the loop, V( I) rapidly decreases to zero near the breakpoint I b . We succeeded to derive an equation determining the approximate breakpoint location.

  16. Pharmacodynamics of Doxycycline and Tetracycline against Staphylococcus pseudintermedius: Proposal of Canine-Specific Breakpoints for Doxycycline

    Maaland, Marit Gaastra; Papich, Mark G.; Turnidge, John; Guardabassi, Luca

    2013-01-01

    Doxycycline is a tetracycline that has been licensed for veterinary use in some countries, but no clinical breakpoints are available for veterinary pathogens. The objectives of this study were (i) to establish breakpoints for doxycycline and (ii) to evaluate the use of tetracycline as a surrogate to predict the doxycycline susceptibility of Staphylococcus pseudintermedius isolates. MICs and inhibition zone diameters were determined for 168 canine S. pseudintermedius isolates according to ...

  17. Susceptibility of Extended-Spectrum-β-Lactamase-Producing Enterobacteriaceae According to the New CLSI Breakpoints

    Wang, Peng; Hu, Fupin; Xiong, Zizhong; Ye, Xinyu; Zhu, Demei; Wang, Yun F. (Wayne); Wang, Minggui

    2011-01-01

    In 2010 the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) lowered the susceptibility breakpoints of some cephalosporins and aztreonam for Enterobacteriaceae and eliminated the need to perform screening for extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs) and confirmatory tests. The aim of this study was to determine how many ESBL-producing strains of three common species of Enterobacteriaceae test susceptible using the new breakpoints. As determined with the CLSI screening and confirmatory tests, ...

  18. On the Existence of Step-To-Step Breakpoint Transitions in Accelerated Sprinting

    McGhie, David; Danielsen, Jørgen; Sandbakk, Øyvind; Haugen, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Accelerated running is characterised by a continuous change of kinematics from one step to the next. It has been argued that breakpoints in the step-to-step transitions may occur, and that these breakpoints are an essential characteristic of dynamics during accelerated running. We examined this notion by comparing a continuous exponential curve fit (indicating continuity, i.e., smooth transitions) with linear piecewise fitting (indicating breakpoint). We recorded the kinematics of 24 well trained sprinters during a 25 m sprint run with start from competition starting blocks. Kinematic data were collected for 24 anatomical landmarks in 3D, and the location of centre of mass (CoM) was calculated from this data set. The step-to-step development of seven variables (four related to CoM position, and ground contact time, aerial time and step length) were analysed by curve fitting. In most individual sprints (in total, 41 sprints were successfully recorded) no breakpoints were identified for the variables investigated. However, for the mean results (i.e., the mean curve for all athletes) breakpoints were identified for the development of vertical CoM position, angle of acceleration and distance between support surface and CoM. It must be noted that for these variables the exponential fit showed high correlations (r2>0.99). No relationship was found between the occurrences of breakpoints for different variables as investigated using odds ratios (Mantel-Haenszel Chi-square statistic). It is concluded that although breakpoints regularly appear during accelerated running, these are not the rule and thereby unlikely a fundamental characteristic, but more likely an expression of imperfection of performance. PMID:27467387

  19. Case-specific, breakpoint-spanning DNA probes for analysis of single interphase cells.

    Lersch, R A; Fung, J; Munné, S; Pedersen, R A; Weier, H U

    2000-01-01

    Balanced reciprocal translocations are known to interfere with homolog pairing in meiosis. Many individuals carrying such chromosomal abnormalities suffer from reduced fertility or spontaneous abortions and seek help in the form of assisted reproductive technology. Although most translocations are relatively easy to detect in metaphase cells, the majority of embryonic cells biopsied in the course of in vitro fertilization (IVF) procedures are in interphase. These nuclei are, thus, unsuitable for analysis by chromosome banding or painting using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Our assay, based on FISH detection of breakpoint-spanning DNA probes, identifies translocations in interphase nuclei by microscopic inspection of hybridization domains. Probes are selected that span the breakpoint regions on normal homologs. The probes should hybridize to several hundred kilobases of DNA flanking the breakpoint. The two breakpoint-spanning DNA probes for the translocation chromosomes are labeled in separate colors (e.g., red and green). The translocation event producing two fused red/green hybridization domains can then be detected in interphase cell nuclei using a fluorescence microscope. We applied this scheme to analyze somatic and germ cells from 21 translocation patients, each with distinct breakpoints. Here, we summarize our experience and provide a description of strategies, cost estimates, as well as typical time frames. PMID:11142758

  20. TIPP: taxonomic identification and phylogenetic profiling

    Nguyen, Nam-phuong; Mirarab, Siavash; Liu, Bo; Pop, Mihai; Warnow, Tandy

    2014-01-01

    Motivation: Abundance profiling (also called ‘phylogenetic profiling’) is a crucial step in understanding the diversity of a metagenomic sample, and one of the basic techniques used for this is taxonomic identification of the metagenomic reads. Results: We present taxon identification and phylogenetic profiling (TIPP), a new marker-based taxon identification and abundance profiling method. TIPP combines SAT\\'e-enabled phylogenetic placement a phylogenetic placement method, with statistical techniques to control the classification precision and recall, and results in improved abundance profiles. TIPP is highly accurate even in the presence of high indel errors and novel genomes, and matches or improves on previous approaches, including NBC, mOTU, PhymmBL, MetaPhyler and MetaPhlAn. Availability and implementation: Software and supplementary materials are available at http://www.cs.utexas.edu/users/phylo/software/sepp/tipp-submission/. Contact: warnow@illinois.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:25359891

  1. Concurrent progressive ratio schedules: Effects of reinforcer probability on breakpoint and response allocation.

    Jarmolowicz, David P; Sofis, Michael J; Darden, Alexandria C

    2016-07-01

    Although progressive ratio (PR) schedules have been used to explore effects of a range of reinforcer parameters (e.g., magnitude, delay), effects of reinforcer probability remain underexplored. The present project used independently progressing concurrent PR PR schedules to examine effects of reinforcer probability on PR breakpoint (highest completed ratio prior to a session terminating 300s pause) and response allocation. The probability of reinforcement on one lever remained at 100% across all conditions while the probability of reinforcement on the other lever was systematically manipulated (i.e., 100%, 50%, 25%, 12.5%, and a replication of 25%). Breakpoints systematically decreased with decreasing reinforcer probabilities while breakpoints on the control lever remained unchanged. Patterns of switching between the two levers were well described by a choice-by-choice unit price model that accounted for the hyperbolic discounting of the value of probabilistic reinforcers. PMID:27131782

  2. Ring chromosome 13: lack of distinct syndromes based on different breakpoints on 13q.

    Brandt, C A; Hertz, J M; Petersen, M B; Vogel, F.; Noer, H; Mikkelsen, M

    1992-01-01

    A stillborn male child with anencephaly and multiple malformations was found to have the karyotype 46,XY,r(13) (p11q21.1). The breakpoint at 13q21.1, determined by high resolution banding, is the most proximal breakpoint ever reported in patients with ring chromosome 13. In situ hybridisation with the probe L1.26 confirmed the derivation from chromosome 13 and DNA polymorphism analysis showed maternal origin of the ring chromosome. Our results, together with a review of previous reports of ca...

  3. Improved structural characterization of chromosomal breakpoints using high resolution custom array-CGH

    Lindstrand, A.; Schoumans, J.; Gustavsson, P.; Hanemaaijer, N.; Malmgren, H.; Blennow, E.

    2010-01-01

    Array-CGH is a powerful tool for the rapid detection of genomic imbalances. By customizing the array it is possible to increase the resolution in a targeted genomic region of interest and determine the structure of the breakpoints with high accuracy, as well as to detect very small imbalances. We ha

  4. Distribution of X-ray-induced chromosome breakpoints in Down syndrome lymphocytes

    Down syndrome (DS) individuals are known to be predisposed to develop leukemia and their lymphocytes are highly sensitive to the induction of chromosome aberrations by X-rays. A study was conducted to identify the chromosome breakpoints and to evaluate whether site specificity for chromosome breakage and rearrangement may exist which may explain the predisposition phenomenon. DS lymphocytes at the G1 phase of the cell cycle were irradiated with 300, 450, and 600 rad of X-rays. Cells were harvested after 3 days in culture and 193 G-banded karyotypes were analyzed to identify the induced chromosome abnormalities. Out of 273 breakpoints identified, 122 were involved in the formation of stable chromosome rearrangements and 151 in the formation of unstable abnormalities. The Poisson analysis of these breakpoints demonstrated that 16 chromosome bands located in chromosomes 1, 3, 7, 12, 17, 19 and X were preferentially involved in breakage and rearrangement (P less than 0.05). These 16 bands are also found to be locations of cancer breakpoints, oncogenes, or fragile sites. Many abnormal cells were observed to carry stable chromosome rearrangements only. Therefore, these cells are presumed to be compatible with survival and to be initiated in the transformation process. We propose that similar stable and site-specific chromosome rearrangements may exist in proliferating cells in DS individuals after exposure to clastogens and that this abnormality predisposes them to develop leukemia

  5. Distribution of X-ray-induced chromosome breakpoints in Down syndrome lymphocytes

    Shafik, H.M.; Au, W.W.; Whorton, E.B. Jr.; Legator, M.S. (Univ. of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston (USA))

    1990-01-01

    Down syndrome (DS) individuals are known to be predisposed to develop leukemia and their lymphocytes are highly sensitive to the induction of chromosome aberrations by X-rays. A study was conducted to identify the chromosome breakpoints and to evaluate whether site specificity for chromosome breakage and rearrangement may exist which may explain the predisposition phenomenon. DS lymphocytes at the G1 phase of the cell cycle were irradiated with 300, 450, and 600 rad of X-rays. Cells were harvested after 3 days in culture and 193 G-banded karyotypes were analyzed to identify the induced chromosome abnormalities. Out of 273 breakpoints identified, 122 were involved in the formation of stable chromosome rearrangements and 151 in the formation of unstable abnormalities. The Poisson analysis of these breakpoints demonstrated that 16 chromosome bands located in chromosomes 1, 3, 7, 12, 17, 19 and X were preferentially involved in breakage and rearrangement (P less than 0.05). These 16 bands are also found to be locations of cancer breakpoints, oncogenes, or fragile sites. Many abnormal cells were observed to carry stable chromosome rearrangements only. Therefore, these cells are presumed to be compatible with survival and to be initiated in the transformation process. We propose that similar stable and site-specific chromosome rearrangements may exist in proliferating cells in DS individuals after exposure to clastogens and that this abnormality predisposes them to develop leukemia.

  6. Data Mining Validation of Fluconazole Breakpoints Established by the European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing▿

    Cuesta, Isabel; Bielza, Concha; Larrañaga, Pedro; Cuenca-Estrella, Manuel; Laguna, Fernando; Rodriguez-Pardo, Dolors; Almirante, Benito; Pahissa, Albert; Rodríguez-Tudela, Juan L.

    2009-01-01

    European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST) breakpoints classify Candida strains with a fluconazole MIC ≤ 2 mg/liter as susceptible, those with a fluconazole MIC of 4 mg/liter as representing intermediate susceptibility, and those with a fluconazole MIC > 4 mg/liter as resistant. Machine learning models are supported by complex statistical analyses assessing whether the results have statistical relevance. The aim of this work was to use supervised classification algorithms to analyze the clinical data used to produce EUCAST fluconazole breakpoints. Five supervised classifiers (J48, Correlation and Regression Trees [CART], OneR, Naïve Bayes, and Simple Logistic) were used to analyze two cohorts of patients with oropharyngeal candidosis and candidemia. The target variable was the outcome of the infections, and the predictor variables consisted of values for the MIC or the proportion between the dose administered and the MIC of the isolate (dose/MIC). Statistical power was assessed by determining values for sensitivity and specificity, the false-positive rate, the area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve, and the Matthews correlation coefficient (MCC). CART obtained the best statistical power for a MIC > 4 mg/liter for detecting failures (sensitivity, 87%; false-positive rate, 8%; area under the ROC curve, 0.89; MCC index, 0.80). For dose/MIC determinations, the target was >75, with a sensitivity of 91%, a false-positive rate of 10%, an area under the ROC curve of 0.90, and an MCC index of 0.80. Other classifiers gave similar breakpoints with lower statistical power. EUCAST fluconazole breakpoints have been validated by means of machine learning methods. These computer tools must be incorporated in the process for developing breakpoints to avoid researcher bias, thus enhancing the statistical power of the model. PMID:19433568

  7. Revisit of fluoroquinolone and azithromycin susceptibility breakpoints for Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi.

    Das, Surojit; Ray, Ujjwayini; Dutta, Shanta

    2016-07-01

    In recent years, increase in occurrence of fluoroquinolone (FQ)-resistant S almonella Typhi isolates has caused considerable inconvenience in selecting appropriate antimicrobials for treatment of typhoid. The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends azithromycin for the empirical treatment option of uncomplicated typhoid. The CLSI updated the breakpoints of disc diffusion (DD) and MIC results of FQs and azithromycin for Salmonella Typhi in 2015, but DD breakpoints of ofloxacin and levofloxacin were not included. In this study, the inhibition zone diameters and MICs of nalidixic acid, ciprofloxacin, ofloxacin, levofloxacin and azithromycin were determined in Salmonella Typhi Kolkata isolates (n =146) over a 16-year period (1998 to 2013) and the data were compared with the available CLSI breakpoints. Very major error and major error (ME) of FQs were not observed in the study isolates, but the minor error of ciprofloxacin (15.8 %) and ME of azithromycin (3.5 %) exceeded the acceptable limit. A positive correlation between MICs of FQ and mutations in the quinolone-resistance-determining region (QRDR) showed the reliability of MIC results to determine FQ susceptibility of Salmonella Typhi (n =74). Isolates showing decreased ciprofloxacin susceptibility (MIC 0.125-0.5 µg  ml-1) were likely to have at least one mutation in the QRDR region. The results on DD breakpoints of ofloxacin (resistant, ≤15 mm; intermediate, 16-24 mm, and susceptible, ≥25 mm) and levofloxacin (resistant, ≤18 mm; intermediate, 19-27 mm, and susceptible, ≥28 mm) corroborated those of earlier studies. In view of the emerging FQ- and azithromycin-resistant Salmonella Typhi isolates, DD and MIC breakpoints of those antimicrobials should be revisited routinely. PMID:27221661

  8. Phylogenetic effective sample size

    Bartoszek, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    In this paper I address the question - how large is a phylogenetic sample I propose a definition of a phylogenetic effective sample size for Brownian motion and Ornstein-Uhlenbeck processes - the regression effective sample size. I discuss how mutual information can be used to define an effective sample size in the non-normal process case and compare these two definitions to an already present concept of effective sample size (the mean effective sample size). Through a simulation study I find...

  9. Translocation and deletion breakpoints in cancer genomes are associated with potential non-B DNA-forming sequences

    Bacolla, Albino; Tainer, John A.; Vasquez, Karen M.; Cooper, David N.

    2016-01-01

    Gross chromosomal rearrangements (including translocations, deletions, insertions and duplications) are a hallmark of cancer genomes and often create oncogenic fusion genes. An obligate step in the generation of such gross rearrangements is the formation of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). Since the genomic distribution of rearrangement breakpoints is non-random, intrinsic cellular factors may predispose certain genomic regions to breakage. Notably, certain DNA sequences with the potential to fold into secondary structures [potential non-B DNA structures (PONDS); e.g. triplexes, quadruplexes, hairpin/cruciforms, Z-DNA and single-stranded looped-out structures with implications in DNA replication and transcription] can stimulate the formation of DNA DSBs. Here, we tested the postulate that these DNA sequences might be found at, or in close proximity to, rearrangement breakpoints. By analyzing the distribution of PONDS-forming sequences within ±500 bases of 19 947 translocation and 46 365 sequence-characterized deletion breakpoints in cancer genomes, we find significant association between PONDS-forming repeats and cancer breakpoints. Specifically, (AT)n, (GAA)n and (GAAA)n constitute the most frequent repeats at translocation breakpoints, whereas A-tracts occur preferentially at deletion breakpoints. Translocation breakpoints near PONDS-forming repeats also recur in different individuals and patient tumor samples. Hence, PONDS-forming sequences represent an intrinsic risk factor for genomic rearrangements in cancer genomes. PMID:27084947

  10. A new approach to assess COPD by identifying lung function break-points

    Eriksson, Göran; Jarenbäck, Linnea; Peterson, Stefan; Ankerst, Jaro; Bjermer, Leif; Tufvesson, Ellen

    2015-01-01

    Purpose COPD is a progressive disease, which can take different routes, leading to great heterogeneity. The aim of the post-hoc analysis reported here was to perform continuous analyses of advanced lung function measurements, using linear and nonlinear regressions. Patients and methods Fifty-one COPD patients with mild to very severe disease (Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease [GOLD] Stages I–IV) and 41 healthy smokers were investigated post-bronchodilation by flow-volume spirometry, body plethysmography, diffusion capacity testing, and impulse oscillometry. The relationship between COPD severity, based on forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1), and different lung function parameters was analyzed by flexible nonparametric method, linear regression, and segmented linear regression with break-points. Results Most lung function parameters were nonlinear in relation to spirometric severity. Parameters related to volume (residual volume, functional residual capacity, total lung capacity, diffusion capacity [diffusion capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide], diffusion capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide/alveolar volume) and reactance (reactance area and reactance at 5Hz) were segmented with break-points at 60%–70% of FEV1. FEV1/forced vital capacity (FVC) and resonance frequency had break-points around 80% of FEV1, while many resistance parameters had break-points below 40%. The slopes in percent predicted differed; resistance at 5 Hz minus resistance at 20 Hz had a linear slope change of −5.3 per unit FEV1, while residual volume had no slope change above and −3.3 change per unit FEV1 below its break-point of 61%. Conclusion Continuous analyses of different lung function parameters over the spirometric COPD severity range gave valuable information additional to categorical analyses. Parameters related to volume, diffusion capacity, and reactance showed break-points around 65% of FEV1, indicating that air trapping starts to dominate

  11. A new approach to assess COPD by identifying lung function break-points

    Eriksson G

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Göran Eriksson,1,* Linnea Jarenbäck,1,* Stefan Peterson,2 Jaro Ankerst,1 Leif Bjermer,1 Ellen Tufvesson11Respiratory Medicine and Allergology, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, 2Regional Cancer Center South, Skåne University Hospital, Lund, Sweden*These authors contributed equally to this workPurpose: COPD is a progressive disease, which can take different routes, leading to great heterogeneity. The aim of the post-hoc analysis reported here was to perform continuous analyses of advanced lung function measurements, using linear and nonlinear regressions.Patients and methods: Fifty-one COPD patients with mild to very severe disease (Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease [GOLD] Stages I–IV and 41 healthy smokers were investigated post-bronchodilation by flow-volume spirometry, body plethysmography, diffusion capacity testing, and impulse oscillometry. The relationship between COPD severity, based on forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1, and different lung function parameters was analyzed by flexible nonparametric method, linear regression, and segmented linear regression with break-points.Results: Most lung function parameters were nonlinear in relation to spirometric severity. Parameters related to volume (residual volume, functional residual capacity, total lung capacity, diffusion capacity [diffusion capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide], diffusion capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide/alveolar volume and reactance (reactance area and reactance at 5Hz were segmented with break-points at 60%–70% of FEV1. FEV1/forced vital capacity (FVC and resonance frequency had break-points around 80% of FEV1, while many resistance parameters had break-points below 40%. The slopes in percent predicted differed; resistance at 5 Hz minus resistance at 20 Hz had a linear slope change of -5.3 per unit FEV1, while residual volume had no slope change above and -3.3 change per unit FEV1 below its break-point of 61

  12. Phylogenetically resolving epidemiologic linkage

    Romero-Severson, Ethan O.; Bulla, Ingo; Leitner, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Although the use of phylogenetic trees in epidemiological investigations has become commonplace, their epidemiological interpretation has not been systematically evaluated. Here, we use an HIV-1 within-host coalescent model to probabilistically evaluate transmission histories of two epidemiologically linked hosts. Previous critique of phylogenetic reconstruction has claimed that direction of transmission is difficult to infer, and that the existence of unsampled intermediary links or common sources can never be excluded. The phylogenetic relationship between the HIV populations of epidemiologically linked hosts can be classified into six types of trees, based on cladistic relationships and whether the reconstruction is consistent with the true transmission history or not. We show that the direction of transmission and whether unsampled intermediary links or common sources existed make very different predictions about expected phylogenetic relationships: (i) Direction of transmission can often be established when paraphyly exists, (ii) intermediary links can be excluded when multiple lineages were transmitted, and (iii) when the sampled individuals’ HIV populations both are monophyletic a common source was likely the origin. Inconsistent results, suggesting the wrong transmission direction, were generally rare. In addition, the expected tree topology also depends on the number of transmitted lineages, the sample size, the time of the sample relative to transmission, and how fast the diversity increases after infection. Typically, 20 or more sequences per subject give robust results. We confirm our theoretical evaluations with analyses of real transmission histories and discuss how our findings should aid in interpreting phylogenetic results. PMID:26903617

  13. Determination of IVC breakpoint for josephson junction stack. Non-periodic boundary conditions with γ = 1

    Serdyukova, S. I.

    2014-07-01

    We prove that, in the case of non-periodic (with γ = 1) boundary conditions, the calculation of the current-voltage characteristic (IVC) for a stack of n intrinsic Josephson junctions reduces to solving a system of [( n + 1)/2] non-linear differential equations instead of the n original ones. The current voltage characteristic V( I) has the shape of a hysteresis loop. On the back branch of the loop V( I) decreases to zero rapidly near the breakpoint I b . We succeeded to derive an algorithm determining the approximate breakpoint location and to improve simultaneously the mixed numerical-analytical algorithm of IVC calculation for a stack of Josephson junctions developed by us before. The efficiency of the improved algorithm is shown by the calculations of IVC for stacks consisting of various numbers of intrinsic Josephson junctions.

  14. Mutation analysis in Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy patients from Bulgaria shows a peculiar distribution of breakpoints by intron

    Todorova, A.; Bronzova, J.; Kremensky, I. [Univ. Hospital of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Sofia (Bulgaria)] [and others

    1996-10-02

    For the first time in Bulgaria, a deletion/duplication screening was performed on a group of 84 unrelated Duchenne/Becker muscular dystrophy patients, and the breakpoint distribution in the dystrophin gene was analyzed. Intragenic deletions were detected in 67.8% of patients, and intragenic duplications in 2.4%. A peculiar distribution of deletion breakpoints was found. Only 13.2% of the deletion breakpoints fell in the {open_quotes}classical{close_quotes} hot spot in intron 44, whereas the majority (> 54%) were located within the segment encompassing introns 45-51, which includes intron 50, the richest in breakpoints (16%) in the Bulgarian sample. Comparison with data from Greece and Turkey points at the probable existence of a deletion hot spot within intron 50, which might be a characteristic of populations of the Balkan region. 17 refs., 2 figs.

  15. SoftSearch: integration of multiple sequence features to identify breakpoints of structural variations.

    Steven N Hart

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Structural variation (SV represents a significant, yet poorly understood contribution to an individual's genetic makeup. Advanced next-generation sequencing technologies are widely used to discover such variations, but there is no single detection tool that is considered a community standard. In an attempt to fulfil this need, we developed an algorithm, SoftSearch, for discovering structural variant breakpoints in Illumina paired-end next-generation sequencing data. SoftSearch combines multiple strategies for detecting SV including split-read, discordant read-pair, and unmated pairs. Co-localized split-reads and discordant read pairs are used to refine the breakpoints. RESULTS: We developed and validated SoftSearch using real and synthetic datasets. SoftSearch's key features are 1 not requiring secondary (or exhaustive primary alignment, 2 portability into established sequencing workflows, and 3 is applicable to any DNA-sequencing experiment (e.g. whole genome, exome, custom capture, etc.. SoftSearch identifies breakpoints from a small number of soft-clipped bases from split reads and a few discordant read-pairs which on their own would not be sufficient to make an SV call. CONCLUSIONS: We show that SoftSearch can identify more true SVs by combining multiple sequence features. SoftSearch was able to call clinically relevant SVs in the BRCA2 gene not reported by other tools while offering significantly improved overall performance.

  16. Gene alterations at Drosophila inversion breakpoints provide prima facie evidence for natural selection as an explanation for rapid chromosomal evolution

    Guillén Yolanda

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chromosomal inversions have been pervasive during the evolution of the genus Drosophila, but there is significant variation between lineages in the rate of rearrangement fixation. D. mojavensis, an ecological specialist adapted to a cactophilic niche under extreme desert conditions, is a chromosomally derived species with ten fixed inversions, five of them not present in any other species. Results In order to explore the causes of the rapid chromosomal evolution in D. mojavensis, we identified and characterized all breakpoints of seven inversions fixed in chromosome 2, the most dynamic one. One of the inversions presents unequivocal evidence for its generation by ectopic recombination between transposon copies and another two harbor inverted duplications of non-repetitive DNA at the two breakpoints and were likely generated by staggered single-strand breaks and repair by non-homologous end joining. Four out of 14 breakpoints lay in the intergenic region between preexisting duplicated genes, suggesting an adaptive advantage of separating previously tightly linked duplicates. Four out of 14 breakpoints are associated with transposed genes, suggesting these breakpoints are fragile regions. Finally two inversions contain novel genes at their breakpoints and another three show alterations of genes at breakpoints with potential adaptive significance. Conclusions D. mojavensis chromosomal inversions were generated by multiple mechanisms, an observation that does not provide support for increased mutation rate as explanation for rapid chromosomal evolution. On the other hand, we have found a number of gene alterations at the breakpoints with putative adaptive consequences that directly point to natural selection as the cause of D. mojavensis rapid chromosomal evolution.

  17. A Universal Phylogenetic Tree.

    Offner, Susan

    2001-01-01

    Presents a universal phylogenetic tree suitable for use in high school and college-level biology classrooms. Illustrates the antiquity of life and that all life is related, even if it dates back 3.5 billion years. Reflects important evolutionary relationships and provides an exciting way to learn about the history of life. (SAH)

  18. EUCAST technical note on isavuconazole breakpoints for Aspergillus, itraconazole breakpoints for Candida and updates for the antifungal susceptibility testing method documents.

    Arendrup, M C; Meletiadis, J; Mouton, J W; Guinea, J; Cuenca-Estrella, M; Lagrou, K; Howard, S J

    2016-06-01

    The Subcommittee on Antifungal Susceptibility Testing (AFST) of the ESCMID European Committee for Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST) has determined breakpoints for isavuconazole and Aspergillus and for itraconazole and Candida spp., released a new document summarizing existing and new minimum inhibitory concentration ranges for quality control strains and revised the method documents for yeast and mould susceptibility testing. This technical note is based on the EUCAST isavuconazole and itraconazole rationale documents, version 1.0 of the routine and extended internal quality control for antifungal susceptibility testing as recommended by EUCAST, and the E.Def 7.3, E.Def 9.2 and E.Def 9.3 method documents (http://www.eucast.org). PMID:26851656

  19. Phylogenetic molecular function annotation

    Barbara E Engelhardt; Jordan, Michael I.; Repo, Susanna T; Brenner, Steven E

    2009-01-01

    It is now easier to discover thousands of protein sequences in a new microbial genome than it is to biochemically characterize the specific activity of a single protein of unknown function. The molecular functions of protein sequences have typically been predicted using homology-based computational methods, which rely on the principle that homologous proteins share a similar function. However, some protein families include groups of proteins with different molecular functions. A phylogenetic ...

  20. Molecular phylogenetics before sequences

    Mark A. Ragan; Bernard, Guillaume,; Chan, Cheong Xin

    2014-01-01

    From 1971 to 1985, Carl Woese and colleagues generated oligonucleotide catalogs of 16S/18S rRNAs from more than 400 organisms. Using these incomplete and imperfect data, Carl and his colleagues developed unprecedented insights into the structure, function, and evolution of the large RNA components of the translational apparatus. They recognized a third domain of life, revealed the phylogenetic backbone of bacteria (and its limitations), delineated taxa, and explored the tempo and mode of micr...

  1. Canonical phylogenetic ordination.

    Giannini, Norberto P

    2003-10-01

    A phylogenetic comparative method is proposed for estimating historical effects on comparative data using the partitions that compose a cladogram, i.e., its monophyletic groups. Two basic matrices, Y and X, are defined in the context of an ordinary linear model. Y contains the comparative data measured over t taxa. X consists of an initial tree matrix that contains all the xj monophyletic groups (each coded separately as a binary indicator variable) of the phylogenetic tree available for those taxa. The method seeks to define the subset of groups, i.e., a reduced tree matrix, that best explains the patterns in Y. This definition is accomplished via regression or canonical ordination (depending on the dimensionality of Y) coupled with Monte Carlo permutations. It is argued here that unrestricted permutations (i.e., under an equiprobable model) are valid for testing this specific kind of groupwise hypothesis. Phylogeny is either partialled out or, more properly, incorporated into the analysis in the form of component variation. Direct extensions allow for testing ecomorphological data controlled by phylogeny in a variation partitioning approach. Currently available statistical techniques make this method applicable under most univariate/multivariate models and metrics; two-way phylogenetic effects can be estimated as well. The simplest case (univariate Y), tested with simulations, yielded acceptable type I error rates. Applications presented include examples from evolutionary ethology, ecology, and ecomorphology. Results showed that the new technique detected previously overlooked variation clearly associated with phylogeny and that many phylogenetic effects on comparative data may occur at particular groups rather than across the entire tree. PMID:14530135

  2. The effects of acute L-carnitine administration on ventilatory breakpoint and exercise performanceduring incremental exercise

    Mojtaba Kaviani

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available (Received 31 October, 2009 ; Accepted 10 March, 2010AbstractBackground and purpose: Many athletes adopt nutritional manipulations to improve their performance. Among the substances generally consumed is carnitine (L-trimethyl-3-hydroxy-ammoniobutanoate which has been used by athletes as an ergogenic aid, due to its role in the transport of long-chain fatty acids across mitochondrial membranes. Nutritional supplements containing carbohydrates, proteins, vitamins, and minerals have been widely used in various sporting fields to provide a boost to the recommended daily allowance. The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of acute L-carnitine administration on ventilatory breakpoint, an exercise performance during incremental exercise.Materials and methods: This study was double-blind, randomized and crossover in design. The subjects were 12 randomly selected active male physical education students, 21.75±0.64 years old, with a mean body mass index (BMI of 23.7±0.94kg/m2, divided into 2 groups. They received orally either 2g of L-carnitine dissolved in 200 ml of water, plus 6 drops of lemon juice or a placebo (6 ml lemon juice dissolved in 200 ml of water 90 minutes before they began to exercise on a treadmill. They performed a modified protocol of Conconi test to exhaustion. One-way analysis of variance with repeated measurements was used for data analysis.Results: The results showed that exercise performance improved in LC group (2980±155 meter compared with placebo group (2331±51 meter. Furthermore, no significant difference was found in ventilatory breakpoint between the two groups.Conclusion: This finding indicates that administration of L- Carnitine, 90 minutes prior to exercise may improve performance; despite the ventilatory breakpoint as one of the anaerobic system indices that had no effect. J Mazand Univ Med Sci 2009; 19(73: 43-50 (Persian.

  3. Effects of breakpoint changes on carbapenem susceptibility rates of Enterobacteriaceae: Results from the SENTRY Antimicrobial Surveillance Program, United States, 2008 to 2012

    Rennie, Robert P.; Jones, Ronald N

    2014-01-01

    In the absence of clinical resistance, breakpoints for many antimicrobial agents are often set high. Clinical failures following use of the agents over time requires re-evaluation of breakpoints. This is based on patient response, pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic information and in vitro minimal inhibitory concentration data. Data from the SENTRY Antimicrobial Surveillance Program has shown that Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute breakpoint changes for carbapenems that occurred betwee...

  4. Determination of ETV6‐RUNX1 genomic breakpoint by next‐generation sequencing

    Jin, Yanliang; Wang, Xingwei; Hu, Shaoyan; Tang, Jingyan; Li, Benshang; Chai, Yihuan

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The t(12;21)(p13;q22) ETV6‐RUNX1 gene fusion is one of the most common chromosomal translocation in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). It is associated with favorable prognosis. The identification of the genomic sequence of the breakpoint flanking regions of the ETV6‐RUNX1 translocation should be the best strategy to monitor minimal residual disease (MRD) in patients with ETV6‐RUNX1‐positive ALL. In this study, the ETV6‐RUNX1 translocation was sequenced by next‐generation ...

  5. Rearrangement of the breakpoint cluster region in Philadelphia chromosome positive acute leukemia.

    Takahashi, Isao; Sekito,Noriko; Takeuchi, Makoto; Osada, Ken; Matsuzaki,Toshiro; Fukuda, Shunichi; Lai,Minyu; Uchida, Kozaburo; Kimura,Ikuro; Miyamoto,Kanji; Kitajima,Koichi; Sanada, Hiroshi

    1988-01-01

    The rearrangement of breakpoint cluster region (ber) was examined in leukemic cells obtained from 3 patients initially diagnosed as having Ph+ acute leukemia, 2 with acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) and one with acute mixed leukemia. DNA was digested with Bgl II and BamH I. The ber rearrangement was present in the case of acute mixed leukemia (Case 1), but was absent in the 2 cases of ALL (Cases 2 and 3). These results suggest that Case 1 represented a type of blast crisis of chronic myelocyt...

  6. Using Sorting by Reversal: Breakpoint Graph for Gene Assembly in Ciliates

    Brijder, Robert; Jan Hoogeboom, Hendrik

    2007-09-01

    The theory of gene assembly in ciliates has much in common with the theory of sorting by reversal. Both model processes that are based on splicing, and have a fixed begin and end product. The main difference is the type of splicing operations used to obtain the end product from the begin product. In this overview paper we show that the concept of breakpoint graph, known from the theory of sorting by reversal, has many uses in the theory of gene assembly. Our aim is to present the material in an intuitive and informal manner to allow for an efficient introduction into the subject.

  7. Isolation of a cosmid clone corresponding to an inv(21) breakpoint of a patient with transient abnormal myelopoiesis

    Ohta, Tohru, Nakano, Motoi, Tsujita, Takahiro [Nagasaki Univ. School of Medicine, Nagasaki (Japan)] [and others

    1996-03-01

    Transient abnormal myelopoiesis (TAM) is a leukemoid reaction occurring occasionally in Down syndrome (DS) newborn infants. It has been hypothesized that {open_quotes}disomic homozygosity{close_quotes} in 21-trisomic cells plays an important role in the genesis of TAM, and the putative TAM gene was suggested to be mapped at a 21q11 region. We encountered a DS-associated TAM infant with a 47, XY, inv(21) (q11.1q22.13), +inv(21) (q11.1q22.13) karyotype. On the basis of another presumption that in this patient the putative TAM gene is disrupted by the break, we tried to isolate a breakpoint DNA. FISH analysis with cosmid clones corresponding to various sequence-tagged-site (STS) markers mapped at around 21q11.1-q11.2, we confirmed that the proximal breakpoint of the inv (21) was located between two STSs, G51E07 and D21S215, the latter locus being consistent with the previous tentative mapping. After construction of a cosmid contig encompassing between the two markers, we have isolated a cosmid clone corresponding to the proximal breakpoint of the inversion. This breakpoint was located near a previously identified duplicated region that is homologous to the sequence at 21q22.1. The isolated cosmid clone is useful for analysis of other TAM patients and for a search for a transcript at or flanking the breakpoint. 27 refs., 4 figs.

  8. Fast phylogenetic DNA barcoding

    Terkelsen, Kasper Munch; Boomsma, Wouter Krogh; Willerslev, Eske;

    2008-01-01

    We present a heuristic approach to the DNA assignment problem based on phylogenetic inferences using constrained neighbour joining and non-parametric bootstrapping. We show that this method performs as well as the more computationally intensive full Bayesian approach in an analysis of 500 insect...... DNA sequences obtained from GenBank. We also analyse a previously published dataset of environmental DNA sequences from soil from New Zealand and Siberia, and use these data to illustrate the fact that statistical approaches to the DNA assignment problem allow for more appropriate criteria...... for determining the taxonomic level at which a particular DNA sequence can be assigned....

  9. Genomic instability in rat: Breakpoints induced by ionising radiation and interstitial telomeric-like sequences

    Camats, Nuria [Institut de Biotecnologia i Biomedicina (IBB), Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Barcelona (Spain); Departament de Biologia Cel.lular, Fisiologia i Immunologia Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Barcelona (Spain); Ruiz-Herrera, Aurora [Departament de Biologia Cel.lular, Fisiologia i Immunologia Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Barcelona (Spain); Parrilla, Juan Jose [Servicio de Ginecologia y Obstetricia, Hospital Universitario Virgen de la Arrixaca, Ctra, Madrid-Cartagena, s/n, El Palmar, 30120 Murcia (Spain); Acien, Maribel [Servicio de Ginecologia y Obstetricia, Hospital Universitario Virgen de la Arrixaca, Ctra, Madrid-Cartagena, s/n, El Palmar, 30120 Murcia (Spain); Paya, Pilar [Servicio de Ginecologia y Obstetricia, Hospital Universitario Virgen de la Arrixaca, Ctra, Madrid-Cartagena, s/n, El Palmar, 30120 Murcia (Spain); Giulotto, Elena [Dipartimento di Genetica e Microbiologia Adriano Buzzati Traverso, Universita degli Studi di Pavia, 27100 Pavia (Italy); Egozcue, Josep [Departament de Biologia Cel.lular, Fisiologia i Immunologia Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Barcelona (Spain); Garcia, Francisca [Institut de Biotecnologia i Biomedicina (IBB), Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Barcelona (Spain); Garcia, Montserrat [Institut de Biotecnologia i Biomedicina (IBB), Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Barcelona (Spain) and Departament de Biologia Cellular, Fisiologia i Immunologia Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Barcelona (Spain)]. E-mail: Montserrat.Garcia.Caldes@uab.es

    2006-03-20

    The Norwegian rat (Rattus norvegicus) is the most widely studied experimental species in biomedical research although little is known about its chromosomal structure. The characterisation of possible unstable regions of the karyotype of this species would contribute to the better understanding of its genomic architecture. The cytogenetic effects of ionising radiation have been widely used for the study of genomic instability, and the importance of interstitial telomeric-like sequences (ITSs) in instability of the genome has also been reported in previous studies in vertebrates. In order to describe the unstable chromosomal regions of R. norvegicus, the distribution of breakpoints induced by X-irradiation and ITSs in its karyotype were analysed in this work. For the X-irradiation analysis, 52 foetuses (from 14 irradiated rats) were studied, 4803 metaphases were analysed, and a total of 456 breakpoints induced by X-rays were detected, located in 114 chromosomal bands, with 25 of them significantly affected by X-irradiation (hot spots). For the analysis of ITSs, three foetuses (from three rats) were studied, 305 metaphases were analysed and 121 ITSs were detected, widely distributed in the karyotype of this species. Seventy-six percent of all hot spots analysed in this study were co-localised with ITSs.

  10. Detection of chromosomal breakpoints in patients with developmental delay and speech disorders.

    Kagistia H Utami

    Full Text Available Delineating candidate genes at the chromosomal breakpoint regions in the apparently balanced chromosome rearrangements (ABCR has been shown to be more effective with the emergence of next-generation sequencing (NGS technologies. We employed a large-insert (7-11 kb paired-end tag sequencing technology (DNA-PET to systematically analyze genome of four patients harbouring cytogenetically defined ABCR with neurodevelopmental symptoms, including developmental delay (DD and speech disorders. We characterized structural variants (SVs specific to each individual, including those matching the chromosomal breakpoints. Refinement of these regions by Sanger sequencing resulted in the identification of five disrupted genes in three individuals: guanine nucleotide binding protein, q polypeptide (GNAQ, RNA-binding protein, fox-1 homolog (RBFOX3, unc-5 homolog D (C.elegans (UNC5D, transmembrane protein 47 (TMEM47, and X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis (XIAP. Among them, XIAP is the causative gene for the immunodeficiency phenotype seen in the patient. The remaining genes displayed specific expression in the fetal brain and have known biologically relevant functions in brain development, suggesting putative candidate genes for neurodevelopmental phenotypes. This study demonstrates the application of NGS technologies in mapping individual gene disruptions in ABCR as a resource for deciphering candidate genes in human neurodevelopmental disorders (NDDs.

  11. Genomic instability in rat: Breakpoints induced by ionising radiation and interstitial telomeric-like sequences

    The Norwegian rat (Rattus norvegicus) is the most widely studied experimental species in biomedical research although little is known about its chromosomal structure. The characterisation of possible unstable regions of the karyotype of this species would contribute to the better understanding of its genomic architecture. The cytogenetic effects of ionising radiation have been widely used for the study of genomic instability, and the importance of interstitial telomeric-like sequences (ITSs) in instability of the genome has also been reported in previous studies in vertebrates. In order to describe the unstable chromosomal regions of R. norvegicus, the distribution of breakpoints induced by X-irradiation and ITSs in its karyotype were analysed in this work. For the X-irradiation analysis, 52 foetuses (from 14 irradiated rats) were studied, 4803 metaphases were analysed, and a total of 456 breakpoints induced by X-rays were detected, located in 114 chromosomal bands, with 25 of them significantly affected by X-irradiation (hot spots). For the analysis of ITSs, three foetuses (from three rats) were studied, 305 metaphases were analysed and 121 ITSs were detected, widely distributed in the karyotype of this species. Seventy-six percent of all hot spots analysed in this study were co-localised with ITSs

  12. Breakpoint analysis of transcriptional and genomic profiles uncovers novel gene fusions spanning multiple human cancer types.

    Craig P Giacomini

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Gene fusions, like BCR/ABL1 in chronic myelogenous leukemia, have long been recognized in hematologic and mesenchymal malignancies. The recent finding of gene fusions in prostate and lung cancers has motivated the search for pathogenic gene fusions in other malignancies. Here, we developed a "breakpoint analysis" pipeline to discover candidate gene fusions by tell-tale transcript level or genomic DNA copy number transitions occurring within genes. Mining data from 974 diverse cancer samples, we identified 198 candidate fusions involving annotated cancer genes. From these, we validated and further characterized novel gene fusions involving ROS1 tyrosine kinase in angiosarcoma (CEP85L/ROS1, SLC1A2 glutamate transporter in colon cancer (APIP/SLC1A2, RAF1 kinase in pancreatic cancer (ATG7/RAF1 and anaplastic astrocytoma (BCL6/RAF1, EWSR1 in melanoma (EWSR1/CREM, CDK6 kinase in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (FAM133B/CDK6, and CLTC in breast cancer (CLTC/VMP1. Notably, while these fusions involved known cancer genes, all occurred with novel fusion partners and in previously unreported cancer types. Moreover, several constituted druggable targets (including kinases, with therapeutic implications for their respective malignancies. Lastly, breakpoint analysis identified new cell line models for known rearrangements, including EGFRvIII and FIP1L1/PDGFRA. Taken together, we provide a robust approach for gene fusion discovery, and our results highlight a more widespread role of fusion genes in cancer pathogenesis.

  13. Phylogenetic comparative assembly

    Husemann Peter

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent high throughput sequencing technologies are capable of generating a huge amount of data for bacterial genome sequencing projects. Although current sequence assemblers successfully merge the overlapping reads, often several contigs remain which cannot be assembled any further. It is still costly and time consuming to close all the gaps in order to acquire the whole genomic sequence. Results Here we propose an algorithm that takes several related genomes and their phylogenetic relationships into account to create a graph that contains the likelihood for each pair of contigs to be adjacent. Subsequently, this graph can be used to compute a layout graph that shows the most promising contig adjacencies in order to aid biologists in finishing the complete genomic sequence. The layout graph shows unique contig orderings where possible, and the best alternatives where necessary. Conclusions Our new algorithm for contig ordering uses sequence similarity as well as phylogenetic information to estimate adjacencies of contigs. An evaluation of our implementation shows that it performs better than recent approaches while being much faster at the same time.

  14. Phylogenetic trees in bioinformatics

    Burr, Tom L [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    Genetic data is often used to infer evolutionary relationships among a collection of viruses, bacteria, animal or plant species, or other operational taxonomic units (OTU). A phylogenetic tree depicts such relationships and provides a visual representation of the estimated branching order of the OTUs. Tree estimation is unique for several reasons, including: the types of data used to represent each OTU; the use ofprobabilistic nucleotide substitution models; the inference goals involving both tree topology and branch length, and the huge number of possible trees for a given sample of a very modest number of OTUs, which implies that fmding the best tree(s) to describe the genetic data for each OTU is computationally demanding. Bioinformatics is too large a field to review here. We focus on that aspect of bioinformatics that includes study of similarities in genetic data from multiple OTUs. Although research questions are diverse, a common underlying challenge is to estimate the evolutionary history of the OTUs. Therefore, this paper reviews the role of phylogenetic tree estimation in bioinformatics, available methods and software, and identifies areas for additional research and development.

  15. Modeling body size evolution in Felidae under alternative phylogenetic hypotheses

    José Alexandre Felizola Diniz-Filho

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of phylogenetic comparative methods in ecological research has advanced during the last twenty years, mainly due to accurate phylogenetic reconstructions based on molecular data and computational and statistical advances. We used phylogenetic correlograms and phylogenetic eigenvector regression (PVR to model body size evolution in 35 worldwide Felidae (Mammalia, Carnivora species using two alternative phylogenies and published body size data. The purpose was not to contrast the phylogenetic hypotheses but to evaluate how analyses of body size evolution patterns can be affected by the phylogeny used for comparative analyses (CA. Both phylogenies produced a strong phylogenetic pattern, with closely related species having similar body sizes and the similarity decreasing with increasing distances in time. The PVR explained 65% to 67% of body size variation and all Moran's I values for the PVR residuals were non-significant, indicating that both these models explained phylogenetic structures in trait variation. Even though our results did not suggest that any phylogeny can be used for CA with the same power, or that “good” phylogenies are unnecessary for the correct interpretation of the evolutionary dynamics of ecological, biogeographical, physiological or behavioral patterns, it does suggest that developments in CA can, and indeed should, proceed without waiting for perfect and fully resolved phylogenies.

  16. Ant-Based Phylogenetic Reconstruction (ABPR: A new distance algorithm for phylogenetic estimation based on ant colony optimization

    Karla Vittori

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available We propose a new distance algorithm for phylogenetic estimation based on Ant Colony Optimization (ACO, named Ant-Based Phylogenetic Reconstruction (ABPR. ABPR joins two taxa iteratively based on evolutionary distance among sequences, while also accounting for the quality of the phylogenetic tree built according to the total length of the tree. Similar to optimization algorithms for phylogenetic estimation, the algorithm allows exploration of a larger set of nearly optimal solutions. We applied the algorithm to four empirical data sets of mitochondrial DNA ranging from 12 to 186 sequences, and from 898 to 16,608 base pairs, and covering taxonomic levels from populations to orders. We show that ABPR performs better than the commonly used Neighbor-Joining algorithm, except when sequences are too closely related (e.g., population-level sequences. The phylogenetic relationships recovered at and above species level by ABPR agree with conventional views. However, like other algorithms of phylogenetic estimation, the proposed algorithm failed to recover expected relationships when distances are too similar or when rates of evolution are very variable, leading to the problem of long-branch attraction. ABPR, as well as other ACO-based algorithms, is emerging as a fast and accurate alternative method of phylogenetic estimation for large data sets.

  17. Ultrafast Approximation for Phylogenetic Bootstrap

    Bui Quang Minh, [No Value; Nguyen, Thi; von Haeseler, Arndt

    2013-01-01

    Nonparametric bootstrap has been a widely used tool in phylogenetic analysis to assess the clade support of phylogenetic trees. However, with the rapidly growing amount of data, this task remains a computational bottleneck. Recently, approximation methods such as the RAxML rapid bootstrap (RBS) and

  18. Quartets and unrooted phylogenetic networks.

    Gambette, Philippe; Berry, Vincent; Paul, Christophe

    2012-08-01

    Phylogenetic networks were introduced to describe evolution in the presence of exchanges of genetic material between coexisting species or individuals. Split networks in particular were introduced as a special kind of abstract network to visualize conflicts between phylogenetic trees which may correspond to such exchanges. More recently, methods were designed to reconstruct explicit phylogenetic networks (whose vertices can be interpreted as biological events) from triplet data. In this article, we link abstract and explicit networks through their combinatorial properties, by introducing the unrooted analog of level-k networks. In particular, we give an equivalence theorem between circular split systems and unrooted level-1 networks. We also show how to adapt to quartets some existing results on triplets, in order to reconstruct unrooted level-k phylogenetic networks. These results give an interesting perspective on the combinatorics of phylogenetic networks and also raise algorithmic and combinatorial questions. PMID:22809417

  19. Genomic EWS-FLI1 fusion sequences in Ewing sarcoma resemble breakpoint characteristics of immature lymphoid malignancies.

    Manfred Berger

    Full Text Available Chromosomal translocations between the EWS gene and members of the ETS gene family are characteristic molecular features of the Ewing sarcoma. The most common translocation t(11;22(q24;q12 fuses the EWS gene to FLI1, and is present in 85-90% of Ewing sarcomas. In the present study, a specifically designed multiplex long-range PCR assay was applied to amplify genomic EWS-FLI1 fusion sites from as little as 100 ng template DNA. Characterization of the EWS-FLI1 fusion sites of 42 pediatric and young adult Ewing sarcoma patients and seven cell lines revealed a clustering in the 5' region of the EWS-breakpoint cluster region (BCR, in contrast to random distribution of breakpoints in the FLI1-BCR. No association of breakpoints with various recombination-inducing sequence motifs was identified. The occurrence of small deletions and duplications at the genomic junction is characteristic of involvement of the non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ repair system, similar to findings at chromosomal breakpoints in pediatric leukemia and lymphoma.

  20. Fine mapping of the 1q21 breakpoint of the papillary venal cell carcinoma-associated (X;1) translocation

    Weterman, MAJ; Dijkhuizen, T; vandenBerg, E; vanKessel, AG

    1996-01-01

    A combination of Southern blot analysis on a panel of tumor-derived somatic cell hybrids and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) techniques was used to map a series of DNA markers relative to the 1q21 breakpoint of the renal cell carcinoma (RCC)-associated (X;1)-(p11;q21) translocation. This b

  1. Accuracy of Carbapenem Nonsusceptibility for Identification of KPC-Possessing Enterobacteriaceae by Use of the Revised CLSI Breakpoints

    Landman, David; Salamera, Julius; Singh, Manisha; Quale, John

    2011-01-01

    Using the updated 2010 CLSI carbapenem breakpoints for the Enterobacteriaceae, nonsusceptibility to ertapenem and imipenem predicted the presence of blaKPC poorly, especially among Escherichia coli and Enterobacter species. In regions where KPC-producing bacteria are endemic, testing for nonsusceptibility to meropenem may provide improved accuracy in identifying these isolates.

  2. Fine mapping of the EDA gene: A translocation breakpoint is associated with a CpG island that is transcribed

    Srivastava, A.K.; Schlessinger, D. [Washington Univ. School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Montonen, O. [Univ. of Helsinki (Finland)] [and others

    1996-01-01

    In order to identify the gene for human X-linked anhidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (EDA), a translocation breakpoint in a female with t(X;1)(q13.1;p36.3) and EDA (patient AK) was finely mapped. The EDA region contains five groups of rare-cutter restriction sites that define CpG islands. The two more centromeric of these islands are associated with transcripts of 3.5 kb and 1.8 kb. The third CpG island maps within <1 kb of the translocation breakpoint in patient AK, as indicated by a genomic rearrangement, and {approximately}100 kb centromeric from another previously mapped translocation breakpoint (patient AnLy). Northern analysis with a probe from this CpG island detected an {approximately}6-kb mRNA in several fetal tissues tested. An extended YAC contig of 1,200 kb with an average of fivefold coverage was constructed. The two most telomeric CpG islands map 350 kb telomeric of the two translocations. Taken together, the results suggest that the CpG island just proximal of the AK translocation breakpoint lies at the 5{prime} end of a candidate gene for EDA. 26 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Use of Animal Models To Support Revising Meningococcal Breakpoints of β-Lactams.

    Belkacem, Nouria; Hong, Eva; Antunes, Ana; Terrade, Aude; Deghmane, Ala-Eddine; Taha, Muhamed-Kheir

    2016-07-01

    Antibiotic susceptibility testing (AST) in Neisseria meningitidis is an important part of the management of invasive meningococcal disease. It defines MICs of antibiotics that are used in treatment and/or prophylaxis and that mainly belong to the beta-lactams. The interpretation of the AST results requires breakpoints to classify the isolates into susceptible, intermediate, or resistant. The resistance to penicillin G is defined by a MIC of >0.25 mg/liter, and that of amoxicillin is defined by a MIC of >1 mg/liter. We provide data that may support revision of resistance breakpoints for beta-lactams in meningococci. We used experimental intraperitoneal infection in 8-week-old transgenic female mice expressing human transferrin and human factor H. Dynamic bioluminescence imaging was performed to follow the infection by bioluminescent meningococcus strains with different MICs. Three hours later, infected mice were treated intramuscularly using several doses of amoxicillin or penicillin G. Signal decreased during infection with a meningococcus strain showing a penicillin G MIC of 0.064 mg/liter at all doses. Signals decreased for the strain with a penicillin G MIC of 0.5 mg/liter only after treatment with the highest doses, corresponding to 250,000 units/kg of penicillin G or 200 mg/kg of amoxicillin, although this decrease was at a lower rate than that of the strain with a MIC of 0.064 mg/liter. The decrease in bioluminescent signals was associated with a decrease in the levels of the proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-6 (IL-6). Our data suggest that a high dose of amoxicillin or penicillin G can reduce growth during infection by isolates showing penicillin G MICs of >0.25 mg/liter and ≤1 mg/liter. PMID:27090179

  4. Breakpoint characterization of large deletions in EXT1 or EXT2 in 10 Multiple Osteochondromas families

    Szuhai Karoly

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Osteochondromas (cartilage-capped bone tumors are by far the most commonly treated of all primary benign bone tumors (50%. In 15% of cases, these tumors occur in the context of a hereditary syndrome called multiple osteochondromas (MO, an autosomal dominant skeletal disorder characterized by the formation of multiple cartilage-capped bone tumors at children's metaphyses. MO is caused by various mutations in EXT1 or EXT2, whereby large genomic deletions (single-or multi-exonic are responsible for up to 8% of MO-cases. Methods Here we report on the first molecular characterization of ten large EXT1- and EXT2-deletions in MO-patients. Deletions were initially indentified using MLPA or FISH analysis and were subsequently characterized using an MO-specific tiling path array, allele-specific PCR-amplification and sequencing analysis. Results Within the set of ten large deletions, the deleted regions ranged from 2.7 to 260 kb. One EXT2 exon 8 deletion was found to be recurrent. All breakpoints were located outside the coding exons of EXT1 and EXT2. Non-allelic homologous recombination (NAHR mediated by Alu-sequences, microhomology mediated replication dependent recombination (MMRDR and non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ were hypothesized as the causal mechanisms in different deletions. Conclusions Molecular characterization of EXT1- and EXT2-deletion breakpoints in MO-patients indicates that NAHR between Alu-sequences as well as NHEJ are causal and that the majority of these deletions are nonrecurring. These observations emphasize once more the huge genetic variability which is characteristic for MO. To our knowledge, this is the first study characterizing large genomic deletions in EXT1 and EXT2.

  5. A recurrent chromosome translocation breakpoint in breast and pancreatic cancer cell lines targets the neuregulin/NRG1 gene.

    Adélaïde, José; Huang, Huai-En; Murati, Anne; Alsop, Amber E; Orsetti, Béatrice; Mozziconacci, Marie-Joëlle; Popovici, Cornel; Ginestier, Christophe; Letessier, Anne; Basset, Céline; Courtay-Cahen, Céline; Jacquemier, Jocelyne; Theillet, Charles; Birnbaum, Daniel; Edwards, Paul A W; Chaffanet, Max

    2003-08-01

    The 8p11-21 region is a frequent target of alterations in breast cancer and other carcinomas. We surveyed 34 breast tumor cell lines and 9 pancreatic cancer cell lines for alterations of this region by use of multicolor fluorescence in situ hybridization (M-FISH) and BAC-specific FISH. We describe a recurrent chromosome translocation breakpoint that targets the NRG1 gene on 8p12. NRG1 encodes growth factors of the neuregulin/heregulin-1 family that are ligands for tyrosine kinase receptors of the ERBB family. Breakpoints within the NRG1 gene were found in four of the breast tumor cell lines: ZR-75-1, in a dic(8;11); HCC1937, in a t(8;10)(p12;p12.1); SUM-52, in an hsr(8)(p12); UACC-812, in a t(3;8); and in two of the pancreatic cancer cell lines: PaTu I, in a der(8)t(4;8); and SUIT-2, in a del(8)(p). Mapping by two-color FISH showed that the breaks were scattered over 1.1 Mb within the NRG1 gene. It is already known that the MDA-MB-175 breast tumor cell line has a dic(8;11), with a breakpoint in NRG1 that fuses NRG1 to the DOC4 gene on 11q13. Thus, we have found a total of seven breakpoints, in two types of cancer cell lines, that target the NRG1 gene. This suggests that the NRG1 locus is a recurring target of translocations in carcinomas. PCR analysis of reverse-transcribed cell line RNAs revealed an extensive complexity of the NRG1 transcripts but failed to detect a consistent pattern of mRNA isoforms in the cell lines with NRG1 breakpoint. PMID:12800145

  6. [Foundations of the new phylogenetics].

    Pavlinov, I Ia

    2004-01-01

    Evolutionary idea is the core of the modern biology. Due to this, phylogenetics dealing with historical reconstructions in biology takes a priority position among biological disciplines. The second half of the 20th century witnessed growth of a great interest to phylogenetic reconstructions at macrotaxonomic level which replaced microevolutionary studies dominating during the 30s-60s. This meant shift from population thinking to phylogenetic one but it was not revival of the classical phylogenetics; rather, a new approach emerged that was baptized The New Phylogenetics. It arose as a result of merging of three disciplines which were developing independently during 60s-70s, namely cladistics, numerical phyletics, and molecular phylogenetics (now basically genophyletics). Thus, the new phylogenetics could be defined as a branch of evolutionary biology aimed at elaboration of "parsimonious" cladistic hypotheses by means of numerical methods on the basis of mostly molecular data. Classical phylogenetics, as a historical predecessor of the new one, emerged on the basis of the naturphilosophical worldview which included a superorganismal idea of biota. Accordingly to that view, historical development (the phylogeny) was thought an analogy of individual one (the ontogeny) so its most basical features were progressive parallel developments of "parts" (taxa), supplemented with Darwinian concept of monophyly. Two predominating traditions were diverged within classical phylogenetics according to a particular interpretation of relation between these concepts. One of them (Cope, Severtzow) belittled monophyly and paid most attention to progressive parallel developments of morphological traits. Such an attitude turned this kind of phylogenetics to be rather the semogenetics dealing primarily with evolution of structures and not of taxa. Another tradition (Haeckel) considered both monophyletic and parallel origins of taxa jointly: in the middle of 20th century it was split into

  7. Quantum Simulation of Phylogenetic Trees

    Ellinas, Demosthenes; Jarvis, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Quantum simulations constructing probability tensors of biological multi-taxa in phylogenetic trees are proposed, in terms of positive trace preserving maps, describing evolving systems of quantum walks with multiple walkers. Basic phylogenetic models applying on trees of various topologies are simulated following appropriate decoherent quantum circuits. Quantum simulations of statistical inference for aligned sequences of biological characters are provided in terms of a quantum pruning map o...

  8. CEBPA copy number variations in normal karyotype acute myeloid leukemia: Possible role of breakpoint-associated microhomology and chromatin status in CEBPA mutagenesis.

    Libura, Marta; Pawełczyk, Marta; Florek, Izabella; Matiakowska, Karolina; Jaźwiec, Bożena; Borg, Katarzyna; Solarska, Iwona; Zawada, Magdalena; Czekalska, Sylwia; Libura, Jolanta; Salamanczuk, Zoriana; Jakóbczyk, Małgorzata; Mucha, Barbara; Duszeńko, Ewa; Soszyńska, Krystyna; Karabin, Karolina; Piątkowska-Jakubas, Beata; Całbecka, Małgorzata; Gajkowska-Kulig, Justyna; Gadomska, Grażyna; Kiełbiński, Marek; Ejduk, Anna; Kata, Dariusz; Grosicki, Sebastian; Kyrcz-Krzemień, Sławomira; Warzocha, Krzysztof; Kuliczkowski, Kazimierz; Skotnicki, Aleksander; Jęrzejczak, Wiesław Wiktor; Haus, Olga

    2015-12-01

    Copy number variations (CNV) in CEBPA locus represent heterogeneous group of mutations accompanying acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The aim of this study was to characterize different CEBPA mutation categories in regard to biological data like age, cytology, CD7, and molecular markers, and identify possible factors affecting their etiology. We report here the incidence of 12.6% of CEBPA mutants in the population of 262 normal karyotype AML (NK-AML) patients. We confirmed that double mutant AMLs presented uniform biological features when compared to single CEBPA mutations and accompanied mostly younger patients. We hypothesized that pathogenesis of distinct CEBPA mutation categories might be influenced by different factors. The detailed sequence analysis revealed frequent breakpoint-associated microhomologies of 2 to 12bp. The analysis of distribution of microhomology motifs along CEBPA gene showed that longer stretches of microhomology at the mutational junctions were relatively rare by chance which suggests their functional role in the CEBPA mutagenesis. Additionally, accurate quantification of CEBPA transcript levels showed that double CEBPA mutations correlated with high-level CEBPA expression, whereas single N-terminal CEBPA mutations were associated with low-level CEBPA expression. This might suggest that high-level CEBPA expression and/or accessibility of CEBPA locus contribute to B-ZIP in-frame duplications. PMID:26460249

  9. Clinically and Microbiologically Derived Azithromycin Susceptibility Breakpoints for Salmonella enterica Serovars Typhi and Paratyphi A

    Thieu, Nga Tran Vu; Dolecek, Christiane; Karkey, Abhilasha; Gupta, Ruchi; Turner, Paul; Dance, David; Maude, Rapeephan R.; Ha, Vinh; Tran, Chinh Nguyen; Thi, Phuong Le; Be, Bay Pham Van; Phi, La Tran Thi; Ngoc, Rang Nguyen; Ghose, Aniruddha; Dongol, Sabina; Campbell, James I.; Thanh, Duy Pham; Thanh, Tuyen Ha; Moore, Catrin E.; Sona, Soeng; Gaind, Rajni; Deb, Monorama; Anh, Ho Van; Van, Sach Nguyen; Tinh, Hien Tran; Day, Nicholas P. J.; Dondorp, Arjen; Thwaites, Guy; Faiz, Mohamed Abul; Phetsouvanh, Rattanaphone; Newton, Paul; Basnyat, Buddha; Farrar, Jeremy J.; Baker, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Azithromycin is an effective treatment for uncomplicated infections with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi and serovar Paratyphi A (enteric fever), but there are no clinically validated MIC and disk zone size interpretative guidelines. We studied individual patient data from three randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of antimicrobial treatment in enteric fever in Vietnam, with azithromycin used in one treatment arm, to determine the relationship between azithromycin treatment response and the azithromycin MIC of the infecting isolate. We additionally compared the azithromycin MIC and the disk susceptibility zone sizes of 1,640 S. Typhi and S. Paratyphi A clinical isolates collected from seven Asian countries. In the RCTs, 214 patients who were treated with azithromycin at a dose of 10 to 20 mg/ml for 5 to 7 days were analyzed. Treatment was successful in 195 of 214 (91%) patients, with no significant difference in response (cure rate, fever clearance time) with MICs ranging from 4 to 16 μg/ml. The proportion of Asian enteric fever isolates with an MIC of ≤16 μg/ml was 1,452/1,460 (99.5%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 98.9 to 99.7) for S. Typhi and 207/240 (86.3%; 95% CI, 81.2 to 90.3) (P 16 μg/ml and to determine MIC and disk breakpoints for S. Paratyphi A. PMID:25733500

  10. Elements of regional beetle faunas: faunal variation and compositional breakpoints along climate, land cover and geographical gradients.

    Heino, Jani; Alahuhta, Janne

    2015-03-01

    Regional faunas are structured by historical, spatial and environmental factors. We studied large-scale variation in four ecologically different beetle groups (Coleoptera: Dytiscidae, Carabidae, Hydrophiloidea, Cerambycidae) along climate, land cover and geographical gradients, examined faunal breakpoints in relation to environmental variables, and investigated the best fit pattern of assemblage variation (i.e. randomness, checkerboards, nestedness, evenly spaced, Gleasonian, Clementsian). We applied statistical methods typically used in the analysis of local ecological communities to provide novel insights into faunal compositional patterns at large spatial grain and geographical extent. We found that spatially structured variation in climate and land cover accounted for most variation in each beetle group in partial redundancy analyses, whereas the individual effect of each explanatory variable group was generally much less important in accounting for variation in provincial species composition. We also found that climate variables were most strongly associated with faunal breakpoints, with temperature-related variables alone accounting for about 20% of variation at the first node of multivariate regression tree for each beetle group. The existence of faunal breakpoints was also shown by the 'elements of faunal structure' analyses, which suggested Clementsian gradients across the provinces, that is, that there were two or more clear groups of species responding similarly to the underlying ecological gradients. The four beetle groups showed highly similar biogeographical patterns across our study area. The fact that temperature was related to faunal breakpoints in the species composition of each beetle group suggests that climate sets a strong filter to the distributions of species at this combination of spatial grain and spatial extent. This finding held true despite the ecological differences among the four beetle groups, ranging from fully aquatic to fully

  11. Sensititre autoreader for same-day breakpoint broth microdilution susceptibility testing of members of the family Enterobacteriaceae.

    Doern, G V; Staneck, J L; Needham, C.; Tubert, T

    1987-01-01

    The Sensititre Autoreader system is an instrument-assisted broth microdilution susceptibility test procedure based on the detection of fluorogenic growth substrate metabolism by test bacteria with different concentrations of antimicrobial agents. In the current investigation, this system was assessed as a means for predicting the in vitro activity of 17 antimicrobial agents versus numerous species of the family Enterobacteriaceae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa by using a breakpoint broth microdil...

  12. Effects of Breakpoint Changes on Carbapenem Susceptibility Rates ofEnterobacteriaceae: Results from the SENTRY Antimicrobial Surveillance Program, United States, 2008 to 2012

    Robert P Rennie

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the absence of clinical resistance, breakpoints for many antimicrobial agents are often set high. Clinical failures following use of the agents over time requires re-evaluation of breakpoints. This is based on patient response, pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic information and in vitro minimal inhibitory concentration data. Data from the SENTRY Antimicrobial Surveillance Program has shown that Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute breakpoint changes for carbapenems that occurred between 2008 and 2012 in North America have resulted in decreased levels of susceptibility for some species. In particular, reduced susceptibility to imipenem was observed for Proteus mirabilis (35% and Morganella morganii (80%. Minor decreases in susceptibility were also noted for Enterobacter species with ertapenem (5% and imipenem (4.3%, and Serratia species with imipenem (6.4%. No significant decreases in susceptibility were observed for meropenem following the breakpoint changes. There were no earlier breakpoints established for doripenem. Very few of these Enterobacteriaceae produce carbapenamase enzymes; therefore, the clinical significance of these changes has not yet been clearly determined. In conclusion, ongoing surveillance studies with in vitro minimum inhibitory concentration data are essential in predicting the need for breakpoint changes and in identifying the impact of such changes on the percent susceptibility of different species.

  13. Accurate Finite Difference Algorithms

    Goodrich, John W.

    1996-01-01

    Two families of finite difference algorithms for computational aeroacoustics are presented and compared. All of the algorithms are single step explicit methods, they have the same order of accuracy in both space and time, with examples up to eleventh order, and they have multidimensional extensions. One of the algorithm families has spectral like high resolution. Propagation with high order and high resolution algorithms can produce accurate results after O(10(exp 6)) periods of propagation with eight grid points per wavelength.

  14. Phylogenetic Position of Barbus lacerta Heckel, 1843

    Mustafa Korkmaz

    2015-11-01

    As a result, five clades come out from phylogenetic reconstruction and in phylogenetic tree Barbus lacerta determined to be sister group of Barbus macedonicus, Barbus oligolepis and Barbus plebejus complex.

  15. DendroBlast: approximate phylogenetic trees in the absence of multiple sequence alignments

    KELLY S; Maini, P. K.

    2013-01-01

    The rapidly growing availability of genome information has created considerable demand for both fast and accurate phylogenetic inference algorithms. We present a novel method called DendroBLAST for reconstructing phylogenetic dendrograms/trees from protein sequences using BLAST. This method differs from other methods by incorporating a simple model of sequence evolution to test the effect of introducing sequence changes on the reliability of the bipartitions in the inferred tree. Using realis...

  16. Bilateral renal agenesis/hypoplasia/dysplasia (BRAHD: postmortem analysis of 45 cases with breakpoint mapping of two de novo translocations.

    Louise Harewood

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Bilateral renal agenesis/hypoplasia/dysplasia (BRAHD is a relatively common, lethal malformation in humans. Established clinical risk factors include maternal insulin dependent diabetes mellitus and male sex of the fetus. In the majority of cases, no specific etiology can be established, although teratogenic, syndromal and single gene causes can be assigned to some cases. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: 45 unrelated fetuses, stillbirths or infants with lethal BRAHD were ascertained through a single regional paediatric pathology service (male:female 34:11 or 3.1:1. The previously reported phenotypic overlaps with VACTERL, caudal dysgenesis, hemifacial microsomia and Müllerian defects were confirmed. A new finding is that 16/45 (35.6%; m:f 13:3 or 4.3:1 BRAHD cases had one or more extrarenal malformations indicative of a disoder of laterality determination including; incomplete lobulation of right lung (seven cases, malrotation of the gut (seven cases and persistence of the left superior vena cava (five cases. One such case with multiple laterality defects and sirelomelia was found to have a de novo apparently balanced reciprocal translocation 46,XY,t(2;6(p22.3;q12. Translocation breakpoint mapping was performed by interphase fluorescent in-situ hybridization (FISH using nuclei extracted from archival tissue sections in both this case and an isolated bilateral renal agenesis case associated with a de novo 46,XY,t(1;2(q41;p25.3. Both t(2;6 breakpoints mapped to gene-free regions with no strong evidence of cis-regulatory potential. Ten genes localized within 500 kb of the t(1;2 breakpoints. Wholemount in-situ expression analyses of the mouse orthologs of these genes in embryonic mouse kidneys showed strong expression of Esrrg, encoding a nuclear steroid hormone receptor. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that Esrrg was restricted to proximal ductal tissue within the embryonic kidney. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The previously unreported

  17. Chromosomal breakpoints and structural alterations of the c-myc locus differ in endemic and sporadic forms of Burkitt lymphoma.

    Pelicci, P.G.; Knowles, D M; Magrath, I; Dalla-Favera, R

    1986-01-01

    We have examined the position of the chromosomal breakpoint relative to the human c-myc gene (MYC) and the presence of other structural alterations of the same locus in 19 fresh samples of Burkitt lymphoma (BL) and 13 BL-derived cell lines. This panel includes the two pathogenetic forms of BL: the endemic (African-type) BL (eBL) and sporadic (American-type) BL (sBL). In all cases tested, including fresh samples and cell lines, structural alterations of the 5' portion of the gene were detected...

  18. Molecular characterization of two proximal deletion breakpoint regions in both Prader-Willi and Angelman syndrome patients

    Christian, S.L.; Huang, B.; Ledbetter, D.H. [National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States)] [and others

    1995-07-01

    Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) and Angelman syndrome (AS) are distinct mental retardation syndromes caused by paternal and maternal deficiencies, respectively, in chromosome 15q11{minus}q13. Approximately 70% of these patients have a large deletion of {approximately}4 Mb extending from D15S9 (ML34) through D15S12 (IR10A). To further characterize the deletion breakpoints proximal to D15S9, three new polymorphic microsatellite markers were developed that showed observed heterozygosities of 60%-87%. D15S541 and D15S542 were isolated for YAC A124A3 containing the D15S18 (IR39) locus. D15S543 was isolated from a cosmid cloned from the proximal right end of YAC 254B5 containing the D15S9 (ML34) locus. Gene-centromere mapping of these markers, using a panel of ovarian teratomas of known meiotic origin, extended the genetic map of chromosome 15 by 2-3 cM toward the centromere. Analysis of the more proximal S541/S542 markers on 53 Prader-Willi and 33 Angelman deletion patients indicated two classes of patients: 44% (35/80) of the informative patients were deleted for these markers (class I), while 56% (45/80) were not deleted (class II), with no difference between PWS and AS. In contrast, D15S543 was deleted in all informative patients (13/48) or showed the presence of a single allele (in 35/48 patients), suggesting that this marker is deleted in the majority of PWS and AS cases. These results confirm the presence of two common proximal deletion breakpoint regions in both Prader-Willi and Angelman syndromes and are consistent with the same deletion mechanism being responsible for paternal and maternal deletions. One breakpoint region lies between D15S541/S542 and D15S543, with an additional breakpoint region being proximal to D15S541/S542. 46 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. A complex double translocation involving four chromosomes and five breakpoints in a child with mild mental retardation.

    Couzin, D A; Watt, J L; Auchterlonie, I. A.

    1983-01-01

    A 6-year-old boy with speech delay and mild mental retardation (IQ 82) was found to have a complex double translocation involving four chromosomes and a total of five breakpoints, two being on the same arm. This resulted in the karyotype 46,XY,t(2;4;7)(7;8)(q14;q31;q11q22;q13). As far as the authors are aware this is the first time that such a complex double translocation has been reported. Both parents had normal karyotypes.

  20. Phylogenetic Distribution of Fungal Sterols

    Weete, John D.; Abril, Maritza; Blackwell, Meredith

    2010-01-01

    Background Ergosterol has been considered the “fungal sterol” for almost 125 years; however, additional sterol data superimposed on a recent molecular phylogeny of kingdom Fungi reveals a different and more complex situation. Methodology/Principal Findings The interpretation of sterol distribution data in a modern phylogenetic context indicates that there is a clear trend from cholesterol and other Δ5 sterols in the earliest diverging fungal species to ergosterol in later diverging fungi. The...

  1. Combinatorial Approaches to Accurate Identification of Orthologous Genes

    Shi, Guanqun

    2011-01-01

    The accurate identification of orthologous genes across different species is a critical and challenging problem in comparative genomics and has a wide spectrum of biological applications including gene function inference, evolutionary studies and systems biology. During the past several years, many methods have been proposed for ortholog assignment based on sequence similarity, phylogenetic approaches, synteny information, and genome rearrangement. Although these methods share many commonly a...

  2. Transforming phylogenetic networks: Moving beyond tree space.

    Huber, Katharina T; Moulton, Vincent; Wu, Taoyang

    2016-09-01

    Phylogenetic networks are a generalization of phylogenetic trees that are used to represent reticulate evolution. Unrooted phylogenetic networks form a special class of such networks, which naturally generalize unrooted phylogenetic trees. In this paper we define two operations on unrooted phylogenetic networks, one of which is a generalization of the well-known nearest-neighbor interchange (NNI) operation on phylogenetic trees. We show that any unrooted phylogenetic network can be transformed into any other such network using only these operations. This generalizes the well-known fact that any phylogenetic tree can be transformed into any other such tree using only NNI operations. It also allows us to define a generalization of tree space and to define some new metrics on unrooted phylogenetic networks. To prove our main results, we employ some fascinating new connections between phylogenetic networks and cubic graphs that we have recently discovered. Our results should be useful in developing new strategies to search for optimal phylogenetic networks, a topic that has recently generated some interest in the literature, as well as for providing new ways to compare networks. PMID:27224010

  3. Functional and phylogenetic ecology in R

    Swenson, Nathan G

    2014-01-01

    Functional and Phylogenetic Ecology in R is designed to teach readers to use R for phylogenetic and functional trait analyses. Over the past decade, a dizzying array of tools and methods were generated to incorporate phylogenetic and functional information into traditional ecological analyses. Increasingly these tools are implemented in R, thus greatly expanding their impact. Researchers getting started in R can use this volume as a step-by-step entryway into phylogenetic and functional analyses for ecology in R. More advanced users will be able to use this volume as a quick reference to understand particular analyses. The volume begins with an introduction to the R environment and handling relevant data in R. Chapters then cover phylogenetic and functional metrics of biodiversity; null modeling and randomizations for phylogenetic and functional trait analyses; integrating phylogenetic and functional trait information; and interfacing the R environment with a popular C-based program. This book presents a uni...

  4. Mechanism of fragility at BCL2 gene minor breakpoint cluster region during t(14;18) chromosomal translocation.

    Nambiar, Mridula; Raghavan, Sathees C

    2012-03-16

    The t(14;18) translocation in follicular lymphoma is one of the most common chromosomal translocations. Breaks in chromosome 18 are localized at the 3'-UTR of BCL2 gene or downstream and are mainly clustered in either the major breakpoint region or the minor breakpoint cluster region (mcr). The recombination activating gene (RAG) complex induces breaks at IgH locus of chromosome 14, whereas the mechanism of fragility at BCL2 mcr remains unclear. Here, for the first time, we show that RAGs can nick mcr; however, the mechanism is unique. Three independent nicks of equal efficiency are generated, when both Mg(2+) and Mn(2+) are present, unlike a single nick during V(D)J recombination. Further, we demonstrate that RAG binding and nicking at the mcr are independent of nonamer, whereas a CCACCTCT motif plays a critical role in its fragility, as shown by sequential mutagenesis. More importantly, we recapitulate the BCL2 mcr translocation and find that mcr can undergo synapsis with a standard recombination signal sequence within the cells, in a RAG-dependent manner. Further, mutation to the CCACCTCT motif abolishes recombination within the cells, indicating its vital role. Hence, our data suggest a novel, physiologically relevant, nonamer-independent mechanism of RAG nicking at mcr, which may be important for generation of chromosomal translocations in humans. PMID:22275374

  5. Genomic inverse PCR for exploration of ligated breakpoints (GIPFEL, a new method to detect translocations in leukemia.

    Elisa Fueller

    Full Text Available Here we present a novel method "Genomic inverse PCR for exploration of ligated breakpoints" (GIPFEL that allows the sensitive detection of recurrent chromosomal translocations. This technique utilizes limited amounts of DNA as starting material and relies on PCR based quantification of unique DNA sequences that are created by circular ligation of restricted genomic DNA from translocation bearing cells. Because the complete potential breakpoint region is interrogated, a prior knowledge of the individual, specific interchromosomal fusion site is not required. We validated GIPFEL for the five most common gene fusions associated with childhood leukemia (MLL-AF4, MLL-AF9, MLL-ENL, ETV6-RUNX1, and TCF3-PBX1. A workflow of restriction digest, purification, ligation, removal of linear fragments and precipitation enriching for circular DNA was developed. GIPFEL allowed detection of translocation specific signature sequences down to a 10-4 dilution which is close to the theoretical limit. In a blinded proof-of-principle study utilizing DNA from cell lines and 144 children with B-precursor-ALL associated translocations this method was 100% specific with no false positive results. Sensitivity was 83%, 65%, and 24% for t(4;11, t(9;11 and t(11;19 respectively. Translocation t(12;21 was correctly detected in 64% and t(1;19 in 39% of the cases. In contrast to other methods, the characteristics of GIPFEL make it particularly attractive for prospective studies.

  6. Analysis of t(9;17)(q33.2;q25.3) chromosomal breakpoint regions and genetic association reveals novel candidate genes for bipolar disorder

    Rajkumar, A.P.; Christensen, Jane H.; Mattheisen, Manuel;

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Breakpoints of chromosomal abnormalities facilitate identification of novel candidate genes for psychiatric disorders. Genome-wide significant evidence supports the linkage between chromosome 17q25.3 and bipolar disorder (BD). Co-segregation of translocation t(9;17)(q33.2;q25.3) with...... psychiatric disorders has been reported. We aimed to narrow down these chromosomal breakpoint regions and to investigate the associations between single nucleotide polymorphisms within these regions and BD as well as schizophrenia (SZ) in large genome-wide association study samples. METHODS: We cross......-linked Danish psychiatric and cytogenetic case registers to identify an individual with both t(9;17)(q33.2;q25.3) and BD. Fluorescent in situ hybridization was employed to map the chromosomal breakpoint regions of this proband. We accessed the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium BD (n = 16,731) and SZ (n = 21...

  7. Distribution of radiation-induced G1 exchange and terminal deletion breakpoints in Chinese hamster chromosomes as detected by G banding

    A total of 255 chromosomal aberrations induced by X-rays in G1 phase of the cell cycle were scored in 600 G-banded metaphases prepared from Chinese hamster female cells. On the basis of a detailed analysis of these aberrations a total of 441 chromosomal breakpoints were mapped to the individual Chinese hamster chromosomes and their bands. More breakpoints were mapped to G-light (80.5%) than to G-dark (19.5%) bands. These results indicate that radiation-induced exchange and terminal deletion breakpoints, as observed in the first postirradiation metaphase, have different patterns of distribution in Chinese hamster chromosomes. Clustering of terminal deletions in the long arms of X chromosomes, which are entirely occupied by heterochromatin, suggests that chromosomal repair mechanisms responsible for rejoining of chromosomal breaks are less effective in heterochromatic than in other genomic regions. (author)

  8. Breakpoint characterization of the der(19)t(11;19)(q13;p13) in the ovarian cancer cell line SKOV-3

    Onkes, W.; Fredrik, R.; Micci, F; Schonbeck, B.; Martin-Subero, J.; ULLMANN, R; Hilpert, F; Brautigam, K.; JANSSEN, O; Maass, N; Siebert, R.; S. Heim; Arnold, N; Weimer, J.

    2013-01-01

    About 20% of ovarian carcinomas show alterations of 19p13 and/or 19q13 in the form of added extra material whose origin often is from chromosome 11. Based on earlier spectral karyotype analysis of the ovarian cancer cell line SKOV-3, which shows an unbalanced translocation der(19)t(11;19), the aim of this study was to determine the precise breakpoints of that derivative chromosome. After rough delimitation of the breakpoints of microdissected derivative chromosomes by array analysis, we desig...

  9. Phylogenetic placement of the Spirosomaceae

    Woese, C. R.; Maloy, S.; Mandelco, L.; Raj, H. D.

    1990-01-01

    Comparative analysis of 16S rRNA sequences shows that the family Spirosomaceae belongs within the eubacterial phylum defined by the flavobacteria and bacteriodes. Its constituent genera, Spirosoma, Flectobacillus, and Runella form a monophyletic grouping therein. The phylogenetic assignment is based not only upon evolutionary distance analysis, but also upon sequence signatures and higher order structural synapomorphies in 16S rRNA. Another genus peripherally associated with the Spirosomaceae, Ancylobacter ("Microcyclus"), does not cluster with the flavobacteria and their relatives, but rather belongs to the alpha subdivision of the purple bacteria.

  10. Phylogenetics of neotropical Platymiscium (Leguminosae

    Saslis-Lagoudakis, C. Haris; Chase, Mark W; Robinson, Daniel N;

    2008-01-01

    Platymiscium is a neotropical legume genus of forest trees in the Pterocarpus clade of the pantropical "dalbergioid" clade. It comprises 19 species (29 taxa), distributed from Mexico to southern Brazil. This study presents a molecular phylogenetic analysis of Platymiscium and allies inferred from...... nuclear ribosomal (nrITS) and plastid (trnL, trnL-F and matK) DNA sequence data using parsimony and Bayesian methods. Divergence times are estimated using a Bayesian method assuming a relaxed molecular clock (multidivtime). Within the Pterocarpus clade, new sister relationships are recovered: Pterocarpus...

  11. Phycas: software for Bayesian phylogenetic analysis.

    Lewis, Paul O; Holder, Mark T; Swofford, David L

    2015-05-01

    Phycas is open source, freely available Bayesian phylogenetics software written primarily in C++ but with a Python interface. Phycas specializes in Bayesian model selection for nucleotide sequence data, particularly the estimation of marginal likelihoods, central to computing Bayes Factors. Marginal likelihoods can be estimated using newer methods (Thermodynamic Integration and Generalized Steppingstone) that are more accurate than the widely used Harmonic Mean estimator. In addition, Phycas supports two posterior predictive approaches to model selection: Gelfand-Ghosh and Conditional Predictive Ordinates. The General Time Reversible family of substitution models, as well as a codon model, are available, and data can be partitioned with all parameters unlinked except tree topology and edge lengths. Phycas provides for analyses in which the prior on tree topologies allows polytomous trees as well as fully resolved trees, and provides for several choices for edge length priors, including a hierarchical model as well as the recently described compound Dirichlet prior, which helps avoid overly informative induced priors on tree length. PMID:25577605

  12. Many-core algorithms for statistical phylogenetics

    Suchard, Marc A.; Rambaut, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    Motivation: Statistical phylogenetics is computationally intensive, resulting in considerable attention meted on techniques for parallelization. Codon-based models allow for independent rates of synonymous and replacement substitutions and have the potential to more adequately model the process of protein-coding sequence evolution with a resulting increase in phylogenetic accuracy. Unfortunately, due to the high number of codon states, computational burden has largely thwarted phylogenetic re...

  13. Sequencing and characterisation of rearrangements in three S. pastorianus strains reveals the presence of chimeric genes and gives evidence of breakpoint reuse.

    Sarah K Hewitt

    Full Text Available Gross chromosomal rearrangements have the potential to be evolutionarily advantageous to an adapting organism. The generation of a hybrid species increases opportunity for recombination by bringing together two homologous genomes. We sought to define the location of genomic rearrangements in three strains of Saccharomyces pastorianus, a natural lager-brewing yeast hybrid of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Saccharomyces eubayanus, using whole genome shotgun sequencing. Each strain of S. pastorianus has lost species-specific portions of its genome and has undergone extensive recombination, producing chimeric chromosomes. We predicted 30 breakpoints that we confirmed at the single nucleotide level by designing species-specific primers that flank each breakpoint, and then sequencing the PCR product. These rearrangements are the result of recombination between areas of homology between the two subgenomes, rather than repetitive elements such as transposons or tRNAs. Interestingly, 28/30 S. cerevisiae-S. eubayanus recombination breakpoints are located within genic regions, generating chimeric genes. Furthermore we show evidence for the reuse of two breakpoints, located in HSP82 and KEM1, in strains of proposed independent origin.

  14. Characterization of two ectrodactyly-associated translocation breakpoints separated by 2.5 Mb on chromosome 2q14.1-q14.2.

    David, D.; Marques, B.; Ferreira, C.; Vieira, P.; Corona-Rivera, A.; Ferreira, J.C.; Bokhoven, J.H.L.M. van

    2009-01-01

    Split hand-split foot malformation or ectrodactyly is a heterogeneous congenital defect of digit formation. The aim of this study is the mapping of the breakpoints and a detailed molecular characterization of the candidate genes for an isolated and syndromic form of ectrodactyly, both associated wit

  15. Mycobacterium tuberculosis pncA Polymorphisms That Do Not Confer Pyrazinamide Resistance at a Breakpoint Concentration of 100 Micrograms per Milliliter in MGIT

    Whitfield, Michael G.; Streicher, Elizabeth M.; Sampson, Samantha L.; Sirgel, Frik A.; van Helden, Paul D.; Mercante, Alexandra; Willby, Melisa; Hughes, Kelsey; Birkness, Kris; Morlock, Glenn; van Rie, Annelies; Posey, James E.

    2015-01-01

    Sequencing of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis pncA gene allows for pyrazinamide susceptibility testing. We summarize data on pncA polymorphisms that do not confer resistance at a susceptibility breakpoint of 100 μg/ml pyrazinamide in MGIT within a cohort of isolates from South Africa and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. PMID:26292310

  16. Follicular lymphoma with a novel t(14;18) breakpoint involving the immunoglobulin heavy chain switch mu region indicates an origin from germinal center B cells

    Fenton, JAL; Vaandrager, JW; Aarts, WM; Bende, RJ; Heering, K; van Dijk, M; Morgan, G; van Noesel, CJM; Schuuring, E; Kluin, PM

    2002-01-01

    With the use of DNA-fiber fluorescent in situ hybridization, a BCL2 protein positive follicular lymphoma with a novel BCL2 breakpoint involving the immunoglobulin heavy chain (IGH) switch mu (S-mu) region instead of the J(H) or D-H gene segments was identified. Sequence analysis showed that the geno

  17. A high-resolution comparative map between pig chromosome 17 and human chromosomes 4, 8, and 20: Identification of synteny breakpoints

    Lahbib-Mansais, Yvette; Karlskov-Mortensen, Peter; Mompart, Florence;

    2005-01-01

    We report on the construction of a high-resolution comparative map of porcine chromosome 17 (SSC17) focusing on evolutionary breakpoints with human chromosomes. The comparative map shows high homology with human chromosome 20 but suggests more limited homologies with other human chromosomes. SSC1...

  18. Detection of three common translocation breakpoints in non-Hodgkin's lymphomas by fluorescence in situ hybridization on routine paraffin-embedded tissue sections

    Haralambieva, E; Kleiverda, K; Mason, DY; Schuuring, E; Kluin, PM

    2002-01-01

    Non-random chromosomal translocations are specifically involved in the pathogenesis of many non-Hodgkin's lymphomas and have clinical implications as diagnostic and/or prognostic markers. Their detection is often impaired by technical problems, including the distribution of the breakpoints over larg

  19. Phylogenetic organization of bacterial activity.

    Morrissey, Ember M; Mau, Rebecca L; Schwartz, Egbert; Caporaso, J Gregory; Dijkstra, Paul; van Gestel, Natasja; Koch, Benjamin J; Liu, Cindy M; Hayer, Michaela; McHugh, Theresa A; Marks, Jane C; Price, Lance B; Hungate, Bruce A

    2016-09-01

    Phylogeny is an ecologically meaningful way to classify plants and animals, as closely related taxa frequently have similar ecological characteristics, functional traits and effects on ecosystem processes. For bacteria, however, phylogeny has been argued to be an unreliable indicator of an organism's ecology owing to evolutionary processes more common to microbes such as gene loss and lateral gene transfer, as well as convergent evolution. Here we use advanced stable isotope probing with (13)C and (18)O to show that evolutionary history has ecological significance for in situ bacterial activity. Phylogenetic organization in the activity of bacteria sets the stage for characterizing the functional attributes of bacterial taxonomic groups. Connecting identity with function in this way will allow scientists to begin building a mechanistic understanding of how bacterial community composition regulates critical ecosystem functions. PMID:26943624

  20. Progress, pitfalls and parallel universes: a history of insect phylogenetics.

    Kjer, Karl M; Simon, Chris; Yavorskaya, Margarita; Beutel, Rolf G

    2016-08-01

    The phylogeny of insects has been both extensively studied and vigorously debated for over a century. A relatively accurate deep phylogeny had been produced by 1904. It was not substantially improved in topology until recently when phylogenomics settled many long-standing controversies. Intervening advances came instead through methodological improvement. Early molecular phylogenetic studies (1985-2005), dominated by a few genes, provided datasets that were too small to resolve controversial phylogenetic problems. Adding to the lack of consensus, this period was characterized by a polarization of philosophies, with individuals belonging to either parsimony or maximum-likelihood camps; each largely ignoring the insights of the other. The result was an unfortunate detour in which the few perceived phylogenetic revolutions published by both sides of the philosophical divide were probably erroneous. The size of datasets has been growing exponentially since the mid-1980s accompanied by a wave of confidence that all relationships will soon be known. However, large datasets create new challenges, and a large number of genes does not guarantee reliable results. If history is a guide, then the quality of conclusions will be determined by an improved understanding of both molecular and morphological evolution, and not simply the number of genes analysed. PMID:27558853

  1. Phylogenetic comparative approaches for studying niche conservatism

    COOPER, NATALIE; Jetz, Walter; Freckleton, Rob P.

    2010-01-01

    Analyses of phylogenetic niche conservatism (PNC) are becoming increasingly common. However, each analysis makes subtly different assumptions about the evolutionary mechanism that generates patterns of niche conservatism. To understand PNC, analyses should be conducted with reference to a clear underlying model, using appropriate methods. Here, we outline five macroevolutionary models that may underlie patterns of PNC (drift, niche retention, phylogenetic inertia, niche filling ? shifti...

  2. The space of ultrametric phylogenetic trees.

    Gavryushkin, Alex; Drummond, Alexei J

    2016-08-21

    The reliability of a phylogenetic inference method from genomic sequence data is ensured by its statistical consistency. Bayesian inference methods produce a sample of phylogenetic trees from the posterior distribution given sequence data. Hence the question of statistical consistency of such methods is equivalent to the consistency of the summary of the sample. More generally, statistical consistency is ensured by the tree space used to analyse the sample. In this paper, we consider two standard parameterisations of phylogenetic time-trees used in evolutionary models: inter-coalescent interval lengths and absolute times of divergence events. For each of these parameterisations we introduce a natural metric space on ultrametric phylogenetic trees. We compare the introduced spaces with existing models of tree space and formulate several formal requirements that a metric space on phylogenetic trees must possess in order to be a satisfactory space for statistical analysis, and justify them. We show that only a few known constructions of the space of phylogenetic trees satisfy these requirements. However, our results suggest that these basic requirements are not enough to distinguish between the two metric spaces we introduce and that the choice between metric spaces requires additional properties to be considered. Particularly, that the summary tree minimising the square distance to the trees from the sample might be different for different parameterisations. This suggests that further fundamental insight is needed into the problem of statistical consistency of phylogenetic inference methods. PMID:27188249

  3. Discriminating the effects of phylogenetic hypothesis, tree resolution and clade age estimates on phylogenetic signal measurements.

    Seger, G D S; Duarte, L D S; Debastiani, V J; Kindel, A; Jarenkow, J A

    2013-09-01

    Understanding how species traits evolved over time is the central question to comprehend assembly rules that govern the phylogenetic structure of communities. The measurement of phylogenetic signal (PS) in ecologically relevant traits is a first step to understand phylogenetically structured community patterns. The different methods available to estimate PS make it difficult to choose which is most appropriate. Furthermore, alternative phylogenetic tree hypotheses, node resolution and clade age estimates might influence PS measurements. In this study, we evaluated to what extent these parameters affect different methods of PS analysis, and discuss advantages and disadvantages when selecting which method to use. We measured fruit/seed traits and flowering/fruiting phenology of endozoochoric species occurring in Southern Brazilian Araucaria forests and evaluated their PS using Mantel regressions, phylogenetic eigenvector regressions (PVR) and K statistic. Mantel regressions always gave less significant results compared to PVR and K statistic in all combinations of phylogenetic trees constructed. Moreover, a better phylogenetic resolution affected PS, independently of the method used to estimate it. Morphological seed traits tended to show higher PS than diaspores traits, while PS in flowering/fruiting phenology depended mostly on the method used to estimate it. This study demonstrates that different PS estimates are obtained depending on the chosen method and the phylogenetic tree resolution. This finding has implications for inferences on phylogenetic niche conservatism or ecological processes determining phylogenetic community structure. PMID:23368095

  4. DendroBLAST: approximate phylogenetic trees in the absence of multiple sequence alignments.

    Steven Kelly

    Full Text Available The rapidly growing availability of genome information has created considerable demand for both fast and accurate phylogenetic inference algorithms. We present a novel method called DendroBLAST for reconstructing phylogenetic dendrograms/trees from protein sequences using BLAST. This method differs from other methods by incorporating a simple model of sequence evolution to test the effect of introducing sequence changes on the reliability of the bipartitions in the inferred tree. Using realistic simulated sequence data we demonstrate that this method produces phylogenetic trees that are more accurate than other commonly-used distance based methods though not as accurate as maximum likelihood methods from good quality multiple sequence alignments. In addition to tests on simulated data, we use DendroBLAST to generate input trees for a supertree reconstruction of the phylogeny of the Archaea. This independent analysis produces an approximate phylogeny of the Archaea that has both high precision and recall when compared to previously published analysis of the same dataset using conventional methods. Taken together these results demonstrate that approximate phylogenetic trees can be produced in the absence of multiple sequence alignments, and we propose that these trees will provide a platform for improving and informing downstream bioinformatic analysis. A web implementation of the DendroBLAST method is freely available for use at http://www.dendroblast.com/.

  5. Advances in phylogenetic studies of Nematoda

    2002-01-01

    Nematoda is a metazoan group with extremely high diversity only next to Insecta. Caenorhabditis elegans is now a favorable experimental model animal in modern developmental biology, genetics and genomics studies. However, the phylogeny of Nematoda and the phylogenetic position of the phylum within animal kingdom have long been in debate. Recent molecular phylogenetic studies gave great challenges to the traditional nematode classification. The new phylogenies not only placed the Nematoda in the Ecdysozoan and divided the phylum into five clades, but also provided new insights into animal molecular identification and phylogenetic biodiversity studies. The present paper reviews major progress and remaining problems in the current molecular phylogenetic studies of Nematoda, and prospects the developmental tendencies of this field.

  6. Marine turtle mitogenome phylogenetics and evolution

    Duchene, S.; Frey, A.; Alfaro-Núñez, A.;

    2012-01-01

    . Analyses of partial mitochondrial sequences and some nuclear markers have revealed phylogenetic inconsistencies within Cheloniidae, especially regarding the placement of the flatback. Population genetic studies based on D-Loop sequences have shown considerable structuring in species with broad geographic...

  7. Phylogenetic structure in tropical hummingbird communities

    Graham, Catherine H; Parra, Juan L; Rahbek, Carsten;

    2009-01-01

    sustaining an expensive means of locomotion at high elevations. We found that communities in the lowlands on opposite sides of the Andes tend to be phylogenetically similar despite their large differences in species composition, a pattern implicating the Andes as an important dispersal barrier. In contrast......How biotic interactions, current and historical environment, and biogeographic barriers determine community structure is a fundamental question in ecology and evolution, especially in diverse tropical regions. To evaluate patterns of local and regional diversity, we quantified the phylogenetic...... composition of 189 hummingbird communities in Ecuador. We assessed how species and phylogenetic composition changed along environmental gradients and across biogeographic barriers. We show that humid, low-elevation communities are phylogenetically overdispersed (coexistence of distant relatives), a pattern...

  8. A High-Resolution Comparative Chromosome Map of Cricetus cricetus and Peromyscus eremicus Reveals the Involvement of Constitutive Heterochromatin in Breakpoint Regions.

    Vieira-da-Silva, Ana; Louzada, Sandra; Adega, Filomena; Chaves, Raquel

    2015-01-01

    Compared to humans and other mammals, rodent genomes, specifically Muroidea species, underwent intense chromosome reshuffling in which many complex structural rearrangements occurred. This fact makes them preferential animal models for studying the process of karyotype evolution. Here, we present the first combined chromosome comparative maps between 2 Cricetidae species, Cricetus cricetus and Peromyscus eremicus, and the index species Mus musculus and Rattus norvegicus. Comparative chromosome painting was done using mouse and rat paint probes together with in silico analysis from the Ensembl genome browser database. Hereby, evolutionary events (inter- and intrachromosomal rearrangements) that occurred in C. cricetus and P. eremicus since the putative ancestral Muroidea genome could be inferred, and evolutionary breakpoint regions could be detected. A colocalization of constitutive heterochromatin and evolutionary breakpoint regions in each genome was observed. Our results suggest the involvement of constitutive heterochromatin in karyotype restructuring of these species, despite the different levels of conservation of the C. cricetus (derivative) and P. eremicus (conserved) genomes. PMID:25999143

  9. On the validity of setting breakpoint minimum inhibition concentrations at one quarter of the plasma concentration achieved following oral administration of oxytetracycline

    Coyne, R.; Samuelsen, O.; Bergh, Ø.;

    2004-01-01

    that the therapy was probably beneficial. Thus, the data obtained in this work suggest that the application of the 4:1 ratio is not a valid method of generating meaningful breakpoint MIC values. Published values for the MIC of OTC against A. salmonicida and the plasma concentrations achieved after oral...... administration of OTC medicated feed were applied to investigate the validity of the application of the 4:1 ratio. Breakpoints generated by the application of this ratio to these data would suggest that OTC could never have had any value in combating A. salmonicida infections. As this conclusion is contrary...... to experience, it is argued that examination of the published data reinforces the conclusion that the 4:1 ratio has little value in the oral therapy of fish disease....

  10. On the analysis of phylogenetically paired designs

    Funk, Jennifer L.; Rakovski, Cyril S; Macpherson, J Michael

    2015-01-01

    As phylogenetically controlled experimental designs become increasingly common in ecology, the need arises for a standardized statistical treatment of these datasets. Phylogenetically paired designs circumvent the need for resolved phylogenies and have been used to compare species groups, particularly in the areas of invasion biology and adaptation. Despite the widespread use of this approach, the statistical analysis of paired designs has not been critically evaluated. We propose a mixed mod...

  11. Phylogenetic relationships in the family Alloherpesviridae

    Waltzek, T.B.; Kelley, G.O.; Alfaro, M.E.; Kurobe, T.; Davison, A J; Hedrick, R.P.

    2009-01-01

    Phylogenetic relationships among herpesviruses (HVs) of mammals, birds, and reptiles have been studied extensively, whereas those among other HVs are relatively unexplored. We have reconstructed the phylogenetic relationships among 13 fish and amphibian HVs using maximum likelihood and Bayesian analyses of amino acid sequences predicted from parts of the DNA polymerase and terminase genes. The relationships among 6 of these viruses were confirmed using the partial DNA polymerase data plus the...

  12. Consequences of recombination on traditional phylogenetic analysis

    Schierup, M H; Hein, J

    2000-01-01

    We investigate the shape of a phylogenetic tree reconstructed from sequences evolving under the coalescent with recombination. The motivation is that evolutionary inferences are often made from phylogenetic trees reconstructed from population data even though recombination may well occur (mtDNA or...... recombination leads to a large overestimation of the substitution rate heterogeneity and the loss of the molecular clock. These results are discussed in relation to viral and mtDNA data sets. Udgivelsesdato: 2000-Oct...

  13. Phylogenetic Position of Barbus lacerta Heckel, 1843

    Mustafa Korkmaz

    2015-01-01

    The genus Barbus is characterized by a complex taxonomical structure, due to high number of species and its morphological plasticity; it counts more than 25 species in Europe, displaying different ecological preferences. 21 taxon’s from Barbus genus including Barbus lacerta was used in phylogenetic analysis. Cytochrome oxidase I (COI) gene sequence analysis of Barbus lacerta is presented firstly in this study. A phylogenetic tree (neighbor-joining and maximum likelihood analysis) was reco...

  14. Summer holidays as break-point in shaping a tannery sludge microbial community around a stable core microbiota.

    Giordano, Cesira; Boscaro, Vittorio; Munz, Giulio; Mori, Gualtiero; Vannini, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Recently, several investigations focused on the discovery of a bacterial consortium shared among different wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). Nevertheless, the definition of a core microbiota over time represents the necessary counterpart in order to unravel the dynamics of bacterial communities in these environments. Here we performed a monthly survey on the bacterial community of a consortial industrial plant. Objectives of this study were: (1) to identify a core microbiota constant over time; (2) to evaluate the temporal dynamics of the community during one year. A conspicuous and diversified core microbiota is constituted by operational taxonomic units which are present throughout the year in the plant. Community composition data confirm that the presence and abundance of bacteria in WWTPs is highly consistent at high taxonomic level. Our results indicate however a difference in microbial community structure between two groups of samples, identifying the summer holiday period as the break-point. Changes in the structure of the microbial community occur otherwise gradually, one month after another. Further studies will clarify how the size and diversity of the core microbiota could affect the observed dynamics. PMID:27461169

  15. Putative cruciform DNA structures at BCL6 breakpoint region may explain BCL6 translocation in diffuse large B-Cell lymphoma

    Cancer is a disease characterized by uncontrolled proliferation of cells, caused by genetic alterations such as chromosomal translocations, which are present in almost all hematological malignancies. Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma (DLBL) is the most common non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, comprising 40-50% of all lymphomas both in India and worldwide, and is characterized by BCL6 chromosomal translocation. However, the mechanism of this translocation is completely unknown. By mapping of translocation breakpoints from patients, we have identified three breakpoint cluster regions at 5' UTR of BCL6 gene. Bioinformatics analysis of cluster II, which possesses majority of breakpoints, this region may form cruciform DNA structures. Gel mobility shift assays using oligomeric DNA from the region suggested that a portion of cluster II folded into hairpin structures. Mutations to the wild type sequences disrupted hairpin formation. Circular dichroism studies on BCL6 oligomers resulted in a spectra containing two overlapping peaks at 265 nm and 285 nm, confirming hairpin structure. Further, the structure was destroyed upon heating, and reformed when appropriate conditions were provided. P1 nuclease assay in conjunction with KMnO4 probing suggested that the structure possessed an eight nucleotide double-stranded stem and a nine nucleotide loop. To further understand the mechanism of BCL6 translocation in vivo, human cells were transfected with episomes harboring cluster II region and the results obtained will be discussed. Hence, our results suggest the formation of a putative cruciform DNA structure at BCL6 breakpoint region and that may facilitate breakage at BCL6 gene explaining chromosomal translocations in DLBL. (author)

  16. Influence of Clinical Breakpoint Changes from CLSI 2009 to EUCAST 2011 Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing Guidelines on Multidrug Resistance Rates of Gram-Negative Rods

    Hombach, Michael; Wolfensberger, Aline; Stefan P Kuster; Böttger, Erik C.

    2013-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) rates of Gram-negative rods were analyzed comparing CLSI 2009 and EUCAST 2011 antibiotic susceptibility testing guidelines. After EUCAST 2011 was applied, the MDR rates increased for Klebsiella pneumoniae (2.2%), Enterobacter cloacae (1.1%), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (0.7%), and Escherichia coli (0.4%). A total of 24% of Enterobacteriaceae MDR isolates and 12% of P. aeruginosa MDR isolates were categorized as MDR due to breakpoint changes.

  17. Phylogenetic niche conservatism in C4 grasses.

    Liu, Hui; Edwards, Erika J; Freckleton, Robert P; Osborne, Colin P

    2012-11-01

    Photosynthetic pathway is used widely to discriminate plant functional types in studies of global change. However, independent evolutionary lineages of C(4) grasses with different variants of C(4) photosynthesis show different biogeographical relationships with mean annual precipitation, suggesting phylogenetic niche conservatism (PNC). To investigate how phylogeny and photosynthetic type differentiate C(4) grasses, we compiled a dataset of morphological and habitat information of 185 genera belonging to two monophyletic subfamilies, Chloridoideae and Panicoideae, which together account for 90 % of the world's C(4) grass species. We evaluated evolutionary variance and covariance of morphological and habitat traits. Strong phylogenetic signals were found in both morphological and habitat traits, arising mainly from the divergence of the two subfamilies. Genera in Chloridoideae had significantly smaller culm heights, leaf widths, 1,000-seed weights and stomata; they also appeared more in dry, open or saline habitats than those of Panicoideae. Controlling for phylogenetic structure showed significant covariation among morphological traits, supporting the hypothesis of phylogenetically independent scaling effects. However, associations between morphological and habitat traits showed limited phylogenetic covariance. Subfamily was a better explanation than photosynthetic type for the variance in most morphological traits. Morphology, habitat water availability, shading, and productivity are therefore all involved in the PNC of C(4) grass lineages. This study emphasized the importance of phylogenetic history in the ecology and biogeography of C(4) grasses, suggesting that divergent lineages need to be considered to fully understand the impacts of global change on plant distributions. PMID:22569558

  18. Phylogenetic distribution of fungal sterols.

    John D Weete

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Ergosterol has been considered the "fungal sterol" for almost 125 years; however, additional sterol data superimposed on a recent molecular phylogeny of kingdom Fungi reveals a different and more complex situation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The interpretation of sterol distribution data in a modern phylogenetic context indicates that there is a clear trend from cholesterol and other Delta(5 sterols in the earliest diverging fungal species to ergosterol in later diverging fungi. There are, however, deviations from this pattern in certain clades. Sterols of the diverse zoosporic and zygosporic forms exhibit structural diversity with cholesterol and 24-ethyl -Delta(5 sterols in zoosporic taxa, and 24-methyl sterols in zygosporic fungi. For example, each of the three monophyletic lineages of zygosporic fungi has distinctive major sterols, ergosterol in Mucorales, 22-dihydroergosterol in Dimargaritales, Harpellales, and Kickxellales (DHK clade, and 24-methyl cholesterol in Entomophthorales. Other departures from ergosterol as the dominant sterol include: 24-ethyl cholesterol in Glomeromycota, 24-ethyl cholest-7-enol and 24-ethyl-cholesta-7,24(28-dienol in rust fungi, brassicasterol in Taphrinales and hypogeous pezizalean species, and cholesterol in Pneumocystis. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Five dominant end products of sterol biosynthesis (cholesterol, ergosterol, 24-methyl cholesterol, 24-ethyl cholesterol, brassicasterol, and intermediates in the formation of 24-ethyl cholesterol, are major sterols in 175 species of Fungi. Although most fungi in the most speciose clades have ergosterol as a major sterol, sterols are more varied than currently understood, and their distribution supports certain clades of Fungi in current fungal phylogenies. In addition to the intellectual importance of understanding evolution of sterol synthesis in fungi, there is practical importance because certain antifungal drugs (e.g., azoles target reactions in

  19. Charles Darwin, beetles and phylogenetics

    Beutel, Rolf G.; Friedrich, Frank; Leschen, Richard A. B.

    2009-11-01

    . This has changed dramatically. With very large data sets and high throughput sampling, phylogenetic questions can be addressed without prior knowledge of morphological characters. Nevertheless, molecular studies have not lead to the great breakthrough in beetle systematics—yet. Especially the phylogeny of the extremely species rich suborder Polyphaga remains incompletely resolved. Coordinated efforts of molecular workers and of morphologists using innovative techniques may lead to more profound insights in the near future. The final aim is to develop a well-founded phylogeny, which truly reflects the evolution of this immensely species rich group of organisms.

  20. Over half of breakpoints in gene pairs involved in cancer-specific recurrent translocations are mapped to human chromosomal fragile sites

    Pierce Levi CT

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene rearrangements such as chromosomal translocations have been shown to contribute to cancer development. Human chromosomal fragile sites are regions of the genome especially prone to breakage, and have been implicated in various chromosome abnormalities found in cancer. However, there has been no comprehensive and quantitative examination of the location of fragile sites in relation to all chromosomal aberrations. Results Using up-to-date databases containing all cancer-specific recurrent translocations, we have examined 444 unique pairs of genes involved in these translocations to determine the correlation of translocation breakpoints and fragile sites in the gene pairs. We found that over half (52% of translocation breakpoints in at least one gene of these gene pairs are mapped to fragile sites. Among these, we examined the DNA sequences within and flanking three randomly selected pairs of translocation-prone genes, and found that they exhibit characteristic features of fragile DNA, with frequent AT-rich flexibility islands and the potential of forming highly stable secondary structures. Conclusion Our study is the first to examine gene pairs involved in all recurrent chromosomal translocations observed in tumor cells, and to correlate the location of more than half of breakpoints to positions of known fragile sites. These results provide strong evidence to support a causative role for fragile sites in the generation of cancer-specific chromosomal rearrangements.

  1. Tourette syndrome in a pedigree with a 7;18 translocation: Identification of a YAC spanning the translocation breakpoint at 18q22.3

    Boghosian-Sell, L.; Overhauser, J. [Thomas Jefferson Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States); Comings, D.E. [City of Hope Medical Center, Duarte, CA (United States)

    1996-11-01

    Tourette syndrome is a neuropsychiatric disorder characterized by the presence of multiple, involuntary motor and vocal tics. Associated pathologies include attention deficit disorder and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Extensive linkage analysis based on an autosomal dominant mode of transmission with reduced penetrance has failed to show linkage with polymorphic markers, suggesting either locus heterogeneity or a polygenic origin for Tourette syndrome. An individual diagnosed with Tourette syndrome has been described carrying a constitutional chromosome translocation. Other family members carrying the translocation exhibit features seen in Tourette syndrome including motor tics, vocal tics, and OCD. Since the disruption of specific genes by a chromosomal rearrangement can elicit a particular phenotype, we have undertaken the physical mapping of the 7;18 translocation such that genes mapping at the site of the breakpoint can be identified and evaluated for a possible involvement in Tourette syndrome. Using somatic cell hybrids retaining either the der(7) or the der(18), a more precise localization of the breakpoints on chromosomes 7 and 18 have been determined. Furthermore, physical mapping has identified two YAC clones that span the translocation breakpoint on chromosome 18 as determined by FISH. These YAC clones will be useful for the eventual identification of genes that map to chromosomes 7 and 18 at the site of the translocation. 41 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Towards accurate emergency response behavior

    Nuclear reactor operator emergency response behavior has persisted as a training problem through lack of information. The industry needs an accurate definition of operator behavior in adverse stress conditions, and training methods which will produce the desired behavior. Newly assembled information from fifty years of research into human behavior in both high and low stress provides a more accurate definition of appropriate operator response, and supports training methods which will produce the needed control room behavior. The research indicates that operator response in emergencies is divided into two modes, conditioned behavior and knowledge based behavior. Methods which assure accurate conditioned behavior, and provide for the recovery of knowledge based behavior, are described in detail

  3. Phylogenetic and functional assessment of orthologs inference projects and methods.

    Adrian M Altenhoff

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Accurate genome-wide identification of orthologs is a central problem in comparative genomics, a fact reflected by the numerous orthology identification projects developed in recent years. However, only a few reports have compared their accuracy, and indeed, several recent efforts have not yet been systematically evaluated. Furthermore, orthology is typically only assessed in terms of function conservation, despite the phylogeny-based original definition of Fitch. We collected and mapped the results of nine leading orthology projects and methods (COG, KOG, Inparanoid, OrthoMCL, Ensembl Compara, Homologene, RoundUp, EggNOG, and OMA and two standard methods (bidirectional best-hit and reciprocal smallest distance. We systematically compared their predictions with respect to both phylogeny and function, using six different tests. This required the mapping of millions of sequences, the handling of hundreds of millions of predicted pairs of orthologs, and the computation of tens of thousands of trees. In phylogenetic analysis or in functional analysis where high specificity is required, we find that OMA and Homologene perform best. At lower functional specificity but higher coverage level, OrthoMCL outperforms Ensembl Compara, and to a lesser extent Inparanoid. Lastly, the large coverage of the recent EggNOG can be of interest to build broad functional grouping, but the method is not specific enough for phylogenetic or detailed function analyses. In terms of general methodology, we observe that the more sophisticated tree reconstruction/reconciliation approach of Ensembl Compara was at times outperformed by pairwise comparison approaches, even in phylogenetic tests. Furthermore, we show that standard bidirectional best-hit often outperforms projects with more complex algorithms. First, the present study provides guidance for the broad community of orthology data users as to which database best suits their needs. Second, it introduces new methodology

  4. Molecular breakpoint cloning and gene expression studies of a novel translocation t(4;15(q27;q11.2 associated with Prader-Willi syndrome

    Slater Howard R

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prader-Willi syndrome (MIM #176270; PWS is caused by lack of the paternally-derived copies, or their expression, of multiple genes in a 4 Mb region on chromosome 15q11.2. Known mechanisms include large deletions, maternal uniparental disomy or mutations involving the imprinting center. De novo balanced reciprocal translocations in 5 reported individuals had breakpoints clustering in SNRPN intron 2 or exon 20/intron 20. To further dissect the PWS phenotype and define the minimal critical region for PWS features, we have studied a 22 year old male with a milder PWS phenotype and a de novo translocation t(4;15(q27;q11.2. Methods We used metaphase FISH to narrow the breakpoint region and molecular analyses to map the breakpoints on both chromosomes at the nucleotide level. The expression of genes on chromosome 15 on both sides of the breakpoint was determined by RT-PCR analyses. Results Pertinent clinical features include neonatal hypotonia with feeding difficulties, hypogonadism, short stature, late-onset obesity, learning difficulties, abnormal social behavior and marked tolerance to pain, as well as sticky saliva and narcolepsy. Relative macrocephaly and facial features are not typical for PWS. The translocation breakpoints were identified within SNRPN intron 17 and intron 10 of a spliced non-coding transcript in band 4q27. LINE and SINE sequences at the exchange points may have contributed to the translocation event. By RT-PCR of lymphoblasts and fibroblasts, we find that upstream SNURF/SNRPN exons and snoRNAs HBII-437 and HBII-13 are expressed, but the downstream snoRNAs PWCR1/HBII-85 and HBII-438A/B snoRNAs are not. Conclusion As part of the PWCR1/HBII-85 snoRNA cluster is highly conserved between human and mice, while no copy of HBII-438 has been found in mouse, we conclude that PWCR1/HBII-85 snoRNAs is likely to play a major role in the PWS- phenotype.

  5. Barcoding and Phylogenetic Inferences in Nine Mugilid Species (Pisces, Mugiliformes

    Neonila Polyakova

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Accurate identification of fish and fish products, from eggs to adults, is important in many areas. Grey mullets of the family Mugilidae are distributed worldwide and inhabit marine, estuarine, and freshwater environments in all tropical and temperate regions. Various Mugilid species are commercially important species in fishery and aquaculture of many countries. For the present study we have chosen two Mugilid genes with different phylogenetic signals: relatively variable mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase subunit I (COI and conservative nuclear rhodopsin (RHO. We examined their diversity within and among 9 Mugilid species belonging to 4 genera, many of which have been examined from multiple specimens, with the goal of determining whether DNA barcoding can achieve unambiguous species recognition of Mugilid species. The data obtained showed that information based on COI sequences was diagnostic not only for species-level identification but also for recognition of intraspecific units, e.g., allopatric populations of circumtropical Mugil cephalus, or even native and acclimatized specimens of Chelon haematocheila. All RHO sequences appeared strictly species specific. Based on the data obtained, we conclude that COI, as well as RHO sequencing can be used to unambiguously identify fish species. Topologies of phylogeny based on RHO and COI sequences coincided with each other, while together they had a good phylogenetic signal.

  6. Accurate determination of antenna directivity

    Dich, Mikael

    1997-01-01

    The derivation of a formula for accurate estimation of the total radiated power from a transmitting antenna for which the radiated power density is known in a finite number of points on the far-field sphere is presented. The main application of the formula is determination of directivity from power...

  7. Molecular analysis of the distribution of chromosomal breakpoints: characterization of a 'hot' region for breaks in human chromosome 11

    Full text: Ionizing radiation randomly damages DNA and chromosomes whereas subsequent chromosome breaks are non-random. Assuming, as an ideal and naive but useful proposition, that breaks are equally likely anywhere in the chromosome and that a deletion always occurs between two breaks, the frequency of fragments would decrease linearly with increasing fragment size. This simple distribution is not, however, observed. To shed light on the 'real' situation of break formation we mapped breakpoints in the human chromosome no. 11 of 353 independent CD59- mutants isolated from human/hamster hybrid AL cells exposed to radiations (high and low dose-rate gamma rays, high LET carbon or nitrogen ions, protons) or chemicals (arsenic or irradiated, mutagenic histidine) or unexposed. The number of breaks per unit length of DNA differed significantly in different regions of chromosome 11.The highest level of breaks (140/mbp) were in the 0.8 mbp segment between CD59 and Catalase (CAT). Finer mapping of break points was carried out using 26 PCR primer pairs spread across this interval in 15 independent mutants. In two mutants, the break point was in a 107 bp fragment; in the other 13 the breaks were in a single 35 mbp fragment, but not all were at exactly the same site; 4 of 13 occurred in 3 different 3 mbp sub-segments. We are sequencing these fragments to look for such features as repeats: 'colder' regions like that between CD59 and WT will also be analyzed. But, since at least some breaks occurred at different sites and the frequency and distribution of breaks was about the same for all treatments, our we postulate that hot (and cold spots) may be due more to structural features or specific repair than to sequence or type of damage

  8. A non-B-DNA structure at the Bcl-2 major breakpoint region is cleaved by the RAG complex.

    Raghavan, Sathees C; Swanson, Patrick C; Wu, Xiantuo; Hsieh, Chih-Lin; Lieber, Michael R

    2004-03-01

    The causes of spontaneous chromosomal translocations in somatic cells of biological organisms are largely unknown, although double-strand DNA breaks are required in all proposed mechanisms. The most common chromosomal abnormality in human cancer is the reciprocal translocation between chromosomes 14 and 18 (t(14;18)), which occurs in follicular lymphomas. The break at the immunoglobulin heavy-chain locus on chromosome 14 is an interruption of the normal V(D)J recombination process. But the breakage on chromosome 18, at the Bcl-2 gene, occurs within a confined 150-base-pair region (the major breakpoint region or Mbr) for reasons that have remained enigmatic. We have reproduced key features of the translocation process on an episome that propagates in human cells. The RAG complex--which is the normal enzyme for DNA cleavage at V, D or J segments--nicks the Bcl-2 Mbr in vitro and in vivo in a manner that reflects the pattern of the chromosomal translocations; however, the Mbr is not a V(D)J recombination signal. Rather the Bcl-2 Mbr assumes a non-B-form DNA structure within the chromosomes of human cells at 20-30% of alleles. Purified DNA assuming this structure contains stable regions of single-strandedness, which correspond well to the translocation regions in patients. Hence, a stable non-B-DNA structure in the human genome appears to be the basis for the fragility of the Bcl-2 Mbr, and the RAG complex is able to cleave this structure. PMID:14999286

  9. Characterization of a branch of the phylogenetic tree

    We use a combination of analytic models and computer simulations to gain insight into the dynamics of evolution. Our results suggest that certain interesting phenomena should eventually emerge from the fossil record. For example, there should be a 'tortoise and hare effect': Those genera with the smallest species death rate are likely to survive much longer than genera with large species birth and death rates. A complete characterization of the behavior of a branch of the phylogenetic tree corresponding to a genus and accurate mathematical representations of the various stages are obtained. We apply our results to address certain controversial issues that have arisen in paleontology such as the importance of punctuated equilibrium and whether unique Cambrian phyla have survived to the present

  10. Characterization of a branch of the phylogenetic tree.

    Samuel, Stuart A; Weng, Gezhi

    2003-02-21

    We use a combination of analytic models and computer simulations to gain insight into the dynamics of evolution. Our results suggest that certain interesting phenomena should eventually emerge from the fossil record. For example, there should be a "tortoise and hare effect": those genera with the smallest species death rate are likely to survive much longer than genera with large species birth and death rates. A complete characterization of the behavior of a branch of the phylogenetic tree corresponding to a genus and accurate mathematical representations of the various stages are obtained. We apply our results to address certain controversial issues that have arisen in paleontology such as the importance of punctuated equilibrium and whether unique Cambrian phyla have survived to the present. PMID:12623281

  11. Morphological and molecular convergences in mammalian phylogenetics.

    Zou, Zhengting; Zhang, Jianzhi

    2016-01-01

    Phylogenetic trees reconstructed from molecular sequences are often considered more reliable than those reconstructed from morphological characters, in part because convergent evolution, which confounds phylogenetic reconstruction, is believed to be rarer for molecular sequences than for morphologies. However, neither the validity of this belief nor its underlying cause is known. Here comparing thousands of characters of each type that have been used for inferring the phylogeny of mammals, we find that on average morphological characters indeed experience much more convergences than amino acid sites, but this disparity is explained by fewer states per character rather than an intrinsically higher susceptibility to convergence for morphologies than sequences. We show by computer simulation and actual data analysis that a simple method for identifying and removing convergence-prone characters improves phylogenetic accuracy, potentially enabling, when necessary, the inclusion of morphologies and hence fossils for reliable tree inference. PMID:27585543

  12. Cyber infrastructure for Fusarium: three integrated platforms supporting strain identification, phylogenetics, comparative genomics and knowledge sharing

    Park, Bongsoo; Park, Jongsun; Cheong, Kyeong-Chae; Choi, Jaeyoung; Jung, Kyongyong; Kim, Donghan; Lee, Yong-Hwan; Ward, Todd J.; O'Donnell, Kerry; Geiser, David M.; Kang, Seogchan

    2010-01-01

    The fungal genus Fusarium includes many plant and/or animal pathogenic species and produces diverse toxins. Although accurate species identification is critical for managing such threats, it is difficult to identify Fusarium morphologically. Fortunately, extensive molecular phylogenetic studies, founded on well-preserved culture collections, have established a robust foundation for Fusarium classification. Genomes of four Fusarium species have been published with more being currently sequence...

  13. PANTHER version 7: improved phylogenetic trees, orthologs and collaboration with the Gene Ontology Consortium

    Mi, Huaiyu; Dong, Qing; Muruganujan, Anushya; Gaudet, Pascale; Lewis, Suzanna; Thomas, Paul D

    2009-01-01

    Protein Analysis THrough Evolutionary Relationships (PANTHER) is a comprehensive software system for inferring the functions of genes based on their evolutionary relationships. Phylogenetic trees of gene families form the basis for PANTHER and these trees are annotated with ontology terms describing the evolution of gene function from ancestral to modern day genes. One of the main applications of PANTHER is in accurate prediction of the functions of uncharacterized genes, based on their evolu...

  14. Phylogenetic Relationships and Biogeographic History of Iriarteeae

    Bacon, Christine D.; Florez, Alexander; Balslev, Henrik;

    sequence data for 11 loci (5 chloroplast and 6 nuclear) to reconstruct a coalescent species tree and infer relationships amongst genera and species to, in turn, allow for tests of biogeography and community phylogenetics in the tribe. Our results define inter-generic relationships and resolve all genera as...

  15. DNA barcoding and phylogenetic relationships in Timaliidae.

    Huang, Z H; Ke, D H

    2015-01-01

    The Timaliidae, a diverse family of oscine passerine birds, has long been a subject of debate regarding its phylogeny. The mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) gene has been used as a powerful marker for identification and phylogenetic studies of animal species. In the present study, we analyzed the COI barcodes of 71 species from 21 genera belonging to the family Timaliidae. Every bird species possessed a barcode distinct from that of other bird species. Kimura two-parameter (K2P) distances were calculated between barcodes. The average genetic distance between species was 18 times higher than the average genetic distance within species. The neighbor-joining method was used to construct a phylogenetic tree and all the species could be discriminated by their distinct clades within the phylogenetic tree. The results indicate that some currently recognized babbler genera might not be monophyletic, with the COI gene data supporting the hypothesis of polyphyly for Garrulax, Alcippe, and Minla. Thus, DNA barcoding is an effective molecular tool for Timaliidae species identification and phylogenetic inference. PMID:26125793

  16. Phylogenetic and phylogenomic overview of the Polyporales.

    Binder, Manfred; Justo, Alfredo; Riley, Robert; Salamov, Asaf; Lopez-Giraldez, Francesc; Sjökvist, Elisabet; Copeland, Alex; Foster, Brian; Sun, Hui; Larsson, Ellen; Larsson, Karl-Henrik; Townsend, Jeffrey; Grigoriev, Igor V; Hibbett, David S

    2013-01-01

    We present a phylogenetic and phylogenomic overview of the Polyporales. The newly sequenced genomes of Bjerkandera adusta, Ganoderma sp., and Phlebia brevispora are introduced and an overview of 10 currently available Polyporales genomes is provided. The new genomes are 39 500 000-49 900 00 bp and encode for 12 910-16 170 genes. We searched available genomes for single-copy genes and performed phylogenetic informativeness analyses to evaluate their potential for phylogenetic systematics of the Polyporales. Phylogenomic datasets (25, 71, 356 genes) were assembled for the 10 Polyporales species with genome data and compared with the most comprehensive dataset of Polyporales to date (six-gene dataset for 373 taxa, including taxa with missing data). Maximum likelihood and Bayesian phylogenetic analyses of genomic datasets yielded identical topologies, and the corresponding clades also were recovered in the 373-taxa dataset although with different support values in some datasets. Three previously recognized lineages of Polyporales, antrodia, core polyporoid and phlebioid clades, are supported in most datasets, while the status of the residual polyporoid clade remains uncertain and certain taxa (e.g. Gelatoporia, Grifola, Tyromyces) apparently do not belong to any of the major lineages of Polyporales. The most promising candidate single-copy genes are presented, and nodes in the Polyporales phylogeny critical for the suprageneric taxonomy of the order are identified and discussed. PMID:23935031

  17. Phylogenetic Memory of Developing Mammalian Dentition

    Peterková, Renata; Lesot, H.; Peterka, Miroslav

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 306, č. 3 (2006), s. 234-250. ISSN 1552-5007 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA304/05/2665; GA MŠk OC B23.002 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390512 Keywords : Phylogenetic Memory Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.756, year: 2006

  18. Genomic repeat abundances contain phylogenetic signal

    Dodsworth, S.; Chase, M.W.; Kelly, L.J.; Leitch, I.J.; Macas, Jiří; Novák, Petr; Piednoël, M.; Weiß-Schneeweiss, H.; Leitch, A.R.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 64, č. 1 (2015), s. 112-126. ISSN 1063-5157 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP501/12/G090 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Repetitive DNA * continuous characters * genomics * next-generation sequencing * phylogenetics Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 14.387, year: 2014

  19. Phyloclimatic modeling: combining phylogenetics and bioclimatic modeling.

    Yesson, C; Culham, A

    2006-10-01

    We investigate the impact of past climates on plant diversification by tracking the "footprint" of climate change on a phylogenetic tree. Diversity within the cosmopolitan carnivorous plant genus Drosera (Droseraceae) is focused within Mediterranean climate regions. We explore whether this diversity is temporally linked to Mediterranean-type climatic shifts of the mid-Miocene and whether climate preferences are conservative over phylogenetic timescales. Phyloclimatic modeling combines environmental niche (bioclimatic) modeling with phylogenetics in order to study evolutionary patterns in relation to climate change. We present the largest and most complete such example to date using Drosera. The bioclimatic models of extant species demonstrate clear phylogenetic patterns; this is particularly evident for the tuberous sundews from southwestern Australia (subgenus Ergaleium). We employ a method for establishing confidence intervals of node ages on a phylogeny using replicates from a Bayesian phylogenetic analysis. This chronogram shows that many clades, including subgenus Ergaleium and section Bryastrum, diversified during the establishment of the Mediterranean-type climate. Ancestral reconstructions of bioclimatic models demonstrate a pattern of preference for this climate type within these groups. Ancestral bioclimatic models are projected into palaeo-climate reconstructions for the time periods indicated by the chronogram. We present two such examples that each generate plausible estimates of ancestral lineage distribution, which are similar to their current distributions. This is the first study to attempt bioclimatic projections on evolutionary time scales. The sundews appear to have diversified in response to local climate development. Some groups are specialized for Mediterranean climates, others show wide-ranging generalism. This demonstrates that Phyloclimatic modeling could be repeated for other plant groups and is fundamental to the understanding of

  20. Formation of a G-quadruplex at the BCL2 major breakpoint region of the t(14;18) translocation in follicular lymphoma

    Nambiar, Mridula; Goldsmith, G.; Moorthy, Balaji T.; Lieber, Michael R.; Joshi, Mamata V.; Choudhary, Bibha; Hosur, Ramakrishna V.; Sathees C Raghavan

    2010-01-01

    The t(14;18) translocation in follicular lymphoma is one of the most common chromosomal translocations. Most breaks on chromosome 18 are located at the 3′-UTR of the BCL2 gene and are mainly clustered in the major breakpoint region (MBR). Recently, we found that the BCL2 MBR has a non-B DNA character in genomic DNA. Here, we show that single-stranded DNA modeled from the template strand of the BCL2 MBR, forms secondary structures that migrate faster on native PAGE in the presence of potassium...

  1. Strong phylogenetic signals and phylogenetic niche conservatism in ecophysiological traits across divergent lineages of Magnoliaceae

    Hui Liu; Qiuyuan Xu; Pengcheng He; Santiago, Louis S.; Keming Yang; Qing Ye

    2015-01-01

    The early diverged Magnoliaceae shows a historical temperate-tropical distribution among lineages indicating divergent evolution, yet which ecophysiological traits are phylogenetically conserved, and whether these traits are involved in correlated evolution remain unclear. Integrating phylogeny and 20 ecophysiological traits of 27 species, from the four largest sections of Magnoliaceae, we tested the phylogenetic signals of these traits and the correlated evolution between trait pairs. Phylog...

  2. Stratification of co-evolving genomic groups using ranked phylogenetic profiles

    Tsoka Sophia

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous methods of detecting the taxonomic origins of arbitrary sequence collections, with a significant impact to genome analysis and in particular metagenomics, have primarily focused on compositional features of genomes. The evolutionary patterns of phylogenetic distribution of genes or proteins, represented by phylogenetic profiles, provide an alternative approach for the detection of taxonomic origins, but typically suffer from low accuracy. Herein, we present rank-BLAST, a novel approach for the assignment of protein sequences into genomic groups of the same taxonomic origin, based on the ranking order of phylogenetic profiles of target genes or proteins across the reference database. Results The rank-BLAST approach is validated by computing the phylogenetic profiles of all sequences for five distinct microbial species of varying degrees of phylogenetic proximity, against a reference database of 243 fully sequenced genomes. The approach - a combination of sequence searches, statistical estimation and clustering - analyses the degree of sequence divergence between sets of protein sequences and allows the classification of protein sequences according to the species of origin with high accuracy, allowing taxonomic classification of 64% of the proteins studied. In most cases, a main cluster is detected, representing the corresponding species. Secondary, functionally distinct and species-specific clusters exhibit different patterns of phylogenetic distribution, thus flagging gene groups of interest. Detailed analyses of such cases are provided as examples. Conclusion Our results indicate that the rank-BLAST approach can capture the taxonomic origins of sequence collections in an accurate and efficient manner. The approach can be useful both for the analysis of genome evolution and the detection of species groups in metagenomics samples.

  3. Molecular Phylogenetic: Organism Taxonomy Method Based on Evolution History

    N.L.P Indi Dharmayanti

    2011-01-01

    Phylogenetic is described as taxonomy classification of an organism based on its evolution history namely its phylogeny and as a part of systematic science that has objective to determine phylogeny of organism according to its characteristic. Phylogenetic analysis from amino acid and protein usually became important area in sequence analysis. Phylogenetic analysis can be used to follow the rapid change of a species such as virus. The phylogenetic evolution tree is a two dimensional of a spec...

  4. Accurate Modeling of Advanced Reflectarrays

    Zhou, Min

    of the incident field, the choice of basis functions, and the technique to calculate the far-field. Based on accurate reference measurements of two offset reflectarrays carried out at the DTU-ESA Spherical NearField Antenna Test Facility, it was concluded that the three latter factors are particularly important...... to the conventional phase-only optimization technique (POT), the geometrical parameters of the array elements are directly optimized to fulfill the far-field requirements, thus maintaining a direct relation between optimization goals and optimization variables. As a result, better designs can be obtained compared...... using the GDOT to demonstrate its capabilities. To verify the accuracy of the GDOT, two offset contoured beam reflectarrays that radiate a high-gain beam on a European coverage have been designed and manufactured, and subsequently measured at the DTU-ESA Spherical Near-Field Antenna Test Facility...

  5. Accurate ab initio spin densities

    Boguslawski, Katharina; Legeza, Örs; Reiher, Markus

    2012-01-01

    We present an approach for the calculation of spin density distributions for molecules that require very large active spaces for a qualitatively correct description of their electronic structure. Our approach is based on the density-matrix renormalization group (DMRG) algorithm to calculate the spin density matrix elements as basic quantity for the spatially resolved spin density distribution. The spin density matrix elements are directly determined from the second-quantized elementary operators optimized by the DMRG algorithm. As an analytic convergence criterion for the spin density distribution, we employ our recently developed sampling-reconstruction scheme [J. Chem. Phys. 2011, 134, 224101] to build an accurate complete-active-space configuration-interaction (CASCI) wave function from the optimized matrix product states. The spin density matrix elements can then also be determined as an expectation value employing the reconstructed wave function expansion. Furthermore, the explicit reconstruction of a CA...

  6. Accurate thickness measurement of graphene

    Shearer, Cameron J.; Slattery, Ashley D.; Stapleton, Andrew J.; Shapter, Joseph G.; Gibson, Christopher T.

    2016-03-01

    Graphene has emerged as a material with a vast variety of applications. The electronic, optical and mechanical properties of graphene are strongly influenced by the number of layers present in a sample. As a result, the dimensional characterization of graphene films is crucial, especially with the continued development of new synthesis methods and applications. A number of techniques exist to determine the thickness of graphene films including optical contrast, Raman scattering and scanning probe microscopy techniques. Atomic force microscopy (AFM), in particular, is used extensively since it provides three-dimensional images that enable the measurement of the lateral dimensions of graphene films as well as the thickness, and by extension the number of layers present. However, in the literature AFM has proven to be inaccurate with a wide range of measured values for single layer graphene thickness reported (between 0.4 and 1.7 nm). This discrepancy has been attributed to tip-surface interactions, image feedback settings and surface chemistry. In this work, we use standard and carbon nanotube modified AFM probes and a relatively new AFM imaging mode known as PeakForce tapping mode to establish a protocol that will allow users to accurately determine the thickness of graphene films. In particular, the error in measuring the first layer is reduced from 0.1-1.3 nm to 0.1-0.3 nm. Furthermore, in the process we establish that the graphene-substrate adsorbate layer and imaging force, in particular the pressure the tip exerts on the surface, are crucial components in the accurate measurement of graphene using AFM. These findings can be applied to other 2D materials.

  7. Identification of a Novel P190-Derived Breakpoint Peptide Suitable for Peptide Vaccine Therapeutic Approach in Ph+ Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Patients

    Micaela Ippoliti

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Ph+ acute lymphoblastic leukemia (Ph+ ALL is a high-risk acute leukemia with poor prognosis, in which the specific t(9;22(q34;q11 translocation results in a chimeric bcr-abl (e1a2 breakpoint and in a 190 KD protein (p190 with constitutive tyrosine kinase activity. The advent of first- and second-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs improved the short-term outcome of Ph+ ALL patients not eligible for allo-SCT; yet disease recurrence is almost inevitable. Peptides derived from p190-breakpoint area are leukemia-specific antigens that may mediate an antitumor response toward p190+ leukemia cells. We identified one peptide named p190-13 able to induce in vitro peptide-specific CD4+ T cell proliferation in Ph+ ALL patients in complete remission during TKIs. Thus this peptide appears a good candidate for developing an immune target vaccine strategy possibly synergizing with TKIs for remission maintenance.

  8. N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) formation potential of amine-based water treatment polymers: Effects of in situ chloramination, breakpoint chlorination, and pre-oxidation.

    Park, Sang Hyuck; Padhye, Lokesh P; Wang, Pei; Cho, Min; Kim, Jae-Hong; Huang, Ching-Hua

    2015-01-23

    Recent studies show that cationic amine-based water treatment polymers may be important precursors that contribute to formation of the probable human carcinogen N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) during water treatment and disinfection. To better understand how water treatment parameters affect NDMA formation from the polymers, the effects of in situ chloramination, breakpoint chlorination, and pre-oxidation on the NDMA formation from the polymers were investigated. NDMA formation potential (NDMA-FP) as well as dimethylamine (DMA) residual concentration were measured from poly(epichlorohydrin dimethylamine) (polyamine) and poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) (polyDADMAC) solutions upon reactions with oxidants including free chlorine, chlorine dioxide, ozone, and monochloramine under different treatment conditions. The results supported that dichloramine (NHCl2) formation was the critical factor affecting NDMA formation from the polymers during in situ chloramination. The highest NDMA formation from the polymers occurred near the breakpoint of chlorination. Polymer chain breakdown and transformation of the released DMA and other intermediates were important factors affecting NDMA formation from the polymers in pre-oxidation followed by post-chloramination. Pre-oxidation generally reduced NDMA-FP of the polymers; however, the treatments involving pre-ozonation increased polyDADMAC's NDMA-FP and DMA release. The strategies for reducing NDMA formation from the polymers may include the avoidance of the conditions favorable to NHCl2 formation and the avoidance of polymer exposure to strong oxidants such as ozone. PMID:25112551

  9. Statistical assignment of DNA sequences using Bayesian phylogenetics

    Terkelsen, Kasper Munch; Boomsma, Wouter Krogh; Huelsenbeck, John P;

    2008-01-01

    We provide a new automated statistical method for DNA barcoding based on a Bayesian phylogenetic analysis. The method is based on automated database sequence retrieval, alignment, and phylogenetic analysis using a custom-built program for Bayesian phylogenetic analysis. We show on real data that...

  10. Phylogenetic Analysis of PRRSV from Danish Pigs

    Hjulsager, Charlotte Kristiane; Breum, Solvej Østergaard; Larsen, Lars Erik

    visualized with NJ-plot software. Genbank entries of Danish PRRSV sequences from the 1990’ties were included in the phylogenetic analysis. Translated sequences were aligned with current vaccine isolates. Results Both PRRSV EU and US type viruses were isolated from material submitted from Danish pigs in the...... phylogenetic analysis, in order to asses the applicability of vaccines currently used to control PRRSV infection in Danish pig herds. Materials and methods Lung tissue from samples submitted to the National Veterinary Institute during 2003-2008 for PRRSV diagnosis were screened for PRRSV by real-time RT......-PCR, essentially as described by Egli et al. 2001, on RNA extracted with RNeasy Mini Kit (QIAGEN). Complete open reading frames (ORF) ORF5 and ORF7 were PCR amplified as described (Oleksiewicz et al. 1998) and sequenced. Sequences were aligned and Neighbour-Joining trees were constructed with ClustalX. Trees were...

  11. The phylogenetics of succession can guide restoration

    Shooner, Stephanie; Chisholm, Chelsea Lee; Davies, T. Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Phylogenetic tools have increasingly been used in community ecology to describe the evolutionary relationships among co-occurring species. In studies of succession, such tools may allow us to identify the evolutionary lineages most suited for particular stages of succession and habitat...... phylogenetically random subset of species from the local species pool. Over time, there appears to be selection for particular lineages that come to be filtered across space and environment. The species most appropriate for mine site restoration might, therefore, depend on the successional stage of the community...... appropriate for mine site restoration might, therefore, depend on the successional stage of the community and the local species composition. For example, in later succession, it could be more beneficial to facilitate establishment of more distant relatives. Our findings can improve management practices by...

  12. Concepts of Classification and Taxonomy. Phylogenetic Classification

    Fraix-Burnet, Didier

    2016-01-01

    Phylogenetic approaches to classification have been heavily developed in biology by bioinformaticians. But these techniques have applications in other fields, in particular in linguistics. Their main characteristics is to search for relationships between the objects or species in study, instead of grouping them by similarity. They are thus rather well suited for any kind of evolutionary objects. For nearly fifteen years, astrocladistics has explored the use of Maximum Parsimony (or cladistics) for astronomical objects like galaxies or globular clusters. In this lesson we will learn how it works. 1 Why phylogenetic tools in astrophysics? 1.1 History of classification The need for classifying living organisms is very ancient, and the first classification system can be dated back to the Greeks. The goal was very practical since it was intended to distinguish between eatable and toxic aliments, or kind and dangerous animals. Simple resemblance was used and has been used for centuries. Basically, until the XVIIIth...

  13. Clustering with phylogenetic tools in astrophysics

    Fraix-Burnet, Didier

    2016-01-01

    Phylogenetic approaches are finding more and more applications outside the field of biology. Astrophysics is no exception since an overwhelming amount of multivariate data has appeared in the last twenty years or so. In particular, the diversification of galaxies throughout the evolution of the Universe quite naturally invokes phylogenetic approaches. We have demonstrated that Maximum Parsimony brings useful astrophysical results, and we now proceed toward the analyses of large datasets for galaxies. In this talk I present how we solve the major difficulties for this goal: the choice of the parameters, their discretization, and the analysis of a high number of objects with an unsupervised NP-hard classification technique like cladistics. 1. Introduction How do the galaxy form, and when? How did the galaxy evolve and transform themselves to create the diversity we observe? What are the progenitors to present-day galaxies? To answer these big questions, observations throughout the Universe and the physical mode...

  14. A phylogenetic analysis of Aquifex pyrophilus

    Burggraf, S.; Olsen, G. J.; Stetter, K. O.; Woese, C. R.

    1992-01-01

    The 16S rRNA of the bacterion Aquifex pyrophilus, a microaerophilic, oxygen-reducing hyperthermophile, has been sequenced directly from the the PCR amplified gene. Phylogenetic analyses show the Aq. pyrophilus lineage to be probably the deepest (earliest) in the (eu)bacterial tree. The addition of this deep branching to the bacterial tree further supports the argument that the Bacteria are of thermophilic ancestry.

  15. A Consistent Phylogenetic Backbone for the Fungi

    Ebersberger, Ingo; de Matos Simoes, Ricardo; Kupczok, Anne; Gube, Matthias; Kothe, Erika; Voigt, Kerstin; von Haeseler, Arndt

    2011-01-01

    The kingdom of fungi provides model organisms for biotechnology, cell biology, genetics, and life sciences in general. Only when their phylogenetic relationships are stably resolved, can individual results from fungal research be integrated into a holistic picture of biology. However, and despite recent progress, many deep relationships within the fungi remain unclear. Here, we present the first phylogenomic study of an entire eukaryotic kingdom that uses a consistency criterion to strengthen...

  16. Phylogenetic invariants for stationary base composition

    Allman, Elizabeth S.; Rhodes, John A.

    2004-01-01

    Changing base composition during the evolution of biological sequences can mislead some of the phylogenetic inference techniques in current use. However, detecting whether such a process has occurred may be difficult, since convergent evolution may lead to similar base frequencies emerging from different lineages. To study this situation, algebraic models of biological sequence evolution are introduced in which the base composition is fixed throughout evolution. Basic properties of the associ...

  17. Phylogenetic tree shapes resolve disease transmission patterns

    Colijn, Caroline; Gardy, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Whole-genome sequencing is becoming popular as a tool for understanding outbreaks of communicable diseases, with phylogenetic trees being used to identify individual transmission events or to characterize outbreak-level overall transmission dynamics. Existing methods to infer transmission dynamics from sequence data rely on well-characterized infectious periods, epidemiological and clinical metadata which may not always be available, and typically require computatio...

  18. Phylogenetic conservatism of functional traits in microorganisms

    Martiny, Adam C.; Treseder, Kathleen; Pusch, Gordon

    2012-01-01

    A central question in biology is how biodiversity influences ecosystem functioning. Underlying this is the relationship between organismal phylogeny and the presence of specific functional traits. The relationship is complicated by gene loss and convergent evolution, resulting in the polyphyletic distribution of many traits. In microorganisms, lateral gene transfer can further distort the linkage between phylogeny and the presence of specific functional traits. To identify the phylogenetic co...

  19. Incongruencies in Vaccinia Virus Phylogenetic Trees

    Chad Smithson

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Over the years, as more complete poxvirus genomes have been sequenced, phylogenetic studies of these viruses have become more prevalent. In general, the results show similar relationships between the poxvirus species; however, some inconsistencies are notable. Previous analyses of the viral genomes contained within the vaccinia virus (VACV-Dryvax vaccine revealed that their phylogenetic relationships were sometimes clouded by low bootstrapping confidence. To analyze the VACV-Dryvax genomes in detail, a new tool-set was developed and integrated into the Base-By-Base bioinformatics software package. Analyses showed that fewer unique positions were present in each VACV-Dryvax genome than expected. A series of patterns, each containing several single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs were identified that were counter to the results of the phylogenetic analysis. The VACV genomes were found to contain short DNA sequence blocks that matched more distantly related clades. Additionally, similar non-conforming SNP patterns were observed in (1 the variola virus clade; (2 some cowpox clades; and (3 VACV-CVA, the direct ancestor of VACV-MVA. Thus, traces of past recombination events are common in the various orthopoxvirus clades, including those associated with smallpox and cowpox viruses.

  20. A Consistent Phylogenetic Backbone for the Fungi

    Ebersberger, Ingo; de Matos Simoes, Ricardo; Kupczok, Anne; Gube, Matthias; Kothe, Erika; Voigt, Kerstin; von Haeseler, Arndt

    2012-01-01

    The kingdom of fungi provides model organisms for biotechnology, cell biology, genetics, and life sciences in general. Only when their phylogenetic relationships are stably resolved, can individual results from fungal research be integrated into a holistic picture of biology. However, and despite recent progress, many deep relationships within the fungi remain unclear. Here, we present the first phylogenomic study of an entire eukaryotic kingdom that uses a consistency criterion to strengthen phylogenetic conclusions. We reason that branches (splits) recovered with independent data and different tree reconstruction methods are likely to reflect true evolutionary relationships. Two complementary phylogenomic data sets based on 99 fungal genomes and 109 fungal expressed sequence tag (EST) sets analyzed with four different tree reconstruction methods shed light from different angles on the fungal tree of life. Eleven additional data sets address specifically the phylogenetic position of Blastocladiomycota, Ustilaginomycotina, and Dothideomycetes, respectively. The combined evidence from the resulting trees supports the deep-level stability of the fungal groups toward a comprehensive natural system of the fungi. In addition, our analysis reveals methodologically interesting aspects. Enrichment for EST encoded data—a common practice in phylogenomic analyses—introduces a strong bias toward slowly evolving and functionally correlated genes. Consequently, the generalization of phylogenomic data sets as collections of randomly selected genes cannot be taken for granted. A thorough characterization of the data to assess possible influences on the tree reconstruction should therefore become a standard in phylogenomic analyses. PMID:22114356

  1. The phylogenetic affinities of the extinct glyptodonts.

    Delsuc, Frédéric; Gibb, Gillian C; Kuch, Melanie; Billet, Guillaume; Hautier, Lionel; Southon, John; Rouillard, Jean-Marie; Fernicola, Juan Carlos; Vizcaíno, Sergio F; MacPhee, Ross D E; Poinar, Hendrik N

    2016-02-22

    Among the fossils of hitherto unknown mammals that Darwin collected in South America between 1832 and 1833 during the Beagle expedition were examples of the large, heavily armored herbivores later known as glyptodonts. Ever since, glyptodonts have fascinated evolutionary biologists because of their remarkable skeletal adaptations and seemingly isolated phylogenetic position even within their natural group, the cingulate xenarthrans (armadillos and their allies). In possessing a carapace comprised of fused osteoderms, the glyptodonts were clearly related to other cingulates, but their precise phylogenetic position as suggested by morphology remains unresolved. To provide a molecular perspective on this issue, we designed sequence-capture baits using in silico reconstructed ancestral sequences and successfully assembled the complete mitochondrial genome of Doedicurus sp., one of the largest glyptodonts. Our phylogenetic reconstructions establish that glyptodonts are in fact deeply nested within the armadillo crown-group, representing a distinct subfamily (Glyptodontinae) within family Chlamyphoridae. Molecular dating suggests that glyptodonts diverged no earlier than around 35 million years ago, in good agreement with their fossil record. Our results highlight the derived nature of the glyptodont morphotype, one aspect of which is a spectacular increase in body size until their extinction at the end of the last ice age. PMID:26906483

  2. Phylogenetic-based propagation of functional annotations within the Gene Ontology consortium.

    Gaudet, Pascale; Livstone, Michael S; Lewis, Suzanna E; Thomas, Paul D

    2011-09-01

    The goal of the Gene Ontology (GO) project is to provide a uniform way to describe the functions of gene products from organisms across all kingdoms of life and thereby enable analysis of genomic data. Protein annotations are either based on experiments or predicted from protein sequences. Since most sequences have not been experimentally characterized, most available annotations need to be based on predictions. To make as accurate inferences as possible, the GO Consortium's Reference Genome Project is using an explicit evolutionary framework to infer annotations of proteins from a broad set of genomes from experimental annotations in a semi-automated manner. Most components in the pipeline, such as selection of sequences, building multiple sequence alignments and phylogenetic trees, retrieving experimental annotations and depositing inferred annotations, are fully automated. However, the most crucial step in our pipeline relies on software-assisted curation by an expert biologist. This curation tool, Phylogenetic Annotation and INference Tool (PAINT) helps curators to infer annotations among members of a protein family. PAINT allows curators to make precise assertions as to when functions were gained and lost during evolution and record the evidence (e.g. experimentally supported GO annotations and phylogenetic information including orthology) for those assertions. In this article, we describe how we use PAINT to infer protein function in a phylogenetic context with emphasis on its strengths, limitations and guidelines. We also discuss specific examples showing how PAINT annotations compare with those generated by other highly used homology-based methods. PMID:21873635

  3. Sequence exploration reveals information bias among molecular markers used in phylogenetic reconstruction for Colletotrichum species.

    Rampersad, Sephra N; Hosein, Fazeeda N; Carrington, Christine Vf

    2014-01-01

    The Colletotrichum gloeosporioides species complex is among the most destructive fungal plant pathogens in the world, however, identification of isolates of quarantine importance to the intra-specific level is confounded by a number of factors that affect phylogenetic reconstruction. Information bias and quality parameters were investigated to determine whether nucleotide sequence alignments and phylogenetic trees accurately reflect the genetic diversity and phylogenetic relatedness of individuals. Sequence exploration of GAPDH, ACT, TUB2 and ITS markers indicated that the query sequences had different patterns of nucleotide substitution but were without evidence of base substitution saturation. Regions of high entropy were much more dispersed in the ACT and GAPDH marker alignments than for the ITS and TUB2 markers. A discernible bimodal gap in the genetic distance frequency histograms was produced for the ACT and GAPDH markers which indicated successful separation of intra- and inter-specific sequences in the data set. Overall, analyses indicated clear differences in the ability of these markers to phylogenetically separate individuals to the intra-specific level which coincided with information bias. PMID:25392785

  4. Ant-Based Phylogenetic Reconstruction (ABPR): A new distance algorithm for phylogenetic estimation based on ant colony optimization

    Karla Vittori; Alexandre C B Delbem; Pereira, Sérgio L

    2008-01-01

    We propose a new distance algorithm for phylogenetic estimation based on Ant Colony Optimization (ACO), named Ant-Based Phylogenetic Reconstruction (ABPR). ABPR joins two taxa iteratively based on evolutionary distance among sequences, while also accounting for the quality of the phylogenetic tree built according to the total length of the tree. Similar to optimization algorithms for phylogenetic estimation, the algorithm allows exploration of a larger set of nearly optimal solutions. We appl...

  5. Characterization of two ectrodactyly-associated translocation breakpoints separated by 2.5 Mb on chromosome 2q14.1–q14.2

    David, Dezső; Marques, Bárbara; Ferreira, Cristina; Vieira, Paula; Corona-Rivera, Alfredo; Ferreira, José Carlos; Van Bokhoven, Hans

    2009-01-01

    Split hand-split foot malformation or ectrodactyly is a heterogeneous congenital defect of digit formation. The aim of this study is the mapping of the breakpoints and a detailed molecular characterization of the candidate genes for an isolated and syndromic form of ectrodactyly, both associated with de novo apparently balanced chromosome translocations involving the same chromosome 2 band, [t(2;11)(q14.2;q14.2)] and [t(2;4)(q14.1;q35)], respectively. Breakpoints were mapped by fluorescence i...

  6. A More Accurate Fourier Transform

    Courtney, Elya

    2015-01-01

    Fourier transform methods are used to analyze functions and data sets to provide frequencies, amplitudes, and phases of underlying oscillatory components. Fast Fourier transform (FFT) methods offer speed advantages over evaluation of explicit integrals (EI) that define Fourier transforms. This paper compares frequency, amplitude, and phase accuracy of the two methods for well resolved peaks over a wide array of data sets including cosine series with and without random noise and a variety of physical data sets, including atmospheric $\\mathrm{CO_2}$ concentrations, tides, temperatures, sound waveforms, and atomic spectra. The FFT uses MIT's FFTW3 library. The EI method uses the rectangle method to compute the areas under the curve via complex math. Results support the hypothesis that EI methods are more accurate than FFT methods. Errors range from 5 to 10 times higher when determining peak frequency by FFT, 1.4 to 60 times higher for peak amplitude, and 6 to 10 times higher for phase under a peak. The ability t...

  7. A Note on Encodings of Phylogenetic Networks of Bounded Level

    Gambette, Philippe

    2009-01-01

    Driven by the need for better models that allow one to shed light into the question how life's diversity has evolved, phylogenetic networks have now joined phylogenetic trees in the center of phylogenetics research. Like phylogenetic trees, such networks canonically induce collections of phylogenetic trees, clusters, and triplets, respectively. Thus it is not surprising that many network approaches aim to reconstruct a phylogenetic network from such collections. Related to the well-studied perfect phylogeny problem, the following question is of fundamental importance in this context: When does one of the above collections encode (i.e. uniquely describe) the network that induces it? In this note, we present a complete answer to this question for the special case of a level-1 (phylogenetic) network by characterizing those level-1 networks for which an encoding in terms of one (or equivalently all) of the above collections exists. Given that this type of network forms the first layer of the rich hierarchy of lev...

  8. High-resolution phylogenetic microbial community profiling

    Singer, Esther; Coleman-Derr, Devin; Bowman, Brett; Schwientek, Patrick; Clum, Alicia; Copeland, Alex; Ciobanu, Doina; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Gies, Esther; Hallam, Steve; Tringe, Susannah; Woyke, Tanja

    2014-03-17

    The representation of bacterial and archaeal genome sequences is strongly biased towards cultivated organisms, which belong to merely four phylogenetic groups. Functional information and inter-phylum level relationships are still largely underexplored for candidate phyla, which are often referred to as microbial dark matter. Furthermore, a large portion of the 16S rRNA gene records in the GenBank database are labeled as environmental samples and unclassified, which is in part due to low read accuracy, potential chimeric sequences produced during PCR amplifications and the low resolution of short amplicons. In order to improve the phylogenetic classification of novel species and advance our knowledge of the ecosystem function of uncultivated microorganisms, high-throughput full length 16S rRNA gene sequencing methodologies with reduced biases are needed. We evaluated the performance of PacBio single-molecule real-time (SMRT) sequencing in high-resolution phylogenetic microbial community profiling. For this purpose, we compared PacBio and Illumina metagenomic shotgun and 16S rRNA gene sequencing of a mock community as well as of an environmental sample from Sakinaw Lake, British Columbia. Sakinaw Lake is known to contain a large age of microbial species from candidate phyla. Sequencing results show that community structure based on PacBio shotgun and 16S rRNA gene sequences is highly similar in both the mock and the environmental communities. Resolution power and community representation accuracy from SMRT sequencing data appeared to be independent of GC content of microbial genomes and was higher when compared to Illumina-based metagenome shotgun and 16S rRNA gene (iTag) sequences, e.g. full-length sequencing resolved all 23 OTUs in the mock community, while iTags did not resolve closely related species. SMRT sequencing hence offers various potential benefits when characterizing uncharted microbial communities.

  9. Phylogenetic and biogeographic analysis of sphaerexochine trilobites.

    Curtis R Congreve

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Sphaerexochinae is a speciose and widely distributed group of cheirurid trilobites. Their temporal range extends from the earliest Ordovician through the Silurian, and they survived the end Ordovician mass extinction event (the second largest mass extinction in Earth history. Prior to this study, the individual evolutionary relationships within the group had yet to be determined utilizing rigorous phylogenetic methods. Understanding these evolutionary relationships is important for producing a stable classification of the group, and will be useful in elucidating the effects the end Ordovician mass extinction had on the evolutionary and biogeographic history of the group. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Cladistic parsimony analysis of cheirurid trilobites assigned to the subfamily Sphaerexochinae was conducted to evaluate phylogenetic patterns and produce a hypothesis of relationship for the group. This study utilized the program TNT, and the analysis included thirty-one taxa and thirty-nine characters. The results of this analysis were then used in a Lieberman-modified Brooks Parsimony Analysis to analyze biogeographic patterns during the Ordovician-Silurian. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The genus Sphaerexochus was found to be monophyletic, consisting of two smaller clades (one composed entirely of Ordovician species and another composed of Silurian and Ordovician species. By contrast, the genus Kawina was found to be paraphyletic. It is a basal grade that also contains taxa formerly assigned to Cydonocephalus. Phylogenetic patterns suggest Sphaerexochinae is a relatively distinctive trilobite clade because it appears to have been largely unaffected by the end Ordovician mass extinction. Finally, the biogeographic analysis yields two major conclusions about Sphaerexochus biogeography: Bohemia and Avalonia were close enough during the Silurian to exchange taxa; and during the Ordovician there was dispersal between Eastern Laurentia and

  10. The impact of incorporating molecular evolutionary model into predictions of phylogenetic signal and noise

    JeffreyPeterTownsend

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Phylogenetic inference can be improved by the development and use of better models for inference given the data available, or by gathering more appropriate data given the potential inferences to be made. Numerous studies have demonstrated the crucial importance of selecting a best-fit model to conducting accurate phylogenetic inference given a data set, explicitly revealing how model choice affects the results of phylogenetic inferences. However, the importance of specifying a correct model of evolution for predictions of the best data to be gathered has never been examined. Here, we extend analyses of phylogenetic signal and noise that predict the potential to resolve nodes in a phylogeny to incorporate all time-reversible Markov models of nucleotide substitution. Extending previous results on the canonical four-taxon tree, our theory yields an analytical method that uses estimates of the rates of evolution and the model of molecular evolution to predict the distribution of signal, noise, and polytomy. We applied our methods to a study of 29 taxa of the yeast genus Candida and allied members to predict the power of five markers, COX2, ACT1, RPB1, RPB2, and D1/D2 LSU, to resolve a poorly supported backbone node corresponding to a clade of haploid Candida species, as well as nineteen other nodes that are reasonably short and at least moderately deep in the consensus tree. The use of simple, unrealistic models that did not take into account transition/transversion rate differences led to some discrepancies in predictions, but overall our results demonstrate that predictions of signal and noise in phylogenetics are fairly robust to model specification.

  11. Concepts of Classification and Taxonomy Phylogenetic Classification

    Fraix-Burnet, D.

    2016-05-01

    Phylogenetic approaches to classification have been heavily developed in biology by bioinformaticians. But these techniques have applications in other fields, in particular in linguistics. Their main characteristics is to search for relationships between the objects or species in study, instead of grouping them by similarity. They are thus rather well suited for any kind of evolutionary objects. For nearly fifteen years, astrocladistics has explored the use of Maximum Parsimony (or cladistics) for astronomical objects like galaxies or globular clusters. In this lesson we will learn how it works.

  12. Phylogenetic position of the spirochetal genus Cristispira

    Paster, B.J.; Pelletier, D.A.; Dewhirst, F.E.; Weisburg, W.G.; Fussing, V.; Poulsen, Lars K.; Dannenberg, S.; Schroeder, I.

    1996-01-01

    Comparative sequence analysis of 16S rRNA genes was used to determine the phylogenetic relationship of the genus Cristispira to other spirochetes. Since Cristispira organisms cannot presently be grown in vitro, 16S rRNA genes were amplified directly from bacterial DNA isolated from Cristispira a...... genus within this family. A fluorescently labeled DNA probe designed from the CP1 sequence was used for in situ hybridization experiments to verify that the sequence obtained was derived from the observed Cristispira cells....

  13. 38 CFR 4.46 - Accurate measurement.

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Accurate measurement. 4... RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.46 Accurate measurement. Accurate measurement of the length of stumps, excursion of joints, dimensions and location of scars with respect...

  14. A Distance Measure for Genome Phylogenetic Analysis

    Cao, Minh Duc; Allison, Lloyd; Dix, Trevor

    Phylogenetic analyses of species based on single genes or parts of the genomes are often inconsistent because of factors such as variable rates of evolution and horizontal gene transfer. The availability of more and more sequenced genomes allows phylogeny construction from complete genomes that is less sensitive to such inconsistency. For such long sequences, construction methods like maximum parsimony and maximum likelihood are often not possible due to their intensive computational requirement. Another class of tree construction methods, namely distance-based methods, require a measure of distances between any two genomes. Some measures such as evolutionary edit distance of gene order and gene content are computational expensive or do not perform well when the gene content of the organisms are similar. This study presents an information theoretic measure of genetic distances between genomes based on the biological compression algorithm expert model. We demonstrate that our distance measure can be applied to reconstruct the consensus phylogenetic tree of a number of Plasmodium parasites from their genomes, the statistical bias of which would mislead conventional analysis methods. Our approach is also used to successfully construct a plausible evolutionary tree for the γ-Proteobacteria group whose genomes are known to contain many horizontally transferred genes.

  15. Epitope discovery with phylogenetic hidden Markov models.

    Lacerda, Miguel

    2010-05-01

    Existing methods for the prediction of immunologically active T-cell epitopes are based on the amino acid sequence or structure of pathogen proteins. Additional information regarding the locations of epitopes may be acquired by considering the evolution of viruses in hosts with different immune backgrounds. In particular, immune-dependent evolutionary patterns at sites within or near T-cell epitopes can be used to enhance epitope identification. We have developed a mutation-selection model of T-cell epitope evolution that allows the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genotype of the host to influence the evolutionary process. This is one of the first examples of the incorporation of environmental parameters into a phylogenetic model and has many other potential applications where the selection pressures exerted on an organism can be related directly to environmental factors. We combine this novel evolutionary model with a hidden Markov model to identify contiguous amino acid positions that appear to evolve under immune pressure in the presence of specific host immune alleles and that therefore represent potential epitopes. This phylogenetic hidden Markov model provides a rigorous probabilistic framework that can be combined with sequence or structural information to improve epitope prediction. As a demonstration, we apply the model to a data set of HIV-1 protein-coding sequences and host HLA genotypes.

  16. Phylogenetic diversity of Mesorhizobium in chickpea

    Dong Hyun Kim; Mayank Kaashyap; Abhishek Rathore; Roma R Das; Swathi Parupalli; Hari D Upadhyaya; S Gopalakrishnan; Pooran M Gaur; Sarvjeet Singh; Jagmeet Kaur; Mohammad Yasin; Rajeev K Varshney

    2014-06-01

    Crop domestication, in general, has reduced genetic diversity in cultivated gene pool of chickpea (Cicer arietinum) as compared with wild species (C. reticulatum, C. bijugum). To explore impact of domestication on symbiosis, 10 accessions of chickpeas, including 4 accessions of C. arietinum, and 3 accessions of each of C. reticulatum and C. bijugum species, were selected and DNAs were extracted from their nodules. To distinguish chickpea symbiont, preliminary sequences analysis was attempted with 9 genes (16S rRNA, atpD, dnaJ, glnA, gyrB, nifH, nifK, nodD and recA) of which 3 genes (gyrB, nifK and nodD) were selected based on sufficient sequence diversity for further phylogenetic analysis. Phylogenetic analysis and sequence diversity for 3 genes demonstrated that sequences from C. reticulatum were more diverse. Nodule occupancy by dominant symbiont also indicated that C. reticulatum (60%) could have more various symbionts than cultivated chickpea (80%). The study demonstrated that wild chickpeas (C. reticulatum) could be used for selecting more diverse symbionts in the field conditions and it implies that chickpea domestication affected symbiosis negatively in addition to reducing genetic diversity.

  17. A phylogenetic blueprint for a modern whale.

    Gatesy, John; Geisler, Jonathan H; Chang, Joseph; Buell, Carl; Berta, Annalisa; Meredith, Robert W; Springer, Mark S; McGowen, Michael R

    2013-02-01

    The emergence of Cetacea in the Paleogene represents one of the most profound macroevolutionary transitions within Mammalia. The move from a terrestrial habitat to a committed aquatic lifestyle engendered wholesale changes in anatomy, physiology, and behavior. The results of this remarkable transformation are extant whales that include the largest, biggest brained, fastest swimming, loudest, deepest diving mammals, some of which can detect prey with a sophisticated echolocation system (Odontoceti - toothed whales), and others that batch feed using racks of baleen (Mysticeti - baleen whales). A broad-scale reconstruction of the evolutionary remodeling that culminated in extant cetaceans has not yet been based on integration of genomic and paleontological information. Here, we first place Cetacea relative to extant mammalian diversity, and assess the distribution of support among molecular datasets for relationships within Artiodactyla (even-toed ungulates, including Cetacea). We then merge trees derived from three large concatenations of molecular and fossil data to yield a composite hypothesis that encompasses many critical events in the evolutionary history of Cetacea. By combining diverse evidence, we infer a phylogenetic blueprint that outlines the stepwise evolutionary development of modern whales. This hypothesis represents a starting point for more detailed, comprehensive phylogenetic reconstructions in the future, and also highlights the synergistic interaction between modern (genomic) and traditional (morphological+paleontological) approaches that ultimately must be exploited to provide a rich understanding of evolutionary history across the entire tree of Life. PMID:23103570

  18. Phylogenetic analysis of honey bee behavioral evolution.

    Raffiudin, Rika; Crozier, Ross H

    2007-05-01

    DNA sequences from three mitochondrial (rrnL, cox2, nad2) and one nuclear gene (itpr) from all 9 known honey bee species (Apis), a 10th possible species, Apis dorsata binghami, and three outgroup species (Bombus terrestris, Melipona bicolor and Trigona fimbriata) were used to infer Apis phylogenetic relationships using Bayesian analysis. The dwarf honey bees were confirmed as basal, and the giant and cavity-nesting species to be monophyletic. All nodes were strongly supported except that grouping Apis cerana with A. nigrocincta. Two thousand post-burnin trees from the phylogenetic analysis were used in a Bayesian comparative analysis to explore the evolution of dance type, nest structure, comb structure and dance sound within Apis. The ancestral honey bee species was inferred with high support to have nested in the open, and to have more likely than not had a silent vertical waggle dance and a single comb. The common ancestor of the giant and cavity-dwelling bees is strongly inferred to have had a buzzing vertical directional dance. All pairwise combinations of characters showed strong association, but the multiple comparisons problem reduces the ability to infer associations between states between characters. Nevertheless, a buzzing dance is significantly associated with cavity-nesting, several vertical combs, and dancing vertically, a horizontal dance is significantly associated with a nest with a single comb wrapped around the support, and open nesting with a single pendant comb and a silent waggle dance. PMID:17123837

  19. Evaluation by Data Mining Techniques of Fluconazole Breakpoints Established by the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) and Comparison with Those of the European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST)▿

    Cuesta, Isabel; Bielza, Concha; Cuenca-Estrella, Manuel; Larrañaga, Pedro; Rodríguez-Tudela, Juan L.

    2010-01-01

    The EUCAST and the CLSI have established different breakpoints for fluconazole and Candida spp. However, the reference methodologies employed to obtain the MICs provide similar results. The aim of this work was to apply supervised classification algorithms to analyze the clinical data used by the CLSI to establish fluconazole breakpoints for Candida infections and to compare these data with the results obtained with the data set used to set up EUCAST fluconazole breakpoints, where the MIC for detecting failures was >4 mg/liter, with a sensitivity of 87%, a false-positive rate of 8%, and an area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve of 0.89. Five supervised classifiers (J48 and CART decision trees, the OneR decision rule, the naïve Bayes classifier, and simple logistic regression) were used to analyze the original cohort of patients (Rex's data set), which was used to establish CLSI breakpoints, and a later cohort of candidemia (Clancy's data set), with which CLSI breakpoints were validated. The target variable was the outcome of the infections, and the predictor variable was the MIC or dose/MIC ratio. For Rex's data set, the MIC detecting failures was >8 mg/liter, and for Clancy's data set, the MIC detecting failures was >4 mg/liter, in close agreement with the EUCAST breakpoint (MIC > 4 mg/liter). The sensitivities, false-positive rates, and areas under the ROC curve obtained by means of CART, the algorithm with the best statistical results, were 52%, 18%, and 0.7, respectively, for Rex's data set and 65%, 6%, and 0.72, respectively, for Clancy's data set. In addition, the correlation between outcome and dose/MIC ratio was analyzed for Clancy's data set, where a dose/MIC ratio of >75 was associated with successes, with a sensitivity of 93%, a false-positive rate of 29%, and an area under the ROC curve of 0.83. This dose/MIC ratio of >75 was identical to that found for the cohorts used by EUCAST to establish their breakpoints (a dose/MIC ratio of

  20. Computational Prediction of Phylogenetically Conserved Sequence Motifs for Five Different Candidate Genes in Type II Diabetic Nephropathy

    P Srinivasan

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Computational identification of phylogenetic motifs helps to understand the knowledge about known functional features that includes catalytic site, substrate binding epitopes, and protein-protein interfaces. Furthermore, they are strongly conserved among orthologs, indicating their evolutionary importance. The study aimed to analyze five candidate genes involved in type II diabetic nephropathy and to predict phylogenetic motifs from their corresponding orthologous protein sequences.Methods: AKR1B1, APOE, ENPP1, ELMO1 and IGFBP1 are the genes that have been identified as an important target for type II diabetic nephropathy through experimental studies. Their corresponding protein sequences, structures, orthologous sequences were retrieved from UniprotKB, PDB, and PHOG database respectively. Multiple sequence alignments were constructed using ClustalW and phylogenetic motifs were identified using MINER. The occurrence of amino acids in the obtained phylogenetic motifs was generated using WebLogo and false positive expectations were calculated against phylogenetic similarity.Results: In total, 17 phylogenetic motifs were identified from the five proteins and the residues such as glycine, leucine, tryptophan, aspartic acid were found in appreciable frequency whereas arginine identified in all the predicted PMs. The result implies that these residues can be important to the functional and structural role of the proteins and calculated false positive expectations implies that they were generally conserved in traditional sense.Conclusion: The prediction of phylogenetic motifs is an accurate method for detecting functionally important conserved residues. The conserved motifs can be used as a potential drug target for type II diabetic nephropathy.

  1. Phylogenetic positions of several amitochondriate protozoa-Evidence from phylogenetic analysis of DNA topoisomerase II

    HE De; DONG Jiuhong; WEN Jianfan; XIN Dedong; LU Siqi

    2005-01-01

    Several groups of parasitic protozoa, as represented by Giardia, Trichomonas, Entamoeba and Microsporida, were once widely considered to be the most primitive extant eukaryotic group―Archezoa. The main evidence for this is their 'lacking mitochondria' and possessing some other primitive features between prokaryotes and eukaryotes, and being basal to all eukaryotes with mitochondria in phylogenies inferred from many molecules. Some authors even proposed that these organisms diverged before the endosymbiotic origin of mitochondria within eukaryotes. This view was once considered to be very significant to the study of origin and evolution of eukaryotic cells (eukaryotes). However, in recent years this has been challenged by accumulating evidence from new studies. Here the sequences of DNA topoisomerase II in G. lamblia, T. vaginalis and E. histolytica were identified first by PCR and sequencing, then combining with the sequence data of the microsporidia Encephalitozoon cunicul and other eukaryotic groups of different evolutionary positions from GenBank, phylogenetic trees were constructed by various methods to investigate the evolutionary positions of these amitochondriate protozoa. Our results showed that since the characteristics of DNA topoisomerase II make it avoid the defect of 'long-branch attraction' appearing in the previous phylogenetic analyses, our trees can not only reflect effectively the relationship of different major eukaryotic groups, which is widely accepted, but also reveal phylogenetic positions for these amitochondriate protozoa, which is different from the previous phylogenetic trees. They are not the earliest-branching eukaryotes, but diverged after some mitochondriate organisms such as kinetoplastids and mycetozoan; they are not a united group but occupy different phylogenetic positions. Combining with the recent cytological findings of mitochondria-like organelles in them, we think that though some of them (e.g. diplomonads, as represented

  2. Fast Computations for Measures of Phylogenetic Beta Diversity

    Tsirogiannis, Constantinos; Sandel, Brody

    2016-01-01

    For many applications in ecology, it is important to examine the phylogenetic relations between two communities of species. More formally, let T be a phylogenetic tree and let A and B be two samples of its tips, representing the examined communities. We want to compute a value that expresses the phylogenetic diversity between A and B in T . There exist several measures that can do this; these are the so-called phylogenetic beta diversity (β-diversity) measures. Two popular measures of this ki...

  3. Phylogenetic Structure of Foliar Spectral Traits in Tropical Forest Canopies

    Kelly M. McManus

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The Spectranomics approach to tropical forest remote sensing has established a link between foliar reflectance spectra and the phylogenetic composition of tropical canopy tree communities vis-à-vis the taxonomic organization of biochemical trait variation. However, a direct relationship between phylogenetic affiliation and foliar reflectance spectra of species has not been established. We sought to develop this relationship by quantifying the extent to which underlying patterns of phylogenetic structure drive interspecific variation among foliar reflectance spectra within three Neotropical canopy tree communities with varying levels of soil fertility. We interpreted the resulting spectral patterns of phylogenetic signal in the context of foliar biochemical traits that may contribute to the spectral-phylogenetic link. We utilized a multi-model ensemble to elucidate trait-spectral relationships, and quantified phylogenetic signal for spectral wavelengths and traits using Pagel’s lambda statistic. Foliar reflectance spectra showed evidence of phylogenetic influence primarily within the visible and shortwave infrared spectral regions. These regions were also selected by the multi-model ensemble as those most important to the quantitative prediction of several foliar biochemical traits. Patterns of phylogenetic organization of spectra and traits varied across sites and with soil fertility, indicative of the complex interactions between the environmental and phylogenetic controls underlying patterns of biodiversity.

  4. Automatic selection of reference taxa for protein-protein interaction prediction with phylogenetic profiling

    Simonsen, Martin; Maetschke, S.R.; Ragan, M.A.

    2012-01-01

    Motivation: Phylogenetic profiling methods can achieve good accuracy in predicting protein–protein interactions, especially in prokaryotes. Recent studies have shown that the choice of reference taxa (RT) is critical for accurate prediction, but with more than 2500 fully sequenced taxa publicly......: We present three novel methods for automating the selection of RT, using machine learning based on known protein–protein interaction networks. One of these methods in particular, Tree-Based Search, yields greatly improved prediction accuracies. We further show that different methods for constituting...

  5. Phylogenetic position of the spirochetal genus Cristispira

    Paster, B.J.; Pelletier, D.A.; Dewhirst, F.E.;

    1996-01-01

    a cell-laden crystalline styles of the oyster Crassostrea virginica. The amplified products were then cloned into Escherichia coli plasmids. Sequence comparisons of the gene coding for 16S rRNA (rDNA) insert of one clone, designated CP1, indicated that it was spirochetal. The sequence of the 16S rDNA...... insert of another clone was mycoplasmal. The CP1 sequence possessed most of the individual base signatures that are unique to 16S rRNA (or rDNA) sequences of known spirochetes. CP1 branched deeply among other spirochetal genera within the family Spirochaetaceae, and accordingly, it represents a separate......Comparative sequence analysis of 16S rRNA genes was used to determine the phylogenetic relationship of the genus Cristispira to other spirochetes. Since Cristispira organisms cannot presently be grown in vitro, 16S rRNA genes were amplified directly from bacterial DNA isolated from Cristispira...

  6. Dating human cultural capacity using phylogenetic principles.

    Lind, J; Lindenfors, P; Ghirlanda, S; Lidén, K; Enquist, M

    2013-01-01

    Humans have genetically based unique abilities making complex culture possible; an assemblage of traits which we term "cultural capacity". The age of this capacity has for long been subject to controversy. We apply phylogenetic principles to date this capacity, integrating evidence from archaeology, genetics, paleoanthropology, and linguistics. We show that cultural capacity is older than the first split in the modern human lineage, and at least 170,000 years old, based on data on hyoid bone morphology, FOXP2 alleles, agreement between genetic and language trees, fire use, burials, and the early appearance of tools comparable to those of modern hunter-gatherers. We cannot exclude that Neanderthals had cultural capacity some 500,000 years ago. A capacity for complex culture, therefore, must have existed before complex culture itself. It may even originated long before. This seeming paradox is resolved by theoretical models suggesting that cultural evolution is exceedingly slow in its initial stages. PMID:23648831

  7. Rapid and accurate pyrosequencing of angiosperm plastid genomes

    Farmerie William G

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plastid genome sequence information is vital to several disciplines in plant biology, including phylogenetics and molecular biology. The past five years have witnessed a dramatic increase in the number of completely sequenced plastid genomes, fuelled largely by advances in conventional Sanger sequencing technology. Here we report a further significant reduction in time and cost for plastid genome sequencing through the successful use of a newly available pyrosequencing platform, the Genome Sequencer 20 (GS 20 System (454 Life Sciences Corporation, to rapidly and accurately sequence the whole plastid genomes of the basal eudicot angiosperms Nandina domestica (Berberidaceae and Platanus occidentalis (Platanaceae. Results More than 99.75% of each plastid genome was simultaneously obtained during two GS 20 sequence runs, to an average depth of coverage of 24.6× in Nandina and 17.3× in Platanus. The Nandina and Platanus plastid genomes shared essentially identical gene complements and possessed the typical angiosperm plastid structure and gene arrangement. To assess the accuracy of the GS 20 sequence, over 45 kilobases of sequence were generated for each genome using conventional sequencing. Overall error rates of 0.043% and 0.031% were observed in GS 20 sequence for Nandina and Platanus, respectively. More than 97% of all observed errors were associated with homopolymer runs, with ~60% of all errors associated with homopolymer runs of 5 or more nucleotides and ~50% of all errors associated with regions of extensive homopolymer runs. No substitution errors were present in either genome. Error rates were generally higher in the single-copy and noncoding regions of both plastid genomes relative to the inverted repeat and coding regions. Conclusion Highly accurate and essentially complete sequence information was obtained for the Nandina and Platanus plastid genomes using the GS 20 System. More importantly, the high accuracy

  8. The Complete Chloroplast Genome Sequences of Five Epimedium Species: Lights into Phylogenetic and Taxonomic Analyses

    Zhang, Yanjun; Du, Liuwen; Liu, Ao; Chen, Jianjun; Wu, Li; Hu, Weiming; Zhang, Wei; Kim, Kyunghee; Lee, Sang-Choon; Yang, Tae-Jin; Wang, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Epimedium L. is a phylogenetically and economically important genus in the family Berberidaceae. We here sequenced the complete chloroplast (cp) genomes of four Epimedium species using Illumina sequencing technology via a combination of de novo and reference-guided assembly, which was also the first comprehensive cp genome analysis on Epimedium combining the cp genome sequence of E. koreanum previously reported. The five Epimedium cp genomes exhibited typical quadripartite and circular structure that was rather conserved in genomic structure and the synteny of gene order. However, these cp genomes presented obvious variations at the boundaries of the four regions because of the expansion and contraction of the inverted repeat (IR) region and the single-copy (SC) boundary regions. The trnQ-UUG duplication occurred in the five Epimedium cp genomes, which was not found in the other basal eudicotyledons. The rapidly evolving cp genome regions were detected among the five cp genomes, as well as the difference of simple sequence repeats (SSR) and repeat sequence were identified. Phylogenetic relationships among the five Epimedium species based on their cp genomes showed accordance with the updated system of the genus on the whole, but reminded that the evolutionary relationships and the divisions of the genus need further investigation applying more evidences. The availability of these cp genomes provided valuable genetic information for accurately identifying species, taxonomy and phylogenetic resolution and evolution of Epimedium, and assist in exploration and utilization of Epimedium plants. PMID:27014326

  9. Phylogenetic diversity (PD and biodiversity conservation: some bioinformatics challenges

    Daniel P. Faith

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Biodiversity conservation addresses information challenges through estimations encapsulated in measures of diversity. A quantitative measure of phylogenetic diversity, “PD”, has been defined as the minimum total length of all the phylogenetic branches required to span a given set of taxa on the phylogenetic tree (Faith 1992a. While a recent paper incorrectly characterizes PD as not including information about deeper phylogenetic branches, PD applications over the past decade document the proper incorporation of shared deep branches when assessing the total PD of a set of taxa. Current PD applications to macroinvertebrate taxa in streams of New South Wales, Australia illustrate the practical importance of this definition. Phylogenetic lineages, often corresponding to new, “cryptic”, taxa, are restricted to a small number of stream localities. A recent case of human impact causing loss of taxa in one locality implies a higher PD value for another locality, because it now uniquely represents a deeper branch. This molecular-based phylogenetic pattern supports the use of DNA barcoding programs for biodiversity conservation planning. Here, PD assessments side-step the contentious use of barcoding-based “species” designations. Bio-informatics challenges include combining different phylogenetic evidence, optimization problems for conservation planning, and effective integration of phylogenetic information with environmental and socio-economic data.

  10. Visualising very large phylogenetic trees in three dimensional hyperbolic space

    Liberles David A

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Common existing phylogenetic tree visualisation tools are not able to display readable trees with more than a few thousand nodes. These existing methodologies are based in two dimensional space. Results We introduce the idea of visualising phylogenetic trees in three dimensional hyperbolic space with the Walrus graph visualisation tool and have developed a conversion tool that enables the conversion of standard phylogenetic tree formats to Walrus' format. With Walrus, it becomes possible to visualise and navigate phylogenetic trees with more than 100,000 nodes. Conclusion Walrus enables desktop visualisation of very large phylogenetic trees in 3 dimensional hyperbolic space. This application is potentially useful for visualisation of the tree of life and for functional genomics derivatives, like The Adaptive Evolution Database (TAED.

  11. Open Reading Frame Phylogenetic Analysis on the Cloud

    Che-Lun Hung

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Phylogenetic analysis has become essential in researching the evolutionary relationships between viruses. These relationships are depicted on phylogenetic trees, in which viruses are grouped based on sequence similarity. Viral evolutionary relationships are identified from open reading frames rather than from complete sequences. Recently, cloud computing has become popular for developing internet-based bioinformatics tools. Biocloud is an efficient, scalable, and robust bioinformatics computing service. In this paper, we propose a cloud-based open reading frame phylogenetic analysis service. The proposed service integrates the Hadoop framework, virtualization technology, and phylogenetic analysis methods to provide a high-availability, large-scale bioservice. In a case study, we analyze the phylogenetic relationships among Norovirus. Evolutionary relationships are elucidated by aligning different open reading frame sequences. The proposed platform correctly identifies the evolutionary relationships between members of Norovirus.

  12. Open reading frame phylogenetic analysis on the cloud.

    Hung, Che-Lun; Lin, Chun-Yuan

    2013-01-01

    Phylogenetic analysis has become essential in researching the evolutionary relationships between viruses. These relationships are depicted on phylogenetic trees, in which viruses are grouped based on sequence similarity. Viral evolutionary relationships are identified from open reading frames rather than from complete sequences. Recently, cloud computing has become popular for developing internet-based bioinformatics tools. Biocloud is an efficient, scalable, and robust bioinformatics computing service. In this paper, we propose a cloud-based open reading frame phylogenetic analysis service. The proposed service integrates the Hadoop framework, virtualization technology, and phylogenetic analysis methods to provide a high-availability, large-scale bioservice. In a case study, we analyze the phylogenetic relationships among Norovirus. Evolutionary relationships are elucidated by aligning different open reading frame sequences. The proposed platform correctly identifies the evolutionary relationships between members of Norovirus. PMID:23671843

  13. Site-specific time heterogeneity of the substitution process and its impact on phylogenetic inference

    Philippe Hervé

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Model violations constitute the major limitation in inferring accurate phylogenies. Characterizing properties of the data that are not being correctly handled by current models is therefore of prime importance. One of the properties of protein evolution is the variation of the relative rate of substitutions across sites and over time, the latter is the phenomenon called heterotachy. Its effect on phylogenetic inference has recently obtained considerable attention, which led to the development of new models of sequence evolution. However, thus far focus has been on the quantitative heterogeneity of the evolutionary process, thereby overlooking more qualitative variations. Results We studied the importance of variation of the site-specific amino-acid substitution process over time and its possible impact on phylogenetic inference. We used the CAT model to define an infinite mixture of substitution processes characterized by equilibrium frequencies over the twenty amino acids, a useful proxy for qualitatively estimating the evolutionary process. Using two large datasets, we show that qualitative changes in site-specific substitution properties over time occurred significantly. To test whether this unaccounted qualitative variation can lead to an erroneous phylogenetic tree, we analyzed a concatenation of mitochondrial proteins in which Cnidaria and Porifera were erroneously grouped. The progressive removal of the sites with the most heterogeneous CAT profiles across clades led to the recovery of the monophyly of Eumetazoa (Cnidaria+Bilateria, suggesting that this heterogeneity can negatively influence phylogenetic inference. Conclusion The time-heterogeneity of the amino-acid replacement process is therefore an important evolutionary aspect that should be incorporated in future models of sequence change.

  14. Usefulness of Microscan System panels with EUCAST clinical breakpoints to evaluate the antimicrobial susceptibility of ß-lactamase producing- Gram negative isolates

    Elisabetta Nucleo

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The study aimed to evaluate the ability of NBC45, NBC46 and NB40 Microscan (MS panels, updated to 2010 EUCAST breakpoints, to identify at species level and to correctly define the susceptibility to ß-lactams of 61 ß-lactamases (BLs producing Gram-negative isolates. A collection of 73 fully identified strains was analyzed: 21 Klebsiella spp., 17 E. coli, 15 P. mirabilis, 9 A. baumannii (Ab, 7 P. aeruginosa and 4 Enterobacter spp.. 61/73 were BLs and/or carbapenemases producers: 15 were CTX-M-1/-2/-14/-15 positive, and among them two were also VIM-1 positive. Four were TEM-52/-92, 3 PER-1, 2 SHV-12/-18 and 6 CMY-16 producers, while 11 were KPC-2/-3, 9 OXA-51/-58/-23, 8 VIM-1 and 2 IMP-13 positive. One K. oxytoca K-1 iper-producer, 11 non-BL producers/ATCC control strains and a OprD2 porin lacking P. aeruginosa were also included. All isolates were identified by Api-20E and VITEK-2 System and antibiotic susceptibilities were obtained by broth microdilution method. Resistance genes were identified by PCR and sequencing. All 73 isolates were correctly identified and a complete agreement for susceptibility patterns was observed for both ATCC control strains and non-BL clinical isolates. MS failed to detect a BL/Extended-Spectrum-ß-Lactamase (ESâL production in 5/61 cases: any ESßL alert was detected using NBC46 panel for 3/15 CTX-M positive strains and 2 VIM-1/CTX-M-15 producing K. pneumoniae isolates. Intermediate resistance to cefoxitin (MIC 16 mg/L, susceptibility to cefepime (MIC 8 mg/L for ertapenem (ETP, according to previously results. All VIM-1 producers resulted intermediate/resistant to imipenem (IP and meropenem (MP; decreased MIC values were observed in 2/8 cases. Carbapenem MICs >8 mg/L were detected for IP-13 P. aeruginosa producers; 6/9 OXA carbapenemases- producing Ab showed IP MIC >8 mg/L and 3/6 MP MIC >8 mg/L. 3/9 Ab OXA-58/-51 producers, tested using NB40 panel, were intermediate or resistant to doripenem and meropenem

  15. A phylogenetic re-evaluation of Arthrinium.

    Crous, Pedro W; Groenewald, Johannes Z

    2013-07-01

    Although the genus Arthrinium (sexual morph Apiospora) is commonly isolated as an endophyte from a range of substrates, and is extremely interesting for the pharmaceutical industry, its molecular phylogeny has never been resolved. Based on morphology and DNA sequence data of the large subunit nuclear ribosomal RNA gene (LSU, 28S) and the internal transcribed spacers (ITS) and 5.8S rRNA gene of the nrDNA operon, the genus Arthrinium is shown to belong to Apiosporaceae in Xylariales. Arthrinium is morphologically and phylogenetically circumscribed, and the sexual genus Apiospora treated as synonym on the basis that Arthinium is older, more commonly encountered, and more frequently used in literature. An epitype is designated for Arthrinium pterospermum, and several well-known species are redefined based on their morphology and sequence data of the translation elongation factor 1-alpha (TEF), beta-tubulin (TUB) and internal transcribed spacer (ITS1, 5.8S, ITS2) gene regions. Newly described are A. hydei on Bambusa tuldoides from Hong Kong, A. kogelbergense on dead culms of Restionaceae from South Africa, A. malaysianum on Macaranga hullettii from Malaysia, A. ovatum on Arundinaria hindsii from Hong Kong, A. phragmites on Phragmites australis from Italy, A. pseudospegazzinii on Macaranga hullettii from Malaysia, A. pseudosinense on bamboo from The Netherlands, and A. xenocordella from soil in Zimbabwe. Furthermore, the genera Pteroconium and Cordella are also reduced to synonymy, rejecting spore shape and the presence of setae as characters of generic significance separating them from Arthrinium. PMID:23898419

  16. Phylogenetic biodiversity assessment based on systematic nomenclature

    Ross H Crozier

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Biodiversity assessment demands objective measures, because ultimately conservation decisions must prioritize the use of limited resources for preserving taxa. The most general framework for the objective assessment of conservation worth are those that assess evolutionary distinctiveness, e.g. Genetic (Crozier 1992 and Phylogenetic Diversity (Faith 1992, and Evolutionary History (Nee & May 1997. These measures all attempt to assess the conservation worth of any scheme based on how much of the encompassing phylogeny of organisms is preserved. However, their general applicability is limited by the small proportion of taxa that have been reliably placed in a phylogeny. Given that phylogenizaton of many interesting taxa or important is unlikely to occur soon, we present a framework for using taxonomy as a reasonable surrogate for phylogeny. Combining this framework with exhaustive searches for combinations of sites containing maximal diversity, we provide a proof-of-concept for assessing conservation schemes for systematized but un-phylogenised taxa spread over a series of sites. This is illustrated with data from four studies, on North Queensland flightless insects (Yeates et al. 2002, ants from a Florida Transect (Lubertazzi & Tschinkel 2003, New England bog ants (Gotelli & Ellison 2002 and a simulated distribution of the known New Zealand Lepidosauria (Daugherty et al. 1994. The results support this approach, indicating that species, genus and site numbers predict evolutionary history, to a degree depending on the size of the data set.

  17. Phylogenetic analyses of Andromedeae (Ericaceae subfam. Vaccinioideae).

    Kron, K A; Judd, W S; Crayn, D M

    1999-09-01

    Phylogenetic relationships within the Andromedeae and closely related taxa were investigated by means of cladistic analyses based on phenotypic (morphology, anatomy, chromosome number, and secondary chemistry) and molecular (rbcL and matK nucleotide sequences) characters. An analysis based on combined molecular and phenotypic characters indicates that the tribe is composed of two major clades-the Gaultheria group (incl. Andromeda, Chamaedaphne, Diplycosia, Gaultheria, Leucothoë, Pernettya, Tepuia, and Zenobia) and the Lyonia group (incl. Agarista, Craibiodendron, Lyonia, and Pieris). Andromedeae are shown to be paraphyletic in all analyses because the Vaccinieae link with some or all of the genera of the Gaultheria group. Oxydendrum is sister to the clade containing the Vaccinieae, Gaultheria group, and Lyonia group. The monophyly of Agarista, Lyonia, Pieris, and Gaultheria (incl. Pernettya) is supported, while that of Leucothoë is problematic. The close relationship of Andromeda and Zenobia is novel and was strongly supported in the molecular (but not morphological) analyses. Diplycosia, Tepuia, Gaultheria, and Pernettya form a well-supported clade, which can be diagnosed by the presence of fleshy calyx lobes and methyl salicylate. Recognition of Andromedeae is not reflective of our understanding of geneological relationships and should be abandoned; the Lyonia group is formally recognized at the tribal level. PMID:10487817

  18. Fast Structural Search in Phylogenetic Databases

    William H. Piel

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available As the size of phylogenetic databases grows, the need for efficiently searching these databases arises. Thanks to previous and ongoing research, searching by attribute value and by text has become commonplace in these databases. However, searching by topological or physical structure, especially for large databases and especially for approximate matches, is still an art. We propose structural search techniques that, given a query or pattern tree P and a database of phylogenies D, find trees in D that are sufficiently close to P . The “closeness” is a measure of the topological relationships in P that are found to be the same or similar in a tree D in D. We develop a filtering technique that accelerates searches and present algorithms for rooted and unrooted trees where the trees can be weighted or unweighted. Experimental results on comparing the similarity measure with existing tree metrics and on evaluating the efficiency of the search techniques demonstrate that the proposed approach is promising

  19. Phylogenetic characterization of archaea in saltpan sediments.

    Ahmad, Nasier; Johri, Sarojini; Sultan, Phalisteen; Abdin, Malik Z; Qazi, Ghulam N

    2011-06-01

    A study was undertaken to investigate the presence of archaeal diversity in saltpan sediments of Goa, India by 16S rDNA-dependent molecular phylogeny. Small subunit rRNA (16S rDNA) from saltpan sediment metagenome were amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using primers specific to the domain archaea. 10 unique phylotypes were obtained by PCR based RFLP of 16S rRNA genes using endonuclease Msp 1, which was most suitable to score the genetic diversity. These phylotypes spanned a wide range within the domain archaea including both crenarchaeota and euryarcheaota. None of the retrieved crenarchaeota sequences could be grouped with previously cultured crenarchaeota however; two sequences were related with haloarchaea. Most of the sequences determined were closely related to the sequences that had been previously obtained from metagenome of a variety of marine environments. The phylogenetic study of a site investigated for the first time revealed the presence of low archaeal population but showed yet unclassified species, may specially adapted to the salt pan sediment of Goa. PMID:22654153

  20. PHYLOGENETIC STUDY OF SOME STRAINS OF DUNALIELLA

    Duc Tran

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Dunaliella strains were isolated from a key site for salt production in Vietnam (Vinh Hao, Binh Thuan province. The strains were identified based on Internal Transcribed Spacer (ITS markers. The phylogenetic tree revealed these strains belong to the clades of Dunaliella salina and Dunaliella viridis. Results of this study confirm the ubiquitous nature of Dunaliella and suggest that strains of Dunaliella salina might be acquired locally worldwide for the production of beta-carotene. The identification of these species infers the presence of other Dunaliella species (Dunaliella tertiolecta, Dunaliella primolecta, Dunaliella parva, but further investigation would be required to confirm their presence in Vietnam. We anticipate the physiological and biochemical characteristics of these local species will be compared with imported strains in a future effort. This will facilitate selection of strains with the best potential for exploitation in the food, aquaculture and biofuel industries. The Dunaliella strains isolated and identified in this study are maintained at the Laboratory of Algal Biotechnology, International University and will be made available for research and educational institutions.

  1. Comprehensive phylogenetic analysis of bacterial reverse transcriptases.

    Nicolás Toro

    Full Text Available Much less is known about reverse transcriptases (RTs in prokaryotes than in eukaryotes, with most prokaryotic enzymes still uncharacterized. Two surveys involving BLAST searches for RT genes in prokaryotic genomes revealed the presence of large numbers of diverse, uncharacterized RTs and RT-like sequences. Here, using consistent annotation across all sequenced bacterial species from GenBank and other sources via RAST, available from the PATRIC (Pathogenic Resource Integration Center platform, we have compiled the data for currently annotated reverse transcriptases from completely sequenced bacterial genomes. RT sequences are broadly distributed across bacterial phyla, but green sulfur bacteria and cyanobacteria have the highest levels of RT sequence diversity (≤85% identity per genome. By contrast, phylum Actinobacteria, for which a large number of genomes have been sequenced, was found to have a low RT sequence diversity. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that bacterial RTs could be classified into 17 main groups: group II introns, retrons/retron-like RTs, diversity-generating retroelements (DGRs, Abi-like RTs, CRISPR-Cas-associated RTs, group II-like RTs (G2L, and 11 other groups of RTs of unknown function. Proteobacteria had the highest potential functional diversity, as they possessed most of the RT groups. Group II introns and DGRs were the most widely distributed RTs in bacterial phyla. Our results provide insights into bacterial RT phylogeny and the basis for an update of annotation systems based on sequence/domain homology.

  2. The best of both worlds: Phylogenetic eigenvector regression and mapping

    José Alexandre Felizola Diniz Filho

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Eigenfunction analyses have been widely used to model patterns of autocorrelation in time, space and phylogeny. In a phylogenetic context, Diniz-Filho et al. (1998 proposed what they called Phylogenetic Eigenvector Regression (PVR, in which pairwise phylogenetic distances among species are submitted to a Principal Coordinate Analysis, and eigenvectors are then used as explanatory variables in regression, correlation or ANOVAs. More recently, a new approach called Phylogenetic Eigenvector Mapping (PEM was proposed, with the main advantage of explicitly incorporating a model-based warping in phylogenetic distance in which an Ornstein-Uhlenbeck (O-U process is fitted to data before eigenvector extraction. Here we compared PVR and PEM in respect to estimated phylogenetic signal, correlated evolution under alternative evolutionary models and phylogenetic imputation, using simulated data. Despite similarity between the two approaches, PEM has a slightly higher prediction ability and is more general than the original PVR. Even so, in a conceptual sense, PEM may provide a technique in the best of both worlds, combining the flexibility of data-driven and empirical eigenfunction analyses and the sounding insights provided by evolutionary models well known in comparative analyses.

  3. Chronic γ-irradiation results in increased cell killing and chromosomal aberration with specific breakpoints in fibroblast cell strains derived from non-Hodgkin's lymphoma patients

    Cultured skin fibroblast cells from 16 NHL (non-Hodgkin's lymphoma) patients and 2 clinically normal subjects were compared for cell survival and chromosomal aberration after chronic γ-irradiation. Fibroblasts from an ataxia telangiectasia (AT) homozygote and an AT heterozygote were used as positive controls. Following irradiation, fibroblasts from all 16 NHL patients showed an increase in both cell death and chromosomal aberration (breaks and rearrangements) compared to normal subjects. The difference in frequency of chromosomal aberration between normals and NHL-patients remained virtually unchanged over a period of 24-72 h post irradiation incubation of cells. Cell cycle analysis by flow cytometry carried out in 1 normal and 1 NHL fibroblast cell strain showed that more cells representing the NHL patient were in G2/M phase compared to the normal at various times of cytogenetic analysis. While the AT homozygote appeared to be the most radiosensitive, the AT heterozygote showed a slightly higher incidence of cell death and chromosomal aberration than the normals. The cellular and chromosomal radiosensitivity of fibroblast cell lines from NHL-patients differed slightly from that of AT heterozygote but clearly occupied an intermediate position between the AT homozygote and the normal subjects. Cells from 3 of the NHL patients showed radiation-induced specific chromosomal breaks involving chromosomes 1, 2, 6, 8, 10 and 11 which correspond to known fragile sites. Such breakpoints associated with increased radiosensitivity may be indicative of predisposition to malignancy in the patients studied. (author). 30 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs

  4. Both V(D)J coding ends but neither signal end can recombine at the bcl-2 major breakpoint region, and the rejoining is ligase IV dependent.

    Raghavan, Sathees C; Hsieh, Chih-Lin; Lieber, Michael R

    2005-08-01

    The t(14;18) chromosomal translocation is the most common translocation in human cancer, and it occurs in all follicular lymphomas. The 150-bp bcl-2 major breakpoint region (Mbr) on chromosome 18 is a fragile site, because it adopts a non-B DNA conformation that can be cleaved by the RAG complex. The non-B DNA structure and the chromosomal translocation can be recapitulated on intracellular human minichromosomes where immunoglobulin 12- and 23-signals are positioned downstream of the bcl-2 Mbr. Here we show that either of the two coding ends in these V(D)J recombination reactions can recombine with either of the two broken ends of the bcl-2 Mbr but that neither signal end can recombine with the Mbr. Moreover, we show that the rejoining is fully dependent on DNA ligase IV, indicating that the rejoining phase relies on the nonhomologous DNA end-joining pathway. These results permit us to formulate a complete model for the order and types of cleavage and rejoining events in the t(14;18) translocation. PMID:16024785

  5. Double-strand break formation by the RAG complex at the bcl-2 major breakpoint region and at other non-B DNA structures in vitro.

    Raghavan, Sathees C; Swanson, Patrick C; Ma, Yunmei; Lieber, Michael R

    2005-07-01

    The most common chromosomal translocation in cancer, t(14;18) at the 150-bp bcl-2 major breakpoint region (Mbr), occurs in follicular lymphomas. The bcl-2 Mbr assumes a non-B DNA conformation, thus explaining its distinctive fragility. This non-B DNA structure is a target of the RAG complex in vivo, but not because of its primary sequence. Here we report that the RAG complex generates at least two independent nicks that lead to double-strand breaks in vitro, and this requires the non-B DNA structure at the bcl-2 Mbr. A 3-bp mutation is capable of abolishing the non-B structure formation and the double-strand breaks. The observations on the bcl-2 Mbr reflect more general properties of the RAG complex, which can bind and nick at duplex-single-strand transitions of other non-B DNA structures, resulting in double-strand breaks in vitro. Hence, the present study reveals novel insight into a third mechanism of action of RAGs on DNA, besides the standard heptamer/nonamer-mediated cleavage in V(D)J recombination and the in vitro transposase activity. PMID:15988007

  6. Formation of a G-quadruplex at the BCL2 major breakpoint region of the t(14;18) translocation in follicular lymphoma

    Nambiar, Mridula; Goldsmith, G.; Moorthy, Balaji T.; Lieber, Michael R.; Joshi, Mamata V.; Choudhary, Bibha; Hosur, Ramakrishna V.; Raghavan, Sathees C.

    2011-01-01

    The t(14;18) translocation in follicular lymphoma is one of the most common chromosomal translocations. Most breaks on chromosome 18 are located at the 3′-UTR of the BCL2 gene and are mainly clustered in the major breakpoint region (MBR). Recently, we found that the BCL2 MBR has a non-B DNA character in genomic DNA. Here, we show that single-stranded DNA modeled from the template strand of the BCL2 MBR, forms secondary structures that migrate faster on native PAGE in the presence of potassium, due to the formation of intramolecular G-quadruplexes. Circular dichroism shows evidence for a parallel orientation for G-quadruplex structures in the template strand of the BCL2 MBR. Mutagenesis and the DMS modification assay confirm the presence of three guanine tetrads in the structure. 1H nuclear magnetic resonance studies further confirm the formation of an intramolecular G-quadruplex and a representative model has been built based on all of the experimental evidence. We also provide data consistent with the possible formation of a G-quadruplex structure at the BCL2 MBR within mammalian cells. In summary, these important features could contribute to the single-stranded character at the BCL2 MBR, thereby contributing to chromosomal fragility. PMID:20880994

  7. A response to Yu et al. "A forward-backward fragment assembling algorithm for the identification of genomic amplification and deletion breakpoints using high-density single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP array", BMC Bioinformatics 2007, 8: 145

    Diaz-Uriarte Ramon

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Yu et al. (BMC Bioinformatics 2007,8: 145+ have recently compared the performance of several methods for the detection of genomic amplification and deletion breakpoints using data from high-density single nucleotide polymorphism arrays. One of the methods compared is our non-homogenous Hidden Markov Model approach. Our approach uses Markov Chain Monte Carlo for inference, but Yu et al. ran the sampler for a severely insufficient number of iterations for a Markov Chain Monte Carlo-based method. Moreover, they did not use the appropriate reference level for the non-altered state. Methods We rerun the analysis in Yu et al. using appropriate settings for both the Markov Chain Monte Carlo iterations and the reference level. Additionally, to show how easy it is to obtain answers to additional specific questions, we have added a new analysis targeted specifically to the detection of breakpoints. Results The reanalysis shows that the performance of our method is comparable to that of the other methods analyzed. In addition, we can provide probabilities of a given spot being a breakpoint, something unique among the methods examined. Conclusion Markov Chain Monte Carlo methods require using a sufficient number of iterations before they can be assumed to yield samples from the distribution of interest. Running our method with too small a number of iterations cannot be representative of its performance. Moreover, our analysis shows how our original approach can be easily adapted to answer specific additional questions (e.g., identify edges.

  8. Laboratory Building for Accurate Determination of Plutonium

    2008-01-01

    <正>The accurate determination of plutonium is one of the most important assay techniques of nuclear fuel, also the key of the chemical measurement transfer and the base of the nuclear material balance. An

  9. Preliminary Study of Phylogenetic Relationship of Rice Field Chironomidae (Diptera Inferred From DNA Sequences of Mitochondrial Cytochrome Oxidase Subunit I

    Salman A. Al-Shami

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Chironomidae have been recorded in rice fields throughout the world including in many countries such as India, Australia and the USA. Although some studies provide the key to genera level and note the difficulty of identifying the larvae to species level. Chironomid researches have been hindered because of difficulties in specimen preparation, identification, morphology and literature. Systematics, phylogenetics and taxonomic studies of insects developed quickly with emergence of molecular techniques. These techniques provide an effective tool toward more accurate identification of ambiguous chironomid species. Approach: Samples of chironomids larvae were collected from rice plots at Bukit Merah Agricultural Experimental Station (BMAES, Penang, Malaysia. A 710 bp fragment of mitochondrial gene Cytochrome Oxidase subunit I (COI was amplified and sequenced. Results: Five species of Chironomidae; three species of subfamily Chironominae, Chironomus kiiensis, Polypedilum trigonus, Tanytarsus formosanus, two species of subfamily Tanypodinae, Clinotanypus sp and Tanypus punctipennis were morphologically identified. The phylogenetic relationship among these species was been investigated. High sequence divergence was observed between two individuals of the presumed C. kiiensis and it is suggested that more than one species may be present. However the intraspecific sequence divergence was lower between the other species of Tanypodinae subfamily. Interestingly, Tanytarsus formosanus showed close phylogenetic relationship to Tanypodinae species and this presumably reflect co-evolutionary traits of different subfamilies. Conclusion: The sequence of the mtDNA cytochrome oxidase subunit I gene has proven useful to investigate the phylogenetic relationship among the ambiguous species of chironomids.

  10. Disentangling the effect of body size and phylogenetic distances on zooplankton top-down control of algae.

    Gianuca, Andros T; Pantel, Jelena H; De Meester, Luc

    2016-04-13

    A negative consequence of biodiversity loss is reduced rates of ecosystem functions. Phylogenetic-based biodiversity indices have been claimed to provide more accurate predictions of ecosystem functioning than species diversity alone. This approach assumes that the most relevant traits for ecosystem functioning present a phylogenetic signal. Yet, traits-mediating niche partitioning and resource uptake efficiency in animals can be labile. To assess the relative power of a key trait (body size) and phylogeny to predict zooplankton top-down control on phytoplankton, we manipulated trait and phylogenetic distances independently in microcosms while holding species richness constant. We found that body size provided strong predictions of top-down control. In contrast, phylogeny was a poor predictor of grazing rates. Size-related grazing efficiency asymmetry was mechanistically more important than niche differences in mediating ecosystem function in our experimental settings. Our study demonstrates a strong link between a single functional trait (i.e. body size) in zooplankton and trophic interactions, and urges for a cautionary use of phylogenetic information and taxonomic diversity as substitutes for trait information to predict and understand ecosystem functions. PMID:27075258

  11. [Phylogenetic analysis of bacteria of extreme ecosystems].

    Romanovskaia, V A; Parfenova, V V; Bel'kova, N L; Sukhanova, E V; Gladka, G V; Tashireva, A A

    2014-01-01

    Phylogenetic analysis of aerobic chemoorganotrophic bacteria of the two extreme regions (Dead Sea and West Antarctic) was performed on the basis of the nucleotide sequences of the 16S rRNA gene. Thermotolerant and halotolerant spore-forming bacteria 7t1 and 7t3 of terrestrial ecosystems Dead Sea identified as Bacillus licheniformis and B. subtilis subsp. subtilis, respectively. Taking into account remote location of thermotolerant strain 6t1 from closely related strains in the cluster Staphylococcus, 6t1 strain can be regarded as Staphylococcus sp. In terrestrial ecosystems, Galindez Island (Antarctic) detected taxonomically diverse psychrotolerant bacteria. From ornithogenic soil were isolated Micrococcus luteus O-1 and Microbacterium trichothecenolyticum O-3. Strains 4r5, 5r5 and 40r5, isolated from grass and lichens, can be referred to the genus Frondihabitans. These strains are taxonomically and ecologically isolated and on the tree diagram form the joint cluster with three isolates Frondihabitans sp., isolated from the lichen Austrian Alps, and psychrotolerant associated with plants F. cladoniiphilus CafT13(T). Isolates from black lichen in the different stationary observation points on the south side of a vertical cliff identified as: Rhodococcus fascians 181n3, Sporosarcina aquimarina O-7, Staphylococcus sp. 0-10. From orange biofilm of fouling on top of the vertical cliff isolated Arthrobacter sp. 28r5g1, from the moss-- Serratia sp. 6r1g. According to the results, Frondihabitans strains most frequently encountered among chemoorganotrophic aerobic bacteria in the Antarctic phytocenoses. PMID:25007437

  12. Annals of morphology. Atavisms: phylogenetic Lazarus?

    Zanni, Ginevra; Opitz, John M

    2013-11-01

    Dedication: with highest respect and affection to Prof. Giovanni Neri on the eve of his official administrative retirement as Chair of the Institute of Medical Genetics of the Università Cattolica of Rome for leadership in medical genetics and medical science and friendship for decades. The concept "atavism," reversion, throwback, Rückschlag remains an epistemological challenge in biology; unwise or implausible over-interpretation of a given structure as such has led some to almost total skepticism as to its existence. Originating in botany in the 18th century it became applied to zoology (and humans) with increasing frequency over the last two centuries such that the very concept became widely discredited. Presently, atavisms have acquired a new life and reconsideration given certain reasonable criteria, including: Homology of structure of the postulated atavism to that of ancestral fossils or collateral species with plausible soft tissue reconstructions taking into account relationships of parts, obvious sites of origin and insertion of muscles, vascular channels, etc. Most parsimonious, plausible phylogenetic assumptions. Evident rudimentary or vestigial anatomical state in prior generations or in morphogenesis of a given organism. Developmental instability in prior generations, that is, some closely related species facultatively with or without the trait. Genetic identity or phylogenomic similarity inferred in ancestors and corroborated in more or less closely related species. Fluctuating asymmetry may be the basis for the striking evolutionary diversification and common atavisms in limbs; however, strong selection and developmental constraints would make atavisms in, for example, cardiac or CNS development less likely. Thus, purported atavisms must be examined critically in light of the above criteria. PMID:24166815

  13. Carotenogenesis diversification in phylogenetic lineages of Rhodophyta.

    Takaichi, Shinichi; Yokoyama, Akiko; Mochimaru, Mari; Uchida, Hiroko; Murakami, Akio

    2016-06-01

    Carotenoid composition is very diverse in Rhodophyta. In this study, we investigated whether this variation is related to the phylogeny of this group. Rhodophyta consists of seven classes, and they can be divided into two groups on the basis of their morphology. The unicellular group (Cyanidiophyceae, Porphyridiophyceae, Rhodellophyceae, and Stylonematophyceae) contained only β-carotene and zeaxanthin, "ZEA-type carotenoids." In contrast, within the macrophytic group (Bangiophyceae, Compsopogonophyceae, and Florideophyceae), Compsopogonophyceae contained antheraxanthin in addition to ZEA-type carotenoids, "ANT-type carotenoids," whereas Bangiophyceae contained α-carotene and lutein along with ZEA-type carotenoids, "LUT-type carotenoids." Florideophyceae is divided into five subclasses. Ahnfeltiophycidae, Hildenbrandiophycidae, and Nemaliophycidae contained LUT-type carotenoids. In Corallinophycidae, Hapalidiales and Lithophylloideae in Corallinales contained LUT-type carotenoids, whereas Corallinoideae in Corallinales contained ANT-type carotenoids. In Rhodymeniophycidae, most orders contained LUT-type carotenoids; however, only Gracilariales contained ANT-type carotenoids. There is a clear relationship between carotenoid composition and phylogenetics in Rhodophyta. Furthermore, we searched open genome databases of several red algae for references to the synthetic enzymes of the carotenoid types detected in this study. β-Carotene and zeaxanthin might be synthesized from lycopene, as in land plants. Antheraxanthin might require zeaxanthin epoxydase, whereas α-carotene and lutein might require two additional enzymes, as in land plants. Furthermore, Glaucophyta contained ZEA-type carotenoids, and Cryptophyta contained β-carotene, α-carotene, and alloxanthin, whose acetylenic group might be synthesized from zeaxanthin by an unknown enzyme. Therefore, we conclude that the presence or absence of the four enzymes is related to diversification of carotenoid

  14. Mapping phylogenetic endemism in R using georeferenced branch extents

    Guerin, Greg R.; Lowe, Andrew J.

    2015-12-01

    Applications are needed to map biodiversity from large-scale species occurrence datasets whilst seamlessly integrating with existing functions in R. Phylogenetic endemism (PE) is a biodiversity measure based on range-restricted phylogenetic diversity (PD). Current implementations use area of occupancy (AOO) or frequency to estimate the spatial range of branch-length (i.e. phylogenetic range-rarity), rather than extent of occurrence (EOO; i.e. georeferenced phylogenetic endemism), which is known to produce different range estimates. We present R functions to map PD or PE weighted by AOO or EOO (new georeferenced implementation), taking as inputs georeferenced species occurrences and a phylogeny. Non-parametric statistics distinguish PD/PE from trivial correlates of species richness and sampling intensity.

  15. Markov invariants, plethysms, and phylogenetics (the long version)

    Sumner, J G; Jermiin, L S; Jarvis, P D

    2008-01-01

    We explore model based techniques of phylogenetic tree inference exercising Markov invariants. Markov invariants are group invariant polynomials and are distinct from what is known in the literature as phylogenetic invariants, although we establish a commonality in some special cases. We show that the simplest Markov invariant forms the foundation of the Log-Det distance measure. We take as our primary tool group representation theory, and show that it provides a general framework for analysing Markov processes on trees. From this algebraic perspective, the inherent symmetries of these processes become apparent, and focusing on plethysms, we are able to define Markov invariants and give existence proofs. We give an explicit technique for constructing the invariants, valid for any number of character states and taxa. For phylogenetic trees with three and four leaves, we demonstrate that the corresponding Markov invariants can be fruitfully exploited in applied phylogenetic studies.

  16. Asperisporium and Pantospora (Mycosphaerellaceae): epitypifications and phylogenetic placement

    Minnis, A.M.; Kennedy, A.H.; Grenier, D.B.; Rehner, S.A.; Bischoff, J.F.

    2012-01-01

    The species-rich family Mycosphaerellaceae contains considerable morphological diversity and includes numerous anamorphic genera, many of which are economically important plant pathogens. Recent revisions and phylogenetic research have resulted in taxonomic instability. Ameliorating this problem req

  17. Phylogenetic relationships of Salmonella based on rRNA sequences

    Christensen, H.; Nordentoft, Steen; Olsen, J.E.

    1998-01-01

    To establish the phylogenetic relationships between the subspecies of Salmonella enterica (official name Salmonella choleraesuis), Salmonella bongori and related members of Enterobacteriaceae, sequence comparison of rRNA was performed by maximum-likelihood analysis. The two Salmonella species were...

  18. Phylogenetic constraints in key functional traits behind species' climate niches

    Kellermann, Vanessa; Loeschcke, Volker; Hoffmann, Ary A; Kristensen, Torsten Nygård; Fløjgaard, Camilla; David, Jean R; Svenning, Jens-Christian; Overgaard, Johannes

    2012-01-01

    Species distributions are often constrained by climatic tolerances that are ultimately determined by evolutionary history and/or adaptive capacity, but these factors have rarely been partitioned. Here, we experimentally determined two key climatic niche traits (desiccation and cold resistance) for....... Desiccation and cold resistance were clearly linked to species distributions because significant associations between traits and climatic variables persisted even after controlling for phylogeny. We used different methods to untangle whether phylogenetic signal reflected phylogenetically related species...... adapted to similar environments or alternatively phylogenetic inertia. For desiccation resistance, weak phylogenetic inertia was detected; ancestral trait reconstruction, however, revealed a deep divergence that could be traced back to the genus level. Despite drosophilids’ high evolutionary potential...

  19. Phylogenetic and biological species diversity within the Neurospora tetrasperma complex.

    Menkis, A; Bastiaans, E; Jacobson, D J; Johannesson, H

    2009-09-01

    The objective of this study was to explore the evolutionary history of the morphologically recognized filamentous ascomycete Neurospora tetrasperma, and to reveal the genetic and reproductive relationships among its individuals and populations. We applied both phylogenetic and biological species recognition to a collection of strains representing the geographic and genetic diversity of N. tetrasperma. First, we were able to confirm a monophyletic origin of N. tetrasperma. Furthermore, we found nine phylogenetic species within the morphospecies. When using the traditional broad biological species recognition all investigated strains of N. tetrasperma constituted a single biological species. In contrast, when using a quantitative measurement of the reproductive success, incorporating characters such as viability and fertility of offspring, we found a high congruence between the phylogenetic and biological species recognition. Taken together, phylogenetically and biologically defined groups of individuals exist in N. tetrasperma, and these should be taken into account in future studies of its life history traits. PMID:19682307

  20. Phylogenetic comparative methods complement discriminant function analysis in ecomorphology.

    Barr, W Andrew; Scott, Robert S

    2014-04-01

    In ecomorphology, Discriminant Function Analysis (DFA) has been used as evidence for the presence of functional links between morphometric variables and ecological categories. Here we conduct simulations of characters containing phylogenetic signal to explore the performance of DFA under a variety of conditions. Characters were simulated using a phylogeny of extant antelope species from known habitats. Characters were modeled with no biomechanical relationship to the habitat category; the only sources of variation were body mass, phylogenetic signal, or random "noise." DFA on the discriminability of habitat categories was performed using subsets of the simulated characters, and Phylogenetic Generalized Least Squares (PGLS) was performed for each character. Analyses were repeated with randomized habitat assignments. When simulated characters lacked phylogenetic signal and/or habitat assignments were random, ecomorphology. PMID:24382658

  1. Statistical Phylogenetic Tree Analysis Using Differences of Means

    Arnaoudova, Elissaveta; David C Haws; Huggins, Peter; Jaromczyk, Jerzy W; Moore, Neil; Schardl, Christopher L; Yoshida, Ruriko

    2010-01-01

    We propose a statistical method to test whether two phylogenetic trees with given alignments are significantly incongruent. Our method compares the two distributions of phylogenetic trees given by the input alignments, instead of comparing point estimations of trees. This statistical approach can be applied to gene tree analysis for example, detecting unusual events in genome evolution such as horizontal gene transfer and reshuffling. Our method uses difference of means to compare two distrib...

  2. Statistical phylogenetic tree analysis using differences of means

    Elissaveta Arnaoudova; David C Haws; Peter Huggins; Jerzy Jaromczyk; Niel Moore; Christopher Schardl; Ruriko Yoshida

    2010-01-01

    We propose a statistical method to test whether two phylogenetic trees with given alignments are significantly incongruent. Our method compares the two distributions of phylogenetic trees given by the input alignments, instead of comparing point estimations of trees. This statistical approach can be applied to gene tree analysis for example, detecting unusual events in genome evolution such as horizontal gene transfer and reshuffling. Our method uses difference of means to compare two distri...

  3. Ecological and phylogenetic influences on maxillary dentition in snakes

    Kate Jackson

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The maxillary dentition of snakes was used as a system with which to investigate the relative importance of the interacting forces of ecological selective pressures and phylogenetic constraints indetermining morphology. The maxillary morphology of three groups of snakes having different diets, with each group comprising two distinct lineages — boids and colubroids — was examined. Our results suggest that dietary selective pressures may be more significantthan phylogenetic history in shaping maxillary morphology.

  4. Phylogenetic analysis of porcine parvoviruses from swine samples in China

    Li Dong; Chen Yingli; Xie Baoxia; Bao Huifang; Bai Xingwen; Li Pinghua; Cao Yimei; Fu Yuanfang; Sun Pu; Lu Zengjun; Hao Xiaofang; Liu Zaixin

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Porcine parvovirus (PPV) usually causes reproductive failure in sows. The objective of the present study was to analyze the phylogenetic distribution and perform molecular characterization of PPVs isolated in China, as well as to identify two field strains, LZ and JY. The data used in this study contained the available sequences for NS1 and VP2 from GenBank, as well as the two aforementioned Chinese strains. Results Phylogenetic analysis shows that the PPV sequences are di...

  5. Exploration of phylogenetic data using a global sequence analysis method

    Giron Alain

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Molecular phylogenetic methods are based on alignments of nucleic or peptidic sequences. The tremendous increase in molecular data permits phylogenetic analyses of very long sequences and of many species, but also requires methods to help manage large datasets. Results Here we explore the phylogenetic signal present in molecular data by genomic signatures, defined as the set of frequencies of short oligonucleotides present in DNA sequences. Although violating many of the standard assumptions of traditional phylogenetic analyses – in particular explicit statements of homology inherent in character matrices – the use of the signature does permit the analysis of very long sequences, even those that are unalignable, and is therefore most useful in cases where alignment is questionable. We compare the results obtained by traditional phylogenetic methods to those inferred by the signature method for two genes: RAG1, which is easily alignable, and 18S RNA, where alignments are often ambiguous for some regions. We also apply this method to a multigene data set of 33 genes for 9 bacteria and one archea species as well as to the whole genome of a set of 16 γ-proteobacteria. In addition to delivering phylogenetic results comparable to traditional methods, the comparison of signatures for the sequences involved in the bacterial example identified putative candidates for horizontal gene transfers. Conclusion The signature method is therefore a fast tool for exploring phylogenetic data, providing not only a pretreatment for discovering new sequence relationships, but also for identifying cases of sequence evolution that could confound traditional phylogenetic analysis.

  6. FootPrinter3: phylogenetic footprinting in partially alignable sequences

    Fang, Fei; Blanchette, Mathieu

    2006-01-01

    FootPrinter3 is a web server for predicting transcription factor binding sites by using phylogenetic footprinting. Until now, phylogenetic footprinting approaches have been based either on multiple alignment analysis (e.g. PhyloVista, PhastCons), or on motif-discovery algorithms (e.g. FootPrinter2). FootPrinter3 integrates these two approaches, making use of local multiple sequence alignment blocks when those are available and reliable, but also allowing finding motifs in unalignable regions....

  7. Asperisporium and Pantospora (Mycosphaerellaceae): epitypifications and phylogenetic placement

    Minnis, A.M.; Kennedy, A.H.; Grenier, D.B.; Rehner, S.A.; Bischoff, J.F.

    2012-01-01

    The species-rich family Mycosphaerellaceae contains considerable morphological diversity and includes numerous anamorphic genera, many of which are economically important plant pathogens. Recent revisions and phylogenetic research have resulted in taxonomic instability. Ameliorating this problem requires phylogenetic placement of type species of key genera. We present an examination of the type species of the anamorphic Asperisporium and Pantospora. Cultures isolated from recent port intercep...

  8. Hal: an Automated Pipeline for Phylogenetic Analyses of Genomic Data

    Robbertse, Barbara; Yoder, Ryan J.; Boyd, Alex; Reeves, John; Spatafora, Joseph W.

    2011-01-01

    The rapid increase in genomic and genome-scale data is resulting in unprecedented levels of discrete sequence data available for phylogenetic analyses. Major analytical impasses exist, however, prior to analyzing these data with existing phylogenetic software. Obstacles include the management of large data sets without standardized naming conventions, identification and filtering of orthologous clusters of proteins or genes, and the assembly of alignments of orthologous sequence data into ind...

  9. Phylogenetic analysis and development of probes for differentiating methylotrophic bacteria.

    Brusseau, G A; Bulygina, E S; Hanson, R S

    1994-01-01

    Fifteen small-subunit rRNAs from methylotrophic bacteria have been sequenced. Comparisons of these sequences with 22 previously published sequences further defined the phylogenetic relationships among these bacteria and illustrated the agreement between phylogeny and physiological characteristics of the bacteria. Phylogenetic trees were constructed with 16S rRNA sequences from methylotrophic bacteria and representative organisms from subdivisions within the class Proteobacteria on the basis o...

  10. Phylogenetic trees and the tropical geometry of flag varieties

    Manon, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    International audience We will discuss some recent theorems relating the space of weighted phylogenetic trees to the tropical varieties of each flag variety of type A. We will also discuss the tropicalizations of the functions corresponding to semi-standard tableaux, in particular we relate them to familiar functions from phylogenetics. We close with some remarks on the generalization of these results to the tropical geometry of arbitrary flag varieties. This involves the family of Bergman...