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Sample records for accrediting industrial safety

  1. The Accreditation of Laboratories Proficiency and Safety

    2005-01-01

    @@ Recently, China National Accreditation Board for Laboratories (CNAL) has released CNAL/AC23:2004 Medical Laboratories: Accreditation Criteria For Quality and Proficiency, and meanwhile GB 19489 Laboratories: General Requirements For Biosafety and ISO 15190 Medical Laboratories-Requirements For Safetywill be adopted by CNAL as the accreditation criteria for laboratories safety.

  2. Impact of hospital accreditation on patients' safety and quality indicators

    Al-Awa, Bahjat

    2011-01-01

    Ecole de Santé Publique Université Libre de Bruxelles Academic Year 2010-2011 Al-Awa, Bahjat Impact of Hospital Accreditation on Patients' Safety and Quality Indicators Dissertation Summary I. Introduction: There is increased interest around the world in the evaluation of healthcare, coming not only from governments, but also from providers and consumers [1]. Therefore initiatives to address quality of health care have become worldwide phenomena [2]. As quality is crucial fa...

  3. Promoting quality and patient safety via the new integrated hospital accreditation programme.

    Dror, Yehuda

    2010-01-01

    Hospital accreditation should act as a strategic asset hospitals have in promoting quality and patient safety, not just a mere "ticket to trade". The newly US government-approved DNV NIAHO offers healthcare provider organizations a new alternative to hospital accreditation that combines CMS's Conditions of Participation (CoP) with the proven success of the ISO 9001 quality management standard, to promote sustainable quality and patient safety improvement. PMID:20614684

  4. Industrial Education Safety Guide.

    California State Dept. of Education, Sacramento.

    California is one of the few states in which school districts have a legal responsibility for accidents involving students while they are participating in assigned school activities. This guide was prepared to help school administrators and teachers evaluate their safety instruction programs and industrial education facilities in accordance with…

  5. Study of industry safety management

    This book deals with general remarks, industrial accidents, statistics of industrial accidents, unsafe actions, making machinery and facilities safe, safe activities, having working environment safe, survey of industrial accidents and analysis of causes, system of safety management and operations, safety management planning, safety education, human engineering such as human-machines system, system safety, and costs of disaster losses. It lastly adds individual protective equipment and working clothes including protect equipment for eyes, face, hands, arms and feet.

  6. Predicting the outcomes of performance error indicators on accreditation status in the nuclear power industry

    The null hypothesis for this study suggested that there was no significant difference in the types of performance error indicators between accredited and non-accredited programs on the following types of indicators: (1) number of significant event reports per unit, (2) number of forced outages per unit, (3) number of unplanned automatic scrams per unit, and (4) amount of equivalent availability per unit. A sample of 90 nuclear power plants was selected for this study. Data were summarized from two data bases maintained by the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations. Results of this study did not support the research hypothesis. There was no significant difference between the accredited and non-accredited programs on any of the four performance error indicators. The primary conclusions of this include the following: (1) The four selected performance error indicators cannot be used individually or collectively to predict accreditation status in the nuclear power industry. (2) Annual performance error indicator ratings cannot be used to determine the effects of performance-based training on plant performance. (3) The four selected performance error indicators cannot be used to measure the effect of operator job performance on plant effectiveness

  7. Leadership for safety: industrial experience

    Flin, R; Yule, S

    2004-01-01

    The importance of leadership for effective safety management has been the focus of research attention in industry for a number of years, especially in energy and manufacturing sectors. In contrast, very little research into leadership and safety has been carried out in medical settings. A selective review of the industrial safety literature for leadership research with possible application in health care was undertaken. Emerging findings show the importance of participative, transformational ...

  8. Industrial hazard and safety handbook

    King, Ralph W

    1979-01-01

    Industrial Hazard and Safety Handbook (Revised Impression) describes and exposes the main hazards found in industry, with emphasis on how these hazards arise, are ignored, are identified, are eliminated, or are controlled. These hazard conditions can be due to human stresses (for example, insomnia), unsatisfactory working environments, as well as secret industrial processes. The book reviews the cost of accidents, human factors, inspections, insurance, legal aspects, planning for major emergencies, organization, and safety measures. The text discusses regulations, codes of practice, site layou

  9. Leadership for safety: industrial experience.

    Flin, R; Yule, S

    2004-12-01

    The importance of leadership for effective safety management has been the focus of research attention in industry for a number of years, especially in energy and manufacturing sectors. In contrast, very little research into leadership and safety has been carried out in medical settings. A selective review of the industrial safety literature for leadership research with possible application in health care was undertaken. Emerging findings show the importance of participative, transformational styles for safety performance at all levels of management. Transactional styles with attention to monitoring and reinforcement of workers' safety behaviours have been shown to be effective at the supervisory level. Middle managers need to be involved in safety and foster open communication, while ensuring compliance with safety systems. They should allow supervisors a degree of autonomy for safety initiatives. Senior managers have a prime influence on the organisation's safety culture. They need to continuously demonstrate a visible commitment to safety, best indicated by the time they devote to safety matters. PMID:15576692

  10. Industrial Safety and Accidents Prevention

    Accident Hazards, dangers, losses and risk are what we would to like to eliminate, minimize or avoid in industry. Modern industries have created many opportunities for these against which man's primitive instincts offer no protection. In today's complex industrial environment safety has become major preoccupation, especially after the realization that there is a clear economic incentive to do so. Industrial hazards may cause by human error or by physical or mechanical malfunction, it is very often possible to eliminate the worst consequences of human error by engineering modification. But the modification also needs checking very thoroughly to ensue that it has not introduced some new and unsuspected hazard. (author)

  11. 78 FR 45781 - Accreditation of Third-Party Auditors/Certification Bodies to Conduct Food Safety Audits and to...

    2013-07-29

    ... January 16, 2013 (78 FR 3646). \\4\\ The Produce Safety proposed rule was published in the Federal Register... Guidance on Third-Party Certification for Food and Feed In the Federal Register of July 10, 2008 (73 FR... 1 and 16 Accreditation of Third-Party Auditors/Certification Bodies to Conduct Food Safety...

  12. FOOD SAFETY IN CATERING INDUSTRY

    P. Cattaneo

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Catering industry plays a very important role in public health management, because about 30% of total daily meals are consumed in catering industry (restaurants, bar. In this work food safety was evaluated in 20 catering centres throughout microbiological analyses of different categories of meals. Results demonstrate that there was an important decrease of microbial contamination between 2006 and 2007, no pathogens were found in 217 samples examined: this was obtained by improving voluntary controls.

  13. Safety Management Analysis In Construction Industry

    T. Subramani; R. Lordsonmillar

    2014-01-01

    The Indian society and economy have suffered human and financial losses as a result of the poor safety record in the construction industry. The purpose of this study is to examine safety management in the construction industry. The study will collects data from general contractors, who are involved in major types of construction. Collected data include information regarding organizational safety policy, safety training, safety meetings, safety equipment, safety inspections, sa...

  14. Strengthening organizational performance through accreditation research-a framework for twelve interrelated studies: the ACCREDIT project study protocol

    Pope Catherine

    2011-10-01

    -scale, project-based studies. The overall approach for our research is a multi-level, multi-study design. Discussion The ACCREDIT project will examine the utility, reliability, relevance and cost effectiveness of differing forms of accreditation, focused on general practice, aged care and acute care settings in Australia. Empirically, there are potential research gains to be made by understanding accreditation and extending existing knowledge; theoretically, this design will facilitate a systems view of accreditation of benefit to the partnership, international research communities, and future accreditation designers. "Accreditation of health-care organisations is a multimillion dollar industry which shapes care in many countries. Recent reviews of research show little evidence that accreditation increases safety or improves quality. It's time we knew about the cost and value of accreditation and about its future direction." [Professor John Øvretveit, Karolinska Institute, Sweden, 7 October 2009

  15. Industrial Radiography Safety in Australia

    400 μSv average for industrial radiographers in a developed country such as the United Kingdom (NRPB 2005), it is less than that reported for a developing country such as Iran (AEOI 2004), which is 1650 μSv. Industrial radiography accidents most frequently occur with radiation devices using sealed sources such as iridium 192 and cobalt 60, and not with x-ray generators. In comparison to other countries, the safety record of industrial radiographers as judged by accident data and dose records, places Australia somewhere between that of an advanced country and a developing one. Many of the investigations into accidents in industrial radiography have revealed that their frequency and severity would have been reduced or even eliminated if the persons involved had been better prepared to use the equipment, and better prepared to deal with accident and incident situations. In Australia, there appears to be scope for improvement and standardisation of training in the use of industrial radiography equipment, and more importantly, in the training for response to possible accidents and incidents. A national standard for radiation safety training and assessment should be developed by a competent organisation such as the Australian Institute for Non-Destructive Testing. It should be incorporated into the Code of Practice or Safety Guide for industrial radiography and adopted by all jurisdictions. The use of a code of safe practice for industrial radiography should continue. The present NH and MRC code is in need of review. Such a review must result in a code and a guideline document which are readily useable by the industry, standardise training in radiation safety, ensure a high level of operational radiation safety and are available for adoption by the various Australian jurisdictions with minimal supplementary local requirements. Copyright (2006) The Australian Institute for Non-Destructive Testing

  16. Nuclear industry and radioecological safety

    The beginning of XXI century is marked with increasing public concern over impact of man-made activity, including nuclear technologies, on the environment. Currently, the anthropocentric principle is applied in the course of the radioecological safety guaranteeing for the environment, which postulates that human protectability serves as guarantee of the environmental one. However, this principle correctness is called in question recently. The ecocentric principle is proposed as an alternative doctrine, defining balance between human importance and that of any other elements of biota. The system recommended isn't intended for the regulatory standards development yet, because of substantial gaps in scientific knowledge. Nevertheless, renunciation of the anthropocentric principle can result in unwarranted tightened regulatory basis, decreasing of nuclear industry evolution rates, and, consequently, breaching of societal and economical priorities. It is obvious that for the safety guaranteeing, nuclear industry shouldn't stand out against a background of other fields of human activity involved hazard factors. Therefore, new conceptions applying within the regulatory system is to be weighted and exclude formal using of discussion theses. More than semi-centennial experience of the anthropocentric approach applying serves as an evidence of safe protection of ecosystems against radiation exposure that ensures safe ecological development of nuclear power industry and other fields of nuclear technologies application. (author)

  17. Industrial Safety Training for Soviet Workers.

    Semenov, A.

    1978-01-01

    Various forms of worker training in industrial safety in the Soviet Union are described by a Soviet labor inspector, with special "industrial safety rooms" the principal means of inplant instruction. Safety education in vocational schools and "people's universities" is also touched on. (MF)

  18. Pennsylvania Industrial Arts Safety Guide. Second Edition.

    Graham, Charles D., Ed.

    Intended to alert industrial arts teachers, teacher educators, school administrators, and industrial arts supervisors to the importance of a strong safety program, this guide provides the instructional resources for instituting safety instruction in the public schools, for the inservice training of industrial arts teachers, and for the education…

  19. Advances in industrial ergonomics and safety I

    Mital, A. (ed.) (University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH (USA). Dept. of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, Ergonomics Research Lab.)

    1989-01-01

    125 papers are presented under the session headings: industrial ergonomics - programs and applications; applied work physiology; occupational biomechanics; engineering anthropometry; work and protective clothing; hand tools; human-computer interface; theory and practice of industrial safety; human perception and performance; human strengths; industrial noise and vibration; machine guarding and industrial machine safety; manual materials handling; modelling for safety and health; occupational injuries and health problems; policies and standards; quality control and inspection; rehabilitation and designing for the disabled; work duration and fatigue; and work and work place design. Includes papers on static and dynamic back strength of underground coal miners, and slip and fall accidents during equipment maintenance in the surface mining industry.

  20. Radiation Safety in Industrial Radiography. Specific Safety Guide (Arabic Edition)

    This Safety Guide provides recommendations for ensuring radiation safety in industrial radiography used in non-destructive testing. This includes industrial radiography work that utilizes X ray and gamma sources, both in shielded facilities that have effective engineering controls and outside shielded facilities using mobile sources. Contents: 1. Introduction; 2. Duties and responsibilities; 3. Safety assessment; 4. Radiation protection programme; 5. Training and qualification; 6. Individual monitoring of workers; 7. Workplace monitoring; 8. Control of radioactive sources; 9. Safety of industrial radiography sources and exposure devices; 10. Radiography in shielded enclosures; 11. Site radiography; 12. Transport of radioactive sources; 13. Emergency preparedness and response; Appendix: IAEA categorization of radioactive sources; Annex I: Example safety assessment; Annex II: Overview of industrial radiography sources and equipment; Annex III: Examples of accidents in industrial radiography.

  1. Radiation Safety in Industrial Radiography. Specific Safety Guide

    This Safety Guide provides recommendations for ensuring radiation safety in industrial radiography used in non-destructive testing. This includes industrial radiography work that utilizes X ray and gamma sources, both in shielded facilities that have effective engineering controls and in outside shielded facilities using mobile sources. Contents: 1. Introduction; 2. Duties and responsibilities; 3. Safety assessment; 4. Radiation protection programme; 5. Training and qualification; 6. Individual monitoring of workers; 7. Workplace monitoring; 8. Control of radioactive sources; 9. Safety of industrial radiography sources and exposure devices; 10. Radiography in shielded enclosures; 11. Site radiography; 12. Transport of radioactive sources; 13. Emergency preparedness and response; Appendix: IAEA categorization of radioactive sources; Annex I: Example safety assessment; Annex II: Overview of industrial radiography sources and equipment; Annex III: Examples of accidents in industrial radiography.

  2. Radiation Safety in Industrial Radiography. Specific Safety Guide (Spanish Edition)

    This Safety Guide provides recommendations for ensuring radiation safety in industrial radiography used in non-destructive testing. This includes industrial radiography work that utilizes X ray and gamma sources, both in shielded facilities that have effective engineering controls and in outside shielded facilities using mobile sources. Contents: 1. Introduction; 2. Duties and responsibilities; 3. Safety assessment; 4. Radiation protection programme; 5. Training and qualification; 6. Individual monitoring of workers; 7. Workplace monitoring; 8. Control of radioactive sources; 9. Safety of industrial radiography sources and exposure devices; 10. Radiography in shielded enclosures; 11. Site radiography; 12. Transport of radioactive sources; 13. Emergency preparedness and response; Appendix: IAEA categorization of radioactive sources; Annex I: Example safety assessment; Annex II: Overview of industrial radiography sources and equipment; Annex III: Examples of accidents in industrial radiography

  3. Reviewing industrial safety in nuclear power plants

    This document contains guidance and reference materials for Operational Safety Review Team (OSART) experts, in addition to the OSART Guidelines (TECDOC-449), for use in the review of industrial safety activities at nuclear power plants. It sets out objectives for an excellent industrial safety programme, and suggests investigations which should be made in evaluating industrial safety programmes. The attributes of an excellent industrial safety programme are listed as examples for comparison. Practical hints for reviewing industrial safety are discussed, so that the necessary information can be obtained effectively through a review of documents and records, discussions with counterparts, and field observations. There are several annexes. These deal with major features of industrial safety programmes such as safety committees, reporting and investigation systems and first aid and medical facilities. They include some examples which are considered commendable. The document should be taken into account not only when reviewing management, organization and administration but also in the review of related areas, such as maintenance and operations, so that all aspects of industrial safety in an operating nuclear power plant are covered

  4. Industrial Arts Curriculum Guide for Safety.

    Connecticut State Dept. of Education, Hartford. Div. of Vocational Education.

    This guide is intended to draw attention to the necessity for safety education in every aspect of industrial arts and to provide resources for upgrading and improving safety instruction in the classroom. It also can be used for inservice training of industrial art teachers and for undergraduate teacher education in Connecticut. Introductory…

  5. Safety Behaviour in the Construction Industry

    MacDonald, Nick; Hrymak, Victor

    2002-01-01

    The influences on safety standards and employee safety behaviour was analysed on 18 large construction sites on the island of Ireland. The safety management and documentation of these sites was also analysed. The results are discussed at length together with comprehensive recommendations for the industry.

  6. Accreditation of nuclear engineering programs

    The American Nuclear Society (ANS) Professional Development and Accreditation Committee (PDAC) has the responsibility for accreditation of engineering and technology programs for nuclear and similarly named programs. This committee provides society liaison with the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET), is responsible for the appointment and training of accreditation visitors, nomination of members for the ABET Board and Accreditation Commissions, and review of the criteria for accreditation of nuclear-related programs. The committee is composed of 21 members representing academia and industry. The ABET consists of 19 participating bodies, primarily professional societies, and 4 affiliate bodies. Representation on ABET is determined by the size of the professional society and the number of programs accredited. The ANS, as a participating body, has one member on the ABET board, two members on the Engineering Accreditation Commission, and one on the Technology Accreditation Commission. The ABET board sets ABET policy and the commissions are responsible for accreditation visits

  7. Safety culture in nuclear industry

    This paper after defining the term safety culture outlines the requirements at various levels of the plant management to ensure that safety culture pervades all activities related to the plant. Techniques are also indicated which can be used to assess the effectiveness of safety culture

  8. Road safety and trade and industry.

    2014-01-01

    Trade and industry mostly experience the negative consequences of crashes, but sometimes the consequences are positive. The negative consequences of road traffic crashes include loss of personnel and damage to vehicles. Some other industries, such as damage repair companies, on the other hand, derive income from road crashes. Trade and industry can also be of importance for road safety. Particularly the transport sector, the car industry and insurers take several initiatives which for example...

  9. New Jersey Industrial Arts Education Safety Guide.

    Kobylarz, Joseph D.; Olender, Francis B.

    This guide was developed to assist the teacher in planning, implementing, revising, or improving safety instruction in industrial arts classes in New Jersey, and has as its theme, "Safety Is Everyone's Responsibility." The guide is organized in seven major sections. The first section explains the purpose of the guide, outlines the contents of a…

  10. Safety Considerations in the Chemical Process Industries

    Englund, Stanley M.

    There is an increased emphasis on chemical process safety as a result of highly publicized accidents. Public awareness of these accidents has provided a driving force for industry to improve its safety record. There has been an increasing amount of government regulation.

  11. The National Accreditation Board for Hospital and Health Care Providers accreditation programme in India.

    Gyani, Girdhar J; Krishnamurthy, B

    2014-01-01

    Quality in health care is important as it is directly linked with patient safety. Quality as we know is driven either by regulation or by market demand. Regulation in most developing countries has not been effective, as there is shortage of health care providers and governments have to be flexible. In such circumstances, quality has taken a back seat. Accreditation symbolizes the framework for quality governance of a hospital and is based on optimum standards. Not only is India establishing numerous state of the art hospitals, but they are also experiencing an increase in demand for quality as well as medical tourism. India launched its own accreditation system in 2006, conforming to standards accredited by ISQua. This article shows the journey to accreditation in India and describes the problems encountered by hospitals as well as the benefits it has generated for the industry and patients. PMID:24938026

  12. Quality and safety in Spain; La calidad y seguridad industrial en Espana

    Prieto Barrio, J. M.; Martinez Martin, D. J.

    2015-07-01

    For three decades, and after the entry of Spain into the EU, it has been developed a regulatory, stable but evolving, framework that has allowed to create the conditions and structures to have stringent safety conditions of products and manufacturing facilities, as well as all the activities necessary for their certification and control. This development has been possible, among others, by the work of impulse and coordination of the Ministry of industry, Energy and Tourism, and particularly of the quality and Industrial safety sub directorate. On the other hand it has been developed a quality infrastructure that has, at the State level, with a standardisation (AENOR) entity and an accreditation body (ENAC) with recognized prestige around the world. In this article, in the first part, a list the regulations which apply to products and manufacturing facilities is shown, as well as explain the role played by standards and accreditation system in industrial safety and the factor of competitiveness that this entails for our industrial sector, and, in the second part, the institutional role of the Ministry and, the aforementioned Sub directorate, is described. The aim of the article is to be a descriptive reference of the current regulatory framework as well as the role of the State in this process. (Author)

  13. Radiation protection and safety in industrial radiography

    The use of ionizing radiation, particularly in medicine and industry, is growing throughout the world, with further expansion likely as technical developments result from research. One of the longest established applications of ionizing radiation is industrial radiography, which uses both X radiation and gamma radiation to investigate the integrity of equipment and structures. Industrial radiography is widespread in almost all Member States. It is indispensable to the quality assurance required in modern engineering practice and features in the work of multinational companies and small businesses alike. Industrial radiography is extremely versatile. The equipment required is relatively inexpensive and simple to operate. It may be highly portable and capable of being operated by a single worker in a wide range of different conditions, such as at remote construction sites, offshore locations and cross-country pipelines as well as in complex fabrication facilities. The associated hazards demand that safe working practices be developed in order to minimize the potential exposure of radiographers and other persons who may be in the vicinity of the work. The use of shielded enclosures (fixed facilities), with effective safety devices, significantly reduces any radiation exposures arising from the work. This Safety Report summarizes good and current state of the art practices in industrial radiography and provides technical advice on radiation protection and safety. It contains information for Regulatory Authorities, operating organizations, workers, equipment manufacturers and client organizations, with the intention of explaining their responsibilities and means to enhance radiation protection and safety in industrial radiography

  14. Advances in industrial ergonomics and safety II

    Das, B. (ed.) (Technical University of Nova Scotia, Halifax, NS (Canada). Dept. of Industrial Engineering)

    1990-01-01

    135 papers were presented at the conference in 20 sessions with the following headings: aging and industrial performance; back injury and rehabilitation; bioinstrumentation and electromyography; cumulative trauma disorders; engineering anthropometry; equipment design and ergonomics; human computer interaction; human performance and worker satisfaction; human strength and testing; industrial accidents and prevention; industrial biomechanics; injuries in health care; manual materials handling; noise and vibration effects; occupational health and safety; robotics and agricultural machinery safety; statistics and modelling in ergonomics; work environment; workplace safety analysis; and workstation design. Papers are included entitled: A model for analyzing mining machine illumination systems' by R.L. Unger, A.F. Glowacki and E.W. Rossi, 'Ergonomic design guidelines for underground coal mining equipment by E.J. Conway and R. Unger, and Hot work environment and human strain - a relation proposed by K. Bhattacharya and S. Raja.

  15. CAECC Software Testing Laboratory Accredited by CNAL

    2005-01-01

    Software Testing Laboratory of China Aerospace Engineering and Consultation Center (CAECC) is accredited by China National Accreditation Board for Laboratories (CNAL) as the first such laboratory in domestic space industry. Since CNAL is a member of International Laboratory Accreditation Cooperation (ILAC),software testing reports certificated to CAECC are recognized by 45 laboratory accreditation organizations in AsiaPacific region, Europe and America.

  16. Laboratory accreditation complying with ISO 25 Guide (IRAM 301): Industrial radiography method

    The ISO 25 Guide (IRAM 301) replaced by ISO 17025 is the standard applied for the implementation of a quality system in a test or calibration laboratory. This document is not known as ISO 9000, but it is the proper standard for this kind of laboratory. This document establishes requirements no just for the quality system in general, but on technical competence, that means the laboratory technical aptitude to carry out the tests. The aim of this paper is to comment the criteria used in the Radiographic Laboratory of CEMEC, that have been assessed by the United King dome Accreditation Service (UKAS). (author)

  17. Radiation safety in Australia's mineral sands industry

    This brochure is part of a training package aiming to explain in simple terms what radiation is, how it affects people's lives and how, in the specific case of the mineral sand industry, the risk of ill-effects from low-level radioactivity could be effectively guarded against by simple and easily followed safety precautions. ills

  18. A REVIEW ON INDUSTRIAL SAFETY AND HEALTH

    Patel Govind

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Progress of the industrial safety and occupational health movements in the United States toward their common goal of protecting the physical welfare of workers is discussed in this article. When these activities and workmen's compensation began, about a half century ago, it was anticipated that they would be "complementary and mutually sustaining." Besides presenting historical accounts of the safety and health movements, the authors evaluate the current problems and relationships among safety, health, and compensation activities. This article constitutes part of a broader study by the authors to be published under the title "Workmen's Compensation and Occupational Disability." (Author's abstract courtesy EBSCO. This Article will examine that historical perspective, covering both state and federal law, and will comprehensively detail the current law relating to occupational safety and health in the State of Washington.

  19. Improving labor safety in the petroleum industry

    Khobot' ko, V.I.; Nugayev, R.Ya.

    1979-01-01

    A principal problem when creating new techniques and technology is development of optimal interaction in the man-machine-environment interface to eliminate accidents. In the oil and gas industry, this is solved by development of a single management document for ergonomic norms and standard level requirements, as well as establishing a standard safety system. To give production manager greater responsibility for safety, implementation of a ''Single operating system for creation of safe working conditions'' has been initiated.

  20. High safety in the mining industry

    1987-08-01

    Presents an interview in question and answer format with the deputy chairman of Gosgortekhnadzor (Committee for Supervision of Industrial Work Safety and Mining Supervision) in which he discusses two recent fatal accidents in the Yasinovskaya-Glubokaya and Chaikino coal mines and identifies areas where safety needs to be improved (more automation, protective devices, ventilation etc.). Discusses the particular problems involved with deep mining (20% of mines are now deeper than 700 m and 27 mines are deeper than 1000 m), such as fires, dust, methane, rock falls, insufficient maintenance and strata control and poor ventilation. Confirms that a large number of accidents is due to poor organization and stresses the fact the coal industry must be subjected to perestroika (restructuring) as much as other areas of society.

  1. Managing knowledge to improve industrial safety

    Debray, Bruno; Abou Assali, Amjad; Lenne, Dominique

    2008-01-01

    The capacity to manage risks and maintain industrial safety is largely based on the capacity of various actors to acquire, maintain and share knowledge on a large variety of subjects. The actors are, of course, the plant operator but also the employees, the competent authorities, the external maintenance teams or internal or external experts in charge of risk assessment and design of risk management. The knowledge ranges from the regulatory framework to the details of a machine or a process b...

  2. A simple approach to industrial laser safety.

    Lewandowski, Michael A; Hinz, Michael W

    2005-02-01

    Industrial applications of lasers include marking, welding, cutting, and other material processing. Lasers used in these ways have significant power output but are generally designed to limit operator exposure to direct or scattered laser radiation to harmless levels in order to meet the Federal Laser Product Performance Standard (21CFR1040) for Class 1 laser products. Interesting challenges occur when companies integrate high power lasers into manufacturing or process control equipment. A significant part of the integration process is developing engineering and administrative controls to produce an acceptable level of laser safety while balancing production, maintenance, and service requirements. 3M Company uses a large number of high power lasers in numerous manufacturing processes. Whether the laser is purchased as a Class 1 laser product or whether it is purchased as a Class 4 laser and then integrated into a manufacturing application, 3M Company has developed an industrial laser safety program that maintains a high degree of laser safety while facilitating the rapid and economical integration of laser technology into the manufacturing workplace. This laser safety program is based on the requirements and recommendations contained in the American National Standard for Safe Use of Lasers, ANSI Z136.1. The fundamental components of the 3M program include hazard evaluation, engineering, administrative, and procedural controls, protective equipment, signs and labels, training, and re-evaluation upon change. This program is implemented in manufacturing facilities and has resulted in an excellent history of laser safety and an effective and efficient use of laser safety resources. PMID:15654241

  3. The Next Accreditation System.

    Kirk, Lynne M

    2016-02-01

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education has implemented a new accreditation system for graduate medical education in the United States. This system, called the Next Accreditation System, focuses on more continuous monitoring of the outcomes of residency training, and for high-quality programs, less on the detailed processes of that training. This allows programs to innovate to best meet the needs of their trainees and communities. This new system also reviews the clinical learning environment at each institution sponsoring graduate medical education, focusing on professionalism, trainee supervision, duty hour and fatigue management, care transitions, and integration of residents into patient safety and health care quality. This Next Accreditation System is too new to fully assess its outcomes in better preparing residents for medical practice. Assessments of its early implementation, however, suggest we can expect such outcomes in the near future. PMID:26859375

  4. Trends in Area of Safety Communications within Industrial Networks

    Maria Franekova; Ales Janota; Karol Rastocny

    2005-01-01

    The paper deals with the problems of safety communication in industrial networks for purpose of assurance of functional safety. It is intents on analysis of treats on industry networks and there is described recommended safety protections and their location into layer communication protocol applicable in fieldbus network, which they are used within safety critical processes control.

  5. Safety Management Practices in the Bhutanese Construction Industry

    Kin Dorji; Bonaventura H.W. Hadikusumo

    2006-01-01

    The construction industry is considered as one of the most hazardous industrial sectors wherein the construction workers are more prone to accidents. In developed countries such as United Kingdom and United States of America, there is strict legal enforcement of safety in the construction industry and also in the implementation of safety management systems which are designed to minimize or eliminate accidents at work places. However, occupational safety in construction industry is very poor i...

  6. Days on safety of industrial radiographic controls

    This program is divided in three parts: the context and the regulations, the preparation and the implementation, the tools of prevention and the initiatives and the perspectives.In the first part devoted to the context and regulation are: the context by the Authority of nuclear safety (A.S.N.), the regulation referential, the transport of gamma-graphs; in the second part are the distribution of liabilities, materials and associated requirements, the feedback of incidents and exploitation of it, training and base requirements, works of S.F.R.P./C.O.F.R.E.N.D. and the A.S.N. position; the third part includes help to evaluation of risks at working places of industry radiologists, dosimetry study of a working place, guide to evaluate oneself; the fourth part devoted to the initiatives and the perspectives are: regional experiences charters of good practices in industry radiography, integration of works and deployment by the members of the C.O.F.R.E.N.D., perspectives in matter of prevention of occupational risks in the area of industry radiography. (N.C.)

  7. [Accreditation in health care].

    Fügedi, Gergely; Lám, Judit; Belicza, Éva

    2016-01-24

    Besides the rapid development of healing procedures and healthcare, efficiency of care, institutional performance and safe treatment are receiving more and more attention in the 21st century. Accreditation, a scientifically proven tool for improving patient safety, has been used effectively in healthcare for nearly a hundred years, but only started to spread worldwide since the 1990s. The support and active participation of medical staff are determining factors in operating and getting accross the nationally developed, upcoming Hungarian accreditation system. However, this active assistance cannot be expected without the participants' understanding of the basic goals and features of the system. The presence of the ISO certification in Hungary, well-known by healthcare professionals, further complicates the understanding and orientation among quality management and improvement systems. This paper aims to provide an overview of the history, goals, function and importance of healthcare accreditation, and its similarities and differences regarding ISO certification. PMID:26772826

  8. Quality and safety in the palestinian construction industry

    Enshassi, Adnan; Choudhry, Rafiq; Abualqumboz, Moheeb

    2009-01-01

    Construction industry is one of the largest and most important industries in Palestine. Quality and safety in the industry still suffers from ignorance and lack of supervision and accident rate on construction projects is very high. The objective of this paper is to identify the quality and safety factors that relate to safety, and determine their relative importance as perceived by contractors to help reduction of accidents. A survey was conducted by using a 55 item questionnaire which was g...

  9. Workplace Safety and Health Topics: Industries and Occupations

    ... Programs Contact NIOSH NIOSH Industries & Occupations Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Agriculture Aircrew Safety & Health Body Art Center for Workers Compensation Studies (CWCS) Cleaning and ...

  10. Safety analyse of cryptography protocol used within safety-related control systems in industry

    Franeková, Mária; Fedor KÁLLAY; Kurytnik, Igor Piotr

    2008-01-01

    In the paper the possibilities of solution safety communication within area of safety-related control industry system are summarised with using cryptography techniques. Requirements to safety are based on generic standard for functional safety of Electrical/Electronic/Programmable Electronic (E/E/PE) systems IEC 61508 and standards, which define safety and security profiles in industrial network used in measurement and control systems. In mainly part of paper the model of safe...

  11. Using game theory to improve safety within chemical industrial parks

    Reniers, Genserik

    2013-01-01

    Though the game-theoretic approach has been vastly studied and utilized in relation to economics of industrial organizations, it has hardly been used to tackle safety management in multi-plant chemical industrial settings. Using Game Theory for Improving Safety within Chemical Industrial Parks presents an in-depth discussion of game-theoretic modelling which may be applied to improve cross-company prevention and -safety management in a chemical industrial park.   By systematically analyzing game-theoretic models and approaches in relation to managing safety in chemical industrial parks, Using Game Theory for Improving Safety within Chemical Industrial Parks explores the ways game theory can predict the outcome of complex strategic investment decision making processes involving several adjacent chemical plants. A number of game-theoretic decision models are discussed to provide strategic tools for decision-making situations.   Offering clear and straightforward explanations of methodologies, Using Game Theor...

  12. System safety education focused on industrial engineering

    Johnston, W. L.; Morris, R. S.

    1971-01-01

    An educational program, designed to train students with the specific skills needed to become safety specialists, is described. The discussion concentrates on application, selection, and utilization of various system safety analytical approaches. Emphasis is also placed on the management of a system safety program, its relationship with other disciplines, and new developments and applications of system safety techniques.

  13. Safety and security profiles of industry networks used in safety- critical applications

    Mária FRANEKOVÁ

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The author describes the mechanisms of safety and security profiles of industry and communication networks used within safety – related applications in technological and information levels of process control recommended according to standards IEC 61784-3,4. Nowadays the number of vendors of the safety – related communication technologies who guarantees besides the standard communication, the communication amongst the safety – related equipment according to IEC 61508 is increasing. Also the number of safety – related products is increasing, e. g. safety Fieldbus, safety PLC, safety curtains, safety laser scanners, safety buttons, safety relays and other. According to world survey the safety Fieldbus denoted the highest growth from all manufactured safety products.The main part of this paper is the description of the safety-related Fieldbus communication system, which has to guaranty Safety Integrity Level.

  14. Safety climate practice in Korean manufacturing industry

    Safety climate survey was sent to 642 plants in 2003 to explore safety climate practices in the Korean manufacturing plants, especially in hazardous chemical treating plants. Out of 642 plants contacted 195 (30.4%) participated in the surveys. Data were collected by e-mail using SQL-server and mail. The main objective of this study was to explore safety climate practices (level of safety climate and the underlying problems). In addition, the variables that may influence the level of safety climate among managers and workers were explored. The questionnaires developed by health and safety executive (HSE) in the UK were modified to incorporate differences in Korean culture. Eleven important factors were summarized. Internal reliability of these factors was validated. Number of employees in the company varied from less than 30 employees (9.2%) to over 1000 employees (37.4%). Both managers and workers showed generally high level of safety climate awareness. The major underlying problems identified were inadequate health and safety procedures/rules, pressure for production, and rule breaking. The length of employment was a significant contributing factor to the level of safety climate. In this study, participants showed generally high level of safety climate, and length of employment affected the differences in the level of safety climate. Managers' commitment to comply safety rules, procedures, and effective safety education and training are recommended

  15. Preliminary study on improving safety culture in Malaysian nuclear industries

    Ibrahim, Sabariah Kader [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Y. E. [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-15

    This paper presents preliminary study on safety culture and its implementation in Malaysian nuclear industries by realizing the importance of safety culture; identification of important safety culture attributes; safety culture assessment and the practices to incorporate the identified safety culture attributes in organization. The first section of this paper explains the terms and definitions related to safety culture. Second, for the realization of importance of safety culture in organization, the international operational experiences emphasizing the importance of safety culture are described. Third, important safety culture attributes which are frequently cited in literature are provided. Fourth, methods to assess safety culture in operating organization are described. Finally, the practices to enhance the safety culture in an organization are discussed.

  16. Preliminary study on improving safety culture in Malaysian nuclear industries

    This paper presents preliminary study on safety culture and its implementation in Malaysian nuclear industries by realizing the importance of safety culture; identification of important safety culture attributes; safety culture assessment and the practices to incorporate the identified safety culture attributes in organization. The first section of this paper explains the terms and definitions related to safety culture. Second, for the realization of importance of safety culture in organization, the international operational experiences emphasizing the importance of safety culture are described. Third, important safety culture attributes which are frequently cited in literature are provided. Fourth, methods to assess safety culture in operating organization are described. Finally, the practices to enhance the safety culture in an organization are discussed

  17. Industrial safety and applied health physics. Annual report for 1977

    Progress is reported on the following: radiation monitoring with regard to personnel monitoring and health physics instrumentation; environs surveillance with regard to atmospheric monitoring, water monitoring, radiation background measurements, and soil and grass samples; radiation and safety surveys with regard to laboratory operations monitoring, radiation incidents, and laundry monitoring; industrial safety and special projects with regard to accident analysis, disabling injuries, and safety awards

  18. Behavioral Safety in the Food Services Industry: Challenges and Outcomes

    Lebbon, Angela; Sigurdsson, Sigurdur Oli; Austin, John

    2012-01-01

    During the course of a 6-year behavioral safety consult at a food and drink industry site, data were collected on the number of Occupational Safety Health Administration (OSHA) recordable incidents, number of lost and restricted days, and number of peer safety observations. Employees were trained to identify safe and unsafe behavior, conduct peer…

  19. OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND SAFETY ISSUES IN VICTORIAN CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY, AUSTRALIA

    M. Asad, Abdurrahman

    2010-01-01

    The construction industry has one of the highest injury ratios of all Australian industries. Individuals employed on the construction industries find themselves confronted with dangerous and life-threatening work conditions. However, it appears that the trend in Occupational Health and Safety (OHS) performance of construction industry has improved consistently compared with the other industries. The enforcement of OHS law and regulation, and the outcome of authority function to assist and pro...

  20. Relationships between psychological safety climate facets and safety behavior in the rail industry: a dominance analysis.

    Morrow, Stephanie L; McGonagle, Alyssa K; Dove-Steinkamp, Megan L; Walker, Curtis T; Marmet, Matthew; Barnes-Farrell, Janet L

    2010-09-01

    The goals of this study were twofold: (1) to confirm a relationship between employee perceptions of psychological safety climate and safety behavior for a sample of workers in the rail industry and (2) to explore the relative strengths of relationships between specific facets of safety climate and safety behavior. Non-management rail maintenance workers employed by a large North American railroad completed a survey (n=421) regarding workplace safety perceptions and behaviors. Three facets of safety climate (management safety, coworker safety, and work-safety tension) were assessed as relating to individual workers' reported safety behavior. All three facets were significantly associated with safety behavior. Dominance analysis was used to assess the relative importance of each facet as related to the outcome, and work-safety tension evidenced the strongest relationship with safety behavior. PMID:20538102

  1. Evaluation Indicator System for China’s Agricultural Industrial Safety

    Qingpeng; GAO; Bin; CHEN; Qinyang; LI

    2013-01-01

    On the basis of new characteristics and trend of China’s agricultural development in the post-WTO period,combining analysis of factors influencing agricultural industrial safety,this paper builds an evaluation indicator system for China’s agricultural industrial safety by scientific indicator system design method.This indicator system includes risk factor indicators(showing risk degree)and capacity factor indicators(showing guaranteeing ability),and consists of 7 subsystems:consumption safety,production safety,industrial controlling capacity,industrial development capacity,industrial development environment,government functions and industrial foundation condition.Risk factor is divided into 5 levels:higher risk,high risk,medium risk,low risk and lower risk;guarantee risk is also divided into five levels:strong,healthy,normal,weak and disabled.According to the overall evaluation score obtained from weighting sum,the agricultural industrial safety includes 5 types:very safe,safe,basically safe,not safe and hazardous.This evaluation indicator system is expected to providing theoretical reference for evaluating China’s agricultural industrial safety.

  2. Industrial Personal Computer based Display for Nuclear Safety System

    The safety display of nuclear system has been classified as important to safety (SIL:Safety Integrity Level 3). These days the regulatory agencies are imposing more strict safety requirements for digital safety display system. To satisfy these requirements, it is necessary to develop a safety-critical (SIL 4) grade safety display system. This paper proposes industrial personal computer based safety display system with safety grade operating system and safety grade display methods. The description consists of three parts, the background, the safety requirements and the proposed safety display system design. The hardware platform is designed using commercially available off-the-shelf processor board with back plane bus. The operating system is customized for nuclear safety display application. The display unit is designed adopting two improvement features, i.e., one is to provide two separate processors for main computer and display device using serial communication, and the other is to use Digital Visual Interface between main computer and display device. In this case the main computer uses minimized graphic functions for safety display. The display design is at the conceptual phase, and there are several open areas to be concreted for a solid system. The main purpose of this paper is to describe and suggest a methodology to develop a safety-critical display system and the descriptions are focused on the safety requirement point of view

  3. Safety of Nanotechnology in Food Industries

    Amini, Seyed Mohammad; Gilaki, Marzieh; Karchani, Mohsen

    2014-01-01

    The arrival of nanotechnology in various industries has been so rapid and widespread because of its wide-ranging applications in our daily lives. Nutrition and food service is one of the biggest industries to be affected by nanotechnology in all areas, changing even the nature of food itself. Whether it’s farming, food packaging, or the prevention of microbial contamination the major food industries have seen dramatic changes because of nanotechnology. Different nanomaterials such as nanopowd...

  4. Health and safety record of the nuclear industry

    This paper examines the claim of the nuclear industry to have an excellent safety record, in terms of health and accident records of workers in the industry. It does not consider accidents which have not resulted in harm to the workers' health. The nuclear industry is considered to include all work with ionising radiations and radioactive materials, in education, research, medicine and industry. Since 'safety' is not an absolute concept, comparisons are made with the published records of other industries, and a study is made of the performance of the nuclear industry in relation to its own safety criteria. Data are presented on the radiation exposure of nuclear workers in Europe, America, India and Australia, in relation to the internationally recommended limits, and there is some discussion of the risks involved in these limits. The death rate in parts of the nuclear industry in America, the United Kingdom, and Australia is presented and compared with the death rate for other industries in those countries, and a listing is made of deaths caused by radiation in the period 1945 to 1968. Injury rates for the US and Australian nuclear industries are also compared with the injury rates for other industries in these countries. Consideration is given to the safety record of individual components of the nuclear industry (using the wide definition of this industry given above), special attention being given to health records of uranium miners, plutonium workers and radiologists. Although there are difficulties in obtaining sufficiently detailed information of this kind it is considered that the data presented, relative to any reasonable standard, demonstrate that the nuclear industry has a safety record to be proud of. (author)

  5. Approaching safety in the Swedish and Danish construction industry

    Grill, Martin; Grytnes, Regine; Törner, Marianne

    2015-01-01

    Background: Persistent high accident rates in the construction industry motivate research to improve the understanding of underlying factors affecting safety behaviour and safety outcomes. The Scandinavian countries of Sweden and Denmark are culturally similar but with a considerable difference in...... accidents rates, especially in construction, and as such offer an opportunity to explore organizational and managerial issues related to safety outcomes. Methods: Semi-structured interviews were carried out with five construction managers and four construction workers in Danish and Swedish construction...... industry. The transcripts were analysed using semantic thematic analysis. Results: Seven safety related themes were distinguished, conveying safety culture differences between Swedish and Danish construction industry concerning: participatory or directive management; challenge or obey; compliance or non...

  6. Principles and methods of securing industrial ecological safety

    П. Г. Белов; Ю. Ф. Запорожченко

    1999-01-01

    Proposed is classification of risks, determined is regularity and factors of technogenic acci­dents, proposed is energoentropic concept of technogenic risks, considered are the principles and methods of securing industrial and ecologic safety

  7. Safety applications of computer based systems for the process industry

    Computer based systems, generally referred to as Programmable Electronic Systems (PESs) are being increasingly used in the process industry, also to perform safety functions. The process industry as they intend in this document includes, but is not limited to, chemicals, oil and gas production, oil refining and power generation. Starting in the early 1970's the wide application possibilities and the related development problems of such systems were recognized. Since then, many guidelines and standards have been developed to direct and regulate the application of computers to perform safety functions (EWICS-TC7, IEC, ISA). Lessons learnt in the last twenty years can be summarised as follows: safety is a cultural issue; safety is a management issue; safety is an engineering issue. In particular, safety systems can only be properly addressed in the overall system context. No single method can be considered sufficient to achieve the safety features required in many safety applications. Good safety engineering approach has to address not only hardware and software problems in isolation but also their interfaces and man-machine interface problems. Finally, the economic and industrial aspects of the safety applications and development of PESs in process plants are evidenced throughout all the Report. Scope of the Report is to contribute to the development of an adequate awareness of these problems and to illustrate technical solutions applied or being developed

  8. Safety culture and safety management within the Norwegian-controlled shipping industry ; State of art, interrelationships, and influencing factors

    Oltedal, Helle Asgjerd

    2011-01-01

    This research focuses attention on safety challenges within the Norwegian shipping industry. A status picture of the shipboard safety culture and the interrelationships with safety management and organizational factors is given. Three research questions are explored: (1) What characterizes safety culture and safety management within the shipping industry? (2) What is the relationship between safety culture and safety performance within the shipping industry? (3) What charact...

  9. Industrial safety and applied health physics. Annual report for 1977

    Auxier, J.A.; Davis, D.M.

    1978-06-01

    Progress is reported on the following: radiation monitoring with regard to personnel monitoring and health physics instrumentation; environs surveillance with regard to atmospheric monitoring, water monitoring, radiation background measurements, and soil and grass samples; radiation and safety surveys with regard to laboratory operations monitoring, radiation incidents, and laundry monitoring; industrial safety and special projects with regard to accident analysis, disabling injuries, and safety awards. (HLW)

  10. Safety and security profiles of industry networks used in safety- critical applications

    Franeková, Mária

    2008-01-01

    The author describes the mechanisms of safety and security profiles of industry and communication networks used within safety – related applications in technological and information levels of process control recommended according to standards IEC 61784-3,4. Nowadays the number of vendors of the safety – related communication technologies who guarantees besides the standard communication, the communication amongst the safety – related equipment according to IEC 61508 is increasing. Also the n...

  11. Accredited Birth Centers

    ... 717-933-9743 Accredited since January 2016 100 Bright Eyes Midwifery and Wild Rivers Women's Health Accredited ... Birthing Center-Cedar Park Accredited 1130 Cottonwood Creek Trail Building D Suite 2 Cedar Park, TX 78613 ...

  12. Biosensor: an emerging safety tool for meat industry.

    Singh, Pradeep Kumar; Jairath, Gauri; Ahlawat, Satyavir Singh; Pathera, Ashok; Singh, Prashant

    2016-04-01

    The meat industry associated with the health hazards like deadly pathogens, veterinary drugs, pesticide residues, toxins and heavy metals is in need of a tool to tackle the awful situation and ensure safer product to consumer. The growth in the industry, global trade scenario, stringent laws and consumer awareness has placed an extra onus on the meat industry to meet out the expectations and demands. Biosensors are the latest tool of detection in the fast growing industries including the food industry. Hence an attempt is envisaged here to review the possibility of harnessing biosensors as tool of safety to safe guard the consumer health and address safety issues in reference to the common threats of concern in the meat industry. PMID:27413204

  13. Radiation safety in industrial radiography in the Philippines

    The article presents the application of radiography in almost all sectors of the industry from construction stage of plants, in oil and gas, petrochemical and power industry which are the biggest users of radiography. Industrial radiography is being conducted using a set of operational procedures developed by the level 3 radiographer and approved by the Radiological Health and Safety Officer (RHSO) to ensure safe and successful completion of the activity

  14. A review of crane safety in the construction industry.

    Neitzel, R L; Seixas, N S; Ren, K K

    2001-12-01

    The complex, dynamic, and continually changing nature of construction work has been recognized as an important contributor to the high rates of injuries and fatalities in the industry. Cranes are a central component of many construction operations and are associated with a large fraction of construction deaths; in fact, estimates suggest that cranes are involved in up to one-third of all construction and maintenance fatalities. Safety and health professionals serving the construction industry need adequate training and knowledge regarding available crane safety devices and procedures so that they may insure these techniques are effectively utilized during construction operations. This paper reviews available information on crane-related injuries, currently available safety devices, and commonly used crane safety procedures. Recommendations for improved crane injury prevention and future crane safety research are given. PMID:11783872

  15. Safety, economic incentives and insurance in the Norwegian petroleum industry

    There is an increased use of key performance indicators and incentive schemes in the petroleum industry. Applying modern incentive theory, we explore what implications this management trend has for injury and major accident prevention efforts and safety. Can economic incentives be designed for accident prevention activities? In cases where this is not possible, what are the challenges for the safety efforts? In particular, how are safety efforts affected by enhanced economic incentives for other performance dimensions like production and rate of return? Can safety be neglected? What remedies are available?

  16. Nuclear safety research: responsive industry results

    EPRI's nuclear safety research program made a number of technical advances this past year. EPRI has completed a study of common cause failure, developed software for plant reliability and safety, studied reliability-centered maintenance, studied the consequences of steam generator tube rupture, completed the study of eastern seismic activity, looked at piping design improvements, qualified RETRAN for simulator applications, conducted intermediate-scale molten corium-concrete interaction tests and completed a mechanistic code to calculate core melt. A major owner's group experimental effort on hydrogen combustion has been completed, characterizing hydrogen combustion behavior in BWR6 Mark III containments. Within the US, EPRI is involved in many national and international collaborative efforts such as the TREAT STEP and the MIST B and W tests, the OECD LOFT program and the LACE, ACE, and Marviken aerosol-behavior experimental programs. Also, EPRI is participating the NRC's important Severe Fuel Damage Program. This paper reviews EPRI's nuclear safety research program in the context of this new transitional phase and how it is meeting the everyday challenges of commercial nuclear power. 158 references

  17. INPO accreditation - product definition for utility training

    As a part of its responsibility to promote training excellence, the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO) initiated an accreditation program in 1982 on behalf of its member utilities. The purpose of the accreditation program is to assist INPO members in developing and maintaining training programs that produce well-qualified, competent personnel to operate the nation's nuclear power plants. Accreditation formally recognizes nuclear utility training as meeting the INPO accreditation objectives and criteria for initial and continuing training programs for operations, maintenance, and technical personnel. The ultimate objective to be achieved by accreditation is to maintain high-quality training and enhance the professionalism of the personnel who operate the nuclear power plants. While initial accreditation represents recognition that quality training programs have been put in place at the nuclear power plants, the renewal of accreditation represents recognition that quality training programs have been put in place at the nuclear power plants, the renewal of accreditation will keep the training programs vital, effective, and up to high standards. The nuclear power industry has accepted the responsibility of striving for excellence in training its personnel to safely operate the power plants. The full use of accreditation and the accrediting process is an important means to fulfilling this responsibility

  18. Community Road Safety Initiatives for the Minerals Industry

    Tim Horberry

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Major companies in the minerals industry are increasingly recognizing that their operations have an impact in the wider community. Regarding transportation issues, this impact extends beyond purely the safety of company vehicle fleets to consideration of Community Road Safety (CRS concerns, which address the driving, walking, and riding practices of community members in a locale with increased heavy vehicle traffic. Our assessment here of national and international trends in approaches to road safety awareness and associated road safety strategies is meant to inform companies in the minerals industry of developments that can influence the design of their road safety initiatives. The review begins by considering the overall road safety context and the dominant “safe systems” framework employed internationally. Thereafter, it considers what is typically included in CRS initiatives for the minerals industry. Three case studies are then presented to highlight approaches that feature exemplary collaboration, design, implementation, or impact. Thereafter, we analyze lessons learnt by key researchers and practitioners in the CRS field. Finally, we conclude that best CRS practices for the minerals industry rely on eleven factors, including for example collaboration with local entities and stepwise implementation.

  19. Promoting safety culture in radiation industry through radiation audit

    This paper illustrates the Malaysian experience in implementing and promoting effective radiation safety program. Current management practice demands that an organization inculcate culture of safety in preventing radiation hazard. The aforementioned objectives of radiation protection can only be met when it is implemented and evaluated continuously. Commitment from the workforce to treat safety as a priority and the ability to turn a requirement into a practical language is also important to implement radiation safety policy efficiently. Maintaining and improving safety culture is a continuous process. There is a need to establish a program to measure, review and audit health and safety performance against predetermined standards. This program is known as radiation safety audit and is able to reveal where and when action is needed to make improvements to the systems of controls. A structured and proper radiation self-auditing system is seen as the sole requirement to meet the current and future needs in sustainability of radiation safety. As a result safety culture, which has been a vital element on safety in many industries can be improved and promote changes, leading to good safety performance and excellence. (author)

  20. Further activities of safety culture toward nuclear transportation industry

    On September 30, 1999, a criticality accident occurred at the uranium processing facility of the JCO Co. Ltd. (hereinafter referred to as ''JCO'') Tokai plant, located in Tokaimura, Ibaraki Prefecture. This was an unprecedented accident in Japan's history of peaceful use of nuclear power, resulting in three workers exposed to severe radiation, two of whom died, and the evacuation and enforced indoor confinement of local residents. Nuclear power suppliers must take personal responsibility for ensuring safety. In this connection, the electric power industry, heavy electric machinery manufacturers, fuel fabricators, and nuclear power research organizations gathered together to establish the Nuclear Safety Network (NSnet) in December 1999, based on the resolve to share and improve the level of the safety culture across the entire nuclear power industry and to assure that such an accident never occurs again. NSnet serves as a link between nuclear power enterprises, research organizations, and other bodies, based on the principles of equality and reciprocity. A variety of activities are pursued, such as diffusing a safety culture, implementing mutual evaluation among members, and exchanging safety-related information. Aiming to share and improve the safety culture throughout the entire nuclear power industry, NSnet thoroughly implements the principle of safety first, while at the same time making efforts to restore trust in nuclear power

  1. Nuclear safety research: Responsive industry results

    EPRI's nuclear safety research program made a number of technical advances this past year. EPRI has completed a study of common cause failure, developed software for plant reliability and safety, studied reliability-centered maintenance, studied the consequences of steam generator tube rupture, completed the study of eastern United States seismic activity, looked at piping design improvements, qualified RETRAN for simulator applications, conducted intermediate scale molten corium-concrete interaction (MCCI) tests, and completed a mechanistic code to calculate core melt. A major owner's group experimental effort on hydrogen combustion has been completed, characterizing hydrogen combustion behavior in BWR6 Mark III containments. Within the United States, EPRI is involved in many national and international collaborative efforts, such as the TREAT STEP and MIST B and W tests, the OECD LOFT program, and the LACE, ACE, and Marviken aerosol behavior experimental programs. The LACE program successfully completed its experiments and is well on its way to completing all associated work shedding important light on aerosol behavior in containment and release from containment. Also, EPRI is participating in NRC's important Severe Fuel Damage Program. (orig./GL)

  2. Safety in Rubber Industry Workplaces European Experiences

    Claudio Celeta

    2011-01-01

    In Europe,since many years,safety in workplaces has been one of the main priorities for authorities and enterprises.European authorities have arranged a set of standards and rules,so that this target is achieved and maintained as far as possible.In particular,the so-called Machinery Directive has a considerable importance.Its first edition was published in the Official Journal of the European Community in 1989 and has been continuously updated up to the edition actually in force,published in 2006. The Machinery Directive provides that different risks shall be considered when designing and manufacturing a machine,such as sources of energy,static electricity,high temperature,explosive materials and chemical reactions,noise,vibrations,powders and gases,assembling errors etc.

  3. 10 CFR 34.42 - Radiation Safety Officer for industrial radiography.

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Radiation Safety Officer for industrial radiography. 34.42... SAFETY REQUIREMENTS FOR INDUSTRIAL RADIOGRAPHIC OPERATIONS Radiation Safety Requirements § 34.42 Radiation Safety Officer for industrial radiography. The RSO shall ensure that radiation safety...

  4. Probabilistic safety targets in different industrial applications and their comparability

    A survey is given of quantified safety objectives that have developed - for various purposes - in different industry and high-technology sectors (e.g. process and petrochemical industries; nuclear industry, aeronautics; structural applications such as off-shore structures and dams; pharmaceutics and toxic substances) over the past two-decades. In certain cases such objectives are to be regarded as design and operational objectives; in others they are aimed at determining acceptability/tolerability of risks to which individuals or groups of the population are exposed in modern society. Associated to the demonstration of quantified safety objectives are Probabilistic safety/risk analyses at various levels, which implies the resolution of problems related to their validity and uncertainty-bands. Considerations are put forward with regard to the comparability or non-comparability) of several of the objectives that are examined. (author)

  5. Performance indicators for monitoring safety management systems in chemical industry

    M. Jovašević-Stojanović

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of the Safety Management System (SMS in chemical industry appears as one of the important requirements introduced by the EU "Seveso II" Directive on the control of major-accident hazards. This paper aims to provide a contribution regarding the SMS structure and the definition of the tools for assessing the effectiveness of this system by means of safety performance indicators. The performance indicators are linked to a reference values or policy targets, illustrating how far the SMS is from the desired level. We developed a system of performance indicators for SMS in chemical industry by using the concept of environmental performance indicators defined in standard ISO 14031. A set of three types of safety system performance indicators was proposed: management performance indicators, operational performance indicators and safety status indicators. These indicators represent the most important factors in the linkage between a possible cause of an accident and its effects.

  6. Safety, reliability and efficiency in the nuclear industry

    This paper reviews the factors which must be taken into consideration if the management of safety in the nuclear industry is to be put on a rational basis. The wealth available in a society depends directly on the man-hour efficiency of its industry. Safety and good living depend on the availability of wealth. Second-order technology requires man-hour input, but the safety component does not add to output and so tends to reduce man-hour efficiency. An optimum combination of net impacts on society-wide safety and good living implies some limit on man-hour expenditure and loss of production arising from attempts to reduce the direct risk

  7. Profiling contextual factors which influence safety in heavy vehicle industries.

    Edwards, Jason R D; Davey, Jeremy; Armstrong, Kerry A

    2014-12-01

    A significant proportion of worker fatalities within Australia result from truck-related incidents. Truck drivers face a number of health and safety concerns. Safety culture, viewed here as the beliefs, attitudes and values shared by an organisation's workers, which interact with their surrounding context to influence behaviour, may provide a valuable lens for exploring safety-related behaviours in heavy vehicle operations. To date no major research has examined safety culture within heavy vehicle industries. As safety culture provides a means to interpret experiences and generate behaviour, safety culture research should be conducted with an awareness of the context surrounding safety. The current research sought to examine previous health and safety research regarding heavy vehicle operations to profile contextual factors which influence health and safety. A review of 104 peer-reviewed papers was conducted. Findings of these papers were then thematically analysed. A number of behaviours and scenarios linked with crashes and non-crash injuries were identified, along with a selection of health outcomes. Contextual factors which were found to influence these outcomes were explored. These factors were found to originate from government departments, transport organisations, customers and the road and work environment. The identified factors may provide points of interaction, whereby culture may influence health and safety outcomes. PMID:25269101

  8. Implementation of the safety components base on industrial networks

    Michalski, P.; Hetmańczyk, M. P.

    2015-11-01

    Capabilities of modern automation systems, especially in the field of industrial networks applications, encouraging them to favor during the process of developing the automation project [2,3,5]. Extensive network topologies and simplicity and clear structure causing displacement of the classic wiring. The article presents: project workflow for creating laboratory stand based on industrial network and base on it implementing the safety system. The individual steps of the process are described. In addition, the paper presents the main concept for controlling the safety functions of the system.

  9. Managing for safety and safety culture within the UK nuclear industry. A regulator's perspective

    This paper outlines the basis of the legal system for the regulation of health and safety at work within the United Kingdom (UK), and in particular, the regulation of the nuclear industry. The framework, formulated by the regulator, which has been published as a practical guide for directors, managers, health and safety professionals and employee representatives for the successful management of health and safety is explained. This guidance, however, concentrates, to a large extent, on management systems and only addresses in part the types of issues, such as behaviours, values, attitudes and beliefs which contribute to the safety culture of an organization. The regulator of the UK nuclear industry has considered research, and other work, carried out by several organizations in this area, notably the Advisory Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations (ACSNI) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), and produced its own framework for managing for safety at nuclear installations. As a regulator, the Health and Safety Executive (HSE), and its inspectorate responsible for regulation of the nuclear industry, HM Nuclear Installations Inspectorate (HMNII), are not the appropriate organization to assess the safety culture of an organization, but positively encourage organizations to both carry out this assessment themselves and to monitor their performance. To this end, HSE has developed, and made available, the Health and Safety Climate Tool which is aimed at providing organizations with information which can be used as part of a continuous improvement process. (author)

  10. Management of health, safety and environment in process industry

    Duijm, Nijs Jan; Fiévez, C.; Gerbec, M.;

    2008-01-01

    The present status of industrial HSE management in a number of EU member states is reviewed, with a focus on the integration of health, safety and environment in single management systems. The review provides insight into the standards and paradigms adopted by industry, and it identifies trends and...... needs for improvement. It appears that most industries consider goal-based HSE management programs to be a success and believe them to contribute to the profitability of the industry. We conclude that HSE management would benefit greatly from guidance on how to use existing management systems...... efficiently and also from the further development of meaningful safety performance indicators that identify the conditions prior to accidents and incidents. (C) 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved....

  11. OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND RISK ASSESSMENT IN THE MINING INDUSTRY

    Slobodan Radosavljević

    2008-01-01

    Global dynamics of the technological changes creates a need for modern approaches while evaluating and analysing the risk in the mining industry. Analysing and managing technical systems in the mining industry is a key factor concerning the quality of their functioning. Dependability, safety, and maintenance management based on the risk analysis can contribute substantially to the overall effectiveness and efficiency of the mining technological systems. Besides applying adequate technology, o...

  12. Teamwork and Safety in the Maritime Industry: A SWOT Approach

    2010-01-01

    Abstract The past few decades the use of teams has increased, also in complex sociotechnical systems such as the maritime industry. Safety issues involve a wide range of elements, including human factors, and pose a number of challenges to organisations in the shipping industry. The primary aim of this study was to examine the Big Five of teamwork model and its ability to capture teamwork aspects of all kinds of teams, independent of team type, organisational level and domain. The collect...

  13. Assessing safety culture and safety performance in a high hazard industry

    Jones, Ceri

    2014-01-01

    In the UK 27 million working days are lost due to work-related illness or injury; at an estimate of £13.4 billion to the economy. Over the last 30 years researchers have examined safety culture and its relationship to poor safety performance. An organisation in the high hazard construction industry wanted to understand the factors that shaped and influenced safety performance and safety culture. This thesis details a research project which addresses that aim. A multi-method, triangulated appr...

  14. Structural modeling of safety performance in construction industry.

    Yahya Khosravi

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available With rapid economic development and industrialization, the construction industry continues to rank among the most hazardous industries in the world. Therefore, construction safety is always a significant concern for both practitioners and researchers. The objective of this study was to create a structural modeling of components that influence the safety performance in construction projects.We followed a two-stage Structural Equation Model based on a questionnaire study (n=230. In the first stage, we applied the Structural Equation Model to the proposed model to test the validity of the observed variables of each latent variable. In the next stage, we modified the proposed model. The LISREL 8.8 software was used to conduct the analysis of the structural model.A good-fit structural model (Goodness of Fit Index=0.92; Root Mean Square Residual=0.04; Root Mean Square Error of Approximation=0.04; Comparative Fit Index=0.98; Normalized Fit Index=0.96 indicated that social and organizational constructs influence safety performance via the general component of the safety climate.The new structural model can be used to provide better understanding of the links between safety performance indicators and contributing components, and make stronger recommendations for effective intervention in construction projects.

  15. Post-Fukushima Probabilistic Safety Enhancements of Industry

    Na, Janghwan; Jeon, Ho-Jun; Lee, Hyun-Gyo [Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co. Ltd. Central Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    Nuclear concerned society as well as regulatory agency of Korea also asked several safety measures be included to the existing safety principles. These measures include the post-Fukushima near action items, several mid-long term obligations for severe accidents and rare external hazards which were disregarded due to unlikely event probabilities. This paper illustrates some activities being done or planned in view of probabilistic assessment boundaries; 1) Items currently performed by industry, 2) Regulatory measures which will impact to the industry activities, 3) Activities planned by mid-long bases. After the Fukushima accident, the significance of severe accidents and PSA came to the public as well as the industry itself. Among fifty safety-related plans, in this paper, we showed the implementation strategies and interim insights from LPSD PSA. The plans or activities now underway are further enhancing the safety for operating by introducing PSR and construction plants by inclusion of PSA insights into SAR. The main focus for safety improvement is targeted by not only the hardware improvement, but also systematic structure and effective operational improvement. The results of LPSD PSA implementation strategy will contribute to conforming of regulatory requirement and legislation of PSA which requests the application of extended scope of analysis, new methodology, PSA quality, living PSA through technically sound and application- specific PSA models.

  16. Post-Fukushima Probabilistic Safety Enhancements of Industry

    Nuclear concerned society as well as regulatory agency of Korea also asked several safety measures be included to the existing safety principles. These measures include the post-Fukushima near action items, several mid-long term obligations for severe accidents and rare external hazards which were disregarded due to unlikely event probabilities. This paper illustrates some activities being done or planned in view of probabilistic assessment boundaries; 1) Items currently performed by industry, 2) Regulatory measures which will impact to the industry activities, 3) Activities planned by mid-long bases. After the Fukushima accident, the significance of severe accidents and PSA came to the public as well as the industry itself. Among fifty safety-related plans, in this paper, we showed the implementation strategies and interim insights from LPSD PSA. The plans or activities now underway are further enhancing the safety for operating by introducing PSR and construction plants by inclusion of PSA insights into SAR. The main focus for safety improvement is targeted by not only the hardware improvement, but also systematic structure and effective operational improvement. The results of LPSD PSA implementation strategy will contribute to conforming of regulatory requirement and legislation of PSA which requests the application of extended scope of analysis, new methodology, PSA quality, living PSA through technically sound and application- specific PSA models

  17. Safety in Trade and Industrial and Technical Education.

    Thomas, John C.

    Intended to serve as a resource guide to assist trade, industrial, and technical teachers in maintaining an effective and efficient safety program, the document does not contain information concerning the many specific operations of the various trades. The materials serve as a background for teachers as they develop their own units of instruction…

  18. Process Control Systems in the Chemical Industry: Safety vs. Security

    Jeffrey Hahn; Thomas Anderson

    2005-04-01

    Traditionally, the primary focus of the chemical industry has been safety and productivity. However, recent threats to our nation’s critical infrastructure have prompted a tightening of security measures across many different industry sectors. Reducing vulnerabilities of control systems against physical and cyber attack is necessary to ensure the safety, security and effective functioning of these systems. The U.S. Department of Homeland Security has developed a strategy to secure these vulnerabilities. Crucial to this strategy is the Control Systems Security and Test Center (CSSTC) established to test and analyze control systems equipment. In addition, the CSSTC promotes a proactive, collaborative approach to increase industry's awareness of standards, products and processes that can enhance the security of control systems. This paper outlines measures that can be taken to enhance the cybersecurity of process control systems in the chemical sector.

  19. SAFETY PERFORMANCE OF SUBCONTRACTORS IN THE PALESTINIAN CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY

    Adnan Enshassi

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Subcontractors perform most of the construction works and their effect on industry are apparent in different activities of construction. Therefore, subcontractors need more attention from government and contractors union. The aim of this paper is to identify, evaluate, and rank factors that influence safety performance of subcontractors in the Gaza Strip (Palestine according to their relative importance. The study concluded that reported accident rates will decrease among subcontractors and their workers if new workers are trained well in the work site and they are informed about dangerous places, and if a workable safety plan is well preplanned. The results also showed that reported accident rates increased among subcontractors when using old, unsafe equipment and due to the complexity or difficulty in the construction sites features. Owners and general contractors need to stipulate strict clauses for safety in the contract for improving safety record of subcontractors. Construction workers must receive proper job related safety and health training with a safety logbook. It is recommended that the subcontractors and workers should attend continuing safety programs on regular basis as part of their perquisite to work in construction sites.

  20. Should healthcare providers do safety cases? Lessons from a cross-industry review of safety case practices

    Sujan, Mark A.; Habli, Ibrahim; Kelly, Tim P.; Pozzi, Simone; Johnson, Christopher W.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Healthcare organisations are often encouraged to learn from other industries in order to develop proactive and rigorous safety management practices. In the UK safety–critical industries safety cases have been used to provide justification that systems are acceptably safe. There has been growing interest in healthcare in the application of safety cases for medical devices and health information technology. However, the introduction of safety cases into general safety management and re...

  1. Human factor in the problem of Russian nuclear industry safety

    The approach to human factor definition, considered in the paper, consists of recognition of as many as possible factors for developing a complete list of factors, which have influence on mistakes or successful work of NPP personnel. Safety culture is considered as the main factor. The enhancement in nuclear power industry includes an optimization of organizational structures and development of personnel safety attitudes. The organizational factors, as possible root causes for human errors, need to be identified, assessed and improved. The organizational activities taken in Russia are presented

  2. OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND RISK ASSESSMENT IN THE MINING INDUSTRY

    Slobodan Radosavljević

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Global dynamics of the technological changes creates a need for modern approaches while evaluating and analysing the risk in the mining industry. Analysing and managing technical systems in the mining industry is a key factor concerning the quality of their functioning. Dependability, safety, and maintenance management based on the risk analysis can contribute substantially to the overall effectiveness and efficiency of the mining technological systems. Besides applying adequate technology, organizing and harmonizing the system links among various structures and standardization is of the great importance in achieving business goals. The choice and use of the optimal solutions in the analysis ought to recognize, anticipate, forestall, reduce, and minimize the risk and possible destructive applications. The mining industry production practice recognizes the need for the strategy of organizational and process redesigning as well as raising this issue to the level of the other managing functions of the company. A realistic view of the present state in the risk analysis shows the need for the rapid transformation in the mining industry. The study puts forward a proposal for the possible approaches and improvement relating to the following and implementing modern, standardized world trends, (models and methods concerning the analysis of the technical and occupational safety risk in some of the basic processes in the mining industry.

  3. Probabilistic safety assessment in the chemical and nuclear industries

    Fullwood, Ralph R

    2000-01-01

    Probabilistic Safety Analysis (PSA) determines the probability and consequences of accidents, hence, the risk. This subject concerns policy makers, regulators, designers, educators and engineers working to achieve maximum safety with operational efficiency. Risk is analyzed using methods for achieving reliability in the space program. The first major application was to the nuclear power industry, followed by applications to the chemical industry. It has also been applied to space, aviation, defense, ground, and water transportation. This book is unique in its treatment of chemical and nuclear risk. Problems are included at the end of many chapters, and answers are in the back of the book. Computer files are provided (via the internet), containing reliability data, a calculator that determines failure rate and uncertainty based on field experience, pipe break calculator, event tree calculator, FTAP and associated programs for fault tree analysis, and a units conversion code. It contains 540 references and many...

  4. Labeled Multi-Bernoulli Tracking for Industrial Mobile Platform Safety

    Rathnayake, Tharindu; Hoseinnezhad, Reza; Tennakoon, Ruwan; Bab-Hadiashar, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a track-before-detect labeled multi-Bernoulli filter tailored for industrial mobile platform safety applications. We derive two application specific separable likelihood functions that capture the geometric shape and colour information of the human targets who are wearing a high visible vest. These likelihoods are then used in a labeled multi-Bernoulli filter with a novel two step Bayesian update. Preliminary simulation results show that the proposed solution can successfu...

  5. Wearable sensors networks for safety applications in industrial scenarios

    Musu, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Industrial contexts, and in particular the port areas, are very complex systems to be monitored and controlled due to the combined presence of vehicles and people. The port areas are the gateway between navigation and terrestrial transportation and are of great importance in transport logistics. Unfortunately, the management of port areas is quite complex because the safety of the workers must be always assured. Therefore, in such a context, a centralized control system for the ...

  6. Evaluation of food safety management systems in Serbian dairy industry

    Igor Tomašević; Nada Šmigić; Ilija Đekić; Vlade Zarić; Nikola Tomić; Jelena Miocinovic; Andreja Rajković

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports incentives, costs, difficulties and benefits of food safety management systems implementation in the Serbian dairy industry. The survey involved 27 food business operators with the national milk and dairy market share of 65 %. Almost two thirds of the assessed dairy producers (70.4 %) claimed that they had a fully operational and certified HACCP system in place, while 29.6 % implemented HACCP, but had no third party certification. ISO 22000 was implemented and certified in ...

  7. SAFETY PERFORMANCE OF SUBCONTRACTORS IN THE PALESTINIAN CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY

    Adnan Enshassi; Rafiq M. Choudhry; Peter E. Mayer; Younis Shoman

    2008-01-01

    Subcontractors perform most of the construction works and their effect on industry are apparent in different activities of construction. Therefore, subcontractors need more attention from government and contractors union. The aim of this paper is to identify, evaluate, and rank factors that influence safety performance of subcontractors in the Gaza Strip (Palestine) according to their relative importance. The study concluded that reported accident rates will decrease among subcontractors and ...

  8. Evaluation of food safety management systems in Serbian dairy industry

    Igor Tomašević

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports incentives, costs, difficulties and benefits of food safety management systems implementation in the Serbian dairy industry. The survey involved 27 food business operators with the national milk and dairy market share of 65 %. Almost two thirds of the assessed dairy producers (70.4 % claimed that they had a fully operational and certified HACCP system in place, while 29.6 % implemented HACCP, but had no third party certification. ISO 22000 was implemented and certified in 29.6 % of the companies, while only 11.1 % had implemented and certified IFS standard. The most important incentive for implementing food safety management systems for Serbian dairy producers was to increase and improve safety and quality of dairy products. The cost of product investigation/analysis and hiring external consultants were related to the initial set-up of food safety management system with the greatest importance. Serbian dairy industry was not greatly concerned by the financial side of implementing food safety management systems due to the fact that majority of prerequisite programmes were in place and regularly used by almost 100 % of the producers surveyed. The presence of competency gap between the generic knowledge for manufacturing food products and the knowledge necessary to develop and implement food safety management systems was confirmed, despite the fact that 58.8 % of Serbian dairy managers had university level of education. Our study brings about the innovation emphasizing the attitudes and the motivation of the food production staff as the most important barrier for the development and implementation of HACCP. The most important identified benefit was increased safety of dairy products with the mean rank scores of 6.85. The increased customer confidence and working discipline of staff employed in food processing were also found as important benefits of implementing/operating HACCP. The study shows that the level of HACCP

  9. Accreditation: The American Experience.

    Adelman, Clem; Silver, Harold

    The report presents the findings of an investigation into the trends and issues concerning accreditation of professionals and institutions of higher education in the United States. In late 1988 and early 1989, the study examined the accreditation of courses in nursing, engineering, and teacher education, and the accreditation of institutions in…

  10. Does accreditation stimulate change? A study of the impact of the accreditation process on Canadian healthcare organizations

    Shabah Abdo

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background One way to improve quality and safety in healthcare organizations (HCOs is through accreditation. Accreditation is a rigorous external evaluation process that comprises self-assessment against a given set of standards, an on-site survey followed by a report with or without recommendations, and the award or refusal of accreditation status. This study evaluates how the accreditation process helps introduce organizational changes that enhance the quality and safety of care. Methods We used an embedded multiple case study design to explore organizational characteristics and identify changes linked to the accreditation process. We employed a theoretical framework to analyze various elements and for each case, we interviewed top managers, conducted focus groups with staff directly involved in the accreditation process, and analyzed self-assessment reports, accreditation reports and other case-related documents. Results The context in which accreditation took place, including the organizational context, influenced the type of change dynamics that occurred in HCOs. Furthermore, while accreditation itself was not necessarily the element that initiated change, the accreditation process was a highly effective tool for (i accelerating integration and stimulating a spirit of cooperation in newly merged HCOs; (ii helping to introduce continuous quality improvement programs to newly accredited or not-yet-accredited organizations; (iii creating new leadership for quality improvement initiatives; (iv increasing social capital by giving staff the opportunity to develop relationships; and (v fostering links between HCOs and other stakeholders. The study also found that HCOs' motivation to introduce accreditation-related changes dwindled over time. Conclusions We conclude that the accreditation process is an effective leitmotiv for the introduction of change but is nonetheless subject to a learning cycle and a learning curve. Institutions invest

  11. Laboratory accreditation in developing economies

    Full text: Accreditation of laboratories has been practiced for well over one hundred years with the primary objective of seeking a formal recognition for the competence of a laboratory to perform specified tests or measurements. While first accreditation schemes intended initially to serve only the immediate needs of the body making the evaluation with the purpose of minimizing testing and inspection to be conducted by laboratories, third-party accreditation enables a laboratory to demonstrate its capability as well as availability of all necessary resources to undertake particular tests correctly and that is managed in such a way that it is likely to do this consistently, taking into consideration standards developed by national and international standards-setting bodies. The international standard ISO/IEC 17025 and laboratory accreditation are concerned with competence and quality management of laboratories only, thus requiring a single common set of criteria applicable to them. Quality assurance is therefore fully relevant to laboratories in general and analytical laboratories in particular; it should not be confused with the certification approach according to ISO/IEC 9000 family of standards, that is concerned with quality management applicable to any organization as a whole. The role of laboratory accreditation can be manifold, but in all cases the recipient of the test report needs to have confidence that the data in it is reliable, particularly if the test data is important in a decision-making process. As such, it offers a comprehensive way to ensure: - the availability of managerial and technical staff with the authority and resources needed; - the effectiveness of equipment management, traceability of measurement and safety procedures; - the performance of tests, taking into consideration laboratory accommodation and facilities as well as laboratory practices. The presentation will include also some practical aspects of quality management system

  12. Safety- and Risk Analysis Activities in Chemical Industry in Europe

    The current paper gives an overview of the legislation and the methods used in safety and risk management in the chemical industry within Europe and in particular within the European Union. The paper is based on a report that has been written for the SOS-1 project under the Nordic nuclear safety research (NKS). Safety- and risk-related matters in the process industry, in particular, in chemical, within the EU are subject to consideration at three levels: (1) EU legislation, (2) European/intemational standardisation, and (3) socio-economic analysis. EC Directives define the 'essential requirements', e.g., protection of health and safety, that must be fulfilled when goods are placed on the market or some industry is put into operation. The European standards bodies (CEN, CENELEC and ETSI) have the task of establishing the corresponding technical specifications, meeting the essential requirements of the Directives, compliance with which will provide a presumption of conformity with the essential requirements. Such specifications are referred to as 'harmonised standards'. Compliance with harmonised standards remains voluntary, and manufacturers are free to choose any other technical solution that provides compliance with the essential requirements. This view is stated in the 'New Approach' to technical harmonisation and standardisation (details can be found on the web page: http://europe.eu.int/comm/enterprise/newapproach/standardization/index .html). Standardisation as well as the regulation of technical risks is increasingly being undertaken at European or international level. The European legislator limits its role to the affirmation of overall objectives, and leaves it to the economic players to draw up the technical procedures and standards to specify in detail the ways and means of attaining them. Many countries have introduced requirements that new legislation and/or administrative regulations be subject to socio-economic analysis. In this respect there is a

  13. Industrial high pressure applications. Processes, equipment and safety

    Eggers, Rudolf (ed.) [Technische Univ. Hamburg-Harburg, Hamburg (Germany). Inst. fuer Thermische Verfahrenstechnik

    2012-07-01

    Industrial high pressure processes open the door to many reactions that are not possible under 'normal' conditions. These are to be found in such different areas as polymerization, catalytic reactions, separations, oil and gas recovery, food processing, biocatalysis and more. The most famous high pressure process is the so-called Haber-Bosch process used for fertilizers and which was awarded a Nobel prize. Following an introduction on historical development, the current state, and future trends, this timely and comprehensive publication goes on to describe different industrial processes, including methanol and other catalytic syntheses, polymerization and renewable energy processes, before covering safety and equipment issues. With its excellent choice of industrial contributions, this handbook offers high quality information not found elsewhere, making it invaluable reading for a broad and interdisciplinary audience.

  14. Application of fuzzy integrated evaluation in the safety of coal industry of China

    LIU Wei; TAO Shu-ren

    2005-01-01

    Based on fuzzy integrated evaluation theory, the safety of coal industry was analyzed, the factors affecting the safety of coal industry was considered, and its fuzzy integrated estimating theory and results were given. Finally this paper proposed a new method of industry safety estimation. According to this method, we can integrate the factors affecting coal industry and deal with the parameters and targets of evaluating factors by quantitative analysis, thus give a scientific and reasonable safety degree analyzing evaluation.

  15. Radiological safety in petroleum industry. Towards prevention culture

    Within the frame of regulatory control of industrial applications the audit of sealed and open radioactive sources in oil uses is one of the most relevant. The handling of radioactive sources, the requirement of procedures and training are just a few examples among all those that make up the radiological safety culture. A number of requirements divided into three main groups: operational safety at the storage area of radioactive sources, during transportation and during the applications (Cementation, well logging and use of radiotracers) are highlighted. Due to the great number of aspects that have to be taken in account as well as the interrelation of all control processes it is highly recommended that aspects of safety culture and quality should be considered and improvements regarding prevention, should be introduced so as to correct deviations that could arise in order to avoid radiological risk situations, emphasizing risk perception situations, attitude training, implementation of audit and level of safety in the facilities and control of duties, involving radiological material handling, described in the present work. (author)

  16. Procurement in the Nuclear Industry, Quality, Safety and Decision Making

    The major purpose of the present study is partly to map and partly to make an analysis of the decision processes in the procurement routines in the nuclear industry in order to provide a basis for: 1. further development of safety inspections about procurements for Swedish Radiation Safety Authority 2. improvements of safety management in connection with procurement within a nuclear-power plant, 3 improvements of procurement routines in general in a nuclear power plant. The procurement processes at a nuclear power plant were analyzed from a decision theoretic perspective. Key staff at the plant was interviewed and written instructions as well as digitalized processes were used in the analysis. The results illustrate the most important moments during the procurement process with descriptions from interviews and documents. The staff at the nuclear power plant used a multi-attribute utility decision theory MAUT-inspired model in evaluation of alternatives and both compensatory (in which negative aspects can be compensated by positive aspects) and non-compensatory (in which certain 'pass' levels of attributes have to be exceeded for a choice) decision rules were used in the procurement process. Not surprising, nuclear safety was evaluated in a non-compensatory manner following regulatory criteria while costs were evaluated in trade-off compensatory rules, which means that a weakness in one consideration might be compensated by strength in another consideration. Thus, nuclear safety above the regulator's and law requirements are not integrated in a compensatory manner when procurement alternatives are evaluated. The nuclear plant assessed an organization's safety culture at an early stage of the purchasing process. A successful and a less successful procurement case were reported with the lessons learned from them. We find that the existing written instructions for purchase were well elaborated and adequate. There is a lack of personal resources when procurement teams

  17. Probabilistic analysis of safety in industrial irradiation plants

    The Argentinean Nuclear Regulatory Authority is carrying out the Probabilistic Safety Analysis (PSA) of the two industrial irradiation plants existent in the country. The objective of this presentation is to show from the regulatory point of view, the advantages of applying this tool, as well as the appeared difficulties; for it will be made a brief description of the facilities, of the method and of the normative one. Both plants are multipurpose facilities classified as 'industrial irradiator category IV' (panoramic irradiator with source deposited in pool). Basically, the execution of an APS consists of the following stages: 1. Identification of initiating events. 2. Modeling of Accidental Sequences (Event Trees). 3. Analysis of Systems (Fault trees). 4. Quantification of Accidental Sequences. The argentine normative doesn't demand to these facilities the realization of an APS, however the basic standard of Radiological Safety establishes that in the design of this type of facilities in the cases that is justified, should make sure that the annual probability of occurrence of an accidental sequence and the resulting dose in a person gives as result an radiological risk inferior to the risk limit adopted as acceptance criteria. On the other hand the design standard specifies for these irradiators it demands a maximum fault rate of 10-2 for the related components with the systems of radiological safety. In our case, the possible initiating events have been identified that carried out to not wanted situations (about people exposure, radioactive contamination). Then, for each one of the significant initiating events, the corresponding accidental sequences were modeled and the safety systems that intervene in this sequences by means of fault trees were analyzed, for then to determine the fault probabilities of the same ones. At the moment they are completing these fault trees, but the difficulty resides in the impossibility of obtaining real data of the reliability

  18. A Nuclear Safety System based on Industrial Computer

    The Plant Protection System(PPS), a nuclear safety Instrumentation and Control (I and C) system for Nuclear Power Plants(NPPs), generates reactor trip on abnormal reactor condition. The Core Protection Calculator System (CPCS) is a safety system that generates and transmits the channel trip signal to the PPS on an abnormal condition. Currently, these systems are designed on the Programmable Logic Controller(PLC) based system and it is necessary to consider a new system platform to adapt simpler system configuration and improved software development process. The CPCS was the first implementation using a micro computer in a nuclear power plant safety protection system in 1980 which have been deployed in Ulchin units 3,4,5,6 and Younggwang units 3,4,5,6. The CPCS software was developed in the Concurrent Micro5 minicomputer using assembly language and embedded into the Concurrent 3205 computer. Following the micro computer based CPCS, PLC based Common-Q platform has been used for the ShinKori/ShinWolsong units 1,2 PPS and CPCS, and the POSAFE-Q PLC platform is used for the ShinUlchin units 1,2 PPS and CPCS. In developing the next generation safety system platform, several factors (e.g., hardware/software reliability, flexibility, licensibility and industrial support) can be considered. This paper suggests an Industrial Computer(IC) based protection system that can be developed with improved flexibility without losing system reliability. The IC based system has the advantage of a simple system configuration with optimized processor boards because of improved processor performance and unlimited interoperability between the target system and development system that use commercial CASE tools. This paper presents the background to selecting the IC based system with a case study design of the CPCS. Eventually, this kind of platform can be used for nuclear power plant safety systems like the PPS, CPCS, Qualified Indication and Alarm . Pami(QIAS-P), and Engineering Safety

  19. Safety approaches in hazardous non-nuclear industries and their relation to nuclear safety

    Several industries present major accident hazards: nuclear, chemical, explosive, natural gas, and the various forms of transportation of their product and waste. Natural events present similar or greater potential for disaster. When the sizes and likelihoods of the accidents in question are compared there is often found to be a large gap between the public perception and political acceptability of the hazards in question, and their relative real significance or probability. A variety of regulatory agencies have developed, in the United Kingdom and elsewhere, to control such hazards. The UK chemical industry uses a variety of techniques including simple hazard identification, engineering codes and standards, HAZOP, event and fault-tree analysis, consequence or risk quantification. The multistage safety acceptance procedures used by a few chemical companies are similar in concept to the stages of the licensing procedure used in the UK for nuclear power stations. UK regulatory regimes for the nuclear and chemical industry are compared. The advantages and disadvantages of licensing are discussed. The need for sample inspection is noted. The question of performance targets is considered. The role of probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) is currently under scrutiny. PSA is a useful tool, which enables comparisons to be made between levels of safety achievable by different means or in different situations. It assumes assurance of reasonable standards of operation and care. It may seem attractive as a basis for regulatory control, but it should be applied only as an aid to judgement. An example is given of the use by the Health and Safety Executive of quantitative risk criteria for advice on the siting of buildings near chemical major hazards. The presentation of risk information to the public is discussed. The Health and Safety Commission's general policy on access to information is described. 11 refs, 2 figs, 1 tab

  20. Research study about the establishment of safety culture. Effects of organizational factors in construction industry's safety indices

    To find the relationships between safety related activities (such as safety patrol' or '4s/5s activities') and accidents rate in the workplace, questionnaires were sent to 965 construction companies and 120 answers were returned. In this questionnaire, safety activities, safety regulations and safety policies of the companies were asked and organizational climates, company policies, philosophies and the number of accidents in workplace were also asked. There seems some relationships between accidents rate and safety activities, safety regulations and safety policies in the companies, but the deviations between estimate values and observed values are so great that it seems impossible to estimate the accidents rate in the working place from the safety activities, safety regulations and safety policies of the companies. On the other hand, some characteristics of safety activities and organizational climates in the construction industry were identified using multi variants analysis. More detailed researches using sophisticated questionnaire will be conducted in the construction industry and petrochemical industry and relationships between the accidents rate and the safety activities will be compared between different industries. (author)

  1. The industry commitment to global transport safety standards

    Full text: Standards and regulations have no intrinsic practical effect without taking into account those who are the object of such standards and regulations. Standards and regulations do not become operationally effective until they are implemented by the entities which are subject to them. Accordingly, there is a necessary synergy between the regulator and the regulated - the regulators whose task it is to make and enforce the rules for safe, efficient and reliable transport, and those whose job it is to transport within the rules. No sector of transport is regulated more stringently than the nuclear transport industry. The nuclear transport industry is subject to a comprehensive, inter-connected regime of international, modal and national regulations and standards. The IAEA transport safety regulations, the so-called TS-R-1, are at the heart of that international regulatory regime. Appropriate provisions of TS-R-1 are incorporated in the regulations and standards of the International Maritime Organization (IMO) for marine transport, the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) for air transport, the ADR, RID and ADN for road, rail and inland waterways in Europe, and the regulatory regimes of the IAEA Member States themselves. The IAEA transport safety regulations are reviewed every two years and amended or revised as appropriate to ensure they are up-to-date. There is a widespread recognition today that maintaining transport options in the interest of bringing the benefits of nuclear energy where they are wanted the world over requires open and sustained dialogue between regulator and the regulated. There is a clear determination on the part of the nuclear transport industry and the key international organisations to dialogue, and the World Nuclear Transport Institute provides a vehicle for taking part in this dialogue. Equally, industry must take the opportunities afforded it to inform the regulators, the IAEA and others of the context in which

  2. Safety- and Risk Analysis Activities in Chemical Industry in Europe

    Kozine, Igor; Duijm, Nijs Jan; Lauridsen Kurt [Risoe National Laboratory, Roskilde (Denmark). Systems Analysis Department

    2001-07-01

    The current paper gives an overview of the legislation and the methods used in safety and risk management in the chemical industry within Europe and in particular within the European Union. The paper is based on a report that has been written for the SOS-1 project under the Nordic nuclear safety research (NKS). Safety- and risk-related matters in the process industry, in particular, in chemical, within the EU are subject to consideration at three levels: (1) EU legislation, (2) European/intemational standardisation, and (3) socio-economic analysis. EC Directives define the 'essential requirements', e.g., protection of health and safety, that must be fulfilled when goods are placed on the market or some industry is put into operation. The European standards bodies (CEN, CENELEC and ETSI) have the task of establishing the corresponding technical specifications, meeting the essential requirements of the Directives, compliance with which will provide a presumption of conformity with the essential requirements. Such specifications are referred to as 'harmonised standards'. Compliance with harmonised standards remains voluntary, and manufacturers are free to choose any other technical solution that provides compliance with the essential requirements. This view is stated in the 'New Approach' to technical harmonisation and standardisation (details can be found on the web page: http://europe.eu.int/comm/enterprise/newapproach/standardization/index .html). Standardisation as well as the regulation of technical risks is increasingly being undertaken at European or international level. The European legislator limits its role to the affirmation of overall objectives, and leaves it to the economic players to draw up the technical procedures and standards to specify in detail the ways and means of attaining them. Many countries have introduced requirements that new legislation and/or administrative regulations be subject to socio-economic analysis

  3. Agency for quality and accreditation of the health care facilities

    Zisovska, Elizabeta

    2014-01-01

    The Agency ensures quality and safety in health care through the process of accreditation and re-accreditation of the health care facilities. The Agency develops, revise and improves the standards of the health care in HC facilities, monitors the implementation of the standards and facilitates the preparedness of the HC facility for successful external assessment.

  4. 77 FR 24722 - Draft Guidance for Industry: Safety of Nanomaterials in Cosmetic Products; Availability

    2012-04-25

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Draft Guidance for Industry: Safety of Nanomaterials in... ``Guidance for Industry: Safety of Nanomaterials in Cosmetic Products.'' The draft guidance, when finalized, will represent FDA's current thinking on the safety assessment of nanomaterials in cosmetic...

  5. 78 FR 10064 - Safety Zone; Vigor Industrial Roll-Out, West Duwamish Waterway, Seattle, WA

    2013-02-13

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Vigor Industrial Roll-Out, West Duwamish... Security FR Federal Register NPRM Notice of Proposed Rulemaking A. Regulatory History and Information The... at Vigor Industrial. The safety zone is necessary to ensure the safety of the maritime public...

  6. Radiation protection, safety and associated problems in industrial radiography

    Industrial radiography is an indispensable tool for non-destructive testing. Its use entails potential radiation exposure to the operator as well as to the public. Since such radiation has the potential to be harmful, there is a need to limit radiation exposure to a level at which the risk is believed to be acceptable to the individual and to society. The Radiation Protection Society and the Department of National Health believe that the level of protection provided for radiation workers should be comparable with that in other 'safe' industries. The total risk for radiation workers includes the risk of non-radiation related accidents in the various occupations, as well as the special risks of radiation exposure. Industrial radiographers have one of the poorest safety records of all non-medical radiation workers. Operator errors and management errors seem to be the primary contributors to most accidental high exposures. It is necessary to remember that industrial radiography has to be carried out in a wide variety of work places under many different working conditions, both by day and by night. High energy end emissivity (X-ray output or source activity) is required for the radiation to be transmitted through specimens, because these are normally constructed of thick and dense materials such as steel. Additionally, most radiographic sources must be portable to permit use in field locations. On the negative side it must be mentioned that studies undertaken abroad conclude that the most important factors contributing to unsafe operations are human related. Careful planning of the method of work is essential if unnecessary risks are to be avoided. The most effective way of reducing accidents would seem to be to train employees to adhere to established and well documented procedures, to exercise common sense and sound judgement, and to use the protective equipment and devices provided in the manner specified. 2 tabs., 3 refs

  7. Development and Evaluation of a Computer-Based Program for Assessing Quality of Family Medicine Teams Based on Accreditation Standards

    Valjevac, Salih; Ridjanovic, Zoran; Masic, Izet

    2009-01-01

    CONFLICT OF INTEREST: NONE DECLARED SUMMARY Introduction Agency for healthcare quality and accreditation in Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina (AKAZ) is authorized body in the field of healthcare quality and safety improvement and accreditation of healthcare institutions. Beside accreditation standards for hospitals and primary health care centers, AKAZ has also developed accreditation standards for family medicine teams. Methods Software development was primarily based on Accreditation Sta...

  8. The industry commitment to global transport safety standards

    Green, L. [World Nuclear Transport Inst., London (United Kingdom)

    2004-07-01

    Standards and regulations have no intrinsic practical effect without taking into account those who are the object of such standards and regulations. Standards and regulations do not become operationally effective until they are implemented by the entities which are subject to them. Accordingly, there is a necessary synergy between the regulator and the regulated - the regulators whose task it is to make and enforce the rules for safe, efficient and reliable transport, and those whose job it is to transport within the rules. One has no full meaning without the other. Harmonisation issues which can impede efficient and timely implementation of regulations can occur at any stage of the process, starting with the timely publication of the IAEA Regulations, incorporation by the modal organisations, adoption by national competent authorities and finally, rendered operational by industrial transport organisations. Both, the regulator and the transporter, can be more effective in achieving their purposes when they co-operate in the interest of mutual understanding. PATRAM provides one excellent opportunity for such exchange between the regulator and the regulated - there are other important opportunities within the IAEA and international modal organisations. I suggest, however, that more could be done between the regulators and the regulated collectively to share real-life experiences with actually implementing the regulations and operating within them, and to draw appropriate lessons. In the case of the international transport safety regulatory regime, it is the nuclear transport industry, such as represented by the World Nuclear Transport Institute (WNTI), which is, of course, the object of transport safety standards and regulations. And as such, the nuclear transport industry is a principal stakeholder in the regime. Regulatory compliance is a cornerstone of the nuclear transport industry. The international nature of the fuel cycle mandates transnational movement of

  9. The industry commitment to global transport safety standards

    Standards and regulations have no intrinsic practical effect without taking into account those who are the object of such standards and regulations. Standards and regulations do not become operationally effective until they are implemented by the entities which are subject to them. Accordingly, there is a necessary synergy between the regulator and the regulated - the regulators whose task it is to make and enforce the rules for safe, efficient and reliable transport, and those whose job it is to transport within the rules. One has no full meaning without the other. Harmonisation issues which can impede efficient and timely implementation of regulations can occur at any stage of the process, starting with the timely publication of the IAEA Regulations, incorporation by the modal organisations, adoption by national competent authorities and finally, rendered operational by industrial transport organisations. Both, the regulator and the transporter, can be more effective in achieving their purposes when they co-operate in the interest of mutual understanding. PATRAM provides one excellent opportunity for such exchange between the regulator and the regulated - there are other important opportunities within the IAEA and international modal organisations. I suggest, however, that more could be done between the regulators and the regulated collectively to share real-life experiences with actually implementing the regulations and operating within them, and to draw appropriate lessons. In the case of the international transport safety regulatory regime, it is the nuclear transport industry, such as represented by the World Nuclear Transport Institute (WNTI), which is, of course, the object of transport safety standards and regulations. And as such, the nuclear transport industry is a principal stakeholder in the regime. Regulatory compliance is a cornerstone of the nuclear transport industry. The international nature of the fuel cycle mandates transnational movement of

  10. Training Accreditation Program

    The Training Accreditation Program establishes the objectives and criteria against which DOE nuclear facility training is evaluated to determine its readiness for accreditation. Training programs are evaluated against the accreditation objectives and criteria by facility personnel during the initial self-evaluation process. From this self-evaluation, action plans are made by the contractor to address the scope of work necessary in order to upgrade any deficiencies noted. This scope of work must be formally documented in the Training Program Accreditation Plan. When reviewed and approved by the responsible Head of the Field Organization and cognizant Program Secretarial Office, EH-1 concurrence is obtained. This plan then becomes the document which guides accreditation efforts for the contractor

  11. A health and safety survey of Irish funeral industry workers.

    Kelly, N

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Those handling deceased individuals, including the funeral industry, face a variety of health and safety hazards including occupationally acquired infectious disease. AIMS: To identify the knowledge, attitudes and beliefs of Irish funeral industry workers towards occupational hazards and infectious disease in 2009. METHODS: The sample analysed consisted of all listed member premises of the Irish Association of Funeral Directors as at 1 July 2009. A postal survey was sent to each premises in July 2009, with two rounds of follow-up reviews sent to non-responders. Four main areas were covered--occupational hazards, embalming, industry expertise and demographics. The quantitative and qualitative results were analysed to assess knowledge, attitudes and beliefs. Data collection was completed on 31 December 2009. RESULTS: Two hundred and thirty listed member premises were contacted. Twenty-two were unsuitable for the survey. One hundred and thirty-eight valid replies were received from 130 premises, representing a premises response rate of 63% (130\\/208). Seventy-three premises (56%) identified themselves as embalmers. Embalmers had variable vaccine uptake and variable knowledge, attitude and beliefs towards embalming those with blood-borne viruses. Fifteen per cent of respondents reported a work-related injury, back injury being the most common. Splash and sharps injuries were reported as a work-related injury, and infections believed to be work related were also reported. CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrates widespread occupational health concerns among this professional group. It confirms the need for occupational health advice and services. There is also a strong desire for regulation of this profession in Ireland.

  12. Establishment, Present Condition, and Developmental Direction of the New Korean Healthcare Accreditation System

    Chang, Hoo-Sun; Lee, Sun-Hee

    2012-01-01

    On July 23rd, 2010 a revised medical law (Article 58) was passed to change existing evaluation system of medical institutions to an accreditation system. The new healthcare accreditation system was introduced to encourage medical institutions to work voluntarily and continuously to improve patient safety and medical service quality. Changes regarding the healthcare accreditation system included the establishment of an accreditation agency, the voluntary participation of medical institutions, ...

  13. Forklift safety a practical guide to preventing powered industrial truck incidents and injuries

    Swartz, George

    1999-01-01

    Written for the more than 1.5 million powered industrial truck operators and supervisors in general industry, as well as those in the construction and marine industries, this Second Edition provides an updated guide to training operators in safety and complying with OSHA's 1999 forklift standard. This edition of Forklift Safety includes a new chapter devoted to the new OSHA 1910.178 standard and new information regarding dock safety, narrow aisle trucks, off-dock incidents, tip-over safety, pallet safety, and carbon monoxide.

  14. Industrial Deregulation Policy of New Government and Improvement Strategy of Nuclear Safety Regulation

    New Government launched in Feb. 2008 pledged the 'economic revival through alleviating the enterprise regulation.' Based on this commitment, the government established a strategic goal, that is, 'zero-base regulation innovation' and now is performing nine governmental projects. Although the industrial safety deregulations including the nuclear safety deregulation are not comprised in the projects, 43 regulation issues, among 267 issues suggested by 5 economic and industrial organizations at the beginning of this year, correspond to the industry safety. Therefore, the demand for reform of the safety regulation is unavoidable. Accordingly, we will investigate the direction to cope with the need for the nuclear safety deregulation in this paper

  15. Electromedical devices test laboratories accreditation

    Murad, C.; Rubio, D.; Ponce, S.; Álvarez Abri, A.; Terrón, A.; Vicencio, D.; Fascioli, E.

    2007-11-01

    In the last years, the technology and equipment at hospitals have been increase in a great way as the risks of their implementation. Safety in medical equipment must be considered an important issue to protect patients and their users. For this reason, test and calibrations laboratories must verify the correct performance of this kind of devices under national and international standards. Is an essential mission for laboratories to develop their measurement activities taking into account a quality management system. In this article, we intend to transmit our experience working to achieve an accredited Test Laboratories for medical devices in National technological University.

  16. Industry safety and policy proposal on China’s vehicle and parts sectors

    CATARC

    2008-01-01

    <正>I. Importance of the vehicle industry safety China has become a big vehicle production country, but not yet a strong one. Therefore people of the industry need to strengthen their awareness on the situation.

  17. The Role Of Industrial Safety Measures In Combating Occupational Hazards And Accidents In India

    Sharmistha Bhattacharjee

    2012-01-01

    The presence of occupational hazards and industrial accidents de-motivates the worker to contribute their best to the organization. The participation of workers in the workplace which promises safety and security fosters teamwork, quality of product high productivity and a good communication between management and the industrial workers. For combating occupational hazards and accidents in an industrial site, safety is necessary and a challenging issue in an industrial environment. S...

  18. Role of industry in the environmental health and safety aspects of the developing Plowshare industry

    lt is first pointed out that no person or organization has a more vital interest in the early establishment of an effective health and safety program within which commercial operations based on Plowshare technology can be carried on with assurance than does that facet of industry which is directly involved in the attempt to prove out these Plowshare applications. The formulation of such a code must be a matter of the highest priority to all concerned. To accomplish this task successfully, however, requires the exercise of a truly hard-nosed objectivity both on the part of the Governmental agencies who bear statutory responsibility for ensuring the public health and safety and also on that of the industrial groups who are trying to realize the significant economic potentials inherent in the Plowshare technology. While it is abundantly clear that achievement of a sound and reliable public health and safety code is imperative for both regulatory agencies and operating industry, it must also be recognized that both groups serve the inescapable additional responsibility of acting as the public's trustees to assure the healthy development of a new technology which may well prove to be of vital importance to the Nation. The basic nature of the joint operating procedure required in order to provide an effective way of fulfilling these common obligations is then examined. The discussion then turns to the present stage of the developmental progress of the potential Plowshare industry. Scientific breakthrough has long since been accomplished and scientific feasibility has been quite generally proven. For a number of important possible applications even technological feasibility has been established. In these cases the demonstration of economic feasibility and the attainment of public acceptance are the two factors that still remain to be achieved before a full-fledged if still infant industry becomes a reality. Industry alone is capable of determining economic feasibility. It

  19. Safety Benchmarking of Industrial Construction Projects Based on Zero Accidents Techniques

    Rogers, Jennifer Kathleen

    2012-01-01

    Safety is a continually significant issue in the construction industry. The Occupation Safety and Health Administration as well as individual construction companies are constantly working on verifying that their selected safety plans have a positive effect on reduction of workplace injuries. Worker safety is a large concern for both the workers and employers in construction and the government also attempts to impose effective regulations concerning minimum safety requirements. There are ...

  20. Occupational Health, Safety and Risk Analysis in Large Scale Industry of Lahore

    Muhammad Qasim; Aroj Bashir; Malik Muhammad Anees; Muhammad Usman Ghani; Moeen Khalid; Faisal Hanan; Jahanzaib Malik

    2014-01-01

    Occupational safety and health (OSH) it is concerned with guarding the safety, health and welfare of people who are engaged in work or employment. The aim of paper is discussed Occupational Health, Safety and Risk Analysis In large scale industry of Lahore. The paper has completed after study various articles and research paper related to Occupational safety and health so it concluded that Promotion of Health is an important part of occupational health professionals. Health educators, safety ...

  1. Factors Contribute to Safety Culture in the Manufacturing Industry in Malaysia

    Ong Choon Hee

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to explain the role of safety culture in the manufacturing industry in Malaysia and identify factors contribute to safety culture. It is suggested in this study that leadership support, management commitment and safety management system are important factors that contribute to safety culture. This study also provides theoretical implications to guide future research and offers practical implications to the managers in the development of safety culture. Given that ...

  2. Safety Leadership Defined within the Australian Construction Industry

    Luke Daniel

    2015-01-01

    This research explores the tenets of safety leadership within the Australian construction environment. The scope of this research aims to establish a universal definition of safety leadership and how it differs from other leadership disciplines. The literature review into this topic was governed by the parent disciplines of Safety and Leadership.  Gaps were identified in the literature that indicated safety leadership is not a well-defined concept and much of the work into safety leadership h...

  3. Accreditation, a tool for business competitiveness

    Conformity Assessment Bodies (laboratories , certification and inspection bodies, etc ) assess conformity of products and services to requirements , usually relating to quality and safety. For their activities to provide due confidence both in national and international markets these bodies must demonstrate to have the relevant technical competence and to perform according to international standards. This confidence is based on the assessments conducted in different countries by the accreditation body in Spain ENAC. Using accredited conformity assessment bodies bodies: risks are minimized; customer confidence is increased; acceptance in foreign countries is enhanced; self-regulation is promoted. (Author)

  4. Industrial safety and applied health physics. Annual report for 1980

    Information is reported in sections entitled: radiation monitoring; Environmental Management Program; radiation and safety surveys; industrial safety and special projects; Office of Operational Safety; and training, lectures, publications, and professional activities. There were no external or internal exposures to personnel which exceeded the standards for radiation protection as defined in DOE Manual Chapter 0524. Only 35 employees received whole body dose equivalents of 10 mSv (1 rem) or greater. There were no releases of gaseous waste from the Laboratory which were of a level that required an incident report to DOE. There were no releases of liquid radioactive waste from the Laboratory which were of a level that required an incident report to DOE. The quantity of those radionuclides of primary concern in the Clinch River, based on the concentration measured at White Oak Dam and the dilution afforded by the Clinch River, averaged 0.16 percent of the concentration guide. The average background level at the Perimeter Air Monitoring (PAM) stations during 1980 was 9.0 μrad/h (0.090 μGy/h). Soil samples were collected at all perimeter and remote monitoring stations and analyzed for eleven radionuclides including plutonium and uranium. Plutonium-239 content ranged from 0.37 Bq/kg (0.01 pCi/g) to 1.5 Bq/kg (0.04 pCi/g), and the uranium-235 content ranged from 0.7 Bq/kg (0.02 pCi/g) to 16 Bq/kg (0.43 pCi/g). Grass samples were collected at all perimeter and remote monitoring stations and analyzed for twelve radionuclides including plutonium and uranium. Plutonium-239 content ranged from 0.04 Bq/kg (0.001 pCi/g) to 0.07 Bq/kg (0.002 pCi/g), and the uranium-235 content ranged from 0.37 Bq/kg (0.01 pCi/g) to 12 Bq/kg

  5. Pipe rules: regulators, industry work together to maintain safety

    Budd, G.

    2002-10-01

    Two tragic pipeline explosions in the United States in recent years focused attention on pipeline regulations both in the United States as well as in Canada. In the United States regulations tend to be highly prescriptive, especially in the aftermath of the two explosions. In Canada, there appears to be a sharper focus on the goal of pipeline safety, with regulators encouraging companies to come up with their own set of specifics for achieving it. The Canadian National Energy Board, the regulatory body, places the emphasis on integrity management, encouraging the industry to be more systematic in its approach to the problem. Industry response to the NEB initiative has been positive as shown by the responses of various pipeline and pipeline service companies. For example, NeoCorr Engineering Ltd., produced its web-enabled proprietary software program called OCELOT (online corrosion evaluation tool). The firm has been providing corrosion evaluation, flow modelling and related services for some time; as of this year, the service is also available online. NeoCorr's services are directed to address the technical needs of pipeline operators concerned about quality maintenance in the current non-prescriptive integrity management climate. The system captures all operating data, physical location, shape and terrain of line; these provide the basis for a flow model and a digital pipeline elevation profile. On the basis of this, the process provides information on the likelihood of corrosion and any other integrity issues, which then triggers the maintenance plan that is tailored to the profile. Because the cost of state-of-the-art detection technology is high, small and new companies are often reluctant to avail themselves of these services, but pipelines companies with thousands of flow lines and collectors in service have all the incentive needed to perform maintenance. Improvements in internal logging and crack detection tools also helped to improve attention to

  6. Tales of Accreditation Woe.

    Dickmeyer, Nathan

    2002-01-01

    Offers cautionary tales depicting how an "Enron mentality" infiltrated three universities and jeopardized their accreditation status. The schools were guilty, respectively, of bad bookkeeping, lack of strategy and stable leadership, and loss of academic integrity by selling degrees. (EV)

  7. JACIE accreditation in paediatric haemopoietic SCT.

    Cornish, J M

    2008-10-01

    The Joint Accreditation Committee of the International Society for Cellular Therapy (ISCT) and European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation (EBMT), known as JACIE, is a nonprofit body established for the purposes of assessment and accreditation in the field of haemopoietic SCT (HSCT). The committee was established in 1999 with the aim of creating a standardized system of accreditation officially recognized across Europe and based on the accreditation standards established by the US-based Foundation for the Accreditation of Cellular Therapy (FACT). The major objectives of JACIE are to improve the quality of HSCT in Europe by providing a means whereby transplant centres, cell collection facilities and processing facilities can demonstrate high-quality practice. JACIE launched its official inspection programme in January 2004, and since then more than 35 centres in Europe have been inspected. The history of paediatric-specific accreditation guidelines has lagged behind the overall development but is now incorporated within the standards. There is now acknowledgement that a paediatric transplant team will be headed by a paediatric programme director, that an independent paediatric unit will perform no less than 10 allogeneic transplants in children under the age of 18 per year, be looked after by nurses and junior doctors specifically trained in paediatric practice and have access to paediatric subspecialties with an intensive care unit on site. Paediatric units will be examined by a paediatric-trained inspector. Remaining issues of difference with the guidelines relate to the numbers required for accreditation in combined units. Overall, the paediatric community in Europe has embraced the JACIE guidelines. JACIE is working more closely with other international organizations in cellular therapy to develop international standards for all aspects of SCT. The recent implementation of Directive 2004/23/EC has provided an impetus for the implementation of JACIE in

  8. DRUGS EFFICIENCY AND SAFETY: THE ROLE OF PHARMACEUTICAL INDUSTRY

    F. I. Belyalov

    2015-01-01

    Relationships of pharmaceutical industry with medical science and practice are analyzed. The influence of pharmaceutical industry on clinical trials, journal publications, governmental organizations, physicians and researchers is discussed.

  9. Developing an industry-oriented safety curriculum using the Delphi technique.

    Chen, Der-Fa; Wu, Tsung-Chih; Chen, Chi-Hsiang; Chang, Shu-Hsuan; Yao, Kai-Chao; Liao, Chin-Wen

    2016-09-01

    In this study, we examined the development of industry-oriented safety degree curricula at a college level. Based on a review of literature on the practices and study of the development of safety curricula, we classified occupational safety and health curricula into the following three domains: safety engineering, health engineering, and safety and health management. We invited 44 safety professionals to complete a four-round survey that was designed using a modified Delphi technique. We used Chi-square statistics to test the panel experts' consensus on the significance of the items in the three domains and employed descriptive statistics to rank the participants' rating of each item. The results showed that the top three items for each of the three domains were Risk Assessment, Dangerous Machinery and Equipment, and Fire and Explosion Prevention for safety engineering; Ergonomics, Industrial Toxicology, and Health Risk Assessment for health engineering; and Industrial Safety and Health Regulations, Accident Investigation and Analysis, and Emergency Response for safety and health management. Only graduates from safety programmes who possess practical industry-oriented abilities can satisfy industry demands and provide value to the existence of college safety programmes. PMID:26104789

  10. US accreditation programmes for personal radiation dosimetry

    In order to verify an acceptable level of safety in the workplace, it is necessary to measure the quantity of ionising radiation to which radiation workers could be, or actually are, exposed. At present, there are organisations capable of providing measurement results with good accuracy and precision. These organisations may provide personal dosimetry services to their own facilities, or to others on a contractual basis. They generally have high quality equipment and well trained personnel. However, in today's climate, it is important to demonstrate and document that these systems and services to others meet national standards of quality. In order to provide a higher level of confidence in the results generated by organisations that provide personal dosimetry services in the US, two accreditation programmes have been established. They are the Department of Energy Laboratory Accreditation Program (DOELAP) and the National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program (NVLAP). These two programmes will be described and results will be given, along with plans for future development. (author)

  11. A Comparative Study on Safety and Security Management Systems in Industries

    Palanisamy Sivaprakash

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: To understand and appreciate the safety and security management systems in industries with a view to find out critical areas requiring attention so as to enhance the effectiveness of safety management systems and security management systems in large, medium and small scale industries. Approach: The study was restricted to Large, Medium and Small scale industries located in Tamilnadu, Kerala, Pondycherry, Karnataka and Andhra Pradesh states of India. The data have been randomly collected from 45 samples each from Large, Medium and Small scale industries. This study has taken into the account of 6 major elements namely management commitment, documentation, facilities, promotion, procedure and training and each major elements having 6 sub elements thus consisting of 36 sub elements of safety management systems and 36 sub elements of security management systems. The sub-elements are prepared such as to reflect the availability of the safety and security management system in industries. Results: Major accident hazard industries require more attention towards safety and security management systems. The safety management system has gained more prevalence than security management system in large scale industries than the medium and small scale industries. The safety management system has considerable prevalence than security management system in medium scale industries than the small scale industries. The safety and security management system have more or less the same prevalence in the small scale industries. Conclusion: All the industries should devise systems for the adoption and implementation of safety and security management system. Security failures can lead to safety failures and hence they must be given equal importance. The major accident hazard industries should adopt all the safety and security management elements. All the elements of safety and security management systems should be given equal importance for effective and

  12. Safety in a changing environment: Can we draw lessons from other industrial sectors?

    Many industries confront vital economic and political changes at key times of their development, which may have an impact on their level of safety. As an example, the safety records of the air transport industry in the USA and the rail transport sector in the UK are contrasted through the two major changes these sectors underwent in recent history: deregulation under President Carter in the late 1970s and privatization of British Rail under Mrs. Thatcher. While deregulation did not seem to adversely affect the safety of air travel in the USA, safety in the rail sector in the UK has apparently dropped markedly. Using parallels involving mergers or splitting up scenarios from industrial sectors, some lessons are drawn for all safety critical industrial systems, in particular for the nuclear industry, and the concept of cyndinics, a methodical and scientific approach to danger and risk, is introduced. (author)

  13. A survey of approaches combining safety and security for industrial control systems

    The migration towards digital control systems creates new security threats that can endanger the safety of industrial infrastructures. Addressing the convergence of safety and security concerns in this context, we provide a comprehensive survey of existing approaches to industrial facility design and risk assessment that consider both safety and security. We also provide a comparative analysis of the different approaches identified in the literature. - Highlights: • We raise awareness of safety and security convergence in numerical control systems. • We highlight safety and security interdependencies for modern industrial systems. • We give a survey of approaches combining safety and security engineering. • We discuss the potential of the approaches to model safety and security interactions

  14. Control of radiation sources through regulatory inspections of radiation safety in Brazilian industries

    This work presents a brief description of the situation of Brazilian Regulatory Authority with regard to safety control of industrial radioactive installations. It shows the national regulatory infrastructure responsible for radiation safety inspections, the regulation infrastructure, the national inventory of industrial installations, the national system of inspection and enforcement and the national system for qualifying radiation protection officers. Some results of regulatory safety inspections are also shown. (author)

  15. An overview of applications and radiation safety aspects of linear accelerators in Brazilian industry

    This work presents a brief description of the situation of Brazilian Regulatory Authority about safety control on Industrial Linear Accelerators Installations. It shows the national regulatory infrastructure responsible for radiation safety inspections, the regulation infrastructure, the national inventory of industrial installations, the national system of inspection and enforcement and the national system for qualifying the radiation protection officer. Some results of regulatory safety inspections are also showed in this work. (author)

  16. An overview of application and radiation safety aspects of linear accelerators in Brazilian industry

    This work presents a brief description of the situation of Brazilian Regulatory Authority about safety control on Industrial Linear Accelerators Installations. It shows the national regulatory infrastructure responsible for radiation safety inspections, the regulation infrastructure, the national inventory of industrial installations, the national system of inspection and enforcement and the national system for qualifying the radiation protection officer. Some results of regulatory safety inspections are also showed in this work. (author)

  17. Control of radiation sources through regulatory inspections of radiation safety in Brazilian industries

    This work presents a brief description of the situation of Brazilian Regulatory Authority about safety control on industrial radioactive installations. It shows the national regulatory infrastructure responsible for radiation safety inspections, the regulation infrastructure, the national inventory of industrial installations, the national system of inspection and enforcement and the national system for qualifying the radiation protection officer. Some results of regulatory safety inspections are also showed in this work. (author)

  18. Safety Reviews of Technical System Modifications in the Nuclear Industry

    Falk, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    The function of safety reviews (here understood as expert judgements on proposals for design modifications and redesign of technical systems in commercial Nuclear Power Plants, supported by formalised safety review processes) plays a fundamental role for safety in nuclear installations. The primary aims of the presented case studies includes: critically examining and identifying the main areas for improvement of the existing technical safety review process as it is conducted at a Swedish nucl...

  19. Testing frequencies of safety related pumps and valves: Probabilistic safety assessment versus United States industry codes

    PSA provides a mechanism for identifying key risk significant components and estimating the effects of test frequency changes. If it is possible to optimize the testing frequencies of these components, component failure probabilities can be minimized. This reduces overall system unavailability and the probability of core damage. In cases where test frequencies cannot be adjusted directly into an optimal range, it is at least useful to know where the existing test frequency lies relative to the optimal value. From this, one can determine whether a component is being undertested or overtested. Test intervals have been historically established on the basis of deterministic industry standards such as the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code. Section XI, Subsections IWP and IWV, of this code, respectively, set recommended test intervals for safety related pumps and valves. Since optimal test intervals have not been established on the basis of actual experience data, it has not been possible for testing program developers to judge whether increases in test intervals will have a positive or negative effect on component unavailability. The paper reviews the basic theory of optimal test intervals for periodically tested components, discusses recent work which addresses the effects of operational data uncertainties and demonstrates that, on the basis of actual operational reliability data, safety related pumps and motor operated valves are not being overtested. 11 refs, 2 tabs

  20. Industrial Fuel Gas Demonstration Plant Program. Task III, Demonstration plant safety, industrial hygiene, and major disaster plan (Deliverable No. 35)

    None

    1980-03-01

    This Health and Safety Plan has been adopted by the IFG Demonstration Plant managed by Memphis Light, Gas and Water at Memphis, Tennessee. The plan encompasses the following areas of concern: Safety Plan Administration, Industrial Health, Industrial Safety, First Aid, Fire Protection (including fire prevention and control), and Control of Safety Related Losses. The primary objective of this plan is to achieve adequate control of all potentially hazardous activities to assure the health and safety of all employees and eliminate lost work time to both the employees and the company. The second objective is to achieve compliance with all Federal, state and local laws, regulations and codes. Some thirty specific safe practice instruction items are included.

  1. Safety Climates in Construction Industry: Understanding the Role of Construction Sites and Workgroups

    Sílvia Silva; Adriana Araújo; Dário Costa; J. L. Meliá

    2013-01-01

    Studies of safety climate in construction revealed a significant positive association between safety climate and various aspects of occupational health and safety. The mechanisms through which this impact operates are still unclear and safety climate is usually studied without considering the complexity of this industry (companies, worksites and groups). The aim of this research is to analyze to what extend there are differences between construction sites and to explore...

  2. Industrial Sanitation and Personal Facilities. Module SH-13. Safety and Health.

    Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

    This student module on industrial sanitation and personal facilities is one of 50 modules concerned with job safety and health. This module deals wth many facets of industrial sanitation and the facilities industries should provide so that proper health procedures may be followed. Following the introduction, 14 objectives (each keyed to a page in…

  3. Safety in industrial applications: From fixed fences to direct interaction

    Oberer-Treitz, Susanne; Dietz, Thomas; Verl, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    Human-Robot-Cooperation will allow leveraging the capabilities of human and robot better through direct interaction, but requires new methods to ensure the safety of the worker. The article introduces a new methodology for the safety assessment in robotics by analyzing the collision risk of a robot. The concept for passive safety assessment, i.e. the approach to consider the collision potential of a robot system for analyzing its danger potential is presented. A test-setup to parameterize and...

  4. Evaluation model for safety capacity of chemical industrial park based on acceptable regional risk

    Guohua Chen; Shukun Wang; Xiaoqun Tan

    2015-01-01

    The paper defines the Safety Capacity of Chemical Industrial Park (SCCIP) from the perspective of acceptable regional risk. For the purpose of exploring the evaluation model for the SCCIP, a method based on quantitative risk assessment was adopted for evaluating transport risk and to confirm reasonable safety transport capacity of chemical industrial park, and then by combining with the safety storage capacity, a SCCIP evaluation model was put forward. The SCCIP was decided by the smaller one between the largest safety storage capacity and the maximum safety transport capacity, or else, the regional risk of the park will exceed the acceptable level. The developed method was applied to a chemical industrial park in Guangdong province to obtain the maximum safety transport capacity and the SCCIP. The results can be realized in the regional risk control of the park effectively.

  5. Safety Leadership Defined within the Australian Construction Industry

    Luke Daniel

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This research explores the tenets of safety leadership within the Australian construction environment. The scope of this research aims to establish a universal definition of safety leadership and how it differs from other leadership disciplines. The literature review into this topic was governed by the parent disciplines of Safety and Leadership.  Gaps were identified in the literature that indicated safety leadership is not a well-defined concept and much of the work into safety leadership has been borrowed from other schools of leadership. An exploratory research methodology was utilised which rooted the research into the post-positivist methodology. There were twenty interviews conducted for this research, with participants coming from various leadership positions across multiple construction projects around Australia. Findings detailed a saturation of data that allowed for an empirical definition towards safety leadership to be established. As a person’s scope of responsibility increases, their view of safety leadership becomes synonymous with leadership; although differences do exist. These differences were attributed to the importance of demonstrating safety and working within the legal framework of Australian construction projects. It is proposed that this research offers a substantial contribution to knowledge, based upon a well-defined definition into safety leadership.

  6. The Evaluation of Factors Influencing Safety Performance : A Case in an Industrial Gas Manufacturing Company (Ghana

    Evelyn Enchill

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Safety has become a very important element in firms and organisations especially in Ghana. The impact of safety factors on a firm’s 3E’s (Employee, Environment and Equipment can improve or deteriorate firm’s public image. This paper identified the key safety indicators and also provided a set of core factors that contribute meaningful in promoting safety performance in an Industrial Gas producer in Ghana using the Analytic Hierarchy Process. Organisational, Human, Technical and Environmental factors were identified as the safety indicators in relation to the study area. The studies revealed that organisational factor is the most important factor or criterion that could facilitate a better safety performance of the Industrial Gas Company. In addition, employees was identified the best safety alternative, whilst environment and equipment followed sequentially

  7. Responsibility for managing and legal consequences in the field of industrial safety

    The object of industrial safety is to protect the aspirations, the life and the health of the employee from injury and by accident prevention in the field to combat dangers to life and health. The necessity for industrial safety is just as uncontentious as the objectives pursued by it. There is also a humanitarian connotation here since the health and welfare of employees are of central importance. In addition, economic aspects have to be taken into consideration, for industrial accidents mean unnecessary industrial costs which can have not insignificant economic consequences. Boards of directors, heads of various departments in the hierarchy, also the members of those departments must be absolutely clear as to what are the requirements for industrial safety in detail, what consequences arise for the introduction and organization of industrial processes right through the organization of the enterprise itself and how in this respect responsibilities are to be allocated to those affected. (orig.)

  8. Construction Safety And Health Factors At The Industry Level: The Case Of Singapore

    Charles Y.J. Cheah

    2007-01-01

    The construction industry is one of the most hazardous industries due to the unique nature of its products and the processes involved. Recent occurrences of highly publicized construction site accidents in Singapore have highlighted the immediate needs for the local industry to address safety and attention at the industry level. The objective of this paper is to examine issues and critical factors affecting S&H standards in Singapore. Clearly, collective efforts should be pursued at the indus...

  9. 76 FR 65734 - Guidance for Industry on Evaluating the Safety of Flood-Affected Food Crops for Human Consumption...

    2011-10-24

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Guidance for Industry on Evaluating the Safety of Flood... entitled ``Guidance for Industry: Evaluating the Safety of Flood-Affected Food Crops for Human Consumption... industry entitled ``Evaluating the Safety of Flood-affected Food Crops for Human Consumption''...

  10. Deliberations on nuclear safety regulatory system in a changing industrial environment

    Nuclear safety concern, which may accompany such external environmental factors as privatization and restructuring of the electric power industry, is emerging as an international issue. In order to cope with the concern about nuclear safety, it is important to feedback valuable experiences of advanced countries that restructured their electric power industries earlier and further to reflect the current safety issues, which are raised internationally, fully into the nuclear safety regulatory system. This paper is to review the safety issues that might take place in the process of increasing competition in the nuclear power industry, and further to present a basic direction and effective measures for ensuring nuclear safety in response thereto from the viewpoint of safety regulation. It includes a political direction for a regulatory body's efforts to rationalize and enforce efficiently its regulation. It proposes to ensure that regulatory specialty and regulatory cost are stably secured. Also, this paper proposes maintaining a sound nuclear safety regulatory system to monitor thoroughly the safety management activities of the industry, which might be neglected as a result of focusing on reduction of the cost for producing electric power. (author)

  11. The strengthening of the nuclear safety regulatory system in restructuring of electric power industry sector

    Nuclear safety concern, which may accompany such external environmental factors as privatization and restructuring of the electric power industry, is emerging as an international issue. In order to cope with the concern about nuclear safety, it is important to feedback valuable experiences of advanced countries which ever restructured their electric power industries earlier and further to reflect the current safety issues, which are raised internationally, fully into the nuclear safety regulatory system. This paper is to review the safety issues that might take place in the process of increasing competition in the nuclear power industry, and further to present a basic direction and effective measures for ensuring nuclear safety in response thereto from the viewpoint of safety regulation. It includes a political direction for regulatory body's efforts to rationalize and enforce efficiently its regulation. It proposes to ensure that regulatory specialty and regulatory cost are stably secured. Also, this paper proposes for maintaining a sound nuclear safety regulatory system to monitor thoroughly the safety management activities of the industry, which might be neglected as a result of focusing on reduction of the cost for producing electric power

  12. Safety of technical facilities in the nuclear power industry

    Five papers were submitted on the activities of the Czech Labor Safety Office dealing with the results of surveillance in 1988, draft measures aimed at improving nuclear power installation safety, problems of the construction, start-up and operation of the Dukovany nuclear power plant, production of regulations and technical safety during the construction of the Temelin nuclear power plant, qualifications of organizations, responsibilities of authorized organizations, requirements for enclosed and primary technical documentation in producing equipment for nuclear power, and obligations of authorized organizations in nuclear power unit operations, maintenance of nuclear power installations and education of nuclear power plant personnel. (J.B.)

  13. Regulatory and industry co-operation on nuclear safety research. Challenges and opportunities

    Regulator-industry co-operation in nuclear safety research has potential advantages as well as disadvantages. This report provides research managers in industry, regulatory organisations and research centres with information on current practices in collaborative safety research in OECD member countries. It identifies means of establishing effective industry-regulator collaboration and provides indications on how to overcome difficulties that can arise. It also advises on possible areas of concern. The report addresses in particular the issue of regulator independence, means to preserve it and ways to demonstrate it to the public while undertaking collaboration with industry. (author)

  14. Evaluating safety-critical organizations - emphasis on the nuclear industry

    Reiman, Teemu; Oedewald, Pia (VTT, Technical Research Centre of Finland (Finland))

    2009-04-15

    An organizational evaluation plays a key role in the monitoring, as well as controlling and steering, of the organizational safety culture. If left unattended, organizations have a tendency to gradually drift into a condition where they have trouble identifying their vulnerabilities and mechanisms or practices that create or maintain these vulnerabilities. The aim of an organizational evaluation should be to promote increased understanding of the sociotechnical system and its changing vulnerabilities. Evaluation contributes to organizational development and management. Evaluations are used in various situations, but when the aim is to learn about possible new vulnerabilities, identify organizational reasons for problems, or prepare for future challenges, the organization is most open to genuine surprises and new findings. It is recommended that organizational evaluations should be conducted when - there are changes in the organizational structures - new tools are implemented - when the people report increased workplace stress or a decreased working climate - when incidents and near-misses increase - when work starts to become routine - when weak signals (such as employees voicing safety concerns or other worries, the organization 'feels' different, organizational climate has changed) are perceived. In organizations that already have a high safety level, safety managers work for their successors. This means that they seldom see the results of their successful efforts to improve safety. This is due to the fact that it takes time for the improvement to become noticeable in terms of increased measurable safety levels. The most challenging issue in an organizational evaluation is the definition of criteria for safety. We have adopted a system safety perspective and we state that an organization has a high potential for safety when - safety is genuinely valued and the members of the organization are motivated to put effort on achieving high levels of safety

  15. Evaluating safety-critical organizations - emphasis on the nuclear industry

    An organizational evaluation plays a key role in the monitoring, as well as controlling and steering, of the organizational safety culture. If left unattended, organizations have a tendency to gradually drift into a condition where they have trouble identifying their vulnerabilities and mechanisms or practices that create or maintain these vulnerabilities. The aim of an organizational evaluation should be to promote increased understanding of the sociotechnical system and its changing vulnerabilities. Evaluation contributes to organizational development and management. Evaluations are used in various situations, but when the aim is to learn about possible new vulnerabilities, identify organizational reasons for problems, or prepare for future challenges, the organization is most open to genuine surprises and new findings. It is recommended that organizational evaluations should be conducted when - there are changes in the organizational structures - new tools are implemented - when the people report increased workplace stress or a decreased working climate - when incidents and near-misses increase - when work starts to become routine - when weak signals (such as employees voicing safety concerns or other worries, the organization 'feels' different, organizational climate has changed) are perceived. In organizations that already have a high safety level, safety managers work for their successors. This means that they seldom see the results of their successful efforts to improve safety. This is due to the fact that it takes time for the improvement to become noticeable in terms of increased measurable safety levels. The most challenging issue in an organizational evaluation is the definition of criteria for safety. We have adopted a system safety perspective and we state that an organization has a high potential for safety when - safety is genuinely valued and the members of the organization are motivated to put effort on achieving high levels of safety - it is

  16. Initiatives of Japanese nuclear industry to improve nuclear safety after the Fukushima Daiichi accident

    The Fukushima Daiichi accident provided strong lessons to the nuclear industry in Japan from the aspect that the industry must not be just satisfied with meeting the national regulatory requirement but that they should pursue further efforts towards higher performance without complacency. The Japan Nuclear Safety Institute (JANSI) was established in November 2012, as an independent organization from the nuclear industrial organizations in Japan, to lead them in making continuous efforts to realize the highest level of safety in the world. The current activity initiated by JANSI has been the reformation of organizational management in the nuclear industry to recognize safety culture with more commitment from top leaders to enhancing nuclear safety and the related human resource development than before the Fukushima Daiichi accident. (author)

  17. Ergonomic and work safety evaluation criteria of process excellence in the foundry industry

    Butlewski, M.; A. Misztal; Jasiulewicz-Kaczmarek, M.; Janik, S.

    2014-01-01

    The article presents a concept of criteria assessment called the “process excellence” for ergonomics and work safety in enterprises of the foundry industry as well as points to the possibility of its application.

  18. Safety in the East: a political and industrial challenge

    Nuclear power is still an issue in the East, and there is a long way to go before the situation will become satisfactory. The most complicated part is the transfer of safety culture, which will be a much longer and trickier task than modernizing the facilities. This transfer calls for long-term cooperation among entities playing the same roles in the East and West. Europe has clearly understood this situation, and has organized its assistance program in such a way as to promote this cooperation on concrete issues. One good example of what a global assistance strategy should be is the Moshouse project, involving electricians, builders, and safety organization in intimate long-term cooperation, while facilitating early shutdown of the riskier reactors. For the IPSN, cooperation with the other TSO's (Technical Safety Organizations) is the main strategy line for all action taken in the East. Starting from situations where the IPSN and its partners in the West enjoy almost direct support from the local authorities, the purpose is to spawn and foster competence within the country by cooperative safety research and by developing analytical tools for accident situations. When the moment comes, if the local political determination and the economic situation so permit, the safety authorities will then be able to ensure the development of the safety culture on their own, in their own country. (author)

  19. From Evaluation to Accreditation

    Rasmussen, Palle

    for policy. In the state controlled and public financed Danish higher education system quality assessment became institutionalised in a national agency, the "evaluation centre", which was to do recurrent assessment of all higher education programmes. This was later given up. Recently accreditation of...

  20. Assessment of Native Languages for Food Safety Training Programs for Meat Industry Employees

    Olsen, Sherrlyn S.; Cordray, Joseph C.; Sapp, Stephen; Sebranek, Joseph G.; Anderson, Barbara; Wenger, Matt

    2012-01-01

    Challenges arise when teaching food safety to culturally diverse employees working in meatpacking and food manufacturing industries. A food safety training program was developed in English, translated into Spanish, and administered to 1,265 adult learners. Assessments were conducted by comparing scores before and immediately following training.…

  1. Proceedings of the Seminar on Environmental and Radiation Safety Aspect at Non-nuclear Industry

    The Seminar on Environmental and Radiation Safety Aspect at Non-nuclear Industry held on March 2003 in Jakarta. The purpose of this Seminar be able to information exchange among research workers in National Nuclear Energy Agency. The Seminar discussed about Science and Technology of Radiation Safety and Environment. There are 17 papers which have separated index. (PPIN)

  2. Issues of Safety and Security: New Challenging to Malaysia Tourism Industry

    Mohd Ayob Norizawati; Masron Tarmiji

    2014-01-01

    The safety and security issues nowadays become one of the forces causing changes in tourism industry in era of millennium. The main concern of this issues more focus on crime rates, terrorism, food safety, health issues and natural disaster. This topic gained the popularity in tourism research after 9/11 tragedy and since then the academicians and practitioners started seeking the best solution in ways to mitigate these negative impacts. For Malaysia, the image as safety and secure destinatio...

  3. Integrated occupational safety and health management solutions and industrial cases

    Häkkinen, Kari; Niskanen, Toivo

    2015-01-01

    Maximizing reader insights into a new movement toward leadership approaches that are collaborated and shared,  and which views Occupational Safety and Health (OSH) and performance excellence within the wider examination of leadership relationships and practices, this book argues that these relationships and processes are so central to the establishment of OSH functioning that studying them warrants a broad, cross-disciplinary, multiple method analysis. Exploring the complexity of leadership by the impact that contexts (e.g., national and organizational culture) may have on leaders, this book discusses the related literature, then moves forward to show how a more comprehensive practical approach to Occupational Safety and Health and performance excellence can function on levels pertaining to events, individuals, groups, and organizations. This book proposes that greater clarity in understanding leadership in Occupational Safety and Health and performance excellence can be developed from addressing two fundame...

  4. Is gerontology ready for accreditation?

    Haley, William E; Ferraro, Kenneth F; Montgomery, Rhonda J V

    2012-01-01

    The authors review widely accepted criteria for program accreditation and compare gerontology with well-established accredited fields including clinical psychology and social work. At present gerontology lacks many necessary elements for credible professional accreditation, including defined scope of practice, applied curriculum, faculty with applied professional credentials, and resources necessary to support professional credentialing review. Accreditation with weak requirements will be dismissed as "vanity" accreditation, and strict requirements will be impossible for many resource-poor programs to achieve, putting unaccredited programs at increased risk for elimination. Accreditation may be appropriate in the future, but it should be limited to professional or applied gerontology, perhaps for programs conferring bachelor's or master's degrees. Options other than accreditation to enhance professional skills and employability of gerontology graduates are discussed. PMID:22289064

  5. Industry Initiated Core Safety Attributes for Human Spaceflight for the 7th IAASS Conference

    Mango, Edward J.

    2014-01-01

    Now that the NASA Commercial Crew Program (CCP) is beginning its full certification contract for crew transportation to the International Space Station (ISS), is it time for industry to embrace a minimum set of core safety attributes? Those attributes can then be evolved into an industry-led set of basic safety standards and requirements. After 50 years of human space travel sponsored by governments, there are two basic conditions that now exist within the international space industry. The first, there is enough of a space-faring history to encourage the space industry to design, develop and operate human spaceflight systems without government contracts for anything other than services. Second, industry is capable of defining and enforcing a set of industry-based safety attributes and standards for human spaceflight to low-Earth orbit (LEO). This paper will explore both of these basic conditions with a focus on the safety attributes and standards. In the United States, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is now starting to dialogue with industry about the basic safety principles and attributes needed for potential future regulatory oversight. This process is not yet formalized and will take a number of years once approval is given to move forward. Therefore, throughout the next few years, it is an excellent time and opportunity for industry to collaborate together and develop the core set of attributes and standards. As industry engages and embraces a common set of safety attributes, then government agencies, like the FAA and NASA can use that industry-based product to strengthen their efforts on a safe commercial spaceflight foundation for the future. As the commercial space industry takes the lead role in establishing core safety attributes, and then enforcing those attributes, the entire planet can move away from governmental control of design and development and let industry expand safe and successful space operations in LEO. At that point the

  6. Safety and Security in Industrial Applications of Radioactive Sources: Two Principles, Only One Commitment

    The Nuclear Regulatory Authority of Argentina applies the basic principles of radiation protection and the necessary requirements to ensure radiation safety and physical security of radioactive sources, established in its Regulatory Standards. The criteria used by Regulatory Standards aim to reinforce and strengthen the measures of safety and security of radioactive material applying the concepts of safety culture and defence in depth. The paper refers to the criteria currently applied to mobile radioactive sources that are used in industrial applications with measurement purposes, studies of well logging and industrial radiography. (author)

  7. Impacts of electricity industry restructure on nuclear safety and corresponding strategies to respond

    Restructuring and privatization of the electricity power industry has raised new concerns that such process could affect nuclear safety. Since electricity industry of Korea is also being restructured, regulatory body should make pro-active and precautionary efforts to remove negative impacts on nuclear safety and to make positive effects maximized. This paper examines the international efforts of nuclear regulator cope with electricity restructuring, analyzes the impacts of relevant issues raised by other countries on domestic nuclear safety, and proposes policy directions to resolve such issues

  8. Health, Safety and Environment Culture in the Petroleum Industry in Norway

    Høivik, Dordi

    2009-01-01

    This thesis is based on four studies of aspects of health, safety and environment (HSE) culture in the petroleum industry in Norway. Oil and gas production is currently Norway’s largest industry, with both offshore and onshore operations. HSE issues, focusing on reducing risks to people, facilities and the environment, are important in this industry. The main objective of this study was to gain more knowledge about factors that affect the HSE in the Norwegian petroleum indus...

  9. Radiation Safety Regulatory Policy and Rule for NORM Industries in China

    Background information and the basic status concerning NORM industries in China is briefly introduced in the paper, including current natural radiation levels and the main results of a general survey related to NORM industries implemented by the Ministry of Environmental Protection. An introduction to the radiation safety regulatory policy and rule for NORM industries in China is also briefly presented. Finally, some considerations concerning NORM regulatory issues are discussed. (author)

  10. European downstream oil industry safety performance. Statistical summary of reported incidents - 2011

    Burton, A. [Awaken Consulting, Shropshire, Herefordshire (United Kingdom); Den Haan, K.H.

    2012-07-15

    In this eighteenth annual report on European downstream oil industry safety performance, 2011 statistics are presented on work-related personal injuries for the industry's own employees and contractors. Data were received from 34 CONCAWE Member Companies representing approximately 96% of the European refining capacity. Trends over the last eighteen years are also highlighted and the data are compared to similar statistics from related industries. This report also presents the third year of results for Process Safety Performance Indicators from CONCAWE members.

  11. European downstream oil industry safety performance. Statistical summary of reported incidents - 2012

    Burton, A. [Awaken Consulting, Shropshire, Herefordshire (United Kingdom); Den Haan, K.H.

    2013-08-15

    In this nineteenth annual report on European downstream oil industry safety performance, 2012 statistics are presented on work-related personal injuries for the industry's own employees and contractors. Data were received from 38 CONCAWE Member Companies representing approximately 98% of the European refining capacity. Trends over the last nineteen years are also highlighted and the data are compared to similar statistics from related industries. This report also presents the fourth year of results for Process Safety Performance Indicators from CONCAWE members.

  12. Heuristics and ontologies as keys to enter complex organisational systems : virtual reality (VR) applications to improve industrial safety

    Affeltranger, Bastien; Plot, Emmanuel; Debray, Bruno; Le Cardinal, Gilles; Camus, Fabrice

    2006-01-01

    International audience A major issue in industrial safety is that different stakeholders, namely those involved in the generation, mitigation and monitoring of industrial risks (both occupational and of major accidents), develop different perceptions of what industrial safety is, or how it should be achieved. Because they differ, these representations generate likewise different analyses and assessments of industrial safety features and levels. When diverging, such risk perceptions can be ...

  13. Health protection and industrial safety. Nuclear power plants

    The standard applies to components of the primary circuit including its auxiliary facilities, and of the secondary circuit of nuclear power plants with pressurized water reactors; to lifting gear and load take-ups for the transport of nuclear fuel and primary circuit components; to elevators within the containment, electrical installations, and piping and valves of radiation protection monitoring equipment. Part 1 defines the terms and specifies engineered safety requirements

  14. Efficient Safety Culture as Sustainable Development in Construction Industry

    Otti. V. I; Nwolum F. C

    2015-01-01

    The paper focuses on precaution necessary to prevent avoidable accidents in the construction industries, important water development, building and roads construction in Nigeria. Moreover, appreciate the need for a safe working environment but also precaution necessary for hitch-free operation.

  15. Mammography accreditation program

    In the mid-1980's, the movement toward the use of dedicated mammography equipment provided significant improvement in breast cancer detection. However, several studies demonstrated that this change was not sufficient to ensure optimal image quality at a low radiation dose. In particular, the 1985 Nationwide Evaluation of X-ray Trends identified the wide variations in image quality and radiation dose, even from dedicated units. During this time period, the American Cancer Society (ACS) launched its Breast Cancer Awareness Screening Campaign. However, there were concerns about the ability of radiology to respond to the increased demand for optimal screening examinations that would result from the ACS program. To respond to these concerns, the ACS and the American College of Radiology (ACR) established a joint committee on mammography screening in 1986. After much discussion, it was decided to use the ACR Diagnostic Practice Accreditation Program as a model for the development of a mammography accreditation program. However, some constraints were required in order to make the program meet the needs of the ACS. This voluntary, peer review program had to be timely and cost effective. It was determined that the best way to address these needs would be to conduct the program by mail. Finally, by placing emphasis on the educational nature of the program, it would provide an even greater opportunity for improving mammographic quality. The result of this effort was that, almost six years ago, in May 1987, the pilot study for the ACR Mammography Accreditation Program (MAP) began, and in August of that year, the first applications were received. In November 1987, the first 3-year accreditation certificates were awarded

  16. Mammography accreditation program

    Wilcox, P.

    1993-12-31

    In the mid-1980`s, the movement toward the use of dedicated mammography equipment provided significant improvement in breast cancer detection. However, several studies demonstrated that this change was not sufficient to ensure optimal image quality at a low radiation dose. In particular, the 1985 Nationwide Evaluation of X-ray Trends identified the wide variations in image quality and radiation dose, even from dedicated units. During this time period, the American Cancer Society (ACS) launched its Breast Cancer Awareness Screening Campaign. However, there were concerns about the ability of radiology to respond to the increased demand for optimal screening examinations that would result from the ACS program. To respond to these concerns, the ACS and the American College of Radiology (ACR) established a joint committee on mammography screening in 1986. After much discussion, it was decided to use the ACR Diagnostic Practice Accreditation Program as a model for the development of a mammography accreditation program. However, some constraints were required in order to make the program meet the needs of the ACS. This voluntary, peer review program had to be timely and cost effective. It was determined that the best way to address these needs would be to conduct the program by mail. Finally, by placing emphasis on the educational nature of the program, it would provide an even greater opportunity for improving mammographic quality. The result of this effort was that, almost six years ago, in May 1987, the pilot study for the ACR Mammography Accreditation Program (MAP) began, and in August of that year, the first applications were received. In November 1987, the first 3-year accreditation certificates were awarded.

  17. FIS accreditation guidelines

    Ojanen, Pinja

    2010-01-01

    The International Ski Federation (FIS) was founded to support and develop the sport of skiing 100 years ago. Since then skiing has grown in importance and has become more popular. Nowadays ski companies, athletes and family members, but also fan clubs, national ski associations, sponsors and local organizers get involved for a sporting event. The aim of this project-based thesis was to create guidelines and make the FIS accreditation system as user-friendly as possible. For the groups (ser...

  18. Safety regulations of radiation sources in industry in the Philippines

    The Philippine Nuclear Research Institute (PNRI) by virtue of Republic Act 2067, as amended, Republic Act 5207 and Executive Order 128 (1987), was mandated to advance and regulate the safe and peaceful applications of nuclear science and technology in the Philippines. The PNRI was formerly the Philippine Atomic Energy Commission established in 1958. This report aims to share the experiences of the PNRI on licensing and regulating the safe use of radioactive materials in industry, particularly in industrial gamma radiography, nuclear gauges and radioactive tracers. It enumerates the licensing and enforcement procedures. Some common problems encountered in the licensing and enforcement activities and comments of future plans to resolve the problems were also discussed. (Author)

  19. Radiation safety needs for the resurgent uranium mining industry

    Full text: After many years in the economic doldrums the world's uranium industry is undergoing a renaissance. The recent rapid price increase for the product and the anticipated market shortfalls in supply of yellowcake have are responsible for this. There is now a rush of new activity: abandoned mines from a previous era are being re-examined for their potential to be re-opened; planning for exploitation of known but undeveloped uranium deposits is proceeding at a rapid pace in many countries new to uranium mining; and finally worldwide exploration activity for uranium is expanding at a great rate with more than 400 companies now claiming to be involved in the uranium mining market. All of there activities have significant implications the radiation protection profession. At every stage of the uranium production cycle, from exploration to mining and processing through to remediation there are requirements for proper radiation protection procedures and regulation. The long period of reduced activity in uranium mining has meant that few young people have been joining the industry over the past 20 years. There is now a shortage of trained and experienced radiation protection professionals associated with the mining industry that cannot be overcome overnight. The paper discusses the development of this situation and the various strategies that are being put in place around the world to improve the situation. In particular the International Atomic Energy Agency has been working with radiation protection authorities and uranium mining industry representatives from around the world to address the issue. The latest developments in this project will be described and the future plans described. (author)

  20. Safety and reliability in industrial organizations - The key factors

    A survey-based technique has been developed that measures and generates comparative data on important organizational, work group, and job-level variables that are directly related to on-the-job accidents. This paper describes the results of an analysis of data from more than 2,700 employees in the chemical, oil, construction, and wood products industries. These analyses indicate that several key variables are significantly related to accidents in the workplace

  1. Scale development of safety management system evaluation for the airline industry.

    Chen, Ching-Fu; Chen, Shu-Chuan

    2012-07-01

    The airline industry relies on the implementation of Safety Management System (SMS) to integrate safety policies and augment safety performance at both organizational and individual levels. Although there are various degrees of SMS implementation in practice, a comprehensive scale measuring the essential dimensions of SMS is still lacking. This paper thus aims to develop an SMS measurement scale from the perspective of aviation experts and airline managers to evaluate the performance of company's safety management system, by adopting Schwab's (1980) three-stage scale development procedure. The results reveal a five-factor structure consisting of 23 items. The five factors include documentation and commands, safety promotion and training, executive management commitment, emergency preparedness and response plan and safety management policy. The implications of this SMS evaluation scale for practitioners and future research are discussed. PMID:22405247

  2. Systematic impact of institutional pressures on safety climate in the construction industry.

    He, Qinghua; Dong, Shuang; Rose, Timothy; Li, Heng; Yin, Qin; Cao, Dongping

    2016-08-01

    This paper explores how three types of institutional pressure (i.e., coercive, mimetic and normative pressures) systematically impact on the safety climate of construction projects. These impacts are empirically tested by survey data collected from 186 questionnaires of construction companies operating in Shanghai, China. The results, obtained by partial least squares analysis, show that organizational management commitment to safety and employee involvement is positively related to all three institutional pressures, while the perception of responsibility for safety and health is significantly influenced by coercive and mimetic pressure. However, coercive and normative pressures have no significant effect on the applicability of safety rules and work practices, revealing the importance of external organizational pressures in improving project safety climate from a systematic view. The findings also provide insights into the use of institutional forces to facilitate the improvement of safety climate in the construction industry. PMID:26706434

  3. Industrial Safety and Applied Health Physics Division, annual report for 1982

    Activities during the past year are summarized for the Health Physics Department, the Environmental Management Department, and the Safety Department. The Health Physics Department conducts radiation and safety surveys, provides personnel monitoring services for both external and internal radiation, and procures, services, and calibrates appropriate portable and stationary health physics instruments. The Environmental Management Department insures that the activities of the various organizations within ORNL are carried out in a responsible and safe manner. This responsibility involves the measurement, field monitoring, and evaluation of the amounts of radionuclides and hazardous materials released to the environment and the control of hazardous materials used within ORNL. The department also collaborates in the design of ORNL Facilities to help reduce the level of materials released to the environment. The Safety Department is responsible for maintaining a high level of staff safety. This includes aspects of both operational and industrial safety and also coordinates the activities of the Director's Safety Review Committee

  4. Industrial Safety and Applied Health Physics Division, annual report for 1982

    1983-12-01

    Activities during the past year are summarized for the Health Physics Department, the Environmental Management Department, and the Safety Department. The Health Physics Department conducts radiation and safety surveys, provides personnel monitoring services for both external and internal radiation, and procures, services, and calibrates appropriate portable and stationary health physics instruments. The Environmental Management Department insures that the activities of the various organizations within ORNL are carried out in a responsible and safe manner. This responsibility involves the measurement, field monitoring, and evaluation of the amounts of radionuclides and hazardous materials released to the environment and the control of hazardous materials used within ORNL. The department also collaborates in the design of ORNL Facilities to help reduce the level of materials released to the environment. The Safety Department is responsible for maintaining a high level of staff safety. This includes aspects of both operational and industrial safety and also coordinates the activities of the Director's Safety Review Committee. (ACR)

  5. Accreditation: recognition for quality training

    A three-step accreditation program for personnel training has upgraded nuclear power plant instruction and standards. The accreditation process includes self-evaluation, Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO) evaluation, and an Accrediting Board decision. During the self-evaluation phase, utilities compare their training with standardized criteria to identify any weaknesses and implement solutions. INPO participation and assistance at this point introduces objective appraisal at an early stage and ensures that adequate documentation will be available for the INPO evaluation

  6. Application of rupture disc safety device in nuclear industry

    Conventional disc devices are used to protect pressure vessels against excess pressure. However, there are several limitations for conventional discs: they are prone to premature fatigue failure; on bursting, disc material is released into to discharge piping; the difference between the design burst pressure and the design work pressure of the protected vessel is too large, etc. These limitations have been avoided by the new reverse buckling disc devices, in which the compressive strength of the disc material is used to determine its bursting pressure. The new type reverse buckling discs have been used successfully in nuclear industry

  7. The 'PROCESO' index: a new methodology for the evaluation of operational safety in the chemical industry

    The acknowledgement of industrial installations as complex systems in the early 1980s outstands as a milestone in the path to operational safety. Process plants are social-technical complex systems of a dynamic nature, whose properties depend not only on their components, but also on the inter-relations among them. A comprehensive assessment of operational safety requires a systemic approach, i.e. an integrated framework that includes all the relevant factors influencing safety. Risk analysis methodologies and safety management systems head the list of methods that point in this direction, but they normally require important plant resources. As a consequence, their use is frequently restricted to especially dangerous processes often driven by compliance with legal requirements. In this work a new safety index for the chemical industry, termed the 'Proceso' Index (standing for the Spanish terms for PROCedure for the Evaluation of Operational Safety), has been developed. PROCESO is based on the principles of systems theory, has a tree-like structure and considers 25 areas to guide the review of plant safety. The method uses indicators whose respective weight values have been obtained via an expert judgement technique. This paper describes the steps followed to develop this new Operational Safety Index, explains its structure and illustrates its application to process plants

  8. Risk and safety in the nuclear industry and conventional norms of society

    In the present study the societal acceptance of various risks is analyzed and rules of risk acceptance as a function of different parameters are spelled out. The monetary value of a human life is estimated, based on investments in safety of different human activities. The acceptable risks and safety investments in different human activities are then compared with risks and safety investments of the nuclear industry. Safety investments required to reduce the radioactivity releases and risks from nuclear power stations to ALAP levels are taken as a study case. It is found that risks in the nuclear industry are several orders of magnitude lower and safety investments per human life saved are several orders of magnitude higher, as compared with risks and safety investments in other human activities. It is also shown that the incremental safety investments needed to further reduce the radiation doses in the environment during normal and continuous operation of nuclear plants are extravagantly high as compared to safety investments in other human activities and in other facets of human life. Considering that there is a limit to the economic means available, societal expenditures for reducing risks should by spread, as much as possible, over all human activities to get the maximum return from investments. (B.G.)

  9. Industrial gamma radiography: recent developments towards improved quality and safety

    Gamma radiography has been one of the most important NDT techniques for more than 40 years. The success has been based on the wide range of applications, unambiguous results, as well as easy to operate and unexpensive equipment, which can be used under almost all environmental conditions. Most recently improved levels of quality and safety have been reached by new equipment designs as well as from the availability of a new isotope -Se-75. Various national and international standards define requirements of gammagraphic apparatus to ensure safe and reliable operation and minimize potential hazards for the operator and the environment by faulty operation. This especially includes self-controlling safety functions as well as monitoring and clear display of safe/unsafe conditions. Lately, the ISO DIS 3999 (1998) has successfully passed voting of the international community involved in the evaluation of this ISO standard. The gammagraphic apparatus' GAMMAMAT TSI for Ir-192 and GAMMA-MAT SE for Se-75 are in full compliance to the latest versions of the national standards and also the ISO DIS 3999 (1998). In addition to their unparalleled reliability and longest operational life the equipment design includes low level of leakage radiation, real source position control, safe/unsafe display and automatic source locking. The isotope Se-75 is offering low radiation energies, which result in high radiographic contrast and resolution for improved flaw detectability. Sources of activity up to 3 TBq/80 Ci are available and most commonly used. The physical parameters of the isotope offer many other practical advantages. The half-life of 120 days results in 60% more useful lifetime over an Ir-192 source. The low radiation energies allow a special designed container of incredibly low 7 kg total weight. Radiation protection during NDT work can be achieved much more easily and radiation controlled areas can be much smaller. (Author)

  10. The Effect of Perceived Organizational Support and Safety Climate on Voluntary Turnover in the Transportation Industry

    J. Kirk Ring

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available A model investigating the relationship between safety climate, perceivedorganizational support, and voluntary turnover is developed and tested with datacollected from the trucking industry. Perceived organizational support is shownto mediate the relationship between safety climate and voluntary turnover, butthis effect occurs only with tenured employees who are not at the beginning orend of their careers. This implicates a curvilinear relationship of the variablesand offers statistical support for a temporal nature of perceived organizationalsupport which has not been found in previous studies.

  11. The Effect of Perceived Organizational Support and Safety Climate on Voluntary Turnover in the Transportation Industry

    J. Kirk Ring

    2011-01-01

    A model investigating the relationship between safety climate, perceivedorganizational support, and voluntary turnover is developed and tested with datacollected from the trucking industry. Perceived organizational support is shownto mediate the relationship between safety climate and voluntary turnover, butthis effect occurs only with tenured employees who are not at the beginning orend of their careers. This implicates a curvilinear relationship of the variablesand offers statistical suppor...

  12. Benchmarking of process safety management elements in the South African process industry / M.O. Popoola

    Popoola, Musiliu Olayide

    2007-01-01

    This study is a benchmarking exercise aimed at identifying the variation in the practice - within the South African process industry - of three process safety management (PSM) elements, namely: Management of Change (MOC), Emergency Preparedness Program (EPP), and Process Safety Incident Investigation (PSII) programs. Structured questionnaires were developed for each of the three PSM elements, and sent to over 180 process plants. Typically, the study experienced a low response rate. Howeve...

  13. Industrial safety in a nuclear decommissioning environment observations and lessons learned

    Decommissioning activities present unusual and unexpected workplace safety challenges that go far beyond the traditional experience of nuclear power plant managers. A blend of state-of-the-art safety program management tools along with new and practical applications are required to ensure high industrial safety performance. The demanding and rigorously applied nuclear safety engineering standards that are accepted as normal and routine in the operation of a nuclear power facility, should transform as an industrial safety standard during the non-operating period of decommissioning. In addition, historical measures of non-nuclear industrial safety injury rates would or should not be acceptable safety behaviors during a nuclear decommissioning project. When complex projects, such as the decommissioning of a nuclear generating facility are undertaken, the workforce brings experience, qualifications, and assumptions to the project. The overall multi-year general schedule is developed, with more schedule details, for example, for the nearest rolling 12-18 months. Methods are established for the selection of contractors to assist in areas that are not normal tasks for the facility workforce, whose normal activity is managing and operating a nuclear generating station. However, it is critical to manage those contractors to the agreed work scope to ensure success is maintained by both parties, e.g. the job gets done, on schedule, on budget, all parties are financially whole when the work is complete, and safely. The purpose of this paper is to provide a perspective of nuclear plant personal safety in the ever changing industrial environment created by the demolition of robust and often radiologically contaminated structures in a nuclear facility decommissioning project. (author)

  14. Work health and safety in cotton ginning industry: a survey of practices in australia

    This survey focuses on the WH and S (Work Health and Safety) practices in Australia and relates them with those in Pakistan. It also highlights the planned areas of work required on WH and S in cotton ginning industry of Pakistan. This article is one a series of research studies that will inform a broader approach development. The aim of the survey was to design a standardized health and safety Act for cotton ginning industry of Pakistan and to help ginners meet their due industry obligations under the model WH and S Act. The first component of the research study survey was to review the relevant Australian work and safety model as this provides a framework to protect the health, safety and welfare of all employees at work and of other people who might be affected by the job. The second aspect of the research study survey concerned site visits to cotton gins with the support of Australian Centre for Agricultural Health and Safety, Moree, NSW. During these visits the existing ginning process in terms of WH and S were reviewed. Informal interviews were also conducted with Gin Managers and Ginning Experts regarding WH and S in the Australian cotton ginning industry. (author)

  15. Nanotechnology: a future tool to improve quality and safety in meat industry.

    Singh, Pradeep Kumar; Jairath, Gauri; Ahlawat, Satyavir Singh

    2016-04-01

    Nanotechnology refers to the new aspect of science modifies its physical, chemical and biological properties leading to new applications or enhanced utility. Keeping the pace with other industries, the meat industry has adopted the new technology in a range of applications to improve the quality and safety of products. The potential applications include the improvement in the tastes, texture, flavor, production of low fat and salt products, enhanced nutrient absorption, improved packaging techniques and better pathogen detection system. However some safety issues need to be addressed before taking a ride on the technology at the full throttle. PMID:27413202

  16. Safety culture in the Finnish and Swedish nuclear industries - history and present

    Reiman, T.; Pietikaeinen, E. (Technical Research Centre of Finland, VTT (Finland)); Kahlbom, U. (RiskPilot AB (Sweden)); Rollenhagen, C. (Royal Institute of Technology (KTH) (Sweden))

    2010-03-15

    The report presents results from an interview study that examined the characteristics of the Nordic nuclear branch safety culture. The study also tested the theoretical model of safety culture developed by the authors. The interview data was collected in Sweden (n = 14) and Finland (n = 16). Interviewees represented the major actors in the nuclear field (regulators, power companies, expert organizations, waste management organizations). The study gave insight into the nature of safety culture in the nuclear industry. It provided an overview on the variety of factors that people in the industry consider important for safety. The respondents rather coherently saw such psychological states as motivation, mindfulness, sense of control, understanding of hazards and safety and sense of responsibility as important for nuclear safety. Some of the respondents described a certain Nordic orientation towards safety. One characteristic was a sense of personal responsibility for safety. However, there was no clear agreement on the existence of a shared Nordic nuclear safety culture. Sweden and Finland were seen different for example in the way the co-operation between plants and nuclear safety authorities was arranged and re-search activities organized. There were also perceived differences in the way everyday activities like decision making were carried out in the organizations. There are multiple explanations for the differences. The industry in Sweden has been driven by the strong supplier. In Finland the regulator's role in shaping the culture has been more active. Other factors creating differences are e.g. national culture and company culture and the type of the power plant. Co-operation between Nordic nuclear power organizations was viewed valuable yet challenging from safety point of view. The report concludes that a good safety culture requires a deep and wide under-standing of nuclear safety including the various accident mechanisms of the power plants as well as

  17. Safety culture in the Finnish and Swedish nuclear industries - history and present

    The report presents results from an interview study that examined the characteristics of the Nordic nuclear branch safety culture. The study also tested the theoretical model of safety culture developed by the authors. The interview data was collected in Sweden (n = 14) and Finland (n = 16). Interviewees represented the major actors in the nuclear field (regulators, power companies, expert organizations, waste management organizations). The study gave insight into the nature of safety culture in the nuclear industry. It provided an overview on the variety of factors that people in the industry consider important for safety. The respondents rather coherently saw such psychological states as motivation, mindfulness, sense of control, understanding of hazards and safety and sense of responsibility as important for nuclear safety. Some of the respondents described a certain Nordic orientation towards safety. One characteristic was a sense of personal responsibility for safety. However, there was no clear agreement on the existence of a shared Nordic nuclear safety culture. Sweden and Finland were seen different for example in the way the co-operation between plants and nuclear safety authorities was arranged and re-search activities organized. There were also perceived differences in the way everyday activities like decision making were carried out in the organizations. There are multiple explanations for the differences. The industry in Sweden has been driven by the strong supplier. In Finland the regulator's role in shaping the culture has been more active. Other factors creating differences are e.g. national culture and company culture and the type of the power plant. Co-operation between Nordic nuclear power organizations was viewed valuable yet challenging from safety point of view. The report concludes that a good safety culture requires a deep and wide under-standing of nuclear safety including the various accident mechanisms of the power plants as well as a

  18. Evaluation of the safety engineering of the industries which use the natural gas (PB e PE

    Francisco S. Másculo

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Natural gas in Industries is a field of studies that has recently been object of concern andresearch in universities and research centers. This analysis has become more evident dueto several factors as the increasing use in industries of the natural gas replacing thecombustible oil (BPF in your energetic matrix. The aim of this article is introducing someconsiderations about ergonomics and safety of work of the Industries which use the NaturalGas, analyzing the changes occurred with after your introduction. The industrial consumerswere stratified in several variables, such as: Kinds of the Industrial Production; Geographicallocation; Gas consumption in the industry, among others. Although the geographical locationof the studied companies was in the eastern Northeast (PB and PE, the results can begeneralized in the measure in which they were boarded global characteristics big sizecompanies, almost all owning or trying to obtain quality certifications, environmental andsafety engineering.

  19. On the state of the radiation safety in the atomic energy and nuclear industry of Russia

    The general aspects of the activity of organs of government in the field of human radiation protection and some other problems of nuclear industry connecting with the new economic and politic situation in Russia have been discussed. There are present information about the organs of government relating to the questions of radiation safety and the major directions of governmental policy in this fields. Some problems of the elimination of the consequences of the accidents in NPPs (Chernobyl, Chelyabinsk), the programs of the radiation safety improvement of population and the information about new normative nuclear safety documents have also been written in this report. (author)

  20. Exploring factors associated with workers' safety rule violations in the Chinese construction industry: a multimethod investigation

    Wang, Dandan

    2013-01-01

    The Chinese construction industry is China's third biggest industrial killer. Accidents causation analysis revealed that more than 80% of accidents are caused by unsafe human behaviour. The current research was focused on exploring and examining the factors affecting safety rule violations among Chinese construction workers through four main studies in which a combination of qualitative and quantitative methodologies were used. In the first study, on-site observation and organisational docume...

  1. HACCP as a Regulatory Innovation to Improve Food Safety in the Meat Industry

    Unnevehr, Laurian J.; Jensen, Helen H.

    1996-01-01

    Industrial engineers in the food-processing industry have developed the Halyard Analysis Critical Control Point (HACCP) system as a preventive approach to ensuring the safety of meat and poultry products. This paper discusses both the origins of HACCP as an engineering concept and the economics of HACCP as a regulatory tool. The authors contend that the economics literature has not adequately explored the benefits from prevention, particularly when the costs of hazard detection are high and t...

  2. Licenses for industrial radiography and radiation safety requirements for radiographic operation: CPR part 11

    This part describes the requirements for issuing of licenses for the use of sealed sources containing radioactive material in industrial radiography and radiation safety requirements for persons using such sealed sources in industrial radiography. The provisions and requirements of this part are in addition to, and not in substitution, for other applicable requirements of CPR (Code of PNRI Regulations) Part 2 and other parts of the code. (Author)

  3. Radiological safety assessment of gas mantle industries in India

    Thorium, a radioactive element of actinide family was discovered by Berzelius in 1828 and named by him in honor of the Scandinavian God open-quote Thor close-quote. Following its discovery the earliest known use of thorium was in the making of gas mantles. The other use as an X-ray contrast medium open-quote Thorotrast close-quote has since long been discontinued, where as even today its use in gas mantles is continued. Gas lights have been used as a source of light since 1800's. In India, although electric bulbs have replaced most of the gas lights, even today in villages and in urban areas where there is no continuous power supply and in outdoor lightings gas lamps are used. The mantle which is used in these lamps is called the Welsbach mantle and is a netted hose that is impregnated with thorium nitrate and other metals. The function of a gas mantle is to produce a bright light during operation of the lighting device (gas or kerosene lamp) in which the mantle is placed. When placed in a lighting device and heated to 1300-1800 degree Celcius thorium in the mantle incandesces and gives off bright light. In India presently there are about 70 manufacturing units handling 150 metric tons of thorium nitrate annually. There are about four hundred persons involved in manufacturing 200 million mantles per year. Thorium is chosen because of its property of incadescence, however since it is radioactive, radiation safety of the workplace, handling personnel and safe environmental condition for members of public have to be maintained

  4. Industrial safety and applied health physics. Annual report for 1978

    There were no external or internal exposures to personnel which exceeded the standards for radiation protection as defined in DOE Manual Chapter 0524. Only 39 employees received whole body dose equivalents of one rem or greater. The highest whole body dose equivalent to an employee was 3.3 rem. The highest internal exposure was less than 25% of a maximum permissible dose for any calendar quarter. During 1978, 23 portable instruments were added to the inventory and 228 retired. The total number in service on January 1, 1979, was 1023. There were no releases of gaseous waste or liquid radioactive waste from the laboratory which were of a level that required an incident report to DOE. The average background level at the PAM stations during 1978 was 9.3 μR/hr, or 81 mR/yr. Soil samples were collected at all perimeter and remote monitoring stations and analyzed for eleven radionuclides including plutonium and uranium. Grass samples were collected and analyzed for twelve radionuclides including plutonium and uranium. During 1978, the Radiation and Safety Surveys personnel continued to assist the operating groups in keeping contamination, air concentrations, and personnel exposure levels below the established maximum permissible levels. Fourteen radiation incidents involving radioactive materials were recorded during 1978. Of the 582,000 articles of wearing apparel and 192,000 articles, such as mops, laundry bags, towels, etc., monitored during 1978 about four percent were found to be contaminated. Three lost workday cases occurred at ORNL in 1978, a frequency rate of 0.07. The Serious Injury frequency rate for 1978 was 1.40, as based on the new OSHA system for recording injuries and illness (RII). A total of 55 days were lost or charged for the three lost workday cases in 1978

  5. 42 CFR 488.8 - Federal review of accreditation organizations.

    2010-10-01

    ... organization proposes to adopt new requirements or change its survey process. An accreditation organization... national accreditation organization. CMS's review and evaluation of a national accreditation organization... criteria— (1) The equivalency of an accreditation organization's accreditation requirements of an entity...

  6. OECD/NEA WGFCS Workshop: Safety Assessment of Fuel Cycle Facilities - Regulatory Approaches and Industry Perspectives

    Nuclear fuel is produced, processed, and stored mainly in industrial-scale facilities. Uranium ores are processed and refined to produce a pure uranium salt stream, Uranium is converted and enriched, nuclear fuel is fabricated (U fuel and U/Pu fuel for the closed cycle option); and spent fuel is stored and reprocessed in some countries (close cycle option). Facilities dedicated to the research and development of new fuel or new processes are also considered as Fuel Cycle Facilities. The safety assessment of nuclear facilities has often been led by the methodology and techniques initially developed for Nuclear Power Plants. As FCFs cover a wide diversity of installations the various approaches of national regulators, and their technical support organizations, for the Safety Assessment of Fuel Cycle Facilities are also diverse, as are the approaches by their industries in providing safety justifications for their facilities. The objective of the Working Group on Fuel Cycle Safety is to advance the understanding for both regulators and operators of relevant aspects of nuclear fuel cycle safety in member countries. A large amount of experience is available in safety assessment of FCFs, which should be shared to develop ideas in this field. To contribute to this task, the Workshop on 'Safety Assessment of Fuel Cycle Facilities - Regulatory Approaches and Industry Perspectives' was held in Toronto, on 27 - 29 September 2011. The workshop was hosted by Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission. The current proceedings provide summary of the results of the workshop with the text of the papers given and presentations made

  7. Safety- and risk analysis activities in other areas than the nuclear industry

    Kozine, I.; Duijm, N.J.; Lauridsen, K. [Risoe National Lab. (Denmark)

    2000-12-01

    The report gives an overview of the legislation within the European Union in the field of major industrial hazards and gives examples of decision criteria applied in a number of European countries when judging the acceptability of an activity. Furthermore, the report mentions a few methods used in the analysis of the safety of chemical installations. (au)

  8. Industrial Safety. MAS-123. Waste Isolation Division (WID). Management and Supervisor Training (MAST) Program.

    Westinghouse Electric Corp., Carlsbad, NM.

    This learning module, which is part of a management and supervisor training program for managers and supervisors employed at the Department of Energy's Waste Isolation Division, is designed to prepare trainees to promote and monitor the industrial safety program at their plant. The following topics are covered in the module's individual sections:…

  9. Competency Based Education Curriculum for the Orientation and Safety Program of the Oil and Gas Industry.

    United Career Center, Clarksburg, WV.

    This competency-based education curriculum for teaching the orientation and safety program for the oil and gas industry in West Virginia is organized into seven units. These units cover the following topics: introduction to oil and gas, first aid, site preparation, drilling operations, equipment familiarity, well completion, and preparation for…

  10. Safety- and risk analysis activities in other areas than the nuclear industry

    The report gives an overview of the legislation within the European Union in the field of major industrial hazards and gives examples of decision criteria applied in a number of European countries when judging the acceptability of an activity. Furthermore, the report mentions a few methods used in the analysis of the safety of chemical installations. (au)

  11. Toward a sustainable cement industry in 2020 : improvement of the environmental, health & safety performance

    2001-01-01

    This background document concentrates on technical and managerial aspects of Environmental, Health & Safety Performance (EHS) control in the cement industry. It gives an overview of options for improvement toward a sustainable cement production in 2020. Energy consumption and use of alternative fuel

  12. Toward a sustainable cement industry in 2020 : improvement of the environmental, health & safety performance

    2001-01-01

    This background document concentrates on technical and managerial aspects of Environmental, Health & Safety Performance (EHS) control in the cement industry. It gives an overview of options for improvement toward a sustainable cement production in 2020. Energy consumption and use of alternative fuels and raw materials are included in this substudy.

  13. OECI accreditation of the European Institute of Oncology of Milan: strengths and weaknesses.

    Deriu, Pietro L; Basso, Silvia; Mastrilli, Fabrizio; Orecchia, Roberto

    2015-12-31

    The European Institute of Oncology began the process to reach the accreditation promoted by the Organisation of European Cancer Institutes (OECI) in 2012. This accreditation integrates the quality and safety path started in 2001 with accreditation by the Joint Commission International. Despite the presence of diversified accreditations and certifications and the clear need of time, effort, and commitment, the models are complementary. Each model is not to be considered as an end but as a tool for improvement: e.g., mixing accreditation standards led to an improvement in the quality and safety of processes. The present article details the OECI accreditation experience of the European Institute of Oncology, in particular the following strengths of OECI standards: collaboration among several involved parties (patient, volunteer, patient's general practitioner) in the clinical and quality/safety processes; a larger involvement of support personnel (psycho-oncologists, dieticians, physical therapists); and the development of clinical/translational research and innovation in prevention, diagnosis, and treatment to guarantee the best available practice in diagnosis and treatment. The OECI accreditation is specific to oncology and therefore its standards are tailored to a cancer center, both in terms of language used in the standards manual and in terms of patient needs. The OECI accreditation system puts an auditor team with a standards manual in charge of verifying quality and confirms the definition of IEO as a Comprehensive Cancer Center. PMID:27096268

  14. Assessing outcomes of industrial hygiene graduate education.

    Brosseau, Lisa; Fredrickson, Ann

    2009-05-01

    To ensure that industrial hygiene professionals continue to be prepared for current and future trends, it is important to regularly assess the value of their education. Described here are the results of discussions with employers and a mailed survey of graduates. Comparisons are made with past mailed surveys of both groups. Two sets of discussions were held in late 2005 with employers of industrial hygienists and other health and safety professionals. Twenty-eight participants were asked to discuss current and future needs for professionals in their organization and economic sector, their expectations for knowledge and skills when hiring professionals, methods for finding and hiring, and the importance of ABET accreditation. At the same time, a survey was mailed to 71 industrial hygiene students graduating in the last 15 years. Respondents were asked to rank the value of and their proficiency in 42 competencies. Questions also assessed employment experience, certification, the importance of ABET accreditation, and demographic characteristics. There was a lot of agreement between the two stakeholder groups (employers and graduates) about the most important skill and knowledge areas. Most employers identified communicating effectively and exposure assessment among the most important skills, with designing and initiating research as among the least. Hazard recognition, exposure measurement principles, and personal protective equipment were the most highly ranked knowledge areas. Employers discussed the need for good "business skills" such as teamwork, communication, and project management, and the importance of problem-solving skills. Graduates reported that skills in the areas of recognition, evaluation, and control were most valuable in their first jobs and generally reported high levels of proficiency in these skill areas. There was a similar dichotomy in opinions about accreditation within each stakeholder group. The reputation of the academic program was

  15. The Role Of Industrial Safety Measures In Combating Occupational Hazards And Accidents In India

    Sharmistha Bhattacharjee

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The presence of occupational hazards and industrial accidents de-motivates the worker to contribute their best to the organization. The participation of workers in the workplace which promises safety and security fosters teamwork, quality of product high productivity and a good communication between management and the industrial workers. For combating occupational hazards and accidents in an industrial site, safety is necessary and a challenging issue in an industrial environment. Serious technological accidents happens everyday somewhere in the world, causing deaths, injuries and damages to the environment and to the employees Most accidents are caused by people. People are not aware of how to use protective equipments nor are they aware of industrial hygiene and security measures. This paper provides an overview from the secondary sources of data on occupational hazards and accidents, and focuses on the safety and security services and measures provided by the institutions and government to combat the problems to provide an understanding of the situation in Indian context

  16. 9 CFR 439.53 - Revocation of accreditation.

    2010-01-01

    ... deceptively packaged food or upon fraud in connection with transactions in food. (c) Any misdemeanor based... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Revocation of accreditation. 439.53 Section 439.53 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF...

  17. Reliability-based approaches for safety margin assessment in the French nuclear industry

    The prevention of the fast fracture damage of the mechanical equipment important for the safety of nuclear islands of the French PWR relies on deterministic rules. These rules include flaw acceptance criteria involving safety factors applied to characteristic values (implicit margins) of the physical variables. The sets of safety factors that are currently under application in the industrial analyses with the agreement of the Safety Authority, are distributed across the two main physical parameters and have partly been based on a semi-probabilistic approach. After presenting the generic probabilistic pro-codification approach this paper shows its application to the evaluation of the performances of the existing regulatory flaw acceptance criteria. This application can be carried out in a realistic manner or in a more simplified one. These two approaches are applied to representative mechanical components. Their results are consistent. (author)

  18. Assessment of safety culture from the INB organization: A case study for nuclear fuel cycle industry

    The present article describes strategies, methodologies and first results on the Safety Culture Self-assessment Project under way at INB since August 2001. As a Brazilian Government company in charge of the nuclear fuel cycle activities,. the main purposes of the Project is to evaluate the present status of its safety culture and to propose actions to ensure continuous safety improvement at management level of its industrial processes. The proposed safety culture assessment describes INB's various production sites taking into account the different aspects of their activities, such as regional, social and technical issues. The survey was performed in March/2002 very good attendance (about 80%) the employees. The first global survey results are presented in item 4. (author)

  19. Employee Health and Safety Practices: An Exploratory and Comparative Study of the Shipping and Manufacturing Industries in Ghana

    Samuel Howard Quartey

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The state of employee health and safety in the shipping and the manufacturing industries in most developingeconomies remains largely unexamined. The purpose of this study was to examine employee health and safetypractices in the shipping and manufacturing industries. The results from the quantitative analysis indicated thatemployees in the shipping and the manufacturing industries are prone to employee health and safety hazards. Thefindings suggest that management and employees demonstrated negative attitudes towards employee health andsafety practices in the industries. Results also showed that the shipping industry had more employee health andsafety initiatives than the manufacturing industry. The results further revealed that the age, gender and levels ofeducation of employees do not influence employees’ attitudes toward health and safety practices. The qualitativeanalysis also revealed that low productivity and high medical and insurance bills were associated with ineffectiveemployee health and safety practices while effective health and safety practices led to high profitability and highproductivity. Further, inadequate health and safety education and promotion as well as ineffective regulatorybodies were the major national challenges to health and safety practices. Moreover, non-compliance behaviours ofemployees as well as inadequate managerial support remained the industrial challenges to health and safetypractices. In conclusion, industries must consider employee health and safety as their internal corporate socialresponsibility (CSR investment.

  20. 76 FR 62073 - Guidance for Industry on Implementation of the Fee Provisions of the FDA Food Safety...

    2011-10-06

    ... Provisions of the FDA Food Safety Modernization Act; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS... guidance for industry entitled ``Implementation of the Fee Provisions of Section 107 of the FDA Food Safety... guidance for industry entitled ``Implementation of the Fee Provisions of Section 107 of the FDA Food...

  1. Industrial hygiene, occupational safety and respiratory symptoms in the Pakistani cotton industry

    Khan, Abdul Wali; Moshammer, Hanns Michael; Kundi, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Objectives In the cotton industry of Pakistan, 15 million people are employed and exposed to cotton dust, toxic chemicals, noise and physical hazards. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of health symptoms, particularly respiratory symptoms, and to measure cotton dust and endotoxin levels in different textile factories of Faisalabad, Pakistan. Methods A cross-sectional investigation was performed in a representative sample of 47 cotton factories in the Faisalabad region in P...

  2. Construction Safety And Health Factors At The Industry Level: The Case Of Singapore

    Charles Y.J. Cheah

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The construction industry is one of the most hazardous industries due to the unique nature of its products and the processes involved. Recent occurrences of highly publicized construction site accidents in Singapore have highlighted the immediate needs for the local industry to address safety and attention at the industry level. The objective of this paper is to examine issues and critical factors affecting S&H standards in Singapore. Clearly, collective efforts should be pursued at the industry level as the country moves towards the ultimate safety management strategy of self-regulation. The findings also indicate that the challenge of making worksites safe should not be placed solely on the contractors but should be shared by all parties affecting the value chain of construction, including the developers, the consultants and the government. The factors identified through factor analysis may inform legislators and industry practitioners in terms of the sources of problems and help develop effective strategies for improvement. Some of the experiences mentioned in the paper could also be relevant to other countries facing similar circumstances.

  3. 7 CFR 983.1 - Accredited laboratory.

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Accredited laboratory. 983.1 Section 983.1 Agriculture..., ARIZONA, AND NEW MEXICO Definitions § 983.1 Accredited laboratory. An accredited laboratory is a laboratory that has been approved or accredited by the U.S. Department of Agriculture....

  4. Preliminary results from the application of risk matrix method for safety assessment in industrial radiography

    Although the uses of ionizing radiation in industry are subject to procedures that provide a high level of safety, experience has shown that equipment failure, human errors, or the combination of both that can trigger accidental exposures may occur. Traditionally, the radiation safety checks whether these industrial practices (industrial radiography, industrial irradiators, among others) are sufficiently safe to prevent similar accidental exposures already occurred, so that becomes dependent on the published information and not always answers questions like: What other events can occur, or what other risks are present? Taking into account the results achieved by the Foro Iberoamericano de Organismos Reguladores Radiologicos y Nucleares, its leading position in the use of techniques of risk analysis in radioactive facilities and the need to develop a proactive approach to the prevention of accidents arising from the use of ionizing radiations in the industry, it intends to apply the risk analysis technique known as Risk Matrix to a hypothetical reference entity for the region in which industrial radiography is performed. In this paper the results of the first stage of this study are shown, that is the identification of initiating events (IE) and barriers that help mitigate the consequences of such IE, so that can appreciate the applicability of this method to industrial radiography services, to reduce the risk to acceptable levels. The fundamental advantage associated with the application of this methodology is that can be applied by the professionals working in the service and identifies specific weaknesses that from the point of view of safety there, so they can be prioritized resources depending on risk reduction. (Author)

  5. Links between operating experience feedback of industrial accidents and nuclear safety

    Since 1992, the bureau for analysis of industrial risks and pollutions (BARPI) collects, analyzes and publishes information on industrial accidents. The ARIA database lists over 40.000 accidents or incidents, most of which occurred in French classified facilities (ICPE). Events occurring in nuclear facilities are rarely reported in ARIA because they are reported in other databases. This paper describes the process of selection, characterization and review of these accidents, as well as the following consultation with industry trade groups. It is essential to publicize widely the lessons learned from analyzing industrial accidents. To this end, a web site (www.aria.developpement-durable.gouv.fr) gives free access to the accidents summaries, detailed sheets, studies, etc. to professionals and the general public. In addition, the accidents descriptions and characteristics serve as inputs to new regulation projects or risk analyses. Finally, the question of the links between operating experience feedback of industrial accidents and nuclear safety is explored: if the rigorous and well-documented methods of experience feedback in the nuclear field certainly set an example for other activities, nuclear safety can also benefit from inputs coming from the vast diversity of accidents arisen into industrial facilities because of common grounds. Among these common grounds we can find: -) the fuel cycle facilities use many chemicals and chemical processes that are also used by chemical industries; -) the problems resulting from the ageing of equipment affect both heavy and nuclear industries; -) the risk of hydrogen explosion; -) the risk of ammonia, ammonia is a gas used by nuclear power plants as an ingredient in the onsite production of mono-chloramine and ammonia is involved in numerous accidents in the industry: at least 900 entries can be found in the ARIA database. The paper is followed by the slides of the presentation

  6. Accreditation in university environmental radioactivity laboratories

    Full text: The experimental work performed in university laboratories comes from many different fields and it is assumed to be of high quality. In general, the results are published in national or international journals or presented at conferences. Only a few laboratories have a clear understanding of the importance of implementing Quality Assurance Systems and the accreditation of their activities according to the international standards, such as ISO 17025. Today, few universities include this issue in their programmes. Most laboratories associate quality assurance with the fact that referees before publication have revised their works. Here the authors describe their experience in two university laboratories involved in environmental radioactivity control. Both laboratories have implanted a Quality Assurance System based on ISO 17025, the standard used for accreditation of the technical competence of laboratories. One of them (LARA-UPC) belongs to a research institute and the other (LRA-UB) belongs to a university department with different logistic organisation. Both laboratories provide services to public and private institutions along side their teaching and research activities. The Quality Assurance Unit (UGQ-UB) is responsible for activities related to technical support in implementation and assessment in quality systems. In the case of these laboratories this UGQ performs internal audits. Accreditation is particularly important in environmental radioactivity analysis, where objective evidence of the quality of the data is required. Moreover, the results of radioactivity analysis are important: e.g. quality of water for human consumption (Directive 98/83/CE), environmental surveys (PVRA, Art. 35 of the Euratom Treaty for EU members), imports of agricultural products (Directive 99/1661/EC), export certificate required for agricultural products (2001/1621/EC), measurements in support of health and safety. It is important to assure the accuracy and precision of

  7. Accreditation in university environmental radioactivity laboratories

    Full text: The experimental work performed in university laboratories comes from many different fields and it is assumed to be of high quality. In general, the results are published in national or international journals or presented at conferences. Only a few laboratories have a clear understanding of the importance of implementing Quality Assurance Systems and the accreditation of their activities according to the international standards, such as ISO 17025. Today, few universities include this issue in the ir programmes. Most laboratories associate quality assurance with the fact that referees before publication have revised their works. Here the authors describe their experience in two university laboratories involved in environmental radioactivity control. Both laboratories have implanted a Quality Assurance System based on ISO 17025, the standard used for accreditation of the technical competence of laboratories. One of them (LARA-UPC) belongs to a research institute and the other (LRAUB) belongs to a university department with different logistic organisation. Both laboratories provide services to public and private institutions along side their teaching and research activities. The Quality Assurance Unit (UGQ-UB) is responsible for activities related to technical support in implementation and assessment in quality systems. In the case of these laboratories this UGQ performs internal audits. Accreditation is particularly important in environmental radioactivity analysis, where objective evidence of the quality of the data is required. Moreover, the results of radioactivity analysis are important: e.g. quality of water for human consumption (Directive 98/83/CE), environmental surveys (PVRA, Art. 35 of the Euratom Treaty for EU members), imports of agricultural products (Directive 99/1661/EC), export certificate required for agricultural products (2001/1621/EC), measurements in support of health and safety. It is important to assure the accuracy and precision of

  8. Quality and safety in Spain

    For three decades, and after the entry of Spain into the EU, it has been developed a regulatory, stable but evolving, framework that has allowed to create the conditions and structures to have stringent safety conditions of products and manufacturing facilities, as well as all the activities necessary for their certification and control. This development has been possible, among others, by the work of impulse and coordination of the Ministry of industry, Energy and Tourism, and particularly of the quality and Industrial safety sub directorate. On the other hand it has been developed a quality infrastructure that has, at the State level, with a standardisation (AENOR) entity and an accreditation body (ENAC) with recognized prestige around the world. In this article, in the first part, a list the regulations which apply to products and manufacturing facilities is shown, as well as explain the role played by standards and accreditation system in industrial safety and the factor of competitiveness that this entails for our industrial sector, and, in the second part, the institutional role of the Ministry and, the aforementioned Sub directorate, is described. The aim of the article is to be a descriptive reference of the current regulatory framework as well as the role of the State in this process. (Author)

  9. Wireless Sensing Based on RFID and Capacitive Technologies for Safety in Marble Industry Process Control

    Fabrizio Iacopetti

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents wireless sensing systems to increase safety and robustness in industrial process control, particularly in industrial machines for marble slab working. The process is performed by abrasive or cutting heads activated independently by the machine controller when the slab, transported on a conveyer belt, is under them. Current slab detection systems are based on electromechanical or optical devices at the machine entrance stage, suffering from deterioration and from the harsh environment. Slab displacement or break inside the machine due to the working stress may result in safety issues and damages to the conveyer belt due to incorrect driving of the working tools. The experimented contactless sensing techniques are based on four RFID and two capacitive sensing technologies and on customized hardware/software. The proposed solutions aim at overcoming some limitations of current state-of-the-art detection systems, allowing for reliable slab detection, outside and/or inside the machine, while maintaining low complexity and at the same time robustness to industrial harsh conditions. The proposed sensing devices may implement a wireless or wired sensor network feeding detection data to the machine controller. Data integrity check and process control algorithms have to be implemented for the safety and reliability of the overall industrial process.

  10. The Industry Standard Tool-set (IST) of Codes for CANDU Safety Analysis

    Computer codes are used in the Canadian nuclear industry for design support and safety analysis of CANDU reactors and small reactors, and in the provision of analysis services to its internal and external customers. Many of these codes were brought into service during the growth years of the nuclear power industry in Canada (mid 1970's to late 1980's). Typically, validation was conducted during the development of the codes to ensure their adequacy, however the validation process followed was not formalized. Similarly, the software engineering processes employed during their development and subsequent maintenance were not necessarily consistent with modern standards. In the mid-1990's the Canadian nuclear industry undertook a number of projects to upgrade the quality of safety analysis software. Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) established a safety analysis code Validation Project and Ontario Power Generation Incorporated (OPGI) - formerly Ontario Hydro - established a Verification and Validation of Safety Analysis Software Project as part of its Integrated Improvement Program (IIP). Underlying forces driving these projects included concerns raised by the regulator regarding the quality of safety analysis software and the need to conform to newly-issued Canadian quality assurance standards, specifically CSA N286.7. These projects involve establishing either formal software validation or software verification and validation methods, together with design recovery of the software and its documentation. The objectives of the projects are to ensure: - that there is a low likelihood of errors being introduced into safety analysis that are due to deficiencies in the software, - a documentation base exists for the codes that would demonstrate to the regulator that acceptable quality exists and - that the codes are formally qualified for their intended applications. As these projects were being established it was recognized that developments to enhance capabilities