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Sample records for accurate frequency dependent

  1. Radiation hydrodynamics simulations in massive star formation I - Fast and accurate frequency dependent radiation transport

    Kuiper, Rolf; Dullemond, Cornelis; Kley, Wilhelm; Henning, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Context: Radiative feedback plays a crucial role in the formation of massive stars. The implementation of a fast and accurate description of the proceeding thermodynamics in pre-stellar cores and evolving accretion disks is therefore a main effort in current hydrodynamics simulations. Aims: We introduce our newly implemented three-dimensional frequency dependent radiation transport algorithm for hydrodynamics simulations of spatial configurations with a dominant central source. Methods: The module combines the advantage of the speed of an approximate Flux Limited Diffusion (FLD) solver with the high accuracy of a frequency dependent first order ray-tracing routine. Results: We prove the viability of the scheme in a standard radiation benchmark test compared to a full frequency dependent Monte-Carlo based radiative transfer code. The setup includes a central star, a circumstellar flared disk, as well as an envelope. The test is performed for different optical depths. Considering the frequency dependence of the...

  2. High Frequency QRS ECG Accurately Detects Cardiomyopathy

    Schlegel, Todd T.; Arenare, Brian; Poulin, Gregory; Moser, Daniel R.; Delgado, Reynolds

    2005-01-01

    High frequency (HF, 150-250 Hz) analysis over the entire QRS interval of the ECG is more sensitive than conventional ECG for detecting myocardial ischemia. However, the accuracy of HF QRS ECG for detecting cardiomyopathy is unknown. We obtained simultaneous resting conventional and HF QRS 12-lead ECGs in 66 patients with cardiomyopathy (EF = 23.2 plus or minus 6.l%, mean plus or minus SD) and in 66 age- and gender-matched healthy controls using PC-based ECG software recently developed at NASA. The single most accurate ECG parameter for detecting cardiomyopathy was an HF QRS morphological score that takes into consideration the total number and severity of reduced amplitude zones (RAZs) present plus the clustering of RAZs together in contiguous leads. This RAZ score had an area under the receiver operator curve (ROC) of 0.91, and was 88% sensitive, 82% specific and 85% accurate for identifying cardiomyopathy at optimum score cut-off of 140 points. Although conventional ECG parameters such as the QRS and QTc intervals were also significantly longer in patients than controls (P less than 0.001, BBBs excluded), these conventional parameters were less accurate (area under the ROC = 0.77 and 0.77, respectively) than HF QRS morphological parameters for identifying underlying cardiomyopathy. The total amplitude of the HF QRS complexes, as measured by summed root mean square voltages (RMSVs), also differed between patients and controls (33.8 plus or minus 11.5 vs. 41.5 plus or minus 13.6 mV, respectively, P less than 0.003), but this parameter was even less accurate in distinguishing the two groups (area under ROC = 0.67) than the HF QRS morphologic and conventional ECG parameters. Diagnostic accuracy was optimal (86%) when the RAZ score from the HF QRS ECG and the QTc interval from the conventional ECG were used simultaneously with cut-offs of greater than or equal to 40 points and greater than or equal to 445 ms, respectively. In conclusion 12-lead HF QRS ECG employing

  3. Frequency dependence of quasiparticle mixers

    An analysis of the frequency dependence of superconductor-insulator-normal (SIN) and superconductor-insulator-superconductor (SIS) quasiparticle mixers is presented. Power-law expressions for conversion loss and mixer shot-noise temperature for the double-sideband SIN mixer are derived from the Tucker theory for the case of a source conductance which is small compared to the conductance of the junction. For an ideal SIN tunnel junction at T = 0 the mixer conversion efficiency is shown to decrease approximately linearly with frequency up to f = Δ/h. From f = Δ/h to 2Δ/h the conversion efficiency remains approximately constant, while above f = 2Δ/h it rolls off as the inverse square of the frequency. Expressions for the shot-noise contribution to the mixer noise temperature are also derived. At frequencies up to f = Δ/h the noise temperature rises as the square root of the frequency. From f = Δ/h to f = 2Δ/h the noise temperature of the mixer increases linearly with frequency, whereas above f = 2Δ/h it rises as the cube of the frequency. Conversion efficiency and noise temperature are also calculated numerically for the SIN mixer. Good agreement is found between the frequency dependencies calculated analytically in the limit of small local oscillator power and the numerical calculations for optimal pumping

  4. Accurate rest frequencies of methanol maser and dark cloud lines

    Müller, H S P; Maeder, H

    2004-01-01

    We report accurate laboratory measurements of selected methanol transition frequencies between 0.834 and 230 GHz in order to facilitate astronomical velocity analyses. New data have been obtained between 10 and 27 GHz and between 60 and 119 GHz. Emphasis has been put on known or potential interstellar maser lines as well as on transitions suitable for the investigation of cold dark clouds. Because of the narrow line widths (<0.5 kms-1) of maser lines and lines detected in dark molecular clouds, accurate frequencies are needed for comparison of the velocities of different methanol lines with each other as well as with lines from other species. In particular, frequencies for a comprehensive set of transitions are given which, because of their low level energies (< 20 cm-1 or 30 K) are potentially detectable in cold clouds. Global Hamiltonian fits generally do not yet yield the required accuracy. Additionally, we report transition frequencies for other lines that may be used to test and to improve existing...

  5. Frequency-dependent heat capacity

    Behrens, Claus Flensted

    The frequency–dependent heat capacity of super-cooled glycerol near the glass transition is measured using the 3w detection technique. An electrical conducting thin film with a temperature–dependent electrical resistance is deposited on a substrate. The thin film is used simultaneously as a heater...

  6. KFM: a homemade yet accurate and dependable fallout meter

    The KFM is a homemade fallout meter that can be made using only materials, tools, and skills found in millions of American homes. It is an accurate and dependable electroscope-capacitor. The KFM, in conjunction with its attached table and a watch, is designed for use as a rate meter. Its attached table relates observed differences in the separations of its two leaves (before and after exposures at the listed time intervals) to the dose rates during exposures of these time intervals. In this manner dose rates from 30 mR/hr up to 43 R/hr can be determined with an accuracy of +-25%. A KFM can be charged with any one of the three expedient electrostatic charging devices described. Due to the use of anhydrite (made by heating gypsum from wallboard) inside a KFM and the expedient ''dry-bucket'' in which it can be charged when the air is very humid, this instrument always can be charged and used to obtain accurate measurements of gamma radiation no matter how high the relative humidity. The step-by-step illustrated instructions for making and using a KFM are presented. These instructions have been improved after each successive field test. The majority of the untrained test families, adequately motivated by cash bonuses offered for success and guided only by these written instructions, have succeeded in making and using a KFM

  7. The KFM, A Homemade Yet Accurate and Dependable Fallout Meter

    Kearny, C.H.

    2001-11-20

    The KFM is a homemade fallout meter that can be made using only materials, tools, and skills found in millions of American homes. It is an accurate and dependable electroscope-capacitor. The KFM, in conjunction with its attached table and a watch, is designed for use as a rate meter. Its attached table relates observed differences in the separations of its two leaves (before and after exposures at the listed time intervals) to the dose rates during exposures of these time intervals. In this manner dose rates from 30 mR/hr up to 43 R/hr can be determined with an accuracy of {+-}25%. A KFM can be charged with any one of the three expedient electrostatic charging devices described. Due to the use of anhydrite (made by heating gypsum from wallboard) inside a KFM and the expedient ''dry-bucket'' in which it can be charged when the air is very humid, this instrument always can be charged and used to obtain accurate measurements of gamma radiation no matter how high the relative humidity. The heart of this report is the step-by-step illustrated instructions for making and using a KFM. These instructions have been improved after each successive field test. The majority of the untrained test families, adequately motivated by cash bonuses offered for success and guided only by these written instructions, have succeeded in making and using a KFM. NOTE: ''The KFM, A Homemade Yet Accurate and Dependable Fallout Meter'', was published by Oak Ridge National Laboratory report in1979. Some of the materials originally suggested for suspending the leaves of the Kearny Fallout Meter (KFM) are no longer available. Because of changes in the manufacturing process, other materials (e.g., sewing thread, unwaxed dental floss) may not have the insulating capability to work properly. Oak Ridge National Laboratory has not tested any of the suggestions provided in the preface of the report, but they have been used by other groups. When using these

  8. Frequency-dependent streaming potentials: a review

    Jouniaux, Laurence; 10.1155/2012/648781

    2012-01-01

    The interpretation of seismoelectric observations involves the dynamic electrokinetic coupling, which is related to the streaming potential coefficient. We describe the different models of the frequency-dependent streaming potential, mainly the Packard's and the Pride's model. We compare the transition frequency separating low-frequency viscous flow and high-frequency inertial flow, for dynamic permeability and dynamic streaming potential. We show that the transition frequency, on a various collection of samples for which both formation factor and permeability are measured, is predicted to depend on the permeability as inversely proportional to the permeability. We review the experimental setups built to be able to perform dynamic measurements. And we present some measurements and calculations of the dynamic streaming potential.

  9. Accurate approximate solution to nonlinear oscillators in which the restoring force is inversely proportional to the dependent variable

    A modified generalized, rational harmonic balance method is used to construct approximate frequency-amplitude relations for a conservative nonlinear singular oscillator in which the restoring force is inversely proportional to the dependent variable. The procedure is used to solve the nonlinear differential equation approximately. The approximate frequency obtained using this procedure is more accurate than those obtained using other approximate methods and the discrepancy between the approximate frequency and the exact one is lower than 0.40%

  10. Kinship as a frequency dependent strategy.

    Ji, Ting; Zheng, Xiu-Deng; He, Qiao-Qiao; Wu, Jia-Jia; Mace, Ruth; Tao, Yi

    2016-02-01

    Humans divide themselves up into separate cultures, which is a unique and ubiquitous characteristic of our species. Kinship norms are one of the defining features of such societies. Here we show how norms of marital residence can evolve as a frequency-dependent strategy, using real-world cases from southwestern China and an evolutionary game model. The process of kinship change has occurred in the past and is also occurring now in southwestern China. Our data and models show how transitions between residence types can occur both as response to changing costs and benefits of co-residence with kin, and also due to the initial frequency of the strategies adopted by others in the population: patrilocal societies can become matrilocal, and neolocal societies can become duolocal. This illustrates how frequency-dependent selection plays a role both in the maintenance of group-level cultural diversity and in cultural extinction. PMID:26998333

  11. Frequency dependent changes in NMDAR-dependent synaptic plasticity

    Arvind eKumar

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The NMDAR-dependent synaptic plasticity is thought to mediate several forms of learning, and can be induced by spike trains containing a small number of spikes occurring with varying rates and timing, as well as with oscillations. We computed the influence of these variables on the plasticity induced at a single NMDAR containing synapse using a reduced model that was analytically tractable, and these findings were confirmed using detailed, multi-compartment model. In addition to explaining diverse experimental results about the rate and timing dependence of synaptic plasticity, the model made several novel and testable predictions. We found that there was a preferred frequency for inducing long-term potentiation (LTP such that higher frequency stimuli induced lesser LTP, decreasing as 1/f when the number of spikes in the stimulus was kept fixed. Among other things, the preferred frequency for inducing LTP varied as a function of the distance of the synapse from the soma. In fact, same stimulation frequencies could induce LTP or LTD depending on the dendritic location of the synapse. Next, we found that rhythmic stimuli induced greater plasticity then irregular stimuli. Furthermore, brief bursts of spikes significantly expanded the timing dependence of plasticity. Finally, we found that in the ~5-15Hz frequency range both rate- and timing-dependent plasticity mechanisms work synergistically to render the synaptic plasticity most sensitive to spike-timing. These findings provide computational evidence that oscillations can have a profound influence on the plasticity of an NMDAR-dependent synapse, and show a novel role for the dendritic morphology in this process.

  12. A Novel Multimode Waveguide Coupler for Accurate Power Measurement of Traveling Wave Tube Harmonic Frequencies

    Wintucky, Edwin G.; Simons, Rainee N.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the design, fabrication and test results for a novel waveguide multimode directional coupler (MDC). The coupler fabricated from two dissimilar waveguides is capable of isolating the power at the second harmonic frequency from the fundamental power at the output port of a traveling-wave tube (TWT). In addition to accurate power measurements at harmonic frequencies, a potential application of the MDC is in the design of a beacon source for atmospheric propagation studies at millimeter-wave frequencies.

  13. Frequency Dependent Negative Resistance-A review

    D.Susan

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Inductors are bulky and costly but reducing the size of the inductors reduces the quality factor. There is also a fundamental limitation of using inductor that it cannot be suitable for the micro miniature structure and integrated circuits applications. Because of these limitations, inductors cannot be used in most of the analog circuit applications. Hence simulated inductors are used as an alternative. In case the simulated inductor becomes floating some linear transformation is used which results in the formation of a new D element called the Frequency Dependent Negative Resistance (FDNR. This paper presents an overview of the basic circuits of simulating the Frequency Dependent Negative Resistance and its various applications in analog circuits in the place of floating inductor.

  14. Simple and Accurate Dependency Parsing Using Bidirectional LSTM Feature Representations

    Kiperwasser, Eliyahu; Goldberg, Yoav

    2016-01-01

    We present a simple and effective scheme for dependency parsing which is based on bidirectional-LSTMs (BiLSTMs). Each sentence token is associated with a BiLSTM vector representing the token in its sentential context, and feature vectors are constructed by concatenating a few BiLSTM vectors. The BiLSTM is trained jointly with the parser objective, resulting in very effective feature extractors for parsing. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the approach by applying it to a greedy transition ...

  15. Frequency dependent thermal expansion in binary viscoelasticcomposites

    Berryman, James G.

    2007-12-01

    The effective thermal expansion coefficient beta* of abinary viscoelastic composite is shown to be frequency dependent even ifthe thermal expansion coefficients beta A and beta B of both constituentsare themselves frequency independent. Exact calculations for binaryviscoelastic systems show that beta* is related to constituent valuesbeta A, beta B, volume fractions, and bulk moduli KA, KB, as well as tothe overall bulk modulus K* of the composite system. Then, beta* isdetermined for isotropic systems by first bounding (or measuring) K* andtherefore beta*. For anisotropic systems with hexagonal symmetry, theprincipal values of the thermal expansion beta*perp and beta*para can bedetermined exactly when the constituents form a layered system. In allthe examples studied, it is shown explicitly that the eigenvectors of thethermoviscoelastic system possess non-negative dissipation -- despite thecomplicated analytical behavior of the frequency dependent thermalexpansivities themselves. Methods presented have a variety ofapplications from fluid-fluid mixtures to fluid-solid suspensions, andfrom fluid-saturated porous media to viscoelastic solid-solidcomposites.

  16. Accurate Estimation of Low Fundamental Frequencies from Real-Valued Measurements

    Christensen, Mads Græsbøll

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, the difficult problem of estimating low fundamental frequencies from real-valued measurements is addressed. The methods commonly employed do not take the phenomena encountered in this scenario into account and thus fail to deliver accurate estimates. The reason for this is that they...... employ asymptotic approximations that are violated when the harmonics are not well-separated in frequency, something that happens when the observed signal is real-valued and the fundamental frequency is low. To mitigate this, we analyze the problem and present some exact fundamental frequency estimators...... that are aimed at solving this problem. These esti- mators are based on the principles of nonlinear least-squares, harmonic fitting, optimal filtering, subspace orthogonality, and shift-invariance, and they all reduce to already published methods for a high number of observations. In experiments, the...

  17. DPOAE generation dependence on primary frequencies ratio

    Botti, Teresa; Sisto, Renata; Moleti, Arturo; D'Amato, Luisa; Sanjust, Filippo

    2015-12-01

    Two different mechanisms are responsible for the DPOAE generation. The nonlinear distortion wave-fixed mechanism generates the DPOAE Zero-Latency (ZL) component, as a backward traveling wave from the "overlap" region. Linear reflection of the forward DP wave (IDP) generates the DPOAE Long-Latency (LL) component through a place-fixed mechanism. ZL and LL components add up vectorially to generate the DPOAE recorded in the ear canal. The 2f1 - f2 and 2f2 - f1 DPOAE intensity depends on the stimulus level and on the primary frequency ratio r = f2/f1, where f1 and f2 are the primary stimuli frequencies. Here we study the behavior of the ZL and LL DPOAE components as a function of r by both numerical and laboratory experiments, measuring DPAOEs with an equal primary levels (L1 = L2) paradigm in the range [35, 75] dB SPL, with r ranging in [1.1, 1.45]. Numerical simulations of a nonlocal nonlinear model have been performed without cochlear roughness, to suppress the linear reflection mechanism. In this way the model solution at the base represents the DPOAE ZL component, and the solution at the corresponding DPOAE tonotopic place corresponds to the IDP. This technique has been not effectual to study the 2f2 - f1 DPOAE, as a consequence of its generation mechanism. While the 2f1 - f2 generation place is known to be the tonotopic place x(f2), the 2f2 - f1 DPOAE one has to be assumed basal to its corresponding reflection place. That is because ZL components generated in x(f2) cannot significantly pass through their resonant place. Moreover increasing the ratio r, 2f2 - f1 ZL and LL generation place approach each other, because the overlap region of primary tones decreases. Consequently, the distinction between the two places becomes complicated. DPOAEs have been measured in six young normal-hearing subjects. DPOAE ZL and LL components have been separated by a time-frequency filtering method based on the wavelet transform 1. due to their different phase gradient delay

  18. Accurate and fast fiber transfer delay measurement based on phase discrimination and frequency measurement

    Dong, J W; Gao, C; Wang, L J

    2016-01-01

    An accurate and fast fiber transfer delay measurement method is demonstrated. As a key technique, a simple ambiguity resolving process based on phase discrimination and frequency measurement is used to overcome the contradiction between measurement accuracy and system complexity. The optimized system achieves a high accuracy of 0.3 ps with a 0.1 ps resolution, and a large dynamic range up to 50 km as well as no dead zone.

  19. Low noise frequency synthesizer with self-calibrated voltage controlled oscillator and accurate AFC algorithm

    A low noise phase locked loop (PLL) frequency synthesizer implemented in 65 nm CMOS technology is introduced. A VCO noise reduction method suited for short channel design is proposed to minimize PLL output phase noise. A self-calibrated voltage controlled oscillator is proposed in cooperation with the automatic frequency calibration circuit, whose accurate binary search algorithm helps reduce the VCO tuning curve coverage, which reduces the VCO noise contribution at PLL output phase noise. A low noise, charge pump is also introduced to extend the tuning voltage range of the proposed VCO, which further reduces its phase noise contribution. The frequency synthesizer generates 9.75–11.5 GHz high frequency wide band local oscillator (LO) carriers. Tested 11.5 GHz LO bears a phase noise of−104 dBc/Hz at 1 MHz frequency offset. The total power dissipation of the proposed frequency synthesizer is 48 mW. The area of the proposed frequency synthesizer is 0.3 mm2, including bias circuits and buffers. (semiconductor integrated circuits)

  20. Accurate Frequency Estimation Based On Three-Parameter Sine-Fitting With Three FFT Samples

    Liu Xin

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a simple DFT-based golden section searching algorithm (DGSSA for the single tone frequency estimation. Because of truncation and discreteness in signal samples, Fast Fourier Transform (FFT and Discrete Fourier Transform (DFT are inevitable to cause the spectrum leakage and fence effect which lead to a low estimation accuracy. This method can improve the estimation accuracy under conditions of a low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR and a low resolution. This method firstly uses three FFT samples to determine the frequency searching scope, then – besides the frequency – the estimated values of amplitude, phase and dc component are obtained by minimizing the least square (LS fitting error of three-parameter sine fitting. By setting reasonable stop conditions or the number of iterations, the accurate frequency estimation can be realized. The accuracy of this method, when applied to observed single-tone sinusoid samples corrupted by white Gaussian noise, is investigated by different methods with respect to the unbiased Cramer-Rao Low Bound (CRLB. The simulation results show that the root mean square error (RMSE of the frequency estimation curve is consistent with the tendency of CRLB as SNR increases, even in the case of a small number of samples. The average RMSE of the frequency estimation is less than 1.5 times the CRLB with SNR = 20 dB and N = 512.

  1. Size-dependent dielectrophoretic crossover frequency of spherical particles.

    Weng, Ping-You; Chen, I-An; Yeh, Che-Kai; Chen, Pin-Yi; Juang, Jia-Yang

    2016-01-01

    Dielectrophoresis (DEP) has been extensively used in lab-on-a-chip systems for trapping, separating, and manipulating of micro particles suspended in a liquid medium. The most widely used analytic model, the dipole model, provides an accurate prediction on the crossover frequency of submicron particles, but cannot explain the significant drop in crossover frequency of larger particles. Here, we present numerical simulations using the Maxwell stress tensor (MST) and finite element method to study the size effect of the DEP crossover frequency of spherical polystyrene particles suspended in de-ionized water. Our results show that the surface conductance due to the electrical double layer plays a key role, and the size dependency of crossover frequency obtained by the MST method agrees reasonably well with published experimental data. The exponents of the power law are approximately -1.0 and -4.3 for smaller (diameter  4.6 μm), respectively. The free surface charge distribution reveals that the charge begins accumulating on the particle equator for particle diameters larger than a critical diameter of 4.6 μm, a result not captured by the dipolar approximation. This method may be extended to analyze bioparticles with complex shapes and composition, and provides new insights into the interpretation of dielectrophoresis applications using lab-on-a-chip systems. PMID:26909121

  2. Ultrasonic Backscattering from Suspended Erythrocytes: Dependence on Frequency and Size.

    Kuo, Ihyuan

    The ultrasonic scattering properties of blood have been intensively investigated since the echo signal from red blood cells carries abundant diagnostic information for the study of blood flow and blood properties in the vessels. Recently, ultrasound of frequency higher than 20 MHz has been implemented in intravascular imaging to obtain better images of the vessel wall. In this research measurements were extended to 30 MHz to better understand the effect of blood on the operation of these intravascular devices. The experimentally measured backscatter of saline suspended porcine erythrocytes for frequency up to 30 MHz agrees very well with the theoretical analysis which indicate that Rayleigh scattering is still valid below this frequency. The analysis utilize the T-matrix method to calculate the backscattering cross section of an erythrocyte modeled as a fluid sphere, disk, and biconcave disk. Measurements on the backscattering coefficients of porcine, bovine, and lamb erythrocytes reveal that the backscatter has a square dependence on cell volume. The cell size dependent backscatter is also analyzed via a continuum approach. It is found that the echo intensity of high frequency ultrasound suffers greatly from the attenuation. The dilemma may be solved by using a spherically focused transducer. An analysis of the focused beam reflected from a perfect planar reflector leads to the modification of the standard substitution method for the backscatter measurement since the "image source" theory is found to be inappropriate for the focused beam. Reflection of the focused beam near the focal point is described based on Huygens' principle. Experimental and theoretical results indicate that the backscatter is dependent upon the position of the scatterer and the geometry of the transducer if a focused beam is used. Since ultrasound velocity information is needed for scattering measurements, an innovative method for measuring the acoustic speed and the attenuation coefficient

  3. The dependency of timbre on fundamental frequency

    Marozeau, Jeremy; de Cheveigné, Alain; McAdams, Stephen; Winsberg, Suzanne

    2003-11-01

    The dependency of the timbre of musical sounds on their fundamental frequency (F0) was examined in three experiments. In experiment I subjects compared the timbres of stimuli produced by a set of 12 musical instruments with equal F0, duration, and loudness. There were three sessions, each at a different F0. In experiment II the same stimuli were rearranged in pairs, each with the same difference in F0, and subjects had to ignore the constant difference in pitch. In experiment III, instruments were paired both with and without an F0 difference within the same session, and subjects had to ignore the variable differences in pitch. Experiment I yielded dissimilarity matrices that were similar at different F0's, suggesting that instruments kept their relative positions within timbre space. Experiment II found that subjects were able to ignore the salient pitch difference while rating timbre dissimilarity. Dissimilarity matrices were symmetrical, suggesting further that the absolute displacement of the set of instruments within timbre space was small. Experiment III extended this result to the case where the pitch difference varied from trial to trial. Multidimensional scaling (MDS) of dissimilarity scores produced solutions (timbre spaces) that varied little across conditions and experiments. MDS solutions were used to test the validity of signal-based predictors of timbre, and in particular their stability as a function of F0. Taken together, the results suggest that timbre differences are perceived independently from differences of pitch, at least for F0 differences smaller than an octave. Timbre differences can be measured between stimuli with different F0's.

  4. An Accurate Quartic Force Field and Vibrational Frequencies for HNO and DNO

    Dateo, Christopher E.; Lee, Timothy J.; Schwenke, David W.

    1994-01-01

    An accurate ab initio quartic force field for HNO has been determined using the singles and doubles coupled-cluster method that includes a perturbational estimate of the effects of connected triple excitations, CCSD(T), in conjunction with the correlation consistent polarized valence triple zeta (cc-pVTZ) basis set. Improved harmonic frequencies were determined with the cc-pVQZ basis set. Fundamental vibrational frequencies were determined using a second-order perturbation theory analysis and also using variational calculations. The N-0 stretch and bending fundamentals are determined well from both vibrational analyses. The H-N stretch, however, is shown to have an unusually large anharmonic correction, and is not well determined using second-order perturbation theory. The H-N fundamental is well determined from the variational calculations, demonstrating the quality of the ab initio quartic force field. The zero-point energy of HNO that should be used in isodesmic reactions is also discussed.

  5. Frequency-dependent fitness in gynodioecious Lobelia siphilitica.

    Rivkin, L Ruth; Case, Andrea L; Caruso, Christina M

    2015-05-01

    Selection is frequency dependent when an individual's fitness depends on the frequency of its phenotype. Frequency-dependent selection should be common in gynodioecious plants, where individuals are female or hermaphroditic; if the fitness of females is limited by the availability of pollen to fertilize their ovules, then they should have higher fitness when rare than when common. To test whether the fitness of females is frequency dependent, we manipulated the sex ratio in arrays of gynodioecious Lobelia siphilitica. To test whether fitness was frequency dependent because of variation in pollen availability, we compared open-pollinated and supplemental hand-pollinated plants. Open-pollinated females produced more seeds when they were rare than when they were common, as expected if fitness is negatively frequency dependent. However, hand-pollinated females also produced more seeds when they were rare, indicating that variation in pollen availability was not the cause of frequency-dependent fitness. Instead, fitness was frequency dependent because both hand- and open-pollinated females opened more flowers when they were rare than when they were common. This plasticity in the rate of anthesis could cause fitness to be frequency dependent even when reproduction is not pollen limited, and thus expand the conditions under which frequency-dependent selection operates in gynodioecious species. PMID:25824809

  6. Pulsed Frequency Shifted Feedback Laser for Accurate Long Distance Measurements: Beat Order Determination

    Pique, Jean-Paul

    2012-01-01

    Long-distance measurements (10 m - 1000 m) with an accuracy of 10-7 is a challenge for many applications. We show that it is achievable with Frequency Shifted Feedback (FSF) laser interferometry technique, provided that the determination of the radio frequency beat order be made without ambiguity and on a time scale compatible with atmospheric applications. Using the pulsed-FSF laser that we developed for laser guide star application, we propose and test, up to 240 m, a simple method for measuring the beat order in real time. The moving-comb and Yatsenko models are also discussed. The first of these models fails to interpret our long-distance interferometry results. We show that the accuracy of long-distance measurements depends primarily on the stabilization of the acoustic frequency of the modulator.

  7. Elimination of frequency dependence in generating voltmeter

    Generally high voltage of the order of a few million volts developed in Van de Graaff accelerator are measured using a generating voltmeter. This works on the principle that, when the capacitance between the high voltage dome and a plate (known as stator) near it, is varied, the current induced in the stator circuit is proportional to the dome voltage (V) and the frequency of variation of the capacitance (f). The current is a measure of V if f is assumed to be constant. Generally f is derived from the main's supply frequency. It is observed that this supply frequency does not remain constant but fluctuates around 50 cycles. Thus the measured induced current fluctuates some error in the measurement of the voltage even if the actual dome voltage remains constant. To eliminate this, a circuit has been designed which measures the induced charge on the stator instead of current. This induced charge is independent of frequency but is proportional to dome voltage. The voltage so measured is independent of frequency. (author)

  8. Range-Angle-Dependent Beamforming by Frequency Diverse Array Antenna

    Wen-Qin Wang; Huaizong Shao; Jingye Cai

    2012-01-01

    This paper proposes a range-angle-dependent beamforming for frequency diverse array (FDA) antenna systems. Unlike conventional phased-array antenna, the FDA antenna employs a small amount of frequency increment compared to the carrier frequency across the array elements. The use of frequency increment generates an antenna pattern that is a function of range, time and angle. The range-angle-dependent beamforming allows the FDA antenna to transmit energy over a desired range or angle. This prov...

  9. Discrete diffusion Monte Carlo for frequency-dependent radiative transfer

    Densmore, Jeffrey D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kelly, Thompson G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Urbatish, Todd J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-11-17

    Discrete Diffusion Monte Carlo (DDMC) is a technique for increasing the efficiency of Implicit Monte Carlo radiative-transfer simulations. In this paper, we develop an extension of DDMC for frequency-dependent radiative transfer. We base our new DDMC method on a frequency-integrated diffusion equation for frequencies below a specified threshold. Above this threshold we employ standard Monte Carlo. With a frequency-dependent test problem, we confirm the increased efficiency of our new DDMC technique.

  10. Accurate formula for dissipative interaction in frequency modulation atomic force microscopy

    Suzuki, Kazuhiro; Matsushige, Kazumi; Yamada, Hirofumi [Department of Electronic Science and Engineering, Kyoto University, Katsura, Nishikyo, Kyoto 615-8510 (Japan); Kobayashi, Kei [Department of Electronic Science and Engineering, Kyoto University, Katsura, Nishikyo, Kyoto 615-8510 (Japan); The Hakubi Center for Advanced Research, Kyoto University, Katsura, Nishikyo, Kyoto 615-8520 (Japan); Labuda, Aleksander [Department of Physics, McGill University, Montreal H3A 2T8 (Canada)

    2014-12-08

    Much interest has recently focused on the viscosity of nano-confined liquids. Frequency modulation atomic force microscopy (FM-AFM) is a powerful technique that can detect variations in the conservative and dissipative forces between a nanometer-scale tip and a sample surface. We now present an accurate formula to convert the dissipation power of the cantilever measured during the experiment to damping of the tip-sample system. We demonstrated the conversion of the dissipation power versus tip-sample separation curve measured using a colloidal probe cantilever on a mica surface in water to the damping curve, which showed a good agreement with the theoretical curve. Moreover, we obtained the damping curve from the dissipation power curve measured on the hydration layers on the mica surface using a nanometer-scale tip, demonstrating that the formula allows us to quantitatively measure the viscosity of a nano-confined liquid using FM-AFM.

  11. Accurate formula for dissipative interaction in frequency modulation atomic force microscopy

    Suzuki, Kazuhiro; Kobayashi, Kei; Labuda, Aleksander; Matsushige, Kazumi; Yamada, Hirofumi

    2014-12-01

    Much interest has recently focused on the viscosity of nano-confined liquids. Frequency modulation atomic force microscopy (FM-AFM) is a powerful technique that can detect variations in the conservative and dissipative forces between a nanometer-scale tip and a sample surface. We now present an accurate formula to convert the dissipation power of the cantilever measured during the experiment to damping of the tip-sample system. We demonstrated the conversion of the dissipation power versus tip-sample separation curve measured using a colloidal probe cantilever on a mica surface in water to the damping curve, which showed a good agreement with the theoretical curve. Moreover, we obtained the damping curve from the dissipation power curve measured on the hydration layers on the mica surface using a nanometer-scale tip, demonstrating that the formula allows us to quantitatively measure the viscosity of a nano-confined liquid using FM-AFM.

  12. An accurate 3D inspection system using heterodyne multiple frequency phase-shifting algorithm

    Xiao, Zhenzhong; Chee, Oichoo; Asundi, Anand

    This paper presents an accurate 3D inspection system for industrial applications, which uses digital fringe projection technology. The system consists of two CCD cameras and a DLP projector. The mathematical model of the 3D inspection system with 10 distortion parameters for each camera is proposed. A heterodyne multiple frequency phase-shifting algorithm is employed for overcoming the unwrapping problem of phase functions and for a reliable unwrapping procedure. The redundant phase information is used to increase the accuracy of the 3D reconstruction. To demonstrate the effectiveness of our system, a standard sphere was used for testing. The verification test for the 3D inspection systems are based on the VDI standard 2634. The result shows the proposed system can be used for industrial quality inspection with high measurement precision.

  13. Accurate formula for dissipative interaction in frequency modulation atomic force microscopy

    Much interest has recently focused on the viscosity of nano-confined liquids. Frequency modulation atomic force microscopy (FM-AFM) is a powerful technique that can detect variations in the conservative and dissipative forces between a nanometer-scale tip and a sample surface. We now present an accurate formula to convert the dissipation power of the cantilever measured during the experiment to damping of the tip-sample system. We demonstrated the conversion of the dissipation power versus tip-sample separation curve measured using a colloidal probe cantilever on a mica surface in water to the damping curve, which showed a good agreement with the theoretical curve. Moreover, we obtained the damping curve from the dissipation power curve measured on the hydration layers on the mica surface using a nanometer-scale tip, demonstrating that the formula allows us to quantitatively measure the viscosity of a nano-confined liquid using FM-AFM

  14. Frequency dependence of vestibuloocular reflex thresholds

    Haburcakova, Csilla; Lewis, Richard F.; Merfeld, Daniel M.

    2011-01-01

    How the brain processes signals in the presence of noise impacts much of behavioral neuroscience. Thresholds provide one way to assay noise. While perceptual thresholds have been widely investigated, vestibuloocular reflex (VOR) thresholds have seldom been studied and VOR threshold dynamics have never, to our knowledge, been reported. Therefore, we assessed VOR thresholds as a function of frequency. Specifically, we measured horizontal VOR thresholds evoked by yaw rotation in rhesus monkeys, ...

  15. Frequency-dependent energy harvesting via magnetic shape memory alloys

    Sayyaadi, Hassan; Askari Farsangi, Mohammad Amin

    2015-11-01

    This paper is focused on presenting an accurate framework to describe frequency-dependent energy harvesting via magnetic shape memory alloys (MSMAs). Modeling strategy incorporates the phenomenological constitutive model developed formerly together with the magnetic diffusion equation. A hyperbolic hardening function is employed to define reorientation-induced strain hardening in the material, and the diffusion equation is used to add dynamic effects to the model. The MSMA prismatic specimen is surrounded by a pickup coil, and the induced voltage during martensite-variant reorientation is investigated with the help of Faraday’s law of magnetic field induction. It has been shown that, in order to harvest the maximum RMS voltage in the MSMA-based energy harvester, an optimum value of bias magnetic field exists, which is the corresponding magnetic field for the start of pseudoelasticity behavior. In addition, to achieve a more compact energy harvester with higher energy density, a specimen with a lower aspect ratio can be chosen. As the main novelty of the paper, it is found that the dynamic effects play a major role in determining the harvested voltage and power, especially for high excitation frequency or specimen thickness.

  16. Accurate measurements of cross-plane thermal conductivity of thin films by dual-frequency time-domain thermoreflectance (TDTR)

    Jiang, Puqing; Huang, Bin; Koh, Yee Kan

    2016-07-01

    Accurate measurements of the cross-plane thermal conductivity Λcross of a high-thermal-conductivity thin film on a low-thermal-conductivity (Λs) substrate (e.g., Λcross/Λs > 20) are challenging, due to the low thermal resistance of the thin film compared with that of the substrate. In principle, Λcross could be measured by time-domain thermoreflectance (TDTR), using a high modulation frequency fh and a large laser spot size. However, with one TDTR measurement at fh, the uncertainty of the TDTR measurement is usually high due to low sensitivity of TDTR signals to Λcross and high sensitivity to the thickness hAl of Al transducer deposited on the sample for TDTR measurements. We observe that in most TDTR measurements, the sensitivity to hAl only depends weakly on the modulation frequency f. Thus, we performed an additional TDTR measurement at a low modulation frequency f0, such that the sensitivity to hAl is comparable but the sensitivity to Λcross is near zero. We then analyze the ratio of the TDTR signals at fh to that at f0, and thus significantly improve the accuracy of our Λcross measurements. As a demonstration of the dual-frequency approach, we measured the cross-plane thermal conductivity of a 400-nm-thick nickel-iron alloy film and a 3-μm-thick Cu film, both with an accuracy of ˜10%. The dual-frequency TDTR approach is useful for future studies of thin films.

  17. Ultrasonic Characterization of Tissues via Backscatter Frequency Dependence

    Stetson, Paul F.; Sommer, F.G.

    1997-01-01

    Phantom and patient studies were performed to assess the potential of backscatter frequency dependence as a useful parameter for tissue characterization. A commercial phased-array ultrasonic scanner was adapted to allow digitization of the intermediate-frequency ultrasonic data, Studies of agar...... phantoms containing polystyrene microspheres with 3.5 and 5 MHz transducers indicated the ability for robust differentiation of phantoms having different scatterer size and frequency dependence, based on calculated differences in mean frequencies of backscattered spectra, Using a 3,5-MHz probe......, significantly lower mean frequency of ultrasound backscattered from cirrhotic, compared to normal, liver tissue was noted, Studies of benign and malignant liver tumors (hemangiomas and metastases, respectively) indicated differences in frequency content of these tumors, compared to the adjacent normal liver...

  18. An asymptotic preserving unified gas kinetic scheme for frequency-dependent radiative transfer equations

    Sun, Wenjun; Jiang, Song; Xu, Kun; Li, Shu

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents an extension of previous work (Sun et al., 2015 [22]) of the unified gas kinetic scheme (UGKS) for the gray radiative transfer equations to the frequency-dependent (multi-group) radiative transfer system. Different from the gray radiative transfer equations, where the optical opacity is only a function of local material temperature, the simulation of frequency-dependent radiative transfer is associated with additional difficulties from the frequency-dependent opacity. For the multiple frequency radiation, the opacity depends on both the spatial location and the frequency. For example, the opacity is typically a decreasing function of frequency. At the same spatial region the transport physics can be optically thick for the low frequency photons, and optically thin for high frequency ones. Therefore, the optical thickness is not a simple function of space location. In this paper, the UGKS for frequency-dependent radiative system is developed. The UGKS is a finite volume method and the transport physics is modeled according to the ratio of the cell size to the photon's frequency-dependent mean free path. When the cell size is much larger than the photon's mean free path, a diffusion solution for such a frequency radiation will be obtained. On the other hand, when the cell size is much smaller than the photon's mean free path, a free transport mechanism will be recovered. In the regime between the above two limits, with the variation of the ratio between the local cell size and photon's mean free path, the UGKS provides a smooth transition in the physical and frequency space to capture the corresponding transport physics accurately. The seemingly straightforward extension of the UGKS from the gray to multiple frequency radiation system is due to its intrinsic consistent multiple scale transport modeling, but it still involves lots of work to properly discretize the multiple groups in order to design an asymptotic preserving (AP) scheme in all

  19. Frequency Dependence of Attenuation Constant of Dielectric Materials

    A. S. Zadgaonkar

    1975-01-01

    Full Text Available Different dielectric materials have been studied for frequency dependence of attenuation constant. The sensitive cathode ray oscillograph method has been used to evaluate to the dielectric constant and loss factor, and from these attenuation constants have been calculated. The temperature remaining constant, a regular increase has been observed in attenuation constant, at higher frequencies of electro-magnetic propagating wave.

  20. Accurate Prediction of Ligand Affinities for a Proton-Dependent Oligopeptide Transporter.

    Samsudin, Firdaus; Parker, Joanne L; Sansom, Mark S P; Newstead, Simon; Fowler, Philip W

    2016-02-18

    Membrane transporters are critical modulators of drug pharmacokinetics, efficacy, and safety. One example is the proton-dependent oligopeptide transporter PepT1, also known as SLC15A1, which is responsible for the uptake of the ?-lactam antibiotics and various peptide-based prodrugs. In this study, we modeled the binding of various peptides to a bacterial homolog, PepTSt, and evaluated a range of computational methods for predicting the free energy of binding. Our results show that a hybrid approach (endpoint methods to classify peptides into good and poor binders and a theoretically exact method for refinement) is able to accurately predict affinities, which we validated using proteoliposome transport assays. Applying the method to a homology model of PepT1 suggests that the approach requires a high-quality structure to be accurate. Our study provides a blueprint for extending these computational methodologies to other pharmaceutically important transporter families. PMID:27028887

  1. Harmonic oscillator with time - dependent mass and frequency

    A general treatment of the quantal harmonic oscillator with time-dependent mass and frequency is presented. The treatment is based on the use of some time-dependent transformations in the method of invariants of Lewis and Riesenfeld. Exact coherent states for such a system are also constructed. (A.C.A.S.)

  2. Frequency dependence of the large frequency separation of solar-like oscillators: Influence of the Helium second-ionization zone

    Hekker, S; Elsworth, Y; Chaplin, W J

    2011-01-01

    The large frequency separation between modes of the same degree and consecutive orders in a star is approximately proportional to the square root of its mean density. To determine the large frequency separation as accurately as possible a mean large frequency separation computed over several orders is often used. It is, however, known that the large frequency separation varies with frequency in a second order effect. From observations it has been shown that this frequency dependence is more important for main-sequence stars than it is for red-giant stars. Here we use YREC models to verify and explain this observational result. We find that for stars with R > 8 Rsun the effect of the Helium second ionisation zone is relatively small. For these stars the deep location of the He II zone induces a frequency modulation covering only a few large separations, while the amplitude of the modulation is low due to the relatively weak and extended He II layer, causing a shallow wide depression in the first adiabatic expo...

  3. Frequency-Dependent Properties of Magnetic Nanoparticle Crystals

    Majetich, Sara [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2016-05-17

    In the proposed research program we will investigate the time- and frequency-dependent behavior of ordered nanoparticle assemblies, or nanoparticle crystals. Magnetostatic interactions are long-range and anisotropic, and this leads to complex behavior in nanoparticle assemblies, particularly in the time- and frequency-dependent properties. We hypothesize that the high frequency performance of composite materials has been limited because of the range of relaxation times; if a composite is a dipolar ferromagnet at a particular frequency, it should have the advantages of a single phase material, but without significant eddy current power losses. Arrays of surfactant-coated monodomain magnetic nanoparticles can exhibit long-range magnetic order that is stable over time. The magnetic domain size and location of domain walls is governed not by structural grain boundaries but by the shape of the array, due to the local interaction field. Pores or gaps within an assembly pin domain walls and limit the domain size. Measurements of the magnetic order parameter as a function of temperature showed that domains can exist at high temoerature, and that there is a collective phase transition, just as in an exchange-coupled ferromagnet. Dipolar ferromagnets are not merely of fundamental interest; they provide an interesting alternative to exchange-based ferromagnets. Dipolar ferromagnets made with high moment metallic particles in an insulating matrix could have high permeability without large eddy current losses. Such nanocomposites could someday replace the ferrites now used in phase shifters, isolators, circulators, and filters in microwave communications and radar applications. We will investigate the time- and frequency-dependent behavior of nanoparticle crystals with different magnetic core sizes and different interparticle barrier resistances, and will measure the magnetic and electrical properties in the DC, low frequency (0.1 Hz - 1 kHz), moderate frequency (10 Hz - 500

  4. The frequency dependence of scattering imprints on pulsar observations

    Geyer, Marisa

    2016-01-01

    Observations of pulsars across the radio spectrum are revealing a dependence of the characteristic scattering time ($\\tau$) on frequency, which is more complex than the simple power law with a theoretically predicted power law index. In this paper we investigate these effects using simulated pulsar data at frequencies below 300 MHz. We investigate different scattering mechanisms, namely isotropic and anisotropic scattering, by thin screens along the line of sight, and the particular frequency dependent impact on pulsar profiles and scattering time scales of each. We also consider how the screen shape, location and offset along the line of sight lead to specific observable effects. We evaluate how well forward fitting techniques perform in determining $\\tau$. We investigate the systematic errors in $\\tau$ associated with the use of an incorrect fitting method and with the determination of an off-pulse baseline. Our simulations provide examples of average pulse profiles at various frequencies. Using these we co...

  5. Trade-Off Geometries and Frequency-Dependent Selection

    de Mazancourt, C; Dieckmann, U

    2004-01-01

    Life-history evolution is determined by the interplay between natural selection and adaptive constraints. The classical approach to studying constrained life-history evolution - Richard Levin's geometric comparison of fitness sets and adaptive functions - is applicable when selection pressures are frequency-independent. Here we extend this widely used tool to frequency-dependent selection. Such selection pressures very with a population's phenotypic composition, and are increasingly recognize...

  6. Frequency-dependent effective hydraulic conductivity of strongly heterogeneous media.

    Caspari, E; Gurevich, B; Müller, T M

    2013-10-01

    The determination of the transport properties of heterogeneous porous rocks, such as an effective hydraulic conductivity, arises in a range of geoscience problems, from groundwater flow analysis to hydrocarbon reservoir modeling. In the presence of formation-scale heterogeneities, nonstationary flows, induced by pumping tests or propagating elastic waves, entail localized pressure diffusion processes with a characteristic frequency depending on the pressure diffusivity and size of the heterogeneity. Then, on a macroscale, a homogeneous equivalent medium exists, which has a frequency-dependent effective conductivity. The frequency dependence of the conductivity can be analyzed with Biot's equations of poroelasticity. In the quasistatic frequency regime of this framework, the slow compressional wave is a proxy for pressure diffusion processes. This slow compressional wave is associated with the out-of-phase motion of the fluid and solid phase, thereby creating a relative fluid-solid displacement vector field. Decoupling of the poroelasticity equations gives a diffusion equation for the fluid-solid displacement field valid in a poroelastic medium with spatial fluctuations in hydraulic conductivity. Then, an effective conductivity is found by a Green's function approach followed by a strong-contrast perturbation theory suggested earlier in the context of random dielectrics. This theory leads to closed-form expressions for the frequency-dependent effective conductivity as a function of the one- and two-point probability functions of the conductivity fluctuations. In one dimension, these expressions are consistent with exact solutions in both low- and high-frequency limits for arbitrary conductivity contrast. In 3D, the low-frequency limit depends on the details of the microstructure. However, the derived approximation for the effective conductivity is consistent with the Hashin-Shtrikman bounds. PMID:24229128

  7. Comment on “Frequency-dependent dispersion in porous media”

    Davit, Yohan

    2012-07-10

    In a recent paper, Valdès-Parada and Alvarez-Ramirez used the technique of volume averaging to derive a "frequency-dependent" dispersion tensor, Dγ*, the goal of which is to describe solute transport in porous media undergoing periodic processes. We describe two issues related to this dispersion tensor. First, we demonstrate that the definition of Dγ* is erroneous and derive a corrected version, Dγ*c. With this modification, the approach of Valdès-Parada and Alvarez-Ramirez becomes strictly equivalent to the one devised by Moyne. Second, we show that the term "frequency-dependent dispersion" is misleading because Dγ* and Dγ*c do not depend on the process operating frequency, χ. The study carried out by Valdès-Parada and Alvarez-Ramirez represents a spectral analysis of the relaxation of Dγ* towards its steady-state, independent of any periodic operation or excitation. © 2012 American Physical Society.

  8. Chlorine nuclear quadrupole resonance spectrometer with accurate recording the resonant frequency

    A spectrometer with automatic frequency control (AFC) of the nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) detector has been developed for decreasing errors and automating measurement of NQR frequencies. A parametric superregenerator is used as a detector of signals in the NQR 35Cl spectrometer. A digital frequency meter and a band puncher are used for measuring and recording of the values of the synthesizer frequency; the recording of the first derivative of the NQR signal is done by a two-coordinate self-recorder. The AFC circuit consists of an audio generator, an amplidude detector, a selective low-frequency amplifier, a low-frequency phase detector, a direct-current amplifier and a voltage adder. The recording of the first derivative of the signal of NQR 35Cl in KClO3 at the modulation frequency of 250 Hz was given to illustrate the operation of the NQR spectrometer. The rems error of measurements of the NQR 35Cl in KClO3 frequency is +-1.5 Hz, which corresponds to possible sample temperature changes with an accuracy of +0.0003 K

  9. Dynamical gap generation in graphene with frequency dependent renormalization effects

    Carrington, M E; von Smekal, L; Thoma, M H

    2016-01-01

    We study the frequency dependencies in the renormalization of the fermion Greens function for the $\\pi$-band electrons in graphene and their influence on the dynamical gap generation at sufficiently strong interaction. Adopting the effective QED-like description for the low-energy excitations within the Dirac-cone region we self consistently solve the fermion Dyson-Schwinger equation in various approximations for the photon propagator and the vertex function with special emphasis on frequency dependent Lindhard screening and retardation effects.

  10. On Polarization and Frequency Dependence of Diffuse Indoor Propagation

    Nielsen, Jesper Ødum; Andersen, Jørgen Bach; Pedersen, Gert Frølund;

    2011-01-01

    polarization and orientation. Also the frequency dependence is investigated, with measurements done at both 2.3 GHz and 5.8 GHz center frequencies. The RE theory was found to fit well to the measurements with a RT in the range 22-25 ns. Only small differences were found due to the polarization and the channel...... room and an absorption coefficient. The PDP is independent on the location in the room, except for the arrival time. Based on measurements in a room with a spherical array of 16 dual- polarized wideband horn antennas, the current work studies how the RE parameters depend on the receiver (Rx) antenna...

  11. Imaging frequency-dependent reflectivity from synthetic-aperture radar

    This paper develops a method for using a synthetic-aperture radar system to obtain not only a spatial image of a scene but also the localized frequency dependence of the scene reflectivity. In other words, for each image pixel, we also obtain a plot of the frequency dependence of the reflectivity in that pixel. We present a method for extracting this information from the data, and also a formula that characterizes the performance of this imaging system. We conclude with some simulations suggesting that the method may be promising. (paper)

  12. Frequency-dependent traveltime tomography for near-surface seismic refraction data

    Zelt, Colin A.; Chen, Jianxiong

    2016-07-01

    Traveltime tomography is the main method by which the Earth's seismic velocity is determined on all scales, from the near-surface (travel paths at each iteration, and the calculation of a frequency-dependent total traveltime, as opposed to a delay time, are used. Frequency-dependent traveltime tomography (FDTT) involves two modifications to conventional traveltime tomography: (1) the calculation of frequency-dependent traveltimes using wavelength-dependent velocity smoothing (WDVS), and (2) the corresponding sensitivity kernels that arise from using WDVS. Results show that the former modification is essential to achieve significant benefits from FDTT, whereas the latter is optional in that similar results can be achieved using infinite-frequency kernels. The long seismic wavelengths relative to the total path lengths and the size of subsurface heterogeneities of typical near-surface data means the improvements over ray theory tomography are significant. The benefits of FDTT are demonstrated using conventional minimum-structure regularization techniques to address the issue of model nonuniqueness. For synthetic data, the estimated FDTT models are shown to be more accurate than the corresponding infinite-frequency-derived models. Both 2-D and 3-D applications of FDTT to real data from a near-surface study yield estimated models that contain more structure than the corresponding infinite-frequency-derived models. Applications of FDTT without regularization demonstrate the potential of the WDVS-derived sensitivity kernels to provide a natural smoothing of the velocity model and thereby allow the data alone to determine the final model structure.

  13. Frequency-dependent force fields for QMMM calculations.

    Harczuk, Ignat; Vahtras, Olav; Ågren, Hans

    2015-03-28

    We outline the construction of frequency-dependent polarizable force fields. The force fields are derived from analytic response theory for different frequencies using a generalization of the LoProp algorithm giving a decomposition of a molecular dynamical polarizability to localized atomic dynamical polarizabilities. These force fields can enter in a variety of applications - we focus on two such applications in this work: firstly, they can be incorporated in a physical, straightforward, way for current existing methods that use polarizable embeddings, and we can show, for the first time, the effect of the frequency dispersion within the classical environment of a quantum mechanics-molecular mechanics (QMMM) method. Our methodology is here evaluated for some test cases comprising water clusters and organic residues. Secondly, together with a modified Silberstein-Applequist procedure for interacting inducible point-dipoles, these frequency-dependent polarizable force fields can be used for a classical determination of frequency-dependent cluster polarizabilities. We evaluate this methodology by comparing with the corresponding results obtained from quantum mechanics or QMMM where the absolute mean [small alpha, Greek, macron] is determined with respect to the size of the QM and MM parts of the total system. PMID:25714984

  14. Generation of accurate integral surfaces in time-dependent vector fields.

    Garth, Christoph; Krishnan, Han; Tricoche, Xavier; Bobach, Tom; Joy, Kenneth I

    2008-01-01

    We present a novel approach for the direct computation of integral surfaces in time-dependent vector fields. As opposed to previous work, which we analyze in detail, our approach is based on a separation of integral surface computation into two stages: surface approximation and generation of a graphical representation. This allows us to overcome several limitations of existing techniques. We first describe an algorithm for surface integration that approximates a series of time lines using iterative refinement and computes a skeleton of the integral surface. In a second step, we generate a well-conditioned triangulation. Our approach allows a highly accurate treatment of very large time-varying vector fields in an efficient, streaming fashion. We examine the properties of the presented methods on several example datasets and perform a numerical study of its correctness and accuracy. Finally, we investigate some visualization aspects of integral surfaces. PMID:18988990

  15. Accurate Non-adiabatic Quantum Dynamics from Pseudospectral Sampling of Time-dependent Gaussian Basis Sets

    Heaps, Charles W

    2016-01-01

    Quantum molecular dynamics requires an accurate representation of the molecular potential energy surface from a minimal number of electronic structure calculations, particularly for nonadiabatic dynamics where excited states are required. In this paper, we employ pseudospectral sampling of time-dependent Gaussian basis functions for the simulation of non-adiabatic dynamics. Unlike other methods, the pseudospectral Gaussian molecular dynamics tests the Schr\\"{o}dinger equation with $N$ Dirac delta functions located at the centers of the Gaussian functions reducing the scaling of potential energy evaluations from $\\mathcal{O}(N^2)$ to $\\mathcal{O}(N)$. By projecting the Gaussian basis onto discrete points in space, the method is capable of efficiently and quantitatively describing nonadiabatic population transfer and intra-surface quantum coherence. We investigate three model systems; the photodissociation of three coupled Morse oscillators, the bound state dynamics of two coupled Morse oscillators, and a two-d...

  16. Frequency-dependent dynamic effective properties of porous materials

    Peijun Wei; Zhuping Huang

    2005-01-01

    The frequency-dependent dynamic effective properties (phase velocity, attenuation and elastic modulus) of porous materials are studied numerically. The coherent plane longitudinal and shear wave equations, which are obtained by averaging on the multiple scattering fields, are used to evaluate the frequency-dependent dynamic effective properties of a porous material. It is found that the prediction of the dynamic effective properties includes the size effects of voids which are not included in most prediction of the traditional static effective properties. The prediction of the dynamic effective elastic modulus at a relatively low frequency range is compared with that of the traditional static effective elastic modulus, and the dynamic effective elastic modulus is found to be very close to the Hashin-Shtrikman upper bound.

  17. Task, muscle and frequency dependent vestibular control of posture

    Forbes, P.A.; Siegmund, G.P.; Schouten, A.C.; Blouin, J.S.

    2015-01-01

    The vestibular system is crucial for postural control; however there are considerable differences in the task dependence and frequency response of vestibular reflexes in appendicular and axial muscles. For example, vestibular reflexes are only evoked in appendicular muscles when vestibular informati

  18. Frequency-dependent seismic reflection coefficient for discriminating gas reservoirs

    The asymptotic equation of wave propagation in fluid-saturated porous media is available for calculating the normal reflection coefficient within a seismic frequency band. This frequency-dependent reflection coefficient is expressed in terms of a dimensionless parameter ε, which is the product of the reservoir fluid mobility (i.e. inverse viscosity), fluid density and the frequency of the signal. In this paper, we apply this expression to the Xinchang gas field, China, where reservoirs are in super-tight sands with very low permeability. We demonstrate that the variation in the reflection coefficient at a gas–water contact as a transition zone within a sand formation is observable within the seismic frequency band. Then, we conduct seismic inversion to generate attributes which first indicate the existence of fluid (either gas or water), and then discriminate a gas reservoir from a water reservoir

  19. Simultaneous and accurate measurement of the dielectric constant at many frequencies spanning a wide range

    Pérez-Aparicio, Roberto; Cottinet, Denis; Tanase, Marius; Metz, Pascal; Bellon, Ludovic; Naert, Antoine; Ciliberto, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    We present an innovative technique which allows the simultaneous measurement of the dielectric constant of a material at many frequencies, spanning a four orders of magnitude range chosen between 10 --2 Hz and 10 4 Hz. The sensitivity and accuracy are comparable to those obtained using standard single frequency techniques. The technique is based on three new and simple features: a) the precise real time correction of the amplication of a current amplier; b) the specic shape of the excitation signal and its frequency spectrum; and c) the precise synchronization between the generation of the excitation signal and the acquisition of the dielectric response signal. This technique is useful in the case of relatively fast dynamical measurements when the knowledge of the time evolution of the dielectric constant is needed.

  20. Accurate fault location technique for distribution system using fault-generated high-frequency transient voltage signals

    Bo, Z.Q.; Weller, G. [Alstom T and D Protection Control Ltd., Stafford (United Kingdom); Redfern, M.A. [University of Bath (United Kingdom). Dept. of Electronic and Electrical Engineering

    1999-01-01

    A technique is presented for accurate fault location on distribution overhead lines and underground cables. A specially designed fault locator unit is used to capture the high-frequency voltage transient signal generated by faults on the distribution line/cable. The travelling time of the high-frequency components is used to determine the fault position. The technique is insensitive to fault type, fault resistance, fault inception angle and system source configuration, and is able to offer very high accuracy in fault location in a distribution system. (author)

  1. Improving Planck calibration by including frequency-dependent relativistic corrections

    Quartin, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    The Planck satellite detectors are calibrated in the 2015 release using the "orbital dipole", which is the time-dependent dipole generated by the Doppler effect due to the motion of the satellite around the Sun. Such an effect has also relativistic time-dependent corrections of relative magnitude 10^(-3), due to coupling with the "solar dipole" (the motion of the Sun compared to the CMB rest frame), which are included in the data calibration by the Planck collaboration. We point out that such corrections are subject to a frequency-dependent multiplicative factor. This factor differs from unity especially at the highest frequencies, relevant for the HFI instrument. Since currently Planck calibration errors are dominated by systematics, to the point that polarization data is currently unreliable at large scales, such a correction can in principle be highly relevant for future data releases.

  2. Accurate calculation of vibrational frequencies using explicitly correlated coupled-cluster theory.

    Rauhut, Guntram; Knizia, Gerald; Werner, Hans-Joachim

    2009-02-01

    The recently proposed explicitly correlated CCSD(T)-F12x (x = a,b) approximations [T. B. Adler, G. Knizia, and H.-J. Werner, J. Chem. Phys. 127, 221106 (2007)] are applied to compute equilibrium structures and harmonic as well as anharmonic vibrational frequencies for H(2)O, HCN, CO(2), CH(2)O, H(2)O(2), C(2)H(2), CH(2)NH, C(2)H(2)O, and the trans-isomer of 1,2-C(2)H(2)F(2). Using aug-cc-pVTZ basis sets, the CCSD(T)-F12a equilibrium geometries and harmonic vibrational frequencies are in very close agreement with CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pV5Z values. The anharmonic frequencies are evaluated using vibrational self-consistent field and vibrational configuration interaction methods based on automatically generated potential energy surfaces. The mean absolute deviation of the CCSD(T)-F12a/aug-cc-pVTZ anharmonic frequencies from experimental values amounts to only 4.0 cm(-1). PMID:19206956

  3. Comparison of Bergeron and Frequency-dependent cable models for the simulation of electromagnetic transients

    Silva, Filipe Miguel Faria da

    2016-01-01

    The simulation of electromagnetic transients involving underground cables is very time consuming, when compared with simulations involving overhead lines, and Bergeron models are often used instead of the more accurate frequency-dependent models, in order to reduce the simulation time. This paper...... analyses the simulation errors of different Bergeron models to a reference frequency-dependent model for a 150kV cable. The simulations consider flat and trefoil installation, both-ends bonding and cross-bonding, ideal voltage source and modelling of the area around the cable. The Bergeron model is...... modelling of the area around the cable being energised, the Bergeron model has a small error if tuned for the right frequency....

  4. Frequency dependent topological patterns of resting-state brain networks.

    Long Qian

    Full Text Available The topological organization underlying brain networks has been extensively investigated using resting-state fMRI, focusing on the low frequency band from 0.01 to 0.1 Hz. However, the frequency specificities regarding the corresponding brain networks remain largely unclear. In the current study, a data-driven method named complementary ensemble empirical mode decomposition (CEEMD was introduced to separate the time series of each voxel into several intrinsic oscillation rhythms with distinct frequency bands. Our data indicated that the whole brain BOLD signals could be automatically divided into five specific frequency bands. After applying the CEEMD method, the topological patterns of these five temporally correlated networks were analyzed. The results showed that global topological properties, including the network weighted degree, network efficiency, mean characteristic path length and clustering coefficient, were observed to be most prominent in the ultra-low frequency bands from 0 to 0.015 Hz. Moreover, the saliency of small-world architecture demonstrated frequency-density dependency. Compared to the empirical mode decomposition method (EMD, CEEMD could effectively eliminate the mode-mixing effects. Additionally, the robustness of CEEMD was validated by the similar results derived from a split-half analysis and a conventional frequency division method using the rectangular window band-pass filter. Our findings suggest that CEEMD is a more effective method for extracting the intrinsic oscillation rhythms embedded in the BOLD signals than EMD. The application of CEEMD in fMRI data analysis will provide in-depth insight in investigations of frequency specific topological patterns of the dynamic brain networks.

  5. Frequency-dependent Lg-wave attenuation in northern Morocco

    Noriega, Raquel; Ugalde, Arantza; Villaseñor, Antonio; Harnafi, Mimoun

    2015-11-01

    Frequency-dependent attenuation (Q- 1) in the crust of northern Morocco is estimated from Lg-wave spectral amplitude measurements every quarter octave in the frequency band 0.8 to 8 Hz. This study takes advantage of the improved broadband data coverage in the region provided by the deployment of the IberArray seismic network. Earthquake data consist of 71 crustal events with magnitudes 4 ≤ mb ≤ 5.5 recorded on 110 permanent and temporary seismic stations between January 2008 and December 2013 with hypocentral distances between 100 and 900 km. 1274 high-quality Lg waveforms provide dense path coverage of northern Morocco, crossing a region with a complex structure and heterogeneous tectonic setting as a result of continuous interactions between the African and Eurasian plates. We use two different methods: the coda normalization (CN) analysis, that allows removal of the source and site effects from the Lg spectra, and the spectral amplitude decay (SAD) method, that simultaneously inverts for source, site, and path attenuation terms. The CN and SAD methods return similar results, indicating that the Lg Q models are robust to differences in the methodologies. Larger errors and no significant frequency dependence are observed for frequencies lower than 1.5 Hz. For distances up to 400 km and the frequency band 1.5 ≤ ƒ (Hz) ≤ 4.5, the model functions Q(f) = (529- 22+ 23)(f/1.5)0.23 ± 0.06 and Q(f) = (457- 7+ 7)(f/1.5)0.44 ± 0.02 are obtained using the CN and SAD methods, respectively. A change in the frequency dependence is observed above 4.5 Hz for both methods which may be related to the influence of the Sn energy on the Lg window. The frequency-dependent Q- 1 estimates represent an average attenuation beneath a broad region including the Rif and Tell mountains, the Moroccan and Algerian mesetas, the Atlas Mountains and the Sahara Platform structural domains, and correlate well with areas of moderate seismicity where intermediate Q values have been obtained.

  6. Frequency dependence and partitioning of respiratory impedance in dogs.

    Kappos, A D; Rodarte, J R; Lai-Fook, S J

    1981-09-01

    Total pulmonary resistance (Rt) and reactance (Xt) from 1 to 30 Hz were determined by time series analysis in open-chest vagotomized dogs. Rt and Xt were partitioned by retrograde catheter into central airway resistance (Rc) and reactance (Xc) and peripheral resistance (Rp) and reactance (Xp). Rt, Rc, or Rp did not change with transpulmonary pressure (Pst) from 5 to 15 cmH2O, although Rc tended to decrease and Rp to increase. Vagal stimulation (Vs) and intravenous histamine (H) increased all resistances (R) at all lung volumes (V) and produced an inverse relationship between R and V. The increases in Rt produced by H and Vs were not significantly different at any volume, but H predominantly increased Rp and Vs predominantly increased Rc. In the control (vagotomized) dogs at Pst of 5 cmH2O, Rp/Rt was 0.41 +/- 0.03 (SE). Rp/Rt was significantly increased by H but not by Vs. Control Rt decreased slightly from 5 to 10 Hz and increased from 15 to 30 Hz. The increase of Rt at higher frequencies caused by the frequency dependence of Rc was not changed by H but was augmented by Vs. The slope of Xt and Xc vs. frequency was increased by Vs but not by H. The frequency dependence of Rt and Xt above 10 Hz appears to be caused by inertial losses proximal to the 2-mm airways. Thus central and peripheral bronchoconstriction caused by Vs and H, respectively, could be differentiated by increased frequency dependence of Rt and Xt above 15 Hz. PMID:7327963

  7. Frequency-Dependent Dispersion Measures and Implications for Pulsar Timing

    Cordes, J M; Stinebring, D R

    2016-01-01

    We analyze the frequency dependence of the dispersion measure (DM), the column density of free electrons to a pulsar, caused by multipath scattering from small scale electron-density fluctuations. The DM is slightly different along each propagation path and the transverse spread of paths varies greatly with frequency, yielding time-of-arrival (TOA) perturbations that scale differently than the inverse square of the frequency, the expected dependence for a cold, unmagnetized plasma. We quantify DM and TOA perturbations analytically for thin phase screens and extended media and verify the results with simulations of thin screens. The rms difference between DMs across an octave band near 1.5~GHz $\\sim 4\\times10^{-5}\\,{\\rm pc\\ cm^{-3}}$ for pulsars at $\\sim 1$~kpc distance. TOA errors from chromatic DMs are of order a few to hundreds of nanoseconds for pulsars with DM $\\lesssim 30$~pc~cm$^{-3}$ observed across an octave band but increase rapidly to microseconds or larger for larger DMs and wider frequency ranges....

  8. Frequency Dependent Specific Heat from Thermal Effusion in Spherical Geometry

    Jakobsen, Bo; Olsen, Niels Boye; Christensen, Tage Emil

    2008-01-01

    We present a novel method of measuring the frequency dependent specific heat at the glass transition applied to 5-polyphenyl-4-ether. The method employs thermal waves effusing radially out from the surface of a spherical thermistor that acts as both a heat generator and thermometer. It is a merit of the method compared to planar effusion methods that the influence of the mechanical boundary conditions are analytically known. This implies that it is the longitudinal rather than the isobaric sp...

  9. Microstructure-Dependent Gas Adsorption: Accurate Predictions of Methane Uptake in Nanoporous Carbons

    Ihm, Yungok [University of Tennessee (UTK) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Cooper, Valentino R [ORNL; Gallego, Nidia C [ORNL; Contescu, Cristian I [ORNL; Morris, James R [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate a successful, efficient framework for predicting gas adsorption properties in real materials based on first-principles calculations, with a specific comparison of experiment and theory for methane adsorption in activated carbons. These carbon materials have different pore size distributions, leading to a variety of uptake characteristics. Utilizing these distributions, we accurately predict experimental uptakes and heats of adsorption without empirical potentials or lengthy simulations. We demonstrate that materials with smaller pores have higher heats of adsorption, leading to a higher gas density in these pores. This pore-size dependence must be accounted for, in order to predict and understand the adsorption behavior. The theoretical approach combines: (1) ab initio calculations with a van der Waals density functional to determine adsorbent-adsorbate interactions, and (2) a thermodynamic method that predicts equilibrium adsorption densities by directly incorporating the calculated potential energy surface in a slit pore model. The predicted uptake at P=20 bar and T=298 K is in excellent agreement for all five activated carbon materials used. This approach uses only the pore-size distribution as an input, with no fitting parameters or empirical adsorbent-adsorbate interactions, and thus can be easily applied to other adsorbent-adsorbate combinations.

  10. Accurate non-adiabatic quantum dynamics from pseudospectral sampling of time-dependent Gaussian basis sets

    Heaps, Charles W.; Mazziotti, David A.

    2016-08-01

    Quantum molecular dynamics requires an accurate representation of the molecular potential energy surface from a minimal number of electronic structure calculations, particularly for nonadiabatic dynamics where excited states are required. In this paper, we employ pseudospectral sampling of time-dependent Gaussian basis functions for the simulation of non-adiabatic dynamics. Unlike other methods, the pseudospectral Gaussian molecular dynamics tests the Schrödinger equation with N Dirac delta functions located at the centers of the Gaussian functions reducing the scaling of potential energy evaluations from O ( N 2 ) to O ( N ) . By projecting the Gaussian basis onto discrete points in space, the method is capable of efficiently and quantitatively describing the nonadiabatic population transfer and intra-surface quantum coherence. We investigate three model systems: the photodissociation of three coupled Morse oscillators, the bound state dynamics of two coupled Morse oscillators, and a two-dimensional model for collinear triatomic vibrational dynamics. In all cases, the pseudospectral Gaussian method is in quantitative agreement with numerically exact calculations. The results are promising for nonadiabatic molecular dynamics in molecular systems where strongly correlated ground or excited states require expensive electronic structure calculations.

  11. Nonlinear wave equation in frequency domain: accurate modeling of ultrafast interaction in anisotropic nonlinear media

    Guo, Hairun; Zeng, Xianglong; Zhou, Binbin;

    2013-01-01

    further simulations we demonstrate few-cycle compressed solitons in extremely short crystals, where spectral phenomena, such as blue/red shifting, nonstationary radiation in accordance with the nonlocal phase-matching condition, and dispersive-wave generation are observed and marked, which helps improve......We interpret the purely spectral forward Maxwell equation with up to third-order induced polarizations for pulse propagation and interactions in quadratic nonlinear crystals. The interpreted equation, also named the nonlinear wave equation in the frequency domain, includes quadratic and cubic...... nonlinearities, delayed Raman effects, and anisotropic nonlinearities. The full potential of this wave equation is demonstrated by investigating simulations of solitons generated in the process of ultrafast cascaded second-harmonic generation. We show that a balance in the soliton delay can be achieved due to...

  12. Frequency-dependent micromechanics of cellularized biopolymer networks

    Jones, Chris; Kim, Jihan; McIntyre, David; Sun, Bo

    Mechanical interactions between cells and the extracellular matrix (ECM) influence many cellular behaviors such as growth, differentiation, and migration. These are dynamic processes in which the cells actively remodel the ECM. Reconstituted collagen gel is a common model ECM for studying cell-ECM interactions in vitro because collagen is the most abundant component of mammalian ECM and gives the ECM its material stiffness. We embed micron-sized particles in collagen and use holographic optical tweezers to apply forces to the particles in multiple directions and over a range of frequencies up to 10 Hz. We calculate the local compliance and show that it is dependent on both the direction and frequency of the applied force. Performing the same measurement on many particles allows us to characterize the spatial inhomogeneity of the mechanical properties and shows that the compliance decreases at higher frequencies. Performing these measurements on cell-populated collagen gels shows that cellular remodeling of the ECM changes the mechanical properties of the collagen and we investigate whether this change is dependent on the local strain and distance from nearby cells.

  13. Dependence of enhanced asymmetry-induced transport on collision frequency

    Eggleston, D. L. [Occidental College, Physics Department, Los Angeles, California 90041 (United States)

    2014-07-15

    A single-particle code with collisional effects is used to study how asymmetry-induced radial transport in a non-neutral plasma depends on collision frequency. For asymmetries of the form ϕ{sub 1}(r) cos(kz) cos(ωt−lθ), two sources for the transport have been identified: resonant particles and axially trapped particles. The simulation shows that this latter type, which occurs near the radius where ω matches the azimuthal rotation frequency ω{sub R}, is usually dominant at low collision frequency ν but becomes negligible at higher ν. This behavior can be understood by noting that axially trapped particles have a lower trapping frequency than resonant particles. In the low ν (banana) regime, the radial oscillations have amplitude Δr ≈ v{sub r}/ω{sub T}, so axially trapped particles dominate, and the transport may even exceed the resonant particle plateau regime level. As ν increases, collisions start to interrupt the slower axially trapped particle oscillations, while the resonant particles are still in the banana regime, so the axially trapped particle contribution to the transport decreases. At the largest ν values, axially trapped particle transport is negligible and the observed diffusion coefficient matches that given by plateau regime resonant particle theory. Heuristic models based on these considerations give reasonable agreement with the observed scaling laws for the value of the collision frequency where axially trapped particle transport starts to decrease and for the enhancement of the diffusion coefficient produced by axially trapped particles.

  14. Frequency-dependent Drude damping in Casimir force calculations

    Esquivel-Sirvent, R, E-mail: raul@fisica.unam.m [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apdo. Postal 20-364, Mexico D.F. 01000 (Mexico)

    2009-04-01

    The Casimir force is calculated between Au thin films that are described by a Drude model with a frequency dependent damping function. The model parameters are obtained from available experimental data for Au thin films. Two cases are considered; annealed and nonannealed films that have a different damping function. Compared with the calculations using a Drude model with a constant damping parameter, we observe changes in the Casimir force of a few percent. This behavior is only observed in films of no more than 300 A thick.

  15. An efficient realization of frequency dependent boundary conditions in an acoustic finite-difference time-domain model

    Escolano-Carrasco, José; Jacobsen, Finn; López, J.J.

    2008-01-01

    The finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method provides a simple and accurate way of solving initial boundary value problems. However, most acoustic problems involve frequency dependent boundary conditions, and it is not easy to include such boundary conditions in an FDTD model. Although solutions...

  16. Frequency-Dependent Selection at Rough Expanding Fronts

    Kuhr, Jan-Timm

    2015-01-01

    Microbial colonies are experimental model systems for studying the colonization of new territory by biological species through range expansion. We study a generalization of the two-species Eden model, which incorporates local frequency-dependent selection, in order to analyze how social interactions between two species influence surface roughness of growing microbial colonies. The model includes several classical scenarios from game theory. We then concentrate on an expanding public goods game, where either cooperators or defectors take over the front depending on the system parameters. We analyze in detail the critical behavior of the nonequilibrium phase transition between global cooperation and defection and thereby identify a new universality class of phase transitions dealing with absorbing states. At the transition, the number of boundaries separating sectors decays with a novel power law in time and their superdiffusive motion crosses over from Eden scaling to a nearly ballistic regime. In parallel, th...

  17. Highly Accurate Quartic Force Fields, Vibrational Frequencies, and Spectroscopic Constants for Cyclic and Linear C3H3(+)

    Huang, Xinchuan; Taylor, Peter R.; Lee, Timothy J.

    2011-01-01

    High levels of theory have been used to compute quartic force fields (QFFs) for the cyclic and linear forms of the C H + molecular cation, referred to as c-C H + and I-C H +. Specifically the 33 3333 singles and doubles coupled-cluster method that includes a perturbational estimate of connected triple excitations, CCSD(T), has been used in conjunction with extrapolation to the one-particle basis set limit and corrections for scalar relativity and core correlation have been included. The QFFs have been used to compute highly accurate fundamental vibrational frequencies and other spectroscopic constants using both vibrational 2nd-order perturbation theory and variational methods to solve the nuclear Schroedinger equation. Agreement between our best computed fundamental vibrational frequencies and recent infrared photodissociation experiments is reasonable for most bands, but there are a few exceptions. Possible sources for the discrepancies are discussed. We determine the energy difference between the cyclic and linear forms of C H +, 33 obtaining 27.9 kcal/mol at 0 K, which should be the most reliable available. It is expected that the fundamental vibrational frequencies and spectroscopic constants presented here for c-C H + 33 and I-C H + are the most reliable available for the free gas-phase species and it is hoped that 33 these will be useful in the assignment of future high-resolution laboratory experiments or astronomical observations.

  18. Chemical dependency in women. Meeting the challenges of accurate diagnosis and effective treatment.

    Unger, K B

    1988-01-01

    Women dependent on alcohol or prescribed or nonprescribed psychoactive drugs present special diagnostic challenges to physicians. Chemical dependency likewise has adverse effects on women who are nonusers through the disease of co-dependency. The natural history of chemical dependency in women includes sex-specific differences in presenting signs and symptoms. Collateral medical history may come from a variety of community sources. Diagnoses may also use sex-specific criteria, with simultaneo...

  19. Towards an Accurate Stress Dependant Time & Frequency Domain VE Response Model for Bituminous Binders

    Woldekidan, M.F.; Huurman, M.; Pronk, A.C.

    2010-01-01

    Linear viscoelastic properties of bituminous binders for short loading times are analyzed using dynamic mechanical analysis methods. Dynamic Shear Rheometer (DSR) test with parallel plate (PP) configuration is widely used for this purpose. Due to the complex stress distribution over the cross-sectio

  20. Estimation of frequency-dependent electrokinetic forces on tin oxide nanobelts in low frequency electric fields

    Kumar, Surajit; Hesketh, Peter J, E-mail: surajitk@gatech.edu [George W Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332 (United States)

    2010-08-13

    A novel experimental approach is used for studying the response of ethanol-suspended SnO{sub 2} nanobelts under the influence of low frequency ac electric fields. The electrically generated forces are estimated by analyzing the angular motion of the nanobelt, induced by repulsive forces originating predominantly from negative dielectrophoresis (DEP) on planar microelectrodes. The nanobelt motion is experimentally recorded in real time in the low frequency range (<100 kHz) and the angular velocities are calculated. A simple analytical model of force balance between the electrical forces and fluidic drag for long nano-objects is developed and used to deduce estimates of the frequency-dependent DEP force and torque magnitudes from the angular velocity data. Additional experiments, performed in a parallel plate electrode configuration in a fluidic channel to investigate the effect of dc and very low frequency ac ({approx}Hz) electric fields, indicate the presence of electrophoresis in the ethanol-suspended SnO{sub 2} nanobelts. The experimentally observed nanobelt motion is analyzed using the equation of motion, and an order-of-magnitude estimate of the nanobelt surface charge density is obtained.

  1. Accurate Lineshapes from Sub-1 cm-1 Resolution Sum Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy of α-Pinene at Room Temperature

    Mifflin, Amanda L.; Velarde Ruiz Esparza, Luis A.; Ho, Junming; Psciuk, Brian; Negre, Christian; Ebben, Carlena J.; Upshur, Mary Alice; Lu, Zhou; Strick, Benjamin; Thomson, Regan; Batista, Victor; Wang, Hongfei; Geiger, Franz M.

    2015-02-26

    Room temperature sub-wavenumber high-resolution broadband sum frequency generation (HR-BB-SFG) spectra of the common terpene (+)-α-pinene reveal ten peaks in the C–H stretching region. The spectral resolution exceeds that of Fourier transform infrared, femtosecond stimulated Raman, and traditional BB-SFG and scanning SFG spectroscopy of the same molecule. Experiment and simulation show the spectral lineshapes to be accurate. Homogeneous vibrational decoherence lifetimes of up to 1.7 psec are assigned to specific oscillators and compare favorably to lifetimes computed from density functional tight binding molecular dynamics calculations, while phase-resolved spectra yield orientation information for them. We propose the new spectroscopy as an attractive alternative to time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy or heterodyne-detection schemes for studying vibrational energy relaxation and vibrational coherences in molecules.

  2. A frequency dependent preconditioned wavelet method for atmospheric tomography

    Yudytskiy, Mykhaylo; Helin, Tapio; Ramlau, Ronny

    2013-12-01

    Atmospheric tomography, i.e. the reconstruction of the turbulence in the atmosphere, is a main task for the adaptive optics systems of the next generation telescopes. For extremely large telescopes, such as the European Extremely Large Telescope, this problem becomes overly complex and an efficient algorithm is needed to reduce numerical costs. Recently, a conjugate gradient method based on wavelet parametrization of turbulence layers was introduced [5]. An iterative algorithm can only be numerically efficient when the number of iterations required for a sufficient reconstruction is low. A way to achieve this is to design an efficient preconditioner. In this paper we propose a new frequency-dependent preconditioner for the wavelet method. In the context of a multi conjugate adaptive optics (MCAO) system simulated on the official end-to-end simulation tool OCTOPUS of the European Southern Observatory we demonstrate robustness and speed of the preconditioned algorithm. We show that three iterations are sufficient for a good reconstruction.

  3. Frequency-dependent loudness balancing in bimodal cochlear implant users.

    Veugen, Lidwien C E; Chalupper, Josef; Snik, Ad F M; van Opstal, A John; Mens, Lucas H M

    2016-08-01

    Conclusion In users of a cochlear implant (CI) and a hearing aid (HA) in contralateral ears, frequency-dependent loudness balancing between devices did, on average, not lead to improved speech understanding as compared to broadband balancing. However, nine out of 15 bimodal subjects showed significantly better speech understanding with either one of the fittings. Objectives Sub-optimal fittings and mismatches in loudness are possible explanations for the large individual differences seen in listeners using bimodal stimulation. Methods HA gain was adjusted for soft and loud input sounds in three frequency bands (0-548, 548-1000, and >1000 Hz) to match loudness with the CI. This procedure was compared to a simple broadband balancing procedure that reflected current clinical practice. In a three-visit cross-over design with 4 weeks between sessions, speech understanding was tested in quiet and in noise and questionnaires were administered to assess benefit in real world. Results Both procedures resulted in comparable HA gains. For speech in noise, a marginal bimodal benefit of 0.3 ± 4 dB was found, with large differences between subjects and spatial configurations. Speech understanding in quiet and in noise did not differ between the two loudness balancing procedures. PMID:26986743

  4. Frequency-dependent springs in the seismic analysis of structures

    This paper presents a two-step algorithm for the seismic analysis of structure resting on the rigid embedded basement. Frequency-domain analysis of SSI is carried out on the second step for a platform model with special 'soil spring' which is complex, frequency-dependent, wave-dependent and non-balanced. Theory is presented to obtain the parameters of the soil spring on the first step of the analysis, performed without structure (only geometry of the basement is used) using well-known SASSI code (Lysmer et al, 1981) or in some other ways. On the second step in the SASSI analysis the soil spring is included in the model as a special finite element. Thus, the first step enables to save the computer resources on structure, the second step-to save resources on soil. Soil spring is the most general form for a SSI linear analysis: conventional springs and dashpots can be easily represented in such a format. Thus, the presented approach enables to study the impact of various factors (such as the embedment depth and soil-structure separation, the off-diagonal stiffness, various formulas for stiffness and damping, etc.) on the soil spring parameters. These parameters can be studied separately from the structure itself. As an example, the study of the horizontal soil mesh size is presented. Lumped soil spring may be used on the second step to obtain structural response spectra. To get stresses complex stiffness may be distributed over the basement slab and embedded walls. The proposed approach may be considered to be the alternative to the impedance method (see ASCE4-98). (authors)

  5. Frequency-dependent selection at rough expanding fronts

    Kuhr, Jan-Timm; Stark, Holger

    2015-10-01

    Microbial colonies are experimental model systems for studying the colonization of new territory by biological species through range expansion. We study a generalization of the two-species Eden model, which incorporates local frequency-dependent selection, in order to analyze how social interactions between two species influence surface roughness of growing microbial colonies. The model includes several classical scenarios from game theory. We then concentrate on an expanding public goods game, where either cooperators or defectors take over the front depending on the system parameters. We analyze in detail the critical behavior of the nonequilibrium phase transition between global cooperation and defection and thereby identify a new universality class of phase transitions dealing with absorbing states. At the transition, the number of boundaries separating sectors decays with a novel power law in time and their superdiffusive motion crosses over from Eden scaling to a nearly ballistic regime. In parallel, the width of the front initially obeys Eden roughening and, at later times, passes over to selective roughening.

  6. Frequency-dependent traveltime tomography using fat rays: application to near-surface seismic imaging

    Jordi, Claudio; Schmelzbach, Cedric; Greenhalgh, Stewart

    2016-08-01

    Frequency-dependent traveltime tomography does not rely on the high frequency assumption made in classical ray-based tomography. By incorporating the effects of velocity structures in the first Fresnel volume around the central ray, it offers a more realistic and accurate representation of the actual physics of seismic wave propagation and thus, enhanced imaging of near-surface structures is expected. The objective of this work was to apply frequency-dependent first arrival traveltime tomography to surface seismic data that were acquired for exploration scale and near-surface seismic imaging. We adapted a fat ray tomography algorithm from global-earth seismology that calculates the Fresnel volumes based on source and receiver (adjoint source) traveltime fields. The fat ray tomography algorithm was tested on synthetic model data that mimics the dimensions of two field data sets. The field data sets are presented as two case studies where fat ray tomography was applied for near-surface seismic imaging. The data set of the first case study was recorded for high-resolution near-surface imaging of a Quaternary valley (profile length 10 km). All results of fat ray tomography are compared against the results of classical ray-based tomography. We show that fat ray tomography can provide enhanced tomograms and that it is possible to recover more information on the subsurface when compared to ray tomography. However, model assessment based on the column sum of the Jacobian matrix revealed that especially the deep parts of the structure in the fat ray tomograms might not be adequately covered by fat rays. Furthermore, the performance of the fat ray tomography depends on the chosen input frequency in relation to the scale of the seismic survey. Synthetic data testing revealed that the best results were obtained when the frequency was chosen to correspond to an approximate wavelength-to-target depth ratio of 0.1.

  7. Disambiguating past events: Accurate source memory for time and context depends on different retrieval processes.

    Persson, Bjorn M; Ainge, James A; O'Connor, Akira R

    2016-07-01

    Current animal models of episodic memory are usually based on demonstrating integrated memory for what happened, where it happened, and when an event took place. These models aim to capture the testable features of the definition of human episodic memory which stresses the temporal component of the memory as a unique piece of source information that allows us to disambiguate one memory from another. Recently though, it has been suggested that a more accurate model of human episodic memory would include contextual rather than temporal source information, as humans' memory for time is relatively poor. Here, two experiments were carried out investigating human memory for temporal and contextual source information, along with the underlying dual process retrieval processes, using an immersive virtual environment paired with a 'Remember-Know' memory task. Experiment 1 (n=28) showed that contextual information could only be retrieved accurately using recollection, while temporal information could be retrieved using either recollection or familiarity. Experiment 2 (n=24), which used a more difficult task, resulting in reduced item recognition rates and therefore less potential for contamination by ceiling effects, replicated the pattern of results from Experiment 1. Dual process theory predicts that it should only be possible to retrieve source context from an event using recollection, and our results are consistent with this prediction. That temporal information can be retrieved using familiarity alone suggests that it may be incorrect to view temporal context as analogous to other typically used source contexts. This latter finding supports the alternative proposal that time since presentation may simply be reflected in the strength of memory trace at retrieval - a measure ideally suited to trace strength interrogation using familiarity, as is typically conceptualised within the dual process framework. PMID:27174312

  8. High-Frequency CTD Measurements for Accurate GPS/acoustic Sea-floor Crustal Deformation Measurement System

    Tadokoro, K.; Yasuda, K.; Taniguchi, S.; Uemura, Y.; Matsuhiro, K.

    2015-12-01

    The GPS/acoustic sea-floor crustal deformation measurement system has developed as a useful tool to observe tectonic deformation especially at subduction zones. One of the factors preventing accurate GPS/acoustic sea-floor crustal deformation measurement is horizontal heterogeneity of sound speed in the ocean. It is therefore necessary to measure the gradient directly from sound speed structure. We report results of high-frequency CTD measurements using Underway CTD (UCTD) in the Kuroshio region. We perform the UCTD measurements on May 2nd, 2015 at two stations (TCA and TOA) above the sea-floor benchmarks installed across the Nankai Trough, off the south-east of Kii Peninsula, middle Japan. The number of measurement points is six at each station along circles with a diameter of 1.8 nautical miles around the sea-floor benchmark. The stations TCA and TOA are located on the edge and the interior of the Kuroshio current, respectively, judging from difference in sea water density measured at the two stations, as well as a satellite image of sea-surface temperature distribution. We detect a sound speed gradient of high speeds in the southern part and low speeds in the northern part at the two stations. At the TCA station, the gradient is noticeable down to 300 m in depth; the maximum difference in sound speed is +/- 5 m/s. The sound speed difference is as small as +/- 1.3 m/s at depths below 300 m, which causes seafloor benchmark positioning error as large as 1 m. At the TOA station, the gradient is extremely small down to 100 m in depth. The maximum difference in sound speed is less than +/- 0.3 m/s that is negligible small for seafloor benchmark positioning error. Clear gradient of high speed is observed to the depths; the maximum difference in sound speed is +/- 0.8-0.9 m/s, causing seafloor benchmark positioning error of several tens centimeters. The UCTD measurement is effective tool to detect sound speed gradient. We establish a method for accurate sea

  9. Advanced Reservoir Imaging Using Frequency-Dependent Seismic Attributes

    Fred Hilterman; Tad Patzek; Gennady Goloshubin; Dmitriy Silin; Charlotte Sullivan; Valeri Korneev

    2007-12-31

    Our report concerning advanced imaging and interpretation technology includes the development of theory, the implementation of laboratory experiments and the verification of results using field data. We investigated a reflectivity model for porous fluid-saturated reservoirs and demonstrated that the frequency-dependent component of the reflection coefficient is asymptotically proportional to the reservoir fluid mobility. We also analyzed seismic data using different azimuths and offsets over physical models of fractures filled with air and water. By comparing our physical model synthetics to numerical data we have identified several diagnostic indicators for quantifying the fractures. Finally, we developed reflectivity transforms for predicting pore fluid and lithology using rock-property statistics from 500 reservoirs in both the shelf and deep-water Gulf of Mexico. With these transforms and seismic AVO gathers across the prospect and its down-dip water-equivalent reservoir, fluid saturation can be estimated without a calibration well that ties the seismic. Our research provides the important additional mechanisms to recognize, delineate, and validate new hydrocarbon reserves and assist in the development of producing fields.

  10. Nonparametric multiscale blind estimation of intensity-frequency-dependent noise.

    Colom, Miguel; Lebrun, Marc; Buades, Antoni; Morel, Jean-Michel

    2015-10-01

    The camera calibration parameters and the image processing chain which generated a given image are generally not available to the receiver. This happens for example with scanned photographs and for most JPEG images. These images have undergone various nonlinear contrast changes and also linear and nonlinear filters. To deal with remnant noise in such images, we introduce a general nonparametric intensity and frequency-dependent noise model. We demonstrate by simulated and experiments with real images that this model, which requires the estimation of more than 1000 parameters, performs an efficient noise estimation. The proposed noise model is a patch model. Its estimation can therefore be used as a preliminary step to any patch-based denoising method. Our noise estimation method introduces several new tools for performing this complex estimation. One of them is a new sparse patch distance function permitting to find noisy patches with similar underlying geometry. A validation of the noise model and of its estimation method is obtained by comparing its results to ground-truth noise curves for both raw and JPEG-encoded images, and by visual inspection of the denoising results of real images. A fair comparison with the state of the art is also performed. PMID:26080053

  11. Frequency Dependence of Ultrasound Neurostimulation in the Mouse Brain.

    Ye, Patrick Peiyong; Brown, Julian R; Pauly, Kim Butts

    2016-07-01

    Ultrasound neuromodulation holds promise as a non-invasive technique for neuromodulation of the central nervous system. However, much remains to be determined about how the technique can be transformed into a useful technology, including the effect of ultrasound frequency. Previous studies have demonstrated neuromodulation in vivo using frequencies <1 MHz, with a trend toward improved efficacy with lower frequency. However, using higher frequencies could offer improved ultrasound spatial resolution. We investigate the ultrasound neuromodulation effects in mice at various frequencies both below and above 1 MHz. We find that frequencies up to 2.9 MHz can still be effective for generating motor responses, but we also confirm that as frequency increases, sonications require significantly more intensity to achieve equivalent efficacy. We argue that our results provide evidence that favors either a particle displacement or a cavitation-based mechanism for the phenomenon of ultrasound neuromodulation. PMID:27090861

  12. KARAT-LAMBDA - frequency dependent ray-traced troposphere delays for space applications

    Hobiger, Thomas; Baron, Philippe

    2014-05-01

    Space-geodetic microwave techniques work under the assumption that the only dispersive, i.e. frequency dependent delay contribution is caused by the ionosphere. In general, the refractivity, even for the troposphere, is a complex quantity which can be denoted as N = N0 + (N'(f) + i N''(f)) where N0 is a frequency independent term, and N'(f) and N''(f) represent the complex frequency dependence. Thereby, the imaginary part can be used to derive the loss of energy (absorption) and the real part can be assigned to the changes in the propagation velocity (refraction) and thus describes the delay of an electromagnetic wave which propagates through that medium. Although the frequency dependent delay contribution appears to be of small order, one has to consider that signals are propagating through few kilometers of troposphere at high elevations to hundredths of kilometers at low elevations. Therefore, the Kashima Ray-Tracing package (Hobiger et al., 2008) has been modified (and named KARAT-LAMBDA) to enable the consideration of a frequency dependent refractivity. By using this tool, it was studied if and to which extent future space geodetic instruments are affected from dispersive troposphere delays. Moreover, a semi-empirical correction model for the microwave link of the Atomic Clock Ensemble in Space (ACES) has been developed, based on ray-tracing calculations with KARAT-LAMBDA. The proposed model (Hobiger et al., 2013) has been tested with simulated ISS overflights at different potential ACES ground station sites and it could be demonstrated that this model is capable to remove biases and elevation dependent features caused by the dispersive troposphere delay difference between the up-link and down-link. References: T. Hobiger, R. Ichikawa, T. Kondo, and Y. Koyama (2008), Fast and accurate ray-tracing algorithms for real-time space geodetic applications using numerical weather models, Journal of Geophysical Research, vol. 113, iss. D203027, pp. 1-14. T. Hobiger, D

  13. Accurate statistics for local sequence alignment with position-dependent scoring by rare-event sampling

    Rahmann Sven

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Molecular database search tools need statistical models to assess the significance for the resulting hits. In the classical approach one asks the question how probable a certain score is observed by pure chance. Asymptotic theories for such questions are available for two random i.i.d. sequences. Some effort had been made to include effects of finite sequence lengths and to account for specific compositions of the sequences. In many applications, such as a large-scale database homology search for transmembrane proteins, these models are not the most appropriate ones. Search sensitivity and specificity benefit from position-dependent scoring schemes or use of Hidden Markov Models. Additional, one may wish to go beyond the assumption that the sequences are i.i.d. Despite their practical importance, the statistical properties of these settings have not been well investigated yet. Results In this paper, we discuss an efficient and general method to compute the score distribution to any desired accuracy. The general approach may be applied to different sequence models and and various similarity measures that satisfy a few weak assumptions. We have access to the low-probability region ("tail" of the distribution where scores are larger than expected by pure chance and therefore relevant for practical applications. Our method uses recent ideas from rare-event simulations, combining Markov chain Monte Carlo simulations with importance sampling and generalized ensembles. We present results for the score statistics of fixed and random queries against random sequences. In a second step, we extend the approach to a model of transmembrane proteins, which can hardly be described as i.i.d. sequences. For this case, we compare the statistical properties of a fixed query model as well as a hidden Markov sequence model in connection with a position based scoring scheme against the classical approach. Conclusions The results illustrate that the

  14. The nest site lottery: how selectively neutral density dependent growth suppression induces frequency dependent selection.

    Argasinski, K; Broom, M

    2013-12-01

    Modern developments in population dynamics emphasize the role of the turnover of individuals. In the new approaches stable population size is a dynamic equilibrium between different mortality and fecundity factors instead of an arbitrary fixed carrying capacity. The latest replicator dynamics models assume that regulation of the population size acts through feedback driven by density dependent juvenile mortality. Here, we consider a simplified model to extract the properties of this approach. We show that at the stable population size, the structure of the frequency dependent evolutionary game emerges. Turnover of individuals induces a lottery mechanism where for each nest site released by a dead adult individual a single newborn is drawn from the pool of newborn candidates. This frequency dependent selection leads towards the strategy maximizing the number of newborns per adult death. However, multiple strategies can maximize this value. Among them, the strategy with the greatest mortality (which implies the greatest instantaneous growth rate) is selected. This result is important for the discussion about universal fitness measures and which parameters are maximized by natural selection. This is related to the fitness measures R0 and r, because the number of newborns per single dead individual equals the lifetime production of newborn R0 in models without aging. We thus have a two-stage procedure, instead of a single fitness measure, which is a combination of R0 and r. According to the nest site lottery mechanism, at stable population size, selection favors strategies with the greatest r, i.e. those with the highest turnover, from those with the greatest R0. PMID:24071631

  15. Dependence of excitation frequency of resonant circuit on RF irradiation position of MRI equipment

    Hyperthermia using implants is a cancer treatment in which cancer tissue is heated to over 42.5 deg C to selectively kill the cancer cells. In this study, a resonant circuit was used as an implant, and a weak magnetic field of radiofrequency (RF) pulses from a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) device was used as an excitation source. We report here how the temperature of the resonant circuit was controlled by changing the excitation frequency of the MRI. As a result, the temperature rise of the resonant circuit was successfully found to depend on its position in the MRI device. This significant result indicates that the temperature of the resonant circuit can be controlled only by adjusting the excitation position. Accurate temperature control is therefore expected to be possible by combining this control technique with the temperature measurement function of MRI equipment. (author)

  16. Dependence of synchronization frequency of Kuramoto oscillators on symmetry of intrinsic frequency in ring network

    Arindam Saha; R E Amritkar

    2014-12-01

    Kuramoto oscillators have been proposed earlier as a model for interacting systems that exhibit synchronization. In this article, we study the difference between networks with symmetric and asymmetric distribution of natural frequencies. We first indicate that synchronization frequency of oscillators in a completely connected network is always equal to the mean of the natural frequency distribution. In particular, shape of the natural frequency distribution does not affect the synchronization frequency in this case. Then, we analyse the case of oscillators in a directed ring network, where asymmetry in the natural frequency distribution is seen to shift the synchronization frequency of the network. We also present an estimate of the shift in the frequencies for slightly asymmetric distributions.

  17. Small-scale field experiments accurately scale up to predict density dependence in reef fish populations at large scales.

    Steele, Mark A; Forrester, Graham E

    2005-09-20

    Field experiments provide rigorous tests of ecological hypotheses but are usually limited to small spatial scales. It is thus unclear whether these findings extrapolate to larger scales relevant to conservation and management. We show that the results of experiments detecting density-dependent mortality of reef fish on small habitat patches scale up to have similar effects on much larger entire reefs that are the size of small marine reserves and approach the scale at which some reef fisheries operate. We suggest that accurate scaling is due to the type of species interaction causing local density dependence and the fact that localized events can be aggregated to describe larger-scale interactions with minimal distortion. Careful extrapolation from small-scale experiments identifying species interactions and their effects should improve our ability to predict the outcomes of alternative management strategies for coral reef fishes and their habitats. PMID:16150721

  18. Tidal dissipation in the Moon. Learning from the "incorrect" frequency dependence measured by the LLR

    Efroimsky, M.

    2012-09-01

    It was demonstrated back in 2001 that fitting of the LLR data results in the quality factor Q of the Moon scaling as the frequency ξ to a negative power [8]: Q ˜ ξp , where p = -0.19 . (1) At the same time, numerous measurements by various seismological teams agree on the exponent being positive, not negative [4]. The positive sign of the exponent stems also from geodetic measurements [1], and it finds its explanation within the theory of friction in minerals [5]. On all these grounds, the aforementioned finding by the LLR team appears to be implausible and to disagree with the conventional wisdom of solid state mechanics and seismology. A later reexamination in [9] rendered a less upsetting value, p = -0.09 , which was still negative and still seemed to contradict our knowledge of microphysical processes in solids. The authors later wrote [10]: "There is a weak dependence of tidal specific dissipation Q on period. The Q increases from ˜ 30 at a month to ˜ 35 at one year. Q for rock is expected to have a weak dependence on tidal period, but it is expected to decrease with period rather than increase. The frequency dependence of Q deserves further attention and should be improved." A possible explanation of this paradox comes from the observation that the LLR measurements provided information on the tidal and not seismic dissipation. The difference between these two processes comes from self-gravitation of the celestial body. To address the problem accurately, one has to calculate the tidal factors kl sin ɛl showing up in the Darwin-Kaula expansion for the tidal torque or force. Here kl is the degree-l Love number, while ɛl is the appropriate tidal lag. Sometimes sin ɛl is denoted with 1/Q , which is not recommended, because this notation does not distinguish between the tidal reaction appropriate to harmonics of different degree. This notation also puts one at risk of confusing the tidal damping with the seismic damping, two process that have much in common

  19. Frequency dependent characteristics of solar impulsive radio bursts

    An investigation was made of the impulsive radio bursts observed in the frequency range 0.245 to 35 GHz. Important results obtained are: (i) Simple type 1 bursts with intensities 0 to 10 f.u. and simple type 2 bursts with intensities 10 to 500 f.u. are predominant in the frequency ranges 1.415 to 4.995 GHz and 4.995 to 8.8 GHz, respectively; (ii) With maxima around 2.7 GHz and 4 GHz for the first and second types respectively, the durations of the radio bursts decrease gradually both towards lower and higher frequencies; (iii) As regards occurrences, the first type dominates in the southern solar hemisphere peaking around 8.8 GHz, whereas the second type favours the north with no well-defined maximum in any frequency; (iv) Both types prefer the eastern hemisphere, the peak occurrences being around 8.8 GHz and 5 GHz for the two successive types, respectively; (c) The spectra of impulsive radio bursts are generally of the inverted U-type with the maximum emission intensity between 5 and 15 GHz. (author)

  20. A Frequency-domain test for long range dependence

    Gromykov, G; Ould Haye, M; Philippe, Anne

    2016-01-01

    A new frequency-domain test statistic is introduced to test for short memory versus long memory. We provide its asymptotic distribution under the null hypothesis and show that it is consistent under any long memory alternative. Some simulation studies show that this test is more robust than various standard tests in terms of empirical size when the normality of observed process is lost.

  1. Cue-dependency and Frequency Effects: Evidence from Chinese

    Gao Dingguo; Yang Zhiliang

    2005-01-01

    The present study disclosed that a) prime stimuli had a significant effect on the object in implicit tests, but not in the explicit condition, and b) greater priming occurred when the study and test fonts coincided than whey they differeds, Moreover,the performance in implicit memory tests was more impaired by a shift from official to printed fonts than by a shift in the reverse direction. In addition, the results also revealed that low frequency materials produced more priming than did high frequency materials in implicit memory tests, but less effect of this variable on priming in explicit memory tests could be obtained with the same target characters. The above results implied that a transfer appropriate processing approach suggested by Roediger, Weldon and Challis (1989) is more acceptable to interpret the dissociation between implicit and explicit memory. The authors also critically commented on the implicit memory tests of Chinese widely used by researchers.

  2. Sensitivity in frequency dependent angular rotation of optical vortices.

    Rumala, Yisa S

    2016-03-10

    This paper presents robust strategies to enhance the rotation sensitivity (and resolution) of a coherent superposition of optical vortices emerging from a single spiral phase plate (SPP) device when light's optical frequency (or wavelength) going into the SPP device is varied. The paper discusses the generation and measurement of ultrasmall rotation. Factors that affect the ability to perform precision rotation measurements include the linewidth and stability of the input light source, the number of photon counts making position rotation measurements on the CCD detector, SPP reflectivity, the length of SPP device, and the angular modulation frequency of the intensity pattern due to a coherent superposition of optical vortices in a single SPP device. This paper also discusses parameters to obtain a high-sensitivity single shot measurement and multiple measurements. Furthermore, it presents what I believe is a new scaling showing the enhancement in sensitivity (and resolution) in the standard quantum limit and Heisenberg limit. With experimentally realizable parameters, there is an enhancement of rotation sensitivity by at least one order of magnitude compared to previous rotation measurements with optical vortices. Understanding robust strategies to enhance the rotation sensitivity in an SPP device is important to metrology in general and for building compact SPP sensors such as gyroscopes, molecular sensors, and thermal sensors. PMID:26974798

  3. Sound frequency-invariant neural coding of a frequency-dependent cue to sound source location.

    Jones, Heath G; Brown, Andrew D; Koka, Kanthaiah; Thornton, Jennifer L; Tollin, Daniel J

    2015-07-01

    The century-old duplex theory of sound localization posits that low- and high-frequency sounds are localized with two different acoustical cues, interaural time and level differences (ITDs and ILDs), respectively. While behavioral studies in humans and behavioral and neurophysiological studies in a variety of animal models have largely supported the duplex theory, behavioral sensitivity to ILD is curiously invariant across the audible spectrum. Here we demonstrate that auditory midbrain neurons in the chinchilla (Chinchilla lanigera) also encode ILDs in a frequency-invariant manner, efficiently representing the full range of acoustical ILDs experienced as a joint function of sound source frequency, azimuth, and distance. We further show, using Fisher information, that nominal "low-frequency" and "high-frequency" ILD-sensitive neural populations can discriminate ILD with similar acuity, yielding neural ILD discrimination thresholds for near-midline sources comparable to behavioral discrimination thresholds estimated for chinchillas. These findings thus suggest a revision to the duplex theory and reinforce ecological and efficiency principles that hold that neural systems have evolved to encode the spectrum of biologically relevant sensory signals to which they are naturally exposed. PMID:25972580

  4. A time domain based method for the accurate measurement of Q-factor and resonance frequency of microwave resonators

    Gyüre, B.; Márkus, B. G.; Bernáth, B.; Simon, F., E-mail: ferenc.simon@univie.ac.at [Department of Physics, Budapest University of Technology and Economics and MTA-BME Lendület Spintronics Research Group (PROSPIN), P.O. Box 91, H-1521 Budapest (Hungary); Murányi, F. [Foundation for Research on Information Technologies in Society (IT’IS), Zeughausstrasse 43, 8004 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2015-09-15

    We present a novel method to determine the resonant frequency and quality factor of microwave resonators which is faster, more stable, and conceptually simpler than the yet existing techniques. The microwave resonator is pumped with the microwave radiation at a frequency away from its resonance. It then emits an exponentially decaying radiation at its eigen-frequency when the excitation is rapidly switched off. The emitted microwave signal is down-converted with a microwave mixer, digitized, and its Fourier transformation (FT) directly yields the resonance curve in a single shot. Being a FT based method, this technique possesses the Fellgett (multiplex) and Connes (accuracy) advantages and it conceptually mimics that of pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance. We also establish a novel benchmark to compare accuracy of the different approaches of microwave resonator measurements. This shows that the present method has similar accuracy to the existing ones, which are based on sweeping or modulating the frequency of the microwave radiation.

  5. A time domain based method for the accurate measurement of Q-factor and resonance frequency of microwave resonators

    We present a novel method to determine the resonant frequency and quality factor of microwave resonators which is faster, more stable, and conceptually simpler than the yet existing techniques. The microwave resonator is pumped with the microwave radiation at a frequency away from its resonance. It then emits an exponentially decaying radiation at its eigen-frequency when the excitation is rapidly switched off. The emitted microwave signal is down-converted with a microwave mixer, digitized, and its Fourier transformation (FT) directly yields the resonance curve in a single shot. Being a FT based method, this technique possesses the Fellgett (multiplex) and Connes (accuracy) advantages and it conceptually mimics that of pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance. We also establish a novel benchmark to compare accuracy of the different approaches of microwave resonator measurements. This shows that the present method has similar accuracy to the existing ones, which are based on sweeping or modulating the frequency of the microwave radiation

  6. Frequency dependent superfluid stiffness in the pseudogap regime in strongly disordered NbN thin films

    Mondal, Mintu; Kamlapure, Anand; Ganguli, Somesh Chandra; Jesudasan, John; Bagwe, Vivas; Benfatto, Lara; Raychaudhuri, Pratap

    2012-01-01

    We measure the frequency dependence of the complex ac conductivity of NbN films with different levels of disorder in frequency range 0.4-20 GHz. Films with low disorder exhibit a narrow dynamic fluctuation regime above T_c as expected for a conventional superconductor. However, for strongly disordered samples, the fluctuation regime extends well above T_c, with a strongly frequency-dependent superfluid stiffness which disappears only at a temperature T* close to the pseudogap temperature obta...

  7. Frequency analysis of temperature-dependent interferometric signal for the measurement of the temperature coefficient of refractive index

    Zhou, Jianqin; Shen, Jun; Neill, W. Stuart

    2016-07-01

    A method of frequency analysis for the measurement of the temperature coefficient of refractive index (dn/dT) using a Fabry-Perot interferometer was developed and tested against ethanol and water. The temperature-dependent interferometric signal described by Airy's formula was analyzed in both the temperature and frequency domains. By fast Fourier transform, a low-pass filter was designed and employed to eliminate the noise superimposed on the signal. dn/dT was determined accurately from the noise-removed signal by peak analysis. Furthermore, the signal frequency parameters may be utilized for the material thermophysical property characterization. This method lays the foundation for an online dn/dT instrument for monitoring chemical processes.

  8. Frequency Dependence of Damping and Compliance in Loudspeaker Suspensions

    Thorborg, Knud; Tinggaard, Carsten; Agerkvist, Finn T.;

    2010-01-01

    A loudspeakers suspension is commonly not, even by small signals, to be regarded as a simple spring following Hooke’s law – as otherwise presumed by traditional theory. Different types of polymers (rubber or plastic, either vulcanized, foamed or TPE) used for surrounds - besides impregnated...... textiles used for spiders - have more or less visco-elastic properties; best known is the “creep” effect. This phenomenon in itself is normally of little interest in the audio frequency range. It is mainly a DC phenomenon. As such it manifests itself when a static (DC) force probes the speaker voice coil...... empirical model mathematically describing the effects of visco-elasticity in loudspeaker suspensions. The evaluation is to a high degree based on test loudspeakers with rubber surrounds with a high content of plasticizer combining high compliance and high damping. This is very effective to reduce rim...

  9. Frequency Dependence of Damping and Compliance in Loudspeaker Suspensions

    Thorborg, Knud; Tinggaard, Carsten; Agerkvist, Finn T.; Futtrup, Claus

    2010-01-01

    empirical model mathematically describing the effects of visco-elasticity in loudspeaker suspensions. The evaluation is to a high degree based on test loudspeakers with rubber surrounds with a high content of plasticizer combining high compliance and high damping. This is very effective to reduce rim...... resonances, but less used in high quality loudspeakers today – where “Low Loss Rubber Surround” is currently seen as a marketing feature, as it is expected to have positive impact on sound quality. The plasticized type of surround shows significant creep, followed by compliance and damping increasing towards...... lower frequencies. The LOG-model is found to give good agreement with measurements, also for loudspeakers with low loss surrounds. However, it is not supported by a theory explaining visco-elastic properties in a physical way. Surrounds today are mostly made from SBR rubber for which - with the...

  10. Frequency-dependent changes in the amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations in internet gaming disorder.

    Lin, Xiao; Jia, Xize; Zang, Yu-Feng; Dong, Guangheng

    2015-01-01

    Neuroimaging studies have revealed that the task-related functional brain activities are impaired in internet gaming disorder (IGD) subjects. However, little is known about the alternations in spontaneous brain activities about them. Recent studies have proposed that the brain activities of different frequency ranges are generated by different nervous activities and have different physiological and psychological functions. Thus, in this study, we set to explore the spontaneous brain activities in IGD subjects by measuring the fractional amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation (fALFF), to investigate band-specific changes of resting-state fALFF. We subdivided the frequency range into five bands based on literatures. Comparing to healthy controls, the IGD group showed decreased fALFF values in the cerebellum posterior lobe and increased fALFF values in superior temporal gyrus. Significant interactions between frequency bands and groups were found in the cerebellum, the anterior cingulate, the lingual gyrus, the middle temporal gyrus, and the middle frontal gyrus. Those brain regions are proved related to the executive function and decision-making. These results revealed the changed spontaneous brain activity of IGD, which contributed to understanding the underlying pathophysiology of IGD. PMID:26441815

  11. Frequency-dependent changes in the amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations in internet gaming disorder

    Lin, Xiao; Jia, Xize; Zang, Yu-Feng; Dong, Guangheng

    2015-01-01

    Neuroimaging studies have revealed that the task-related functional brain activities are impaired in internet gaming disorder (IGD) subjects. However, little is known about the alternations in spontaneous brain activities about them. Recent studies have proposed that the brain activities of different frequency ranges are generated by different nervous activities and have different physiological and psychological functions. Thus, in this study, we set to explore the spontaneous brain activitie...

  12. The vestibular implant: Frequency-dependency of the electrically evoked Vestibulo-Ocular Reflex in humans

    Raymond Van De Berg

    2015-01-01

    A strong and significant effect of frequency was observed in the total peak eye velocity of the eVOR. This effect was similar to that observed in the “natural” VOR. Other characteristics of the (eVOR (angle, habituation-index, and asymmetry showed no significant frequency-dependent effect. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that, at least at the specific (limited frequency range tested, responses elicited by a vestibular implant closely mimic the frequency-dependency of the “normal” vestibular system.

  13. Studies of frequency dependent C-V characteristics of neutron irradiated p+-n silicon detectors

    Frequency-dependent capacitance-voltage fluence (C-V) characteristics of neutron irradiated high resistivity silicon p+-n detectors have been observed up to a fluence of 8.0 x 1012 n/cm2. It has been found that frequency dependence of the deviation of the C-V characteristic (from its normal V-1/2 dependence), is strongly dependent on the ratio of the defect density and the effective doping density Nt/N'd. As the defect density approaches the effective dopant density, or Nt/N'd → 1, the junction capacitance eventually assumes the value of the detector geometry capacitance at high frequencies (f ≤ 105 Hz), independent of voltage. A two-trap-level model using the concept of quasi-fermi levels has been developed, which predicts both the effects of C-V frequency dependence and dopant compensation observed in this study

  14. Impact of the frequency dependence of tidal Q on the evolution of planetary systems

    Auclair-Desrotour, P; Mathis, S

    2013-01-01

    Context. Tidal dissipation in planets and in stars is one of the key physical mechanisms that drive the evolution of planetary systems. Aims. Tidal dissipation properties are intrisically linked to the internal structure and the rheology of studied celestial bodies. The resulting dependence of the dissipation upon the tidal frequency is strongly different in the cases of solids and fluids. Methods. We compute the tidal evolution of a two-body coplanar system, using the tidal quality factor's frequency-dependencies appropriate to rocks and to convective fluids. Results. The ensuing orbital dynamics comes out smooth or strongly erratic, dependent on how the tidal dissipation depends upon frequency. Conclusions. We demonstrate the strong impact of the internal structure and of the rheology of the central body on the orbital evolution of the tidal perturber. A smooth frequency-dependence of the tidal dissipation renders a smooth orbital evolution while a peaked dissipation can furnish erratic orbital behaviour.

  15. Self-referenced, accurate and sensitive optical frequency comb spectroscopy with a virtually imaged phased array spectrometer.

    Kowzan, Grzegorz; Lee, Kevin F; Paradowska, Magdalena; Borkowski, Mateusz; Ablewski, Piotr; Wójtewicz, Szymon; Stec, Kamila; Lisak, Daniel; Fermann, Martin E; Trawiński, Ryszard S; Masłowski, Piotr

    2016-03-01

    We present a cavity-enhanced direct optical frequency comb spectroscopy system with a virtually imaged phased array (VIPA) spectrometer and either a dither or a Pound-Drever-Hall (PDH) locking scheme used for stable transmission of the comb through the cavity. A self-referenced scheme for frequency axis calibration is shown along with an analysis of its accuracy. A careful comparison between both locking schemes is performed based on near-IR measurements of the carbon monoxide ν=3←0 band P branch transitions in a gas sample with known composition. The noise-equivalent absorptions (NEA) for the PDH and dither schemes are 9.9×10-10  cm-1 and 5.3×10-9  cm-1, respectively. PMID:26974094

  16. Accurate Time-Dependent Wave Packet Calculations for the O(+) + H2 → OH(+) + H Ion-Molecule Reaction.

    Bulut, N; Castillo, J F; Jambrina, P G; Kłos, J; Roncero, O; Aoiz, F J; Bañares, L

    2015-12-17

    Accurate quantum reactive scattering time-dependent wave packet close-coupling calculations have been carried out to determine total reaction probabilities and integral cross sections for the O(+) + H2 → OH(+) + H reaction in a range of collision energies from 10(-3) eV up to 1.0 eV for the H2 rovibrational states (v = 0; j = 0, 1, 2) and (v = 1; j = 0) using the potential energy surface (PES) by Martı́nez et al. As expected for a barrierless reaction, the reaction cross section decays rapidly with collision energy, Ec, following a behavior that nearly corresponds to that predicted by the Langevin model. Rotational excitation of H2 into j = 1, 2 has a very moderate effect on reactivity, similarly to what happens with vibrational excitation below Ec ≈ 0.3 eV. However, at higher collision energies the cross section increases notably when H2 is promoted to v = 1. This effect is explained by resorting to the effective potentials in the entrance channel. The integral cross sections have been used to calculate rate constants in the temperature range 200-1000 K. A good overall agreement has been found with the available experimental data on integral cross sections and rate constants. In addition, time-independent quantum mechanical and quasi-classical trajectory (QCT) calculations have been performed on the same PES aimed to compare the various methodologies and to discern the detailed mechanism of the title reaction. In particular, the analysis of individual trajectories has made it possible to explain, in terms of the coupling between reagent relative velocity and the topography of the PES, the presence of a series of alternating maxima and minima in the collision energy dependence of the QCT reaction probabilities for the reactions with H2(v=0,1,j=0), which are absent in the quantum mechanical calculations. PMID:25822338

  17. Ultrasonic Measurement of Change in Elasticity due to Endothelium Dependent Relaxation Response by Accurate Detection of Artery-Wall Boundary

    Kaneko, Takuya; Hasegawa, Hideyuki; Kanai, Hiroshi

    2007-07-01

    Ross hypothesized that an endothelial dysfunction is considered to be an initial step in atherosclerosis. Endothelial cells, which release nitric oxide (NO) in response to shear stress from blood flow, have a function of relaxing smooth muscle in the media of the arterial wall. For the assessment of the endothelial function, there is a conventional method in which the change in the diameter of the brachial artery caused by flow-mediated dilation (FMD) is measured with ultrasound. However, despite the fact that the collagen-rich hard adventitia does not respond to NO, the conventional method measures the change in diameter depending on the mechanical property of the entire wall including the adventitia. Therefore, we developed a method of measuring the change in the thickness and the elasticity of the brachial artery during a cardiac cycle using the phased tracking method for the evaluation of the mechanical property of only the intima-media region. In this study, the initial positions of echoes from the lumen-intima and media-adventitia boundaries are determined using complex template matching to accurately estimate the minute change in the thickness and the elasticity of the brachial and radial arteries. The ambiguity in the determination of such boundaries was eliminated using complex template matching, and the change in elasticity measured by the proposed method was larger than the change in inner diameter obtained by the conventional method.

  18. Bidirectional frequency-dependent effect of extremely low-frequency electromagnetic field on E. coli K-12.

    Martirosyan, Varsik; Baghdasaryan, Naira; Ayrapetyan, Sinerik

    2013-09-01

    In the present work, the frequency-dependent effects of extremely low-frequency electromagnetic field (ELF EMF) on Escherichia coli K-12 growth have been studied. The frequency-dependent effects of ELF EMF have shown that it can either stimulate or inhibit the growth of microbes. However, the mechanism by which the ELF EMF affects the bacterial cells is not clear yet. It was suggested that the aqua medium can serve as a target through which the biological effect of ELF EMF on microbes may be realized. To check this hypothesis, the frequency-dependent effects (2, 4, 6, 8, 10 Hz, B = 0.4 mT, 30 min) of ELF EMF on the bacterial growth were studied in both cases where the microbes were in the culture media during the exposure and where culture media was preliminarily exposed to the ELF EMF before the addition of bacteria. For investigating the cell proliferation, the radioactive [(3)H]-thymidine assay was carried out. It has been shown that EMF at 4 Hz exposure has pronounced stimulation while at 8 Hz it has inhibited cell proliferation. PMID:23046211

  19. Strongly Frequency-dependent Photoinduced Magnetic Disaccommodation in YIG: 0.001 Ca

    2000-01-01

    By measuring frequency dependence of photoinduced double peaks of disaccommodation, DA as a function of temperature was observed at very Iow frequency: 0.07~0.30 kHz, in a single crystal of yttrium iron garnet, YIG with small amounts of Ca: 0.001, while only single peak existed at the higher frequency 0.5 kHz. The behavior is explained based on theoretical approach on a domain wall dynamics.

  20. Time-domain analysis of frequency dependent inertial wave forces on cylinders

    Krenk, Steen

    2013-01-01

    Mono-pile structures are attractive for small well-head platforms and foundation of offshore wind turbines at moderate water depth. Their diameter of several meters makes them prone to simultaneous occurrence of frequency-dependent inertial forces and non-linear drag. The present paper presents a...... reduction of the resonant part of the response for natural structural frequencies above the dominating wave frequency....

  1. Planck intermediate results. XXII. Frequency dependence of thermal emission from Galactic dust in intensity and polarization

    Cardoso, J. F.; Delabrouille, J.; Ganga, K.;

    2015-01-01

    Planck has mapped the intensity and polarization of the sky at microwave frequencies with unprecedented sensitivity. We use these data to characterize the frequency dependence of dust emission. We make use of the Planck 353 GHz I, Q, and U Stokes maps as dust templates, and cross-correlate them w...

  2. Assessing the utility of frequency dependent nudging for reducing biases in biogeochemical models

    Lagman, Karl B.; Fennel, Katja; Thompson, Keith R.; Bianucci, Laura

    2014-09-01

    Bias errors, resulting from inaccurate boundary and forcing conditions, incorrect model parameterization, etc. are a common problem in environmental models including biogeochemical ocean models. While it is important to correct bias errors wherever possible, it is unlikely that any environmental model will ever be entirely free of such errors. Hence, methods for bias reduction are necessary. A widely used technique for online bias reduction is nudging, where simulated fields are continuously forced toward observations or a climatology. Nudging is robust and easy to implement, but suppresses high-frequency variability and introduces artificial phase shifts. As a solution to this problem Thompson et al. (2006) introduced frequency dependent nudging where nudging occurs only in prescribed frequency bands, typically centered on the mean and the annual cycle. They showed this method to be effective for eddy resolving ocean circulation models. Here we add a stability term to the previous form of frequency dependent nudging which makes the method more robust for non-linear biological models. Then we assess the utility of frequency dependent nudging for biological models by first applying the method to a simple predator-prey model and then to a 1D ocean biogeochemical model. In both cases we only nudge in two frequency bands centered on the mean and the annual cycle, and then assess how well the variability in higher frequency bands is recovered. We evaluate the effectiveness of frequency dependent nudging in comparison to conventional nudging and find significant improvements with the former.

  3. Frequency dependence of the pump-to-signal RIN transfer in fiber optical parametric amplifiers

    Pakarzadeh Dezfuli Nezhad, Hassan; Rottwitt, Karsten; Zakery, A.

    2009-01-01

    Using a numerical model, the frequency dependence of the pump-to-signal RIN transfer in FOPAs has been investigated. The model includes fiber loss, pump depletion as well as difference in group velocity among interacting beams.......Using a numerical model, the frequency dependence of the pump-to-signal RIN transfer in FOPAs has been investigated. The model includes fiber loss, pump depletion as well as difference in group velocity among interacting beams....

  4. Frequency dependence of the self-heating effect in polymer-based composites

    K. Holeczek

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The self-heating effect caused by viscous energy dissipation in polymer-based composite structures subjected to harmonic loads is considered to have a great influence on the residual life of the component. The purpose of the conducted investigations is the determination of the dynamic mechanical behaviour of a polymer-based composite material under different excitation frequencies and temperatures.Design/methodology/approach: The dynamic mechanical analysis was employed for measurements of temperature and frequency dependence of the complex rigidity parameters. Obtained loss rigidity curves for different load frequencies enable the determination of the glass-transition temperatures and finally frequency-dependence of the loss rigidity determined on the basis of the kinetic molecular theory and Williams-Landel-Ferry (WLF hypothesis.Findings: The dependency between glass-transition temperature and excitation frequency has been investigated. The activation energy of the phase transition as well as the temperature dependence of the shift factor was calculated. The glass-transition temperature and constants of WLF equation enable the determination of temperature and frequency dependence of the loss rigidity according to the time-temperature superposition principle.Research limitations/implications: The ranges of temperatures were limited to 30-150 °C and excitation frequencies to 1-200 Hz, the behaviour of the composite material outside these ranges can be estimated based on the theoretical assumptions only. Obtained dependencies are correct only for linearly viscoelastic materials.Practical implications: Obtained dependencies can be useful for estimation of the mechanical and thermal degradation of polymer-based composites and can be subsequently applied for the determination of fatigue, crack growth and residual life of composite structures.Originality/value: The determination of temperature and frequency dependence of the loss rigidity

  5. Viscoelastic properties of bovine knee joint articular cartilage: dependency on thickness and loading frequency

    Espino, Daniel M; Shepherd, Duncan ET; Hukins, David WL

    2014-01-01

    Background The knee is an incongruent joint predisposed to developing osteoarthritis, with certain regions being more at risk of cartilage degeneration even in non-osteoarthrosed joints. At present it is unknown if knee regions prone to cartilage degeneration have similar storage and/or loss stiffness, and frequency-dependent trends, to other knee joint cartilage. The aim of this study was to determine the range of frequency-dependent, viscoelastic stiffness of articular cartilage across the ...

  6. A kinetic model for the frequency dependence of cholinergic modulation at hippocampal GABAergic synapses.

    Stone, Emily; Haario, Heikki; Lawrence, J Josh

    2014-12-01

    In this paper we use a simple model of presynaptic neuromodulation of GABA signaling to decipher paired whole-cell recordings of frequency dependent cholinergic neuromodulation at CA1 parvalbumin-containing basket cell (PV BC)-pyramidal cell synapses. Variance-mean analysis is employed to normalize the data, which is then used to estimate parameters in the mathematical model. Various parameterizations and hidden parameter dependencies are investigated using Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) parameter estimation techniques. This analysis reveals that frequency dependence of cholinergic modulation requires both calcium-dependent recovery from depression and mAChR-induced inhibition of presynaptic calcium entry. A reduction in calcium entry into the presynaptic terminal in the kinetic model accounted for the frequency-dependent effects of mAChR activation. PMID:25445738

  7. Frequency dependent magneto-transport in charge transfer Co(II) complex

    A charge transfer chelated system containing ferromagnetic metal centers is the ideal system to investigate the magneto-transport and magneto-dielectric effects due to the presence of both electronic as well as magnetic properties and their coupling. Magneto-transport properties in materials are usually studied through dc charge transport under magnetic field. As frequency dependent conductivity is an essential tool to understand the nature of carrier wave, its spatial extension and their mutual interaction, in the present work, we have investigated frequency dependent magneto-transport along with magnetization behavior in [Co2(II)-(5-(4-PhMe)-1,3,4-oxadiazole-H+-2-thiolate)5](OAc)4 metal complex to elucidate the nature of above quantities and their response under magnetic field in the transport property. We have used the existing model for ac conduction incorporating the field dependence to explain the frequency dependent magneto-transport. It is seen that the frequency dependent magneto-transport could be well explained using the existing model for ac conduction. -Highlights: • Chelated Co(II) complex is synthesized for magneto-transport applications. • Frequency dependent magneto-transport and magnetization behavior are studied. • Nature of carrier wave, its spatial extension is investigated under magnetic field. • Existing model for ac conduction is used with magnetic field dependence

  8. Time-domain representation of frequency dependent inertial forces on offshore structures

    Krenk, Steen

    2013-01-01

    located above the peak frequency of the wave spectrum, and the frequency dependence of the inertial force coefficient can then result in a substantial reduction of the resonant part of the response. It is of interest to represent this effect in the time domain for response analysis including finite height...... waves and drag forces. The inertia coefficient has been determined within linear wave theory in terms of the wave-number by MacCamy and Fuchs. For diameters less than about half the water depth this solution can be transformed to frequency form by use of the deep-water dispersion relation. The frequency...

  9. Frequency dependence of fast mode ultrasound attenuation of liquid 4He in aerogel

    In our previous work, anomalous sound attenuation in superfluid phase was observed in liquid 4He filled in 97.0 % porous aerogel using longitudinal ultrasound at the frequency of 10 MHz. To understand the nature of the observed anomaly one needs to know the viscous coupling between normal component and aerogel strands. As far as the viscous penetration depth depends on frequency in the present work we have measured longitudinal ultrasound propagation in liquid 4He filled in 97.0 % porous aerogel at the frequencies 6, 10, and 15 MHz. In the normal phase the sound velocity had no frequency dependence and was reduced from that of bulk liquid, since the sound velocity in aerogel is smaller than in bulk liquid helium. The attenuation in normal phase is discussed using a viscoelastic theory. The obtained results indicated that the ultrasound experiment in normal phase was performed in low frequency or crossover regime.

  10. Frequency Dependence of Resonance Field of One-Dimensional Heisenberg Antiferromagnet KCuF3

    SHI Qing-Fan; L(U) Zhen; MA Mu-Yan; MA Chao; LI Liang-Sheng

    2006-01-01

    @@ The frequency dependence of the in-plane angular change of the antiferromagnetic resonance (AFMR) field of KCuF3 is systematically measured at frequencies ranging from 3.8 to 10.6 GHz at 4.2K. The effect of inequivalent g-tensors is found to gradually diminish with decreasing the frequency, and completely vanish when the frequency is decreased to the lower-frequency branch of C-band, while the effect of the effective anisotropy field is significantly enhanced with decreasing the frequency. The calculated AFMR field Hres based on the eight-sublattice model proposed by Yamada and Kato [J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. 63 (1994)289] is in good agreement with the experimental data.

  11. Frequency Diverse Array MIMO Radar Adaptive Beamforming with Range-Dependent Interference Suppression in Target Localization

    Kuandong Gao; Huaizong Shao; Jingye Cai; Hui Chen; Wen-Qin Wang

    2015-01-01

    Conventional multiple-input and multiple-output (MIMO) radar is a flexible technique which enjoys the advantages of phased-array radar without sacrificing its main advantages. However, due to its range-independent directivity, MIMO radar cannot mitigate nondesirable range-dependent interferences. In this paper, we propose a range-dependent interference suppression approach via frequency diverse array (FDA) MIMO radar, which offers a beamforming-based solution to suppress range-dependent inter...

  12. Frequency- and stress-dependent changes in shear-wave velocity dispersion in water-saturated, unconsolidated sand

    Ghose, R.

    2009-04-01

    Anelastic processes in the earth causes dissipation of seismic energy. Because of the fundamental laws of causality, the dissipation effects demand a frequency-dependent change of elastic moduli, and therefore, dispersion in elastic wave velocities. Assessing the dispersion of seismic shear waves in the unconsolidated subsoil is important for at least 3 reasons: 1) shear-wave velocity (Vs) is a key parameter in all dynamic loading problems; the frequency of the observed shear waves in field, downhole and laboratory measurements varies widely (20 Hz - 10 kHz), and consequently an uncertainty resulting from an unknown or poorly known estimate of dispersion may translate into erroneous evaluation and potential risks, 2) generally Vs-dispersion is considered negligible for the frequency range of practical interest; it is important to check this assumption and modify the site evaluation results, if necessary, and 3) the underlying soil-physics of any observed dispersion can be useful in estimating an unknown soil physical parameter. In the present research, we have concentrated on Vs dispersion in saturated sand in laboratory, under varying vertical and horizontal stress levels that are realistic in the context of shallow subsoil investigations. We explored theoretical models to obtain insight from our experimental findings. Laboratory experiments involving array seismic measurements and accurate stress control present clear evidence of dispersive shear-wave velocity in saturated sand in the frequency range 2-16 kHz. The change of Vs as a function of frequency is clearly nonlinear. For low frequencies, as observed in the field data, our result indicates significant dispersion and, therefore, nonlinear variation of attenuation. This has important implication on site evaluation using Vs. Significantly, the data allows us to distinguish a frequency-dependence of the velocity dispersion. The relative importance of fluid motion relative to the skeleton frame (Biot theory

  13. Dependence of the ray transference of model eyes on the frequency of light

    Tanya Evans

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The transference defines the first-order character of an optical system; almost all the system’s optical properties can be calculated from it. It is useful, therefore, to have some idea of how it depends on the frequency of light. We examine the dependence for two Gaussian eyes. It turns out to be nearly linear for all four fundamental properties. The result is an equation for the dependence of the transference on frequency which is almost symplectic. We also transform the transference into Hamiltonian space, obtain equations for the least-squares straight line for the three independent transformed properties and map them back to the group of transferences. The result is an equation for the dependence of the transference on frequency which is exactly symplectic and therefore representative of an optical system. The results may approximate those of real eyes and give estimates of the dependence of almost all optical properties on frequency.Keywords: ray transference; frequency; symplecticity

  14. Low frequency noise variability in ultra scaled FD-SOI n-MOSFETs: Dependence on gate bias, frequency and temperature

    Theodorou, C. G.; Ioannidis, E. G.; Haendler, S.; Josse, E.; Dimitriadis, C. A.; Ghibaudo, G.

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, a parametric statistical analysis of the low-frequency noise (LFN) in very small area (W·L ≈ 10-3 μm2) 14 nm fully depleted silicon-on-insulator (FD-SOI) n-MOS devices is presented. It has been demonstrated that the LFN origin is due to carrier trapping/detrapping into gate dielectric traps near the interface and the mean noise level in such small area MOSFETs is well approached by the carrier number fluctuations model in all measurement conditions. The impact of gate voltage bias and temperature on the LFN variability, as well as the standard deviation dependence on frequency have been studied for the first time, focusing on their relation to the Random Telegraph Noise (RTN) effect and its characteristics.

  15. The nest site lottery: how selectively neutral density dependent growth suppression induces frequency dependent selection

    Argasinski, K.; Broom, M.

    2013-01-01

    Modern developments in population dynamics emphasize the role of the turnover of individuals. In the new approaches stable population size is a dynamic equilibrium between different mortality and fecundity factors instead of an arbitrary fixed carrying capacity. The latest replicator dynamics models assume that regulation of the population size acts through feedback driven by density dependent juvenile mortality. Here, we consider a simplified model to extract the properties of this approach....

  16. Frequency dependence of the acoustic field generated from a spherical cavity transducer with open ends

    Faqi Li

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Resolution of high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU focusing is limited by the wave diffraction. We have developed a spherical cavity transducer with two open ends to improve the focusing precision without sacrificing the acoustic intensity (App Phys Lett 2013; 102: 204102. This work aims to theoretically and experimentally investigate the frequency dependence of the acoustic field generated from the spherical cavity transducer with two open ends. The device emits high intensity ultrasound at the frequency ranging from 420 to 470 kHz, and the acoustic field is measured by a fiber optic probe hydrophone. The measured results shows that the spherical cavity transducer provides high acoustic intensity for HIFU treatment only in its resonant modes, and a series of resonant frequencies can be choosen. Furthermore, a finite element model is developed to discuss the frequency dependence of the acoustic field. The numerical simulations coincide well with the measured results.

  17. Frequency dependence of the acoustic field generated from a spherical cavity transducer with open ends

    Li, Faqi; Song, Dan; Zeng, Deping; Lin, Zhou; He, Min; Lei, Guangrong; Wu, Junru; Zhang, Dong; Wang, Zhibiao

    2015-12-01

    Resolution of high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) focusing is limited by the wave diffraction. We have developed a spherical cavity transducer with two open ends to improve the focusing precision without sacrificing the acoustic intensity (App Phys Lett 2013; 102: 204102). This work aims to theoretically and experimentally investigate the frequency dependence of the acoustic field generated from the spherical cavity transducer with two open ends. The device emits high intensity ultrasound at the frequency ranging from 420 to 470 kHz, and the acoustic field is measured by a fiber optic probe hydrophone. The measured results shows that the spherical cavity transducer provides high acoustic intensity for HIFU treatment only in its resonant modes, and a series of resonant frequencies can be choosen. Furthermore, a finite element model is developed to discuss the frequency dependence of the acoustic field. The numerical simulations coincide well with the measured results.

  18. Frequency dependence of the acoustic field generated from a spherical cavity transducer with open ends

    Li, Faqi; Zeng, Deping; He, Min; Wang, Zhibiao, E-mail: dzhang@nju.edu.cn, E-mail: wangzhibiao@haifu.com.cn [State Key Laboratory of Ultrasound Engineering in Medicine Co-founded by Chongqing and the Ministry of Science and Technology, College of Biomedical Engineering, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 401121 (China); Song, Dan; Lei, Guangrong [National Engineering Research Center of Ultrasound Medicine, Chongqing 401121 (China); Lin, Zhou; Zhang, Dong, E-mail: dzhang@nju.edu.cn, E-mail: wangzhibiao@haifu.com.cn [Institute of Acoustics, Key Laboratory of Modern Acoustics, MOE, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Wu, Junru [Department of Physics, University of Vermont, Burlington, VT 05405 (United States)

    2015-12-15

    Resolution of high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) focusing is limited by the wave diffraction. We have developed a spherical cavity transducer with two open ends to improve the focusing precision without sacrificing the acoustic intensity (App Phys Lett 2013; 102: 204102). This work aims to theoretically and experimentally investigate the frequency dependence of the acoustic field generated from the spherical cavity transducer with two open ends. The device emits high intensity ultrasound at the frequency ranging from 420 to 470 kHz, and the acoustic field is measured by a fiber optic probe hydrophone. The measured results shows that the spherical cavity transducer provides high acoustic intensity for HIFU treatment only in its resonant modes, and a series of resonant frequencies can be choosen. Furthermore, a finite element model is developed to discuss the frequency dependence of the acoustic field. The numerical simulations coincide well with the measured results.

  19. Frequency dependence of the acoustic field generated from a spherical cavity transducer with open ends

    Resolution of high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) focusing is limited by the wave diffraction. We have developed a spherical cavity transducer with two open ends to improve the focusing precision without sacrificing the acoustic intensity (App Phys Lett 2013; 102: 204102). This work aims to theoretically and experimentally investigate the frequency dependence of the acoustic field generated from the spherical cavity transducer with two open ends. The device emits high intensity ultrasound at the frequency ranging from 420 to 470 kHz, and the acoustic field is measured by a fiber optic probe hydrophone. The measured results shows that the spherical cavity transducer provides high acoustic intensity for HIFU treatment only in its resonant modes, and a series of resonant frequencies can be choosen. Furthermore, a finite element model is developed to discuss the frequency dependence of the acoustic field. The numerical simulations coincide well with the measured results

  20. Frequency, pressure, and strain dependence of nonlinear elasticity in Berea Sandstone

    Rivière, Jacques; Pimienta, Lucas; Scuderi, Marco; Candela, Thibault; Shokouhi, Parisa; Fortin, Jérôme; Schubnel, Alexandre; Marone, Chris; Johnson, Paul A.

    2016-04-01

    Acoustoelasticity measurements in a sample of room dry Berea sandstone are conducted at various loading frequencies to explore the transition between the quasi-static (f→0) and dynamic (few kilohertz) nonlinear elastic response. We carry out these measurements at multiple confining pressures and perform a multivariate regression analysis to quantify the dependence of the harmonic content on strain amplitude, frequency, and pressure. The modulus softening (equivalent to the harmonic at 0f) increases by a factor 2-3 over 3 orders of magnitude increase in frequency. Harmonics at 2f, 4f, and 6f exhibit similar behaviors. In contrast, the harmonic at 1f appears frequency independent. This result corroborates previous studies showing that the nonlinear elasticity of rocks can be described with a minimum of two physical mechanisms. This study provides quantitative data that describes the rate dependency of nonlinear elasticity. These findings can be used to improve theories relating the macroscopic elastic response to microstructural features.

  1. The impact of Antenna Pattern Frequency Dependence in Aperture Synthesis Microwave Radiometers

    Camps Carmona, Adriano José; Torres Torres, Francisco; Corbella Sanahuja, Ignasi; Duffo Ubeda, Núria; Vall-Llossera Ferran, Mercedes Magdalena; Martín Neira, Manuel

    2005-01-01

    The effect of the frequency dependence of the antenna voltage patterns within the bandwidth of an aperture synthesis interferometric radiometer is studied and quantified using actual antenna voltage patterns measured at different frequencies for the first nine receivers of the Microwave Imaging Radiometer with Aperture Synthesis instrument aboard the European Space Agency's Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity mission. A technique is proposed to mitigate this effect.

  2. Effect of Frequency-Dependent Attenuation on Predicted Histotripsy Waveforms in Tissue-Mimicking Phantoms.

    Bader, Kenneth B; Crowe, Michael J; Raymond, Jason L; Holland, Christy K

    2016-07-01

    Tissue-mimicking phantoms are employed for the assessment of shocked histotripsy pulses in vitro. These broadband shock waves are critical for tissue ablation and are influenced by the frequency-dependent attenuation of the medium. The density, sound speed and attenuation spectra (2-25 MHz) were measured for phantoms that mimic key histotripsy targets. The influence of non-linear propagation relative to the attenuation was described in terms of Gol'dberg number. An expression was derived to estimate the bandwidth of shocked histotripsy pulses for power law-dependent attenuation. The expression is independent of the fundamental frequency of the histotripsy pulse for linear frequency-dependent attenuation. PMID:27108036

  3. Frequency dependence and assembly characteristics of silver nanomaterials trapped by dielectrophoresis

    Kataoka, R.; Tokita, H.; Uchida, S.; Sano, R.; Nishikawa, H.

    2015-10-01

    For rapid and accurate fabrication of industrial products, the development of effective technique to manipulate and assemble nanomaterials is essential. In the present work, we investigated the dielectrophoretic behavior of silver nanoparticles and nanowires at various driving frequencies and voltage amplitudes, and examined three-dimensional assembly of the nanomaterials using dielectrophoretic devices with microstructures. The collectable range in frequency for nanoparticles and nanowires was from 10 kHz to 1 MHz. In particular, the aggregation shape of nanowires was changed against driving frequency. The bunch of nanowires was bridged between pillars of dielectrophoretic device. When the applied voltage was turned off, the trapped nanowires were entirely released. In pit type device, trapping of nanoparticles was observed in outermost pits of array. The aggregates of nanoparticles were directly fixed to the bottom electrode.

  4. Temperature dependence of acoustic harmonics generated by nonlinear ultrasound wave propagation in water at various frequencies.

    Maraghechi, Borna; Hasani, Mojtaba H; Kolios, Michael C; Tavakkoli, Jahan

    2016-05-01

    Ultrasound-based thermometry requires a temperature-sensitive acoustic parameter that can be used to estimate the temperature by tracking changes in that parameter during heating. The objective of this study is to investigate the temperature dependence of acoustic harmonics generated by nonlinear ultrasound wave propagation in water at various pulse transmit frequencies from 1 to 20 MHz. Simulations were conducted using an expanded form of the Khokhlov-Zabolotskaya-Kuznetsov nonlinear acoustic wave propagation model in which temperature dependence of the medium parameters was included. Measurements were performed using single-element transducers at two different transmit frequencies of 3.3 and 13 MHz which are within the range of frequencies simulated. The acoustic pressure signals were measured by a calibrated needle hydrophone along the axes of the transducers. The water temperature was uniformly increased from 26 °C to 46 °C in increments of 5 °C. The results show that the temperature dependence of the harmonic generation is different at various frequencies which is due to the interplay between the mechanisms of absorption, nonlinearity, and focusing gain. At the transmit frequencies of 1 and 3.3 MHz, the harmonic amplitudes decrease with increasing the temperature, while the opposite temperature dependence is observed at 13 and 20 MHz. PMID:27250143

  5. Frequency-Dependent Current Noise through Quantum-Dot Spin Valves

    Braun, Matthias; König, Jürgen; Martinek, Jan

    2006-01-01

    We study frequency-dependent current noise through a single-level quantum dot connected to ferromagnetic leads with non-collinear magnetization. We propose to use the frequency-dependent Fano factor as a tool to detect single-spin dynamics in the quantum dot. Spin precession due to an external magnetic and/or a many-body exchange field affects the Fano factor of the system in two ways. First, the tendency towards spin-selective bunching of the transmitted electrons is suppressed, which gives ...

  6. Frequency dependent loss analysis and minimization of system losses in switchmode audio power amplifiers

    Yamauchi, Akira; Knott, Arnold; Jørgensen, Ivan Harald Holger;

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, frequency dependent losses in switch-mode audio power amplifiers are analyzed and a loss model is improved by taking the voltage dependence of the parasitic capacitance of MOSFETs into account. The estimated power losses are compared to the measurement and great accuracy is achieved....... By choosing the optimal switching frequency based on the proposed analysis, the experimental results show that system power losses of the reference design are minimized and an efficiency improvement of 8 % in maximum is achieved without compromising audio performances....

  7. Self-consistent modeling of terahertz waveguide and cavity with frequency-dependent conductivity

    Huang, Y. J.; Chu, K. R., E-mail: krchu@yahoo.com.tw [Department of Physics, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Thumm, M. [IHM and IHE, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2015-01-15

    The surface resistance of metals, and hence the Ohmic dissipation per unit area, scales with the square root of the frequency of an incident electromagnetic wave. As is well recognized, this can lead to excessive wall losses at terahertz (THz) frequencies. On the other hand, high-frequency oscillatory motion of conduction electrons tends to mitigate the collisional damping. As a result, the classical theory predicts that metals behave more like a transparent medium at frequencies above the ultraviolet. Such a behavior difference is inherent in the AC conductivity, a frequency-dependent complex quantity commonly used to treat electromagnetics of metals at optical frequencies. The THz region falls in the gap between microwave and optical frequencies. However, metals are still commonly modeled by the DC conductivity in currently active vacuum electronics research aimed at the development of high-power THz sources (notably the gyrotron), although a small reduction of the DC conductivity due to surface roughness is sometimes included. In this study, we present a self-consistent modeling of the gyrotron interaction structures (a metallic waveguide or cavity) with the AC conductivity. The resulting waveguide attenuation constants and cavity quality factors are compared with those of the DC-conductivity model. The reduction in Ohmic losses under the AC-conductivity model is shown to be increasingly significant as the frequency reaches deeper into the THz region. Such effects are of considerable importance to THz gyrotrons for which the minimization of Ohmic losses constitutes a major design consideration.

  8. Dependence of the colored frequency noise in spin torque oscillators on current and magnetic field

    The nano-scale spin torque oscillator (STO) is a compelling device for on-chip, highly tunable microwave frequency signal generation. Currently, one of the most important challenges for the STO is to increase its longer-time frequency stability by decreasing the 1/f frequency noise, but its high level makes even its measurement impossible using the phase noise mode of spectrum analyzers. Here, we present a custom made time-domain measurement system with 150 MHz measurement bandwidth making possible the investigation of the variation of the 1/f as well as the white frequency noise in a STO over a large set of operating points covering 18–25 GHz. The 1/f level is found to be highly dependent on the oscillation amplitude-frequency non-linearity and the vicinity of unexcited oscillation modes. These findings elucidate the need for a quantitative theoretical treatment of the low-frequency, colored frequency noise in STOs. Based on the results, we suggest that the 1/f frequency noise possibly can be decreased by improving the microstructural quality of the metallic thin films

  9. Security and Hyper-accurate Positioning Monitoring with Automatic Dependent Surveillance-Broadcast (ADS-B) Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Lightning Ridge Technologies, working in collaboration with The Innovation Laboratory, Inc., extend Automatic Dependent Surveillance Broadcast (ADS-B) into a safe,...

  10. Security and Hyper-accurate Positioning Monitoring with Automatic Dependent Surveillance-Broadcast (ADS-B) Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Lightning Ridge Technologies, LLC, working in collaboration with The Innovation Laboratory, Inc., extend Automatic Dependent Surveillance ? Broadcast (ADS-B) into a...

  11. Phase-Shifted Based Numerical Method for Modeling Frequency-Dependent Effects on Seismic Reflections

    Chen, Xuehua; Qi, Yingkai; He, Xilei; He, Zhenhua; Chen, Hui

    2016-04-01

    The significant velocity dispersion and attenuation has often been observed when seismic waves propagate in fluid-saturated porous rocks. Both the magnitude and variation features of the velocity dispersion and attenuation are frequency-dependent and related closely to the physical properties of the fluid-saturated porous rocks. To explore the effects of frequency-dependent dispersion and attenuation on the seismic responses, in this work, we present a numerical method for seismic data modeling based on the diffusive and viscous wave equation (DVWE), which introduces the poroelastic theory and takes into account diffusive and viscous attenuation in diffusive-viscous-theory. We derive a phase-shift wave extrapolation algorithm in frequencywavenumber domain for implementing the DVWE-based simulation method that can handle the simultaneous lateral variations in velocity, diffusive coefficient and viscosity. Then, we design a distributary channels model in which a hydrocarbon-saturated sand reservoir is embedded in one of the channels. Next, we calculated the synthetic seismic data to analytically and comparatively illustrate the seismic frequency-dependent behaviors related to the hydrocarbon-saturated reservoir, by employing DVWE-based and conventional acoustic wave equation (AWE) based method, respectively. The results of the synthetic seismic data delineate the intrinsic energy loss, phase delay, lower instantaneous dominant frequency and narrower bandwidth due to the frequency-dependent dispersion and attenuation when seismic wave travels through the hydrocarbon-saturated reservoir. The numerical modeling method is expected to contribute to improve the understanding of the features and mechanism of the seismic frequency-dependent effects resulted from the hydrocarbon-saturated porous rocks.

  12. Temperature Dependence of Lattice Vibration Frequencies of KNiF3 in Connection with Antiferromagnetism

    Tomono, Yuzo; Takaoka, Tosihide; Yajima, Masaaki; Tanokura, Yosiko; Jinda, Nan

    1990-02-01

    Temperature dependence of three infrared active modes of vibrations were measured for KNiF3 powdered specimen. A characteristic temperature dependence was observed for the highest mode, which is about 450 cm-1, at room temperature. This mode is due to a bending motion of F-Ni-F bond, which is expected to modulate superexchange interaction between nearest neighboring Ni ions. Therefore the anomalous increase of the highest mode frequency was interpreted by superexchange interaction, which increases at lower temperatures.

  13. Co-dependence of Extreme Events in High Frequency FX Returns

    Arnold Polanski; Evarist Stoja

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate extreme events in high frequency, multivariate FX returns within a purposely built framework. We generalize univariate tests and concepts to multidimensional settings and employ these novel techniques for parametric and nonparametric analysis. In particular, we investigate and quantify the co-dependence of cross-sectional and intertemporal extreme events. We find evidence of the cubic law of extreme returns, their increasing and asymmetric dependence and of the s...

  14. Frequency dependent attenuation of seismic waves for Delhi and surrounding area, India

    Babita Sharma

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The attenuation properties of Delhi & surrounding region have been investigated using 62 local earthquakes recorded at nine stations. The frequency dependent quality factors Qa (using P-waves and Qb (using S-waves have been determined using the coda normalization method. Quality factor of coda-waves (Qc has been estimated using the single backscattering model in the frequency range from 1.5 Hz to 9 Hz. Wennerberg formulation has been used to estimate Qi (intrinsic attenuation parameter and Qs (scattering attenuation parameter for the region. The values Qa, Qb, Qc, Qi and Qs estimated are frequency dependent in the range of 1.5Hz-9Hz. Frequency dependent relations are estimated as Qa=52f1.03, Qb=98f1.07 and Qc=158f0.97. Qc estimates lie in between the values of Qi and Qs but closer to Qi at all central frequencies. Comparison between Qi and Qs shows that intrinsic absorption is predominant over scattering for Delhi and surrounding region. 

  15. Low-frequency (0.7-7.4 mHz geomagnetic field fluctuations at high latitude: frequency dependence of the polarization pattern

    L. Cafarella

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available A statistical analysis of the polarization pattern of low-frequency geomagnetic field fluctuations (0.7-7.4 mHz covering the entire 24-h interval was performed at the Antarctic station Terra Nova Bay (80.0°S geomagnetic latitude throughout 1997 and 1998. The results show that the polarization pattern exhibits a frequency dependence, as can be expected from the frequency dependence of the latitude where the coupling between the magnetospheric compressional mode and the field line resonance takes place. The polarization analysis of single pulsation events shows that wave packets with different polarization sense, depending on frequency, can be simultaneously observed.

  16. Dynamic Acousto-Elasticity: Pressure and Frequency Dependences in Berea Sandstone.

    Riviere, J. V.; Pimienta, L.; Latour, S.; Fortin, J.; Schubnel, A.; Johnson, P. A.

    2014-12-01

    Nonlinear elasticity is studied at the laboratory scale with the goal of understanding observations at earth scales, for instance during strong ground motion, tidal forcing and earthquake slip processes. Here we report frequency and pressure dependences on elasticity when applying dynamic acousto-elasticity (DAE) of rock samples, analogous to quasi-static acousto-elasticity. DAE allows one to obtain the elastic behavior over the entire dynamic cycle, detailing the full nonlinear behavior under tension and compression, including hysteresis and memory effects. We perform DAE on a sample of Berea sandstone subject to 0.5MPa uniaxial load, with sinusoidal oscillating strain amplitudes ranging from 10-6 to 10-5 and at frequencies from 0.1 to 260Hz. In addition, the confining pressure is increased stepwise from 0 to 30MPa. We compare results to previous measurements made at lower (mHz) and higher (kHz) frequencies. Nonlinear elastic parameters corresponding to conditioning effects, third order elastic constants and fourth order elastic constants are quantitatively compared over the pressure and frequency ranges. We observe that the decrease in modulus due to conditioning increases with frequency, suggesting a frequency and/or strain-rate dependence that should be included in nonlinear elastic models of rocks. In agreement with previous measurements, nonlinear elastic effects also decrease with confining pressure, suggesting that nonlinear elastic sources such as micro-cracks, soft bonds and dislocations are turned off as the pressure increases.

  17. Computer investigation of coaxial gyro-bwo efficiency depending on oscillation frequency and longitudinal waveguide dimensions

    In this article (first part of one) we investigated efficiency dependence of gyro-BWO on oscillation frequencies f=7.7...10 GHz under fixed injection energy of an electron beam γ0=2. We obtained efficiency increasing of gyro-BWO from ∼10 up to ∼30% at above mentioned oscillation frequency band f=7.7...10 GHz. Then (second part) we investigated efficiency dependence on longitudinal and transversal waveguide dimensions under the same oscillation frequencies and fixed energy injection of an electron beam. High efficiency η ∼ 0.3 still remains the same under fixed distance between radii of coaxial waveguide. High efficiency η takes place too under varying length L of space interaction 60 cm ≥ L ≥ 30 cm due to form changing like-a-bell guiding magnetic field

  18. Audio-Band Frequency-Dependent Squeezing for Gravitational-Wave Detectors

    Oelker, Eric; Isogai, Tomoki; Miller, John; Tse, Maggie; Barsotti, Lisa; Mavalvala, Nergis; Evans, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Quantum vacuum fluctuations impose strict limits on precision displacement measurements, those of interferometric gravitational-wave detectors among them. Introducing squeezed states into an interferometer's readout port can improve the sensitivity of the instrument, leading to richer astrophysical observations. However, optomechanical interactions dictate that the vacuum's squeezed quadrature must rotate by 90° around 50 Hz. Here we use a 2-m-long, high-finesse optical resonator to produce frequency-dependent rotation around 1.2 kHz. This demonstration of audio-band frequency-dependent squeezing uses technology and methods that are scalable to the required rotation frequency and validates previously developed theoretical models, heralding application of the technique in future gravitational-wave detectors.

  19. Frequency dependence of anomalous transport in field theory and holography⋆,⋆⋆

    Megías Eugenio

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the frequency dependence of anomalous transport coefficients for a relativistic gas of free chiral fermions and for a strongly coupled conformal field theory with holographic dual. We perform the computation by using the Kubo formulae for- malism, and compare with a hydrodynamic calculation of two point functions. Some implications for heavy ion physics are discussed.

  20. Frequency and temperature dependent transport properties of NiCuZn ceramic oxide

    Hossen M. Belal

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available A polycrystalline sample of ceramic oxide Ni0.27Cu0.10Zn0.63Fe2O4 was prepared by the solid state reaction method. The sintered sample was well polished to remove any oxide layer formed during sintering and the two surfaces of the pellet were coated with a silver paste as a contact material. Among dielectric properties, complex dielectric constant (ε* = εʹ - jεʺ, loss tangent (tanδ and ac conductivity (σac in the frequency range of 20 Hz to 2 MHz were analyzed in the temperature range of 303 to 498 K using a Wayne Kerr impedance analyzer (model No. 6500B. The experimental results indicate that ε, εʺ, tanδ and σac decrease with an increase in frequency and increase with increasing temperature. The transition temperature, as obtained from dispersion curve of εʹ, shifts towards higher temperature with an increase in frequency. The variation of dielectric properties with frequency and temperature shows the dispersion behavior which is explained in the light of Maxwell-Wagner type of interfacial polarization in accordance with the Koop’s phenomenological theory. The frequency dependent conductivity results satisfy the Jonscher’s power law, σT(ω = σ(o+Aωn, and the results show the occurrence of two types of conduction process at elevated temperature: (i low frequency conductivity, due to long-range ordering (frequency independent, region I, (ii mid frequency conductivity at the grain boundaries (region II, dispersion and (iii high frequency conductivity at the grain interior due to the short-range hopping mechanism (frequency independent plateau, region III.

  1. Frequency dependence on the accuracy of electrical impedance spectroscopy measurements in microfluidic devices

    This communication presents the dependence on frequency of the accuracy of electrical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements in microfluidic devices. For this study, a very simple microfluidic device was used, with a hydrophilic microfluidic channel in which two parallel electrodes were patterned. Glass was the preferred substrate material for the fabrication of this microfluidic device, mainly due to its excellent dielectric properties even at relatively high frequencies. The testing was performed in air, and with DI water, ethanol and solutions of silica beads suspended in ethanol. The results show that the accuracy of the measurement increases with the frequency. The variation of the average of standard deviation error was between 13% at 10 kHz and less than 1% at 100 MHz. This clearly indicates that a high frequency range must be considered for further studies using electrical impedance spectroscopy in microfluidic devices. (brief communication)

  2. Staurosporine Inhibits Frequency-Dependent Myofilament Desensitization in Intact Rabbit Cardiac Trabeculae

    Kenneth D. Varian

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Myofilament calcium sensitivity decreases with frequency in intact healthy rabbit trabeculae and associates with Troponin I and Myosin light chain-2 phosphorylation. We here tested whether serine-threonine kinase activity is primarily responsible for this frequency-dependent modulations of myofilament calcium sensitivity. Right ventricular trabeculae were isolated from New Zealand White rabbit hearts and iontophoretically loaded with bis-fura-2. Twitch force-calcium relationships and steady state force-calcium relationships were measured at frequencies of 1 and 4 Hz at 37 °C. Staurosporine (100 nM, a nonspecific serine-threonine kinase inhibitor, or vehicle (DMSO was included in the superfusion solution before and during the contractures. Staurosporine had no frequency-dependent effect on force development, kinetics, calcium transient amplitude, or rate of calcium transient decline. The shift in the pCa50 of the force-calcium relationship was significant from 6.05±0.04 at 1 Hz versus 5.88±0.06 at 4 Hz under control conditions (vehicle, P<0.001 but not in presence of staurosporine (5.89±0.08 at 1 Hz versus 5.94±0.07 at 4 Hz, P=NS. Phosphoprotein analysis (Pro-Q Diamond stain confirmed that staurosporine significantly blunted the frequency-dependent phosphorylation at Troponin I and Myosin light chain-2. We conclude that frequency-dependent modulation of calcium sensitivity is mediated through a kinase-specific effect involving phosphorylation of myofilament proteins.

  3. Demonstrating frequency-dependent transmission of sarcoptic mange in red foxes.

    Devenish-Nelson, Eleanor S; Richards, Shane A; Harris, Stephen; Soulsbury, Carl; Stephens, Philip A

    2014-10-01

    Understanding the relationship between disease transmission and host density is essential for predicting disease spread and control. Using long-term data on sarcoptic mange in a red fox Vulpes vulpes population, we tested long-held assumptions of density- and frequency-dependent direct disease transmission. We also assessed the role of indirect transmission. Contrary to assumptions typical of epidemiological models, mange dynamics are better explained by frequency-dependent disease transmission than by density-dependent transmission in this canid. We found no support for indirect transmission. We present the first estimates of R0 and age-specific transmission coefficients for mange in foxes. These parameters are important for managing this poorly understood but highly contagious and economically damaging disease. PMID:25296930

  4. MODELING THE FREQUENCY DEPENDENCE OF RADIO BEAMS FOR CONE-DOMINANT PULSARS

    Beam radii for cone-dominant pulsars follow a power-law relation with frequency, thetav = (ν/ν0) k + thetav0, which has not been well explained in previous works. We study this frequency dependence of beam radius (FDB) for cone-dominant pulsars by using the curvature radiation mechanism. Considering various density and energy distributions of particles in the pulsar open field-line region, we numerically simulate the emission intensity distribution across emission height and rotation phase, get integrated profiles at different frequencies, and obtain the FDB curves. For the density model of a conal-like distribution, the simulated profiles always shrink to one component at high frequencies. In the density model with two separated density patches, the profiles generally have two distinct components, and the power-law indices k are found to be in the range from –0.1 to –2.5, consistent with observational results. Energy distributions of streaming particles have significant influence on the frequency-dependence behavior. Radial energy decay of particles is desired to get proper thetav0 in models. We conclude that by using the curvature radiation mechanism, the observed FDB for the cone-dominant pulsars can only be explained by the emission model of particles in two density patches with a Gaussian energy distribution and a radial energy loss.

  5. Extended exergy concept to facilitate designing and optimization of frequency-dependent direct energy conversion systems

    Highlights: • Proved exergy method is not adequate to optimize frequency-dependent energy conversion. • Exergy concept is modified to facilitate the thermoeconomic optimization of photocell. • The exergy of arbitrary radiation is used for a practical purpose. • The utility of the concept is illustrated using pragmatic examples. - Abstract: Providing the radiation within the acceptable (responsive) frequency range(s) is a common method to increase the efficiency of the frequency-dependent energy conversion systems, such as photovoltaic and nano-scale rectenna. Appropriately designed auxiliary items such as spectrally selective thermal emitters, optical filters, and lenses are used for this purpose. However any energy conversion method that utilizes auxiliary components to increase the efficiency of a system has to justify the potential cost incurred by those auxiliary components through the economic gain emerging from the increased system efficiency. Therefore much effort should be devoted to design innovative systems, effectively integrating the auxiliary items and to optimize the system with economic considerations. Exergy is the widely used method to design and optimize conventional energy conversion systems. Although the exergy concept is used to analyze photovoltaic systems, it has not been used effectively to design and optimize such systems. In this manuscript, we present a modified exergy method in order to effectively design and economically optimize frequency-dependent energy conversion systems. Also, we illustrate the utility of this concept using examples of thermophotovoltaic, Photovoltaic/Thermal and concentrated solar photovoltaic

  6. Influence of Gaussian white noise on the frequency-dependent linear polarizability of doped quantum dot

    Highlights: • Linear polarizability of quantum dot has been studied. • Quantum dot is doped with a repulsive impurity. • The polarizabilities are frequency-dependent. • Influence of Gaussian white noise has been monitored. • Noise exploited is of additive and multiplicative nature. - Abstract: We investigate the profiles of diagonal components of frequency-dependent linear (αxx and αyy) optical response of repulsive impurity doped quantum dots. The dopant impurity potential chosen assumes Gaussian form. The study principally puts emphasis on investigating the role of noise on the polarizability components. In view of this we have exploited Gaussian white noise containing additive and multiplicative characteristics (in Stratonovich sense). The frequency-dependent polarizabilities are studied by exposing the doped dot to a periodically oscillating external electric field of given intensity. The oscillation frequency, confinement potentials, dopant location, and above all, the noise characteristics tune the linear polarizability components in a subtle manner. Whereas the additive noise fails to have any impact on the polarizabilities, the multiplicative noise influences them delicately and gives rise to additional interesting features

  7. The Effect of Temperature Dependent Frequency Factor on the Evaluated Trapping Parameters of TSL Glow Curves

    Yazici, A. N.; Öztürk, Z.

    1998-01-01

    The effect of temperature dependency on frequency factor and its relationship to trapping parameters is discussed by using the peak shape method. The coefficients appearing in the peak shape formula for the calculation of the activation energy have been determined and tabulated for the symmetry factor mg(X) for x=0.50 and 0.75 of the peak intensity. It is found that significant errors occur in the value of the trapping parameters if the temperature dependecy of the frequency factor is not consider.

  8. The Effect of Temperature Dependent Frequency Factor on the Evaluated Trapping Parameters of TSL Glow Curves

    YAZICI, A. N.; ÖZTÜRK, Z.

    1998-01-01

    The effect of temperature dependency on frequency factor and its relationship to trapping parameters is discussed by using the peak shape method. The coefficients appearing in the peak shape formula for the calculation of the activation energy have been determined and tabulated for the symmetry factor mg(X) for x=0.50 and 0.75 of the peak intensity. It is found that significant errors occur in the value of the trapping parameters if the temperature dependecy of the frequency factor is not con...

  9. Compressive sensing of frequency-dependent seismic radiation from subduction zone megathrust ruptures

    Yao, Huajian; Shearer, Peter M.; Gerstoft, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Megathrust earthquakes rupture a broad zone of the subducting plate interface in both along-strike and along-dip directions. The along-dip rupture characteristics of megathrust events, e.g., their slip and energy radiation distribution, reflect depth-varying frictional properties of the slab interface. Here, we report high-resolution frequency-dependent seismic radiation of the four largest megathrust earthquakes in the past 10 y using a compressive-sensing (sparse source recovery) technique, resolving generally low-frequency radiation closer to the trench at shallower depths and high-frequency radiation farther from the trench at greater depths. Together with coseismic slip models and early aftershock locations, our results suggest depth-varying frictional properties at the subducting plate interfaces. The shallower portion of the slab interface (above ∼15 km) is frictionally stable or conditionally stable and is the source region for tsunami earthquakes with large coseismic slip, deficient high-frequency radiation, and few early aftershocks. The slab interface at intermediate depths (∼15–35 km) is the main unstable seismogenic zone for the nucleation of megathrust quakes, typically with large coseismic slip, abundant early aftershocks, and intermediate- to high-frequency radiation. The deeper portion of the slab interface (∼35–45 km) is seismically unstable, however with small coseismic slip, dominant high-frequency radiation, and relatively fewer aftershocks.

  10. Disentangling the roles of frequency-vs. state-dependence in generating individual differences in behavioural plasticity

    Mathot, Kimberley J.; van den Hout, Piet J.; Piersma, Theunis; Kempenaers, Bart; Reale, Denis; Dingemanse, Niels J.; Sih, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    Theoretical work suggests that both negative frequency-dependent payoffs and state-dependent payoffs can lead to individual variation in behavioural plasticity. We investigated the roles of both frequency- and state-dependence on the occurrence of individual variation in behavioural plasticity in a series of experiments where we manipulated perceived predation danger for red knots (Calidris canutus islandica). We found individual variation in plasticity in a trait with negative frequency-depe...

  11. Frequency dependence of the magnetoelectric effect in a magnetostrictive-piezoelectric heterostructure

    Yu Guo-Liang; Li Yuan-Xun; Zeng Yu-Qin; Li Jie; Zuo Lin; Li Qiang; Zhang Huai-Wu

    2013-01-01

    The frequency dependence of the magnetoelectric effect in a magnetostrictive-piezoelectric heterostructure is theoretically studied by solving combined magnetic,elastic,and electric equations with boundary conditions.Both the mechanical coupling coefficient and the losses of the magnetostrictive and piezoelectric phases are taken into account.The numerical result indicates that the magnetoelectric coefficient and the resonance frequency are determined by the mechanical coupling coefficient,losses,and geometric parameters.Moreover,at the electromechanical resonance frequency,the module of the magnetoelectric coefficient is mostly contributed by the imaginary part.The relationship between the real and the imaginary parts of the magnetoelectric coefficient fit well to the Cole-Cole circle.The magnetostrictive-piezoelectric heterostructure has a great potential application as miniature and no-secondary coil solid-state transformers.

  12. Frequency dependence of junction capacitance of BPW34 and BPW41 p-i-n photodiodes

    Habibe Bayhan; Şadan Özden

    2007-04-01

    This article investigates the frequency dependence of small-signal capacitance of silicon BPW34 and BPW41 (Vishay) p-i-n photodiodes. We show that the capacitance-frequency characteristics of these photodiodes are well-described by the Schibli and Milnes model. The activation energy and the concentration of the dominant trap levels detected in BPW34 and BPW41 are 280{330 meV and 1.1 × 1012 - 1.2 × 1012 cm-3, respectively. According to the high-frequency - measurements, the impurity concentrations are determined to be about 5.3 × 1012 and 1.9 × 1013 cm-3 in BPW41 and BPW34, respectively using the method of / (-2) vs. .

  13. Constraints on frequency-dependent violations of Shapiro delay from GW150914

    Emre O. Kahya

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available On 14th September 2015, a transient gravitational wave (GW150914 was detected by the two LIGO detectors at Hanford and Livingston from the coalescence of a binary black hole system located at a distance of about 400 Mpc. We point out that GW150914 experienced a Shapiro delay due to the gravitational potential of the mass distribution along the line of sight of about 1800 days. Also, the near-simultaneous arrival of gravitons over a frequency range of about 200 Hz within a 0.2 s window allows us to constrain any violations of Shapiro delay and Einstein's equivalence principle between the gravitons at different frequencies. From the calculated Shapiro delay and the observed duration of the signal, frequency-dependent violations of the equivalence principle for gravitons are constrained to an accuracy of O(10−9.

  14. Temperature-Dependence of the Amide-I Frequency Map for Peptides and Proteins

    Chen Han; Jian-ping Wang

    2011-01-01

    In our recent work [Phys.Chem.Chem.Phys.11,9149 (2009)],a molecular-mechanics force field-based amide-I vibration frequency map (MM-map) for peptides and proteins was constructed.In this work,the temperature dependence of the MM-map is examined based on high-temperature molecular dynamics simulations and infrared (IR) experiments.It is shown that the 298-K map works for up to 500-K molecular dynamics trajectories,which reasonably reproduces the 88 ℃ experimental IR results.Linear IR spectra are also simulated for two tripeptides containing natural and unnatural amino acid residues,and the results are in reasonable agreement with experiment.The results suggest the MM-map can be used to obtain the temperature-dependent amide-I local mode frequencies and their distributions for peptide oligomers,which is useful in particular for understanding the IR signatures of the thermally unfolded species.

  15. Accurate Ground-State Energies of Solids and Molecules from Time-Dependent Density-Functional Theory

    Olsen, Thomas; Thygesen, Kristian Sommer

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate that ground-state energies approaching chemical accuracy can be obtained by combining the adiabatic-connection fluctuation-dissipation theorem with time-dependent densityfunctional theory. The key ingredient is a renormalization scheme, which eliminates the divergence of the...... and solids. We also consider examples of barrier heights in chemical reactions, molecular adsorption, and graphene interacting with metal surfaces, which are three examples where the RPA has been successful. In these cases, the renormalized kernel provides results that are of equal quality or even...

  16. On the frequency dependence and spatial coherence of PKP precursor amplitudes

    Mancinelli, Nicholas; Shearer, Peter; Thomas, Christine

    2016-03-01

    Studies now agree that small-scale (˜10 km) weak (˜0.1%) velocity perturbations throughout the lowermost mantle generate the globally averaged amplitudes of 1 Hz precursors to the core phase, . The possible frequency dependence and spatial coherence of this scattered phase, however, has been given less attention. Using a large global data set of ˜150,000 PKP precursor recordings, we characterize the frequency dependence of PKP precursors at central frequencies ranging from 0.5 to 4 Hz. At greater frequencies, we observe more scattered energy (relative to the reference phase PKPdf), particularly at shorter ranges. We model this observation by invoking heterogeneity at length scales from 2 to 30 km. Amplitudes at 0.5 Hz, in particular, suggest the presence of more heterogeneity at scales >8 km than present in previously published models. Using a regional bootstrap approach, we identify large (>20°), spatially coherent regions of anomalously strong scattering beneath the West Pacific, Central/North America, and—to a lesser extent—East Africa. Finally, as proof of concept, we use array processing techniques to locate the origin of scattered energy observed in Southern California by the Anza and Southern California Seismic Networks. The energy appears to come primarily from out-of-plane scattering on the receiver side. We suggest that such improvised arrays can increase global coverage and may reveal whether a majority of precursor energy comes from localized heterogeneity in the lowermost mantle.

  17. Rolling estimations of long range dependence volatility for high frequency S&P500 index

    Cheong, Chin Wen; Pei, Tan Pei

    2015-10-01

    This study evaluates the time-varying long range dependence behaviors of the S&P500 volatility index using the modified rescaled adjusted range (R/S) statistic. For better computational result, a high frequency rolling bipower variation realized volatility estimates are used to avoid possible abrupt jump. The empirical analysis findings allow us to understand better the informationally market efficiency before and after the subprime mortgage crisis.

  18. Evolution of learned strategy choice in a frequency-dependent game

    Katsnelson, Edith; Motro, Uzi; Marcus W Feldman; Lotem, Arnon

    2011-01-01

    In frequency-dependent games, strategy choice may be innate or learned. While experimental evidence in the producer–scrounger game suggests that learned strategy choice may be common, a recent theoretical analysis demonstrated that learning by only some individuals prevents learning from evolving in others. Here, however, we model learning explicitly, and demonstrate that learning can easily evolve in the whole population. We used an agent-based evolutionary simulation of the producer–scroung...

  19. Correlation factor, velocity autocorrelation function and frequency-dependent tracer diffusion coefficient

    van Beijeren, H.; Kehr, K. W.

    1986-01-01

    The correlation factor, defined as the ratio between the tracer diffusion coefficient in lattice gases and the diffusion coefficient for a corresponding uncorrelated random walk, is known to assume a very simple form under certain conditions. A simple derivation of this is given with the aid of the Green-Kubo formula for the tracer diffusion coefficient and it is generalised to a frequency-dependent correlation factor. The application to lattice gases with nearly vanishing vacancy concentrati...

  20. Robust H∞ Control for Time-Varying Delay Systems with Frequency-Dependent Performance Weights

    Nagahara, Masanori; Arai, Shingo; Uchimura, Yutaka

    This paper proposes a control design that enables us to shape the frequency-dependent performance using a modified Lyapunov-Krasovskii-based stabilizing condition. A stabilizing controller can be obtained by solving the condition formulated in Linear Matrix Inequality (LMI). The designed controller is evaluated using numerical simulations, and it is employed to realize the velocity control of a DC motor. Experimental results verified that the proposed controller achieved better performance with less conservativeness and that it is applicable to real plants.

  1. Frequency dependent rectifier memristor bridge used as a programmable synaptic membrane voltage generator

    Oliver Pabst; Torsten Schmidt

    2013-01-01

    Reasoned by its dynamical behavior, the memristor enables a lot of new applications in analog circuit design. Since some realizations have been shown (e.g. 2007 by Hewlett Packard), the development of applications with memristors becomes more and more interesting. Besides applications in neural networks and storage devices, analog memristive circuits also promise further applications. Therefore, this article proposes a frequency dependent rectifier memristor bridge for different purposes, for...

  2. The Hygiene Hypothesis: An Explanation for the Increased Frequency of Insulin- Dependent Diabetes

    Bach, J.-F.; Chatenoud, L

    2012-01-01

    The steadily increasing frequency of insulin-dependent diabetes in several countries is best explained today by the decline of infections. Epidemiologic and animal data support this conclusion, which, however, requires confirmation by intervention trials in man. The mechanisms of the protective effect of infections on diabetes onset are diverse including competition for homeostatic factors and stimulation of regulatory T cells and of Toll-like receptors. These considerations might have intere...

  3. Spatial Frequency Dependence of the Human Visual Cortex Response on Temporal Frequency Modulation Studied by fMRI

    A. Mirzajani

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Background/Objective: The brain response to temporal frequencies (TF has been already reported. However, there is no study on different TF with respect to various spatial frequencies (SF. Materials and Methods: Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI was done by a 1.5 T General Electric system for 14 volunteers (9 males and 5 females, aged 19–26 years during square-wave reversal checkerboard visual stimulation with different temporal frequencies of 4, 6, 8 and 10 Hz in 2 states of low SF of 0.4 and high SF of 8 cycles/degree (cpd. All subjects had normal visual acuity of 20/20 based on Snellen’s fraction in each eye with good binocular vision and normal visual field based on confrontation test. The mean luminance of the entire checkerboard was 161.4 cd/m2 and the black and white check contrast was 96%. The activation map was created using the data obtained from the block designed fMRI study. Pixels with a Z score above a threshold of 2.3, at a statistical significance level of 0.05, were considered activated. The average percentage blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD signal change for all activated pixels within the occipital lobe, multiplied by the total number of activated pixels within the occipital lobe, was used as an index for the magnitude of the fMRI signal at each state of TF&SF. Results: The magnitude of the fMRI signal in response to different TF’s was maximum at 6 Hz for a high SF value of 8 cpd; it was however, maximum at a TF of 8 Hz for a low SF of 0.4 cpd. Conclusion: The results of this study agree with those of animal invasive neurophysiologic studies showing SF and TF selectivity of neurons in visual cortex. These results can be useful for vision therapy and selecting visual tasks in fMRI studies.

  4. Viscoelastic characterization of compacted pharmaceutical excipient materials by analysis of frequency-dependent mechanical relaxation processes

    Welch, K.; Mousavi, S.; Lundberg, B.; Strømme, M.

    2005-09-01

    A newly developed method for determining the frequency-dependent complex Young's modulus was employed to analyze the mechanical response of compacted microcrystalline cellulose, sorbitol, ethyl cellulose and starch for frequencies up to 20 kHz. A Debye-like relaxation was observed in all the studied pharmaceutical excipient materials and a comparison with corresponding dielectric spectroscopy data was made. The location in frequency of the relaxation peak was shown to correlate to the measured tensile strength of the tablets, and the relaxation was interpreted as the vibrational response of the interparticle hydrogen and van der Waals bindings in the tablets. Further, the measured relaxation strength, holding information about the energy loss involved in the relaxation processes, showed that the weakest material in terms of tensile strength, starch, is the material among the four tested ones that is able to absorb the most energy within its structure when exposed to external perturbations inducing vibrations in the studied frequency range. The results indicate that mechanical relaxation analysis performed over relatively broad frequency ranges should be useful for predicting material properties of importance for the functionality of a material in applications such as, e.g., drug delivery, drug storage and handling, and also for clarifying the origin of hitherto unexplained molecular processes.

  5. Warning signals are under positive frequency-dependent selection in nature.

    Chouteau, Mathieu; Arias, Mónica; Joron, Mathieu

    2016-02-23

    Positive frequency-dependent selection (FDS) is a selection regime where the fitness of a phenotype increases with its frequency, and it is thought to underlie important adaptive strategies resting on signaling and communication. However, whether and how positive FDS truly operates in nature remains unknown, which hampers our understanding of signal diversity. Here, we test for positive FDS operating on the warning color patterns of chemically defended butterflies forming multiple coexisting mimicry assemblages in the Amazon. Using malleable prey models placed in localities showing differences in the relative frequencies of warningly colored prey, we demonstrate that the efficiency of a warning signal increases steadily with its local frequency in the natural community, up to a threshold where protection stabilizes. The shape of this relationship is consistent with the direct effect of the local abundance of each warning signal on the corresponding avoidance knowledge of the local predator community. This relationship, which differs from purifying selection acting on each mimetic pattern, indicates that predator knowledge, integrated over the entire community, is saturated only for the most common warning signals. In contrast, among the well-established warning signals present in local prey assemblages, most are incompletely known to local predators and enjoy incomplete protection. This incomplete predator knowledge should generate strong benefits to life history traits that enhance warning efficiency by increasing the effective frequency of prey visible to predators. Strategies such as gregariousness or niche convergence between comimics may therefore readily evolve through their effects on predator knowledge and warning efficiency. PMID:26858416

  6. Towards Efficient and Accurate Description of Many-Electron Problems: Developments of Static and Time-Dependent Electronic Structure Methods

    Ding, Feizhi

    Understanding electronic behavior in molecular and nano-scale systems is fundamental to the development and design of novel technologies and materials for application in a variety of scientific contexts from fundamental research to energy conversion. This dissertation aims to provide insights into this goal by developing novel methods and applications of first-principle electronic structure theory. Specifically, we will present new methods and applications of excited state multi-electron dynamics based on the real-time (RT) time-dependent Hartree-Fock (TDHF) and time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) formalism, and new development of the multi-configuration self-consist field theory (MCSCF) for modeling ground-state electronic structure. The RT-TDHF/TDDFT based developments and applications can be categorized into three broad and coherently integrated research areas: (1) modeling of the interaction between moleculars and external electromagnetic perturbations. In this part we will first prove both analytically and numerically the gauge invariance of the TDHF/TDDFT formalisms, then we will present a novel, efficient method for calculating molecular nonlinear optical properties, and last we will study quantum coherent plasmon in metal namowires using RT-TDDFT; (2) modeling of excited-state charge transfer in molecules. In this part, we will investigate the mechanisms of bridge-mediated electron transfer, and then we will introduce a newly developed non-equilibrium quantum/continuum embedding method for studying charge transfer dynamics in solution; (3) developments of first-principles spin-dependent many-electron dynamics. In this part, we will present an ab initio non-relativistic spin dynamics method based on the two-component generalized Hartree-Fock approach, and then we will generalized it to the two-component TDDFT framework and combine it with the Ehrenfest molecular dynamics approach for modeling the interaction between electron spins and nuclear

  7. A frequency-dependent log-quadratic Pn spreading model in the Northeast China and Korean peninsula

    Hao, J.; Zhao, L.; Xie, X. B.; Yao, Z.

    2015-12-01

    In 9 October 2006, 25 May 2009, and 12 February 2013, North Korea conducted three successive nuclear tests near the China-Korea border. Based on 297 broadband stations distributed in East China, South Korea, and Japan, the digital seismograms from these nuclear tests are collected to investigate the geometric spreading and attenuation of seismic Pn waves in Northeast China and Korean Peninsula. A highly accurate broadband Pn-wave data set generated by North Korean nuclear tests is used to constrain parameters of a frequency-dependent log-quadratic geometric spreading function and a power-law Pn Q model. The geometric spreading function and apparent Pn wave Q is obtained for the studied area between 2.0 and 10.0 Hz. By taking the two-station amplitude ratios of the Pn spectra, followed by correcting it for the known spreading function, we can strip the effects of source and crust legs from the apparent Pn Q, and retrieve the P-wave attenuation information along the pure upper mantle path. We then use a tomographic approach to obtain the upper mantle P-wave attenuation in Northeast China and Korean Peninsula. The Pn wave spectra observed in China are compared with those recorded in Japan, and the result reveals that the high-frequency Pn signal across the oceanic path attenuated faster than those through the continental path. This work was supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (grants 41174048 and 41374065).

  8. Frequency dependence of quantum path interference in non-collinear high-order harmonic generation

    Shi-Yang, Zhong; Xin-Kui, He; Hao, Teng; Peng, Ye; Li-Feng, Wang; Peng, He; Zhi-Yi, Wei

    2016-02-01

    High-order harmonic generation (HHG) driven by two non-collinear beams including a fundamental and its weak second harmonic is numerically studied. The interference of harmonics from adjacent electron quantum paths is found to be dependent on the relative delay of the driving pulse, and the dependences are different for different harmonic orders. This frequency dependence of the interference is attributed to the spatial frequency chirp in the HHG beam resulting from the harmonic dipole phase, which in turn provides a potential way to gain an insight into the generation of high-order harmonics. As an example, the intensity dependent dipole phase coefficient α is retrieved from the interference fringe. Project supported by the National Key Basic Research Program of China (Grant Nos. 2013CB922401 and 2013CB922402), the National Key Scientific Instrument and Equipment Development Projects, China (Grant No. 2012YQ12004704), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11374356), and the International Joint Research Program of National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61210017).

  9. Response of a kinetic Ising system to oscillating external fields: Amplitude and frequency dependence

    The S=1/2, nearest-neighbor, kinetic Ising model has been used to model magnetization switching in nanoscale ferromagnets. For this model, earlier work based on the droplet theory of the decay of metastable phases and Monte Carlo simulations has shown the existence of a size dependent spinodal field which separates deterministic and stochastic decay regimes. We extend the above work to study the effects of an oscillating field on the magnetization response of the kinetic Ising model. We compute the power spectral density of the time-dependent magnetization for different values of the amplitude and frequency of the external field, using Monte Carlo simulation data. We also investigate the amplitude and frequency dependence of the probability distributions for the hysteresis loop area and the period-averaged magnetization. The time-dependent response of the system is classified by analyzing the behavior of these quantities within the framework of the distinct deterministic and stochastic decay modes mentioned above. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  10. Simple, accurate, and efficient implementation of 1-electron atomic time-dependent Schrödinger equation in spherical coordinates

    Patchkovskii, Serguei; Muller, H. G.

    2016-02-01

    Modelling atomic processes in intense laser fields often relies on solving the time-dependent Schrödinger equation (TDSE). For processes involving ionisation, such as above-threshold ionisation (ATI) and high-harmonic generation (HHG), this is a formidable task even if only one electron is active. Several powerful ideas for efficient implementation of atomic TDSE were introduced by H.G. Muller some time ago (Muller, 1999), including: separation of Hamiltonian terms into tri-diagonal parts; implicit representation of the spatial derivatives; and use of a rotating reference frame. Here, we extend these techniques to allow for non-uniform radial grids, arbitrary laser field polarisation, and non-Hermitian terms in the Hamiltonian due to the implicit form of the derivatives (previously neglected). We implement the resulting propagator in a parallel Fortran program, adapted for multi-core execution. Cost of TDSE propagation scales linearly with the problem size, enabling full-dimensional calculations of strong-field ATI and HHG spectra for arbitrary field polarisations on a standard desktop PC.

  11. Sensitivity of seismic measurements to frequency-dependent attenuation and upper mantle structure: An initial approach

    Bellis, C.; Holtzman, B.

    2014-07-01

    This study addresses the sensitivity of seismic attenuation measurements to dissipative mechanisms and structure in the Earth's upper mantle. The Andrade anelastic model fits experimental attenuation data with a mild power law frequency dependence and can be scaled from laboratory to Earth conditions. We incorporate this anelastic model into 400km 1-D thermal profiles of the upper mantle. These continuous-spectrum models are approximated by multiple relaxation mechanisms that are implemented within a finite-difference scheme to perform wave propagation simulations in 1-D domains. In two sets of numerical experiments, we evaluate the measurable signature of the intrinsic attenuation structure. The two sets are defined by thermal profiles with added step functions of temperature, varying in (i) amplitude and depth or (ii) amplitude and sharpness. The corresponding synthetic data are processed using both the conventional t* approach, i.e., a linear regression of the displacement frequency spectrum, and an alternative nonlinear fit to identify the integrated value of attenuation and its frequency dependence. The measured sensitivity patterns are analyzed to assess the effects of the anelastic model and its spatial distribution on seismic data (in the absence of scattering effects). We have two straightforward results: (1) the frequency dependence power law is recoverable from the measurements; (2) t* is sensitive to both the depth and the amplitude of the step, and it is insensitive to the sharpness of the step, in the 0.25 to 2 Hz band. There is much potential for gaining information about the upper mantle thermodynamic state from careful interpretation of attenuation.

  12. Dependence of the transference of a reduced eye on frequency of light*

    T. Evans

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In Gaussian optics the transference is a matrix that is a complete representation of the effects of the system on a ray traversing it. Almost all of the familiar optical properties of the system, such asrefractive error and power of the system, can be calculated from the transference. Because of the central importance of the transference it is useful to have some idea of how it depends on the frequencyof light. This paper examines the simplest model eye, the reduced eye. The dependence of the transference is calculated in terms of both frequency andwavelength of light and both dependencies are displayed graphically. The principal matrix logarithms are also calculated and displayed graphically. Chromatic difference in refractive compensation, power and ametropia are obtained for the reduced eye from the transferences.  (S Afr Optom 2011 70(4 149-155

  13. Frequency-dependent viscous flow in channels with fractal rough surfaces

    Cortis, A.; Berryman, J.G.

    2010-05-01

    The viscous dynamic permeability of some fractal-like channels is studied. For our particular class of geometries, the ratio of the pore surface area-to-volume tends to {infinity} (but has a finite cutoff), and the universal scaling of the dynamic permeability, k({omega}), needs modification. We performed accurate numerical computations of k({omega}) for channels characterized by deterministic fractal wall surfaces, for a broad range of fractal dimensions. The pertinent scaling model for k({omega}) introduces explicitly the fractal dimension of the wall surface for a range of frequencies across the transition between viscous and inertia dominated regimes. The new model provides excellent agreement with our numerical simulations.

  14. Frequency dependent gamma-ray irradiation response of Sm2O3 MOS capacitors

    The frequency dependent irradiation influences on Sm2O3 MOS capacitors have been investigated and possible use of Sm2O3 in MOS-based radiation sensor was discussed in this study. To examine their gamma irradiation response over a range of doses, the fabricated MOS capacitors were irradiated up to 30 grays. Capacitance–Voltage (C–V) measurements were recorded for various doses and the influences of irradiation were determined from the mid-gap and flat-band voltage shifts. In addition, the degradations of irradiation have been studied by impedance based leakage current–voltage (J–V) characteristics. The results demonstrate that J–V characteristics have not been significantly change by irradiation and implying that the excited traps have a minor effect on current for given dose ranges. However, the frequency of applied voltage during the C–V measurements affects the irradiation response of devices, significantly. The variations on the electrical characteristics may be attributed to the different time dependency of acceptor and donor-like interface states. In spite of the variations on the device characteristics, low frequency measurements indicate that Sm2O3 is a potential candidate to be used as a dielectric layer in MOS based irradiation sensors

  15. Frequency and temperature dependence of skin bioimpedance during a contralateral cold test.

    Podtaev, S; Nikolaev, D; Samartsev, V; Gavrilov, V; Tsiberkin, K

    2015-03-01

    A study of the α- and β-dispersion of skin bioimpedance dependence on temperature and micro-hemodynamics is presented. The vascular tone changes during the cold test are verified by the wavelet-analysis of skin temperature signals obtained simultaneously with impedance measurements. Thirty three normal healthy subjects of 28  ±  7 years old were entered into the study. The tetra-polar electrode system was used to record the resistance and reactance; measurements were carried out at 67 frequencies, in a frequency range from 2 Hz to 50 kHz. It has been found that the impedance decreases with vasodilation and increases with vasoconstriction. The high values of correlation among thermal oscillation amplitudes and Nyquist diagram parameters prove the impedance dependence on blood flow in three frequency bands corresponding to the myogenic, neurogenic and endothelial vascular tone regulation mechanisms. Using an equivalent RC circuit, we obtained the changes in the Nyquist diagram matching the experimental data. The proposed descriptive α-dispersion model can be used to study mechanisms responsible for intercellular interaction. PMID:25690397

  16. Dielectrophoresis of DNA: time- and frequency-dependent collections on microelectrodes.

    Bakewell, David J; Morgan, Hywel

    2006-06-01

    This paper reports measurements that characterize the collection of DNA onto interdigitated microelectrodes by high-frequency dielectrophoresis. Measurements of time-dependent collection of 12 kilobase pair plasmid DNA onto microelectrodes by dielectrophoresis show significant reduction in the response as the frequency increases from 100 kHz to 20 MHz. Collection time profiles are quantitatively measured using fluorescence microscopy over the range 100 kHz to 5 MHz and are represented in terms of two parameters: the initial dielectrophoretic collection rate, and the initial to steady-state collection transition. Measured values for both parameters are consistent with trends in the frequency-dependent real part of the effective polarizability measured for the same plasmid DNA using dielectric spectroscopy. The experimentally measured parameters are qualitatively compared with trends predicted by theory that takes into account dielectrophoretic particle movement and diffusion. The differences between experiment and theory are discussed with suggested improvements to theoretical models, for example, including the effects of electrohydrodynamically driven fluid motion. PMID:16805110

  17. Reversal of magnetization of a single-domain magnetic particle by the ac field of time-dependent frequency

    Cai, Liufei; Garanin, D.A.; Chudnovsky, E. M.

    2012-01-01

    We report numerical and analytical studies of the reversal of the magnetic moment of a single-domain magnetic particle by a circularly polarized ac field of time-dependent frequency. For the time-linear frequency sweep, the phase diagrams are computed that illustrate the dependence of the reversal on the frequency sweep rate v, the amplitude of the ac field h, the magnetic anisotropy field d, and the damping parameter alpha. It is shown that the most efficient magnetization reversal requires ...

  18. Frequency Dependence of Polarization of Zebra Pattern in Type-IV Solar Radio Bursts

    Kaneda, Kazutaka; Iwai, Kazumasa; Tsuchiya, Fuminori; Obara, Takahiro

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the polarization characteristics of a zebra pattern (ZP) in a type-IV solar radio burst observed with AMATERAS on 2011 June 21 for the purpose of evaluating the generation processes of ZP. Analyzing highly resolved spectral and polarization data revealed the frequency dependence of the degree of circular polarization and the delay between two polarized components for the first time. The degree of circular polarization was 50-70 percent right-handed and it varied little as a function of frequency. Cross-correlation analysis determined that the left-handed circularly polarized component was delayed by 50-70 ms relative to the right-handed component over the entire frequency range of the ZP and this delay increased with the frequency. We examined the obtained polarization characteristics by using pre-existing ZP models and concluded that the ZP was generated by the double plasma resonance process. Our results suggest that the ZP emission was originally generated in a completely polarized state in...

  19. Frequency-dependent viscoelastic parameters of mouse brain tissue estimated by MR elastography

    Clayton, E H; Bayly, P V [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, Washington University in St Louis, 1 Brookings Drive, Campus Box 1185, Saint Louis, MO 63130 (United States); Garbow, J R, E-mail: clayton@wustl.edu, E-mail: garbow@wustl.edu, E-mail: pvb@wustl.edu [Biomedical Magnetic Resonance Laboratory, Department of Radiology, Washington University in St Louis, 4525 Scott Avenue, Campus Box 8227, Saint Louis, MO 63110 (United States)

    2011-04-21

    Viscoelastic properties of mouse brain tissue were estimated non-invasively, in vivo, using magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) at 4.7 T to measure the dispersive properties of induced shear waves. Key features of this study include (i) the development and application of a novel MR-compatible actuation system which transmits vibratory motion into the brain through an incisor bar, and (ii) the investigation of the mechanical properties of brain tissue over a 1200 Hz bandwidth from 600-1800 Hz. Displacement fields due to propagating shear waves were measured during continuous, harmonic excitation of the skull. This protocol enabled characterization of the true steady-state patterns of shear wave propagation. Analysis of displacement fields obtained at different frequencies indicates that the viscoelastic properties of mouse brain tissue depend strongly on frequency. The average storage modulus (G') increased from approximately 1.6 to 8 kPa over this range; average loss modulus (G'') increased from approximately 1 to 3 kPa. Both moduli were well approximated by a power-law relationship over this frequency range. MRE may be a valuable addition to studies of disease in murine models, and to pre-clinical evaluations of therapies. Quantitative measurements of the viscoelastic parameters of brain tissue at high frequencies are also valuable for modeling and simulation of traumatic brain injury.

  20. Frequency-dependent viscoelastic parameters of mouse brain tissue estimated by MR elastography

    Viscoelastic properties of mouse brain tissue were estimated non-invasively, in vivo, using magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) at 4.7 T to measure the dispersive properties of induced shear waves. Key features of this study include (i) the development and application of a novel MR-compatible actuation system which transmits vibratory motion into the brain through an incisor bar, and (ii) the investigation of the mechanical properties of brain tissue over a 1200 Hz bandwidth from 600-1800 Hz. Displacement fields due to propagating shear waves were measured during continuous, harmonic excitation of the skull. This protocol enabled characterization of the true steady-state patterns of shear wave propagation. Analysis of displacement fields obtained at different frequencies indicates that the viscoelastic properties of mouse brain tissue depend strongly on frequency. The average storage modulus (G') increased from approximately 1.6 to 8 kPa over this range; average loss modulus (G'') increased from approximately 1 to 3 kPa. Both moduli were well approximated by a power-law relationship over this frequency range. MRE may be a valuable addition to studies of disease in murine models, and to pre-clinical evaluations of therapies. Quantitative measurements of the viscoelastic parameters of brain tissue at high frequencies are also valuable for modeling and simulation of traumatic brain injury.

  1. Feasibility of controlling speed-dependent low-frequency brake vibration amplification by modulating actuation pressure

    Sen, Osman Taha; Dreyer, Jason T.; Singh, Rajendra

    2014-12-01

    In this article, a feasibility study of controlling the low frequency torque response of a disc brake system with modulated actuation pressure (in the open loop mode) is conducted. First, a quasi-linear model of the torsional system is introduced, and analytical solutions are proposed to incorporate the modulation effect. Tractable expressions for three different modulation schemes are obtained, and conditions that would lead to a reduction in the oscillatory amplitudes are identified. Second, these conditions are evaluated with a numerical model of the torsional system with clearance nonlinearity, and analytical solutions are verified in terms of the trends observed. Finally, a laboratory experiment with a solenoid valve is built to modulate actuation pressure with a constant duty cycle, and time-frequency domain data are acquired. Measurements are utilized to assess analytical observations, and all methods show that the speed-dependent brake torque amplitudes can be altered with an appropriate modulation of actuation pressure.

  2. Frequency dependence of magnetic shielding performance of HTS plates in mixed states

    The magnetic shielding performance of the high-Tc superconducting (HTS) plate is investigated numerically. The behavior of the shielding current density in the HTS plate is expressed as the integral-differential equation with a normal component of the current vector potential as a dependent variable. The numerical code for solving the equation has been developed by using the combination of the Newton-Raphson method and the successive substitution method and, by use of the code, damping coefficients and shielding factors are evaluated for the various values of the frequency ω. The results of computations show that the HTS plate has a possibility of shielding the high-frequency magnetic field with ω > or approx. 1 kHz. (author)

  3. Wideband Power Amplifier Modeling Incorporating Carrier Frequency Dependent AM/AM and AM/PM Characteristics

    Tkacenko, A.

    2013-05-01

    In this article, we present a complex baseband model for a wideband power amplifier that incorporates carrier frequency dependent amplitude modulation (AM) and phase modulation (PM) (i.e., AM/AM and AM/PM) characteristics in the design process. The structure used to implement the amplifier model is a Wiener system which accounts for memory effects caused by the frequency selective nature of the amplifier, in addition to the nonlinearities caused by gain compression and saturation. By utilizing piecewise polynomial nonlinearities in the structure, it is shown how to construct the Wiener model to exactly accommodate all given AM/AM and AM/PM measurement constraints. Simulation results using data from a 50 W 32-way Ka-band solid-state power amplifier (SSPA) are provided, highlighting the differences in degradation incurred for a wideband input signal as compared with a narrowband input.

  4. Frequency dependence of magnetic shielding performance of HTS plates in mixed states

    Kamitani, Atsushi; Yokono, Takafumi [Yamagata Univ., Yonezawa (Japan). Faculty of Engineering; Yokono, Takafumi [Tsukuba Univ., Ibaraki (Japan). Inst. of Information Sciences and Electronics

    2000-06-01

    The magnetic shielding performance of the high-Tc superconducting (HTS) plate is investigated numerically. The behavior of the shielding current density in the HTS plate is expressed as the integral-differential equation with a normal component of the current vector potential as a dependent variable. The numerical code for solving the equation has been developed by using the combination of the Newton-Raphson method and the successive substitution method and, by use of the code, damping coefficients and shielding factors are evaluated for the various values of the frequency {omega}. The results of computations show that the HTS plate has a possibility of shielding the high-frequency magnetic field with {omega} > or approx. 1 kHz. (author)

  5. Negative frequency-dependent selection is intensified at higher population densities in protist populations.

    Minter, Ewan J A; Watts, Phillip C; Lowe, Chris D; Brockhurst, Michael A

    2015-06-01

    Natural populations of free-living protists often exhibit high-levels of intraspecific diversity, yet this is puzzling as classic evolutionary theory predicts dominance by genotypes with high fitness, particularly in large populations where selection is efficient. Here, we test whether negative frequency-dependent selection (NFDS) plays a role in the maintenance of diversity in the marine flagellate Oxyrrhis marina using competition experiments between multiple pairs of strains. We observed strain-specific responses to frequency and density, but an overall signature of NFDS that was intensified at higher population densities. Because our strains were not selected a priori on the basis of particular traits expected to exhibit NFDS, these data represent a relatively unbiased estimate of the role for NFDS in maintaining diversity in protist populations. These findings could help to explain how bloom-forming plankton, which periodically achieve exceptionally high population densities, maintain substantial intraspecific diversity. PMID:26063750

  6. Dependences of quantitative ultrasound parameters on frequency and porosity in water-saturated nickel foams.

    Lee, Kang Il

    2014-02-01

    The frequency-dependent phase velocity, attenuation coefficient, and backscatter coefficient were measured from 0.8 to 1.2 MHz in 24 water-saturated nickel foams as trabecular-bone-mimicking phantoms. The power law fits to the measurements showed that the phase velocity, the attenuation coefficient, and the backscatter coefficient were proportional to the frequency with exponents n of 0.95, 1.29, and 3.18, respectively. A significant linear correlation was found between the phase velocity at 1.0 MHz and the porosity. In contrast, the best regressions for the normalized broadband ultrasound attenuation and the backscatter coefficient at 1.0 MHz were obtained with the polynomial fits of second order. PMID:25234916

  7. Temperature dependence of low-frequency optical phonons in TlInS{sub 2}

    Paucar, Raul; Wakita, Kazuki [Electronics and Computer Engineering, Chiba Institute of Technology, Chiba (Japan); Shim, YongGu [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka Prefecture University, Osaka (Japan); Alekperov, Oktay; Mamedov, Nazim [Institute of Physics, Azerbaijan National Academy of Sciences, Baku (Azerbaijan)

    2015-06-15

    The unpolarized Stocks component of the Raman spectra of the layered ternary thallium dichalcogenide, TlInS{sub 2} was studied with the aid of a Raman confocal microscope system in the low-frequency region of 35-150 cm{sup -1} over the temperature range that embraced the region of the successive phase transitions in this crystal. The observed spectra were deconvoluted into Lorentzian peaks to single-out the contribution of each Raman mode. The temperature dependence of the Raman frequency and broadening associated with each mode was then obtained. The irregular temperature behaviour of most modes was disclosed in the proximity of phase transitions. (copyright 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  8. Dielectric Characterization of composite building materials depending on the volume fraction for Mobile Phone Frequencies

    Terhzaz Jaouad

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This W presents a new technique of Dielectric Characterization of composites building materials. This technique is based on the modeling of an open coaxial cell with a mathematical formulation that links the admittances of the filled and empty cell to the complex permittivity ε* of materials characterization. We applied this technique to the dielectric characterization of some building materials powder in the frequency band (100MHz-4GHz. We also characterize some composite materials (sand- brick, cement- sand, and cement-brick depending on the volume fraction for Mobile Phone Frequencies. We made a comparison with the laws of mixtures to identify the most appropriate law to render the dielectric behavior of these materials.

  9. The heat capacity of lipid membranes in finite reservoirs and the relation to the frequency dependence

    Mosgaard, Lars D; Heimburg, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Membranes are two-dimensional structures embedded in a three-dimensional heat reservoir. At constant temperature, the heat capacity is proportional to the enthalpy fluctuations. However, when the membrane is embedded in a finite aqueous reservoir, the enthalpy and temperature fluctuations of the reservoir are intimately coupled to the enthalpy fluctuations of the membrane. Employing Monte Carlo simulations, we show that membranes embedded in water reservoirs of various sizes display different enthalpy fluctuations and fluctuation time scales. In particular, larger water reservoirs result in a larger enthalpy fluctuations of the membrane and in slower fluctuation time scales (relaxation times). In periodic processes such as sound propagation in membranes, the membrane has only a finite time available to exchange heat with the medium. A larger frequency therefore reduces the accessible volume of the reservoir. We discuss the relevance of these considerations for the frequency dependence of the compressibility a...

  10. Frequency dependence of CA3 spike phase response arising from h-current properties

    Hyun Jae Jang

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The phase of firing of hippocampal neurons during theta oscillations encodes spatial information. Moreover, the spike phase response to synaptic inputs in individual cells depends on the expression of the hyperpolarisation-activated mixed cation current (Ih, which differs between CA3 and CA1 pyramidal neurons. Here, we compared the phase response of these two cell types, as well as their intrinsic membrane properties. We found that both CA3 and CA1 pyramidal neurons show a voltage sag in response to negative current steps but that this voltage sag is significantly smaller in CA3 cells. Moreover, CA3 pyramidal neurons have less prominent resonance properties compared to CA1 pyramidal neurons. This is consistent with differential expression of Ih by the two cell types. Despite their distinct intrinsic membrane properties, both CA3 and CA1 pyramidal neurons displayed bidirectional spike phase control by excitatory conductance inputs during theta oscillations. In particular, excitatory inputs delivered at the descending phase of a dynamic clamp-induced membrane potential oscillation delayed the subsequent spike by nearly 50 mrad. The effect was shown to be mediated by Ih and was counteracted by increasing inhibitory conductance driving the membrane potential oscillation. Using our experimental data to feed a computational model, we showed that differences in Ih between CA3 and CA1 pyramidal neurons could predict frequency-dependent differences in phase response properties between these cell types. We confirmed experimentally such frequency-dependent spike phase control in CA3 neurons. Therefore, a decrease in theta frequency, which is observed in intact animals during novelty, might switch the CA3 spike phase response from unidirectional to bidirectional and thereby promote encoding of the new context.

  11. An Efficient and Accurate Grid Method for Solving the Time-Dependent Schroedinger Equation: Application of Coulomb Wave Function DVR to Atomic Systems in Strong Laser Fields

    Peng, L Y; Peng, Liang-You; Starace, Anthony F.

    2006-01-01

    We present an efficient and accurate grid method for solving the time-dependent Schr\\"{o}dinger equation of atomic systems interacting with intense laser pulses. As usual, the angular part of the wave function is expanded in terms of spherical harmonics. Instead of the usual finite difference (FD) scheme, the radial coordinate is discretized using the discrete variable representation which is constructed from the Coulomb wave function. For an accurate description of the ionization dynamics of atomic systems, the Coulomb wave function discrete variable representation (CWDVR) method needs 3-10 times less grid points than the FD method. The resultant grid points of CWDVR distribute unevenly so that one has finer grid near the origin and coarser one at larger distances. The other important advantage of the CWDVR method is that it treats the Coulomb singularity accurately and gives a good representation of continuum wave functions. The time propagation of the wave function is implemented using the well-known Arnol...

  12. Frequency dependence of arrival direction and polarization of low-latitude whistlers and their ducted propagation

    The combined use of digital recorders and a fast Fourier transform analyzer made it possible for them to carry out wideband field analysis direction finding measurements of whistlers at low latitude (geomagnetic latitude 25 degree N). It is found that there is a negligibly small frequency dependence of the ionospheric exit point and polarization of daytime whistlers during each occurrence peak with duration of about 2 hours, which lends further support to their propagation in a field-aligned duct in the magnetosphere for each occurrence peak

  13. A note on the physical interpretation of frequency dependent boundary conditions in a digital waveguide mesh

    Escolano-Carrasco, José; Jacobsen, Finn

    2007-01-01

    Digital waveguide mesh (DWM) is a popular method for time domain modelling of sound fields. DWM consists of a recursive digital filter structure where a D'Alembert solution of the wave equation is propagated. One of the attractive characteristics of this method is related to the simplicity...... model of the boundary does not agree with the behaviour of a locally reacting surface, and this can give rise to contradictions in the physical interpretation of the reflected sound field. This paper analyses the behaviour of frequency dependent boundary conditions in DWM in order to obtain a physical...

  14. Testing of Dependencies between Stock Returns and Trading Volume by High Frequency Data

    Piotr Gurgul

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper is concerned with a dependence analysis of returns, return volatility and trading volume for five companies listed on the Vienna Stock Exchange and five from theWarsaw Stock Exchange. Taking into account high frequency data for these companies, tests based on a comparison of Bernstein copula densities using the Hellinger distance were conducted. The paper presents some patterns of causal and other relationships between stock returns, realized volatility and expected and unexpected trading volume. There is a linear causality running from realized volatility to expected trading volume, and a lack of nonlinear dependence in the opposite direction. The authors detected strong linear and nonlinear causality from stock returns to expected trading volume. They did not find causality running in the opposite direction. In addition, the existence of fractional cointegration was examined. Despite the equality of the long memory parameters of realized volatility and trading volumes, they do not move together in the long term horizon.

  15. Shear wave anisotropy from aligned inclusions: ultrasonic frequency dependence of velocity and attenuation

    de Figueiredo, J. J. S.; Schleicher, J.; Stewart, R. R.; Dayur, N.; Omoboya, B.; Wiley, R.; William, A.

    2013-04-01

    To understand their influence on elastic wave propagation, anisotropic cracked media have been widely investigated in many theoretical and experimental studies. In this work, we report on laboratory ultrasound measurements carried out to investigate the effect of source frequency on the elastic parameters (wave velocities and the Thomsen parameter γ) and shear wave attenuation) of fractured anisotropic media. Under controlled conditions, we prepared anisotropic model samples containing penny-shaped rubber inclusions in a solid epoxy resin matrix with crack densities ranging from 0 to 6.2 per cent. Two of the three cracked samples have 10 layers and one has 17 layers. The number of uniform rubber inclusions per layer ranges from 0 to 100. S-wave splitting measurements have shown that scattering effects are more prominent in samples where the seismic wavelength to crack aperture ratio ranges from 1.6 to 1.64 than in others where the ratio varied from 2.72 to 2.85. The sample with the largest cracks showed a magnitude of scattering attenuation three times higher compared with another sample that had small inclusions. Our S-wave ultrasound results demonstrate that elastic scattering, scattering and anelastic attenuation, velocity dispersion and crack size interfere directly in shear wave splitting in a source-frequency dependent manner, resulting in an increase of scattering attenuation and a reduction of shear wave anisotropy with increasing frequency.

  16. Frequency-dependent electrodeformation of giant phospholipid vesicles in AC electric field

    Peterlin, Primoz

    2010-01-01

    A model of vesicle electrodeformation is described which obtains a parametrized vesicle shape by minimizing the sum of the membrane bending energy and the energy due to the electric field. Both the vesicle membrane and the aqueous media inside and outside the vesicle are treated as leaky dielectrics, and the vesicle itself is modelled as a nearly spherical shape enclosed within a thin membrane. It is demonstrated (a) that the model achieves a good quantitative agreement with the experimentally determined prolate-to-oblate transition frequencies in the kHz range, and (b) that the model can explain a phase diagram of shapes of giant phospholipid vesicles with respect to two parameters: the frequency of the applied AC electric field and the ratio of the electrical conductivities of the aqueous media inside and outside the vesicle, explored in a recent paper (S. Aranda et al., Biophys. J. 95:L19--L21, 2008). A possible use of the frequency-dependent shape transitions of phospholipid vesicles in conductometry of m...

  17. The influence of frequency-dependent radiative transfer on the structures of radiative shocks

    Vaytet, N; Audit, E; Chabrier, G

    2013-01-01

    Radiative shocks are shocks in a gas where the radiative energy and flux coming from the very hot post-shock material are non-negligible in the shock's total energy budget, and are often large enough to heat the material ahead of the shock. Many simulations of radiative shocks, both in the contexts of astrophysics and laboratory experiments, use a grey treatment of radiative transfer coupled to the hydrodynamics. However, the opacities of the gas show large variations as a function of frequency and this needs to be taken into account if one wishes to reproduce the relevant physics. We have performed radiation hydrodynamics simulations of radiative shocks in Ar using multigroup (frequency dependent) radiative transfer with the HERACLES code. The opacities were taken from the ODALISC database. We show the influence of the number of frequency groups used on the dynamics and morphologies of subcritical and supercritical radiative shocks in Ar gas, and in particular on the extent of the radiative precursor. We fin...

  18. Analysis of the frequency-dependent response to wave forcing in the extratropics

    A. J. Haklander

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available A quasigeostrophic model for the frequency-dependent response of the zonal-mean flow to planetary-wave forcing at Northern Hemisphere (NH midlatitudes is applied to 4-D-Var ECMWF analysis data for six extended winter seasons. The theoretical response is a non-linear function of the frequency of the forcing, the thermal damping time α−1, and a scaling parameter µ which includes the aspect ratio of the meridional to the vertical length scale of the response. Regression of the calculated response from the analyses onto the theoretical response yields height-dependent estimates for both α−1 and µ. The thermal damping time estimated from this dynamical model is about 2 days in the troposphere, 7–10 days in the stratosphere, and 2–4 days in the lower mesosphere. For the stratosphere and lower mesosphere, the estimates lie within the range of existing radiative damping time estimates, but for the troposphere they are significantly smaller.

  19. In situ evidence for frequency dependence of near-surface Q

    Li, Guofa; Sacchi, Mauricio D.; Zheng, Hao

    2016-02-01

    The frequency dependence of the quality factor Q has long been predicted by mathematical modelling and laboratory measurements; however, in situ evidence from seismic surveys is still lacking. We have conducted the cross-hole seismic surveys to investigate the near-surface seismic attenuation in the Daqing oilfield in northeastern China. The seismic waves were fired in a source hole of 40 m from the bottom to the surface at an interval of 1 m and were recorded in a receiver hole of 40 m by two geophones with one at the surface and the other one at the bottom. The direct waves were extracted to avoid the noise disturbance and the reflection interference, and the attenuations without the effects of the source signature and the receiver coupling were estimated by a method we proposed. The nonlinear attenuations were observed and fitted using the power-law-based Q. The reliability of Q estimate was verified by the high similarity between the real and the simulated attenuations. Therefore, the experiment we have conducted can be treated as a reliable evidence for the frequency dependence of near-surface Q.

  20. Negative frequency-dependent interactions can underlie phenotypic heterogeneity in a clonal microbial population.

    Healey, David; Axelrod, Kevin; Gore, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    Genetically identical cells in microbial populations often exhibit a remarkable degree of phenotypic heterogeneity even in homogenous environments. Such heterogeneity is commonly thought to represent a bet-hedging strategy against environmental uncertainty. However, evolutionary game theory predicts that phenotypic heterogeneity may also be a response to negative frequency-dependent interactions that favor rare phenotypes over common ones. Here we provide experimental evidence for this alternative explanation in the context of the well-studied yeast GAL network. In an environment containing the two sugars glucose and galactose, the yeast GAL network displays stochastic bimodal activation. We show that in this mixed sugar environment, GAL-ON and GAL-OFF phenotypes can each invade the opposite phenotype when rare and that there exists a resulting stable mix of phenotypes. Consistent with theoretical predictions, the resulting stable mix of phenotypes is not necessarily optimal for population growth. We find that the wild-type mixed strategist GAL network can invade populations of both pure strategists while remaining uninvasible by either. Lastly, using laboratory evolution we show that this mixed resource environment can directly drive the de novo evolution of clonal phenotypic heterogeneity from a pure strategist population. Taken together, our results provide experimental evidence that negative frequency-dependent interactions can underlie the phenotypic heterogeneity found in clonal microbial populations. PMID:27487817

  1. Analysis of the frequency-dependent response to wave forcing in the extratropics

    A. J. Haklander

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available A quasigeostrophic model for the frequency-dependent response of the zonal-mean flow to planetary-wave forcing at Northern Hemisphere (NH midlatitudes is applied to 4-D-Var ECMWF analysis data for six extended winter seasons. The theoretical response is a non-linear function of the frequency of the forcing, the thermal damping time α−1, and a scaling parameter μ which includes the aspect ratio of the meridional to the vertical length scale of the response. Non-linear regression of the calculated response from the analyses onto the theoretical response yields height-dependent estimates for both α−1 and μ. The thermal damping time estimated from this dynamical model is about 2 days in the troposphere, 7–10 days in the stratosphere, and 2–4 days in the lower mesosphere. These estimates generally lie within the range of existing estimates, although the values we find for the troposphere are significantly smaller than those calculated in several radiative transfer modeling studies. At most levels, the estimates for μ are significantly lower than can be derived from scaling arguments that apply outside the forcing region. We illustrate with an example how the response of the meridional circulation inside the forcing area can have a higher aspect ratio than the effective response outside the forcing area.

  2. Frequency dependent power fluctuations: a feature of the ESR system or physical?

    Y. Ogawa

    Full Text Available The k-dependence of the received power in high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR conditions, occurring for naturally enhanced ion-acoustic lines (NEIALs and for real satellites, is investigated by using the EISCAT Svalbard Radar (ESR, where the data are recorded in eight separate channels using different frequencies. For the real satellites we find large variations of the relative powers from event to event, which is probably due to a different number of pulses catching the satellite over the integration period. However, the large power difference remains unexpected in one case. Over short time scale (< 10 s the relative power difference seems to be highly stable. For most NEIAL events the differences between channels are within noise level. In a few cases variations of the relative power well above both the estimated and expected 1-sigma level occur over a signal preintegrated profile. We thus suggest that the frequency dependence of the power in NEIAL events has its origin in the scattering medium itself as the most plausible explanation.

    Key words: Ionosphere (auroral ionosphere; plasma waves and instabilities; instruments and techniques

  3. Angular and Frequency-Dependent Wave Velocity and Attenuation in Fractured Porous Media

    Carcione, José M.; Gurevich, Boris; Santos, Juan E.; Picotti, Stefano

    2013-11-01

    Wave-induced fluid flow generates a dominant attenuation mechanism in porous media. It consists of energy loss due to P-wave conversion to Biot (diffusive) modes at mesoscopic-scale inhomogeneities. Fractured poroelastic media show significant attenuation and velocity dispersion due to this mechanism. The theory has first been developed for the symmetry axis of the equivalent transversely isotropic (TI) medium corresponding to a poroelastic medium containing planar fractures. In this work, we consider the theory for all propagation angles by obtaining the five complex and frequency-dependent stiffnesses of the equivalent TI medium as a function of frequency. We assume that the flow direction is perpendicular to the layering plane and is independent of the loading direction. As a consequence, the behaviour of the medium can be described by a single relaxation function. We first consider the limiting case of an open (highly permeable) fracture of negligible thickness. We then compute the associated wave velocities and quality factors as a function of the propagation direction (phase and ray angles) and frequency. The location of the relaxation peak depends on the distance between fractures (the mesoscopic distance), viscosity, permeability and fractures compliances. The flow induced by wave propagation affects the quasi-shear (qS) wave with levels of attenuation similar to those of the quasi-compressional (qP) wave. On the other hand, a general fracture can be modeled as a sequence of poroelastic layers, where one of the layers is very thin. Modeling fractures of different thickness filled with CO2 embedded in a background medium saturated with a stiffer fluid also shows considerable attenuation and velocity dispersion. If the fracture and background frames are the same, the equivalent medium is isotropic, but strong wave anisotropy occurs in the case of a frameless and highly permeable fracture material, for instance a suspension of solid particles in the fluid.

  4. The evolution of social learning rules: payoff-biased and frequency-dependent biased transmission.

    Kendal, Jeremy; Giraldeau, Luc-Alain; Laland, Kevin

    2009-09-21

    Humans and other animals do not use social learning indiscriminately, rather, natural selection has favoured the evolution of social learning rules that make selective use of social learning to acquire relevant information in a changing environment. We present a gene-culture coevolutionary analysis of a small selection of such rules (unbiased social learning, payoff-biased social learning and frequency-dependent biased social learning, including conformism and anti-conformism) in a population of asocial learners where the environment is subject to a constant probability of change to a novel state. We define conditions under which each rule evolves to a genetically polymorphic equilibrium. We find that payoff-biased social learning may evolve under high levels of environmental variation if the fitness benefit associated with the acquired behaviour is either high or low but not of intermediate value. In contrast, both conformist and anti-conformist biases can become fixed when environment variation is low, whereupon the mean fitness in the population is higher than for a population of asocial learners. Our examination of the population dynamics reveals stable limit cycles under conformist and anti-conformist biases and some highly complex dynamics including chaos. Anti-conformists can out-compete conformists when conditions favour a low equilibrium frequency of the learned behaviour. We conclude that evolution, punctuated by the repeated successful invasion of different social learning rules, should continuously favour a reduction in the equilibrium frequency of asocial learning, and propose that, among competing social learning rules, the dominant rule will be the one that can persist with the lowest frequency of asocial learning. PMID:19501102

  5. Digital timing: sampling frequency, anti-aliasing filter and signal interpolation filter dependence on timing resolution

    The main focus of our study is to investigate how the performance of digital timing methods is affected by sampling rate, anti-aliasing and signal interpolation filters. We used the Nyquist sampling theorem to address some basic questions such as what will be the minimum sampling frequencies? How accurate will the signal interpolation be? How do we validate the timing measurements? The preferred sampling rate would be as low as possible, considering the high cost and power consumption of high-speed analog-to-digital converters. However, when the sampling rate is too low, due to the aliasing effect, some artifacts are produced in the timing resolution estimations; the shape of the timing profile is distorted and the FWHM values of the profile fluctuate as the source location changes. Anti-aliasing filters are required in this case to avoid the artifacts, but the timing is degraded as a result. When the sampling rate is marginally over the Nyquist rate, a proper signal interpolation is important. A sharp roll-off (higher order) filter is required to separate the baseband signal from its replicates to avoid the aliasing, but in return the computation will be higher. We demonstrated the analysis through a digital timing study using fast LSO scintillation crystals as used in time-of-flight PET scanners. From the study, we observed that there is no significant timing resolution degradation down to 1.3 Ghz sampling frequency, and the computation requirement for the signal interpolation is reasonably low. A so-called sliding test is proposed as a validation tool checking constant timing resolution behavior of a given timing pick-off method regardless of the source location change. Lastly, the performance comparison for several digital timing methods is also shown.

  6. Angle dependence of the frequency correlation in random photonic media: Diffusive regime and its breakdown near localization

    Muskens, O.L.; Beek, van der T.; Lagendijk, A.

    2011-01-01

    The frequency correlations of light in complex photonic media are of interest as a tool for characterizing the dynamical aspects of light diffusion. We demonstrate here that the frequency correlation shows a pronounced angle dependence both in transmission and in reflection geometries. Using a broad

  7. Frequency-Dependent Squeeze Amplitude Attenuation and Squeeze Angle Rotation by Electromagnetically Induced Transparency for Gravitational Wave Interferometers

    Mikhailov, Eugeniy E.; Goda, Keisuke; Corbitt, Thomas; Mavalvala, Nergis

    2005-01-01

    We study the effects of frequency-dependent squeeze amplitude attenuation and squeeze angle rotation by electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) on gravitational wave (GW) interferometers. We propose the use of low-pass, band-pass, and high-pass EIT filters, an S-shaped EIT filter, and an intra-cavity EIT filter to generate frequency-dependent squeezing for injection into the antisymmetric port of GW interferometers. We find that the EIT filters have several advantages over the previous...

  8. Long range dependence in the high frequency USD/INR exchange rate

    Kumar, Dilip

    2014-02-01

    Using high frequency data, this paper examines the long memory property in the unconditional and conditional volatility of the USD/INR exchange rate at different time scales using the Local Whittle (LW), the Exact Local Whittle (ELW) and the FIAPARCH models. Results indicate that the long memory property remains quite stable across different time scales for both unconditional and conditional volatility measures. Results from the non-overlapping moving window approach indicate that the extreme events (such as the subprime crisis and the European debt crisis) resulted in highly persistent behavior of the USD/INR exchange rate and thus lead to market inefficiency. This paper also examines the long memory property in the realized volatility based on different time scale data. Results indicate that the realized volatility measures based on different scales of the high frequency data exhibit a consistent and stable long memory property. However, the realized volatility measures based on daily data exhibit lower degree of long-range dependence. This study has implications for traders and investors (with different trading horizons) and can be helpful in predicting expected future volatility and in designing and implementing trading strategies at different time scales.

  9. Global examination of the wind-dependence of very low frequency underwater ambient noise.

    Nichols, Stephen M; Bradley, David L

    2016-03-01

    Ocean surface winds play a key role in underwater ambient noise generation. One particular frequency band of interest is the infrasonic or very low frequency (VLF) band from 1 to 20 Hz. In this spectral band, wind generated ocean surface waves interact non-linearly to produce acoustic waves, which couple into the seafloor to generate microseisms, as explained by the theory developed by Longuet-Higgins. This study examines long term data sets in the VLF portion of the ambient noise spectrum, collected by the hydroacoustic systems of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test Ban Treaty Organization in the Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian Oceans. Three properties of the noise field were examined: (a) the behavior of the acoustic spectrum slope from 1 to 5 Hz, (b) correlation of noise levels and wind speeds, and (c) the autocorrelation behavior of both the noise field and the wind. Analysis results indicate the spectrum slope is site dependent, and for both correlation methods, a high correlation between wind and the noise field in the 1-5 Hz band. PMID:27036248

  10. Frequency-dependent photothermal measurement of transverse thermal diffusivity of organic semiconductors

    Brill, J. W.; Shahi, Maryam; Yao, Y. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky 40506-0055 (United States); Payne, Marcia M.; Anthony, J. E. [Department of Chemistry, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky 40506-0055 (United States); Edberg, Jesper; Crispin, Xavier [Department of Science and Technology, Organic Electronics, Linköping University, SE-601 74 Norrköping (Sweden)

    2015-12-21

    We have used a photothermal technique, in which chopped light heats the front surface of a small (∼1 mm{sup 2}) sample and the chopping frequency dependence of thermal radiation from the back surface is measured with a liquid-nitrogen-cooled infrared detector. In our system, the sample is placed directly in front of the detector within its dewar. Because the detector is also sensitive to some of the incident light, which leaks around or through the sample, measurements are made for the detector signal that is in quadrature with the chopped light. Results are presented for layered crystals of semiconducting 6,13-bis(triisopropylsilylethynyl) pentacene (TIPS-pn) and for papers of cellulose nanofibrils coated with semiconducting poly(3,4-ethylene-dioxythiophene):poly(styrene-sulfonate) (NFC-PEDOT). For NFC-PEDOT, we have found that the transverse diffusivity, smaller than the in-plane value, varies inversely with thickness, suggesting that texturing of the papers varies with thickness. For TIPS-pn, we have found that the interlayer diffusivity is an order of magnitude larger than the in-plane value, consistent with previous estimates, suggesting that low-frequency optical phonons, presumably associated with librations in the TIPS side groups, carry most of the heat.

  11. Frequency dependent rectifier memristor bridge used as a programmable synaptic membrane voltage generator

    Oliver Pabst

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Reasoned by its dynamical behavior, the memristor enables a lot of new applications in analog circuit design. Since some realizations have been shown (e.g. 2007 by Hewlett Packard, the development of applications with memristors becomes more and more interesting. Besides applications in neural networks and storage devices, analog memristive circuits also promise further applications. Therefore, this article proposes a frequency dependent rectifier memristor bridge for different purposes, for example, using as a programmable synaptic membrane voltage generator for Spike-Time-Dependent-Plasticity and describes the circuit theory. In this context it is shown that the Picard Iteration is one possibility to analytically solve the system of nonlinear state equations of memristor circuits. An intuitive picture of how a memristor works in a network in general is given as well and in this context some research on the dynamical behavior of a HP memristor should be done. After all it is suggested to use the memristor bridge as a neuron.

  12. Temperature and frequency dependence of AC conductivity of new quaternary Se-Te-Bi-Pb chalcogenide glasses

    Yadav, Preeti; Sharma, Ambika

    2016-05-01

    The aim of the present work is to study the temperature and frequency dependence of ac conductivity of new quaternary Se84-xTe15Bi1.0Pbx chalcogenide glasses. The Se84-xTe15Bi1.0Pbx (x = 2, 6) glassy alloys are prepared by using melt quenching technique. The temperature and frequency dependent behavior of ac conductivity σac(ω) has been carried out in the frequency range 42 Hz to 5 MHz and in the temperature range of 298-323 K below glass transition temperature. The behavior of ac conductivity is described in terms of the power law ωs. The obtained temperature dependence behavior of ac conductivity and frequency component (s) are explained by means of correlated barrier hopping model recommended by Elliot.

  13. Spatial heterogeneity, frequency-dependent selection and polymorphism in host-parasite interactions

    Tellier Aurélien

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genomic and pathology analysis has revealed enormous diversity in genes involved in disease, including those encoding host resistance and parasite effectors (also known in plant pathology as avirulence genes. It has been proposed that such variation may persist when an organism exists in a spatially structured metapopulation, following the geographic mosaic of coevolution. Here, we study gene-for-gene relationships governing the outcome of plant-parasite interactions in a spatially structured system and, in particular, investigate the population genetic processes which maintain balanced polymorphism in both species. Results Following previous theory on the effect of heterogeneous environments on maintenance of polymorphism, we analysed a model with two demes in which the demes have different environments and are coupled by gene flow. Environmental variation is manifested by different coefficients of natural selection, the costs to the host of resistance and to the parasite of virulence, the cost to the host of being diseased and the cost to an avirulent parasite of unsuccessfully attacking a resistant host. We show that migration generates negative direct frequency-dependent selection, a condition for maintenance of stable polymorphism in each deme. Balanced polymorphism occurs preferentially if there is heterogeneity for costs of resistance and virulence alleles among populations and to a lesser extent if there is variation in the cost to the host of being diseased. We show that the four fitness costs control the natural frequency of oscillation of host resistance and parasite avirulence alleles. If demes have different costs, their frequencies of oscillation differ and when coupled by gene flow, there is amplitude death of the oscillations in each deme. Numerical simulations show that for a multiple deme island model, costs of resistance and virulence need not to be present in each deme for stable polymorphism to occur

  14. Influence of pressure, temperature, and pore fluid on the frequency-dependent attenuation of elastic waves in Berea sandstone

    O'hara, Stephen G.

    1985-07-01

    The effects of pore fluid, effective stress, pore fluid pressure, and temperature on the frequency dependence of elastic wave attenuation in Berea sandstone are interrelated in a series of systematic experiments. The attenuation of both the extensional and torsional modes of cylindrical samples of the sandstone is measured on the frequency range 3-30 kHz. To simulate conditions within the earth, the sandstone is subjected to confining stress to 70.0 MPa and temperature from 24.0 °C to 120.0 °C. Confining pressure and pore fluid pressure are varied independently. Data for two different pore fluids, brine and n-heptane, suggest that a scaling law exists for the pressure and temperature dependence of the attenuation in terms of the pore fluid. The logarithmic decrement of the sandstone is almost frequency independent in a vacuum evacuated sample, but shows a linear frequency dependence, once the sample is saturated. Extrapolation of this linear trend to low frequencies suggests that the decrement in fluid-filled sandstone is effectively frequency independent at seismic frequencies (<100 Hz). The frequency dependence becomes more pronounced as either the effective stress or the temperature is decreased. When the difference between the external stress on the sandstone and the pore fluid pressure is large, the attenuation depends only on the effective stress and is relatively temperature independent. But at low effective stress, the attenuation increases linearly with increasing pore fluid pressure and decreases linearly with increasing temperature. While a specific model is lacking, the attenuation process is apparently influenced most strongly by chemical processes at the pore fluid-matrix interface accompanied by subtle changes in the sandstone matrix dimensions.

  15. The Protective Effect of Conditioning on Noise-Induced Hearing Loss Is Frequency-Dependent

    Akram Pourbakht

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available We compared the extent of temporary threshold shift (TTS and hair cell loss following high level 4 kHz noise exposure with those preconditioned with moderate level 1 and 4 kHz octave band noise. Fifteen Male albino guinea pigs (300- 350 g in weight were randomly allocated into three groups: those exposed to 4 kHz octave band noise at 102 dB SPL (group 1, n=5; those conditioned with 1 kHz octave band noise at 85 dB SPL, 6 hours per day for 5 days, then exposed to noise (group 2, n=5; those conditioned with 4 kHz octave band noise at 85 dB SPL, then exposed to noise (group 3, n=5. An hour and one week after noise exposure, threshold shifts were evaluated by auditory-evoked brainstem response (ABR and then animals were euthanized for histological evaluation. We found that TTS and cochlear damage caused by noise exposure were significantly reduced by 1 kHz and 4 kHz conditioning (P<0.001. We also showed that 4 kHz protocol attenuates noise- induced TTS but no significant TTS reduction occurred by 1 kHz conditioning. Both protocol protected noise-induced cochlear damage. We concluded that lower tone conditioning could not protect against higher tone temporary noise-induced hearing loss, thus conditioning is a local acting and frequency-dependent phenomenon.

  16. Plant-soil feedbacks promote negative frequency dependence in the coexistence of two aridland grasses.

    Chung, Y Anny; Rudgers, Jennifer A

    2016-07-27

    Understanding the mechanisms of species coexistence is key to predicting patterns of species diversity. Historically, the ecological paradigm has been that species coexist by partitioning resources: as a species increases in abundance, self-limitation kicks in, because species-specific resources decline. However, determining coexistence mechanisms has been a particular puzzle for sedentary organisms with high overlap in their resource requirements, such as plants. Recent evidence suggests that plant-associated microbes could generate the stabilizing self-limitation (negative frequency dependence) that is required for species coexistence. Here, we test the key assumption that plant-microbe feedbacks cause such self-limitation. We used competition experiments and modelling to evaluate how two common groups of soil microbes (rhizospheric microbes and biological soil crusts) influenced the self-limitation of two competing desert grass species. Negative feedbacks between the dominant plant competitor and its rhizospheric microbes magnified self-limitation, whereas beneficial interactions between both plant species and biological soil crusts partly counteracted this stabilizing effect. Plant-microbe interactions have received relatively little attention as drivers of vegetation dynamics in dry land ecosystems. Our results suggest that microbial mechanisms can contribute to patterns of plant coexistence in arid grasslands. PMID:27466448

  17. Text Dependent Speaker Identification Using a Bayesian network and Mel Frequency Cepstrum Coefficient

    Mohd. Manjur Alam

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Speaker identification is a biometric technique. The objective of automatic speaker recognition is to extract, characterize and recognize the information about speaker identity. Speaker Recognition technology has recently been used in large number of commercial areas successfully such as in voice based biometrics; voice controlled appliances, security control for confidential information, remote access to computers and many more interesting areas. A speaker identification system has two phases which are the training phase and the testing phase. Feature extraction is the first step for each phase in speaker recognition. Many algorithms are suggested by the researchers for feature extraction. In this work, the Mel Frequency Cepstrum Coefficient (MFCC feature has been used for designing a text dependent speaker identification system. While, in the identification phase, the existing reference templates are compared with the unknown voice input. In this thesis, a Bayesian network is used as the training/recognition algorithm which makes the final decision about the specification of the speaker by comparing unknown features to all models in the database and selecting the best matching model. i, e. the highest scored model. The speaker who obtains the highest score is selected as the target speaker.

  18. Finite element analysis of the dynamic behavior of a laminated windscreen with frequency dependent viscoelastic core.

    Bouayed, Kaïss; Hamdi, Mohamed-Ali

    2012-08-01

    This paper presents numerical and experimental validation of results obtained by a shell finite element, which has been developed for modeling of the dynamic behavior of sandwich multilayered structures with a viscoelastic core. The proposed shell finite element is very easy to implement in existing finite element solvers, since it uses only the displacements as degrees of freedom at external faces and at inter-layer interfaces. The displacement field is linearly interpolated in the thickness direction of each layer, and analytical integration is made in the thickness direction in order to avoid meshing of each sandwich layer by solid elements. Only the two dimensional mid-surface of reference is meshed, facilitating the mesh generation task. A simplified modal approach using a real modal basis is also proposed to efficiently calculate the dynamic response of the sandwich structure. The proposed method reduces the memory size and computing time and takes into account the frequency-dependence of the polymer core mechanical properties. Results obtained by the proposed element in conjunction with the simplified modal method have been numerically and experimentally validated by comparison to results obtained by commercial software codes (MSC/NASTRAN and ESI/RAYON-VTM), and to measurements done on automobile windscreens. PMID:22894198

  19. Accurate measurements and temperature dependence of the water vapor self-continuum absorption in the 2.1 μm atmospheric window.

    Ventrillard, I; Romanini, D; Mondelain, D; Campargue, A

    2015-10-01

    In spite of its importance for the evaluation of the Earth radiative budget, thus for climate change, very few measurements of the water vapor continuum are available in the near infrared atmospheric windows especially at temperature conditions relevant for our atmosphere. In addition, as a result of the difficulty to measure weak broadband absorption signals, the few available measurements show large disagreements. We report here accurate measurements of the water vapor self-continuum absorption in the 2.1 μm window by Optical Feedback Cavity Enhanced Absorption Spectroscopy (OF-CEAS) for two spectral points located at the low energy edge and at the center of the 2.1 μm transparency window, at 4302 and 4723 cm(-1), respectively. Self-continuum cross sections, CS, were retrieved with a few % relative uncertainty, from the quadratic dependence of the spectrum base line level measured as a function of water vapor pressure, between 0 and 16 Torr. At 296 K, the CS value at 4302 cm(-1) is found 40% higher than predicted by the MT_CKD V2.5 model, while at 4723 cm(-1), our value is 5 times larger than the MT_CKD value. On the other hand, these OF-CEAS CS values are significantly smaller than recent measurements by Fourier transform spectroscopy at room temperature. The temperature dependence of the self-continuum cross sections was also investigated for temperatures between 296 K and 323 K (23-50 °C). The derived temperature variation is found to be similar to that derived from previous Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) measurements performed at higher temperatures, between 350 K and 472 K. The whole set of measurements spanning the 296-472 K temperature range follows a simple exponential law in 1/T with a slope close to the dissociation energy of the water dimer, D0 ≈ 1100 cm(-1). PMID:26450311

  20. Accurate measurements and temperature dependence of the water vapor self-continuum absorption in the 2.1 μm atmospheric window

    In spite of its importance for the evaluation of the Earth radiative budget, thus for climate change, very few measurements of the water vapor continuum are available in the near infrared atmospheric windows especially at temperature conditions relevant for our atmosphere. In addition, as a result of the difficulty to measure weak broadband absorption signals, the few available measurements show large disagreements. We report here accurate measurements of the water vapor self-continuum absorption in the 2.1 μm window by Optical Feedback Cavity Enhanced Absorption Spectroscopy (OF-CEAS) for two spectral points located at the low energy edge and at the center of the 2.1 μm transparency window, at 4302 and 4723 cm−1, respectively. Self-continuum cross sections, CS, were retrieved with a few % relative uncertainty, from the quadratic dependence of the spectrum base line level measured as a function of water vapor pressure, between 0 and 16 Torr. At 296 K, the CS value at 4302 cm−1 is found 40% higher than predicted by the MT-CKD V2.5 model, while at 4723 cm−1, our value is 5 times larger than the MT-CKD value. On the other hand, these OF-CEAS CS values are significantly smaller than recent measurements by Fourier transform spectroscopy at room temperature. The temperature dependence of the self-continuum cross sections was also investigated for temperatures between 296 K and 323 K (23-50 °C). The derived temperature variation is found to be similar to that derived from previous Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) measurements performed at higher temperatures, between 350 K and 472 K. The whole set of measurements spanning the 296-472 K temperature range follows a simple exponential law in 1/T with a slope close to the dissociation energy of the water dimer, D0 ≈ 1100 cm−1

  1. Structural and frequency dependencies of a.c. and dielectric characterizations of epitaxial InSb-based heterojunctions

    A ASHERY; A H ZAKI; M HUSSIEN MOURAD; A M AZAB; A A M FARAG

    2016-08-01

    In this work, heterojunction of InSb/InP was grown by liquid phase epitaxy (LPE). Surface morphology and crystalline structure of the heterojunction were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The frequency and temperature dependences of a.c. conductivity and dielectric properties of the heterojunctions were investigated in the ranges of 100 kHz–5 MHz and 298–628 K, respectively. The a.c. conductivity and its frequency exponents were interpreted in terms of correlated barrier hopping model (CBH), as the dominant conduction mechanism for charge carrier transport. The calculated activation energy, from the Arrhenius plot, was found to decrease with increasing frequency. Experimental results of both dielectric constant $\\epsilon_1$ and dielectric loss $\\epsilon_2$ showed a remarkable dependence of both frequency and temperature.

  2. Dependence of a rabbit's reaction on the frequency of repetition of an impulse and current exposition in experiment

    Koklin А.Е.; Lukyanova S.N.; Grigoryev О.A.; Andrianova Т.К.; Alekseyeva V.A.

    2013-01-01

    Now electroshock devices are used as a civilian weapon for self-defense and as a non-lethal weapon in the police. Therefore, medical-biological safety testing of electroshock devices should be carried out. Development of hygienic regulations is relevant as well. The aim of our work is the study of the biological effects of pulsed current depending on the pulse frequency, pulse amplitude and exposure. Material and methods. We compared the biological effects with varying frequency of the curren...

  3. Frequency offset dependence of adiabatic rotating frame relaxation rate constants: relevance to MRS investigations of metabolite dynamics in vivo

    Mangia, Silvia; Liimatainen, Timo; Garwood, Michael; Tkac, Ivan; Henry, Pierre-Gilles; Deelchand, Dinesh; Michaeli, Shalom

    2011-01-01

    In this work, we investigated the frequency-offset dependence of the rotating frame longitudinal (R1ρ) and transverse (R2ρ) relaxation rate constants when using hyperbolic-secant adiabatic full passage pulses or continuous-wave spin-lock irradiation. Phantom and in vivo measurements were performed to validate theoretical predictions of the dominant relaxation mechanisms existing during adiabatic full passage pulses when using different settings of the frequency offset relative to the carrier....

  4. Dependence of Levitation Force on Frequency of an Oscillating Magnetic Levitation Field in a Bulk YBCO Superconductor

    Carter, Hamilton; Pate, Stephen; Goedecke, George

    2012-01-01

    The dependence of the magnetic field strength required for levitation of a melt textured, single domain YBCO superconductor disc on the frequency of the current generating the levitating magnetic field has been investigated. The magnetic field strength is found to be independent of frequency between 10 and 300 Hz. This required field strength is found to be in good experimental and theoretical[1] agreement with the field strength required to levitate the same superconductor with a non-oscilla...

  5. Nonequilibrium frequency-dependent noise through a quantum dot: A real-time functional renormalization group approach

    Moca C.P.; Simon P; Chung C.H.; Zarand G.

    2011-01-01

    We construct a real time current-conserving functional renormalization group (RG) scheme on the Keldysh contour to study frequency-dependent transport and noise through a quantum dot in the local moment regime. We find that the current vertex develops a non-trivial non-local structure in time, governed by a new set of RG equations. Solving these RG equations, we compute the complete frequency and temperature-dependence of the noise spectrum. For voltages large compared to the Kondo temperatur...

  6. Range-separated time-dependent density-functional theory with a frequency-dependent second-order Bethe-Salpeter correlation kernel

    Rebolini, Elisa

    2015-01-01

    We present a range-separated linear-response time-dependent density-functional theory (TDDFT) which combines a density-functional approximation for the short-range response kernel and a frequency-dependent second-order Bethe-Salpeter approximation for the long-range response kernel. This approach goes beyond the adiabatic approximation usually used in linear-response TDDFT and aims at improving the accuracy of calculations of electronic excitation energies of molecular systems. A detailed derivation of the frequency-dependent second-order Bethe-Salpeter correlation kernel is given using many-body Green-function theory. Preliminary tests of this range-separated TDDFT method are presented for the calculation of excitation energies of four small molecules: N2, CO2, H2CO, and C2H4. The results suggest that the addition of the long-range second-order Bethe-Salpeter correlation kernel overall slightly improves the excitation energies.

  7. Conditioned frequency-dependent hearing sensitivity reduction in the bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus).

    Nachtigall, Paul E; Supin, Alexander Ya

    2015-04-01

    The frequency specificity of conditioned dampening of hearing, when a loud sound is preceded by a warning sound, was investigated in a bottlenose dolphin. The loud sounds were 5 s tones of 16, 22.5 or 32 kHz, sound pressure level of 165 dB root mean square (RMS) re. 1 µPa. Hearing sensitivity was tested at the same three frequencies. Hearing sensitivity was measured using pip-train test stimuli and auditory evoked potential recording. The test sound stimuli served also as warning sounds. The durations of the warning sounds were varied randomly to avoid locking a conditioning effect to the timing immediately before the loud sound. Hearing thresholds before the loud sound increased, relative to the baseline, at test frequencies equal to or higher than the loud sound frequency. The highest threshold increase appeared at test frequencies of 0.5 octaves above the loud sound frequencies. PMID:25657210

  8. Magnetostriction Dependence of the Relaxation Frequency in the Magnetoimpedance Effect for Amorphous and Nanocrystalline Ribbons

    M.L.Sánchez; V.M.Prida; B.Hernando; G.V.Kurlyandskaya; J.D.Santos; M.Tejedor; M.Vázquez

    2002-01-01

    The magnetoimpedance effect and changes of the relaxation frequency fx are studied in CoFeSiB and CoFeMoSiB amorphous and FeCuNbSiB nanocrystalline ribbons. The evolution of the magnetostriction constant λs and relaxation frequency is analysed for the states with different magnetic anisotropies induced in the same ribbons.A monotonic decrease of the relaxation frequency is observed for shifting of λs towards positive values.

  9. Robust, frequency-stable and accurate mid-IR laser spectrometer based on frequency comb metrology of quantum cascade lasers up-converted in orientation-patterned GaAs

    Hansen, Michael G; Vasilyev, Sergey V; Grisard, Arnaud; Lallier, Eric; Gérard, Bruno; Schiller, Stephan

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate a robust and simple method for measurement, stabilization and tuning of the frequency of cw mid-infrared (MIR) lasers, in particular of quantum cascade lasers. The proof of principle is performed with a quantum cascade laser at 5.4 \\mu m, which is upconverted to 1.2 \\mu m by sum-frequency generation in orientation-patterned GaAs with the output of a standard high-power cw 1.5 \\mu m fiber laser. Both the 1.2 \\mu m and the 1.5 \\mu m waves are measured by a standard Er:fiber frequency comb. Frequency measurement at the 100 kHz-level, stabilization to sub-10 kHz level, controlled frequency tuning and long-term stability are demonstrated.

  10. Rupture and Frequency-dependent Seismic Radiation of the 2012 Mw 8.6 Sumatra Strike-slip Earthquake

    Yin, Jiuxun; Yao, Huajian

    2016-03-01

    On April 11, 2012, a great strike-slip earthquake (moment magnitude of Mw 8.6) occurred off the west coast of northern Sumatra area followed by an Mw 8.2 aftershock 2 hours later. Different geophysical data and methods have been used to investigate the mechanism, faulting, seismic radiation, and slip propagation of this event, but frequency-dependent features of its rupture process have not been discussed much. In this study we use a compressive sensing method based on sparsity inversion in the frequency domain to study the frequency-dependent seismic radiation and rupture process of this event. Our results indicate a very complex rupture process concerning at least 3 different rupture stages on multiple subfaults with nearly conjugate geometries. The main shock has triggered seismicity on a series of ridge-perpendicular or ridge-parallel conjugate strike-slip faults around the Nighty East Ridge. Obvious frequency-dependent rupture process has been presented and discussed. Combined with results from slip inversion based on the finite-fault model, we observe that in the beginning stage of the rupture lower frequency radiation appears to originate from the areas with large slip, while the high-frequency radiation is located at the boundary of large-slip region or rupture front. Some radiation probably originates from the repeating slip on the main faults or triggered events on some nearby faults in the rupture area. The complex frequency-dependent seismic radiation patterns observed in this study provide important information for future investigation of rupture physics of this complex strike-slip event.

  11. Accurate experimental determination of the isotope effects on the triple point temperature of water. I. Dependence on the 2H abundance

    Faghihi, V.; Peruzzi, A.; Aerts-Bijma, A. T.; Jansen, H. G.; Spriensma, J. J.; van Geel, J.; Meijer, H. A. J.

    2015-12-01

    Variation in the isotopic composition of water is one of the major contributors to uncertainty in the realization of the triple point of water (TPW). Although the dependence of the TPW on the isotopic composition of the water has been known for years, there is still a lack of a detailed and accurate experimental determination of the values for the correction constants. This paper is the first of two articles (Part I and Part II) that address quantification of isotope abundance effects on the triple point temperature of water. In this paper, we describe our experimental assessment of the 2H isotope effect. We manufactured five triple point cells with prepared water mixtures with a range of 2H isotopic abundances encompassing widely the natural abundance range, while the 18O and 17O isotopic abundance were kept approximately constant and the 18O  -  17O ratio was close to the Meijer-Li relationship for natural waters. The selected range of 2H isotopic abundances led to cells that realised TPW temperatures between approximately  -140 μK to  +2500 μK with respect to the TPW temperature as realized by VSMOW (Vienna Standard Mean Ocean Water). Our experiment led to determination of the value for the δ2H correction parameter of A2H  =  673 μK / (‰ deviation of δ2H from VSMOW) with a combined uncertainty of 4 μK (k  =  1, or 1σ).

  12. Design and fabrication of a low-frequency (1-3 MHz) ultrasound transducer for accurate placement of screw implants in the spine

    Manbachi, Amir; Lee, Mike; Foster, F. Stuart; Ginsberg, Howard J.; Cobbold, Richard S. C.

    2014-03-01

    In 2012 approximately 800,000 spinal fusion surgeries were performed in the United States, requiring the insertion of screws into the pedicles. Their exact placement is critical and made complex due to limited visibility of the spine, continuous bleeding in the exposed regions, and variability in morphologies. The alarmingly high rate of screw misplacements (up to 20%) reported in the literature is of major concern since such misplacements can place the surrounding vital structures at risk. A potential guidance method for determining the best screw trajectory is by the use of real-time ultrasound imaging similar to that used for intravascular imaging. An endovascular transducer could be inserted into the pedicle to image the anatomy from within and identify bone boundaries. A major challenge of imaging within bone is high signal attenuation. The rapid increase of attenuation with frequency requires much lower frequencies (1-3 MHz) than those used in intravascular imaging. This study describes the custom design and fabrication of 2 MHz ultrasound probes (3.5 mm diameter/ 11 Fr) for pedicle screw guidance. Three transducer designs are explored to provide improved sensitivity and signal to noise ratio, compared to the previously tested transducer within the pedicle. Experimental measurements are compared with the results obtained using various simulation tools. The work reported in this paper represents the first stage in our ultimate goal of developing a 32- element phased array that is capable of generating a radial B-mode image.

  13. 38 CFR 3.30 - Frequency of payment of improved pension and parents' dependency and indemnity compensation (DIC).

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Frequency of payment of improved pension and parents' dependency and indemnity compensation (DIC). 3.30 Section 3.30 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS ADJUDICATION Pension, Compensation,...

  14. Yttrium iron garnet thickness and frequency dependence of the spin-charge current conversion in YIG/Pt systems

    Castel, V.; Vlietstra, N.; van Wees, B. J.

    2014-01-01

    We report the frequency dependence of the spin current emission (spin pumping) in a hybrid ferrimagnetic insulator/normal metal system as a function of the insulating layer thickness. The system is based on an yttrium iron garnet (YIG) film [0.2, 1, and 3 mu m] grown by liquid-phase epitaxy coupled

  15. Frequency-dependent spontaneous emission rate from CdSe and CdTe nanocrystals: Influence of dark states

    van Driel, A. F.; Allan, G.; Delerue, C.;

    2005-01-01

    We studied the rate of spontaneous emission from colloidal CdSe and CdTe nanocrystals at room temperature. The decay rate, obtained from luminescence decay curves, increases with the emission frequency in a supralinear way. This dependence is explained by the thermal occupation of dark exciton...

  16. Simplified frequency-dependent formulae for series-impedance matrices of single-core HVAC cables

    Silva, Filipe Miguel Faria da

    2015-01-01

    not power frequency. Different methods exist for estimating the impedance of single-core cables. The IEC60287-1-1 standard presents equations that may be use for power frequencies, whereas the loop-method, based on Bessel equations, is typically used for higher frequencies. Simplifications of the...... reference formula using Bessel equations exist, but they still have some complexity, e.g., hyperbolic cotangents and hyperbolic cosecants are used. Moreover, the series impedance matrix that is designed with these equations and used to estimate the resistance and reactance, requires the summation of at...

  17. Frequency dependence of speckle in continuous-wave ultrasound with implications for blood perfusion measurements.

    Jansson, Tomas; Jurkonis, Rytis; Mast, T. Douglas; Persson, Hans W; Lindström, Kjell

    2002-01-01

    Speckle in continuous wave (CW) Doppler has previously been found to cause large variations in detected Doppler power in blood perfusion measurements, where a large number of blood vessels are present in the sample volume. This artifact can be suppressed by using a number of simultaneously transmitted frequencies and averaging the detected signals. To optimize the strategy, statistical properties of speckle in CW ultrasound need to be known. This paper presents analysis of the frequency separ...

  18. Frequency-dependent variation in the two-dimensional beam pattern of an echolocating dolphin

    Starkhammar, Josefin; Moore, Patrick W.; Talmadge, Lois; Houser, Dorian S.

    2011-01-01

    Recent recordings of dolphin echolocation using a dense array of hydrophones suggest that the echolocation beam is dynamic and can at times consist of a single dominant peak, while at other times it consists of forward projected primary and secondary peaks with similar energy, partially overlapping in space and frequency bandwidth. The spatial separation of the peaks provides an area in front of the dolphin, where the spectral magnitude slopes drop off quickly for certain frequency bands. Thi...

  19. Frequency and surface dependence of the mechanical loss in fused silica

    Penn, S D; Busby, D; Harry, G M; Gretarsson, A M; Numata, K; Willems, P; Penn, Steven D.; Ageev, Alexander; Busby, Dan; Harry, Gregory M.; Gretarsson, Andri M.; Numata, Kenji; Willems, Phil

    2005-01-01

    We have compiled measurements of the mechanical loss in fused silica from samples spanning a wide range of geometries and resonant frequency in order to model the known variation of the loss with frequency and surface-to-volume ratio. This improved understanding of the mechanical loss has contributed significantly to the design of advanced interferometric gravitational wave detectors, which require ultra-low loss materials for their test mass mirrors.

  20. Tailored voltage waveform capacitively coupled plasmas in electronegative gases:frequency dependence of asymmetry effects

    Schüngel, E; Korolov, I.; Bruneau, Bastien; Derzsi, A.; Johnson, Erik V.; O'Connell, Deborah; Gans, Timo; Booth, Jean-Paul; Donko, Z.; Schulze, J.

    2016-01-01

    Capacitively coupled radio frequency plasmas operated in an electronegative gas (CF4) and driven by voltage waveforms composed of four consecutive harmonics are investigated for different fundamental driving frequencies using PIC/MCC simulations and an analytical model. As has been observed previously for electropositive gases, the application of peak-shaped waveforms (that are characterized by a strong amplitude asymmetry) results in the development of a DC self-bias due to the electrical as...

  1. Sustained Exocytosis after Action Potential-Like Stimulation at Low Frequencies in Mouse Chromaffin Cells Depends on a Dynamin-Dependent Fast Endocytotic Process

    Moya-Díaz, José; Álvarez, Yanina D.; Montenegro, Mauricio; Bayonés, Lucas; Belingheri, Ana V.; González-Jamett, Arlek M.; Cárdenas, Ana M.; Marengo, Fernando D.

    2016-01-01

    Under basal conditions the action potential firing rate of adrenal chromaffin cells is lower than 0.5 Hz. The maintenance of the secretory response at such frequencies requires a continuous replenishment of releasable vesicles. However, the mechanism that allows such vesicle replenishment remains unclear. Here, using membrane capacitance measurements on mouse chromaffin cells, we studied the mechanism of replenishment of a group of vesicles released by a single action potential-like stimulus (APls). The exocytosis triggered by APls (ETAP) represents a fraction (40%) of the immediately releasable pool, a group of vesicles highly coupled to voltage dependent calcium channels. ETAP was replenished with a time constant of 0.73 ± 0.11 s, fast enough to maintain synchronous exocytosis at 0.2–0.5 Hz stimulation. Regarding the mechanism involved in rapid ETAP replenishment, we found that it depends on the ready releasable pool; indeed depletion of this vesicle pool significantly delays ETAP replenishment. On the other hand, ETAP replenishment also correlates with a dynamin-dependent fast endocytosis process (τ = 0.53 ± 0.01 s). In this regard, disruption of dynamin function markedly inhibits the fast endocytosis and delays ETAP replenishment, but also significantly decreases the synchronous exocytosis during repetitive APls stimulation at low frequencies (0.2 and 0.5 Hz). Considering these findings, we propose a model in where both the transfer of vesicles from ready releasable pool and fast endocytosis allow rapid ETAP replenishment during low stimulation frequencies. PMID:27507935

  2. Effect of Ni doping on the dielectric constant of ZnO and its frequency dependent exchange interaction

    Ni doped ZnO powders were synthesized by a simple dissolution followed by precipitation using zinc acetate, nickel acetate and oxalic acid for different atomic percentages of Ni doping. Proper phase formation was confirmed by x-ray diffraction and the compositional analysis was performed by using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopic studies. The frequency dependent dielectric constant of the Ni doped ZnO samples was measured by an LCR meter, and from the dielectric constant versus frequency curve, fitted with the Cole equation, we obtained static and high frequency dielectric constants of the Ni doped ZnO samples. It was observed that both the static and high frequency dielectric constants decreased with increasing percentages of Ni doping in ZnO. A simple theoretical model based on the Penn model has been successfully developed to describe the above-mentioned variation. We have also observed the frequency dependence of the s, p-d exchange interaction and a theoretical calculation has been successfully developed to explain it.

  3. The Accuracy of the Digital imaging system and the frequency dependent type apex locator in root canal length measurement

    Lee, Byoung Rib; Park, Chang Seo [Dept. of Dental Radiology, College of Dentistry, Yensei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-08-15

    In order to achieve a successful endodontic treatment, root canals must be obturated three-dimensionally without causing any damage to apical tissues. Accurate length determination of the root canal is critical in this case. For this reason, I've used the conventional periapical radiography, Digora (digital imaging system) and Root ZX (the frequency dependent type apex locator) to measure the length of the canal and compare it with the true length obtained by cutting the tooth in half and measuring the length between the occlusal surface and the apical foramen. From the information obtained by these measurements, I was able to evaluate the accuracy and clinical usefulness of each systems, whether the thickness of files used in endodontic therapy has any effect on the measuring systems was also evaluated in an effort to simplify the treatment planning phase of endodontic treatment. 29 canals of 29 sound premolars were measured with no 15, no 20, no 25 files by 3 different dentists each using the periapical radiography, Digora and Root ZX. The measurements were then compared with the true length. The results were as follows; 1. In comparing mean discrepancies between measurements obtained by using periapical radiography (mean error : -0.449 {+-} 0.444 mm), Digora (mean error : -0.417 {+-} 0.415 mm) and Root ZX (mean error : 0.123 {+-} 0.458 mm) with true length, periapical radiography and Digora system had statistically significant differences (p<0.05) in most cases while root zx showed none (p>0.05). 2. By subtracting values obtained by using periapical radiography, Digora and Root ZX from the true length and making a distribution table of their absolute values, the following analysis was possible. In the case of periapical film, 140 out of 261 (53.6%) were clinically acceptable satisfying the margin of error of less than 0.5 mm, 151 out of 261 (53,6%) were acceptable in the Digora system while Root ZX had 197 out of 261 (75.5%) within the limits of 0.5 mm

  4. The Accuracy of the Digital imaging system and the frequency dependent type apex locator in root canal length measurement

    In order to achieve a successful endodontic treatment, root canals must be obturated three-dimensionally without causing any damage to apical tissues. Accurate length determination of the root canal is critical in this case. For this reason, I've used the conventional periapical radiography, Digora (digital imaging system) and Root ZX (the frequency dependent type apex locator) to measure the length of the canal and compare it with the true length obtained by cutting the tooth in half and measuring the length between the occlusal surface and the apical foramen. From the information obtained by these measurements, I was able to evaluate the accuracy and clinical usefulness of each systems, whether the thickness of files used in endodontic therapy has any effect on the measuring systems was also evaluated in an effort to simplify the treatment planning phase of endodontic treatment. 29 canals of 29 sound premolars were measured with no 15, no 20, no 25 files by 3 different dentists each using the periapical radiography, Digora and Root ZX. The measurements were then compared with the true length. The results were as follows ; 1. In comparing mean discrepancies between measurements obtained by using periapical radiography (mean error : -0.449 ± 0.444 mm), Digora (mean error : -0.417 ± 0.415 mm) and Root ZX (mean error : 0.123 ± 0.458 mm) with true length, periapical radiography and Digora system had statistically significant differences (p0.05). 2. By subtracting values obtained by using periapical radiography, Digora and Root ZX from the true length and making a distribution table of their absolute values, the following analysis was possible. In the case of periapical film, 140 out of 261 (53.6%) were clinically acceptable satisfying the margin of error of less than 0.5 mm, 151 out of 261 (53,6%) were acceptable in the Digora system while Root ZX had 197 out of 261 (75.5%) within the limits of 0.5 mm margin of error. 3. In determining whether the thickness of

  5. Self-perception and dissatisfaction with weight does not depend on the frequency of physical activity

    Araújo Denise Sardinha Mendes Soares de

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the level of satisfaction with body weight and the self-perception of the weight/height ratio and to verify the influence of the frequency of present and past physical activity on these variables. METHODS: Using questionnaires or interviews, we obtained height data, reported and desired weight, self-perception of the weight/height ratio, and the frequency of current physical activity in 844 adults (489 women. Of these, evaluated the frequency of physical activity during high school of 193 individuals,and we measured their height and weight. RESULTS: Less than 2/3 of the individuals had body mass index between 20 and 24.9 kg/m2. A tendency existed to overestimate height by less than 1 cm and to underestimate weight by less than 1kg. Desired weight was less than that reported (p<0.001, and only 20% were satisfied with their current weight. Only 42% of men and 25% of women exercised regularly. No association was found between the frequency of physical activity and the variables height, weight, and body mass index, and the level of satisfaction with current weight. CONCLUSION: Height and weight reported seem to be valid for epidemological studies, and great dissatisfaction with body weight and a distorted self-perception of height/weight ratio exists, especially in women, regardless of the frequency of physical activity.

  6. Temperature-Dependent Mollow Triplet Spectra from a Single Quantum Dot: Rabi Frequency Renormalization and Sideband Linewidth Insensitivity

    Wei, Yu-Jia; He, Yu; He, Yu-Ming;

    2014-01-01

    We investigate temperature-dependent resonance fluorescence spectra obtained from a single self- assembled quantum dot. A decrease of the Mollow triplet sideband splitting is observed with increasing temperature, an effect we attribute to a phonon-induced renormalization of the driven dot Rabi...... frequency. We also present first evidence for a nonperturbative regime of phonon coupling, in which the expected linear increase in sideband linewidth as a function of temperature is canceled by the corresponding reduction in Rabi frequency. These results indicate that dephasing in semiconductor quantum...

  7. Influence of insulator-semiconductor interface parameters and bulk parameters on frequency dependence of GaAs MIS conductance

    The numerical calculations of MIS conductance vs frequency at fixed gate voltage have been presented. The equivalent circuit of MIS structure including a. c. losses in insulator and series resistance has been used. The analysis is based on the idea that frequency behaviour of conductance is evoked by tunnelling of electrons between semiconductor and spatially distributed insulator-semiconductor interface states. The existence of acceptor and donor states with exponential energy dependence and Gaussian type distribution of density in space have been assumed. The possibility of explanations of experimental data for SiO2-GaAs MIS structure in the frame of accepted model has been presented. (author)

  8. Frequency-dependent attenuation and elasticity in unconsolidated earth materials: effect of damping

    Hu, Yanqing; Valenza, John J; Johnson, David L

    2014-01-01

    We use the Discrete Element Method (DEM) to understand the underlying attenuation mechanism in granular media, with special applicability to the measurements of the so-called effective mass developed earlier. We consider that the particles interact via Hertz-Mindlin elastic contact forces and that the damping is describable as a force proportional to the velocity difference of contacting grains. We determine the behavior of the complex-valued normal mode frequencies using 1) DEM, 2) direct diagonalization of the relevant matrix, and 3) a numerical search for the zeros of the relevant determinant. All three methods are in strong agreement with each other. The real and the imaginary parts of each normal mode frequency characterize the elastic and the dissipative properties, respectively, of the granular medium. We demonstrate that, as the interparticle damping, $\\xi$, increases, the normal modes exhibit nearly circular trajectories in the complex frequency plane and that for a given value of $\\xi$ they all lie ...

  9. Signature of magnetic-dependent gapless odd frequency states at superconductor/ferromagnet interfaces.

    Di Bernardo, A; Diesch, S; Gu, Y; Linder, J; Divitini, G; Ducati, C; Scheer, E; Blamire, M G; Robinson, J W A

    2015-01-01

    The theory of superconductivity developed by Bardeen, Cooper and Schrieffer (BCS) explains the stabilization of electron pairs into a spin-singlet, even frequency, state by the formation of an energy gap within which the density of states is zero. At a superconductor interface with an inhomogeneous ferromagnet, a gapless odd frequency superconducting state is predicted, in which the Cooper pairs are in a spin-triplet state. Although indirect evidence for such a state has been obtained, the gap structure and pairing symmetry have not so far been determined. Here we report scanning tunnelling spectroscopy of Nb superconducting films proximity coupled to epitaxial Ho. These measurements reveal pronounced changes to the Nb subgap superconducting density of states on driving the Ho through a metamagnetic transition from a helical antiferromagnetic to a homogeneous ferromagnetic state for which a BCS-like gap is recovered. The results prove odd frequency spin-triplet superconductivity at superconductor/inhomogeneous magnet interfaces. PMID:26329811

  10. Temperature-dependent vibrational dephasing: Comparison of liquid and glassy solvents using frequency-selected vibrational echoes

    Xu, Qing-Hua; Fayer, M. D.

    2002-08-01

    Frequency-selected vibrational echo experiments were used to investigate the temperature dependences of vibrational dephasing associated with the 0-1 transition of the CO stretching mode of RuTPPCOPy (TPP=5,10,15,20-tetraphenylporphyrin, Py=pyridine) in two solvents: polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) and 2-methyltetrahydrofuran (2-MTHF). In PMMA, a glass, the echo decay is exponential at all the temperatures studied, and the dephasing rate increases linearly with increasing temperature. In 2-MTHF, there is a change in the functional form of the temperature dependence when the solvent goes through the glass transition temperature (Tg). Below Tg, the dephasing rate increases linearly with temperature, while above Tg, it rises very steeply in a nonlinear manner. In the liquid at higher temperatures, the vibrational echo decays are nonexponential. A model frequency-frequency correlation function (FFCF) is proposed in which the FFCF differs for a glass and a liquid because of the intrinsic differences in the nature of the dynamics. At least two motions, inertial and diffusive, contribute to the vibrational dephasing in the liquids. The different temperature dependences of inertial and diffusive motions are discussed. Comparison of the model calculations of the vibrational echo temperature dependence and the data show reasonable, but not quantitative agreement.

  11. Frequency dependent conductivity of the thin film blend of electroluminescent poly(p-phenylene vinylene) with waterborne polyurethane as ionomer

    The frequency dependent conductivity, σ(ω), of the blend containing two different charge carrying material, a conjugated polymer, poly(p-phenylene vinylene), PPV and an ionomer, waterborne polyurethane ionomer, WPUI, was investigated in the frequency (ω) range from 0.1 to 1000 kHz by impedance spectroscopy and compared with the individual materials, PPV and WPUI, respectively. Clear differences could be seen in the dependence of ω on both real and imaginary parts of impedance between WPUI, PPV and the blend film. At high frequencies (>200 kHz), all the three materials, exhibit a power law dependence between σ(ω) and ω as σ(ω)∝ωs. Simulation of s value through theoretical fitting reveals that the s value of the blend (1.108) is in between PPV (1.289) and WPUI (1.035) and signifies the mixed contribution of carrier transport of PPV and WPUI in the blend. The morphology of the blend as observed from atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging reveals that WPUI connects the islanded parts of PPV and provides a path for carrier conduction. Results observed indicate that carrier transport operates through barrier hopping in these materials and the difference in the dependence of ω on σ in the blend is attributed from the influence of SO3- group in WPUI on the carrier transport of PPV

  12. Analysis of Age Dependent Effects of Heat Stress on EEG Frequency Components in Rats

    RAKESH KUMAR SINHA

    2009-01-01

    Objective To demonstrate changes in different frequencies of cerebral electrical activity or electroencephalogram (EEG) following exposure to high environmental heat in three different age groups of freely moving rats. Methods Rats were divided into three groups (i) acute heat stress - subjected to a single exposure for four hours at 38 ℃; (ii) chronic heat stress -exposed for 21 days daily for one hour at 38 ℃, and (iii) handling control groups. The digital polygraphic sleep-EEG recordings were performed just after the heat exposure from acute stressed rats and on 22nd day from chronic stressed rats by simultaneous recording of cortical EEG EOG (electrooculogram), and EMG (electromyogram). Further, power spectrum analyses were performed to analyze the effects of heat stress. Results The frequency analysis of EEG signals following exposure to high environmental heat revealed that in all three age groups of rats, changes in higher frequency components (β2) were significant in all sleep-wake states following both acute and chronic heat stress conditions. After exposure to acute heat, significant changes in EEG frequencies with respect to their control groups were observed, which were reversed partly or fully in four hours of EEG recording. On the other hand, due to repetitive chronic exposure to hot environment, adaptive and long-term changes in EEG frequency patterns were observed. Conclusion The present study has exhibited that the cortical EEG is sensitive to environmental heat and alterations in EEG frequencies in different sleep-wake states due to heat stress can be differentiated efficiently by EEG power spectrum analysis.

  13. Frequency-Dependent Neural Activity in Patients with Unilateral Vascular Pulsatile Tinnitus

    Lv, Han; Zhao, Pengfei; Liu, Zhaohui; Wang, Guopeng; Zeng, Rong; Yan, Fei; Dong, Cheng; Zhang, Ling; Li, Rui; Wang, Peng; Li, Ting; Gong, Shusheng; Wang, Zhenchang

    2016-01-01

    Previous resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) studies have shown that neurological changes are important findings in vascular pulsatile tinnitus (PT) patients. Here, we utilized rs-fMRI to measure the amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations (ALFF) in forty patients with unilateral PT and forty age-, gender-, and education-matched normal control subjects. Two different frequency bands (slow-4, 0.027–0.073 Hz, and slow-5, 0.010–0.027 Hz, which are more sensitive to subc...

  14. Attentional modulation of SSVEP power depends on the network tagged by the flicker frequency

    Ding, Jian; Sperling, George; Srinivasan, Ramesh

    2005-01-01

    The modulation of steady-state visual evoked potential (SSVEP) by attention was studied in detail using 15 “tag” frequencies in the range of 2.5–20 Hz. The stimuli were two series of random disc search arrays superimposed on two concentric color-marked annuli respectively. Two series of arrays were updated independently; one updated at one fixed frequency (flicker) and the other updated randomly according to a white noise distribution (random broadband flicker, rbbf). On each trial, the subje...

  15. Multiple-Station Observation of Frequency Dependence and Polarization Characteristics of ELF/VLF waves generated via Ionospheric Modification

    Maxworth, A. S.; Golkowski, M.; Cohen, M.; Moore, R. C.

    2014-12-01

    Generation of Extremely Low Frequency (ELF) and Very Low Frequency (VLF) signals through ionospheric modification has been practiced for many years. Heating the lower ionosphere with high power HF waves allows for modulation of natural current systems. Our experiments were carried out at the High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) facility in Alaska, USA. In this experiment, the ionosphere was heated with a vertical amplitude modulating signal and the modulation frequency was changed sequentially within an array of 40 frequencies followed by a frequency ramp. The observed magnetic field amplitude and polarization of the generated ELF/VLF signals were analyzed for multiple sites and as a function of modulation frequency. Our three observation sites: Chistochina, Paxson and Paradise are located within 36km (azimuth 47.7°), 50.2km (azimuth -20°) and 99km (azimuth 80.3°) respectively. We show that the peak amplitudes observed as a function of frequency result from vertical resonance in the Earth-ionosphere waveguide and can be used to diagnose the D-region profile. Polarization analysis showed that out of the three sites Paxson shows the highest circularity in the magnetic field polarization, compared to Chistochina and Paradise which show highly linear polarizations. The experimental results were compared with a theoretical simulation model results and it was clear that in both cases, the modulated Hall current dominates the observed signals at Chistochina and Paradise sites and at Paxson there is an equal contribution from Hall and Pedersen currents. The Chistochina site shows the highest magnetic field amplitudes in both experimental and simulation environments. Depending upon the experimental and simulation observations at the three sites, a radiation pattern for the HAARP ionospheric heater can be mapped

  16. Stimulus Ratio and Level Dependence of Low- and Mid-Frequency Distortion-Product Otoacoustic Emissions

    Christensen, Anders Tornvig; Ordoñez, Rodrigo Pizarro; Hammershøi, Dorte

    2014-01-01

    from heartbeating, breathing and swallowing contaminates the measurement. Above 4000 Hz, calibration of the equipment involved is challenging, if not impossible, to do reliably. Here, we investigate alternative measurement parameters to see if the DPOAE is limited to frequencies above 500 Hz. Few...

  17. Ethyl benzene-induced ototoxicity in rats : a dose-dependent mild-frequency hearing loss

    Cappaert, N.L.M.; Klis, S.F.L.; Baretta, A.B.; Muijser, H.; Smoorenburg, G.F.

    2000-01-01

    Rats were exposed to ethyl benzene at 0, 300, 400 and 550 ppm for 8 hours/day for 5 consecutive days. Three to six weeks after the exposure, auditory function was tested by measuring compound action potentials (CAP) in the frequency range of 1-24 kHz and 2f1-f2 distortion product otoacoustic emissio

  18. Can the frequency-dependent specific heat be measured by thermal effusion methods?

    Christensen, Tage; Olsen, Niels Boye; Dyre, Jeppe C.

    2007-01-01

    It has recently been shown that plane-plate heat effusion methods devised for wide-frequency specific-heat spectroscopy do not give the isobaric specific heat, but rather the so-called longitudinal specific heat. Here it is shown that heat effusion in a spherical symmetric geometry also involves the longitudinal specific heat.

  19. Frequency-dependent modulation of KCNQ1 and HERG1 potassium channels

    Diness, Thomas Goldin; Hansen, Rie Schultz; Olesen, Søren-Peter; Grunnet, Morten

    2006-01-01

    presence of the beta-subunits KCNE1 and KCNE2. In addition, the functional role of HERG1 in native guinea pig cardiac myocytes was demonstrated at different pacing frequencies by application of 10microM of the new HERG1 activator, NS1643. In conclusion, we have demonstrated that HERG1 and hKCNQ1 channels...

  20. Resolution and Dynamical Core Dependence of Atmospheric River Frequency in Global Model Simulations

    Hagos, Samson M.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Yang, Qing; Zhao, Chun; Lu, Jian

    2015-04-01

    This study examines the sensitivity of atmospheric river (AR) frequency simulated by a global model with different grid resolutions and dynamical cores. Analysis is performed on aquaplanet simulations using version 4 of Community Atmosphere Model (CAM4) at 240, 120, 60 and 30 km model resolutions each with the Model for Prediction Across Scales (MPAS) and High-Order Methods Modeling Environment (HOMME) dynamical cores. The frequency of AR events decreases with model resolution and the HOMME dynamical core produces more AR events than MPAS. Comparing the frequencies determined using absolute and percentile thresholds of large-scale conditions used to define an AR, model sensitivity is found to be related to the overall sensitivity of sub-tropical westerlies, atmospheric precipitable water content and profile and to a lesser extent on extra-tropical Rossby wave activity to model resolution and dynamical core. Real world simulations using MPAS at 120 km and 30 km grid resolutions also exhibit a decrease of AR frequency with increasing resolution over southern East Pacific, but there difference is smaller over northern East Pacific. This inter-hemispheric difference is related to the enhancement of convection in over the tropics with increased resolution. This anomalous convection sets off Rossby wave patterns that weaken the subtropical westerlies over southern East Pacific but have relatively little effect on those over northern East Pacific. In comparison to NCEP2 reanalysis, MPAS real world simulations are found to underestimate AR frequencies at both resolutions likely because of their climatologically drier sub-tropics and poleward shifted jets. This study highlights the important links between model climatology of large-scale conditions and extremes.

  1. Tailored voltage waveform capacitively coupled plasmas in electronegative gases: frequency dependence of asymmetry effects

    Schüngel, E.; Korolov, I.; Bruneau, B.; Derzsi, A.; Johnson, E.; O’Connell, D.; Gans, T.; Booth, J.-P.; Donkó, Z.; Schulze, J.

    2016-07-01

    Capacitively coupled radio frequency plasmas operated in an electronegative gas (CF4) and driven by voltage waveforms composed of four consecutive harmonics are investigated for different fundamental driving frequencies using PIC/MCC simulations and an analytical model. As has been observed previously for electropositive gases, the application of peak-shaped waveforms (that are characterized by a strong amplitude asymmetry) results in the development of a DC self-bias due to the electrical asymmetry effect (EAE), which increases the energy of ions arriving at the powered electrode. In contrast to the electropositive case (Korolov et al 2012 J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 45 465202) the absolute value of the DC self-bias is found to increase as the fundamental frequency is reduced in this electronegative discharge, providing an increased range over which the DC self-bias can be controlled. The analytical model reveals that this increased DC self-bias is caused by changes in the spatial profile and the mean value of the net charge density in the grounded electrode sheath. The spatio-temporally resolved simulation data show that as the frequency is reduced the grounded electrode sheath region becomes electronegative. The presence of negative ions in this sheath leads to very different dynamics of the power absorption of electrons, which in turn enhances the local electronegativity and plasma density via ionization and attachment processes. The ion flux to the grounded electrode (where the ion energy is lowest) can be up to twice that to the powered electrode. At the same time, while the mean ion energies at both electrodes are quite different, their ratio remains approximately constant for all base frequencies studied here.

  2. Measuring the frequency-dependent attenuation in lossy material using large time-bandwidth product ultrasound signals

    Gordon, Grant A.

    1999-06-01

    Broadband signals are commonly used in ultrasonic spectroscopy to measure the frequency dependent attenuation characteristics of lossy solid media. Compared to narrowband signals, broadband signals are preferred since they do not require tedious frequency scanning and extensive data reduction efforts. Typically these broadband signals take the form of a pulse. Although the spectral range of a pulse is wide, the spectral resolution is limited by the duration of the signal. By employing signals with large time- bandwidth-products, the overall accuracy and resolution of ultrasonic spectroscopy can be improved. Expressions for the interaction of longitudinal waves, with large time- bandwidth-product, and isotropic materials are developed. The approach is effective for evaluating material with signals optimized for a frequency resolution and range of interest, but can also be used when thin materials (polyurethane commonly used in ultrasonic transducer fabrication.

  3. Frequency dependence of the magnetostrictive phenomenon in Metglas® 2605SA1 ribbon: A minor-loop case

    S. U. Jen

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Frequency dependence of magnetostrictive phenomenon of as-cast 2605SA1 ribbon was studied. We applied a sinusoidal sweeping field (H, with a fixed frequency (f, along length (L of the ribbon, and simultaneously recorded the longitudinal magnetostriction (λ∥ and the transverse magnetostriction (λ⊥ as a function of time (t, respectively. f was varied from 0.07 to 122 Hz. In the low-f case (f =0.07 Hz, we observed the frequency-doubling (FD feature in λ∥(t and λ⊥(t curves; i.e., only even harmonic magnetostrictive signals showed up. In the high-f case (f = 122 Hz, we observed the no-frequency-doubling (NFD feature; i.e., both odd and even harmonic magnetostrictive signals showed up. A theory, based on the balance among various torques acting on magnetization, is developed to explain the f dependence of the magnetostriction phenomenon observed. From this theory, we conclude that only when the reflection symmetry of the system is reserved, i.e., when the equivalent easy axis (EEA is perpendicular to L, will λ∥(t and λ⊥(t have the true-frequency-doubling (TFD feature. However, for the as-cast 2605SA1 ribbon, EEA is not perpendicular to L. Thus, strictly speaking, we should observe the NFD feature only. Nevertheless, in the low-f limit, we can show that the FD feature is somewhat allowed under the condition, b/α being close to 1, where b and α are the two parameters used in the theory. From experimental data, this condition is met for as-cast 2605SA1. To make a distinction from TFD, this low-f feature is called close-frequency-doubling (CFD in this paper. In general, the theory explains all the experimental results fairly well.

  4. Frequency dependence of the magnetostrictive phenomenon in Metglas 2605SA1 ribbon: A minor-loop case

    Jen, S. U.; Liu, C. C.; Lin, H. R.; Chou, S. H.

    2014-12-01

    Frequency dependence of magnetostrictive phenomenon of as-cast 2605SA1 ribbon was studied. We applied a sinusoidal sweeping field (H), with a fixed frequency (f), along length (L) of the ribbon, and simultaneously recorded the longitudinal magnetostriction (λ∥) and the transverse magnetostriction (λ⊥) as a function of time (t), respectively. f was varied from 0.07 to 122 Hz. In the low-f case (f =0.07 Hz), we observed the frequency-doubling (FD) feature in λ∥(t) and λ⊥(t) curves; i.e., only even harmonic magnetostrictive signals showed up. In the high-f case (f = 122 Hz), we observed the no-frequency-doubling (NFD) feature; i.e., both odd and even harmonic magnetostrictive signals showed up. A theory, based on the balance among various torques acting on magnetization, is developed to explain the f dependence of the magnetostriction phenomenon observed. From this theory, we conclude that only when the reflection symmetry of the system is reserved, i.e., when the equivalent easy axis (EEA) is perpendicular to L, will λ∥(t) and λ⊥(t) have the true-frequency-doubling (TFD) feature. However, for the as-cast 2605SA1 ribbon, EEA is not perpendicular to L. Thus, strictly speaking, we should observe the NFD feature only. Nevertheless, in the low-f limit, we can show that the FD feature is somewhat allowed under the condition, b/α being close to 1, where b and α are the two parameters used in the theory. From experimental data, this condition is met for as-cast 2605SA1. To make a distinction from TFD, this low-f feature is called close-frequency-doubling (CFD) in this paper. In general, the theory explains all the experimental results fairly well.

  5. Modulation of epileptic activity by deep brain stimulation: a model-based study of frequency-dependent effects

    Faten eMina

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available A number of studies showed that deep brain stimulation (DBS can modulate the activity in the epileptic brain and that a decrease of seizures can be achieved in responding patients. In most of these studies, the choice of stimulation parameters is critical to obtain desired clinical effects. In particular, the stimulation frequency is a key parameter that is difficult to tune. A reason is that our knowledge about the frequency-dependant mechanisms according to which DBS indirectly impacts the dynamics of pathological neuronal systems located in the neocortex is still limited. We address this issue using both computational modeling and intracerebral EEG (iEEG data.We developed a macroscopic (neural mass model of the thalamocortical network. In line with already-existing models, it includes interconnected neocortical pyramidal cells and interneurons, thalamocortical cells and reticular neurons. The novelty was to introduce, in the thalamic compartment, the biophysical effects of direct stimulation. Regarding clinical data, we used a quite unique data set recorded in a patient (drug-resistant epilepsy with a focal cortical dysplasia (FCD. In this patient, DBS strongly reduced the sustained epileptic activity of the FCD for low-frequency (LFS, < 2 Hz and high-frequency stimulation (HFS, > 70 Hz while intermediate-frequency stimulation (IFS, around 50 Hz had no effect.Signal processing, clustering and optimization techniques allowed us to identify the necessary conditions for reproducing, in the model, the observed frequency-dependent stimulation effects. Key elements which explain the suppression of epileptic activity in the FCD include a feed-forward inhibition and synaptic short-term depression of thalamocortical connections at LFS, and b inhibition of the thalamic output at HFS. Conversely, modeling results indicate that IFS favors thalamic oscillations and entrains epileptic dynamics.

  6. Wavevector- and frequency-dependent shear viscosity of water: the modified collective mode approach and molecular dynamics calculations

    I.P.Omelyan

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The transverse momentum time autocorrelation functions and wavevector- and frequency-dependent shear viscosity are calculated for an interaction site model of water using a modified collective mode approach and molecular dynamics simulations. The modified mode approach is based on a formulation which consistently takes into account non-Markovian effects into the kinetic memory kernels. As is demonstrated by comparing the theory results with the molecular dynamics data, the entire frequency dependence of the shear viscosity can be reproduced quantitatively over the whole wavelength range in terms of six generalized collective modes employing the kinetic memory kernel in the non-Markovian approximation of the third order. It is also shown that the results corresponding to the exact atomic and abbreviated molecular descriptions may differ considerably. In the infinite wavevector regime the dynamic correlations are completely determined by a single free motion of the molecules.

  7. Hysteretic ac loss in a coated superconductor subjected to oscillating magnetic fields: ferromagnetic effect and frequency dependence

    Numerical simulations of the hysteretic ac loss in a coated superconductor with a more realistic version of the architecture were performed via the finite-element technique in the presence of an oscillating magnetic field. The coated superconductor was electromagnetically modeled by resorting to the quasistatic approximation of a vector potential approach in conjunction with nonlinear descriptions of the superconducting layer and the ferromagnetic substrate therein by a power-law model and the Langevin equation, respectively. A diverse effect of the ferromagnetic substrate on the hysteretic ac loss, depending on the strength of the applied magnetic field, was displayed, and its underlying cause was identified. The dependence of the hysteretic ac loss on the applied frequency is found to be related to a critical amplitude of the applied magnetic field, and the eddy-current loss dissipated in the metal coatings becomes prominent as the frequency increases only at high applied magnetic fields. (paper)

  8. Frequency-dependent facilitation of synaptic throughput via postsynaptic NMDA receptors in the nucleus of the solitary tract.

    Zhao, Huan; Peters, James H; Zhu, Mingyan; Page, Stephen J; Ritter, Robert C; Appleyard, Suzanne M

    2015-01-01

    Hindbrain NMDA receptors play important roles in reflexive and behavioural responses to vagal activation. NMDA receptors have also been shown to contribute to the synaptic responses of neurons in the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS), but their exact role remains unclear. In this study we used whole cell patch-clamping techniques in rat horizontal brain slice to investigate the role of NMDA receptors in the fidelity of transmission across solitary tract afferent-NTS neuron synapses. Results show that NMDA receptors contribute up to 70% of the charge transferred across the synapse at high (>5 Hz) firing rates, but have little contribution at lower firing frequencies. Results also show that NMDA receptors critically contribute to the fidelity of transmission across these synapses during high frequency (>5 Hz) afferent discharge rates. This novel role of NMDA receptors may explain in part how primary visceral afferents, including vagal afferents, can maintain fidelity of transmission across a broad range of firing frequencies. Neurons within the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) receive vagal afferent innervations that initiate gastrointestinal and cardiovascular reflexes. Glutamate is the fast excitatory neurotransmitter released in the NTS by vagal afferents, which arrive there via the solitary tract (ST). ST stimulation elicits excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) in NTS neurons mediated by both AMPA- and NMDA-type glutamate receptors (-Rs). Vagal afferents exhibit a high probability of vesicle release and exhibit robust frequency-dependent depression due to presynaptic vesicle depletion. Nonetheless, synaptic throughput is maintained even at high frequencies of afferent activation. Here we test the hypothesis that postsynaptic NMDA-Rs are essential in maintaining throughput across ST-NTS synapses. Using patch clamp electrophysiology in horizontal brainstem slices, we found that NMDA-Rs, including NR2B subtypes, carry up to 70% of the charge transferred

  9. Frequency-dependent reduction of voltage-gated sodium current modulates retinal ganglion cell response rate to electrical stimulation

    Tsai, David; Morley, John W.; Suaning, Gregg J.; Lovell, Nigel H.

    2011-10-01

    The ability to elicit visual percepts through electrical stimulation of the retina has prompted numerous investigations examining the feasibility of restoring sight to the blind with retinal implants. The therapeutic efficacy of these devices will be strongly influenced by their ability to elicit neural responses that approximate those of normal vision. Retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) can fire spikes at frequencies greater than 200 Hz when driven by light. However, several studies using isolated retinas have found a decline in RGC spiking response rate when these cells were stimulated at greater than 50 Hz. It is possible that the mechanism responsible for this decline also contributes to the frequency-dependent 'fading' of electrically evoked percepts recently reported in human patients. Using whole-cell patch clamp recordings of rabbit RGCs, we investigated the causes for the spiking response depression during direct subretinal stimulation of these cells at 50-200 Hz. The response depression was not caused by inhibition arising from the retinal network but, instead, by a stimulus-frequency-dependent decline of RGC voltage-gated sodium current. Under identical experimental conditions, however, RGCs were able to spike at high frequency when driven by light stimuli and intracellular depolarization. Based on these observations, we demonstrated a technique to prevent the spiking response depression.

  10. Microwave adsorption by ortho-H pairs in solid hydrogen: temperature and density dependence of the frequencies

    The energy levels of an ortho-hydrogen pair in solid para-hydrogen are mainly determined by the electric quadrupole-quadropole interaction between the ortho molecules which has an R-5 dependence. The frequencies of the observed adsorption lines should therefore shift as a function of temperature due to thermal expansion. The experimental result of this shift, however, is a factor of 2 to 3 larger than that expected from thermal expansion calculated from specific heat data. We have also pressurized the sample at constant temperature with helium gas up to approximately 0.4 bar, and obtained a confirmation of the R-5 dependence. (auth)

  11. Frequency dependence of the Hall-potential distribution in quantum Hall systems: Roles of edge channels and current contacts

    Shima, Kousuke; Akera, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    The spatial dependence of the Hall potential induced in a two-dimensional electron system (2DES) by AC source-drain voltage is studied theoretically in the incoherent linear transport in the strong-magnetic-field regime. The local capacitance approximation is employed in which the potential at each point of the 2DES is proportional to the induced charge at the same point It is shown that the frequency dependence of the induced charge distribution is described by three time constants, tau(e) f...

  12. Frequency-dependent local field factors in dielectric liquids by a polarizable force field and molecular dynamics simulations

    Davari, Nazanin; Haghdani, Shokouh; Åstrand, Per-Olof [Department of Chemistry, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Trondheim (Norway)

    2015-12-31

    A force field model for calculating local field factors, i.e. the linear response of the local electric field for example at a nucleus in a molecule with respect to an applied electric field, is discussed. It is based on a combined charge-transfer and point-dipole interaction model for the polarizability, and thereby it includes two physically distinct terms for describing electronic polarization: changes in atomic charges arising from transfer of charge between the atoms and atomic induced dipole moments. A time dependence is included both for the atomic charges and the atomic dipole moments and if they are assumed to oscillate with the same frequency as the applied electric field, a model for frequency-dependent properties are obtained. Furthermore, if a life-time of excited states are included, a model for the complex frequency-dependent polariability is obtained including also information about excited states and the absorption spectrum. We thus present a model for the frequency-dependent local field factors through the first molecular excitation energy. It is combined with molecular dynamics simulations of liquids where a large set of configurations are sampled and for which local field factors are calculated. We are normally not interested in the average of the local field factor but rather in configurations where it is as high as possible. In electrical insulation, we would like to avoid high local field factors to reduce the risk for electrical breakdown, whereas for example in surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy, high local field factors are desired to give dramatically increased intensities.

  13. Frequency-dependent local field factors in dielectric liquids by a polarizable force field and molecular dynamics simulations

    A force field model for calculating local field factors, i.e. the linear response of the local electric field for example at a nucleus in a molecule with respect to an applied electric field, is discussed. It is based on a combined charge-transfer and point-dipole interaction model for the polarizability, and thereby it includes two physically distinct terms for describing electronic polarization: changes in atomic charges arising from transfer of charge between the atoms and atomic induced dipole moments. A time dependence is included both for the atomic charges and the atomic dipole moments and if they are assumed to oscillate with the same frequency as the applied electric field, a model for frequency-dependent properties are obtained. Furthermore, if a life-time of excited states are included, a model for the complex frequency-dependent polariability is obtained including also information about excited states and the absorption spectrum. We thus present a model for the frequency-dependent local field factors through the first molecular excitation energy. It is combined with molecular dynamics simulations of liquids where a large set of configurations are sampled and for which local field factors are calculated. We are normally not interested in the average of the local field factor but rather in configurations where it is as high as possible. In electrical insulation, we would like to avoid high local field factors to reduce the risk for electrical breakdown, whereas for example in surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy, high local field factors are desired to give dramatically increased intensities

  14. Analysis of frequency- and temperature-dependent interface states in PtSi/p-Si Schottky diodes

    Sellai, A. [Physics Department, P.O. Box 36, Sultan Qaboos University 123, Muscat (Oman)], E-mail: asellai@squ.edu.om; Ouennoughi, Z. [Laboratoire Optoelectronique et Composants, Departement de Physique UFAS Setif Algerie (Algeria)

    2008-12-05

    To yield quantitative information about their interface states, PtSi/p-Si Schottky structures have been studied using conductance and capacitance measurements over a wide range of frequencies (1 kHz to 1 MHz) and at several temperatures (80-140 K). The increase in capacitance at lower frequencies is seen as a signature of interface states, the densities of which are evaluated to be of the order of {approx}10{sup 12} eV{sup -1} cm{sup -2}. The presence of interface states is also evidenced as a peak in the conductance-frequency characteristics that increases in magnitude with decreasing temperatures. The variations of interface conductance are best described by an analytical equation derived assuming an energy-dependent cross-section of these interface states. The conductance data is subsequently used to extract the relaxation times of interface states and their energy distribution with respect to the top of the valence band. Relaxation times, in particular, while temperature dependent with an average value of {approx}4 {mu}s, show a noticeably weak dependence on bias.

  15. Temperature dependence of emission frequency spectra of a liquid metal anode

    Akhmadaliev, Ch [Research Center Rossendorf Inc., Institute of Ion Beams and Materials Research, PO Box 510119, D-01314, Dresden (Germany); Bischoff, L [Research Center Rossendorf Inc., Institute of Ion Beams and Materials Research, PO Box 510119, D-01314 Dresden (Germany); Mair, G L R [Department of Physics, Section of Solid State Physics, University of Athens, Panepistimiopolis, Zographos, GR-15784, Athens (Greece); Aidinis, C J [Department of Physics, Section of Applied Physics, University of Athens, Panepistimiopolis, Zographos, GR-15784, Athens (Greece); Ganetsos, Th [Department of Physics, Section of Solid State Physics, University of Athens, Panepistimiopolis, Zographos, GR-15784, Athens (Greece); Anagnostakis, E [Hellenic Army Academy, Bari, GR-16673, Athens, (Greece)

    2003-01-07

    In an attempt to understand the instabilities that develop on an ion-emitting molten metal anode, we study current oscillograms and emission frequency spectra, as a function of emission current and emitter temperature. It is concluded that increasing the temperature affects adversely the stability of the emitter, thus enhancing the emission of droplets. However, a droplet emission mode, as well as an understanding thereof, is useful for deposition purposes. (rapid communication)

  16. The Frequency of Nonmotor Symptoms among Advanced Parkinson Patients May Depend on Instrument Used for Assessment

    Nelson Hwynn; Haq, Ihtsham U.; Irene A Malaty; Resnick, Andrew S.; Okun, Michael S.; Carew, Danica S.; Genko Oyama; Yunfeng Dai; Wu, Samuel S.; Rodriguez, Ramon L.; Jacobson, Charles E.; Fernandez, Hubert H

    2011-01-01

    Background. Nonmotor symptoms (NMS) of Parkinson's disease (PD) may be more debilitating than motor symptoms. The purpose of this study was to determine the frequency and corecognition of NMS among our advanced PD cohort (patients considered for deep brain stimulation (DBS)) and caregivers. Methods. NMS-Questionnaire (NMS-Q), a self-administered screening questionnaire, and NMS Assessment-Scale (NMS-S), a clinician-administered scale, were administered to PD patients and caregivers. Results. ...

  17. Frequency and Temperature Dependence of Fabrication Parameters in Polymer Dispersed Liquid Crystal Devices

    Juan C. Torres

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available A series of polymer dispersed liquid crystal devices using glass substrates have been fabricated and investigated focusing on their electrical properties. The devices have been studied in terms of impedance as a function of frequency. An electric equivalent circuit has been proposed, including the influence of the temperature on the elements into it. In addition, a relevant effect of temperature on electrical measurements has been observed.

  18. Spatial hearing in Cope's gray treefrog: II. Frequency-dependent directionality in the amplitude and phase of tympanum vibrations.

    Caldwell, Michael S; Lee, Norman; Schrode, Katrina M; Johns, Anastasia R; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jakob; Bee, Mark A

    2014-04-01

    Anuran ears function as pressure difference receivers, and the amplitude and phase of tympanum vibrations are inherently directional, varying with sound incident angle. We quantified the nature of this directionality for Cope's gray treefrog, Hyla chrysoscelis. We presented subjects with pure tones, advertisement calls, and frequency-modulated sweeps to examine the influence of frequency, signal level, lung inflation, and sex on ear directionality. Interaural differences in the amplitude of tympanum vibrations were 1-4 dB greater than sound pressure differences adjacent to the two tympana, while interaural differences in the phase of tympanum vibration were similar to or smaller than those in sound phase. Directionality in the amplitude and phase of tympanum vibration were highly dependent on sound frequency, and directionality in amplitude varied slightly with signal level. Directionality in the amplitude and phase of tone- and call-evoked responses did not differ between sexes. Lung inflation strongly affected tympanum directionality over a narrow frequency range that, in females, included call frequencies. This study provides a foundation for further work on the biomechanics and neural mechanisms of spatial hearing in H. chrysoscelis, and lends valuable perspective to behavioral studies on the use of spatial information by this species and other frogs. PMID:24504183

  19. Stability of the human upright stance depending on the frequency of external disturbances.

    Ishida, Akimasa; Masuda, Tadashi; Inaoka, Hidenori; Fukuoka, Yutaka

    2008-03-01

    During an upright stance of humans, it is usually assumed that a stiffer ankle joint contributes to stabilize the stance. To show that under certain conditions a stiffer ankle joint can reduce the stability, the frequency responses of the moment and the angle of the ankle joint against external disturbances caused by random horizontal translations of the support surface were evaluated in ten healthy adult subjects by varying the difficulty of the task at four levels. When it was difficult to keep the upright stance, the subject tended to make the ankle joint stiffer. The transfer function relating the external disturbance moment to the ankle joint moment showed a larger gain in the high frequency range (>0.3 Hz) compared with the gains obtained under easier conditions. A simulation analysis based on a simple inverted pendulum model also reproduced this tendency. These results indicate that the stiffer ankle joint and the resulting higher ankle moment for high frequency external disturbances enhance the possibility that the center of pressure exceeds the limit arising from the size of the feet and can make the upright stance unstable. PMID:17929068

  20. Frequency-Dependent Neural Activity in Patients with Unilateral Vascular Pulsatile Tinnitus

    Han Lv

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI studies have shown that neurological changes are important findings in vascular pulsatile tinnitus (PT patients. Here, we utilized rs-fMRI to measure the amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations (ALFF in forty patients with unilateral PT and forty age-, gender-, and education-matched normal control subjects. Two different frequency bands (slow-4, 0.027–0.073 Hz, and slow-5, 0.010–0.027 Hz, which are more sensitive to subcortical and cortical neurological signal changes, resp. were analyzed to examine the intrinsic brain activity in detail. Compared to controls, PT patients had increased ALFF values mainly in the PCu, bilateral IPL (inferior parietal lobule, left IFG (inferior frontal gyrus, and right IFG/anterior insula and decreased ALFF values in the multiple occipital areas including bilateral middle-inferior occipital lobe. For the differences of the two frequency bands, widespread ALFF differences were observed. The ALFF abnormalities in aMPFC/ACC, PCu, right IPL, and some regions of occipital and parietal cortices were greater in the slow-5 band compared to the slow-4 band. Additionally, the THI score of PT patients was positively correlated with changes in slow-5 and slow-4 band in PCu. Pulsatile tinnitus is a disease affecting the neurological activities of multiple brain regions. Slow-5 band is more sensitive in detecting the alternations. Our results also indicated the importance of pathophysiological investigations in patients with pulsatile tinnitus in the future.

  1. Frequency-Dependent Neural Activity in Patients with Unilateral Vascular Pulsatile Tinnitus.

    Lv, Han; Zhao, Pengfei; Liu, Zhaohui; Wang, Guopeng; Zeng, Rong; Yan, Fei; Dong, Cheng; Zhang, Ling; Li, Rui; Wang, Peng; Li, Ting; Gong, Shusheng; Wang, Zhenchang

    2016-01-01

    Previous resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) studies have shown that neurological changes are important findings in vascular pulsatile tinnitus (PT) patients. Here, we utilized rs-fMRI to measure the amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations (ALFF) in forty patients with unilateral PT and forty age-, gender-, and education-matched normal control subjects. Two different frequency bands (slow-4, 0.027-0.073 Hz, and slow-5, 0.010-0.027 Hz, which are more sensitive to subcortical and cortical neurological signal changes, resp.) were analyzed to examine the intrinsic brain activity in detail. Compared to controls, PT patients had increased ALFF values mainly in the PCu, bilateral IPL (inferior parietal lobule), left IFG (inferior frontal gyrus), and right IFG/anterior insula and decreased ALFF values in the multiple occipital areas including bilateral middle-inferior occipital lobe. For the differences of the two frequency bands, widespread ALFF differences were observed. The ALFF abnormalities in aMPFC/ACC, PCu, right IPL, and some regions of occipital and parietal cortices were greater in the slow-5 band compared to the slow-4 band. Additionally, the THI score of PT patients was positively correlated with changes in slow-5 and slow-4 band in PCu. Pulsatile tinnitus is a disease affecting the neurological activities of multiple brain regions. Slow-5 band is more sensitive in detecting the alternations. Our results also indicated the importance of pathophysiological investigations in patients with pulsatile tinnitus in the future. PMID:27413554

  2. Frequency-Dependent Neural Activity in Patients with Unilateral Vascular Pulsatile Tinnitus

    Lv, Han; Zhao, Pengfei; Liu, Zhaohui; Wang, Guopeng; Zeng, Rong; Yan, Fei; Dong, Cheng; Zhang, Ling; Li, Rui; Wang, Peng; Li, Ting

    2016-01-01

    Previous resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) studies have shown that neurological changes are important findings in vascular pulsatile tinnitus (PT) patients. Here, we utilized rs-fMRI to measure the amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations (ALFF) in forty patients with unilateral PT and forty age-, gender-, and education-matched normal control subjects. Two different frequency bands (slow-4, 0.027–0.073 Hz, and slow-5, 0.010–0.027 Hz, which are more sensitive to subcortical and cortical neurological signal changes, resp.) were analyzed to examine the intrinsic brain activity in detail. Compared to controls, PT patients had increased ALFF values mainly in the PCu, bilateral IPL (inferior parietal lobule), left IFG (inferior frontal gyrus), and right IFG/anterior insula and decreased ALFF values in the multiple occipital areas including bilateral middle-inferior occipital lobe. For the differences of the two frequency bands, widespread ALFF differences were observed. The ALFF abnormalities in aMPFC/ACC, PCu, right IPL, and some regions of occipital and parietal cortices were greater in the slow-5 band compared to the slow-4 band. Additionally, the THI score of PT patients was positively correlated with changes in slow-5 and slow-4 band in PCu. Pulsatile tinnitus is a disease affecting the neurological activities of multiple brain regions. Slow-5 band is more sensitive in detecting the alternations. Our results also indicated the importance of pathophysiological investigations in patients with pulsatile tinnitus in the future. PMID:27413554

  3. Mapping of permafrost surface and active layer properties using GPR: a comparison of frequency dependencies

    Gacitua, Guisella; Uribe, José Andrés; Tamstorf, Mikkel Peter;

    2011-01-01

    of the permafrost and from the internal features in the unfrozen soil. These results will be further used to determine the distribution of dielectric heterogeneities to support water content estimated from the same profiles. Comparing results from 400 and 800 MHz, we found that although both...... frequencies are suitable to measure thickness and to detect features in the active layer, the 400 MHz gives a better impression of the influence of the dielectric contrast effect from top of the permafrost zone which can be used to quantify the soil water content....

  4. Time-domain representation of frequency dependent inertial forces on offshore structures

    Krenk, Steen

    to the 'phase lag' obtained for the response of discrete mechanical systems. Two options are explored: introducing a corresponding phase lag in the components of the wave kinematics, or compensating the phase lag by combining a stable complex frequency with its complex conjugate. In the latter case...... the time history of the inertial force is determined by processing the stable part of the transformation by a forward time integration, followed by an integration in the negative time-direction to obtain the final inertial force time history. The differential equations of the local inertial force at a...

  5. Frequency depending permittivity of the Coulomb system with Bose-Einstein condensate

    Bobrov, V B

    2015-01-01

    The second-order singularity is found in the low-frequency region of the permittivity of a homogeneous and isotropic system of charged particles consisting of electrons and boson nuclei. This singularity is caused by the existence of a Bose-Einstein condensate for nuclei. The result obtained leads to the existence of the "nuclei superconductivity", which can be experimentally verified in superfluid He II. The results of the proposed an experiment can be considered as a direct proof of the existence of a Bose-Einstein condensate in superfluid He II.

  6. Scattering approach to frequency-dependent current noise in Fabry-Pérot graphene devices

    Hammer, Jan; Belzig, Wolfgang

    2013-03-01

    We study finite-frequency quantum noise and photon-assisted electron transport through a wide and ballistic graphene sheet between two metallic leads. The elementary excitations allow us to examine the differences between effects related to Fabry-Pérot-like interferences and signatures caused by correlations of coherently scattered particles in electron- and holelike parts of the Dirac spectrum. We identify different features in the current-current auto- and cross-correlation spectra and trace them back to the interference patterns of the product of transmission and reflection amplitudes, which define the integrands of the involved correlators. At positive frequencies, the correlator of the autoterminal noise spectrum with final and initial states associated to the measurement terminal is dominant. Phase jumps occur within the interference patterns of corresponding integrands, which also reveal the intrinsic energy scale of the two-terminal graphene setup. The excess noise spectra, as well as the cross-correlation ones, show large fluctuations between positive and negative values. Oscillatory signatures of the cross-correlation noise are due to an alternating behavior of the integrands.

  7. Assessment of breadmaking performance of wheat flour dough by means of frequency dependent ultrasound

    Technological performance of wheat flour varies among different wheat varieties. Gluten plays a key role within the solid phase of dough in the formation and the retention of gas bubbles during breadmaking. Rheological tests are usually performed to predict breadmaking potential. The aim here was to investigate the ability of ultrasound to discriminate wheat doughs based on breadmaking qualities. The ultimate goal is the development of an online quality control system currently unavailable in the baked goods industry, rendering this work innovative. Samples were prepared from a strong wheat flour, with one control sample and one added with inulin and distilled monoglycerides, producing doughs of distinct breadmaking quality. Doughs were subjected to density determination, elongation tests, and ultrasound analysis. The ultrasound tests were performed in the frequency range of 300 kHz – 6 MHz. Ultrasonic phase velocity increased with increasing frequency to about 2 MHz, becoming constant and then decreasing from 3 MHz for the control sample. Distinct differences in attenuation coefficient between the fibre-enriched and control doughs were observed. Ultrasound can potentially add to a better understanding of dough quality and can discriminate between doughs of contrasting properties.

  8. The frequency of diagnostic errors in radiologic reports depends on the patient's age

    Background: Patients who undergo treatment may suffer preventable medical errors. Some of these errors are due to diagnostic imaging procedures. Purpose: To compare the frequency of diagnostic errors in different age groups in an urban European population. Material and Methods: A total of 19 129 reported radiologic examinations were included. During a 6-month period, the analyzed age groups were: children (aged 0-9 years), adults (40-49 years), and elderly (86-95 years). Results: The frequency of radiologic examinations per year was 0.3 in children, 0.6 in adults, and 1.1 in elderly. Significant errors were significantly more frequent in the elderly (1.7%) and children (1.4%) compared with adults (0.8%). There were 60 false-positive reports and 232 false-negative reports. Most errors were made by staff radiologists after hours when they reported on examinations outside their area of expertise. Conclusion: Diagnostic errors are more frequent in children and the elderly compared with middle-aged adults

  9. Assessment of breadmaking performance of wheat flour dough by means of frequency dependent ultrasound

    Braunstein, D.; Page, J. H.; Strybulevych, A.; Peressini, D.; Scanlon, M. G.

    2012-12-01

    Technological performance of wheat flour varies among different wheat varieties. Gluten plays a key role within the solid phase of dough in the formation and the retention of gas bubbles during breadmaking. Rheological tests are usually performed to predict breadmaking potential. The aim here was to investigate the ability of ultrasound to discriminate wheat doughs based on breadmaking qualities. The ultimate goal is the development of an online quality control system currently unavailable in the baked goods industry, rendering this work innovative. Samples were prepared from a strong wheat flour, with one control sample and one added with inulin and distilled monoglycerides, producing doughs of distinct breadmaking quality. Doughs were subjected to density determination, elongation tests, and ultrasound analysis. The ultrasound tests were performed in the frequency range of 300 kHz - 6 MHz. Ultrasonic phase velocity increased with increasing frequency to about 2 MHz, becoming constant and then decreasing from 3 MHz for the control sample. Distinct differences in attenuation coefficient between the fibre-enriched and control doughs were observed. Ultrasound can potentially add to a better understanding of dough quality and can discriminate between doughs of contrasting properties.

  10. Time- and Frequency-Dependent Imaging of Nuclear Dynamics in Laser-Excited Nobel-Gas Dimers

    Magrakvelidze, M.; Kramer, A.; Bartschat, K.; Thumm, U.

    2014-05-01

    We study the nuclear dynamics of noble-gas dimer ions resolved in time using intense ultrashort pump in combination with delayed probe laser pulses. We compare our time-dependent numerical results with those from a complementary description of the same basic dynamics in the frequency domain. This alternative analysis is based on the Fourier transformation of the time- and internuclear-separation-dependent wavefunction probability density or, equivalently, the Fourier transformation of the delay-dependent kinetic-energy-release spectra. Specifically, for pump-laser excited diatomic molecules, it allows for the characterization of their nuclear motion in terms of coherently superimposed stationary vibrational states and the mapping of the laser-dressed nuclear potential curves, thereby supplementing the time-domain formulation, as we will demonstrate for the sequence He2+ to Xe2+ of dimer cations.

  11. Resistance to Change and Frequency of Response-Dependent Stimuli Uncorrelated with Reinforcement

    Podlesnik, Christopher A.; Jimenez-Gomez, Corina; Ward, Ryan D.; Shahan, Timothy A.

    2009-01-01

    Stimuli uncorrelated with reinforcement have been shown to enhance response rates and resistance to disruption; however, the effects of different rates of stimulus presentations have not been assessed. In two experiments, we assessed the effects of adding different rates of response-dependent brief stimuli uncorrelated with primary reinforcement…

  12. Frequency-dependence of Vmax in K-depolarized guinea pig ventricle: effects of nifedipine and verapamil.

    Woods, J P; West, T C

    1985-01-01

    Right ventricular strips from guinea pig hearts were used to compare the effects of nifedipine and verapamil on the maximal upstroke velocity (Vmax) of rapid depolarization in potassium-depolarized preparations. The Vmax was used as an indirect measure of the slow inward current (Isi). Barium (0.8 mM) was added to the Tyrode solution to restore excitability of the K-depolarized tissue. The effects of nifedipine and verapamil on rested state Vmax (VmaxRS), frequency-dependent changes in Vmax, and recovery of Vmax as a function of diastolic interval were studied. The depression of Vmax at rested state (RS), following 3-5-min rest, was concentration-dependent for both drugs, although the effect of nifedipine was greater. The percentage depression of VmaxRS by nifedipine was 24.3 +/- 6.4 at 10(-8)M, 51.3 +/- 2.6 at 5 X 10(-8)M, and 74.0 +/- 1.0 at 10(-7)M. For verapamil the values were 6.2 +/- 3.8 at 10(-7)M, 13.1 +/- 0.9 at 5 X 10(-7)M, and 42.0 +/- 0.5 at 10(-6)M. The depression of Vmax by each drug was frequency-dependent over a range from 0.05 to 2.0 Hz. Frequency-dependence was quantitatively greater with verapamil. The kinetics of recovery of Vmax were assessed by means of paired stimuli given at varying diastolic intervals during recovery from a RS depolarization. The recovery curve was biexponential. In the drug-free condition, the time constant for the first phase of recovery (Tr1) was 140 +/- 12 ms and the time constant for the second phase (Tr2) was 2689 +/- 146 ms.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2580143

  13. Emotion Regulation and Substance Use Frequency in Women with Substance Dependence and Borderline Personality Disorder Receiving Dialectical Behavior Therapy

    Axelrod, Seth R.; Perepletchikova, Francheska; Holtzman, Kevin; Sinha, Rajita

    2011-01-01

    Background Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) identifies emotion dysregulation as central to the dangerous impulsivity of borderline personality disorder (BPD) including substance use disorders, and DBT targets improved emotion regulation as a primary mechanism of change. However, improved emotion regulation with DBT and associations between such improvement and behavioral outcomes such as substance use has not been previously reported. Objective Thus, the goal of this study was to assess for improvement in emotion regulation and to examine the relationship between improvements in the emotion regulation and substance use problems following DBT treatment. Method Emotion regulation as assessed by the Difficulties in Emotion Regulation Scale, depressed mood as assessed by the Beck Depression Inventory, and their associations with substance use frequency were investigated in 27 women with substance dependence and BPD receiving 20 weeks of DBT in an academic community outpatient substance abuse treatment program. Results indicated improved emotion regulation, improved mood, and decreased substance use frequency. Further, emotion regulation improvement, but not improved mood, explained the variance of decreased substance use frequency. Conclusions This is the first study to demonstrate improved emotion regulation in BPD patients treated with DBT and to show that improved emotion regulation can account for increased behavioral control in BPD patients. Significance and Future Research Emotion regulation assessment is recommended for future studies to further clarify the etiology and maintenance of disorders associated with emotional dyregulation such as BPD and substance dependence, and to further explore emotion regulation as a potential mechanism of change for clinical interventions. PMID:21091162

  14. Temperature and frequency dependence of negative differential capacitance in a planar GaN-based p-i-n photodetector

    Bao, Xichang, E-mail: baoxc@qibebt.ac.cn [Qingdao Institute of Bioenergy and Bioprocess Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Qingdao 266101 (China); State Key Laboratories of Transducer Technology, Shanghai Institute of Technical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200083 (China); Xu, Jintong; Li, Chao; Qiao, Hui; Zhang, Yan [State Key Laboratories of Transducer Technology, Shanghai Institute of Technical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200083 (China); Li, Xiangyang, E-mail: lixy@mail.sitp.ac.cn [State Key Laboratories of Transducer Technology, Shanghai Institute of Technical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200083 (China)

    2013-12-25

    Highlights: •Planar GaN-based p-i-n photodetector was prepared by ion implantation. •A novel negative differential capacitance (NDC) effect is observed in the photodetector. •The NDC effect is due to the carrier confinement of the deep level centers formed by ion implantation. -- Abstract: In this work, back-illuminated planar GaN-based p-i-n photodetectors were fabricated by Si implantation into GaN-based p-i-n structure grown by metal–organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). The dark current density of the photodetector is 1.03 nA/cm{sup 2} under zero bias. The unbiased responsivity is 0.122 A/W at 360 nm, corresponding to an external quantum efficiency of 42%. Temperature and frequency dependence of capacitance versus voltage characteristics of the photodetectors are also investigated respectively. A novel negative differential capacitance (NDC) effect observed in the photodetector at room temperature under the frequency of 120 kHz or at low temperature under relative high frequency (such as 200 kHz). The NDC effect becomes much more obvious with the temperature or frequency decreased. This novel phenomenon is mainly due to the carrier confinement of the deep level centers in the detector, which mainly include lattice defects formed by high dose ion implantation and subsequent annealing.

  15. Torsional stress dependence of reactance and resistance in Fe-rich amorphous wires at low frequencies

    Amorphous ferromagnetic wire with a highly positive saturation magnetostriction coefficient, made of Fe73.5Si13.5B9Nb3Cu1, was simultaneously submitted to both, an AC current passing through it and a torsional stress, in order to induce a helical magnetic anisotropy in the wire that modifies its domain structure and therefore the magnetic response of the sample. The aim of this work is to study the reactive, resistive and impedance behaviour in this Fe-rich wire, submitted to different applied torsional stresses, and for several values of the AC current amplitude through the wire (5-20 mArms), in the low frequency range, f< MHz. The experimental results are explained on the basis of the core-shell model

  16. Potential-dependent sum frequency generation study of 5-methylbenzotriazole on polycrystalline copper, platinum, and gold.

    Romero, Casey; Baldelli, Steven

    2006-06-22

    In situ sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy, at varied potentials and polarization combinations, was performed on polycrystalline copper, polycrystalline platinum, and polycrystalline gold samples in 0.5 M HClO4 with 50 mM 5-methylbenzotriazole (5-methylBTAH) added. These studies were performed to determine the orientation of 5-methylBTAH on the surface at different potentials. For copper surfaces, orientation of the molecule on the surface is not affected by potential within the potential window studied (-500 to -100 mV vs saturated calomel electrode (SCE)). Sum frequency generation spectra of 5-methylBTAH on platinum show a change in orientation over the potential range studied (-250 to 750 mV vs SCE). The orientation of the methyl group tilts more toward the plane of the interface as the potential is scanned in the positive direction. This orientation change is correlated to hydrogen coadsorption on the platinum surface at low potentials. 5-Methylbenzotriazole lies in the surface plane or does not orient on gold at lower potentials but the orientation is tilted toward normal at more positive potentials over the potential range studied (-500 to 900 mV vs SCE). To compliment these results, cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements were performed. Cyclic voltammograms of copper show that addition of 5-methylBTAH protects the surface from copper dissolution, increasing the electrochemical window by 450 mV. Cyclic voltammetry of 5-methylBTAH on platinum showed a partial blockage of adsorbed hydrogen and also prevented the adsorption of oxygenated species at 450-600 mV. Cyclic voltammetry on gold shows that 5-methylBTAH blocks oxide formation for 400 mV thus increasing the electrochemical window. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy has been performed to determine the potential of zero charge of 5-methylBTAH on copper. PMID:16800498

  17. Frequency of Psychiatric Disorders in Children of Opioid or Methamphetamine-Dependent Patients

    Parvaresh, Noushin; Mazhari, Shahrzad; Nazari-Noghabi, Maryam

    2015-01-01

    Background Addiction is one of the main problems of human societies, which is more common in developing countries. In addition, it causes to personal and social problems and family problem. The aim of this study was to examine the prevalence of psychiatric disorders in children 5-15 years old of opioid or methamphetamine dependence patients. Methods For this study, three groups including: (1) children of parents addicted to opium, (2) children of parents addicted to methamphetamine, and (3) c...

  18. Relative frequencies of supernovae types: dependence on host galaxy magnitude, galactocentric radius and local metallicity

    Boissier, S

    2009-01-01

    Context: Stellar evolution theory suggests that the relationship between number ratios of supernova (SN) types and metallicity holds important clues as to the nature of the progenitor stars (mass, metallicity, rotation, binarity, etc). Aims: We investigate the metallicity dependence of number ratios of various SN types, using a large sample of SN along with information on their radial position in, and magnitude of, their host galaxy. Methods: We derive typical galaxian metallicities (using the well known metallicity-luminosity relation) and local metallicities, i.e. at the position of the SN; in the latter case, we use the empirical fact that the metallicity gradients in disk galaxies are ~ constant when expressed in dex/R25. Results: We confirm a dependence of the N(Ibc)/N(II) ratio on metallicity; recent single star models with rotation and binary star models with no rotation appear to reproduce equally well that metallicity dependence. The size of our sample does not allow significant conclusions on the N(...

  19. Size-, electric-field-, and frequency-dependent third-order nonlinear optical properties of hydrogenated silicon nanoclusters

    Li, Haipeng; Xu, Hu; Shen, Xiaopeng; Han, Kui; Bi, Zetong; Xu, Runfeng

    2016-06-01

    We investigated the electronic properties and second hyperpolarizabilities of hydrogenated silicon nanoclusters (H-SiNCs) by using the density functional theory method. The effects of cluster size, external electric field and incident frequency on the second hyperpolarizability were also examined, respectively. We found that small H-SiNCs exhibit large second hyperpolarizability. With the increase of the number of silicon atoms in H-SiNCs, the frontier molecular orbital energy gap decreases, attributed to the enhancement of the second hyperpolarizability. Interestingly, we also found the electric-field-induced gigantic enhancement of the second hyperpolarizability for H-SiNCs due to the change of electron density distributions. In addition, our results demonstrate a significant dependence on the frequency of incident light.

  20. Experimental and theoretical analysis of THz-frequency, direction-dependent, phonon polariton modes in a subwavelength, anisotropic slab waveguide.

    Yang, Chengliang; Wu, Qiang; Xu, Jingjun; Nelson, Keith A; Werley, Christopher A

    2010-12-01

    Femtosecond optical pulses were used to generate THz-frequency phonon polariton waves in a 50 micrometer lithium niobate slab, which acts as a subwavelength, anisotropic planar waveguide. The spatial and temporal electric field profiles of the THz waves were recorded for different propagation directions using a polarization gating imaging system, and experimental dispersion curves were determined via a two-dimensional Fourier transform. Dispersion relations for an anisotropic slab waveguide were derived via analytical analysis and found to be in excellent agreement with all observed experimental modes. From the dispersion relations, we analyze the propagation-direction-dependent behavior, effective refractive index values, and generation efficiencies for THz-frequency modes in the subwavelength, anisotropic slab waveguide. PMID:21164986

  1. A temperature dependent multi-ion model for time accurate numerical simulation of the electrochemical machining process. Part II: Numerical simulation

    The temperature distribution and shape evolution during electrochemical machining (ECM) are the result of a large number of intertwined physical processes. Electrolyte flow, electrical conduction, ion transport, electrochemical reactions, heat generation and heat transfer strongly influence one another, making modeling and numerical simulation of ECM a very challenging procedure. In part I , a temperature dependent multi-ion transport and reaction model (MITReM) is put forward which considers mass transfer as a consequence of diffusion, convection and migration, combined with the electroneutrality condition and linearized temperature dependent polarization relations at the electrode–electrolyte interface. The flow field is calculated using the incompressible laminar Navier–Stokes equations for viscous flow. The local temperature is obtained by solving internal energy balance, enabling the use of temperature dependent expressions for several physical properties such as the ion diffusion coefficients and electrolyte viscosity. In this second part, the temperature dependent MITReM is used to simulate ECM of stainless steel in aqueous NaNO3 electrolyte solution. The effects of temperature, electrode thermal conduction, reaction heat generation, electrolyte flow and water depletion are investigated. A comparison is made between the temperature dependent potential model and MITReM.

  2. Incorporation of exact boundary conditions into a discontinuous galerkin finite element method for accurately solving 2d time-dependent maxwell equations

    Sirenko, Kostyantyn

    2013-01-01

    A scheme that discretizes exact absorbing boundary conditions (EACs) to incorporate them into a time-domain discontinuous Galerkin finite element method (TD-DG-FEM) is described. The proposed TD-DG-FEM with EACs is used for accurately characterizing transient electromagnetic wave interactions on two-dimensional waveguides. Numerical results demonstrate the proposed method\\'s superiority over the TD-DG-FEM that employs approximate boundary conditions and perfectly matched layers. Additionally, it is shown that the proposed method can produce the solution with ten-eleven digit accuracy when high-order spatial basis functions are used to discretize the Maxwell equations as well as the EACs. © 1963-2012 IEEE.

  3. Size dependence of magnetization switching and its dispersion of Co/Pt nanodots under the assistance of radio frequency fields

    We have studied the dot size dependence of microwave assisted magnetization switching (MAS) on perpendicular magnetic Co/Pt multilayer dot array. The significant microwave assistance effect has been observed over the entire dot size D ranging from 50 nm to 330 nm examined in the present study. The MAS behavior, however, critically depends on D. The excitation frequency dependence of the switching field is well consistent with the spin wave theory, indicating that the magnetization precession in MAS is in accordance with the well defined eigenmodes depending on the dot diameter. The lowest order spin wave is only excited for D ≤ 100 nm, and then the MAS effect is well consistent with that of the single macrospin prediction. On the other hand, higher order spin waves are excited for D > 100 nm, giving rise to the significant enhancement of the MAS effect. The dispersion of MAS effect also depends on D and is significantly reduced for the region of D > 100 nm. This significant reduction of the dispersion is attributed to the essential feature of the MAS effect which is insensitive to the local fluctuation of anisotropy field, such as defect, damaged layer, and so on

  4. Modulation of Cortical Oscillations by Low-Frequency Direct Cortical Stimulation Is State-Dependent.

    Alagapan, Sankaraleengam; Schmidt, Stephen L; Lefebvre, Jérémie; Hadar, Eldad; Shin, Hae Won; Frӧhlich, Flavio

    2016-03-01

    Cortical oscillations play a fundamental role in organizing large-scale functional brain networks. Noninvasive brain stimulation with temporally patterned waveforms such as repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) and transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS) have been proposed to modulate these oscillations. Thus, these stimulation modalities represent promising new approaches for the treatment of psychiatric illnesses in which these oscillations are impaired. However, the mechanism by which periodic brain stimulation alters endogenous oscillation dynamics is debated and appears to depend on brain state. Here, we demonstrate with a static model and a neural oscillator model that recurrent excitation in the thalamo-cortical circuit, together with recruitment of cortico-cortical connections, can explain the enhancement of oscillations by brain stimulation as a function of brain state. We then performed concurrent invasive recording and stimulation of the human cortical surface to elucidate the response of cortical oscillations to periodic stimulation and support the findings from the computational models. We found that (1) stimulation enhanced the targeted oscillation power, (2) this enhancement outlasted stimulation, and (3) the effect of stimulation depended on behavioral state. Together, our results show successful target engagement of oscillations by periodic brain stimulation and highlight the role of nonlinear interaction between endogenous network oscillations and stimulation. These mechanistic insights will contribute to the design of adaptive, more targeted stimulation paradigms. PMID:27023427

  5. Firing-rate, symbolic dynamics and frequency dependence in periodically driven spiking models: a piecewise-smooth approach

    Granados, Albert; Krupa, Maciej

    2013-01-01

    In this work we consider a periodically forced generic integrate-and-fire model with a unique attracting equilibrium in the subthreshold dynamics and study the dependence of the firing-rate on the frequency of the drive. In an earlier study we have obtained rigorous results on the bifurcation structure in such systems, with emphasis on the relation between the firing-rate and the rotation number of the existing periodic orbits. In this work we study how these bifurcation structures behave upo...

  6. Dynamics of electronic transitions and frequency dependence of negative capacitance in semiconductor diodes under high forward bias

    We observed qualitatively dissimilar frequency dependence of negative capacitance under high charge injection in two sets of functionally different junction diodes: III-V based light emitting and Si-based non-light emitting diodes. Using an advanced approach based on bias activated differential capacitance, we developed a generalized understanding of negative capacitance phenomenon which can be extended to any diode based device structure. We explained the observations as the mutual competition of fast and slow electronic transition rates which are different in different devices. This study can be useful in understanding the interfacial effects in semiconductor heterostructures and may lead to superior device functionality.

  7. Temperature-modulated calorimetry of the frequency dependence of the glass transition of poly(ethylene terephthalate) and ....

    Wunderlich, B.; Okazaki, I. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    1997-03-01

    Temperature-modulated differential scanning calorimetry, TMDSC, is new technique that permits to measure the apparent heat capacity vs modulation frequency. The method is briefly described and a quasi- isothermal measurement method is used to derive the kinetic parameters for PET and PS. A first-order kinetics expression was used to describe the approach to equilibrium and point out the limits caused by asymmetry and cooperativity of the kinetics. Use of a complex description of heat capacity and entropy is discussed. Activation energies vary from 75 to 350 kJ/mol, dependent on thermal pretreatment and the preexponential factor is correlated with the activation energy.

  8. Non-linear character of dose dependences of chromosome aberration frequency in radiation-damaged root

    The dose dependences of the aberrant anaphases in the root meristem in 48 hours after the irradiation have non-linear character and a plateau in the region about 6-8 Gy. The plateau indicates the activation of recovery processes. In the plateau range, the level of damages for this genotype is 33% for aberrant anaphases (FAA), 2.3 aberrations per aberrant anaphase (A/AC), and 0.74 aberrations for the total number of anaphases. At 10 Gy, the dose curve forms the exponential region caused by the involvement of the large number of new cells with unrepaired damages in the mutation process. The increase of A/AC to 1.1 indicate the ''criticality'' of the meristem radiation damage.

  9. Dependence of Small Planet Frequency on Stellar Metallicity Hidden by Their Prevalence

    Zhu, Wei; Huang, Chelsea

    2016-01-01

    The dependence of gas giant planet occurrence rate on stellar metallicity has been firmly established. We extend this so-called planet-metallicity correlation to broader ranges of metallicities and planet masses/radii. In particular, we assume that the planet-metallicity correlation is a power law below some critical saturation threshold, and that the probability of hosting at least one planet is unity for stars with metallicity above the threshold. We then are able to explain the discrepancy between the tentative detection and null detection in previous studies regarding the planet-metallicity correlation for small planets. In particular, we find that the null detection of this correlation can be attributed to the combination of high planet occurrence rate and low detection efficiency. Therefore, a planet-metallicity correlation for small planets cannot be ruled out. We propose that stars with metallicities lower than the Solar value are better targets for testing the planet-metallicity correlation for small...

  10. Power Spectrum of Out-of-equilibrium Forces in Living Cells : Amplitude and Frequency Dependence

    Gallet, Francois; Bohec, Pierre; Richert, Alain

    2009-01-01

    Living cells exhibit an important out-of-equilibrium mechanical activity, mainly due to the forces generated by molecular motors. These motor proteins, acting individually or collectively on the cytoskeleton, contribute to the violation of the fluctuation-dissipation theorem in living systems. In this work we probe the cytoskeletal out-of-equilibrium dynamics by performing simultaneous active and passive microrheology experiments, using the same micron-sized probe specifically bound to the actin cortex. The free motion of the probe exhibits a constrained, subdiffusive behavior at short time scales (t < 2s), and a directed, superdiffusive behavior at larger time scales, while, in response to a step force, its creep function presents the usual weak power law dependence with time. Combining the results of both experiments, we precisely measure for the first time the power spectrum of the force fluctuations exerted on this probe, which lies more than one order of magnitude above the spectrum expected at equili...

  11. Non-Universal temperature dependencies of the low frequency ac magnetic susceptibility in high Tc superconductors

    Di Gioacchino, D.; Celani, F.; Tripodi, P. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Frascati, RM (Italy). Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati; Testa, A.M. [Consiglio Nazionale per le Ricerche, Monterotondo, RM, (Italy). Istituto di Chimica dei Materiali; Pace, S. [INFM, Univ. Salerno, Salerno (Italy). Dept. of Physics

    1999-07-01

    The paper is organized as follows. In Sec. 2 the non-linear diffusion problem is formulated in terms of a partial differential equation, together with the parallel resistor model for the 1-5 characteristics. To study in some detail the effects of thermally activated processes in different cases, we have chosen different temperature functional dependencies for the pinning potential, U{sub p}(T), and the critical current density, J{sub c}(T), related to particular pinning models. Local magnetic field profiles, magnetization cycles and {chi}n (T) are discussed in Sec. 3. Moreover, a comparison of numerical results with available experimental data and analytical approximated predictions is also presented. Finally, Sec. 4 is devoted to summary and conclusions.

  12. Fractional amplitude analysis of low frequency fluctuation in alcohol dependent individuals: a resting state functional MRI study

    Objective: To explore brain activity features during the resting state in alcohol dependent individuals, and study the relationship between the brain activity features and alcohol dependent individuals' clinical symptoms. Methods: Twenty-four alcohol dependent individuals and 22 healthy control subjects, well matched in gender, age, education and handedness, were enrolled as the alcohol dependent group and control group respectively. A GE 3.0 T MR scanner was used to acquire all the subjects' resting state data. DPARSF software was used to process resting functional MRI data, and then the whole brain fractional amplitudes of low frequency fluctuation (fALFF) data were acquired. Two-sample t test statistical analysis was made to access fALFF difference between the two groups. Results: In comparison with the control group, the alcohol dependent group showed reduced fALFF in bilateral medial prefrontal gyrus, right inferior occipital gyrus, left precuneus,left inferior temporal gyrus, and left posterior lobe of cerebellum (0.64-1.69 vs. 0.87-1.78, t=-4.23- -2.79, P<0.05). fALFF was increased in the alcohol dependent group at the anterior cingulate,bilateral inferior frontal gyrus,right middle frontal gyrus,bilateral insular lobe,bilateral dorsal thalamus (0.86-1.82 vs. 0.76-1.58, t=3.56-3.96, P<0.05). Conclusion: Alcohol dependent individuals had abnormal activity at the bilateral prefrontal lobe,anterior cingulate, bilateral dorsal thalamus, bilateral insular lobe, left posterior lobe of cerebellum et al, during the resting state, and these abnormal activities might be related with clinical manifestation and pathophysiology. (authors)

  13. Dependence of a rabbit's reaction on the frequency of repetition of an impulse and current exposition in experiment

    Koklin А.Е.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Now electroshock devices are used as a civilian weapon for self-defense and as a non-lethal weapon in the police. Therefore, medical-biological safety testing of electroshock devices should be carried out. Development of hygienic regulations is relevant as well. The aim of our work is the study of the biological effects of pulsed current depending on the pulse frequency, pulse amplitude and exposure. Material and methods. We compared the biological effects with varying frequency of the current pulse (50, 400, and 600 Hz with varying exposure (0.25, 0.5 and 1.0 s.. Average pulse power in all cases was equal, and the pulse energy was different. Experiments were performed on rabbits. Biological effects of stun device were evaluated by clinical lesions, as well as electrophysiological parameters: ECG and electro-pneumogram. Results. Response was observed only in the current period (0.25 s, 0.5 s or 1 s was disorientation, convulsing, dyspnea. The degree of severity of the reaction was determined by a combination of pulse repetition frequency and exposure. Immediately after switching off the current noted vocalization, decreased heart rate and breathing. Heart rate and respiration in 5 minutes back to the normal values. Conclusions. In the results of the research has got a comparative classification organism's response (based on a points system as well as the characteristic of the biological response of the individual systems of the body on the parameters of the current pulse.

  14. The effects of frequency-dependent quasar evolution on the celestial reference frame

    Shabala, Stanislav; McCallum, Jamie; Titov, Oleg; Blanchard, Jay; Lovell, Jim; Watson, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    We examine the relationship between source position stability and astrophysical properties of radio-loud quasars making up the International Celestial Reference Frame. We construct light curves for 95 most frequently observed ICRF2 quasars at both the geodetic VLBI observing bands. Because the appearance of new quasar components corresponds to an increase in quasar flux density, these light curves allow us to probe source structure on sub-100 microarcsecond scales, much smaller than conventional VLBI imaging. Flux density monitoring also allows us to trace the evolution of quasar structure. We test how source position stability depends on three astrophysical parameters: (1) Flux density variability at X-band; (2) Time lag between S and X-band light curves; (3) Spectral index rms, defined as the variability in the ratio between S and X-band flux densities. We find that small (<0.15 years) time lags between S and X-band light curves and low (<0.10) spectral index variability are excellent indicators of po...

  15. Finite frequency traveltime sensitivity kernels for acoustic anisotropic media: Angle dependent bananas

    Djebbi, Ramzi

    2013-08-19

    Anisotropy is an inherent character of the Earth subsurface. It should be considered for modeling and inversion. The acoustic VTI wave equation approximates the wave behavior in anisotropic media, and especially it\\'s kinematic characteristics. To analyze which parts of the model would affect the traveltime for anisotropic traveltime inversion methods, especially for wave equation tomography (WET), we drive the sensitivity kernels for anisotropic media using the VTI acoustic wave equation. A Born scattering approximation is first derived using the Fourier domain acoustic wave equation as a function of perturbations in three anisotropy parameters. Using the instantaneous traveltime, which unwraps the phase, we compute the kernels. These kernels resemble those for isotropic media, with the η kernel directionally dependent. They also have a maximum sensitivity along the geometrical ray, which is more realistic compared to the cross-correlation based kernels. Focusing on diving waves, which is used more often, especially recently in waveform inversion, we show sensitivity kernels in anisotropic media for this case.

  16. Estimation of the frequency-dependent site amplification factors of Japan based on the coda normalization method

    Takemoto, T.; Furumura, T.; Saito, T.; Maeda, T.; Noguchi, S.

    2011-12-01

    We estimated the frequency dependent properties of the site amplification factors at each station of the K-NET and KiK-net strong motion network across Japan based on the coda normalization method. Using a large number of waveform data of 3,004 acceleration record from 48 earthquakes and waveform record from 1800 strong motion stations, we estimated the site amplification factors at each frequency band from f=0.5-1 Hz, 1-2 Hz, 2-4 Hz, to 4-8 Hz. In this study we assumed a rock-site station (Tashiro at Kyushu) as a reference of the site amplification estimates. The estimated site amplification factors show strong variations in the low frequency band (0.5-1 Hz) as compare with that of the high frequency band (4-8 Hz). Large site amplification factor in the low-frequency band is found in major populated cities such as Tokyo, Osaka, and Nagoya with varying amplification factors between 10 to 20 dB relative to the reference rock-site station. Such distribution of the site amplification factors in the low-frequency (0.5-1 Hz) band is in good corresponding to the depth distribution of a basement rocks with S-wave speed greater than 2.9 km/s. On the other hand the site-amplification factors in high-frequency (4-8 Hz) band are rather small (5 to 10 dB) as compared with that of the low-frequency band and spatial distribution is almost randomly distributed irrespective to surface geology. In order to examine the reliability of our estimates of the site amplification factors based on the coda-normalization method and to examine how the site amplification modify the distribution of seismic intensity distributions for large earthquakes, we reproduced intensity distributions of recent Japanese M7 earthquakes such as the 2004 Niigata Chuetsu (M6.8), the 2005 Western Fukuoka (M7.0), and the 2008 Coast of Iwate (M6.8) earthquakes by removing the site amplification factors of each frequency band from the acceleration waveform record at each K-NET and the KiK-net station. The site

  17. A differential algebraic approach for the modeling of polycrystalline ferromagnetic hysteresis with minor loops and frequency dependence

    Wang, Dan; Wang, Linxiang; Melnik, Roderick

    2016-07-01

    In the current paper, a nonlinear differential algebraic approach is proposed for the modeling of hysteretic dynamics of polycrystalline ferromagnetic materials. The model is constructed by employing a phenomenological theory to the magnetization orientation switching. For the modeling of hysteresis in polycrystalline ferromagnetic materials, the single crystal model is applied to each magnetic domain along its own principal axis. The overall dynamics of the polycrystalline materials is obtained by taking a weighted combination of the dynamics of all magnetic domains. The weight function for the combination is taken as the distribution function of the principal axes. Numerical simulations are performed and comparisons with its experimental counterparts are presented. The hysteretic dynamics caused by orientation switching processes is accurately captured by the proposed model. Minor hysteresis loops associated with partial-amplitude loadings are also captured. Rate dependence of the hysteresis loops are inherently incorporated into the model due to its differential nature.

  18. Frequency offset dependence of adiabatic rotating frame relaxation rate constants: relevance to MRS investigations of metabolite dynamics in vivo.

    Mangia, Silvia; Liimatainen, Timo; Garwood, Michael; Tkac, Ivan; Henry, Pierre-Gilles; Deelchand, Dinesh; Michaeli, Shalom

    2011-08-01

    In this work, we investigated the frequency-offset dependence of the rotating frame longitudinal (R(1ρ)) and transverse (R(2ρ)) relaxation rate constants when using hyperbolic-secant adiabatic full passage pulses or continuous-wave spin-lock irradiation. Phantom and in vivo measurements were performed to validate theoretical predictions of the dominant relaxation mechanisms existing during adiabatic full passage pulses when using different settings of the frequency offset relative to the carrier. In addition, adiabatic R(1ρ) and R(2ρ) values of total creatine and N-acetylaspartate were measured in vivo from the human brain at 4 T. When the continuous-wave pulse power was limited to safe specific absorption rates for humans, simulations revealed a strong dependence of R(1ρ) and R(2ρ) values on the frequency offset for both dipolar interactions and anisochronous exchange mechanisms. By contrast, theoretical and experimental results showed adiabatic R(1ρ) and R(2ρ) values to be practically invariant within the large subregion of the bandwidth of the hyperbolic-secant pulse where complete inversion was achieved. However, adiabatic R(1ρ) and R(2ρ) values of the methyl protons of total creatine (at 3.03 ppm) were almost doubled when compared with those of the methyl protons of N-acetylaspartate (at 2.01 ppm) in spite of the fact that these resonances were in the flat region of the inversion band of the adiabatic full passage pulses. We conclude that differences in adiabatic R(1ρ) and R(2ρ) values of human brain metabolites are not a result of their chemical shifts, but instead reflect differences in dynamics. PMID:21264976

  19. Accurate experimental determination of the isotope effects on the triple point temperature of water. II. Combined dependence on the 18O and 17O abundances

    Faghihi, V.; Kozicki, M.; Aerts-Bijma, A. T.; Jansen, H. G.; Spriensma, J. J.; Peruzzi, A.; Meijer, H. A. J.

    2015-12-01

    This paper is the second of two articles on the quantification of isotope effects on the triple point temperature of water. In this second article, we address the combined effects of 18O and 17O isotopes. We manufactured five triple point cells with waters with 18O and 17O abundances exceeding widely the natural abundance range while maintaining their natural 18O/17O relationship. The 2H isotopic abundance was kept close to that of VSMOW (Vienna Standard Mean Ocean Water). These cells realized triple point temperatures ranging between  -220 μK to 1420 μK with respect to the temperature realized by a triple point cell filled with VSMOW. Our experiment allowed us to determine an accurate and reliable value for the newly defined combined 18, 17O correction parameter of AO  =  630 μK with a combined uncertainty of 10 μK. To apply this correction, only the 18O abundance of the TPW needs to be known (and the water needs to be of natural origin). Using the results of our two articles, we recommend a correction equation along with the coefficient values for isotopic compositions differing from that of VSMOW and compare the effect of this new equation on a number of triple point cells from the literature and from our own institute. Using our correction equation, the uncertainty in the isotope correction for triple point cell waters used around the world will be  <1 μK.

  20. Calibration period dependence of extreme flood estimations (with a model-based flood frequency method)

    Brigode, P.; Bernardara, P.; Paquet, E.; Gailhard, J.; Garavaglia, F.; Ribstein, P.; Micovic, Z.

    2013-12-01

    Extreme floods estimation methods are developed since many years within the hydrological and statistical communities. More recently, approaches based on the statistical analysis of flood streamflow samples simulated by rainfall-runoff models which are forced by simulated rainfall spread in the scientific literature. These approaches, called stochastic simulation methods, are typically composed by a probabilistic rainfall model and a rainfall-runoff model. Each of these two models are calibrated over observed hydrometeorological series such as daily precipitation series for the probabilistic rainfall models or such as daily streamflow, precipitation and temperature series for the rainfall-runoff models. Since extreme flood observations are by definition particularly rare, the validation of the proposed extreme flood estimations is one of the main critical issues, whatever the method - statistical or physically-based - used. Moreover, the observed hydrometeorological series used for the calibration of the stochastic simulation methods may be subject to significant variability over time, due to global climate oscillations such as El Niño Southern Oscillations for example. If the estimation of total involved uncertainty is a difficult task, investigating to what extent the proposed extreme flood values are dependent on the calibration period is an interesting first step. The general aim of this study is to propose a methodology for performing a sensitivity analysis of extreme flood estimations to the variability of observed series used for the model calibrations in a stochastic simulation framework. The methodology proposed is based on the nonparametric bootstrap concept and consists to perform a set of block-bootstrap experiments, thus generating different sets of observed series sub-samples. The generated observed series sub-samples are then used for the calibration of the different models considered within the stochastic simulation method. The main originality of

  1. Frequency band-dependence of S-wave splitting in China mainland and its implications

    LIU; Kun

    2001-01-01

    [1]Liu, T. S., Loess and the Environment, Beijing: China Ocean Press, 1985, 1-251.[2]Chen, L. X., Zhu, Q. G., Luo, H. B. et al., East Asian Monsoon, Beijing: China Meteorology Press, 1991, 28-61.[3]An, Z. S., Liu, T. S., Lu, Y. C. et al., The long-term palaeomonsoon variation recorded by the loess-palaeosol sequence in central China, Quaternary International, 1990, (7/8): 91-95.[4]Guo, Z. T., Liu, T. S., Fedoroff, N. et al., Shift of the monsoon intensity on the Loess Plateau at ca. 0.85 MaBP, Chinese Science Bulletin, 1993, 38(2): 586-591.[5]Chen, J., An, Z. S., Wang, Y. J. et al., Distributions of Rb and Sr in the Luochuan loess-paleosol sequence of China during the last 800 ka: Implications for paleomonsoon variations, Science in China, Ser. D, 1999, 42(3): 225-232.[6]Chen, J., Wang, Y. J., Ji, J. F. et al., Rb/Sr variations and its climatic stratigraphical significance of a loess-paleosol profile from Luochuan, Shaanxi Province, Quaternary Sciences (in Chinese), 1999, 19(4): 350-356.[7]Guo, Z. T.,Liu, T. S., Fedoroff, N. et al., Climate extremes in loess of China coupled with the strength of deep-water for-mation in the North Atlantic, Global and Planetary Change, 1998, 18: 113-128.[8]Guo, Z. T., Liu, T. S., An, Z. S., Paleosols of the last 0.15 Ma in the Weinan loess section and their paleoclimate signifi-cance, Quaternary Sciences (in Chinese), 1994, 14(3): 256-269.[9]Guo, Z, T,, Fedoroff, N., Liu, T. S., Micromorphology of the loess-paleosol sequence of the last 130 ka in China and pa-leoclimatic event, Science in China (in Chinese), Ser. D, 1996, 26(3): 392-398.[10]Guo, Z., Liu, T., Guiot, J., et al., High frequency pulses of East Asian monsoon climate in the last two glaciations: Link with the North Atlantic, Climate Dynamics, 1996, 12: 701-709.[11]Guo, Z. T., Peng, S. Z., Wei, L. Y. et al., Weathering signals of Millennial-Scale oscillations of the East Asian Summer monsoon over the last 220 ka, Chinese Science

  2. Development of one-energy group, two-dimensional, frequency dependent detector adjoint function based on the nodal method

    One-energy group, two-dimensional computer code was developed to calculate the response of a detector to a vibrating absorber in a reactor core. A concept of local/global components, based on the frequency dependent detector adjoint function, and a nodalization technique were utilized. The frequency dependent detector adjoint functions presented by complex equations were expanded into real and imaginary parts. In the nodalization technique, the flux is expanded into polynomials about the center point of each node. The phase angle and the magnitude of the one-energy group detector adjoint function were calculated for a detector located in the center of a 200x200 cm reactor using a two-dimensional nodalization technique, the computer code EXTERMINATOR, and the analytical solution. The purpose of this research was to investigate the applicability of a polynomial nodal model technique to the calculations of the real and the imaginary parts of the detector adjoint function for one-energy group two-dimensional polynomial nodal model technique. From the results as discussed earlier, it is concluded that the nodal model technique can be used to calculate the detector adjoint function and the phase angle. Using the computer code developed for nodal model technique, the magnitude of one energy group frequency dependent detector adjoint function and the phase angle were calculated for the detector located in the center of a 200x200 cm homogenous reactor. The real part of the detector adjoint function was compared with the results obtained from the EXTERMINATOR computer code as well as the analytical solution based on a double sine series expansion using the classical Green's Function solution. The values were found to be less than 1% greater at 20 cm away from the source region and about 3% greater closer to the source compared to the values obtained from the analytical solution and the EXTERMINATOR code. The currents at the node interface matched within 1% of the average

  3. Quantum yield dependence of electroluminescence of ZnS-Cu crystals doped with Sm, Eu, Pb or Tm on the exciting voltage frequency

    The frequency dependence of the quantum yield of electroluminescence of ZnS-Cu crystals doped with Eu, Sm, Pb or Tm within the frequency range from 50 Hz to 10 kHz and voltages 0.15-1.5 kW is measured. The maximum of this dependence may be explained by the competition of recombination processes and by the polarization of the crystal

  4. Phase speed and frequency-dependent damping of longitudinal intensity oscillations in coronal loop structures observed with AIA/SDO

    Abedini, A.

    2016-04-01

    Longitudinal intensity oscillations along coronal loops that are interpreted as signatures of magneto-acoustic waves are observed frequently in different coronal structures. The aim of this paper is to estimate the physical parameters of the slow waves and the quantitative dependence of these parameters on their frequencies in the solar corona loops that are situated above active regions with the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) onboard Solar Dynamic Observatory (SDO). The observed data on 2012-Feb-12, consisting of 300 images with an interval of 24 seconds in the 171 Å and 193 Å passbands is analyzed for evidence of propagating features as slow waves along the loop structures. Signatures of longitudinal intensity oscillations that are damped rapidly as they travel along the loop structures were found, with periods in the range of a few minutes to few tens of minutes. Also, the projected (apparent) phase speeds, projected damping lengths, damping times and damping qualities of filtered intensities centred on the dominant frequencies are measured in the range of Cs ≃38-79 km s^{-1}, Ld≃ 23-68 Mm, τd≃7-21 min and τ_{d/P}≃0.34-0.77, respectively. The theoretical and observational results of this study indicate that the damping times and damping lengths increase with increasing the oscillation periods, and are highly sensitive function of oscillation period, but the projected speeds and the damping qualities are not very sensitive to the oscillation periods. Furthermore, the magnitude values of physical parameters are in good agreement with the prediction of the theoretical dispersion relations of high-frequency MHD waves (>1.1 mHz) in a coronal plasma with electron number density in the range of ne≃107-10^{12} cm^{-3}.

  5. Frequency dependence and fuel effect on optical properties of nano TiO2-based structures

    Ghasemifard, Mahdi; Ghamari, Misagh; Iziy, Meysam

    2016-06-01

    TiO2-(Ti0.5Si0.5)O2 nanopowders (TS-NPs) with average particle size around 90 nm were successfully synthesized by controlled auto-combustion method by using citric acid/nitric acid (AC:NA) and urea/metal cation (U:MC). The structure of powders was studied based on their X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns. The XRD of TS-NPs shows that rutile and anatase are the main phases of TS-NPs for AC:NA and U:MC, respectively. Particle size and histogram of nanopowders were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS). Optical properties of TS-NPs were calculated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and Kramers-Kroning (KK) relation. Plasma frequencies of TS-NPs obtained from energy loss functions depend on fuels as a result of changes in crystal structure, particle size distribution, and morphology.

  6. Phase speed and frequency-dependent damping of longitudinal intensity oscillations in coronal loop structures observed with AIA/SDO

    Abedini, A

    2016-01-01

    Longitudinal intensity oscillations along coronal loops that are interpreted as signatures of magneto-acoustic waves are observed frequently in different coronal structures. The aim of this paper is to estimate the physical parameters of the slow waves and the quantitative dependence of these parameters on their frequencies in the solar corona loops that are situated above active regions with the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) onboard Solar Dynamic Observatory (SDO). The observed data on 2012-Feb-12, consisting of 300 images with an interval of 24 seconds in the 171 $\\rm{\\AA}$ and 193 $\\rm{\\AA}$ passbands is analyzed for evidence of propagating features as slow waves along the loop structures. Signatures of longitudinal intensity oscillations that are damped rapidly as they travel along the loop structures were found, with periods in the range of a few minutes to few tens of minutes. Also, the projected (apparent) phase speeds, projected damping lengths, damping times and damping qualities of filtered int...

  7. Thickness dependent low-frequency noise characteristics of a-InZnO thin-film transistors under light illumination

    The influence of illumination on the electrical characteristics of amorphous indium–zinc oxide (a-IZO) thin-film transistors (TFTs) has been investigated. The electrical properties are found to depend significantly on the active thickness (TIZO) of the a-IZO TFT. The active thickness is seen to play a major role in the carrier transport mechanism. Based on the carrier fluctuation model, the low-frequency noise (LFN) characteristics of a-IZO devices of varying thicknesses were evaluated before as well as after illumination. Similar to the results of DC and capacitance–voltage (C–V) measurements, the LFN characteristics too show that the light-induced carrier transport becomes significantly enhanced for relatively thick (TIZO ≥ 60 nm) a-IZO devices

  8. Temperature and frequency dependent electrical properties of NiCuZn ferrite with CuO-rich grain boundary segregation

    Highlights: • Sintered NiCuZn ferrite contains CuO-rich segregation along the grain boundaries. • Segregation is allied with different activation energies based on temperature zone. • Both grain boundary and segregated layer posses short-range hopping mechanism. - Abstract: Polycrystalline Ni0.9−yCuyZn0.1Fe1.98O4−δ (y = 0, 0.1 and 0.2) powder was synthesized by conventional solid-state reaction method. X-ray diffraction analysis confirmed single phase cubic spinel phase formation in the calcined powders. An additional phase was observed predominantly after sintering of y = 0.2 compound. The extra phase in the sintered sample is due to the formation of CuO-rich segregation along the grain boundary, which is confirmed by high resolution scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analysis. In order to understand the temperature and frequency dependent electrical properties of segregated ferrite, detailed impedance spectra was investigated on Ni0.7Cu0.2Zn0.1Fe1.98O4−δ in the frequency range of 1 kHz–1 MHz and temperature range of 30–250 °C

  9. Asymmetric and frequency-dependent pollinator-mediated interactions may influence competitive displacement in two vernal pool plants.

    Runquist, Ryan Briscoe; Stanton, Maureen L

    2013-02-01

    A plant species immigrating into a community may experience a rarity disadvantage due to competition for the services of pollinators. These negative reproductive interactions have the potential to lead to competitive displacement or exclusion of a species from a site. In this study, we used one- and two-species arrays of potted plants to test for density and frequency dependence in pollinator-mediated and above-ground intraspecific and interspecific competition between two species of Limnanthes that have overlapping ranges, but rarely occur in close sympatry. There were asymmetric competitive effects; the species responded differently to their frequency within 16-plant replacement series arrays. Limnanthes douglasii rosea experienced stronger reductions in lifetime and per-flower fertility, likely due to pollinator-mediated competition with Limnanthes alba. This effect may be linked to asymmetrical competition through heterospecific pollen transfer. This study demonstrates that pollinator-mediated competition may discourage establishment of L. d. rosea in sites already occupied by its congener. PMID:23134452

  10. The use of magnetic susceptibility and its frequency dependence for delineation of a magnetic stratigraphy in ash-flow tuffs

    Variations in the grain size, amount, and mineralogy of magnetic phases in layered volcanic rocks define a magnetic stratigraphy that can be identified by means of magnetic susceptibility measurements. In ash-flow tuffs, grain size and other variables that control susceptibility are to a large extent a function of the cooling and alteration history. The phases responsible for the susceptibility of ash-flow tuffs consist of post-emplacement high-temperature precipitates of Fe-oxides in volcanic glass, and the phenocrystic Fe-Ti oxides. At Yucca Mountain, Nevada, laterally-continuous high-susceptibility (∼ 10-2 SI) horizons exist in the Paintbrush Tuff due to the presence of either precipitates or phenocrystic Fe-Ti oxides. The frequency dependence of magnetic susceptibility, χ(ω), can be used to discriminate between horizons with multi-domain phenocrystic material. The χ(ω) exhibits a 26% decrease per decade of increasing frequency for precipitate grain sizes where the superparamagnetic single-domain state gives way to stable single-domain behavior, and thus χ(ω) offers an indirect method for rapid estimation of magnetic grain sizes. The interpretation of variations established by field and laboratory susceptibility data has been constrained by petrography and transmission electron microscopy (TEM)

  11. On the frequency-dependent specific heat and TMDSC: Constitutive modelling based on thermodynamics with internal state variables

    To develop constitutive models to represent the thermomechanically chemically coupled behaviour of curing resins, vulcanizing elastomers or melting and crystallizing polymers the technique of DSC is extremely helpful. In the present study, the method of TMDSC is interpreted and evaluated in the context of thermodynamics with internal state variables. The balance equation of energy and the dissipation principle in the form of the Clausius-Duhem inequality form the theoretical basis of our study. Since the pressure and the temperature are the external variables in DSC, the specific Gibbs free energy is used as thermodynamic potential. It depends on temperature, stress and a set of internal state variables to represent the microstructure of the material on a phenomenological basis. The temperature- and internal variable-induced changes in the Gibbs free energy are approximated by a Taylor series up to second order terms. As a substantial result of this work, closed-form expressions for the dynamic calorimetric response due to harmonic temperature perturbations and the frequency-dependent complex heat capacity are derived. The theory allows a physical interpretation of the complex heat capacity and its underlying phenomena and is in accordance with experimental observations from literature.

  12. Low-Frequency Dependence of Conductivity and Dielectric Properties of Polyaniline/ZnFe2O4 Nanocomposites

    G. D. Prasanna; H. S. Jayanna; Ashok R Lamani; M. L. Dinesha; C. S. Naveen; G. J. Shankaramurthy

    2011-01-01

    Conducting polyaniline/ZnFe2O4 nanocomposites are synthesized by using a simple and inexpensive one-step in-situ polymerization method in the presence of ZnFe2O4 nanoparticles.The structural,morphological and electrical properties of the samples are characterized by x-ray diffraction,Fourier transform infrared spectra and scanning electron microscopy.These results reveal the formation of polyaniline/ZnFe2O4 nanocomposites.The morphology of these samples is studied by scanning electron microscopy.Further,the ac conductivity (σac) of these composites is investigated in the frequency range of 1 kHz-10 MHz.The presence of polarons and bipolarons are responsible for the frequency dependence of ac conductivity in these nanocomposites.The ac conductivity is found to be constant up to 1 MHz and thereafter it increases steeply.The ac conductivity of 0.695S·cm-1 at room temperature is observed as the maxima for the polyaniline with 40wt% of the ZnFe2O4 nanocomposite.Polymers are known,in general,as a class of heat sensitive,flexible,electrically insulating,amorphous or semicrystalline materials.The electrical properties of polymers can be modified by the addition of inorganic materials.Nanoscale particles as fillers are attractive due to their intriguing properties arising from the nanosize and resulting large surface area.The insertion of nanoscale materials may improve the electrical and dielectric properties of the host polymers.[1]A large number of polymers are now included in the list of conducting polymers,including polyaniline,polypyrrole,polythiophene,polyparaphenylene,polyphenylene sulphide,polyphenylene vinylene,etc.%Conducting polyaniline/ZnFe2O4 nanocomposites are synthesized by using a simple and inexpensive one-step in-situ polymerization method in the presence of ZnFe2OA nanoparticles. The structural, morphological and electrical properties of the samples are characterized by x-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectra and scanning electron

  13. Temperature and frequency dependence of transport phenomena in co-doped rare earth oxides nanoparticles for ITSOFCs

    Highlights: • Phase pure ceria (Gd–La and Gd–Nd co-doped) as electrolytes for fuel cells. • Facile synthesis is done with composite mediated hydrothermal method. • Significant variation in transport properties with doping concentration is observed. • The Raman spectra confirmed the targeted doping and increase of vacancy sites. • Maximum conductivity achieved was 1.78 S cm−1 for Ce0.5Gd0.25Nd0.25Oδ at 600 °C. - Abstract: The present study is focused on the conductivity enhancement of the doped ceria. Composite mediated hydrothermal method (CMHM) was employed to produce the material. X-ray diffraction was used to determine phase of nanocrystalline Ce1−2xGdxLaxOδ and Ce1−2xGdxNdxOδ (x = 0.1, 0.25). Conduction mechanism (dc conductivity and ac conductivity) in prepared samples was observed as a function of temperature and frequency. DC conductivity was measured in temperature range 300–700 °C. AC conductivity was measured in frequency range 1 kHz to 3 MHz at temperatures 300, 400, 500, 600, and 700 °C. The enhancement in conductivity was observed due to availability of oxygen vacancy sites which was dependent on composition. The Raman measurements supported the electrical conductivity results and more vacancy sites were observed in Raman spectrum in samples which showed maximum conductivities. The maximum conductivity achieved was 1.78 S cm−1 (at 600 °C) for Ce0.5Gd0.25Nd0.25Oδ, which is quite a higher value in these compounds. This made this material a potential candidate for its use as an electrolyte material for Intermediate Temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (ITSOFCs)

  14. Is it possible to infer the frequency-dependent seismic attenuation of fractured materials from high-strain creep tests?

    mallet, celine; quintal, beatriz; caspari, eva; holliger, klaus

    2016-04-01

    The seismic and hydraulic characterization of fractured rocks is an important objective for reservoir development in general and the production of geothermal energy in particular. The attenuation of seismic waves in saturated fractured media is governed by local displacements of the fluid relative to the solid induced by the compressions and extensions associated with the passing wavefield. This phenomenon is generally referred to as wave-induced fluid flow (WIFF). Recent evidence suggests that this energy dissipation mechanism is sensitive to the interconnectivity of the fractures, which offers the perspective of linking seismic observations to the hydraulic properties of fractured rocks. Here, we consider the results of laboratory experiments, which are referred to as creep tests. Such tests consist of applying a constant stress to a water-saturated thermally cracked glass sample and recording the resulting strain response as a function of time. The primary advantages of the considered material are (i) that the fracture network is well documented and (ii) that the homogeneous and non-porous glass matrix limits WIFF to the fracture network. Due to the high stress levels as well as other technical issues, creep tests are not commonly used for laboratory-based measurements of energy dissipation. Therefore, an objective of this study is to explore whether and to what extent such data can be interpreted in terms of the seismic attenuation characteristics of the probed samples, as this might open access to a vast reservoir of corresponding data, notably for cracked materials. Transforming the observed time-dependent stress-strain relation into the Fourier domain, allows us to infer the corresponding frequency-dependent attenuation characteristics, which we then seek to interpret through numerical simulations based on Biot's quasi-static poroelastic equations. The 2D geometry of the fracture network considered in these simulations is derived from a scanning electron

  15. Study of the lacustrine phytoplankton productivity dependence on solar radiation, on the basis of direct high-frequency measurements

    Provenzale, Maria; Ojala, Anne; Heiskanen, Jouni; Erkkilä, Kukka-Maaria; Mammarella, Ivan; Hari, Pertti; Vesala, Timo

    2016-04-01

    One of the main components of the carbon cycle in lakes is phytoplankton. Its in situ photosynthesis and respiration are usually studied with traditional methods (dark and light bottle method, 14C labelling technique). These methods, relying on sampling and incubation, may lead to unrealistic results. They also have a poor temporal resolution, which does not allow the non-linear relationship between photosynthetically active solar radiation (PAR) and photosynthesis to be properly investigated. As a consequence, the phytoplankton net primary productivity (NPP) cannot be parameterised as a function of ambient variables. In 2008 an innovative free-water approach was proposed. It is based on non-dispersive infrared air CO2 probes that, by building an appropriate system, can be used to measure the CO2 concentration in the water at a high-frequency. At that time, the method was tested only on 3 days of data. Here, we deployed it on a boreal lake in Finland for four summers, in order to calculate the NPP and verify its dependence on PAR. The set-up was completed by an eddy-covariance system and water PAR and temperature sensors. In analogy with the procedure typically used in terrestrial ecology, we obtained the phytoplankton NPP computing the mass balance of CO2 in the mixed layer of the lake, i.e. the superficial layer where the conditions are homogeneous and most of the photosynthetic activity takes place. After calculating the NPP , we verified its dependence on PAR. The theoretical model we used was a saturating Michaelis-Menten curve, in which the variables are water temperature and PAR. The equation also contains parameters typical of the phytoplankton communities, which represent their maximum potential photosynthetic rate, their half-saturation constant and their basal respiration. These parameters allow the NPP to be parameterised as a function of T and PAR. For all the analysed year, we found a very good agreement between theory and data (R2 ranged from 0.80 to

  16. Determination of the magnetocrystalline anisotropy constant from the frequency dependence of the specific absorption rate in a frozen ferrofluid

    Mosher, Nathaniel; Perkins-Harbin, Emily; Aho, Brandon; Wang, Lihua; Kumon, Ronald; Rablau, Corneliu; Vaishnava, Prem; Tackett, Ronald; Therapeutic Biomaterials Group Team

    2015-03-01

    Colloidal suspensions of superparamagnetic nanoparticles, known as ferrofluids, are promising candidates for the mediation of magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH). In such materials, the dissipation of heat occurs as a result of the relaxation of the particles in an applied ac magnetic field via the Brownian and Neel mechanisms. In order to isolate and study the role of the Neel mechanism in this process, the sample can be frozen, using liquid nitrogen, in order to suppress the Brownian relaxation. In this experiment, dextran-coated Fe3O4 nanoparticles synthesized via co-precipitation and characterized via transmission electron microscopy and dc magnetization are used as MFH mediators over the temperature range between -70 °C to -10 °C (Brownian-suppressed state). Heating the nanoparticles using ac magnetic field (amplitude ~300 Oe), the frequency dependence of the specific absorption rate (SAR) is calculated between 150 kHz and 350 kHz and used to determine the magnetocrystalline anisotropy of the sample. We would like to thank Fluxtrol, Inc. for their help with this project

  17. Subparsec-scale dynamics of a dusty gas disk exposed to anisotropic AGN radiation with frequency-dependent radiative transfer

    Namekata, Daisuke

    2016-01-01

    We explore the gas dynamics near the dust sublimation radius of active galactic nucleus (AGN). For the purpose, we perform axisymmetric radiation hydrodynamic simulations of a dusty gas disk of radius $\\approx 1\\,\\mathrm{pc}$ around a supermassive black hole of mass $10^{7}\\,\\mathrm{M_{\\odot}}$ taking into account (1) anisotropic radiation of accretion disk, (2) X-ray heating by corona, (3) radiative transfer of infrared (IR) photons reemitted by dust, (4) frequency dependency of direct and IR radiations, and (5) separate temperatures for gas and dust. As a result, we find that for Eddington ratio $\\approx 0.77$, a nearly neutral, dense ($\\approx 10^{6\\operatorname{-}8}\\;\\mathrm{cm^{-3}}$), geometrically-thin ($h/r<0.06$) disk forms with a high velocity ($\\approx 200 \\sim 3000\\;\\mathrm{km/s}$) dusty outflow launched from the disk surface. The disk temperature is determined by the balance between X-ray heating and various cooling, and the disk is almost supported by thermal pressure. Contrary to \\citet{krol...

  18. Plasma frequency and dielectric function dependence on doping and temperature for p-type indium phosphide epitaxial films

    The optical properties of p-type InP epitaxial films with different doping concentrations are investigated by infrared absorption measurements accompanied by reflection and transmission spectra taken from 25 to 300 K. A complete dielectric function (DF) model, including intervalence band (IVB) transitions, free-carrier and lattice absorption, is used to determine the optical constants with improved accuracy in the spectral range from 2 to 35 μm. The IVB transitions by free holes among the split-off, light-hole, and heavy-hole bands are studied using the DF model under the parabolic-band approximation. A good understanding of IVB transitions and the absorption coefficient is useful for designing high operating temperature and high detectivity infrared detectors and other optoelectronic devices. In addition, refractive index values reported here are useful for optoelectronic device designing, such as implementing p-InP waveguides in semiconductor quantum cascade lasers. The temperature dependence of hole effective mass and plasma frequency is also reported.

  19. Dependence of chromatic responses in V1 on visual field eccentricity and spatial frequency: an fMRI study.

    D'Souza, Dany V; Auer, Tibor; Frahm, Jens; Strasburger, Hans; Lee, Barry B

    2016-03-01

    Psychophysical sensitivity to red-green chromatic modulation decreases with visual eccentricity, compared to sensitivity to luminance modulation, even after appropriate stimulus scaling. This is likely to occur at a central, rather than a retinal, site. Blood-oxygenation-level-dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) responses to stimuli designed to separately stimulate different afferent channels' [red-green, luminance, and short-wavelength (S)-cone] circular gratings were recorded as a function of visual eccentricity (±10  deg) and spatial frequency (SF) in human primary visual cortex (V1) and further visual areas (V2v, V3v). In V1, the SF tuning of BOLD fMRI responses became coarser with eccentricity. For red-green and luminance gratings, similar SF tuning curves were found at all eccentricities. The pattern for S-cone modulation differed, with SF tuning changing more slowly with eccentricity than for the other two modalities. This may be due to the different retinal distribution with eccentricity of this receptor type. A similar pattern held in V2v and V3v. This would suggest that transformation or spatial filtering of the chromatic (red-green) signal occurs beyond these areas. PMID:26974942

  20. Frequency-dependent conductivity in tris(acetylacetonato)manganese(III) thin films on Si(1 0 0) substrates

    Thin tris(acetylacetonate)manganese(III) films of amorphous structure were prepared by vacuum deposition on glass and Si (1 0 0) substrates. The as-deposited and annealed-in-vacuum films were characterised by X-ray fluorescence, X-ray diffraction and optical absorption spectroscopy. The prepared title-complex amorphous films were investigated as insulators for Al/insulator/Si(P) metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) structures, which were characterised by the measurement of their capacitance and AC-conductance as a function of gate voltage. From those measurements, State density D it at insulator/semiconductor interface and the density of the fixed charges in the complex insulator were determined. It was found that D it was in order of 1011 eV-1 cm-2 and the surface charge density in the insulator film was in order of 1011-1012 cm-2.The frequency dependence of the electrical conductivity and dielectric properties of MIS structures were studied at room temperature. The results follow the correlated barrier-hopping (CBH) model, from which the fundamental absorption bandgap, the minimum hopping distance and other parameters of the model were determined. This study shows that the tris(acetylacetonate)manganese(III) films grown on Si(1 0 0) is a promising candidate for high-ε dielectric applications. It displays sufficiently high-ε value in the range 30-40

  1. Celiac disease T-cell epitopes from gamma-gliadins: immunoreactivity depends on the genome of origin, transcript frequency, and flanking protein variation

    Salentijn Elma MJ

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Celiac disease (CD is caused by an uncontrolled immune response to gluten, a heterogeneous mixture of wheat storage proteins. The CD-toxicity of these proteins and their derived peptides is depending on the presence of specific T-cell epitopes (9-mer peptides; CD epitopes that mediate the stimulation of HLA-DQ2/8 restricted T-cells. Next to the thoroughly characterized major T-cell epitopes derived from the α-gliadin fraction of gluten, γ-gliadin peptides are also known to stimulate T-cells of celiac disease patients. To pinpoint CD-toxic γ-gliadins in hexaploid bread wheat, we examined the variation of T-cell epitopes involved in CD in γ-gliadin transcripts of developing bread wheat grains. Results A detailed analysis of the genetic variation present in γ-gliadin transcripts of bread wheat (T. aestivum, allo-hexaploid, carrying the A, B and D genome, together with genomic γ-gliadin sequences from ancestrally related diploid wheat species, enabled the assignment of sequence variants to one of the three genomic γ-gliadin loci, Gli-A1, Gli-B1 or Gli-D1. Almost half of the γ-gliadin transcripts of bread wheat (49% was assigned to locus Gli-D1. Transcripts from each locus differed in CD epitope content and composition. The Gli-D1 transcripts contained the highest frequency of canonical CD epitope cores (on average 10.1 per transcript followed by the Gli-A1 transcripts (8.6 and the Gli-B1 transcripts (5.4. The natural variants of the major CD epitope from γ-gliadins, DQ2-γ-I, showed variation in their capacity to induce in vitro proliferation of a DQ2-γ-I specific and HLA-DQ2 restricted T-cell clone. Conclusions Evaluating the CD epitopes derived from γ-gliadins in their natural context of flanking protein variation, genome specificity and transcript frequency is a significant step towards accurate quantification of the CD toxicity of bread wheat. This approach can be used to predict relative levels of CD toxicity of

  2. A versatile phenomenological model for the S-shaped temperature dependence of photoluminescence energy for an accurate determination of the exciton localization energy in bulk and quantum well structures

    Temperature dependence of the photoluminescence (PL) peak energy of bulk and quantum well (QW) structures is studied by using a new phenomenological model for including the effect of localized states. In general an anomalous S-shaped temperature dependence of the PL peak energy is observed for many materials which is usually associated with the localization of excitons in band-tail states that are formed due to potential fluctuations. Under such conditions, the conventional models of Varshni, Viña and Passler fail to replicate the S-shaped temperature dependence of the PL peak energy and provide inconsistent and unrealistic values of the fitting parameters. The proposed formalism persuasively reproduces the S-shaped temperature dependence of the PL peak energy and provides an accurate determination of the exciton localization energy in bulk and QW structures along with the appropriate values of material parameters. An example of a strained InAs0.38P0.62/InP QW is presented by performing detailed temperature and excitation intensity dependent PL measurements and subsequent in-depth analysis using the proposed model. Versatility of the new formalism is tested on a few other semiconductor materials, e.g. GaN, nanotextured GaN, AlGaN and InGaN, which are known to have a significant contribution from the localized states. A quantitative evaluation of the fractional contribution of the localized states is essential for understanding the temperature dependence of the PL peak energy of bulk and QW well structures having a large contribution of the band-tail states. (paper)

  3. Learning to be different: Acquired skills, social learning, frequency dependence, and environmental variation can cause behaviourally mediated foraging specializations

    Tinker, M.T.; Mangel, M.; Estes, J.A.

    2009-01-01

    ) Offspring can learn foraging skills from their mothers (matrilineal social learning). (6) Food abundance is limited, such that average individual energy reserves are low Additionally, the following factors increase the likelihood of alternative specializations co-occurring in a predator population: (1) The predator exerts effective top-down control of prey abundance, resulting in frequency-dependent dynamics. (2) There is stochastic Variation in prey population dynamics, but this Variation is neither too extreme in magnitude nor too 'slow' with respect to the time required for an individual forager to learn new foraging skills. For a given predator population, we deduce that the degree of specialization will be highest for those prey types requiring complex capture or handling skills, while prey species that are both profitable and easy to capture and handle will be included in the diet of all individuals. Frequency-dependent benefits of selecting alternative prey types, combined with the ability of foragers to improve their foraging skills by learning, and transmit learned skills to offspring, can result in behaviourally mediated foraging specialization, and also lead to the co-existence of alternative specializations. The extent of such specialization is predicted to be a variable trait, increasing in locations or years when intra-specific competition is high relative to inter-specific competition. ?? 2009 M. Tim Tinker.

  4. Frequency dependent negative capacitance effect and dielectric properties of swift heavy ion irradiated Ni/oxide/n-GaAs Schottky diode

    Bobby, A.; Shiwakoti, N.; Verma, S.; Asokan, K.; Antony, B. K.

    2016-05-01

    The Ni/n-GaAs Schottky barrier diode having thin interfacial oxide layer was subjected to 25 MeV C4+ ion irradiation at selected fluences. The in-situ capacitance and dielectric properties were investigated in the 1 KHz to 5 MHz frequency range. The results show a decrease in capacitance with increase in ion fluence at low frequencies. Interestingly, a negative capacitance effect was also observed in this frequency range in all the samples. As a consequence, changes were observed in parameters like series resistance, conductance, dielectric loss, dielectric constant, loss tangent and ac electrical conductivity. At high frequencies, the capacitance reaches the geometric value 'C0'. The results were interpreted in terms of the generation of irradiation induced traps, carrier capture and emission from deep and shallow states and its frequency dependent saturation effects.

  5. Mitigating artifacts in back-projection source imaging with implications for frequency-dependent properties of the Tohoku-Oki earthquake

    Meng, Lingsen; Ampuero, Jean-Paul; Luo, Yingdi; Wu, Wenbo; Ni, Sidao

    2012-12-01

    Comparing teleseismic array back-projection source images of the 2011 Tohoku-Oki earthquake with results from static and kinematic finite source inversions has revealed little overlap between the regions of high- and low-frequency slip. Motivated by this interesting observation, back-projection studies extended to intermediate frequencies, down to about 0.1 Hz, have suggested that a progressive transition of rupture properties as a function of frequency is observable. Here, by adapting the concept of array response function to non-stationary signals, we demonstrate that the "swimming artifact", a systematic drift resulting from signal non-stationarity, induces significant bias on beamforming back-projection at low frequencies. We introduce a "reference window strategy" into the multitaper-MUSIC back-projection technique and significantly mitigate the "swimming artifact" at high frequencies (1 s to 4 s). At lower frequencies, this modification yields notable, but significantly smaller, artifacts than time-domain stacking. We perform extensive synthetic tests that include a 3D regional velocity model for Japan. We analyze the recordings of the Tohoku-Oki earthquake at the USArray and at the European array at periods from 1 s to 16 s. The migration of the source location as a function of period, regardless of the back-projection methods, has characteristics that are consistent with the expected effect of the "swimming artifact". In particular, the apparent up-dip migration as a function of frequency obtained with the USArray can be explained by the "swimming artifact". This indicates that the most substantial frequency-dependence of the Tohoku-Oki earthquake source occurs at periods longer than 16 s. Thus, low-frequency back-projection needs to be further tested and validated in order to contribute to the characterization of frequency-dependent rupture properties.

  6. Time dependence of micronucleus frequency in germinating onion root tip cells and growth decrease of plant's roots irradiated by accelerated heavy ions

    Micronucleus induction of germinating onion seed root tip cells delayed with increase of radiation dose. The frequency at the time the cells showed the maximum frequency indicated a dose relationship of upward bell shape. Growth decrease of germinating green sorgo seed roots by radiations were severer than onion and it showed also linear energy transfer (LET) dependence like onion. Alphalfa seeds are very strong for radiation, however, finally showed recognizable growth decrease at high dose of 60 Gy, and no LET dependence was found. (author)

  7. Kinetic isotope effect of the 16O + 36O2 and 18O + 32O2 isotope exchange reactions: Dominant role of reactive resonances revealed by an accurate time-dependent quantum wavepacket study

    The O + O2 isotope exchange reactions play an important role in determining the oxygen isotopic composition of a number of trace gases in the atmosphere, and their temperature dependence and kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) provide important constraints on our understanding of the origin and mechanism of these and other unusual oxygen KIEs important in the atmosphere. This work reports a quantum dynamics study of the title reactions on the newly constructed Dawes-Lolur-Li-Jiang-Guo (DLLJG) potential energy surface (PES). The thermal reaction rate coefficients of both the 18O + 32O2 and 16O + 36O2 reactions obtained using the DLLJG PES exhibit a clear negative temperature dependence, in sharp contrast with the positive temperature dependence obtained using the earlier modified Siebert-Schinke-Bittererova (mSSB) PES. In addition, the calculated KIE shows an improved agreement with the experiment. These results strongly support the absence of the “reef” structure in the entrance/exit channels of the DLLJG PES, which is present in the mSSB PES. The quantum dynamics results on both PESs attribute the marked KIE to strong near-threshold reactive resonances, presumably stemming from the mass differences and/or zero point energy difference between the diatomic reactant and product. The accurate characterization of the reactivity for these near-thermoneutral reactions immediately above the reaction threshold is important for correct characterization of the thermal reaction rate coefficients

  8. Age-Related Enhancement of a Protein Synthesis-Dependent Late Phase of LTP Induced by Low Frequency Paired-Pulse Stimulation in Hippocampus

    Huang, Yan-You; Kandel, Eric R.

    2006-01-01

    Protein synthesis-dependent late phase of LTP (L-LTP) is typically induced by repeated high-frequency stimulation (HFS). This form of L-LTP is reduced in the aged animal and is positively correlated with age-related memory loss. Here we report a novel form of protein synthesis-dependent late phase of LTP in the CA1 region of hippocampus induced by…

  9. On the source-frequency dependence of fracture-orientation estimates from shear-wave transmission experiments

    Santos, Leo K.; de Figueiredo, J. J. S.; Omoboya, Bode; Schleicher, Jörg; Stewart, Robert R.; Dyaur, Nikolay

    2015-03-01

    Shear-wave propagation through anisotropic fractured or cracked media can provide valuable information about these fracture swarms and their orientations. The main goal of this work is to recover information about fracture orientation based on the shear waveforms (S-waveforms). For this study, we carried out ultrasonic S-wave measurements in a synthetic physical model made of epoxy resin (isotropic matrix proxy), with small cylindrical rubber strips as inclusions (artificial cracks) inserted in it to simulate a homogeneous anisotropic medium. In these experiments, we used low, intermediate, and high frequency shear-wave sources, with frequencies 90, 431, and 840 kHz. We integrated and interpreted the resulting S-wave seismograms, cross-correlation panels and anisotropic parameter-analysis curves. We were able to estimate the crack orientation in single-orientation fracture zones. The high frequency peaks associated with scattered S-waves provided interpretable information about the fracture orientations when the propagation direction was parallel to the fracture plane. The analysis was possible utilizing results from frequency-versus-polarization-angle curves. Moreover, we applied a bandpass filtering process to the intermediate and high frequency seismograms in order to obtain low frequency seismograms. A spectral analysis using frequency-wavenumber (F-K) spectra supports this filtering process. The results obtained using an analysis of cross-correlograms and the Thomsen parameter γ extracted from filtered high-frequency data were quite similar to those obtained using a low-frequency source. This highlighted the possibility of using less expensive high-frequency sources to recover information about the fracture set.

  10. Dependences of the attenuation and the backscatter coefficients on the frequency and the porosity in bovine trabecular bone: application of the binary mixture model

    The present study aims to investigate the dependences of the attenuation and the backscatter coefficients on the frequency and the porosity in bovine trabecular bone in vitro. The frequency dependent attenuation and backscatter coefficients were measured in 22 bovine femoral trabecular bone samples over a frequency range from 1.4 to 3.0 MHz by using a pair of transducers with a diameter of 12.7 mm and a center frequency of 2.25 MHz. The binary mixture model for ultrasonic scattering in trabecular bone, in which trabecular bone is assumed to be an isotropic binary mixture composed of a bone matrix and marrow, was applied to predict the measurements. The experimental results showed that the attenuation and the backscatter coefficients increased with increasing frequency from 1.4 to 3.0 MHz and decreased with increasing porosity from 66.9 to 91.5%. The predictions of the binary mixture model showed good agreements with the measurements, suggesting that scattering may be the dominant attenuation mechanism in dense bovine trabecular bone at frequencies from 1.4 to 3.0 MHz.

  11. Hemispheric asymmetry of frequency-dependent suppression in the ipsilateral primary motor cortex during finger movement: a functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    Hayashi, Masamichi J; Saito, Daisuke N; Aramaki, Yu; Asai, Tatsuya; Fujibayashi, Yasuhisa; Sadato, Norihiro

    2008-12-01

    Electrophysiological studies have suggested that the activity of the primary motor cortex (M1) during ipsilateral hand movement reflects both the ipsilateral innervation and the transcallosal inhibitory control from its counterpart in the opposite hemisphere, and that their asymmetry might cause hand dominancy. To examine the asymmetry of the involvement of the ipsilateral motor cortex during a unimanual motor task under frequency stress, we conducted block-design functional magnetic resonance imaging with 22 normal right-handed subjects. The task involved visually cued unimanual opponent finger movement at various rates. The contralateral M1 showed symmetric frequency-dependent activation. The ipsilateral M1 showed task-related deactivation at low frequencies without laterality. As the frequency of the left-hand movement increased, the left M1 showed a gradual decrease in the deactivation. This data suggests a frequency-dependent increased involvement of the left M1 in ipsilateral hand control. By contrast, the right M1 showed more prominent deactivation as the frequency of the right-hand movement increased. This suggests that there is an increased transcallosal inhibition from the left M1 to the right M1, which overwhelms the right M1 activation during ipsilateral hand movement. These results demonstrate the dominance of the left M1 in both ipsilateral innervation and transcallosal inhibition in right-handed individuals. PMID:18413350

  12. Frequency-dependent acceleration of cardiac repolarization by progesterone underlying its cardiac protection against drug-induced proarrhythmic effects in female rabbits.

    Cheng, Jianhua; Zhang, Juan; Ma, Xiaohong; Su, Dan

    2012-08-15

    Concurrent supplement of estradiol and progesterone has been shown to reduce the cardiac sensitivity to class III antiarrhythmic agent-induced arrhythmias in ovariectomized rabbits. To understand the underlying cardiac electrophysiological mechanisms of the hormones, present study explored the modulation of progesterone and estradiol on repolarization and its frequency dependence in papillary muscles of female rabbit right ventricles by glass microelectrode technique. Results showed that progesterone shortened action potential duration for 90% repolarization (APD(90)) whereas estradiol prolonged APD(90) and those actions on APD(90) were concentration-dependent for both hormones at 1.0-30 μM (Pstimulation frequencies (0.2-3.3Hz). The shortening of APD(90) by progesterone (10 μM) was enhanced with the increase in frequencies reaching a statistic significance at frequencies ≥1.0 Hz, whereas the prolongation of APD(90) by estradiol (3 μM) was weakened with the increase in frequencies and the significant change was observed at frequencies ≤2.0 Hz (Pearly afterdepolarization induced after by dofetilide (0.1 μM), a class III antiarrhythmic agent, were significantly less or lower in the papillary muscles pretreated with progesterone than in those pretreated with estradiol (P<0.01 or P<0.05). In conclusion, progesterone has a reverse modulating affect on cardiac repolarization to that of estradiol. By acceleration of ventricular repolarization, progesterone may reduce the susceptibility of females to class III antiarrhythmic agents-induced proarrhythmic affection. PMID:22705061

  13. Temperature dependence of frequency dispersion in III–V metal-oxide-semiconductor C-V and the capture/emission process of border traps

    This paper presents a detailed investigation of the temperature dependence of frequency dispersion observed in capacitance-voltage (C-V) measurements of III-V metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) devices. The dispersion in the accumulation region of the capacitance data is found to change from 4%–9% (per decade frequency) to ∼0% when the temperature is reduced from 300 K to 4 K in a wide range of MOS capacitors with different gate dielectrics and III-V substrates. We show that such significant temperature dependence of C-V frequency dispersion cannot be due to the temperature dependence of channel electrostatics, i.e., carrier density and surface potential. We also show that the temperature dependence of frequency dispersion, and hence, the capture/emission process of border traps can be modeled by a combination of tunneling and a “temperature-activated” process described by a non-radiative multi-phonon model, instead of a widely believed single-step elastic tunneling process

  14. Comparison of the Frequency-dependent Effects of Amiodarone on Ventricular Electrophysiology in Congestive Heart Failure Canine Models and Normal Dogs

    Zhou Shuxian; Zhang Yuling; Lei Juan; Wu Wei; Zhang Xuming

    2007-01-01

    Objectives To compare the frequency-dependent effects of amiodarone (Ami) on ventricular electrophysiology in right ventricular rapid pacing-induced congestive heart failure (CHF) canine models.Methods Thirty-two dogs were randomized into four groups: the control group, the Ami group in which the normal dogs were given Ami orally 300 mg a day for 4~5 weeks, the CHF group induced by right ventricular rapid pacing ( 240 pulses. min -1 for 4 ~ 5 weeks), and the group of CHF dogs fed with Ami orally 300 mg a day for 4 ~ 5 weeks. The techniques of electrical stimulation and monophasic action potential (MAP) recording were used in the electrophysiology studies. Results The effects of Ami on ventricular MAP duration(MAPD90) and effective refractory period (VERP)were not frequency-dependent in CHF dogs. There was also no frequency-dependent effect on the increase in the ratio of VERP to MAPD90 (VERP/MAPD90). The prolongation of ventricular conduction time was frequencydependent. Conclusions The frequency-dependent effects of Ami on ventricular electrophysiology in CHF dogs were similar to that in normal dogs.

  15. Temperature dependence of frequency dispersion in III–V metal-oxide-semiconductor C-V and the capture/emission process of border traps

    Vais, Abhitosh, E-mail: Abhitosh.Vais@imec.be; Martens, Koen; DeMeyer, Kristin [Department of Electrical Engineering, KU Leuven, B-3000 Leuven (Belgium); IMEC, Kapeldreef 75, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Lin, Han-Chung; Ivanov, Tsvetan; Collaert, Nadine; Thean, Aaron [IMEC, Kapeldreef 75, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Dou, Chunmeng [Frontier Research Center, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama 226-8502 (Japan); Xie, Qi; Maes, Jan [ASM International, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Tang, Fu; Givens, Michael [ASM International, Phoenix, Arizona 85034-7200 (United States); Raskin, Jean-Pierre [Institute of Information and Communication Technologies, Electronics and Applied Mathematics, Universiteé Catholique de Louvain, B-1348 Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium)

    2015-08-03

    This paper presents a detailed investigation of the temperature dependence of frequency dispersion observed in capacitance-voltage (C-V) measurements of III-V metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) devices. The dispersion in the accumulation region of the capacitance data is found to change from 4%–9% (per decade frequency) to ∼0% when the temperature is reduced from 300 K to 4 K in a wide range of MOS capacitors with different gate dielectrics and III-V substrates. We show that such significant temperature dependence of C-V frequency dispersion cannot be due to the temperature dependence of channel electrostatics, i.e., carrier density and surface potential. We also show that the temperature dependence of frequency dispersion, and hence, the capture/emission process of border traps can be modeled by a combination of tunneling and a “temperature-activated” process described by a non-radiative multi-phonon model, instead of a widely believed single-step elastic tunneling process.

  16. Understanding the thickness-dependent effective lifetime of crystalline silicon passivated with a thin layer of intrinsic hydrogenated amorphous silicon using a nanometer-accurate wet-etching method

    Deligiannis, Dimitrios; Marioleas, Vasileios; Vasudevan, Ravi; Visser, Cassan C. G.; van Swaaij, René A. C. M. M.; Zeman, Miro

    2016-06-01

    This work studies the dependency of the effective lifetime on the a-Si:H layer thickness of c-Si substrates passivated with intrinsic a-Si:H. This is experimentally investigated by using a soft wet-etching method that enables accurate control of the a-Si:H layer thickness. In this way, variations in the effective lifetime down to thicknesses of a few nanometers are studied, while excluding effects originating from the deposition conditions of a-Si:H when samples of different thicknesses are fabricated. For thin passivation layers, results show a strong thickness dependency of the effective lifetime, which is mainly influenced by the recombination at the external a-Si:H surfaces. For thicker passivation layers, the effective lifetime is predominantly determined by the bulk a-Si:H and/or c-Si defect density. During the etching of the a-Si:H passivation layers, a gradient in the Cody gap for our samples is observed. This gradient is accompanied by a stronger decrease in the effective lifetime and is attributed to a decrease in the a-Si:H band gap and valence band offset. The observed changes in lifetime with a-Si:H layer thickness are supported with AFORS-HET simulations. When a gradient in the a-Si:H passivation layer band gap is used, simulations can reproduce the experimental results.

  17. Dependence of in-situ Bose condensate size on frequency of RF-field used for evaporative cooling

    Mishra, S R; Tiwari, S K; Rawat, H S

    2016-01-01

    We report the results of in-situ characterization of $ ^{87}$Rb atom cloud in a quadrupole Ioffe configuration (QUIC) magnetic trap after radio frequency (RF) evaporative cooling of the trapped atom cloud. The in-situ absorption images of the atom cloud have shown clear bimodal optical density (OD) profiles which indicate the Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) phase transition in the trapped gas. Also, we report the measured variation in the sizes of the condensate and thermal clouds with the final frequency in the frequency scan of the RF-field applied for evaporative cooling. The results are consistent with the theoretical understanding and predictions reported earlier.

  18. Dynamic multiple scattering theory of the Huggins coefficient for discrete Gaussian chains. II. Numerical computations of the frequency dependence and steady state limit

    Perico, Angelo; La Ferla, Roberto; Freed, Karl F.

    1987-05-01

    Numerical calculations are presented for the frequency dependent Huggins coefficient based on the formal derivation provided in paper I using the dynamical multiple scattering theory for discrete Gaussian chains. The calculations employ fast Fourier transform methods and confirm the analytic complexity of this frequency dependence as previously anticipated from our calculations of the concentration dependence of the normal mode autocorrelation function. The harmonic spring model is considered because this simple limit is amenable to closed form solution, displaying the frequency dependence of the relaxation rates and providing a useful check on the difficult numerical computations for higher numbers n of beads. The steady state Huggins coefficient is also calculated with carefully optimized Gauss-Laguerre quadrature methods which permit extrapolation to n→∞. The calculated steady state value of 0.33 lies below experimental data for theta solutions, and an extensive discussion of the experimental data is provided to understand the discrepancy. One major factor, suggested by Schrag, arises from a strong concentration dependence of the individual bead friction coefficient.

  19. Correction for frequency-dependent hydrophone response to nonlinear pressure waves using complex deconvolution and rarefactional filtering: application with fiber optic hydrophones.

    Wear, Keith; Liu, Yunbo; Gammell, Paul M; Maruvada, Subha; Harris, Gerald R

    2015-01-01

    Nonlinear acoustic signals contain significant energy at many harmonic frequencies. For many applications, the sensitivity (frequency response) of a hydrophone will not be uniform over such a broad spectrum. In a continuation of a previous investigation involving deconvolution methodology, deconvolution (implemented in the frequency domain as an inverse filter computed from frequency-dependent hydrophone sensitivity) was investigated for improvement of accuracy and precision of nonlinear acoustic output measurements. Timedelay spectrometry was used to measure complex sensitivities for 6 fiber-optic hydrophones. The hydrophones were then used to measure a pressure wave with rich harmonic content. Spectral asymmetry between compressional and rarefactional segments was exploited to design filters used in conjunction with deconvolution. Complex deconvolution reduced mean bias (for 6 fiber-optic hydrophones) from 163% to 24% for peak compressional pressure (p+), from 113% to 15% for peak rarefactional pressure (p-), and from 126% to 29% for pulse intensity integral (PII). Complex deconvolution reduced mean coefficient of variation (COV) (for 6 fiber optic hydrophones) from 18% to 11% (p+), 53% to 11% (p-), and 20% to 16% (PII). Deconvolution based on sensitivity magnitude or the minimum phase model also resulted in significant reductions in mean bias and COV of acoustic output parameters but was less effective than direct complex deconvolution for p+ and p-. Therefore, deconvolution with appropriate filtering facilitates reliable nonlinear acoustic output measurements using hydrophones with frequency-dependent sensitivity. PMID:25585399

  20. Admittance–voltage profiling of AlxGa1−xN/GaN heterostructures: Frequency dependence of capacitance and conductance

    Admittance–voltage profiling of AlxGa1−xN/GaN heterostructures was used to determine the frequency dependent capacitance and conductance of FET devices in the frequency range from 50 Hz to 1 MHz. The nominally undoped low pressure metal-organic vapor-phase epitaxy structures were grown with an Al-content of 30%. An additional 1 nm thick AlN interlayer was placed in one structure before the Al0.3Ga0.7N layer growth. For frequencies below 108 Hz it is convenient to use equivalent circuits to represent electric or dielectric properties of a material, a method widely used, for example, in impedance spectroscopy. We want to emphasize the relation between frequency dependent admittance–voltage profiling and the corresponding equivalent circuits to the complex dielectric function. Debye and Drude models are used for the description of the frequency dependent admittance profiles in a range of depletion onset of the two-dimensional electron gas. Capacitance- and conductance-frequency profiles are fitted in the entire measured range by combining both models. Based on our results, we see contributions to the two-dimensional electron gas for our samples from surface states (80%) as well as from background doping in the Al0.3Ga0.7N barriers (20%). The specific resistance of the layers below the gate is above 105 Ω cm for both samples and increases with increasing negative bias, i.e., the layers below the gate are essentially depleted. We propose that the resistance due to free charge carriers, determined by the Drude model, is located between gate and drain and, because of the AlN interlayer, the resistance is lowered by a factor of about 30 if compared to the sample without an AlN layer

  1. Fermi resonance and solvent dependence of the vC=O frequency shifts of Raman spectra: cyclohexanone and 2-cyclohexene-1-one

    Nam, S I; Lee, M S; Jung, Y M

    2001-01-01

    The carbonyl stretching vibration, vC=O of 2-cyclohexene-1-one , is in Fermi resonance with a combination tone. The amount of Fermi resonance interaction between these two modes is dependent upon the amount of solute/solvent interaction due to hydrogen bonding between the carbonyl oxygen and the solvent proton. The corrected vC=O frequency of 2-cyclohexene-1-one occurs at a lower frequency than the observed vC=O mode of cyclohexanone, possibly caused by expanded conjugation effects. The carbonyl stretching modes of cyclic ketones were also affected by interaction with the ROH/CCl sub 4 mixed solvent system.

  2. Controlling the high frequency response of H2 by ultra-short tailored laser pulses: A time-dependent configuration interaction study

    We combine the stochastic pulse optimization (SPO) scheme with the time-dependent configuration interaction singles method in order to control the high frequency response of a simple molecular model system to a tailored femtosecond laser pulse. For this purpose, we use H2 treated in the fixed nuclei approximation. The SPO scheme, as similar genetic algorithms, is especially suited to control highly non-linear processes, which we consider here in the context of high harmonic generation. Here, we will demonstrate that SPO can be used to realize a “non-harmonic” response of H2 to a laser pulse. Specifically, we will show how adding low intensity side frequencies to the dominant carrier frequency of the laser pulse and stochastically optimizing their contribution can create a high-frequency spectral signal of significant intensity, not harmonic to the carrier frequency. At the same time, it is possible to suppress the harmonic signals in the same spectral region, although the carrier frequency is kept dominant during the optimization

  3. Controlling the high frequency response of H{sub 2} by ultra-short tailored laser pulses: A time-dependent configuration interaction study

    Schönborn, Jan Boyke; Saalfrank, Peter; Klamroth, Tillmann, E-mail: klamroth@uni-potsdam.de [Institut für Chemie, Universität Potsdam, Karl-Liebknecht-Str. 24-25, D-14476 Potsdam-Golm (Germany)

    2016-01-28

    We combine the stochastic pulse optimization (SPO) scheme with the time-dependent configuration interaction singles method in order to control the high frequency response of a simple molecular model system to a tailored femtosecond laser pulse. For this purpose, we use H{sub 2} treated in the fixed nuclei approximation. The SPO scheme, as similar genetic algorithms, is especially suited to control highly non-linear processes, which we consider here in the context of high harmonic generation. Here, we will demonstrate that SPO can be used to realize a “non-harmonic” response of H{sub 2} to a laser pulse. Specifically, we will show how adding low intensity side frequencies to the dominant carrier frequency of the laser pulse and stochastically optimizing their contribution can create a high-frequency spectral signal of significant intensity, not harmonic to the carrier frequency. At the same time, it is possible to suppress the harmonic signals in the same spectral region, although the carrier frequency is kept dominant during the optimization.

  4. Frequency-Dependent Regulation of Follicle-Stimulating Hormone β by Pulsatile Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone Is Mediated by Functional Antagonism of bZIP Transcription Factors ▿

    Ciccone, Nick A.; Xu, Shuyun; Lacza, Charlemagne T.; Carroll, Rona S.; Kaiser, Ursula B.

    2010-01-01

    Oscillatory synthesis and secretion of the gonadotropins, follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH), under the control of pulsatile hypothalamic gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH), is essential for normal reproductive development and fertility. The molecular mechanisms by which various patterns of pulsatile GnRH regulate gonadotrope responsiveness remain poorly understood. In contrast to the α and LHβ subunit genes, FSHβ subunit transcription is preferentially stimulated at low rather than high frequencies of pulsatile GnRH. In this study, mutation of a cyclic AMP response element (CRE) within the FSHβ promoter resulted in the loss of preferential GnRH stimulation at low pulse frequencies. We hypothesized that high GnRH pulse frequencies might stimulate a transcriptional repressor(s) to attenuate the action of CRE binding protein (CREB) and show that inducible cAMP early repressor (ICER) fulfills such a role. ICER was not detected under basal conditions, but pulsatile GnRH stimulated ICER to a greater extent at high than at low pulse frequencies. ICER binds to the FSHβ CRE site to reduce CREB occupation and abrogates both maximal GnRH stimulation and GnRH pulse frequency-dependent effects on FSHβ transcription. These data suggest that ICER production antagonizes the stimulatory action of CREB to attenuate FSHβ transcription at high GnRH pulse frequencies, thereby playing a critical role in regulating cyclic reproductive function. PMID:20008557

  5. Frequency dependence of the maximum operating temperature for quantum-cascade lasers up to 5.4 THz

    Wienold, M. [Paul-Drude-Institut für Festkörperelektronik, Hausvogteiplatz 5–7, 10117 Berlin (Germany); Humboldt Universität zu Berlin, Institut für Physik, Newtonstr. 15, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Deutsches Zentrum für Luft und Raumfahrt, Rutherfordstr. 2, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Röben, B.; Lü, X.; Rozas, G.; Schrottke, L.; Biermann, K.; Grahn, H. T., E-mail: htgrahn@pdi-berlin.de [Paul-Drude-Institut für Festkörperelektronik, Hausvogteiplatz 5–7, 10117 Berlin (Germany)

    2015-11-16

    We report on the observation of an approximately linear reduction in the maximum operating temperature with an increasing emission frequency for terahertz quantum-cascade lasers between 4.2 and 5.4 THz. These lasers are based on the same design type, but vary in period length and barrier height for the cascade structure. The sample emitting at the highest frequency around 5.4 THz can be operated in pulsed mode up to 56 K. We identify an additional relaxation channel for electrons by longitudinal optical phonon scattering from the upper to the lower laser level and increasing optical losses toward higher frequencies as major processes, leading to the observed temperature behavior.

  6. Frequency dependence of the maximum operating temperature for quantum-cascade lasers up to 5.4 THz

    We report on the observation of an approximately linear reduction in the maximum operating temperature with an increasing emission frequency for terahertz quantum-cascade lasers between 4.2 and 5.4 THz. These lasers are based on the same design type, but vary in period length and barrier height for the cascade structure. The sample emitting at the highest frequency around 5.4 THz can be operated in pulsed mode up to 56 K. We identify an additional relaxation channel for electrons by longitudinal optical phonon scattering from the upper to the lower laser level and increasing optical losses toward higher frequencies as major processes, leading to the observed temperature behavior

  7. Frequency dependence of the maximum operating temperature for quantum-cascade lasers up to 5.4 THz

    Wienold, M.; Röben, B.; Lü, X.; Rozas, G.; Schrottke, L.; Biermann, K.; Grahn, H. T.

    2015-11-01

    We report on the observation of an approximately linear reduction in the maximum operating temperature with an increasing emission frequency for terahertz quantum-cascade lasers between 4.2 and 5.4 THz. These lasers are based on the same design type, but vary in period length and barrier height for the cascade structure. The sample emitting at the highest frequency around 5.4 THz can be operated in pulsed mode up to 56 K. We identify an additional relaxation channel for electrons by longitudinal optical phonon scattering from the upper to the lower laser level and increasing optical losses toward higher frequencies as major processes, leading to the observed temperature behavior.

  8. 考虑频变参数补偿算法的长线距离保护%A Compensation Algorithm Based Distance Protection Considering Frequency-dependent Parameters

    焦在滨; 杨黎明; 宋国兵; 姚旭; 索南加乐

    2013-01-01

    The distributing and frequency-dependent parameter characteristics of ultra-high voltage (UHV) long transmission lines lead to the nonlinear relationship between the measured impedance of conventional distance protection and fault distance. The harmonics are remarkable in the early failure period, and only if the frequency-dependent parameter characteristics are considered, the long transmission line distance protection could action correctly. A new distance protection case that considering the frequency-dependent parameters is proposed. Based on electromagnetic field theory and long transmission equations, the calculation of voltage and current in frequency-dependent parameters transmission line is decomposed to the calculation in distributing parameters transmission line and the concatenation of a compensation algorithm, which could be transformed to a finite impulse response (FIR) filter. According to this, the voltage and current of the terminal of the distance section could be calculated from the measuring point, and the distance protection can be set by the fault location. Simulation results show that this new method is fast and accurate in both time domain and action.%特高压长距离输电线路的测量阻抗与故障距离不成正比,并且故障暂态过程中谐波丰富,只有计及频变参数的影响,长输电线路距离保护才能够正确地反映故障点位置.为此,根据传输线路方程,在分布参数模型的基础上构造补偿矩阵,利用有限脉冲响应滤波器描述线路频变参数特性.实际应用中,新的距离保护原理由保护安装处的测量电压和电流,利用长距离传输线路精确数学模型计算整定点处的电压和电流,并以此为观测点构造距离保护.仿真结果表明,所提出的算法能够在时域里快速、准确地识别故障位置,有效提高了长线距离保护的性能.

  9. Size-Dependent Relaxation Properties of Monodisperse Magnetite Nanoparticles Measured Over Seven Decades of Frequency by AC Susceptometry.

    Ferguson, R Matthew; Khandhar, Amit P; Jonasson, Christian; Blomgren, Jakob; Johansson, Christer; Krishnan, Kannan M

    2013-07-01

    Magnetic relaxation is exploited in innovative biomedical applications of magnetic particles such as magnetic particle imaging (MPI), magnetic fluid hyperthermia, and bio-sensing. Relaxation behavior should be optimized to achieve high performance imaging, efficient heating, and good SNR in bio-sensing. Using two AC susceptometers with overlapping frequency ranges, we have measured the relaxation behavior of a series of monodisperse magnetic particles and demonstrated that this approach is an effective way to probe particle relaxation characteristics from a few Hz to 10 MHz, the frequencies relevant for MPI, hyperthermia, and sensing. PMID:25473124

  10. The frequency dependence of the viscous component of the magnetic susceptibility of lunar rock and soil samples

    Hanneken, J. W.; Vant-Hull, L. L.; Carnes, J. G.

    1976-01-01

    The susceptibility of two lunar samples (a soil and a low metamorphic grade breccia) has been measured in a weak field - 0.001 Oe - and as a function of frequency from 0.032 to 1.0 Hz. The measurements were made using a superconducting magnetometer. The results show that the susceptibility decreases linearly with the log of frequency. This observation is in agreement with a theoretical model for viscous decay based on the Neel theory of single-domain and superparamagnetic grains. The relation derived agrees with a model in which there is a uniform distribution of relaxation times.

  11. Stress depended changes in activityof gp red blood cells receptors and its correction by therahertz waves at nitric oxide frequency

    Kirichuk V.F.

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The effect of electromagnetic radiation in the terahertz range frequencies of molecular spectrum of emission and absorption of nitric oxide 150.176–150.664 GHz for the restoration of the impaired carbohydrate component and functional activity glikoproteid receptors of erythrocytes of white rats in a state of acute imm obilization stress. Shown that exposure to electromagnetic waves at these frequencies is the normalization of the increased content of b-D-galactose in the carbohydrate component and the restoration of the impaired activity of the receptors glikoproteid erythrocytes

  12. MAINTENANCE OF PERIODICITY DEFINITION OF INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINE DEPENDING ON THE FREQUENCY MODEL PARAMETERS OF THE FILTER

    Atroshchenko V. A.; Shevtsov Y. D.; Kobzeva S. A.; Chiglikova N. D.

    2013-01-01

    In this article we study connection between frequency characteristics of oil filter and lubricant system condition of internal combustion engine. Method is suggested, it allows to trace changes of technical condition of oil filter, engine oil, engine and to estimate a residual resource of working capacity up to maintenance

  13. Frequency-dependent changes in the regional amplitude and synchronization of resting-state functional MRI in stroke.

    Jianfang Zhu

    Full Text Available Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (R-fMRI has been intensively used to assess alterations of inter-regional functional connectivity in patients with stroke, but the regional properties of brain activity in stroke have not yet been fully investigated. Additionally, no study has examined a frequency effect on such regional properties in stroke patients, although this effect has been shown to play important roles in both normal brain functioning and functional abnormalities. Here we utilized R-fMRI to measure the amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations (ALFF and regional homogeneity (ReHo, two major methods for characterizing the regional properties of R-fMRI, in three different frequency bands (slow-5: 0.01-0.027 Hz; slow-4: 0.027-0.73 Hz; and typical band: 0.01-0.1 Hz in 19 stroke patients and 15 healthy controls. Both the ALFF and ReHo analyses revealed changes in brain activity in a number of brain regions, particularly the parietal cortex, in stroke patients compared with healthy controls. Remarkably, the regions with changed activity as detected by the slow-5 band data were more extensive, and this finding was true for both the ALFF and ReHo analyses. These results not only confirm previous studies showing abnormality in the parietal cortex in patients with stroke, but also suggest that R-fMRI studies of stroke should take frequency effects into account when measuring intrinsic brain activity.

  14. Statistical frequency-dependent analysis of trial-to-trial variability in single time series by recurrence plots

    Tamara Tosic

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available For decades, research in neuroscience has supported the hypothesis that brain dynamics exhibits recurrent metastable states connected by transients, which together encode fundamental neural information processing. To understand the system’s dynamics it is important to detect such recurrence domains, but it is challenging to extract them from experimental neuroscience datasets due to the large trial-to-trial variability. The proposed methodology extracts recurrent metastable states in univariate time series by transforming datasets into their time-frequency representations and computing recurrence plots based on instantaneous spectral power values in various frequency bands. Additionally, a new statistical inference analysis compares different trial recurrence plots with corresponding surrogates to obtain statistically significant recurrent structures. This combination of methods is validated by applying it to two artificial datasets. In a final study of visually-evoked Local Field Potentials in partially anesthetized ferrets, the methodology is able to reveal recurrence structures of neural responses with trial-to-trial variability. Focusing on different frequency bands, the delta-band activity is much less recurrent than alpha-band activity. Moreover, alpha-activity is susceptible to pre-stimuli, while delta-activity is much less sensitive to pre-stimuli. This difference in recurrence structures in different frequency bands indicates diverse underlying information processing steps in the brain.

  15. The dependence of high-order harmonic generation on the laser frequency and inter-nuclear distance from multi-atom molecular ions

    Yufeng Wang; Zhenrong Sun; Xiangyun Zhang; Jun Xiao; Li Deng; Weiping Zhang; Zugeng Wang; Zhinan Zeng

    2006-01-01

    High-order harmonic generation from one-dimensional (1D) multi-atom molecular ions in an ultra-short laser field is theoretically investigated. The dynamics of the electron in a linearly polarized intense laserfield is analyzed in terms of 1D Schr(o)dinger equation with the Crank-Nicolson algorithm. The dependence of high-order harmonics on the laser frequency and the inter-nuclear distance is discussed. It is found that the optimum range of inter-nuclear distance should be changed to get extended harmonic generation for different laser frequency, and the lower frequency laser pulse is favorable to higher order harmonic generation as the inter-nuclear distance increases.

  16. The Frequency-Dependence of the NMR Longitudinal Relaxation Rate, T(1)(-1), of Water in Cysts of the Brine Shrimp

    Egan, Thomas F.

    The NMR spin-lattice relaxation rate, T(,1)(' -1), of water is independent of the Larmor frequency, (omega)/2(pi), in the normal rf range. However, T(,1)('-1) of intracellular water in biological systems, which accounts for as much as 80% of the cell mass, is frequency-dependent. This indicates that the NMR properties of water in the cellular environment are influenced by long-correlation time processes due to the interaction of water with proteins and other macromolecular constituents of the cell. In this research, the relaxation rate T(,1)(' -1) of water in the Artemia (brine shrimp) cyst is examined as a function of: (1) the proton NMR Larmor frequency for .01 brine shrimp cysts are influenced by additional relexation mechanisms; translational diffusion of hydration water is one possibility.

  17. Frequency and field dependence of the a.c. magnetic susceptibility of YBCO pellets fabricated by a citrate pyrolysis and ozone annealing

    It is well known that low field diamagnetic properties of sintered high Tc superconducting samples are dominated by weak Josephson couplings between grains. Taking into account the effect of shielding currents on the junctions, a simple phenomenological model predicts the frequency dependence of the low field magnetic susceptibility. In this paper the authors report preliminary results on such measurements performed on synterized samples fabricated by the citrate pyrolysis method. In the magnetic field range between 1 Gauss and 20 Gauss, the temperature dependence of both the real and the imaginary part of the magnetic susceptibility has been studied at some frequency between 10 Hz and 120 Hz. The experimental data are in agreement with the qualitative expected behavior

  18. A new possibility for production of sub-picosecond x-ray pulses using a time dependent radio frequency orbit deflection

    Zholents, A.

    2015-10-21

    It is shown that two radio frequency deflecting cavities with slightly different frequencies can be used to produce time-dependent orbit deflection to a few special electron bunches circulating in a synchrotron without affecting the majority of the electron bunches. These special bunches produce an x-ray pulse in which transverse position or angle, or both, are correlated with time. The x-ray pulse is then shortened, either with an asymmetrically cut crystal that acts as a pulse compressor, or with an angular aperture such as a narrow slit positioned downstream. The implementation of this technique creates a highly flexible environment for synchrotrons in which users of most beamlines will be able to easily select between the x-rays originated by the standard electron bunches and the short x-ray pulses originated by the special electron bunches carrying a time-dependent transverse correlation.

  19. A new possibility for production of sub-picosecond x-ray pulses using a time dependent radio frequency orbit deflection

    It is shown that two radio frequency deflecting cavities with slightly different frequencies can be used to produce time-dependent orbit deflection to a few special electron bunches circulating in a synchrotron without affecting the majority of the electron bunches. These special bunches produce an x-ray pulse in which transverse position or angle, or both, are correlated with time. The x-ray pulse is then shortened, either with an asymmetrically cut crystal that acts as a pulse compressor, or with an angular aperture such as a narrow slit positioned downstream. The implementation of this technique creates a highly flexible environment for synchrotrons in which users of most beamlines will be able to easily select between the x-rays originated by the standard electron bunches and the short x-ray pulses originated by the special electron bunches carrying a time-dependent transverse correlation

  20. A new possibility for production of sub-picosecond x-ray pulses using a time dependent radio frequency orbit deflection

    Zholents, A.

    2015-10-01

    It is shown that two radio frequency deflecting cavities with slightly different frequencies can be used to produce time-dependent orbit deflection to a few special electron bunches circulating in a synchrotron without affecting the majority of the electron bunches. These special bunches produce an x-ray pulse in which transverse position or angle, or both, are correlated with time. The x-ray pulse is then shortened, either with an asymmetrically cut crystal that acts as a pulse compressor, or with an angular aperture such as a narrow slit positioned downstream. The implementation of this technique creates a highly flexible environment for synchrotrons in which users of most beamlines will be able to easily select between the x-rays originated by the standard electron bunches and the short x-ray pulses originated by the special electron bunches carrying a time-dependent transverse correlation.

  1. Implementation of the CCSD-PCM linear response function for frequency dependent properties in solution: Application to polarizability and specific rotation

    Caricato, Marco

    2013-09-01

    This work reports the first implementation of the frequency dependent linear response (LR) function for the coupled cluster singles and doubles method (CCSD) combined with the polarizable continuum model of solvation for the calculation of frequency dependent properties in solution. In particular, values of static and dynamic polarizability as well as specific rotation are presented for various test molecules. Model calculations of polarizability show that a common approximation used in the definition of the LR function with solvation models recovers over 70% of the full response while maintaining a computational cost comparable to gas phase LR-CCSD. Calculations of specific rotation for three compounds for which gas phase methods predict the wrong sign of the rotation show that accounting for the electronic response of the solvent may be essential to assign the correct absolute configuration of chiral molecules.

  2. A New Possibility for Production of Sub-picosecond X-ray Pulses using a Time Dependent Radio Frequency Orbit Deflection

    Zholents, A. A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2015-05-01

    It is shown that two radio frequency deflecting cavities with slightly different frequencies can be used to produce time-dependent orbit deflection to a few special electron bunches while keeping the majority of the electron bunches unaffected. These special bunches produce an x-ray pulse in which transverse position or angle, or both, are correlated with time. The x-ray pulses are then shortened, either with an asymmetrically cut crystal that acts as a pulse compressor, or with an angular aperture such as a narrow slit positioned downstream. The implementation of this technique creates a highly flexible environment for synchrotrons in which users of most beamlines will be able to easily select between the x-rays originated by the standard electron bunches and the short x-ray pulses originated by the special electron bunches carrying a time-dependent transverse correlation.

  3. Age-related enhancement of a protein synthesis-dependent late phase of LTP induced by low frequency paired-pulse stimulation in hippocampus

    Huang, Yan-You; Kandel, Eric R.

    2006-01-01

    Protein synthesis-dependent late phase of LTP (L-LTP) is typically induced by repeated high-frequency stimulation (HFS). This form of L-LTP is reduced in the aged animal and is positively correlated with age-related memory loss. Here we report a novel form of protein synthesis-dependent late phase of LTP in the CA1 region of hippocampus induced by a brief 1-Hz paired-pulse stimulation (PP-1 Hz, 1 min). In contrast to L-LTP induced by HFS, the late phase of PP-1 Hz LTP does not exist in young ...

  4. Frequency- and axial-field-dependent circular magnetization reversal in a stress-annealed Fe-based nanocrystalline wire

    Absract: After suitable annealing under a tensile stress, Fe73.5Cu1Nb3Si13.5B9 amorphous wire becomes the nano-structured material together with a transverse anisotropy field Hk=-3.2 kA/m. Its circular permeability, μ=μ'-jμ'', was determined from the measurements of the impedance, as a function of the frequency (f=333-33,333 Hz) and amplitude (IAC=0.1-100 mA) of AC current and the axially applied DC field (H=0-89 kA/m). We found that the circular technical magnetization of this sample carried out by the spontaneous domain nucleation process. The influences of the AC current frequency and the axial DC field on the circular magnetization have been studied

  5. Size-Dependent Relaxation Properties of Monodisperse Magnetite Nanoparticles Measured Over Seven Decades of Frequency by AC Susceptometry

    Ferguson, R. Matthew; Khandhar, Amit P.; Jonasson, Christian; Blomgren, Jakob; Johansson, Christer; Krishnan, Kannan M

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic relaxation is exploited in innovative biomedical applications of magnetic particles such as magnetic particle imaging (MPI), magnetic fluid hyperthermia, and bio-sensing. Relaxation behavior should be optimized to achieve high performance imaging, efficient heating, and good SNR in bio-sensing. Using two AC susceptometers with overlapping frequency ranges, we have measured the relaxation behavior of a series of monodisperse magnetic particles and demonstrated that this approach is an...

  6. A Study Regarding the Efficiency of the Electromagnetic Induction Thermal Treatment Process Depending to the Work Frequency

    MICH-VANCEA Claudiu; Teodor LEUCA; NAGY Stefan

    2011-01-01

    The paper is focused on the induction heating for thermal treatments to make more efficient this process, using the numerical simulation. In the first part we analyze the parameters that can changethe dept penetration of the electromagnetic field in the hardened piece. The frequency of the electromagnetic field can be imposed, and by this parameter we can control the hardened layer in piece. In second part of the paper, is presented the numerical simulation in 1Dfor the induction heating proc...

  7. The Many Faces of Affect: A Multilevel Model of Drinking Frequency/Quantity and Alcohol Dependence Symptoms Among Young Adults

    Simons, Jeffrey S.; Wills, Thomas A.; Neal, Dan J.

    2016-01-01

    This research tested a multilevel structural equation model of associations between 3 aspects of affective functioning (state affect, trait affect, and affective lability) and 3 alcohol outcomes (likelihood of drinking, quantity on drinking days, and dependence symptoms) in a sample of 263 college students. Participants provided 49 days of experience sampling data over 1.3 years in a longitudinal burst design. Within-person results: At the daily level, positive affect was directly associated with greater likelihood and quantity of alcohol consumption. Daily negative affect was directly associated with higher consumption on drinking days and with higher dependence symptoms. Between-person direct effects: Affect lability was associated with higher trait negative, but not positive, affect. Trait positive affect was inversely associated with the proportion of drinking days, whereas negative affectivity predicted a greater proportion of drinking days. Affect lability exhibited a direct association with dependence symptoms. Between-person indirect effects: Trait positive affect was associated with fewer dependence symptoms via proportion of drinking days. Trait negative affect was associated with greater dependence symptoms via proportion of drinking days. The results distinguish relations of positive and negative affect to likelihood versus amount of drinking and state versus trait drinking outcomes, and highlight the importance of affect variability for predicting alcohol dependence symptoms. PMID:24933278

  8. A More Accurate Fourier Transform

    Courtney, Elya

    2015-01-01

    Fourier transform methods are used to analyze functions and data sets to provide frequencies, amplitudes, and phases of underlying oscillatory components. Fast Fourier transform (FFT) methods offer speed advantages over evaluation of explicit integrals (EI) that define Fourier transforms. This paper compares frequency, amplitude, and phase accuracy of the two methods for well resolved peaks over a wide array of data sets including cosine series with and without random noise and a variety of physical data sets, including atmospheric $\\mathrm{CO_2}$ concentrations, tides, temperatures, sound waveforms, and atomic spectra. The FFT uses MIT's FFTW3 library. The EI method uses the rectangle method to compute the areas under the curve via complex math. Results support the hypothesis that EI methods are more accurate than FFT methods. Errors range from 5 to 10 times higher when determining peak frequency by FFT, 1.4 to 60 times higher for peak amplitude, and 6 to 10 times higher for phase under a peak. The ability t...

  9. Stiffness of sphere–plate contacts at MHz frequencies: dependence on normal load, oscillation amplitude, and ambient medium

    Jana Vlachová; Rebekka König; Diethelm Johannsmann

    2015-01-01

    The stiffness of micron-sized sphere–plate contacts was studied by employing high frequency, tangential excitation of variable amplitude (0–20 nm). The contacts were established between glass spheres and the surface of a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM), where the resonator surface had been coated with either sputtered SiO2 or a spin-cast layer of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA). The results from experiments undertaken in the dry state and in water are compared. Building on the shifts in th...

  10. Thickness-dependent coherent phonon frequency in ultrathin FeSe/SrTiO3 films

    Yang, Shuolong [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Stanford Univ., Stanford, CA (United States); Sobota, Jonathan A. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Leuenberger, Dominik [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Stanford Univ., Stanford, CA (United States); Kemper, Alexander F. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Lee, James J. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Stanford Univ., Stanford, CA (United States); Schmitt, Felix T. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Stanford Univ., Stanford, CA (United States); Li, Wei [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Stanford Univ., Stanford, CA (United States); Moore, Rob G. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Stanford Univ., Stanford, CA (United States); Kirchmann, Patrick S. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Shen, Zhi -Xun [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Stanford Univ., Stanford, CA (United States)

    2015-06-01

    Ultrathin FeSe films grown on SrTiO3 substrates are a recent milestone in atomic material engineering due to their important role in understanding unconventional superconductivity in Fe-based materials. By using femtosecond time- and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy, we study phonon frequencies in ultrathin FeSe/SrTiO3 films grown by molecular beam epitaxy. After optical excitation, we observe periodic modulations of the photoelectron spectrum as a function of pump–probe delay for 1-unit-cell, 3-unit-cell, and 60-unit-cell thick FeSe films. The frequencies of the coherent intensity oscillations increase from 5.00 ± 0.02 to 5.25 ± 0.02 THz with increasing film thickness. By comparing with previous works, we attribute this mode to the Se A1g phonon. The dominant mechanism for the phonon softening in 1-unit-cell thick FeSe films is a substrate-induced lattice strain. Results demonstrate an abrupt phonon renormalization due to a lattice mismatch between the ultrathin film and the substrate.

  11. Field strength dependence of the high-frequency viscoelastic relaxation process in polyaniline/silicone oil electrorheological suspensions

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Polyaniline (PANI was synthesized via oxidative coupling polymerization in acid conditions and de-doped in ammonia solution. The electrorheological (ER properties of the PANI/silicone oil suspensions were investigated in the oscillatory mode shear, with particular focus on the high frequency region, where a crossover in G′(ω and G″(ω signals the onset of a dissipative relaxation process, presumed to be associated with motion of PANI particles within the fibrillar structures generated by the electric field. The relationship between the crossover frequency, ωc, and the electric field strength (E was investigated as a function of matrix viscosity and shear strain. We find that ωc increases with increasing electric field strength, and decreases with increases of matrix viscosity and strain amplitude. These observations are in qualitative agreement with a theoretical model, which relates the relaxation mechanism to the competition between hydrodynamic and electrostatic forces between PANI particles within thick fibrillar structures. At the crossover point, a critical scaling relation is found relating two dimensionless parameters, the Mason number (Mn, and the Peclet number (Pe, viz. Mn~(Pe0.09.

  12. Real-time CARS imaging reveals a calpain-dependent pathway for paranodal myelin retraction during high-frequency stimulation.

    Terry B Huff

    Full Text Available High-frequency electrical stimulation is becoming a promising therapy for neurological disorders, however the response of the central nervous system to stimulation remains poorly understood. The current work investigates the response of myelin to electrical stimulation by laser-scanning coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS imaging of myelin in live spinal tissues in real time. Paranodal myelin retraction at the nodes of Ranvier was observed during 200 Hz electrical stimulation. Retraction was seen to begin minutes after the onset of stimulation and continue for up to 10 min after stimulation was ceased, but was found to reverse after a 2 h recovery period. The myelin retraction resulted in exposure of Kv 1.2 potassium channels visualized by immunofluorescence. Accordingly, treating the stimulated tissue with a potassium channel blocker, 4-aminopyridine, led to the appearance of a shoulder peak in the compound action potential curve. Label-free CARS imaging of myelin coupled with multiphoton fluorescence imaging of immuno-labeled proteins at the nodes of Ranvier revealed that high-frequency stimulation induced paranodal myelin retraction via pathologic calcium influx into axons, calpain activation, and cytoskeleton degradation through spectrin break-down.

  13. Age-dependent frequencies of NPM1 mutations and FLT3-ITD in patients with normal karyotype AML (NK-AML).

    Schneider, Friederike; Hoster, Eva; Schneider, Stephanie; Dufour, Annika; Benthaus, Tobias; Kakadia, Purvi M; Bohlander, Stefan K; Braess, Jan; Heinecke, Achim; Sauerland, Maria C; Berdel, Wolfgang E; Buechner, Thomas; Woermann, Bernhard J; Feuring-Buske, Michaela; Buske, Christian; Creutzig, Ursula; Thiede, Christian; Zwaan, Michel C; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, Marry M; Reinhardt, Dirk; Hiddemann, Wolfgang; Spiekermann, Karsten

    2012-01-01

    Prognosis of AML in elderly patients is poor due to adverse patient characteristics and comorbidities. In addition, disease-associated parameters reveal differences between older and younger patients with AML. Survival in normal karyotype AML (NK-AML) is influenced by different clinical and molecular markers. The aim of this work was to investigate the frequencies of molecular markers in patients with NK-AML with a focus on NPM1 mutations and FLT3-ITD in different age groups. In the present study, we analyzed the frequencies of mutations of NPM1 and FLT3-ITD in a cohort of 1,321 adult patients and 148 children with AML treated within the AMLCG99, the AML98, and AML04 trials and their distribution in different age groups. Additionally, the frequencies of mutations in CEBPA genes, FLT3-TKD, and MLL-PTD were analyzed in the cohort with NK-AML (n = 729). Our data show that the presence of mutations of NPM1 (from 60% to 40%) and FLT3-ITD (from 50% to 20%) significantly decreased with age in adult AML. Consequently, the proportion of NPM1-/FLT3-ITD- patients increased with age. The decreasing frequency of NPM1 mutations in elderly patients was paralleled by a reduced complete remission (CR) rate in the elderly of 55% compared to 80% in the younger patients. By contrast, the frequencies of other gene mutations, like FLT3-TKD and MLL-PTD, and mutations in CEBPA were not age-dependent. The decreasing frequency of the favorable NPM1 mutations with increasing age may partially explain the worse outcome in the elderly patients. Furthermore, the increasing amount of elderly patients without NPM1 mutations or FLT3-ITD suggests that other molecular and clinical risk factors may influence prognosis in this age group. PMID:21744003

  14. Does scaling or addition provide the correct frequency dependence of β(-ωσ; ω1, ω2) at the correlated level? An investigation for six molecules

    Dalskov, Erik K.; Jensen, Hans Jørgen Aa; Oddershede, Jens

    1997-01-01

    an underestimation of the frequency dependence if scaling or addition is applied. There does not seem to be a simple way to infer anything about the validity of scaling or addition for β∥ from either the lower lying excitations and their intensities or from the frequency dependence of the dipole...

  15. Fabricating off-diagonal components of frequency-dependent linear and nonlinear polarizabilities of doped quantum dots by Gaussian white noise

    We make a rigorous exploration of the profiles of off-diagonal components of frequency-dependent linear (αxy, αyx), first nonlinear (βxyy, βyxx), and second nonlinear (γxxyy, γyyxx) polarizabilities of quantum dots driven by Gaussian white noise. The quantum dot is doped with repulsive Gaussian impurity. Noise has been applied additively and multiplicatively to the system. An external oscillatory electric field has also been applied to the system. Gradual variations of external frequency, dopant location, and noise strength give rise to interesting features of polarizability components. The observations reveal intricate interplay between noise strength and dopant location which designs the polarizability profiles. Moreover, the mode of application of noise also modulates the polarizability components. Interestingly, in case of additive noise the noise strength has no role on polarizabilities whereas multiplicative noise invites greater delicacy in them. The said interplay provides a rather involved framework to attain stable, enhanced, and often maximized output of linear and nonlinear polarizabilities. - Highlights: • Linear and nonlinear polarizabilities of quantum dot are studied. • The polarizability components are off-diagonal and frequency-dependent. • Quantum dot is doped with a repulsive impurity. • Doped system is subject to Gaussian white noise. • Mode of noise application affects polarizabilities

  16. Fabricating off-diagonal components of frequency-dependent linear and nonlinear polarizabilities of doped quantum dots by Gaussian white noise

    Saha, Surajit [Department of Chemistry, Bishnupur Ramananda College, Bishnupur, Bankura 722122, West Bengal (India); Ganguly, Jayanta [Department of Chemistry, Brahmankhanda Basapara High School, Basapara, Birbhum 731215, West Bengal (India); Ghosh, Manas, E-mail: pcmg77@rediffmail.com [Department of Chemistry, Physical Chemistry Section, Visva Bharati University, Santiniketan, Birbhum 731 235, West Bengal (India)

    2015-07-15

    We make a rigorous exploration of the profiles of off-diagonal components of frequency-dependent linear (α{sub xy}, α{sub yx}), first nonlinear (β{sub xyy}, β{sub yxx}), and second nonlinear (γ{sub xxyy}, γ{sub yyxx}) polarizabilities of quantum dots driven by Gaussian white noise. The quantum dot is doped with repulsive Gaussian impurity. Noise has been applied additively and multiplicatively to the system. An external oscillatory electric field has also been applied to the system. Gradual variations of external frequency, dopant location, and noise strength give rise to interesting features of polarizability components. The observations reveal intricate interplay between noise strength and dopant location which designs the polarizability profiles. Moreover, the mode of application of noise also modulates the polarizability components. Interestingly, in case of additive noise the noise strength has no role on polarizabilities whereas multiplicative noise invites greater delicacy in them. The said interplay provides a rather involved framework to attain stable, enhanced, and often maximized output of linear and nonlinear polarizabilities. - Highlights: • Linear and nonlinear polarizabilities of quantum dot are studied. • The polarizability components are off-diagonal and frequency-dependent. • Quantum dot is doped with a repulsive impurity. • Doped system is subject to Gaussian white noise. • Mode of noise application affects polarizabilities.

  17. Accurate Finite Difference Algorithms

    Goodrich, John W.

    1996-01-01

    Two families of finite difference algorithms for computational aeroacoustics are presented and compared. All of the algorithms are single step explicit methods, they have the same order of accuracy in both space and time, with examples up to eleventh order, and they have multidimensional extensions. One of the algorithm families has spectral like high resolution. Propagation with high order and high resolution algorithms can produce accurate results after O(10(exp 6)) periods of propagation with eight grid points per wavelength.

  18. Spin dynamics and frequency dependence of magnetic damping study in soft ferromagnetic FeTaC film with a stripe domain structure

    Samantaray, B., E-mail: iitg.biswanath@gmail.com; Ranganathan, R.; Mandal, P. [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhannagar, Calcutta 700 064 (India); Singh, Akhilesh K.; Perumal, A. [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Guwahati, Guwahati - 781039 (India)

    2015-06-15

    Perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) and low magnetic damping are the key factors for the free layer magnetization switching by spin transfer torque technique in magnetic tunnel junction devices. The magnetization precessional dynamics in soft ferromagnetic FeTaC thin film with a stripe domain structure was explored in broad band frequency range by employing micro-strip ferromagnetic resonance technique. The polar angle variation of resonance field and linewidth at different frequencies have been analyzed numerically using Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation by taking into account the total free energy density of the film. The numerically estimated parameters Landé g-factor, PMA constant, and effective magnetization are found to be 2.1, 2 × 10{sup 5} erg/cm{sup 3} and 7145 Oe, respectively. The frequency dependence of Gilbert damping parameter (α) is evaluated by considering both intrinsic and extrinsic effects into the total linewidth analysis. The value of α is found to be 0.006 at 10 GHz and it increases monotonically with decreasing precessional frequency.

  19. Spin dynamics and frequency dependence of magnetic damping study in soft ferromagnetic FeTaC film with a stripe domain structure

    B. Samantaray

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA and low magnetic damping are the key factors for the free layer magnetization switching by spin transfer torque technique in magnetic tunnel junction devices. The magnetization precessional dynamics in soft ferromagnetic FeTaC thin film with a stripe domain structure was explored in broad band frequency range by employing micro-strip ferromagnetic resonance technique. The polar angle variation of resonance field and linewidth at different frequencies have been analyzed numerically using Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation by taking into account the total free energy density of the film. The numerically estimated parameters Landé g-factor, PMA constant, and effective magnetization are found to be 2.1, 2 × 105 erg/cm3 and 7145 Oe, respectively. The frequency dependence of Gilbert damping parameter (α is evaluated by considering both intrinsic and extrinsic effects into the total linewidth analysis. The value of α is found to be 0.006 at 10 GHz and it increases monotonically with decreasing precessional frequency.

  20. Spin dynamics and frequency dependence of magnetic damping study in soft ferromagnetic FeTaC film with a stripe domain structure

    Perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) and low magnetic damping are the key factors for the free layer magnetization switching by spin transfer torque technique in magnetic tunnel junction devices. The magnetization precessional dynamics in soft ferromagnetic FeTaC thin film with a stripe domain structure was explored in broad band frequency range by employing micro-strip ferromagnetic resonance technique. The polar angle variation of resonance field and linewidth at different frequencies have been analyzed numerically using Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation by taking into account the total free energy density of the film. The numerically estimated parameters Landé g-factor, PMA constant, and effective magnetization are found to be 2.1, 2 × 105 erg/cm3 and 7145 Oe, respectively. The frequency dependence of Gilbert damping parameter (α) is evaluated by considering both intrinsic and extrinsic effects into the total linewidth analysis. The value of α is found to be 0.006 at 10 GHz and it increases monotonically with decreasing precessional frequency

  1. Habitat assessment ability of bumble-bees implies frequency-dependent selection on floral rewards and display size

    Biernaskie, Jay M; Gegear, Robert J

    2007-01-01

    Foraging pollinators could visit hundreds of flowers in succession on mass-flowering plants, yet they often visit only a small number—potentially saving the plant from much self-pollination among its own flowers (geitonogamy). This study tests the hypothesis that bumble-bee (Bombus impatiens) residence on a particular plant depends on an assessment of that plant's reward value relative to the overall quality experienced in the habitat. In a controlled environment, naive bees were given experi...

  2. AC susceptibility of Sr2RuO4-Sr3Ru2O7 eutectics: Dependence on AC field strength and frequency

    The low-field AC susceptibility of a eutectic crystal of the Sr2RuO4-Sr3Ru2O7 system exhibits superconducting transition features at three temperatures. We investigate the dependence on AC field strength from 0.021 to 2.1 Oe-rms and frequency from 17 to 3 kHz. The two lower-temperature peaks in the imaginary part originate in the Sr3Ru2O7 part. The lowest-temperature peak is exceedingly sensitive to the field amplitude and shifts to lower temperatures with increasing amplitude. By contrast, it slightly shifts to higher temperatures with increasing frequency. These results support that the sensitive features involve weak links forming the screening paths

  3. Comparative study of time-dependent effects of 4 and 8 Hz mechanical vibration at infrasound frequency on E. coli K-12 cells proliferation.

    Martirosyan, Varsik; Ayrapetyan, Sinerik

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present work is to study the time-dependent effects of mechanical vibration (MV) at infrasound (IS) frequency at 4 and 8 Hz on E. coli K-12 growth by investigating the cell proliferation, using radioactive [(3)H]-thymidine assay. In our previous work it was suggested that the aqua medium can serve as a target through which the biological effect of MV on microbes could be realized. At the same time it was shown that microbes have mechanosensors on the surface of the cells and can sense small changes of the external environment. The obtained results were shown that the time-dependent effects of MV at 4 and 8 Hz frequency could either stimulate or inhibit the growth of microbes depending from exposure time. It more particularly, the invention relates to a method for controlling biological functions through the application of mechanical vibration, thus making it possible to artificially control the functions of bacterial cells, which will allow us to develop method that can be used in agriculture, industry, medicine, biotechnology to control microbial growth. PMID:24725172

  4. Time- and frequency-dependent model of time-resolved coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) with a picosecond-duration probe pulse

    Stauffer, Hans U.; Miller, Joseph D.; Slipchenko, Mikhail N.; Meyer, Terrence R.; Prince, Benjamin D.; Roy, Sukesh; Gord, James R.

    2014-01-01

    The hybrid femtosecond/picosecond coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (fs/ps CARS) technique presents a promising alternative to either fs time-resolved or ps frequency-resolved CARS in both gas-phase thermometry and condensed-phase excited-state dynamics applications. A theoretical description of time-dependent CARS is used to examine this recently developed probe technique, and quantitative comparisons of the full time-frequency evolution show excellent accuracy in predicting the experimental vibrational CARS spectra obtained for two model systems. The interrelated time- and frequency-domain spectral signatures of gas-phase species produced by hybrid fs/ps CARS are explored with a focus on gas-phase N2 vibrational CARS, which is commonly used as a thermometric diagnostic of combusting flows. In particular, we discuss the merits of the simple top-hat spectral filter typically used to generate the ps-duration hybrid fs/ps CARS probe pulse, including strong discrimination against non-resonant background that often contaminates CARS signal. It is further demonstrated, via comparison with vibrational CARS results on a time-evolving solvated organic chromophore, that this top-hat probe-pulse configuration can provide improved spectral resolution, although the degree of improvement depends on the dephasing timescales of the observed molecular modes and the duration and timing of the narrowband final pulse. Additionally, we discuss the virtues of a frequency-domain Lorentzian probe-pulse lineshape and its potential for improving the hybrid fs/ps CARS technique as a diagnostic in high-pressure gas-phase thermometry applications.

  5. Endomorphin-2 is released from newborn rat primary sensory neurons in a frequency- and calcium-dependent manner.

    Scanlin, Heather L; Carroll, Elizabeth A; Jenkins, Victoria K; Balkowiec, Agnieszka

    2008-05-01

    Recent evidence indicates that endomorphins, endogenous mu-opioid receptor (MOR) agonists, modulate synaptic transmission in both somatic and visceral sensory pathways. Here we show that endomorphin-2 (END-2) is expressed in newborn rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) and nodose-petrosal ganglion complex (NPG) neurons, and rarely co-localizes with brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). In order to examine activity-dependent release of END-2 from neurons, we established a model using dispersed cultures of DRG and NPG cells activated by patterned electrical field stimulation. To detect release of END-2, we developed a novel rapid capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), in which END-2 capture antibody was added to neuronal cultures shortly before their electrical stimulation. The conventional assay was effective at reliably detecting END-2 only when the cells were stimulated in the presence of CTAP, a MOR-selective antagonist. This suggests that the strength of the novel assay is related primarily to rapid capture of released END-2 before it binds to endogenous MORs. Using the rapid capture ELISA, we found that stimulation protocols known to induce plastic changes at sensory synapses were highly effective at releasing END-2. Removal of extracellular calcium or blocking voltage-activated calcium channels significantly reduced the release. Together, our data provide the first evidence that END-2 is expressed by newborn DRG neurons of all sizes found in this age group, and can be released from these, as well as from NPG neurons, in an activity-dependent manner. These results point to END-2 as a likely mediator of activity-dependent plasticity in sensory pathways. PMID:18513316

  6. High frequency stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus leads to presynaptic GABA(B-dependent depression of subthalamo-nigral afferents.

    Anton Dvorzhak

    Full Text Available Patients with akinesia benefit from chronic high frequency stimulation (HFS of the subthalamic nucleus (STN. Among the mechanisms contributing to the therapeutic success of HFS-STN might be a suppression of activity in the output region of the basal ganglia. Indeed, recordings in the substantia nigra pars reticulata (SNr of fully adult mice revealed that HFS-STN consistently produced a reduction of compound glutamatergic excitatory postsynaptic currents at a time when the tetrodotoxin-sensitive components of the local field potentials had already recovered after the high frequency activation. These observations suggest that HFS-STN not only alters action potential conduction on the way towards the SNr but also modifies synaptic transmission within the SNr. A classical conditioning-test paradigm was then designed to better separate the causes from the indicators of synaptic depression. A bipolar platinum-iridium macroelectrode delivered conditioning HFS trains to a larger group of fibers in the STN, while a separate high-ohmic glass micropipette in the rostral SNr provided test stimuli at minimal intensity to single fibers. The conditioning-test interval was set to 100 ms, i.e. the time required to recover the excitability of subthalamo-nigral axons after HFS-STN. The continuity of STN axons passing from the conditioning to the test sites was examined by an action potential occlusion test. About two thirds of the subthalamo-nigral afferents were occlusion-negative, i.e. they were not among the fibers directly activated by the conditioning STN stimulation. Nonetheless, occlusion-negative afferents exhibited signs of presynaptic depression that could be eliminated by blocking GABA(B receptors with CGP55845 (1 µM. Further analysis of single fiber-activated responses supported the proposal that the heterosynaptic depression of synaptic glutamate release during and after HFS-STN is mainly caused by the tonic release of GABA from co-activated striato

  7. Expression of Heat Shock Proteins (HSPs in Aged Skeletal Muscles Depends on the Frequency and Duration of Exercise Training

    Jeong-Seok Kim, Young-Hee Lee, Do-Yourl Choi, Ho-Keun Yi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The skeletal muscle in aged rats adapts rapidly following a period of exercise. This adaptation includes structural remodeling and biochemical changes such as an up-regulation of antioxidant enzymes, content of stress and heat shock proteins (HSPs. However, the associated molecular mechanisms mediating different types of exercise training-induced adaptations are not yet completely understood. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of duration and frequency exercise on the expression of HSPs, antioxidant enzymes, and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPKs in the skeletal muscles of aged rats. Young (3-month-old and aged (20-month-old male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to 6 groups and extensor digitorum longus (EDL; fast twitch muscle fiber and soleus (SOL; slow twitch muscle fiber skeletal muscles were collected immediately. The expression pattern of HSPs in skeletal muscles was decreased in old groups compared with young groups. Especially, HSPs showed lower expression in SOL than EDL muscle. Interestingly, HSPs in aged rats was increased significantly after S1 (single long-duration; 1×30 min, 5 days/week for 6 weeks and M1 types (multiple short-duration; 3×10 min·day−1, 5 days·week−1 for 6 weeks than S2 (single long-duration; 1×30 min, 3 days/week for 6 weeks and M2 (multiple short-duration; 3×10 min·day−1, 3 days·week−1 for 6 weeks types of exercise training. Also, superoxide dismutase (SODs showed similar expression as HSP did. On the contrary, the p-ERK and p-JNK were down regulated. In addition, p-p38 level in the SOL muscle was activated markedly in all exercise groups. These results demonstrate that increasing of HSP expression through duration and frequency exercise can lead to protection and training-induced adaptation against aging-induced structural weakness in skeletal muscles.

  8. The frequency of re-planning and its variability dependent on the modification of the re-planning criteria and IGRT correction strategy in head and neck IMRT

    To analyse the frequency of re-planning and its variability dependent on the IGRT correction strategy and on the modification of the dosimetric criteria for re-planning for the spinal cord in head and neck IG-IMRT. Daily kV-control-CTs of six head and neck patients (=175 CTs) were analysed. All volumes of interest were re-contoured using deformable image registration. Three IGRT correction strategies were simulated and the resulting dose distributions were computed for all fractions. Different sets of criteria with varying dose thresholds for re-planning were investigated. All sets of criteria ensure equivalent target coverage of both CTVs, but vary in the tolerance threshold of the spinal cord. The variations of the D95 and D2 in respect to the planned values ranged from -7% to +3% for both CTVs, and -2% to +6% for the spinal cord. Despite different correction vectors of the three IGRT strategies, the dosimetric differences were small. The number of fractions not requiring re-planning varied between 0% and 11% dependent on the applied IGRT correction strategy. In contrast, this number ranged between 32% and 70% dependent on the dosimetric thresholds, even though these thresholds were only gently modified. The more precise the planned dose needs to be maintained over the treatment course, the more frequently re-planning is required. The influence of different IGRT correction strategies, even though geometrically notable, was found to be of only limited relevance for the re-planning frequency. In contrast, the definition and modification of thresholds for re-planning have a major impact on the re-planning frequency

  9. Arabic Audio News Retrieval System Using Dependent Speaker Mode, Mel Frequency Cepstral Coefficient and Dynamic Time Warping Techniques

    Hasan Muaidi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Recently, audio data has increasingly becomes one of the prevalent source of information, especially after the exponential growth of using Internet, digital libraries systems and digital mobile devices. The currently massive amount of audio data stimulates working on developing custom audio retrieval tools to facilitate the audio retrieval tasks. The most familiar audio retrieval systems are based on searching using keyword, title or authors. This study presents the feasibility of using MEL Frequency Cepstral Coefficients (MFCCs to extract features and Dynamic Time Warping (DTW to compare the test patterns for Arabic audio news. The study proposes and implements architecture for content based audio retrieval system that is dedicated for the Arabic Audio News. The proposed architecture (ARANEWS utilizes automatic speech recognition for isolated Arabic keyword speech mode; template based automatic speech recognition approach, MFCCs and DTW. ARANEWS presents a style of retrieval system that based on modeling signal waves and measuring the similarity between features that are extracted from spoken queries and spoken keywords. One of the major components that compose ARANEWS system is feature Database (ARANEWSDB. ARANEWSDB stores the extracted features (MFCCs from the spoken keywords that are prepared to retrieve Arabic audio news. ARANEWS supports using Query by Humming (QBH and Query by Example (QBE instead of using query by text.

  10. Frequency-dependent excitability of "membrane" slow responses of Rabbit left atrial trabeculae in the presence of Ba2+ and high K+

    1982-01-01

    Small trabeculae of rabbit left atrium immersed in TKBa solution (Tyrode with 10 mM K+ and 1 mM Ba2+) were used to study frequency dependence of "membrane" slow response excitability at long cycle lengths (greater than 1 s). In TKBa, stimuli generate graded, low- amplitude (2-15 mV) subliminal responses of variable long duration (up to 450 ms). A full all-or-none slow response is generated when a subliminal response depolarizes the membrane to about--35 mV. Subliminal response amplitude and r...

  11. Frequency-dependence of the switching voltage in electronic switching of Pt-dispersed SiO2 thin films

    Choi, Byung Joon; Chen, I.-Wei

    2016-06-01

    The switching time-voltage dependence of electronic resistive switching was studied for understanding the switching dynamics in Pt-dispersed SiO2 thin film devices. Trapezoidal voltage pulses with opposite polarities were consecutively introduced and thereby transient on-switching and offswitching were examined. A prior on-switching voltage determines the off-switching voltage regardless of the sweeping rate of the pulse for the prior on-switching. However, the off-switching voltage was sensitive to the sweeping rate of the subsequent pulses for off-switching. The frequencydependent impedance of both the device and the surrounding circuit element are thought to result in the variation of the off-switching voltage; otherwise, the switching voltage is independent of time.

  12. Frequency-specific response facilitation of supra and infragranular barrel cortical neurons depends on NMDA receptor activation in rats.

    Barros-Zulaica, N; Castejon, C; Nuñez, A

    2014-10-01

    Sensory experience has a profound effect on neocortical neurons. Passive stimulation of whiskers or sensory deprivation from whiskers can induce long-lasting changes in neuronal responses or modify the receptive field in adult animals. We recorded barrel cortical neurons in urethane-anesthetized rats in layers 2/3 or 5/6 to determine if repetitive stimulation would induce long-lasting response facilitation. Air-puff stimulation (20-ms duration, 40 pulses at 0.5-8Hz) was applied to a single whisker. This repetitive stimulation increased tactile responses in layers 2/3 and 5/6 for 60min. Moreover, the functional coupling (coherence) between the sensory stimulus and the neural response also increased after the repetitive stimulation in neurons showing response facilitation. The long-lasting response facilitation was due to activation of N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors because it was reduced by APV ((2R)-amino-5-phosphonovaleric acid, (2R)-amino-5-phosphonopentanoate) and MK801 application. Inactivation of layer 2/3 also blocked response facilitation in layer 5/6, suggesting that layer 2/3 may be fundamental in this synaptic plasticity processes. Moreover, i.p. injection of eserine augmented the number of layer 2/3 neurons expressing long-lasting response facilitation; this effect was blocked by atropine, suggesting that muscarinic receptor activation favors the induction of the response facilitation. Our data indicate that physiologically repetitive stimulation of a single whisker at the frequency at which rats move their whiskers during exploration of the environment induces long-lasting response facilitation improving sensory processing. PMID:25281880

  13. F-doping dependence of {sup 75}As nuclear quadrupole resonance frequency in LaFeAs(O{sub 1-x}F{sub x})

    Kitagawa, S., E-mail: shunsaku@scphys.kyoto-u.ac.j [Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); JST, TRIP (Transformative Research-Project on Iron Pnictides), Sanban-cho Bldg., 5, Sanban-cho, Chiyoda, Tokyo 102-0075 (Japan); Nakai, Y.; Iye, T.; Ishida, K. [Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); JST, TRIP (Transformative Research-Project on Iron Pnictides), Sanban-cho Bldg., 5, Sanban-cho, Chiyoda, Tokyo 102-0075 (Japan); Kamihara, Y. [JST, TRIP (Transformative Research-Project on Iron Pnictides), Sanban-cho Bldg., 5, Sanban-cho, Chiyoda, Tokyo 102-0075 (Japan); Hirano, M. [ERATO-SORST, JST, Frontier Research Center, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan); Frontier Research Center, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan); Hosono, H. [ERATO-SORST, JST, Frontier Research Center, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan); Frontier Research Center, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan); Materials and Structures Laboratory, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan)

    2010-12-15

    We report the F-doping dependence of {sup 75}As nuclear quadruple resonance frequency ({sup 75{nu}}{sub Q}) in the iron-oxypnictide LaFeAs(O{sub 1-x}F{sub x}) (x = 0, 0.07, 0.08, 0.11 and 0.14). It was revealed that {sup 75{nu}}{sub Q} becomes larger with increasing x up to 0.14. From point charge calculations, we found that experimental F-doping dependence of {sup 75{nu}}{sub Q} cannot be accounted for by the effect of surrounding ions. Therefore, the on-site charge distribution at the {sup 75}As site modified by the hybridization between As-4p and Fe-3d orbitals gives dominant contribution to {sup 75{nu}}{sub Q} in LaFeAs(O{sub 1-x}F{sub x}).

  14. [Intensification of the oncolysis by clostridia by means of radio-frequency hyperthermy in experiments on animals--dependence on dosage and on intervals (author's transl)].

    Dietzel, F; Gericke, D

    1977-04-01

    The effect of a local pretreatment by radio-frequency hyperthermy upon the capability of germination and, hence, upon the oncolysis by intravenously given spores of oncolytic clostridia (M55) was tested with 2305 NMRI-mice carrying neck tumors. Using two different experimental tumors (Ehrlich adenocarcinoma and Harding-Passey-melanoma) it is possible to show the dependence of the intensification on the thermic dose. Additionally, there is a distinct dependence of the extent of oncolysis on the time interval between the hyperthermy treatment and the administration of clostridia. The intensification effect in both the tumors is mostly marked twelve hours after hyperthermy. The rapidly growing Ehrlich adenocarcinoma regenerates more quickly than the slowly growing Harding-Passey-melanoma. A period of 12 hours between hyperthermy and injection of clostridia represents a favourable interval for the timing of slowly as well as of rapidly growing tumors. PMID:857352

  15. Frequency-Dependent Electrical Transport Properties of 4,4′,4″-Tri(N-carbazolyl)-Triphenylamine Investigated by Impedance Spectroscopy

    LI Bi-Xin; CHEN Jiang-Shan; ZHAO Yong-Biao; MA Dong-Ge

    2011-01-01

    Frequency-dependent electrical transport properties of 4, 4′, 4″-tri (N-carbazolyl)-triphenylamine (TCTA ) are analyzed by impedance spectroscopy (IS) as functions of bias and temperature. The Cole-Cole plot shows a single semicircle which indicates that the equivalent circuit can be designed as a single parallel resistor Rp and capacitor Cp network with a series resistance Rs. The bulk capacitance Cp remains unchanged while the resistance Rp decreases along with bias voltage. Conduction mechanism matches well with the space-charge-limited current (SCLC) model with exponential trap charge distributions. The temperature-dependent impedance studies reveal the activation energy of 0.246eV with no phase change in the temperature range 220-320K. These results indicate that the IS method is applicable for organic semiconductors having a wide band gap.%@@ Frequency-dependent electrical transport properties of 4,4′,4″-tri(N-carbazolyl)-triphenylamine(TCTA ) are analyzed by impedance spectroscopy(IS) as functions of bias and temperature.The Cole-Cole plot shows a single semicircle which indicates that the equivalent circuit can be designed as a single parallel resistor Rp and capacitor Cp network with a series resistance Rs.The bulk capacitance Cp remains unchanged while the resistance Rp decreases along with bias voltage.Conduction mechanism matches well with the space-charge-limited current (SCLC) model with exponential trap charge distributions.The temperature-dependent impedance studies reveal the activation energy of 0.246eV with no phase change in the temperature range 220-320K.These results indicate that the IS method is applicable for organic semiconductors having a wide band gap.

  16. Radio Frequency Characteristics of Multifinger 0.1 μm Metamorphic High-Electron-Mobility Transistors Depending on Number of Gate Fingers and Gate Width

    Oh, Jung-Hun; Han, Min; Moon, Sung-Woon; Choi, Seok-Gyu; Baek, Yong-Hyun; Rhee, Jin-Koo; Kim, Sam-Dong

    2007-10-01

    We investigate the effects of the number of gate fingers (N) and gate width (W) on the high-frequency characteristics of 0.1 μm depletion-mode metamorphic high-electron-mobility transistors (MHEMTs). The extracted gate-to-source capacitance (Cgs), gate-to-drain capacitance (Cgd), intrinsic transconductance (gm,int), and drain conductance (Gds) are proportional to total gate width (wt), whereas intrinsic resistance (Ri) and source resistance (Rs) are inversely proportional to wt. Gate resistance (Rg) linearly increases at various slopes with non-zero gate resistances at zero gate width depending on N. The cutoff frequency ( fT) and maximum frequency of oscillation ( fmax) are calculated using a small-signal model and curve-fitting equations extracted from each small-signal parameter. fT is almost constant; however, fmax is a strong function of Rg1/2 and is affected by both N and wt. A large wt produces a low fmax; however, at a given wt, increasing the number of gate fingers is more efficient than increasing single gate width for maximizing the fmax.

  17. Light-dependent and -independent behavioral effects of extremely low frequency magnetic fields in a land snail are consistent with a parametric resonance mechanism

    Prato, F.S.; Thomas, A.W. [Univ. of Western Ontario, London, Ontario (Canada)]|[St. Joseph`s Health Centre, London, Ontario (Canada); Kavaliers, M. [Univ. of Western Ontario, London, Ontario (Canada); Cullen, A.P. [Univ. of Waterloo, Ontario (Canada). School of Optometry

    1997-05-01

    Exposure to extremely low frequency (ELF) magnetic fields has been shown to attenuate endogenous opioid peptide mediated antinociception or analgesia in the terrestrial pulmonate snail, Cepaea nemoralis. Here the authors examine the roles of light in determining this effect and address the mechanisms associated with mediating the effects of the ELF magnetic fields in both the presence and absence of light. Specifically, they consider whether the magnetic field effects involve an indirect induced electric current mechanism or a direct effect such as a parametric resonance mechanism (PRM). They exposed snails in both the presence and absence of light at three different frequencies (30, 60, and 120 Hz) with static field values (B{sub DC}) and ELF magnetic field amplitude (peak) and direction (B{sub AC}) set according to the predictions of the PRM for Ca{sup 2+}. Analgesia was induced in snails by injecting them with an enkephalinase inhibitor, which augments endogenous opioid (enkephalin) activity. They found that the magnetic field exposure reduced this opioid-induced analgesia significantly more if the exposure occurred in the presence rather than the absence of light. However, the percentage reduction in analgesia in both the presence and absence of light was not dependent on the ELF frequency. This finding suggests that in both the presence and the absence of light the effect of the ELF magnetic field was mediated by a direct magnetic field detection mechanism such as the PRM rather than an induced current mechanism.

  18. An empirical dependence of frequency in the oscillatory sorption of H2 and D2 in Pd on the first ionization potential of noble gases

    Lalik, Erwin

    2011-01-01

    Oscillatory heat evolution in sorption of H2 and D2 in Pd can be induced by admixture of ca. 10 % vol. of inert gases He, Ne, Ar, Kr or N2 to either isotope prior to its contact with palladium powder. The oscillations are represented in a form of calorimetric time series, recorded using gas flow-through microcalorimeter at the temperatures of 75 {\\deg}C for D2 and 106 {\\deg}C for H2. For both D2 and H2, the oscillation parameters changes as a function of the kind of inert gas used: the amplitude increases and the frequency decreases in passing from He to Kr. An empirical dependence of the oscillation frequencies observed for various admixtures and normalized with respect to Kr has been found. Accordingly, the frequency is a function of a product of the first ionization potential and the square root of atomic mass of the inert gas (He, Ne, Ar, Kr or N2). On the other hand, invariance of the thermal effects of sorption is evident from the integrated areas under the calorimetric time series yielding the molar he...

  19. Frequency-dependent brain regional homogeneity alterations in patients with mild cognitive impairment during working memory state relative to resting state

    Pengyun eWang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Several studies have reported working memory deficits in patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI. However, previous studies investigating the neural mechanisms of MCI have primarily focused on brain activity alterations during working memory tasks. No study to date has compared brain network alterations in the working memory state between MCI patients and normal control subjects. Therefore, using the index of regional homogeneity (ReHo, we explored brain network impairments in MCI patients during a working memory task relative to the resting state, and identified frequency-dependent effects in separate frequency bands.Our results indicate that, in MCI patients, ReHo is altered in the posterior cingulate cortex in the slow-3 band (0.073–0.198 Hz, and in the bottom of the right occipital lobe and part of the right cerebellum, the right thalamus, a diffusing region in the bilateral prefrontal cortex, the left and right parietal-occipital regions, and the right angular gyrus in the slow-5 band (0.01–0.027 Hz. Furthermore, in normal controls, the value of ReHo in clusters belonging to the default mode network decreased, while the value of ReHo in clusters belonging to the attentional network increased during the task state. However, this pattern was reversed in MCI patients, and was associated with decreased working memory performance. In addition, we identified altered functional connectivity of the abovementioned regions with other parts of the brain in MCI patients.This is the first study to compare frequency-dependent alterations of ReHo in MCI patients between resting and working memory states. The results provide a new perspective regarding the neural mechanisms of working memory deficits in MCI patients, and extend our knowledge of altered brain patterns in resting and task-evoked states.

  20. Ab initio calculation on accurate analytic potential energy functions and harmonic frequencies of c3∑+g and B1∏u states of dimer 7Li2

    Yu Ben-Hai; Shi De-Heng; Sun Jin-Feng; Zhu Zun-Lue; Liu Yu-Fang; Yang Xiang-Dong

    2007-01-01

    The comparison between single-point energy scanning (SPES) and geometry optimization (OPT) in determining the equilibrium geometries of c3∑+g and B1∏u states of dimer 7Li2 is made at numerous basis sets by using a symmetryadapted-cluster configuration-interaction (SAC-CI) method in the Gaussian 03 program package. In this paper the difference of the equilibrium geometries obtained by SPES and by OPT is reported. The results obtained by SPES are found to be more reasonable than those obtained by OPT in full active space at the present SAC-CI level of theory. And the conclusion is attained that the cc-PVTZ is a most suitable basis set for these states. The calculated dissociation energies and equilibrium geometries are 0.8818 eV and 0.3090 nm for c3∑+g state, and 0.3668 eV and 0.2932 nm for B1∏u state respectively. The potential energy curves are calculated over a wide internuclear distance range from about 2.5a0 to 37a0 and have a least-squares fit into the Murrell-Sorbie function. According to the calculated analytic potential energy functions, the harmonic frequencies (ωe) and other spectroscopic data (ωeχe, Be and αe) are calculated. Comparison of the theoretical determinations at present work with the experiments and other theories clearly shows that the present work is the most complete effort and thus represents an improvement over previous theoretical results.

  1. Investigating the gas phase emitter effect of caesium and cerium in ceramic metal halide lamps in dependence on the operating frequency

    Ruhrmann, C.; Westermeier, M.; Bergner, A.; Luijks, G. M. J. F.; Awakowicz, P.; Mentel, J.

    2011-09-01

    The work function and with it the temperature of tungsten electrodes in HID lamps can be lowered and the lifetime of lamps increased by the gas phase emitter effect. A determination of the emitter effect of Cs and Ce is performed by phase resolved measurements of the electrode tip temperature Ttip(phiv), plasma temperature Tpl(phiv) and particle densities N(phiv) by means of pyrometric, optical emission and broadband absorption spectroscopy in dependence on the operating frequency. The investigated HID lamps are ceramic metal halide lamps with transparent discharge vessels made of YAG, filled with a buffer gas consisting of Ar, Kr and predominantly Hg and seeded with CsI or CeI3. In the YAG lamp seeded with CsI and CeI3 as well as in a YAG lamp seeded with DyI3 (corresponding results can be found in a preceding paper) a gas phase emitter effect is observed in the cathodic phase due to a Cs, Ce or Dy ion current. In the YAG lamp seeded with CsI the phase averaged coverage of the electrode surface with emitter atoms decreases and the electrode temperature rises with increasing frequency, whereas the emitter effect of Ce and Dy is extended to the anodic phase, which leads to a decreased average temperature Ttip(phiv) with increasing frequency. This different behaviour of the averaged values of Ttip(phiv) for increasing frequency is caused by the differing adsorption energies Ea of the respective emitter materials. In spite of the influence of Ea on the coverage of the electrode with emitter atoms, the cathodic gas phase emitter effect produces in the YAG lamps seeded with CsI, CeI3 and DyI3 a general reduction in the electrode tip temperature Ttip(phiv) in comparison with a YAG lamp with Hg filling only.

  2. Respiratory mechanics measured by forced oscillation technique in rheumatoid arthritis-related pulmonary abnormalities: frequency-dependence, heterogeneity and effects of smoking.

    Sokai, Risa; Ito, Satoru; Iwano, Shingo; Uchida, Akemi; Aso, Hiromichi; Kondo, Masashi; Ishiguro, Naoki; Kojima, Toshihisa; Hasegawa, Yoshinori

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA)-related pulmonary disorders specifically airway abnormalities and interstitial pneumonia (IP) are important extra-articular manifestations. The forced oscillation technique (FOT) is a useful method to assess respiratory impedance, respiratory resistance (Rrs) and reactance (Xrs), at different oscillatory frequencies during tidal breathing. The aim of this study was to characterize the respiratory mechanics of patients with RA and to relate them to parameters of the pulmonary function test and findings of chest CT images. Respiratory impedance of RA patients (n = 69) was measured as a function of frequency from 4 to 36 Hz using the FOT device and compared with that of healthy subjects (n = 10). Data were retrospectively reviewed. Patients were female-dominant (60.9 %) and 95.7 % had abnormal CT findings including airway and parenchymal abnormalities. Thirty-seven of 69 patients (53.6 %) were smokers. Rrs was significantly frequency-dependent in RA patients but not in the healthy subjects. Xrs were significantly frequency-dependent in both RA and healthy groups. Rrs was significantly higher during an expiratory phase in both RA and healthy groups. Xrs was significantly lower (more negative) during an expiratory phase than that during an inspiratory phase in RA patients but not in healthy subjects. Xrs of the RA group was significantly more negative than that of the normal control. There was no difference in impedance parameters between the airway lesion dominant (n = 27) and IP dominant groups (n = 23) in the RA group. The impedance parameters of the RA group significantly correlated with most parameters of the pulmonary function test. In pulmonary function test results, % of the predicted value for forced expiratory flow from 25 to 75 % of forced vital capacity was significantly lower and % of the predicted value for diffusing capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide was higher in the airway lesion dominant group than those in

  3. Valence crossover of Ce ions in CeCu2Si2 under high pressure. Pressure dependence of the unit cell volume and the NQR frequency

    The pressure dependence of the valence of Ce ions in CeCu2Si2 has been investigated by means of X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) and nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) measurements. The high-pressure XRPD measurements were carried out at 12 K for CeCu2Si2 and CeCu2Ge2. Precise measurements under smoothly-applied pressure were achieved through the selection of the gasket material of a diamond anvil cell. The jump of the unit cell volume, which was reported previously in CeCu2Ge2, was not observed within the experimental accuracy, indicating the absence of a first-order valance transition. The pressure dependence of 63Cu-NQR frequency νQ measured in CeCu2Si2 was compared with that calculated from the measured lattice parameters. The νQ's were calculated for the two cases of LaCu2Si2 and CeCu2Si2, corresponding to localized and itinerant cases for 4f electrons, respectively. The measured and calculated slopes dνQ/dP show good agreement. A small but significant deviation from the pressure-linear dependence in νQ was observed in the narrow pressure range of 3.9-4.5 GPa, indicating a valence crossover adjacent to the critical end point. (author)

  4. Frequency Dependence of Physical Parameters of Microinhomogeneous Media. Space Statistics Dépendance en fréquence des paramètres physiques de milieux microhétérogènes. Statistiques spatiales

    Kukharenko Y. A.

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The diagram technique for calculation of the dynamic properties of an anisotropic media with randomly distributed inclusions (pores, cracks is developed. Statistical description of inclusions is determined by distribution function dependent on five groups of parameters :- over coordinates; - over angles of orientation of shapes;- over angles of orientation of crystallographic axes;- over aspect ratio (in a case of ellipsoidal inclusions;- over types of phase of inclusions. Such statistical approach allows to take into consideration any type and order of correlation interactions between inclusions. The diagram series for an average Green function is (GF constructed. The accurate summation of this series leads to a nonlinear dynamic equation for an average GF (Dyson equation. The kernel of this equation is a mass operator which depends on frequency and can be presented in a form of diagram series on accurate GF. The mass operator coincides with effective complex tensor of elasticity (or conductivity in a local approximation. An expansion of effective dynamic elastic (transport tensor on distribution functions of any order is obtained. It is shown that correlation between homogeneities can produce an effective elastic and transport parameters anisotropy. In correlation approximation the dispersion dependencies of the effective elastic constants are studied. Frequency dependencies of a coefficient anisotropy of the elastic properties as function of statistical distributed inclusions over coordinates (isotropic matrix and isotropic (spherical inclusions are obtained. La technique par diagrammes appliquée au calcul des propriétés dynamiques d'un milieu anisotrope ayant une distribution aléatoire d'inclusions (pores, fissures est ici développée. La description statistique des inclusions est déterminée par une fonction de distribution reposant sur cinq groupes de paramètres : - les coordonnées, - les angles d'orientation des formes, - les

  5. Soluble ICAM-5, a product of activity dependent proteolysis, increases mEPSC frequency and dendritic expression of GluA1.

    Irina Lonskaya

    Full Text Available Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs are zinc dependent endopeptidases that can be released from neurons in an activity dependent manner to play a role in varied forms of learning and memory. MMP inhibitors impair hippocampal long term potentiation (LTP, spatial memory, and behavioral correlates of drug addiction. Since MMPs are thought to influence LTP through a β1 integrin dependent mechanism, it has been suggested that these enzymes cleave specific substrates to generate integrin binding ligands. In previously published work, we have shown that neuronal activity stimulates rapid MMP dependent shedding of intercellular adhesion molecule-5 (ICAM-5, a synaptic adhesion molecule expressed on dendrites of the telencephalon. We have also shown that the ICAM-5 ectodomain can interact with β1 integrins to stimulate integrin dependent phosphorylation of cofilin, an event that occurs with dendritic spine maturation and LTP. In the current study, we investigate the potential for the ICAM-5 ectodomain to stimulate changes in α-amino-3-hydroxyl-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionate receptor (AMPAR dependent glutamatergic transmission. Single cell recordings show that the ICAM-5 ectodomain stimulates an increase in the frequency, but not the amplitude, of AMPA mini excitatory post synaptic currents (mEPSCs. With biotinylation and precipitation assays, we also show that the ICAM-5 ectodomain stimulates an increase in membrane levels of GluA1, but not GluA2, AMPAR subunits. In addition, we observe an ICAM-5 associated increase in GluA1 phosphorylation at serine 845. Concomitantly, ICAM-5 affects an increase in GluA1 surface staining along dendrites without affecting an increase in dendritic spine number. Together these data are consistent with the possibility that soluble ICAM-5 increases glutamatergic transmission and that post-synaptic changes, including increased phosphorylation and dendritic insertion of GluA1, could contribute. We suggest that future studies

  6. Biomimetic Approach for Accurate, Real-Time Aerodynamic Coefficients Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Aerodynamic and structural reliability and efficiency depends critically on the ability to accurately assess the aerodynamic loads and moments for each lifting...

  7. An empirical dependence of frequency in the oscillatory sorption of H2 and D2 in Pd on the first ionization potential of noble gases.

    Lalik, Erwin

    2011-08-14

    Oscillatory heat evolution in sorption of H(2) and D(2) in Pd can be induced by an admixture of ~10 vol.% of an inert gas (He, Ne, Ar, Kr, or N(2)) to either isotope prior to its contact with palladium powder. The oscillations are represented in the form of a calorimetric time series, recorded using a gas flow-through microcalorimeter at the temperatures of 75 °C for D(2) and 106 °C for H(2). For both D(2) and H(2), the oscillation parameters change as a function of the kind of inert gas used: the amplitude increases and the frequency decreases in passing from He to Kr. An empirical dependence of the oscillation frequencies observed for various admixtures and normalized with respect to Kr has been found. Accordingly, the frequency is a function of a product of the first ionization potential and the square root of atomic mass of the inert gas (He, Ne, Ar, Kr, or N(2)). On the other hand, invariance of the thermal effects of sorption is evident from the integrated areas under the calorimetric time series yielding the molar heats of sorption conserved, irrespective of the inert gas admixture. A novel calibration procedure has been devised in order to deal with an instability of calibration factor arising in desorption of H(2) and D(2) from Pd. A method of dynamic calibration factor made it possible to obtain a good agreement between the heats of sorption and desorption of both H(2) and D(2) within individual sorption-desorption cycles for all inert gas admixtures. PMID:21842944

  8. Interface states in Al2O3/AlGaN/GaN metal-oxide-semiconductor structure by frequency dependent conductance technique

    Frequency dependent conductance measurements are implemented to investigate the interface states in Al2O3/AlGaN/GaN metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) structures. Two types of device structures, namely, the recessed gate structure (RGS) and the normal gate structure (NGS), are studied in the experiment. Interface trap parameters including trap density Dit, trap time constant τit, and trap state energy ET in both devices have been determined. Furthermore, the obtained results demonstrate that the gate recess process can induce extra traps with shallower energy levels at the Al2O3/AlGaN interface due to the damage on the surface of the AlGaN barrier layer resulting from reactive ion etching (RIE). (condensed matter: electronic structure, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties)

  9. Frequency-Dependent Social Transmission and the Interethnic Transfer of Female Genital Modification in the African Diaspora and Indigenous Populations of Colombia.

    Ross, Cody T; Campiño, Patricia Joyas; Winterhalder, Bruce

    2015-12-01

    We present a quantitative account based on ethnographic and documentary research of the prevalence of female genital modification (FGMo) in the African diaspora and indigenous populations of Colombia. We use these data to test hypotheses concerning the cultural evolutionary drivers of costly trait persistence, attenuation, and intergroup transmission. The uptake of FGMo by indigenous populations in Colombia is consistent with frequency-dependent hypotheses for the social transmission of the FGMo trait from the African diaspora population in the period following the era of slavery in Colombia. The prevalence and severity of practices related to FGMo decline with level of sociocultural integration into mainstream Colombian culture. Our results provide empirical support for the cultural evolutionary models proposed by Ross et al. (2015) to describe the transmission dynamics of FGMo and other costly traits. Analysis of costly trait dynamics contributes knowledge useful to applied anthropology and may be of interest in policy design and human rights monitoring in Colombia and elsewhere. PMID:26471377

  10. Dependence of synergy current driven by lower hybrid wave and electron cyclotron wave on the frequency and parallel refractive index of electron cyclotron wave for Tokamaks

    The physical mechanism of the synergy current driven by lower hybrid wave (LHW) and electron cyclotron wave (ECW) in tokamaks is investigated using theoretical analysis and simulation methods in the present paper. Research shows that the synergy relationship between the two waves in velocity space strongly depends on the frequency ω and parallel refractive index N// of ECW. For a given spectrum of LHW, the parameter range of ECW, in which the synergy current exists, can be predicted by theoretical analysis, and these results are consistent with the simulation results. It is shown that the synergy effect is mainly caused by the electrons accelerated by both ECW and LHW, and the acceleration of these electrons requires that there is overlap of the resonance regions of the two waves in velocity space

  11. Comparison of frequency-distance relationship and Gaussian-diffusion-based methods of compensation for distance-dependent spatial resolution in SPECT imaging

    The goal of this investigation was to compare resolution recovery versus noise level of two methods for compensation of distance-dependent resolution (DDR) in SPECT imaging. The two methods of compensation were restoration filtering based on the frequency-distance relationship (FDR) prior to iterative reconstruction, and modelling DDR in the projector/backprojector pair employed in iterative reconstruction. FDR restoration filtering was computationally faster than modelling the detector response in iterative reconstruction. Using Gaussian diffusion to model the detector response in iterative reconstruction sped up the process by a factor of 2.5 over frequency domain filtering in the projector/backprojector pair. Gaussian diffusion modelling resulted in a better resolution versus noise tradeoff than either FDR restoration filtering or solely modelling attenuation in the projector/backprojector pair of iterative reconstruction. For the pixel size investigated herein (0.317 cm), accounting for DDR in the projector/backprojector pair by Gaussian diffusion, or by applying a blurring function based on the distance from the face of the collimator at each distance, resulted in very similar resolution recovery and slice noise level. (author)

  12. Effects of low intensity electromagnetic irradiation of 70.6 and 73 GHz frequencies and antibiotics on energy-dependent proton and potassium ion transport by E. coli.

    Torgomyan, H

    2012-12-01

    The effects of low intensity (flux capacity 0.06 mW/cm2) coherent electromagnetic irradiation (EMI) of 70.6 and 73 GHz frequencies and their combined effects with antibiotics--ceftriaxone or kanamycin (0.4 or 15 microM, correspondingly) on E. coli K12 growth and survival have been reported previously. To further study the effects of EMI and antibiotics and mechanisms, decrease in overall energy (glucose)-dependent H+ and K+ fluxes across the cell membrane was investigated in E. coli. The depression of H+ and K+ fluxes rate was maximally achieved with the 73 GHz frequency. The EMI strengthened the effect of N,N'-dicyclohexycarbodiimide (DCCD, an inhibitor of the F0F1-ATPase). The 73 GHz EMI had more influence on H+ efflux inhibition, whereas 70.6 GHz on K+ influx. Also, EMI strengthened the depressive effects of ceftriaxone and kanamycin on the overall and DCCD-inhibited H+ and K+ fluxes. The 73 GHz EMI strengthened the effect of ceftriaxone on both ions fluxes. Kanamycin depressed H+ efflux more as compared to ceftriaxone, which was also strengthened with EMI. The results of E. coli H+ and K+ transport systems activities depression by irradiation and the irradiation effect on DCCD and antibiotics action indicated the EMI and antibiotics causing primary changes in the bacterial membrane. PMID:23350277

  13. Dose- and time-dependent changes of micronucleus frequency and gene expression in the progeny of irradiated cells: Two components in radiation-induced genomic instability?

    Huumonen, Katriina [University of Eastern Finland, Department of Environmental Science, P.O. Box 1627, 70211 Kuopio (Finland); Korkalainen, Merja [National Institute for Health and Welfare, Department of Environmental Health, P.O. Box 95, 70701 Kuopio (Finland); Boman, Eeva; Heikkilä, Janne [Kuopio University Hospital, Cancer Center, P.O. Box 1777, 70211 Kuopio (Finland); Höytö, Anne [University of Eastern Finland, Department of Environmental Science, P.O. Box 1627, 70211 Kuopio (Finland); Lahtinen, Tapani [Kuopio University Hospital, Cancer Center, P.O. Box 1777, 70211 Kuopio (Finland); Luukkonen, Jukka [University of Eastern Finland, Department of Environmental Science, P.O. Box 1627, 70211 Kuopio (Finland); Viluksela, Matti [National Institute for Health and Welfare, Department of Environmental Health, P.O. Box 95, 70701 Kuopio (Finland); Naarala, Jonne [University of Eastern Finland, Department of Environmental Science, P.O. Box 1627, 70211 Kuopio (Finland); Juutilainen, Jukka, E-mail: jukka.juutilainen@uef.fi [University of Eastern Finland, Department of Environmental Science, P.O. Box 1627, 70211 Kuopio (Finland)

    2014-07-15

    Highlights: • Development with time of radiation-induced genomic instability (RIGI) was studied. • Dose–response of micronuclei showed marked time-dependent changes. • A new model assuming two components in RIGI was found to fit with the data. • The persisting component of RIGI seems to be independent of dose above a threshold. • Increasing heterogeneity was characteristic to delayed gene expression changes. - Abstract: Murine embryonic C3H/10T½ fibroblasts were exposed to X-rays at doses of 0.2, 0.5, 1, 2 or 5 Gy. To follow the development of radiation-induced genomic instability (RIGI), the frequency of micronuclei was measured with flow cytometry at 2 days after exposure and in the progeny of the irradiated cells at 8 and 15 days after exposure. Gene expression was measured at the same points in time by PCR arrays profiling the expression of 84 cancer-relevant genes. The micronucleus results showed a gradual decrease in the slope of the dose–response curve between days 2 and 15. The data were consistent with a model assuming two components in RIGI. The first component is characterized by dose-dependent increase in micronuclei. It may persist more than ten cell generations depending on dose, but eventually disappears. The second component is more persistent and independent of dose above a threshold higher than 0.2 Gy. Gene expression analysis 2 days after irradiation at 5 Gy showed consistent changes in genes that typically respond to DNA damage. However, the consistency of changes decreased with time, suggesting that non-specificity and increased heterogeneity of gene expression are characteristic to the second, more persistent component of RIGI.

  14. Dose- and time-dependent changes of micronucleus frequency and gene expression in the progeny of irradiated cells: Two components in radiation-induced genomic instability?

    Highlights: • Development with time of radiation-induced genomic instability (RIGI) was studied. • Dose–response of micronuclei showed marked time-dependent changes. • A new model assuming two components in RIGI was found to fit with the data. • The persisting component of RIGI seems to be independent of dose above a threshold. • Increasing heterogeneity was characteristic to delayed gene expression changes. - Abstract: Murine embryonic C3H/10T½ fibroblasts were exposed to X-rays at doses of 0.2, 0.5, 1, 2 or 5 Gy. To follow the development of radiation-induced genomic instability (RIGI), the frequency of micronuclei was measured with flow cytometry at 2 days after exposure and in the progeny of the irradiated cells at 8 and 15 days after exposure. Gene expression was measured at the same points in time by PCR arrays profiling the expression of 84 cancer-relevant genes. The micronucleus results showed a gradual decrease in the slope of the dose–response curve between days 2 and 15. The data were consistent with a model assuming two components in RIGI. The first component is characterized by dose-dependent increase in micronuclei. It may persist more than ten cell generations depending on dose, but eventually disappears. The second component is more persistent and independent of dose above a threshold higher than 0.2 Gy. Gene expression analysis 2 days after irradiation at 5 Gy showed consistent changes in genes that typically respond to DNA damage. However, the consistency of changes decreased with time, suggesting that non-specificity and increased heterogeneity of gene expression are characteristic to the second, more persistent component of RIGI

  15. PRESSURE DEPENDENCE OF DYNAMICAL CHARGES AND IONICITY OF SEMICONDUCTORS

    Cardona, M.

    1984-01-01

    The advent of the diamond anvil cell has made possible very accurate determinations of the pressure dependence of phonon frequencies by means of Raman scattering. In polar materials pairs of longitudinal and transverse phonons are observed. The pressure dependence of the separation between these lines gives direct information on the dependence of the dynamic effective charge on lattice constant which can be taken as a measure of the dependence of the bond-ionicities on a0. We discuss experime...

  16. AN ACCURATE FLUX DENSITY SCALE FROM 1 TO 50 GHz

    Perley, R. A.; Butler, B. J., E-mail: RPerley@nrao.edu, E-mail: BButler@nrao.edu [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, P.O. Box O, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States)

    2013-02-15

    We develop an absolute flux density scale for centimeter-wavelength astronomy by combining accurate flux density ratios determined by the Very Large Array between the planet Mars and a set of potential calibrators with the Rudy thermophysical emission model of Mars, adjusted to the absolute scale established by the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe. The radio sources 3C123, 3C196, 3C286, and 3C295 are found to be varying at a level of less than {approx}5% per century at all frequencies between 1 and 50 GHz, and hence are suitable as flux density standards. We present polynomial expressions for their spectral flux densities, valid from 1 to 50 GHz, with absolute accuracy estimated at 1%-3% depending on frequency. Of the four sources, 3C286 is the most compact and has the flattest spectral index, making it the most suitable object on which to establish the spectral flux density scale. The sources 3C48, 3C138, 3C147, NGC 7027, NGC 6542, and MWC 349 show significant variability on various timescales. Polynomial coefficients for the spectral flux density are developed for 3C48, 3C138, and 3C147 for each of the 17 observation dates, spanning 1983-2012. The planets Venus, Uranus, and Neptune are included in our observations, and we derive their brightness temperatures over the same frequency range.

  17. Engineering of the frequency dependence of the ferroelectric properties of thin film Pt/Ba{sub 0.5}Sr{sub 0.5}TiO{sub 3}/Pt structures

    Markov, A., E-mail: a.markov@fz-juelich.de [Peter Grünberg Institute (PGI), Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Hollmann, E. [Peter Grünberg Institute (PGI), Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Tumarkin, A.; Kozyrev, A. [Electrotechnical University, Prof. Popov Str. 5, St. Petersburg 197376 (Russian Federation); Wördenweber, R. [Peter Grünberg Institute (PGI), Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany)

    2015-10-15

    Engineering of a frequency dependent permittivity can be of interest for various sensor application. In this work a strong modification of the frequency dependence of the ferroelectric properties is achieved via a controlled diffusion of the metal electrode (Pt) into the ferroelectric layer ((Ba,Sr)TiO{sub 3}). For this purpose a series of Ba{sub 0.5}Sr{sub 0.5}TiO{sub 3} layers is deposited onto Pt coated sapphire at various temperatures range from 660 °C to 760 °C. Using an additional Pt top electrode, the electronic properties of the resulting capacitors are investigated via frequency dependent cryoelectronic measurements. The structure and stoichiometry of the layers are analyzed via X-ray and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, respectively. The analysis of the permittivity and loss tangent shows a strong frequency dependence of the permittivity in a small region of the deposition temperatures (680–710 °C), i.e. the permittivity changes from ε{sub eff}≃600 at low frequency to ε{sub eff}≃20 at high frequency. This behavior is caused by a partial diffusion of Pt into the ferroelectric layer and can be explained by the Maxwell–Wagner model.

  18. A Novel Frequency Measurement Method Suitable for a Large Frequency Ratio Condition

    ZHOU Wei; XUAN Zong-Qiang; YU Jian-Guo; WANG Hai; ZHOU Hui; LI Zhi-Qi

    2004-01-01

    @@ As for the obstacles to direct comparison between superhigh and lower frequencies, we accomplish the accurate comparison between low and microwave frequencies with the 105 ratios of the operating frequencies on the basis of phase comparison between the signals whose frequencies are related by an arbitrary integer. This method is simple and accurate, and will be widely used as a special frequency comparison approach.

  19. The frequency-dependent elements in the code SASSI: A bridge between civil engineers and the soil-structure interaction specialists

    Tyapin, Alexander [Atomenergoproject, 7/1 Bakuninskaya Str., Moscow 105005 (Russian Federation)]. E-mail: Atyapin@bvcp.ru

    2007-07-15

    After four decades of the intensive studies of the soil-structure interaction (SSI) effects in the field of the NPP seismic analysis there is a certain gap between the SSI specialists and civil engineers. The results obtained using the advanced SSI codes like SASSI are often rather far from the results obtained using general codes (though match the experimental and field data). The reasons for the discrepancies are not clear because none of the parties can recall the results of the 'other party' and investigate the influence of various factors causing the difference step by step. As a result, civil engineers neither feel the SSI effects, nor control them. The author believes that the SSI specialists should do the first step forward (a) recalling 'viscous' damping in the structures versus the 'material' one and (b) convoluting all the SSI wave effects into the format of 'soil springs and dashpots', more or less clear for civil engineers. The tool for both tasks could be a special finite element with frequency-dependent stiffness developed by the author for the code SASSI. This element can represent both soil and structure in the SSI model and help to split various factors influencing seismic response. In the paper the theory and some practical issues concerning the new element are presented.

  20. Time dependent Doppler shifts in high-order harmonic generation in intense laser interactions with solid density plasma and frequency chirped pulses

    Welch, E. C.; Zhang, P.; He, Z.-H. [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2104 (United States); Dollar, F. [JILA, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States); Krushelnick, K.; Thomas, A. G. R., E-mail: agrt@umich.edu [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2104 (United States); Center for Ultrafast Optical Science, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2104 (United States)

    2015-05-15

    High order harmonic generation from solid targets is a compelling route to generating intense attosecond or even zeptosecond pulses. However, the effects of ion motion on the generation of harmonics have only recently started to be considered. Here, we study the effects of ion motion in harmonics production at ultrahigh laser intensities interacting with solid density plasma. Using particle-in-cell simulations, we find that there is an optimum density for harmonic production that depends on laser intensity, which scales linearly with a{sub 0} with no ion motion but with a reduced scaling if ion motion is included. We derive a scaling for this optimum density with ion motion and also find that the background ion motion induces Doppler red-shifts in the harmonic structures of the reflected pulse. The temporal structure of the Doppler shifts is correlated to the envelope of the incident laser pulse. We demonstrate that by introducing a frequency chirp in the incident pulse we are able to eliminate these Doppler shifts almost completely.

  1. The gas phase emitter effect of lanthanum within ceramic metal halide lamps and its dependence on the La vapor pressure and operating frequency

    Ruhrmann, C.; Hoebing, T.; Bergner, A.; Groeger, S.; Awakowicz, P.; Mentel, J. [Electrical Engineering and Plasma Technology, Ruhr University Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany); Denissen, C.; Suijker, J. [Philips Lighting, Category Professional Lamps, P.O. Box 80020, NL-5600JM Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2015-08-07

    The gas phase emitter effect increases the lamp lifetime by lowering the work function and, with it, the temperature of the tungsten electrodes of metal halide lamps especially for lamps in ceramic vessels due to their high rare earth pressures. It is generated by a monolayer on the electrode surface of electropositive atoms of certain emitter elements, which are inserted into the lamp bulb by metal iodide salts. They are vaporized, dissociated, ionized, and deposited by an emitter ion current onto the electrode surface within the cathodic phase of lamp operation with a switched-dc or ac-current. The gas phase emitter effect of La and the influence of Na on the emitter effect of La are studied by spatially and phase-resolved pyrometric measurements of the electrode tip temperature, La atom, and ion densities by optical emission spectroscopy as well as optical broadband absorption spectroscopy and arc attachment images by short time photography. An addition of Na to the lamp filling increases the La vapor pressure within the lamp considerably, resulting in an improved gas phase emitter effect of La. Furthermore, the La vapor pressure is raised by a heating of the cold spot. In this way, conditions depending on the La vapor pressure and operating frequency are identified, at which the temperature of the electrodes becomes a minimum.

  2. The gas phase emitter effect of lanthanum within ceramic metal halide lamps and its dependence on the La vapor pressure and operating frequency

    The gas phase emitter effect increases the lamp lifetime by lowering the work function and, with it, the temperature of the tungsten electrodes of metal halide lamps especially for lamps in ceramic vessels due to their high rare earth pressures. It is generated by a monolayer on the electrode surface of electropositive atoms of certain emitter elements, which are inserted into the lamp bulb by metal iodide salts. They are vaporized, dissociated, ionized, and deposited by an emitter ion current onto the electrode surface within the cathodic phase of lamp operation with a switched-dc or ac-current. The gas phase emitter effect of La and the influence of Na on the emitter effect of La are studied by spatially and phase-resolved pyrometric measurements of the electrode tip temperature, La atom, and ion densities by optical emission spectroscopy as well as optical broadband absorption spectroscopy and arc attachment images by short time photography. An addition of Na to the lamp filling increases the La vapor pressure within the lamp considerably, resulting in an improved gas phase emitter effect of La. Furthermore, the La vapor pressure is raised by a heating of the cold spot. In this way, conditions depending on the La vapor pressure and operating frequency are identified, at which the temperature of the electrodes becomes a minimum

  3. Stage-dependent minimum bit resolution maps of full-parallel pipelined FFT/IFFT architectures incorporated in real-time optical orthogonal frequency division multiplexing transceivers

    Junjie Zhang

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Fast Fourier transform (FFT and inverse FFT (IFFT are the fundamental algorithms at the heart of optical orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OOFDM transceivers. The high digital signal processing (DSP complexity has become one of the most significant obstacles to experimentally demonstrating real-time high-capacity OOFDM transceivers. In this study, extensive numerical explorations are undertaken, for the first time, of the impacts of each individual transceiver DSP element on the inverse error vector magnitude (IEVM performance of the OOFDM transceivers incorporating full-parallel pipelined FFT/IFFT architectures. More importantly, FFT/IFFT stage-dependent minimum bit resolution maps are identified, based on which minimum bit resolutions of individual DSP elements of various FFT/IFFT stages can be easily selected according to chosen analogue-to-digital converter/digital-to-analogue converter resolutions. The validity and high accuracy of the identified maps are experimentally verified in field programmable gate array (FPGA-based platforms. In addition to great ease of practical OOFDM transceiver designs, the maps also significantly reduce the FPGA logic resource usage without degrading the overall transceiver IEVM performance.

  4. Time dependent Doppler shifts in high-order harmonic generation in intense laser interactions with solid density plasma and frequency chirped pulses

    High order harmonic generation from solid targets is a compelling route to generating intense attosecond or even zeptosecond pulses. However, the effects of ion motion on the generation of harmonics have only recently started to be considered. Here, we study the effects of ion motion in harmonics production at ultrahigh laser intensities interacting with solid density plasma. Using particle-in-cell simulations, we find that there is an optimum density for harmonic production that depends on laser intensity, which scales linearly with a0 with no ion motion but with a reduced scaling if ion motion is included. We derive a scaling for this optimum density with ion motion and also find that the background ion motion induces Doppler red-shifts in the harmonic structures of the reflected pulse. The temporal structure of the Doppler shifts is correlated to the envelope of the incident laser pulse. We demonstrate that by introducing a frequency chirp in the incident pulse we are able to eliminate these Doppler shifts almost completely

  5. Circadian transitions in radiation dose-dependent augmentation of mRNA levels for DNA damage-induced genes elicited by accurate real-time RT-PCR quantification

    Molecular mechanisms of intracellular response after DNA-damage by exposure to ionizing radiation have been studied. In the case of cells isolated from living body of human and experimental animals, alteration of the responsiveness by physiological oscillation such as circadian rhythm must be considered. To examine the circadian variation in the response of p53-responsible genes p21, mdm2, bax, and puma, we established a method to quantitate their mRNA levels with high reproducibility and accuracy based on real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and compared the levels of responsiveness in mouse hemocytes after diurnal irradiation to that after nocturnal irradiation. Augmentations of p21 and mdm2 mRNA levels with growth-arrest and of puma mRNA before apoptosis were confirmed by time-course experiment in RAW264.7, and dose-dependent increases in the peak levels of all the RNA were shown. Similarly, the relative RNA levels of p21, mdm2, bax, and puma per glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) also increased dose-dependently in peripheral blood and bone marrow cells isolated from whole-body-irradiated mice. Induction levels of all messages reduced by half after nighttime irradiation as compared with daytime irradiation in blood cells. In marrow cells, nighttime irradiation enhanced the p21 and mdm2 mRNA levels than daytime irradiation. No significant difference in bax or puma mRNA levels was observed between nighttime and daytime irradiation in marrow cells. This suggests that early-stage cellular responsiveness in DNA damage-induced genes is modulated between diurnal and nocturnal irradiation. (author)

  6. Full-CI calculation of imaginary frequency-dependent dipole-quadrupole polarizabilities of ground state LiH and the C 7 dispersion coefficients of LiH-LiH

    Luigi Bendazzoli, Gian; Magnasco, Valerio; Figari, Giuseppe; Rui, Marina

    2002-09-01

    Full-CI calculations of frequency-dependent dipole and dipole-quadrupole polarizabilities of ground state LiH have been performed in the imaginary frequency range 0-56 a.u. using a set of 58 Gaussian type orbitals (GTOs) giving a Full-CI dimension of about 700.000 determinants in each symmetry-adapted subspace. A 16-point Gauss-Legendre quadrature of the Casimir-Polder formula over imaginary frequencies allows calculation of the dipole-quadrupole dispersion constants for the LiH-LiH homodimer, from which C 7 dispersion coefficients are derived for the first time.

  7. Common and Low Frequency Variants in MERTK Are Independently Associated with Multiple Sclerosis Susceptibility with Discordant Association Dependent upon HLA-DRB1*15:01 Status.

    Michele D Binder

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Multiple Sclerosis (MS is a chronic inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system. The risk of developing MS is strongly influenced by genetic predisposition, and over 100 loci have been established as associated with susceptibility. However, the biologically relevant variants underlying disease risk have not been defined for the vast majority of these loci, limiting the power of these genetic studies to define new avenues of research for the development of MS therapeutics. It is therefore crucial that candidate MS susceptibility loci are carefully investigated to identify the biological mechanism linking genetic polymorphism at a given gene to the increased chance of developing MS. MERTK has been established as an MS susceptibility gene and is part of a family of receptor tyrosine kinases known to be involved in the pathogenesis of demyelinating disease. In this study we have refined the association of MERTK with MS risk to independent signals from both common and low frequency variants. One of the associated variants was also found to be linked with increased expression of MERTK in monocytes and higher expression of MERTK was associated with either increased or decreased risk of developing MS, dependent upon HLA-DRB1*15:01 status. This discordant association potentially extended beyond MS susceptibility to alterations in disease course in established MS. This study provides clear evidence that distinct polymorphisms within MERTK are associated with MS susceptibility, one of which has the potential to alter MERTK transcription, which in turn can alter both susceptibility and disease course in MS patients.

  8. Accurate and efficient waveforms for compact binaries on eccentric orbits

    Huerta, E A; McWilliams, Sean T; O'Shaughnessy, Richard; Yunes, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    Compact binaries that emit gravitational waves in the sensitivity band of ground-based detectors can have non-negligible eccentricities just prior to merger, depending on the formation scenario. We develop a purely analytic, frequency-domain model for gravitational waves emitted by compact binaries on orbits with small eccentricity, which reduces to the quasi-circular post-Newtonian approximant TaylorF2 at zero eccentricity and to the post-circular approximation of Yunes et al. (2009) at small eccentricity. Our model uses a spectral approximation to the (post-Newtonian) Kepler problem to model the orbital phase as a function of frequency, accounting for eccentricity effects up to ${\\cal{O}}(e^8)$ at each post-Newtonian order. Our approach accurately reproduces an alternative time-domain eccentric waveform model for eccentricities $e\\in [0, 0.4]$ and binaries with total mass less than 12 solar masses. As an application, we evaluate the signal amplitude that eccentric binaries produce in different networks of e...

  9. An Accurate Flux Density Scale from 1 to 50 GHz

    Perley, Rick A

    2012-01-01

    We develop an absolute flux density scale for cm-wavelength astronomy by combining accurate flux density ratios determined by the VLA between the planet Mars and a set of potential calibrators with the Rudy thermophysical emission model of Mars, adjusted to the absolute scale established by WMAP. The radio sources 3C123, 3C196, 3C286 and 3C295 are found to be varying at a level of less than ~5% per century at all frequencies between 1 and 50 GHz, and hence are suitable as flux density standards. We present polynomial expressions for their spectral flux densities, valid from 1 to 50 GHz, with absolute accuracy estimated at 1-3% depending on frequency. Of the four sources, 3C286 is the most compact and has the flattest spectral index, making it the most suitable object on which to establish the spectral flux density scale. The sources 3C48, 3C138, 3C147, NGC7027, NGC6542, and MWC349 show significant variability on various timescales. Polynomial coefficients for the spectral flux density are developed for 3C48, ...

  10. Accurate atomic data for industrial plasma applications

    Griesmann, U.; Bridges, J.M.; Roberts, J.R.; Wiese, W.L.; Fuhr, J.R. [National Inst. of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States)

    1997-12-31

    Reliable branching fraction, transition probability and transition wavelength data for radiative dipole transitions of atoms and ions in plasma are important in many industrial applications. Optical plasma diagnostics and modeling of the radiation transport in electrical discharge plasmas (e.g. in electrical lighting) depend on accurate basic atomic data. NIST has an ongoing experimental research program to provide accurate atomic data for radiative transitions. The new NIST UV-vis-IR high resolution Fourier transform spectrometer has become an excellent tool for accurate and efficient measurements of numerous transition wavelengths and branching fractions in a wide wavelength range. Recently, the authors have also begun to employ photon counting techniques for very accurate measurements of branching fractions of weaker spectral lines with the intent to improve the overall accuracy for experimental branching fractions to better than 5%. They have now completed their studies of transition probabilities of Ne I and Ne II. The results agree well with recent calculations and for the first time provide reliable transition probabilities for many weak intercombination lines.

  11. Accurate determination of characteristic relative permeability curves

    Krause, Michael H.; Benson, Sally M.

    2015-09-01

    A recently developed technique to accurately characterize sub-core scale heterogeneity is applied to investigate the factors responsible for flowrate-dependent effective relative permeability curves measured on core samples in the laboratory. The dependency of laboratory measured relative permeability on flowrate has long been both supported and challenged by a number of investigators. Studies have shown that this apparent flowrate dependency is a result of both sub-core scale heterogeneity and outlet boundary effects. However this has only been demonstrated numerically for highly simplified models of porous media. In this paper, flowrate dependency of effective relative permeability is demonstrated using two rock cores, a Berea Sandstone and a heterogeneous sandstone from the Otway Basin Pilot Project in Australia. Numerical simulations of steady-state coreflooding experiments are conducted at a number of injection rates using a single set of input characteristic relative permeability curves. Effective relative permeability is then calculated from the simulation data using standard interpretation methods for calculating relative permeability from steady-state tests. Results show that simplified approaches may be used to determine flowrate-independent characteristic relative permeability provided flow rate is sufficiently high, and the core heterogeneity is relatively low. It is also shown that characteristic relative permeability can be determined at any typical flowrate, and even for geologically complex models, when using accurate three-dimensional models.

  12. Spatial hearing in Cope’s gray treefrog: II. Frequency-dependent directionality in the amplitude and phase of tympanum vibrations

    Caldwell, Michael S.; Lee, Norman; Schrode, Katrina M.; Johns, Anastasia R.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jakob; Bee, Mark A.

    2014-01-01

    Anuran ears function as pressure difference receivers, and the amplitude and phase of tympanum vibrations are inherently directional, varying with sound incident angle. We quantified the nature of this directionality for Cope’s gray treefrog, Hyla chrysoscelis. We presented subjects with pure tones, advertisement calls, and frequency-modulated sweeps to examine the influence of frequency, signal level, lung inflation, and sex on ear directionality. Interaural differences in the amplitude of t...

  13. Towards accurate emergency response behavior

    Nuclear reactor operator emergency response behavior has persisted as a training problem through lack of information. The industry needs an accurate definition of operator behavior in adverse stress conditions, and training methods which will produce the desired behavior. Newly assembled information from fifty years of research into human behavior in both high and low stress provides a more accurate definition of appropriate operator response, and supports training methods which will produce the needed control room behavior. The research indicates that operator response in emergencies is divided into two modes, conditioned behavior and knowledge based behavior. Methods which assure accurate conditioned behavior, and provide for the recovery of knowledge based behavior, are described in detail

  14. Accurate determination of antenna directivity

    Dich, Mikael

    1997-01-01

    The derivation of a formula for accurate estimation of the total radiated power from a transmitting antenna for which the radiated power density is known in a finite number of points on the far-field sphere is presented. The main application of the formula is determination of directivity from power...

  15. Dependence of the frequency dispersion of the bulk viscosity coefficient of solutions of electrolytes on the nature of the decay of relaxing fluxes

    Odinaev, S.; Akdodov, D. M.

    2016-06-01

    The region of the frequency dispersion of the bulk viscosity coefficient η V (ω) of solutions of electrolytes is studied as a function of the nature of the decay of the stress tensor in the momentum and configuration space, the analytical expressions of which are derived by means of kinetic equations. Numerical calculations of η V (ω) for a water solution of NaCl are performed over a wide range of frequencies, temperatures, and densities using a selection of the potentials of intermolecular interaction Φ{in{itab}}(|ěc r|) and radial distribution function {itg}{in{itab}}(|ěc r|). It is shown that the region of frequency dispersion η V (ω) based on the power law of the decay of the stress tensor is wide ( 105 Hz), while the region based on the exponential law is narrow ( 102 Hz).

  16. Mutant frequencies and spectra depend on growth state and passage number in cells cultured from transgenic lacZ-plasmid reporter mice.

    Busuttil, Rita A; Rubio, Miguel; Dollé, Martijn E T; Campisi, Judith; Vijg, Jan

    2006-01-01

    Transgenic mice harboring the lacZ gene within a plasmid that can be recovered and amplified in Escherichia coli, to establish mutant frequencies and spectra, have provided crucial insights into the relationships between mutations, cancer and aging in vivo. Here, we use embryonic fibroblasts from tr

  17. Mouse strain-dependent changes in frequency and proliferation of hematopoietic stem cells during aging : Correlation between lifespan and cycling activity

    deHaan, G; Nijhof, W; VanZant, G

    1997-01-01

    We have quantified the frequency and proliferation of five subsets of primitive hematopoietic cells, using the cobblestone area forming cell (CAFC) assay, in marrow of five strains of mice with lifespans ranging from about 500 to 800 days. Stem cell characteristics were determined in young (6 weeks)

  18. MAINTENANCE STRATEGY BASED ON THE DIAGNOSTIC RESULTS OF POWER TRANSFORMERS ACTIVE PART WITH ACCOUNT FOR RESONANCE FREQUENCY BIAS DEPENDING ON HUMIDIFICATION AND INTER-WINDING FAULTS

    Ivanova Z. G.

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The article contains an overview of the existing methods for the detection of defects in the windings of the power transformers and their shortcomings, presented new methods and tools to evaluate performance of transformers based on the change of the resonance frequencies caused windings humidification and the advent inter-winding fault

  19. Sample dependence of the Casimir force

    Pirozhenko, I.; Lambrecht, A.; Svetovoy, V.B.

    2006-01-01

    We have analysed available optical data for Au in the mid-infrared range which is important for a precise prediction of the Casimir force. Significant variation of the data demonstrates genuine sample dependence of the dielectric function. We demonstrate that the Casimir force is largely determined by the material properties in the low frequency domain and argue that therefore the precise values of the Drude parameters are crucial for an accurate evaluation of the force. These parameters can ...

  20. Autonomous Rubidium Clock Weak Frequency Jump Detector for Onboard Navigation Satellite System.

    Khare, Akshay; Arora, Rajat; Banik, Alak; Mehta, Sanjay D

    2016-02-01

    Frequency jumps are common in rubidium frequency sources. They affect the estimation of user position in navigational satellite systems. These jumps must be detected and corrected immediately as they have direct impact on the navigation system integrity. A novel weak frequency jump detector is proposed based on a Kalman filter with a multi-interval approach. This detector can be applied for both "sudden" and "slow" frequency transitions. In this detection method, noises of clock data are reduced by Kalman filtering, for accurate estimation of jump size with less latency. Analysis on in-orbit rubidium atomic frequency standard (RAFS) phase telemetry data shows that the detector can be used for fast detection and correction of weak frequency jumps. Furthermore, performance comparison of different existing frequency jump detection techniques with the proposed detector is discussed. A multialgorithm-based strategy is proposed depending on the jump size and latency for onboard navigation satellites having RAFS as the primary frequency source. PMID:26685233

  1. 采用DSP技术适用于任意色散媒质的FDTD方法研究%Frequency-Dependent FDTD Method Using DSP for Arbitrary Dispersive Media

    2000-01-01

    A new frequency dependent finite difference time domain (FD-FDTD) method using digital signal processing (DSP) is proposed.The dispersive media is characterized as an infinite-impulse response (IIR) filter, directly leading to FDTD equations. The representation of a dispersive medium is therefore converted to a problem of digital fIR design. It is shown that the numerical results are consistent with analytic solution.

  2. Kinetic isotope effect of the {sup 16}O + {sup 36}O{sub 2} and {sup 18}O + {sup 32}O{sub 2} isotope exchange reactions: Dominant role of reactive resonances revealed by an accurate time-dependent quantum wavepacket study

    Sun, Zhigang, E-mail: zsun@dicp.ac.cn; Yu, Dequan; Xie, Wenbo; Hou, Jiayi [State Key Laboratory of Molecular Reaction Dynamics and Center for Theoretical and Computational Chemistry, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian 116023, China and Center for Advanced Chemical Physics and 2011 Frontier Center for Quantum Science and Technology, University of Science and Technology of China, 96 Jinzhai Road, Hefei 230026 (China); Dawes, Richard [Department of Chemistry, Missouri University of Science and Technology, Rolla, Missouri 65409 (United States); Guo, Hua [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131 (United States)

    2015-05-07

    The O + O{sub 2} isotope exchange reactions play an important role in determining the oxygen isotopic composition of a number of trace gases in the atmosphere, and their temperature dependence and kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) provide important constraints on our understanding of the origin and mechanism of these and other unusual oxygen KIEs important in the atmosphere. This work reports a quantum dynamics study of the title reactions on the newly constructed Dawes-Lolur-Li-Jiang-Guo (DLLJG) potential energy surface (PES). The thermal reaction rate coefficients of both the {sup 18}O + {sup 32}O{sub 2} and {sup 16}O + {sup 36}O{sub 2} reactions obtained using the DLLJG PES exhibit a clear negative temperature dependence, in sharp contrast with the positive temperature dependence obtained using the earlier modified Siebert-Schinke-Bittererova (mSSB) PES. In addition, the calculated KIE shows an improved agreement with the experiment. These results strongly support the absence of the “reef” structure in the entrance/exit channels of the DLLJG PES, which is present in the mSSB PES. The quantum dynamics results on both PESs attribute the marked KIE to strong near-threshold reactive resonances, presumably stemming from the mass differences and/or zero point energy difference between the diatomic reactant and product. The accurate characterization of the reactivity for these near-thermoneutral reactions immediately above the reaction threshold is important for correct characterization of the thermal reaction rate coefficients.

  3. Frequency-dependent fitness of hybrids between oilseed rape (¤Brassica napus¤) and weedy ¤B. rapa¤ (Brassicaceae)

    Hauser, T.P.; Damgaard, C.; Bagger Jørgensen, Rikke

    2003-01-01

    Fitness of interspecific hybrids is sometimes high relative to their parents, despite the conventional belief that they are mostly unfit. F-1 hybrids between oilseed rape (Brassica napus) and weedy B. rapa can be significantly more fit than their weedy parents under some conditions; however, under...... other conditions they are less fit. To understand the reasons, we measured the seed production of B. napus, B. rapa, and different generations of hybrid plants at three different densities and in mixtures of different frequencies (including pure stands). Brassica napus, B. rapa, and backcross plants (F......-1 female x B. rapa) produced many more seeds per plant in pure plots than in mixtures and more seeds in plots when each was present at high frequency. The opposite was true for F-1 plants that produced many more seeds than B. rapa in mixtures, but fewer in pure stands. Both vegetative and...

  4. [Action of Combined Magnetic Fields with a Very Weak Low-frequency Alternating Component on Luminol-dependent Chemiluminescence in Mammalian Blood].

    Novikov, V V; Yablokova, E N; Fesenko, E E

    2015-01-01

    It is shown that the exposure of heparinized venous human blood diluted in phosphate buffer saline to extremely weak alternating magnetic fields of the ultralow-frequency (1 Hz, 600 nT; 4.4 Hz, 100 nT; 16.5 Hz, 160 nT) in combination with a collinear static magnetic field of 42 microT at physiological temperatures, causes a sharp 3-4 fold increase in its chemiluminescence after addition of luminol. PMID:26349217

  5. Stage-dependent minimum bit resolution maps of full-parallel pipelined FFT/IFFT architectures incorporated in real-time optical orthogonal frequency division multiplexing transceivers

    Junjie Zhang; Wenyan Yuan; Kai Wang; Bingyao Cao; Roger P. Giddings; Min Wang; Jianming Tang

    2014-01-01

    Fast Fourier transform (FFT) and inverse FFT (IFFT) are the fundamental algorithms at the heart of optical orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OOFDM) transceivers. The high digital signal processing (DSP) complexity has become one of the most significant obstacles to experimentally demonstrating real-time high-capacity OOFDM transceivers. In this study, extensive numerical explorations are undertaken, for the first time, of the impacts of each individual transceiver DSP element on the...

  6. Low and mid-frequency pulsations in the polar cap: polarization pattern and MLT dependence of the spectral power during the descending phase of the solar cycle

    Massimo Vellante

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available We present a statistical analysis of ULF (1-100 mHz geomagnetic measurements conducted during years 2003-
    2006 at the Italian/French base of Concordia at Dome C, close to the geomagnetic pole, and at the Italian base
    «Mario Zucchelli» at Terra Nova Bay, also located in the polar cap, but at lower latitude. Our analysis shows that
    high latitude ULF pulsation power is largely controlled by the solar wind speed. At Terra Nova Bay the power
    shows a maximum at local noon, clearly related to cusp and closed field lines phenomena. At few mHz, the polarization
    pattern indicates field line resonances driven, just equatorward with respect to the station, by waves
    propagating tailward; the polarization of higher frequency pulsations, mostly originated from interplanetary upstream
    waves, suggests waves propagating sunward from the night sector. At Dome C the wave power shows a
    small enhancement in the local morning, more pronounced for mid-frequency pulsations; the polarization pattern,
    at all frequencies, appears to indicate waves propagating sunward from the night sector, suggesting a propagation
    channel to the ground via the magnetotail lobes.

  7. Metamaterial lens of specifiable frequency-dependent focus and adjustable aperture for electron cyclotron emission in the DIII-D tokamak

    Hammond, K C; Massidda, S D; Volpe, F A

    2014-01-01

    Electron Cyclotron Emission (ECE) of different frequencies originates at different locations in non-uniformly magnetized plasmas. For simultaneous observation of multiple ECE frequencies from the outside edge of a toroidal plasma confinement device (e.g. a tokamak), the focal length of the collecting optics should increase with the frequency to maximize the resolution on a line of sight along the magnetic field gradient. Here we present the design and numerical study of a zoned metamaterial lens with such characteristics, for possible deployment with the 83-130 GHz ECE radiometer in the DIII-D tokamak. The lens consists of a concentric array of miniaturized element phase-shifters. These were reverse-engineered starting from the desired Gaussian beam waist locations and further optimized to account for diffraction and finite-aperture effects that tend to displace the waist. At the same time we imposed high and uniform transmittance, averaged over all phase-shifters. The focal length is shown to increase from 1...

  8. Towards an accurate bioimpedance identification

    Sánchez Terrones, Benjamín; Louarroudi, E.; Bragós Bardia, Ramon; Pintelon, Rik

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the local polynomial method (LPM) for estimating the time- invariant bioimpedance frequency response function (FRF) considering both the output-error (OE) and the errors-in-variables (EIV) identi cation framework and compare it with the traditional cross and autocorrelation spectral analysis techniques. The bioimpedance FRF is measured with the multisine electrical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) technique. To show the overwhelming accuracy of the LPM approach, both t...

  9. Investigating the dependence of the temperature of high-intensity discharge (HID) lamp electrodes on the operating frequency by pyrometric measurements

    Reinelt, J.; Westermeier, M.; Ruhrmann, C.; Bergner, A.; Awakowicz, P.; Mentel, J.

    2011-03-01

    Phase-resolved temperature distributions are determined along a rod-shaped tungsten electrode, by which an ac arc is operated within a model lamp filled with argon. Switched dc and sinusoidal currents are applied with amplitudes of several amperes and operating frequencies being varied between 10 Hz and 10 kHz. The temperature is deduced from the grey body radiation of the electrode being recorded with a spectroscopic measuring system. Phase-resolved values of the electrode tip temperature Ttip and of the power input Pin are determined comparing the measured temperature distributions with the integral of the one-dimensional heat balance with these parameters as integration constants. They are supplemented by phase-resolved measurements of the sum of cathode and anode fall called the electrode sheath voltage. If a switched dc current is applied it is found that both quantities are within the cathodic phase only marginally higher than for a cathode being operated with a dc current. Ttip and Pin start to decrease for low currents and to increase for high currents at the beginning of the anodic phase. But with increasing operating frequency the deviations from the cathodic phase are reduced until they cannot be resolved for frequencies of several kHz. A more pronounced modulation, but the same tendencies, is observed with a sinusoidal current waveform. For 10 kHz a diffuse arc attachment with an almost phase-independent electrode tip temperature, which deviates only marginally from that of a dc cathode, and an electrode sheath voltage proportional to the arc current is established with both current waveforms.

  10. Ion–Cyclotron Resonance Frequency Interval Dependence on the O VI Ion Number Density in the North Polar Coronal Hole 1.5–3 Region

    Özgür Gültekin; Emine Rızaoǧlu; K. Gediz Akdeniz

    2013-12-01

    The frequency intervals in which O VI ions get in resonance with ion–cyclotron waves are calculated using the kinetic model, for the latest six values found in literature on O VI ion number densities in the 1.5–3 region of the NPCH. It is found that the common resonance interval is 1.5 kHz to 3 kHz. The -variations of wave numbers necessary for the above calculations are evaluated numerically, solving the cubic dispersion relation with the dielectric response derived from the quasi-linear Vlasov equation for the left-circularly polarized ion-cyclotron waves.

  11. Spectral anomalies of the effect of light-induced drift of caesium atoms caused by the velocity dependence of transport collision frequencies

    The spectral features of the light-induced drift (LID) velocity of caesium atoms in inert buffer gases are studied theoretically. A strong temperature dependence of the spectral LID line shape of Cs atoms in Ar or Kr atmosphere in the vicinity of T ∼ 1000 K is predicted. It is shown that the anomalous LID of Cs atoms in binary buffer mixtures of two different inert gases can be observed at virtually any (including ambient) temperature, depending on the content of the components in these mixtures. The results obtained make it possible to precisely test the interatomic interaction potentials in the experiments on the anomalous LID. (quantum optics)

  12. Temperature dependence of spontaneous switch-on and switch-off of laser cavity solitons in vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers with frequency-selective feedback

    A systematic experimental and numerical investigation of the conditions for the spontaneous formation of laser cavity solitons in broad-area vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers with frequency-selective feedback by a volume Bragg grating is reported. It is shown that the switching thresholds are controlled by a combination of frequency shifts induced by ambient temperature and Joule heating. The gain level has only a minor influence on the threshold but controls mainly the power of the solitons. At large initial detuning and high threshold gain, the first observed structure can be a high order soliton. In real devices spatial disorder in the cavity length causes a pinning of solitons and a dispersion of thresholds. The experimental observations are in good agreement with numerical simulations taking into account disorder and the coupling of gain and cavity resonance due to Joule heating. In particular, we demonstrate that the existence of the traps explain the spontaneous switch on of the solitons, but do not modify the soliton shape significantly, i.e. the observed solitons are a good approximation of the ones expected in a homogeneous system. (paper)

  13. The concept of spatial frequency depending DQE and its application to a comparison of two detectors used in transvenous coronary angiography

    Menk, R.H.; Thomlinson, W.; Gmuer, N.; Zhong, Z. [Brookhaven Nat. Lab., Upton, NY (United States). Nat. Synchrotron Light Source; Chapman, D. [CSRRI, Illinois Institute of Technology, 3301 S. Dearborn, Chicago, IL 60616 (United States); Arfelli, F. [ELETTRA, Sincrotrone, Trieste, 34012 Trieste (Italy); Dix, W.R.; Graeff, W.; Lohmann, M.; Illing, G.; Schildwaechter, L.; Reime, B. [Hamburger Synchrotronstrahlungslabor HASYLAB at Deutsches Elektronensynchrotron DESY, Notkestrasse 85, 22603 Hamburg (Germany); Kupper, W. [Herz Kreislauf Klinik Bevensen, Roemstedter Strasse, Bad Bevensen (Germany); Hamm, C. [Medizinische Klinik, Kardiologie, Universitaetsklinik Eppendorf, Martinistrasse 52, 20246 Hamburg (Germany); Giacomini, J.C.; Gordon, H.J.; Rubenstein, E. [Department of Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, 94305 (United States); Dervan, J. [Division of Cardiology, Health Sciences Center, SUNY at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY 11794-8171 (United States); Besch, H.J.; Walenta, A.H. [Universitaet Gesamthochschule Siegen, Adolf Reichwein Strasse, 57068 Siegen (Germany)

    1997-10-21

    A comparison of two different multi-channel line detectors utilized in transvenous coronary angiography was performed. An Li+ drifted silicon strip detector (SSD) was tested at the SMERF facility X17B2 at the national synchrotron light source (NSLS). An ionization chamber (IC) was tested at the W2 beamline at HASYLAB. Both detectors were operated in the charge-integrating mode. The main purpose was to measure and compare the modulation transfer function (MTF(f)), noise power spectrum (NPS(f)), detective quantum efficiency (DQE(f)) in terms of spatial frequencies and the dynamic range of both detector systems. It turned out that the IC is superior to the SSD in time resolution and dynamic range at a single gain setting and has a slight advantage in the transmission of high spatial frequencies. Although for high photon flux the DQE values of the IC exceed those of the SSD, it is the reverse for low photon flux caused by a higher noise floor of the read-out electronics. This makes the SSD superior to the IC since the incident flux is limited by the tolerable entry dose to the patients. For the comparison other criteria like price, reliability, maintenance, etc., are not taken into consideration. (orig.). 15 refs.

  14. Photoionization of resonantly driven atomic states by an extreme ultraviolet-free-electron laser: intensity dependence and renormalization of Rabi frequencies

    We analyze theoretically the high intensity photoionization dynamics of a system with two atomic states resonantly coupled by coherent extreme ultraviolet laser radiation that also gives rise to the ionization. The ground state occupation of such a system is shown to exhibit damped Rabi oscillations. The corresponding ionization, which is responsible for the damping, scales almost linearly with the field intensity when the pulse length exceeds the Rabi period. For shorter pulses a quadratic scaling is found. The Rabi frequency is shifted compared to its value for an isolated two-level system. The shift increases with excitation intensity and can acquire a high percentage of the unrenormalized frequency at high intensities. Analytical results obtained within a simplified solvable model demonstrate that the damping and the shift both result from the coupling of the discrete states to the ionization continuum and are therefore closely related. Numerical simulations for a two-electron system reveal at high intensities the importance of off-resonant ionization channels. (paper)

  15. Temperature dependence of spontaneous switch-on and switch-off of laser cavity solitons in vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers with frequency-selective feedback

    Jimenez, J.; Oppo, G.-L.; Ackemann, T.

    2016-03-01

    A systematic experimental and numerical investigation of the conditions for the spontaneous formation of laser cavity solitons in broad-area vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers with frequency-selective feedback by a volume Bragg grating is reported. It is shown that the switching thresholds are controlled by a combination of frequency shifts induced by ambient temperature and Joule heating. The gain level has only a minor influence on the threshold but controls mainly the power of the solitons. At large initial detuning and high threshold gain, the first observed structure can be a high order soliton. In real devices spatial disorder in the cavity length causes a pinning of solitons and a dispersion of thresholds. The experimental observations are in good agreement with numerical simulations taking into account disorder and the coupling of gain and cavity resonance due to Joule heating. In particular, we demonstrate that the existence of the traps explain the spontaneous switch on of the solitons, but do not modify the soliton shape significantly, i.e. the observed solitons are a good approximation of the ones expected in a homogeneous system.

  16. Temperature- and frequency-dependent dielectric behaviors of insulator/semiconductor (Al2O3/ZnO) nanolaminates with various ZnO thicknesses

    Li, Jin; Bi, Xiaofang

    2016-07-01

    Al2O3/ZnO nanolaminates (NLs) with various ZnO sublayer thicknesses were prepared by atomic layer deposition. The Al2O3 sublayers are characterized as amorphous and the ZnO sublayers have an oriented polycrystalline structure. As the ZnO thickness decreases to a certain value, each NL exhibits a critical temperature at which its dielectric constant starts to rise quickly. Moreover, this temperature increases as the ZnO thickness is decreased further. On the other hand, the permittivity demonstrates a large value of several hundred at a frequency  ⩽1000 Hz, followed by a steplike decrease at a higher frequency. The change in the cut-off frequency with ZnO thickness is characterized by a hook function. It is revealed that the Coulomb confinement effect becomes predominant in the dielectric behaviors of the NLs with very thin ZnO. As the ZnO thickness decreases to about the same as or even smaller than the Bohr radius of ZnO, a great change in the carrier concentration and effective mass of ZnO is induced, which is shown to be responsible for the peculiar dielectric behaviors of Al2O3/ZnO with very thin ZnO. These findings provide insight into the prevailing mechanisms to optimize the dielectric properties of semiconductor/insulator laminates with nanoscale sublayer thickness.

  17. Celiac disease T cell epitopes from gamma-gliadins: immunoreactivity depends on the genome of origin, transcript frequency, and flanking protein variation

    Salentijn, E.M.J.; Mitea, D.C.; Goryunova, S.V.; Meer, van der I.M.; Padioleau, I.; Gilissen, L.J.W.J.; Koning, de F.; Smulders, M.J.M.

    2012-01-01

    Background - Celiac disease (CD) is caused by an uncontrolled immune response to gluten, a heterogeneous mixture of wheat storage proteins. The CD-toxicity of these proteins and their derived peptides is depending on the presence of specific T-cell epitopes (9-mer peptides; CD epitopes) that mediate

  18. Amplitude Variation of Bottom Simulating Reflection with Respect to Frequency - Transitional Base or Attenuation?

    Lee, Myung W.

    2007-01-01

    The amplitude of a bottom simulating reflection (BSR), which occurs near the phase boundary between gas hydrate-bearing sediments and underlying gas-filled sediments, strongly depends on the frequency content of a seismic signal, as well as the impedance contrast across the phase boundary. A strong-amplitude BSR, detectable in a conventional seismic profile, is a good indicator of the presence of free gas beneath the phase boundary. However, the BSR as observed in low-frequency multichannel seismic data is generally difficult to identify in high-frequency, single-channel seismic data. To investigate the frequency dependence of BSR amplitudes, single-channel seismic data acquired with an air gun source at Blake Ridge, which is located off the shore of South Carolina, were analyzed in the frequency range of 10-240 Hz. The frequency-dependent impedance contrast caused by the velocity dispersion in partially gas saturated sediments is important to accurately analyze BSR amplitude. Analysis indicates that seismic attenuation of gas hydrate-bearing sediments, velocity dispersion, and a transitional base all contribute to the frequency-dependent BSR amplitude variation in the frequency range of 10-500 Hz. When velocity dispersion is incorporated into the BSR amplitude analysis, the frequency-dependent BSR amplitude at Blake Ridge can be explained with gas hydrate-bearing sediments having a quality factor of about 250 and a transitional base with a thickness of about 1 meter.

  19. Encoding voice fundamental frequency into vibrotactile frequency.

    Rothenberg, M; Molitor, R D

    1979-10-01

    Measured in this study was the ability of eight hearing and five deaf subjects to identify the stress pattern in a short sentence from the variation in voice fundamental frequency (F0), when presented aurally (for hearing subjects) and when transformed into vibrotactile pulse frequency. Various transformations from F0 to pulse frequency were tested in an attempt to determine an optimum transformation, the amount of F0 information that could be transmitted, and what the limitations in the tactile channel might be. The results indicated that a one- or two-octave reduction of F0 vibrotactile frequency (transmitting every second or third glottal pulse) might result in a significant ability to discriminate the intonation patterns associated with moderate-to-strong patterns of sentence stress in English. However, accurate reception of the details of the intonation pattern may require a slower than normal pronounciation because of an apparent temporal indeterminacy of about 200 ms in the perception of variations in vibrotactile frequency. A performance deficit noted for the two prelingually, profoundly deaf subjects with marginally discriminable encodings offers some support for our previous hypothesis that there is a natural association between auditory pitch and perceived vibrotactile frequency. PMID:159917

  20. Accurate wall thickness measurement using autointerference of circumferential Lamb wave

    In this paper, a method of accurately measuring the pipe wall thickness by using noncontact air-coupled ultrasonic transducer (NAUT) was presented. In this method, accurate measurement of angular wave number (AWN) is a key technique because the AWN is changes minutely with the wall thickness. An autointerference of the circumferential (C-) Lamb wave was used for accurate measurements of the AWN. Principle of the method was first explained. Modified method for measuring the wall thickness near a butt weld line was also proposed and its accuracy was evaluated within 6 μm error. It was also shown in the paper that wall thickness measurement was accurately carried out beyond the difference among the sensors by calibrating the frequency response of the sensors. (author)