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Sample records for accurate image reconstruction

  1. Iterative feature refinement for accurate undersampled MR image reconstruction

    Wang, Shanshan; Liu, Jianbo; Liu, Qiegen; Ying, Leslie; Liu, Xin; Zheng, Hairong; Liang, Dong

    2016-05-01

    Accelerating MR scan is of great significance for clinical, research and advanced applications, and one main effort to achieve this is the utilization of compressed sensing (CS) theory. Nevertheless, the existing CSMRI approaches still have limitations such as fine structure loss or high computational complexity. This paper proposes a novel iterative feature refinement (IFR) module for accurate MR image reconstruction from undersampled K-space data. Integrating IFR with CSMRI which is equipped with fixed transforms, we develop an IFR-CS method to restore meaningful structures and details that are originally discarded without introducing too much additional complexity. Specifically, the proposed IFR-CS is realized with three iterative steps, namely sparsity-promoting denoising, feature refinement and Tikhonov regularization. Experimental results on both simulated and in vivo MR datasets have shown that the proposed module has a strong capability to capture image details, and that IFR-CS is comparable and even superior to other state-of-the-art reconstruction approaches.

  2. Accurate reconstruction of hyperspectral images from compressive sensing measurements

    Greer, John B.; Flake, J. C.

    2013-05-01

    The emerging field of Compressive Sensing (CS) provides a new way to capture data by shifting the heaviest burden of data collection from the sensor to the computer on the user-end. This new means of sensing requires fewer measurements for a given amount of information than traditional sensors. We investigate the efficacy of CS for capturing HyperSpectral Imagery (HSI) remotely. We also introduce a new family of algorithms for constructing HSI from CS measurements with Split Bregman Iteration [Goldstein and Osher,2009]. These algorithms combine spatial Total Variation (TV) with smoothing in the spectral dimension. We examine models for three different CS sensors: the Coded Aperture Snapshot Spectral Imager-Single Disperser (CASSI-SD) [Wagadarikar et al.,2008] and Dual Disperser (CASSI-DD) [Gehm et al.,2007] cameras, and a hypothetical random sensing model closer to CS theory, but not necessarily implementable with existing technology. We simulate the capture of remotely sensed images by applying the sensor forward models to well-known HSI scenes - an AVIRIS image of Cuprite, Nevada and the HYMAP Urban image. To measure accuracy of the CS models, we compare the scenes constructed with our new algorithm to the original AVIRIS and HYMAP cubes. The results demonstrate the possibility of accurately sensing HSI remotely with significantly fewer measurements than standard hyperspectral cameras.

  3. Ensuring convergence in total-variation-based reconstruction for accurate microcalcification imaging in breast X-ray CT

    Jørgensen, Jakob H; Pan, Xiaochuan

    2011-01-01

    Breast X-ray CT imaging is being considered in screening as an extension to mammography. As a large fraction of the population will be exposed to radiation, low-dose imaging is essential. Iterative image reconstruction based on solving an optimization problem, such as Total-Variation minimization, shows potential for reconstruction from sparse-view data. For iterative methods it is important to ensure convergence to an accurate solution, since important image features, such as presence of microcalcifications indicating breast cancer, may not be visible in a non-converged reconstruction, and this can have clinical significance. To prevent excessively long computational times, which is a practical concern for the large image arrays in CT, it is desirable to keep the number of iterations low, while still ensuring a sufficiently accurate reconstruction for the specific imaging task. This motivates the study of accurate convergence criteria for iterative image reconstruction. In simulation studies with a realistic...

  4. Use of a ray-based reconstruction algorithm to accurately quantify preclinical microSPECT images

    Vandeghinste, Bert; Van Holen, Roel; Vanhove, Christian; De Vos, Filip; Vandenberghe, Stefaan; Staelens, Steven

    2014-01-01

    This work aimed to measure the in vivo quantification errors obtained when ray-based iterative reconstruction is used in micro-singlephoton emission computed tomography (SPECT). This was investigated with an extensive phantom-based evaluation and two typical in vivo studies using (99m) Tc and In-111, measured on a commercially available cadmium zinc telluride (CZT)-based small-animal scanner. Iterative reconstruction was implemented on the GPU using ray tracing, including (1) scatter correcti...

  5. Use of a ray-based reconstruction algorithm to accurately quantify preclinical microSPECT images.

    Vandeghinste, Bert; Van Holen, Roel; Vanhove, Christian; De Vos, Filip; Vandenberghe, Stefaan; Staelens, Steven

    2014-01-01

    This work aimed to measure the in vivo quantification errors obtained when ray-based iterative reconstruction is used in micro-single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). This was investigated with an extensive phantom-based evaluation and two typical in vivo studies using 99mTc and 111In, measured on a commercially available cadmium zinc telluride (CZT)-based small-animal scanner. Iterative reconstruction was implemented on the GPU using ray tracing, including (1) scatter correction, (2) computed tomography-based attenuation correction, (3) resolution recovery, and (4) edge-preserving smoothing. It was validated using a National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) phantom. The in vivo quantification error was determined for two radiotracers: [99mTc]DMSA in naive mice (n  =  10 kidneys) and [111In]octreotide in mice (n  =  6) inoculated with a xenograft neuroendocrine tumor (NCI-H727). The measured energy resolution is 5.3% for 140.51 keV (99mTc), 4.8% for 171.30 keV, and 3.3% for 245.39 keV (111In). For 99mTc, an uncorrected quantification error of 28 ± 3% is reduced to 8 ± 3%. For 111In, the error reduces from 26 ± 14% to 6 ± 22%. The in vivo error obtained with 99mTc-dimercaptosuccinic acid ([99mTc]DMSA) is reduced from 16.2 ± 2.8% to -0.3 ± 2.1% and from 16.7 ± 10.1% to 2.2 ± 10.6% with [111In]octreotide. Absolute quantitative in vivo SPECT is possible without explicit system matrix measurements. An absolute in vivo quantification error smaller than 5% was achieved and exemplified for both [99mTc]DMSA and [111In]octreotide. PMID:24824961

  6. Analysis of algebraic reconstruction technique for accurate imaging of gas temperature and concentration based on tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy

    Hui-Hui, Xia; Rui-Feng, Kan; Jian-Guo, Liu; Zhen-Yu, Xu; Ya-Bai, He

    2016-06-01

    An improved algebraic reconstruction technique (ART) combined with tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy(TDLAS) is presented in this paper for determining two-dimensional (2D) distribution of H2O concentration and temperature in a simulated combustion flame. This work aims to simulate the reconstruction of spectroscopic measurements by a multi-view parallel-beam scanning geometry and analyze the effects of projection rays on reconstruction accuracy. It finally proves that reconstruction quality dramatically increases with the number of projection rays increasing until more than 180 for 20 × 20 grid, and after that point, the number of projection rays has little influence on reconstruction accuracy. It is clear that the temperature reconstruction results are more accurate than the water vapor concentration obtained by the traditional concentration calculation method. In the present study an innovative way to reduce the error of concentration reconstruction and improve the reconstruction quality greatly is also proposed, and the capability of this new method is evaluated by using appropriate assessment parameters. By using this new approach, not only the concentration reconstruction accuracy is greatly improved, but also a suitable parallel-beam arrangement is put forward for high reconstruction accuracy and simplicity of experimental validation. Finally, a bimodal structure of the combustion region is assumed to demonstrate the robustness and universality of the proposed method. Numerical investigation indicates that the proposed TDLAS tomographic algorithm is capable of detecting accurate temperature and concentration profiles. This feasible formula for reconstruction research is expected to resolve several key issues in practical combustion devices. Project supported by the Young Scientists Fund of the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61205151), the National Key Scientific Instrument and Equipment Development Project of China (Grant

  7. Accurate image reconstruction from few-views and limited-angle data in divergent-beam CT

    Sidky, Emil Y; Pan, Xiaochuan

    2009-01-01

    In practical applications of tomographic imaging, there are often challenges for image reconstruction due to under-sampling and insufficient data. In computed tomography (CT), for example, image reconstruction from few views would enable rapid scanning with a reduced x-ray dose delivered to the patient. Limited-angle problems are also of practical significance in CT. In this work, we develop and investigate an iterative image reconstruction algorithm based on the minimization of the image total variation (TV) that applies to divergent-beam CT. Numerical demonstrations of our TV algorithm are performed with various insufficient data problems in fan-beam CT. The TV algorithm can be generalized to cone-beam CT as well as other tomographic imaging modalities.

  8. Image Reconstruction. Chapter 13

    This chapter discusses how 2‑D or 3‑D images of tracer distribution can be reconstructed from a series of so-called projection images acquired with a gamma camera or a positron emission tomography (PET) system [13.1]. This is often called an ‘inverse problem’. The reconstruction is the inverse of the acquisition. The reconstruction is called an inverse problem because making software to compute the true tracer distribution from the acquired data turns out to be more difficult than the ‘forward’ direction, i.e. making software to simulate the acquisition. There are basically two approaches to image reconstruction: analytical reconstruction and iterative reconstruction. The analytical approach is based on mathematical inversion, yielding efficient, non-iterative reconstruction algorithms. In the iterative approach, the reconstruction problem is reduced to computing a finite number of image values from a finite number of measurements. That simplification enables the use of iterative instead of mathematical inversion. Iterative inversion tends to require more computer power, but it can cope with more complex (and hopefully more accurate) models of the acquisition process

  9. An accurate and efficient system model of iterative image reconstruction in high-resolution pinhole SPECT for small animal research

    Accurate modeling of the photon acquisition process in pinhole SPECT is essential for optimizing resolution. In this work, the authors develop an accurate system model in which pinhole finite aperture and depth-dependent geometric sensitivity are explicitly included. To achieve high-resolution pinhole SPECT, the voxel size is usually set in the range of sub-millimeter so that the total number of image voxels increase accordingly. It is inevitably that a system matrix that models a variety of favorable physical factors will become extremely sophisticated. An efficient implementation for such an accurate system model is proposed in this research. We first use the geometric symmetries to reduce redundant entries in the matrix. Due to the sparseness of the matrix, only non-zero terms are stored. A novel center-to-radius recording rule is also developed to effectively describe the relation between a voxel and its related detectors at every projection angle. The proposed system matrix is also suitable for multi-threaded computing. Finally, the accuracy and effectiveness of the proposed system model is evaluated in a workstation equipped with two Quad-Core Intel X eon processors.

  10. Fast direct Fourier methods, based on one- and two-pass coordinate transformations, yield accurate reconstructions of x-ray CT clinical images

    The conversion from polar to Cartesian coordinates can be carried out with two-pass algorithms. The paper describes two different methods based on concentric square frames and octagonal frames and their results, obtained with accurate interpolations based on the 'moving window Shannon reconstruction' (MWSR). The embedding of these algorithms in direct Fourier methods (DFMs) of tomographic reconstruction is discussed. With respect to ne-pass methods and to the use of octagonal frames, the square frame method makes it possible to carry out the first pass, a radial resampling, in the direct space, before computing 1D Fourier transforms (FTs) of projections. Reconstructions of clinical images from the raw data of a third-generation x-ray tomograph are presented and compared with those obtained with one-pass FMs and with the convolution back-projection method (CBPM) performed by the instrument. The simple algorithm using square frames yields results in complete agreement with other DFM protocols and the CBPM. On a general-purpose computer, the execution of DFM protocols based on one-pass and two-pass coordinate transformations is 35 to 55 times faster than the BPM and make the algorithms attractive for modern instrumentation. (author)

  11. Building with Drones: Accurate 3D Facade Reconstruction using MAVs

    Daftry, Shreyansh; Hoppe, Christof; Bischof, Horst

    2015-01-01

    Automatic reconstruction of 3D models from images using multi-view Structure-from-Motion methods has been one of the most fruitful outcomes of computer vision. These advances combined with the growing popularity of Micro Aerial Vehicles as an autonomous imaging platform, have made 3D vision tools ubiquitous for large number of Architecture, Engineering and Construction applications among audiences, mostly unskilled in computer vision. However, to obtain high-resolution and accurate reconstruc...

  12. Overview of Image Reconstruction

    Marr, R. B.

    1980-04-01

    Image reconstruction (or computerized tomography, etc.) is any process whereby a function, f, on Rn is estimated from empirical data pertaining to its integrals, ∫f(x) dx, for some collection of hyperplanes of dimension k < n. The paper begins with background information on how image reconstruction problems have arisen in practice, and describes some of the application areas of past or current interest; these include radioastronomy, optics, radiology and nuclear medicine, electron microscopy, acoustical imaging, geophysical tomography, nondestructive testing, and NMR zeugmatography. Then the various reconstruction algorithms are discussed in five classes: summation, or simple back-projection; convolution, or filtered back-projection; Fourier and other functional transforms; orthogonal function series expansion; and iterative methods. Certain more technical mathematical aspects of image reconstruction are considered from the standpoint of uniqueness, consistency, and stability of solution. The paper concludes by presenting certain open problems. 73 references. (RWR)

  13. Overview of image reconstruction

    Image reconstruction (or computerized tomography, etc.) is any process whereby a function, f, on R/sup n/ is estimated from empirical data pertaining to its integrals, ∫f(x) dx, for some collection of hyperplanes of dimension k < n. The paper begins with background information on how image reconstruction problems have arisen in practice, and describes some of the application areas of past or current interest; these include radioastronomy, optics, radiology and nuclear medicine, electron microscopy, acoustical imaging, geophysical tomography, nondestructive testing, and NMR zeugmatography. Then the various reconstruction algorithms are discussed in five classes: summation, or simple back-projection; convolution, or filtered back-projection; Fourier and other functional transforms; orthogonal function series expansion; and iterative methods. Certain more technical mathematical aspects of image reconstruction are considered from the standpoint of uniqueness, consistency, and stability of solution. The paper concludes by presenting certain open problems. 73 references

  14. LOFAR sparse image reconstruction

    Garsden, H.; Girard, J. N.; Starck, J. L.; Corbel, S.; Tasse, C.; Woiselle, A.; McKean, J. P.; van Amesfoort, A. S.; Anderson, J.; Avruch, I. M.; Beck, R.; Bentum, M. J.; Best, P.; Breitling, F.; Broderick, J.; Brüggen, M.; Butcher, H. R.; Ciardi, B.; de Gasperin, F.; de Geus, E.; de Vos, M.; Duscha, S.; Eislöffel, J.; Engels, D.; Falcke, H.; Fallows, R. A.; Fender, R.; Ferrari, C.; Frieswijk, W.; Garrett, M. A.; Grießmeier, J.; Gunst, A. W.; Hassall, T. E.; Heald, G.; Hoeft, M.; Hörandel, J.; van der Horst, A.; Juette, E.; Karastergiou, A.; Kondratiev, V. I.; Kramer, M.; Kuniyoshi, M.; Kuper, G.; Mann, G.; Markoff, S.; McFadden, R.; McKay-Bukowski, D.; Mulcahy, D. D.; Munk, H.; Norden, M. J.; Orru, E.; Paas, H.; Pandey-Pommier, M.; Pandey, V. N.; Pietka, G.; Pizzo, R.; Polatidis, A. G.; Renting, A.; Röttgering, H.; Rowlinson, A.; Schwarz, D.; Sluman, J.; Smirnov, O.; Stappers, B. W.; Steinmetz, M.; Stewart, A.; Swinbank, J.; Tagger, M.; Tang, Y.; Tasse, C.; Thoudam, S.; Toribio, C.; Vermeulen, R.; Vocks, C.; van Weeren, R. J.; Wijnholds, S. J.; Wise, M. W.; Wucknitz, O.; Yatawatta, S.; Zarka, P.; Zensus, A.

    2015-03-01

    Context. The LOw Frequency ARray (LOFAR) radio telescope is a giant digital phased array interferometer with multiple antennas distributed in Europe. It provides discrete sets of Fourier components of the sky brightness. Recovering the original brightness distribution with aperture synthesis forms an inverse problem that can be solved by various deconvolution and minimization methods. Aims: Recent papers have established a clear link between the discrete nature of radio interferometry measurement and the "compressed sensing" (CS) theory, which supports sparse reconstruction methods to form an image from the measured visibilities. Empowered by proximal theory, CS offers a sound framework for efficient global minimization and sparse data representation using fast algorithms. Combined with instrumental direction-dependent effects (DDE) in the scope of a real instrument, we developed and validated a new method based on this framework. Methods: We implemented a sparse reconstruction method in the standard LOFAR imaging tool and compared the photometric and resolution performance of this new imager with that of CLEAN-based methods (CLEAN and MS-CLEAN) with simulated and real LOFAR data. Results: We show that i) sparse reconstruction performs as well as CLEAN in recovering the flux of point sources; ii) performs much better on extended objects (the root mean square error is reduced by a factor of up to 10); and iii) provides a solution with an effective angular resolution 2-3 times better than the CLEAN images. Conclusions: Sparse recovery gives a correct photometry on high dynamic and wide-field images and improved realistic structures of extended sources (of simulated and real LOFAR datasets). This sparse reconstruction method is compatible with modern interferometric imagers that handle DDE corrections (A- and W-projections) required for current and future instruments such as LOFAR and SKA.

  15. Underwater Image Reconstruction Using Image Fusion Technique.

    Ms. Kulkarni Aparna S.

    2013-01-01

    In proposed work the image fusion technique is used for reconstruction of underwater image. The main purpose of proposed work is to improve resolution of underwater image. There are various method employed for reconstruction of underwater images but some have limitations such as low resolution. Resolution is one of the parameter which is important for quality of images. Wavelet based image reconstruction may improve resolution of underwater images. Image fusion technique has three levels 1) d...

  16. IMAGE RECONSTRUCTION AND OBJECT CLASSIFICATION IN CT IMAGING SYSTEM

    张晓明; 蒋大真; 等

    1995-01-01

    By obtaining a feasible filter function,reconstructed images can be got with linear interpolation and filtered backoprojection techniques.Considering the gray and spatial correlation neighbour informations of each pixel,a new supervised classification method is put forward for the reconstructed images,and an experiment with noise image is done,the result shows that the method is feasible and accurate compared with ideal phantoms.

  17. Spectral image reconstruction through the PCA transform

    Ma, Long; Qiu, Xuewei; Cong, Yangming

    2015-12-01

    Digital color image reproduction based on spectral information has become a field of much interest and practical importance in recent years. The representation of color in digital form with multi-band images is not very accurate, hence the use of spectral image is justified. Reconstructing high-dimensional spectral reflectance images from relatively low-dimensional camera signals is generally an ill-posed problem. The aim of this study is to use the Principal component analysis (PCA) transform in spectral reflectance images reconstruction. The performance is evaluated by the mean, median and standard deviation of color difference values. The values of mean, median and standard deviation of root mean square (GFC) errors between the reconstructed and the actual spectral image were also calculated. Simulation experiments conducted on a six-channel camera system and on spectral test images show the performance of the suggested method.

  18. An iterative image reconstruction algorithm for SPECT

    Properties of two algorithms for iterative reconstruction of SPECT images, LS-MLEM and LS-OSEM, are studied and compared with the ML-EM algorithm in this paper. By using projection data of heavy-noise, their effectiveness in improving SPECT image quality is evaluated. A phantom with hot and cold lesion is used in the investigation. The reconstructed images using LS-MLEM or LS-OSEM show that there is not a rapid increase in image noise, and the 'best' estimate is assuming that the reconstructed images satisfy the statistical model. The major advantage of using LS-MLEM or LS-OSEM algorithm in SPECT imaging is in their ability to accurately control for heavy-noise. And LS-OSEM algorithm obviously improves the convergence rate. (authors)

  19. Computational Imaging for VLBI Image Reconstruction

    Bouman, Katherine L.; Johnson, Michael D; Zoran, Daniel; Fish, Vincent L.; Doeleman, Sheperd S.; Freeman, William T.

    2016-01-01

    Very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) is a technique for imaging celestial radio emissions by simultaneously observing a source from telescopes distributed across Earth. The challenges in reconstructing images from fine angular resolution VLBI data are immense. The data is extremely sparse and noisy, thus requiring statistical image models such as those designed in the computer vision community. In this paper we present a novel Bayesian approach for VLBI image reconstruction. While other m...

  20. Computational Imaging for VLBI Image Reconstruction

    Bouman, Katherine L.; Johnson, Michael D; Zoran, Daniel; Fish, Vincent L.; Doeleman, Sheperd Samuel; Freeman, William T.

    2016-01-01

    Very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) is a technique for imaging celestial radio emissions by simultaneously observing a source from telescopes distributed across Earth. The challenges in reconstructing images from fine angular resolution VLBI data are immense. The data is extremely sparse and noisy, thus requiring statistical image models such as those designed in the computer vision community. In this paper we present a novel Bayesian approach for VLBI image reconstruction. While other ...

  1. Convergence of iterative image reconstruction algorithms for Digital Breast Tomosynthesis

    Sidky, Emil; Jørgensen, Jakob Heide; Pan, Xiaochuan

    Most iterative image reconstruction algorithms are based on some form of optimization, such as minimization of a data-fidelity term plus an image regularizing penalty term. While achieving the solution of these optimization problems may not directly be clinically relevant, accurate optimization...... solutions can aid in iterative image reconstruction algorithm design. This issue is particularly acute for iterative image reconstruction in Digital Breast Tomosynthesis (DBT), where the corresponding data model IS particularly poorly conditioned. The impact of this poor conditioning is that iterative....... Math. Imag. Vol. 40, pgs 120-145) and apply it to iterative image reconstruction in DBT....

  2. Antenna Modeling and Reconstruction Accuracy of Time Domain-Based Image Reconstruction in Microwave Tomography

    Andreas Fhager; Shantanu K. Padhi; Mikael Persson; John Howard

    2013-01-01

    Nonlinear microwave imaging heavily relies on an accurate numerical electromagnetic model of the antenna system. The model is used to simulate scattering data that is compared to its measured counterpart in order to reconstruct the image. In this paper an antenna system immersed in water is used to image different canonical objects in order to investigate the implication of modeling errors on the final reconstruction using a time domain-based iterative inverse reconstruction algorithm and thr...

  3. Invariant Image Watermarking Using Accurate Zernike Moments

    Ismail A. Ismail

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available problem statement: Digital image watermarking is the most popular method for image authentication, copyright protection and content description. Zernike moments are the most widely used moments in image processing and pattern recognition. The magnitudes of Zernike moments are rotation invariant so they can be used just as a watermark signal or be further modified to carry embedded data. The computed Zernike moments in Cartesian coordinate are not accurate due to geometrical and numerical error. Approach: In this study, we employed a robust image-watermarking algorithm using accurate Zernike moments. These moments are computed in polar coordinate, where both approximation and geometric errors are removed. Accurate Zernike moments are used in image watermarking and proved to be robust against different kind of geometric attacks. The performance of the proposed algorithm is evaluated using standard images. Results: Experimental results show that, accurate Zernike moments achieve higher degree of robustness than those approximated ones against rotation, scaling, flipping, shearing and affine transformation. Conclusion: By computing accurate Zernike moments, the embedded bits watermark can be extracted at low error rate.

  4. Reconstruction techniques for optoacoustic imaging

    Frenz, Martin; Koestli, Kornel P.; Paltauf, Guenther; Schmidt-Kloiber, Heinz; Weber, Heinz P.

    2001-06-01

    Optoacoustics is a method to gain information from inside a tissue. This is done by irradiating a tissue with a short light pulse, which generates a pressure distribution inside the tissue that mirrors the absorber distribution. The pressure distribution measured on the tissue-surface allows, by applying a back-projection method, to calculate a tomography image of the absorber distribution. This study presents a novel computational algorithm based on Fourier transform, which, at least in principle, yields an exact 3D reconstruction of the distribution of absorbed energy density inside turbid media. The reconstruction is based on 2D pressure distributions captured outside at different times. The FFT reconstruction algorithm is first tested in the back projection of simulated pressure transients of small model absorbers, and finally applied to reconstruct the distribution of artificial blood vessels in three dimensions.

  5. Computational Imaging for VLBI Image Reconstruction

    Bouman, Katherine L; Zoran, Daniel; Fish, Vincent L; Doeleman, Sheperd S; Freeman, William T

    2015-01-01

    Very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) is a technique for imaging celestial radio emissions by simultaneously observing a source from telescopes distributed across Earth. The challenges in reconstructing images from fine angular resolution VLBI data are immense. The data is extremely sparse and noisy, thus requiring statistical image models such as those designed in the computer vision community. In this paper we present a novel Bayesian approach for VLBI image reconstruction. While other methods require careful tuning and parameter selection for different types of images, our method is robust and produces good results under different settings such as low SNR or extended emissions. The success of our method is demonstrated on realistic synthetic experiments as well as publicly available real data. We present this problem in a way that is accessible to members of the computer vision community, and provide a dataset website (vlbiimaging.csail.mit.edu) to allow for controlled comparisons across algorithms. Thi...

  6. Towards an accurate volume reconstruction in atom probe tomography.

    Beinke, Daniel; Oberdorfer, Christian; Schmitz, Guido

    2016-06-01

    An alternative concept for the reconstruction of atom probe data is outlined. It is based on the calculation of realistic trajectories of the evaporated ions in a recursive refinement process. To this end, the electrostatic problem is solved on a Delaunay tessellation. To enable the trajectory calculation, the order of reconstruction is inverted with respect to previous reconstruction schemes: the last atom detected is reconstructed first. In this way, the emitter shape, which controls the trajectory, can be defined throughout the duration of the reconstruction. A proof of concept is presented for 3D model tips, containing spherical precipitates or embedded layers of strongly contrasting evaporation thresholds. While the traditional method following Bas et al. generates serious distortions in these cases, a reconstruction with the proposed electrostatically informed approach improves the geometry of layers and particles significantly. PMID:27062338

  7. Reconstruction of Cloud Contaminated Remote Sensing Images Using Inpainting Strategy

    D.Linett Sophia

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses a method for cloud detection and their reconstruction technique. Detecting theseportions of an image and then filling in the missing data is an important photo editing work. The filling-in approach such as inpainting techniques, which aim at filling holes in remote sensing images by propagating surrounding structures and texture information. Inpainting technique is a novel method for completing missing parts caused by the detection of foreground or background elements from an image.Reconstruction of missing data in remotely sensed image is of great challenge due to its complexity. These images may be partly contaminated by cloud. Detection of these clouds and accurate reconstruction of cloud removed area in satellite image is done here. To improve the accuracy in remotely sensed images, efficient inpainting techniques can be applied for reconstruction of missing regions. Large areas with lots of information lost are harder to reconstruct, because information in other parts of the image is not enough to get an impression of what is missing. Image inpainting is not to recover the originalimage, but to create some image that has a close resemblance with the original image. In this paper two different methods are proposed for filling in process. The first method involves reconstruction process by Exemplar Inpainting whereas the other method uses the Modified Exemplar inpainting. The entire process is developed using MATLAB software. The proposed method of cloud detection here is simple and easily applied to all cloud cover images.

  8. Image reconstruction algorithms from projections

    Many physical or bio-physical phenomena can be analysed as 'images' that is to say a bi-dimensionnal representation of a characteristic parameter of the material (density, concentration of a given element, resistivity, etc...). The various algorithms reviewed in the paper lead to a numerical reconstitution of such an image from a finite set of measurements considered as 'projections' of the initial object. We first give a physical insight then the mathematical formulation of the various concepts necessary for the presentation of the problem; after that we show why and how many reconstruction algorithms are possible. These different strategies are quickly compared chiefly according to realization facilities, structure, volume and performances (speed, accuracy) of the processing system required

  9. Accurate reconstruction of insertion-deletion histories by statistical phylogenetics.

    Oscar Westesson

    Full Text Available The Multiple Sequence Alignment (MSA is a computational abstraction that represents a partial summary either of indel history, or of structural similarity. Taking the former view (indel history, it is possible to use formal automata theory to generalize the phylogenetic likelihood framework for finite substitution models (Dayhoff's probability matrices and Felsenstein's pruning algorithm to arbitrary-length sequences. In this paper, we report results of a simulation-based benchmark of several methods for reconstruction of indel history. The methods tested include a relatively new algorithm for statistical marginalization of MSAs that sums over a stochastically-sampled ensemble of the most probable evolutionary histories. For mammalian evolutionary parameters on several different trees, the single most likely history sampled by our algorithm appears less biased than histories reconstructed by other MSA methods. The algorithm can also be used for alignment-free inference, where the MSA is explicitly summed out of the analysis. As an illustration of our method, we discuss reconstruction of the evolutionary histories of human protein-coding genes.

  10. 3D Reconstruction of NMR Images

    Peter Izak; Milan Smetana; Libor Hargas; Miroslav Hrianka; Pavol Spanik

    2007-01-01

    This paper introduces experiment of 3D reconstruction NMR images scanned from magnetic resonance device. There are described methods which can be used for 3D reconstruction magnetic resonance images in biomedical application. The main idea is based on marching cubes algorithm. For this task was chosen sophistication method by program Vision Assistant, which is a part of program LabVIEW.

  11. Iterative image reconstruction in ECT

    A series of preliminary studies has been performed in the authors laboratories to explore the use of a priori information in Bayesian image restoration and reconstruction. One piece of a priori information is the fact that intensities of neighboring pixels tend to be similar if they belong to the same region within which similar tissue characteristics are exhibited. this property of local continuity can be modeled by the use of Gibbs priors, as first suggested by German and Geman. In their investigation, they also included line sites between each pair of neighboring pixels in the Gibbs prior and used discrete binary numbers to indicate the absence or presence of boundaries between regions. These two features of the a priori model permit averaging within boundaries of homogeneous regions to alleviate the degradation caused by Poisson noise. with the use of this Gibbs prior in combination with the technique of stochastic relaxation, German and Geman demonstrated that noise levels can be reduced significantly in 2-D image restoration. They have developed a Bayesian method that utilizes a Gibbs prior to describe the spatial correlation of neighboring regions and takes into account the effect of limited spatial resolution as well. The statistical framework of the proposed approach is based on the data augmentation scheme suggested by Tanner and Wong. Briefly outlined here, this Bayesian method is based on Geman and Geman's approach

  12. Running image reconstruction for intraoperative MRI

    Recently there has been a growing interest in the use of MR-guided navigation to improve the safety and effectiveness of surgical procedures. The purpose of our work was to develop and demonstrate an imaging strategy which allows a physician to continue operating without the delays caused from imaging. Phase scrambling Fourier transform imaging technique allows for a localized image to be reconstructed from the segmented signal. Therefore, continuous imaging (a running reconstruction) of MR images is feasible by combining this localized imaging property with fast image reconstruction. Since local images are updated in several TR periods, even during data acquisition, the orientation or location of the subject (devices) can be monitored faster than by the conventional fast imaging technique. Feasibility studies of the proposed imaging were performed using a 0.0183T MRI scanner and a personal computer for image reconstruction. Since the image SNR obtained by the ultra-low field MRI scanner was quite small, experiments using the phantom were performed. The proposed running reconstruction strategy appears to be feasible for a variety of guided interventional MRI procedures. It also appears to provide some important advantages over conventional 2DFT imaging. The proposed technique can be readily applied in a well established MRI equipped with the fast imaging technique by pulsing the resistive shim coils that are already present. (author)

  13. Large scale vision based navigation without an accurate global reconstruction

    Segvic, S.; Remazeilles, A.; Diosi, A.; Chaumette, François

    2007-01-01

    International audience Autonomous cars will likely play an important role in the future. A vision system designed to support outdoor navigation for such vehicles has to deal with large dynamic environments, changing imaging conditions, and temporary occlusions by other moving objects. This paper presents a novel appearance-based navigation framework relying on a single perspective vision sensor, which is aimed towards resolving of the above issues. The solution is based on a hierarchical e...

  14. A constrained variable projection reconstruction method for photoacoustic computed tomography without accurate knowledge of transducer responses

    Sheng, Qiwei; Matthews, Thomas P; Xia, Jun; Zhu, Liren; Wang, Lihong V; Anastasio, Mark A

    2015-01-01

    Photoacoustic computed tomography (PACT) is an emerging computed imaging modality that exploits optical contrast and ultrasonic detection principles to form images of the absorbed optical energy density within tissue. When the imaging system employs conventional piezoelectric ultrasonic transducers, the ideal photoacoustic (PA) signals are degraded by the transducers' acousto-electric impulse responses (EIRs) during the measurement process. If unaccounted for, this can degrade the accuracy of the reconstructed image. In principle, the effect of the EIRs on the measured PA signals can be ameliorated via deconvolution; images can be reconstructed subsequently by application of a reconstruction method that assumes an idealized EIR. Alternatively, the effect of the EIR can be incorporated into an imaging model and implicitly compensated for during reconstruction. In either case, the efficacy of the correction can be limited by errors in the assumed EIRs. In this work, a joint optimization approach to PACT image r...

  15. Reconstruction of images from neuromagnetic fields

    In response to specific stimuli, the human brain emits a measurable magnetic field from regions actively involved in processing the stimulus. We have implemented an iterative algorithm to reconstruct images from the neuromagnetic field. Computer simulation studies performed to develop the algorithm are reported. Experimental measurements of a human visually-evoked field and images reconstructed therefrom are also reported. The results demonstrate, for the first time, the feasibility of imaging multiple sources within the brain that produce a magnetic field

  16. Joint image reconstruction and sensitivity estimation in SENSE (JSENSE).

    Ying, Leslie; Sheng, Jinhua

    2007-06-01

    Parallel magnetic resonance imaging (pMRI) using multichannel receiver coils has emerged as an effective tool to reduce imaging time in various applications. However, the issue of accurate estimation of coil sensitivities has not been fully addressed, which limits the level of speed enhancement achievable with the technology. The self-calibrating (SC) technique for sensitivity extraction has been well accepted, especially for dynamic imaging, and complements the common calibration technique that uses a separate scan. However, the existing method to extract the sensitivity information from the SC data is not accurate enough when the number of data is small, and thus erroneous sensitivities affect the reconstruction quality when they are directly applied to the reconstruction equation. This paper considers this problem of error propagation in the sequential procedure of sensitivity estimation followed by image reconstruction in existing methods, such as sensitivity encoding (SENSE) and simultaneous acquisition of spatial harmonics (SMASH), and reformulates the image reconstruction problem as a joint estimation of the coil sensitivities and the desired image, which is solved by an iterative optimization algorithm. The proposed method was tested on various data sets. The results from a set of in vivo data are shown to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method, especially when a rather large net acceleration factor is used. PMID:17534910

  17. Breast reconstruction - methods and imaging

    Silicon implants are used for breast reconstruction or for cosmetic operations. The contribution outlines the role of mammography, sonography and MR for defect assessment, tumour detection and monitoring after prosthesis implantation. Instrument adjustment for mammographic screening of patients with implants is gone into. Autologic reconstruction techniques and protocols of secondary and tertiary early detection are presented. (orig.)

  18. Algorithms for reconstructing images for industrial applications

    Several algorithms for reconstructing objects from their projections are being studied in our Laboratory, for industrial applications. Such algorithms are useful locating the position and shape of different composition of materials in the object. A Comparative study of two algorithms is made. The two investigated algorithsm are: The MART (Multiplicative - Algebraic Reconstruction Technique) and the Convolution Method. The comparison are carried out from the point view of the quality of the image reconstructed, number of views and cost. (Author)

  19. Detection geometry and reconstruction error in magnetic source imaging

    Hughett, P.; Budinger, T.F. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)]|[California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences

    1993-11-01

    A recently developed reconstruction algorithm for magnetic source imaging exploits prior knowledge about source location, source power density, detector geometry, and detector noise power to obtain an explicit estimate of the reconstruction error. This paper demonstrates the application of the new algorithm to the optimal design of practical detector arrays to minimize the reconstruction error in specific applications. For a representative configuration for magnetocardiography, the optimal array width (for minimum reconstruction error) varies from 19 to 28 cm depending on the assumed source depth, number of detectors, source power and noise power. The reconstruction accuracy ranges from 5% of the a priori standard deviation for the sources nearest the detector plane to 95% of the a priori deviation for the deepest sources. The reconstruction error was found to depend on accidental alignments between dipole sources and point detectors, indicating that a more sophisticated model is required for accurate estimates of reconstruction error. The error calculation is fast, taking about a second for this problem on a workstation-class computer. The availability of a method for rapidly computing the reconstruction error for any given source characteristics and detector geometry will facilitate the optimal design of magnetometer array size, element spacing, and orientation for specific applications in biomagnetic and geomagnetic source imaging.

  20. 4D image reconstruction for emission tomography

    An overview of the theory of 4D image reconstruction for emission tomography is given along with a review of the current state of the art, covering both positron emission tomography and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). By viewing 4D image reconstruction as a matter of either linear or non-linear parameter estimation for a set of spatiotemporal functions chosen to approximately represent the radiotracer distribution, the areas of so-called ‘fully 4D’ image reconstruction and ‘direct kinetic parameter estimation’ are unified within a common framework. Many choices of linear and non-linear parameterization of these functions are considered (including the important case where the parameters have direct biological meaning), along with a review of the algorithms which are able to estimate these often non-linear parameters from emission tomography data. The other crucial components to image reconstruction (the objective function, the system model and the raw data format) are also covered, but in less detail due to the relatively straightforward extension from their corresponding components in conventional 3D image reconstruction. The key unifying concept is that maximum likelihood or maximum a posteriori (MAP) estimation of either linear or non-linear model parameters can be achieved in image space after carrying out a conventional expectation maximization (EM) update of the dynamic image series, using a Kullback-Leibler distance metric (comparing the modeled image values with the EM image values), to optimize the desired parameters. For MAP, an image-space penalty for regularization purposes is required. The benefits of 4D and direct reconstruction reported in the literature are reviewed, and furthermore demonstrated with simple simulation examples. It is clear that the future of reconstructing dynamic or functional emission tomography images, which often exhibit high levels of spatially correlated noise, should ideally exploit these 4D

  1. Medical image reconstruction a conceptual tutorial

    Zeng, Gengsheng

    2010-01-01

    This text introduces classical and modern image reconstruction technologies. It presents both analytical and iterative methods of these technologies and their applications in X-ray CT, SPECT, PET and MRI.

  2. Scattering Correction For Image Reconstruction In Flash Radiography

    Cao, Liangzhi; Wang, Mengqi; Wu, Hongchun; Liu, Zhouyu; Cheng, Yuxiong; Zhang, Hongbo [Xi' an Jiaotong Univ., Xi' an (China)

    2013-08-15

    Scattered photons cause blurring and distortions in flash radiography, reducing the accuracy of image reconstruction significantly. The effect of the scattered photons is taken into account and an iterative deduction of the scattered photons is proposed to amend the scattering effect for image restoration. In order to deduct the scattering contribution, the flux of scattered photons is estimated as the sum of two components. The single scattered component is calculated accurately together with the uncollided flux along the characteristic ray, while the multiple scattered component is evaluated using correction coefficients pre-obtained from Monte Carlo simulations.The arbitrary geometry pretreatment and ray tracing are carried out based on the customization of AutoCAD. With the above model, an Iterative Procedure for image restORation code, IPOR, is developed. Numerical results demonstrate that the IPOR code is much more accurate than the direct reconstruction solution without scattering correction and it has a very high computational efficiency.

  3. Scattering Correction For Image Reconstruction In Flash Radiography

    Scattered photons cause blurring and distortions in flash radiography, reducing the accuracy of image reconstruction significantly. The effect of the scattered photons is taken into account and an iterative deduction of the scattered photons is proposed to amend the scattering effect for image restoration. In order to deduct the scattering contribution, the flux of scattered photons is estimated as the sum of two components. The single scattered component is calculated accurately together with the uncollided flux along the characteristic ray, while the multiple scattered component is evaluated using correction coefficients pre-obtained from Monte Carlo simulations.The arbitrary geometry pretreatment and ray tracing are carried out based on the customization of AutoCAD. With the above model, an Iterative Procedure for image restORation code, IPOR, is developed. Numerical results demonstrate that the IPOR code is much more accurate than the direct reconstruction solution without scattering correction and it has a very high computational efficiency

  4. Structured illumination microscopy image reconstruction algorithm

    Lal, Amit; Shan, Chunyan; Xi, Peng

    2016-01-01

    Structured illumination microscopy (SIM) is a very important super-resolution microscopy technique, which provides high speed super-resolution with about two-fold spatial resolution enhancement. Several attempts aimed at improving the performance of SIM reconstruction algorithm have been reported. However, most of these highlight only one specific aspect of the SIM reconstruction -- such as the determination of the illumination pattern phase shift accurately -- whereas other key elements -- s...

  5. 3D Reconstruction of NMR Images

    Peter Izak

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces experiment of 3D reconstruction NMR images scanned from magnetic resonance device. There are described methods which can be used for 3D reconstruction magnetic resonance images in biomedical application. The main idea is based on marching cubes algorithm. For this task was chosen sophistication method by program Vision Assistant, which is a part of program LabVIEW.

  6. Bayesian image reconstruction: Application to emission tomography

    Nunez, J.; Llacer, J.

    1989-02-01

    In this paper we propose a Maximum a Posteriori (MAP) method of image reconstruction in the Bayesian framework for the Poisson noise case. We use entropy to define the prior probability and likelihood to define the conditional probability. The method uses sharpness parameters which can be theoretically computed or adjusted, allowing us to obtain MAP reconstructions without the problem of the grey'' reconstructions associated with the pre Bayesian reconstructions. We have developed several ways to solve the reconstruction problem and propose a new iterative algorithm which is stable, maintains positivity and converges to feasible images faster than the Maximum Likelihood Estimate method. We have successfully applied the new method to the case of Emission Tomography, both with simulated and real data. 41 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Investigation of iterative image reconstruction in three-dimensional optoacoustic tomography

    wang, Kun; Oraevsky, Alexander A; Anastasio, Mark A

    2012-01-01

    Iterative image reconstruction algorithms for optoacoustic tomography (OAT), also known as photoacoustic tomography, have the ability to improve image quality over analytic algorithms due to their ability to incorporate accurate models of the imaging physics, instrument response, and measurement noise. However, to date, there have been few reported attempts to employ advanced iterative image reconstruction algorithms for improving image quality in three-dimensional (3D) OAT. In this work, we implement and investigate two iterative image reconstruction methods for use with a 3D OAT small animal imager: namely, a penalized least-squares (PLS) method employing a quadratic smoothness penalty and a PLS method employing a total variation norm penalty. The reconstruction algorithms employ accurate models of the ultrasonic transducer impulse responses. Experimental data sets are employed to compare the performances of the iterative reconstruction algorithms to that of a 3D filtered backprojection (FBP) algorithm. By ...

  8. 3-D Reconstruction of Medical Image Using Wavelet Transform and Snake Model

    Jinyong Cheng

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Medical image segmentation is an important step in 3-D reconstruction, and 3-D reconstruction from medical images is an important application of computer graphics and biomedicine image processing. An improved image segmentation method which is suitable for 3-D reconstruction is presented in this paper. A 3-D reconstruction algorithm is used to reconstruct the 3-D model from medical images. Rough edge is obtained by multi-scale wavelet transform at first. With the rough edge, improved gradient vector flow snake model is used and the object contour in the image is found. In the experiments, we reconstruct 3-D models of kidney, liver and brain putamen. The performances of the experiments indicate that the new algorithm can produce accurate 3-D reconstruction.

  9. Reconstruction Algorithms in Undersampled AFM Imaging

    Arildsen, Thomas; Oxvig, Christian Schou; Pedersen, Patrick Steffen;

    2016-01-01

    This paper provides a study of spatial undersampling in atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging followed by different image reconstruction techniques based on sparse approximation as well as interpolation. The main reasons for using undersampling is that it reduces the path length and thereby the...... scanning time as well as the amount of interaction between the AFM probe and the specimen. It can easily be applied on conventional AFM hardware. Due to undersampling, it is then necessary to further process the acquired image in order to reconstruct an approximation of the image. Based on real AFM cell...

  10. Heuristic optimization in penumbral image for high resolution reconstructed image

    Penumbral imaging is a technique which uses the fact that spatial information can be recovered from the shadow or penumbra that an unknown source casts through a simple large circular aperture. The size of the penumbral image on the detector can be mathematically determined as its aperture size, object size, and magnification. Conventional reconstruction methods are very sensitive to noise. On the other hand, the heuristic reconstruction method is very tolerant of noise. However, the aperture size influences the accuracy and resolution of the reconstructed image. In this article, we propose the optimization of the aperture size for the neutron penumbral imaging.

  11. Sparse Image Reconstruction in Computed Tomography

    Jørgensen, Jakob Sauer

    In recent years, increased focus on the potentially harmful effects of x-ray computed tomography (CT) scans, such as radiation-induced cancer, has motivated research on new low-dose imaging techniques. Sparse image reconstruction methods, as studied for instance in the field of compressed sensing...

  12. Efficient MR image reconstruction for compressed MR imaging.

    Huang, Junzhou; Zhang, Shaoting; Metaxas, Dimitris

    2011-10-01

    In this paper, we propose an efficient algorithm for MR image reconstruction. The algorithm minimizes a linear combination of three terms corresponding to a least square data fitting, total variation (TV) and L1 norm regularization. This has been shown to be very powerful for the MR image reconstruction. First, we decompose the original problem into L1 and TV norm regularization subproblems respectively. Then, these two subproblems are efficiently solved by existing techniques. Finally, the reconstructed image is obtained from the weighted average of solutions from two subproblems in an iterative framework. We compare the proposed algorithm with previous methods in term of the reconstruction accuracy and computation complexity. Numerous experiments demonstrate the superior performance of the proposed algorithm for compressed MR image reconstruction. PMID:21742542

  13. Techniques in Iterative Proton CT Image Reconstruction

    Penfold, Scott

    2015-01-01

    This is a review paper on some of the physics, modeling, and iterative algorithms in proton computed tomography (pCT) image reconstruction. The primary challenge in pCT image reconstruction lies in the degraded spatial resolution resulting from multiple Coulomb scattering within the imaged object. Analytical models such as the most likely path (MLP) have been proposed to predict the scattered trajectory from measurements of individual proton location and direction before and after the object. Iterative algorithms provide a flexible tool with which to incorporate these models into image reconstruction. The modeling leads to a large and sparse linear system of equations that can efficiently be solved by projection methods-based iterative algorithms. Such algorithms perform projections of the iterates onto the hyperlanes that are represented by the linear equations of the system. They perform these projections in possibly various algorithmic structures, such as block-iterative projections (BIP), string-averaging...

  14. Image formation and tomogram reconstruction in optical coherence microscopy

    Villiger, Martin; Lasser, Theo

    2010-01-01

    In this work we present a model for image formation in optical coherence microscopy. In the spectral domain detection, each wavenumber has a specific coherent transfer function that samples a different part of the object's spatial frequency spectrum. The reconstruction of the tomogram is usually accurate only in a short depth of field. Using numerical simulations based on the developed model, we identified two distinct mechanisms that influence the signal of out-of-focus sample information. B...

  15. Time Reversal Reconstruction Algorithm Based on PSO Optimized SVM Interpolation for Photoacoustic Imaging

    Mingjian Sun

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Photoacoustic imaging is an innovative imaging technique to image biomedical tissues. The time reversal reconstruction algorithm in which a numerical model of the acoustic forward problem is run backwards in time is widely used. In the paper, a time reversal reconstruction algorithm based on particle swarm optimization (PSO optimized support vector machine (SVM interpolation method is proposed for photoacoustics imaging. Numerical results show that the reconstructed images of the proposed algorithm are more accurate than those of the nearest neighbor interpolation, linear interpolation, and cubic convolution interpolation based time reversal algorithm, which can provide higher imaging quality by using significantly fewer measurement positions or scanning times.

  16. Bayesian Image Reconstruction Based on Voronoi Diagrams

    Cabrera, G F; Hitschfeld, N

    2007-01-01

    We present a Bayesian Voronoi image reconstruction technique (VIR) for interferometric data. Bayesian analysis applied to the inverse problem allows us to derive the a-posteriori probability of a novel parameterization of interferometric images. We use a variable Voronoi diagram as our model in place of the usual fixed pixel grid. A quantization of the intensity field allows us to calculate the likelihood function and a-priori probabilities. The Voronoi image is optimized including the number of polygons as free parameters. We apply our algorithm to deconvolve simulated interferometric data. Residuals, restored images and chi^2 values are used to compare our reconstructions with fixed grid models. VIR has the advantage of modeling the image with few parameters, obtaining a better image from a Bayesian point of view.

  17. Terahertz Imaging for Biomedical Applications Pattern Recognition and Tomographic Reconstruction

    Yin, Xiaoxia; Abbott, Derek

    2012-01-01

    Terahertz Imaging for Biomedical Applications: Pattern Recognition and Tomographic Reconstruction presents the necessary algorithms needed to assist screening, diagnosis, and treatment, and these algorithms will play a critical role in the accurate detection of abnormalities present in biomedical imaging. Terahertz biomedical imaging has become an area of interest due to its ability to simultaneously acquire both image and spectral information. Terahertz imaging systems are being commercialized with an increasing number of trials performed in a biomedical setting. Terahertz tomographic imaging and detection technology contributes to the ability to identify opaque objects with clear boundaries,and would be useful to both in vivo and ex vivo environments. This book also: Introduces terahertz radiation techniques and provides a number of topical examples of signal and image processing, as well as machine learning Presents the most recent developments in an emerging field, terahertz radiation Utilizes new methods...

  18. Superresolution images reconstructed from aliased images

    Vandewalle, Patrick; Süsstrunk, Sabine; Vetterli, Martin

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, we present a simple method to almost quadruple the spatial resolution of aliased images. From a set of four low resolution, undersampled and shifted images, a new image is constructed with almost twice the resolution in each dimension. The resulting image is aliasing-free. A small aliasing-free part of the frequency domain of the images is used to compute the exact subpixel shifts. When the relative image positions are known, a higher resolution image can be constructed using t...

  19. Fast undersampled functional magnetic resonance imaging using nonlinear regularized parallel image reconstruction.

    Thimo Hugger

    Full Text Available In this article we aim at improving the performance of whole brain functional imaging at very high temporal resolution (100 ms or less. This is achieved by utilizing a nonlinear regularized parallel image reconstruction scheme, where the penalty term of the cost function is set to the L(1-norm measured in some transform domain. This type of image reconstruction has gained much attention recently due to its application in compressed sensing and has proven to yield superior spatial resolution and image quality over e.g. Tikhonov regularized image reconstruction. We demonstrate that by using nonlinear regularization it is possible to more accurately localize brain activation from highly undersampled k-space data at the expense of an increase in computation time.

  20. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS OF TOMOGRAPHIC RECONSTRUCTION ALGORITHMS BY MORPHOLOGICAL IMAGE CHARACTERISTICS

    Sebastian Lǖck

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available We suggest a procedure for quantitative quality control of tomographic reconstruction algorithms. Our task-oriented evaluation focuses on the correct reproduction of phase boundary length and has thus a clear implication for morphological image analysis of tomographic data. Indirectly the method monitors accurate reproduction of a variety of locally defined critical image features within tomograms such as interface positions and microstructures, debonding, cracks and pores. Tomographic errors of such local nature are neglected if only global integral characteristics such as mean squared deviation are considered for the evaluation of an algorithm. The significance of differences in reconstruction quality between algorithms is assessed using a sample of independent random scenes to be reconstructed. These are generated by a Boolean model and thus exhibit a substantial stochastic variability with respect to image morphology. It is demonstrated that phase boundaries in standard reconstructions by filtered backprojection exhibit substantial errors. In the setting of our simulations, these could be significantly reduced by the use of the innovative reconstruction algorithm DIRECTT.

  1. Fast, automatic, and accurate catheter reconstruction in HDR brachytherapy using an electromagnetic 3D tracking system

    Poulin, Eric; Racine, Emmanuel; Beaulieu, Luc, E-mail: Luc.Beaulieu@phy.ulaval.ca [Département de physique, de génie physique et d’optique et Centre de recherche sur le cancer de l’Université Laval, Université Laval, Québec, Québec G1V 0A6, Canada and Département de radio-oncologie et Axe Oncologie du Centre de recherche du CHU de Québec, CHU de Québec, 11 Côte du Palais, Québec, Québec G1R 2J6 (Canada); Binnekamp, Dirk [Integrated Clinical Solutions and Marketing, Philips Healthcare, Veenpluis 4-6, Best 5680 DA (Netherlands)

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: In high dose rate brachytherapy (HDR-B), current catheter reconstruction protocols are relatively slow and error prone. The purpose of this technical note is to evaluate the accuracy and the robustness of an electromagnetic (EM) tracking system for automated and real-time catheter reconstruction. Methods: For this preclinical study, a total of ten catheters were inserted in gelatin phantoms with different trajectories. Catheters were reconstructed using a 18G biopsy needle, used as an EM stylet and equipped with a miniaturized sensor, and the second generation Aurora{sup ®} Planar Field Generator from Northern Digital Inc. The Aurora EM system provides position and orientation value with precisions of 0.7 mm and 0.2°, respectively. Phantoms were also scanned using a μCT (GE Healthcare) and Philips Big Bore clinical computed tomography (CT) system with a spatial resolution of 89 μm and 2 mm, respectively. Reconstructions using the EM stylet were compared to μCT and CT. To assess the robustness of the EM reconstruction, five catheters were reconstructed twice and compared. Results: Reconstruction time for one catheter was 10 s, leading to a total reconstruction time inferior to 3 min for a typical 17-catheter implant. When compared to the μCT, the mean EM tip identification error was 0.69 ± 0.29 mm while the CT error was 1.08 ± 0.67 mm. The mean 3D distance error was found to be 0.66 ± 0.33 mm and 1.08 ± 0.72 mm for the EM and CT, respectively. EM 3D catheter trajectories were found to be more accurate. A maximum difference of less than 0.6 mm was found between successive EM reconstructions. Conclusions: The EM reconstruction was found to be more accurate and precise than the conventional methods used for catheter reconstruction in HDR-B. This approach can be applied to any type of catheters and applicators.

  2. Fast, automatic, and accurate catheter reconstruction in HDR brachytherapy using an electromagnetic 3D tracking system

    Purpose: In high dose rate brachytherapy (HDR-B), current catheter reconstruction protocols are relatively slow and error prone. The purpose of this technical note is to evaluate the accuracy and the robustness of an electromagnetic (EM) tracking system for automated and real-time catheter reconstruction. Methods: For this preclinical study, a total of ten catheters were inserted in gelatin phantoms with different trajectories. Catheters were reconstructed using a 18G biopsy needle, used as an EM stylet and equipped with a miniaturized sensor, and the second generation Aurora® Planar Field Generator from Northern Digital Inc. The Aurora EM system provides position and orientation value with precisions of 0.7 mm and 0.2°, respectively. Phantoms were also scanned using a μCT (GE Healthcare) and Philips Big Bore clinical computed tomography (CT) system with a spatial resolution of 89 μm and 2 mm, respectively. Reconstructions using the EM stylet were compared to μCT and CT. To assess the robustness of the EM reconstruction, five catheters were reconstructed twice and compared. Results: Reconstruction time for one catheter was 10 s, leading to a total reconstruction time inferior to 3 min for a typical 17-catheter implant. When compared to the μCT, the mean EM tip identification error was 0.69 ± 0.29 mm while the CT error was 1.08 ± 0.67 mm. The mean 3D distance error was found to be 0.66 ± 0.33 mm and 1.08 ± 0.72 mm for the EM and CT, respectively. EM 3D catheter trajectories were found to be more accurate. A maximum difference of less than 0.6 mm was found between successive EM reconstructions. Conclusions: The EM reconstruction was found to be more accurate and precise than the conventional methods used for catheter reconstruction in HDR-B. This approach can be applied to any type of catheters and applicators

  3. Image Reconstruction Image reconstruction by using local inverse for full field of view

    Yang, Kang; Yang, Xintie; Zhao, Shuang-Ren

    2015-01-01

    The iterative refinement method (IRM) has been very successfully applied in many different fields for examples the modern quantum chemical calculation and CT image reconstruction. It is proved that the refinement method can create an exact inverse from an approximate inverse with a few iterations. The IRM has been used in CT image reconstruction to lower the radiation dose. The IRM utilize the errors between the original measured data and the recalculated data to correct the reconstructed images. However if it is not smooth inside the object, there often is an over-correction along the boundary of the organs in the reconstructed images. The over-correction increase the noises especially on the edges inside the image. One solution to reduce the above mentioned noises is using some kind of filters. Filtering the noise before/after/between the image reconstruction processing. However filtering the noises also means reduce the resolution of the reconstructed images. The filtered image is often applied to the imag...

  4. Image reconstructions with the rotating RF coil.

    Trakic, A; Wang, H; Weber, E; Li, B K; Poole, M; Liu, F; Crozier, S

    2009-12-01

    Recent studies have shown that rotating a single RF transceive coil (RRFC) provides a uniform coverage of the object and brings a number of hardware advantages (i.e. requires only one RF channel, averts coil-coil coupling interactions and facilitates large-scale multi-nuclear imaging). Motion of the RF coil sensitivity profile however violates the standard Fourier Transform definition of a time-invariant signal, and the images reconstructed in this conventional manner can be degraded by ghosting artifacts. To overcome this problem, this paper presents Time Division Multiplexed-Sensitivity Encoding (TDM-SENSE), as a new image reconstruction scheme that exploits the rotation of the RF coil sensitivity profile to facilitate ghost-free image reconstructions and reductions in image acquisition time. A transceive RRFC system for head imaging at 2 Tesla was constructed and applied in a number of in vivo experiments. In this initial study, alias-free head images were obtained in half the usual scan time. It is hoped that new sequences and methods will be developed by taking advantage of coil motion. PMID:19800824

  5. Image reconstructions with the rotating RF coil

    Trakic, A.; Wang, H.; Weber, E.; Li, B. K.; Poole, M.; Liu, F.; Crozier, S.

    2009-12-01

    Recent studies have shown that rotating a single RF transceive coil (RRFC) provides a uniform coverage of the object and brings a number of hardware advantages (i.e. requires only one RF channel, averts coil-coil coupling interactions and facilitates large-scale multi-nuclear imaging). Motion of the RF coil sensitivity profile however violates the standard Fourier Transform definition of a time-invariant signal, and the images reconstructed in this conventional manner can be degraded by ghosting artifacts. To overcome this problem, this paper presents Time Division Multiplexed — Sensitivity Encoding (TDM-SENSE), as a new image reconstruction scheme that exploits the rotation of the RF coil sensitivity profile to facilitate ghost-free image reconstructions and reductions in image acquisition time. A transceive RRFC system for head imaging at 2 Tesla was constructed and applied in a number of in vivo experiments. In this initial study, alias-free head images were obtained in half the usual scan time. It is hoped that new sequences and methods will be developed by taking advantage of coil motion.

  6. Optimizing modelling in iterative image reconstruction for preclinical pinhole PET

    Goorden, Marlies C.; van Roosmalen, Jarno; van der Have, Frans; Beekman, Freek J.

    2016-05-01

    The recently developed versatile emission computed tomography (VECTor) technology enables high-energy SPECT and simultaneous SPECT and PET of small animals at sub-mm resolutions. VECTor uses dedicated clustered pinhole collimators mounted in a scanner with three stationary large-area NaI(Tl) gamma detectors. Here, we develop and validate dedicated image reconstruction methods that compensate for image degradation by incorporating accurate models for the transport of high-energy annihilation gamma photons. Ray tracing software was used to calculate photon transport through the collimator structures and into the gamma detector. Input to this code are several geometric parameters estimated from system calibration with a scanning 99mTc point source. Effects on reconstructed images of (i) modelling variable depth-of-interaction (DOI) in the detector, (ii) incorporating photon paths that go through multiple pinholes (‘multiple-pinhole paths’ (MPP)), and (iii) including various amounts of point spread function (PSF) tail were evaluated. Imaging 18F in resolution and uniformity phantoms showed that including large parts of PSFs is essential to obtain good contrast-noise characteristics and that DOI modelling is highly effective in removing deformations of small structures, together leading to 0.75 mm resolution PET images of a hot-rod Derenzo phantom. Moreover, MPP modelling reduced the level of background noise. These improvements were also clearly visible in mouse images. Performance of VECTor can thus be significantly improved by accurately modelling annihilation gamma photon transport.

  7. An accurate tongue tissue strain synthesis using pseudo-wavelet reconstruction-based tagline detection

    Yuan, Xiaohui; Ozturk, Cengizhan; Chi-Fishman, Gloria

    2007-03-01

    This paper describe our work on tagline detection and tissue strain synthesis. The tagline detection method extends our previous work 16 using pseudo-wavelet reconstruction. The novelty in tagline detection is that we integrated an active contour model and successfully improved the detection and indexing performance. Using pseudo-wavelet reconstruction-based method, prominent wavelet coefficients were retained while others were eliminated. Taglines were then extracted from the reconstructed images using thresholding. Due to noise and artifacts, a tagline can be broken into segments. We employed an active contour model that tracks the most likely segments and bridges them. Experiments demonstrated that our method extracts taglines automatically with greater robustness. Tissue strain was also reconstructed using extracted taglines.

  8. Image reconstruction for brain CT slices

    吴建明; 施鹏飞

    2004-01-01

    Different modalities in biomedical images, like CT, MRI and PET scanners, provide detailed cross-sectional views of human anatomy. This paper introduces three-dimensional brain reconstruction based on CT slices. It contains filtering, fuzzy segmentation, matching method of contours, cell array structure and image animation. Experimental results have shown its validity. The innovation is matching method of contours and fuzzy segmentation algorithm of CT slices.

  9. 3D Reconstruction in Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Mikulka, J.; Bartušek, Karel

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. 7 (2010), s. 617-620. ISSN 1931-7360 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA102/09/0314 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20650511 Keywords : reconstruction methods * magnetic resonance imaging Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering

  10. 3D Reconstruction in Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Mikulka, J.; Bartušek, Karel

    Cambridge : The Electromagnetics Academy, 2010, s. 1043-1046. ISBN 978-1-934142-14-1. [PIERS 2010 Cambridge. Cambridge (US), 05.07.2010-08.07.2010] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA102/09/0314 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20650511 Keywords : 3D reconstruction * magnetic resonance imaging Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering

  11. Implementation of efficient image reconstruction for CT

    Jie Liu; Guangfei Wang

    2005-01-01

    @@ The operational procedures for efficiently reconstructing the two-dimensional image of a body by the filtered back projection are described in this paper. The projections are interpolated for four times of original projection by zero-padding the original projection in frequency-domain and then inverse fast Fourier transform (FFT) is taken to improve accuracy.

  12. Connections model for tomographic images reconstruction

    This paper shows an artificial neural network with an adequately topology for tomographic image reconstruction. The associated error function is derived and the learning algorithm is make. The simulated results are presented and demonstrate the existence of a generalized solution for nets with linear activation function. (Author)

  13. Stochastic image reconstruction for a dual-particle imaging system

    Hamel, M. C.; Polack, J. K.; Poitrasson-Rivière, A.; Flaska, M.; Clarke, S. D.; Pozzi, S. A.; Tomanin, A.; Peerani, P.

    2016-02-01

    Stochastic image reconstruction has been applied to a dual-particle imaging system being designed for nuclear safeguards applications. The dual-particle imager (DPI) is a combined Compton-scatter and neutron-scatter camera capable of producing separate neutron and photon images. The stochastic origin ensembles (SOE) method was investigated as an imaging method for the DPI because only a minimal estimation of system response is required to produce images with quality that is comparable to common maximum-likelihood methods. This work contains neutron and photon SOE image reconstructions for a 252Cf point source, two mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel canisters representing point sources, and the MOX fuel canisters representing a distributed source. Simulation of the DPI using MCNPX-PoliMi is validated by comparison of simulated and measured results. Because image quality is dependent on the number of counts and iterations used, the relationship between these quantities is investigated.

  14. Sampling conditions for gradient-magnitude sparsity based image reconstruction algorithms

    Sidky, Emil Y.; Jørgensen, Jakob H.; Pan, Xiaochuan

    2012-03-01

    Image reconstruction from sparse-view data in 2D fan-beam CT is investigated by constrained, total-variation minimization. This optimization problem exploits possible sparsity in the gradient magnitude image (GMI). The investigation is performed in simulation under ideal, noiseless data conditions in order to reveal a possible link between GMI sparsity and the necessary number of projection views for reconstructing an accurate image. Results are shown for two, quite different phantoms of similar GMI sparsity.

  15. Simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique based on guided image filtering.

    Ji, Dongjiang; Qu, Gangrong; Liu, Baodong

    2016-07-11

    The challenge of computed tomography is to reconstruct high-quality images from few-view projections. Using a prior guidance image, guided image filtering smoothes images while preserving edge features. The prior guidance image can be incorporated into the image reconstruction process to improve image quality. We propose a new simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique based on guided image filtering. Specifically, the prior guidance image is updated in the image reconstruction process, merging information iteratively. To validate the algorithm practicality and efficiency, experiments were performed with numerical phantom projection data and real projection data. The results demonstrate that the proposed method is effective and efficient for nondestructive testing and rock mechanics. PMID:27410859

  16. 3-D Reconstruction From Satellite Images

    Denver, Troelz

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this project has been to implement a software system, that is able to create a 3-D reconstruction from two or more 2-D photographic images made from different positions. The height is determined from the disparity difference of the images. The general purpose of the system is mapping of......, where various methods have been tested in order to optimize the performance. The match results are used in the reconstruction part to establish a 3-D digital representation and finally, different presentation forms are discussed....... treated individually. A detailed treatment of various lens distortions is required, in order to correct for these problems. This subject is included in the acquisition part. In the calibration part, the perspective distortion is removed from the images. Most attention has been paid to the matching problem...

  17. Calibration of time-of-flight cameras for accurate intraoperative surface reconstruction

    Purpose: In image-guided surgery (IGS) intraoperative image acquisition of tissue shape, motion, and morphology is one of the main challenges. Recently, time-of-flight (ToF) cameras have emerged as a new means for fast range image acquisition that can be used for multimodal registration of the patient anatomy during surgery. The major drawbacks of ToF cameras are systematic errors in the image acquisition technique that compromise the quality of the measured range images. In this paper, we propose a calibration concept that, for the first time, accounts for all known systematic errors affecting the quality of ToF range images. Laboratory and in vitro experiments assess its performance in the context of IGS.Methods: For calibration the camera-related error sources depending on the sensor, the sensor temperature and the set integration time are corrected first, followed by the scene-specific errors, which are modeled as function of the measured distance, the amplitude and the radial distance to the principal point of the camera. Accounting for the high accuracy demands in IGS, we use a custom-made calibration device to provide reference distance data, the cameras are calibrated too. To evaluate the mitigation of the error, the remaining residual error after ToF depth calibration was compared with that arising from using the manufacturer routines for several state-of-the-art ToF cameras. The accuracy of reconstructed ToF surfaces was investigated after multimodal registration with computed tomography (CT) data of liver models by assessment of the target registration error (TRE) of markers introduced in the livers.Results: For the inspected distance range of up to 2 m, our calibration approach yielded a mean residual error to reference data ranging from 1.5 ± 4.3 mm for the best camera to 7.2 ± 11.0 mm. When compared to the data obtained from the manufacturer routines, the residual error was reduced by at least 78% from worst calibration result to most accurate

  18. Calibration of time-of-flight cameras for accurate intraoperative surface reconstruction

    Mersmann, Sven; Seitel, Alexander; Maier-Hein, Lena [Division of Medical and Biological Informatics, Junior Group Computer-assisted Interventions, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Baden-Wurttemberg 69120 (Germany); Erz, Michael; Jähne, Bernd [Heidelberg Collaboratory for Image Processing (HCI), University of Heidelberg, Baden-Wurttemberg 69115 (Germany); Nickel, Felix; Mieth, Markus; Mehrabi, Arianeb [Department of General, Visceral and Transplant Surgery, University of Heidelberg, Baden-Wurttemberg 69120 (Germany)

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: In image-guided surgery (IGS) intraoperative image acquisition of tissue shape, motion, and morphology is one of the main challenges. Recently, time-of-flight (ToF) cameras have emerged as a new means for fast range image acquisition that can be used for multimodal registration of the patient anatomy during surgery. The major drawbacks of ToF cameras are systematic errors in the image acquisition technique that compromise the quality of the measured range images. In this paper, we propose a calibration concept that, for the first time, accounts for all known systematic errors affecting the quality of ToF range images. Laboratory and in vitro experiments assess its performance in the context of IGS.Methods: For calibration the camera-related error sources depending on the sensor, the sensor temperature and the set integration time are corrected first, followed by the scene-specific errors, which are modeled as function of the measured distance, the amplitude and the radial distance to the principal point of the camera. Accounting for the high accuracy demands in IGS, we use a custom-made calibration device to provide reference distance data, the cameras are calibrated too. To evaluate the mitigation of the error, the remaining residual error after ToF depth calibration was compared with that arising from using the manufacturer routines for several state-of-the-art ToF cameras. The accuracy of reconstructed ToF surfaces was investigated after multimodal registration with computed tomography (CT) data of liver models by assessment of the target registration error (TRE) of markers introduced in the livers.Results: For the inspected distance range of up to 2 m, our calibration approach yielded a mean residual error to reference data ranging from 1.5 ± 4.3 mm for the best camera to 7.2 ± 11.0 mm. When compared to the data obtained from the manufacturer routines, the residual error was reduced by at least 78% from worst calibration result to most accurate

  19. Optimized 3D Street Scene Reconstruction from Driving Recorder Images

    Yongjun Zhang

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents an automatic region detection based method to reconstruct street scenes from driving recorder images. The driving recorder in this paper is a dashboard camera that collects images while the motor vehicle is moving. An enormous number of moving vehicles are included in the collected data because the typical recorders are often mounted in the front of moving vehicles and face the forward direction, which can make matching points on vehicles and guardrails unreliable. Believing that utilizing these image data can reduce street scene reconstruction and updating costs because of their low price, wide use, and extensive shooting coverage, we therefore proposed a new method, which is called the Mask automatic detecting method, to improve the structure results from the motion reconstruction. Note that we define vehicle and guardrail regions as “mask” in this paper since the features on them should be masked out to avoid poor matches. After removing the feature points in our new method, the camera poses and sparse 3D points that are reconstructed with the remaining matches. Our contrast experiments with the typical pipeline of structure from motion (SfM reconstruction methods, such as Photosynth and VisualSFM, demonstrated that the Mask decreased the root-mean-square error (RMSE of the pairwise matching results, which led to more accurate recovering results from the camera-relative poses. Removing features from the Mask also increased the accuracy of point clouds by nearly 30%–40% and corrected the problems of the typical methods on repeatedly reconstructing several buildings when there was only one target building.

  20. Sparse image reconstruction for molecular imaging

    Ting, Michael; Hero, Alfred O

    2008-01-01

    The application that motivates this paper is molecular imaging at the atomic level. When discretized at sub-atomic distances, the volume is inherently sparse. Noiseless measurements from an imaging technology can be modeled by convolution of the image with the system point spread function (psf). Such is the case with magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM), an emerging technology where imaging of an individual tobacco mosaic virus was recently demonstrated with nanometer resolution. We also consider additive white Gaussian noise (AWGN) in the measurements. Many prior works of sparse estimators have focused on the case when H has low coherence; however, the system matrix H in our application is the convolution matrix for the system psf. A typical convolution matrix has high coherence. The paper therefore does not assume a low coherence H. A discrete-continuous form of the Laplacian and atom at zero (LAZE) p.d.f. used by Johnstone and Silverman is formulated, and two sparse estimators derived by maximizing t...

  1. Analysis of discrete-to-discrete imaging models for iterative tomographic image reconstruction and compressive sensing

    Jørgensen, Jakob H; Pan, Xiaochuan

    2011-01-01

    Discrete-to-discrete imaging models for computed tomography (CT) are becoming increasingly ubiquitous as the interest in iterative image reconstruction algorithms has heightened. Despite this trend, all the intuition for algorithm and system design derives from analysis of continuous-to-continuous models such as the X-ray and Radon transform. While the similarity between these models justifies some crossover, questions such as what are sufficient sampling conditions can be quite different for the two models. This sampling issue is addressed extensively in the first half of the article using singular value decomposition analysis for determining sufficient number of views and detector bins. The question of full sampling for CT is particularly relevant to current attempts to adapt compressive sensing (CS) motivated methods to application in CT image reconstruction. The second half goes in depth on this subject and discusses the link between object sparsity and sufficient sampling for accurate reconstruction. Par...

  2. High-performance computing and networking as tools for accurate emission computed tomography reconstruction

    Passeri, A. [Dipartimento di Fisiopatologia Clinica - Sezione di Medicina Nucleare, Universita` di Firenze (Italy); Formiconi, A.R. [Dipartimento di Fisiopatologia Clinica - Sezione di Medicina Nucleare, Universita` di Firenze (Italy); De Cristofaro, M.T.E.R. [Dipartimento di Fisiopatologia Clinica - Sezione di Medicina Nucleare, Universita` di Firenze (Italy); Pupi, A. [Dipartimento di Fisiopatologia Clinica - Sezione di Medicina Nucleare, Universita` di Firenze (Italy); Meldolesi, U. [Dipartimento di Fisiopatologia Clinica - Sezione di Medicina Nucleare, Universita` di Firenze (Italy)

    1997-04-01

    It is well known that the quantitative potential of emission computed tomography (ECT) relies on the ability to compensate for resolution, attenuation and scatter effects. Reconstruction algorithms which are able to take these effects into account are highly demanding in terms of computing resources. The reported work aimed to investigate the use of a parallel high-performance computing platform for ECT reconstruction taking into account an accurate model of the acquisition of single-photon emission tomographic (SPET) data. An iterative algorithm with an accurate model of the variable system response was ported on the MIMD (Multiple Instruction Multiple Data) parallel architecture of a 64-node Cray T3D massively parallel computer. The system was organized to make it easily accessible even from low-cost PC-based workstations through standard TCP/IP networking. A complete brain study of 30 (64 x 64) slices could be reconstructed from a set of 90 (64 x 64) projections with ten iterations of the conjugate gradients algorithm in 9 s, corresponding to an actual speed-up factor of 135. This work demonstrated the possibility of exploiting remote high-performance computing and networking resources from hospital sites by means of low-cost workstations using standard communication protocols without particular problems for routine use. The achievable speed-up factors allow the assessment of the clinical benefit of advanced reconstruction techniques which require a heavy computational burden for the compensation effects such as variable spatial resolution, scatter and attenuation. The possibility of using the same software on the same hardware platform with data acquired in different laboratories with various kinds of SPET instrumentation is appealing for software quality control and for the evaluation of the clinical impact of the reconstruction methods. (orig.). With 4 figs., 1 tab.

  3. High-performance computing and networking as tools for accurate emission computed tomography reconstruction

    It is well known that the quantitative potential of emission computed tomography (ECT) relies on the ability to compensate for resolution, attenuation and scatter effects. Reconstruction algorithms which are able to take these effects into account are highly demanding in terms of computing resources. The reported work aimed to investigate the use of a parallel high-performance computing platform for ECT reconstruction taking into account an accurate model of the acquisition of single-photon emission tomographic (SPET) data. An iterative algorithm with an accurate model of the variable system response was ported on the MIMD (Multiple Instruction Multiple Data) parallel architecture of a 64-node Cray T3D massively parallel computer. The system was organized to make it easily accessible even from low-cost PC-based workstations through standard TCP/IP networking. A complete brain study of 30 (64 x 64) slices could be reconstructed from a set of 90 (64 x 64) projections with ten iterations of the conjugate gradients algorithm in 9 s, corresponding to an actual speed-up factor of 135. This work demonstrated the possibility of exploiting remote high-performance computing and networking resources from hospital sites by means of low-cost workstations using standard communication protocols without particular problems for routine use. The achievable speed-up factors allow the assessment of the clinical benefit of advanced reconstruction techniques which require a heavy computational burden for the compensation effects such as variable spatial resolution, scatter and attenuation. The possibility of using the same software on the same hardware platform with data acquired in different laboratories with various kinds of SPET instrumentation is appealing for software quality control and for the evaluation of the clinical impact of the reconstruction methods. (orig.). With 4 figs., 1 tab

  4. Propagation phasor approach for holographic image reconstruction

    Luo, Wei; Zhang, Yibo; Göröcs, Zoltán; Feizi, Alborz; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2016-01-01

    To achieve high-resolution and wide field-of-view, digital holographic imaging techniques need to tackle two major challenges: phase recovery and spatial undersampling. Previously, these challenges were separately addressed using phase retrieval and pixel super-resolution algorithms, which utilize the diversity of different imaging parameters. Although existing holographic imaging methods can achieve large space-bandwidth-products by performing pixel super-resolution and phase retrieval sequentially, they require large amounts of data, which might be a limitation in high-speed or cost-effective imaging applications. Here we report a propagation phasor approach, which for the first time combines phase retrieval and pixel super-resolution into a unified mathematical framework and enables the synthesis of new holographic image reconstruction methods with significantly improved data efficiency. In this approach, twin image and spatial aliasing signals, along with other digital artifacts, are interpreted as noise terms that are modulated by phasors that analytically depend on the lateral displacement between hologram and sensor planes, sample-to-sensor distance, wavelength, and the illumination angle. Compared to previous holographic reconstruction techniques, this new framework results in five- to seven-fold reduced number of raw measurements, while still achieving a competitive resolution and space-bandwidth-product. We also demonstrated the success of this approach by imaging biological specimens including Papanicolaou and blood smears. PMID:26964671

  5. Propagation phasor approach for holographic image reconstruction

    Luo, Wei; Zhang, Yibo; Göröcs, Zoltán; Feizi, Alborz; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2016-03-01

    To achieve high-resolution and wide field-of-view, digital holographic imaging techniques need to tackle two major challenges: phase recovery and spatial undersampling. Previously, these challenges were separately addressed using phase retrieval and pixel super-resolution algorithms, which utilize the diversity of different imaging parameters. Although existing holographic imaging methods can achieve large space-bandwidth-products by performing pixel super-resolution and phase retrieval sequentially, they require large amounts of data, which might be a limitation in high-speed or cost-effective imaging applications. Here we report a propagation phasor approach, which for the first time combines phase retrieval and pixel super-resolution into a unified mathematical framework and enables the synthesis of new holographic image reconstruction methods with significantly improved data efficiency. In this approach, twin image and spatial aliasing signals, along with other digital artifacts, are interpreted as noise terms that are modulated by phasors that analytically depend on the lateral displacement between hologram and sensor planes, sample-to-sensor distance, wavelength, and the illumination angle. Compared to previous holographic reconstruction techniques, this new framework results in five- to seven-fold reduced number of raw measurements, while still achieving a competitive resolution and space-bandwidth-product. We also demonstrated the success of this approach by imaging biological specimens including Papanicolaou and blood smears.

  6. Accurate focal spot diagnostics based on a single shot coherent modulation imaging

    A single-shot method based on coherent modulation imaging is presented for the diagnostics of the focal spot of laser facilities. The laser beam to be measured first illuminates a highly random phase plate with a known structure and subsequently the intensity of the resulting diffraction pattern is recorded by a charge-coupled device positioned behind the phase plate. Intensity distribution at the focus of the laser beam is accurately reconstructed with the coherent modulation imaging method. The feasibility of this method is demonstrated with an experiment involving a He–Ne laser. (letter)

  7. Accurate Image Super-Resolution Using Very Deep Convolutional Networks

    Kim, Jiwon; Lee, Jung Kwon; Lee, Kyoung Mu

    2015-01-01

    We present a highly accurate single-image super-resolution (SR) method. Our method uses a very deep convolutional network inspired by VGG-net used for ImageNet classification \\cite{simonyan2015very}. We find increasing our network depth shows a significant improvement in accuracy. Our final model uses 20 weight layers. By cascading small filters many times in a deep network structure, contextual information over large image regions is exploited in an efficient way. With very deep networks, ho...

  8. Interacting with image hierarchies for fast and accurate object segmentation

    Beard, David V.; Eberly, David H.; Hemminger, Bradley M.; Pizer, Stephen M.; Faith, R. E.; Kurak, Charles; Livingston, Mark

    1994-05-01

    Object definition is an increasingly important area of medical image research. Accurate and fairly rapid object definition is essential for measuring the size and, perhaps more importantly, the change in size of anatomical objects such as kidneys and tumors. Rapid and fairly accurate object definition is essential for 3D real-time visualization including both surgery planning and Radiation oncology treatment planning. One approach to object definition involves the use of 3D image hierarchies, such as Eberly's Ridge Flow. However, the image hierarchy segmentation approach requires user interaction in selecting regions and subtrees. Further, visualizing and comprehending the anatomy and the selected portions of the hierarchy can be problematic. In this paper we will describe the Magic Crayon tool which allows a user to define rapidly and accurately various anatomical objects by interacting with image hierarchies such as those generated with Eberly's Ridge Flow algorithm as well as other 3D image hierarchies. Preliminary results suggest that fairly complex anatomical objects can be segmented in under a minute with sufficient accuracy for 3D surgery planning, 3D radiation oncology treatment planning, and similar applications. Potential modifications to the approach for improved accuracy are summarized.

  9. A Wiener filtering based back projection algorithm for image reconstruction

    In the context of computed tomography (CT), a key techniques is the image reconstruction from projection data. The filtered back projection (FBP) algorithm is commonly used in image reconstruction. Based on cause analysis of the artifacts, we propose a new image reconstruction algorithm combining the Wiener filter and FBP algorithm. The conventional FBP image reconstruction algorithm is improved by adopting Wiener filter: and artifacts in the reconstructed images are obviously reduced. Experimental results of typical flow regimes show that the improved algorithm can effectively improve the image quality. (authors)

  10. Probabilistic image reconstruction for radio interferometers

    Sutter, P M; McEwen, Jason D; Bunn, Emory F; Karakci, Ata; Korotkov, Andrei; Timbie, Peter; Tucker, Gregory S; Zhang, Le

    2013-01-01

    We present a novel, general-purpose method for deconvolving and denoising images from gridded radio interferometric visibilities using Bayesian inference based on a Gaussian process model. The method automatically takes into account incomplete coverage of the uv-plane and mode coupling due to the beam. Our method uses Gibbs sampling to efficiently explore the full posterior distribution of the underlying signal image given the data. We use a set of widely diverse mock images with a realistic interferometer setup and level of noise to assess the method. Compared to results from a proxy for the CLEAN method we find that in terms of RMS error and signal-to-noise ratio our approach performs better than traditional deconvolution techniques, regardless of the structure of the source image in our test suite. Our implementation scales as O(np log np), provides full statistical and uncertainty information of the reconstructed image, requires no supervision, and provides a robust, consistent framework for incorporating...

  11. A method for accurate modelling of the crystal response function at a crystal sub-level applied to PET reconstruction

    Stute, S.; Benoit, D.; Martineau, A.; Rehfeld, N. S.; Buvat, I.

    2011-02-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) images suffer from low spatial resolution and signal-to-noise ratio. Accurate modelling of the effects affecting resolution within iterative reconstruction algorithms can improve the trade-off between spatial resolution and signal-to-noise ratio in PET images. In this work, we present an original approach for modelling the resolution loss introduced by physical interactions between and within the crystals of the tomograph and we investigate the impact of such modelling on the quality of the reconstructed images. The proposed model includes two components: modelling of the inter-crystal scattering and penetration (interC) and modelling of the intra-crystal count distribution (intraC). The parameters of the model were obtained using a Monte Carlo simulation of the Philips GEMINI GXL response. Modelling was applied to the raw line-of-response geometric histograms along the four dimensions and introduced in an iterative reconstruction algorithm. The impact of modelling interC, intraC or combined interC and intraC on spatial resolution, contrast recovery and noise was studied using simulated phantoms. The feasibility of modelling interC and intraC in two clinical 18F-NaF scans was also studied. Measurements on Monte Carlo simulated data showed that, without any crystal interaction modelling, the radial spatial resolution in air varied from 5.3 mm FWHM at the centre of the field-of-view (FOV) to 10 mm at 266 mm from the centre. Resolution was improved with interC modelling (from 4.4 mm in the centre to 9.6 mm at the edge), or with intraC modelling only (from 4.8 mm in the centre to 4.3 mm at the edge), and it became stationary across the FOV (4.2 mm FWHM) when combining interC and intraC modelling. This improvement in resolution yielded significant contrast enhancement, e.g. from 65 to 76% and 55.5 to 68% for a 6.35 mm radius sphere with a 3.5 sphere-to-background activity ratio at 55 and 215 mm from the centre of the FOV, respectively

  12. A method for accurate modelling of the crystal response function at a crystal sub-level applied to PET reconstruction

    Positron emission tomography (PET) images suffer from low spatial resolution and signal-to-noise ratio. Accurate modelling of the effects affecting resolution within iterative reconstruction algorithms can improve the trade-off between spatial resolution and signal-to-noise ratio in PET images. In this work, we present an original approach for modelling the resolution loss introduced by physical interactions between and within the crystals of the tomograph and we investigate the impact of such modelling on the quality of the reconstructed images. The proposed model includes two components: modelling of the inter-crystal scattering and penetration (interC) and modelling of the intra-crystal count distribution (intraC). The parameters of the model were obtained using a Monte Carlo simulation of the Philips GEMINI GXL response. Modelling was applied to the raw line-of-response geometric histograms along the four dimensions and introduced in an iterative reconstruction algorithm. The impact of modelling interC, intraC or combined interC and intraC on spatial resolution, contrast recovery and noise was studied using simulated phantoms. The feasibility of modelling interC and intraC in two clinical 18F-NaF scans was also studied. Measurements on Monte Carlo simulated data showed that, without any crystal interaction modelling, the radial spatial resolution in air varied from 5.3 mm FWHM at the centre of the field-of-view (FOV) to 10 mm at 266 mm from the centre. Resolution was improved with interC modelling (from 4.4 mm in the centre to 9.6 mm at the edge), or with intraC modelling only (from 4.8 mm in the centre to 4.3 mm at the edge), and it became stationary across the FOV (4.2 mm FWHM) when combining interC and intraC modelling. This improvement in resolution yielded significant contrast enhancement, e.g. from 65 to 76% and 55.5 to 68% for a 6.35 mm radius sphere with a 3.5 sphere-to-background activity ratio at 55 and 215 mm from the centre of the FOV, respectively

  13. Reconstructing building mass models from UAV images

    Li, Minglei

    2015-07-26

    We present an automatic reconstruction pipeline for large scale urban scenes from aerial images captured by a camera mounted on an unmanned aerial vehicle. Using state-of-the-art Structure from Motion and Multi-View Stereo algorithms, we first generate a dense point cloud from the aerial images. Based on the statistical analysis of the footprint grid of the buildings, the point cloud is classified into different categories (i.e., buildings, ground, trees, and others). Roof structures are extracted for each individual building using Markov random field optimization. Then, a contour refinement algorithm based on pivot point detection is utilized to refine the contour of patches. Finally, polygonal mesh models are extracted from the refined contours. Experiments on various scenes as well as comparisons with state-of-the-art reconstruction methods demonstrate the effectiveness and robustness of the proposed method.

  14. A two-step Hilbert transform method for 2D image reconstruction

    Noo, Frederic; Clackdoyle, Rolf; Pack, Jed D [UCAIR, Department of Radiology, University of Utah, UT (United States)

    2004-09-07

    The paper describes a new accurate two-dimensional (2D) image reconstruction method consisting of two steps. In the first step, the backprojected image is formed after taking the derivative of the parallel projection data. In the second step, a Hilbert filtering is applied along certain lines in the differentiated backprojection (DBP) image. Formulae for performing the DBP step in fan-beam geometry are also presented. The advantage of this two-step Hilbert transform approach is that in certain situations, regions of interest (ROIs) can be reconstructed from truncated projection data. Simulation results are presented that illustrate very similar reconstructed image quality using the new method compared to standard filtered backprojection, and that show the capability to correctly handle truncated projections. In particular, a simulation is presented of a wide patient whose projections are truncated laterally yet for which highly accurate ROI reconstruction is obtained.

  15. A two-step Hilbert transform method for 2D image reconstruction

    The paper describes a new accurate two-dimensional (2D) image reconstruction method consisting of two steps. In the first step, the backprojected image is formed after taking the derivative of the parallel projection data. In the second step, a Hilbert filtering is applied along certain lines in the differentiated backprojection (DBP) image. Formulae for performing the DBP step in fan-beam geometry are also presented. The advantage of this two-step Hilbert transform approach is that in certain situations, regions of interest (ROIs) can be reconstructed from truncated projection data. Simulation results are presented that illustrate very similar reconstructed image quality using the new method compared to standard filtered backprojection, and that show the capability to correctly handle truncated projections. In particular, a simulation is presented of a wide patient whose projections are truncated laterally yet for which highly accurate ROI reconstruction is obtained

  16. A two-step Hilbert transform method for 2D image reconstruction.

    Noo, Frédéric; Clackdoyle, Rolf; Pack, Jed D

    2004-09-01

    The paper describes a new accurate two-dimensional (2D) image reconstruction method consisting of two steps. In the first step, the backprojected image is formed after taking the derivative of the parallel projection data. In the second step, a Hilbert filtering is applied along certain lines in the differentiated backprojection (DBP) image. Formulae for performing the DBP step in fanbeam geometry are also presented. The advantage of this two-step Hilbert transform approach is that in certain situations, regions of interest (ROIs) can be reconstructed from truncated projection data. Simulation results are presented that illustrate very similar reconstructed image quality using the new method compared to standard filtered backprojection, and that show the capability to correctly handle truncated projections. In particular, a simulation is presented of a wide patient whose projections are truncated laterally yet for which highly accurate ROI reconstruction is obtained. PMID:15470913

  17. Deep Reconstruction Models for Image Set Classification.

    Hayat, Munawar; Bennamoun, Mohammed; An, Senjian

    2015-04-01

    Image set classification finds its applications in a number of real-life scenarios such as classification from surveillance videos, multi-view camera networks and personal albums. Compared with single image based classification, it offers more promises and has therefore attracted significant research attention in recent years. Unlike many existing methods which assume images of a set to lie on a certain geometric surface, this paper introduces a deep learning framework which makes no such prior assumptions and can automatically discover the underlying geometric structure. Specifically, a Template Deep Reconstruction Model (TDRM) is defined whose parameters are initialized by performing unsupervised pre-training in a layer-wise fashion using Gaussian Restricted Boltzmann Machines (GRBMs). The initialized TDRM is then separately trained for images of each class and class-specific DRMs are learnt. Based on the minimum reconstruction errors from the learnt class-specific models, three different voting strategies are devised for classification. Extensive experiments are performed to demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed framework for the tasks of face and object recognition from image sets. Experimental results show that the proposed method consistently outperforms the existing state of the art methods. PMID:26353289

  18. Joint reconstruction of absorption and refractive properties in propagation-based x-ray phase-contrast tomography via a non-linear image reconstruction algorithm

    Chen, Yujia; Wang, Kun; Gursoy, Doga; Soriano, Carmen; De Carlo, Francesco; Anastasio, Mark A.

    2016-03-01

    Propagation-based X-ray phase-contrast tomography (XPCT) provides the opportunity to image weakly absorbing objects and is being explored actively for a variety of important pre-clinical applications. Quantitative XPCT image reconstruction methods typically involve a phase retrieval step followed by application of an image reconstruction algorithm. Most approaches to phase retrieval require either acquiring multiple images at different object-to-detector distances or introducing simplifying assumptions, such as a single-material assumption, to linearize the imaging model. In order to overcome these limitations, a non-linear image reconstruction method has been proposed previously that jointly estimates the absorption and refractive properties of an object from XPCT projection data acquired at a single propagation distance, without the need to linearize the imaging model. However, the numerical properties of the associated non-convex optimization problem remain largely unexplored. In this study, computer simulations are conducted to investigate the feasibility of the joint reconstruction problem in practice. We demonstrate that the joint reconstruction problem is ill-posed and sensitive to system inconsistencies. Particularly, the method can generate accurate refractive index images only if the object is thin and has no phase-wrapping in the data. However, we also observed that, for weakly absorbing objects, the refractive index images reconstructed by the joint reconstruction method are, in general, more accurate than those reconstructed using methods that simply ignore the object's absorption.

  19. Image Reconstruction from 2D stack of MRI/CT to 3D using Shapelets

    Arathi T

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Image reconstruction is an active research field, due to the increasing need for geometric 3D models in movie industry, games, virtual environments and in medical fields. 3D image reconstruction aims to arrive at the 3D model of an object, from its 2D images taken at different viewing angles. Medical images are multimodal, which includes MRI, CT scan image, PET and SPECT images. Of these, MRI and CT scan images of an organ when taken, is available as a stack of 2D images, taken at different angles. This 2D stack of images is used to get a 3D view of the organ of interest, to aid doctors in easier diagnosis. Existing 3D reconstruction techniques are voxel based techniques, which tries to reconstruct the 3D view based on the intensity value stored at each voxel location. These techniques don’t make use of the shape/depth information available in the 2D image stack. In this work, a 3D reconstruction technique for MRI/CT 2D image stack, based on Shapelets has been proposed. Here, the shape/depth information available in each 2D image in the image stack is manipulated to get a 3D reconstruction, which gives a more accurate 3D view of the organ of interest. Experimental results exhibit the efficiency of this proposed technique.

  20. MR imaging of the reconstructed breast

    The etiology of pain is difficult to evaluate in a reconstructed breast because of capsular contracture and compression of tissue. MR images were obtained in 45 patients with a variety of pulse techniques. In hands, STIR (short inversion recovery) imaging was the most sensitive sequence. Suppression of the fat signal and increased contrast between normal and pathologic tissue, coupled with the synergistic effects of prolonged T1 and T2, were a major practical advantage. MR imaging can demonstrate recurrent tumor involving the chest wall, internal mammary nodes and rupture of the implant bag. The authors believe MR imaging can play a strong supplementary role in determining the etiology of pain in a postmastectomy patient

  1. Image-reconstruction methods in positron tomography

    Townsend, David W; CERN. Geneva

    1993-01-01

    Physics and mathematics for medical imaging\tIn the two decades since the introduction of the X-ray scanner into radiology, medical imaging techniques have become widely established as essential tools in the diagnosis of disease. As a consequence of recent technological and mathematical advances, the non-invasive, three-dimensional imaging of internal organs such as the brain and the heart is now possible, not only for anatomical investigations using X-rays but also for studies which explore the functional status of the body using positron-emitting radioisotopes and nuclear magnetic resonance. Mathematical methods which enable three-dimentional distributions to be reconstructed from projection data acquired by radiation detectors suitably positioned around the patient will be described in detail. The lectures will trace the development of medical imaging from simpleradiographs to the present-day non-invasive measurement of in vivo boichemistry. Powerful techniques to correlate anatomy and function that are cur...

  2. Fully 3D PET image reconstruction with a 4D sinogram blurring kernel

    Tohme, Michel S.; Qi, Jinyi [California Univ., Davis, CA (United States). Dept. of Biomedical Engineering; Zhou, Jian

    2011-07-01

    Accurately modeling PET system response is essential for high-resolution image reconstruction. Traditionally, sinogram blurring effects are modeled as a 2D blur in each sinogram plane. Such 2D blurring kernel is insufficient for fully 3D PET data, which has four dimensions. In this paper, we implement a fully 3D PET image reconstruction using a 4D sinogram blurring kernel estimated from point source scans and perform phantom experiments to evaluate the improvements in image quality over methods with existing 2D blurring kernels. The results show that the proposed reconstruction method can achieve better spatial resolution and contrast recovery than existing methods. (orig.)

  3. Portable and accurate 3D scanner for breast implant design and reconstructive plastic surgery

    Rigotti, Camilla; Borghese, Nunzio A.; Ferrari, Stefano; Baroni, Guido; Ferrigno, Giancarlo

    1998-06-01

    In order to evaluate the proper breast implant, the surgeon relies on a standard set of measurements manually taken on the subject. This approach does not allow to obtain an accurate reconstruction of the breast shape and asymmetries can easily arise after surgery. The purpose of this work is to present a method which can help the surgeon in the choice of the shape and dimensions of a prosthesis allowing for a perfect symmetry between the prosthesis and the controlateral breast and can be used as a 3D visual feedback in plastic surgery.

  4. Research about Three Dimensional Reconstruction of Medical Image

    Qiechun Chen

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, through comparison of different reconstruction algorithms for volume rendering, we put forward Ray Casting algorithm as the scheme of 3D reconstruction of medical image. We improved the image synthesis operator, and combined section sampling mode to reconstruct the image. Finally we rendered images on GPU. By using improved operator, we not only made the rendering speed accelerated, but also made the quality of rendering images improved.

  5. Research about Three Dimensional Reconstruction of Medical Image

    Qiechun Chen; Guangyuan Zhang; Xin Wang; Linan Fan

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, through comparison of different reconstruction algorithms for volume rendering, we put forward Ray Casting algorithm as the scheme of 3D reconstruction of medical image. We improved the image synthesis operator, and combined section sampling mode to reconstruct the image. Finally we rendered images on GPU. By using improved operator, we not only made the rendering speed accelerated, but also made the quality of rendering images improved.

  6. Image reconstruction by NMR Fresnel diffractive imaging technique

    A new approach to MR angiography, the NMR diffractive imaging technique, has been investigated. The expression for NMR signals obtained in the NMR diffractive imaging technique is similar to the equation for Fresnel diffraction in light waves or sound waves. Therefore, it is possible to reconstruct an image focusing on any plane in the depth direction from data scanned two-dimensionally by changing an imaging parameter in the reconstruction step. To support this imaging technique, a coil system composed of six coils was designed. Experiments were performed using an ultra-low-field MRI scanner to acquire two-dimensional data in the proposed technique. Even though blurred images outside the focus are superimposed on the image in the focal plane, the three-dimensional distribution of the object can be recognized by moving the focal plane in the depth direction. To obtain supplemental information for the object, acquiring images from different angles is helpful for recognizing the spatial distribution of the object more precisely. Although the image obtained contains blurred images outside the focus the proposed imaging technique is expected to be useful in MR fast angiography. (author)

  7. Adaptive Kaczmarz method for image reconstruction in electrical impedance tomography

    We present an adaptive Kaczmarz method for solving the inverse problem in electrical impedance tomography and determining the conductivity distribution inside an object from electrical measurements made on the surface. To best characterize an unknown conductivity distribution and avoid inverting the Jacobian-related term JTJ which could be expensive in terms of computation cost and memory in large-scale problems, we propose solving the inverse problem by applying the optimal current patterns for distinguishing the actual conductivity from the conductivity estimate between each iteration of the block Kaczmarz algorithm. With a novel subset scheme, the memory-efficient reconstruction algorithm which appropriately combines the optimal current pattern generation with the Kaczmarz method can produce more accurate and stable solutions adaptively as compared to traditional Kaczmarz- and Gauss–Newton-type methods. Choices of initial current pattern estimates are discussed in this paper. Several reconstruction image metrics are used to quantitatively evaluate the performance of the simulation results. (paper)

  8. A sparse reconstruction algorithm for ultrasonic images in nondestructive testing.

    Guarneri, Giovanni Alfredo; Pipa, Daniel Rodrigues; Neves Junior, Flávio; de Arruda, Lúcia Valéria Ramos; Zibetti, Marcelo Victor Wüst

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound imaging systems (UIS) are essential tools in nondestructive testing (NDT). In general, the quality of images depends on two factors: system hardware features and image reconstruction algorithms. This paper presents a new image reconstruction algorithm for ultrasonic NDT. The algorithm reconstructs images from A-scan signals acquired by an ultrasonic imaging system with a monostatic transducer in pulse-echo configuration. It is based on regularized least squares using a l1 regularization norm. The method is tested to reconstruct an image of a point-like reflector, using both simulated and real data. The resolution of reconstructed image is compared with four traditional ultrasonic imaging reconstruction algorithms: B-scan, SAFT, ω-k SAFT and regularized least squares (RLS). The method demonstrates significant resolution improvement when compared with B-scan-about 91% using real data. The proposed scheme also outperforms traditional algorithms in terms of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). PMID:25905700

  9. A Sparse Reconstruction Algorithm for Ultrasonic Images in Nondestructive Testing

    Giovanni Alfredo Guarneri

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Ultrasound imaging systems (UIS are essential tools in nondestructive testing (NDT. In general, the quality of images depends on two factors: system hardware features and image reconstruction algorithms. This paper presents a new image reconstruction algorithm for ultrasonic NDT. The algorithm reconstructs images from A-scan signals acquired by an ultrasonic imaging system with a monostatic transducer in pulse-echo configuration. It is based on regularized least squares using a l1 regularization norm. The method is tested to reconstruct an image of a point-like reflector, using both simulated and real data. The resolution of reconstructed image is compared with four traditional ultrasonic imaging reconstruction algorithms: B-scan, SAFT, !-k SAFT and regularized least squares (RLS. The method demonstrates significant resolution improvement when compared with B-scan—about 91% using real data. The proposed scheme also outperforms traditional algorithms in terms of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR.

  10. Automated Image-Based Procedures for Accurate Artifacts 3D Modeling and Orthoimage Generation

    Marc Pierrot-Deseilligny

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The accurate 3D documentation of architectures and heritages is getting very common and required in different application contexts. The potentialities of the image-based approach are nowadays very well-known but there is a lack of reliable, precise and flexible solutions, possibly open-source, which could be used for metric and accurate documentation or digital conservation and not only for simple visualization or web-based applications. The article presents a set of photogrammetric tools developed in order to derive accurate 3D point clouds and orthoimages for the digitization of archaeological and architectural objects. The aim is also to distribute free solutions (software, methodologies, guidelines, best practices, etc. based on 3D surveying and modeling experiences, useful in different application contexts (architecture, excavations, museum collections, heritage documentation, etc. and according to several representations needs (2D technical documentation, 3D reconstruction, web visualization, etc..

  11. Particle Image Velocimetry Measurements in an Anatomically-Accurate Scaled Model of the Mammalian Nasal Cavity

    Rumple, Christopher; Krane, Michael; Richter, Joseph; Craven, Brent

    2013-11-01

    The mammalian nose is a multi-purpose organ that houses a convoluted airway labyrinth responsible for respiratory air conditioning, filtering of environmental contaminants, and chemical sensing. Because of the complexity of the nasal cavity, the anatomy and function of these upper airways remain poorly understood in most mammals. However, recent advances in high-resolution medical imaging, computational modeling, and experimental flow measurement techniques are now permitting the study of respiratory airflow and olfactory transport phenomena in anatomically-accurate reconstructions of the nasal cavity. Here, we focus on efforts to manufacture an anatomically-accurate transparent model for stereoscopic particle image velocimetry (SPIV) measurements. Challenges in the design and manufacture of an index-matched anatomical model are addressed. PIV measurements are presented, which are used to validate concurrent computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of mammalian nasal airflow. Supported by the National Science Foundation.

  12. Fast and Accurate Brain Image Retrieval Using Gabor Wavelet Algorithm

    J.Esther

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available CBIR in medical image databases are used to assist physician in diagnosis the diseases and also used to aid diagnosis by identifying similar past cases. In order to retrieve a fast, accurate and an effective similarity of images from the large data set. The pre-processing step is extraction of brain. It removes the unwanted non-brain areas like scalp, skull, neck, eyes, ear etc from the MRI Head scan images. After removing the unwanted areas of non-brain region, it is very effective to retrieve the similar images. In this paper it is proposed a brain extraction technique using fuzzy morphological operators. For the experimental results 1200 MRI images are taken from scan centre and some brain images are collected from web and these have been implemented with popular brain extraction algorithm of Graph- Cut Algorithm (GCUT and Expectation Maximization algorithm (EMA. The experiment result shows that the proposed algorithm fuzzy morphological operator algorithm (FMOA is prompting the best promising results. Using this FMOA result retrieved the brain image from the large collection of databases using Gabor-Wavelet Transform.

  13. A Quadratic Spline based Interface (QUASI) reconstruction algorithm for accurate tracking of two-phase flows

    Diwakar, S. V.; Das, Sarit K.; Sundararajan, T.

    2009-12-01

    A new Quadratic Spline based Interface (QUASI) reconstruction algorithm is presented which provides an accurate and continuous representation of the interface in a multiphase domain and facilitates the direct estimation of local interfacial curvature. The fluid interface in each of the mixed cells is represented by piecewise parabolic curves and an initial discontinuous PLIC approximation of the interface is progressively converted into a smooth quadratic spline made of these parabolic curves. The conversion is achieved by a sequence of predictor-corrector operations enforcing function ( C0) and derivative ( C1) continuity at the cell boundaries using simple analytical expressions for the continuity requirements. The efficacy and accuracy of the current algorithm has been demonstrated using standard test cases involving reconstruction of known static interface shapes and dynamically evolving interfaces in prescribed flow situations. These benchmark studies illustrate that the present algorithm performs excellently as compared to the other interface reconstruction methods available in literature. Quadratic rate of error reduction with respect to grid size has been observed in all the cases with curved interface shapes; only in situations where the interface geometry is primarily flat, the rate of convergence becomes linear with the mesh size. The flow algorithm implemented in the current work is designed to accurately balance the pressure gradients with the surface tension force at any location. As a consequence, it is able to minimize spurious flow currents arising from imperfect normal stress balance at the interface. This has been demonstrated through the standard test problem of an inviscid droplet placed in a quiescent medium. Finally, the direct curvature estimation ability of the current algorithm is illustrated through the coupled multiphase flow problem of a deformable air bubble rising through a column of water.

  14. Nonlinear dual reconstruction of SPECT activity and attenuation images.

    Liu, Huafeng; Guo, Min; Hu, Zhenghui; Shi, Pengcheng; Hu, Hongjie

    2014-01-01

    In single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), accurate attenuation maps are needed to perform essential attenuation compensation for high quality radioactivity estimation. Formulating the SPECT activity and attenuation reconstruction tasks as coupled signal estimation and system parameter identification problems, where the activity distribution and the attenuation parameter are treated as random variables with known prior statistics, we present a nonlinear dual reconstruction scheme based on the unscented Kalman filtering (UKF) principles. In this effort, the dynamic changes of the organ radioactivity distribution are described through state space evolution equations, while the photon-counting SPECT projection data are measured through the observation equations. Activity distribution is then estimated with sub-optimal fixed attenuation parameters, followed by attenuation map reconstruction given these activity estimates. Such coupled estimation processes are iteratively repeated as necessary until convergence. The results obtained from Monte Carlo simulated data, physical phantom, and real SPECT scans demonstrate the improved performance of the proposed method both from visual inspection of the images and a quantitative evaluation, compared to the widely used EM-ML algorithms. The dual estimation framework has the potential to be useful for estimating the attenuation map from emission data only and thus benefit the radioactivity reconstruction. PMID:25225796

  15. A new Level-set based Protocol for Accurate Bone Segmentation from CT Imaging

    Pinheiro, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    In this work it is proposed a medical image segmentation pipeline for accurate bone segmentation from CT imaging. It is a two-step methodology, with a pre-segmentation step and a segmentation refinement step. First, the user performs a rough segmenting of the desired region of interest. Next, a fully automatic refinement step is applied to the pre-segmented data. The automatic segmentation refinement is composed by several sub-stpng, namely image deconvolution, image cropping and interpolation. The user-defined pre-segmentation is then refined over the deconvolved, cropped, and up-sampled version of the image. The algorithm is applied in the segmentation of CT images of a composite femur bone, reconstructed with different reconstruction protocols. Segmentation outcomes are validated against a gold standard model obtained with coordinate measuring machine Nikon Metris LK V20 with a digital line scanner LC60-D that guarantees an accuracy of 28 $\\mu m$. High sub-pixel accuracy models were obtained for all tested...

  16. Three dimensional reconstruction of continuous ICT images by MATLAB

    The three dimensional (3D) reconstruction of industrial computed tomography (ICT) images plays an important role in non-destructive test (NDT). In this paper, the 3D reconstruction work of a serial of continuous ICT images was done by MATLAB. The reconstructed cubic image was good. The inner structures of the object can be watched by divided and transparently displayed images. And more information of the detected object can be achieved. (authors)

  17. On the Use of Uavs in Mining and Archaeology - Geo-Accurate 3d Reconstructions Using Various Platforms and Terrestrial Views

    Tscharf, A.; Rumpler, M.; Fraundorfer, F.; Mayer, G.; Bischof, H.

    2015-08-01

    During the last decades photogrammetric computer vision systems have been well established in scientific and commercial applications. Especially the increasing affordability of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) in conjunction with automated multi-view processing pipelines have resulted in an easy way of acquiring spatial data and creating realistic and accurate 3D models. With the use of multicopter UAVs, it is possible to record highly overlapping images from almost terrestrial camera positions to oblique and nadir aerial images due to the ability to navigate slowly, hover and capture images at nearly any possible position. Multi-copter UAVs thus are bridging the gap between terrestrial and traditional aerial image acquisition and are therefore ideally suited to enable easy and safe data collection and inspection tasks in complex or hazardous environments. In this paper we present a fully automated processing pipeline for precise, metric and geo-accurate 3D reconstructions of complex geometries using various imaging platforms. Our workflow allows for georeferencing of UAV imagery based on GPS-measurements of camera stations from an on-board GPS receiver as well as tie and control point information. Ground control points (GCPs) are integrated directly in the bundle adjustment to refine the georegistration and correct for systematic distortions of the image block. We discuss our approach based on three different case studies for applications in mining and archaeology and present several accuracy related analyses investigating georegistration, camera network configuration and ground sampling distance. Our approach is furthermore suited for seamlessly matching and integrating images from different view points and cameras (aerial and terrestrial as well as inside views) into one single reconstruction. Together with aerial images from a UAV, we are able to enrich 3D models by combining terrestrial images as well inside views of an object by joint image processing to

  18. Image reconstruction exploiting object sparsity in boundary-enhanced X-ray phase-contrast tomography.

    Sidky, Emil Y; Anastasio, Mark A; Pan, Xiaochuan

    2010-05-10

    Propagation-based X-ray phase-contrast tomography (PCT) seeks to reconstruct information regarding the complex-valued refractive index distribution of an object. In many applications, a boundary-enhanced image is sought that reveals the locations of discontinuities in the real-valued component of the refractive index distribution. We investigate two iterative algorithms for few-view image reconstruction in boundary-enhanced PCT that exploit the fact that a boundary-enhanced PCT image, or its gradient, is often sparse. In order to exploit object sparseness, the reconstruction algorithms seek to minimize the l(1)-norm or TV-norm of the image, subject to data consistency constraints. We demonstrate that the algorithms can reconstruct accurate boundary-enhanced images from highly incomplete few-view projection data. PMID:20588896

  19. Three-dimensional reconstruction of laser-imploded targets from simulated pinhole images.

    Xu, Peng; Bai, Yonglin; Bai, Xiaohong; Liu, Baiyu; Ouyang, Xian; Wang, Bo; Yang, Wenzheng; Gou, Yongsheng; Zhu, Bingli; Qin, Junjun

    2012-11-10

    This paper proposes an integral method to achieve a more accurate weighting matrix that makes very positive contributions to the image reconstruction in inertial confinement fusion research. Standard algebraic reconstruction techniques with a positivity constraint included are utilized. The final normalized mean-square error between the simulated and reconstructed projection images is 0.000365%, which is a nearly perfect result, indicating that the weighting matrix is very important. Compared with the error between the simulated and reconstructed phantoms, which is 2.35%, it seems that the improvement of the accuracy of the projection image does not mean the improvement of the phantom. The proposed method can reconstruct a simulated laser-imploded target consisting of 100×100×100 voxels. PMID:23142895

  20. Prior image constrained image reconstruction in emerging computed tomography applications

    Brunner, Stephen T.

    Advances have been made in computed tomography (CT), especially in the past five years, by incorporating prior images into the image reconstruction process. In this dissertation, we investigate prior image constrained image reconstruction in three emerging CT applications: dual-energy CT, multi-energy photon-counting CT, and cone-beam CT in image-guided radiation therapy. First, we investigate the application of Prior Image Constrained Compressed Sensing (PICCS) in dual-energy CT, which has been called "one of the hottest research areas in CT." Phantom and animal studies are conducted using a state-of-the-art 64-slice GE Discovery 750 HD CT scanner to investigate the extent to which PICCS can enable radiation dose reduction in material density and virtual monochromatic imaging. Second, we extend the application of PICCS from dual-energy CT to multi-energy photon-counting CT, which has been called "one of the 12 topics in CT to be critical in the next decade." Numerical simulations are conducted to generate multiple energy bin images for a photon-counting CT acquisition and to investigate the extent to which PICCS can enable radiation dose efficiency improvement. Third, we investigate the performance of a newly proposed prior image constrained scatter correction technique to correct scatter-induced shading artifacts in cone-beam CT, which, when used in image-guided radiation therapy procedures, can assist in patient localization, and potentially, dose verification and adaptive radiation therapy. Phantom studies are conducted using a Varian 2100 EX system with an on-board imager to investigate the extent to which the prior image constrained scatter correction technique can mitigate scatter-induced shading artifacts in cone-beam CT. Results show that these prior image constrained image reconstruction techniques can reduce radiation dose in dual-energy CT by 50% in phantom and animal studies in material density and virtual monochromatic imaging, can lead to radiation

  1. SU-E-I-73: Clinical Evaluation of CT Image Reconstructed Using Interior Tomography

    Purpose: Radiation dose reduction has been a long standing challenge in CT imaging of obese patients. Recent advances in interior tomography (reconstruction of an interior region of interest (ROI) from line integrals associated with only paths through the ROI) promise to achieve significant radiation dose reduction without compromising image quality. This study is to investigate the application of this technique in CT imaging through evaluating imaging quality reconstructed from patient data. Methods: Projection data were directly obtained from patients who had CT examinations in a Dual Source CT scanner (DSCT). Two detectors in a DSCT acquired projection data simultaneously. One detector provided projection data for full field of view (FOV, 50 cm) while another detectors provided truncated projection data for a FOV of 26 cm. Full FOV CT images were reconstructed using both filtered back projection and iterative algorithm; while interior tomography algorithm was implemented to reconstruct ROI images. For comparison reason, FBP was also used to reconstruct ROI images. Reconstructed CT images were evaluated by radiologists and compared with images from CT scanner. Results: The results show that the reconstructed ROI image was in excellent agreement with the truth inside the ROI, obtained from images from CT scanner, and the detailed features in the ROI were quantitatively accurate. Radiologists evaluation shows that CT images reconstructed with interior tomography met diagnosis requirements. Radiation dose may be reduced up to 50% using interior tomography, depending on patient size. Conclusion: This study shows that interior tomography can be readily employed in CT imaging for radiation dose reduction. It may be especially useful in imaging obese patients, whose subcutaneous tissue is less clinically relevant but may significantly increase radiation dose

  2. Model-based reconstruction for illumination variation in face images

    B. J. Boom; L. J. Spreeuwers; Veldhuis, R.N.J.

    2008-01-01

    We propose a novel method to correct for arbitrary illumination variation in the face images. The main purpose is to improve recognition results of face images taken under uncontrolled illumination conditions. We correct the illumination variation in the face images using a face shape model, which allows us to estimate the face shape in the face image. Using this face shape, we can reconstruct a face image under frontal illumination. These reconstructed images improve the results in face iden...

  3. Optimized Quasi-Interpolators for Image Reconstruction.

    Sacht, Leonardo; Nehab, Diego

    2015-12-01

    We propose new quasi-interpolators for the continuous reconstruction of sampled images, combining a narrowly supported piecewise-polynomial kernel and an efficient digital filter. In other words, our quasi-interpolators fit within the generalized sampling framework and are straightforward to use. We go against standard practice and optimize for approximation quality over the entire Nyquist range, rather than focusing exclusively on the asymptotic behavior as the sample spacing goes to zero. In contrast to previous work, we jointly optimize with respect to all degrees of freedom available in both the kernel and the digital filter. We consider linear, quadratic, and cubic schemes, offering different tradeoffs between quality and computational cost. Experiments with compounded rotations and translations over a range of input images confirm that, due to the additional degrees of freedom and the more realistic objective function, our new quasi-interpolators perform better than the state of the art, at a similar computational cost. PMID:26390452

  4. How accurately can digital images depict conventional radiographs

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate how accurately the video image of a digitized chest radiograph can depict normal anatomic configurations of thoracic organs seen on a conventional radiograph. These configurations are important to diagnosis of diseases of the chest. Chest radiographs of 50 individuals diagnosed as normal were analyzed. Three chest physicians and one radiologist reviewed 50 pairs of digitized images (digitized in 0.125-mm pixel size, 10-bit gray scale, displayed on 1,024 x 1.536, 8-bit gray scale) constructed and conventional films. The visibility of eight structures (spinal process, trachea, right and left main bronchus, anterior tip of right fourth rib, vessels behind diaphragm and cardiac shadow, and descending aorta behind heart) was graded into five levels of confidence

  5. Modeling of polychromatic attenuation using computed tomography reconstructed images

    Yan, C. H.; Whalen, R. T.; Beaupre, G. S.; Yen, S. Y.; Napel, S.

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents a procedure for estimating an accurate model of the CT imaging process including spectral effects. As raw projection data are typically unavailable to the end-user, we adopt a post-processing approach that utilizes the reconstructed images themselves. This approach includes errors from x-ray scatter and the nonidealities of the built-in soft tissue correction into the beam characteristics, which is crucial to beam hardening correction algorithms that are designed to be applied directly to CT reconstructed images. We formulate this approach as a quadratic programming problem and propose two different methods, dimension reduction and regularization, to overcome ill conditioning in the model. For the regularization method we use a statistical procedure, Cross Validation, to select the regularization parameter. We have constructed step-wedge phantoms to estimate the effective beam spectrum of a GE CT-I scanner. Using the derived spectrum, we computed the attenuation ratios for the wedge phantoms and found that the worst case modeling error is less than 3% of the corresponding attenuation ratio. We have also built two test (hybrid) phantoms to evaluate the effective spectrum. Based on these test phantoms, we have shown that the effective beam spectrum provides an accurate model for the CT imaging process. Last, we used a simple beam hardening correction experiment to demonstrate the effectiveness of the estimated beam profile for removing beam hardening artifacts. We hope that this estimation procedure will encourage more independent research on beam hardening corrections and will lead to the development of application-specific beam hardening correction algorithms.

  6. Image reconstruction design of industrial CT instrument for teaching

    Industrial CT instrument for teaching is applied to teaching and study in field of physics and radiology major, image reconstruction is an important part of software on CT instrument. The paper expatiate on CT physical theory and first generation CT reconstruction algorithm, describe scan process of industrial CT instrument for teaching; analyze image artifact as result of displacement of rotation center, implement method of center displacement correcting, design and complete image reconstruction software, application shows that reconstructed image is very clear and qualitatively high. (authors)

  7. Visual image reconstruction from human brain activity: A modular decoding approach

    Brain activity represents our perceptual experience. But the potential for reading out perceptual contents from human brain activity has not been fully explored. In this study, we demonstrate constraint-free reconstruction of visual images perceived by a subject, from the brain activity pattern. We reconstructed visual images by combining local image bases with multiple scales, whose contrasts were independently decoded from fMRI activity by automatically selecting relevant voxels and exploiting their correlated patterns. Binary-contrast, 10 x 10-patch images (2100 possible states), were accurately reconstructed without any image prior by measuring brain activity only for several hundred random images. The results suggest that our approach provides an effective means to read out complex perceptual states from brain activity while discovering information representation in multi-voxel patterns.

  8. Gibbs artifact reduction for POCS super-resolution image reconstruction

    Chuangbai XIAO; Jing YU; Kaina SU

    2008-01-01

    The topic of super-resolution image reconstruc-tion has recently received considerable attention among the research community. Super-resolution image reconstruc-tion methods attempt to create a single high-resolution image from a number of low-resolution images (or a video sequence). The method of projections onto convex sets (POCS) for super-resolution image reconstruction attracts many researchers' attention. In this paper, we propose an improvement to reduce the amount of Gibbs artifacts pre-senting on the edges of the high-resolution image recon-structed by the POCS method. The proposed method weights the blur PSF centered at an edge pixel with an exponential function, and consequently decreases the coef-ficients of the PSF in the direction orthogonal to the edge. Experiment results show that the modification reduces effectively the visibility of Gibbs artifacts on edges and improves obviously the quality of the reconstructed high-resolution image.

  9. Image Reconstruction from Truncated Data in Single-Photon Emission Computed Tomomgraphy with Uniform Attenuation

    Noo, Frederic; Defrise, Michel; Pack, Jed; Clackdoyle, Rolf

    2007-01-01

    We present a mathematical analysis of the problem of image reconstruction from truncated data in two-dimensional (2D) single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Recent results in classical tomography have shown that accurate reconstruction of some parts of the object is possible in the presence of truncation. We have investigated how these results extend to 2D parallel-beam SPECT, assuming that the attenuation map is known and constant in a convex region $\\Omega$ that includes all ac...

  10. Improvement of reconstructed image quality of neutron computed tomography

    Neutron computed tomography has been studied. Endeavor has been given to obtain high image quality of CT reconstruction. Film method is comparatively preferred to dynamic neutron TV one. Some models for nuclear fuels have been reconstructed. Dispersion of 300 μm Eu-particles in TiO2 pellets, which simulate PuO2/UO2 nuclear fuel, have been reconstructed

  11. Optimization of CT image reconstruction algorithms for the lung tissue research consortium (LTRC)

    McCollough, Cynthia; Zhang, Jie; Bruesewitz, Michael; Bartholmai, Brian

    2006-03-01

    To create a repository of clinical data, CT images and tissue samples and to more clearly understand the pathogenetic features of pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema, the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) launched a cooperative effort known as the Lung Tissue Resource Consortium (LTRC). The CT images for the LTRC effort must contain accurate CT numbers in order to characterize tissues, and must have high-spatial resolution to show fine anatomic structures. This study was performed to optimize the CT image reconstruction algorithms to achieve these criteria. Quantitative analyses of phantom and clinical images were conducted. The ACR CT accreditation phantom containing five regions of distinct CT attenuations (CT numbers of approximately -1000 HU, -80 HU, 0 HU, 130 HU and 900 HU), and a high-contrast spatial resolution test pattern, was scanned using CT systems from two manufacturers (General Electric (GE) Healthcare and Siemens Medical Solutions). Phantom images were reconstructed using all relevant reconstruction algorithms. Mean CT numbers and image noise (standard deviation) were measured and compared for the five materials. Clinical high-resolution chest CT images acquired on a GE CT system for a patient with diffuse lung disease were reconstructed using BONE and STANDARD algorithms and evaluated by a thoracic radiologist in terms of image quality and disease extent. The clinical BONE images were processed with a 3 x 3 x 3 median filter to simulate a thicker slice reconstructed in smoother algorithms, which have traditionally been proven to provide an accurate estimation of emphysema extent in the lungs. Using a threshold technique, the volume of emphysema (defined as the percentage of lung voxels having a CT number lower than -950 HU) was computed for the STANDARD, BONE, and BONE filtered. The CT numbers measured in the ACR CT Phantom images were accurate for all reconstruction kernels for both manufacturers. As expected, visual evaluation of the

  12. Image reconstruction for field-focusing capacitance imaging

    For online monitoring of multi-phase flows of non-conductive materials, a field-focusing capacitance imaging system has been developed. With a field focusing capacitance sensor, a tomographic image based on capacitance measurements is used directly to map the material distribution. However, it is difficult to achieve a required accuracy for measurement of void fraction from the capacitance image, because of the soft-field effect of the capacitance sensor. In this paper, the forward and inverse problems with a field-focusing capacitance sensor are described. Simulation and experimental results show that deconvolution-based algorithms can reduce the blurring artefact and can reconstruct an image close to the original distribution

  13. Photogrammetric 3D reconstruction using mobile imaging

    Fritsch, Dieter; Syll, Miguel

    2015-03-01

    In our paper we demonstrate the development of an Android Application (AndroidSfM) for photogrammetric 3D reconstruction that works on smartphones and tablets likewise. The photos are taken with mobile devices, and can thereafter directly be calibrated using standard calibration algorithms of photogrammetry and computer vision, on that device. Due to still limited computing resources on mobile devices, a client-server handshake using Dropbox transfers the photos to the sever to run AndroidSfM for the pose estimation of all photos by Structure-from-Motion and, thereafter, uses the oriented bunch of photos for dense point cloud estimation by dense image matching algorithms. The result is transferred back to the mobile device for visualization and ad-hoc on-screen measurements.

  14. Reconstruction from gamma radiography and ultrasonic images

    This work deals with the three-dimensional reconstruction from gamma radiographic and ultrasonic images. Such an issue belongs to the field of data fusion since the data provide complementary information. The two sets of data are independently related to two sets of parameters: gamma ray attenuation and ultrasonic reflectivity. The fusion problem is addressed in a Bayesian framework; the kingpin of the task is then to define a joint a priori model for both attenuation and reflectivity. Thus, the developing of this model and the entailed joint estimation constitute the principal contribution of this work. The results of real data treatments demonstrate the validity of this method as compared to a sequential approach of the two sets of data

  15. 鞍形CT的感兴趣区图像重建%ROI-image Reconstruction for a Saddle Trajectory

    夏丹; 余立锋; 邹宇

    2005-01-01

    Recently, we have developed a general formula for 3D cone-beam CT reconstruction, which can accommondate general, smooth trajectories. From the formula, algorithms can be derived for image reconstruction within a region of interest (ROI) from truncated data. In this work, we apply the derived backprojection filteration (BPF) algorithm and the minimum-data filtered backprojection (MD-FBP) algorithm to reconstructing ROI images from cone-beam projection data acquired with a saddle trajec-tory. Our numerical results in these studies demonstrate that the BPF and MD-FBP algorithms can accurately reconstruct ROI images from truncated data.

  16. Total variation minimization-based multimodality medical image reconstruction

    Cui, Xuelin; Yu, Hengyong; Wang, Ge; Mili, Lamine

    2014-09-01

    Since its recent inception, simultaneous image reconstruction for multimodality fusion has received a great deal of attention due to its superior imaging performance. On the other hand, the compressed sensing (CS)-based image reconstruction methods have undergone a rapid development because of their ability to significantly reduce the amount of raw data. In this work, we combine computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) into a single CS-based reconstruction framework. From a theoretical viewpoint, the CS-based reconstruction methods require prior sparsity knowledge to perform reconstruction. In addition to the conventional data fidelity term, the multimodality imaging information is utilized to improve the reconstruction quality. Prior information in this context is that most of the medical images can be approximated as piecewise constant model, and the discrete gradient transform (DGT), whose norm is the total variation (TV), can serve as a sparse representation. More importantly, the multimodality images from the same object must share structural similarity, which can be captured by DGT. The prior information on similar distributions from the sparse DGTs is employed to improve the CT and MRI image quality synergistically for a CT-MRI scanner platform. Numerical simulation with undersampled CT and MRI datasets is conducted to demonstrate the merits of the proposed hybrid image reconstruction approach. Our preliminary results confirm that the proposed method outperforms the conventional CT and MRI reconstructions when they are applied separately.

  17. Model-Based Reconstructive Elasticity Imaging Using Ultrasound

    Salavat R. Aglyamov

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Elasticity imaging is a reconstructive imaging technique where tissue motion in response to mechanical excitation is measured using modern imaging systems, and the estimated displacements are then used to reconstruct the spatial distribution of Young's modulus. Here we present an ultrasound elasticity imaging method that utilizes the model-based technique for Young's modulus reconstruction. Based on the geometry of the imaged object, only one axial component of the strain tensor is used. The numerical implementation of the method is highly efficient because the reconstruction is based on an analytic solution of the forward elastic problem. The model-based approach is illustrated using two potential clinical applications: differentiation of liver hemangioma and staging of deep venous thrombosis. Overall, these studies demonstrate that model-based reconstructive elasticity imaging can be used in applications where the geometry of the object and the surrounding tissue is somewhat known and certain assumptions about the pathology can be made.

  18. Block-based reconstructions for compressive spectral imaging

    Correa, Claudia V.; Arguello, Henry; Arce, Gonzalo R.

    2013-05-01

    Coded Aperture Snapshot Spectral Imaging system (CASSI) captures spectral information of a scene using a reduced amount of focal plane array (FPA) projections. These projections are highly structured and localized such that each measurement contains information of a small portion of the data cube. Compressed sensing reconstruction algorithms are then used to recover the underlying 3-dimensional (3D) scene. The computational burden to recover a hyperspectral scene in CASSI is overwhelming for some applications such that reconstructions can take hours in desktop architectures. This paper presents a new method to reconstruct a hyperspectral signal from its compressive measurements using several overlapped block reconstructions. This approach exploits the structure of the CASSI sensing matrix to separately reconstruct overlapped regions of the 3D scene. The resultant reconstructions are then assembled to obtain the full recovered data cube. Typically, block-processing causes undesired artifacts in the recovered signal. Vertical and horizontal overlaps between adjacent blocks are then used to avoid these artifacts and increase the quality of reconstructed images. The reconstruction time and the quality of the reconstructed images are calculated as a function of the block-size and the amount of overlapped regions. Simulations show that the quality of the reconstructions is increased up to 6 dB and the reconstruction time is reduced up to 4 times when using block-based reconstruction instead of full data cube recovery at once. The proposed method is suitable for multi-processor architectures in which each core recovers one block at a time.

  19. MR imaging of the augmented and reconstructed breast

    Full text: Introduction: Various diagnostic methods are used to assess the changes in both the integrity of the implant, and the fibrous capsule of breast parenchyma. MRI has advantages over other diagnostic methods providing high tissue contrast, multi-faceted imaging and lack of ionizing radiation. What you will learn: MRI evaluation of breast augmentation approaches and their complications, MRI assessment of disease with malignant and benign characteristics in patients with breast implants, MRI assessment of breast reconstruction with autologous tissue. Discussion: Mammography after augmentation and reconstructive mammoplasty is hampered by the deformation of the breast parenchyma of the implant and the reduced compression. Postoperative scarring is also difficult to assess. MRI evaluation of implant rupture is accurate using the findings specific to it - linguine sign, teardrop sign or siliconomas. According to Gorczyca et al. MRI has a sensitivity 94% and specificity 97% in the evaluation of rupture. MRI mammography is highly sensitive - between 90 and 95%, in the detection of malignant, but it has limited specificity, which is its disadvantage. Malignant lesions can be represented as fibroadenomas, postoperative and inflammatory changes. Conclusion: Difficulties in the diagnosis of rupture of the implant, the primary and recurrent carcinoma based on clinical examination and inconclusive data from mammography and ultrasound imaging make MRI the method of choice in the evaluation of patients with breast implants

  20. Current profile reconstruction using X-ray imaging on the PEGASUS toroidal experiment

    Tritz, Kevin Lee

    Internal plasma profiles, specifically the current profile, are necessary to accurately characterize the plasma equilibrium and perform detailed stability analyses of magnetically confined toroidal plasmas. External magnetic measurements alone are not sufficient to properly constrain the current profile for an equilibrium reconstruction. This work confirms the insensitivity of the profiles to external magnetics and demonstrates the successful incorporation of tangential X-ray imaging into a modified equilibrium code for current profile reconstruction in highly shaped, low aspect-ratio plasmas. An equilibrium reconstruction code was developed that used two dimensional X-ray images to constrain a flexible spline parameterization of the plasma profiles. Image constraint modeling was performed with this code, demonstrating that the profiles were well constrained, with less than 10% deviation of the reconstructed central safety factor, if the image measurement noise was held below 2% for emissivity constraints, and below 1% for intensity constraints. Two tangential soft X-ray pinhole camera imaging systems, a transmissive and reflective phosphor design, were built and operated on the PEGASUS toroidal experiment. Intensity image contours from these systems were used to constrain equilibrium reconstructions of the plasma discharge. The shapes and values of the q profiles determined by these reconstructions correspond well with the presence of coherent MHD activity observed in the plasmas. A comparison of the X-ray intensity-constrained equilibria with the external-magnetics-only reconstructions showed good agreement between most gross plasma parameters, but large variation between the reconstructed profiles. A next generation X-ray imaging system was designed to provide higher sensitivity, a more compact form factor, and multiple time point capability. The increased sensitivity will allow the variance of the experimental reconstructed profiles to achieve the level

  1. Superiority of CT imaging reconstruction on Linux OS

    Objective: To compare the speed of CT reconstruction using the Linux and Windows OS. Methods: Shepp-Logan head phantom in different pixel size was projected to obtain the sinogram by using the inverse Fourier transformation, filtered back projection and Radon transformation on both Linux and Windows OS. Results: CT image reconstruction using the Linux operating system was significantly better and more efficient than Windows. Conclusion: CT image reconstruction using the Linux operating system is more efficient. (authors)

  2. Fully Automatic 3D Reconstruction of Histological Images

    Bagci, Ulas; Bai, Li

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a computational framework for 3D volume reconstruction from 2D histological slices using registration algorithms in feature space. To improve the quality of reconstructed 3D volume, first, intensity variations in images are corrected by an intensity standardization process which maps image intensity scale to a standard scale where similar intensities correspond to similar tissues. Second, a subvolume approach is proposed for 3D reconstruction by dividing standardized...

  3. Numerical modelling and image reconstruction in diffuse optical tomography

    Dehghani, Hamid; Srinivasan, Subhadra; Pogue, Brian W.; Gibson, Adam

    2009-01-01

    The development of diffuse optical tomography as a functional imaging modality has relied largely on the use of model-based image reconstruction. The recovery of optical parameters from boundary measurements of light propagation within tissue is inherently a difficult one, because the problem is nonlinear, ill-posed and ill-conditioned. Additionally, although the measured near-infrared signals of light transmission through tissue provide high imaging contrast, the reconstructed images suffer ...

  4. Reconstruction of Optical Thickness from Hoffman Modulation Contrast Images

    Olsen, Niels Holm; Sporring, Jon; Nielsen, Mads; Hnida, Christina; Ziebe, Søren

    Hoffman microscopy imaging systems are part of numerous fertility clinics world-wide. We discuss the physics of the Hoffman imaging system from optical thickness to image intensity, implement a simple, yet fast, reconstruction algorithm using Fast Fourier Transformation and discuss the usability ...... the method on a number of cells from a human embryo. Novelty is identifying the non-linearity of a typical Hoffman imaging system, and the application of Fourier Transformation to reconstruct the optical thickness....

  5. Imaging of limb salvage surgery and pelvic reconstruction following resection of malignant bone tumours

    Highlights: • Advances in reconstructive orthopaedic techniques now allow for limb salvage and prosthetic reconstruction procedures to be performed on patients who would otherwise be required to undergo debilitating limb amputations for malignant bone tumours. • The resulting post-operative imaging of such cases can be daunting for the radiologist to interpret, particularly in the presence of distorted anatomy and unfamiliar hardware. • This article reviews the indications for limb salvage surgery, prosthetic reconstruction devices involved, expected post-operative imaging findings, as well as the potential hardware related complications that may be encountered in the management of such cases. • By being aware of the various types of reconstructive techniques used in limb salvage surgery as well as the potential complications, the reporting radiologist should possess greater confidence in making an accurate assessment of the expected post-operative imaging findings in the management of such cases. - Abstract: Advances in reconstructive orthopaedic techniques now allow for limb salvage and prosthetic reconstruction procedures to be performed on patients who would otherwise be required to undergo debilitating limb amputations for malignant bone tumours. The resulting post-operative imaging of such cases can be daunting for the radiologist to interpret, particularly in the presence of distorted anatomy and unfamiliar hardware. This article reviews the indications for limb salvage surgery, prosthetic reconstruction devices involved, expected post-operative imaging findings, as well as the potential hardware related complications that may be encountered in the management of such cases

  6. Imaging of limb salvage surgery and pelvic reconstruction following resection of malignant bone tumours

    Tan, Tien Jin, E-mail: tien_jin_tan@cgh.com.sg [Department of Radiology, Vancouver General Hospital, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Aljefri, Ahmad M. [Department of Radiology, Vancouver General Hospital, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Clarkson, Paul W.; Masri, Bassam A. [Department of Orthopaedics, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Ouellette, Hugue A.; Munk, Peter L.; Mallinson, Paul I. [Department of Radiology, Vancouver General Hospital, Vancouver, BC (Canada)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • Advances in reconstructive orthopaedic techniques now allow for limb salvage and prosthetic reconstruction procedures to be performed on patients who would otherwise be required to undergo debilitating limb amputations for malignant bone tumours. • The resulting post-operative imaging of such cases can be daunting for the radiologist to interpret, particularly in the presence of distorted anatomy and unfamiliar hardware. • This article reviews the indications for limb salvage surgery, prosthetic reconstruction devices involved, expected post-operative imaging findings, as well as the potential hardware related complications that may be encountered in the management of such cases. • By being aware of the various types of reconstructive techniques used in limb salvage surgery as well as the potential complications, the reporting radiologist should possess greater confidence in making an accurate assessment of the expected post-operative imaging findings in the management of such cases. - Abstract: Advances in reconstructive orthopaedic techniques now allow for limb salvage and prosthetic reconstruction procedures to be performed on patients who would otherwise be required to undergo debilitating limb amputations for malignant bone tumours. The resulting post-operative imaging of such cases can be daunting for the radiologist to interpret, particularly in the presence of distorted anatomy and unfamiliar hardware. This article reviews the indications for limb salvage surgery, prosthetic reconstruction devices involved, expected post-operative imaging findings, as well as the potential hardware related complications that may be encountered in the management of such cases.

  7. Evaluating image reconstruction methods for tumor detection performance in whole-body PET oncology imaging

    Lartizien, Carole; Kinahan, Paul E.; Comtat, Claude; Lin, Michael; Swensson, Richard G.; Trebossen, Regine; Bendriem, Bernard

    2000-04-01

    This work presents initial results from observer detection performance studies using the same volume visualization software tools that are used in clinical PET oncology imaging. Research into the FORE+OSEM and FORE+AWOSEM statistical image reconstruction methods tailored to whole- body 3D PET oncology imaging have indicated potential improvements in image SNR compared to currently used analytic reconstruction methods (FBP). To assess the resulting impact of these reconstruction methods on the performance of human observers in detecting and localizing tumors, we use a non- Monte Carlo technique to generate multiple statistically accurate realizations of 3D whole-body PET data, based on an extended MCAT phantom and with clinically realistic levels of statistical noise. For each realization, we add a fixed number of randomly located 1 cm diam. lesions whose contrast is varied among pre-calibrated values so that the range of true positive fractions is well sampled. The observer is told the number of tumors and, similar to the AFROC method, asked to localize all of them. The true positive fraction for the three algorithms (FBP, FORE+OSEM, FORE+AWOSEM) as a function of lesion contrast is calculated, although other protocols could be compared. A confidence level for each tumor is also recorded for incorporation into later AFROC analysis.

  8. Terrain reconstruction from Chang'e-3 PCAM images

    Wang, Wen-Rui; Ren, Xin; Wang, Fen-Fei; Liu, Jian-Jun; Li, Chun-Lai

    2015-07-01

    The existing terrain models that describe the local lunar surface have limited resolution and accuracy, which can hardly meet the needs of rover navigation, positioning and geological analysis. China launched the lunar probe Chang'e-3 in December, 2013. Chang'e-3 encompassed a lander and a lunar rover called “Yutu” (Jade Rabbit). A set of panoramic cameras were installed on the rover mast. After acquiring panoramic images of four sites that were explored, the terrain models of the local lunar surface with resolution of 0.02m were reconstructed. Compared with other data sources, the models derived from Chang'e-3 data were clear and accurate enough that they could be used to plan the route of Yutu. Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China.

  9. A fast algorithm for image reconstruction based on sparse decomposition

    YIN Zhongke; WANG Jianying; Pierre Vandergheynst

    2007-01-01

    It is very slow at present to reconstruct an image from its sparse decomposition results.To overcome this one of the main drawbacks in image sparse decomposition,the property of the energy distribution of atoms is studied in this paper.Based on the property that energy of most atoms is highly concentrated,an algorithm is proposed to fast reconstruct an image from atoms' parameters by limiting atom reconstruction calculating within the atom energy concentrating area.Moreover,methods for fast calculating atom energy and normalization are also put forward.The fast algorithm presented in this Paper improves the speed of the image reconstructing by approximately 32 times without degrading the reconstructed image quality.

  10. Concurrent image and dose reconstruction for image guided radiation therapy

    Sheng, Ke

    The importance of knowing the patient actual position is essential for intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). This procedure uses tightened margin and escalated tumor dose. In order to eliminate the uncertainty of the geometry in IMRT, daily imaging is prefered. The imaging dose, limited field of view and the imaging concurrency of the MVCT (mega-voltage computerized tomography) are investigated in this work. By applying partial volume imaging (PVI), imaging dose can be reduced for a region of interest (ROI) imaging. The imaging dose and the image quality are quantitatively balanced with inverse imaging dose planning. With PVI, 72% average imaging dose reduction was observed on a typical prostate patient case. The algebraic reconstruction technique (ART) based projection onto convex sets (POCS) shows higher robustness than filtered back projection when available imaging data is not complete and continuous. However, when the projection is continuous as in the actual delivery, a non-iterative wavelet based multiresolution local tomography (WMLT) is able to achieve 1% accuracy within the ROI. The reduction of imaging dose is dependent on the size of ROI. The improvement of concurrency is also discussed based on the combination of PVI and WMLT. Useful target images were acquired with treatment beams and the temporal resolution can be increased to 20 seconds in tomotherapy. The data truncation problem with the portal imager was also studied. Results show that the image quality is not adversely affected by truncation when WMLT is employed. When the online imaging is available, a perturbation dose calculation (PDC) that estimates the actual delivered dose is proposed. Corrected from the Fano's theorem, PDC counts the first order term in the density variation to calculate the internal and external anatomy change. Although change in the dose distribution that is caused by the internal organ motion is less than 1% for 6 MV beams, the external anatomy change has

  11. Study of image reconstruction using dynamic grids in tomographic gamma scanning

    In this paper, a new image reconstruction algorithm employing dynamic grids technique is proposed for tomographic gamma scanning. The key feature of the algorithm is the use of adaptive grid refinement in areas that indicate large values. Simulation results show that the application of dynamic grids has a good performance in emission reconstruction with a distinct advantage in the accurate positioning of the 'hot spots' and reducing the number of grids, but doesn't achieve a tangible improvement in transmission reconstruction. (authors)

  12. Improvement of fluorescence-enhanced optical tomography with improved optical filtering and accurate model-based reconstruction algorithms

    Lu, Yujie; Zhu, Banghe; Darne, Chinmay; Tan, I.-Chih; Rasmussen, John C.; Sevick-Muraca, Eva M.

    2011-12-01

    The goal of preclinical fluorescence-enhanced optical tomography (FEOT) is to provide three-dimensional fluorophore distribution for a myriad of drug and disease discovery studies in small animals. Effective measurements, as well as fast and robust image reconstruction, are necessary for extensive applications. Compared to bioluminescence tomography (BLT), FEOT may result in improved image quality through higher detected photon count rates. However, background signals that arise from excitation illumination affect the reconstruction quality, especially when tissue fluorophore concentration is low and/or fluorescent target is located deeply in tissues. We show that near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging with an optimized filter configuration significantly reduces the background noise. Model-based reconstruction with a high-order approximation to the radiative transfer equation further improves the reconstruction quality compared to the diffusion approximation. Improvements in FEOT are demonstrated experimentally using a mouse-shaped phantom with targets of pico- and subpico-mole NIR fluorescent dye.

  13. Depth-based selective image reconstruction using spatiotemporal image analysis

    Haga, Tetsuji; Sumi, Kazuhiko; Hashimoto, Manabu; Seki, Akinobu

    1999-03-01

    In industrial plants, a remote monitoring system which removes physical tour inspection is often considered desirable. However the image sequence given from the mobile inspection robot is hard to see because interested objects are often partially occluded by obstacles such as pillars or fences. Our aim is to improve the image sequence that increases the efficiency and reliability of remote visual inspection. We propose a new depth-based image processing technique, which removes the needless objects from the foreground and recovers the occluded background electronically. Our algorithm is based on spatiotemporal analysis that enables fine and dense depth estimation, depth-based precise segmentation, and accurate interpolation. We apply this technique to a real time sequence given from the mobile inspection robot. The resulted image sequence is satisfactory in that the operator can make correct visual inspection with less fatigue.

  14. Laminographic reconstruction from real-time radiographic images

    We report the application of digital laminography reconstruction methods to real-time radiographic (RTR) images. Multiple digital images were acquired with the part at several orientations. Several acquisition and reconstruction methods have been investigated and their effects on the depth resolution and signal-to-noise ratio of the reconstructed images are discussed. The standard method yields the best signal-to-noise but the worst depth separation; the extreme value method yields the best depth separation with a slight decrease in signal-to-noise; and the iterative method is a compromise between the two. Both the extreme value and iterative methods require care in properly normalizing the projection images

  15. Image Compression and Reconstruction using Cubic Spline Interpolation Technique

    R. Muthaiah

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A new dimension of image compression using random pixels of irregular sampling and image reconstruction using cubic-spline interpolation techniques proposed in this paper. It also covers the wide field of multimedia communication concerned with multimedia messaging (MMS and image transfer through mobile phones and tried to find a mechanism to transfer images with minimum bandwidth requirement. This method would provide a better efficiency both in pixel reconstruction and color reproduction. The discussion covers theoretical techniques of random pixel selection, transfer and implementation of efficient reconstruction with cubic spline interpolation.

  16. Accelerated gradient methods for total-variation-based CT image reconstruction

    Total-variation (TV)-based CT image reconstruction has shown experimentally to be capable of producing accurate reconstructions from sparse-view data. In particular TV-based reconstruction is well suited for images with piecewise nearly constant regions. Computationally, however, TV-based reconstruction is demanding, especially for 3D imaging, and the reconstruction from clinical data sets is far from being close to real-time. This is undesirable from a clinical perspective, and thus there is an incentive to accelerate the solution of the underlying optimization problem. The TV reconstruction can in principle be found by any optimization method, but in practice the large scale of the systems arising in CT image reconstruction preclude the use of memory-intensive methods such as Newton's method. The simple gradient method has much lower memory requirements, but exhibits prohibitively slow convergence. In the present work we address the question of how to reduce the number of gradient method iterations needed to achieve a high-accuracy TV reconstruction. We consider the use of two accelerated gradient-based methods, GPBB and UPN, to solve the 3D-TV minimization problem in CT image reconstruction. The former incorporates several heuristics from the optimization literature such as Barzilai-Borwein (BB) step size selection and nonmonotone line search. The latter uses a cleverly chosen sequence of auxiliary points to achieve a better convergence rate. The methods are memory efficient and equipped with a stopping criterion to ensure that the TV reconstruction has indeed been found. An implementation of the methods (in C with interface to Matlab) is available for download from http://www2.imm.dtu.dk/~pch/TVReg/. We compare the proposed methods with the standard gradient method, applied to a 3D test problem with synthetic few-view data. We find experimentally that for realistic parameters the proposed methods significantly outperform the standard gradient method. (orig.)

  17. Reconstruction of biofilm images: combining local and global structural parameters

    Resat, Haluk; Renslow, Ryan S.; Beyenal, Haluk

    2014-11-07

    Digitized images can be used for quantitative comparison of biofilms grown under different conditions. Using biofilm image reconstruction, it was previously found that biofilms with a completely different look can have nearly identical structural parameters and that the most commonly utilized global structural parameters were not sufficient to uniquely define these biofilms. Here, additional local and global parameters are introduced to show that these parameters considerably increase the reliability of the image reconstruction process. Assessment using human evaluators indicated that the correct identification rate of the reconstructed images increased from 50% to 72% with the introduction of the new parameters into the reconstruction procedure. An expanded set of parameters especially improved the identification of biofilm structures with internal orientational features and of structures in which colony sizes and spatial locations varied. Hence, the newly introduced structural parameter sets helped to better classify the biofilms by incorporating finer local structural details into the reconstruction process.

  18. Research on THz CT system and image reconstruction algorithm

    Li, Ming-liang; Wang, Cong; Cheng, Hong

    2009-07-01

    Terahertz Computed Tomography takes the advantages of not only high resolution in space and density without image overlap but also the capability of being directly used in digital processing and spectral analysis, which determine it to be a good choice in parameter detection for process control. But Diffraction and scattering of THz wave will obfuscate or distort the reconstructed image. In order to find the most effective reconstruction method to build THz CT model. Because of the expensive cost, a fan-shaped THz CT industrial detection system scanning model, which consists of 8 emitters and 32 receivers, is established based on studying infrared CT technology. The model contains control and interface, data collecting and image reconstruction sub-system. It analyzes all the sub-function modules then reconstructs images with algebraic reconstruction algorithm. The experimental result proves it to be an effective, efficient algorithm with high resolution and even better than back-projection method.

  19. Calibration and Image Reconstruction for the Hurricane Imaging Radiometer (HIRAD)

    Ruf, Christopher; Roberts, J. Brent; Biswas, Sayak; James, Mark W.; Miller, Timothy

    2012-01-01

    The Hurricane Imaging Radiometer (HIRAD) is a new airborne passive microwave synthetic aperture radiometer designed to provide wide swath images of ocean surface wind speed under heavy precipitation and, in particular, in tropical cyclones. It operates at 4, 5, 6 and 6.6 GHz and uses interferometric signal processing to synthesize a pushbroom imager in software from a low profile planar antenna with no mechanical scanning. HIRAD participated in NASA s Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes (GRIP) mission during Fall 2010 as its first science field campaign. HIRAD produced images of upwelling brightness temperature over a aprox 70 km swath width with approx 3 km spatial resolution. From this, ocean surface wind speed and column averaged atmospheric liquid water content can be retrieved across the swath. The calibration and image reconstruction algorithms that were used to verify HIRAD functional performance during and immediately after GRIP were only preliminary and used a number of simplifying assumptions and approximations about the instrument design and performance. The development and performance of a more detailed and complete set of algorithms are reported here.

  20. A comparison of manual neuronal reconstruction from biocytin histology or 2-photon imaging: morphometry and computer modeling

    Arne Vladimir Blackman; Stefan Grabuschnig; Robert Legenstein; Per Jesper Sjöström

    2014-01-01

    Accurate 3D reconstruction of neurons is vital for applications linking anatomy and physiology. Reconstructions are typically created using Neurolucida after biocytin histology (BH). An alternative inexpensive and fast method is to use freeware such as Neuromantic to reconstruct from fluorescence imaging (FI) stacks acquired using 2-photon laser-scanning microscopy during physiological recording. We compare these two methods with respect to morphometry, cell classification, and multicompartme...

  1. Compressed Sensing MR Image Reconstruction Exploiting TGV and Wavelet Sparsity

    Di Zhao; Huiqian Du; Yu Han; Wenbo Mei

    2014-01-01

    Compressed sensing (CS) based methods make it possible to reconstruct magnetic resonance (MR) images from undersampled measurements, which is known as CS-MRI. The reference-driven CS-MRI reconstruction schemes can further decrease the sampling ratio by exploiting the sparsity of the difference image between the target and the reference MR images in pixel domain. Unfortunately existing methods do not work well given that contrast changes are incorrectly estimated or motion compensation is inac...

  2. Tomographic images reconstruction and its applications in SPECT

    The basis of the filtered back projection algorithms for image reconstruction from one-dimensional projections are described. This method is applied to SPECT studies and the effects due to photon attenuation, Compton scattering, detector response and statistical noise are analysed. The results show the importance of a) the filtering procedure to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio of the reconstructed images, and b) the correction of the image artifacts due to the above mentioned effects to improve resolution and contrast. (Author)

  3. Sparse Reconstruction Schemes for Nonlinear Electromagnetic Imaging

    Desmal, Abdulla

    2016-03-01

    synthetically generated or actually measured scattered fields, show that the images recovered by these sparsity-regularized methods are sharper and more accurate than those produced by existing methods. The methods developed in this work have potential application areas ranging from oil/gas reservoir engineering to biological imaging where sparse domains naturally exist.

  4. Deep wideband single pointings and mosaics in radio interferometry - How accurately do we reconstruct intensities and spectral indices of faint sources?

    Rau, Urvashi; Owen, Frazer N

    2016-01-01

    Many deep wide-band wide-field radio interferometric surveys are being designed to accurately measure intensities, spectral indices and polarization properties of faint source populations. In this paper we compare various wideband imaging methods to evaluate the accuracy to which intensities and spectral indices of sources close to the confusion limit can be reconstructed. We simulated a wideband single-pointing (C-array, L-Band (1-2GHz)) and 46-pointing mosaic(D-array, C-Band (4-8GHz)) JVLA observation using realistic brightness distribution ranging from $1\\mu$Jy to $100m$Jy and time-,frequency-, polarization- and direction-dependent instrumental effects. The main results from these comparisons are (a) errors in the reconstructed intensities and spectral indices are larger for weaker sources even in the absence of simulated noise, (b) errors are systematically lower for joint reconstruction methods (such as MT-MFS) along with A-Projection for accurate primary beam correction, and (c) use of MT-MFS for image ...

  5. Neural portraits of perception: reconstructing face images from evoked brain activity.

    Cowen, Alan S; Chun, Marvin M; Kuhl, Brice A

    2014-07-01

    Recent neuroimaging advances have allowed visual experience to be reconstructed from patterns of brain activity. While neural reconstructions have ranged in complexity, they have relied almost exclusively on retinotopic mappings between visual input and activity in early visual cortex. However, subjective perceptual information is tied more closely to higher-level cortical regions that have not yet been used as the primary basis for neural reconstructions. Furthermore, no reconstruction studies to date have reported reconstructions of face images, which activate a highly distributed cortical network. Thus, we investigated (a) whether individual face images could be accurately reconstructed from distributed patterns of neural activity, and (b) whether this could be achieved even when excluding activity within occipital cortex. Our approach involved four steps. (1) Principal component analysis (PCA) was used to identify components that efficiently represented a set of training faces. (2) The identified components were then mapped, using a machine learning algorithm, to fMRI activity collected during viewing of the training faces. (3) Based on activity elicited by a new set of test faces, the algorithm predicted associated component scores. (4) Finally, these scores were transformed into reconstructed images. Using both objective and subjective validation measures, we show that our methods yield strikingly accurate neural reconstructions of faces even when excluding occipital cortex. This methodology not only represents a novel and promising approach for investigating face perception, but also suggests avenues for reconstructing 'offline' visual experiences-including dreams, memories, and imagination-which are chiefly represented in higher-level cortical areas. PMID:24650597

  6. Imaging biopsy composition at ACL reconstruction

    Pedersen DR

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Douglas R Pedersen,1,2 James A Martin,1,2 Daniel R Thedens,3 Noelle F Klocke,1,2 Nathaniel H Roberts,1 Jessica E Goetz,1 Annunziato Amendola1 1Department of Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation, 2Department of Biomedical Engineering, 3Department of Radiology, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, USA Purpose: Early-stage osteoarthritis (OA includes glycosaminoglycan (GAG loss and collagen disruption that cannot be seen on morphological magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. T1ρ MRI is a measurement that probes the low-frequency rate of exchange between protons of free water and those from water associated with macromolecules in the cartilage's extracellular matrix. While it has been hypothesized that increased water mobility resulting from early osteoarthritic changes cause elevated T1ρ MRI values, there remain several unknown mechanisms influencing T1ρ measurements in cartilage. The purpose of this work was to relate histological and biochemical metrics directly measured from osteochondral biopsies and fluid specimens with quantitative MRI-detected changes of in vivo cartilage composition. Patients and methods: Six young patients were enrolled an average of 41 days after acute anterior cruciate ligament (ACL rupture. Femoral trochlear groove osteochondral biopsies, serum, and synovial fluid were harvested during ACL reconstruction to complement a presurgery quantitative MRI study (T1ρ, T2, delayed gadolinium-enhanced MRI of cartilage [dGEMRIC] relaxation times. A high-resolution MRI scan of the excised osteochondral biopsy was also collected. Analyses of in vivo T1ρ images were compared with ex vivo T1ρ imaging, GAG assays and histological GAG distribution in the osteochondral biopsies, and direct measures of bone and cartilage turnover markers and "OA marker" 3B3 in serum and synovial fluid samples. Conclusion: T1ρ relaxation times in patients with a torn ACL were elevated from normal, indicating changes consistent with general fluid effusion after

  7. Quantitative image quality evaluation for cardiac CT reconstructions

    Tseng, Hsin-Wu; Fan, Jiahua; Kupinski, Matthew A.; Balhorn, William; Okerlund, Darin R.

    2016-03-01

    Maintaining image quality in the presence of motion is always desirable and challenging in clinical Cardiac CT imaging. Different image-reconstruction algorithms are available on current commercial CT systems that attempt to achieve this goal. It is widely accepted that image-quality assessment should be task-based and involve specific tasks, observers, and associated figures of merits. In this work, we developed an observer model that performed the task of estimating the percentage of plaque in a vessel from CT images. We compared task performance of Cardiac CT image data reconstructed using a conventional FBP reconstruction algorithm and the SnapShot Freeze (SSF) algorithm, each at default and optimal reconstruction cardiac phases. The purpose of this work is to design an approach for quantitative image-quality evaluation of temporal resolution for Cardiac CT systems. To simulate heart motion, a moving coronary type phantom synchronized with an ECG signal was used. Three different percentage plaques embedded in a 3 mm vessel phantom were imaged multiple times under motion free, 60 bpm, and 80 bpm heart rates. Static (motion free) images of this phantom were taken as reference images for image template generation. Independent ROIs from the 60 bpm and 80 bpm images were generated by vessel tracking. The observer performed estimation tasks using these ROIs. Ensemble mean square error (EMSE) was used as the figure of merit. Results suggest that the quality of SSF images is superior to the quality of FBP images in higher heart-rate scans.

  8. A 3D Model Reconstruction Method Using Slice Images

    LI Hong-an; KANG Bao-sheng

    2013-01-01

    Aiming at achieving the high accuracy 3D model from slice images, a new model reconstruction method using slice im-ages is proposed. Wanting to extract the outermost contours from slice images, the method of the improved GVF-Snake model with optimized force field and ray method is employed. And then, the 3D model is reconstructed by contour connection using the im-proved shortest diagonal method and judgment function of contour fracture. The results show that the accuracy of reconstruction 3D model is improved.

  9. Application of particle filtering algorithm in image reconstruction of EMT

    To improve the image quality of electromagnetic tomography (EMT), a new image reconstruction method of EMT based on a particle filtering algorithm is presented. Firstly, the principle of image reconstruction of EMT is analyzed. Then the search process for the optimal solution for image reconstruction of EMT is described as a system state estimation process, and the state space model is established. Secondly, to obtain the minimum variance estimation of image reconstruction, the optimal weights of random samples obtained from the state space are calculated from the measured information. Finally, simulation experiments with five different flow regimes are performed. The experimental results have shown that the average image error of reconstruction results obtained by the method mentioned in this paper is 42.61%, and the average correlation coefficient with the original image is 0.8706, which are much better than corresponding indicators obtained by LBP, Landweber and Kalman Filter algorithms. So, this EMT image reconstruction method has high efficiency and accuracy, and provides a new method and means for EMT research. (paper)

  10. Image Reconstruction Algorithm for Electrical Charge Tomography System

    M. F. Rahmat

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Many problems in scientific computing can be formulated as inverse problem. A vast majority of these problems are ill-posed problems. In Electrical Charge Tomography (EChT, normally the sensitivity matrix generated from forward modeling is very ill-condition. This condition posts difficulties to the inverse problem solution especially in the accuracy and stability of the image being reconstructed. The objective of this study is to reconstruct the image cross-section of the material in pipeline gravity dropped mode conveyor as well to solve the ill-condition of matrix sensitivity. Approach: Least Square with Regularization (LSR method had been introduced to reconstruct the image and the electrodynamics sensor was used to capture the data that installed around the pipe. Results: The images were validated using digital imaging technique and Singular Value Decomposition (SVD method. The results showed that image reconstructed by this method produces a good promise in terms of accuracy and stability. Conclusion: This implied that LSR method provides good and promising result in terms of accuracy and stability of the image being reconstructed. As a result, an efficient method for electrical charge tomography image reconstruction has been introduced.

  11. [Image quality evaluation of new image reconstruction methods applying the iterative reconstruction].

    Takata, Tadanori; Ichikawa, Katsuhiro; Hayashi, Hiroyuki; Mitsui, Wataru; Sakuta, Keita; Koshida, Haruka; Yokoi, Tomohiro; Matsubara, Kousuke; Horii, Jyunsei; Iida, Hiroji

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the image quality of an iterative reconstruction method, the iterative reconstruction in image space (IRIS), which was implemented in a 128-slices multi-detector computed tomography system (MDCT), Siemens Somatom Definition Flash (Definition). We evaluated image noise by standard deviation (SD) as many researchers did before, and in addition, we measured modulation transfer function (MTF), noise power spectrum (NPS), and perceptual low-contrast detectability using a water phantom including a low-contrast object with a 10 Hounsfield unit (HU) contrast, to evaluate whether the noise reduction of IRIS was effective. The SD and NPS were measured from the images of a water phantom. The MTF was measured from images of a thin metal wire and a bar pattern phantom with the bar contrast of 125 HU. The NPS of IRIS was lower than that of filtered back projection (FBP) at middle and high frequency regions. The SD values were reduced by 21%. The MTF of IRIS and FBP measured by the wire phantom coincided precisely. However, for the bar pattern phantom, the MTF values of IRIS at 0.625 and 0.833 cycle/mm were lower than those of FBP. Despite the reduction of the SD and the NPS, the low-contrast detectability study indicated no significant difference between IRIS and FBP. From these results, it was demonstrated that IRIS had the noise reduction performance with exact preservation for high contrast resolution and slight degradation of middle contrast resolution, and could slightly improve the low contrast detectability but with no significance. PMID:22516592

  12. Artificial neural network Radon inversion for image reconstruction

    Image reconstruction techniques are essential to computer tomography. Algorithms such as filtered backprojection (FBP) or algebraic techniques are most frequently used. This paper presents an attempt to apply a feed-forward back-propagation supervised artificial neural network (BPN) to tomographic image reconstruction, specifically to positron emission tomography (PET). The main result is that the network trained with Gaussian test images proved to be successful at reconstructing images from projection sets derived from arbitrary objects. Additional results relate to the design of the network and the full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the Gaussians in the training sets. First, the optimal number of nodes in the middle layer is about an order of magnitude less than the number of input or output nodes. Second, the number of iterations required to achieve a required training set tolerance appeared to decrease exponentially with the number of nodes in the middle layer. Finally, for training sets containing Gaussians of a single width, the optimal accuracy of reconstructing the control set is obtained with a FWHM of three pixels. Intended to explore feasibility, the BPN presented in the following does not provide reconstruction accuracy adequate for immediate application to PET. However, the trained network does reconstruct general images independent of the data with which it was trained. Proposed in the concluding section are several possible refinements that should permit the development of a network capable of fast reconstruction of three-dimensional images from the discrete, noisy projection data characteristic of PET

  13. Fully Automatic 3D Reconstruction of Histological Images

    Bagci, Ulas

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a computational framework for 3D volume reconstruction from 2D histological slices using registration algorithms in feature space. To improve the quality of reconstructed 3D volume, first, intensity variations in images are corrected by an intensity standardization process which maps image intensity scale to a standard scale where similar intensities correspond to similar tissues. Second, a subvolume approach is proposed for 3D reconstruction by dividing standardized slices into groups. Third, in order to improve the quality of the reconstruction process, an automatic best reference slice selection algorithm is developed based on an iterative assessment of image entropy and mean square error of the registration process. Finally, we demonstrate that the choice of the reference slice has a significant impact on registration quality and subsequent 3D reconstruction.

  14. Particle Image Velocimetry Measurements in Anatomically-Accurate Models of the Mammalian Nasal Cavity

    Rumple, C.; Richter, J.; Craven, B. A.; Krane, M.

    2012-11-01

    A summary of the research being carried out by our multidisciplinary team to better understand the form and function of the nose in different mammalian species that include humans, carnivores, ungulates, rodents, and marine animals will be presented. The mammalian nose houses a convoluted airway labyrinth, where two hallmark features of mammals occur, endothermy and olfaction. Because of the complexity of the nasal cavity, the anatomy and function of these upper airways remain poorly understood in most mammals. However, recent advances in high-resolution medical imaging, computational modeling, and experimental flow measurement techniques are now permitting the study of airflow and respiratory and olfactory transport phenomena in anatomically-accurate reconstructions of the nasal cavity. Here, we focus on efforts to manufacture transparent, anatomically-accurate models for stereo particle image velocimetry (SPIV) measurements of nasal airflow. Challenges in the design and manufacture of index-matched anatomical models are addressed and preliminary SPIV measurements are presented. Such measurements will constitute a validation database for concurrent computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of mammalian respiration and olfaction. Supported by the National Science Foundation.

  15. Sparsity-constrained PET image reconstruction with learned dictionaries

    Tang, Jing; Yang, Bao; Wang, Yanhua; Ying, Leslie

    2016-09-01

    PET imaging plays an important role in scientific and clinical measurement of biochemical and physiological processes. Model-based PET image reconstruction such as the iterative expectation maximization algorithm seeking the maximum likelihood solution leads to increased noise. The maximum a posteriori (MAP) estimate removes divergence at higher iterations. However, a conventional smoothing prior or a total-variation (TV) prior in a MAP reconstruction algorithm causes over smoothing or blocky artifacts in the reconstructed images. We propose to use dictionary learning (DL) based sparse signal representation in the formation of the prior for MAP PET image reconstruction. The dictionary to sparsify the PET images in the reconstruction process is learned from various training images including the corresponding MR structural image and a self-created hollow sphere. Using simulated and patient brain PET data with corresponding MR images, we study the performance of the DL-MAP algorithm and compare it quantitatively with a conventional MAP algorithm, a TV-MAP algorithm, and a patch-based algorithm. The DL-MAP algorithm achieves improved bias and contrast (or regional mean values) at comparable noise to what the other MAP algorithms acquire. The dictionary learned from the hollow sphere leads to similar results as the dictionary learned from the corresponding MR image. Achieving robust performance in various noise-level simulation and patient studies, the DL-MAP algorithm with a general dictionary demonstrates its potential in quantitative PET imaging.

  16. MR Image Reconstruction Using Block Matching and Adaptive Kernel Methods.

    Johannes F M Schmidt

    Full Text Available An approach to Magnetic Resonance (MR image reconstruction from undersampled data is proposed. Undersampling artifacts are removed using an iterative thresholding algorithm applied to nonlinearly transformed image block arrays. Each block array is transformed using kernel principal component analysis where the contribution of each image block to the transform depends in a nonlinear fashion on the distance to other image blocks. Elimination of undersampling artifacts is achieved by conventional principal component analysis in the nonlinear transform domain, projection onto the main components and back-mapping into the image domain. Iterative image reconstruction is performed by interleaving the proposed undersampling artifact removal step and gradient updates enforcing consistency with acquired k-space data. The algorithm is evaluated using retrospectively undersampled MR cardiac cine data and compared to k-t SPARSE-SENSE, block matching with spatial Fourier filtering and k-t ℓ1-SPIRiT reconstruction. Evaluation of image quality and root-mean-squared-error (RMSE reveal improved image reconstruction for up to 8-fold undersampled data with the proposed approach relative to k-t SPARSE-SENSE, block matching with spatial Fourier filtering and k-t ℓ1-SPIRiT. In conclusion, block matching and kernel methods can be used for effective removal of undersampling artifacts in MR image reconstruction and outperform methods using standard compressed sensing and ℓ1-regularized parallel imaging methods.

  17. MR Image Reconstruction Using Block Matching and Adaptive Kernel Methods.

    Schmidt, Johannes F M; Santelli, Claudio; Kozerke, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    An approach to Magnetic Resonance (MR) image reconstruction from undersampled data is proposed. Undersampling artifacts are removed using an iterative thresholding algorithm applied to nonlinearly transformed image block arrays. Each block array is transformed using kernel principal component analysis where the contribution of each image block to the transform depends in a nonlinear fashion on the distance to other image blocks. Elimination of undersampling artifacts is achieved by conventional principal component analysis in the nonlinear transform domain, projection onto the main components and back-mapping into the image domain. Iterative image reconstruction is performed by interleaving the proposed undersampling artifact removal step and gradient updates enforcing consistency with acquired k-space data. The algorithm is evaluated using retrospectively undersampled MR cardiac cine data and compared to k-t SPARSE-SENSE, block matching with spatial Fourier filtering and k-t ℓ1-SPIRiT reconstruction. Evaluation of image quality and root-mean-squared-error (RMSE) reveal improved image reconstruction for up to 8-fold undersampled data with the proposed approach relative to k-t SPARSE-SENSE, block matching with spatial Fourier filtering and k-t ℓ1-SPIRiT. In conclusion, block matching and kernel methods can be used for effective removal of undersampling artifacts in MR image reconstruction and outperform methods using standard compressed sensing and ℓ1-regularized parallel imaging methods. PMID:27116675

  18. Surface Reconstruction and Image Enhancement via $L^1$-Minimization

    Dobrev, Veselin

    2010-01-01

    A surface reconstruction technique based on minimization of the total variation of the gradient is introduced. Convergence of the method is established, and an interior-point algorithm solving the associated linear programming problem is introduced. The reconstruction algorithm is illustrated on various test cases including natural and urban terrain data, and enhancement oflow-resolution or aliased images. Copyright © by SIAM.

  19. Face reconstruction from image sequences for forensic face comparison

    Dam, van Chris; Veldhuis, Raymond; Spreeuwers, Luuk

    2015-01-01

    The authors explore the possibilities of a dense model-free three-dimensional (3D) face reconstruction method, based on image sequences from a single camera, to improve the current state of forensic face comparison. They propose a new model-free 3D reconstruction method for faces, based on the Lambe

  20. Reconstruction of a ring applicator using CT imaging: impact of the reconstruction method and applicator orientation

    The purpose of this study is to investigate whether the method of applicator reconstruction and/or the applicator orientation influence the dose calculation to points around the applicator for brachytherapy of cervical cancer with CT-based treatment planning. A phantom, containing a fixed ring applicator set and six lead pellets representing dose points, was used. The phantom was CT scanned with the ring applicator at four different angles related to the image plane. In each scan the applicator was reconstructed by three methods: (1) direct reconstruction in each image (DR) (2) reconstruction in multiplanar reconstructed images (MPR) and (3) library plans, using pre-defined applicator geometry (LIB). The doses to the lead pellets were calculated. The relative standard deviation (SD) for all reconstruction methods was less than 3.7% in the dose points. The relative SD for the LIB method was significantly lower (p < 0.05) than for the DR and MPR methods for all but two points. All applicator orientations had similar dose calculation reproducibility. Using library plans for applicator reconstruction gives the most reproducible dose calculation. However, with restrictive guidelines for applicator reconstruction the uncertainties for all methods are low compared to other factors influencing the accuracy of brachytherapy

  1. Combining Public Domain and Professional Panoramic Imagery for the Accurate and Dense 3d Reconstruction of the Destroyed Bel Temple in Palmyra

    Wahbeh, W.; Nebiker, S.; Fangi, G.

    2016-06-01

    This paper exploits the potential of dense multi-image 3d reconstruction of destroyed cultural heritage monuments by either using public domain touristic imagery only or by combining the public domain imagery with professional panoramic imagery. The focus of our work is placed on the reconstruction of the temple of Bel, one of the Syrian heritage monuments, which was destroyed in September 2015 by the so called "Islamic State". The great temple of Bel is considered as one of the most important religious buildings of the 1st century AD in the East with a unique design. The investigations and the reconstruction were carried out using two types of imagery. The first are freely available generic touristic photos collected from the web. The second are panoramic images captured in 2010 for documenting those monuments. In the paper we present a 3d reconstruction workflow for both types of imagery using state-of-the art dense image matching software, addressing the non-trivial challenges of combining uncalibrated public domain imagery with panoramic images with very wide base-lines. We subsequently investigate the aspects of accuracy and completeness obtainable from the public domain touristic images alone and from the combination with spherical panoramas. We furthermore discuss the challenges of co-registering the weakly connected 3d point cloud fragments resulting from the limited coverage of the touristic photos. We then describe an approach using spherical photogrammetry as a virtual topographic survey allowing the co-registration of a detailed and accurate single 3d model of the temple interior and exterior.

  2. Sparse representation and dictionary learning penalized image reconstruction for positron emission tomography

    Accurate and robust reconstruction of the radioactivity concentration is of great importance in positron emission tomography (PET) imaging. Given the Poisson nature of photo-counting measurements, we present a reconstruction framework that integrates sparsity penalty on a dictionary into a maximum likelihood estimator. Patch-sparsity on a dictionary provides the regularization for our effort, and iterative procedures are used to solve the maximum likelihood function formulated on Poisson statistics. Specifically, in our formulation, a dictionary could be trained on CT images, to provide intrinsic anatomical structures for the reconstructed images, or adaptively learned from the noisy measurements of PET. Accuracy of the strategy with very promising application results from Monte-Carlo simulations, and real data are demonstrated. (paper)

  3. Application of iterative image reconstruction to functional brain mapping

    Full text: The advantage of the iterative image reconstruction algorithms, such as the maximum likelihood expectation maximisation (ML-EM) algorithm in providing improved image signal-to-noise ratio (SNR)in the low count positron emission tomography (PET) studies makes it a suitable image reconstruction algorithm for PET functional brain mapping. The ML-EM algorithm improves the sensitivity and specificity of functional brain imaging compared to images reconstructed using the filtered back projection (FBP) algorithm. We optimised the ML-EM algorithm for maximum sensitivity with no loss of specificity (compared to the FBP algorithm) as a function of iteration number and t-value probability threshold. A receiver operating characteristic (ROC) for analysing a simulated 3D activation study was determined for each ML-EM iteration up to the twenty first iteration. At four ML-EM iterations and using a 0.05 t-value probability threshold, the ML-EM images identified the signal regions with 41% increased sensitivity and 6% decreased specificity compared to FBP images. Results for a human auditory stimulus activation study are also presented and discussed. In conclusion, the images reconstructed at four ML-EM iterations demonstrate improved statistical properties compared to images reconstructed using FBP algorithm

  4. Initial evaluation of discrete orthogonal basis reconstruction of ECT images

    Discrete orthogonal basis restoration (DOBR) is a linear, non-iterative, and robust method for solving inverse problems for systems characterized by shift-variant transfer functions. This simulation study evaluates the feasibility of using DOBR for reconstructing emission computed tomographic (ECT) images. The imaging system model uses typical SPECT parameters and incorporates the effects of attenuation, spatially-variant PSF, and Poisson noise in the projection process. Sample reconstructions and statistical error analyses for a class of digital phantoms compare the DOBR performance for Hartley and Walsh basis functions. Test results confirm that DOBR with either basis set produces images with good statistical properties. No problems were encountered with reconstruction instability. The flexibility of the DOBR method and its consistent performance warrants further investigation of DOBR as a means of ECT image reconstruction

  5. Generalized metrics induced anatomical prior for MAP PET image reconstruction

    Information theoretic metrics, including mutual information (MI) and joint entropy (JE), have been investigated as priors to incorporate anatomical information in ill-posed positron emission tomography (PET) image reconstruction. These metrics are generally based on the Shannon entropy. Meanwhile, in this paper, we proposed a generalized metrics induced anatomical prior for maximum a posteriori (MAP) PET reconstruction based on the generalized Shannon entropy metrics or Tsallis entropy. For the presented prior computation, a non-parametric method was used to estimate the joint probability density of the PET and MR image. Furthermore, we also developed an one-step-advance (OSA) MAP algorithm for PET image reconstruction with the presented prior regularization. Simulation results show that the presented novel prior has significantly improved the reconstructed PET image quality. (orig.)

  6. Online reconstruction of 3D magnetic particle imaging data.

    Knopp, T; Hofmann, M

    2016-06-01

    Magnetic particle imaging is a quantitative functional imaging technique that allows imaging of the spatial distribution of super-paramagnetic iron oxide particles at high temporal resolution. The raw data acquisition can be performed at frame rates of more than 40 volumes s(-1). However, to date image reconstruction is performed in an offline step and thus no direct feedback is available during the experiment. Considering potential interventional applications such direct feedback would be mandatory. In this work, an online reconstruction framework is implemented that allows direct visualization of the particle distribution on the screen of the acquisition computer with a latency of about 2 s. The reconstruction process is adaptive and performs block-averaging in order to optimize the signal quality for a given amount of reconstruction time. PMID:27182668

  7. Online reconstruction of 3D magnetic particle imaging data

    Knopp, T.; Hofmann, M.

    2016-06-01

    Magnetic particle imaging is a quantitative functional imaging technique that allows imaging of the spatial distribution of super-paramagnetic iron oxide particles at high temporal resolution. The raw data acquisition can be performed at frame rates of more than 40 volumes s‑1. However, to date image reconstruction is performed in an offline step and thus no direct feedback is available during the experiment. Considering potential interventional applications such direct feedback would be mandatory. In this work, an online reconstruction framework is implemented that allows direct visualization of the particle distribution on the screen of the acquisition computer with a latency of about 2 s. The reconstruction process is adaptive and performs block-averaging in order to optimize the signal quality for a given amount of reconstruction time.

  8. Homotopy Based Reconstruction from Acoustic Images

    Sharma, Ojaswa

    are reconstruction from an organised set of linear cross sections and reconstruction from an arbitrary set of linear cross sections. The first problem is looked upon in the context of acoustic signals wherein the cross sections show a definite geometric arrangement. A reconstruction in this case can...... take advantage of the inherent arrangement. The problem of reconstruction from arbitrary cross sections is a generic problem and is also shown to be solved here using the mathematical tool of continuous deformations. As part of a complete processing, segmentation using level set methods is explored for......This thesis presents work in the direction of generating smooth surfaces from linear cross sections embedded in R2 and R3 using homotopy continuation. The methods developed in this research are generic and can be applied to higher dimensions as well. Two types of problems addressed in this research...

  9. Image reconstruction for x-ray holographic microscopy

    The authors have demonstrated direct Fourier reconstruction of a simple three-dimensional object from multiple Fourier transform holograms recorded at different incidence angles. Following phase recovery of the scattered field based on the reference scatterer, the authors used standard diffraction tomography techniques to reconstruct the object scattering potential. For systems of low numerical aperture, algebraic techniques which assume straight rays were demonstrated to produce images with fewer reconstruction artifacts. These techniques allow the use of a priori knowledge of the object; this approach should be extended into diffraction-based reconstruction algorithms

  10. Progress toward the development and testing of source reconstruction methods for NIF neutron imaging

    Development of analysis techniques for neutron imaging at the National Ignition Facility is an important and difficult task for the detailed understanding of high-neutron yield inertial confinement fusion implosions. Once developed, these methods must provide accurate images of the hot and cold fuels so that information about the implosion, such as symmetry and areal density, can be extracted. One method under development involves the numerical inversion of the pinhole image using knowledge of neutron transport through the pinhole aperture from Monte Carlo simulations. In this article we present results of source reconstructions based on simulated images that test the methods effectiveness with regard to pinhole misalignment.

  11. Program package for accurate 3D field reconstruction from boundary measurements

    The problem of the magnetic field reconstruction inside a subregion in R3 from magnetic measurements on the closed boundary of this subregion is considered. The efficiency of the proposed method, algorithm and associated software for the precision magnet system is discussed. The results of the software verification, numerical experiments as well as the ones of the field reconstruction using boundary measurements in the magnet M1 of the separator COMBAS are given. Requirements to the position accuracy of sensors consistent with the required accuracy of the magnetic field reconstruction are defined. Recommendations on the magnetic scheme design for the field mapping are given. (author)

  12. Practically acquired and modified cone-beam computed tomography images for accurate dose calculation in head and neck cancer

    On-line cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) may be used to reconstruct the dose for geometric changes of patients and tumors during radiotherapy course. This study is to establish a practical method to modify the CBCT for accurate dose calculation in head and neck cancer. Fan-beam CT (FBCT) and Elekta's CBCT were used to acquire images. The CT numbers for different materials on CBCT were mathematically modified to match them with FBCT. Three phantoms were scanned by FBCT and CBCT for image uniformity, spatial resolution, and CT numbers, and to compare the dose distribution from orthogonal beams. A Rando phantom was scanned and planned with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Finally, two nasopharyngeal cancer patients treated with IMRT had their CBCT image sets calculated for dose comparison. With 360 acquisition of CBCT and high-resolution reconstruction, the uniformity of CT number distribution was improved and the otherwise large variations for background and high-density materials were reduced significantly. The dose difference between FBCT and CBCT was < 2% in phantoms. In the Rando phantom and the patients, the dose-volume histograms were similar. The corresponding isodose curves covering ≥ 90% of prescribed dose on FBCT and CBCT were close to each other (within 2 mm). Most dosimetric differences were from the setup errors related to the interval changes in body shape and tumor response. The specific CBCT acquisition, reconstruction, and CT number modification can generate accurate dose calculation for the potential use in adaptive radiotherapy.

  13. Practically acquired and modified cone-beam computed tomography images for accurate dose calculation in head and neck cancer

    Hu, Chih-Chung [National Taiwan Univ. Hospital and College of Medicine, Taipei (China). Division of Radiation Oncology; Yuanpei Univ., Hsinchu (China). Dept. of Radiological Technology; Huang, Wen-Tao [Yuanpei Univ., Hsinchu (China). Dept. of Radiological Technology; Tsai, Chiao-Ling; Chao, Hsiao-Ling; Huang, Guo-Ming; Wang, Chun-Wei [National Taiwan Univ. Hospital and College of Medicine, Taipei (China). Division of Radiation Oncology; Wu, Jian-Kuen [National Taiwan Univ. Hospital and College of Medicine, Taipei (China). Division of Radiation Oncology; National Taiwan Normal Univ., Taipei (China). Inst. of Electro-Optical Science and Technology; Wu, Chien-Jang [National Taiwan Normal Univ., Taipei (China). Inst. of Electro-Optical Science and Technology; Cheng, Jason Chia-Hsien [National Taiwan Univ. Hospital and College of Medicine, Taipei (China). Division of Radiation Oncology; National Taiwan Univ. Taipei (China). Graduate Inst. of Oncology; National Taiwan Univ. Taipei (China). Graduate Inst. of Clinical Medicine; National Taiwan Univ. Taipei (China). Graduate Inst. of Biomedical Electronics and Bioinformatics

    2011-10-15

    On-line cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) may be used to reconstruct the dose for geometric changes of patients and tumors during radiotherapy course. This study is to establish a practical method to modify the CBCT for accurate dose calculation in head and neck cancer. Fan-beam CT (FBCT) and Elekta's CBCT were used to acquire images. The CT numbers for different materials on CBCT were mathematically modified to match them with FBCT. Three phantoms were scanned by FBCT and CBCT for image uniformity, spatial resolution, and CT numbers, and to compare the dose distribution from orthogonal beams. A Rando phantom was scanned and planned with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Finally, two nasopharyngeal cancer patients treated with IMRT had their CBCT image sets calculated for dose comparison. With 360 acquisition of CBCT and high-resolution reconstruction, the uniformity of CT number distribution was improved and the otherwise large variations for background and high-density materials were reduced significantly. The dose difference between FBCT and CBCT was < 2% in phantoms. In the Rando phantom and the patients, the dose-volume histograms were similar. The corresponding isodose curves covering {>=} 90% of prescribed dose on FBCT and CBCT were close to each other (within 2 mm). Most dosimetric differences were from the setup errors related to the interval changes in body shape and tumor response. The specific CBCT acquisition, reconstruction, and CT number modification can generate accurate dose calculation for the potential use in adaptive radiotherapy.

  14. Total variation superiorization schemes in proton computed tomography image reconstruction

    Penfold, S N; Censor, Y; Rosenfeld, A B

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Iterative projection reconstruction algorithms are currently the preferred reconstruction method in proton computed tomography (pCT). However, due to inconsistencies in the measured data arising from proton energy straggling and multiple Coulomb scattering, noise in the reconstructed image increases with successive iterations. In the current work, we investigated the use of total variation superiorization (TVS) schemes that can be applied as an algorithmic add-on to perturbation-resilient iterative projection algorithms for pCT image reconstruction. Methods: The block-iterative diagonally relaxed orthogonal projections (DROP) algorithm was used for reconstructing Geant4 Monte Carlo simulated pCT data sets. Two TVS schemes added on to DROP were investigated; the first carried out the superiorization steps once per cycle and the second once per block. Simplifications of these schemes, involving the elimination of the computationally expensive feasibility proximity checking step of the TVS framework, we...

  15. Fast MR Spectroscopic Imaging Technologies and Data Reconstruction Methods

    HUANGMin; LUSong-tao; LINJia-rui; ZHANYing-jian

    2004-01-01

    MRSI plays a more and more important role in clinical application. In this paper, we compare several fast MRSI technologies and data reconstruction methods. For the conventional phase encoding MRSI, the data reconstruction using FFT is simple. But the data acquisition is very time consuming and thus prohibitive in clinical settings. Up to now, the MRSI technologies based on echo-planar, spiral trajectories and sensitivity encoding are the fastest in data acquisition, but their data reconstruction is complex. EPSI reconstruction uses shift of odd and even echoes. Spiral SI uses gridding FFT. SENSE-SI, a new approach to reducing the acquisition time, uses the distinct spatial sensitivities of the individual coil elements to recover the missing encoding information. These improvements in data acquisition and image reconstruction provide a potential value of metabolic imaging as a clinical tool.

  16. A novel building boundary reconstruction method based on lidar data and images

    Chen, Yiming; Zhang, Wuming; Zhou, Guoqing; Yan, Guangjian

    2013-09-01

    Building boundary is important for the urban mapping and real estate industry applications. The reconstruction of building boundary is also a significant but difficult step in generating city building models. As Light detection and ranging system (Lidar) can acquire large and dense point cloud data fast and easily, it has great advantages for building reconstruction. In this paper, we combine Lidar data and images to develop a novel building boundary reconstruction method. We use only one scan of Lidar data and one image to do the reconstruction. The process consists of a sequence of three steps: project boundary Lidar points to image; extract accurate boundary from image; and reconstruct boundary in Lidar points. We define a relationship between 3D points and the pixel coordinates. Then we extract the boundary in the image and use the relationship to get boundary in the point cloud. The method presented here reduces the difficulty of data acquisition effectively. The theory is not complex so it has low computational complexity. It can also be widely used in the data acquired by other 3D scanning devices to improve the accuracy. Results of the experiment demonstrate that this method has a clear advantage and high efficiency over others, particularly in the data with large point spacing.

  17. Accurate Image Retrieval Algorithm Based on Color and Texture Feature

    Chunlai Yan

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Content-Based Image Retrieval (CBIR is one of the most active hot spots in the current research field of multimedia retrieval. According to the description and extraction of visual content (feature of the image, CBIR aims to find images that contain specified content (feature in the image database. In this paper, several key technologies of CBIR, e. g. the extraction of the color and texture features of the image, as well as the similarity measures are investigated. On the basis of the theoretical research, an image retrieval system based on color and texture features is designed. In this system, the Weighted Color Feature based on HSV space is adopted as a color feature vector, four features of the Co-occurrence Matrix, saying Energy, Entropy, Inertia Quadrature and Correlation, are used to construct texture vectors, and the Euclidean distance for similarity measure is employed as well. Experimental results show that this CBIR system is efficient in image retrieval.

  18. Comparison of image reformation using personal computer with CT scan reconstruction

    Radiographic planning is needed for implant placement in order to determine implant length, jaw bone volume, anatomical structure and so on. Radiographic examination includes conventional radiography, conventional tomography and CT scan. The most accurate measurement can be obtained from CT scan. For the cross-sectional view of mandible, CT scan reconstruction is generally needed. But the cross-sectional view of mandible can be reformed by personal computer. This study was performed to examine the clinical usefulness of reformed image using personal computer in comparison with CT scan reconstructed image. CT axial slices of 4 mandibles of 4 volunteers were used. Digital imaging system was composed of Macintosh II ci computer, high resolution Sony XC-77 CCD camera, Quick Capture frame grabber board and 'NIH Image' program. Seven reconstructed cross-sectional images within CT machine (CT group) were obtained. And seven reformed cross-sectional images (PC group) after digitization of CT axial slices into the personal computer were obtained. PC group was compared with CT group in the objective and subjective aspects. The results were as follow: 1. Measurement of mandibular height and width in both group showed insignificant difference (P>0.05). 2. Subjective assessment of the mandibular canal in both group showed insignificant difference (P>0.05). 3. Image reformation using personal computer could provide panoramic view, which could not be obtained in CT scan reconstruction.

  19. Super Resolution Image Reconstruction using LWT

    Padavala, Sivakrishna; Moghul, Arifullah Baig

    2013-01-01

    Since over three decades, computers have been widely used for processing and displaying images. The ability to process visual information from a super resolution image can enhance the information present in the image. The motivation is from a human eye which takes in raw images (noisy, blurred and translated) and constructs a super resolution image. An image with improved resolution is desired in almost all of the applications to enhance qualitative features and is reported to be achieved by ...

  20. Influence and improvement of metal artifacts in dental structures by CT for radiation treatment planning. Reconstruction of transverse images using oblique images by gantry tilt scanning

    Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) radiation treatment planning (RTP) requires accuracy. Metal artifacts are one of the factors that influence RTP. The metal artifacts from dental structures are problems at the level of the oropharynx, since these artifacts impair visualization of tumors or lymph nodes and change CT (computed tomography) values. We simulated RTP at the level of the oropharynx using CT images with and without artifacts from dental structures. Gantry tilt scanning was performed to avoid artifacts from dental structures and transverse images reconstructed from oblique images by gantry tilt scanning using a technique of multiplanar reconstruction (MPR). The reconstructed transverse images were used for the RTP. The reconstructed transverse images were useful to obtain accurate target volumes and the RTP of two opposed equally weighted beams by correct CT values. As dose distribution was changed slightly by the metal artifacts, the use of CT images without artifact is recommended in RTP. (author)

  1. Application of Super-Resolution Image Reconstruction to Digital Holography

    Zhang Shuqun

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe a new application of super-resolution image reconstruction to digital holography which is a technique for three-dimensional information recording and reconstruction. Digital holography has suffered from the low resolution of CCD sensors, which significantly limits the size of objects that can be recorded. The existing solution to this problem is to use optics to bandlimit the object to be recorded, which can cause the loss of details. Here super-resolution image reconstruction is proposed to be applied in enhancing the spatial resolution of digital holograms. By introducing a global camera translation before sampling, a high-resolution hologram can be reconstructed from a set of undersampled hologram images. This permits the recording of larger objects and reduces the distance between the object and the hologram. Practical results from real and simulated holograms are presented to demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed technique.

  2. Matrix-based image reconstruction methods for tomography

    Matrix methods of image reconstruction have not been used, in general, because of the large size of practical matrices, ill condition upon inversion and the success of Fourier-based techniques. An exception is the work that has been done at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory for imaging with accelerated radioactive ions. An extension of that work into more general imaging problems shows that, with a correct formulation of the problem, positron tomography with ring geometries results in well behaved matrices which can be used for image reconstruction with no distortion of the point response in the field of view and flexibility in the design of the instrument. Maximum Likelihood Estimator methods of reconstruction, which use the system matrices tailored to specific instruments and do not need matrix inversion, are shown to result in good preliminary images. A parallel processing computer structure based on multiple inexpensive microprocessors is proposed as a system to implement the matrix-MLE methods. 14 references, 7 figures

  3. Compensation for air voids in photoacoustic computed tomography image reconstruction

    Matthews, Thomas P.; Li, Lei; Wang, Lihong V.; Anastasio, Mark A.

    2016-03-01

    Most image reconstruction methods in photoacoustic computed tomography (PACT) assume that the acoustic properties of the object and the surrounding medium are homogeneous. This can lead to strong artifacts in the reconstructed images when there are significant variations in sound speed or density. Air voids represent a particular challenge due to the severity of the differences between the acoustic properties of air and water. In whole-body small animal imaging, the presence of air voids in the lungs, stomach, and gastrointestinal system can limit image quality over large regions of the object. Iterative reconstruction methods based on the photoacoustic wave equation can account for these acoustic variations, leading to improved resolution, improved contrast, and a reduction in the number of imaging artifacts. However, the strong acoustic heterogeneities can lead to instability or errors in the numerical wave solver. Here, the impact of air voids on PACT image reconstruction is investigated, and procedures for their compensation are proposed. The contributions of sound speed and density variations to the numerical stability of the wave solver are considered, and a novel approach for mitigating the impact of air voids while reducing the computational burden of image reconstruction is identified. These results are verified by application to an experimental phantom.

  4. Electrophysiology Catheter Detection and Reconstruction From Two Views in Fluoroscopic Images.

    Hoffmann, Matthias; Brost, Alexander; Koch, Martin; Bourier, Felix; Maier, Andreas; Kurzidim, Klaus; Strobel, Norbert; Hornegger, Joachim

    2016-02-01

    Electrophysiology (EP) studies and catheter ablation have become important treatment options for several types of cardiac arrhythmias. We present a novel image-based approach for automatic detection and 3-D reconstruction of EP catheters where the physician marks the catheter to be reconstructed by a single click in each image. The result can be used to provide 3-D information for enhanced navigation throughout EP procedures. Our approach involves two X-ray projections acquired from different angles, and it is based on two steps: First, we detect the catheter in each view after manual initialization using a graph-search method. Then, the detection results are used to reconstruct a full 3-D model of the catheter based on automatically determined point pairs for triangulation. An evaluation on 176 different clinical fluoroscopic images yielded a detection rate of 83.4%. For measuring the error, we used the coupling distance which is a more accurate quality measure than the average point-wise distance to a reference. For successful outcomes, the 2-D detection error was 1.7 mm ±1.2 mm. Using successfully detected catheters for reconstruction, we obtained a reconstruction error of 1.8 mm ±1.1 mm on phantom data. On clinical data, our method yielded a reconstruction error of 2.2 mm ±2.2 mm. PMID:26441411

  5. Noninvasive Vascular Displacement Estimation for Relative Elastic Modulus Reconstruction in Transversal Imaging Planes

    Chris L. de Korte

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerotic plaque rupture can initiate stroke or myocardial infarction. Lipid-rich plaques with thin fibrous caps have a higher risk to rupture than fibrotic plaques. Elastic moduli differ for lipid-rich and fibrous tissue and can be reconstructed using tissue displacements estimated from intravascular ultrasound radiofrequency (RF data acquisitions. This study investigated if modulus reconstruction is possible for noninvasive RF acquisitions of vessels in transverse imaging planes using an iterative 2D cross-correlation based displacement estimation algorithm. Furthermore, since it is known that displacements can be improved by compounding of displacements estimated at various beam steering angles, we compared the performance of the modulus reconstruction with and without compounding. For the comparison, simulated and experimental RF data were generated of various vessel-mimicking phantoms. Reconstruction errors were less than 10%, which seems adequate for distinguishing lipid-rich from fibrous tissue. Compounding outperformed single-angle reconstruction: the interquartile range of the reconstructed moduli for the various homogeneous phantom layers was approximately two times smaller. Additionally, the estimated lateral displacements were a factor of 2–3 better matched to the displacements corresponding to the reconstructed modulus distribution. Thus, noninvasive elastic modulus reconstruction is possible for transverse vessel cross sections using this cross-correlation method and is more accurate with compounding.

  6. Bayesian image reconstruction for emission tomography based on median root prior

    The aim of the present study was to investigate a new type of Bayesian one-step late reconstruction method which utilizes a median root prior (MRP). The method favours images which have locally monotonous radioactivity concentrations. The new reconstruction algorithm was applied to ideal simulated data, phantom data and some patient examinations with PET. The same projection data were reconstructed with filtered back-projection (FBP) and maximum likelihood-expectation maximization (ML-EM) methods for comparison. The MRP method provided good-quality images with a similar resolution to the FBP method with a ramp filter, and at the same time the noise properties were as good as with Hann-filtered FBP images. The typical artefacts seen in FBP reconstructed images outside of the object were completely removed, as was the grainy noise inside the object. Quantitativley, the resulting average regional radioactivity concentrations in a large region of interest in images produced by the MRP method corresponded to the FBP and ML-EM results but at the pixel by pixel level the MRP method proved to be the most accurate of the tested methods. In contrast to other iterative reconstruction methods, e.g. ML-EM, the MRP method was not sensitive to the number of iterations nor to the adjustment of reconstruction parameters. Only the Bayesian parameter β had to be set. The proposed MRP method is much more simple to calculate than the methods described previously, both with regard to the parameter settings and in terms of general use. The new MRP reconstruction method was shown to produce high-quality quantitative emission images with only one parameter setting in addition to the number of iterations. (orig.)

  7. MR Image Reconstruction Using Block Matching and Adaptive Kernel Methods

    Schmidt, Johannes F. M.; Claudio Santelli; Sebastian Kozerke

    2016-01-01

    An approach to Magnetic Resonance (MR) image reconstruction from undersampled data is proposed. Undersampling artifacts are removed using an iterative thresholding algorithm applied to nonlinearly transformed image block arrays. Each block array is transformed using kernel principal component analysis where the contribution of each image block to the transform depends in a nonlinear fashion on the distance to other image blocks. Elimination of undersampling artifacts is achieved by convention...

  8. Ill-posed problem and regularization in reconstruction of radiobiological parameters from serial tumor imaging data

    The main objective of this article is to improve the stability of reconstruction algorithms for estimation of radiobiological parameters using serial tumor imaging data acquired during radiation therapy. Serial images of tumor response to radiation therapy represent a complex summation of several exponential processes as treatment induced cell inactivation, tumor growth rates, and the rate of cell loss. Accurate assessment of treatment response would require separation of these processes because they define radiobiological determinants of treatment response and, correspondingly, tumor control probability. However, the estimation of radiobiological parameters using imaging data can be considered an inverse ill-posed problem because a sum of several exponentials would produce the Fredholm integral equation of the first kind which is ill posed. Therefore, the stability of reconstruction of radiobiological parameters presents a problem even for the simplest models of tumor response. To study stability of the parameter reconstruction problem, we used a set of serial CT imaging data for head and neck cancer and a simplest case of a two-level cell population model of tumor response. Inverse reconstruction was performed using a simulated annealing algorithm to minimize a least squared objective function. Results show that the reconstructed values of cell surviving fractions and cell doubling time exhibit significant nonphysical fluctuations if no stabilization algorithms are applied. However, after applying a stabilization algorithm based on variational regularization, the reconstruction produces statistical distributions for survival fractions and doubling time that are comparable to published in vitro data. This algorithm is an advance over our previous work where only cell surviving fractions were reconstructed. We conclude that variational regularization allows for an increase in the number of free parameters in our model which enables development of more

  9. Ill-posed problem and regularization in reconstruction of radiobiological parameters from serial tumor imaging data

    Chvetsov, Alevei V.; Sandison, George A.; Schwartz, Jeffrey L.; Rengan, Ramesh

    2015-11-01

    The main objective of this article is to improve the stability of reconstruction algorithms for estimation of radiobiological parameters using serial tumor imaging data acquired during radiation therapy. Serial images of tumor response to radiation therapy represent a complex summation of several exponential processes as treatment induced cell inactivation, tumor growth rates, and the rate of cell loss. Accurate assessment of treatment response would require separation of these processes because they define radiobiological determinants of treatment response and, correspondingly, tumor control probability. However, the estimation of radiobiological parameters using imaging data can be considered an inverse ill-posed problem because a sum of several exponentials would produce the Fredholm integral equation of the first kind which is ill posed. Therefore, the stability of reconstruction of radiobiological parameters presents a problem even for the simplest models of tumor response. To study stability of the parameter reconstruction problem, we used a set of serial CT imaging data for head and neck cancer and a simplest case of a two-level cell population model of tumor response. Inverse reconstruction was performed using a simulated annealing algorithm to minimize a least squared objective function. Results show that the reconstructed values of cell surviving fractions and cell doubling time exhibit significant nonphysical fluctuations if no stabilization algorithms are applied. However, after applying a stabilization algorithm based on variational regularization, the reconstruction produces statistical distributions for survival fractions and doubling time that are comparable to published in vitro data. This algorithm is an advance over our previous work where only cell surviving fractions were reconstructed. We conclude that variational regularization allows for an increase in the number of free parameters in our model which enables development of more

  10. Influence of Iterative Reconstruction Algorithms on PET Image Resolution

    Karpetas, G. E.; Michail, C. M.; Fountos, G. P.; Valais, I. G.; Nikolopoulos, D.; Kandarakis, I. S.; Panayiotakis, G. S.

    2015-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess image quality of PET scanners through a thin layer chromatography (TLC) plane source. The source was simulated using a previously validated Monte Carlo model. The model was developed by using the GATE MC package and reconstructed images obtained with the STIR software for tomographic image reconstruction. The simulated PET scanner was the GE DiscoveryST. A plane source consisted of a TLC plate, was simulated by a layer of silica gel on aluminum (Al) foil substrates, immersed in 18F-FDG bath solution (1MBq). Image quality was assessed in terms of the modulation transfer function (MTF). MTF curves were estimated from transverse reconstructed images of the plane source. Images were reconstructed by the maximum likelihood estimation (MLE)-OSMAPOSL, the ordered subsets separable paraboloidal surrogate (OSSPS), the median root prior (MRP) and OSMAPOSL with quadratic prior, algorithms. OSMAPOSL reconstruction was assessed by using fixed subsets and various iterations, as well as by using various beta (hyper) parameter values. MTF values were found to increase with increasing iterations. MTF also improves by using lower beta values. The simulated PET evaluation method, based on the TLC plane source, can be useful in the resolution assessment of PET scanners.

  11. Compressed sensing MR image reconstruction exploiting TGV and wavelet sparsity.

    Zhao, Di; Du, Huiqian; Han, Yu; Mei, Wenbo

    2014-01-01

    Compressed sensing (CS) based methods make it possible to reconstruct magnetic resonance (MR) images from undersampled measurements, which is known as CS-MRI. The reference-driven CS-MRI reconstruction schemes can further decrease the sampling ratio by exploiting the sparsity of the difference image between the target and the reference MR images in pixel domain. Unfortunately existing methods do not work well given that contrast changes are incorrectly estimated or motion compensation is inaccurate. In this paper, we propose to reconstruct MR images by utilizing the sparsity of the difference image between the target and the motion-compensated reference images in wavelet transform and gradient domains. The idea is attractive because it requires neither the estimation of the contrast changes nor multiple times motion compensations. In addition, we apply total generalized variation (TGV) regularization to eliminate the staircasing artifacts caused by conventional total variation (TV). Fast composite splitting algorithm (FCSA) is used to solve the proposed reconstruction problem in order to improve computational efficiency. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method can not only reduce the computational cost but also decrease sampling ratio or improve the reconstruction quality alternatively. PMID:25371704

  12. Compressed Sensing MR Image Reconstruction Exploiting TGV and Wavelet Sparsity

    Di Zhao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Compressed sensing (CS based methods make it possible to reconstruct magnetic resonance (MR images from undersampled measurements, which is known as CS-MRI. The reference-driven CS-MRI reconstruction schemes can further decrease the sampling ratio by exploiting the sparsity of the difference image between the target and the reference MR images in pixel domain. Unfortunately existing methods do not work well given that contrast changes are incorrectly estimated or motion compensation is inaccurate. In this paper, we propose to reconstruct MR images by utilizing the sparsity of the difference image between the target and the motion-compensated reference images in wavelet transform and gradient domains. The idea is attractive because it requires neither the estimation of the contrast changes nor multiple times motion compensations. In addition, we apply total generalized variation (TGV regularization to eliminate the staircasing artifacts caused by conventional total variation (TV. Fast composite splitting algorithm (FCSA is used to solve the proposed reconstruction problem in order to improve computational efficiency. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method can not only reduce the computational cost but also decrease sampling ratio or improve the reconstruction quality alternatively.

  13. SPECT data acquisition and image reconstruction in a stationary small animal SPECT/MRI system

    Xu, Jingyan; Chen, Si; Yu, Jianhua; Meier, Dirk; Wagenaar, Douglas J.; Patt, Bradley E.; Tsui, Benjamin M. W.

    2010-04-01

    The goal of the study was to investigate data acquisition strategies and image reconstruction methods for a stationary SPECT insert that can operate inside an MRI scanner with a 12 cm bore diameter for simultaneous SPECT/MRI imaging of small animals. The SPECT insert consists of 3 octagonal rings of 8 MR-compatible CZT detectors per ring surrounding a multi-pinhole (MPH) collimator sleeve. Each pinhole is constructed to project the field-of-view (FOV) to one CZT detector. All 24 pinholes are focused to a cylindrical FOV of 25 mm in diameter and 34 mm in length. The data acquisition strategies we evaluated were optional collimator rotations to improve tomographic sampling; and the image reconstruction methods were iterative ML-EM with and without compensation for the geometric response function (GRF) of the MPH collimator. For this purpose, we developed an analytic simulator that calculates the system matrix with the GRF models of the MPH collimator. The simulator was used to generate projection data of a digital rod phantom with pinhole aperture sizes of 1 mm and 2 mm and with different collimator rotation patterns. Iterative ML-EM reconstruction with and without GRF compensation were used to reconstruct the projection data from the central ring of 8 detectors only, and from all 24 detectors. Our results indicated that without GRF compensation and at the default design of 24 projection views, the reconstructed images had significant artifacts. Accurate GRF compensation substantially improved the reconstructed image resolution and reduced image artifacts. With accurate GRF compensation, useful reconstructed images can be obtained using 24 projection views only. This last finding potentially enables dynamic SPECT (and/or MRI) studies in small animals, one of many possible application areas of the SPECT/MRI system. Further research efforts are warranted including experimentally measuring the system matrix for improved geometrical accuracy, incorporating the co

  14. Three-dimensional image reconstruction for scattering light tomography

    For optical imaging of testes we have developed three-dimensional image reconstruction algorithms for scattering light tomography in the near-infrared range. The mathematical problem is thereby decomposed into a pixel conversion step and an inverse problem solver. Different voxal bases and solution methods have been selected and evaluated. (author)

  15. 3D image reconstruction of fiber systems using electron tomography

    Over the past several years, electron microscopists and materials researchers have shown increased interest in electron tomography (reconstruction of three-dimensional information from a tilt series of bright field images obtained in a transmission electron microscope (TEM)). In this research, electron tomography has been used to reconstruct a three-dimensional image for fiber structures from secondary electron images in a scanning electron microscope (SEM). The implementation of this technique is used to examine the structure of fiber system before and after deformation. A test sample of steel wool was tilted around a single axis from −10° to 60° by one-degree steps with images taken at every degree; three-dimensional images were reconstructed for the specimen of fine steel fibers. This method is capable of reconstructing the three-dimensional morphology of this type of lineal structure, and to obtain features such as tortuosity, contact points, and linear density that are of importance in defining the mechanical properties of these materials. - Highlights: • The electron tomography technique has been adapted to the SEM for analysis of linear structures. • Images are obtained by secondary electron imaging through a given depth of field, making them analogous to projected images. • Quantitative descriptions of the microstructure can be obtained including tortuosity and contact points per volume

  16. Distributed image reconstruction for very large arrays in radio astronomy

    Ferrari, André; Flamary, Rémi; Richard, Cédric

    2015-01-01

    Current and future radio interferometric arrays such as LOFAR and SKA are characterized by a paradox. Their large number of receptors (up to millions) allow theoretically unprecedented high imaging resolution. In the same time, the ultra massive amounts of samples makes the data transfer and computational loads (correlation and calibration) order of magnitudes too high to allow any currently existing image reconstruction algorithm to achieve, or even approach, the theoretical resolution. We investigate here decentralized and distributed image reconstruction strategies which select, transfer and process only a fraction of the total data. The loss in MSE incurred by the proposed approach is evaluated theoretically and numerically on simple test cases.

  17. Analytic 3D image reconstruction using all detected events

    We present the results of testing a previously presented algorithm for three-dimensional image reconstruction that uses all gamma-ray coincidence events detected by a PET volume-imaging scanner. By using two iterations of an analytic filter-backprojection method, the algorithm is not constrained by the requirement of a spatially invariant detector point spread function, which limits normal analytic techniques. Removing this constraint allows the incorporation of all detected events, regardless of orientation, which improves the statistical quality of the final reconstructed image

  18. An image correlation procedure for digitally reconstructed radiographs and electronic portal images

    Purpose: To study a procedure that uses megavoltage digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) calculated from patient's three-dimensional (3D) computed tomography (CT) data as a reference image for correlation with on-line electronic portal images (EPIs) to detect patient setup errors. Methods and Materials: Megavoltage DRRs were generated by ray tracing through a modified volumetric CT data set in which CT numbers were converted into linear attenuation coefficients for the therapeutic beam energy. The DRR transmission image was transformed to the grayscale window of the EPI by a histogram-matching technique. An alternative approach was to calibrate the transmission DRR using a measured response curve of the electronic portal imaging device (EPID). This forces the calculated transmission fluence values to be distributed in the same range as that of the EPID image. A cross-correlation technique was used to determine the degree of alignment of the patient anatomy found in the EPID image relative to the reference DRR. Results: Phantom studies demonstrated that the correlation procedure had a standard deviation of 0.5 mm and 0.5 deg. in aligning translational shifts and in-plane rotations. Systematic errors were found between a reference DRR and a reference EPID image. The automated grayscale image-correlation process was completed within 3 s on a workstation computer or 12 s on a PC. Conclusion: The alignment procedure allows the direct comparison of a patient's treatment portal designed with a 3D planning computer with a patient's on-line portal image acquired at the treatment unit. The image registration process is automated to the extent that it requires minimal user intervention, and it is fast and accurate enough for on-line clinical applications

  19. Large Scale 3D Image Reconstruction in Optical Interferometry

    Schutz, Antony; Mary, David; Thiébaut, Eric; Soulez, Ferréol

    2015-01-01

    Astronomical optical interferometers (OI) sample the Fourier transform of the intensity distribution of a source at the observation wavelength. Because of rapid atmospheric perturbations, the phases of the complex Fourier samples (visibilities) cannot be directly exploited , and instead linear relationships between the phases are used (phase closures and differential phases). Consequently, specific image reconstruction methods have been devised in the last few decades. Modern polychromatic OI instruments are now paving the way to multiwavelength imaging. This paper presents the derivation of a spatio-spectral ("3D") image reconstruction algorithm called PAINTER (Polychromatic opticAl INTErferometric Reconstruction software). The algorithm is able to solve large scale problems. It relies on an iterative process, which alternates estimation of polychromatic images and of complex visibilities. The complex visibilities are not only estimated from squared moduli and closure phases, but also from differential phase...

  20. Analysis Operator Learning and Its Application to Image Reconstruction

    Hawe, Simon; Diepold, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    Exploiting a priori known structural information lies at the core of many image reconstruction methods that can be stated as inverse problems. The synthesis model, which assumes that images can be decomposed into a linear combination of very few atoms of some dictionary, is now a well established tool for the design of image reconstruction algorithms. An interesting alternative is the analysis model, where the signal is multiplied by an analysis operator and the outcome is assumed to be the sparse. This approach has only recently gained increasing interest. The quality of reconstruction methods based on an analysis model severely depends on the right choice of the suitable operator. In this work, we present an algorithm for learning an analysis operator from training images. Our method is based on an $\\ell_p$-norm minimization on the set of full rank matrices with normalized columns. We carefully introduce the employed conjugate gradient method on manifolds, and explain the underlying geometry of the constrai...

  1. Cervigram image segmentation based on reconstructive sparse representations

    Zhang, Shaoting; Huang, Junzhou; Wang, Wei; Huang, Xiaolei; Metaxas, Dimitris

    2010-03-01

    We proposed an approach based on reconstructive sparse representations to segment tissues in optical images of the uterine cervix. Because of large variations in image appearance caused by the changing of the illumination and specular reflection, the color and texture features in optical images often overlap with each other and are not linearly separable. By leveraging sparse representations the data can be transformed to higher dimensions with sparse constraints and become more separated. K-SVD algorithm is employed to find sparse representations and corresponding dictionaries. The data can be reconstructed from its sparse representations and positive and/or negative dictionaries. Classification can be achieved based on comparing the reconstructive errors. In the experiments we applied our method to automatically segment the biomarker AcetoWhite (AW) regions in an archive of 60,000 images of the uterine cervix. Compared with other general methods, our approach showed lower space and time complexity and higher sensitivity.

  2. A novel automated image analysis method for accurate adipocyte quantification

    Osman, Osman S.; Selway, Joanne L; Kępczyńska, Małgorzata A; Stocker, Claire J.; O’Dowd, Jacqueline F; Cawthorne, Michael A.; Arch, Jonathan RS; Jassim, Sabah; Langlands, Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    Increased adipocyte size and number are associated with many of the adverse effects observed in metabolic disease states. While methods to quantify such changes in the adipocyte are of scientific and clinical interest, manual methods to determine adipocyte size are both laborious and intractable to large scale investigations. Moreover, existing computational methods are not fully automated. We, therefore, developed a novel automatic method to provide accurate measurements of the cross-section...

  3. A hybrid genetic algorithm-extreme learning machine approach for accurate significant wave height reconstruction

    Alexandre, E.; Cuadra, L.; Nieto-Borge, J. C.; Candil-García, G.; del Pino, M.; Salcedo-Sanz, S.

    2015-08-01

    Wave parameters computed from time series measured by buoys (significant wave height Hs, mean wave period, etc.) play a key role in coastal engineering and in the design and operation of wave energy converters. Storms or navigation accidents can make measuring buoys break down, leading to missing data gaps. In this paper we tackle the problem of locally reconstructing Hs at out-of-operation buoys by using wave parameters from nearby buoys, based on the spatial correlation among values at neighboring buoy locations. The novelty of our approach for its potential application to problems in coastal engineering is twofold. On one hand, we propose a genetic algorithm hybridized with an extreme learning machine that selects, among the available wave parameters from the nearby buoys, a subset FnSP with nSP parameters that minimizes the Hs reconstruction error. On the other hand, we evaluate to what extent the selected parameters in subset FnSP are good enough in assisting other machine learning (ML) regressors (extreme learning machines, support vector machines and gaussian process regression) to reconstruct Hs. The results show that all the ML method explored achieve a good Hs reconstruction in the two different locations studied (Caribbean Sea and West Atlantic).

  4. Improving JWST Coronagraphic Performance with Accurate Image Registration

    Van Gorkom, Kyle; Pueyo, Laurent; Lajoie, Charles-Philippe; JWST Coronagraphs Working Group

    2016-06-01

    The coronagraphs on the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will enable high-contrast observations of faint objects at small separations from bright hosts, such as circumstellar disks, exoplanets, and quasar disks. Despite attenuation by the coronagraphic mask, bright speckles in the host’s point spread function (PSF) remain, effectively washing out the signal from the faint companion. Suppression of these bright speckles is typically accomplished by repeating the observation with a star that lacks a faint companion, creating a reference PSF that can be subtracted from the science image to reveal any faint objects. Before this reference PSF can be subtracted, however, the science and reference images must be aligned precisely, typically to 1/20 of a pixel. Here, we present several such algorithms for performing image registration on JWST coronagraphic images. Using both simulated and pre-flight test data (taken in cryovacuum), we assess (1) the accuracy of each algorithm at recovering misaligned scenes and (2) the impact of image registration on achievable contrast. Proper image registration, combined with post-processing techniques such as KLIP or LOCI, will greatly improve the performance of the JWST coronagraphs.

  5. Propagation Phasor Approach in Holographic Image Reconstruction

    Luo, Wei

    2016-01-01

    High-resolution and wide-field imaging is of great value for various scientific disciplines; such tasks demand the imaging modalities to possess large space-bandwidth products. The rapid evolutions of modern image sensor technologies and computing power have provided tremendous opportunities for development of new imaging systems with significantly larger space-bandwidth products than conventional lens-based systems. This dissertation introduces the latest advance in lensfree holographic micr...

  6. Reconstruction of Undersampled Atomic Force Microscopy Images

    Jensen, Tobias Lindstrøm; Arildsen, Thomas; Østergaard, Jan;

    2013-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is one of the most advanced tools for high-resolution imaging and manipulation of nanoscale matter. Unfortunately, standard AFM imaging requires a timescale on the order of seconds to minutes to acquire an image which makes it complicated to observe dynamic processes...

  7. Distributed multi-frequency image reconstruction for radio-interferometry

    Deguignet, Jérémy; Mary, David; Ferrari, Chiara

    2016-01-01

    The advent of enhanced technologies in radio interferometry and the perspective of the SKA telescope bring new challenges in image reconstruction. One of these challenges is the spatio-spectral reconstruction of large (Terabytes) data cubes with high fidelity. This contribution proposes an alternative implementation of one such 3D prototype algorithm, MUFFIN (MUlti-Frequency image reconstruction For radio INterferometry), which combines spatial and spectral analysis priors. Using a recently proposed primal dual algorithm, this new version of MUFFIN allows a parallel implementation where computationally intensive steps are split by spectral channels. This parallelization allows to implement computationally demanding translation invariant wavelet transforms (IUWT), as opposed to the union of bases used previously. This alternative implementation is important as it opens the possibility of comparing these efficient dictionaries, and others, in spatio-spectral reconstruction. Numerical results show that the IUWT-...

  8. Image interface in Java for tomographic reconstruction in nuclear medicine

    The aim of this study is to implement a software for tomographic reconstruction of SPECT data from Nuclear Medicine with a flexible interface design, cross-platform, written in Java. Validation tests were performed based on SPECT simulated data. The results showed that the implemented algorithms and filters agree with the theoretical context. We intend to extend the system by implementing additional tomographic reconstruction techniques and Java threads, in order to provide simultaneously image processing. (author)

  9. High resolution image reconstruction with constrained, total-variation minimization

    Sidky, Emil Y; Duchin, Yuval; Ullberg, Christer; Pan, Xiaochuan

    2011-01-01

    This work is concerned with applying iterative image reconstruction, based on constrained total-variation minimization, to low-intensity X-ray CT systems that have a high sampling rate. Such systems pose a challenge for iterative image reconstruction, because a very fine image grid is needed to realize the resolution inherent in such scanners. These image arrays lead to under-determined imaging models whose inversion is unstable and can result in undesirable artifacts and noise patterns. There are many possibilities to stabilize the imaging model, and this work proposes a method which may have an advantage in terms of algorithm efficiency. The proposed method introduces additional constraints in the optimization problem; these constraints set to zero high spatial frequency components which are beyond the sensing capability of the detector. The method is demonstrated with an actual CT data set and compared with another method based on projection up-sampling.

  10. Improved image quality in pinhole SPECT by accurate modeling of the point spread function in low magnification systems

    Pino, Francisco [Unitat de Biofísica, Facultat de Medicina, Universitat de Barcelona, Barcelona 08036, Spain and Servei de Física Mèdica i Protecció Radiològica, Institut Català d’Oncologia, L’Hospitalet de Llobregat 08907 (Spain); Roé, Nuria [Unitat de Biofísica, Facultat de Medicina, Universitat de Barcelona, Barcelona 08036 (Spain); Aguiar, Pablo, E-mail: pablo.aguiar.fernandez@sergas.es [Fundación Ramón Domínguez, Complexo Hospitalario Universitario de Santiago de Compostela 15706, Spain and Grupo de Imagen Molecular, Instituto de Investigacións Sanitarias de Santiago de Compostela (IDIS), Galicia 15782 (Spain); Falcon, Carles; Ros, Domènec [Institut d’Investigacions Biomèdiques August Pi i Sunyer (IDIBAPS), Barcelona 08036, Spain and CIBER en Bioingeniería, Biomateriales y Nanomedicina (CIBER-BBN), Barcelona 08036 (Spain); Pavía, Javier [Institut d’Investigacions Biomèdiques August Pi i Sunyer (IDIBAPS), Barcelona 080836 (Spain); CIBER en Bioingeniería, Biomateriales y Nanomedicina (CIBER-BBN), Barcelona 08036 (Spain); and Servei de Medicina Nuclear, Hospital Clínic, Barcelona 08036 (Spain)

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) has become an important noninvasive imaging technique in small-animal research. Due to the high resolution required in small-animal SPECT systems, the spatially variant system response needs to be included in the reconstruction algorithm. Accurate modeling of the system response should result in a major improvement in the quality of reconstructed images. The aim of this study was to quantitatively assess the impact that an accurate modeling of spatially variant collimator/detector response has on image-quality parameters, using a low magnification SPECT system equipped with a pinhole collimator and a small gamma camera. Methods: Three methods were used to model the point spread function (PSF). For the first, only the geometrical pinhole aperture was included in the PSF. For the second, the septal penetration through the pinhole collimator was added. In the third method, the measured intrinsic detector response was incorporated. Tomographic spatial resolution was evaluated and contrast, recovery coefficients, contrast-to-noise ratio, and noise were quantified using a custom-built NEMA NU 4–2008 image-quality phantom. Results: A high correlation was found between the experimental data corresponding to intrinsic detector response and the fitted values obtained by means of an asymmetric Gaussian distribution. For all PSF models, resolution improved as the distance from the point source to the center of the field of view increased and when the acquisition radius diminished. An improvement of resolution was observed after a minimum of five iterations when the PSF modeling included more corrections. Contrast, recovery coefficients, and contrast-to-noise ratio were better for the same level of noise in the image when more accurate models were included. Ring-type artifacts were observed when the number of iterations exceeded 12. Conclusions: Accurate modeling of the PSF improves resolution, contrast, and recovery

  11. An adaptive filtered back-projection for photoacoustic image reconstruction

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to develop an improved filtered-back-projection (FBP) algorithm for photoacoustic tomography (PAT), which allows image reconstruction with higher quality compared to images reconstructed through traditional algorithms. Methods: A rigorous expression of a weighting function has been derived directly from a photoacoustic wave equation and used as a ramp filter in Fourier domain. The authors’ new algorithm utilizes this weighting function to precisely calculate each photoacoustic signal’s contribution and then reconstructs the image based on the retarded potential generated from the photoacoustic sources. In addition, an adaptive criterion has been derived for selecting the cutoff frequency of a low pass filter. Two computational phantoms were created to test the algorithm. The first phantom contained five spheres with each sphere having different absorbances. The phantom was used to test the capability for correctly representing both the geometry and the relative absorbed energy in a planar measurement system. The authors also used another phantom containing absorbers of different sizes with overlapping geometry to evaluate the performance of the new method for complicated geometry. In addition, random noise background was added to the simulated data, which were obtained by using an arc-shaped array of 50 evenly distributed transducers that spanned 160° over a circle with a radius of 65 mm. A normalized factor between the neighbored transducers was applied for correcting measurement signals in PAT simulations. The authors assumed that the scanned object was mounted on a holder that rotated over the full 360° and the scans were set to a sampling rate of 20.48 MHz. Results: The authors have obtained reconstructed images of the computerized phantoms by utilizing the new FBP algorithm. From the reconstructed image of the first phantom, one can see that this new approach allows not only obtaining a sharp image but also showing

  12. Motion compensation for PET image reconstruction using deformable tetrahedral meshes

    Respiratory-induced organ motion is a technical challenge to PET imaging. This motion induces displacements and deformation of the organs tissues, which need to be taken into account when reconstructing the spatial radiation activity. Classical image-based methods that describe motion using deformable image registration (DIR) algorithms cannot fully take into account the non-reproducibility of the respiratory internal organ motion nor the tissue volume variations that occur during breathing. In order to overcome these limitations, various biomechanical models of the respiratory system have been developed in the past decade as an alternative to DIR approaches. In this paper, we describe a new method of correcting motion artefacts in PET image reconstruction adapted to motion estimation models such as those based on the finite element method. In contrast with the DIR-based approaches, the radiation activity was reconstructed on deforming tetrahedral meshes. For this, we have re-formulated the tomographic reconstruction problem by introducing a time-dependent system matrix based calculated using tetrahedral meshes instead of voxelized images. The MLEM algorithm was chosen as the reconstruction method. The simulations performed in this study show that the motion compensated reconstruction based on tetrahedral deformable meshes has the capability to correct motion artefacts. Results demonstrate that, in the case of complex deformations, when large volume variations occur, the developed tetrahedral based method is more appropriate than the classical DIR-based one. This method can be used, together with biomechanical models controlled by external surrogates, to correct motion artefacts in PET images and thus reducing the need for additional internal imaging during the acquisition. (paper)

  13. Research on key technique of microscopy three-dimensional image reconstruction based on piezoelectric ceramics

    Wang, Jianhua; Xiao, Zexin

    2011-11-01

    Due to the limited depth of focus of microscope objective, a series of images taken from different sections and directions are needed to reconstruct 3D microscopy image. In this paper, we present a novel method which utilizes piezoelectric actuator, high magnification microscopy system without mirror and single CCD to observe micro-objects and reconstruct its three-dimensional image. Inverse piezoelectric effect of piezoelectric ceramics have some superior characteristics, such as high positioning resolution, high positioning accuracy, etc. And piezoelectric actuator possess the advantage of small-size, strong-power and easy- to-integrated as well. Based on these points, we designed a 360° rotation and tilt positioning platform. In this platform, Piezoelectric actuator is employed to ensure the positioning accuracy at axis-Z direction. At the same time, Motion of 360° rotation and tilt can be controlled precisely using stepping motor controlling technology. Furthermore, finite element methods (FEM) analyze software--ANSYS is used to analyze the rigidity, stress and structure optimization of the platform. This rotation and tilt mechanical positioning platform can help the single CCD to get clear, complete-view two dimensional images. This method paves the way for three-dimensional reconstruction of micro objects. Experiments demonstrate that this 360° rotation and tilt positioning stage is structure-simple and high-accurate. It can be widely used in micro-structure observing and three-dimensional image reconstruction among mechanics, materials and biology, etc.

  14. Direct reconstruction of the Vienna applicator on MR images

    Purpose: To introduce and test a direct reconstruction concept for intracavitary tandem ring applicators in MR image-based brachytherapy treatment planning. Materials and methods: Optical measurements of transparent ring-phantoms provided the geometric relation between source path and the Vienna ring applicator as visible on MRI. For the manual direct reconstruction method (PLATO), the geometry plotted on a transparency was placed on the screen and rotated to fit with visible ring holes. With the software-integrated reconstruction method (OncentraGYN), the applicator geometry was directly used when placing the visible parts of the applicator in the 3D dataset. Clinical feasibility was tested in 10 clinical insertions. Reconstruction and dose calculation were performed independently on two treatment planning systems (PLATO and OncentraGYN) using MRI alone. DVH parameters for targets and organs at risk were analysed and compared to the clinically used radiograph/MRI registration-based method. Results: The direct reconstruction concept for both methods was feasible and reduced treatment planning time. Evaluated DVH parameters for plans using direct reconstruction methods differed from clinically used plans (traditional reconstruction) in mean differences ≤0.2 Gy for plans with 7 Gy prescribed dose. Conclusion: If the relation between applicator shape visible on MRI and the source path is defined once, the reconstruction process can be performed by directly placing the applicator in the MRI dataset.

  15. Within-host bacterial diversity hinders accurate reconstruction of transmission networks from genomic distance data.

    Worby, Colin J.; Marc Lipsitch; Hanage, William P

    2014-01-01

    The prospect of using whole genome sequence data to investigate bacterial disease outbreaks has been keenly anticipated in many quarters, and the large-scale collection and sequencing of isolates from cases is becoming increasingly feasible. While sequence data can provide many important insights into disease spread and pathogen adaptation, it remains unclear how successfully they may be used to estimate individual routes of transmission. Several studies have attempted to reconstruct transmis...

  16. Within-Host Bacterial Diversity Hinders Accurate Reconstruction of Transmission Networks from Genomic Distance Data

    Worby, Colin J.; Marc Lipsitch; William P Hanage

    2014-01-01

    The prospect of using whole genome sequence data to investigate bacterial disease outbreaks has been keenly anticipated in many quarters, and the large-scale collection and sequencing of isolates from cases is becoming increasingly feasible. While sequence data can provide many important insights into disease spread and pathogen adaptation, it remains unclear how successfully they may be used to estimate individual routes of transmission. Several studies have attempted to reconstruct transmis...

  17. Improved proton computed tomography by dual modality image reconstruction

    Hansen, David Christoffer; Bassler, Niels; Petersen, Jørgen B.B.;

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Proton computed tomography (CT) is a promising image modality for improving the stopping power estimates and dose calculations for particle therapy. However, the finite range of about 33 cm of water of most commercial proton therapy systems limits the sites that can be scanned from a full...... 360◦ rotation. In this paper the authors propose a method to overcome the problem using a dual modality reconstruction (DMR) combining the proton data with a cone-beam x-ray prior. Methods: A Catphan 600 phantom was scanned using a cone beam x-ray CT scanner. A digital replica of the phantom was...... created in the Monte Carlo code Geant4 and a 360◦ proton CT scan was simulated, storing the entrance and exit position and momentum vector of every proton. Proton CT images were reconstructed using a varying number of angles from the scan. The proton CT images were reconstructed using a constrained...

  18. Reconstruction of CT images by the Bayes- back projection method

    Haruyama, M; Takase, M; Tobita, H

    2002-01-01

    In the course of research on quantitative assay of non-destructive measurement of radioactive waste, the have developed a unique program based on the Bayesian theory for reconstruction of transmission computed tomography (TCT) image. The reconstruction of cross-section images in the CT technology usually employs the Filtered Back Projection method. The new imaging reconstruction program reported here is based on the Bayesian Back Projection method, and it has a function of iterative improvement images by every step of measurement. Namely, this method has the capability of prompt display of a cross-section image corresponding to each angled projection data from every measurement. Hence, it is possible to observe an improved cross-section view by reflecting each projection data in almost real time. From the basic theory of Baysian Back Projection method, it can be not only applied to CT types of 1st, 2nd, and 3rd generation. This reported deals with a reconstruction program of cross-section images in the CT of ...

  19. Sparse representation for the ISAR image reconstruction

    Hu, Mengqi; Montalbo, John; Li, Shuxia; Sun, Ligang; Qiao, Zhijun G.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, a sparse representation of the data for an inverse synthetic aperture radar (ISAR) system is provided in two dimensions. The proposed sparse representation motivates the use a of a Convex Optimization that recovers the image with far less samples, which is required by Nyquist-Shannon sampling theorem to increases the efficiency and decrease the cost of calculation in radar imaging.

  20. Accurate location of nuclear explosions at Azgir, Kazakhstan, from satellite images and seismic data: Implications for monitoring decoupled explosions

    Sykes, L.R.; Deng, J. (Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, Palisades, NY (United States) Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States)); Lyubomirskiy, P. (Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, Palisades, NY (United States))

    1993-09-15

    This paper reports on the accurate location of ten large tamped nuclear explosions near Azgir, Kazakhstan, conducted by the former Soviet Union in salt domes. The events are located from shot points on a SPOT satellite image, and from reconstructed seismic events recorded on seismographs scattered around the world, including recently released data from the Soviet Union. A concern behind the location of these events, is the possibility that the caverns created by these shots might be used for seismically decoupled testing of nuclear explosions in the future.

  1. Relevance of accurate Monte Carlo modeling in nuclear medical imaging

    Zaidi, H

    1999-01-01

    Monte Carlo techniques have become popular in different areas of medical physics with advantage of powerful computing systems. In particular, they have been extensively applied to simulate processes involving random behavior and to quantify physical parameters that are difficult or even impossible to calculate by experimental measurements. Recent nuclear medical imaging innovations such as single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), positron emission tomography (PET), and multiple emission tomography (MET) are ideal for Monte Carlo modeling techniques because of the stochastic nature of radiation emission, transport and detection processes. Factors which have contributed to the wider use include improved models of radiation transport processes, the practicality of application with the development of acceleration schemes and the improved speed of computers. This paper presents derivation and methodological basis for this approach and critically reviews their areas of application in nuclear imaging. An ...

  2. Flame Reconstruction Using Synthetic Aperture Imaging

    Murray, Preston; Tree, Dale; Truscott, Tadd

    2011-01-01

    Flames can be formed by burning methane (CH4). When oxygen is scarce, carbon particles nucleate into solid particles called soot. These particles emit photons, making the flame yellow. Later, methane is pre-mixed with air forming a blue flame; burning more efficiently, providing less soot and light. Imaging flames and knowing their temperature are vital to maximizing efficiency and validating numerical models. Most temperature probes disrupt the flame and create differences leading to an inaccurate measurement of the flame temperature. We seek to image the flame in three dimensions using synthetic aperture imaging. This technique has already successfully measured velocity fields of a vortex ring [1]. Synthetic aperture imaging is a technique that views one scene from multiple cameras set at different angles, allowing some cameras to view objects that are obscured by others. As the resulting images are overlapped different depths of the scene come into and out of focus, known as focal planes, similar to tomogr...

  3. Alpha image reconstruction (AIR): A new iterative CT image reconstruction approach using voxel-wise alpha blending

    Purpose: Iterative image reconstruction gains more and more interest in clinical routine, as it promises to reduce image noise (and thereby patient dose), to reduce artifacts, or to improve spatial resolution. Among vendors and researchers, however, there is no consensus of how to best achieve these aims. The general approach is to incorporatea priori knowledge into iterative image reconstruction, for example, by adding additional constraints to the cost function, which penalize variations between neighboring voxels. However, this approach to regularization in general poses a resolution noise trade-off because the stronger the regularization, and thus the noise reduction, the stronger the loss of spatial resolution and thus loss of anatomical detail. The authors propose a method which tries to improve this trade-off. The proposed reconstruction algorithm is called alpha image reconstruction (AIR). One starts with generating basis images, which emphasize certain desired image properties, like high resolution or low noise. The AIR algorithm reconstructs voxel-specific weighting coefficients that are applied to combine the basis images. By combining the desired properties of each basis image, one can generate an image with lower noise and maintained high contrast resolution thus improving the resolution noise trade-off. Methods: All simulations and reconstructions are performed in native fan-beam geometry. A water phantom with resolution bar patterns and low contrast disks is simulated. A filtered backprojection (FBP) reconstruction with a Ram-Lak kernel is used as a reference reconstruction. The results of AIR are compared against the FBP results and against a penalized weighted least squares reconstruction which uses total variation as regularization. The simulations are based on the geometry of the Siemens Somatom Definition Flash scanner. To quantitatively assess image quality, the authors analyze line profiles through resolution patterns to define a contrast

  4. A rapid reconstruction algorithm for three-dimensional scanning images

    Xiang, Jiying; Wu, Zhen; Zhang, Ping; Huang, Dexiu

    1998-04-01

    A `simulated fluorescence' three-dimensional reconstruction algorithm, which is especially suitable for confocal images of partial transparent biological samples, is proposed in this paper. To make the retina projection of the object reappear and to avoid excessive memory consumption, the original image is rotated and compressed before the processing. A left image and a right image are mixed by different colors to increase the sense of stereo. The details originally hidden in deep layers are well exhibited with the aid of an `auxiliary directional source'. In addition, the time consumption is greatly reduced compared with conventional methods such as `ray tracing'. The realization of the algorithm is interpreted by a group of reconstructed images.

  5. Gadgetron: An Open Source Framework for Medical Image Reconstruction

    Hansen, Michael Schacht; Sørensen, Thomas Sangild

    2013-01-01

    recompiling the basic framework infrastructure. Gadgets are typically implemented in C/C++, but the framework includes wrapper Gadgets that allow the user to implement new modules in the Python scripting language for rapid prototyping. In addition to the streaming framework infrastructure, the Gadgetron comes......This work presents a new open source framework for medical image reconstruction called the “Gadgetron.” The framework implements a flexible system for creating streaming data processing pipelines where data pass through a series of modules or “Gadgets” from raw data to reconstructed images. The...

  6. Image reconstruction in PET using time of flight information

    Recent progresses in fast time coincidence technique have permitted the use of time of flight (TOF) information in positron Emission Tomography. We describe the basic concept of positron time of flight imaging and introduce new concepts in order to incorporate the TOF data in the reconstruction process. An algorithm to recover positron activity is then proposed. We describe the image reconstruction in the TTVO1 time of flight camera, the system architecture and the special purpose operators. The time of flight tomography offers large development possibilities and we look forward the new high resolution, high signal-to-noise TOF camera

  7. A simulation study on image reconstruction in magnetic particle imaging with field-free-line encoding

    Murase, Kenya

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to present image reconstruction methods for magnetic particle imaging (MPI) with a field-free-line (FFL) encoding scheme and to propose the use of the maximum likelihood-expectation maximization (ML-EM) algorithm for improving the image quality of MPI. The feasibility of these methods was investigated by computer simulations, in which the projection data were generated by summing up the Fourier harmonics obtained from the MPI signals based on the Langevin function. Images were reconstructed from the generated projection data using the filtered backprojection (FBP) method and the ML-EM algorithm. The effects of the gradient of selection magnetic field (SMF), the strength of drive magnetic field (DMF), the diameter of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs), and the number of projection data on the image quality of the reconstructed images were investigated. The spatial resolution of the reconstructed images became better with increasing gradient of SMF and with increasing diameter of MNPs u...

  8. Blockwise conjugate gradient methods for image reconstruction in volumetric CT.

    Qiu, W; Titley-Peloquin, D; Soleimani, M

    2012-11-01

    Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) enables volumetric image reconstruction from 2D projection data and plays an important role in image guided radiation therapy (IGRT). Filtered back projection is still the most frequently used algorithm in applications. The algorithm discretizes the scanning process (forward projection) into a system of linear equations, which must then be solved to recover images from measured projection data. The conjugate gradients (CG) algorithm and its variants can be used to solve (possibly regularized) linear systems of equations Ax=b and linear least squares problems minx∥b-Ax∥2, especially when the matrix A is very large and sparse. Their applications can be found in a general CT context, but in tomography problems (e.g. CBCT reconstruction) they have not widely been used. Hence, CBCT reconstruction using the CG-type algorithm LSQR was implemented and studied in this paper. In CBCT reconstruction, the main computational challenge is that the matrix A usually is very large, and storing it in full requires an amount of memory well beyond the reach of commodity computers. Because of these memory capacity constraints, only a small fraction of the weighting matrix A is typically used, leading to a poor reconstruction. In this paper, to overcome this difficulty, the matrix A is partitioned and stored blockwise, and blockwise matrix-vector multiplications are implemented within LSQR. This implementation allows us to use the full weighting matrix A for CBCT reconstruction without further enhancing computer standards. Tikhonov regularization can also be implemented in this fashion, and can produce significant improvement in the reconstructed images. PMID:22325240

  9. A novel hybrid reconstruction algorithm for first generation incoherent scatter CT (ISCT) of large objects with potential medical imaging applications.

    Alpuche Aviles, Jorge E; Pistorius, Stephen; Gordon, Richard; Elbakri, Idris A

    2011-01-01

    This work presents a first generation incoherent scatter CT (ISCT) hybrid (analytic-iterative) reconstruction algorithm for accurate ρ{e}imaging of objects with clinically relevant sizes. The algorithm reconstructs quantitative images of ρ{e} within a few iterations, avoiding the challenges of optimization based reconstruction algorithms while addressing the limitations of current analytical algorithms. A 4π detector is conceptualized in order to address the issue of directional dependency and is then replaced with a ring of detectors which detect a constant fraction of the scattered photons. The ISCT algorithm corrects for the attenuation of photons using a limited number of iterations and filtered back projection (FBP) for image reconstruction. This results in a hybrid reconstruction algorithm that was tested with sinograms generated by Monte Carlo (MC) and analytical (AN) simulations. Results show that the ISCT algorithm is weakly dependent on the ρ{e} initial estimate. Simulation results show that the proposed algorithm reconstruct ρ{e} images with a mean error of -1% ± 3% for the AN model and from -6% to -8% for the MC model. Finally, the algorithm is capable of reconstructing qualitatively good images even in the presence of multiple scatter. The proposed algorithm would be suitable for in-vivo medical imaging as long as practical limitations can be addressed. PMID:21422588

  10. Dual-source CT coronary imaging in heart transplant recipients: image quality and optimal reconstruction interval

    Bastarrika, Gorka; Arraiza, Maria; Pueyo, Jesus C. [Clinica Universitaria, Universidad de Navarra, Department of Radiology, Pamplona (Spain); Cecco, Carlo N. de [Universita' di Roma ' ' Sapienza' ' -Ospedale Sant' Andrea, Department of Radiology, Rome (Italy); Ubilla, Matias; Mastrobuoni, Stefano; Rabago, Gregorio [Clinica Universitaria, Universidad de Navarra, Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, Pamplona (Spain)

    2008-09-15

    The image quality and optimal reconstruction interval for coronary arteries in heart transplant recipients undergoing non-invasive dual-source computed tomography (DSCT) coronary angiography was evaluated. Twenty consecutive heart transplant recipients who underwent DSCT coronary angiography were included (19 male, one female; mean age 63.1{+-}10.7 years). Data sets were reconstructed in 5% steps from 30% to 80% of the R-R interval. Two blinded independent observers assessed the image quality of each coronary segments using a five-point scale (from 0 = not evaluative to 4=excellent quality). A total of 289 coronary segments in 20 heart transplant recipients were evaluated. Mean heart rate during the scan was 89.1{+-}10.4 bpm. At the best reconstruction interval, diagnostic image quality (score {>=}2) was obtained in 93.4% of the coronary segments (270/289) with a mean image quality score of 3.04{+-} 0.63. Systolic reconstruction intervals provided better image quality scores than diastolic reconstruction intervals (overall mean quality scores obtained with the systolic and diastolic reconstructions 3.03{+-}1.06 and 2.73{+-}1.11, respectively; P<0.001). Different systolic reconstruction intervals (35%, 40%, 45% of RR interval) did not yield to significant differences in image quality scores for the coronary segments (P=0.74). Reconstructions obtained at the systolic phase of the cardiac cycle allowed excellent diagnostic image quality coronary angiograms in heart transplant recipients undergoing DSCT coronary angiography. (orig.)

  11. A methodology to event reconstruction from trace images.

    Milliet, Quentin; Delémont, Olivier; Sapin, Eric; Margot, Pierre

    2015-03-01

    The widespread use of digital imaging devices for surveillance (CCTV) and entertainment (e.g., mobile phones, compact cameras) has increased the number of images recorded and opportunities to consider the images as traces or documentation of criminal activity. The forensic science literature focuses almost exclusively on technical issues and evidence assessment [1]. Earlier steps in the investigation phase have been neglected and must be considered. This article is the first comprehensive description of a methodology to event reconstruction using images. This formal methodology was conceptualised from practical experiences and applied to different contexts and case studies to test and refine it. Based on this practical analysis, we propose a systematic approach that includes a preliminary analysis followed by four main steps. These steps form a sequence for which the results from each step rely on the previous step. However, the methodology is not linear, but it is a cyclic, iterative progression for obtaining knowledge about an event. The preliminary analysis is a pre-evaluation phase, wherein potential relevance of images is assessed. In the first step, images are detected and collected as pertinent trace material; the second step involves organising and assessing their quality and informative potential. The third step includes reconstruction using clues about space, time and actions. Finally, in the fourth step, the images are evaluated and selected as evidence. These steps are described and illustrated using practical examples. The paper outlines how images elicit information about persons, objects, space, time and actions throughout the investigation process to reconstruct an event step by step. We emphasise the hypothetico-deductive reasoning framework, which demonstrates the contribution of images to generating, refining or eliminating propositions or hypotheses. This methodology provides a sound basis for extending image use as evidence and, more generally

  12. AN IMAGE-BASED TECHNIQUE FOR 3D BUILDING RECONSTRUCTION USING MULTI-VIEW UAV IMAGES

    F. Alidoost

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, with the development of the urban areas, the automatic reconstruction of the buildings, as an important objects of the city complex structures, became a challenging topic in computer vision and photogrammetric researches. In this paper, the capability of multi-view Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs images is examined to provide a 3D model of complex building façades using an efficient image-based modelling workflow. The main steps of this work include: pose estimation, point cloud generation, and 3D modelling. After improving the initial values of interior and exterior parameters at first step, an efficient image matching technique such as Semi Global Matching (SGM is applied on UAV images and a dense point cloud is generated. Then, a mesh model of points is calculated using Delaunay 2.5D triangulation and refined to obtain an accurate model of building. Finally, a texture is assigned to mesh in order to create a realistic 3D model. The resulting model has provided enough details of building based on visual assessment.

  13. Towards corner matching for image reconstruction

    Uselton, S P; Jancun-Kelly, T J; Hamann, B; Joy, K I

    1999-06-14

    A common problem in so-called multi-source visualization data analysis and visualization is the identification of certain common features in two-dimensional (2D) images and their counterparts in three-dimensions (3D). We discuss methods to define and effectively extract features, e.g., corners or edges, from 2D images and 3D models. Work toward this goal is described and lessons learned discussed.

  14. Accurate Measurement of Magnetic Resonance Imaging Gradient Characteristics

    Hui Liu

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Recently, gradient performance and fidelity has become of increasing interest, as the fidelity of the magnetic resonance (MR image is somewhat dependent on the fidelity of the gradient system. In particular, for high fidelity non-Cartesian imaging, due to non-fidelity of the gradient system, it becomes necessary to know the actual k-space trajectory as opposed to the requested trajectory. In this work we show that, by considering the gradient system as a linear time-invariant system, the gradient impulse response function (GIRF can be reliably measured to a relatively high degree of accuracy with a simple setup, using a small phantom and a series of simple experiments. It is shown experimentally that the resulting GIRF is able to predict actual gradient performance with a high degree of accuracy. The method captures not only the frequency response but also gradient timing errors and artifacts due to mechanical vibrations of the gradient system. Some discussion is provided comparing the method presented here with other analogous methods, along with limitations of these methods.

  15. CT image reconstruction system based on hardware implementation

    Silva, Hamilton P. da [Faculdade Tecnologica Internacional de Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Evseev, Ivan; Schelin, Hugo R.; Paschuk, Sergei A.; Milhoretto, Edney; Setti, Joao A.P.; Zibetti, Marcelo [Universidade Tecnologica Federal do Parana, Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Hormaza, Joel M. [UNESP, Botucatu, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Biociencias; Lopes, Ricardo T. [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao de Engenharia (COPPE/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Lab. de Instrumentacao Nuclear

    2009-07-01

    Full text: The timing factor is very important for medical imaging systems, which can nowadays be synchronized by vital human signals, like heartbeats or breath. The use of hardware implemented devices in such a system has advantages considering the high speed of information treatment combined with arbitrary low cost on the market. This article refers to a hardware system which is based on electronic programmable logic called FPGA, model Cyclone II from ALTERA Corporation. The hardware was implemented on the UP3 ALTERA Kit. A partially connected neural network with unitary weights was programmed. The system was tested with 60 topographic projections, 100 points in each, of the Shepp and Logan phantom created by MATLAB. The main restriction was found to be the memory size available on the device: the dynamic range of reconstructed image was limited to 0 65535. Also, the normalization factor must be observed in order to do not saturate the image during the reconstruction and filtering process. The test shows a principal possibility to build CT image reconstruction systems for any reasonable amount of input data by arranging the parallel work of the hardware units like we have tested. However, further studies are necessary for better understanding of the error propagation from topographic projections to reconstructed image within the implemented method. (author)

  16. PET image reconstruction: mean, variance, and optimal minimax criterion

    Liu, Huafeng; Gao, Fei; Guo, Min; Xue, Liying; Nie, Jing; Shi, Pengcheng

    2015-04-01

    Given the noise nature of positron emission tomography (PET) measurements, it is critical to know the image quality and reliability as well as expected radioactivity map (mean image) for both qualitative interpretation and quantitative analysis. While existing efforts have often been devoted to providing only the reconstructed mean image, we present a unified framework for joint estimation of the mean and corresponding variance of the radioactivity map based on an efficient optimal min-max criterion. The proposed framework formulates the PET image reconstruction problem to be a transformation from system uncertainties to estimation errors, where the minimax criterion is adopted to minimize the estimation errors with possibly maximized system uncertainties. The estimation errors, in the form of a covariance matrix, express the measurement uncertainties in a complete way. The framework is then optimized by ∞-norm optimization and solved with the corresponding H∞ filter. Unlike conventional statistical reconstruction algorithms, that rely on the statistical modeling methods of the measurement data or noise, the proposed joint estimation stands from the point of view of signal energies and can handle from imperfect statistical assumptions to even no a priori statistical assumptions. The performance and accuracy of reconstructed mean and variance images are validated using Monte Carlo simulations. Experiments on phantom scans with a small animal PET scanner and real patient scans are also conducted for assessment of clinical potential.

  17. Software for 3D diagnostic image reconstruction and analysis

    Recent advances in computer technologies have opened new frontiers in medical diagnostics. Interesting possibilities are the use of three-dimensional (3D) imaging and the combination of images from different modalities. Software prepared in our laboratories devoted to 3D image reconstruction and analysis from computed tomography and ultrasonography is presented. In developing our software it was assumed that it should be applicable in standard medical practice, i.e. it should work effectively with a PC. An additional feature is the possibility of combining 3D images from different modalities. The reconstruction and data processing can be conducted using a standard PC, so low investment costs result in the introduction of advanced and useful diagnostic possibilities. The program was tested on a PC using DICOM data from computed tomography and TIFF files obtained from a 3D ultrasound system. The results of the anthropomorphic phantom and patient data were taken into consideration. A new approach was used to achieve spatial correlation of two independently obtained 3D images. The method relies on the use of four pairs of markers within the regions under consideration. The user selects the markers manually and the computer calculates the transformations necessary for coupling the images. The main software feature is the possibility of 3D image reconstruction from a series of two-dimensional (2D) images. The reconstructed 3D image can be: (1) viewed with the most popular methods of 3D image viewing, (2) filtered and processed to improve image quality, (3) analyzed quantitatively (geometrical measurements), and (4) coupled with another, independently acquired 3D image. The reconstructed and processed 3D image can be stored at every stage of image processing. The overall software performance was good considering the relatively low costs of the hardware used and the huge data sets processed. The program can be freely used and tested (source code and program available at

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging with nonlinear gradient fields signal encoding and image reconstruction

    Schultz, Gerrit

    2013-01-01

    Within the past few decades magnetic resonance imaging has become one of the most important imaging modalities in medicine. For a reliable diagnosis of pathologies further technological improvements are of primary importance. This text deals with a radically new approach of image encoding: The fundamental principle of gradient linearity is challenged by investigating the possibilities of acquiring anatomical images with the help of nonlinear gradient fields. Besides a thorough theoretical analysis with a focus on signal encoding and image reconstruction, initial hardware implementations are tested using phantom as well as in-vivo measurements. Several applications are presented that give an impression about the implications that this technological advancement may have for future medical diagnostics.   Contents n  Image Reconstruction in MRI n  Nonlinear Gradient Encoding: PatLoc Imaging n  Presentation of Initial Hardware Designs n  Basics of Signal Encoding and Image Reconstruction in PatLoc Imaging n ...

  19. Efficient iterative image reconstruction algorithm for dedicated breast CT

    Antropova, Natalia; Sanchez, Adrian; Reiser, Ingrid S.; Sidky, Emil Y.; Boone, John; Pan, Xiaochuan

    2016-03-01

    Dedicated breast computed tomography (bCT) is currently being studied as a potential screening method for breast cancer. The X-ray exposure is set low to achieve an average glandular dose comparable to that of mammography, yielding projection data that contains high levels of noise. Iterative image reconstruction (IIR) algorithms may be well-suited for the system since they potentially reduce the effects of noise in the reconstructed images. However, IIR outcomes can be difficult to control since the algorithm parameters do not directly correspond to the image properties. Also, IIR algorithms are computationally demanding and have optimal parameter settings that depend on the size and shape of the breast and positioning of the patient. In this work, we design an efficient IIR algorithm with meaningful parameter specifications and that can be used on a large, diverse sample of bCT cases. The flexibility and efficiency of this method comes from having the final image produced by a linear combination of two separately reconstructed images - one containing gray level information and the other with enhanced high frequency components. Both of the images result from few iterations of separate IIR algorithms. The proposed algorithm depends on two parameters both of which have a well-defined impact on image quality. The algorithm is applied to numerous bCT cases from a dedicated bCT prototype system developed at University of California, Davis.

  20. The influence of image reconstruction algorithms on linear thorax EIT image analysis of ventilation

    Analysis methods of electrical impedance tomography (EIT) images based on different reconstruction algorithms were examined. EIT measurements were performed on eight mechanically ventilated patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome. A maneuver with step increase of airway pressure was performed. EIT raw data were reconstructed offline with (1) filtered back-projection (BP); (2) the Dräger algorithm based on linearized Newton–Raphson (DR); (3) the GREIT (Graz consensus reconstruction algorithm for EIT) reconstruction algorithm with a circular forward model (GRC) and (4) GREIT with individual thorax geometry (GRT). Individual thorax contours were automatically determined from the routine computed tomography images. Five indices were calculated on the resulting EIT images respectively: (a) the ratio between tidal and deep inflation impedance changes; (b) tidal impedance changes in the right and left lungs; (c) center of gravity; (d) the global inhomogeneity index and (e) ventilation delay at mid-dorsal regions. No significant differences were found in all examined indices among the four reconstruction algorithms (p > 0.2, Kruskal–Wallis test). The examined algorithms used for EIT image reconstruction do not influence the selected indices derived from the EIT image analysis. Indices that validated for images with one reconstruction algorithm are also valid for other reconstruction algorithms. (paper)

  1. Joint Image Reconstruction and Segmentation Using the Potts Model

    Storath, Martin; Frikel, Jürgen; Unser, Michael

    2014-01-01

    We propose a new algorithmic approach to the non-smooth and non-convex Potts problem (also called piecewise-constant Mumford-Shah problem) for inverse imaging problems. We derive a suitable splitting into specific subproblems that can all be solved efficiently. Our method does not require a priori knowledge on the gray levels nor on the number of segments of the reconstruction. Further, it avoids anisotropic artifacts such as geometric staircasing. We demonstrate the suitability of our method for joint image reconstruction and segmentation from limited data in x-ray and photoacoustic tomography. For instance, our method is able to reconstruct the Shepp-Logan phantom from $7$ angular views only. We demonstrate the practical applicability in an experiment with real PET data.

  2. Holographic reconstruction of NMR images in Fresnel transform technique

    The free induction signal in the NMR Fresnel transform imaging technique is expressed by a similar equation to that of the Fresnel diffraction equation in light. It is possible to record NMR signals on a photographic film as a hologram in the same manner as optical holography. Since the dynamic range of the signal in the Fresnel transform technique is small, image information can be recorded on a hologram at a high efficiency. Very clear images are reconstructed optically from the NMR hologram in many experiments. Image brightness are improved by using a compound hologram in which several same holograms are arranged periodically. (author)

  3. Electron image reconstruction of helical protein assemblies

    The analysis of projections of large ordered biological systems obtained by electron microscopy of negatively stained specimens is described. The biological structures amenable to this approach are constructed from a large number of identical protein molecules, which are arranged according to helical symmetry. Electron images of these structures generally contain sufficient information in order to calculate a three-dimensional density map. (Auth.)

  4. Whole Mouse Brain Image Reconstruction from Serial Coronal Sections Using FIJI (ImageJ).

    Paletzki, Ronald; Gerfen, Charles R

    2015-01-01

    Whole-brain reconstruction of the mouse enables comprehensive analysis of the distribution of neurochemical markers, the distribution of anterogradely labeled axonal projections or retrogradely labeled neurons projecting to a specific brain site, or the distribution of neurons displaying activity-related markers in behavioral paradigms. This unit describes a method to produce whole-brain reconstruction image sets from coronal brain sections with up to four fluorescent markers using the freely available image-processing program FIJI (ImageJ). PMID:26426384

  5. Effects of point configuration on the accuracy in 3D reconstruction from biplane images

    Two or more angiograms are being used frequently in medical imaging to reconstruct locations in three-dimensional (3D) space, e.g., for reconstruction of 3D vascular trees, implanted electrodes, or patient positioning. A number of techniques have been proposed for this task. In this simulation study, we investigate the effect of the shape of the configuration of the points in 3D (the 'cloud' of points) on reconstruction errors for one of these techniques developed in our laboratory. Five types of configurations (a ball, an elongated ellipsoid (cigar), flattened ball (pancake), flattened cigar, and a flattened ball with a single distant point) are used in the evaluations. For each shape, 100 random configurations were generated, with point coordinates chosen from Gaussian distributions having a covariance matrix corresponding to the desired shape. The 3D data were projected into the image planes using a known imaging geometry. Gaussian distributed errors were introduced in the x and y coordinates of these projected points. Gaussian distributed errors were also introduced into the gantry information used to calculate the initial imaging geometry. The imaging geometries and 3D positions were iteratively refined using the enhanced-Metz-Fencil technique. The image data were also used to evaluate the feasible R-t solution volume. The 3D errors between the calculated and true positions were determined. The effects of the shape of the configuration, the number of points, the initial geometry error, and the input image error were evaluated. The results for the number of points, initial geometry error, and image error are in agreement with previously reported results, i.e., increasing the number of points and reducing initial geometry and/or image error, improves the accuracy of the reconstructed data. The shape of the 3D configuration of points also affects the error of reconstructed 3D configuration; specifically, errors decrease as the 'volume' of the 3D configuration

  6. Super-resolution image reconstruction employing Kriging interpolation technique

    Panagiotopoulou, Antigoni; Anastassopoulos, Vassilis

    2007-01-01

    In this paper a high-resolution (HR) image is reconstructed from a sequence of subpixel shifted, aliased low-resolution (LR) frames by means of a novel nonuniform interpolation super-resolution (SR) method. A gradient-based algorithm estimates the horizontal and vertical shifts for each frame. Then, the uniformly spaced sampling points of the HR image are produced by means of Kriging interpolation. Wiener filtering is employed to deal with the restoration problem. The novelty of the proposed ...

  7. IMAGE PROCESSING FOR SECURITY APPLICATIONS: DOCUMENT RECONSTRUCTION AND VIDEO ENHANCEMENT

    Ukovich, Anna

    2007-01-01

    Image and video processing play an important role in the development of technologies for dealing with security issues: surveillance cameras are widely diffused as means of crime reduction, and image analysis tools are used in the forensics field. In this thesis two problems are considered: the reconstruction of documents which have been reduced to a heap of paper strips by a shredder device and the enhancement of poorly illuminated surveillance videos. The system architectu...

  8. An iterative CT reconstruction algorithm for fast fluid flow imaging

    Eyndhoven, van, G.L.; Batenburg, K. Joost; Kazantsev, Daniil; Van Nieuwenhove, Vincent; Lee, Peter D.; Dobson, Katherine J.; Sijbers, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: The study of fluid flow through solid matter by computed tomography (CT) imaging has many applications, ranging from petroleum and aquifer engineering to biomedical, manufacturing, and environmental research. To avoid motion artifacts, current experiments are often limited to slow fluid flow dynamics. This severely limits the applicability of the technique. In this paper, a new iterative CT reconstruction algorithm for improved a temporal/spatial resolution in the imaging of fluid f...

  9. Image reconstruction in single photon emission computed tomography for radioactive waste testing

    The aim of this study is to reconstruct by tomography the spatial distribution of the activity of an object which emits photons. First, an analysis of the imaging qualities of a tomograph in terms of physical parameters related to the measurement process is proposed. Then, an algorithm which evaluates, the self-attenuation of the emitted photons and corrects for the collimator aperture angle is developed; this computation corresponds to a subdivision of the object into voxels and to a parallel geometry of the projections. Two algebraic reconstruction methods have been studied; one using a regularized least-squares technique, the other using a bayesian approach. We show by computer simulations the dependence of the reconstruction on the condition number of the self-attenuation matrix and on the estimation errors of this matrix. Then, the reconstruction is tested on experimental data; the images we reconstruct on a square grid of ten by ten voxels from one hundred twenty measurements show an accurate location of the sources; their activities are efficiently estimated when the collimator aperture angle is well taken into account in the self-attenuation matrix

  10. RECONSTRUCTION OF HUMAN LUNG MORPHOLOGY MODELS FROM MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGES

    Reconstruction of Human Lung Morphology Models from Magnetic Resonance ImagesT. B. Martonen (Experimental Toxicology Division, U.S. EPA, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709) and K. K. Isaacs (School of Public Health, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27514)

  11. Statistical image reconstruction methods for simultaneous emission/transmission PET scans

    Transmission scans are necessary for estimating the attenuation correction factors (ACFs) to yield quantitatively accurate PET emission images. To reduce the total scan time, post-injection transmission scans have been proposed in which one can simultaneously acquire emission and transmission data using rod sources and sinogram windowing. However, since the post-injection transmission scans are corrupted by emission coincidences, accurate correction for attenuation becomes more challenging. Conventional methods (emission subtraction) for ACF computation from post-injection scans are suboptimal and require relatively long scan times. We introduce statistical methods based on penalized-likelihood objectives to compute ACFs and then use them to reconstruct lower noise PET emission images from simultaneous transmission/emission scans. Simulations show the efficacy of the proposed methods. These methods improve image quality and SNR of the estimates as compared to conventional methods

  12. Image reconstruction for optical tomography using photon density waves

    Khalaf, R

    1999-08-01

    Diagnostic imaging makes use of different kinds of radiation. A recent type of imaging using near-infrared light is thought to be a safer and less-expensive method of in-vivo imaging. Near infra-red light can penetrate biological tissue to certain depths. The problem of using near infrared light for imaging, is that the scattering of the photons dominates absorption, causing difficulties in the reconstruction model on which biomedical optical imaging depends crucially. The aim of this thesis is to develop and investigate the performance of a reconstruction algorithm in the frequency domain which allows fast and efficient reconstruction of the image of a limb, or an optical phantom. The forward problem of the propagation of photons inside biological tissue is modelled using the Diffusion Approximation theory solved by the finite element method. Values of DC intensity, phase shift and modulation depth at the boundary as functions of the diffusion and absorption coefficients are given. The inverse model is formulated as a nonlinear least-squares optimisation problem. The Truncated Newton method with Trust region is used to determine the optical properties. Reverse differentiation is used to calculate the error function because of its speed advantage over forward differentiation. A sensitivity analysis is performed to investigate the simultaneous reconstruction of the diffusion and absorption coefficients. The use of a combined error function of DC intensity, phase and modulation prove to be the most successful at recovering the optical parameters. The ability to distinguish between object size and size of optical parameter is also investigated. Contrast, mean and standard deviation are used as measures of the performance of the reconstruction algorithm. A Tikhonov regularisation method was used to improve ill-conditioning and behaviour in the presence of noise. An investigation of the optimal regularisation parameter is undertaken with the addition of noise to the

  13. Image reconstruction for optical tomography using photon density waves

    Diagnostic imaging makes use of different kinds of radiation. A recent type of imaging using near-infrared light is thought to be a safer and less-expensive method of in-vivo imaging. Near infra-red light can penetrate biological tissue to certain depths. The problem of using near infrared light for imaging, is that the scattering of the photons dominates absorption, causing difficulties in the reconstruction model on which biomedical optical imaging depends crucially. The aim of this thesis is to develop and investigate the performance of a reconstruction algorithm in the frequency domain which allows fast and efficient reconstruction of the image of a limb, or an optical phantom. The forward problem of the propagation of photons inside biological tissue is modelled using the Diffusion Approximation theory solved by the finite element method. Values of DC intensity, phase shift and modulation depth at the boundary as functions of the diffusion and absorption coefficients are given. The inverse model is formulated as a nonlinear least-squares optimisation problem. The Truncated Newton method with Trust region is used to determine the optical properties. Reverse differentiation is used to calculate the error function because of its speed advantage over forward differentiation. A sensitivity analysis is performed to investigate the simultaneous reconstruction of the diffusion and absorption coefficients. The use of a combined error function of DC intensity, phase and modulation prove to be the most successful at recovering the optical parameters. The ability to distinguish between object size and size of optical parameter is also investigated. Contrast, mean and standard deviation are used as measures of the performance of the reconstruction algorithm. A Tikhonov regularisation method was used to improve ill-conditioning and behaviour in the presence of noise. An investigation of the optimal regularisation parameter is undertaken with the addition of noise to the

  14. Pattern density function for reconstruction of three-dimensional porous media from a single two-dimensional image

    Gao, Mingliang; Teng, Qizhi; He, Xiaohai; Zuo, Chen; Li, ZhengJi

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) structures are useful for studying the spatial structures and physical properties of porous media. A 3D structure can be reconstructed from a single two-dimensional (2D) training image (TI) by using mathematical modeling methods. Among many reconstruction algorithms, an optimal-based algorithm was developed and has strong stability. However, this type of algorithm generally uses an autocorrelation function (which is unable to accurately describe the morphological features of porous media) as its objective function. This has negatively affected further research on porous media. To accurately reconstruct 3D porous media, a pattern density function is proposed in this paper, which is based on a random variable employed to characterize image patterns. In addition, the paper proposes an original optimal-based algorithm called the pattern density function simulation; this algorithm uses a pattern density function as its objective function, and adopts a multiple-grid system. Meanwhile, to address the key point of algorithm reconstruction speed, we propose the use of neighborhood statistics, the adjacent grid and reversed phase method, and a simplified temperature-controlled mechanism. The pattern density function is a high-order statistical function; thus, when all grids in the reconstruction results converge in the objective functions, the morphological features and statistical properties of the reconstruction results will be consistent with those of the TI. The experiments include 2D reconstruction using one artificial structure, and 3D reconstruction using battery materials and cores. Hierarchical simulated annealing and single normal equation simulation are employed as the comparison algorithms. The autocorrelation function, linear path function, and pore network model are used as the quantitative measures. Comprehensive tests show that 3D porous media can be reconstructed accurately from a single 2D training image by using the method proposed

  15. Bayesian PET image reconstruction incorporating anato-functional joint entropy

    Tang, Jing; Rahmim, Arman

    2009-12-01

    We developed a maximum a posterior (MAP) reconstruction method for positron emission tomography (PET) image reconstruction incorporating magnetic resonance (MR) image information, with the joint entropy between the PET and MR image features serving as the regularization constraint. A non-parametric method was used to estimate the joint probability density of the PET and MR images. Using realistically simulated PET and MR human brain phantoms, the quantitative performance of the proposed algorithm was investigated. Incorporation of the anatomic information via this technique, after parameter optimization, was seen to dramatically improve the noise versus bias tradeoff in every region of interest, compared to the result from using conventional MAP reconstruction. In particular, hot lesions in the FDG PET image, which had no anatomical correspondence in the MR image, also had improved contrast versus noise tradeoff. Corrections were made to figures 3, 4 and 6, and to the second paragraph of section 3.1 on 13 November 2009. The corrected electronic version is identical to the print version.

  16. An automated 3D reconstruction method of UAV images

    Liu, Jun; Wang, He; Liu, Xiaoyang; Li, Feng; Sun, Guangtong; Song, Ping

    2015-10-01

    In this paper a novel fully automated 3D reconstruction approach based on low-altitude unmanned aerial vehicle system (UAVs) images will be presented, which does not require previous camera calibration or any other external prior knowledge. Dense 3D point clouds are generated by integrating orderly feature extraction, image matching, structure from motion (SfM) and multi-view stereo (MVS) algorithms, overcoming many of the cost, time limitations of rigorous photogrammetry techniques. An image topology analysis strategy is introduced to speed up large scene reconstruction by taking advantage of the flight-control data acquired by UAV. Image topology map can significantly reduce the running time of feature matching by limiting the combination of images. A high-resolution digital surface model of the study area is produced base on UAV point clouds by constructing the triangular irregular network. Experimental results show that the proposed approach is robust and feasible for automatic 3D reconstruction of low-altitude UAV images, and has great potential for the acquisition of spatial information at large scales mapping, especially suitable for rapid response and precise modelling in disaster emergency.

  17. Projective 3D-reconstruction of Uncalibrated Endoscopic Images

    P. Faltin

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The most common medical diagnostic method for urinary bladder cancer is cystoscopy. This inspection of the bladder is performed by a rigid endoscope, which is usually guided close to the bladder wall. This causes a very limited field of view; difficulty of navigation is aggravated by the usage of angled endoscopes. These factors cause difficulties in orientation and visual control. To overcome this problem, the paper presents a method for extracting 3D information from uncalibrated endoscopic image sequences and for reconstructing the scene content. The method uses the SURF-algorithm to extract features from the images and relates the images by advanced matching. To stabilize the matching, the epipolar geometry is extracted for each image pair using a modified RANSAC-algorithm. Afterwards these matched point pairs are used to generate point triplets over three images and to describe the trifocal geometry. The 3D scene points are determined by applying triangulation to the matched image points. Thus, these points are used to generate a projective 3D reconstruction of the scene, and provide the first step for further metric reconstructions.

  18. Three-dimensional reconstruction of functional brain images

    We consider PET (positron emission tomography) measurement with SPM (Statistical Parametric Mapping) analysis to be one of the most useful methods to identify activated areas of the brain involved in language processing. SPM is an effective analytical method that detects markedly activated areas over the whole brain. However, with the conventional presentations of these functional brain images, such as horizontal slices, three directional projection, or brain surface coloring, makes understanding and interpreting the positional relationships among various brain areas difficult. Therefore, we developed three-dimensionally reconstructed images from these functional brain images to improve the interpretation. The subjects were 12 normal volunteers. The following three types of images were constructed: routine images by SPM, three-dimensional static images, and three-dimensional dynamic images, after PET images were analyzed by SPM during daily dialog listening. The creation of images of both the three-dimensional static and dynamic types employed the volume rendering method by VTK (The Visualization Toolkit). Since the functional brain images did not include original brain images, we synthesized SPM and MRI brain images by self-made C++ programs. The three-dimensional dynamic images were made by sequencing static images with available software. Images of both the three-dimensional static and dynamic types were processed by a personal computer system. Our newly created images showed clearer positional relationships among activated brain areas compared to the conventional method. To date, functional brain images have been employed in fields such as neurology or neurosurgery, however, these images may be useful even in the field of otorhinolaryngology, to assess hearing and speech. Exact three-dimensional images based on functional brain images are important for exact and intuitive interpretation, and may lead to new developments in brain science. Currently, the surface

  19. Three-dimensional reconstruction of functional brain images

    Inoue, Masato; Shoji, Kazuhiko; Kojima, Hisayoshi; Hirano, Shigeru; Naito, Yasushi; Honjo, Iwao [Kyoto Univ. (Japan)

    1999-08-01

    We consider PET (positron emission tomography) measurement with SPM (Statistical Parametric Mapping) analysis to be one of the most useful methods to identify activated areas of the brain involved in language processing. SPM is an effective analytical method that detects markedly activated areas over the whole brain. However, with the conventional presentations of these functional brain images, such as horizontal slices, three directional projection, or brain surface coloring, makes understanding and interpreting the positional relationships among various brain areas difficult. Therefore, we developed three-dimensionally reconstructed images from these functional brain images to improve the interpretation. The subjects were 12 normal volunteers. The following three types of images were constructed: routine images by SPM, three-dimensional static images, and three-dimensional dynamic images, after PET images were analyzed by SPM during daily dialog listening. The creation of images of both the three-dimensional static and dynamic types employed the volume rendering method by VTK (The Visualization Toolkit). Since the functional brain images did not include original brain images, we synthesized SPM and MRI brain images by self-made C++ programs. The three-dimensional dynamic images were made by sequencing static images with available software. Images of both the three-dimensional static and dynamic types were processed by a personal computer system. Our newly created images showed clearer positional relationships among activated brain areas compared to the conventional method. To date, functional brain images have been employed in fields such as neurology or neurosurgery, however, these images may be useful even in the field of otorhinolaryngology, to assess hearing and speech. Exact three-dimensional images based on functional brain images are important for exact and intuitive interpretation, and may lead to new developments in brain science. Currently, the surface

  20. A novel data processing technique for image reconstruction of penumbral imaging

    Xie, Hongwei; Li, Hongyun; Xu, Zeping; Song, Guzhou; Zhang, Faqiang; Zhou, Lin

    2011-06-01

    CT image reconstruction technique was applied to the data processing of the penumbral imaging. Compared with other traditional processing techniques for penumbral coded pinhole image such as Wiener, Lucy-Richardson and blind technique, this approach is brand new. In this method, the coded aperture processing method was used for the first time independent to the point spread function of the image diagnostic system. In this way, the technical obstacles was overcome in the traditional coded pinhole image processing caused by the uncertainty of point spread function of the image diagnostic system. Then based on the theoretical study, the simulation of penumbral imaging and image reconstruction was carried out to provide fairly good results. While in the visible light experiment, the point source of light was used to irradiate a 5mm×5mm object after diffuse scattering and volume scattering. The penumbral imaging was made with aperture size of ~20mm. Finally, the CT image reconstruction technique was used for image reconstruction to provide a fairly good reconstruction result.

  1. How accurate is preoperative evaluation of pelvic organ prolapse in women undergoing vaginal reconstruction surgery?

    Haim Krissi

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the differences between the in-office and intraoperative techniques used to evaluate pelvic organ prolapse. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A prospective study included 25 women undergoing vaginal reconstruction surgery including vaginal hysterectomy for pelvic organ prolapse. The outpatient pelvic and site-specific vaginal examination was performed in the lithotomy position with the Valsalva maneuver. Repeated intraoperative examination was performed under general anesthesia with standard mild cervical traction. The Pelvic Organ Prolapse Quantification system (POPQ was used for both measurements and staging. The values found under the two conditions were compared. RESULTS: The intraoperative POPQ-measurements values were significantly higher than the outpatient values for apical wall prolapse in 17/25 (68% women and for anterior wall prolapse in 8/25 (32% women. There was not a significant difference in the posterior wall where increase in staging was shown in 3/25 (12% patients. CONCLUSIONS: Clinicians and patients should be alert to the possibility that pelvic organ measurements performed under general anesthesia with mild traction may be different from preoperative evaluation.

  2. A fast, accurate, and automatic 2D-3D image registration for image-guided cranial radiosurgery

    The authors developed a fast and accurate two-dimensional (2D)-three-dimensional (3D) image registration method to perform precise initial patient setup and frequent detection and correction for patient movement during image-guided cranial radiosurgery treatment. In this method, an approximate geometric relationship is first established to decompose a 3D rigid transformation in the 3D patient coordinate into in-plane transformations and out-of-plane rotations in two orthogonal 2D projections. Digitally reconstructed radiographs are generated offline from a preoperative computed tomography volume prior to treatment and used as the reference for patient position. A multiphase framework is designed to register the digitally reconstructed radiographs with the x-ray images periodically acquired during patient setup and treatment. The registration in each projection is performed independently; the results in the two projections are then combined and converted to a 3D rigid transformation by 2D-3D geometric backprojection. The in-plane transformation and the out-of-plane rotation are estimated using different search methods, including multiresolution matching, steepest descent minimization, and one-dimensional search. Two similarity measures, optimized pattern intensity and sum of squared difference, are applied at different registration phases to optimize accuracy and computation speed. Various experiments on an anthropomorphic head-and-neck phantom showed that, using fiducial registration as a gold standard, the registration errors were 0.33±0.16 mm (s.d.) in overall translation and 0.29 deg. ±0.11 deg. (s.d.) in overall rotation. The total targeting errors were 0.34±0.16 mm (s.d.), 0.40±0.2 mm (s.d.), and 0.51±0.26 mm (s.d.) for the targets at the distances of 2, 6, and 10 cm from the rotation center, respectively. The computation time was less than 3 s on a computer with an Intel Pentium 3.0 GHz dual processor

  3. High Resolution Image Reconstruction from Projection of Low Resolution Images DIffering in Subpixel Shifts

    Mareboyana, Manohar; Le Moigne-Stewart, Jacqueline; Bennett, Jerome

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate a simple algorithm that projects low resolution (LR) images differing in subpixel shifts on a high resolution (HR) also called super resolution (SR) grid. The algorithm is very effective in accuracy as well as time efficiency. A number of spatial interpolation techniques using nearest neighbor, inverse-distance weighted averages, Radial Basis Functions (RBF) etc. used in projection yield comparable results. For best accuracy of reconstructing SR image by a factor of two requires four LR images differing in four independent subpixel shifts. The algorithm has two steps: i) registration of low resolution images and (ii) shifting the low resolution images to align with reference image and projecting them on high resolution grid based on the shifts of each low resolution image using different interpolation techniques. Experiments are conducted by simulating low resolution images by subpixel shifts and subsampling of original high resolution image and the reconstructing the high resolution images from the simulated low resolution images. The results of accuracy of reconstruction are compared by using mean squared error measure between original high resolution image and reconstructed image. The algorithm was tested on remote sensing images and found to outperform previously proposed techniques such as Iterative Back Projection algorithm (IBP), Maximum Likelihood (ML), and Maximum a posterior (MAP) algorithms. The algorithm is robust and is not overly sensitive to the registration inaccuracies.

  4. Gamma-ray detection and Compton camera image reconstruction with application to hadron therapy

    A novel technique for radiotherapy - hadron therapy - irradiates tumors using a beam of protons or carbon ions. Hadron therapy is an effective technique for cancer treatment, since it enables accurate dose deposition due to the existence of a Bragg peak at the end of particles range. Precise knowledge of the fall-off position of the dose with millimeters accuracy is critical since hadron therapy proved its efficiency in case of tumors which are deep-seated, close to vital organs, or radio-resistant. A major challenge for hadron therapy is the quality assurance of dose delivery during irradiation. Current systems applying positron emission tomography (PET) technologies exploit gamma rays from the annihilation of positrons emitted during the beta decay of radioactive isotopes. However, the generated PET images allow only post-therapy information about the deposed dose. In addition, they are not in direct coincidence with the Bragg peak. A solution is to image the complete spectrum of the emitted gamma rays, including nuclear gamma rays emitted by inelastic interactions of hadrons to generated nuclei. This emission is isotropic, and has a spectrum ranging from 100 keV up to 20 MeV. However, the measurement of these energetic gamma rays from nuclear reactions exceeds the capability of all existing medical imaging systems. An advanced Compton scattering detection method with electron tracking capability is proposed, and modeled to reconstruct the high-energy gamma-ray events. This Compton detection technique was initially developed to observe gamma rays for astrophysical purposes. A device illustrating the method was designed and adapted to Hadron Therapy Imaging (HTI). It consists of two main sub-systems: a tracker where Compton recoiled electrons are measured, and a calorimeter where the scattered gamma rays are absorbed via the photoelectric effect. Considering a hadron therapy scenario, the analysis of generated data was performed, passing trough the complete

  5. Reconstruction of Cochlea Based on Micro-CT and Histological Images of the Human Inner Ear

    Christos Bellos

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The study of the normal function and pathology of the inner ear has unique difficulties as it is inaccessible during life and, so, conventional techniques of pathologic studies such as biopsy and surgical excision are not feasible, without further impairing function. Mathematical modelling is therefore particularly attractive as a tool in researching the cochlea and its pathology. The first step towards efficient mathematical modelling is the reconstruction of an accurate three dimensional (3D model of the cochlea that will be presented in this paper. The high quality of the histological images is being exploited in order to extract several sections of the cochlea that are not visible on the micro-CT (mCT images (i.e., scala media, spiral ligament, and organ of Corti as well as other important sections (i.e., basilar membrane, Reissner membrane, scala vestibule, and scala tympani. The reconstructed model is being projected in the centerline of the coiled cochlea, extracted from mCT images, and represented in the 3D space. The reconstruction activities are part of the SIFEM project, which will result in the delivery of an infrastructure, semantically interlinking various tools and libraries (i.e., segmentation, reconstruction, and visualization tools with the clinical knowledge, which is represented by existing data, towards the delivery of a robust multiscale model of the inner ear.

  6. Fast and accurate generation method of PSF-based system matrix for PET reconstruction

    Sun, Xiao-Li; Yun, Ming-Kai; Li, Dao-Wu; Gao, Juan; Li, Mo-Han; Chai, Pei; Tang, Hao-Hui; Zhang, Zhi-Ming; Wei, Long

    2016-01-01

    Positional single photon incidence response (P-SPIR) theory is researched in this paper to generate more accurate PSF-contained system matrix simply and quickly. The method has been proved highly effective to improve the spatial resolution by applying to the Eplus-260 primate PET designed by the Institute of High Energy Physics of the Chinese Academy of Sciences(IHEP). Simultaneously, to meet the clinical needs, GPU acceleration is put to use. Basically, P-SPIR theory takes both incidence angle and incidence position by crystal subdivision instead of only incidence angle into consideration based on Geant4 Application for Emission Tomography (GATE). The simulation conforms to the actual response distribution and can be completed rapidly within less than 1s. Furthermore,two-block penetration and normalization of the response probability are raised to fit the reality. With PSF obtained, the homogenization model is analyzed to calculate the spread distribution of bins within a few minutes for system matrix genera...

  7. Polarimetric ISAR: Simulation and image reconstruction

    Chambers, David H. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-03-21

    In polarimetric ISAR the illumination platform, typically airborne, carries a pair of antennas that are directed toward a fixed point on the surface as the platform moves. During platform motion, the antennas maintain their gaze on the point, creating an effective aperture for imaging any targets near that point. The interaction between the transmitted fields and targets (e.g. ships) is complicated since the targets are typically many wavelengths in size. Calculation of the field scattered from the target typically requires solving Maxwell’s equations on a large three-dimensional numerical grid. This is prohibitive to use in any real-world imaging algorithm, so the scattering process is typically simplified by assuming the target consists of a cloud of independent, non-interacting, scattering points (centers). Imaging algorithms based on this scattering model perform well in many applications. Since polarimetric radar is not very common, the scattering model is often derived for a scalar field (single polarization) where the individual scatterers are assumed to be small spheres. However, when polarization is important, we must generalize the model to explicitly account for the vector nature of the electromagnetic fields and its interaction with objects. In this note, we present a scattering model that explicitly includes the vector nature of the fields but retains the assumption that the individual scatterers are small. The response of the scatterers is described by electric and magnetic dipole moments induced by the incident fields. We show that the received voltages in the antennas are linearly related to the transmitting currents through a scattering impedance matrix that depends on the overall geometry of the problem and the nature of the scatterers.

  8. 3D reconstruction of multiple stained histology images

    Yi Song

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Three dimensional (3D tissue reconstructions from the histology images with different stains allows the spatial alignment of structural and functional elements highlighted by different stains for quantitative study of many physiological and pathological phenomena. This has significant potential to improve the understanding of the growth patterns and the spatial arrangement of diseased cells, and enhance the study of biomechanical behavior of the tissue structures towards better treatments (e.g. tissue-engineering applications. Methods: This paper evaluates three strategies for 3D reconstruction from sets of two dimensional (2D histological sections with different stains, by combining methods of 2D multi-stain registration and 3D volumetric reconstruction from same stain sections. Setting and Design: The different strategies have been evaluated on two liver specimens (80 sections in total stained with Hematoxylin and Eosin (H and E, Sirius Red, and Cytokeratin (CK 7. Results and Conclusion: A strategy of using multi-stain registration to align images of a second stain to a volume reconstructed by same-stain registration results in the lowest overall error, although an interlaced image registration approach may be more robust to poor section quality.

  9. Image Reconstruction for Invasive ERT in Vertical Oil Well Logging

    周海力; 徐立军; 曹章; 胡金海; 刘兴斌

    2012-01-01

    An invasive electrical resistance tomographic sensor was proposed for production logging in vertical oil well.The sensor consists of 24 electrodes that are fixed to the logging tool,which can move in the pipeline to acquire data on the conductivity distribution of oil/water mixture flow at different depths.A sensitivity-based algorithm was introduced to reconstruct the cross-sectional images.Analysis on the sensitivity of the sensor to the distribution of oil/water mixture flow was carried out to optimize the position of the imaging cross-section.The imaging results obtained using various boundary conditions at the pipe wall and the logging tool were compared.Eight typical models with various conductivity distributions were created and the measurement data were obtained by solving the forward problem of the sensor system.Image reconstruction was then implemented by using the simulation data for each model.Comparisons between the models and the reconstructed images show that the number and spatial distribution of the oil bubbles can be clearly identified.

  10. Development of Image Reconstruction Algorithms in electrical Capacitance Tomography

    The Electrical Capacitance Tomography (ECT) has not obtained a good development in order to be used at industrial level. That is due first to difficulties in the measurement of very little capacitances (in the range of femto farads) and second to the problem of reconstruction on- line of the images. This problem is due also to the small numbers of electrodes (maximum 16), that made the usual algorithms of reconstruction has many errors. In this work it is described a new purely geometrical method that could be used for this purpose. (Author) 4 refs

  11. Reconstruction of surface potential from Kelvin probe force microscopy images

    We present an algorithm for reconstructing a sample surface potential from its Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) image. The measured KPFM image is a weighted average of the surface potential underneath the tip apex due to the long-range electrostatic forces. We model the KPFM measurement by a linear shift-invariant system where the impulse response is the point spread function (PSF). By calculating the PSF of the KPFM probe (tip+cantilever) and using the measured noise statistics, we deconvolve the measured KPFM image to obtain the surface potential of the sample.The reconstruction algorithm is applied to measurements of CdS-PbS nanorods measured in amplitude modulation KPFM (AM-KPFM) and to graphene layers measured in frequency modulation KPFM (FM-KPFM). We show that in the AM-KPFM measurements the averaging effect is substantial, whereas in the FM-KPFM measurements the averaging effect is negligible. (paper)

  12. 3D RECONSTRUCTION FROM MULTI-VIEW MEDICAL X-RAY IMAGES – REVIEW AND EVALUATION OF EXISTING METHODS

    S. Hosseinian

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The 3D concept is extremely important in clinical studies of human body. Accurate 3D models of bony structures are currently required in clinical routine for diagnosis, patient follow-up, surgical planning, computer assisted surgery and biomechanical applications. However, 3D conventional medical imaging techniques such as computed tomography (CT scan and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI have serious limitations such as using in non-weight-bearing positions, costs and high radiation dose(for CT. Therefore, 3D reconstruction methods from biplanar X-ray images have been taken into consideration as reliable alternative methods in order to achieve accurate 3D models with low dose radiation in weight-bearing positions. Different methods have been offered for 3D reconstruction from X-ray images using photogrammetry which should be assessed. In this paper, after demonstrating the principles of 3D reconstruction from X-ray images, different existing methods of 3D reconstruction of bony structures from radiographs are classified and evaluated with various metrics and their advantages and disadvantages are mentioned. Finally, a comparison has been done on the presented methods with respect to several metrics such as accuracy, reconstruction time and their applications. With regards to the research, each method has several advantages and disadvantages which should be considered for a specific application.

  13. D Reconstruction from Multi-View Medical X-Ray Images - Review and Evaluation of Existing Methods

    Hosseinian, S.; Arefi, H.

    2015-12-01

    The 3D concept is extremely important in clinical studies of human body. Accurate 3D models of bony structures are currently required in clinical routine for diagnosis, patient follow-up, surgical planning, computer assisted surgery and biomechanical applications. However, 3D conventional medical imaging techniques such as computed tomography (CT) scan and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have serious limitations such as using in non-weight-bearing positions, costs and high radiation dose(for CT). Therefore, 3D reconstruction methods from biplanar X-ray images have been taken into consideration as reliable alternative methods in order to achieve accurate 3D models with low dose radiation in weight-bearing positions. Different methods have been offered for 3D reconstruction from X-ray images using photogrammetry which should be assessed. In this paper, after demonstrating the principles of 3D reconstruction from X-ray images, different existing methods of 3D reconstruction of bony structures from radiographs are classified and evaluated with various metrics and their advantages and disadvantages are mentioned. Finally, a comparison has been done on the presented methods with respect to several metrics such as accuracy, reconstruction time and their applications. With regards to the research, each method has several advantages and disadvantages which should be considered for a specific application.

  14. Image reconstruction techniques applied to nuclear mass models

    Morales, Irving O.; Isacker, P. Van; Velazquez, V.; Barea, J.; Mendoza-Temis, J.; Vieyra, J. C. López; Hirsch, J. G.; Frank, A.

    2010-02-01

    A new procedure is presented that combines well-known nuclear models with image reconstruction techniques. A color-coded image is built by taking the differences between measured masses and the predictions given by the different theoretical models. This image is viewed as part of a larger array in the (N,Z) plane, where unknown nuclear masses are hidden, covered by a “mask.” We apply a suitably adapted deconvolution algorithm, used in astronomical observations, to “open the window” and see the rest of the pattern. We show that it is possible to improve significantly mass predictions in regions not too far from measured nuclear masses.

  15. Image reconstruction techniques applied to nuclear mass models

    A new procedure is presented that combines well-known nuclear models with image reconstruction techniques. A color-coded image is built by taking the differences between measured masses and the predictions given by the different theoretical models. This image is viewed as part of a larger array in the (N,Z) plane, where unknown nuclear masses are hidden, covered by a 'mask'.' We apply a suitably adapted deconvolution algorithm, used in astronomical observations, to 'open the window' and see the rest of the pattern. We show that it is possible to improve significantly mass predictions in regions not too far from measured nuclear masses.

  16. A qualitative and quantitative analysis of radiation dose and image quality of computed tomography images using adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction.

    Hussain, Fahad Ahmed; Mail, Noor; Shamy, Abdulrahman M; Suliman, Alghamdi; Saoudi, Abdelhamid

    2016-01-01

    Image quality is a key issue in radiology, particularly in a clinical setting where it is important to achieve accurate diagnoses while minimizing radiation dose. Some computed tomography (CT) manufacturers have introduced algorithms that claim significant dose reduction. In this study, we assessed CT image quality produced by two reconstruction algorithms provided with GE Healthcare's Discovery 690 Elite positron emission tomography (PET) CT scanner. Image quality was measured for images obtained at various doses with both conventional filtered back-projection (FBP) and adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) algorithms. A stan-dard CT dose index (CTDI) phantom and a pencil ionization chamber were used to measure the CT dose at 120 kVp and an exposure of 260 mAs. Image quality was assessed using two phantoms. CT images of both phantoms were acquired at tube voltage (kV) of 120 with exposures ranging from 25 mAs to 400 mAs. Images were reconstructed using FBP and ASIR ranging from 10% to 100%, then analyzed for noise, low-contrast detectability, contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), and modulation transfer function (MTF). Noise was 4.6 HU in water phantom images acquired at 260 mAs/FBP 120 kV and 130 mAs/50% ASIR 120 kV. The large objects (fre-quency frequency >7 lp/cm) showed poor visibility compared to FBP at 260 mAs and even worse for images acquired at less than 130 mAs. ASIR blending more than 50% at low dose tends to reduce contrast of small objects (frequency >7 lp/cm). We concluded that dose reduction and ASIR should be applied with close attention if the objects to be detected or diagnosed are small (frequency > 7 lp/cm). Further investigations are required to correlate the small objects (frequency > 7 lp/cm) to patient anatomy and clinical diagnosis. PMID:27167261

  17. The SRT reconstruction algorithm for semiquantification in PET imaging

    Kastis, George A., E-mail: gkastis@academyofathens.gr [Research Center of Mathematics, Academy of Athens, Athens 11527 (Greece); Gaitanis, Anastasios [Biomedical Research Foundation of the Academy of Athens (BRFAA), Athens 11527 (Greece); Samartzis, Alexandros P. [Nuclear Medicine Department, Evangelismos General Hospital, Athens 10676 (Greece); Fokas, Athanasios S. [Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB30WA, United Kingdom and Research Center of Mathematics, Academy of Athens, Athens 11527 (Greece)

    2015-10-15

    Purpose: The spline reconstruction technique (SRT) is a new, fast algorithm based on a novel numerical implementation of an analytic representation of the inverse Radon transform. The mathematical details of this algorithm and comparisons with filtered backprojection were presented earlier in the literature. In this study, the authors present a comparison between SRT and the ordered-subsets expectation–maximization (OSEM) algorithm for determining contrast and semiquantitative indices of {sup 18}F-FDG uptake. Methods: The authors implemented SRT in the software for tomographic image reconstruction (STIR) open-source platform and evaluated this technique using simulated and real sinograms obtained from the GE Discovery ST positron emission tomography/computer tomography scanner. All simulations and reconstructions were performed in STIR. For OSEM, the authors used the clinical protocol of their scanner, namely, 21 subsets and two iterations. The authors also examined images at one, four, six, and ten iterations. For the simulation studies, the authors analyzed an image-quality phantom with cold and hot lesions. Two different versions of the phantom were employed at two different hot-sphere lesion-to-background ratios (LBRs), namely, 2:1 and 4:1. For each noiseless sinogram, 20 Poisson realizations were created at five different noise levels. In addition to making visual comparisons of the reconstructed images, the authors determined contrast and bias as a function of the background image roughness (IR). For the real-data studies, sinograms of an image-quality phantom simulating the human torso were employed. The authors determined contrast and LBR as a function of the background IR. Finally, the authors present plots of contrast as a function of IR after smoothing each reconstructed image with Gaussian filters of six different sizes. Statistical significance was determined by employing the Wilcoxon rank-sum test. Results: In both simulated and real studies, SRT

  18. The SRT reconstruction algorithm for semiquantification in PET imaging

    Purpose: The spline reconstruction technique (SRT) is a new, fast algorithm based on a novel numerical implementation of an analytic representation of the inverse Radon transform. The mathematical details of this algorithm and comparisons with filtered backprojection were presented earlier in the literature. In this study, the authors present a comparison between SRT and the ordered-subsets expectation–maximization (OSEM) algorithm for determining contrast and semiquantitative indices of 18F-FDG uptake. Methods: The authors implemented SRT in the software for tomographic image reconstruction (STIR) open-source platform and evaluated this technique using simulated and real sinograms obtained from the GE Discovery ST positron emission tomography/computer tomography scanner. All simulations and reconstructions were performed in STIR. For OSEM, the authors used the clinical protocol of their scanner, namely, 21 subsets and two iterations. The authors also examined images at one, four, six, and ten iterations. For the simulation studies, the authors analyzed an image-quality phantom with cold and hot lesions. Two different versions of the phantom were employed at two different hot-sphere lesion-to-background ratios (LBRs), namely, 2:1 and 4:1. For each noiseless sinogram, 20 Poisson realizations were created at five different noise levels. In addition to making visual comparisons of the reconstructed images, the authors determined contrast and bias as a function of the background image roughness (IR). For the real-data studies, sinograms of an image-quality phantom simulating the human torso were employed. The authors determined contrast and LBR as a function of the background IR. Finally, the authors present plots of contrast as a function of IR after smoothing each reconstructed image with Gaussian filters of six different sizes. Statistical significance was determined by employing the Wilcoxon rank-sum test. Results: In both simulated and real studies, SRT exhibits

  19. Accurate membrane tracing in three-dimensional reconstructions from electron cryotomography data

    Page, Christopher; Hanein, Dorit; Volkmann, Niels, E-mail: niels@burnham.org

    2015-08-15

    The connection between the extracellular matrix and the cell is of major importance for mechanotransduction and mechanobiology. Electron cryo-tomography, in principle, enables better than nanometer-resolution analysis of these connections, but restrictions of data collection geometry hamper the accurate extraction of the ventral membrane location from these tomograms, an essential prerequisite for the analysis. Here, we introduce a novel membrane tracing strategy that enables ventral membrane extraction at high fidelity and extraordinary accuracy. The approach is based on detecting the boundary between the inside and the outside of the cell rather than trying to explicitly trace the membrane. Simulation studies show that over 99% of the membrane can be correctly modeled using this principle and the excellent match of visually identifiable membrane stretches with the extracted boundary of experimental data indicates that the accuracy is comparable for actual data. - Highlights: • The connection between the ECM and the cell is of major importance. • Electron cryo-tomography provides nanometer-resolution information. • Data collection geometry hampers extraction of membranes from tomograms. • We introduce a novel membrane tracing strategy allowing high fidelity extraction. • Simulations show that over 99% of the membrane can be correctly modeled this way.

  20. Accurate membrane tracing in three-dimensional reconstructions from electron cryotomography data

    The connection between the extracellular matrix and the cell is of major importance for mechanotransduction and mechanobiology. Electron cryo-tomography, in principle, enables better than nanometer-resolution analysis of these connections, but restrictions of data collection geometry hamper the accurate extraction of the ventral membrane location from these tomograms, an essential prerequisite for the analysis. Here, we introduce a novel membrane tracing strategy that enables ventral membrane extraction at high fidelity and extraordinary accuracy. The approach is based on detecting the boundary between the inside and the outside of the cell rather than trying to explicitly trace the membrane. Simulation studies show that over 99% of the membrane can be correctly modeled using this principle and the excellent match of visually identifiable membrane stretches with the extracted boundary of experimental data indicates that the accuracy is comparable for actual data. - Highlights: • The connection between the ECM and the cell is of major importance. • Electron cryo-tomography provides nanometer-resolution information. • Data collection geometry hampers extraction of membranes from tomograms. • We introduce a novel membrane tracing strategy allowing high fidelity extraction. • Simulations show that over 99% of the membrane can be correctly modeled this way

  1. LOR-interleaving image reconstruction for PET imaging with fractional-crystal collimation

    Li, Yusheng; Matej, Samuel; Karp, Joel S.; Metzler, Scott D.

    2015-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) has become an important modality in medical and molecular imaging. However, in most PET applications, the resolution is still mainly limited by the physical crystal sizes or the detector’s intrinsic spatial resolution. To achieve images with better spatial resolution in a central region of interest (ROI), we have previously proposed using collimation in PET scanners. The collimator is designed to partially mask detector crystals to detect lines of response (LORs) within fractional crystals. A sequence of collimator-encoded LORs is measured with different collimation configurations. This novel collimated scanner geometry makes the reconstruction problem challenging, as both detector and collimator effects need to be modeled to reconstruct high-resolution images from collimated LORs. In this paper, we present a LOR-interleaving (LORI) algorithm, which incorporates these effects and has the advantage of reusing existing reconstruction software, to reconstruct high-resolution images for PET with fractional-crystal collimation. We also develop a 3D ray-tracing model incorporating both the collimator and crystal penetration for simulations and reconstructions of the collimated PET. By registering the collimator-encoded LORs with the collimator configurations, high-resolution LORs are restored based on the modeled transfer matrices using the non-negative least-squares method and EM algorithm. The resolution-enhanced images are then reconstructed from the high-resolution LORs using the MLEM or OSEM algorithm. For validation, we applied the LORI method to a small-animal PET scanner, A-PET, with a specially designed collimator. We demonstrate through simulated reconstructions with a hot-rod phantom and MOBY phantom that the LORI reconstructions can substantially improve spatial resolution and quantification compared to the uncollimated reconstructions. The LORI algorithm is crucial to improve overall image quality of collimated PET, which

  2. LOR-interleaving image reconstruction for PET imaging with fractional-crystal collimation

    Positron emission tomography (PET) has become an important modality in medical and molecular imaging. However, in most PET applications, the resolution is still mainly limited by the physical crystal sizes or the detector’s intrinsic spatial resolution. To achieve images with better spatial resolution in a central region of interest (ROI), we have previously proposed using collimation in PET scanners. The collimator is designed to partially mask detector crystals to detect lines of response (LORs) within fractional crystals. A sequence of collimator-encoded LORs is measured with different collimation configurations. This novel collimated scanner geometry makes the reconstruction problem challenging, as both detector and collimator effects need to be modeled to reconstruct high-resolution images from collimated LORs. In this paper, we present a LOR-interleaving (LORI) algorithm, which incorporates these effects and has the advantage of reusing existing reconstruction software, to reconstruct high-resolution images for PET with fractional-crystal collimation. We also develop a 3D ray-tracing model incorporating both the collimator and crystal penetration for simulations and reconstructions of the collimated PET. By registering the collimator-encoded LORs with the collimator configurations, high-resolution LORs are restored based on the modeled transfer matrices using the non-negative least-squares method and EM algorithm. The resolution-enhanced images are then reconstructed from the high-resolution LORs using the MLEM or OSEM algorithm. For validation, we applied the LORI method to a small-animal PET scanner, A-PET, with a specially designed collimator. We demonstrate through simulated reconstructions with a hot-rod phantom and MOBY phantom that the LORI reconstructions can substantially improve spatial resolution and quantification compared to the uncollimated reconstructions. The LORI algorithm is crucial to improve overall image quality of collimated PET, which

  3. Light field display and 3D image reconstruction

    Iwane, Toru

    2016-06-01

    Light field optics and its applications become rather popular in these days. With light field optics or light field thesis, real 3D space can be described in 2D plane as 4D data, which we call as light field data. This process can be divided in two procedures. First, real3D scene is optically reduced with imaging lens. Second, this optically reduced 3D image is encoded into light field data. In later procedure we can say that 3D information is encoded onto a plane as 2D data by lens array plate. This transformation is reversible and acquired light field data can be decoded again into 3D image with the arrayed lens plate. "Refocusing" (focusing image on your favorite point after taking a picture), light-field camera's most popular function, is some kind of sectioning process from encoded 3D data (light field data) to 2D image. In this paper at first I show our actual light field camera and our 3D display using acquired and computer-simulated light field data, on which real 3D image is reconstructed. In second I explain our data processing method whose arithmetic operation is performed not in Fourier domain but in real domain. Then our 3D display system is characterized by a few features; reconstructed image is of finer resolutions than density of arrayed lenses and it is not necessary to adjust lens array plate to flat display on which light field data is displayed.

  4. Analytic image reconstruction from partial data for a single-scan cone-beam CT with scatter correction

    Min, Jonghwan; Pua, Rizza; Cho, Seungryong, E-mail: scho@kaist.ac.kr [Department of Nuclear and Quantum Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), 291 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Insoo; Han, Bumsoo [EB Tech, Co., Ltd., 550 Yongsan-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-500 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: A beam-blocker composed of multiple strips is a useful gadget for scatter correction and/or for dose reduction in cone-beam CT (CBCT). However, the use of such a beam-blocker would yield cone-beam data that can be challenging for accurate image reconstruction from a single scan in the filtered-backprojection framework. The focus of the work was to develop an analytic image reconstruction method for CBCT that can be directly applied to partially blocked cone-beam data in conjunction with the scatter correction. Methods: The authors developed a rebinned backprojection-filteration (BPF) algorithm for reconstructing images from the partially blocked cone-beam data in a circular scan. The authors also proposed a beam-blocking geometry considering data redundancy such that an efficient scatter estimate can be acquired and sufficient data for BPF image reconstruction can be secured at the same time from a single scan without using any blocker motion. Additionally, scatter correction method and noise reduction scheme have been developed. The authors have performed both simulation and experimental studies to validate the rebinned BPF algorithm for image reconstruction from partially blocked cone-beam data. Quantitative evaluations of the reconstructed image quality were performed in the experimental studies. Results: The simulation study revealed that the developed reconstruction algorithm successfully reconstructs the images from the partial cone-beam data. In the experimental study, the proposed method effectively corrected for the scatter in each projection and reconstructed scatter-corrected images from a single scan. Reduction of cupping artifacts and an enhancement of the image contrast have been demonstrated. The image contrast has increased by a factor of about 2, and the image accuracy in terms of root-mean-square-error with respect to the fan-beam CT image has increased by more than 30%. Conclusions: The authors have successfully demonstrated that the

  5. Analytic image reconstruction from partial data for a single-scan cone-beam CT with scatter correction

    Purpose: A beam-blocker composed of multiple strips is a useful gadget for scatter correction and/or for dose reduction in cone-beam CT (CBCT). However, the use of such a beam-blocker would yield cone-beam data that can be challenging for accurate image reconstruction from a single scan in the filtered-backprojection framework. The focus of the work was to develop an analytic image reconstruction method for CBCT that can be directly applied to partially blocked cone-beam data in conjunction with the scatter correction. Methods: The authors developed a rebinned backprojection-filteration (BPF) algorithm for reconstructing images from the partially blocked cone-beam data in a circular scan. The authors also proposed a beam-blocking geometry considering data redundancy such that an efficient scatter estimate can be acquired and sufficient data for BPF image reconstruction can be secured at the same time from a single scan without using any blocker motion. Additionally, scatter correction method and noise reduction scheme have been developed. The authors have performed both simulation and experimental studies to validate the rebinned BPF algorithm for image reconstruction from partially blocked cone-beam data. Quantitative evaluations of the reconstructed image quality were performed in the experimental studies. Results: The simulation study revealed that the developed reconstruction algorithm successfully reconstructs the images from the partial cone-beam data. In the experimental study, the proposed method effectively corrected for the scatter in each projection and reconstructed scatter-corrected images from a single scan. Reduction of cupping artifacts and an enhancement of the image contrast have been demonstrated. The image contrast has increased by a factor of about 2, and the image accuracy in terms of root-mean-square-error with respect to the fan-beam CT image has increased by more than 30%. Conclusions: The authors have successfully demonstrated that the

  6. Achieving accurate radiochromic optical-CT imaging when using a polychromatic light source

    Optical-CT performed with a broad spectrum light source can lead to inaccurate reconstructed attenuation coefficients (and hence dose) due to 'spectral warping' as the beam passes through the dosimeter. Some wavelengths will be attenuated more strongly than others depending on the absorption spectrum of the radiochromic dosimeter. A simulation was run to characterize the error introduced by the spectrum warping phenomena. Simulations of a typical dosimeter and delivered dose (6cm diameter, 2 Gy irradiation) showed reconstructed attenuation coefficients can be in error by >12% when compared to those obtained from a monochromatic scan. A method to correct for these errors is presented and preliminary data suggests that with the correction, polychromatic imaging can yield imaging results equal in accuracy to those of monochromatic imaging. The advantage is that polychromatic imaging may be less sensitive to prominent schlerring artefacts that are often observed in telecentric optical-CT scanning systems with tight bandwidth filters applied.

  7. Performance validation of phase diversity image reconstruction techniques

    Hirzberger, J.; Feller, A.; Riethmüller, T. L.; Gandorfer, A.; Solanki, S. K.

    2011-05-01

    We present a performance study of a phase diversity (PD) image reconstruction algorithm based on artificial solar images obtained from MHD simulations and on seeing-free data obtained with the SuFI instrument on the Sunrise balloon borne observatory. The artificial data were altered by applying different levels of degradation with synthesised wavefront errors and noise. The PD algorithm was modified by changing the number of fitted polynomials, the shape of the pupil and the applied noise filter. The obtained reconstructions are evaluated by means of the resulting rms intensity contrast and by the conspicuousness of appearing artifacts. The results show that PD is a robust method which consistently recovers the initial unaffected image contents. The efficiency of the reconstruction is, however, strongly dependent on the number of used fitting polynomials and the noise level of the images. If the maximum number of fitted polynomials is higher than 21, artifacts have to be accepted and for noise levels higher than 10-3 the commonly used noise filtering techniques are not able to avoid amplification of spurious structures.

  8. GPU based Monte Carlo for PET image reconstruction: parameter optimization

    This paper presents the optimization of a fully Monte Carlo (MC) based iterative image reconstruction of Positron Emission Tomography (PET) measurements. With our MC re- construction method all the physical effects in a PET system are taken into account thus superior image quality is achieved in exchange for increased computational effort. The method is feasible because we utilize the enormous processing power of Graphical Processing Units (GPUs) to solve the inherently parallel problem of photon transport. The MC approach regards the simulated positron decays as samples in mathematical sums required in the iterative reconstruction algorithm, so to complement the fast architecture, our work of optimization focuses on the number of simulated positron decays required to obtain sufficient image quality. We have achieved significant results in determining the optimal number of samples for arbitrary measurement data, this allows to achieve the best image quality with the least possible computational effort. Based on this research recommendations can be given for effective partitioning of computational effort into the iterations in limited time reconstructions. (author)

  9. Complications of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: MR imaging

    Arthroscopic reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) using autografts or allografts is being performed with increasing frequency, particularly in young athletes. Although the procedure is generally well tolerated, with good success rates, early and late complications have been documented. As clinical manifestations of graft complications are often non-specific and plain radiographs cannot directly visualize the graft and the adjacent soft tissues, MR imaging has a definite role in the diagnosis of complications after ACL reconstruction and may direct subsequent therapeutic management. Our purpose is to review the normal MR imaging of the ACL graft and present the MR imaging findings of a wide spectrum of complications after ACL reconstruction, such as graft impingement, graft rupture, cystic degeneration of the graft, postoperative infection of the knee, diffuse and localized (i.e., cyclops lesion) arthrofibrosis, and associated donor site abnormalities. Awareness of the MR imaging findings of complications as well as the normal appearances of the normal ACL graft is essential for correct interpretation. (orig.)

  10. Complications of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: MR imaging

    Papakonstantinou, Olympia; Chung, Christine B.; Chanchairujira, Kullanuch; Resnick, Donald L. [Department of Radiology, Veterans Affairs Medical Center, University of California, 3350 La Jolla Village Dr., San Diego, CA 92161 (United States)

    2003-05-01

    Arthroscopic reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) using autografts or allografts is being performed with increasing frequency, particularly in young athletes. Although the procedure is generally well tolerated, with good success rates, early and late complications have been documented. As clinical manifestations of graft complications are often non-specific and plain radiographs cannot directly visualize the graft and the adjacent soft tissues, MR imaging has a definite role in the diagnosis of complications after ACL reconstruction and may direct subsequent therapeutic management. Our purpose is to review the normal MR imaging of the ACL graft and present the MR imaging findings of a wide spectrum of complications after ACL reconstruction, such as graft impingement, graft rupture, cystic degeneration of the graft, postoperative infection of the knee, diffuse and localized (i.e., cyclops lesion) arthrofibrosis, and associated donor site abnormalities. Awareness of the MR imaging findings of complications as well as the normal appearances of the normal ACL graft is essential for correct interpretation. (orig.)

  11. A fast experimental beam hardening correction method for accurate bone mineral measurements in 3D μCT imaging system.

    Koubar, Khodor; Bekaert, Virgile; Brasse, David; Laquerriere, Patrice

    2015-06-01

    Bone mineral density plays an important role in the determination of bone strength and fracture risks. Consequently, it is very important to obtain accurate bone mineral density measurements. The microcomputerized tomography system provides 3D information about the architectural properties of bone. Quantitative analysis accuracy is decreased by the presence of artefacts in the reconstructed images, mainly due to beam hardening artefacts (such as cupping artefacts). In this paper, we introduced a new beam hardening correction method based on a postreconstruction technique performed with the use of off-line water and bone linearization curves experimentally calculated aiming to take into account the nonhomogeneity in the scanned animal. In order to evaluate the mass correction rate, calibration line has been carried out to convert the reconstructed linear attenuation coefficient into bone masses. The presented correction method was then applied on a multimaterial cylindrical phantom and on mouse skeleton images. Mass correction rate up to 18% between uncorrected and corrected images were obtained as well as a remarkable improvement of a calculated mouse femur mass has been noticed. Results were also compared to those obtained when using the simple water linearization technique which does not take into account the nonhomogeneity in the object. PMID:25818096

  12. Tomographic Image Reconstruction Using Training Images with Matrix and Tensor Formulations

    Soltani, Sara

    Reducing X-ray exposure while maintaining the image quality is a major challenge in computed tomography (CT); since the imperfect data produced from the few view and/or low intensity projections results in low-quality images that are suffering from severe artifacts when using conventional...... reconstruction methods. Incorporating a priori information about the solution is a necessity to improve the reconstruction. For example, Total Variation (TV) regularization method –assuming a piecewise constant image model – has been shown to allow reducing X-ray exposure significantly, while maintaining the...... machine learning technique (here, the dictionary learning), prototype elements from the training images are extracted and then incorporated in the tomographic reconstruction problem both with matrix and tensor representations of the training images. First, an algorithm for the tomographic image...

  13. A Comparison of Manual Neuronal Reconstruction from Biocytin Histology or 2-Photon Imaging: Morphometry and Computer Modeling

    Arne Vladimir Blackman

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Accurate 3D reconstruction of neurons is vital for applications linking anatomy and physiology. Reconstructions are typically created using Neurolucida after biocytin histology (BH. An alternative inexpensive and fast method is to use freeware such as Neuromantic to reconstruct from fluorescence imaging (FI stacks acquired using 2-photon laser-scanning microscopy during physiological recording. We compare these two methods with respect to morphometry, cell classification, and multicompartmental modeling in the NEURON simulation environment. Quantitative morphological analysis of the same cells reconstructed using both methods reveals that whilst biocytin reconstructions facilitate tracing of more distal collaterals, both methods are comparable in representing the overall morphology: automated clustering of reconstructions from both methods successfully separates neocortical basket cells from pyramidal cells but not BH from FI reconstructions. BH reconstructions suffer more from tissue shrinkage and compression artifacts than FI reconstructions do. FI reconstructions, on the other hand, consistently have larger process diameters. Consequently, significant differences in NEURON modeling of excitatory post-synaptic potential (EPSP forward propagation are seen between the two methods, with FI reconstructions exhibiting smaller depolarizations. Simulated action potential backpropagation (bAP, however, is indistinguishable between reconstructions obtained with the two methods. In our hands, BH reconstructions are necessary for NEURON modeling and detailed morphological tracing, and thus remain state of the art, although they are more labor intensive, more expensive, and suffer from a higher failure rate. However, for a subset of anatomical applications such as cell type identification, FI reconstructions are superior, because of indistinguishable classification performance with greater ease of use, essentially 100% success rate, and lower cost.

  14. A dual oxygenation and fluorescence imaging platform for reconstructive surgery

    Ashitate, Yoshitomo; Nguyen, John N.; Venugopal, Vivek; Stockdale, Alan; Neacsu, Florin; Kettenring, Frank; Lee, Bernard T.; Frangioni, John V.; Gioux, Sylvain

    2013-03-01

    There is a pressing clinical need to provide image guidance during surgery. Currently, assessment of tissue that needs to be resected or avoided is performed subjectively, leading to a large number of failures, patient morbidity, and increased healthcare costs. Because near-infrared (NIR) optical imaging is safe, noncontact, inexpensive, and can provide relatively deep information (several mm), it offers unparalleled capabilities for providing image guidance during surgery. These capabilities are well illustrated through the clinical translation of fluorescence imaging during oncologic surgery. In this work, we introduce a novel imaging platform that combines two complementary NIR optical modalities: oxygenation imaging and fluorescence imaging. We validated this platform during facial reconstructive surgery on large animals approaching the size of humans. We demonstrate that NIR fluorescence imaging provides identification of perforator arteries, assesses arterial perfusion, and can detect thrombosis, while oxygenation imaging permits the passive monitoring of tissue vital status, as well as the detection and origin of vascular compromise simultaneously. Together, the two methods provide a comprehensive approach to identifying problems and intervening in real time during surgery before irreparable damage occurs. Taken together, this novel platform provides fully integrated and clinically friendly endogenous and exogenous NIR optical imaging for improved image-guided intervention during surgery.

  15. Utility of high-definition FDG-PET image reconstruction for lung cancer staging

    Ozawa, Yoshiyuki; Hara, Masaki; Shibamoto, Yuta [Dept. of Radiology, Nagoya City Univ. Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Aichi (Japan)], e-mail: ykiooster@gmail.com; Tamaki, Tsuneo; Omi, Kumiko [Dept. of Radiology, East Nagoya Imaging Diagnosis Center, Aichi (Japan); Nishio, Masami [Dept. of Radiology, Nagoya PET Imaging Center, Aichi (Japan)

    2013-10-15

    Background: High-definition (HD) positron emission tomography (PET) image reconstruction is a new image reconstruction method based on the point spread function system, which improves the spatial resolution of the images. Purpose: To compare the utility of HD reconstruction of PET images for staging lung cancer with that of conventional 2D ordered subset expectation maximization + Fourier rebinning (2D) reconstruction. Material and Methods: Thirty-five lung cancer patients (24 men, 11 women; median age, 66 years) who underwent surgery after 18F-2-deoxy-fluoro-D-glucose (FDG)-PET-CT were studied. Their PET data were reconstructed with 2D and HD PET reconstruction algorithms. Two radiologists individually TNM staged both sets of images. They also evaluated the quality of the images and the diagnostic confidence that the images afforded them using 5-point scales. Results: T, N, and M stages were correctly diagnosed on both the 2D and HD reconstructed images in 23 (66%), 25 (71%), and 30 (86%) of 35 cases, respectively. Overall TNM stage was correctly diagnosed on both types of reconstructed images in 23 cases (66%), underestimated in three (9%), and overestimated in nine (26%). No significant difference in T, N, or M stage or overall TNM stage was observed between the two reconstruction methods. However, the HD reconstructed images afforded a significantly higher level of diagnostic confidence during TNM staging than the 2D reconstructed images and were also of higher quality than the 2D reconstructed images. Conclusion: Although HD reconstruction of FDG-PET images did not improve the diagnostic accuracy of lung cancer staging compared with 2D reconstruction, the quality of the HD reconstructed images and the diagnostic confidence level they afforded the radiologists were higher than those of the conventional 2D reconstructed images.

  16. Utility of high-definition FDG-PET image reconstruction for lung cancer staging

    Background: High-definition (HD) positron emission tomography (PET) image reconstruction is a new image reconstruction method based on the point spread function system, which improves the spatial resolution of the images. Purpose: To compare the utility of HD reconstruction of PET images for staging lung cancer with that of conventional 2D ordered subset expectation maximization + Fourier rebinning (2D) reconstruction. Material and Methods: Thirty-five lung cancer patients (24 men, 11 women; median age, 66 years) who underwent surgery after 18F-2-deoxy-fluoro-D-glucose (FDG)-PET-CT were studied. Their PET data were reconstructed with 2D and HD PET reconstruction algorithms. Two radiologists individually TNM staged both sets of images. They also evaluated the quality of the images and the diagnostic confidence that the images afforded them using 5-point scales. Results: T, N, and M stages were correctly diagnosed on both the 2D and HD reconstructed images in 23 (66%), 25 (71%), and 30 (86%) of 35 cases, respectively. Overall TNM stage was correctly diagnosed on both types of reconstructed images in 23 cases (66%), underestimated in three (9%), and overestimated in nine (26%). No significant difference in T, N, or M stage or overall TNM stage was observed between the two reconstruction methods. However, the HD reconstructed images afforded a significantly higher level of diagnostic confidence during TNM staging than the 2D reconstructed images and were also of higher quality than the 2D reconstructed images. Conclusion: Although HD reconstruction of FDG-PET images did not improve the diagnostic accuracy of lung cancer staging compared with 2D reconstruction, the quality of the HD reconstructed images and the diagnostic confidence level they afforded the radiologists were higher than those of the conventional 2D reconstructed images

  17. Electromagnetic Model and Image Reconstruction Algorithms Based on EIT System

    CAO Zhang; WANG Huaxiang

    2006-01-01

    An intuitive 2 D model of circular electrical impedance tomography ( EIT) sensor with small size electrodes is established based on the theory of analytic functions.The validation of the model is proved using the result from the solution of Laplace equation.Suggestions on to electrode optimization and explanation to the ill-condition property of the sensitivity matrix are provided based on the model,which takes electrode distance into account and can be generalized to the sensor with any simple connected region through a conformal transformation.Image reconstruction algorithms based on the model are implemented to show feasibility of the model using experimental data collected from the EIT system developed in Tianjin University.In the simulation with a human chestlike configuration,electrical conductivity distributions are reconstructed using equi-potential backprojection (EBP) and Tikhonov regularization (TR) based on a conformal transformation of the model.The algorithms based on the model are suitable for online image reconstruction and the reconstructed results are good both in size and position.

  18. Accurate optical wavefront reconstruction based on reciprocity of an optical path using low resolution spatial light modulators

    Li, Zhiyang

    2010-10-01

    A method for high precision optical wavefront reconstruction using low resolution spatial light modulators (SLMs) was proposed. It utilizes an adiabatic waveguide taper consisting of a plurality of single-mode waveguides to decompose an incident light field into simple fundamental modes of the single-mode waveguides. By digital generation of the conjugate fields of those simple fundamental modes a field proportional to the original incident light field might be reconstructed accurately based on reciprocity. Devices based on the method using transparent and reflective SLMs possess no aberration like that of a conventional optic lens and are able to achieve diffraction limited resolution. Specifically on the surface of the narrow end of a taper a resolution much higher than half of the wavelength is attainable. The device may work in linear mode and possesses unlimited theoretical 3D space-bandwidth product (SBP). The SBP of a real device is limited by the accuracy of SLMs. A pair of 8-bit SLMs with 1000 × 1000 = 10 6 pixels could provide a SBP of about 5 × 10 4. The SBP may expand by 16 times if 10-bit SLMs with the same number of pixels are employed or 16 successive frames are used to display one scene. The device might be used as high precision optical tweezers, or employed for continuous or discrete real-time 3D display, 3D measurement, machine vision, etc.

  19. Digital filtering and reconstruction of coded aperture images

    The real-time neutron radiography facility at the University of Virginia has been used for both transmission radiography and computed tomography. Recently, a coded aperture system has been developed to permit the extraction of three dimensional information from a low intensity field of radiation scattered by an extended object. Short wave-length radiations (e.g. neutrons) are not easily image because of the difficulties in achieving diffraction and refraction with a conventional lens imaging system. By using a coded aperture approach, an imaging system has been developed that records and reconstructs an object from an intensity distribution. This system has a signal-to-noise ratio that is proportional to the total open area of the aperture making it ideal for imaging with a limiting intensity radiation field. The main goal of this research was to develope and implement the digital methods and theory necessary for the reconstruction process. Several real-time video systems, attached to an Intellect-100 image processor, a DEC PDP-11 micro-computer, and a Convex-1 parallel processing mainframe were employed. This system, coupled with theoretical extensions and improvements, allowed for retrieval of information previously unobtainable by earlier optical methods. The effect of thermal noise, shot noise, and aperture related artifacts were examined so that new digital filtering techniques could be constructed and implemented. Results of image data filtering prior to and following the reconstruction process are reported. Improvements related to the different signal processing methods are emphasized. The application and advantages of this imaging technique to the field of non-destructive testing are also discussed

  20. A Software Package of Quantitative SPECT Image Reconstruction for Measurement of Physiological in Vivo Parameter

    Accurate estimation of radioactivity is essential for the quantitative measurement of physiological in vivo parameter in the medical field using nuclear medicine imaging. Among many nuclear medicine modalities, single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) has been widely used in many clinical studies. Many SPECT studies with quantitative manner have been reported and evaluated, which have been contributed to the advance of SPECT technique and wide spread of its use. However, SPECT is still not employed in quantitative study as much as positron emission tomography (PET) has done. Recently, we reported an approach to quantify radioactivity accurately using SPECT, and evaluated its applicability in real measurement of physiological parameter [1-8]. Based on these reports, we developed a software package (QSPECT) for image reconstruction of SPECT data

  1. Research on image matching method of big data image of three-dimensional reconstruction

    Zhang, Chunsen; Qiu, Zhenguo; Zhu, Shihuan; Wang, Xiqi; Xu, Xiaolei; Zhong, Sidong

    2015-12-01

    Image matching is the main flow of a three-dimensional reconstruction. With the development of computer processing technology, seeking the image to be matched from the large date image sets which acquired from different image formats, different scales and different locations has put forward a new request for image matching. To establish the three dimensional reconstruction based on image matching from big data images, this paper put forward a new effective matching method based on visual bag of words model. The main technologies include building the bag of words model and image matching. First, extracting the SIFT feature points from images in the database, and clustering the feature points to generate the bag of words model. We established the inverted files based on the bag of words. The inverted files can represent all images corresponding to each visual word. We performed images matching depending on the images under the same word to improve the efficiency of images matching. Finally, we took the three-dimensional model with those images. Experimental results indicate that this method is able to improve the matching efficiency, and is suitable for the requirements of large data reconstruction.

  2. Dual-source CT coronary imaging in heart transplant recipients: image quality and optimal reconstruction interval

    The image quality and optimal reconstruction interval for coronary arteries in heart transplant recipients undergoing non-invasive dual-source computed tomography (DSCT) coronary angiography was evaluated. Twenty consecutive heart transplant recipients who underwent DSCT coronary angiography were included (19 male, one female; mean age 63.1±10.7 years). Data sets were reconstructed in 5% steps from 30% to 80% of the R-R interval. Two blinded independent observers assessed the image quality of each coronary segments using a five-point scale (from 0 = not evaluative to 4=excellent quality). A total of 289 coronary segments in 20 heart transplant recipients were evaluated. Mean heart rate during the scan was 89.1±10.4 bpm. At the best reconstruction interval, diagnostic image quality (score ≥2) was obtained in 93.4% of the coronary segments (270/289) with a mean image quality score of 3.04± 0.63. Systolic reconstruction intervals provided better image quality scores than diastolic reconstruction intervals (overall mean quality scores obtained with the systolic and diastolic reconstructions 3.03±1.06 and 2.73±1.11, respectively; P<0.001). Different systolic reconstruction intervals (35%, 40%, 45% of RR interval) did not yield to significant differences in image quality scores for the coronary segments (P=0.74). Reconstructions obtained at the systolic phase of the cardiac cycle allowed excellent diagnostic image quality coronary angiograms in heart transplant recipients undergoing DSCT coronary angiography. (orig.)

  3. GPU based Monte Carlo for PET image reconstruction: detector modeling

    Monte Carlo (MC) calculations and Graphical Processing Units (GPUs) are almost like the dedicated hardware designed for the specific task given the similarities between visible light transport and neutral particle trajectories. A GPU based MC gamma transport code has been developed for Positron Emission Tomography iterative image reconstruction calculating the projection from unknowns to data at each iteration step taking into account the full physics of the system. This paper describes the simplified scintillation detector modeling and its effect on convergence. (author)

  4. Wavelets to reconstruct turbulence multifractals from experimental image sequences

    Dérian, Pierre; Héas, Patrick; Mémin, Étienne

    2011-01-01

    International audience In the context of turbulent fluid motion measurement from image sequences, we propose in this paper to reverse the traditional point of view of wavelets perceived as an analyzing tool: wavelets and their properties are now considered as prior regularization models for the motion estimation problem, in order to exhibit some well-known turbulence regularities and multifractal behaviors on the reconstructed motion field.

  5. Iterative PET Image Reconstruction Using Translation Invariant Wavelet Transform.

    Zhou, Jian; Senhadji, Lotfi; Coatrieux, Jean-Louis; Luo, Limin

    2009-01-01

    The present work describes a Bayesian maximum a posteriori (MAP) method using a statistical multiscale wavelet prior model. Rather than using the orthogonal discrete wavelet transform (DWT), this prior is built on the translation invariant wavelet transform (TIWT). The statistical modeling of wavelet coefficients relies on the generalized Gaussian distribution. Image reconstruction is performed in spatial domain with a fast block sequential iteration algorithm. We study theoretically the TIWT...

  6. Image reconstruction using Monte Carlo simulation and artificial neural networks

    PET data sets are subject to two types of distortions during acquisition: the imperfect response of the scanner and attenuation and scattering in the active distribution. In addition, the reconstruction of voxel images from the line projections composing a data set can introduce artifacts. Monte Carlo simulation provides a means for modeling the distortions and artificial neural networks a method for correcting for them as well as minimizing artifacts. (author) figs., tab., refs

  7. SU-E-J-23: An Accurate Algorithm to Match Imperfectly Matched Images for Lung Tumor Detection Without Markers

    Rozario, T; Bereg, S [University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, TX (United States); Chiu, T; Liu, H; Kearney, V; Jiang, L; Mao, W [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: In order to locate lung tumors on projection images without internal markers, digitally reconstructed radiograph (DRR) is created and compared with projection images. Since lung tumors always move and their locations change on projection images while they are static on DRRs, a special DRR (background DRR) is generated based on modified anatomy from which lung tumors are removed. In addition, global discrepancies exist between DRRs and projections due to their different image originations, scattering, and noises. This adversely affects comparison accuracy. A simple but efficient comparison algorithm is reported. Methods: This method divides global images into a matrix of small tiles and similarities will be evaluated by calculating normalized cross correlation (NCC) between corresponding tiles on projections and DRRs. The tile configuration (tile locations) will be automatically optimized to keep the tumor within a single tile which has bad matching with the corresponding DRR tile. A pixel based linear transformation will be determined by linear interpolations of tile transformation results obtained during tile matching. The DRR will be transformed to the projection image level and subtracted from it. The resulting subtracted image now contains only the tumor. A DRR of the tumor is registered to the subtracted image to locate the tumor. Results: This method has been successfully applied to kV fluoro images (about 1000 images) acquired on a Vero (Brainlab) for dynamic tumor tracking on phantom studies. Radiation opaque markers are implanted and used as ground truth for tumor positions. Although, other organs and bony structures introduce strong signals superimposed on tumors at some angles, this method accurately locates tumors on every projection over 12 gantry angles. The maximum error is less than 2.6 mm while the total average error is 1.0 mm. Conclusion: This algorithm is capable of detecting tumor without markers despite strong background signals.

  8. Variational Reconstruction of Left Cardiac Structure from CMR Images.

    Min Wan

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular Disease (CVD, accounting for 17% of overall deaths in the USA, is the leading cause of death over the world. Advances in medical imaging techniques make the quantitative assessment of both the anatomy and function of heart possible. The cardiac modeling is an invariable prerequisite for quantitative analysis. In this study, a novel method is proposed to reconstruct the left cardiac structure from multi-planed cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR images and contours. Routine CMR examination was performed to acquire both long axis and short axis images. Trained technologists delineated the endocardial contours. Multiple sets of two dimensional contours were projected into the three dimensional patient-based coordinate system and registered to each other. The union of the registered point sets was applied a variational surface reconstruction algorithm based on Delaunay triangulation and graph-cuts. The resulting triangulated surfaces were further post-processed. Quantitative evaluation on our method was performed via computing the overlapping ratio between the reconstructed model and the manually delineated long axis contours, which validates our method. We envisage that this method could be used by radiographers and cardiologists to diagnose and assess cardiac function in patients with diverse heart diseases.

  9. Neutron source reconstruction from pinhole imaging at National Ignition Facility

    The neutron imaging system at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) is an important diagnostic tool for measuring the two-dimensional size and shape of the neutrons produced in the burning deuterium-tritium plasma during the ignition stage of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions at NIF. Since the neutron source is small (∼100 μm) and neutrons are deeply penetrating (>3 cm) in all materials, the apertures used to achieve the desired 10-μm resolution are 20-cm long, single-sided tapers in gold. These apertures, which have triangular cross sections, produce distortions in the image, and the extended nature of the pinhole results in a non-stationary or spatially varying point spread function across the pinhole field of view. In this work, we have used iterative Maximum Likelihood techniques to remove the non-stationary distortions introduced by the aperture to reconstruct the underlying neutron source distributions. We present the detailed algorithms used for these reconstructions, the stopping criteria used and reconstructed sources from data collected at NIF with a discussion of the neutron imaging performance in light of other diagnostics

  10. A Two-Phase Space Resection Model for Accurate Topographic Reconstruction from Lunar Imagery with PushbroomScanners.

    Xu, Xuemiao; Zhang, Huaidong; Han, Guoqiang; Kwan, Kin Chung; Pang, Wai-Man; Fang, Jiaming; Zhao, Gansen

    2016-01-01

    Exterior orientation parameters' (EOP) estimation using space resection plays an important role in topographic reconstruction for push broom scanners. However, existing models of space resection are highly sensitive to errors in data. Unfortunately, for lunar imagery, the altitude data at the ground control points (GCPs) for space resection are error-prone. Thus, existing models fail to produce reliable EOPs. Motivated by a finding that for push broom scanners, angular rotations of EOPs can be estimated independent of the altitude data and only involving the geographic data at the GCPs, which are already provided, hence, we divide the modeling of space resection into two phases. Firstly, we estimate the angular rotations based on the reliable geographic data using our proposed mathematical model. Then, with the accurate angular rotations, the collinear equations for space resection are simplified into a linear problem, and the global optimal solution for the spatial position of EOPs can always be achieved. Moreover, a certainty term is integrated to penalize the unreliable altitude data for increasing the error tolerance. Experimental results evidence that our model can obtain more accurate EOPs and topographic maps not only for the simulated data, but also for the real data from Chang'E-1, compared to the existing space resection model. PMID:27077855

  11. A Two-Phase Space Resection Model for Accurate Topographic Reconstruction from Lunar Imagery with PushbroomScanners

    Xuemiao Xu

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Exterior orientation parameters’ (EOP estimation using space resection plays an important role in topographic reconstruction for push broom scanners. However, existing models of space resection are highly sensitive to errors in data. Unfortunately, for lunar imagery, the altitude data at the ground control points (GCPs for space resection are error-prone. Thus, existing models fail to produce reliable EOPs. Motivated by a finding that for push broom scanners, angular rotations of EOPs can be estimated independent of the altitude data and only involving the geographic data at the GCPs, which are already provided, hence, we divide the modeling of space resection into two phases. Firstly, we estimate the angular rotations based on the reliable geographic data using our proposed mathematical model. Then, with the accurate angular rotations, the collinear equations for space resection are simplified into a linear problem, and the global optimal solution for the spatial position of EOPs can always be achieved. Moreover, a certainty term is integrated to penalize the unreliable altitude data for increasing the error tolerance. Experimental results evidence that our model can obtain more accurate EOPs and topographic maps not only for the simulated data, but also for the real data from Chang’E-1, compared to the existing space resection model.

  12. Multiplanar reconstruction in MR imaging of the knee. Comparison with standard sagittal and coronal images

    Purpose: To compare standard MR sagittal and coronal imaging of the knee with the MR technique of finer sagittal imaging and subsequent reconstruction in any plane. Material and Methods: Forty-seven patients took part in the study. Two radiologists each made two independent interpretations in every case, based on images of: a) 4-mm sagittal and coronal slices; and b) 1.2-mm sagittal slices with subsequent reconstruction. Results: We found no significant difference in diagnostic efficacy between the two MR techniques. The reconstruction in any desired plane involved a potential reduction of 10 min in examination time but an increase of approximately 20 min in postprocessing time. Conclusion: The use of multiplanar reconstruction offered no additional diagnostic value and no saving of time. (orig.)

  13. Development of image reconstruction for Gamma-ray CT of large-dimension industrial plants using Monte Carlo simulation

    Khorsandi, M.; Feghhi, S.A.H., E-mail: A_feghhi@sbu.ac.ir

    2015-08-01

    In industrial Gamma-ray CT, specifically for large-dimension plants or processes, the simplicity and portability of CT system necessitate to use individual gamma-ray detectors for imaging purposes. Considering properties of the gamma-ray source as well as characteristics of the detectors, including penetration depth, energy resolution, size, etc., the quality of reconstructed images is limited. Therefore, implementation of an appropriate reconstruction procedure is important to improve the image quality. In this paper, an accurate and applicable procedure has been proposed for image reconstruction of Gamma-ray CT of large-dimension industrial plants. Additionally, a portable configuration of tomographic system was introduced and simulated in MCNPX Monte Carlo code. The simulation results were validated through comparison with the experimental results reported in the literature. Evaluations showed that maximum difference between reconstruction error in this work and the benchmark was less than 1.3%. Additional investigation has been carried out on a typical standard phantom introduced by IAEA using the validated procedure. Image quality assessment showed that the reconstruction error was less than 1.7% using different algorithms and a good contrast higher than 76% was obtained. Our overall results are indicative of the fact that the procedures and methods introduced in this work are quite efficient for improving the image quality of gamma CT of industrial plants.

  14. Development of image reconstruction for Gamma-ray CT of large-dimension industrial plants using Monte Carlo simulation

    In industrial Gamma-ray CT, specifically for large-dimension plants or processes, the simplicity and portability of CT system necessitate to use individual gamma-ray detectors for imaging purposes. Considering properties of the gamma-ray source as well as characteristics of the detectors, including penetration depth, energy resolution, size, etc., the quality of reconstructed images is limited. Therefore, implementation of an appropriate reconstruction procedure is important to improve the image quality. In this paper, an accurate and applicable procedure has been proposed for image reconstruction of Gamma-ray CT of large-dimension industrial plants. Additionally, a portable configuration of tomographic system was introduced and simulated in MCNPX Monte Carlo code. The simulation results were validated through comparison with the experimental results reported in the literature. Evaluations showed that maximum difference between reconstruction error in this work and the benchmark was less than 1.3%. Additional investigation has been carried out on a typical standard phantom introduced by IAEA using the validated procedure. Image quality assessment showed that the reconstruction error was less than 1.7% using different algorithms and a good contrast higher than 76% was obtained. Our overall results are indicative of the fact that the procedures and methods introduced in this work are quite efficient for improving the image quality of gamma CT of industrial plants

  15. 3D CAD model reconstruction of a human femur from MRI images

    Benaissa EL FAHIME

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Medical practice and life sciences take full advantage of progress in engineering disciplines, in particular the computer assisted placement technique in hip surgery. This paper describes the three dimensional model reconstruction of human femur from MRI images. The developed program enables to obtain digital shape of 3D femur recognized by all CAD software and allows an accurate placement of the femoral component. This technic provides precise measurement of implant alignment during hip resurfacing or total hip arthroplasty, thereby reducing the risk of component mal-positioning and femoral neck notching.

  16. Iterative Self-Dual Reconstruction on Radar Image Recovery

    Martins, Charles; Medeiros, Fatima; Ushizima, Daniela; Bezerra, Francisco; Marques, Regis; Mascarenhas, Nelson

    2010-05-21

    Imaging systems as ultrasound, sonar, laser and synthetic aperture radar (SAR) are subjected to speckle noise during image acquisition. Before analyzing these images, it is often necessary to remove the speckle noise using filters. We combine properties of two mathematical morphology filters with speckle statistics to propose a signal-dependent noise filter to multiplicative noise. We describe a multiscale scheme that preserves sharp edges while it smooths homogeneous areas, by combining local statistics with two mathematical morphology filters: the alternating sequential and the self-dual reconstruction algorithms. The experimental results show that the proposed approach is less sensitive to varying window sizes when applied to simulated and real SAR images in comparison with standard filters.

  17. Hierarchical Bayesian sparse image reconstruction with application to MRFM

    Dobigeon, Nicolas; Tourneret, Jean-Yves

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a hierarchical Bayesian model to reconstruct sparse images when the observations are obtained from linear transformations and corrupted by an additive white Gaussian noise. Our hierarchical Bayes model is well suited to such naturally sparse image applications as it seamlessly accounts for properties such as sparsity and positivity of the image via appropriate Bayes priors. We propose a prior that is based on a weighted mixture of a positive exponential distribution and a mass at zero. The prior has hyperparameters that are tuned automatically by marginalization over the hierarchical Bayesian model. To overcome the complexity of the posterior distribution, a Gibbs sampling strategy is proposed. The Gibbs samples can be used to estimate the image to be recovered, e.g. by maximizing the estimated posterior distribution. In our fully Bayesian approach the posteriors of all the parameters are available. Thus our algorithm provides more information than other previously proposed sparse reconstr...

  18. Qualitative and quantitative analysis of reconstructed images using projections with noises

    The reconstruction of a two-dimencional image from one-dimensional projections in an analytic algorithm ''convolution method'' is simulated on a microcomputer. In this work it was analysed the effects caused in the reconstructed image in function of the number of projections and noise level added to the projection data. Qualitative and quantitative (distortion and image noise) comparison were done with the original image and the reconstructed images. (author)

  19. MR-guided PET motion correction in LOR space using generic projection data for image reconstruction with PRESTO

    The BrainPET scanner from Siemens, designed as hybrid MR/PET system for simultaneous acquisition of both modalities, provides high-resolution PET images with an optimum resolution of 3 mm. However, significant head motion often compromises the achievable image quality, e.g. in neuroreceptor studies of human brain. This limitation can be omitted when tracking the head motion and accurately correcting measured Lines-of-Response (LORs). For this purpose, we present a novel method, which advantageously combines MR-guided motion tracking with the capabilities of the reconstruction software PRESTO (PET Reconstruction Software Toolkit) to convert motion-corrected LORs into highly accurate generic projection data. In this way, the high-resolution PET images achievable with PRESTO can also be obtained in presence of severe head motion

  20. Detection of pulmonary embolism using 64-slice multidetector-row computed tomography: accuracy and reproducibility on different image reconstruction parameters

    Jung, Jung Im; Ahn, Myeong Im; Park, Seog Hee (Dept. of Radiology, Seoul St Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic Univ. of Korea (Korea, Republic of)), email: jijung@catholic.ac.kr; Kim, Ki Jun (Deparment of Radiology, Incheon St Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic Univ. of Korea (Korea, Republic of)); Kim, Hyo Rim (Deparment of Radiology, Yeouido St Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic Univ. of Korea (Korea, Republic of)); Park, Hyun Jin (Dept. of Radiology, St Vincent Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic Univ. of Korea (Korea, Republic of)); Jung, SeungHee; Lim, Hyeon Woo (Deparment of Preventive Medicine, College of Medicine, The Catholic Univ. of Korea (Korea, Republic of))

    2011-05-15

    Background Direct comparison of different image reconstruction parameters to detect pulmonary embolism (PE) using 64-slice multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT) is absent and the most accurate image reconstruction parameters have not yet been proven. Purpose To compare different image reconstruction parameters for detecting PE using 64-slice MDCT in patients suspected of having an acute PE. Material and Methods Forty patients who underwent pulmonary CT angiography with 64-slice MDCT for a suspected PE were included. Different image reconstruction parameters were used for each patient: axial and coronal images with slice thicknesses of 0.625 mm, 1.3 mm, and 2.5 mm and axial maximum intensity projection (MIP) images with slab thicknesses of 1.3 mm, 2.5 mm, and 5 mm. Four experienced radiologists reviewed the images. The diagnosis of a PE was based on consensus review of axial 0.625 mm slice thickness images by two chest radiologists with allowing multiplanar reconstruction. Accuracy and reproducibility (kappa value) were evaluated. Results In 15 of 40 patients, a PE was diagnosed. For detecting lobar PEs, axial images with a slice thickness of 1.25 mm and all coronal re-formatted images showed comparable results to axial images with a slice thickness of 0.625 mm. For detecting segmental PEs, axial images with a slice thickness of 1.25 mm and coronal images with a slice thickness of 0.625 mm re-formatted images showed comparable results to axial images of a slice thickness of 0.625 mm. For detecting subsegmental PEs, axial images with a slice thickness of 0.625 mm showed the highest sensitivity. Better reproducibility was obtained when the thinner slice thickness reconstructions were in axial and coronal images. However, reproducibility of MIP images with slab thicknesses of 2.5 mm and 5 mm was similar for detecting segmental and subsegmental PEs. Conclusion Thin-slice reconstruction of less than 1 mm is mandatory for visualization of PE at the subsegmental

  1. Isotope specific resolution recovery image reconstruction in high resolution PET imaging

    Kotasidis, Fotis A. [Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Geneva University Hospital, CH-1211 Geneva, Switzerland and Wolfson Molecular Imaging Centre, MAHSC, University of Manchester, M20 3LJ, Manchester (United Kingdom); Angelis, Georgios I. [Faculty of Health Sciences, Brain and Mind Research Institute, University of Sydney, NSW 2006, Sydney (Australia); Anton-Rodriguez, Jose; Matthews, Julian C. [Wolfson Molecular Imaging Centre, MAHSC, University of Manchester, Manchester M20 3LJ (United Kingdom); Reader, Andrew J. [Montreal Neurological Institute, McGill University, Montreal QC H3A 2B4, Canada and Department of Biomedical Engineering, Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, King' s College London, St. Thomas’ Hospital, London SE1 7EH (United Kingdom); Zaidi, Habib [Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Geneva University Hospital, CH-1211 Geneva (Switzerland); Geneva Neuroscience Centre, Geneva University, CH-1205 Geneva (Switzerland); Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, PO Box 30 001, Groningen 9700 RB (Netherlands)

    2014-05-15

    Purpose: Measuring and incorporating a scanner-specific point spread function (PSF) within image reconstruction has been shown to improve spatial resolution in PET. However, due to the short half-life of clinically used isotopes, other long-lived isotopes not used in clinical practice are used to perform the PSF measurements. As such, non-optimal PSF models that do not correspond to those needed for the data to be reconstructed are used within resolution modeling (RM) image reconstruction, usually underestimating the true PSF owing to the difference in positron range. In high resolution brain and preclinical imaging, this effect is of particular importance since the PSFs become more positron range limited and isotope-specific PSFs can help maximize the performance benefit from using resolution recovery image reconstruction algorithms. Methods: In this work, the authors used a printing technique to simultaneously measure multiple point sources on the High Resolution Research Tomograph (HRRT), and the authors demonstrated the feasibility of deriving isotope-dependent system matrices from fluorine-18 and carbon-11 point sources. Furthermore, the authors evaluated the impact of incorporating them within RM image reconstruction, using carbon-11 phantom and clinical datasets on the HRRT. Results: The results obtained using these two isotopes illustrate that even small differences in positron range can result in different PSF maps, leading to further improvements in contrast recovery when used in image reconstruction. The difference is more pronounced in the centre of the field-of-view where the full width at half maximum (FWHM) from the positron range has a larger contribution to the overall FWHM compared to the edge where the parallax error dominates the overall FWHM. Conclusions: Based on the proposed methodology, measured isotope-specific and spatially variant PSFs can be reliably derived and used for improved spatial resolution and variance performance in resolution

  2. Accurate band-to-band registration of AOTF imaging spectrometer using motion detection technology

    Zhou, Pengwei; Zhao, Huijie; Jin, Shangzhong; Li, Ningchuan

    2016-05-01

    This paper concerns the problem of platform vibration induced band-to-band misregistration with acousto-optic imaging spectrometer in spaceborne application. Registrating images of different bands formed at different time or different position is difficult, especially for hyperspectral images form acousto-optic tunable filter (AOTF) imaging spectrometer. In this study, a motion detection method is presented using the polychromatic undiffracted beam of AOTF. The factors affecting motion detect accuracy are analyzed theoretically, and calculations show that optical distortion is an easily overlooked factor to achieve accurate band-to-band registration. Hence, a reflective dual-path optical system has been proposed for the first time, with reduction of distortion and chromatic aberration, indicating the potential of higher registration accuracy. Consequently, a spectra restoration experiment using additional motion detect channel is presented for the first time, which shows the accurate spectral image registration capability of this technique.

  3. Pragmatic fully 3D image reconstruction for the MiCES mouse imaging PET scanner

    We present a pragmatic approach to image reconstruction for data from the micro crystal elements system (MiCES) fully 3D mouse imaging positron emission tomography (PET) scanner under construction at the University of Washington. Our approach is modelled on fully 3D image reconstruction used in clinical PET scanners, which is based on Fourier rebinning (FORE) followed by 2D iterative image reconstruction using ordered-subsets expectation-maximization (OSEM). The use of iterative methods allows modelling of physical effects (e.g., statistical noise, detector blurring, attenuation, etc), while FORE accelerates the reconstruction process by reducing the fully 3D data to a stacked set of independent 2D sinograms. Previous investigations have indicated that non-stationary detector point-spread response effects, which are typically ignored for clinical imaging, significantly impact image quality for the MiCES scanner geometry. To model the effect of non-stationary detector blurring (DB) in the FORE+OSEM(DB) algorithm, we have added a factorized system matrix to the ASPIRE reconstruction library. Initial results indicate that the proposed approach produces an improvement in resolution without an undue increase in noise and without a significant increase in the computational burden. The impact on task performance, however, remains to be evaluated

  4. Fast two-dimensional super-resolution image reconstruction algorithm for ultra-high emitter density.

    Huang, Jiaqing; Gumpper, Kristyn; Chi, Yuejie; Sun, Mingzhai; Ma, Jianjie

    2015-07-01

    Single-molecule localization microscopy achieves sub-diffraction-limit resolution by localizing a sparse subset of stochastically activated emitters in each frame. Its temporal resolution is limited by the maximal emitter density that can be handled by the image reconstruction algorithms. Multiple algorithms have been developed to accurately locate the emitters even when they have significant overlaps. Currently, compressive-sensing-based algorithm (CSSTORM) achieves the highest emitter density. However, CSSTORM is extremely computationally expensive, which limits its practical application. Here, we develop a new algorithm (MempSTORM) based on two-dimensional spectrum analysis. With the same localization accuracy and recall rate, MempSTORM is 100 times faster than CSSTORM with ℓ(1)-homotopy. In addition, MempSTORM can be implemented on a GPU for parallelism, which can further increase its computational speed and make it possible for online super-resolution reconstruction of high-density emitters. PMID:26125349

  5. REGION-BASED 3D SURFACE RECONSTRUCTION USING IMAGES ACQUIRED BY LOW-COST UNMANNED AERIAL SYSTEMS

    Z. Lari

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Accurate 3D surface reconstruction of our environment has become essential for an unlimited number of emerging applications. In the past few years, Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS are evolving as low-cost and flexible platforms for geospatial data collection that could meet the needs of aforementioned application and overcome limitations of traditional airborne and terrestrial mobile mapping systems. Due to their payload restrictions, these systems usually include consumer-grade imaging and positioning sensor which will negatively impact the quality of the collected geospatial data and reconstructed surfaces. Therefore, new surface reconstruction surfaces are needed to mitigate the impact of using low-cost sensors on the final products. To date, different approaches have been proposed to for 3D surface construction using overlapping images collected by imaging sensor mounted on moving platforms. In these approaches, 3D surfaces are mainly reconstructed based on dense matching techniques. However, generated 3D point clouds might not accurately represent the scanned surfaces due to point density variations and edge preservation problems. In order to resolve these problems, a new region-based 3D surface renostruction trchnique is introduced in this paper. This approach aims to generate a 3D photo-realistic model of individually scanned surfaces within the captured images. This approach is initiated by a Semi-Global dense Matching procedure is carried out to generate a 3D point cloud from the scanned area within the collected images. The generated point cloud is then segmented to extract individual planar surfaces. Finally, a novel region-based texturing technique is implemented for photorealistic reconstruction of the extracted planar surfaces. Experimental results using images collected by a camera mounted on a low-cost UAS demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed approach for photorealistic 3D surface reconstruction.

  6. Region-Based 3d Surface Reconstruction Using Images Acquired by Low-Cost Unmanned Aerial Systems

    Lari, Z.; Al-Rawabdeh, A.; He, F.; Habib, A.; El-Sheimy, N.

    2015-08-01

    Accurate 3D surface reconstruction of our environment has become essential for an unlimited number of emerging applications. In the past few years, Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) are evolving as low-cost and flexible platforms for geospatial data collection that could meet the needs of aforementioned application and overcome limitations of traditional airborne and terrestrial mobile mapping systems. Due to their payload restrictions, these systems usually include consumer-grade imaging and positioning sensor which will negatively impact the quality of the collected geospatial data and reconstructed surfaces. Therefore, new surface reconstruction surfaces are needed to mitigate the impact of using low-cost sensors on the final products. To date, different approaches have been proposed to for 3D surface construction using overlapping images collected by imaging sensor mounted on moving platforms. In these approaches, 3D surfaces are mainly reconstructed based on dense matching techniques. However, generated 3D point clouds might not accurately represent the scanned surfaces due to point density variations and edge preservation problems. In order to resolve these problems, a new region-based 3D surface renostruction trchnique is introduced in this paper. This approach aims to generate a 3D photo-realistic model of individually scanned surfaces within the captured images. This approach is initiated by a Semi-Global dense Matching procedure is carried out to generate a 3D point cloud from the scanned area within the collected images. The generated point cloud is then segmented to extract individual planar surfaces. Finally, a novel region-based texturing technique is implemented for photorealistic reconstruction of the extracted planar surfaces. Experimental results using images collected by a camera mounted on a low-cost UAS demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed approach for photorealistic 3D surface reconstruction.

  7. Image Reconstruction and Discrimination at Low Light Levels

    Zerom, Petros

    Quantum imaging is a recent and promising branch of quantum optics that exploits the quantum nature of light. Improving the limitations imposed by classical sources of light in optical imaging techniques or overcoming the classical boundaries of image formation is one of the key motivations in quantum imaging. In this thesis, I describe certain aspects of both quantum and thermal ghost imaging and I also study image discrimination with high fidelity at low light levels. First of all, I present a theoretical and experimental study of entangled-photon compressive ghost imaging. In quantum ghost imaging using entangled photon pairs, the brightness of readily available sources is rather weak. The usual technique of image acquisition in this imaging modality is to raster scan a single-pixel single-photon sensitive detector in one arm of a ghost imaging setup. In most imaging modalities, the number of measurements required to fully resolve an object is dependent on the measurement's Nyquist limit. In the first part of the thesis, I propose a ghost imaging (GI) configuration that uses bucket detectors (as opposed to a raster scanning detector) in both arms of the GI setup. High resolution image reconstruction using only 27% of the measurement's Nyquist limit using compressed sensing algorithms are presented. The second part of my thesis deals with thermal ghost imaging. Unlike in quantum GI, bright and spatially correlated classical sources of radiation are used in thermal GI. Usually high-contrast speckle patterns are used as sources of the correlated beams of radiation. I study the effect of the field statistics of the illuminating source on the quality of ghost images. I show theoretically and experimentally that a thermal GI setup can produce high quality images even when low-contrast (intensity-averaged) speckle patterns are used as an illuminating source, as long as the collected signal is mainly caused by the random fluctuation of the incident speckle field, as

  8. Reconstruction of Static Black Hole Images Using Simple Geometric Forms

    Benkevitch, Leonid; Lu, Rusen; Doeleman, Shepherd; Fish, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    General Relativity predicts that the emission close to a black hole must be lensed by its strong gravitational field, illuminating the last photon orbit. This results in a dark circular area known as the black hole 'shadow'. The Event Horizon Telescope (EHT) is a (sub)mm VLBI network capable of Schwarzschild-radius resolution on Sagittarius A* (or Sgr A*), the 4 million solar mass black hole at the Galactic Center. The goals of the Sgr A* observations include resolving and measuring the details of its morphology. However, EHT data are sparse in the visibility domain, complicating reliable detailed image reconstruction. Therefore, direct pixel imaging should be complemented by other approaches. Using simulated EHT data from a black hole emission model we consider an approach to Sgr A* image reconstruction based on a simple and computationally efficient analytical model that produces images similar to the synthetic ones. The model consists of an eccentric ring with a brightness gradient and a two-dimensional Ga...

  9. Application of DIRI dynamic infrared imaging in reconstructive surgery

    Pawlowski, Marek; Wang, Chengpu; Jin, Feng; Salvitti, Matthew; Tenorio, Xavier

    2006-04-01

    We have developed the BioScanIR System based on QWIP (Quantum Well Infrared Photodetector). Data collected by this sensor are processed using the DIRI (Dynamic Infrared Imaging) algorithms. The combination of DIRI data processing methods with the unique characteristics of the QWIP sensor permit the creation of a new imaging modality capable of detecting minute changes in temperature at the surface of the tissue and organs associated with blood perfusion due to certain diseases such as cancer, vascular disease and diabetes. The BioScanIR System has been successfully applied in reconstructive surgery to localize donor flap feeding vessels (perforators) during the pre-surgical planning stage. The device is also used in post-surgical monitoring of skin flap perfusion. Since the BioScanIR is mobile; it can be moved to the bedside for such monitoring. In comparison to other modalities, the BioScanIR can localize perforators in a single, 20 seconds scan with definitive results available in minutes. The algorithms used include (FFT) Fast Fourier Transformation, motion artifact correction, spectral analysis and thermal image scaling. The BioScanIR is completely non-invasive and non-toxic, requires no exogenous contrast agents and is free of ionizing radiation. In addition to reconstructive surgery applications, the BioScanIR has shown promise as a useful functional imaging modality in neurosurgery, drug discovery in pre-clinical animal models, wound healing and peripheral vascular disease management.

  10. Spectral-overlap approach to multiframe superresolution image reconstruction.

    Cohen, Edward; Picard, Richard H; Crabtree, Peter N

    2016-05-20

    Various techniques and algorithms have been developed to improve the resolution of sensor-aliased imagery captured with multiple subpixel-displaced frames on an undersampled pixelated image plane. These dealiasing algorithms are typically known as multiframe superresolution (SR), or geometric SR to emphasize the role of the focal-plane array. Multiple low-resolution (LR) aliased frames of the same scene are captured and allocated to a common high-resolution (HR) reconstruction grid, leading to the possibility of an alias-free reconstruction, as long as the HR sampling rate is above the Nyquist rate. Allocating LR-frame irradiances to HR frames requires the use of appropriate weights. Here we present a novel approach in the spectral domain to calculating exactly weights based on spatial overlap areas, which we call the spectral-overlap (SO) method. We emphasize that the SO method is not a spectral approach but rather an approach to calculating spatial weights that uses spectral decompositions to exploit the array properties of the HR and LR pixels. The method is capable of dealing with arbitrary aliasing factors and interframe motions consisting of in-plane translations and rotations. We calculate example reconstructed HR images (the inverse problem) from synthetic aliased images for integer and for fractional aliasing factors. We show the utility of the SO-generated overlap-area weights in both noniterative and iterative reconstructions with known or unknown aliasing factor. We show how the overlap weights can be used to generate the Green's function (pixel response function) for noniterative dealiasing. In addition, we show how the overlap-area weights can be used to generate synthetic aliased images (the forward problem). We compare the SO approach to the spatial-domain geometric approach of O'Rourke and find virtually identical high accuracy but with significant enhancements in speed for SO. We also compare the SO weights to interpolated weights and find that

  11. Image reconstruction for the ClearPETTM Neuro

    ClearPETTM is a family of small-animal PET scanners which are currently under development within the Crystal Clear Collaboration (CERN). All scanners are based on the same detector block design using individual LSO and LuYAP crystals in phoswich configuration, coupled to multi-anode photomultiplier tubes. One of the scanners, the ClearPETTM Neuro is designed for applications in neuroscience. Four detector blocks with 64 2x2x10 mm LSO and LuYAP crystals, arranged in line, build a module. Twenty modules are arranged in a ring with a ring diameter of 13.8 cm and an axial size of 11.2 cm. An insensitive region at the border of the detector heads results in gaps between the detectors axially and tangentially. The detectors are rotating by 360o in step and shoot mode during data acquisition. Every second module is shifted axially to compensate partly for the gaps between the detector blocks in a module. This unconventional scanner geometry requires dedicated image reconstruction procedures. Data acquisition acquires single events that are stored with a time mark in a dedicated list mode format. Coincidences are associated off line by software. After sorting the data into 3D sinograms, image reconstruction is performed using the Ordered Subset Maximum A Posteriori One-Step Late (OSMAPOSL) iterative algorithm implemented in the Software for Tomographic Image Reconstruction (STIR) library. Due to the non-conventional scanner design, careful estimation of the sensitivity matrix is needed to obtain artifact-free images from the ClearPETTM Neuro

  12. Deformable meshes for medical image segmentation accurate automatic segmentation of anatomical structures

    Kainmueller, Dagmar

    2014-01-01

    ? Segmentation of anatomical structures in medical image data is an essential task in clinical practice. Dagmar Kainmueller introduces methods for accurate fully automatic segmentation of anatomical structures in 3D medical image data. The author's core methodological contribution is a novel deformation model that overcomes limitations of state-of-the-art Deformable Surface approaches, hence allowing for accurate segmentation of tip- and ridge-shaped features of anatomical structures. As for practical contributions, she proposes application-specific segmentation pipelines for a range of anatom

  13. Review of image reconstruction techniques in medical transaxial computed tomography

    After a brief recall about the basic principle of transaxial computed tomography this paper deals with the main image reconstruction techniques usable in different medical fields when projections are pre-processed according to the kind of detected signals. The analytical techniques which are based on the back-projection operation and deconvolution filtering are distinguished from the algebraic techniques which involve an iterative process for computation of the correction coefficients to be applied to the pixel values. For each technique the reconstruction algorithm is described and an illustration of the data processing steps in the case of a single radioactive source is given. The application conditions and related problems are discussed in the field of single photon emission computed tomography. The main deconvolution filters used in analytical techniques are briefly described and this review is completed by a comparison between the characteristics of analytical and algebraic techniques

  14. SPECT-OPT multimodal imaging enables accurate evaluation of radiotracers for β-cell mass assessments.

    Eter, Wael A; Parween, Saba; Joosten, Lieke; Frielink, Cathelijne; Eriksson, Maria; Brom, Maarten; Ahlgren, Ulf; Gotthardt, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) has become a promising experimental approach to monitor changes in β-cell mass (BCM) during diabetes progression. SPECT imaging of pancreatic islets is most commonly cross-validated by stereological analysis of histological pancreatic sections after insulin staining. Typically, stereological methods do not accurately determine the total β-cell volume, which is inconvenient when correlating total pancreatic tracer uptake with BCM. Alternative methods are therefore warranted to cross-validate β-cell imaging using radiotracers. In this study, we introduce multimodal SPECT - optical projection tomography (OPT) imaging as an accurate approach to cross-validate radionuclide-based imaging of β-cells. Uptake of a promising radiotracer for β-cell imaging by SPECT, (111)In-exendin-3, was measured by ex vivo-SPECT and cross evaluated by 3D quantitative OPT imaging as well as with histology within healthy and alloxan-treated Brown Norway rat pancreata. SPECT signal was in excellent linear correlation with OPT data as compared to histology. While histological determination of islet spatial distribution was challenging, SPECT and OPT revealed similar distribution patterns of (111)In-exendin-3 and insulin positive β-cell volumes between different pancreatic lobes, both visually and quantitatively. We propose ex vivo SPECT-OPT multimodal imaging as a highly accurate strategy for validating the performance of β-cell radiotracers. PMID:27080529

  15. Use of an object model in three dimensional image reconstruction. Application in medical imaging

    Threedimensional image reconstruction from projections corresponds to a set of techniques which give information on the inner structure of the studied object. These techniques are mainly used in medical imaging or in non destructive evaluation. Image reconstruction is an ill-posed problem. So the inversion has to be regularized. This thesis deals with the introduction of a priori information within the reconstruction algorithm. The knowledge is introduced through an object model. The proposed scheme is applied to the medical domain for cone beam geometry. We address two specific problems. First, we study the reconstruction of high contrast objects. This can be applied to bony morphology (bone/soft tissue) or to angiography (vascular structures opacified by injection of contrast agent). With noisy projections, the filtering steps of standard methods tend to smooth the natural transitions of the investigated object. In order to regularize the reconstruction but to keep contrast, we introduce a model of classes which involves the Markov random fields theory. We develop a reconstruction scheme: analytic reconstruction-reprojection. Then, we address the case of an object changing during the acquisition. This can be applied to angiography when the contrast agent is moving through the vascular tree. The problem is then stated as a dynamic reconstruction. We define an evolution AR model and we use an algebraic reconstruction method. We represent the object at a particular moment as an intermediary state between the state of the object at the beginning and at the end of the acquisition. We test both methods on simulated and real data, and we prove how the use of an a priori model can improve the results. (author)

  16. Image reconstruction of FT-IR microspectrometric data

    Lasch, Peter; Lewis, E. Neil; Kidder, Linda H.; Naumann, Dieter

    2000-03-01

    FT-IR microspectrometry, particularly in combination with digital imaging techniques shows great promise for in-vivo and ex-vivo medical diagnosis. The statement is based on the knowledge that this method delivers information of the chemical structure and composition of a sample and the fact that any disease is linked to changes in the molecular and structural composition of cells and tissues. Typically, these changes are highly specific for a given tissue structure and are therefore potentially detectable by FT-IR microspectrometry. In this paper we present several approaches for the representation of mid-infrared microspectroscopic data acquired with high spatial resolution by the use of a MCT focal plane array detector. The applicability of image reassembling methodologies like functional group analysis, image reconstruction based on factor analysis and artificial neural network analysis to the IR data is discussed.

  17. Effects of acquisition time and reconstruction algorithm on image quality, quantitative parameters, and clinical interpretation of myocardial perfusion imaging

    Enevoldsen, Lotte Hahn; Menashi, Changez A K; Andersen, Ulrik B;

    2013-01-01

    Recently introduced iterative reconstruction algorithms with resolution recovery (RR) and noise-reduction technology seem promising for reducing scan time or radiation dose without loss of image quality. However, the relative effects of reduced acquisition time and reconstruction software have...

  18. Application of adaptive kinetic modelling for bias propagation reduction in direct 4D image reconstruction

    Parametric imaging in thoracic and abdominal PET can provide additional parameters more relevant to the pathophysiology of the system under study. However, dynamic data in the body are noisy due to the limiting counting statistics leading to suboptimal kinetic parameter estimates. Direct 4D image reconstruction algorithms can potentially improve kinetic parameter precision and accuracy in dynamic PET body imaging. However, construction of a common kinetic model is not always feasible and in contrast to post-reconstruction kinetic analysis, errors in poorly modelled regions may spatially propagate to regions which are well modelled. To reduce error propagation from erroneous model fits, we implement and evaluate a new approach to direct parameter estimation by incorporating a recently proposed kinetic modelling strategy within a direct 4D image reconstruction framework. The algorithm uses a secondary more general model to allow a less constrained model fit in regions where the kinetic model does not accurately describe the underlying kinetics. A portion of the residuals then is adaptively included back into the image whilst preserving the primary model characteristics in other well modelled regions using a penalty term that trades off the models. Using fully 4D simulations based on dynamic [15O]H2O datasets, we demonstrate reduction in propagation-related bias for all kinetic parameters. Under noisy conditions, reductions in bias due to propagation are obtained at the cost of increased noise, which in turn results in increased bias and variance of the kinetic parameters. This trade-off reflects the challenge of separating the residuals arising from poor kinetic modelling fits from the residuals arising purely from noise. Nonetheless, the overall root mean square error is reduced in most regions and parameters. Using the adaptive 4D image reconstruction improved model fits can be obtained in poorly modelled regions, leading to reduced errors potentially propagating

  19. Cardiac motion correction based on partial angle reconstructed images in x-ray CT

    Kim, Seungeon; Chang, Yongjin; Ra, Jong Beom, E-mail: jbra@kaist.ac.kr [Department of Electrical Engineering, KAIST, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    Purpose: Cardiac x-ray CT imaging is still challenging due to heart motion, which cannot be ignored even with the current rotation speed of the equipment. In response, many algorithms have been developed to compensate remaining motion artifacts by estimating the motion using projection data or reconstructed images. In these algorithms, accurate motion estimation is critical to the compensated image quality. In addition, since the scan range is directly related to the radiation dose, it is preferable to minimize the scan range in motion estimation. In this paper, the authors propose a novel motion estimation and compensation algorithm using a sinogram with a rotation angle of less than 360°. The algorithm estimates the motion of the whole heart area using two opposite 3D partial angle reconstructed (PAR) images and compensates the motion in the reconstruction process. Methods: A CT system scans the thoracic area including the heart over an angular range of 180° + α + β, where α and β denote the detector fan angle and an additional partial angle, respectively. The obtained cone-beam projection data are converted into cone-parallel geometry via row-wise fan-to-parallel rebinning. Two conjugate 3D PAR images, whose center projection angles are separated by 180°, are then reconstructed with an angular range of β, which is considerably smaller than a short scan range of 180° + α. Although these images include limited view angle artifacts that disturb accurate motion estimation, they have considerably better temporal resolution than a short scan image. Hence, after preprocessing these artifacts, the authors estimate a motion model during a half rotation for a whole field of view via nonrigid registration between the images. Finally, motion-compensated image reconstruction is performed at a target phase by incorporating the estimated motion model. The target phase is selected as that corresponding to a view angle that is orthogonal to the center view angles of

  20. Cardiac motion correction based on partial angle reconstructed images in x-ray CT

    Purpose: Cardiac x-ray CT imaging is still challenging due to heart motion, which cannot be ignored even with the current rotation speed of the equipment. In response, many algorithms have been developed to compensate remaining motion artifacts by estimating the motion using projection data or reconstructed images. In these algorithms, accurate motion estimation is critical to the compensated image quality. In addition, since the scan range is directly related to the radiation dose, it is preferable to minimize the scan range in motion estimation. In this paper, the authors propose a novel motion estimation and compensation algorithm using a sinogram with a rotation angle of less than 360°. The algorithm estimates the motion of the whole heart area using two opposite 3D partial angle reconstructed (PAR) images and compensates the motion in the reconstruction process. Methods: A CT system scans the thoracic area including the heart over an angular range of 180° + α + β, where α and β denote the detector fan angle and an additional partial angle, respectively. The obtained cone-beam projection data are converted into cone-parallel geometry via row-wise fan-to-parallel rebinning. Two conjugate 3D PAR images, whose center projection angles are separated by 180°, are then reconstructed with an angular range of β, which is considerably smaller than a short scan range of 180° + α. Although these images include limited view angle artifacts that disturb accurate motion estimation, they have considerably better temporal resolution than a short scan image. Hence, after preprocessing these artifacts, the authors estimate a motion model during a half rotation for a whole field of view via nonrigid registration between the images. Finally, motion-compensated image reconstruction is performed at a target phase by incorporating the estimated motion model. The target phase is selected as that corresponding to a view angle that is orthogonal to the center view angles of

  1. An Iterative CT Reconstruction Algorithm for Fast Fluid Flow Imaging.

    Van Eyndhoven, Geert; Batenburg, K Joost; Kazantsev, Daniil; Van Nieuwenhove, Vincent; Lee, Peter D; Dobson, Katherine J; Sijbers, Jan

    2015-11-01

    The study of fluid flow through solid matter by computed tomography (CT) imaging has many applications, ranging from petroleum and aquifer engineering to biomedical, manufacturing, and environmental research. To avoid motion artifacts, current experiments are often limited to slow fluid flow dynamics. This severely limits the applicability of the technique. In this paper, a new iterative CT reconstruction algorithm for improved a temporal/spatial resolution in the imaging of fluid flow through solid matter is introduced. The proposed algorithm exploits prior knowledge in two ways. First, the time-varying object is assumed to consist of stationary (the solid matter) and dynamic regions (the fluid flow). Second, the attenuation curve of a particular voxel in the dynamic region is modeled by a piecewise constant function over time, which is in accordance with the actual advancing fluid/air boundary. Quantitative and qualitative results on different simulation experiments and a real neutron tomography data set show that, in comparison with the state-of-the-art algorithms, the proposed algorithm allows reconstruction from substantially fewer projections per rotation without image quality loss. Therefore, the temporal resolution can be substantially increased, and thus fluid flow experiments with faster dynamics can be performed. PMID:26259219

  2. Level-set-based reconstruction algorithm for EIT lung images: first clinical results

    We show the first clinical results using the level-set-based reconstruction algorithm for electrical impedance tomography (EIT) data. The level-set-based reconstruction method (LSRM) allows the reconstruction of non-smooth interfaces between image regions, which are typically smoothed by traditional voxel-based reconstruction methods (VBRMs). We develop a time difference formulation of the LSRM for 2D images. The proposed reconstruction method is applied to reconstruct clinical EIT data of a slow flow inflation pressure–volume manoeuvre in lung-healthy and adult lung-injury patients. Images from the LSRM and the VBRM are compared. The results show comparable reconstructed images, but with an improved ability to reconstruct sharp conductivity changes in the distribution of lung ventilation using the LSRM. (paper)

  3. Study on the fast neutron imaging and 3D image reconstruction method with Geant4

    Detecting the shielded highly enriched nuclear material by fast neutron is very significant for homeland security. With Gean4-based Monte Carlo simulation program developed by our group, the interaction of 14 MeV fast neutrons with highly enriched nuclear material (Highly enriched Uranium) and ordinary materials (lead, iron, and polyethylene) were simulated and the simulation data were analyzed with ROOT. The three-dimensional images of detected materials were obtained by the position and time data of gamma rays produced by the interaction of 14 MeV fast neutron and these materials. The reconstruction results show that the data of gamma rays can be used to reconstruct the three-dimensional imaging of detected materials. Additionally, the relative contrast of reconstructed imaging can be used to distinguish the different materials qualitatively. (authors)

  4. Influence of image reconstruction methods on statistical parametric mapping of brain PET images

    Objective: Statistic parametric mapping (SPM) was widely recognized as an useful tool in brain function study. The aim of this study was to investigate if imaging reconstruction algorithm of PET images could influence SPM of brain. Methods: PET imaging of whole brain was performed in six normal volunteers. Each volunteer had two scans with true and false acupuncturing. The PET scans were reconstructed using ordered subsets expectation maximization (OSEM) and filtered back projection (FBP) with 3 varied parameters respectively. The images were realigned, normalized and smoothed using SPM program. The difference between true and false acupuncture scans was tested using a matched pair t test at every voxel. Results: (1) SPM corrected multiple comparison (Pcorrecteduncorrected<0.001): SPM derived from the images with different reconstruction method were different. The largest difference, in number and position of the activated voxels, was noticed between FBP and OSEM re- construction algorithm. Conclusions: The method of PET image reconstruction could influence the results of SPM uncorrected multiple comparison. Attention should be paid when the conclusion was drawn using SPM uncorrected multiple comparison. (authors)

  5. A practical statistical polychromatic image reconstruction for computed tomography using spectrum binning

    Wu, Meng; Yang, Qiao; Maier, Andreas; Fahrig, Rebecca

    2014-03-01

    Polychromatic statistical reconstruction algorithms have very high computational demands due to the difficulty of the optimization problems and the large number of spectrum bins. We want to develop a more practical algorithm that has a simpler optimization problem, a faster numerical solver, and requires only a small amount of prior knowledge. In this paper, a modified optimization problem for polychromatic statistical reconstruction algorithms is proposed. The modified optimization problem utilizes the idea of determining scanned materials based on a first pass FBP reconstruction to fix the ratios between photoelectric and Compton scattering components of all image pixels. The reconstruction of a density image is easy to solve by a separable quadratic surrogate algorithm that is also applicable to the multi-material case. In addition, a spectrum binning method is introduced so that the full spectrum information is not required. The energy bins sizes and attenuations are optimized based on the true spectrum and object. With these approximations, the expected line integral values using only a few energy bins are very closed to the true polychromatic values. Thus both the problem size and computational demand caused by the large number of energy bins that are typically used to model a full spectrum are reduced. Simulation showed that three energy bins using the generalized spectrum binning method could provide an accurate approximation of the polychromatic X-ray signals. The average absolute error of the logarithmic detector signal is less than 0.003 for a 120 kVp spectrum. The proposed modified optimization problem and spectrum binning approach can effectively suppress beam hardening artifacts while providing low noise images.

  6. Sparse/Low Rank Constrained Reconstruction for Dynamic PET Imaging.

    Xingjian Yu

    Full Text Available In dynamic Positron Emission Tomography (PET, an estimate of the radio activity concentration is obtained from a series of frames of sinogram data taken at ranging in duration from 10 seconds to minutes under some criteria. So far, all the well-known reconstruction algorithms require known data statistical properties. It limits the speed of data acquisition, besides, it is unable to afford the separated information about the structure and the variation of shape and rate of metabolism which play a major role in improving the visualization of contrast for some requirement of the diagnosing in application. This paper presents a novel low rank-based activity map reconstruction scheme from emission sinograms of dynamic PET, termed as SLCR representing Sparse/Low Rank Constrained Reconstruction for Dynamic PET Imaging. In this method, the stationary background is formulated as a low rank component while variations between successive frames are abstracted to the sparse. The resulting nuclear norm and l1 norm related minimization problem can also be efficiently solved by many recently developed numerical methods. In this paper, the linearized alternating direction method is applied. The effectiveness of the proposed scheme is illustrated on three data sets.

  7. Evaluation of the Optimal Image Reconstruction Interval for Coronary Artery Imaging Using 64-Slice Computed Tomography

    Background: Cardiac computed tomography (CT) has become an established complement in cardiac imaging. Thus, optimized image quality is diagnostically crucial. Purpose: To prospectively evaluate whether, by using 64-slice CT, a specific reconstruction interval can be identified providing best image quality for all coronary artery segments and each individual coronary artery. Material and Methods: 311 coronary segments of 14 men and seven women were analyzed using 64-slice CT. Data reconstruction was performed in 5% increments from 5-100% of the R-R interval. Four experienced observers independently evaluated image quality of the coronary arteries according to the AHA classification. A three-point ranking scale was applied: 1, very poor, no evaluation possible; 2, diagnostically sufficient quality; 3, highest image quality, no artifacts. Results: The best reconstruction point for all segments was found to be 65% of the R-R interval (mean value 2.4±0.5; P<0.05). On a per-artery basis, best image quality was again achieved at 65% of the R-R interval: RCA 2.2±0.4, LCA 2.4±0.5, LM 2.5±0.2, LAD 2.3±0.4, LCX 2.3±0.5. Conclusion: By using 64-slice CT, the need for adjusting the reconstruction point to each coronary segment might be overcome. Best image quality was achieved with image reconstruction at 65% of the R-R interval for all coronary segments as well as each coronary artery

  8. Holographic microscopy reconstruction in both object and image half spaces with undistorted 3D grid

    Verrier, Nicolas; Tessier, Gilles; Gross, Michel

    2015-01-01

    We propose a holographic microscopy reconstruction method, which propagates the hologram, in the object half space, in the vicinity of the object. The calibration yields reconstructions with an undistorted reconstruction grid i.e. with orthogonal x, y and z axis and constant pixels pitch. The method is validated with an USAF target imaged by a x60 microscope objective, whose holograms are recorded and reconstructed for different USAF locations along the longitudinal axis:-75 to +75 {\\mu}m. Since the reconstruction numerical phase mask, the reference phase curvature and MO form an afocal device, the reconstruction can be interpreted as occurring equivalently in the object or in image half space.

  9. Spatial resolution properties of motion-compensated tomographic image reconstruction methods

    Chun, Se Young; Fessler, Jeffrey A.

    2012-01-01

    Many motion-compensated image reconstruction (MCIR) methods have been proposed to correct for subject motion in medical imaging. MCIR methods incorporate motion models to improve image quality by reducing motion artifacts and noise.

  10. Evaluation of imaging protocol for ECT based on CS image reconstruction algorithm

    Zhou, Xiaolin; Cao, Xuexiang; Liu, Shuangquan; Wang, Lu; Huang, Xianchao; Wei, Long

    2013-01-01

    SPECT (Single-photon Emission Computerized Tomography) and PET (Positron Emission Tomography) are essential medical imaging tools, for which the sampling angle number, scan time should be chosen carefully to compromise between image quality and the radiopharmaceutical dose. In this study, the image quality of different acquisition protocol was evaluated via varied angle number and count number per angle with Monte Carlo simulation data. It was shown that when similar imaging counts were used, the factor of acquisition counts was more important than that of the sampling number in ECT (Emission Computerized Tomography). To further reduce the activity requirement and the scan duration, an iterative image reconstruction algorithm for limited-view and low-dose tomography based on compressed sensing theory has been developed. The total variation regulation was added in the reconstruction process to improve SNR (Signal to Noise Ratio) and reduce the artifacts caused by the limited angle sampling. Maximization of max...

  11. High-definition computed tomography for coronary artery stents imaging: Initial evaluation of the optimal reconstruction algorithm

    Cui, Xiaoming, E-mail: mmayzy2008@126.com; Li, Tao, E-mail: litaofeivip@163.com; Li, Xin, E-mail: lx0803@sina.com.cn; Zhou, Weihua, E-mail: wangxue0606@gmail.com

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • High-resolution scan mode is appropriate for imaging coronary stent. • HD-detail reconstruction algorithm is stent-dedicated kernel. • The intrastent lumen visibility also depends on stent diameter and material. - Abstract: Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vivo performance of four image reconstruction algorithms in a high-definition CT (HDCT) scanner with improved spatial resolution for the evaluation of coronary artery stents and intrastent lumina. Materials and methods: Thirty-nine consecutive patients with a total of 71 implanted coronary stents underwent coronary CT angiography (CCTA) on a HDCT (Discovery CT 750 HD; GE Healthcare) with the high-resolution scanning mode. Four different reconstruction algorithms (HD-stand, HD-detail; HD-stand-plus; HD-detail-plus) were applied to reconstruct the stented coronary arteries. Image quality for stent characterization was assessed. Image noise and intrastent luminal diameter were measured. The relationship between the measurement of inner stent diameter (ISD) and the true stent diameter (TSD) and stent type were analysed. Results: The stent-dedicated kernel (HD-detail) offered the highest percentage (53.5%) of good image quality for stent characterization and the highest ratio (68.0 ± 8.4%) of visible stent lumen/true stent lumen for luminal diameter measurement at the expense of an increased overall image noise. The Pearson correlation coefficient between the ISD and TSD measurement and spearman correlation coefficient between the ISD measurement and stent type were 0.83 and 0.48, respectively. Conclusions: Compared with standard reconstruction algorithms, high-definition CT imaging technique with dedicated high-resolution reconstruction algorithm provides more accurate stent characterization and intrastent luminal diameter measurement.

  12. High-definition computed tomography for coronary artery stents imaging: Initial evaluation of the optimal reconstruction algorithm

    Highlights: • High-resolution scan mode is appropriate for imaging coronary stent. • HD-detail reconstruction algorithm is stent-dedicated kernel. • The intrastent lumen visibility also depends on stent diameter and material. - Abstract: Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vivo performance of four image reconstruction algorithms in a high-definition CT (HDCT) scanner with improved spatial resolution for the evaluation of coronary artery stents and intrastent lumina. Materials and methods: Thirty-nine consecutive patients with a total of 71 implanted coronary stents underwent coronary CT angiography (CCTA) on a HDCT (Discovery CT 750 HD; GE Healthcare) with the high-resolution scanning mode. Four different reconstruction algorithms (HD-stand, HD-detail; HD-stand-plus; HD-detail-plus) were applied to reconstruct the stented coronary arteries. Image quality for stent characterization was assessed. Image noise and intrastent luminal diameter were measured. The relationship between the measurement of inner stent diameter (ISD) and the true stent diameter (TSD) and stent type were analysed. Results: The stent-dedicated kernel (HD-detail) offered the highest percentage (53.5%) of good image quality for stent characterization and the highest ratio (68.0 ± 8.4%) of visible stent lumen/true stent lumen for luminal diameter measurement at the expense of an increased overall image noise. The Pearson correlation coefficient between the ISD and TSD measurement and spearman correlation coefficient between the ISD measurement and stent type were 0.83 and 0.48, respectively. Conclusions: Compared with standard reconstruction algorithms, high-definition CT imaging technique with dedicated high-resolution reconstruction algorithm provides more accurate stent characterization and intrastent luminal diameter measurement

  13. Evaluation of imaging protocol for ECT based on CS image reconstruction algorithm

    Single-photon emission computerized tomography and positron emission tomography are essential medical imaging tools, for which the sampling angle number and scan time should be carefully chosen to give a good compromise between image quality and radiopharmaceutical dose. In this study, the image quality of different acquisition protocols was evaluated via varied angle number and count number per angle with Monte Carlo simulation data. It was shown that, when similar imaging counts were used, the factor of acquisition counts was more important than that of the sampling number in emission computerized tomography. To further reduce the activity requirement and the scan duration, an iterative image reconstruction algorithm for limited-view and low-dose tomography based on compressed sensing theory has been developed. The total variation regulation was added to the reconstruction process to improve the signal to noise Ratio and reduce artifacts caused by the limited angle sampling. Maximization of the maximum likelihood of the estimated image and the measured data and minimization of the total variation of the image are alternatively implemented. By using this advanced algorithm, the reconstruction process is able to achieve image quality matching or exceed that of normal scans with only half of the injection radiopharmaceutical dose. (authors)

  14. Reconstruction of mechanically recorded sound by image processing

    Audio information stored in the undulations of grooves in a medium such as a phonograph record may be reconstructed, with no or minimal contact, by measuring the groove shape using precision metrology methods and digital image processing. The effects of damage, wear, and contamination may be compensated, in many cases, through image processing and analysis methods. The speed and data handling capacity of available computing hardware make this approach practical. Various aspects of this approach are discussed. A feasibility test is reported which used a general purpose optical metrology system to study a 50 year old 78 r.p.m. phonograph record. Comparisons are presented with stylus playback of the record and with a digitally re-mastered version of the original magnetic recording. A more extensive implementation of this approach, with dedicated hardware and software, is considered

  15. Multiple View Reconstruction of Calibrated Images using Singular Value Decomposition

    Chaudhury, Ayan; Manna, Sumita; Mukherjee, Subhadeep; Chakrabarti, Amlan

    2010-01-01

    Calibration in a multi camera network has widely been studied for over several years starting from the earlier days of photogrammetry. Many authors have presented several calibration algorithms with their relative advantages and disadvantages. In a stereovision system, multiple view reconstruction is a challenging task. However, the total computational procedure in detail has not been presented before. Here in this work, we are dealing with the problem that, when a world coordinate point is fixed in space, image coordinates of that 3D point vary for different camera positions and orientations. In computer vision aspect, this situation is undesirable. That is, the system has to be designed in such a way that image coordinate of the world coordinate point will be fixed irrespective of the position & orientation of the cameras. We have done it in an elegant fashion. Firstly, camera parameters are calculated in its local coordinate system. Then, we use global coordinate data to transfer all local coordinate d...

  16. Plenoptic camera image simulation for reconstruction algorithm verification

    Schwiegerling, Jim

    2014-09-01

    Plenoptic cameras have emerged in recent years as a technology for capturing light field data in a single snapshot. A conventional digital camera can be modified with the addition of a lenslet array to create a plenoptic camera. Two distinct camera forms have been proposed in the literature. The first has the camera image focused onto the lenslet array. The lenslet array is placed over the camera sensor such that each lenslet forms an image of the exit pupil onto the sensor. The second plenoptic form has the lenslet array relaying the image formed by the camera lens to the sensor. We have developed a raytracing package that can simulate images formed by a generalized version of the plenoptic camera. Several rays from each sensor pixel are traced backwards through the system to define a cone of rays emanating from the entrance pupil of the camera lens. Objects that lie within this cone are integrated to lead to a color and exposure level for that pixel. To speed processing three-dimensional objects are approximated as a series of planes at different depths. Repeating this process for each pixel in the sensor leads to a simulated plenoptic image on which different reconstruction algorithms can be tested.

  17. Accurate and Nonparametric Imaging Algorithm for Targets Buried in Dielectric Medium for UWB Radars

    Akune, Ken; Kidera, Shouhei; Kirimoto, Tetsuo

    Ultra-wide band (UWB) pulse radar with high range resolution and dielectric permeability is promising as an internal imaging technique for non-destructive testing or breast cancer detection. Various imaging algorithms for buried objects within a dielectric medium have been proposed, such as aperture synthesis, the time reversal approach and the space-time beamforming algorithm. However, these algorithms mostly require a priori knowledge of the dielectric medium boundary in image focusing, and often suffer from inadequate accuracy to identify the detailed structure of buried targets, such as an edge or specular surface owing to employing the waveform focusing scheme. To overcome these difficulties, this paper proposes an accurate and non-parametric (i.e. using an arbitrary shape without target modeling) imaging algorithm for targets buried in a homogeneous dielectric medium by advancing the RPM (Range Points Migration) algorithm to internal imaging issues, which has been demonstrated to provide an accurate image even for complex-shaped objects in free-space measurement. Numerical simulations, including those for two-dimensional (2-D) and three-dimensional (3-D) cases, verify that the proposed algorithm enhances the imaging accuracy by less than 1/10 of the wavelength and significantly reduces the computational cost by specifying boundary extraction compared with the conventional SAR-based algorithm.

  18. 3D Reconstruction of virtual colon structures from colonoscopy images.

    Hong, DongHo; Tavanapong, Wallapak; Wong, Johnny; Oh, JungHwan; de Groen, Piet C

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the first fully automated reconstruction technique of 3D virtual colon segments from individual colonoscopy images. It is the basis of new software applications that may offer great benefits for improving quality of care for colonoscopy patients. For example, a 3D map of the areas inspected and uninspected during colonoscopy can be shown on request of the endoscopist during the procedure. The endoscopist may revisit the suggested uninspected areas to reduce the chance of missing polyps that reside in these areas. The percentage of the colon surface seen by the endoscopist can be used as a coarse objective indicator of the quality of the procedure. The derived virtual colon models can be stored for post-procedure training of new endoscopists to teach navigation techniques that result in a higher level of procedure quality. Our technique does not require a prior CT scan of the colon or any global positioning device. Our experiments on endoscopy images of an Olympus synthetic colon model reveal encouraging results with small average reconstruction errors (4.1 mm for the fold depths and 12.1 mm for the fold circumferences). PMID:24225230

  19. Robust Compressive Phase Retrieval via L1 Minimization With Application to Image Reconstruction

    Yang, Zai; Xie, Lihua

    2013-01-01

    Phase retrieval refers to a classical nonconvex problem of recovering a signal from its Fourier magnitude measurements. Inspired by the compressed sensing technique, signal sparsity is exploited in recent studies of phase retrieval to reduce the required number of measurements, known as compressive phase retrieval (CPR). In this paper, l1 minimization problems are formulated for CPR to exploit the signal sparsity and alternating direction algorithms are presented for problem solving. For real-valued, nonnegative image reconstruction, the image of interest is shown to be an optimal solution of the formulated l1 minimization in the noise free case. Numerical simulations demonstrate that the proposed approach is fast, accurate and robust to measurements noises.

  20. Guided Signal Reconstruction with Application to Image Magnification

    Gadde, Akshay; Knyazev, Andrew; Tian, Dong; Mansour, Hassan

    2015-01-01

    We study the problem of reconstructing a signal from its projection on a subspace. The proposed signal reconstruction algorithms utilize a guiding subspace that represents desired properties of reconstructed signals. We show that optimal reconstructed signals belong to a convex bounded set, called the "reconstruction" set. We also develop iterative algorithms, based on conjugate gradient methods, to approximate optimal reconstructions with low memory and computational costs. The effectiveness...

  1. Intravital spectral imaging as a tool for accurate measurement of vascularization in mice

    Tsatsanis Christos

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Quantitative determination of the development of new blood vessels is crucial for our understanding of the progression of several diseases, including cancer. However, in most cases a high throughput technique that is simple, accurate, user-independent and cost-effective for small animal imaging is not available. Methods In this work we present a simple approach based on spectral imaging to increase the contrast between vessels and surrounding tissue, enabling accurate determination of the blood vessel area. This approach is put to test with a 4T1 breast cancer murine in vivo model and validated with histological and microvessel density analysis. Results We found that one can accurately measure the vascularization area by using excitation/emission filter pairs which enhance the surrounding tissue's autofluorescence, significantly increasing the contrast between surrounding tissue and blood vessels. Additionally, we found excellent correlation between this technique and histological and microvessel density analysis. Conclusions Making use of spectral imaging techniques we have shown that it is possible to accurately determine blood vessel volume intra-vitally. We believe that due to the low cost, accuracy, user-independence and simplicity of this technique, it will be of great value in those cases where in vivo quantitative information is necessary.

  2. Creation of Anatomically Accurate Computer-Aided Design (CAD) Solid Models from Medical Images

    Stewart, John E.; Graham, R. Scott; Samareh, Jamshid A.; Oberlander, Eric J.; Broaddus, William C.

    1999-01-01

    Most surgical instrumentation and implants used in the world today are designed with sophisticated Computer-Aided Design (CAD)/Computer-Aided Manufacturing (CAM) software. This software automates the mechanical development of a product from its conceptual design through manufacturing. CAD software also provides a means of manipulating solid models prior to Finite Element Modeling (FEM). Few surgical products are designed in conjunction with accurate CAD models of human anatomy because of the difficulty with which these models are created. We have developed a novel technique that creates anatomically accurate, patient specific CAD solids from medical images in a matter of minutes.

  3. Defining the Most Accurate Measurable Dimension(s of the Liver in Predicting Liver Volume Based on CT Volumetery and Reconstruction

    Reza Saadat Mostafavi

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Background/Objective: The presence of liver volume has a great effect on diagnosis and management of different diseases such as lymphoproliferative conditions. "nPatients and Methods: Abdominal CT scan of 100 patients without any findings for liver disease (in history and imaging was subjected to volumetry and reconstruction. Along with the liver volume, in axial series, the AP diameter of the left lobe (in midline and right lobe (mid-clavicular and lateral maximum diameter of the liver in the mid-axiliary line and maximum diameter to IVC were calculated. In the coronal mid-axillary and sagittal mid-clavicular plane, maximum superior-inferior dimensions were calculated with their various combinations (multiplying. Regression analysis between dimensions and volume were performed. "nResults: The most accurate combination was the superior inferior sagittal dimension multiplied by AP diameter of the right lobe (R squared 0.78, P-value<0.001 and the most solitary dimension was the lateral dimension to IVC in the axial plane (R squared 0.57, P-value<0.001 with an interval of 9-11cm for 68% of normal. "nConclusion: We recommend the lateral maximum diameter of liver from surface to IVC in the axial plane in ultrasound for liver volume prediction with an interval of 9-11cm for 68% of normal. Out of this range is regarded as abnormal.

  4. First results of genetic algorithm application in ML image reconstruction in emission tomography

    This paper concerns application of genetic algorithm in maximum likelihood image reconstruction in emission tomography. The example of genetic algorithm for image reconstruction is presented. The genetic algorithm was based on the typical genetic scheme modified due to the nature of solved problem. The convergence of algorithm was examined. The different adaption functions, selection and crossover methods were verified. The algorithm was tested on simulated SPECT data. The obtained results of image reconstruction are discussed. (author)

  5. Efficient and robust 3D CT image reconstruction based on total generalized variation regularization using the alternating direction method.

    Chen, Jianlin; Wang, Linyuan; Yan, Bin; Zhang, Hanming; Cheng, Genyang

    2015-01-01

    Iterative reconstruction algorithms for computed tomography (CT) through total variation regularization based on piecewise constant assumption can produce accurate, robust, and stable results. Nonetheless, this approach is often subject to staircase artefacts and the loss of fine details. To overcome these shortcomings, we introduce a family of novel image regularization penalties called total generalized variation (TGV) for the effective production of high-quality images from incomplete or noisy projection data for 3D reconstruction. We propose a new, fast alternating direction minimization algorithm to solve CT image reconstruction problems through TGV regularization. Based on the theory of sparse-view image reconstruction and the framework of augmented Lagrange function method, the TGV regularization term has been introduced in the computed tomography and is transformed into three independent variables of the optimization problem by introducing auxiliary variables. This new algorithm applies a local linearization and proximity technique to make the FFT-based calculation of the analytical solutions in the frequency domain feasible, thereby significantly reducing the complexity of the algorithm. Experiments with various 3D datasets corresponding to incomplete projection data demonstrate the advantage of our proposed algorithm in terms of preserving fine details and overcoming the staircase effect. The computation cost also suggests that the proposed algorithm is applicable to and is effective for CBCT imaging. Theoretical and technical optimization should be investigated carefully in terms of both computation efficiency and high resolution of this algorithm in application-oriented research. PMID:26756406

  6. Images from the Mind: BCI image reconstruction based on Rapid Serial Visual Presentations of polygon primitives

    Luís F Seoane

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available We provide a proof of concept for an EEG-based reconstruction of a visual image which is on a user's mind. Our approach is based on the Rapid Serial Visual Presentation (RSVP of polygon primitives and Brain-Computer Interface (BCI technology. In an experimental setup, subjects were presented bursts of polygons: some of them contributed to building a target image (because they matched the shape and/or color of the target while some of them did not. The presentation of the contributing polygons triggered attention-related EEG patterns. These Event Related Potentials (ERPs could be determined using BCI classification and could be matched to the stimuli that elicited them. These stimuli (i.e. the ERP-correlated polygons were accumulated in the display until a satisfactory reconstruction of the target image was reached. As more polygons were accumulated, finer visual details were attained resulting in more challenging classification tasks. In our experiments, we observe an average classification accuracy of around 75%. An in-depth investigation suggests that many of the misclassifications were not misinterpretations of the BCI concerning the users' intent, but rather caused by ambiguous polygons that could contribute to reconstruct several different images. When we put our BCI-image reconstruction in perspective with other RSVP BCI paradigms, there is large room for improvement both in speed and accuracy. These results invite us to be optimistic. They open a plethora of possibilities to explore non-invasive BCIs for image reconstruction both in healthy and impaired subjects and, accordingly, suggest interesting recreational and clinical applications.

  7. Segmentation-free statistical image reconstruction for polyenergetic x-ray computed tomography with experimental validation

    This paper describes a statistical image reconstruction method for x-ray CT that is based on a physical model that accounts for the polyenergetic x-ray source spectrum and the measurement nonlinearities caused by energy-dependent attenuation. Unlike our earlier work, the proposed algorithm does not require pre-segmentation of the object into the various tissue classes (e.g., bone and soft tissue) and allows mixed pixels. The attenuation coefficient of each voxel is modelled as the product of its unknown density and a weighted sum of energy-dependent mass attenuation coefficients. We formulate a penalized-likelihood function for this polyenergetic model and develop an iterative algorithm for estimating the unknown density of each voxel. Applying this method to simulated x-ray CT measurements of objects containing both bone and soft tissue yields images with significantly reduced beam hardening artefacts relative to conventional beam hardening correction methods. We also apply the method to real data acquired from a phantom containing various concentrations of potassium phosphate solution. The algorithm reconstructs an image with accurate density values for the different concentrations, demonstrating its potential for quantitative CT applications

  8. An edge-preserving algorithm of joint image restoration and volume reconstruction for rotation-scanning 4D echocardiographic images

    GUO Qiang; YANG Xin

    2006-01-01

    A statistical algorithm for the reconstruction from time sequence echocardiographic images is proposed in this paper.The ability to jointly restore the images and reconstruct the 3D images without blurring the boundary is the main innovation of this algorithm. First, a Bayesian model based on MAP-MRF is used to reconstruct 3D volume, and extended to deal with the images acquired by rotation scanning method. Then, the spatiotemporal nature of ultrasound images is taken into account for the parameter of energy function, which makes this statistical model anisotropic. Hence not only can this method reconstruct 3D ultrasound images, but also remove the speckle noise anisotropically. Finally, we illustrate the experiments of our method on the synthetic and medical images and compare it with the isotropic reconstruction method.

  9. Accurate estimation of motion blur parameters in noisy remote sensing image

    Shi, Xueyan; Wang, Lin; Shao, Xiaopeng; Wang, Huilin; Tao, Zhong

    2015-05-01

    The relative motion between remote sensing satellite sensor and objects is one of the most common reasons for remote sensing image degradation. It seriously weakens image data interpretation and information extraction. In practice, point spread function (PSF) should be estimated firstly for image restoration. Identifying motion blur direction and length accurately is very crucial for PSF and restoring image with precision. In general, the regular light-and-dark stripes in the spectrum can be employed to obtain the parameters by using Radon transform. However, serious noise existing in actual remote sensing images often causes the stripes unobvious. The parameters would be difficult to calculate and the error of the result relatively big. In this paper, an improved motion blur parameter identification method to noisy remote sensing image is proposed to solve this problem. The spectrum characteristic of noisy remote sensing image is analyzed firstly. An interactive image segmentation method based on graph theory called GrabCut is adopted to effectively extract the edge of the light center in the spectrum. Motion blur direction is estimated by applying Radon transform on the segmentation result. In order to reduce random error, a method based on whole column statistics is used during calculating blur length. Finally, Lucy-Richardson algorithm is applied to restore the remote sensing images of the moon after estimating blur parameters. The experimental results verify the effectiveness and robustness of our algorithm.

  10. Accurate calibration of a stereo-vision system in image-guided radiotherapy

    Image-guided radiotherapy using a three-dimensional (3D) camera as the on-board surface imaging system requires precise and accurate registration of the 3D surface images in the treatment machine coordinate system. Two simple calibration methods, an analytical solution as three-point matching and a least-squares estimation method as multipoint registration, were introduced to correlate the stereo-vision surface imaging frame with the machine coordinate system. Both types of calibrations utilized 3D surface images of a calibration template placed on the top of the treatment couch. Image transformational parameters were derived from corresponding 3D marked points on the surface images to their given coordinates in the treatment room coordinate system. Our experimental results demonstrated that both methods had provided the desired calibration accuracy of 0.5 mm. The multipoint registration method is more robust particularly for noisy 3D surface images. Both calibration methods have been used as our weekly QA tools for a 3D image-guided radiotherapy system

  11. Noise spatial nonuniformity and the impact of statistical image reconstruction in CT myocardial perfusion imaging

    Lauzier, Pascal Thériault; Jie TANG; Speidel, Michael A.; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To achieve high temporal resolution in CT myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI), images are often reconstructed using filtered backprojection (FBP) algorithms from data acquired within a short-scan angular range. However, the variation in the central angle from one time frame to the next in gated short scans has been shown to create detrimental partial scan artifacts when performing quantitative MPI measurements. This study has two main purposes. (1) To demonstrate the existence of a di...

  12. Three-dimensional image reconstruction for PET by multi-slice rebinning and axial image filtering.

    Lewittt, R M; Muehllehner, G; Karpt, J S

    1994-03-01

    A fast method is described for reconstructing volume images from three-dimensional (3D) coincidence data in positron emission tomography (PET). The reconstruction method makes use of all coincidence data acquired by high-sensitivity PET systems that do not have inter-slice absorbers (septa) to restrict the axial acceptance angle. The reconstruction method requires only a small amount of storage and computation, making it well suited for dynamic and whole-body studies. The method consists of three steps: (i) rebinning of coincidence data into a stack of 2D sinograms; (ii) slice-by-slice reconstruction of the sinogram associated with each slice to produce a preliminary 3D image having strong blurring in the axial (z) direction, but with different blurring at different z positions; and (iii) spatially variant filtering of the 3D image in the axial direction (i.e. 1D filtering in z for each x-y column) to produce the final image. The first step involves a new form of the rebinning operation in which multiple sinograms are incremented for each oblique coincidence line (multi-slice rebinning). The axial filtering step is formulated and implemented using the singular value decomposition (SVD). The method has been applied successfully to simulated data and to measured data for different kinds of phantom (multiple point sources, multiple discs, a cylinder with cold spheres, and a 3D brain phantom). PMID:15551583

  13. Comparison of clinical and physics scoring of PET images when image reconstruction parameters are varied

    In this study the quantitative and qualitative image quality (IQ) measurements with clinical judgement of IQ in positron emission tomography (PET) were compared. The limitations of IQ metrics and the proposed criteria of acceptability for PET scanners are discussed. Phantom and patient images were reconstructed using seven different iterative reconstruction protocols. For each reconstructed set of images, IQ was scored based both on the visual analysis and on the quantitative metrics. The quantitative physics metrics did not rank the reconstruction protocols in the same order as the clinicians' scoring of perceived IQ (Rs = -0.54). Better agreement was achieved when comparing the clinical perception of IQ to the physicist's visual assessment of IQ in the phantom images (Rs = +0.59). The closest agreement was seen between the quantitative physics metrics and the measurement of the standard uptake values (SUVs) in small tumours (Rs = +0.92). Given the disparity between the clinical perception of IQ and the physics metrics a cautious approach to use of IQ measurements for determining suspension levels is warranted. (authors)

  14. Filling factor characteristics of masking phase-only hologram on the quality of reconstructed images

    Deng, Yuanbo; Chu, Daping

    2016-03-01

    The present study evaluates the filling factor characteristics of masking phase-only hologram on its corresponding reconstructed image. A square aperture with different filling factor is added on the phase-only hologram of the target image, and average cross-section intensity profile of the reconstructed image is obtained and deconvolved with that of the target image to calculate the point spread function (PSF) of the image. Meanwhile, Lena image is used as the target image and evaluated by metrics RMSE and SSIM to assess the quality of reconstructed image. The results show that the PSF of the image agrees with the PSF of the Fourier transform of the mask, and as the filling factor of the mask decreases, the width of PSF increases and the quality of reconstructed image drops. These characteristics could be used in practical situations where phase-only hologram is confined or need to be sliced or tiled.

  15. On-line reconstruction of NMR images using a liquid crystal-spatial light modulator

    MRI fast-imaging technique such an echo-planar imaging (EPI) has begun to be employed in commercial MRI system and data acquisition time may be shorten to less than 100 ms. With this imaging system, if MRI images were reconstructed in a moment, we would be allowed to get a real time moving image. Reconstructing images in synchronization with data acquisition may be executed numerically by using digital signal processing board or parallel combined CPU in the case of small data-size. However, these methods even take a few time to reconstruct images and it may be the limiting factor for the real-time imaging. Optical information processing has the potential to overcome the time limitation related to image reconstruction, because optical computation has the advantage of very fast parallel processing. Holography is the most popular technique for optically reconstructing images and has the potential of producing a three-dimensional image. The expression of NMR signal in Fresnel transform technique is similar equation to that of the Fresnel diffraction equation in light. Therefore, holographic reconstruction of NMR images is feasible, making a hologram from NMR spin-echo signal and reconstructing images using a coherent optical system. In this paper, we describe a new method of optoelectronic reconstruction of NMR images using a liquid crystal-spatial light modulator (LC-SLM) as a hologram display, addressing a hologram electrically and using a coherent optical system. Experimental results show considerably good images are obtained even from the commercially available LC-SLM. The results also indicate a real-time reconstruction of NMR images by combining the NMR fast-speed imaging technique, because the hologram pattern on the LC-SLM is refreshed at a video-rate that is fully catch up with the data-acquisition time of high-speed imaging. (author)

  16. Event-by-event PET image reconstruction using list-mode origin ensembles algorithm

    Andreyev, Andriy

    2016-03-01

    There is a great demand for real time or event-by-event (EBE) image reconstruction in emission tomography. Ideally, as soon as event has been detected by the acquisition electronics, it needs to be used in the image reconstruction software. This would greatly speed up the image reconstruction since most of the data will be processed and reconstructed while the patient is still undergoing the scan. Unfortunately, the current industry standard is that the reconstruction of the image would not start until all the data for the current image frame would be acquired. Implementing an EBE reconstruction for MLEM family of algorithms is possible, but not straightforward as multiple (computationally expensive) updates to the image estimate are required. In this work an alternative Origin Ensembles (OE) image reconstruction algorithm for PET imaging is converted to EBE mode and is investigated whether it is viable alternative for real-time image reconstruction. In OE algorithm all acquired events are seen as points that are located somewhere along the corresponding line-of-responses (LORs), together forming a point cloud. Iteratively, with a multitude of quasi-random shifts following the likelihood function the point cloud converges to a reflection of an actual radiotracer distribution with the degree of accuracy that is similar to MLEM. New data can be naturally added into the point cloud. Preliminary results with simulated data show little difference between regular reconstruction and EBE mode, proving the feasibility of the proposed approach.

  17. Performance Evaluating of some Methods in 3D Depth Reconstruction from a Single Image

    Wen, Wei

    2009-01-01

    We studied the problem of 3D reconstruction from a single image. The 3D reconstruction is one of the basic problems in Computer Vision. The 3D reconstruction is usually achieved by using two or multiple images of a scene. However recent researches in Computer Vision field have enabled us to recover the 3D information even from only one single image. The methods used in such reconstructions are based on depth information, projection geometry, image content, human psychology and so on. Each met...

  18. Information extraction and CT reconstruction of liver images based on diffraction enhanced imaging

    Chunhong Hu; Tao Zhao; Lu Zhang; Hui Li; Xinyan Zhao; Shuqian Luo

    2009-01-01

    X-ray phase-contrast imaging (PCI) is a new emerging imaging technique that generates a high spatial resolution and high contrast of biological soft tissues compared to conventional radiography. Herein a biomedical application of diffraction enhanced imaging (DEI) is presented. As one of the PCI methods, DEI derives contrast from many different kinds of sample information, such as the sample's X-ray absorption, refraction gradient and ultra-small-angle X-ray scattering (USAXS) properties, and the sample information is expressed by three parametric images. Combined with computed tomography (CT), DEI-CT can produce 3D volumetric images of the sample and can be used for investigating micro-structures of biomedical samples. Our DEI experiments for fiver samples were implemented at the topog-raphy station of Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility (BSRF). The results show that by using our provided information extraction method and DEI-CT reconstruction approach, the obtained parametric images clearly display the inner structures of liver tissues and the morphology of blood vessels. Furthermore, the reconstructed 3D view of the fiver blood vessels exhibits the micro blood vessels whose minimum diameter is on the order of about tens of microns, much better than its conventional CT reconstruction at a millimeter resolution.In conclusion, both the information extraction method and DEI-CT have the potential for use in biomedical micro-structures analysis.

  19. Reconstruction of limited-angle and few-view nano-CT image via total variation iterative reconstruction

    Liang, Zhiting; Guan, Yong; Liu, Gang; Bian, Rui; Zhang, Xiaobo; Xiong, Ying; Tian, Yangchao

    2013-09-01

    Nano-CT has been considered as an important technique applied in analyzing inter-structures of nanomaterials and biological cell. However, maximum rotation angle of the sample stage is limited by sample space; meanwhile, the scan time is exorbitantly large to get enough projections in some cases. Therefore, it is difficult to acquire nano-CT images with high quality by using conventional Fourier reconstruction methods based on limited-angle or few-view projections. In this paper, we utilized the total variation (TV) iterative reconstruction to carry out numerical image and nano-CT image reconstruction with limited-angle and few-view data. The results indicated that better quality images had been achieved.

  20. An adaptive total variation image reconstruction method for speckles through disordered media

    Gong, Changmei; Shao, Xiaopeng; Wu, Tengfei

    2013-09-01

    Multiple scattering of light in highly disordered medium can break the diffraction limit of conventional optical system combined with image reconstruction method. Once the transmission matrix of the imaging system is obtained, the target image can be reconstructed from its speckle pattern by image reconstruction algorithm. Nevertheless, the restored image attained by common image reconstruction algorithms such as Tikhonov regularization has a relatively low signal-tonoise ratio (SNR) due to the experimental noise and reconstruction noise, greatly reducing the quality of the result image. In this paper, the speckle pattern of the test image is simulated by the combination of light propagation theories and statistical optics theories. Subsequently, an adaptive total variation (ATV) algorithm—the TV minimization by augmented Lagrangian and alternating direction algorithms (TVAL3), which is based on augmented Lagrangian and alternating direction algorithm, is utilized to reconstruct the target image. Numerical simulation experimental results show that, the TVAL3 algorithm can effectively suppress the noise of the restored image and preserve more image details, thus greatly boosts the SNR of the restored image. It also indicates that, compared with the image directly formed by `clean' system, the reconstructed results can overcoming the diffraction limit of the `clean' system, therefore being conductive to the observation of cells and protein molecules in biological tissues and other structures in micro/nano scale.

  1. Super-Resolution Reconstruction for Multi-Angle Remote Sensing Images Considering Resolution Differences

    Hongyan Zhang; Zeyu Yang; Liangpei Zhang; Huanfeng Shen

    2014-01-01

    Multi-angle remote sensing images are acquired over the same imaging scene from different angles, and share similar but not identical information. It is therefore possible to enhance the spatial resolution of the multi-angle remote sensing images by the super-resolution reconstruction technique. However, different sensor shooting angles lead to different resolutions for each angle image, which affects the effectiveness of the super-resolution reconstruction of the multi-angle images. In vie...

  2. Nonlinear Adjustment Model with Integral and Its Application to Super Resolution Image Reconstruction

    Zhu, Jianjun; Fan, Donghao; Zhou, Cui; Zhou, Jinghong

    2015-01-01

    The process of super resolution image reconstruction is such a process that multiple observations are taken on the same target to obtain low resolution images, then the low resolution images are used to reconstruct the real image of the target, namely high resolution image. This process is similar to that in the field of surveying and mapping, in which the same target is observed repeatedly and the optimal values is calculated with surveying adjustment methods. In this paper, the method of su...

  3. Development of anatomically and dielectrically accurate breast phantoms for microwave imaging applications

    O'Halloran, M.; Lohfeld, S.; Ruvio, G.; Browne, J.; Krewer, F.; Ribeiro, C. O.; Inacio Pita, V. C.; Conceicao, R. C.; Jones, E.; Glavin, M.

    2014-05-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most common cancers in women. In the United States alone, it accounts for 31% of new cancer cases, and is second only to lung cancer as the leading cause of deaths in American women. More than 184,000 new cases of breast cancer are diagnosed each year resulting in approximately 41,000 deaths. Early detection and intervention is one of the most significant factors in improving the survival rates and quality of life experienced by breast cancer sufferers, since this is the time when treatment is most effective. One of the most promising breast imaging modalities is microwave imaging. The physical basis of active microwave imaging is the dielectric contrast between normal and malignant breast tissue that exists at microwave frequencies. The dielectric contrast is mainly due to the increased water content present in the cancerous tissue. Microwave imaging is non-ionizing, does not require breast compression, is less invasive than X-ray mammography, and is potentially low cost. While several prototype microwave breast imaging systems are currently in various stages of development, the design and fabrication of anatomically and dielectrically representative breast phantoms to evaluate these systems is often problematic. While some existing phantoms are composed of dielectrically representative materials, they rarely accurately represent the shape and size of a typical breast. Conversely, several phantoms have been developed to accurately model the shape of the human breast, but have inappropriate dielectric properties. This study will brie y review existing phantoms before describing the development of a more accurate and practical breast phantom for the evaluation of microwave breast imaging systems.

  4. Targeting accurate object extraction from an image: a comprehensive study of natural image matting.

    Zhu, Qingsong; Shao, Ling; Li, Xuelong; Wang, Lei

    2015-02-01

    With the development of digital multimedia technologies, image matting has gained increasing interests from both academic and industrial communities. The purpose of image matting is to precisely extract the foreground objects with arbitrary shapes from an image or a video frame for further editing. It is generally known that image matting is inherently an ill-posed problem because we need to output three images out of only one input image. In this paper, we provide a comprehensive survey of the existing image matting algorithms and evaluate their performance. In addition to the blue screen matting, we systematically divide all existing natural image matting methods into four categories: 1) color sampling-based; 2) propagation-based; 3) combination of sampling-based and propagation-based; and 4) learning-based approaches. Sampling-based methods assume that the foreground and background colors of an unknown pixel can be explicitly estimated by examining nearby pixels. Propagation-based methods are instead based on the assumption that foreground and background colors are locally smooth. Learning-based methods treat the matting process as a supervised or semisupervised learning problem. Via the learning process, users can construct a linear or nonlinear model between the alpha mattes and the image colors using a training set to estimate the alpha matte of an unknown pixel without any assumption about the characteristics of the testing image. With three benchmark data sets, the various matting algorithms are evaluated and compared using several metrics to demonstrate the strengths and weaknesses of each method both quantitatively and qualitatively. Finally, we conclude this paper by outlining the research trends and suggesting a number of promising directions for future development. PMID:25423658

  5. SU-E-J-76: CBCT Reconstruction of a Full Couch Using Rigid Registration and Pre-Scanned Couch Image and Its Clinical Application

    Purpose: Only a part of a treatment couch is reconstructed in CBCT due to the limited field of view (FOV). This often generates inaccurate results in the delivered dose evaluation with CBCT and more noise in the CBCT reconstruction. Full reconstruction of the couch at treatment setup can be used for more accurate exit beam dosimetry. The goal of this study is to develop a method to reconstruct a full treatment couch using a pre-scanned couch image and rigid registration. Methods: A full couch (Exact Couch, Varian) model image was reconstructed by rigidly registering and combining two sets of partial CBCT images. The full couch model includes three parts: two side rails and a couch top. A patient CBCT was reconstructed with reconstruction grid size larger than the physical field of view to include the full couch. The image quality of the couch is not good due to data truncation, but good enough to allow rigid registration of the couch. A composite CBCT image of the patient plus couch has been generated from the original reconstruction by replacing couch portion with the pre-acquired model couch, rigidly registered to the original scan. We evaluated the clinical usefulness of this method by comparing treatment plans generated on the original and on the modified scans. Results: The full couch model could be attached to a patient CBCT image set via rigid image registration. Plan DVHs showed 1∼2% difference between plans with and without full couch modeling. Conclusion: The proposed method generated a full treatment couch CBCT model, which can be successfully registered to the original patient image. This method was also shown to be useful in generating more accurate dose distributions, by lowering 1∼2% dose in PTV and a few other critical organs. Part of this study is supported by NIH R01CA133539

  6. MO-C-18A-01: Advances in Model-Based 3D Image Reconstruction

    Chen, G [University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Pan, X [University Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States); Stayman, J [Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD (United States); Samei, E [Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Recent years have seen the emergence of CT image reconstruction techniques that exploit physical models of the imaging system, photon statistics, and even the patient to achieve improved 3D image quality and/or reduction of radiation dose. With numerous advantages in comparison to conventional 3D filtered backprojection, such techniques bring a variety of challenges as well, including: a demanding computational load associated with sophisticated forward models and iterative optimization methods; nonlinearity and nonstationarity in image quality characteristics; a complex dependency on multiple free parameters; and the need to understand how best to incorporate prior information (including patient-specific prior images) within the reconstruction process. The advantages, however, are even greater – for example: improved image quality; reduced dose; robustness to noise and artifacts; task-specific reconstruction protocols; suitability to novel CT imaging platforms and noncircular orbits; and incorporation of known characteristics of the imager and patient that are conventionally discarded. This symposium features experts in 3D image reconstruction, image quality assessment, and the translation of such methods to emerging clinical applications. Dr. Chen will address novel methods for the incorporation of prior information in 3D and 4D CT reconstruction techniques. Dr. Pan will show recent advances in optimization-based reconstruction that enable potential reduction of dose and sampling requirements. Dr. Stayman will describe a “task-based imaging” approach that leverages models of the imaging system and patient in combination with a specification of the imaging task to optimize both the acquisition and reconstruction process. Dr. Samei will describe the development of methods for image quality assessment in such nonlinear reconstruction techniques and the use of these methods to characterize and optimize image quality and dose in a spectrum of clinical

  7. Accurate setup of paraspinal patients using a noninvasive patient immobilization cradle and portal imaging

    Because of the proximity of the spinal cord, effective radiotherapy of paraspinal tumors to high doses requires highly conformal dose distributions, accurate patient setup, setup verification, and patient immobilization. An immobilization cradle has been designed to facilitate the rapid setup and radiation treatment of patients with paraspinal disease. For all treatments, patients were set up to within 2.5 mm of the design using an amorphous silicon portal imager. Setup reproducibility of the target using the cradle and associated clinical procedures was assessed by measuring the setup error prior to any correction. From 350 anterior/posterior images, and 303 lateral images, the standard deviations, as determined by the imaging procedure, were 1.3 m, 1.6 m, and 2.1 in the ant/post, right/left, and superior/inferior directions. Immobilization was assessed by measuring patient shifts between localization images taken before and after treatment. From 67 ant/post image pairs and 49 lateral image pairs, the standard deviations were found to be less than 1 mm in all directions. Careful patient positioning and immobilization has enabled us to develop a successful clinical program of high dose, conformal radiotherapy of paraspinal disease using a conventional Linac equipped with dynamic multileaf collimation and an amorphous silicon portal imager

  8. Accurate and reliable segmentation of the optic disc in digital fundus images.

    Giachetti, Andrea; Ballerini, Lucia; Trucco, Emanuele

    2014-07-01

    We describe a complete pipeline for the detection and accurate automatic segmentation of the optic disc in digital fundus images. This procedure provides separation of vascular information and accurate inpainting of vessel-removed images, symmetry-based optic disc localization, and fitting of incrementally complex contour models at increasing resolutions using information related to inpainted images and vessel masks. Validation experiments, performed on a large dataset of images of healthy and pathological eyes, annotated by experts and partially graded with a quality label, demonstrate the good performances of the proposed approach. The method is able to detect the optic disc and trace its contours better than the other systems presented in the literature and tested on the same data. The average error in the obtained contour masks is reasonably close to the interoperator errors and suitable for practical applications. The optic disc segmentation pipeline is currently integrated in a complete software suite for the semiautomatic quantification of retinal vessel properties from fundus camera images (VAMPIRE). PMID:26158034

  9. Evaluating the capability of time-of-flight cameras for accurately imaging a cyclically loaded beam

    Lahamy, Hervé; Lichti, Derek; El-Badry, Mamdouh; Qi, Xiaojuan; Detchev, Ivan; Steward, Jeremy; Moravvej, Mohammad

    2015-05-01

    Time-of-flight cameras are used for diverse applications ranging from human-machine interfaces and gaming to robotics and earth topography. This paper aims at evaluating the capability of the Mesa Imaging SR4000 and the Microsoft Kinect 2.0 time-of-flight cameras for accurately imaging the top surface of a concrete beam subjected to fatigue loading in laboratory conditions. Whereas previous work has demonstrated the success of such sensors for measuring the response at point locations, the aim here is to measure the entire beam surface in support of the overall objective of evaluating the effectiveness of concrete beam reinforcement with steel fibre reinforced polymer sheets. After applying corrections for lens distortions to the data and differencing images over time to remove systematic errors due to internal scattering, the periodic deflections experienced by the beam have been estimated for the entire top surface of the beam and at witness plates attached. The results have been assessed by comparison with measurements from highly-accurate laser displacement transducers. This study concludes that both the Microsoft Kinect 2.0 and the Mesa Imaging SR4000s are capable of sensing a moving surface with sub-millimeter accuracy once the image distortions have been modeled and removed.

  10. PET image reconstruction with system matrix based on point spread function derived from single photon incidence response

    Xin, Fan; Ming-Kai, Yun; Xiao-Li, Sun; Xue-Xiang, Cao; Shuang-Quanm, Liu; Pei, Chai; Dao-Wu, Li; Long, Wei

    2014-01-01

    In positron emission tomography (PET) imaging, statistical iterative reconstruction (IR) techniques appear particularly promising since they can provide accurate physical model and geometric system description. The reconstructed image quality mainly depends on the system matrix model which describes the relationship between image space and projection space for the IR method. The system matrix can contain some physics factors of detection such as geometrical component and blurring component. Point spread function (PSF) is generally used to describe the blurring component. This paper proposes an IR method based on the PSF system matrix, which is derived from the single photon incidence response function. More specifically, the gamma photon incidence on a crystal array is simulated by the Monte Carlo (MC) simulation, and then the single photon incidence response functions are obtained. Subsequently, using the single photon incidence response functions, the coincidence blurring factor is acquired according to the...

  11. Statistical models and regularization strategies in statistical image reconstruction of low-dose X-ray computed tomography: a survey

    Zhang, Hao; Ma, Jianhua; Lu, Hongbing; Liang, Zhengrong

    2014-01-01

    Statistical image reconstruction (SIR) methods have shown potential to substantially improve the image quality of low-dose X-ray computed tomography (CT) as compared to the conventional filtered back-projection (FBP) method for various clinical tasks. According to the maximum a posterior (MAP) estimation, the SIR methods can be typically formulated by an objective function consisting of two terms: (1) data-fidelity (or equivalently, data-fitting or data-mismatch) term modeling the statistics of projection measurements, and (2) regularization (or equivalently, prior or penalty) term reflecting prior knowledge or expectation on the characteristics of the image to be reconstructed. Existing SIR methods for low-dose CT can be divided into two groups: (1) those that use calibrated transmitted photon counts (before log-transform) with penalized maximum likelihood (pML) criterion, and (2) those that use calibrated line-integrals (after log-transform) with penalized weighted least-squares (PWLS) criterion. Accurate s...

  12. SPECT-OPT multimodal imaging enables accurate evaluation of radiotracers for β-cell mass assessments

    Wael A. Eter; Saba Parween; Lieke Joosten; Cathelijne Frielink; Maria Eriksson; Maarten Brom; Ulf Ahlgren; Martin Gotthardt

    2016-01-01

    Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) has become a promising experimental approach to monitor changes in β-cell mass (BCM) during diabetes progression. SPECT imaging of pancreatic islets is most commonly cross-validated by stereological analysis of histological pancreatic sections after insulin staining. Typically, stereological methods do not accurately determine the total β-cell volume, which is inconvenient when correlating total pancreatic tracer uptake with BCM. Alternative ...

  13. SPECT-OPT multimodal imaging enables accurate evaluation of radiotracers for beta-cell mass assessments

    Wael A. Eter; Parween, Saba; Joosten, Lieke; Frielink, Cathelijne; Eriksson, Maria; Brom, Maarten; Ahlgren, Ulf; Gotthardt, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) has become a promising experimental approach to monitor changes in beta-cell mass (BCM) during diabetes progression. SPECT imaging of pancreatic islets is most commonly cross-validated by stereological analysis of histological pancreatic sections after insulin staining. Typically, stereological methods do not accurately determine the total beta-cell volume, which is inconvenient when correlating total pancreatic tracer uptake with BCM. Altern...

  14. WE-A-17A-10: Fast, Automatic and Accurate Catheter Reconstruction in HDR Brachytherapy Using An Electromagnetic 3D Tracking System

    Poulin, E; Racine, E; Beaulieu, L [CHU de Quebec - Universite Laval, Quebec, Quebec (Canada); Binnekamp, D [Integrated Clinical Solutions and Marketing, Philips Healthcare, Best, DA (Netherlands)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: In high dose rate brachytherapy (HDR-B), actual catheter reconstruction protocols are slow and errors prompt. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accuracy and robustness of an electromagnetic (EM) tracking system for improved catheter reconstruction in HDR-B protocols. Methods: For this proof-of-principle, a total of 10 catheters were inserted in gelatin phantoms with different trajectories. Catheters were reconstructed using a Philips-design 18G biopsy needle (used as an EM stylet) and the second generation Aurora Planar Field Generator from Northern Digital Inc. The Aurora EM system exploits alternating current technology and generates 3D points at 40 Hz. Phantoms were also scanned using a μCT (GE Healthcare) and Philips Big Bore clinical CT system with a resolution of 0.089 mm and 2 mm, respectively. Reconstructions using the EM stylet were compared to μCT and CT. To assess the robustness of the EM reconstruction, 5 catheters were reconstructed twice and compared. Results: Reconstruction time for one catheter was 10 seconds or less. This would imply that for a typical clinical implant of 17 catheters, the total reconstruction time would be less than 3 minutes. When compared to the μCT, the mean EM tip identification error was 0.69 ± 0.29 mm while the CT error was 1.08 ± 0.67 mm. The mean 3D distance error was found to be 0.92 ± 0.37 mm and 1.74 ± 1.39 mm for the EM and CT, respectively. EM 3D catheter trajectories were found to be significantly more accurate (unpaired t-test, p < 0.05). A mean difference of less than 0.5 mm was found between successive EM reconstructions. Conclusion: The EM reconstruction was found to be faster, more accurate and more robust than the conventional methods used for catheter reconstruction in HDR-B. This approach can be applied to any type of catheters and applicators. We would like to disclose that the equipments, used in this study, is coming from a collaboration with Philips Medical.

  15. Feasibility study for application of the compressed-sensing framework to interior computed tomography (ICT) for low-dose, high-accurate dental x-ray imaging

    Je, U. K.; Cho, H. M.; Cho, H. S.; Park, Y. O.; Park, C. K.; Lim, H. W.; Kim, K. S.; Kim, G. A.; Park, S. Y.; Woo, T. H.; Choi, S. I.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, we propose a new/next-generation type of CT examinations, the so-called Interior Computed Tomography (ICT), which may presumably lead to dose reduction to the patient outside the target region-of-interest (ROI), in dental x-ray imaging. Here an x-ray beam from each projection position covers only a relatively small ROI containing a target of diagnosis from the examined structure, leading to imaging benefits such as decreasing scatters and system cost as well as reducing imaging dose. We considered the compressed-sensing (CS) framework, rather than common filtered-backprojection (FBP)-based algorithms, for more accurate ICT reconstruction. We implemented a CS-based ICT algorithm and performed a systematic simulation to investigate the imaging characteristics. Simulation conditions of two ROI ratios of 0.28 and 0.14 between the target and the whole phantom sizes and four projection numbers of 360, 180, 90, and 45 were tested. We successfully reconstructed ICT images of substantially high image quality by using the CS framework even with few-view projection data, still preserving sharp edges in the images.

  16. Investigation of optimization-based reconstruction with an image-total-variation constraint in PET

    Zhang, Zheng; Ye, Jinghan; Chen, Buxin; Perkins, Amy E.; Rose, Sean; Sidky, Emil Y.; Kao, Chien-Min; Xia, Dan; Tung, Chi-Hua; Pan, Xiaochuan

    2016-08-01

    Interest remains in reconstruction-algorithm research and development for possible improvement of image quality in current PET imaging and for enabling innovative PET systems to enhance existing, and facilitate new, preclinical and clinical applications. Optimization-based image reconstruction has been demonstrated in recent years of potential utility for CT imaging applications. In this work, we investigate tailoring the optimization-based techniques to image reconstruction for PET systems with standard and non-standard scan configurations. Specifically, given an image-total-variation (TV) constraint, we investigated how the selection of different data divergences and associated parameters impacts the optimization-based reconstruction of PET images. The reconstruction robustness was explored also with respect to different data conditions and activity up-takes of practical relevance. A study was conducted particularly for image reconstruction from data collected by use of a PET configuration with sparsely populated detectors. Overall, the study demonstrates the robustness of the TV-constrained, optimization-based reconstruction for considerably different data conditions in PET imaging, as well as its potential to enable PET configurations with reduced numbers of detectors. Insights gained in the study may be exploited for developing algorithms for PET-image reconstruction and for enabling PET-configuration design of practical usefulness in preclinical and clinical applications.

  17. Image reconstruction for a Positron Emission Tomograph optimized for breast cancer imaging

    The author performs image reconstruction for a novel Positron Emission Tomography camera that is optimized for breast cancer imaging. This work addresses for the first time, the problem of fully-3D, tomographic reconstruction using a septa-less, stationary, (i.e. no rotation or linear motion), and rectangular camera whose Field of View (FOV) encompasses the entire volume enclosed by detector modules capable of measuring Depth of Interaction (DOI) information. The camera is rectangular in shape in order to accommodate breasts of varying sizes while allowing for soft compression of the breast during the scan. This non-standard geometry of the camera exacerbates two problems: (a) radial elongation due to crystal penetration and (b) reconstructing images from irregularly sampled data. Packing considerations also give rise to regions in projection space that are not sampled which lead to missing information. The author presents new Fourier Methods based image reconstruction algorithms that incorporate DOI information and accommodate the irregular sampling of the camera in a consistent manner by defining lines of responses (LORs) between the measured interaction points instead of rebinning the events into predefined crystal face LORs which is the only other method to handle DOI information proposed thus far. The new procedures maximize the use of the increased sampling provided by the DOI while minimizing interpolation in the data. The new algorithms use fixed-width evenly spaced radial bins in order to take advantage of the speed of the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT), which necessitates the use of irregular angular sampling in order to minimize the number of unnormalizable Zero-Efficiency Bins (ZEBs). In order to address the persisting ZEBs and the issue of missing information originating from packing considerations, the algorithms (a) perform nearest neighbor smoothing in 2D in the radial bins (b) employ a semi-iterative procedure in order to estimate the unsampled data

  18. Image reconstruction for a Positron Emission Tomograph optimized for breast cancer imaging

    Virador, Patrick R.G.

    2000-04-01

    The author performs image reconstruction for a novel Positron Emission Tomography camera that is optimized for breast cancer imaging. This work addresses for the first time, the problem of fully-3D, tomographic reconstruction using a septa-less, stationary, (i.e. no rotation or linear motion), and rectangular camera whose Field of View (FOV) encompasses the entire volume enclosed by detector modules capable of measuring Depth of Interaction (DOI) information. The camera is rectangular in shape in order to accommodate breasts of varying sizes while allowing for soft compression of the breast during the scan. This non-standard geometry of the camera exacerbates two problems: (a) radial elongation due to crystal penetration and (b) reconstructing images from irregularly sampled data. Packing considerations also give rise to regions in projection space that are not sampled which lead to missing information. The author presents new Fourier Methods based image reconstruction algorithms that incorporate DOI information and accommodate the irregular sampling of the camera in a consistent manner by defining lines of responses (LORs) between the measured interaction points instead of rebinning the events into predefined crystal face LORs which is the only other method to handle DOI information proposed thus far. The new procedures maximize the use of the increased sampling provided by the DOI while minimizing interpolation in the data. The new algorithms use fixed-width evenly spaced radial bins in order to take advantage of the speed of the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT), which necessitates the use of irregular angular sampling in order to minimize the number of unnormalizable Zero-Efficiency Bins (ZEBs). In order to address the persisting ZEBs and the issue of missing information originating from packing considerations, the algorithms (a) perform nearest neighbor smoothing in 2D in the radial bins (b) employ a semi-iterative procedure in order to estimate the unsampled data

  19. Stereoscopic Polar Plume Reconstructions from Stereo/Secchi Images

    Feng, L; Solanki, S K; Wilhelm, K; Wiegelmann, T; Podlipnik, B; Howard, R A; Plunkett, S P; Wuelser, J P; Gan, W Q; 10.1088/0004-637X/700/1/292

    2009-01-01

    We present stereoscopic reconstructions of the location and inclination of polar plumes of two data sets based on the two simultaneously recorded images taken by the EUVI telescopes in the SECCHI instrument package onboard the \\emph{STEREO (Solar TErrestrial RElations Observatory)} spacecraft. The ten plumes investigated show a superradial expansion in the coronal hole in 3D which is consistent with the 2D results. Their deviations from the local meridian planes are rather small with an average of $6.47^{\\circ}$. By comparing the reconstructed plumes with a dipole field with its axis along the solar rotation axis, it is found that plumes are inclined more horizontally than the dipole field. The lower the latitude is, the larger is the deviation from the dipole field. The relationship between plumes and bright points has been investigated and they are not always associated. For the first data set, based on the 3D height of plumes and the electron density derived from SUMER/\\emph{SOHO} Si {\\sc viii} line pair, ...

  20. Modulus reconstruction from prostate ultrasound images using finite element modeling

    Yan, Zhennan; Zhang, Shaoting; Alam, S. Kaisar; Metaxas, Dimitris N.; Garra, Brian S.; Feleppa, Ernest J.

    2012-03-01

    In medical diagnosis, use of elastography is becoming increasingly more useful. However, treatments usually assume a planar compression applied to tissue surfaces and measure the deformation. The stress distribution is relatively uniform close to the surface when using a large, flat compressor but it diverges gradually along tissue depth. Generally in prostate elastography, the transrectal probes used for scanning and compression are cylindrical side-fire or rounded end-fire probes, and the force is applied through the rectal wall. These make it very difficult to detect cancer in prostate, since the rounded contact surfaces exaggerate the non-uniformity of the applied stress, especially for the distal, anterior prostate. We have developed a preliminary 2D Finite Element Model (FEM) to simulate prostate deformation in elastography. The model includes a homogeneous prostate with a stiffer tumor in the proximal, posterior region of the gland. A force is applied to the rectal wall to deform the prostate, strain and stress distributions can be computed from the resultant displacements. Then, we assume the displacements as boundary condition and reconstruct the modulus distribution (inverse problem) using linear perturbation method. FEM simulation shows that strain and strain contrast (of the lesion) decrease very rapidly with increasing depth and lateral distance. Therefore, lesions would not be clearly visible if located far away from the probe. However, the reconstructed modulus image can better depict relatively stiff lesion wherever the lesion is located.

  1. Current profile reconstruction using electron temperature imaging diagnostics

    Tritz, K.; Stutman, D.; Delgado-Aparicio, L. F.; Finkenthal, M.; Pacella, D.; Kaita, R.; Stratton, B.; Sabbagh, S.

    2004-10-01

    Flux surface shape information can be used to constrain the current profile for reconstruction of the plasma equilibrium. One method of inferring flux surface shape relies on plasma x-ray emission; however, deviations from the flux surfaces due to impurity and density asymmetries complicate the interpretation. Electron isotherm surfaces should correspond well to the plasma flux surfaces, and equilibrium constraint modeling using this isotherm information constrains the current profile. The KFIT code is used to assess the profile uncertainty and to optimize the number, location and SNR required for the Te detectors. As Te imaging detectors we consider tangentially viewing, vertically spaced, linear gas electron multiplier arrays operated in pulse height analysis (PHA) mode and multifoil soft x-ray arrays. Isoflux coordinate sets provided by Te measurements offer a strong constraint on the equilibrium reconstruction in both a stacked horizontal array configuration and a crossed horizontal and vertical beam system, with q0 determined to within ±4%. The required SNR can be provided with either PHA or multicolor diagnostic techniques, though the multicolor system requires ˜×4 better statistics for comparable final errors.

  2. Exploring the Nuclear Landscape by Image Reconstruction Techniques

    In spite of the development of ever more elaborate techniques for the calculation of nuclear properties, the calculation of the most basic property of atomic nuclei, their mass, still represents a challenging task. The differences between measured masses and Liquid Drop Model (LDM) predictions have well known regularities. They contain information related to shell closures, nuclear deformation and the residual nuclear interactions, and display a well defined pattern, which can be viewed as a two-dimensional image. In the present work the more than 2000 known nuclear masses are studied as an array in the N-Z plane viewed through a mask, behind which the approximately 7000 unknown unstable nuclei that can exist between the proton and neutron drip lines are hidden. Employing a Fourier transform deconvolution method these masses can be predicted. Measured masses are reconstructed with and r.m.s. error of less than 100 keV. Potential applications of the present approach are outlined. (Author)

  3. Image reconstruction from few views by l0-norm optimization

    Sun, Yu-Li; Tao, Jin-Xu

    2014-07-01

    In the medical computer tomography (CT) field, total variation (TV), which is the l1-norm of the discrete gradient transform (DGT), is widely used as regularization based on the compressive sensing (CS) theory. To overcome the TV model's disadvantageous tendency of uniformly penalizing the image gradient and over smoothing the low-contrast structures, an iterative algorithm based on the l0-norm optimization of the DGT is proposed. In order to rise to the challenges introduced by the l0-norm DGT, the algorithm uses a pseudo-inverse transform of DGT and adapts an iterative hard thresholding (IHT) algorithm, whose convergence and effective efficiency have been theoretically proven. The simulation demonstrates our conclusions and indicates that the algorithm proposed in this paper can obviously improve the reconstruction quality.

  4. Image reconstruction from few views by ℓ0-norm optimization

    In the medical computer tomography (CT) field, total variation (TV), which is the ℓ1-norm of the discrete gradient transform (DGT), is widely used as regularization based on the compressive sensing (CS) theory. To overcome the TV model's disadvantageous tendency of uniformly penalizing the image gradient and over smoothing the low-contrast structures, an iterative algorithm based on the ℓ0-norm optimization of the DGT is proposed. In order to rise to the challenges introduced by the ℓ0-norm DGT, the algorithm uses a pseudo-inverse transform of DGT and adapts an iterative hard thresholding (IHT) algorithm, whose convergence and effective efficiency have been theoretically proven. The simulation demonstrates our conclusions and indicates that the algorithm proposed in this paper can obviously improve the reconstruction quality. (interdisciplinary physics and related areas of science and technology)

  5. A Fast Super-Resolution Reconstruction from Image Sequence

    2006-01-01

    Based on the mechanism of imagery, a novel method called the delaminating combining template method, used for the problem of super-resolution reconstruction from image sequence, is described in this paper. The combining template method contains two steps: a delaminating strategy and a combining template algorithm. The delaminating strategy divides the original problem into several sub-problems;each of them is only connected to one degrading factor. The combining template algorithm is suggested to resolve each sub-problem. In addition, to verify the valid of the method, a new index called oriental entropy is presented. The results from the theoretical analysis and experiments illustrate that this method to be promising and efficient.

  6. Fast fully 3-D image reconstruction in PET using planograms.

    Brasse, D; Kinahan, P E; Clackdoyle, R; Defrise, M; Comtat, C; Townsend, D W

    2004-04-01

    We present a method of performing fast and accurate three-dimensional (3-D) backprojection using only Fourier transform operations for line-integral data acquired by planar detector arrays in positron emission tomography. This approach is a 3-D extension of the two-dimensional (2-D) linogram technique of Edholm. By using a special choice of parameters to index a line of response (LOR) for a pair of planar detectors, rather than the conventional parameters used to index a LOR for a circular tomograph, all the LORs passing through a point in the field of view (FOV) lie on a 2-D plane in the four-dimensional (4-D) data space. Thus, backprojection of all the LORs passing through a point in the FOV corresponds to integration of a 2-D plane through the 4-D "planogram." The key step is that the integration along a set of parallel 2-D planes through the planogram, that is, backprojection of a plane of points, can be replaced by a 2-D section through the origin of the 4-D Fourier transform of the data. Backprojection can be performed as a sequence of Fourier transform operations, for faster implementation. In addition, we derive the central-section theorem for planogram format data, and also derive a reconstruction filter for both backprojection-filtering and filtered-backprojection reconstruction algorithms. With software-based Fourier transform calculations we provide preliminary comparisons of planogram backprojection to standard 3-D backprojection and demonstrate a reduction in computation time by a factor of approximately 15. PMID:15084067

  7. Image quality of iterative reconstruction in cranial CT imaging: comparison of model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) and adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASiR)

    The purpose of this study was to compare cranial CT (CCT) image quality (IQ) of the MBIR algorithm with standard iterative reconstruction (ASiR). In this institutional review board (IRB)-approved study, raw data sets of 100 unenhanced CCT examinations (120 kV, 50-260 mAs, 20 mm collimation, 0.984 pitch) were reconstructed with both ASiR and MBIR. Signal-to-noise (SNR) and contrast-to-noise (CNR) were calculated from attenuation values measured in caudate nucleus, frontal white matter, anterior ventricle horn, fourth ventricle, and pons. Two radiologists, who were blinded to the reconstruction algorithms, evaluated anonymized multiplanar reformations of 2.5 mm with respect to depiction of different parenchymal structures and impact of artefacts on IQ with a five-point scale (0: unacceptable, 1: less than average, 2: average, 3: above average, 4: excellent). MBIR decreased artefacts more effectively than ASiR (p < 0.01). The median depiction score for MBIR was 3, whereas the median value for ASiR was 2 (p < 0.01). SNR and CNR were significantly higher in MBIR than ASiR (p < 0.01). MBIR showed significant improvement of IQ parameters compared to ASiR. As CCT is an examination that is frequently required, the use of MBIR may allow for substantial reduction of radiation exposure caused by medical diagnostics. (orig.)

  8. Image reconstruction of dense scattering media from cw sources using constrained CGD and a matrix rescaling technique

    Chang, Jenghwa; Graber, Harry L.; Barbour, Randall L.

    1995-05-01

    This study reports on results of our efforts to improve the efficiency and stability of previously developed reconstruction algorithms for optical diffusion tomography. The previous studies, which applied regularization and a priori contraints to iterative methods--POCS, CGD, and SART algorithms--showed that in most cases, good quality reconstructions of simply structured media were achievalbe using a perturbation model. The CGD method, which is the most efficient of the three algorithms, was, however, in some instances not able to produce good quality images because of the difficulty in applying range constraints, which can cause divergence. In this study, a scheme is proposed to detect this gradient vector is reset and the CGD reconstruction is restarted using the previous reconstruction as the initial value. In gradient vector is reset and the CGD reconstruction is restarted using the previous reconstruction as the initial value. In addition, a rescaling technique, which rescaled the weight matrix to make it more uniform and less ill-conditioned, is also used to suppress numerical errors and accelerate convergence. Two criteria, rescaling the maximum of each column to 1 and rescaling the average of each column to 1, were applied and compared to results without rescaling. The results show that, with properly imposed constraints, good quality images can be obtained using the CGD method. The convergence speed is much slower when constraints are imposed, but still comparable to the POCS and SART algorithms, The rescaling technique produces more stable and more accurate reconstructions, and speeds up the reconstruction significantly for all three algorithms.

  9. Molecular Imaging : Computer Reconstruction and Practice - Proceedings of the NATO Advanced Study Institute on Molecular Imaging from Physical Principles to Computer Reconstruction and Practice

    Lemoigne, Yves

    2008-01-01

    This volume collects the lectures presented at the ninth ESI School held at Archamps (FR) in November 2006 and is dedicated to nuclear physics applications in molecular imaging. The lectures focus on the multiple facets of image reconstruction processing and management and illustrate the role of digital imaging in clinical practice. Medical computing and image reconstruction are introduced by analysing the underlying physics principles and their implementation, relevant quality aspects, clinical performance and recent advancements in the field. Several stages of the imaging process are specifically addressed, e.g. optimisation of data acquisition and storage, distributed computing, physiology and detector modelling, computer algorithms for image reconstruction and measurement in tomography applications, for both clinical and biomedical research applications. All topics are presented with didactical language and style, making this book an appropriate reference for students and professionals seeking a comprehen...

  10. Neuron Image Analyzer: Automated and Accurate Extraction of Neuronal Data from Low Quality Images.

    Kim, Kwang-Min; Son, Kilho; Palmore, G Tayhas R

    2015-01-01

    Image analysis software is an essential tool used in neuroscience and neural engineering to evaluate changes in neuronal structure following extracellular stimuli. Both manual and automated methods in current use are severely inadequate at detecting and quantifying changes in neuronal morphology when the images analyzed have a low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). This inadequacy derives from the fact that these methods often include data from non-neuronal structures or artifacts by simply tracing pixels with high intensity. In this paper, we describe Neuron Image Analyzer (NIA), a novel algorithm that overcomes these inadequacies by employing Laplacian of Gaussian filter and graphical models (i.e., Hidden Markov Model, Fully Connected Chain Model) to specifically extract relational pixel information corresponding to neuronal structures (i.e., soma, neurite). As such, NIA that is based on vector representation is less likely to detect false signals (i.e., non-neuronal structures) or generate artifact signals (i.e., deformation of original structures) than current image analysis algorithms that are based on raster representation. We demonstrate that NIA enables precise quantification of neuronal processes (e.g., length and orientation of neurites) in low quality images with a significant increase in the accuracy of detecting neuronal changes post-stimulation. PMID:26593337

  11. Accurate Image Search using Local Descriptors into a Compact Image Representation

    Soumia Benkrama

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Progress in image retrieval by using low-level features, such as colors, textures and shapes, the performance is still unsatisfied as there are existing gaps between low-level features and high-level semantic concepts. In this work, we present an improved implementation for the bag of visual words approach. We propose a image retrieval system based on bag-of-features (BoF model by using scale invariant feature transform (SIFT and speeded up robust features (SURF. In literature SIFT and SURF give of good results. Based on this observation, we decide to use a bag-of-features approach over quaternion zernike moments (QZM. We compare the results of SIFT and SURF with those of QZM. We propose an indexing method for content based search task that aims to retrieve collection of images and returns a ranked list of objects in response to a query image. Experimental results with the Coil-100 and corel-1000 image database, demonstrate that QZM produces a better performance than known representations (SIFT and SURF.

  12. The limitation of MRA reconstruction imaging evaluating intraluminal thrombus on endovascular exclusion for abdominal aortic aneurysm

    Objective: To investigate the effect of pitfall MRA reconstruction imaging without intraluminal thrombus on endovascular exclusion for abdominal aortic aneurysm. Methods: Comparing the MRA reconstruction imaging with the MRA cross-section imaging, all of 22 patients underwent endovascular exclusion from Jan 2002 to Oct 2002 were included. Results: Intraluminal thrombus possessed the merit of clinical treatment, otherwise would mislead the evaluation of the procedure. Conclusions: It is important to use MRA reconstruction imaging evaluating abdominal aortic aneurysm combining MRA cross-section imaging

  13. Enhancing nanoscale SEM image segmentation and reconstruction with crystallographic orientation data and machine learning

    Current methods of image segmentation and reconstructions from scanning electron micrographs can be inadequate for resolving nanoscale gaps in composite materials (1–20 nm). Such information is critical to both accurate material characterizations and models of piezoresistive response. The current work proposes the use of crystallographic orientation data and machine learning for enhancing this process. It is first shown how a machine learning algorithm can be used to predict the connectivity of nanoscale grains in a Nickel nanostrand/epoxy composite. This results in 71.9% accuracy for a 2D algorithm and 62.4% accuracy in 3D. Finally, it is demonstrated how these algorithms can be used to predict the location of gaps between distinct nanostrands — gaps which would otherwise not be detected with the sole use of a scanning electron microscope. - Highlights: • A method is proposed for enhancing the segmentation/reconstruction of SEM images. • 3D crystallographic orientation data from a nickel nanocomposite is collected. • A machine learning algorithm is used to detect trends in adjacent grains. • This algorithm is then applied to predict likely regions of nanoscale gaps. • These gaps would otherwise be unresolved with the sole use of an SEM

  14. Reconstruction of apparent orthotropic conductivity tensor image using magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography

    Magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography visualizes current density and/or conductivity distributions inside an electrically conductive object. Injecting currents into the imaging object along at least two different directions, induced magnetic flux density data can be measured using a magnetic resonance imaging scanner. Without rotating the object inside the scanner, we can measure only one component of the magnetic flux density denoted as Bz. Since the biological tissues such as skeletal muscle and brain white matter show strong anisotropic properties, the reconstruction of anisotropic conductivity tensor is indispensable for the accurate observations in the biological systems. In this paper, we propose a direct method to reconstruct an axial apparent orthotropic conductivity tensor by using multiple Bz data subject to multiple injection currents. To investigate the anisotropic conductivity properties, we first recover the internal current density from the measured Bz data. From the recovered internal current density and the curl-free condition of the electric field, we derive an over-determined matrix system for determining the internal absolute orthotropic conductivity tensor. The over-determined matrix system is designed to use a combination of two loops around each pixel. Numerical simulations and phantom experimental results demonstrate that the proposed algorithm stably determines the orthotropic conductivity tensor

  15. Reconstruction of apparent orthotropic conductivity tensor image using magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography

    Sajib, Saurav Z. K.; Kim, Ji Eun; Jeong, Woo Chul; Kim, Hyung Joong; Woo, Eung Je [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Kyung Hee University, Yongin, Gyeonggi (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Oh In, E-mail: oikwon@konkuk.ac.kr [Department of Mathematics, Konkuk University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-03-14

    Magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography visualizes current density and/or conductivity distributions inside an electrically conductive object. Injecting currents into the imaging object along at least two different directions, induced magnetic flux density data can be measured using a magnetic resonance imaging scanner. Without rotating the object inside the scanner, we can measure only one component of the magnetic flux density denoted as B{sub z}. Since the biological tissues such as skeletal muscle and brain white matter show strong anisotropic properties, the reconstruction of anisotropic conductivity tensor is indispensable for the accurate observations in the biological systems. In this paper, we propose a direct method to reconstruct an axial apparent orthotropic conductivity tensor by using multiple B{sub z} data subject to multiple injection currents. To investigate the anisotropic conductivity properties, we first recover the internal current density from the measured B{sub z} data. From the recovered internal current density and the curl-free condition of the electric field, we derive an over-determined matrix system for determining the internal absolute orthotropic conductivity tensor. The over-determined matrix system is designed to use a combination of two loops around each pixel. Numerical simulations and phantom experimental results demonstrate that the proposed algorithm stably determines the orthotropic conductivity tensor.

  16. Image Reconstruction from 2D stack of MRI/CT to 3D using Shapelets

    Arathi T; Latha Parameswaran

    2014-01-01

    Image reconstruction is an active research field, due to the increasing need for geometric 3D models in movie industry, games, virtual environments and in medical fields. 3D image reconstruction aims to arrive at the 3D model of an object, from its 2D images taken at different viewing angles. Medical images are multimodal, which includes MRI, CT scan image, PET and SPECT images. Of these, MRI and CT scan images of an organ when taken, is available as a stack of 2D images, taken at different a...

  17. Reconstructions with identical filling (RIF) of the heart: a physiological approach to image reconstruction in coronary CT angiography

    Reinartz, S.D.; Diefenbach, B.S.; Kuhl, C.K.; Mahnken, A.H. [University Hospital, RWTH Aachen University, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Aachen (Germany); Allmendinger, T. [Siemens Healthcare Sector, Department of Computed Tomography, Forchheim (Germany)

    2012-12-15

    To compare image quality in coronary artery computed tomography angiography (cCTA) using reconstructions with automated phase detection and Reconstructions computed with Identical Filling of the heart (RIF). Seventy-four patients underwent ECG-gated dual source CT (DSCT) between November 2009 and July 2010 for suspected coronary heart disease (n = 35), planning of transcatheter aortic valve replacement (n = 34) or evaluation of ventricular function (n = 5). Image data sets by the RIF formula and automated phase detection were computed and evaluated with the AHA 15-segment model and a 5-grade Likert scale (1: poor, 5: excellent quality). Subgroups regarding rhythm (sinus rhythm = SR; arrhythmia = ARR) and potential premedication were evaluated by a per-segment, per-vessel and per-patient analysis. RIF significantly improved image quality in 10 of 15 coronary segments (P < 0.05). More diagnostic segments were provided by RIF regarding the entire cohort (n = 693 vs. 590, P < 0.001) and all of the subgroups (e.g. ARR: n = 143 vs. 72, P < 0.001). In arrhythmic patients (n = 19), more diagnostic vessels (e.g. LAD: n = 10 vs. 3; P < 0.014) and complete data sets (n = 7 vs. 1; P < 0.001) were produced. RIF reconstruction is superior to automatic diastolic non-edited reconstructions, especially in arrhythmic patients. RIF theory provides a physiological approach for determining the optimal image reconstruction point in ECG-gated CT angiography. (orig.)

  18. Reconstructions with identical filling (RIF) of the heart: a physiological approach to image reconstruction in coronary CT angiography

    To compare image quality in coronary artery computed tomography angiography (cCTA) using reconstructions with automated phase detection and Reconstructions computed with Identical Filling of the heart (RIF). Seventy-four patients underwent ECG-gated dual source CT (DSCT) between November 2009 and July 2010 for suspected coronary heart disease (n = 35), planning of transcatheter aortic valve replacement (n = 34) or evaluation of ventricular function (n = 5). Image data sets by the RIF formula and automated phase detection were computed and evaluated with the AHA 15-segment model and a 5-grade Likert scale (1: poor, 5: excellent quality). Subgroups regarding rhythm (sinus rhythm = SR; arrhythmia = ARR) and potential premedication were evaluated by a per-segment, per-vessel and per-patient analysis. RIF significantly improved image quality in 10 of 15 coronary segments (P < 0.05). More diagnostic segments were provided by RIF regarding the entire cohort (n = 693 vs. 590, P < 0.001) and all of the subgroups (e.g. ARR: n = 143 vs. 72, P < 0.001). In arrhythmic patients (n = 19), more diagnostic vessels (e.g. LAD: n = 10 vs. 3; P < 0.014) and complete data sets (n = 7 vs. 1; P < 0.001) were produced. RIF reconstruction is superior to automatic diastolic non-edited reconstructions, especially in arrhythmic patients. RIF theory provides a physiological approach for determining the optimal image reconstruction point in ECG-gated CT angiography. (orig.)

  19. Photoacoustic image reconstruction from ultrasound post-beamformed B-mode image

    Zhang, Haichong K.; Guo, Xiaoyu; Kang, Hyun Jae; Boctor, Emad M.

    2016-03-01

    A requirement to reconstruct photoacoustic (PA) image is to have a synchronized channel data acquisition with laser firing. Unfortunately, most clinical ultrasound (US) systems don't offer an interface to obtain synchronized channel data. To broaden the impact of clinical PA imaging, we propose a PA image reconstruction algorithm utilizing US B-mode image, which is readily available from clinical scanners. US B-mode image involves a series of signal processing including beamforming, followed by envelope detection, and end with log compression. Yet, it will be defocused when PA signals are input due to incorrect delay function. Our approach is to reverse the order of image processing steps and recover the original US post-beamformed radio-frequency (RF) data, in which a synthetic aperture based PA rebeamforming algorithm can be further applied. Taking B-mode image as the input, we firstly recovered US postbeamformed RF data by applying log decompression and convoluting an acoustic impulse response to combine carrier frequency information. Then, the US post-beamformed RF data is utilized as pre-beamformed RF data for the adaptive PA beamforming algorithm, and the new delay function is applied by taking into account that the focus depth in US beamforming is at the half depth of the PA case. The feasibility of the proposed method was validated through simulation, and was experimentally demonstrated using an acoustic point source. The point source was successfully beamformed from a US B-mode image, and the full with at the half maximum of the point improved 3.97 times. Comparing this result to the ground-truth reconstruction using channel data, the FWHM was slightly degraded with 1.28 times caused by information loss during envelope detection and convolution of the RF information.

  20. Research on super-resolution image reconstruction based on an improved POCS algorithm

    Xu, Haiming; Miao, Hong; Yang, Chong; Xiong, Cheng

    2015-07-01

    Super-resolution image reconstruction (SRIR) can improve the fuzzy image's resolution; solve the shortage of the spatial resolution, excessive noise, and low-quality problem of the image. Firstly, we introduce the image degradation model to reveal the essence of super-resolution reconstruction process is an ill-posed inverse problem in mathematics. Secondly, analysis the blurring reason of optical imaging process - light diffraction and small angle scattering is the main reason for the fuzzy; propose an image point spread function estimation method and an improved projection onto convex sets (POCS) algorithm which indicate effectiveness by analyzing the changes between the time domain and frequency domain algorithm in the reconstruction process, pointed out that the improved POCS algorithms based on prior knowledge have the effect to restore and approach the high frequency of original image scene. Finally, we apply the algorithm to reconstruct synchrotron radiation computer tomography (SRCT) image, and then use these images to reconstruct the three-dimensional slice images. Comparing the differences between the original method and super-resolution algorithm, it is obvious that the improved POCS algorithm can restrain the noise and enhance the image resolution, so it is indicated that the algorithm is effective. This study and exploration to super-resolution image reconstruction by improved POCS algorithm is proved to be an effective method. It has important significance and broad application prospects - for example, CT medical image processing and SRCT ceramic sintering analyze of microstructure evolution mechanism.

  1. PET image reconstruction with rotationally symmetric polygonal pixel grid based highly compressible system matrix

    To achieve a maximum compression of system matrix in positron emission tomography (PET) image reconstruction, we proposed a polygonal image pixel division strategy in accordance with rotationally symmetric PET geometry. Geometrical definition and indexing rule for polygonal pixels were established. Image conversion from polygonal pixel structure to conventional rectangular pixel structure was implemented using a conversion matrix. A set of test images were analytically defined in polygonal pixel structure, converted to conventional rectangular pixel based images, and correctly displayed which verified the correctness of the image definition, conversion description and conversion of polygonal pixel structure. A compressed system matrix for PET image recon was generated by tap model and tested by forward-projecting three different distributions of radioactive sources to the sinogram domain and comparing them with theoretical predictions. On a practical small animal PET scanner, a compress ratio of 12.6:1 of the system matrix size was achieved with the polygonal pixel structure, comparing with the conventional rectangular pixel based tap-mode one. OS-EM iterative image reconstruction algorithms with the polygonal and conventional Cartesian pixel grid were developed. A hot rod phantom was detected and reconstructed based on these two grids with reasonable time cost. Image resolution of reconstructed images was both 1.35 mm. We conclude that it is feasible to reconstruct and display images in a polygonal image pixel structure based on a compressed system matrix in PET image reconstruction. (authors)

  2. Geometrically invariant and high capacity image watermarking scheme using accurate radial transform

    Singh, Chandan; Ranade, Sukhjeet K.

    2013-12-01

    Angular radial transform (ART) is a region based descriptor and possesses many attractive features such as rotation invariance, low computational complexity and resilience to noise which make them more suitable for invariant image watermarking than that of many transform domain based image watermarking techniques. In this paper, we introduce ART for fast and geometrically invariant image watermarking scheme with high embedding capacity. We also develop an accurate and fast framework for the computation of ART coefficients based on Gaussian quadrature numerical integration, 8-way symmetry/anti-symmetry properties and recursive relations for the calculation of sinusoidal kernel functions. ART coefficients so computed are then used for embedding the binary watermark using dither modulation. Experimental studies reveal that the proposed watermarking scheme not only provides better robustness against geometric transformations and other signal processing distortions, but also has superior advantages over the existing ones in terms of embedding capacity, speed and visual imperceptibility.

  3. A correlative imaging based methodology for accurate quantitative assessment of bone formation in additive manufactured implants.

    Geng, Hua; Todd, Naomi M; Devlin-Mullin, Aine; Poologasundarampillai, Gowsihan; Kim, Taek Bo; Madi, Kamel; Cartmell, Sarah; Mitchell, Christopher A; Jones, Julian R; Lee, Peter D

    2016-06-01

    A correlative imaging methodology was developed to accurately quantify bone formation in the complex lattice structure of additive manufactured implants. Micro computed tomography (μCT) and histomorphometry were combined, integrating the best features from both, while demonstrating the limitations of each imaging modality. This semi-automatic methodology registered each modality using a coarse graining technique to speed the registration of 2D histology sections to high resolution 3D μCT datasets. Once registered, histomorphometric qualitative and quantitative bone descriptors were directly correlated to 3D quantitative bone descriptors, such as bone ingrowth and bone contact. The correlative imaging allowed the significant volumetric shrinkage of histology sections to be quantified for the first time (~15 %). This technique demonstrated the importance of location of the histological section, demonstrating that up to a 30 % offset can be introduced. The results were used to quantitatively demonstrate the effectiveness of 3D printed titanium lattice implants. PMID:27153828

  4. Automatic alignment and reconstruction of images for soft x-ray tomography

    Parkinson, Dilworth Y.; Knoechel, Christian; Yang, Chao; Larabell, Carolyn A.; Le Gros, Mark A.

    2011-01-01

    Soft x-ray tomography (SXT) is a powerful imaging technique that generates quantitative, 3D images of the structural organization of whole cells in a near-native state. SXT is also a high-throughput imaging technique. At the National Center for X-ray Tomography (NCXT), specimen preparation and image collection for tomographic reconstruction of a whole cell require only minutes. Aligning and reconstructing the data, however, take significantly longer. Here we describe a new component of the hi...

  5. A Method for Interactive 3D Reconstruction of Piecewise Planar Objects from Single Images

    Sturm, Peter; Maybank, Steve

    1999-01-01

    We present an approach for 3D reconstruction of objects from a single image. Obviously, constraints on the 3D structure are needed to perform this task. Our approach is based on user-provided coplanarity, perpendicularity and parallelism constraints. These are used to calibrate the image and perform 3D reconstruction. The method is described in detail and results are provided.

  6. Experimental demonstration of an analytic method for image reconstruction in optical tomography with large data sets

    Wang, Zheng-Min; Panasyuk, George Y.; Markel, Vadim A.; Schotland, John C.

    2005-01-01

    We report the first experimental test of an analytic image reconstruction algorithm for optical tomography with large data sets. Using a continuous-wave optical tomography system with 10^8 source-detector pairs, we demonstrate the reconstruction of an absorption image of a phantom consisting of a highly-scattering medium with absorbing inhomogeneities.

  7. Iterative Image Reconstruction for PROPELLER-MRI using the NonUniform Fast Fourier Transform

    Tamhane, Ashish A.; Anastasio, Mark A.; Gui, Minzhi; Arfanakis, Konstantinos

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To investigate an iterative image reconstruction algorithm using the non-uniform fast Fourier transform (NUFFT) for PROPELLER (Periodically Rotated Overlapping parallEL Lines with Enhanced Reconstruction) MRI. Materials and Methods Numerical simulations, as well as experiments on a phantom and a healthy human subject were used to evaluate the performance of the iterative image reconstruction algorithm for PROPELLER, and compare it to that of conventional gridding. The trade-off between spatial resolution, signal to noise ratio, and image artifacts, was investigated for different values of the regularization parameter. The performance of the iterative image reconstruction algorithm in the presence of motion was also evaluated. Results It was demonstrated that, for a certain range of values of the regularization parameter, iterative reconstruction produced images with significantly increased SNR, reduced artifacts, for similar spatial resolution, compared to gridding. Furthermore, the ability to reduce the effects of motion in PROPELLER-MRI was maintained when using the iterative reconstruction approach. Conclusion An iterative image reconstruction technique based on the NUFFT was investigated for PROPELLER MRI. For a certain range of values of the regularization parameter the new reconstruction technique may provide PROPELLER images with improved image quality compared to conventional gridding. PMID:20578028

  8. An image-based approach to the reconstruction of ancient architectures by extracting and arranging 3D spatial components

    Divya Udayan J; HyungSeok KIM; Jee-In KIM

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this research is the rapid reconstruction of ancient buildings of historical importance using a single image. The key idea of our approach is to reduce the infi nite solutions that might otherwise arise when recovering a 3D geometry from 2D photographs. The main outcome of our research shows that the proposed methodology can be used to reconstruct ancient monuments for use as proxies for digital effects in applications such as tourism, games, and entertainment, which do not require very accurate modeling. In this article, we consider the reconstruction of ancient Mughal architecture including the Taj Mahal. We propose a modeling pipeline that makes an easy reconstruction possible using a single photograph taken from a single view, without the need to create complex point clouds from multiple images or the use of laser scanners. First, an initial model is automatically reconstructed using locally fi tted planar primitives along with their boundary polygons and the adjacency relation among parts of the polygons. This approach is faster and more accurate than creating a model from scratch because the initial reconstruction phase provides a set of structural information together with the adjacency relation, which makes it possible to estimate the approximate depth of the entire structural monument. Next, we use manual extrapolation and editing techniques with modeling software to assemble and adjust different 3D components of the model. Thus, this research opens up the opportunity for the present generation to experience remote sites of architectural and cultural importance through virtual worlds and real-time mobile applications. Variations of a recreated 3D monument to represent an amalgam of various cultures are targeted for future work.

  9. An accurate and practical method for inference of weak gravitational lensing from galaxy images

    Bernstein, Gary M.; Armstrong, Robert; Krawiec, Christina; March, Marisa C.

    2016-07-01

    We demonstrate highly accurate recovery of weak gravitational lensing shear using an implementation of the Bayesian Fourier Domain (BFD) method proposed by Bernstein & Armstrong, extended to correct for selection biases. The BFD formalism is rigorously correct for Nyquist-sampled, background-limited, uncrowded images of background galaxies. BFD does not assign shapes to galaxies, instead compressing the pixel data D into a vector of moments M, such that we have an analytic expression for the probability P(M|g) of obtaining the observations with gravitational lensing distortion g along the line of sight. We implement an algorithm for conducting BFD's integrations over the population of unlensed source galaxies which measures ≈10 galaxies s-1 core-1 with good scaling properties. Initial tests of this code on ≈109 simulated lensed galaxy images recover the simulated shear to a fractional accuracy of m = (2.1 ± 0.4) × 10-3, substantially more accurate than has been demonstrated previously for any generally applicable method. Deep sky exposures generate a sufficiently accurate approximation to the noiseless, unlensed galaxy population distribution assumed as input to BFD. Potential extensions of the method include simultaneous measurement of magnification and shear; multiple-exposure, multiband observations; and joint inference of photometric redshifts and lensing tomography.

  10. Effect of different image reconstruction algorithms on phase analysis of gated myocardial perfusion SPECT studies

    Objective: To evaluate the effect of various iterative reconstruction methods on phase analysis of gated myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI). Methods: Thirty consecutive patients scanned by the Philips CardioMD system were recruited into this study. The gated SPECT (GSPECT) data were reconstructed with filtered backprojection (FBP), maximum likelihood expectation maximization (MLEM), three-dimensional (3D) resolution recovery MLEM (AST), attenuation corrected (AC) MLEM, AC and 3D Monte Carlo scatter corrected (ACSC) MLEM methods. Parameters of left ventricular (LV) dyssynchrony (phase standard deviation and histogram bandwidth) were measured using the software SyncTool. Paired t-test was used to compare the differences of the LV dyssynchrony indices between FBP and MLEM, AC MLEM, ACSC MLEM, AST respectively. Results: The phase standard deviations of stress GSPECT MPI for FBP, MLEM, AC MLEM, ACSC MLEM, and AST were 11.6 degree, 10.9 degree, 11.2 degree, 11.6 degree, 11.4 degree respectively;while the histogram bandwidths were 35.7 degree, 34.3 degree, 35.1 degree, 36.9 degree, 35.1 degree respectively. The phase standard deviations of rest GSPECT MPI for FBP, MLEM, AC MLEM, ACSC MLEM and AST were 15.2 degree, 14.5 degree, 15.4 degree, 15.4 degree, 14.8 degree respectively; while the histogram bandwidths were 47.3 degree, 46.4 degree, 46.4 degree, 47.9 degree, 46.1 degree respectively. No statistical significance was observed between the FBP and various iterative reconstruction methods for both the stress and rest GSPECT MPI study (t:-1.179 to 1.554, P>0.05 for all). Conclusion: The standard FBP reconstruction method is accurate enough for the measurement of LV dyssynchrony indices using the widely used clinical software SyncTool. (authors)

  11. dPIRPLE: a joint estimation framework for deformable registration and penalized-likelihood CT image reconstruction using prior images

    Sequential imaging studies are conducted in many clinical scenarios. Prior images from previous studies contain a great deal of patient-specific anatomical information and can be used in conjunction with subsequent imaging acquisitions to maintain image quality while enabling radiation dose reduction (e.g., through sparse angular sampling, reduction in fluence, etc). However, patient motion between images in such sequences results in misregistration between the prior image and current anatomy. Existing prior-image-based approaches often include only a simple rigid registration step that can be insufficient for capturing complex anatomical motion, introducing detrimental effects in subsequent image reconstruction. In this work, we propose a joint framework that estimates the 3D deformation between an unregistered prior image and the current anatomy (based on a subsequent data acquisition) and reconstructs the current anatomical image using a model-based reconstruction approach that includes regularization based on the deformed prior image. This framework is referred to as deformable prior image registration, penalized-likelihood estimation (dPIRPLE). Central to this framework is the inclusion of a 3D B-spline-based free-form-deformation model into the joint registration-reconstruction objective function. The proposed framework is solved using a maximization strategy whereby alternating updates to the registration parameters and image estimates are applied allowing for improvements in both the registration and reconstruction throughout the optimization process. Cadaver experiments were conducted on a cone-beam CT testbench emulating a lung nodule surveillance scenario. Superior reconstruction accuracy and image quality were demonstrated using the dPIRPLE algorithm as compared to more traditional reconstruction methods including filtered backprojection, penalized-likelihood estimation (PLE), prior image penalized-likelihood estimation (PIPLE) without registration, and

  12. Preoperative digital mammography imaging in conservative mastectomy and immediate reconstruction

    Angrigiani, Claudio; Hammond, Dennis; Nava, Maurizio; Gonzalez, Eduardo; Rostagno, Roman; Gercovich, Gustavo

    2016-01-01

    Background Digital mammography clearly distinguishes gland tissue density from the overlying non-glandular breast tissue coverage, which corresponds to the existing tissue between the skin and the Cooper’s ligaments surrounding the gland (i.e., dermis and subcutaneous fat). Preoperative digital imaging can determine the thickness of this breast tissue coverage, thus facilitating planning of the most adequate surgical techniques and reconstructive procedures for each case. Methods This study aimed to describe the results of a retrospective study of 352 digital mammograms in 176 patients with different breast volumes who underwent preoperative conservative mastectomies. The breast tissue coverage thickness and its relationship with the breast volume were evaluated. Results The breast tissue coverage thickness ranged from 0.233 to 4.423 cm, with a mean value of 1.952 cm. A comparison of tissue coverage and breast volume revealed a non-direct relationship between these factors. Conclusions Preoperative planning should not depend only on breast volume. Flap evaluations based on preoperative imaging measurements might be helpful when planning a conservative mastectomy. Accordingly, we propose a breast tissue coverage classification (BTCC). PMID:26855903

  13. Image reconstruction using a first generation CT scanner

    Computed tomography (CT) is a non-destructive imaging technique that has been used in medical diagnosis since 1971. For many years the CT technique has also been applied to material characterisation and the detection of defects and flaws in industrial components associated with the nuclear, aerospace and missile industries. This paper reports on the construction of a first generation CT scanner built to demonstrate some applications of CT in the field of non-destructive testing and characterisation of materials. The scanner uses a mono-energetic 667 keV Cs-137 gamma radiation source and sodium iodide detector. The analogue output of the detector is connected to a Minekin rate meter. The object is placed on a specimen stage with the movement controlled by stepper motors through a GPIB interface. The projection data is acquired by placing the object at various angles with respect to the incident radiation and scanning the object laterally through a fixed source and detector assembly. The attenuation data is then processed on a Pentium computer using the summation filtered back-projection image reconstruction method. The mass attenuation coefficients were measured for aluminium, stainless steel, brass and lead and the results compared favourably with published data. The CT scanner will be improved to study various other applications in materials science and be used to establish a modern computed tomographic scanning facility. (author)

  14. Reconstruction 3-dimensional image from 2-dimensional image of status optical coherence tomography (OCT) for analysis of changes in retinal thickness

    Arinilhaq,; Widita, Rena [Department of Physics, Nuclear Physics and Biophysics Research Group, Institut Teknologi Bandung (Indonesia)

    2014-09-30

    Optical Coherence Tomography is often used in medical image acquisition to diagnose that change due easy to use and low price. Unfortunately, this type of examination produces a two-dimensional retinal image of the point of acquisition. Therefore, this study developed a method that combines and reconstruct 2-dimensional retinal images into three-dimensional images to display volumetric macular accurately. The system is built with three main stages: data acquisition, data extraction and 3-dimensional reconstruction. At data acquisition step, Optical Coherence Tomography produced six *.jpg images of each patient were further extracted with MATLAB 2010a software into six one-dimensional arrays. The six arrays are combined into a 3-dimensional matrix using a kriging interpolation method with SURFER9 resulting 3-dimensional graphics of macula. Finally, system provides three-dimensional color graphs based on the data distribution normal macula. The reconstruction system which has been designed produces three-dimensional images with size of 481 × 481 × h (retinal thickness) pixels.

  15. High Resolution Image Reconstruction Method for a Double-plane PET System with Changeable Spacing

    Gu, Xiao-Yue; Li, Lin; Yin, Peng-Fei; Shang, Lei-Min; Yun, Ming-Kai; Lu, Zhen-Rui; Huang, Xian-Chao; Wei, Long

    2015-01-01

    Positron Emission Mammography (PEM) imaging systems with the ability in detection of millimeter-sized tumors were developed in recent years. And some of them have been well used in clinical applications. In consideration of biopsy application, a double-plane detector configuration is practical for the convenience of breast immobilization. However, the serious blurring effect in the double-plane system with changeable spacing for different breast size should be studied. Methods: We study a high resolution reconstruction method applicable for a double-plane PET system with a changeable detector spacing. Geometric and blurring components should be calculated at real time for different detector distance. Accurate geometric sensitivity is obtained with a tube area model. Resolution recovery is achieved by estimating blurring effects derived from simulated single gamma response information. Results: The results show that the new geometric modeling gives a more finite and smooth sensitivity weight in double-plane sy...

  16. Simultaneous reconstruction of the activity image and registration of the CT image in TOF-PET

    Rezaei, Ahmadreza; Michel, Christian; Casey, Michael E.; Nuyts, Johan

    2016-02-01

    Previously, maximum-likelihood methods have been proposed to jointly estimate the activity image and the attenuation image or the attenuation sinogram from time-of-flight (TOF) positron emission tomography (PET) data. In this contribution, we propose a method that addresses the possible alignment problem of the TOF-PET emission data and the computed tomography (CT) attenuation data, by combining reconstruction and registration. The method, called MLRR, iteratively reconstructs the activity image while registering the available CT-based attenuation image, so that the pair of activity and attenuation images maximise the likelihood of the TOF emission sinogram. The algorithm is slow to converge, but some acceleration could be achieved by using Nesterov’s momentum method and by applying a multi-resolution scheme for the non-rigid displacement estimation. The latter also helps to avoid local optima, although convergence to the global optimum cannot be guaranteed. The results are evaluated on 2D and 3D simulations as well as a respiratory gated clinical scan. Our experiments indicate that the proposed method is able to correct for possible misalignment of the CT-based attenuation image, and is therefore a very promising approach to suppressing attenuation artefacts in clinical PET/CT. When applied to respiratory gated data of a patient scan, it produced deformations that are compatible with breathing motion and which reduced the well known attenuation artefact near the dome of the liver. Since the method makes use of the energy-converted CT attenuation image, the scale problem of joint reconstruction is automatically solved.

  17. Exact Reconstruction for Near-Field Three-Dimensional Planar Millimeter-Wave Holographic Imaging

    Qiao, Lingbo; Wang, Yingxin; Zhao, Ziran; Chen, Zhiqiang

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, an exact reconstruction formula is presented for near-field three-dimensional (3D) planar millimeter-wave (MMW) holographic imaging. The proposed formula is derived based on scalar diffraction theory, and the round-trip imaging process is equivalent to a unidirectional optical field propagation. Because of compensating the propagation loss of the source for the near-field imaging configuration, the inconsistency in range domain of the reconstructed 3D images is avoided. The proposed reconstruction formula also gives a phase correction for the reconstructed complex-valued reflectivity of the target and the range coordinate can be exactly determined. Simulations and laboratory imaging experiments are performed to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed reconstruction formula.

  18. A Compton scattering image reconstruction algorithm based on total variation minimization

    Li Shou-Peng; Wang Lin-Yuan; Yan Bin; Li Lei; Liu Yong-Jun

    2012-01-01

    Compton scattering imaging is a novel radiation imaging method using scattered photons.Its main characteristics are detectors that do not have to be on the opposite side of the source,so avoiding the rotation process.The reconstruction problem of Compton scattering imaging is the inverse problem to solve electron densities from nonlinear equations,which is ill-posed.This means the solution exhibits instability and sensitivity to noise or erroneous measurements.Using the theory for reconstruction of sparse images,a reconstruction algorithm based on total variation minimization is proposed.The reconstruction problem is described as an optimization problem with nonlinear data-consistency constraint.The simulated results show that the proposed algorithm could reduce reconstruction error and improve image quality,especially when there are not enough measurements.

  19. Reducing CT radiation dose with iterative reconstruction algorithms: The influence of scan and reconstruction parameters on image quality and CTDIvol

    Highlights: • Iterative reconstruction (IR) and filtered back projection (FBP) were compared. • CT image noise was reduced by 12.4%–52.2% using IR in comparison to FBP. • IR did not affect high- and low-contrast resolution. • CTDIvol was reduced by 26–50% using hybrid IR at comparable image quality levels. • IR produced good to excellent image quality in patients. - Abstract: Objectives: In this phantom CT study, we investigated whether images reconstructed using filtered back projection (FBP) and iterative reconstruction (IR) with reduced tube voltage and current have equivalent quality. We evaluated the effects of different acquisition and reconstruction parameter settings on image quality and radiation doses. Additionally, patient CT studies were evaluated to confirm our phantom results. Methods: Helical and axial 256 multi-slice computed tomography scans of the phantom (Catphan®) were performed with varying tube voltages (80–140 kV) and currents (30–200 mAs). 198 phantom data sets were reconstructed applying FBP and IR with increasing iterations, and soft and sharp kernels. Further, 25 chest and abdomen CT scans, performed with high and low exposure per patient, were reconstructed with IR and FBP. Two independent observers evaluated image quality and radiation doses of both phantom and patient scans. Results: In phantom scans, noise reduction was significantly improved using IR with increasing iterations, independent from tissue, scan-mode, tube-voltage, current, and kernel. IR did not affect high-contrast resolution. Low-contrast resolution was also not negatively affected, but improved in scans with doses <5 mGy, although object detectability generally decreased with the lowering of exposure. At comparable image quality levels, CTDIvol was reduced by 26–50% using IR. In patients, applying IR vs. FBP resulted in good to excellent image quality, while tube voltage and current settings could be significantly decreased. Conclusions: Our

  20. STEREOSCOPIC POLAR PLUME RECONSTRUCTIONS FROM STEREO/SECCHI IMAGES

    We present stereoscopic reconstructions of the location and inclination of polar plumes of two data sets based on the two simultaneously recorded images taken by the EUVI telescopes in the SECCHI instrument package onboard the Solar TErrestrial RElations Observatory spacecraft. The 10 plumes investigated show a superradial expansion in the coronal hole in three dimensions (3D) which is consistent with the two-dimensional results. Their deviations from the local meridian planes are rather small with an average of 6.047. By comparing the reconstructed plumes with a dipole field with its axis along the solar rotation axis, it is found that plumes are inclined more horizontally than the dipole field. The lower the latitude is, the larger is the deviation from the dipole field. The relationship between plumes and bright points has been investigated and they are not always associated. For the first data set, based on the 3D height of plumes and the electron density derived from SUMER/SOHO Si VIII line pair, we found that electron densities along the plumes decrease with height above the solar surface. The temperature obtained from the density scale height is 1.6-1.8 times larger than the temperature obtained from Mg IX line ratios. We attribute this discrepancy to a deviation of the electron and the ion temperatures. Finally, we have found that the outflow speeds studied in the O VI line in the plumes corrected by the angle between the line of sight and the plume orientation are quite small with a maximum of 10 km s-1. It is unlikely that plumes are a dominant contributor to the fast solar wind.

  1. High resolution image reconstruction method for a double-plane PET system with changeable spacing

    Gu, Xiao-Yue; Zhou, Wei; Li, Lin; Wei, Long; Yin, Peng-Fei; Shang, Lei-Min; Yun, Ming-Kai; Lu, Zhen-Rui; Huang, Xian-Chao

    2016-05-01

    Breast-dedicated positron emission tomography (PET) imaging techniques have been developed in recent years. Their capacities to detect millimeter-sized breast tumors have been the subject of many studies. Some of them have been confirmed with good results in clinical applications. With regard to biopsy application, a double-plane detector arrangement is practicable, as it offers the convenience of breast immobilization. However, the serious blurring effect of the double-plane PET, with changeable spacing for different breast sizes, should be studied. We investigated a high resolution reconstruction method applicable for a double-plane PET. The distance between the detector planes is changeable. Geometric and blurring components were calculated in real-time for different detector distances, and accurate geometric sensitivity was obtained with a new tube area model. Resolution recovery was achieved by estimating blurring effects derived from simulated single gamma response information. The results showed that the new geometric modeling gave a more finite and smooth sensitivity weight in the double-plane PET. The blurring component yielded contrast recovery levels that could not be reached without blurring modeling, and improved visual recovery of the smallest spheres and better delineation of the structures in the reconstructed images were achieved with the blurring component. Statistical noise had lower variance at the voxel level with blurring modeling at matched resolution, compared to without blurring modeling. In distance-changeable double-plane PET, finite resolution modeling during reconstruction achieved resolution recovery, without noise amplification. Supported by Knowledge Innovation Project of The Chinese Academy of Sciences (KJCX2-EW-N06)

  2. Accurate localization of intracavitary brachytherapy applicators from 3D CT imaging studies

    Purpose: To present an accurate method to identify the positions and orientations of intracavitary (ICT) brachytherapy applicators imaged in 3D CT scans, in support of Monte Carlo photon-transport simulations, enabling accurate dose modeling in the presence of applicator shielding and interapplicator attenuation. Materials and methods: The method consists of finding the transformation that maximizes the coincidence between the known 3D shapes of each applicator component (colpostats and tandem) with the volume defined by contours of the corresponding surface on each CT slice. We use this technique to localize Fletcher-Suit CT-compatible applicators for three cervix cancer patients using post-implant CT examinations (3 mm slice thickness and separation). Dose distributions in 1-to-1 registration with the underlying CT anatomy are derived from 3D Monte Carlo photon-transport simulations incorporating each applicator's internal geometry (source encapsulation, high-density shields, and applicator body) oriented in relation to the dose matrix according to the measured localization transformations. The precision and accuracy of our localization method are assessed using CT scans, in which the positions and orientations of dense rods and spheres (in a precision-machined phantom) were measured at various orientations relative to the gantry. Results: Using this method, we register 3D Monte Carlo dose calculations directly onto post insertion patient CT studies. Using CT studies of a precisely machined phantom, the absolute accuracy of the method was found to be ±0.2 mm in plane, and ±0.3 mm in the axial direction while its precision was ±0.2 mm in plane, and ±0.2 mm axially. Conclusion: We have developed a novel, and accurate technique to localize intracavitary brachytherapy applicators in 3D CT imaging studies, which supports 3D dose planning involving detailed 3D Monte Carlo dose calculations, modeling source positions, shielding and interapplicator shielding

  3. The research of Digital Holographic Object Wave Field Reconstruction in Image and Object Space

    LI Jun-Chang; PENG Zu-Jie; FU Yun-Chang

    2011-01-01

    @@ For conveniently detecting objects of different sizes using digital holography, usual measurements employ the object wave transformed by an optical system with different magnifications to fit charge coupled devices (CCDs), then the object field reconstruction involves the diffraction calculation of the optic wave passing through the optical system.We propose two methods to reconstruct the object field.The one is that, when the object is imaging in an image space in which we reconstruct the image of the object field, the object field can be expressed according to the object-image relationship.The other is that, when the object field reaching CCD is imaged in an object space in which we reconstruct the object field, the optical system is described by introducing matrix optics in this paper.The reconstruction formulae which easily use classic diffraction integral are derived.Finally, experimental verifications are also accomplished.%For conveniently detecting objects of different sizes using digital holography, usual measurements employ the object wave transformed by an optical system with different magnifications to fit charge coupled devices (CCDs), then the object Reid reconstruction involves the diffraction calculation of the optic wave passing through the optical system. We propose two methods to reconstruct the object field. The one is that, when the object is imaging in an image space in which we reconstruct the image of the object field, the object field can be expressed according to the object-image relationship. The other is that, when the object field reaching CCD is imaged in an object space in which we reconstruct the object field, the optical system is described by introducing matrix optics in this paper. The reconstruction formulae which easily use classic diffraction integral are derived. Finally, experimental verifications are also accomplished.

  4. Choice of reconstructed tissue properties affects interpretation of lung EIT images

    Electrical impedance tomography (EIT) estimates an image of change in electrical properties within a body from stimulations and measurements at surface electrodes. There is significant interest in EIT as a tool to monitor and guide ventilation therapy in mechanically ventilated patients. In lung EIT, the EIT inverse problem is commonly linearized and only changes in electrical properties are reconstructed. Early algorithms reconstructed changes in resistivity, while most recent work using the finite element method reconstructs conductivity. Recently, we demonstrated that EIT images of ventilation can be misleading if the electrical contrasts within the thorax are not taken into account during the image reconstruction process. In this paper, we explore the effect of the choice of the reconstructed electrical properties (resistivity or conductivity) on the resulting EIT images. We show in simulation and experimental data that EIT images reconstructed with the same algorithm but with different parametrizations lead to large and clinically significant differences in the resulting images, which persist even after attempts to eliminate the impact of the parameter choice by recovering volume changes from the EIT images. Since there is no consensus among the most popular reconstruction algorithms and devices regarding the parametrization, this finding has implications for potential clinical use of EIT. We propose a program of research to develop reconstruction techniques that account for both the relationship between air volume and electrical properties of the lung and artefacts introduced by the linearization. (paper)

  5. Normalization of a spatially variant image reconstruction problem in electrical impedance tomography using system blurring properties

    The electrical impedance tomography (EIT) image reconstruction problem is ill posed and spatially variant. Because of the problem's ill-posed nature, small amounts of measurement noise can corrupt reconstructed images. The problem must be regularized to reduce image artifacts. In this paper, we focus on the spatially variant characteristics of the problem. Correcting errors due to spatial variance should improve reconstruction accuracy. In this paper, we present methods to normalize the spatially variant image reconstruction problem by equalizing the point spread function (PSF). In order to equalize the PSF, we used the reconstruction blurring properties obtained from the sensitivity matrix. We compared three mathematical normalization schemes: pixel-wise scaling (PWS), weighted pseudo-inversion (WPI) and weighted minimum norm method (WMNM) to equalize images. The quantity index (QI), defined as the integral of pixel values of an EIT conductivity image, was considered in investigating spatial variance. The QI values along with reconstructed images are presented for cases of two-dimensional full array and hemiarray electrode topologies. We found that a spatially invariant QI could be obtained by applying normalization methods based on equalization of the PSF using conventional regularized reconstruction methods such as truncated singular value decomposition (TSVD) and WMNM. We found that WMNM normalization applied to WMNM regularized reconstruction was the best of the methods tested overall, for both hemiarray and full array electrode topologies

  6. Multi-view Multi-sparsity Kernel Reconstruction for Multi-class Image Classification

    Zhu, Xiaofeng

    2015-05-28

    This paper addresses the problem of multi-class image classification by proposing a novel multi-view multi-sparsity kernel reconstruction (MMKR for short) model. Given images (including test images and training images) representing with multiple visual features, the MMKR first maps them into a high-dimensional space, e.g., a reproducing kernel Hilbert space (RKHS), where test images are then linearly reconstructed by some representative training images, rather than all of them. Furthermore a classification rule is proposed to classify test images. Experimental results on real datasets show the effectiveness of the proposed MMKR while comparing to state-of-the-art algorithms.

  7. On multigrid methods for image reconstruction from projections

    Henson, V.E.; Robinson, B.T. [Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, CA (United States); Limber, M. [Simon Fraser Univ., Burnaby, British Columbia (Canada)

    1994-12-31

    The sampled Radon transform of a 2D function can be represented as a continuous linear map R : L{sup 1} {yields} R{sup N}. The image reconstruction problem is: given a vector b {element_of} R{sup N}, find an image (or density function) u(x, y) such that Ru = b. Since in general there are infinitely many solutions, the authors pick the solution with minimal 2-norm. Numerous proposals have been made regarding how best to discretize this problem. One can, for example, select a set of functions {phi}{sub j} that span a particular subspace {Omega} {contained_in} L{sup 1}, and model R : {Omega} {yields} R{sup N}. The subspace {Omega} may be chosen as a member of a sequence of subspaces whose limit is dense in L{sup 1}. One approach to the choice of {Omega} gives rise to a natural pixel discretization of the image space. Two possible choices of the set {phi}{sub j} are the set of characteristic functions of finite-width `strips` representing energy transmission paths and the set of intersections of such strips. The authors have studied the eigenstructure of the matrices B resulting from these choices and the effect of applying a Gauss-Seidel iteration to the problem Bw = b. There exists a near null space into which the error vectors migrate with iteration, after which Gauss-Seidel iteration stalls. The authors attempt to accelerate convergence via a multilevel scheme, based on the principles of McCormick`s Multilevel Projection Method (PML). Coarsening is achieved by thickening the rays which results in a much smaller discretization of an optimal grid, and a halving of the number of variables. This approach satisfies all the requirements of the PML scheme. They have observed that a multilevel approach based on this idea accelerates convergence at least to the point where noise in the data dominates.

  8. The Performance Evaluation of Multi-Image 3d Reconstruction Software with Different Sensors

    Mousavi, V.; Khosravi, M.; Ahmadi, M.; Noori, N.; Naveh, A. Hosseini; Varshosaz, M.

    2015-12-01

    Today, multi-image 3D reconstruction is an active research field and generating three dimensional model of the objects is one the most discussed issues in Photogrammetry and Computer Vision that can be accomplished using range-based or image-based methods. Very accurate and dense point clouds generated by range-based methods such as structured light systems and laser scanners has introduced them as reliable tools in the industry. Image-based 3D digitization methodologies offer the option of reconstructing an object by a set of unordered images that depict it from different viewpoints. As their hardware requirements are narrowed down to a digital camera and a computer system, they compose an attractive 3D digitization approach, consequently, although range-based methods are generally very accurate, image-based methods are low-cost and can be easily used by non-professional users. One of the factors affecting the accuracy of the obtained model in image-based methods is the software and algorithm used to generate three dimensional model. These algorithms are provided in the form of commercial software, open source and web-based services. Another important factor in the accuracy of the obtained model is the type of sensor used. Due to availability of mobile sensors to the public, popularity of professional sensors and the advent of stereo sensors, a comparison of these three sensors plays an effective role in evaluating and finding the optimized method to generate three-dimensional models. Lots of research has been accomplished to identify a suitable software and algorithm to achieve an accurate and complete model, however little attention is paid to the type of sensors used and its effects on the quality of the final model. The purpose of this paper is deliberation and the introduction of an appropriate combination of a sensor and software to provide a complete model with the highest accuracy. To do this, different software, used in previous studies, were compared and

  9. THE PERFORMANCE EVALUATION OF MULTI-IMAGE 3D RECONSTRUCTION SOFTWARE WITH DIFFERENT SENSORS

    V. Mousavi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Today, multi-image 3D reconstruction is an active research field and generating three dimensional model of the objects is one the most discussed issues in Photogrammetry and Computer Vision that can be accomplished using range-based or image-based methods. Very accurate and dense point clouds generated by range-based methods such as structured light systems and laser scanners has introduced them as reliable tools in the industry. Image-based 3D digitization methodologies offer the option of reconstructing an object by a set of unordered images that depict it from different viewpoints. As their hardware requirements are narrowed down to a digital camera and a computer system, they compose an attractive 3D digitization approach, consequently, although range-based methods are generally very accurate, image-based methods are low-cost and can be easily used by non-professional users. One of the factors affecting the accuracy of the obtained model in image-based methods is the software and algorithm used to generate three dimensional model. These algorithms are provided in the form of commercial software, open source and web-based services. Another important factor in the accuracy of the obtained model is the type of sensor used. Due to availability of mobile sensors to the public, popularity of professional sensors and the advent of stereo sensors, a comparison of these three sensors plays an effective role in evaluating and finding the optimized method to generate three-dimensional models. Lots of research has been accomplished to identify a suitable software and algorithm to achieve an accurate and complete model, however little attention is paid to the type of sensors used and its effects on the quality of the final model. The purpose of this paper is deliberation and the introduction of an appropriate combination of a sensor and software to provide a complete model with the highest accuracy. To do this, different software, used in previous

  10. Improved Image Fusion in PET/CT Using Hybrid Image Reconstruction and Super-Resolution

    Kennedy, John A.; Ora Israel; Alex Frenkel; Rachel Bar-Shalom; Haim Azhari

    2007-01-01

    Purpose. To provide PET/CT image fusion with an improved PET resolution and better contrast ratios than standard reconstructions. Method. Using a super-resolution algorithm, several PET acquisitions were combined to improve the resolution. In addition, functional PET data was smoothed with a hybrid computed tomography algorithm (HCT), in which anatomical edge information taken from the CT was employed to retain sharper edges. The combined HCT and super-resolution technique were evaluated in p...

  11. Task-based detectability in CT image reconstruction by filtered backprojection and penalized likelihood estimation

    Purpose: Nonstationarity is an important aspect of imaging performance in CT and cone-beam CT (CBCT), especially for systems employing iterative reconstruction. This work presents a theoretical framework for both filtered-backprojection (FBP) and penalized-likelihood (PL) reconstruction that includes explicit descriptions of nonstationary noise, spatial resolution, and task-based detectability index. Potential utility of the model was demonstrated in the optimal selection of regularization parameters in PL reconstruction. Methods: Analytical models for local modulation transfer function (MTF) and noise-power spectrum (NPS) were investigated for both FBP and PL reconstruction, including explicit dependence on the object and spatial location. For FBP, a cascaded systems analysis framework was adapted to account for nonstationarity by separately calculating fluence and system gains for each ray passing through any given voxel. For PL, the point-spread function and covariance were derived using the implicit function theorem and first-order Taylor expansion according toFessler [“Mean and variance of implicitly defined biased estimators (such as penalized maximum likelihood): Applications to tomography,” IEEE Trans. Image Process. 5(3), 493–506 (1996)]. Detectability index was calculated for a variety of simple tasks. The model for PL was used in selecting the regularization strength parameter to optimize task-based performance, with both a constant and a spatially varying regularization map. Results: Theoretical models of FBP and PL were validated in 2D simulated fan-beam data and found to yield accurate predictions of local MTF and NPS as a function of the object and the spatial location. The NPS for both FBP and PL exhibit similar anisotropic nature depending on the pathlength (and therefore, the object and spatial location within the object) traversed by each ray, with the PL NPS experiencing greater smoothing along directions with higher noise. The MTF of FBP

  12. Computational Chemical Imaging for Cardiovascular Pathology: Chemical Microscopic Imaging Accurately Determines Cardiac Transplant Rejection

    Tiwari, Saumya; Reddy, Vijaya B.; Bhargava, Rohit; Raman, Jaishankar

    2015-01-01

    Rejection is a common problem after cardiac transplants leading to significant number of adverse events and deaths, particularly in the first year of transplantation. The gold standard to identify rejection is endomyocardial biopsy. This technique is complex, cumbersome and requires a lot of expertise in the correct interpretation of stained biopsy sections. Traditional histopathology cannot be used actively or quickly during cardiac interventions or surgery. Our objective was to develop a stain-less approach using an emerging technology, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopic imaging to identify different components of cardiac tissue by their chemical and molecular basis aided by computer recognition, rather than by visual examination using optical microscopy. We studied this technique in assessment of cardiac transplant rejection to evaluate efficacy in an example of complex cardiovascular pathology. We recorded data from human cardiac transplant patients’ biopsies, used a Bayesian classification protocol and developed a visualization scheme to observe chemical differences without the need of stains or human supervision. Using receiver operating characteristic curves, we observed probabilities of detection greater than 95% for four out of five histological classes at 10% probability of false alarm at the cellular level while correctly identifying samples with the hallmarks of the immune response in all cases. The efficacy of manual examination can be significantly increased by observing the inherent biochemical changes in tissues, which enables us to achieve greater diagnostic confidence in an automated, label-free manner. We developed a computational pathology system that gives high contrast images and seems superior to traditional staining procedures. This study is a prelude to the development of real time in situ imaging systems, which can assist interventionists and surgeons actively during procedures. PMID:25932912

  13. Computational chemical imaging for cardiovascular pathology: chemical microscopic imaging accurately determines cardiac transplant rejection.

    Saumya Tiwari

    Full Text Available Rejection is a common problem after cardiac transplants leading to significant number of adverse events and deaths, particularly in the first year of transplantation. The gold standard to identify rejection is endomyocardial biopsy. This technique is complex, cumbersome and requires a lot of expertise in the correct interpretation of stained biopsy sections. Traditional histopathology cannot be used actively or quickly during cardiac interventions or surgery. Our objective was to develop a stain-less approach using an emerging technology, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR spectroscopic imaging to identify different components of cardiac tissue by their chemical and molecular basis aided by computer recognition, rather than by visual examination using optical microscopy. We studied this technique in assessment of cardiac transplant rejection to evaluate efficacy in an example of complex cardiovascular pathology. We recorded data from human cardiac transplant patients' biopsies, used a Bayesian classification protocol and developed a visualization scheme to observe chemical differences without the need of stains or human supervision. Using receiver operating characteristic curves, we observed probabilities of detection greater than 95% for four out of five histological classes at 10% probability of false alarm at the cellular level while correctly identifying samples with the hallmarks of the immune response in all cases. The efficacy of manual examination can be significantly increased by observing the inherent biochemical changes in tissues, which enables us to achieve greater diagnostic confidence in an automated, label-free manner. We developed a computational pathology system that gives high contrast images and seems superior to traditional staining procedures. This study is a prelude to the development of real time in situ imaging systems, which can assist interventionists and surgeons actively during procedures.

  14. X-ray CT image reconstruction from few-views via total generalized p-variation minimization.

    Hanming Zhang; Xiaoqi Xi; Bin Yan; Yu Han; Lei Li; Jianlin Chen; Ailong Cai

    2015-08-01

    Total variation (TV)-based CT image reconstruction, employing the image gradient sparsity, has shown to be experimentally capable of reducing the X-ray sampling rate and removing the unwanted artifacts, yet may cause unfavorable over-smoothing and staircase effects by the piecewise constant assumption. In this paper, we present a total generalized p-variation (TGpV) regularization model to adaptively preserve the edge information while avoiding the staircase effect. The new model is solved by splitting variables with an efficient alternating minimization scheme. With the utilization of generalized p-shrinkage mappings and partial Fourier transform, all the subproblems have closed solutions. The proposed method shows excellent properties of edge preserving as well as the smoothness features by the consideration of high order derivatives. Experimental results indicate that the proposed method could avoid the mentioned effects and reconstruct more accurately than both the TV and TGV minimization algorithms when applied to a few-view problem. PMID:26737566

  15. Image reconstruction from phased-array data based on multichannel blind deconvolution.

    She, Huajun; Chen, Rong-Rong; Liang, Dong; Chang, Yuchou; Ying, Leslie

    2015-11-01

    In this paper we consider image reconstruction from fully sampled multichannel phased array MRI data without knowledge of the coil sensitivities. To overcome the non-uniformity of the conventional sum-of-square reconstruction, a new framework based on multichannel blind deconvolution (MBD) is developed for joint estimation of the image function and the sensitivity functions in image domain. The proposed approach addresses the non-uniqueness of the MBD problem by exploiting the smoothness of both functions in the image domain through regularization. Results using simulation, phantom and in vivo experiments demonstrate that the reconstructions by the proposed algorithm are more uniform than those by the existing methods. PMID:26119418

  16. Magni: A Python Package for Compressive Sampling and Reconstruction of Atomic Force Microscopy Images

    Christian Schou Oxvig

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Magni is an open source Python package that embraces compressed sensing and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM imaging techniques. It provides AFM-specific functionality for undersampling and reconstructing images from AFM equipment and thereby accelerating the acquisition of AFM images. Magni also provides researchers in compressed sensing with a selection of algorithms for reconstructing undersampled general images, and offers a consistent and rigorous way to efficiently evaluate the researchers own developed reconstruction algorithms in terms of phase transitions. The package also serves as a convenient platform for researchers in compressed sensing aiming at obtaining a high degree of reproducibility of their research.

  17. An iterative reconstruction method of complex images using expectation maximization for radial parallel MRI

    In MRI (magnetic resonance imaging), signal sampling along a radial k-space trajectory is preferred in certain applications due to its distinct advantages such as robustness to motion, and the radial sampling can be beneficial for reconstruction algorithms such as parallel MRI (pMRI) due to the incoherency. For radial MRI, the image is usually reconstructed from projection data using analytic methods such as filtered back-projection or Fourier reconstruction after gridding. However, the quality of the reconstructed image from these analytic methods can be degraded when the number of acquired projection views is insufficient. In this paper, we propose a novel reconstruction method based on the expectation maximization (EM) method, where the EM algorithm is remodeled for MRI so that complex images can be reconstructed. Then, to optimize the proposed method for radial pMRI, a reconstruction method that uses coil sensitivity information of multichannel RF coils is formulated. Experiment results from synthetic and in vivo data show that the proposed method introduces better reconstructed images than the analytic methods, even from highly subsampled data, and provides monotonic convergence properties compared to the conjugate gradient based reconstruction method. (paper)

  18. An iterative reconstruction method of complex images using expectation maximization for radial parallel MRI

    Choi, Joonsung; Kim, Dongchan; Oh, Changhyun; Han, Yeji; Park, HyunWook

    2013-05-01

    In MRI (magnetic resonance imaging), signal sampling along a radial k-space trajectory is preferred in certain applications due to its distinct advantages such as robustness to motion, and the radial sampling can be beneficial for reconstruction algorithms such as parallel MRI (pMRI) due to the incoherency. For radial MRI, the image is usually reconstructed from projection data using analytic methods such as filtered back-projection or Fourier reconstruction after gridding. However, the quality of the reconstructed image from these analytic methods can be degraded when the number of acquired projection views is insufficient. In this paper, we propose a novel reconstruction method based on the expectation maximization (EM) method, where the EM algorithm is remodeled for MRI so that complex images can be reconstructed. Then, to optimize the proposed method for radial pMRI, a reconstruction method that uses coil sensitivity information of multichannel RF coils is formulated. Experiment results from synthetic and in vivo data show that the proposed method introduces better reconstructed images than the analytic methods, even from highly subsampled data, and provides monotonic convergence properties compared to the conjugate gradient based reconstruction method.

  19. PIRPLE: a penalized-likelihood framework for incorporation of prior images in CT reconstruction

    Over the course of diagnosis and treatment, it is common for a number of imaging studies to be acquired. Such imaging sequences can provide substantial patient-specific prior knowledge about the anatomy that can be incorporated into a prior-image-based tomographic reconstruction for improved image quality and better dose utilization. We present a general methodology using a model-based reconstruction approach including formulations of the measurement noise that also integrates prior images. This penalized-likelihood technique adopts a sparsity enforcing penalty that incorporates prior information yet allows for change between the current reconstruction and the prior image. Moreover, since prior images are generally not registered with the current image volume, we present a modified model-based approach that seeks a joint registration of the prior image in addition to the reconstruction of projection data. We demonstrate that the combined prior-image- and model-based technique outperforms methods that ignore the prior data or lack a noise model. Moreover, we demonstrate the importance of registration for prior-image-based reconstruction methods and show that the prior-image-registered penalized-likelihood estimation (PIRPLE) approach can maintain a high level of image quality in the presence of noisy and undersampled projection data. (paper)

  20. Texture-preserving Bayesian image reconstruction for low-dose CT

    Zhang, Hao; Han, Hao; Hu, Yifan; Liu, Yan; Ma, Jianhua; Li, Lihong; Moore, William; Liang, Zhengrong

    2016-03-01

    Markov random field (MRF) model has been widely used in Bayesian image reconstruction to reconstruct piecewise smooth images in the presence of noise, such as in low-dose X-ray computed tomography (LdCT). While it can preserve edge sharpness via edge-preserving potential function, its regional smoothing may sacrifice tissue image textures, which have been recognized as useful imaging biomarkers, and thus it compromises clinical tasks such as differentiating malignant vs. benign lesions, e.g., lung nodule or colon polyp. This study aims to shift the edge preserving regional noise smoothing paradigm to texture-preserving framework for LdCT image reconstruction while retaining the advantage of MRF's neighborhood system on edge preservation. Specifically, we adapted the MRF model to incorporate the image textures of lung, bone, fat, muscle, etc. from previous full-dose CT scan as a priori knowledge for texture-preserving Bayesian reconstruction of current LdCT images. To show the feasibility of proposed reconstruction framework, experiments using clinical patient scans (with lung nodule or colon polyp) were conducted. The experimental outcomes showed noticeable gain by the a priori knowledge for LdCT image reconstruction with the well-known Haralick texture measures. Thus, it is conjectured that texture-preserving LdCT reconstruction has advantages over edge-preserving regional smoothing paradigm for texture-specific clinical applications.

  1. Lung ultrasound for the diagnosis of childhood pneumonia: a safe and accurate imaging mode

    Hendaus, Mohamed Ata; Jomha, Fatima Ahmed; Alhammadi, Ahmed Hassan

    2015-01-01

    Pneumonia is the most common infectious cause of mortality in children worldwide. Chest x-ray (CXR) has been used as a supplementary mode in the diagnosis of pneumonia in children, but its frequent use might expose children to unnecessary ionizing radiation. In this review, we present up-to-date data of an alternative mode of imaging other than CXR in the diagnosis of pneumonia in children. We found that lung ultrasound is a safe and accurate mode of imaging that can be used by a health care provider in the cases of suspected pneumonia. It is more sensitive than CXR in the diagnosis of pneumonia and obviates the need for irradiation. PMID:26677334

  2. Novel fusion for hybrid optical/microcomputed tomography imaging based on natural light surface reconstruction and iterated closest point

    Ning, Nannan; Tian, Jie; Liu, Xia; Deng, Kexin; Wu, Ping; Wang, Bo; Wang, Kun; Ma, Xibo

    2014-02-01

    In mathematics, optical molecular imaging including bioluminescence tomography (BLT), fluorescence tomography (FMT) and Cerenkov luminescence tomography (CLT) are concerned with a similar inverse source problem. They all involve the reconstruction of the 3D location of a single/multiple internal luminescent/fluorescent sources based on 3D surface flux distribution. To achieve that, an accurate fusion between 2D luminescent/fluorescent images and 3D structural images that may be acquired form micro-CT, MRI or beam scanning is extremely critical. However, the absence of a universal method that can effectively convert 2D optical information into 3D makes the accurate fusion challengeable. In this study, to improve the fusion accuracy, a new fusion method for dual-modality tomography (luminescence/fluorescence and micro-CT) based on natural light surface reconstruction (NLSR) and iterated closest point (ICP) was presented. It consisted of Octree structure, exact visual hull from marching cubes and ICP. Different from conventional limited projection methods, it is 360° free-space registration, and utilizes more luminescence/fluorescence distribution information from unlimited multi-orientation 2D optical images. A mouse mimicking phantom (one XPM-2 Phantom Light Source, XENOGEN Corporation) and an in-vivo BALB/C mouse with implanted one luminescent light source were used to evaluate the performance of the new fusion method. Compared with conventional fusion methods, the average error of preset markers was improved by 0.3 and 0.2 pixels from the new method, respectively. After running the same 3D internal light source reconstruction algorithm of the BALB/C mouse, the distance error between the actual and reconstructed internal source was decreased by 0.19 mm.

  3. Enhanced imaging of microcalcifications in digital breast tomosynthesis through improved image-reconstruction algorithms

    Sidky, Emil Y; Reiser, Ingrid S; Nishikawa, Robert M; Moore, Richard H; Kopans, Daniel B

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: We develop a practical, iterative algorithm for image-reconstruction in under-sampled tomographic systems, such as digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT). METHOD: The algorithm controls image regularity by minimizing the image total $p$-variation (TpV), a function that reduces to the total variation when $p=1.0$ or the image roughness when $p=2.0$. Constraints on the image, such as image positivity and estimated projection-data tolerance, are enforced by projection onto convex sets (POCS). The fact that the tomographic system is under-sampled translates to the mathematical property that many widely varied resultant volumes may correspond to a given data tolerance. Thus the application of image regularity serves two purposes: (1) reduction of the number of resultant volumes out of those allowed by fixing the data tolerance, finding the minimum image TpV for fixed data tolerance, and (2) traditional regularization, sacrificing data fidelity for higher image regularity. The present algorithm allows for this...

  4. Enhanced reconstruction of partially occluded objects with occlusion removal in synthetic aperture integral imaging

    Zhiliang Zhou; Yan Yuan; Xiangli Bin; Qian Wang

    2011-01-01

    @@ Synthetic aperture integral imaging provides the ability to reconstruct partially occluded objects from multi-view images.However, the reconstructed images suffer from degraded contrast due to the super-imposition of foreground defocus blur.We propose an algorithm to remove foreground occlusions before reconstructing backgrounds.Occlusions are identified by estimating the color variance on elemental im-ages and then deleting it in the final synthetic image.We demonstrate the superiority of our method by presenting experimental results as well as comparing our method with other approaches.%Synthetic aperture integral imaging provides the ability to reconstruct partially occluded objects from multi-view images. However, the reconstructed images suffer from degraded contrast due to the superimposition of foreground defocus blur. We propose an algorithm to remove foreground occlusions before reconstructing backgrounds. Occlusions are identified by estimating the color variance on elemental images and then deleting it in the final synthetic image. We demonstrate the superiority of our method by presenting experimental results as well as comparing our method with other approaches.

  5. Re-sampling of inline holographic images for improved reconstruction resolution

    Podorov, S G; Paganin, D M; Pavlov, K M

    2009-01-01

    Digital holographic microscopy based on Gabor in-line holography is a well-known method to reconstruct both the amplitude and phase of small objects. To reconstruct the image of an object from its hologram, obtained under illumination by monochromatic scalar waves, numerical calculations of Fresnel integrals are required. To improve spatial resolution in the resulting reconstruction, we re-sample the holographic data before application of the reconstruction algorithm. This procedure amounts to inverting an interpolated Fresnel diffraction image to recover the object. The advantage of this method is demonstrated on experimental data, for the case of visible-light Gabor holography of a resolution grid and a gnat wing.

  6. Accelerating Image Reconstruction in Three-Dimensional Optoacoustic Tomography on Graphics Processing Units

    Wang, Kun; Kao, Yu-Jiun; Chou, Cheng-Ying; Oraevsky, Alexander A; Anastasio, Mark A; 10.1118/1.4774361

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Optoacoustic tomography (OAT) is inherently a three-dimensional (3D) inverse problem. However, most studies of OAT image reconstruction still employ two-dimensional (2D) imaging models. One important reason is because 3D image reconstruction is computationally burdensome. The aim of this work is to accelerate existing image reconstruction algorithms for 3D OAT by use of parallel programming techniques. Methods: Parallelization strategies are proposed to accelerate a filtered backprojection (FBP) algorithm and two different pairs of projection/backprojection operations that correspond to two different numerical imaging models. The algorithms are designed to fully exploit the parallel computing power of graphic processing units (GPUs). In order to evaluate the parallelization strategies for the projection/backprojection pairs, an iterative image reconstruction algorithm is implemented. Computer-simulation and experimental studies are conducted to investigate the computational efficiency and numerical a...

  7. Alternating Direction Total Variation Image Reconstruction and Practical Decomposition for Dual-energy Computed Tomography

    Li, Lei; Wang, Linyuan; Yan, Bin; Zhang, Hanming; Zheng, Zhizhong; Zhang, Wenkun; Lu, Wanli; Hu, Guoen

    2016-01-01

    Dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) has shown great potential and promising applications in advanced imaging fields for its capabilities of material decomposition. However, image reconstructions and decompositions under sparse views dataset suffers severely from multi factors, such as insufficiencies of data, appearances of noise, and inconsistencies of observations. Under sparse views, conventional filtered back-projection type reconstruction methods fails to provide CT images with satisfying quality. Moreover, direct image decomposition is unstable and meet with noise boost even with full views dataset. This paper proposes an iterative image reconstruction algorithm and a practical image domain decomposition method for DECT. On one hand, the reconstruction algorithm is formulated as an optimization problem, which containing total variation regularization term and data fidelity term. The alternating direction method is utilized to design the corresponding algorithm which shows faster convergence speed com...

  8. Sparsity-regularized image reconstruction of decomposed K-edge data in spectral CT

    Xu, Qiaofeng; Sawatzky, Alex; Anastasio, Mark A.; Schirra, Carsten O.

    2014-05-01

    The development of spectral computed tomography (CT) using binned photon-counting detectors has garnered great interest in recent years and has enabled selective imaging of K-edge materials. A practical challenge in CT image reconstruction of K-edge materials is the mitigation of image artifacts that arise from reduced-view and/or noisy decomposed sinogram data. In this note, we describe and investigate sparsity-regularized penalized weighted least squares-based image reconstruction algorithms for reconstructing K-edge images from few-view decomposed K-edge sinogram data. To exploit the inherent sparseness of typical K-edge images, we investigate use of a total variation (TV) penalty and a weighted sum of a TV penalty and an ℓ1-norm with a wavelet sparsifying transform. Computer-simulation and experimental phantom studies are conducted to quantitatively demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed reconstruction algorithms.

  9. Robust framework for PET image reconstruction incorporating system and measurement uncertainties.

    Huafeng Liu

    Full Text Available In Positron Emission Tomography (PET, an optimal estimate of the radioactivity concentration is obtained from the measured emission data under certain criteria. So far, all the well-known statistical reconstruction algorithms require exactly known system probability matrix a priori, and the quality of such system model largely determines the quality of the reconstructed images. In this paper, we propose an algorithm for PET image reconstruction for the real world case where the PET system model is subject to uncertainties. The method counts PET reconstruction as a regularization problem and the image estimation is achieved by means of an uncertainty weighted least squares framework. The performance of our work is evaluated with the Shepp-Logan simulated and real phantom data, which demonstrates significant improvements in image quality over the least squares reconstruction efforts.

  10. Reconstructing the landing trajectory of the CE-3 lunar probe by using images from the landing camera

    An accurate determination of the landing trajectory of Chang'e-3 (CE-3) is significant for verifying orbital control strategy, optimizing orbital planning, accurately determining the landing site of CE-3 and analyzing the geological background of the landing site. Due to complexities involved in the landing process, there are some differences between the planned trajectory and the actual trajectory of CE-3. The landing camera on CE-3 recorded a sequence of the landing process with a frequency of 10 frames per second. These images recorded by the landing camera and high-resolution images of the lunar surface are utilized to calculate the position of the probe, so as to reconstruct its precise trajectory. This paper proposes using the method of trajectory reconstruction by Single Image Space Resection to make a detailed study of the hovering stage at a height of 100 m above the lunar surface. Analysis of the data shows that the closer CE-3 came to the lunar surface, the higher the spatial resolution of images that were acquired became, and the more accurately the horizontal and vertical position of CE-3 could be determined. The horizontal and vertical accuracies were 7.09 m and 4.27 m respectively during the hovering stage at a height of 100.02 m. The reconstructed trajectory can reflect the change in CE-3's position during the powered descent process. A slight movement in CE-3 during the hovering stage is also clearly demonstrated. These results will provide a basis for analysis of orbit control strategy, and it will be conducive to adjustment and optimization of orbit control strategy in follow-up missions

  11. Reconstruction of images from Gabor zone plate gamma-ray holography

    Unwin, Clare E.; Rew, G. A. A.; Perks, J. R.; Beynon, T. D.; Scott, Malcolm C.

    1999-09-01

    Zone plate holography is a way of obtaining 3D images from a single exposure. Unlike conventional holography, coherent radiation sources are not required. Gama ray zone plate holography can be used to image gamma rays emitted by radiopharmaceuticals used in nuclear medicine. This work concerns the computer based reconstruction of gamma ray holograms. Reconstruction algorithms including correlation and Wiener filtering are described. The images obtained using the different methods are compared.

  12. The convergence of object dependent resolution in maximum likelihood based tomographic image reconstruction

    Study of the maximum likelihood by EM algorithm (ML) with a reconstruction kernel equal to the intrinsic detector resolution and sieve regularization has demonstrated that any image improvements over filtered backprojection (FBP) are a function of image resolution. Comparing different reconstruction algorithms potentially requires measuring and matching the image resolution. Since there are no standard methods for describing the resolution of images from a nonlinear algorithm such as ML, the authors have defined measures of effective local Gaussian resolution (ELGR) and effective global Gaussian resolution (EGGR) and examined their behaviour in FBP images and in ML images using two different measurement techniques. (Author)

  13. SU-E-I-82: Improving CT Image Quality for Radiation Therapy Using Iterative Reconstruction Algorithms and Slightly Increasing Imaging Doses

    Noid, G; Chen, G; Tai, A; Li, X [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Iterative reconstruction (IR) algorithms are developed to improve CT image quality (IQ) by reducing noise without diminishing spatial resolution or contrast. For CT in radiation therapy (RT), slightly increasing imaging dose to improve IQ may be justified if it can substantially enhance structure delineation. The purpose of this study is to investigate and to quantify the IQ enhancement as a result of increasing imaging doses and using IR algorithms. Methods: CT images were acquired for phantoms, built to evaluate IQ metrics including spatial resolution, contrast and noise, with a variety of imaging protocols using a CT scanner (Definition AS Open, Siemens) installed inside a Linac room. Representative patients were scanned once the protocols were optimized. Both phantom and patient scans were reconstructed using the Sinogram Affirmed Iterative Reconstruction (SAFIRE) and the Filtered Back Projection (FBP) methods. IQ metrics of the obtained CTs were compared. Results: IR techniques are demonstrated to preserve spatial resolution as measured by the point spread function and reduce noise in comparison to traditional FBP. Driven by the reduction in noise, the contrast to noise ratio is doubled by adopting the highest SAFIRE strength. As expected, increasing imaging dose reduces noise for both SAFIRE and FBP reconstructions. The contrast to noise increases from 3 to 5 by increasing the dose by a factor of 4. Similar IQ improvement was observed on the CTs for selected patients with pancreas and prostrate cancers. Conclusion: The IR techniques produce a measurable enhancement to CT IQ by reducing the noise. Increasing imaging dose further reduces noise independent of the IR techniques. The improved CT enables more accurate delineation of tumors and/or organs at risk during RT planning and delivery guidance.

  14. SU-E-I-82: Improving CT Image Quality for Radiation Therapy Using Iterative Reconstruction Algorithms and Slightly Increasing Imaging Doses

    Purpose: Iterative reconstruction (IR) algorithms are developed to improve CT image quality (IQ) by reducing noise without diminishing spatial resolution or contrast. For CT in radiation therapy (RT), slightly increasing imaging dose to improve IQ may be justified if it can substantially enhance structure delineation. The purpose of this study is to investigate and to quantify the IQ enhancement as a result of increasing imaging doses and using IR algorithms. Methods: CT images were acquired for phantoms, built to evaluate IQ metrics including spatial resolution, contrast and noise, with a variety of imaging protocols using a CT scanner (Definition AS Open, Siemens) installed inside a Linac room. Representative patients were scanned once the protocols were optimized. Both phantom and patient scans were reconstructed using the Sinogram Affirmed Iterative Reconstruction (SAFIRE) and the Filtered Back Projection (FBP) methods. IQ metrics of the obtained CTs were compared. Results: IR techniques are demonstrated to preserve spatial resolution as measured by the point spread function and reduce noise in comparison to traditional FBP. Driven by the reduction in noise, the contrast to noise ratio is doubled by adopting the highest SAFIRE strength. As expected, increasing imaging dose reduces noise for both SAFIRE and FBP reconstructions. The contrast to noise increases from 3 to 5 by increasing the dose by a factor of 4. Similar IQ improvement was observed on the CTs for selected patients with pancreas and prostrate cancers. Conclusion: The IR techniques produce a measurable enhancement to CT IQ by reducing the noise. Increasing imaging dose further reduces noise independent of the IR techniques. The improved CT enables more accurate delineation of tumors and/or organs at risk during RT planning and delivery guidance

  15. Non-uniform optical transfer functions in particle imaging: calibration and application to tomographic reconstruction

    A new approach to the weighting function, which describes particle imaging in tomographic reconstruction, is introduced. Instead of assuming a spatially homogeneous mapping function of voxels to the images, a variable optical transfer function (OTF) is applied. By this method, the negative effects of optical distortions on the reconstruction can be reduced considerably. The effects of these improvements in reconstruction quality on the methods of tomographic particle imaging velocimetry, as well as 3D particle tracking are investigated. A method to calibrate the OTF to experimental circumstances is proposed as an additional step to the volume self-calibration. It is shown that this kind of calibration is able to capture the predominant particle imaging both for simulated as well as experimental data. The most common distortions of particle imaging are blurring due to a small depth of field and astigmatism due to imaging optics. The effects of both of these distortions on reconstruction and correlation quality are investigated via simulated data. In both cases, a strong influence on relevant parameters can be seen. Reconstructions using a spatially varying OTF, calibrated to the imaging conditions, show a significant improvement in reconstruction quality and the accuracy of the particle peak position, as well as in the accuracy of the gained displacement vector field when using two time steps. Evaluation of experimental data by PTV methods shows a reduction in ghost particle intensity and improvements in peak position accuracy. A computationally efficient method of applying the OTF to tomographic reconstruction is introduced. (paper)

  16. Sparsity-promoting orthogonal dictionary updating for image reconstruction from highly undersampled magnetic resonance data

    Image reconstruction from undersampled k-space data accelerates magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) by exploiting image sparseness in certain transform domains. Employing image patch representation over a learned dictionary has the advantage of being adaptive to local image structures and thus can better sparsify images than using fixed transforms (e.g. wavelets and total variations). Dictionary learning methods have recently been introduced to MRI reconstruction, and these methods demonstrate significantly reduced reconstruction errors compared to sparse MRI reconstruction using fixed transforms. However, the synthesis sparse coding problem in dictionary learning is NP-hard and computationally expensive. In this paper, we present a novel sparsity-promoting orthogonal dictionary updating method for efficient image reconstruction from highly undersampled MRI data. The orthogonality imposed on the learned dictionary enables the minimization problem in the reconstruction to be solved by an efficient optimization algorithm which alternately updates representation coefficients, orthogonal dictionary, and missing k-space data. Moreover, both sparsity level and sparse representation contribution using updated dictionaries gradually increase during iterations to recover more details, assuming the progressively improved quality of the dictionary. Simulation and real data experimental results both demonstrate that the proposed method is approximately 10 to 100 times faster than the K-SVD-based dictionary learning MRI method and simultaneously improves reconstruction accuracy. (paper)

  17. 3-D Reconstruction From 2-D Radiographic Images and Its Application to Clinical Veterinary Medicine

    Hamamoto, Kazuhiko; Sato, Motoyoshi

    3D imaging technique is very important and indispensable in diagnosis. The main stream of the technique is one in which 3D image is reconstructed from a set of slice images, such as X-ray CT and MRI. However, these systems require large space and high costs. On the other hand, a low cost and small size 3D imaging system is needed in clinical veterinary medicine, for example, in the case of diagnosis in X-ray car or pasture area. We propose a novel 3D imaging technique using 2-D X-ray radiographic images. This system can be realized by cheaper system than X-ray CT and enables to get 3D image in X-ray car or portable X-ray equipment. In this paper, a 3D visualization technique from 2-D radiographic images is proposed and several reconstructions are shown. These reconstructions are evaluated by veterinarians.

  18. A comparative study of three-dimensional reconstructive images of temporomandibular joint using computed tomogram

    The purpose of this study was to clarify the spatial relationship of temporomandibular joint and to an aid in the diagnosis of temporomandibular disorder. For this study, three-dimensional images of normal temporomandibular joint were reconstructed by computer image analysis system and three-dimensional reconstructive program integrated in computed tomography. The obtained results were as follows : 1. Two-dimensional computed tomograms had the better resolution than three dimensional computed tomograms in the evaluation of bone structure and the disk of TMJ. 2. Direct sagittal computed tomograms and coronal computed tomograms had the better resolution in the evaluation of the disk of TMJ. 3. The positional relationship of the disk could be visualized, but the configuration of the disk could not be clearly visualized on three-dimensional reconstructive CT images. 4. Three-dimensional reconstructive CT images had the smoother margin than three-dimensional images reconstructed by computer image analysis system, but the images of the latter had the better perspective. 5. Three-dimensional reconstructive images had the better spatial relationship of the TMJ articulation, and the joint space were more clearly visualized on dissection images.

  19. Color calibration and fusion of lens-free and mobile-phone microscopy images for high-resolution and accurate color reproduction

    Zhang, Yibo; Wu, Yichen; Zhang, Yun; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2016-06-01

    Lens-free holographic microscopy can achieve wide-field imaging in a cost-effective and field-portable setup, making it a promising technique for point-of-care and telepathology applications. However, due to relatively narrow-band sources used in holographic microscopy, conventional colorization methods that use images reconstructed at discrete wavelengths, corresponding to e.g., red (R), green (G) and blue (B) channels, are subject to color artifacts. Furthermore, these existing RGB colorization methods do not match the chromatic perception of human vision. Here we present a high-color-fidelity and high-resolution imaging method, termed “digital color fusion microscopy” (DCFM), which fuses a holographic image acquired at a single wavelength with a color-calibrated image taken by a low-magnification lens-based microscope using a wavelet transform-based colorization method. We demonstrate accurate color reproduction of DCFM by imaging stained tissue sections. In particular we show that a lens-free holographic microscope in combination with a cost-effective mobile-phone-based microscope can generate color images of specimens, performing very close to a high numerical-aperture (NA) benchtop microscope that is corrected for color distortions and chromatic aberrations, also matching the chromatic response of human vision. This method can be useful for wide-field imaging needs in telepathology applications and in resource-limited settings, where whole-slide scanning microscopy systems are not available.

  20. Color calibration and fusion of lens-free and mobile-phone microscopy images for high-resolution and accurate color reproduction.

    Zhang, Yibo; Wu, Yichen; Zhang, Yun; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2016-01-01

    Lens-free holographic microscopy can achieve wide-field imaging in a cost-effective and field-portable setup, making it a promising technique for point-of-care and telepathology applications. However, due to relatively narrow-band sources used in holographic microscopy, conventional colorization methods that use images reconstructed at discrete wavelengths, corresponding to e.g., red (R), green (G) and blue (B) channels, are subject to color artifacts. Furthermore, these existing RGB colorization methods do not match the chromatic perception of human vision. Here we present a high-color-fidelity and high-resolution imaging method, termed "digital color fusion microscopy" (DCFM), which fuses a holographic image acquired at a single wavelength with a color-calibrated image taken by a low-magnification lens-based microscope using a wavelet transform-based colorization method. We demonstrate accurate color reproduction of DCFM by imaging stained tissue sections. In particular we show that a lens-free holographic microscope in combination with a cost-effective mobile-phone-based microscope can generate color images of specimens, performing very close to a high numerical-aperture (NA) benchtop microscope that is corrected for color distortions and chromatic aberrations, also matching the chromatic response of human vision. This method can be useful for wide-field imaging needs in telepathology applications and in resource-limited settings, where whole-slide scanning microscopy systems are not available. PMID:27283459