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Sample records for accurate group difference

  1. Accurate Finite Difference Algorithms

    Goodrich, John W.

    1996-01-01

    Two families of finite difference algorithms for computational aeroacoustics are presented and compared. All of the algorithms are single step explicit methods, they have the same order of accuracy in both space and time, with examples up to eleventh order, and they have multidimensional extensions. One of the algorithm families has spectral like high resolution. Propagation with high order and high resolution algorithms can produce accurate results after O(10(exp 6)) periods of propagation with eight grid points per wavelength.

  2. Accurate Finite Difference Methods for Option Pricing

    Persson, Jonas

    2006-01-01

    Stock options are priced numerically using space- and time-adaptive finite difference methods. European options on one and several underlying assets are considered. These are priced with adaptive numerical algorithms including a second order method and a more accurate method. For American options we use the adaptive technique to price options on one stock with and without stochastic volatility. In all these methods emphasis is put on the control of errors to fulfill predefined tolerance level...

  3. Accurate finite difference methods for time-harmonic wave propagation

    Harari, Isaac; Turkel, Eli

    1994-01-01

    Finite difference methods for solving problems of time-harmonic acoustics are developed and analyzed. Multidimensional inhomogeneous problems with variable, possibly discontinuous, coefficients are considered, accounting for the effects of employing nonuniform grids. A weighted-average representation is less sensitive to transition in wave resolution (due to variable wave numbers or nonuniform grids) than the standard pointwise representation. Further enhancement in method performance is obtained by basing the stencils on generalizations of Pade approximation, or generalized definitions of the derivative, reducing spurious dispersion, anisotropy and reflection, and by improving the representation of source terms. The resulting schemes have fourth-order accurate local truncation error on uniform grids and third order in the nonuniform case. Guidelines for discretization pertaining to grid orientation and resolution are presented.

  4. Accurate characterization of OPVs: Device masking and different solar simulators

    Gevorgyan, Suren; Carlé, Jon Eggert; Søndergaard, Roar R.;

    2013-01-01

    One of the prime objects of organic solar cell research has been to improve the power conversion efficiency. Unfortunately, the accurate determination of this property is not straight forward and has led to the recommendation that record devices be tested and certified at a few accredited...... laboratories following rigorous ASTM and IEC standards. This work tries to address some of the issues confronting the standard laboratory in this regard. Solar simulator lamps are investigated for their light field homogeneity and direct versus diffuse components, as well as the correct device area...

  5. Consistent Multigroup Theory Enabling Accurate Course-Group Simulation of Gen IV Reactors

    Rahnema, Farzad; Haghighat, Alireza; Ougouag, Abderrafi

    2013-11-29

    The objective of this proposal is the development of a consistent multi-group theory that accurately accounts for the energy-angle coupling associated with collapsed-group cross sections. This will allow for coarse-group transport and diffusion theory calculations that exhibit continuous energy accuracy and implicitly treat cross- section resonances. This is of particular importance when considering the highly heterogeneous and optically thin reactor designs within the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) framework. In such reactors, ignoring the influence of anisotropy in the angular flux on the collapsed cross section, especially at the interface between core and reflector near which control rods are located, results in inaccurate estimates of the rod worth, a serious safety concern. The scope of this project will include the development and verification of a new multi-group theory enabling high-fidelity transport and diffusion calculations in coarse groups, as well as a methodology for the implementation of this method in existing codes. This will allow for a higher accuracy solution of reactor problems while using fewer groups and will reduce the computational expense. The proposed research represents a fundamental advancement in the understanding and improvement of multi- group theory for reactor analysis.

  6. Psychological wellness constructs: relationships and group differences

    Liezl Gropp

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the study was to examine the relationships between several constructs that were hypothesised to be components underlying psychological wellness and to establish whether there were differences between managerial and non-managerial groups or between Black and White groups in respect of the wellness variables. The Personal Orientation Inventory (POI, Locus of Control Inventory (LOC, Sense of Coherence Scale (SOC, and the Bar-On EQ-I were administered to a random sample of 200 employees of a financial services company. Statistically significant differences were found between the groups on several of the wellness variables with the manager and White groups obtaining higher scores on these variables than their comparison groups. However, in respect of External Locus of Control, the non-manager and Black groups obtained the higher scores. Factor analytic results demonstrated that the wellness variables clustered in two correlated factors (r = 0,43 labeled psychological wellness and self-actualisation.

  7. High-order accurate monotone difference schemes for solving gasdynamic problems by Godunov's method with antidiffusion

    Moiseev, N. Ya.

    2011-04-01

    An approach to the construction of high-order accurate monotone difference schemes for solving gasdynamic problems by Godunov's method with antidiffusion is proposed. Godunov's theorem on monotone schemes is used to construct a new antidiffusion flux limiter in high-order accurate difference schemes as applied to linear advection equations with constant coefficients. The efficiency of the approach is demonstrated by solving linear advection equations with constant coefficients and one-dimensional gasdynamic equations.

  8. On the Definitions of Difference Galois Groups

    Chatzidakis, Zoé; Hardouin, Charlotte; Singer, Michael F.

    2007-01-01

    We compare several definitions of the Galois group of a linear difference equation that have arisen in algebra, analysis and model theory and show, that these groups are isomorphic over suitable fields. In addition, we study properties of Picard-Vessiot extensions over fields with not necessarily algebraically closed subfields of constants.

  9. Lie group computation of finite difference schemes

    Hoarau, Emma; David, Claire

    2006-01-01

    nombre de pages 10 A Mathematica based program has been elaborated in order to determine the symmetry group of a finite difference equation, by means of its differential representation. The package provides functions which enable us to solve the determining equations of the related Lie group

  10. Psychological wellness constructs: relationships and group differences

    Liezl Gropp; Dirk Geldenhuys; Deléne Visser

    2007-01-01

    The objective of the study was to examine the relationships between several constructs that were hypothesised to be components underlying psychological wellness and to establish whether there were differences between managerial and non-managerial groups or between Black and White groups in respect of the wellness variables. The Personal Orientation Inventory (POI), Locus of Control Inventory (LOC), Sense of Coherence Scale (SOC), and the Bar-On EQ-I were administered to a random sample of 20...

  11. Construction of Difference Equations Using Lie Groups

    The theory of prolongations of the generators of groups of point transformations to the grid point values of dependent variables and grid spacings is developed and applied to the construction of group invariant numerical algorithms. The concepts of invariant difference operators and generalized discrete sources are introduced for the discretization of systems of inhomogeneous differential equations and shown to produce exact difference equations. Invariant numerical flux functions are constructed from the general solutions of first order partial differential equations that come out of the evaluation of the Lie derivatives of conservation forms of difference schemes. It is demonstrated that invariant numerical flux functions with invariant flux or slope limiters can be determined to yield high resolution difference schemes. The introduction of an invariant flux or slope limiter can be done so as not to break the symmetry properties of a numerical flux-function

  12. Determining true difference between treatment groups

    Lucien J. Cardinal

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In this article, the author reviews the P value and how it is used to determine true difference of outcome in treatment groups. P value, standard deviation, standard error of the mean, bias, and confidence interval are discussed in common language, with a minimum of jargon and with clinical examples.

  13. Metacognition and Group Differences: A Comparative Study

    Al-Hilawani, Yasser A.

    2014-01-01

    In this study, metacognition refers to performing visual analysis and discrimination of real life events and situations in naïve psychology, naïve physics, and naïve biology domains. It is used, along with measuring reaction time, to examine differences in the ability of four groups of students to select appropriate pictures that correspond with…

  14. Determining true difference between treatment groups

    Cardinal, Lucien J.

    2016-01-01

    In this article, the author reviews the P value and how it is used to determine true difference of outcome in treatment groups. P value, standard deviation, standard error of the mean, bias, and confidence interval are discussed in common language, with a minimum of jargon and with clinical examples.Keywords: P value; standard error of the mean; central limits theorem; standard deviation; normal distribution; statistics; parametric statistics; bias; randomization(Published: 17 February 2016)C...

  15. Accurate Measurement of Mitochondrial DNA Deletion Level and Copy Number Differences in Human Skeletal Muscle

    Grady, John P.; Murphy, Julie L; Blakely, Emma L.; Haller, Ronald G.; Taylor, Robert W; Turnbull, Doug M.; Tuppen, Helen A. L.

    2014-01-01

    Accurate and reliable quantification of the abundance of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) molecules, both wild-type and those harbouring pathogenic mutations, is important not only for understanding the progression of mtDNA disease but also for evaluating novel therapeutic approaches. A clear understanding of the sensitivity of mtDNA measurement assays under different experimental conditions is therefore critical, however it is routinely lacking for most published mtDNA quantification assays. Here, ...

  16. Gender Differences in Honesty: Groups Versus Individuals

    Mühlheusser, Gerd; Roider, Andreas; Wallmeier, Niklas

    2014-01-01

    Extending the die rolling experiment of Fischbacher and Föllmi-Heusi (2013), we compare gender effects with respect to unethical behavior by individuals and by two-person groups. In contrast to individual decisions, gender matters strongly under group decisions. We find more lying in male groups and mixed groups than in female groups.

  17. Evaluation of new reference genes in papaya for accurate transcript normalization under different experimental conditions.

    Xiaoyang Zhu

    Full Text Available Real-time reverse transcription PCR (RT-qPCR is a preferred method for rapid and accurate quantification of gene expression studies. Appropriate application of RT-qPCR requires accurate normalization though the use of reference genes. As no single reference gene is universally suitable for all experiments, thus reference gene(s validation under different experimental conditions is crucial for RT-qPCR analysis. To date, only a few studies on reference genes have been done in other plants but none in papaya. In the present work, we selected 21 candidate reference genes, and evaluated their expression stability in 246 papaya fruit samples using three algorithms, geNorm, NormFinder and RefFinder. The samples consisted of 13 sets collected under different experimental conditions, including various tissues, different storage temperatures, different cultivars, developmental stages, postharvest ripening, modified atmosphere packaging, 1-methylcyclopropene (1-MCP treatment, hot water treatment, biotic stress and hormone treatment. Our results demonstrated that expression stability varied greatly between reference genes and that different suitable reference gene(s or combination of reference genes for normalization should be validated according to the experimental conditions. In general, the internal reference genes EIF (Eukaryotic initiation factor 4A, TBP1 (TATA binding protein 1 and TBP2 (TATA binding protein 2 genes had a good performance under most experimental conditions, whereas the most widely present used reference genes, ACTIN (Actin 2, 18S rRNA (18S ribosomal RNA and GAPDH (Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase were not suitable in many experimental conditions. In addition, two commonly used programs, geNorm and Normfinder, were proved sufficient for the validation. This work provides the first systematic analysis for the selection of superior reference genes for accurate transcript normalization in papaya under different experimental

  18. A fourth order accurate finite difference scheme for the computation of elastic waves

    Bayliss, A.; Jordan, K. E.; Lemesurier, B. J.; Turkel, E.

    1986-01-01

    A finite difference for elastic waves is introduced. The model is based on the first order system of equations for the velocities and stresses. The differencing is fourth order accurate on the spatial derivatives and second order accurate in time. The model is tested on a series of examples including the Lamb problem, scattering from plane interf aces and scattering from a fluid-elastic interface. The scheme is shown to be effective for these problems. The accuracy and stability is insensitive to the Poisson ratio. For the class of problems considered here it is found that the fourth order scheme requires for two-thirds to one-half the resolution of a typical second order scheme to give comparable accuracy.

  19. Stable and high order accurate difference methods for the elastic wave equation in discontinuous media

    Duru, Kenneth

    2014-12-01

    © 2014 Elsevier Inc. In this paper, we develop a stable and systematic procedure for numerical treatment of elastic waves in discontinuous and layered media. We consider both planar and curved interfaces where media parameters are allowed to be discontinuous. The key feature is the highly accurate and provably stable treatment of interfaces where media discontinuities arise. We discretize in space using high order accurate finite difference schemes that satisfy the summation by parts rule. Conditions at layer interfaces are imposed weakly using penalties. By deriving lower bounds of the penalty strength and constructing discrete energy estimates we prove time stability. We present numerical experiments in two space dimensions to illustrate the usefulness of the proposed method for simulations involving typical interface phenomena in elastic materials. The numerical experiments verify high order accuracy and time stability.

  20. Phase Measurement for Accurate Mapping of Chemical Bonds in Acentric Space Groups

    Although the electron density is fundamental to the study of chemical bonding and density-functional theory, it cannot be accurately mapped experimentally for the important class of crystals lacking inversion symmetry, since structure factor phase information is normally inaccessible. We report the combination of x-ray and electron diffraction experiments for the determination of the electron density in acentric AlN, using multiple-scattering effects in convergent-beam electron diffraction to obtain sensitivity to structure factor phases, and describe a new error metric and weighting scheme for multipole refinement using combined measurements of structure factor magnitudes and phases

  1. Direct Simulations of Transition and Turbulence Using High-Order Accurate Finite-Difference Schemes

    Rai, Man Mohan

    1997-01-01

    In recent years the techniques of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) have been used to compute flows associated with geometrically complex configurations. However, success in terms of accuracy and reliability has been limited to cases where the effects of turbulence and transition could be modeled in a straightforward manner. Even in simple flows, the accurate computation of skin friction and heat transfer using existing turbulence models has proved to be a difficult task, one that has required extensive fine-tuning of the turbulence models used. In more complex flows (for example, in turbomachinery flows in which vortices and wakes impinge on airfoil surfaces causing periodic transitions from laminar to turbulent flow) the development of a model that accounts for all scales of turbulence and predicts the onset of transition may prove to be impractical. Fortunately, current trends in computing suggest that it may be possible to perform direct simulations of turbulence and transition at moderate Reynolds numbers in some complex cases in the near future. This seminar will focus on direct simulations of transition and turbulence using high-order accurate finite-difference methods. The advantage of the finite-difference approach over spectral methods is that complex geometries can be treated in a straightforward manner. Additionally, finite-difference techniques are the prevailing methods in existing application codes. In this seminar high-order-accurate finite-difference methods for the compressible and incompressible formulations of the unsteady Navier-Stokes equations and their applications to direct simulations of turbulence and transition will be presented.

  2. Accurate potential energy curves for the group 12 dimers Zn-2, Cd-2, and Hg-2

    Pahl, Elke; Figgen, Detlev; Borschevsky, Anastasia; Peterson, Kirk A.; Schwerdtfeger, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Potential energy curves of the electronic ground states of the group 12 dimers Zn-2 and Cd-2 were computed at the CCSD(T) level of theory, including full triple corrections Delta T in the coupled-cluster procedure, and spin-orbit (SO) contributions from four-component coupled-cluster calculations, e

  3. Accurate measurements and design standards: consistency of design and the travel of 'facts' between heterogeneous groups

    Velkar, Aashish

    2007-01-01

    Design standards are carriers and creators of facts, enabling facts about product value to travel between groups, and assisting in the creation of product value by establishing a reference or comparison against which product attributes are compared. However, when design standards are not consistent, facts about product value may not travel well, even when designs can be expressed or measured with a high degree of precision. Examining the evidence from British iron and steel industry in the ni...

  4. Accurate variational electronic structure calculations with the density matrix renormalization group

    Wouters, Sebastian

    2014-01-01

    During the past 15 years, the density matrix renormalization group (DMRG) has become increasingly important for ab initio quantum chemistry. The underlying matrix product state (MPS) ansatz is a low-rank decomposition of the full configuration interaction tensor. The virtual dimension of the MPS controls the size of the corner of the many-body Hilbert space that can be reached. Whereas the MPS ansatz will only yield an efficient description for noncritical one-dimensional systems, it can still be used as a variational ansatz for other finite-size systems. Rather large virtual dimensions are then required. The two most important aspects to reduce the corresponding computational cost are a proper choice and ordering of the active space orbitals, and the exploitation of the symmetry group of the Hamiltonian. By taking care of both aspects, DMRG becomes an efficient replacement for exact diagonalization in quantum chemistry. DMRG and Hartree-Fock theory have an analogous structure. The former can be interpreted a...

  5. Prognosticators and Risk Grouping in Patients with Lung Metastasis from Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma: A more accurate and appropriate assessment of prognosis

    Lung metastases arising from nasopharyngeal carcinomas (NPC) have a relatively favourable prognosis. The purpose of this study was to identify the prognostic factors and to establish a risk grouping in patients with lung metastases from NPC. A total of 198 patients who developed lung metastases from NPC after primary therapy were retrospectively recruited from January 1982 to December 2000. Univariate and multivariate analyses of clinical variables were performed using Cox proportional hazards regression models. Actuarial survival rates were plotted against time using the Kaplan-Meier method, and log-rank testing was used to compare the differences between the curves. The median overall survival (OS) period and the lung metastasis survival (LMS) period were 51.5 and 20.9 months, respectively. After univariate and multivariate analyses of the clinical variables, age, T classification, N classification, site of metastases, secondary metastases and disease-free interval (DFI) correlated with OS, whereas age, VCA-IgA titre, number of metastases and secondary metastases were related to LMS. The prognoses of the low- (score 0-1), intermediate- (score 2-3) and high-risk (score 4-8) subsets based on these factors were significantly different. The 3-, 5- and 10-year survival rates of the low-, intermediate- and high-risk subsets, respectively (P < 0.001) were as follows: 77.3%, 60% and 59%; 52.3%, 30% and 27.8%; and 20.5%, 7% and 0%. In this study, clinical variables provided prognostic indicators of survival in NPC patients with lung metastases. Risk subsets would help in a more accurate assessment of a patient's prognosis in the clinical setting and could facilitate the establishment of patient-tailored medical strategies and supports

  6. Accurate Measurement of the Relative Abundance of Different DNA Species in Complex DNA Mixtures

    Jeong, Sangkyun; Yu, Hyunjoo; Pfeifer, Karl

    2012-01-01

    A molecular tool that can compare the abundances of different DNA sequences is necessary for comparing intergenic or interspecific gene expression. We devised and verified such a tool using a quantitative competitive polymerase chain reaction approach. For this approach, we adapted a competitor array, an artificially made plasmid DNA in which all the competitor templates for the target DNAs are arranged with a defined ratio, and melting analysis for allele quantitation for accurate quantitation of the fractional ratios of competitively amplified DNAs. Assays on two sets of DNA mixtures with explicitly known compositional structures of the test sequences were performed. The resultant average relative errors of 0.059 and 0.021 emphasize the highly accurate nature of this method. Furthermore, the method's capability of obtaining biological data is demonstrated by the fact that it can illustrate the tissue-specific quantitative expression signatures of the three housekeeping genes G6pdx, Ubc, and Rps27 by using the forms of the relative abundances of their transcripts, and the differential preferences of Igf2 enhancers for each of the multiple Igf2 promoters for the transcription. PMID:22334570

  7. Hypertranscendance et Groupes de Galois aux differences

    Hardouin, Charlotte

    2006-01-01

    This paper deals with criteria of algebraic independence for the derivatives of solutions of rank one difference equations. The key idea consists in deriving from the commutativity of the differentiation and difference operators a sequence of iterated extensions of the original difference module, thereby setting the problem in the framework of difference Galois theory and finally reducing it to an exercise in linear algebra. The involved tannakian categories are neutral over non necessarily a...

  8. Accurate and automatic extrinsic calibration method for blade measurement system integrated by different optical sensors

    He, Wantao; Li, Zhongwei; Zhong, Kai; Shi, Yusheng; Zhao, Can; Cheng, Xu

    2014-11-01

    Fast and precise 3D inspection system is in great demand in modern manufacturing processes. At present, the available sensors have their own pros and cons, and hardly exist an omnipotent sensor to handle the complex inspection task in an accurate and effective way. The prevailing solution is integrating multiple sensors and taking advantages of their strengths. For obtaining a holistic 3D profile, the data from different sensors should be registrated into a coherent coordinate system. However, some complex shape objects own thin wall feather such as blades, the ICP registration method would become unstable. Therefore, it is very important to calibrate the extrinsic parameters of each sensor in the integrated measurement system. This paper proposed an accurate and automatic extrinsic parameter calibration method for blade measurement system integrated by different optical sensors. In this system, fringe projection sensor (FPS) and conoscopic holography sensor (CHS) is integrated into a multi-axis motion platform, and the sensors can be optimally move to any desired position at the object's surface. In order to simple the calibration process, a special calibration artifact is designed according to the characteristics of the two sensors. An automatic registration procedure based on correlation and segmentation is used to realize the artifact datasets obtaining by FPS and CHS rough alignment without any manual operation and data pro-processing, and then the Generalized Gauss-Markoff model is used to estimate the optimization transformation parameters. The experiments show the measurement result of a blade, where several sampled patches are merged into one point cloud, and it verifies the performance of the proposed method.

  9. Accurate 3-D finite difference computation of traveltimes in strongly heterogeneous media

    Noble, M.; Gesret, A.; Belayouni, N.

    2014-12-01

    Seismic traveltimes and their spatial derivatives are the basis of many imaging methods such as pre-stack depth migration and tomography. A common approach to compute these quantities is to solve the eikonal equation with a finite-difference scheme. If many recently published algorithms for resolving the eikonal equation do now yield fairly accurate traveltimes for most applications, the spatial derivatives of traveltimes remain very approximate. To address this accuracy issue, we develop a new hybrid eikonal solver that combines a spherical approximation when close to the source and a plane wave approximation when far away. This algorithm reproduces properly the spherical behaviour of wave fronts in the vicinity of the source. We implement a combination of 16 local operators that enables us to handle velocity models with sharp vertical and horizontal velocity contrasts. We associate to these local operators a global fast sweeping method to take into account all possible directions of wave propagation. Our formulation allows us to introduce a variable grid spacing in all three directions of space. We demonstrate the efficiency of this algorithm in terms of computational time and the gain in accuracy of the computed traveltimes and their derivatives on several numerical examples.

  10. Accurate calculation of binding energies for molecular clusters - Assessment of different models

    Friedrich, Joachim; Fiedler, Benjamin

    2016-06-01

    In this work we test different strategies to compute high-level benchmark energies for medium-sized molecular clusters. We use the incremental scheme to obtain CCSD(T)/CBS energies for our test set and carefully validate the accuracy for binding energies by statistical measures. The local errors of the incremental scheme are benchmark values are ΔE = - 278.01 kJ/mol for (H2O)10, ΔE = - 221.64 kJ/mol for (HF)10, ΔE = - 45.63 kJ/mol for (CH4)10, ΔE = - 19.52 kJ/mol for (H2)20 and ΔE = - 7.38 kJ/mol for (H2)10 . Furthermore we test state-of-the-art wave-function-based and DFT methods. Our benchmark data will be very useful for critical validations of new methods. We find focal-point-methods for estimating CCSD(T)/CBS energies to be highly accurate and efficient. For foQ-i3CCSD(T)-MP2/TZ we get a mean error of 0.34 kJ/mol and a standard deviation of 0.39 kJ/mol.

  11. Comparison and validation of different 235U fast fission delayed neutron group parameters

    The differences between 235U fast fission delayed neutron group parameters in ENDF/B7, JEFF 3.1, JENDL 3.3, CENDL 2.2 and Keepin datum were analyzed. The delayed neutron group parameters were validated by experiments on CFBR-II. The Keepin delayed neutron group parameters are more accurate than delayed neutron group parameters in the primary nuclear databases. The eight-group delayed neutron parameters in JEEF 3.1 are better than six-group delayed neutron parameters in other databases. (authors)

  12. Differences in the Association between Segment and Language: Early Bilinguals Pattern with Monolinguals and Are Less Accurate than Late Bilinguals.

    Blanco, Cynthia P; Bannard, Colin; Smiljanic, Rajka

    2016-01-01

    Early bilinguals often show as much sensitivity to L2-specific contrasts as monolingual speakers of the L2, but most work on cross-language speech perception has focused on isolated segments, and typically only on neighboring vowels or stop contrasts. In tasks that include sounds in context, listeners' success is more variable, so segment discrimination in isolation may not adequately represent the phonetic detail in stored representations. The current study explores the relationship between language experience and sensitivity to segmental cues in context by comparing the categorization patterns of monolingual English listeners and early and late Spanish-English bilinguals. Participants categorized nonce words containing different classes of English- and Spanish-specific sounds as being more English-like or more Spanish-like; target segments included phonemic cues, cues for which there is no analogous sound in the other language, or phonetic cues, cues for which English and Spanish share the category but for which each language varies in its phonetic implementation. Listeners' language categorization accuracy and reaction times were analyzed. Our results reveal a largely uniform categorization pattern across listener groups: Spanish cues were categorized more accurately than English cues, and phonemic cues were easier for listeners to categorize than phonetic cues. There were no differences in the sensitivity of monolinguals and early bilinguals to language-specific cues, suggesting that the early bilinguals' exposure to Spanish did not fundamentally change their representations of English phonology. However, neither did the early bilinguals show more sensitivity than the monolinguals to Spanish sounds. The late bilinguals however, were significantly more accurate than either of the other groups. These findings indicate that listeners with varying exposure to English and Spanish are able to use language-specific cues in a nonce-word language categorization task

  13. Disambiguating past events: Accurate source memory for time and context depends on different retrieval processes.

    Persson, Bjorn M; Ainge, James A; O'Connor, Akira R

    2016-07-01

    Current animal models of episodic memory are usually based on demonstrating integrated memory for what happened, where it happened, and when an event took place. These models aim to capture the testable features of the definition of human episodic memory which stresses the temporal component of the memory as a unique piece of source information that allows us to disambiguate one memory from another. Recently though, it has been suggested that a more accurate model of human episodic memory would include contextual rather than temporal source information, as humans' memory for time is relatively poor. Here, two experiments were carried out investigating human memory for temporal and contextual source information, along with the underlying dual process retrieval processes, using an immersive virtual environment paired with a 'Remember-Know' memory task. Experiment 1 (n=28) showed that contextual information could only be retrieved accurately using recollection, while temporal information could be retrieved using either recollection or familiarity. Experiment 2 (n=24), which used a more difficult task, resulting in reduced item recognition rates and therefore less potential for contamination by ceiling effects, replicated the pattern of results from Experiment 1. Dual process theory predicts that it should only be possible to retrieve source context from an event using recollection, and our results are consistent with this prediction. That temporal information can be retrieved using familiarity alone suggests that it may be incorrect to view temporal context as analogous to other typically used source contexts. This latter finding supports the alternative proposal that time since presentation may simply be reflected in the strength of memory trace at retrieval - a measure ideally suited to trace strength interrogation using familiarity, as is typically conceptualised within the dual process framework. PMID:27174312

  14. Group decision making: integrating different interests into a joint decision:

    RajkoviÄ Vladislav

    2011-01-01

    The paper discusses group decision making as a way of managing decision knowledge. Described are pros and cons of group decision making. Special emphasis is given to the leveraging of different interests and possibilities of formulating a joint decision. Available methods and techniques together with a properly organized group work can make a substantial contribution.

  15. Pulmonary capacities of different groups of sportsmen in India.

    A. K. Ghosh; Ahuja, A; Khanna, G L

    1985-01-01

    Pulmonary functional capacities, vital capacity (VC) maximum voluntary ventilation (MVV), forced expiratory volume in 1 second and FEV 1.0 (per cent VC) of 168 sportsmen belonging to different sports activities and of 10 sedentary individuals have been studied. It was observed that all these pulmonary functional capacities of different groups of sportsmen were higher than those of the sedentary group. The mean VC of the basketball, boxing, cricket, football, hockey and the table tennis groups...

  16. Executive function in different groups of university students

    Prosen, Simona; Smrtnik Vitulić, Helena

    2015-01-01

    The present study analyses the executive function (EF) skills of 369 students of primary education (n = 116), preschool education (n = 72), social pedagogy (n = 54), and biology (n = 128). It explores how the different groups of students use selected executive skills and whether there are any differences between the groups in this respect. Eleven EF skills were self-assessed using the Executive Skills Questionnaire for Students (Dawson & Guare, 2010). All of the groups of students experien...

  17. Different groups, different motives: identity motives underlying changes in identification with novel groups.

    Easterbrook, Matt; Vignoles, Vivian L

    2012-08-01

    Social identification is known to have wide-reaching implications, but theorists disagree about the underlying motives. Integrating motivated identity construction theory with recent social identity research, the authors predicted which motives underlie identification with two types of groups: interpersonal networks and social categories. In a five-wave longitudinal study of social identity processes among 268 new university residents, multilevel analyses showed that motives involved in identity enactment processes--self-esteem, belonging, and efficacy--significantly predicted within-person changes in identification with flatmates (an interpersonal network group), whereas motives involved in identity definition processes--meaning, self-esteem, and distinctiveness--significantly predicted within-person changes in identification with halls of residence (an abstract social category). This article discusses implications for research into identity motives and social identity. PMID:22569221

  18. Different groups, different motives: identity motives underlying changes in identification with novel groups

    Easterbrook, Matt; Vignoles, Vivian L.

    2012-01-01

    Social identification is known to have wide-reaching implications, but theorists disagree about the underlying motives. Integrating motivated identity construction theory with recent social identity research, the authors predicted which motives underlie identification with two types of groups: interpersonal networks and social categories. In a five-wave longitudinal study of social identity processes among 268 new university residents, multilevel analyses showed that motives involved in ident...

  19. Accurate finite difference beam propagation method for complex integrated optical structures

    Rasmussen, Thomas; Povlsen, Jørn Hedegaard; Bjarklev, Anders Overgaard

    1993-01-01

    A simple and effective finite-difference beam propagation method in a z-varying nonuniform mesh is developed. The accuracy and computation time for this method are compared with a standard finite-difference method for both the 3-D and 2-D versions......A simple and effective finite-difference beam propagation method in a z-varying nonuniform mesh is developed. The accuracy and computation time for this method are compared with a standard finite-difference method for both the 3-D and 2-D versions...

  20. STUDIES ON HUMAN FALLOPIAN TUBAL EPITHELIUM IN DIFFERENT AGE GROUPS

    Jayasri

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND AIMS The “fallopian tubes” (oviducts or uterine tubes are long paired flexuous reproductive organ which transports ova, spermatozoa, zygotes, the pre-implantation morulae and blastocyst. It has major role during reproductive period, but it remains as if vestigial organ before puberty and after menopause. Due to increasing rate of tubal block and infertility, oviducts and their structures gaining importance and have become a subject of research in present days particularly epithelium. The aim of the study is to ascertain any histological difference of tubal epithelium in different age groups and the research work could be utilized for investigation and management of infertility. MATERIALS AND METHODS Seven samples of each group i.e., prereproductive, reproductive & postmenopausal were collected from fresh unembalmed human cadavers received in the department of Anatomy, FAA Medical College, Barpeta, Assam. The slides were prepared using the standard laboratory procedure. Under low and high power objectives the type of cells were observed and epithelial height was measured in the different segments. Stress was given for any significant difference of epithelial height between the different age groups. RESULTS Study revealed that among the groups within the same segment, epithelial height was recorded highest (33.57µm in reproductive group as against the lowest (22.91µm in post-menopausal group. Epithelial structures of the prereproductive and reproductive groups were significantly differed (p<0.01 from the postmenopausal group. CONCLUSIONS From the findings of the present study it can be concluded that: 1. In all the groups fallopian tubal epithelium is of simple columnar type and contains three types of cells. Cells are ciliated, secretory & peg (intercalary cells. 2. In all the groups same type of increasing trend of epithelial height from intramural segment to ampullary segment was recorded. 3. In intergroup comparison of

  1. Approximate Lie Group Analysis of Finite-difference Equations

    Latypov, Azat M.

    1995-01-01

    Approximate group analysis technique, that is, the technique combining the methodology of group analysis and theory of small perturbations, is applied to finite-difference equations approximating ordinary differential equations. Finite-difference equations are viewed as a system of algebraic equations with a small parameter, introduced through the definitions of finite-difference derivatives. It is shown that application of the approximate invariance criterion to this algebraic system results...

  2. ORGANIZATIONAL WORK GROUPS AND WORK TEAMS – APPROACHES AND DIFFERENCES

    Raluca ZOLTAN

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Work groups and work teams represents basic structures of traditional and modern organizations, and during the time they have been intensively researched. However, managers often do not always consider the fundamental differences between groups and teams, which will lead to unrealistic goals and results below expectations. Thus, in the present paper we propose a review of the main researching approaches on groups and teams (psychosocial, socio-technical, and behavioral approach, in the third part of the paper being detailed the fundamental differences between groups and teams in the light of these approaches.

  3. Efficiency of High-Order Accurate Difference Schemes for the Korteweg-de Vries Equation

    Kanyuta Poochinapan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Two numerical models to obtain the solution of the KdV equation are proposed. Numerical tools, compact fourth-order and standard fourth-order finite difference techniques, are applied to the KdV equation. The fundamental conservative properties of the equation are preserved by the finite difference methods. Linear stability analysis of two methods is presented by the Von Neumann analysis. The new methods give second- and fourth-order accuracy in time and space, respectively. The numerical experiments show that the proposed methods improve the accuracy of the solution significantly.

  4. Behavioral Characteristics of Weaned Piglets Mixed in Different Groups.

    Hwang, Hyun-Su; Lee, Jae-Kang; Eom, Tae-Kyung; Son, Seung-Hun; Hong, Joon-Ki; Kim, Ki-Hyun; Rhim, Shin-Jae

    2016-07-01

    With regard to animal welfare concerns, behavioral information of weaned and mixed piglets is great interest in swine production. The aim of this study was to demonstrate the change in behavior of weaned piglets over time in two different groups (littermates and piglets from different litters) after mixing. Two weaned groups of piglets (72 individuals in all) housed either with littermates or with foreign piglets (6 individuals in 1.8 m×1.4 m pens, 28°C±1°C temperature) were observed with the aid of video technology for 9 consecutive hours on days 1, 2, and 3 after mixing. The behaviors of the weaned piglets in the control and treatment groups were significantly different among the days after mixing. Piglets were, however, more active and aggressive in the groups with foreign piglets. This study reveals a lower level of agonistic behavior in groups of piglets that came from the same litter. PMID:26954152

  5. ORGANIZATIONAL WORK GROUPS AND WORK TEAMS – APPROACHES AND DIFFERENCES

    Raluca ZOLTAN; Romulus VANCEA

    2015-01-01

    Work groups and work teams represents basic structures of traditional and modern organizations, and during the time they have been intensively researched. However, managers often do not always consider the fundamental differences between groups and teams, which will lead to unrealistic goals and results below expectations. Thus, in the present paper we propose a review of the main researching approaches on groups and teams (psychosocial, socio-technical, and behavioral approach), in the third...

  6. A new method testing the orthogonality of different protecting groups.

    Ágoston, Károly; Ágoston, Ágnes; Dorgan, Colin R; Fügedi, Péter

    2015-12-11

    A new test was elaborated to identify a new set of orthogonal protecting groups. With the developed method eight different protecting groups were tested under various deprotection conditions and the complex reaction mixtures were analysed by HPLC. The developed method allows for quick identification of orthogonality using simple model structures. PMID:26580711

  7. Testing for difference between two groups of functional neuroimaging experiments

    Nielsen, Finn Årup; Chen, Andrew C. N.; Hansen, Lars Kai

    2004-01-01

    We describe a meta-analytic method that tests for the difference between two groups of functional neuroimaging experiments. We use kernel density estimation in three-dimensional brain space to convert points representing focal brain activations into a voxel-based representation. We find the maximum...... applied on data from thermal pain studies where "hot pain" and "cold pain" form the two groups....

  8. High-order accurate difference schemes for solving gasdynamic equations by the Godunov method with antidiffusion

    Moiseev, N. Ya.; Silant'eva, I. Yu.

    2009-05-01

    A technique is proposed for improving the accuracy of the Godunov method as applied to gasdynamic simulations in one dimension. The underlying idea is the reconstruction of fluxes arsoss cell boundaries (“large” values) by using antidiffusion corrections, which are obtained by analyzing the differential approximation of the schemes. In contrast to other approaches, the reconstructed values are not the initial data but rather large values calculated by solving the Riemann problem. The approach is efficient and yields higher accuracy difference schemes with a high resolution.

  9. Wind effect on PV module temperature: Analysis of different techniques for an accurate estimation.

    Schwingshackl, Clemens; Petitta, Marcello; Ernst Wagner, Jochen; Belluardo, Giorgio; Moser, David; Castelli, Mariapina; Zebisch, Marc; Tetzlaff, Anke

    2013-04-01

    In this abstract a study on the influence of wind to model the PV module temperature is presented. This study is carried out in the framework of the PV-Alps INTERREG project in which the potential of different photovoltaic technologies is analysed for alpine regions. The PV module temperature depends on different parameters, such as ambient temperature, irradiance, wind speed and PV technology [1]. In most models, a very simple approach is used, where the PV module temperature is calculated from NOCT (nominal operating cell temperature), ambient temperature and irradiance alone [2]. In this study the influence of wind speed on the PV module temperature was investigated. First, different approaches suggested by various authors were tested [1], [2], [3], [4], [5]. For our analysis, temperature, irradiance and wind data from a PV test facility at the airport Bolzano (South Tyrol, Italy) from the EURAC Institute of Renewable Energies were used. The PV module temperature was calculated with different models and compared to the measured PV module temperature at the single panels. The best results were achieved with the approach suggested by Skoplaki et al. [1]. Preliminary results indicate that for all PV technologies which were tested (monocrystalline, amorphous, microcrystalline and polycrystalline silicon and cadmium telluride), modelled and measured PV module temperatures show a higher agreement (RMSE about 3-4 K) compared to standard approaches in which wind is not considered. For further investigation the in-situ measured wind velocities were replaced with wind data from numerical weather forecast models (ECMWF, reanalysis fields). Our results show that the PV module temperature calculated with wind data from ECMWF is still in very good agreement with the measured one (R² > 0.9 for all technologies). Compared to the previous analysis, we find comparable mean values and an increasing standard deviation. These results open a promising approach for PV module

  10. SPARC: Accurate and efficient finite-difference formulation and parallel implementation of Density Functional Theory. Part I: Isolated clusters

    Ghosh, Swarnava

    2016-01-01

    As the first component of SPARC (Simulation Package for Ab-initio Real-space Calculations), we present an accurate and efficient finite-difference formulation and parallel implementation of Density Functional Theory (DFT) for isolated clusters. Specifically, utilizing a local reformulation of the electrostatics, the Chebyshev polynomial filtered self-consistent field iteration, and a reformulation of the non-local component of the force, we develop a framework using the finite-difference representation that enables the efficient evaluation of energies and atomic forces to within chemical accuracies. Through selected examples consisting of a variety of elements, we demonstrate that SPARC obtains exponential convergence in energy and forces with domain size; systematic convergence in the energy and forces with mesh-size to reference plane-wave result at comparably high rates; forces that are consistent with the energy, both free from any noticeable `egg-box' effect; and accurate ground-state properties includin...

  11. SPARC: Accurate and efficient finite-difference formulation and parallel implementation of Density Functional Theory. Part II: Periodic systems

    Ghosh, Swarnava

    2016-01-01

    As the second component of SPARC (Simulation Package for Ab-initio Real-space Calculations), we present an accurate and efficient finite-difference formulation and parallel implementation of Density Functional Theory (DFT) for periodic systems. Specifically, employing a local formulation of the electrostatics, the Chebyshev polynomial filtered self-consistent field iteration, and a reformulation of the non-local force component, we develop a finite-difference framework wherein both the energy and atomic forces can be efficiently calculated to within chemical accuracies. We demonstrate using a wide variety of materials systems that SPARC obtains high convergence rates in energy and forces with respect to spatial discretization to reference plane-wave result; energies and forces that are consistent and display negligible `egg-box' effect; and accurate ground-state properties. We also demonstrate that the weak and strong scaling behavior of SPARC is similar to well-established and optimized plane-wave implementa...

  12. Accurate calculation of well-type detector geometrical efficiency using sources with different shapes and geometries

    The well-type detectors are widely used to determine the low level activity in small samples, thus the absolute detector efficiency is required. The calculation of the absolute efficiency of well-type HPGe or NaI(Tl) detectors depends mainly on the value of the geometrical efficiency. The geometrical efficiency depends on the solid angle subtended by various sources situated at different locations from the detector surface. The present work is essentially concerned to introduce a numerical simulation method (NSM) to calculate the geometrical efficiency and give the ability to use it in the theoretical calibration process of γ-ray well-type detectors for using isotropic radiating γ-ray (point, disk or volumetric) sources. The results are compared with some published data to show the approach validity and shows how much this work is important in the efficiency calibration process for the complicated γ-ray detection system

  13. Automatic and Accurate Conflation of Different Road-Network Vector Data towards Multi-Modal Navigation

    Meng Zhang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available With the rapid improvement of geospatial data acquisition and processing techniques, a variety of geospatial databases from public or private organizations have become available. Quite often, one dataset may be superior to other datasets in one, but not all aspects. In Germany, for instance, there were three major road network vector data, viz. Tele Atlas (which is now “TOMTOM”, NAVTEQ (which is now “here”, and ATKIS. However, none of them was qualified for the purpose of multi-modal navigation (e.g., driving + walking: Tele Atlas and NAVTEQ consist of comprehensive routing-relevant information, but many pedestrian ways are missing; ATKIS covers more pedestrian areas but the road objects are not fully attributed. To satisfy the requirements of multi-modal navigation, an automatic approach has been proposed to conflate different road networks together, which involves five routines: (a road-network matching between datasets; (b identification of the pedestrian ways; (c geometric transformation to eliminate geometric inconsistency; (d topologic remodeling of the conflated road network; and (e error checking and correction. The proposed approach demonstrates high performance in a number of large test areas and therefore has been successfully utilized for the real-world data production in the whole region of Germany. As a result, the conflated road network allows the multi-modal navigation of “driving + walking”.

  14. Grouping and crowding affect target appearance over different spatial scales.

    Bilge Sayim

    Full Text Available Crowding is the impairment of peripheral target perception by nearby flankers. A number of recent studies have shown that crowding shares many features with grouping. Here, we investigate whether effects of crowding and grouping on target perception are related by asking whether they operate over the same spatial scale. A target letter T had two sets of flanking Ts of varying orientations. The first set was presented close to the target, yielding strong crowding. The second set was either close enough to cause crowding on their own or too far to cause crowding on their own. The Ts of the second set had the same orientation that either matched the target's orientation (Grouped condition or not (Ungrouped condition. In Experiment 1, the Grouped flankers reduced crowding independently of their distance from the target, suggesting that grouping operated over larger distances than crowding. In Experiments 2 and 3 we found that grouping did not affect sensitivity but produced a strong bias to report that the grouped orientation was present at the target location whether or not it was. Finally, we investigated whether this bias was a response or perceptual bias, rejecting the former in favor of a perceptual grouping explanation. We suggest that the effect of grouping is to assimilate the target to the identity of surrounding flankers when they are all the same, and that this shape assimilation effect differs in its spatial scale from the integration effect of crowding.

  15. Power map permutations and symmetric differences in finite groups

    Hablicsek, Márton

    2011-01-01

    Let $G$ be a finite group. For all $a \\in \\Z$, such that $(a,|G|)=1$, the function $\\rho_a: G \\to G$ sending $g$ to $g^a$ defines a permutation of the elements of $G$. Motivated by a recent generalization of Zolotarev's proof of classic quadratic reciprocity, due to Duke and Hopkins, we study the signature of the permutation $\\rho_a$. By introducing the group of conjugacy equivariant maps and the symmetric difference method on groups, we exhibit an integer $d_{G}$ such that $\\text{sgn}(\\rho_a)=(\\frac{d_G}{a})$ for all $G$ in a large class of groups, containing all finite nilpotent and odd order groups.

  16. Renormalization Group in different fields of theoretical physics

    A very simple and general approach to the symmetry that is widely known as a Renormalization Group symmetry is presented. It essentially uses a functional formulation of group transformations that can be considered as a generalization of self-similarity transformations well known in mathematical physics since last century. This generalized Functional Self-Similarity symmetry and corresponding group transformations are discussed first for a number of simple physical problems taken from diverse fields of classical physics as well as for QED. Then we formulate the Renorm-Group Method as a regular procedure that essentially improves the approximate solutions near the singularity. After that we discuss relations between different formulations of Renormalization Group as they appear in various parts of a modern theoretical physics. Finally we present several topics of RGM application in modern QFT. (author)

  17. Reliability of the identification of functional ankle instability (Idfai scale across different age groups in adults

    Reshma S Gurav

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Functional ankle instability (FAI is the tendency of the foot to ′give way′. Identification of Functional Ankle Instability questionnaire (IdFAI is a newly developed questionnaire to detect whether individuals meet the minimum criteria necessary for inclusion in an FAI population. However, the reliability of the questionnaire was studied only in a restricted age group. Aim: The purpose of this investigation was to examine the reliability of IdFAI across different age groups in adults. Materials and Methods: One hundred and twenty participants in the age group of 20-60 years consisting of 30 individuals in each age group were asked to complete the IdFAI on two occasions. Test-retest reliability was evaluated by intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC 2,1 . Results: The study revealed that IdFAI has excellent test-retest reliability when studied across different age groups. The ICC 2,1 in the age groups 20-30 years, 30-40 years, 40-50 years and 50-60 years was 0.978, 0.975, 0.961 and 0.922, respectively with Cronbach′s alpha >0.9 in all the age groups. Conclusion: The IdFAI can accurately predict if an individual meets the minimum criterion for FAI across different age groups in adults. Thus, the questionnaire can be applied over different age groups in clinical and research set-ups.

  18. INDIVIDUAL PSYCHOLOGICAL CHARACTERISTICS OF RAILWAYS OPERATORS OF DIFFERENT AGE GROUPS

    Bugaeva V. M.

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of the study of some individual psychological characteristics of the drivers of rail transport in the age groups 25–34 and 35–45 years. We have identified a number of differences between the two age groups associated with both features individually-psychological sphere, and in the psycho-physiological features. Features of age-related psychological differences can be explained by the age characteristics of the representatives of each group; psycho-physiological features of age differences may reflect developed in the course of a long professional activity features. We have also developed adaptive strategies, consciously or unconsciously selected during the long-running monotonous activities and in small social groups (teams of drivers allow, on the one hand, higher quality performance of their professional duties, on the other — to avoid the harmful effects of stressful situations at work. It can be assumed that the composition of drivers age group 35– 45 years is the result of natural selection, when those who did not cope with this type of activity is simply dismissed or transferred to other kinds of professions

  19. Public opinion on doping in cycling: Differences among population groups

    Van Reeth, Daam; Lagae, Wim

    2013-01-01

    Despite the vast amount of literature available on doping in sports, little is known about how the general public actually thinks about doping. It is even more unclear how public opinion on doping differs within the population. Our questionnaire-based study for Flanders (Belgium), with a focus on doping in cycling, shows a strong disapproval of doping use by all respondents. There are statistically significant differences, though, among the population groups. Cycling fans tend to be less nega...

  20. Epistemic Impact on Group Problem Solving for Different Science Majors

    Mason, Andrew J

    2016-01-01

    Implementation of cognitive apprenticeship in an introductory physics lab group problem solving exercise may be mitigated by epistemic views toward physics of non-physics science majors. Quantitative pre-post data of the Force Concept Inventory (FCI) and Colorado Learning Attitudes About Science Survey (CLASS) of 39 students of a first-semester algebra-based introductory physics course, while describing typical results for a traditional-format course overall (g = +0.14), suggest differences in epistemic views between health science majors and life science majors which may correlate with differences in pre-post conceptual understanding. Audiovisual data of student lab groups working on a context-rich problem and students' written reflections described each group's typical dynamics and invoked epistemic games. We examined the effects of framework-based orientation (favored by biology majors) and performance-based orientation (favored by computer science, chemistry, and health science majors) on pre-post attitud...

  1. AGING COEFFICIENT IN DIFFERENT RELIGIOUS GROUPS IN IRAN

    D.D. Farhud

    1998-08-01

    Full Text Available Aging Coefficient (AC, or aged–child ratio, is the number of individuals aged 65 years and over, divided by the number of individuals aged 0-14, multiplied by 100. In this point–descriptive study, the aging coefficient has been calculated for the followers of four different religions, for the past four respective decades, according to sex and locality. Overall age composition in different religious groups, in a decreasing order is: Christians, Jews, and Zoroastrians showed a slight decrease in the 80’s and a higher increase afterward. Moslems show a more consistent mode, but with a slight increase in the last decade; but in all cases AC has been lower than 15, presenting a higher proportion of a young population or lower aged group. The increase of AC in each group can be caused by the old age survival, i.e. increasing life expectancy, or decreasing birth rate

  2. Differences in evolutionary pressure acting within highly conserved ortholog groups

    Aravind L

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In highly conserved widely distributed ortholog groups, the main evolutionary force is assumed to be purifying selection that enforces sequence conservation, with most divergence occurring by accumulation of neutral substitutions. Using a set of ortholog groups from prokaryotes, with a single representative in each studied organism, we asked the question if this evolutionary pressure is acting similarly on different subgroups of orthologs defined as major lineages (e.g. Proteobacteria or Firmicutes. Results Using correlations in entropy measures as a proxy for evolutionary pressure, we observed two distinct behaviors within our ortholog collection. The first subset of ortholog groups, called here informational, consisted mostly of proteins associated with information processing (i.e. translation, transcription, DNA replication and the second, the non-informational ortholog groups, mostly comprised of proteins involved in metabolic pathways. The evolutionary pressure acting on non-informational proteins is more uniform relative to their informational counterparts. The non-informational proteins show higher level of correlation between entropy profiles and more uniformity across subgroups. Conclusion The low correlation of entropy profiles in the informational ortholog groups suggest that the evolutionary pressure acting on the informational ortholog groups is not uniform across different clades considered this study. This might suggest "fine-tuning" of informational proteins in each lineage leading to lineage-specific differences in selection. This, in turn, could make these proteins less exchangeable between lineages. In contrast, the uniformity of the selective pressure acting on the non-informational groups might allow the exchange of the genetic material via lateral gene transfer.

  3. Impact of Education on the Income of Different Social Groups

    Yue, Changjun; Liu, Yanping

    2007-01-01

    This study investigates, statistically and econometrically, the income level, income inequality, education inequality, and the relationship between education and income of different social groups, on the basis of the Chinese Urban Household Survey conducted in 2005, the Gini coefficient and the quartile regression method. Research findings…

  4. Differences by Age Groups in Health Care Spending

    Fisher, Charles R.

    1980-01-01

    This paper presents differences by age in health care spending by type of expenditure and by source of funds through 1978. Use of health care services generally increases with age. The average health bill reached $2,026 for the aged in 1978, $764 for the intermediate age group, and $286 for the young. Biological, demographic, and policy factors determine each age group's share of health spending. Public funds financed over three-fifths of the health expenses of the aged, with Medicare and Med...

  5. Properties of graphene inks stabilized by different functional groups

    Different graphene inks have been synthesized by chemical methods. These uniform dispersions were stabilized by various functional groups such as room temperature ionic liquid, polyaniline, polyelectrolyte (poly[2,5-bis(3-sulfonatopropoxy)-1,4-ethynylphenylene-alt-1, 4-ethynylphenylene] sodium salt) and poly(styrenesulfonate) (PSS). The dispersions can be easily cast into high-quality, free-standing films but with very different physiochemical properties such as surface tension and adhesion. SEM and AFM methods have been applied to have a detailed study of the properties of the inks. It is found that graphenes modified by p-type polyaniline show the highest surface tension. Diverse surface adhesive properties to the substrate are also found with various functional groups. The different viscoelasticities of graphene inks were related to the microscopic structure of their coating layer and subsequently related to the configuration, chemistry and molecular dimensions of the modifying molecules to establish the property-structure relationship. Modifications of graphene inks made from chemical reduction cannot only enable cost-effective processing for printable electronics but also extend the applications into, for example, self-assembly of graphene via bottom-up nano-architecture and surface energy engineering of the graphenes. To fabricate useful devices, understanding the surface properties of graphene inks is very important. It is the first paper of this kind to study the surface tension and adhesion of graphene influenced by different functional groups.

  6. Modelling fuel demand for different socio-economic groups

    The fuel demand literature provides a range of estimates of the long and short-run price and income elasticities of gasoline demand for different countries and states. These estimates can be very useful in predicting the overall impacts of policy approaches designed to reduce fuel consumption and to address concerns of carbon emissions or energy security. However, analysis of policy options based on elasticities that are homogenous across income groups provides no information about the relative distributional burden that may be faced by different sectors of the population. Different responses to the same change in price or income are likely to occur, dependent on both travel needs and income levels. This paper estimates gasoline demand elasticities for different income quintiles in the United States to test for heterogeneity in demand response. Group wise summary consumer expenditure data for 20 years is used to derive the elasticity estimates. The results show that the elasticities do vary across groups and follow a U-pattern from the lowest to the highest income quintile. The lowest income quintile is found to have the largest price elasticity. The lowest and the highest income quintiles appear to be statistically insensitive to any changes in income. The rebound effect also follows the U-pattern, with the highest rebound observed among the wealthiest households. Rural households appear to have lower price elasticity than households in urban areas. (author)

  7. Properties of graphene inks stabilized by different functional groups

    Wei, Di; Li, Hongwei; Han, Dongxue; Zhang, Qixian; Niu, Li; Yang, Huafeng; Bower, Chris; Andrew, Piers; Ryhänen, Tapani

    2011-06-01

    Different graphene inks have been synthesized by chemical methods. These uniform dispersions were stabilized by various functional groups such as room temperature ionic liquid, polyaniline, polyelectrolyte (poly[2,5-bis(3-sulfonatopropoxy)-1,4-ethynylphenylene-alt-1,4-ethynylphenylene] sodium salt) and poly(styrenesulfonate) (PSS). The dispersions can be easily cast into high-quality, free-standing films but with very different physiochemical properties such as surface tension and adhesion. SEM and AFM methods have been applied to have a detailed study of the properties of the inks. It is found that graphenes modified by p-type polyaniline show the highest surface tension. Diverse surface adhesive properties to the substrate are also found with various functional groups. The different viscoelasticities of graphene inks were related to the microscopic structure of their coating layer and subsequently related to the configuration, chemistry and molecular dimensions of the modifying molecules to establish the property-structure relationship. Modifications of graphene inks made from chemical reduction cannot only enable cost-effective processing for printable electronics but also extend the applications into, for example, self-assembly of graphene via bottom-up nano-architecture and surface energy engineering of the graphenes. To fabricate useful devices, understanding the surface properties of graphene inks is very important. It is the first paper of this kind to study the surface tension and adhesion of graphene influenced by different functional groups.

  8. Discordance Rates Between AMH and FSH in Different Age Groups

    Selcuk Selcuk

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To evaluate the discordance rates between anti-Mullerian hormone (AMH and follicle stimulating hormone (FSH levels according to different age groups in a cohort of Turkish women. Material and Method: This retrospective study was conducted at infertility clinics of Zeynep Kamil Training and Research Hospital. Patients were divided into 4 groups as %u2264 30 years, 31-35 years, 36-39 years, and %u2265 40 years to evaluate the discordance between AMH and FSH in terms of age. Discordance rates, and median level of AMH and of FSH were determined for each age group. Results: 467 patients who met the inclusion criteria were enrolled in the study. 35.1% (n=164, 28.3% (n=132, 22.7%(n=106, and 13.9% (n=65 of patients were %u2264 30 years, 31-35 years, 36-39 years, and %u2265 40 years, respectively. The discordance rates in terms of normal AMH but abnormal FSH level were 4.2%, 6.7%, 11.0%, 17.9% in the %u2264 30, 31-35, 36-39, %u226540 years age groups, respectively, whereas the discordance rates in terms of normal FSH but abnormal AMH levels were 6.2%, 8.5%, 16.7%, 17.9% in the same age groups, respectively. Discussion: Discordance rates steadily increased with advancing age both for concerning AMH-reassuring FSH and concerning FSH-reassuring AMH. Data from our study and the literature lead us to conclude that age-based AMH and FSH levels and also that discordance between these parameters may vary among different ethnic groups.

  9. Epistemic Impact on Group Problem Solving for Different Science Majors

    Mason, Andrew J.; Bertram, Charles A.

    2016-01-01

    Implementation of cognitive apprenticeship in an introductory physics lab group problem solving exercise may be mitigated by epistemic views toward physics of non-physics science majors. Quantitative pre-post data of the Force Concept Inventory (FCI) and Colorado Learning Attitudes About Science Survey (CLASS) of 39 students of a first-semester algebra-based introductory physics course, while describing typical results for a traditional-format course overall (g = +0.14), suggest differences i...

  10. Gamma-Ray Burst Groups Observed by Different Satellites

    Horváth, István; Veres, Péter

    2009-01-01

    Two classes of gamma-ray bursts have been identified in the BATSE catalogs characterized by durations shorter and longer than about 2 seconds. There are, however, some indications for the existence of a third one. Swift satellite detectors have different spectral sensitivity than pre-Swift ones for gamma-ray bursts. Therefore it is worth to reanalyze the durations and their distribution and also the classification of GRBs. In this paper we are going to analyze the bursts' duration distribution and also the duration-hardness bivariate distribution, published in The First BAT Catalog, whether it contains two, three or maybe more groups. Similarly to the BATSE data, to explain the BAT GRBs duration distribution three components are needed. Although, the relative frequencies of the groups are different than they were in the BATSE GRB sample, the difference in the instrument spectral sensitivities can explain this bias in a natural way. This means theoretical models may have to explain three different type of gamm...

  11. Latent cluster analysis of ALS phenotypes identifies prognostically differing groups.

    Jeban Ganesalingam

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS is a degenerative disease predominantly affecting motor neurons and manifesting as several different phenotypes. Whether these phenotypes correspond to different underlying disease processes is unknown. We used latent cluster analysis to identify groupings of clinical variables in an objective and unbiased way to improve phenotyping for clinical and research purposes. METHODS: Latent class cluster analysis was applied to a large database consisting of 1467 records of people with ALS, using discrete variables which can be readily determined at the first clinic appointment. The model was tested for clinical relevance by survival analysis of the phenotypic groupings using the Kaplan-Meier method. RESULTS: The best model generated five distinct phenotypic classes that strongly predicted survival (p<0.0001. Eight variables were used for the latent class analysis, but a good estimate of the classification could be obtained using just two variables: site of first symptoms (bulbar or limb and time from symptom onset to diagnosis (p<0.00001. CONCLUSION: The five phenotypic classes identified using latent cluster analysis can predict prognosis. They could be used to stratify patients recruited into clinical trials and generating more homogeneous disease groups for genetic, proteomic and risk factor research.

  12. Prevalence of cilantro (Coriandrum sativum disliking among different ethnocultural groups

    Mauer Lilli

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cilantro, the leaf of the Coriandrum sativum plant, is an herb that is widely consumed globally and has purported health benefits ranging from antibacterial to anticancer activities. Some individuals report an extreme dislike for cilantro, and this may explain the different cilantro consumption habits between populations. However, the prevalence of cilantro dislike has not previously been reported in any population. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of cilantro dislike among different ethnocultural groups from a population of young adults living in Canada. Subjects (n = 1,639 between the ages of 20 and 29 years were participants of the Toronto Nutrigenomics and Health Study. Individuals rated their preference for cilantro on a 9-point scale from ‘dislike extremely’ to ‘like extremely’. Subjects also had the option to select ‘have not tried’ or ‘would not try’. Subjects who selected 1 to 4 were classified as disliking cilantro. Results The prevalence of dislike ranged from 3 to 21%. The proportion of subjects classified as disliking cilantro was 21% for East Asians, 17% for Caucasians, 14% for those of African descent, 7% for South Asians, 4% for Hispanics, and 3% for Middle Eastern subjects. Conclusions These findings show that the prevalence of cilantro dislike differs widely between various ethnocultural groups.

  13. Comparison between different reactions of group IV hydride with H

    ZHANG; Shaolong; ZHANG; Xuqiang; ZHANG; Qinggang; ZHANG; Yici

    2006-01-01

    The four-dimensional time-dependent quantum dynamics calculations for reactions of group IV hydride with H are carried out by employing the semirigid vibrating rotor target model and the time-dependent wave packet method. The reaction possibility, cross section and rate constants for reactions (H+SiH4 and H+GeH4) in different initial vibrational and rotational states are obtained. The common feature for such kind of reaction process is summarized. The theoretical result is consistent with available measurement, which indicates the credibility of this theory and the potential energy surface.

  14. Multi-group unified nodal method with two-group coarse-mesh finite difference formulation

    The one-node kernels of the unified nodal method (UNM) which were originally developed for two-group (2G) problems are extended to solve multi-group (MG) problems within the framework of the 2G coarse-mesh finite difference (CMFD) formulation. The analytic nodal method (ANM) kernel of UNM is reformulated for the MG application by adopting the Pade approximation to avoid the similarity transform required to diagonalize the G x G buckling matrix. In addition, a one-node semi-analytic nodal method (SANM) kernel which is considered adequate for multi-group calculations is also integrated into the UNM formulation by expressing it in the form consistent with the other UNM kernels. As an efficient global solution framework, the 2G CMFD formulation with dynamic group condensation and prolongation is established and the performance of the various MG kernels is examined using various static and transient benchmark problems. It turns out that the SANM kernel is the best one for MG problems not only because it retains accuracy comparable to MGANM with a shorter computing time but also because its accuracy or its convergence does not depend on the eigenvalue range of the buckling matrix of the system. The 2G CMFD formulation with MG one-node UNM kernels turns out to be very effective in that it conveniently accelerates the MG source iteration

  15. Small group learning : do group members' implicit theories of ability make a difference ?

    Beckmann, N; Wood, R E; Minbashian, A.; Tabernero, C

    2012-01-01

    We examined the impact of members' implicit theories of ability on group learning and the mediating role of several group process variables, such as goal-setting, effort attributions, and efficacy beliefs. Comparisons were between 15 groups with a strong incremental view on ability (high incremental theory groups), and 15 groups with a weak incremental view on ability (low incremental theory groups). Groups worked on a computer-based management simulation. The task required the groups to lear...

  16. Are interest groups different in the factors determining landscape preferences?

    Maria Bacher

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In the last decades, rural landscape in Europe has evolved from an agricultural by-product to an important public good. This development creates not only new challenges to farming practices, it also makes participation and public involvement an indispensable tool for sustainable landscape planning. This is especially true for many European mountain regions, where tourism represents an important source of income and conflicts between locals’ and tourists’ interests should be avoided. In our study, we analyze whether discrepancies in the perception of the Alpine landscape can be located between locals and tourists and, if these differences exist, in which aspects these two groups are differing. A model employing three general factors able to describe landscape preferences regardless of the personal background is suggested and validated by confirmatory factor analysis. Our major finding shows that an attractive landscape for tourists does not have to be contradictory to a landscape that supports a high living quality for locals. Compromises in landscape planning between locals’ and tourists’ requirements seem often not to be necessary as they, generally, do not differ in the way they experience and assess the landscape.

  17. Energetic differences between bacterioplankton trophic groups and coral reef resistance.

    McDole Somera, Tracey; Bailey, Barbara; Barott, Katie; Grasis, Juris; Hatay, Mark; Hilton, Brett J; Hisakawa, Nao; Nosrat, Bahador; Nulton, James; Silveira, Cynthia B; Sullivan, Chris; Brainard, Russell E; Rohwer, Forest

    2016-04-27

    Coral reefs are among the most productive and diverse marine ecosystems on the Earth. They are also particularly sensitive to changing energetic requirements by different trophic levels. Microbialization specifically refers to the increase in the energetic metabolic demands of microbes relative to macrobes and is significantly correlated with increasing human influence on coral reefs. In this study, metabolic theory of ecology is used to quantify the relative contributions of two broad bacterioplankton groups, autotrophs and heterotrophs, to energy flux on 27 Pacific coral reef ecosystems experiencing human impact to varying degrees. The effective activation energy required for photosynthesis is lower than the average energy of activation for the biochemical reactions of the Krebs cycle, and changes in the proportional abundance of these two groups can greatly affect rates of energy and materials cycling. We show that reef-water communities with a higher proportional abundance of microbial autotrophs expend more metabolic energy per gram of microbial biomass. Increased energy and materials flux through fast energy channels (i.e. water-column associated microbial autotrophs) may dampen the detrimental effects of increased heterotrophic loads (e.g. coral disease) on coral reef systems experiencing anthropogenic disturbance. PMID:27097927

  18. Percutaneous nephrolithotomy in children in different age groups

    Guven, Selcuk; Frattini, Antonio; Onal, Bulent;

    2013-01-01

    participating centres in the PCNL Global Study, as categorised in different age groups. PATIENTS AND METHODS: •  The Clinical Research Office of the Endourological Society (CROES) Study was conducted from November 2007 to December 2009, and included 96 centres and >5800 patients. •  All children aged ≤14 years...... in the PCNL Global Study database were the focus of the study. RESULTS: •  In all, 107 children aged ≤14 years were included in the analysis. •  The PCNL procedure was conducted in 13 patients (12.1%) in the supine position; tubeless PCNL was performed in 15 patients (14%); and balloon dilatation was......Study Type - Therapy (case series) Level of Evidence 4 What's known on the subject? and What does the study add? Without age being a limiting risk factor, recent reports have shown that almost any version of percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) can be safely applied in children. As there has been no...

  19. Differences between Belgian and Brazilian group A Streptococcus epidemiologic landscape.

    Pierre Robert Smeesters

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Group A Streptococcus (GAS clinical and molecular epidemiology varies with location and time. These differences are not or are poorly understood. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We prospectively studied the epidemiology of GAS infections among children in outpatient hospital clinics in Brussels (Belgium and Brasília (Brazil. Clinical questionnaires were filled out and microbiological sampling was performed. GAS isolates were emm-typed according to the Center for Disease Control protocol. emm pattern was predicted for each isolate. 334 GAS isolates were recovered from 706 children. Skin infections were frequent in Brasília (48% of the GAS infections, whereas pharyngitis were predominant (88% in Brussels. The mean age of children with GAS pharyngitis in Brussels was lower than in Brasília (65/92 months, p<0.001. emm-typing revealed striking differences between Brazilian and Belgian GAS isolates. While 20 distinct emm-types were identified among 200 Belgian isolates, 48 were found among 128 Brazilian isolates. Belgian isolates belong mainly to emm pattern A-C (55% and E (42.5% while emm pattern E (51.5% and D (36% were predominant in Brasília. In Brasília, emm pattern D isolates were recovered from 18.5% of the pharyngitis, although this emm pattern is supposed to have a skin tropism. By contrast, A-C pattern isolates were infrequently recovered in a region where rheumatic fever is still highly prevalent. CONCLUSIONS: Epidemiologic features of GAS from a pediatric population were very different in an industrialised country and a low incomes region, not only in term of clinical presentation, but also in terms of genetic diversity and distribution of emm patterns. These differences should be taken into account for designing treatment guidelines and vaccine strategies.

  20. Small Group Learning: Do Group Members' Implicit Theories of Ability Make a Difference?

    Beckmann, Nadin; Wood, Robert E.; Minbashian, Amirali; Tabernero, Carmen

    2012-01-01

    We examined the impact of members' implicit theories of ability on group learning and the mediating role of several group process variables, such as goal-setting, effort attributions, and efficacy beliefs. Comparisons were between 15 groups with a strong incremental view on ability (high incremental theory groups), and 15 groups with a weak…

  1. Characterization of condenser microphones under different environmental conditions for accurate speed of sound measurements with acoustic resonators

    Condenser microphones are more commonly used and have been extensively modeled and characterized in air at ambient temperature and static pressure. However, several applications of interest for metrology and physical acoustics require to use these transducers in significantly different environmental conditions. Particularly, the extremely accurate determination of the speed of sound in monoatomic gases, which is pursued for a determination of the Boltzmann constant k by an acoustic method, entails the use of condenser microphones mounted within a spherical cavity, over a wide range of static pressures, at the temperature of the triple point of water (273.16 K). To further increase the accuracy achievable in this application, the microphone frequency response and its acoustic input impedance need to be precisely determined over the same static pressure and temperature range. Few previous works examined the influence of static pressure, temperature, and gas composition on the microphone's sensitivity. In this work, the results of relative calibrations of 1/4 in. condenser microphones obtained using an electrostatic actuator technique are presented. The calibrations are performed in pure helium and argon gas at temperatures near 273 K and in the pressure range between 10 and 600 kPa. These experimental results are compared with the predictions of a realistic model available in the literature, finding a remarkable good agreement. The model provides an estimate of the acoustic impedance of 1/4 in. condenser microphones as a function of frequency and static pressure and is used to calculate the corresponding frequency perturbations induced on the normal modes of a spherical cavity when this is filled with helium or argon gas.

  2. Gender Similarities and Differences in Preadolescent Peer Groups

    Xie, Hongling; Shi, Bing

    2009-01-01

    The Social Cognitive Mapping procedure was used to identify peer social groups in 26 fifth-grade classrooms from six elementary schools in a northeastern urban school district. Four group structural features were examined: size, the number of subcliques, cohesion, and salience hierarchy. Ethnic diversity index was calculated for each group. An…

  3. Application of the energy reassignment method to measure accurate Rayleigh and Love wave group velocities from ambient seismic noise cross-correlations

    Witek, M.; Kang, T. S.; van der Lee, S.

    2015-12-01

    We have collected three-component data from 122 Korean accelerometer stations for the month of December in 2014. We apply similar techniques described by Zha et al. (2013) to retrieve accurate station orientation angles, in order to rotate the horizontal component data into the radial and transverse frame of reference, and for subsequent measurement of Love wave group velocity dispersion. We simultaneously normalize all three components of a daily noise record via the frequency-time normalization (FTN) method. Each component is divided by the average signal envelope in an effort to retain relative amplitude information between all three components. Station orientations are found by a grid search for the orientation azimuth which maximizes the coherency between the radial-vertical cross-correlation and the Hilbert transformed vertical-vertical cross-correlation. After measuring orientation angles, we cross-correlate and rotate the data. Typically, the group velocity dispersion curves are measured using the frequency time analysis technique (FTAN), effectively producing spectrograms with significant uncertainty in the time-frequency plane. The spectrogram approach retains only the amplitude information of the short-time Fourier transform (STFT). However, Kodera et al (1976) show that by taking into account the phase information, the concepts of instantaneous frequency and group-time delay can be used to compute the first moment of the signal power in the frequency and time domains. During energy reassignment, the signal power calculated using the STFT at a point (t0,f0t_0, f_0) is reassigned to the location of the first moment (t^g,f^ihat{t}_g,hat{f}_i), where t^ghat{t}_g is the group-time delay and f^ihat{f}_i is the instantaneous frequency. We apply the method of energy reassignment to produce precise Rayleigh and Love wave group velocity measurements in the frequency range 0.1 - 1.0 Hz. Tests on synthetic data show more accurate retrieval of group velocities at

  4. Entrepreneurial networking differences: An ethnic in-group and out-group analysis

    Boris Urban

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: Researching entrepreneurship using a network perspective is important, as social networks are assets for small business owners struggling to survive in competitive markets.Research purpose: The research question of this study has focused on what we can learn about entrepreneurial networking, considering that there is an under-explored and unarticulated set of networking principles and practices which have not been previously analysed in terms of a multiethnic country context.Motivation for the study: Often the lack of network use is reported as a feature of entrepreneurs, who have less opportunity to utilise formal social capital features. Social networks provided by extended family, community-based or organisational relationships are often theorised to supplement the effects of education, experience and financial capital.Research design, approach and method: Based on hypothesised differences in networking ties, network assistance and support relationships, a survey was used to collect data on quantitative measures. Descriptive statistics were calculated and differential tests were conducted to test the hypotheses.Main findings: Results indicate that entrepreneurial networking is largely independent on group composition. Generally at least some aspects of networking are generic and as a consequence, a more integrated view of networking can be adopted.Practical/managerial implications: The practical value of the present study points to several areas of interest to entrepreneurs, policy makers and educators, through demonstrating the multifaceted nature of entrepreneurial networks for different groups and their explanatory potential in understanding networking.Contribution/value-add: Despite the importance of entrepreneurial networking, little empirical or theoretical research has examined the dynamics of networking in a developing country context such as South Africa, which has lower than expected total entrepreneurship activity.

  5. Big Five personality group differences across academic majors

    Vedel, Anna

    decades, studies have regularly explored associations between enrolment in specific academic majors and scores on the Big Five personality traits; Neuroticism, Extraversion, Openness, Agreeableness, and Conscientiousness. The present review examines this research systematically, summarises group...

  6. Negative impact of asthma on patients in different age groups

    Marcela Batan Alith

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the impact of asthma on patients in Brazil, by age group (12-17 years, 18-40 years, and ≥ 41 years. Methods: From a survey conducted in Latin America in 2011, we obtained data on 400 patients diagnosed with asthma and residing in one of four Brazilian state capitals (São Paulo, Rio de Janeiro, Curitiba, and Salvador. The data had been collected using a standardized questionnaire in face-to-face interviews. For the patients who were minors, the parents/guardians had completed the questionnaire. The questions addressed asthma control, number of hospitalizations, number of emergency room visits, and school/work absenteeism, as well as the impact of asthma on the quality of life, sleep, and leisure. We stratified the data by the selected age groups. Results: The proportions of patients who responded in the affirmative to the following questions were significantly higher in the 12- to 17-year age group than in the other two groups: "Have you had at least one episode of severe asthma that prevented you from playing/exercising in the last 12 months?" (p = 0.012; "Have you been absent from school/work in the last 12 months?" (p < 0.001; "Have you discontinued your asthma relief or control medication in the last 12 months?" (p = 0.008. In addition, 30.2% of the patients in the 12- to 17-year age group reported that normal physical exertion was very limiting (p = 0.010 vs. the other groups, whereas 14% of the patients in the ≥ 41-year age group described social activities as very limiting (p = 0.011 vs. the other groups. Conclusions: In this sample, asthma had a greater impact on the patients between 12 and 17 years of age, which might be attributable to poor treatment compliance.

  7. Attachment disorganization in different clinical groups: What underpins unresolved attachment?

    Juen Florian; Arnold Lisa; Meissner Dominik; Nolte Tobias; Buchheim Anna

    2013-01-01

    This paper summarizes findings and clinical implications of research on attachment disorganization in diverse clinical groups. Disorganized/unresolved attachment is overrepresented in these groups compared to healthy control participants, but disorder specific characteristics of this attachment pattern are still poorly understood. The focus of this study was to explore defensive processes in participants whose narratives were classified as disorganized/unresolved using the Adult Attach...

  8. Features of Chronic Bronchitis in Different Age Groups

    Galina L. Ignatova

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Lung diseases are assuming greater relevance and importance today. Chronic bronchitis is a self-nosology, which may precede the development of COPD, the importance of which can hardly be overestimated. The main problem in this disease is caused by late diagnosis and treatment due to the delay by patients in seeking medical help. The aim of the work was to study the distribution and exposure to tobacco smoke, especially chronic bronchitis, depending on various factors, including age. Methods: We examined 1779 persons, including 855 men and 924 women. The mean age of the population was 35.83±8.3 years. We conducted surveys and spirometry. The outcome was assessed after a bronchodilation test was performed with salbutamol 400 mcg. We performed all statistical analysis using software package Statistica 10. Results: We identified chronic bronchitis in 9.2% of the cases in the group of younger individuals and in 14.9% of the cases in the group of older individuals, during the active detection of chronic bronchitis using questionnaires. The prevalence of cigarette smoking was slightly higher among the younger (39.5% than the older persons (33.6%; the frequency of smoking in a group of chronic bronchitis was reliably higher. Also, in this group, the performance spirometry reliably decreased. Conclusions: Outpatient survey is an effective method of identifying chronic bronchitis. Smoking is a major risk factor in the group of young respondents and the prevalence of smoking is inversely related to the education level of the respondents, regardless of age. As the decline in the Forced Expiratory Volume (FEV1 and FEV1/FVC is the main criterion diagnosis of COPD, it revealed significant declines in the FEV1 of the younger smoking individuals, which may help to predict the development of COPD in the older age group.

  9. How Do Groups Work? Age Differences in Performance and the Social Outcomes of Peer Collaboration

    Leman, Patrick J.

    2015-01-01

    Do children derive different benefits from group collaboration at different ages? In the present study, 183 children from two age groups (8.8 and 13.4 years) took part in a class quiz as members of a group, or individually. In some groups, cohesiveness was made salient by awarding prizes to the top performing groups. In other groups, prizes were…

  10. Deriving Oral Assessment Scales across Different Tests and Rater Groups.

    Chalhoub-Deville, Micheline

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to derive the criteria/dimensions underlying learners' second-language oral ability scores across three tests: an oral interview, a narration, and a read-aloud. A stimulus tape of 18 speech samples was presented to 3 native speaker rater groups for evaluation. Results indicate that researchers might need to reconsider…

  11. Food risk perceptions by different consumer groups in Germany

    Roosen, Jutta; Thiele, Silke; Hansen, Kristin

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of the changing food risk perceptions of German consumers over the period 1992 to 2002. We analyse the respondents' general risk attitudes and their specific perceptions of food risks. Using cluster analysis we generate a typology of four consumer types. One group is worried about natural food risks, the second does not worry about any types of food risks, the third is concerned about technical food risks and the fourth is concerned about all food risks. A mult...

  12. Attachment disorganization in different clinical groups: What underpins unresolved attachment?

    Juen Florian

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper summarizes findings and clinical implications of research on attachment disorganization in diverse clinical groups. Disorganized/unresolved attachment is overrepresented in these groups compared to healthy control participants, but disorder specific characteristics of this attachment pattern are still poorly understood. The focus of this study was to explore defensive processes in participants whose narratives were classified as disorganized/unresolved using the Adult Attachment Projective Picture System (AAP. Besides the predominance of disorganized attachment, clinical participants demonstrated more “segregated system material” especially in stories representing aloneness and more “Personal Experience material” compared to healthy individuals. Within the disorganized/ unresolved clinical individuals, BPD and PTSD patients showed the highest proportion of attachment disorganization and were less able to use other attachment-related defenses to maintain organized. Furthermore, PTSD patients were emotionally overwhelmed by the projective attachment scenes compared to the other clinical groups as indexed by an incapacity to complete sections of the AAP. BPD and addicted patients were characterized by a high degree of self-other boundary confusion. Depressive and schizophrenic patients showed a high overall defensive intensity to remain organized.

  13. Wild chimpanzees show group differences in selection of agricultural crops

    McLennan, Matthew R.; Hockings, Kimberley J.

    2014-01-01

    The ability of wild animals to respond flexibly to anthropogenic environmental changes, including agriculture, is critical to survival in human-impacted habitats. Understanding use of human foods by wildlife can shed light on the acquisition of novel feeding habits and how animals respond to human-driven land-use changes. Little attention has focused on within-species variation in use of human foods or its causes. We examined crop-feeding in two groups of wild chimpanzees – a specialist frugi...

  14. Generational Differences among a Small Group of Hmong Americans

    Vang, Pa Der

    2013-01-01

    Few studies have looked at the differences in culture, language, and educational attainments among generations of Hmong in the United States since the beginning of their immigration to the United States. This study of 195 Hmong participants examines the effects of generational status on Hmong immigrants across several factors including marriage…

  15. A Neuroanatomical Signature for Schizophrenia Across Different Ethnic Groups.

    Gong, Qiyong; Dazzan, Paola; Scarpazza, Cristina; Kasai, Kyioto; Hu, Xinyu; Marques, Tiago R; Iwashiro, Norichika; Huang, Xiaoqi; Murray, Robin M; Koike, Shinsuke; David, Anthony S; Yamasue, Hidenori; Lui, Su; Mechelli, Andrea

    2015-11-01

    Schizophrenia is a disabling clinical syndrome found across the world. While the incidence and clinical expression of this illness are strongly influenced by ethnic factors, it is unclear whether patients from different ethnicities show distinct brain deficits. In this multicentre study, we used structural Magnetic Resonance Imaging to investigate neuroanatomy in 126 patients with first episode schizophrenia who came from 4 ethnically distinct cohorts (White Caucasians, African-Caribbeans, Japanese, and Chinese). Each patient was individually matched with a healthy control of the same ethnicity, gender, and age (±1 year). We report a reduction in the gray matter volume of the right anterior insula in patients relative to controls (P literature, implicating the right anterior insula in bipolar disorder, depression, addiction, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and anxiety, we speculate that the neuroanatomical deficit reported here may represent a transdiagnostic feature of Axis I disorders. PMID:26264820

  16. Accurate measurement of sample conductivity in a diamond anvil cell with axis symmetrical electrodes and finite difference calculation

    Jie Yang

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available We report a relatively precise method of conductivity measurement in a diamond anvil cell with axis symmetrical electrodes and finite difference calculation. The axis symmetrical electrodes are composed of two parts: one is a round thin-film electrode deposited on diamond facet and the other is the inside wall of metal gasket. Due to the asymmetrical configuration of the two electrodes, finite difference method can be applied to calculate the conductivity of sample, which can reduce the measurement error.

  17. Do different groups have different risk factors for dieting and exercise as body management strategies?

    Behshid Garrusi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim – Body change strategies are activities that could be potentially harmful. Individuals may use different methods for achieving advertised ideal body. Some of demographic and psychosocial contributing factors could be affect decision regarding body management activities. In Iran there is a few research about this matter, therefore the aim of this study was exploring risk factors in body management. Materials and Methods – In this cross sectional study, 400 people participated that including general population, university students and body building clubs attainders. The self administrated questionnaire based on reliable sources of body image that evaluated its validity and validity. Statistical analysis was done by using central indexes and distribution and logistic regression. Data analysis was done by software of SPSS 16. Results – Marital status, education, economic status, age and BMI had no relation with body management strategies. Birthplace effects on choose of diet and exercise. Gender is only had effect on exercise choosing. Use of Western TV had effect on doing exercise. Pressure of relatives was an important factor in decision about dieting. Self steam and compare of appearance with others affected choosing of dieting. There were no differences between selected groups. Conclusion – In spite of similarities between body dissatisfaction and its management strategies with other studies in Iran, there is necessity for future studies.

  18. Variability and Intelligibility of Clarified Speech to Different Listener Groups

    Silber, Ronnie F.

    Two studies examined the modifications that adult speakers make in speech to disadvantaged listeners. Previous research that has focused on speech to the deaf individuals and to young children has shown that adults clarify speech when addressing these two populations. Acoustic measurements suggest that the signal undergoes similar changes for both populations. Perceptual tests corroborate these results for the deaf population, but are nonsystematic in developmental studies. The differences in the findings for these populations and the nonsystematic results in the developmental literature may be due to methodological factors. The present experiments addressed these methodological questions. Studies of speech to hearing impaired listeners have used read, nonsense, sentences, for which speakers received explicit clarification instructions and feedback, while in the child literature, excerpts of real-time conversations were used. Therefore, linguistic samples were not precisely matched. In this study, experiments used various linguistic materials. Experiment 1 used a children's story; experiment 2, nonsense sentences. Four mothers read both types of material in four ways: (1) in "normal" adult speech, (2) in "babytalk," (3) under the clarification instructions used in the "hearing impaired studies" (instructed clear speech) and (4) in (spontaneous) clear speech without instruction. No extra practice or feedback was given. Sentences were presented to 40 normal hearing college students with and without simultaneous masking noise. Results were separately tabulated for content and function words, and analyzed using standard statistical tests. The major finding in the study was individual variation in speaker intelligibility. "Real world" speakers vary in their baseline intelligibility. The four speakers also showed unique patterns of intelligibility as a function of each independent variable. Results were as follows. Nonsense sentences were less intelligible than story

  19. Diversification strategies in family and non-family groups: main differences according non-family group type

    Alejandro Hernández Trasobares

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the last decade, the interest for the study of ownership structure as a determinant of diversification arises. However, there is a lack of researches that analyze the influence of the nature of the ultimate owner in the level and type of diversification. Therefore, the objective of this paper is to analyze the diversification strategies used by the main Spanish business groups whose parent company is listed on the stock markets, and to study the differences between family and non-family business groups, considering in these last, the type of ultimate owner. In the study a sample of ninety-nine listed companies is used, where companies that constitute the business group are identified. In the paper are used as econometric methodologies the binomial logistic models and panel data models. The results show that family nature of business group positively influences in specialization and related diversification and negatively on unrelated diversification. Family groups differ most form those non-family groups where there is not a reference shareholder than can exercise effective control and ownership dispersion is higher, the groups referred as “non effective control”. The research allows further analysis of differences between family and non-family groups, considering the nature of the ultimate owner for non-family groups.

  20. Platelet serotonin levels in pervasive developmental disorders and mental retardation : Diagnostic group differences, within-group distribution, and behavioral correlates

    Mulder, EJ; Anderson, GM; Kema, IP; de Bildt, A; van Lang, NDJ; den Boer, JA; Minderaa, RB

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To investigate group differences, the within-group distributions, and the clinical correlates of platelet serotonin (5-HT) levels in pervasive developmental disorders (PDD). Method: Platelet 5-HT levels were measured in Dutch children and young adults, recruited from 2001 through 2003, wi

  1. Platelet Serotonin Levels in Pervasive Developmental Disorders and Mental Retardation: Diagnostic Group Differences, Within-Group Distribution, and Behavioral Correlates.

    Mulder, Erik J.; Anderson, George M.; Kema, Ido P.; De Bildt, Annelies; Van Lang, Natasja D.J.; Den Boer, Johan A.; Minderaa Ruud B.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To investigate group differences, the within-group distributions, and the clinical correlates of platelet serotonin (5-HT) levels in pervasive developmental disorders (PDD). Method: Platelet 5-HT levels were measured in Dutch children and young adults, recruited from 2001 through 2003, with PDD (autism, Asperger's and PDD-not otherwise…

  2. Poisson Geometry of Difference Lax Operators, and Difference Galois Theory, or Quantum groups from Poisson brackets anomalies

    Semenov-Tian-Shansky, Michael

    2014-09-01

    We discuss the lift of Poisson structures associated with auxiliary linear problems for the differential and difference Lax equations to the space of wave functions. Due to a peculiar symmetry breaking, the corresponding differential and difference Galois groups become Poisson Lie Groups.

  3. Poisson Geometry of Difference Lax Operators, and Difference Galois Theory, or Quantum groups from Poisson brackets anomalies

    Semenov-Tian-Shansky Michael

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We discuss the lift of Poisson structures associated with auxiliary linear problems for the differential and difference Lax equations to the space of wave functions. Due to a peculiar symmetry breaking, the corresponding differential and difference Galois groups become Poisson Lie Groups.

  4. The Difference Between Clusters and Groups: A Journey from Cluster Cores to their Outskirts and Beyond

    Bower, R G; Bower, Richard G.; Balogh, Michael L.

    2003-01-01

    In this review, we take the reader on a journey. We start by looking at the properties of galaxies in the cores of rich clusters. We have focused on the overall picture: star formation in clusters is strongly suppressed relative to field galaxies at the same redshift. We will argue that the increasing activity and blue populations of clusters with redshift results from a greater level of activity in field galaxies rather than a change in the transformation imposed by the cluster environment. With this in mind, we travel out from the cluster focussing firstly on the properties of galaxies in the outskirts of clusters and then on galaxies in isolated groups. At low redshift, we are able to efficiently probe these environments using the Sloan and 2DF redshift surveys. These allow an accurate comparison of galaxy star formation rates in different regions. The current results show a strong suppression of star formation above a critical threshold in local density. The threshold seems similar regardless of the overa...

  5. The effects of different gender groupings on middle school students' performance in science lab

    Drab, Deborah D.

    Grouping students for labs in science classes is a common practice. This mixed methods quasi-experimental action research study examines homogeneous and heterogeneous gender grouping strategies to determine what gender grouping strategy is the most effective in a coeducational science classroom setting. Sixth grade students were grouped in same-gender and mixed-gender groups, alternating each quarter. Over the course of an academic year, data were collected from four sources. The teacher-researcher observed groups working during hands-on activities to collect data on student behaviors. Students completed post-lab questionnaires and an end-of-course questionnaire about their preferences and experiences in the different grouping strategies. Student scores on written lab assignments were also utilized. Data analysis focused on four areas: active engagement, student achievement, student perceptions of success and cooperative teamwork. Findings suggest that teachers may consider grouping students of different ability levels according to different gender grouping strategies to optimize learning.

  6. On the properties of compact groups identified in different photometric bands

    Taverna, Antonela; Zandivarez, Ariel; Joray, Francisco; Kanagusuku, Maria Jose

    2016-01-01

    Historically, compact group catalogues vary not only in their identification algorithms and selection functions, but also in their photometric bands. Differences between compact group catalogues have been reported. However, it is difficult to assess the impact of the photometric band in these differences given the variety of identification algorithms. We used the mock lightcone built by Henriques et al. (2012) to identify and compare compact groups in three different photometric bands: $K$, $r$, and $u$. We applied the same selection functions in the three bands, and found that compact groups in the u-band look the smallest in projection, the difference between the two brightest galaxies is the largest in the K-band, while compact groups in the r-band present the lowest compactness. We also investigated the differences between samples when galaxies are selected only in one particular band (pure compact groups) and those that exist regardless the band in which galaxies were observed (common compact groups). We...

  7. Giardia muris and Giardia duodenalis groups: ultrastructural differences between the trophozoites

    Maria Inês L Sogayar; Elisa Aparecida Gregório

    1989-01-01

    Trophozoites of the Giardia muris group from hamsters, domestic rats and mice and of the Giardia duodenalis group from hamsters and domestic rats were examined by transmission electron microscopy. The basic ultrastructure of the trophozoites was similar. Differences were shown in the morphology of the ventrolateral flange of the trophozoites of Giardia muris and Giardia duodenalis groups. Marginal plates are less developed in the species of the Giardia duodenalis group. In this group, the dis...

  8. Socioeconomic and Gender Group Differences in Early Literacy Skills: A Multiple-Group Confirmatory Factor Analysis Approach

    Lee, Julia Ai Cheng; Al Otaiba, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    Socioeconomic status and gender are important demographic variables that strongly relate to academic achievement. This study examined the early literacy skills differences between 4 sociodemographic groups, namely, boys ineligible for free or reduced-price lunch (FRL), girls ineligible for FRL, boys eligible for FRL, and girls eligible for FRL.…

  9. Aptitude Treatment Effects of Laboratory Grouping Method for Students of Differing Reasoning Ability.

    Lawrenz, Frances

    1985-01-01

    Determined: (1) if elementary education majors (N=91) from different levels of reasoning ability learned more science concepts under different grouping methods in an inquiry/learning cycle-based physical science class; and (2) if these students became able to reason more effectively under the different grouping methods. (JN)

  10. Fluorescently tuned nitrogen-doped carbon dots from carbon source with different content of carboxyl groups

    In this study, fluorescent nitrogen-doped carbon dots (NCDs) were tuned via varying the sources with different number of carboxyl groups. Owing to the interaction between amino and carboxyl, more amino groups conjugate the surface of the NCDs by the source with more carboxyl groups. Fluorescent NCDs were tuned via varying the sources with different content of carboxyl groups. Correspondingly, the nitrogen content, fluorescence quantum yields and lifetime of NCDs increases with the content of carboxyl groups from the source. Furthermore, cytotoxicity assay and cell imaging test indicate that the resultant NCDs possess low cytotoxicity and excellent biocompatibility

  11. Fluorescently tuned nitrogen-doped carbon dots from carbon source with different content of carboxyl groups

    Wang, Hao; Wang, Yun; Dai, Xiao; Zou, Guifu, E-mail: kqzhang@suda.edu.cn, E-mail: zouguifu@suda.edu.cn [College of Physics, Optoelectronics and Energy and Collaborative Innovation Center of Suzhou Nano Science and Technology, Soochow University, Suzhou 215006 (China); Gao, Peng; Zhang, Ke-Qin, E-mail: kqzhang@suda.edu.cn, E-mail: zouguifu@suda.edu.cn; Du, Dezhuang [National Engineering Laboratory for Modern Silk, College of Textile and Clothing Engineering, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 (China); Guo, Jun [Testing and Analysis Center, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 (China)

    2015-08-01

    In this study, fluorescent nitrogen-doped carbon dots (NCDs) were tuned via varying the sources with different number of carboxyl groups. Owing to the interaction between amino and carboxyl, more amino groups conjugate the surface of the NCDs by the source with more carboxyl groups. Fluorescent NCDs were tuned via varying the sources with different content of carboxyl groups. Correspondingly, the nitrogen content, fluorescence quantum yields and lifetime of NCDs increases with the content of carboxyl groups from the source. Furthermore, cytotoxicity assay and cell imaging test indicate that the resultant NCDs possess low cytotoxicity and excellent biocompatibility.

  12. Do different groups have different risk factors for dieting and exercise as body management strategies?

    Behshid Garrusi; Mohammad Reza Baneshi; Fatemeh Amiri

    2012-01-01

    Aim – Body change strategies are activities that could be potentially harmful. Individuals may use different methods for achieving advertised ideal body. Some of demographic and psychosocial contributing factors could be affect decision regarding body management activities. In Iran there is a few research about this matter, therefore the aim of this study was exploring risk factors in body management. Materials and Methods – In this cross sectional study, 400 people participated that includin...

  13. A study on biochemical differences among five different groups of rice striped stem borer Chilo suppressalis Walker (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae

    A Zibaee

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Identification of biodiversity in different rice striped stem borer (Chilo supprressalis populations is very important to adopt suitable integrated pest management procedures. Larvae were collected from five different regions in north of Iran including Gourabzarmikh (Go, Sheikhmahaleh (Sh, Rasht (Ra, Amol (Am and Babol (Ba. Activity levels of five enzymes including alkaline phosphatase, alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, lactate dehydrogenase and alpha-amylase were evaluated in 4th instar larvae. In addition, five non-enzymatic compounds such as glucose, cholesterol, total protein, uric acid and urea were also measured. Amount of measured compounds showed significant differences in all groups except for alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase. Hierarchical agglomerative clustering under UPGMA model demonstrated that Ba population had the most genetic distance and was separated from other groups. In the second group, Go population had the most genetic distance from others and two groups of Ra and Sh had the least genetic distances.

  14. ICM cooling, AGN feedback and BCG properties of galaxy groups-Five properties where groups differ from clusters

    Bharadwaj, V; Schellenberger, G; Eckmiller, H J; Mittal, R; Israel, H

    2014-01-01

    Using Chandra data for a sample of 26 galaxy groups, we constrained the central cooling times (CCTs) of the ICM and classified the groups as strong cool-core (SCC), weak cool-core (WCC) and non-cool-core (NCC) based on their CCTs. The total radio luminosity of the brightest cluster galaxy (BCG) was obtained using radio catalog data and literature, which was compared to the CCT to understand the link between gas cooling and radio output. We determined K-band luminosities of the BCG with 2MASS data, and used it to constrain the masses of the SMBH, which were then compared to the radio output. We also tested for correlations between the BCG luminosity and the overall X-ray luminosity and mass of the group. The observed cool-core/non-cool-core fractions for groups are comparable to those of clusters. However, notable differences are seen. For clusters, all SCCs have a central temperature drop, but for groups, this is not the case as some SCCs have centrally rising temperature profiles. While for the cluster sampl...

  15. Cooperative learning in higher education: differences in the perception of the contribution to the group

    Jareño Cebrián, Francisco; Jiménez Moreno, Juan José; Lagos Rodríguez, Maria Gabriela

    2014-01-01

    This document analyses cooperative learning in a working group using a problem-based learning methodology. We also evaluate if the perception that each member of the group has of his/her contribution to cooperative learning is greater or lesser than that observed by his/her team-mates. Different elements of the work carried out in the group are analysed, such as the effective effort made, their participation, the organisation of the group, cohesion, communication, and the overall perceptio...

  16. Different leaders : emergent organizational and intellectual leadership in children’s collaborative learning groups.

    Mercier, E; Higgins, S; da Costa, L.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents two studies that examine emergent leadership in children’s collaborative learning groups. Building on research that finds that leadership moves are distributed among group members during learning activities, we examined whether there were patterns in the distribution of moves, resulting in different types of emergent leaders in groups. Study one examines individual groups working with a teacher, on the same task either with paper or multi-touch tables. Study two examines g...

  17. Antimicrobial resistance of fecal aerobic gram-negative bacilli in different age groups in a community.

    Leistevuo, T; Leistevuo, J; Osterblad, M; Arvola, T. (Timo); Toivonen, P; Klaukka, T; Lehtonen, A; Huovinen, P.

    1996-01-01

    We measured the occurrence of antimicrobial resistance in fecal aerobic gram-negative bacilli by age in community subjects. For none of the eight antimicrobial agents studied were there any statistically significant differences in the carriage rates of resistance in different age groups. Bacterial resistance was common in all age groups, including the children, and occurred for all antimicrobial agents tested.

  18. Job and organisations: explaining group level differences in job satisfaction in the banking sector

    Bart Cambré; Evelien Kippers; Marc van Veldhoven; Hans De Witte

    2012-01-01

    Purpose – This paper aims to contribute to the understanding of group level differences in job satisfaction. Specifically, the authors seek to understand the shared variance in job satisfaction at the group level of jobs within organisations, in a particular industrial sector. To explain differences in job satisfaction between groups, the authors examine the role of job characteristics, particularly as these are defined within the job‐demand‐control‐support model. Design/methodology/approach ...

  19. Optimisation of isolation methods for the azaspiracid group of marine biotoxins and the development of accurate and precise methods of analysis

    Kilcoyle, J.

    2015-01-01

    The two main groups of biotoxins which affect the Irish shellfish industry are azaspiracids (AZAs) and the okadaic acid (OA) group (OA, DTX2, DTX1 and their esters) toxins. Since AZAs were first identified in 1998, well over 30 analogues have been reported. Structural and toxicological data have been described for AZA1–5 (isolated from shellfish). LC-MS/MS is the EU reference method for detection of the AZAs (AZA1, -2 and -3) and the OA group toxins in raw shellfish with the regulatory limit ...

  20. Optimisation of Isolation Methods for the AZA Group of Marine Biotoxins and the Development of Accurate and Precise Methods of Analysis

    Kilcoyne, Jane

    2015-01-01

    The two main groups of biotoxins which affect the Irish shellfish industry are azaspiracids (AZAs) and the okadaic acid (OA) group (OA, DTX2, DTX1 and their esters) toxins. Since AZAs were first identified in 1998, well over 30 analogues have been reported. Structural and toxicological data have been described for AZA1–5 (isolated from shellfish). LC-MS/MS is the EU reference method for detection of the AZAs (AZA1, -2 and -3) and the OA group toxins in raw shellfish with the regulatory limit ...

  1. Clinical presentation of infective endocarditis caused by different groups of non-beta haemolytic streptococci.

    Nilson, B; Olaison, L; Rasmussen, M

    2016-02-01

    Streptococci are common causes of infective endocarditis (IE) and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) has provided a practical tool for their species determination. We aimed to investigate if particular groups of non-beta heamolytic streptococci were associated with IE or to specific presentations thereof. The Swedish Registry of Infective Endocarditis was used to identify cases of IE caused by streptococci and a local database to identify cases of streptococcal bacteremia. The bacteria were grouped using MALDI-TOF MS and the clinical characteristics of IE caused by different groups were compared. We identified a group of 201 streptococcal IE isolates: 18 isolates belonged to the anginosus, 19 to the bovis, 140 to the mitis, 17 to the mutans, and seven to the salivarius groups. The mitis and mutans groups were significantly more common and the anginosus group less common among IE cases as compared to all cause bacteremia. Patients infected with the bovis group isolates were older, had more cardiac devices, and had more commonly prosthetic valve IE compared to IE caused by streptococci of the other groups. Twenty-one percent of patients needed surgery, and in-hospital mortality was 8% with no significant differences between the groups. Grouping of non-beta haemolytic streptococci using MALDI-TOF MS can provide a basis for decision-making in streptococcal bacteremia. IE caused by bovis group isolates have clinical characteristics distinguishing them from IE caused by other groups of Streptococcus. PMID:26610338

  2. Differences in Conative Characteristics and Perceived Group Cohesion of the Basketball Players Playing in Different Positions in the Team

    Sindik, Joško; Nazor, Damir

    2011-01-01

    Identification of differences in individual conative characteristics and in perceived group cohesion of the basketball players playing in different positions in the team could provide guidelines for a better selection of basketball players and better coaching work. The aim of our study was to determine the differences in relation to the positions of guards and forwards/ centres, and the four major positions in the team. The final sample of subjects (74 basketball players) is selected...

  3. Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA) Profile of Modified Sba-15 at Different Amount of Alkoxy silane Group

    This study focused on meso porous silica SBA-15 modified with alkoxy silane functional group; phenyltriethoxysilane (PTES) and vinyltriethoxysilane (VTES) using direct synthesis and post-grafting methods. By direct synthesis method, SBA-15 template by triblock copolymer (P123) and functionalized with alkoxy silane groups at different amount of loadings were co-condensed with tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) under acidic conditions. As for post-grafting method, different loadings of alkoxy silane groups were added after co-condensation of TEOS with P123 template. Both synthesis methods used calcination process to remove surfactant template at 550 degree Celsius for 5 hours. The derivatized SBA-15 was characterized by thermogravimetric analysis to evaluate the profile at different loadings of alkoxy silane groups with different synthesis method. At temperature range of 300-800 degree Celsius, post-grafting method displayed the highest weight loss of phenyl and vinyl groups. However, there was no significant difference of weight loss for different amount of organo silane groups. In this study, TGA has shown to be significant characterization means to determine the effects of different method used in synthesizing modified SBA-15. It was shown that different loading of phenyl and vinyl groups did not affect the efficiency of surfactant removal. (author)

  4. Gender-Stereotyping and Cognitive Sex Differences in Mixed- and Same-Sex Groups

    Hirnstein, Marco; Andrews, Lisa Coloma; Hausmann, Markus

    2014-01-01

    Sex differences in specific cognitive abilities are well documented, but the biological, psychological, and sociocultural interactions that may underlie these differences are largely unknown. We examined within a biopsychosocial approach how gender stereotypes affect cognitive sex differences when adult participants were tested in mixed- or same-sex groups. A total of 136 participants (70 women) were allocated to either mixed- or same-sex groups and completed a battery of sex-sensitive cognit...

  5. Rotating vibration behavior of the turbine blades with different groups of blades

    Tsai, Gwo-Chung

    2004-04-01

    The rotating vibration behaviors of full cycle of 60 blades are studied in this report. The dynamic analysis of two different structures in one of which there are 10 groups of 6 blades and in the other 5 groups of 12 blades, is performed to investigate behavior deviation. In this research, the following jobs are considered: (1) collect the geometric dimensions and material properties of a single blade, (2) create the finite element model of a single blade, a group of 6 blades and 12 blades, and full cycle of 60 blades, (3) perform the vibration analyses of a single blade, a group of blades and a full circle of 60 blades, (4) perform the steady state stress analysis of the blade with different rotating speed; (5) get the Campbell diagram for the full circle of blades, and (6) make comparisons between a group of 6 blades and a group of 12 blades. The conclusions from the analyses are the following: (1) the contact elements are applied to groups of 6 and 12 blades systems and the highest stresses are observed at the location of the first neck of the blade root. These results completely agree very well with in-site observations. (2) The big differences were present in the Campbell diagram: resonant frequencies are observed in the first vibration group for the full system comprising the group of 6 blades and resonant frequencies are not found in the first vibration group of the full blade system made of the group of 12 blades. (3) The dynamic behavior of the full blade system comprised of a group of 6 blades was found much different from that of the full blade system made is of a group of 12 blades. (4) Excellent agreements for the vibration frequencies and mode shapes of a single blade and a full circle of blades are obtained between the FEA results and experimental data.

  6. Bumblebee workers from different sire groups vary in susceptibility to parasite infection

    Baer, Boris; Schmid-Hempel, Paul

    2003-01-01

    is so far only supported indirectly. Here we tested this crucial assumption using data from a study on the bumblebee Bombus terrestris L. with queens inseminated with sperm of either one or several males that originated from different sire groups (i.e. groups of brothers). We found that, under field...... conditions, workers from different sire groups, forming a patriline within a given colony, indeed differ in their susceptibility to the common intestinal parasite, Crithidia bombi, and do so independently of queen mating frequency....

  7. Comparison of Bleeding Time and Clotting Time in Different Blood Groups

    B. Mahapatra

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Researchers have demonstrated that epistaxis is more often encountered in patients having blood group O probably due to lower expression of von Willebrand factor. We had taken up this study to find out if there is any definite relationship between the blood groups with the bleeding time and clotting time in our population. Approach: This retrospective study was conducted in the department of physiology in our institution. The available detail reports of 740 students passing through 1st year of MBBS over the years from 1999-2007 were analyzed in respect of age, sex, blood groups, bleeding time and clotting time. The blood grouping was done with the standard antisera and bleeding time and clotting time were estimated by Duke method and capillary tube method respectively. Finally bleeding time and clotting time of different blood groups were compared and statistical analysis was done. Results: In present study population O group was found in more number of cases (37.8% than A, B and AB. Clotting time was found to be prolonged more than 6 min in maximum number of cases in B group (12.7 cases followed by A group (8 and O group (5.8 and AB group (4.3%. Similarly bleeding time was more than 4 min in AB group in 21.8 followed by 13.9 in group B, 10.5 in group A and 9.6% in group O. Conclusion: In present study population interestingly clotting time was more in blood group AB and bleeding time in blood group B than other blood groups which was statistically significant. Further study needed to correlate the association of this finding in cases of epistaxis and hemoptysis in our population.

  8. Relationships between different sets involving group and Drazin projectors and nonnegativity

    Herrero Debón, Alicia; Ramirez, Francisco J.; Thome, Néstor

    2013-01-01

    This paper deals with nonnegativity of matrices and their group or Drazin inverses. Firstly, the nonnegativity of a square matrix A, its group inverse A# and its group projector AA# is used to define different sets for which relationships and characterizations are given. Next, an extension of the previous results for index greater than 1 is presented. Similar sets are introduced and studied for Drazin inverses and Drazin projectors considering the core-nilpotent decomposition. In addition,...

  9. The causes of difficult tracheal intubation and preoperative assessments in different age groups

    Moon, Hyoung-Yong; Baek, Chong Wha; Kim, Jin-Seo; Koo, Gill Hoi; Kim, Jin-Yun; Woo, Young-Cheol; Jung, Yong Hun; Kang, Hyun; Shin, Hwa-Yong; Yang, So-Young

    2013-01-01

    Background We studied the differences in airway assessment factors among old, middle, and young age groups, and evaluated the frequency and causes of difficult intubation among these groups. Methods Patients were divided into young (< 40 yr, n = 75 ), middle (40-59 yr, n = 83), and old (≥ 60 yr, n = 89) group. Airway assessment factors such as head and neck movement, thyromental distance, interincisor gap, dentition, Mallampati score, and Arné score were assessed. After muscle relaxation, cer...

  10. Increasing the data size to accurately reconstruct the phylogenetic relationships between nine subgroups of the Drosophila melanogaster species group (Drosophilidae, Diptera).

    Yang, Yong; Hou, Zhuo-Cheng; Qian, Yuan-Huai; Kang, Han; Zeng, Qing-Tao

    2012-01-01

    Previous phylogenetic analyses of the melanogaster species group have led to conflicting hypotheses concerning their relationship; therefore the addition of new sequence data is necessary to discover the phylogeny of this species group. Here we present new data derived from 17 genes and representing 48 species to reconstruct the phylogeny of the melanogaster group. A variety of statistical tests, as well as maximum likelihood mapping analysis, were performed to estimate data quality, suggesting that all genes had a high degree of contribution to resolve the phylogeny. Individual locus was analyzed using maximum likelihood (ML), and the concatenated dataset (12,988 bp) were analyzed using partitioned maximum likelihood (ML) and Bayesian analyses. Separated analysis produced various phylogenetic relationships, however, phylogenetic topologies from ML and Bayesian analysis based on concatenated dataset, at the subgroup level, were completely identical to each other with high levels of support. Our results recovered three major clades: the ananassae subgroup, followed by the montium subgroup, the melanogaster subgroup and the oriental subgroups form the third monophyletic clade, in which melanogaster (takahashii, suzukii) forms one subclade and ficusphila [eugracilis (elegans, rhopaloa)] forms another. However, more data are necessary to determine the phylogenetic position of Drosophila lucipennis which proved difficult to place. PMID:21985965

  11. Aptitude treatment effects of laboratory grouping method for students of differing reasoning ability

    Lawrenz, Frances; Munch, Theodore W.

    This study examines aptitude treatment effects in an inquiry/learning cycle based physical science class for elementary education majors. The aptitude was formal reasoning ability and the students were arranged into three groups: high, middle, and low ability reasoners. The treatment was method of forming groups to work in the laboratory. Students in each of three classes were grouped according to reasoning ability. In one class the laboratory groups were homogeneous, i.e., students of similar reasoning ability were grouped together. In the second class the students were grouped heterogeneously, i.e., students of different reasoning ability were grouped together. In the third class, the student choice pattern, the students chose their own partners. The findings were that there were no aptitude treatment interaction for achievement or for gain in formal reasoning ability, that grouping students of similar cognitive ability together for laboratory work in the class was more effective in terms of science achievement than grouping students of differing cognitive ability together or than allowing students to choose their own partners, and that students at different levels of reasoning ability experienced differential gains in that ability over the semester.

  12. Variations of Weight of Prostate Gland in Different Age Groups of Bangladeshi Cadaver.

    Epsi, E Z; Khalil, M; Mannan, S; Azam, M S; Ahmed, Z; Farjan, S; Kabir, A; Ara, I; Ajmery, S; Zaman, U K; Amin, S

    2016-07-01

    Now a days, benign prostatic hyperplasia and carcinoma of the prostate are the most common disorders in men. A cross sectional descriptive study was conducted in Department of Anatomy, Mymensingh Medical College, Mymensingh to find out the difference in weight of the prostate gland of Bangladeshi people in relation to age. The present study was performed on 67 postmortem human prostate gland collected from the morgue in the Department of Forensic Medicine, Mymensingh Medical College by non random purposive sampling technique. The specimens were collected from Bangladeshi cadaver of age ranging from 10 to 80 years. All the specimens were grouped into three categories - Group A (upto 18 years), Group B (19 to 45 years) and Group C (above 45 years) according to age. Dissection was performed according to standard autopsy techniques. The weight of the prostate gland were measured and recorded. The mean weight of the prostate gland was 10.13gm in Group A, 17.27gm in Group B and 22.50gm in Group C. Variance analysis shows that mean differences of weight of the prostate were highly significant among all age groups. The weight of prostate gland was found to increase with increased age. For statistical analysis, differences between age groups were analyzed by using students unpaired 't' test. The present study will help to increase the information pool on the weight of prostate gland of Bangladeshi people. PMID:27612887

  13. Different Leaders: Emergent Organizational and Intellectual Leadership in Children's Collaborative Learning Groups

    Mercier, Emma M.; Higgins, Steven E.; da Costa, Laura

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents two studies that examine emergent leadership in children's collaborative learning groups. Building on research that finds that leadership moves are distributed among group members during learning activities, we examined whether there were patterns in the distribution of moves, resulting in different types of emergent…

  14. What Could Critical Mathematics Education Mean for Different Groups of Students?

    Skovsmose, Ole

    2016-01-01

    In this article I consider what critical mathematics education could mean for different groups of students. Much discussion and research has addressed students at social risk. My point, however, is that critical mathematics education concerns other groups as well: for example, students in comfortable positions, blind students, elderly students,…

  15. A simple, efficient, and high-order accurate curved sliding-mesh interface approach to spectral difference method on coupled rotating and stationary domains

    Zhang, Bin; Liang, Chunlei

    2015-08-01

    This paper presents a simple, efficient, and high-order accurate sliding-mesh interface approach to the spectral difference (SD) method. We demonstrate the approach by solving the two-dimensional compressible Navier-Stokes equations on quadrilateral grids. This approach is an extension of the straight mortar method originally designed for stationary domains [7,8]. Our sliding method creates curved dynamic mortars on sliding-mesh interfaces to couple rotating and stationary domains. On the nonconforming sliding-mesh interfaces, the related variables are first projected from cell faces to mortars to compute common fluxes, and then the common fluxes are projected back from the mortars to the cell faces to ensure conservation. To verify the spatial order of accuracy of the sliding-mesh spectral difference (SSD) method, both inviscid and viscous flow cases are tested. It is shown that the SSD method preserves the high-order accuracy of the SD method. Meanwhile, the SSD method is found to be very efficient in terms of computational cost. This novel sliding-mesh interface method is very suitable for parallel processing with domain decomposition. It can be applied to a wide range of problems, such as the hydrodynamics of marine propellers, the aerodynamics of rotorcraft, wind turbines, and oscillating wing power generators, etc.

  16. Analysis of changes of demographic parameters in different groups of Chernigiv region population

    To perform comparison of the changes in different social and age groups of the population of Chernigiv region, Kozeletsky district in particular, which was exposed to considerable radioactive contamination, during the recent 20 years (beginning from 1977). The Chernobyl accident together with social and other unfavorable factors caused negative demographic changes in the contaminated districts. Reduction in the number of different social groups of the population is expected

  17. Perception of teachers' behaviour, motivational beliefs and self-regulated learning in different adolescent age groups

    Melita Puklek Levpušček

    2001-01-01

    In the study we compared learning motivation, perception of learning self-efficacy and use of cognitive and metacognitive learning strategies in different age groups of adolescents. The aim of the study was also to find out if there are any differences in the perception of teachers' behaviour in classroom related to adolescents' age. We assumed that school represents an important microsystem, which influences the establishment of adolescent's learning self-regulation. Six groups o...

  18. Group cohesion in exercise classes: An examination of gender and type of exercise class differences

    Hülya Aşçı

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Group cohesion has been attributed to the higher levels of attendance and performance and lower levels of drop-outs in exercise classes. Cohesion can be affected by different type of exercise classes and gender. Therefore, the main purpose of the study was to compare the group cohesion levels of martial arts participants (aikido, taekwondo, karate, and kendo with aerobic-like participants (aerobics, aero-steps, phys-gym, and high-low aerobics. This causal comparative study also aimed at examining sex differences in group cohesion in exercise classes. There were 140 participants (Mage=28.1 SD= 8.01 and female= 138 male= 2 in aerobic-like classes and 137 participants (Mage= 22.2 SD= 3.8 and female= 48 male= 89 in martial arts classes. Results revealed no sex differences between the groups on the perceptions of cohesion. On the other hand, except for individual attractions to the group-task dimension, participants of martial art classes had higher levels of group cohesion than the participants of aerobic-like classes. Consequently, it was concluded that different types of exercise classes may have different levels of cohesion and those differences were discussed within the context of exercise classes.

  19. Group cohesion in exercise classes: An examination of gender and type of exercise class differences

    Selçuk Akpınar

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Group cohesion has been attributed to the higher levels of attendance and performance and lower levels of drop-outs in exercise classes. Cohesion can be affected by different type of exercise classes and gender. Therefore, the main purpose of the study was to compare the group cohesion levels of martial arts participants (aikido, taekwondo, karate, and kendo with aerobic-like participants (aerobics, aero-steps, phys-gym, and high-low aerobics. This causal comparative study also aimed at examining gender differences in group cohesion in exercise classes. There were 140 participants (Mage=28.1 SD= 8.01 and female= 138 male= 2 in aerobic-like classes and 137 participants (Mage= 22.2 SD= 3.8 and female= 48 male= 89 in martial arts classes. Results revealed no gender differences between the groups on the perceptions of cohesion. On the other hand, except for individual attractions to the group-task dimension, participants of martial art classes had higher levels of group cohesion than the participants of aerobic-like classes. Consequently, it was concluded that different types of exercise classes may have different levels of cohesion and those differences were discussed within the context of exercise classes. 

  20. Comparison of Hemagglutination and Hemolytic Activity of Various Bacterial Clinical Isolates Against Different Human Blood Groups.

    Hrv, Rajkumar; Devaki, Ramakrishna; Kandi, Venkataramana

    2016-01-01

    Among the various pathogenic determinants shown by microorganisms hemagglutination and hemolysin production assume greater significance in terms of laboratory identification. This study evaluated the hemagglutination and hemolytic activity of various bacterial isolates against different blood groups. One hundred and fifty bacterial strains, isolated from clinical specimens like urine, pus, blood, and other body fluids were tested for their hemagglutinating and hemolytic activity against human A, B, AB, and O group red blood cells. Among the 150 isolates 81 were Escherichia coli, 18 were Klebsiella pneumoniae, 19 were Pseudomonas aeruginosa, 10 were Pseudomonas spp, six were Proteus mirabilis, and the rest 16 were Staphylococcus aureus. Nearly 85% of the isolates agglutinated A group cells followed by B and AB group (59.3% and 60.6% respectively). Least number of isolates agglutinated O group cells (38.0%). When the hemolytic activity was tested, out of these 150 isolates 79 (52.6%) hemolyzed A group cells, 61 (40.6%) hemolyzed AB group cells, 46 (30.6%) hemolyzed B group cells, and 57 (38.6%) isolates hemolyzed O group cells. Forty-six percent of the isolates exhibited both hemagglutinating and hemolytic property against A group cells, followed by B and AB group cells (28.6% and 21.3% respectively). Least number of isolates i.e., 32 (21.3%) showed both the properties against O group cells. The isolates showed wide variation in their hemagglutination and hemolytic properties against different combinations of human blood group cells. The study highlights the importance of selection of the type of cells especially when human RBCs are used for studying the hemagglutination and hemolytic activity of bacterial isolates because these two properties are considered as characteristic of pathogenic strains. PMID:27014523

  1. Clinical-anthropometric characteristics of COPD outpatients belonging to the different groups and having different severity of airway obstruction

    Gashynova K.Y.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to compare the clinical and anthropometric characteristics of patients with COPD, which differ in the degree of airways obstruction and belong to groups A, B, C, D in accordance with GOLD, 2011 classification. A total of 112 ambulatory COPD patients in remission made the study sample. Anthropometric data, body mass index, medical history, dyspnea by mMRC scale, and spirometry was performed for all patients. There was confirmed that outpatients with COPD is a heterogeneous group, in which the majority are those with moderate (48.22 % and severe (30.36 %, airway obstruction. Despite the vast majority of men among outpatients, the percentage of women among patients with mild to moderate obstruction (22.58±5.31 % was significantly higher (p=0.002 as compared with those with severe or very severe limitation of airflow (6.00±3.36 %. Patients with severe and very severe obstruction were of significantly older age (p = 0.024. At the same time, the distribution of patients according to the GOLD, 2011 classification, demonstrate that all groups did not differ on any of the anthropometric indicators, including gender and age (p > 0.050. Distribution of patients by groups with different risk for future exacerbations is not a mirror image of gradation in accordance with the degree of airway obstruction. Every second (50.00±4.43 % of cases patient is included in group C and every tenth (10.20±4.32 % belongs to the group D not due to degree of bronchial obstruction, but due to the number of exa­cerbations in the past year. Therefore, in future studies it is advisable to use both principles of patients’ classification.

  2. The applicability of measures of socioeconomic position to different ethnic groups within the UK

    Lambert Helen

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In this paper we seek to tease out differences in socioeconomic position between ethnic groups. There are 3 main reasons why conventional socioeconomic indicators and asset based measures may not be equally applicable to all ethnic groups: 1 Differences in response rate to conventional socioeconomic indicators 2 Cultural and social differences in economic priorities/opportunities 3 Differences in housing quality, assets and debt within socioeconomic strata Methods The sample consisted of White (n = 227, African-Caribbean (n = 213 and Indian and Pakistani (n = 233 adults aged between 18 and 59 years living in Leeds as measured in a stratified population survey. Measures included income, education, employment, car ownership, home ownership, housing quality, household assets, investments, debt, perceived ability to obtain various sums and perceived level of financial support given and received. Results Response rates to education and income questions were similar for the different ethnic groups. Overall response rates for income were much lower than those for education and biased towards wealthier people. There were differences between ethnic groups in economic priorities/opportunities particularly in relation to car ownership, home ownership, investment and debt. Differences in living conditions, household assets and debt between ethnic groups were dependent on differences in education; however differences in car ownership, home ownership, ability to obtain £10 000, and loaning money to family/friends and income from employment/self employment persisted after adjustment for education. Conclusion In the UK, education appears to be an effective variable for measuring variation in SEP across ethnic groups but the ability to account for SEP differences may be improved by the addition of car and home ownership, ability to obtain £10 000, loaning money to family/friends and income from employment/self employment. Further research

  3. PredictSNP2: A Unified Platform for Accurately Evaluating SNP Effects by Exploiting the Different Characteristics of Variants in Distinct Genomic Regions.

    Bendl, Jaroslav; Musil, Miloš; Štourač, Jan; Zendulka, Jaroslav; Damborský, Jiří; Brezovský, Jan

    2016-05-01

    An important message taken from human genome sequencing projects is that the human population exhibits approximately 99.9% genetic similarity. Variations in the remaining parts of the genome determine our identity, trace our history and reveal our heritage. The precise delineation of phenotypically causal variants plays a key role in providing accurate personalized diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment of inherited diseases. Several computational methods for achieving such delineation have been reported recently. However, their ability to pinpoint potentially deleterious variants is limited by the fact that their mechanisms of prediction do not account for the existence of different categories of variants. Consequently, their output is biased towards the variant categories that are most strongly represented in the variant databases. Moreover, most such methods provide numeric scores but not binary predictions of the deleteriousness of variants or confidence scores that would be more easily understood by users. We have constructed three datasets covering different types of disease-related variants, which were divided across five categories: (i) regulatory, (ii) splicing, (iii) missense, (iv) synonymous, and (v) nonsense variants. These datasets were used to develop category-optimal decision thresholds and to evaluate six tools for variant prioritization: CADD, DANN, FATHMM, FitCons, FunSeq2 and GWAVA. This evaluation revealed some important advantages of the category-based approach. The results obtained with the five best-performing tools were then combined into a consensus score. Additional comparative analyses showed that in the case of missense variations, protein-based predictors perform better than DNA sequence-based predictors. A user-friendly web interface was developed that provides easy access to the five tools' predictions, and their consensus scores, in a user-understandable format tailored to the specific features of different categories of variations. To

  4. An accurate determination of human grawth hormone content in different pituitary extracts, using a radioimmunoassay with polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis as a bound-free separation system

    Human growth hormone was extracted and purified according to the method of Roos et al. A first control of its purification and integrity was performed through molecular weight determination by gel filtration on Sephadex G-100 and on plyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE). Its biological activity was confirmed by the growth promoted in non-hypophysectomized rats at plateau. The main object, however, was the setting up of an accurate, reproducible method that could furnish the more absolute and comparable value of rafioimmunoassayable HGH content in perfect agreement with the results obtained by other laboratories. This was accomplished through a radioimmunoassay system that uses HGH labelled with 125I, where the separation of the bound from the free antigen is achieved on polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, by a modification introduced in the original method of Davis. The resulting values, extremely close to that stated by the KABI-Laboratories (Stockolm), through obtained in quite different conditions of incubation, antibody concentration and with no use of second antibody, represent a confident approach to a comparable measure of this hormone in extract, which can also be applied to plasma determinations

  5. Stable, high-order SBP-SAT finite difference operators to enable accurate simulation of compressible turbulent flows on curvilinear grids, with application to predicting turbulent jet noise

    Byun, Jaeseung; Bodony, Daniel; Pantano, Carlos

    2014-11-01

    Improved order-of-accuracy discretizations often require careful consideration of their numerical stability. We report on new high-order finite difference schemes using Summation-By-Parts (SBP) operators along with the Simultaneous-Approximation-Terms (SAT) boundary condition treatment for first and second-order spatial derivatives with variable coefficients. In particular, we present a highly accurate operator for SBP-SAT-based approximations of second-order derivatives with variable coefficients for Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions. These terms are responsible for approximating the physical dissipation of kinetic and thermal energy in a simulation, and contain grid metrics when the grid is curvilinear. Analysis using the Laplace transform method shows that strong stability is ensured with Dirichlet boundary conditions while weaker stability is obtained for Neumann boundary conditions. Furthermore, the benefits of the scheme is shown in the direct numerical simulation (DNS) of a Mach 1.5 compressible turbulent supersonic jet using curvilinear grids and skew-symmetric discretization. Particularly, we show that the improved methods allow minimization of the numerical filter often employed in these simulations and we discuss the qualities of the simulation.

  6. The Comparison of Different Age Groups on the Attitudes toward and the Use of ICT

    Kubiatko, Milan

    2013-01-01

    Different factors may be influencing the use of information and communication technology (ICT). One of the important factors is age. The society is divided into different groups according to age. A well-known age-based categorization, commonly used especially in the field of economics,, is based on whether people belong to the Millennial…

  7. The use and risk of portable electronic devices while cycling among different age groups.

    Goldenbeld, C. Houtenbos, M. Ehlers, E. & Waard, D. de

    2012-01-01

    In The Netherlands, a survey was set up to monitor the extent of the use of portable, electronic devices while cycling amongst different age groups of cyclists and to estimate the possible consequences for safety. The main research questions concerned age differences in the self-reported use of elec

  8. The use and risk of portable electronic devices while cycling among different age groups

    Goldenbeld, C.; Houtenbos, M.; Ehlers, E.; De Waard, D.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: In the Netherlands, a survey was set up to monitor the extent of the use of portable, electronic devices while cycling amongst different age groups of cyclists and to estimate the possible consequences for safety. Method: The main research questions concerned age differences in the sel

  9. Clinical and immunological characteristics of hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome in women of different age groups

    Kutdusova A.M.

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the clinical and immunological features of the hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome in women of different age groups. Materials and methods: Clinical and laboratory characteristics of hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome in 148 women aged 17 to 65 years old have been investigated. Patients have been divided into two groups: group I included 101 patients with normal menstrual rhythm, group II included 47 female patients with menopause. In 57 women (36 from group I, 21 — from group II the content of CD3+, CD4+, CD8+, CD16+, CD19+ — sub-populations of peripheral blood lymphocytes has been determined. Results: In compared groups significant differences in structure and frequency of complications of the disease have been revealed. Unidirectional tendency to increase significantly reduced absolute rates of investigated lymphocyte subpopulations in dynamics of the disease has been identified. It also has been stated that by the time of early convalescence in case of severe form of HFRS the indices did not reach the standard level. In an older group of women deeper damage and long-term recovery of immune system have been marked. Conclusion: According to the results of clinical and immunological studies the research work has revealed that in young women the response of the immune system to HFRS has developed faster and stronger than that in patients during the menopause period.

  10. Occupational differences in work engagement: A longitudinal study among eight occupational groups in Norway.

    Innstrand, Siw Tone

    2016-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to explore occupational differences in the experience of engagement both with regard to differences in the level of work engagement as well as in the predicting value of different antecedent variables. Multigroup latent mean analysis was performed on eight different occupational groups in Norway (lawyers, physicians, nurses, teachers, church ministers, bus drivers, and people working in advertising and information technology; N = 3,475). Tests for factorial invariance supported the use of the Oldenburg Burnout Inventory scale across occupational groups and that the latent means were comparable across the groups. Results indicated significant occupational differences in the experience of vigor and dedication. The lawyers reported the most vigor and the church ministers the most dedication. Least vigor was reported among the teachers and the advertising group reported to be least dedicated. Cross-lagged multigroup structural equation modeling (SEM) analysis suggested there are different processes behind the development of engagement across occupations. Visualization of how some occupations cluster or differ from each other is important as it might engender theory building and further hypotheses testing. PMID:27263496

  11. Sex differences among Swedish adolescents in mother-child relationships in the intake of different food groups.

    Vågstrand, Karin

    2010-04-01

    The present study has explored mother-child relationships in the intake of different food groups and the sex differences in these relationships. A population-based sample of 471 mother-child pairs from Stockholm completed a dietary questionnaire to assess habitual dietary intake. Girls showed overall stronger correlations with their mothers' diet than boys did. The strongest correlations found, in both girls and boys, were for the intakes of fruit juice and sweet bakery goods (r 0.30-0.37, P cereals was the only food group with a significant sex interaction (P = 0.01; mothers-girls, r 0.30, P protein, P = 0.001; fat, P = 0.004; carbohydrates, P = 0.001). Mothers and daughters (r 0.29, P percentage of energy) of different food groups. Since teenaged children have a similar intake of especially snack foods as their mothers, it could be meaningful to educate mothers when aiming at improving the diet of teenaged children, both boys and girls. PMID:20096142

  12. Dynamics of hormonal status in women of different age groups in hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome

    Murzabaeva R.Т.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the hormonal parameters in women of different age groups in hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome. Materials and methods: We have studied the content of cortisol, thyrotropic hormone (TTH, triiodothyro-nine (T3, free thyroxin (FT4, luteinizing hormone (LH, follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH, testosterone, estradiol, progesterone, prolactin in blood serum of 62 women with moderate (33 and severe (29 HFRS forms age (17-62. They were divided into 2 groups: the first group (33 patients women with the normal menstrual cycle, the second group (29 women consisted of patients in climacteric period. Results: TTH secretion increase, T3 and FT4 — decrease with their normalization to the recovery period were registered in the thyroid system of the compared groups. Blood cortisol level was high during the illness. Gonadotropic hypophysis function study demonstrated that LH and blood prolactin concentrations were increased since oliguria period; FSH was authentic reduced. The indices of these hormones were restored to the normal level by the reconvalescence period. LH and FSH contents were authentic higher in women of the second group in comparison with the first group. The hyperprolactinemia was observed in both women groups during the whole period of disease. The increased progesterone and testosterone concentrations have been manifested in blood serum. The estradiol concentration had different direction tendencies. Conclusion: Thus, the complex study of hypophysic- thyreoid and gonadotropic hormone state of adrenal system and the sexual hormone levels in women of different age groups in HFRS revealed the hormone status indces changes due to the period and severity of the disease, connected with the virus action, intoxication, the general inflammation reactions and their age.

  13. The adequacy of different robust statistical tests in comparing two independent groups

    Peró, Maribel; Guàrdia Olmos, Joan

    2013-01-01

    In the current study, we evaluated various robust statistical methods for comparing two independent groups. Two scenarios for simulation were generated: one of equality and another of population mean differences. In each of the scenarios, 33 experimental conditions were used as a function of sample size, standard deviation and asymmetry. For each condition, 5000 replications per group were generated. The results obtained by this study show an adequate type error I rate but not a high power fo...

  14. Endoparasite prevalence and recurrence across different age groups of dogs and cats

    Gates, Maureen C.; Nolan, Thomas J.

    2009-01-01

    The apparent prevalence of endoparasite infections across different age groups was calculated from 6,555 dogs and 1,566 cats that had a fecal examination performed upon presentation to the Veterinary Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania between 1997 and 2007. Based on notations from the medical history indicating prior parasite infections, estimates of recurrence were generated for each common group of parasites, including Trichuris, Giardia, ascarids, hookworms, Cystoisospora, and tape...

  15. Parameter identification and synchronization for uncertain network group with different structures

    Li, Chengren; Lü, Ling; Sun, Ying; Wang, Ying; Wang, Wenjun; Sun, Ao

    2016-09-01

    We design a novel synchronization technique to research the synchronization of network group constituted of uncertain networks with different structures. Based on Lyapunov theorem, the selection principles of the control inputs and the parameter identification laws of the networks are determined, and synchronization conditions of the network group are obtained. Some numerical simulations are provided to verify the correctness and effectiveness of the synchronization technique. We find that the network number, the number of network nodes and network connections indeed will not affect the stability of synchronization of network group.

  16. Production and reproduction of egg- and meat-type quails reared in different group sizes

    TC Santos; AE Murakami; JC Fanhani; CAL Oliveira

    2011-01-01

    Egg- and meat-type quails were reared in groups of different sizes with a fixed female-to-male ratio of 2 to 1 and an area of 158 cm² per bird. The aim was to investigate the influence of group size on quail production and reproductive variables. To this end, 360 quails (180 meat and 180 egg-type quails) were assigned in a completely randomized experimental design to one of three treatments with ten replicates each. The treatments consisted of groups with nine, six, or three quails per cage. ...

  17. Anthropometric difference of the knee on MRI according to gender and age groups.

    Han, Hyuksoo; Oh, Sohee; Chang, Chong Bum; Kang, Seung-Baik

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the anthropometric data from MRI images that were obtained from the non-arthritic knees in Asian adults, and to identify the existence of morphologic differences between age groups. This cross-sectional study included knee MR images of 535 patients (273 males, 262 females) taken for the evaluation of soft-tissue injuries, excluding cases with cartilage defect and malalignment. The age, gender, height, and BMI were also assessed. The patients were grouped into three different 20-year age groups (20-39, 40-59, and 60-79). The MRI analysis was performed on the anthropometric parameters of distal femur and posterior tibial slope. Age-related differences were found in femoral width, distance from the distal and posterior cartilage surface to the medial/lateral epicondyle, medial posterior condylar offset (PCO), and posterior condylar angle (PCA) (all P < 0.001), but not in lateral PCO, and medial/lateral tibial slopes. In the analysis of covariance analyses, significant interaction between gender and age groups was found in most parameters, but not in PCA, distance from the posterior cartilage surface to the medial epicondyle, or medial tibial slope. We found anthropometric differences among age groups exist in most of distal femoral parameters, but not in posterior tibial slope. The results of this study can be used by manufacturers to modify prostheses to be suitable for the future Asian elderly population. PMID:26253858

  18. Subtle cytotoxicity and genotoxicity differences in superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles coated with various functional groups

    Hong SC

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Seong Cheol Hong1,*, Jong Ho Lee1,*, Jaewook Lee1, Hyeon Yong Kim1, Jung Youn Park2, Johann Cho3, Jaebeom Lee1, Dong-Wook Han11Department of Nanomedical Engineering, BK21 Nano Fusion Technology Division, College of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Pusan National University, 2Department of Biotechnology Research, National Fisheries Research and Development Institute, Busan, 3Electronic Materials Lab, Samsung Corning Precision Materials Co, Ltd, Gumi City, Gyeongsangbukdo, Korea*These authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs have been widely utilized for the diagnosis and therapy of specific diseases, as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI contrast agents and drug-delivery carriers, due to their easy transportation to targeted areas by an external magnetic field. For such biomedical applications, SPIONs must have multifunctional characteristics, including optimized size and modified surface. However, the biofunctionality and biocompatibility of SPIONs with various surface functional groups of different sizes have yet to be elucidated clearly. Therefore, it is important to carefully monitor the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of SPIONs that are surfaced-modified with various functional groups of different sizes. In this study, we evaluated SPIONs with diameters of approximately 10 nm and 100~150 nm, containing different surface functional groups. SPIONs were covered with –O-groups, so-called bare SPIONs. Following this, they were modified with three different functional groups – hydroxyl (–OH, carboxylic (–COOH, and amine (–NH2 groups – by coating their surfaces with tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS, (3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane (APTMS, TEOS-APTMS, or citrate, which imparted different surface charges and sizes to the particles. The effects of SPIONs coated with these functional groups on mitochondrial activity, intracellular accumulation of reactive oxygen species, membrane integrity

  19. Child mental health differences amongst ethnic groups in Britain: a systematic review

    Leon David A

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inter-ethnic differences have been reported for many mental health outcomes in the UK, but no systematic review on child mental health has been published. The aim of this review is to compare the population-based prevalence of child mental disorders between ethnic groups in Britain, and relate these findings to ethnic differences in mental health service use. Methods A systematic search of bibliographic databases for population-based and clinic-based studies of children aged 0–19, including all ethnic groups and the main child mental disorders. We synthesised findings by comparing each minority group to the White British study sample. Results 31 population-based and 18 clinic-based studies met the inclusion criteria. Children in the main minority groups have similar or better mental health than White British children for common disorders, but may have higher rates for some less common conditions. The causes of these differences are unclear. There may be unmet need for services among Pakistani and Bangladeshi children. Conclusion Inter-ethnic differences exist but are largely unexplained. Future studies should address the challenges of cross-cultural psychiatry and investigate reasons for inter-ethnic differences.

  20. Stroke risk factors and subtypes in different age groups: A hospital-based study

    Wu Chih-Ying

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: To compare the influence of stroke risk factors between different stroke types and age groups in Taiwan. Materials and Methods: During the study period, March 2007 to August 2008, 1,161 patients with acute ischemic stroke were admitted to the neurological ward. All the patients had risk factors work up and stroke subtype categorization. Results: The study cohort included 736 men and 425 women. Patients were grouped into three age groups: below 50 years (153, 13.2%; 50-75 years, (702, 60.5% and above 75 years (306, 26.4%. Stroke subtypes included: (1 large-artery atherosclerosis (14.6%, cardioembolism (12%, small-artery occlusion (39.4%, stroke of other determined etiology (1.5% and stroke of undetermined etiology (32.6%. Older patient group had higher frequency of hypertension and diabetes mellitus. Younger age group of patients had high frequency of obesity and elevated serum triglyceride levels. Smoking and alcohol consumption were strongly related to men, and heart disease and obesity were related to women. Conclusions: The influence of risk factors at different ages is different. Awareness of the stroke risk factors before stroke and treatment with appropriate therapies or life modifications may have a bearing on the outcomes.

  1. Sexual peculiarities of lymphoid formations in trachea and bronchi of individuals of different age groups

    V.B. Shadlinsky; B.M. Guseynov

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the investigation is to study the sexual peculiarities of lymphoid formations in trachea and bronchi of individuals of different age groups. The lymphoid apparatus of trachea and bronchi has been studied. taken from 58 humans of different age and both sexes, died or perished in accidents without pathologies of respiratory and immune systems was studied via microscopical methods. The trachea and bronchi principalis were fixated in 10% solution of formalin and in water Karnua. The lo...

  2. Personality, sensation seeking and motivation differences between high and low risk volunteer groups

    Graham, Sonja

    2006-01-01

    Volunteers fill a large variety of important roles in society, roles which differ substantially depending on the nature of the job. The majority of current literature focuses on the personality traits and motivations that serve to distinguish volunteers as a whole from the general population. Acknowledging this, the present study examines differences within the volunteer population, comparing two volunteer groups with roles deemed either high or low personal risk, on measures o...

  3. Structural and functional changes of face and neck skin in women of different age groups

    Makarchuk O.I.

    2008-01-01

    To define structural and functional changes of skin in women of different age groups and their relationships in this work intraoperational biopsy material of skin of 100 women at the age from 19 to 73 years, that was taken during standard surgery instrumentations for different defects of face and neck skin correction, was investigated. Skin material of cheek face region, temple region of head and anterior neck region was morphologically processed. To define parameters of microvessels and derm...

  4. The use and risk of portable electronic devices while cycling among different age groups.

    Goldenbeld, C. & Houtenbos, M.

    2012-01-01

    In The Netherlands, a survey was set up to monitor the extent of the use of portable, electronic devices while cycling amongst different age groups of cyclists and to estimate the possible consequences for safety. The main research questions concerned age differences in the self-reported use of electronic devices while cycling, self-reported crash involvement and risk, and self-reported compensatory behaviour. Teen cyclists (12-17 years) and young adult cyclists (18-34 years) were more freque...

  5. Grouping Normal Type Ia Supernovae by UV to Optical Color Differences

    Milne, Peter A; Roming, Peter W A; Bufano, Filomena; Gehrels, Neil

    2013-01-01

    Observations of many SNe Ia with the UVOT instrument on the Swift satellite has revealed that there exists order to the differences in the UV-OPT colors of normal SNe. We examine UV-OPT color curves for 25 SNe Ia, dividing them into 4 groups, finding that ~1/3 of these SNe Ia have bluer UV-OPT colors than the larger group, with these "NUV-blue" SNe Ia 0.4 mag bluer than the "NUV-red" SNe Ia in u-v. Another group of events feature colors similar to NUV-red SNe Ia in the u-v to uvw1-v colors, but similar to the NUV-blue SNe Ia in the uvm2-v color. We name these events "MUV-blue". The last group initially has colors similar to NUV-red SNe Ia, but with color curves that feature more modest changes than the larger NUV-red group. These "irregular" events are comprised of all the NUV-red events with the broadest optical peaks, which leads us to consider this minor group a subset of the NUV-red group. When so separated and the accounting is made for the rapid time evolution of the UV-OPT colors, we find that the scat...

  6. Analysis of human hair cross sections from two different population groups by Nuclear Microscopy

    Trace element analysis of hair is used as a screening technique to assess body-nutrient levels and/or toxicity due to environmental pollutants. With the aim to compare element content and spatial distribution within scalp hair-shaft cross sections of two distinct human population groups, and to assess possible similarities and/or differences, hair samples from Sudan and South Africa were collected. Proton backscattering and Micro-PIXE were used to determine the matrix composition and content of light and middle transition elements, with beam energies of 1.5 and 3.0 MeV. Mapping analysis showed a relatively similar content distribution for S, Cl, K and Ca within each group. However significant differences, particularly for heavier metals, such as Fe and Zn were also found. Correspondence Analysis of the data showed a clear separation between the two groups when the total content over the hair cross section was considered.

  7. Duration distributions for different softness groups of gamma-ray bursts

    Qinx, Y -P; Fan, J H; Su, C -Y; Lu, R -J

    2010-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are divided into two classes according to their durations. We investigate if the softness of bursts plays a role in the conventional classification of the objects. We employ the BATSE (Burst and Transient Source Experiment) catalog and analyze the duration distributions of different groups of GRBs associated with distinct softness. Our analysis reveals that the conventional classification of GRBs with the duration of bursts is influenced by the softness of the objects. There exits a bimodality in the duration distribution of GRBs for each group of bursts and the time position of the dip in the bimodality histogram shifts with the softness parameter. Our findings suggest that the conventional classification scheme should be modified by separating the two well-known populations in different softness groups, which would be more reasonable than doing so with a single sample. According to the relation between the dip position and the softness parameter, we get an empirical function that can...

  8. Skin color and makeup strategies of women from different ethnic groups.

    Caisey, L; Grangeat, F; Lemasson, A; Talabot, J; Voirin, A

    2006-12-01

    The development of a world-wide makeup foundation range requires a thorough understanding of skin color features of women around the world. To understand the cosmetic needs of women from different ethnic groups, we measured skin color in five different groups (French and American Caucasian, Japanese, African-American, and Hispanic-American) and compared the data obtained with women's self-perception of skin color, before or after applying their usual foundation product. Skin color was measured using a spectro-radiometer and a spheric lighting device with CCD camera ensuring a highly reliable imaging and data acquisition. The diversity of skin types involved in the study lead to define a large, continuous color space where color spectra from various ethnic groups overlap. Three types of complexion - dark, medium, or light - were distinguished in each group. Only Japanese women did not identify with this lightness scale and considered it makes more sense to classify their skin according to a pink-ocher-beige color scale. The approach however revealed the great variety of skin colors within each ethnic group and the extent of unevenness. A fairly good agreement appeared between women's self-perception and data from color measurements but in Hispanic-American group. Data recorded, after foundation was applied, showed overall consistency with makeup strategy as described by volunteers except for the latter group whose approach looked more uncertain and variable. The findings of the study demonstrate the advantage of combining qualitative and quantitative approach for assessing the cosmetic needs and expectations of women from different ethnic origin and cultural background. PMID:18489287

  9. Does the EDI Measure School Readiness in the Same Way across Different Groups of Children?

    Guhn, Martin; Gadermann, Anne; Zumbo, Bruno D.

    2007-01-01

    The present study investigates whether the Early Development Instrument (Offord & Janus, 1999) measures school readiness similarly across different groups of children. We employ ordinal logistic regression to investigate differential item functioning, a method of examining measurement bias. For 40,000 children, our analysis compares groups…

  10. Big Five personality group differences across academic majors: A systematic review

    Vedel, Anna

    2016-01-01

    on Conscientiousness. Effect sizes were calculated to estimate the magnitude of the personality group differences. These effect sizes were consistent across studies comparing similar pairs of academic majors. For all Big Five personality traits medium effect sizes were found frequently, and for Openness even large...

  11. Radio vs. Television: Their Cognitive Impact on Children of Different Socioeconomic and Ethnic Groups.

    Greenfield, Patricia; Beagles-Roos, Jessica

    1988-01-01

    Reports on two studies which compared the impact of radio and television on children from different social classes and ethnic groups. Found that radio was more stimulating than television to the imagination (especially among white children) and that television led to greater overall recall of information. (ARH)

  12. Multicultural Contacts in Education: A Case Study of an Exchange Project between Different Ethnic Groups

    Schuitema, Jaap; Veugelers, Wiel

    2011-01-01

    One important aim of citizenship education is learning to deal with cultural diversity. To this end, schools organise exchange projects to bring students into contact with different social and cultural groups. The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of intergroup contact in educational settings and to understand what the most…

  13. Adult Age, Gender, and Race Group Differences in Images of Aging

    Foos, Paul W.; Clark, M. Cherie; Terrell, Debra F.

    2006-01-01

    Younger and older African American and Caucasian American adults, who were matched by age ("M" age = 40.63 years), completed a survey on perceptions of aging and subjective age. The 2 groups did not differ in the age they considered someone to be old ("M" age = 74.5 years). However, when asked which age was the happiest age, African Americans…

  14. A Resource File for Social Studies in Utah. Level 4: Living in Groups in Differing Environments.

    Utah State Office of Education, Salt Lake City.

    This resource file contains information for Utah elementary school teachers to help their level 4 students meet the state's instructional objectives in the social studies. This particular student level emphasizes living in groups in differing environments. The following disciplines are covered in the resource file: psychology, anthropology,…

  15. The effect of interventions on Twitter in four target groups using different measures of influence

    Maanen, P.P. van; Wijn, R.; Boertjes, E.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, the influence of interventions on Twitter users is studied. We define influence in (a) number of participants, (b) size of the audience, (c) amount of activity, and (d) reach. Influence is studied for four different target groups: (a) politicians, (b) journalists, (c) employees and (d

  16. Polonioum 210 levels in urine of different groups of italian population

    Samples of urine obtained from different groups of the italian population has been analized to determine the content of polonium-210. The analysis has been carried out with samples from people with high probability of exposure to radon and hits daughters

  17. Experiential Learning Methods, Simulation Complexity and Their Effects on Different Target Groups

    Kluge, Annette

    2007-01-01

    This article empirically supports the thesis that there is no clear and unequivocal argument in favor of simulations and experiential learning. Instead the effectiveness of simulation-based learning methods depends strongly on the target group's characteristics. Two methods of supporting experiential learning are compared in two different complex…

  18. Population aspects of formation of gastroenterological pathology in patients of different age groups

    Chernenkov Yu.V.

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Process of development of the most important forms of pathology of the digestive organs among people of different ages has been analyzed in a large industrial center for sixteen years. The age groups liable to gastroenterological pathology have been identified under conditions of social stress

  19. Towards Better Group Work: Seeing the Difference between Cooperation and Collaboration

    Kozar, Olga

    2010-01-01

    The author argues that being unaware of the differences between cooperation and collaboration impedes teachers from organizing group work as effectively as possible. True collaboration is simply too valuable not to take advantage of because it provides students with a significant opportunity to learn from one another, negotiate meaning, and…

  20. Job search and the theory of planned behavior: Minority – majority group differences in The Netherlands

    E.A.J. van Hooft (Edwin); M.Ph. Born (Marise); T.W. Taris (Toon); H. van der Flier (Henk)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractThe labor market in many Western countries increasingly diversifies. However, little is known about job search behavior of 'non-traditional' applicants such as ethnic minorities. This study investigated minority – majority group differences in the predictors of job search behavior, using

  1. Dynamics of telomere length in different age groups in a Latvian population.

    Zole, Egija; Pliss, Liana; Ranka, Renate; Krumina, Astrida; Baumanis, Viesturs

    2013-12-01

    The shortening of telomeres with ageing is a well-documented observation; however, the reported number of nucleotides in telomeres varies between different laboratories and studies. Such variability is likely caused by ethnic differences between the populations studied. Until now, there were no studies that investigated the variability of telomere length in a senescent Latvian population of the most common mitochondrial haplogroups, defined as H (45%), U (25%), Y chromosomal N1c (40%) and R1a1 (40%). Telomere length was determined in 121 individuals in different age groups, including a control group containing individuals of 20-40 years old and groups of individuals between 60-70 years old, 71-80 years old, 81-90 years old, and above 90 years old. Telomere length was determined using the Southern blot telomeric restriction fragment assay (TRF). Decreased telomere length with ageing was confirmed, but a comparison of centenarians and individuals between 60-90 years of age did not demonstrate a significant difference in telomere length. However, significant variability in telomere length was observed in the control group, indicating probable rapid telomere shortening in some individuals that could lead up to development of health status decline appearing with ageing. Telomere length measured in mononuclear blood cells (MNC) was compared with the telomere length measured in whole peripheral white blood cells (WBC) using TRF. Telomere length in MNC was longer than in WBC for the control group with individuals 20 to 40 years old; in contrast, for the group of individuals aged 65 to 85 years old, measured telomere length was shorter in MNC when compared to WBC. PMID:23919820

  2. Larger mitochondrial DNA than Y-chromosome differences between matrilocal and patrilocal groups from Sumatra.

    Gunnarsdóttir, Ellen Dröfn; Nandineni, Madhusudan R; Li, Mingkun; Myles, Sean; Gil, David; Pakendorf, Brigitte; Stoneking, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Genetic differences between human populations are typically larger for the Y-chromosome than for mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), which has been attributed to the ubiquity of patrilocality across human cultures. However, this claim has been disputed, and previous analyses of matrilocal groups give conflicting results. Here we analyse mtDNA variation (complete mtDNA genome sequences via next-generation sequencing) and non-recombining regions of the Y-chromosome variation (Y-single-nucleotide-polymorphisms and Y-short-tandem-repeats (STR)) in a matrilocal group (the Semende) and a patrilocal group (the Besemah) from Sumatra. We find in the Semende significantly lower mtDNA diversity than in the Besemah as expected for matrilocal groups, but unexpectedly we find no difference in Y-chromosome diversity between the groups. We highlight the importance of using complete mtDNA sequences for such analyses, as using only partial sequences (as done in previous studies) can give misleading results. PMID:21407194

  3. The relationship between personality traits and anxiety/depression levels in different drug abusers' groups

    Tatalović Vorkapić Sanja

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available AIM: Since psychosocial characteristics of drug abuse involve mainly specific personality and emotional changes, it is very important to investigate characteristics of addictive personality in relationship with emotional state of the individual. Considering that, the objective of this study was to analyse the relationship between personality structure and emotional state of two different groups: heroin addicts and recreate drug abusers. METHODS: The total of 288 (219 males and 69 females; 191 heroin addicts and 97 recreate drug users clients of Centre for the prevention and treatment of drug abuse in Rijeka completed Eysenck's Personality Questionnaire (EPQ R/A, Beck's Anxiety Inventory (BAI and Beck's Depression Inventory (BDI. Their average age was 22. RESULTS: In the group of heroin addicts, higher levels of anxiety and depression were significantly correlated with higher levels of psychoticism, neuroticism, criminality and addiction. In the group of recreate drug users, higher extraversion and social conformity were determined. Furthermore, in the first group was found even higher depression. However when the anxiety level was compared between these two groups, there was no significant difference. CONCLUSION: Overall, the findings implied that the used measurement instruments could serve as the useful diagnostic tools that could ensure advantageous treatment directions.

  4. Food prices and consumer demand: differences across income levels and ethnic groups.

    Cliona Ni Mhurchu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Targeted food pricing policies may improve population diets. To assess their effects on inequalities, it is important to determine responsiveness to price changes across income levels and ethnic groups. OBJECTIVE: Our goal was to estimate price elasticity (PE values for major commonly consumed food groups in New Zealand, by income and ethnicity. PE values represent percentage change in demand associated with 1% change in price of that good (own-PE or another good (cross-PE. DESIGN: We used food expenditure data from national household economic surveys in 2007/08 and 2009/10 and Food Price Index data from 2007 and 2010. Adopting an Almost Ideal Demand System approach, own-PE and cross-PE estimates were derived for 24 food categories, household income quintiles, and two ethnic groups (Māori and non-Māori. RESULTS: Own-PE estimates (with two exceptions ranged from -0.44 to -1.78. Cross-PE estimates were generally small; only 31% of absolute values were greater than 0.10. Excluding the outlier 'energy drinks', nine of 23 food groups had significantly stronger own-PEs for the lowest versus highest income quintiles (average regression-based difference across food groups -0.30 (95% CI -0.62 to 0.02. Six own-PEs were significantly stronger among Māori; the average difference for Māori: non-Māori across food groups was -0.26 (95% CI -0.52 to 0.00. CONCLUSIONS: Food pricing policies have potential to improve population diets. The greater sensitivity of low-income households and Māori to price changes suggests the beneficial effects of such policies on health would be greatest for these groups.

  5. Gender-stereotyping and cognitive sex differences in mixed- and same-sex groups.

    Hirnstein, Marco; Coloma Andrews, Lisa; Hausmann, Markus

    2014-11-01

    Sex differences in specific cognitive abilities are well documented, but the biological, psychological, and sociocultural interactions that may underlie these differences are largely unknown. We examined within a biopsychosocial approach how gender stereotypes affect cognitive sex differences when adult participants were tested in mixed- or same-sex groups. A total of 136 participants (70 women) were allocated to either mixed- or same-sex groups and completed a battery of sex-sensitive cognitive tests (i.e., mental rotation, verbal fluency, perceptual speed) after gender stereotypes or gender-neutral stereotypes (control) were activated. To study the potential role of testosterone as a mediator for group sex composition and stereotype boost/threat effects, saliva samples were taken before the stereotype manipulation and after cognitive testing. The results showed the typical male and female advantages in mental rotation and verbal fluency, respectively. In general, men and women who were tested in mixed-sex groups and whose gender stereotypes had not been activated performed best. Moreover, a stereotype threat effect emerged in verbal fluency with reduced performance in gender stereotyped men but not women. Testosterone levels did not mediate the effects of group sex composition and stereotype threat nor did we find any relationship between testosterone and cognitive performance in men and women. Taken together, the findings suggest that an interaction of gender stereotyping and group sex composition affects the performance of men and women in sex-sensitive cognitive tasks. Mixed-sex settings can, in fact, increase cognitive performance as long as gender-stereotyping is prevented. PMID:24923876

  6. Cephalometric and anthropometric data of obstructive apnea in different age groups

    Paulo de Tarso Moura Borges

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome usually present with changes in upper airway morphology and/or body fat distribution, which may occur throughout life and increase the severity of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome with age. Objective: To correlate cephalometric and anthropometric measures with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome severity in different age groups. Methods: A retrospective study of cephalometric and anthropometric measures of 102 patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome was analyzed. Patients were divided into three age groups (≥20 and <40 years, ≥40 and <60 years, and ≥60 years. Pearson's correlation was performed for these measures with the apnea-hypopnea index in the full sample, and subsequently by age group. Results: The cephalometric measures MP-H (distance between the mandibular plane and the hyoid bone and PNS-P (distance between the posterior nasal spine and the tip of the soft palate and the neck and waist circumferences showed a statistically significant correlation with apnea-hypopnea index in both the full sample and in the ≥40 and <60 years age group. These variables did not show any significant correlation with the other two age groups (<40 and ≥60 years. Conclusion: Cephalometric measurements MP-H and PNS-P and cervical and waist circumfer- ences correlated with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome severity in patients in the ≥40 and <60 age group.

  7. The Difference of Food Pattern and Physical Acti vity between Obese and Non Obese Teenage Group.

    Kartika Suryaputra

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Obesity in teenage is a syndrome that happened because of fat accumulation in the body. Obesity occured because of complex interaction between parental fatness, food pattern, and physical activity. In Indonesia, prevalence of teenage obesity is gradually increasing. The aim of this research was to analyze about the difference of foodpattern and physical activity between obesity and non obesity teenage group. This study was an analytical observational research with cross sectional design. The samples were 40 teenage from Santa Agnes seniorhigh school Surabaya (age 15-17 that was taken by simple random sampling, that divers to 20 obese and 20 non obese teenage group. The data were analysed by Mann Whitney test for nutrition knowledge, pocket money, food pattern, fast food’s consumption, snack’s consumption pattern, consumption level of energy, carbohydrat, protein, and fat, physical activity and parental fatness. The result of the statistic test showed that variables significant difference are nutrition knowledge, pocket money, food pattern, fastfood’s consumption, snack’s consumption pattern, energy consumption level, carbohydrate consumption level, protein consumption level, fat consumption level, physical activity and parental fatness between obese and non obese teenage group. The conlusion is that significant differences are food pattern and physical activity between obese and non obese teenage group. Recommendation is necessary to provide information and education to teenage about healthy food and adequate physical activity to prevent obesity

  8. Geochemical characteristics of different maceral groups in the Huangxian Coal,China

    CAI Zhen-yu; WANG Jin-xi; JIN Yu-jie; ZHANG Hong-jian; JIN Kan-kun

    2004-01-01

    In order to research how lignite is utilized, two coal samples of seams 2 and 4were taken from the Huangxian Basin, China. The samples were separated into vitrinite,sporinite, and resinite. Geo-chemical and pyrolysis methods were used to analyse three maceral groups and two seam samples. The results indicate that the resinite and sporinite groups have higher extract yields, S1, S2, HI values, and pyrolysis compounds.These differences may shed light on the usage of the Huangxian lignite. Seam 2 produces more gas and oil than seam 4 does because seam 2 contains more resinite and sporinite macerals.

  9. Grouping normal type Ia supernovae by UV to optical color differences

    Observations of many Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) for multiple epochs per object with the Swift Ultraviolet Optical Telescope instrument have revealed that there exists order to the differences in the UV-optical colors of optically normal supernovae (SNe). We examine UV-optical color curves for 23 SNe Ia, dividing the SNe into four groups, and find that roughly one-third of 'NUV-blue' SNe Ia have bluer UV-optical colors than the larger 'NUV-red' group. Two minor groups are recognized, 'MUV-blue' and 'irregular' SNe Ia. While we conclude that the latter group is a subset of the NUV-red group, containing the SNe with the broadest optical peaks, we conclude that the 'MUV-blue' group is a distinct group. Separating into the groups and accounting for the time evolution of the UV-optical colors lowers the scatter in two NUV-optical colors (e.g., u – v and uvw1 – v) to the level of the scatter in b – v. This finding is promising for extending the cosmological utilization of SNe Ia into the NUV. We generate spectrophotometry of 33 SNe Ia and determine the correct grouping for each. We argue that there is a fundamental spectral difference in the 2900-3500 Å wavelength range, a region suggested to be dominated by absorption from iron-peak elements. The NUV-blue SNe Ia feature less absorption than the NUV-red SNe Ia. We show that all NUV-blue SNe Ia in this sample also show evidence of unburned carbon in optical spectra, whereas only one NUV-red SN Ia features that absorption line. Every NUV-blue event also exhibits a low gradient of the Si II λ6355 absorption feature. Many NUV-red events also exhibit a low gradient, perhaps suggestive that NUV-blue events are a subset of the larger low-velocity gradient group.

  10. Trouble at rest: how correlation patterns and group differences become distorted after global signal regression.

    Saad, Ziad S; Gotts, Stephen J; Murphy, Kevin; Chen, Gang; Jo, Hang Joon; Martin, Alex; Cox, Robert W

    2012-01-01

    Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (RS-FMRI) holds the promise of revealing brain functional connectivity without requiring specific tasks targeting particular brain systems. RS-FMRI is being used to find differences between populations even when a specific candidate target for traditional inferences is lacking. However, the problem with RS-FMRI is a lacking definition of what constitutes noise and signal. RS-FMRI is easy to acquire but is not easy to analyze or draw inferences from. In this commentary we discuss a problem that is still treated lightly despite its significant impact on RS-FMRI inferences; global signal regression (GSReg), the practice of projecting out signal averaged over the entire brain, can change resting-state correlations in ways that dramatically alter correlation patterns and hence conclusions about brain functional connectedness. Although Murphy et al. in 2009 demonstrated that GSReg negatively biases correlations, the approach remains in wide use. We revisit this issue to argue the problem that GSReg is more than negative bias or the interpretability of negative correlations. Its usage can fundamentally alter interregional correlations within a group, or their differences between groups. We used an illustrative model to clearly convey our objections and derived equations formalizing our conclusions. We hope this creates a clear context in which counterarguments can be made. We conclude that GSReg should not be used when studying RS-FMRI because GSReg biases correlations differently in different regions depending on the underlying true interregional correlation structure. GSReg can alter local and long-range correlations, potentially spreading underlying group differences to regions that may never have had any. Conclusions also apply to substitutions of GSReg for denoising with decompositions of signals aggregated over the network's regions to the extent they cannot separate signals of interest from noise. We touch on the

  11. Similar barriers and facilitators to physical activity across different clinical groups experiencing lower limb spasticity.

    Hundza, Sandra; Quartly, Caroline; Kim, Jasmine M; Dunnett, James; Dobrinsky, Jill; Loots, Iris; Choy, Kim; Chow, Brayley; Hampshire, Alexis; Temple, Viviene A

    2016-07-01

    Purpose Given the importance of physical activity in maintaining health and wellness, an improved understanding of physical activity patterns across different clinical populations is required. This study examines the facilitators for, and barriers to, participation in physical activity across multiple contexts for three clinical groups with chronic lower limb spasticity (individuals with stroke, multiple sclerosis and incomplete spinal cord injury). Method This cross-sectional study employed quantitative measures for spasticity, ankle range of motion, pain, falls, cognition, mobility, and physical activity as well as qualitative semi-structured interviews. Results There were similar impairments in body functions and structures and limitations in activities across the clinical groups. These impairments and limitations negatively impacted participation in physical activity, which was low. Environmental and personal factors exacerbated or mitigated the limiting effects of body functions and structures and activities on physical activity in many areas of life. Conclusions In this population, participation in physical activity includes activities such as housework which are different than what is typically considered as physical activity. Further, the presence of similar barriers and facilitators across the groups suggests that support and services to promote valued forms of physical activity could be organised and delivered based on limitations in mobility and functioning rather than clinical diagnosis. Implications for rehabilitation Physical activity is of utmost importance in maintaining health and wellness in clinical populations. This research highlights the desired and actual physical activity for these populations can look different than what may traditionally be considered as physical activity (e.g. housework is not typically considered participation physical activity). Therefore, rehabilitation interventions need to be directly designed to enhance clients

  12. Concurrent crack and powder cocaine users from Sao Paulo: Do they represent a different group?

    Breen Gerome

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cocaine abuse is a serious and socially damaging illegal drug problem. Different routes of administration are associated with a specific progression of use, different degrees of abuse liability, propensity for dependence and treatment response. There have been relatively few studies comparing different cocaine users groups and no studies into the characterization of the group of individuals reporting concurrent use of powder cocaine and crack cocaine. Methods Six hundred and ninety-nine cocaine users were assessed during the period August 1997 to October 1998 in one outpatient and six inpatient clinics located in the São Paulo, Brazil. Patients were interviewed using a structured questionnaire schedule in Portuguese, designed specifically for the Brazilian population. The statistical analyses were performed using either ANOVA or a chi-squared test and focusing on their preferred form of use/route of administration and other variables. Results For 83% of the variables tested in this study, the Dual Users subgroup (using both powder and crack cocaine demonstrated statistical differences from the single drug user subgroups. Those differences include the initiation of cocaine, the abuse of other illicit drugs, and rates of criminal history. Conclusion These data suggest cocaine-dependent individuals who report use of both powder and crack cocaine are an at least partially, distinct subgroup. However, further studies will be necessary to confirm this and to determine if they also show a different treatment response.

  13. Adsorbate-adsorbate interactions and chemisorption at different coverage studied by accurate {\\em ab initio} calculations: CO on transition metal surfaces

    Mason, Sara E.; Grinberg, Ilya; Rappe, Andrew M.

    2005-01-01

    We use density functional theory (DFT) with the generalized gradient approximation (GGA) and our first-principles extrapolation method for accurate chemisorption energies {[Mason {\\em et al.}, Phys. Rev. B {\\bf 69}, 161401R (2004)]} to calculate the chemisorption energy for CO on a variety of transition metal surfaces for various adsorbate densities and patterns. We identify adsorbate through-space repulsion, bonding competition, and substrate-mediated electron delocalization as key factors d...

  14. Differences in Clinical and Laboratory Findings between Group D and Non-Group D Non-Typhoidal Salmonella Gastroenteritis in Children

    Park, Heung Keun; Rhie, Kyuyol; Yeom, Jung Sook; Park, Ji Sook; Park, Eun Sil; Seo, Ji-Hyun; Lim, Jae Young; Park, Chan-Hoo; Woo, Hyang-Ok; Youn, Hee-Shang; Kang, Ki Ryeon; Park, Jung Je

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the differences in clinical features and laboratory findings between group D and non-group D non-typhoidal Salmonella (NTS) gastroenteritis in children. Methods A retrospective chart review of children diagnosed with NTS confirmed by culture study was performed. The clinical features and laboratory findings of group D and non-group D NTS were compared. Results From 2003 to 2012, 75 cases were diagnosed as NTS at our center. The number of group D and non-group D patients...

  15. Behavior and performance of pigs grouped by three different methods at weaning.

    Friend, T H; Knabe, D A; Tanksley, T D

    1983-12-01

    Crossbred pigs (384) used in three trials were assigned to one of three grouping treatments when moved to 1.4 X 1.6 m nursery pens 4 h postweaning at 28 d of age. Treatments included eight pigs from the same litter (8-1), four pigs from each of two different litters (4-2) and one pig from each of eight different litters (1-8). A commercial odor masking agent (OMA) commonly used to reduce tail biting and fighting was sprayed on one-half of the replicates of each treatment 20 min after (trial 1) or immediately before (trials 2 and 3) the pigs were moved to the nursery. Agonistic behavior was quantified (trials 2 and 3) by direct observation for the first 3 h and again for 2 h at 24 and 48 h post-grouping. Application of OMA 20 min post-mixing caused only a temporary (3 to 5 min) cessation of fighting. A slight increase in fighting in all three grouping treatments was observed when OMA was applied before mixing. Average daily gain for 0 to 4 and 0 to 28 d and feed intake for 0 to 7 and 0 to 28 d were not influenced by OMA or grouping treatments. Combining alien pigs resulted in a significant increase in fighting but did not affect long term performance. PMID:6674280

  16. Understanding childhood asthma in focus groups: perspectives from mothers of different ethnic backgrounds

    McKenzie Sheila

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diagnosing childhood asthma is dependent upon parental symptom reporting but there are problems in the use of words and terms. The purpose of this study was to describe and compare understandings of childhood 'asthma' by mothers from three different ethnic backgrounds who have no personal experience of diagnosing asthma. A better understanding of parents' perceptions of an illness by clinicians should improve communication and management of the illness. Method Sixty-six mothers living in east London describing their ethnic backgrounds as Bangladeshi, white English and black Caribbean were recruited to 9 focus groups. Discussion was semi-structured. Three sessions were conducted with each ethnic group. Mothers were shown a video clip of a boy with audible wheeze and cough and then addressed 6 questions. Sessions were recorded and transcribed verbatim. Responses were compared within and between ethnic groups. Results Each session, and ethnic group overall, developed a particular orientation to the discussion. Some mothers described the problem using single signs, while others imitated the sound or made comparisons to other illnesses. Hereditary factors were recognised by some, although all groups were concerned with environmental triggers. Responses about what to do included 'normal illness' strategies, use of health services and calls for complementary treatment. All groups were concerned about using medication every day. Expectations about the quality of life were varied, with recognition that restrictions may be based on parental beliefs about asthma, rather than asthma itself. Conclusion Information from these focus groups suggests mothers know a great deal about childhood asthma even though they have no personal experience of it. Knowledge of how mothers from these ethnic backgrounds perceive asthma may facilitate doctor – patient communication with parents of children experiencing breathing difficulties.

  17. Malaysian cultural differences in knowledge, attitudes and practices related to erectile dysfunction: focus group discussions.

    Low, W Y; Wong, Y L; Zulkifli, S N; Tan, H M

    2002-12-01

    This qualitative study aimed to examine cultural differences in knowledge, attitudes and practices related to erectile dysfunction (ED) utilizing focus group discussion. Six focus groups consisting of 66 men, 45-70-y-old were conducted-two Malay groups (n=18), two Chinese groups (n=25) and two Indian groups (n=23). Participants were purposely recruited from the general public on a voluntary basis with informed consent. Transcripts were analyzed using qualitative data analysis software ATLASti. The Malay and Chinese traditional remedies for preventing or treating ED are commonly recognized among all races. Many have a negative perception of someone with ED. Malay and Chinese men tended to blame their wife for their problem and thought that the problem might lead to extra-marital affairs, unlike the Indian men who attributed their condition to fate. Malays would prefer traditional medicine for the problem. The Chinese felt they would be more comfortable with a male doctor whilst this is not so with the Malays or Indians. Almost all prefer the doctor to initiate discussion on sexual issues related to their medical condition. There is a need for doctors to consider cultural perspectives in a multicultural society as a lack of understanding of this often contributes to an inadequate consultation. PMID:12494275

  18. The Therapeutic role of Magnesium in different depressive syndromes of the male population comprising of different age groups

    *N. Bano

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The basic and fundamental role of Mg as being the second most abundant intercellular cation is established in various studies. It is identified as a divalent metal cofactor in over 300 enzymatic reactions involving energy metabolism and protein and nucleic acid synthesis. The biological function is identified in neuromuscular excitability. Mg ion regulates calcium ion flow in neuronal channels, helping to regulate neuronal Nitric Oxide production1. Mg deficiency causes NMDA coupled Calcium channels to be biased towards opening, causing neuronal injury & neurological dysfunction, which may appear to humans as major depression. The present study confirms a reduction in the symptoms of depression found in the male population comprising of different age group by Mg treatment. CSF Mg has been found low in treatment resistant suicidal depression. Brain Mg is also low in TRD using phosphorous nuclear magnetic resonance Spectroscopy2. A 2009 randomized clinical trial shows that Mg therapy was an effective as TCAs in depressed diabetics. Increase in brain Mg enhances both short term synaptic facilitation and long term potentiation and improves learning and memory function3 The present study is based on findings that male subjects diagnosed as depressed showed a marked reduction in behavioral and somatic features of the disease after administration of Magnesium supplement. Physiological and somatic anxiety was also alleviated in a certain age group which displayed recovery from Insomnia and agitation. Suicidal tendency was also negative in all age groups. This study focuses on the behavioral and somatic responses pertaining to brain biochemical changes induced by Magnesium therapy.

  19. Differences in morphological properties between the olivine group minerals formed in natural and industrial processes

    Dević S.; Marčeta L.

    2007-01-01

    Olivines are a large isomorphic series of minerals, belonging to silicates group. Regardless of their chemical composition, any of these minerals can be formed both in natural and industrial processes. The aim of this work is to describe these minerals and differences of morphological properties between the olivines formed in nature, and those formed as byproducts of some industrial processes , as Process Metalurgy-Ironmaking. The olivines whose formation is tied to rock masses (natural proce...

  20. The associations between psychosocial workload and mental health complaints in different age groups.

    Zoer, I.; Ruitenburg, M.M.; Botje, D.; Frings-Dresen, M. H. W.; Sluiter, J.K.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to explore associations between psychosocial workload and mental health complaints in different age groups. A questionnaire was sent to 2021 employees of a Dutch railway company. Six aspects of psychosocial workload (work pressure, mental workload, emotional workload, autonomy, social support from colleagues and social support from supervisors) and three mental health outcomes (work-related fatigue, stress and burnout) were assessed. Associations between...

  1. Identifying target groups for environmentally sustainable transport: assessment of different segmentation approaches

    Haustein, Sonja; Hunecke, Marcel

    2013-01-01

    Recently, the use of attitude-based market segmentation to promote environmentally sustainable transport has significantly increased. The segmentation of the population into meaningful groups sharing similar attitudes and preferences provides valuable information about how green measures should be...... and behavioural segmentations are compared regarding marketing criteria. Although none of the different approaches can claim absolute superiority, attitudinal approaches show advantages in providing startingpoints for interventions to reduce car use....

  2. Prevalence of anaemia among different physiological groups in the rural areas of Maharashtra

    Nimmathota Arlappa; Meshram, Indrapal I; Nagalla Balakrishna; Rachkula Harikumar; Kodavanti Mallikharjuna Rao; Avula Laxmaiah

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Anaemia continues to be a major public health nutritional problem in India, and has adverse health and economic implications. Objective: The objective of the study was to assess the prevalence of anaemia among different physiological groups in the state of Maharashtra. Methodology: A community based cross-sectional study adopting multistage stratified random sampling procedure was carried out in rural Maharashtra. Information of socio-demographic particulars was collected with p...

  3. Visual estimation of ACL injury risk: Efficient assessment method, group differences, and expertise mechanisms

    Petushek, Erich J.; Cokely, Edward T.; Ward, Paul; Durocher, John; Wallace, Sean; Myer, Gregory D

    2015-01-01

    Simple observational assessment of movement quality (e.g., drop vertical jump biomechanics) is an efficient and low cost method for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury screening and prevention. A recently developed test (see www.ACL-IQ.org) has revealed substantial cross-professional/group differences in visual ACL injury risk estimation skill. Specifically, parents, sport coaches, and to some degree sports medicine physicians, would likely benefit from training or the use of decision sup...

  4. Job search and the theory of planned behavior: Minority – majority group differences in The Netherlands

    Hooft, Edwin; Born, Marise; Taris, Toon; Flier, Henk

    2003-01-01

    textabstractThe labor market in many Western countries increasingly diversifies. However, little is known about job search behavior of 'non-traditional' applicants such as ethnic minorities. This study investigated minority – majority group differences in the predictors of job search behavior, using the theory of planned behavior (Ajzen, 1985). Data were collected in a two-wave longitudinal design among 697 temporary employees in The Netherlands. Results showed that the ethnic minorities’ per...

  5. The Seroepidemiology of Varicella Zoster Virus (VZV) in Different Age Groups in Tehran, Iran

    Zohreh Sharifi Sekyneh Emadi Ghanjin

    2005-01-01

    Varicella zoster virus (VZV), the causative agent of chicken pox and shingles, can cause severe systemic infections of the CNS and the respiratory tract in immunocompetent individuals as well as in immunocompromized patients. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to assess the prevalence of antibody Varicella zoster virus in different age groups. The enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) method was used to assess the presence of anti -VZV antibody. A total of 635 serum sample...

  6. Influence of Surface Preparation for Different Groups of A2B6 Mixed Crystals

    Zakrzewski, J.; Maliński, M.; Strzałkowski, K.; Firszt, F.; Łęgowski, S.; Męczyńska, H.

    2010-01-01

    Piezoelectric photothermal spectroscopy has been used for measurements of the optical and thermal parameters of semiconductors. The investigated crystals were grown by the high-pressure Bridgman method under argon overpressure. The obtained photoacoustic (PA) spectra show the complexity of the effects observed for the different groups of selected A2B6 crystals. These effects comprise ideal samples and samples with damaged surfaces. The spectra show the influence of the surface treatment on the PA amplitude and phase spectra.

  7. The Difference of Food Pattern and Physical Acti vity between Obese and Non Obese Teenage Group.

    Kartika Suryaputra; Siti Rahayu Nadhiroh

    2012-01-01

    Obesity in teenage is a syndrome that happened because of fat accumulation in the body. Obesity occured because of complex interaction between parental fatness, food pattern, and physical activity. In Indonesia, prevalence of teenage obesity is gradually increasing. The aim of this research was to analyze about the difference of foodpattern and physical activity between obesity and non obesity teenage group. This study was an analytical observational research with cross sectional design. The ...

  8. Density-Matrix Renormalization Group studies of mixture of two different ultracold bosonic atoms

    We investigate the ground state phase diagram for a two species Bose mixture in a one dimensional optical lattice using the finite size density matrix renormalization group (FSDMRG) method. We present our result for different combinations of inter and intra-species repulsion strengths with a commensurate filling factor. We obtain a superfluid (SF) to Mott insulator (MI) transition when the inter species interaction term is less than the intra-species interaction term. However, when the former is slightly greater than the latter we find that the two different species reside in spatially separate regions

  9. The pattern of serotonin and FMRFamide in cercaria from different taxonomic groups--a preliminary study.

    Tolstenkov, O O; Terenina, Nadezhda; Gustafsson, Margaretha; Serbina, Elena; Kreshchenko, Natalia D; Maklakova, Ludmila; Jashina, Alexandra

    2008-01-01

    Serotoninergic and FMRFamidergic components of the nervous system were examined in cercaria from different types using immunocytochemical techniques interfaced with confocal scanning laser microscopy. Cercariae from 9 families were studied - Opisthorchis felineus, Parafasciolopsis fasciolaemorpha, Echinochasmus coaxatus, Echinoparyphium aconiatum, Notocotylus attenuatus, Psilotrema tuberculata, Plagiorchis sp., Cyathocotyle bithyniae, Diplostomum chromatophorum. The results show that 5-HT-IR and FMRFamide-IR occur in all types of cercariae, regardless of what morphological, taxonomic and biological group they belong to. Small differences in the patterns of 5-HT-IR and FMRFamide-IR were observed. PMID:18652395

  10. Salivary Alpha Amylase Activity in Human Beings of Different Age Groups Subjected to Psychological Stress

    Sahu, Gopal K.; Upadhyay, Seema; Panna, Shradha M.

    2013-01-01

    Salivary alpha-amylase (sAA) has been proposed as a sensitive non-invasive biomarker for stress-induced changes in the body that reflect the activity of the sympathetic nervous system. Though several experiments have been conducted to determine the validity of this salivary component as a reliable stress marker in human subjects, the effect of stress induced changes on sAA level in different age groups is least studied. This article reports the activity of sAA in human subjects of different a...

  11. Perception of teachers' behaviour, motivational beliefs and self-regulated learning in different adolescent age groups

    Melita Puklek Levpušček

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available In the study we compared learning motivation, perception of learning self-efficacy and use of cognitive and metacognitive learning strategies in different age groups of adolescents. The aim of the study was also to find out if there are any differences in the perception of teachers' behaviour in classroom related to adolescents' age. We assumed that school represents an important microsystem, which influences the establishment of adolescent's learning self-regulation. Six groups of adolescents between age 13 and 18 (N=593 took part in the study. Adolescents filled in the questionnaire of motivational beliefs and self-regulated learning and the scales of teachers' behaviour. The results showed higher learning self-efficacy in younger than older adolescents, less use of learning strategies in older than younger male adolescents, lower perception of teachers' support in older than younger female adolescents and less teachers' tolerance for autonomous decision making in classroom in older than younger adolescent groups. The adolescents of different age who perceived more opportunities for autonomy in class work showed more intrinsic interest for learning.

  12. ICM cooling, AGN feedback and BCG properties of galaxy groups-Five properties where groups differ from clusters

    Bharadwaj, V.; Reiprich, T. H.; Schellenberger, G.; Eckmiller, H. J.; Mittal, R; Israel, H.

    2014-01-01

    Using Chandra data for a sample of 26 galaxy groups, we constrained the central cooling times (CCTs) of the ICM and classified the groups as strong cool-core (SCC), weak cool-core (WCC) and non-cool-core (NCC) based on their CCTs. The total radio luminosity of the brightest cluster galaxy (BCG) was obtained using radio catalog data and literature, which was compared to the CCT to understand the link between gas cooling and radio output. We determined K-band luminosities of the BCG with 2MASS ...

  13. Adult total wellness: group differences based on sitting time and physical activity level

    2014-01-01

    Background An increasing body of evidence associates a high level of sitting time with poor health outcomes. The benefits of moderate to vigorous-intensity physical activities to various aspects of health are now well documented; however, individuals may engage in moderate-intensity physical activity for at least 30 minutes on five or more days of the week and still exhibit a high level of sitting time. This purpose of this study was to examine differences in total wellness among adults relative to high/low levels of sitting time combined with insufficient/sufficient physical activity (PA). The construct of total wellness incorporates a holistic approach to the body, mind and spirit components of life, an approach which may be more encompassing than some definitions of health. Methods Data were obtained from 226 adult respondents (27 ± 6 years), including 116 (51%) males and 110 (49%) females. Total PA and total sitting time were assessed with the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ) (short-version). The Wellness Evaluation of Lifestyle Inventory was used to assess total wellness. An analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) was utilised to assess the effects of the sitting time/physical activity group on total wellness. A covariate was included to partial out the effects of age, sex and work status (student or employed). Cross-tabulations were used to show associations between the IPAQ derived high/low levels of sitting time with insufficient/sufficient PA and the three total wellness groups (i.e. high level of wellness, moderate wellness and wellness development needed). Results The majority of the participants were located in the high total sitting time and sufficient PA group. There were statistical differences among the IPAQ groups for total wellness [F (2,220) = 32.5 (p <0.001)]. A Chi-square test revealed a significant difference in the distribution of the IPAQ categories within the classification of wellness [χ2 (N = 226) = 54.5, p < .001

  14. Genetic parameters for EUROP carcass traits within different groups of cattle in Ireland.

    Hickey, J M; Keane, M G; Kenny, D A; Cromie, A R; Veerkamp, R F

    2007-02-01

    The first objective of this study was to test the ability of systems of weighing and classifying bovine carcasses used in commercial abattoirs in Ireland to provide information that can be used for the purposes of genetic evaluation of carcass weight, carcass fatness class, and carcass conformation class. Secondly, the study aimed to test whether genetic and phenotypic variances differed by breed of sire. Variance components for carcass traits were estimated for crosses between dairy cows and 8 breeds of sire commonly found in the Irish cattle population. These 8 breeds were Aberdeen Angus, Belgian Blue, Charolais, Friesian, Hereford, Holstein, Limousin, and Simmental. A multivariate animal model was used to estimate genetic parameters within the Holstein sire breed group. Univariate analyses were used to estimate variance components for the remaining 7 sire breed groups. Multivariate sire models were used to formally test differences in genetic variances in sire breed groups. Field data on 64,443 animals, which were slaughtered in commercial abattoirs between the ages of 300 and 875 d, were analyzed in 8 analyses. Carcass fat class and carcass conformation class were measured using the European Union beef carcass classification system (EUROP) scale. For all 3 traits, the sire breed group with the greatest genetic variance had a value of more than 8 times the sire breed group with least genetic variance. Heritabilities ranged from zero to moderate for carcass fatness class (0.00 to 0.40), from low to moderate for carcass conformation class (0.04 to 0.36), and from low to high for carcass weight (0.06 to 0.65). Carcass weight was the most heritable (0.26) of the 3 traits. Carcass conformation class and carcass fatness class were equally heritable (0.17). Genetic and phenotypic correlations were all positive in the Holstein sire breed group. The genetic correlations varied from 0.11 for the relationship between carcass weight and carcass fatness class to 0.44 for the

  15. Variation in Weed Seed Fate Fed to Different Holstein Cattle Groups

    Mesgaran, Mohsen Beheshtian

    2016-01-01

    Weed seeds may maintain their viability when passing through the digestive tract of cattle and can be therefore dispersed by animal movement or the application of manure. Whether different cattle types of the same species can cause differential weed seed fate is largely unknown to us particularly under non-grazed systems similar to Holstein-Friesian dairy farming. We investigated the effect on the seed survival of four weed species in the digestive tracts of four groups of Holstein cattle: lactating cows, feedlot male calves, dry cows and growing heifers. The weed species used were Cuscuta campestris, Polygonum aviculare, Rumex crispus and Sorghum halepense. Cattle excretion was sampled for recovery and viability of seeds at four 24 hourly intervals after seed intake. The highest seed recovery occurred two days after seed intake in all cattle groups. Averaged over weed species, dry and lactating cows had the lowest and highest seed recovery of 36.4% and 74.4% respectively. No significant differences were observed in seed recovery of the four weed species when their seeds were fed to dry cows. Based on a power model fitted to seed viability data, the estimated time to 50% viability loss after seed intake, over all cattle groups ranged from 65 h (R. crispus) to 76 h (P. aviculare). Recovered seeds from the dung of feedlot male calves showed the highest mortality among cattle groups. Significant correlation was found between seed viability and ruminal pH (r = 0.86; P<0.05). This study shows that management programs aiming to minimize weed infestation caused by livestock should account for the variation amongst cattle groups in seed persistence. Our findings can be used as a guideline for evaluating the potential risk of the spread of weeds via the application of cattle manure. PMID:27104783

  16. Group differences in physician responses to handheld presentation of clinical evidence: a verbal protocol analysis

    Pavlovic Nada J

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To identify individual differences in physicians' needs for the presentation of evidence resources and preferences for mobile devices. Methods Within-groups analysis of responses to semi-structured interviews. Interviews consisted of using prototypes in response to task-based scenarios. The prototypes were implemented on two different form factors: a tablet style PC and a pocketPC. Participants were from three user groups: general internists, family physicians and medicine residents, and from two different settings: urban and semi-urban. Verbal protocol analysis, which consists of coding utterances, was conducted on the transcripts of the testing sessions. Statistical relationships were investigated between staff physicians' and residents' background variables, self-reported experiences with the interfaces, and verbal code frequencies. Results 47 physicians were recruited from general internal medicine, family practice clinics and a residency training program. The mean age of participants was 42.6 years. Physician specialty had a greater effect on device and information-presentation preferences than gender, age, setting or previous technical experience. Family physicians preferred the screen size of the tablet computer and were less concerned about its portability. Residents liked the screen size of the tablet, but preferred the portability of the pocketPC. Internists liked the portability of the pocketPC, but saw less advantage to the large screen of the tablet computer (F[2,44] = 4.94, p = .012. Conclusion Different types of physicians have different needs and preferences for evidence-based resources and handheld devices. This study shows how user testing can be incorporated into the process of design to inform group-based customization.

  17. Upper limb joint motion of two different user groups during manual wheelchair propulsion

    Hwang, Seonhong; Kim, Seunghyeon; Son, Jongsang; Lee, Jinbok; Kim, Youngho

    2013-02-01

    Manual wheelchair users have a high risk of injury to the upper extremities. Recent studies have focused on kinematic and kinetic analyses of manual wheelchair propulsion in order to understand the physical demands on wheelchair users. The purpose of this study was to investigate upper limb joint motion by using a motion capture system and a dynamometer with two different groups of wheelchair users propelling their wheelchairs at different speeds under different load conditions. The variations in the contact time, release time, and linear velocity of the experienced group were all larger than they were in the novice group. The propulsion angles of the experienced users were larger than those of the novices under all conditions. The variances in the propulsion force (both radial and tangential) of the experienced users were larger than those of the novices. The shoulder joint moment had the largest variance with the conditions, followed by the wrist joint moment and the elbow joint moment. The variance of the maximum shoulder joint moment was over four times the variance of the maximum wrist joint moment and eight times the maximum elbow joint moment. The maximum joint moments increased significantly as the speed and load increased in both groups. Quick and significant manipulation ability based on environmental changes is considered an important factor in efficient propulsion. This efficiency was confirmed from the propulsion power results. Sophisticated strategies for efficient manual wheelchair propulsion could be understood by observation of the physical responses of each upper limb joint to changes in load and speed. We expect that the findings of this study will be utilized for designing a rehabilitation program to reduce injuries.

  18. Production and reproduction of egg- and meat-type quails reared in different group sizes

    TC Santos

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Egg- and meat-type quails were reared in groups of different sizes with a fixed female-to-male ratio of 2 to 1 and an area of 158 cm² per bird. The aim was to investigate the influence of group size on quail production and reproductive variables. To this end, 360 quails (180 meat and 180 egg-type quails were assigned in a completely randomized experimental design to one of three treatments with ten replicates each. The treatments consisted of groups with nine, six, or three quails per cage. Birds were observed for three cycles of 14 days. Daily feed intake and feed conversion ratio were influenced (p < 0.05 by group size in both types of quails. Quail type influenced (p < 0.05 daily feed intake, feed conversion, and egg weight due to the typical differences between meat and egg-type birds. Despite the observed differences in production parameters, the mean values observed were typical of meat- and egg-type quails. The number of hydrolysis points (holes per mm² on the vitelline membrane on the germinal disc area was higher in meat quails (2.89 ± 0.21 than in egg quails (2.15 ± 0.13. This parameter was not influenced by the number of birds per cage, which suggests that the number of males inside the cage did not modify the spermatozoa pool inside the female oviduct. We concluded that a ratio of two females per male in cages with three, six, and nine birds/cage is recommended, as no deleterious effect on quail reproduction was observed.

  19. [Current model of breakfast for different age groups: children, a adolescents and adults].

    Núñez, C; Cuadrado, C; Carbajal, A; Moreiras, O

    1998-01-01

    The objective of the present work is to assess the current breakfast model in different age groups: children between the ages of 6 and 12 years (n = 54); adolescents between the ages of 13 and 17 years (n = 174); and adults, older than 18 years of age (n = 252). For this a questionnaire has been designed that follows the standards of that used for a similar study by our team in 1984 on a sample of 1350 individuals. The modified and amplified questionnaire included open and closed questions about: the omission of breakfast and its causes, foods that are a part of breakfast, the most frequent types and the variations, the role of the second breakfast, the number of fasting hours since dinner, the time spent of breakfast, and the subjective opinion regarding the importance or not of having breakfast. 98.95% answer yes to the question do you have breakfast, but only 9% eats a nutritionally correct breakfast, one defined as that breakfast that supplies 20% of the total energy and includes foods from at least four different groups. All the children included some form of milk product in their breakfast. The adolescents consumed the lowest proportion of cereals (19.4%) and the highest proportion of pastries (24.2%). The percentage of adults who drink coffee with milk (57%) and sugar (37.7%) is significantly higher than that it the other two groups. Bread (37.7%), pastries (28.3%) and cookies (26.1%) are the solid foods eaten most by the adults. The children spend the longest time on breakfast. 35.9% of the sample varies their breakfast, 43.1% never does, and 21% does so sometimes. The average time elapsed between dinner and breakfast is 10.5 +/- 1.2 hours. It is advisable to have a more nutritionally balanced breakfast, including different foods from at least four groups, and including a greater variety in the menus. PMID:9780752

  20. A rapid, accurate and robust particle-based assay for the simultaneous screening of plasma samples for the presence of five different anti-cytokine autoantibodies

    Guldager, Daniel Kring Rasmussen; von Stemann, Jakob Hjorth; Larsen, Rune;

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: To establish and validate a rapid, cost-effective and accurate screening assay for the simultaneous testing of human naturally occurring anti-cytokine autoantibodies (c-aAb) targeting interleukin-1α (IL-1α), interleukin-6 (IL-6), interleukin-10 (IL-10), granulocyte-macrophage colony...... METHODS: The microsphere-based Luminex platform was used. Recombinant forms of human IL-1α, IL-6, IL-10, GM-CSF, and IFNα were gently coupled to MAG-PLEX beads. Plasma IgG binding was measured with phycoerythrin (PE)-labeled secondary antibodies. Previously confirmed c-aAb positive and negative donor...

  1. Comparison of Masking Level Difference in Patients with Multiple Sclerosis and Healthy Control Group

    Soghrat Faghihzadeh

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Multiple sclerosis (MS is a neurological disorder that involves central nervous system. Studies have showed that multiple sclerosis affects behavioral central auditory tests, such as masking release or masking level difference (MLD. The purpose of this study is to compare the masking level difference between multiple sclerosis patients and normal subjects.Methods: This cross sectional and non-interventional study was conducted on 32 multiple sclerosis patients aged between 20-50 years and 32 controls matched for age and gender in Faculty of Rehabilitation, Tehran University of Medical Sciences. masking level difference test was performed on each subject.Results: The mean masking level difference in the two groups was significantly different (p<0.01 however, gender did not prove to play a role in this difference.Conclusion: As part of the multiple sclerosis diagnosis panel, masking level difference test is an efficient modality for evaluation of hearing impairment and monitoring of rehabilitation progress.

  2. Duration distributions for different softness groups of gamma-ray bursts

    GUPTA; A.C.

    2010-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts(GRBs) are divided into two classes according to their durations.We investigate if the softness of bursts plays a role in the conventional classification of the objects.We employ the BATSE(Burst and Transient Source Experiment) catalog and analyze the duration distributions of different groups of GRBs associated with distinct softness.Our analysis reveals that the conventional classification of GRBs with the duration of bursts is influenced by the softness of the objects.There exists a bimodality in the duration distribution of GRBs for each group of bursts and the time position of the dip in the bimodality histogram shifts with the softness parameter.Our findings suggest that the conventional classification scheme should be modified by separating the two well-known populations in different softness groups,which would be more reasonable than doing so with a single sample.According to the relation between the dip position and the softness parameter,we get an empirical function that can roughly set apart the short-hard and long-soft bursts:SP =(0.100 ± 0.028) T-(0.85 0.18) 90,± where SP is the softness parameter adopted in this paper.

  3. Substituted Septithiophenes with End Groups of Different Size: Packing and Frustration in Bulk and Thin Films.

    de Jeu, Wim H; Rahimi, Khosrow; Ziener, Ulrich; Vill, Roman; Herzig, Eva M; Müller-Buschbaum, Peter; Möller, Martin; Mourran, Ahmed

    2016-02-16

    We report on three different liquid crystalline compounds with a central septithiophene core and alkylated end groups of strongly increasing bulkiness. In principle, the thiophene cores prefer to pack parallel to optimize their π-π interactions, which becomes sterically impossible for the bulkier end groups. Using X-ray diffraction, we find that the way out of this packing dilemma is toward liquid-crystal phases of higher dimensionality in the order smectic → columnar ↔ bicontinuous cubic. For the smectic phase, packing in a monolayer is no problem; for the other ones packing considerations become more stringent in films due to the boundaries. Surface X-ray techniques and atomic force microscopy indicate an appreciable difference between monolayer and three-layer films, in which the monolayers appear to escape from packing frustration by generating superstructures. We propose a basic structure of columns parallel to the substrate that provides a compromise between preserving some π-π interactions and packing the bulky alkyl groups. PMID:26807677

  4. The Multilevel Mixed Intact Group Analysis: A Mixed Method to Seek, Detect, Describe, and Explain Differences Among Intact Groups

    Schoonenboom, Judith

    2016-01-01

    Educational innovations often involve intact subgroups, such as school classes or university departments. In small-scale educational evaluation research, typically involving 1 to 20 subgroups, differences among these subgroups are often neglected. This article presents a mixed method from a qualitative perspective, in which differences among…

  5. [NON-CORONARY ATHEROSCLEROSIS PROGRESSION AFTER MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION IN PATIENTS OF DIFFERENT AGE GROUPS].

    Barbarash, L S; Karetnikova, V N; Volykova, M A; Kolomytseva, I S; Shibanova, I A; Kashtalap, V V; Sizova, I N

    2015-01-01

    The initial rate of non-coronary atherosclerosis progression in patients of different age groups before and after myocardial infarction (MI) was studied. 168 patients with ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) were enrolled in the study; the age of 60 was a criterion for patients distribution into the study groups. It is established that one year after MI the patients younger than 60 years of age had recurrent acute coronary syndromes (ACS), and older patients had cerebral vascular accidents. Thus in both younger and older patients a correlation, between the presence and intensity of atherosclerosis progression and the rates of cardiovascular events was observed; however, in older patients atherosclerosis progression is associated not only with higher coronary but also cerebrovascular events rates. PMID:26390621

  6. Ethnic and gender differences in the association between discrimination and depressive symptoms among five immigrant groups.

    Kim, Il-Ho; Noh, Samuel

    2014-12-01

    This study examines ethnic and gender differences in exposure to discrimination and its association with depressive symptoms among five immigrant groups. Data were derived from a cross-sectional survey of 900 adult immigrants (50.8% men, 49.2% women) sampled from five ethnic immigrant communities in Toronto between April and September 2001. Men reported higher levels of discrimination than women. Ethiopians had the highest perception of discrimination followed by Korean, Iranian, Vietnamese, and Irish immigrants. With regard to discrimination-related depressive symptoms, Iranian and Korean men showed a greater risk than their Irish counterparts. Among women, Vietnamese and Irish seemed to be more vulnerable to discrimination than other ethnic groups. Despite experiencing the highest level of discrimination, Ethiopian men and women showed no association between discrimination and depressive symptoms. The exposure and psychological response to discrimination vary significantly across ethnicities and gender. PMID:24375383

  7. Examination of health status measurement along different dimensions and comparability across population groups

    Moesgaard Iburg, Kim

    preventive, curative and rehabilitative interventions. Different aspects of health are relevant to measure, for example mortality, morbidity, functional limitations and quality of life dimensions. The complexity of measuring health is further reflected in various modes of assessment, for example self......An increasing interest in assessing the state of health of population groups and whole nations is seen these years. The main idea is to estimate the extent to which societies are burdened by diseases and illnesses, and to use the acquired knowledge as the basis for optimal resource allocation for......-reported health, physician assessed health and tested health. This thesis uses data on health status from Denmark, Greenland and USA to discuss burden of disease issues, summary measures of population health and problems in comparing health across populations and groups....

  8. Raynaud's phenomenon in different groups of workers using hand-held vibrating tools.

    Harazin, B; Langauer-Lewowicka, H

    1996-05-01

    The dose-effect relationship showed in the Annex A of the ISO standard 5349-1986 can be used for preventing vibration-induced white fingers (VWF) because it allows to calculate the latent period for the lowest risk of VWF. The aim of this study was to assess the risk of VWF in three different occupational groups of workers whose members operated the same vibrating power tools and the same industrial processes throughout the workday. Each occupational group was employed in two foundries and they were considered to be very stable with a low turnover rate. The mean frequency-weighted acceleration magnitudes measured from pneumatic rammers (25.3 +/- 3.3 ms-2) where three times higher than from chipping hammers (8.4 +/- 3.8 ms-2) and six times higher than from grinders (3.8 +/- 1.1 ms-2). Medical examinations were carried out in 102 men consisting of 22 chippers, 42 rammers and 38 grinders. The results of this study showed that the relationship between lifetime exposure to hand-arm vibration and the vascular disorders can be predicted quite well using the Annex A of ISO standard only in one occupational group, that is, in chippers. Thirty-six percent of chippers reported blanching symptoms, but only five percent of the rammers and three percent of the grinders had these vascular disturbances. Our results may be explained by the fact that vibration received by an operator depends on the manner in which the tool is used. In a foundry three following work processes are performed: preparing forms in ramming mix, cleaning and grinding of castings during which different forces are used by operators. It seems very likely that the energy absorbtion in the hands and arms of chippers must be stronger than in other studied groups. PMID:8996728

  9. Identification of copy number variants defining genomic differences among major human groups.

    Lluís Armengol

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Understanding the genetic contribution to phenotype variation of human groups is necessary to elucidate differences in disease predisposition and response to pharmaceutical treatments in different human populations. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have investigated the genome-wide profile of structural variation on pooled samples from the three populations studied in the HapMap project by comparative genome hybridization (CGH in different array platforms. We have identified and experimentally validated 33 genomic loci that show significant copy number differences from one population to the other. Interestingly, we found an enrichment of genes related to environment adaptation (immune response, lipid metabolism and extracellular space within these regions and the study of expression data revealed that more than half of the copy number variants (CNVs translate into gene-expression differences among populations, suggesting that they could have functional consequences. In addition, the identification of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs that are in linkage disequilibrium with the copy number alleles allowed us to detect evidences of population differentiation and recent selection at the nucleotide variation level. CONCLUSIONS: Overall, our results provide a comprehensive view of relevant copy number changes that might play a role in phenotypic differences among major human populations, and generate a list of interesting candidates for future studies.

  10. Determination of equivalent breast phantoms for different age groups of Taiwanese women: An experimental approach

    Purpose: Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) slab is one of the mostly used phantoms for studying breast dosimetry in mammography. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the equivalence between exposure factors acquired from PMMA slabs and patient cases of different age groups of Taiwanese women in mammography. Methods: This study included 3910 craniocaudal screen/film mammograms on Taiwanese women acquired on one mammographic unit. The tube loading, compressed breast thickness (CBT), compression force, tube voltage, and target/filter combination for each mammogram were collected for all patients. The glandularity and the equivalent thickness of PMMA were determined for each breast using the exposure factors of the breast in combination with experimental measurements from breast-tissue-equivalent attenuation slabs. Equivalent thicknesses of PMMA to the breasts of Taiwanese women were then estimated. Results: The average ± standard deviation CBT and breast glandularity in this study were 4.2 ± 1.0 cm and 54% ± 23%, respectively. The average equivalent PMMA thickness was 4.0 ± 0.7 cm. PMMA slabs producing equivalent exposure factors as in the breasts of Taiwanese women were determined for the age groups 30-49 yr and 50-69 yr. For the 4-cm PMMA slab, the CBT and glandularity values of the equivalent breast were 4.1 cm and 65%, respectively, for the age group 30-49 yr and 4.4 cm and 44%, respectively, for the age group 50-69 yr. Conclusions: The average thickness of PMMA slabs producing the same exposure factors as observed in a large group of Taiwanese women is less than that reported for American women. The results from this study can provide useful information for determining a suitable thickness of PMMA for mammographic dose survey in Taiwan. The equivalence of PMMA slabs and the breasts of Taiwanese women is provided to allow average glandular dose assessment in clinical practice.

  11. Determination of equivalent breast phantoms for different age groups of Taiwanese women: An experimental approach

    Dong, Shang-Lung; Chu, Tieh-Chi; Lin, Yung-Chien; Lan, Gong-Yau; Yeh, Yu-Hsiu; Chen, Sharon; Chuang, Keh-Shih [Department of Biomedical Engineering and Environmental Sciences, National Tsing Hua University, 101 Section 2, Kuang-Fu Road, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Department of Radiology, Cheng Hsin General Hospital, 45 Cheng Hsin Street, Pai-Tou District, Taipei 11220, Taiwan (China); Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Kaohsiung Medical University, 100 Shih-Chuan 1st Road, Kaohsiung 80708, Taiwan (China); Department of Biomedical Engineering and Environmental Sciences, National Tsing Hua University, 101 Section 2, Kuang-Fu Road, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China)

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) slab is one of the mostly used phantoms for studying breast dosimetry in mammography. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the equivalence between exposure factors acquired from PMMA slabs and patient cases of different age groups of Taiwanese women in mammography. Methods: This study included 3910 craniocaudal screen/film mammograms on Taiwanese women acquired on one mammographic unit. The tube loading, compressed breast thickness (CBT), compression force, tube voltage, and target/filter combination for each mammogram were collected for all patients. The glandularity and the equivalent thickness of PMMA were determined for each breast using the exposure factors of the breast in combination with experimental measurements from breast-tissue-equivalent attenuation slabs. Equivalent thicknesses of PMMA to the breasts of Taiwanese women were then estimated. Results: The average {+-} standard deviation CBT and breast glandularity in this study were 4.2 {+-} 1.0 cm and 54% {+-} 23%, respectively. The average equivalent PMMA thickness was 4.0 {+-} 0.7 cm. PMMA slabs producing equivalent exposure factors as in the breasts of Taiwanese women were determined for the age groups 30-49 yr and 50-69 yr. For the 4-cm PMMA slab, the CBT and glandularity values of the equivalent breast were 4.1 cm and 65%, respectively, for the age group 30-49 yr and 4.4 cm and 44%, respectively, for the age group 50-69 yr. Conclusions: The average thickness of PMMA slabs producing the same exposure factors as observed in a large group of Taiwanese women is less than that reported for American women. The results from this study can provide useful information for determining a suitable thickness of PMMA for mammographic dose survey in Taiwan. The equivalence of PMMA slabs and the breasts of Taiwanese women is provided to allow average glandular dose assessment in clinical practice.

  12. Comparison of different sampling techniques and of different culture methods for detection of group B streptococcus carriage in pregnant women

    Verhelst Rita

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Streptococcus agalactiae (group B streptococcus; GBS is a significant cause of perinatal and neonatal infections worldwide. To detect GBS colonization in pregnant women, the CDC recommends isolation of the bacterium from vaginal and anorectal swab samples by growth in a selective enrichment medium, such as Lim broth (Todd-Hewitt broth supplemented with selective antibiotics, followed by subculture on sheep blood agar. However, this procedure may require 48 h to complete. We compared different sampling and culture techniques for the detection of GBS. Methods A total of 300 swabs was taken from 100 pregnant women at 35-37 weeks of gestation. For each subject, one rectovaginal, one vaginal and one rectal ESwab were collected. Plating onto Columbia CNA agar (CNA, group B streptococcus differential agar (GBSDA (Granada Medium and chromID Strepto B agar (CA, with and without Lim broth enrichment, were compared. The isolates were confirmed as S. agalactiae using the CAMP test on blood agar and by molecular identification with tDNA-PCR or by 16S rRNA gene sequence determination. Results The overall GBS colonization rate was 22%. GBS positivity for rectovaginal sampling (100% was significantly higher than detection on the basis of vaginal sampling (50%, but not significantly higher than for rectal sampling (82%. Direct plating of the rectovaginal swab on CNA, GBSDA and CA resulted in detection of 59, 91 and 95% of the carriers, respectively, whereas subculturing of Lim broth yielded 77, 95 and 100% positivity, respectively. Lim broth enrichment enabled the detection of only one additional GBS positive subject. There was no significant difference between GBSDA and CA, whereas both were more sensitive than CNA. Direct culture onto GBSDA or CA (91 and 95% detected more carriers than Lim broth enrichment and subculture onto CNA (77%. One false negative isolate was observed on GBSDA, and three false positives on CA. Conclusions In

  13. Impaired Recognition of Facially Expressed Emotions in Different Groups of Patients with Sleep Disorders

    Crönlein, Tatjana; Langguth, Berthold; Eichhammer, Peter; Busch, Volker

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Recently it has been shown that acute sleep loss has a direct impact on emotional processing in healthy individuals. Here we studied the effect of chronically disturbed sleep on emotional processing by investigating two samples of patients with sleep disorders. Methods 25 patients with psychophysiologic insomnia (23 women and 2 men, mean age: 51.6 SD; 10.9 years), 19 patients with sleep apnea syndrome (4 women and 15 men, mean age: 51.9; SD 11.1) and a control sample of 24 subjects with normal sleep (15women and 9 men, mean age 45.3; SD 8.8) completed a Facial Expressed Emotion Labelling (FEEL) task, requiring participants to categorize and rate the intensity of six emotional expression categories: anger, anxiety, fear, happiness, disgust and sadness. Differences in FEEL score and its subscales among the three samples were analysed using ANOVA with gender as a covariate. Results Both patients with psychophysiologic insomnia and patients with sleep apnea showed significantly lower performance in the FEEL test as compared to the control group. Differences were seen in the scales happiness and sadness. Patient groups did not differ from each other. Conclusion By demonstrating that previously known effects of acute sleep deprivation on emotional processing can be extended to persons experiencing chronically disturbed sleep, our data contribute to a deeper understanding of the relationship between sleep loss and emotions. PMID:27073852

  14. Sport Tourism Centres from Top Athletes’ Perspective: Differences among Sport Groups

    Polanec Anze

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Sport tourism plays an important role in the tourism industry and consequently in the economy. Sport tourism centres as providers of sport services need to be familiar with the basic needs of their customers and tailor their services accordingly. Objectives: The aim of the paper is to determine the models for customizing sport tourism services to address the needs specific for an individual sport. Methods/Approach: A questionnaire has been created and sent electronically or physically to top athletes from Slovenia, Central and Eastern Europe. Respondents were mainly from Slovenia and mostly representatives of national sports federations. The Mann Whitney and the Kruskall-Wallis tests were applied in order to test differences among sport groups. Results: The conducted Mann-Whitney non-parametric tests show that representatives of different sport groups have different perspectives on sport tourism services. Conclusions: The results of the study can be used by sport tourism centres in the process of tailoring their services, planning marketing activities or developing strategic projects.

  15. Metabolism of Oxycodone in Human Hepatocytes from Different Age Groups and Prediction of Hepatic Plasma Clearance

    MiiaTurpeinen; TimoKorjamo; AriTolonen; Veli-PekkaRanta; HannuKokki

    2012-01-01

    Oxycodone is commonly used to treat severe pain in adults and children. It is extensively metabolized in the liver in adults, but the maturation of metabolism is not well understood. Our aim was to study the metabolism of oxycodone in cryopreserved human hepatocytes from different age groups (3 days, 2 and 5 months, 4 years, adult pool) and predict hepatic plasma clearance of oxycodone using these data. Oxycodone (0.1, 1 and 10 µM) was incubated with hepatocytes for 4 hours, and 1 µ...

  16. Adolescent Substance Use Groups: Antecedent and Concurrent Personality Differences in a Longitudinal Study

    Oliva, E. M.; Keyes, M.; Iacono, W. G.;

    2012-01-01

    personality and age-18 substance use in a community sample of 1,298 twins (96% Caucasian, 49% male). Personality measures at ages 11 and 18 assessed positive emotionality (agentic and communal), negative emotionality, and constraint. Substance use groupsabstainers, experimenters, and problem userswere created...... experimenters in communal positive emotionality, whereas female abstainers scored higher in agentic positive emotionality than female experimenters, who scored higher than female problem users. Experimenters were significantly lower in negative emotionality than problem users. Our findings are inconsistent with...... the notion that experimenters had the healthiest personality functioning and instead suggest different strengths and weaknesses for each group. Future studies should examine agentic and communal positive emotionality separately....

  17. The Effect of the Ammonium Group on the Different Annealing Processes

    The ammonium group can play an essential role in the different annealing processes of neutron-irradiated ammonium compounds. Some details of this effect were investigated. To give a more complete picture of this subject first some typical results, already published, are briefly discussed, concerning the thermal, radiation, photochemical and ultra-sonic annealing of ammonium and potassium sulphate as well as of ammonium and potassium dichromate. Afterwards new experimental data are reported showing the influence of the ammonium group on the thermal, radiation and ultra-sonic annealing of mono-, di- and triammonium phosphates. It was established that under the conditions of neutron irradiation in the pile the ammonium group in a compound can be transformed into certain metastabile recoil fragments, which can lead to the formation of reducing substances, e. g. hydrazine. The yield of hydrazine increases by the subsequent treatment of the neutron-irradiated solid samples with gamma-rays, ultra sound etc. Simultaneously with the increase in the hydrazine yield a strong change of the retention occurs. (author)

  18. Infrared Thermography to Evaluate Heat Tolerance in Different Genetic Groups of Lambs

    Concepta McManus

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Heat stress is considered a limiting factor for sheep production. We used information from physiological characteristics linked to heat tolerance to determine whether infrared thermography temperatures were able to separate groups of animals and determine the most important variables in this differentiation. Forty-eight four-month-old male lambs from eight genetic groups were used. Physiological (rectal temperature–RT, heart rate–HR, respiratory rate–RR and blood traits, infrared thermography temperatures, heat tolerance indices, body measurements, weight and carcass traits were measured. Statistical analyses included variance, correlations, factor, discrimination and regression. Observing the correlations between physiological characteristics (RT, RR and HR with temperatures measured by infrared thermography, regions for further studies should include the mean temperature of flank, nose and rump. Results show that there are strong relationships between thermograph measurements and RR, RT and HR in lambs, which are suggested to be directly correlated with heat tolerance capacity of the different genetic groups evaluated in this study. The assessment of body surface temperature measured by the thermograph could be used as a noninvasive tool to assess heat tolerance of the animals.

  19. The Seroepidemiology of Varicella Zoster Virus (VZV) in Different Age Groups in Tehran, Iran.

    Sharifi, Zohreh; Emadi Ghanjin, Sekyneh

    2005-06-01

    Varicella zoster virus (VZV), the causative agent of chicken pox and shingles, can cause severe systemic infections of the CNS and the respiratory tract in immunocompetent individuals as well as in immunocompromized patients.The aim of this cross-sectional study was to assess the prevalence of antibody Varicella zoster virus in different age groups.The enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) method was used to assess the presence of anti -VZV antibody.A total of 635 serum samples were collected. Age specific prevalence of IgG antibody to VZV showed a progressive increase with age in both males and females. The overall seroprevalence rate was 83.6%. Prevalence of antibodies was 59.7% in the age group of less than 10 years, 60.4 % in 10-14 years, 87.5 % in 15-19 years, 88 % in 20-24 years, 89.4 % in 25-29 years and 87.9 % in 30-39 years.The data show that children should be considered as a target group for prevention programs against VZV infection. PMID:17301429

  20. Testing problem-solving capacities: differences between individual testing and social group setting.

    Krasheninnikova, Anastasia; Schneider, Jutta M

    2014-09-01

    Testing animals individually in problem-solving tasks limits distractions of the subjects during the test, so that they can fully concentrate on the problem. However, such individual performance may not indicate the problem-solving capacity that is commonly employed in the wild when individuals are faced with a novel problem in their social groups, where the presence of a conspecific influences an individual's behaviour. To assess the validity of data gathered from parrots when tested individually, we compared the performance on patterned-string tasks among parrots tested singly and parrots tested in social context. We tested two captive groups of orange-winged amazons (Amazona amazonica) with several patterned-string tasks. Despite the differences in the testing environment (singly vs. social context), parrots from both groups performed similarly. However, we found that the willingness to participate in the tasks was significantly higher for the individuals tested in social context. The study provides further evidence for the crucial influence of social context on individual's response to a challenging situation such as a problem-solving test. PMID:24668582

  1. Analysis of development of force of different muscular groups for girls 18 - 20 years.

    Loshytska T.I.

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The question of development of different muscular groups is considered for girls. 42 students of a 1 course took part in researches. The absolute and relative indexes of development of muscles of hands and back are investigational. A method is used dynamometry and method of indexes. Accordance of actual indexes of force is studied to the age-related norms. The estimation of actual indexes is conducted on the levels of development. It is shown that muscular force in the different belts of human organism is developed variously. It is marked that existent situation can result in the numerous diseases of spine, which becomes complicated by the protracted stay of students in a static pose.

  2. Single Alternating Group Explicit (SAGE) Method for Electrochemical Finite Difference Digital Simulation

    DENG,Zhao-Xiang(邓兆祥); LIN,Xiang-Qin(林祥钦); TONG,Zhong-Hua(童中华)

    2002-01-01

    The four different schemes of Group Explicit Method (GEM): GER, GEL, SAGE and DAGE have been claimed to be unstable when employed for electrochemical digital simulations with large model diffusion coefficient DM@ However, in this investigation, in spite of the conditional stability of GER and GEL, the SAGE scheme, which is a combination of GEL and GER, was found to be unconditionally stable when used for simulations of electrochemical reaction-diffusions and had a performance comparable with or even better than the Fast Quasi Explicit Finite Difference Method (FQEFD) in srme aspects. Corresponding differential equations of SAGE scheme for digital simulations of various electrochemical mechanisms with both uniform and exponentially expanded space units were established. The effectiveness of the SAGE method was further demonstrated by the simulations of an EC and a catalytic mechanism with very large homogoneous rate constants.

  3. Differences in morphological properties between the olivine group minerals formed in natural and industrial processes

    Dević S.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Olivines are a large isomorphic series of minerals, belonging to silicates group. Regardless of their chemical composition, any of these minerals can be formed both in natural and industrial processes. The aim of this work is to describe these minerals and differences of morphological properties between the olivines formed in nature, and those formed as byproducts of some industrial processes , as Process Metalurgy-Ironmaking. The olivines whose formation is tied to rock masses (natural process and the olivines genetically tied to industrial processes of black metallurgy slags (process metallurgy-Ironmaking are shown in this paper. The morphological properties of these minerals and their differences have been analyzed by optical microscopy in refracted and in reflected light. .

  4. Extending the cereus group genomics to putative food-bornepathogens of different toxicity

    Lapidus, Alla; Goltsman, Eugene; Auger, Sandrine; Galleron,Nathalie; Segurens, Beatrice; Dossat, Carole; Land, Miriam L.; Broussole,Veronique; Brillard, Julien; Guinebretiere, Marie-Helene; Sanchis,Vincent; Nguen-the, Christophe; Lereclus, Didier; Richardson, Paul; Winker, Patrick; Weissenbach, Jean; Ehrlich, S.Dusko; Sorokin, Alexei

    2006-08-24

    The cereus group represents sporulating soil bacteriacontaining pathogenic strains which may cause diarrheic or emetic foodpoisoning outbreaks. Multiple locus sequence typing revealed a presencein natural samples of these bacteria of about thirty clonal complexes.Application of genomic methods to this group was however biased due tothe major interest for representatives closely related to B. anthracis.Albeit the most important food-borne pathogens were not yet defined,existing dataindicate that they are scattered all over the phylogenetictree. The preliminary analysis of the sequences of three genomesdiscussed in this paper narrows down the gaps in our knowledge of thecereus group. The strain NVH391-98 is a rare but particularly severefood-borne pathogen. Sequencing revealed that the strain must be arepresentative of a novel bacterial species, for which the name Bacilluscytotoxis is proposed. This strain has a reduced genome size compared toother cereus group strains. Genome analysis revealed absence of sigma Bfactor and the presence of genes encoding diarrheic Nhe toxin, notdetected earlier. The strain B. cereus F837/76 represents a clonalcomplex close to that of B. anthracis. Including F837/76, three such B.cereus strains had been sequenced. Alignment of genomes suggests that B.anthracis is their common ancestor. Since such strains often emerge fromclinical cases, they merit a special attention. The third strain, KBAB4,is a typical psychrotrophe characteristic to unbiased soil communities.Phylogenic studies show that in nature it is the most active group interms of gene exchange. Genomic sequence revealed high presence ofextra-chromosomal genetic material (about 530 kb) that may account forthis phenomenon. Genes coding Nhe-like toxin were found on a big plasmidin this strain. This may indicate a potential mechanism of toxicityspread from the psychrotrophic strain community. The results of thisgenomic work and ecological compartments of different strains incite

  5. Thermoluminescence of quartz optical fibres with different contents of OH-groups

    Full text: The thermo-luminescence or afterglow (AG) of quartz optical fibres (OF) of FVP-300 marks with contents of 1000 ppm OH groups and FIL with 10 ppm OH-group was studied after gamma γ-irradiations at 77 K to different doses in the temperature interval of 77-300 K. In the both OF types the AG was detected at 77K with the intensity decreasing while keeping at 77K and completely disappeared in 2-3 hours. The AG curves of both types FL contain peaks with maxima at 90, 95, 110, 130, 170 and 220 K. Besides, in FL with low contents OH-groups there is also a broad band at 260K. The intensities of peaks at 170, 220 and 260 K in OF with low contents of OH-groups are much higher than those for a large OH group contents. It means that higher contents of OH group suppresses the formation of these AG peaks. The comparative analysis of AG peaks of these OF types with literary data has shown their full coincidence with the data of work [1] on study of thermal luminescence of quartz crystal activated simultaneously by germanium and aluminum. We explained the studied radiation-stimulated changes in both OF types by analogy with the case of crystalline quartz with Ge and Al admixtures by Mackey model though it does not reflect completely all the processes of creation and annealing the centres. The essence of Mackey model is the following: during γ-irradiation of silicon dioxide at 77K [GeO4]- +[Ale+O4]+M+ centers are formed. Either heating up to 300K or long ageing at 77K (as in our case of OF) leads to the formation of [GeO4]-M+ +[Ale+O4]+hν type centres. References: 1. Tcinober L.I. Proceedings of the conference of All-union Scientific Research Institution of piezo-optic mineral crude, M., 1960, vol. 3, No 2, p. 95. (authors)

  6. THE INFLUENCE OF AGE HENS ON THE INTENSITY LOAD CAPACITY FROM DIFFERENT WEIGHT GROUPS EGGS

    Tatjana Pandurević

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the effect of age of hens on the intensity of load from different weight groups eggs. This paper presents the correlation connection, meaning and significance of differences connection for two weight classes (M - 53 to 63g and L – 63g to 73g, which make up the largest part of the total number of eggs produced during the entire production cycle, as well as for all of the eggs produced, as compared to age-laying hens. Between age and intensity of load to 53 weeks of age hens (SN53/34, there is a strong positive, medium and slight correlation coefficients determined and phenotypic correlation are statistically confirmed at the level of P <0.01 and P <0.05. From 53 weeks of age until the end of exploitation of laying hens (SN72/53 the correlation strength of the association was weaker and weaker, and in the last eight weeks passed in the negative, ie. Fortified negative phenotypic correlation coefficients, but were not statistically significant (P> 0.05. Between the age of hens and intensity of load hardest groups (classes eggs (L there is a complete and very strong connections and established correlation coefficients were statistically significant at P <0.001.

  7. Prevalence of anaemia among different physiological groups in the rural areas of Maharashtra

    Nimmathota Arlappa

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Anaemia continues to be a major public health nutritional problem in India, and has adverse health and economic implications. Objective: The objective of the study was to assess the prevalence of anaemia among different physiological groups in the state of Maharashtra. Methodology: A community based cross-sectional study adopting multistage stratified random sampling procedure was carried out in rural Maharashtra. Information of socio-demographic particulars was collected with pretested questionnaire. A finger prick blood sample of 20 µL was collected from the subjects. Haemoglobin was estimated using cyanmethemoglobin method. Results: The overall prevalence of anaemia was 59%, 61%, 76% and 73% among pre-school children, adolescent girls, pregnant women and lactating mothers, respectively. Logistic regression analysis revealed that the risk of anaemia was two times higher among pregnant and lactating women and among the subjects belonged to scheduled caste and scheduled tribe communities. Conclusion: Anaemia is a severe public health problem among pre-school children and women of different physiological groups in rural Maharashtra. Therefore, there is a need to strengthen the existing national nutritional anaemia control programme and the community is encouraged to consume iron rich foods through health and nutrition education and information, education and communication (IEC activities.

  8. Different genetic algorithms and the evolution of specialization: a study with groups of simulated neural robots.

    Ferrauto, Tomassino; Parisi, Domenico; Di Stefano, Gabriele; Baldassarre, Gianluca

    2013-01-01

    Organisms that live in groups, from microbial symbionts to social insects and schooling fish, exhibit a number of highly efficient cooperative behaviors, often based on role taking and specialization. These behaviors are relevant not only for the biologist but also for the engineer interested in decentralized collective robotics. We address these phenomena by carrying out experiments with groups of two simulated robots controlled by neural networks whose connection weights are evolved by using genetic algorithms. These algorithms and controllers are well suited to autonomously find solutions for decentralized collective robotic tasks based on principles of self-organization. The article first presents a taxonomy of role-taking and specialization mechanisms related to evolved neural network controllers. Then it introduces two cooperation tasks, which can be accomplished by either role taking or specialization, and uses these tasks to compare four different genetic algorithms to evaluate their capacity to evolve a suitable behavioral strategy, which depends on the task demands. Interestingly, only one of the four algorithms, which appears to have more biological plausibility, is capable of evolving role taking or specialization when they are needed. The results are relevant for both collective robotics and biology, as they can provide useful hints on the different processes that can lead to the emergence of specialization in robots and organisms. PMID:23514239

  9. The comparison of recreative activities of 11-15 age group depending on different regions

    Adem Pala

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to compare the recreative activities of 11-15 age group depending on different Regions. In this respect, 227 children from Southeastern part of Turkey and 262 children from Marmara region of Turkey participated in this study in a volunteered way.The questionnaire adapted from previous studies was implemented on these participants. Afterwards, the data were analyzed in terms of frequency, percentage and independent group of t-test statistics. Data were analyzed with the help of SPSS 15.0 and the significance rate was determined 0,05. Consequently, significantly different result were found (p0,05.According to the findings of this research, 37,9 % of the participant from Southeastern part of Turkey chose “sports” option of the item of “what they do in their leisure time”, 53,3 % of participant within same region chose “football” option of the item of “which recreative activities they regularly deal with”. 51,5 % of the participant from Marmara region chose “sports” option of the former question: Additionally , 25,6 % of item chose “football”, 21,5 % of them chose “badminton” and 12,8 % of them chose “basketball” options of the latter question.

  10. Preliminary examination of ethnic group differences in adolescent girls' attitudes toward depression treatments.

    Caporino, Nicole E; Chen, Jason I; Karver, Marc S

    2014-01-01

    Efficacious treatments are only valuable to the extent that they are used. Given ethnic disparities in mental health service utilization, this preliminary study examined differences between Hispanic and non-Hispanic White (NHW) adolescents' ratings of the acceptability of depression treatments and related constructs. Female high school students (N = 67; 54% Hispanic) read a vignette describing a depressed adolescent and rated the acceptability of four single treatments for depression (i.e., cognitive-behavioral therapy, interpersonal therapy, family therapy, and pharmacotherapy) and three treatment combinations. Hispanic adolescents completed a self-report measure of acculturation and all adolescents were interviewed about their beliefs of the causes of depression. Results showed more similarities than differences between ethnic groups, with Hispanic and NHW adolescents favoring psychological treatments over pharmacotherapy. Among Hispanic participants, overall ratings of treatment acceptability were significantly higher for bicultural adolescents than Hispanic adolescents immersed predominantly in non-Hispanic culture. Hispanic and NHW adolescents generally showed similar beliefs about the causes of depression, with both groups endorsing personality and cognitions at high rates, but Hispanics were significantly less likely than NHWs to endorse trauma as a cause of depression. Implications for decreasing ethnic disparities in unmet need for treatment are discussed. PMID:23834256