WorldWideScience

Sample records for accurate mass measurements

  1. On uplimit of accurate measurement of tau mass

    Mo, X H

    2016-01-01

    Tau lepton as one of three elementary leptons in nature, the measurement of its mass has ever been performed since its discovery. The present relative accuracy is already at the level of better than 10 to minus 4 and more effects are still made in order to increase the accuracy further. However, the analysis of available techniques for and expectable luminosity from e+e- collider indicates that the precision uplimit of tau mass is almost reached, which means that brand new approaches should be looked for if the great improvement is yearned for.

  2. Accurate on-line mass flow measurements in supercritical fluid chromatography.

    Tarafder, Abhijit; Vajda, Péter; Guiochon, Georges

    2013-12-13

    This work demonstrates the possible advantages and the challenges of accurate on-line measurements of the CO2 mass flow rate during supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC) operations. Only the mass flow rate is constant along the column in SFC. The volume flow rate is not. The critical importance of accurate measurements of mass flow rates for the achievement of reproducible data and the serious difficulties encountered in supercritical fluid chromatography for its assessment were discussed earlier based on the physical properties of carbon dioxide. In this report, we experimentally demonstrate the problems encountered when performing mass flow rate measurements and the gain that can possibly be achieved by acquiring reproducible data using a Coriolis flow meter. The results obtained show how the use of a highly accurate mass flow meter permits, besides the determination of accurate values of the mass flow rate, a systematic, constant diagnosis of the correct operation of the instrument and the monitoring of the condition of the carbon dioxide pump. PMID:24210558

  3. Analysis of plant galactolipids by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry with accurate mass measurement

    Zábranská, Marie; Vrkoslav, Vladimír; Sobotníková, J.; Cvačka, Josef

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 165, č. 5 (2012), s. 601-607. ISSN 0009-3084 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/09/0139 Grant ostatní: GA UK(CZ) SVV 2012-265201 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : accurate mass measurement * DGDG * equivalent carbon number * MGDG * RP-HPLC/MS Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 2.147, year: 2012

  4. Induced Dual-Nanospray: A Novel Internal Calibration Method for Convenient and Accurate Mass Measurement

    Li, Yafeng; Zhang, Ning; Zhou, Yueming; Wang, Jianing; Zhang, Yiming; Wang, Jiyun; Xiong, Caiqiao; Chen, Suming; Nie, Zongxiu

    2013-09-01

    Accurate mass information is of great importance in the determination of unknown compounds. An effective and easy-to-control internal mass calibration method will dramatically benefit accurate mass measurement. Here we reported a simple induced dual-nanospray internal calibration device which has the following three advantages: (1) the two sprayers are in the same alternating current field; thus both reference ions and sample ions can be simultaneously generated and recorded. (2) It is very simple and can be easily assembled. Just two metal tubes, two nanosprayers, and an alternating current power supply are included. (3) With the low-flow-rate character and the versatility of nanoESI, this calibration method is capable of calibrating various samples, even untreated complex samples such as urine and other biological samples with small sample volumes. The calibration errors are around 1 ppm in positive ion mode and 3 ppm in negative ion mode with good repeatability. This new internal calibration method opens up new possibilities in the determination of unknown compounds, and it has great potential for the broad applications in biological and chemical analysis.

  5. Accurate mass measurements of short-lived isotopes with the MISTRAL rf spectrometer

    Toader, C F; Borcea, C; Doubre, H; Duma, M; Jacotin, M; Henry, S; Képinski, J F; Lebée, G; Le Scornet, G; Lunney, M D; Monsanglant, C; De Saint-Simon, M; Thibault, C

    1999-01-01

    The MISTRAL experiment has measured its first masses at ISOLDE. Installed in May 1997, this radiofrequency transmission spectrometer is to concentrate on nuclides with particularly short half-lives. MISTRAL received its first stable beam in October and first radioactive beam in November 1997. These first tests, with a plasma ion source, resulted in excellent isobaric separation and reasonable transmission. Further testing and development enabled first data taking in July 1998 on neutron-rich Na isotopes having half-lives as short as 31 ms.

  6. A Facility for Accurate Heat Load and Mass Leak Measurements on Superfluid Helium Valves

    Bézaguet, Alain-Arthur; Ferlin, G; Losserand-Madoux, R; Perin, A; Vandoni, Giovanna; Van Weelderen, R

    1999-01-01

    The superconducting magnets of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will be protected by safety relief valves operating at 1.9 K in superfluid helium (HeII). A test facility was developed to precisely determine the heat load and the mass leakage of cryogenic valves with HeII at their inlet. The temperature of the valve inlet can be varied from 1.8 K to 2 K for pressures up to 3.5 bar. The valve outlet pipe temperature can be regulated between 5 K and 20 K. The heat flow is measured with high precision using a Kapitza-resistance heatmeter and is also crosschecked by a vaporization measurement. After calibration, a precision of 10 mW for heat flows up to 1.1 W has been achieved. The helium leak can be measured up to 15 mg/s with an accuracy of 0.2 mg/s. We present a detailed description of the test facility and the measurements showing its performances.

  7. ICP-MS and ESI orbitrap MS/MS for plant elemental speciation. The need for accurate mass measurements

    Complete text of publication follows. Metallomics approaches based on the combined use of elemental and molecular mass spectrometry have been developed to gain a better understanding of the factors involved in the uptake and distribution of selenium (Se) and arsenic (As) in a well-known hyperaccumulator, Arabidopsis thaliana. Plants, individually and simultaneously supplemented with As and Se (1, 3, 5 μg g-1), were grown hydroponically for 7 weeks in a controlled environment. The effect of the presence of Se on the As uptake by the plant leaves was investigated here for the first time; Se in the growing media was found not to affect As concentrations of the leaves in comparison with individual exposure to As. The use of 1% formic acid (1 deg C, 1 h), compared with buffer extraction (2, 5, 12 h) by sonication, was found to be the choice as a compromise between extraction efficiency and preservation of the compound entity. Using size-exclusion HPLC-ICP-MS, the coelution of the main As peak (70% of the total chromatogram area) with sulphur was observed, suggesting the presence of biomolecules containing S and As in the leaves. A deeper insight into the As species distribution in the leaves was achieved using reversed phase HPLC in combination with ICP-MS and ESI Orbitrap MS/MS. The need for accurate mass measurements (using ESI Orbitrap MS/MS) to minimize ambiguity in species identification will be demonstrated.

  8. Critical evaluation of screening techniques for emerging environmental contaminants based on accurate mass measurements with time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    Nurmi, Joonas; Pellinen, Jukka; Rantalainen, Anna-Lea

    2012-03-01

    Emerging contaminants from wastewater effluent samples were analysed, using posttarget and nontarget analysis techniques. The samples were analysed with an ultra performance liquid chromatograph-time-of-flight mass spectrometer (UPLC-TOF-MS), and the resulting data were processed with commercial deconvolution software. The method works well for posttarget analysis with prior information about the retention times of the compounds of interest. With positive polarity, 63 of 66 compounds and with negative polarity, 18 of 20 compounds were correctly identified in a spiked sample, while two compounds of a total of 88 fell out of the mass range. Furthermore, a four-stage process for identification was developed for the posttarget analysis lacking the retention time data. In the process, the number of candidate compounds was reduced by using the accurate mass of selected compounds in two steps (stages 1 and 2), structure-property relationships (stage 3) and isotope patterns of the analytes (stage 4). The process developed was validated by analysing wastewater samples spiked with 88 compounds. This procedure can be used to gain a preliminary indication of the presence of certain analytes in the samples. Nontarget analysis was tested by applying a theoretical mass spectra library for a wastewater sample spiked with six pharmaceuticals. The results showed a high number of false identifications. In addition, manual processing of the data was considered laborious and ineffective. Finally, the posttarget analysis was applied to a real wastewater sample. The analysis revealed the presence of six compounds that were afterwards confirmed with standard compounds as being correct. Three psycholeptics (nordiazepam, oxazepam and temazepam) could be tentatively identified, using the identification process developed. Posttarget analysis with UPLC-TOF-MS proved to be a promising method for analysing wastewater samples, while we concluded that the software for nontarget analysis will need

  9. Accurate thickness measurement of graphene

    Shearer, Cameron J.; Slattery, Ashley D.; Stapleton, Andrew J.; Shapter, Joseph G.; Gibson, Christopher T.

    2016-03-01

    Graphene has emerged as a material with a vast variety of applications. The electronic, optical and mechanical properties of graphene are strongly influenced by the number of layers present in a sample. As a result, the dimensional characterization of graphene films is crucial, especially with the continued development of new synthesis methods and applications. A number of techniques exist to determine the thickness of graphene films including optical contrast, Raman scattering and scanning probe microscopy techniques. Atomic force microscopy (AFM), in particular, is used extensively since it provides three-dimensional images that enable the measurement of the lateral dimensions of graphene films as well as the thickness, and by extension the number of layers present. However, in the literature AFM has proven to be inaccurate with a wide range of measured values for single layer graphene thickness reported (between 0.4 and 1.7 nm). This discrepancy has been attributed to tip-surface interactions, image feedback settings and surface chemistry. In this work, we use standard and carbon nanotube modified AFM probes and a relatively new AFM imaging mode known as PeakForce tapping mode to establish a protocol that will allow users to accurately determine the thickness of graphene films. In particular, the error in measuring the first layer is reduced from 0.1-1.3 nm to 0.1-0.3 nm. Furthermore, in the process we establish that the graphene-substrate adsorbate layer and imaging force, in particular the pressure the tip exerts on the surface, are crucial components in the accurate measurement of graphene using AFM. These findings can be applied to other 2D materials.

  10. CLASH-VLT: CONSTRAINTS ON THE DARK MATTER EQUATION OF STATE FROM ACCURATE MEASUREMENTS OF GALAXY CLUSTER MASS PROFILES

    Sartoris, Barbara; Borgani, Stefano; Girardi, Marisa [Dipartimento di Fisica, Sezione di Astronomia, Università di Trieste, Via Tiepolo 11, I-34143 Trieste (Italy); Biviano, Andrea; Balestra, Italo; Nonino, Mario [INAF/Osservatorio Astronomico di Trieste, Via Tiepolo 11, I-34143 Trieste (Italy); Rosati, Piero [Dipartimento di Fisica e Scienze della Terra, Universita' di Ferrara, Via Saragat 1, I-44122 Ferrara (Italy); Umetsu, Keiichi; Czakon, Nicole [Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Academia Sinica, P.O. Box 23-141, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Bartelmann, Matthias [Zentrum für Astronomie der Universität Heidelberg, ITA, Albert-Ueberle-Str. 2, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Grillo, Claudio [Dark Cosmology Centre, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Juliane Maries Vej 30, DK-2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Lemze, Doron; Medezinski, Elinor [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The Johns Hopkins University, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Zitrin, Adi [Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, MS 249-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Mercurio, Amata [INAF/Osservatorio Astronomico di Capodimonte, Via Moiariello 16, I-80131 Napoli (Italy); Postman, Marc; Bradley, Larry; Coe, Dan [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Broadhurst, Tom [Department of Theoretical Physics, University of the Basque Country, P.O. Box 644, E-48080 Bilbao (Spain); Melchior, Peter, E-mail: sartoris@oats.inaf.it [Department of Physics, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); and others

    2014-03-01

    A pressureless scenario for the dark matter (DM) fluid is a widely adopted hypothesis, despite the absence of direct observational evidence. According to general relativity, the total mass-energy content of a system shapes the gravitational potential well, but different test particles perceive this potential in different ways depending on their properties. Cluster galaxy velocities, being <mass. We exploit this phenomenon to constrain the equation of state (EoS) parameter of the fluid, primarily DM, contained in galaxy clusters. We use complementary information provided by the kinematic and lensing mass profiles of the galaxy cluster MACS 1206.2–0847 at z = 0.44, as obtained in an extensive imaging and spectroscopic campaign within the Cluster Lensing And Supernova survey with Hubble. The unprecedented high quality of our data set and the properties of this cluster are well suited to determine the EoS parameter of the cluster fluid. Since baryons contribute at most 15% to the total mass in clusters and their pressure is negligible, the EoS parameter we derive describes the behavior of the DM fluid. We obtain the most stringent constraint on the DM EoS parameter to date, w = (p{sub r} + 2 p{sub t} )/(3 c {sup 2}ρ) = 0.00 ± 0.15 (stat) ± 0.08 (syst), averaged over the radial range 0.5 Mpc ≤ r ≤ r {sub 200}, where p{sub r} and p{sub t} are the radial and tangential pressure, and ρ is the density. We plan to further improve our constraint by applying the same procedure to all clusters from the ongoing Cluster Lensing And Supernova Survey with Hubble-Very Large Telescope program.

  11. 38 CFR 4.46 - Accurate measurement.

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Accurate measurement. 4... RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.46 Accurate measurement. Accurate measurement of the length of stumps, excursion of joints, dimensions and location of scars with respect...

  12. Tandem Mass Spectrometry Measurement of the Collision Products of Carbamate Anions Derived from CO2 Capture Sorbents: Paving the Way for Accurate Quantitation

    Jackson, Phil; Fisher, Keith J.; Attalla, Moetaz Ibrahim

    2011-08-01

    The reaction between CO2 and aqueous amines to produce a charged carbamate product plays a crucial role in post-combustion capture chemistry when primary and secondary amines are used. In this paper, we report the low energy negative-ion CID results for several anionic carbamates derived from primary and secondary amines commonly used as post-combustion capture solvents. The study was performed using the modern equivalent of a triple quadrupole instrument equipped with a T-wave collision cell. Deuterium labeling of 2-aminoethanol (1,1,2,2,-d4-2-aminoethanol) and computations at the M06-2X/6-311++G(d,p) level were used to confirm the identity of the fragmentation products for 2-hydroxyethylcarbamate (derived from 2-aminoethanol), in particular the ions CN-, NCO- and facile neutral losses of CO2 and water; there is precedent for the latter in condensed phase isocyanate chemistry. The fragmentations of 2-hydroxyethylcarbamate were generalized for carbamate anions derived from other capture amines, including ethylenediamine, diethanolamine, and piperazine. We also report unequivocal evidence for the existence of carbamate anions derived from sterically hindered amines ( Tris(2-hydroxymethyl)aminomethane and 2-methyl-2-aminopropanol). For the suite of carbamates investigated, diagnostic losses include the decarboxylation product (-CO2, 44 mass units), loss of 46 mass units and the fragments NCO- ( m/z 42) and CN- ( m/z 26). We also report low energy CID results for the dicarbamate dianion (-O2CNHC2H4NHCO{2/-}) commonly encountered in CO2 capture solution utilizing ethylenediamine. Finally, we demonstrate a promising ion chromatography-MS based procedure for the separation and quantitation of aqueous anionic carbamates, which is based on the reported CID findings. The availability of accurate quantitation methods for ionic CO2 capture products could lead to dynamic operational tuning of CO2 capture-plants and, thus, cost-savings via real-time manipulation of solvent

  13. Accurate, reproducible measurement of blood pressure.

    Campbell, N. R.; Chockalingam, A; Fodor, J. G.; McKay, D. W.

    1990-01-01

    The diagnosis of mild hypertension and the treatment of hypertension require accurate measurement of blood pressure. Blood pressure readings are altered by various factors that influence the patient, the techniques used and the accuracy of the sphygmomanometer. The variability of readings can be reduced if informed patients prepare in advance by emptying their bladder and bowel, by avoiding over-the-counter vasoactive drugs the day of measurement and by avoiding exposure to cold, caffeine con...

  14. Accurate shear measurement with faint sources

    Zhang, Jun; Foucaud, Sebastien [Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 955 Jianchuan road, Shanghai, 200240 (China); Luo, Wentao, E-mail: betajzhang@sjtu.edu.cn, E-mail: walt@shao.ac.cn, E-mail: foucaud@sjtu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for Research in Galaxies and Cosmology, Shanghai Astronomical Observatory, Nandan Road 80, Shanghai, 200030 (China)

    2015-01-01

    For cosmic shear to become an accurate cosmological probe, systematic errors in the shear measurement method must be unambiguously identified and corrected for. Previous work of this series has demonstrated that cosmic shears can be measured accurately in Fourier space in the presence of background noise and finite pixel size, without assumptions on the morphologies of galaxy and PSF. The remaining major source of error is source Poisson noise, due to the finiteness of source photon number. This problem is particularly important for faint galaxies in space-based weak lensing measurements, and for ground-based images of short exposure times. In this work, we propose a simple and rigorous way of removing the shear bias from the source Poisson noise. Our noise treatment can be generalized for images made of multiple exposures through MultiDrizzle. This is demonstrated with the SDSS and COSMOS/ACS data. With a large ensemble of mock galaxy images of unrestricted morphologies, we show that our shear measurement method can achieve sub-percent level accuracy even for images of signal-to-noise ratio less than 5 in general, making it the most promising technique for cosmic shear measurement in the ongoing and upcoming large scale galaxy surveys.

  15. Precision mass measurements

    Gläser, M.; Borys, M.

    2009-12-01

    Mass as a physical quantity and its measurement are described. After some historical remarks, a short summary of the concept of mass in classical and modern physics is given. Principles and methods of mass measurements, for example as energy measurement or as measurement of weight forces and forces caused by acceleration, are discussed. Precision mass measurement by comparing mass standards using balances is described in detail. Measurement of atomic masses related to 12C is briefly reviewed as well as experiments and recent discussions for a future new definition of the kilogram, the SI unit of mass.

  16. Accurate mass error correction in liquid chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry based metabolomics

    Mihaleva, V.V.; Vorst, O.F.J.; Maliepaard, C.A.; Verhoeven, H.A.; Vos, de C.H.; Hall, R.D.; Ham, van R.C.H.J.

    2008-01-01

    Compound identification and annotation in (untargeted) metabolomics experiments based on accurate mass require the highest possible accuracy of the mass determination. Experimental LC/TOF-MS platforms equipped with a time-to-digital converter (TDC) give the best mass estimate for those mass signals

  17. Mining tandem mass spectral data to develop a more accurate mass error model for peptide identification.

    Fu, Yan; Gao, Wen; He, Simin; Sun, Ruixiang; Zhou, Hu; Zeng, Rong

    2007-01-01

    The assumption on the mass error distribution of fragment ions plays a crucial role in peptide identification by tandem mass spectra. Previous mass error models are the simplistic uniform or normal distribution with empirically set parameter values. In this paper, we propose a more accurate mass error model, namely conditional normal model, and an iterative parameter learning algorithm. The new model is based on two important observations on the mass error distribution, i.e. the linearity between the mean of mass error and the ion mass, and the log-log linearity between the standard deviation of mass error and the peak intensity. To our knowledge, the latter quantitative relationship has never been reported before. Experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach in accurately quantifying the mass error distribution and the ability of the new model to improve the accuracy of peptide identification. PMID:17990507

  18. Accurate, Empirical Radii and Masses of Planets with Gaia Parallaxes

    Stassun, Keivan G; Gaudi, B Scott

    2016-01-01

    We present new, empirical measurements of the radii of 132 stars that host transiting planets. These stellar radii are determined using only direct observables---the bolometric flux at Earth, the stellar effective temperature, and the parallax newly provided by the Gaia first data release---and thus are virtually model independent, extinction being the only free parameter. We also determine each star's mass using our newly determined radius and the stellar density, itself a virtually model independent quantity from the previously published transit analysis. The newly determined stellar radii and masses are in turn used to re-determine the transiting planet radii and masses, once again using only direct observables. The uncertainties on the stellar radii and masses are typically 7% and 25%, respectively, and the resulting uncertainties on the planet radii and masses are 8% and 20%, respectively. These accuracies are generally larger than the previously published model-dependent precisions of 5% and 6% on the p...

  19. Mass Customization Measurements Metrics

    Nielsen, Kjeld; Brunø, Thomas Ditlev; Jørgensen, Kaj Asbjørn;

    2014-01-01

    A recent survey has indicated that 17 % of companies have ceased mass customizing less than 1 year after initiating the effort. This paper presents measurement for a company’s mass customization performance, utilizing metrics within the three fundamental capabilities: robust process design, choice...... navigation, and solution space development. A mass customizer when assessing performance with these metrics can identify within which areas improvement would increase competitiveness the most and enable more efficient transition to mass customization....

  20. How accurate are your reported emissions measurements?

    Macak J.J. III [Mostardi Platt Environmental (United States)

    2006-09-15

    Complying with permitted emissions limits may be the most significant operations risk for a power plant. As limits are slowly ratcheted downward, understanding the accuracy and variation of measured pollutant levels becomes even more important. To avoid misunderstandings, regulators and plant owners should factor measurement uncertainty into air quality permit numbers both as the permit is formulated and preceding any subsequent modifications. 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Accurate measurement of oxygen consumption in children undergoing cardiac catheterization.

    Li, Jia

    2013-01-01

    Oxygen consumption (VO(2) ) is an important part of hemodynamics using the direct Fick principle in children undergoing cardiac catheterization. Accurate measurement of VO(2) is vital. Obviously, any error in the measurement of VO(2) will translate directly into an equivalent percentage under- or overestimation of blood flows and vascular resistances. It remains common practice to estimate VO(2) values from published predictive equations. Among these, the LaFarge equation is the most commonly used equation and gives the closest estimation with the least bias and limits of agreement. However, considerable errors are introduced by the LaFarge equation, particularly in children younger than 3 years of age. Respiratory mass spectrometry remains the "state-of-the-art" method, allowing highly sensitive, rapid and simultaneous measurement of multiple gas fractions. The AMIS 2000 quadrupole respiratory mass spectrometer system has been adapted to measure VO(2) in children under mechanical ventilation with pediatric ventilators during cardiac catheterization. The small sampling rate, fast response time and long tubes make the equipment a unique and powerful tool for bedside continuous measurement of VO(2) in cardiac catheterization for both clinical and research purposes. PMID:22488802

  2. Absolute neutrino mass measurements

    Wolf, Joachim

    2011-10-01

    The neutrino mass plays an important role in particle physics, astrophysics and cosmology. In recent years the detection of neutrino flavour oscillations proved that neutrinos carry mass. However, oscillation experiments are only sensitive to the mass-squared difference of the mass eigenvalues. In contrast to cosmological observations and neutrino-less double beta decay (0v2β) searches, single β-decay experiments provide a direct, model-independent way to determine the absolute neutrino mass by measuring the energy spectrum of decay electrons at the endpoint region with high accuracy. Currently the best kinematic upper limits on the neutrino mass of 2.2eV have been set by two experiments in Mainz and Troitsk, using tritium as beta emitter. The next generation tritium β-experiment KATRIN is currently under construction in Karlsruhe/Germany by an international collaboration. KATRIN intends to improve the sensitivity by one order of magnitude to 0.2eV. The investigation of a second isotope (137Rh) is being pursued by the international MARE collaboration using micro-calorimeters to measure the beta spectrum. The technology needed to reach 0.2eV sensitivity is still in the R&D phase. This paper reviews the present status of neutrino-mass measurements with cosmological data, 0v2β decay and single β-decay.

  3. Organ mass measurements

    The term, anatomical measurements, in the context of this Co-ordinated Research Programme refers to measurements of masses of internal organs, although the human body is composed of internal organs and tissues such as skeleton, muscle, skin and adipose. The mass of an organ containing a radionuclide (source organ), and the mass of a target organ which absorbs energy of the radiation, are essential parameters in the ICRP dosimetric model derived from the MIRD method. Twelve specific organs of interest were proposed at the Coordinated Research Programme Project Formulation Meeting (PFM) in 1988. A slightly different set of thirteen organs with potential significance for radiation protection were selected for study at the Research Co-ordination Meeting held at the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre in 1991. The dimensions of the organs could also be useful information, but were considered unimportant for internal dose assessment. Due to the strong concern about the unified method for collecting organ mass data at the PFM, a guide-line was established stressing the need for organ data from subjects that were healthy and normal, at least until shortly before death, or from sudden death cases, following the Japanese experience. In this report, masses of nine to thirteen organs are presented from seven participating countries. Three participants have also reported the organ masses as fractions of the total body mass

  4. Accurately bearing measurement in non-cooperative passive location system

    The system of non-cooperative passive location based on array is proposed. In the system, target is detected by beamforming and Doppler matched filtering; and bearing is measured by a long-base-ling interferometer which is composed of long distance sub-arrays. For the interferometer with long-base-line, the bearing is measured accurately but ambiguously. To realize unambiguous accurately bearing measurement, beam width and multiple constraint adoptive beamforming technique is used to resolve azimuth ambiguous. Theory and simulation result shows this method is effective to realize accurately bearing measurement in no-cooperate passive location system. (authors)

  5. Accurate measurement of liquid transport through nanoscale conduits.

    Alibakhshi, Mohammad Amin; Xie, Quan; Li, Yinxiao; Duan, Chuanhua

    2016-01-01

    Nanoscale liquid transport governs the behaviour of a wide range of nanofluidic systems, yet remains poorly characterized and understood due to the enormous hydraulic resistance associated with the nanoconfinement and the resulting minuscule flow rates in such systems. To overcome this problem, here we present a new measurement technique based on capillary flow and a novel hybrid nanochannel design and use it to measure water transport through single 2-D hydrophilic silica nanochannels with heights down to 7 nm. Our results show that silica nanochannels exhibit increased mass flow resistance compared to the classical hydrodynamics prediction. This difference increases with decreasing channel height and reaches 45% in the case of 7 nm nanochannels. This resistance increase is attributed to the formation of a 7-angstrom-thick stagnant hydration layer on the hydrophilic surfaces. By avoiding use of any pressure and flow sensors or any theoretical estimations the hybrid nanochannel scheme enables facile and precise flow measurement through single nanochannels, nanotubes, or nanoporous media and opens the prospect for accurate characterization of both hydrophilic and hydrophobic nanofluidic systems. PMID:27112404

  6. Accurate measurement of liquid transport through nanoscale conduits

    Alibakhshi, Mohammad Amin; Xie, Quan; Li, Yinxiao; Duan, Chuanhua

    2016-04-01

    Nanoscale liquid transport governs the behaviour of a wide range of nanofluidic systems, yet remains poorly characterized and understood due to the enormous hydraulic resistance associated with the nanoconfinement and the resulting minuscule flow rates in such systems. To overcome this problem, here we present a new measurement technique based on capillary flow and a novel hybrid nanochannel design and use it to measure water transport through single 2-D hydrophilic silica nanochannels with heights down to 7 nm. Our results show that silica nanochannels exhibit increased mass flow resistance compared to the classical hydrodynamics prediction. This difference increases with decreasing channel height and reaches 45% in the case of 7 nm nanochannels. This resistance increase is attributed to the formation of a 7-angstrom-thick stagnant hydration layer on the hydrophilic surfaces. By avoiding use of any pressure and flow sensors or any theoretical estimations the hybrid nanochannel scheme enables facile and precise flow measurement through single nanochannels, nanotubes, or nanoporous media and opens the prospect for accurate characterization of both hydrophilic and hydrophobic nanofluidic systems.

  7. Accurate wall thickness measurement using autointerference of circumferential Lamb wave

    In this paper, a method of accurately measuring the pipe wall thickness by using noncontact air-coupled ultrasonic transducer (NAUT) was presented. In this method, accurate measurement of angular wave number (AWN) is a key technique because the AWN is changes minutely with the wall thickness. An autointerference of the circumferential (C-) Lamb wave was used for accurate measurements of the AWN. Principle of the method was first explained. Modified method for measuring the wall thickness near a butt weld line was also proposed and its accuracy was evaluated within 6 μm error. It was also shown in the paper that wall thickness measurement was accurately carried out beyond the difference among the sensors by calibrating the frequency response of the sensors. (author)

  8. The Use of Accurate Mass Tags for High-Throughput Microbial Proteomics

    We describe and demonstrate a global strategy that extends the sensitivity, dynamic range, comprehensiveness, and throughput of proteomic measurements based upon the use of peptide accurate mass tags (AMTs) produced by global protein enzymatic digestion. The two-stage strategy exploits Fourier transform-ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometry to validate peptide AMTs for a specific organism, tissue or cell type from potential mass tags identified using conventional tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) methods, providing greater confidence in identifications as well as the basis for subsequent measurements without the need for MS/MS, and thus with greater sensitivity and increased throughput. A single high resolution capillary liquid chromatography separation combined with high sensitivity, high resolution and ac-curate FT-ICR measurements has been shown capable of characterizing peptide mixtures of significantly more than 10 5 components with mass accuracies of -1 ppm, sufficient for broad protein identification using AMTs. Other attractions of the approach include the broad and relatively unbiased proteome coverage, the capability for exploiting stable isotope labeling methods to realize high precision for relative protein abundance measurements, and the projected potential for study of mammalian proteomes when combined with additional sample fractionation. Using this strategy, in our first application we have been able to identify AMTs for 60% of the potentially expressed proteins in the organism Deinococcus radiodurans

  9. Accurate, reliable control of process gases by mass flow controllers

    Hardy, J.; McKnight, T.

    1997-02-01

    The thermal mass flow controller, or MFC, has become an instrument of choice for the monitoring and controlling of process gas flow throughout the materials processing industry. These MFCs are used on CVD processes, etching tools, and furnaces and, within the semiconductor industry, are used on 70% of the processing tools. Reliability and accuracy are major concerns for the users of the MFCs. Calibration and characterization technologies for the development and implementation of mass flow devices are described. A test facility is available to industry and universities to test and develop gas floe sensors and controllers and evaluate their performance related to environmental effects, reliability, reproducibility, and accuracy. Additional work has been conducted in the area of accuracy. A gravimetric calibrator was invented that allows flow sensors to be calibrated in corrosive, reactive gases to an accuracy of 0.3% of reading, at least an order of magnitude better than previously possible. Although MFCs are typically specified with accuracies of 1% of full scale, MFCs may often be implemented with unwarranted confidence due to the conventional use of surrogate gas factors. Surrogate gas factors are corrections applied to process flow indications when an MFC has been calibrated on a laboratory-safe surrogate gas, but is actually used on a toxic, or corrosive process gas. Previous studies have indicated that the use of these factors may cause process flow errors of typically 10%, but possibly as great as 40% of full scale. This paper will present possible sources of error in MFC process gas flow monitoring and control, and will present an overview of corrective measures which may be implemented with MFC use to significantly reduce these sources of error.

  10. Handbook of mass measurement

    Jones, Frank E

    2002-01-01

    "How much does it weigh?" seems a simple question. To scientists and engineers, however, the answer is far from simple, and determining the answer demands consideration of an almost overwhelming number of factors.With an intriguing blend of history, fundamentals, and technical details, the Handbook of Mass Measurement sets forth the details of achieving the highest precision in mass measurements. It covers the whole field, from the development, calibration, and maintenance of mass standards to detailed accounts of weighing designs, balances, and uncertainty. It addresses the entire measurement process and provides in-depth examinations of the various factors that introduce error.Much of the material is the authors'' own work and some of it is published here for the first time. Jones and Schoonover are both highly regarded veterans of the U.S. National Institute of Standards and Technology. With this handbook, they have provided a service and resource vital to anyone involved not only in the determination of m...

  11. Accurate Mass Determinations in Decay Chains with Missing Energy

    Cheng, Hsin-Chia; Engelhardt, Dalit; Gunion, John F.; Han, Zhenyu; McElrath, Bob

    2008-01-01

    Many beyond the Standard Model theories include a stable dark matter candidate that yields missing / invisible energy in collider detectors. If observed at the Large Hadron Collider, we must determine if its mass and other properties (and those of its partners) predict the correct dark matter relic density. We give a new procedure for determining its mass with small error.

  12. Direct Neutrino Mass measurements

    Neutrino oscillation experiments have shown that neutrino are massive particles, but they are not able to determine the absolute neutrino mass scale. The experiments dedicated to effective electron-neutrino mass determination are the ones based on kinematic analyses of electrons emitted in single β-decay as 3H and 187Re. Nowadays the electrostatic spectrometers and microcalorimeters, two complementary techniques, are the most sensitive detection principles. Two experiments, KATRIN and MARE, are currently being prepared to explore neutrino masses down to 0.2 eV. The KATRIN experiment, which combines an ultra-luminous windowless gaseous tritium source with a high resolution electrostatic spectrometer, will provide high precision in β-studies never achieved before. The MARE project aims at the direct and calorimetric measurement of the electron neutrino mass with sub-eV sensitivity. Although the baseline of the MARE project consists in a large array of rhenium based thermal detectors, a different option for the isotope is also being considered. This contribution gives an outlook for both experiments.

  13. History and progress on accurate measurements of the Planck constant.

    Steiner, Richard

    2013-01-01

    The measurement of the Planck constant, h, is entering a new phase. The CODATA 2010 recommended value is 6.626 069 57 × 10(-34) J s, but it has been a long road, and the trip is not over yet. Since its discovery as a fundamental physical constant to explain various effects in quantum theory, h has become especially important in defining standards for electrical measurements and soon, for mass determination. Measuring h in the International System of Units (SI) started as experimental attempts merely to prove its existence. Many decades passed while newer experiments measured physical effects that were the influence of h combined with other physical constants: elementary charge, e, and the Avogadro constant, N(A). As experimental techniques improved, the precision of the value of h expanded. When the Josephson and quantum Hall theories led to new electronic devices, and a hundred year old experiment, the absolute ampere, was altered into a watt balance, h not only became vital in definitions for the volt and ohm units, but suddenly it could be measured directly and even more accurately. Finally, as measurement uncertainties now approach a few parts in 10(8) from the watt balance experiments and Avogadro determinations, its importance has been linked to a proposed redefinition of a kilogram unit of mass. The path to higher accuracy in measuring the value of h was not always an example of continuous progress. Since new measurements periodically led to changes in its accepted value and the corresponding SI units, it is helpful to see why there were bumps in the road and where the different branch lines of research joined in the effort. Recalling the bumps along this road will hopefully avoid their repetition in the upcoming SI redefinition debates. This paper begins with a brief history of the methods to measure a combination of fundamental constants, thus indirectly obtaining the Planck constant. The historical path is followed in the section describing how the

  14. History and progress on accurate measurements of the Planck constant

    Steiner, Richard

    2013-01-01

    The measurement of the Planck constant, h, is entering a new phase. The CODATA 2010 recommended value is 6.626 069 57 × 10-34 J s, but it has been a long road, and the trip is not over yet. Since its discovery as a fundamental physical constant to explain various effects in quantum theory, h has become especially important in defining standards for electrical measurements and soon, for mass determination. Measuring h in the International System of Units (SI) started as experimental attempts merely to prove its existence. Many decades passed while newer experiments measured physical effects that were the influence of h combined with other physical constants: elementary charge, e, and the Avogadro constant, NA. As experimental techniques improved, the precision of the value of h expanded. When the Josephson and quantum Hall theories led to new electronic devices, and a hundred year old experiment, the absolute ampere, was altered into a watt balance, h not only became vital in definitions for the volt and ohm units, but suddenly it could be measured directly and even more accurately. Finally, as measurement uncertainties now approach a few parts in 108 from the watt balance experiments and Avogadro determinations, its importance has been linked to a proposed redefinition of a kilogram unit of mass. The path to higher accuracy in measuring the value of h was not always an example of continuous progress. Since new measurements periodically led to changes in its accepted value and the corresponding SI units, it is helpful to see why there were bumps in the road and where the different branch lines of research joined in the effort. Recalling the bumps along this road will hopefully avoid their repetition in the upcoming SI redefinition debates. This paper begins with a brief history of the methods to measure a combination of fundamental constants, thus indirectly obtaining the Planck constant. The historical path is followed in the section describing how the improved

  15. History and progress on accurate measurements of the Planck constant

    The measurement of the Planck constant, h, is entering a new phase. The CODATA 2010 recommended value is 6.626 069 57 × 10−34 J s, but it has been a long road, and the trip is not over yet. Since its discovery as a fundamental physical constant to explain various effects in quantum theory, h has become especially important in defining standards for electrical measurements and soon, for mass determination. Measuring h in the International System of Units (SI) started as experimental attempts merely to prove its existence. Many decades passed while newer experiments measured physical effects that were the influence of h combined with other physical constants: elementary charge, e, and the Avogadro constant, NA. As experimental techniques improved, the precision of the value of h expanded. When the Josephson and quantum Hall theories led to new electronic devices, and a hundred year old experiment, the absolute ampere, was altered into a watt balance, h not only became vital in definitions for the volt and ohm units, but suddenly it could be measured directly and even more accurately. Finally, as measurement uncertainties now approach a few parts in 108 from the watt balance experiments and Avogadro determinations, its importance has been linked to a proposed redefinition of a kilogram unit of mass. The path to higher accuracy in measuring the value of h was not always an example of continuous progress. Since new measurements periodically led to changes in its accepted value and the corresponding SI units, it is helpful to see why there were bumps in the road and where the different branch lines of research joined in the effort. Recalling the bumps along this road will hopefully avoid their repetition in the upcoming SI redefinition debates. This paper begins with a brief history of the methods to measure a combination of fundamental constants, thus indirectly obtaining the Planck constant. The historical path is followed in the section describing how the

  16. Accurate Peptide Fragment Mass Analysis: Multiplexed Peptide Identification and Quantification

    Weisbrod, Chad R.; Eng, Jimmy K.; Hoopmann, Michael R.; Baker, Tahmina; Bruce, James E.

    2012-01-01

    FT All Reaction Monitoring (FT-ARM) is a novel approach for the identification and quantification of peptides that relies upon the selectivity of high mass accuracy data and the specificity of peptide fragmentation patterns. An FT-ARM experiment involves continuous, data-independent, high mass accuracy MS/MS acquisition spanning a defined m/z range. Custom software was developed to search peptides against the multiplexed fragmentation spectra by comparing theoretical or empirical fragment ion...

  17. Accurate Insertion Loss Measurements of the Juno Patch Array Antennas

    Chamberlain, Neil; Chen, Jacqueline; Hodges, Richard; Demas, John

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes two independent methods for estimating the insertion loss of patch array antennas that were developed for the Juno Microwave Radiometer instrument. One method is based principally on pattern measurements while the other method is based solely on network analyzer measurements. The methods are accurate to within 0.1 dB for the measured antennas and show good agreement (to within 0.1dB) of separate radiometric measurements.

  18. Accurately measuring dynamic coefficient of friction in ultraform finishing

    Briggs, Dennis; Echaves, Samantha; Pidgeon, Brendan; Travis, Nathan; Ellis, Jonathan D.

    2013-09-01

    UltraForm Finishing (UFF) is a deterministic sub-aperture computer numerically controlled grinding and polishing platform designed by OptiPro Systems. UFF is used to grind and polish a variety of optics from simple spherical to fully freeform, and numerous materials from glasses to optical ceramics. The UFF system consists of an abrasive belt around a compliant wheel that rotates and contacts the part to remove material. This work aims to accurately measure the dynamic coefficient of friction (μ), how it changes as a function of belt wear, and how this ultimately affects material removal rates. The coefficient of friction has been examined in terms of contact mechanics and Preston's equation to determine accurate material removal rates. By accurately predicting changes in μ, polishing iterations can be more accurately predicted, reducing the total number of iterations required to meet specifications. We have established an experimental apparatus that can accurately measure μ by measuring triaxial forces during translating loading conditions or while manufacturing the removal spots used to calculate material removal rates. Using this system, we will demonstrate μ measurements for UFF belts during different states of their lifecycle and assess the material removal function from spot diagrams as a function of wear. Ultimately, we will use this system for qualifying belt-wheel-material combinations to develop a spot-morphing model to better predict instantaneous material removal functions.

  19. Accurate mass filtering of ion chromatograms for metabolite identification using a unit mass resolution liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry system.

    Gu, Ming; Wang, Yongdong; Zhao, Xian-Guo; Gu, Zhe-Ming

    2006-01-01

    Acceleration of liquid chromatography/mass spectrometric (LC/MS) analysis for metabolite identification critically relies on effective data processing since the rate of data acquisition is much faster than the rate of data mining. The rapid and accurate identification of metabolite peaks from complex LC/MS data is a key component to speeding up the process. Current approaches routinely use selected ion chromatograms that can suffer severely from matrix effects. This paper describes a new method to automatically extract and filter metabolite-related information from LC/MS data obtained at unit mass resolution in the presence of complex biological matrices. This approach is illustrated by LC/MS analysis of the metabolites of verapamil from a rat microsome incubation spiked with biological matrix (bile). MS data were acquired in profile mode on a unit mass resolution triple-quadrupole instrument, externally calibrated using a unique procedure that corrects for both mass axis and mass spectral peak shape to facilitate metabolite identification with high mass accuracy. Through the double-filtering effects of accurate mass and isotope profile, conventional extracted ion chromatograms corresponding to the parent drug (verapamil at m/z 455), demethylated verapamil (m/z 441), and dealkylated verapamil (m/z 291), that contained substantial false-positive peaks, were simplified into chromatograms that are substantially free from matrix interferences. These filtered chromatograms approach what would have been obtained by using a radioactivity detector to detect radio-labeled metabolites of interest. PMID:16463359

  20. Radio Astronomers Set New Standard for Accurate Cosmic Distance Measurement

    1999-06-01

    A team of radio astronomers has used the National Science Foundation's Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) to make the most accurate measurement ever made of the distance to a faraway galaxy. Their direct measurement calls into question the precision of distance determinations made by other techniques, including those announced last week by a team using the Hubble Space Telescope. The radio astronomers measured a distance of 23.5 million light-years to a galaxy called NGC 4258 in Ursa Major. "Ours is a direct measurement, using geometry, and is independent of all other methods of determining cosmic distances," said Jim Herrnstein, of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) in Socorro, NM. The team says their measurement is accurate to within less than a million light-years, or four percent. The galaxy is also known as Messier 106 and is visible with amateur telescopes. Herrnstein, along with James Moran and Lincoln Greenhill of the Harvard- Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics; Phillip Diamond, of the Merlin radio telescope facility at Jodrell Bank and the University of Manchester in England; Makato Inoue and Naomasa Nakai of Japan's Nobeyama Radio Observatory; Mikato Miyoshi of Japan's National Astronomical Observatory; Christian Henkel of Germany's Max Planck Institute for Radio Astronomy; and Adam Riess of the University of California at Berkeley, announced their findings at the American Astronomical Society's meeting in Chicago. "This is an incredible achievement to measure the distance to another galaxy with this precision," said Miller Goss, NRAO's Director of VLA/VLBA Operations. "This is the first time such a great distance has been measured this accurately. It took painstaking work on the part of the observing team, and it took a radio telescope the size of the Earth -- the VLBA -- to make it possible," Goss said. "Astronomers have sought to determine the Hubble Constant, the rate of expansion of the universe, for decades. This will in turn lead to an

  1. Accurate measurement of streamwise vortices using dual-plane PIV

    Waldman, Rye M.; Breuer, Kenneth S. [Brown University, School of Engineering, Providence, RI (United States)

    2012-11-15

    Low Reynolds number aerodynamic experiments with flapping animals (such as bats and small birds) are of particular interest due to their application to micro air vehicles which operate in a similar parameter space. Previous PIV wake measurements described the structures left by bats and birds and provided insight into the time history of their aerodynamic force generation; however, these studies have faced difficulty drawing quantitative conclusions based on said measurements. The highly three-dimensional and unsteady nature of the flows associated with flapping flight are major challenges for accurate measurements. The challenge of animal flight measurements is finding small flow features in a large field of view at high speed with limited laser energy and camera resolution. Cross-stream measurement is further complicated by the predominately out-of-plane flow that requires thick laser sheets and short inter-frame times, which increase noise and measurement uncertainty. Choosing appropriate experimental parameters requires compromise between the spatial and temporal resolution and the dynamic range of the measurement. To explore these challenges, we do a case study on the wake of a fixed wing. The fixed model simplifies the experiment and allows direct measurements of the aerodynamic forces via load cell. We present a detailed analysis of the wake measurements, discuss the criteria for making accurate measurements, and present a solution for making quantitative aerodynamic load measurements behind free-flyers. (orig.)

  2. Alignment of capillary electrophoresis-mass spectrometry datasets using accurate mass information.

    Nevedomskaya, Ekaterina; Derks, Rico; Deelder, André M; Mayboroda, Oleg A; Palmblad, Magnus

    2009-12-01

    Capillary electrophoresis-mass spectrometry (CE-MS) is a powerful technique for the analysis of small soluble compounds in biological fluids. A major drawback of CE is the poor migration time reproducibility, which makes it difficult to combine data from different experiments and correctly assign compounds. A number of alignment algorithms have been developed but not all of them can cope with large and irregular time shifts between CE-MS runs. Here we present a genetic algorithm designed for alignment of CE-MS data using accurate mass information. The utility of the algorithm was demonstrated on real data, and the results were compared with one of the existing packages. The new algorithm showed a significant reduction of elution time variation in the aligned datasets. The importance of mass accuracy for the performance of the algorithm was also demonstrated by comparing alignments of datasets from a standard time-of-flight (TOF) instrument with those from the new ultrahigh resolution TOF maXis (Bruker Daltonics). PMID:19826795

  3. Optimized pulse sequences for the accurate measurement of aortic compliance

    Aortic compliance is potentially an important cardiovascular diagnostic parameter by virtue of a proposed correlation with cardiovascular fitness. Measurement requires cross-sectional images of the ascending and descending aorta in systole and diastole for measurement of aortic lumen areas. Diastolic images have poor vessel- wall delineation due to signal from slow-flowing blood. A comparison has been carried out using presaturation (SAT) RF pulses, transparent RF pulses, and flow-compensated gradients in standard pulse sequences to improve vessel-wall delineation in diastole. Properly timed SAT pulses provide the most consistent vessel-wall delineation and the most accurate measurement of aortic compliance

  4. A Statistical Method for Assessing Peptide Identification Confidence in Accurate Mass and Time Tag Proteomics

    Stanley, Jeffrey R.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Slysz, Gordon W.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Karpievitch, Yuliya V.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Smith, Richard D.; Dabney, Alan R.

    2011-07-15

    High-throughput proteomics is rapidly evolving to require high mass measurement accuracy for a variety of different applications. Increased mass measurement accuracy in bottom-up proteomics specifically allows for an improved ability to distinguish and characterize detected MS features, which may in turn be identified by, e.g., matching to entries in a database for both precursor and fragmentation mass identification methods. Many tools exist with which to score the identification of peptides from LC-MS/MS measurements or to assess matches to an accurate mass and time (AMT) tag database, but these two calculations remain distinctly unrelated. Here we present a statistical method, Statistical Tools for AMT tag Confidence (STAC), which extends our previous work incorporating prior probabilities of correct sequence identification from LC-MS/MS, as well as the quality with which LC-MS features match AMT tags, to evaluate peptide identification confidence. Compared to existing tools, we are able to obtain significantly more high-confidence peptide identifications at a given false discovery rate and additionally assign confidence estimates to individual peptide identifications. Freely available software implementations of STAC are available in both command line and as a Windows graphical application.

  5. Calibration Techniques for Accurate Measurements by Underwater Camera Systems

    Mark Shortis

    2015-01-01

    Calibration of a camera system is essential to ensure that image measurements result in accurate estimates of locations and dimensions within the object space. In the underwater environment, the calibration must implicitly or explicitly model and compensate for the refractive effects of waterproof housings and the water medium. This paper reviews the different approaches to the calibration of underwater camera systems in theoretical and practical terms. The accuracy, reliability, validation a...

  6. Measurements of neutrino mass

    Direct experimental information of neutrino mass as derived from the study of nuclear and elementary-particle weak decays is reviewed. Topics include tritium beta decay; the 3He-T mass difference; electron capture decay of 163Ho and 158Tb; and limits on massive neutrinos from cosmology. 38 references

  7. Mass properties measurement system dynamics

    Doty, Keith L.

    1993-01-01

    The MPMS mechanism possess two revolute degrees-of-freedom and allows the user to measure the mass, center of gravity, and the inertia tensor of an unknown mass. The dynamics of the Mass Properties Measurement System (MPMS) from the Lagrangian approach to illustrate the dependency of the motion on the unknown parameters.

  8. Accurate volume measurement system for plutonium nitrate solution

    An accurate volume measurement system for a large amount of plutonium nitrate solution stored in a reprocessing or a conversion plant has been developed at the Plutonium Conversion Development Facility (PCDF) in the Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp. (PNC) Tokai Works. A pair of differential digital quartz pressure transducers is utilized in the volume measurement system. To obtain high accuracy, it is important that the non-linearity of the transducer is minimized within the measurement range, the zero point is stabilized, and the damping property of the pneumatic line is designed to minimize pressure oscillation. The accuracy of the pressure measurement can always be within 2Pa with re-calibration once a year. In the PCDF, the overall uncertainty of the volume measurement has been evaluated to be within 0.2 %. This system has been successfully applied to the Japanese government's and IAEA's routine inspection since 1984. (author)

  9. Calibration Techniques for Accurate Measurements by Underwater Camera Systems.

    Shortis, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Calibration of a camera system is essential to ensure that image measurements result in accurate estimates of locations and dimensions within the object space. In the underwater environment, the calibration must implicitly or explicitly model and compensate for the refractive effects of waterproof housings and the water medium. This paper reviews the different approaches to the calibration of underwater camera systems in theoretical and practical terms. The accuracy, reliability, validation and stability of underwater camera system calibration are also discussed. Samples of results from published reports are provided to demonstrate the range of possible accuracies for the measurements produced by underwater camera systems. PMID:26690172

  10. Direct neutrino mass measurements

    Thümmler, T.

    2011-07-01

    The determination of the neutrino rest mass plays an important role at the intersections of cosmology, particle physics and astroparticle physics. This topic is currently being addressed by two complementary approaches in laboratory experiments. Neutrinoless double beta decay experiments probe whether neutrinos are Majorana particles and determine an effective neutrino mass value. Single beta decay experiments such as KATRIN and MARE investigate the spectral shape of β-decay electrons close to their kinematic endpoint in order to determine the neutrino rest mass with a model-independent method. Owing to neutrino flavour mixing, the neutrino mass parameter appears as an average of all neutrino mass eigenstates contributing to the electron neutrino. The KArlsruhe TRItium Neutrino experiment (KATRIN) is currently the experiment in the most advanced status of commissioning. Applying an ultra-luminous molecular windowless gaseous tritium source and an integrating high-resolution spectrometer of MAC-E filter type, it allows β-spectroscopy close to the T 2 end-point with unprecedented precision and will reach a sensitivity of 200 meV/ c 2 (90% C.L.) on the neutrino rest mass.

  11. Methods for Accurate Free Flight Measurement of Drag Coefficients

    Courtney, Elya; Courtney, Michael

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes experimental methods for free flight measurement of drag coefficients to an accuracy of approximately 1%. There are two main methods of determining free flight drag coefficients, or equivalent ballistic coefficients: 1) measuring near and far velocities over a known distance and 2) measuring a near velocity and time of flight over a known distance. Atmospheric conditions must also be known and nearly constant over the flight path. A number of tradeoffs are important when designing experiments to accurately determine drag coefficients. The flight distance must be large enough so that the projectile's loss of velocity is significant compared with its initial velocity and much larger than the uncertainty in the near and/or far velocity measurements. On the other hand, since drag coefficients and ballistic coefficients both depend on velocity, the change in velocity over the flight path should be small enough that the average drag coefficient over the path (which is what is really determined)...

  12. Atomic spectroscopy and highly accurate measurement: determination of fundamental constants

    This document reviews the theoretical and experimental achievements of the author concerning highly accurate atomic spectroscopy applied for the determination of fundamental constants. A pure optical frequency measurement of the 2S-12D 2-photon transitions in atomic hydrogen and deuterium has been performed. The experimental setting-up is described as well as the data analysis. Optimized values for the Rydberg constant and Lamb shifts have been deduced (R = 109737.31568516 (84) cm-1). An experiment devoted to the determination of the fine structure constant with an aimed relative uncertainty of 10-9 began in 1999. This experiment is based on the fact that Bloch oscillations in a frequency chirped optical lattice are a powerful tool to transfer coherently many photon momenta to the atoms. We have used this method to measure accurately the ratio h/m(Rb). The measured value of the fine structure constant is α-1 = 137.03599884 (91) with a relative uncertainty of 6.7*10-9. The future and perspectives of this experiment are presented. This document presented before an academic board will allow his author to manage research work and particularly to tutor thesis students. (A.C.)

  13. SPECT-OPT multimodal imaging enables accurate evaluation of radiotracers for β-cell mass assessments.

    Eter, Wael A; Parween, Saba; Joosten, Lieke; Frielink, Cathelijne; Eriksson, Maria; Brom, Maarten; Ahlgren, Ulf; Gotthardt, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) has become a promising experimental approach to monitor changes in β-cell mass (BCM) during diabetes progression. SPECT imaging of pancreatic islets is most commonly cross-validated by stereological analysis of histological pancreatic sections after insulin staining. Typically, stereological methods do not accurately determine the total β-cell volume, which is inconvenient when correlating total pancreatic tracer uptake with BCM. Alternative methods are therefore warranted to cross-validate β-cell imaging using radiotracers. In this study, we introduce multimodal SPECT - optical projection tomography (OPT) imaging as an accurate approach to cross-validate radionuclide-based imaging of β-cells. Uptake of a promising radiotracer for β-cell imaging by SPECT, (111)In-exendin-3, was measured by ex vivo-SPECT and cross evaluated by 3D quantitative OPT imaging as well as with histology within healthy and alloxan-treated Brown Norway rat pancreata. SPECT signal was in excellent linear correlation with OPT data as compared to histology. While histological determination of islet spatial distribution was challenging, SPECT and OPT revealed similar distribution patterns of (111)In-exendin-3 and insulin positive β-cell volumes between different pancreatic lobes, both visually and quantitatively. We propose ex vivo SPECT-OPT multimodal imaging as a highly accurate strategy for validating the performance of β-cell radiotracers. PMID:27080529

  14. A spectroscopic transfer standard for accurate atmospheric CO measurements

    Nwaboh, Javis A.; Li, Gang; Serdyukov, Anton; Werhahn, Olav; Ebert, Volker

    2016-04-01

    Atmospheric carbon monoxide (CO) is a precursor of essential climate variables and has an indirect effect for enhancing global warming. Accurate and reliable measurements of atmospheric CO concentration are becoming indispensable. WMO-GAW reports states a compatibility goal of ±2 ppb for atmospheric CO concentration measurements. Therefore, the EMRP-HIGHGAS (European metrology research program - high-impact greenhouse gases) project aims at developing spectroscopic transfer standards for CO concentration measurements to meet this goal. A spectroscopic transfer standard would provide results that are directly traceable to the SI, can be very useful for calibration of devices operating in the field, and could complement classical gas standards in the field where calibration gas mixtures in bottles often are not accurate, available or stable enough [1][2]. Here, we present our new direct tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (dTDLAS) sensor capable of performing absolute ("calibration free") CO concentration measurements, and being operated as a spectroscopic transfer standard. To achieve the compatibility goal stated by WMO for CO concentration measurements and ensure the traceability of the final concentration results, traceable spectral line data especially line intensities with appropriate uncertainties are needed. Therefore, we utilize our new high-resolution Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy CO line data for the 2-0 band, with significantly reduced uncertainties, for the dTDLAS data evaluation. Further, we demonstrate the capability of our sensor for atmospheric CO measurements, discuss uncertainty calculation following the guide to the expression of uncertainty in measurement (GUM) principles and show that CO concentrations derived using the sensor, based on the TILSAM (traceable infrared laser spectroscopic amount fraction measurement) method, are in excellent agreement with gravimetric values. Acknowledgement Parts of this work have been

  15. Black-Hole Mass Measurements

    Vestergaard, Marianne

    2004-01-01

    The applicability and apparent uncertainties of the techniques currently available for measuring or estimating black-hole masses in AGNs are briefly summarized.......The applicability and apparent uncertainties of the techniques currently available for measuring or estimating black-hole masses in AGNs are briefly summarized....

  16. Accurate measurement of streamwise vortices in low speed aerodynamic flows

    Waldman, Rye M.; Kudo, Jun; Breuer, Kenneth S.

    2010-11-01

    Low Reynolds number experiments with flapping animals (such as bats and small birds) are of current interest in understanding biological flight mechanics, and due to their application to Micro Air Vehicles (MAVs) which operate in a similar parameter space. Previous PIV wake measurements have described the structures left by bats and birds, and provided insight to the time history of their aerodynamic force generation; however, these studies have faced difficulty drawing quantitative conclusions due to significant experimental challenges associated with the highly three-dimensional and unsteady nature of the flows, and the low wake velocities associated with lifting bodies that only weigh a few grams. This requires the high-speed resolution of small flow features in a large field of view using limited laser energy and finite camera resolution. Cross-stream measurements are further complicated by the high out-of-plane flow which requires thick laser sheets and short interframe times. To quantify and address these challenges we present data from a model study on the wake behind a fixed wing at conditions comparable to those found in biological flight. We present a detailed analysis of the PIV wake measurements, discuss the criteria necessary for accurate measurements, and present a new dual-plane PIV configuration to resolve these issues.

  17. Accurate measurement of RF exposure from emerging wireless communication systems

    Isotropic broadband probes or spectrum analyzers (SAs) may be used for the measurement of rapidly varying electromagnetic fields generated by emerging wireless communication systems. In this paper this problematic is investigated by comparing the responses measured by two different isotropic broadband probes typically used to perform electric field (E-field) evaluations. The broadband probes are submitted to signals with variable duty cycles (DC) and crest factors (CF) either with or without Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing (OFDM) modulation but with the same root-mean-square (RMS) power. The two probes do not provide accurate enough results for deterministic signals such as Worldwide Interoperability for Microwave Access (WIMAX) or Long Term Evolution (LTE) as well as for non-deterministic signals such as Wireless Fidelity (WiFi). The legacy measurement protocols should be adapted to cope for the emerging wireless communication technologies based on the OFDM modulation scheme. This is not easily achieved except when the statistics of the RF emission are well known. In this case the measurement errors are shown to be systematic and a correction factor or calibration can be applied to obtain a good approximation of the total RMS power.

  18. Accurate reconstruction of hyperspectral images from compressive sensing measurements

    Greer, John B.; Flake, J. C.

    2013-05-01

    The emerging field of Compressive Sensing (CS) provides a new way to capture data by shifting the heaviest burden of data collection from the sensor to the computer on the user-end. This new means of sensing requires fewer measurements for a given amount of information than traditional sensors. We investigate the efficacy of CS for capturing HyperSpectral Imagery (HSI) remotely. We also introduce a new family of algorithms for constructing HSI from CS measurements with Split Bregman Iteration [Goldstein and Osher,2009]. These algorithms combine spatial Total Variation (TV) with smoothing in the spectral dimension. We examine models for three different CS sensors: the Coded Aperture Snapshot Spectral Imager-Single Disperser (CASSI-SD) [Wagadarikar et al.,2008] and Dual Disperser (CASSI-DD) [Gehm et al.,2007] cameras, and a hypothetical random sensing model closer to CS theory, but not necessarily implementable with existing technology. We simulate the capture of remotely sensed images by applying the sensor forward models to well-known HSI scenes - an AVIRIS image of Cuprite, Nevada and the HYMAP Urban image. To measure accuracy of the CS models, we compare the scenes constructed with our new algorithm to the original AVIRIS and HYMAP cubes. The results demonstrate the possibility of accurately sensing HSI remotely with significantly fewer measurements than standard hyperspectral cameras.

  19. Study of accurate volume measurement system for plutonium nitrate solution

    Hosoma, T. [Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Works

    1998-12-01

    It is important for effective safeguarding of nuclear materials to establish a technique for accurate volume measurement of plutonium nitrate solution in accountancy tank. The volume of the solution can be estimated by two differential pressures between three dip-tubes, in which the air is purged by an compressor. One of the differential pressure corresponds to the density of the solution, and another corresponds to the surface level of the solution in the tank. The measurement of the differential pressure contains many uncertain errors, such as precision of pressure transducer, fluctuation of back-pressure, generation of bubbles at the front of the dip-tubes, non-uniformity of temperature and density of the solution, pressure drop in the dip-tube, and so on. The various excess pressures at the volume measurement are discussed and corrected by a reasonable method. High precision-differential pressure measurement system is developed with a quartz oscillation type transducer which converts a differential pressure to a digital signal. The developed system is used for inspection by the government and IAEA. (M. Suetake)

  20. Accurate measurement of RF exposure from emerging wireless communication systems

    Letertre, Thierry; Monebhurrun, Vikass; Toffano, Zeno

    2013-04-01

    Isotropic broadband probes or spectrum analyzers (SAs) may be used for the measurement of rapidly varying electromagnetic fields generated by emerging wireless communication systems. In this paper this problematic is investigated by comparing the responses measured by two different isotropic broadband probes typically used to perform electric field (E-field) evaluations. The broadband probes are submitted to signals with variable duty cycles (DC) and crest factors (CF) either with or without Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing (OFDM) modulation but with the same root-mean-square (RMS) power. The two probes do not provide accurate enough results for deterministic signals such as Worldwide Interoperability for Microwave Access (WIMAX) or Long Term Evolution (LTE) as well as for non-deterministic signals such as Wireless Fidelity (WiFi). The legacy measurement protocols should be adapted to cope for the emerging wireless communication technologies based on the OFDM modulation scheme. This is not easily achieved except when the statistics of the RF emission are well known. In this case the measurement errors are shown to be systematic and a correction factor or calibration can be applied to obtain a good approximation of the total RMS power.

  1. Accurate determination and certification of bromine in plastic by isotope dilution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    Highlights: • Accurate analytical method of Br in plastic was studied by isotope dilution ICPMS. • A microwave acid digestion using quartz vessel was suitable for Br analysis. • Sample dilution by NH3 solution could remove memory effect for ICPMS measurement. • The analytical result of the ID-ICPMS showed consistency with that of INAA. • The ID-ICPMS developed could apply to certification of Br in candidate plastic CRM. - Abstract: The accurate analytical method of bromine (Br) in plastic was developed by an isotope dilution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ID-ICPMS). The figures of merit of microwave acid digestion procedures using polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) or quartz vessels were studied and the latter one was suitable for Br analysis since its material was free from Br contamination. The sample dilution procedures using Milli-Q water or ammonium (NH3) solution were also studied to remove memory effect for ICPMS measurement. Although severe memory effect was observed on Milli-Q water dilution, NH3 solution could remove it successfully. The accuracy of the ID-ICPMS was validated by a certified reference material (CRM) as well as the comparison with the analytical result obtained by an instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) as different analytical method. From these results, the ID-ICPMS developed in the present study could be evaluated as accurate analytical method of Br in plastic materials and it could apply to certification of Br in candidate plastic CRM with respect to such regulations related to RoHS (restriction of the use of hazardous substances in electrical and electronics equipment) directive

  2. Accurate determination and certification of bromine in plastic by isotope dilution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    Ohata, Masaki, E-mail: m-oohata@aist.go.jp; Miura, Tsutomu

    2014-07-21

    Highlights: • Accurate analytical method of Br in plastic was studied by isotope dilution ICPMS. • A microwave acid digestion using quartz vessel was suitable for Br analysis. • Sample dilution by NH{sub 3} solution could remove memory effect for ICPMS measurement. • The analytical result of the ID-ICPMS showed consistency with that of INAA. • The ID-ICPMS developed could apply to certification of Br in candidate plastic CRM. - Abstract: The accurate analytical method of bromine (Br) in plastic was developed by an isotope dilution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ID-ICPMS). The figures of merit of microwave acid digestion procedures using polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) or quartz vessels were studied and the latter one was suitable for Br analysis since its material was free from Br contamination. The sample dilution procedures using Milli-Q water or ammonium (NH{sub 3}) solution were also studied to remove memory effect for ICPMS measurement. Although severe memory effect was observed on Milli-Q water dilution, NH{sub 3} solution could remove it successfully. The accuracy of the ID-ICPMS was validated by a certified reference material (CRM) as well as the comparison with the analytical result obtained by an instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) as different analytical method. From these results, the ID-ICPMS developed in the present study could be evaluated as accurate analytical method of Br in plastic materials and it could apply to certification of Br in candidate plastic CRM with respect to such regulations related to RoHS (restriction of the use of hazardous substances in electrical and electronics equipment) directive.

  3. New simple method for fast and accurate measurement of volumes

    A new simple method is presented, which allows us to measure in just a few minutes but with reasonable accuracy (less than 1%) the volume confined inside a generic enclosure, regardless of the complexity of its shape. The technique proposed also allows us to measure the volume of any portion of a complex manifold, including, for instance, pipes and pipe fittings, valves, gauge heads, and so on, without disassembling the manifold at all. To this purpose an airtight variable volume is used, whose volume adjustment can be precisely measured; it has an overall capacity larger than that of the unknown volume. Such a variable volume is initially filled with a suitable test gas (for instance, air) at a known pressure, as carefully measured by means of a high precision capacitive gauge. By opening a valve, the test gas is allowed to expand into the previously evacuated unknown volume. A feedback control loop reacts to the resulting finite pressure drop, thus contracting the variable volume until the pressure exactly retrieves its initial value. The overall reduction of the variable volume achieved at the end of this process gives a direct measurement of the unknown volume, and definitively gets rid of the problem of dead spaces. The method proposed actually does not require the test gas to be rigorously held at a constant temperature, thus resulting in a huge simplification as compared to complex arrangements commonly used in metrology (gas expansion method), which can grant extremely accurate measurement but requires rather expensive equipments and results in time consuming methods, being therefore impractical in most applications. A simple theoretical analysis of the thermodynamic cycle and the results of experimental tests are described, which demonstrate that, in spite of its simplicity, the method provides a measurement accuracy within 0.5%. The system requires just a few minutes to complete a single measurement, and is ready immediately at the end of the process. The

  4. Downhole temperature tool accurately measures well bore profile

    This paper reports that an inexpensive temperature tool provides accurate temperatures measurements during drilling operations for better design of cement jobs, workovers, well stimulation, and well bore hydraulics. Valid temperature data during specific wellbore operations can improve initial job design, fluid testing, and slurry placement, ultimately enhancing well bore performance. This improvement applies to cement slurries, breaker activation for slurries, breaker activation for stimulation and profile control, and fluid rheological properties for all downhole operations. The temperature tool has been run standalone mounted inside drill pipe, on slick wire line and braided cable, and as a free-falltool. It has also been run piggyback on both directional surveys (slick line and free-fall) and standard logging runs. This temperature measuring system has been used extensively in field well bores to depths of 20,000 ft. The temperature tool is completely reusable in the field, ever similar to the standard directional survey tools used on may drilling rigs. The system includes a small, rugged, programmable temperature sensor, a standard body housing, various adapters for specific applications, and a personal computer (PC) interface

  5. Accurate Measurements of Aircraft Engine Soot Emissions Using a CAPS PMssa Monitor

    Onasch, Timothy; Thompson, Kevin; Renbaum-Wolff, Lindsay; Smallwood, Greg; Make-Lye, Richard; Freedman, Andrew

    2016-04-01

    We present results of aircraft engine soot emissions measurements during the VARIAnT2 campaign using CAPS PMssa monitors. VARIAnT2, an aircraft engine non-volatile particulate matter (nvPM) emissions field campaign, was focused on understanding the variability in nvPM mass measurements using different measurement techniques and accounting for possible nvPM sampling system losses. The CAPS PMssa monitor accurately measures both the optical extinction and scattering (and thus single scattering albedo and absorption) of an extracted sample using the same sample volume for both measurements with a time resolution of 1 second and sensitivity of better than 1 Mm-1. Absorption is obtained by subtracting the scattering signal from the total extinction. Given that the single scattering albedo of the particulates emitted from the aircraft engine measured at both 630 and 660 nm was on the order of 0.1, any inaccuracy in the scattering measurement has little impact on the accuracy of the ddetermined absorption coefficient. The absorption is converted into nvPM mass using a documented Mass Absorption Coefficient (MAC). Results of soot emission indices (mass soot emitted per mass of fuel consumed) for a turbojet engine as a function of engine power will be presented and compared to results obtained using an EC/OC monitor.

  6. Review of neutrino mass measurements

    The current status of the experimental search for neutrino mass is reviewed, with emphasis on direct kinematic methods. New data on the /tau/ neutrino from the Argus collaboration have reduced the upper mass limit a factor of 2. The situation concerning the electron neutrino mass as measured in tritium beta decay is essentially unchanged from a year ago. Simpson and Hime report finding evidence for a 17-keV neutrino in the β decay of 35S. There may be evidence for neutrino mass and mixing in the SN1987a data. 62 refs., 4 figs

  7. Automatic classification and accurate size measurement of blank mask defects

    Bhamidipati, Samir; Paninjath, Sankaranarayanan; Pereira, Mark; Buck, Peter

    2015-07-01

    complexity of defects encountered. The variety arises due to factors such as defect nature, size, shape and composition; and the optical phenomena occurring around the defect. This paper focuses on preliminary characterization results, in terms of classification and size estimation, obtained by Calibre MDPAutoClassify tool on a variety of mask blank defects. It primarily highlights the challenges faced in achieving the results with reference to the variety of defects observed on blank mask substrates and the underlying complexities which make accurate defect size measurement an important and challenging task.

  8. Assessing temporal flux of plant hormones in stored processing potatoes using high definition accurate mass spectrometry

    José Juan Ordaz-Ortiz; Sofia Foukaraki; Leon Alexander Terry

    2015-01-01

    Plant hormones are important molecules which at low concentration can regulate various physiological processes. Mass spectrometry has become a powerful technique for the quantification of multiple classes of plant hormones because of its high sensitivity and selectivity. We developed a new ultrahigh pressure liquid chromatography–full-scan high-definition accurate mass spectrometry method, for simultaneous determination of abscisic acid and four metabolites phaseic acid, dihydrophaseic acid, ...

  9. Accurate Measurements of Aerosol Hygroscopic Growth over a Wide Range in Relative Humidity.

    Rovelli, Grazia; Miles, Rachael E H; Reid, Jonathan P; Clegg, Simon L

    2016-06-30

    Using a comparative evaporation kinetics approach, we describe a new and accurate method for determining the equilibrium hygroscopic growth of aerosol droplets. The time-evolving size of an aqueous droplet, as it evaporates to a steady size and composition that is in equilibrium with the gas phase relative humidity, is used to determine the time-dependent mass flux of water, yielding information on the vapor pressure of water above the droplet surface at every instant in time. Accurate characterization of the gas phase relative humidity is provided from a control measurement of the evaporation profile of a droplet of know equilibrium properties, either a pure water droplet or a sodium chloride droplet. In combination, and by comparison with simulations that account for both the heat and mass transport governing the droplet evaporation kinetics, these measurements allow accurate retrieval of the equilibrium properties of the solution droplet (i.e., the variations with water activity in the mass fraction of solute, diameter growth factor, osmotic coefficient or number of water molecules per solute molecule). Hygroscopicity measurements can be made over a wide range in water activity (from >0.99 to, in principle, volatile solutes. The approach is benchmarked for binary and ternary inorganic solution aerosols with typical uncertainties in water activity of 0.9 and ∼±1% below 80% RH, and maximum uncertainties in diameter growth factor of ±0.7%. For all of the inorganic systems examined, the time-dependent data are consistent with large values of the mass accommodation (or evaporation) coefficient (>0.1). PMID:27285052

  10. Analysis of hydraulic fracturing flowback and produced waters using accurate mass: identification of ethoxylated surfactants.

    Thurman, E Michael; Ferrer, Imma; Blotevogel, Jens; Borch, Thomas

    2014-10-01

    Two series of ethylene oxide (EO) surfactants, polyethylene glycols (PEGs from EO3 to EO33) and linear alkyl ethoxylates (LAEs C-9 to C-15 with EO3-EO28), were identified in hydraulic fracturing flowback and produced water using a new application of the Kendrick mass defect and liquid chromatography/quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The Kendrick mass defect differentiates the proton, ammonium, and sodium adducts in both singly and doubly charged forms. A structural model of adduct formation is presented, and binding constants are calculated, which is based on a spherical cagelike conformation, where the central cation (NH4(+) or Na(+)) is coordinated with ether oxygens. A major purpose of the study was the identification of the ethylene oxide (EO) surfactants and the construction of a database with accurate masses and retention times in order to unravel the mass spectral complexity of surfactant mixtures used in hydraulic fracturing fluids. For example, over 500 accurate mass assignments are made in a few seconds of computer time, which then is used as a fingerprint chromatogram of the water samples. This technique is applied to a series of flowback and produced water samples to illustrate the usefulness of ethoxylate "fingerprinting", in a first application to monitor water quality that results from fluids used in hydraulic fracturing. PMID:25164376

  11. First mass measurements at LHCb

    Bressieux, J

    2011-01-01

    The LHC opens new frontiers in heavy flavour physics through an unprecedented statistical reach for a variety of interesting states produced in pp collisions. The LHCb spectrometer provides a good mass resolution and is suitable for spectroscopy studies. We present first preliminary mass measurements of several $b$ hadrons and of the exotic $X(3872)$ meson, reconstructed in final states containing a $J/\\psi$ using the data collected in 2010 by the LHCb experiment. An important aspect of the analysis is the calibration of the momentum scale using $J/\\psi \\to \\mu^+ \\mu^-$ decays, as well as the control of systematic uncertainties. While the already very competitive mass measurements for the $B^+$, $B^0$ and $B^0_s$ mesons receive similar contributions from systematic and statistical uncertainties, those of the $\\Lambda_b$, $B^+_c$ and $X(3872)$ particles are dominated by statistical uncertainties, and will therefore substantially improve with more data in the future.

  12. Galaxy And Mass Assembly: accurate panchromatic photometry from optical priors using LAMBDAR

    Wright, A. H.; Robotham, A. S. G.; Bourne, N.; Driver, S. P.; Dunne, L.; Maddox, S. J.; Alpaslan, M.; Andrews, S. K.; Bauer, A. E.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Brough, S.; Brown, M. J. I.; Clarke, C.; Cluver, M.; Davies, L. J. M.; Grootes, M. W.; Holwerda, B. W.; Hopkins, A. M.; Jarrett, T. H.; Kafle, P. R.; Lange, R.; Liske, J.; Loveday, J.; Moffett, A. J.; Norberg, P.; Popescu, C. C.; Smith, M.; Taylor, E. N.; Tuffs, R. J.; Wang, L.; Wilkins, S. M.

    2016-07-01

    We present the Lambda Adaptive Multi-Band Deblending Algorithm in R (LAMBDAR), a novel code for calculating matched aperture photometry across images that are neither pixel- nor PSF-matched, using prior aperture definitions derived from high-resolution optical imaging. The development of this program is motivated by the desire for consistent photometry and uncertainties across large ranges of photometric imaging, for use in calculating spectral energy distributions. We describe the program, specifically key features required for robust determination of panchromatic photometry: propagation of apertures to images with arbitrary resolution, local background estimation, aperture normalization, uncertainty determination and propagation, and object deblending. Using simulated images, we demonstrate that the program is able to recover accurate photometric measurements in both high-resolution, low-confusion, and low-resolution, high-confusion, regimes. We apply the program to the 21-band photometric data set from the Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) Panchromatic Data Release (PDR; Driver et al. 2016), which contains imaging spanning the far-UV to the far-IR. We compare photometry derived from LAMBDAR with that presented in Driver et al. (2016), finding broad agreement between the data sets. None the less, we demonstrate that the photometry from LAMBDAR is superior to that from the GAMA PDR, as determined by a reduction in the outlier rate and intrinsic scatter of colours in the LAMBDAR data set. We similarly find a decrease in the outlier rate of stellar masses and star formation rates using LAMBDAR photometry. Finally, we note an exceptional increase in the number of UV and mid-IR sources able to be constrained, which is accompanied by a significant increase in the mid-IR colour-colour parameter-space able to be explored.

  13. Measuring neutrino mass without neutrinos!

    Peach, Kenneth J

    2004-01-01

    Neutrinoless double beta decay offers the most precise (if challenging) way of measuring the absolute mass of the neutrino. Particle Physics met at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory last autumn to discuss wether the UK should take a lead in setting up such an experiment

  14. Mass measurements near N = Z

    After an outline of the physics motivations, that illustrate why we think it is important to measure masses in the region N = Z, we report on on experiments performed at Ganil. An experiment aimed at measuring the masses of proton-rich nuclei in the mass region A∼60-80 has been performed, using a direct time-of-flight technique in conjunction with SISSI and the SPEG spectrometer at GANIL. The nuclei were produced via the fragmentation of a 78Kr beam (73 MeV/nucleon). A novel technique for the purification of the secondary beams, based on the stripping of the ions and using the α and the SPEG spectrometers, was successfully checked. It allows for good selectivity without altering the beam quality. Secondary ions of 100Ag, 100Cd, 100In and 100Sn were produced via the fusion-evaporation reaction 50Cr+58Ni at an energy of 5.1 MeV/nucleon, and were accelerated simultaneously in the second cyclotron of GANIL (CSS2). About 10 counts were observed from the production and acceleration of 100Sn22+. The masses of 100Cd, 100In and 100Sn were measured with respect to 100Ag using the CSS2 cyclotron, with precisions of 2 x 10-6, 3 x 10-6 and 10-5 respectively. (orig.)

  15. Top Mass from Electroweak Measurements

    Jacobsen, Bob

    1994-01-01

    The electroweak measurements made at LEP using 1989-1993 data are presented in preliminary form. The agreement with the Standard Model is satisfactory, and allows a combined fit to all available data for the masses of the top quark and standard Higgs boson. The fit yields M_t = 177 +11 -11 +18 -19 GeV/c2, where the second error reflects the uncertainty in the Higgs mass. Talk given at the XXIXth Rencontre de Moriond, `QCD and High Energy Hadronic Interactions', March 1994, Meribel France

  16. Fast and accurate mock catalogue generation for low-mass galaxies

    Koda, Jun; Beutler, Florian; Kazin, Eyal; Marin, Felipe

    2015-01-01

    We present an accurate and fast framework for generating mock catalogues including low-mass halos, based on an implementation of the COmoving Lagrangian Acceleration (COLA) technique. Multiple realisations of mock catalogues are crucial for analyses of large-scale structure, but conventional N-body simulations are too computationally expensive for the production of thousands of realisations. We show that COLA simulations can produce accurate mock catalogues with a moderate computation resource for low- to intermediate- mass galaxies in $10^{12} M_\\odot$ haloes, both in real and redshift space. COLA simulations have accurate peculiar velocities, without systematic errors in the velocity power spectra for k < 0.15 h/Mpc, and with only 3-per-cent error for k < 0.2 h/Mpc. We use COLA with 10 time steps and a Halo Occupation Distribution to produce 600 mock galaxy catalogues of the WiggleZ Dark Energy Survey. Our parallelized code for efficient generation of accurate halo catalogues is publicly available at ...

  17. Fast and accurate mock catalogue generation for low-mass galaxies

    Koda, Jun; Blake, Chris; Beutler, Florian; Kazin, Eyal; Marin, Felipe

    2016-06-01

    We present an accurate and fast framework for generating mock catalogues including low-mass haloes, based on an implementation of the COmoving Lagrangian Acceleration (COLA) technique. Multiple realisations of mock catalogues are crucial for analyses of large-scale structure, but conventional N-body simulations are too computationally expensive for the production of thousands of realizations. We show that COLA simulations can produce accurate mock catalogues with a moderate computation resource for low- to intermediate-mass galaxies in 1012 M⊙ haloes, both in real and redshift space. COLA simulations have accurate peculiar velocities, without systematic errors in the velocity power spectra for k ≤ 0.15 h Mpc-1, and with only 3-per cent error for k ≤ 0.2 h Mpc-1. We use COLA with 10 time steps and a Halo Occupation Distribution to produce 600 mock galaxy catalogues of the WiggleZ Dark Energy Survey. Our parallelized code for efficient generation of accurate halo catalogues is publicly available at github.com/junkoda/cola_halo.

  18. Accurate Prediction of the Ammonia Probes of a Variable Proton-to-Electron Mass Ratio

    Owens, Alec; Thiel, Walter; Špirko, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    A comprehensive study of the mass sensitivity of the vibration-rotation-inversion transitions of $^{14}$NH$_3$, $^{15}$NH$_3$, $^{14}$ND$_3$, and $^{15}$ND$_3$ is carried out variationally using the TROVE approach. Variational calculations are robust and accurate, offering a new way to compute sensitivity coefficients. Particular attention is paid to the $\\Delta k=\\pm 3$ transitions between the accidentally coinciding rotation-inversion energy levels of the $\

  19. SPECT-OPT multimodal imaging enables accurate evaluation of radiotracers for β-cell mass assessments

    Wael A. Eter; Saba Parween; Lieke Joosten; Cathelijne Frielink; Maria Eriksson; Maarten Brom; Ulf Ahlgren; Martin Gotthardt

    2016-01-01

    Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) has become a promising experimental approach to monitor changes in β-cell mass (BCM) during diabetes progression. SPECT imaging of pancreatic islets is most commonly cross-validated by stereological analysis of histological pancreatic sections after insulin staining. Typically, stereological methods do not accurately determine the total β-cell volume, which is inconvenient when correlating total pancreatic tracer uptake with BCM. Alternative ...

  20. SPECT-OPT multimodal imaging enables accurate evaluation of radiotracers for beta-cell mass assessments

    Wael A. Eter; Parween, Saba; Joosten, Lieke; Frielink, Cathelijne; Eriksson, Maria; Brom, Maarten; Ahlgren, Ulf; Gotthardt, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) has become a promising experimental approach to monitor changes in beta-cell mass (BCM) during diabetes progression. SPECT imaging of pancreatic islets is most commonly cross-validated by stereological analysis of histological pancreatic sections after insulin staining. Typically, stereological methods do not accurately determine the total beta-cell volume, which is inconvenient when correlating total pancreatic tracer uptake with BCM. Altern...

  1. Accurate and fast fiber transfer delay measurement based on phase discrimination and frequency measurement

    Dong, J W; Gao, C; Wang, L J

    2016-01-01

    An accurate and fast fiber transfer delay measurement method is demonstrated. As a key technique, a simple ambiguity resolving process based on phase discrimination and frequency measurement is used to overcome the contradiction between measurement accuracy and system complexity. The optimized system achieves a high accuracy of 0.3 ps with a 0.1 ps resolution, and a large dynamic range up to 50 km as well as no dead zone.

  2. The Megamaser Cosmology Project. III. Accurate Masses of Seven Supermassive Black Holes in Active Galaxies with Circumnuclear Megamaser Disks

    Kuo, C Y; Condon, J J; Impellizzeri, C M V; Lo, K Y; Zaw, I; Schenker, M; Henkel, C; Reid, M J; Greene, J E

    2010-01-01

    Observations of H$_2$O masers from circumnuclear disks in active galaxies for the Megamaser Cosmology Project allow accurate measurement of the mass of supermassive black holes (BH) in these galaxies. We present the Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) images and kinematics of water maser emission in six active galaxies: NGC~1194, NGC~2273, NGC~2960 (Mrk~1419), NGC~4388, NGC~6264 and NGC~6323. We use the Keplerian rotation curves of these six megamaser galaxies, plus a seventh previously published, to determine accurate enclosed masses within the central $\\sim0.3$ pc of these galaxies, smaller than the radius of the sphere of influence of the central mass in all cases. We also set lower limits to the central mass densities of between 0.12 and 60 $\\times 10^{10} M_{\\odot}$~pc$^{-3}$. For six of the seven disks, the high central densities rule out clusters of stars or stellar remnants as the central objects, and this result further supports our assumption that the enclosed mass can be attributed predominant...

  3. Accurate phase measurements for thick spherical objects using optical quadrature microscopy

    Warger, William C., II; DiMarzio, Charles A.

    2009-02-01

    In vitro fertilization (IVF) procedures have resulted in the birth of over three million babies since 1978. Yet the live birth rate in the United States was only 34% in 2005, with 32% of the successful pregnancies resulting in multiple births. These multiple pregnancies were directly attributed to the transfer of multiple embryos to increase the probability that a single, healthy embryo was included. Current viability markers used for IVF, such as the cell number, symmetry, size, and fragmentation, are analyzed qualitatively with differential interference contrast (DIC) microscopy. However, this method is not ideal for quantitative measures beyond the 8-cell stage of development because the cells overlap and obstruct the view within and below the cluster of cells. We have developed the phase-subtraction cell-counting method that uses the combination of DIC and optical quadrature microscopy (OQM) to count the number of cells accurately in live mouse embryos beyond the 8-cell stage. We have also created a preliminary analysis to measure the cell symmetry, size, and fragmentation quantitatively by analyzing the relative dry mass from the OQM image in conjunction with the phase-subtraction count. In this paper, we will discuss the characterization of OQM with respect to measuring the phase accurately for spherical samples that are much larger than the depth of field. Once fully characterized and verified with human embryos, this methodology could provide the means for a more accurate method to score embryo viability.

  4. High-resolution accurate mass spectrometry as a technique for characterization of complex lysimeter leachate samples.

    Hand, Laurence H; Marshall, Samantha J; Saeed, Mansoor; Earll, Mark; Hadfield, Stephen T; Richardson, Kevan; Rawlinson, Paul

    2016-06-01

    Lysimeter studies can be used to identify and quantify soil degradates of agrochemicals (metabolites) that have the potential to leach to groundwater. However, the apparent metabolic profile of such lysimeter leachate samples will often be significantly more complex than would be expected in true groundwater samples. This is particularly true for S-metolachlor, which has an extremely complex metabolic pathway. Consequently, it was not practically possible to apply a conventional analytical approach to identify all metabolites in an S-metolachlor lysimeter study, because there was insufficient mass to enable the use of techniques such as nuclear magnetic resonance. Recent advances in high-resolution accurate mass spectrometry, however, allow innovative screening approaches to characterize leachate samples to a greater extent than previously possible. Leachate from the S-metolachlor study was screened for accurate masses (±5 ppm of the nominal mass) corresponding to more than 400 hypothetical metabolite structures. A refined list of plausible metabolites was constructed from these data to provide a comprehensive description of the most likely metabolites present. The properties of these metabolites were then evaluated using a principal component analysis model, based on molecular descriptors, to visualize the entire chemical space and to cluster the metabolites into a number of subclasses. This characterization and principal component analysis evaluation enabled the selection of suitable representative metabolites that were subsequently used as exemplars to assess the toxicological relevance of the leachate as a whole. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:1401-1412. © 2015 SETAC. PMID:26627902

  5. Potential Direct Single-Star Mass Measurement

    Ghosh, H

    2004-01-01

    We analyze the lightcurve of the microlensing event OGLE-2003-BLG-175/MOA-2003-BLG-45 and show that it has two properties that, when combined with future high resolution astrometry, could lead to a direct, accurate measurement of the lens mass. First, the lightcurve shows clear signs of distortion due to the Earth's accelerated motion, which yields a measurement of the projected Einstein radius \\tilde r_E. Second, from precise astrometric measurements, we show that the blended light in the event is coincident with the microlensed source to within about 15 mas. This argues strongly that this blended light is the lens and hence opens the possibility of directly measuring the lens-source relative proper motion \\vec\\mu_\\rel and so the mass M=(c^2/4G)\\mu_\\rel t_E \\tilde r_E, where t_E is the measured Einstein timescale. While the lightcurve-based measurement of \\tilde r_E is, by itself, severely degenerate, we show that this degeneracy can be completely resolved by measuring the direction of proper motion \\vec\\mu_...

  6. Direct measurements of neutrino masses

    Holzschuh, E. [Zurich Univ. (Switzerland). Inst. fuer Physik

    1996-11-01

    The direct measurements have so far given no indication for a nonzero (positive) mass of any of the three known neutrinos. The experiments measuring the tau and the muon neutrino are good shape. The tritium experiments are in an unfortunate situation. It is unclear to me whether the problems are experimental or theoretical or a combination of both. The electronic final states distribution have been calculated, but the results have never been tested experimentally. The most important question to be answered is about the validity of the sudden approximation. (author) 9 figs., 2 tabs., 16 refs.

  7. Accurate micro Hall effect measurements on scribe line pads

    Østerberg, Frederik Westergaard; Petersen, Dirch Hjorth; Wang, Fei;

    2009-01-01

    Hall mobility and sheet carrier density are important parameters to monitor in advanced semiconductor production. If micro Hall effect measurements are done on small pads in scribe lines, these parameters may be measured without using valuable test wafers. We report how Hall mobility can be extra......Hall mobility and sheet carrier density are important parameters to monitor in advanced semiconductor production. If micro Hall effect measurements are done on small pads in scribe lines, these parameters may be measured without using valuable test wafers. We report how Hall mobility can...... be extracted from micro four-point measurements performed on a rectangular pad. The dimension of the investigated pad is 400 × 430 ¿m2, and the probe pitches range from 20 ¿m to 50 ¿m. The Monte Carlo method is used to find the optimal way to perform the Hall measurement and extract Hall mobility most...

  8. Problems with Accurate Atomic Lfetime Measurements of Multiply Charged Ions

    Trabert, E

    2009-02-19

    A number of recent atomic lifetime measurements on multiply charged ions have reported uncertainties lower than 1%. Such a level of accuracy challenges theory, which is a good thing. However, a few lessons learned from earlier precision lifetime measurements on atoms and singly charged ions suggest to remain cautious about the systematic errors of experimental techniques.

  9. Accurate Measurements of Spectral Reflectance in Picasso's Guernica Painting.

    de Luna, Javier Muñoz; Fernandez-Balbuena, Antonio Alvarez; Vázquez, Daniel; Melgosa, Manuel; Durán, Humberto; García, Jorge; Muro, Carmen

    2016-01-01

    The use of non-invasive spectral measurements to control the conservation status is a part of the preventive conservation of artworks which nowadays is becoming increasingly interesting. This paper describes how to use a spectral measuring device and an illumination system specifically designed for such a task in a very large dimension artwork painting (7.8 m wide × 3.5 m high). The system, controlled by a Cartesian robot, allows spectral measurements in a spectral range of 400-780 nm. The measured data array has a total of 2201 circular regions with 5.5 mm spot diameter placed on a square grid. Colorimetric calculations performed from these spectral measurements may be used to characterize color shifts related to reflectance changes in specific areas of the paint. A color shifting from the expected gray has been shown. PMID:26767640

  10. PRESAGE 3D dosimetry accurately measures Gamma Knife output factors

    Klawikowski, Slade J.; Yang, James N.; Adamovics, John; Ibbott, Geoffrey S.

    2014-12-01

    Small-field output factor measurements are traditionally very difficult because of steep dose gradients, loss of lateral electronic equilibrium, and dose volume averaging in finitely sized detectors. Three-dimensional (3D) dosimetry is ideal for measuring small output factors and avoids many of these potential challenges of point and 2D detectors. PRESAGE 3D polymer dosimeters were used to measure the output factors for the 4 mm and 8 mm collimators of the Leksell Perfexion Gamma Knife radiosurgery treatment system. Discrepancies between the planned and measured distance between shot centers were also investigated. A Gamma Knife head frame was mounted onto an anthropomorphic head phantom. Special inserts were machined to hold 60 mm diameter, 70 mm tall cylindrical PRESAGE dosimeters. The phantom was irradiated with one 16 mm shot and either one 4 mm or one 8 mm shot, to a prescribed dose of either 3 Gy or 4 Gy to the 50% isodose line. The two shots were spaced between 30 mm and 60 mm apart and aligned along the central axis of the cylinder. The Presage dosimeters were measured using the DMOS-RPC optical CT scanning system. Five independent 4 mm output factor measurements fell within 2% of the manufacturer’s Monte Carlo simulation-derived nominal value, as did two independent 8 mm output factor measurements. The measured distances between shot centers varied by ±0.8 mm with respect to the planned shot displacements. On the basis of these results, we conclude that PRESAGE dosimetry is excellently suited to quantify the difficult-to-measure Gamma Knife output factors.

  11. Visual texture accurate material appearance measurement, representation and modeling

    Haindl, Michal

    2013-01-01

    This book surveys the state of the art in multidimensional, physically-correct visual texture modeling. Features: reviews the entire process of texture synthesis, including material appearance representation, measurement, analysis, compression, modeling, editing, visualization, and perceptual evaluation; explains the derivation of the most common representations of visual texture, discussing their properties, advantages, and limitations; describes a range of techniques for the measurement of visual texture, including BRDF, SVBRDF, BTF and BSSRDF; investigates the visualization of textural info

  12. How to perform the most accurate possible phase measurements

    Berry, D. W.; Higgins, B. L.; Bartlett, S. D.; Mitchell, M. W.; Pryde, G. J.; Wiseman, H. M.

    2009-01-01

    We present the theory of how to achieve phase measurements with the minimum possible variance in ways that are readily implementable with current experimental techniques. Measurements whose statistics have high-frequency fringes, such as those obtained from NOON states, have commensurately high information yield. However this information is also highly ambiguous because it does not distinguish between phases at the same point on different fringes. We provide schemes to eliminate this phase am...

  13. ACCUWIND - Accurate wind speed measurements in wind energy - Summary report

    Friis Pedersen, Troels; Dahlberg, J.-Å.; Cuerva, A.; Mouzakis, F.; Busche, P.; Eecen, P.; Sanz-Andres, A.; Franchini, S.; Markkilde Petersen, Søren

    2006-01-01

    verification purposes, and for purposes of optimisation in research and development. The revised IEC standard on power performance measurements has now included requirements for classification of cup anemometers. Thebasis for setting up such requirements of cup anemometers is two EU projects SITEPARIDEN and......The cup anemometer is at present the standard instrument used for mean wind speed measurement in wind energy. It is being applied in high numbers around the world for wind energy assessments. It is also applied exclusively for accredited power performancemeasurements for certification and...... analysis of characteristics of cup and sonic anemometers. The methods and procedures provide a platform, hopefully for use in meeting the requirements of the IEC standard on power performance measurements, as well as for development of improvedinstruments....

  14. How to perform the most accurate possible phase measurements

    Berry, D W; Bartlett, S D; Mitchell, M W; Pryde, G J; Wiseman, H M

    2009-01-01

    We present the theory of how to achieve phase measurements with the minimum possible variance in ways that are readily implementable with current experimental techniques. Measurements whose statistics have high-frequency fringes, such as those obtained from NOON states, have commensurately high information yield. However this information is also highly ambiguous because it does not distinguish between phases at the same point on different fringes. We provide schemes to eliminate this phase ambiguity in a highly efficient way, providing phase estimates with uncertainty that is within a small constant factor of the Heisenberg limit, the minimum allowed by the laws of quantum mechanics. These techniques apply to NOON state and multi-pass interferometry, as well as phase measurements in quantum computing. We have reported the experimental implementation of some of these schemes with multi-pass interferometry elsewhere. Here we present the theoretical foundation, and also present some new experimental results. The...

  15. SPARC: Mass Models for 175 Disk Galaxies with Spitzer Photometry and Accurate Rotation Curves

    Lelli, Federico; Schombert, James M

    2016-01-01

    We introduce SPARC (Spitzer Photometry & Accurate Rotation Curves): a sample of 175 nearby galaxies with new surface photometry at 3.6 um and high-quality rotation curves from previous HI/Halpha studies. SPARC spans a broad range of morphologies (S0 to Irr), luminosities (~5 dex), and surface brightnesses (~4 dex). We derive [3.6] surface photometry and study structural relations of stellar and gas disks. We find that both the stellar mass-HI mass relation and the stellar radius-HI radius relation have significant intrinsic scatter, while the HI mass-radius relation is extremely tight. We build detailed mass models and quantify the ratio of baryonic-to-observed velocity (Vbar/Vobs) for different characteristic radii and values of the stellar mass-to-light ratio (M/L) at [3.6]. Assuming M/L=0.5 Msun/Lsun (as suggested by stellar population models) we find that (i) the gas fraction linearly correlates with total luminosity, (ii) the transition from star-dominated to gas-dominated galaxies roughly correspond...

  16. Measuring the delay time of transmission line accurately by oscilloscope

    In the signal measurements and the diagnoses of transmission line's hitch fields, the transmission line's delay time is usually used. In the paper, a method of using oscilloscope to measure transmission line's delay time is discussed. A method diagnosing transmission line's hitches is also provided. The methods have been used successfully. It will help the power transmission line 's and communication line's hitches to be found and restored fast in many fields, for example, the heavy snow disaster in the southern of China. (authors)

  17. A capacitance servo control plunger for accurate lifetime measurement

    The recoil distance Doppler shift method has been widely used in the study of nuclear structure to determine the level lifetime and absolute transition probabilities. A capacitance servo control plunger based on this method has been successfully developed by the Nuclear Structure Group of the China Institute of Atomic Energy. Three microscopes were employed to check the parallelism and can therefore guarantee a delicate measurement of the distance between the target and the stopper. This new plunger made a successful performance in the test experiment and the measured lifetime of the 2+→0+ transition in 78Kr is in agreement with the previous value. (authors)

  18. THE ARAUCARIA PROJECT: ACCURATE DETERMINATION OF THE DYNAMICAL MASS OF THE CLASSICAL CEPHEID IN THE ECLIPSING SYSTEM OGLE-LMC-CEP-1812

    We have analyzed the double-lined eclipsing binary system OGLE-LMC-CEP-1812 in the LMC and demonstrate that it contains a classical fundamental mode Cepheid pulsating with a period of 1.31 days. The secondary star is a stable giant. We derive the dynamical masses for both stars with an accuracy of 1.5%, making the Cepheid in this system the second classical Cepheid with a very accurate dynamical mass determination, following the OGLE-LMC-CEP-0227 system studied by Pietrzyński et al. The measured dynamical mass agrees very well with that predicted by pulsation models. We also derive the radii of both components and accurate orbital parameters for the binary system. This new, very accurate dynamical mass for a classical Cepheid will greatly contribute to the solution of the Cepheid mass discrepancy problem, and to our understanding of the structure and evolution of classical Cepheids.

  19. Miniature bioelectric device accurately measures and telemeters temperature

    Fryer, T. B.

    1966-01-01

    Miniature micropower solid-state circuit measures and telemeters the body temperature of laboratory animals over periods up to two years. The circuit employs a thermistor as a temperature sensing element and an fm transmitter. It is constructed from conventional discrete components or integrated circuits.

  20. Accurate antenna reflector loss measurements for radiometer calibration budget

    Skou, Niels

    Antenna reflector losses may play an important role in the calibration budget for a microwave radiometer. If the losses are small they are difficult to measure by traditional means. However, they can be assessed directly by radiometric means using the sky brightness temperature as incident...

  1. Accurate physical laws can permit new standard units: The two laws F→=ma→ and the proportionality of weight to mass

    Saslow, Wayne M.

    2014-04-01

    Three common approaches to F→=ma→ are: (1) as an exactly true definition of force F→ in terms of measured inertial mass m and measured acceleration a→; (2) as an exactly true axiom relating measured values of a→, F→ and m; and (3) as an imperfect but accurately true physical law relating measured a→ to measured F→, with m an experimentally determined, matter-dependent constant, in the spirit of the resistance R in Ohm's law. In the third case, the natural units are those of a→ and F→, where a→ is normally specified using distance and time as standard units, and F→ from a spring scale as a standard unit; thus mass units are derived from force, distance, and time units such as newtons, meters, and seconds. The present work develops the third approach when one includes a second physical law (again, imperfect but accurate)—that balance-scale weight W is proportional to m—and the fact that balance-scale measurements of relative weight are more accurate than those of absolute force. When distance and time also are more accurately measurable than absolute force, this second physical law permits a shift to standards of mass, distance, and time units, such as kilograms, meters, and seconds, with the unit of force—the newton—a derived unit. However, were force and distance more accurately measurable than time (e.g., time measured with an hourglass), this second physical law would permit a shift to standards of force, mass, and distance units such as newtons, kilograms, and meters, with the unit of time—the second—a derived unit. Therefore, the choice of the most accurate standard units depends both on what is most accurately measurable and on the accuracy of physical law.

  2. Accurate Measurement of Heat Capacity by Differential Scanning Calorimetry

    1984-01-01

    Experience with high quality heat capacity measurement by differential scanning calorimetry is summarized and illustrated, pointing out three major causes of error: (1) incompatible thermal histories of the sample, reference and blank runs; (2) unstable initial and final isotherms; (3) incompatible differences between initial and final isotherm amplitudes for sample, reference and blank runs. Considering these problems, it is shown for the case of polyoxymethylene that accuracies in heat capacity of 0.1 percent may be possible.

  3. Importance of Accurate Measurements in Nutrition Research: Dietary Flavonoids as a Case Study.

    Harnly, James

    2016-03-01

    Accurate measurements of the secondary metabolites in natural products and plant foods are critical for establishing relations between diet and health. There are as many as 50,000 secondary metabolites that may influence human health. Their structural and chemical diversity presents a challenge to analytical chemistry. With respect to flavonoids, putative identification is accessible, but positive identification and quantification are limited by the lack of standards. Quantification has been tested with use of both nonspecific and specific methods. Nonspecific methods, which include antioxidant capacity methods, fail to provide information on the measured components, suffer from numerous interferences, are not equatable, and are unsuitable for health research. Specific methods, such as LC with diode array and mass spectrometric detection, require the use of internal standards and relative molar response factors. These methods are relatively expensive and require a high level of expertise and experimental verification; however, they represent the only suitable means of relating health outcomes to specific dietary components. PMID:26980821

  4. Accurate measurement of intestinal transit in the rat

    A new method for quantifying intestinal transit was evaluated by comparison with two other popular techniques. The distribution of radiochromium (51Cr) throughout the small intestine of rats previously treated with saline (1.0 ml/kg s.c.), capsaicin (10 mg/kg s.c.), hexamethonium (20 mg/kg i.p.), D-ala2-met-enkephalinamide (1.0 microgram i.c.v.), or neostigmine (0.1 mg/kg i.p.) was quantified by (1) measuring the most distal intestinal segment reached by chromium, (2) calculating the slope produced by linear regression analysis on cumulative percent chromium that had passed through each segment, and (3) determining the geometric center of the distribution of chromium throughout the small intestine. It was concluded that the geometric center methods for quantifying intestinal transit provides the most sensitive and reliable measure of intestinal transit. Less sensitive techniques often fail to detect important effects of drugs on intestinal transit

  5. Accurate measurement of intestinal transit in the rat

    Miller, M.S.; Galligan, J.J.; Burks, T.F.

    1981-11-01

    A new method for quantifying intestinal transit was evaluated by comparison with two other popular techniques. The distribution of radiochromium (51Cr) throughout the small intestine of rats previously treated with saline (1.0 ml/kg s.c.), capsaicin (10 mg/kg s.c.), hexamethonium (20 mg/kg i.p.), D-ala2-met-enkephalinamide (1.0 microgram i.c.v.), or neostigmine (0.1 mg/kg i.p.) was quantified by (1) measuring the most distal intestinal segment reached by chromium, (2) calculating the slope produced by linear regression analysis on cumulative percent chromium that had passed through each segment, and (3) determining the geometric center of the distribution of chromium throughout the small intestine. It was concluded that the geometric center methods for quantifying intestinal transit provides the most sensitive and reliable measure of intestinal transit. Less sensitive techniques often fail to detect important effects of drugs on intestinal transit.

  6. Blood-Pressure Measuring System Gives Accurate Graphic Output

    1965-01-01

    The problem: To develop an instrument that will provide an external (indirect) measurement of arterial blood pressure in the form of an easily interpreted graphic trace that can be correlated with standard clinical blood-pressure measurements. From sphygmograms produced by conventional sphygmographs, it is very difficult to differentiate the systolic and diastolic blood-pressure pulses and to correlate these indices with the standard clinical values. It is nearly impossible to determine these indices when the subject is under physical or emotional stress. The solution: An electronic blood-pressure system, basically similar to conventional ausculatory sphygmomanometers, employing a standard occluding cuff, a gas-pressure source, and a gas-pressure regulator and valve. An electrical output transducer senses cuff pressure, and a microphone positioned on the brachial artery under the occluding cuff monitors the Korotkoff sounds from this artery. The output signals present the conventional systolic and diastolic indices in a clear, graphical display. The complete system also includes an electronic timer and cycle-control circuit.

  7. ACCURATE UNIVERSAL MODELS FOR THE MASS ACCRETION HISTORIES AND CONCENTRATIONS OF DARK MATTER HALOS

    A large amount of observations have constrained cosmological parameters and the initial density fluctuation spectrum to a very high accuracy. However, cosmological parameters change with time and the power index of the power spectrum dramatically varies with mass scale in the so-called concordance ΛCDM cosmology. Thus, any successful model for its structural evolution should work well simultaneously for various cosmological models and different power spectra. We use a large set of high-resolution N-body simulations of a variety of structure formation models (scale-free, standard CDM, open CDM, and ΛCDM) to study the mass accretion histories, the mass and redshift dependence of concentrations, and the concentration evolution histories of dark matter halos. We find that there is significant disagreement between the much-used empirical models in the literature and our simulations. Based on our simulation results, we find that the mass accretion rate of a halo is tightly correlated with a simple function of its mass, the redshift, parameters of the cosmology, and of the initial density fluctuation spectrum, which correctly disentangles the effects of all these factors and halo environments. We also find that the concentration of a halo is strongly correlated with the universe age when its progenitor on the mass accretion history first reaches 4% of its current mass. According to these correlations, we develop new empirical models for both the mass accretion histories and the concentration evolution histories of dark matter halos, and the latter can also be used to predict the mass and redshift dependence of halo concentrations. These models are accurate and universal: the same set of model parameters works well for different cosmological models and for halos of different masses at different redshifts, and in the ΛCDM case the model predictions match the simulation results very well even though halo mass is traced to about 0.0005 times the final mass, when

  8. On accurate differential measurements with electrochemical impedance spectroscopy

    Kernbach, S; Kernbach, O

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the impedance spectroscopy adapted for analysis of small electrochemical changes in fluids. To increase accuracy of measurements the differential approach with temperature stabilization of fluid samples and electronics is used. The impedance analysis is performed by the single point DFT, signal correlation, calculation of RMS amplitudes and interference phase shift. For test purposes the samples of liquids and colloids are treated by fully shielded electromagnetic generators and passive cone-shaped structures. Fluidic samples collected from different geological locations are also analysed. In all tested cases we obtained different results for impacted and non-impacted samples, moreover, a degradation of electrochemical stability after treatment is observed. This method is used in laboratory analysis of weak emissions and ensures a high repeatability of results.

  9. Identification of Microorganisms by High Resolution Tandem Mass Spectrometry with Accurate Statistical Significance

    Alves, Gelio; Wang, Guanghui; Ogurtsov, Aleksey Y.; Drake, Steven K.; Gucek, Marjan; Suffredini, Anthony F.; Sacks, David B.; Yu, Yi-Kuo

    2016-02-01

    Correct and rapid identification of microorganisms is the key to the success of many important applications in health and safety, including, but not limited to, infection treatment, food safety, and biodefense. With the advance of mass spectrometry (MS) technology, the speed of identification can be greatly improved. However, the increasing number of microbes sequenced is challenging correct microbial identification because of the large number of choices present. To properly disentangle candidate microbes, one needs to go beyond apparent morphology or simple `fingerprinting'; to correctly prioritize the candidate microbes, one needs to have accurate statistical significance in microbial identification. We meet these challenges by using peptidome profiles of microbes to better separate them and by designing an analysis method that yields accurate statistical significance. Here, we present an analysis pipeline that uses tandem MS (MS/MS) spectra for microbial identification or classification. We have demonstrated, using MS/MS data of 81 samples, each composed of a single known microorganism, that the proposed pipeline can correctly identify microorganisms at least at the genus and species levels. We have also shown that the proposed pipeline computes accurate statistical significances, i.e., E-values for identified peptides and unified E-values for identified microorganisms. The proposed analysis pipeline has been implemented in MiCId, a freely available software for Microorganism Classification and Identification. MiCId is available for download at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/CBBresearch/Yu/downloads.html.

  10. Accurate measurement of microscopic forces and torques using optical tweezers

    Andrew Forbes

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available It is now well known that matter may be trapped by optical fields with high intensity gradients. Once trapped, it is then possible to manipulate microscopic particles using such optical fields, in so-called optical tweezers. Such optical trapping and tweezing systems have found widespread application across diverse fields in science, from applied biology to fundamental physics. In this article we outline the design and construction of an optical trapping and tweezing system, and show how the resulting interaction of the laser light with microscopic particles may be understood in terms of the transfer of linear and angular momentum of light. We demonstrate experimentally the use of our optical tweezing configuration for the measurement of microscopic forces and torques. In particular, we make use of digital holography to create so-called vortex laser beams, capable of transferring orbital angular momentum to particles. The use of such novel laser beams in an optical trapping and tweezing set-up allows for the control of biological species at the single-cell level.

  11. Accurate Measurement of Magnetic Resonance Imaging Gradient Characteristics

    Hui Liu

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Recently, gradient performance and fidelity has become of increasing interest, as the fidelity of the magnetic resonance (MR image is somewhat dependent on the fidelity of the gradient system. In particular, for high fidelity non-Cartesian imaging, due to non-fidelity of the gradient system, it becomes necessary to know the actual k-space trajectory as opposed to the requested trajectory. In this work we show that, by considering the gradient system as a linear time-invariant system, the gradient impulse response function (GIRF can be reliably measured to a relatively high degree of accuracy with a simple setup, using a small phantom and a series of simple experiments. It is shown experimentally that the resulting GIRF is able to predict actual gradient performance with a high degree of accuracy. The method captures not only the frequency response but also gradient timing errors and artifacts due to mechanical vibrations of the gradient system. Some discussion is provided comparing the method presented here with other analogous methods, along with limitations of these methods.

  12. Accurate lattice parameter measurements of stoichiometric uranium dioxide

    Highlights: • The lattice parameter of stoichiometric uranium dioxide has been re-evaluated. • The new value is substantially higher than the generally accepted value. • The new value has an improved precision. • Earlier published values on the lattice parameter of UO2 are carefully re-assessed. • High accuracy was obtained on both stoichiometry and lattice parameter measurements. - Abstract: The paper presents and discusses lattice parameter analyses of pure, stoichiometric UO2. Attention was paid to prepare stoichiometric samples and to maintain stoichiometry throughout the analyses. The lattice parameter of UO2.000±0.001 was evaluated as being 547.127 ± 0.008 pm at 20 °C, which is substantially higher than many published values for the UO2 lattice constant and has an improved precision by about one order of magnitude. The higher value of the lattice constant is mainly attributed to the avoidance of hyperstoichiometry in the present study and to a minor extent to the use of the currently accepted Cu Kα1 X-ray wavelength value. Many of the early studies used Cu Kα1 wavelength values that differ from the currently accepted value, which also contributed to an underestimation of the true lattice parameter

  13. Accurate lattice parameter measurements of stoichiometric uranium dioxide

    Leinders, Gregory, E-mail: gregory.leinders@sckcen.be [KU Leuven, Department of Chemistry, Celestijnenlaan 200F, P.O. Box 2404, B-3001 Heverlee (Belgium); Belgian Nuclear Research Centre (SCK-CEN), Institute for Nuclear Materials Science, Boeretang 200, B-2400 Mol (Belgium); Cardinaels, Thomas [Belgian Nuclear Research Centre (SCK-CEN), Institute for Nuclear Materials Science, Boeretang 200, B-2400 Mol (Belgium); Binnemans, Koen [KU Leuven, Department of Chemistry, Celestijnenlaan 200F, P.O. Box 2404, B-3001 Heverlee (Belgium); Verwerft, Marc [Belgian Nuclear Research Centre (SCK-CEN), Institute for Nuclear Materials Science, Boeretang 200, B-2400 Mol (Belgium)

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: • The lattice parameter of stoichiometric uranium dioxide has been re-evaluated. • The new value is substantially higher than the generally accepted value. • The new value has an improved precision. • Earlier published values on the lattice parameter of UO{sub 2} are carefully re-assessed. • High accuracy was obtained on both stoichiometry and lattice parameter measurements. - Abstract: The paper presents and discusses lattice parameter analyses of pure, stoichiometric UO{sub 2}. Attention was paid to prepare stoichiometric samples and to maintain stoichiometry throughout the analyses. The lattice parameter of UO{sub 2.000±0.001} was evaluated as being 547.127 ± 0.008 pm at 20 °C, which is substantially higher than many published values for the UO{sub 2} lattice constant and has an improved precision by about one order of magnitude. The higher value of the lattice constant is mainly attributed to the avoidance of hyperstoichiometry in the present study and to a minor extent to the use of the currently accepted Cu Kα{sub 1} X-ray wavelength value. Many of the early studies used Cu Kα{sub 1} wavelength values that differ from the currently accepted value, which also contributed to an underestimation of the true lattice parameter.

  14. Screening of the polyphenol content of tomato-based products through accurate-mass spectrometry (HPLC-ESI-QTOF).

    Vallverdú-Queralt, Anna; Jáuregui, Olga; Di Lecce, Giuseppe; Andrés-Lacueva, Cristina; Lamuela-Raventós, Rosa M

    2011-12-01

    Tomatoes, the second most important vegetable crop worldwide, are a key component in the so-called "Mediterranean diet" and its consumption has greatly increased worldwide over the past 2 decades, mostly due to a growing demand for tomato-based products such as ketchups, gazpachos and tomato juices. In this work, tomato-based products were analysed after a suitable work-up extraction procedure using liquid chromatography/electrospray ionisation-time of flight-mass spectrometry (HPLC-ESI-QTOF) with negative ion detection using information-dependent acquisition (IDA) to determine their phenolic composition. The compounds were confirmed by accurate mass measurements in MS and MS(2) modes. The elemental composition was selected according to the accurate masses and isotopic pattern. In this way, 47 compounds (simple phenolic and hydroxycinnamoylquinic acids and flavone, flavonol, flavanone and dihydrochalcone derivatives) were identified in tomato-based products, five of them, as far as was known, were previously unreported in tomatoes. The phenolic fingerprint showed that tomato-based products differ in phenolic composition, principally in protocatechuic acid-O-hexoside, apigenin and its glycosylated forms, quercetin-O-dihexoside, kaempferol-C-hexoside and eriodictyol-O-dihexoside. Gazpacho showed the highest number of phenolic compounds due to the vegetables added for its production. PMID:25212313

  15. Mass measurement of depleted uranium components with coincidence neutron count

    The technique of the mass measurement of depleted uranium components was studied with active and passive coincidence neutron count. A well neutron coincidence counter was used to measure the coincidence neutron counts of the depleted uranium components with various mass. Am-Be source was selected as the external neutron source for induced fission in the active measurement, and a shield was optimized to reduce the accidental coincidence counts. In the active measurement, the maximum relative deviation of the linear fit mass from the nominal mass of the depleted uranium components is 11.71%, compared to 4.05% in the passive measurement. It is proved that because of the weakening of the shape influence, the passive method is more accurate and reliable to measure the mass of depleted uranium components than the active method. (authors)

  16. Rapid and accurate biofuel moisture content gauging using magnetic resonance measurement technology

    Jaervinen, T.

    2013-04-15

    Biomass is extensively utilised in energy production and as a raw material, such as for the production of liquid biofuels. All those processes will benefit if the moisture content of bio material is known in advance as accurately as possible under transient circumstances. Biofuel trade is increasingly based on the calorific value of fuels. In the first step, this also increases the need for rapid and accurate moisture content determination. During the last few years, large biofuel standardisation has been implemented, emphasising biofuel quality control at all stages of the utilisation chain. In principle, the moisture instrumental measurement can be utilised by many technologies and procedures. Typical techniques are infrared, radiofrequency, microwave, radiometric, electrical conductivity, capacitance, and impedance. Nuclear magnetic resonance (MR) and thermal neutron absorption are also applied. The MR measurement principle has been known and utilised already since the early 1950s. It has become the basic instrumental analysis tool in chemistry. It is also well-known as a very accurate method for analysing most compounds, especially substances containing hydrogen. The utilisation of MR metering is expanded extensively to medical diagnostics as a form of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Because of the precision of the MR principle, there have for a long time been efforts to apply it in new and different areas, and to make more user-friendly, smaller, and even portable devices. Such a device was designed by Vaisala a few years ago. VTT has utilised Vaisala's MR prototype for approximately one year for moisture content measurement of different biofuels. The first step in the use of an MR device for moisture determination was the definition of its measurement accuracy compared to the standard method (EN 14774). Those tests proved that the absolute precision seems to be comparable to the standard moisture content measurement method. It was also found out that

  17. A feasibility study of UHPLC-HRMS accurate-mass screening methods for multiclass testing of organic contaminants in food.

    Pérez-Ortega, Patricia; Lara-Ortega, Felipe J; García-Reyes, Juan F; Gilbert-López, Bienvenida; Trojanowicz, Marek; Molina-Díaz, Antonio

    2016-11-01

    The feasibility of accurate-mass multi-residue screening methods using liquid chromatography high-resolution mass spectrometry (UHPLC-HRMS) using time-of-flight mass spectrometry has been evaluated, including over 625 multiclass food contaminants as case study. Aspects such as the selectivity and confirmation capability provided by HRMS with different acquisition modes (full-scan or full-scan combined with collision induced dissociation (CID) with no precursor ion isolation), and chromatographic separation along with main limitations such as sensitivity or automated data processing have been examined. Compound identification was accomplished with retention time matching and accurate mass measurements of the targeted ions for each analyte (mainly (de)protonated molecules). Compounds with the same nominal mass (isobaric species) were very frequent due to the large number of compounds included. Although 76% of database compounds were involved in isobaric groups, they were resolved in most cases (99% of these isobaric species were distinguished by retention time, resolving power, isotopic profile or fragment ions). Only three pairs could not be resolved with these tools. In-source CID fragmentation was evaluated in depth, although the results obtained in terms of information provided were not as thorough as those obtained using fragmentation experiments without precursor ion isolation (all ion mode). The latter acquisition mode was found to be the best suited for this type of large-scale screening method instead of classic product ion scan, as provided excellent fragmentation information for confirmatory purposes for an unlimited number of compounds. Leaving aside the sample treatment limitations, the main weaknesses noticed are basically the relatively low sensitivity for compounds which does not map well against electrospray ionization and also quantitation issues such as those produced by signal suppression due to either matrix effects from coeluting matrix or from

  18. Accurate Measurement of the in vivo Ammonium Concentration in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Cueto-Rojas, Hugo F; Maleki Seifar, Reza; Ten Pierick, Angela; Heijnen, Sef J; Wahl, Aljoscha

    2016-01-01

    Ammonium (NH₄⁺) is the most common N-source for yeast fermentations, and N-limitation is frequently applied to reduce growth and increase product yields. While there is significant molecular knowledge on NH₄⁺ transport and assimilation, there have been few attempts to measure the in vivo concentration of this metabolite. In this article, we present a sensitive and accurate analytical method to quantify the in vivo intracellular ammonium concentration in Saccharomyces cerevisiae based on standard rapid sampling and metabolomics techniques. The method validation experiments required the development of a proper sample processing protocol to minimize ammonium production/consumption during biomass extraction by assessing the impact of amino acid degradation-an element that is often overlooked. The resulting cold chloroform metabolite extraction method, together with quantification using ultra high performance liquid chromatography-isotope dilution mass spectrometry (UHPLC-IDMS), was not only more sensitive than most of the existing methods but also more accurate than methods that use electrodes, enzymatic reactions, or boiling water or boiling ethanol biomass extraction because it minimized ammonium consumption/production during sampling processing and interference from other metabolites in the quantification of intracellular ammonium. Finally, our validation experiments showed that other metabolites such as pyruvate or 2-oxoglutarate (αKG) need to be extracted with cold chloroform to avoid measurements being biased by the degradation of other metabolites (e.g., amino acids). PMID:27120628

  19. Accurate Measurement of the in vivo Ammonium Concentration in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Hugo F. Cueto-Rojas

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Ammonium (NH4+ is the most common N-source for yeast fermentations, and N-limitation is frequently applied to reduce growth and increase product yields. While there is significant molecular knowledge on NH4+ transport and assimilation, there have been few attempts to measure the in vivo concentration of this metabolite. In this article, we present a sensitive and accurate analytical method to quantify the in vivo intracellular ammonium concentration in Saccharomyces cerevisiae based on standard rapid sampling and metabolomics techniques. The method validation experiments required the development of a proper sample processing protocol to minimize ammonium production/consumption during biomass extraction by assessing the impact of amino acid degradation—an element that is often overlooked. The resulting cold chloroform metabolite extraction method, together with quantification using ultra high performance liquid chromatography-isotope dilution mass spectrometry (UHPLC-IDMS, was not only more sensitive than most of the existing methods but also more accurate than methods that use electrodes, enzymatic reactions, or boiling water or boiling ethanol biomass extraction because it minimized ammonium consumption/production during sampling processing and interference from other metabolites in the quantification of intracellular ammonium. Finally, our validation experiments showed that other metabolites such as pyruvate or 2-oxoglutarate (αKG need to be extracted with cold chloroform to avoid measurements being biased by the degradation of other metabolites (e.g., amino acids.

  20. Cluster abundance in chameleon $f(R)$ gravity I: toward an accurate halo mass function prediction

    Cataneo, Matteo; Lombriser, Lucas; Li, Baojiu

    2016-01-01

    We refine the mass and environment dependent spherical collapse model of chameleon $f(R)$ gravity by calibrating a phenomenological correction inspired by the parameterized post-Friedmann framework against high-resolution $N$-body simulations. We employ our method to predict the corresponding modified halo mass function, and provide fitting formulas to calculate the fractional enhancement of the $f(R)$ halo abundance with respect to that of General Relativity (GR) within a precision of $\\lesssim 5\\%$ from the results obtained in the simulations. Similar accuracy can be achieved for the full $f(R)$ mass function on the condition that the modeling of the reference GR abundance of halos is accurate at the percent level. We use our fits to forecast constraints on the additional scalar degree of freedom of the theory, finding that upper bounds competitive with current Solar System tests are within reach of cluster number count analyses from ongoing and upcoming surveys at much larger scales. Importantly, the flexi...

  1. Zero G Mass Measurement Device (ZGMMD) Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Zero Gravity Mass Measurement Device (ZGMMD) provides the ability to measure the mass of samples in a microgravity environment, like that found on the...

  2. High-Precision Mass Measurements of Exotic Nuclei with the Triple-Trap Mass Spectrometer Isoltrap

    Blaum, K; Zuber, K T; Stanja, J

    2002-01-01

    The masses of close to 200 short-lived nuclides have already been measured with the mass spectrometer ISOLTRAP with a relative precision between 1$\\times$10$^{-7}$ and 1$\\times$10^{-8}$. The installatin of a radio-frequency quadrupole trap increased the overall efficiency by two orders of magnitude which is at present about 1%. In a recent upgrade, we installed a carbon cluster laser ion source, which will allow us to use carbon clusters as mass references for absolute mass measurements. Due to these improvements and the high reliability of ISOLTRAP we are now able to perform accurate high-precision mass measurements all over the nuclear chart. We propose therefore mass measurements on light, medium and heavy nuclides on both sides of the valley of stability in the coming four years. ISOLTRAP is presently the only instrument capable of the high precision required for many of the proposed studies.

  3. Accurate evolutions of unequal-mass neutron-star binaries: properties of the torus and short GRB engines

    We present new results from accurate and fully general-relativistic simulations of the coalescence of unmagnetized binary neutron stars with various mass ratios. The evolution of the stars is followed through the inspiral phase, the merger, and the prompt collapse to a black hole, up until the appearance of a thick accretion disc, which is studied as it enters and remains in a regime of quasi-steady accretion. Although a simple ideal-fluid equation of state with Γ = 2 is used, this work presents a systematic study within a fully general-relativistic framework of the properties of the resulting black-hole-torus system produced by the merger of unequal-mass binaries. More specifically, we show that (1) the mass of the torus increases considerably with the mass asymmetry, and equal-mass binaries do not produce significant tori if they have a total baryonic mass Mtot ∼> 3.7 Mo-dot; (2) tori with masses Mtor ∼ 0.2 Mo-dot are measured for binaries with Mtot ∼ 3.4 Mo-dot and mass ratios q ∼ 0.75-0.85; (3) the mass of the torus can be estimated by the simple expression Mtor-bar(q,Mtot = [c1 (1-q) + c2](Mmax-Mot), involving the maximum mass for the binaries and coefficients constrained from the simulations, and suggesting that the tori can have masses as large as Mtor-bar ∼ 0.35Modot for Mtot ∼ 2.8 Mo-dot and q ∼ 0.75-0.85; (4) using a novel technique to analyze the evolution of the tori, we find no evidence for the onset of non-axisymmetric instabilities and that very little, if any, of their mass is unbound; (5) finally, for all the binaries considered, we compute the complete gravitational waveforms and the recoils imparted to the black holes, discussing the prospects of the detection of these sources for a number of present and future detectors.

  4. In-depth glycoproteomic characterization of γ-conglutin by high-resolution accurate mass spectrometry.

    Silvia Schiarea

    Full Text Available The molecular characterization of bioactive food components is necessary for understanding the mechanisms of their beneficial or detrimental effects on human health. This study focused on γ-conglutin, a well-known lupin seed N-glycoprotein with health-promoting properties and controversial allergenic potential. Given the importance of N-glycosylation for the functional and structural characteristics of proteins, we studied the purified protein by a mass spectrometry-based glycoproteomic approach able to identify the structure, micro-heterogeneity and attachment site of the bound N-glycan(s, and to provide extensive coverage of the protein sequence. The peptide/N-glycopeptide mixtures generated by enzymatic digestion (with or without N-deglycosylation were analyzed by high-resolution accurate mass liquid chromatography-multi-stage mass spectrometry. The four main micro-heterogeneous variants of the single N-glycan bound to γ-conglutin were identified as Man2(Xyl (Fuc GlcNAc2, Man3(Xyl (Fuc GlcNAc2, GlcNAcMan3(Xyl (Fuc GlcNAc2 and GlcNAc 2Man3(Xyl (Fuc GlcNAc2. These carry both core β1,2-xylose and core α1-3-fucose (well known Cross-Reactive Carbohydrate Determinants, but corresponding fucose-free variants were also identified as minor components. The N-glycan was proven to reside on Asn131, one of the two potential N-glycosylation sites. The extensive coverage of the γ-conglutin amino acid sequence suggested three alternative N-termini of the small subunit, that were later confirmed by direct-infusion Orbitrap mass spectrometry analysis of the intact subunit.

  5. Enantiomeric separation in comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography with accurate mass analysis.

    Chin, Sung-Tong; Nolvachai, Yada; Marriott, Philip J

    2014-11-01

    Chiral comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (eGC×GC) coupled to quadrupole-accurate mass time-of-flight mass spectrometry (QTOFMS) was evaluated for its capability to report the chiral composition of several monoterpenes, namely, α-pinene, β-pinene, and limonene in cardamom oil. Enantiomers in a standard mixture were fully resolved by direct enantiomeric-GC analysis with a 2,3-di-O-methyl-6-t-butylsilyl derivatized β-cyclodextrin phase; however, the (+)-(R)-limonene enantiomer in cardamom oil was overlapped with other background components including cymene and cineole. Verification of (+)-(R)-limonene components based on characteristic ions at m/z 136, 121, and 107 acquired by chiral single-dimension GC-QTOFMS in the alternate MS/MSMS mode of operation was unsuccessful due to similar parent/daughter ions generated by interfering or co-eluting cymene and cineole. Column phases SUPELCOWAX, SLB-IL111, HP-88, and SLB-IL59, were incorporated as the second dimension column ((2)D) in chiral GC×GC analysis; the SLB-IL59 offered the best resolution for the tested monoterpene enantiomers from the matrix background. Enantiomeric ratios for α-pinene, β-pinene, and limonene were determined to be 1.325, 2.703, and 1.040, respectively, in the cardamom oil sample based on relative peak area data. PMID:24420979

  6. CycloBranch: De Novo Sequencing of Nonribosomal Peptides from Accurate Product Ion Mass Spectra

    Novák, Jiří; Lemr, Karel; Schug, Kevin A.; Havlíček, Vladimír

    2015-07-01

    Nonribosomal peptides have a wide range of biological and medical applications. Their identification by tandem mass spectrometry remains a challenging task. A new open-source de novo peptide identification engine CycloBranch was developed and successfully applied in identification or detailed characterization of 11 linear, cyclic, branched, and branch-cyclic peptides. CycloBranch is based on annotated building block databases the size of which is defined by the user according to ribosomal or nonribosomal peptide origin. The current number of involved nonisobaric and isobaric building blocks is 287 and 521, respectively. Contrary to all other peptide sequencing tools utilizing either peptide libraries or peptide fragment libraries, CycloBranch represents a true de novo sequencing engine developed for accurate mass spectrometric data. It is a stand-alone and cross-platform application with a graphical and user-friendly interface; it supports mzML, mzXML, mgf, txt, and baf file formats and can be run in parallel on multiple threads. It can be downloaded for free from http://ms.biomed.cas.cz/cyclobranch/, where the User's manual and video tutorials can be found.

  7. Fatty acids composition of Caenorhabditis elegans using accurate mass GCMS-QTOF.

    Henry, Parise; Owopetu, Olufunmilayo; Adisa, Demilade; Nguyen, Thao; Anthony, Kevin; Ijoni-Animadu, David; Jamadar, Sakha; Abdel-Rahman, Fawzia; Saleh, Mahmoud A

    2016-08-01

    The free living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is a proven model organism for lipid metabolism research. Total lipids of C. elegans were extracted using chloroform and methanol in 2:1 ratio (v/v). Fatty acids composition of the extracted total lipids was converted to their corresponding fatty acids methyl esters (FAMEs) and analyzed by gas chromatography/accurate mass quadrupole time of flight mass spectrometry using both electron ionization and chemical ionization techniques. Twenty-eight fatty acids consisting of 12 to 22 carbon atoms were identified, 65% of them were unsaturated. Fatty acids containing 12 to17 carbons were mostly saturated with stearic acid (18:0) as the major constituent. Several branched-chain fatty acids were identified. Methyl-14-methylhexadecanoate (iso- 17:0) was the major identified branched fatty acid. This is the first report to detect the intact molecular parent ions of the identified fatty acids in C. elegans using chemical ionization compared to electron ionization which produced fragmentations of the FAMEs. PMID:27166662

  8. Isotopic Measurement of Uranium by Mass Spectrometry

    The growing application of atomic energy creates a wider need for precise and accurate knowledge of the isotopic composition of uranium. This information is particularly of great importance in the accountability and transfer of enriched uranium for reactor and research applications involving millions of dollars worth of fissionable materials. Reliable isotopic measurements are also necessary to ensure compliance of fuel element compositions with the reactor design specifications and to permit calculation of process and fuel burn-up losses. Mass spectrometry methods, which far surpass the capabilities of other methods, Were developed for very precise isotopic determinations. These methods, ''Single Standard'' and ''Double Standard'', involve the comparison of measurements of an unknown sample to similar measurements on known standards. Use of the ''Double Standard'' method eliminates the effects of instrument bias, thus permitting isotopic determinations with precisions (95% limit of error) of the order of ± 0.02% of the values. Accuracies are limited only by the knowledge of the standard values used, which are referenced to the series of uranium isotopic standards available from the US National Bureau of Standards. The mass spectrometers are also useful for the absolute determination of isotopic composition of uranium, especially in forms other than UF6. Thermal ionization techniques using high-resolution (approximately 12-in. radius) spectrometers permit the absolute isotopic characterization of the minor isotopes (i.e. those less than 10 wt.%) with an accuracy and precision of about 0.5% of the values per analysis. These analyses are particularly useful in calibrating highly enriched and highly depleted uranium for subsequent use as blending materials in an isotopic standards programme. Both relative and absolute isotopic measurement methods are described as well as their application in the accountability and operational analytical programmes. These applications

  9. Integrated Post-Experiment Monoisotopic Mass Refinement: An Integrated Approach to Accurately Assign Monoisotopic Precursor Masses to Tandem Mass Spectrometric Data

    Jung, Hee-Jung; Purvine, Samuel O.; Kim, Hokeun; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Hyung, Seok-Won; Monroe, Matthew E.; Mun, Dong-Gi; Kim, Kyong-Chul; Park, Jong-Moon; Kim, Su-Jin; Tolic, Nikola; Slysz, Gordon W.; Moore, Ronald J.; Zhao, Rui; Adkins, Joshua N.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Lee, Hookeun; Camp, David G.; Yu, Myeong-Hee; Smith, Richard D.; Lee, Sang-Won

    2010-10-15

    Accurate assignment of monoisotopic precursor masses to tandem mass spectrometric (MS/MS) data is a fundamental and critically important step for successful peptide identifications in mass spectrometry based proteomics. Here we describe an integrated approach that combines three previously reported methods of treating MS/MS data for precursor mass refinement. This combined method, “integrated Post-Experiment Monoisotopic Mass Refinement” (iPE MMR), integrates steps: 1) generation of refined MS/MS data by DeconMSn, 2) additional refinement of the resultant MS/MS data by a modified version of PE-MMR, and 3) elimination of systematic errors of precursor masses using DtaRefinery. iPE-MMR is the first method that utilizes all MS information from multiple MS scans of a precursor ion and multiple charge states of it in an MS scan to determine precursor mass. By combining the synergistic features of each of method, iPE MMR increases sensitivity in peptide identification and provides increased accuracy when applied to complex high-throughput proteomics data. iPE MMR also allows incorporating additional data processing step(s) or skipping step(s), if necessary, to enable new developments or applications of the tools, as each step of iPE MMR produces output data in a common and conventional format used in proteomics data processing.

  10. Mass Measurement of Very Short Half-Lived Nuclei

    Duma, M; Iacob, V E; Thibault, C

    2002-01-01

    The MISTRAL (Mass measurements at ISolde with a Transmission RAdiofrequency spectrometer on-Line) experiment exploits a rapid measurement technique to make accurate mass determinations of very short-lived nuclei. The physics goals are to elucidate new nuclear structure effects and constrain nuclear mass models in regions of interest to nuclear astrophysics.\\\\ \\\\The spectrometer, installed in May 97, performed as promised in the proposal with mass resolution exceeding 100,000. In its first experiment in July 1998, neutron-rich Na isotopes having half-lives as short as 31 ms were measured. A second experiment in November 1998 enabled us to improve the measurement precision of the isotopes $^{26-30}$Na to about 20 keV. The measurement program continues as experiment IS 373.

  11. Disentangling correlated scatter in cluster mass measurements

    Noh, Yookyung

    2012-01-01

    The challenge of obtaining galaxy cluster masses is increasingly being addressed by multiwavelength measurements. As scatters in measured cluster masses are often sourced by properties of or around the clusters themselves, correlations between mass scatters are frequent and can be significant, with consequences for errors on mass estimates both directly and those obtained via stacking. Using a high resolution 250 Mpc/h side N-body simulation, combined with proxies for observational cluster mass measurements, we obtain mass scatter correlations and covariances for 243 individual clusters along ~96 lines of sight each, both separately and together. We use principal component analysis (PCA) to characterize scatter trends and variations between clusters. The dominant mass scatter combination identified by PCA is common to many clusters, and tends to dominate the mass scatters when viewing the cluster along its long axis. We also correlate cluster mass scatter, environmental and intrinsic properties, and use PCA t...

  12. Zero G Mass Measurement Device (ZGMMD) Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Zero G Mass Measurement Device (ZGMMD) will provide the ability to quantify the mass of objects up to 2,000 grams, including live animal specimens in a zero G...

  13. Bone Mass Measurement: What the Numbers Mean

    ... supported by your browser. Home Bone Basics Bone Mass Measurement: What the Numbers Mean Publication available in: ... been one or more osteoporotic fractures. Low Bone Mass Versus Osteoporosis The information provided by a BMD ...

  14. Measuring solar reflectance Part I: Defining a metric that accurately predicts solar heat gain

    Levinson, Ronnen; Akbari, Hashem; Berdahl, Paul

    2010-05-14

    Solar reflectance can vary with the spectral and angular distributions of incident sunlight, which in turn depend on surface orientation, solar position and atmospheric conditions. A widely used solar reflectance metric based on the ASTM Standard E891 beam-normal solar spectral irradiance underestimates the solar heat gain of a spectrally selective 'cool colored' surface because this irradiance contains a greater fraction of near-infrared light than typically found in ordinary (unconcentrated) global sunlight. At mainland U.S. latitudes, this metric RE891BN can underestimate the annual peak solar heat gain of a typical roof or pavement (slope {le} 5:12 [23{sup o}]) by as much as 89 W m{sup -2}, and underestimate its peak surface temperature by up to 5 K. Using R{sub E891BN} to characterize roofs in a building energy simulation can exaggerate the economic value N of annual cool-roof net energy savings by as much as 23%. We define clear-sky air mass one global horizontal ('AM1GH') solar reflectance R{sub g,0}, a simple and easily measured property that more accurately predicts solar heat gain. R{sub g,0} predicts the annual peak solar heat gain of a roof or pavement to within 2 W m{sup -2}, and overestimates N by no more than 3%. R{sub g,0} is well suited to rating the solar reflectances of roofs, pavements and walls. We show in Part II that R{sub g,0} can be easily and accurately measured with a pyranometer, a solar spectrophotometer or version 6 of the Solar Spectrum Reflectometer.

  15. Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA): Accurate Panchromatic Photometry from Optical Priors using LAMBDAR

    Wright, A H; Bourne, N; Driver, S P; Dunne, L; Maddox, S J; Alpaslan, M; Andrews, S K; Bauer, A E; Bland-Hawthorn, J; Brough, S; Brown, M J I; Cluver, M; Davies, L J M; Holwerda, B W; Hopkins, A M; Jarrett, T H; Kafle, P R; Lange, R; Liske, J; Loveday, J; Moffett, A J; Norberg, P; Popescu, C C; Smith, M; Taylor, E N; Tuffs, R J; Wang, L; Wilkins, S M

    2016-01-01

    We present the Lambda Adaptive Multi-Band Deblending Algorithm in R (LAMBDAR), a novel code for calculating matched aperture photometry across images that are neither pixel- nor PSF-matched, using prior aperture definitions derived from high resolution optical imaging. The development of this program is motivated by the desire for consistent photometry and uncertainties across large ranges of photometric imaging, for use in calculating spectral energy distributions. We describe the program, specifically key features required for robust determination of panchromatic photometry: propagation of apertures to images with arbitrary resolution, local background estimation, aperture normalisation, uncertainty determination and propagation, and object deblending. Using simulated images, we demonstrate that the program is able to recover accurate photometric measurements in both high-resolution, low-confusion, and low-resolution, high-confusion, regimes. We apply the program to the 21-band photometric dataset from the ...

  16. Body mass index and blood pressure measurement during pregnancy.

    Hogan, Jennifer L

    2012-02-01

    OBJECTIVE: The accurate measurement of blood pressure requires the use of a large cuff in subjects with a high mid-arm circumference (MAC). This prospective study examined the need for a large cuff during pregnancy and its correlation with maternal obesity. METHODS: Maternal body mass index (BMI), fat mass, and MAC were measured. RESULTS: Of 179 women studied, 15.6% were obese. With a BMI of level 1 obesity, 44% needed a large cuff and with a BMI of level 2 obesity 100% needed a large cuff. CONCLUSION: All women booking for antenatal care should have their MAC measured to avoid the overdiagnosis of pregnancy hypertension.

  17. Selected top quark mass measurements at CMS

    Bouvier, Elvire

    2016-01-01

    Selected measurements of the top quark mass are presented, obtained from CMS data collected in proton-proton collisions at the LHC at center-of-mass energies of 7, 8, and 13 TeV. ``Standard'' techniques are employed in each decay channel of top quark pair events and their results are combined. The mass of the top quark is also measured using several ``alternative'' methods, including measurements from shapes of top quark decay distributions in single top quark and top quark pair events as well as pole mass measurements.

  18. Accurate Quantification of Lipid Species by Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry — Meets a Key Challenge in Lipidomics

    Kui Yang

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS has become one of the most popular and powerful technologies to identify and quantify individual lipid species in lipidomics. Meanwhile, quantitative analysis of lipid species by ESI-MS has also become a major obstacle to meet the challenges of lipidomics. Herein, we discuss the principles, advantages, and possible limitations of different mass spectrometry-based methodologies for lipid quantification, as well as a few practical issues important for accurate quantification of individual lipid species. Accordingly, accurate quantification of individual lipid species, one of the key challenges in lipidomics, can be practically met.

  19. Dynamical Mass Measurements of Contaminated Galaxy Clusters Using Machine Learning

    Ntampaka, Michelle; Trac, Hy; Sutherland, Dougal; Fromenteau, Sebastien; Poczos, Barnabas; Schneider, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    Galaxy clusters are a rich source of information for examining fundamental astrophysical processes and cosmological parameters, however, employing clusters as cosmological probes requires accurate mass measurements derived from cluster observables. We study dynamical mass measurements of galaxy clusters contaminated by interlopers, and show that a modern machine learning (ML) algorithm can predict masses by better than a factor of two compared to a standard scaling relation approach. We create a mock catalog from Multidark's publicly-available N-body MDPL1 simulation where a simple cylindrical cut around the cluster center allows interlopers to contaminate the clusters. In the standard approach, we use a power law scaling relation to infer cluster mass from galaxy line of sight (LOS) velocity dispersion. The presence of interlopers in the catalog produces a wide, flat fractional mass error distribution, with width = 2.13. We employ the Support Distribution Machine (SDM) class of algorithms to learn from distributions of data to predict single values. Applied to distributions of galaxy observables such as LOS velocity and projected distance from the cluster center, SDM yields better than a factor-of-two improvement (width = 0.67). Remarkably, SDM applied to contaminated clusters is better able to recover masses than even a scaling relation approach applied to uncontaminated clusters. We show that the SDM method more accurately reproduces the cluster mass function, making it a valuable tool for employing cluster observations to evaluate cosmological models.

  20. Volume and mass measurements of liquids

    The report comprises the 10 lectures given at the 74th PTB seminar, which represent the state of the art in the field of liquid flow measurement. The lectures deal with the overflow-pipette as the primary volume standard of PTB, gas elimination devices (compulsory in measuring assemblies with volume meters), measuring assemblies for the reception of milk, electromagnetic flowmeters, vortex-shedding meters, indirect mass measurement from volume and density, direct mass measurement (coriolis flowmeters), pipeline-measurements, level measurement at storage tanks with conventional and optical methods and a development aid project for the set up of test rigs in India. (orig.)

  1. Measuring Accurate Body Parameters of Dressed Humans with Large-Scale Motion Using a Kinect Sensor

    Sidan Du

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Non-contact human body measurement plays an important role in surveillance, physical healthcare, on-line business and virtual fitting. Current methods for measuring the human body without physical contact usually cannot handle humans wearing clothes, which limits their applicability in public environments. In this paper, we propose an effective solution that can measure accurate parameters of the human body with large-scale motion from a Kinect sensor, assuming that the people are wearing clothes. Because motion can drive clothes attached to the human body loosely or tightly, we adopt a space-time analysis to mine the information across the posture variations. Using this information, we recover the human body, regardless of the effect of clothes, and measure the human body parameters accurately. Experimental results show that our system can perform more accurate parameter estimation on the human body than state-of-the-art methods.

  2. Precise atomic mass measurements by deflection mass spectrometry

    Barber, R C

    2003-01-01

    Since its inception nearly 90 years ago by J.J. Thomson, the precise determination of atomic masses by the classical technique of deflecting charged particles in electric and magnetic fields has provided a large body of data on naturally occurring nuclides. Currently, such measurements on stable nuclides have frequently achieved a precision of better than two parts in 10 sup 9 of the mass. A review of the technique, together with a brief summary of the important historical developments in the field of precise atomic mass measurements, will be given. The more recent contributions to this field by the deflection mass spectrometer at the University of Manitoba will be provided as illustrations of the culmination of the techniques used and the applications that have been studied. A brief comparison between this and newer techniques using Penning traps will be presented.

  3. Precise atomic mass measurements by deflection mass spectrometry

    Barber, R. C.; Sharma, K. S.

    2003-05-01

    Since its inception nearly 90 years ago by J.J. Thomson, the precise determination of atomic masses by the classical technique of deflecting charged particles in electric and magnetic fields has provided a large body of data on naturally occurring nuclides. Currently, such measurements on stable nuclides have frequently achieved a precision of better than two parts in 10 9 of the mass. A review of the technique, together with a brief summary of the important historical developments in the field of precise atomic mass measurements, will be given. The more recent contributions to this field by the deflection mass spectrometer at the University of Manitoba will be provided as illustrations of the culmination of the techniques used and the applications that have been studied. A brief comparison between this and newer techniques using Penning traps will be presented.

  4. Mass properties measurement system: Dynamics and statics measurements

    Doty, Keith L.

    1993-01-01

    This report presents and interprets experimental data obtained from the Mass Properties Measurement System (MPMS). Statics measurements yield the center-of-gravity of an unknown mass and dynamics measurements yield its inertia matrix. Observations of the MPMS performance has lead us to specific design criteria and an understanding of MPMS limitations.

  5. Top quark mass measurements in ATLAS

    The top quark is a fundamental constituent of the Standard Model (SM). The properties of this quark are accurately predicted by this theory, except for its mass, which remains a fundamental parameter of the SM. With the advent of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), many million of top-antitop quark pairs are available for study. With such statistics, the physics of the top quark has entered the precision era. In this note, the most recent experimental results by ATLAS concerning the top quark mass are reported

  6. Mass measurement of W with UA2

    This thesis describes the measurement of the W mass with the UA2 detector at the CERN antipp collider. In the first section, the importance of the measurement of the W mass in the framework of the Standard Model at the level of radiative corrections is discussed. In the second part, we describe the experimental apparatus used, which is designed for good electron identification and energy measurement and for good missing transverse momentum measurement. We describe the selection of W and Z events, decaying to electron-neutrino and electron-positron, used for the measurements of the masses of these two intermediate bosons. The method used to extract the W mass is described in detail, with emphasis on the informations given by the study of Z events. The values obtained for the W and Z masses are given after discussion of systematic uncertainties. The main uncertainty, which arises from the energy scale uncertainty, vanishes in the masses ratio. This value, combined with the Z mass from LEP, allows us to obtain a precise determination of the W mass: Mw = 80.49 ± 0.37 GeV/c2. The implications of this measurement on the Standard Model parameters are discussed in the last section

  7. Top quark mass measurement in dilepton channel

    In this work, we measured the top quark mass in tt'-' events produced in pp'-' interactions at the center-of-mass energy 1.96 TeV using CDF detector. We used dilepton in tt'-' events where both W bosons from top quarks are decaying into leptons. The data sample corresponds to 340 pb-1. We found there 33 tt'-' candidates while expecting 10.5 ± 1.9 background events. In the measurement, we reconstruct one, representative mass for each event using the assumption about longitudinal momentum of in tt'-' system, in order to be able to kinematically solve the under-constrained system. The mass distributions (templates) are created for simulated signal and background events. Templates are parametrized in order to obtain smooth probability density functions. Likelihood maximization which includes these parametrized templates is then performed on reconstructed masses obtained from data sample in order to obtain final top quark mass estimate. The result of applying this procedure on data events is top quark mass estimate 169.5+7.7-7.2(stat.) ± 4.0(syst.) GeV/c2 for 30 out of 33 candidates, where the solution for top quark mass was found. This measurement was a part of first top quark mass measurement in dilepton channel at CDF in Run II. The top quark mass measured here is consistent with the CDF measurement in dilepton channel from Run I Mtop = 167.4 ± 10.3(stat.) ± 4.8(syst.) GeV/c2. Moreover, the combined result of four top quark mass measurements in dilepton channel from Run II (one of these four measurements is our measurement) Mtop = 167.9 ± 5.2(stat.) ± 3.7(syst.) GeV/c2 significantly (by ∼ 40%) improved the precision of top quark mass determination from Run I. It should be also noted, that this combined result is consistent with measurement obtained in 'lepton+jets' channel at CDF in Run II (Mtop = 173.5+3.9-3.8 GeV/c2). So, we don't have yet any indication about new physics beyond the Standard Model. My main contribution in this analysis was the optimization

  8. Precision Mass Measurement of Argon Isotopes

    Lunney, D

    2002-01-01

    % IS388\\\\ \\\\ A precision mass measurement of the neutron-deficient isotopes $^{32,33,34}$Ar is proposed. Mass values of these isotopes are of importance for: a) a stringent test of the Isobaric-Multiplet- Mass-Equation, b) a verification of the correctness of calculated charge-dependent corrections as used in super-allowed $\\beta$- decay studies aiming at a test of the CVC hypothesis, and c) the determination of the kinematics in electron-neutrino correlation experiments searching for scalar currents in weak interaction. The measurements will be carried out with the ISOLTRAP Penning trap mass spectrometer.

  9. No galaxy left behind: accurate measurements with the faintest objects in the Dark Energy Survey

    Suchyta, E; Aleksić, J; Melchior, P; Jouvel, S; MacCrann, N; Crocce, M; Gaztanaga, E; Honscheid, K; Leistedt, B; Peiris, H V; Ross, A J; Rykoff, E S; Sheldon, E; Abbott, T; Abdalla, F B; Allam, S; Banerji, M; Benoit-Lévy, A; Bertin, E; Brooks, D; Burke, D L; Rosell, A Carnero; Kind, M Carrasco; Carretero, J; Cunha, C E; D'Andrea, C B; da Costa, L N; DePoy, D L; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Dietrich, J P; Doel, P; Eifler, T F; Estrada, J; Evrard, A E; Flaugher, B; Fosalba, P; Frieman, J; Gerdes, D W; Gruen, D; Gruendl, R A; James, D J; Jarvis, M; Kuehn, K; Kuropatkin, N; Lahav, O; Lima, M; Maia, M A G; March, M; Marshall, J L; Miller, C J; Miquel, R; Neilsen, E; Nichol, R C; Nord, B; Ogando, R; Percival, W J; Reil, K; Roodman, A; Sako, M; Sanchez, E; Scarpine, V; Sevilla-Noarbe, I; Smith, R C; Soares-Santos, M; Sobreira, F; Swanson, M E C; Tarle, G; Thaler, J; Thomas, D; Vikram, V; Walker, A R; Wechsler, R H; Zhang, Y

    2015-01-01

    Accurate statistical measurement with large imaging surveys has traditionally required throwing away a sizable fraction of the data. This is because most measurements have have relied on selecting nearly complete samples, where variations in the composition of the galaxy population with seeing, depth, or other survey characteristics are small. We introduce a new measurement method that aims to minimize this wastage, allowing precision measurement for any class of stars or galaxies detectable in an imaging survey. We have implemented our proposal in Balrog, a software package which embeds fake objects in real imaging in order to accurately characterize measurement biases. We demonstrate this technique with an angular clustering measurement using Dark Energy Survey (DES) data. We first show that recovery of our injected galaxies depends on a wide variety of survey characteristics in the same way as the real data. We then construct a flux-limited sample of the faintest galaxies in DES, chosen specifically for th...

  10. Top quark mass measurement at the Tevatron

    Guimaraes da Costa, Joao; /Harvard U.

    2004-12-01

    The authors report on the latest experimental measurements of the top quark mass by the CDF and D0 Collaborations at the Fermilab Tevatron. They present a new top mass measurement using the t{bar t} events collected by the D0 Collaboration in Run I between 1994 and 1996. This result is combined with previous measurements to yield a new world top mass average. They also describe several preliminary results using up to 193 pb{sup -1} of t{bar t} events produced in {bar p}p collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV during the Run II of the Tevatron.

  11. Top quark mass measurements at CDF

    Maki, Tuula; /Helsinki U. /Helsinki Inst. of Phys.

    2007-10-01

    The top quark mass is interesting both as a fundamental parameter of the standard model as well as an important input to precision electroweak tests. The CDF Collaboration has measured the top quark mass with high precision in all decay channels with complementary methods. A combination of the results from CDF gives a top quark mass of 170.5{+-}1.3(stat.){+-}1.8(syst.) GeV/c{sup 2}.

  12. Reanalysing glacier mass balance measurement series

    Zemp, M.; E. Thibert; Huss, M.; Stumm, D.; Rolstad Denby, C.; Nuth, C.; S. U. Nussbaumer; G. Moholdt; A. Mercer; Mayer, C.; Joerg, P. C.; P. Jansson; B. Hynek; Fischer, A.; Escher-Vetter, H.

    2013-01-01

    Glacier-wide mass balance has been measured for more than sixty years and is widely used as an indicator of climate change and to assess the glacier contribution to runoff and sea level rise. Until recently, comprehensive uncertainty assessments have rarely been carried out and mass balance data have often been applied using rough error estimation or without consideration of errors. In this study, we propose a framework for reanalysing glacier mass balance series that includes conceptual and ...

  13. Measuring Accurate Body Parameters of Dressed Humans with Large-Scale Motion Using a Kinect Sensor

    Sidan Du; Yang Li; Yao Yu; Yu Zhou; Huanghao Xu

    2013-01-01

    Non-contact human body measurement plays an important role in surveillance, physical healthcare, on-line business and virtual fitting. Current methods for measuring the human body without physical contact usually cannot handle humans wearing clothes, which limits their applicability in public environments. In this paper, we propose an effective solution that can measure accurate parameters of the human body with large-scale motion from a Kinect sensor, assuming that the people are wearing clo...

  14. Top Quark Mass Measurements at the LHC

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00220136; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The top quark mass ($m_{top}$) is a fundamental parameter of the Standard Model of Particle Physics (SM). As the heaviest of all SM particles with a mass close to the electroweak symmetry-breaking scale, the top quark plays a pivotal role in the theory of elementary particles. The exact value of the top quark mass has implications on a number of theoretical predictions, which motivates the need for precision measurements of $m_{top}$. This document highlights a number of such measurements carried out by the ATLAS and CMS collaborations based on the combined LHC Run 1 datasets at centre-of-mass energies of $\\sqrt{s}=7$ and $8$ TeV. A wide range of analysis strategies are employed for a number of final-state signatures. Measurements of both the top quark pole mass as well as the value of $m_{top}$ as defined by the Monte Carlo generator in simulated signal samples are discussed.

  15. Measurement of mass and isotopic fission yields for heavy fission products with the LOHENGRIN mass spectrometer

    In spite of the huge amount of fission yield data available in different libraries, more accurate values are still needed for nuclear energy applications and to improve our understanding of the fission process. Thus measurements of fission yields were performed at the mass spectrometer Lohengrin at the Institut Laue-Langevin in Grenoble, France. The mass separator Lohengrin is situated at the research reactor of the institute and permits the placement of an actinide layer in a high thermal neutron flux. It separates fragments according to their atomic mass, kinetic energy and ionic charge state by the action of magnetic and electric fields. Coupled to a high resolution ionization chamber the experiment was used to investigate the mass and isotopic yields of the light mass region. Almost all fission yields of isotopes from Th to Cf have been measured at Lohengrin with this method. To complete and improve the nuclear data libraries, these measurements have been extended in this work to the heavy mass region for the reactions 235U(nth,f), 239Pu(nth,f) and 241Pu(nth,f). For these higher masses an isotopic separation is no longer possible. So, a new method was undertaken with the reaction 239Pu(nth,f) to determine the isotopic yields by spectrometry. These experiments have allowed to reduce considerably the uncertainties. Moreover the ionic charge state and kinetic energy distributions were specifically studied and have shown, among others, nanosecond isomers for some masses. (author)

  16. Physical consequences of the alpha/beta rule which accurately calculates particle masses

    Using the fine structure constant α (=1/137.036), the proton vs. electron mass ratio β (= 1836.2) and the integers m and n, the α/β rule: mparticle = α-n x β m x 27.2 eV/c2 allows almost exact calculation of particle masses. (K.O.Greulich, DPG Spring meeting 2014, Mainz, T99.4) With n=2, m=0 the electron mass becomes 510.79 keV/c2 (experimental 511 keV/c2) With n=2, m=1 the proton mass is 937.9 MeV/c2 (literature 938.3 MeV/c2). For n=3 and m=1 a particle with 128.6 GeV/c2 close to the reported Higgs mass, is expected. For n=14 and m=-1 the Planck mass results. The calculated masses for gauge bosons and for quarks have similar accuracy. All masses fit into the same scheme (the alpha/beta rule), indicating that non of these particle masses play an extraordinary role. Particularly, the Higgs Boson, often termed the *God particle* plays in this sense no extraordinary role. In addition, particle masses are intimately correlated with the fine structure constant α. If particle masses have been constant over all times, α must have been constant over these times. In addition, the ionization energy of the hydrogen atom (13.6 eV) needs to have been constant if particle masses have been unchanged or vice versa. In conclusion, the α/β rule needs to be taken into account when cosmological models are developed.

  17. Mass measurements with the GANIL cyclotrons

    An original method of mass measurements using the GANIL facility cyclotrons as an Accelerator-Mass spectrometer system is presented. The first test runs show that a precision of 3.10-6 can be achieved. Further improvement of this value can be obtained. Although some limitations apply to this technique, a broad spectrum of nuclei can be studied by this method

  18. A theoretical study on accurate measurements of thoron with airflow-through scintillation cell method

    For accurate measurements of 220Rn concentration with airflow-through scintillation cell method, a theoretical study was performed for discussing the influences of sampling flow rate, volumes of sampling tube and scintillation cell on the measurements. It is found that a high flow rate and a large inner volume of scintillation cell as well as a small inner volume of sampling tube are not only preferable for measuring low levels of 220Rn, but also helpful for enhancing the measurement accuracy. In calibration experiments, both the sampling flow rate and the sampling tube volume should be noted. The variations of the flow rate and tube volume should be considered for accurate measurements in the fields. (authors)

  19. Applicability of hydraulic dynamometer for measuring load mass on forwarders

    Pandur Zdravko

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the last few years, with the start of wood biomass production from wood residues, the need for determining the quantity of extracted wood residuals on a landing site has appeared. The beginning of intensive usage of wood residues for wood biomass starts in lowland forest where all wood residues are extracted with forwarders. There are several ways to determine load mass on a forwarder, first and probably most accurate is the use of load cells which are installed between forwarder undercarriage and loading space. In Croatia, as far as it is known, there is no forwarder with such equipment, although manufacturers offer the installation of such equipment when buying a new forwarder. The second option is using a portable measuring platform (axle scale which was already used for research of axle loads of trucks and forwarders. The data obtained with the measuring platform are very accurate, while its deficiency is relatively great mass, large dimensions and high price. The third option is determining mass by using hydraulic dynamometer which is installed on crane between the rotator and the telescopic boom. The production and installation of such a system is very simple, and with the price it can easily compete with previously described measuring systems. The main deficiency of this system is its unsatisfying accuracy. The results of assortment mass measuring with hydraulic dynamometer installed on a hydraulic crane and discussion on factors influencing obtained results will be presented in this paper.

  20. Simplified fundamental force and mass measurements

    Robinson, I. A.

    2016-08-01

    The watt balance relates force or mass to the Planck constant h, the metre and the second. It enables the forthcoming redefinition of the unit of mass within the SI by measuring the Planck constant in terms of mass, length and time with an uncertainty of better than 2 parts in 108. To achieve this, existing watt balances require complex and time-consuming alignment adjustments limiting their use to a few national metrology laboratories. This paper describes a simplified construction and operating principle for a watt balance which eliminates the need for the majority of these adjustments and is readily scalable using either electromagnetic or electrostatic actuators. It is hoped that this will encourage the more widespread use of the technique for a wide range of measurements of force or mass. For example: thrust measurements for space applications which would require only measurements of electrical quantities and velocity/displacement.

  1. Miniature Sensor for Aerosol Mass Measurements Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR project seeks to develop a miniature sensor for mass measurement of size-classified aerosols. A cascade impactor will be used to classify aerosol sample...

  2. Cosmological and astrophysical neutrino mass measurements

    Abazajian, K.N.; Calabrese, E.; Cooray, A.;

    2011-01-01

    Cosmological and astrophysical measurements provide powerful constraints on neutrino masses complementary to those from accelerators and reactors. Here we provide a guide to these different probes, for each explaining its physical basis, underlying assumptions, current and future reach....

  3. Cosmological and Astrophysical Neutrino Mass Measurements

    Abazajian, K N; Cooray, A; De Bernardis, F; Dodelson, S; Friedland, A; Fuller, G M; Hannestad, S; Keating, B G; Linder, E V; Lunardini, C; Melchiorri, A; Miquel, R; Pierpaoli, E; Pritchard, J; Serra, P; Takada, M; Wong, Y Y Y

    2011-01-01

    Cosmological and astrophysical measurements provide powerful constraints on neutrino masses complementary to those from accelerators and reactors. Here we provide a guide to these different probes, for each explaining its physical basis, underlying assumptions, current and future reach.

  4. Mass Flow Meter Analysis for Reliable Measuring

    Kupanovac, Tihomir; Špoljarić, Željko; Valter, Zdravko

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to show how to analyze and correctly chose measuring device specially applied on mass flow meter based on Coriolis principle. In the beginning short description of Coriolis based mass flow meter is given. Furthermore, comparison analysis of two flow meters shows where are the problems of wrongly applied method in slurry fluid measurement in production of powder detergents plant. Analysis is made using RS Logix 500 program. In given diagrams which show causes of wrong ...

  5. An improved technique for accurate heat capacity measurements on powdered samples using a commercial relaxation calorimeter

    Highlights: → We have previously published a method for accurate PPMS eat capacity measurements. → The older method had a significant grease problem above 250 K. → Here we publish new results using copper strips instead of grease to pot the sample. → The new method now requires on two measurements instead of four. - Abstract: We have modified our earlier technique for accurate PPMS heat capacity measurements on powdered samples by means of applying Wakefield grease or small copper strips in the sample preparation instead of using Apiezon N high-vacuum grease. For the Wakefield grease measurements, we put a small amount of Wakefield thermal compound in a copper cup instead of potting with Apiezon N, and the accuracy of measurements on powdered benzoic acid was determined to be ±1% and ±4% in the temperature ranges of 10 K -1 . mol-1, which deviates 0.08% and -0.08% from the measurement results of our low-temperature adiabatic and semi-adiabatic calorimeters, respectively. We recommend that this technique become the standard for accurate heat capacity measurements on insulating powdered samples using a PPMS system and the corresponding thermodynamic calculations.

  6. Rapid and accurate U-Th dating of ancient carbonates using inductively coupled plasma-quadrupole mass spectrometry

    Here, the potential for rapid and accurate U-Th dating technique of marine aragonite skeletons (deep-sea corals, Lophelia pertusa) and secondary calcite deposits (speleothems and stalagmites) has been explored using inductively coupled plasma-quadrupole mass spectrometry (ICP-QMS). The analytical procedure includes a largely simplified chemical separation technique for uranium (U) and thorium (Th) using UTEVA resin. The developed technique permits simultaneous quantification of uranium [238U] and thorium [232Th] concentrations and their respective isotopic composition, required for U-series disequilibrium dating. Up to 50 U-Th dates per day can be achieved through ICP-QMS with δ234U and δ230Th reproducibility (2 σ) of 3-4 parts per thousand and 1%, respectively. The high sensitivity (≥3.0 x 105 cps/ppb) together with low background (≤0.5 cps) on each mass between 228 and 236 amu allowed U-Th dating of ancient deep-water corals (15-260 kyr) and stalagmites (30-85 kyr) at precision levels of less than 2%. Consequently, the combination of simplified chemistry using UTEVA with state-of-the-art ICP-QMS isotopic measurements that do not require a U-Th separation step now provides an extremely rapid and low-cost U-series dating technology. The level of precision is most convenient for numerous geochronological applications, such as the determination of climatic influences on ecosystem development and carbonate precipitation. As a first-example application we present ICP-QMS U-Th dates of North Atlantic deep-water coral fragments retrieved in the southeastern Porcupine Seabight (MD01-2463G. Mound Therese), indicating a purely interglacial growth of deep-water corals on so-called carbonate mounds over several climate cycles. (authors)

  7. Rapid and Accurate U-Th Dating of Ancient Carbonates using Inductively Coupled Plasma-Quadrupole Mass Spectrometry

    Douville, Eric; Sallé, Eline; Frank, Norbert; Eisele, Markus; Pons-Branchu, Edwige; Ayrault, Sophie

    2010-05-01

    Here, the potential for rapid and accurate U-Th dating technique of marine aragonite skeletons (deep-sea corals, Lophelia pertusa) and secondary calcite deposits (speleothems and stalagmites) has been explored using inductively-coupled plasma-quadrupole mass spectrometry (ICP-QMS). The analytical procedure includes a largely simplified chemical separation technique for uranium (U) and thorium (Th) using UTEVA resin. The developed technique permits simultaneous quantification of uranium [238U] and thorium [232Th] concentrations and their respective isotopic composition, required for U-series disequilibrium dating. Up to 50 U-Th dates per day can be achieved through ICP-QMS with 234U and 230Th reproducibility (2sigma) of 3-4 permil and 1 percent, respectively. The high sensitivity (> 300 000 cps/ppb) together with low background (<0.5 cps) on each mass between 228-236 amu allowed U-Th dating of ancient deep water corals (15-260 kyrs) and stalagmites (30-85 kyrs) at precision levels of less than 2%. Consequently, the combination of simplified chemistry using UTEVA with state-of-the-art ICP-QMS isotopic measurements that do not require a U-Th separation step now provides an extremely rapid and low-cost U-series dating technology. The level of precision is most convenient for numerous geochronological applications, such as the determination of climatic influences on ecosystem development and carbonate precipitation. As a first-example application we present ICP-QMS U-Th dates of North Atlantic deep-water coral fragments retrieved in the southeastern Porcupine Seabight (MD01-2463G, Mound Thérèse), indicating a purely interglacial growth of deep-water corals on so-called carbonate mounds over several climate cycles.

  8. Impact of Precision Mass Measurements on Nuclear Physics and Astrophysics

    Kreim, Susanne; Dilling, Jens; Litvinov, Yuri A

    2013-01-01

    Among all nuclear ground-state properties, atomic masses are highly specific for each particular combination of neutron and proton number, N and Z, respectively. The data obtained through mass measurements provide details of the nuclear interaction and thus apply to a variety of physics topics. Some of the most crucial questions to be addressed by mass spectrometry of unstable radionuclides are, on the one hand, nuclear forces and structure, describing phenomena such as the so-called neutron-halos or the evolution of magic numbers when moving towards the borders of nuclear existence. On the other hand, the understanding of the processes of element formation in the Universe poses a challenge and requires an accurate knowledge of nuclear astrophysics. Here, precision atomic mass values of a large number of exotic nuclei participating in nucleosynthesis processes are among the key input data in large-scale reaction network calculations.

  9. Accurate measurement of neodymium isotopic composition using Neptune MC-ICP-MS

    Yueheng YANG; Hongfu ZHANG; Liewen XIE; Fuyuan WU

    2008-01-01

    This paper reports the measurement of the Neodymium isotopic composition by Neptune Multiple Collector Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (MC-ICP-MS) over the last two years. Although there is concomitant Cerium in the chemical separation process, this has no significant influence on the Neodymium analysis. As for the sample containing small amounts of Samarium (Sm/Nd<0.04), direct calibration for isobaric interference and mass discrimina-tion by the exponential law can be obtained by assuming that Samarium mass discrimination is the same as that of Neodymium. Geological samples after traditional chemi-cal separation were measured by Neptune MC-ICP-MS and Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometry (TIMS) respectively. The results show that Neptune MC-ICP-MS can measure Neodymium isotopic composition as precisely the TIMS does and is even more effective and less time-consuming than the TIMS Method.

  10. A fast and accurate method to compute the mass return from multiple stellar populations

    Calura, F; Nipoti, C

    2013-01-01

    The mass returned to the ambient medium by aging stellar populations over cosmological times sums up to a significant fraction (20% - 30% or more) of their initial mass. This continuous mass injection plays a fundamental role in phenomena such as galaxy formation and evolution, fueling of supermassive black holes in galaxies and the consequent (negative and positive) feedback phenomena, and the origin of multiple stellar populations in globular clusters. In numerical simulations the calculation of the mass return can be time consuming, since it requires at each time step the evaluation of a convolution integral over the whole star formation history, so the computational time increases quadratically with the number of time-steps. The situation can be especially critical in hydrodynamical simulations, where different grid points are characterized by different star formation histories, and the gas cooling and heating times are shorter by orders of magnitude than the characteristic stellar lifetimes. In this pape...

  11. Evaluation of Modified Pycnometric Method for Accurately Measuring the Density of Molten Nickel

    XIAO Feng; FANG Liang; FU Yuechao; YANG Lingchuan

    2004-01-01

    A modified pycnometric method has been developed to obtain accurate densities of molten nickel.The new method allows continuous measurement of density over a wide temperature range from a single experiment.The measurement error of the method was analyzed, and the total uncertainty of the measurement was estimated to be within ±0.34%. The measured density of molten nickel decreases linearly with increasing temperature over a range from the melting point to 1873K. The density at the melting point and the thermal expansion coefficient of molten nickel are 7.90Mg·m-3 and 1.92×10-4 K-1,respectively.

  12. Development of a high accurate gear measuring machine based on laser interferometry

    Lin, Hu; Xue, Zi; Yang, Guoliang; Huang, Yao; Wang, Heyan

    2015-02-01

    Gear measuring machine is a specialized device for gear profile, helix or pitch measurement. The classic method for gear measurement and the conventional gear measuring machine are introduced. In this gear measuring machine, the Abbe errors arisen from the angle error of guideways hold a great weight in affection of profile measurement error. For minimize of the Abbe error, a laser measuring system is applied to develop a high accurate gear measuring machine. In this laser measuring system, two cube-corner reflectors are placed close to the tip of probe, a laser beam from laser head is splited along two paths, one is arranged tangent to the base circle of gear for the measurement of profile and pitch, another is arranged parallel to the gear axis for the measurement of helix, both laser measurement performed with a resolution of 0.3nm. This approach not only improves the accuracy of length measurement but minimize the Abbe offset directly. The configuration of this improved measuring machine is illustrated in detail. The measurements are performed automatically, and all the measurement signals from guide rails, rotary table, probe and laser measuring system are obtained synchronously. Software collects all the data for further calculation and evaluation. The first measurements for a gear involute artifact and a helix artifact are carried out, the results are shown and analyzed as well.

  13. An Accurate Measurement of Planck's Constant using a Watt Balance Experiment

    Williams, Edwin R.

    1998-04-01

    The experiment described here is performed with colleagues Richard Steiner and David Newell ( R. L. Steiner, A. D. Gillespie, K. Fujii, E. R. Williams, D. B. Newell, A. Picard, G. N. Stenbakken, and P. T. Olsen, "The NIST Watt Balance: Progress Toward Monitoring the Kilogram" IEEE Trans. Instrum. Meas. vol. IM46, pp. 601-604, 1997.). By measuring the Watt in both electrical and SI mechanical units, one can measure Planck's constant, h. Electric power measured in terms of the Josephson effect voltage and quantum Hall effect resistance can be compared to mechanical power measured in terms of the kilogram, meter and second in a two part experiment using a coil in a magnetic field (B. P. Kibble, "A measurement of the gyromagnetic ratio of the proton by the strong field method" Atomic Masses and Fundamental Constants. J. H. Sanders and A. H. Wapstra, Eds. New York : Plenum, 1976.). The primary quantities measured are a =B110 mA current that balances a one kilogram mass in local gravity, and a one volt signal generated by the same coil moving at a velocity of 2 mm/s. The velocity measurement is the most challenging. We are presently measuring h with a standard uncertainty near 1 part in 10 million. This also measures the mass of an electron with similar uncertainty. From this work we plan to monitor the stability of the Kilogram artifact with the goal of someday having a quantum based unit of mass.

  14. Ratio method of measuring W boson mass

    Guo, Feng [Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States)

    2010-08-01

    This dissertation describes an alternative method of measuring the W boson mass in DØ experiment. Instead of extracting MW from the fitting of W → ev fast Monte Carlo simulations to W → ev data as in the standard method, we make the direct fit of transverse mass between W → ev data and Z → ee data. One of the two electrons from Z boson is treated as a neutrino in the calculation of transverse mass. In ratio method, the best fitted scale factor corresponds to the ratio of W and Z boson mass (MW/MZ). Given the precisely measured Z boson mass, W mass is directly fitted from W → ev and Z → ee data. This dissertation demonstrates that ratio method is a plausible method of measuring the W boson mass. With the 1 fb-1 DØ Run IIa dataset, ratio method gives MW = 80435 ± 43(stat) ± 26(sys) MeV.

  15. Ratio method of measuring $w$ boson mass

    Guo, Feng; /SUNY, Stony Brook

    2010-08-01

    This dissertation describes an alternative method of measuring the W boson mass in D0 experiment. Instead of extracting M{sub W} from the fitting of W {yields} e{nu} fast Monte Carlo simulations to W {yields} e{nu} data as in the standard method, we make the direct fit of transverse mass between W {yields} e{nu} data and Z {yields} ee data. One of the two electrons from Z boson is treated as a neutrino in the calculation of transverse mass. In ratio method, the best fitted scale factor corresponds to the ratio of W and Z boson mass (M{sub W}/M{sub Z}). Given the precisely measured Z boson mass, W mass is directly fitted from W {yields} e{nu} and Z {yields} ee data. This dissertation demonstrates that ratio method is a plausible method of measuring the W boson mass. With the 1 fb{sup -1} D0 Run IIa dataset, ratio method gives M{sub W} = 80435 {+-} 43(stat) {+-} 26(sys) MeV.

  16. A simple and accurate model for Love wave based sensors: Dispersion equation and mass sensitivity

    Jiansheng Liu

    2014-01-01

    Dispersion equation is an important tool for analyzing propagation properties of acoustic waves in layered structures. For Love wave (LW) sensors, the dispersion equation with an isotropic-considered substrate is too rough to get accurate solutions; the full dispersion equation with a piezoelectric-considered substrate is too complicated to get simple and practical expressions for optimizing LW-based sensors. In this work, a dispersion equation is introduced for Love waves in a layered struct...

  17. Generation increases at Cofrentes Nuclear Power Plant based on accurate feedwater flow measurement

    This paper discusses the application of Caldon LEFM ultrasonic flow and temperature measurement systems at Cofrentes Nuclear Power Plant. Based on plant instrumentation, Cofrentes engineering personnel estimated an 8 to 10 MW electric shortfall in generation due to venturi nozzle fouling. An external LEFM ultrasonic flow measurement system installed in October 2000 showed a shortfall of about 9 MW electric, consistent with expectations. The plant has increased generation by using the more accurate ultrasonic system to correct for the venturi nozzle bias. Following the recovery of generation lost to venturi fouling, Cofrentes plans to upgrade the flow meter to Caldon's LEFM CheckPlus system. This system is sufficiently accurate to warrant re-licensing for a power up-rate of up to 1,7% based on improved thermal power measurement. (author)

  18. Particle Image Velocimetry Measurements in an Anatomically-Accurate Scaled Model of the Mammalian Nasal Cavity

    Rumple, Christopher; Krane, Michael; Richter, Joseph; Craven, Brent

    2013-11-01

    The mammalian nose is a multi-purpose organ that houses a convoluted airway labyrinth responsible for respiratory air conditioning, filtering of environmental contaminants, and chemical sensing. Because of the complexity of the nasal cavity, the anatomy and function of these upper airways remain poorly understood in most mammals. However, recent advances in high-resolution medical imaging, computational modeling, and experimental flow measurement techniques are now permitting the study of respiratory airflow and olfactory transport phenomena in anatomically-accurate reconstructions of the nasal cavity. Here, we focus on efforts to manufacture an anatomically-accurate transparent model for stereoscopic particle image velocimetry (SPIV) measurements. Challenges in the design and manufacture of an index-matched anatomical model are addressed. PIV measurements are presented, which are used to validate concurrent computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of mammalian nasal airflow. Supported by the National Science Foundation.

  19. Mass Measurement with Rare-RI Rin

    Ozawa, Akira

    2014-09-01

    Mass measurement with Rare-RI Ring in RIKEN RI Beam Factory (RIBF) will be presented. The main purpose of Rare-RI Ring is to measure the mass for very neutron-rich nuclei, the production rate of which is very small (rare RI) and the life-time of which is predicted to be very short (less than 10 ms). In Rare-RI Ring, mass measurements will be performed based on isochronous mass spectrometry. There are two innovative apparatus in Rare-RI Ring: individual injection, which can realize the injection of 200 A MeV rare RI one-by-one, and a cyclotron-like storage ring, which allows high isochronous magnetic fields with large angular and momentum acceptances (~1%). By these apparatus, we will achieve a 10-6 mass resolution, and will be able to access rare RI, the production rate of which is down to 1 event/day/pnA in RIBF. Construction of Rare-RI Ring has started from the 2012 fiscal year. Construction of the storage ring itself was almost completed. In this fiscal year, we succeeded to store alphas from 241Am source and to check the production of isochronous fields in the storage ring. In this talk, present status of Rare-RI Ring and the possible mass measurement there will be presented.

  20. Recent progress in precision mass measurements

    During the last years, a new generation of technique for measuring directly masses of short-lived isotopes has evolved. The common features of these modern techniques are a transition from the measurement of kinetic energies or voltage ratios to a determination of time and frequency and in most cases storage of the ions for extended periods of time. (orig.)

  1. Defining allowable physical property variations for high accurate measurements on polymer parts

    Mohammadi, A.; Sonne, M. R.; Madruga, D. G.; De Chiffre, L.; Hattel, J. H.

    2016-06-01

    Measurement conditions and material properties have a significant impact on the dimensions of a part, especially for polymers parts. Temperature variation causes part deformations that increase the uncertainty of the measurement process. Current industrial tolerances of a few micrometres demand high accurate measurements in non-controlled ambient. Most of polymer parts are manufactured by injection moulding and their inspection is carried out after stabilization, around 200 hours. The overall goal of this work is to reach ±5μm in uncertainty measurements a polymer products which is a challenge in today`s production and metrology environments. The residual deformations in polymer products at room temperature after injection molding are important when micrometer accuracy needs to be achieved. Numerical modelling can give a valuable insight to what is happening in the polymer during cooling down after injection molding. In order to obtain accurate simulations, accurate inputs to the model are crucial. In reality however, the material and physical properties will have some variations. Although these variations may be small, they can act as a source of uncertainty for the measurement. In this paper, we investigated how big the variation in material and physical properties are allowed in order to reach the 5 μm target on the uncertainty.

  2. Improved plant economics through accurate feedwater flow measurement with the crossflow ultrasonic flowmeter

    The crossflow ultrasonic flowmeter (UFM) improves nuclear power plant performance through more accurate and reliable feedwater flow measurement. Reactor power levels are typically monitored via secondary-side calorimetric calculations that depend on the accurate measurement of feedwater flow . The feedwater flow is measured with calibrated venturis in most plants. These are subject to chemical fouling and other mechanical problems. If the loss in accuracy of the feedwater flow measurement overstates the actual flow rate, the result is a direct loss in megawatts generated by the plant. This paper describes a new, innovative ultrasonic technique to improve the accuracy, stability and repeatability of ultrasonic flow measurements. By employing this advanced technology to provide a continuous correction to the venturi-measured feed water flow rate, plants have reported the recovery of between 5 and 25 MWe. This technology has been implemented in a new flowmeter called CROSSFLOW. The CROSSFLOW meter utilizes a mathematical process called cross-correlation to process the ultrasonic signal, which is modulated by the flow eddys to determine the velocity of the feedwater. It replaces the older, less accurate transit-time methodology. Comparisons with weigh tank test, calibrated plant instrumentation, and chemical tracer tests have demonstrated a repeatable accuracy of 0.21% or better with this advanced cross-correlation technology. The paper discusses the history of the cross-correlation technique and its theoretical basis, illustrates how this technique addresses the measurement sensitivities for various parameters, demonstrates the calculation of the accuracy of the meter, and discusses the recently completed NRC review of the CROSSFLOW System and methodology. The paper also discusses recent precision flow measurement applications being performed with CROSSFLOW at nuclear plants worldwide. Among these applications are the measurement of Reactor Coolant System flow and the

  3. KATRIN: Measuring the Mass Scale of Neutrinos

    Oblath, Noah; Katrin Collaboration

    2011-10-01

    Over the past decade, experiments studying neutrinos from atmospheric, solar, and reactor sources have shown conclusively that neutrinos change flavor and, as a consequence, have a small but finite mass. However, the scale of neutrino masses remains an open question that is of great importance for many areas of physics. The most direct method to measure the neutrino mass scale is still via beta decay. The talk will focus primarily on the status of the KArlsruhe TRItium Neutrino experiment (KATRIN), currently under construction. KATRIN combines an ultra-luminous molecular windowless gaseous tritium source with a high-resolution integrating spectrometer to gain sensitivity to the absolute mass scale of neutrinos. The projected sensitivity of the experiment on the neutrino mass is 0.2 eV at 90% C.L. In this talk I will discuss the status of the KATRIN experiment.

  4. Measuring the running top-quark mass

    We present the first direct determination of the running top-quark mass based on the total cross section of top-quark pair-production as measured at the Tevatron. Our theory prediction for the cross section includes various next-to-next-to-leading order QCD contributions, in particular all logarithmically enhanced terms near threshold, the Coulomb corrections at two loops and all explicitly scale dependent terms at NNLO accuracy. The result allows for an exact and independent variation of the renormalization and factorization scales. For Tevatron and LHC we study its dependence on all scales, on the parton luminosity and on the top-quark mass using both the conventional pole mass definition as well as the running mass in the MS scheme. We extract for the top-quark an MS mass of m(μ=m) =160.0+3.3-3.2 GeV. (orig.)

  5. Precision measurement of W mass at LHC

    The W mass allows for a precise cross check of the Standard Model (SM), and its uncertainty is the limiting factor for sensitivity to the SM Higgs mass and what may lie beyond. A precise W mass measurement is feasible at the LHC due to large number of events, not only for W decays, but also corresponding Z decays, which will be the key ingredients for precision calibration and understanding of systematic errors. Using statistics corresponding to 10 fb-1 of data at the LHC, we have investigated strategies for improving the uncertainty on the mass measurement beyond 15 MeV, including both theoretical and experimental effects. No single source of uncertainty necessarily contribute more than 5 MeV to the overall uncertainty

  6. Precision measurement of W mass at LHC

    Petersen, Troels C. [Building 40-3D-002, CERN, Geneva (Switzerland)

    2008-03-15

    The W mass allows for a precise cross check of the Standard Model (SM), and its uncertainty is the limiting factor for sensitivity to the SM Higgs mass and what may lie beyond. A precise W mass measurement is feasible at the LHC due to large number of events, not only for W decays, but also corresponding Z decays, which will be the key ingredients for precision calibration and understanding of systematic errors. Using statistics corresponding to 10 fb{sup -1} of data at the LHC, we have investigated strategies for improving the uncertainty on the mass measurement beyond 15 MeV, including both theoretical and experimental effects. No single source of uncertainty necessarily contribute more than 5 MeV to the overall uncertainty.

  7. Accurate disintegration-rate measurement of 55Fe by liquid scintillation counting

    A method involving liquid scintillation counting is described for the accurate measurement of disintegration rate of 55Fe. The method is based on the use of calculated efficiency functions together with either of the nuclides 54Mn and 51Cr as internal standards for measurement of counting efficiencies by coincidence counting. The method was used by the NAC during a recent international intercomparison of radioactivity measurements, and a summary of the results obtained by nine participating laboratories is presented. A spread in results of several percent is evident

  8. Measurement of the W boson mass

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich; /Dubna, JINR; Abbott, Braden Keim; /Oklahoma U.; Abolins, Maris A.; /Michigan State U.; Acharya, Bannanje Sripath; /Tata Inst.; Adams, Mark Raymond; /Illinois U., Chicago; Adams, Todd; /Florida State U.; Aguilo, Ernest; /Alberta U. /Simon Fraser U. /York U., Canada /McGill U.; Ahsan, Mahsana; /Kansas State U.; Alexeev, Guennadi D.; /Dubna, JINR; Alkhazov, Georgiy D.; /St. Petersburg, INP; Alton, Andrew K.; /Michigan U. /Augustana Coll., Sioux Falls /Northeastern U.

    2009-08-01

    The authors present a measurement of the W boson mass in W {yields} e{nu} decays using 1 fb{sup -1} of data collected with the D0 detector during Run II of the Fermilab Tevatron collider. With a sample of 499830 W {yields} e{nu} candidate events, they measure M{sub W} = 80.401 {+-} 0.043 GeV. This is the most precise measurement from a single experiment.

  9. Measurement of the W boson mass

    We present a preliminary measurement of the W boson mass using data collected by the D null experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron during the 1994-1995 collider run 1b. We use W → eν decays to extract the W mass from the observed spectrum of transverse mass of the electron (|η| 0 → ee decays to constrain our model of the detector response. We measure mW/mZ = 0.8815 ± 0.0011(stat) ± 0.0014(syst) and mW = 80.38 ± 0.07 (W stat) ± 0.13(syst) GeV. Combining this result with our previous measurement from the 1992-1993 data, we obtain mW = 80.37 ± 0.15 GeV (errors combined in quadrature)

  10. Mass measurements and evaluation around A=22

    Frequency ratio measurements with different combinations of the singly charged ions from 21,22,23Na, 22,24Mg, and 37,39K were performed at the on-line Penning trap mass spectrometer ISOLTRAP, CERN, Geneva. The masses and mass differences were deduced with a relative uncertainty of about or even below one part in 108 for the ions of interest using a least-squares analysis of all measured relations. The results have direct consequences for weak-interaction study as they give additional input to the test of CVC, and for nuclear astrophysics, because they help to establish the minimum observable signal for a NeNa cycle in a nova burst. We report here about the measurements and the detailed evaluation. (orig.)

  11. Precise and accurate measurements of strong-field photoionisation and a transferrable laser intensity calibration standard

    Wallace, W C; Khurmi, C; U., Satya Sainadh; Calvert, J E; Laban, D E; Pullen, M G; Bartschat, K; Grum-Grzhimailo, A N; Wells, D; Quiney, H M; Tong, X M; Litvinyuk, I V; Sang, R T; Kielpinski, D

    2016-01-01

    Ionization of atoms and molecules in strong laser fields is a fundamental process in many fields of research, especially in the emerging field of attosecond science. So far, demonstrably accurate data have only been acquired for atomic hydrogen (H), a species that is accessible to few investigators. Here we present measurements of the ionization yield for argon, krypton, and xenon with percentlevel accuracy, calibrated using H, in a laser regime widely used in attosecond science. We derive a transferrable calibration standard for laser peak intensity, accurate to 1.3%, that is based on a simple reference curve. In addition, our measurements provide a much-needed benchmark for testing models of ionisation in noble-gas atoms, such as the widely employed single-active electron approximation.

  12. Accurate potential drop sheet resistance measurements of laser-doped areas in semiconductors

    Heinrich, Martin, E-mail: mh.seris@gmail.com [Solar Energy Research Institute of Singapore, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117574 (Singapore); NUS Graduate School for Integrative Science and Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117456 (Singapore); Kluska, Sven; Binder, Sebastian [Fraunhofer Institute for Solar Energy Systems (ISE), Heidenhofstrasse 2, D-79110 Freiburg (Germany); Hameiri, Ziv [The School of Photovoltaic and Renewable Energy Engineering, The University of New South Wales, Sydney NSW 2052 (Australia); Hoex, Bram [Solar Energy Research Institute of Singapore, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117574 (Singapore); Aberle, Armin G. [Solar Energy Research Institute of Singapore, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117574 (Singapore); NUS Graduate School for Integrative Science and Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117456 (Singapore); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117456 (Singapore)

    2014-10-07

    It is investigated how potential drop sheet resistance measurements of areas formed by laser-assisted doping in crystalline Si wafers are affected by typically occurring experimental factors like sample size, inhomogeneities, surface roughness, or coatings. Measurements are obtained with a collinear four point probe setup and a modified transfer length measurement setup to measure sheet resistances of laser-doped lines. Inhomogeneities in doping depth are observed from scanning electron microscope images and electron beam induced current measurements. It is observed that influences from sample size, inhomogeneities, surface roughness, and coatings can be neglected if certain preconditions are met. Guidelines are given on how to obtain accurate potential drop sheet resistance measurements on laser-doped regions.

  13. Rapid and accurate broadband absorption cross-section measurement of human bodies in a reverberation chamber

    A measurement methodology for polarization and angle of incidence averaged electromagnetic absorption cross-section using a reverberation chamber is presented. The method is optimized for simultaneous rapid and accurate determination of average absorption cross-section over the frequency range 1–15 GHz, making it suitable for use in human absorption and exposure studies. The typical measurement time of the subject is about 8 min with a corresponding statistical uncertainty of about 3% in the measured absorption cross-section. The method is validated by comparing measurements on a spherical phantom with Mie series calculations. The efficacy of the method is demonstrated with measurements of the posture dependence of the absorption cross-section of a human subject and an investigation of the effects of clothing on the measured absorption which are important considerations for the practical design of experiments for studies on human subjects. (paper)

  14. Interpretation of In Situ and Laboratory Thermal Measurements Resulting in Accurate Thermogeological Characterisation

    Hemmingway, Phil; Long, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Growing worldwide interest in the exploitation of geothermal energy resources has led to a scenario where the technology routinely forms part of building-scale renewable energy feasibility studies. A thorough understanding of site-specific thermogeological parameters is a vital design requirement of such systems and accurate measurement and interpretation of these parameters is necessary in order to inform scientifically rigorous system design. An overview of the theory underlying a number of...

  15. Accurate Measurement of Mitochondrial DNA Deletion Level and Copy Number Differences in Human Skeletal Muscle

    Grady, John P.; Murphy, Julie L; Blakely, Emma L.; Haller, Ronald G.; Taylor, Robert W; Turnbull, Doug M.; Tuppen, Helen A. L.

    2014-01-01

    Accurate and reliable quantification of the abundance of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) molecules, both wild-type and those harbouring pathogenic mutations, is important not only for understanding the progression of mtDNA disease but also for evaluating novel therapeutic approaches. A clear understanding of the sensitivity of mtDNA measurement assays under different experimental conditions is therefore critical, however it is routinely lacking for most published mtDNA quantification assays. Here, ...

  16. A Novel Multimode Waveguide Coupler for Accurate Power Measurement of Traveling Wave Tube Harmonic Frequencies

    Wintucky, Edwin G.; Simons, Rainee N.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the design, fabrication and test results for a novel waveguide multimode directional coupler (MDC). The coupler fabricated from two dissimilar waveguides is capable of isolating the power at the second harmonic frequency from the fundamental power at the output port of a traveling-wave tube (TWT). In addition to accurate power measurements at harmonic frequencies, a potential application of the MDC is in the design of a beacon source for atmospheric propagation studies at millimeter-wave frequencies.

  17. Accurate FRET Measurements within Single Diffusing Biomolecules Using Alternating-Laser Excitation

    Lee, Nam Ki; Kapanidis, Achillefs N.; Wang, You; Michalet, Xavier; Mukhopadhyay, Jayanta; Ebright, Richard H.; Weiss, Shimon

    2005-01-01

    Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between a donor (D) and an acceptor (A) at the single-molecule level currently provides qualitative information about distance, and quantitative information about kinetics of distance changes. Here, we used the sorting ability of confocal microscopy equipped with alternating-laser excitation (ALEX) to measure accurate FRET efficiencies and distances from single molecules, using corrections that account for cross-talk terms that contaminate the FRE...

  18. Atom interferometry experiments with lithium. Accurate measurement of the electric polarizability

    Atom interferometers are very sensitive tools to make precise measurements of physical quantities. This study presents a measurement of the static electric polarizability of lithium by atom interferometry. Our result, α = (24.33 ± 0.16)*10-30 m3, improves by a factor 3 the most accurate measurements of this quantity. This work describes the tuning and the operation of a Mach-Zehnder atom interferometer in detail. The two interfering arms are separated by the elastic diffraction of the atomic wave by a laser standing wave, almost resonant with the first resonance transition of lithium atom. A set of experimental techniques, often complicated to implement, is necessary to build the experimental set-up. After a detailed study of the atom source (a supersonic beam of lithium seeded in argon), we present our experimental atom signals which exhibit a very high fringe visibility, up to 84.5 % for first order diffraction. A wide variety of signals has been observed by diffraction of the bosonic isotope at higher diffraction orders and by diffraction of the fermionic less abundant isotope. The quality of these signals is then used to do very accurate phase measurements. A first experiment investigates how the atom interferometer signals are modified by a magnetic field gradient. An absolute measurement of lithium atom electric polarizability is then achieved by applying a static electric field on one of the two interfering arms, separated by only 90 micrometers. The construction of such a capacitor, its alignment in the experimental set-up and its operation are fully detailed.We obtain a very accurate phase measurement of the induced Lo Surdo - Stark phase shift (0.07 % precision). For this first measurement, the final uncertainty on the electric polarizability of lithium is only 0.66 %, and is dominated by the uncertainty on the atom beam mean velocity, so that a further reduction of the uncertainty can be expected. (author)

  19. Oxidized Fatty Acid Analysis by Charge Switch Derivatization, Selected Reaction Monitoring and Accurate Mass Quantification

    Liu, Xinping; Moon, Sung Ho; Mancuso, David J.; Jenkins, Christopher M.; Guan, Shaoping; Sims, Harold F.; Gross, Richard W.

    2013-01-01

    A highly sensitive, specific and robust method for the analysis of oxidized metabolites of linoleic, acid (LA), arachidonic acid (AA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) was developed using charge-switch derivatization, LC-ESI MS/MS with selected reaction monitoring (SRM) and quantitation by high mass accuracy analysis of product ions thereby minimizing interferences from contaminating ions. Charge-switch derivatization of LA, AA and DHA metabolites with N-(4-aminomethylphenyl)-pyridinium resulted...

  20. Measurement of the Top Quark Mass

    We present a measurement of the top quark mass using a sample of t bar t decays into an electron or a muon, a neutrino, and four jets. The data were collected in p bar p collisions at √(s)=1.8 TeV with the Collider Detector at Fermilab and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 109 pb-1 . We measure the top quark mass to be 175.9±4.8(stat)±4.9( syst) GeV /c2 . copyright 1998 The American Physical Society

  1. Intravital spectral imaging as a tool for accurate measurement of vascularization in mice

    Tsatsanis Christos

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Quantitative determination of the development of new blood vessels is crucial for our understanding of the progression of several diseases, including cancer. However, in most cases a high throughput technique that is simple, accurate, user-independent and cost-effective for small animal imaging is not available. Methods In this work we present a simple approach based on spectral imaging to increase the contrast between vessels and surrounding tissue, enabling accurate determination of the blood vessel area. This approach is put to test with a 4T1 breast cancer murine in vivo model and validated with histological and microvessel density analysis. Results We found that one can accurately measure the vascularization area by using excitation/emission filter pairs which enhance the surrounding tissue's autofluorescence, significantly increasing the contrast between surrounding tissue and blood vessels. Additionally, we found excellent correlation between this technique and histological and microvessel density analysis. Conclusions Making use of spectral imaging techniques we have shown that it is possible to accurately determine blood vessel volume intra-vitally. We believe that due to the low cost, accuracy, user-independence and simplicity of this technique, it will be of great value in those cases where in vivo quantitative information is necessary.

  2. High-precision mass spectrometric hydrogen isotope ratio measurements

    The analytical capabilities of mass spectrometric ion-current measurement systems are described on both a theoretical and a practical basis. From the theoretical standpoint, a signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) model that evaluated the fundamental sources of noise present in ion-current measurement systems was developed. Use of this model accurately predicted the performance (precision) for ion-current ratio measurements made by two isotope ratio mass spectrometers, one designed for carbon isotopic measurements, and the other designed for hydrogen isotopic measurements. Isotope ratio measurements differ from current-ratio measurements in that the observed ion-current ratio must be corrected to reflect the ratio of the ion currents due to the isotopic species of interest, which, for hydrogen isotope ratio mass spectrometry, are HD+ and H2+. Interfaces to these two ion currents are described in detail. To compensate for H3+ three measurement procedures, the two-standard calibration, the one-standard differential measurement with electronic H3+ compensation, and the two-standard differential measurement, are described. The one- and two-standard differential measurements were successfully used for measurement of isotopic abundances. Results of a collaborative investigation to validate the use of 18O in place of D as an isotopic label for total body water measurements are presented. In this research both 18O and D were administered simultaneously to several subjects. The weight of total body water of these subjects as measured by the dilution of D into the body water was in good agreement with the results of the 18O measurements. A brief description of the laboratory computer system is also given

  3. In Pursuit of Highly Accurate Atomic Lifetime Measurements of Multiply Charged Ions

    Trabert, E

    2009-06-01

    Accurate atomic lifetime data are useful for terrestrial and astrophysical plasma diagnostics. At accuracies higher than those required for these applications, lifetime measurements test atomic structure theory in ways complementary to spectroscopic energy determinations. At the highest level of accuracy, the question arises whether such tests reach the limits of modern theory, a combination of quantum mechanics and QED, adn possibly point to physics beyond the Standard Model. If high-precision atomic lifetime measurements, especially on multiply charged ions, have not quite reached this high accuracy yet, then what is necessary to attain this goal?

  4. Using gas blow methods to realize accurate volume measurement of radioactivity liquid

    For liquid which has radioactivity, Realized the accurate volume measurement uncertainty less than 0.2% (k=2) by means of gas blow methods presented in the 'American National Standard-Nuclear Material Control-Volume Calibration Methods(ANSI N15.19-1989)' and the 'ISO Committee Drafts (ISO/TC/85/SC 5N 282 )' and Explored a set methods of Data Processing. In the article, the major problems is to solve data acquisition and function foundation and measurement uncertainty estimate. (authors)

  5. A fast experimental beam hardening correction method for accurate bone mineral measurements in 3D μCT imaging system.

    Koubar, Khodor; Bekaert, Virgile; Brasse, David; Laquerriere, Patrice

    2015-06-01

    Bone mineral density plays an important role in the determination of bone strength and fracture risks. Consequently, it is very important to obtain accurate bone mineral density measurements. The microcomputerized tomography system provides 3D information about the architectural properties of bone. Quantitative analysis accuracy is decreased by the presence of artefacts in the reconstructed images, mainly due to beam hardening artefacts (such as cupping artefacts). In this paper, we introduced a new beam hardening correction method based on a postreconstruction technique performed with the use of off-line water and bone linearization curves experimentally calculated aiming to take into account the nonhomogeneity in the scanned animal. In order to evaluate the mass correction rate, calibration line has been carried out to convert the reconstructed linear attenuation coefficient into bone masses. The presented correction method was then applied on a multimaterial cylindrical phantom and on mouse skeleton images. Mass correction rate up to 18% between uncorrected and corrected images were obtained as well as a remarkable improvement of a calculated mouse femur mass has been noticed. Results were also compared to those obtained when using the simple water linearization technique which does not take into account the nonhomogeneity in the object. PMID:25818096

  6. Stellar mass-to-light ratios from galaxy spectra: how accurate can they be?

    Gallazzi, Anna

    2009-01-01

    Stellar masses play a crucial role in the exploration of galaxy properties and the evolution of the galaxy population. In this paper, we explore the minimum possible uncertainties in stellar mass-to-light (M/L) ratios from the assumed star formation history (SFH) and metallicity distribution, with the goals of providing a minimum set of requirements for observational studies. We use a large Monte Carlo library of SFHs to study as a function of galaxy spectral type and signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) the statistical uncertainties of M/L values using either absorption-line data or broad band colors. The accuracy of M/L estimates can be significantly improved by using metal-sensitive indices in combination with age-sensitive indices, in particular for galaxies with intermediate-age or young stellar populations. While M/L accuracy clearly depends on the spectral S/N ratio, there is no significant gain in improving the S/N much above 50/pix and limiting uncertainties of 0.03 dex are reached. Assuming that dust is accu...

  7. Dynamic Bayesian Network for Accurate Detection of Peptides from Tandem Mass Spectra.

    Halloran, John T; Bilmes, Jeff A; Noble, William S

    2016-08-01

    A central problem in mass spectrometry analysis involves identifying, for each observed tandem mass spectrum, the corresponding generating peptide. We present a dynamic Bayesian network (DBN) toolkit that addresses this problem by using a machine learning approach. At the heart of this toolkit is a DBN for Rapid Identification (DRIP), which can be trained from collections of high-confidence peptide-spectrum matches (PSMs). DRIP's score function considers fragment ion matches using Gaussians rather than fixed fragment-ion tolerances and also finds the optimal alignment between the theoretical and observed spectrum by considering all possible alignments, up to a threshold that is controlled using a beam-pruning algorithm. This function not only yields state-of-the art database search accuracy but also can be used to generate features that significantly boost the performance of the Percolator postprocessor. The DRIP software is built upon a general purpose DBN toolkit (GMTK), thereby allowing a wide variety of options for user-specific inference tasks as well as facilitating easy modifications to the DRIP model in future work. DRIP is implemented in Python and C++ and is available under Apache license at http://melodi-lab.github.io/dripToolkit . PMID:27397138

  8. Improved dynamic compensation for accurate cutting force measurements in milling applications

    Scippa, A.; Sallese, L.; Grossi, N.; Campatelli, G.

    2015-03-01

    Accurate cutting-force measurements appear to be the key information in most of the machining related studies as they are fundamental in understanding the cutting processes, optimizing the cutting operations and evaluating the presence of instabilities that could affect the effectiveness of cutting processes. A variety of specifically designed transducers are commercially available nowadays and many different approaches in measuring cutting forces are presented in literature. The available transducers, though, express some limitations since they are conditioned by the vibration of the surrounding system and by the transducer's natural frequency. These parameters can drastically affect the measurement accuracy in some cases; hence an effective and accurate tool is required to compensate those dynamically induced errors in cutting force measurements. This work is aimed at developing and testing a compensation technique based on Kalman filter estimator. Two different approaches named "band-fitting" and "parallel elaboration" methods, have been developed to extend applications of this compensation technique, especially for milling purpose. The compensation filter has been designed upon the experimentally identified system's dynamic and its accuracy and effectiveness has been evaluated by numerical and experimental tests. Finally its specific application in cutting force measurements compensation is described.

  9. No Galaxy Left Behind: Accurate Measurements with the Faintest Objects in the Dark Energy Survey

    Suchyta, E. [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States). et al.

    2015-07-29

    Accurate statistical measurement with large imaging surveys has traditionally required throwing away a sizable fraction of the data. This is because most measurements have have relied on selecting nearly complete samples, where variations in the composition of the galaxy population with seeing, depth, or other survey characteristics are small. We introduce a new measurement method that aims to minimize this wastage, allowing precision measurement for any class of stars or galaxies detectable in an imaging survey. We have implemented our proposal in Balrog, a software package which embeds fake objects in real imaging in order to accurately characterize measurement biases. We also demonstrate this technique with an angular clustering measurement using Dark Energy Survey (DES) data. We first show that recovery of our injected galaxies depends on a wide variety of survey characteristics in the same way as the real data. We then construct a flux-limited sample of the faintest galaxies in DES, chosen specifically for their sensitivity to depth and seeing variations. Using the synthetic galaxies as randoms in the standard LandySzalay correlation function estimator suppresses the effects of variable survey selection by at least two orders of magnitude. Now our measured angular clustering is found to be in excellent agreement with that of a matched sample drawn from much deeper, higherresolution space-based COSMOS imaging; over angular scales of 0.004° < θ < 0.2 ° , we find a best-fit scaling amplitude between the DES and COSMOS measurements of 1.00 ± 0.09. We expect this methodology to be broadly useful for extending the statistical reach of measurements in a wide variety of coming imaging surveys.

  10. Measurement of caudate nucleus area - a more accurate measurement for Huntington's disease?

    Caudate nucleus atrophy occurs in Huntington's disease and methods of measuring this have been described using axial CT, but these are indirect and lack sensitivity. We measured caudate nucleus area (blind to the subjects' clinical state) in 30 subjects with or at risk of Huntington's disease, and in 100 normal age matched controls. Fifteen subjects with established symptomatic Huntington's disease, 3 with early symptoms, and 3 presymptomatic subjects (2 showing a high probability for the Huntington's disease gene on genetic testing, and one who has since developed symptoms) were correctly identified. Three normal (gene negative) family members were also correctly identified. Outcome is awaited in 6. CT caudate area measurement is simple and reproducible and we have found it to be a useful confirmatory test for Huntington's disease. (orig.)

  11. Measuring accurately liquid and tissue surface tension with a compression plate tensiometer

    Mgharbel, Abbas; Rieu, Jean-Paul

    2009-01-01

    Apparent tissue surface tension allows the quantification of cell-cell cohesion and was reported to be a powerful indicator for the cellular rearrangements that take place during embryonic development or for cancer progression. The measurement is realized with a parallel compression plate tensiometer using the capillary laws. Although it was introduced more than a decade ago, it is based on various geometrical or physical approximations. Surprisingly, these approximations have never been tested. Using a novel tensiometer, we compare the two currently used methods to measure tissue surface tension and propose a third one, based on a local polynomial fit (LPF) of the profile of compressed droplets or cell aggregates. We show the importance of measuring the contact angle between the plate and the drop/aggregate to obtain real accurate measurement of surface tension when applying existing methods. We can suspect that many reported values of surface tension are greatly affected because of not handling this paramet...

  12. Test of the standard model at low energy: accurate measurements of the branching rates of 62Ga; accurate measurements of the half-life of 38Ca

    Precise measurements of Fermi superallowed 0+ → 0+ β decays provide a powerful tool to study the weak interaction properties in the framework of the Standard Model (SM). Collectively, the comparative half-lives (ft) of these transitions allow a sensitive probe of the CVC (Conserved Vector Current) hypothesis and contribute to the most demanding test of the unitarity of the quarks-mixing CKM matrix top-row, by providing, so far, the most accurate determination of its dominant element (Vud). Until recently, an apparent departure from unity enhanced a doubt on the validity of the minimal SM and thus stimulated a considerable effort in order to extend the study to other Fermi emitters available. The 62Ga and 38Ca are among key nuclei to achieve these precision tests and verify the reliability of the corrections applied to the experimental ft-values. The 62Ga β-decay was investigated at the IGISOL separator, with an experimental setup composed of 3 EUROBALL Clovers for γ-ray detection. Very weak intensity (62Zn. The newly established analog branching-ratio (B.RA equals 99.893(24) %) was used to compute the universal Ft-value (62Ga). The latter turned out to be in good agreement with the 12 well-known cases. Compatibility between the upper limit set here on the term (δIM) and the theoretical prediction suggests that the isospin-symmetry-breaking correction is indeed large for the heavy (A ≥ 62) β-emitters. The study of the 38Ca decay was performed at the CERN-ISOLDE facility. Injection of fluorine into the ion source, in order to chemically select the isotopes of interest, assisted by the REXTRAP Penning trap facility and a time-of-flight analysis, enabled us to eliminate efficiently the troublesome 38mK. For the first time, the 38Ca half-life is measured with a highly purified radioactive sample. The preliminary result obtained, T1/2(38Ca) 445.8(10) ms, improves the precision on the half-life as determined from previous measurements by a factor close to 10

  13. Fast and Accurate Fourier Series Solutions to Gravitational Lensing by A General Family of Two Power-Law Mass Distributions

    Chae, K H

    2002-01-01

    Fourier series solutions to the deflection and magnification by a family of three-dimensional cusped two power-law ellipsoidal mass distributions are presented. The cusped two power-law ellipsoidal mass distributions are characterized by inner and outer power-law radial indices and a break (or, transition) radius. The model family includes mass models mimicking Jaffe, Hernquist, and $\\eta$ models and dark matter halo profiles from numerical simulations. The Fourier series solutions for the cusped two power-law mass distributions are relatively simple, and allow a very fast calculation even for a chosen small fractional calculational error (e.g. $10^{-5}$). These results will be particularly useful for studying lensed systems which provide a number of accurate lensing constraints and for systematic analyses of large numbers of lenses. Subroutines employing these results for the two power-law model and the results by Chae, Khersonsky, & Turnshek for the generalized single power-law mass model are made publi...

  14. Fast and Accurate Fourier Series Solutions to Gravitational Lensing by a General Family of Two-Power-Law Mass Distributions

    Chae, Kyu-Hyun

    2002-04-01

    Fourier series solutions to the deflection and magnification by a family of three-dimensional cusped two-power-law ellipsoidal mass distributions are presented. The cusped two-power-law ellipsoidal mass distributions are characterized by inner and outer power-law radial indices and a break (or transition) radius. The model family includes mass models mimicking Jaffe, Hernquist, and η models and dark matter halo profiles from numerical simulations. The Fourier series solutions for the cusped two-power-law mass distributions are relatively simple and allow a very fast calculation, even for a chosen small fractional calculational error (e.g., 10-5). These results will be particularly useful for studying lensed systems that provide a number of accurate lensing constraints and for systematic analyses of large numbers of lenses. Subroutines employing these results for the two-power-law model and the results by Chae, Khersonsky, & Turnshek for the generalized single-power-law mass model are made publicly available.

  15. Particle Image Velocimetry Measurements in Anatomically-Accurate Models of the Mammalian Nasal Cavity

    Rumple, C.; Richter, J.; Craven, B. A.; Krane, M.

    2012-11-01

    A summary of the research being carried out by our multidisciplinary team to better understand the form and function of the nose in different mammalian species that include humans, carnivores, ungulates, rodents, and marine animals will be presented. The mammalian nose houses a convoluted airway labyrinth, where two hallmark features of mammals occur, endothermy and olfaction. Because of the complexity of the nasal cavity, the anatomy and function of these upper airways remain poorly understood in most mammals. However, recent advances in high-resolution medical imaging, computational modeling, and experimental flow measurement techniques are now permitting the study of airflow and respiratory and olfactory transport phenomena in anatomically-accurate reconstructions of the nasal cavity. Here, we focus on efforts to manufacture transparent, anatomically-accurate models for stereo particle image velocimetry (SPIV) measurements of nasal airflow. Challenges in the design and manufacture of index-matched anatomical models are addressed and preliminary SPIV measurements are presented. Such measurements will constitute a validation database for concurrent computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of mammalian respiration and olfaction. Supported by the National Science Foundation.

  16. A measurement of the tau mass

    Albrecht, H.; Ehrlichmann, H.; Hamacher, T.; Hofmann, R.P.; Kirchhoff, T.; Nau, A.; Nowak, S.; Schroeder, H.; Schulz, H.D.; Walter, M.; Wurth, R. (Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)); Appuhn, R.D.; Hast, C.; Kolanoski, H.; Lange, A.; Lindner, A.; Mankel, R.; Schieber, M.; Siegmund, T.; Spaan, B.; Thurn, H.; Toepfer, D.; Walther, A.; Wegener, D. (Dortmund Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik); Paul

    1992-06-01

    Using the ARGUS detector at the DORIS II storage ring, a new measurement of the mass of the {tau} lepton has been obtained. An analysis of the tan pseudomass spectrum for decays of the type {tau}{sup -} {yields} {pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{nu}{sub {tau}} finds m{sub {tau}} = (1776.3 {+-} 2.4 {+-} 1.4) MeV/c{sup 2}. This result also leads to an improvement of the upper limit on the {nu}{sub {tau}} mass to m{sub {nu}{tau}} < 31 MeV/c{sup 2} at the 95% confidence level. (orig.).

  17. A measurement of the tau mass

    Using the ARGUS detector at the DORIS II storage ring, a new measurement of the mass of the τ lepton has been obtained. An analysis of the tan pseudomass spectrum for decays of the type τ- → π-π-π+ντ finds mτ = (1776.3 ± 2.4 ± 1.4) MeV/c2. This result also leads to an improvement of the upper limit on the ντ mass to mντ 2 at the 95% confidence level. (orig.)

  18. Experiment for a precision neutrino mass measurement

    We describe an experiment which is designed to determine the electron neutrino mass to better than 2 eV. Key features of the experiment are a high activity frozen tritium source and a high resolution electrostatic spectrometer designed to make a careful measurement of the tritium beta decay end point spectrum. The goal is to determine the neutrino mass to better than 1 eV statistically in a four day run. A series of these runs will allow study of potential systematics. The construction phase is nearly complete and preliminary data will be taken in late spring

  19. Top quark mass measurements at the LHC

    Fuster, Juan; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The latest measurements of the top quark mass using the ATLAS and CMS experiments at the LHC are presented. The discussion includes the results obtained using the conventional methods (Template/Ideogram) and those derived from the so called alternative methods. Results from the conventional methods using the various top final states (lepton+jets, di-lepton and full hadronic) are reviewed. Determinations using the inclusive ttbar production, the ttbar production with an additional jet and the lepton-b-jet invariant mass distribution are also discussed.

  20. Interpreting $W$ mass measurements in the SMEFT

    Bjørn, Mikkel

    2016-01-01

    Measurements of the $W^\\pm$ mass ($m_W$) provide an important consistency check of the Standard Model (SM) and constrain the possibility of physics beyond the SM. Precision measurements of $m_W$ at hadron colliders are inferred from kinematic distributions of transverse variables. We examine how this inference is modified when considering the presence of physics beyond the SM expressed in terms of local contact operators. We show that Tevatron measurements of $m_W$ using transverse variables are transparent and applicable as consistent constraints in the Standard Model Effective Field theory (SMEFT) and find the extra error introduced in these measurements due to SMEFT higher dimensional operators to be subdominant to the current experimental systematic errors. This means that the leading challenge to interpreting these measurements in the SMEFT is the pure theoretical uncertainty in how these measurements are mapped to Lagrangian parameters. We stress the need to avoid using naive combinations of Tevatron an...

  1. Highly accurate measurements of the spontaneous fission half-life of 240,242Pu

    Salvador-Castiñeira, P.; Bryś, T.; Eykens, R.; Hambsch, F.-J.; Moens, A.; Oberstedt, S.; Sibbens, G.; Vanleeuw, D.; Vidali, M.; Pretel, C.

    2013-12-01

    Fast spectrum neutron-induced fission cross-section data for transuranic isotopes are of special demand from the nuclear data community. In particular highly accurate data are needed for the new generation IV nuclear applications. The aim is to obtain precise neutron-induced fission cross sections for 240Pu and 242Pu. To do so, accurate data on spontaneous fission half-lives must be available. Also, minimizing uncertainties in the detector efficiency is a key point. We studied both isotopes by means of a twin Frisch-grid ionization chamber with the goal of improving the present data on the neutron-induced fission cross section. For the two plutonium isotopes the high α-particle decay rates pose a particular problem to experiments due to piling-up events in the counting gas. Argon methane and methane were employed as counting gases, the latter showed considerable improvement in signal generation due to its higher drift velocity. The detection efficiency for both samples was determined, and improved spontaneous fission half-lives were obtained with very low statistical uncertainty (0.13% for 240Pu and 0.04% for 242Pu): for 240Pu, T1/2,SF=1.165×1011 yr (1.1%), and for 242Pu, T1/2,SF=6.74×1010 yr (1.3%). Systematic uncertainties are due to sample mass (0.4% for 240Pu and 0.9% for 242Pu) and efficiency (1%).

  2. Accurate determination of silver nanoparticles in animal tissues by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    Veverková, Lenka [Regional Centre of Advanced Technologies and Materials, Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Palacky University, 17.listopadu 12, CZ 771 46 Olomouc (Czech Republic); Hradilová, Šárka [Regional Centre of Advanced Technologies and Materials, Department of Physical Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Palacky University, 17.listopadu 12, CZ 771 46 Olomouc (Czech Republic); Milde, David, E-mail: david.mlde@upol.cz [Regional Centre of Advanced Technologies and Materials, Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Palacky University, 17.listopadu 12, CZ 771 46 Olomouc (Czech Republic); Panáček, Aleš [Regional Centre of Advanced Technologies and Materials, Department of Physical Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Palacky University, 17.listopadu 12, CZ 771 46 Olomouc (Czech Republic); Skopalová, Jana [Regional Centre of Advanced Technologies and Materials, Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Palacky University, 17.listopadu 12, CZ 771 46 Olomouc (Czech Republic); Kvítek, Libor [Regional Centre of Advanced Technologies and Materials, Department of Physical Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Palacky University, 17.listopadu 12, CZ 771 46 Olomouc (Czech Republic); Petrželová, Kamila [Regional Centre of Advanced Technologies and Materials, Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Palacky University, 17.listopadu 12, CZ 771 46 Olomouc (Czech Republic); National Reference Laboratory for Chemical Elements, Department of Residues in Kroměříž, State Veterinary Institute Olomouc, Hulínská 2286, CZ 767 60 Kroměříž (Czech Republic); and others

    2014-12-01

    This study examined recoveries of silver determination in animal tissues after wet digestion by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The composition of the mineralization mixture for microwave assisted digestion was optimized and the best recoveries were obtained for mineralization with HNO{sub 3} and addition of HCl promptly after digestion. The optimization was performed on model samples of chicken meat spiked with silver nanoparticles and a solution of ionic silver. Basic calculations of theoretical distribution of Ag among various silver-containing species were implemented and the results showed that most of the silver is in the form of soluble complexes AgCl{sub 2}{sup −} and AgCl{sub 3}{sup 2−} for the optimized composition of the mineralization mixture. Three animal tissue certified reference materials were then analyzed to verify the trueness and precision of the results. - Highlights: • We performed detailed optimization of microwave assisted digestion procedure of animal tissue used prior to Ag determination by ICP-MS. • We provide basic equilibrium calculations to give theoretical explanation of results from optimization of tested mineralization mixtures. • Results from method validation that was done by analysis of several matrix CRMs are presented.

  3. Accurate determination of silver nanoparticles in animal tissues by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    This study examined recoveries of silver determination in animal tissues after wet digestion by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The composition of the mineralization mixture for microwave assisted digestion was optimized and the best recoveries were obtained for mineralization with HNO3 and addition of HCl promptly after digestion. The optimization was performed on model samples of chicken meat spiked with silver nanoparticles and a solution of ionic silver. Basic calculations of theoretical distribution of Ag among various silver-containing species were implemented and the results showed that most of the silver is in the form of soluble complexes AgCl2− and AgCl32− for the optimized composition of the mineralization mixture. Three animal tissue certified reference materials were then analyzed to verify the trueness and precision of the results. - Highlights: • We performed detailed optimization of microwave assisted digestion procedure of animal tissue used prior to Ag determination by ICP-MS. • We provide basic equilibrium calculations to give theoretical explanation of results from optimization of tested mineralization mixtures. • Results from method validation that was done by analysis of several matrix CRMs are presented

  4. CLASH-VLT: Insights on the mass substructures in the Frontier Fields Cluster MACS J0416.1-2403 through accurate strong lens modeling

    Grillo, C; Rosati, P; Mercurio, A; Balestra, I; Munari, E; Nonino, M; Caminha, G B; Lombardi, M; De Lucia, G; Borgani, S; Gobat, R; Biviano, A; Girardi, M; Umetsu, K; Coe, D; Koekemoer, A M; Postman, M; Zitrin, A; Halkola, A; Broadhurst, T; Sartoris, B; Presotto, V; Annunziatella, M; Maier, C; Fritz, A; Vanzella, E; Frye, B

    2014-01-01

    We present a detailed mass reconstruction and a novel study on the substructure properties in the core of the CLASH and Frontier Fields galaxy cluster MACS J0416.1-2403. We show and employ our extensive spectroscopic data set taken with the VIMOS instrument as part of our CLASH-VLT program, to confirm spectroscopically 10 strong lensing systems and to select a sample of 175 plausible cluster members to a limiting stellar mass of log(M_*/M_Sun) ~ 8.6. We reproduce the measured positions of 30 multiple images with a remarkable median offset of only 0.3" by means of a comprehensive strong lensing model comprised of 2 cluster dark-matter halos, represented by cored elliptical pseudo-isothermal mass distributions, and the cluster member components. The latter have total mass-to-light ratios increasing with the galaxy HST/WFC3 near-IR (F160W) luminosities. The measurement of the total enclosed mass within the Einstein radius is accurate to ~5%, including systematic uncertainties. We emphasize that the use of multip...

  5. Accurate 3D shape measurement of multiple separate objects with stereo vision

    3D shape measurement has emerged as a very useful tool in numerous fields because of its wide and ever-increasing applications. In this paper, we present a passive, fast and accurate 3D shape measurement technique using stereo vision approach. The technique first employs a scale-invariant feature transform algorithm to detect point matches at a number of discrete locations despite the discontinuities in the images. Then an automated image registration algorithm is applied to find full-field point matches with subpixel accuracy. After that, the 3D shapes of the objects can be reconstructed according to the obtained point matching and the camera information. The proposed technique is capable of performing a full-field 3D shape measurement with high accuracy even in the presence of discontinuities and multiple separate regions. The validity is verified by experiments. (paper)

  6. Accurate Young's modulus measurement based on Rayleigh wave velocity and empirical Poisson's ratio

    Li, Mingxia; Feng, Zhihua

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents a method for Young's modulus measurement based on Rayleigh wave speed. The error in Poisson's ratio has weak influence on the measurement of Young's modulus based on Rayleigh wave speed, and Poisson's ratio minimally varies in a certain material; thus, we can accurately estimate Young's modulus with surface wave speed and a rough Poisson's ratio. We numerically analysed three methods using Rayleigh, longitudinal, and transversal wave speed, respectively, and the error in Poisson's ratio shows the least influence on the result in the method involving Rayleigh wave speed. An experiment was performed and has proved the feasibility of this method. Device for speed measuring could be small, and no sample pretreatment is needed. Hence, developing a portable instrument based on this method is possible. This method makes a good compromise between usability and precision.

  7. A Flexible Fringe Projection Vision System with Extended Mathematical Model for Accurate Three-Dimensional Measurement.

    Xiao, Suzhi; Tao, Wei; Zhao, Hui

    2016-01-01

    In order to acquire an accurate three-dimensional (3D) measurement, the traditional fringe projection technique applies complex and laborious procedures to compensate for the errors that exist in the vision system. However, the error sources in the vision system are very complex, such as lens distortion, lens defocus, and fringe pattern nonsinusoidality. Some errors cannot even be explained or rendered with clear expressions and are difficult to compensate directly as a result. In this paper, an approach is proposed that avoids the complex and laborious compensation procedure for error sources but still promises accurate 3D measurement. It is realized by the mathematical model extension technique. The parameters of the extended mathematical model for the 'phase to 3D coordinates transformation' are derived using the least-squares parameter estimation algorithm. In addition, a phase-coding method based on a frequency analysis is proposed for the absolute phase map retrieval to spatially isolated objects. The results demonstrate the validity and the accuracy of the proposed flexible fringe projection vision system on spatially continuous and discontinuous objects for 3D measurement. PMID:27136553

  8. Comparison of thermistor linearization techniques for accurate temperature measurement in phase change materials

    Alternate energy technologies are developing rapidly in the recent years. A significant part of this trend is the development of different phase change materials (PCMs). Proper utilization of PCMs requires accurate thermal characterization. There are several methodologies used in this field. This paper stresses the importance of accurate temperature measurements during the implementation of T-history method. Since the temperature sensor size is also important thermistors have been selected as the sensing modality. Two thermistor linearization techniques, one based on Wheatstone bridge and the other based on simple serial-parallel resistor connection, are compared in terms of achievable temperature accuracy through consideration of both, nonlinearity and self-heating errors. Proper calibration was performed before T-history measurement of RT21 (RUBITHERM (registered) GmbH) PCM. Measurement results suggest that the utilization of serial-parallel resistor connection gives better accuracy (less than ±0.1 deg. C) in comparison with the Wheatstone bridge based configuration (up to ±1.5 deg. C).

  9. Phase Measurement for Accurate Mapping of Chemical Bonds in Acentric Space Groups

    Although the electron density is fundamental to the study of chemical bonding and density-functional theory, it cannot be accurately mapped experimentally for the important class of crystals lacking inversion symmetry, since structure factor phase information is normally inaccessible. We report the combination of x-ray and electron diffraction experiments for the determination of the electron density in acentric AlN, using multiple-scattering effects in convergent-beam electron diffraction to obtain sensitivity to structure factor phases, and describe a new error metric and weighting scheme for multipole refinement using combined measurements of structure factor magnitudes and phases

  10. Accurate macromolecular structures using minimal measurements from X-ray free-electron lasers

    Hattne, Johan; Echols, Nathaniel; Tran, Rosalie; Kern, Jan; Gildea, Richard J.; Brewster, Aaron S.; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Glöckner, Carina; Hellmich, Julia; Laksmono, Hartawan; Sierra, Raymond G.; Lassalle-Kaiser, Benedikt; Lampe, Alyssa; Han, Guangye; Gul, Sheraz; DiFiore, Dörte; Milathianaki, Despina; Fry, Alan R.; Miahnahri, Alan; White, William E.; Schafer, Donald W.; Seibert, M. Marvin; Koglin, Jason E.; Sokaras, Dimosthenis; Weng, Tsu-Chien; Sellberg, Jonas; Latimer, Matthew J.; Glatzel, Pieter; Zwart, Petrus H.; Grosse-Kunstleve, Ralf W.; Bogan, Michael J.; Messerschmidt, Marc; Williams, Garth J.; Boutet, Sébastien; Messinger, Johannes; Zouni, Athina; Yano, Junko; Bergmann, Uwe; Yachandra, Vittal K.; Adams, Paul D.; Sauter, Nicholas K.

    2014-01-01

    X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) sources enable the use of crystallography to solve three-dimensional macromolecular structures under native conditions and free from radiation damage. Results to date, however, have been limited by the challenge of deriving accurate Bragg intensities from a heterogeneous population of microcrystals, while at the same time modeling the X-ray spectrum and detector geometry. Here we present a computational approach designed to extract statistically significant high-resolution signals from fewer diffraction measurements. PMID:24633409

  11. Designer cantilevers for even more accurate quantitative measurements of biological systems with multifrequency AFM

    Contera, S.

    2016-04-01

    Multifrequency excitation/monitoring of cantilevers has made it possible both to achieve fast, relatively simple, nanometre-resolution quantitative mapping of mechanical of biological systems in solution using atomic force microscopy (AFM), and single molecule resolution detection by nanomechanical biosensors. A recent paper by Penedo et al [2015 Nanotechnology 26 485706] has made a significant contribution by developing simple methods to improve the signal to noise ratio in liquid environments, by selectively enhancing cantilever modes, which will lead to even more accurate quantitative measurements.

  12. A simple and accurate measurement method of current density of an electron accelerator for irradiation

    For simple and accurate measurement of the current distribution in a broad beam from electron accelerators, a method for detecting the charge absorbed in a graphite target exposed to the air has been examined. The present report means to solve several fundamental problems. The effective incidence area of the absorber is strictly defined by the design of the geometrical arrangement of the absorber assembly. Electron backscattering from the absorber is corrected with backscattering coefficients in consideration of oblique incidence on the absorber. The influence of ionic charge produced in air is ascribed to the contact potential between the absorber and the guard, and correction methods are proposed. (orig.)

  13. Accurate measurements of surface emission rate for large-area alpha and beta reference sources

    For alpha emitters and beta emitters with maximum beta energy greater than 0.150 MeV, the characteristics of reference sources for the calibration of surface contamination monitors are specified by the international standard ISO 8769. According to this standard, the surface emission rate of reference sources has to be measured by absolute methods or by using an instrument that has been calibrated by means of sources that has been measured absolutely. Moreover, the surface emission rate has to be measured by the national standards laboratory with an uncertainty which must not exceed 3% (one standard deviation). In this paper, the counting system and the experimental conditions needed for accurate measurements of the surface emission rate are presented. The uncertainty of such measurements is much smaller than 3%. The evaluation of this uncertainty is also described. The counting system used for absolute alpha and beta surface emission rate measurements is composed of a large area, gas-flow, windowless proportional detector, an integral and a spectrometric counting channels. The method of measurement for alpha and beta surface emission rate is very simple but it is necessary to achieve the optimum experimental conditions of counting for obtaining accurate measurement results. Thus, the proportional detector has to work under a continuous and stable gas-flow and its plateau has to be long with a very low slope. To obtain a counting efficiency of 100%, it has to use a tight detector and a very pure counting gas. Additionally, the detector must be flushed and then operated under a steady gas-flow for several hours prior to measurements in order to be cleaned of air impurities. To perform alpha and beta surface emission rate measurements we optimized first the conditions of counting. For beta sources, the discrimination level has been adjusted by means of a 55 Fe source. Using this spectrum, we checked the stability of the counting system because the peak, corresponding

  14. Ocean Lidar Measurements of Beam Attenuation and a Roadmap to Accurate Phytoplankton Biomass Estimates

    Hu, Yongxiang; Behrenfeld, Mike; Hostetler, Chris; Pelon, Jacques; Trepte, Charles; Hair, John; Slade, Wayne; Cetinic, Ivona; Vaughan, Mark; Lu, Xiaomei; Zhai, Pengwang; Weimer, Carl; Winker, David; Verhappen, Carolus C.; Butler, Carolyn; Liu, Zhaoyan; Hunt, Bill; Omar, Ali; Rodier, Sharon; Lifermann, Anne; Josset, Damien; Hou, Weilin; MacDonnell, David; Rhew, Ray

    2016-06-01

    Beam attenuation coefficient, c, provides an important optical index of plankton standing stocks, such as phytoplankton biomass and total particulate carbon concentration. Unfortunately, c has proven difficult to quantify through remote sensing. Here, we introduce an innovative approach for estimating c using lidar depolarization measurements and diffuse attenuation coefficients from ocean color products or lidar measurements of Brillouin scattering. The new approach is based on a theoretical formula established from Monte Carlo simulations that links the depolarization ratio of sea water to the ratio of diffuse attenuation Kd and beam attenuation C (i.e., a multiple scattering factor). On July 17, 2014, the CALIPSO satellite was tilted 30° off-nadir for one nighttime orbit in order to minimize ocean surface backscatter and demonstrate the lidar ocean subsurface measurement concept from space. Depolarization ratios of ocean subsurface backscatter are measured accurately. Beam attenuation coefficients computed from the depolarization ratio measurements compare well with empirical estimates from ocean color measurements. We further verify the beam attenuation coefficient retrievals using aircraft-based high spectral resolution lidar (HSRL) data that are collocated with in-water optical measurements.

  15. Accurate mass fragment library for rapid analysis of pesticides on produce using ambient pressure desorption ionization with high-resolution mass spectrometry.

    Kern, Sara E; Lin, Lora A; Fricke, Frederick L

    2014-08-01

    U.S. food imports have been increasing steadily for decades, intensifying the need for a rapid and sensitive screening technique. A method has been developed that uses foam disks to sample the surface of incoming produce. This work provides complimentary information to the extensive amount of published pesticide fragmentation data collected using LCMS systems (Sack et al. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, 59, 6383-6411, 2011; Mol et al. Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry, 403, 2891-2908, 2012). The disks are directly analyzed using transmission-mode direct analysis in real time (DART) ambient pressure desorption ionization coupled to a high resolution accurate mass-mass spectrometer (HRAM-MS). In order to provide more certainty in the identification of the pesticides detected, a library of accurate mass fragments and isotopes of the protonated parent molecular ion (the [M+H]⁺) has been developed. The HRAM-MS is equipped with a quadrupole mass filter, providing the capability of "data-dependent" fragmentation, as opposed to "all -ion" fragmentation (where all of the ions enter a collision chamber and are fragmented at once). A temperature gradient for the DART helium stream and multiple collision energies were employed to detect and fragment 164 pesticides of varying chemical classes, sizes, and polarities. The accurate mass information of precursor ([M+H]⁺ ion) and fragment ions is essential in correctly identifying chemical contaminants on the surface of imported produce. Additionally, the inclusion of isotopes of the [M+H]⁺ in the database adds another metric to the confirmation process. The fragmentation data were collected using a Q-Exactive mass spectrometer and were added to a database used to process data collected with an Exactive mass spectrometer, an instrument that is more readily available for this screening application. The commodities investigated range from smooth-skinned produce such as apples to rougher surfaces like broccoli

  16. Accurate Mass Fragment Library for Rapid Analysis of Pesticides on Produce Using Ambient Pressure Desorption Ionization with High-Resolution Mass Spectrometry

    Kern, Sara E.; Lin, Lora A.; Fricke, Frederick L.

    2014-08-01

    U.S. food imports have been increasing steadily for decades, intensifying the need for a rapid and sensitive screening technique. A method has been developed that uses foam disks to sample the surface of incoming produce. This work provides complimentary information to the extensive amount of published pesticide fragmentation data collected using LCMS systems (Sack et al. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, 59, 6383-6411, 2011; Mol et al. Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry, 403, 2891-2908, 2012). The disks are directly analyzed using transmission-mode direct analysis in real time (DART) ambient pressure desorption ionization coupled to a high resolution accurate mass-mass spectrometer (HRAM-MS). In order to provide more certainty in the identification of the pesticides detected, a library of accurate mass fragments and isotopes of the protonated parent molecular ion (the [M+H]+) has been developed. The HRAM-MS is equipped with a quadrupole mass filter, providing the capability of "data-dependent" fragmentation, as opposed to "all -ion" fragmentation (where all of the ions enter a collision chamber and are fragmented at once). A temperature gradient for the DART helium stream and multiple collision energies were employed to detect and fragment 164 pesticides of varying chemical classes, sizes, and polarities. The accurate mass information of precursor ([M+H]+ ion) and fragment ions is essential in correctly identifying chemical contaminants on the surface of imported produce. Additionally, the inclusion of isotopes of the [M+H]+ in the database adds another metric to the confirmation process. The fragmentation data were collected using a Q-Exactive mass spectrometer and were added to a database used to process data collected with an Exactive mass spectrometer, an instrument that is more readily available for this screening application. The commodities investigated range from smooth-skinned produce such as apples to rougher surfaces like broccoli. The

  17. Fourier Transform Mass Spectrometry and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Analysis for the Rapid and Accurate Characterization of Hexacosanoylceramide

    Charles W. Ross

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Ceramides are a central unit of all sphingolipids which have been identified as sites of biological recognition on cellular membranes mediating cell growth and differentiation. Several glycosphingolipids have been isolated, displaying immunomodulatory and anti-tumor activities. These molecules have generated considerable interest as potential vaccine adjuvants in humans. Accurate analyses of these and related sphingosine analogues are important for the characterization of structure, biological function, and metabolism. We report the complementary use of direct laser desorption ionization (DLDI, sheath flow electrospray ionization (ESI Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR MS and high-field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR analysis for the rapid, accurate identification of hexacosanoylceramide and starting materials. DLDI does not require stringent sample preparation and yields representative ions. Sheath-flow ESI yields ions of the product and byproducts and was significantly better than monospray ESI due to improved compound solubility. Negative ion sheath flow ESI provided data of starting materials and products all in one acquisition as hexacosanoic acid does not ionize efficiently when ceramides are present. NMR provided characterization of these lipid molecules complementing the results obtained from MS analyses. NMR data was able to differentiate straight chain versus branched chain alkyl groups not easily obtained from mass spectrometry.

  18. Fourier Transform Mass Spectrometry and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Analysis for the Rapid and Accurate Characterization of Hexacosanoylceramide

    Ross, Charles W.; Simonsick, William J.; Bogusky, Michael J.; Celikay, Recep W.; Guare, James P.; Newton, Randall C.

    2016-01-01

    Ceramides are a central unit of all sphingolipids which have been identified as sites of biological recognition on cellular membranes mediating cell growth and differentiation. Several glycosphingolipids have been isolated, displaying immunomodulatory and anti-tumor activities. These molecules have generated considerable interest as potential vaccine adjuvants in humans. Accurate analyses of these and related sphingosine analogues are important for the characterization of structure, biological function, and metabolism. We report the complementary use of direct laser desorption ionization (DLDI), sheath flow electrospray ionization (ESI) Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR MS) and high-field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis for the rapid, accurate identification of hexacosanoylceramide and starting materials. DLDI does not require stringent sample preparation and yields representative ions. Sheath-flow ESI yields ions of the product and byproducts and was significantly better than monospray ESI due to improved compound solubility. Negative ion sheath flow ESI provided data of starting materials and products all in one acquisition as hexacosanoic acid does not ionize efficiently when ceramides are present. NMR provided characterization of these lipid molecules complementing the results obtained from MS analyses. NMR data was able to differentiate straight chain versus branched chain alkyl groups not easily obtained from mass spectrometry. PMID:27367671

  19. Precision mass measurements utilizing beta endpoints

    A technique for precise determination of beta endpoints with an intrinsic germanium detector has been developed. The energy calibration was derived from γ-ray photopeak measurements. This analysis procedure has been checked with a 27Si source produced in a (p,n) reaction on an 27Al target and subsequently applied to mass separated samples of 76Rb, 77Rb and 78Rb. Results indicate errors < 50 keV are obtainable. (orig.)

  20. Accurate heat transfer measurements using thermochromic liquid crystal. Part 1: Calibration and characteristics of crystals

    Kakade, V.U. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Bath, Bath, BA2 7AY (United Kingdom); Lock, G.D. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Bath, Bath, BA2 7AY (United Kingdom)], E-mail: ensgdl@bath.ac.uk; Wilson, M.; Owen, J.M.; Mayhew, J.E. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Bath, Bath, BA2 7AY (United Kingdom)

    2009-10-15

    Encapsulated thermochromic liquid crystal (TLC) can accurately measure surface temperature in a variety of heat transfer and fluid flow experiments. Narrow-band TLC, where the colour changes over a temperature range of {approx}1 deg. C, can be used to determine surface temperature within an uncertainty of 0.1 deg. C. Wide-band TLC, typically active over 5-20 deg. C, allow the possibility of mapping surface temperature distributions. In part 1 of this two-part paper, an extensive set of calibrations for narrow-band and wide-band TLC is reported. This generic study provides insight into the importance and influence of the various factors governing the colour-temperature relationship. These governing effects include the variation in optical path, the spectrum of the illumination source, the lighting and viewing angles, the differences between cooling or heating cycles (hysteresis), the variation with the number of heating or cooling cycles (aging) and how this varies with TLC film thickness. Two narrow-band crystals are also specifically calibrated for application to experiments on a transparent disc rotating at high speed ({approx}5000 rpm). Part 2 of this paper describes how these accurately-calibrated crystals were used to measure the transient surface temperature on, and heat transfer to, a rotating disc.

  1. Accurate heat transfer measurements using thermochromic liquid crystal. Part 1: Calibration and characteristics of crystals

    Encapsulated thermochromic liquid crystal (TLC) can accurately measure surface temperature in a variety of heat transfer and fluid flow experiments. Narrow-band TLC, where the colour changes over a temperature range of ∼1 deg. C, can be used to determine surface temperature within an uncertainty of 0.1 deg. C. Wide-band TLC, typically active over 5-20 deg. C, allow the possibility of mapping surface temperature distributions. In part 1 of this two-part paper, an extensive set of calibrations for narrow-band and wide-band TLC is reported. This generic study provides insight into the importance and influence of the various factors governing the colour-temperature relationship. These governing effects include the variation in optical path, the spectrum of the illumination source, the lighting and viewing angles, the differences between cooling or heating cycles (hysteresis), the variation with the number of heating or cooling cycles (aging) and how this varies with TLC film thickness. Two narrow-band crystals are also specifically calibrated for application to experiments on a transparent disc rotating at high speed (∼5000 rpm). Part 2 of this paper describes how these accurately-calibrated crystals were used to measure the transient surface temperature on, and heat transfer to, a rotating disc.

  2. Comprehensive two-dimensional liquid chromatography tandem diode array detector (DAD) and accurate mass QTOF-MS for the analysis of flavonoids and iridoid glycosides in Hedyotis diffusa.

    Li, Duxin; Schmitz, Oliver J

    2015-01-01

    The analysis of chemical constituents in Chinese herbal medicines (CHMs) is a challenge because of numerous compounds with various polarities and functional groups. Liquid chromatography coupled with quadrupole time-of-flight (QTOF) mass spectrometry (LC/MS) is of particular interest in the analysis of herbal components. One of the main attributes of QTOF that makes it an attractive analytical technique is its accurate mass measurement for both precursor and product ions. For the separation of CHMs, comprehensive two-dimensional chromatography (LCxLC) provides much higher resolving power than traditional one-dimensional separation. Therefore, a LCxLC-QTOF-MS system was developed and applied to the analysis of flavonoids and iridoid glycosides in aqueous extracts of Hedyotis diffusa (Rubiaceae). Shift gradient was applied in the two-dimensional separation in the LCxLC system to increase the orthogonality and effective peak distribution area of the analysis. Tentative identification of compounds was done by accurate mass interpretation and validation by UV spectrum. A clear classification of flavonol glycosides (FGs), acylated FGs, and iridoid glycosides (IGs) was shown in different regions of the LCxLC contour plot. In total, five FGs, four acylated FGs, and three IGs were tentatively identified. In addition, several novel flavonoids were found, which demonstrates that LCxLC-QTOF-MS detection also has great potential in herbal medicine analysis. PMID:25171829

  3. Wide-band mass measurements with a multi-reflection time-of-flight mass spectrograph

    Schury, P.; Ito, Y.; Wada, M; Wollnik, H.

    2013-01-01

    We characterize the mass bandwidth of the a multi-reflection time-of-flight mass spectrograph, showing both the functional and useful mass bandwidth. We then demonstrate the use of a multi-reflection time-of-flight mass spectrograph to perform mass measurements in mass bands much wider than the mass bandwidth.

  4. Accurate mass screening and identification of emerging contaminants in environmental samples by liquid chromatography-hybrid linear ion trap Orbitrap mass spectrometry.

    Hogenboom, A C; van Leerdam, J A; de Voogt, P

    2009-01-16

    The European Reach legislation will possibly drive producers to develop newly designed chemicals that will be less persistent, bioaccumulative or toxic. If this innovation leads to an increased use of more hydrophilic chemicals it may result in higher mobilities of chemicals in the aqueous environment. As a result, the drinking water companies may face stronger demands on removal processes as the hydrophilic compounds inherently are more difficult to remove. Monitoring efforts will also experience a shift in focus to more water-soluble compounds. Screening source waters on the presence of (emerging) contaminants is an essential step in the control of the water cycle from source to tap water. In this article, some of our experiences are presented with the hybrid linear ion trap (LTQ) FT Orbitrap mass spectrometer, in the area of chemical water analysis. A two-pronged strategy in mass spectrometric research was employed: (i) exploring effluent, surface, ground- and drinking-water samples searching for accurate masses corresponding to target compounds (and their product ions) known from, e.g. priority lists or the scientific literature and (ii) full-scan screening of water samples in search of 'unknown' or unexpected masses, followed by MS(n) experiments to elucidate the structure of the unknowns. Applications of both approaches to emerging water contaminants are presented and discussed. Results are presented for target analysis search for pharmaceuticals, benzotriazoles, illicit drugs and for the identification of unknown compounds in a groundwater sample and in a polar extract of a landfill soil sample (a toxicity identification evaluation bioassay sample). The applications of accurate mass screening and identification described in this article demonstrate that the LC-LTQ FT Orbitrap MS is well equipped to meet the challenges posed by newly emerging polar contaminants. PMID:18771771

  5. Isotopic Ratio Outlier Analysis of the S. cerevisiae Metabolome Using Accurate Mass Gas Chromatography/Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry: A New Method for Discovery.

    Qiu, Yunping; Moir, Robyn; Willis, Ian; Beecher, Chris; Tsai, Yu-Hsuan; Garrett, Timothy J; Yost, Richard A; Kurland, Irwin J

    2016-03-01

    Isotopic ratio outlier analysis (IROA) is a (13)C metabolomics profiling method that eliminates sample to sample variance, discriminates against noise and artifacts, and improves identification of compounds, previously done with accurate mass liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS). This is the first report using IROA technology in combination with accurate mass gas chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC/TOF-MS), here used to examine the S. cerevisiae metabolome. S. cerevisiae was grown in YNB media, containing randomized 95% (13)C, or 5%(13)C glucose as the single carbon source, in order that the isotopomer pattern of all metabolites would mirror the labeled glucose. When these IROA experiments are combined, the abundance of the heavy isotopologues in the 5%(13)C extracts, or light isotopologues in the 95%(13)C extracts, follows the binomial distribution, showing mirrored peak pairs for the molecular ion. The mass difference between the (12)C monoisotopic and the (13)C monoisotopic equals the number of carbons in the molecules. The IROA-GC/MS protocol developed, using both chemical and electron ionization, extends the information acquired from the isotopic peak patterns for formulas generation. The process that can be formulated as an algorithm, in which the number of carbons, as well as the number of methoximations and silylations are used as search constraints. In electron impact (EI/IROA) spectra, the artifactual peaks are identified and easily removed, which has the potential to generate "clean" EI libraries. The combination of chemical ionization (CI) IROA and EI/IROA affords a metabolite identification procedure that enables the identification of coeluting metabolites, and allowed us to characterize 126 metabolites in the current study. PMID:26820234

  6. ACCURATE: Greenhouse Gas Profiles Retrieval from Combined IR-Laser and Microwave Occultation Measurements

    Proschek, Veronika; Kirchengast, Gottfried; Schweitzer, Susanne; Fritzer, Johannes

    2010-05-01

    The new climate satellite concept ACCURATE (Atmospheric Climate and Chemistry in the UTLS Region And climate Trends Explorer) enables simultaneous measurement of profiles of greenhouse gases, isotopes, wind and thermodynamic variables from Low Earth Orbit (LEO) satellites. The measurement principle applied is a combination of the novel LEO-LEO infrared laser occultation (LIO) technique and the already better studied LEO-LEO microwave occultation (LMO) technique. Resulting occultation events are evenly distributed around the world, have high vertical resolution and accuracy and are stable over long time periods. The LIO uses near-monochromatic signals in the short-wave infrared range (~2-2.5 μm for ACCURATE). These signals are absorbed by various trace species in the Earth's atmosphere. Profiles of the concentration of the absorbing species can be derived from signal transmission measurements. Accurately known temperature, pressure and humidity profiles derived from simultaneously measured LMO signals are essential pre-information for the retrieval of the trace species profiles. These LMO signals lie in the microwave band region from 17-23 GHz and, optionally, 178-195 GHz. The current ACCURATE mission design is arranged for the measurement of six greenhouse gases (GHG) (H2O, CO2, CH4, N2O, O3, CO) and four isotopes (13CO2, C18OO, HDO, H218O), with focus on the upper troposphere/lower stratosphere region (UTLS, 5-35 km). Wind speed in line-of-sight can be derived from a line-symmetric transmission difference which is caused by wind-induced Doppler shift. By-products are information on cloud layering, aerosol extinction, and scintillation strength. We introduce the methodology to retrieve GHG profiles from quasi-realistic forward-simulated intensities of LIO signals and thermodynamic profiles retrieved in a preceding step from LMO signals. Key of the retrieval methodology is the differencing of two LIO transmission signals, one being GHG sensitive on a target

  7. Accurate Resolution Measurement for X-Ray Micro-CT Systems

    Sharma, K. Sen; Seshadri, S.; Feser, M.; Wang, G.

    2011-09-01

    Accurate measurement of modulation transfer function (MTF), or alternatively point spread function, of an x-ray micro-CT system is essential for various purposes—to determine scanner resolution, to retrieve further information about a scanned object by image-processing, etc. In this paper, a new method for MTF measurement is proposed that can be used with any resolution pattern and is more adept at studying MTF spatial variation than the traditional method of using bar pattern analysis. A resolution target used to determine micro-CT resolution was scanned in a lab-based nano-CT system—the image from the nano-CT gave the `ground truth'. The ground truth was quantitavely compared with the micro-CT projection of same target to determine the point spread function of the system. Results matched well with bar pattern analysis, but the new method was able to study spatial variations while the bar pattern analysis failed.

  8. An accurate measurement of PMT TTS based on the photoelectron spectrum

    Huang, Wei-Ping; Tang, Ze-Bo; Li, Cheng; Jiang, Kun; Zhao, Xiao-Kun; Wang, Peng-Fei

    2015-06-01

    The water Cherenkov detector array (WCDA) for the Large High Altitude Air Shower Observatory (LHAASO) will employ more than 3600 hemisphere 8-inch photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). Good time performance of the PMT, especially the transit time spread (TTS), is required for the WCDA. In order to meet the demand of the WCDA experiment, an accurate measurement of PMT TTS based on the photoelectron spectrum is studied. The method is appropriate for multi-photoelectrons and makes it possible to measure the TTS of different photoelectrons simultaneously. The TTS of different photoelectrons for a Hamamatsu R5912 PMT is tested with a specially designed divider circuit. The relationship between TTS and number of photoelectrons is also presented in this paper. Supported by Natural Science Foundation of China (11275196) and “Strategic Priority Program” of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (XDA03010100)

  9. Generalized weighted ratio method for accurate turbidity measurement over a wide range.

    Liu, Hongbo; Yang, Ping; Song, Hong; Guo, Yilu; Zhan, Shuyue; Huang, Hui; Wang, Hangzhou; Tao, Bangyi; Mu, Quanquan; Xu, Jing; Li, Dejun; Chen, Ying

    2015-12-14

    Turbidity measurement is important for water quality assessment, food safety, medicine, ocean monitoring, etc. In this paper, a method that accurately estimates the turbidity over a wide range is proposed, where the turbidity of the sample is represented as a weighted ratio of the scattered light intensities at a series of angles. An improvement in the accuracy is achieved by expanding the structure of the ratio function, thus adding more flexibility to the turbidity-intensity fitting. Experiments have been carried out with an 850 nm laser and a power meter fixed on a turntable to measure the light intensity at different angles. The results show that the relative estimation error of the proposed method is 0.58% on average for a four-angle intensity combination for all test samples with a turbidity ranging from 160 NTU to 4000 NTU. PMID:26699060

  10. Highly accurate thickness measurement of multi-layered automotive paints using terahertz technology

    Krimi, Soufiene; Klier, Jens; Jonuscheit, Joachim; von Freymann, Georg; Urbansky, Ralph; Beigang, René

    2016-07-01

    In this contribution, we present a highly accurate approach for thickness measurements of multi-layered automotive paints using terahertz time domain spectroscopy in reflection geometry. The proposed method combines the benefits of a model-based material parameters extraction method to calibrate the paint coatings, a generalized Rouard's method to simulate the terahertz radiation behavior within arbitrary thin films, and the robustness of a powerful evolutionary optimization algorithm to increase the sensitivity of the minimum thickness measurement limit. Within the framework of this work, a self-calibration model is introduced, which takes into consideration the real industrial challenges such as the effect of wet-on-wet spray in the painting process.