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Sample records for acclimation affects clinal

  1.     Developmental acclimation affects clinal variation in stress resistance traits in Drosophila buzzatii

    Sarup, Pernille Merete; Loeschcke, Volker

    2010-01-01

      Patterns of clinal genetic variation in Drosophila are often characterized after rearing at constant temperatures. However, clinal patterns might change after acclimation if populations differ in their plastic response to fluctuating environments. We studied longevity, starvation and heat knock...... temperatures, especially in heat knock-down, for which clinal patterns disappeared when flies were reared at constant temperatures. This result emphasises the importance of determining whether populations originating from different environments differ in their plastic responses to stress....

  2. Waterlogging and submergence stress: affects and acclimation.

    Phukan, Ujjal J; Mishra, Sonal; Shukla, Rakesh Kumar

    2016-10-01

    Submergence, whether partial or complete, imparts some serious consequences on plants grown in flood prone ecosystems. Some plants can endure these conditions by embracing various survival strategies, including morphological adaptations and physiological adjustments. This review summarizes recent progress made in understanding of the stress and the acclimation responses of plants under waterlogged or submerged conditions. Waterlogging and submergence are often associated with hypoxia development, which may trigger various morphological traits and cellular acclimation responses. Ethylene, abscisic acid, gibberellic acid and other hormones play a crucial role in the survival process which is controlled genetically. Effects at the cellular level, including ATP management, starch metabolism, elemental toxicity, role of transporters and redox status have been explained. Transcriptional and hormonal interplay during this stress may provide some key aspects in understanding waterlogging and submergence tolerance. The level and degree of tolerance may vary depending on species or climatic variations which need to be studied for a proper understanding of waterlogging stress at the global level. The exploration of regulatory pathways and interplay in model organisms such as Arabidopsis and rice would provide valuable resources for improvement of economically and agriculturally important plants in waterlogging affected areas. PMID:26177332

  3. Fish pre-acclimation temperature only modestly affects cadmium toxicity in Atlantic salmon hepatocytes.

    Olsvik, Pål A; Søfteland, Liv; Hevrøy, Ernst M; Rasinger, Josef D; Waagbø, Rune

    2016-04-01

    An emerging focus in environmental toxicology is how climate change will alter bioavailability and uptake of contaminants in organisms. Ectothermic animals unable to adjust their temperature by local migration, such as farmed fish kept in net pens, may become more vulnerable to contaminants in warmer seas. The aim of this work was to study cadmium (Cd) toxicity in cells obtained from fish acclimated to sub-optimal growth temperature. Atlantic salmon hepatocytes, harvested from fish pre-acclimated either at 15°C (optimal growth temperature) or 20°C (heat-stressed), were exposed in vitro to two concentrations of Cd (control, 1 and 100µM Cd) for 48h. Cd-induced cytotoxicity, determined with the xCELLigence system, was more pronounced in cells from fish pre-acclimated to a high temperature than in cells from fish grown at optimal temperature. A feed spiked with antioxidants could not ameliorate the Cd-induced cytotoxicity in cells from temperature-stressed fish. At the transcriptional level, Cd exposure affected 11 out of 20 examined genes, of which most are linked to oxidative stress. The transcriptional levels of a majority of the altered genes were changed in cells harvested from fish grown at sub-optimal temperature. Interaction effects between Cd exposure and fish pre-acclimation temperature were seen for four transcripts, hmox1, mapk1, fth1 and mmp13. Overall, this study shows that cells from temperature-stressed fish are modestly more vulnerable to Cd stress, and indicate that mechanisms linked to oxidative stress may be differentially affected in temperature-stressed cells. PMID:27033036

  4. An Intronic Polymorphism in couch potato Is Not Distributed Clinally in European Drosophila melanogaster Populations nor Does It Affect Diapause Inducibility.

    Zonato, Valeria; Fedele, Giorgio; Kyriacou, Charalambos P

    2016-01-01

    couch potato (cpo) encodes an RNA binding protein that has been reported to be expressed in the peripheral and central nervous system of embryos, larvae and adults, including the major endocrine organ, the ring gland. A polymorphism in the D. melanogaster cpo gene coding region displays a latitudinal cline in frequency in North American populations, but as cpo lies within the inversion In(3R)Payne, which is at high frequencies and itself shows a strong cline on this continent, interpretation of the cpo cline is not straightforward. A second downstream SNP in strong linkage disequilibrium with the first has been claimed to be primarily responsible for the latitudinal cline in diapause incidence in USA populations.Here, we investigate the frequencies of these two cpo SNPs in populations of Drosophila throughout continental Europe. The advantage of studying cpo variation in Europe is the very low frequency of In(3R)Payne, which we reveal here, does not appear to be clinally distributed. We observe a very different geographical scenario for cpo variation from the one in North America, suggesting that the downstream SNP does not play a role in diapause. In an attempt to verify whether the SNPs influence diapause we subsequently generated lines with different combinations of the two cpo SNPs on known timeless (tim) genetic backgrounds, because polymorphism in the clock gene tim plays a significant role in diapause inducibility. Our results reveal that the downstream cpo SNP does not seem to play any role in diapause induction in European populations in contrast to the upstream coding cpo SNP. Consequently, all future diapause studies on strains of D. melanogaster should initially determine their tim and cpo status. PMID:27598401

  5. The DnaJ-Like Zinc Finger Domain Protein PSA2 Affects Light Acclimation and Chloroplast Development in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Wang, Yan-Wen; Chen, Si-Ming; Wang, Wei-Jie; Huang, Xing-Qi; Zhou, Chang-Fang; Zhuang, Zhong; Lu, Shan

    2016-01-01

    The biosynthesis of chlorophylls and carotenoids and the assembly of thylakoid membranes are critical for the photoautotrophic growth of plants. Different factors are involved in these two processes. In recent years, members of the DnaJ-like zinc finger domain proteins have been found to take part in the biogenesis and/or the maintenance of plastids. One member of this family of proteins, PSA2, was recently found to localize to the thylakoid lumen and regulate the accumulation of photosystem I. In this study, we report that the silencing of PSA2 in Arabidopsis thaliana resulted in variegated leaves and retarded growth. Although both chlorophylls and total carotenoids decreased in the psa2 mutant, violaxanthin, and zeaxanthin accumulated in the mutant seedlings grown under growth condition. Lower levels of non-photochemical quenching and electron transport rate were also found in the psa2 mutant seedlings under growth condition compared with those of the wild-type plants, indicating an impaired capability to acclimate to normal light irradiance when PSA2 was silenced. Moreover, we also observed an abnormal assembly of grana thylakoids and poorly developed stroma thylakoids in psa2 chloroplasts. Taken together, our results demonstrate that PSA2 is a member of the DnaJ-like zinc finger domain protein family that affects light acclimation and chloroplast development. PMID:27047527

  6. Daily Acclimation Handling Does Not Affect Hippocampal Long-Term Potentiation or Cause Chronic Sleep Deprivation in Mice

    Vecsey, Christopher G.; Wimmer, Mathieu E. J.; Havekes, Robbert; Park, Alan J.; Perron, Isaac J.; Meerlo, Peter; Abel, Ted

    2013-01-01

    Study Objectives: Gentle handling is commonly used to perform brief sleep deprivation in rodents. It was recently reported that daily acclimation handling, which is often used before behavioral assays, causes alterations in sleep, stress, and levels of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor subunits prior to

  7. Cr(Vi) reduction capacity of activated sludge as affected by nitrogen and carbon sources, microbial acclimation and cell multiplication

    Ferro Orozco, A.M., E-mail: mferro@cidca.org.ar [Centro de Investigacion y Desarrollo en Criotecnologia de Alimentos (CIDCA) CCT La Plata CONICET - Fac. de Cs. Exactas, UNLP. 47 y 116 (B1900AJJ) La Plata (Argentina); Contreras, E.M.; Zaritzky, N.E. [Centro de Investigacion y Desarrollo en Criotecnologia de Alimentos (CIDCA) CCT La Plata CONICET - Fac. de Cs. Exactas, UNLP. 47 y 116 (B1900AJJ) La Plata (Argentina); Fac. de Ingenieria, UNLP. 47 y 1 (B1900AJJ) - La Plata (Argentina)

    2010-04-15

    The objectives of the present work were: (i) to analyze the capacity of activated sludge to reduce hexavalent chromium using different carbon sources as electron donors in batch reactors, (ii) to determine the relationship between biomass growth and the amount of Cr(VI) reduced considering the effect of the nitrogen to carbon source ratio, and (iii) to determine the effect of the Cr(VI) acclimation stage on the performance of the biological chromium reduction assessing the stability of the Cr(VI) reduction capacity of the activated sludge. The highest specific Cr(VI) removal rate (q{sub Cr}) was attained with cheese whey or lactose as electron donors decreasing in the following order: cheese whey {approx} lactose > glucose > citrate > acetate. Batch assays with different nitrogen to carbon source ratio demonstrated that biological Cr(VI) reduction is associated to the cell multiplication phase; as a result, maximum Cr(VI) removal rates occur when there is no substrate limitation. The biomass can be acclimated to the presence of Cr(VI) and generate new cells that maintain the ability to reduce chromate. Therefore, the activated sludge process could be applied to a continuous Cr(VI) removal process.

  8. Cr(Vi) reduction capacity of activated sludge as affected by nitrogen and carbon sources, microbial acclimation and cell multiplication

    The objectives of the present work were: (i) to analyze the capacity of activated sludge to reduce hexavalent chromium using different carbon sources as electron donors in batch reactors, (ii) to determine the relationship between biomass growth and the amount of Cr(VI) reduced considering the effect of the nitrogen to carbon source ratio, and (iii) to determine the effect of the Cr(VI) acclimation stage on the performance of the biological chromium reduction assessing the stability of the Cr(VI) reduction capacity of the activated sludge. The highest specific Cr(VI) removal rate (qCr) was attained with cheese whey or lactose as electron donors decreasing in the following order: cheese whey ∼ lactose > glucose > citrate > acetate. Batch assays with different nitrogen to carbon source ratio demonstrated that biological Cr(VI) reduction is associated to the cell multiplication phase; as a result, maximum Cr(VI) removal rates occur when there is no substrate limitation. The biomass can be acclimated to the presence of Cr(VI) and generate new cells that maintain the ability to reduce chromate. Therefore, the activated sludge process could be applied to a continuous Cr(VI) removal process.

  9. Thermal adaptation and clinal mitochondrial DNA variation of European anchovy

    Silva, Gonçalo; Lima, Fernando P.; Martel, Paulo; Castilho, Rita

    2014-01-01

    Natural populations of widely distributed organisms often exhibit genetic clinal variation over their geographical ranges. The European anchovy, Engraulis encrasicolus, illustrates this by displaying a two-clade mitochondrial structure clinally arranged along the eastern Atlantic. One clade has low frequencies at higher latitudes, whereas the other has an anti-tropical distribution, with frequencies decreasing towards the tropics. The distribution pattern of these clades has been explained as...

  10. Genome-wide transcription analysis of clinal genetic variation in Drosophila

    Chen, Ying; Lee, Siu F.; Blanc, Eric; Reuter, Caroline; Wertheim, Bregje; Martinez-Diaz, Pedro; Hoffmann, Ary A.; Partridge, Linda

    2012-01-01

    Clinal variation in quantitative traits is widespread, but its genetic basis awaits identification. Drosophila melanogaster shows adaptive, clinal variation in traits such as body size along latitudinal gradients on multiple continents. To investigate genome wide transcription differentiation betwee

  11. Plasma clearance of cadmium and zinc in non-acclimated and metal-acclimated trout

    Chowdhury, M. Jasim; Grosell, M.; McDonald, D.G.; Wood, C.M

    2003-08-20

    Adult rainbow trout were pre-exposed to a sublethal concentration of waterborne cadmium (Cd, 26.7 nmol/l) or waterborne zinc (Zn, 2294 nmol/l) for 30 days to induce acclimation. A single dose of radiolabeled Cd (64.4 nmol/kg) or Zn (183.8 nmol/kg) was injected into the vascular system of non-acclimated and Cd- or Zn-acclimated trout through indwelling arterial catheters. Subsequently, repetitive blood samples over 10 h and terminal tissue samples (liver, heart, bile, stomach, intestine, kidney, gills, muscle, and spleen) were taken to characterize the effect of metal acclimation on clearance kinetics in vivo. Plasma clearance of Cd in Cd-acclimated fish (0.726{+-}0.015 and 0.477{+-}0.012 ml/min per kg for total and newly accumulated Cd, respectively), was faster than that in non-acclimated trout (0.493{+-}0.013 and 0.394{+-}0.009 ml/min per kg). Unlike plasma Cd, the levels of Cd in red blood cells (RBCs) were 1.2-2.2 times higher in Cd-acclimated fish than in non-acclimated fish. At 10 h post-injection, the liver accumulated the highest proportion ({approx}22%) of the injected Cd dose in both non-acclimated and Cd-acclimated fish but did not account for the difference in plasma levels of Cd between two groups. Plasma clearance of Zn ({approx}0.23 ml/min per kg for new Zn) was substantially lower than Cd clearance. Pre-acclimation to waterborne Zn reduced the new Zn levels in RBCs, but did not affect the clearance of Zn from blood plasma or tissue burdens of Zn in fish. Bile concentrations of both Cd and Zn were elevated in acclimated fish, but total bile burden accounted for <1% of the injected metal dose. The results suggest that the detoxification process of injected plasma Cd is stimulated by pre-acclimation to waterborne Cd, and that Zn levels are homeostatically controlled in both non-acclimated and acclimated trout.

  12. Bacterial Acclimation Inside an Aqueous Battery.

    Dexian Dong

    Full Text Available Specific environmental stresses may lead to induced genomic instability in bacteria, generating beneficial mutants and potentially accelerating the breeding of industrial microorganisms. The environmental stresses inside the aqueous battery may be derived from such conditions as ion shuttle, pH gradient, free radical reaction and electric field. In most industrial and medical applications, electric fields and direct currents are used to kill bacteria and yeast. However, the present study focused on increasing bacterial survival inside an operating battery. Using a bacterial acclimation strategy, both Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis were acclimated for 10 battery operation cycles and survived in the battery for over 3 days. The acclimated bacteria changed in cell shape, growth rate and colony color. Further analysis indicated that electrolyte concentration could be one of the major factors determining bacterial survival inside an aqueous battery. The acclimation process significantly improved the viability of both bacteria E. coli and B. subtilis. The viability of acclimated strains was not affected under battery cycle conditions of 0.18-0.80 mA cm(-2 and 1.4-2.1 V. Bacterial addition within 1.0×10(10 cells mL(-1 did not significantly affect battery performance. Because the environmental stress inside the aqueous battery is specific, the use of this battery acclimation strategy may be of great potential for the breeding of industrial microorganisms.

  13. Genome-Wide Transcription Analysis of Clinal Genetic Variation in Drosophila

    Chen, Ying; Siu F Lee; Blanc, Eric; Reuter, Caroline; Wertheim, Bregje; Martinez-Diaz, Pedro; Hoffmann, Ary A.; Partridge, Linda

    2012-01-01

    Clinal variation in quantitative traits is widespread, but its genetic basis awaits identification. Drosophila melanogaster shows adaptive, clinal variation in traits such as body size along latitudinal gradients on multiple continents. To investigate genome wide transcription differentiation between North and South that might contribute to the clinal phenotypic variation, we compared RNA expression patterns during development of D. melanogaster from tropical northern and temperate southern p...

  14. Genome-wide transcription analysis of clinal genetic variation in Drosophila.

    Chen, Y; Lee, S. F.; E. Blanc; C. Reuter; Wertheim, B.; Martinez-Diaz, P.; Hoffmann, A. A.; Partridge, L

    2012-01-01

    Clinal variation in quantitative traits is widespread, but its genetic basis awaits identification. Drosophila melanogaster shows adaptive, clinal variation in traits such as body size along latitudinal gradients on multiple continents. To investigate genome wide transcription differentiation between North and South that might contribute to the clinal phenotypic variation, we compared RNA expression patterns during development of D. melanogaster from tropical northern and temperate southern p...

  15. Clinal variation of some mammals during the Holocene in Missouri

    Purdue, James R.

    1980-03-01

    Eastern cottontail ( Sylvilagus floridanus), fox squirrel ( Sciurus niger), and gray squirrel ( Sciurus carolinensis) were examined for clinal variation during the Holocene. Modern samples of all three species displayed strong east-west patterns along the western edge of the eastern deciduous forest: S. floridanus and S. niger decrease and S. carolinensis increases in size. Archeological samples of S. carolinensis from Rodgers Shelter (23BE125), Benton County, Missouri, and Graham Cave (23MT2), Montgomery County, Missouri, indicated an increase in size from early to middle Holocene. Sylvilagus floridanus from Rodgers Shelter decreased in size from early to middle Holocene and then increased during the late Holocene to modern proportions. A literature survey reveals that clinal variation is a common phenomenon among modern homeotherms. In introduced species, clinal variation has developed after relatively few generations, indicating rapid adaptations to environmental conditions; often winter climatic variables are implicated. Morphological variation in the study species during the Holocene is interpreted as a response to changing climates. Studies of morphological clines may lead to another valuable data source for reconstructing past ecologies.

  16. Thermal adaptation and clinal mitochondrial DNA variation of European anchovy.

    Silva, Gonçalo; Lima, Fernando P; Martel, Paulo; Castilho, Rita

    2014-10-01

    Natural populations of widely distributed organisms often exhibit genetic clinal variation over their geographical ranges. The European anchovy, Engraulis encrasicolus, illustrates this by displaying a two-clade mitochondrial structure clinally arranged along the eastern Atlantic. One clade has low frequencies at higher latitudes, whereas the other has an anti-tropical distribution, with frequencies decreasing towards the tropics. The distribution pattern of these clades has been explained as a consequence of secondary contact after an ancient geographical isolation. However, it is not unlikely that selection acts on mitochondria whose genes are involved in relevant oxidative phosphorylation processes. In this study, we performed selection tests on a fragment of 1044 bp of the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene using 455 individuals from 18 locations. We also tested correlations of six environmental features: temperature, salinity, apparent oxygen utilization and nutrient concentrations of phosphate, nitrate and silicate, on a compilation of mitochondrial clade frequencies from 66 sampling sites comprising 2776 specimens from previously published studies. Positive selection in a single codon was detected predominantly (99%) in the anti-tropical clade and temperature was the most relevant environmental predictor, contributing with 59% of the variance in the geographical distribution of clade frequencies. These findings strongly suggest that temperature is shaping the contemporary distribution of mitochondrial DNA clade frequencies in the European anchovy. PMID:25143035

  17. Genome-wide transcription analysis of clinal genetic variation in Drosophila.

    Ying Chen

    Full Text Available Clinal variation in quantitative traits is widespread, but its genetic basis awaits identification. Drosophila melanogaster shows adaptive, clinal variation in traits such as body size along latitudinal gradients on multiple continents. To investigate genome wide transcription differentiation between North and South that might contribute to the clinal phenotypic variation, we compared RNA expression patterns during development of D. melanogaster from tropical northern and temperate southern populations using whole genome tiling arrays. We found that genes that were differentially expressed between the cline ends were generally associated with metabolism and growth, and experimental alteration of expression of a sample of them generally resulted in altered body size in the predicted direction, sometimes significantly so. We further identified the serpent (srp transcription factor binding sites to be enriched near genes up-regulated in expression in the south. Analysis of clinal populations revealed a significant cline in the expression level of srp. Experimental over-expression of srp increased body size, as predicted from its clinal expression pattern, suggesting that it may be involved in regulating adaptive clinal variation in Drosophila. This study identified a handful of genes that contributed to clinal phenotypic variation through altered gene expression level, yet misexpression of individual gene led to modest body size change.

  18. Extended alternating-temperature cold acclimation and culture duration improve pear shoot cryopreservation.

    Chang, Y; Reed, B M

    2000-06-01

    Meristems of many pear genotypes can be successfully cryopreserved following 1 week of cold acclimation, but an equal number do not survive the process or have very little regrowth. This study compared commonly used cold acclimation protocols to determine whether the cold acclimation technique used affected the cold hardiness of shoots or the regrowth of cryopreserved meristems. In vitro-grown pear (Pyrus L.) shoots were cold acclimated for up to 16 weeks, then either the shoot tips were tested for cold hardiness or the meristems were cryopreserved by controlled freezing. Cold acclimation consisted of alternating temperatures (22 degrees C with light/-1 degrees C darkness with various photo- and thermoperiods) or a constant temperature (4 degrees C with an 8-h photoperiod or darkness). Compared with nonacclimated controls, both alternating- and constant-temperature acclimation significantly improved postcryopreservation regrowth of P. cordata Desv. and P. pashia Buch. -Ham. ex D. Don meristems. Alternating-temperature acclimation combined with either an 8-h photoperiod or darkness was significantly better than constant-temperature acclimation. Alternating-temperature shoot acclimation for 2 to 5 weeks significantly increased postcryopreservation meristem regrowth, and recovery remained high for up to 15 weeks acclimation. Postcryopreservation meristem regrowth increased with 1 to 5 weeks of constant-temperature acclimation and then declined with longer acclimation. Shoot cold hardiness varied with the acclimation procedure. The LT(50) of shoots acclimated for 10 weeks with alternating temperatures was -25 degrees C; that with constant temperature was -14.7 degrees C; and that of the nonacclimated control was -10 degrees C. Less frequent transfer of cultures also improved acclimation of shoots. Shoots grown without transfer to fresh medium for 6-12 weeks had higher postcryopreservation recovery with shorter periods of acclimation than shoots with a 3-week transfer

  19. Effect of thermal acclimation on thermal preference, resistance and locomotor performance of hatchling soft-shelled turtle

    Mei-Xian WU,Ling-Jun HU, Wei DANG, Hong-Liang LU, Wei-Guo DU

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The significant influence of thermal acclimation on physiological and behavioral performance has been documented in many ectothermic animals, but such studies are still limited in turtle species. We acclimated hatchling soft-shelled turtles Pelodiscus sinensis under three thermal conditions (10, 20 and 30 °C for 4 weeks, and then measured selected body temperature (Tsel, critical thermal minimum (CTMin and maximum (CTMax, and locomotor performance at different body temperatures. Thermal acclimation significantly affected thermal preference and resistance of P. sinensis hatchlings. Hatchling turtles acclimated to 10 °C selected relatively lower body temperatures and were less resistant to high temperatures than those acclimated to 20 °C and 30 °C. The turtles’ resistance to low temperatures increased with a decreasing acclimation temperature. The thermal resistance range (i.e. the difference between CTMax and CTMin, TRR was widest in turtles acclimated to 20 °C, and narrowest in those acclimated to 10 °C. The locomotor performance of turtles was affected by both body temperature and acclimation temperature. Hatchling turtles acclimated to relatively higher temperatures swam faster than did those acclimated to lower temperatures. Accordingly, hatchling turtles acclimated to a particular temperature may not enhance the performance at that temperature. Instead, hatchlings acclimated to relatively warm temperatures have a better performance, supporting the “hotter is better” hypothesis [Current Zoology 59 (6 : 718–724, 2013 ].

  20. Clinal variation for amino acid polymorphisms at the Pgm locus in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Verrelli, B C; Eanes, W. F.

    2001-01-01

    Clinal variation is common for enzymes in the glycolytic pathway for Drosophila melanogaster and is generally accepted as an adaptive response to different climates. Although the enzyme phosphoglucomutase (PGM) possesses several allozyme polymorphisms, it is unique in that it had been reported to show no clinal variation. Our recent DNA sequence investigation of Pgm found extensive cryptic amino acid polymorphism segregating with the allozyme alleles. In this study, we characterize the geogra...

  1. Salt acclimation processes in wheat.

    Janda, Tibor; Darko, Éva; Shehata, Sami; Kovács, Viktória; Pál, Magda; Szalai, Gabriella

    2016-04-01

    Young wheat plants (Triticum aestivum L. cv. Mv Béres) were exposed to 0 or 25 mM NaCl for 11 days (salt acclimation). Thereafter the plants were irrigated with 500 mM NaCl for 5 days (salt stress). Irrigating the plants with a low concentration of NaCl successfully led to a reduction in chlorotic symptoms and in the impairment of the photosynthetic processes when the plants were exposed to subsequent high-dose salt treatment. After exposure to a high concentration of NaCl there was no difference in leaf Na content between the salt-acclimated and non-acclimated plants, indicating that salt acclimation did not significantly modify Na transport to the shoots. While the polyamine level was lower in salt-treated plants than in the control, salt acclimation led to increased osmotic potential in the leaves. Similarly, the activities of certain antioxidant enzymes, namely glutathione reductase, catalase and ascorbate peroxidase, were significantly higher in salt-acclimated plants. The results also suggest that while SOS1, SOS2 or NHX2 do not play a decisive role in the salt acclimation processes in young wheat plants; another stress-related gene, WALI6, may contribute to the success of the salt acclimation processes. The present study suggested that the responses of wheat plants to acclimation with low level of salt and to treatment with high doses of salt may be fundamentally different. PMID:26854409

  2. Genomics of clinal variation in Drosophila: disentangling the interactions of selection and demography.

    Flatt, Thomas

    2016-03-01

    Clines in phenotypes and genotype frequencies across environmental gradients are commonly taken as evidence for spatially varying selection. Classical examples include the latitudinal clines in various species of Drosophila, which often occur in parallel fashion on multiple continents. Today, genomewide analysis of such clinal systems provides a fantastic opportunity for unravelling the genetics of adaptation, yet major challenges remain. A well-known but often neglected problem is that demographic processes can also generate clinality, independent of or coincident with selection. A closely related issue is how to identify true genic targets of clinal selection. In this issue of Molecular Ecology, three studies illustrate these challenges and how they might be met. Bergland et al. report evidence suggesting that the well-known parallel latitudinal clines in North American and Australian D. melanogaster are confounded by admixture from Africa and Europe, highlighting the importance of distinguishing demographic from adaptive clines. In a companion study, Machado et al. provide the first genomic comparison of latitudinal differentiation in D. melanogaster and its sister species D. simulans. While D. simulans is less clinal than D. melanogaster, a significant fraction of clinal genes is shared between both species, suggesting the existence of convergent adaptation to clinaly varying selection pressures. Finally, by drawing on several independent sources of evidence, Božičević et al. identify a functional network of eight clinal genes that are likely involved in cold adaptation. Together, these studies remind us that clinality does not necessarily imply selection and that separating adaptive signal from demographic noise requires great effort and care. PMID:26919307

  3. Seawater Acclimation of Spirulina

    Shaochen GUAN; Yixuan LI; Gan WANG; Lang QIN; Yi ZHU; Yunbo LUO

    2012-01-01

    Abstract [Objective] This study aimed to seek the cultivation method for Spirulina with seawater. [Method] Spirulina was habituated culture progressively with pre- pared seawater acclimation solution. The morphological changes of Spirulina were observed and its biochemical indicators were measured. [Result] A new algae species was obtained, which had better stability and greater average length than Spirulina in fresh water. Compared with the Spirulina in fresh water, the new al- gae species showed no significant change in chlorophyll content, but a 62.8% in- crease in the concentration of phycocyanin. [Conclusion] The method could save resources and cost, which lays the foundation for large scale production and processing of Spirulina.

  4. Acclimation improves salt stress tolerance in Zea mays plants.

    Pandolfi, Camilla; Azzarello, Elisa; Mancuso, Stefano; Shabala, Sergey

    2016-08-20

    Plants exposure to low level salinity activates an array of processes leading to an improvement of plant stress tolerance. Although the beneficial effect of acclimation was demonstrated in many herbaceous species, underlying mechanisms behind this phenomenon remain poorly understood. In the present study we have addressed this issue by investigating ionic mechanisms underlying the process of plant acclimation to salinity stress in Zea mays. Effect of acclimation were examined in two parallel sets of experiments: a growth experiment for agronomic assessments, sap analysis, stomatal conductance, chlorophyll content, and confocal laser scanning imaging; and a lab experiment for in vivo ion flux measurements from root tissues. Being exposed to salinity, acclimated plants (1) retain more K(+) but accumulate less Na(+) in roots; (2) have better vacuolar Na(+) sequestration ability in leaves and thus are capable of accumulating larger amounts of Na(+) in the shoot without having any detrimental effect on leaf photochemistry; and (3) rely more on Na(+) for osmotic adjustment in the shoot. At the same time, acclimation affect was not related in increased root Na(+) exclusion ability. It appears that even in a such salt-sensitive species as maize, Na(+) exclusion from uptake is of a much less importance compared with the efficient vacuolar Na(+) sequestration in the shoot. PMID:27372277

  5. Mitochondrial physiology and reactive oxygen species production are altered by hypoxia acclimation in killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus).

    Du, Sherry N N; Mahalingam, Sajeni; Borowiec, Brittney G; Scott, Graham R

    2016-04-15

    Many fish encounter hypoxia in their native environment, but the role of mitochondrial physiology in hypoxia acclimation and hypoxia tolerance is poorly understood. We investigated the effects of hypoxia acclimation on mitochondrial respiration, O2kinetics, emission of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and antioxidant capacity in the estuarine killifish ( ITALIC! Fundulus heteroclitus). Killifish were acclimated to normoxia, constant hypoxia (5 kPa O2) or intermittent diel cycles of nocturnal hypoxia (12 h:12 h normoxia:hypoxia) for 28-33 days and mitochondria were isolated from liver. Neither pattern of hypoxia acclimation affected the respiratory capacities for oxidative phosphorylation or electron transport, leak respiration, coupling control or phosphorylation efficiency. Hypoxia acclimation also had no effect on mitochondrial O2kinetics, but ITALIC! P50(the O2tension at which hypoxia inhibits respiration by 50%) was lower in the leak state than during maximal respiration, and killifish mitochondria endured anoxia-reoxygenation without any impact on mitochondrial respiration. However, both patterns of hypoxia acclimation reduced the rate of ROS emission from mitochondria when compared at a common O2tension. Hypoxia acclimation also increased the levels of protein carbonyls and the activities of superoxide dismutase and catalase in liver tissue (the latter only occurred in constant hypoxia). Our results suggest that hypoxia acclimation is associated with changes in mitochondrial physiology that decrease ROS production and may help improve hypoxia tolerance. PMID:26896545

  6. Postponed reproduction as an adaptation to winter conditions in Drosophila melanogaster: evidence for clinal variation under semi-natural conditions.

    Mitrovski, P.; Hoffmann, A. A.

    2001-01-01

    Patterns of climatic adaptation in drosophila and other insects have largely been inferred from laboratory comparisons of traits that vary clinally. Here, we extend this research to comparisons under semi-natural conditions. To test for clinal variation in reproductive patterns and survival over winter, Drosophila melanogaster populations were initiated from seven collection sites along the eastern coast of Australia, ranging from tropical to temperate regions. The fecundity and survival of t...

  7. Y-Chromosomal Diversity in Europe Is Clinal and Influenced Primarily by Geography, Rather than by Language

    Rosser, Z H; Zerjal, T; Hurles, M. E.; Adojaan, M; Alavantic, D; Amorim, A.; Amos, W; Armenteros, M; E Arroyo; Barbujani, G; Beckman, G; Beckman, L.; Bertranpetit, J; Bosch, E.; Bradley, D.G

    2000-01-01

    Clinal patterns of autosomal genetic diversity within Europe have been interpreted in previous studies in terms of a Neolithic demic diffusion model for the spread of agriculture; in contrast, studies using mtDNA have traced many founding lineages to the Paleolithic and have not shown strongly clinal variation. We have used 11 human Y-chromosomal biallelic polymorphisms, defining 10 haplogroups, to analyze a sample of 3,616 Y chromosomes belonging to 47 European and circum-European population...

  8. Assortative mating and gene flow generate clinal phenological variation in trees

    Soularue Jean-Paul; Kremer Antoine

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background On-going climate change is shifting the timing of bud burst (TBB) of broad leaf and conifer trees in temperate areas, raising concerns about the abilities of natural populations to respond to these shifts. The level of expected evolutionary change depends on the level and distribution of genetic variation of TBB. While numerous experimental studies have highlighted the role of divergent selection in promoting clinal TBB differentiation, we explored whether the observed pat...

  9. Integrating landscape genomics and spatially explicit approaches to detect loci under selection in clinal populations

    Jones, Matthew R.; Forester, Brenna R.; Teufel, Ashley I.; Adams, Rachael V.; Anstett, Daniel N.; Goodrich, Betsy A.; Erin L. Landguth; Joost, Stéphane; Manel, Stéphanie

    2013-01-01

    Uncovering the genetic basis of adaptation hinges on the ability to detect loci under selection. However, population genomics outlier approaches to detect selected loci may be inappropriate for clinal populations or those with unclear population structure because they require that individuals be clustered into populations. An alternate approach, landscape genomics, uses individual-based approaches to detect loci under selection and reveal potential environmental drivers of selection. We teste...

  10. Arabidopsis thaliana populations show clinal variation in a climatic gradient associated with altitude

    Montesinos-Navarro, Alicia; Wig, Jennifer; Picó, F. Xavier; Tonsor, Stephen J.

    2011-01-01

    • Understanding the adaptive basis of life history variation is a central goal in evo- lutionary ecology. The use of model species enables the combination of molecular mechanistic knowledge with ecological and evolutionary questions, but the study of life history variation in natural environments is required to merge these disci- plines. • Here, we tested for clinal variation in life history and associated traits along an environmental and altitudinal gradient in the model species Arabid...

  11. Experimental Evolution under Fluctuating Thermal Conditions Does Not Reproduce Patterns of Adaptive Clinal Differentiation in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Kellermann, Vanessa; Hoffmann, Ary A; Kristensen, Torsten Nygaard; Moghadam, Neda Nasiri; Loeschcke, Volker

    2015-11-01

    Experimental evolution can be a useful tool for testing the impact of environmental factors on adaptive changes in populations, and this approach is being increasingly used to understand the potential for evolutionary responses in populations under changing climates. However, selective factors will often be more complex in natural populations than in laboratory environments and produce different patterns of adaptive differentiation. Here we test the ability of laboratory experimental evolution under different temperature cycles to reproduce well-known patterns of clinal variation in Drosophila melanogaster. Six fluctuating thermal regimes mimicking the natural temperature conditions along the east coast of Australia were initiated. Contrary to expectations, on the basis of field patterns there was no evidence for adaptation to thermal regimes as reflected by changes in cold and heat resistance after 1-3 years of laboratory natural selection. While laboratory evolution led to changes in starvation resistance, development time, and body size, patterns were not consistent with those seen in natural populations. These findings highlight the complexity of factors affecting trait evolution in natural populations and indicate that caution is required when inferring likely evolutionary responses from the outcome of experimental evolution studies. PMID:26655772

  12. Fertilization and allelopathy modify Pinus halepensis saplings crown acclimation to shade

    Monnier, Y.; Vila, B.; Bousquet-Mélou, A.; Prévosto, B.; Fernandez, C

    2011-01-01

    Pinus halepensis Mill. is a Mediterranean pioneer forest species with shade intolerance features. The purpose of this study is to better understand how stand fertility and allelopathic properties of adult trees influence shade acclimation of saplings. Crown growth and morphological plasticity were studied under different light, fertilization, and allelopathic conditions in a nursery experiment. We tested whether shade-acclimation capacity increases with fertilization, and is affected by autot...

  13. Secondary contact and local adaptation contribute to genome-wide patterns of clinal variation in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Bergland, Alan O; Tobler, Ray; González, Josefa; Schmidt, Paul; Petrov, Dmitri

    2016-03-01

    Populations arrayed along broad latitudinal gradients often show patterns of clinal variation in phenotype and genotype. Such population differentiation can be generated and maintained by both historical demographic events and local adaptation. These evolutionary forces are not mutually exclusive and can in some cases produce nearly identical patterns of genetic differentiation among populations. Here, we investigate the evolutionary forces that generated and maintain clinal variation genome-wide among populations of Drosophila melanogaster sampled in North America and Australia. We contrast patterns of clinal variation in these continents with patterns of differentiation among ancestral European and African populations. Using established and novel methods we derive here, we show that recently derived North America and Australia populations were likely founded by both European and African lineages and that this hybridization event likely contributed to genome-wide patterns of parallel clinal variation between continents. The pervasive effects of admixture mean that differentiation at only several hundred loci can be attributed to the operation of spatially varying selection using an FST outlier approach. Our results provide novel insight into the well-studied system of clinal differentiation in D. melanogaster and provide a context for future studies seeking to identify loci contributing to local adaptation in a wide variety of organisms, including other invasive species as well as temperate endemics. PMID:26547394

  14. The genetic covariance among clinal environments after adaptation to an environmental gradient in Drosophila serrata.

    Sgrò, Carla M.; Blows, Mark W.

    2004-01-01

    We examined the genetic basis of clinal adaptation by determining the evolutionary response of life-history traits to laboratory natural selection along a gradient of thermal stress in Drosophila serrata. A gradient of heat stress was created by exposing larvae to a heat stress of 36 degrees for 4 hr for 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, or 5 days of larval development, with the remainder of development taking place at 25 degrees. Replicated lines were exposed to each level of this stress every second generatio...

  15. Cold acclimation alters the connective tissue content of the zebrafish (Danio rerio) heart.

    Johnson, Amy C; Turko, Andy J; Klaiman, Jordan M; Johnston, Elizabeth F; Gillis, Todd E

    2014-06-01

    Thermal acclimation can alter cardiac function and morphology in a number of fish species, but little is known about the regulation of these changes. The purpose of the present study was to determine how cold acclimation affects zebrafish (Danio rerio) cardiac morphology, collagen composition and connective tissue regulation. Heart volume, the thickness of the compact myocardium, collagen content and collagen fiber composition were compared between control (27°C) and cold-acclimated (20°C) zebrafish using serially sectioned hearts stained with Picrosirius Red. Collagen content and fiber composition of the pericardial membrane were also examined. Cold acclimation did not affect the volume of the contracted heart; however, there was a significant decrease in the thickness of the compact myocardium. There was also a decrease in the collagen content of the compact myocardium and in the amount of thick collagen fibers throughout the heart. Cold-acclimated zebrafish also increased expression of the gene transcript for matrix metalloproteinase 2, matrix metalloproteinase 9, tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 2 and collagen Type I α1. We propose that the reduction in the thickness of the compact myocardium as well as the change in collagen content may help to maintain the compliance of the ventricle as temperatures decrease. Together, these results clearly demonstrate that the zebrafish heart undergoes significant remodeling in response to cold acclimation. PMID:24577447

  16. Identification of components associated with thermal acclimation of photosystem II in Synechocystis sp. PCC6803.

    John G Rowland

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Photosystem II (PSII is the most thermally sensitive component of photosynthesis. Thermal acclimation of this complex activity is likely to be critically important to the ability of photosynthetic organisms to tolerate temperature changes in the environment. METHODOLOGY/FINDINGS: We have analysed gene expression using whole-genome microarrays and monitored alterations in physiology during acclimation of PSII to elevated growth temperature in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. PSII acclimation is complete within 480 minutes of exposure to elevated temperature and is associated with a highly dynamic transcriptional response. 176 genes were identified and classified into seven distinct response profile groups. Response profiles suggest the existence of an early transient phase and a sustained phase to the acclimation response. The early phase was characterised by induction of general stress response genes, including heat shock proteins, which are likely to influence PSII thermal stability. The sustained phase consisted of acclimation-specific alterations that are involved in other cellular processes. Sustained responses included genes involved in phycobillisome structure and modification, photosynthesis, respiration, lipid metabolism and motility. Approximately 60% of genes with sustained altered expression levels have no known function. The potential role of differentially expressed genes in thermotolerance and acclimation is discussed. We have characterised the acclimation physiology of selected gene 'knockouts' to elucidate possible gene function in the response. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: All mutants show lower PSII rates under normal growth conditions. Basal PSII thermotolerance was affected by mutations in clpB1, cpcC2, hspA, htpG and slr1674. Final PSII thermotolerance was affected by mutations in cpcC2, hik34, hspA and hypA1, suggesting that these gene products play roles in long-term thermal acclimation of PSII.

  17. Benefit of heat acclimation is limited by the evaporative potential when wearing chemical protective clothing.

    Chang, S K; Gonzalez, R R

    1999-08-01

    Heat acclimation-induced sweating responses have the potential of reducing heat strain for chemical protective garment wearers. However, this potential benefit is strongly affected by the properties of the garment. If the clothing ensemble permits sufficient evaporative heat dissipation, then heat acclimation becomes helpful in reducing heat strain. On the other hand, if the garment creates an impenetrable barrier to moisture, no benefit can be gained from heat acclimation as the additional sweating cannot be evaporated. Ten subjects were studied exercising on a treadmill while wearing two different chemical protective ensembles. Skin heat flux, skin temperature, core temperature, metabolic heat production and heart rate were measured. It was found that the benefit of heat acclimation is strongly dependent on the ability of the body to dissipate an adequate amount of heat evaporatively. The evaporative potential (EP), a measure of thermal insulation modified by moisture permeability, of the clothing ensemble offers a quantitative index useful to determine, a priori, whether heat acclimation would be helpful when wearing protective clothing system. The data show that when EP is < 15%, heat acclimation affords no benefit. An evaporative potential graph is created to aid in this determination. PMID:10504888

  18. Photosynthetic acclimation to high temperatures in wheat

    Sayed, O. H.

    1992-01-01

    Growth and photosynthetic performance were assessed for the Finnish wheat Triticum aestivum L. var. APU under a cool (13/10�C day/night) and a warm (30/25�C day/night) regime. Plants exhibited a certain degree of acclimation to warm growth conditions. This acclimation appeared to involve enhanced performance of both photosystem II and whole-chain electron transport. Enhanced thermal stability of photophosphorylation was also observed in warm-grown plants.

  19. Clinal variation at phenology-related genes in spruce: parallel evolution in FTL2 and Gigantea?

    Chen, Jun; Tsuda, Yoshiaki; Stocks, Michael; Källman, Thomas; Xu, Nannan; Kärkkäinen, Katri; Huotari, Tea; Semerikov, Vladimir L; Vendramin, Giovanni G; Lascoux, Martin

    2014-07-01

    Parallel clines in different species, or in different geographical regions of the same species, are an important source of information on the genetic basis of local adaptation. We recently detected latitudinal clines in SNPs frequencies and gene expression of candidate genes for growth cessation in Scandinavian populations of Norway spruce (Picea abies). Here we test whether the same clines are also present in Siberian spruce (P. obovata), a close relative of Norway spruce with a different Quaternary history. We sequenced nine candidate genes and 27 control loci and genotyped 14 SSR loci in six populations of P. obovata located along the Yenisei river from latitude 56°N to latitude 67°N. In contrast to Scandinavian Norway spruce that both departs from the standard neutral model (SNM) and shows a clear population structure, Siberian spruce populations along the Yenisei do not depart from the SNM and are genetically unstructured. Nonetheless, as in Norway spruce, growth cessation is significantly clinal. Polymorphisms in photoperiodic (FTL2) and circadian clock (Gigantea, GI, PRR3) genes also show significant clinal variation and/or evidence of local selection. In GI, one of the variants is the same as in Norway spruce. Finally, a strong cline in gene expression is observed for FTL2, but not for GI. These results, together with recent physiological studies, confirm the key role played by FTL2 and circadian clock genes in the control of growth cessation in spruce species and suggest the presence of parallel adaptation in these two species. PMID:24814465

  20. Costs and benefits of cold acclimation in field released Drosophila

    Kristensen, Torsten N; Hoffmann, Ary A; Overgaard, Johannes;

    2008-01-01

    -acclimated were up to 36 times more likely to find food than the cold-acclimated flies when temperatures were warm. Such costs and strong benefits were not evident in laboratory tests where we found no reduction in heat survival of the cold-acclimated flies. Field release studies, therefore, reveal costs of cold...... for costs and benefits of developmental or adult cold acclimation. Both types of cold acclimation had enormous benefits at low temperatures in the field; in the coldest releases only cold-acclimated flies were able to find a resource. However, this advantage came at a huge cost; flies that had not been cold...

  1. Thyroid hormone regulates cardiac performance during cold acclimation in zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    Little, Alexander G; Seebacher, Frank

    2014-03-01

    Limitations to oxygen transport reduce aerobic scope and thereby activity at thermal extremes. Oxygen transport in fish is facilitated to a large extent by cardiac function so that climate variability may reduce fitness by constraining the performance of the heart. In zebrafish (Danio rerio), thyroid hormone (TH) regulates skeletal muscle function and metabolism in response to thermal acclimation. Here, we aimed to determine whether TH also regulates cardiac function during acclimation. We used propylthiouracil and iopanoic acid to induce hypothyroidism in zebrafish over a 3 week acclimation period to either 18 or 28°C. We found that cold-acclimated fish had higher maximum heart rates and sarco-endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA) activity than warm-acclimated fish. Hypothyroid treatment significantly decreased these responses in the cold-acclimated fish, but it did not affect the warm-acclimated fish. TH did not influence SERCA gene transcription, nor did it increase metabolic rate, of isolated whole hearts. To verify that physiological changes following hypothyroid treatment were in fact due to the action of TH, we supplemented hypothyroid fish with 3,5-diiodothryronine (T2) or 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine (T3). Supplementation of hypothyroid fish with T2 or T3 restored heart rate and SERCA activity to control levels. We also show that, in zebrafish, changes in cardiac output in response to warming are primarily mediated by heart rate, rather than by stroke volume. Thus, changes in heart rate are important for the overall aerobic capacity of the fish. In addition to its local effects on heart phenotype, we show that TH increases sympathetic tone on the heart at rest and during maximum exercise. Our findings reveal a new pathway through which fish can mitigate the limiting effects of temperature variability on oxygen transport to maintain aerobic scope and promote thermal tolerance. PMID:24265422

  2. Branchial ionocyte organization and ion-transport protein expression in juvenile alewives acclimated to freshwater or seawater

    Christensen, A.K.; Hiroi, J.; Schultz, E.T.; McCormick, S.D.

    2012-01-01

    The alewife (Alosa pseudoharengus) is a clupeid that undergoes larval and juvenile development in freshwater preceding marine habitation. The purpose of this study was to investigate osmoregulatory mechanisms in alewives that permit homeostasis in different salinities. To this end, we measured physiological, branchial biochemical and cellular responses in juvenile alewives acclimated to freshwater (0.5p.p.t.) or seawater (35.0p.p.t.). Plasma chloride concentration was higher in seawater-acclimated than freshwater-acclimated individuals (141mmoll -1 vs 134mmoll -1), but the hematocrit remained unchanged. In seawateracclimated individuals, branchial Na +/K +-ATPase (NKA) activity was higher by 75%. Western blot analysis indicated that the abundance of the NKA subunit and a Na+/K+/2Cl- cotransporter (NKCC1) were greater in seawater-acclimated individuals by 40% and 200%, respectively. NKA and NKCC1 were localized on the basolateral surface and tubular network of ionocytes in both acclimation groups. Immunohistochemical labeling for the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) was restricted to the apical crypt of ionocytes in seawater-acclimated individuals, whereas sodium/hydrogen exchanger 3 (NHE3) labeling was present on the apical surface of ionocytes in both acclimation groups. Ionocytes were concentrated on the trailing edge of the gill filament, evenly distributed along the proximal 75% of the filamental axis and reduced distally. Ionocyte size and number on the gill filament were not affected by salinity; however, the number of lamellar ionocytes was significantly lower in seawater-acclimated fish. Confocal z-series reconstructions revealed that mature ionocytes in seawater-acclimated alewives occurred in multicellular complexes. These complexes might reduce paracellular Na + resistance, hence facilitating Na+ extrusion in hypo-osmoregulating juvenile alewives after seaward migration. ?? 2012. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  3. Effect of salinity on methanogenic propionate degradation by acclimated marine sediment-derived culture.

    Miura, Toyokazu; Kita, Akihisa; Okamura, Yoshiko; Aki, Tsunehiro; Matsumura, Yukihiko; Tajima, Takahisa; Kato, Junichi; Nakashimada, Yutaka

    2015-12-01

    Degradation of propionate under high salinity is needed for biomethane production from salt-containing feedstocks. In this study, marine sediment-derived culture was evaluated to determine the effect of salinity on methanogenic propionate degradation. Microbes in marine sediments were subjected to fed-batch cultivation on propionate for developing acclimatized cultures. The rate of propionate degradation increased eightfold during 10 rounds of cultivation. Microbial community composition was determined through pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons after 10 rounds of cultivation. Taxa analysis was conducted for the reads obtained by pyrosequencing. Known propionate degraders were undetectable in the acclimated culture. Comparison of bacterial taxa in the original sediment with those in the acclimated culture revealed that the populations of four bacterial taxa were significantly increased during acclimation. Methanolobus was the predominant archaea genus in the acclimated culture. The propionate degradation rate of the acclimated culture was not affected by salinity of up to equivalent of 1.9 % NaCl. The rate decreased at higher salinity levels and was more than 50 % of the maximum rate even at equivalent of 4.3 % NaCl. PMID:26364311

  4. Effects of warm acclimation on physiology and gonad development in the sea urchin Evechinus chloroticus.

    Delorme, Natalí J; Sewell, Mary A

    2016-08-01

    The physiology of the New Zealand sea urchin Evechinus chloroticus was evaluated through feeding, respiration, growth and gonad growth in adult animals acclimated for 90days at 18°C (annual mean temperature) and 24°C (ambient summer temperature (21°C) +3°C). Measured parameters with representative rates of assimilation efficiency were used to calculate scope for growth (SfG) for each treatment. All physiological parameters were negatively affected at 24°C, showing a decrease in feeding rate which coincided with negative growth and gonad development at the end of the acclimation period, and a decrease in respiration rate suggesting metabolic depression. Histology of gonad samples after the acclimation period also showed no gametic material in animals acclimated at 24°C. All animals acclimated at 24°C had negative growth, differing from the calculated SfG which indicated that the animals had sufficient energy for production. The results suggest that calculated SfG in echinoderms should be used together with actual measurements of growth in individuals as, by itself, SfG may underestimate the actual effect of ocean warming when animals are exposed to stressful conditions. Overall, considering the total loss of reproductive output observed in E. chloroticus at higher temperatures, an increase in seawater temperature could dramatically influence the persistence of northern populations of this species, leading to flow-on effects in the subtidal ecosystem. PMID:27043875

  5. Revisiting the Clinal Concept of Evolution and Dispersal for the Tick-Borne Flaviviruses by Using Phylogenetic and Biogeographic Analyses

    Heinze, D. M.; Gould, E A; Forrester, N. L.

    2012-01-01

    Tick-borne flaviviruses (TBF) are widely dispersed across Africa, Europe, Asia, Oceania, and North America, and some present a significant threat to human health. Seminal studies on tick-borne encephalitis viruses (TBEV), based on partial envelope gene sequences, predicted a westward clinal pattern of evolution and dispersal across northern Eurasia, terminating in the British Isles. We tested this hypothesis using all available full-length open reading frame (ORF) TBF sequences. Phylogenetic ...

  6. Physical and Linkage Maps for Drosophila serrata, a Model Species for Studies of Clinal Adaptation and Sexual Selection

    Stocker, Ann J.; Rusuwa, Bosco B.; Blacket, Mark J.; Frentiu, Francesca D; Sullivan, Mitchell; Foley, Bradley R.; Beatson, Scott; Hoffmann, Ary A.; Chenoweth, Stephen F.

    2012-01-01

    Drosophila serrata is a member of the montium group, which contains more than 98 species and until recently was considered a subgroup within the melanogaster group. This Drosophila species is an emerging model system for evolutionary quantitative genetics and has been used in studies of species borders, clinal variation and sexual selection. Despite the importance of D. serrata as a model for evolutionary research, our poor understanding of its genome remains a significant limitation. Here, w...

  7. Rapid Development of Adaptive, Climate-Driven Clinal Variation in Seed Mass in the Invasive Annual Forb Echium plantagineum L.

    Konarzewski, Tara K.; Murray, Brad R.; Godfree, Robert C.

    2012-01-01

    We examined adaptive clinal variation in seed mass among populations of an invasive annual species, Echium plantagineum, in response to climatic selection. We collected seeds from 34 field populations from a 1,000 km long temperature and rainfall gradient across the species' introduced range in south-eastern Australia. Seeds were germinated, grown to reproductive age under common glasshouse conditions, and progeny seeds were harvested and weighed. Analyses showed that seed mass was significan...

  8. Embryonic developmental temperatures modulate thermal acclimation of performance curves in tadpoles of the frog Limnodynastes peronii.

    Frank Seebacher

    Full Text Available Performance curves of physiological rates are not fixed, and determining the extent to which thermal performance curves can change in response to environmental signals is essential to understand the effect of climate variability on populations. The aim of this study was to determine whether and how temperatures experienced during early embryonic development affect thermal performance curves of later life history stages in the frog Limnodynastes peronii. We tested the hypotheses that a the embryonic environment affects mean trait values only; b temperature at which performance of tadpoles is maximal shifts with egg incubation temperatures so that performance is maximised at the incubation temperatures, and c incubation temperatures modulate the capacity for reversible acclimation in tadpoles. Growth rates were greater in warm (25°C compared to cold (15°C acclimated (6 weeks tadpoles regardless of egg developmental temperatures (15°C or 25°C, representing seasonal means. The breadth of the performance curve of burst locomotor performance (measured at 10, 15, 20, 25, and 30°C, representing annual range is greatest when egg developmental and acclimation temperatures coincide. The mode of the performance curves shifted with acclimation conditions and maximum performance was always at higher temperatures than acclimation conditions. Performance curves of glycolytic (lactate dehydrogenase activities and mitochondrial (citrate synthase and cytochrome c oxidase enzymes were modulated by interactions between egg incubation and acclimation temperatures. Lactate dehydrogenase activity paralleled patterns seen in burst locomotor performance, but oxygen consumption rates and mitochondrial enzyme activities did not mirror growth or locomotor performance. We show that embryonic developmental conditions can modulate performance curves of later life-history stages, thereby conferring flexibilty to respond to environmental conditions later in life.

  9. Plasticity of functional traits varies clinally along a rainfall gradient in Eucalyptus tricarpa.

    McLean, Elizabeth H; Prober, Suzanne M; Stock, William D; Steane, Dorothy A; Potts, Brad M; Vaillancourt, René E; Byrne, Margaret

    2014-06-01

    Widespread species often occur across a range of climatic conditions, through a combination of local genetic adaptations and phenotypic plasticity. Species with greater phenotypic plasticity are likely to be better positioned to cope with rapid anthropogenic climate changes, while those displaying strong local adaptations might benefit from translocations to assist the movement of adaptive genes as the climate changes. Eucalyptus tricarpa occurs across a climatic gradient in south-eastern Australia, a region of increasing aridity, and we hypothesized that this species would display local adaptation to climate. We measured morphological and physiological traits reflecting climate responses in nine provenances from sites of 460 to 1040 mm annual rainfall, in their natural habitat and in common gardens near each end of the gradient. Local adaptation was evident in functional traits and differential growth rates in the common gardens. Some traits displayed complex combinations of plasticity and genetic divergence among provenances, including clinal variation in plasticity itself. Provenances from drier locations were more plastic in leaf thickness, whereas leaf size was more plastic in provenances from higher rainfall locations. Leaf density and stomatal physiology (as indicated by δ(13)C and δ(18)O) were highly and uniformly plastic. In addition to variation in mean trait values, genetic variation in trait plasticity may play a role in climate adaptation. PMID:24329726

  10. Epoxycarotenoid-mediated synthesis of abscisic acid in Physcomitrella patens implicating conserved mechanisms for acclimation to hyperosmosis in embryophytes.

    Takezawa, Daisuke; Watanabe, Naoki; Ghosh, Totan Kumar; Saruhashi, Masashi; Suzuki, Atsushi; Ishiyama, Kanako; Somemiya, Shinnosuke; Kobayashi, Masatomo; Sakata, Yoichi

    2015-04-01

    Plants acclimate to environmental stress signals such as cold, drought and hypersalinity, and provoke internal protective mechanisms. Abscisic acid (ABA), a carotenoid-derived phytohormone, which increases in response to the stress signals above, has been suggested to play a key role in the acclimation process in angiosperms, but the role of ABA in basal land plants such as mosses, including its biosynthetic pathways, has not been clarified. Targeted gene disruption of PpABA1, encoding zeaxanthin epoxidase in the moss Physcomitrella patens was conducted to determine the role of endogenous ABA in acclimation processes in mosses. The generated ppaba1 plants were found to accumulate only a small amount of endogenous ABA. The ppaba1 plants showed reduced osmotic acclimation capacity in correlation with reduced dehydration tolerance and accumulation of late embryogenesis abundant proteins. By contrast, cold-induced freezing tolerance was less affected in ppaba1, indicating that endogenous ABA does not play a major role in the regulation of cold acclimation in the moss. Our results suggest that the mechanisms for osmotic acclimation mediated by carotenoid-derived synthesis of ABA are conserved in embryophytes and that acquisition of the mechanisms played a crucial role in terrestrial adaptation and colonization by land plant ancestors. PMID:25545104

  11. Light acclimation in Porphyridium purpureum (Rhodophyta): Growth, photosynthesis, and phycobilisomes

    Levy, I.; Gantt, E. (Smithsonian Institution, WA (USA))

    1988-12-01

    Acclimation to three photon flux densities 10, 35, 180 {mu}E{center dot}m{sup {minus}2}{center dot}s{sup {minus}1} was determined in laboratory cultures of Porphyridium purpureum Bory, Drew and Ross. Cultures grown at low, medium, and high PPFDs had compensation points of <3, 6, and 20 {mu}E{center dot}m{sup {minus}2}{center dot}s{sup {minus}1}, respectively, and saturating irradiances in the initial log phase of 90, 115, 175 {mu}E{center dot}m{sup {minus}2}{center dot}s{sup {minus}1} and up to 240 {mu}E{center dot}m{sup {minus}2}{center dot}s{sup {minus}1} in late log phase. High light cells had the smallest photosynthetic unit size (phycobiliproteins plus chlorophyll), the highest photosynthetic capacity, and the highest growth rates. Photosystem I reaction centers (P700) per cell remained proportional to chlorophyll at ca. 110 chl/P700. However, phycobiliprotein content decreased as did the phycobilisome number (ca. 50%) in high light cells, whereas the phycobilisome size remained the same as in medium and low light cells. We concluded that acclimation of this red alga to varied PPFDs was manifested by the plasticity of the photosystem II antennae with little, if any, affect noted on photosystem I.

  12. Gastrointestinal uptake and fate of cadmium in rainbow trout acclimated to sublethal dietary cadmium

    Chowdhury, M.J.; McDonald, D.G.; Wood, C.M

    2004-08-10

    Adult rainbow trout were pre-exposed to a sublethal concentration of dietary Cd (500 mg/kg dry wt.) for 30 days to induce acclimation. A gastrointestinal dose of radiolabeled Cd (276 {mu}g/kg wet wt.) was infused into the stomach of non-acclimated and Cd-acclimated trout through a stomach catheter. Repetitive blood samples over 24 h and terminal tissue samples were taken to investigate the gastrointestinal uptake, plasma clearance kinetics, and tissue distribution of Cd. Only a small fraction of the infused dose (non-acclimated: 2.4%; Cd-acclimated: 6.6%) was internalized across the gut wall, while most was bound in the gut tissues (10-24%) or remained in the lumen (16-33%) or lost from the fish ({approx}50%) over 24 h. Cadmium loading during pre-exposure produced a profound increase of total Cd in the blood plasma ({approx}28-fold) and red blood cells (RBC; {approx}20-fold). The plasma Cd-time profiles consisted of an apparent rising (uptake) phase and a declining (clearance) phase with a maximum value of uptake in 4 h, suggesting that uptake of gastrointestinally infused Cd was very rapid. Acclimation to dietary Cd did not affect plasma Cd clearance ({approx}0.5 ml/min), but enhanced new Cd levels in the plasma (but not in the RBC), and resulted in a longer half-life for plasma Cd. Tissue total and new Cd levels varied in different regions of the gastrointestinal tract, and overall levels in gut tissues were much greater than in non-gut tissues, reflecting the Cd exposure route. Dietary Cd, but not the infused Cd, greatly increased total Cd levels of all gut tissues in the order posterior-intestine (640-fold) > cecae (180-fold) > mid-intestine (94-fold) > stomach (53-fold) in Cd-acclimated fish relative to naieve fish. Among non-gut tissues in the Cd-acclimated fish, the great increases of total Cd levels were observed in the liver (73-fold), kidney (39-fold), carcass (35-fold), and gills (30-fold). The results provide some clear conclusions that may be useful

  13. Distribution and clinal trends of the ABO and Rh genes in select Middle Eastern countries.

    AlSuhaibani, E S; Kizilbash, N A; Afshan, K; Malik, S

    2015-01-01

    An understanding of the ABO and Rh blood group systems is important for blood transfusions and is also pertinent due to their potential association with certain morbidities and susceptibilities to infections. To investigate the diversity and differentiation of the ABO and Rh loci in Middle Eastern populations, data from twelve representative Middle Eastern populations were analyzed. Six populations were in conformity with Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium at the ABO locus. The pooled heterozygosity at both loci was calculated to be highest in the sample from Jordan and lowest in Bahrain. Heterogeneity was pronounced in the Northern compared to the Southern Middle Eastern populations. Overall, the absolute gene diversity was 0.0046 and gene differentiation was calculated to be 0.0100. Genetic diversity of the studied loci across all populations (HT) was estimated to be 0.4594, while the diversity within the populations (HS) was 0.4548. Nei's genetic distance analyses revealed highest affinities between the populations of Kuwait and Qatar, Oman and Yemen, and between Qatar and the United Arab Emirates. These results were displayed through a UGPMA dendrogram and principal component analyses, which established clustering of certain populations. Clinal trends of the allelic systems were observed by generating contour maps that allow a detailed appreciation of the distributions of alleles across the geography of the Arabian Peninsula and the Middle East. Taken together, these analyses are helpful in understanding the differentiation of blood group loci and for designing prospective studies for establishing the associations of these loci with health variables in the populations studied. PMID:26400302

  14. Assortative mating and gene flow generate clinal phenological variation in trees

    Soularue Jean-Paul

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background On-going climate change is shifting the timing of bud burst (TBB of broad leaf and conifer trees in temperate areas, raising concerns about the abilities of natural populations to respond to these shifts. The level of expected evolutionary change depends on the level and distribution of genetic variation of TBB. While numerous experimental studies have highlighted the role of divergent selection in promoting clinal TBB differentiation, we explored whether the observed patterns of variation could be generated by the joint effects of assortative mating for TBB and gene flow among natural populations. We tested this hypothesis using an in silico approach based on quantitative genetic models. Results Our simulations showed that genetic clines can develop even without divergent selection. Assortative mating in association with environmental gradients substantially shifted the mean genetic values of populations. Owing to assortative mating, immigrant alleles were screened for proximal or distant populations depending on the strength of the environmental cline. Furthermore, we confirmed that assortative mating increases the additive genetic variance within populations. However, we observed also a rapid decline of the additive genetic variance caused by restricted gene flow between neighboring populations resulting from preferential matings between phenologically-matching phenotypes. Conclusions We provided evidence that the patterns of genetic variation of phenological traits observed in forest trees can be generated solely by the effects of assortative mating and gene flow. We anticipate that predicted temperature increases due to climate change will further enhance genetic differentiation across the landscape. These trends are likely to be reinforced or counteracted by natural selection if phenological traits are correlated to fitness.

  15. Salicylic acid and heat acclimation pretreatment protects Laminaria japonica sporophyte (Phaeophyceae) from heat stress

    Zhou, Bin; Tang, Xuexi; Wang, You

    2010-07-01

    Possible mediatory roles of heat acclimation and salicylic acid in protecting the sporophyte of marine macroalga Laminaria japonica (Phaeophyceae) from heat stress were studied. Heat stress resulted in oxidative injury in the kelp blades. Under heat stress significant accumulation of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and malonaldehyde (MDA), a membrane lipid peroxidation product, and a drastic decrease in chlorophyll a content were recorded. Activity of the enzymatic antioxidant system was drastically affected by heat stress. The activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) was significantly increased while peroxidase (POD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GPX) were greatly inhibited and, simultaneously, phenylalanine ammonia-lyase was activated while polyphenol oxidase (PPO) was inhibited. Both heat acclimation pretreatment and exogenous application of salicylic acid alleviated oxidative damage in kelp blades. Blades receiving heat acclimation pretreatment and exogenous salicylic acid prior to heat stress exhibited a reduced increase in H2O2 and MDA content, and a lower reduction in chlorophyll a content. Pretreatment with heat acclimation and salicylic acid elevated activities of SOD, POD, CAT, GPX and PPO. Considering these results collectively, we speculate that the inhibition of antioxidant enzymes is a possible cause of the heat-stress-induced oxidative stress in L. japonica, and enhanced thermotolerance may be associated, at least in part, with the elevated activity of the enzymatic antioxidant system.

  16. Effects of cadmium exposure on the gill proteome of Cottus gobio: Modulatory effects of prior thermal acclimation

    Highlights: • Fish acclimated to elevated temperature were subsequently exposed to cadmium. • Interaction of both stressors on LDH activity and protein expression was complex. • Both stressors have opposite effects at branchial protein expression level. • Proteins belonging to the same functional class exhibited differing responses. • Prior acclimation to elevated temperature modulated the effects of cadmium exposure. - Abstract: Temperature and trace metals are common environmental stressors, and their importance is increasing due to global climate change and anthropogenic pollution. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether acclimation to elevated temperature affects the response of the European bullhead (Cottus gobio) to subsequent cadmium (Cd) exposure by using enzymatic and proteomic approaches. Fish acclimated to 15 (standard temperature), 18 or 21 °C for 28 days were exposed to 1 mg Cd/L for 4 days at the respective acclimation temperature. First, exposure to Cd significantly decreased the activity of the lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) in gills of fish acclimated to 15 or 18 °C. However, an acclimation to 21 °C suppressed the inhibitory effect of Cd. Second, using a proteomic analysis by 2D-DIGE, we observed that thermal acclimation was the first parameter affecting the protein expression profile in gills of C. gobio, while subsequent Cd exposure seemed to attenuate this temperature effect. Moreover, our results showed opposite effects of these two environmental stressors at protein expression level. From the 52 protein spots displaying significant interaction effects of temperature and Cd exposure, a total of 28 different proteins were identified using nano LC–MS/MS and the Peptide and Protein Prophet algorithms of Scaffold software. The identified differentially expressed proteins can be categorized into diverse functional classes, related to protein turnover, folding and chaperoning, metabolic process, ion transport, cell

  17. Effects of cadmium exposure on the gill proteome of Cottus gobio: Modulatory effects of prior thermal acclimation

    Dorts, Jennifer, E-mail: jennifer.dorts@unamur.be [Research Unit in Environmental and Evolutionary Biology (URBE), University of Namur, Rue de Bruxelles 61, B-5000 Namur (Belgium); Kestemont, Patrick [Research Unit in Environmental and Evolutionary Biology (URBE), University of Namur, Rue de Bruxelles 61, B-5000 Namur (Belgium); Thézenas, Marie-Laetitia; Raes, Martine [Research Unit in Cell Biology (URBC) (NARILIS), University of Namur, Rue de Bruxelles 61, B-5000 Namur (Belgium); Silvestre, Frédéric [Research Unit in Environmental and Evolutionary Biology (URBE), University of Namur, Rue de Bruxelles 61, B-5000 Namur (Belgium)

    2014-09-15

    Highlights: • Fish acclimated to elevated temperature were subsequently exposed to cadmium. • Interaction of both stressors on LDH activity and protein expression was complex. • Both stressors have opposite effects at branchial protein expression level. • Proteins belonging to the same functional class exhibited differing responses. • Prior acclimation to elevated temperature modulated the effects of cadmium exposure. - Abstract: Temperature and trace metals are common environmental stressors, and their importance is increasing due to global climate change and anthropogenic pollution. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether acclimation to elevated temperature affects the response of the European bullhead (Cottus gobio) to subsequent cadmium (Cd) exposure by using enzymatic and proteomic approaches. Fish acclimated to 15 (standard temperature), 18 or 21 °C for 28 days were exposed to 1 mg Cd/L for 4 days at the respective acclimation temperature. First, exposure to Cd significantly decreased the activity of the lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) in gills of fish acclimated to 15 or 18 °C. However, an acclimation to 21 °C suppressed the inhibitory effect of Cd. Second, using a proteomic analysis by 2D-DIGE, we observed that thermal acclimation was the first parameter affecting the protein expression profile in gills of C. gobio, while subsequent Cd exposure seemed to attenuate this temperature effect. Moreover, our results showed opposite effects of these two environmental stressors at protein expression level. From the 52 protein spots displaying significant interaction effects of temperature and Cd exposure, a total of 28 different proteins were identified using nano LC–MS/MS and the Peptide and Protein Prophet algorithms of Scaffold software. The identified differentially expressed proteins can be categorized into diverse functional classes, related to protein turnover, folding and chaperoning, metabolic process, ion transport, cell

  18. Influence of nutrient supply on shade-sun acclimation of Picea abies seedlings: effects on foliar morphology, photosynthetic performance and growth.

    Grassi, G.; Minotta, G.

    2000-05-01

    Norway spruce seedlings (Picea abies Karst.) were grown in low light for one year, under conditions of adequate and limiting nutrition, then transferred to high light. Three months after transfer we measured photosynthesis, leaf nitrogen concentration, leaf chlorophyll concentration and leaf mass per area (LMA) of current-year and 1-year-old shoots; silhouette area ratio (SAR, the ratio of shoot silhouette area to projected needle area) was also measured in current-year shoots. At the foliage level, the effects of light and nutrient treatments differed markedly. Light availability during foliage expansion primarily affected LMA and SAR (morphological acclimation at the needle and shoot level, respectively). By contrast, nutrient supply in high light affected photosynthetic capacity per unit of leaf tissue (physiological acclimation at the cellular level) but did not affect LMA and SAR. The capacity for shade-sun acclimation in foliage formed before transfer to high light differed greatly from that of foliage formed following the transfer. The morphological inflexibility of mature needles (measured by LMA) limited their shade-sun acclimation potential. In contrast, at high nutrient supply, shoots that developed just after the change in photosynthetic photon flux density largely acclimated, both morphologically and physiologically, to the new light environment. The acclimation response of both current- and 1-year-old shoots was prevented by nutrient limitation. Analysis of growth at the whole-plant level largely confirmed the conclusions drawn at the shoot level. We conclude that nutrient shortage subsequent to the opening of a canopy gap may strongly limit the acclimation response of Norway spruce seedlings. Successful acclimation was largely related to the plant's ability to produce sun foliage and adjust whole-plant biomass allocation rapidly. PMID:12651514

  19. Rumen bacterial communities can be acclimated faster to high concentrate diets than currently implemented feedlot programs

    Anderson, C L; Schneider, C.J.; Erickson, G.E.; MacDonald, J C; Fernando, S. C.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Aims Recent studies have demonstrated RAMP ®, a complete starter feed, to have beneficial effects for animal performance. However, how RAMP may elicit such responses is unknown. To understand if RAMP adaptation results in changes in the rumen bacterial community that can potentially affect animal performance, we investigated the dynamics of rumen bacterial community composition in corn‐adapted and RAMP‐adapted cattle. Methods and Results During gradual acclimation of the rumen bacter...

  20. The acclimation of Chlorella to high-level nitrite for potential application in biological NOx removal from industrial flue gases.

    Li, Tianpei; Xu, Gang; Rong, Junfeng; Chen, Hui; He, Chenliu; Giordano, Mario; Wang, Qiang

    2016-05-20

    Nitrogen oxides (NOx) are the components of fossil flue gas that give rise to the greatest environmental concerns. This study evaluated the ability of the green algae Chlorella to acclimate to high level of NOx and the potential utilization of Chlorella strains in biological NOx removal (DeNOx) from industrial flue gases. Fifteen Chlorella strains were subject to high-level of nitrite (HN, 176.5 mmolL(-1) nitrite) to simulate exposure to high NOx. These strains were subsequently divided into four groups with respect to their ability to tolerate nitrite (excellent, good, fair, and poor). One strain from each group was selected to evaluate their photosynthetic response to HN condition, and the nitrite adaptability of the four Chlorella strains were further identified by using chlorophyll fluorescence. The outcome of our experiments shows that, although high concentrations of nitrite overall negatively affect growth and photosynthesis of Chlorella strains, the degree of nitrite tolerance is a strain-specific feature. Some Chlorella strains have an appreciably higher ability to acclimate to high-level of nitrite. Acclimation is achieved through a three-step process of restrict, acclimate, and thriving. Notably, Chlorella sp. C2 was found to have a high tolerance and to rapidly acclimate to high concentrations of nitrite; it is therefore a promising candidate for microalgae-based biological NOx removal. PMID:27010349

  1. Limited effectiveness of heat acclimation to soldiers wearing US Army and US Air Force chemical protective clothing. Technical report

    Chang, S.K.; Gonzalez, R.R.

    1995-11-01

    Heat acclilmation-induced sweating responses have the potential of reducing heat strain for soldiers wearing chemical protective garment. However, this potential benefit is strongly affected by the properties of the garment. If the clothing ensemble permits sufficient evaporative heat dissipation, then heat acclimation becomes helpful in reducing heat strain. On the other hand, if the garment creates an impenetrable barrier to moisture, no benefit can be gained from heat acclimation as the additional sweating cannot be evaporated. We studied 10 subjects exercising on a treadmill while wearing two different U.S. military chemical protective ensembles. Skin heat flux, skin temperature, core temperature, metabolic heat production, and heart rate were measured. We found that the benefit of heat acclimation is strongly dependent on an unimpeded ability of evaporative heat loss from skin areas. The evaporative potential (EP), a measure of thermal insulation modified by moisture permeability, of the clothing ensemble offers a quantitative index useful to determine whether heat acclimation is helpful while protective clothing system. Our data show that when EP is less than 15%, heat acclimation affords no benefit. An evaporative potential graph is created to aid in this determination.

  2. Alterations of calf venous and arterial compliance following acclimation to heat administered at a fixed daily time in humans

    Maruyama, Megumi; Hara, Toshiko; Hashimoto, Michio; Koga, Miki; Shido, Osamu

    2006-05-01

    We investigated the effects of heat acclimation on venous and arterial compliance in humans. Four male and four female volunteers were exposed to an ambient temperature of 40°C and relative humidity of 40% for 4 h (1330 1730 hours) per day for 9 10 consecutive days. The calf venous compliance (CV) was estimated using venous occlusion plethysmography with a mercury-in-silastic strain gauge placed around the right calf at its maximum girth. The compliance of the small (CSA) and large (CLA) arteries were assessed by reflective and capacitance compliance by analyzing the radial artery blood pressure waveforms, basing on the use of a modified Windkessel model. The calf CV, CSA, CLA, systolic and diastolic blood pressures, heart rate and core temperature were determined twice a day, 0930 1100 hours (AM test) and 1500 1630 hours (PM test), in both heat-acclimated and non-heat-acclimated (control) conditions. Heat acclimation appeared to decrease blood pressures, heart rate and significantly lowered core temperature only in the PM test. In the control condition, the calf CV was not affected by the time of day and the CSA was significantly depressed in the PM test. After acclimation to heat, the calf CV significantly increased and the CSA did not decrease in the PM test. The results presented suggest that repeated heat exposure in humans, for 4 h at a fixed time daily, increases the calf CV and the CSA particularly during the period when the subjects were previously exposed to heat.

  3. Effect of moderate hypoxia at three acclimation temperatures on stress responses in Atlantic cod with different haemoglobin types

    Methling, Caroline; Aluru, Neelakanteswar; Vijayan, Mathilakath M;

    2010-01-01

    geographical distribution pattern, and differences in preferred temperature of cod with different haemoglobin types, the study was extended to include haemoglobin polymorphism. We hypothesised that the differences in temperature preference between HbI-1 and HbI-2 type cod might also be reflected in a...... difference in stress response to hypoxia exposure. Two hsp70-isoforms (labelled a and b) were detected and they differed in expression in the gills but not in the liver of Atlantic cod. Acclimation temperature significantly affected the expression of hsp70 in the liver, and in an isoform-specific manner in...... the gills. Hypoxia exposure increased the expression of hsp70 in the liver, but not the gills, of cod and this response was not influenced by the acclimation temperature. The expression of hsp70 in both tissues did not differ between fish with different haemoglobin types. Acclimation temperature...

  4. Clinal variation or validation of a subspecies? A case study of the Graptemys nigrinoda complex (Testudines: Emydidae)

    Ennen, Joshua R.; Kalis, Marley E.; Patterson, Adam L.; Kreiser, Brian R.; Lovich, Jeffrey E.; Godwin, James; Qualls, Carl P.

    2014-01-01

    Widely distributed species often display intraspecific morphological variation due to the abiotic and biotic gradients experienced across their ranges. Historically, in many vertebrate taxa, such as birds and reptiles, these morphological differences within a species were used to delimit subspecies. Graptemys nigrinoda is an aquatic turtle species endemic to the Mobile Bay Basin. Colour pattern and morphological variability were used to describe a subspecies (G. n. delticola) from the lower reaches of the system, although it and the nominate subspecies also reportedly intergrade over a large portion of the range. Other researchers have suggested that these morphological differences merely reflect clinal variation. Our molecular data (mtDNA) did not support the existence of the subspecies, as the haplotypes were differentiated by only a few base pairs and one haplotype was shared between the putative subspecies. While there were significant morphological and pattern differences among putative specimens of G. n. nigrinoda, G. n. delticola and G. n. nigrinoda × delticola, these differences probably represent clinal variation as they were also related to environmental variables [i.e. cumulative drainage area and drainage (categorical)]. Specimens occupying slow-current, high-turbidity river reaches (e.g. the Tensaw River) exhibited greater relative carapace heights and more dark pigmentation, while specimens occupying fast-current, clearer rivers (e.g. the upper Alabama, Cahaba and Tallapoosa rivers) exhibited lower carapace heights and more yellow pigmentation. Given the absence of clear molecular and morphological differences that are related to drainage characteristics, we suggest that there is not sufficient evidence for the recognition of G. n. delticola as a distinct subspecies.

  5. Y-Chromosomal Diversity in Europe Is Clinal and Influenced Primarily by Geography, Rather than by Language

    Rosser, Zoë H.; Zerjal, Tatiana; Hurles, Matthew E.; Adojaan, Maarja; Alavantic, Dragan; Amorim, António; Amos, William; Armenteros, Manuel; Arroyo, Eduardo; Barbujani, Guido; Beckman, Gunhild; Beckman, Lars; Bertranpetit, Jaume; Bosch, Elena; Bradley, Daniel G.; Brede, Gaute; Cooper, Gillian; Côrte-Real, Helena B. S. M.; de Knijff, Peter; Decorte, Ronny; Dubrova, Yuri E.; Evgrafov, Oleg; Gilissen, Anja; Glisic, Sanja; Gölge, Mukaddes; Hill, Emmeline W.; Jeziorowska, Anna; Kalaydjieva, Luba; Kayser, Manfred; Kivisild, Toomas; Kravchenko, Sergey A.; Krumina, Astrida; Kučinskas, Vaidutis; Lavinha, João; Livshits, Ludmila A.; Malaspina, Patrizia; Maria, Syrrou; McElreavey, Ken; Meitinger, Thomas A.; Mikelsaar, Aavo-Valdur; Mitchell, R. John; Nafa, Khedoudja; Nicholson, Jayne; Nørby, Søren; Pandya, Arpita; Parik, Jüri; Patsalis, Philippos C.; Pereira, Luísa; Peterlin, Borut; Pielberg, Gerli; Prata, Maria João; Previderé, Carlo; Roewer, Lutz; Rootsi, Siiri; Rubinsztein, D. C.; Saillard, Juliette; Santos, Fabrício R.; Stefanescu, Gheorghe; Sykes, Bryan C.; Tolun, Aslihan; Villems, Richard; Tyler-Smith, Chris; Jobling, Mark A.

    2000-01-01

    Clinal patterns of autosomal genetic diversity within Europe have been interpreted in previous studies in terms of a Neolithic demic diffusion model for the spread of agriculture; in contrast, studies using mtDNA have traced many founding lineages to the Paleolithic and have not shown strongly clinal variation. We have used 11 human Y-chromosomal biallelic polymorphisms, defining 10 haplogroups, to analyze a sample of 3,616 Y chromosomes belonging to 47 European and circum-European populations. Patterns of geographic differentiation are highly nonrandom, and, when they are assessed using spatial autocorrelation analysis, they show significant clines for five of six haplogroups analyzed. Clines for two haplogroups, representing 45% of the chromosomes, are continentwide and consistent with the demic diffusion hypothesis. Clines for three other haplogroups each have different foci and are more regionally restricted and are likely to reflect distinct population movements, including one from north of the Black Sea. Principal-components analysis suggests that populations are related primarily on the basis of geography, rather than on the basis of linguistic affinity. This is confirmed in Mantel tests, which show a strong and highly significant partial correlation between genetics and geography but a low, nonsignificant partial correlation between genetics and language. Genetic-barrier analysis also indicates the primacy of geography in the shaping of patterns of variation. These patterns retain a strong signal of expansion from the Near East but also suggest that the demographic history of Europe has been complex and influenced by other major population movements, as well as by linguistic and geographic heterogeneities and the effects of drift. PMID:11078479

  6. Acclimation of subsurface microbial communities to mercury

    de Lipthay, Julia R; Rasmussen, Lasse D; Øregaard, Gunnar;

    2008-01-01

    of the subsurface communities, possibly due to differences in the availability of mercury. IncP-1 trfA genes were detected in extracted community DNA from all soil depths of the contaminated site, and this finding was correlated to the isolation of four different mercury-resistance plasmids, all belonging......We studied the acclimation to mercury of bacterial communities of different depths from contaminated and noncontaminated floodplain soils. The level of mercury tolerance of the bacterial communities from the contaminated site was higher than those of the reference site. Furthermore, the level...... of mercury tolerance and functional versatility of bacterial communities in contaminated soils initially were higher for surface soil, compared with the deeper soils. However, following new mercury exposure, no differences between bacterial communities were observed, which indicates a high adaptive potential...

  7. Intraspecific variation in thermal acclimation of photosynthesis across a range of temperatures in a perennial crop.

    Zaka, Serge; Frak, Ela; Julier, Bernadette; Gastal, François; Louarn, Gaëtan

    2016-01-01

    Interest in the thermal acclimation of photosynthesis has been stimulated by the increasing relevance of climate change. However, little is known about intra-specific variations in thermal acclimation and its potential for breeding. In this article, we examined the difference in thermal acclimation between alfalfa (Medicago sativa) cultivars originating from contrasting origins, and sought to analyze the mechanisms in play. A series of experiments was carried out at seven growth temperatures between 5 and 35 °C using four cultivars from temperate and Mediterranean origin. Leaf traits, the photosynthetic rate at 25 °C (A400 (25)), the photosynthetic rate at optimal temperature (A400 (opt)), the thermal optimum of photosynthesis (Topt), and the photosynthetic parameters from the Farqhuar model were determined. Irrespective of cultivar origin, a clear shift in the temperature responses of photosynthesis was observed as a function of growth temperature, affecting thermal optimum of photosynthesis, photosynthetic rate at optimal temperature and photosynthetic rate at 25 °C. For both cultivars, Topt values increased linearly in leaves grown between 5 and 35 °C. Relative homeostasis of A400 (25) and A400 (opt) was found between 10 °C and 30 °C growth temperatures, but sharp declines were recorded at 5 and 35 °C. This homeostasis was achieved in part through modifications to leaf nitrogen content, which increased at extreme temperatures. Significant changes were also recorded regarding nitrogen partitioning in the photosynthetic apparatus and in the temperature dependence of photosynthetic parameters. The cultivars differed only in terms of the temperature response of photosynthetic parameters, with Mediterranean genotypes displaying a greater sensitivity of the maximum rate of Rubisco carboxylation to elevated temperatures. It was concluded that intra-specific variations in the temperature acclimation of photosynthesis exist among alfalfa cultivars

  8. Heat acclimation and physical training adaptations of young women using different contraceptive hormones.

    Armstrong, Lawrence E; Maresh, Carl M; Keith, Nicole R; Elliott, Tabatha A; Vanheest, Jaci L; Scheett, Timothy P; Stoppani, James; Judelson, Daniel A; De Souza, Mary Jane

    2005-05-01

    Although endogenous and exogenous steroid hormones affect numerous physiological processes, the interactions of reproductive hormones, chronic exercise training, and heat acclimation are unknown. This investigation evaluated the responses and adaptations of 36 inactive females [age 21 +/- 3 (SD) yr] as they undertook a 7- to 8-wk program [heat acclimation and physical training (HAPT)] of indoor heat acclimation (90 min/day, 3 days/wk) and outdoor physical training (3 days/wk) while using either an oral estradiol-progestin contraceptive (ORAL, n = 15), a contraceptive injection of depot medroxyprogesterone acetate (DEPO, n = 7), or no contraceptive (EU-OV, n = 14; control). Standardized physical fitness and exercise-heat tolerance tests (36.5 degrees C, 37% relative humidity), administered before and after HAPT, demonstrated that the three subject groups successfully (P heat (i.e., rectal temperature, heart rate) and improved muscular endurance (i.e., sit-ups, push-ups, 4.6-km run time) and body composition characteristics. The stress of HAPT did not disrupt the menstrual cycle length/phase characteristics, ovulation, or plasma hormone concentrations of EU-OV. No between-group differences (P > 0.05) existed for rectal and skin temperatures or metabolic, cardiorespiratory, muscular endurance, or body composition variables. A significant difference post-HAPT in the onset temperature of local sweating, ORAL (37.2 +/- 0.4 degrees C) vs. DEPO (37.7 +/- 0.2 degrees C), suggested that steroid hormones influenced this adaptation. In summary, virtually all adaptations of ORAL and DEPO were similar to EU-OV, suggesting that exogenous reproductive hormones neither enhanced nor impaired the ability of women to complete 7-8 wk of strenuous physical training and heat acclimation. PMID:15598669

  9. FREEZING IN NON-ACCLIMATED OATS: A COMPARISON OF THERMAL RESPONSE AND HISTOLOGY OF RECOVERING CROWNS IN GRADUAL AND RAPIDLY FROZEN PLANTS.

    Freezing in winter cereals is a complex phenomenon that can affect various plant tissues differently. To better understand how freezing affects specific tissue in the over wintering organ (crown) of winter cereal crops, non acclimated oats were frozen to -3°C over an extended period and tissue dama...

  10. Salt Acclimation of Cyanobacteria and Their Application in Biotechnology

    Nadin Pade

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The long evolutionary history and photo-autotrophic lifestyle of cyanobacteria has allowed them to colonize almost all photic habitats on Earth, including environments with high or fluctuating salinity. Their basal salt acclimation strategy includes two principal reactions, the active export of ions and the accumulation of compatible solutes. Cyanobacterial salt acclimation has been characterized in much detail using selected model cyanobacteria, but their salt sensing and regulatory mechanisms are less well understood. Here, we briefly review recent advances in the identification of salt acclimation processes and the essential genes/proteins involved in acclimation to high salt. This knowledge is of increasing importance because the necessary mass cultivation of cyanobacteria for future use in biotechnology will be performed in sea water. In addition, cyanobacterial salt resistance genes also can be applied to improve the salt tolerance of salt sensitive organisms, such as crop plants.

  11. Generalist-specialist trade-off during thermal acclimation

    Seebacher, Frank; Ducret, Varlérie; Little, Alexander G; Adriaenssens, Bart

    2015-01-01

    The shape of performance curves and their plasticity define how individuals and populations respond to environmental variability. In theory, maximum performance decreases with an increase in performance breadth. However, reversible acclimation may counteract this generalist–specialist trade-off, because performance optima track environmental conditions so that there is no benefit of generalist phenotypes. We tested this hypothesis by acclimating individual mosquitofish (Gambusia holbrooki) to...

  12. Acclimation and thermal tolerance in Antarctic marine ectotherms

    Peck, L.S.; Morley, S.A.; Richard, J.; Clark, M.S.

    2014-01-01

    Antarctic marine species have evolved in one of the coldest and most temperature-stable marine environments on Earth. They have long been classified as being stenothermal, or having a poor capacity to resist warming. Here we show that their ability to acclimate their physiology to elevated temperatures is poor compared with species from temperate latitudes, and similar to those from the tropics. Those species that have been demonstrated to acclimate take a very long time to do so, with Antarc...

  13. Foliar temperature acclimation reduces simulated carbon sensitivity to climate

    Smith, Nicholas G.; Malyshev, Sergey L.; Shevliakova, Elena; Kattge, Jens; Dukes, Jeffrey S.

    2016-04-01

    Plant photosynthesis and respiration are the largest carbon fluxes between the terrestrial biosphere and the atmosphere, and their parameterizations represent large sources of uncertainty in projections of land carbon uptake in Earth system models (ESMs). The incorporation of temperature acclimation of photosynthesis and foliar respiration, commonly observed processes, into ESMs has been proposed as a way to reduce this uncertainty. Here we show that, across 15 flux tower sites spanning multiple biomes at various locations worldwide (10° S-67° N), acclimation parameterizations improve a model's ability to reproduce observed net ecosystem exchange of CO2. This improvement is most notable in tropical biomes, where photosynthetic acclimation increased model performance by 36%. The consequences of acclimation for simulated terrestrial carbon uptake depend on the process, region and time period evaluated. Globally, including acclimation has a net effect of increasing carbon assimilation and storage, an effect that diminishes with time, but persists well into the future. Our results suggest that land models omitting foliar temperature acclimation are likely to overestimate the temperature sensitivity of terrestrial carbon exchange, thus biasing projections of future carbon storage and estimates of policy indicators such as the transient climate response to cumulative carbon emissions.

  14. Interaction with diurnal and circadian regulation results in dynamic metabolic and transcriptional changes during cold acclimation in Arabidopsis.

    Carmen Espinoza

    Full Text Available In plants, there is a large overlap between cold and circadian regulated genes and in Arabidopsis, we have shown that cold (4°C affects the expression of clock oscillator genes. However, a broader insight into the significance of diurnal and/or circadian regulation of cold responses, particularly for metabolic pathways, and their physiological relevance is lacking. Here, we performed an integrated analysis of transcripts and primary metabolites using microarrays and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. As expected, expression of diurnally regulated genes was massively affected during cold acclimation. Our data indicate that disruption of clock function at the transcriptional level extends to metabolic regulation. About 80% of metabolites that showed diurnal cycles maintained these during cold treatment. In particular, maltose content showed a massive night-specific increase in the cold. However, under free-running conditions, maltose was the only metabolite that maintained any oscillations in the cold. Furthermore, although starch accumulates during cold acclimation we show it is still degraded at night, indicating significance beyond the previously demonstrated role of maltose and starch breakdown in the initial phase of cold acclimation. Levels of some conventional cold induced metabolites, such as γ-aminobutyric acid, galactinol, raffinose and putrescine, exhibited diurnal and circadian oscillations and transcripts encoding their biosynthetic enzymes often also cycled and preceded their cold-induction, in agreement with transcriptional regulation. However, the accumulation of other cold-responsive metabolites, for instance homoserine, methionine and maltose, did not have consistent transcriptional regulation, implying that metabolic reconfiguration involves complex transcriptional and post-transcriptional mechanisms. These data demonstrate the importance of understanding cold acclimation in the correct day-night context, and are further

  15. Cadmium-induced inhibition of photosynthesis and long-term acclimation to cadmium stress in the hyperaccumulator Thlaspi caerulescens.

    Küpper, Hendrik; Parameswaran, Aravind; Leitenmaier, Barbara; Trtílek, Martin; Setlík, Ivan

    2007-01-01

    Acclimation of hyperaccumulators to heavy metal-induced stress is crucial for phytoremediation and was investigated using the hyperaccumulator Thlaspi caerulescens and the nonaccumulators T. fendleri and T. ochroleucum. Spatially and spectrally resolved kinetics of in vivo absorbance and fluorescence were measured with a novel fluorescence kinetic microscope. At the beginning of growth on cadmium (Cd), all species suffered from toxicity, but T. caerulescens subsequently recovered completely. During stress, a few mesophyll cells in T. caerulescens became more inhibited and accumulated more Cd than the majority; this heterogeneity disappeared during acclimation. Chlorophyll fluorescence parameters related to photochemistry were more strongly affected by Cd stress than nonphotochemical parameters, and only photochemistry showed acclimation. Cd acclimation in T. caerulescens shows that part of its Cd tolerance is inducible and involves transient physiological heterogeneity as an emergency defence mechanism. Differential effects of Cd stress on photochemical vs nonphotochemical parameters indicate that Cd inhibits the photosynthetic light reactions more than the Calvin-Benson cycle. Differential spectral distribution of Cd effects on photochemical vs nonphotochemical quenching shows that Cd inhibits at least two different targets in/around photosystem II (PSII). Spectrally homogeneous maximal PSII efficiency (F(v)/F(m)) suggests that in healthy T. caerulescens all chlorophylls fluorescing at room temperature are PSII-associated. PMID:17688582

  16. Phenotypic flexibility of energetics in acclimated Siberian hamsters has a narrower scope in winter than in summer.

    Boratyński, Jan S; Jefimow, Małgorzata; Wojciechowski, Michał S

    2016-04-01

    As photoperiod shortens with the approach of winter, small mammals should reduce their energy expenditure to survive periods of food limitation. However, within seasons, animals should balance their energy budgets as abiotic conditions change, sometimes unpredictably; cold spells should increase heat production, while warm spells should do the opposite. Therefore, we addressed specific questions about the possible interactions between seasonal acclimatization and the intra-seasonal phenotypic flexibility of metabolic rate. We hypothesized that phenotypic flexibility in small mammals differs seasonally and is greater in summer than in winter, and predicted that seasonal adjustments in energetics, which are driven by photoperiod, overwhelm the influence of variations in the thermal environment. We measured body mass, basal metabolic rate (BMR), facultative non-shivering thermogenesis (fNST), body temperature, and calculated minimum thermal conductance in Siberian hamsters Phodopus sungorus. Animals were acclimated to winter-like, and then to summer-like conditions and, within each season, were exposed twice, for 3 weeks to 10, 20 or 28 °C. We used differences between values measured after these short acclimation periods as a measure of the scope of phenotypic flexibility. After winter acclimation, hamsters were lighter, had lower whole animal BMR, higher fNST than in summer, and developed heterothermy. After these short acclimations to the above-mentioned temperatures, hamsters showed reversible changes in BMR and fNST; however, these traits were less flexible in winter than in summer. We conclude that seasonal acclimation affects hamster responses to intra-seasonal variations in the thermal environment. We argue that understanding seasonal changes in phenotypic flexibility is crucial for predicting the biological consequences of global climate changes. PMID:26803319

  17. Short Duration Heat Acclimation in Australian Football Players.

    Kelly, Monica; Gastin, Paul B; Dwyer, Daniel B; Sostaric, Simon; Snow, Rodney J

    2016-03-01

    This study examined if five sessions of short duration (27 min), high intensity, interval training (HIIT) in the heat over a nine day period would induce heat acclimation in Australian football (AF) players. Fourteen professional AF players were matched for VO2peak (mL·kg(-1)·min(-1)) and randomly allocated into either a heat acclimation (Acc) (n = 7) or Control (Con) group (n = 7). The Acc completed five cycle ergometer HIIT sessions within a nine day period on a cycle ergometer in the heat (38.7 ± 0.5 °C; 34.4 ± 1.3 % RH), whereas Con trained in thermo-neutral conditions (22.3 ± 0.2 °C; 35.8 ± 0. % RH). Four days prior and two days post HIIT participants undertook a 30 min constant load cycling test at 60% V̇O2peak in the heat (37.9 ± 0.1 °C; 28.5 ± 0.7 % RH) during which VO2, blood lactate concentration ([Lac(-)]), heart rate (HR), rating of perceived exertion (RPE), thermal comfort, core and skin temperatures were measured. Heat acclimation resulted in reduced RPE, thermal comfort and [Lac(-)] (all p HIIT, in both groups. Heat acclimation did not influence any other measured variables. In conclusion, five short duration HIIT sessions in hot dry conditions induced limited heat acclimation responses in AF players during the in-season competition phase. In practice, the heat acclimation protocol can be implemented in a professional team environment; however the physiological adaptations resulting from such a protocol were limited. Key pointsSome minor heat acclimation adaptations can be induced in professional AF players with five 27 min non-consecutive, short duration HIIT sessions in the heat.The heat acclimation protocol employed in this study was able to be implemented in a professional team sport environment during an actual competitive season.Elevating and maintaining a high core temperature sufficient for heat acclimation likely requires a longer heat training session or some pre-heating prior to exercise. PMID:26957934

  18. Paradoxical acclimation responses in the thermal performance of insect immunity.

    Ferguson, Laura V; Heinrichs, David E; Sinclair, Brent J

    2016-05-01

    Winter is accompanied by multiple stressors, and the interactions between cold and pathogen stress potentially determine the overwintering success of insects. Thus, it is necessary to explore the thermal performance of the insect immune system. We cold-acclimated spring field crickets, Gryllus veletis, to 6 °C for 7 days and measured the thermal performance of potential (lysozyme and phenoloxidase activity) and realised (bacterial clearance and melanisation) immune responses. Cold acclimation decreased the critical thermal minimum from -0.5 ± 0.25 to -2.1 ± 0.18 °C, and chill coma recovery time after 72 h at -2 °C from 16.8 ± 4.9 to 5.2 ± 2.0 min. Measures of both potential and realised immunity followed a typical thermal performance curve, decreasing with decreasing temperature. However, cold acclimation further decreased realised immunity at low, but not high, temperatures; effectively, immune activity became paradoxically specialised to higher temperatures. Thus, cold acclimation induced mismatched thermal responses between locomotor and immune systems, as well as within the immune system itself. We conclude that cold acclimation in insects appears to preferentially improve cold tolerance over whole-animal immune performance at low temperatures, and that the differential thermal performance of physiological responses to multiple pressures must be considered when predicting ectotherms' response to climate change. PMID:26846428

  19. Early and delayed long-term transcriptional changes and short-term transient responses during cold acclimation in olive leaves

    Leyva-Pérez, María de la O; Valverde-Corredor, Antonio; Valderrama, Raquel; Jiménez-Ruiz, Jaime; Muñoz-Merida, Antonio; Trelles, Oswaldo; Barroso, Juan Bautista; Mercado-Blanco, Jesús; Luque, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    Low temperature severely affects plant growth and development. To overcome this constraint, several plant species from regions having a cool season have evolved an adaptive response, called cold acclimation. We have studied this response in olive tree (Olea europaea L.) cv. Picual. Biochemical stress markers and cold-stress symptoms were detected after the first 24 h as sagging leaves. After 5 days, the plants were found to have completely recovered. Control and cold-stressed plants were sequ...

  20. Drinking and water balance during exercise and heat acclimation

    Greenleaf, J. E.; Brock, P. J.; Keil, L. C.; Morse, J. T.

    1983-01-01

    The interactions between fluid intake and balance, and plasma ion, osmotic, and endocrine responses during dehydration produced by exercise in cool and warm environments during acclimation are explored. Two groups of five male subjects performed 8 days of ergometer exercise in hot and thermoneutral conditions, respectively. The exercise trials lasted 2 hr each. Monitoring was carried out on the PV, osmotic, sodium, and endocrine concentrations, voluntary fluid intake, fluid balances, and fluid deficits. A negative correlation was observed between the plasma sodium and osmolality during acclimation. The presence of hypervolemia during acclimation is suggested as a cause of drinking, while the vasopressin concentration was not found to be a significant factor stimulating drinking. Finally, the predominant mechanism in fluid intake during exercise and heat exposure is concluded to be the renin-angiotensin II system in the presence of reductions in total body water and extracellular plasma volumes.

  1. UV-B Perception and Acclimation in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    Tilbrook, Kimberley; Dubois, Marine; Crocco, Carlos D; Yin, Ruohe; Chappuis, Richard; Allorent, Guillaume; Schmid-Siegert, Emanuel; Goldschmidt-Clermont, Michel; Ulm, Roman

    2016-04-01

    Plants perceive UV-B, an intrinsic component of sunlight, via a signaling pathway that is mediated by the photoreceptor UV RESISTANCE LOCUS8 (UVR8) and induces UV-B acclimation. To test whether similar UV-B perception mechanisms exist in the evolutionarily distant green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, we identified Chlamydomonas orthologs of UVR8 and the key signaling factor CONSTITUTIVELY PHOTOMORPHOGENIC1 (COP1). Cr-UVR8 shares sequence and structural similarity to Arabidopsis thaliana UVR8, has conserved tryptophan residues for UV-B photoreception, monomerizes upon UV-B exposure, and interacts with Cr-COP1 in a UV-B-dependent manner. Moreover, Cr-UVR8 can interact with At-COP1 and complement the Arabidopsis uvr8 mutant, demonstrating that it is a functional UV-B photoreceptor. Chlamydomonas shows apparent UV-B acclimation in colony survival and photosynthetic efficiency assays. UV-B exposure, at low levels that induce acclimation, led to broad changes in the Chlamydomonas transcriptome, including in genes related to photosynthesis. Impaired UV-B-induced activation in the Cr-COP1 mutant hit1 indicates that UVR8-COP1 signaling induces transcriptome changes in response to UV-B. Also, hit1 mutants are impaired in UV-B acclimation. Chlamydomonas UV-B acclimation preserved the photosystem II core proteins D1 and D2 under UV-B stress, which mitigated UV-B-induced photoinhibition. These findings highlight the early evolution of UVR8 photoreceptor signaling in the green lineage to induce UV-B acclimation and protection. PMID:27020958

  2. Short Duration Heat Acclimation in Australian Football Players

    Monica Kelly, Paul B. Gastin, Daniel B Dwyer, Simon Sostaric, Rodney J. Snow

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This study examined if five sessions of short duration (27 min, high intensity, interval training (HIIT in the heat over a nine day period would induce heat acclimation in Australian football (AF players. Fourteen professional AF players were matched for VO2peak (mL·kg-1·min-1 and randomly allocated into either a heat acclimation (Acc (n = 7 or Control (Con group (n = 7. The Acc completed five cycle ergometer HIIT sessions within a nine day period on a cycle ergometer in the heat (38.7 ± 0.5 °C; 34.4 ± 1.3 % RH, whereas Con trained in thermo-neutral conditions (22.3 ± 0.2 °C; 35.8 ± 0. % RH. Four days prior and two days post HIIT participants undertook a 30 min constant load cycling test at 60% VO2peak in the heat (37.9 ± 0.1 °C; 28.5 ± 0.7 % RH during which VO2, blood lactate concentration ([Lac-], heart rate (HR, rating of perceived exertion (RPE, thermal comfort, core and skin temperatures were measured. Heat acclimation resulted in reduced RPE, thermal comfort and [Lac-] (all p < 0.05 during the submaximal exercise test in the heat. Heart rate was lower (p = 0.007 after HIIT, in both groups. Heat acclimation did not influence any other measured variables. In conclusion, five short duration HIIT sessions in hot dry conditions induced limited heat acclimation responses in AF players during the in-season competition phase. In practice, the heat acclimation protocol can be implemented in a professional team environment; however the physiological adaptations resulting from such a protocol were limited.

  3. Short Duration Heat Acclimation in Australian Football Players

    Kelly, Monica; Gastin, Paul B.; Dwyer, Daniel B; Sostaric, Simon; Snow, Rodney J.

    2016-01-01

    This study examined if five sessions of short duration (27 min), high intensity, interval training (HIIT) in the heat over a nine day period would induce heat acclimation in Australian football (AF) players. Fourteen professional AF players were matched for VO2peak (mL·kg-1·min-1) and randomly allocated into either a heat acclimation (Acc) (n = 7) or Control (Con) group (n = 7). The Acc completed five cycle ergometer HIIT sessions within a nine day period on a cycle ergometer in the heat (38....

  4. Rapid development of adaptive, climate-driven clinal variation in seed mass in the invasive annual Forb Echium plantagineum L.

    Konarzewski, Tara K; Murray, Brad R; Godfree, Robert C

    2012-01-01

    We examined adaptive clinal variation in seed mass among populations of an invasive annual species, Echium plantagineum, in response to climatic selection. We collected seeds from 34 field populations from a 1,000 km long temperature and rainfall gradient across the species' introduced range in south-eastern Australia. Seeds were germinated, grown to reproductive age under common glasshouse conditions, and progeny seeds were harvested and weighed. Analyses showed that seed mass was significantly related to climatic factors, with populations sourced from hotter, more arid sites producing heavier seeds than populations from cooler and wetter sites. Seed mass was not related to edaphic factors. We also found that seed mass was significantly related to both longitude and latitude with each degree of longitude west and latitude north increasing seed mass by around 2.5% and 4% on average. There was little evidence that within-population or between-population variation in seed mass varied in a systematic manner across the study region. Our findings provide compelling evidence for development of a strong cline in seed mass across the geographic range of a widespread and highly successful invasive annual forb. Since large seed mass is known to provide reproductive assurance for plants in arid environments, our results support the hypothesis that the fitness and range potential of invasive species can increase as a result of genetic divergence of populations along broad climatic gradients. In E. plantagineum population-level differentiation has occurred in 150 years or less, indicating that the adaptation process can be rapid. PMID:23284621

  5. Rapid development of adaptive, climate-driven clinal variation in seed mass in the invasive annual Forb Echium plantagineum L.

    Tara K Konarzewski

    Full Text Available We examined adaptive clinal variation in seed mass among populations of an invasive annual species, Echium plantagineum, in response to climatic selection. We collected seeds from 34 field populations from a 1,000 km long temperature and rainfall gradient across the species' introduced range in south-eastern Australia. Seeds were germinated, grown to reproductive age under common glasshouse conditions, and progeny seeds were harvested and weighed. Analyses showed that seed mass was significantly related to climatic factors, with populations sourced from hotter, more arid sites producing heavier seeds than populations from cooler and wetter sites. Seed mass was not related to edaphic factors. We also found that seed mass was significantly related to both longitude and latitude with each degree of longitude west and latitude north increasing seed mass by around 2.5% and 4% on average. There was little evidence that within-population or between-population variation in seed mass varied in a systematic manner across the study region. Our findings provide compelling evidence for development of a strong cline in seed mass across the geographic range of a widespread and highly successful invasive annual forb. Since large seed mass is known to provide reproductive assurance for plants in arid environments, our results support the hypothesis that the fitness and range potential of invasive species can increase as a result of genetic divergence of populations along broad climatic gradients. In E. plantagineum population-level differentiation has occurred in 150 years or less, indicating that the adaptation process can be rapid.

  6. Diferenciação clinal e correlação do polimorfismo cromossómico e tamanho do corpo em Drosophila subobscura

    Lima, Margarida Rocha de, 1983-

    2011-01-01

    Tese de mestrado. Biologia (Biologia Evolutiva e do Desenvolvimento). Universidade de Lisboa, Faculdade de Ciências, 2011 A variação clinal permite a identificação de características e genes associados a condições ambientais, despertando um grande interesse ao nível da Biologia Evolutiva e da Conservação. A Drosophila subobscura apresenta um cline latitudinal quer no tamanho do corpo, quer no polimorfismo cromossómico no continente europeu. Mais recentemente, apresentou novamente esta vari...

  7. Isopods failed to acclimate their thermal sensitivity of locomotor performance during predictable or stochastic cooling.

    Matthew S Schuler

    Full Text Available Most organisms experience environments that vary continuously over time, yet researchers generally study phenotypic responses to abrupt and sustained changes in environmental conditions. Gradual environmental changes, whether predictable or stochastic, might affect organisms differently than do abrupt changes. To explore this possibility, we exposed terrestrial isopods (Porcellio scaber collected from a highly seasonal environment to four thermal treatments: (1 a constant 20°C; (2 a constant 10°C; (3 a steady decline from 20° to 10°C; and (4 a stochastic decline from 20° to 10°C that mimicked natural conditions during autumn. After 45 days, we measured thermal sensitivities of running speed and thermal tolerances (critical thermal maximum and chill-coma recovery time. Contrary to our expectation, thermal treatments did not affect the thermal sensitivity of locomotion; isopods from all treatments ran fastest at 33° to 34°C and achieved more than 80% of their maximal speed over a range of 10° to 11°C. Isopods exposed to a stochastic decline in temperature tolerated cold the best, and isopods exposed to a constant temperature of 20°C tolerated cold the worst. No significant variation in heat tolerance was observed among groups. Therefore, thermal sensitivity and heat tolerance failed to acclimate to any type of thermal change, whereas cold tolerance acclimated more during stochastic change than it did during abrupt change.

  8. Chlorophyll Fluorescence Analysis of Cyanobacterial Photosynthesis and Acclimation

    Campbell, Douglas; Hurry, Vaughan; Adrian K Clarke; Gustafsson, Petter; Öquist, Gunnar

    1998-01-01

    Cyanobacteria are ecologically important photosynthetic prokaryotes that also serve as popular model organisms for studies of photosynthesis and gene regulation. Both molecular and ecological studies of cyanobacteria benefit from real-time information on photosynthesis and acclimation. Monitoring in vivo chlorophyll fluorescence can provide noninvasive measures of photosynthetic physiology in a wide range of cyanobacteria and cyanolichens and requires only small samples. Cyanobacterial fluore...

  9. Evidence for developmental thermal acclimation in the damselfish, Pomacentrus moluccensis

    Grenchik, M. K.; Donelson, J. M.; Munday, P. L.

    2013-03-01

    Tropical species are predicted to have limited capacity for acclimation to global warming. This study investigated the potential for developmental thermal acclimation by the tropical damselfish Pomacentrus moluccensis to ocean temperatures predicted to occur over the next 50-100 years. Newly settled juveniles were reared for 4 months in four temperature treatments, consisting of the current-day summer average (28.5 °C) and up to 3 °C above the average (29.5, 30.5 and 31.5 °C). Resting metabolic rate (RMR) of fish reared at 29.5 and 31.5 °C was significantly higher than the control group reared at 28.5 °C. In contrast, RMR of fish reared at 30.5 °C was not significantly different from the control group, indicating these fish had acclimated to their rearing temperature. Furthermore, fish that developed in 30.5 and 31.5 °C exhibited an enhanced ability to deal with acute temperature increases. These findings illustrate that developmental acclimation may help coral reef fish cope with warming ocean temperatures.

  10. Molecular processes of transgenerational acclimation to a warming ocean

    Veilleux, Heather D.

    2015-07-20

    Some animals have the remarkable capacity to acclimate across generations to projected future climate change1, 2, 3, 4; however, the underlying molecular processes are unknown. We sequenced and assembled de novo transcriptomes of adult tropical reef fish exposed developmentally or transgenerationally to projected future ocean temperatures and correlated the resulting expression profiles with acclimated metabolic traits from the same fish. We identified 69 contigs representing 53 key genes involved in thermal acclimation of aerobic capacity. Metabolic genes were among the most upregulated transgenerationally, suggesting shifts in energy production for maintaining performance at elevated temperatures. Furthermore, immune- and stress-responsive genes were upregulated transgenerationally, indicating a new complement of genes allowing the second generation of fish to better cope with elevated temperatures. Other differentially expressed genes were involved with tissue development and transcriptional regulation. Overall, we found a similar suite of differentially expressed genes among developmental and transgenerational treatments. Heat-shock protein genes were surprisingly unresponsive, indicating that short-term heat-stress responses may not be a good indicator of long-term acclimation capacity. Our results are the first to reveal the molecular processes that may enable marine fishes to adjust to a future warmer environment over multiple generations.

  11. Phospholipase A2 activity during cold acclimation of wheat

    Phospholipase A2 (EC 3.1.1.4; PLA2) activity in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) crown tissue from plants undergoing cold acclimation and/or chilling stress was investigated in a moderately cold tolerant winter wheat, a spring wheat, and a poorly cold tolerant winter wheat. Activity levels were inv...

  12. Effect of elevated CO2 concentration: Acclimation of Rubisco

    Urban, Otmar; Šprtová, Miroslava

    Volume 1. 1. Brno : Global Change Research Centre, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, v. v. i, 2015 - (Urban, O.; Klem, K.), s. 78-88 ISBN 978-80-87902-14-1 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1415 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : CO2 concentration * Rubisco * acclimation Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour

  13. Disease and thermal acclimation in a more variable and unpredictable climate

    Raffel, Thomas R.; Romansic, John M.; Halstead, Neal T.; McMahon, Taegan A.; Venesky, Matthew D.; Rohr, Jason R.

    2013-02-01

    Global climate change is shifting the distribution of infectious diseases of humans and wildlife with potential adverse consequences for disease control. As well as increasing mean temperatures, climate change is expected to increase climate variability, making climate less predictable. However, few empirical or theoretical studies have considered the effects of climate variability or predictability on disease, despite it being likely that hosts and parasites will have differential responses to climatic shifts. Here we present a theoretical framework for how temperature variation and its predictability influence disease risk by affecting host and parasite acclimation responses. Laboratory experiments conducted in 80 independent incubators, and field data on disease-associated frog declines in Latin America, support the framework and provide evidence that unpredictable temperature fluctuations, on both monthly and diurnal timescales, decrease frog resistance to the pathogenic chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis. Furthermore, the pattern of temperature-dependent growth of the fungus on frogs was opposite to the pattern of growth in culture, emphasizing the importance of accounting for the host-parasite interaction when predicting climate-dependent disease dynamics. If similar acclimation responses influence other host-parasite systems, as seems likely, then present models, which generally ignore small-scale temporal variability in climate, might provide poor predictions for climate effects on disease.

  14. Above-Ground Dimensions and Acclimation Explain Variation in Drought Mortality of Scots Pine Seedlings from Various Provenances

    Seidel, Hannes; Menzel, Annette

    2016-01-01

    Seedling establishment is a critical part of the life cycle, thus seedling survival might be even more important for forest persistence under recent and future climate change. Scots pine forests have been disproportionally more affected by climate change triggered forest-dieback. Nevertheless, some Scots pine provenances might prove resilient to future drought events because of the species’ large distributional range, genetic diversity, and adaptation potential. However, there is a lack of knowledge on provenance-specific survival under severe drought events and on how acclimation alters survival rates in Scots pine seedlings. We therefore conducted two drought-induced mortality experiments with potted Scots pine seedlings in a greenhouse. In the first experiment, 760 three-year-old seedlings from 12 different provenances of the south-western distribution range were subjected to the same treatment followed by the mortality experiment in 2014. In the second experiment, we addressed the question of whether acclimation to re-occurring drought stress events and to elevated temperature might decrease mortality rates. Thus, 139 four-year-old seedlings from France, Germany, and Poland were subjected to different temperature regimes (2012–2014) and drought treatments (2013–2014) before the mortality experiment in 2015. Provenances clearly differed in their hazard of drought-induced mortality, which was only partly related to the climate of their origin. Drought acclimation decreased the hazard of drought-induced mortality. Above-ground dry weight and height were the main determinants for the hazard of mortality, i.e., heavier and taller seedlings were more prone to mortality. Consequently, Scots pine seedlings exhibit a considerable provenance-specific acclimation potential against drought mortality and the selection of suitable provenances might thus facilitate seedling establishment and the persistence of Scots pine forest. PMID:27458477

  15. Above-Ground Dimensions and Acclimation Explain Variation in Drought Mortality of Scots Pine Seedlings from Various Provenances.

    Seidel, Hannes; Menzel, Annette

    2016-01-01

    Seedling establishment is a critical part of the life cycle, thus seedling survival might be even more important for forest persistence under recent and future climate change. Scots pine forests have been disproportionally more affected by climate change triggered forest-dieback. Nevertheless, some Scots pine provenances might prove resilient to future drought events because of the species' large distributional range, genetic diversity, and adaptation potential. However, there is a lack of knowledge on provenance-specific survival under severe drought events and on how acclimation alters survival rates in Scots pine seedlings. We therefore conducted two drought-induced mortality experiments with potted Scots pine seedlings in a greenhouse. In the first experiment, 760 three-year-old seedlings from 12 different provenances of the south-western distribution range were subjected to the same treatment followed by the mortality experiment in 2014. In the second experiment, we addressed the question of whether acclimation to re-occurring drought stress events and to elevated temperature might decrease mortality rates. Thus, 139 four-year-old seedlings from France, Germany, and Poland were subjected to different temperature regimes (2012-2014) and drought treatments (2013-2014) before the mortality experiment in 2015. Provenances clearly differed in their hazard of drought-induced mortality, which was only partly related to the climate of their origin. Drought acclimation decreased the hazard of drought-induced mortality. Above-ground dry weight and height were the main determinants for the hazard of mortality, i.e., heavier and taller seedlings were more prone to mortality. Consequently, Scots pine seedlings exhibit a considerable provenance-specific acclimation potential against drought mortality and the selection of suitable provenances might thus facilitate seedling establishment and the persistence of Scots pine forest. PMID:27458477

  16. Acclimation increases freezing stress response of Arabidopsis thaliana at proteome level

    Fanucchi, Francesca

    2012-06-01

    This study used 2DE to investigate how Arabidopsis thaliana modulates protein levels in response to freezing stress after sub-lethal exposure at - 10 °C, both in cold-acclimated and in non-acclimated plants. A map was implemented in which 62 spots, corresponding to 44 proteins, were identified. Twenty-two spots were modulated upon treatments, and the corresponding proteins proved to be related to photosynthesis, energy metabolism, and stress response. Proteins demonstrated differences between control and acclimation conditions. Most of the acclimation-responsive proteins were either not further modulated or they were down-modulated by freezing treatment, indicating that the levels reached during acclimation were sufficient to deal with freezing. Anabolic metabolism appeared to be down-regulated in favor of catabolic metabolism. Acclimated plants and plants submitted to freezing after acclimation showed greater reciprocal similarity in protein profiles than either showed when compared both to control plants and to plants frozen without acclimation. The response of non-acclimated plants was aimed at re-modulating photosynthetic apparatus activity, and at increasing the levels of proteins with antioxidant-, molecular chaperone-, or post-transcriptional regulative functions. These changes, even less effective than the acclimation strategy, might allow the injured plastids to minimize the production of non-useful metabolites and might counteract photosynthetic apparatus injuries. © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Multi-generation cadmium acclimation and tolerance in Daphnia magna Straus

    The cladoceran Daphnia magna was acclimated for seven generations to cadmium concentrations ranging from 0 (control) to 250 μg/l Cd (corresponding to a free ion activity of 4.60 nM Cd2+). Acute and chronic cadmium tolerance as well as cadmium accumulation were monitored as a function of acclimation time. After two to three generations of acclimation to concentrations ranging from 0.23 to 1.11 nM Cd2+ increases in acute tolerance were maximal (factor 7.2) and significant. Acclimation for seven generations to the same acclimation concentrations did result in an increased chronic cadmium tolerance (21 days EC50 values increased). Organisms acclimated to 1.93 nM Cd2+ were equally or more sensitive than non-acclimated daphnids in acute and chronic toxicity tests. Cadmium contents in D. magna increased significantly as a function of the acclimation concentration. Maximum body burdens of 236±30 μg Cd/g dry weight were measured in organisms exposed to 4.60 nM Cd2+, but detoxification mechanisms were only successful up to 82±20 μg Cd/g dry weight as this concentration did not cause major decreases in survival and reproduction in chronic toxicity tests. As the potential positive effect of acclimation on cadmium tolerance disappeared with successive acclimation generations and increasing acclimation concentrations, it is concluded that multi-generation acclimation studies are important for the evaluation of the long-term effects of environmental toxicants. - Multi-generation acclimation studies are important for evaluating long-term effects of aquatic pollutants

  18. Gas exchange under water : acclimation of terrestrial plants to submergence

    Mommer, Liesje

    2005-01-01

    Gas exchange between the plant and the environment is severely hampered when plants are submerged, leading to oxygen and energy deficits. A straightforward way to reduce these shortages of oxygen and carbohydrates would be prolonged photosynthesis under water, but this has received only little attention. This thesis, therefore, aims to investigate in depth the effects of acclimation to submergence on underwater gas exchange capacity of terrestrial plants. It elucidates the beneficial effects ...

  19. Thermal acclimation under constant temperatures: Exercise in ecological fantasy?

    Gvoždík, Lumír; Měráková, Eva; Šamajová, Pavlína

    Prague : Society for Experimental Biology, 2010. s. 103. [SEB Annual Main Meeting 2010. 30.06.2010-03.07.2010, Prague] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA206/06/0953; GA ČR GAP506/10/2170 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60930519 Keywords : thermal acclimation * ectotherms Subject RIV: EG - Zoology http://www.sebiology.org/meetings/Past_Meetings/prague/Abstracts/A3.pdf

  20. Impacts of Hypersaline Acclimation on Chlorpyrifos Toxicity to Salmonids

    Maryoung, Lindley Anne

    2014-01-01

    As part of their unique life cycle, most Pacific salmonids transition from freshwater to saltwater, requiring various adjustments in physiology. However, molecular mechanisms underlying this transition are largely unknown. Additionally, acclimation to hypersaline conditions enhances the acute toxicity of certain thioether organophosphate and carbamate pesticides in some species of euryhaline fish, yet sublethal impacts have been far less studied. The current study aimed to determine underlyin...

  1. Dynamic reorganization of photosynthetic supercomplexes during environmental acclimation of photosynthesis

    Minagawa, Jun

    2013-01-01

    Plants and algae have acquired the ability to acclimate to ever-changing environments in order to survive. During photosynthesis, light energy is converted by several membrane protein supercomplexes into electrochemical energy, which is eventually used to assimilate CO2. The efficiency of photosynthesis is modulated by many environmental factors such as quality and quantity of light, temperature, drought, and CO2 concentration, among others. Accumulating evidence indicates that photosynthetic...

  2. Pulmonary ventilation following acclimation to a hot environment

    Beaudin, Andrew Edward

    2007-01-01

    Human pulmonary ventilation and the hyperoxic-centrally mediated ventilatory response to CO2 were studied before and after a 10-day passive heat acclimation (HA). It was hypothesized pulmonary ventilation during a passively- or actively-induced hyperthermia would adapt similarily to thermolytic heat loss responses and that chemosensitivity would be increased following HA. Following HA, onset of increased cutaneous vasodilatation, eccrine sweating and ventilation in both passively- and activel...

  3. Internal Filters : Prospects for UV-Acclimation in Higher Plants

    Caldwell, Martyn M.; Robberecht, Ronald; Flint, Stephan D.

    1983-01-01

    Wavelength-selective absorption of solar radiation within plant leaves allows penetration of visible radiation to the chloroplats, while removing much of the damaging ultraviolet-B radiation. Flavonoids are important in this wavelength-selective absorption. Induction of flavonoid synthesis by solar radiation, and specifically by UV-B radiation, is discussed as this relates to the potential acclimation of plants to enhanced solar UV-B radiation that would result from stratospheric ozone reduct...

  4. Dynamic reorganization of photosynthetic supercomplexes during environmental acclimation

    Jun eMinagawa

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Plants and algae have acquired the ability to acclimate to ever-changing environments in order to survive. During photosynthesis, light energy is converted by several membrane protein supercomplexes into electrochemical energy, which is eventually used to assimilate CO2. The efficiency of photosynthesis is modulated by many environmental factors such as quality and quantity of light, temperature, drought, and CO2 concentration, among others. Accumulating evidence indicates that photosynthetic supercomplexes undergo supramolecular reorganization within a short timeframe during acclimation to an environmental change. This reorganization includes state transitions that balance the excitation of photosystem I and II by shuttling peripheral antenna proteins between the two, thermal energy dissipation that occurs at energy-quenching sites within the light-harvesting antenna generated for negative feedback when excess light is absorbed, and cyclic electron flow that is facilitated between photosystem I and the cytochrome bf complex when cells demand more ATP and/or need to activate energy dissipation. This review will highlight the recent findings regarding these environmental acclimation events in model organisms with particular attention to the unicellular green alga C. reinhardtii and with reference to the vascular plant A. thaliana, which offers a glimpse into the dynamic behavior of photosynthetic machineries in nature.

  5. Cardiovascular adaptations supporting human exercise-heat acclimation.

    Périard, Julien D; Travers, Gavin J S; Racinais, Sébastien; Sawka, Michael N

    2016-04-01

    This review examines the cardiovascular adaptations along with total body water and plasma volume adjustments that occur in parallel with improved heat loss responses during exercise-heat acclimation. The cardiovascular system is well recognized as an important contributor to exercise-heat acclimation that acts to minimize physiological strain, reduce the risk of serious heat illness and better sustain exercise capacity. The upright posture adopted by humans during most physical activities and the large skin surface area contribute to the circulatory and blood pressure regulation challenge of simultaneously supporting skeletal muscle blood flow and dissipating heat via increased skin blood flow and sweat secretion during exercise-heat stress. Although it was traditionally held that cardiac output increased during exercise-heat stress to primarily support elevated skin blood flow requirements, recent evidence suggests that temperature-sensitive mechanisms may also mediate an elevation in skeletal muscle blood flow. The cardiovascular adaptations supporting this challenge include an increase in total body water, plasma volume expansion, better sustainment and/or elevation of stroke volume, reduction in heart rate, improvement in ventricular filling and myocardial efficiency, and enhanced skin blood flow and sweating responses. The magnitude of these adaptations is variable and dependent on several factors such as exercise intensity, duration of exposure, frequency and total number of exposures, as well as the environmental conditions (i.e. dry or humid heat) in which acclimation occurs. PMID:26905458

  6. No Inbreeding depression for low temperature developmental acclimation across multiple drosophila species

    Kristensen, Torsten Nygård; Loeschcke, Volker; Bilde, Trine;

    2011-01-01

    Populations are from time to time exposed to stressful temperatures. Their thermal resistance levels are determined by inherent and plastic mechanisms, which are both likely to be under selection in natural populations. Previous studies on Drosophila species have shown that inherent resistance is...... highly species specific, and differs among ecotypes (e.g., tropical and widespread species). Apart from being exposed to thermal stress many small and fragmented populations face genetic challenges due to, for example, inbreeding. Inbreeding has been shown to reduce inherent resistance levels toward...... stressful temperatures, but whether adaptation to thermal stress through plastic responses also is affected by inbreeding is so far not clear. In this study, we test inherent cold resistance and the ability to respond plastically to temperature changes through developmental cold acclimation in inbred and...

  7. Physiological responses in rufous-collared sparrows to thermal acclimation and seasonal acclimatization.

    Maldonado, Karin Evelyn; Cavieres, Grisel; Veloso, Claudio; Canals, Mauricio; Sabat, Pablo

    2009-04-01

    A large number of physiological acclimation studies assume that flexibility in a certain trait is both adaptive and functionally important for organisms in their natural environment; however, it is not clear how an organism's capacity for temperature acclimation translates to the seasonal acclimatization that these organisms must accomplish. To elucidate this relationship, we measured BMR and TEWL rates in both field-acclimatized and laboratory-acclimated adult rufous-collared sparrows (Zonotrichia capensis). Measurements in field-acclimatized birds were taken during the winter and summer seasons; in the laboratory-acclimated birds, we took our measurements following 4 weeks at either 15 or 30 degrees C. Although BMR and TEWL rates did not differ between winter and summer in the field-acclimatized birds, laboratory-acclimated birds exposed to 15 degrees C exhibited both a higher BMR and TEWL rate when compared to the birds acclimated to 30 degrees C and the field-acclimatized birds. Because organ masses seem to be similar between field and cold-acclimated birds whereas BMR is higher in cold-acclimated birds, the variability in BMR cannot be explained completely by adjustments in organ masses. Our findings suggest that, although rufous-collared sparrows can exhibit thermal acclimation of physiological traits, sparrows do not use this capacity to cope with minor to moderate fluctuations in environmental conditions. Our data support the hypothesis that physiological flexibility in energetic traits is a common feature of avian metabolism. PMID:19011873

  8. Reproductive acclimation to increased water temperature in a tropical reef fish.

    Jennifer M Donelson

    Full Text Available Understanding the capacity of organisms to cope with projected global warming through acclimation and adaptation is critical to predicting their likely future persistence. While recent research has shown that developmental acclimation of metabolic attributes to ocean warming is possible, our understanding of the plasticity of key fitness-associated traits, such as reproductive performance, is lacking. We show that while the reproductive ability of a tropical reef fish is highly sensitive to increases in water temperature, reproductive capacity at +1.5°C above present-day was improved to match fish maintained at present-day temperatures when fish complete their development at the higher temperature. However, reproductive acclimation was not observed in fish reared at +3.0°C warmer than present-day, suggesting limitations to the acclimation possible within one generation. Surprisingly, the improvements seen in reproduction were not predicted by the oxygen- and capacity-limited thermal tolerance hypothesis. Specifically, pairs reared at +1.5°C, which showed the greatest capacity for reproductive acclimation, exhibited no acclimation of metabolic attributes. Conversely, pairs reared at +3.0°C, which exhibited acclimation in resting metabolic rate, demonstrated little capacity for reproductive acclimation. Our study suggests that understanding the acclimation capacity of reproductive performance will be critically important to predicting the impacts of climate change on biological systems.

  9. Cross acclimation between heat and hypoxia: Heat acclimation improves cellular tolerance and exercise performance in acute normobaric hypoxia

    Ben James Lee

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background. The potential for cross acclimation between environmental stressors is not well understood. Thus the aim of this investigation was to determine the effect of fixed-workload heat or hypoxic acclimation on cellular, physiological and performance responses during post acclimation hypoxic exercise in humans. Method. Twenty-one males (age 22 ± 5 years; stature 1.76 ± 0.07m; mass 71.8 ± 7.9kg; V ̇O2 peak 51 ± 7mL.kg-1.min-1 completed a cycling hypoxic stress test (HST and self-paced 16.1km time trial (TT before (HST1, TT1, and after (HST2, TT2 a series of 10 daily 60 min training sessions (50% N V ̇O2peak in control (CON, n = 7; 18°C, 35%RH, hypoxic (HYP, n = 7; or hot (HOT, n = 7; 40°C, 25% RH conditions. Results. TT performance in hypoxia was improved following both acclimation treatments, HYP (-3:16 ± 3:10 mins:sec; p = 0.0006 and HOT (-2:02 ± 1:02 mins:sec; p = 0.005, but unchanged after CON (+0:31 ± 1:42 mins:sec. Resting monocyte heat shock protein 72 (mHSP72 increased prior to HST2 in HOT (62 ± 46% and HYP (58 ± 52%, but was unchanged after CON (9 ± 46%, leading to an attenuated mHSP72 response to hypoxic exercise in HOT and HYP HST2 compared to HST1 (p < 0.01. Changes in extracellular hypoxia-inducible factor 1-α followed a similar pattern to those of mHSP72. Physiological strain index (PSI was attenuated in HOT (HST1 = 4.12 ± 0.58, HST2 = 3.60 ± 0.42; p = 0.007 as a result of a reduced HR (HST1 = 140 ± 14 b.min-1; HST2 131 ± 9 b.min-1 p = 0.0006 and Trectal (HST1 = 37.55 ± 0.18°C; HST2 37.45 ± 0.14°C; p = 0.018 during exercise. Whereas PSI did not change in HYP (HST1 = 4.82 ± 0.64, HST2 4.83 ± 0.63. Conclusion. Heat acclimation improved cellular and systemic physiological tolerance to steady state exercise in moderate hypoxia. Additionally we show, for the first time, that heat acclimation improved cycling time trial performance to a magnitude similar to that achieved by hypoxic acclimation.

  10. Microtopographic hydrologic variability change resulting from vegetation acclimation response to elevated atmospheric CO2

    Le, P. V.; Kumar, P.

    2015-12-01

    The elevated concentration of atmospheric CO2 increases the ratio of carbon fixation to water loss from plants or water use efficiency, which reduces transpiration. However, the magnitude of the effects of this vegetation acclimation on hydrologic dynamics, such as soil moisture content and surface runoff controlled by microtopographic variability on the land surface, remains unclear. Here we integrate a multi-layer canopy-root-soil model (MLCan) with a coupled surface-subsurface flow model (GCSFlow) to capture the acclimation responses of vegetation to climate change and predict how these changes affect hydrologic dynamics on landscapes at fine scales. The model is implemented on a hybrid CPU-GPU parallel computing environment to overcome challenges associated with the high density of computational grid and nonlinear solvers. The model is capable of simulating large-scale heterogeneities due to both microtopography and soils and lateral water fluxes at emerging lidar-scale resolutions (~1m). We demonstrate that hybrid computing is feasible for detailed, large-scale ecohydrologic modeling, which has been previously assumed to be an intractable computational problem. Simulations are performed for corn crop in the Goose Creek watershed in central Illinois, USA at present and projected higher concentrations of atmospheric CO2, 400 ppm and 550 ppm, respectively. The results show a net decrease of 11% for the average annual evapotranspiration of corn, which increases water content in the soil and at the land surface. These results highlight the critical role of a warming climate on atmospheric-soil-vegetation interactions and the need to understand other dynamics near the soil surface associated with water and vegetation.

  11. Heat and cold acclimation in helium-cold hypothermia in the hamster.

    Musacchia, X. J.

    1972-01-01

    A study was made of the effects of acclimation of hamsters to high (34-35 C) and low (4-5 C) temperatures for periods up to 6 weeks on the induction of hypothermia in hamsters. Hypothermia was achieved by exposing hamsters to a helox mixture of 80% helium and 20% oxygen at 0 C. Hypothermic induction was most rapid (2-3 hr) in heat-acclimated hamsters and slowest (6-12 hr) in cold-acclimated hamsters. The induction period was intermediate (5-8 hr) in room temperature nonacclimated animals (controls). Survival time in hypothermia was relatable to previous temperature acclimations. The hypothesis that thermogenesis in cold-acclimated hamsters would accentuate resistance to induction of hypothermia was substantiated.

  12. Nature clinale de la fréquence des ovarioles et des spermathèques observée chez les ouvrières de l'abeille du Cap, Apis mellifera capensis

    Phiancharoen, Mananya; Christian W W Pirk; Radloff, Sarah E.; Hepburn, Randall

    2010-01-01

    International audience It was determined that 300 Cape workers, Apis mellifera capensis (collected from each of 6 colonies at each of 5 localities about 200 km apart along an 800 km transect in the Western and Eastern Cape Provinces, South Africa) was the sample size required to statistically estimate the proportions of workers with spermathecae at each location at 95% confidence levels. Because of the extremely clinal nature of this honeybee population, we tested the hypotheses that (1) o...

  13. Integration of polyamines in the cold acclimation response.

    Alcázar, Rubén; Cuevas, Juan C; Planas, Joan; Zarza, Xavier; Bortolotti, Cristina; Carrasco, Pedro; Salinas, Julio; Tiburcio, Antonio F; Altabella, Teresa

    2011-01-01

    Temperature is one of the most important environmental factors limiting the geographical distribution of plants and accounts for significant reductions in the yield of agriculturally important crops. Low temperature damages many plant species, especially those adapted to tropical climates. In contrast, some species from temperate regions are able to develop freezing tolerance in response to low-non-freezing temperature, an adaptive process named cold acclimation. Numerous molecular, biochemical and physiological changes occur during cold acclimation, most of them being associated with significant changes in gene expression and metabolite profiles. During recent years, transcriptomic and metabolomic approaches have allowed the identification of cold-responsive genes and main metabolites which accumulate in plants exposed to cold. The obtained data support the previously held idea that polyamines (PAs) are involved in plant responses to cold, although their specific role is still not well understood. In this review, we synthesize published data regarding PA-responses to cold stress and integrate them with global transcriptional and metabolic changes. The potential of PA genetic engineering for the development of plants resistant to cold and freezing temperatures, and their plausible mechanisms of action are also discussed. PMID:21421344

  14. Carbon fluxes acclimate more strongly to elevated growth temperatures than to elevated CO2 concentrations in a northern conifer.

    Kroner, Yulia; Way, Danielle A

    2016-08-01

    Increasing temperatures and atmospheric CO2 concentrations will affect tree carbon fluxes, generating potential feedbacks between forests and the global climate system. We studied how elevated temperatures and CO2 impacted leaf carbon dynamics in Norway spruce (Picea abies), a dominant northern forest species, to improve predictions of future photosynthetic and respiratory fluxes from high-latitude conifers. Seedlings were grown under ambient (AC, c. 435 μmol mol(-1) ) or elevated (EC, 750 μmol mol(-1) ) CO2 concentrations at ambient, +4 °C, or +8 °C growing temperatures. Photosynthetic rates (Asat ) were high in +4 °C/EC seedlings and lowest in +8 °C spruce, implying that moderate, but not extreme, climate change may stimulate carbon uptake. Asat , dark respiration (Rdark ), and light respiration (Rlight ) rates acclimated to temperature, but not CO2 : the thermal optimum of Asat increased, and Rdark and Rlight were suppressed under warming. In all treatments, the Q10 of Rlight (the relative increase in respiration for a 10 °C increase in leaf temperature) was 35% higher than the Q10 of Rdark , so the ratio of Rlight to Rdark increased with rising leaf temperature. However, across all treatments and a range of 10-40 °C leaf temperatures, a consistent relationship between Rlight and Rdark was found, which could be used to model Rlight in future climates. Acclimation reduced daily modeled respiratory losses from warm-grown seedlings by 22-56%. When Rlight was modeled as a constant fraction of Rdark , modeled daily respiratory losses were 11-65% greater than when using measured values of Rlight . Our findings highlight the impact of acclimation to future climates on predictions of carbon uptake and losses in northern trees, in particular the need to model daytime respiratory losses from direct measurements of Rlight or appropriate relationships with Rdark . PMID:26728638

  15. Trait acclimation mitigates mortality risks of tropical canopy trees under global warming

    Frank eSterck

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available There is a heated debate about the effect of global change on tropical forests. Many scientists predict large-scale tree mortality while others point to mitigating roles of CO2 fertilization and – the notoriously unknown – physiological trait acclimation of trees. In this opinion article we provided a first quantification of the potential of trait acclimation to mitigate the negative effects of warming on tropical canopy tree growth and survival. We applied a physiological tree growth model that incorporates trait acclimation through an optimization approach. Our model estimated the maximum effect of acclimation when trees optimize traits that are strongly plastic on a week to annual time scale (leaf photosynthetic capacity, total leaf area, stem sapwood area to maximize carbon gain. We simulated tree carbon gain for temperatures (25-35ºC and ambient CO2 concentrations (390-800 ppm predicted for the 21st century. Full trait acclimation increased simulated carbon gain by up to 10-20% and the maximum tolerated temperature by up to 2ºC, thus reducing risks of tree death under predicted warming. Functional trait acclimation may thus increase the resilience of tropical trees to warming, but cannot prevent tree death during extremely hot and dry years at current CO2 levels. We call for incorporating trait acclimation in field and experimental studies of plant functional traits, and in models that predict responses of tropical forests to climate change.

  16. Trait Acclimation Mitigates Mortality Risks of Tropical Canopy Trees under Global Warming

    Sterck, Frank; Anten, Niels P. R.; Schieving, Feike; Zuidema, Pieter A.

    2016-01-01

    There is a heated debate about the effect of global change on tropical forests. Many scientists predict large-scale tree mortality while others point to mitigating roles of CO2 fertilization and – the notoriously unknown – physiological trait acclimation of trees. In this opinion article we provided a first quantification of the potential of trait acclimation to mitigate the negative effects of warming on tropical canopy tree growth and survival. We applied a physiological tree growth model that incorporates trait acclimation through an optimization approach. Our model estimated the maximum effect of acclimation when trees optimize traits that are strongly plastic on a week to annual time scale (leaf photosynthetic capacity, total leaf area, stem sapwood area) to maximize carbon gain. We simulated tree carbon gain for temperatures (25–35°C) and ambient CO2 concentrations (390–800 ppm) predicted for the 21st century. Full trait acclimation increased simulated carbon gain by up to 10–20% and the maximum tolerated temperature by up to 2°C, thus reducing risks of tree death under predicted warming. Functional trait acclimation may thus increase the resilience of tropical trees to warming, but cannot prevent tree death during extremely hot and dry years at current CO2 levels. We call for incorporating trait acclimation in field and experimental studies of plant functional traits, and in models that predict responses of tropical forests to climate change. PMID:27242814

  17. Effect of cold acclimation on the photosynthetic performance of two ecotypes of Colobanthus quitensis (Kunth) Bartl.

    Bravo, León A; Saavedra-Mella, Felipe A; Vera, Felipe; Guerra, Alexi; Cavieres, Lohengrin A; Ivanov, Alexander G; Huner, Norman P A; Corcuera, Luis J

    2007-01-01

    The effects of cold acclimation of two ecotypes (Antarctic and Andes) of Colobanthus quitensis (Kunth) Bartl. Caryophyllaceae on their photosynthetic characteristics and performance under high light (HL) were compared. Non-acclimated plants of the Antarctic ecotype exhibited a higher (34%) maximal rate of photosynthesis than the Andes ecotype. In cold-acclimated plants the light compensation point was increased. Dark respiration was significantly increased during the exposure to 4 degrees C in both ecotypes. Cold-acclimated Antarctic plants showed higher Phi(PSII) and qP compared with the Andes ecotype. In addition, the Antarctic ecotype exhibited higher heat dissipation (NPQ), especially in the cold-acclimated state, which was mainly associated with the fast relaxing component of non-photochemical quenching (NPQ(F)). By contrast, the Andes ecotype exhibited a lower NPQ(F) and a significant increase in the slowly relaxing component (NPQ(s)) at low temperature and HL, indicating higher sensitivity to low temperature-induced photoinhibition. Although the xanthophyll cycle was fully operational in both ecotypes, cold-acclimated Antarctic plants exposed to HL exhibited higher epoxidation state of the xanthophyll cycle pigments (EPS) compared with the cold-acclimated Andes ecotype. Thus, the photosynthetic apparatus of the Antarctic ecotype operates more efficiently than that of the Andes one, under a combination of low temperature and HL. The ecotype differences are discussed in relation to the different climatic conditions of the two Colobanthus. PMID:18057038

  18. Trait Acclimation Mitigates Mortality Risks of Tropical Canopy Trees under Global Warming.

    Sterck, Frank; Anten, Niels P R; Schieving, Feike; Zuidema, Pieter A

    2016-01-01

    There is a heated debate about the effect of global change on tropical forests. Many scientists predict large-scale tree mortality while others point to mitigating roles of CO2 fertilization and - the notoriously unknown - physiological trait acclimation of trees. In this opinion article we provided a first quantification of the potential of trait acclimation to mitigate the negative effects of warming on tropical canopy tree growth and survival. We applied a physiological tree growth model that incorporates trait acclimation through an optimization approach. Our model estimated the maximum effect of acclimation when trees optimize traits that are strongly plastic on a week to annual time scale (leaf photosynthetic capacity, total leaf area, stem sapwood area) to maximize carbon gain. We simulated tree carbon gain for temperatures (25-35°C) and ambient CO2 concentrations (390-800 ppm) predicted for the 21st century. Full trait acclimation increased simulated carbon gain by up to 10-20% and the maximum tolerated temperature by up to 2°C, thus reducing risks of tree death under predicted warming. Functional trait acclimation may thus increase the resilience of tropical trees to warming, but cannot prevent tree death during extremely hot and dry years at current CO2 levels. We call for incorporating trait acclimation in field and experimental studies of plant functional traits, and in models that predict responses of tropical forests to climate change. PMID:27242814

  19. The effects of cold acclimation on electrocardiogram parameters in five species of turtles.

    Risher, J F; Claussen, D L

    1987-01-01

    The effects of thermal acclimation at 25 or 5 degrees C on electrical activity in the heart were investigated in Pseudemys scripta, Terrapene carolina, Chrysemys picta marginata, Chrysemys picta dorsalis, Chelydra serpentina, and Sternotherus odoratus. The durations of the QRS complex and P-R, R-T and R-R intervals were found to increase with decreasing body temperature in all animals tested. The amplitudes of the P and T waves and QRS complex were dependent upon both acclimation temperature and test temperature. Differences between acclimation groups in the change in QRS amplitudes between 20 and 0 degrees C were statistically significant for all species. PMID:2886260

  20. Early and delayed long-term transcriptional changes and short-term transient responses during cold acclimation in olive leaves.

    Leyva-Pérez, María de la O; Valverde-Corredor, Antonio; Valderrama, Raquel; Jiménez-Ruiz, Jaime; Muñoz-Merida, Antonio; Trelles, Oswaldo; Barroso, Juan Bautista; Mercado-Blanco, Jesús; Luque, Francisco

    2015-02-01

    Low temperature severely affects plant growth and development. To overcome this constraint, several plant species from regions having a cool season have evolved an adaptive response, called cold acclimation. We have studied this response in olive tree (Olea europaea L.) cv. Picual. Biochemical stress markers and cold-stress symptoms were detected after the first 24 h as sagging leaves. After 5 days, the plants were found to have completely recovered. Control and cold-stressed plants were sequenced by Illumina HiSeq 1000 paired-end technique. We also assembled a new olive transcriptome comprising 157,799 unigenes and found 6,309 unigenes differentially expressed in response to cold. Three types of response that led to cold acclimation were found: short-term transient response, early long-term response, and late long-term response. These subsets of unigenes were related to different biological processes. Early responses involved many cold-stress-responsive genes coding for, among many other things, C-repeat binding factor transcription factors, fatty acid desaturases, wax synthesis, and oligosaccharide metabolism. After long-term exposure to cold, a large proportion of gene down-regulation was found, including photosynthesis and plant growth genes. Up-regulated genes after long-term cold exposure were related to organelle fusion, nucleus organization, and DNA integration, including retrotransposons. PMID:25324298

  1. Cold acclimation induces distinctive changes in the chromatin state and transcript levels of COR genes in Cannabis sativa varieties with contrasting cold acclimation capacities.

    Mayer, Boris F; Ali-Benali, Mohamed Ali; Demone, Jordan; Bertrand, Annick; Charron, Jean-Benoit

    2015-11-01

    Little is known about the capacity of Cannabis sativa to cold-acclimate and develop freezing tolerance. This study investigates the cold acclimation (CA) capacity of nine C. sativa varieties and the underlying genetic and epigenetic responses. The varieties were divided into three groups based on their contrasting CA capacities by comparing the survival of non-acclimated and cold-acclimated plants in whole-plant freeze tests. In response to the CA treatment, all varieties accumulated soluble sugars but only the varieties with superior capacity for CA could maintain higher levels throughout the treatment. In addition, the varieties that acclimated most efficiently accumulated higher transcript levels of cold-regulated (COR) genes and genes involved in de novo DNA methylation while displaying locus- and variety-specific changes in the levels of H3K9ac, H3K27me3 and methylcytosine (MeC) during CA. Furthermore, these hardy C. sativa varieties displayed significant increases in MeC levels at COR gene loci when deacclimated, suggesting a role for locus-specific DNA methylation in deacclimation. This study uncovers the molecular mechanisms underlying CA in C. sativa and reveals higher levels of complexity regarding how genetic, epigenetic and environmental factors intertwine. PMID:25534661

  2. Cold-acclimation increases the predatory efficiency of the aphidophagous coccinellid Adalia bipunctata

    Sørensen, Christian Hougaard; Toft, Søren; Kristensen, Torsten Nygård

    2013-01-01

    a heat knock down assay as well as the effects of rearing temperature on pupal survival and adult mass. We demonstrate that ladybirds acclimated to a certain temperature consume more aphids at that temperature than ladybirds acclimated to other temperatures. Acclimating ladybirds to cold temperatures...... thermal regimes. Here, we report on the effects of rearing temperature (15, 20 and 25 °C) of A. bipunctata on aphid predation at similar test temperatures and under cold semi-natural conditions. Furthermore we assessed the upper thermal critical limit of ladybirds from the three rearing temperatures using...... also increased their body-size but reduced pupal survival and heat resistance, suggesting costs associated with acclimation. Our findings have implications for the application of ladybirds as bio-control agents in different thermal environments. The results can be used to improve the efficiency of pest...

  3. Temperature acclimation of photosynthesis and respiration: A key uncertainty in the carbon cycle-climate feedback

    Lombardozzi, Danica L.; Bonan, Gordon B.; Smith, Nicholas G.; Dukes, Jeffrey S.; Fisher, Rosie A.

    2015-10-01

    Earth System Models typically use static responses to temperature to calculate photosynthesis and respiration, but experimental evidence suggests that many plants acclimate to prevailing temperatures. We incorporated representations of photosynthetic and leaf respiratory temperature acclimation into the Community Land Model, the terrestrial component of the Community Earth System Model. These processes increased terrestrial carbon pools by 20 Pg C (22%) at the end of the 21st century under a business-as-usual (Representative Concentration Pathway 8.5) climate scenario. Including the less certain estimates of stem and root respiration acclimation increased terrestrial carbon pools by an additional 17 Pg C (~40% overall increase). High latitudes gained the most carbon with acclimation, and tropical carbon pools increased least. However, results from both of these regions remain uncertain; few relevant data exist for tropical and boreal plants or for extreme temperatures. Constraining these uncertainties will produce more realistic estimates of land carbon feedbacks throughout the 21st century.

  4. Gelation in protein extracts from cold acclimated and non-acclimated winter rye (Secale cereale L. cv Musketeer).

    Lim, Ze Long; Low, Nicholas H; Moffatt, Barbara A; Gray, Gordon R

    2013-04-01

    A protein gel is a three-dimensional network consisting of molecular interactions between biopolymers that entrap a significant volume of a continuous liquid phase (water). Molecular interactions in gels occur at junction zones within and between protein molecules through electrostatic forces, hydrogen bonding, hydrophobic associations (van der Waals attractions) and covalent bonding. Gels have the physicochemical properties of both solids and liquids, and are extremely important in the production and stability of a variety of foods, bioproducts and pharmaceuticals. In this study, gelation was induced in phenol extracted protein fractions from non-acclimated (NA) and cold-acclimated (CA) winter rye (Secale cereale L. cv Musketeer) leaf tissue after repeated freeze-thaw treatments. Gel formation only occurred at high pH (pH 12.0) and a minimum of 3-4 freeze-thaw cycles were required. The gel was thermally stable and only a specific combination of chemical treatments could disrupt the gel network. SDS-PAGE analysis identified ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase oxygenase (Rubisco) as the major protein component in the gel, although Rubisco itself did not appear to be a factor in gelation. Raman spectroscopy suggested changes in protein secondary structure during freeze-thaw cycles. Overall, the NA and CA gels were similar in composition and structure, with the exception that the CA gel appeared to be amyloidic in nature based on thioflavin T (ThT) fluorescence. Protein gelation, particularly in the apoplast, may confer protection against freeze-induced dehydration and potentially have a commercial application to improve frozen food quality. PMID:23348601

  5. Heat shock response of the blue crab Portunus pelagicus:thermal stress and acclimation

    Suhaila Qari

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To determine the effect of prior heat shock on the CTMax of differently acclimated Portunus pelagicus (P. pelagicus) as well as the time course of the changes in CTMax post heat shock. Methods: Crabs P. pelagicus were held in laboratory aquaria in tanks, which were supplied with filtered and aerated seawater. Crabs were acclimated at 20 °C, 25 °C, 30 °C and 35 °C for 3 weeks before their CTMax was determined. The CTMax was recorded for each crab as the median temperature during the 5 min period when a crab was not able to right itself, the average CTMax was calculated. The effect of heat shock on subsequent CTMax was measured. Crabs were heat shocked at temperature 1 °C lower than the CTMax for 20 min, followed by either 0.5 h, 1 h or 1.5 h recovery at 20 °C. The same procedure was repeated at other acclimation temperatures (25 °C, 30 °C and 35 °C). Results: Temperature acclimation of P. pelargicus from 20-35 °C progressively increased the CTMax. Acclimation at 35 °C the CTMax was 42.66 °C, whereas acclimation at 20 °C the CTMax was 39.8 °C. In P. pelagicus acclimated, at 20 °C the CTMax values after heat shock were significantly higher than crabs in control for 30 min, 1 h and 1.5 h after heat shock. In the 25 °C and 30 °C acclimated crabs, the CTMax values after heat shock were significantly higher than control only in 30 min and 1 h after heat shock. No significant differences in 35 °C acclimated crabs between control and heat shocked crabs were found after recovery for 30 min, 1 h, or 1.5 h. Conclusions: Heat shock caused significant rises in the CTMax, however, this increase was progressively reduced with longer recovery times at the acclimation temperature. For 20 °C acclimated crabs, the increased CTMax was still evident after 90 min, but for 25 °C and 30 °C crabs, the response was over after 90 min. Heat shock of 35 °C crabs was problematical, the CTMax gave no increased thermotolerance. It must be concluded that the

  6. Boreal and temperate trees show strong acclimation of respiration to warming.

    Reich, Peter B; Sendall, Kerrie M; Stefanski, Artur; Wei, Xiaorong; Rich, Roy L; Montgomery, Rebecca A

    2016-03-31

    Plant respiration results in an annual flux of carbon dioxide (CO2) to the atmosphere that is six times as large as that due to the emissions from fossil fuel burning, so changes in either will impact future climate. As plant respiration responds positively to temperature, a warming world may result in additional respiratory CO2 release, and hence further atmospheric warming. Plant respiration can acclimate to altered temperatures, however, weakening the positive feedback of plant respiration to rising global air temperature, but a lack of evidence on long-term (weeks to years) acclimation to climate warming in field settings currently hinders realistic predictions of respiratory release of CO2 under future climatic conditions. Here we demonstrate strong acclimation of leaf respiration to both experimental warming and seasonal temperature variation for juveniles of ten North American tree species growing for several years in forest conditions. Plants grown and measured at 3.4 °C above ambient temperature increased leaf respiration by an average of 5% compared to plants grown and measured at ambient temperature; without acclimation, these increases would have been 23%. Thus, acclimation eliminated 80% of the expected increase in leaf respiration of non-acclimated plants. Acclimation of leaf respiration per degree temperature change was similar for experimental warming and seasonal temperature variation. Moreover, the observed increase in leaf respiration per degree increase in temperature was less than half as large as the average reported for previous studies, which were conducted largely over shorter time scales in laboratory settings. If such dampening effects of leaf thermal acclimation occur generally, the increase in respiration rates of terrestrial plants in response to climate warming may be less than predicted, and thus may not raise atmospheric CO2 concentrations as much as anticipated. PMID:26982730

  7. Upregulation of aquaporin expression in the salivary glands of heat-acclimated rats

    Naotoshi Sugimoto; Kentaro Matsuzaki; Hiroaki Ishibashi; Masao Tanaka; Toshioki Sawaki; Yoshimasa Fujita; Takafumi Kawanami; Yasufumi Masaki; Toshiro Okazaki; Joji Sekine; Shoichi Koizumi; Akihiro Yachie; Hisanori Umehara; Osamu Shido

    2013-01-01

    It is known that aquaporin (AQP) 5 expression in the apical membrane of acinar cells in salivary glands is important for the secretion of saliva in rodents and humans. Although heat acclimation enhances saliva secretion in rodents, the molecular mechanism of how heat induces saliva secretion has not been determined. Here, we found that heat acclimation enhanced the expression of AQP5 and AQP1 in rat submandibular glands concomitant with the promotion of the HIF-1α pathway, leading to VEGF ind...

  8. Dynamic compositional changes of detergent-resistant plasma membrane microdomains during plant cold acclimation

    Minami, Anzu; Furuto, Akari; Uemura, Matsuo

    2010-01-01

    Plants increase their freezing tolerance upon exposure to low, non-freezing temperatures, which is known as cold acclimation. Cold acclimation results in a decrease in the proportion of sphingolipids in the plasma membrane in many plants including Arabidopsis thaliana. The decrease in sphingolipids has been considered to contribute to the increase in the cryostability of the plasma membrane through regulating membrane fluidity. Recently we have proposed a possibility of another important sphi...

  9. Effects of acclimation on poststocking dispersal and physiological condition of age-1 pallid sturgeon

    Oldenburg, E.W.; Guy, C.S.; Cureton, E.S.; Webb, M.A.H.; Gardner, W.M.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of acclimation to flow and site-specific physicochemical water conditions on poststocking dispersal and physiological condition of age-1 hatchery-reared pallid sturgeon. Fish from three acclimation treatments were radio-tagged, released at two locations (Missouri River and Marias River), and monitored using passive telemetry stations. Marias treatment was acclimated to flow and site-specific physicochemical conditions, Bozeman treatment was acclimated to flow only, and controls had no acclimation (reared under traditional conservation propagation protocol). During both years, fish released in the Missouri River dispersed less than fish released in the Marias River. In 2005, Marias treatment dispersed less and nearly twice as many fish remained in the Missouri River reach as compared to control fish. In 2006, pallid sturgeon dispersed similarly among treatments and the number of fish remaining in the Missouri River reach was similar among all treatments. Differences in poststocking dispersal between years were related to fin curl which was present in all fish in 2005 and only 26% in 2006. Pallid sturgeon from all treatments in both years had a greater affinity for the lower reaches of the Missouri River than the upper reaches. Thus, release site influenced poststocking dispersal more than acclimation treatment. No difference was observed in relative growth rate among treatments. However, acclimation to flow (i.e., exercise conditioning) prevented fat accumulation from rupturing hepatocytes. Acclimation conditions used in this study did not benefit pallid sturgeon unless physiological maladies were present. Overriding all treatment effects was stocking location; thus, natural resource agencies need to consider stocking location carefully to reduce poststocking dispersal. ?? 2011 Blackwell Verlag, Berlin.

  10. Effects of fasting on maximum thermogenesis in temperature-acclimated rats

    Wang, L. C. H.

    1981-09-01

    To further investigate the limiting effect of substrates on maximum thermogenesis in acute cold exposure, the present study examined the prevalence of this effect at different thermogenic capabilities consequent to cold- or warm-acclimation. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (n=11) were acclimated to 6, 16 and 26‡C, in succession, their thermogenic capabilities after each acclimation temperature were measured under helium-oxygen (21% oxygen, balance helium) at -10‡C after overnight fasting or feeding. Regardless of feeding conditions, both maximum and total heat production were significantly greater in 6>16>26‡C-acclimated conditions. In the fed state, the total heat production was significantly greater than that in the fasted state at all acclimating temperatures but the maximum thermogenesis was significant greater only in the 6 and 16‡C-acclimated states. The results indicate that the limiting effect of substrates on maximum and total thermogenesis is independent of the magnitude of thermogenic capability, suggesting a substrate-dependent component in restricting the effective expression of existing aerobic metabolic capability even under severe stress.

  11. Short-term Cold Acclimation Recruits Brown Adipose Tissue in Obese Humans.

    Hanssen, Mark J W; van der Lans, Anouk A J J; Brans, Boudewijn; Hoeks, Joris; Jardon, Kelly M C; Schaart, Gert; Mottaghy, Felix M; Schrauwen, Patrick; van Marken Lichtenbelt, Wouter D

    2016-05-01

    Recruitment of brown adipose tissue (BAT) has emerged as a potential tool to combat obesity and associated metabolic complications. Short-term cold acclimation has been shown not only to enhance the presence and activity of BAT in lean humans but also to improve the metabolic profile of skeletal muscle to benefit glucose uptake in patients with type 2 diabetes. Here we examined whether short-term cold acclimation also induced such adaptations in 10 metabolically healthy obese male subjects. A 10-day cold acclimation period resulted in increased cold-induced glucose uptake in BAT, as assessed by [(18)F]fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography. BAT activity was negatively related to age, with a similar trend for body fat percentage. In addition, cold-induced glucose uptake in BAT was positively related to glucose uptake in visceral white adipose tissue, although glucose uptake in visceral and subcutaneous white adipose tissue depots was unchanged upon cold acclimation. Cold-induced skeletal muscle glucose uptake tended to increase upon cold acclimation, which was paralleled by increased basal GLUT4 localization in the sarcolemma, as assessed through muscle biopsies. Proximal skin temperature was increased and subjective responses to cold were slightly improved at the end of the acclimation period. These metabolic adaptations to prolonged exposure to mild cold may lead to improved glucose metabolism or prevent the development of obesity-associated insulin resistance and hyperglycemia. PMID:26718499

  12. Effects of acclimation to handling on performance, reproductive, and physiological responses of Brahman-crossbred heifers.

    Cooke, R F; Arthington, J D; Austin, B R; Yelich, J V

    2009-10-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of acclimation to handling on growth, plasma concentrations of progesterone (P4) and cortisol, temperament, and reproductive performance of Brahman-crossbred heifers. Over 2 consecutive years, 37 Braford and 43 Brahman x Angus heifers were initially evaluated, within 30 d after weaning, for BW and puberty status via transrectal ultrasonography and plasma P4 concentrations (d 0 and 10), and for temperament by measurements of chute score, pen score, and exit velocity (d 10 only). On d 11, heifers were stratified by breed, puberty status, temperament score, BW, and age and randomly assigned to receive or not (control) the acclimation treatment. Acclimated heifers were exposed to a handling process 3 times weekly (Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays) for 4 wk (d 11 to 39 of the experiment). The acclimation treatment was applied individually to heifers by processing them through a handling facility, whereas control heifers remained undisturbed on pasture. Heifer puberty status, evaluated via plasma P4 concentrations and transrectal ultrasonography, and BW were assessed again on d 40 and 50, d 80 and 90, and d 120 and 130. Blood samples collected before (d 10) and at the end of the acclimation period (d 40) were also analyzed for plasma concentrations of cortisol. Heifer temperament was assessed again on d 40 of the study. No interactions containing the effects of treatment, breed, and year were detected. Acclimated heifers had reduced (P Brahman-crossbred heifers. PMID:19617508

  13. An isotopomer strategy to detect plant acclimation to increasing atmospheric CO2

    Augusti, A.; Betson, T. R.; Schleucher, J.

    2009-04-01

    Abundances of deuterium (D) and 18O in precipitation carry climate signals. Both isotopes are incorporated into leaf photosynthate, and in a second step into tree rings. Strikingly, while D and 18O climate signals in precipitation are related, tree-ring records of both isotopes do not generally go in parallel. This contribution investigates this discrepancy, based on a comparison of the fractionation mechanisms for both isotopes. We present a strategy to detect plant acclimation on time scales of centuries from intramolecular deuterium distributions (D isotopomers). We showed recently that specific C-H groups of glucose units exchange with water during cellulose synthesis in tree trunks, in agreement with the biochemistry of cellulose formation. Most importantly, this result allows separating influences of source water and of D fractionations in the plant, and hence to isolate climate signals and physiological signals. NMR measurements of intramolecular D distributions of glucose demonstrate that each C-H group has a distinct abundance (each D isotopomer), corresponding to its unique biochemical history, and can serve as independent information channel. Therefore, isotopomers increase the information content of isotopes several-fold. Thus, using D isotopomers, a situation may be achieved where experimental quantities overdetermine the number of variables to be reconstructed. This increased information content can be retrieved along the following strategies. Similar to C-O groups that exchange during cellulose synthesis, D isotopomers of C-H groups which heavily exchange should adopt the D abundance of source water and associated climate signals. We will present tree-ring results that support the feasibility of this approach. C-H groups that are not affected by isotope exchange are passed from leaves to the trunk, and can therefore transmit leaf-level information to tree rings. On the leaf level, overall D abundance of photosynthate is influenced by transpiration

  14. A novel technology for quick acclimation of an anaerobic microbial consortia used for biodegrading teraphthalic acid(TA)

    2002-01-01

    The seed sludge originated from a methane fermentation reactor was enriched and acclimated with TA as sole carbon source under nitrate respiration mode first for 6 week, and then can be turned to methane fermentation conditions. After 6 weeks processing, the specific rate acclimation. Aftera total of 90 days for the enrichment and acclimation, the fermentative bacteria which originally existed in the seed sludge nearly disappeared, and instead of them, the TA reductive and cleaving bacteria group was formed in the new consortia, which was confirmed by the MPN counts and roll tube counts. Compared with the control experiment, the acclimation period can be shortened by about 50%.

  15. Transcriptome characterization of Ishige okamurae (Phaeophyceae) shows strong environmental acclimation

    QU Jieqiong; WANG Xumin; CHI Shan; WU Shuangxiu; SUN Jing; LIU Cui; CHEN Shengping; YU Jun; LIU Tao

    2014-01-01

    Ishige okamurae, with leathery branched narrow fronds consisting of cylindrical hairs, is the typical species of the genus Ishige, which is considered as one of the most basal genera in the phylogeny of the Phaeophy-ceae. Apart from great public interest from the evolutionary respect, more attention has been brought on the abundant bioactive compounds in I. okamurae for therapeutic or economic considerations, such as di-phlorethohydroxycarmalol and ishigoside. Yet little is known about related key genes or metabolic pathways involved in I. okamurae, which calls upon us to carry out global analyses of transcriptome by next generation sequencing. Altogether, we obtained 78 583 assembled scaffolds with N50 of 1 709 nucleotides, and 25 357 unigenes with significant BLAST matches (E-value cutoff of 10-5). In terms of characterization of the tran-scriptome of I. okamurae, we focused on anti-stress metabolic pathways and synthetic routes of bioactive compounds in an attempt to obtain a better understanding of the interactive organism-environment regula-tory networks. Pathway-based analysis helped us to deepen our comprehension of the interaction between I. okamurae and its surroundings, with MAPK signal pathway as an example. Furthermore, we discovered a wide range of novel putative functional proteins that could be of wide application, such as Rab family, using sequence-based transcriptome. In conclusion, transcriptome characterization of I. okamurae (Phaeophy-ceae) shows strong environmental acclimation.

  16. UV-B radiation and acclimation in timberline plants

    Turunen, Minna [Arctic Centre, University of Lapland, PO Box 122, FI-96101 Rovaniemi (Finland)]. E-mail: minna.turunen@ulapland.fi; Latola, Kirsi [Thule Institute, PO Box 7300, FI-90014 University of Oulu, Oulu (Finland)

    2005-10-15

    Research has shown that some plants respond to enhanced UV-B radiation by producing smaller and thicker leaves, by increasing the thickness of epidermis and concentration of UV-B absorbing compounds of their surface layers and activation of the antioxidant defence system. The response of high-altitude plants to UV-B radiation in controlled conditions is often less pronounced compared to low-altitude plants, which shows that the alpine timberline plants are adapted to UV-B. These plants may have a simultaneous co-tolerance for several stress factors: acclimation or adaptation to the harsh climate can also increase tolerance to UV-B radiation, and vice versa. On the other hand, alpine timberline plants of northern latitudes may be less protected against increasing UV-B radiation than plants from more southern latitudes and higher elevations due to harsh conditions and weaker preadaptation resulting from lower UV-B radiation exposure. It is evident that more long-term experimental field research is needed in order to study the interaction of climate, soil and UV-B irradiance on the timberline plants. - More long-term field research is needed to assess the interaction of climate, soil and UV-B on timberline plants.

  17. Study of the Effect of SRT on Microbial Diversity in Laboratory-scale Sequencing Batch Reactors Using Acclimated and Non-Acclimated Seed

    Tellez, Berenice

    2011-07-07

    Solids Retention Time (SRT) is an important design parameter in activated sludge wastewater treatment systems. In this study, the effect of SRT on the bacterial community structure and diversity was examined in replicate lab-scale activated sludge sequencing batch reactors were operated for a period of 8 weeks and seeded with acclimated or non-acclimated sludge. Four SBRs (acclimated) were set up as duplicates and operated at an SRT of 2 days, and another set of four SBRs (non-acclimated) were operated at an SRT of 10 days. To characterize the microbial community in the SBRs, 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing was used to measure biodiversity and to assess the reproducibility and stability of the bacterial community structure in replicate reactors. Diversity results showed that SBRs operated at an SRT of 10 days are more diverse than SBRs operated at an SRT of 2 days. This suggests that engineering decision could enhance diversity in activated sludge systems. Cluster analysis based on phylogenetic information revealed that the bacterial community structure was not stable and replicated SBRs evolved differently.

  18. Fresh water acclimation elicits a decrease in plasma corticosteroids in the euryhaline Atlantic stingray, Dasyatis sabina.

    Evans, Andrew N; Nunez, B Scott

    2015-10-01

    It is thought that the elasmobranch corticosteroid hormone 1α-hydroxycorticosterone (1α-B) functions as both a glucocorticoid (GC) and mineralocorticoid (MC). Classical antinatriuretic MC activities would run counter to the osmoregulatory strategy of euryhaline elasmobranchs acclimating to fresh water (FW). Therefore we hypothesize that FW acclimation will be accompanied by a decrease in plasma corticosteroids in these animals. However, events that activate the "fight-or-flight" response could mask changes associated with acclimation to lower salinities. To better define the MC role of corticosteroids in elasmobranchs, we designed a transfer system that allows the acclimation of Atlantic stingrays (Dasyatis sabina) from seawater (SW) to FW over 12h while minimizing other extraneous stressors. Blood and interrenal glands were sampled from one group of stingrays 24h after FW transfer, while another group was sampled two weeks after FW transfer. Two other groups served as mock-transfer controls in that they were treated and sampled in the same way, but remained in SW for the entire period. Plasma corticosteroids, osmolality, chloride, and urea were significantly lower in FW-acclimated stingrays (compared to mock-transfer stingrays) 24h after FW transfer. This pattern remained after two weeks in FW, with the exception that plasma corticosteroids returned to pre-acclimation levels. There were no significant differences between experimental groups in interrenal levels of mRNAs encoding key steroidogenic proteins (steroidogenic acute regulatory protein and cholesterol side chain cleavage enzyme). Temporally decreased corticosteroid levels during FW acclimation are consistent with the unique strategy of euryhaline elasmobranchs, whereby lower plasma osmolality is maintained in FW vs. SW environments to reduce hydromineral gradients. PMID:26315386

  19. Photosynthetic acclimation in the context of structural constraints to carbon export from leaves.

    Adams, William W; Watson, Amy M; Mueh, Kristine E; Amiard, Véronique; Turgeon, Robert; Ebbert, Volker; Logan, Barry A; Combs, Andrew F; Demmig-Adams, Barbara

    2007-01-01

    The potential role of foliar carbon export features in the acclimation of photosynthetic capacity to differences and changes in light environment was evaluated. These features included apoplastic vs. symplastic phloem loading, density of loading veins, plasmodesmatal frequency in intermediary cells, and the ratio of loading cells to sieve elements. In initial studies, three apoplastic loaders (spinach, pea, Arabidopsis thaliana) exhibited a completely flexible photosynthetic response to changing light conditions, while two symplastic loaders (pumpkin, Verbascum phoeniceum), although able to adjust to different long-term growth conditions, were more limited in their response when transferred from low (LL) to high (HL) light. This suggested that constraints imposed by the completely physical pathway of sugar export might act as a bottleneck in the export of carbon from LL-acclimated leaves of symplastic loaders. While both symplastic loaders exhibited variable loading vein densities (low in LL and high in HL), none of the three apoplastic loaders initially characterized exhibited such differences. However, an additional apoplastic species (tomato) exhibited similar differences in vein density during continuous growth in different light environments. Furthermore, in contrast to the other apoplastic loaders, photosynthetic acclimation in tomato was not complete following a transfer from LL to HL. This suggests that loading vein density and loading cells per sieve element, and thus apparent loading surface capacity, play a major role in the potential for photosynthetic acclimation to changes in light environment. Photosynthetic acclimation and vein density acclimation were also characterized in the slow-growing, sclerophytic evergreen Monstera deliciosa. This evergreen possessed a lower vein density during growth in LL compared to HL and exhibited a more severely limited potential for photosynthetic acclimation to increases in light environment than the rapidly

  20. Different environmental temperatures affect amino acid metabolism in the eurytherm teleost Senegalese sole (Solea senegalensis Kaup, 1858) as indicated by changes in plasma metabolites.

    Costas, Benjamín; Aragão, Cláudia; Ruiz-Jarabo, Ignacio; Vargas-Chacoff, Luis; Arjona, Francisco J; Mancera, Juan M; Dinis, Maria T; Conceição, Luís E C

    2012-07-01

    Senegalese sole (Solea senegalensis) is a eurytherm teleost that under natural conditions can be exposed to annual water temperature fluctuations between 12 and 26°C. This study assessed the effects of temperature on sole metabolic status, in particular in what concerns plasma free amino acid changes during thermal acclimation. Senegalese sole maintained at 18°C were acclimated to either cold (12°C) or warm (26°C) environmental temperatures for 21 days. Fish maintained at 18°C served as control. Plasma concentrations of cortisol, glucose, lactate, triglycerides, proteins, and free amino acids were assessed. Cold acclimation influenced interrenal responses of sole by increasing cortisol release. Moreover, plasma glucose and lactate concentrations increased linearly with temperature, presumably reflecting a higher metabolic activity of sole acclimated to 26°C. Acclimation temperature affected more drastically plasma concentrations of dispensable than that of indispensable amino acids, and different acclimation temperatures induced different responses. Asparagine, glutamine and ornithine seem to be of particular importance for ammonia detoxification mechanisms, synthesis of triglycerides that may be used during homeoviscous adaptation and, to a lesser extent, as energetic substrates in specimens acclimated to 12°C. When sole is acclimated to 26°C taurine, glutamate, GABA and glycine increased, which may suggest important roles as antioxidant defences, in osmoregulatory processes and/or for energetic purposes at this thermal regimen. In conclusion, acclimation to different environmental temperatures induces several metabolic changes in Senegalese sole, suggesting that amino acids may be important for thermal acclimation. PMID:21947601

  1. Light acclimation and pH perturbations affect photosynthetic performance in Chlorella mass culture

    Ihnken, S.; Beardall, J.; Kromkamp, J.C.; Serrano, C.G.; Torres, M.A.; Masojídek, Jiří; Malapartida, I.; Abdala, R.; Jerez, C.G.; Malapascua, José R.F.; Navarro, E.; Rico, R.M.; Peralta, E.; Ferreira Ezequil, J.P.; Figueroa, F.L.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 2 (2014), s. 95-110. ISSN 1864-7790 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Chlorella * Mass culture * pH * Chlorophyll fluorescence Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 1.258, year: 2014

  2. Growth response and acclimation of CO2 exchange characteristics to elevated temperatures in tropical tree seedlings.

    Cheesman, Alexander W; Winter, Klaus

    2013-09-01

    Predictions of how tropical forests will respond to future climate change are constrained by the paucity of data on the performance of tropical species under elevated growth temperatures. In particular, little is known about the potential of tropical species to acclimate physiologically to future increases in temperature. Seedlings of 10 neo-tropical tree species from different functional groups were cultivated in controlled-environment chambers under four day/night temperature regimes between 30/22 °C and 39/31 °C. Under well-watered conditions, all species showed optimal growth at temperatures above those currently found in their native range. While non-pioneer species experienced catastrophic failure or a substantially reduced growth rate under the highest temperature regime employed (i.e. daily average of 35 °C), growth in three lowland pioneers showed only a marginal reduction. In a subsequent experiment, three species (Ficus insipida, Ormosia macrocalyx, and Ochroma pyramidale) were cultivated at two temperatures determined as sub- and superoptimal for growth, but which resulted in similar biomass accumulation despite a 6°C difference in growth temperature. Through reciprocal transfer and temperature adjustment, the role of thermal acclimation in photosynthesis and respiration was investigated. Acclimation potential varied among species, with two distinct patterns of respiration acclimation identified. The study highlights the role of both inherent temperature tolerance and thermal acclimation in determining the ability of tropical tree species to cope with enhanced temperatures. PMID:23873999

  3. Biodegradation of 4-chlorophenol by acclimated and unacclimated activated sludge-Evaluation of biokinetic coefficients

    Unacclimated and acclimated activated sludges were examined for their ability to degrade 4-CP (4-chlorophenol) in the presence and absence of a readily growing substrate using aerobic batch reactors. The effects of 4-CP on the μ (specific growth rate), COD removal efficiency, Y (yield coefficient), and q (specific substrate utilization rate) were investigated. It was observed that the toxicity of 4-CP on the culture decreased remarkably after acclimation. For example, the IC50 value on the basis of μ was found to increase from 130 to 218mg/L with the acclimation of the culture. Although an increase in 4-CP concentration up to 300mg/L has no adverse effect on the COD removal efficiency of the acclimated culture, a considerable decrease was observed in the case of an unacclimated culture. Although 4-CP removal was not observed with an unacclimated culture, almost complete removal was achieved with the acclimated culture, up to 300mg/L. The Haldane kinetic model adequately predicted the biodegradation of 4-CP and the kinetic constants obtained were qm=41.17mg/(gMLVSSh), Ks=1.104mg/L, and Ki=194.4mg/L. The degradation of 4-CP led to formation of 5-chloro-2-hydroxymuconic semialdehyde, which was further metabolized, indicating complete degradation of 4-CP via a meta-cleavage pathway

  4. Effects of elevated CO2 on fish behaviour undiminished by transgenerational acclimation

    Welch, Megan J.; Watson, Sue-Ann; Welsh, Justin Q.; McCormick, Mark I.; Munday, Philip L.

    2014-12-01

    Behaviour and sensory performance of marine fishes are impaired at CO2 levels projected to occur in the ocean in the next 50-100 years, and there is limited potential for within-generation acclimation to elevated CO2 (refs , ). However, whether fish behaviour can acclimate or adapt to elevated CO2 over multiple generations remains unanswered. We tested for transgenerational acclimation of reef fish olfactory preferences and behavioural lateralization at moderate (656 μatm) and high (912 μatm) end-of-century CO2 projections. Juvenile spiny damselfish, Acanthochromis polyacanthus, from control parents (446 μatm) exhibited an innate avoidance to chemical alarm cue (CAC) when reared in control conditions. In contrast, juveniles lost their innate avoidance of CAC and even became strongly attracted to CAC when reared at elevated CO2 levels. Juveniles from parents maintained at mid-CO2 and high-CO2 levels also lost their innate avoidance of CAC when reared in elevated CO2, demonstrating no capacity for transgenerational acclimation of olfactory responses. Behavioural lateralization was also disrupted for juveniles reared under elevated CO2, regardless of parental conditioning. Our results show minimal potential for transgenerational acclimation in this fish, suggesting that genetic adaptation will be necessary to overcome the effects of ocean acidification on behaviour.

  5. Thermogenin amount and activity in hamster brown fat mitochondria: effect of cold acclimation

    Sundin, U.; Moore, G.; Nedergaard, J.; Cannon, B.

    1987-05-01

    To investigate the acclimation process in a hibernator, four different parameters of thermogenin amount and activity were investigated in brown adipose tissue mitochondria from cold-exposed and cold-acclimated Syrian hamsters. Hamsters, which are hibernators, have been considered to be primed for thermogenesis and thus not to show cold-acclimation effects, but here a significant increase in (/sup 3/H)GDP-binding capacity was observed, and this increase was paralleled by an increase in thermogenin antigen amount, as measured in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The transient nature of the effect of cold exposure on (/sup 3/H)GDP binding, characteristically observed with rat mitochondria, was not observed with hamster mitochondria, and the increase in (/sup 3/H)GDP binding occurred without a change in the dissociation constant. The increase in thermogenin amount was paralleled by an increase both in GDP-sensitive Cl/sup -/ permeability of the mitochondria and in GDP-sensitive respiration. It was established that it is the maximal activity of thermogenin that is rate limiting for thermogenesis in isolated mitochondria, provided that an optimal substrate is used (such as palmitoyl carnitine). Cold acclimation also increased the total amount of mitochondria in the tissue, leading totally to a sixfold increase in thermogenin content of the hamster. It is concluded that hamsters show the expected physiological, pharmacological, and biochemical signs of cold acclimation.

  6. Enzyme activity, hormone concentration in tree shrew (Tupaia belangeri during cold acclimation

    Lin Zhang

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Environmental factors play an important role in the seasonal adaptation of body mass and thermogenesis in wild small mammals. The tree shrew (Tupaia belangeri, is a unique species of small mammals which is origin of island in the Oriental realm. The present study was to test the hypothesis that ambient temperature was a cue to induce adjustments in body mass, energy intake, metabolism, uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1 in brown adipose tissue (BAT, and other biochemical characters of T. belangeri during cold exposure about 21 days. Our data demonstrate that cold acclimation induced a remarkable increase in body mass, a significant increase in energy intake and metabolic rate, and high expression of UCP1 in BAT of T. belangeri. Cold acclimation induced an increase in cytochrome c oxidase (COX and Thyroidhormones (T3/T4. These data supported that T. belangeri increased the body mass and increased energy intake and expenditure under cold acclimation. Increased expression of UCP1 was potentially involved in the regulation of energy metabolism and thermogenic capacity following cold acclimation. And it through changes in enzyme activity and hormone concentration under cold acclimation, and suggested temperature changes play an important role in the regulation of thermogenic capacity in tree shrew.

  7. Thermogenin amount and activity in hamster brown fat mitochondria: effect of cold acclimation

    To investigate the acclimation process in a hibernator, four different parameters of thermogenin amount and activity were investigated in brown adipose tissue mitochondria from cold-exposed and cold-acclimated Syrian hamsters. Hamsters, which are hibernators, have been considered to be primed for thermogenesis and thus not to show cold-acclimation effects, but here a significant increase in [3H]GDP-binding capacity was observed, and this increase was paralleled by an increase in thermogenin antigen amount, as measured in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The transient nature of the effect of cold exposure on [3H]GDP binding, characteristically observed with rat mitochondria, was not observed with hamster mitochondria, and the increase in [3H]GDP binding occurred without a change in the dissociation constant. The increase in thermogenin amount was paralleled by an increase both in GDP-sensitive Cl- permeability of the mitochondria and in GDP-sensitive respiration. It was established that it is the maximal activity of thermogenin that is rate limiting for thermogenesis in isolated mitochondria, provided that an optimal substrate is used (such as palmitoyl carnitine). Cold acclimation also increased the total amount of mitochondria in the tissue, leading totally to a sixfold increase in thermogenin content of the hamster. It is concluded that hamsters show the expected physiological, pharmacological, and biochemical signs of cold acclimation

  8. Acclimation of tree function and structure to climate change and implications to forest carbon and nutrient balances

    Hari, P.; Nissinen, A.; Berninger, F. [Helsinki Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Forest Ecology] [and others

    1996-12-31

    Before large-scale anthropogenetic emissions the environmental factors have been rather stable for thousands of years, varying yearly, seasonally and daily in rather regular manners around some mean values. In this century the emissions of CO{sub 2}, sulphur and nitrogen from society to atmosphere are changing both atmospheric and soil environment at rates not experienced before. The fluxes to soil affect the contents of plant available nutrients and solubility of toxic compounds in the forest soil. Additionally, the chemical state of soil environment is coupled to tree growth, litter production and nutrient uptake as well as to the activity of biological organisms in soil, which decompose litter and release nutrients from it. Trees have developed effective regulation systems to cope with the environment during the evolution. The resulting acclimations improve the functioning of the trees if the environmental factors remain within their range of variation during the evolution. Outside the range the results of the regulation are unpredictable. The acclimative changes caused by the action of the regulation system may considerably change the response of trees to present environmental change. The analysis of the effects of present environmental change on forests requires simultaneous treatment of the atmosphere, forest soils and trees. Each of these components is dominated by its own features. The analyze of material and energy fluxes connect them to each other. The aim of this research is to analyse changes in the forest soils and reactions of trees to changes in the atmosphere and forest soils under a common theoretical framework, enabling combination of the obtained results into a holistic analysis of the response of forests to the present environmental change

  9. The influence of ambient temperature and thermal acclimation on hearing in a eurythermal and a stenothermal otophysan fish.

    Wysocki, Lidia Eva; Montey, Karen; Popper, Arthur N

    2009-10-01

    Being ectothermic, fish body temperature generally depends on ambient water temperature. Thus, ambient temperature might affect various sensory systems, including hearing, as a result of metabolic and physiological processes. However, the maintenance of sensory functions in a changing environment may be crucial for an animal's survival. Many fish species rely on hearing for acoustic orientation and communication. In order to investigate the influence of temperature on the auditory system, channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus was chosen as a model for a eurytherm species and the tropical catfish Pimelodus pictus as a model for a stenotherm fish. Hearing sensitivity was measured with animals acclimated or unacclimated to different water temperatures. Ambient water temperature significantly influenced hearing thresholds and the shape of auditory evoked potentials, especially at higher frequencies in I. punctatus. Hearing sensitivity of I. punctatus was lowest at 10 degrees C and increased by up to 36 dB between 10 degrees C and 26 degrees C. Significant differences were also revealed between acclimated and unacclimated animals after an increase in water temperature but not a decrease. By contrast, differences in hearing thresholds were smaller in P. pictus, even if a similar temperature difference (8 degrees C) was considered. However, P. pictus showed a similar trend as I. punctatus in exhibiting higher hearing sensitivity at the highest tested temperature, especially at the highest frequency tested. The results therefore suggest that the functional temperature dependence of sensory systems may differ depending upon whether a species is physiologically adapted to tolerate a wide or narrow temperature range. PMID:19749101

  10. Thermal fluctuations affect the transcriptome through mechanisms independent of average temperature.

    Sørensen, Jesper Givskov; Schou, Mads Fristrup; Kristensen, Torsten Nygaard; Loeschcke, Volker

    2016-01-01

    Terrestrial ectotherms are challenged by variation in both mean and variance of temperature. Phenotypic plasticity (thermal acclimation) might mitigate adverse effects, however, we lack a fundamental understanding of the molecular mechanisms of thermal acclimation and how they are affected by fluctuating temperature. Here we investigated the effect of thermal acclimation in Drosophila melanogaster on critical thermal maxima (CTmax) and associated global gene expression profiles as induced by two constant and two ecologically relevant (non-stressful) diurnally fluctuating temperature regimes. Both mean and fluctuation of temperature contributed to thermal acclimation and affected the transcriptome. The transcriptomic response to mean temperatures comprised modification of a major part of the transcriptome, while the response to fluctuations affected a much smaller set of genes, which was highly independent of both the response to a change in mean temperature and to the classic heat shock response. Although the independent transcriptional effects caused by fluctuations were relatively small, they are likely to contribute to our understanding of thermal adaptation. We provide evidence that environmental sensing, particularly phototransduction, is a central mechanism underlying the regulation of thermal acclimation to fluctuating temperatures. Thus, genes and pathways involved in phototransduction are likely of importance in fluctuating climates. PMID:27487917

  11. The effects of acclimation to sunlight on the xylem vulnerability to embolism in Fagus sylvatica L

    We assessed the effects of irradiance received during growth on the vulnerability of Fagus sylvatica L. xylem vessels to water-stress-induced embolism. The measurements were conducted on (1) potted saplings acclimated for 2 years under 100% and 12% incident global radiation and (2) branches collected from sun-exposed and shaded sides of adult trees. Both experiments yielded similar results. Light-acclimated shoots were less vulnerable to embolism. Xylem water potential levels producing 50% loss of hydraulic conductivity were lower in sun-exposed branches and seedlings than in shade-grown ones (–3·0 versus –2·3 MPa on average). The differences in vulnerability were not correlated with differences in xylem hydraulic conductivity nor vessel diameter. Resistance to cavitation was correlated with transpiration rates, midday xylem and leaf water potentials in adult trees. We concluded that vulnerability to cavitation in Fagus sylvatica may acclimate to contrasting ambient light conditions. (author)

  12. Influence of muscular work on the vestigial effects of cold acclimation

    Sobolev, V.I.; Chirva, G.I.

    1981-11-01

    The persistence of the vestigial effects of long-term cold acclimation and the effects of regular muscular work on these effects are investigated in studies on male albino rats preliminarily exposed to a temperature of 2 C for 28 days. Measurements of the calorigenic effect of noradrenaline, cold tolerance at -25 C, the level of working hyperthermia and organ and tissue weights were performed on the first, tenth, 20th, and 30th days of the post-acclimation period in control rats and rats performing 50 min of treadwheel exercise daily. Results indicate noradrenaline-dependent thermogenesis to be the most persistent effect of long-term cold acclimation. Muscular activity is found to accelerate the process of deacclimation due to its effects on physical, and then chemical, thermoregulation.

  13. Combined effects of temperature acclimation and cadmium exposure on mitochondrial function in eastern oysters Crassostrea virginica gmelin (Bivalvia: Ostreidae).

    Cherkasov, Anton S; Ringwood, Amy H; Sokolova, Inna M

    2006-09-01

    Cadmium and temperature have strong impacts on the metabolic physiology of aquatic organisms. To analyze the combined impact of these two stressors on aerobic capacity, effects of Cd exposure (50 microg/L) on mitochondrial function were studied in oysters (Crassostrea virginica) acclimated to 12 and 20 degrees C in winter and to 20 and 28 degrees C in fall. Cadmium exposure had different effects on mitochondrial bioenergetics of oysters depending on the acclimation temperature. In oysters acclimated to 12 degrees C, Cd exposure resulted in elevated intrinsic rates of mitochondrial oxidation, whereas at 28 degrees C, a rapid and pronounced decrease of mitochondrial oxidative capacity was found in Cd-exposed oysters. At the intermediate acclimation temperature (20 degrees C), effects of Cd exposure on intrinsic rates of mitochondrial oxidation were negligible. Degree of coupling significantly decreased in mitochondria from 28 degrees C-acclimated oysters but not in that from 12 degrees C- or 20 degrees C-acclimated oysters. Acclimation at elevated temperatures also increased sensitivity of oyster mitochondria to extramitochondrial Cd. Variation in mitochondrial membrane potential explained 41% of the observed variation in mitochondrial adenosine triphosphate synthesis and proton leak between different acclimation groups of oysters. Temperature-dependent sensitivity of metabolic physiology to Cd has significant implications for toxicity testing and for extrapolation of laboratory studies to field populations of aquatic poikilotherms, indicating the importance of taking into account the thermal regime of the environment. PMID:16986802

  14. [Study on biodegradation of 2,4-DCP by anaerobic sludge acclimated by mixed mono-chlorphenols].

    Zhang, Wen; Chen, Ling; Ji, Jun-Ping; Xia, Si-Qing

    2007-06-01

    Purpose of this study was to determine the treatability of 2,4-dichlorophenol (2,4-DCP) by anaerobic granular sludge which was acclimated by mixed mono-chlorphenols (2-CP, 4-MCP). The characteristic of degradation of 2,4-DCP by anaerobic sludge acclimated by mixed mono-chlorphenols was investigated through shake flask study and performance of continuous flow anaerobic bioreactors. The difference of degradation of 2,4-DCP by acclimated and unacclimated sludge was also compared. 2,4-DCP was degraded at 50 h and 180 h respectively for acclimated and unacclimated sludge, which testified that acclimated sludge could more effectively degrade 2,4-DCP. Although the intermediate product 4-MCP was present in both reaction system, 4-MCP could be degraded completely after 400 h in the acclimated sludge but accumulated in the unacclimated sludge. Therefore, acclimation by the mixed mono-chlorphenols (2-CP, 4-MCP) could enhance the ability of para- and meta-dechlorination for anaerobic sludge and increase the treatability of 2,4-DCP. The results of continuous anaerobic sludge-suspended carrier bioreactor (ASSCB) indicate that inoculation of the acclimated sludge by mixed mono-chlorphenols can degrade two mono-chlorphenols simultaneously, shorten the setup period, and increase the efficiency of degrading 2,4-DCP. 2-CP was easily degraded with removal rate of over 80% . While the removal rate of 4-MCP was fluctuating within 30% - 80% with changes of its influent concentration. PMID:17674731

  15. The role of antioxidant system in freezing acclimation-induced freezing resistance of Populus suaveolens cuttings

    Luo Lei; Lin Shan-zhi; Zheng Hui-quan; Lei Yang; Zhang Qian; Zhang Zhi-yi

    2007-01-01

    We investigated the changes in the contents of H2O2, malonaldehyde (MDA) and endogenous antioxidants, the activities of protective enzymes and some critical enzymes involved in the ascorbate-glutathione (ASA-GSH) cycle as well as freezing resistance(expressed as LT50) and correlations mentioned above, in detail using Populus suaveolens cuttings. The purpose was to explore the physiological mechanism of the enhancement of freezing resistance induced by freezing acclimation at -20℃, and to elucidate the physiological mechanisms by which trees adapt to freezing. The results showed that freezing acclimation enhanced the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), peroxidase (POD), catalase (CAT), monodehydroascorbate reductase (MDAR), ascorbate peroxidase(APX), dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR) and glutathione reductase (GR). And it increased the contents of reduced ascorbate(ASA), reduced glutathione (GSH), dehydroascorbate (DHA) and oxidized glutathione (GSSG). However, H2O2 and MDA contents and LT50 of cuttings were decreased. LT50 in cuttings was found to be closely correlated to the levels of SOD, POD, CAT, APX,DHAR, MDAR, GR, H2O2, MDA, ASA, GSH, DHA and GSSG during freezing acclimation. This suggested that the enhancement of freezing resistance of cuttings induced by freezing acclimation may relate to the distinct increase for the levels of SOD, POD, CAT,APX, DHAR, MDAR,GR,ASA, GSH, DHA, and GSSG. In addition, the observed levels of APX, DHAR, MDAR, GR, ASA, DHA,GSH and GSSG were higher than those of SOD, POD and CAT during freezing acclimation. It indicated that a higher capacity of the ASA-GSH cycle is required for H2O2 detoxification, and growth and development of cuttings. Based on the obtained results, it can be concluded that the ASA-GSH cycle plays an important role in enhancement of freezing resistance of P. suaveolens cuttings during freezing acclimation.

  16. Effects of Low-Temperature Acclimation and Oxygen Stress on Tocopheron Production in Euglena gracilis Z

    1985-01-01

    The effects of low-temperature acclimation and oxygen stress on tocopheron production were examined in the unicellular phytoflagellate Euglena gracilis Z. Cells were cultured photoheterotrophically at 27.5 ± 1°C with 5% carbon dioxide-95% air and 740 microeinsteins m−2 s−1 (photosynthetically active radiation) and served as controls. Low-temperature acclimation (12.5 ± 1°C) and high-oxygen stress (5% carbon dioxide-95% oxygen) were individually examined in the mass culturing of the algae. Chr...

  17. Temperature acclimation and heat tolerance of photosynthesis in Norwegian Saccharina latissima (Laminariales, Phaeophyceae)

    Sogn Andersen, Guri; Pedersen, Morten Foldager; Nielsen, Søren Laurentius

    2013-01-01

    is a cold-temperate species, and increasing seawater temperature has been suggested as one of the major causes of the decline. Several studies have shown that S. latissima can acclimate to a wide range of temperatures. However, local adaptations may render the extrapolation of existing results inappropriate....... We investigated the potential for thermal acclimation and heat tolerance in S. latissima collected from three locations along the south coast of Norway. Plants were kept in laboratory cultures at three different growth temperatures (10, 15, and 20°C) for 4–6 weeks, after which their photosynthetic...

  18. Temperature-Acclimated Brown Adipose Tissue Modulates Insulin Sensitivity in Humans

    Lee, Paul; Smith, Sheila; Linderman, Joyce; Courville, Amber B.; Brychta, Robert J.; Dieckmann, William; Werner, Charlotte D.; Chen, Kong Y.; Celi, Francesco S.

    2014-01-01

    In rodents, brown adipose tissue (BAT) regulates cold- and diet-induced thermogenesis (CIT; DIT). Whether BAT recruitment is reversible and how it impacts on energy metabolism have not been investigated in humans. We examined the effects of temperature acclimation on BAT, energy balance, and substrate metabolism in a prospective crossover study of 4-month duration, consisting of four consecutive blocks of 1-month overnight temperature acclimation (24°C [month 1] → 19°C [month 2] → 24°C [month...

  19. Orthostatic responses to dietary sodium restriction during heat acclimation

    Szlyk, Patricia C.; Sils, Ingrid V.; Caretti, David M.; Moore, Robert J.; Armstrong, Lawrence E.; Tartarini, Kim A.; Francesconi, Ralph P.; Askew, Eldon W.; Hubbard, Roger W.

    1994-01-01

    Several studies have shown that individuals consuming low-salt diets and working in the heat have an increased risk or incidence of heat injury, suggestive of inadequate cardiovascular adjustment. Furthermore, others have shown that prolonged work in hot climates can precipitate orthostatic hypotension and syncope. This study was designed to evaluate the effects of moderate-salt (MS) and low-salt (LS) diets on the circulatory responses and incidence of presyncopal symptoms to an orthostatic test (OT) during successive days of heat acclimation (HA). Seventeen unacclimatized male soldiers (mean +/- SE: age 20+/-1 yrs) participated in this two-phase study. The first phase consisted of a seven day dietary stabilization period during which all subjects consumed similar diets of about 4000 kcal/day containing 8g NaCl and lived in a dormitory setting (21 C, 30% RH). The second phase commenced on day eight and consisted of dietary NaCl restriction and 10 days HA (days 8-17). Volunteers were randomly assigned to either the MS diet (n=9) providing 8g NaCl/day or the LS diet (n=8) furnishing just 4g NaCl/day. The acquisition of HA was manifested in both groups by reductions in exercising rectal temperature and heart rate (HR); these characteristics were similar in the MS and LS diets. The OT was performed at 21 C on day seven of the stabilization phase and on days 9, 11, 13, 15, and 17 of the HA phase, before and after 8.5 hr of intermittent treadmill walking in a hot environment. Blood pressure (BP) and HR responses at 1,2, and 4 min and any presyncopal symptoms were recorded after assuming an upright position from recumbency. All subjects completed the OT before and after prolonged exercise in the heat without incidence of either hypotension or presyncopal symptoms irrespective of dietary-salt intake and day of HA. The results indicate that the prolonged work in the heat can be performed without orthostatic hypotension or syncope while consuming 4g NaCl/day with adequate

  20. Metabolic and hormonal acclimation to heat stress in domesticated ruminants.

    Bernabucci, U; Lacetera, N; Baumgard, L H; Rhoads, R P; Ronchi, B; Nardone, A

    2010-07-01

    a minor portion of the reduced milk yield from environmentally induced hyperthermic cows. How these metabolic changes are initiated and regulated is not known. It also remains unclear how these changes differ between short-term v. long-term heat acclimation to impact animal productivity and well-being. A better understanding of the adaptations enlisted by ruminants during heat stress is necessary to enhance the likelihood of developing strategies to simultaneously improve heat tolerance and increase productivity. PMID:22444615

  1. Metabolite profiling during cold acclimation of Lolium perenne genotypes distinct in the level of frost tolerance.

    Bocian, Aleksandra; Zwierzykowski, Zbigniew; Rapacz, Marcin; Koczyk, Grzegorz; Ciesiołka, Danuta; Kosmala, Arkadiusz

    2015-11-01

    Abiotic stresses, including low temperature, can significantly reduce plant yielding. The knowledge on the molecular basis of stress tolerance could help to improve its level in species of relatively high importance to agriculture. Unfortunately, the complex research performed so far mainly on model species and also, to some extent, on cereals does not fully cover the demands of other agricultural plants of temperate climate, including forage grasses. Two Lolium perenne (perennial ryegrass) genotypes with contrasting levels of frost tolerance, the high frost tolerant (HFT) and the low frost tolerant (LFT) genotypes, were selected for comparative metabolomic research. The work focused on the analysis of leaf metabolite accumulation before and after seven separate time points of cold acclimation. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS) was used to identify amino acids (alanine, proline, glycine, glutamic and aspartic acid, serine, lysine and asparagine), carbohydrates (fructose, glucose, sucrose, raffinose and trehalose) and their derivatives (mannitol, sorbitol and inositol) accumulated in leaves in low temperature. The observed differences in the level of frost tolerance between the analysed genotypes could be partially due to the time point of cold acclimation at which the accumulation level of crucial metabolite started to increase. In the HFT genotype, earlier accumulation was observed for proline and asparagine. The increased amounts of alanine, glutamic and aspartic acids, and asparagine during cold acclimation could be involved in the regulation of photosynthesis intensity in L. perenne. Among the analysed carbohydrates, only raffinose revealed a significant association with the acclimation process in this species. PMID:26025228

  2. The Acclimation Process of New CEOs in Community Colleges: Important Lessons Learned.

    Hammons, James O.; Murphree, Jackie

    1999-01-01

    Describes the process by which new community college presidents acclimate to their roles. Discusses a survey of 71 new community college CEOs. Provides conclusions and implications for improved practice, and includes recommended (and not recommended) actions and suggestions for current and future CEOs and boards of trustees. Contains 45…

  3. Acclimation of Photosynthesis to Light and Canopy Nitrogen Distribution: an Interpretation

    Thornley, J. H. M.

    2004-01-01

    • Background and Aims Acclimation of photosynthesis to light and its connection with canopy nitrogen (N) distribution are considered. An interpretation of a proportionality between light‐saturated photosynthesis and local averaged leaf irradiance is proposed by means of a simple model.

  4. Long-term acclimation of anaerobic sludges for high-rate methanogenesis from LCFA

    Inhibition of methanogens by long chain fatty acids (LCFA) and the low numbers of LCFA-degrading bacteria are limitations to exploit biogas production from fat-rich wastewaters. Generally reactors fail due to excessive LCFA accumulation onto the sludge. Here, long-term acclimation and bioaugmentation with a LCFA-degrading coculture were hypothesized as strategies to enhance methanogenic conversion of these compounds. Anaerobic sludges previously exposed to LCFA for more than 100 days converted a specific biomass-associated substrate of (3.2 ± 0.1) kg·kg−1 with very short lag phases (<1 day), whereas non-acclimated sludges showed lag phases of 11–15 days for metabolizing (1.6–1.8) kg·kg−1. Addition of a coculture of Syntrophomonas zehnderi and Methanobacterium formicicum to sludges previously loaded with LCFA and containing different amounts of biomass-associated substrate (from (0.5–3.2) kg·kg−1) did not improve methane production neither lag phases were shortened, indicating that the endogenous microbiota are not a limiting factor. Clearly, we show that long-term sludge acclimation to LCFA is essential for high rate methanogenesis from LCFA. - Highlights: • Long-term sludge acclimation results in more resilient microbial communities to LCFA. • Excessive LCFA accumulation onto the biomass should be prevented. • Bioaugmentation does not improve methane production by LCFA-overloaded sludge

  5. Acclimation of Norway spruce photosynthetic apparatus to the combined effect of high irradiance and temperature

    Štroch, M.; Vrábl, D.; Podolinská, J.; Kalina, J.; Urban, Otmar; Špunda, V.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 167, č. 8 (2010), s. 597-605. ISSN 0176-1617 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA522/07/0759 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60870520 Keywords : diurnal courses * picea abies * thermal acclimation * thermal energy dissipation * xanthophyll cycle Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 2.677, year: 2010

  6. Cold stress and acclimation – what is important for metabolic adjustment?

    Janská, A.; Maršík, Petr; Zelenková, S.; Ovesná, J.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 12, č. 3 (2010), s. 395-405. ISSN 1435-8603 R&D Projects: GA MZe QH81287; GA AV ČR KJB400550705 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : Cold acclimation * crops * metabolomics Subject RIV: GE - Plant Breeding Impact factor: 2.409, year: 2010

  7. Fall Chinook Acclimation Project; Pittsburg Landing, Captain John Rapids, and Big Canyon, Annual Report 2002.

    McLeod, Bruce

    2003-01-01

    Fisheries co-managers of U.S. v Oregon supported and directed the construction and operation of acclimation and release facilities for Snake River fall Chinook from Lyons Ferry Hatchery at three sites above Lower Granite Dam. In 1996, Congress instructed the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USCOE) to construct, under the Lower Snake River Compensation Plan (LSRCP), final rearing and acclimation facilities for fall Chinook in the Snake River basin to complement their activities and efforts in compensating for fish lost due to construction of the lower Snake River dams. The Nez Perce Tribe (NPT) played a key role in securing funding and selecting acclimation sites, then assumed responsibility for operation and maintenance of the facilities. In 1997, Bonneville Power Administrative (BPA) was directed to fund operations and maintenance (O&M) for the facilities. Two acclimation facilities, Captain John Rapids and Pittsburg Landing, are located on the Snake River between Asotin, WA and Hells Canyon Dam and one facility, Big Canyon, is located on the Clearwater River at Peck. The Capt. John Rapids facility is a single pond while the Pittsburg Landing and Big Canyon sites consist of portable fish rearing tanks assembled and disassembled each year. Acclimation of 450,000 yearling smolts (150,000 each facility) begins in March and ends 6 weeks later. When available, an additional 2,400,000 fall Chinook sub-yearlings may be acclimated for 6 weeks, following the smolt release. The project goal is to increase the naturally spawning population of Snake River fall Chinook salmon upstream of Lower Granite Dam. This is a supplementation project; in that hatchery produced fish are acclimated and released into the natural spawning habitat for the purpose of returning a greater number of spawners to increase natural production. Only Snake River stock is used and production of juveniles occurs at Lyons Ferry Hatchery. This is a long-term project, targeted to work towards achieving

  8. Acclimation of Plant Populations to Shade: Photosynthesis, Respiration, and Carbon Use Efficiency

    Frantz, Jonathan M.; Bugbee, Bruce

    2005-01-01

    Cloudy days cause an abrupt reduction in daily photosynthetic photon flux (PPF), but we have a poor understanding of how plants acclimate to this change. We used a unique lo-chamber, steady-state, gas-exchange system to continuously measure daily photosynthesis and night respiration of populations of a starch accumulator [tomato (Lycopersicone scukntum Mill. cv. Micro-Tina)] and a sucrose accumulator [lettuce (Latuca sativa L ev. Grand Rapids)] over 42 days. AI1 measurements were done at elevated CO2, (1200micr-/mol) avoid any CO2 limitations and included both shoots and roots. We integrated photosynthesis and respiration measurements separately to determine daily net carbon gain and carbon use efficiency (CUE) as the ratio of daily net C gain to total day-time C fixed over the 42-day period. After 16 to 20 days of growth in constant PPF, plants in some chambers were subjected to an abrupt PPF reduction to simulate shade or a series of cloudy days. The immediate effect and the long term acclimation rate w'ere assessed from canopy quantum yield and carbon use efficiency. The effect of shade on carbon use efficiency and acclimation was much slower than predicted by widely used growth models. It took 12 days for tomato populations to recover their original CUE and lettuce CUE never completely acclimated. Tomatoes, the starch accumulator, acclimated to low light more rapidly than lettuce, the sucrose accumulator. Plant growth models should be modified to include the photosynthesis/respiration imbalance and resulting inefficiency of carbon gain associated with changing PIT conditions on cloudy days.

  9. Plasma membrane rafts of rainbow trout are subject to thermal acclimation.

    Zehmer, John K; Hazel, Jeffrey R

    2003-05-01

    Rafts are cholesterol- and sphingolipid-enriched microdomains of the plasma membrane (PM) that organize many signal transduction pathways. Interactions between cholesterol and saturated lipids lead to patches of liquid-ordered membrane (rafts) phase-separating from the remaining PM. Phase behavior is temperature sensitive, and acute changes in temperature experienced by poikilotherms would be expected to perturb raft structure, necessitating an acclimatory response. Therefore, with thermal acclimation, we would expect compositional changes in the raft directed to offset this perturbation. Using differential and density gradient centrifugation, we separated PM from the livers of rainbow trout acclimated to 5 degrees C and 20 degrees C into raft-enriched (raft) and raft-depleted PM (RDPM). Compared with RDPM, the raft fractions were enriched in cholesterol, the beta(2)-adrenergic receptor and adenylyl cyclase, which are commonly used markers for this microdomain. Furthermore, cholesterol was enriched in all fractions from warm-compared with cold-acclimated animals, but this increase was 3.4 times greater in raft than in PM. We developed a novel approach for measuring membrane molecular interaction strength (and thus the tendency to stabilize raft structure) based on the susceptibility of membranes to detergent. Specifically, studies with model vesicles demonstrated that the capacity of a membrane to accommodate detergent prior to solubilization (saturation point) was a good index of this property. The saturation point of the isolated membrane preparations was temperature sensitive and was significantly different in 5 degrees C- and 20 degrees C-acclimated RDPM when assayed at 5 degrees C and 20 degrees C, respectively. By contrast, this comparison in rafts was not significantly different, suggesting compensation of this property. These data suggest that compositional changes made in the PM during thermal acclimation act to offset thermal perturbation of the raft but

  10. Cardiovascular function, compliance, and connective tissue remodeling in the turtle, Trachemys scripta, following thermal acclimation.

    Keen, Adam N; Shiels, Holly A; Crossley, Dane A

    2016-07-01

    Low temperature directly alters cardiovascular physiology in freshwater turtles, causing bradycardia, arterial hypotension, and a reduction in systemic blood pressure. At the same time, blood viscosity and systemic resistance increase, as does sensitivity to cardiac preload (e.g., via the Frank-Starling response). However, the long-term effects of these seasonal responses on the cardiovascular system are unclear. We acclimated red-eared slider turtles to a control temperature (25°C) or to chronic cold (5°C). To differentiate the direct effects of temperature from a cold-induced remodeling response, all measurements were conducted at the control temperature (25°C). In anesthetized turtles, cold acclimation reduced systemic resistance by 1.8-fold and increased systemic blood flow by 1.4-fold, resulting in a 2.3-fold higher right to left (R-L; net systemic) cardiac shunt flow and a 1.8-fold greater shunt fraction. Following a volume load by bolus injection of saline (calculated to increase stroke volume by 5-fold, ∼2.2% of total blood volume), systemic resistance was reduced while pulmonary blood flow and systemic pressure increased. An increased systemic blood flow meant the R-L cardiac shunt was further pronounced. In the isolated ventricle, passive stiffness was increased following cold acclimation with 4.2-fold greater collagen deposition in the myocardium. Histological sections of the major outflow arteries revealed a 1.4-fold higher elastin content in cold-acclimated animals. These results suggest that cold acclimation alters cardiac shunting patterns with an increased R-L shunt flow, achieved through reducing systemic resistance and increasing systemic blood flow. Furthermore, our data suggests that cold-induced cardiac remodeling may reduce the stress of high cardiac preload by increasing compliance of the vasculature and decreasing compliance of the ventricle. Together, these responses could compensate for reduced systolic function at low temperatures in

  11. Effects of acclimation temperature on thermal tolerance and membrane phospholipid composition in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster

    Overgaard, Johannes; Tomcala, Ales; Sørensen, Jesper G;

    2008-01-01

    Adaptative responses of ectothermic organisms to thermal variation typically involve the reorganization of membrane glycerophospholipids (GPLs) to maintain membrane function. We investigated how acclimation at 15, 20 and 25 degrees C during preimaginal development influences the thermal tolerance...

  12. Fructan accumulation and transcription of candidate genes during cold acclimation in three varieties of Poa pratensis

    Rao, R Shyama Prasad; Andersen, Jeppe Reitan; Dionisio, Giuseppe; Boelt, Birte

    2011-01-01

    to different environments: Northern Norway, Denmark, and the Netherlands. Fructan content increased significantly during cold acclimation and varieties showed significant differences in the level of fructan accumulation. cDNA sequences of putative fructosyltransferase (FT), fructan exohydrolase (FEH......Poa pratensis, a type species for the grass family (Poaceae), is an important cool season grass that accumulates fructans as a polysaccharide reserve. We studied fructan contents and expression of candidate fructan metabolism genes during cold acclimation in three varieties of P. pratensis adapted......), and cold acclimation protein (CAP) genes were identified and cloned. In agreement with a function in fructan biosynthesis, transcription of a putative sucrose:fructan 6-fructosyltransferase (Pp6-SFT) gene was induced during cold acclimation and fructan accumulation in all three P. pratensis varieties...

  13. The Coordination of Gene Expression within Photosynthesis Pathway for Acclimation of C4 Energy Crop Miscanthus lutarioriparius

    Xing, Shilai; Kang, Lifang; Xu, Qin; Fan, Yangyang; Wei LIU; Zhu, Caiyun; Song, Zhihong; Wang, Qian; Yan, Juan; Li, Jianqiang; Sang, Tao

    2016-01-01

    As a promising candidate for the second-generation C4 energy crop, Miscanthus lutarioriparius has well acclimated to the water-limited and high-light Loess Plateau in China by improving photosynthesis rate and water use efficiency (WUE) compared to its native habitat along Yangtze River. Photosynthetic genes were demonstrated as one major category of the candidate genes underlying the physiological superiority. To further study how photosynthetic genes interact to improve the acclimation pote...

  14. Ascorbic Acid Biosynthesis and Brackish Water Acclimation in the Euryhaline Freshwater White-Rimmed Stingray, Himantura signifer

    Wong, Samuel Z. H.; Ching, Biyun; Chng, You R.; Wong, Wai P.; Chew, Shit F.; Ip, Yuen K.

    2013-01-01

    L-gulono-γ-lactone oxidase (Gulo) catalyzes the last step of ascorbic acid biosynthesis, which occurs in the kidney of elasmobranchs. This study aimed to clone and sequence gulonolactone oxidase (gulo) from the kidney of the euryhaline freshwater stingray, Himantura signifer, and to determine the effects of acclimation from freshwater to brackish water (salinity 20) on its renal gulo mRNA expression and Gulo activity. We also examined the effects of brackish water acclimation on concentration...

  15. Acclimation of Trichodesmium erythraeum ISM101 to high and low irradiance analysed on the physiological, biophysical and biochemical level.

    Andresen, Elisa; Lohscheider, Jens; Setlikova, Eva; Adamska, Iwona; Simek, Miloslav; Küpper, Hendrik

    2010-01-01

    As the nonheterocystous diazotrophic cyanobacterium Trichodesmium lives both at the ocean surface and deep in the water column, it has to acclimate to vastly different irradiances. Here, we investigate its strategy of light acclimation in several ways. In this study, we used spectrally resolved fluorescence kinetic microscopy to investigate the biophysics of photosynthesis in individual cells, analysed cell extracts for pigment and phycobiliprotein composition, measured nitrogenase activity and the abundance of key proteins, and assayed protein synthesis/degradation by radioactive labelling. After acclimation to high light, Trichodesmium grew faster at 1000 micromol m(-2) s(-1) than at 100 micromol m(-2) s(-1). This acclimation was associated with decreasing cell diameter, faster protein turnover, the down-regulation of light-harvesting pigments and the outer part of the phycobiliprotein antenna, the up-regulation of light-protective carotenoids, changes in the coupling of phycobilisomes to the reaction centres and in the coupling of individual phycobiliproteins to the phycobilisomes. The latter was particularly interesting, as it represents an as yet unreported light acclimation strategy. Only in the low light-acclimated culture and only after the onset of actinic light did phycourobilin and phycoerythrin contribute to photochemical fluorescence quenching, showing that these phycobiliproteins may become quickly (in seconds) very closely coupled to photosystem II. This fast reversible coupling also became visible in the nonphotochemical changes of the fluorescence quantum yield. PMID:19863729

  16. Thermopreference, tolerance and metabolic rate of early stages juvenile Octopus maya acclimated to different temperatures.

    Noyola, Javier; Caamal-Monsreal, Claudia; Díaz, Fernando; Re, Denisse; Sánchez, Adolfo; Rosas, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Thermopreference, tolerance and oxygen consumption rates of early juveniles Octopus maya (O. maya; weight range 0.38-0.78g) were determined after acclimating the octopuses to temperatures (18, 22, 26, and 30°C) for 20 days. The results indicated a direct relationship between preferred temperature (PT) and acclimated temperature, the PT was 23.4°C. Critical Thermal Maxima, (CTMax; 31.8±1.2, 32.7±0.9, 34.8±1.4 and 36.5±1.0) and Critical Thermal Minima, (CTMin; 11.6±0.2, 12.8±0.6, 13.7±1.0, 19.00±0.9) increased significantly (Pmaya has an increased capability for adapting to moderate temperatures, and suggest increased culture potential in subtropical regions southeast of México. PMID:24229799

  17. Sodium and chloride transport in soft water and hard water acclimated zebrafish (Danio rerio)

    Boisen, A M Z; Amstrup, J; Novak, I; Grosell, M

    2003-01-01

    that this is achieved at least in part by a greatly enhanced apparent uptake capacity and affinity for both ions. Zebrafish maintain plasma and whole body electrolyte concentrations similar to most other freshwater teleosts even in deionized water containing only 35 microM NaCl, i.e soft water. We...... recorded an extremely low transport affinity constant (K(m)) of 8+/-1 microM for the active uptake of Cl(-) in soft water acclimated fish, while other transport kinetic parameters were in agreement with reports for other freshwater organisms. While both Na(+) and Cl(-) uptake in soft water clearly depends...... on apical proton pump activity, changes in abundance and possibly localization of this protein did not appear to contribute to soft water acclimation. Active Cl(-) uptake was strongly dependent on branchial carbonic anhydrase (CA) activity regardless of water type, while the response of Na...

  18. Photosynthetic acclimation to enriched CO{sub 2} concentrations in Pinus Ponderosa

    Torres, M.P. [California State Univ., Humbolt, CA (United States)

    1995-11-01

    By the middle of the 21st century earth`s ambient CO{sub 2} level is expected to increase two-fold ({approximately}350 umol/L). Higher levels of CO{sub 2} are expected to cause major changes in the morphological, physiological, and biochemical traits of the world`s vegetation. Therefore, we constructed an experiment designed to measure the long-term acclimation processes of Pinus Ponderosa. As a prominent forest conifer, Pinus Ponderosa is useful when assessing a large scale global carbon budget. Eighteen genetically variable families were exposed to 3 different levels of CO{sub 2} (350 umol/L, 525 umol/L, 700 umol/L), for three years. Acclimation responses were quantified by assays of photosynthetic rate, chlorophyll fluorescence, and chlorophyll pigment concentrations.

  19. Effect of acclimation and nutrient supply on 5-tolyltriazole biodegradation with activated sludge communities.

    Herzog, Bastian; Yuan, Heyang; Lemmer, Hilde; Horn, Harald; Müller, Elisabeth

    2014-07-01

    The corrosion inhibitor 5-tolyltriazole (5-TTri) can have a detrimental impact on aquatic systems thus implying an acute need to reduce the effluent concentrations of 5-TTri. In this study, 5-TTri biodegradation was enhanced through acclimation and nutrient supply. Activated sludge communities (ASC) were setup in nine subsequent ASC generations. While generation two showed a lag phase of five days without biodegradation, generations four to nine utilized 5-TTri right after inoculation, with biodegradation rates from 3.3 to 5.2 mg L(-1)d(-1). Additionally, centrifuged AS supernatant was used to simulate the nutrient conditions in wastewater. This sludge supernatant (SS) significantly enhanced biodegradation, resulting in removal rates ranging from 3.2 to 5.0 mg L(-1)d(-1) without acclimation while the control groups without SS observed lower rates of ⩽ 2.2 mg L(-1)d(-1). PMID:24841493

  20. Temperature acclimation of growth, photosynthesis and respiration in two mesophilic phytoplankton species

    Stæhr, P. A.; Birkeland, M. J.

    2006-01-01

    Temperature acclimation in two mesophilic microalgae, Microcystis aeruginosa (Cyanobacteriales) and Scenedesmus acutus (Chlorococcales), was studied by measuring growth rate, photosynthesis, respiration, cell size, cellular pigment content and Chl a-specific light absorption. Phytoplankton were...... grown as nutrient-replete semicontinuous cultures for 2 weeks at 5, 15 and 25°C, during which growth rate was determined from changes in Chl a. Gross photosynthesis (GP) was measured as 14C assimilation at saturating light and respiration (R) was measured as O2 uptake along a temperature gradient from 0...... to 40°C. Net photosynthesis (NP) was determined as the difference between GP and R. For both species, acclimation to increasing growth temperatures resulted in increasing growth rate, cellular pigment content and decreasing cell size and Chl a-specific light absorption. Scenedesmus acutus and M...

  1. A Case for Site Acclimation in the Reintroduction of the Endangered Razorback Sucker (Xyrauchen Texanus)

    United States Geological Survey

    1999-01-01

    Two site-acclimation studies (Mueller and Marsh 1998, Foster and Mueller 1999) were conducted in 1997 and 1998. The primary emphasis was habitat use and dispersal but we also examined if the rapid dispersal, typically associated with hatchery-produced razorback suckers (suckers), could be mitigated by allowing fish a period of time to recover from stocking-induced stress. Findings of those studies and existing physiological literature suggest that current stocking protocols may subject stoc...

  2. Chlorophyll fluorescence emission can screen cold tolerance of cold acclimated Arabidopsis thaliana accessions

    Mishra, Anamika; Heyer, A. G.; Mishra, Kumud

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 38 (2014). ISSN 1746-4811 R&D Projects: GA MŠk EE2.3.20.0246; GA MŠk 7E12047 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : high-throughput screening * chlorophyll a fluorescence transients * cold tolerance * cold acclimation * whole plant * Arabidopsis thaliana Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 3.102, year: 2014

  3. Uncoupling High Light Responses from Singlet Oxygen Retrograde Signaling and Spatial-Temporal Systemic Acquired Acclimation.

    Carmody, Melanie; Crisp, Peter A; d'Alessandro, Stefano; Ganguly, Diep; Gordon, Matthew; Havaux, Michel; Albrecht-Borth, Verónica; Pogson, Barry J

    2016-07-01

    Distinct ROS signaling pathways initiated by singlet oxygen ((1)O2) or superoxide and hydrogen peroxide have been attributed to either cell death or acclimation, respectively. Recent studies have revealed that more complex antagonistic and synergistic relationships exist within and between these pathways. As specific chloroplastic ROS signals are difficult to study, rapid systemic signaling experiments using localized high light (HL) stress or ROS treatments were used in this study to uncouple signals required for direct HL and ROS perception and distal systemic acquired acclimation (SAA). A qPCR approach was chosen to determine local perception and distal signal reception. Analysis of a thylakoidal ascorbate peroxidase mutant (tapx), the (1)O2-retrograde signaling double mutant (ex1/ex2), and an apoplastic signaling double mutant (rbohD/F) revealed that tAPX and EXECUTER 1 are required for both HL and systemic acclimation stress perception. Apoplastic membrane-localized RBOHs were required for systemic spread of the signal but not for local signal induction in directly stressed tissues. Endogenous ROS treatments revealed a very strong systemic response induced by a localized 1 h induction of (1)O2 using the conditional flu mutant. A qPCR time course of (1)O2 induced systemic marker genes in directly and indirectly connected leaves revealed a direct vascular connection component of both immediate and longer term SAA signaling responses. These results reveal the importance of an EXECUTER-dependent (1)O2 retrograde signal for both local and long distance RBOH-dependent acclimation signaling that is distinct from other HL signaling pathways, and that direct vascular connections have a role in spatial-temporal SAA induction. PMID:27288360

  4. Warm acclimation and oxygen depletion induce species-specific responses in salmonids.

    Anttila, Katja; Lewis, Mario; Prokkola, Jenni M; Kanerva, Mirella; Seppänen, Eila; Kolari, Irma; Nikinmaa, Mikko

    2015-05-15

    Anthropogenic activities are greatly altering the habitats of animals, whereby fish are already encountering several stressors simultaneously. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the capacity of fish to respond to two different environmental stressors (high temperature and overnight hypoxia) separately and together. We found that acclimation to increased temperature (from 7.7±0.02°C to 14.9±0.05°C) and overnight hypoxia (daily changes from normoxia to 63-67% oxygen saturation), simulating climate change and eutrophication, had both antagonistic and synergistic effects on the capacity of fish to tolerate these stressors. The thermal tolerance of Arctic char (Salvelinus alpinus) and landlocked salmon (Salmo salar m. sebago) increased with warm acclimation by 1.3 and 2.2°C, respectively, but decreased when warm temperature was combined with overnight hypoxia (by 0.2 and 0.4°C, respectively). In contrast, the combination of the stressors more than doubled hypoxia tolerance in salmon and also increased hypoxia tolerance in char by 22%. Salmon had 1.2°C higher thermal tolerance than char, but char tolerated much lower oxygen levels than salmon at a given temperature. The changes in hypoxia tolerance were connected to the responses of the oxygen supply and delivery system. The relative ventricle mass was higher in cold- than in warm-acclimated salmon but the thickness of the compact layer of the ventricle increased with the combination of warm and hypoxia acclimation in both species. Char had also significantly larger hearts and thicker compact layers than salmon. The results illustrate that while fish can have protective responses when encountering a single environmental stressor, the combination of stressors can have unexpected species-specific effects that will influence their survival capacity. PMID:25827840

  5. Consequences of thermal acclimation for the mating behaviour and swimming performance of female mosquito fish

    Wilson, Robbie S; Condon, Catriona H.L; Johnston, Ian A.

    2007-01-01

    The mating system of eastern mosquito fish (Gambusia holbrooki) is dominated by male sexual coercion, where all matings are forced and females never appear to cooperate and actively avoid all attempts. Previous research has shown that male G. holbrooki offer a model system for examining the benefits of reversible thermal acclimation for reproductive success, but examining the benefits to female avoidance behaviour has been difficult. In this study, we examined the ability of non-male-deprived...

  6. Blue light is essential for high light acclimation and photoprotection in the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum

    Schellenberger Costa, Benjamin; Jungandreas, Anne; Jakob, Torsten; Weisheit, Wolfram; Mittag, Maria; Wilhelm, Christian

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to test the hypothesis that the acclimation to different light intensities in the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum is controlled by light quality perception mechanisms. Therefore, semi-continuous cultures of P. tricornutum were illuminated with equal amounts of photosynthetically absorbed radiation of blue (BL), white (WL), and red light (RL) and in combination of two intensities of irradiance, low (LL) and medium light (ML). Under LL conditions, growth ...

  7. Growth response and acclimation of CO2 exchange characteristics to elevated temperatures in tropical tree seedlings

    Cheesman, Alexander W.; Winter, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    Predictions of how tropical forests will respond to future climate change are constrained by the paucity of data on the performance of tropical species under elevated growth temperatures. In particular, little is known about the potential of tropical species to acclimate physiologically to future increases in temperature. Seedlings of 10 neo-tropical tree species from different functional groups were cultivated in controlled-environment chambers under four day/night temperature regimes betwee...

  8. Constraints to hydraulic acclimation under reduced light in two contrasting Phaseolus vulgaris cultivars.

    Matzner, Steven L; Rettedal, David D; Harmon, Derek A; Beukelman, MacKenzie R

    2014-08-01

    Two cultivars of Phaseolus vulgaris L. were grown under three light levels to determine if hydraulic acclimation to light occurs in herbaceous annuals and whether intraspecific trade-offs constrain hydraulic traits. Acclimation occurred in response to reduced light and included decreased stomatal density (SD) and increased specific leaf area (SLA). Reduced light resulted in lower wood density (WD); decreased cavitation resistance, measured as the xylem pressure causing a 50 % reduction in stem conductivity (P50); and increased hydraulic capacity, measured as average leaf mass specific transpiration (E(LM)). Significant or marginally significant trade-offs between P50 and WD, WD and E(LM), and E(LM) and P50 reflected variation due to both genotype and environmental effects. A trade-off between WD and P50 within one cultivar indicated that morphological adjustment was constrained. Coordinated changes in WD, P50, and E(LM) within each cultivar in response to light were consistent with trade-offs constraining plasticity. A water-use efficiency (WUE, measured as δ(13)C) versus hydraulic capacity (E(LM)) trade-off was observed within each cultivar, further indicating that hydraulic trade-offs can constrain acclimation. Larger plants had lower hydraulic capacity (E(LM)) but greater cavitation resistance, WD, and WUE. Distinct hydraulic strategies were observed with the cultivar adapted to irrigated conditions having higher stomatal conductance and stem flow rates. The cultivar adapted to rain-fed conditions had higher leaf area and greater cavitation resistance. Hydraulic trade-offs were observed within the herbaceous P. vulgaris resulting from both genotype and environmental effects. Trade-offs within a cultivar reflected constraints to hydraulic acclimation in response to changing light. PMID:24863433

  9. WCS120 protein family and proteins soluble upon boiling in cold-acclimated winter wheat

    Vitamvas, P.; Saalbach, Gerhard; Prasil, I.T.;

    2007-01-01

    The amount of proteins soluble upon boiling (especially WCS120 proteins) and the ability to develop frost tolerance (FT) after cold acclimation was studied in two frost-tolerant winter wheat cultivars, Mironovskaya 808 and Bezostaya 1. Protein get Not analysis, mass spectrometry (MS) and image...... cultivars. Moreover, the differences of CA and NA samples of the MIR were shown by Liquid chromatography (LC)-tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). (c) 2006 Etsevier GmbH. All rights reserved....

  10. Effects of acclimation on water and electrolitic disbalance in soldiers during exertional heat stress

    Radaković Sonja S.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Exertional heat stress is a common problem in military services. The aim of this study was to examine changes in body water and serum concentrations of some electrolites in soldiers during exertional heat stress (EHST, as well as effects of 10-day passive or active acclimation in a climatic chamber. Methods. Forty male soldiers with high aerobic capacity, performed EHST either in cool (20 ºC, 16 ºC WBGT-wet bulb globe temperature, or hot (40 ºC, 25 ºC WBGT environment, unacclimatized, or after 10 days of passive or active acclimation. The subjects were allowed to drink tap water ad libitum during EHST. Mean skin (Tsk and tympanic (Tty temperatures and heart rates (HR measured physiological strain, while sweat rate (SwR, and serum concentrations of sodium, potassium and osmolality measured changes in water and electrolyte status. Blood samples were collected before and immediately after the EHST. Results. Exertional heat stress in hot conditions induced physiological heat stress (increase in Tty, HR, and SwR, with significant decrease in serum sodium concentration (140.6±1.52 before vs 138.5±1.0 mmol/l after EHST, p < 0.01 and osmolality (280.7±3.8 vs 277.5±2.6 mOsm/kg, p < 0.05 in the unacclimatized group. The acclimated soldiers suffered no such effects of exertional heat stress, despite almost the same degree of heat strain, measured by Tty, HR and SwR. Conclusion. In the trained soldiers, 10-day passive or active acclimation in a climatic chamber can prevent disturbances in water and electrolytic balance, i.e. decrease in serum sodium concentrations and osmolality induced by exertional heat stress.

  11. Can leaf net carbon gain acclimate to keep up with global warming?

    Vico, Giulia; Manzoni, Stefano; Way, Danielle; Hurry, Vaughan

    2016-04-01

    Plants are able to adjust their physiological activity to fluctuations and long-term changes in their growing environment. Nevertheless, projected increases in temperature will occur with unprecedented speed. Will global warming exceed the thermal acclimation capacity of leaves, thus reducing net CO2 assimilation? Such a reduction in net CO2 assimilation rate (Anet) in response to warming may deplete ecosystems' net primary productivity, with global impacts on the carbon cycling. Here we combine data on net photosynthetic thermal acclimation to changes in temperature with a probabilistic description of leaf temperature variability. We analytically obtain the probability distribution of the net CO2 assimilation rate as a function of species-specific leaf traits and growing conditions. Using this approach, we study the effects of mean leaf temperature and its variability on average Anet and the frequency of occurrence of sub-optimal thermal conditions. To maximize the net CO2 assimilation in warmer conditions, the thermal optimum for Anet (Topt) must track the growing temperature. Observations suggest that plants' thermal acclimation capacity is limited, so that growing temperatures cannot be tracked by the Topt. It is thus likely that net CO2 assimilation rates will decline in the future. Furthermore, for set leaf traits, large fluctuations in leaf temperature reduce average Anet and increase the frequency of occurrence of sub-optimal conditions for net CO2 assimilation.

  12. Rediscovering leaf optical properties: New insights into plant acclimation to solar UV radiation.

    Barnes, Paul W; Flint, Stephan D; Ryel, Ronald J; Tobler, Mark A; Barkley, Anne E; Wargent, Jason J

    2015-08-01

    The accumulation of UV-absorbing compounds (flavonoids and other phenylpropanoid derivatives) and resultant decrease in the UV transmittance of the epidermis in leaves (TUV), is a primary protective mechanism against the potentially deleterious effects of UV radiation and is a critical component of the overall acclimation response of plants to changing UV environments. Traditional measurements of TUV were laborious, time-consuming and destructive or invasive, thus limiting their ability to efficiently make multiple measurements of the optical properties of plants in the field. The development of rapid, nondestructive optical methods of determining TUV has permitted the examination of UV optical properties of leaves with increased replication, on a finer time scale, and enabled repeated sampling of the same leaf over time. This technology has therefore allowed for studies examining acclimation responses to UV in plants in ways not previously possible. Here we provide a brief review of these earlier studies examining leaf UV optical properties and some of their important contributions, describe the principles by which the newer non-invasive measurements of epidermal UV transmittance are made, and highlight several case studies that reveal how this technique is providing new insights into this UV acclimation response in plants, which is far more plastic and dynamic than previously thought. PMID:25465528

  13. Differential accumulation of two glycine-rich proteins during cold-acclimation alfalfa.

    Ferullo, J M; Vézina, L P; Rail, J; Laberge, S; Nadeau, P; Castonguay, Y

    1997-03-01

    Two mRNAs, MsaCiA and MsaCiB, encoding for proteins harboring glycine-rich motifs, accumulate in alfalfa during cold acclimation. Fusion polypeptides containing the amino acid sequences deduced from these mRNAs were produced in Escherichia coli and used to raise antibodies. Each antibody cross-reacted specifically with soluble polypeptides, MSACIA-32 and MSACIB, respectively. These polypeptides were detectable only in crowns of cold-acclimated plants, even though MsaCiA mRNA accumulated in both crows and leaves during cold acclimation. The analysis of parietal proteins showed that several MSACIA-related proteins, with a molecular mass of 32, 41 and 68 kDa, did accumulate in leaf cell walls and one of 59 kDa crown cell walls. This diversity is most probably due to a tissue-specific maturation of MSACIA. A discrepancy was found between the time-course of accumulation of MSACIB and the one of the corresponding transcript. These results indicate that timing and localization of MSACIA and MSACIB expression are different, and suggest that this differential expression involves both transcriptional and post-transcriptional events. Comparisons made among six cultivars of contrasting freezing tolerance suggest that low tolerance could be explained by failure to accumulate proteins like MSACIA and MSACIB at a sufficient level. PMID:9132054

  14. Reproductive arrest and stress resistance in winter-acclimated Drosophila suzukii.

    Toxopeus, Jantina; Jakobs, Ruth; Ferguson, Laura V; Gariepy, Tara D; Sinclair, Brent J

    2016-06-01

    Overwintering insects must survive the multiple-stress environment of winter, which includes low temperatures, reduced food and water availability, and cold-active pathogens. Many insects overwinter in diapause, a developmental arrest associated with high stress tolerance. Drosophila suzukii (Diptera: Drosophilidae), spotted wing drosophila, is an invasive agricultural pest worldwide. Its ability to overwinter and therefore establish in temperate regions could have severe implications for fruit crop industries. We demonstrate here that laboratory populations of Canadian D. suzukii larvae reared under short-day, low temperature, conditions develop into dark 'winter morph' adults similar to those reported globally from field captures, and observed by us in southern Ontario, Canada. These winter-acclimated adults have delayed reproductive maturity, enhanced cold tolerance, and can remain active at low temperatures, although they do not have the increased desiccation tolerance or survival of fungal pathogen challenges that might be expected from a more heavily melanised cuticle. Winter-acclimated female D. suzukii have underdeveloped ovaries and altered transcript levels of several genes associated with reproduction and stress. While superficially indicative of reproductive diapause, the delayed reproductive maturity of winter-acclimated D. suzukii appears to be temperature-dependent, not regulated by photoperiod, and is thus unlikely to be 'true' diapause. The traits of this 'winter morph', however, likely facilitate overwintering in southern Canada, and have probably contributed to the global success of this fly as an invasive species. PMID:27039032

  15. Copper uptake kinetics and regulation in a marine fish after waterborne copper acclimation

    The uptake kinetics and regulation of copper in a marine predatory fish, the black sea bream Acanthopagrus schlegeli after acclimation to waterborne Cu were examined, using radiotracer techniques. The dissolved Cu uptake followed a linear pattern during the time of exposure, and the calculated uptake rate constant was 6.24 L kg-1 day-1. The efflux rate constant was 0.091 day-1 following dietary uptake of Cu, and the dietary assimilation efficiency (AE) of Cu varied between 1.7% and 10.9% after the fish were fed with three types of prey (oysters, clams and brine shrimp). After the fish were acclimated at a nominal concentration of 50 μg Cu L-1 for 14 days, the Cu uptake rate and efflux rate constant did not change significantly, but the Cu body concentrations and metallothionein (MT) concentrations in fish tissues increased significantly. Subcellular Cu distributions were also modified. Significant MT induction was observed in response to increased Cu tissue concentrations, indicating that MT rather than the uptake kinetics may play a primary role in Cu regulation during waterborne Cu acclimation in this marine fish. Moreover, the high Cu efflux may also be important in Cu regulation during long-term exposure. Our modeling calculations indicated that dietary uptake was likely to be the main route for Cu bioaccumulation in the fish, and the relative contribution of waterborne and dietary uptake depended on the bioconcentration factor (BCF) of the prey and ingestion rate of fish.

  16. Cadmium accumulation, gill Cd binding, acclimation, and physiological effects during long term sublethal Cd exposure in rainbow trout

    Juvenile rainbow trout, on 3% of body weight daily ration, were exposed to 0 (control), 3, and 10 μg l-1 Cd (as Cd(NO3)2 · 4H2O) in moderately hard (140 mg l-1 as CaCO3), alkaline (95 mg l-1 as CaCO3, pH 8.0) water for 30 days. Particular attention focused on acclimation, and on whether a gill surface binding model, originally developed in dilute softwater, could be applied in this water quality to fish chronically exposed to Cd. Only the higher Cd concentration caused mortality (30%, in the first few days). The costs of acclimation, if any, in our study were subtle since no significant effects of chronic Cd exposure were seen in growth rate, swimming performance (stamina and UCrit), routine O2 consumption, or whole body ion levels. Substantial acclimation occurred in both exposure groups, manifested as 11- to 13-fold increases in 96-h LC50 values. In water quality regulations, which are based on toxicity tests with non-acclimated fish only, this remarkable protective effect of acclimation is not taken into account. Cd accumulated in a time- and concentration-dependent fashion to 60-120x (gills), 8-20x (liver), 2-7x (carcass), and 5-12x (whole bodies) control levels by 30 days. Chronically accumulated gill Cd could not be removed by ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) challenge. These gill Cd concentrations were 20- to 40-fold greater than levels predicted by the gill-binding model to cause mortality during acute exposure. In short-term gill Cd-binding experiments (up to 70 μg l-1 exposures for 3 h), gill Cd burden increased as predicted in control fish, but was not detectable against the high background concentrations in acclimated fish. In light of these results, Cd uptake/turnover tests were performed using radioactive 109Cd to improve sensitivity. With this approach, a small saturable binding component was seen, but could not be related to toxic response in acclimated fish. Acclimated trout internalized less 109Cd than control fish, but interpretation was

  17. The Acclimation of Phaeodactylum tricornutum to Blue and Red Light Does Not Influence the Photosynthetic Light Reaction but Strongly Disturbs the Carbon Allocation Pattern

    Jungandreas, Anne; Schellenberger Costa, Benjamin; Jakob, Torsten; von Bergen, Martin; Baumann, Sven; Wilhelm, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Diatoms are major contributors to the aquatic primary productivity and show an efficient acclimation ability to changing light intensities. Here, we investigated the acclimation of Phaeodactylum tricornutum to different light quality with respect to growth rate, photosynthesis rate, macromolecular composition and the metabolic profile by shifting the light quality from red light (RL) to blue light (BL) and vice versa. Our results show that cultures pre-acclimated to BL and RL exhibited simila...

  18. Acclimation during space flight: effects on human emotion

    Liu, Qing; Zhou, Ren-Lai; Zhao, Xin; CHEN, XIAO-PING; Chen, Shan-Guang

    2016-01-01

    Recently, studies on the extent to which spaceflight affects the psychology of individuals has received attention. In order to reveal the mental challenges that humans face in space, we need practical viewpoints to integrate the psychological effects, behavior, performance and the environment itself for space exploration. The present review discusses the individual variables related to space psychology and manned spaceflight, in addition to their growing trends. These items include patterns o...

  19. Photosynthesis acclimation, leaf nitrogen concentration, and growth of four tree species over 3 years in response to elevated carbon dioxide and nitrogen treatment in subtropical China

    Liu, Juxiu; Zhou, Guoyi; Duan, Honglang; Li, Yuelin; Zhang, Deqiang [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou (China). South China Botanical Garden; Xu, Zhihong [Griffith Univ., Nathan, Brisbane (Australia). Centre for Forestry and Horticultural Research

    2011-10-15

    Up to date, most studies about the plant photosynthetic acclimation responses to elevated carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) concentration have been performed in temperate areas, which are often N limited under natural conditions and with low ambient N deposition. It is unclear whether photosynthetic downregulation is alleviated with increased N availability, for example, from increased N deposition due to fossil fuel combustion in the tropics and subtropics. Awareness of plant photosynthetic responses to elevated CO{sub 2} concentration will contribute to the better understanding and prediction of future forest productivity under global change. Four tree species, Schima superba Gardn. et Champ., Ormosia pinnata (Lour.) Merr, Castanopsis hystrix AC. DC., and Acmena acuminatissima (Blume) Merr. et Perry were exposed to a factorial combination of atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentration (ambient and elevated CO{sub 2} concentration at ca. 700 {mu}mol CO{sub 2} mol{sup -1}) and N deposition (ambient and ambient + 100 kg N ha{sup -1} year{sup -1}) in open-top chambers in southern China for 3 years since March 2005. Light-saturated net photosynthetic rate, leaf N concentration, and tree growth of all species were measured. The CO{sub 2} treatments did not affect light-saturated net photosynthetic rate of all species grown with the high N treatment. However, S. superba grown with the low N treatment (ambient) had 23% and 47% greater net photosynthesis in the ambient CO{sub 2} concentration than those in the elevated CO{sub 2} concentration for December 2006 and November 2007 (20 and 31 months after the treatments were applied), respectively, and A. acuminatissima grown with the low N treatment had 173%, 26%, and 121% greater net photosynthesis in trees grown in the ambient CO{sub 2} concentration than those in the elevated CO{sub 2} concentration for July 2006 (16 months after the treatments), December 2006 (20 months), and November 2007 (31 months), respectively, whereas

  20. Ultrastructural and Extracellular Protein Changes in Cell Suspension Cultures of Populus euphratica Associated with Low Temperature-induced Cold Acclimation

    Dai Huanqin; Lu Cunfu; Zhang Hui; Zhang Xujia

    2003-01-01

    Populus euphratica Olive is the only tree species that can grow in the saline land and also survive cold winters in northwest China, and it plays a very important role in stabilizing the vulnerable ecosystem there. A cell suspension culture was initiated from callus derived from plantlets of Populus euphratica. Cold acclimation was induced (LT50 of-17.5 ℃) in cell suspension at 4-5 ℃ in the dark for 30 days and the freezing tolerance increased from LT50 of-12.5 ℃ in nonacclimated cells to LT50 of-17.5 ℃ in cold-acclimated cells. Microvacuolation, cytoplasmic augmentation and accumulation of starch granules were observed in cells that were cold-acclimated by exposure to low temperatures. Several qualitative and quantitative changes in proteins were noted during cold acclimation. Antibodies to carrot extracellular (apoplastic) 36 kD antifreeze protein did not cross react on immunoelectroblots with extracellular proteins in cell suspension culture medium of Populus euphratica, indicating no common epitopes in the carrot 36 kD antifreeze protein and P euphratica extracellular proteins. The relationship of these changes to cold acclimation in Populus euphratica cell cultures was discussed.

  1. Effects of seawater acclimation on mRNA levels of corticosteroid receptor genes in osmoregulatory and immune systems in trout

    Yada, T.; Hyodo, S.; Schreck, C.B.

    2008-01-01

    Influence of environmental salinity on expression of distinct corticosteroid receptor (CR) genes, glucocorticoid receptor (GR)-1 and -2, and mineralcorticoid receptor (MR), was examined in osmoregulatory and hemopoietic organs and leucocytes of steelhead trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). There was no significant difference in plasma cortisol levels between freshwater (FW)- or seawater (SW)-acclimated trout, whereas Na+, K+-ATPase was activated in gill of SW fish. Plasma lysozyme levels also showed a significant increase after acclimation to SW. In SW-acclimated fish, mRNA levels of GR-1, GR-2, and MR were significantly higher in gill and body kidney than those in FW. Head kidney and spleen showed no significant change in these CR mRNA levels after SW-acclimation. On the other hand, leucocytes isolated from head kidney and peripheral blood showed significant decreases in mRNA levels of CR in SW-acclimated fish. These results showed differential regulation of gene expression of CR between osmoregulatory and immune systems. ?? 2008 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Unlocking the Constraints of Cyanobacterial Productivity: Acclimations Enabling Ultrafast Growth

    Bernstein, Hans C.; McClure, Ryan S.; Hill, Eric A.; Markillie, Lye Meng; Chrisler, William B.; Romine, Margaret F.; McDermott, Jason E.; Posewitz, Matthew C.; Bryant, Donald A.; Konopka, Allan; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Beliaev, Alex S.

    2016-07-26

    Harnessing the metabolic potential of photosynthetic microbes for next-generation biotechnology objectives requires detailed scientific understanding of the physiological constraints and regulatory controls affecting carbon partitioning between biomass, metabolite storage pools, and bioproduct synthesis. We dissected the cellular mechanisms underlying the remarkable physiological robustness of the euryhaline unicellular cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7002 (Synechococcus 7002) and identify key mechanisms that allow cyanobacteria to achieve unprecedented photoautotrophic productivities (~2.5-h doubling time). Ultrafast growth of Synechococcus 7002 was supported by high rates of photosynthetic electron transfer and linked to significantly elevated transcription of precursor biosynthesis and protein translation machinery. Notably, no growth or photosynthesis inhibition signatures were observed under any of the tested experimental conditions. Finally, the ultrafast growth in Synechococcus 7002 was also linked to a 300% expansion of average cell volume. We hypothesize that this cellular adaptation is required at high irradiances to support higher cell division rates and reduce deleterious effects, corresponding to high light, through increased carbon and reductant sequestration.

  3. Ecohydrological responses of dense canopies to environmental variability: 2. Role of acclimation under elevated CO2

    Drewry, D. T.; Kumar, P.; Long, S.; Bernacchi, C.; Liang, X.-Z.; Sivapalan, M.

    2010-12-01

    The ability to accurately predict land-atmosphere exchange of mass, energy, and momentum over the coming century requires the consideration of plant biochemical, ecophysiological, and structural acclimation to modifications of the ambient environment. Amongst the most important environmental changes experienced by terrestrial vegetation over the last century has been the increase in ambient carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations, with a projected doubling in CO2 from preindustrial levels by the middle of this century. This change in atmospheric composition has been demonstrated to significantly alter a variety of leaf and plant properties across a range of species, with the potential to modify land-atmosphere interactions and their associated feedbacks. Free Air Carbon Enrichment (FACE) technology has provided significant insight into the functioning of vegetation in natural conditions under elevated CO2, but remains limited in its ability to quantify the exchange of CO2, water vapor, and energy at the canopy scale. This paper addresses the roles of ecophysiological, biochemical, and structural plant acclimation on canopy-scale exchange of CO2, water vapor, and energy through the application of a multilayer canopy-root-soil model (MLCan) capable of resolving changes induced by elevated CO2 through the canopy and soil systems. Previous validation of MLCan flux estimates were made for soybean and maize in the companion paper using a record of six growing seasons of eddy covariance data from the Bondville Ameriflux site. Observations of leaf-level photosynthesis, stomatal conductance, and surface temperature collected at the SoyFACE experimental facility in central Illinois provide a basis for examining the ability of MLCan to capture vegetation responses to an enriched CO2 environment. Simulations of control (370 [ppm]) and elevated (550 [ppm]) CO2 environments allow for an examination of the vertical variation and canopy-scale responses of vegetation states and fluxes

  4. Differential characteristics of photochemical acclimation to cold in two contrasting sweet sorghum hybrids.

    Zegada-Lizarazu, Walter; Fernando Luna, Dario; Monti, Andrea

    2016-08-01

    Sweet sorghum has a photosynthetic system which is highly sensitive to cold stress and hence strongly limits its development in temperate environments; therefore, the identification of key exploitable cold tolerance traits is imperative. From a preliminary field trial, two dissimilar sweet sorghum hybrids (ICSSH31 and Bulldozer), in terms of early vigor and productivity, were selected for a controlled-environment trial aiming at identifying useful traits related to acclimation mechanisms to cold stress. The higher cold tolerance of Bulldozer was partially related to a more efficient photochemical regulation mechanism of the incoming light energy: the higher tolerance of photosystem II (PSII) to photo-inactivation was because of a more effective dissipation capacity of the excess of energy and to a more balanced diversion of the absorbed energy into alternative energy sinks. ICSSH31 increased the dissipation and accumulation of a large amount of xanthophylls, as in Bulldozer, but, at the same time, inactivated the oxygen evolving complex and the re-synthesis of chlorophyll (Chl) a and b, thus, leading to an overproduction of CO2 fixation enzymes after re-warming. In summary, in Bulldozer, the acclimation adjustments of the photosynthetic apparatus occurred through an efficient control of energy transfer toward the reaction centers, and this likely allowed a more successful seedling establishment; ICSSH31, conversely, exhibited a fast re-synthesis of Chl pigments, which appears to divert photosynthates from dry matter accumulation. Such broad acclimation traits may constitute a source for selecting higher genetic gain traits relevant for enlarging the growing season of promising biomass sorghum ideotypes in temperate climates. PMID:26867791

  5. High-temperature sensitivity and its acclimation for photosynthetic electron reactions of desert succulents

    Chetti, M.B.; Nobel, P.S. (Univ. of California, Los Angeles (USA))

    1987-08-01

    Photosynthetic electron reactions of succulent plants from hot deserts are able to tolerate extremely high temperatures and to acclimate to seasonal increase in temperature. In this study, we report the influence of relatively long, in vivo, high-temperature treatments on electron transport reactions for two desert succulents, Agave deserti and Opuntia ficus-indica, species which can tolerate 60{degree}C. Whole chain electron transport averaged 3{degree}C more sensitive to a 1-hour high-temperature treatment than did PSII (Photosystem II) which in turn averaged 3{degree}C more sensitive than did PSI. For plants maintained at day/night air temperatures of 30{degree}C/20{degree}C, treatment at 50{degree}C cause these reactions to be inhibited an average of 39% during the first hour, an additional 31% during the next 4 hours, and 100% by 12 hours. Upon shifting the plants from 30{degree}C/20{degree}C to 45{degree}C/35{degree}C, the high temperatures where activity was inhibited 50% increased 3{degree}C to 8{degree}C for the three electron transport reactions, the half-times for acclimation averaging 5 days for A. deserti and 4 days for O. ficus-indica. For the 45{degree}C/35{degree}C plants treated at 60{degree}C for 1 hour, PSI activity was reduced by 54% for A. deserti and 36% for O. ficus-indica. Acclimation leads to a toleration of very high temperatures without substantial disruption of electron transport for these desert succulents, facilitating their survival in hot deserts. Indeed, the electron transport reactions of these species tolerate longer periods at higher temperatures than any other vascular plants so far reported.

  6. Multigenerational acclimation of Daphnia magna to mercury: relationships between biokinetics and toxicity.

    Tsui, Martin T K; Wang, Wen-Xiong

    2005-11-01

    We examined the effects of multigenerational exposure of mercury (Hg) on Hg toxicity and biokinetics in a population of Daphnia magna. After chronic Hg exposure at 3.8 microg Hg/L, the first generation (F0) adults had an elevated 24-h median lethal concentration (LC50) of Hg (76 microg/L) when compared to the control adults (56 microg/L). The dissolved influx rate of Hg was depressed significantly in the Hg-treated adults, which was accompanied by a reduced ingestion rate and enhanced induction of metallothionein-like proteins (MTLP). The second-generation (F1) juveniles originating from the control and exposed lines had no major differences in these parameters (except the dietary assimilation efficiency). Recovery from Hg stress enhanced the vulnerability of F1 adults to Hg toxicity, with a reduced 48-h LC50 (44 microg/L) and a decreased concentration of MTLP (80% of control). Nevertheless, Hg-treated F1 adults had similar tolerance (in terms of LC50s) as the control line, indicating that D. magna acclimated to Hg stress after the first generation of exposure. No major difference occurred in the Hg biokinetics and toxicity among different groups of F2 daphnids. However, the F2 neonates produced by the Hg-treated F1 adults had much higher 48-h LC50 (149 microg/L) and MTLP concentration (148% of control) when there was continuous Hg exposure after birth. We concluded that acclimation to Hg stress occurred quickly in D. magna, though animals recovering from Hg stress were more vulnerable to Hg toxicity. Both ingestion rate and MTLP may not be good biomarkers of Hg stress in the field, because acclimation can be achieved through multigenerational exposure to elevated Hg concentrations. PMID:16398130

  7. Sensitivity and Acclimation of Three Canopy-Forming Seaweeds to UVB Radiation and Warming

    Xiao, Xi

    2015-12-02

    Canopy-forming seaweeds, as primary producers and foundation species, provide key ecological services. Their responses to multiple stressors associated with climate change could therefore have important knock-on effects on the functioning of coastal ecosystems. We examined interactive effects of UVB radiation and warming on juveniles of three habitat-forming subtidal seaweeds from Western Australia–Ecklonia radiata, Scytothalia dorycarpa and Sargassum sp. Fronds were incubated for 14 days at 16–30°C with or without UVB radiation and growth, health status, photosynthetic performance, and light absorbance measured. Furthermore, we used empirical models from the metabolic theory of ecology to evaluate the sensitivity of these important seaweeds to ocean warming. Results indicated that responses to UVB and warming were species specific, with Sargassum showing highest tolerance to a broad range of temperatures. Scytothalia was most sensitive to elevated temperature based on the reduced maximum quantum yields of PSII; however, Ecklonia was most sensitive, according to the comparison of activation energy calculated from Arrhenius’ model. UVB radiation caused reduction in the growth, physiological responses and thallus health in all three species. Our findings indicate that Scytothalia was capable of acclimating in response to UVB and increasing its light absorption efficiency in the UV bands, probably by up-regulating synthesis of photoprotective compounds. The other two species did not acclimate over the two weeks of exposure to UVB. Overall, UVB and warming would severely inhibit the growth and photosynthesis of these canopy-forming seaweeds and decrease their coverage. Differences in the sensitivity and acclimation of major seaweed species to temperature and UVB may alter the balance between species in future seaweed communities under climate change.

  8. Annual variation in photo acclimation and photoprotection of the photobiont in the foliose lichen Xanthoria parietina.

    Vráblíková, Hana; McEvoy, Maria; Solhaug, Knut Asbjørn; Barták, Milos; Gauslaa, Yngvar

    2006-05-01

    Seasonal variation in maximal photochemical quantum yield (F(V)/F(M)) of photosystem II (PS II), light adapted quantum yield (Phi(II)) of PS II, non-photochemical quenching (NPQ), contents of chlorophylls, and xanthophyll cycle pigments (VAZ) was studied in Xanthoria parietina repeatedly sampled in one location in S Norway during one year. The seasonal course in the susceptibility to photoinhibition was evaluated as high light-induced changes (1,800 micromol photons m(-2) s(-1) for 24h) in F(V)/F(M), Phi(II), and NPQ, measured as the ability to recover after 2 and 20 h at low light in control thalli with a natural cortical parietin screen, and in thalli from which parietin had been removed prior to high light exposures. F(V)/F(M), Phi(II), chlorophyll content, and the conversion state of VAZ (DEPS) reached minimum in spring. At the same time, yearly maxima of VAZ content and NPQ were recorded. Thereafter, F(V)/F(M), Phi(II), and chlorophyll content increased gradually, reaching maximum values in late autumn. DEPS peaked already in summer. Similarly, VAZ and NPQ decreased from early summer until winter. All data show that the X. parietina photobiont acclimates to seasonal changes in solar radiation, consistent with the lichen's preference for well-lit habitats. However, a comparison with a study of seasonal acclimation in the X. parietina mycobiont shows that in order to understand the seasonal photobiont acclimation, one has to consider the seasonal variation in internal screening caused by the fungal regulation of the PAR-absorbing parietin. A joint effort of both bionts seems to be required to avoid serious photoinhibition. PMID:16481192

  9. Sensitivity and Acclimation of Three Canopy-Forming Seaweeds to UVB Radiation and Warming.

    Xi Xiao

    Full Text Available Canopy-forming seaweeds, as primary producers and foundation species, provide key ecological services. Their responses to multiple stressors associated with climate change could therefore have important knock-on effects on the functioning of coastal ecosystems. We examined interactive effects of UVB radiation and warming on juveniles of three habitat-forming subtidal seaweeds from Western Australia-Ecklonia radiata, Scytothalia dorycarpa and Sargassum sp. Fronds were incubated for 14 days at 16-30°C with or without UVB radiation and growth, health status, photosynthetic performance, and light absorbance measured. Furthermore, we used empirical models from the metabolic theory of ecology to evaluate the sensitivity of these important seaweeds to ocean warming. Results indicated that responses to UVB and warming were species specific, with Sargassum showing highest tolerance to a broad range of temperatures. Scytothalia was most sensitive to elevated temperature based on the reduced maximum quantum yields of PSII; however, Ecklonia was most sensitive, according to the comparison of activation energy calculated from Arrhenius' model. UVB radiation caused reduction in the growth, physiological responses and thallus health in all three species. Our findings indicate that Scytothalia was capable of acclimating in response to UVB and increasing its light absorption efficiency in the UV bands, probably by up-regulating synthesis of photoprotective compounds. The other two species did not acclimate over the two weeks of exposure to UVB. Overall, UVB and warming would severely inhibit the growth and photosynthesis of these canopy-forming seaweeds and decrease their coverage. Differences in the sensitivity and acclimation of major seaweed species to temperature and UVB may alter the balance between species in future seaweed communities under climate change.

  10. Relative crystallinity of plant biomass: studies on assembly, adaptation and acclimation.

    Darby Harris

    Full Text Available Plant biomechanical design is central to cell shape, morphogenesis, reproductive performance and protection against environmental and mechanical stress. The cell wall forms the central load bearing support structure for plant design, yet a mechanistic understanding of its synthesis is incomplete. A key tool for studying the structure of cellulose polymorphs has been x-ray diffraction and fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR. Relative crystallinity index (RCI is based on the x-ray diffraction characteristics of two signature peaks and we used this technique to probe plant assembly, adaptation and acclimation. Confocal microscopy was used to visualize the dynamics of cellulose synthase in transgenic Arabidopsis plants expressing a homozygous YFP::CESA6. Assembly: RCI values for stems and roots were indistinguishable but leaves had 23.4 and 21.6% lower RCI than stems and roots respectively. Adaptation: over 3-fold variability in RCI was apparent in leaves from 35 plant species spanning Ordovician to Cretaceous periods. Within this study, RCI correlated positively with leaf geometric constraints and with mass per unit area, suggestive of allometry. Acclimation: biomass crystallinity was found to decrease under conditions of thigmomorphogenesis in Arabidopsis. Further, in etiolated pea hypocotyls, RCI values also decreased compared to plants that were grown in light, consistent with alterations in FTIR cellulose fingerprint peaks and live cell imaging experiments revealing rapid orientation of the YFP::cellulose synthase-6 array in response to light. Herein, results and technical challenges associated with the structure of the cell wall that gives rise to sample crystallinity are presented and examined with respect to adaptation, acclimation and assembly in ecosystem-level processes.

  11. Acclimation to different depths by the marine angiosperm Posidonia oceanica: transcriptomic and proteomic profiles

    Emanuela eDattolo

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available For seagrasses, seasonal and daily variations in light and temperature represent the mains factors driving their distribution along the bathymetric cline. Changes in these environmental factors, due to climatic and anthropogenic effects, can compromise their survival. In a framework of conservation and restoration, it becomes crucial to improve our knowledge about the physiological plasticity of seagrass species along environmental gradients. Here, we aimed to identify differences in transcriptomic and proteomic profiles, involved in the acclimation along the depth gradient in the seagrass Posidonia oceanica, and to improve the available molecular resources in this species, which is an important requisite for the application of eco-genomic approaches. To do that, from plant growing in the shallow (-5m and a deep (-25m portions of a single meadow, (i we generated two reciprocal EST (Expressed Sequences Tags libraries using a Suppressive Subtractive Hybridization (SSH approach, to obtain depth/specific transcriptional profiles, and (ii we identified proteins differentially expressed, using the highly innovative USIS mass spectrometry methodology, coupled with 1D-SDS electrophoresis and labeling free approach. Mass spectra were searched in the open source Global Proteome Machine (GPM engine against plant databases and with the X!Tandem algorithm against a local database. Transcriptional analysis showed both quantitative and qualitative differences between depths. EST libraries had only the 3% of transcripts in common. A total of 315 peptides belonging to 64 proteins were identified by mass spectrometry. ATP synthase subunits were among the most abundant proteins in both conditions. Both approaches identified genes and proteins in pathways related to energy metabolism, transport and genetic information processing, that appear o be the most involved in depth acclimation in P. oceanica. Their putative rules in acclimation to depth were discussed.

  12. Copper uptake kinetics and regulation in a marine fish after waterborne copper acclimation

    Dang Fei; Zhong Huan [AMCE and Department of Biology, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST), Clear Water Bay, Kowloon (Hong Kong); Wang Wenxiong, E-mail: wwang@ust.hk [AMCE and Department of Biology, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST), Clear Water Bay, Kowloon (Hong Kong)

    2009-09-14

    The uptake kinetics and regulation of copper in a marine predatory fish, the black sea bream Acanthopagrus schlegeli after acclimation to waterborne Cu were examined, using radiotracer techniques. The dissolved Cu uptake followed a linear pattern during the time of exposure, and the calculated uptake rate constant was 6.24 L kg{sup -1} day{sup -1}. The efflux rate constant was 0.091 day{sup -1} following dietary uptake of Cu, and the dietary assimilation efficiency (AE) of Cu varied between 1.7% and 10.9% after the fish were fed with three types of prey (oysters, clams and brine shrimp). After the fish were acclimated at a nominal concentration of 50 {mu}g Cu L{sup -1} for 14 days, the Cu uptake rate and efflux rate constant did not change significantly, but the Cu body concentrations and metallothionein (MT) concentrations in fish tissues increased significantly. Subcellular Cu distributions were also modified. Significant MT induction was observed in response to increased Cu tissue concentrations, indicating that MT rather than the uptake kinetics may play a primary role in Cu regulation during waterborne Cu acclimation in this marine fish. Moreover, the high Cu efflux may also be important in Cu regulation during long-term exposure. Our modeling calculations indicated that dietary uptake was likely to be the main route for Cu bioaccumulation in the fish, and the relative contribution of waterborne and dietary uptake depended on the bioconcentration factor (BCF) of the prey and ingestion rate of fish.

  13. Effects of both ecdysone and the acclimation to low temperature, on growth and metabolic rate of juvenile freshwater crayfish Cherax quadricarinatus (Decapoda, Parastacidae

    Anouk Chaulet

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Growth, metabolic rate, and energy reserves of Cherax quadricarinatus (von Martens, 1868 juveniles were evaluated in crayfish acclimated for 16 weeks to either 25ºC (temperature near optimum or 20ºC (marginal for the species. Additionally, the modulating effect of ecdsyone on acclimation was studied. After 12 weeks of exposure, weight gain of both experimental groups acclimated to 25ºC (control: C25, and ecdysone treated: E25 was significantly higher than that of those groups acclimated to 20ºC (C20 and E20. A total compensation in metabolic rate was seen after acclimation from 25ºC to 20ºC; for both the control group and the group treated with ecdysone. A Q10value significantly higher was only observed in the group acclimated to 20ºC and treated with ecdysone. A reduction of glycogen reserves in both hepatopancreas and muscle, as well as a lower protein content in muscle, was seen in both groups acclimated to 20ºC. Correspondingly, glycemia was always higher in these groups. Increased lipid levels were seen in the hepatopancreas of animals acclimated to 20ºC, while a higher lipid level was also observed in muscle at 20ºC, but only in ecdysone-treated crayfish.

  14. CO2 and HCO3- uptake in marine diatoms acclimated to different CO2 concentrations.

    Burkhardt, S.; Amoroso, G.; Riebesell, Ulf

    2001-01-01

    Rates of cellular uptake of CO2 and HCO3- during steady-state photosynthesis were measured in the marine diatoms Thalassiosira weissflogii and Phaeodactylum tricornutum, acclimated to CO2 partial pressures of 36, 180, 360, and 1,800 ppmv. In addition, in vivo activity of extracellular (eCA) and intracellular (iCA) carbonic anhydrase was determined in relation to CO2 availability. Both species responded to diminishing CO2 supply with an increase in eCA and iCA activity. In P. tricornutum, eCA ...

  15. The mechanism of the acclimation of Nannochloropsis oceanica to freshwater deduced from its transcriptome profiles

    Guo, Li; Yang, Guanpin

    2015-10-01

    In this study, we compared the transcriptomes of Nannochloropsis oceanica cultured in f/2 medium prepared with sea-water and freshwater, respectively, aiming to understand the acclimation mechanism of this alga to freshwater. Differentially expressed genes were mainly assigned to the degradation of cell components, ion transportation, and ribosomal biogenesis. These findings indicate that the algal cells degrade its components (mainly amino acids and fatty acids) to yield excessive energy (ATP) to maintain cellular ion (mainly K+ and Ca2+) homeostasis, while the depletion of amino acids and ATP, and the reduction of ribosomes attenuate the protein translation and finally slow down the cell growth.

  16. IGF-I and branchial IGF receptor expression and localization during salinity acclimation in striped bass

    Tipsmark, Christian Kølbaek; Luckenbach, John Adam; Madsen, Steffen; Borski, Russell John

    2007-01-01

    The initial response of the IGF-I system and the expression and cellular localization of IGF type-I receptor (IGF-IR) were studied in the gill of a euryhaline teleost during salinity acclimation. Exposure of striped bass (Morone saxatilis) to hyperosmotic and hypoosmotic challenges induced small,...... first time in teleosts that IGF-IR and Na+-K+-ATPase are localized in putative chloride cells at the base of the lamellae, identifying these cells in the gill as a target for IGF-I and IGF-II. Overall the data suggest a hyperosmoregulatory role of IGF-I in this species....

  17. Lactate threshold predicting time-trial performance: impact of heat and acclimation

    Lorenzo, Santiago; Minson, Christopher T.; Babb, Tony G.; Halliwill, John R.

    2011-01-01

    The relationship between exercise performance and lactate and ventilatory thresholds under two distinct environmental conditions is unknown. We examined the relationships between six lactate threshold methods (blood- and ventilation-based) and exercise performance in cyclists in hot and cool environments. Twelve cyclists performed a lactate threshold test, a maximal O2 uptake (V̇o2max) test, and a 1-h time trial in hot (38°C) and cool (13°C) conditions, before and after heat acclimation. Eigh...

  18. Ascorbic Acid Biosynthesis and Brackish Water Acclimation in the Euryhaline Freshwater White-Rimmed Stingray, Himantura signifer.

    Samuel Z H Wong

    Full Text Available L-gulono-γ-lactone oxidase (Gulo catalyzes the last step of ascorbic acid biosynthesis, which occurs in the kidney of elasmobranchs. This study aimed to clone and sequence gulonolactone oxidase (gulo from the kidney of the euryhaline freshwater stingray, Himantura signifer, and to determine the effects of acclimation from freshwater to brackish water (salinity 20 on its renal gulo mRNA expression and Gulo activity. We also examined the effects of brackish water acclimation on concentrations of ascorbate, dehydroascorbate and ascorbate + dehydroascorbate in the kidney, brain and gill. The complete cDNA coding sequence of gulo from the kidney of H. signifer contained 1323 bp coding for 440 amino acids. The expression of gulo was kidney-specific, and renal gulo expression decreased significantly by 67% and 50% in fish acclimated to brackish water for 1 day and 6 days, respectively. There was also a significant decrease in renal Gulo activity after 6 days of acclimation to brackish water. Hence, brackish water acclimation led to a decrease in the ascorbic acid synthetic capacity in the kidney of H. signifer. However, there were significant increases in concentrations of ascorbate and ascorbate + dehydroascorbate in the gills (after 1 or 6 days, and a significant increase in the concentration of ascorbate and a significant decrease in the concentration of dehydroascorbate in the brain (after 1 day of fish acclimated to brackish water. Taken together, our results indicate that H. signifer might experience greater salinity-induced oxidative stress in freshwater than in brackish water, possibly related to its short history of freshwater invasion. These results also suggest for the first time a possible relationship between the successful invasion of the freshwater environment by some euryhaline marine elasmobranchs and the ability of these elasmobranchs to increase the capacity of ascorbic acid synthesis in response to hyposalinity stress.

  19. The influence of photosynthetic acclimation to rising CO2 and warmer temperatures on leaf and canopy photosynthesis models

    Bagley, Justin; Rosenthal, David M.; Ruiz-Vera, Ursula M.; Siebers, Matthew H.; Kumar, Praveen; Ort, Donald R.; Bernacchi, Carl J.

    2015-02-01

    There is an increasing necessity to understand how climate change factors, particularly increasing atmospheric concentrations of CO2 ([CO2]) and rising temperature, will influence photosynthetic carbon assimilation (A). Based on theory, an increased [CO2] concomitant with a rise in temperature will increase A in C3 plants beyond that of an increase in [CO2] alone. However, uncertainty surrounding the acclimation response of key photosynthetic parameters to these changes can influence this response. In this work, the acclimation responses of C3 photosynthesis for soybean measured at the SoyFACE Temperature by Free-Air CO2 Enrichment experiment are incorporated in a leaf biochemical and canopy photosynthesis model. The two key parameters used as model inputs, the maximum velocity for carboxylation (Vc,max) and maximum rate of electron transport (Jmax), were measured in a full factorial [CO2] by temperature experiment over two growing seasons and applied in leaf- and canopy-scale models to (1) reassess the theory of combined increases in [CO2] and temperature on A, (2) determine the role of photosynthetic acclimation to increased growth [CO2] and/or temperature in leaf and canopy predictions of A for these treatments, and (3) assess the diurnal and seasonal differences in leaf- and canopy-scale A associated with the imposed treatments. The results demonstrate that the theory behind combined increases in [CO2] and temperature is sound; however, incorporating more recent parameterizations into the photosynthesis model predicts greater increases in A when [CO2] and temperature are increased together. Photosynthetic acclimation is shown to decrease leaf-level A for all treatments; however, in elevated [CO2] the impact of acclimation does not result in any appreciable loss in photosynthetic potential at the canopy scale. In this analysis, neglecting photosynthetic acclimation in heated treatments, with or without concomitant rise in [CO2], leads to modeled overestimates of

  20. Ascorbic Acid Biosynthesis and Brackish Water Acclimation in the Euryhaline Freshwater White-Rimmed Stingray, Himantura signifer.

    Wong, Samuel Z H; Ching, Biyun; Chng, You R; Wong, Wai P; Chew, Shit F; Ip, Yuen K

    2013-01-01

    L-gulono-γ-lactone oxidase (Gulo) catalyzes the last step of ascorbic acid biosynthesis, which occurs in the kidney of elasmobranchs. This study aimed to clone and sequence gulonolactone oxidase (gulo) from the kidney of the euryhaline freshwater stingray, Himantura signifer, and to determine the effects of acclimation from freshwater to brackish water (salinity 20) on its renal gulo mRNA expression and Gulo activity. We also examined the effects of brackish water acclimation on concentrations of ascorbate, dehydroascorbate and ascorbate + dehydroascorbate in the kidney, brain and gill. The complete cDNA coding sequence of gulo from the kidney of H. signifer contained 1323 bp coding for 440 amino acids. The expression of gulo was kidney-specific, and renal gulo expression decreased significantly by 67% and 50% in fish acclimated to brackish water for 1 day and 6 days, respectively. There was also a significant decrease in renal Gulo activity after 6 days of acclimation to brackish water. Hence, brackish water acclimation led to a decrease in the ascorbic acid synthetic capacity in the kidney of H. signifer. However, there were significant increases in concentrations of ascorbate and ascorbate + dehydroascorbate in the gills (after 1 or 6 days), and a significant increase in the concentration of ascorbate and a significant decrease in the concentration of dehydroascorbate in the brain (after 1 day) of fish acclimated to brackish water. Taken together, our results indicate that H. signifer might experience greater salinity-induced oxidative stress in freshwater than in brackish water, possibly related to its short history of freshwater invasion. These results also suggest for the first time a possible relationship between the successful invasion of the freshwater environment by some euryhaline marine elasmobranchs and the ability of these elasmobranchs to increase the capacity of ascorbic acid synthesis in response to hyposalinity stress. PMID:23825042

  1. Exercise- and methylcholine-induced sweating responses in older and younger men: effect of heat acclimation and aerobic fitness

    Inoue, Y.; Havenith, George; Kenney, W. Larry; Loomis, Joseph L.; Buskirk, Elsworth R.

    The purpose of this investigation was to examine the effects of aging and aerobic fitness on exercise- and methylcholine-induced sweating responses during heat acclimation. Five younger [Y group - age: 23+/-1 (SEM) years; maximal oxygen consumption (V.O2max): 47+/-3 ml.kg-1.min-1], four highly fit older (HO group - 63+/-3 years; 48+/-4 ml.kg-1.min-1) and five normally fit older men (NO group - 67+/-3 years; 30+/-1 ml.kg-1.min-1) who were matched for height, body mass and percentage fat, were heat acclimated by daily cycle exercise ( 35% V.O2max for 90 min) in a hot (43°C, 30% RH) environment for 8 days. The heat acclimation regimen increased performance time, lowered final rectal temperature (Tre) and percentage maximal heart rate (%HRmax), improved thermal comfort and decreased sweat sodium concentration similarly in all groups. Although total body sweating rates (M.sw) during acclimation were significantly greater in the Y and HO groups than in the NO group (PHO>NO, and on the forearm Y=HO>NO. No group differences were observed for activated sweat gland density at any site. The SGO at the respective sites increased in the post-acclimation test regardless of group (P<0.01), but on the thigh the magnitude of the increase was lower in the NO (P<0.02) and HO (P=0.07) groups than in the Y group. These findings suggest that heat tolerance and the improvement with acclimation are little impaired not only in highly fit older but also normally fit older men, when the subjects exercised at the same relative exercise intensity. Furthermore, the changes induced by acclimation appear associated with an age-related decrease in V.O2max. However methylcholine-activated SGO and the magnitude of improvement of SGO with acclimation are related not only to V.O2max but also to aging, suggesting that sensitivity to cholinergic stimulation decreases with aging.

  2. Light acclimation potential and carry-over effects vary among three evergreen tree species with contrasting patterns of leaf emergence and maturation.

    Ishii, Hiroaki; Ohsugi, Yoshihiro

    2011-08-01

    We compared light acclimation potential among three evergreen broadleaved species with contrasting patterns of shoot elongation, leaf emergence and leaf maturation. Understory saplings were transferred to a high-light environment before bud break, grown for 13 months, and then transferred back to the understory to observe subsequent carry-over effects. Acclimation potential was highest and sapling mortality was lowest for Cinnamomum japonicum Sieb. ex Nakai. Indeterminate growth and successive leaf emergence allowed this species to acclimate to both high and low light by adjusting leaf production as well as leaf properties. Sapling mortality occurred after both transfers for Camellia japonica L., which also has indeterminate growth and successive leaf emergence. In this species, carry-over effects were observed at the individual level, but leaf-level acclimation potential was high. Acclimation potential was lowest and sapling mortality occurred soon after the transfer to high light for Quercus glauca Thunb. ex Murray. Determinate growth and flush-type leaf emergence resulted in significant carry-over effects in this species. Indeterminate growth and successive leaf emergence increase whole-plant acclimation potential by extending the period of growth and architectural development during the growing season. Similarly, we inferred that delayed leaf maturation, observed in many evergreen species, increases the acclimation potential of current-year leaves by extending the period of leaf development. In evergreen species, the acclimation potential of preexisting leaves determines the role that leaf turnover plays in whole-plant light acclimation, resulting in diverse strategies for light acclimation among species, as observed in this study. PMID:21868403

  3. Assessment of Barotrauma from Rapid Decompression of Depth-Acclimated Juvenile Chinook Salmon Bearing Radiotelemetry Transmitters

    Brown, Richard S.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Welch, Abigail E.; Stephenson, John R.; Abernethy, Cary S.; Ebberts, Blaine D.; Langeslay, Mike; Ahmann, Martin L.; Feil, Daniel H.; Skalski, J. R.; Townsend, Richard L.

    2009-11-01

    This study investigated the mortality of and injury to juvenile Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha exposed to simulated pressure changes associated with passage through a large Kaplan hydropower turbine. Mortality and injury varied depending on whether a fish was carrying a transmitter, the method of transmitter implantation, the depth of acclimation, and the size of the fish. Juvenile Chinook salmon implanted with radio transmitters were more likely than those without to die or sustain injuries during simulated turbine passage. Gastric transmitter implantation resulted in higher rates of injury and mortality than surgical implantation. Mortality and injury increased with increasing pressure of acclimation. Injuries were more common in subyearling fish than in yearling fish. Gas emboli in the gills and internal hemorrhaging were the major causes of mortality. Rupture of the swim bladder and emphysema in the fins were also common. This research makes clear that the exposure of juvenile Chinook salmon bearing radiotelemetry transmitters to simulated turbine pressures with a nadir of 8-19 kPa can result in barotrauma, leading to immediate or delayed mortality. The study also identified sublethal barotrauma injuries that may increase susceptibility to predation. These findings have significant implications for many studies that use telemetry devices to estimate the survival and behavior of juvenile salmon as they pass through large Kaplan turbines typical of those within the Columbia River hydropower system. Our results indicate that estimates of turbine passage survival for juvenile Chinook salmon obtained with radiotelemetry devices may be negatively biased.

  4. Body mass, Thermogenesis and energy metabolism in Tupaia belangeri during cold acclimation

    Wan-long Zhu

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available In order to study the relationship between energy strategies and environmental temperature, basal metabolic rate (BMR, nonshivering thermogenesis (NST, the total protein contents, mitochondrial protein contents, state and state respiratory ability, cytochrome C oxidase activity Ⅲ Ⅳ of liver, heart, diaphragm, gastrocnemius and brown adipose tissue (BAT, serum leptin level and serum thyroid hormone levels were measured in tree shrews (Tupaia belangeri during cold exposure (5±1oC for 1 day, 7 days,14days,21 days. The results showed that body mass increased, BMR and NST increased, the change of liver mitochondrial protein content was more acutely than total protein. The mitochondrial protein content of heart and BAT were significantly increased during cold-exposed, however the skeletal muscle more moderate reaction. The state Ⅲ and state Ⅳ mitochondrial respiration of these tissues were enhanced significantly than the control. The cytochrome C oxidase activity with cold acclimation also significantly increased except the gastrocnemius. Liver, muscle, BAT, heart and other organs were concerned with thermoregulation during the thermal regulation process above cold-exposed. There is a negative correlation between leptin level and body mass. These results suggested that T. belangeri enhanced thermogenic capacity during cold acclimation, and leptin participated in the regulation of energy balance and body weight in T. belangeri.

  5. Chloroplast osmotic adjustment allows for acclimation of photosynthesis to low water potentials

    Previously in this laboratory, studies indicated that photosynthesis (PS) of chloroplasts isolated from spinach plants which underwent osmotic adjustment during in situ water deficits was inhibited less at low osmotic potentials (Psi/sub s/) in vitro than PS of plastids isolated from well watered plants. In this study, an attempt was made to determine if chloroplast acclimation to low Psi/sub s/ was associated with in situ stromal solute accumulation. During a 14d stress cycle, in situ stromal volume was estimated by measuring (using the 3H2O, 14C-sorbitol silicon oil centrifugation technique) the stromal space of plastids in solutions which had the Psi/sub s/ adjusted to the leaf Psi/sub s/. During the first lid of the cycle, stromal volume did not decline, despite a decrease of over 20% in the leaf RWC. After this time, stromal volume dropped rapidly. In situ stromal Psi/sub s/ was also estimated during a stress cycle. These studies indicated that stromal Psi/sub s/ was lowered by net solute accumulation. The data presented in this report suggest that chloroplast acclimation to low Psi/sub s/ may involve stromal solute accumulation and volume maintenance during cell water loss

  6. Acclimation to high-light conditions in cyanobacteria: from gene expression to physiological responses.

    Muramatsu, Masayuki; Hihara, Yukako

    2012-01-01

    Photosynthetic organisms have evolved various acclimatory responses to high-light (HL) conditions to maintain a balance between energy supply (light harvesting and electron transport) and consumption (cellular metabolism) and to protect the photosynthetic apparatus from photodamage. The molecular mechanism of HL acclimation has been extensively studied in the unicellular cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. Whole genome DNA microarray analyses have revealed that the change in gene expression profile under HL is closely correlated with subsequent acclimatory responses such as (1) acceleration in the rate of photosystem II turnover, (2) downregulation of light harvesting capacity, (3) development of a protection mechanism for the photosystems against excess light energy, (4) upregulation of general protection mechanism components, and (5) regulation of carbon and nitrogen assimilation. In this review article, we survey recent progress in the understanding of the molecular mechanisms of these acclimatory responses in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. We also briefly describe attempts to understand HL acclimation in various cyanobacterial species in their natural environments. PMID:22006212

  7. Low temperature acclimation with electrical stimulation enhance the biocathode functioning stability for antibiotics detoxification.

    Liang, Bin; Kong, Deyong; Ma, Jincai; Wen, Chongqing; Yuan, Tong; Lee, Duu-Jong; Zhou, Jizhong; Wang, Aijie

    2016-09-01

    Improvement of the stability of functional microbial communities in wastewater treatment system is critical to accelerate pollutants detoxification in cold regions. Although biocathode communities could accelerate environmental pollutants degradation, how to acclimate the cold stress and to improve the catalytic stability of functional microbial communities are remain poorly understood. Here we investigated the structural and functional responses of antibiotic chloramphenicol (CAP) reducing biocathode communities to constant low temperature 10 °C (10-biocathode) and temperature elevation from 10 °C to 25 °C (S25-biocathode). Our results indicated that the low temperature acclimation with electrical stimulation obviously enhanced the CAP nitro group reduction efficiency when comparing the aromatic amine product AMCl2 formation efficiency with the 10-biocathode and S25-biocathode under the opened and closed circuit conditions. The 10-biocathode generated comparative AMCl maximum as the S25-biocathode but showed significant lower dehalogenation rate of AMCl2 to AMCl. The continuous low temperature and temperature elevation both enriched core functional community in the 10-biocathode and S25-biocathode, respectively. The 10-biocathode functioning stability maintained mainly through selectively enriching cold-adapted functional species, coexisting metabolically similar nitroaromatics reducers and maintaining the relative abundance of key electrons transfer genes. This study provides new insights into biocathode functioning stability for accelerating environmental pollutants degradation in cold wastewater system. PMID:27183211

  8. Transcriptomic analysis provides insight into high-altitude acclimation in domestic goats.

    Tang, Qianzi; Huang, Wenyao; Guan, Jiuqiang; Jin, Long; Che, Tiandong; Fu, Yuhua; Hu, Yaodong; Tian, Shilin; Wang, Dawei; Jiang, Zhi; Li, Xuewei; Li, Mingzhou

    2015-08-10

    Domestic goats are distributed in a wide range of habitats and have acclimated to their local environmental conditions. To investigate the gene expression changes of goats that are induced by high altitude stress, we performed RNA-seq on 27 samples from the three hypoxia-sensitive tissues (heart, lung, and skeletal muscle) in three indigenous populations from distinct altitudes (600 m, 2000 m, and 3000 m). We generated 129Gb of high-quality sequencing data (~4Gb per sample) and catalogued the expression profiles of 12,421 annotated hircine genes in each sample. The analysis showed global similarities and differences of high-altitude transcriptomes among populations and tissues as well as revealed that the heart underwent the most high-altitude induced expression changes. We identified numerous differentially expressed genes that exhibited distinct expression patterns, and nonsynonymous single nucleotide variant-containing genes that were highly differentiated between the high- and low-altitude populations. These genes have known or potential roles in hypoxia response and were enriched in functional gene categories potentially responsible for high-altitude stress. Therefore, they are appealing candidates for further investigation of the gene expression and associated regulatory mechanisms related to high-altitude acclimation. PMID:25958351

  9. THE RELIABILITY OF ADOLESCENT THERMOREGULATORY RESPONSES DURING A HEAT ACCLIMATION PROTOCOL

    Craig A. Williams

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the between trial variation of thermoregulatory measures during a heat acclimation protocol. Eight 14-16 y old boys completed three bouts of 20-min cycling at 45 % peak VO2 in a hot environment (35.1 ± 1.2 °C and 46. 4 ± 1.0 % relative humidity on two occasions separated by a minimum of 24 h. Reliability was assessed through analysis of within-subject variation, the change in the mean, and retest correlation for measurements of aural temperature (Tau, mean skin temperature (Tsk, heart rate (HR and oxygen uptake (VO2. Between trial differences were low for Tau, Tskbout1, Tskbout2and3 and HR with coefficients of variation 0.6 %, 1.5 %, 0.5 % and 4.0 %, respectively. The results demonstrate good reliability that will allow future investigators to precisely determine the extent of heat acclimation protocols in relation to the measurement error

  10. Plant acclimation impacts carbon allocation to isoprene emissions: evidence from past to future CO2 levels

    de Boer, Hugo J.; van der Laan, Annick; Dekker, Stefan C.; Holzinger, Rupert

    2016-04-01

    Isoprene (C5H8) is produced in plant leaves as a side product of photosynthesis, whereby approximately 0.1-2.0% of the photosynthetic carbon uptake is released back into the atmosphere via isoprene emissions. Isoprene biosynthesis is thought to alleviate oxidative stress, specifically in warm, dry and high-light environments. Moreover, isoprene biosynthesis is influenced by atmospheric CO2 concentrations in the short term (CO2 concentration (Ci), and in the long term (>weeks) via acclimation in photosynthetic biochemistry. In order to understand the effects of CO2-induced climate change on carbon allocation in plants it is therefore important to quantify how isoprene biosynthesis and emissions are effected by both short-term responses and long-term acclimation to rising atmospheric CO2 levels. A promising development for modelling CO2-induced changes in isoprene emissions is the Leaf-Energetic-Status model (referred to as LES-model hereafter, see Harrison et al., 2013 and Morfopoulos et al., 2014). This model simulates isoprene emissions based on the hypothesis that isoprene biosynthesis depends on the imbalance between the photosynthetic electron supply of reducing power and the electron demands of carbon fixation. In addition to environmental conditions, this imbalance is determined by the photosynthetic electron transport capacity (Jmax) and the maximum carboxylation capacity of Rubisco (V cmax). Here we compare predictions of the LES-model with observed isoprene emission responses of Quercus robur (pedunculate oak) specimen that acclimated to CO2 levels representative of the last glacial, the present and the end of this century (200, 400 and 800 ppm, respectively) for two growing seasons. Plants were grown in walk-in growth chambers with tight control of light, temperature, humidity and CO2 concentrations. Photosynthetic biochemical parameters V cmax and Jmax were determined with a Licor LI-6400XT photosynthesis system. The relationship between photosynthesis

  11. Complete Genome Sequence of Cyanobacterium Geminocystis sp. Strain NIES-3708, Which Performs Type II Complementary Chromatic Acclimation.

    Hirose, Yuu; Katayama, Mitsunori; Ohtsubo, Yoshiyuki; Misawa, Naomi; Iioka, Erica; Suda, Wataru; Oshima, Kenshiro; Hanaoka, Mitsumasa; Tanaka, Kan; Eki, Toshihiko; Ikeuchi, Masahiko; Kikuchi, Yo; Ishida, Makoto; Hattori, Masahira

    2015-01-01

    To explore the variation of the light-regulated genes during complementary chromatic acclimation (CCA), we determined the complete genome sequence of the cyanobacterium Geminocystis sp. strain NIES-3708. Within the light-regulated operon for CCA, we found genes for phycoerythrin but not phycocyanin, suggesting that this cyanobacterium modulates phycoerythrin composition only (type II CCA). PMID:25953174

  12. Mitochondrial Acclimation Capacities to Ocean Warming and Acidification Are Limited in the Antarctic Nototheniid Fish, Notothenia rossii and Lepidonotothen squamifrons

    Strobel, Anneli; Graeve, Martin; Poertner, Hans O.; Mark, Felix C

    2013-01-01

    Antarctic notothenioid fish are characterized by their evolutionary adaptation to the cold, thermostable Southern Ocean, which is associated with unique physiological adaptations to withstand the cold and reduce energetic requirements but also entails limited compensation capacities to environmental change. This study compares the capacities of mitochondrial acclimation to ocean warming and acidification between the Antarctic nototheniid Notothenia rossii and the sub-Antarctic Lepidonotothen ...

  13. Acclimation of foliar respiration and photosynthesis in response to experimental warming in a temperate steppe in northern China.

    Yonggang Chi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Thermal acclimation of foliar respiration and photosynthesis is critical for projection of changes in carbon exchange of terrestrial ecosystems under global warming. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A field manipulative experiment was conducted to elevate foliar temperature (Tleaf by 2.07°C in a temperate steppe in northern China. Rd/Tleaf curves (responses of dark respiration to Tleaf, An/Tleaf curves (responses of light-saturated net CO2 assimilation rates to Tleaf, responses of biochemical limitations and diffusion limitations in gross CO2 assimilation rates (Ag to Tleaf, and foliar nitrogen (N concentration in Stipa krylovii Roshev. were measured in 2010 (a dry year and 2011 (a wet year. Significant thermal acclimation of Rd to 6-year experimental warming was found. However, An had a limited ability to acclimate to a warmer climate regime. Thermal acclimation of Rd was associated with not only the direct effects of warming, but also the changes in foliar N concentration induced by warming. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Warming decreased the temperature sensitivity (Q10 of the response of Rd/Ag ratio to Tleaf. Our findings may have important implications for improving ecosystem models in simulating carbon cycles and advancing understanding on the interactions between climate change and ecosystem functions.

  14. Acclimation-dependent expression of heat shock protein 70 in Pacific abalone (Haliotis discus hannai Ino) and its acute response to thermal exposure

    LI Jiaqi; HE Qingguo; SUN Hui; LIU Xiao

    2012-01-01

    Heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) is one important member of heat shock protein (Hsp) family that is responsible for various stresses,especially thermal stress.Here we examined the response of Hsp70gene to both chronic and acute thermal exposure in Pacific abalone (Haliotis discus hannai Ino).For the chronic exposure,abalones were maintained at 8,12,20,and 30℃ for four months and their mRNA levels were measured.The highest mRNA level of Hsp70 gene relative to actin gene was detected in the 30℃-acclimated group,followed by the 8℃-acclimated group and then the 12℃- and 20℃-acclimated groups.After the long-term acclimation,gills from each of the above acclimation groups were dissected and exposed to different temperatures between 8℃ and 38℃ for 30 min.Hsp70 expression in gills acclimated to different temperatures responded differentially to the same temperature exposure.The incubation temperature that induced maximum Hsp70 mRNA expression was higher in the higher temperature acclimation groups than lower temperature groups.Pacific abalones could alter the expression pattern of Hsp70 gene according to environmental thermal conditions,through which they deal with the stress of thermal variations.

  15. Costs and benefits of thermal acclimation for codling moth, Cydia pomonella (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae): implications for pest control and the sterile insect release programme

    Chidawanyika, Frank; Terblanche, John S

    2011-01-01

    Sterile insect release (SIR) is used to suppress insect pest populations in agro-ecosystems, but its success hinges on the performance of the released insects and prevailing environmental conditions. For example, low temperatures dramatically reduce SIR efficacy in cooler conditions. Here, we report on the costs and benefits of thermal acclimation for laboratory and field responses of codling moth, Cydia pomonella. Using a component of field fitness, we demonstrate that low temperature acclimated laboratory-reared moths are recaptured significantly more (∼2–4×) under cooler conditions in the wild relative to warm-acclimated or control moths. However, improvements in low temperature performance in cold-acclimated moths came at a cost to performance under warmer conditions. At high ambient temperatures, warm-acclimation improved field performance relative to control or cold-acclimated moths. Laboratory assessments of thermal activity and their limits matched the field results, indicating that these laboratory assays may be transferable to field performance. This study demonstrates clear costs and benefits of thermal acclimation on laboratory and field performance and the potential utility of thermal pretreatments for offsetting negative efficacy in SIR programmes under adverse thermal conditions. Consequently, the present work shows that evolutionary principles of phenotypic plasticity can be used to improve field performance and thus possibly enhance pest control programmes seeking increased efficacy. PMID:25568003

  16. Cardiac molecular-acclimation mechanisms in response to swimming-induced exercise in Atlantic salmon.

    Vicente Castro

    Full Text Available Cardiac muscle is a principal target organ for exercise-induced acclimation mechanisms in fish and mammals, given that sustained aerobic exercise training improves cardiac output. Yet, the molecular mechanisms underlying such cardiac acclimation have been scarcely investigated in teleosts. Consequently, we studied mechanisms related to cardiac growth, contractility, vascularization, energy metabolism and myokine production in Atlantic salmon pre-smolts resulting from 10 weeks exercise-training at three different swimming intensities: 0.32 (control, 0.65 (medium intensity and 1.31 (high intensity body lengths s(-1. Cardiac responses were characterized using growth, immunofluorescence and qPCR analysis of a large number of target genes encoding proteins with significant and well-characterized function. The overall stimulatory effect of exercise on cardiac muscle was dependent on training intensity, with changes elicited by high intensity training being of greater magnitude than either medium intensity or control. Higher protein levels of PCNA were indicative of cardiac growth being driven by cardiomyocyte hyperplasia, while elevated cardiac mRNA levels of MEF2C, GATA4 and ACTA1 suggested cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. In addition, up-regulation of EC coupling-related genes suggested that exercised hearts may have improved contractile function, while higher mRNA levels of EPO and VEGF were suggestive of a more efficient oxygen supply network. Furthermore, higher mRNA levels of PPARα, PGC1α and CPT1 all suggested a higher capacity for lipid oxidation, which along with a significant enlargement of mitochondrial size in cardiac myocytes of the compact layer of fish exercised at high intensity, suggested an enhanced energetic support system. Training also elevated transcription of a set of myokines and other gene products related to the inflammatory process, such as TNFα, NFκB, COX2, IL1RA and TNF decoy receptor. This study provides the first

  17. Associations between the acclimation of phloem-cell wall ingrowths in minor veins and maximal photosynthesis rate

    William Walter Adams

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The companion cells (CCs and/or phloem parenchyma cells (PCs in foliar minor veins of some species exhibit invaginations that are amplified when plants develop in high light (HL compared to low light (LL. Leaves of plants that develop under HL also exhibit greater maximal rates of photosynthesis compared to those that develop under LL, suggesting that the increased membrane area of CCs and PCs of HL-acclimated leaves may provide for greater levels of transport proteins facilitating enhanced sugar export. Furthermore, the degree of wall invagination in PCs (Arabidopsis thaliana or CCs (pea of fully expanded LL-acclimated leaves increased to the same level as that present in HL-acclimated leaves seven days following transfer to HL, and maximal photosynthesis rates of transferred leaves of both species likewise increased to the same level as in HL-acclimated leaves. In contrast, transfer of Senecio vulgaris from LL to HL resulted in increased wall invagination in CCs, but not PCs, and such leaves furthermore exhibited only partial upregulation of photosynthetic capacity following LL to HL transfer. Moreover, a significant linear relationship existed between the level of cell wall ingrowths and maximal photosynthesis rates across all three species and growth light regimes. A positive linear relationship between these two parameters was also present for two ecotypes (Sweden, Italy of the winter annual A. thaliana in response to growth at different temperatures, with significantly greater levels of PC wall ingrowths and higher rates of photosynthesis in leaves that developed at cooler versus warmer temperatures. Treatment of LL-acclimated plants with the stress hormone methyl jasmonate also resulted in increased levels of wall ingrowths in PCs of A. thaliana and S. vulgaris but not in CCs of pea and S. vulgaris. The possible role of PC wall ingrowths in sugar export versus as physical barriers to the movement of pathogens warrants further attention.

  18. Environmental temperature and physiological polymorphism of populations. II. The relation of changes in the organismal heat resistance to its initial level during heat acclimation

    Ushakov, B.P.; Amosova, I.S.; Chernokozheva, I.S.; Dregolskaya, I.N.; Pashkova, I.M.; Skholl, E.D.

    1977-01-01

    Study was made of the changes in the organismal heat resistance level and average values were obtained for clones and siblings of Hydra oligactis, Asellus acquaticus, Drosophila melanogaster, Strongylocentrotus droebachiensis (embryos) and Rana temporaria (tadpoles) during short-term heat acclimation (sibacclimation method). In all the species studied a negative correlation was observed between the initial heat resistance level of clones and siblings and its increase during heat acclimation. Reaction norm during temperature resistance acclimation of poikilotherms depends on the initial organismal heat resistance inherent in each genotype.

  19. The tomato mutant ars1 (altered response to salt stress 1) identifies an R1-type MYB transcription factor involved in stomatal closure under salt acclimation.

    Campos, Juan F; Cara, Beatriz; Pérez-Martín, Fernando; Pineda, Benito; Egea, Isabel; Flores, Francisco B; Fernandez-Garcia, Nieves; Capel, Juan; Moreno, Vicente; Angosto, Trinidad; Lozano, Rafael; Bolarin, Maria C

    2016-06-01

    A screening under salt stress conditions of a T-DNA mutant collection of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) led to the identification of the altered response to salt stress 1 (ars1) mutant, which showed a salt-sensitive phenotype. Genetic analysis of the ars1 mutation revealed that a single T-DNA insertion in the ARS1 gene was responsible of the mutant phenotype. ARS1 coded for an R1-MYB type transcription factor and its expression was induced by salinity in leaves. The mutant reduced fruit yield under salt acclimation while in the absence of stress the disruption of ARS1 did not affect this agronomic trait. The stomatal behaviour of ars1 mutant leaves induced higher Na(+) accumulation via the transpiration stream, as the decreases of stomatal conductance and transpiration rate induced by salt stress were markedly lower in the mutant plants. Moreover, the mutation affected stomatal closure in a response mediated by abscisic acid (ABA). The characterization of tomato transgenic lines silencing and overexpressing ARS1 corroborates the role of the gene in regulating the water loss via transpiration under salinity. Together, our results show that ARS1 tomato gene contributes to reduce transpirational water loss under salt stress. Finally, this gene could be interesting for tomato molecular breeding, because its manipulation could lead to improved stress tolerance without yield penalty under optimal culture conditions. PMID:26578112

  20. Comparative biochemical methane potential of paragrass using an unacclimated and an acclimated microbial consortium.

    Nuchdang, Sasikarn; Khemkhao, Maneerat; Techkarnjanaruk, Somkiet; Phalakornkule, Chantaraporn

    2015-05-01

    The effect of inoculum sources on the anaerobic digestion of paragrass was investigated. Two types of sludge were used as the inoculums: an anaerobic sludge obtained from a domestic wastewater treatment plant (OS) and a sludge acclimated to fibrous substrates in raw palm oil mill effluent (AMC). Microbial activity assays showed that the AMC had hydrolytic and acetogenic activities two times greater than the activities of the OS. In addition, the production of methane from acetate by the AMC occurred without a lag phase, while it took 8 days for the OS to start producing methane from the same substrate. The biochemical methane potential after 80 days digestion was 316 ml STP/g VS(added) using the AMC, and 277 ml STP/g VS(added) using the OS. The methane potential of the paragrass was estimated to be 3337 Nm(3) CH4/ha a. PMID:25727758

  1. A Preliminary Assessment of Barotrauma Injuries and Acclimation Studies for Three Fish Species

    Brown, Richard S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Walker, Ricardo W. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Stephenson, John R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-12-15

    Fish that pass hydro structures either through turbine passage, deep spill, or other deep pathways can experience rapid decreases in pressure that can result in barotrauma. In addition to morphology and physiology of the fish’s swim bladder, the severity of barotrauma is directly related to the volume of undissolved gas in fish prior to rapid decompression and the lowest pressure the fish experience as they pass hydro structures (termed the “nadir”). The volume of undissolved gas in fish is influenced by the depth of acclimation (the pressure at which the fish is neutrally buoyant); therefore, determining the depth where fish are neutrally buoyant is a critical precursor to determining the relationship between pressure changes and injury or mortality.

  2. Chromatic acclimation and population dynamics of green sulfur bacteria grown with spectrally tailored light

    Saikin, Semion K; Huh, Joonsuk; Hannout, Moataz; Wang, Yaya; Zare, Farrokh; Aspuru-Guzik, Alan; Tang, Joseph Kuo-Hsiang

    2014-01-01

    Living organisms have to adjust to their surrounding in order to survive in stressful conditions. We study this mechanism in one of most primitive creatures - photosynthetic green sulfur bacteria. These bacteria absorb photons very efficiently using the chlorosome antenna complexes and perform photosynthesis in extreme low-light environments. How the chlorosomes in green sulfur bacteria are acclimated to the stressful light conditions, for instance, if the spectrum of light is not optimal for absorption, is unknown. Studying Chlorobaculum tepidum cultures with far-red to near-infrared light-emitting diodes, we found that these bacteria react to changes in energy flow by regulating the amount of light-absorbing pigments and the size of the chlorosomes. Surprisingly, our results indicate that the bacteria can survive in near-infrared lights capturing low-frequency photons by the intermediate units of the light-harvesting complex. The latter strategy may be used by the species recently found near hydrothermal ve...

  3. Effects of freezing and cold acclimation on the plasma membrane of isolated protoplasts

    Steponkus, P.L.

    1991-01-01

    This project focuses on lesions in the plasma membrane of protoplasts that occur during freezing to temperatures below {minus}5{degrees} which result in changes in the semipermeablity of the plasma membrane. This injury, referred to as loss of osmotic responsiveness, is associated with the formation of large, aparticulate domains in the plasma membrane, aparticulate lamellae subtending the plasma membrane, and lamellar-to-hexagonal{sub II} phase transitions in the plasma membrane and subtending lamellar. The goals of this project are to provide a mechanistic understanding of the mechanism by which freeze-induced dehydration effects the formation of aparticulate domains and lamellar-to-hexagonal{sub II} phase transitions and to determine the mechanisms by which cold acclimation and cryoprotectants preclude or diminish these ultrastructural changes. Our working hypothesis is the formation of aparticulate domains and lamellar-to-hexagon{sub II} phase transitions in the plasma membrane and subtending lamellae are manifestations of hydration-dependent bilayer-bilayer interactions.

  4. Acclimation of Antarctic Chlamydomonas to the sea-ice environment: a transcriptomic analysis.

    Liu, Chenlin; Wang, Xiuliang; Wang, Xingna; Sun, Chengjun

    2016-07-01

    The Antarctic green alga Chlamydomonas sp. ICE-L was isolated from sea ice. As a psychrophilic microalga, it can tolerate the environmental stress in the sea-ice brine, such as freezing temperature and high salinity. We performed a transcriptome analysis to identify freezing stress responding genes and explore the extreme environmental acclimation-related strategies. Here, we show that many genes in ICE-L transcriptome that encoding PUFA synthesis enzymes, molecular chaperon proteins, and cell membrane transport proteins have high similarity to the gens from Antarctic bacteria. These ICE-L genes are supposed to be acquired through horizontal gene transfer from its symbiotic microbes in the sea-ice brine. The presence of these genes in both sea-ice microalgae and bacteria indicated the biological processes they involved in are possibly contributing to ICE-L success in sea ice. In addition, the biological pathways were compared between ICE-L and its closely related sister species, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Volvox carteri. In ICE-L transcripome, many sequences homologous to the plant or bacteria proteins in the post-transcriptional, post-translational modification, and signal-transduction KEGG pathways, are absent in the nonpsychrophilic green algae. These complex structural components might imply enhanced stress adaptation capacity. At last, differential gene expression analysis at the transcriptome level of ICE-L indicated that genes that associated with post-translational modification, lipid metabolism, and nitrogen metabolism are responding to the freezing treatment. In conclusion, the transcriptome of Chlamydomonas sp. ICE-L is very useful for exploring the mutualistic interaction between microalgae and bacteria in sea ice; and discovering the specific genes and metabolism pathways responding to the freezing acclimation in psychrophilic microalgae. PMID:27161450

  5. Daphnetin methylation stabilizes the activity of phosphoribulokinase in wheat during cold acclimation.

    Kane, Khalil; Moheb, Amira; Fukushi, Yukihara; Roy, René; Hüner, Norman P A; Ibrahim, Ragai K; Sarhan, Fathey

    2012-10-01

    The methylation of daphnetin (7,8-dihydroxycoumarin) to its 8-methyl derivative is catalyzed by a wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) O-methyltransferase (TaOMT1). This enzyme is regulated by cold and photosystem II excitation pressure (plastid redox state). Here, we investigated the biological significance of this methylation and its potential role in modulating the activity of kinases in wheat. To identify the potential kinases that may interact with daphnetin in wheat, the soluble protein extract from aerial parts of cold-acclimated wheat was purified by DEAE-cellulose separation and affinity chromatography on a daphnetin derivative (7,8-dihydroxy-4-coumarin acetic acid)-EAH sepharose column. Mass spectrometric analysis indicated that wheat phosphoribulokinase (TaPRK) is the major kinase that binds to daphnetin. This TaPRK plays an important role in regulating the flow of carbon through the Calvin cycle, by catalyzing the final step in the regeneration of ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate from ribulose-5-phosphate (Ru5P) and ATP. The activities of TaPRK, endogenous or recombinant, are inhibited by daphnetin in a specific and dose-dependent manner, but not by its monomethyl derivative (7-methyl, 8-hydroxycoumarin). Furthermore, HPLC-MS analysis of wheat extracts reveals that 7,8-dimethoxycoumarin is more abundant than its monomethyl derivative. The results also show that cold acclimation does not alter the level of TaPRK mRNA or its enzyme activity, and thus ensures the stable generation of ribulose 1,5-biphosphate. PMID:22827600

  6. Emerging Perspectives on the Mechanisms,Regulation, and Distribution of Light Color Acclimation in Cyanobacteria

    Andrian Gutu; David M. Kehoe

    2012-01-01

    Chromatic acclimation (CA) provides many cyanobacteria with the ability to tailor the properties of their lightharvesting antennae to the spectral distribution of ambient light.CA was originally discovered as a result of its dramatic cellular phenotype in red and green light.However,discoveries over the past decade have revealed that many pairs of light colors,ranging from blue to infrared,can trigger CA responses.The capacity to undergo CA is widespread geographically,occurs in most habitats around the world,and is found within all major cyanobacterial groups.In addition,many other cellular activities have been found to be under CA control,resulting in distinct physiological and morphological states for cells under different light-color conditions.Several types of CA appear to be the result of convergent evolution,where different strategies are used to achieve the final goal of optimizing light-harvesting antenna composition to maximize photon capture.The regulation of CA has been found to occur primarily at the level of RNA abundance.The CA-regulatory pathways uncovered thus far are two-component systems that use phytochrome-class photoreceptors with sensor-kinase domains to control response regulators that function as transcription factors.However,there is also at least one CAregulatory pathway that operates at the post-transcriptional level.It is becoming increasingly clear that large numbers of cyanobacterial species have the capacity to acclimate to a wide variety of light colors through the use of a range of different CA processes.

  7. Interaction of proline, sugars, and anthocyanins during photosynthetic acclimation of Arabidopsis thaliana to drought stress.

    Sperdouli, Ilektra; Moustakas, Michael

    2012-04-15

    The relationships among photosynthetic acclimation, proline (Pro), soluble sugar (SS), and anthocyanin (An) accumulation in Arabidopsis thaliana leaves to the onset of drought stress (OnDS), mild (MiDS) and moderate drought stress (MoDS), were evaluated. As leaf water content (LWC) decreased, metabolic concentrations (Pro, SS, and An) increased and were negatively and significantly correlated with LWC. Thus, these metabolites may have an important role in the acclimation process to drought stress (DS). No correlations among Pro, SS and An accumulation with the quantum efficiency of PSII photochemistry (Φ(PSII)) and the excitation pressure (1-q(P)) were observed under DS. This implies that, while metabolites increased in a drought-dependent way, PSII activity did not decrease in the same pattern. Our results indicated that, under MoDS, A. thaliana leaves were able to maintain oxidative compounds such as malondialdeyde, an end product of lipid peroxidation, within the range of control leaves, and to cope with oxidative damage, as was evident by the decreased excitation pressure (1-q(P)) and similar (ns difference) Φ(PSII) to that of control leaves. In addition, a statistically significant increased accumulation of Pro, SS and An was recorded only under MoDS compared to controls. The better PSII functioning of MoDS Arabidopsis leaves may reflect the greater capacity of these leaves to undertake key metabolic adjustments, including increased Pro, SS and An accumulation, to maintain a higher antioxidant protection and a better balance between light capture and energy use. PMID:22305050

  8. Characteristics of fat metabolism in skeletal muscle of rats after hypobaric hypoxic acclimation

    Mao Sunzhong; Gao Yuqi; Chen Jian; Liu Fuyi; Gao Wenxiang; Huang Jian; Liao Weigong; Cai Mingchun

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the characteristics of fat metabolism in rat skeletal muscle after hypobaric hypoxia acclimation. Methods: Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into 3 groups randomly: control group (H0), hypoxic 5-day group (H5), and hypoxic 15-day group (HI5). Animals of H5 and 15 groups were exposed to hypobaric hypoxia chamber simulating 5 000 m high altitude for 5 d or 15 d respectively, 23 h per day. H0 group stayed outside of chamber.The level of fatty acid oxidation and uptake, and glucose oxidation were examined, and the level of non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA), ATP and phosphocreatine (PCr) were also assayed in rat skeletal muscles. Results: The contents of ATP and PCr in H5 group were lower than those in H0 and H15 groups (P<0.05), while there was no significant difference between H0 and H15. Compared with H0, the blood NEFA level in all hypoxia groups was increased significantly (P<0.05). The muscle NEFA level in HI5 group was greatly higher than that in H0 and H5 groups. The rates of fatty acid oxidation and uptake in H15 group were significantly higher than those in H0 and H5 groups (P<0.05), and the rate of glucose oxidation in all hypoxia groups was significantly decreased than that in H0 group (P<0.05). Conclusion: It is concluded that the enhanced fat oxidation may be one of the mechanisms in the maintenance of energy homeostasis after hypobaric hypoxic acclimation.

  9. Acclimation of photosynthetic parameters is not the icing on the cake. It is the cake.

    Prentice, Iain Colin; Wang, Han; Togashi, Henrique; Keenan, Trevor; Davis, Tyler; Wright, Ian

    2015-04-01

    Photosynthesis and transpiration are tightly coupled through stomatal behaviour and therefore it is impossible to understand and parsimoniously model one without also considering the other. The ratio of leaf-internal to ambient carbon dioxide concentration (ci:ca ratio) is a measure of the "exchange rate" between water and carbon. We have shown that it is possible to predict the observed dependencies of ci:ca on environmental factors (temperature, vapour pressure deficit and atmospheric pressure) based on the "least-cost hypothesis", which states that plants minimize the sum of the unit costs (respiration per unit assimilation) of maintaining the capacities for carbon fixation (Vcmax) and water transport. Moreover, with the help of the "co-ordination hypothesis" (the long-accepted idea that Rubisco capacity and electron transport tend to co-limit photosynthesis) it is possible to predict not only how ci:ca should vary, but also how Vcmax and electron transport capacity (Jmax) should vary, in space and time. We will present empirical support for this idea based on both ecophysiological measurements at the leaf scale, and analysis of carbon dioxide flux measurements at the ecosystem scale. We conclude that acclimation of photosynthetic parameters is pervasive. This is fundamental because it predicts a quite different set of environmental responses than those that are usually applied in models that incorrectly assume constancy of parameter values with time and within plant functional types (PFTs). In addition, acclimation actually simplifies modelling because it describes universal relationships that apply across all PFTs with the C3 photosynthetic pathway, and it removes the need to specify parameters such as Vcmax and Jmax as if they were properties of PFTs.

  10. The protective effect of heat acclimation from hypoxic damage in the brain involves changes in the expression of glutamate receptors

    Yacobi, Assaf; Stern Bach, Yael; Horowitz, Michal

    2014-01-01

    Long-term heat acclimation (34 °C, 30d) alters the physiological responses and the metabolic state of organisms. It also improves ability to cope with hypoxic stress via a cross-tolerance mechanism. Within the brain, the hippocampal and frontal cortex neurons are the most sensitive to hypoxia and cell death is mainly caused by calcium influx via glutamate-gated ion channels, specifically NMDA and AMPA receptors. GluN1 subunit levels of NMDA-R correspond to NMDA-R levels. GluN2B/GluN2A subunit ratio is a qualitative index of channel activity; a higher ratio implies lower calcium permeability. The GluA2 subunit of AMPA-R controls channel permeability by inhibiting calcium penetration. Here, in rats model we (i)used behavioral-assessment tests to evaluate heat acclimation mediated hypoxic (15’ 4.5 ± 0.5% O2) neuroprotection, (ii) measured protein and transcript levels of NMDA-R and AMPA-R subunits before and after hypoxia in the hippocampus and the frontal cortex, to evaluate the role of Ca2+ in neuro-protection/cross-tolerance. Behavioral tests confirmed hypoxic tolerance in long-term (30d) but not in short-term (2d) heat acclimated rats. Hypoxic tolerance in the long-term acclimated phenotype was accompanied by a significant decrease in basal NMDA receptor GluN1 protein and an increase in its mRNA. The long-term acclimated rats also showed post ischemic increases in the GluN2B/GluN2A subunit ratio and GluA2 subunit of the AMPA receptor, supporting the hypothesis that reduced calcium permeability contributes to heat acclimation mediated hypoxia cross-tolerance. Abrupt post ischemic change in GluN2B/GluN2A subunit ratio with no change in NMDA-R subunits transcript levels implies that post-translational processes are inseparable acclimatory cross-tolerance mechanism.

  11. Acclimation to different thermal conditions in a northerly wintering shorebird is driven by body mass-related changes in organ size

    Vezina, Francois; Jalvingh, Kirsten M.; Dekinga, Anne; Piersma, Theunis

    2006-01-01

    Seasonal acclimatization and experimental acclimation to cold in birds typically results from increased shivering endurance and elevated thermogenic capacity leading to improved resistance to cold. A wide array of physiological adjustments, ranging from biochemical transformations to organ mass vari

  12. Cold acclimation of Arabidopsis thaliana results in incomplete recovery of photosynthetic capacity, associated with an increased reduction of the chloroplast stroma.

    Savitch, L V; Barker-Astrom, J; Ivanov, A G; Hurry, V; Oquist, G; Huner, N P; Gardeström, P

    2001-12-01

    The effects of short-term cold stress and long-term cold acclimation on the light reactions of photosynthesis were examined in vivo to assess their contributions to photosynthetic acclimation to low temperature in Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh.. All photosynthetic measurements were made at the temperature of exposure: 23 degrees C for non-acclimated plants and 5 degrees C for cold-stressed and cold-acclimated plants. Three-day cold-stress treatments at 5 degrees C inhibited light-saturated rates of CO2 assimilation and O2 evolution by approximately 75%. The 3-day exposure to 5 degrees C also increased the proportion of reduced QA by 50%, decreased the yield of PSII electron transport by 65% and decreased PSI activity by 31%. In contrast, long-term cold acclimation resulted in a strong but incomplete recovery of light-saturated photosynthesis at 5 degrees C. The rates of light-saturated CO2 and O2 gas exchange and the in vivo yield of PSII activity under light-saturating conditions were only 35-40% lower, and the relative redox state of QA only 20% lower, at 5 degrees C after cold acclimation than in controls at 23 degrees C. PSI activity showed full recovery during long-term cold acclimation. Neither short-term cold stress nor long-term cold acclimation of Arabidopsis was associated with a limitation in ATP, and both treatments resulted in an increase in the ATP/NADPH ratio. This increase in ATP/NADPH was associated with an inhibition of PSI cyclic electron transport but there was no apparent change in the Mehler reaction activity in either cold-stressed or cold-acclimated leaves. Cold acclimation also resulted in an increase in the reduction state of the stroma, as indicated by an increased total activity and activation state of NADP-dependent malate dehydrogenase, and increased light-dependent activities of the major regulatory enzymes of the oxidative pentose-phosphate pathway. We suggest that the photosynthetic capacity during cold stress as well as cold

  13. The sampling scheme matters: Pan troglodytes troglodytes and P. t. schweinfurthii are characterized by clinal genetic variation rather than a strong subspecies break.

    Fünfstück, Tillmann; Arandjelovic, Mimi; Morgan, David B; Sanz, Crickette; Reed, Patricia; Olson, Sarah H; Cameron, Ken; Ondzie, Alain; Peeters, Martine; Vigilant, Linda

    2015-02-01

    Populations of an organism living in marked geographical or evolutionary isolation from other populations of the same species are often termed subspecies and expected to show some degree of genetic distinctiveness. The common chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes) is currently described as four geographically delimited subspecies: the western (P. t. verus), the nigerian-cameroonian (P. t. ellioti), the central (P. t. troglodytes) and the eastern (P. t. schweinfurthii) chimpanzees. Although these taxa would be expected to be reciprocally monophyletic, studies have not always consistently resolved the central and eastern chimpanzee taxa. Most studies, however, used data from individuals of unknown or approximate geographic provenance. Thus, genetic data from samples of known origin may shed light on the evolutionary relationship of these subspecies. We generated microsatellite genotypes from noninvasively collected fecal samples of 185 central chimpanzees that were sampled across large parts of their range and analyzed them together with 283 published eastern chimpanzee genotypes from known localities. We observed a clear signal of isolation by distance across both subspecies. Further, we found that a large proportion of comparisons between groups taken from the same subspecies showed higher genetic differentiation than the least differentiated between-subspecies comparison. This proportion decreased substantially when we simulated a more clumped sampling scheme by including fewer groups. Our results support the general concept that the distribution of the sampled individuals can dramatically affect the inference of genetic population structure. With regard to chimpanzees, our results emphasize the close relationship of equatorial chimpanzees from central and eastern equatorial Africa and the difficult nature of subspecies definitions. PMID:25330245

  14. Long-term cold acclimation extends survival time at 0°C and modifies the metabolomic profiles of the larvae of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster.

    Vladimír Koštál

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Drosophila melanogaster is a chill-susceptible insect. Previous studies on this fly focused on acute direct chilling injury during cold shock and showed that lower lethal temperature (LLT, approximately -5°C exhibits relatively low plasticity and that acclimations, both rapid cold hardening (RCH and long-term cold acclimation, shift the LLT by only a few degrees at the maximum. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We found that long-term cold acclimation considerably improved cold tolerance in fully grown third-instar larvae of D. melanogaster. A comparison of the larvae acclimated at constant 25°C with those acclimated at constant 15°C followed by constant 6°C for 2 d (15°C→6°C showed that long-term cold acclimation extended the lethal time for 50% of the population (Lt(50 during exposure to constant 0°C as much as 630-fold (from 0.137 h to 86.658 h. Such marked physiological plasticity in Lt(50 (in contrast to LLT suggested that chronic indirect chilling injury at 0°C differs from that caused by cold shock. Long-term cold acclimation modified the metabolomic profiles of the larvae. Accumulations of proline (up to 17.7 mM and trehalose (up to 36.5 mM were the two most prominent responses. In addition, restructuring of the glycerophospholipid composition of biological membranes was observed. The relative proportion of glycerophosphoethanolamines (especially those with linoleic acid at the sn-2 position increased at the expense of glycerophosphocholines. CONCLUSION: Third-instar larvae of D. melanogaster improved their cold tolerance in response to long-term cold acclimation and showed metabolic potential for the accumulation of proline and trehalose and for membrane restructuring.

  15. Effect of short-term heat acclimation on endurance time and skin blood flow in trained athletes

    Chen TI

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Tsung-I Chen,1,2 Pu-Hsi Tsai,3 Jui-Hsing Lin,4 Ning-Yuean Lee,5 Michael TC Liang61Graduate Institute of Sport Science, National Taiwan Sport University, Taoyuan, 2Center for Physical Education, Tzu Chi University, Hualien, 3Department of Sport and Leisure, National Quemoy University, Kinmen, 4Department of Physical Education, National Pingtung University of Education, Pingtung, 5College of Living Technology, Tainan University of Technology, Tainan, Taiwan; 6Department of Kinesiology and Health Promotion, California State Polytechnic University, Pomona, CA, USABackground: To examine whether short-term, ie, five daily sessions, vigorous dynamic cycling exercise and heat exposure could achieve heat acclimation in trained athletes and the effect of heat acclimation on cutaneous blood flow in the active and nonactive limb.Methods: Fourteen male badminton and table tennis athletes (age = 19.6 ± 1.2 years were randomized into a heat acclimation (EXP, n = 7 or nonheat acclimation (CON, n = 7 group. For 5 consecutive days, the EXP group was trained using an upright leg cycle ergometer in a hot environment (38.4°C ± 0.4°C, while the CON group trained in a thermoneutral environment (24.1°C ± 0.3°C. For both groups, the training intensity and duration increased from a work rate of 10% below ventilatory threshold (VT and 25 minutes per session on day 1, to 10% above VT and 45 minutes per session on day 5. Subjects performed two incremental leg cycle exercise tests to exhaustion at baseline and post-training in both hot and thermoneutral conditions. Study outcome measurements include: maximum oxygen uptake (VO2max; exercise heart rate (HR; O2 pulse; exercise time to exhaustion (tmax; skin blood flow in the upper arm (SkBFa and quadriceps (SkBFq; and mean skin (Tsk.Results: The significant heat-acclimated outcome measurements obtained during high-intensity leg cycling exercise in the high ambient environment are: (1 56%–100% reduction in cutaneous

  16. Inter and intra-specific variation in photosynthetic acclimation response to long term exposure of elevated carbon dioxide

    Wilkinson, M. [Univ. of Essex, Colchester (United Kingdom)]|[Writtle Coll. (United Kingdom)

    1996-08-01

    The response of intra and interspecific variation in photosynthetic acclimation to growth at elevated atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentration (600{micro}mol mol-l) in six important grassland species was investigated. Plants were grown in a background sward of Lolium perenne and measurements were made after four years of growth at elevated C{sub a}. Elevated CO{sub 2} was maintained using a FACE (Free-Air Carbon Enrichment) system. Significant intra and interspecific variation in acclimation response was demonstrated. The response of adaxial and abaxial stomatal conductance to elevated CO{sub 2} was also investigated. The stomatal conductance of both the adaxial and abaxial leaf surfaces was found to be reduced by elevated C{sub a}. Significant asymmetric responses in stomatal conductance was demonstrated in D. glomerata and T. pratense. Analysis of stomatal indices and densities indicated that the observed reductions in stomatal conductance were probably the result of changes in stomatal aperture.

  17. John Day Fall Chinook/Salmon Mitigation Plan Acclimation and Imprinting Site Feasibility Study: Summary Report : Completion Report.

    U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service; Sverdrup Corporation; United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1987-09-01

    The purpose of this Plan is to replace upriver bright fall chinook salmon which were lost by construction of the John Day Dam. This will be accomplished by releasing salmon fry and smolts, incubated in the Spring Creek and Bonneville Hatcheries, at several upriver locations. Prior to release it is desired to feed and acclimate the juvenile fish to relieve the stress of truck transport, and to imprint them to the release site. This will ultimately produce adult chinook salmon that return to their historic spawning areas through traditional common property fisheries. It will also provide sexually mature broodstock fish that can be captured and spawned to supplement continued hatchery operation. This report summarizes results of an engineering feasibility study done for 10 potential acclimation sites on the Columbia, Yakima and Walla Walla Rivers. A detailed report has been prepared for each site and each is bound separately.

  18. ESKIMO1 is a key gene involved in water economy as well as cold acclimation and salt tolerance

    Bouchabke-Coussa, O.; Quashie, M.L.; Seoane, Jose Miguel;

    2008-01-01

    Background: Drought is a major social and economic problem resulting in huge yield reduction in the field. Today's challenge is to develop plants with reduced water requirements and stable yields in fluctuating environmental conditions. Arabidopsis thaliana is an excellent model for identifying...... as a key gene involved in plant water economy as well as cold acclimation and salt tolerance. Results: All esk1 mutants were more tolerant to freezing, after acclimation, than their wild type counterpart. esk1 mutants also showed increased tolerance to mild water deficit for all traits measured. The mutant......'s improved tolerance to reduced water supply may be explained by its lower transpiration rate and better water use efficiency (WUE), which was assessed by carbon isotope discrimination and gas exchange measurements. esk1 alleles were also shown to be more tolerant to salt stress. Transcriptomic analysis...

  19. De novo Synthesis and Assembly of rRNA into Ribosomal Subunits during Cold Acclimation in Escherichia coli.

    Piersimoni, Lolita; Giangrossi, Mara; Marchi, Paolo; Brandi, Anna; Gualerzi, Claudio O; Pon, Cynthia L

    2016-04-24

    During the cold adaptation that follows a cold stress, bacterial cells undergo many physiological changes and extensive reprogramming of their gene expression pattern. Bulk gene expression is drastically reduced, while a set of cold shock genes is selectively and transiently expressed. The initial stage of cold acclimation is characterized by the establishment of a stoichiometric imbalance of the translation initiation factors (IFs)/ribosomes ratio that contributes to the preferential translation of cold shock transcripts. Whereas de novo synthesis of the IFs following cold stress has been documented, nothing was known concerning the activity of the rrn operons during the cold acclimation period. In this work, we focus on the expression of the rrn operons and the fate of rRNA after temperature downshift. We demonstrate that in Escherichia coli, rRNA synthesis does not stop during the cold acclimation phase, but continues with greater contribution of the P2 compared to the P1 promoter and all seven rrn operons are active, although their expression levels change with respect to pre-stress conditions. Eight hours after the 37°→10°C temperature downshift, the newly transcribed rRNA represents up to 20% of total rRNA and is preferentially found in the polysomes. However, with respect to the de novo synthesis of the IFs, both rRNA transcription and maturation are slowed down drastically by cold stress, thereby accounting in part for the stoichiometric imbalance of the IFs/ribosomes. Overall, our data indicate that new ribosomes, which are possibly suitable to function at low temperature, are slowly assembled during cold acclimation. PMID:26953262

  20. Oxygen Consumption and Swimming Performance in Hypoxia-Acclimated Rainbow Trout Salmo Gairdneri

    BUSHNELL, PG; STEFFENSEN, JF; JOHANSEN, K

    1984-01-01

    -1 in hypoxiaacclimated fish. 3. Normoxic oxygen consumption of control fish ranged from 97.5 mg O2 kg-1 h-1(5.5cm s-1) to 318.5 mg O2 kg-1 h-1 (54.8 cm s-1) and did not differ significantly from that of hypoxia-acclimated fish in normoxia. 4. Reduction of ambient P002 from normoxia to 60mmHg or 40mm...

  1. Acclimation of Trichodesmium erythraeum ISM101 to high and low irradiance analysed on the physiological, biophysical and biochemical level

    Andresen, E.; Lohscheider, J.; Šetlíková, Eva; Adamska, I.; Šimek, Miloslav; Küpper, H.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 185, č. 1 (2010), s. 173-188. ISSN 0028-646X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA206/08/1683 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510; CEZ:AV0Z60660521 Keywords : light acclimation * protein turnover * regulation of photosynthesis for nitrogen fixation Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 6.516, year: 2010

  2. Automated Non-invasive Video-Microscopy of Oyster Spat Heart Rate during Acute Temperature Change: Impact of Acclimation Temperature

    Domnik, Nicolle J.; Polymeropoulos, Elias T.; Elliott, Nicholas G.; Frappell, Peter B.; Fisher, John T.

    2016-01-01

    We developed an automated, non-invasive method to detect real-time cardiac contraction in post-larval (1.1–1.7 mm length), juvenile oysters (i.e., oyster spat) via a fiber-optic trans-illumination system. The system is housed within a temperature-controlled chamber and video microscopy imaging of the heart was coupled with video edge-detection to measure cardiac contraction, inter-beat interval, and heart rate (HR). We used the method to address the hypothesis that cool acclimation (10°C vs. 22°C—Ta10 or Ta22, respectively; each n = 8) would preserve cardiac phenotype (assessed via HR variability, HRV analysis and maintained cardiac activity) during acute temperature changes. The temperature ramp (TR) protocol comprised 2°C steps (10 min/experimental temperature, Texp) from 22°C to 10°C to 22°C. HR was related to Texp in both acclimation groups. Spat became asystolic at low temperatures, particularly Ta22 spat (Ta22: 8/8 vs. Ta10: 3/8 asystolic at Texp = 10°C). The rate of HR decrease during cooling was less in Ta10 vs. Ta22 spat when asystole was included in analysis (P = 0.026). Time-domain HRV was inversely related to temperature and elevated in Ta10 vs. Ta22 spat (P < 0.001), whereas a lack of defined peaks in spectral density precluded frequency-domain analysis. Application of the method during an acute cooling challenge revealed that cool temperature acclimation preserved active cardiac contraction in oyster spat and increased time-domain HRV responses, whereas warm acclimation enhanced asystole. These physiologic changes highlight the need for studies of mechanisms, and have translational potential for oyster aquaculture practices.

  3. Intracerebroventricular administration of leptin increase physical activity but has no effect on thermogenesis in cold-acclimated rats

    Gang-Bin Tang; Xiang-Fang Tang; Kui Li; De-Hua Wang

    2015-01-01

    Most small homotherms display low leptin level in response to chronic cold exposure. Cold-induced hypoleptinemia was proved to induce hyperphagia. However, it is still not clear whether hypoleptinemia regulates energy expenditure in cold condition. We try to answer this question in chronic cold-acclimated rats. Results showed that 5-day intracerebroventricular(ICV) infusion of leptin (5 μg/day) had no effects on basal and adaptive thermogenesis and uncoupling protein 1 expression. Physical ac...

  4. Food restriction attenuates oxidative stress in brown adipose tissue of striped hamsters acclimated to a warm temperature.

    Zhang, Ji-Ying; Zhao, Xiao-Ya; Wang, Gui-Ying; Wang, Chun-Ming; Zhao, Zhi-Jun

    2016-05-01

    It has been suggested that the up-regulation of uncoupling proteins (UCPs) decreases reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, in which case there should be a negative relationship between UCPs expression and ROS levels. In this study, the effects of temperature and food restriction on ROS levels and metabolic rate, UCP1 mRNA expression and antioxidant levels were examined in the brown adipose tissue (BAT) of the striped hamsters (Cricetulus barabensis). The metabolic rate and food intake of hamsters which had been restricted to 80% of ad libitum food intake, and acclimated to a warm temperature (30°C), decreased significantly compared to a control group. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) levels were 42.9% lower in food restricted hamsters than in the control. Malonadialdehyde (MDA) levels of hamsters acclimated to 30°C that were fed ad libitum were significantly higher than those of the control group, but 60.1% lower than hamsters that had been acclimated to the same temperature but subject to food restriction. There were significantly positive correlations between H2O2 and, MDA levels, catalase activity, and total antioxidant capacity. Cytochrome c oxidase activity and UCP1 mRNA expression significantly decreased in food restricted hamsters compared to the control. These results suggest that warmer temperatures increase oxidative stress in BAT by causing the down-regulation of UCP1 expression and decreased antioxidant activity, but food restriction may attenuate the effects. PMID:27157336

  5. Simultaneous enhancement of phenolic compound degradations by Acinetobacter strain V2 via a step-wise continuous acclimation process.

    Lin, Johnson; Sharma, Vikas; Milase, Ridwaan; Mbhense, Ntuthuko

    2016-06-01

    Phenol degradation enhancement of Acinetobacter strain V2 by a step-wise continuous acclimation process was investigated. At the end of 8 months, three stable adapted strains, designated as R, G, and Y, were developed with the sub-lethal concentration of phenol at 800, 1100, and 1400 mg/L, respectively, from 400 mg/L of V2 parent strain. All strains degraded phenol at their sub-lethal level within 24 h, their growth rate increased as the acclimation process continued and retained their degradation properties even after storing at -80 °C for more than 3 years. All adapted strains appeared coccoid with an ungranulated surface under electron microscope compared to typical rod-shaped parental strain V2 . The adapted Y strain also possessed superior degradation ability against aniline, benzoate, and toluene. This study demonstrated the use of long term acclimation process to develop efficient and better pollutant degrading bacterial strains with potentials in industrial and environmental bioremediation. PMID:26471472

  6. The significance of cysteine synthesis for acclimation to high light conditions.

    Speiser, Anna; Haberland, Stefan; Watanabe, Mutsumi; Wirtz, Markus; Dietz, Karl-Josef; Saito, Kazuki; Hell, Rüdiger

    2014-01-01

    Situations of excess light intensity are known to result in the emergence of reactive oxygen species that originate from the electron transport chain in chloroplasts. The redox state of glutathione and its biosynthesis contribute importantly to the plant's response to this stress. In this study we analyzed the significance of cysteine synthesis for long-term acclimation to high light conditions in Arabidopsis thaliana. Emphasis was put on the rate-limiting step of cysteine synthesis, the formation of the precursor O-acetylserine (OAS) that is catalyzed by serine acetyltransferase (SERAT). Wild type Arabidopsis plants responded to the high light condition (800 μmol m(-2) s(-1) for 10 days) with synthesis of photo-protective anthocyanins, induction of total SERAT activity and elevated glutathione levels when compared to the control condition (100 μmol m(-2) s(-1)). The role of cysteine synthesis in chloroplasts was probed in mutant plants lacking the chloroplast isoform SERAT2;1 (serat2;1) and two knock-out alleles of CYP20-3, a positive interactor of SERAT in the chloroplast. Acclimation to high light resulted in a smaller growth enhancement than wild type in the serat2;1 and cyp20-3 mutants, less induction of total SERAT activity and OAS levels but similar cysteine and glutathione concentrations. Expression analysis revealed no increase in mRNA of the chloroplast SERAT2;1 encoding SERAT2;1 gene but up to 4.4-fold elevated SERAT2;2 mRNA levels for the mitochondrial SERAT isoform. Thus, lack of chloroplast SERAT2;1 activity or its activation by CYP20-3 prevents the full growth response to high light conditions, but the enhanced demand for glutathione is likely mediated by synthesis of OAS in the mitochondria. In conclusion, cysteine synthesis in the chloroplast is important for performance but is dispensable for survival under long-term exposure to high light and can be partially complemented by cysteine synthesis in mitochondria. PMID:25653656

  7. Differential expression of duplicated LDH-A genes during temperature acclimation of weatherfish Misgurnus fossilis. Functional consequences for the enzyme.

    Zakhartsev, Maxim; Lucassen, Magnus; Kulishova, Liliya; Deigweiher, Katrin; Smirnova, Yuliya A; Zinov'eva, Rina D; Mugue, Nikolay; Baklushinskaya, Irina; Pörtner, Hans O; Ozernyuk, Nikolay D

    2007-03-01

    Temperature acclimation in poikilotherms entails metabolic rearrangements provided by variations in enzyme properties. However, in most cases the underlying molecular mechanisms that result in structural changes in the enzymes are obscure. This study reports that acclimation to low (5 degrees C) and high (18 degrees C) temperatures leads to differential expression of alternative forms of the LDH-A gene in white skeletal muscle of weatherfish, Misgurnus fossilis. Two isoforms of LDH-A mRNA were isolated and characterized: a short isoform (= 1332 bp) and a long isoform ( = 1550 bp), which both have 5'-UTRs and ORFs of the same length (333 amino acid residues), but differ in the length of the 3'-UTR. In addition, these two mRNAs have 44 nucleotide point mismatches of an irregular pattern along the complete sequence, resulting in three amino acid mismatches (Gly214Val; Val304Ile and Asp312Glu) between protein products from the short and long mRNA forms, correspondingly LDH-A(alpha) and LDH-A(beta) subunits. It is expected that the beta-subunit is more aliphatic due to the properties of the mismatched amino acids and therefore sterically more restricted. According to molecular modelling of M. fossilis LDH-A, the Val304Ile mismatch is located in the subunit contact area of the tetramer, whereas the remaining two mismatches surround the contact area; this is expected to manifest in the kinetic and thermodynamic properties of the assembled tetramer. In warm-acclimated fish the relative expression between alpha and beta isoforms of the LDH-A mRNA is around 5 : 1, whereas in cold-acclimated fish expression of is reduced almost to zero. This indicates that at low temperature the pool of total tetrameric LDH-A is more homogeneous in terms of alpha/beta-subunit composition. The temperature acclimation pattern of proportional pooling of subunits with different kinetic and thermodynamic properties of the tetrameric enzyme may result in fine-tuning of the properties of skeletal

  8. Heterotrophic respiration does not acclimate to continuous warming in a subtropical forest

    Wu, Chuansheng; Liang, Naishen; Sha, Liqing; Xu, Xingliang; Zhang, Yiping; Lu, Huazheng; Song, Liang; Song, Qinghai; Xie, Youneng

    2016-02-01

    As heterotrophic respiration (RH) has great potential to increase atmospheric CO2 concentrations, it is important to understand warming effects on RH for a better prediction of carbon-climate feedbacks. However, it remains unclear how RH responds to warming in subtropical forests. Here, we carried out trenching alone and trenching with warming treatments to test the climate warming effect on RH in a subtropical forest in southwestern China. During the measurement period, warming increased annual soil temperature by 2.1 °C, and increased annual mean RH by 22.9%. Warming effect on soil temperature (WET) showed very similar pattern with warming effect on RH (WERH), decreasing yearly. Regression analyses suggest that WERH was controlled by WET and also regulated by the soil water content. These results showed that the decrease of WERH was not caused by acclimation to the warmer temperature, but was instead due to decrease of WET. We therefore suggest that global warming will accelerate soil carbon efflux to the atmosphere, regulated by the change in soil water content in subtropical forests.

  9. Gains and losses of coral skeletal porosity changes with ocean acidification acclimation.

    Fantazzini, Paola; Mengoli, Stefano; Pasquini, Luca; Bortolotti, Villiam; Brizi, Leonardo; Mariani, Manuel; Di Giosia, Matteo; Fermani, Simona; Capaccioni, Bruno; Caroselli, Erik; Prada, Fiorella; Zaccanti, Francesco; Levy, Oren; Dubinsky, Zvy; Kaandorp, Jaap A; Konglerd, Pirom; Hammel, Jörg U; Dauphin, Yannicke; Cuif, Jean-Pierre; Weaver, James C; Fabricius, Katharina E; Wagermaier, Wolfgang; Fratzl, Peter; Falini, Giuseppe; Goffredo, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Ocean acidification is predicted to impact ecosystems reliant on calcifying organisms, potentially reducing the socioeconomic benefits these habitats provide. Here we investigate the acclimation potential of stony corals living along a pH gradient caused by a Mediterranean CO2 vent that serves as a natural long-term experimental setting. We show that in response to reduced skeletal mineralization at lower pH, corals increase their skeletal macroporosity (features >10 μm) in order to maintain constant linear extension rate, an important criterion for reproductive output. At the nanoscale, the coral skeleton's structural features are not altered. However, higher skeletal porosity, and reduced bulk density and stiffness may contribute to reduce population density and increase damage susceptibility under low pH conditions. Based on these observations, the almost universally employed measure of coral biomineralization, the rate of linear extension, might not be a reliable metric for assessing coral health and resilience in a warming and acidifying ocean. PMID:26183259

  10. Differential adaptation of two varieties of common bean to abiotic stress: II. Acclimation of photosynthesis.

    Wentworth, Mark; Murchie, Erik H; Gray, Julie E; Villegas, Daniel; Pastenes, Claudio; Pinto, Manuel; Horton, Peter

    2006-01-01

    The photosynthetic characteristics of two contrasting varieties of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) have been determined. These varieties, Arroz and Orfeo, differ in their productivity under stress conditions, resistance to drought stress, and have distinctly different stomatal behaviour. When grown under conditions of high irradiance and high temperature, both varieties displayed evidence of photosynthetic acclimation at the chloroplast level-there was an increase in chlorophyll a/b ratio, a decreased content of Lhcb proteins, and an increased xanthophyll cycle pool size. Both varieties also showed reduced chlorophyll content on a leaf area basis and a decrease in leaf area. Both varieties showed an increase in leaf thickness but only Arroz showed the characteristic elongated palisade cells in the high light-grown plants; Orfeo instead had a larger number of smaller, rounded cells. Differences were found in stomatal development: whereas Arroz showed very little change in stomatal density, Orfeo exhibited a large increase, particularly on the upper leaf surface. It is suggested that these differences in leaf cell structure and stomatal density give rise to altered rates of photosynthesis and stomatal conductance. Whereas, Arroz had the same photosynthetic rate in plants grown at both low and high irradiance, Orfeo showed a higher photosynthetic capacity at high irradiance. It is suggested that the higher yield of Orfeo compared with Arroz under stress conditions can be explained, in part, by these cellular differences. PMID:16415331

  11. Physiological acclimation to elevated temperature in a reef-building coral from an upwelling environment

    Mayfield, A. B.; Fan, T.-Y.; Chen, C.-S.

    2013-12-01

    Recent work has found that pocilloporid corals from regions characterized by unstable temperatures, such as those exposed to periodic upwelling, display a remarkable degree of phenotypic plasticity. In order to understand whether important reef builders from these upwelling reefs remain physiologically uncompromised at temperatures they will experience in the coming decades as a result of global climate change, a long-term elevated temperature experiment was conducted with Pocillopora damicornis specimens collected from Houbihu, a small embayment within Nanwan Bay, southern Taiwan that is characterized by 8-9 °C temperature changes during upwelling events. Upon nine months of exposure to nearly 30 °C, all colony (mortality and surface area), polyp ( Symbiodinium density and chlorophyll a content), tissue (total thickness), and molecular (gene expression and molecular composition)-level parameters were documented at similar levels between experimental corals and controls incubated at 26.5 °C, suggesting that this species can readily acclimate to elevated temperatures that cause significant degrees of stress, or even bleaching and mortality, in conspecifics of other regions of the Indo-Pacific. However, the gastrodermal tissue layer was relatively thicker in corals of the high temperature treatment sampled after nine months, possibly as an adaptive response to shade Symbiodinium from the higher photosynthetically active radiation levels that they were experiencing at that sampling time. Such shading may have prevented high light and high temperature-induced photoinhibition, and consequent bleaching, in these samples.

  12. Diatom acclimation to elevated CO2 via cAMP signalling and coordinated gene expression

    Hennon, Gwenn M. M.; Ashworth, Justin; Groussman, Ryan D.; Berthiaume, Chris; Morales, Rhonda L.; Baliga, Nitin S.; Orellana, Mónica V.; Armbrust, E. V.

    2015-08-01

    Diatoms are responsible for ~40% of marine primary productivity, fuelling the oceanic carbon cycle and contributing to natural carbon sequestration in the deep ocean. Diatoms rely on energetically expensive carbon concentrating mechanisms (CCMs) to fix carbon efficiently at modern levels of CO2 (refs , , ). How diatoms may respond over the short and long term to rising atmospheric CO2 remains an open question. Here we use nitrate-limited chemostats to show that the model diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana rapidly responds to increasing CO2 by differentially expressing gene clusters that regulate transcription and chromosome folding, and subsequently reduces transcription of photosynthesis and respiration gene clusters under steady-state elevated CO2. These results suggest that exposure to elevated CO2 first causes a shift in regulation, and then a metabolic rearrangement. Genes in one CO2-responsive cluster included CCM and photorespiration genes that share a putative cAMP-responsive cis-regulatory sequence, implying these genes are co-regulated in response to CO2, with cAMP as an intermediate messenger. We verified cAMP-induced downregulation of CCM gene δ-CA3 in nutrient-replete diatom cultures by inhibiting the hydrolysis of cAMP. These results indicate an important role for cAMP in downregulating CCM and photorespiration genes under elevated CO2 and provide insights into mechanisms of diatom acclimation in response to climate change.

  13. Changes in membrane lipids and carotenoids during light acclimation in a marine cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp.

    Olimpio Montero; Alberto Sánchez-Guijo; Luis M Lubián; Gonzalo Martínez-Rodríguez

    2012-09-01

    Time course of carotenoid and membrane lipid variation during high light (HL) acclimation (about 85 mol m−2 s−1), after transfer from low light (LL) (5–10 μmol m−2 s−1), was determined in a marine Synechococcus strain. High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) coupled to diode array detector (DAD) or electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) was used for compound separation and detection. Myxoxanthophyll rose within a time interval of 8 h to 24 h after the onset of exposure to HL. -carotene content started to decrease after 4 h of the onset of exposure to HL. Zeaxanthin content rose with exposure to HL, but it was only significant after 24 h of exposure. Carotenoid changes are in agreement with a coordinated activity of the enzymes of the myxoxanthophyll biosynthetic pathway, with no rate-limiting intermediate steps. Lipid analysis showed all species with a C18:3/C16:0 composition increased their content, the changes of PG(18:3/16:0) and MGDG(18:3/16:0) being primarily significant. Major lipid changes were also found to occur within 24 h. These changes might suggest reduction and reorganization of the thylakoid membrane structure. Hypotheses are also drawn on the role played by lipid molecule shape and their possible effect in membrane fluidity and protein accommodation.

  14. Toward systems biology in brown algae to explore acclimation and adaptation to the shore environment.

    Tonon, Thierry; Eveillard, Damien; Prigent, Sylvain; Bourdon, Jérémie; Potin, Philippe; Boyen, Catherine; Siegel, Anne

    2011-12-01

    Brown algae belong to a phylogenetic lineage distantly related to land plants and animals. They are almost exclusively found in the intertidal zone, a harsh and frequently changing environment where organisms are submitted to marine and terrestrial constraints. In relation with their unique evolutionary history and their habitat, they feature several peculiarities, including at the level of their primary and secondary metabolism. The establishment of Ectocarpus siliculosus as a model organism for brown algae has represented a framework in which several omics techniques have been developed, in particular, to study the response of these organisms to abiotic stresses. With the recent publication of medium to high throughput profiling data, it is now possible to envision integrating observations at the cellular scale to apply systems biology approaches. As a first step, we propose a protocol focusing on integrating heterogeneous knowledge gained on brown algal metabolism. The resulting abstraction of the system will then help understanding how brown algae cope with changes in abiotic parameters within their unique habitat, and to decipher some of the mechanisms underlying their (1) acclimation and (2) adaptation, respectively consequences of (1) the behavior or (2) the topology of the system resulting from the integrative approach. PMID:22136637

  15. Study on Seawater-acclimation Spirulina%海水驯化螺旋藻研究

    关邵晨; 王璇; 李杰; 秦琅; 董仁杰; 朱毅

    2012-01-01

    [Objective] The aim was to seek Spirulina culture methods with seawater. [Method] Spirulina was habituated culture progressively with prepared seawater-acclimation solution, moreover, the morphological changes of Spirulina were observed and its biochemical indicators were measured. [Result]The new algaes was obtained, it has better stability and average length was greater than Spirulina in fresh water, its chlorophyll content was substantially unchanged, and the concentration of phycocyanin increased by 62.8% compared with Spirulina in fresh water. [Conclusion] The method can save resources and cost, which lay the foundation for large scale production and processing of Spirulina.%[目的]探寻螺旋藻的海水培养方法.[方法]用配制的海水驯化培养液对螺旋藻进行逐级驯化培养,观察螺旋藻的形态学变化并测量其生化指标.[结果]得到了平均长度大于淡水螺旋藻且稳定性良好的藻种,其叶绿素含量基本不变,藻蓝蛋白浓度较淡水培养的螺旋藻增加了62.8%.[结论]该方法可节省资源和成本,为螺旋藻的规模化生产和加工奠定了基础.

  16. Role of calcium in acclimation of the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942 to nitrogen starvation.

    Leganés, Francisco; Forchhammer, Karl; Fernández-Piñas, Francisca

    2009-01-01

    A Ca2+ signal is required for the process of heterocyst differentiation in the filamentous diazotrophic cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC 7120. This paper presents evidence that a transient increase in intracellular free Ca2+ is also involved in acclimation to nitrogen starvation in the unicellular non-diazotrophic cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942. The Ca2+ transient was triggered in response to nitrogen step-down or the addition of 2-oxoglutarate (2-OG), or its analogues 2,2-difluoropentanedioic acid (DFPA) and 2-methylenepentanedioic acid (2-MPA), to cells growing with combined nitrogen, suggesting that an increase in intracellular 2-OG levels precedes the Ca2+ transient. The signalling protein P(II) and the transcriptional regulator NtcA appear to be needed to trigger the signal. Suppression of the Ca2+ transient by the intracellular Ca2+ chelator N,N'-[1,2-ethanediylbis(oxy-2,1-phenylene)]bis[N-[2-[(acetyloxy)methoxy]-2-oxoethyl

  17. EFFECTS OF 4-CHLOROPHENOL LOADINGS ON ACCLIMATION OF BIOMASS WITH OPTIMIZED FIXED TIME SEQUENCING BATCH REACTOR

    H. Movahedyan, A. Assadi, M. M. Amin

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Chlorinated phenols in many industrial effluents are usually difficult to be removed by conventional biological treatment processes. Performance of the aerobic sequencing batch reactor treating 4-chlorophenol containing wastewater at different loadings rates from 0.0075 to 1.2 g4CP/L.d was evaluated. The sequencing batch reactor was operated with fill, react, settle and decant phases in the order of 10:370:90:10 min, respectively, for a cycle time of 8 h at 10 days solid retention time and 16 h hydraulic retention time in the stable period. The effects of 4-chlorophenol loadings on the 4-chlorophenol and chemical oxygen demand removal percents, yield coefficient (Y, biomass variation and sludge volume index were investigated. High chemical oxygen demand removal efficiencies (95±3.5% and approximately complete 4-chlorophenol removal (>99% were observed even in the absence of growth substrate. The degradation of 4-chlorophenol led to formation of 5-chloro-2-hydroxymuconic semialdehyde, which was more oxidized, indicating complete disappearance of 4-chlorophenol via meta-cleavage pathway. A compact sludge with excellent settleability (sludge volume index=47±6.1 mL/g developed during entire acclimation period. High removal efficiencies with sequencing batch reactor may be due to enforced short term unsteady state conditions coupled with periodic exposure of the microorganisms to defined process conditions which facilitate the required metabolic pathways for treating xenobiotics containing wastewater.

  18. EROD activity in thermally-acclimated gizzard shad -- What do the differences mean?

    The authors examined liver EROD activity in gizzard shad, Dorosoma cepedianum, following a diesel spill at Bruce Nuclear Generating Station A. The spill occurred in late December 1995 through early January 1996, at which time gizzard shad are thermally captive in the heated discharge. Further, the nearby discharge of Bruce Nuclear Generating Station B provided a control. Fish were collected and livers sampled within two weeks of the spill and at roughly seven weeks after the spill. At both times, significant differences in EROD were apparent between collection sites; however, the higher activity was consistently observed at the control site. The authors are unable to identify a source of induction at the control site or to explain the differences in EROD activity between sites, although there were slight but consistent differences in the size of fish and water temperatures at the two sites. They are also examining liver antioxidant activity in these fish. Clearly, use of EROD activity in interpreting the potential effects of oil spill on gizzard shad will have to be held in abeyance pending further understanding of the biology of these fish and in particular the confounding effects of winter acclimation to a thermal discharge

  19. Grande Ronde Endemic Spring Chinook Salmon Supplementation Project; Lostine River Operations and Maintenance 2004 Smolt Acclimation and Adult Return Report.

    Zollman, Richard L.; Eschler, Russell; Sealey, Shawn [Nez Perce Tribe

    2009-03-31

    The Nez Perce Tribe (NPT), through funding provided by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), has implemented a Chinook salmon supplementation program (250,000 smolts) on the Lostine River, a tributary to the Grande Ronde River of Oregon. The Grande Ronde Endemic Spring Chinook Salmon Supplementation project, which involves supplementation of the Upper Grande Ronde River and Catherine Creek in addition to the Lostine River, was established to prevent extirpation and increase the number of threatened Snake River spring/summer Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) returning to the Grande Ronde River. This report covers the eighth season (1997-2004) of adult Chinook salmon broodstock collection in the Lostine River and the sixth season (1999-2004) of acclimation of resulting Lostine River progeny. Production of Lostine River spring Chinook salmon smolts currently occurs at Lookingglass Fish Hatchery (LGH). The Lostine River supplementation program utilizes two strategies to obtain egg source for production of smolts for supplementation: captive broodstock and conventional broodstock. The captive broodstock strategy involves (1) capture of natural juvenile spring Chinook salmon smolts from the Lostine River, (2) rearing those to adult and spawning them, and (3) rearing the resultant progeny for eventual acclimation and release back into the Lostine River. The conventional broodstock strategy involves (1) capture of natural and hatchery origin adults returning to the Lostine River, (2) holding those adults and spawning them, and (3) rearing the resultant progency for acclimation and release back into the Lostine River. This report focuses on (1) the trapping and collection of adult spring Chinook salmon that return to the Lostine River, which provides the broodstock source for the conventional strategy and (2) the acclimation and release of juvenile spring Chinook salmon produced from the captive broodstock and conventional broodstock strategies. In 2004

  20. The temporal and species dynamics of photosynthetic acclimation in flag leaves of rice (Oryza sativa) and wheat (Triticum aestivum) under elevated carbon dioxide

    Zhu, J.; Zeng, Q.; Xie, Z.; Tang, H.; Zhu, C. (Chinese Academy of Sciences. State Key Lab. of Soil and Sustainable Agriculture, Institute of Soil Science, Nanjing (China)); Hasegawa, T. (National Institute for Agro-Environmental Sciences. Agro-Meteorology Div., Tsukuba (Japan)); Ziska, L. (Crop Systems and Global Change Lab., Beltsville, MD (United States)); Jia, X. (Chinese Academic of Sciences/Nanjing Botanical Garden Memorial Sun Yat-Sen. Jiangsu Institute of Botany, Nanjing (China))

    2012-07-15

    In this study, we tested for the temporal occurrence of photosynthetic acclimation to elevated [CO{sub 2}] in the flag leaf of two important cereal crops, rice and wheat. In order to characterize the temporal onset of acclimation and the basis for any observed decline in photosynthetic rate, we characterized net photosynthesis, g{sub s}, g{sub m}, C{sub i}/C{sub a}, C{sub i}/C{sub c}, V{sub cmax}, J{sub max}, cell wall thickness, content of Rubisco, cytochrome (Cyt) f, N, chlorophyll and carbohydrate, mRNA expression for rbcL and petA, activity for Rubisco, sucrose phosphate synthase (SPS) and sucrose synthase (SS) at full flag expansion, mid-anthesis and the late grain-filling stage. No acclimation was observed for either crop at full flag leaf expansion. However, at the mid-anthesis stage, photosynthetic acclimation in rice was associated with RuBP carboxylation and regeneration limitations, while wheat only had the carboxylation limitation. By grain maturation, the decline of Rubisco content and activity had contributed to RuBP carboxylation limitation of photosynthesis in both crops at elevated [CO{sub 2}]; however, the sharp decrease of Rubisco enzyme activity played a more important role in wheat. Although an increase in non-structural carbohydrates did occur during these later stages, it was not consistently associated with changes in SPS and SS or photosynthetic acclimation. Rather, over time elevated [CO{sub 2}] appeared to enhance the rate of N degradation and senescence so that by late-grain fill, photosynthetic acclimation to elevated [CO{sub 2}] in the flag leaf of either species was complete. These data suggest that the basis for photosynthetic acclimation with elevated [CO{sub 2}] may be more closely associated with enhanced rates of senescence, and, as a consequence, may be temporally dynamic, with significant species variation. (Author)

  1. Acclimation-induced changes in toxicity and induction of metallothionein-like proteins in the fathead minnow following sublethal exposure to cobalt, silver, and zinc

    Increases in tolerance and resistance to metal toxicity by aquatic organisms have been linked to elevated levels of low-molecular-weight metal-binding proteins (e.g., metallothioneins). Acclimation-induced changes in toxic response and the concentration of metallothionein-like proteins (MTP) were studied in laboratory populations of the fathead minnow, Pimephales promelas, following sublethal exposure to Co, Ag, and Zn. Following 7 and 14 days of sublethal exposure, tolerance and resistance, as measured by acute toxicity values, were altered in a dose dependent fashion. Acute toxicity values returned to control levels after 21 days of continuous exposure. Tolerance and resistance of Co- and Zn-acclimated animals were depressed after a 7-day post-acclimation period in control water. Tolerance and resistance of Ag-acclimated animals were temporarily enhanced after 7 days post-acclimation and returned to control levels after 14 days. Accumulation of Co, Ag, and Zn measured as wholebody residues appeared to be regulated in 4 of 6 exposure regimes with residues reaching stable levels after 7 to 14 days of exposure. MTP was induced by exposure to 1.8 mg Zn/L and 0.01 mg Ag/L, however, no sustained (i.e., post 21 days) tolerance or resistance were observed at these dose levels indicating that these two biological responses may not be directly related

  2. Endocrine systems in juvenile anadromous and landlocked Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar): Seasonal development and seawater acclimation

    Nilsen, Tom O.; Ebbesson, Lars O.E.; Kiilerich, P.; Bjornsson, B. Th; Madsen, Steffen S.; McCormick, S.D.; Stefansson, S.O.

    2008-01-01

    The present study compares developmental changes in plasma levels of growth hormone (GH), insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) and cortisol, and mRNA levels of their receptors and the prolactin receptor (PRLR) in the gill of anadromous and landlocked Atlantic salmon during the spring parr-smolt transformation (smoltification) period and following four days and one month seawater (SW) acclimation. Plasma GH and gill GH receptor (GHR) mRNA levels increased continuously during the spring smoltification period in the anadromous, but not in landlocked salmon. There were no differences in plasma IGF-I levels between strains, or any increase during smoltification. Gill IGF-I and IGF-I receptor (IGF-IR) mRNA levels increased in anadromous salmon during smoltification, with no changes observed in landlocked fish. Gill PRLR mRNA levels remained stable in both strains during spring. Plasma cortisol levels in anadromous salmon increased 5-fold in May and June, but not in landlocked salmon. Gill glucocorticoid receptor (GR) mRNA levels were elevated in both strains at the time of peak smoltification in anadromous salmon, while mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) mRNA levels remained stable. Only anadromous salmon showed an increase of gill 11??-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type-2 (11??-HSD2) mRNA levels in May. GH and gill GHR mRNA levels increased in both strains following four days of SW exposure in mid-May, whereas only the anadromous salmon displayed elevated plasma GH and GHR mRNA after one month in SW. Plasma IGF-I increased after four days in SW in both strains, decreasing in both strains after one month in SW. Gill IGF-I mRNA levels were only increased in landlocked salmon after 4 days in SW. Gill IGF-IR mRNA levels in SW did not differ from FW levels in either strain. Gill PRLR mRNA did not change after four days of SW exposure, and decreased in both strains after one month in SW. Plasma cortisol levels did not change following SW exposure in either strain. Gill GR, 11

  3. Changes of brain monoamine levels and physiological indexes during heat acclimation in rats.

    Nakagawa, Hikaru; Matsumura, Takeru; Suzuki, Kota; Ninomiya, Chisa; Ishiwata, Takayuki

    2016-05-01

    Brain monoamines, such as noradrenaline (NA), dopamine (DA), and serotonin (5-HT), regulate many important physiological functions including thermoregulation. The purpose of this study was to clarify changes in NA, DA, and 5-HT levels in several brain regions in response to heat acclimation while also recording body temperature (Tb), heart rate (HR), and locomotor activity (Act). Rats were exposed to a heated environment (32°C) for 3h (3H), 1 day (1D), 7 days, 14 days (14D), 21 days, or 28 days (28D). After heat exposure, each of the following brain regions were immediately extracted and homogenized: the caudate putamen (CPu), preoptic area (PO), dorsomedial hypothalamus (DMH), frontal cortex (FC), and hippocampus (Hip). NA, DA, and 5-HT levels in the extract were measured by high performance liquid chromatography. Although Tb increased immediately after heat exposure, it decreased about 14D later. HR was maintained at a low level throughout heat exposure, and Act tended to increase near the end of heat exposure. After 3H, we observed a marked increase in NA level in the CPu. Although this response vanished after 1D, the level increased again after 28D. DA level in the CPu decreased significantly from 1D to 28D. 5-HT level in the PO and DMH decreased from 1D to 14D. It returned to control levels after 28D with increment of DA level. 5-HT level in the FC decreased at the start of heat exposure, but recovered after 28D; a time point at which DA level also increased. Monoamine levels in the Hip were unchanged after early heat exposure, but both 5-HT and DA levels increased after 28D. These results provide definitive evidence of changes in monoamines in individual brain regions involved in thermoregulation and behavioral, cognitive, and memory function during both acute and chronic heat exposure. PMID:27157329

  4. Process- and controller-adaptations determine the physiological effects of cold acclimation.

    Werner, Jürgen

    2008-09-01

    Experimental results on physiological effects of cold adaptation seem confusing and apparently incompatible with one another. This paper will explain that a substantial part of such a variety of results may be deduced from a common functional concept. A core/shell treatment ("model") of the thermoregulatory system is used with mean body temperature as the controlled variable. Adaptation, as a higher control level, is introduced into the system. Due to persistent stressors, either the (heat transfer) process or the controller properties (parameters) are adjusted (or both). It is convenient to call the one "process adaptation" and the other "controller adaptation". The most commonly demonstrated effect of autonomic cold acclimation is a change in the controller threshold. The analysis shows that this necessarily means a lowering of body temperature because of a lowered metabolic rate. This explains experimental results on both Europeans in the climatic chamber and Australian Aborigines in a natural environment. Exclusive autonomic process adaptation occurs in the form of a better insulation. The analysis explains why the post-adaptive steady-state can only be achieved, if the controller system reduces metabolism and why in spite of this the new state is inevitably characterized by a rise in body temperature. If both process and controller adaptations are simultaneously present, there may be not any change of body temperature at all, e.g., as demonstrated in animal experiments. Whether this kind of adaptation delivers a decrease, an increase or no change of mean body temperature, depends on the proportion of process and controller adaptation. PMID:18026979

  5. Photosynthetic and Respiratory Acclimation to Experimental Warming for Four Species in a Tallgrass Prairie Ecosystem

    Xuhui Zhou; Xiaozhong Liu; Linda L. Wallace; Yiqi Luo

    2007-01-01

    Global temperature has been increased by 0.6 ℃ over the past century and is predicted to increase by 1.4-5.8 ℃ by the end of this century. It is unclear what impacts global warming will have on tallgrass species. In the present study, we examined leaf net photosynthetic rate (Pn) and leaf respiration rate in darkness (Rd) of Aster ericoides (L.)Nesom, Ambrosia psilostachya DC., Hellanthus mollis Lam., and Sorghastrum nutans (L.) Nash In response to experimental warming in a tallgrass prairie ecosystem of the Great Plains, USA, in the autumn (fall) of 2000 and through 2001. Warming has been implemented with infrared heaters since 21 November 1999. The Pn increased significantly in spring, decreased in early fall, and did not change in summer and late fall in the four species under warming compared with control. The Rd of the four species increased significantly until mid-summer and then did not change under warming. Measured temperature-response curves of Pn showed that warming increased the optimum temperature of Pn (Topt) by 2.32 and 4.59 ℃ for H. mollis and S. nutans, respectively, in August, whereas there were no changes in May and September, and A. ericoides and A. psilostachya also showed no changes in any of the 3 months. However, Pn at optimum temperature (Popt) showed downregulation in September and no regulation in May and August for all four species. The temperature-response curves of Rd illustrate that the temperature sensitivity of Rd, Q10, was lower in the warmed plots compared with the control plots, except for A. ericoides in August, whereas there were no changes in May and September for all four species. The results of the present study indicate that photosynthetic and respiratory acclimation varies with species and among seasons, occurring in the mid-growing season and not in the early and late growing seasons.

  6. Spatio-Temporal Canopy Complexity and Leaf Acclimation to Variable Canopy Microhabitats.

    Fotis, A. T.

    2014-12-01

    The theory that forests become carbon (C) neutral with maturity has recently been challenged. While a growing body of evidence shows that net C accumulation continues in forests that are centuries old, the reasons remain poorly known. Increasing canopy structural complexity, quantified by high variability in leaf distribution, has been proposed as a mechanism for sustained rates of C assimilation in mature forests. The goal of our research was to expand on these findings and explore a new idea of spatio-temporal canopy structural complexity as a mechanism linking canopy structure to function (C assimilation).Our work takes place at the UMBS AmeriFlux core facility (US-UMB) in northern Michigan, USA. Canopy structure was quantified over 6 seasons with portable canopy LiDAR (PCL) and canopy spatial microhabitat variability was studied using hemispherical photographs from different heights within the canopy. We found a more even distribution of irradiance in more structurally complex canopies within a single year, and furthermore, that between-year variability of spatial leaf arrangement decreased with increasing canopy complexity. We suggest that in complex canopies less redistribution of leaf material over time may lead to more similar light microhabitats within and among years. Conversely, in less complex canopies this relationship can lead to a year-to-year time lag in morphological leaf acclimation since the effects of the previous-year's light environment are reflected in the morphological characteristics of current-year leaves.Our study harnesses unique spatio-temporal resolution measurements of canopy structure and microhabitat that can inform better management strategies seeking to maximize forest C uptake. Future research quantifying the relationship between canopy structure and light distribution will improve performance of ecosystem models that currently lack spatially explicit canopy structure information.

  7. Grande Ronde Endemic Spring Chinook Salmon Supplementation Project; Lostine River Operations and Maintenance 2003 Smolt Acclimation and Adult Return Report.

    Zollman, Richard L.; Eschler, Russell; Sealey, Shawn [Nez Perce Tribe

    2009-03-31

    The Nez Perce Tribe (NPT), through funding provided by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), has implemented a Chinook salmon supplementation program (250,000 smolts) on the Lostine River, a tributary to the Grande Ronde River of Oregon. The Grande Ronde Endemic Spring Chinook Salmon Supplementation project, which involves supplementation of the Upper Grande Ronde River and Catherine Creek in addition to the Lostine River, was established to prevent extirpation and increase the number of threatened Snake River spring/summer Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) returning to the Grande Ronde River. This report covers the seventh season (1997-2003) of adult Chinook salmon broodstock collection in the Lostine River and the fifth season (1999-2003) of acclimating the resultant progeny. Production of Lostine River spring Chinook salmon smolts currently occurs at Lookingglass Fish Hatchery (LGH). The Lostine River supplementation program utilizes two strategies to obtain egg source for production of smolts for supplementation: captive broodstock and conventional broodstock. The captive broodstock strategy involves (1) capture of natural juvenile spring Chinook salmon smolts from the Lostine River, (2) rearing those to adult and spawning them, and (3) rearing the resultant progeny for eventual acclimation and release back into the Lostine River. The conventional broodstock strategy involves (1) capture of natural and hatchery origin adults returning to the Lostine River, (2) holding those adults and spawning them, and (3) rearing the resultant progeny for acclimation and release back into the Lostine River. This report focuses on (1) the trapping and collection of adult spring Chinook salmon that return to the Lostine River, which provides the broodstock source for the conventional strategy and (2) the acclimation and release of juvenile spring Chinook salmon produced from the captive broodstock and conventional broodstock strategies. In 2003, acclimation of

  8. Protective effect of UV-A radiation during acclimation of the photosynthetic apparatus to UV-B treatment.

    Štroch, Michal; Materová, Zuzana; Vrábl, Daniel; Karlický, Václav; Šigut, Ladislav; Nezval, Jakub; Špunda, Vladimír

    2015-11-01

    We examined the acclimation response of the photosynthetic apparatus of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) to a combination of UV-A and UV-B radiation (UVAB) and to UV-B radiation alone. Our aim was to evaluate whether UV-A radiation prevents UV-B-induced damage to the photosynthetic apparatus and whether UV-A pre-acclimation is required to mitigate the negative influence of UV-B radiation. Barley plants were grown from seeds under low photosynthetically active radiation (50 μmol m(-2) s(-1)) either in the absence or presence of UV-A radiation (UVA- and UVA+ plants, respectively). After 8 days of development, plants were exposed simultaneously to UV-A and UV-B radiation for the next 6 days. Additionally, UVA- plants were exposed to UV-B radiation alone. The UVA+ plants had a higher CO2 assimilation rate near the light-saturation region (A(N)) and a higher content of both total chlorophylls (Chls) and total carotenoids than the UVA- plants. Chls content, A(N), the potential quantum yield of photosystem II (PSII) photochemistry (F(V)/F(M)), the capacity of light-induced thermal energy dissipation and the efficiency of excitation energy transfer within PSII remained the same or even increased in both UVA+ and UVA- plants after UVAB treatment. On the contrary, exposure of UVA- plants to UV-B radiation itself led to a reduction in all these characteristics. We revealed that the presence of UV-A radiation during UVAB treatment not only mitigated but completely eliminated the negative effect of UV-B radiation on the functioning of the photosynthetic apparatus and that UV-A pre-acclimation was not crucial for development of this UV-A-induced resistance against UV-B irradiation. PMID:26233710

  9. Physiological acclimation of a desert antelope, Arabian oryx (Oryx leucoryx), to long-term food and water restriction.

    Ostrowski, Stéphane; Williams, Joseph B; Mésochina, Pascal; Sauerwein, Helga

    2006-03-01

    Desert mammals often experience scarcity of drinking water and food for prolonged periods. In this study, the first long-term acclimation experiment in a non-domesticated desert-adapted ungulate, we investigated the mechanisms used by the Arabian oryx Oryx leucoryx, to adjust its physiology to progressive food and water restriction over 5 months, an experimental regimen and time course chosen to mimic what it typically experiences between spring and late summer in the desert. At the end of the acclimation period, oryx consumed less than one and half of food and water of animals in the control group and lost 8.2+/-2.6% of their initial body mass. Experimental animals reduced their mass-specific resting metabolic rate (RMR) and total evaporative water loss (TEWL) by 16.2 and 25.7%, respectively, and maintained a digestive efficiency of about 70%. We found no support for the idea that reduced RMR in oryx correlated with a decreased thyroid hormone concentration in plasma. At the end of the 5 months acclimation, oryx continued to mobilize fatty acids to fuel metabolism, and did not use protein breakdown as a major source of gluconeogenesis. Oryx in the experimental group reduced their water intake by 70% and maintained constant plasma osmolality. They adjusted their water budget by reducing mass-specific TEWL, increasing urine osmolality and reducing urine volume by 40%, and excreting feces with <50% water content. Oryx have an unusually low TEWL compared with other arid-zone ungulates; both hydrated and water-deprived individuals have TEWL values, 51.7 and 39.3%, respectively, of allometric predictions for arid-zone ungulates. PMID:16283332

  10. Is warmer better? Decreased oxidative damage in notothenioid fish after long-term acclimation to multiple stressors.

    Enzor, Laura A; Place, Sean P

    2014-09-15

    Antarctic fish of the suborder Notothenioidei have evolved several unique adaptations to deal with subzero temperatures. However, these adaptations may come with physiological trade-offs, such as an increased susceptibility to oxidative damage. As such, the expected environmental perturbations brought on by global climate change have the potential to significantly increase the level of oxidative stress and cellular damage in these endemic fish. Previous single stressor studies of the notothenioids have shown they possess the capacity to acclimate to increased temperatures, but the cellular-level effects remain largely unknown. Additionally, there is little information on the ability of Antarctic fish to respond to ecologically relevant environmental changes where multiple variables change concomitantly. We have examined the potential synergistic effects that increased temperature and Ṗ(CO2) have on the level of protein damage in Trematomus bernacchii, Pagothenia borchgrevinki and Trematomus newnesi, and combined these measurements with changes in total enzymatic activity of catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) in order to gauge tissue-specific changes in antioxidant capacity. Our findings indicate that total SOD and CAT activity levels displayed only small changes across treatments and tissues. Short-term acclimation to decreased seawater pH and increased temperature resulted in significant increases in oxidative damage. Surprisingly, despite no significant change in antioxidant capacity, cellular damage returned to near-basal levels, and significantly decreased in T. bernacchii, after long-term acclimation. Overall, these data suggest that notothenioid fish currently maintain the antioxidant capacity necessary to offset predicted future ocean conditions, but it remains unclear whether this capacity comes with physiological trade-offs. PMID:25013114

  11. Pre-anthesis high-temperature acclimation alleviates damage to the flag leaf caused by post-anthesis heat stress in wheat

    Wang, Xiao; Cai, Jian; Jian, Dong;

    2011-01-01

    and enhanced cell membrane peroxidation, as exemplified by increased O2-• production rate and reduction in activities of antioxiditave enzymes. However, under post-anthesis heat stress, plants with pre-anthesis hightemperature acclimation (HH)showedmuchhigher photosynthetic rates than those without pre......The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of pre-anthesis high-temperature acclimation on leaf physiology of winter wheat in response to post-anthesis heat stress. The results showed that both pre- and post-anthesis heat stresses significantly depressed flag leaf photosynthesis......-anthesis high-temperature acclimation (CH). Leaves ofHHplants exhibited a higher Chl a/b ratio and lower chlorophyll/carotenoid ratio and superoxide anion radical release rate compared with those of the CH plants. In addition, antioxidant enzyme activities in HH plants were significantly higher than in CH...

  12. Effects of acclimation on the toxicity of stream water contaminated with zinc and cadmium to juvenile cutthroat trout

    Harper, D.D.; Farag, A.M.; Brumbaugh, W.G.

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the influence of acclimation on results of in situ bioassays with cutthroat trout in metal-contaminated streams. Cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki) were held for 21 days (1) in live containers at a reference or "clean" site having dissolved metals near detection limits (0.01 ??g/L cadmium [Cd] and 2.8 ??g/L zinc [Zn]; hardness 32 mg/L as CaCO3) and (2) at a site in a mining-impacted watershed having moderately increased metals (0.07 ??g/L Cd and 38 to 40 ??g/L Zn; hardness 50 mg/L as CaCO3). The 96-hour survival of each treatment group was then tested in situ at five sites from September 5 to 9, 2002, and each group exhibited a range of metal concentrations (0.44 to 39 ??g/L arsenic [As], 0.01 to 2.2 ??g/L Cd, and 0.49 to 856 ??g/L Zn). Survival was 100% at three sites for both treatments. However, a higher percentage of metal-acclimated fish survived at the site with the second highest concentrations of Cd and Zn (0.90 and 238 ??g/L, respectively) compared with fish acclimated at the reference site (100% vs. 55%, respectively). Survival was 65% for acclimated fish and 0% for metal-nai??ve fish at the site with the largest metal concentrations (2.2 ??g/L Cd and 856 ??g/L Zn). Water collected from the site with the largest concentrations of dissolved metals (on October 30, 2002) was used in a laboratory serial dilution to determine 96-hour LC50 values. The 96-hour LC50 estimates of nai??ve fish during the in situ and laboratory experiments were similar (0.60 ??g Cd/L and 226 ??g Zn/L for in situ and 0.64 ??g Cd/L and 201 ??g Zn/L for laboratory serial dilutions). However, mortality of nai??ve cutthroat trout tested under laboratory conditions was more rapid in dilutions of 100%, 75%, and 38% site water than in situ experiments. ?? 2007 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

  13. Effect of season, needle age and elevated CO2concentration on photosynthesis and Rubisco acclimation in Picea abies

    Urban, Otmar; Hrstka, M.; Zitová, Martina; Holišová, Petra; Šprtová, Miroslava; Klem, Karel; Calfapietra, Carlo; De Angelis, Paolo; Marek, Michal V.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 58, SEP 2012 (2012), s. 135-141. ISSN 0981-9428 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA600870701; GA MŽP(CZ) SP/2D1/93/07; GA ČR(CZ) GAP501/10/0340; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2010007; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0073 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : Activation state * Electron transport rate * Norway spruce * Photosynthetic acclimation * Rubisco carboxylation * Rubisco specific activity Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 2.775, year: 2012

  14. The role of acclimation in scaling GPP from the leaf to the canopy for crops in a changing climate

    Bernacchi, C.; Bagley, J. E.; Ort, D. R.; Kumar, P.; Ruiz Vera, U. M.

    2013-12-01

    Multi-faceted challenges from global climate change and increased demands on agriculture for food, fiber and, increasingly fuel is driving a need to understand how major climate change factors, particularly increasing atmospheric concentrations of CO2 and rising temperature, will influence leaf photosynthesis (A) and ecosystem gross primary productivity (GPP). Eight of the ten major crops grown globally utilize the C3 photosynthetic pathway and based on mechanistic understanding of C3 photosynthesis, a synergism exists with rising CO2 and increasing temperature that is predicted to increase A beyond that of an increase in [CO2] alone. However, considerable uncertainty surrounds the acclimation response of photosynthesis to global change and, as a result, the influence of physiological adjustments of photosynthesis is currently not represented in leaf, canopy, ecosystem or general circulation models that are used to predict ecosystem-scale responses to global change scenarios. Here, we incorporate into mechanistic leaf and canopy photosynthesis models the acclimation responses of the two key parameters required for modeling A and GPP, the maximum velocity for carboxylation (Vc,max) and maximum rate of electron transport (Jmax), determined from in-field experimentation for soybean and poplar, which vary in regards to what limits A in elevated CO2. Measurements of Vc,max and Jmax from the Soybean Temperature by Free Air CO2 Enrichment (Soy-T-FACE) experiment and of poplar at the Poplar FACE experiment were used to model the response of net carbon uptake to [CO2] and/or temperature. The modeling was conducted using the mechanistic leaf photosynthesis model (Farquhar, von Caemmerer, & Berry Model) and the latest generation canopy photosynthesis model with an integrated mechanistic representation of physiology and biophysical components, the Multi-Layer Canopy (MLCan) model. While the theory behind the interactions of [CO2] and temperature on photosynthesis are well

  15. Acclimation, adaptation, traits and trade-offs in plankton functional type models: reconciling terminology for biology and modelling

    Flynn, Kevin J.; St. John, Michael; Raven, John A.;

    2015-01-01

    ideally only be considered for describing intra-generational interactions; in applications between generations, and certainly between unrelated species, such concepts should be avoided. We suggest that systems biology approaches, through to complex adaptive/acclimative systems modelling, with explicit......We propose definitions in terminology to enhance ongoing collaborations between biologists and modellers on plankton ecology. Organism “functional type” should refer to commonality in ecology not biogeochemistry; the latter is largely an emergent property of the former, while alignment with ecology...

  16. Natural Resources Containing Arbutin. Determination of Arbutin in the Leaves of Bergenia crassifolia (L. Fritsch. acclimated in Romania

    Carmen POP

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Bergenia crassifolia (L. Fritsch. is cited in literature as being one of the richest in arbutin (15-20%, an important pharmaceutical substance with disinfecting properties (in genitourinary diseases and also depigmentation properties (skin whitening agent. The aim of this study consisted in determination of arbutin content in leaves of Bergenia crassifolia acclimated in Romania. The optimum parameters for the extraction of arbutin and the dynamics of the accumulation of arbutin in Bergenia crassifolia leaves during the four seasons were also studied. The content of arbutin varied between 17.44% and 22.59% dry weight, values which are similar to those found in literature

  17. Affect Regulation

    Pedersen, Signe Holm; Poulsen, Stig Bernt; Lunn, Susanne

    2014-01-01

    Gergely and colleagues’ state that their Social Biofeedback Theory of Parental Affect Mirroring” can be seen as a kind of operationalization of the classical psychoanalytic concepts of holding, containing and mirroring. This article examines to what extent the social biofeedback theory of parenta...

  18. Long-Term Growth of Soybean at Elevated [CO2] Does not Cause Acclimation of Stomatal Conductance Under Fully Open-air Conditions.

    Leakey, A. D.; Bernacchi, C. J.; Ort, D. R.; Long, S. P.

    2008-12-01

    Accurately predicting plant function and global biogeochemical cycles later this century will be complicated if stomatal conductance (gs) acclimates to growth at elevated [CO2], in the sense of a long-term alteration of the response of gs to [CO2], humidity (h) and/or photosynthetic rate (A). If so, photosynthetic and stomatal models will require parameterization at each growth [CO2] of interest. Photosynthetic acclimation to long-term growth at elevated [CO2] occurs frequently. Acclimation of gs has rarely been examined, even though stomatal density commonly changes with growth [CO2]. Soybean was grown under field conditions at ambient [CO2] (378 μmol mol-1) and elevated [CO2] (552 μmol mol-1) using Free-Air [CO2] Enrichment (FACE). This study tested for stomatal acclimation by parameterizing and validating the widely used Ball et al. model (1987, Progress in Photosynthesis Research, Vol IV, 221-224) with measurements of leaf gas exchange. The dependence of gs on A, h and [CO2] at the leaf surface was unaltered by long-term growth at elevated [CO2]. This suggests that the commonly observed decrease in gs under elevated [CO2] is due entirely to the direct instantaneous effect of [CO2] on gs and that there is no longer-term acclimation of stomatal conductance independent of photosynthetic acclimation. The Ball et al. (1987) model accurately predicted gs for soybean growing under ambient and elevated [CO2] in the field. Model parameters under ambient and elevated [CO2] were indistinguishable, demonstrating that stomatal function under ambient and elevated [CO2] could be modeled without the need for parameterization at each growth [CO2].

  19. Effects of Cold Acclimation on Several Enzyme Activities in Euonymus radicans 'Emorald & Gold' and Its Relation to Semi-lethal Temperature

    Guo Huihong; Gao Shumin; Zhao Fengjun; Li Fenglan

    2004-01-01

    The changes in activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), peroxidase (POD) and ATPase in the leaves of Euonymus radicans were studied when seedlings were cold-acclimated (at 4 ℃) for 1 week, 2 weeks, 3 weeks and then treated for 1 d under low temperature stress (at -5 ℃). The semi-lethal temperatures of acclimated and unacclimated seedlings were also investigated. The results indicated that the activities of the three enzymes in the leaves of the seedlings treated at 4 ℃ for 1, 2 and 3 weeks were all higher than those of unacclimated seedings (treated at 22 ℃ as controls). The activities of SOD and POD increased continuously with the prolongation of the time of cold acclimation, but stepped up to summits then down to the levels of the controls. The activities of SOD culminated at the first week, and the activities of POD at the second week. When acclimated and unacclimated seedlings were both treated at -5 ℃ for 1 d, the activities of the three enzymes in the leaves of acclimated seedlings were a little lower than those before stress, but higher than those of the controls. Moreover, the decrease rate of enzyme activities was greatly lower than that of the controls. The results showed that cold acclimation could enhance the stability of the three enzymes in the leaves of seedlings under low temperature stress; the semi-lethal temperature was -19.1 ℃ when the seedlings were treated at 4 ℃ for 3 weeks, but it was -5.4 ℃ when the seedlings were treated at 22 ℃. The decline of the semi-lethal temperature caused by the adaptive changes of enzyme activities was one of the foundations of enhancing the cold tolerance.

  20. Effects of temperature and thermal acclimation on locomotor performance of Macrobiotus hufelandi Schultze (Tardigrada: Macrobiotidae)%温度和热驯化对胡氏大生熊虫运动行为的影响

    李晓晨; 王立志

    2005-01-01

    The beneficial acclimation hypothesis (BAH) predicts that animals acclimated to a particular temperature have enhanced performance or fitness at that temperature in comparison with animals acclimated to other temperatures. The BAH has been tested by a variety of empirical examinations, and was rejected by some of them. In order to provide new evidences for the BAH, the effects of acute and acclimation temperature (AT) on locomotor performance of Macrobiotus hufelandi (Tardigrada: Macrobiotidae) were investigated. The tardigrades were collected from Nanwutai, Qinling Mountains which traverse from west to east in central China. The subjects were acclimated to either 2℃ or 22℃ for 2 weeks. The animal was transferred onto a frosted slide and allowed to walk freely at the performance temperature (PT) 2℃ or 22℃. Only one individual was tested per test bout, which lasted from three to five minutes. To avoid occurrence of thermal acclimation effect, the standard adaptation time was limited to 1.5 min. Each subject was tested for once at the same PT, and was tested only at one PT. A total of 25 individuals were tested and measured at the same PT. The locomotor performance of the animals was recorded with a digital video camera mounted on a microscope at 4×10 amplification and replayed on a PC. Every subject was identified. Walking speed (WS) and percentage of time moving (PTM) at both PTs (2℃ or 22℃) were selected as the rate parameters of locomotor performance. The two-way repeated measures ANOVA with a significance level of α= 0.05 and Duncan multiple range test were used to analyze the data. WS of the animals acclimated to and tested at the same temperatures was significantly faster than that for animals acclimated to and tested at the different temperatures, similarly, PTM of the animals acclimated to 22℃ and tested at 22℃ was significantly greater than PTM of animals acclimated to 22℃ and tested at 2℃, which indicated that the animals acclimated

  1. Alterations in mitochondrial electron transport system activity in response to warm acclimation, hypoxia-reoxygenation and copper in rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss

    Sappal, Ravinder [Department of Pathology and Microbiology, Atlantic Veterinary College, University of Prince Edward Island, Charlottetown, PE, C1A 4P3 (Canada); Department of Biomedical Sciences, Atlantic Veterinary College, University of Prince Edward Island, Charlottetown, PE, C1A 4P3 (Canada); MacDougald, Michelle [Faculty of Medicine, Memorial University of Newfoundland, Health Sciences Centre, Prince Philip Drive, St. John’s, NL, A1B 3V6 (Canada); Fast, Mark [Department of Pathology and Microbiology, Atlantic Veterinary College, University of Prince Edward Island, Charlottetown, PE, C1A 4P3 (Canada); Stevens, Don [Department of Biomedical Sciences, Atlantic Veterinary College, University of Prince Edward Island, Charlottetown, PE, C1A 4P3 (Canada); Kibenge, Fred [Department of Pathology and Microbiology, Atlantic Veterinary College, University of Prince Edward Island, Charlottetown, PE, C1A 4P3 (Canada); Siah, Ahmed [British Columbia Centre for Aquatic Health Sciences, 871A Island Highway, Campbell River, BC, V9W 2C2 (Canada); Kamunde, Collins, E-mail: ckamunde@upei.ca [Department of Biomedical Sciences, Atlantic Veterinary College, University of Prince Edward Island, Charlottetown, PE, C1A 4P3 (Canada)

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • Sequential inhibition and activation allows assessment of multiple segments of the electron transport system. • Warm acclimation and hypoxia-reoxygenation have global effects on the electron transport system. • Warm acclimation and hypoxia-reoxygenation sensitize the electron transport system to copper. • Thermal stress, hypoxia-reoxygenation and copper act additively to impair mitochondrial function. - Abstract: Fish expend significant amounts of energy to handle the numerous potentially stressful biotic and abiotic factors that they commonly encounter in aquatic environments. This universal requirement for energy singularizes mitochondria, the primary cellular energy transformers, as fundamental drivers of responses to environmental change. Our study probed the interacting effects of thermal stress, hypoxia-reoxygenation (HRO) and copper (Cu) exposure in rainbow trout to test the prediction that they act jointly to impair mitochondrial function. Rainbow trout were acclimated to 11 (controls) or 20 °C for 2 months. Liver mitochondria were then isolated and their responses in vitro to Cu (0–20 μM) without and with HRO were assessed. Sequential inhibition and activation of mitochondrial electron transport system (ETS) enzyme complexes permitted the measurement of respiratory activities supported by complex I–IV (CI–IV) in one run. The results showed that warm acclimation reduced fish and liver weights but increased mitochondrial protein indicating impairment of energy metabolism, increased synthesis of defense proteins and/or reduced liver water content. Whereas acute rise (11 → 20 °C) in temperature increased mitochondrial oxidation rates supported by CI–IV, warm acclimation reduced the maximal (state 3) and increased the basal (state 4) respiration leading to global uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS). HRO profoundly inhibited both maximal and basal respiration rates supported by CI–IV, reduced RCR for all except

  2. Alterations in mitochondrial electron transport system activity in response to warm acclimation, hypoxia-reoxygenation and copper in rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss

    Highlights: • Sequential inhibition and activation allows assessment of multiple segments of the electron transport system. • Warm acclimation and hypoxia-reoxygenation have global effects on the electron transport system. • Warm acclimation and hypoxia-reoxygenation sensitize the electron transport system to copper. • Thermal stress, hypoxia-reoxygenation and copper act additively to impair mitochondrial function. - Abstract: Fish expend significant amounts of energy to handle the numerous potentially stressful biotic and abiotic factors that they commonly encounter in aquatic environments. This universal requirement for energy singularizes mitochondria, the primary cellular energy transformers, as fundamental drivers of responses to environmental change. Our study probed the interacting effects of thermal stress, hypoxia-reoxygenation (HRO) and copper (Cu) exposure in rainbow trout to test the prediction that they act jointly to impair mitochondrial function. Rainbow trout were acclimated to 11 (controls) or 20 °C for 2 months. Liver mitochondria were then isolated and their responses in vitro to Cu (0–20 μM) without and with HRO were assessed. Sequential inhibition and activation of mitochondrial electron transport system (ETS) enzyme complexes permitted the measurement of respiratory activities supported by complex I–IV (CI–IV) in one run. The results showed that warm acclimation reduced fish and liver weights but increased mitochondrial protein indicating impairment of energy metabolism, increased synthesis of defense proteins and/or reduced liver water content. Whereas acute rise (11 → 20 °C) in temperature increased mitochondrial oxidation rates supported by CI–IV, warm acclimation reduced the maximal (state 3) and increased the basal (state 4) respiration leading to global uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS). HRO profoundly inhibited both maximal and basal respiration rates supported by CI–IV, reduced RCR for all except

  3. Isolation of intact and pure chloroplasts from leaves of Arabidopsis thaliana plants acclimated to low irradiance for studies on Rubisco regulation

    Magda Grabsztunowicz

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available A protocol is presented for low-cost and fast isolation of intact and pure chloroplasts from leaves of plants acclimated to low irradiance. The protocol is based on a differential centrifugation of cleared leaf homogenate and omits a centrifugation on Percoll gradient step. The intactness and purity of the chloroplasts isolated from leaves of low irradiance-acclimated plants by using this protocol (confirmed by phase contrast microscopy as well as enzymatic and immunological approaches allows plausible studies on low irradiance-dependent Rubisco regulation.

  4. Acclimation of photosynthesis to elevated CO sub 2 in five C sub 3 species. [Chenopodium album, Phaseolus vulgaris, Solanum tuberosum, Solanum melongena, Brassica oleracea

    Sage, R.F. (Univ. of Georgia, Athens (USA)); Sharkey, T.D. (Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison (USA)); Seemann, J.R. (Univ. of Nevada, Reno (USA))

    1989-02-01

    The effect of long-term (weeks to months) CO{sub 2} enhancement on (a) the gas-exchange characteristics, (b) the content and activation state of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase (rubisco), and (c) leaf nitrogen, chlorophyll, and dry weight per area were studied in five C{sub 3} species (Chenopodium album, Phaseolus vulgaris, Solanum tuberosum, Solanum melongena, and Brassica oleracea) grown at CO{sub 2} partial pressures of 300 or 900 to 1000 microbars. Long-term exposure to elevated CO{sub 2} affected the CO{sub 2} response of photosynthesis in one of three ways: (a) the initial slope of the CO{sub 2} response was unaffected, but the photosynthetic rate at high CO{sub 2} increased (S. tuberosum); (b) the initial slope decreased but the CO{sub 2}-saturated rate of photosynthesis decreased (B. oleracea, S. melongena). In all five species, growth at high CO{sub 2} increased the extent to which photosynthesis was stimulated following a decrease in the partial pressure of O{sub 2} or an increase in measurement CO{sub 2} above 600 microbars. This stimulation indicates that a limitation on photosynthesis by the capacity to regenerate orthophosphate was reduced or absent after acclimation to high CO{sub 2}. Leaf nitrogen per area either increased (S. tuberosum, S. melongena) or was little changed by CO{sub 2} enhancement. The content of rubisco was lower in only two of the fives species, yet its activation state was 19% to 48% lower in all five species following long-term exposure to high CO{sub 2}. These results indicate that during growth in CO{sub 2}-enriched air, leaf rubisco content remains in excess of that required to support the observed photosynthetic rates.

  5. Short-term exercise-heat acclimation enhances skin vasodilation but not hyperthermic hyperpnea in humans exercising in a hot environment.

    Fujii, Naoto; Honda, Yasushi; Ogawa, Takeshi; Tsuji, Bun; Kondo, Narihiko; Koga, Shunsaku; Nishiyasu, Takeshi

    2012-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that short-term exercise-heat acclimation (EHA) attenuates hyperthermia-induced hyperventilation in humans exercising in a hot environment. Twenty-one male subjects were divided into the two groups: control (C, n = 11) and EHA (n = 10). Subjects in C performed exercise-heat tests [cycle exercise for ~75 min at 58% [Formula: see text] (37°C, 50% relative humidity)] before and after a 6-day interval with no training, while subjects in EHA performed the tests before and after exercise training in a hot environment (37°C). The training entailed four 20-min bouts of exercise at 50% [Formula: see text] separated by 10 min of rest daily for 6 days. In C, comparison of the variables recorded before and after the no-training period revealed no changes. In EHA, the training increased resting plasma volume, while it reduced esophageal temperature (T (es)), heart rate at rest and during exercise, and arterial blood pressure and oxygen uptake ([Formula: see text]) during exercise. The training lowered the T (es) threshold for increasing forearm vascular conductance (FVC), while it increased the slope relating FVC to T (es) and the peak FVC during exercise. It also lowered minute ventilation ([Formula: see text]) during exercise, but this effect disappeared after removing the influence of [Formula: see text] on [Formula: see text]. The training did not change the slope relating ventilatory variables to T (es). We conclude that short-term EHA lowers ventilation largely by reducing metabolism, but it does not affect the sensitivity of hyperthermia-induced hyperventilation during submaximal, moderate-intensity exercise in humans. PMID:21547423

  6. Affective Urbanism

    Samson, Kristine

    , experience and consumption are all strategic design tools applied by planners and architects. Whereas urban design in former modernist planning served merely functional or political means, urban design has increasingly become an aesthetical mediator of ideologies embedded in the urban field of life forces...... capitalism not only changes urban life and its means of production, it specifically influences the way the city is designed and how it unfolds as events (Anderson & Harrison 2010) and affective, emotional production (Pile 2009). Through examples of urban design and events in the Carlsberg City in Copenhagen...... and The High Line in Chelsea, New York, the paper sets out to define and question these affective modes of production. Whether these productions are socio-material practices consisting of ludic designs (Stevens 2007), temporary architecture or art installations or evental practices consisting of...

  7. Nitrogen Starvation Acclimation in Synechococcus elongatus: Redox-Control and the Role of Nitrate Reduction as an Electron Sink

    Alexander Klotz

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Nitrogen starvation acclimation in non-diazotrophic cyanobacteria is characterized by a process termed chlorosis, where the light harvesting pigments are degraded and the cells gradually tune down photosynthetic and metabolic activities. The chlorosis response is governed by a complex and poorly understood regulatory network, which converges at the expression of the nblA gene, the triggering factor for phycobiliprotein degradation. This study established a method that allows uncoupling metabolic and redox-signals involved in nitrogen-starvation acclimation. Inhibition of glutamine synthetase (GS by a precise dosage of l-methionine-sulfoximine (MSX mimics the metabolic situation of nitrogen starvation. Addition of nitrate to such MSX-inhibited cells eliminates the associated redox-stress by enabling electron flow towards nitrate/nitrite reduction and thereby, prevents the induction of nblA expression and the associated chlorosis response. This study demonstrates that nitrogen starvation is perceived not only through metabolic signals, but requires a redox signal indicating over-reduction of PSI-reduced electron acceptors. It further establishes a cryptic role of nitrate/nitrite reductases as electron sinks to balance conditions of over-reduction.

  8. Acclimation of croton and hibiscus seedlings in response to the application of indobultiric acid and humic acid for rooting

    Lílian Estrela Borges Baldotto

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The vegetative propagation of ornamental plants can be accelerated by applying plant growth regulators. Amongst them, the use of auxins, plant hormones with physiological effects on cell elongation and rooting have stood out. Alternatively, the application of humic acids, bioactive fraction of soil organic matter, also results in increases in rooting cuttings of ornamental plants. The objective of this work was to study the growth characteristics and the nutritional contents of croton and hibiscus plants during acclimation of seedlings in response to different concentrations of indolebutyric acid (IBA and humic acid (HA applied to cuttings for rooting. The experiment was conducted in greenhouse, and the apical stem cuttings were treated with solutions with concentrations of 0, 250, 500, 1000 and 2000 mg L-1of IBA and 0, 10, 20, 30 and 40 mg L-1 of C from HA. At 45 days of rooting in carbonized rice husk, they were individually transferred to plastic bags of 2.0 dm3 containing a mixture of soil: sand: manure (2: 1: 1 as substrate. At 90 days of acclimation, the plants were collected for measurement of growth and nutritional variables. The results showed that the application of the IBA stimulates the absorption of nutrients and growth of croton cuttings and transplanted hibiscus, contributing to formation of vigorous seedlings. A similar response occurred with the application of HA in hibiscus cuttings

  9. Delayed flowering is associated with lack of photosynthetic acclimation in Pigeon pea (Cajanus cajan L.) grown under elevated CO₂.

    Sreeharsha, Rachapudi Venkata; Sekhar, Kalva Madhana; Reddy, Attipalli Ramachandra

    2015-02-01

    In the present study, we investigated the likely consequences of future atmospheric CO2 concentrations [CO2] on growth, physiology and reproductive phenology of Pigeonpea. A short duration Pigeonpea cultivar (ICPL 15011) was grown without N fertilizer from emergence to final harvest in CO2 enriched atmosphere (open top chambers; 550μmolmol(-1)) for two seasons. CO2 enrichment improved both net photosynthetic rates (Asat) and foliar carbohydrate content by 36 and 43%, respectively, which further reflected in dry biomass after harvest, showing an increment of 29% over the control plants. Greater carboxylation rates of Rubisco (Vcmax) and photosynthetic electron transport rates (Jmax) in elevated CO2 grown plants measured during different growth periods, clearly demonstrated lack of photosynthetic acclimation. Further, chlorophyll a fluorescence measurements as indicated by Fv/Fm and ΔF/Fm' ratios justified enhanced photosystem II efficiency. Mass and number of root nodules were significantly high in elevated CO2 grown plants showing 58% increase in nodule mass ratio (NMR) which directly correlated with Pn. Growth under high CO2 showed significant ontogenic changes including delayed flowering. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that the lack of photosynthetic acclimation and increased carbohydrate-nitrogen reserves modulate the vegetative and reproductive growth patterns in Pigeonpea grown under elevated CO2. PMID:25575994

  10. Nitrogen Starvation Acclimation in Synechococcus elongatus: Redox-Control and the Role of Nitrate Reduction as an Electron Sink.

    Klotz, Alexander; Reinhold, Edgar; Doello, Sofía; Forchhammer, Karl

    2015-01-01

    Nitrogen starvation acclimation in non-diazotrophic cyanobacteria is characterized by a process termed chlorosis, where the light harvesting pigments are degraded and the cells gradually tune down photosynthetic and metabolic activities. The chlorosis response is governed by a complex and poorly understood regulatory network, which converges at the expression of the nblA gene, the triggering factor for phycobiliprotein degradation. This study established a method that allows uncoupling metabolic and redox-signals involved in nitrogen-starvation acclimation. Inhibition of glutamine synthetase (GS) by a precise dosage of l-methionine-sulfoximine (MSX) mimics the metabolic situation of nitrogen starvation. Addition of nitrate to such MSX-inhibited cells eliminates the associated redox-stress by enabling electron flow towards nitrate/nitrite reduction and thereby, prevents the induction of nblA expression and the associated chlorosis response. This study demonstrates that nitrogen starvation is perceived not only through metabolic signals, but requires a redox signal indicating over-reduction of PSI-reduced electron acceptors. It further establishes a cryptic role of nitrate/nitrite reductases as electron sinks to balance conditions of over-reduction. PMID:25780959

  11. Evidence for a temperature acclimation mechanism in bacteria: an empirical test of a membrane-mediated trade-off

    Hall, Edward K.; Singer, Gabriel A.; Kainz, Martin J.; Lennon, Jay T.

    2010-01-01

    1. Shifts in bacterial community composition along temporal and spatial temperature gradients occur in a wide range of habitats and have potentially important implications for ecosystem functioning. However, it is often challenging to empirically link an adaptation or acclimation that defines environmental niche or biogeography with a quantifiable phenotype, especially in micro-organisms. 2. Here we evaluate a possible mechanistic explanation for shifts in bacterioplankton community composition in response to temperature by testing a previously hypothesized membrane mediated trade-off between resource acquisition and respiratory costs. 3. We isolated two strains of Flavobacterium sp. at two temperatures (cold isolate and warm isolate) from the epilimnion of a small temperate lake in North Central Minnesota. 4. Compared with the cold isolate the warm isolate had higher growth rate, higher carrying capacity, lower lag time and lower respiration at the high temperature and lower phosphorus uptake at the low temperature. We also observed significant differences in membrane lipid composition between isolates and between environments that were consistent with adjustments necessary to maintain membrane fluidity at different temperatures. 5. Our results suggest that temperature acclimation in planktonic bacteria is, in part, a resource-dependent membrane-facilitated phenomenon. This study provides an explicit example of how a quantifiable phenotype can be linked through physiology to competitive ability and environmental niche.

  12. Generation and analysis of 9792 EST sequences from cold acclimated oat, Avena sativa

    Olsson Björn

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Oat is an important crop in North America and northern Europe. In Scandinavia, yields are limited by the fact that oat cannot be used as a winter crop. In order to develop such a crop, more knowledge about mechanisms of cold tolerance in oat is required. Results From an oat cDNA library 9792 single-pass EST sequences were obtained. The library was prepared from pooled RNA samples isolated from leaves of four-week old Avena sativa (oat plants incubated at +4°C for 4, 8, 16 and 32 hours. Exclusion of sequences shorter than 100 bp resulted in 8508 high-quality ESTs with a mean length of 710.7 bp. Clustering and assembly identified a set of 2800 different transcripts denoted the Avena sativa cold induced UniGene set (AsCIUniGene set. Taking advantage of various tools and databases, putative functions were assigned to 1620 (58% of these genes. Of the remaining 1180 unclassified sequences, 427 appeared to be oat-specific since they lacked any significant sequence similarity (Blast E values > 10-10 to any sequence available in the public databases. Of the 2800 UniGene sequences, 398 displayed significant homology (BlastX E values ≤ 10-10 to genes previously reported to be involved in cold stress related processes. 107 novel oat transcription factors were also identified, out of which 51 were similar to genes previously shown to be cold induced. The CBF transcription factors have a major role in regulating cold acclimation. Four oat CBF sequences were found, belonging to the monocot cluster of DREB family ERF/AP2 domain proteins. Finally in the total EST sequence data (5.3 Mbp approximately 400 potential SSRs were found, a frequency similar to what has previously been identified in Arabidopsis ESTs. Conclusion The AsCIUniGene set will now be used to fabricate an oat biochip, to perform various expression studies with different oat cultivars incubated at varying temperatures, to generate molecular markers and provide tools for

  13. Assessment of Barotrauma Resulting from Rapid Decompression of Depth Acclimated Juvenile Chinook Salmon Bearing Radio Telemetry Transmitters

    Brown, Richard S.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Welch, Abigail E.; Stephenson, John R.; Abernethy, Cary S.; McKinstry, Craig A.; Theriault, Marie-Helene

    2007-09-06

    A multifactor study was conducted by Battelle for the US Army Corps of Engineers to assess the significance of the presence of a radio telemetry transmitter on the effects of rapid decompression from simulated hydro turbine passage on depth acclimated juvenile run-of-the-river Chinook salmon. Study factors were: (1) juvenile chinook salmon age;, subyearling or yearling, (2) radio transmitter present or absent, (3) three transmitter implantation factors: gastric, surgical, and no transmitter, and (4) four acclimation depth factors: 1, 10, 20, and 40 foot submergence equivalent absolute pressure, for a total of 48 unique treatments. Exposed fish were examined for changes in behavior, presence or absence of barotrauma injuries, and immediate or delayed mortality. Logistic models were used to test hypotheses that addressed study objectives. The presence of a radio transmitter was found to significantly increase the risk of barotrauma injury and mortality at exposure to rapid decompression. Gastric implantation was found to present a higher risk than surgical implantation. Fish were exposed within 48 hours of transmitter implantation so surgical incisions were not completely healed. The difference in results obtained for gastric and surgical implantation methods may be the result of study design and the results may have been different if tested fish had completely healed surgical wounds. However, the test did simulate the typical surgical-release time frame for in-river telemetry studies of fish survival so the results are probably representative for fish passing through a turbine shortly following release into the river. The finding of a significant difference in response to rapid decompression between fish bearing radio transmitters and those not implies a bias may exist in estimates of turbine passage survival obtained using radio telemetry. However, the rapid decompression (simulated turbine passage) conditions used for the study represented near worst case exposure

  14. Affective Maps

    Salovaara-Moring, Inka

    Recently, in human geography there has been a considerable attention paid to retheorising maps; less as a product and more as practice. This refers to the notion that rather than reading maps as fixed representations, digital mapping is by nature a dynamic, performative, and participatory practice....... In particular, mapping environmental damage, endangered species, and human made disasters has become one of the focal point of affective knowledge production. These ‘more-than-humangeographies’ practices include notions of species, space and territory, and movement towards a new political ecology...

  15. The effect of acclimation temperature on the fusion kinetics of lipid vesicles derived from endoplasmic reticulum membranes of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) liver.

    Miranda, Estuardo J; Hazel, Jeffrey R

    2002-02-01

    Membrane fusion is an obligatory step in many vital cellular processes. The well-established enrichment of bilayer-destabilizing lipids in membranes of poikilotherms subjected to growth at low temperatures leads to the prediction that such membranes will possess a greater propensity to undergo fusion. This hypothesis was explicitly tested in the present study by determining the kinetics of fusion between small unilamellar vesicles (SUVs) prepared from endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membranes of thermally-acclimated (to 5 and 20 degrees C) rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) liver and bovine brain phosphatidylserine (BBPS). At temperatures above 10 degrees C, ER vesicles from 5 degrees C-acclimated trout, fused more rapidly and to a greater extent with BBPS vesicles (by average factors of 1.25- and 1.45-fold, respectively) than ER vesicles of 20 degrees C-acclimated trout. At temperatures >35 degrees C, apparent fusion rates declined while the extent of fusion increased in both acclimation groups. Fusion kinetics were found to be well correlated with and limited by the physical properties and phase state of the BBPS vesicles. These results indicate that dynamic attributes of biological membranes, such as the propensity to undergo fusion, are of potential regulatory significance and are partially conserved when growth or environmental temperature changes. PMID:11818217

  16. Proton Gradient Regulation5-Like1-Mediated Cyclic Electron Flow Is Crucial for Acclimation to Anoxia and Complementary to Nonphotochemical Quenching in Stress Adaptation

    Kukuczka, Bernadeta; Magneschi, Leonardo; Petroutsos, Dimitris;

    2014-01-01

    double mutant in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii lacking both PGRL1 and LHCSR3 expression. Phenotypic comparative analyses of this double mutant, together with the single knockout strains and with the P. patens pgrl1, demonstrated that PGRL1 is crucial for acclimation to high light and anoxia in...

  17. Leptin immunoexpression and innervation in rat interscapular brown adipose tissue of cold-acclimated rats: the effects of L-arginine and L-NAME.

    Bato Korac

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to explore the effect of nitric oxide on leptin immunoexpression and innervation in interscapular brown adipose tissue (IBAT of room- and cold- acclimated rats. Animals acclimated both to room-temperature (22 +/- 1 degrees C and cold (4 +/- 1 degrees C were treated with L-arginine, a substrate for nitric oxide synthases (NOSs, or N?-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME, an inhibitor of NOSs, for 45 days. Leptin expression and localization in brown adipocytes was studied by immunohistochemistry, and innervation stained by the Bodian method. Strong leptin immunopositivity was observed in brown adipocytes cytoplasm of all room-acclimated groups, but nuclear leptin positivity was found only in L-NAME treated rats. In cold-acclimated control and L-NAME treated rats leptin immunopositivity was absent, while L-arginine treatment reversed the cold-induced suppression of leptin expression. Comparing to control, L-arginine, and even more L-NAME, at 22 +/- 1 degrees C induced greater innervation. In conclusion, L-arginine treatment changes leptin expression pattern on cold in rat IBAT.

  18. [Affective dependency].

    Scantamburlo, G; Pitchot, W; Ansseau, M

    2013-01-01

    Affective dependency is characterized by emotional distress (insecure attachment) and dependency to another person with a low self-esteem and reassurance need. The paper proposes a reflection on the definition of emotional dependency and the confusion caused by various denominations. Overprotective and authoritarian parenting, cultural and socio-environmental factors may contribute to the development of dependent personality. Psychological epigenetic factors, such as early socio-emotional trauma could on neuronal circuits in prefronto-limbic regions that are essential for emotional behaviour.We also focus on the interrelations between dependent personality, domestic violence and addictions. The objective for the clinician is to propose a restoration of self-esteem and therapeutic strategies focused on autonomy. PMID:23888587

  19. Effects of low temperature acclimation on photosynthesis in three Chilean Proteaceae Efectos de la aclimatación a baja temperatura sobre la fotosíntesis de tres proteáceas chilenas

    MAURICIO CASTRO-ARÉVALO

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Embothrium coccineum, Gevuina avellana, and Lomaría ferruginea grow in habitats contrasting in temperature and light intensity. Embothrium coccineum is a pioneer species that establishes itself in open sites completely exposed to variable sunlight and temperature. Gevuina avellana is usually found in more protected sites. Lomaría ferruginea regenerates under the canopy in sites with low thermal oscillations and high humidity. In order to establish an association of their habitats with functional attributes of each species, we studied their photosynthetic responses to temperature and light intensity. We expected that E. coccineum, which grows at full sun, is able to acclimate much better its photosynthetic apparatus to different temperatures than the shade tolerant L. ferruginea and the semi-shade tolerant G. avellana. One group of plants of each species containing six individuals each was subjected to 4 °C (cold-acclimated plants. Another group with the same number of individuals was subjected to 20 °C (non-acclimated plants. In non-acclimated plants of E. coccineum, the photosynthetic rate as measured by 0(2 evolution presented its maximum at 30 °C (16.5 ^mol 0(2 m"² s"¹ with an optimum between 20 and 35 °C, while in G. avellana and L. ferruginea the highest photosynthetic rate (~13 ^mol 0(2 m"² s" was obtained at 25 °C. Cold acclimation significantly reduced the photosynthetic rates of the investigated species. The Q10 for 0(2 evolution decreased significantly in cold-acclimated E. coccineum and G. avellana but not in L. ferruginea. The fluorescence parameters of PSII showed that E. coccineum presents a higher effective quantum yield (cPPSII at both growth temperatures. Photochemical quenching (qP was more affected by the photosynthetic photon flux density (PPFD in L. ferruginea than in the other species. Lomaría ferruginea presented the highest non-photochemical quenching (NPQ at lower PPFD. Thus, the photosynthetic apparatus of

  20. Grande Ronde Endemic Spring Chinook Salmon Supplementation Project; Lostine River Operations and Maintenance 2004 Smolt Acclimation and Adult Return Report.

    Zollman, Richard L.; Eschler, Russell; Sealey, Shawn [Nez Perce Tribe

    2009-03-31

    The Nez Perce Tribe (NPT), through funding provided by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), has implemented a Chinook salmon supplementation program (250,000 smolts) on the Lostine River, a tributary to the Grande Ronde River of Oregon. The Grande Ronde Endemic Spring Chinook Salmon Supplementation project, which involves supplementation of the Upper Grande Ronde River and Catherine Creek in addition to the Lostine River, was established to prevent extirpation and increase the number of threatened Snake River spring/summer Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) returning to the Grande Ronde River. This report covers the eighth season (1997-2004) of adult Chinook salmon broodstock collection in the Lostine River and the sixth season (1999-2004) of acclimation of resulting Lostine River progeny. Production of Lostine River spring Chinook salmon smolts currently occurs at Lookingglass Fish Hatchery (LGH). The Lostine River supplementation program utilizes two strategies to obtain egg source for production of smolts for supplementation: captive broodstock and conventional broodstock. The captive broodstock strategy involves (1) capture of natural juvenile spring Chinook salmon smolts from the Lostine River, (2) rearing those to adult and spawning them, and (3) rearing the resultant progeny for eventual acclimation and release back into the Lostine River. The conventional broodstock strategy involves (1) capture of natural and hatchery origin adults returning to the Lostine River, (2) holding those adults and spawning them, and (3) rearing the resultant progency for acclimation and release back into the Lostine River. This report focuses on (1) the trapping and collection of adult spring Chinook salmon that return to the Lostine River, which provides the broodstock source for the conventional strategy and (2) the acclimation and release of juvenile spring Chinook salmon produced from the captive broodstock and conventional broodstock strategies. In 2004

  1. Fast acclimation of freezing resistance suggests no influence of winter minimum temperature on the range limit of European beech.

    Lenz, Armando; Hoch, Günter; Vitasse, Yann

    2016-04-01

    Low temperature extremes drive species distribution at a global scale. Here, we assessed the acclimation potential of freezing resistance in European beech (Fagus sylvaticaL.) during winter. We specifically asked (i) how do beech populations growing in contrasting climates differ in their maximum freezing resistance, (ii) do differences result from genetic differentiation or phenotypic plasticity to preceding temperatures and (iii) is beech at risk of freezing damage in winter across its distribution range. We investigated the genetic and environmental components of freezing resistance in buds of adult beech trees from three different populations along a natural large temperature gradient in north-western Switzerland, including the site holding the cold temperature record in Switzerland. Freezing resistance of leaf primordia in buds varied significantly among populations, with LT50values (lethal temperature for 50% of samples) ranging from -25 to -40 °C, correlating with midwinter temperatures of the site of origin. Cambial meristems and the pith of shoots showed high freezing resistance in all three populations, with only a trend to lower freezing resistance at the warmer site. After hardening samples at -6 °C for 5 days, freezing resistance of leaf primordia increased in all provenances by up to 4.5 K. After additional hardening at -15 °C for 3 days, all leaf primordia were freezing resistant to -40 °C. We demonstrate that freezing resistance ofF. sylvaticahas a high ability to acclimate to temperature changes in winter, whereas the genetic differentiation of freezing resistance among populations seems negligible over this small geographic scale but large climatic gradient. In contrast to the assumption made in most of the species distribution models, we suggest that absolute minimum temperature in winter is unlikely to shape the cold range limit of beech. We conclude that the rapid acclimation of freezing resistance to winter temperatures allows

  2. Functional roles of Na+/K+-ATPase in active ammonia excretion and seawater acclimation in the giant mudskipper, Periophthalmodon schlosseri

    Shit F Chew

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The giant mudskipper, Periophthalmodon schlosseri, is an amphibious fish that builds burrows in the mudflats. It can actively excrete ammonia through its gills, and tolerate high environmental ammonia. This study aimed to examine the effects of seawater (salinity 30; SW acclimation and/or environmental ammonia exposure on the kinetic properties of Na+/K+-ATPase (Nka from, and mRNA expression and protein abundance of nka/Nka α–subunit isoforms in, the gills of P. schlosseri pre-acclimated to slightly brackish water (salinity 3; SBW. Our results revealed that the Nka from the gills of P. schlosseri pre-acclimated to SBW for 2 wk had substantially higher affinity to (or lower Km for K+ than NH4+, and its affinity to NH4+ decreased significantly after 6-d exposure to 75 mmol l-1 NH4Cl in SBW. Hence, Nka transported K+ selectively to maintain intracellular K+ homeostasis, instead of transporting NH4+ from the blood into ionocytes during active NH4+ excretion as previously suggested. Two nkaα isoforms, nkaα1 and nkaα3, were cloned and sequenced from the gills of P. schlosseri. Their deduced amino acid sequences had K+ binding sites identical to that of Nkaα1c from Anabas testudineus, indicating that they could effectively differentiate K+ from NH4+. Six days of exposure to 75 mmol l-1 NH4Cl in SBW, or to SW with or without 50 mmol l-1 NH4Cl led to significant increases in Nka activities in the gills of P. schlosseri. However, a significant increase in the comprehensive Nkaα protein abundance was observed only in the gills of fish exposed to 50 mmol l-1 NH4Cl in SW. Hence, post-translational modification could be an important activity modulator of branchial Nka in P. schlosseri. The fast modulation of Nka activity and concurrent expressions of two branchial nkaα isoforms could in part contribute to the ability of P. schlosseri to survive abrupt transfer between SBW and SW or abrupt exposure to ammonia.

  3. GENETIC ADAPTATION AND ACCLIMATION OF PHYTOPLANKTON ALONG A STRESS GRADIENT IN THE EXTREME WATERS OF THE AGRIO RIVER-CAVIAHUE LAKE (ARGENTINA)(1).

    López-Rodas, Victoria; Rouco, Mónica; Sánchez-Fortún, Sebastián; Flores-Moya, Antonio; Costas, Eduardo

    2011-10-01

    We tested if different adaptation strategies were linked to a stress gradient in phytoplankton cells. For this purpose, we studied the adaptation and acclimation of Dictyosphaerium chlorelloides (Naumann) Komárek et Perman (Chlorophyta) and Microcystis aeruginosa (Kütz.) Kütz. (Cyanobacteria) to different water samples (from extremely acid, metal-rich water to moderate stressful conditions) of the Agrio River-Caviahue Lake system (Neuquén, Argentina). Both experimental strains were isolated from pristine, slightly alkaline waters. To distinguish between physiological acclimation and genetic adaptation (an adaptive evolution event), a modified Luria-Delbrück fluctuation analysis was carried out with both species by using as selective agent sample waters from different points along the stress gradient. M. aeruginosa did not acclimate to any of the waters tested from different points along the stress gradient nor did D. chlorelloides to the two most acidic and metal-rich waters. However, D. chlorelloides proliferated by rapid genetic adaptation, as the consequence of a single mutation (5.4 × 10(-7) resistant mutants per cell per division) at one locus, in less extreme water and also by acclimation in the least extreme water. It is hypothesized that the stress gradient resulted in different strategies of adaptation in phytoplankton cells from nonextreme waters. Thus, very extreme conditions were lethal for both organisms, but as stressful conditions decreased, adaptation of D. chlorelloides cells was possible by the selection of resistant mutants, and in less extreme conditions, by acclimation. PMID:27020184

  4. Are sun- and shade-type anatomy required for the acclimation of Neoregelia cruenta?

    FERNANDA REINERT

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Sun and shade plants are often discriminated by a number of sun- and shade-type anatomies. Nonetheless, we propose that among tank-bromeliads, changes in rosette architecture satisfy the requirements for coping with contrasting light levels. The tank-bromeliad Neoregelia cruenta naturally colonises sub-habitats ranging from full exposure to direct sunlight, to shaded environments in sand ridge plains. We quantified anatomical and morphological traits of leaves and rosettes of N. cruenta grown under sun and shade conditions. Cells with undulated lateral walls within the water parenchyma are for the first time described for the family. Under high light, leaf blades were wider, shorter, and yellowish. The rosette diameter of sun plants was less than half that of shade plants. Sun leaves overlapped with neighbouring leaves for most of their length, forming a cylindrical rosette where water accumulates. Shade leaves only overlapped in the centre of the rosette. Most anatomical traits were similar under both growth conditions. Stomata were absent from the base of sun leaves, which is probably explained by limited gas exchange at the base of the tight sun-type rosette. Data suggest that the ability of N. cruenta to acclimate to sun and shade is better explained by changes in rosette architecture than by leaf anatomy.Plantas de sol e sombra são frequentemente distinguíveis por diversos aspectos anatômicos. Não obstante, propomos que entre bromélias-tanque, mudanças na arquitetura da roseta satisfazem os requerimentos que permitem habitar extremos de luminosidade. A bromélia-tanque, Neoregelia cruenta naturalmente coloniza microhabitats que variam da exposição direta ao sol, a ambientes sombreados sob o dossel da vegetação de restinga. Quantifi camos aspectos anatômicos e morfológicos das folhas e rosetas de N. cruenta crescida sob sol e sombra. Células com paredes onduladas no parênquima aquífero são pela primeira vez descritas na fam

  5. Simultaneous biotreatment of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons and dyes in a one-step bioreaction by an acclimated Pseudomonas strain.

    Álvarez, María S; Rodríguez, Ana; Sanromán, Ma Ángeles; Deive, Francisco J

    2015-12-01

    A Pseudomonas stutzeri strain acclimated to the presence of neoteric contaminants has been proposed for simultaneously remediating an effluent polluted with Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons and a diazo dye. The pollutants chemical nature imposed a strict control of both the medium composition and the operating conditions. pH, temperature and agitation rates of 7.0, 37.5 and 146 rpm, respectively, led to optimum levels of contaminant removal (higher than 60%) after RSM optimization. The validity of these conditions was checked at flask and bioreactor scale and the kinetics of the biotreatment was elucidated. The simulation of this one-step process applied at larger scale for the remediation of a 200,000 m(3)/year-effluent from a leather factory was compared with a conventional two-steps option. Great reductions in treatment times and in investment and manufacturing costs were concluded, proving the promising potential of the proposed process. PMID:26386421

  6. Contrasting effects of cold acclimation versus obesogenic diets on chemerin gene expression in brown and brite adipose tissues.

    Hansen, Ida R; Jansson, Kim M; Cannon, Barbara; Nedergaard, Jan

    2014-12-01

    Based on results from a signal sequence trap, we investigated chemerin gene expression in brown adipose tissue. Male NMRI mice were exposed to 30, 22 or 4 °C for 3 weeks, or were fed control (chow) diet, cafeteria diet or high-fat diet at thermoneutrality for the same time. In brown adipose tissue, cold acclimation strongly diminished chemerin gene expression, whereas obesogenic diets augmented expression. Qualitatively, changes in expression were paralleled in brite/beige adipose tissues (e.g. inguinal), whereas white adipose tissue (epididymal) and muscle did not react to these cues. Changes in tissue expression were not directly paralleled by alterations in plasma levels. Both these intact animal studies and brown adipocyte cell culture studies indicated that the gene expression regulation was not congruent with a sympathetic/adrenergic control. The data are discussed in relation to suggested endocrine, paracrine and autocrine effects of chemerin. PMID:25224322

  7. Effect of acclimation to outdoor condition on the sexual performance of mass-produced Medflies (Diptera: Tephritidae)

    Application of the sterile insect technique (SIT) as part of integrated area-wide programs to control the Mediterranean fruit fly (medfly) Ceratitis capitata (Wiedemann) require that the released males attract wild females and transfer sterile sperm. However, knowledge about male sexual performance after they are released is scarce. We conducted a study to evaluate male sexual performance in field cage tests, according to standard quality control procedures. Mass-reared 5-d-old sterile males from the genetic sexing strain VIENNA 7mix2000 were acclimated for 0, 1, and 3 d to outdoor conditions before competing with wild males for wild females. Although the proportion of mating (PM) in the test was satisfactory, the resulting relative sterility index (RSI) data showed no significant differences among the treatments. The data indicate that pre-conditioning males to outdoor conditions in Madeira did not confer an advantage in field cage sexual performance. (author)

  8. Differential Regulatory Mechanisms of CBF Regulon Between Nipponbare (Japonica) and 93-11 (Indica) During Cold Acclimation

    PAN Xiao-wu; LI Yong-chao; LI Xiao-xiang; LIU Wen-qiang; MING Jun; LU Ting-ting; TAN Jiang

    2013-01-01

    Nine CBF/DREB1 homologous genes in rice were obtained by BLAST search in the NCBI database,which share conserved amino acid sequences with DREB1 protein in Arabidopsis.Three CBF genes organized in tandem,named OsCBF1,OsCBF2 and OsCBF3,showed a transient induction in the process of cold acclimation,much stronger in indica rice 93-11 compared with japonica rice Nipponbare.The candidate downstream genes OsLIP5 and OsLIP9 were induced in 93-11 but not in Nipponbare.The differential expression of CBF regulon might be caused by polymorphisms within promoter sequences between these two rice varieties.These results could be useful for utilization of CBF/DREB1 genes and illustration of differences in chilling tolerance between indica and japonica rice varieties.

  9. Identification of leaf proteins differentially accumulated during cold acclimation between Festuca pratensis plants with distinct levels of frost tolerance.

    Kosmala, Arkadiusz; Bocian, Aleksandra; Rapacz, Marcin; Jurczyk, Barbara; Zwierzykowski, Zbigniew

    2009-01-01

    Festuca pratensis (meadow fescue) as the most frost-tolerant species within the Lolium-Festuca complex was used as a model for research aimed at identifying the cellular components involved in the cold acclimation (CA) of forage grasses. The work presented here also comprises the first comprehensive proteomic research on CA in a group of monocotyledonous species which are able to withstand winter conditions. Individual F. pratensis plants with contrasting levels of frost tolerance, high frost tolerant (HFT) and low frost tolerant (LFT) plants, were selected for comparative proteomic research. The work focused on the analysis of leaf protein accumulation before and after 2, 8, and 26 h, and 3, 5, 7, 14, and 21 d of CA, using high-throughput two-dimensional electrophoresis, and on the identification of proteins which were accumulated differentially between the selected plants by the application of mass spectrometry. The analyses of approximately 800 protein profiles revealed a total of 41 (5.1%) proteins that showed a minimum of a 1.5-fold difference in abundance, at a minimum of one time point of CA for HFT and LFT genotypes. It was shown that significant differences in profiles of protein accumulation between the analysed plants appeared relatively early during cold acclimation, most often after 26 h (on the 2nd day) of CA and one-half of the differentially accumulated proteins were all parts of the photosynthetic apparatus. Several proteins identified here have been reported to be differentially accumulated during cold conditions for the first time in this paper. The functions of the selected proteins in plant cells and their probable influence on the level of frost tolerance in F. pratensis, are discussed. PMID:19553368

  10. Photosynthetic acclimation of Symbiodinium in hospite depends on vertical position in the tissue of the scleractinian coral Montastrea curta

    Mads eLichtenberg

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Coral photophysiology has been studied intensively from the colony scale down to the scale of single fluorescent pigment granules as light is one of the key determinants for coral health. We studied the photophysiology of the oral and aboral symbiont band of scleractinian coral Montastrea curta to investigate if different acclimation to light exist in hospite on a polyp scale. By combined use of electrochemical and fiber-optic microsensors for O2, scalar irradiance and variable chlorophyll fluorescence, we could characterize the physical and chemical microenvironment experienced by the symbionts and, for the first time, estimate effective quantum yields of PSII photochemistry and rates of electron transport at the position of the zooxanthellae corrected for the in-tissue gradient of scalar irradiance. The oral- and aboral Symbiodinium layers received ~71% and ~33% of surface scalar irradiance, respectively, and the two symbiont layers experience considerable differences in light exposure. Rates of gross photosynthesis did not differ markedly between the oral- and aboral layer and curves of PSII electron transport rates corrected for scalar irradiance in hospite, showed that the light use efficiency under sub-saturating light conditions were similar between the two layers. However, the aboral Symbiodinium band did not experience photosynthetic saturation, even at the highest investigated irradiance where the oral layer was clearly saturated. We thus found a different light acclimation response for the oral and aboral symbiont bands in hospite, and discuss whether such response could be shaped by spectral shifts caused by tissue gradients of scalar irradiance. Based on our experimental finding, combined with previous knowledge, we present a conceptual model on the photophysiology of Symbiodinium residing inside living coral tissue under natural gradients of light and chemical parameters.

  11. Greater impact of extreme drought on photosynthesis of grasslands exposed to a warmer climate in spite of acclimation.

    Zavalloni, Costanza; Gielen, Birgit; De Boeck, Hans J; Lemmens, Catherine M H M; Ceulemans, Reinhart; Nijs, Ivan

    2009-05-01

    In view of the projected increase in the frequency of extreme events during this century, we investigated the impact of a drought extreme on leaf ecophysiological parameters and carbon isotope composition (delta(13)C) of grassland communities with species richness (S) of one, three or nine species. The communities, grown for 3 years at either ambient air temperatures (ambient T(air)) or ambient T(air) + 3 degrees C (elevated T(air)), were additionally subjected to an imposed drought by withholding water for 24 days. During the previous 3 years equal precipitation was applied in both temperature treatments, thus communities at elevated T(air) had experienced more frequent, mild droughts. However, it was unknown whether this resulted in a higher resistance for facing extreme droughts. At similar soil matric potentials stomatal conductance (g(s)) and transpiration (Tr) were higher at elevated than ambient T(air), indicating acclimation to lower soil water content. Despite the stomatal acclimation observed, plants in elevated T(air) showed a lower resistance to the drought extreme as indicated by their lower photosynthetic rate (A(max)), g(s) and Tr during the entire duration of the drought extreme. Lower values for A(max), Tr and g(s) were also recorded in species at S = 3 as compared with species at S = 1 for both temperature treatments, but no further differences with S = 9 suggesting that stress was not alleviated at higher S-levels. The discrimination of (13)C was poorly correlated with measurements of instantaneous leaf water-use efficiency (A(max)/Tr) and, with this time scale and sampling method, it was not possible to detect any potential change in plant water-use efficiency using leaf delta(13)C. PMID:19374719

  12. Differential expression of Na+, K(+)-ATPase α-1 isoforms during seawater acclimation in the amphidromous galaxiid fish Galaxias maculatus.

    Urbina, Mauricio A; Schulte, Patricia M; Bystriansky, Jason S; Glover, Chris N

    2013-04-01

    Inanga (Galaxias maculatus) is an amphidromous fish with a well-known capacity to withstand a wide range of environmental salinities. To investigate the molecular mechanisms facilitating acclimation of inanga to seawater, several isoforms of the Na(+), K(+)-ATPase ion transporter were identified. This included three α-1 (a, b and c), an α-2 and two α-3 (a and b) isoforms. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the inanga α-1a and α-1b formed a clade with the α-1a and α-1b isoforms of rainbow trout, while another clade contained the α-1c isoforms of these species. The expression of all the α-1 isoforms was modulated after seawater exposure (28‰). In gills, the expression of the α-1a isoform was progressively down-regulated after seawater exposure, while the expression of the α-1b isoform was up-regulated. The α-1c isoform behaved similarly to the α-1a, although changes were less dramatic. Physiological indicators of salinity acclimation matched the time frame of the changes observed at the molecular level. A 24-h osmotic shock period was highlighted by small increases in plasma osmolality, plasma Na(+) and a decrease in muscle tissue water content. Thereafter, these values returned close to their pre-exposure (freshwater) values. Na(+), K(+)-ATPase activity showed a decreasing trend over the first 72 h following seawater exposure, but activity increased after 240 h. Our results indicate that inanga is an excellent osmoregulator, an ability that is conferred by the rapid activation of physiological and molecular responses to salinity change. PMID:23142926

  13. Adult acclimation to combined temperature and pH stressors significantly enhances reproductive outcomes compared to short-term exposures.

    Suckling, Coleen C; Clark, Melody S; Richard, Joelle; Morley, Simon A; Thorne, Michael A S; Harper, Elizabeth M; Peck, Lloyd S

    2015-05-01

    This study examined the effects of long-term culture under altered conditions on the Antarctic sea urchin, Sterechinus neumayeri. Sterechinus neumayeri was cultured under the combined environmental stressors of lowered pH (-0.3 and -0.5 pH units) and increased temperature (+2 °C) for 2 years. This time-scale covered two full reproductive cycles in this species and analyses included studies on both adult metabolism and larval development. Adults took at least 6-8 months to acclimate to the altered conditions, but beyond this, there was no detectable effect of temperature or pH. Animals were spawned after 6 and 17 months exposure to altered conditions, with markedly different outcomes. At 6 months, the percentage hatching and larval survival rates were greatest in the animals kept at 0 °C under current pH conditions, whilst those under lowered pH and +2 °C performed significantly less well. After 17 months, performance was not significantly different across treatments, including controls. However, under the altered conditions urchins produced larger eggs compared with control animals. These data show that under long-term culture adult S. neumayeri appear to acclimate their metabolic and reproductive physiology to the combined stressors of altered pH and increased temperature, with relatively little measureable effect. They also emphasize the importance of long-term studies in evaluating effects of altered pH, particularly in slow developing marine species with long gonad maturation times, as the effects of altered conditions cannot be accurately evaluated unless gonads have fully matured under the new conditions. PMID:25491898

  14. Rapid acclimation of juvenile corals to CO2 -mediated acidification by upregulation of heat shock protein and Bcl-2 genes.

    Moya, A; Huisman, L; Forêt, S; Gattuso, J-P; Hayward, D C; Ball, E E; Miller, D J

    2015-01-01

    Corals play a key role in ocean ecosystems and carbonate balance, but their molecular response to ocean acidification remains unclear. The only previous whole-transcriptome study (Moya et al. Molecular Ecology, 2012; 21, 2440) documented extensive disruption of gene expression, particularly of genes encoding skeletal organic matrix proteins, in juvenile corals (Acropora millepora) after short-term (3 d) exposure to elevated pCO2 . In this study, whole-transcriptome analysis was used to compare the effects of such 'acute' (3 d) exposure to elevated pCO2 with a longer ('prolonged'; 9 d) period of exposure beginning immediately post-fertilization. Far fewer genes were differentially expressed under the 9-d treatment, and although the transcriptome data implied wholesale disruption of metabolism and calcification genes in the acute treatment experiment, expression of most genes was at control levels after prolonged treatment. There was little overlap between the genes responding to the acute and prolonged treatments, but heat shock proteins (HSPs) and heat shock factors (HSFs) were over-represented amongst the genes responding to both treatments. Amongst these was an HSP70 gene previously shown to be involved in acclimation to thermal stress in a field population of another acroporid coral. The most obvious feature of the molecular response in the 9-d treatment experiment was the upregulation of five distinct Bcl-2 family members, the majority predicted to be anti-apoptotic. This suggests that an important component of the longer term response to elevated CO2 is suppression of apoptosis. It therefore appears that juvenile A. millepora have the capacity to rapidly acclimate to elevated pCO2 , a process mediated by upregulation of specific HSPs and a suite of Bcl-2 family members. PMID:25444080

  15. MiR393 regulation of auxin signaling and redox-related components during acclimation to salinity in Arabidopsis.

    María José Iglesias

    Full Text Available One of the most striking aspects of plant plasticity is the modulation of development in response to environmental changes. Plant growth and development largely depend on the phytohormone auxin that exerts its function through a partially redundant family of F-box receptors, the TIR1-AFBs. We have previously reported that the Arabidopsis double mutant tir1 afb2 is more tolerant to salt stress than wild-type plants and we hypothesized that down-regulation of auxin signaling might be part of Arabidopsis acclimation to salinity. In this work, we show that NaCl-mediated salt stress induces miR393 expression by enhancing the transcription of AtMIR393A and leads to a concomitant reduction in the levels of the TIR1 and AFB2 receptors. Consequently, NaCl triggers stabilization of Aux/IAA repressors leading to down-regulation of auxin signaling. Further, we report that miR393 is likely involved in repression of lateral root (LR initiation, emergence and elongation during salinity, since the mir393ab mutant shows reduced inhibition of emergent and mature LR number and length upon NaCl-treatment. Additionally, mir393ab mutant plants have increased levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS in LRs, and reduced ascorbate peroxidase (APX enzymatic activity compared with wild-type plants during salinity. Thus, miR393 regulation of the TIR1 and AFB2 receptors could be a critical checkpoint between auxin signaling and specfic redox-associated components in order to coordinate tissue and time-specific growth responses and tolerance during acclimation to salinity in Arabidopsis.

  16. How does real affect affect affect recognition in speech?

    Truong, Khiet Phuong

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the research described in this thesis was to develop speech-based affect recognition systems that can deal with spontaneous (‘real’) affect instead of acted affect. Several affect recognition experiments with spontaneous affective speech data were carried out to investigate what combinati

  17. Grande Ronde Endemic Spring Chinook Salmon Supplementation Project; Lostine River Operations and Maintenance 2007 Smolt Acclimation and Adult Return Report.

    Zollman, Richard L.; Eschler, Russell; Sealey, Shawn [Nez Perce Tribe

    2009-03-31

    The Nez Perce Tribe (NPT), through funding provided by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), has implemented a Chinook salmon supplementation program (250,000 smolts) on the Lostine River, a tributary to the Grande Ronde River of Oregon. The Grande Ronde Endemic Spring Chinook Salmon Supplementation project, which involves supplementation of the Upper Grande Ronde River and Catherine Creek in addition to the Lostine River, was established to prevent extirpation and increase the number of threatened Snake River spring/summer Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) returning to the Grande Ronde River. This report covers the eleventh season (1997-2007) of adult Chinook salmon broodstock collection in the Lostine River and the ninth season (1999-2007) of acclimation of resulting Lostine River progeny. Production of Lostine River spring Chinook salmon smolts currently occurs at Lookingglass Fish Hatchery (LGH). The Lostine River supplementation program utilizes two strategies to obtain egg source for production of smolts for supplementation: captive broodstock and conventional broodstock. The captive broodstock strategy involves (1) capture of natural juvenile spring Chinook salmon smolts from the Lostine River, (2) rearing those to adult and spawning them, and (3) rearing the resultant progeny for eventual acclimation and release back into the Lostine River. The conventional broodstock strategy involves (1) capture of natural and hatchery origin adults returning to the Lostine River, (2) holding those adults and spawning them, and (3) rearing the resultant progeny for acclimation and release back into the Lostine River. This report focuses on (1) the trapping and collection of adult spring Chinook salmon that return to the Lostine River, which provides the broodstock source for the conventional strategy and (2) the acclimation and release of juvenile spring Chinook salmon produced from the captive broodstock and conventional broodstock strategies In 2007

  18. Grande Ronde Endemic Spring Chinook Salmon Supplementation Project; Lostine River Operations and Maintenance 2006 Smolt Acclimation and Adult Return Report.

    Zollman, Richard L.; Eschler, Russell; Sealey, Shawn [Nez Perce Tribe

    2009-03-31

    The Nez Perce Tribe (NPT), through funding provided by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), has implemented a Chinook salmon supplementation program (250,000 smolts) on the Lostine River, a tributary to the Grande Ronde River of Oregon. The Grande Ronde Endemic Spring Chinook Salmon Supplementation project, which involves supplementation of the Upper Grande Ronde River and Catherine Creek in addition to the Lostine River, was established to prevent extirpation and increase the number of threatened Snake River spring/summer Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) returning to the Grande Ronde River. This report covers the tenth season (1997-2006) of adult Chinook salmon broodstock collection in the Lostine River and the eighth season (1999-2006) of acclimation of resulting Lostine River progeny. Production of Lostine River spring Chinook salmon smolts currently occurs at Lookingglass Fish Hatchery (LGH). The Lostine River supplementation program utilizes two strategies to obtain egg source for production of smolts for supplementation: captive broodstock and conventional broodstock. The captive broodstock strategy involves (1) capture of natural juvenile spring Chinook salmon smolts from the Lostine River, (2) rearing those to adult and spawning them, and (3) rearing the resultant progeny for eventual acclimation and release back into the Lostine River. The conventional broodstock strategy involves (1) capture of natural and hatchery origin adults returning to the Lostine River, (2) holding those adults and spawning them, and (3) rearing the resultant progeny for acclimation and release back into the Lostine River. This report focuses on (1) the trapping and collection of adult spring Chinook salmon that return to the Lostine River, which provides the broodstock source for the conventional strategy and (2) the acclimation and release of juvenile spring Chinook salmon produced from the captive broodstock and conventional broodstock strategies In 2006

  19. From ecophysiology to phenomics: some implications of photoprotection and shade-sun acclimation in situ for dynamics of thylakoids in vitro.

    Matsubara, Shizue; Förster, Britta; Waterman, Melinda; Robinson, Sharon A; Pogson, Barry J; Gunning, Brian; Osmond, Barry

    2012-12-19

    Half a century of research into the physiology and biochemistry of sun-shade acclimation in diverse plants has provided reality checks for contemporary understanding of thylakoid membrane dynamics. This paper reviews recent insights into photosynthetic efficiency and photoprotection from studies of two xanthophyll cycles in old shade leaves from the inner canopy of the tropical trees Inga sapindoides and Persea americana (avocado). It then presents new physiological data from avocado on the time frames of the slow coordinated photosynthetic development of sink leaves in sunlight and on the slow renovation of photosynthetic properties in old leaves during sun to shade and shade to sun acclimation. In so doing, it grapples with issues in vivo that seem relevant to our increasingly sophisticated understanding of ΔpH-dependent, xanthophyll-pigment-stabilized non-photochemical quenching in the antenna of PSII in thylakoid membranes in vitro. PMID:23148277

  20. Characterization and properties of intracellular proteins after cold acclimation of the ice-nucleating bacterium Pantoea agglomerans (Erwinia herbicola) IFO12686.

    Koda, N; Aoki, M; Kawahara, H; Yamade, K; Obata, H

    2000-11-01

    The ice-nucleating bacterium Pantoea agglomerans (Erwinia herbicola) IFO12686 (INA(+)) responds to a decrease in temperature by the induction of proteins. The pattern of protein bands from strain IFO12686 following a shift in temperature from 30 to 12 degrees C could be divided into four major groups: (1) increasing protein bands, (2) decreasing protein bands, (3) increasing--decreasing protein bands, and (4) almost constant protein bands. We identified a cryoprotective function in the increasing protein band found in strain IFO12686. The increasing protein bands that followed a reduction in temperature were considered to have an important role in cold acclimation or adaptation. We showed that these proteins possessed cryoprotective activity when tested against the freeze-labile enzyme lactate dehydrogenase. The strain IFO12686 had greater cryotolerance than Pa. agglomerans IAM1595 (INA(-)), and the degree of cryotolerance was increased by cold acclimation. PMID:11161552

  1. The acclimation of Phaeodactylum tricornutum to blue and red light does not influence the photosynthetic light reaction but strongly disturbs the carbon allocation pattern.

    Anne Jungandreas

    Full Text Available Diatoms are major contributors to the aquatic primary productivity and show an efficient acclimation ability to changing light intensities. Here, we investigated the acclimation of Phaeodactylum tricornutum to different light quality with respect to growth rate, photosynthesis rate, macromolecular composition and the metabolic profile by shifting the light quality from red light (RL to blue light (BL and vice versa. Our results show that cultures pre-acclimated to BL and RL exhibited similar growth performance, photosynthesis rates and metabolite profiles. However, light shift experiments revealed rapid and severe changes in the metabolite profile within 15 min as the initial reaction of light acclimation. Thus, during the shift from RL to BL, increased concentrations of amino acids and TCA cycle intermediates were observed whereas during the BL to RL shift the levels of amino acids were decreased and intermediates of glycolysis accumulated. Accordingly, on the time scale of hours the RL to BL shift led to a redirection of carbon into the synthesis of proteins, whereas during the BL to RL shift an accumulation of carbohydrates occurred. Thus, a vast metabolic reorganization of the cells was observed as the initial reaction to changes in light quality. The results are discussed with respect to a putative direct regulation of cellular enzymes by light quality and by transcriptional regulation. Interestingly, the short-term changes in the metabolome were accompanied by changes in the degree of reduction of the plastoquinone pool. Surprisingly, the RL to BL shift led to a severe inhibition of growth within the first 48 h which was not observed during the BL to RL shift. Furthermore, during the phase of growth arrest the photosynthetic performance did not change. We propose arguments that the growth arrest could have been caused by the reorganization of intracellular carbon partitioning.

  2. The Acclimation of Phaeodactylum tricornutum to Blue and Red Light Does Not Influence the Photosynthetic Light Reaction but Strongly Disturbs the Carbon Allocation Pattern

    Jungandreas, Anne; Schellenberger Costa, Benjamin; Jakob, Torsten; von Bergen, Martin; Baumann, Sven; Wilhelm, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Diatoms are major contributors to the aquatic primary productivity and show an efficient acclimation ability to changing light intensities. Here, we investigated the acclimation of Phaeodactylum tricornutum to different light quality with respect to growth rate, photosynthesis rate, macromolecular composition and the metabolic profile by shifting the light quality from red light (RL) to blue light (BL) and vice versa. Our results show that cultures pre-acclimated to BL and RL exhibited similar growth performance, photosynthesis rates and metabolite profiles. However, light shift experiments revealed rapid and severe changes in the metabolite profile within 15 min as the initial reaction of light acclimation. Thus, during the shift from RL to BL, increased concentrations of amino acids and TCA cycle intermediates were observed whereas during the BL to RL shift the levels of amino acids were decreased and intermediates of glycolysis accumulated. Accordingly, on the time scale of hours the RL to BL shift led to a redirection of carbon into the synthesis of proteins, whereas during the BL to RL shift an accumulation of carbohydrates occurred. Thus, a vast metabolic reorganization of the cells was observed as the initial reaction to changes in light quality. The results are discussed with respect to a putative direct regulation of cellular enzymes by light quality and by transcriptional regulation. Interestingly, the short-term changes in the metabolome were accompanied by changes in the degree of reduction of the plastoquinone pool. Surprisingly, the RL to BL shift led to a severe inhibition of growth within the first 48 h which was not observed during the BL to RL shift. Furthermore, during the phase of growth arrest the photosynthetic performance did not change. We propose arguments that the growth arrest could have been caused by the reorganization of intracellular carbon partitioning. PMID:25111046

  3. High-to-low CO2 acclimation reveals plasticity of the photorespiratory pathway and indicates regulatory links to cellular metabolism of Arabidopsis.

    Stefan Timm

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Photorespiratory carbon metabolism was long considered as an essentially closed and nonregulated pathway with little interaction to other metabolic routes except nitrogen metabolism and respiration. Most mutants of this pathway cannot survive in ambient air and require CO(2-enriched air for normal growth. Several studies indicate that this CO(2 requirement is very different for individual mutants, suggesting a higher plasticity and more interaction of photorespiratory metabolism as generally thought. To understand this better, we examined a variety of high- and low-level parameters at 1% CO(2 and their alteration during acclimation of wild-type plants and selected photorespiratory mutants to ambient air. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The wild type and four photorespiratory mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis were grown to a defined stadium at 1% CO(2 and then transferred to normal air (0.038% CO(2. All other conditions remained unchanged. This approach allowed unbiased side-by-side monitoring of acclimation processes on several levels. For all lines, diel (24 h leaf growth, photosynthetic gas exchange, and PSII fluorescence were monitored. Metabolite profiling was performed for the wild type and two mutants. During acclimation, considerable variation between the individual genotypes was detected in many of the examined parameters, which correlated with the position of the impaired reaction in the photorespiratory pathway. CONCLUSIONS: Photorespiratory carbon metabolism does not operate as a fully closed pathway. Acclimation from high to low CO(2 was typically steady and consistent for a number of features over several days, but we also found unexpected short-term events, such as an intermittent very massive rise of glycine levels after transition of one particular mutant to ambient air. We conclude that photorespiration is possibly exposed to redox regulation beyond known substrate-level effects. Additionally, our data

  4. Na+/K+-ATPase α1 mRNA expression in the gill and rectal gland of the Atlantic stingray, Dasyatis sabina, following acclimation to increased salinity

    Evans, Andrew N.; Lambert, Faith N

    2015-01-01

    Background The salt-secreting rectal gland plays a major role in elasmobranch osmoregulation, facilitating ion balance in hyperosmotic environments in a manner analogous to the teleost gill. Several studies have examined the central role of the sodium pump Na+/K+-ATPase in osmoregulatory tissues of euryhaline elasmobranch species, including regulation of Na+/K+-ATPase activity and abundance in response to salinity acclimation. However, while the transcriptional regulation of Na+/K+-ATPase in ...

  5. Inverse metabolic engineering based on transient acclimation of yeast improves acid-containing xylose fermentation and tolerance to formic and acetic acids.

    Hasunuma, Tomohisa; Sakamoto, Takatoshi; Kondo, Akihiko

    2016-01-01

    Improving the production of ethanol from xylose is an important goal in metabolic engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Furthermore, S. cerevisiae must produce ethanol in the presence of weak acids (formate and acetate) generated during pre-treatment of lignocellulosic biomass. In this study, weak acid-containing xylose fermentation was significantly improved using cells that were acclimated to the weak acids during pre-cultivation. Transcriptome analyses showed that levels of transcripts for transcriptional/translational machinery-related genes (RTC3 and ANB1) were enhanced by formate and acetate acclimation. Recombinant yeast strains overexpressing RTC3 and ANB1 demonstrated improved ethanol production from xylose in the presence of the weak acids, along with improved tolerance to the acids. Novel metabolic engineering strategy based on the combination of short-term acclimation and system-wide analysis was developed, which can develop stress-tolerant strains in a short period of time, although conventional evolutionary engineering approach has required long periods of time to isolate inhibitor-adapted strains. PMID:26521247

  6. Biochemical acclimation, stomatal limitation and precipitation patterns underlie decreases in photosynthetic stimulation of soybean (Glycine max) at elevated [CO₂] and temperatures under fully open air field conditions.

    Rosenthal, David M; Ruiz-Vera, Ursula M; Siebers, Matthew H; Gray, Sharon B; Bernacchi, Carl J; Ort, Donald R

    2014-09-01

    The net effect of elevated [CO2] and temperature on photosynthetic acclimation and plant productivity is poorly resolved. We assessed the effects of canopy warming and fully open air [CO2] enrichment on (1) the acclimation of two biochemical parameters that frequently limit photosynthesis (A), the maximum carboxylation capacity of Rubisco (Vc,max) and the maximum potential linear electron flux through photosystem II (Jmax), (2) the associated responses of leaf structural and chemical properties related to A, as well as (3) the stomatal limitation (l) imposed on A, for soybean over two growing seasons in a conventionally managed agricultural field in Illinois, USA. Acclimation to elevated [CO2] was consistent over two growing seasons with respect to Vc,max and Jmax. However, elevated temperature significantly decreased Jmax contributing to lower photosynthetic stimulation by elevated CO2. Large seasonal differences in precipitation altered soil moisture availability modulating the complex effects of elevated temperature and CO2 on biochemical and structural properties related to A. Elevated temperature also reduced the benefit of elevated [CO2] by eliminating decreases in stomatal limitation at elevated [CO2]. These results highlight the critical importance of considering multiple environmental factors (i.e. temperature, moisture, [CO2]) when trying to predict plant productivity in the context of climate change. PMID:25113459

  7. A better energy allocation of absorbed light in photosystem II and less photooxidative damage contribute to acclimation of Arabidopsis thaliana young leaves to water deficit.

    Sperdouli, Ilektra; Moustakas, Michael

    2014-05-01

    Water deficit stress promotes excitation pressure and photooxidative damage due to an imbalance between light capture and energy use. Young leaves (YL) of Arabidopsis thaliana plants acclimate better to the onset of water deficit (OnsWD) than do mature leaves (ML). To obtain a better understanding of this differential response, we evaluated whether YL and ML of A. thaliana exposed to the OnsWD, mild water deficit (MiWD) and moderate water deficit (MoWD), show differences in their photosynthetic performance, and whether photosynthetic acclimation correlates with leaf developmental stage. Water deficit (WD) resulted in greater photooxidative damage in ML compared to YL, but the latter could not be protected under the OnsWD or MiWD, but only under MoWD. YL of A. thaliana with signs of photosynthetic acclimation under MoWD retained higher maximum quantum yield (Fv/Fm) and decreased reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation. YL under MoWD, show a reduced excitation pressure and a better balance between light capture and photochemical energy use, which contributed to their photoprotection, but only under low light intensity (LL, 130μmolphotonsm(-2)s(-1)) and not under high light (HL, 1200μmolphotonsm(-2)s(-1)). In conclusion, leaf developmental stage was correlated with photo-oxidative damage and a differential allocation of absorbed light energy in photosystem II (PSII) of Arabidopsis leaves under WD. PMID:24709149

  8. Dataset of protein changes induced by cold acclimation in red clover (Trifolium pratense L.) populations recurrently selected for improved freezing tolerance.

    Bipfubusa, Marie; Rocher, Solen; Bertrand, Annick; Castonguay, Yves; Renaut, Jenny

    2016-09-01

    The data provide an overview of proteomic changes in red clover (Trifolium pratense L.) in response to cold acclimation and recurrent selection for superior freezing tolerance. Proteins were extracted from crowns of two red clover cultivars grown under non-acclimated or cold-acclimated conditions, and plants obtained from the initial genetic background (TF0) and from populations obtained after three (TF3) and four cycles (TF4) of recurrent selection for superior freezing tolerance. Proteins were analyzed using a two-dimensional fluorescence difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) coupled to mass spectroscopy (MS and MS/MS). Differentially regulated proteins were subsequently identified using MALDI TOF/TOF analysis. The data are related to a recently published research article describing proteome composition changes associated with freezing tolerance in red clover, "A proteome analysis of freezing tolerance in red clover (Trifolium pratense L.)" (Bertrand et al., 2016 [1]). They are available in the ProteomeXchange Consortium database via the PRIDE partner repository under the dataset identifier PRIDE: PXD003689. PMID:27408927

  9. The effects of gender, acclimation state, the opportunity to adjust clothing and physical disability on requirements for thermal comfort

    Parsons, K.C. [Human Thermal Environments Laboratory, Department of Human Sciences, Loughborough University, Loughborough (United Kingdom)

    2002-07-01

    A programme of laboratory studies into thermal comfort requirements is presented. Two studies used groups of 16 subjects over a range of conditions (warm to cool) to investigate the effects of gender over 3 hours exposures in simulated living room/office environments. It was found that for identical levels of clothing and activity, there were only small differences in the thermal comfort responses of male and female subjects for neutral and slightly warm conditions. For cool conditions, female subjects tended to be cooler than males. An experiment to investigate the effects of heat acclimation on thermal comfort requirements involved six male subjects providing thermal comfort responses in neutral and slightly warm environments over 2 days. They then carried out an acclimatization program over 4 days, for 2 hours per day, exercising in a hot (45 {sup o}C, 40% relative humidity) environment. Thermal comfort responses were then recorded in two sessions over 2 days in identical conditions to the pre-acclimation session. It was found that changes in thermal comfort responses were small and likely to be of little practical significance. An investigation into the behaviour of people to maintain thermal comfort by adjusting their clothing was conducted using eight male and eight female subjects. Seated subjects reduced or increased their clothing level by using a wardrobe of clothing that was familiar to them. It was found that subjects can adjust their clothing to maintain thermal comfort, but within limits. Upper limits (clothing off) will be determined by modesty and acceptability. Lower limits (clothing on) will be determined by clothing design and acceptability. A low air temperature limit of 18 {sup o}C in freely available clothing may provide a working hypothesis. A laboratory study of thermal comfort requirements for people with physical disabilities compared responses with those of people without physical disabilities. It was found that there are few group

  10. ESKIMO1 is a key gene involved in water economy as well as cold acclimation and salt tolerance

    Yu Agnes

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Drought is a major social and economic problem resulting in huge yield reduction in the field. Today's challenge is to develop plants with reduced water requirements and stable yields in fluctuating environmental conditions. Arabidopsis thaliana is an excellent model for identifying potential targets for plant breeding. Drought tolerance in the field was successfully conferred to crops by transferring genes from this model species. While involved in a plant genomics programme, which aims to identify new genes responsible for plant response to abiotic stress, we identified ESKIMO1 as a key gene involved in plant water economy as well as cold acclimation and salt tolerance. Results All esk1 mutants were more tolerant to freezing, after acclimation, than their wild type counterpart. esk1 mutants also showed increased tolerance to mild water deficit for all traits measured. The mutant's improved tolerance to reduced water supply may be explained by its lower transpiration rate and better water use efficiency (WUE, which was assessed by carbon isotope discrimination and gas exchange measurements. esk1 alleles were also shown to be more tolerant to salt stress. Transcriptomic analysis of one mutant line and its wild-type background was carried out. Under control watering conditions a number of genes were differentially expressed between the mutant and the wild type whereas under mild drought stress this list of genes was reduced. Among the genes that were differentially expressed between the wild type and mutant, two functional categories related to the response to stress or biotic and abiotic stimulus were over-represented. Under salt stress conditions, all gene functional categories were represented equally in both the mutant and wild type. Based on this transcriptome analysis we hypothesise that in control conditions the esk1 mutant behaves as if it was exposed to drought stress. Conclusion Overall our findings suggest that the

  11. The phospholipid-deficient pho1 mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana is affected in the organization, but not in the light acclimation, of the thylakoid membrane.

    Härtel, H; Essigmann, B; Lokstein, H; Hoffmann-Benning, S; Peters-Kottig, M; Benning, C

    1998-12-01

    The pho1 mutant of Arabidopsis has been shown to respond to the phosphate deficiency in the leaves by decreasing the amount of phosphatidylglycerol (PG). PG is thought to be of crucial importance for the organization and function of the thylakoid membrane. This prompted us to ask what the consequences of the PG deficiency may be in the pho1 mutant when grown under low or high light. While in the wild-type, the lipid pattern was almost insensitive to changes in the growth light, PG was reduced to 45% under low light in the mutant, and it decreased further to 35% under high light. Concomitantly, sulfoquinovosyl diacylglycerol (SQDG) and to a lesser extent digalactosyl diacylglycerol (DGDG) increased. The SQDG increase correlated with increased amounts of the SQD1 protein, an indicator for an actively mediated process. Despite of alterations in the ultrastructure, mutant thylakoids showed virtually no effects on photosynthetic electron transfer, O2 evolution and excitation energy allocation to the reaction centers. Our results support the idea that PG deficiency can at least partially be compensated for by the anionic lipid SQDG and the not charged lipid DGDG. This seems to be an important strategy to maintain an optimal thylakoid lipid milieu for vital processes, such as photosynthesis, under a restricted phosphate availability. PMID:9858733

  12. Effects of acclimation temperature and cadmium exposure on cellular energy budgets in the marine mollusk Crassostrea virginica: linking cellular and mitochondrial responses.

    Cherkasov, Anton S; Biswas, Pradip K; Ridings, Daisy M; Ringwood, Amy H; Sokolova, Inna M

    2006-04-01

    In order to understand the role of metabolic regulation in environmental stress tolerance, a comprehensive analysis of demand-side effects (i.e. changes in energy demands for basal maintenance) and supply-side effects (i.e. metabolic capacity to provide ATP to cover the energy demand) of environmental stressors is required. We have studied the effects of temperature (12, 20 and 28 degrees C) and exposure to a trace metal, cadmium (50 microg l(-1)), on the cellular energy budget of a model marine poikilotherm, Crassostrea virginica (eastern oysters), using oxygen demand for ATP turnover, protein synthesis, mitochondrial proton leak and non-mitochondrial respiration in isolated gill and hepatopancreas cells as demand-side endpoints and mitochondrial oxidation capacity, abundance and fractional volume as supply-side endpoints. Cadmium exposure and high acclimation temperatures resulted in a strong increase of oxygen demand in gill and hepatopancreas cells of oysters. Cd-induced increases in cellular energy demand were significant at 12 and 20 degrees C but not at 28 degrees C, possibly indicating a metabolic capacity limitation at the highest temperature. Elevated cellular demand in cells from Cd-exposed oysters was associated with a 2-6-fold increase in protein synthesis and, at cold acclimation temperatures, with a 1.5-fold elevated mitochondrial proton leak. Cellular aerobic capacity, as indicated by mitochondrial oxidation capacity, abundance and volume, did not increase in parallel to compensate for the elevated energy demand. Mitochondrial oxidation capacity was reduced in 28 degrees C-acclimated oysters, and mitochondrial abundance decreased in Cd-exposed oysters, with a stronger decrease (by 20-24%) in warm-acclimated oysters compared with cold-acclimated ones (by 8-13%). These data provide a mechanistic basis for synergism between temperature and cadmium stress on metabolism of marine poikilotherms. Exposure to combined temperature and cadmium stress may

  13. Expression of key ion transporters in the gill and esophageal-gastrointestinal tract of euryhaline Mozambique tilapia Oreochromis mossambicus acclimated to fresh water, seawater and hypersaline water.

    Zhengjun Li

    Full Text Available The ability of euryhaline Mozambique tilapia to tolerate extreme environmental salinities makes it an excellent model for investigating iono-regulation. This study aimed to characterize and fill important information gap of the expression levels of key ion transporters for Na(+ and Cl(- in the gill and esophageal-gastrointestinal tract of Mozambique tilapia acclimated to freshwater (0 ppt, seawater (30 ppt and hypersaline (70 ppt environments. Among the seven genes studied, it was found that nkcc2, nkcc1a, cftr, nka-α1 and nka-α3, were more responsive to salinity challenge than nkcc1b and ncc within the investigated tissues. The ncc expression was restricted to gills of freshwater-acclimated fish while nkcc2 expression was restricted to intestinal segments irrespective of salinity challenge. Among the tissues investigated, gill and posterior intestine were found to be highly responsive to salinity changes, followed by anterior and middle intestine. Both esophagus and stomach displayed significant up-regulation of nka-α1 and nka-α3, but not nkcc isoforms and cftr, in hypersaline-acclimated fish suggesting a response to hypersalinity challenge and involvement of other forms of transporters in iono-regulation. Changes in gene expression levels were partly corroborated by immunohistochemical localization of transport proteins. Apical expression of Ncc was found in Nka-immunoreactive cells in freshwater-acclimated gills while Nkcc co-localized with Nka-immunoreactive cells expressing Cftr apically in seawater- and hypersaline-acclimated gills. In the intestine, Nkcc-stained apical brush border was found in Nka-immunoreactive cells at greater levels under hypersaline conditions. These findings provided new insights into the responsiveness of these genes and tissues under hypersalinity challenge, specifically the posterior intestine being vital for salt absorption and iono-osmoregulation in the Mozambique tilapia; its ability to survive in

  14. Tomato plants acclimate better to elevated temperature and high light than to treatment with each factor separately.

    Gerganova, Milena; Popova, Antoaneta V; Stanoeva, Daniela; Velitchkova, Maya

    2016-07-01

    The influence of two factors - high temperature and high light intensity, acting separately or simultaneously on the pigment composition, fluorescent characteristics, membrane integrity and synthesis of protective substances was investigated in tomato plants (Solanum lycopersicum cv. M 82). Moderate elevated temperatures (38/29 °C) were applied under optimum or high light intensity for 2 and 6 days and after that the plants are allowed to recover for 5 days at optimum conditions. Parameters of chlorophyll fluorescence were used to evaluate the alterations of photosystem I and photosystem II activity and malondialdehyde content was determined as a measure of stress-induced peroxidation of membrane lipids. The response of treated plants to high light and elevated temperature was estimated by analyzing the accumulation of anthocyanins. Both stress factors exhibit different impact on studied parameters - high light intensity influences considerably quantum yield of photosystem II and photochemical quenching that is compensated to some extent when applied at elevated temperature. High temperature reduces strongly non-photochemical quenching. Data obtained show that after two days under particular conditions, the plants tend to acclimate, but this is achieved after longer treatment - 6 days. During the recovery period the activity of photosystem I and the quantum yield of photosystem II recover almost completely, while the values of non-photochemical quenching although slightly higher, did not reach the levels at the beginning of treatment. PMID:27038602

  15. Putrescine is involved in Arabidopsis freezing tolerance and cold acclimation by regulating abscisic acid levels in response to low temperature.

    Cuevas, Juan C; López-Cobollo, Rosa; Alcázar, Rubén; Zarza, Xavier; Koncz, Csaba; Altabella, Teresa; Salinas, Julio; Tiburcio, Antonio F; Ferrando, Alejandro

    2008-10-01

    The levels of endogenous polyamines have been shown to increase in plant cells challenged with low temperature; however, the functions of polyamines in the regulation of cold stress responses are unknown. Here, we show that the accumulation of putrescine under cold stress is essential for proper cold acclimation and survival at freezing temperatures because Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) mutants defective in putrescine biosynthesis (adc1, adc2) display reduced freezing tolerance compared to wild-type plants. Genes ADC1 and ADC2 show different transcriptional profiles upon cold treatment; however, they show similar and redundant contributions to cold responses in terms of putrescine accumulation kinetics and freezing sensitivity. Our data also demonstrate that detrimental consequences of putrescine depletion during cold stress are due, at least in part, to alterations in the levels of abscisic acid (ABA). Reduced expression of NCED3, a key gene involved in ABA biosynthesis, and down-regulation of ABA-regulated genes are detected in both adc1 and adc2 mutant plants under cold stress. Complementation analysis of adc mutants with ABA and reciprocal complementation tests of the aba2-3 mutant with putrescine support the conclusion that putrescine controls the levels of ABA in response to low temperature by modulating ABA biosynthesis and gene expression. PMID:18701673

  16. Comparison of SAFER behavior assessment results in shelter dogs at intake and after a 3-day acclimation period.

    Bennett, Sara L; Weng, Hsin-Yi; Walker, Sheryl L; Placer, Margaret; Litster, Annette

    2015-01-01

    In this study, it was hypothesized that different results would be obtained by canine behavior assessments performed within 24 hr of shelter intake (Day 0) and after a 3-day acclimation period (Day 3). Safety Assessment for Evaluating Rehoming assessments were performed on 33 dogs at 2 municipal shelters. Agreements between Day 0 and Day 3 varied among subtests, and no consistent temporal patterns were observed. Weighted kappa statistics for each subtest ranged from .28 to .78, and percentage discordance was 0% to 18%. In a 2nd analysis, subtests skipped due to serious aggression were replaced with scores corresponding to serious aggression, and missing values for the Food subtest were replaced with scores for no aggression if the dog did not eat. For subtests skipped due to severe aggression, more than 50% of the dogs had scores indicating low aggression on the other assessment. Eight of 16 dogs who did not eat on Day 0 ate on Day 3; 2 showed aggression. Until the ideal time to test can be identified, it should be based on the individual dog's welfare status, and testing of dogs showing severe stress should be avoided. PMID:25603466

  17. Developmental plasticity and acclimation both contribute to adaptive responses to alternating seasons of plenty and of stress in Bicyclus butterflies

    Paul M Brakefield; Jeroen Pijpe; Bas J Zwaan

    2007-04-01

    Plasticity is a crucial component of the life cycle of invertebrates that live as active adults throughout wet and dry seasons in the tropics. Such plasticity is seen in the numerous species of Bicyclus butterflies in Africa which exhibit seasonal polyphenism with sequential generations of adults with one or other of two alternative phenotypes. These differ not only in wing pattern but in many other traits. This divergence across a broad complex of traits is associated with survival and reproduction either in a wet season that is favourable in terms of resources, or mainly in a dry season that is more stressful. This phenomenon has led us to examine the bases of the developmental plasticity in a model species, B. anynana, and also the evolution of key adult life history traits, including starvation resistance and longevity. We now understand something about the processes that generate variation in the phenotype, and also about the ecological context of responses to environmental stress. The responses clearly involve a mix of developmental plasticity as cued by different environments in pre-adult development, and the acclimation of life history traits in adults to their prevailing environment.

  18. Investigating hsp Gene Expression in Liver of Channa striatus under Heat Stress for Understanding the Upper Thermal Acclimation

    Gopal Krishna Purohit

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Changes in hsp gene expression profiles in murrel Channa striatus experimentally exposed to temperature stress (36°C for 4, 15, and 30 days were investigated; fish collected from aquaculture ponds and maintained in laboratory at the pond temperature (25 ± 1°C served as control. Channa collected from a hot spring runoff (36°C was included in the study to examine the hsp profiles beyond 30 days of exposure. Gene expression analyses of a battery of hsps in liver tissues were carried out by quantitative RT-PCR and protein expressions were analyzed by immunoblotting. hsps could be grouped into three clusters based on similarity in response to heat stress: hsp70, hsp78, and hsp60, whose transcript level continued to increase with duration of exposure; hsp90 and hsp110 that increased to a much higher level and then decreased; hsp27 and hsp47 that did not significantly vary as compared to control. The results suggest that Hsp70, Hsp78, and Hsp60 are involved in thermal acclimation and long term survival at high temperature. Fish living in the hot spring runoff appears to continuously express hsps that can be approximated by long term induction of hsps in farmed fish if temperature of their environment is raised to 36°C.

  19. Acute heat stress and thermal acclimation induce CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein delta in the goby Gillichthys mirabilis.

    Buckley, Bradley A

    2011-08-01

    Members of the CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein (C/EBP) family of transcription factors have regulatory control over numerous processes related to cell fate determination, including differentiation, proliferation, cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. In mammals, abnormalities in the expression of some isoforms of C/EBPs are pathogenic and are implicated as being involved in myeloid leukemia and breast cancers. Next to nothing is known about their regulation, function or stress-responsiveness in poikilotherms. Here, both acute heat stress and thermal acclimation were demonstrated to induce the expression of one isoform, C/EBP-δ, in the liver, white muscle and gill of the eurythermal estuarine goby, Gillichthys mirabilis. The established role of C/EBP-δ in causing cell cycle arrest and/or promoting apoptosis in other vertebrates suggests that the heat-inducibility of this protein in poikilotherms may be part of the conserved cellular stress response with the hypothesized role of causing temporary cessation of cell growth and/or programmed cell death during bouts of environmental stress. The observed regulation of c/ebp-δ during hyperthermia represents a novel, heat-inducible signaling pathway in fishes. PMID:21442321

  20. Response to cold acclimation in diapause pupae of Hyles euphorbiae (Lepidoptera: Sphingidae): candidate biomarker identification using proteomics.

    Stuckas, H; Mende, M B; Hundsdoerfer, A K

    2014-08-01

    The distribution range of Hyles euphorbiae covers distinct climates across the Palaearctic. Previous investigations showed a correlation between mitochondrial DNA identity of populations and climatic conditions related to winter; however, the lack of biomarkers hampers investigations to test whether geographically distinct populations do show specific molecular responses to low temperatures or whether they possess specific genetic identity at loci functionally related to cold response. The present study was designed to identify candidate protein biomarkers and biological processes that are associated with cold acclimation of overwintering H. euphorbiae diapause pupae. Specimens taken from a single central European population were gradually cooled from 20 °C to -2 °C over 36 days and 12 differentially abundant proteins were identified. In addition, DeepSuperSAGE sequencing technology was applied to study differentially regulated genes. There was incongruence between differentially abundant proteins and differentially expressed genes, but functional characteristics of regulated proteins and analyses of gene ontology term enrichment among differentially regulated genes pointed to activation of the same biological processes, e.g. oxidative stress response. As proteins represent biologically active molecules, candidate biomarkers derived from proteomics are considered well suited to explore intraspecific patterns of local adaptation to different climates. PMID:24628883

  1. Comparative ventilatory strategies of acclimated rats and burrowing plateau pika (Ochotona curzoniae) in response to hypoxic-hypercapnia.

    Pichon, Aurélien; Voituron, Nicolas; Bai, Zhenzhong; Jeton, Florine; Tana, Wuren; Marchant, Dominique; Jin, Guoen; Richalet, Jean-Paul; Ge, Ri-Li

    2015-09-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the different ventilatory strategies that help in coping with hypoxic-hypercapnia environment among two species: use acclimated rats and plateau pikas (Ochotona curzoniae) that live in Tibetan plateaus, and have been well adjusted to high altitude. Arterial blood samples taken at 4100 m of elevation in acclimatized rats and adapted pikas revealed inter-species differences with lower hemoglobin and hematocrit and higher blood pH in pikas. A linear and significant increase in minute ventilation was observed in pikas, which help them to cope with hypoxic-hypercapnia. Pikas also displayed a high inspiratory drive and an invariant respiratory timing regardless of the conditions. Biochemical analysis revealed that N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDA) receptor gene and nNOS gene are highly conserved between rats and pikas, however pikas have higher expression of NMDA receptors and nNOS compared to rats at the brainstem level. Taken together, these results suggest that pikas have developed a specific ventilatory pattern supported by a modification of the NMDA/NO ventilatory central pathways to survive in extreme conditions imposed on the Tibetan plateaus. These physiological adaptive strategies help in maintaining a better blood oxygenation despite high CO2 concentration in burrows at high altitude. PMID:25988712

  2. Cold-acclimation limits low temperature induced photoinhibition by promoting a higher photochemical quantum yield and a more effective PSII restoration in darkness in the Antarctic rather than the Andean ecotype of Colobanthus quitensis Kunt Bartl (Cariophyllaceae

    Bascuñán-Godoy Luisa

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ecotypes of Colobanthus quitensis Kunt Bartl (Cariophyllaceae from Andes Mountains and Maritime Antarctic grow under contrasting photoinhibitory conditions, reaching differential cold tolerance upon cold acclimation. Photoinhibition depends on the extent of photodamage and recovery capability. We propose that cold acclimation increases resistance to low-temperature-induced photoinhibition, limiting photodamage and promoting recovery under cold. Therefore, the Antarctic ecotype (cold hardiest should be less photoinhibited and have better recovery from low-temperature-induced photoinhibition than the Andean ecotype. Both ecotypes were exposed to cold induced photoinhibitory treatment (PhT. Photoinhibition and recovery of photosystem II (PSII was followed by fluorescence, CO2 exchange, and immunoblotting analyses. Results The same reduction (25% in maximum PSII efficiency (Fv/Fm was observed in both cold-acclimated (CA and non-acclimated (NA plants under PhT. A full recovery was observed in CA plants of both ecotypes under dark conditions, but CA Antarctic plants recover faster than the Andean ecotype. Under PhT, CA plants maintain their quantum yield of PSII, while NA plants reduced it strongly (50% and 73% for Andean and Antarctic plants respectively. Cold acclimation induced the maintenance of PsaA and Cyt b6/f and reduced a 41% the excitation pressure in Antarctic plants, exhibiting the lowest level under PhT. xCold acclimation decreased significantly NPQs in both ecotypes, and reduced chlorophylls and D1 degradation in Andean plants under PhT. NA and CA plants were able to fully restore their normal photosynthesis, while CA Antarctic plants reached 50% higher photosynthetic rates after recovery, which was associated to electron fluxes maintenance under photoinhibitory conditions. Conclusions Cold acclimation has a greater importance on the recovery process than on limiting photodamage. Cold acclimation determined the

  3. Biomarkers of waterborne copper exposure in the guppy Poecilia vivipara acclimated to salt water

    Machado, Anderson Abel de Souza [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande, Programa de Pós-Graduação em Oceanografia Biológica, Av. Itália km 8, 96201-900 Rio Grande, Rio Grande do Sul (Brazil); Hoff, Mariana Leivas Müller [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande, Instituto de Ciências Biológicas, Av. Itália km 8, 96201-900 Rio Grande, Rio Grande do Sul (Brazil); Klein, Roberta Daniele [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande, Programa de Pós-Graduação em Ciências Fisiológicas – Fisiologia Animal Comparada, Av. Itália km 8, 96201-900 Rio Grande, Rio Grande do Sul (Brazil); Cardozo, Janaina Goulart [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande, Instituto de Ciências Biológicas, Av. Itália km 8, 96201-900 Rio Grande, Rio Grande do Sul (Brazil); Giacomin, Marina Mussoi [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande, Programa de Pós-Graduação em Ciências Fisiológicas – Fisiologia Animal Comparada, Av. Itália km 8, 96201-900 Rio Grande, Rio Grande do Sul (Brazil); Pinho, Grasiela Lopes Leães [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande, Instituto de Oceanografia, Av. Itália km 8, 96201-900 Rio Grande, Rio Grande do Sul (Brazil); and others

    2013-08-15

    Highlights: •Acute effects of waterborne copper were evaluated in the estuarine guppy Poecilia vivipara. •Fishes were acutely exposed to waterborne copper in salt water. •Waterborne copper affects the response of several biochemical and genetic endpoints. •Catalase, reactive oxygen species, antioxidant capacity and lipid peroxidation are responsive to copper exposure. •Copper exposure induces DNA damages in fish erythrocytes. -- Abstract: The responses of a large suite of biochemical and genetic parameters were evaluated in tissues (liver, gills, muscle and erythrocytes) of the estuarine guppy Poecilia vivipara exposed to waterborne copper in salt water (salinity 24 ppt). Activities of antioxidant enzymes (superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione reductase, and glutathione S-transferase), metallothionein-like protein concentration, reactive oxygen species (ROS) content, antioxidant capacity against peroxyl radicals (ACAP), and lipid peroxidation (LPO) were evaluated in liver, gills, and muscle. Comet assay score and nuclear abnormalities and micronucleated cell frequency were analyzed in peripheral erythrocytes. The responses of these parameters were evaluated in fish exposed (96 h) to environmentally relevant copper concentrations (5, 9 and 20 μg L{sup −1}). In control and copper-exposed fish, no mortality was observed over the experimental period. Almost all biochemical and genetic parameters proved to be affected by waterborne copper exposure. However, the response of catalase activity in liver, ROS, ACAP and LPO in muscle, gills and liver, and DNA damages in erythrocytes clearly showed to be dependent on copper concentration in salt water. Therefore, the use of these parameters could be of relevance in the scope of biomonitoring programs in salt water environments contaminated with copper.

  4. Differential usage of storage carbohydrates in the CAM bromeliad Aechmea 'Maya' during acclimation to drought and recovery from dehydration.

    Ceusters, Johan; Borland, Anne M; Londers, Elsje; Verdoodt, Veerle; Godts, Christof; De Proft, Maurice P

    2009-02-01

    CAM requires a substantial investment of resources into storage carbohydrates to account for nocturnal CO(2) uptake, thereby restricting carbohydrate partitioning to other metabolic activities, including dark respiration, growth and acclimation to abiotic stress. Flexible modulation of carbon flow to the different competing sinks under changing environmental conditions is considered a key determinant for the growth, productivity and ecological success of the CAM pathway. The aim of the present study was to examine how shifts in carbohydrate partitioning could assure maintenance of photosynthetic integrity and a positive carbon balance under conditions of increasing water deprivation in CAM species. Measurements of gas exchange, leaf water relations, malate, starch and soluble sugar (glucose, fructose and sucrose) contents were made in leaves of the CAM bromeliad Aechmea 'Maya' over a 6-month period of drought and subsequently over a 2-month period of recovery from drought. Results indicated that short-term influences of water stress were minimized by elevating the level of respiratory recycling, and carbohydrate pools were maintained at the expense of export for growth while providing a comparable nocturnal carbon gain to that in well-watered control plants. Longer term drought resulted in a disproportionate depletion of key carbohydrate reserves. Sucrose, which was of minor importance for providing substrate for the dark reactions under well-watered conditions, became the major source of carbohydrate for nocturnal carboxylation as drought progressed. Flexibility in terms of the major carbohydrate source used to sustain dark CO(2) uptake is therefore considered a crucial factor in meeting the carbon and energy demands under limiting environmental conditions. Recovery from CAM-idling was found to be dependent on the restoration of the starch pool, which was used predominantly for provision of substrate for nocturnal carboxylation, while net carbon export was limited

  5. Physiological characterization of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii acclimated to chronic stress induced by Ag, Cd, Cr, Cu and Hg ions.

    Nowicka, Beatrycze; Pluciński, Bartosz; Kuczyńska, Paulina; Kruk, Jerzy

    2016-08-01

    Acclimation to heavy metal-induced stress is a complex phenomenon. Among the mechanisms of heavy metal toxicity, an important one is the ability to induce oxidative stress, so that the antioxidant response is crucial for providing tolerance to heavy metal ions. The effect of chronic stress induced by ions of five heavy metals, Ag, Cu, Cr (redox-active metals) Cd, Hg (nonredox-active metals) on the green microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii was examined at two levels - the biochemical (content of photosynthetic pigments and prenyllipid antioxidants, lipid peroxidation) and the physiological (growth rate, photosynthesis and respiration rates, induction of nonphotochemical quenching of chlorophyll fluorescence). The expression of the genes which encode the enzymes participating in the detoxification of reactive oxygen species (APX1, CAT1, FSD1, MSD1) was measured. The other gene measured was one required for plastoquinone and α-tocopherol biosynthesis (VTE3). The application of heavy metal ions partly inhibited growth and biosynthesis of chlorophyll. The growth inhibition was accompanied by enhanced lipid peroxidation. An increase in the content of prenyllipid antioxidants was observed in cultures exposed to Cr2O7(2-), Cd(2+) (α- and γ-tocopherol and plastoquinone) and Cu(2+) (only tocopherols). The induction of nonphotochemical quenching was enhanced in cultures exposed to Cu(2+), Cr2O7(2-) and Cd(2+), as compared to the control. Chronic heavy metal-induced stress led to changes in gene expression dependent on the type and concentration of heavy metal ions. The up-regulation of antioxidant enzymes was usually accompanied by the up-regulation of the VTE3 gene. PMID:27104807

  6. Development of intestinal ion-transporting mechanisms during smoltification and seawater acclimation in Atlantic salmon Salmo salar

    Sundh, Henrik; Nilsen, Tom O.; Lindström, Jenny; Hasselberg-Frank, Linda; Stefansson, Sigurd O.; McCormick, Stephen D.; Sundell, K.

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the expression of ion transporters involved in intestinal fluid absorption and presents evidence for developmental changes in abundance and tissue distribution of these transporters during smoltification and seawater (SW) acclimation of Atlantic salmonSalmo salar. Emphasis was placed on Na+, K+-ATPase (NKA) and Na+, K+, Cl− co-transporter (NKCC) isoforms, at both transcriptional and protein levels, together with transcription of chloride channel genes. The nka α1c was the dominant isoform at the transcript level in both proximal and distal intestines; also, it was the most abundant isoform expressed in the basolateral membrane of enterocytes in the proximal intestine. This isoform was also abundantly expressed in the distal intestine in the lower part of the mucosal folds. The protein expression of intestinal Nkaα1c increased during smoltification. Immunostaining was localized to the basal membrane of the enterocytes in freshwater (FW) fish, and re-distributed to a lateral position after SW entry. Two other Nka isoforms, α1a and α1b, were expressed in the intestine but were not regulated to the same extent during smoltification and subsequent SW transfer. Their localization in the intestinal wall indicates a house-keeping function in excitatory tissues. The absorptive form of the NKCC-like isoform (sub-apically located NKCC2 and/or Na+, Cl−co-transporter) increased during smoltification and further after SW transfer. The cellular distribution changed from a diffuse expression in the sub-apical regions during smoltification to clustering of the transporters closer to the apical membrane after entry to SW. Furthermore, transcript abundance indicates that the mechanisms necessary for exit of chloride ions across the basolateral membrane and into the lateral intercellular space are present in the form of one or more of three different chloride channels: cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator I and II and chloride channel

  7. Heat acclimation alters the sleep and behavior based thermoregulatory dynamics of rats in heat stress

    Sinha RK

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: It is well understood that the high environmental heat significantly affects the brain physiology of mammals, particularly the sleep and behavior of the subjects. The objective of the present work is to quantify the effects of acclimatization to the high environmental heat on sleep and behavioral activities in heat stress conditions. Methods: The polygraphic data involved simultaneous recordings of cortical electroencephalogram (EEG, electrooculogram (EOG, and electromyogram (EMG were recorded both on chart as well as in digital format to study the sleep-wake parameters in three different age groups of freely moving rats following exposure to high environmental heat. Each age group was subdivided into four groups: the acute heat stress group, subjected to a single exposure of 4h at 38°C in the biological oxygen demand (BOD incubator; the chronic heat stress group, exposed for 21 days, for 1 h each day, at 38°C in the BOD; acute heat stress followed by 21 days of chronic heat acclimatization and the handling control group. Open field and elevated plus-maze behavior was also analyzed following different exposure setup of high environmental heat. Results: The analyses of results suggest that acclimatization to the high environmental heat significantly alters the effects of acute exposure of high environmental heat on different sleep-wake as well as behavioral parameters. Conclusion: Acclimatization to environmental heat shifts the thermoregulatory set-point and thus these altered changes in sleep and behavior have been observed. Paste Full conclusion here

  8. Seasonal acclimation of the moss Polytrichum juniperinum Hedw. to natural and enhanced ultraviolet radiation

    Lappalainen, Niina M., E-mail: niina.lappalainen@oulu.f [University of Oulu, Department of Biology, P.O. Box 3000, FIN-90014 University of Oulu (Finland); Huttunen, Satu, E-mail: satu.huttunen@oulu.f [University of Oulu, Department of Biology, P.O. Box 3000, FIN-90014 University of Oulu (Finland); Suokanerva, Hanne, E-mail: hanne.suokanerva@fmi.f [Finnish Meteorological Institute, Arctic Research Centre, Taehtelaentie 62, FIN-99600 Sodankylae (Finland); Lakkala, Kaisa, E-mail: kaisa.lakkala@fmi.f [Finnish Meteorological Institute, Arctic Research Centre, Taehtelaentie 62, FIN-99600 Sodankylae (Finland)

    2010-03-15

    Short- and long-term changes in the methanol-extractable UV-absorbing compounds and biomass of the pioneer moss Polytrichum juniperinum in response to natural and enhanced UV radiation were studied. Under natural conditions, the compounds were found to fluctuate seasonally. In summer these compounds correlated negatively with irradiation. The concentration was low in July after a period of simultaneous heat, drought and high irradiation. Transient positive correlation between daily concentration and UV was seen in June. The concentration increased towards autumn and was relatively high under snow. Two enhanced UV experiments were performed. Seasonality in the compounds was again observed, with negative correlations with irradiation. During the first weeks, a transient inhibition of compound production was observed after the daily UV-B treatment. After six years of modulated UV-treatment in situ, photosynthesising biomass decreased under UV-B and increased under UV-A. A larger variation in the UV-absorbing compounds was observed under UV-B treatment. - Juniper polytrichum moss is affected by drought, overwintering conditions and UV.

  9. Experiencing affective interactive art

    Bialoskorski, Leticia S.S.; Westerink, Joyce H.D.M.; Broek, van den Egon L.

    2010-01-01

    The progress in the field of affective computing enables the realization of affective art. This paper describes the affective interactive art system Mood Swings, which interprets and visualizes affect expressed by a person. Mood Swings is founded on the integration of a framework for affective move

  10. Effects of salinity acclimation on the endocrine disruption and acute toxicity of bifenthrin in freshwater and euryhaline strains of Oncorhynchus mykiss.

    Riar, Navneet; Crago, Jordan; Jiang, Weiying; Maryoung, Lindley A; Gan, Jay; Schlenk, Daniel

    2013-12-01

    The pyrethroid insecticide bifenthrin is frequently detected at ng/L concentrations in tributaries of the San Francisco Bay Delta. The estuary is also experiencing increasing salinity through climate change and water redirection. To evaluate the impacts of hypersaline conditions on bifenthrin toxicity in anadromous salmonids of the San Francisco Bay Delta (CA, USA), a 14-d laboratory exposure was performed using 2 strains of Oncorhynchus mykiss (rainbow trout and steelhead) acclimated to freshwater and to 8 g/L and 17 g/L salinity. The fish were then exposed to nominal concentrations of 0 µg/L, 0.1 µg/L, and 1.5 µg/L bifenthrin. Rainbow trout exhibited significant mortality following exposure to 1.5 µg/L (1.07 ± 0.35 µg/L measured) bifenthrin in freshwater. Elevated levels of Na⁺ /K⁺ adenosine triphosphatase α1A mRNA subunit expression was observed in the gill of rainbow trout acclimated to hypersaline conditions relative to freshwater animals. No significant difference was noted in Na⁺ /K⁺ adenosine triphosphatase subunit levels in brains of either strain in freshwater or hypersaline conditions. Likewise, significant differences were not observed in plasma vitellogenin or steroid hormone concentrations in either strain whether maintained in freshwater or saltwater. Saltwater acclimation significantly reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-catalyzed biotransformation of bifenthrin in liver microsomes of rainbow trout but not of steelhead. The present study showed that, relative to steelhead, rainbow trout have different responses to bifenthrin acute toxicity as well as different rates of hepatic bifenthrin biotransformation and regulation of Na⁺ /K⁺ adenosine triphosphatase subunits in gills. These data indicate that significant differences exist between the strains and that animal life history may have important effects on the susceptibility of each strain to environmental contaminants. PMID:23983063

  11. Respiratory plasticity is insufficient to alleviate blood acid-base disturbances after acclimation to ocean acidification in the estuarine red drum, Sciaenops ocellatus.

    Esbaugh, Andrew J; Ern, Rasmus; Nordi, Wiolene M; Johnson, Abbey S

    2016-01-01

    The changes in ocean chemistry stemming from anthropogenic CO2 release--termed ocean acidification (OA)--are predicted to have wide-ranging effects on fish and ultimately threaten global populations. The ability of fish to adapt to environmental change is currently unknown, but phenotypic plasticity has been highlighted as a crucial factor in determining species resilience. Here we show that red drum, a long-lived estuarine-dependent fish species native to the Gulf of Mexico, exhibit respiratory plasticity that increases CO2 excretion capacity when acclimated to OA conditions. Specifically, fish exposed to 14 days of 1000 µatm CO2 had a 32% reduction in branchial diffusion distance and increased expression of two putative CO2 channel proteins--rhag and rhcg1. No changes were observed in the erythrocyte CO2 transport pathways. Surprisingly, no significant changes in blood chemistry were observed between acclimated and acutely challenged animals; however, a non-significant 30 % drop in the magnitude of plasma C(CO2) elevation was observed. Reduced diffusion distance also comes with the cost of increased diffusive water loss, which would require greater osmoregulatory investment by the animal. OA exposure induced increased gill Na(+), K(+) ATPase activity and intestinal nkcc2 expression, supporting both the presumed osmotic stress and increased osmoregulatory investment. However, no differences in standard metabolic rate, maximum metabolic rate or aerobic scope were detected between control and OA acclimated individuals. Similarly, no differences in critical swim speed were detected between groups, suggesting the energetic cost related to respiratory plasticity is negligible against background metabolism. The current study demonstrated that red drum exhibit respiratory plasticity with only mild physiological trade-offs; however, this plasticity is insufficient to fully offset the OA-induced acid-base disturbance and as such is unlikely to impact species resilience

  12. Natural Variation of Cold Deacclimation Correlates with Variation of Cold-Acclimation of the Plastid Antioxidant System in Arabidopsis thaliana Accessions.

    Juszczak, Ilona; Cvetkovic, Jelena; Zuther, Ellen; Hincha, Dirk K; Baier, Margarete

    2016-01-01

    Temperature variations impact on the balance between photosynthetic electron transport and electron-consuming assimilation reactions and transiently increase generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Previous studies demonstrated that the expression of C-repeat binding factors (CBFs), which activate cold acclimation reactions, respond to chloroplast ROS signals and that cold deacclimation is partly halted for days after the transfer of acclimated plants to optimal growth conditions in four Arabidopsis accessions from cold-continental habitats. We hypothesized that these accessions differ from others in the regulation of the plastid antioxidant system (PAS). In the present study, we compared the expression intensity of the 12 most prominent PAS genes for peroxidases, superoxide dismutase and low molecular weight antioxidant regenerating enzymes in 10 Arabidopsis accessions with regulation of CBF and COR (cold regulated genes) transcript levels and cold-regulated metabolite levels prior to cold, after 2 week long cold acclimation and during the first 3 days of deacclimation. In the accessions with prolonged activation of cold responses, by trend, weaker induction of various cold-inducible PAS genes and stronger decreases in the expression of negatively cold-regulated PAS genes were observed. Low PAS gene expression delayed the post-cold decrease in H2O2 levels after transfer of the plants from cold to optimal growth conditions. We conclude that weaker expression of various PAS genes in the cold is an adapted strategy of the Arabidopsis accessions N14, N13, Ms-0, and Kas-1 to avoid full inactivation of cold-responses in the first days after the end of the cold period. PMID:27014325

  13. Stomatal regulation, structural acclimation and metabolic shift towards defensive compounds reduce O3 load in birch under chronic O3 stress

    Oksanen, E.; Riikonen, J.; Kontunen-Soppela, S.; Maenpaa, M.; Rousi, M.

    2009-12-01

    Northern forests are encountering new threats due to continuously increasing load of oxidative stress, e.g. due to rising tropospheric O3 levels, and simultaneous climate warming, which is more intense in northern latitudes as compared to global means. The proportion of silver birch (Betula pendula) in Finnish forests is expected to increase with climate warming. Unfortunately, we have growing evidence that the vitality and the carbon sink strength of birch trees are weakened under chronic O3 stress. In this study we investigated the effects of slightly elevated O3 concentration (1.3 x the ambient), temperature (T) and their combination on the antioxidant defense, gas exchange and leaf growth of Betula pendula saplings (clone 12) growing in open-field conditions over two growing seasons. The plants were measured for SLA (specific leaf area), total leaf area, net photosynthesis (Pn), stomatal conductance (gs), maximum rate of carboxylation (Vc,max), maximum rate of electron transport (Jmax), relative stomatal limitation to photosynthesis (ls), dark respiration (Rd), apoplastic concentrations of AA (ascorbic acid), DHA (dehydroascobate) and total ascorbate, the redox state of apoplastic ascorbate, and total antioxidant capacity. Elevated O3 enhanced the total antioxidant capacity in the apoplast in the first year of the experiment at the ambient T. However, during the second year of the experiment, the saplings responded to elevated O3 level by closing the stomata and by developing leaves with a lower leaf area per mass, rather than by accumulating ascorbate in the apoplast. O3 did not affect the total leaf area, whereas Pn was slightly and gs significantly reduced in the second year. Elevated T enhanced the total leaf area, Pn and Vc,max, redox state of ascorbate and total antioxidant capacity in the apoplast. The effects of T and O3 on total leaf area and net photosynthesis were counteractive. We were not able to detect significant differences in Rd between the

  14. Preferred pH of silver catfish Rhamdia quelen acclimated to different pH levels pH preferencial em jundiás Rhamdia quelen aclimatados em diferentes níveis de pH

    Ana Paula Konzen Riffel; Sinara Jardim; Marcela Ciprandi Pires; Bruna Bertagnolli; Bruna Renata Silva Corrêa; Francine Cenzi de Ré; Francis Maria Bao Zambra; Greice Lubini; Luciano de Oliveira Garcia; Bernardo Baldisserotto

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the preferred pH in silver catfish Rhamdia quelen acclimated to different pH. Fish were acclimated for one week at pH 4.2±0.1, 5.2±0.1, 6.3±0.1, 7.2±0.1, 8.0±0.1, and 9.0±0.1 and after this period, transferred to a polyethylene tube with a pH gradient from 3.5 to 10.0. The position of the fish in the pH gradient was observed 1, 6 and 12 hours after transference. Results indicated that acclimation to different pH did not change pH preference of silver c...

  15. Preconditioning under high par of exposure to UV-A radiation both allow acclimation of the photosynthetic apparatus of barley transferred to UV-B radiation

    Štroch, Michal; Materová, Z.; Vrábl, D.; Šigut, Ladislav; Špunda, Vladimír

    Brno : Global change research centre, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, v. v. i, 2013 - (Stojanov, R.; Žalud, Z.; Cudlín, P.; Farda, A.; Urban, O.; Trnka, M.), s. 248-251 ISBN 978-80-904351-8-6. [Global Change and Resilience. Brno (CZ), 22.05.2013-24.05.2013] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0073; GA ČR GA522/09/0468 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : barley * clorophyll fluorescence * light acclimation * photosynthesis * photosynthetic pigments * UV screening * UV-A and UV-B-radiation Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour

  16. Heat acclimation attenuates physiological strain and the HSP72, but not HSP90 alpha, mRNA response to acute normobaric hypoxia

    Gibson, OR; Turner, G.; Tuttle, JA; Taylor, L.; Watt, PW; Maxwell, NS

    2015-01-01

    Heat acclimation (HA) attenuates physiological strain in hot conditions via phenotypic and cellular adaptation. The aim of this study was to determine whether HA reduced physiological strain, and heat shock protein (HSP) 72 and HSP90α mRNA responses in acute normobaric hypoxia. Sixteen male participants completed ten 90-min sessions of isothermic HA (40°C/40% relative humidity) or exercise training [control (CON); 20°C/40% relative humidity]. HA or CON were preceded (HYP1) and proceeded (HYP2...

  17. Pre-anthesis high temperature acclimation alleviates the negative effects of post-anthesis heat stress on stem stored carbohydrates remobilization and grain starch accumulation in wheat

    Wang, Xiao; Cai, Jian; Liu, Fulai;

    2012-01-01

    -anthesis only (HC), heat at post-anthesis only (CH), and heat stress at both stages (HH). Post-anthesis heat stress decreased grain starch content, reduced the content of fructans and depressed activities of related synthesis enzymes of sucrose:sucrose fructosyltransferase and fructan......The potential role of pre-anthesis high temperature acclimation in alleviating the negative effects of post-anthesis heat stress on stem stored carbohydrate remobilization and grain starch accumulation in wheat was investigated. The treatments included no heat-stress (CC), heat stress at pre......, led to less changed starch content and starch granule size distribution in grains of wheat under post-anthesis heat stress....

  18. Hemolymph ion regulation and kinetic characteristics of the gill (Na⁺, K⁺)-ATPase in the hermit crab Clibanarius vittatus (Decapoda, Anomura) acclimated to high salinity.

    Lucena, Malson N; Garçon, Daniela P; Mantelatto, Fernando L M; Pinto, Marcelo R; McNamara, John C; Leone, Francisco A

    2012-04-01

    We examine hemolymph ion regulation and the kinetic properties of a gill microsomal (Na(+), K(+))-ATPase from the intertidal hermit crab, Clibanarius vittatus, acclimated to 45‰ salinity for 10 days. Hemolymph osmolality is hypo-regulated (1102.5 ± 22.1 mOsm kg(-1) H(2)O) at 45‰ but elevated compared to fresh-caught crabs (801.0 ± 40.1 mOsm kg(-1) H(2)O). Hemolymph [Na(+)] (323.0 ± 2.5 mmol L(-1)) and [Mg(2+)] (34.6 ± 1.0 mmol L(-1)) are hypo-regulated while [Ca(2+)] (22.5 ± 0.7 mmol L(-1)) is hyper-regulated; [K(+)] is hyper-regulated in fresh-caught crabs (17.4 ± 0.5 mmol L(-1)) but hypo-regulated (6.2 ± 0.7 mmol L(-1)) at 45‰. Protein expression patterns are altered in the 45‰-acclimated crabs, although Western blot analyses reveal just a single immunoreactive band, suggesting a single (Na(+), K(+))-ATPase α-subunit isoform, distributed in different density membrane fractions. A high-affinity (Vm=46.5 ± 3.5 Umg(-1); K(0.5)=7.07 ± 0.01 μmol L(-1)) and a low-affinity ATP binding site (Vm=108.1 ± 2.5 U mg(-1); K(0.5)=0.11 ± 0.3 mmol L(-1)), both obeying cooperative kinetics, were disclosed. Modulation of (Na(+), K(+))-ATPase activity by Mg(2+), K(+) and NH(4)(+) also exhibits site-site interactions, but modulation by Na(+) shows Michaelis-Menten kinetics. (Na(+), K(+))-ATPase activity is synergistically stimulated up to 45% by NH(4)(+) plus K(+). Enzyme catalytic efficiency for variable [K(+)] and fixed [NH(4)(+)] is 10-fold greater than for variable [NH(4)(+)] and fixed [K(+)]. Ouabain inhibited ≈80% of total ATPase activity (K(I)=464.7 ± 23.2 μmol L(-1)), suggesting that ATPases other than (Na(+), K(+))-ATPase are present. While (Na(+), K(+))-ATPase activities are similar in fresh-caught (around 142 nmol Pi min(-1)mg(-1)) and 45‰-acclimated crabs (around 154 nmol Pi min(-1)mg(-1)), ATP affinity decreases 110-fold and Na(+) and K(+) affinities increase 2-3-fold in 45‰-acclimated crabs. PMID:22260788

  19. Monitoring and Evaluation of Yearling Fall Chinook Salmon Released from Acclimation Facilities Upstream of Lower Granite Dam; 1998 Annual Report.

    Rocklage, Stephen J. (Nez Perce Tribe, Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Lapwai, ID)

    2004-01-01

    The Nez Perce Tribe, in cooperation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, conducted monitoring and evaluation studies on Lyons Ferry Hatchery (Snake River stock) yearling fall chinook salmon that were acclimated and released at three Fall Chinook Acclimation Project sites upstream of Lower Granite Dam along with yearlings released on-station from Lyons Ferry Hatchery in 1998. The three fall chinook acclimation facilities are operated by the Nez Perce Tribe and located at Pittsburg Landing and Captain John Rapids on the Snake River and at Big Canyon Creek on the Clearwater River. Yearlings at the Big Canyon facility consisted of two size classes that are referred to in this report as 9.5 fish per pound (fpp) and 30 fpp. The Big Canyon 9.5 fpp were comparable to the yearlings at Pittsburg Landing, Captain John Rapids and Lyons Ferry Hatchery. A total of 9,942 yearlings were PIT tagged and released at Pittsburg Landing. PIT tagged yearlings had a mean fork length of 159.9 mm and mean condition factor of 1.19. Of the 9,942 PIT tagged fish released, a total of 6,836 unique tags were detected at mainstem Snake and Columbia River dams (Lower Granite, Little Goose, Lower Monumental and McNary). A total of 4,926 9.5 fpp and 2,532 30 fpp yearlings were PIT tagged and released at Big Canyon. PIT tagged 9.5 fpp yearlings had a mean fork length of 156.9 mm and mean condition factor of 1.13. PIT tagged 30 fpp yearlings had a mean fork length of 113.1 mm and mean condition factor of 1.18. Of the 4,926 PIT tagged 9.5 fpp yearlings released, a total of 3,042 unique tags were detected at mainstem Snake and Columbia River dams. Of the 2,532 PIT tagged 30 fpp yearlings released, a total of 1,130 unique tags were detected at mainstem Snake and Columbia River dams. A total of 1,253 yearlings were PIT tagged and released at Captain John Rapids. PIT tagged yearlings had a mean fork length of 147.5 mm and mean condition factor of 1.09. Of

  20. The effects of starvation on fast-start escape and constant acceleration swimming performance in rose bitterling (Rhodeus ocellatus) at two acclimation temperatures.

    Penghan, Liu-Yi; Pang, Xu; Fu, Shi-Jian

    2016-06-01

    To investigate the effects of starvation and acclimation temperature on the escape ability of juvenile rose bitterling (Rhodeus ocellatus), we measured the fast-start escape and constant acceleration swimming performance of fish fasted for 0 (control), 1 and 2 weeks and half-lethal periods (6 or 4 weeks) at two temperatures (15 and 25 °C). Fish acclimated at a high temperature exhibited shorter response latency (R), higher maximum linear velocity (V max) and longer escape distance during escape movement (D 120ms) than those at the low temperature. Starvation resulted in a significant decrease in V max and D 120ms at either low or high temperature and a significant increase in R at only the high temperature in the half-lethal period groups (P cat (Y, cm s(-1)) and starvation time (X, week) was Y 15 = -1.649X + 55.418 (r = -0.398, n = 34, P = 0.020) at low temperature and Y 25 = -4.917X + 62.916 (r = -0.793, n = 33, P food deprivation at different temperatures. PMID:26684300

  1. The effect of 10 days of heat acclimation on exercise performance in acute hypobaric hypoxia (4350 m).

    White, Ailish C; Salgado, Roy M; Astorino, Todd A; Loeppky, Jack A; Schneider, Suzanne M; McCormick, James J; McLain, Trisha A; Kravitz, Len; Mermier, Christine M

    2016-01-01

    To examine the effect ("cross-tolerance") of heat acclimation (HA) on exercise performance upon exposure to acute hypobaric hypoxia (4350 m). Eight male cyclists residing at 1600 m performed tests of maximal aerobic capacity (VO2max) at 1600 m and 4350 m, a 16 km time-trial at 4350 m, and a heat tolerance test at 1600 m before and after 10 d HA at 40°C, 20% RH. Resting blood samples were obtained pre-and post- HA to estimate changes in plasma volume (ΔPV). Successful HA was indicated by significantly lower exercise heart rate and rectal temperature on day 10 vs. day 1 of HA and during the heat tolerance tests. Heat acclimation caused a 1.9% ΔPV, however VO2max was not significantly different at 1600 m or 4350 m. Time-trial cycling performance improved 28 sec after HA (p = 0.07), suggesting a possible benefit for exercise performance at acute altitude and that cross-tolerance between these variables may exist in humans. These findings do not clearly support the use of HA to improve exercise capacity and performance upon acute hypobaric hypoxia, however they do indicate that HA is not detrimental to either exercise capacity or performance. PMID:27227084

  2. Denitrification with epsilon-caprolactam by acclimated mixed culture and by pure culture of bacteria isolated from polyacrylonitrile fibre manufactured wastewater treatment system.

    Lee, C M; Wang, C C

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study is to isolate denitrifying bacteria utilizing epsilon-caprolactam as the substrate, from a polyacrylonitrile fibre manufactured wastewater treatment system. The aim is also to compare the performance of PAN (polyacrylonitrile) mixed bacteria cultures acclimated to epsilon-caprolactam and isolated pure strain for treating different initial epsilon-caprolactam concentrations from synthetic wastewater under anoxic conditions. The result showed that the PAN mixed bacteria cultures acclimated to epsilon-caprolactam could utilize 1538.5 mg/l of epsilon-caprolactam as a substrate for denitrification. Sufficient time and about 2200 mg/l of nitrate were necessary for the complete epsilon-caprolactam removal. Paracoccus thiophilus was isolated from the polyacrylonitrile fibre manufactured wastewater treatment system and it could utilize 1722.5 mg/l of epsilon-caprolactam as a substrate for denitrification. About 3500 mg/l of nitrate was necessary for the complete removal of epsilon-caprolactam. When the initial epsilon-caprolactam concentration was below 784.3 mg/l, the removal efficiency of epsilon-caprolactam by Paracoccus thiophilus was better than that for the PAN mixed bacteria cultures. The growth of Paracoccus thiophilus was better. However, when the initial epsilon-caprolactam concentration was as high as 1445.8 mg/l, both the epsilon-caprolactam removal efficiency by Paracoccus thiophilus and Paracoccus thiophilus specific growth rate were similar to the PAN mixed bacteria cultures. PMID:15137443

  3. Changes in pools of depsidones and melanins, and their function, during growth and acclimation under contrasting natural light in the lichen Lobaria pulmonaria.

    McEvoy, Maria; Gauslaa, Yngvar; Solhaug, Knut Asbjørn

    2007-01-01

    This study analysed relationships between secondary chemistry, lichen growth rates and external habitat factors for two groups of UV-B-absorbing secondary compounds in the lichen Lobaria pulmonaria in order to test some hypotheses on their formation and function. Medullary depsidones and cortical melanins were quantified in thalli transplanted to three successional forest stands (shaded young forest, open old forest, sun-exposed clear-cut area) and subjected to different watering regimes (spraying with water, water + nitrogen, no spraying). Growth rates were already known. The total concentration of all seven depsidones was constant across the entire range of growth rates and sun exposures, showing that these depsidones serve functions other than photoprotection. Thalli from the well-lit transplantation sites had the highest synthesis of melanins. Within each forest type there was a trade-off between growth and melanin synthesis. Melanins and photosynthetic acclimation enhanced survival on a subsequent exposure to high light intensity, despite excessive temperatures resulting from higher absorption of solar energy in melanic thalli relative to pale thalli. In conclusion, the highly responsive melanic pigments play a photoprotective role in light acclimation, whereas the constant amount of depsidones across a wide spectrum of growth ranges and irradiances is consistent with herbivore defence functions. PMID:17587375

  4. Adaptive alterations on gill Na(+), K(+)-ATPase activity and mitochondrion-rich cells of juvenile Acipenser sinensis acclimated to brackish water.

    Zhao, Feng; Wu, Beibei; Yang, Gang; Zhang, Tao; Zhuang, Ping

    2016-04-01

    Understanding the physiological changes and osmoregulatory strategy is critical for anadromous species to adapt to large changes between freshwater and marine environments. In this study, juvenile Chinese sturgeon (Acipenser sinensis) were acclimated for 2 months to freshwater (FW, c. 0 ‰) and brackish water (BW, 15 ‰). Blood was assessed for changes in osmolality and ions. Gill tissue was assayed for Na(+), K(+)-ATPase (NKA) activity and immunohistochemical analysis on mitochondria-rich cells (MRCs). Serum osmolality and ions concentrations (Na(+), Cl(-) and K(+)) examined, except K(+), increased significantly in those specimens adapted to BW. However, the variations were within the range of effective hyperosmotic adaptation. The specific activity of gill NKA of juveniles adapted to BW was significantly higher (c. 1.6 times) than that of fish adapted to FW. MRCs were mainly presented in the interlamellar region of the filament and at the base of the lamella in either FW- or BW-acclimated individuals. In BW, the number and size of MRCs on filaments greatly increased. However, there was no significant difference in the number and size of the MRCs at the lamella region. Results show that juvenile Chinese sturgeon keep osmotic homeostasis in hyperosmotic environments by increasing gill NKA activity and MRCs' size and number, which is similar to other sturgeons and euryhaline teleosts. PMID:26614501

  5. Acclimation of Arabidopsis thaliana to long-term CO{sub 2} enrichment and nitrogen supply is basically a matter of growth rate adjustment

    Tocquin, P.; Ormenese, S.; Pieltain, A.; Detry, N.; Bernier, G.; Perilleux, C. [Univ. of Liege, Dept. of Life Sciences, Lab. of Plant Physiology, Liege (Belgium)

    2006-12-15

    The long-term response of Arabidopsis thaliana to increasing CO{sub 2} was evaluated in plants grown in 800 {mu}l l{sup -1} CO{sub 2} from sowing and maintained, in hydroponics, on three nitrogen supplies: 'low', 'medium' and 'high'. The global response to high CO{sub 2} and N-supply was evaluated by measuring growth parameters in parallel with photosynthetic activity, leaf carbohydrates, ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) messenger RNA and protein, stomatal conductance (g-s) and density. CO{sub 2} enrichment was found to stimulate biomass production, whatever the N-supply. This stimulation was transient on low N-supply and persisted throughout the whole vegetative growth only in high N-supply. Acclimation on low N-high C0{sub 2} was not associated with carbohydrate accumulation or with a strong reduction in Rubisco amount or activity. At high N-supply, growth stimulation by high CO{sub 2} was mainly because of the acceleration of leaf production and expansion while other parameters such as specific leaf area, root/shoot ratio and g{sub s} appeared to be correlated with total leaf area. Our results thus suggest that, in strictly controlled and stable growing conditions, acclimation of A. thaliana to long-term CO{sub 2} enrichment is mostly controlled by growth rate adjustment. (au)

  6. The photosynthetic acclimation response of Lolium perenne to four years growth in a free-air CO{sub 2} enrichment (FACE) facility

    Creasey, R. [Univ. of Essex (United Kingdom)

    1996-11-01

    In this study, the photosynthetic responses of field grown Lolium perenne to ambient (354 {mu}mol mol{sup -1}) and elevated (600 {mu}mol mol{sup -1}) C{sub a} were measured. The experiment utilized the FACE facility at Eschikon, Switzerland; here the L. Perenne swards had been grown at two nitrogen treatments, with six cuts per year, for 4 years. The study revealed a significant decrease in Rubisco activity (Vcmax) in the low nitrogen FACE plots; this is consistent with the theories of source-sink imbalance resulting in feedback inhibition and down-regulation. Such negative acclimation was not wholly supported by diurnal investigations which revealed an average stimulation of 53.38% and 52.78% in the low and high nitrogen, respectively. However, light response curves and AI investigations also suggested down-regulation, especially in the low nitrogen. SI is expected to decrease in response to elevated C{sub a}, if any change is seen. This was indeed observed in the high nitrogen plots but for the low nitrogen a significant increase was found. Conclusions drawn from this project center around the implications of negative acclimation to future crop productivity. For instance, inter-specific differences in response to elevated C{sub a} may result in ecosystem changes and new management techniques may be necessary. However, real predictions cannot be made from leaf level studies alone as these may not represent the overall changes at the whole plant level.

  7. Differences in leaf proteome response to cold acclimation between Lolium perenne plants with distinct levels of frost tolerance.

    Bocian, Aleksandra; Kosmala, Arkadiusz; Rapacz, Marcin; Jurczyk, Barbara; Marczak, Łukasz; Zwierzykowski, Zbigniew

    2011-07-15

    Perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne) is a high quality forage and turf grass mainly due to its excellent nutritive values and rapid establishment rate. However, this species has limited ability to perform in harsh winter climates. Though winter hardiness is a complex trait, it is commonly agreed that frost tolerance (FT) is its main component. Species growing in temperate regions can acquire FT through exposure to low, non-lethal temperatures, a phenomenon known as cold acclimation (CA). The research on molecular basis of FT has been performed on the model plants, but they are not well adapted to extreme winter climates. Thus, the mechanisms of cell response to low temperature in winter crops and agronomically important perennial grasses have yet to be revealed. Here, two L. perenne plants with contrasting levels of FT, high frost tolerant (HFT) and low frost tolerant (LFT) plants, were selected for comparative proteomic research. The work focused on analyses of leaf protein accumulation before and after 2, 8, 26 h, and 3, 5, 7, 14 and 21 days of CA, using a high-throughput two-dimensional electrophoresis, and on the identification of proteins which were accumulated differentially between the selected plants by the application of mass spectrometry (MS). Analyses of 580 protein profiles revealed a total of 42 (7.2%) spots that showed at a minimum of 1.5-fold differences in protein abundance, at a minimum of at one time point of CA between HFT and LFT genotypes. It was shown that significant differences in profiles of protein accumulation between the analyzed plants appeared most often on the 5th (18 proteins) and the 7th (19 proteins) day of CA. The proteins derived from 35 (83.3%) spots were successfully identified by the use of MS and chloroplast proteins were shown to be the major group selected as differentially accumulated during CA. The functions of the identified proteins and their probable influence on the level of FT in L. perenne are discussed. PMID

  8. 利用彗星试验检测Cu2+对驯化蚯蚓的基因损伤%Detection of Cu2+-induced DNA damage of acclimated earthworms by comet assay

    徐池; 陈剑东; 徐莉; 胡锋; 李辉信

    2012-01-01

    为研究Cu2+对驯化蚯蚓的损伤影响,将赤子爱胜蚓(Eisenia fetida)在非致死浓度(100 mg Cu2+·kg-1)下驯化培养2周,以未驯化的蚯蚓为对照,测定Cu2+对驯化及未驯化蚯蚓的急性毒性,并通过彗星试验( comet assay)观察铜胁迫下(400 mg·kg-1)驯化后蚯蚓基因损伤的动态变化.结果显示:14 d时,Cu2+对驯化蚯蚓和未驯化蚯蚓的半致死浓度(LC50)分别为321.83 ~542.45和230.83~ 342.91 mg·kg-1,驯化后蚯蚓的存活率得到显著提高.彗星试验结果表示:蚯蚓体腔细胞的尾长、尾部DNA含量以及尾矩呈非正态分布,在11和14 d时,驯化后的蚯蚓基因损伤程度明显比未驯化蚯蚓低.彗星试验是检测Cu2+对蚯蚓活体基因损伤的有效手段,蚯蚓体的DNA损伤可以作为指示重金属污染物影响的生物标志物.%To study the damage of Cu2+ to acclimated earthworms, Eisenia fetida was acclimated under the exposure to a non-lethal concentration of copper (100 mg Cu2+ · kg-1 ) for two weeks, with the un-acclimated E. fetida as the control. The acute toxicity of Cu2+ to the acclimated and un-acclimated E. fetida was determined, and the DNA damage of acclimated E. fetida under Cu2+ stress (400 mg · kg-1) was detected by comet assay. On day 14, the 50% lethal concentration (LC50) of Cu2+ for acclimated and un-acclimated E. fetida was 321.83-542.45 and 230. 83-342. 91 mg · kg-1, respectively, and the survival rate of acclimated E. fetida increased significantly. The comet assay showed that the tail length, tail DNA content, and tail moment of the earthworms were in non-normal distribution. On day 11 and day 14, the damaged level of DNA in acclimated E. fetida was much lower than that in un-acclimated E. fetida. The results indicated that comet assay was an effective way to detect the gene damage of living E. fetida under copper stress, and the DNA damage of E. fetida could be used as a biomarker to indicate the impacts of heavy metals pollutants.

  9. Aclimatação de mudas de acariquara à alta irradiância Acclimation of manwood seedlings to full sunlight

    Nilvanda dos Santos Magalhães

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi determinar as mudanças fisiológicas que ocorrem em acariquara (Minquartia guianensis durante o processo de aclimatação à alta irradiância, bem como a estratégia de aclimatação dessa espécie. Plantas mantidas em baixa irradiância foram transferidas para alta irradiância por 290 dias. Durante esse período, foi medida a relação entre fluorescência variável e máxima (Fv/Fm, em folhas desenvolvidas à sombra e, após a senescência prematura por foto-oxidação, em folhas aclimatadas ao sol. Ao final do experimento, foram determinadas as características fotossintéticas e anatômicas da folha. A exposição à alta irradiância causou, logo após a transferência, forte fotoinibição e foto-oxidação parcial da folhagem, mas não provocou a morte da planta. Folhas produzidas no ambiente ensolarado apresentaram valores de Fv/Fm similares aos do controle. A fotossíntese saturada por luz e a fotossíntese saturada por CO2 foram 90 e 50% maiores em plantas aclimatadas à alta irradiância. A velocidade máxima de carboxilação da rubisco e a taxa máxima de regeneração da ribulose bisfosfato seguiram a mesma tendência. Folhas produzidas ao sol apresentaram maior densidade estomática e maior espessura foliar. A produção de folhas novas é a principal estratégia de aclimatação da acariquara à alta irradiância.The aim of this work was to determine the physiological changes that occur in manwood (Minquartia guianensis during the acclimation process to high irradiance, and also to determine the acclimation strategy of this species. Plants kept in low light were transferred to high irradiance for 290 days. During this period the ratio between variable fluorescence and maximum fluorescence (Fv/Fm was measured in leaves developed in the shade, and after premature senescence due to photooxidation, in sun-acclimated leaves. At the end of the experimental period the anatomic and photosynthetic

  10. Monitoring and Evaluation of Yearling Fall Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) Released from Acclimation Facilities Upstream of Lower Granite Dam; 1999 Annual Report.

    Rocklage, Stephen J.; Kellar, Dale S. (Nez Perce Tribe, Department of Fisheries Resource Management, ID)

    2005-07-01

    The Nez Perce Tribe, in cooperation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, conducted monitoring and evaluation studies on Lyons Ferry Hatchery reared yearling fall Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha that were acclimated and released at three Fall Chinook Acclimation Project (FCAP) sites upstream of Lower Granite Dam along with yearlings released on-station from Lyons Ferry Hatchery in 1999. This was the fourth year of a long-term project to supplement natural spawning populations of Snake River stock fall Chinook salmon upstream of Lower Granite Dam. The 453,117 yearlings released from the Fall Chinook Acclimation Project facilities not only slightly exceeded the 450,000 fish quota, but a second release of 76,386 yearlings (hereafter called Surplus) were acclimated at the Big Canyon facility and released about two weeks after the primary releases. We use Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tag technology to monitor the primary performance measures of survival to mainstem dams and migration timing. We also monitor size, condition and tag/mark retention at release. We released 9,941 PIT tagged yearlings from Pittsburg Landing, 9,583 from Big Canyon, 2,511 Big Canyon Surplus and 2,494 from Captain John Rapids. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife released 983 PIT tagged yearlings from Lyons Ferry Hatchery. Fish health sampling indicated that, overall, bacterial kidney disease levels could be considered relatively low and did not appear to increase after transport to the acclimation facilities. Compared to prior years, Quantitative Health Assessment Indices were relatively low at Pittsburg Landing and Lyons Ferry Hatchery and relatively high at Big Canyon and Captain John Rapids. Mean fork lengths (95% confidence interval) of the release groups ranged from 147.4 mm (146.7-148.1 mm) at Captain John Rapids to 163.7 mm (163.3-164.1 mm) at Pittsburg Landing. Mean condition factors ranged from 1.04 at

  11. The Role of Structural, Biochemical and Ecophysiological Plant Acclimation in the Eco-Hydrologic Response of Agro-Ecosystems to Global Change in the Central US

    Drewry, D.; Kumar, P.; Long, S.; Sivapalan, M.; Bernacchi, C.; Liang, X.

    2009-12-01

    The acclimation of terrestrial vegetation to changes in ambient growth environment has significant implications for land-atmosphere exchange of carbon dioxide (CO2) and energy, as well as critical ecosystem services such as food production. Recent field campaigns at the SoyFACE Free Air Carbon Enrichment (FACE) facility in central Illinois have provided clear evidence of the modification of structural, biochemical and ecophysiological properties of key agricultural species at CO2 concentrations projected for the middle of this century. While these acclamatory responses have been linked to changes in leaf-level gas exchange and leaf states (ie. leaf temperature and stomatal conductance), determining the implications for these changes at the canopy-scale has remained a challenge. Here we present a simulation analysis that examines the role of observed plant acclimation in two key mid-west agricultural species, soy (C3 photosynthetic pathway) and corn (C4 photosynthetic pathway), in modifying future carbon uptake and surface energy partitioning, crop water use and resilience to water stress. The model canopies are divided into multiple layers, allowing for resolution of the shortwave and longwave radiation regimes that drive photosynthesis, stomatal conductance and leaf energy balance in each layer, along with the canopy microclimate. The canopy component of the model is coupled to a multi-layer soil-root model that computes soil moisture and root water uptake at each time period, accounting for the effects of moisture stress on canopy functioning. Model skill in capturing the sub-diurnal variability in canopy-atmosphere fluxes is demonstrated using multi-year records of eddy covariance CO2, water vapor and heat fluxes collected at the Bondville (Illinois) AmeriFlux site. An evaluation of the ability of the model to simulate observed changes in energy balance components, leaf-level photosynthetic assimilation, leaf temperature and stomatal conductance under elevated

  12. Clinal variation in the juvenal plumage of American kestrels

    Smallwood, J.A.; Natale, C.; Steenhof, K.; Meetz, M.; Marti, C.D.; Melvin, R.J.; Bortolotti, G.R.; Robertson, R.; Robertson, S.; Shuford, W.R.; Lindemann, S.A.; Tornwall, B.

    1999-01-01

    The American Kestrel(Falco sparverius) is a sexually dichromatic falcon that exhibits considerable individual plumage variability. For example, the anterior extent of the black dorsal barring in juvenile males has been used throughout North America as one of several aging criteria, but recent data demonstrate that the variability among individual Southeastern American Kestrels(E S. paulus)exceeds that accounted for by age. The objective of this study was to search for geographic patterns in the variability of juvenal plumage, particularly those characteristics considered indicative of age. Nestling kestrels (n = 610) were examined prior to fledging during the 1997 breeding season at nest box programs across a large portion of the North American breeding range. From south to north (1) the crown patches of both males and females become more completely rufous, and (2) shaft streaks on forehead and crown feathers become more pronounced, especially in males. Male Southeastern American Kestrels differed from other males (E s. sparverius) in that the anterior extent of dorsal barring averaged less but was more variable. The variability observed in North America appears to be part of a cline extending across the species range in the Western Hemisphere, where tropical subspecies are small and have reduced dorsal barring. Both body size and, especially in males, dorsal barring increases with increasing north and south latitude. We suggest that this geographic pattern is adaptive in terms of thermoregulation, and that differences in the sex roles may explain why males become less barred with maturity while females do not.

  13. Depth-acclimation of photosynthesis, morphology and demography of Posidonia oceanica and Cymodocea nodosa in the Spanish Mediterranean Sea

    Olesen, B.; Enríquez, Susana; Duarte, Carlos M.;

    2002-01-01

    roots at greater depths, thereby promoting the balance between photosynthesis and respiration in the shoots. C. nodosa, being a potentially fast-growing species compared to P. oceanica, had higher maximum photosynthetic and respiration rates as well as light compensation points for photosynthesis....... Photosynthetic efficiency at low light, however, was almost the same for the 2 species as suggested by the relatively small differences in mass-specific light absorption. Only C. nodosa acclimated physiologically to depth as light-use efficiency increased, and light compensation point declined significantly from...... shallow to deep water. P. oceanica, however, possessed low respiration rates and slightly lower light compensation points values than C. nodosa throughout the depth range. Shoot mortality and recruitment rates were unaffected by rooting depth. C. nodosa stand experienced fast shoot turnover compared to P...

  14. Differential Regulation of FXYD5, FXYD9 and FXYD11 Expression in Atlantic Salmon Gill During Parr-Smolt Transformation and Sea Water Acclimation

    Tipsmark, Christian Kølbæk; Madsen, Steffen

    2008-01-01

    . We identified 3 isoforms of the FXYD protein family (FXYD5, FXYD9 and FXYD11) in the salmon gill, which may assist in regulating the catalytic rate of the Na,K-ATPase in these situations. FXYD proteins are auxiliary subunits which may associate with the alpha-subunit of the Na,K-ATPase. Expression in...... the gill of the 3 isoforms was investigated during PST and acclimation of freshwater (FW) salmon to sea water (SW). During the PST, FXYD5 mRNA levels were unaltered, whereas the expression of FXYD9 and FXYD11 peaked in May, coinciding with optimal SW-tolerance and peak levels of Na,K-ATPase of the FW...

  15. Monitoring and Evaluation of Yearling Fall Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) Released from Acclimation Facilities Upstream of Lower Granite Dam; 2002 Annual Report.

    Rocklage, Stephen J.; Kellar, Dale S. (Nez Perce Tribe, Department of Fisheries Resource Management, ID)

    2005-07-01

    The Nez Perce Tribe, in cooperation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, conducted monitoring and evaluation studies on Lyons Ferry Hatchery reared yearling fall Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha that were acclimated and released at three Fall Chinook Acclimation Project sites upstream of Lower Granite Dam in 2002. This was the seventh year of a long-term project to supplement natural spawning populations of Snake River stock fall Chinook salmon upstream of Lower Granite Dam. The 479,358 yearlings released from the Fall Chinook Acclimation Project facilities exceeded the 450,000 fish quota. We use Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tag technology to monitor the primary performance measures of survival to mainstem dams and migration timing. We also monitor size, condition and tag/mark retention at release. We released 7,545 PIT tagged yearlings from Pittsburg Landing, 7,482 from Big Canyon and 2,487 from Captain John Rapids. Fish health sampling indicated that, overall, bacterial kidney disease levels at the acclimation facilities could be considered medium to high with 43-62% of fish sampled rating medium to very high. Mean fork lengths (95% confidence interval) of the PIT tagged groups ranged from 146.7 mm (146.2-147.2 mm) at Captain John Rapids to 164.8 mm (163.5-166.1 mm) at Lyons Ferry Hatchery. Mean condition factors ranged from 1.06 at Lyons Ferry Hatchery to 1.14 at Pittsburg Landing and Captain John Rapids. Estimated survival (95% confidence interval) of PIT tagged yearlings from release to Lower Granite Dam ranged from 88.6% (86.0-91.1%) for Pittsburg Landing to 97.0% (92.4-101.7%) for Captain John Rapids. Estimated survival from release to McNary Dam ranged from 54.3% (50.2-58.3%) for Big Canyon to 70.5% (65.4-75.5%) for Pittsburg Landing. Median migration rates to Lower Granite Dam, based on all observations of PIT tagged yearlings from the FCAP facilities, ranged from 8.1 river kilometers per

  16. Monitoring and Evaluation of Yearling Fall Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) Released from Acclimation Facilities Upstream of Lower Granite Dam; 2003 Annual Report.

    Rocklage, Stephen J. (Nez Perce Tribe, Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Lapwai, ID)

    2005-07-01

    The Nez Perce Tribe, in cooperation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, conducted monitoring and evaluation studies on Lyons Ferry Hatchery reared yearling fall Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha that were acclimated and released at three Fall Chinook Acclimation Project (FCAP) sites upstream of Lower Granite Dam in 2003. This was the eighth year of a long-term project to supplement natural spawning populations of Snake River stock fall Chinook salmon upstream of Lower Granite Dam. The 437,633 yearlings released from the Fall Chinook Acclimation Project facilities were short of the 450,000 fish quota. We use Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tag technology to monitor the primary performance measures of survival to mainstem dams and migration timing. We also monitor size, condition and tag/mark retention at release. We released 7,492 PIT tagged yearlings from Pittsburg Landing, 7,494 from Big Canyon and 2,497 from Captain John Rapids. Fish health sampling indicated that, overall, bacterial kidney disease levels at the acclimation facilities could be considered medium with 37-83% of the fish sampled rating medium to very high. Mean fork lengths (95% confidence interval) of the PIT tagged groups ranged from 153.7 mm (153.2-154.2 mm) at Captain John Rapids to 164.2 mm (163.9-164.5 mm) at Pittsburg Landing. Mean condition factors ranged from 1.06 at Lyons Ferry Hatchery to 1.22 at Captain John Rapids. Estimated survival (95% confidence interval) of PIT tagged yearlings from release to Lower Granite Dam ranged from 83.1% (80.7-85.5%) for Big Canyon to 91.7% (87.7-95.7%) for Captain John Rapids. Estimated survival from release to McNary Dam ranged from 59.9% (54.6-65.2%) for Big Canyon to 69.4% (60.5-78.4%) for Captain John Rapids. Median migration rates to Lower Granite Dam, based on all observations of PIT tagged yearlings from the FCAP facilities, ranged from 5.8 river kilometers per day (rkm/d) for Captain

  17. Immobilized acclimated biomass-powdered activated carbon for the bioregeneration of granular activated carbon loaded with phenol and o-cresol.

    Toh, Run-Hong; Lim, Poh-Eng; Seng, Chye-Eng; Adnan, Rohana

    2013-09-01

    The objectives of the study are to use immobilized acclimated biomass and immobilized biomass-powdered activated carbon (PAC) as a novel approach in the bioregeneration of granular activated carbon (GAC) loaded with phenol and o-cresol, respectively, and to compare the efficiency and rate of the bioregeneration of the phenolic compound-loaded GAC using immobilized and suspended biomasses under varying GAC dosages. Bioregeneration of GAC loaded with phenol and o-cresol, respectively, was conducted in batch system using the sequential adsorption and biodegradation approach. The results showed that the bioregeneration efficiency of GAC loaded with phenol or o-cresol was basically the same irrespective of whether the immobilized or suspended biomass was used. Nonetheless, the duration for bioregeneration was longer under immobilized biomass. The beneficial effect of immobilized PAC-biomass for bioregeneration is the enhancement of the removal rate of the phenolic compounds via adsorption and the shortening of the bioregeneration duration. PMID:23796608

  18. Effects of freezing and cold acclimation on the plasma membrane of isolated protoplasts. Summary progress report, May 16, 1987--June 1, 1991

    Steponkus, P.L.

    1991-12-31

    This project focuses on lesions in the plasma membrane of protoplasts that occur during freezing to temperatures below {minus}5{degrees} which result in changes in the semipermeablity of the plasma membrane. This injury, referred to as loss of osmotic responsiveness, is associated with the formation of large, aparticulate domains in the plasma membrane, aparticulate lamellae subtending the plasma membrane, and lamellar-to-hexagonal{sub II} phase transitions in the plasma membrane and subtending lamellar. The goals of this project are to provide a mechanistic understanding of the mechanism by which freeze-induced dehydration effects the formation of aparticulate domains and lamellar-to-hexagonal{sub II} phase transitions and to determine the mechanisms by which cold acclimation and cryoprotectants preclude or diminish these ultrastructural changes. Our working hypothesis is the formation of aparticulate domains and lamellar-to-hexagon{sub II} phase transitions in the plasma membrane and subtending lamellae are manifestations of hydration-dependent bilayer-bilayer interactions.

  19. Photosynthetic acclimation to drought stress in Agave salmiana Otto ex Salm-Dyck seedlings is largely dependent on thermal dissipation and enhanced electron flux to photosystem I.

    Campos, Huitziméngari; Trejo, Carlos; Peña-Valdivia, Cecilia B; García-Nava, Rodolfo; Conde-Martínez, F Víctor; Cruz-Ortega, Ma Del Rocío

    2014-10-01

    Agave salmiana Otto ex Salm-Dyck, a crassulacean acid metabolism plant that is adapted to water-limited environments, has great potential for bioenergy production. However, drought stress decreases the requirement for light energy, and if the amount of incident light exceeds energy consumption, the photosynthetic apparatus can be injured, thereby limiting plant growth. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of drought and re-watering on the photosynthetic efficiency of A. salmiana seedlings. The leaf relative water content and leaf water potential decreased to 39.6 % and -1.1 MPa, respectively, over 115 days of water withholding and recovered after re-watering. Drought caused a direct effect on photosystem II (PSII) photochemistry in light-acclimated leaves, as indicated by a decrease in the photosynthetic electron transport rate. Additionally, down-regulation of photochemical activity occurred mainly through the inactivation of PSII reaction centres and an increased thermal dissipation capacity of the leaves. Prompt fluorescence kinetics also showed a larger pool of terminal electron acceptors in photosystem I (PSI) as well as an increase in some JIP-test parameters compared to controls, reflecting an enhanced efficiency and specific fluxes for electron transport from the plastoquinone pool to the PSI terminal acceptors. All the above parameters showed similar levels after re-watering. These results suggest that the thermal dissipation of excess energy and the increased energy conservation from photons absorbed by PSII to the reduction of PSI end acceptors may be an important acclimation mechanism to protect the photosynthetic apparatus from over-excitation in Agave plants. PMID:24798124

  20. Effect of short-term exercise-heat acclimation on ventilatory and cerebral blood flow responses to passive heating at rest in humans.

    Fujii, Naoto; Tsuji, Bun; Honda, Yasushi; Kondo, Narihiko; Nishiyasu, Takeshi

    2015-09-01

    Hyperthermia induces hyperventilation and cerebral hypoperfusion in resting humans. We tested the hypothesis that short-term exercise-heat acclimation would alleviate those effects. Twenty healthy male subjects were divided into two groups that performed exercise training in the heat (TR-HEAT, n = 10) or cold (TR-COLD, n = 10). Before and after the training, the subjects in both groups participated in passive-heat tests at rest. Training was performed at 37°C (TR-HEAT) or 10°C (TR-COLD) and entailed four 20-min bouts of cycling at 50% peak oxygen uptake separated by 10-min recoveries daily for 6 consecutive days. After TR-HEAT, esophageal temperature was lowered when measured before and during passive heating, as was the esophageal temperature threshold for cutaneous active vasodilation, whereas plasma volume was increased (all P 0.05). TR-HEAT had no significant effect on passive heating-induced increases in minute ventilation, even when evaluated as the esophageal temperature threshold for increases in minute ventilation and the slope relating minute ventilation to esophageal temperature (all P > 0.05). By contrast, TR-HEAT attenuated the passive heating-induced reduction in the cerebral vascular conductance index (middle cerebral artery mean blood velocity/mean arterial pressure) (all P 0.05). These data suggest that in resting heated humans, short-term heat acclimation achieved through moderate-intensity exercise training (i.e., 50% peak oxygen uptake) in the heat does not influence hyperthermia-induced hyperventilation, but it does potentially attenuate cerebral hypoperfusion. PMID:26159763

  1. Responses to iron limitation are impacted by light quality and regulated by RcaE in the chromatically acclimating cyanobacterium Fremyella diplosiphon.

    Pattanaik, Bagmi; Busch, Andrea W U; Hu, Pingsha; Chen, Jin; Montgomery, Beronda L

    2014-05-01

    Photosynthetic organisms adapt to environmental fluctuations of light and nutrient availability. Iron is critical for photosynthetic organismal growth, as many cellular processes depend upon iron cofactors. Whereas low iron levels can have deleterious effects, excess iron can lead to damage, as iron is a reactive metal that can result in the production of damaging radicals. Therefore, organisms regulate cellular iron levels to maintain optimal iron homeostasis. In particular, iron is an essential factor for the function of photosystems associated with photosynthetic light-harvesting complexes. Photosynthetic organisms, including cyanobacteria, generally respond to iron deficiency by reduced growth, degradation of non-essential proteins and in some cases alterations of cellular morphology. In response to fluctuations in ambient light quality, the cyanobacterium Fremyella diplosiphon undergoes complementary chromatic adaptation (CCA). During CCA, phycobiliprotein composition of light-harvesting antennae is altered in response to green light (GL) and red light (RL) for efficient utilization of light energy for photosynthesis. We observed light-regulated responses to iron limitation in F. diplosiphon. RL-grown cells exhibited significant reductions in growth and pigment levels, and alterations in iron-associated proteins, which impact the accumulation of reactive oxygen species under iron-limiting conditions, whereas GL-grown cells exhibited partial resistance to iron limitation. We investigated the roles of known CCA regulators RcaE, RcaF and RcaC in this light-dependent iron-acclimation response. Through comparative analyses of wild-type and CCA mutant strains, we determined that photoreceptor RcaE has a central role in light-induced oxidative stress associated with iron limitation, and impacts light-regulated iron-acclimation responses, physiologically and morphologically. PMID:24623652

  2. Temporal dynamics of changes in reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels and cellular morphology are coordinated during complementary chromatic acclimation in Fremyella diplosiphon.

    Singh, Shailendra P; Miller, Haley L; Montgomery, Beronda L

    2013-10-14

    Fremyella diplosiphon alters the phycobiliprotein composition of its light-harvesting complexes, i.e., phycobilisomes, and its cellular morphology in response to changes in the prevalent wavelengths of light in the external environment in a phenomenon known as complementary chromatic acclimation (CCA). The organism primarily responds to red light (RL) and green light (GL) during CCA to maximize light absorption for supporting optimal photosynthetic efficiency. Recently, we found that RL-characteristic spherical cell morphology is associated with higher levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) compared to growth under GL where lower ROS levels and rectangular cell shape are observed. The RL-dependent association of increased ROS levels with cellular morphology was demonstrated by treating cells with a ROS-scavenging antioxidant which resulted in the observation of GL-characteristic rectangular morphology under RL. To gain additional insights into the involvement of ROS in impacting cellular morphology changes during CCA, we conducted experiments to study the temporal dynamics of changes in ROS levels and cellular morphology during transition to growth under RL or GL. Alterations in ROS levels and cell morphology were found to be correlated with each other at early stages of acclimation of low white light-grown cells to growth under high RL or cells transitioned between growth in RL and GL. These results provide further general evidence that significant RL-dependent increases in ROS levels are temporally correlated with changes in morphology toward spherical. Future studies will explore the light-dependent mechanisms by which ROS levels may be regulated and the direct impacts of ROS on the observed morphology changes. PMID:24122367

  3. Pain, Affect, and Attachment

    Carl Eduard Scheidt; Elisabeth Waller

    2015-01-01

    Various psychodynamic processes may underlie the development of psychogenic pain disorder such as conversion, the displacement of affect, or narcissistic defenses. However, many of the processes suggested are related to a disorder of affect regulation. The term affect regulation in psychoanalytic literature refers to phenomena which are often described by the concept of alexithymia. Empirical observations suggest that alexithymia is correlated to insecure attachment, especially an insecure di...

  4. The affect structure revisited

    Elefant-Yanni, Véronique Rica; Victoria-Feser, Maria-Pia

    2005-01-01

    In affective psychology, there is a persistent controversy about the number, the nature and the definition of the affect structure dimensions. Responding to the methodological criticisms addressed to the preceding studies, we conciliated the principal theories regarding the affect structure with the same experimental setting. In particular, using the semantic items all around the circumplex we found three bipolar independent dimensions and using only the PANAS semantic items, we found two uni...

  5. Affectivity and race

    This book presents new empirical studies of social difference in the Nordic welfare states, in order to advance novel theoretical perspectives on the everyday practices and macro-politics of race and gender in multi-ethnic societies. With attention to the specific political and cultural landscapes...... of the Nordic countries, Affectivity and Race draws on a variety of sources, including television programmes, news media, fictional literature, interviews, ethnographic observations, teaching curricula and policy documents, to explore the ways in which ideas about affectivity and emotion afford new...... insights into the experience of racial difference and the unfolding of political discourses on race in various social spheres. Organised around the themes of the politicisation of race through affect, the way that race produces affect and the affective experience of race, this interdisciplinary collection...

  6. Affectivity in the Liminal

    Thomassen, Bjørn

    alternative interpretations of what liminality is, or could be, taking it to territories distant from its place of origin, quite the contrary: we are moving the concept back to its rightful place in intellectual history and back to the core of its significance, back to the centre of human emotions trembling......In this paper I propose a return to the work of Arnold van Gennep, in order to briefly discuss how the terms of liminality and affectivity were always already connected. By linking the concept of liminality that van Gennep made famous to affectivity, we are actually not proposing new and...... at the threshold. The paper contains three sections: a) liminality and affectivity in van Gennep’s life; b) liminality and affectivity as a theme in his work; c) liminality and affectivity as developed in the early reception of his work....

  7. Pain, Affect, and Attachment

    Carl Eduard Scheidt

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Various psychodynamic processes may underlie the development of psychogenic pain disorder such as conversion, the displacement of affect, or narcissistic defenses. However, many of the processes suggested are related to a disorder of affect regulation. The term affect regulation in psychoanalytic literature refers to phenomena which are often described by the concept of alexithymia. Empirical observations suggest that alexithymia is correlated to insecure attachment, especially an insecure dismissing representation of attachment. Psychodynamic psychotherapy in psychogenic pain disorder should focus on the reintegration of split-off affects which may provoke intensive counter-transference and which in order to be used therapeutically must be linked to attachment experiences within and outside of the therapeutic relationship.

  8. Colors Can Affect Us!

    张俊斌

    2006-01-01

    Different colors affect us differently.The following will show us how they work. Experiment proves that math problems worked on yellow paper have fewer mistakes than problems written on other colors of paper.

  9. Monitoring and Evaluation of Yearling Fall Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) Released from Acclimation Facilities Upstream of Lower Granite Dam; 2004 Annual Report.

    Rocklage, Stephen J. Nez Perce Tribe, Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Lapawi, ID)

    2005-07-01

    The Nez Perce Tribe, in cooperation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, conducted monitoring and evaluation studies on Lyons Ferry Hatchery reared yearling fall Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha that were acclimated and released at three Fall Chinook Acclimation Project (FCAP) sites upstream of Lower Granite Dam in 2004. This was the ninth year of a long-term project to supplement natural spawning populations of Snake River stock fall Chinook salmon upstream of Lower Granite Dam. The 414,452 yearlings released from the Fall Chinook Acclimation Project facilities were short of the 450,000 fish quota. We use Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tag technology to monitor the primary performance measures of survival to mainstem dams and migration timing. We also monitor size, condition and tag/mark retention at release. We released 4,983 PIT tagged yearlings from Pittsburg Landing, 4,984 from Big Canyon and 4,982 from Captain John Rapids. Fish health sampling indicated that, overall, bacterial kidney disease levels could be considered low with 53-94% rating not detected to low. Mean fork lengths (95% confidence interval) of the PIT tagged groups ranged from 154.6 mm (154.0-155.2 mm) at Pittsburg Landing to 163.0 mm (162.6-163.4 mm) at Captain John Rapids. Mean condition factors ranged from 1.06 at Lyons Ferry Hatchery to 1.16 at Big Canyon. Estimated survival (95% confidence interval) of PIT tagged yearlings from release to Lower Granite Dam ranged from 74.7% (72.9-76.5%) for Big Canyon to 88.1% (85.7-90.6%) for Captain John Rapids. Estimated survival from release to McNary Dam ranged from 45.3% (39.2-51.5%) for Pittsburg Landing to 52.1% (42.9-61.2%) for Big Canyon. Median migration rates to Lower Granite Dam, based on all observations of PIT tagged yearlings from the FCAP facilities, ranged from 5.5 river kilometers per day (rkm/d) for Captain John Rapids to 12.8 rkm/d for Pittsburg Landing. Median migration

  10. Monitoring and Evaluation of Yearling Fall Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) Released from Acclimation Facilities Upstream of Lower Granite Dam; 2001 Annual Report.

    Rocklage, Stephen J.; Kellar, Dale S. (Nez Perce Tribe, Department of Fisheries Resource Management, ID)

    2005-07-01

    The Nez Perce Tribe, in cooperation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, conducted monitoring and evaluation studies on Lyons Ferry Hatchery reared yearling fall Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha that were acclimated and released at three Fall Chinook Acclimation Project sites upstream of Lower Granite Dam along with yearlings released on-station from Lyons Ferry Hatchery in 2001. This was the sixth year of a long-term project to supplement natural spawning populations of Snake River stock fall Chinook salmon upstream of Lower Granite Dam. The 318,932 yearlings released from the Fall Chinook Acclimation Project facilities were short of the 450,000 fish quota. We use Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tag technology to monitor the primary performance measures of survival to mainstem dams and migration timing. We also monitor size, condition and tag/mark retention at release. We released 7,503 PIT tagged yearlings from Pittsburg Landing, 7,499 from Big Canyon and 2,518 from Captain John Rapids. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife released 991 PIT tagged yearlings from Lyons Ferry Hatchery. Fish health sampling indicated that, overall, bacterial kidney disease levels could be considered relatively low. Compared to prior years, Quantitative Health Assessment Indices were relatively low at Big Canyon and Captain John Rapids and about average at Pittsburg Landing and Lyons Ferry Hatchery. Mean fork lengths (95% confidence interval) of the PIT tagged groups ranged from 155.4 mm (154.7-156.1 mm) at Captain John Rapids to 171.6 mm (170.7-172.5 mm) at Lyons Ferry Hatchery. Mean condition factors ranged from 1.02 at Lyons Ferry Hatchery to 1.16 at Big Canyon and Captain John Rapids. Estimated survival (95% confidence interval) of PIT tagged yearlings from release to Lower Granite Dam ranged from 74.4% (73.2-75.5%) for Big Canyon to 85.2% (83.5-87.0%) for Captain John Rapids. Estimated survival from release

  11. Monitoring and Evaluation of Yearling Fall Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) Released from Acclimation Facilities Upstream of Lower Granite Dam; 2000 Annual Report.

    Rocklage, Stephen J.; Kellar, Dale S. (Nez Perce Tribe, Department of Fisheries Resource Management, ID)

    2005-07-01

    The Nez Perce Tribe, in cooperation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, conducted monitoring and evaluation studies on Lyons Ferry Hatchery reared yearling fall Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha that were acclimated and released at three Fall Chinook Acclimation Project sites upstream of Lower Granite Dam along with yearlings released on-station from Lyons Ferry Hatchery in 2000. This was the fifth year of a long-term project to supplement natural spawning populations of Snake River stock fall Chinook salmon upstream of Lower Granite Dam. The 397,339 yearlings released from the Fall Chinook Acclimation Project facilities were short of the 450,000 fish quota. We use Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tag technology to monitor the primary performance measures of survival to mainstem dams and migration timing. We also monitor size, condition and tag/mark retention at release. We released 7,477 PIT tagged yearlings from Pittsburg Landing, 7,421 from Big Canyon and 2,488 from Captain John Rapids. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife released 980 PIT tagged yearlings from Lyons Ferry Hatchery. Fish health sampling indicated that, overall, bacterial kidney disease levels could be considered relatively low. Compared to prior years, Quantitative Health Assessment Indices were relatively low at Big Canyon and Captain John Rapids and about average at Pittsburg Landing and Lyons Ferry Hatchery. Mean fork lengths (95% confidence interval) of the PIT tagged groups ranged from 157.7 mm (157.3-158.1 mm) at Big Canyon to 172.9 mm (172.2-173.6 mm) at Captain John Rapids. Mean condition factors ranged from 1.06 at Captain John Rapids and Lyons Ferry Hatchery to 1.12 at Big Canyon. Estimated survival (95% confidence interval) of PIT tagged yearlings from release to Lower Granite Dam ranged from 87.0% (84.7-89.4%) for Pittsburg Landing to 95.2% (91.5-98.9%) for Captain John Rapids. Estimated survival from release to

  12. ACCLIMATION OF PHOTOSYNTHESIS IN LEAVES OF SOUR ORANGE TREES GROWN AT ELEVATED CO2 FOR 14 YEARS.

    Perennial trees are a major carbon sink on a global scale, accounting for approximately two-thirds of terrestrial carbon fixation. Understanding how slow-growing perennial trees will be affected by future increasing levels of carbon dioxide after a period of years or decades is crucial to understan...

  13. Affective responses to dance.

    Christensen, Julia F; Pollick, Frank E; Lambrechts, Anna; Gomila, Antoni

    2016-07-01

    The objective of the present work was the characterization of mechanisms by which affective experiences are elicited in observers when watching dance movements. A total of 203 dance stimuli from a normed stimuli library were used in a series of independent experiments. The following measures were obtained: (i) subjective measures of 97 dance-naïve participants' affective responses (Likert scale ratings, interviews); and (ii) objective measures of the physical parameters of the stimuli (motion energy, luminance), and of the movements represented in the stimuli (roundedness, impressiveness). Results showed that (i) participants' ratings of felt and perceived affect differed, (ii) felt and perceived valence but not arousal ratings correlated with physical parameters of the stimuli (motion energy and luminance), (iii) roundedness in posture shape was related to the experience of more positive emotion than edgy shapes (1 of 3 assessed rounded shapes showed a clear effect on positiveness ratings while a second reached trend level significance), (iv) more impressive movements resulted in more positive affective responses, (v) dance triggered affective experiences through the imagery and autobiographical memories it elicited in some people, and (vi) the physical parameters of the video stimuli correlated only weakly and negatively with the aesthetics ratings of beauty, liking and interest. The novelty of the present approach was twofold; (i) the assessment of multiple affect-inducing mechanisms, and (ii) the use of one single normed stimulus set. The results from this approach lend support to both previous and present findings. Results are discussed with regards to current literature in the field of empirical aesthetics and affective neuroscience. PMID:27235953

  14. Light acclimation in the lycophyte Selaginella martensii depends on changes in the amount of photosystems and on the flexibility of the light-harvesting complex II antenna association with both photosystems.

    Ferroni, Lorenzo; Suorsa, Marjaana; Aro, Eva-Mari; Baldisserotto, Costanza; Pancaldi, Simonetta

    2016-07-01

    Vascular plants have evolved a long-term light acclimation strategy primarily relying on the regulation of the relative amounts of light-harvesting complex II (LHCII) and of the two photosystems, photosystem I (PSI) and photosystem II (PSII). We investigated whether such a model is also valid in Selaginella martensii, a species belonging to the early diverging group of lycophytes. Selaginella martensii plants were acclimated to three natural light regimes (extremely low light (L), medium light (M) and full sunlight (H)) and thylakoid organization was characterized combining ultrastructural, biochemical and functional methods. From L to H plants, thylakoid architecture was rearranged from (pseudo)lamellar to predominantly granal, the PSII : PSI ratio changed in favour of PSI, and the photochemical capacity increased. However, regulation of light harvesting did not occur through variations in the amount of free LHCII, but rather resulted from the flexibility of the association of free LHCII with PSII and PSI. In lycophytes, the free interspersed LHCII serves a fixed proportion of reaction centres, either PSII or PSI, and the regulation of PSI-LHCII(-PSII) megacomplexes is an integral part of long-term acclimation. Free LHCII ensures photoprotection of PSII, allows regulated use of PSI as an energy quencher, and can also quench endangered PSI. PMID:27058989

  15. Branchial expression and localization of the insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) receptor and changes in plasma IGF-1 and IGF-1 binding protein in striped bass during salinity acclimation

    Tipsmark, Christian Kølbæk; Madsen, Steffen; Borski, Russell

    acclimation. In the present study, primers for the IGF type 1 receptor from striped bass (Morone saxatilis) were designed for a real-time quantitative PCR assay. Two salinity transfer experiments were performed and the time-course of gill IGF-1R expression was examined in parallel with changes in plasma IGF-1...... in the striped bass. Transfer from freshwater (FW) to seawater (SW) induced an overall increase in gill IGF-1R mRNA expression (P<0.01). Plasma IGF-1 concentration decreased significantly after SW transfer (1 and 4 days).  Transfer from SW to FW had no overall effect on gill IGF-1R expression, while...... regulation of gill ion transport in striped bass. The plasma IGF-1 responses indicate, in accordance with previous data showing a rapid negative effect of IGF-1 on SW acclimation, that IGF-1 has a role in hyperosmoregulation in this species. The increased level of IGFBP-3 in SW-acclimated fish may buffer the...

  16. Defects in leaf carbohydrate metabolism compromise acclimation to high light and lead to a high chlorophyll fluorescence phenotype in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Schmitz Jessica

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have studied the impact of carbohydrate-starvation on the acclimation response to high light using Arabidopsis thaliana double mutants strongly impaired in the day- and night path of photoassimilate export from the chloroplast. A complete knock-out mutant of the triose phosphate/phosphate translocator (TPT; tpt-2 mutant was crossed to mutants defective in (i starch biosynthesis (adg1-1, pgm1 and pgi1-1; knock-outs of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase, plastidial phosphoglucomutase and phosphoglucose isomerase or (ii starch mobilization (sex1-3, knock-out of glucan water dikinase as well as in (iii maltose export from the chloroplast (mex1-2. Results All double mutants were viable and indistinguishable from the wild type when grown under low light conditions, but - except for sex1-3/tpt-2 - developed a high chlorophyll fluorescence (HCF phenotype and growth retardation when grown in high light. Immunoblots of thylakoid proteins, Blue-Native gel electrophoresis and chlorophyll fluorescence emission analyses at 77 Kelvin with the adg1-1/tpt-2 double mutant revealed that HCF was linked to a specific decrease in plastome-encoded core proteins of both photosystems (with the exception of the PSII component cytochrome b559, whereas nuclear-encoded antennae (LHCs accumulated normally, but were predominantly not attached to their photosystems. Uncoupled antennae are the major cause for HCF of dark-adapted plants. Feeding of sucrose or glucose to high light-grown adg1-1/tpt-2 plants rescued the HCF- and growth phenotypes. Elevated sugar levels induce the expression of the glucose-6-phosphate/phosphate translocator2 (GPT2, which in principle could compensate for the deficiency in the TPT. A triple mutant with an additional defect in GPT2 (adg1-1/tpt-2/gpt2-1 exhibited an identical rescue of the HCF- and growth phenotype in response to sugar feeding as the adg1-1/tpt-2 double mutant, indicating that this rescue is independent from the

  17. The potential of the MAGIC TOM Parental accessions to explore the genetic variability in tomato acclimation to repeated cycles of water deficit and recovery

    Julie eRipoll

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Episodes of water deficit (WD during the crop cycle of tomato may negatively impact plant growth and fruit yield, but they may also improve fruit quality. Moreover, a moderate WD may induce a plant memory effect which is known to stimulate plant acclimation and defenses for upcoming stress episodes. The objective of this study was to analyze the positive and negative impacts of repeated episodes of WD at the plant and fruit levels. Three episodes of WD (-38 %, -45 % and -55 % of water supply followed by three periods of recovery (WD treatments, were applied to the 8 parents of the Multi-Parent Advanced Generation Inter-Cross population which offers the largest allelic variability observed in tomato. Predawn and midday water potentials, chlorophyll a fluorescence, growth and fruit quality traits (contents in sugars, acids, carotenoids and ascorbic acid (AsA were measured throughout the experiment. Important genotypic variations were observed both at the plant and fruit levels and variations in fruit and leaf traits were found not to be correlated. Overall, the WD treatments were at the origin of important osmotic regulations, reduction of leaf growth, acclimation of photosynthetic functioning, notably through an increase in the chlorophyll content and in the quantum yield of the electron transport flux until PSI acceptors (J0RE1/JABS. The effects on fruit sugar, acid, carotenoid and AsA contents on a dry matter basis ranged from negative to positive to nil depending on genotypes and stress intensity. Three small fruit size accessions were richer in AsA on a fresh matter basis, due to concentration effects. So, fruit quality was improved under WD mainly through concentration effects. On the whole, two accessions, LA1420 and Criollo appeared as interesting genetic resources, cumulating adaptive traits both at the leaf and fruit levels. Our observations show that the complexity involved in plant responses, when considering a broad range of

  18. The Affective Turn

    Alí Lara

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In the last decade studies on affect and emotions have become relevant in the social sciences. This is not just a fad guideline, but instead a simultaneous reader of public life changes and subjective experience, from which it is also being transformed the knowledge production. Such a trend has been known as ‘The Affective Turn’ within the Anglophone Academy. Here we will translate it as ‘El Giro Afectivo’. This turn, so far, has not dabbled in the social science literature that is written in Spanish. This paper draws on a singular panorama of discussions about contemporary social studies of affect and emotion, and it’s vertebrate by some of its expressions in the contemporary academy.

  19. The Affective Turn

    Carnera, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    This paper confronts biopolitics with modern labour addressing questions of ‘governmentality’, ‘self-management’ and ‘social innovation’. It argues that the new modes of production within immaterial labour involve a new complex relation between on the one hand the ‘Art of Governance......-management that human individuation ties together modes of productions with affects and emotions. Introducing Spinoza's concept of ‘affect’, and Gilles Deleuze's reading of Spinoza's ethics focusing on the ‘affective turn’ in relation to the new economy and society, the paper argues for a more positive notion of...... biopolitics that surpasses that of governmentality. The affective self-relation is used as a research tool to analyse the creation of social and economic values in our new modes of productions, for instance, within free labour of the cultural industry. The movie The Five Obstructions is used to show how...

  20. Affected in the nightclub

    Demant, Jakob Johan

    2013-01-01

    experiences within a club as a way of understanding the complexities of pleasure. The study does so by addressing experiences through the concept of affects, which is situated within a framework of a non-representational theory of space. Anxiety, pride, anger, shame and embarrassment are embodied...

  1. Effects of diapause and cold acclimation on egg ultrastructure: new insights into the cold hardiness mechanisms of the Asian tiger mosquito Aedes (Stegomyia) albopictus.

    Kreß, Aljoscha; Kuch, Ulrich; Oehlmann, Jörg; Müller, Ruth

    2016-06-01

    The Asian tiger mosquito, Aedes albopictus (Diptera: Culicidae, SKUSE), is an important threat to public health due to its rapid spread and its potential as a vector. The eggs of Ae. albopictus are the most cold resistant life stage and thus, the cold hardiness of eggs is used to predict the future occurrence of the species in distribution models. However, the mechanism of cold hardiness has yet to be revealed. To address this question, we analyzed the layers of diapausing and cold acclimatized eggs of a temperate population of Ae. albopictus in a full factorial test design using transmission electron microscopy. We reviewed the hypotheses that a thickened wax layer or chorion is the cause of cold hardiness but found no evidence. As a result of the induced diapause, the thickness of the dark endochorion as a layer of high electron density and thus an assumed location for waxes was decreasing. We therefore hypothesized a qualitative alteration of the wax layer due to compaction. Cold acclimation was causing an increase in the thickness of the middle serosa cuticle indicating a detachment of serosa membrane from the endochorion as a potential adaptation strategy to isolate inoculating ice formations in the inter-membranous space. PMID:27232137

  2. Transcriptional regulator PrqR plays a negative role in glucose metabolism and oxidative stress acclimation in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    Khan, Rezaul Islam; Wang, Yushu; Afrin, Shajia; Wang, Bing; Liu, Yumin; Zhang, Xiaoqing; Chen, Lei; Zhang, Weiwen; He, Lin; Ma, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Plant and cyanobacteria can perceive signals from soluble sugar and reactive oxygen species (ROS) and then coordinate gene expression under stress acclimation, but the underlying mechanism remains unclear. In this study, we found that the transcriptional factor PrqR (Slr0895) in Synechocystis can perceive signals from ROS generated after shifting from prolonged darkness with glucose into high-light. The deletion mutant (DprqR) showed increased growth rate and decreased ROS content, whereas the complementary strain (CprqR) restored the growth characteristics, phenotypes and ROS status of WT, thereby establishing PrqR as a negative regulator of ROS.LC/GC-MS-based metabolic profiling also showed active ROS mitigation in DprqR mutant. Further study by qRT-PCR, ChIP-PCR and deletion of both prqR and prqA (DprqR-DprqA mutant) revealed that PrqR exerts this negative regulation of ROS removal by controlling the expression of sodB and prqA (slr0896). Furthermore, PrqR also found to control glucose metabolism by regulating a positive regulator of glucose metabolism, sigE, and its regulons. Results suggest that PrqR was involved in perceiving signals from ROS under physiological condition, as well as in regulating stress removal and glucose metabolism. PMID:27582046

  3. Pre-acclimation of a wastewater inoculum to cellulose in an aqueous–cathode MEC improves power generation in air–cathode MFCs

    Cheng, Shaoan

    2011-01-01

    Cellulose has been used in two-chamber microbial fuel cells (MFCs), but power densities were low. Higher power densities can be achieved in air-cathode MFCs using an inoculum from a two-chamber, aqueous-cathode microbial electrolysis cell (MEC). Air-cathode MFCs with this inoculum produced maximum power densities of 1070mWm-2 (cathode surface area) in single-chamber and 880mWm-2 in two-chamber MFCs. Coulombic efficiencies ranged from 25% to 50%, and COD removals were 50-70% based on total cellulose removals of 60-80%. Decreasing the reactor volume from 26 to 14mL (while maintaining constant electrode spacing) decreased power output by 66% (from 526 to 180mWm-2) due to a reduction in total mass of cellulose added. These results demonstrate that air-cathode MFCs can produce high power densities with cellulose following proper acclimation of the inoculum, and that organic loading rates are important for maximizing power densities from particulate substrates. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Putrescine Is Involved in Arabidopsis Freezing Tolerance and Cold Acclimation by Regulating Abscisic Acid Levels in Response to Low Temperature1

    Cuevas, Juan C.; López-Cobollo, Rosa; Alcázar, Rubén; Zarza, Xavier; Koncz, Csaba; Altabella, Teresa; Salinas, Julio; Tiburcio, Antonio F.; Ferrando, Alejandro

    2008-01-01

    The levels of endogenous polyamines have been shown to increase in plant cells challenged with low temperature; however, the functions of polyamines in the regulation of cold stress responses are unknown. Here, we show that the accumulation of putrescine under cold stress is essential for proper cold acclimation and survival at freezing temperatures because Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) mutants defective in putrescine biosynthesis (adc1, adc2) display reduced freezing tolerance compared to wild-type plants. Genes ADC1 and ADC2 show different transcriptional profiles upon cold treatment; however, they show similar and redundant contributions to cold responses in terms of putrescine accumulation kinetics and freezing sensitivity. Our data also demonstrate that detrimental consequences of putrescine depletion during cold stress are due, at least in part, to alterations in the levels of abscisic acid (ABA). Reduced expression of NCED3, a key gene involved in ABA biosynthesis, and down-regulation of ABA-regulated genes are detected in both adc1 and adc2 mutant plants under cold stress. Complementation analysis of adc mutants with ABA and reciprocal complementation tests of the aba2-3 mutant with putrescine support the conclusion that putrescine controls the levels of ABA in response to low temperature by modulating ABA biosynthesis and gene expression. PMID:18701673

  5. Lipid profiles of detergent resistant fractions of the plasma membrane in oat and rye in association with cold acclimation and freezing tolerance.

    Takahashi, Daisuke; Imai, Hiroyuki; Kawamura, Yukio; Uemura, Matsuo

    2016-04-01

    Cold acclimation (CA) results in alteration of the plasma membrane (PM) lipid composition in plants, which plays a crucial role in the acquisition of freezing tolerance via membrane stabilization. Recent studies have indicated that PM structure is consistent with the fluid mosaic model but is laterally non-homogenous and contains microdomains enriched in sterols, sphingolipids and specific proteins. In plant cells, the function of these microdomains in relation to CA and freezing tolerance is not yet fully understood. The present study aimed to investigate the lipid compositions of detergent resistant fractions of the PM (DRM) which are considered to represent microdomains. They were prepared from leaves of low-freezing tolerant oat and high-freezing tolerant rye. The DRMs contained higher proportions of sterols, sphingolipids and saturated phospholipids than the PM. In particular, one of the sterol lipid classes, acylated sterylglycoside, was the predominant sterol in oat DRM while rye DRM contained free sterol as the major sterol. Oat and rye showed different patterns (or changes) of sterols and 2-hydroxy fatty acids of sphingolipids of DRM lipids during CA. Taken together, these results suggest that CA-induced changes of lipid classes and molecular species in DRMs are associated with changes in the thermodynamic properties and physiological functions of microdomains during CA and hence, influence plant freezing tolerance. PMID:26904981

  6. Sll0528, a Site-2-Protease, Is Critically Involved in Cold, Salt and Hyperosmotic Stress Acclimation of Cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803

    Haijin Lei

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Site-2-proteases (S2Ps mediated proteolysis of transmembrane transcriptional regulators is a conserved mechanism to regulate transmembrane signaling. The universal presence of S2P homologs in different cyanobacterial genomes suggest conserved and fundamental functions, though limited data has been available. Here we provide the first evidence that Sll0528, a site-2-protease in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 is crucial for salt, cold and hyperosmotic stress acclimation. Remarkable induction of sll0528 gene expression was observed under salt, cold and hyperosmotic stress, much higher than induction of the other three S2Ps. Knock-out of sll0528 gene in wild type Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 increased their sensitivity to salt, cold and hyperosmotic stress, as revealed by retarded growth, reduced pigments and disrupted photosystems. The sll0528 gene was induced to a much smaller extent by high light and mixotrophic growth with glucose. Similar growth responses of the sll0528 knockout mutant and wild type under high light and mixotrophic growth indicated that sll0528 was dispensable for these conditions. Recombinant Sll0528 protein could cleave beta-casein into smaller fragments. These results together suggest that the Sll0528 metalloprotease plays a role in the stress response and lays the foundation for further investigation of its mechanism, as well as providing hints for the functional analysis of other S2Ps in cyanobacteria.

  7. Acclimation of Emiliania huxleyi (1516) to nutrient limitation involves precise modification of the proteome to scavenge alternative sources of N and P.

    McKew, Boyd A; Metodieva, Gergana; Raines, Christine A; Metodiev, Metodi V; Geider, Richard J

    2015-10-01

    Limitation of marine primary production by the availability of nitrogen or phosphorus is common. Emiliania huxleyi, a ubiquitous phytoplankter that plays key roles in primary production, calcium carbonate precipitation and production of dimethyl sulfide, often blooms in mid-latitude at the beginning of summer when inorganic nutrient concentrations are low. To understand physiological mechanisms that allow such blooms, we examined how the proteome of E. huxleyi (strain 1516) responds to N and P limitation. We observed modest changes in much of the proteome despite large physiological changes (e.g. cellular biomass, C, N and P) associated with nutrient limitation of growth rate. Acclimation to nutrient limitation did however involve significant increases in the abundance of transporters for ammonium and nitrate under N limitation and for phosphate under P limitation. More notable were large increases in proteins involved in the acquisition of organic forms of N and P, including urea and amino acid/polyamine transporters and numerous C-N hydrolases under N limitation and a large upregulation of alkaline phosphatase under P limitation. This highly targeted reorganization of the proteome towards scavenging organic forms of macronutrients gives unique insight into the molecular mechanisms that underpin how E. huxleyi has found its niche to bloom in surface waters depleted of inorganic nutrients. PMID:26119724

  8. Up-regulation of avian uncoupling protein in cold-acclimated and hyperthyroid ducklings prevents reactive oxygen species production by skeletal muscle mitochondria

    Servais Stéphane

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although identified in several bird species, the biological role of the avian homolog of mammalian uncoupling proteins (avUCP remains extensively debated. In the present study, the functional properties of isolated mitochondria were examined in physiological or pharmacological situations that induce large changes in avUCP expression in duckling skeletal muscle. Results The abundance of avUCP mRNA, as detected by RT-PCR in gastrocnemius muscle but not in the liver, was markedly increased by cold acclimation (CA or pharmacological hyperthyroidism but was down-regulated by hypothyroidism. Activators of UCPs, such as superoxide with low doses of fatty acids, stimulated a GDP-sensitive proton conductance across the inner membrane of muscle mitochondria from CA or hyperthyroid ducklings. The stimulation was much weaker in controls and not observed in hypothyroid ducklings or in any liver mitochondrial preparations. The production of endogenous mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS was much lower in muscle mitochondria from CA and hyperthyroid ducklings than in the control or hypothyroid groups. The addition of GDP markedly increased the mitochondrial ROS production of CA or hyperthyroid birds up to, or above, the level of control or hypothyroid ducklings. Differences in ROS production among groups could not be attributed to changes in antioxidant enzyme activities (superoxide dismutase or glutathione peroxidase. Conclusion This work provides the first functional in vitro evidence that avian UCP regulates mitochondrial ROS production in situations of enhanced metabolic activity.

  9. Sea urchins in a high-CO2 world: the influence of acclimation on the immune response to ocean warming and acidification.

    Brothers, C J; Harianto, J; McClintock, J B; Byrne, M

    2016-08-31

    Climate-induced ocean warming and acidification may render marine organisms more vulnerable to infectious diseases. We investigated the effects of warming and acidification on the immune response of the sea urchin Heliocidaris erythrogramma Sea urchins were gradually introduced to four combinations of temperature and pHNIST (17°C/pH 8.15, 17°C/pH 7.6, 23°C/pH 8.15 and 23°C/pH 7.6) and then held in temperature-pH treatments for 1, 15 or 30 days to determine if the immune response would adjust to stressors over time. Coelomocyte concentration and type, phagocytic capacity and bactericidal activity were measured on day 1, 15 and 30 with different sea urchins used each time. At each time point, the coelomic fluid of individuals exposed to increased temperature and acidification had the lowest coelomocyte concentrations, exhibited lower phagocytic capacities and was least effective at inhibiting bacterial growth of the pathogen Vibrio anguillarum Over time, increased temperature alleviated the negative effects of acidification on phagocytic activity. Our results demonstrate the importance of incorporating acclimation time to multiple stressors when assessing potential responses to future ocean conditions and indicate that the immune response of H. erythrogramma may be compromised under near-future ocean warming and acidification. PMID:27559066

  10. Light acclimation of photosynthesis in two closely related firs (Abies pinsapo Boiss. and Abies alba Mill.): the role of leaf anatomy and mesophyll conductance to CO2.

    Peguero-Pina, José Javier; Sancho-Knapik, Domingo; Flexas, Jaume; Galmés, Jeroni; Niinemets, Ülo; Gil-Pelegrín, Eustaquio

    2016-03-01

    Leaves growing in the forest understory usually present a decreased mesophyll conductance (gm) and photosynthetic capacity. The role of leaf anatomy in determining the variability in gm among species is known, but there is a lack of information on how the acclimation of gm to shade conditions is driven by changes in leaf anatomy. Within this context, we demonstrated that Abies pinsapo Boiss. experienced profound modifications in needle anatomy to drastic changes in light availability that ultimately led to differential photosynthetic performance between trees grown in the open field and in the forest understory. In contrast to A. pinsapo, its congeneric Abies alba Mill. did not show differences either in needle anatomy or in photosynthetic parameters between trees grown in the open field and in the forest understory. The increased gm values found in trees of A. pinsapo grown in the open field can be explained by occurrence of stomata at both needle sides (amphistomatous needles), increased chloroplast surface area exposed to intercellular airspace, decreased cell wall thickness and, especially, decreased chloroplast thickness. To the best of our knowledge, the role of such drastic changes in ultrastructural needle anatomy in explaining the response of gm to the light environment has not been demonstrated in field conditions. PMID:26543153

  11. Neurotransmitters affecting time perception

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND:It has been demonstrated that dopamine and acetylcholine are the main neurotransmitters that affect time perception,which is also affected by other neurotransmitters.OBJECTIVE:To summarize how the neurotransmitter affect the time perception,and put forward the perspectives for further study on time perception.RETRIEVE STRATEGY:An online search for related literatures published in English was conducted in Elsevier SDOL(ScienceDirect Online)database from May 1990 to March 2007 using key words of "timing neurotransmitter".Totally 69 literatures were collected,and they were primarily checked.Inclusive criteria:Reviews and experimental studies;correlative studies of timing neurotransmitter.Exclusive criteria:Repeated studies.LITERATURE EVALUATION:The literatures were mainly sourced from Cognitive Brain Research and Neuroscience,and they were analyzed according to the inclusive criteria.Nineteen of them were involved,and all were experimental studies and reviews.DATA SYNTHESIS:The studies on time perception are developed mainly concentrating on dopamine and acetylcholine.Dopamine D2 receptors mainly affect the speed of internal clock.Dopamine receptors play an important role in both timing excitation and inhibition,which suggests the bi-directional regulation of dopamine.Injection of dopamine agonist can affect the attention to timing information.Injection of BW813U(antagonist of acetylcholine) can induce memory disorder,which indicates the effect of acetylcholine on timing memory,and further study shows that it is the effect of acetylcholine in precentral medial area.In a word,the study on the neurotransmitters affecting time perception is still at the primary stage.CONCLUSION:Dopamine and acetylcholine are the neurotransmitters known to be related to time perception.Dopamine in the basal ganglia is related to internal-clock in the range of seconds and minutes;Acetylcholine in prefrontal cortex is related to the mechanisms of temporal memory and attention

  12. Affects and assemblages

    Samson, Kristine

    happens to aesthetics and how does it change the existing social and geographical understanding of urban space? The paper sets out to reintroduce aesthetical aspects of affects and assemblages in relation to urban space and urban planning. It presupposes urban space as a continuous state of becoming where...... ‘throwntogetherness’ (Massey 2005) or assemblage (Farias & Bender 2010) of perspectives bridging for instance the social and cultural experienced space investigated by the geographer and urban sociologist with the material and formal aesthetics of the architect and urban planner....... cultural geopgraphy. On this backdrop the paper states that affects and assemblages could serve as key notions for the reassembling the aesthetics of urban space. Thus, the paper suggest a less formal understanding of urban space and aesthetics, proposing an understanding of aesthetics as a...

  13. Comfortable bodies: sedentary affects

    David Bissell

    2008-01-01

    Whilst to be comfortable is often equated with conservatism and complacency, this paper considers the various and often complex configurations of comfort as a desirable corporeal sensibility. Subsequently, this paper considers what corporeal comfort as an affective sensibility is and can do to theorisations of the sedentary body. The sensibility of corporeal comfort induced through the relationality between bodies and proximate objects is explored to trace through some of the affectual circul...

  14. Cytoplasm Affects Embryonic Development

    2005-01-01

    @@ Recent studies by CAS researchers furnish strong evidence that a fertilized egg's nucleus isn't the sole site of control for an embryo's development. A research team headed by Prof. Zhu Zuoyan from the CAS Institute of Hydrobiology in Wuhan discovered that cytoplasm affects the number of vertebrae in cloned offspring created when nuclei from one fish genus were transplanted to enucleated eggs of another.

  15. Factors Affecting Wound Healing

    Guo, S; DiPietro, L. A.

    2010-01-01

    Wound healing, as a normal biological process in the human body, is achieved through four precisely and highly programmed phases: hemostasis, inflammation, proliferation, and remodeling. For a wound to heal successfully, all four phases must occur in the proper sequence and time frame. Many factors can interfere with one or more phases of this process, thus causing improper or impaired wound healing. This article reviews the recent literature on the most significant factors that affect cutane...

  16. Affective Image Colorization

    Xiao-Hui Wang; Jia Jia; Han-Yu Liao; Lian-Hong Cai

    2012-01-01

    Colorization of gray-scale images has attracted many attentions for a long time.An important role of image color is the conveyer of emotions (through color themes).The colorization with an undesired color theme is less useful,even it is semantically correct.However this has been rarely considered.Automatic colorization respecting both the semantics and the emotions is undoubtedly a challenge.In this paper,we propose a complete system for affective image colorization.We only need the user to assist object segmentation along with text labels and an affective word.First,the text labels along with other object characters are jointly used to filter the internet images to give each object a set of semantically correct reference images.Second,we select a set of color themes according to the affective word based on art theories.With these themes,a generic algorithm is used to select the best reference for each object,balancing various requirements.Finally,we propose a hybrid texture synthesis approach for colorization.To the best of our knowledge,it is the first system which is able to efficiently colorize a gray-scale image semantically by an emotionally controllable fashion.Our experiments show the effectiveness of our system,especially the benefit compared with the previous Markov random field (MRF) based method.

  17. The Affective Turn

    Alí Lara; Giazú Enciso

    2013-01-01

    En la última década los estudios del afecto y las emociones han cobrado relevancia en las ciencias sociales. Esto no es simplemente una directriz de moda, es un indicador simultáneo de las modificaciones en la vida pública y de la experiencia subjetiva; a partir del cual se está transformando la producción de conocimiento. Tal tendencia ha sido conocida en la academia sajona como The Affective Turn, aquí traducido como “El giro afectivo” y que hasta el momento no ha incursionado como tal en l...

  18. Visual affect recognition

    Stathopoulou, I-O

    2010-01-01

    It is generally known that human faces, as well as body motions and gestures, provide a wealth of information about a person, such as age, race, sex and emotional state. This monograph primarily studies the perception of facial expression of emotion, and secondarily of motion and gestures, with the purpose of developing a fully automated visual affect recognition system for use in modes of human/computer interaction. The book begins with a survey of the literature on emotion perception, followed by a description of empirical studies conducted with human participants and the construction of a '

  19. Molecular characterization of the leopard gecko POMC gene and expressional change in the testis by acclimation to low temperature and with a short photoperiod.

    Endo, Daisuke; Park, Min Kyun

    2004-08-01

    The gene for proopiomelanocortin (POMC), a common precursor of malanotropins, corticotropin, and beta-endorphin, was isolated and analyzed in the squamata species, the leopard gecko, Eublepharis macularius. Leopard gecko POMC (lgPOMC) cDNA is composed of 1299bp, excluding the poly(A) tail, and encodes 270 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence showed the same structural organization as that of other species and displayed identity with those of other vertebrates: 68% with mud turtles, 57/57% with African clawed frog A/B, 53% with chickens, and 45% with mice. In a phylogenic tree, the lgPOMC clustered with the sequences of the mud turtle POMC and python POMC. The lgPOMC gene comprises three exons and two introns and this structure is consistent with humans, rats, mice, African clawed frog and zebrafish. RT-PCR analysis revealed that the lgPOMC mRNA was expressed only in the whole brain, pituitary, and gonads. To analyze in more detail, a competitive assay system to quantify the expression levels of POMC mRNA was established. We measured the POMC mRNA expression levels in the leopard gecko testes following transfer from a condition of 29 degrees C, 16L/8D to 18 degrees C, 10L/14D over 6 weeks. This 6-week acclimation increased the POMC mRNA expression levels significantly. This suggests that the leopard gecko POMC-derived peptides play a role in the mediation of the effect of environmental factors on reproduction. PMID:15242753

  20. Photosynthetic acclimation to photon irradiance and its relation to chlorophyll fluorescence and carbon assimilation in the halotolerant green alga Dunaliella viridis.

    Gordillo, F J; Jiménez, C; Chavarría, J; Xavier Niell, F

    2001-01-01

    This work describes the long-term acclimation of the halotolerant microalga Dunaliella viridis to different photon irradiance, ranging from darkness to 1500 mumol m(-2) s(-1). In order to assess the effects of long-term photoinhibition, changes in oxygen production rate, pigment composition, xanthophyll cycle and in vivo chlorophyll fluorescence using the saturating pulse method were measured. Growth rate was maximal at intermediate irradiance (250 and 700 mumol m(-2) s(-1)). The increase in growth irradiance from 700 to 1500 mumol m(-2) s(-1) did not lead to further significant changes in pigment composition or EPS, indicating saturation in the pigment response to high light. Changes in Photosystem II optimum quantum yield (F(v)/F(m)) evidenced photoinhibition at 700 and especially at 1500 mumol m(-2) s(-1). The relation between photosynthetic electron flow rate and photosyntetic O(2) evolution was linear for cultures in darkness shifting to curvilinear as growth irradiance increased, suggesting the interference of the energy dissipation processes in oxygen evolution. Carbon assimilation efficiencies were studied in relation to changes in growth rate, internal carbon and nitrogen composition, and organic carbon released to the external medium. All illuminated cultures showed a high capability to maintain a C:N ratio between 6 and 7. The percentage of organic carbon released to the external medium increased to its maximum under high irradiance (1500 mumol m(-2) s(-1)). These results suggest that the release of organic carbon could act as a secondary dissipation process when the xanthophyll cycle is saturated. PMID:16228345

  1. The Type II NADPH Dehydrogenase Facilitates Cyclic Electron Flow, Energy-Dependent Quenching, and Chlororespiratory Metabolism during Acclimation of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii to Nitrogen Deprivation.

    Saroussi, Shai I; Wittkopp, Tyler M; Grossman, Arthur R

    2016-04-01

    When photosynthetic organisms are deprived of nitrogen (N), the capacity to grow and assimilate carbon becomes limited, causing a decrease in the productive use of absorbed light energy and likely a rise in the cellular reduction state. Although there is a scarcity of N in many terrestrial and aquatic environments, a mechanistic understanding of how photosynthesis adjusts to low-N conditions and the enzymes/activities integral to these adjustments have not been described. In this work, we use biochemical and biophysical analyses of photoautotrophically grown wild-type and mutant strains of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii to determine the integration of electron transport pathways critical for maintaining active photosynthetic complexes even after exposure of cells to N deprivation for 3 d. Key to acclimation is the type II NADPH dehydrogenase, NDA2, which drives cyclic electron flow (CEF), chlororespiration, and the generation of an H(+) gradient across the thylakoid membranes. N deprivation elicited a doubling of the rate of NDA2-dependent CEF, with little contribution from PGR5/PGRL1-dependent CEF The H(+) gradient generated by CEF is essential to sustain nonphotochemical quenching, while an increase in the level of reduced plastoquinone would promote a state transition; both are necessary to down-regulate photosystem II activity. Moreover, stimulation of NDA2-dependent chlororespiration affords additional relief from the elevated reduction state associated with N deprivation through plastid terminal oxidase-dependent water synthesis. Overall, rerouting electrons through the NDA2 catalytic hub in response to photoautotrophic N deprivation sustains cell viability while promoting the dissipation of excess excitation energy through quenching and chlororespiratory processes. PMID:26858365

  2. The Role of Phosphorylation in Redox Regulation of Photosynthesis Genes psaA and psbA during Photosynthetic Acclimation of Mustard

    Sebastian Steiner; Lars Dietzel; Yvonne Schr(o)ter; Vidal Fey; Raik Wagner; Thomas Pfannschmidt

    2009-01-01

    The long-term response (LTR) to light-quality gradients improves performance and survival of plants in dense stands.It involves redox-controlled transcriptional regulation of the plastome-encoded genes psaAB (encoding the P700 apoproteins of photosystem I) and psbA (encoding the D1 protein of photosystem II) and requires the action of plastid-localized kinases.To study the potential impact of phosphorylation events on plastid gene expression during the LTR,we analyzed mustard seedlings acclimated to light sources favoring either photosystem I or photosystem II.Primer extension analyses of psaA transcripts indicate that the redox regulation occurs at the principal bacterial promoters,suggesting that the plastid encoded RNA polymerase (PEP) is the target for redox signals.Chloroplast protein fractions containing PEP and other DNA-binding proteins were purified from mustard via heparin-Sepharose chromatography.The biochemical prop-erties of these fractions were analyzed with special emphasis on promoter recognition and specificity,phosphorylation state,and kinase activity.The results demonstrate that the LTR involves the action of small DNA-binding proteins; three of them exhibit specific changes in the phosphorylation state.Auto-phosphorylation assays,in addition,exhibit large differ-ences in the activity of endogenous kinase activities.Chloroplast run-on transcription experiments with the kinase inhib-itor H7 and the reductant DTF indicate that phosphorylation events are essential for the mediation of redox signals toward psaA and psbA transcription initiation,but require the synergistic action of a thiol redox signal.The data support the idea that redox signals from the thylakoid membrane are linked to gene expression via phosphorylation events; however,thismediation appears to require a complex network of interacting proteins rather than a simple phosphorelay.

  3. Plasticity of vulnerability to leaf hydraulic dysfunction during acclimation to drought in grapevines: an osmotic-mediated process.

    Martorell, Sebastian; Medrano, Hipolito; Tomàs, Magdalena; Escalona, José M; Flexas, Jaume; Diaz-Espejo, Antonio

    2015-03-01

    Previous studies have reported correlation of leaf hydraulic vulnerability with pressure-volume parameters related to cell turgor. This link has been explained on the basis of the effects of turgor on connectivity among cells and tissue structural integrity, which affect leaf water transport. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that osmotic adjustment to water stress would shift the leaf vulnerability curve toward more negative water potential (Ψ leaf ) by increasing turgor at low Ψ leaf . We measured leaf hydraulic conductance (K leaf ), K leaf vulnerability [50 and 80% loss of K leaf (P50 and P80 ); |Ψ leaf | at 50 and 80% loss of K leaf , respectively), bulk leaf water relations, leaf gas exchange and sap flow in two Vitis vinifera cultivars (Tempranillo and Grenache), under two water treatments. We found that P50 , P80 and maximum K leaf decreased seasonally by more than 20% in both cultivars and watering treatments. However, K leaf at 2 MPa increased threefold, while osmotic potential at full turgor and turgor loss point decreased. Our results indicate that leaf resistance to hydraulic dysfunction is seasonally plastic, and this plasticity may be mediated by osmotic adjustment. PMID:25132228

  4. Acclimation to hypothermic incubation in developing chicken embryos (Gallus domesticus): I. Developmental effects and chronic and acute metabolic adjustments.

    Black, Juli L; Burggren, Warren W

    2004-04-01

    Chronic exposure to a low incubation temperature clearly slows the development of poikilothemic chicken embryos (or any other poikilotherms), but little is known about the more subtle developmental effects of temperature, especially on physiological regulatory systems. Consequently, two populations of chicken embryos were incubated at 38 degrees C and 35 degrees C. When compared at the same development stage, incubation temperature had no significant impact on embryonic survival or growth. Moreover, the relative timing of major developmental landmarks (e.g. internal pipping), expressed as a percentage of development, was unaffected by temperature. The ability to maintain the rate of oxygen consumption ((O(2))) during an acute drop in ambient temperature (T(a)) improved from Hamburger-Hamilton (HH) stages 39-40 to 43-44 in the 38 degrees C but not the 35 degrees C populations. Late stage (HH43-44) embryos incubated at 38 degrees C could maintain (O(2)) (approximately 27-33 micro l g(-1) min(-1)) during an acute drop in T(a) to approximately 30 degrees C. However, at the same stage 35 degrees C embryos acutely measured at 38 degrees C were unable to similarly maintain their (O(2)), which fell as soon as T(a) reached 36 degrees C. Thus, while hypothermic incubation does not affect gross development (other than would be predicted from a simple effect of Q(10)), there is a significant delay in the relative timing of the onset of thermoregulatory ability induced by hypothermic incubation. PMID:15037648

  5. Tradeoffs to Thermal Acclimation: Energetics and Reproduction of a Reef Coral with Heat Tolerant Symbiodinium Type-D

    Alison M. Jones

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The photo-physiological characteristics of thermo-tolerant Symbiodinium types have been postulated to have negative effects on the energetics of the reef corals by reducing fitness. To investigate this, two key and inextricably coupled indicators of fitness, lipids and reproduction, were monitored in colonies of the broadcast-spawning coral Acropora millepora over a two-year period that included a natural bleaching event. In the absence of bleaching ITS1-type clade D predominant colonies had 26% lower stored lipids compared to C2 colonies. At spawning time, this correlated with 28% smaller eggs in type-D colonies. This energetic disparity is expected to have reduced larval duration and settlement-competency periods in type-D compared to type-C2 colonies. More importantly, irrespective of the effect of genotype, the fitness of all corals was adversely affected by the stress of the bleaching event which reduced prespawning lipids by 60% and halved the number of eggs compared to the previous year. Our results extend work that has shown that direct temperature stress and symbiont change are likely to work in concert on corals by demonstrating that the lipids and reproduction of the reef building corals on tropical reefs are likely to be impaired by these processes as our climate warms.

  6. Aerobic N2O emission for activated sludge acclimated under different aeration rates in the multiple anoxic and aerobic process.

    Wang, Huoqing; Guan, Yuntao; Pan, Min; Wu, Guangxue

    2016-05-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is a potent greenhouse gas that can be emitted during biological nitrogen removal. N2O emission was examined in a multiple anoxic and aerobic process at the aeration rates of 600mL/min sequencing batch reactor (SBRL) and 1200mL/min (SBRH). The nitrogen removal percentage was 89% in SBRL and 71% in SBRH, respectively. N2O emission mainly occurred during the aerobic phase, and the N2O emission factor was 10.1% in SBRL and 2.3% in SBRH, respectively. In all batch experiments, the N2O emission potential was high in SBRL compared with SBRH. In SBRL, with increasing aeration rates, the N2O emission factor decreased during nitrification, while it increased during denitrification and simultaneous nitrification and denitrification (SND). By contrast, in SBRH the N2O emission factor during nitrification, denitrification and SND was relatively low and changed little with increasing aeration rates. The microbial competition affected the N2O emission during biological nitrogen removal. PMID:27155411

  7. Material and Affective Movements

    Rasmussen, Lisa Rosén

    2014-01-01

    This chapter offers a study of life at school as remembered by groups of people who finished secondary school in the 1950s, 1970s and 1990s. The article draws up three generational portraits based on in-depth interviews that demonstrate how school life is remembered in complex and textural ways....... The chapter traces the former pupil’s memories of physical and affective movements within the larger context of school and discovers surprisingly diverse modes of knowing, relating, and attending to things, teachers and classmates among and between the three generations. It thus taps into the rich...... demonstrates how the use of spoken memories is a rewarding source for the writing about school from the pupils’ perspective....

  8. Affective World Literature

    Vilslev, Annette Thorsen

    The PhD dissertation compares the literary theory and novels of modern Japanese writer Natsume Sōseki. It reads Sōseki’s Theory of Literature (2009, Bungakuron, 1907) as an inherently comparative and interdisciplinary approach to theorizing feelings in world literature. More broadly, the...... dissertation investigates the critical negotiation of the novel as a travelling genre in Japan in the beginning of the 20th century, and, more specifically, Sōseki’s work in relation to world literature and affect theory. Sōseki’s work is highly influential in Japan and East Asia, and his novels widely...... circulated beyond Japan. Using Sōseki’s theory as an example, and by comparing it to other theories, the dissertation argues that comparative literature needs to include not only more non-Western literature but also more non-Western literary theories in the ongoing debate of world literature. Close...

  9. Anticipated affect and behavioral choice.

    R. Richard; J. van der Pligt; N.K. de Vries

    1996-01-01

    Most research on the impact of affect on attitudes and behavior emphasizes the effect of past and present affective reactions. In this article we focus on anticipated, postbehavioral, affective reactions. The influence of anticipated affective reactions on a number of behaviors was investigated in t

  10. Aclimatação morfológica de forrageiras temperadas a padrões e níveis de sombreamento Morphological acclimation of temperate forages to patterns and levels of shade

    Américo Fróes Garcez Neto

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available As características morfológicas do azevém-perene (Lolium perenne cv. Nui, dátilo (Dactylis glomerata cv. Vision e trevo-vermelho (Trifolium pratense cv. Pawera foram avaliadas em resposta a quatro níveis (0, 25, 50 e 75% e dois padrões de sombreamento (contínuo e alternado, sob três períodos de crescimento (estabelecimento, primeira e segunda rebrotação, na Nova Zelândia, com o objetivo de avaliar as formas de adaptação de diferentes espécies às mudanças no ambiente luminoso. O estudo foi conduzido em delineamento experimental de blocos completos casualizados, com três repetições, entre janeiro e outubro de 2004. A maioria das medidas morfológicas foi afetada pelos níveis de sombreamento. A área foliar específica foi a variável morfológica que variou mais consistentemente em resposta aos níveis de sombreamento, com aumento de 22 a 79% entre as forrageiras. As adaptações morfológicas do dátilo foram as que mais se relacionaram à tolerância ao sombreamento, enquanto as do azevém-perene foram mais relacionadas à expansão da sua área foliar individual. A faixa de sombreamento entre 25 e 50% pode ser considerada a de maior aclimatação morfológica das forrageiras para compensar a restrição luminosa.The morphological characteristics of perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne cv. Nui, cocksfoot (Dactylis glomerata cv. Vision and red clover (Trifolium pratense cv. Pawera in response to four shade levels (0, 25, 50 and 75% and two shade patterns (continuous and alternate were assessed in three growth periods (establishment, first regrowth and second regrowth, in New Zealand, to evaluate the adaptation of different species to changes in the light environment. The experiment was conducted in a randomized complete block design, with three replications, between January and October, 2004. Most of the morphological measurements were affected by the shade levels. The specific leaf area was the morphological variable that most

  11. Effect of Cold Acclimation Combined with Ice-Temperature Storage on the Quality of Broccolis%低温驯化结合冰温贮藏对西兰花品质的影响

    林本芳; 鲁晓翔; 李江阔; 陈绍慧

    2012-01-01

    研究低温驯化结合冰温贮藏对西兰花保鲜品质的影响。贮藏期间每14d测定西兰花理化指标及营养成分。结果表明:与直接冰温贮藏或冷藏相比,低温驯化结合冰温贮藏处理对延缓西兰花VC含量和叶绿素含量的下降均有明显效果,且可降低呼吸强度和乙烯生成速率,提高西兰花过氧化物酶(POD)和过氧化氢酶(CAT)的活性,降低多酚氧化酶(PPO)活性,延缓相对电导率的升高。研究表明西兰花经低温驯化结合冰温贮藏的效果优于直接冰温贮藏的效果。%This study was conducted to investigate the effect of cold acclimation combined with ice-temperature storage(CACITS) on the quality of broccolis.Physicochemical indexes and nutritional components of broccolis were detected every 14 days during storage.The results show that the contents of VC and chlorophyll in broccoli were decreased more significantly by cold acclimation combined with ice-temperature storage than ice-temperature storage alone and ordinary cold storage;moreover,cold acclimation combined with ice-temperature storage could reduce respiratory intensity and ethylene generation rate in broccolis,increase peroxidase(POD) and catalase(CAT) activities,inhibit polyphenol oxidase(PPO) activity and delay the increase of relative electric conductivity.As a result,it can be concluded that cold acclimation combined with ice-temperature storage is better for the quality of of broccolis than ice-temperature storage alone.

  12. The affective life of semiotics

    J. S. Hutta

    2015-01-01

    The paper challenges writings on affect that locate affective dynamism in autonomic bodily responses while positing discourse and language as "capturing" affect. To move beyond such "verticalism", the paper seeks to further an understanding of language, and semiotics more broadly, as itself affective. Drawing on participatory research conducted in Rio de Janeiro, it uses poetic expression as a paradigmatic case of the affective life of semiotics. Conceptually, it builds on Guat...

  13. Security affects us all!

    SMB Department

    2016-01-01

    In the hope of minimising the number of thefts of the Organization’s property, which can lead to months of work going to waste on certain projects, you are reminded of the importance that CERN attaches to the rules concerning the protection of equipment for which we are responsible. If you see any unusual behaviour or if you are the victim of a theft, don’t hesitate to report it by submitting a ticket through the CERN Portal or calling the CSA. Security affects us all!   CERN is attractive in more ways than one, and it remains as attractive as ever to thieves. With the nice weather and with the holiday season in full swing, the number of thefts recorded at CERN is on the rise. Items stolen include money, computers, electronic equipment, cable drums and copper antennae.   There are a few basic precautions that you should take to protect both your own and the Organization’s property: lock your door, don’t leave valuable items in your office, st...

  14. Affective monitoring: A generic mechanism for affect elicitation

    Phaf, R. Hans; Rotteveel, Mark

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we sketch a new framework for affect elicitation, which is based on previous evolutionary and connectionist modeling and experimental work from our group. Affective monitoring is considered a local match–mismatch process within a module of the neural network. Negative affect is raised instantly by mismatches, incongruency, disfluency, novelty, incoherence, and dissonance, whereas positive affect follows from matches, congruency, fluency, familiarity, coherence, and resonance, at...

  15. Identifying Occupationally Specific Affective Behaviors.

    Pucel, David J.

    1993-01-01

    Data from two groups of cosmetology instructors (n=15) and two groups of machinist instructors (n=17) validated the Occupational Affective Behavior Analysis instrument as capable of identifying affective behaviors viewed as important to success in a given occupation. (SK)

  16. Affective monitoring: A generic mechanism for affect elicitation

    MarkRotteveel

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we sketch a new framework for affect elicitation, which is based on previous evolutionary and connectionist modeling and experimental work from our group. Affective monitoring is considered a local match-mismatch process within a module of the neural network. Negative affect is raised instantly by mismatches, incongruency, disfluency, novelty, incoherence, and dissonance, whereas positive affect follows from matches, congruency, fluency, familiarity, coherence, and resonance, at least when an initial mismatch can be solved quickly. Affective monitoring is considered an evolutionary-early conflict and change detection process operating at the same level as, for instance, attentional selection. It runs in parallel and imparts affective flavour to emotional behavior systems, which involve evolutionary-prepared stimuli and action tendencies related to for instance defensive, exploratory, attachment, or appetitive behavior. Positive affect is represented in the networks by high-frequency oscillations, presumably in the gamma band. Negative affect corresponds to more incoherent lower-frequency oscillations, presumably in the theta band. For affect to become conscious, large-scale synchronization of the oscillations over the network and the construction of emotional experiences are required. These constructions involve perceptions of bodily states and action tendencies, but also appraisals as well as efforts to regulate the emotion. Importantly, affective monitoring accompanies every kind of information processing, but conscious emotions, which result from the later integration of affect in a cognitive context, are much rarer events.

  17. Individual Difference Variables, Affective Differentiation, and the Structures of Affect

    Terracciano, Antonio; McCrae, Robert R.; Hagemann, Dirk; Costa, Paul T.

    2008-01-01

    Methodological arguments are usually invoked to explain variations in the structure of affect. Using self-rated affect from Italian samples (N = 600), we show that individual difference variables related to affective differentiation can moderate the observed structure. Indices of circumplexity (Browne, 1992) and congruence coefficients to the hypothesized target were used to quantify the observed structures. Results did not support the circumplex model as a universal structure. A circular structure with axes of activation and valence was approximated only among more affectively differentiated groups: students and respondents with high scores on Openness to Feelings and measures of negative emotionality. A different structure, with unipolar Positive Affect and Negative Affect factors, was observed among adults and respondents with low Openness to Feelings and negative emotionality. The observed structure of affect will depend in part on the nature of the sample studied. PMID:12932207

  18. Individual difference variables, affective differentiation, and the structures of affect.

    Terracciano, Antonio; McCrae, Robert R; Hagemann, Dirk; Costa, Paul T

    2003-10-01

    Methodological arguments are usually invoked to explain variations in the structure of affect. Using self-rated affect from Italian samples (N=600), we show that individual difference variables related to affective differentiation can moderate the observed structure. Indices of circumplexity and congruence coefficients to the hypothesized target were used to quantify the observed structures. Results did not support the circumplex model as a universal structure. A circular structure with axes of activation and valence was approximated only among more affectively differentiated groups: students and respondents with high scores on Openness to Feelings and measures of negative emotionality. A different structure, with unipolar Positive Affect and Negative Affect factors, was observed among adults and respondents with low Openness to Feelings and negative emotionality. The observed structure of affect will depend in part on the nature of the sample studied. PMID:12932207

  19. Affective Induction and Creative Thinking

    Fernández-Abascal, Enrique G.; Díaz, María D. Martín

    2013-01-01

    Three studies explored the relation between affect and production of creative divergent thinking, assessed with the Torrance Tests of Creative Thinking (Figural TTCT). In the first study, general, positive, and negative affect, assessed with the Positive and Negative Affect Scale (PANAS) were compared with creative production. In the second study,…

  20. Application of Affect to CALL

    李露

    2006-01-01

    This essay mainly attempts to discuss some affective factors in CALL, with focus on affective influence on English (foreign language) learning and thus concludes that in the process of CALL related affect should be activated and made good use of to better foreign language teaching and learning.

  1. Encountering science education's capacity to affect and be affected

    Alsop, Steve

    2015-12-01

    What might science education learn from the recent affective turn in the humanities and social sciences? Framed as a response to Michalinos Zembylas's article, this essay draws from selected theorizing in affect theory, science education and science and technology studies, in pursuit of diverse and productive ways to talk of affect within science education. These discussions are framed by desires to transcend traditional epistemic boundaries and practices. The article concludes offering some associated ambiguities and tensions involved.

  2. Semi-empiric model of an air cooled cabinet air conditioner for the dynamic analysis of the building and acclimation systems integrated behaviour; Modelo semi-empirico de condicionador de gabinete resfriado a ar para analise dinamica do comportamento integrado de edificacoes e sistemas de climatizacao

    Correa, Jorge E. [Para Univ., Belem (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Mecanica]. E-mail: jecorrea@amazon.com.br; Melo, Claudio. E-mail: melo@nrva.ufsc.br; Negrao, Cezar O. R. E-mail: negrao@energia.damec.cefetpr.br

    2000-07-01

    This work presents a semi-empirical model for a air cooled case air conditioner. This model is to be inserted in the EPS-r program (Environmental System Performance - research version) allowing the dynamic analysis of the integrated behaviour of buildings and acclimation systems using this equipment. Results obtained from simulations under the operation conditions existing in Brazil are analysed.

  3. Whether Contexts Affecting TESOL Teachers

    马炳军; 杨晓丽

    2013-01-01

    This article aims to verify whether contextual theories affect TESOL teachers in Chinese local classrooms via observing three different English teachers’classroom behaviors by using qualitative method. The findings indicate that three major aspects usually affect English teachers:(1) The teacher’s education context affects their TESOL classroom contexts;(2) The institution’s requirements affect the teacher’s classroom contexts; (3) The spirit of quality-oriented education from the New National Stan-dards for English influences the classroom contexts, which have proved the context theories.

  4. Aclimatização de bastão-do-imperador (Etlingera elatior em substratos à base de coco = Ginger flower (Etlingera elatior acclimation in coconut-based substrates

    Adriane Marinho de Assis

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A aclimatização é uma etapa da micropropagação que inspira cuidados, pela dificuldade de transferir com sucesso as plântulas in vitro para a casa-de-vegetação. O objetivo do trabalho foi avaliar a eficiência de substratos à base de coco durante a aclimatização de bastão-do-imperador. As mudas, obtidas de cultivo in vitro, apresentavam,inicialmente, altura média de 6,2 + 0,4 cm. Foram cultivadas em vasos de polipropileno, permanecendo em viveiro com 70% de luminosidade. Os tratamentos foram: areia, coco em pó, coco desfibrado, coco em pó + areia, coco desfibrado + areia e coco em pó + coco desfibrado. Cinco meses após o transplantio avaliaram-se as variáveis proporção desobrevivência, altura da parte aérea, massa fresca, número de brotos, massa seca das raízes e pH dos substratos. Os substratos areia, coco em pó + areia e coco desfibrado + areia proporcionaram os melhores resultados para todas variáveis acima descritas, sendo recomendados para a aclimatização de bastão-do-imperador.Acclimation is a stage in micro-propagation that requires special attention due to the difficult process involving the successful transfer of in vitro plantlets to the greenhouse. The objective of this work was to assess the efficacy of coconut-based substrates in ginger flower acclimation. Seedlings from in vitro cultivation initially presented an average height of 6.2 ± 4 cm. They were grown in polypropylene vases kept in a nursery, with 70% of light. The following treatments were used: sand, coconut powder, de-fiberedcoconut, coconut powder + sand, de-fibered coconut + sand, and coconut powder + defibered coconut. Five months after transplantation, the following variables were analyzed: survival rate, aerial part height, fresh matter, number of seedlings, root dry matter, and substrate pH. Sand, powder coconut + sand and de-fibered coconut + sand showed the best results for all variables analyzed, and they are recommended for ginger

  5. Acute toxicity, accumulation and tissue distribution of copper in the blue crab Callinectes sapidus acclimated to different salinities: In vivo and in vitro studies

    In vivo and in vitro studies were performed to evaluate acute toxicity, organ-specific distribution, and tissue accumulation of copper in Callinectes sapidus acclimated to two different experimental salinities (2 and 30 ppt). Blue crabs were quite tolerant to copper. Acute dissolved copper toxicity (96-h LC50 and its corresponding 95% confident interval) was higher at salinity 2 ppt (5.3 (3.50-8.05) μM Cu) than at 30 ppt (53.0 (27.39-102.52) μM Cu). The difference between salinities can be completely explained based on the water chemistry because it disappeared when 96-h LC50 values were expressed as the free Cu2+ ion (3.1 (1.93-4.95) μM free Cu at 2 ppt versus 5.6 (2.33-13.37) μM free Cu at 30 ppt) or the Cu2+ activity (1.4 (0.88-2.26) μM Cu activity at 2 ppt versus 1.7 (0.71-4.07) μM Cu activity at 30 ppt). The relationships between gill Cu burden and % mortality were very similar at 2 and 30 ppt, in accord with the Biotic Ligand Model. In vivo experiments showed that copper concentration in the hemolymph is not dependent on metal concentration in the surrounding medium at either experimental salinity. They also showed that copper flux into the gills is higher than into other tissues analyzed, and that anterior and posterior gills are similarly important sites of copper accumulation at both experimental salinities. In vitro experiments with isolated-perfused gills showed that there is a positive relationship between copper accumulation in this tissue and the metal concentration in the incubation media for both anterior and posterior gills. A similar result was observed at both low and high salinities. Furthermore, in vitro experiments showed that copper accumulation in posterior gills is also positively and strongly dependent on the incubation time with copper. Gill copper accumulation occurred at a lower rate in the first 2 h of metal exposure, increasing markedly after this 'steady-state' period. This finding was corroborated by a significant increase in

  6. Acute toxicity, accumulation and tissue distribution of copper in the blue crab Callinectes sapidus acclimated to different salinities: In vivo and in vitro studies

    De Martinez Gaspar Martins, Camila [Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Ciencias Fisiologicas - Fisiologia Animal Comparada, Instituto de Ciencias Biologicas, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande (FURG), Campus Carreiros, Av. Italia km 8, 96201-900, Rio Grande, RS (Brazil); Barcarolli, Indianara Fernanda; Menezes, Eliana Jaime de; Mussoi Giacomin, Marina [Instituto de Ciencias Biologicas, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande (FURG), Campus Carreiros, Av. Italia km 8, 96201-900, Rio Grande, RS (Brazil); Wood, Chris M. [McMaster University, Department of Biology, 1280 Main Street West, Hamilton, ON, L8S 4K1 (Canada); Bianchini, Adalto, E-mail: adaltobianchini@furg.br [Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Ciencias Fisiologicas - Fisiologia Animal Comparada, Instituto de Ciencias Biologicas, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande (FURG), Campus Carreiros, Av. Italia km 8, 96201-900, Rio Grande, RS (Brazil); Instituto de Ciencias Biologicas, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande (FURG), Campus Carreiros, Av. Italia km 8, 96201-900, Rio Grande, RS (Brazil)

    2011-01-17

    In vivo and in vitro studies were performed to evaluate acute toxicity, organ-specific distribution, and tissue accumulation of copper in Callinectes sapidus acclimated to two different experimental salinities (2 and 30 ppt). Blue crabs were quite tolerant to copper. Acute dissolved copper toxicity (96-h LC{sub 50} and its corresponding 95% confident interval) was higher at salinity 2 ppt (5.3 (3.50-8.05) {mu}M Cu) than at 30 ppt (53.0 (27.39-102.52) {mu}M Cu). The difference between salinities can be completely explained based on the water chemistry because it disappeared when 96-h LC{sub 50} values were expressed as the free Cu{sup 2+} ion (3.1 (1.93-4.95) {mu}M free Cu at 2 ppt versus 5.6 (2.33-13.37) {mu}M free Cu at 30 ppt) or the Cu{sup 2+} activity (1.4 (0.88-2.26) {mu}M Cu activity at 2 ppt versus 1.7 (0.71-4.07) {mu}M Cu activity at 30 ppt). The relationships between gill Cu burden and % mortality were very similar at 2 and 30 ppt, in accord with the Biotic Ligand Model. In vivo experiments showed that copper concentration in the hemolymph is not dependent on metal concentration in the surrounding medium at either experimental salinity. They also showed that copper flux into the gills is higher than into other tissues analyzed, and that anterior and posterior gills are similarly important sites of copper accumulation at both experimental salinities. In vitro experiments with isolated-perfused gills showed that there is a positive relationship between copper accumulation in this tissue and the metal concentration in the incubation media for both anterior and posterior gills. A similar result was observed at both low and high salinities. Furthermore, in vitro experiments showed that copper accumulation in posterior gills is also positively and strongly dependent on the incubation time with copper. Gill copper accumulation occurred at a lower rate in the first 2 h of metal exposure, increasing markedly after this 'steady-state' period. This finding

  7. Human Technology and Human Affects

    Fausing, Bent

    2009-01-01

    Human Technology and Human Affects  This year Samsung introduced a mobile phone with "Soul". It was made with a human touch and included itself a magical touch. Which function does technology and affects get in everyday aesthetics like this, its images and interactions included this presentation...

  8. Current Research in Affective Development.

    Strayer, Janet

    1985-01-01

    Current research concerning affective development in infants and children is selectively reviewed. The focus of findings and discussion is on three general and related topics: (1) expression of emotion and affective interaction in infancy; (2) socialization and regulation of emotion; (3) comprehension of emotions and empathy with others by…

  9. Affective modulation of recognition bias

    R.H. Phaf; M. Rotteveel

    2005-01-01

    A correspondence of processing on the familiarity-novelty and positive-negative dimensions, particularly in the earliest processing stages, is proposed. Familiarity manipulations should, therefore, not only influence affective evaluations (e.g., the mere exposure effect), but affective manipulations

  10. Affect intensity and cardiac arousal.

    Blascovich, J; Brennan, K; Tomaka, J; Kelsey, R M; Hughes, P; Coad, M L; Adlin, R

    1992-07-01

    Relationships between affect intensity and basal, evoked, and perceived cardiac arousal were investigated in 3 experiments. Affect intensity was assessed using Larsen and Diener's (1987) Affect Intensity Measure (AIM). Cardiac arousal was evoked with exercise in the 1st study and with mental arithmetic in the 2nd and 3rd. Perceived cardiac arousal was measured under optimal conditions using a standard heartbeat discrimination procedure. Women as a group scored higher on the AIM. Affect intensity was unrelated to basal or evoked cardiac arousal and was negatively related to perceived cardiac arousal in all 3 studies. Data suggest that affect intensity, although unrelated to actual physiological arousal, is negatively related to the accuracy with which individuals perceive their own arousal. Results are discussed within the context of an expanded arousal-regulation model (Blascovich, 1990). PMID:1494983

  11. A Feed-Forward Loop Consisting of the Response Regulator RpaB and the Small RNA PsrR1 Controls Light Acclimation of Photosystem I Gene Expression in the Cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    Kadowaki, Taro; Nagayama, Ryuta; Georg, Jens; Nishiyama, Yoshitaka; Wilde, Annegret; Hess, Wolfgang R; Hihara, Yukako

    2016-04-01

    Since cyanobacteria need to decrease PSI content to avoid absorption of excess light energy, down-regulation of PSI gene expression is one of the key characteristics of the high-light (HL) acclimation response. The transcriptional regulator RpaB and the small RNA PsrR1 (photosynthesis regulatory RNA1) have been suggested to be the two most critical factors for this response inSynechocystissp. PCC 6803. In this study, we found that the HLR1 DNA-binding motif, the recognition sequence for RpaB, is highly conserved in the core promoter region of thepsrR1gene among cyanobacterial species. Gel mobility shift assay revealed that RpaB binds to the HLR1 sequence ofpsrR1in vitro. RNA gel blot analysis together with chromatin affinity purification (ChAP) analysis suggested that PSI genes are activated and thepsrR1gene is repressed by the binding of RpaB under low-light (LL) conditions. A decrease in DNA binding affinity of RpaB occurs within 5 min after the shift from LL to HL conditions, leading to the prompt decrease in PSI promoter activity together with derepression ofpsrR1gene expression. Accumulating PsrR1 molecules then prevent translation from pre-existing PSI transcripts. By this dual repression at transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels, rapid and strict down-regulation of PSI expression under HL is secured. Our findings suggest that RpaB and PsrR1 constitute a feed-forward loop for the regulation of PSI gene expression to achieve a rapid acclimation response to the damaging HL conditions. PMID:26872833

  12. Application of a real-time PCR assay to detect BK potassium channel expression in samples from Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar and Rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss acclimated to freshwater#

    CA Loncoman

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar and Rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss are two fish species that spawn in fresh water (FW and, during development, acclimate to seawater (SW by secreting excess NaCl to the environment. The salmon industry measures Na+/K+ ATPase (NKA activity as a molecular marker to determine the timing of smolt transfer from FW to SW. However, the lack of other accurate molecular markers of smoltification remains a major issue for the fish farming industry. The molecular mechanism of NaCl secretion in gills from SW-acclimated fish has a thermodynamic requirement to recycle K+ out of the cell via potassium channels therefore we hypothesised that potassium channel expression in gills may be a suitable candidate to monitor the smoltification process. In support of this hypothesis, we observed increased expression of BK potassium channel mRNA in gills from S. salar under conditions of high salinity (1.2% compared to animals in FW. In this work, we designed a real-time PCR analysis in order to quantify mRNA levels of BK potassium channels in S. salar organ samples. We found differences in mRNA expression among gills, kidney and intestine. We also found a unique real-time PCR product in S. salar gills through melting curve analysis, agarose gel electrophoresis and cDNA sequencing. This PCR product showed a 98% of identity with the BK channel portion recorded by the NCBI Database and was differentially expressed in gills, kidney and intestine. This real-time PCR assay may become an important tool to study BK potassium channels expressed in the gills of S. salar and its changes during smoltification as putative new candidate to monitor this process.

  13. Affective Computing and Intelligent Interaction

    2012-01-01

    2012 International Conference on Affective Computing and Intelligent Interaction (ICACII 2012) was the most comprehensive conference focused on the various aspects of advances in Affective Computing and Intelligent Interaction. The conference provided a rare opportunity to bring together worldwide academic researchers and practitioners for exchanging the latest developments and applications in this field such as Intelligent Computing, Affective Computing, Machine Learning, Business Intelligence and HCI.   This volume is a collection of 119 papers selected from 410 submissions from universities and industries all over the world, based on their quality and relevancy to the conference. All of the papers have been peer-reviewed by selected experts.  

  14. The affective turn in ethnomusicology

    Hofman Ana

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The affective turn, which has already questioned dominant paradigms in many disciplinary fields including cultural studies, philosophy, political theory, anthropology, psychology and neuroscience, has started to attract more attention in the field of ethnomusicology, becoming a particularly vibrant stream of thought. Drawing on the voices that call for the historicisation of and critical deliberation on the field of affect studies, the article strives to show how theories of affect might expand dominant paradigms in ethnomusicology and also points to their limitations.

  15. Categorization in the Affective Domain

    Sauciuc, Gabriela-Alina

    2011-01-01

    Data collected in Romance and Scandinavian languages (N=474) in a superordinate category name production task indicate that a multiple-strategy approach would be more suitable for accounting of categorization in the affective domain instead of a prototype approach as suggested by previous studies....... This paper will highlight performance aspects which appear to be consistent with such an interpretation, as well as an important layman- expert knowledge asymmetry in affective categorization....

  16. A computational model of affects

    Turkia, Mika

    2008-01-01

    This article provides a simple logical structure, in which affective concepts (i.e. concepts related to emotions and feelings) can be defined. The set of affects defined is similar to the set of emotions covered in the OCC model (Ortony A., Collins A., and Clore G. L.: The Cognitive Structure of Emotions. Cambridge University Press, 1988), but the model presented in this article is fully computationally defined.

  17. Rewards Affecting the Organizational Concerns

    Doina I. POPESCU

    2011-01-01

    To obtain and maintain a high-performing workforce, an enterprise must develop a well-conceived compensation program. In addition to a salary, employees may be rewarded with benefit plans, bonuses, perquisites, stock options, and other long-term incentives. The main purpose of this article is to study how rewards affect employee perceptions, attitudes, and behavior in a variety of ways. Also, the purpose of this article is to analyze how organizational efficiency and effectiveness are affecte...

  18. Staging of unipolar affective illness

    Ewa Ferensztajn

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this article, a concept of staging of unipolar affective illness (recurrent depression is presented. In respective subchapters, three most important aspects of this issue have been discussed: 1 staging of unipolar affective illness; 2 staging of treatment-resistant depression; and 3 conversion of unipolar into bipolar affective illness. The evidence for so called neuroprogression of the illness, accumulated in recent years, has allowed for a classification of staging based on a concept of allostasis and allostatic load. In the course of illness, changes in neuroendocrine system (mainly hypothalamic pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis, immunological system, mechanisms of oxidative stress, neurotransmitters, neurotrophic factors as well as structural and functional changes of the brain occur. In their paper of 2007, Fava and Tossani elaborated a concept of staging of unipolar affective illness presenting a continuum model of five consecutive stages with specific clinical features. In the present paper, a concept of treatment-resistant depression and staging of treatment resistance is presented in the context of several models. An important determinant of treatment-resistant depression is so called subthreshold bipolarity which is connected with worse efficacy of antidepressant drugs. In the course of illness, there is a possibility of changing diagnosis from recurrent depression into bipolar affective illness. The studies on this issue show that frequency of such diagnostic conversion is 1,5% of depressed patients per year.

  19. Family Intimacy and Affection: A Sociology of Positive Affect.

    Martinson, Floyd M.

    This paper deals with aspects of positive family affect in intimate family relationships such as: (1) the nuclear family of orientation, including the child-parent subgroup and the sibling subgroup; (2) the nuclear family of procreation, including the marital subgroup and parent-child subgroup; and (3) the dating relationship. Interpersonal…

  20. Behavioral Management: An Affective Approach. (Affective Education Trainers Manual).

    Heilman, John; Cole, Bob

    This manual provides a framework for training teachers who want to become more skilled in affective education. It is divided into three parts: teacher self-awareness, teacher-student interaction, and teacher-directed group activities. It is designed for use in a two-day workshop. Guidelines for discussions on expectations, responsibility,…

  1. Come, see and experience affective interactive art

    Bialoskorski, Leticia S.S.; Westerink, Joyce H.D.M.; Broek, van den Egon L.; Nijholt, Anton; Reidsma, Dennis; Hondorp, Hendri

    2009-01-01

    The progress in the field of affective computing enables the realization of affective consumer products, affective games, and affective art. This paper describes the affective interactive art system Mood Swings, which interprets and visualizes affect expressed by a person. Mood Swings is founded on

  2. Mood Swings: An Affective Interactive Art System

    Bialoskorski, Leticia S.S.; Westerink, Joyce H.D.M.; Broek, van den Egon L.; Nijholt, Anton; Reidsma, Dennis; Hondorp, Hendri

    2009-01-01

    The progress in the field of affective computing enables the realization of affective consumer products, affective games, and affective art. This paper describes the affective interactive art system Mood Swings, which interprets and visualizes affect expressed by a person. Mood Swings is founded on

  3. Come, See and Experience Affective Interactive Art

    Bialoskorski, Leticia S.S.; Westerink, Joyce H.D.M.; Broek, van den Egon L.; Nijholt, A.; Reidsma, D.; Hondorp, G.H.W.

    2009-01-01

    The progress in the field of affective computing enables the realization of affective consumer products, affective games, and affective art. This paper describes the affective interactive art system Mood Swings, which interprets and visualizes affect expressed by a person. Mood Swings is founded on

  4. Industrial applications of affective engineering

    Shiizuka, Hisao; Lee, Kun-Pyo; Otani, Tsuyoshi; Lim, Chee-Peng

    2014-01-01

    This book examines the industrial applications of affective engineering. The contributors cover new analytical methods such as fluctuation, fuzzy logic, fractals, and complex systems. These chapters also include interdisciplinary research that traverses a wide range of fields, including information engineering, human engineering, cognitive science, psychology, and design studies. The text is split into two parts: theory and applications. This work is a collection of the best papers from ISAE2013 (International Symposium of Affective Engineering) held at Kitakyushu, Japan and Japan Kansei Engineering Meeting on March 6-8, 2013.

  5. Affective Computing and Sentiment Analysis

    Ahmad, Khurshid

    2011-01-01

    This volume maps the watershed areas between two 'holy grails' of computer science: the identification and interpretation of affect -- including sentiment and mood. The expression of sentiment and mood involves the use of metaphors, especially in emotive situations. Affect computing is rooted in hermeneutics, philosophy, political science and sociology, and is now a key area of research in computer science. The 24/7 news sites and blogs facilitate the expression and shaping of opinion locally and globally. Sentiment analysis, based on text and data mining, is being used in the looking at news

  6. On Factors Affecting Listening Comprehension

    苗琴

    2014-01-01

    In English teaching and learning, listening ability is an important part of communicative competence, is a very practical integrated skill. It has been a difficult skill in second language acquisition for many students. Many Chinese students are skilled in reading, but often they tend to neglect the listening. However, owing to the higher requirements of many English tests and the great importance in communication, students begin to pay attention to develop their English listening skills. But there are many factors affecting listening, the paper mainly focuses on linguistic factors and non-linguistic factors that affect listening, to provide a theoretical basis to help exploring ways of improving listening and comprehension skills.

  7. On the Primacy of Affect.

    Zajonc, R. B.

    1984-01-01

    Reasserts view that there can be emotional or affective arousal without prior cognitive appraisal. Criticizes Lazarus's rejection of this view on the grounds that it presents no empirical evidence, is based on an arbitrary definition of emotion, and obliterates all distinctions between cognition, sensation, and perception. (CMG)

  8. Affective temperament and personal identity.

    Stanghellini, Giovanni; Rosfort, René

    2010-10-01

    The complex relationship between temperament and personal identity, and between these and mental disorders, is of critical interest to both philosophy and psychopathology. More than other living creatures, human beings are constituted and characterized by the interplay of their genotype and phenotype. There appears to be an explanatory gap between the almost perfect genetic identity and the individual differences among humans. One reason for this gap is that a human being is a person besides a physiological organism. We propose an outline of a theoretical model that might somewhat mitigate the explanatory discrepancies between physiological mechanisms and individual human emotional experience and behaviour. Arguing for the pervasive nature of human affectivity, i.e., for the assumption that human consciousness and behaviour is characterised by being permeated by affectivity; to envisage the dynamics of emotional experience, we make use of a three-levelled model of human personal identity that differentiates between factors that are simultaneously at work in the constitution of the individual human person: 1) core emotions, 2) affective temperament types/affective character traits, and 3) personhood. These levels are investigated separately in order to respect the methodological diversity among them (neuroscience, psychopathology, and philosophy), but they are eventually brought together in a hermeneutical account of human personhood. PMID:20236706

  9. Affective Development in University Education

    Grootenboer, Peter

    2010-01-01

    There seems to be an increasing requirement for university courses and programs to develop students' affective qualities (beliefs, values, dispositions and attitudes). This study explored the ways academics determined what the desirable qualities were for their particular disciplines and the pedagogical strategies and approaches they used to…

  10. Do recruitment ties affect wages?

    Larsen, Anna Folke; Rand, John; Torm, Nina Elisabeth

    an informal contact, when controlling for standard determinants of wage compensation. Moreover, we show that the mechanism through which informal contacts affect wages depends on the type of recruitment tie used. The findings are robust across location, firm size categories and different worker types....

  11. BOLD fMRI in awake prairie voles: A platform for translational social and affective neuroscience.

    Yee, J R; Kenkel, W M; Kulkarni, P; Moore, K; Perkeybile, A M; Toddes, S; Amacker, J A; Carter, C S; Ferris, C F

    2016-09-01

    The advancement of neuroscience depends on continued improvement in methods and models. Here, we present novel techniques for the use of awake functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in the prairie vole (Microtus ochrogaster) - an important step forward in minimally-invasive measurement of neural activity in a non-traditional animal model. Imaging neural responses in prairie voles, a species studied for its propensity to form strong and selective social bonds, is expected to greatly advance our mechanistic understanding of complex social and affective processes. The use of ultra-high-field fMRI allows for recording changes in region-specific activity throughout the entire brain simultaneously and with high temporal and spatial resolutions. By imaging neural responses in awake animals, with minimal invasiveness, we are able to avoid the confound of anesthesia, broaden the scope of possible stimuli, and potentially make use of repeated scans from the same animals. These methods are made possible by the development of an annotated and segmented 3D vole brain atlas and software for image analysis. The use of these methods in the prairie vole provides an opportunity to broaden neuroscientific investigation of behavior via a comparative approach, which highlights the ethological relevance of pro-social behaviors shared between voles and humans, such as communal breeding, selective social bonds, social buffering of stress, and caregiving behaviors. Results using these methods show that fMRI in the prairie vole is capable of yielding robust blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) signal changes in response to hypercapnic challenge (inhaled 5% CO2), region-specific physical challenge (unilateral whisker stimulation), and presentation of a set of novel odors. Complementary analyses of repeated restraint sessions in the imaging hardware suggest that voles do not require acclimation to this procedure. Taken together, awake vole fMRI represents a new arena of neurobiological

  12. Gene expression of peripheral blood mononuclear cells is affected by cold exposure.

    Reynés, Bàrbara; García-Ruiz, Estefanía; Oliver, Paula; Palou, Andreu

    2015-10-15

    Because of the discovery of brown adipose tissue (BAT) in humans, there is increased interest in the study of induction of this thermogenic tissue as a basis to combat obesity and related complications. Cold exposure is one of the strongest stimuli able to activate BAT and to induce the appearance of brown-like (brite) adipocytes in white fat depots (browning process). We analyzed the potential of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) to reflect BAT and retroperitoneal white adipose tissue (rWAT) response to 1-wk cold acclimation (4°C) at different ages of rat development (1, 2, 4, and 6 mo). As expected, cold exposure increased fatty acid β-oxidation capacity in BAT and rWAT (increased Cpt1a expression), explaining increased circulating nonesterified free fatty acids and decreased adiposity. Cold exposure increased expression of the key thermogenic gene, Ucp1, in BAT and rWAT, but only in 1-mo-old animals. Additionally, other brown/brite markers were affected by cold during the whole developmental period studied in BAT. However, in rWAT, cold exposure increased studied markers mainly at early age. PBMCs did not express Ucp1, but expressed other brown/brite markers, which were cold regulated. Of particular interest, PBMCs reflected adipose tissue-increased Cpt1a mRNA expression in response to cold (in older animals) and browning induction occurring in rWAT of young animals (1 mo) characterized by increased Cidea expression and by the appearance of a high number of multilocular CIDE-A positive adipocytes. These results provide evidence pointing to PBMCs as an easily obtainable biological material to be considered to perform browning studies with minimum invasiveness. PMID:26246506

  13. Removal of FePO{sub 4} and Fe{sub 3}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2} crystals on the surface of passive fillers in Fe{sup 0}/GAC reactor using the acclimated bacteria

    Lai, Bo, E-mail: laibo1981@163.com [Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, School of Architecture and Environment, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); Research Center of Water Pollution Control Technology, Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Zhou, Yuexi [Research Center of Water Pollution Control Technology, Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Yang, Ping [Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, School of Architecture and Environment, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); Wang, Juling [Research Center of Water Pollution Control Technology, Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Yang, Jinghui [China National Petroleum Corporation Research Institute of Safety and Environment Technology HSE Assessment Center, Beijing 100012 (China); Li, Huiqiang [Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, School of Architecture and Environment, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China)

    2012-11-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fe{sub 3}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2} and FePO{sub 4} crystals would weaken treatment efficiency of Fe{sup 0}/GAC reactor. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fe{sub 3}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2} and FePO{sub 4} crystals could be removed by the acclimated bacteria. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer FeS and sulfur in the passive film would be removed by the sulfur-oxidizing bacteria. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Develop a cost-effective bio-regeneration technology for the passive fillers. - Abstract: As past studies presented, there is obvious defect that the fillers in the Fe{sup 0}/GAC reactor begin to be passive after about 60 d continuous running, although the complicated, toxic and refractory ABS resin wastewater can be pretreated efficiently by the Fe{sup 0}/GAC reactor. During the process, the Fe{sub 3}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2} and FePO{sub 4} crystals with high density in the passive film are formed by the reaction between PO{sub 4}{sup 3-} and Fe{sup 2+}/Fe{sup 3+}. Meanwhile, they obstruct the formation of macroscopic galvanic cells between Fe{sup 0} and GAC, which will lower the wastewater treatment efficiency of Fe{sup 0}/GAC reactor. In this study, in order to remove the Fe{sub 3}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2} and FePO{sub 4} crystals on the surface of the passive fillers, the bacteria were acclimated in the passive Fe{sup 0}/GAC reactor. According to the results, it can be concluded that the Fe{sub 3}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2} and FePO{sub 4} crystals with high density in the passive film could be decomposed or removed by the joint action between the typical propionic acid type fermentation bacteria and sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB), whereas the PO{sub 4}{sup 3-} ions from the decomposition of the Fe{sub 3}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2} and FePO{sub 4} crystals were released into aqueous solution which would be discharged from the passive Fe{sup 0}/GAC reactor. Furthermore, the remained FeS and sulfur (S) in the passive film also can be decomposed or removed easily by the

  14. Co-metabolic biodegradation of trichloroethylene by acclimated phenol degrading bacteria%三氯乙烯在苯酚菌中的共代谢降解性能研究

    黄流雅; 胡娟; 张巍; 应维琪

    2012-01-01

    The batch experiments were carried out to investigate the co-metabolic degradation of trichloroethylene (TCE) by acclimated phenol degrading bacteria. The results showed that phenol was an essential co-substrate;the TCE degradation rate was dependent on the initial concentrations of phenol and TCE in co-metabolic degradation system. Active biodegradation of TCE followed after a short lag phase for building up a critical density of acclimated phenol degrading bacteria. A high initial TCE concentration of >9 mg/L inhibited its degradation;an initial phenol/TCE ratio of > 10-15 enhanced the final removal of TCE. The degradation curves of phenol and TCE were well represented by the Haldane inhibition model. The mixed culture bacteria had a higher affinity for phenol than TCE; phenol had competitive inhibition effect on TCE degradation;the inhibition effect of TCE to bacteria was observed in the high initial concentration runs.%通过生物降解实验考察三氯乙烯(TCE)在苯酚驯化微生物中的共代谢降解性能,并进行动力学分析.结果表明,苯酚是TCE苯酚共代谢过程必不可少的共代谢基质;TCE的共代谢降解与苯酚和TCE初始浓度有关.TCE在降解初期会出现一个短暂的迟滞期,TCE的大量降解要在苯酚被利用后才发生;高质量浓度TCE (>9 mg/L)对共代谢降解有抑制作用.苯酚/TCE(质量比)在10~15以上时,苯酚菌对TCE的去除率较大.Haldane模型能够很好地拟合苯酚和TCE的比降解速率.动力学分析表明,微生物对苯酚的亲和力要大于TCE,苯酚对TCE共降解具有竞争性抑制作用,TCE对微生物存在毒性抑制作用;结果证实了生物降解实验的结论.

  15. Psychological factors affecting equine performance

    McBride Sebastian D

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract For optimal individual performance within any equestrian discipline horses must be in peak physical condition and have the correct psychological state. This review discusses the psychological factors that affect the performance of the horse and, in turn, identifies areas within the competition horse industry where current behavioral research and established behavioral modification techniques could be applied to further enhance the performance of animals. In particular, the role of affective processes underpinning temperament, mood and emotional reaction in determining discipline-specific performance is discussed. A comparison is then made between the training and the competition environment and the review completes with a discussion on how behavioral modification techniques and general husbandry can be used advantageously from a performance perspective.

  16. Global Media, Biopolitics and Affect

    Knudsen, Britta Timm; Stage, Carsten

    Global Media, Biopolitics and Affect shows how mediations of bodily vulnerability have become a strong political force in contemporary societies. In discussions and struggles concerning war involvement, healthcare issues, charity, democracy movements, contested national pasts, and climate change...... culture. Likewise, it presents a range of close empirical case studies in the areas of illness blogging, global protests after the killing of Neda Agda Soltan in Iran, charity communication, green media activism, online war commemoration and digital witnessing related to conflicts in Sarajevo and Ukraine......., performances of bodily vulnerability is increasingly used by citizens to raise awareness, create sympathy, encourage political action, and to circulate information in global media networks. The book thus argues that bodily vulnerability can serve as a catalyst for affectively charging and disseminating...

  17. Food aroma affects bite size

    de Wijk René A

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To evaluate the effect of food aroma on bite size, a semisolid vanilla custard dessert was delivered repeatedly into the mouth of test subjects using a pump while various concentrations of cream aroma were presented retronasally to the nose. Termination of the pump, which determined bite size, was controlled by the subject via a push button. Over 30 trials with 10 subjects, the custard was presented randomly either without an aroma, or with aromas presented below or near the detection threshold. Results Results for ten subjects (four females and six males, aged between 26 and 50 years, indicated that aroma intensity affected the size of the corresponding bite as well as that of subsequent bites. Higher aroma intensities resulted in significantly smaller sizes. Conclusions These results suggest that bite size control during eating is a highly dynamic process affected by the sensations experienced during the current and previous bites.

  18. Pseudobulbar affect: prevalence and management

    Ahmed A; Simmons Z

    2013-01-01

    Aiesha Ahmed, Zachary SimmonsDepartment of Neurology, Penn State Hershey Medical Center, Hershey, PA, USAAbstract: Pseudobulbar affect (PBA) may occur in association with a variety of neurological diseases, and so may be encountered in the setting of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, extrapyramidal and cerebellar disorders, multiple sclerosis, traumatic brain injury, Alzheimer's disease, stroke, and brain tumors. The psychological consequences and the impact on social interactions may be...

  19. Trade Finance Affects Trade Dynamics

    ARESPA CASTELLÓ, Marta; Gruber, Diego

    2016-01-01

    Existent literature is by no means conclusive on the effects of trade finance on trade and the economy. We propose a suitable framework to explore the linkages between international trade and finance based on an international real business cycle model where firms require external finance to import and can be financially constrained. We find that credit shocks do affect the dynamic properties of the economy and they have the potential to cause significant deviations in trade and economic perfo...

  20. Bilingualism affects audiovisual phoneme identification

    Burfin, Sabine; Pascalis, Olivier; Ruiz Tada, Elisa; Costa, Albert; Savariaux, Christophe; Kandel, Sonia

    2014-01-01

    We all go through a process of perceptual narrowing for phoneme identification. As we become experts in the languages we hear in our environment we lose the ability to identify phonemes that do not exist in our native phonological inventory. This research examined how linguistic experience—i.e., the exposure to a double phonological code during childhood—affects the visual processes involved in non-native phoneme identification in audiovisual speech perception. We conducted a phoneme identifi...